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Sample records for arsenic oxides

  1. Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase and the methylation of arsenicals in the invertebrate chordate Ciona intestinalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biotransformation of inorganic arsenic (iAs) involves methylation catalyzed by arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt), yielding mono- , di- , and trimethylated arsenicals. To investigate the evolution of molecular mechanisms that mediate arsenic biotransformation,...

  2. Arsenic Adsorption Onto Iron Oxides Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aredes, S.; Klein, B.; Pawlik, M.

    2004-12-01

    The predominant form of arsenic in water is as an inorganic ion. Under different redox conditions arsenic in water is stable in the +5 and +3 oxidation states. Arsenic oxidation state governs its toxicity, chemical form and solubility in natural and disturbed environments. As (III) is found in anoxic environments such as ground water , it is toxic and the common species is the neutral form, H3AsO3. As (V) is found in aerobic conditions such as surface water, it is less toxic and the common species in water are: H2AsO4 - and HAsO4 {- 2}. The water pH determines the predominant arsenate or arsenite species, however, both forms of arsenic can be detected in natural water systems. Iron oxides minerals often form in natural waters and sediments at oxic-anoxic boundaries. Over time they undergo transformation to crystalline forms, such as goethite or hematite. Both As(V) and As(III) sorbs strongly to iron oxides, however the sorption behavior of arsenic is dependent on its oxidation state and the mineralogy of the iron oxides. Competition between arsenic and others ions, such fluoride, sulphate and phosphate also play a role. On the other hand, calcium may increase arsenic adsorption onto iron oxides. Electrokinetic studies and adsorption experiments were carried out in order to determine which conditions favour arsenic adsorption. Hematite, goethite and magnetite as iron based sorbents were used. Test were also conducted with a laterite soil rich in iron minerals. The focus of this study is to evaluate physical and chemical conditions which favour arsenic adsorption onto iron oxides minerals, the results contribute to an understanding of arsenic behaviour in natural and disturbed environments. Furthermore, results could contribute in developing an appropriate remediation technology for arsenic removal in water using iron oxides minerals.

  3. [Competitive Microbial Oxidation and Reduction of Arsenic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ting-ting; Bai, Yao-hui; Liang, Jin-song; Huo, Yang; Wang, Ming-xing; Yuan, Lin-ijang

    2016-02-15

    Filters are widely applied in drinking water treatment plants. Our previous study, which explored the asenic redox in a filter of drinking water plant treating underground water, found that As3+ could be oxidized to As5+ by biogenic manganese oxides, while As5+ could be reduced to As3+ by some microbial arsenic reductases in the biofilter system. This microbial competition could influence the system stability and treatment efficiency. To explore its mechanism, this study selected a manganese-oxidizing bacterial strain (Pseudomonas sp. QJX-1) and a arsenic-reducing strain (Brevibacterium sp. LSJ-9) to investigate their competitive relationship in nutrient acquisition and arsenic redox in the presence of Mn2+, As3+ or As5+ The results revealed that the concentration and valence of Mn and As varied with different reaction time; biological manganese oxides dominated the arsenic redox by rapidly oxidizing the As3+ in the existing system and the As3+ generated by arsenic reductase into As. PCR and RT-PCR results indicated that the arsenic reductase (arsC) was inhibited by the manganese oxidase (cumA). The expression of 16S rRNA in QJX-1 was two orders of magnitude higher than that in LSJ-9, which implied QJX-1 was dominant in the bacterial growth. Our data revealed that hydraulic retention time was critical to the valence of arsenic in the effluent of filter in drinking water treatment plant.

  4. [Competitive Microbial Oxidation and Reduction of Arsenic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ting-ting; Bai, Yao-hui; Liang, Jin-song; Huo, Yang; Wang, Ming-xing; Yuan, Lin-ijang

    2016-02-15

    Filters are widely applied in drinking water treatment plants. Our previous study, which explored the asenic redox in a filter of drinking water plant treating underground water, found that As3+ could be oxidized to As5+ by biogenic manganese oxides, while As5+ could be reduced to As3+ by some microbial arsenic reductases in the biofilter system. This microbial competition could influence the system stability and treatment efficiency. To explore its mechanism, this study selected a manganese-oxidizing bacterial strain (Pseudomonas sp. QJX-1) and a arsenic-reducing strain (Brevibacterium sp. LSJ-9) to investigate their competitive relationship in nutrient acquisition and arsenic redox in the presence of Mn2+, As3+ or As5+ The results revealed that the concentration and valence of Mn and As varied with different reaction time; biological manganese oxides dominated the arsenic redox by rapidly oxidizing the As3+ in the existing system and the As3+ generated by arsenic reductase into As. PCR and RT-PCR results indicated that the arsenic reductase (arsC) was inhibited by the manganese oxidase (cumA). The expression of 16S rRNA in QJX-1 was two orders of magnitude higher than that in LSJ-9, which implied QJX-1 was dominant in the bacterial growth. Our data revealed that hydraulic retention time was critical to the valence of arsenic in the effluent of filter in drinking water treatment plant. PMID:27363151

  5. Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase and the inorganic arsenic methylation phenotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inorganic arsenic is enzymatically methylated; hence, its ingestion results in exposure to the parent compound and various methylated arsenicals. Both experimental and epidemiological evidences suggest that some of the adverse health effects associated with chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic may be mediated by these methylated metabolites. If i As methylation is an activation process, then the phenotype for inorganic arsenic methylation may determine risk associated with exposure to this metalloid. We examined inorganic arsenic methylation phenotypes and arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase genotypes in four species: three that methylate inorganic arsenic (human (Homo sapiens), rat (Rattus norwegicus), and mouse (Mus musculus)) and one that does not methylate inorganic arsenic (chimpanzee, Pan troglodytes). The predicted protein products from arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase are similar in size for rat (369 amino acid residues), mouse (376 residues), and human (375 residues). By comparison, a 275-nucleotide deletion beginning at nucleotide 612 in the chimpanzee gene sequence causes a frameshift that leads to a nonsense mutation for a premature stop codon after amino acid 205. The null phenotype for inorganic arsenic methylation in the chimpanzee is likely due to the deletion in the gene for arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase that yields an inactive truncated protein. This lineage-specific loss of function caused by the deletion event must have occurred in the Pan lineage after Homo-Pan divergence about 5 million years ago

  6. Immobilisation of arsenic by iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappler, A.; Hohmann, C.; Winkler, E.; Muehe, M.; Morin, G.

    2008-12-01

    Arsenic-contaminated groundwater is an environmental problem that affects about 1-2% of the world's population. As arsenic-contaminated water is also used for irrigating rice fields, the uptake of arsenic via rice is in some cases even higher than via drinking water. Arsenic is often of geogenic origin and in many cases bound to iron(III) minerals. Microbial iron(III) reduction leads to dissolution of Fe(III) minerals and thus the arsenic bound to these minerals is released to the environment. In turn, iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria have the potential to co-precipitate or sorb arsenic during iron(II) oxidation followed by iron(III) mineral formation. Here, we present work on arsenic co-precipitation and immobilization by anaerobic and aerobic iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria. Co-precipitation batch experiments with pure cultures of nitrate-dependent, phototrophic, and microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria are used to quantify the amount of arsenic that can be immobilized during microbial iron mineral precipitation. Iron and arsenic speciation and redox state are determined by X- ray diffraction and synchrotron-based X-ray absorption methods (EXAFS, XANES). Microcosm experiments are set-up either with liquid media or with rice paddy soil amended with arsenic. Rice paddy soil from arsenic contaminated rice fields in China that include a natural population of Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms is used as inoculum. Dissolved and solid-phase arsenic and iron are quantified, Arsenic speciation is determined and the iron minerals are identified. Additionally, Arsenic uptake into the rice plant is quantified and a gene expression pattern in rice (Oryza sativa cv Gladia) is determined by microarrays as a response to the presence of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria.

  7. Evidence against the nuclear in situ binding of arsenicals-oxidative stress theory of arsenic carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    A large amount of evidence suggests that arsenicals act via oxidative stress in causing cancer in humans and experimental animals. It is possible that arsenicals could bind in situ close to nuclear DNA followed by Haber-Weiss type oxidative DNA damage. Therefore, we tested this...

  8. Improved Aeration Process - Catalytic Role Of The Iron Oxides In Arsenic Oxidation And Coprecipitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowalski, Krysztof; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen

    2013-01-01

    Demands for a better drinking water quality, especially concerning arsenic, a compound with many adverse health effects, put a pressure on the utilities to ensure the best treatment technologies that meet nowadays and possible future quality standards. The aim of this paper is to introduce...... an improved aeration process that can also help in developing better arsenic removal treatment. The results present advantages of arsenic oxidation in an aeration process in the presence of ferrihydrite surface that have been shown to adsorb arsenic simultaneously to its oxidation. The presence...... of precipitated (ferrihydrite surface) and dissolved iron enhanced arsenic oxidation in comparison to solution with absence of precipitated iron in laboratory scale experiments. However, in the pilot scale studies the adsorption of arsenite on ferrihydrite was found to be the main process occurring during...

  9. REMOVAL OF ARSENIC FROM GROUNDWATER USING NATURALLY OCCURRING IRON OXIDES IN RURAL REGIONS OF MONGOLIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have found that the iron oxide particles produced by grinding naturally occurring iron ores are very effective in removing arsenic from water. The arsenic adsorption isothermal of the particles h...

  10. Geochemical modelling of arsenic adsorption to oxide surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Gustafsson, Jon Petter; Bhattacharya, Prosun

    2007-01-01

    In natural environments, arsenic chemistry is dominated by the reactions of its two predominant soluble forms, arsenate and arsenite. To predict the fate of As in the environment, it is necessary to consider processes that act to restrict its mobility. The mobility of As is strongly influenced by adsorption reactions to particle surfaces. Arsenate and arsenite may form surface complexes with a number of different oxides, including Fe-, Al-, Mn- and Ti oxides. The focus of this chapter is on t...

  11. Arsenic in ground-water under oxidizing conditions, south-west United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, F.N.

    1989-01-01

    Concentrations of dissolved arsenic in ground-water in alluvial basins of Arizona commonly exceed 50 ??g L-1 and reach values as large as 1,300 ??g L-1. Arsenic speciation analyses show that arsenic occurs in the fully oxidized state of plus 5 (As+5), most likely in the form of HAsO4???2, under existing oxidizing and pH conditions. Arsenic in source areas presumably is oxidized to soluble As before transport into the basin or, if after transport, before burial. Probable sources of arsenic are the sulphide and arsenide deposits in the mineralized areas of the mountains surrounding the basins. Arsenic content of alluvial material ranged from 2 to 88 ppm. Occurrence and removal of arsenic in ground-water are related to the pH and the redox condition of the ground-water, the oxidation state of arsenic, and sorption or exchange. Within basins, dissolved arsenic correlates (Pwater. Silicate hydrolysis reactions, as defined within the alluvial basins, under closed conditions cause increases in pH basinward and would promote desorption. Within the region, large concentrations of arsenic are commonly associated with the central parts of basins whose chemistries evolve under closed conditions. Arsenic does not correlate with dissolved iron (r = 0.09) but may be partly controlled by iron in the solid phase. High solid-phase arsenic contents were found in red clay beds. Large concentrations of arsenic also were found in water associated with red clay beds. Basins that contain the larger concentrations are bounded primarily by basalt and andesite, suggesting that the iron content as well as the arsenic content of the basin fill may play a role in the occurrence of arsenic in ground-water. Under oxidizing conditions in Arizona, arsenic in ground-water appears to be controlled in part by sorption or desorption of HAsO4???2 on active ferric oxyhydroxide surfaces. ?? 1989 Sciences and Technology Letters.

  12. Arsenic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of countries, including Argentina, Bangladesh, Chile, China, India, Mexico, and the United States of America. Drinking-water, ... ingestion of inorganic arsenic include developmental effects, neurotoxicity, diabetes, pulmonary disease and cardiovascular disease. Arsenic-induced myocardial ...

  13. ADSORPTION, DESORPTION AND OXIDATION OF ARSENIC AFFECTED BY CLAY MINERALS AND AGING PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adsorption/desorption and oxidation/reduction of arsenic at clay surfaces are very important to the natural attenuation of arsenic in the subsurface environment. Although numerous studies have concluded that iron oxides have high affinities for the adsorption of As(V), very litt...

  14. Arsenic oxidation capabilities of a chemoautotrophic bacterial population: Use for the treatment of an arsenic contaminated wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dictor, M.-C.; Battaglia-Brunet, F.; Garrido, F.; Baranger, P.

    2003-05-01

    An autotrophic bacterial population, named CAsOl, able to oxidise arsenic has been isolated from a former gold mine (Saint-Yrieix, France). This bacterial population was composed of two microorganisms: a bacterial strain close to Ralstonia picketii and the second one related to Thiomonas genus (identification by 16S rDNA sequencing). This microbial consortium was able to oxidise arsenic with CO2 as the carbon source, arsenite as electron donor and oxygen as electron accepter. A significant oxidising activity was observed in a pH range comprised between 3 to 8 (pH optimum 5 7). A laboratory experiment for the biological treatment of a synthetic effluent containing 100 mg.L^{-1} of arsenic has been carried out. A mineral support, pouzzolana, has been colonised by the population CAsOl and the column was fed continuously with a synthetic medium in order to determine the maximal arsenic oxidation rate and the optimal residence time. In our experimental conditions, the maximum arsenic oxidation rate was 3,9 g As(Ill). L^{-1}.day^{-1} with a residence time of 1 hour after 55 days of continuous running. The performance of our bacterial population for arsenite oxidation in arsenic contaminated wastewater are especially important in the case of a treatment of arsenious wastewater as it presents advantages compared to physico-chemical treatments (consumption and cost of chemicals, potential toxic by-products generation...).

  15. Arsenite-oxidizing and arsenate-reducing bacteria associated with arsenic-rich groundwater in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Vivian Hsiu-Chuan; Chu, Yu-Ju; Su, Yu-Chen; Hsiao, Sung-Yun; Wei, Chia-Cheng; Liu, Chen-Wuing; Liao, Chung-Min; Shen, Wei-Chiang; Chang, Fi-John

    2011-04-01

    Drinking highly arsenic-contaminated groundwater is a likely cause of blackfoot disease in Taiwan, but microorganisms that potentially control arsenic mobility in the subsurface remain unstudied. The objective of this study was to investigate the relevant arsenite-oxidizing and arsenate-reducing microbial community that exists in highly arsenic-contaminated groundwater in Taiwan. We cultured and identified arsenic-transforming bacteria, analyzed arsenic resistance and transformation, and determined the presence of genetic markers for arsenic transformation. In total, 11 arsenic-transforming bacterial strains with different colony morphologies and varying arsenic transformation abilities were isolated, including 10 facultative anaerobic arsenate-reducing bacteria and one strictly aerobic arsenite-oxidizing bacterium. All of the isolates exhibited high levels of arsenic resistance with minimum inhibitory concentrations of arsenic ranging from 2 to 200 mM. Strain AR-11 was able to rapidly oxidize arsenite to arsenate at concentrations relevant to environmental groundwater samples without the addition of any electron donors or acceptors. We provide evidence that arsenic-reduction activity may be conferred by the ars operon(s) that were not amplified by the designed primers currently in use. The 16S rRNA sequence analysis grouped the isolates into the following genera: Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Psychrobacter, Vibrio, Citrobacter, Enterobacter, and Bosea. Among these genera, we present the first report of the genus Psychrobacter being involved in arsenic reduction. Our results further support the hypothesis that bacteria capable of either oxidizing arsenite or reducing arsenate coexist and are ubiquitous in arsenic-contaminated groundwater.

  16. Arsenic responsive microRNAs in vivo and their potential involvement in arsenic-induced oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Xuefeng, E-mail: xuefengr@buffalo.edu [Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, School of Public Health and Health Professions, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Biomedical Sciences, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States); Gaile, Daniel P. [Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health and Health Professions, the State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States); Gong, Zhihong [Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, School of Public Health and Health Professions, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States); Qiu, Wenting [School of Public Health, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325035 (China); Ge, Yichen [Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, School of Public Health and Health Professions, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States); Zhang, Chuanwu; Huang, Chenping; Yan, Hongtao [School of Public Health, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325035 (China); Olson, James R. [Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, School of Public Health and Health Professions, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Biomedical Sciences, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States); Kavanagh, Terrance J. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Wu, Hongmei, E-mail: hongmeiwwu@hotmail.com [School of Public Health, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325035 (China)

    2015-03-15

    Arsenic exposure is postulated to modify microRNA (miRNA) expression, leading to changes of gene expression and toxicities, but studies relating the responses of miRNAs to arsenic exposure are lacking, especially with respect to in vivo studies. We utilized high-throughput sequencing technology and generated miRNA expression profiles of liver tissues from Sprague Dawley (SD) rats exposed to various concentrations of sodium arsenite (0, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 mg/L) for 60 days. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis of the miRNA expression profiles clustered the SD rats into different groups based on the arsenic exposure status, indicating a highly significant association between arsenic exposure and cluster membership (p-value of 0.0012). Multiple miRNA expressions were altered by arsenic in an exposure concentration-dependent manner. Among the identified arsenic-responsive miRNAs, several are predicted to target Nfe2l2-regulated antioxidant genes, including glutamate–cysteine ligase (GCL) catalytic subunit (GCLC) and modifier subunit (GCLM) which are involved in glutathione (GSH) synthesis. Exposure to low concentrations of arsenic increased mRNA expression for Gclc and Gclm, while high concentrations significantly reduced their expression, which were correlated to changes in hepatic GCL activity and GSH level. Moreover, our data suggested that other mechanisms, e.g., miRNAs, rather than Nfe2l2-signaling pathway, could be involved in the regulation of mRNA expression of Gclc and Gclm post-arsenic exposure in vivo. Together, our findings show that arsenic exposure disrupts the genome-wide expression of miRNAs in vivo, which could lead to the biological consequence, such as an altered balance of antioxidant defense and oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Chronic arsenic exposure induces changes of hepatic miRNA expression profiles. • Hepatic GCL activity and GSH level in rats are altered following arsenic exposure. • Arsenic induced GCL expression change is

  17. Arsenic responsive microRNAs in vivo and their potential involvement in arsenic-induced oxidative stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic exposure is postulated to modify microRNA (miRNA) expression, leading to changes of gene expression and toxicities, but studies relating the responses of miRNAs to arsenic exposure are lacking, especially with respect to in vivo studies. We utilized high-throughput sequencing technology and generated miRNA expression profiles of liver tissues from Sprague Dawley (SD) rats exposed to various concentrations of sodium arsenite (0, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 mg/L) for 60 days. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis of the miRNA expression profiles clustered the SD rats into different groups based on the arsenic exposure status, indicating a highly significant association between arsenic exposure and cluster membership (p-value of 0.0012). Multiple miRNA expressions were altered by arsenic in an exposure concentration-dependent manner. Among the identified arsenic-responsive miRNAs, several are predicted to target Nfe2l2-regulated antioxidant genes, including glutamate–cysteine ligase (GCL) catalytic subunit (GCLC) and modifier subunit (GCLM) which are involved in glutathione (GSH) synthesis. Exposure to low concentrations of arsenic increased mRNA expression for Gclc and Gclm, while high concentrations significantly reduced their expression, which were correlated to changes in hepatic GCL activity and GSH level. Moreover, our data suggested that other mechanisms, e.g., miRNAs, rather than Nfe2l2-signaling pathway, could be involved in the regulation of mRNA expression of Gclc and Gclm post-arsenic exposure in vivo. Together, our findings show that arsenic exposure disrupts the genome-wide expression of miRNAs in vivo, which could lead to the biological consequence, such as an altered balance of antioxidant defense and oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Chronic arsenic exposure induces changes of hepatic miRNA expression profiles. • Hepatic GCL activity and GSH level in rats are altered following arsenic exposure. • Arsenic induced GCL expression change is

  18. Effect of competitive ions on the arsenic removal by mesoporous hydrous zirconium oxide from drinking water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bortun, Anatoly; Bortun, Mila; Pardini, James [MEL Chemicals Inc., 500 Barbertown Point Breeze Road, Flemington, NJ 08822 (United States); Khainakov, Sergei A. [Departamento de Quimica Organica e Inorganica, Universidad de Oviedo, C/ Julian Claveria, 8, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Garcia, Jose R., E-mail: jrgm@uniovi.es [Departamento de Quimica Organica e Inorganica, Universidad de Oviedo, C/ Julian Claveria, 8, 33006 Oviedo (Spain)

    2010-11-15

    Adsorption properties of 302-type commercially available hydrous zirconium oxide (302-HZO) towards arsenic and some competitive anions and cations have been studied under batch and column conditions. Due to amphoteric properties, anion exchange performance of hydrous zirconium oxide is pH dependent. Media exhibits high affinity towards arsenic in a broad pH range, with high adsorption capacity at pH < 8. It was shown that silicate and phosphate ions are arsenic's main competitors affecting media adsorption capacity. Presence of transition metal cations in <1 ppm does not affect 302-HZO capacity on arsenic, whereas alkaline-earth cations improve arsenic removal. The possibility for significant increase of 302-HZO adsorption capacity on arsenic at pH > 8 by using 'solid acidifier' technique is discussed. Results of 302-HZO field trials are presented.

  19. Arsenic (+3 oxidation state methyltransferase is a specific but replaceable factor against arsenic toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maki Tokumoto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inorganic metalloids, such as arsenic (As, antimony (Sb, selenium (Se, and tellurium (Te, are methylated in biota. In particular, As, Se, and Te are methylated and excreted in urine. The biomethylation is thought to be a means to detoxify the metalloids. The methylation of As is catalyzed by arsenic (+3 oxidation state methyltransferase (AS3MT. However, it is still unclear whether AS3MT catalyzes the methylation of the other metalloids. It is also unclear whether other factors catalyze the As methylation instead of AS3MT. Recombinant human AS3MT (rhAS3MT was prepared and used in the in vitro methylation of As, Se, and Te. As, but not Se and Te, was specifically methylated in the presence of rhAS3MT. Then, siRNA targeting AS3MT was introduced into human hepatocarcinoma (HepG2 cells. Although AS3MT protein expression was completely silenced by the gene knockdown, no increase in As toxicity was found in the HepG2 cells transfected with AS3MT-targeting siRNA. We conclude that AS3MT catalyzes the methylation of As and not other biomethylatable metalloids, such as Se and Te. We speculate that other methylation enzyme(s also catalyze the methylation of As in HepG2 cells.

  20. The role of arsenic compounds in oxidative stress and in the development of diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Bizoń

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available For many years arsenic compounds were used in medicine, including treatment of skin diseases, malaria, diabetes, malaria, stomach ulcers, leukemia and in the eighteenth and the nineteenth century formed the basis of contemporary pharmacology. Due to its toxicity and carcinogenic activity, most of the compounds of this element were removed from use. The major cause of human arsenic toxicity is attributed to contamination of potable water from natural geological sources rather than from mining, smelting and agricultural sources (pesticides or fertilizers. Tobacco smoke also contains arsenic compounds. The characteristics of severe acute arsenic toxicity in humans include gastrointestinal discomfort, vomiting, diarrhea, skin lesions or even death. Chronic exposure frequently causes vascoocclusive disease (such as Blackfoot disease, and the development of lung, skin, liver, kidney and bladder cancers. Arsenic is a pro-inflammatory metal and appears to induce oxidative stress, apoptosis, affect cell proliferation and cell cycle progression. Generation of free radicals by arsenic is associated with its genotoxicity and contributes to the development of neoplastic lesions. Exposure to arsenic can also cause damage of the central nervous system, peripheral neuropathies, and behavioral changes. It was shown the association of exposure to arsenic and type 2 diabetes. Compounds with +3 oxidation state are more toxic and can induce tumor development. Arsenic interacts with other heavy metals, e.g. enhances the toxicity of cadmium nephropathy and acts antagonistically relative to selenium. Studies on the mechanism of interacting the toxicity of arsenic in the human body are crucial and point to lack of access to pure potable water in some regions of the world. People should be aware of the risks that are associated with exposure to arsenic because it is ubiquitous in the industry, as well as the environment. Arsenic is also involved in the spread of

  1. Oxidative Damage in Lymphocytes of Copper Smelter Workers Correlated to Higher Levels of Excreted Arsenic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Jorge; Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Coddou, Claudio; Nelson, Pablo; Maisey, Kevin; Valdés, Daniel; Aspee, Alexis; Espinosa, Victoria; Rozas, Carlos; Montoya, Margarita; Mandiola, Cristian; Rodríguez, Felipe E.; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Escobar, Alejandro; Fernández, Ricardo; Diaz, Hernán; Sandoval, Mario; Imarai, Mónica; Rios, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    Arsenic has been associated with multiple harmful effects at the cellular level. Indirectly these defects could be related to impairment of the integrity of the immune system, in particular in lymphoid population. To characterize the effect of Arsenic on redox status on this population, copper smelter workers and arsenic unexposed donors were recruited for this study. We analyzed urine samples and lymphocyte enriched fractions from donors to determinate arsenic levels and lymphocyte proliferation. Moreover, we studied the presence of oxidative markers MDA, vitamin E and SOD activity in donor plasma. Here we demonstrated that in human beings exposed to high arsenic concentrations, lymphocyte MDA and arsenic urinary levels showed a positive correlation with SOD activity, and a negative correlation with vitamin E serum levels. Strikingly, lymphocytes from the arsenic exposed population respond to a polyclonal stimulator, phytohemaglutinin, with higher rates of thymidine incorporation than lymphocytes of a control population. As well, similar in vitro responses to arsenic were observed using a T cell line. Our results suggest that chronic human exposure to arsenic induces oxidative damage in lymphocytes and could be considered more relevant than evaluation of T cell surveillance. PMID:21253489

  2. Oxidative Damage in Lymphocytes of Copper Smelter Workers Correlated to Higher Levels of Excreted Arsenic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Escobar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic has been associated with multiple harmful effects at the cellular level. Indirectly these defects could be related to impairment of the integrity of the immune system, in particular in lymphoid population. To characterize the effect of Arsenic on redox status on this population, copper smelter workers and arsenic unexposed donors were recruited for this study. We analyzed urine samples and lymphocyte enriched fractions from donors to determinate arsenic levels and lymphocyte proliferation. Moreover, we studied the presence of oxidative markers MDA, vitamin E and SOD activity in donor plasma. Here we demonstrated that in human beings exposed to high arsenic concentrations, lymphocyte MDA and arsenic urinary levels showed a positive correlation with SOD activity, and a negative correlation with vitamin E serum levels. Strikingly, lymphocytes from the arsenic exposed population respond to a polyclonal stimulator, phytohemaglutinin, with higher rates of thymidine incorporation than lymphocytes of a control population. As well, similar in vitro responses to arsenic were observed using a T cell line. Our results suggest that chronic human exposure to arsenic induces oxidative damage in lymphocytes and could be considered more relevant than evaluation of T cell surveillance.

  3. Protective effects of thymoquinone against apoptosis and oxidative stress by arsenic in rat kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sener, Umit; Uygur, Ramazan; Aktas, Cevat; Uygur, Emine; Erboga, Mustafa; Balkas, Gulseren; Caglar, Veli; Kumral, Bahadir; Gurel, Ahmet; Erdogan, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the protective role of thymoquinone (TQ) by targeting its antiapoptotic and antioxidant properties against kidney damage induced by arsenic in rats. We have used the 24 male Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were divided into three groups. Physiological serum in 10 mL/kg dose as intragastric was given to the control group. Sodium arsenite (10 mg/kg, intragastric by gavage for fifteen days) was given to the arsenic group. Sodium arsenite (10 mg/kg, intragastric by gavage for fifteen days) and TQ (10 mg/kg, intragastric by gavage for 15 days) was given to the arsenic + TQ group. After 15 days, the animals' kidneys were taken theirs, then we have performed histological and apoptotic assessment. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) enzyme activities and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels have examined as the oxidative stress parameters. We have determined the levels of arsenic. Increased renal injury and apoptotic cells have been detected in the arsenic group. Degenerative changes in the arsenic + TQ group were diminished. Although the MDA levels were augmented in the arsenic group, SOD, CAT and GSH-Px enzyme activities were lessened than the other groups. Our findings suggest that TQ may impede the oxidative stress, the cells have been damaged and also the generation of apoptotic cells arisen from arsenic. TQ plays a protective role against arsenic-induced toxicity in kidney and may potentially be used as a remedial agent.

  4. Molecular basis for arsenic-induced alteration in nitric oxide production and oxidative stress: implication of endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Yoshito; Pi, Jingbo

    2004-08-01

    Accumulated epidemiological studies have suggested that prolonged exposure of humans to arsenic in drinking water is associated with vascular diseases. The exact mechanism of how this occurs currently unknown. Nitric oxide (NO), formed by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), plays a crucial role in the vascular system. Decreased availability of biologically active NO in the endothelium is implicated in the pathophysiology of several vascular diseases and inhibition of eNOS by arsenic is one of the proposed mechanism s for arsenic-induced vascular diseases. In addition, during exposure to arsenic, overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can occur, resulting in oxidative stress, which is another major risk factor for vascular dysfunction. The molecular basis for decreased NO levels and increased oxidative stress during arsenic exposure is poorly understood. In this article, evidence for arsenic-mediated alteration in NO production and oxidative stress is reviewed. The results of a cross-sectional study in an endemic area of chronic arsenic poisoning and experimental animal studies to elucidate a potential mechanism for the impairment of NO formation and oxidative stress caused by prolonged exposure to arsenate in the drinking water are also reviewed.

  5. Chronic Arsenic Exposure-Induced Oxidative Stress is Mediated by Decreased Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Rat Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Chandra; Kumar, Vijay

    2016-09-01

    The present study was executed to study the effect of chronic arsenic exposure on generation of mitochondrial oxidative stress and biogenesis in rat liver. Chronic sodium arsenite treatment (25 ppm for 12 weeks) decreased mitochondrial complexes activity in rat liver. There was a decrease in mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) activity in arsenic-treated rats that might be responsible for increased protein and lipid oxidation as observed in our study. The messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of mitochondrial and nuclear-encoded subunits of complexes I (ND1 and ND2) and IV (COX I and COX IV) was downregulated in arsenic-treated rats only. The protein and mRNA expression of MnSOD was reduced suggesting increased mitochondrial oxidative damage after arsenic treatment. There was activation of Bax and caspase-3 followed by release of cytochrome c from mitochondria suggesting induction of apoptotic pathway under oxidative stress. The entire phenomenon was associated with decrease in mitochondrial biogenesis as evident by decreased protein and mRNA expression of nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1), nuclear respiratory factor 2 (NRF-2), peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma-coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) in arsenic-treated rat liver. The results of the present study indicate that arsenic-induced mitochondrial oxidative stress is associated with decreased mitochondrial biogenesis in rat liver that may present one of the mechanisms for arsenic-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:26767369

  6. Arsenic Speciation in Wastes Resulting From Pressure Oxidation, Roasting and Smelting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paktunc, D. (CCM)

    2010-11-01

    Arsenic commonly occurs in elevated concentrations in some gold and base-metal deposits. Mining and metallurgical processing of gold and base-metal ores results in solid wastes, effluents, and air emissions containing high concentrations of arsenic. Such wastes form an important source of anthropogenic arsenic in the environment. The nature and occurrence of arsenic in solid wastes are complex and highly variable. A combination of microanalytical tools and techniques including XAFS were used to determine the form and speciation of arsenic in wastes resulting from pressure oxidation, roasting and smelting, and impacted soil. As K-edge and Fe K-edge XAFS analyses of the pressure oxidation residues indicate that arsenic in tetrahedral coordination is corner-linked to 5 to 6 FeO{sub 6} octahedra that are edge- and perhaps face-sharing. During roasting of refractory gold ores, oxidation of As to As{sub 2}O{sub 5} species may be incomplete, which is detrimental to not only gold recovery but also the tailings management options. As K-edge XANES spectra indicate that more than one-third of the arsenic released from a copper smelter stack is composed of As{sup 3+} species. Most likely arsenic species in the smelter-impacted soil include arsenolite, goethite with adsorbed As{sup 5+}, monomethylarsonic acidm, and tetramethylarsonium iodide.

  7. Application of Metal Oxide Heterostructures in Arsenic Removal from Contaminated Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It has become one of the major environmental problems for people worldwide to be exposed to high arsenic concentrations through contaminated drinking water, and even the long-term intake of small doses of arsenic has a carcinogenic effect. As an efficient and economic approach for the purification of arsenic-containing water, the adsorbents in adsorption processes have been widely studied. Among a variety of adsorbents reported, the metal oxide heterostructures with high surface area and specific affinity for arsenic adsorption from aqueous systems have demonstrated a promising performance in practical applications. This review paper aims to summarize briefly the metal oxide heterostructures in arsenic removal from contaminated water, so as to provide efficient, economic, and robust solutions for water purification.

  8. Effects of a manganese oxide-modified biochar composite on adsorption of arsenic in red soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhihong; Zhou, Li; Huang, Yifan; Song, Zhengguo; Qiu, Weiwen

    2015-11-01

    The arsenic adsorption capacity of a manganese oxide-modified biochar composite (MBC), prepared by pyrolysis of a mixture of potassium permanganate and biochar, was investigated in red soil. Adsorption experiments using batch procedures were used to estimate the arsenic adsorption capacities of the absorbent materials. Adsorption and desorption isotherms, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterise the prepared adsorbent materials, and a plausible mechanism for arsenic removal by MBC was proposed. Arsenic in red soil-MBC mixtures exhibited lower mobility than that in soils amended with pristine biochar. The improved removal performance of soil-MBC mixtures was attributed to a lower H/C ratio, higher O/C ratio, higher surface hydrophilicity, and higher surface sorption capacity, even though the impregnation of manganese oxide decreased the specific surface area of the biochar. Arsenic retention increased as the biochar content increased, mainly owing to an increase in soil pH. Several oxygenated functional groups, especially O-H, CO, Mn-O, and Si-O, participated in the adsorption process, and manganese oxides played a significant role in the oxidation of arsenic. This study highlights the potential of MBC as an absorbent to immobilise arsenic for use in contaminated land remediation in the red soils region.

  9. Effects of a manganese oxide-modified biochar composite on adsorption of arsenic in red soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhihong; Zhou, Li; Huang, Yifan; Song, Zhengguo; Qiu, Weiwen

    2015-11-01

    The arsenic adsorption capacity of a manganese oxide-modified biochar composite (MBC), prepared by pyrolysis of a mixture of potassium permanganate and biochar, was investigated in red soil. Adsorption experiments using batch procedures were used to estimate the arsenic adsorption capacities of the absorbent materials. Adsorption and desorption isotherms, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterise the prepared adsorbent materials, and a plausible mechanism for arsenic removal by MBC was proposed. Arsenic in red soil-MBC mixtures exhibited lower mobility than that in soils amended with pristine biochar. The improved removal performance of soil-MBC mixtures was attributed to a lower H/C ratio, higher O/C ratio, higher surface hydrophilicity, and higher surface sorption capacity, even though the impregnation of manganese oxide decreased the specific surface area of the biochar. Arsenic retention increased as the biochar content increased, mainly owing to an increase in soil pH. Several oxygenated functional groups, especially O-H, CO, Mn-O, and Si-O, participated in the adsorption process, and manganese oxides played a significant role in the oxidation of arsenic. This study highlights the potential of MBC as an absorbent to immobilise arsenic for use in contaminated land remediation in the red soils region. PMID:26320008

  10. Metallothionein blocks oxidative DNA damage induced by acute inorganic arsenic exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Wei, E-mail: qu@niehs.nih.gov; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2015-02-01

    We studied how protein metallothionein (MT) impacts arsenic-induced oxidative DNA damage (ODD) using cells that poorly express MT (MT-I/II double knockout embryonic cells; called MT-null cells) and wild-type (WT) MT competent cells. Arsenic (as NaAsO{sub 2}) was less cytolethal over 24 h in WT cells (LC{sub 50} = 11.0 ± 1.3 μM; mean ± SEM) than in MT-null cells (LC{sub 50} = 5.6 ± 1.2 μM). ODD was measured by the immuno-spin trapping method. Arsenic (1 or 5 μM; 24 h) induced much less ODD in WT cells (121% and 141% of control, respectively) than in MT-null cells (202% and 260%). In WT cells arsenic caused concentration-dependent increases in MT expression (transcript and protein), and in the metal-responsive transcription factor-1 (MTF-1), which is required to induce the MT gene. In contrast, basal MT levels were not detectable in MT-null cells and unaltered by arsenic exposure. Transfection of MT-I gene into the MT-null cells markedly reduced arsenic-induced ODD levels. The transport genes, Abcc1 and Abcc2 were increased by arsenic in WT cells but either showed no or very limited increases in MT-null cells. Arsenic caused increases in oxidant stress defense genes HO-1 and GSTα2 in both WT and MT-null cells, but to much higher levels in WT cells. WT cells appear more adept at activating metal transport systems and oxidant response genes, although the role of MT in these responses is unclear. Overall, MT protects against arsenic-induced ODD in MT competent cells by potential sequestration of scavenging oxidant radicals and/or arsenic. - Highlights: • Metallothionein blocks arsenic toxicity. • Metallothionein reduces arsenic-induced DNA damage. • Metallothionein may bind arsenic or radicals produced by arsenic.

  11. Effect of vitamin E supplementation on arsenic induced alteration in blood biochemical profile, oxidant/antioxidant status, serum cortisol level and retention of arsenic and selenium in goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanta, Ranjan Kumar; Garg, Anil Kumar; Dass, Ram Sharan

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic (As) exerts oxidative stress with depletion of body selenium in monogastric animals. But in ruminants this fact is not yet verified. Vitamin E is an effective dietary antioxidant. Thus, in this experiment, the protective effect of vitamin E against arsenic toxicity induced by sodium arsenite (60mg As/kg diet) was investigated in goat kids. For this, 21 male kids were divided into three equal groups and fed either basal diet as such (control), or supplemented with 60mg As/kg diet and 60mg As/kg diet+250IU vitamin E/kg diet for 180 days. Vitamin E supplementation alleviated the toxic effects caused by arsenic on serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase and lipid peroxidation. It also prevented the depletion of reduced glutathione content and reduction in activity of catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione-s-transferase in erythrocytes resulted from arsenic intoxication. The elevated levels of arsenic and reduced levels of selenium in the serum and tissues in arsenic treated animals were attenuated by vitamin E supplementation, though not completely. However, serum cortisol level was not affected by arsenic. It was concluded that arsenic exerts cortisol independent stressor mechanism and supplementation of vitamin E at a level of 250IU/kg diet was partially effective in reducing tissue accumulation of arsenic in the body and protect the kids from oxidative stress induced by arsenic.

  12. Arsenic Attenuation By Oxidized Aquifer Sediments in Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stollenwerk, K.G.; Breit, G.N.; Welch, A.H.; Yount, J.C.; Whitney, J.W.; Foster, A.L.; Uddin, M.N.; Majumder, R.K.; Ahmed, N.; /Geological Survey, Denver /Geological

    2007-07-13

    Recognition of arsenic (As) contamination of shallow fluvio-deltaic aquifers in the Bengal Basin has resulted in increasing exploitation of groundwater from deeper aquifers that generally contain low concentrations of dissolved As. Pumping-induced infiltration of high-As groundwater could eventually cause As concentrations in these aquifers to increase. This study investigates the adsorption capacity for As of sediment from a low-As aquifer near Dhaka, Bangladesh. A shallow, chemically-reducing aquifer at this site extends to a depth of 50 m and has maximum As concentrations in groundwater of 900 {micro}g/L. At depths greater than 50 m, geochemical conditions are more oxidizing and groundwater has < 5 {micro}g/L As. There is no thick layer of clay at this site to inhibit vertical transport of groundwater. Arsenite [As(III)] is the dominant oxidation state in contaminated groundwater; however, data from laboratory batch experiments show that As(III) is oxidized to arsenate [As(V)] by manganese (Mn) minerals that are present in the oxidized sediment. Thus, the long-term viability of the deeper aquifers as a source of water supply is likely to depend on As(V) adsorption. The adsorption capacity of these sediments is a function of the oxidation state of As and the concentration of other solutes that compete for adsorption sites. Arsenite that was not oxidized did adsorb, but to a much lesser extent than As(V). Phosphate (P) caused a substantial decrease in As(V) adsorption. Increasing pH and concentrations of silica (Si) had lesser effects on As(V) adsorption. The effect of bicarbonate (HCO{sub 3}) on As(V) adsorption was negligible. Equilibrium constants for adsorption of As(V), As(III), P, Si, HCO3, and H were determined from the experimental data and a quantitative model developed. Oxidation of As(III) was modeled with a first-order rate constant. This model was used to successfully simulate As(V) adsorption in the presence of multiple competing solutes. Results

  13. Arsenic attenuation by oxidized aquifer sediments in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stollenwerk, K.G.; Breit, G.N.; Welch, A.H.; Yount, J.C.; Whitney, J.W.; Foster, A.L.; Uddin, M.N.; Majumder, R.K.; Ahmed, N.

    2007-01-01

    Recognition of arsenic (As) contamination of shallow fluvio-deltaic aquifers in the Bengal Basin has resulted in increasing exploitation of groundwater from deeper aquifers that generally contain low concentrations of dissolved As. Pumping-induced infiltration of high-As groundwater could eventually cause As concentrations in these aquifers to increase. This study investigates the adsorption capacity for As of sediment from a low-As aquifer near Dhaka, Bangladesh. A shallow, chemically-reducing aquifer at this site extends to a depth of 50??m and has maximum As concentrations in groundwater of 900????g/L. At depths greater than 50??m, geochemical conditions are more oxidizing and groundwater has < 5????g/L As. There is no thick layer of clay at this site to inhibit vertical transport of groundwater. Arsenite [As(III)] is the dominant oxidation state in contaminated groundwater; however, data from laboratory batch experiments show that As(III) is oxidized to arsenate [As(V)] by manganese (Mn) minerals that are present in the oxidized sediment. Thus, the long-term viability of the deeper aquifers as a source of water supply is likely to depend on As(V) adsorption. The adsorption capacity of these sediments is a function of the oxidation state of As and the concentration of other solutes that compete for adsorption sites. Arsenite that was not oxidized did adsorb, but to a much lesser extent than As(V). Phosphate (P) caused a substantial decrease in As(V) adsorption. Increasing pH and concentrations of silica (Si) had lesser effects on As(V) adsorption. The effect of bicarbonate (HCO3) on As(V) adsorption was negligible. Equilibrium constants for adsorption of As(V), As(III), P, Si, HCO3, and H were determined from the experimental data and a quantitative model developed. Oxidation of As(III) was modeled with a first-order rate constant. This model was used to successfully simulate As(V) adsorption in the presence of multiple competing solutes. Results from these

  14. Graphene oxide amplifies the phytotoxicity of arsenic in wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiangang; Kang, Jia; Lu, Kaicheng; Zhou, Ruiren; Mu, Li; Zhou, Qixing

    2014-08-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is widely used in various fields and is considered to be relatively biocompatible. Herein, ``indirect'' nanotoxicity is first defined as toxic amplification of toxicants or pollutants by nanomaterials. This work revealed that GO greatly amplifies the phytotoxicity of arsenic (As), a widespread contaminant, in wheat, for example, causing a decrease in biomass and root numbers and increasing oxidative stress, which are thought to be regulated by its metabolisms. Compared with As or GO alone, GO combined with As inhibited the metabolism of carbohydrates, enhanced amino acid and secondary metabolism and disrupted fatty acid metabolism and the urea cycle. GO also triggered damage to cellular structures and electrolyte leakage and enhanced the uptake of GO and As. Co-transport of GO-loading As and transformation of As(V) to high-toxicity As(III) by GO were observed. The generation of dimethylarsinate, produced from the detoxification of inorganic As, was inhibited by GO in plants. GO also regulated phosphate transporter gene expression and arsenate reductase activity to influence the uptake and transformation of As, respectively. Moreover, the above effects of GO were concentration dependent. Given the widespread exposure to As in agriculture, the indirect nanotoxicity of GO should be carefully considered in food safety.

  15. Capture of gas-phase arsenic oxide by lime: kinetic and mechanistic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, R A; Fan, L S

    2001-02-15

    Trace metal emission from coal combustion is a major concern for coal-burning utilities. Toxic compounds such as arsenic species are difficult to control because of their high volatility. Mineral sorbents such as lime and hydrated lime have been shown to be effective in capturing arsenic from the gas phase over a wide temperature range. In this study, the mechanism of interaction between arsenic oxide (As2O3) and lime (CaO) is studied over the range of 300-1000 degrees C. The interaction between these two components is found to depend on the temperature; tricalcium orthoarsenate (Ca3As2O8) is found to be the product of the reaction below 600 degrees C, whereas dicalcium pyroarsenate (Ca2As2O7) is found to be the reaction product in the range of 700-900 degrees C. Maximum capture of arsenic oxide is found to occur in the range of 500-600 degrees C. At 500 degrees C, a high reactivity calcium carbonate is found to capture arsenic oxide by a combination of physical and chemical adsorption. Intrinsic kinetics of the reaction between calcium oxide and arsenic oxide in the medium-temperature range of 300-500 degrees C is studied in a differential bed flow-through reactor. Using the shrinking core model, the order of reaction with respect to arsenic oxide concentration is found to be about 1, and the activation energy is calculated to be 5.1 kcal/mol. The effect of initial surface area of CaO sorbent is studied over a range of 2.7-45 m2/g using the grain model. The effect of other major acidic flue gas species (SO2 and HCl) on arsenic capture is found to be minimal under the conditions of the experiment. PMID:11349294

  16. Methylation of Arsenic by Recombinant Human Wild-Type Arsenic (+3 Oxidation State) Methyltransferase and its Methionine 287 Threonine (M287T) Polymorph

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACT Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) is the key enzyme in the pathway for methylation of arsenicals. A common polymorphism in the AS3MT gene that replaces a threonyl residue in position 287 with a methionyl residue (AS3MT/M287T) occurs at a frequency...

  17. Aerobic oxidation of mackinawite (FeS) and its environmental implication for arsenic mobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hoon Y.; Han, Young-Soo; Park, Sung W.; Hayes, Kim F.

    2010-06-01

    Oxidation of mackinawite (FeS) and concurrent mobilization of arsenic were investigated as a function of pH under oxidizing conditions. At acidic pH, FeS oxidation is mainly initiated by the proton-promoted dissolution, which results in the release of Fe(II) and sulfide in the solution. While most of dissolved sulfide is volatilized before being oxidized, dissolved Fe(II) is oxidized into green rust-like precipitates and goethite ( α-FeOOH). At basic pH, the development of Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxide coating on the FeS surface inhibits the solution-phase oxidation following FeS dissolution. Instead, FeS is mostly oxidized into lepidocrocite ( γ-FeOOH) via the surface-mediated oxidation without dissolution. At neutral pH, FeS is oxidized via both the solution-phase oxidation following FeS dissolution and the surface-mediated oxidation mechanisms. The mobilization of arsenic during FeS oxidation is strongly affected by FeS oxidation mechanisms. At acidic pH (and to some extent at neutral pH), the rapid FeS dissolution and the slow precipitation of Fe (oxyhydr)oxides results in arsenic accumulation in water. In contrast, the surface-mediated oxidation of FeS at basic pH leads to the direct formation of Fe (oxyhydr)oxides, which provides effective adsorbents for As under oxic conditions. At acidic and neutral pH, the solution-phase oxidation of dissolved Fe(II) accelerates the oxidation of the less adsorbing As(III) to the more adsorbing As(V). This study reveals that the oxidative mobilization of As may be a significant pathway for arsenic enrichment of porewaters in sulfidic sediments.

  18. Arsenic-induced oxidative myocardial injury: protective role of arjunolic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manna, Prasenjit; Sinha, Mahua; Sil, Parames C. [Bose Institute, Department of Chemistry, Kolkata, West Bengal (India)

    2008-03-15

    Arsenic, one of the most harmful metalloids, is ubiquitous in the environment. The present study has been carried out to investigate the protective role of a triterpenoid saponin, arjunolic acid (AA) against arsenic-induced cardiac oxidative damage. In the study, NaAsO{sub 2} was chosen as the source of arsenic. The free radical scavenging activity and the effect of AA on the intracellular antioxidant power were determined from its 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl radical scavenging ability and ferric reducing/antioxidant power assay, respectively. Oral administration of NaAsO{sub 2} at a dose of 10 mg/kg body weight for 2 days caused significant accumulation of arsenic in cardiac tissues of the experimental mice in association with the reduction in cardiac antioxidant enzymes activities, namely superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase. Arsenic intoxication also decreased the cardiac glutathione (GSH) and total thiol contents and increased the levels of oxidized glutathione (GSSG), lipid peroxidation end products and protein carbonyl content. Treatment with AA at a dose of 20 mg/kg body weight for 4 days prior to NaAsO{sub 2} intoxication protected the cardiac tissue from arsenic-induced oxidative impairment. In addition to oxidative stress, arsenic administration increased total cholesterol level as well as the reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level in the sera of the experimental mice. AA pretreatment, however, could prevent this hyperlipidemia. Histological studies on the ultrastructural changes in cardiac tissue supported the protective activity of AA also. Combining all, results suggest that AA could protect cardiac tissues against arsenic-induced oxidative stress probably due to its antioxidant property. (orig.)

  19. Differential oxidative stress and DNA damage in rat brain regions and blood following chronic arsenic exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, D; Flora, S J S

    2008-05-01

    Chronic arsenic poisoning caused by contaminated drinking water is a wide spread and worldwide problem particularly in India and Bangladesh. One of the possible mechanisms suggested for arsenic toxicity is the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The present study was planned 1) to evaluate if chronic exposure to arsenic leads to oxidative stress in blood and brain - parts of male Wistar rats and 2) to evaluate which brain region of the exposed animals was more sensitive to oxidative injury. Male Wistar rats were exposed to arsenic (50A ppm sodium arsenite in drinking water) for 10A months. The brain was dissected into five major parts, pons medulla, corpus striatum, cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum. A number of biochemical variables indicative of oxidative stress were studied in blood and different brain regions. Single-strand DNA damage using comet assay was also assessed in lymphocytes. We observed a significant increase in blood and brain ROS levels accompanied by the depletion of GSH/GSSG ratio and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity in different brain regions of arsenic-exposed rats. Chronic arsenic exposure also caused significant single-strand DNA damage in lymphocytes as depicted by comet with a tail in arsenic-exposed cells compared with the control cells. On the basis of results, we concluded that the cortex region of the brain was more sensitive to oxidative injury compared with the other regions studied. The present study, thus, leads us to suggest that arsenic induces differential oxidative stress in brain regions with cortex followed by hippocampus and causes single-strand DNA damage in lymphocytes.

  20. Regeneration of Commercial SCR Catalysts: Probing the Existing Forms of Arsenic Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Li, Junhua; Peng, Yue; Si, Wenzhe; He, Xu; Hao, Jiming

    2015-08-18

    To investigate the poisoning and regeneration of SCR catalysts, fresh and arsenic-poisoned commercial V2O5-WO3/TiO2 catalysts are researched in the context of deactivation mechanisms and regeneration technology. The results indicate that the forms of arsenic oxide on the poisoned catalyst are related to the proportion of arsenic (As) on the catalyst. When the surface coverage of (V+W+As) is lower than 1, the trivalent arsenic species (As(III)) is the major component, and this species prefers to permeate into the bulk-phase channels. However, at high As concentrations, pentavalent arsenic species (As(IV)) cover the surface of the catalyst. Although both arsenic species lower the NOx conversion, they affect the formation of N2O differently. In particular, N2O production is limited when trivalent arsenic species predominate, which may be related to As2O3 clogging the pores of the catalyst. In contrast, the pentavalent arsenic oxide species (As2O5) possess several As-OH groups. These As-OH groups could not only enhance the ability of the catalyst to become reduced, but also provide several Brønsted acid sites with weak thermal stability that promote the formation of N2O. Finally, although our novel Ca(NO3)2-based regeneration method cannot completely remove As2O3 from the micropores of the catalyst, this approach can effectively wipe off surface arsenic oxides without a significant loss of the catalyst's active components. PMID:26186082

  1. Regeneration of Commercial SCR Catalysts: Probing the Existing Forms of Arsenic Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Li, Junhua; Peng, Yue; Si, Wenzhe; He, Xu; Hao, Jiming

    2015-08-18

    To investigate the poisoning and regeneration of SCR catalysts, fresh and arsenic-poisoned commercial V2O5-WO3/TiO2 catalysts are researched in the context of deactivation mechanisms and regeneration technology. The results indicate that the forms of arsenic oxide on the poisoned catalyst are related to the proportion of arsenic (As) on the catalyst. When the surface coverage of (V+W+As) is lower than 1, the trivalent arsenic species (As(III)) is the major component, and this species prefers to permeate into the bulk-phase channels. However, at high As concentrations, pentavalent arsenic species (As(IV)) cover the surface of the catalyst. Although both arsenic species lower the NOx conversion, they affect the formation of N2O differently. In particular, N2O production is limited when trivalent arsenic species predominate, which may be related to As2O3 clogging the pores of the catalyst. In contrast, the pentavalent arsenic oxide species (As2O5) possess several As-OH groups. These As-OH groups could not only enhance the ability of the catalyst to become reduced, but also provide several Brønsted acid sites with weak thermal stability that promote the formation of N2O. Finally, although our novel Ca(NO3)2-based regeneration method cannot completely remove As2O3 from the micropores of the catalyst, this approach can effectively wipe off surface arsenic oxides without a significant loss of the catalyst's active components.

  2. Nitric oxide mitigates arsenic-induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in Vicia faba L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Pratiksha; Singh, A K

    2015-09-01

    The protective effects of nitric oxide (NO) against arsenic (As)-induced structural disturbances in Vicia faba have been investigated. As treatment (0.25, 0.50, and 1 mM) resulted in a declined growth of V. faba seedlings. Arsenic treatment stimulates the activity of SOD and CAT while the activities of APX and GST content were decreased. The oxidative stress markers such as superoxide radical, hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde (lipid peroxidation) contents were enhanced by As. Overall results revealed that significant accumulation of As suppressed growth, photosynthesis, antioxidant enzymes (SOD, CAT, APX, and GST activity), mitotic index, and induction of different chromosomal abnormalities, hence led to oxidative stress. The concentration of SNP (0.02 mM) was very effective in counteracting the adverse effect of As toxicity. These abnormalities use partially or fully reversed by a simultaneous application of As and NO donor and sodium nitroprusside and has an ameliorating effect against As-induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in V. faba roots.

  3. Arsenic Methylation, Oxidative Stress and Cancer - Is there a Link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenic is a multiorgan human carcinogen. The best-known example of this effect occurred in subgroups of the Taiwanese population who were chronically exposed to high levels of naturally occurring arsenic in drinking water and developed cancers of the skin, lung, urinary bladde...

  4. Intrinsic properties of cupric oxide nanoparticles enable effective filtration of arsenic from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Kyle J.; Reynolds, Brandon; Reddy, K. J.

    2015-06-01

    The contamination of arsenic in human drinking water supplies is a serious global health concern. Despite multiple years of research, sustainable arsenic treatment technologies have yet to be developed. This study demonstrates the intrinsic abilities of cupric oxide nanoparticles (CuO-NP) towards arsenic adsorption and the development of a point-of-use filter for field application. X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy experiments were used to examine adsorption, desorption, and readsorption of aqueous arsenite and arsenate by CuO-NP. Field experiments were conducted with a point-of-use filter, coupled with real-time arsenic monitoring, to remove arsenic from domestic groundwater samples. The CuO-NP were regenerated by desorbing arsenate via increasing pH above the zero point of charge. Results suggest an effective oxidation of arsenite to arsenate on the surface of CuO-NP. Naturally occurring arsenic was effectively removed by both as-prepared and regenerated CuO-NP in a field demonstration of the point-of-use filter. A sustainable arsenic mitigation model for contaminated water is proposed.

  5. DETERMINATION OF THE RATES AND PRODUCTS OF FERROUS IRON OXIDATION IN ARSENIC-CONTAMINATED POND WATER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissolved ferrous iron and arsenic in the presence of insufficient oxygenated ground water is released into a pond. When the mixing of ferrous iron and oxygenated water within the pond occurs, the ferrous iron is oxidized and precipitated as an iron oxide. Groups of experiments...

  6. Synthesis and characterization of a mesoporous hydrous zirconium oxide used for arsenic removal from drinking water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bortun, Anatoly; Bortun, Mila; Pardini, James [MELChemicals Inc, 500 Barbertown Point Breeze Road, Flemington, NJ 08822 (United States); Khainakov, Sergei A. [Departamento de Quimica Organica e Inorganica, Universidad de Oviedo, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Garcia, Jose R., E-mail: jrgm@uniovi.es [Departamento de Quimica Organica e Inorganica, Universidad de Oviedo, 33006 Oviedo (Spain)

    2010-02-15

    Powder (20-50 {mu}m) mesoporous hydrous zirconium oxide was prepared from a zirconium salt granular precursor. The effect of some process parameters on product morphology, porous structure and adsorption performance has been studied. The use of hydrous zirconium oxide for selective arsenic removal from drinking water is discussed.

  7. Chemical behaviors of different arsenic-bearing sulphides bio-oxidated by thermophilic bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Hong-ying; GONG En-pu; YANG Li-li; WANG Da-wen

    2005-01-01

    The study on arsenopyrite and realgar of bacterial oxidation shows that the chemical behaviors of different arsenic-bearing sulphides oxidated by thermophilic bacteria are quite distinct. Arsenopyrite is active and quickly eroded in bacteria-bearing solution. With a high leaching rate over 95%, the arsenopyrite phase cannot be detected by X-ray diffraction(XRD). Arsenopyrite is highly toxic to bacteria that at the initial stage of bio-oxidation, bacterial growth is inhibited and the number of bacterium cell drops from 2.26 × 108/mL to the lowest 2.01 × 105/mL. At the later stages of bio-oxidation, bacteria grow fast and reach 2.23 × 108/mL. Comparably, realgar is inertial and resistive to bacterial corrosion and oxidation. Arsenic in realgar crystal is hard to be leached and the residue is still realgar phase, as indicated by XRD. The cell number of bacteria varies a little, decreasing from 2.26 × 108/mL to 2.01 × 107/mL, during the bacterial oxidation. The results show that the crystal structure and arsenic valency of arsenic-bearing sulphides play a vital role during the leaching process of bacterial oxidation.

  8. Arsenic(V) Incorporation in Vivianite during Microbial Reduction of Arsenic(V)-Bearing Biogenic Fe(III) (Oxyhydr)oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehe, E Marie; Morin, Guillaume; Scheer, Lukas; Pape, Pierre Le; Esteve, Imène; Daus, Birgit; Kappler, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    The dissolution of arsenic-bearing iron(III) (oxyhydr)oxides during combined microbial iron(III) and arsenate(V) reduction is thought to be the main mechanism responsible for arsenic mobilization in reducing environments. Besides its mobilization during bioreduction, arsenic is often resequestered by newly forming secondary iron(II)-bearing mineral phases. In phosphate-bearing environments, iron(II) inputs generally lead to vivianite precipitation. In fact, in a previous study we observed that during bioreduction of arsenate(V)-bearing biogenic iron(III) (oxyhydr)oxides in phosphate-containing growth media, arsenate(V) was immobilized by the newly forming secondary iron(II) and iron(II)/iron(III)mineral phases, including vivianite. In the present study, changes in arsenic redox state and binding environment in these experiments were analyzed. We found that arsenate(V) partly replaced phosphate in vivianite, thus forming a vivianite-symplesite solid solution identified as Fe3(PO4)1.7(AsO4)0.3·8H2O. Our data suggests that in order to predict the fate of arsenic during the bioreduction of abiogenic and biogenic iron(III) (oxyhydr)oxides in arsenic-contaminated environments, the formation of symplesite-vivianite minerals needs to be considered. Indeed, such mineral phases could contribute to a delayed and slow release of arsenic in phosphate-bearing surface and groundwater environments.

  9. Study of iron oxide nanoparticles in soil for remediation of arsenic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shipley, Heather J., E-mail: heather.shipley@utsa.edu; Engates, Karen E.; Guettner, Allison M. [University of Texas at San Antonio, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (United States)

    2011-06-15

    There is a growing interest in the use of nanoparticles for environmental applications due to their unique physical and chemical properties. One possible application is the removal of contaminants from water. In this study, the use of iron oxide nanoparticles (19.3 nm magnetite and 37.0 nm hematite) were examined to remove arsenate and arsenite through column studies. The columns contained 1.5 or 15 wt% iron oxide nanoparticles and soil. Arsenic experiments were conducted with 1.5 wt% iron oxides at 1.5 and 6 mL/h with initial arsenate and arsenite concentrations of 100 {mu}g/L. Arsenic release occurred after 400 PV, and 100% release was reached. A long-term study was conducted with 15 wt% magnetite nanoparticles in soil at 0.3 mL/h with an initial arsenate concentration of 100 {mu}g/L. A negligible arsenate concentration occurred for 3559.6 pore volumes (PVs) (132.1 d). Eventually, the arsenate concentration reached about 20% after 9884.1 PV (207.9 d). A retardation factor of about 6742 was calculated indicating strong adsorption of arsenic to the magnetite nanoparticles in the column. Also, increased adsorption was observed after flow interruption. Other experiments showed that arsenic and 12 other metals (V, Cr, Co, Mn, Se, Mo, Cd, Pb, Sb, Tl, Th, U) could be simultaneously removed by the iron oxide nanoparticles in soil. Effluent concentrations were less than 10% for six out of the 12 metals. Desorption experiment showed partial irreversible sorption of arsenic to the iron oxide nanoparticle surface. Strong adsorption, large retardation factor, and resistant desorption suggest that magnetite and hematite nanoparticles have the potential to be used to remove arsenic in sandy soil possibly through in situ techniques.

  10. Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.; GADGIL, ASHOK J.; ADDY, SUSAN E.A.; KOWOLIK, KRISTIN

    2010-06-01

    We describe laboratory and field results of a novel arsenic removal adsorbent called 'Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash' (ARUBA). ARUBA is prepared by coating particles of coal bottom ash, a waste material from coal fired power plants, with iron (hydr)oxide. The coating process is simple and conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Material costs for ARUBA are estimated to be low (~;;$0.08 per kg) and arsenic remediation with ARUBA has the potential to be affordable to resource-constrained communities. ARUBA is used for removing arsenic via a dispersal-and-removal process, and we envision that ARUBA would be used in community-scale water treatment centers. We show that ARUBA is able to reduce arsenic concentrations in contaminated Bangladesh groundwater to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. Using the Langmuir isotherm (R2 = 0.77) ARUBA's adsorption capacity in treating real groundwater is 2.6x10-6 mol/g (0.20 mg/g). Time-to-90percent (defined as the time interval for ARUBA to remove 90percent of the total amount of arsenic that is removed at equilibrium) is less than one hour. Reaction rates (pseudo-second-order kinetic model, R2>_ 0.99) increase from 2.4x105 to 7.2x105 g mol-1 min-1 as the groundwater arsenic concentration decreases from 560 to 170 ppb. We show that ARUBA's arsenic adsorption density (AAD), defined as the milligrams of arsenic removed at equilibrium per gram of ARUBA added, is linearly dependent on the initial arsenic concentration of the groundwater sample, for initial arsenic concentrations of up to 1600 ppb and an ARUBA dose of 4.0 g/L. This makes it easy to determine the amount of ARUBA required to treat a groundwater source when its arsenic concentration is known and less than 1600 ppb. Storing contaminated groundwater for two to three days before treatment is seen to significantly increase ARUBA's AAD. ARUBA can be separated from treated water by coagulation and clarification, which is expected to

  11. Combined Administration of Taurine and Monoisoamyl Dmsa Protects Arsenic Induced Oxidative Injury in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swaran J. S. Flora

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic is a naturally occurring element that is ubiquitously present in the environment. High concentration of naturally occurring arsenic in drinking water is a major health problem in different parts of the world. Despite arsenic being a health hazard and a well documented carcinogen, no safe, effective and specific preventive or therapeutic measures are available. Among various recent strategies adopted, administration of an antioxidant has been reported to be the most effective. The present study was designed to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of monoisoamyl dimercaptosuccinic acid (MiADMSA, administered either individually or in combination with taurine post chronic arsenic exposure in rats. Arsenic exposed male rats (25 ppm, sodium arsenite in drinking water for 24 weeks were treated with taurine (100 mg/kg, i.p., once daily, monoisoamyl dimercaptosuccinic acid (MiADMSA (50 mg/kg, oral, once daily either individually or in combination for 5 consecutive days. Biochemical variables indicative of oxidative stress along-with arsenic concentration in blood, liver and kidney were measured. Arsenic exposure significantly reduced blood δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD activity, a key enzyme involved in the heme biosynthesis and enhanced zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP level. Clinical hematological variables like white blood cells (WBC, mean cell hemoglobin (MCH, and mean cell hemoglobin concentration (MCHC showed significant decrease with a significant elevation in platelet (PLT count. These changes were accompanied by significant decrease in superoxide dismutase (SOD activity and increased catalase activity. Arsenic exposure caused a significant decrease in hepatic and renal glutathione (GSH level and an increase in oxidized glutathione (GSSG. These biochemical changes were correlated with an increased uptake of arsenic in blood, liver and kidney. Administration of taurine significantly reduced hepatic oxidative stress however co

  12. Solar oxidation and removal of arsenic--Key parameters for continuous flow applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, L W; O'Farrell, C

    2015-12-01

    Solar oxidation to remove arsenic from water has previously been investigated as a batch process. This research has investigated the kinetic parameters for the design of a continuous flow solar reactor to remove arsenic from contaminated groundwater supplies. Continuous flow recirculated batch experiments were carried out under artificial UV light to investigate the effect of different parameters on arsenic removal efficiency. Inlet water arsenic concentrations of up to 1000 μg/L were reduced to below 10 μg/L requiring 12 mg/L iron after receiving 12 kJUV/L radiation. Citrate however was somewhat surprisingly found to promote a detrimental effect on the removal process in the continuous flow reactor studies which is contrary to results found in batch scale tests. The impact of other typical water groundwater quality parameters (phosphate and silica) on the process due to their competition with arsenic for photooxidation products revealed a much higher sensitivity to phosphate ions compared to silicate. Other results showed no benefit from the addition of TiO2 photocatalyst but enhanced arsenic removal at higher temperatures up to 40 °C. Overall, these results have indicated the kinetic envelope from which a continuous flow SORAS single pass system could be more confidently designed for a full-scale community groundwater application at a village level.

  13. A tale of two oxidation states: bacterial colonization of arsenic-rich environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Muller

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biotransformations have a major impact on contamination by toxic elements, which threatens public health in developing and industrial countries. Finding a means of preserving natural environments-including ground and surface waters-from arsenic constitutes a major challenge facing modern society. Although this metalloid is ubiquitous on Earth, thus far no bacterium thriving in arsenic-contaminated environments has been fully characterized. In-depth exploration of the genome of the beta-proteobacterium Herminiimonas arsenicoxydans with regard to physiology, genetics, and proteomics, revealed that it possesses heretofore unsuspected mechanisms for coping with arsenic. Aside from multiple biochemical processes such as arsenic oxidation, reduction, and efflux, H. arsenicoxydans also exhibits positive chemotaxis and motility towards arsenic and metalloid scavenging by exopolysaccharides. These observations demonstrate the existence of a novel strategy to efficiently colonize arsenic-rich environments, which extends beyond oxidoreduction reactions. Such a microbial mechanism of detoxification, which is possibly exploitable for bioremediation applications of contaminated sites, may have played a crucial role in the occupation of ancient ecological niches on earth.

  14. Importance of As(V)-iron oxides complexes in retention mechanisms of arsenic in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancès, B.; Laperche, V.; Juillot, F.; Morin, G.; Calas, G.

    2003-04-01

    The knowledge of arsenic speciation in environmental system is primordial since the mobility and toxicity of this element strongly depends on its chemical form (oxidation state, molecular environment). The objective of the present study is to compare the arsenic speciation in recently polluted soils and in their long term natural analogues in order to identify major As-bearing mineral phases controlling the fate of arsenic in soils. Our approach, which combines conventional techniques (XRD, SEM-EDS) with X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (EXAFS and XANES), provides the possibility of measuring changes of arsenic speciation as a function of soil horizons. At this step of the study, two soil profiles were investigated : The first one is located in the vicinity of a former arsenical pesticides manufactory (Auzon, France). The other one has developed over a geochemical anomaly (Echassières, France) and can be considered as a long term analogue for polluted soils. In the first soil studied, the main source of arsenic comes from the topsoil through the dissolution of pesticides (Schulténite PbHAsO4 and alumopharmacosidérite KAl4(AsO4)3(OH)5.6,5H2O) or/and of As sulfides (realgar AsS and orpiment As2S3). In the second one, arsenic comes from the geological substratum through the dissolution of pharmacosiderite ((Bax,K2-2x)(Fe, Al)4(AsO4)3(OH)5.6H2O formed by hydrothermal weathering of arsenopyrite (FeAsS) and löllingite (FeAs2). Despite these contrasted sources and ways of dissemination, our results indicate that arsenic is mainly present as As(V) co-precipitated with, or adsorbed on poorly ordered iron (oxihydr)oxides, such as ferrihydrite in topsoil horizon of both soil profiles. This study emphasizes the importance of iron (oxihydr)oxides in the trapping of arsenic released in the environment, provided the persistence of acidic and oxidizing soil conditions.

  15. Effect of vitamin E supplementation on arsenic induced oxidative stress in goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, T K; Mani, V; Kaur, H; Kewalramani, N; De, S; Hossain, A; Banerjee, D; Datta, B K

    2012-07-01

    The present study was designed to assess whether supplementation of different levels of vitamin E to long-term arsenic exposed goats affords protection against the oxidative stress caused by the metalloid. Twenty-four crossbred lactating goats were distributed randomly into four groups (control, T(1), T(2) and T(3)) of six in each. The animals in T(1), T(2) and T(3) were given 50 mg/kg DM arsenic daily, while in T(2) and T(3), vitamin E @100 IU and 150 IU/kg DM, respectively, was also supplemented additionally for the period of 12 months. Compared to control, significant (p 63 %), plasma total Ig (22 %) and total antioxidant activity (24 %) was observed in only arsenic treated groups and vitamin E supplementation in both doses produced partial mitigation effect against SOD (23 %, 20 %) and CAT (39 %, 48 %) while complete mitigation against total Ig (16 %, 7 %) and antioxidant activity (10 %, 8 %) was found. Average lymphocyte stimulation index at the end of experiment was (p arsenic exposed groups (1.003 ± 0.01) and significant (p arsenic induced oxidative stress and activities of antioxidant enzymes in goats.

  16. Arsenic and antimony removal from drinking water by adsorption on granular ferric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazakli, Eleni; Zouvelou, Stavroula V; Kalavrouziotis, Ioannis; Leotsinidis, Michalis

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic and antimony occur in drinking water due to natural weathering or anthropogenic activities. There has been growing concern about their impact on health. The aim of this study was to assess the efficiency of a granular ferric oxide adsorbent medium to remove arsenic and antimony from drinking water via rapid small-scale column tests (RSSCTs). Three different water matrices - deionized, raw water treated with a reverse osmosis domestic device and raw water - were spiked with arsenic and/or antimony to a concentration of 100 μg L⁻¹. Both elements were successfully adsorbed onto the medium. The loadings until the guideline value was exceeded in the effluent were found to be 0.35-1.63 mg g⁻¹ for arsenic and 0.12-2.11 mg g⁻¹ for antimony, depending on the water matrix. Adsorption of one element was not substantially affected by the presence of the other. Aeration did not affect significantly the adsorption capacity. Granular ferric oxide could be employed for the simultaneous removal of arsenic and antimony from drinking water, whereas full-scale systems should be assessed via laboratory tests before their implementation.

  17. Arsenic induced oxidative stress and the role of antioxidant supplementation during chelation: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flora, S J S; Bhadauria, Smrati; Kannan, G M; Singh, Nutan

    2007-04-01

    Arsenic is a naturally occurring metalloid, ubiquitously present in the environment in both organic and inorganic forms. Arsenic contamination of groundwater in the West Bengal basin in India is unfolding as one of the worst natural geoenvironmental disaster to date. Chronic exposure of humans to high concentration of arsenic in drinking water is associated with skin lesions, peripheral vascular disease, hypertension, Blackfoot disease and high risk of cancer The underlying mechanism of toxicity includes the interaction with the sulphydryl groups and the generation of reactive oxygen species leading to oxidative stress. Chelation therapy with chelating agents like British Anti Lewisite (BAL), sodium 2,3-dimercaptopropane 1-sulfonate (DMPS), meso 2,3 dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) etc., is considered to be the best known treatment against arsenic poisoning. The treatment with these chelating agents however is compromised with certain serious drawbacks/side effects. The studies show that supplementation of antioxidants along with a chelating agent prove to be a better treatment regimen. This review attempts to provide the readers with a comprehensive account of recent developments in the research on arsenic poisoning particularly the role of oxidative stress/free radicals in the toxic manifestation, an update about the recent strategies for the treatment with chelating agents and a possible beneficial role of antioxidants supplementation to achieve the optimum effects.

  18. Arsenic bioremediation by biogenic iron oxides and sulfides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Omoregie, E.; Couture, R.-M.; Van Cappellen, P.; Corkhill, C.L.; Charnock, J.M.; Polya, D.A.; Vaughan, D; Vanbroekhoven, K.; Lloyd, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    Microcosms containing sediment from an aquifer in Cambodia with naturally elevated levels of arsenic in the associated groundwater were used to evaluate the effectiveness of microbially mediated production of iron minerals for in situ As remediation. The microcosms were first incubated without amend

  19. Electron microscopic study on pyrolysis of CCA (chromium, copper and arsenic oxide)-treated wood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hata, T.; Bronsveld, P.M; Vystavel, T.; Kooi, B.J.; de Hosson, J.T.M.; Kakitani, T.; Otono, A.; Imamura, Y.

    2003-01-01

    The effectiveness of pyrolysis as a possible technique for disposing of CCA (chromium, copper and arsenic oxide)-treated wood was studied. A CCA-treated sample given an extra heat treatment at 450 degreesC for 10 min was thoroughly investigated in order to establish the details of the reaction in wh

  20. Protective effect of arjunolic acid against arsenic-induced oxidative stress in mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Mahua; Manna, Prasenjit; Sil, Parames C

    2008-02-01

    Arsenic, a notoriously poisonous metalloid, is ubiquitous in the environment, and it affects nearly all organ systems of animals including humans. The present study was designed to investigate the preventive role of a triterpenoid saponin, arjunolic acid against arsenic-induced oxidative damage in murine brain. Sodium arsenite was selected as a source of arsenic for this study. The free-radical-scavenging activity and the in vivo antioxidant power of arjunolic acid were determined from its 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl radical scavenging ability and ferric reducing/antioxidant power assay, respectively. Oral administration of sodium arsenite at a dose of 10 mg/kg body weight for 2 days significantly decreased the activities of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase, the level of cellular metabolites, reduced glutathione, total thiols and increased the level of oxidized glutathione. In addition, it enhanced the levels of lipid peroxidation end products and protein carbonyl content. Treatment with arjunolic acid at a dose of 20 mg/kg body weight for 4 days prior to arsenic administration almost normalized above indices. Histological findings due to arsenic intoxication and arjunolic acid treatment supported the other biochemical changes in murine brains. Results of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl radical scavenging and ferric reducing/antioxidant power assays clearly showed the in vitro radical scavenging as well as the in vivo antioxidant power of arjunolic acid, respectively. The effect of a well-established antioxidant, vitamin C, has been included in the study as a positive control. Combining all, results suggest that arjunolic acid possessed the ability to ameliorate arsenic-induced oxidative insult in murine brain and is probably due to its antioxidant activity.

  1. Oxidative DNA damage of peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes, selectively induced by chronic arsenic exposure, is associated with extent of arsenic-related skin lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, Qiuling, E-mail: 924969007@qq.com [Department of Toxicology, Public Health College, Shanxi Medical University, No 56 Xin Jian Nan Lu, Taiyuan (030001) (China); Ma, Ning [Faculty of Health Science, Suzuka University of Medical Science, Suzuka, 510-0293 (Japan); Zhang, Jing; Xu, Wenchao; Li, Yong; Ma, Zhifeng; Li, Yunyun; Tian, Fengjie; Zhang, Wenping [Department of Toxicology, Public Health College, Shanxi Medical University, No 56 Xin Jian Nan Lu, Taiyuan (030001) (China); Mu, Jinjun [The Second Hospital, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan (030001) (China); Li, Yuanfei [The First Hospital, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan (030001) (China); Wang, Dongxing; Liu, Haifang; Yang, Mimi; Ma, Caifeng; Yun, Fen [Department of Toxicology, Public Health College, Shanxi Medical University, No 56 Xin Jian Nan Lu, Taiyuan (030001) (China)

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that oxidative stress is an important risk factor for arsenic-related diseases. Peripheral blood leukocytes constitute an important defense against microorganisms or pathogens, while the research on the impact of chronic arsenic exposure on peripheral blood leukocytes is much more limited, especially at low level arsenic exposure. The purpose of the present study was to explore whether chronic arsenic exposure affects oxidative stress of peripheral blood leukocytes and possible linkages between oxidative stress and arsenic-induced skin lesions. 75 male inhabitants recruited from an As-endemic region of China were investigated in the present study. The classification of arsenicosis was based on the degree of skin lesions. Arsenic levels were measured in drinking water and urine by Atomic Fluorescence Spectroscopy. Urinary 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) was tested by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. 8-OHdG of peripheral blood leukocytes was evaluated using immunocytochemical staining. 8-OHdG-positive reactions were only present in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), but not in monocytes (MNs). The 8-OHdG staining of PMN cytoplasm was observed in all investigated populations, while the 8-OHdG staining of PMN nuclei was frequently found along with the elevated amounts of cell debris in individuals with skin lesion. Urinary arsenic levels were increased in the severe skin lesion group compared with the normal group. No relationship was observed between drinking water arsenic or urine 8-OHdG and the degree of skin lesions. These findings indicated that the target and persistent oxidative stress in peripheral blood PMNs may be employed as a sensitive biomarker directly to assess adverse health effects caused by chronic exposure to lower levels of arsenic. -- Highlights: ► Male inhabitants were investigated from an As-endemic region of China. ► 8-OHdG-positive reactions were only present in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs).

  2. Toxicological and chemical assessment of arsenic-contaminated groundwater after electrochemical and advanced oxidation treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radić, Sandra; Crnojević, Helena; Vujčić, Valerija; Gajski, Goran; Gerić, Marko; Cvetković, Želimira; Petra, Cvjetko; Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera; Oreščanin, Višnja

    2016-02-01

    Owing to its proven toxicity and mutagenicity, arsenic is regarded a principal pollutant in water used for drinking. The objective of this study was the toxicological and chemical evaluation of groundwater samples obtained from arsenic enriched drinking water wells before and after electrochemical and ozone-UV-H2O2-based advanced oxidation processes (EAOP). For this purpose, acute toxicity test with Daphnia magna and chronic toxicity test with Lemna minor L. were employed as well as in vitro bioassays using human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBLs). Several oxidative stress parameters were estimated in L.minor. Physicochemical analysis showed that EAOP treatment was highly efficient in arsenic but also in ammonia and organic compound removal from contaminated groundwater. Untreated groundwater caused only slight toxicity to HPBLs and D. magna in acute experiments. However, 7-day exposure of L. minor to raw groundwater elicited genotoxicity, a significant growth inhibition and oxidative stress injury. The observed genotoxicity and toxicity of raw groundwater samples was almost completely eliminated by EAOP treatment. Generally, the results obtained with L. minor were in agreement with those obtained in the chemical analysis suggesting the sensitivity of the model organism in monitoring of arsenic-contaminated groundwater. In parallel to chemical analysis, the implementation of chronic toxicity bioassays in a battery is recommended in the assessment of the toxic and genotoxic potential of such complex mixtures. PMID:26580737

  3. Toxicological and chemical assessment of arsenic-contaminated groundwater after electrochemical and advanced oxidation treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radić, Sandra; Crnojević, Helena; Vujčić, Valerija; Gajski, Goran; Gerić, Marko; Cvetković, Želimira; Petra, Cvjetko; Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera; Oreščanin, Višnja

    2016-02-01

    Owing to its proven toxicity and mutagenicity, arsenic is regarded a principal pollutant in water used for drinking. The objective of this study was the toxicological and chemical evaluation of groundwater samples obtained from arsenic enriched drinking water wells before and after electrochemical and ozone-UV-H2O2-based advanced oxidation processes (EAOP). For this purpose, acute toxicity test with Daphnia magna and chronic toxicity test with Lemna minor L. were employed as well as in vitro bioassays using human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBLs). Several oxidative stress parameters were estimated in L.minor. Physicochemical analysis showed that EAOP treatment was highly efficient in arsenic but also in ammonia and organic compound removal from contaminated groundwater. Untreated groundwater caused only slight toxicity to HPBLs and D. magna in acute experiments. However, 7-day exposure of L. minor to raw groundwater elicited genotoxicity, a significant growth inhibition and oxidative stress injury. The observed genotoxicity and toxicity of raw groundwater samples was almost completely eliminated by EAOP treatment. Generally, the results obtained with L. minor were in agreement with those obtained in the chemical analysis suggesting the sensitivity of the model organism in monitoring of arsenic-contaminated groundwater. In parallel to chemical analysis, the implementation of chronic toxicity bioassays in a battery is recommended in the assessment of the toxic and genotoxic potential of such complex mixtures.

  4. Effect of adsorbed polyaniline on the thermal stability of iron and arsenic oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robson Fernandes de Farias

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Iron and arsenic oxide grains are coated with the conducting organic polymer polyaniline. The obtained samples were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, SEM, conducting measurements and thermogravimetry. The thermal stability of both oxides are increased. For As2O3 the sublimation temperature is increased from 165ºC in the pure oxide to 206ºC in the polymer modified sample. The pure Fe3O4 sample exhibits sublimation at 780ºC whereas the polyaniline coated oxide is stable until at least 1000ºC.

  5. Draft genome sequence of the arsenite-oxidizing strain Aliihoeflea sp. 2WW, isolated from arsenic-contaminated groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Cavalca; A. Corsini; V. Andreoni; G. Muyzer

    2013-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the arsenite-oxidizing bacterium Aliihoeflea sp. strain 2WW, which consists of a 4.15-Mb chromosome and contains different genes that are involved in arsenic transformations.

  6. Thermochemistry of complex oxides of uranium(6), arsenic and alkali metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Standard reaction enthalpies for stoichiometric mixtures of mono-potassium orthoarsenate, uranium(6) and alkali metal nitrate oxides as well as mixtures of complex oxides of the M1AsUO6 (M1 = Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs) general formulas and potassium nitrate with hydrofluoric acid are determined in adiabatic calorimeter at the temperature of 298.15 K. Standard enthalpies for formation of complex oxides of uranium(6), arsenic and alkali metals at the temperature of 298.15 K are calculated by the obtained results. 8 refs., 1 tab

  7. Response of arsenic-induced oxidative stress, DNA damage, and metal imbalance to combined administration of DMSA and monoisoamyl-DMSA during chronic arsenic poisoning in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadauria, S; Flora, S J S

    2007-03-01

    Arsenic and its compounds cause adverse health effects in humans. Current treatment employs administration of thiol chelators, such as meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) and sodium 2,3-dimercaptopropane 1-sulfonate (DMPS), which facilitate its excretion from the body. However, these chelating agents are compromised by number of limitations due to their lipophobic nature, particularly in case of chronic poisoning. Combination therapy is a new approach to ensure enhanced removal of metal from the body, reduced doses of potentially toxic chelators, and no redistribution of metal from one organ to another, following chronic metal exposure. The present study attempts to investigate dose-related effects of two thiol chelators, DMSA and one of its new analogues, monoisoamyl dimercaptosuccinic acid (MiADMSA), when administered in combination with the aim of achieving normalization of altered biochemical parameters suggestive of oxidative stress and depletion of inorganic arsenic following chronic arsenic exposure. Twenty-five adult male Wistar rats were given 25 ppm arsenic for 10 weeks followed by chelation therapy with the above chelating agents at a dose of 0.3 mmol/kg (orally) when administered individually or 0.15 mmol/kg and 0.3 mmol/kg (once daily for 5 consecutive days), respectively, when administered in combination. Arsenic exposure led to the inhibition of blood delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) activity and depletion of glutathione (GSH) level. These changes were accompanied by significant depletion of hemoglobin, RBC and Hct as well as blood superoxide dismutase (SOD) acitivity. There was an increase in hepatic and renal levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, while GSH:GSSG ratio decreased significantly, accompanied by a significant increase in metallothionein (MT) in hepatocytes. DNA damage based on denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed significant loss in the integrity of DNA extracted from the liver of arsenic

  8. Removal of Trace Arsenic to Meet Drinking Water Standards Using Iron Oxide Coated Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntim, Susana Addo; Mitra, Somenath

    2011-05-12

    This study presents the removal of trace level arsenic to meet drinking water standards using an iron oxide-multi-walled carbon nanotube (Fe-MWCNT) hybrid as a sorbent. The synthesis was facilitated by the high degree of nanotube functionalization using a microwave assisted process, and a controlled assembly of iron oxide was possible where the MWCNT served as an effective support for the oxide. In the final product, 11 % of the carbon atoms were attached to Fe. The Fe-MWCNT was effective in arsenic removal to below the drinking water standard levels of 10 µg L(-1). The absorption capacity of the composite was 1723 µg g(-1) and 189 µg g(-1) for As(III) and As(V) respectively. The adsorption of As(V) on Fe-MWCNT was faster than that of As(III). The pseudo-second order rate equation was found to effectively describe the kinetics of arsenic adsorption. The adsorption isotherms for As(III) and As(V) fitted both the Langmuir and Freundlich models.

  9. Removal of Trace Arsenic to Meet Drinking Water Standards Using Iron Oxide Coated Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntim, Susana Addo; Mitra, Somenath

    2011-01-01

    This study presents the removal of trace level arsenic to meet drinking water standards using an iron oxide-multi-walled carbon nanotube (Fe-MWCNT) hybrid as a sorbent. The synthesis was facilitated by the high degree of nanotube functionalization using a microwave assisted process, and a controlled assembly of iron oxide was possible where the MWCNT served as an effective support for the oxide. In the final product, 11 % of the carbon atoms were attached to Fe. The Fe-MWCNT was effective in arsenic removal to below the drinking water standard levels of 10 µg L−1. The absorption capacity of the composite was 1723 µg g−1 and 189 µg g−1 for As(III) and As(V) respectively. The adsorption of As(V) on Fe-MWCNT was faster than that of As(III). The pseudo-second order rate equation was found to effectively describe the kinetics of arsenic adsorption. The adsorption isotherms for As(III) and As(V) fitted both the Langmuir and Freundlich models. PMID:21625394

  10. Bacterial community succession during the enrichment of chemolithoautotrophic arsenite oxidizing bacteria at high arsenic concentrations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nguyen Ai Le; Akiko Sato; Daisuke Inoue; Kazunari Sei; Satoshi Soda; Michihiko Ike

    2012-01-01

    To generate cost-effective technologies for the removal of arsenic from water,we developed an enrichment culture of chemolithoautotrophic arsenite oxidizing bacteria (CAOs) that could effectively oxidize widely ranging concentrations of As(Ⅲ) to As(Ⅴ).In addition,we attempted to elucidate the enrichment process and characterize the microbial composition of the enrichment culture.A CAOs enrichment culture capable of stably oxidizing As(Ⅲ) to As(Ⅴ) was successfully constructed through repeated batch cultivation for more than 700 days,during which time the initial As(Ⅲ) concentrations were increased in a stepwise manner from l to 10-12 mmol/L.As(Ⅲ) oxidation activity of the enrichment culture gradually improved,and 10-12 mmol/L As(Ⅲ) was almost completely oxidized within four days.Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis showed that the dominant bacteria in the enrichment culture varied drastically during the enrichment process depending on the As(Ⅲ) concentration.Isolation and characterization of bacteria in the enrichment culture revealed that the presence of multiple CAOs with various As(Ⅲ) oxidation abilities enabled the culture to adapt to a wide range of As(Ⅲ) concentrations.The CAOs enrichment culture constructed here may he useful for pretreatment of water from which arsenic is being removed.

  11. Concomitant administration of Moringa oleifera seed powder in the remediation of arsenic-induced oxidative stress in mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Richa; Dubey, D K; Kannan, G M; Flora, S J S

    2007-01-01

    Contamination of ground water by arsenic has become a cause of global public health concern. In West Bengal, India, almost 6 million people are endemically exposed to inorganic arsenic by drinking heavily contaminated groundwater through hand-pumped tube wells. No safe, effective and specific preventive or therapeutic measures for treating arsenic poisoning are available. We recently reported that some of the herbal extracts possess properties effective in reducing arsenic concentration and in restoring some of the toxic effects of arsenic in animal models. Moringa oleifera Lamarack (English: Horseradish-tree, Drumstick-tree, Hindi: Saijan, Sanskrit: Shigru) belongs to the Moringaceae family, is generally known in the developing world as a vegetable, a medicinal plant and a source of vegetable oil. The objective of the present study was to determine whether Moringa oleifera (M. oleifera) seed powder could restore arsenic induced oxidative stress and reduce body arsenic burden. Exposure to arsenic (2.5 mg/kg, intraperitoneally for 6weeks) led to a significant increase in the levels of tissue reactive oxygen species (ROS), metallothionein (MT) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) which were accompanied by a decrease in the activities in the antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in mice. Arsenic exposed mice also exhibited liver injury as reflected by reduced acid phosphatase (ACP), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities and altered heme synthesis pathway as shown by inhibited blood delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (delta-ALAD) activity. Co-administration of M. oleifera seed powder (250 and 500 mg/kg, orally) with arsenic significantly increased the activities of SOD, catalase, GPx with elevation in reduced GSH level in tissues (liver, kidney and brain). These changes were accompanied by approximately 57%, 64% and 17% decrease in blood ROS, liver

  12. Concomitant administration of Moringa oleifera seed powder in the remediation of arsenic-induced oxidative stress in mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Richa; Dubey, D K; Kannan, G M; Flora, S J S

    2007-01-01

    Contamination of ground water by arsenic has become a cause of global public health concern. In West Bengal, India, almost 6 million people are endemically exposed to inorganic arsenic by drinking heavily contaminated groundwater through hand-pumped tube wells. No safe, effective and specific preventive or therapeutic measures for treating arsenic poisoning are available. We recently reported that some of the herbal extracts possess properties effective in reducing arsenic concentration and in restoring some of the toxic effects of arsenic in animal models. Moringa oleifera Lamarack (English: Horseradish-tree, Drumstick-tree, Hindi: Saijan, Sanskrit: Shigru) belongs to the Moringaceae family, is generally known in the developing world as a vegetable, a medicinal plant and a source of vegetable oil. The objective of the present study was to determine whether Moringa oleifera (M. oleifera) seed powder could restore arsenic induced oxidative stress and reduce body arsenic burden. Exposure to arsenic (2.5 mg/kg, intraperitoneally for 6weeks) led to a significant increase in the levels of tissue reactive oxygen species (ROS), metallothionein (MT) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) which were accompanied by a decrease in the activities in the antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in mice. Arsenic exposed mice also exhibited liver injury as reflected by reduced acid phosphatase (ACP), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities and altered heme synthesis pathway as shown by inhibited blood delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (delta-ALAD) activity. Co-administration of M. oleifera seed powder (250 and 500 mg/kg, orally) with arsenic significantly increased the activities of SOD, catalase, GPx with elevation in reduced GSH level in tissues (liver, kidney and brain). These changes were accompanied by approximately 57%, 64% and 17% decrease in blood ROS, liver

  13. Natural attenuation process via microbial oxidation of arsenic in a high Andean watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva, Eduardo D; Rámila, Consuelo d P; Vargas, Ignacio T; Escauriaza, Cristian R; Bonilla, Carlos A; Pizarro, Gonzalo E; Regan, John M; Pasten, Pablo A

    2014-01-01

    Rivers in northern Chile have arsenic (As) concentrations at levels that are toxic for humans and other organisms. Microorganism-mediated redox reactions have a crucial role in the As cycle; the microbial oxidation of As (As(III) to As(V)) is a critical transformation because it favors the immobilization of As in the solid phase. We studied the role of microbial As oxidation for controlling the mobility of As in the extreme environment found in the Chilean Altiplano (i.e., > 4000 meters above sea level (masl) and Altiplano basins and its relevance in the immobilization of As.

  14. Nitric oxide alleviates arsenic-induced toxic effects in ridged Luffa seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vijay Pratap; Srivastava, Prabhat Kumar; Prasad, Sheo Mohan

    2013-10-01

    Hydroponic experiments were conducted to investigate whether exogenous addition of nitric oxide (NO) as sodium nitroprusside (SNP) alleviates arsenic (As) toxicity in Luffa acutangula (L.) Roxb. seedlings. Arsenic (5 and 50 μM) declined growth of Luffa seedlings which was accompanied by significant accumulation of As. SNP (100 μM) protected Luffa seedlings against As toxicity as it declined As accumulation significantly. The photosynthetic pigments and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters such as Fv/Fm, Fv/F0, Fm/F0 and qP were decreased while NPQ was raised by As. However, the toxic effects of As on photosynthesis were significantly ameliorated by SNP. The oxidative stress markers such as superoxide radical, hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde (lipid peroxidation) contents were enhanced by As, however, these oxidative indices were diminished significantly in the presence of SNP. As treatment stimulated the activities of SOD and CAT while the activities of APX and GST, and AsA content and AsA/DHA ratio were decreased. Upon SNP addition, along with further rise in SOD and CAT activity, APX and GST activity, and levels of AsA and AsA/DHA ratio were restored considerably. Overall results revealed that significant accumulation of As suppressed growth, photosynthesis, APX and GST activities and decreased AsA content, hence led to the oxidative stress. However, the addition of SNP protected seedlings against As stress by regulating As accumulation, oxidative stress and antioxidant defense system.

  15. Arsenic toxicity induced endothelial dysfunction and dementia: Pharmacological interdiction by histone deacetylase and inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Bhupesh, E-mail: drbhupeshresearch@gmail.com; Sharma, P.M.

    2013-11-15

    Arsenic toxicity has been reported to damage all the major organs including the brain and vasculature. Dementia including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) are posing greater risk to the world population as it is now increasing at a faster rate. We have investigated the role of sodium butyrate, a selective histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor and aminoguanidine, a selective inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor in pharmacological interdiction of arsenic toxicity induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and dementia in rats. Arsenic toxicity was done by administering arsenic drinking water to rats. Morris water-maze (MWM) test was used for assessment of learning and memory. Endothelial function was assessed using student physiograph. Oxidative stress (aortic superoxide anion, serum and brain thiobarbituric acid reactive species, brain glutathione) and nitric oxide levels (serum nitrite/nitrate) were also measured. Arsenic treated rats have shown impairment of endothelial function, learning and memory, reduction in serum nitrite/nitrate and brain GSH levels along with increase in serum and brain TBARS. Sodium butyrate as well as aminoguanidine significantly convalesce arsenic induced impairment of learning, memory, endothelial function, and alterations in various biochemical parameters. It may be concluded that arsenic induces endothelial dysfunction and dementia, whereas, sodium butyrate, a HDAC inhibitor as well as aminoguanidine, a selective iNOS inhibitor may be considered as potential agents for the management of arsenic induced endothelial dysfunction and dementia. - Highlights: • As has induced endothelial dysfunction (Edf) and vascular dementia (VaD). • As has increased oxidative stress, AChE activity and decreased serum NO. • Inhibitors of HDAC and iNOS have attenuated As induced Edf and VaD. • Both the inhibitors have attenuated As induced biochemical changes. • Inhibitor of HDAC and iNOS has shown good potential

  16. Arsenic toxicity induced endothelial dysfunction and dementia: Pharmacological interdiction by histone deacetylase and inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic toxicity has been reported to damage all the major organs including the brain and vasculature. Dementia including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) are posing greater risk to the world population as it is now increasing at a faster rate. We have investigated the role of sodium butyrate, a selective histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor and aminoguanidine, a selective inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor in pharmacological interdiction of arsenic toxicity induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and dementia in rats. Arsenic toxicity was done by administering arsenic drinking water to rats. Morris water-maze (MWM) test was used for assessment of learning and memory. Endothelial function was assessed using student physiograph. Oxidative stress (aortic superoxide anion, serum and brain thiobarbituric acid reactive species, brain glutathione) and nitric oxide levels (serum nitrite/nitrate) were also measured. Arsenic treated rats have shown impairment of endothelial function, learning and memory, reduction in serum nitrite/nitrate and brain GSH levels along with increase in serum and brain TBARS. Sodium butyrate as well as aminoguanidine significantly convalesce arsenic induced impairment of learning, memory, endothelial function, and alterations in various biochemical parameters. It may be concluded that arsenic induces endothelial dysfunction and dementia, whereas, sodium butyrate, a HDAC inhibitor as well as aminoguanidine, a selective iNOS inhibitor may be considered as potential agents for the management of arsenic induced endothelial dysfunction and dementia. - Highlights: • As has induced endothelial dysfunction (Edf) and vascular dementia (VaD). • As has increased oxidative stress, AChE activity and decreased serum NO. • Inhibitors of HDAC and iNOS have attenuated As induced Edf and VaD. • Both the inhibitors have attenuated As induced biochemical changes. • Inhibitor of HDAC and iNOS has shown good potential in

  17. Arsenic Transformation Predisposes Human Skin Keratinocytes To UV-induced DNA Damage Yet Enhances Their Survival Apparently by Diminishing Oxidant Response

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Yang(Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China); Kojima, Chikara; Chignell, Colin; Mason, Ronald; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic and UV, both human skin carcinogens, may act together as skin co-carcinogens. We find human skin keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) are malignantly transformed by low-level arsenite (100 nM, 30 weeks; termed As-TM cells) and with transformation concurrently undergo full adaptation to arsenic toxicity involving reduced apoptosis and oxidative stress response to high arsenite concentrations. Oxidative DNA damage (ODD) is a possible mechanism in arsenic carcinogenesis and a hallmark o...

  18. Simple and Efficient Synthesis of Iron Oxide-Coated Silica Gel Adsorbents for Arsenic Removal: Adsorption Isotherms and Kinetic Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arifin, Eric; Lee, Jiukyu [Interdisciplinary Program in Nanoscience and Technology, Virginia (United States); Cha, Jinmyung [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    Iron oxide (ferrihydrite, hematite, and magnetite) coated silica gels were prepared using a low-cost, easily-scalable and straightforward method as the adsorbent material for arsenic removal application. Adsorption of the anionic form of arsenic oxyacids, arsenite (AsO{sup 2-}) and arsenate (AsO{sub 4}{sup -3}), onto hematite coated silica gel was fitted against non-linear 3-parameter-model Sips isotherm and 2-parameter-model Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm. Adsorption kinetics of arsenic could be well described by pseudo-second-order kinetic model and value of adsorption energy derived from non-linear Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm suggests chemical adsorption. Although arsenic adsorption process was not affected by the presence of sulfate, chloride, and nitrate anions, as expected, bicarbonate and silicate gave moderate negative effects while the presence of phosphate anions significantly inhibited adsorption process of both arsenite and arsenate. When the actual efficiency to remove arsenic was tested against 1 L of artificial arsenic-contaminated groundwater (0.6 mg/L) in the presence competing anions, the reasonable amount (20 g) of hematite coated silica gel could reduce arsenic concentration to below the WHO permissible safety limit of drinking water of 10 μg/L without adjusting pH and temperature, which would be highly advantageous for practical field application.

  19. Removal of iron and arsenic (III) from drinking water using iron oxide-coated sand and limestone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Rashmi R.; Umlong, Iohborlang M.; Das, Bodhaditya; Borah, Kusum; Thakur, Ashim J.; Raul, Prasanta K.; Banerjee, Saumen; Singh, Lokendra

    2014-06-01

    A method for removal of iron and arsenic (III) from contaminated water using iron oxide-coated sand and limestone has been developed for drinking water. For the intended use, sand was coated with ferric chloride and used as filtering media. Limestone was added onto the coated sand and the effect of limestone addition on removal efficiency of iron and arsenic was monitored. Both batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the efficiency of coated sand and limestone as filtering media. Maximum removal of iron (99.8 %) was obtained with coated sand at a dose of 5 g/100 ml and by adding 0.2 g/100 ml of limestone at pH 7.3. Arsenic (III) removal efficiency increased with the increased dose of coated sand and was best removed at pH 7.12. The maximum adsorption capacity for arsenic (III) obtained from Langmuir model was found to be 0.075 mg/g and the kinetics data followed pseudo-first order better than pseudo-second order. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis and FT-IR study proved the removal of iron and arsenic. Column experiment showed removal of iron and arsenic (III) to <0.3 mg/l and 10 μg/l, respectively, from an initial concentration of 20 mg/l (iron) and 200 μg/l (arsenic).

  20. Transformation and removal of arsenic in groundwater by sequential anodic oxidation and electrocoagulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Tong, Man; Yuan, Songhu; Liao, Peng

    2014-08-01

    Oxidation of As(III) to As(V) is generally essential for the efficient remediation of As(III)-contaminated groundwater. The performance and mechanisms of As(III) oxidation by an as-synthesized active anode, SnO2 loaded onto Ti-based TiO2 nanotubes (Ti/TiO2NTs/Sb-SnO2), were investigated. The subsequent removal of total arsenic by electrocoagulation (EC) was further tested. The Ti/TiO2NTs/Sb-SnO2 anode showed a high and lasting electrochemical activity for As(III) oxidation. 6.67 μM As(III) in synthetic groundwater was completely oxidized to As(V) within 60 min at 50 mA. Direct electron transfer was mainly responsible at the current below 30 mA, while hydroxyl radicals contributed increasingly with the increase in the current above 30 mA. As(III) oxidation was moderately inhibited by the presence of bicarbonate (20 mM), while was dramatically increased with increasing the concentration of chloride (0-10 mM). After the complete oxidation of As(III) to As(V), total arsenic was efficiently removed by EC in the same reactor by reversing electrode polarity. The removal efficiency increased with increasing the current but decreased by the presence of phosphate and silica. Anodic oxidation represents an effective pretreatment approach to increasing EC removal of As(III) in groundwater under O2-limited conditions.

  1. The Role of Oxidative Stress in Gastrointestinal Tract Tissues Induced by Arsenic Toxicity in Cocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ying; Zhao, Panpan; Guo, Guangyang; Hu, Zhibo; Tian, Li; Zhang, Kexin; Zhang, Wen; Xing, Mingwei

    2015-12-01

    Arsenic (As) is a widely distributed trace element which is known to be associated with numerous adverse effects on human beings and animals. Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) is an inorganic arsenical-containing toxic compound. The effect of excessive amounts of As2O3 exposure on gastrointestinal tract tissue damage in cocks is still unknown. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of As2O3 exposure on gastrointestinal tract tissue damage in cocks. In total, 72 1-day-old male Hyline cocks were randomly divided into four groups and fed either a commercial diet or an As2O3 supplement diet containing 7.5, 15, and 30 mg/kg As2O3. The experiment lasted for 90 days and gastrointestinal tract tissue samples (gizzard, glandular stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, and rectum) were collected at 30, 60, and 90 days. Catalase (CAT), glutathione (GSH), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities; malondialdehyde (MDA) contents; and hydroxyl radical (OH·)-mediated inhibition were examined. Furthermore, the results demonstrated that MDA content in the gastrointestinal tract was increased, while the activities of CAT, GSH, and GSH-Px and the ability to resist OH· was decreased in the As2O3 treatment groups. Extensive damage was observed in the gastrointestinal tract. These findings indicated that As2O3 exposure caused oxidative damage in the gastrointestinal tract of cocks due to alterations in antioxidant enzyme activities and elevation of free radicals.

  2. Grape Seed Proanthocyanidin Extract Alleviates Arsenic-induced Oxidative Reproductive Toxicity in Male Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shu Gang; GUO Shu Xia; DING Yu Song; NIU Qiang; XU Shang Zhi; PANG Li Juan; MA Ru Lin; JING Ming Xia; FENG Gang Ling; LIU Jia Ming

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the ability of grape seed proanthocyanidin extract (GSPE) in alleviating arsenic-induced reproductive toxicity. Methods Sixty male Kunming mice received the following treatments by gavage: normal saline solution (control); arsenic trioxide (ATO; 4 mg/kg); GSPE (400 mg/kg); ATO+GSPE (100 mg/kg);ATO+GSPE (200 mg/kg) and ATO+GSPE (400 mg/kg). Thereafter, the mice were sacrificed and weighed, and the testis was examined for pathological changes. Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), heme oxygenase 1 (HO1), glutathione S-transferase (GST), NAD(P)H dehydrogenase, and quinone 1 (NQO1) expression in the testis was detected by real-time PCR. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione (GSH), total antioxidative capability (T-AOC), malondialdehyde (MDA), 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), and reproductive indexes were analyzed. Results ATO-treated mice showed a significantly decreased sperm count and testis somatic index and activity levels of SOD, GSH, and T-AOC than control group. Compared to the ATO-treated group, ATO+GSPE group showed recovery of the measured parameters. Mice treated with ATO+high-dose GSPE showed the highest level of mRNA expression of Nrf2, HO, NQO1, and GST. Conclusion GSPE alleviates oxidative stress damage in mouse testis by activating Nrf2 signaling, thus counteracting arsenic-induced reproductive toxicity.

  3. Arsenic adsorption in pre-treatment natural zeolite with magnesium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A methodology was developed to modify a natural zeolite (chabazite) with magnesium oxide in order to remove arsenic (As+5) from water for human consumption. It is proposed a magnesium oxide while regarded as an efficient adsorbent for removing metals in water. X-ray diffraction analyses show significant changes in the chabazite due to the presence of oxides and amorphous hydroxides incorporated during the pre-treatment. Experimental design results show an efficiency greater than 90% of As+5 adsorbed in five minutes. The results indicate that the most significant variables affecting the adsorption of As+5 are the initial concentration of As and the solid/liquid ratio. Experimental data fitted better to Freundlich isotherm with a 20.17 mg/g adsorption capability. (Author)

  4. Construction of the recombinant broad-host-range plasmids providing their bacterial hosts arsenic resistance and arsenite oxidation ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewniak, Lukasz; Ciezkowska, Martyna; Radlinska, Monika; Sklodowska, Aleksandra

    2015-02-20

    The plasmid pSinA of Sinorhizobium sp. M14 was used as a source of functional phenotypic modules, encoding proteins involved in arsenite oxidation and arsenic resistance, to obtain recombinant broad-host-range plasmids providing their bacterial hosts arsenic resistance and arsenite oxidative ability. An arsenite oxidation module was cloned into pBBR1MCS-2 vector yielding plasmid vector pAIO1, while an arsenic resistance module was cloned into pCM62 vector yielding plasmid pARS1. Both plasmid constructs were introduced (separately and together) into the cells of phylogenetically distant (representing Alpha-, Beta-, and Gammaproteobacteria) and physiologically diversified (unable to oxidize arsenite and susceptible/resistant to arsenite and arsenate) bacteria. Functional analysis of the modified strains showed that: (i) the plasmid pARS1 can be used for the construction of strains with an increased resistance to arsenite [up to 20mM of As(III), (ii) the presence of the plasmid pAIO1 in bacteria previously unable to oxidize As(III) to As(V), contributes to the acquisition of arsenite oxidation abilities by these cells, (iii) the highest arsenite utilization rate are observed in the culture of strains harbouring both the plasmids pAIO1 and pARS1, (iv) the strains harbouring the plasmid pAIO1 were able to grow on arsenic-contaminated mine waters (∼ 3.0 mg As L(-1)) without any supplementation. PMID:25617684

  5. EFFECTS OF ADDROGRAPHIS PANICULATA (NEES. ON ARSENIC- INDUCED ALTERED GLUCOSE HOMEOSTASIS AND OXIDATIVE IMPAIRMENT IN PANCREAS OF SWISS MICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MANDAVA V. RAO

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Andrographis paniculata (Nees. on arsenic-induced changes in biochemical and cellular antioxident sytem was studies in adult female mice. Daily oral administration of arsenic trioxide (0.5 and 1.0mg/kg b.w for 30days induced a significant increase in blood glucose level which was associated with impaired glucose tolrence. Arsenic treatment also resulted in elevated level panreatic tissue specific makers such as activities of amylase and lipase in serum indicating pancreatic dysfunction. Interestingly, this biochemical dysfuntion was accompanied by a marked dose related enchancement of lipid peroxidation indicating significant induction of oxidative damage. Additional evidence such as deletion in reduced gluatathione levels and alterations in enzymic antioxidant defences like superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase in pancreas suggested induction of oxidative stress. Concomitant administration of Adrographis paniculata (50 mg/kg b.w. with arsenic significant restored all these parameters. These results suggest that Adrographis paniculata is capable to reducing arsenic-induce cellular oxidative and inflammatory changes in pancreas.

  6. Massive acute arsenic poisonings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Teresa; Trela, Franciszek

    2005-07-16

    Arsenic poisonings are still important in the field of toxicology, though they are not as frequent as about 20-30 years ago. In this paper, the arsenic concentrations in ante- and post-mortem materials, and also forensic and anatomo-pathological aspects in three cases of massive acute poisoning with arsenic(III) oxide (two of them with unexplained criminalistic background, in which arsenic was taken for amphetamine and one suicide), are presented. Ante-mortem blood and urine arsenic concentrations ranged from 2.3 to 6.7 microg/ml, respectively. Post-mortem tissue total arsenic concentrations were also detected in large concentrations. In case 3, the contents of the duodenum contained as much as 30.1% arsenic(III) oxide. The high concentrations of arsenic detected in blood and tissues in all presented cases are particularly noteworthy in that they are very rarely detected at these concentrations in fatal arsenic poisonings. PMID:15939162

  7. Differential response of oxidative stress and thiol metabolism in contrasting rice genotypes for arsenic tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Preeti; Mishra, Aradhana; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Chakrabarty, Debasis; Trivedi, Prabodh K; Singh, Rana Pratap; Tripathi, Rudra Deo

    2012-05-01

    The mechanism of arsenic (As) tolerance was investigated on two contrasting rice (Oryza sativa L.) genotypes, selected for As tolerance and accumulation. One tolerant (Triguna) and one sensitive (IET-4786) variety were exposed to various arsenate (0-50 μM) levels for 7 d for biochemical analyses. Arsenic induced oxidative stress was more pronounced in IET-4786 than Triguna especially in terms of reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation, EC and pro-oxidant enzymes (NADPH oxidase and ascorbate oxidase). However, Triguna tolerated As stress through the enhanced enzymes activities particularly pertaining to thiol metabolism such as serine acetyl transferase (SAT), cysteine synthase (CS), γ-glutamyl cysteine synthase (γ-ECS), γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (γ-GT), and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) as well as arsenate reductase (AR). Besides maintaining the ratio of redox couples GSH/GSSG and ASC/DHA, the level of phytochelatins (PCs) and phytochelatin synthase (PCS) activity were more pronounced in Triguna, in which harmonized responses of thiol metabolism was responsible for As tolerance in contrast to IET-4786 showing its susceptible nature towards As exposure.

  8. Validation of In-Situ Iron-Manganese Oxide Coated Stream Pebbles as Sensors for Arsenic Source Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, J.; Peters, S. C.; Casteel, A.

    2013-12-01

    Locating nonpoint source contaminant fluxes can be challenging due to the inherent heterogeneity of source and of the subsurface. Contaminants such as arsenic are a concern for drinking water quality and ecosystem health. Arsenic contamination can be the result of several natural and anthropogenic sources, and therefore it can be difficult to trace and identify major areas of arsenic in natural systems. Identifying a useful source indicator for arsenic is a crucial step for environmental remediation efforts. Previous studies have found iron-manganese oxide coated streambed pebbles as useful source indicators due to their high attraction for heavy metals in water. In this study, pebbles, surface water at baseflow and nearby rocks were sampled from the Pennypack Creek and its tributaries, in southwestern Pennsylvania, to test the ability of coated streambed pebbles as environmental source indicators for arsenic. Quartz pebbles, 5-7 cm in diameter, were sampled to minimize elemental contamination from rock chemistry. In addition, quartz provides an excellent substrate for iron and manganese coatings to form. These coatings were leached from pebbles using 4M nitric acid with 0.1% concentrated hydrochloric acid. Following sample processing, analyses were performed using an ICP-MS and the resulting data were spatially organized using ArcGIS software. Arsenic, iron and manganese concentrations in the leachate are normalized to pebble surface area and each location is reported as a ratio of arsenic to iron and manganese. Results suggest that iron-manganese coated stream pebbles are useful indicators of arsenic location within a watershed.

  9. In Vivo and In Vitro Arsenic Exposition Induces Oxidative Stress in Anterior Pituitary Gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronchetti, Sonia A; Bianchi, María S; Duvilanski, Beatriz H; Cabilla, Jimena P

    2016-07-01

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs) is at the top of toxic metalloids. Inorganic arsenic-contaminated water consumption is one of the greatest environmental health threats worldwide. Human iAs exposure has been associated with cancers of several organs, neurological disorders, and reproductive problems. Nevertheless, there are no reports describing how iAs affects the anterior pituitary gland. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms involved in iAs-mediated anterior pituitary toxicity both in vivo and in vitro. We showed that iAs administration (from 5 to 100 ppm) to male rats through drinking water increased messenger RNA expression of several oxidative stress-responsive genes in the anterior pituitary gland. Serum prolactin levels diminished, whereas luteinizing hormone (LH) levels were only affected at the higher dose tested. In anterior pituitary cells in culture, 25 µmol/L iAs significantly decreased prolactin release in a time-dependent fashion, whereas LH levels remained unaltered. Cell viability was significantly reduced mainly by apoptosis evidenced by morphological and phosphatidylserine externalization studies. This process is characterized by early depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and increased levels of reactive oxygen species. Expression of some key oxidative stress-responsive genes, such as heme oxygenase-1 and metallothionein-1, was also stimulated by iAs exposure. The antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine prevented iAs-induced effects on the expression of oxidative stress markers, prolactin release, and apoptosis. In summary, the present work demonstrates for the first time that iAs reduces prolactin release both in vivo and in vitro and induces apoptosis in anterior pituitary cells, possibly resulting from imbalanced cellular redox status.

  10. Preparation of polymer-supported hydrated ferric oxide based on Donnan membrane effect and its application for arsenic removal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In the present study a novel technique was proposed to prepare a polymer-supported hydrated ferric oxide (D201-HFO) based on Donnan membrane effect by using a strongly basic anion exchanger D201 as the host material and FeCl3-HCl-NaCl solution as the reaction environment. D201-HFO was found to exhibit higher capacity for arsenic removal than a commercial sorbent Purolite ArsenX. Furthermore, it presents favorable adsorption selectivity for arsenic removal from aqueous solution, as well as satis- factory kinetics. Fixed-bed column experiments showed that arsenic sorption on D201-HFO could re- sult in concentration of this toxic metalloid element below 10 μg/L, which was the new maximum con- centration limit set recently by the European Commission and imposed by the US EPA and China. Also, the spent D201-HFO is amenable to efficient regeneration by NaOH-NaCl solution.

  11. Preparation of polymer-supported hydrated ferric oxide based on Donnan membrane effect and its application for arsenic removal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG QingJian; PAN BingCai; CHEN XinQing; ZHANG WeiMing; PAN BingJun; ZHANG QuanXing; L. LV; X. S. ZHAO

    2008-01-01

    In the present study a novel technique was proposed to prepare a polymer-supported hydrated ferric oxide (D201-HFO) based on Donnan membrane effect by using a strongly basic anion exchanger D201 as the host material and FeCl3-HCl-NaCl solution as the reaction environment. D201-HFO was found to exhibit higher capacity for arsenic removal than a commercial sorbent Purolite ArsenX. Furthermore, it presents favorable adsorption selectivity for arsenic removal from aqueous solution, as well as satis-factory kinetics. Fixed-bed column experiments showed that arsenic sorption on D201-HFO could re-sult in concentration of this toxic metalloid element below 10 μg/L, which was the new maximum con-centration limit set recently by the European Commission and imposed by the US EPA and China. Also, the spent D201-HFO is amenable to efficient regeneration by NaOH-NaCI solution.

  12. Arsenic transformation predisposes human skin keratinocytes to UV-induced DNA damage yet enhances their survival apparently by diminishing oxidant response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inorganic arsenic and UV, both human skin carcinogens, may act together as skin co-carcinogens. We find human skin keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) are malignantly transformed by low-level arsenite (100 nM, 30 weeks; termed As-TM cells) and with transformation concurrently undergo full adaptation to arsenic toxicity involving reduced apoptosis and oxidative stress response to high arsenite concentrations. Oxidative DNA damage (ODD) is a possible mechanism in arsenic carcinogenesis and a hallmark of UV-induced skin cancer. In the current work, inorganic arsenite exposure (100 nM) did not induce ODD during the 30 weeks required for malignant transformation. Although acute UV-treatment (UVA, 25 J/cm2) increased ODD in passage-matched control cells, once transformed by arsenic to As-TM cells, acute UV actually further increased ODD (> 50%). Despite enhanced ODD, As-TM cells were resistant to UV-induced apoptosis. The response of apoptotic factors and oxidative stress genes was strongly mitigated in As-TM cells after UV exposure including increased Bcl2/Bax ratio and reduced Caspase-3, Nrf2, and Keap1 expression. Several Nrf2-related genes (HO-1, GCLs, SOD) showed diminished responses in As-TM cells after UV exposure consistent with reduced oxidant stress response. UV-exposed As-TM cells showed increased expression of cyclin D1 (proliferation gene) and decreased p16 (tumor suppressor). UV exposure enhanced the malignant phenotype of As-TM cells. Thus, the co-carcinogenicity between UV and arsenic in skin cancer might involve adaptation to chronic arsenic exposure generally mitigating the oxidative stress response, allowing apoptotic by-pass after UV and enhanced cell survival even in the face of increased UV-induced oxidative stress and increased ODD. - Highlights: → Arsenic transformation adapted to UV-induced apoptosis. → Arsenic transformation diminished oxidant response. → Arsenic transformation enhanced UV-induced DNA damage.

  13. Arsenic alters monocyte superoxide anion and nitric oxide production in environmentally exposed children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic (As) exposure has been associated with alterations in the immune system, studies in experimental models and adults have shown that these effects involve macrophage function; however, limited information is available on what type of effects could be induced in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of As exposure, through the association of inorganic As (iAs) and its metabolites [monomethylated arsenic (MMA) and dimethylated arsenic (DMA)] with basal levels of nitric oxide (NO·-) and superoxide anion (O2·-), in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and monocytes, and NO·- and O2·- produced by activated monocytes. Hence, a cross-sectional study was conducted in 87 children (6-10 years old) who had been environmentally exposed to As through drinking water. Levels of urinary As species (iAs, MMA and DMA) were determined by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry, total As (tAs) represents the sum of iAs and its species; tAs urine levels ranged from 12.3 to 1411 μg/g creatinine. Using multiple linear regression models, iAs presented a positive and statistical association with basal NO·- in PBMC (β = 0.0048, p = 0.049) and monocytes (β = 0.0044, p = 0.044), while basal O2·- had a significant positive association with DMA (β = 0.0025, p = 0.046). In activated monocytes, O2·- showed a statistical and positive association with iAs (β = 0.0108, p = 0.023), MMA (β = 0.0066, p = 0.022), DMA (β = 0.0018, p = 0.015), and tAs (β = 0.0013, p = 0.015). We conclude that As exposure in the studied children was positively associated with basal levels of NO·- and O2·- in PBMC and monocytes, suggesting that As induces oxidative stress in circulating blood cells. Additionally, this study showed a positive association of O2·- production with iAs and its metabolites in stimulated monocytes, supporting previous data that suggests that these cells, and particularly the O2·- activation pathway, are relevant targets for As toxicity.

  14. EVALUATING ARSENIC AND MANGANESE REMOVAL FROM WATER BY CHLORINE OXIDATION FOLLOWED BY CLARIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. R. Pires

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThis paper investigates the simultaneous removal of arsenic [As(V or As(III] and manganese [Mn(II] from natural waters of low and high turbidity by clarification (with polyaluminum chloride and aluminum sulfate as primary coagulants associated or not with chlorine pre-oxidation. The results showed that the clarification process exhibited low Mn(II removal, that varied from 6% to 18% and from 19% to 27% for natural waters of low and high turbidity, respectively. The use of chlorine as pre-oxidant increased Mn(II removal up to 77% and was associated with the formation of birnessite. Regarding As(V removal by clarification, particularly for high turbidity water, a concentration lower than that established by the National Drinking Water Quality Standards (10 μg.L-1 was achieved in almost all tests. Oxidation preceding the clarification led to AsIII removal efficiencies from 80% to 90% for both coagulants and types of water.

  15. Schwertmannite Synthesis through Ferrous Ion Chemical Oxidation under Different H2O2 Supply Rates and Its Removal Efficiency for Arsenic from Contaminated Groundwater

    OpenAIRE

    Fenwu Liu; Jun Zhou; Shasha Zhang; Lanlan Liu; Lixiang Zhou; Wenhua Fan

    2015-01-01

    Schwertmannite-mediated removal of arsenic from contaminated water has attracted increasing attention. However, schwertmannite chemical synthesis behavior under different H2O2 supply rates for ferrous ions oxidation is unclear. This study investigated pH, ferrous ions oxidation efficiency, and total iron precipitation efficiency during schwertmannite synthesis by adding H2O2 into FeSO4 · 7H2O solution at different supply rates. Specific surface area and arsenic (III) removal capacity of schwe...

  16. Characterization of arsenite-oxidizing bacteria isolated from arsenic-contaminated groundwater of West Bengal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Dhiraj; Poddar, Soumya; Sar, Pinaki

    2014-01-01

    Nine arsenic (As)-resistant bacterial strains isolated from As-rich groundwater samples of West Bengal were characterized to elucidate their potential in geomicrobial transformation and bioremediation aspects. The 16S rRNA gene-based phylogenetic analysis revealed that the strains were affiliated with genera Actinobacteria, Microbacterium, Pseudomonas and Rhizobium. The strains exhibited high resistance to As [Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ≥ 10 mM As(3+) and MIC ≥ 450 mM As(5+)] and other heavy metals, e.g., Cu(2+), Cr(2+), Ni(2+), etc. (MIC ≥ 2 mM) as well as As transformation (As(3+) oxidation and As(5+) reduction) capabilities. Their ability to utilize diverse carbon source(s) including hydrocarbons and different alternative electron acceptor(s) (As(5+), SO4(2-), S2O3(2-), etc.) during anaerobic growth was noted. Growth at wide range of pH, temperature and salinity, production of siderophore and biofilm were observed. Together with these, growth pattern and transformation kinetics indicated a high As(3+) oxidation activity of the isolates Rhizobium sp. CAS934i, Microbacterium sp. CAS905i and Pseudomonas sp. CAS912i. A positive relation between high As(3+) resistance and As(3+) oxidation and the supportive role of As(3+) in bacterial growth was noted. The results highlighted As(3+) oxidation process and metabolic repertory of strains indigenous to contaminated groundwater and indicates their potential in As(3+) detoxification. Thus, such metabolically well equipped bacterial strains with highest As(3+) oxidation activities may be used for bioremediation of As contaminated water and effluents in the near future. PMID:25137536

  17. Applications of nano-structured metal oxides for treatment of arsenic in water and for antimicrobial coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadu, Rakesh Babu

    Dependency of technology has been increasing radically through cellular phones for communication, data storage devices for education, drinking water purifiers for healthiness, antimicrobial-coated textiles for cleanliness, nanomedicines for deadliest diseases, solar cells for natural power, nanorobots for engineering and many more. Nanotechnology develops many unprecedented products and methodologies with its adroitness in this modern scientific world. Syntheses of nanomaterials play a significant role in the development of technology. Solution combustion and hydrothermal syntheses produce many nanomaterials with different structures and pioneering applications. Nanometal oxides, like titania, silver oxide, manganese oxide and iron oxide have their unique applications in engineering, chemistry and biochemistry. Likewise, this study talks about the syntheses and applications of nanomaterials such as magnetic graphene nanoplatelets (M-Gras) decorated with uniformly dispersed NPs, manganese doped titania nanotubes (Mn-TNTs), and silver doped titania nanopartcles (nAg-TNPs) and their polyurethane based polymer nanocomposite coating (nAg-TiO2 /PU). Basically, M-Gras, and Mn-TNTs were applied for the treatment of arsenic contaminated water, and nAg- TiO2/PU applied for antimicrobial coatings on textiles. Adsorption of arsenic over Mn- TNTs, and M-Gras was discussed while considering all the regulations of arsenic contamination in drinking water and oxidation of arsenic over Mn-TNTs also discussed with the possible surface reactions. Silver doped titania and its polyurethane nanocomposite was coated on polyester fabric and examined the coated fabric for bactericidal activity for gram-negative (E. coli) and gram-positive ( S. epidermidis) bacteria. This study elucidates the development of suitable nanomaterials and their applications to treat or rectify the environmental hazards while following the scientific standards and regulations.

  18. Magnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles from tea waste for arsenic removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunge, Sneha; Singh, Shripal; Sinha, Amalendu

    2014-04-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MION-Tea) successfully synthesized using tea waste template. MION-Tea exhibit super magnetic properties under external magnetic field with saturation magnetization value of 6.9 emu/g at room temperature. SEM of MION-Tea shows cuboid/pyramid shaped crystals structure of Fe3O4 (magnetite). TEM of MION-Tea shows the particle size in the range of 5-25 nm. XRD pattern of MION-Tea is identical to magnetite. Magnetic nanoparticles are tested for removal of As(III) and As(V) from aqueous solution. The adsorption data obeyed the Langmuir equation with high adsorption capacity of 188.69 mg/g for arsenic (III), and 153.8 mg/g for arsenic (V). The mean sorption energy (E) calculated from D-R model, indicated physico-chemical sorption process. A pseudo-second-order kinetic model fitted best for As(III) adsorption on MION-Tea and the derived activation energy was 64.27 kJ/mol. Thermodynamics revealed the endothermic nature of adsorption. The effects of solution pH, interfering anions and initial As(III) concentration have been investigated. MION-Tea was very low cost (Rs. 136 per kg). MION-Tea can be reused up to 5 adsorption cycles and regenerated using NaOH. Cost of As(III) removal from water of was estimated to be Rs. 14 for 100 L. Comparison with reported adsorbents proved MION-Tea a potential adsorbent for As(III) and As(V) adsorption.

  19. XPS characteristics of sulfur of bio-oxidized arsenic-bearing gold concentrate and changes of surface nature of bio-oxidation residue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨洪英; 巩恩普; 杨立; 陈刚; 范有静; 张玉山; 吕久吉

    2004-01-01

    During bio-oxidation of sulfides, the chemical state change of sulfur is a complex and key factor. It is not only an indicator of the extent and intensity of the bio-oxidation, but also controls the property of bio-leaching medium and the period of oxidation. The chemical state of sulfur in sulfides oxidized by leaching bacteria was studied with XPS. Sulfide minerals in the arsenic-hearing gold concentrate consist of pyrite, arsenopyrite, chalcopyrite, galena, sphalerite and so on. In order to probe the pattern of the chemical state change of sulfur in the bio-oxidation residue of arsenic-bearing gold concentrate, the structure of the grains, and the surface nature of the residue, XPS test was carried out through different sputtering duration. The study of XPS clearly shows that: sulfides is progressively oxidized from the surface of minerals to the core by leaching bacteria; the chemical valence of sulfur changes from S2- or [S2]2- to [SO4]2-; sulfur in the core is in a reduction state, S2- or [S2]2- , but exists in an oxidation state S6+ on the surface; due to the chemical state change of sulfur, mineral phase of the bio-oxidation residue is also changed(sulfides inside, while sulfates outside); the layered structure is found in the grains of the bio-oxidation residue.

  20. Arsenic removal from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Robert C.; Anderson, D. Richard

    2007-07-24

    Methods for removing arsenic from water by addition of inexpensive and commonly available magnesium oxide, magnesium hydroxide, calcium oxide, or calcium hydroxide to the water. The hydroxide has a strong chemical affinity for arsenic and rapidly adsorbs arsenic, even in the presence of carbonate in the water. Simple and commercially available mechanical methods for removal of magnesium hydroxide particles with adsorbed arsenic from drinking water can be used, including filtration, dissolved air flotation, vortex separation, or centrifugal separation. A method for continuous removal of arsenic from water is provided. Also provided is a method for concentrating arsenic in a water sample to facilitate quantification of arsenic, by means of magnesium or calcium hydroxide adsorption.

  1. Arsenic pollution sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garelick, Hemda; Jones, Huw; Dybowska, Agnieszka; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia

    2008-01-01

    Arsenic is a widely dispersed element in the Earth's crust and exists at an average concentration of approximately 5 mg/kg. There are many possible routes of human exposure to arsenic from both natural and anthropogenic sources. Arsenic occurs as a constituent in more than 200 minerals, although it primarily exists as arsenopyrite and as a constituent in several other sulfide minerals. The introduction of arsenic into drinking water can occur as a result of its natural geological presence in local bedrock. Arsenic-containing bedrock formations of this sort are known in Bangladesh, West Bengal (India), and regions of China, and many cases of endemic contamination by arsenic with serious consequences to human health are known from these areas. Significant natural contamination of surface waters and soil can arise when arsenic-rich geothermal fluids come into contact with surface waters. When humans are implicated in causing or exacerbating arsenic pollution, the cause can almost always be traced to mining or mining-related activities. Arsenic exists in many oxidation states, with arsenic (III) and (V) being the most common forms. Similar to many metalloids, the prevalence of particular species of arsenic depends greatly on the pH and redox conditions of the matrix in which it exists. Speciation is also important in determining the toxicity of arsenic. Arsenic minerals exist in the environment principally as sulfides, oxides, and phosphates. In igneous rocks, only those of volcanic origin are implicated in high aqueous arsenic concentrations. Sedimentary rocks tend not to bear high arsenic loads, and common matrices such as sands and sandstones contain lower concentrations owing to the dominance of quartz and feldspars. Groundwater contamination by arsenic arises from sources of arsenopyrite, base metal sulfides, realgar and orpiment, arsenic-rich pyrite, and iron oxyhydroxide. Mechanisms by which arsenic is released from minerals are varied and are accounted for by

  2. Proteomic Analysis of Arsenic-Induced Oxidative Stress in Human Epidermal Keratinocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (IAs) has been associated with the development of several human cancers, including those found in the skin, lung, urinary bladder, liver, prostate and kidney. The precise mechanisms by which arsenic causes cancer are unknown. Defining the mod...

  3. Poisoning of noble metal catalysts by arsenic and silicon compounds in an oxidizing atmosphere. Die Vergiftung von Edelmetall-Katalysatoren durch Arsen- und Siliziumverbindungen unter oxidierenden Verbindungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaizik, A.

    1984-01-12

    The dissertation deals with the poisoning of noble metal catalysts by arsenic and silicon compounds in an oxidizing atmosphere. The problem was studied in the field of catalytic exhaust and waste air post-combustion, but the findings can be applied to other catalytic processes in which arsenic and silicon compounds may occur as catalyst poisons. The following issues were investigated: 1. Kinetics of arsenic and silicon poisoning of platinum-containing carrier catalysts; 2. Regeneration of poisoned catalysts; 3. mathematical modelling of the poisoning processes.

  4. Effect of arsenite-oxidizing bacterium B. laterosporus on arsenite toxicity and arsenic translocation in rice seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gui-Di; Xie, Wan-Ying; Zhu, Xi; Huang, Yi; Yang, Xiao-Jun; Qiu, Zong-Qing; Lv, Zhen-Mao; Wang, Wen-Na; Lin, Wen-Xiong

    2015-10-01

    Arsenite [As (III)] oxidation can be accelerated by bacterial catalysis, but the effects of the accelerated oxidation on arsenic toxicity and translocation in rice plants are poorly understood. Herein we investigated how an arsenite-oxidizing bacterium, namely Brevibacillus laterosporus, influences As (III) toxicity and translocation in rice plants. Rice seedlings of four cultivars, namely Guangyou Ming 118 (GM), Teyou Hang II (TH), Shanyou 63 (SY) and Minghui 63 (MH), inoculated with or without the bacterium were grown hydroponically with As (III) to investigate its effects on arsenic toxicity and translocation in the plants. Percentages of As (III) oxidation in the solutions with the bacterium (100%) were all significantly higher than those without (30-72%). The addition of the bacterium significantly decreased As (III) concentrations in SY root, GM root and shoot, while increased the As (III) concentrations in the shoot of SY, MH and TH and in the root of MH. Furthermore, the As (III) concentrations in the root and shoot of SY were both the lowest among the treatments with the bacterium. On the other hand, its addition significantly alleviated the As (III) toxicity on four rice cultivars. Among the treatments amended with B. laterosporus, the bacterium showed the best remediation on SY seedlings, with respect to the subdued As (III) toxicity and decreased As (III) concentration in its roots. These results indicated that As (III) oxidation accelerated by B. laterosporus could be an effective method to alleviate As (III) toxicity on rice seedlings.

  5. Elevated naturally occurring arsenic in a semiarid oxidizing system, Southern High Plains aquifer, Texas, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, B.R.; Nicot, J.-P.; Reedy, R.C.; Kurtzman, D.; Mukherjee, A.; Nordstrom, D.K.

    2009-01-01

    High groundwater As concentrations in oxidizing systems are generally associated with As adsorption onto hydrous metal (Al, Fe or Mn) oxides and mobilization with increased pH. The objective of this study was to evaluate the distribution, sources and mobilization mechanisms of As in the Southern High Plains (SHP) aquifer, Texas, relative to those in other semiarid, oxidizing systems. Elevated groundwater As levels are widespread in the southern part of the SHP (SHP-S) aquifer, with 47% of wells exceeding the current EPA maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 ??g/L (range 0.3-164 ??g/L), whereas As levels are much lower in the north (SHP-N: 9% ??? As MCL of 10 ??g/L; range 0.2-43 ??g/L). The sharp contrast in As levels between the north and south coincides with a change in total dissolved solids (TDS) from 395 mg/L (median north) to 885 mg/L (median south). Arsenic is present as arsenate (As V) in this oxidizing system and is correlated with groundwater TDS (Spearman's ?? = 0.57). The most likely current source of As is sorbed As onto hydrous metal oxides based on correlations between As and other oxyanion-forming elements (V, ?? = 0.88; Se, ?? = 0.54; B, ?? = 0.51 and Mo, ?? = 0.46). This source is similar to that in other oxidizing systems and constitutes a secondary source; the most likely primary source being volcanic ashes in the SHP aquifer or original source rocks in the Rockies, based on co-occurrence of As and F (?? = 0.56), oxyanion-forming elements and SiO2 (?? = 0.41), which are found in volcanic ashes. High groundwater As concentrations in some semiarid oxidizing systems are related to high evaporation. Although correlation of As with TDS in the SHP aquifer may suggest evaporative concentration, unenriched stable isotopes (??2H: -65 to -27; ??18O: -9.1 to -4.2) in the SHP aquifer do not support evaporation. High TDS in the SHP aquifer is most likely related to upward movement of saline water from the underlying Triassic Dockum aquifer. Mobilization of As

  6. Elevated naturally occurring arsenic in a semiarid oxidizing system, Southern High Plains aquifer, Texas, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High groundwater As concentrations in oxidizing systems are generally associated with As adsorption onto hydrous metal (Al, Fe or Mn) oxides and mobilization with increased pH. The objective of this study was to evaluate the distribution, sources and mobilization mechanisms of As in the Southern High Plains (SHP) aquifer, Texas, relative to those in other semiarid, oxidizing systems. Elevated groundwater As levels are widespread in the southern part of the SHP (SHP-S) aquifer, with 47% of wells exceeding the current EPA maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 μg/L (range 0.3-164 μg/L), whereas As levels are much lower in the north (SHP-N: 9% ≥ As MCL of 10 μg/L; range 0.2-43 μg/L). The sharp contrast in As levels between the north and south coincides with a change in total dissolved solids (TDS) from 395 mg/L (median north) to 885 mg/L (median south). Arsenic is present as arsenate (As V) in this oxidizing system and is correlated with groundwater TDS (Spearman's ρ = 0.57). The most likely current source of As is sorbed As onto hydrous metal oxides based on correlations between As and other oxyanion-forming elements (V, ρ = 0.88; Se, ρ = 0.54; B, ρ = 0.51 and Mo, ρ = 0.46). This source is similar to that in other oxidizing systems and constitutes a secondary source; the most likely primary source being volcanic ashes in the SHP aquifer or original source rocks in the Rockies, based on co-occurrence of As and F (ρ = 0.56), oxyanion-forming elements and SiO2 (ρ = 0.41), which are found in volcanic ashes. High groundwater As concentrations in some semiarid oxidizing systems are related to high evaporation. Although correlation of As with TDS in the SHP aquifer may suggest evaporative concentration, unenriched stable isotopes (δ2H: -65 to -27; δ18O: -9.1 to -4.2) in the SHP aquifer do not support evaporation. High TDS in the SHP aquifer is most likely related to upward movement of saline water from the underlying Triassic Dockum aquifer. Mobilization of As

  7. Rural methods to mitigate arsenic contaminated water

    OpenAIRE

    Parajuli, Krishna

    2013-01-01

    Consumption of arsenic contaminated water is one of the burning issues in the rural world. Poor public awareness program about health effects of drinking arsenic contaminated water and the rural methods to mitigate this problem poses a great threat of arsenic poisoning many people of the rural world. In this thesis, arsenic removal efficiency and the working mechanism of four rural and economical arsenic mitigation technologies i.e. solar oxidation and reduction of arsenic (SORAS), Bucket tr...

  8. Arsenic cardiotoxicity: An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamolhodaei, Nafiseh Sadat; Shirani, Kobra; Karimi, Gholamreza

    2015-11-01

    Arsenic, a naturally ubiquitous element, is found in foods and environment. Cardiac dysfunction is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in the world. Arsenic exposure is associated with various cardiopathologic effects including ischemia, arrhythmia and heart failure. Possible mechanisms of arsenic cardiotoxicity include oxidative stress, DNA fragmentation, apoptosis and functional changes of ion channels. Several evidences have shown that mitochondrial disruption, caspase activation, MAPK signaling and p53 are the pathways for arsenic induced apoptosis. Arsenic trioxide is an effective and potent antitumor agent used in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia and produces dramatic remissions. As2O3 administration has major limitations such as T wave changes, QT prolongation and sudden death in humans. In this review, we discuss the underlying pathobiology of arsenic cardiotoxicity and provide information about cardiac health effects associated with some medicinal plants in arsenic toxicity.

  9. Ameliorative efficacy of tetrahydrocurcumin against arsenic induced oxidative damage, dyslipidemia and hepatic mitochondrial toxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthumani, M; Miltonprabu, S

    2015-06-25

    Arsenic (As) is a well-known human carcinogen and a potent hepatotoxin. Environmental exposure to arsenic imposes a serious health hazard to humans and other animals worldwide. Tetrahydrocurcumin (THC), one of the major metabolites of curcumin, exhibits many of the same physiological and pharmacological activities as curcumin and in some systems may exert greater antioxidant activity than the curcumin. It has been reported that THC has antioxidant efficacy attributable to the presence of identical β-diketone of 3rd and 5th substitution in heptane moiety. In the present study, rats were orally treated with arsenic alone (5 mg kg(-1) bw/day) with THC (80 mg kg(-1) bw/day) for 28 days. Hepatotoxicity was measured by the increased activities of serum hepatospecific enzymes, namely aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, alkaline phosphatase and bilirubin along with increased elevation of lipid peroxidative markers, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. And also elevated levels of serum cholesterol, triglycerides, free fatty acids and phospholipids were observed in arsenic intoxicated rats. These effects of arsenic were coupled with enhanced mitochondrial swelling, inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase, Ca(2+)ATPase and a decrease in mitochondrial calcium content. The toxic effect of arsenic was also indicated by significantly decreased activities of enzymatic antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase along with non-enzymatic antioxidant such as reduced glutathione. Administration of THC exhibited significant reversal of arsenic induced toxicity in hepatic tissue. All these changes were supported by the reduction of arsenic concentration and histopathological observations of the liver. These results suggest that THC has a protective effect over arsenic induced toxicity in rat.

  10. Chemical and surface analysis during evolution of arsenopyrite oxidation by Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans in the presence and absence of supplementary arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Aldaba, Hugo; Valles, O Paola; Vazquez-Arenas, Jorge; Rojas-Contreras, J Antonio; Valdez-Pérez, Donato; Ruiz-Baca, Estela; Meraz-Rodríguez, Mónica; Sosa-Rodríguez, Fabiola S; Rodríguez, Ángel G; Lara, René H

    2016-10-01

    Bioleaching of arsenopyrite presents a great interest due to recovery of valuable metals and environmental issues. The current study aims to evaluate the arsenopyrite oxidation by Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans during 240h at different time intervals, in the presence and absence of supplementary arsenic. Chemical and electrochemical characterizations are carried out using Raman, AFM, SEM-EDS, Cyclic Voltammetry, EIS, electrophoretic and adhesion forces to comprehensively assess the surface behavior and biooxidation mechanism of this mineral. These analyses evidence the formation of pyrite-like secondary phase on abiotic control surfaces, which contrast with the formation of pyrite (FeS2)-like, orpiment (As2S3)-like and elementary sulfur and polysulfide (Sn(2-)/S(0)) phases found on biooxidized surfaces. Voltammetric results indicate a significant alteration of arsenopyrite due to (bio)oxidation. Resistive processes determined with EIS are associated with chemical and electrochemical reactions mediated by (bio)oxidation, resulting in the transformation of arsenopyrite surface and biofilm direct attachment. Charge transfer resistance is increased when (bio)oxidation is performed in the presence of supplementary arsenic, in comparison with lowered abiotic control resistances obtained in its absence; reinforcing the idea that more stable surface products are generated when As(V) is in the system. Biofilm structure is mainly comprised of micro-colonies, progressively enclosed in secondary compounds. A more compact biofilm structure with enhanced formation of secondary compounds is identified in the presence of supplementary arsenic, whereby variable arsenopyrite reactivity is linked and attributed to these secondary compounds, including Sn(2-)/S(0), pyrite-like and orpiment-like phases.

  11. Protective effects of selenium on oxidative damage and oxidative stress related gene expression in rat liver under chronic poisoning of arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhao; Wang, Zhou; Li, Jian-jun; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Ping-chuan; Dong, Lu; Chen, Jing-hong; Chen, Qun; Zhang, Xiao-tian; Wang, Zhi-lun

    2013-08-01

    Arsenic (As) is a toxic metalloid existing widely in the environment, and chronic exposure to it through contaminated drinking water has become a global problem of public health. The present study focused on the protective effects of selenium on oxidative damage of chronic arsenic poisoning in rat liver. Rats were divided into four groups at random and given designed treatments for 20 weeks. The oxidative damage of liver tissue was evaluated by lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes. Oxidative stress related genes were detected to reflect the liver stress state at the molecular level. Compared to the control and Na2SeO3 groups, the MDA content in liver tissue was decreased and the activities of antioxidant enzymes were increased in the Na2SeO3 intervention group. The mRNA levels of SOD1, CAT, GPx and Txnrd1 were increased significantly (Pcauses oxidative damage in the rat liver, and Na2SeO3 protects liver cells by adjusting the expression of oxidative stress related genes to improve the activities of antioxidant enzymes. PMID:23603382

  12. Protective effects of selenium on oxidative damage and oxidative stress related gene expression in rat liver under chronic poisoning of arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhao; Wang, Zhou; Li, Jian-jun; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Ping-chuan; Dong, Lu; Chen, Jing-hong; Chen, Qun; Zhang, Xiao-tian; Wang, Zhi-lun

    2013-08-01

    Arsenic (As) is a toxic metalloid existing widely in the environment, and chronic exposure to it through contaminated drinking water has become a global problem of public health. The present study focused on the protective effects of selenium on oxidative damage of chronic arsenic poisoning in rat liver. Rats were divided into four groups at random and given designed treatments for 20 weeks. The oxidative damage of liver tissue was evaluated by lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes. Oxidative stress related genes were detected to reflect the liver stress state at the molecular level. Compared to the control and Na2SeO3 groups, the MDA content in liver tissue was decreased and the activities of antioxidant enzymes were increased in the Na2SeO3 intervention group. The mRNA levels of SOD1, CAT, GPx and Txnrd1 were increased significantly (Ptreatment group. The expressions of HSP70 and HO-1 were significantly (Ptreatment group. The results indicate that long-term intake of NaAsO2 causes oxidative damage in the rat liver, and Na2SeO3 protects liver cells by adjusting the expression of oxidative stress related genes to improve the activities of antioxidant enzymes.

  13. Ethnic differences in five intronic polymorphisms associated with arsenic metabolism within human arsenic (+ 3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human arsenic (+ 3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) is known to catalyze the methylation of arsenite, and intronic single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs: G7395A, G12390C, T14215C, T35587C, and G35991A) in the AS3MT gene were shown to be related to inter-individual variation in the arsenic metabolism. In the present study, the genotyping for these SNPs was developed using the polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism technique. Applying this method, the genotype distribution among the Ovambo, Turkish, Mongolian, Korean, and Japanese populations was investigated, and our results were compared with those from other studies. G7395, G12390, T35587, and A35991 were predominant among the five populations in our study. However, a previous study in Argentina, C12390 and G35991 showed the highest allele frequency among the eight populations studied in other studies. The dominant allele of T14215C differed among populations: the T14215 allele was predominant in Argentina, the allele frequency of C14215 was higher than that of T14215 among Turks, Mongolians, Europeans, and American ancestry. In Korea and Japan, similar allele frequencies were observed in T14215 and C14215. Higher allele frequencies were observed in haplotype G7395/G12390/C14215/T35587 with frequencies of 0.40 (Turks), 0.28 (Mongolians), and 0.23 (Koreans). On the other hand, the allele frequency for G7395/G14215/T35587/A35991 was the highest among the Ovambos (0.32), and the frequency for G7395/G12390/C35587/G35991 was the highest among the Japanese (0.27). It is noteworthy that the Japanese haplotype differs from that of the Koreans and Mongolians, which indicates the importance of investigating other intronic polymorphisms in AS3MT, especially in Asians

  14. Protective Effects of Combined Selenium and Punica granatum Treatment on Some Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress Markers in Arsenic-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafik, Noha M; El Batsh, Maha M

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is one of the major mechanisms implicated in inorganic arsenic poisoning. Punica granatum is known by its free radical scavenging properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective role of combined selenium and P. granatum against arsenic-induced liver injury. Seventy-five female albino rats were divided into five groups (of 15 rats each). Toxicity was induced by oral sodium arsenite (5.5 mg/kg body weight (bw) daily) (group ІІ). Treatment of arsenic-intoxicated rats was induced by daily oral administration of sodium selenite (3 mg/kg bw) (group ІІІ), 100 mg of P. granatum ethanol extract per kilogram body weight dissolved in 300 mL distilled water in three divided doses (100 mL of this suspension every 8 h) (group IV), and combined daily oral treatment with both selenite and P. granatum ethanol extract (group V). After 3 weeks, serum and liver tissues were obtained from the decapitated rats for different estimations. Hepatotoxicity was demonstrated by significant elevation in liver weights and activities of liver enzymes, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and decrease in serum total proteins and albumin (p arsenic hepatotoxicity led to an increased values of malondialdehyde, advanced oxidation protein products, nitric oxide, and interleukin-6 (IL-6) (p arsenic toxicity through activation of Nrf2 anti-oxidant pathway.

  15. The NRF2-mediated oxidative stress response pathway is associated with tumor cell resistance to arsenic trioxide across the NCI-60 panel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Qian

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drinking water contaminated with inorganic arsenic is associated with increased risk for different types of cancer. Paradoxically, arsenic trioxide can also be used to induce remission in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL with a success rate of approximately 80%. A comprehensive study examining the mechanisms and potential signaling pathways contributing to the anti-tumor properties of arsenic trioxide has not been carried out. Methods Here we applied a systems biology approach to identify gene biomarkers that underlie tumor cell responses to arsenic-induced cytotoxicity. The baseline gene expression levels of 14,500 well characterized human genes were associated with the GI50 data of the NCI-60 tumor cell line panel from the developmental therapeutics program (DTP database. Selected biomarkers were tested in vitro for the ability to influence tumor susceptibility to arsenic trioxide. Results A significant association was found between the baseline expression levels of 209 human genes and the sensitivity of the tumor cell line panel upon exposure to arsenic trioxide. These genes were overlayed onto protein-protein network maps to identify transcriptional networks that modulate tumor cell responses to arsenic trioxide. The analysis revealed a significant enrichment for the oxidative stress response pathway mediated by nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2 with high expression in arsenic resistant tumor cell lines. The role of the NRF2 pathway in protecting cells against arsenic-induced cell killing was validated in tumor cells using shRNA-mediated knock-down. Conclusions In this study, we show that the expression level of genes in the NRF2 pathway serve as potential gene biomarkers of tumor cell responses to arsenic trioxide. Importantly, we demonstrate that tumor cells that are deficient for NRF2 display increased sensitivity to arsenic trioxide. The results of our study will be useful in

  16. Arsenic augments the uptake of oxidized LDL by upregulating the expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor in mouse aortic endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, Ekhtear [Department of Biochemistry, Aichi Medical University School of Medicine, Nagakute, Aichi (Japan); Ota, Akinobu, E-mail: aota@aichi-med-u.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry, Aichi Medical University School of Medicine, Nagakute, Aichi (Japan); Karnan, Sivasundaram; Damdindorj, Lkhagvasuren [Department of Biochemistry, Aichi Medical University School of Medicine, Nagakute, Aichi (Japan); Takahashi, Miyuki [Department of Biochemistry, Aichi Medical University School of Medicine, Nagakute, Aichi (Japan); Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, Aichi Medical University School of Medicine, Nagakute, Aichi (Japan); Konishi, Yuko; Konishi, Hiroyuki; Hosokawa, Yoshitaka [Department of Biochemistry, Aichi Medical University School of Medicine, Nagakute, Aichi (Japan)

    2013-12-15

    Although chronic arsenic exposure is a well-known risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, the molecular mechanism underlying arsenic-induced atherosclerosis remains obscure. Therefore, this study aimed to elucidate this molecular mechanism. We examined changes in the mRNA level of the lectin-like oxidized LDL (oxLDL) receptor (LOX-1) in a mouse aortic endothelial cell line, END-D, after sodium arsenite (SA) treatment. SA treatment significantly upregulated LOX-1 mRNA expression; this finding was also verified at the protein expression level. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy analyses showed that the cellular uptake of fluorescence (Dil)-labeled oxLDL was significantly augmented with SA treatment. In addition, an anti-LOX-1 antibody completely abrogated the augmented uptake of Dil-oxLDL. We observed that SA increased the levels of the phosphorylated forms of nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B cells (NF-κB)/p65. SA-induced upregulation of LOX-1 protein expression was clearly prevented by treatment with an antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), or an NF-κB inhibitor, caffeic acid phenethylester (CAPE). Furthermore, SA-augmented uptake of Dil-oxLDL was also prevented by treatment with NAC or CAPE. Taken together, our results indicate that arsenic upregulates LOX-1 expression through the reactive oxygen species-mediated NF-κB signaling pathway, followed by augmented cellular oxLDL uptake, thus highlighting a critical role of the aberrant LOX-1 signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of arsenic-induced atherosclerosis. - Highlights: • Sodium arsenite (SA) increases LOX-1 expression in mouse aortic endothelial cells. • SA enhances cellular uptake of oxidized LDL in dose-dependent manner. • SA-induced ROS generation enhances phosphorylation of NF-κB. • SA upregulates LOX-1 expression through ROS-activated NF-κB signaling pathway.

  17. Long-term Fate of Arsenic under the Oxidation of Ferrous Iron by Nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, J.; Prommer, H.; Siade, A. J.; Chillrud, S. N.; Mailloux, B. J.; Bostick, B. C.

    2015-12-01

    In situ precipitation of iron (Fe) minerals can be an effective means of remediating groundwater arsenic (As) contamination. Among different Fe minerals, magnetite is promising as a host-mineral for As in situ immobilization in that it is stable under a wide range of geochemical conditions, including Fe(III) reducing conditions under which As are often mobilized. Our previous laboratory studies suggest that the formation of nanoparticulate magnetite can be achieved by the oxidation of ferrous Fe with nitrate. Magnetite can incorporate As into its structure during formation, in which case desorption and As(V) reduction are less likely. Nanoparticulate magnetite, once formed, can also immobilize As by surface adsorption, and thus serve as a reactive filter when contaminated groundwater migrates through the treatment zone. In this study, a reactive transport model is develop for the magnetite based As immobilization strategy. The initial numerical model development was guided by experimental data and hypothesized processes from the laboratory one-dimensional column studies. Our modeling results suggest that the ratio between Fe(II) and nitrate in the injectant regulates the extent and distribution of magnetite and ferrihydrite formation, and thus regulates the long-term potential of As immobilization. Based on these results, two-dimensional field-scale model scenarios were developed to predict and compare the impact of chemical and operational parameters on the efficiency of the remediation technology. The modeling results, which suggest that long-term groundwater As removal is feasible, favor scenarios that rely on the chromatographic mixing of Fe(II) and nitrate after injection. This study highlights the importance of combining laboratory studies and reactive transport modeling for elucidating the complex hydro-biogeochemical processes that control the fate of As and for up-scaling of the technology.

  18. Methylation of arsenic by recombinant human wild-type arsenic (+ 3 oxidation state) methyltransferase and its methionine 287 threonine (M287T) polymorph: Role of glutathione

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Lan; Saunders, R. Jesse; Drobná, Zuzana; Walton, Felecia S.; Xun, Pencheng [Department of Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health, 2302 MHRC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7461 (United States); Thomas, David J. [Pharmacokinetics Branch, Mail Drop B 143-01, Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 109 Alexander Drive Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Stýblo, Miroslav, E-mail: styblo@med.unc.edu [Department of Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health, 2302 MHRC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7461 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Arsenic (+ 3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) is the key enzyme in the pathway for methylation of arsenicals. A common polymorphism in the AS3MT gene that replaces a threonyl residue in position 287 with a methionyl residue (AS3MT/M287T) occurs at a frequency of about 10% among populations worldwide. Here, we compared catalytic properties of recombinant human wild-type (wt) AS3MT and AS3MT/M287T in reaction mixtures containing S-adenosylmethionine, arsenite (iAs{sup III}) or methylarsonous acid (MAs{sup III}) as substrates and endogenous or synthetic reductants, including glutathione (GSH), a thioredoxin reductase (TR)/thioredoxin (Trx)/NADPH reducing system, or tris (2-carboxyethyl) phosphine hydrochloride (TCEP). With either TR/Trx/NADPH or TCEP, wtAS3MT or AS3MT/M287T catalyzed conversion of iAs{sup III} to MAs{sup III}, methylarsonic acid (MAs{sup V}), dimethylarsinous acid (DMAs{sup III}), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMAs{sup V}); MAs{sup III} was converted to DMAs{sup III} and DMAs{sup V}. Although neither enzyme required GSH to support methylation of iAs{sup III} or MAs{sup III}, addition of 1 mM GSH decreased K{sub m} and increased V{sub max} estimates for either substrate in reaction mixtures containing TR/Trx/NADPH. Without GSH, V{sub max} and K{sub m} values were significantly lower for AS3MT/M287T than for wtAS3MT. In the presence of 1 mM GSH, significantly more DMAs{sup III} was produced from iAs{sup III} in reactions catalyzed by the M287T variant than in wtAS3MT-catalyzed reactions. Thus, 1 mM GSH modulates AS3MT activity, increasing both methylation rates and yield of DMAs{sup III}. AS3MT genotype exemplified by differences in regulation of wtAS3MT and AS3MT/M287T-catalyzed reactions by GSH may contribute to differences in the phenotype for arsenic methylation and, ultimately, to differences in the disease susceptibility in individuals chronically exposed to inorganic arsenic. -- Highlights: ► Human AS3MT and AS3MT(M287T) require a dithiol

  19. Simultaneous oxidation of arsenic and antimony at low and circumneutral pH, with and without microbial catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asta, Maria P.; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; McCleskey, R. Blaine

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic and Sb are common mine-water pollutants and their toxicity and fate are strongly influenced by redox processes. In this study, simultaneous Fe(II), As(III) and Sb(III) oxidation experiments were conducted to obtain rates under laboratory conditions similar to those found in the field for mine waters of both low and circumneutral pH. Additional experiments were performed under abiotic sterile conditions to determine the biotic and abiotic contributions to the oxidation processes. The results showed that under abiotic conditions in aerated Fe(III)–H2SO4 solutions, Sb(III) oxidizes slightly faster than As(III). The oxidation rates of both elements were accelerated by increasing As(III), Sb(III), Fe(III), and Cl- concentrations in the presence of light. For unfiltered circumneutral water from the Giant Mine (Yellowknife, NWT, Canada), As(III) oxidized at 15–78 μmol/L/h whereas Sb(III) oxidized at 0.03–0.05 μmol/L/h during microbial exponential growth. In contrast, As(III) and Sb(III) oxidation rates of 0.01–0.03 and 0.01–0.02 μmol/L/h, respectively, were obtained in experiments performed with acid unfiltered mine waters from the Iberian Pyritic Belt (SW Spain). These results suggest that the Fe(III) formed from microbialoxidation abiotically oxidized As(III) and Sb(III). After sterile filtration of both mine water samples, neither As(III), Sb(III), nor Fe(II) oxidation was observed. Hence, under the experimental conditions, bacteria were catalyzing As and Sb oxidation in the Giant Mine waters and Fe oxidation in the acid waters of the Iberian Pyrite Belt.

  20. Acute toxicity of arsenic and oxidative stress responses in the embryonic development of the common South American toad Rhinella arenarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardirosian, Mariana Noelia; Lascano, Cecilia Inés; Ferrari, Ana; Bongiovanni, Guillermina Azucena; Venturino, Andrés

    2015-05-01

    Arsenic (As), a natural element of ecological relevance, is found in natural water sources throughout Argentina in concentrations between 0.01 mg/L and 15 mg/L. The autochthonous toad Rhinella arenarum was selected to study the acute toxicity of As and the biochemical responses elicited by the exposure to As in water during its embryonic development. The median lethal concentration (LC50) value averaged 24.3 mg/L As and remained constant along the embryonic development. However, As toxicity drastically decreased when embryos were exposed from heartbeat-stage on day 4 of development, suggesting the onset of detoxification mechanisms. Given the environmental concentrations of As in Argentina, there is a probability of exceeding lethal levels at 1% of sites. Arsenic at sublethal concentrations caused a significant decrease in the total antioxidant potential but generated an increase in endogenous glutathione (GSH) content and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity. This protective response might prevent a deeper decline in the antioxidant system and further oxidative damage. Alternatively, it might be linked to As conjugation with GSH for its excretion. The authors conclude that toad embryos are more sensitive to As during early developmental stages and that relatively high concentrations of this toxic element are required to elicit mortality, but oxidative stress may be an adverse effect at sublethal concentrations.

  1. Decreased Glutathione Peroxidase Activities with Concomitant Increased Oxidized Glutathione Levels among Residents in an Arsenic Contaminated Community of Southern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warangkana CHUNGLOK

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione peroxidase (GPx and glutathione are important antioxidants responsible for the scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS. It has been shown that changes in GPx activities and glutathione levels are associated with various diseases including toxic chemical related diseases and cancers. The study aimed to determine the levels of GPx activity and glutathione among residents in Ron Phibun district, an arsenic-exposed area. Blood samples were obtained from 32 volunteers in the Thasala group, a nearby nonarsenic-exposed area and 36 residents in the Ron Phibun group. Red cell lysates were subjected to analysis of GPx activity and glutathione. The results showed that GPx activities were significantly decreased among study subjects from Ron Phibun (p < 0.05. Interestingly, oxidized glutathione (GSSG levels were significantly increased compared with those from Thasala (p < 0.05. Total glutathione and reduced glutathione (GSH levels were not different among the two groups. Mean values of GPx activities, total glutathione and GSH tended to decrease among high-exposure subjects compared to low-exposure subjects. This was concomitant with a slight increase in GSSG levels among high-exposure subjects. The levels of GPx activities and GSSG may be early biomarkers for low levels of oxidative stress in a mining area affected with arsenic poisoning.

  2. Anabaena sp. mediated bio-oxidation of arsenite to arsenate in synthetic arsenic (III) solution: Process optimization by response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Animesh; Bhattacharya, Priyankari; Swarnakar, Snehasikta; Majumdar, Swachchha; Ghosh, Sourja

    2015-11-01

    Blue green algae Anabaena sp. was cultivated in synthetic arsenite solution to investigate its bio-oxidation potential for arsenic species. Response surface methodology (RSM) was employed based on a 3-level full factorial design considering four factors, viz. initial arsenic (III) concentration, algal dose, temperature and time. Bio-oxidation (%) of arsenic (III) was considered as response for the design. The study revealed that about 100% conversion of As (III) to As (V) was obtained for initial As (III) concentration of 2.5-7.5 mg/L at 30 °C for 72 h of exposure using 3 g/L of algal dose signifying a unique bio-oxidation potential of Anabaena sp. The dissolved CO2 (DCO2) and oxygen (DO) concentration in solution was monitored during the process and based on the data, a probable mechanism was proposed wherein algal cell acts like a catalytic membrane surface and expedites the bio-oxidation process. Bioaccumulation of arsenic, as well as, surface adsorption on algal cell was found considerably low. Lipid content of algal biomass grown in arsenite solution was found slightly lower than that of algae grown in synthetic media. Toxicity effects on algal cells due to arsenic exposure were evaluated in terms of comet assay and chlorophyll a content which indicated DNA damage to some extent along with very little decrease in chlorophyll a content. In summary, the present study explored the potential application of Anabaena sp. as an ecofriendly and sustainable option for detoxification of arsenic contaminated natural water with value-added product generation.

  3. Photo-oxidation, removal and stabilization of arsenic residuals in drinking water, wastewater and process water systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, M.; Gallup, D.; Harden, D. [Arsenic Solutions Inc., Santa Rosa, CA (US)

    2002-07-01

    Arsenic is increasingly recognized as a serious threat to health and the environment. Inorganic As(III), considered one of the most toxic forms of the element, is generally present in reducing geochemical conditions. Removal of As(III) from water is often accomplished by oxidation to As(V), and subsequent removal by common water treatment processes. In the present study, As(III) present in drinking, waste and industrial waters, was oxidized and precipitated as a scorodite-like mineral, FeAsO{sub 4}, by photochemical oxidation in the presence of air and iron. Waters were treated with low concentrations of ferrous ion, Fe{sup 2+}, and air in an ultraviolet reaction chamber. Iron (II) apparently acts as a complexing agent and photoabsorber resulting in both Fe{sup 2+} and As{sup 3+} oxidation. This process provides an opportunity to greatly reduce the iron dose needed to meet the new US-EPA MCL for As and offers the possibility of removal systems that rely on natural Fe as low a 300 ppb. The resultant Fe{sup 3+} and As{sup 5+} co-precipitate solid was removed from water by filtration. Removal of arsenic from western United States and Australian drinking water, a coal gasification sour stripper process water, and Chilean hot springs discharge was described. Ferric arsenate sludge retrieved from filter backwashing was rendered non-hazardous by fixing/stabilizing in special cement formulations. The resulting cement may be beneficially used in materials of construction or disposed of as a non-hazardous material. Examples of As residual stabilization are given. 31 refs.

  4. Ultra-trace determination of arsenic species in environmental waters, food and biological samples using a modified aluminum oxide nanoparticle sorbent and AAS detection after multivariate optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a simple and efficient method for solid phase extraction and speciation of trace quantities of arsenic. It is based on the use of functionalized aluminum oxide nanoparticles and does not require any oxidation or reduction steps. The experimental parameters affecting extraction and quantitation were optimized using fractional factorial design methods. Adsorbed arsenic was eluted from the sorbent with 1 M hydrochloric acid and determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Preconcentration factors up to 750 were achieved depending on the sample volume. Studies on potential interferences by various anions and cations showed the method to be highly selective. Under optimum conditions, the calibration plots are linear in the 5.0 to 280 ng L−1 and 8.0 to 260 ng L−1 concentration ranges for As(III) and total arsenic, respectively. The detection limits (calculated for S/N ratios of 3) are 1.81 and 1.97 ng L−1 for As(III) and total arsenic, respectively. The method was successfully applied to the determination and speciation of arsenic in (spiked) environmental, food and biological samples and gave good recoveries. The method was validated using a certified geological reference material. (author)

  5. Characterization of the arsenite oxidizer Aliihoeflea sp. strain 2WW and its potential application in the removal of arsenic from groundwater in combination with Pf-ferritin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Corsini; M. Colombo; G. Muyzer; L. Cavalca

    2015-01-01

    A heterotrophic arsenite-oxidizing bacterium, strain 2WW, was isolated from a biofilter treating arsenic-rich groundwater. Comparative analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that it was closely related (98.7 %) to the alphaproteobacterium Aliihoeflea aesturari strain N8T. However, it was physiol

  6. The synthesis, characterization and application of iron oxide nanocrystals in magnetic separations for arsenic and uranium removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, John Thomas

    Arsenic and uranium in the environment are hazardous to human health and require better methods for detection and remediation. Nanocrystalline iron oxides offer a number of advantages as sorbents for water purification and environmental remediation. First, highly uniform and crystalline iron oxide nanocrystals (nMAG) were prepared using thermal decomposition of iron salts in organic solutions; for the applications of interest in this thesis, a central challenge was the adaptation of these conventional synthetic methods to the needs of low infrastructure and economically disadvantaged settings. We show here that it is possible to form highly uniform and magnetically responsive nanomaterials using starting reagents and equipment that are readily available and economical. The products of this approach, termed the 'Kitchen Synthesis', are of comparable quality and effectiveness to laboratory materials. The narrow size distributions of the iron oxides produced in the laboratory synthesis made it possible to study the size-dependence of the magnetic separation efficiency of nanocrystals; generally as the diameter of particles increased they could be removed under lower applied magnetic fields. In this work we take advantage of this size-dependence to use magnetic separation as a tool to separate broadly distributed populations of magnetic materials. Such work makes it possible to use these materials in multiplexed separation and sensing schemes. With the synthesis and magnetic separation studies of these materials completed, it was possible to optimize their applications in water purification and environmental remediation. These materials removed both uranium and arsenic from contaminated samples, and had remarkably high sorption capacities --- up to 12 wt% for arsenic and 30 wt% for uranium. The contaminated nMAG is removed from the drinking water by either retention in a sand column, filter, or by magnetic separation. The uranium adsorption process was also utilized

  7. Selenium ameliorates arsenic induced oxidative stress through modulation of antioxidant enzymes and thiols in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Singh, Rana Pratap; Singh, Pradyumna Kumar; Awasthi, Surabhi; Chakrabarty, Debasis; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar; Tripathi, Rudra Deo

    2014-09-01

    Arsenic (As) contamination of rice is a major problem for South-East Asia. In the present study, the effect of selenium (Se) on rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants exposed to As was studied in hydroponic culture. Arsenic accumulation, plant growth, thiolic ligands and antioxidative enzyme activities were assayed after single (As and Se) and simultaneous supplementations (As + Se). The results indicated that the presence of Se (25 µM) decreased As accumulation by threefold in roots and twofold in shoots as compared to single As (25 µM) exposed plants. Arsenic induced oxidative stress in roots and shoots was significantly ameliorated by Se supplementation. The observed positive response was found associated with the increased activities of ascorbate peroxidase (APX; EC 1.11.1.11), catalase (CAT; EC 1.11.1.6) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx; EC 1.11.1.9) and induced levels of non-protein thiols (NPTs), glutathione (GSH) and phytochelatins (PCs) in As + Se exposed plants as compared to single As treatment. Selenium supplementation modulated the thiol metabolism enzymes viz., γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-ECS; EC 6.3.2.2), glutathione-S-transferase (GST; EC 2.5.1.18) and phytochelatin synthase (PCS; EC 2.3.2.15). Gene expression analysis of several metalloid responsive genes (LOX, SOD and MATE) showed upregulation during As stress, however, significant downregulation during As + Se exposure as compared to single As treatment. Gene expressions of enzymes of antioxidant and GSH and PC biosynthetic systems, such as APX, CAT, GPx, γ-ECS and PCS were found to be significantly positively correlated with their enzyme activities. The findings suggested that Se supplementation could be an effective strategy to reduce As accumulation and toxicity in rice plants.

  8. Magnetic iron oxide (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles from tea waste for arsenic removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunge, Sneha, E-mail: jagtapsneha@yahoo.co.in [Central Institute of Mining and Fuel Research, Nagpur Unit-II, 17/C, Telenkhedi Area, Nagpur 440001 (India); Singh, Shripal, E-mail: Shripal_singh@yahoo.co.uk [Central Institute of Mining and Fuel Research, Nagpur Unit-II, 17/C, Telenkhedi Area, Nagpur 440001 (India); Sinha, Amalendu, E-mail: director@cmri.nic.in [Central Institute of Mining and Fuel Research, Barwa Road, Dhanbad, Jharkhand, 826001 (India)

    2014-04-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MION-Tea) successfully synthesized using tea waste template. MION-Tea exhibit super magnetic properties under external magnetic field with saturation magnetization value of 6.9 emu/g at room temperature. SEM of MION-Tea shows cuboid/pyramid shaped crystals structure of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (magnetite). TEM of MION-Tea shows the particle size in the range of 5–25 nm. XRD pattern of MION-Tea is identical to magnetite. Magnetic nanoparticles are tested for removal of As(III) and As(V) from aqueous solution. The adsorption data obeyed the Langmuir equation with high adsorption capacity of 188.69 mg/g for arsenic (III), and 153.8 mg/g for arsenic (V). The mean sorption energy (E) calculated from D–R model, indicated physico-chemical sorption process. A pseudo-second-order kinetic model fitted best for As(III) adsorption on MION-Tea and the derived activation energy was 64.27 kJ/mol. Thermodynamics revealed the endothermic nature of adsorption. The effects of solution pH, interfering anions and initial As(III) concentration have been investigated. MION-Tea was very low cost (Rs. 136 per kg). MION-Tea can be reused up to 5 adsorption cycles and regenerated using NaOH. Cost of As(III) removal from water of was estimated to be Rs. 14 for 100 L. Comparison with reported adsorbents proved MION-Tea a potential adsorbent for As(III) and As(V) adsorption. - Highlights: • Used tea has been used to prepare magnetic nanoparticles. • Nanoparticles have particle size of 2-25nm and cuboid/pyramid structure. • Magnetic nanoparticles show high adsorption capacity for arsenic.

  9. Akaganeite decorated graphene oxide composite for arsenic adsorption/removal and its proconcentration at ultra-trace level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Li; Sun, Yan; Huo, Chun-Bao; Liu, Chen; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2015-07-01

    Carboxylic graphene oxide (GO-COOH) is decorated with akaganeite (β-FeOOH) to produce a β-FeOOH@GO-COOH nanocomposite. The nanocomposite acts as an efficient adsorption medium for the uptake of arsenite and arsenate within a wide range of pH 3-10, providing high adsorption capacities of 77.5mgg(-1) for As(III) and 45.7mgg(-1) for As(V), respectively. Adsorption efficiencies of 100% and 97% are achieved for 5 successive operation cycles for the removal of 100μgL(-1) As(V) and As(III) in 5 fresh portions of aqueous solution (1.0mL for each) with 3mg nanocomposite. After 20 successive adsorption cycles, removal efficiency of >80% is still maintained for both arsenate and arsenite. Further, a removal efficiency of >90% is obtained for 1000μgL(-1) As(V) with 3mg β-FeOOH@GO-COOH for 5 successive adsorption cycles, and the presence of 2000-fold SO4(2-), NO3(-), Cl(-) and Mg(2+) pose no interfering effect. β-FeOOH@GO-COOH also provides a promising medium for the preconcentration of ultra-trace inorganic arsenic. 1mg of nanocomposite is used to adsorb 0.1-3.00μgL(-1) As(V) in 4.0mL solution, and the retained arsenate is recovered by 400μL of NaOH (2molL(-1), containing 2.0% NaBH4), followed by detection with atomic fluorescence spectrometry. A detection limit of 29ngL(-1) is obtained for arsenate. This procedure is validated by analyzing arsenic in a certified reference material (GBW 09101b) and further applied for arsenic determination in water samples.

  10. Arsenic Mobility and Groundwater Extraction in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Charles F.; Swartz, Christopher H.; Badruzzaman, A. B. M.; Keon-Blute, Nicole; Yu, Winston; Ali, M. Ashraf; Jay, Jenny; Beckie, Roger; Niedan, Volker; Brabander, Daniel; Oates, Peter M.; Ashfaque, Khandaker N.; Islam, Shafiqul; Hemond, Harold F.; Ahmed, M. Feroze

    2002-11-01

    High levels of arsenic in well water are causing widespread poisoning in Bangladesh. In a typical aquifer in southern Bangladesh, chemical data imply that arsenic mobilization is associated with recent inflow of carbon. High concentrations of radiocarbon-young methane indicate that young carbon has driven recent biogeochemical processes, and irrigation pumping is sufficient to have drawn water to the depth where dissolved arsenic is at a maximum. The results of field injection of molasses, nitrate, and low-arsenic water show that organic carbon or its degradation products may quickly mobilize arsenic, oxidants may lower arsenic concentrations, and sorption of arsenic is limited by saturation of aquifer materials.

  11. Removal of arsenic from water using manganese (III) oxide: Adsorption of As(III) and As(V).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaeivelni, Kamel; Khodadoust, Amid P

    2016-01-01

    Removal of arsenic from water was evaluated with manganese (III) oxide (Mn2O3) as adsorbent. Adsorption of As(III) and As(V) onto Mn2O3 was favorable according to the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption equilibrium equations, while chemisorption of arsenic occurred according to the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation. Adsorption parameters from the Langmuir, Freundlich, and Temkin equations showed a greater adsorption and removal of As(III) than As(V) by Mn2O3. Maximum removal of As(III) and As(V) occurred at pH 3-9 and at pH 2, respectively, while removal of As(V) in the pH range of 6-9 was 93% (pH 6) to 61% (pH 9) of the maximum removal. Zeta potential measurements for Mn2O3 in As(III) was likely converted to As(V) solutions indicated that As(III) was likely converted to As(V) on the Mn2O3 surface at pH 3-9. Overall, the effective Mn2O3 sorbent rapidly removed As(III) and As(V) from water in the pH range of 6-9 for natural waters.

  12. Residues in human arsenic (+3 oxidation state methyltransferase forming potential hydrogen bond network around S-adenosylmethionine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangli Li

    Full Text Available Residues Tyr59, Gly78, Ser79, Met103, Gln107, Ile136 and Glu137 in human arsenic (+3 oxidation state methyltransferase (hAS3MT were deduced to form a potential hydrogen bond network around S-adenosylmethionine (SAM from the sequence alignment between Cyanidioschyzon merolae arsenite S-adenosylmethyltransferase (CmArsM and hAS3MT. Herein, seven mutants Y59A, G78A, S79A, M103A, Q107A, I136A and E137A were obtained. Their catalytic activities and conformations were characterized and models were built. Y59A and G78A were completely inactive. Only 7.0%, 10.6% and 13.8% inorganic arsenic (iAs was transformed to monomethylated arsenicals (MMA when M103A, Q107A and I136A were used as the enzyme. The Vmax (the maximal velocity of the reaction values of M103A, Q107A, I136A and E137A were decreased to 8%, 22%, 15% and 50% of that of WT-hAS3MT, respectively. The KM(SAM (the Michaelis constant for SAM values of mutants M103A, I136A and E137A were 15.7, 8.9 and 5.1 fold higher than that of WT-hAS3MT, respectively, indicating that their affinities for SAM were weakened. The altered microenvironment of SAM and the reduced capacity of binding arsenic deduced from KM(As (the Michaelis constant for iAs value probably synergetically reduced the catalytic activity of Q107A. The catalytic activity of S79A was higher than that of WT despite of the higher KM(SAM , suggesting that Ser79 did not impact the catalytic activity of hAS3MT. In short, residues Tyr59 and Gly78 significantly influenced the catalytic activity of hAS3MT as well as Met103, Ile136 and Glu137 because they were closely associated with SAM-binding, while residue Gln107 did not affect SAM-binding regardless of affecting the catalytic activity of hAS3MT. Modeling and our experimental results suggest that the adenine ring of SAM is sandwiched between Ile136 and Met103, the amide group of SAM is hydrogen bonded to Gly78 in hAS3MT and SAM is bonded to Tyr59 with van der Waals, cation-π and hydrogen bonding

  13. Water-dispersible magnetite-reduced graphene oxide composites for arsenic removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Vimlesh; Park, Jaesung; Chun, Young; Lee, Jung Woo; Hwang, In-Chul; Kim, Kwang S

    2010-07-27

    Magnetite-graphene hybrids have been synthesized via a chemical reaction with a magnetite particle size of approximately 10 nm. The composites are superparamagnetic at room temperature and can be separated by an external magnetic field. As compared to bare magnetite particles, the hybrids show a high binding capacity for As(III) and As(V), whose presence in the drinking water in wide areas of South Asia has been a huge problem. Their high binding capacity is due to the increased adsorption sites in the M-RGO composite which occurs by reducing the aggregation of bare magnetite. Since the composites show near complete (over 99.9%) arsenic removal within 1 ppb, they are practically usable for arsenic separation from water.

  14. Water-dispersible magnetite-reduced graphene oxide composites for arsenic removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Vimlesh; Park, Jaesung; Chun, Young; Lee, Jung Woo; Hwang, In-Chul; Kim, Kwang S

    2010-07-27

    Magnetite-graphene hybrids have been synthesized via a chemical reaction with a magnetite particle size of approximately 10 nm. The composites are superparamagnetic at room temperature and can be separated by an external magnetic field. As compared to bare magnetite particles, the hybrids show a high binding capacity for As(III) and As(V), whose presence in the drinking water in wide areas of South Asia has been a huge problem. Their high binding capacity is due to the increased adsorption sites in the M-RGO composite which occurs by reducing the aggregation of bare magnetite. Since the composites show near complete (over 99.9%) arsenic removal within 1 ppb, they are practically usable for arsenic separation from water. PMID:20552997

  15. Comparative study of arsenic removal efficiency from water by adsorption and photocatalytic oxidation with titanium dioxide

    OpenAIRE

    Kocabaş, Özlem Züleyha; Kocabas, Ozlem Zuleyha; YÜRÜM, YUDA; Yurum, Yuda

    2010-01-01

    Titanium dioxide, a well-known adsorbent material, has been extensively tested in environmental applications, especially in separation technologies. In the present study, TiO2 nanoparticles were synthesized by using sol-gel method for removing arsenic ions from water. Several water/titanium molar ratios were prepared in order to obtain optimum crystalline structure, morphology, and particle size of titanium dioxide nanoparticles. Two types of TiO2 minerals which were rutile and anatese were m...

  16. 微生物对砷的氧化还原竞争%Competitive Microbial Oxidation and Reduction of Arsenic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨婷婷; 柏耀辉; 梁金松; 霍旸; 王明星; 袁林江

    2016-01-01

    Filters are widely applied in drinking water treatment plants. Our previous study, which explored the asenic redox in a filter of drinking water plant treating underground water, found that As3 + could be oxidized to As5 + by biogenic manganese oxides, while As5 + could be reduced to As3 + by some microbial arsenic reductases in the biofilter system. This microbial competition could influence the system stability and treatment efficiency. To explore its mechanism, this study selected a manganese-oxidizing bacterial strain (Pseudomonas sp. QJX-1) and a arsenic-reducing strain ( Brevibacterium sp. LSJ-9) to investigate their competitive relationship in nutrient acquisition and arsenic redox in the presence of Mn2 + , As3 + or As5 + . The results revealed that the concentration and valence of Mn and As varied with different reaction time; biological manganese oxides dominated the arsenic redox by rapidly oxidizing the As3 +in the existing system and the As3 + generated by arsenic reductase into As5 + . PCR and RT-PCR results indicated that the arsenic reductase (arsC) was inhibited by the manganese oxidase (cumA). The expression of 16S rRNA in QJX-1 was two orders of magnitude higher than that in LSJ-9, which implied QJX-1 was dominant in the bacterial growth. Our data revealed that hydraulic retention time was critical to the valence of arsenic in the effluent of filter in drinking water treatment plant.%滤池被广泛运用于饮用水厂中,前期研究发现某水厂生物滤池处理含砷地下水时,一方面三价砷可被生物氧化锰氧化为五价砷,另一方面滤池系统中存在的微生物砷还原酶可促使五价砷还原为三价砷,而滤池表面存在的这种微生物竞争关系会影响滤池的稳定性及处理效率.为探讨其内在机制,本研究选取1株锰氧化模式菌(Pseudomonas sp. QJX-1)和1株砷还原模式菌(Brevibacterium sp. LSJ-9),考察在 Mn2+、 As(As3+、 As5+)共存时,两菌株对空间、营养物质以及

  17. Protective Effects of Combined Selenium and Punica granatum Treatment on Some Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress Markers in Arsenic-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafik, Noha M; El Batsh, Maha M

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is one of the major mechanisms implicated in inorganic arsenic poisoning. Punica granatum is known by its free radical scavenging properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective role of combined selenium and P. granatum against arsenic-induced liver injury. Seventy-five female albino rats were divided into five groups (of 15 rats each). Toxicity was induced by oral sodium arsenite (5.5 mg/kg body weight (bw) daily) (group ІІ). Treatment of arsenic-intoxicated rats was induced by daily oral administration of sodium selenite (3 mg/kg bw) (group ІІІ), 100 mg of P. granatum ethanol extract per kilogram body weight dissolved in 300 mL distilled water in three divided doses (100 mL of this suspension every 8 h) (group IV), and combined daily oral treatment with both selenite and P. granatum ethanol extract (group V). After 3 weeks, serum and liver tissues were obtained from the decapitated rats for different estimations. Hepatotoxicity was demonstrated by significant elevation in liver weights and activities of liver enzymes, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and decrease in serum total proteins and albumin (p arsenic hepatotoxicity led to an increased values of malondialdehyde, advanced oxidation protein products, nitric oxide, and interleukin-6 (IL-6) (p treated with both P. granatum and selenium. It was concluded that combined P. granatum and selenium treatment had a synergistic hepatoprotective effect against arsenic toxicity through activation of Nrf2 anti-oxidant pathway.

  18. Factors Affecting Arsenic Methylation in Arsenic-Exposed Humans: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hui; Niu, Qiang; Xu, Mengchuan; Rui, Dongsheng; Xu, Shangzhi; Feng, Gangling; Ding, Yusong; Li, Shugang; Jing, Mingxia

    2016-02-06

    Chronic arsenic exposure is a critical public health issue in many countries. The metabolism of arsenic in vivo is complicated because it can be influenced by many factors. In the present meta-analysis, two researchers independently searched electronic databases, including the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Springer, Embase, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure, to analyze factors influencing arsenic methylation. The concentrations of the following arsenic metabolites increase (parsenic exposure: inorganic arsenic (iAs), monomethyl arsenic (MMA), dimethyl arsenic (DMA), and total arsenic. Additionally, the percentages of iAs (standard mean difference (SMD): 1.00; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.60-1.40; parsenic methylation, and arsenic methylation is more efficient in women than in men. The results of this analysis may provide information regarding the role of arsenic oxidative methylation in the arsenic poisoning process.

  19. Factors Affecting Arsenic Methylation in Arsenic-Exposed Humans: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hui; Niu, Qiang; Xu, Mengchuan; Rui, Dongsheng; Xu, Shangzhi; Feng, Gangling; Ding, Yusong; Li, Shugang; Jing, Mingxia

    2016-02-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure is a critical public health issue in many countries. The metabolism of arsenic in vivo is complicated because it can be influenced by many factors. In the present meta-analysis, two researchers independently searched electronic databases, including the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Springer, Embase, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure, to analyze factors influencing arsenic methylation. The concentrations of the following arsenic metabolites increase (parsenic exposure: inorganic arsenic (iAs), monomethyl arsenic (MMA), dimethyl arsenic (DMA), and total arsenic. Additionally, the percentages of iAs (standard mean difference (SMD): 1.00; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.60-1.40; parsenic methylation, and arsenic methylation is more efficient in women than in men. The results of this analysis may provide information regarding the role of arsenic oxidative methylation in the arsenic poisoning process.

  20. Multilayer assemblies of polyelectrolyte-gold nanoparticles for the electrocatalytic oxidation and detection of arsenic(III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottakam Thotiyl, M M; Basit, Hajra; Sánchez, Julio A; Goyer, Cedric; Coche-Guerente, Liliane; Dumy, Pascal; Sampath, S; Labbé, Pierre; Moutet, Jean-Claude

    2012-10-01

    Multilayers of poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) and citrate capped Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) anchored on sodium 3-mercapto-1-propanesulfonate modified gold electrode by electrostatic layer-by-layer assembly (LbL) technique are shown to be an excellent architecture for the direct electrochemical oxidation of As(III) species. The growth of successive layers in the proposed LbL architecture is followed by atomic force microscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy, quartz crystal microbalance with energy dissipation, and electrochemistry. The first bilayer is found to show rather different physico-chemical characteristics as compared to the subsequent bilayers, and this is attributed to the difference in the adsorption environments. The analytical utility of the architecture with five bilayers is exploited for arsenic sensing via the direct electrocatalytic oxidation of As(III), and the detection limit is found to be well below the WHO guidelines of 10ppb. When the non-redox active PDDA is replaced by the redox-active Os(2,2'-bipyridine)(2)Cl-poly(4-vinylpyridine) polyelectrolyte (PVPOs) in the LbL assembly, the performance is found to be inferior, demonstrating that the redox activity of the polyelectrolyte is futile as far as the direct electro-oxidation of As(III) is concerned.

  1. Research Progress on Molecular Mechanisms of Arsenic- induced Oxidative Stress%砷的氧化应激分子机制研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白彩军; 刘丹; 李冰

    2012-01-01

    砷暴露能够引起多种疾病和病理损伤.目前氧化应激机制是砷毒性的研究热点.砷通过扰乱氧化/抗氧化平衡,从而引起细胞信号通路和转录因子活性、细胞周期和细胞凋亡、线粒体、抗氧化物酶的活性、抗氧化防御系统等方面的改变.本文将就砷的氧化应激分子机制的研究进展进行综述.%Arsenic exposure can cause a variety of diseases and pathological damages. In recent years, oxidative stress mechanism has been considered to be the research focus of arsenic toxicity. Arsenic alters multiple cellular pathways and transcription factor activities, cell cycle and cell apoptosis, mitochondria, antioxidant enzymes activity, and antioxidant defense system by disturbing the pro/antioxidant balance. This review summarizes the molecular mechanism of arsenic- induced oxidative stress.

  2. Anoxic nitrate reduction coupled with iron oxidation and attenuation of dissolved arsenic and phosphate in a sand and gravel aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard L.; Kent, Douglas B.; Repert, Deborah A.; Bohlke, J.K.

    2017-01-01

    weeks. Additionally, Fe(II)-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing microbial enrichment cultures were obtained from aquifer sediments. Growth experiments with the cultures sequentially produced nitrite and nitrous oxide from nitrate while simultaneously oxidizing Fe(II). Field and culture results suggest that nitrogen oxide reduction and Fe(II) oxidation in the aquifer are a complex interaction of coupled biotic and abiotic reactions. Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that anoxic nitrate-dependent iron oxidation can occur in groundwater; that it could control iron speciation; and that the process can impact the mobility of other chemical species (e.g., phosphate and arsenic) not directly involved in the oxidation–reduction reaction.

  3. Tolerance, arsenic uptake, and oxidative stress in Acacia farnesiana under arsenate-stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcantara-Martinez, Nemi; Guizar, Sandra; Rivera-Cabrera, Fernando; Anicacio-Acevedo, Blanca E; Buendia-Gonzalez, Leticia; Volke-Sepulveda, Tania

    2016-07-01

    Acacia farnesiana is a shrub widely distributed in soils heavily polluted with arsenic in Mexico. However, the mechanisms by which this species tolerates the phytotoxic effects of arsenic are unknown. This study aimed to investigate the tolerance and bioaccumulation of As by A. farnesiana seedlings exposed to high doses of arsenate (AsV) and the role of peroxidases (POX) and glutathione S-transferases (GST) in alleviating As-stress. For that, long-period tests were performed in vitro under different AsV treatments. A. farnesiana showed a remarkable tolerance to AsV, achieving a half-inhibitory concentration (IC50) of about 2.8 mM. Bioaccumulation reached about 940 and 4380 mg As·kg(-1) of dry weight in shoots and roots, respectively, exposed for 60 days to 0.58 mM AsV. Seedlings exposed to such conditions registered a growth delay during the first 15 days, when the fastest As uptake rate (117 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) occurred, coinciding with both the highest rate of lipid peroxidation and the strongest up-regulation of enzyme activities. GST activity showed a strong correlation with the As bioaccumulated, suggesting its role in imparting AsV tolerance. This study demonstrated that besides tolerance to AsV, A. farnesiana bioaccumulates considerable amounts of As, suggesting that it may be useful for phytostabilization purposes. PMID:26618535

  4. Effects of manganese oxide on arsenic reduction and leaching from contaminated floodplain soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehlert, Katrin; Mikutta, Christian; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    Reductive release of the potentially toxic metalloid As from Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides has been identified as an important process leading to elevated As porewater concentrations in soils and sediments. Despite the ubiquitous presence of Mn oxides in soils and their oxidizing power toward As(III), ...

  5. Unravelling the fate of arsenic during re-oxidation of reduced wetland waters: Experimental constraints and environmental consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pédrot, Mathieu; Dia, Aline; Davranche, Mélanie; Martin, Sébastien; Al-Sid-Cheikh, Maya; Gruau, Gérard

    2015-09-01

    The presence of arsenic(As)-bearing Fe(III) oxyhydroxides in wetland zones may threat water quality due to the reduction processes that affect these zones. These processes have indeed the potential of releasing As into the soil solutions, and ultimately into the nearby river network, being given the hydrological connectivity that exists between wetlands and rivers. The effective transport of the released As into the river network is however dependent on the behaviour of As during the re-oxidation process that will occur at the wetland-river boundary, which could immobilize the released As into neo-formed Fe(III) oxyhydroxides. One of the key questions is, however, which is the impact of the organic-rich nature of wetland waters on this neoformation, which could instead favour the development of highly mobile As-bearing, organomineral colloids. In this study, we evaluated this possibility by carrying out oxidation experiments on humic acid (HA)- and As(III)/Fe(II)-rich waters. The ultrafiltration results showed that the presence of organic molecules during Fe oxidation events played a major role in the hydrolysis reaction of Fe oxyhydroxides. When Fe microparticles were formed in the absence of HA, the occurrence of HA during Fe oxidation events promoted the formation of amorphous nanosize Fe phase diffusely embedded within the organic matrix. These mixed Fe-HA colloids constrained the fate and distribution of As. These results were confirmed by nanoSIMS images that showed As sorption onto and within Fe microparticles (> 0.2 μm) in the absence of HA. By contrast, with HA, results showed preferential incorporation of As in the bulk of Fe-HA colloids (< 0.2 μm) during their formation rather than surface adsorption onto these colloids.

  6. Sorptive Uptake Studies of an Aryl-Arsenical with Iron Oxide Composites on an Activated Carbon Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae H. Kwon

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sorption uptake kinetics and equilibrium studies for 4-hydroxy-3-nitrobenzene arsonic acid (roxarsone was evaluated with synthetic magnetite (Mag-P, commercial magnetite (Mag-C, magnetite 10%, 19%, and 32% composite material (CM-10, -19, -32 that contains granular activated carbon (GAC, and synthetic goethite at pH 7.00 in water at 21 °C for 24 h. GAC showed the highest sorptive removal of roxarsone and the relative uptake for each sorbent material with roxarsone are listed in descending order as follows: GAC (471 mg/g > goethite (418 mg/g > CM-10 (377 mg/g CM-19 (254 mg/g > CM-32 (227 mg/g > Mag-P (132 mg/g > Mag-C (29.5 mg/g. The As (V moiety of roxarsone is adsorbed onto the surface of the iron oxide/oxyhydrate and is inferred as inner-sphere surface complexes; monodentate-mononuclear, bidentate-mononuclear, and bidentate-binuclear depending on the protolytic speciation of roxarsone. The phenyl ring of roxarsone provides the primary driving force for the sorptive interaction with the graphene surface of GAC and its composites. Thus, magnetite composites are proposed as multi-purpose adsorbents for the co-removal of inorganic and organic arsenicals due to the presence of graphenic and iron oxide active adsorption sites.

  7. Kilogram-scale synthesis of iron oxy-hydroxides with improved arsenic removal capacity: study of Fe(II) oxidation--precipitation parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresintsi, Sofia; Simeonidis, Konstantinos; Vourlias, George; Stavropoulos, George; Mitrakas, Manassis

    2012-10-15

    Various iron oxy-hydroxides were synthesized in a continuous flow kilogram-scale production reactor through the precipitation of FeSO(4) and FeCl(2) in the pH range 3-12 under intense oxidative conditions to serve as arsenic adsorbents. The selection of the optimum adsorbent and the corresponding conditions of the synthesis was based not only on its maximum As(III) and As(V) adsorption capacity but also on its potential efficiency to achieve the arsenic health regulation limit in NSF challenge water. As a result, the adsorbent prepared at pH 4, which consists of schwertmannite, was selected because it exhibited the highest adsorption capacity of 13 μg As(V)/mg, while maintaining a residual arsenic concentration of 10 μg/L at an equilibrium pH 7. The high surface charge and the activation of an ion-exchange mechanism between SO(4)(2-) adsorbed in the Stern layer and arsenate ions were found to significantly contribute to the increased adsorption capacity. Adsorption capacity values observed in rapid scale column experiments illustrate the improved efficiency of the qualified adsorbent compared to the common commercial arsenic adsorbents.

  8. Current conditions of researches in arsenic-induced oxidative stress%砷诱发氧化应激研究现状

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安艳; 李春春; 邓晗依

    2015-01-01

    目前,世界范围内有近2亿人通过饮水和饮食暴露于具有毒性危险的砷,慢性砷中毒已经成为严重威胁人类健康的全球性的公共卫生问题。砷作为确认的人类致癌物,其毒性作用具体分子和细胞机制尚不清楚,氧化应激是目前被广泛接受与研究的砷毒性作用机制。本文主要综述了砷诱发活性氧的生成、相关生物标志和砷对抗氧化酶以及抗氧化防御系统作用的相关研究进展。%Currently ,it is estimated that more than 200 million people are at risk of toxic arsenic exposure from groundwater and food contamination . Arsenicosis is a serious and widespread global public health problem . However ,the exact molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in arsenic toxicity remain unclear .Oxidative stress is currently the most widely accepted and studied mechanism of arsenic toxicity .This review updates recent advances in generation of arsenic‐induced reactive oxygen species ,its relevant biomarkers ,the effects of arsenic on enzyme activities and the cellular defense mechanism .

  9. Arsenic in contaminated soil and river sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bombach, G. (Freiberg Univ. of Mining and Technology, Inst. of Mineralogy, Geochemistry and Ore Deposits, Freiberg (Germany)); Pierra, A. (Freiberg Univ. of Mining and Technology, Inst. of Mineralogy, Geochemistry and Ore Deposits, Freiberg (Germany)); Klemm, W. (Freiberg Univ. of Mining and Technology, Inst. of Mineralogy, Geochemistry and Ore Deposits, Freiberg (Germany))

    1994-09-01

    Different areas in the Erzgebirge mountains are contaminated by high arsenic concentration which is caused by the occurrence of ore and industrial sources. The study showed clearly a high concentration of arsenic in the surface and under soil (A and B horizons) in the Freiberg district. The distribution of the arsenic concentration in the area, the content of water soluble arsenic, the several oxidation states (As[sup 3+], As[sup 5+]) and the bonding types have been analyzed. (orig.)

  10. Arsenic Adsorption on Iron Oxides in the Presence of Soluble Organic Carbon and the Influence of Arsenic on Radish and Lettuce Development

    OpenAIRE

    Grafe, Markus

    2000-01-01

    Chapter 2: Germination and Growth of Radish (Raphanus sativus) and Lettuce (Lactuca sativus) Exposed to Arsenite and Arsenate in Hydroponic Growth Solution Little information is available on the survival, uptake, and dry mass production of vegetable seedlings and maturing plants in arsenic enriched environments. Such information is however very important to many vegetable growers in areas of subsistent agricultural like Bangladesh or home-gardeners in closer proximity of As source...

  11. Anaerobic arsenite oxidation with an electrode serving as the sole electron acceptor: A novel approach to the bioremediation of arsenic-polluted groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pous, Narcis [Laboratory of Chemical and Environmental Engineering (LEQUiA), Institute of the Environment, University of Girona, C/Maria Aurèlia Capmany, 69 E-17071 Girona (Spain); Casentini, Barbara; Rossetti, Simona; Fazi, Stefano [Water Research Institute (IRSA-CNR), National Research Council, Via Salaria Km 29.300, 00015 Monterotondo (Italy); Puig, Sebastià [Laboratory of Chemical and Environmental Engineering (LEQUiA), Institute of the Environment, University of Girona, C/Maria Aurèlia Capmany, 69 E-17071 Girona (Spain); Aulenta, Federico, E-mail: aulenta@irsa.cnr.it [Water Research Institute (IRSA-CNR), National Research Council, Via Salaria Km 29.300, 00015 Monterotondo (Italy)

    2015-02-11

    Highlights: • As(III) was oxidized to As(V) in a bioelectrochemical system. • A polarized graphite electrode served as electron acceptor. • Gammaproteobacteria were the dominating organisms at the electrode. - Abstract: Arsenic contamination of soil and groundwater is a serious problem worldwide. Here we show that anaerobic oxidation of As(III) to As(V), a form which is more extensively and stably adsorbed onto metal-oxides, can be achieved by using a polarized (+497 mV vs. SHE) graphite anode serving as terminal electron acceptor in the microbial metabolism. The characterization of the microbial populations at the electrode, by using in situ detection methods, revealed the predominance of gammaproteobacteria. In principle, the proposed bioelectrochemical oxidation process would make it possible to provide As(III)-oxidizing microorganisms with a virtually unlimited, low-cost and low-maintenance electron acceptor as well as with a physical support for microbial attachment.

  12. Increases of ferrous iron oxidation activity and arsenic stressed cell growth by overexpression of Cyc2 in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC19859.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Lin, Jianqun; Pang, Xin; Mi, Shuang; Cui, Shuang; Lin, Jianqiang

    2013-01-01

    Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans plays an important role in bioleaching in reproducing the mineral oxidant of ferric iron (Fe(3+) ) by oxidization of ferrous iron (Fe(2+) ). The high-molecular-weight c-type cytochrome Cyc2 that is located in the external membrane is postulated as the first electron carrier in the Fe(2+) oxidation respiratory pathway of A. ferrooxidans. To increase ferrous iron oxidation activity, a recombinant plasmid pTCYC2 containing cyc2 gene under the control of Ptac promoter was constructed and transferred into A. ferrooxidans ATCC19859. The transcriptional level of cyc2 gene was increased by 2.63-fold and Cyc2 protein expression was observed in the recombinant strain compared with the control. The ferrous iron oxidation activity and the arsenic stressed cell growth of the recombinant strain were also elevated.

  13. Anaerobic arsenite oxidation with an electrode serving as the sole electron acceptor: A novel approach to the bioremediation of arsenic-polluted groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • As(III) was oxidized to As(V) in a bioelectrochemical system. • A polarized graphite electrode served as electron acceptor. • Gammaproteobacteria were the dominating organisms at the electrode. - Abstract: Arsenic contamination of soil and groundwater is a serious problem worldwide. Here we show that anaerobic oxidation of As(III) to As(V), a form which is more extensively and stably adsorbed onto metal-oxides, can be achieved by using a polarized (+497 mV vs. SHE) graphite anode serving as terminal electron acceptor in the microbial metabolism. The characterization of the microbial populations at the electrode, by using in situ detection methods, revealed the predominance of gammaproteobacteria. In principle, the proposed bioelectrochemical oxidation process would make it possible to provide As(III)-oxidizing microorganisms with a virtually unlimited, low-cost and low-maintenance electron acceptor as well as with a physical support for microbial attachment

  14. Effect of competing solutes on arsenic(V) adsorption using iron and aluminum oxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The study focused on the effect of several typical competing solutes on removal of arsenic with Fe2O3 and Al2O3. The test results indicate that chloride, nitrate and sulfate did not have detectable effects, and that selenium(IV) (Se(IV)) and vanadium(V) (V(V)) show slight effects on the adsorption of As(V) with Fe2O3. The results also showed that adsorption of As(V) on Al2O3 was not affected by chloride and nitrate anions, but slightly by Se(IV) and V(V) ions. Unlike the adsorption of As(V) with Fe2O3, that with Fe2O3 was affected by the presence of sulfate in water solutions. Both phosphate and silica have significant adverse effects on the adsorption of As(V) adsorption with Fe2O3 and Al2O3. Compared to the other tested anions, phosphate anion was found to be the most prominent solute affecting the As(V) adsorption with Fe2O3 and Al2O3. In general, Fe2O3 has a better performance than Al2O3 in removal of As(V) within a water environment where multi competing solutes are present.

  15. Removal of arsenic, phosphates and ammonia from well water using electrochemical/chemical methods and advanced oxidation: a pilot plant approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orescanin, Visnja; Kollar, Robert; Nad, Karlo; Halkijevic, Ivan; Kuspilic, Marin; Findri Gustek, Stefica

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop a pilot plant purification system and apply it to groundwater used for human consumption, containing high concentrations of arsenic and increased levels of phosphates, ammonia, mercury and color. The groundwater used was obtained from the production well in the Vinkovci County (Eastern Croatia). Due to a complex composition of the treated water, the purification system involved a combined electrochemical treatment, using iron and aluminum electrode plates with simultaneous ozonation, followed by a post-treatment with UV, ozone and hydrogen peroxide. The removal of the contaminant with the waste sludge collected during the electrochemical treatment was also tested. The combined electrochemical and advanced oxidation treatment resulted in the complete removal of arsenic, phosphates, color, turbidity, suspended solids and ammonia, while the removal of other contaminants of interest was up to 96.7%. Comparable removal efficiencies were obtained by using waste sludge as a coagulant.

  16. Arsenic ototoxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gulin Gokçen Kesici

    2016-01-01

    High levels of arsenic are found in many parts of the world and more than 100 million people may have been exposed to it. There is growing evidence to indicate that arsenic has a deleterious effect on the auditory system. This paper provides the general information of arsenic and its ototoxic effects.

  17. Denitrification-Coupled Iron(II) Oxidation: A Key Process Regulating the Fate and Transport of Nitrate, Phosphate, and Arsenic in a Wastewater-Contaminated Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. L.; Kent, D. B.; Repert, D. A.; Hart, C. P.

    2007-12-01

    Denitrification in the subsurface is often viewed as a heterotrophic process. However, some denitrifiers can also utilize inorganic electron donors. In particular, Fe(II), which is common in many aquifers, could be an important reductant for contaminant nitrate. Anoxic iron oxidation would have additional consequences, including decreased mobility for species like arsenic and phosphate, which bind strongly to hydrous Fe(III) oxide. A study was conducted in a wastewater contaminant plume on Cape Cod to assess the potential for denitrification- coupled Fe(II) oxidation. Previous changes in wastewater disposal upgradient of the study area had resulted in nitrate being transported into a portion of the anoxic zone of the plume and decreased concentrations of Fe(II), phosphate, and arsenic. A series of anoxic tracers (groundwater + nitrate + bromide) were injected into the unaffected, Fe(II)-containing zone under natural gradient conditions. Denitrification was stimulated within 1 m of transport (4 days) for both low and high (100 & 1000 μM) nitrate additions, initially producing stiochiometric quantities of nitrous oxide (>300 μM N) and trace amounts of nitrite. Subsequent injections at the same site reduced nitrate even more rapidly and produced less nitrous oxide, especially over longer transport distances. Fe(II) and nitrate concentrations decreased together and this was accompanied by an increase in colloidal Fe(III) and decreases in pH, total arsenic, and phosphate concentrations. All plume constituents returned to background levels several weeks after the tracer tests were completed. Groundwater microorganisms collected on filters during the tracer test rapidly and immediately reduced nitrite and oxidized Fe(II) in 3-hr laboratory incubations. Several pure cultures of Fe(II)-oxidizing denitrifying bacteria were isolated from core material and subsequently characterized. All of the isolates were mixotrophic, simultaneously oxidizing organic carbon and Fe

  18. Atorvastatin restores arsenic-induced vascular dysfunction in rats: Modulation of nitric oxide signaling and inflammatory mediators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated whether atorvastatin, an extensively prescribed statin for reducing the risks of cardiovascular diseases, can reduce the risk of arsenic-induced vascular dysfunction and inflammation in rats and whether the modulation could be linked to improvement in vascular NO signaling. Rats were exposed to sodium arsenite (100 ppm) through drinking water for 90 consecutive days. Atorvastatin (10 mg/kg bw, orally) was administered once daily during the last 30 days of arsenic exposure. On the 91st day, blood was collected for measuring serum C-reactive protein. Thoracic aorta was isolated for assessing reactivity to phenylephrine, sodium nitroprusside and acetylcholine; evaluating eNOS and iNOS mRNA expression and measuring NO production, while abdominal aorta was used for ELISA of cytokines, chemokine and vascular cell adhesion molecules. Histopathology was done in aortic arches. Arsenic did not alter phenylephrine-elicited contraction. Atorvastatin inhibited Emax of phenylephrine, but it augmented the contractile response in aortic rings from arsenic-exposed animals. Sodium nitroprusside-induced relaxation was not altered with any treatment. However, arsenic reduced acetylcholine-induced relaxation and affected aortic eNOS at the levels of mRNA expression, protein concentration, phosphorylation and NO production. Further, it increased aortic iNOS mRNA expression, iNOS-derived NO synthesis, production of pro-inflammatory mediators (IL-1β, IL-6, MCP-1, VCAM, sICAM) and serum C-reactive protein and aortic vasculopathic lesions. Atorvastatin attenuated these arsenic-mediated functional, biochemical and structural alterations. Results show that atorvastatin has the potential to ameliorate arsenic-induced vascular dysfunction and inflammation by restoring endothelial function with improvement in NO signaling and attenuating production of pro-inflammatory mediators and cell adhesion molecules. - Highlights: • We evaluated if atorvastatin reduce arsenic

  19. Atorvastatin restores arsenic-induced vascular dysfunction in rats: Modulation of nitric oxide signaling and inflammatory mediators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kesavan, Manickam; Sarath, Thengumpallil Sasindran; Kannan, Kandasamy; Suresh, Subramaniyam; Gupta, Priyanka; Vijayakaran, Karunakaran; Sankar, Palanisamy; Kurade, Nitin Pandurang; Mishra, Santosh Kumar; Sarkar, Souvendra Nath, E-mail: snsarkar1911@rediffmail.com

    2014-10-01

    We evaluated whether atorvastatin, an extensively prescribed statin for reducing the risks of cardiovascular diseases, can reduce the risk of arsenic-induced vascular dysfunction and inflammation in rats and whether the modulation could be linked to improvement in vascular NO signaling. Rats were exposed to sodium arsenite (100 ppm) through drinking water for 90 consecutive days. Atorvastatin (10 mg/kg bw, orally) was administered once daily during the last 30 days of arsenic exposure. On the 91{sup st} day, blood was collected for measuring serum C-reactive protein. Thoracic aorta was isolated for assessing reactivity to phenylephrine, sodium nitroprusside and acetylcholine; evaluating eNOS and iNOS mRNA expression and measuring NO production, while abdominal aorta was used for ELISA of cytokines, chemokine and vascular cell adhesion molecules. Histopathology was done in aortic arches. Arsenic did not alter phenylephrine-elicited contraction. Atorvastatin inhibited E{sub max} of phenylephrine, but it augmented the contractile response in aortic rings from arsenic-exposed animals. Sodium nitroprusside-induced relaxation was not altered with any treatment. However, arsenic reduced acetylcholine-induced relaxation and affected aortic eNOS at the levels of mRNA expression, protein concentration, phosphorylation and NO production. Further, it increased aortic iNOS mRNA expression, iNOS-derived NO synthesis, production of pro-inflammatory mediators (IL-1β, IL-6, MCP-1, VCAM, sICAM) and serum C-reactive protein and aortic vasculopathic lesions. Atorvastatin attenuated these arsenic-mediated functional, biochemical and structural alterations. Results show that atorvastatin has the potential to ameliorate arsenic-induced vascular dysfunction and inflammation by restoring endothelial function with improvement in NO signaling and attenuating production of pro-inflammatory mediators and cell adhesion molecules. - Highlights: • We evaluated if atorvastatin reduce arsenic

  20. Microwave-Assisted Combustion Synthesis of Nano Iron Oxide/Iron-Coated Activated Carbon, Anthracite, Cellulose Fiber, and Silica, with Arsenic Adsorption Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallikarjuna N. Nadagouda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Combustion synthesis of iron oxide/iron coated carbons such as activated carbon, anthracite, cellulose fiber, and silica is described. The reactions were carried out in alumina crucibles using a Panasonic kitchen microwave with inverter technology, and the reaction process was completed within a few minutes. The method used no additional fuel and nitrate, which is present in the precursor itself, to drive the reaction. The obtained samples were then characterized with X-ray mapping, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS, selected area diffraction pattern (SAED, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and inductively coupled plasma (ICP spectroscopy. The size of the iron oxide/iron nanoparticle-coated activated carbon, anthracite, cellulose fiber, and silica samples were found to be in the nano range (50–400 nm. The iron oxide/iron nanoparticles mostly crystallized into cubic symmetry which was confirmed by SAED. The XRD pattern indicated that iron oxide/iron nano particles existed in four major phases. That is, γ-Fe2O3, α-Fe2O3, Fe3O4, and Fe. These iron-coated activated carbon, anthracite, cellulose fiber, and silica samples were tested for arsenic adsorption through batch experiments, revealing that few samples had significant arsenic adsorption.

  1. Arsenic and cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianchi F.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of epidemiologic, experimental and clinical evidence shows that arsenic may exert relevant cardiovascular effects with early damage such as endothelial dysfunction. Early biomarkers of cardiovascular damage together with markers of exposure, genetic and epigenetic effects, DNA damage, apoptosis, oxidative stress remain unexplored and a study is ongoing in Italy.

  2. Arsenic adsorption in pre-treatment natural zeolite with magnesium oxides; Adsorcion de arsenico en zeolita natural pretratada con oxidos de magnesio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejia Z, F. [Universidad Autonoma de Baja California, Instituto de Ingenieria, Blvd. Benito Juarez s/n, 21900 Mexicali, Baja California (Mexico); Valenzuela G, J. L.; Aguayo S, S.; Meza F, D., E-mail: fleridam@iq.uson.m [Universidad de Sonora, Departamentos de Geologia e Ingenieria Quimica y Metalurgia, Blvd. Luis Encinas y Rosales s/n, Col. Centro, 83000 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

    2009-07-01

    A methodology was developed to modify a natural zeolite (chabazite) with magnesium oxide in order to remove arsenic (As{sup +5}) from water for human consumption. It is proposed a magnesium oxide while regarded as an efficient adsorbent for removing metals in water. X-ray diffraction analyses show significant changes in the chabazite due to the presence of oxides and amorphous hydroxides incorporated during the pre-treatment. Experimental design results show an efficiency greater than 90% of As{sup +5} adsorbed in five minutes. The results indicate that the most significant variables affecting the adsorption of As{sup +5} are the initial concentration of As and the solid/liquid ratio. Experimental data fitted better to Freundlich isotherm with a 20.17 mg/g adsorption capability. (Author)

  3. Manufacture of high purity low arsenic anhydrous hydrogen fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process for manufacturing anhydrous hydrogen fluoride with reduced levels of arsenic impurity from arsenic contaminated anhydrous hydrogen fluoride is described which comprises: (a) contacting the anhydrous hydrogen fluoride with an effective amount of hydrogen peroxide to oxidize the arsenic impurity in the presence of a catalyst which comprises a catalytic amount of (i) molybdenum or an inorganic molybdenum compound and (ii) a phosphate compound, at a temperature and for a period of time sufficient to oxidize volatile trivalent arsenic impurities in the anhydrous hydrogen fluoride to non-volatile pentavalent arsenic compounds, and (b) distilling the resulting mixture and recovering anhydrous hydrogen fluoride with reduced levels of arsenic impurity

  4. Phytoextraction by arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata L. from six arsenic-contaminated soils: Repeated harvests and arsenic redistribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzaga, Maria I.S.; Santos, Jorge A.G. [Department of Soil Chemistry, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Cruz das Almas, 44380000 (Brazil); Ma, Lena Q. [Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida, 2169 McCarty Hall, Gainesville, FL 32611-0290 (United States)], E-mail: lqma@ifas.ufl.edu

    2008-07-15

    This greenhouse experiment evaluated arsenic removal by Pteris vittata and its effects on arsenic redistribution in soils. P. vittata grew in six arsenic-contaminated soils and its fronds were harvested and analyzed for arsenic in October, 2003, April, 2004, and October, 2004. The soil arsenic was separated into five fractions via sequential extraction. The ferns grew well and took up arsenic from all soils. Fern biomass ranged from 24.8 to 33.5 g plant{sup -1} after 4 months of growth but was reduced in the subsequent harvests. The frond arsenic concentrations ranged from 66 to 6,151 mg kg{sup -1}, 110 to 3,056 mg kg{sup -1}, and 162 to 2,139 mg kg{sup -1} from the first, second and third harvest, respectively. P. vittata reduced soil arsenic by 6.4-13% after three harvests. Arsenic in the soils was primarily associated with amorphous hydrous oxides (40-59%), which contributed the most to arsenic taken up by P. vittata (45-72%). It is possible to use P. vittata to remediate arsenic-contaminated soils by repeatedly harvesting its fronds. - Pteris vittata was effective in continuously removing arsenic from contaminated soils after three repeated harvests.

  5. Arsenic poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoolmeester, W.L.; White, D.R.

    1980-02-01

    Arsenic poisoning continues to require awareness of its diverse clinical manifestations. Industry is the major source of arsenic exposure. Although epidemiologic studies strongly contend that arsenic is carcinogenic, there are little supportive research data. Arsenic poisoning, both acute and chronic, is often overlooked initially in the evaluation of the patient with multisystem disease, but once it is suspected, many accurate methods are available to quantitate the amount and duration of exposure. Treatment with dimercaprol remains the mainstay of therapy, and early treatment is necessary to prevent irreversible complications.

  6. Certain cases of poisoning by arsenic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristol, P.; Fourcade, J.; Ravoire, J.; Bezenech, C.

    1939-05-01

    Cases of acute and chronic poisoning by arsenic are reported. Diffuse pains, angor, edema of the limbs and genitals, complicated by heptic insufficiency and chronic bronchitis were determined in a subject having lived near an industrial plant processing arseniferous ores for several years. The plant emitted several hundred kg of finely dispersed arsenic oxide daily which settled on forage and vegetables. Symptoms of poisoning by arsenic were also detected in cattle in the same area. The installation of Cottrell type dust separators has helped to suppress the arsenic oxide emissions.

  7. Arsenic mobilization and immobilization in paddy soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappler, A.; Hohmann, C.; Zhu, Y. G.; Morin, G.

    2010-05-01

    Arsenic is oftentimes of geogenic origin and in many cases bound to iron(III) minerals. Iron(III)-reducing bacteria can harvest energy by coupling the oxidation of organic or inorganic electron donors to the reduction of Fe(III). This process leads either to dissolution of Fe(III)-containing minerals and thus to a release of the arsenic into the environment or to secondary Fe-mineral formation and immobilisation of arsenic. Additionally, aerobic and anaerobic iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria have the potential to co-precipitate or sorb arsenic during iron(II) oxidation at neutral pH that is usually followed by iron(III) mineral precipitation. We are currently investigating arsenic immobilization by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria and arsenic co-precipitation and immobilization by anaerobic iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria in batch, microcosm and rice pot experiments. Co-precipitation batch experiments with pure cultures of nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria are used to quantify the amount of arsenic that can be immobilized during microbial iron mineral precipitation, to identify the minerals formed and to analyze the arsenic binding environment in the precipitates. Microcosm and rice pot experiments are set-up with arsenic-contaminated rice paddy soil. The microorganisms (either the native microbial population or the soil amended with the nitrate-dependent iron(II)-oxidizing Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1) are stimulated either with iron(II), nitrate, or oxygen. Dissolved and solid-phase arsenic and iron are quantified. Iron and arsenic speciation and redox state in batch and microcosm experiments are determined by LC-ICP-MS and synchrotron-based methods (EXAFS, XANES).

  8. Arsenic poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Low, D.G.

    1971-01-01

    The use of arsenic in ant poisons, herbicides, and insecticides affords the necessary contact with the poison by pets. Treatment was discussed in relation to two circumstances: very early poisoning in which the owner has observed ingestion of the arsenic, and when the signs of the poisoning are evident. Treatment for early ingestion involves emptying the stomach before the arsenic can pass in quantity into the intestine. This is followed with a 1% solution of sodium bicarbonate, with the administering of 3 to 6 mg of apomorphine. When signs of arsenic toxicity are already advanced, there is little advantage to be gained by either gastric lavage or administration of an emetic. The treatment then consists of the intramuscular administration of dimercaprol (BAL) at a dosage of 3 mg/lb of body weight three times a day until recovery. This is the specific antidote for arsenic. 1 reference.

  9. Sequestration of arsenic in ombrotrophic peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothwell, James; Hudson-Edwards, Karen; Taylor, Kevin; Polya, David; Evans, Martin; Allott, Tim

    2014-05-01

    Peatlands can be important stores of arsenic but we are lacking spectroscopic evidence of the sequestration pathways of this toxic metalloid in peatland environments. This study reports on the solid-phase speciation of anthropogenically-derived arsenic in atmospherically contaminated peat from the Peak District National Park (UK). Surface and sub-surface peat samples were analysed by synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy on B18 beamline at Diamond Light Source (UK). The results suggest that there are contrasting arsenic sequestration mechanisms in the peat. The bulk arsenic speciation results, in combination with strong arsenic-iron correlations at the surface, suggest that iron (hydr)oxides are key phases for the immobilisation of arsenic at the peat surface. In contrast, the deeper peat samples are dominated by arsenic sulphides (arsenopyrite, realgar and orpiment). Given that these peats receive inputs solely from the atmosphere, the presence of these sulphide phases suggests an in-situ authigenic formation. Redox oscillations in the peat due to a fluctuating water table and an abundant store of legacy sulphur from historic acid rain inputs may favour the precipitation of arsenic sequestering sulphides in sub-surface horizons. Oxidation-induced loss of these arsenic sequestering sulphur species by water table drawdown has important implications for the mobility of arsenic and the quality of waters draining peatlands.

  10. Synthesis and Application of an Environmentally Insensitive Cy3-Based Arsenical Fluorescent Probe to Identify Adaptive Microbial Responses Involving Proximal Dithiol Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Na; Su, Dian; Cort, John R.; Chen, Baowei; Xiong, Yijia; Qian, Weijun; Konopka, Allan; Bigelow, Diana J.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2013-03-06

    Reversible disulfide oxidation between proximal cysteines in proteins represents a common regulatory control mechanism to modulate flux through metabolic pathways in response to changing environmental conditions. To enable in vivo measurements of cellular redox changes linked to disulfide bond formation, we have synthesized a cell-permeable monosubstituted cyanine dye derivatized with arsenic (i.e., TRAP_Cy3) to trap and visualize dithiols in cytosolic proteins. Alkylation of reactive thiols prior to displacement of the bound TRAP-Cy3 by ethanedithiol permits facile protein capture and mass spectrometric identification of proximal reduced dithiols to the exclusion of individual cysteines. Applying TRAP_Cy3 to evaluate cellular responses to increases in oxygen and light levels in the photosynthetic microbe Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, we observe large decreases in the abundance of reduced dithiols in cellular proteins, which suggest redox-dependent mechanisms involving the oxidation of proximal disulfides. Under these same growth conditions that result in the oxidation of proximal thiols, there is a reduction in the abundance of post-translational oxidative modifications involving nitrotyrosine and methionine sulfoxide formation. These results suggest that the redox status of proximal cysteines respond to environmental conditions, acting to regulate metabolic flux and minimize the formation of reactive oxygen species to decrease oxidative protein damage.

  11. Arsenic, Anaerobes, and Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, J. F.; Oremland, R. S.; Switzer Blum, J.; Hoeft, S. E.; Baesman, S. M.; Bennett, S.; Miller, L. G.; Kulp, T. R.; Saltikov, C.

    2013-12-01

    Arsenic is an element best known for its highly poisonous nature, so it is not something one would associate with being a well-spring for life. Yet discoveries made over the past two decades have delineated that not only are some microbes resistant to arsenic, but that this element's primary redox states can be exploited to conserve energy and support prokaryotic growth ('arsenotrophy') in the absence of oxygen. Hence, arsenite [As(III)] can serve as an electron donor for chemo- or photo-autotrophy while arsenate [As(V)] will serve as an electron acceptor for chemo-heterotrophs and chemo-autotrophs. The phylogenetic diversity of these microbes is broad, encompassing many individual species from diverse taxonomic groups in the Domain Bacteria, with fewer representatives in the Domain Archaea. Speculation with regard to the evolutionary origins of the key functional genes in anaerobic arsenic transformations (arrA and arxA) and aerobic oxidation (aioB) has led to a disputation as to which gene and function is the most ancient and whether arsenic metabolism extended back into the Archaean. Regardless of its origin, robust arsenic metabolism has been documented in extreme environments that are rich in their arsenic content, such as hot springs and especially hypersaline soda lakes associated with volcanic regions. Searles Lake, CA is an extreme, salt-saturated end member where vigorous arsenic metabolism occurs, but there is no detectable sulfate-reduction or methanogenesis. The latter processes are too weak bio-energetically to survive as compared with arsenotrophy, and are also highly sensitive to the abundance of borate ions present in these locales. These observations have implications with respect to the search for microbial life elsewhere in the Solar System where volcanic-like processes have been operative. Hence, because of the likelihood of encountering dense brines in the regolith of Mars (formed by evapo-concentration) or beneath the ice layers of Europa

  12. Application of Graphene Oxide-MnFe2O4 Magnetic Nanohybrids as Magnetically Separable Adsorbent for Highly Efficient Removal of Arsenic from Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huong, Pham Thi Lan; Huy, Le Thanh; Phan, Vu Ngoc; Huy, Tran Quang; Nam, Man Hoai; Lam, Vu Dinh; Le, Anh-Tuan

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a functional magnetic nanohybrid consisting of manganese ferrite magnetic nanoparticles (MnFe2O4) deposited onto graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets was successfully synthesized using a modified co-precipitation method. The as-prepared GO-MnFe2O4 magnetic nanohybrids were characterized using x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer measurements. Adsorption experiments were performed to evaluate the adsorption capacities and efficient removal of arsenic of the nanohybrid and compared with bare MnFe2O4 nanoparticles and GO nanosheets. Our obtained results reveal that the adsorption process of the nanohybrids was well fitted with a pseudo-second-order kinetic equation and a Freundlich isotherm model; the maximum adsorption capacity and removal efficiency of the nanohybrids obtained ~240.385 mg/g and 99.9% with a fast response of equilibrium adsorption time ~20 min. The larger adsorption capacity and shorter equilibrium time of the GO-MnFe2O4 nanohybrids showed better performance than that of bare MnFe2O4 nanoparticles and GO nanosheets. The advantages of reusability, magnetic separation, high removal efficiency, and quick kinetics make these nanohybrids very promising as low-cost adsorbents for fast and effective removal of arsenic from water.

  13. The effect of carbon type on arsenic and trichloroethylene removal capabilities of iron (hydr)oxide nanoparticle-impregnated granulated activated carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigates the impact of the type of virgin granular activated carbon (GAC) media used to synthesize iron (hydr)oxide nanoparticle-impregnated granular activated carbon (Fe-GAC) on its properties and its ability to remove arsenate and organic trichloroethylene (TCE) from water. Two Fe-GAC media were synthesized via a permanganate/ferrous ion synthesis method using bituminous and lignite-based virgin GAC. Data obtained from an array of characterization techniques (pore size distribution, surface charge, etc.) in correlation with batch equilibrium tests, and continuous flow modeling suggested that GAC type and pore size distribution control the iron (nanoparticle) contents, Fe-GAC synthesis mechanisms, and contaminant removal performances. Pore surface diffusion model calculations predicted that lignite Fe-GAC could remove ∼6.3 L g-1 dry media and ∼4 L g-1 dry media of water contaminated with 30 μg L-1 TCE and arsenic, respectively. In contrast, the bituminous Fe-GAC could remove only ∼0.2 L/g dry media for TCE and ∼2.8 L/g dry media for As of the same contaminated water. The results show that arsenic removal capability is increased while TCE removal is decreased as a result of Fe nanoparticle impregnation. This tradeoff is related to several factors, of which changes in surface properties and pore size distributions appeared to be the most dominant.

  14. Dispersion of Natural Arsenic in the Malcantone Watershed, Southern Switzerland: Field Evidence for Repeated Sorption-Desorption and Oxidation-Reduction Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeifer,H.; Gueye-Girardet, A.; Reymond, D.; Schlegel, C.; Temgoua, E.; Hesterberg, D.; Chou, J.

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, elevated arsenic concentrations have been found in waters and soils of many countries, often resulting in a health threat for the local population. Switzerland is not an exception and this paper deals with the release and subsequent fate of arsenic in a 200-km{sup 2} mountainous watershed, characterized by crystalline silicate rocks (gneisses, schists, amphibolites) that contain abundant As-bearing sulfide ore deposits, some of which have been mined for iron and gold in the past. Using analytical methods common for mineralogical, ground water and soil studies (XRD, XRF, XAS-XANES and -EXAFS, electron microprobe, extraction, ICP, AAS with hydride generator, ion chromatography), seven different field situations and related dispersion processes of natural arsenic have been studied: (1) release by rock weathering; (2) transport and deposition by water and ice; (3) release of As to the ground and surface water due to increasing pH; (4) accumulation in humic soil horizons; (5) remobilization by reduction in water-saturated soils and stagnant ground waters; (6) remobilization by using P-rich fertilizers or dung and (7) oxidation, precipitation and dilution in surface waters. Comparison of the results with experimental adsorption studies and speciation diagrams from the literature allows us to reconstruct and identify the typical behavior of arsenic in a natural environment under temperate climatic conditions. The main parameters identified are: (a) once liberated from the primary minerals, sorption processes on Fe-oxy-hydroxides dominate over Al-phases, such as Al-hydroxides or clay minerals and limit the As concentrations in the spring and well waters between 20 and 300 {mu}g/l. (b) Precipitation as secondary minerals is limited to the weathering domain, where the As concentrations are still high and not yet too diluted by rain and soils waters. (c) Although neutral and alkaline pH conditions clearly increase the mobility of As, the main factor to

  15. Arsenic speciation and susceptibility to oxidative stress in the fanworm Sabella spallanzanii (Gmelin) (Annelida, Sabellidae) under naturally acidified conditions: An in situ transplant experiment in a Mediterranean CO2 vent system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricevuto, E; Lanzoni, I; Fattorini, D; Regoli, F; Gambi, M C

    2016-02-15

    The fanworm Sabella spallanzanii (Gmelin, 1791) (Annelida, Sabellidae) is considered tolerant to several types of stressors but is generally absent from the CO2 vents. A peculiar characteristic of this species is the elevated content of arsenic in the gills, particularly dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), stored as an anti-predatory compound. In this study, modulation of trace metal levels, chemical speciation of arsenic and oxidative stress biomarkers were quantified in S. spallanzanii after a 30days transplant experiment into naturally acidified conditions in a Mediterranean vent system. No significant bioaccumulation of metals was observed in the thoracic tissues and branchial crowns after the translocation period, whereas variations occurred in the relative abundance of different arsenic compounds with the appearance of inorganic forms. The antioxidant system of translocated polychaetes exhibited a significant decrease of enzymatic activities of both catalase and glutathione peroxidases, and the impairment of the overall capability to neutralize hydroxyl radicals (OH). This highlighted an oxidative challenge primarily on the detoxification pathway of hydrogen peroxide. Overall low pH-elevated pCO2 may have detrimental effects on arsenic metabolism and oxidative status of S. spallanzanii, supporting the hypothesis of species-specific differences in vulnerability to ocean acidification. PMID:26688050

  16. Arsenic trioxide induces oxidative stress, DNA damage, and mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis in human leukemia (HL-60) cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Sanjay; Yedjou, Clement G.; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), which accounts for approximately 10% of all acute myloid leukemia cases. It is a blood cancer that is formed by chromosomal mutation. Each year in the United States, APL affects about 1,500 patients of all age groups and causes approximately 1.2% of cancer deaths. Arsenic trioxide (ATO) has been used successfully for treatment of APL patients, and both induction and consolidated therapy have resulted i...

  17. Arsenic removal from contaminated waters by Fe-based (hydr)oxides and its phytoavailability in soil-plant system

    OpenAIRE

    Azam, Shah Md. Golam Gousul

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic is considered as being synonymous with toxicity. Alarming As concentrations in natural waters is a worldwide problem. With greater public concern of As poisoning on human health, the developing regulatory guidelines and remediation technologies for mitigating As-contaminated ecosystems is an important issue. Urgent steps must be taken to reduce these impacts by providing access to safe water as a basic human right. Delaying mitigation is increasing death and disease. Layered doubl...

  18. Microbial responses to environmental arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Páez-Espino, David; Tamames, Javier; de Lorenzo, Víctor; Cánovas, David

    2009-02-01

    Microorganisms have evolved dynamic mechanisms for facing the toxicity of arsenic in the environment. In this sense, arsenic speciation and mobility is also affected by the microbial metabolism that participates in the biogeochemical cycle of the element. The ars operon constitutes the most ubiquitous and important scheme of arsenic tolerance in bacteria. This system mediates the extrusion of arsenite out of the cells. There are also other microbial activities that alter the chemical characteristics of arsenic: some strains are able to oxidize arsenite or reduce arsenate as part of their respiratory processes. These type of microorganisms require membrane associated proteins that transfer electrons from or to arsenic (AoxAB and ArrAB, respectively). Other enzymatic transformations, such as methylation-demethylation reactions, exchange inorganic arsenic into organic forms contributing to its complex environmental turnover. This short review highlights recent studies in ecology, biochemistry and molecular biology of these processes in bacteria, and also provides some examples of genetic engineering for enhanced arsenic accumulation based on phytochelatins or metallothionein-like proteins.

  19. Improved diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) measurement of total dissolved inorganic arsenic in waters and soils using a hydrous zirconium oxide binding layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qin; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Hao; Ding, Shiming; Li, Zhu; Williams, Paul N; Cheng, Hao; Han, Chao; Wu, Longhua; Zhang, Chaosheng

    2014-03-18

    A high-capacity diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) technique has been developed for measurement of total dissolved inorganic arsenic (As) using a long shelf life binding gel layer containing hydrous zirconium oxide (Zr-oxide). Both As(III) and As(V) were rapidly accumulated in the Zr-oxide gel and could be quantitatively recovered by elution using 1.0 M NaOH for freshwater or a mixture of 1.0 M NaOH and 1.0 M H2O2 for seawater. DGT uptake of As(III) and As(V) increased linearly with deployment time and was independent of pH (2.0-9.1), ionic strength (0.01-750 mM), the coexistence of phosphate (0.25-10 mg P L(-1)), and the aging of the Zr-oxide gel up to 24 months after production. The capacities of the Zr-oxide DGT were 159 μg As(III) and 434 μg As(V) per device for freshwater and 94 μg As(III) and 152 μg As(V) per device for seawater. These values were 5-29 times and 3-19 times more than those reported for the commonly used ferrihydrite and Metsorb DGTs, respectively. Deployments of the Zr-oxide DGT in As-spiked synthetic seawater provided accurate measurements of total dissolved inorganic As over the 96 h deployment, whereas ferrihydrite and Metsorb DGTs only measured the concentrations accurately up to 24 and 48 h, respectively. Deployments in soils showed that the Zr-oxide DGT was a reliable and robust tool, even for soil samples heavily polluted with As. In contrast, As in these soils was underestimated by ferrihydrite and Metsorb DGTs due to insufficient effective capacities, which were likely suppressed by the competing effects of phosphate. PMID:24528281

  20. Arsenic Removal from Water Using Various Adsorbents: Magnetic Ion Exchange Resins, Hydrous Ion Oxide Particles, Granular Ferric Hydroxide, Activated Alumina, Sulfur Modified Iron, and Iron Oxide-Coated Microsand

    KAUST Repository

    Sinha, Shahnawaz

    2011-09-30

    The equilibrium and kinetic adsorption of arsenic on six different adsorbents were investigated with one synthetic and four natural types (two surface and two ground) of water. The adsorbents tested included magnetic ion exchange resins (MIEX), hydrous ion oxide particles (HIOPs), granular ferric hydroxide (GFH), activated alumina (AA), sulfur modified iron (SMI), and iron oxide-coated mic - rosand (IOC-M), which have different physicochemical properties (shape, charge, surface area, size, and metal content). The results showed that adsorption equilibriums were achieved within a contact period of 20 min. The optimal doses of adsorbents determined for a given equilibrium concentration of C eq = 10 μg/L were 500 mg/L for AA and GFH, 520–1,300 mg/L for MIEX, 1,200 mg/L for HIOPs, 2,500 mg/L for SMI, and 7,500 mg/L for IOC-M at a contact time of 60 min. At these optimal doses, the rate constants of the adsorbents were 3.9, 2.6, 2.5, 1.9, 1.8, and 1.6 1/hr for HIOPs, AA, GFH, MIEX, SMI, and IOC-M, respectively. The presence of silicate significantly reduced the arsenic removal efficiency of HIOPs, AA, and GFH, presumably due to the decrease in chemical binding affinity of arsenic in the presence of silicate. Additional experiments with natural types of water showed that, with the exception of IOC-M, the adsorbents had lower adsorption capacities in ground water than with surface and deionized water, in which the adsorption capacities decreased by approximately 60–95 % .

  1. 四种用于降低三价砷毒性的锰氧化物合成及表征%Synthesis and Characterization of Four Manganese Oxides to Reduce Trivalent Arsenic Toxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李秀娟; 张雅莉; 崔月梅

    2014-01-01

    Four kinds of manganese oxides was synthesized in this paper to study the oxidation and ad-sorption of trivalent arsenic. A variety of methods were used to characterized the morphology of manganese oxides and make the preparation for the next step to reduce the toxicity of trivalent arsenic.%为了研究不同形态的锰氧化物对三价砷的氧化及吸附,本文合成了四种锰氧化物,并用多种方法对其形态进行了表征,以用于后续研究中对三价砷毒性降低的研究。

  2. Urinary arsenic speciation and its correlation with 8-OHdG in Chinese residents exposed to arsenic through coal burning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X.; Pi, J.B.; Li, B.; Xu, Y.Y.; Jin, Y.P.; Sun, G.F. [China Medical University, Shenyang (China). Dept. for Occupational & Environmental Health

    2008-10-15

    In contrast to arsenicosis caused by consumption of water contaminated by naturally occurring inorganic arsenic, human exposure to this metalloid through coal burning has been rarely reported. In this study, arsenic speciation and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels in urine were determined in the Chinese residents exposed to arsenic through coal burning in Guizhou, China, an epidemic area of chronic arsenic poisoning caused by coal burning. The urinary concentrations of inorganic arsenic (iAs), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) and total arsenic (tAs) of high-arsenic exposed subjects were significantly higher than those of low-arsenic exposed residents. A biomarker of oxidative DNA damage, urinary 8-OHdG level was significantly higher in high-arsenic exposed subjects than that of low exposed. Significant positive correlations were found between 8-OHdG levels and concentrations of iAs, MMA, DMA and tAs, respectively. In addition, a significant negative correlation was observed between 8-OHdG levels and the secondary methylation ratio (DMA/(MMA + DMA)). The results suggest that chronic arsenic exposure through burning coal rich in arsenic is associated with oxidative DNA damages, and that secondary methylation capacity is potentially related to the susceptibility of individuals to oxidative DNA damage induced by arsenic exposure through coal burning in domestic living.

  3. N-6-Adenine-Specific DNA Methyltransferase 1 (N6AMT1) Polymorphisms and Arsenic Methylation in Andean Women

    OpenAIRE

    Harari, Florencia; Engström, Karin; Concha, Gabriela; Colque, Graciela; Vahter, Marie; Broberg, Karin

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In humans, inorganic arsenic is metabolized to methylated metabolites mainly by arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT). AS3MT polymorphisms are associated with arsenic metabolism efficiency. Recently, a putative N-6-adenine-specific DNA methyltransferase 1 (N6AMT1) was found to methylate arsenic in vitro. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the role of N6AMT1 polymorphisms in arsenic methylation efficiency in humans. METHODS: We assessed arsenic methylation efficiency in 188 w...

  4. 自噬与氧化应激在砷致癌作用中的研究进展%Roles of autophagy and oxidative stress in arsenic carcinogenesis:a recent advance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘欣璐(综述); 刘起展(审校)

    2016-01-01

    自噬与氧化应激是细胞应激、防御和损伤的重要机制,两者具有密切联系。砷是一种广泛存在于自然环境中的化学污染,国际癌症研究机构(IARC)已经明确砷及其化合物是致癌物质,然而,其致癌机制尚不清楚。近年来的研究发现,自噬与氧化应激在砷致癌过程中发挥重要作用。文中主要对细胞自噬的类型和调控过程、自噬与氧化应激及其与肿瘤发生发展的关系、砷所致的细胞自噬功能改变与氧化应激的关系,两者在砷致癌过程中的作用进行综述。%Autophagy and oxidative stress, which are closely related, play important roles in cellular stress response, defense function, and damage. Arsenic is one of the chemical pollutant, which is widely distributed in natural environment. International agency for research on cancer (IARC) has made it clear that arsenic and its compounds are carcinogens. However, the mechanism of carcinogenesis induced by arsenic still remains obscure. Recently, researchers have found that autophagy and oxidative stress play an important role in the process of arsenic carcinogenesis. In this paper, we have reviewed the types and regulation of cellular autophagy, the roles of autophagy and oxidative stress in tumorigenesis, and the effects of arsenic on carcinogenesis.

  5. Arsenic chemistry in soils and sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fendorf, S.; Nico, P.; Kocar, B.D.; Masue, Y.; Tufano, K.J.

    2009-10-15

    Arsenic is a naturally occurring trace element that poses a threat to human and ecosystem health, particularly when incorporated into food or water supplies. The greatest risk imposed by arsenic to human health results from contamination of drinking water, for which the World Health Organization recommends a maximum limit of 10 {micro}g L{sup -1}. Continued ingestion of drinking water having hazardous levels of arsenic can lead to arsenicosis and cancers of the bladder, skin, lungs and kidneys. Unfortunately, arsenic tainted drinking waters are a global threat and presently having a devastating impact on human health within Asia. Nearly 100 million people, for example, are presently consuming drinking water having arsenic concentrations exceeding the World Health Organization's recommended limit (Ahmed et al., 2006). Arsenic contamination of the environment often results from human activities such as mining or pesticide application, but recently natural sources of arsenic have demonstrated a devastating impact on water quality. Arsenic becomes problematic from a health perspective principally when it partitions into the aqueous rather than the solid phase. Dissolved concentrations, and the resulting mobility, of arsenic within soils and sediments are the combined result of biogeochemical processes linked to hydrologic factors. Processes favoring the partitioning of As into the aqueous phase, potentially leading to hazardous concentrations, vary extensively but can broadly be grouped into four categories: (1) ion displacement, (2) desorption (or limited sorption) at pH values > 8.5, (3) reduction of arsenate to arsenite, and (4) mineral dissolution, particularly reductive dissolution of Fe and Mn (hydr)oxides. Although various processes may liberate arsenic from solids, a transition from aerobic to anaerobic conditions, and commensurate arsenic and iron/manganese reduction, appears to be a dominant, but not exclusive, means by which high concentrations of

  6. Behavior of arsenic in hydrometallurgical zinc production and environmental impact

    OpenAIRE

    Peltekov A.B.; Boyanov B.S.; Markova T.S.

    2014-01-01

    The presence of arsenic in zinc sulphide concentrates is particularly harmful, because it creates problems in zinc electrolysis. The main source of arsenic in non-ferrous metallurgy is arsenopyrite (FeAsS). In oxidative roasting of zinc concentrates, FeAsS oxidizes to arsenic oxides (As2O3, As2O5). In this connection a natural FeAsS was examined, and also the distribution of arsenic in the products of the roasting process, the cycle of sulphuric acid obtaining and the leaching of zinc calcine...

  7. Arsenic poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furr, A.

    1977-01-01

    The route of arsenic exposure is usually by ingestion, thus the veterinarian is concerned with treating either an acute or a peracute condition. The arsenic compounds are considered to be highly toxic with a rapid onset of clinical signs. The toxicity and rapidity of onset are variable, depending upon the age and the species of animal. The chemical form and solubility of the toxicant also play a role in the course of the clinical syndrome. Inorganic arsenicals inhibit the sulfhydryl enzyme systems which are essential for normal cellular respiration and for metabolism of fats and carbohydrates. Therapeutic measures are intended to either remove or inactivate the unabsorbed material in the intestine, protect the alimentary tract, reverse the toxic syndrome and restore the homeostatic equilibrium of the animal. 5 references.

  8. Arsenic poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Low, D.G.

    1974-01-01

    The use of arsenic in ant poisons, herbicides, and insecticides affords the necessary contact with the poison by pets. The gastrointestinal tract appears to suffer the greatest though there may also be injury to the liver and kidneys. The treatments discussed were in relation to very early poisoning in which the owner had observed ingestion of the arsenic, and when the signs of the poisoning were evident. Early observation treatment included emptying the stomach before the arsenic passed in quantity into the intestine. If the signs of toxicity were already advanced, then the treatment consisted of the intramuscular administration of dimercaprol (BAL) at a dosage of 3 mg/lb of body weight three times a day until recovery. l reference.

  9. High-performance single-crystalline arsenic-doped indium oxide nanowires for transparent thin-film transistors and active matrix organic light-emitting diode displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Po-Chiang; Shen, Guozhen; Chen, Haitian; Ha, Young-geun; Wu, Chao; Sukcharoenchoke, Saowalak; Fu, Yue; Liu, Jun; Facchetti, Antonio; Marks, Tobin J; Thompson, Mark E; Zhou, Chongwu

    2009-11-24

    We report high-performance arsenic (As)-doped indium oxide (In(2)O(3)) nanowires for transparent electronics, including their implementation in transparent thin-film transistors (TTFTs) and transparent active-matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) displays. The As-doped In(2)O(3) nanowires were synthesized using a laser ablation process and then fabricated into TTFTs with indium-tin oxide (ITO) as the source, drain, and gate electrodes. The nanowire TTFTs on glass substrates exhibit very high device mobilities (approximately 1490 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)), current on/off ratios (5.7 x 10(6)), steep subthreshold slopes (88 mV/dec), and a saturation current of 60 microA for a single nanowire. By using a self-assembled nanodielectric (SAND) as the gate dielectric, the device mobilities and saturation current can be further improved up to 2560 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and 160 microA, respectively. All devices exhibit good optical transparency (approximately 81% on average) in the visible spectral range. In addition, the nanowire TTFTs were utilized to control green OLEDs with varied intensities. Furthermore, a fully integrated seven-segment AMOLED display was fabricated with a good transparency of 40% and with each pixel controlled by two nanowire transistors. This work demonstrates that the performance enhancement possible by combining nanowire doping and self-assembled nanodielectrics enables silicon-free electronic circuitry for low power consumption, optically transparent, high-frequency devices assembled near room temperature.

  10. The spatial distribution of arsenic contamination in fluvial sediment of the Ganges River: case study from Bihar, India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donselaar, M.E.; Bhatt, A.G.; Bruining, J.; Bose, N.; Ghosh, A.K.

    2013-01-01

    Shallow aquifers in the Ganges River channel belt (Bihar, India) have high and spatially variable concentrations of arsenic contamination. The arsenic is of geogenic origin. Hydrated iron-arsenic-oxide coatings on quartz and clay minerals occur in the Ganges River deposits. The arsenic is subsequent

  11. Nitric oxide alleviated arsenic toxicity by modulation of antioxidants and thiol metabolism in rice (Oryza sativa L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Pal Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide is a gaseous signalling molecule and has a profound impact on plant growth and development. It is reported to serve as pro oxidant as well as antioxidant in plant system. In present study, we evaluated the protective role of nitric oxide against AsV toxicity in rice plants. Arsenate exposure has hampered the plant growth, reduced the chlorophyll content and enhanced the oxidative stress while the exogenous NO supplementation has reverted these symptoms. Nitric oxide supplementation has reduced the As accumulation in root as well as shoot. Nitric oxide supplementation to AsV exposed plants has reduced the gene expression level of OsLsi1 and OsLsi2. Arsenate stress significantly impacted thiol metabolism, it reduced GSH content and GSH/GSSG ratio and enhanced the level of PCs. Nitric oxide supplementation maintained the GSH/GSSG ratio and reduced the level of PCs. Nitric oxide supplementation reverted AsV induced iron deficiency in shoot and had significant impact of gene expression level of various iron transporters (OsYSL2, OsFRDL1, OsIRT1 and OsIRO2. Conclusively, exogenous application of nitric oxide could be advantageous against AsV toxicity and could confer the tolerance to AsV stress in rice.

  12. Factors Affecting Arsenic Methylation in Arsenic-Exposed Humans: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Shen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Chronic arsenic exposure is a critical public health issue in many countries. The metabolism of arsenic in vivo is complicated because it can be influenced by many factors. In the present meta-analysis, two researchers independently searched electronic databases, including the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Springer, Embase, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure, to analyze factors influencing arsenic methylation. The concentrations of the following arsenic metabolites increase (p< 0.000001 following arsenic exposure: inorganic arsenic (iAs, monomethyl arsenic (MMA, dimethyl arsenic (DMA, and total arsenic. Additionally, the percentages of iAs (standard mean difference (SMD: 1.00; 95% confidence interval (CI: 0.60–1.40; p< 0.00001 and MMA (SMD: 0.49; 95% CI: 0.21–0.77; p = 0.0006 also increase, while the percentage of DMA (SMD: −0.57; 95% CI: −0.80–−0.31; p< 0.0001, primary methylation index (SMD: −0.57; 95% CI: −0.94–−0.20; p = 0.002, and secondary methylation index (SMD: −0.27; 95% CI: −0.46–−0.90; p = 0.004 decrease. Smoking, drinking, and older age can reduce arsenic methylation, and arsenic methylation is more efficient in women than in men. The results of this analysis may provide information regarding the role of arsenic oxidative methylation in the arsenic poisoning process.

  13. Vascular Dysfunction in Patients with Chronic Arsenosis Can Be Reversed by Reduction of Arsenic Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Pi, Jingbo; Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Sun, Guifan; Yoshida, Takahiko; Aikawa, Hiroyuki; Fujimoto, Wataru; Iso, Hiroyasu; Cui, Renzhe; Waalkes, Michael P.; Kumagai, Yoshito

    2004-01-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure causes vascular diseases associated with systematic dysfunction of endogenous nitric oxide. Replacement of heavily arsenic-contaminated drinking water with low-arsenic water is a potential intervention strategy for arsenosis, although the reversibility of arsenic intoxication has not established. In the present study, we examined urinary excretion of cyclic guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP), a second messenger of the vasoactive effects of nitric oxide, and signs an...

  14. Intervention effects of curcumin on hepatic oxidative stress injury in water arsenic-exposed rats%姜黄素对饮水砷暴露大鼠肝脏氧化损伤的干预作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李昌哲; 李军; 张爱华; 于春; 徐玉艳; 熊鑫; 杨燕妮

    2015-01-01

    Objective To observe the effects of curcumin on hepatic oxidant stress in water arsenic-exposed rats and to study its mechanism,which can offer references for curcumin used in antioxidant therapy of arsenic poisoning.Methods Thirty-two SD rats were divided into 4 groups according to body weight by random number table,half male and half female.Including control group (lavaged 135 days with deionized water),arsenic poisoning group (lavaged 45 days with deionized water after lavaging 90 days with 10 mg/kg sodium arsenite),pure curcumin group (lavaged 135 days with 1 000 mg/kg curcumin solution) and curcumin treatment group (lavaged 45 days with 1 000 mg/kg curcumin solution after lavaging 90 days with 10 mg/kg sodium arsenite),8 rats in each group.The arsenic contents of urine (urine creatinine corrected) and liver were detected by hydride generation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (HG-ICP-OES);the activity of Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) and catalase (CAT),the contents of malondialdehyde (MDA) in serum and liver homogenate by colorimetric method;the protein expression of liver antioxidant enzyme (SOD 1 and CAT) was assayed by Western blotting.Results The arsenic contents of urine and liver in arsenic poisoning group [(5.83 ± 0.29)μg/g Cr,(15.76 ± 1.65)μg/g] and the arsenic contents of urine in curcumin treatment group [(1.07 ± 0.14)μg/g Cr] were obviously higher than those of control group [(0.40 ± 0.14)μg/g Cr,(4.56 ± 1.05)μg/g,all P < 0.05];compared to arsenic poisoning group,the arsenic contents of urine and liver in curcumin treatment group [(1.07 ± 0.14)μg/g Cr,(5.42 ± 1.76)μg/g] were obviously lower (all P < 0.05).The contents of serum and liver SOD1,CAT and MDA in control group respectively were (102.46 ± 5.03),(29.33 ± 8.13)U/ml,(3.11 ± 0.49)μ mol/L and (204.05 ± 18.33),(126.26 ± 13.19)U/mg prot,(1.62 ± 0.42) μmol/g prot.Compared to the control,the activity of serum and liver SOD1 and CAT in arsenic

  15. Comparison of Low Concentration and High Concentration Arsenic Removal Techniques and Evaluation of Concentration of Arsenic in Ground Water: A Case Study of Lahore, Pakistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasar, Abdullah; Tabinda, Amtul Bari; Shahzadi, Uzma; Saleem, Pakeeza [GC University, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2014-10-15

    The main focus of this study was the evaluation of arsenic concentration in the ground water of Lahore at different depth and application of different mitigation techniques for arsenic removal. Twenty four hours of solar oxidation gives 90% of arsenic removal as compared to 8 hr. or 16 hr. Among oxides, calcium oxide gives 96% of As removal as compared to 93% by lanthanum oxide. Arsenic removal efficiency was up to 97% by ferric chloride, whereas 95% by alum. Activated alumina showed 99% removal as compared to 97% and 95% removal with bauxite and charcoal, respectively. Elemental analysis of adsorbents showed that the presence of phosphate and silica can cause a reduction of arsenic removal efficiency by activated alumina, bauxite and charcoal. This study has laid a foundation for further research on arsenic in the city of Lahore and has also provided suitable techniques for arsenic removal.

  16. Cleaning-induced arsenic mobilization and chromium oxidation from CCA-wood deck: Potential risk to children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gress, J; de Oliveira, L M; da Silva, E B; Lessl, J M; Wilson, P C; Townsend, T; Ma, L Q

    2015-09-01

    Concern about children's exposure to arsenic (As) from wood treated with chromated-copper-arsenate (CCA) led to its withdrawal from residential use in 2004. However, due to its effectiveness, millions of American homes still have CCA-wood decks on which children play. This study evaluated the effects of three deck-cleaning methods on formation of dislodgeable As and hexavalent chromium (CrVI) on CCA-wood surfaces and in leachate. Initial wipes from CCA-wood wetted with water showed 3-4 times more dislodgeable As than on dry wood. After cleaning with a bleach solution, 9.8-40.3μg/100cm(2) of CrVI was found on the wood surface, with up to 170μg/L CrVI in the leachate. Depending on the cleaning method, 699-2473mg of As would be released into the environment from cleaning a 18.6-m(2)-deck. Estimated As doses in children aged 1-6 after 1h of playing on a wet CCA-wood deck were 0.25-0.41μg/kg. This is the first study to identify increased dislodgeable As on wet CCA-wood and to evaluate dislodgeable CrVI after bleach application. Our data suggest that As and CrVI in 25-year old CCA-wood still show exposure risks for children and potential for soil contamination. PMID:26004992

  17. Arsenic-Induced Antioxidant Depletion, Oxidative DNA Breakage, and Tissue Damages are Prevented by the Combined Action of Folate and Vitamin B12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharyya, Nirmallya; Deb, Bimal; Chattopadhyay, Sandip; Maiti, Smarajit

    2015-11-01

    Arsenic is a grade I human carcinogen. It acts by disrupting one-carbon (1C) metabolism and cellular methyl (-CH3) pool. The -CH3 group helps in arsenic disposition and detoxification of the biological systems. Vitamin B12 and folate, the key promoters of 1C metabolism were tested recently (daily 0.07 and 4.0 μg, respectively/100 g b.w. of rat for 28 days) to evaluate their combined efficacy in the protection from mutagenic DNA-breakage and tissue damages. The selected tissues like intestine (first-pass site), liver (major xenobiotic metabolizer) and lung (major arsenic accumulator) were collected from arsenic-ingested (0.6 ppm/same schedule) female rats. The hemo-toxicity and liver and kidney functions were monitored. Our earlier studies on arsenic-exposed humans can correlate carcinogenesis with DNA damage. Here, we demonstrate that the supplementation of physiological/therapeutic dose of vitamin B12 and folate protected the rodents significantly from arsenic-induced DNA damage (DNA fragmentation and comet assay) and hepatic and renal tissue degeneration (histo-architecture, HE staining). The level of arsenic-induced free-radical products (TBARS and conjugated diene) was significantly declined by the restored actions of several antioxidants viz. urate, thiol, catalase, xanthine oxidase, lactoperoxidase, and superoxide dismutase in the tissues of vitamin-supplemented group. The alkaline phosphatase, transaminases, urea and creatinine (hepatic and kidney toxicity marker), and lactate dehydrogenase (tissue degeneration marker) were significantly impaired in the arsenic-fed group. But a significant protection was evident in the vitamin-supplemented group. In conclusion, the combined action of folate and B12 results in the restitution in the 1C metabolic pathway and cellular methyl pool. The cumulative outcome from the enhanced arsenic methylation and antioxidative capacity was protective against arsenic induced mutagenic DNA breakages and tissue damages.

  18. The preparation of forage-grade cupric sulfate with copper oxide ore containing arsenic%含砷氧化铜矿氨浸法制备饲料级硫酸铜

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易求实

    2001-01-01

    采用NH3—(NH4)2SO4浸取氧化铜矿,通过(NH4)2S分离重金属,硫酸亚铁除砷等措施净化浸出液制备硫酸铜饲料添加剂,对浸取条件作了试验研究,对除砷机理进行了分析讨论。总结了氨—硫酸铵浸取剂的优点。%A process for preparing forage-grade cupric sulfate from copper oxide ore containing arsenic was proposed.It includes copper oxide ore leaching with NH3-(NH4)2SO4 solution,separating heavy metals with (NH4)2S and removing arsenic with ferrous sulfate.The leaching conditions are researched and the mechanism for removing arsenic is analyzed.The advantages of ammonia and ammonium sulphate leaching are summarized.

  19. Research Progress on Treatment of Arsenic-Containing Drinking Water by Oxidation Methods%氧化法处理含砷饮用水的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周文庆; 冯燕; 朱友利; 邴帅; 齐欣

    2012-01-01

    According to the presence form,physicochemical property and toxicity of arsenic in drinking water, the several conventional treatment methods of arsenic-containing drinking water and their principles,advantages and disadvantages are briefly introduced in the paper. The principles and research progress on As( III )removal by oxidation methods from drinking water are emphasisly summarized,and the prospect of application of arsenic-containing treatment by oxidation methods from drinking water is put forward to provide a theoretical basis.%根据砷在水体中的存在形式、性质和毒性,简要介绍了含砷饮用水的几种常规处理方法及其原理、优缺点,重点综述了氧化法的原理及研究进展,并对氧化法在含砷饮用水处理中的应用进行了展望,以期为氧化法在含砷饮用水处理中的应用提供理论依据.

  20. 含砷金矿细菌氧化提金废渣综合回收砷%Comprehensive Recovery of Arsenic from Bio-oxidation Gold Ore Slag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙光勇; 王卫亭; 杨军; 杨譞; 张永奎

    2011-01-01

    With bio-oxidation gold ore slag as raw material, arsenic was recycled from the slag. In arsenic leaching test, four factors had been studied including the usage of sodium hydroxide, leaching temperature, ratio of liquid to solid(L/S), and leaching time. In arsenic precipitate test, three factors including the initial solution pH, mole ratio between Ca and As and the reaction time had been studied. The optimum conditions for arsenic leaching include the optimal amount of NaOH of 240 g/L, 60 ℃, L/S = 4/l, 2 h. Under the optimum conditions, the leaching rate of arsenic was 85%. The optimum conditions for arsenic precipitating include the initial solution pH of 12. 0 and the mole ratio between Ca and As of 2 :1, 30 min, under which more than 97% of arsenic would be precipitated.%以细菌氧化提金废渣为原料,对其中所含的砷进行回收.分别考察了碱用量、浸出温度、液固比和浸出时间对砷浸出率的影响及溶液初始pH、钙砷摩尔比和沉淀时间对砷沉淀率的影响.通过单因素条件试验确定了浸砷的较优条件为:氢氧化钠浓度240 g/L,反应温度60℃,液固比4∶1,搅拌浸出2h.在副优条件下砷浸出率达到85%.从浸出液中沉砷的较优条件为:溶液初始pH=12.0,钙砷摩尔比2∶ 1,沉淀时间30 min.在优化条件下砷沉淀率达到97%以上.

  1. Effects of organic matter and ageing on the bioaccessibility of arsenic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meunier, Louise; Koch, Iris [Environmental Sciences Group, Royal Military College, P.O. Box 17 000, Station Forces, Kingston, Ontario K7K7B4 (Canada); Reimer, Kenneth J., E-mail: reimer-k@rmc.ca [Environmental Sciences Group, Royal Military College, P.O. Box 17 000, Station Forces, Kingston, Ontario K7K7B4 (Canada)

    2011-10-15

    Arsenic-contaminated soils may pose a risk to human health. Redevelopment of contaminated sites may involve amending soils with organic matter, which potentially increases arsenic bioaccessibility. The effects of ageing on arsenic-contaminated soils mixed with peat moss were evaluated in a simulated ageing period representing two years, during which arsenic bioaccessibility was periodically measured. Significant increases (p = 0.032) in bioaccessibility were observed for 15 of 31 samples tested, particularly in comparison with samples originally containing >30% bioaccessible arsenic in soils naturally rich in organic matter (>25%). Samples where percent arsenic bioaccessibility was unchanged with age were generally poor in organic matter (average 7.7%) and contained both arsenopyrite and pentavalent arsenic forms that remained unaffected by the organic matter amendments. Results suggest that the addition of organic matter may lead to increases in arsenic bioaccessibility, which warrants caution in the evaluation of risks associated with redevelopment of arsenic-contaminated land. - Highlights: > Adding organic matter to contaminated soils may increase arsenic bioaccessibility. > Ageing soils with >25% organic matter can lead to increased arsenic bioaccessibility. > No changes in arsenic bioaccessibility for soils poor in organic matter (mean 7.7%). > No changes in arsenic bioaccessibility for samples containing arsenopyrite. > Organic matter in soil may favour oxidation of trivalent arsenic to pentavalent form. - Adding organic carbon may increase arsenic bioaccessibility, especially in samples originally containing >30% bioaccessible arsenic in organic carbon-rich soils (>25%).

  2. Effect of iron oxide reductive dissolution on the transformation and immobilization of arsenic in soils: New insights from X-ray photoelectron and X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Jian-Xin [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); School of River and Ocean Engineering, Chongqing Jiaotong University, Chongqing 400074 (China); Wang, Yu-Jun, E-mail: yjwang@issas.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Liu, Cun [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Wang, Li-Hua; Yang, Ke [Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of sciences, Shanghai 201204 (China); Zhou, Dong-Mei, E-mail: dmzhou@issas.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Li, Wei; Sparks, Donald L. [Environmental Soil Chemistry Group, Delaware Environmental Institute and Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19717-1303 United States (United States)

    2014-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Immobility and transformation of As on different Eh soils were investigated. • μ-XRF, XANES, and XPS were used to gain As distribution and speciation in soil. • Sorption capacity of As on anaerobic soil was much higher than that on oxic soil. • Fe oxides reductive dissolution is a key factor for As sorption and transformation. - Abstract: The geochemical behavior and speciation of arsenic (As) in paddy soils is strongly controlled by soil redox conditions and the sequestration by soil iron oxyhydroxides. Hence, the effects of iron oxide reductive dissolution on the adsorption, transformation and precipitation of As(III) and As(V) in soils were investigated using batch experiments and synchrotron based techniques to gain a deeper understanding at both macroscopic and microscopic scales. The results of batch sorption experiments revealed that the sorption capacity of As(V) on anoxic soil was much higher than that on control soil. Synchrotron based X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) mapping studies indicated that As was heterogeneously distributed and was mainly associated with iron in the soil. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), micro-X-ray absorption near edge structure (μ-XANES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses revealed that the primary speciation of As in the soil is As(V). These results further suggested that, when As(V) was introduced into the anoxic soil, the rapid coprecipitation of As(V) with ferric/ferrous ion prevented its reduction to As(III), and was the main mechanism controlling the immobilization of As. This research could improve the current understanding of soil As chemistry in paddy and wetland soils.

  3. High-performance single-crystalline arsenic-doped indium oxide nanowires for transparent thin-film transistors and active matrix organic light-emitting diode displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Po-Chiang; Shen, Guozhen; Chen, Haitian; Ha, Young-geun; Wu, Chao; Sukcharoenchoke, Saowalak; Fu, Yue; Liu, Jun; Facchetti, Antonio; Marks, Tobin J; Thompson, Mark E; Zhou, Chongwu

    2009-11-24

    We report high-performance arsenic (As)-doped indium oxide (In(2)O(3)) nanowires for transparent electronics, including their implementation in transparent thin-film transistors (TTFTs) and transparent active-matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) displays. The As-doped In(2)O(3) nanowires were synthesized using a laser ablation process and then fabricated into TTFTs with indium-tin oxide (ITO) as the source, drain, and gate electrodes. The nanowire TTFTs on glass substrates exhibit very high device mobilities (approximately 1490 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)), current on/off ratios (5.7 x 10(6)), steep subthreshold slopes (88 mV/dec), and a saturation current of 60 microA for a single nanowire. By using a self-assembled nanodielectric (SAND) as the gate dielectric, the device mobilities and saturation current can be further improved up to 2560 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and 160 microA, respectively. All devices exhibit good optical transparency (approximately 81% on average) in the visible spectral range. In addition, the nanowire TTFTs were utilized to control green OLEDs with varied intensities. Furthermore, a fully integrated seven-segment AMOLED display was fabricated with a good transparency of 40% and with each pixel controlled by two nanowire transistors. This work demonstrates that the performance enhancement possible by combining nanowire doping and self-assembled nanodielectrics enables silicon-free electronic circuitry for low power consumption, optically transparent, high-frequency devices assembled near room temperature. PMID:19842677

  4. Characterizations of arsenic-doped zinc oxide films produced by atmospheric metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    p-type ZnO films were prepared by atmospheric metal-organic chemical vapor deposition technique using arsine (AsH3) as the doping source. The electrical and optical properties of arsenic-doped ZnO (ZnO:As) films fabricated at 450–600 °C with various AsH3 flow rates ranging from 8 to 21.34 μmol/min were analyzed and compared. Hall measurements indicate that stable p-type ZnO films with hole concentrations varying from 7.2 × 1015 to 5.8 × 1018 cm−3 could be obtained. Besides, low temperature (17 K) photoluminescence spectra of all ZnO:As films also demonstrate the dominance of the line related to the neutral acceptor-bound exciton. Moreover, the elemental identity and chemical bonding information for ZnO:As films were examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Based on the results obtained, the effects of doping conditions on the mechanism responsible for the p-type conduction were studied. Conclusively, a simple technique to fabricate good-quality p-type ZnO films has been recognized in this work. Depositing the film at 550 °C with an AsH3 flow rate of 13.72 μmol/min is appropriate for producing hole concentrations on the order of 1017 cm−3 for it. Ultimately, by increasing the AsH3 flow rate to 21.34 μmol/min for doping and depositing the film at 600 °C, ZnO:As films with a hole concentration over 5 × 1018 cm−3 together with a mobility of 1.93 cm2V−1 s−1 and a resistivity of 0.494 ohm-cm can be achieved.

  5. Groundwater arsenic concentrations in Vietnam controlled by sediment age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postma, Dieke; Larsen, Flemming; Thai, Nguyen Thi;

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic contamination of groundwater continues to threaten the health of millions of people in southeast Asia. The oxidation of organic carbon, coupled to the reductive dissolution of arsenic-bearing iron oxides, is thought to control the release of sediment-bound arsenic into groundwater. However......-section of the arsenic-contaminated Red River floodplain in Vietnam to determine the origin of variations in groundwater arsenic concentrations. The burial age of the aquifer sediments, determined using optical stimulated luminescence, ranged from 460 years near the course of the present-day river to 5,900 years......, the cause of the high spatial variability in groundwater arsenic concentrations—which can range from 5 to 500 μg l−1 within distances of a few kilometres—has been uncertain. Here, we combine measurements of sediment age, organic-matter reactivity and water chemistry at four locations along a cross...

  6. A Hydrometallurgical Treatment of Arsenic-Bearing Intermediate Products in Smelters : Recovery of Valuable Metals and Arsenic Trioxide

    OpenAIRE

    戸沢, 一光; 梅津, 良昭; 西村, 忠久

    1980-01-01

    A hydrometallurgical treatment of speiss and some arsenic-bearing sulphide mixtures was tested. The principal steps of the process examined here are oxidative ammoniacal leaching, separation of arsenic as MgNH_4AsO_4・6H_2O from the leach solution, acid dissolution of the precipitate and the reduction of the arsenic to produce As_2O_3. The thermodynamic consideration and the leaching test with arsenic sulphide showed that oxidative ammoniacal leaching was applicable to arsenic sulphide and spe...

  7. Earth Abides Arsenic Biotransformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yong-Guan; Yoshinaga, Masafumi; Zhao, Fang-Jie; Rosen, Barry P.

    2014-05-01

    Arsenic is the most prevalent environmental toxic element and causes health problems throughout the world. The toxicity, mobility, and fate of arsenic in the environment are largely determined by its speciation, and arsenic speciation changes are driven, at least to some extent, by biological processes. In this article, biotransformation of arsenic is reviewed from the perspective of the formation of Earth and the evolution of life, and the connection between arsenic geochemistry and biology is described. The article provides a comprehensive overview of molecular mechanisms of arsenic redox and methylation cycles as well as other arsenic biotransformations. It also discusses the implications of arsenic biotransformation in environmental remediation and food safety, with particular emphasis on groundwater arsenic contamination and arsenic accumulation in rice.

  8. Determining the solid phases hosting arsenic in Mekong Delta sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wucher, M.; Stuckey, J. W.; McCurdy, S.; Fendorf, S.

    2011-12-01

    The major river systems originating from the Himalaya deposit arsenic bearing sediment into the deltas of South and Southeast Asia. High rates of sediment and organic carbon deposition combined with frequent flooding leads to anaerobic processes that release arsenic into the pore-water. Arsenic concentrations in the groundwater of these sedimentary basins are often above the World Health Organization drinking water standard of 10 μg As L-1. As a result, 150 million people are at risk of chronic arsenic poisoning through water and rice consumption. The composition of the iron bearing phases hosting the arsenic in these deltaic sediments is poorly understood. Here we implemented a suite of selective chemical extractions to help constrain the types of arsenic bearing solid phases, which were complimented with synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses to define the arsenic and iron mineralogy of the system. Sediment cores were collected in triplicate from a seasonally-inundated wetland in Cambodia at depths of 10, 50, 100, and 150 centimeters. We hypothesize that (i) arsenic will be predominantly associated with iron oxides, and (ii) the ratio of crystalline to amorphous iron oxides will increase with sediment depth (and age). We performed four selective extractions in parallel to quantify the various pools of arsenic. First, 1 M MgCl2 was used to extract electrostatically-bound arsenic (labile forms) from the sediment. Second, 1 M NaH2PO4 targeted strongly adsorbed arsenic. Third, 1 M HCl was used to liberated arsenic coprecipitated with amorphous Fe/Mn oxides, carbonates, and acid-volatile sulfides. Finally, a dithionite extraction was used to account for arsenic associated with reducible Fe/Mn oxides. Through this work, we identified the composition of the phases hosting arsenic at various depths through the soil profile, improving our understanding of how arsenic persists in the aquifer. In addition, defining the arsenic and

  9. Linking microbial oxidation of arsenic with detection and phylogenetic analysis of arsenite oxidase genes in diverse geothermal environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamura, N; Macur, R E; Korf, S; Ackerman, G; Taylor, W P; Kozubal, M; Reysenbach, A-L; Inskeep, W P

    2009-02-01

    The identification and characterization of genes involved in the microbial oxidation of arsenite will contribute to our understanding of factors controlling As cycling in natural systems. Towards this goal, we recently characterized the widespread occurrence of aerobic arsenite oxidase genes (aroA-like) from pure-culture bacterial isolates, soils, sediments and geothermal mats, but were unable to detect these genes in all geothermal systems where we have observed microbial arsenite oxidation. Consequently, the objectives of the current study were to measure arsenite-oxidation rates in geochemically diverse thermal habitats in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) ranging in pH from 2.6 to 8, and to identify corresponding 16S rRNA and aroA genotypes associated with these arsenite-oxidizing environments. Geochemical analyses, including measurement of arsenite-oxidation rates within geothermal outflow channels, were combined with 16S rRNA gene and aroA functional gene analysis using newly designed primers to capture previously undescribed aroA-like arsenite oxidase gene diversity. The majority of bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences found in acidic (pH 2.6-3.6) Fe-oxyhydroxide microbial mats were closely related to Hydrogenobaculum spp. (members of the bacterial order Aquificales), while the predominant sequences from near-neutral (pH 6.2-8) springs were affiliated with other Aquificales including Sulfurihydrogenibium spp., Thermocrinis spp. and Hydrogenobacter spp., as well as members of the Deinococci, Thermodesulfobacteria and beta-Proteobacteria. Modified primers designed around previously characterized and newly identified aroA-like genes successfully amplified new lineages of aroA-like genes associated with members of the Aquificales across all geothermal systems examined. The expression of Aquificales aroA-like genes was also confirmed in situ, and the resultant cDNA sequences were consistent with aroA genotypes identified in the same environments. The aroA sequences

  10. Hepatoprotective efficacy of curcumin against arsenic trioxide toxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    VV Mathews; P Binu; MV Sauganth Paul; M Abhilash; Alex Manju; R Harikumaran Nair

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of curcumin in combating arsenic induced hepatic oxidative stress, histopathological changes and the hepatic arsenic accumulation in rat model. Methods:Oxidative stress was induced by oral administration 4 mg/kg b.wt of arsenic trioxide (As2O3,) for 45 days in experimental rats. The level of liver arsenic concentration, lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione (GSH), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were determined in adult male Wistar rats. Hepatotoxicity was assessed by quantifying the aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT) and alkaline phophatase (ALP). Hepatoprotective efficacy of curcumin (15 mg/kg b.wt) was evaluated by combination treatment with As2O3. Results: As2O3 administration leads to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), arsenic accumulation, serum marker enzymes release and decrease in antioxidant enzymes in liver. Retention of arsenic in liver caused increased level of lipid peroxidation with a concomitant decline in the glutathione dependant antioxidant enzymes and antiperoxidative enzymes. Curcumin treatment protected the liver from arsenic induced deterioration of antioxidant levels as well as oxidative stress. And also a significant decrease in hepatic arsenic accumulation and serum marker enzymes was observed. Histopathological examination revealed a curative improvement in liver tissue. Conclusions:These findings lead to the conclusion that curcumin may have the potential to protect the liver from arsenic-induced toxic effects.

  11. Behavior of arsenic in hydrometallurgical zinc production and environmental impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peltekov A.B.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The presence of arsenic in zinc sulphide concentrates is particularly harmful, because it creates problems in zinc electrolysis. The main source of arsenic in non-ferrous metallurgy is arsenopyrite (FeAsS. In oxidative roasting of zinc concentrates, FeAsS oxidizes to arsenic oxides (As2O3, As2O5. In this connection a natural FeAsS was examined, and also the distribution of arsenic in the products of the roasting process, the cycle of sulphuric acid obtaining and the leaching of zinc calcine were studied. The arsenic contamination of soils in the vicinity of nonferrous metals smelter KCM SA, Plovdiv, Bulgaria as a result of zinc and lead productions has been studied.

  12. Ground water pollution by arsenic and its effects on health. Involvement of metabolic methylation in arsenic-induced genetic damage and tumorigenesis; Muki hiso no mechiru ka taisha to idenshi shogaisei narabini shuyo yuhatsusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanaka, K. [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan)] Okada, S. [Shizuoka Prefecture (Japan)

    1997-07-10

    Drinking water contamination has become a worldwide problem. It is pointed out that re-evaluation of genetic damage with carcinogen is considered as an important problem particularly arsenic`s effects on health. To explain the genetic damage development mechanism of arsenic compound, results of the research conducted on the action of arsenic compound which develops during metabolic methylation process and inorganic arsenic are explained in this paper. The results of the study are summarized as follows. Arsenic genetic damage mutation is caused by dimethyl arsenic in main metabolism than inorganic arsenic. Lung DNA damage is induced by the interaction of O2 and arsenic peroxide radical. Dimethyl arsenic shows very important effect on lung cancer formation process which is induced based on 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO). It not only promotes lung cancer but it also plays an important role in malignant tumor`s mutation. 25 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Arsenic chemistry in the rhizosphere of Pteris vittata L. and Nephrolepis exaltata L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This greenhouse experiment evaluated the influence of arsenic uptake by arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata L. and non-arsenic hyperaccumulator Nephrolepis exaltata L. on arsenic chemistry in bulk and rhizosphere soil. The plants were grown for 8 weeks in a rhizopot with a soil containing 105 mg kg-1 arsenic. The soil arsenic was fractionated into five fractions with decreasing availability: non-specifically bound (N), specifically bound (S), amorphous hydrous-oxide bound (A), crystalline hydrous-oxide bound (C), and residual (R). P. vittata produced larger plant biomass (7.38 vs. 2.32 mg plant-1) and removed more arsenic (2.61 vs. 0.09 mg pot-1 arsenic) than N. exaltata. Plant growth reduced water-soluble arsenic, and increased soil pH (P. vittata only) in the rhizosphere soil. P. vittata was more efficient than N. exaltata to access arsenic from all fractions (39-64% vs. 5-39% reduction). However, most of the arsenic taken up by both plants was from the A fraction (67-77%) in the rhizosphere soil, the most abundant (61.5%) instead of the most available (N fraction). - Plant arsenic uptake altered arsenic distribution in different fractions in the rhizosphere soil

  14. Arsenic efflux from Microcystis aeruginosa under different phosphate regimes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changzhou Yan

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton plays an important role in arsenic speciation, distribution, and cycling in freshwater environments. Little information, however, is available on arsenic efflux from the cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa under different phosphate regimes. This study investigated M. aeruginosa arsenic efflux and speciation by pre-exposing it to 10 µM arsenate or arsenite for 24 h during limited (12 h and extended (13 d depuration periods under phosphate enriched (+P and phosphate depleted (-P treatments. Arsenate was the predominant species detected in algal cells throughout the depuration period while arsenite only accounted for no greater than 45% of intracellular arsenic. During the limited depuration period, arsenic efflux occurred rapidly and only arsenate was detected in solutions. During the extended depuration period, however, arsenate and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA were found to be the two predominant arsenic species detected in solutions under -P treatments, but arsenate was the only species detected under +P treatments. Experimental results also suggest that phosphorus has a significant effect in accelerating arsenic efflux and promoting arsenite bio-oxidation in M. aeruginosa. Furthermore, phosphorus depletion can reduce arsenic efflux from algal cells as well as accelerate arsenic reduction and methylation. These findings can contribute to our understanding of arsenic biogeochemistry in aquatic environments and its potential environmental risks under different phosphorus levels.

  15. Arsenic Trioxide Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenic trioxide is used to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL; a type of cancer in which there ... worsened following treatment with other types of chemotherapy. Arsenic trioxide is in a class of medications called ...

  16. Cryptic exposure to arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossy, Kathleen M; Janusz, Christopher A; Schwartz, Robert A

    2005-01-01

    Arsenic is an odorless, colorless and tasteless element long linked with effects on the skin and viscera. Exposure to it may be cryptic. Although human intake can occur from four forms, elemental, inorganic (trivalent and pentavalent arsenic) and organic arsenic, the trivalent inorganic arsenicals constitute the major human hazard. Arsenic usually reaches the skin from occupational, therapeutic, or environmental exposure, although it still may be employed as a poison. Occupations involving new technologies are not exempt from arsenic exposure. Its acute and chronic effects are noteworthy. Treatment options exist for arsenic-induced pathology, but prevention of toxicity remains the main focus. Vitamin and mineral supplementation may play a role in the treatment of arsenic toxicity.

  17. Cryptic exposure to arsenic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossy Kathleen

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic is an odorless, colorless and tasteless element long linked with effects on the skin and viscera. Exposure to it may be cryptic. Although human intake can occur from four forms, elemental, inorganic (trivalent and pentavalent arsenic and organic arsenic, the trivalent inorganic arsenicals constitute the major human hazard. Arsenic usually reaches the skin from occupational, therapeutic, or environmental exposure, although it still may be employed as a poison. Occupations involving new technologies are not exempt from arsenic exposure. Its acute and chronic effects are noteworthy. Treatment options exist for arsenic-induced pathology, but prevention of toxicity remains the main focus. Vitamin and mineral supplementation may play a role in the treatment of arsenic toxicity.

  18. Arsenic: the forgotten poison?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, E N; Gilbert, D T; Raju, K; Morgan, O S

    1992-03-01

    Chronic arsenic poisoning is an uncommon cause of peripheral neuropathy in Jamaica. A patient with this disorder is described. The insidious nature of chronic arsenic poisoning, with its disabling complications, is emphasised.

  19. Research progress on oxidative damage of liver and kidney exposed to arsenic%砷暴露对肝脏、肾脏氧化损害的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟源霞; 孙文长

    2013-01-01

    砷污染广泛存在于水、土壤和空气中,全球70个国家230多个地区遭受砷污染.砷主要通过污染饮用水的方式进入人体,全球5 000多万人口的饮用水砷浓度超过50 μg/L,1亿4 000万人口饮用水的砷浓度超过10 μg/L.砷暴露诱导活性氧的产生增加,同时降低抗氧化酶、抗氧化物的水平,导致DNA突变、脂质过氧化和蛋白质羰基化增加.因此,砷的毒性机理目前认为是砷诱导机体产生氧化应激.砷暴露可以引起机体多脏器的损害,包括肝脏和肾脏,其机制与线粒体氧化损伤、细胞色素c的释放、诱导靶细胞凋亡有关.某些转录因子起保护作用,如Nrf2,其基因敲除小鼠在砷暴露后表现出明显的肝坏死及炎性细胞浸润.砷中毒的防治主要有螯合剂疗法和抗氧化剂疗法.%Arsenic contamination is widespread in water, soil and air, influences 70 countries over 230 regions and has resulted in the global human health hazards. More than 50 million people drink water with arsenic concentrations exceeding 50μg/L, and more than 140 million population exceeding 10 μg/L. Arsenic increases the production of reactive oxygen species, while reducing the levels of antioxidant enzymes and antioxidant, leading to DNA mutations, lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation. Arsenic exposure can results in multi - organ damages, including liver and kidney. The mechanism is associated with mitochondrial oxidative damage, cytochrome c release and apoptosis. Some transcription factors, such as Nrf2, play a protective role, and the knockout mice of it showed significant liver necrosis and inflammatory cell infiltration. The major preventions and treatments of arsenic poisoning are chelating agents and antioxidants.

  20. Abiotic reductive extraction of arsenic from contaminated soils enhanced by complexation: Arsenic extraction by reducing agents and combination of reducing and chelating agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Jung [Department of Bioactive Material Sciences, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju, Jeollabukdo 561-675 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae-Cheol [Department of Environmental Engineering, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju, Jeollabukdo 561-675 (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Kitae, E-mail: kbaek@jbnu.ac.kr [Department of Bioactive Material Sciences, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju, Jeollabukdo 561-675 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Environmental Engineering, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju, Jeollabukdo 561-675 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-11

    Highlights: • Abiotic reductive extraction of As from contaminated soils was studied. • Oxalate/ascorbate were effective in extracting As bound to amorphous iron oxides. • Reducing agents were not effective in extracting As bound to crystalline oxides. • Reductive As extraction was greatly enhanced by complexation. • Combination of dithionite and EDTA could extract about 90% of the total As. - Abstract: Abiotic reductive extraction of arsenic from contaminated soils was studied with various reducing agents and combinations of reducing and chelating agents in order to remediate arsenic-contaminated soils. Oxalate and ascorbic acid were effective to extract arsenic from soil in which arsenic was associated with amorphous iron oxides, but they were not effective to extract arsenic from soils in which arsenic was bound to crystalline oxides or those in which arsenic was mainly present as a scorodite phase. An X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study showed that iron oxides present in soils were transformed to Fe(II,III) or Fe(II) oxide forms such as magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, Fe{sup II}Fe{sub 2}{sup III}O{sub 4}) by reduction with dithionite. Thus, arsenic extraction by dithionite was not effective due to the re-adsorption of arsenic to the newly formed iron oxide phase. Combination of chelating agents with reducing agents greatly improved arsenic extraction from soil samples. About 90% of the total arsenic could be extracted from all soil samples by using a combination of dithionite and EDTA. Chelating agents form strong complexation with iron, which can prevent precipitation of a new iron oxide phase and also enhance iron oxide dissolution via a non-reductive dissolution pathway.

  1. Treatment of arsenic-contaminated water using akaganeite adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadena C., Fernando (Las Cruces, NM); Johnson, Michael D. (Las Cruces, NM)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention comprises a method and composition using akaganeite, an iron oxide, as an ion adsorption medium for the removal of arsenic from water and affixing it onto carrier media so that it can be used in filtration systems.

  2. Comparative oxidation state specific analysis of arsenic species by high-performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled-mass spectrometry and hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    The formation of methylarsonous acid (MAsIII) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMAsIII) in the course of inorganic arsenic (iAs) metabolism plays an important role in the adverse effects of chronic exposure to iAs. High-performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass ...

  3. Adsorption of Arsenic by Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: A Versatile, Inquiry-Based Laboratory for a High School or College Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDorn, Daniel; Ravalli, Matthew T.; Small, Mary Margaret; Hillery, Barbara; Andreescu, Silvana

    2011-01-01

    There has been much interest in magnetite (Fe[subscript 3]O[subscript 4]) due to its utility in adsorbing high concentrations of arsenic in contaminated water. The magnetic properties of the material allow for simple dispersion and removal from an aqueous system. An inquiry-based laboratory has been developed that illustrates these unique…

  4. Naturally occurring arsenic in the groundwater at the Kansas City Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korte, N.E.

    1990-12-01

    This report describes an investigation concerning the presence of arsenic in concentrations exceeding 0.4 mg/L in the groundwater under the Department of Energy's Kansas City Plant (KCP). The study consisted of four distinct phases: a thorough review of the technical literature, a historical survey of arsenic use at the facility, a laboratory study of existing techniques for determining arsenic speciation, and a field program including water, soil, and sediment sampling. The historical survey and literature review demonstrated that plant activities had not released significant quantities of arsenic to the environment but that similar occurrences of arsenic in alluvial groundwater are widespread in the midwestern United States. Laboratory studies showed that a chromatographic separation technique was necessary to accurately determine arsenic speciation for the KCP groundwater samples. Field studies revealed that naturally occurring reducing conditions prevalent in the subsurface are responsible for dissolving arsenic previously sorbed by iron oxides. Indeed, the data demonstrated that the bulk arsenic concentration of site subsoils and sediments is {approximately}7 mg/kg, whereas the arsenic content of iron oxide subsamples is as high as 84 mg/kg. Literature showed that similar concentrations of arsenic in sediments occur naturally and are capable of producing the levels of arsenic found in groundwater monitoring wells at the KCP. The study concludes, therefore, that the arsenic present in the KCP groundwater is the result of natural phenomena. 44 refs., 8 figs., 14 tabs.

  5. 湖南石门雄黄矿区矿样中的砷氧化细菌的分离及鉴定%Isolation and Identification of Arsenic-oxidizing Bacteria from Shimen Realgar Mine, Hunan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨宇; 白飞; 杨莉; 许庆; 邱冠周

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid industrialization, especially the arsenic containing gold ore mining, arsenic contamination has become a universal concerned eco-environmental problem. How to make better use of a rapid and green approach in biology to disposal of arsenic wastewater could be of great value in relieving arsenic contamination brought by industrial development, improving residents' quality of life and improving human settlements. In the present study, three samples were used as the research objects, which were collected from the water of tailings pond (SY), mine drainage from the mine tunnel 400 m below the surface (XY) and the sediment of tailings pond (NY) in the Shimen Realgar Mine, respectively. Three kinds of As(Ⅲ)-oxidizing microfloras were obtained from these three samples by enrichment culture with arsenic containing medium and subculture after several generation. The As(Ⅲ) tolerance ability was determined in the medium with l~5 g·L-1 of arsenic. Results showed that the cell density of these microfloras reached 109 cells·mL-1 within 2~3 d under 5 g·L-1 of arsenic. Results also showed that the solution containing 1 g·L-1 of sodium arsenite could be completely oxidized by SY, XY and NY within 25 h, 20 h and 35 h respectively, with the decrease of total arsenic mass concentration by 66.7%. 11 As(Ⅲ)-oxidizing bacteria were obtained from those microfloras by repeated plate streaking and qualitative AgNO3 screening method. The 16S rDNA of these strains were examined by sequence alignment of the BLASTN in NCBI. Results showed strains SMY24, SMY33, SMY22, SMY32, SMY21 and SMY31 are Pseudomonas, SMY104 is Acinetobacter. of all known sequences, the maximum rate of sequence similarity of SMY17, SMY25, SMY9 and SMY1 is only 91%, while the minimum is 76%, indicating they are pure culture bacteria that never been reported. By measuring the As(Ⅲ)-oxidizing ability of each strain, results showed SMY104 and SMY21 could completely remove As(Ⅲ) within 20 h

  6. Arsenic compounds toxic to rice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epps, E.A.; Sturgis, M.B.

    1939-01-01

    A study has been made of the kinds of arsenic compounds that may be toxic to rice and of means for correcting the toxicity. Some of the arsenic compounds in flooded soils are reduced, with consequent increase in soluble arsenic content of the soil and decrease in total arsenic content due to liberation of gaseous compounds of arsenic. It was demonstrated that some of the arsenic was lost as arsine. Many of the naturally-occurring compounds of arsenic are not attacked by the micro-organisms and do not become more soluble. Additions of sulfur to soils containing toxic amounts of arsenic decreased the amount of soluble arsenic in the soil.

  7. Tracking the transformation and transport of arsenic sulfide pigments in paints : synchrotron-based X-ray micro-analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keune, Katrien; Mass, Jennifer; Meirer, Florian; Pottasch, Carol; van Loon, Annelies; Hull, Alyssa; Church, Jonathan; Pouyet, Emeline; Cotte, Marine; Mehta, Apurva

    2015-01-01

    Realgar and orpiment, arsenic sulfide pigments used in historic paints, degrade under the influence of light, resulting in transparent, whitish, friable and/or crumbling paints. So far, para-realgar and arsenic trioxide have been identified as the main oxidation products of arsenic sulfide pigments.

  8. Tracking the transformation and transport of arsenic sulfide pigments in paints: synchrotron-based X-ray micro-analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Keune; J. Mass; F. Meirer; C. Pottasch; A. van Loon; A. Hull; J. Church; E. Pouyet; M. Cotte; A. Mehta

    2015-01-01

    Realgar and orpiment, arsenic sulfide pigments used in historic paints, degrade under the influence of light, resulting in transparent, whitish, friable and/or crumbling paints. So far, para-realgar and arsenic trioxide have been identified as the main oxidation products of arsenic sulfide pigments.

  9. Fotocatálise heterogênea com TiO2 para oxidação de arsênio e sua remoção de águas por coprecipitação com sulfato férrico Heterogeneous photocatalysis with TiO2 for the oxidation of arsenic and its removal from water by coprecipitation with ferric sulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Mendes

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The oxidation of arsenic (As(III to As(V in water samples was performed by heterogeneous photocatalysis using a TiO2 film immobilized inside a photochemical reactor. After oxidation, As(V was removed from the water samples by coprecipitation with ferric sulfate. The final conditions of oxidation and arsenic removal (TiO2 film prepared with a suspension: 10% (w/v; pH: 7.0; oxidation time: 30 min and Fe3+ concentration: 50 mg L-1 were applied in natural water samples which were supplemented with 1.0 mg L-1 of As(III to verify the influence of the matrix. After treatment, more than 99% of arsenic was removed from the water.

  10. Environmental Source of Arsenic Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Jin-Yong; Yu, Seung-Do; Hong, Young-Seoub

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic is a ubiquitous, naturally occurring metalloid that may be a significant risk factor for cancer after exposure to contaminated drinking water, cigarettes, foods, industry, occupational environment, and air. Among the various routes of arsenic exposure, drinking water is the largest source of arsenic poisoning worldwide. Arsenic exposure from ingested foods usually comes from food crops grown in arsenic-contaminated soil and/or irrigated with arsenic-contaminated water. According to a ...

  11. The effect of microbial iron oxidation on arsenic mobility and transformation%微生物铁氧化作用对砷迁移转化的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兆苏; 王新军; 陈学萍; 朱永官

    2011-01-01

    采用厌氧培养的方法,从砷污染的水稻上中富集依赖硝酸盐的铁氧化菌群,通过监测培养体系中Fe和A$的形态变化模拟水稻厌氧条件下微生物铁氧化过程对As迁移转化的影响.结果表明,约96%外源添加的Fe(Ⅱ)可在10d内氧化成Fe(Ⅲ),As(Ⅲ)对Fe(Ⅱ)的初期氧化速率具有一定的抑制作用;在微生物铁氧化过程中,As(Ⅲ)被氧化成As(Ⅴ),并吸附在生成的铁氧化物表面或与其共沉淀.微牛物的铁氧化过程可能降低了As的移动性,从而抑制水稻对砷的吸收,降低了砷污染对人体健康的风险.%To observe the effect of the Fe( Ⅱ )-oxidizing process on As mobility and transformation, anaerobic nitrate-dependent Fe-oxidizing bacteria were enriched from an arsenic (As) polluted paddy soil. The Fe and As speciation and concentrations were monitored throughout an incubation experiment.The results showed that 96% Fe( Ⅱ ) was oxidized in 10 days; and simultaneously, As( Ⅲ ) was oxidized to As(Ⅴ), which was adsorbed or coprecipitated by the newly formed Fe( Ⅲ) oxide. The oxidizing rate of Fe(Ⅱ) was restrained by As( Ⅲ ) at the initial stage. These results indicate that As mobility is potentially limited by microbial iron oxidation in the paddy soil, and subsequently As uptake by rice could be decreased.

  12. Behavior, distribution and environmental influence of arsenic in a typical lead smelter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柴立元; 史美清; 梁彦杰; 汤景文; 李青竹

    2015-01-01

    A field study was conducted to determine the behavior and distribution of arsenic during the pyrometallurgy process in a typical SKS (Shuikoushan) lead smelter in Hunan province, China. Environmental influences of arsenic in selected samples were evaluated. Arsenic contents in all input and output samples vary from 0.11%in raw lead to 6.66%in collected dust-2. More arsenic is volatilized in blast furnace and fuming furnace (73.02% of arsenic input) than bottom blowing furnace (10.29%of arsenic input). There are 78.97%, 13.69%, 7.31% of total arsenic distributed in intermediate materials, stockpiled materials and unorganized emissions, respectively. Matte slag-2, collected dust-1 and secondary zinc oxide are hazardous based on the arsenic concentrations of toxicity characteristic leaching procedure. According to risk assessment code (RAC) guideline, arsenic in collected dust-1 poses a very serious risk to the surrounding environment, arsenic in speiss, matte slag-2, water-quenched slag and secondary zinc oxide show low risk, while arsenic in matte slag-1, collected dust-2 and post dust has no risk to the environment.

  13. Arsenic Removal by Liquid Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Marino

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Water contamination with harmful arsenic compounds represents one of the most serious calamities of the last two centuries. Natural occurrence of the toxic metal has been revealed recently for 21 countries worldwide; the risk of arsenic intoxication is particularly high in Bangladesh and India but recently also Europe is facing similar problem. Liquid membranes (LMs look like a promising alternative to the existing removal processes, showing numerous advantages in terms of energy consumption, efficiency, selectivity, and operational costs. The development of different LM configurations has been a matter of investigation by several researching groups, especially for the removal of As(III and As(V from aqueous solutions. Most of these LM systems are based on the use of phosphine oxides as carriers, when the metal removal is from sulfuric acid media. Particularly promising for water treatment is the hollow fiber supported liquid membrane (HFSLM configuration, which offers high selectivity, easy transport of the targeted metal ions, large surface area, and non-stop flow process. The choice of organic extractant(s plays an essential role in the efficiency of the arsenic removal. Emulsion liquid membrane (ELM systems have not been extensively investigated so far, although encouraging results have started to appear in the literature. For such LM configuration, the most relevant step toward efficiency is the choice of the surfactant type and its concentration.

  14. The global menace of arsenic and its conventional remediation - A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Arpan; Paul, Biswajit

    2016-09-01

    Arsenic is a ubiquitous element found in the earth crust with a varying concentration in the earth soil and water. Arsenic has always been under the scanner due to its toxicity in human beings. Contamination of arsenic in drinking water, which generally finds its source from arsenic-containing aquifers; has severely threatened billions of people all over the world. Arsenic poisoning is worse in Bangladesh where As(III) is abundant in waters of tube wells. Natural occurrence of arsenic in groundwater could result from both, oxidative and reductive dissolution. Geothermally heated water has the potential to liberate arsenic from surrounding rocks. Inorganic arsenic has been found to have more toxicity than the organic forms of arsenic. MMA and DMA are now been considered as the organic arsenic compounds having the potential to impair DNA and that is why MMA and DMA are considered as carcinogens. Endless efforts of researchers have elucidated the source, behavior of arsenic in various parts of the environment, mechanism of toxicity and various remediation processes; although, there are lots of areas still to be addressed. In this article, attempts have been made to lay bare an overview of geochemistry, toxicity and current removal techniques of arsenic together.

  15. The global menace of arsenic and its conventional remediation - A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Arpan; Paul, Biswajit

    2016-09-01

    Arsenic is a ubiquitous element found in the earth crust with a varying concentration in the earth soil and water. Arsenic has always been under the scanner due to its toxicity in human beings. Contamination of arsenic in drinking water, which generally finds its source from arsenic-containing aquifers; has severely threatened billions of people all over the world. Arsenic poisoning is worse in Bangladesh where As(III) is abundant in waters of tube wells. Natural occurrence of arsenic in groundwater could result from both, oxidative and reductive dissolution. Geothermally heated water has the potential to liberate arsenic from surrounding rocks. Inorganic arsenic has been found to have more toxicity than the organic forms of arsenic. MMA and DMA are now been considered as the organic arsenic compounds having the potential to impair DNA and that is why MMA and DMA are considered as carcinogens. Endless efforts of researchers have elucidated the source, behavior of arsenic in various parts of the environment, mechanism of toxicity and various remediation processes; although, there are lots of areas still to be addressed. In this article, attempts have been made to lay bare an overview of geochemistry, toxicity and current removal techniques of arsenic together. PMID:27239969

  16. Arsenic removal from flowing irrigation water in bangladesh: impacts of channel properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lineberger, Ethan M; Badruzzaman, A Borhan M; Ali, M Ashraf; Polizzotto, Matthew L

    2013-11-01

    Across Bangladesh, dry-season irrigation with arsenic-contaminated well water is loading arsenic onto rice paddies, leading to increased arsenic concentrations in plants, diminished crop yields, and increased human health risks. As irrigation water flows through conveyance channels between wells and rice fields, arsenic concentrations change over space and time, indicating that channels may provide a location for removing arsenic from solution. However, few studies have systematically evaluated the processes controlling arsenic concentrations in irrigation channels, limiting the ability to manipulate these systems and enhance arsenic removal from solution. The central goal of this study was to quantify how channel design affected removal of dissolved arsenic from flowing irrigation water. Field experiments were conducted in Bangladesh using a chemically constant source of arsenic-contaminated irrigation water and an array of constructed channels with varying geometries. The resulting hydraulic conditions affected the quantity of arsenic removed from solution within the channels by promoting known hydrogeochemical processes. Channels three times the width of control channels removed ∼3 times the mass of arsenic over 32 min of flowing conditions, whereas negligible arsenic removal was observed in tarp-lined channels, which prevented soil-water contact. Arsenic removal from solution was ∼7 times higher in a winding, 200-m-long channel than in the straight, 45-m-long control channels. Arsenic concentrations were governed by oxidative iron-arsenic coprecipitation within the water column, sorption to soils, and phosphate competition. Collectively, these results suggest that better design and management of irrigation channels may play a part in arsenic mitigation strategies for rice fields in Southern Asia. PMID:25602413

  17. 土壤中砷氧化菌的生理生化及转化砷特性研究%Arsenite Transformation Characteristics and Molecular Identification of Arsenic-oxidizing Bacteria Isolated from Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋卫锋; 罗丽丽; 林梓河; 严明; 邓琪; 莫于婷

    2011-01-01

    [目的]通过外加砷源驯化肇庆市鼎湖山自然保护区土壤中细菌,研究砷氧化菌的生理生化及转化砷特性.[方法]采用富集、稀释平板、硝酸盐漫过、生理生化指标的测定等.[结果]从中分离、鉴定出具有氧化砷功能的产碱杆菌和土壤杆菌2种菌株.[结论]这2种菌株最适氧化砷温度为30℃,最适氧化砷pH为9.培养基中乳酸钠浓度对菌株氧化砷有一定的影响.%[ Objective ] Through domesticated bacteria from the applied arsenic source soil in Dinghushan Nature Reserve of Zhaoqing City,physiological,biochemical and transformation characteristics of arsenic oxide bacteria were studied. [ Method]The methods of concentration,plates serial dilution, silver nitrate overflowed, physiological characteristic were adopted. [ Result ] They were identified as alcaligenes castellani and agrobacterium conn respectively, which were able to oxidize arsenite ( As (Ⅲ) ) into arsenate ( As (Ⅴ) ). [ Conclusion ] The optimal temperature and pH were 30 ℃ and 9 respectively for two bacterial strains. In addition,sodium Lactate medium concentration had a certain impact to arsenicoxidizing.

  18. Green approach for ultratrace determination of divalent metal ions and arsenic species using total-reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and mercapto-modified graphene oxide nanosheets as a novel adsorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitko, Rafal; Janik, Paulina; Zawisza, Beata; Talik, Ewa; Margui, Eva; Queralt, Ignasi

    2015-03-17

    A new method based on dispersive microsolid phase extraction (DMSPE) and total-reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (TXRF) is proposed for multielemental ultratrace determination of heavy metal ions and arsenic species. In the developed methodology, the crucial issue is a novel adsorbent synthesized by grafting 3-mercaptopropyl trimethoxysilane on a graphene oxide (GO) surface. Mercapto-modified graphene oxide (GO-SH) can be applied in quantitative adsorption of cobalt, nickel, copper, cadmium, and lead ions. Moreover, GO-SH demonstrates selectivity toward arsenite in the presence of arsenate. Due to such features of GO-SH nanosheets as wrinkled structure and excellent dispersibility in water, GO-SH seems to be ideal for fast and simple preconcentration and determination of heavy metal ions using methodology based on DMSPE and TXRF measurement. The suspension of GO-SH was injected into an analyzed water sample; after filtration, the GO-SH nanosheets with adsorbed metal ions were redispersed in a small volume of internal standard solution and deposited onto a quartz reflector. The high enrichment factor of 150 allows obtaining detection limits of 0.11, 0.078, 0.079, 0.064, 0.054, and 0.083 ng mL(-1) for Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), As(III), Cd(II), and Pb(II), respectively. Such low detection limits can be obtained using a benchtop TXRF system without cooling media and gas consumption. The method is suitable for the analysis of water, including high salinity samples difficult to analyze using other spectroscopy techniques. Moreover, GO-SH can be applied to the arsenic speciation due to its selectivity toward arsenite. PMID:25707847

  19. Toxic Compounds in Our Food: Arsenic Uptake By Rice and Potential Mitigation By Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfferth, A.; Gill, R.; Penido, E.

    2014-12-01

    Arsenic is a ubiquitous element in soils worldwide and has the potential to negatively impact human and ecosystem health under certain biogeochemical conditions. While arsenic is relatively immobile in most oxidized soils due to a high affinity for soil solids, arsenic becomes mobilized under reduced soil conditions due to the reductive dissolution of iron(III) oxides thereby releasing soil-bound arsenic. Since arsenic is a well-known carcinogen, this plant-soil process has the potential to negatively impact the lives of billions of rice consumers worldwide upon plant uptake and grain storage of released arsenic. Moreover, arsenic uptake by rice is excacerbated by the use of As-laden groundwater for rice irrigation. One proposed strategy to decrease arsenic uptake by rice plants is via an increase in dissolved silicon in paddy soil solution (pore-water), since silicic acid and arsenous acid share an uptake pathway. However, several soil processes that influence arsenic cycling may be affected by silicon including desorption from bulk soil, formation and mineralogy of iron(III) oxide plaque, and adsorption/desorption onto/from iron plaque; the effect of silicon on these soil processes will ultimately dictate the effectiveness of altered dissolved silicon in decreasing arsenic uptake at the root, which in turn dictates the concentration of arsenic found in grains. Furthermore, the source of silicon may impact carbon cycling and, in particular, methane emissions. Here, impacts of altered dissolved silicon on processes that affect rhizospheric biogeochemical cycling of arsenic and subsequent plant-uptake, and how it influences other biogeochemical cycles such as carbon and iron are investigated. We show that silicon can decrease arsenic uptake and grain storage under certain conditions, and that altered silicon affects the type of iron (III) oxide that comprises iron plaque.

  20. Attenuation of arsenic neurotoxicity by curcumin in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In view of continued exposure to arsenic and associated human health risk including neurotoxicity, neuroprotective efficacy of curcumin, a polyphenolic antioxidant, has been investigated in rats. A significant decrease in locomotor activity, grip strength (26%) and rota-rod performance (82%) was observed in rats treated with arsenic (sodium arsenite, 20 mg/kg body weight, p.o., 28 days) as compared to controls. The arsenic treated rats also exhibited a decrease in the binding of striatal dopamine receptors (32%) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactivity (19%) in striatum. Increased arsenic levels in corpus striatum (6.5 fold), frontal cortex (6.3 fold) and hippocampus (7.0 fold) associated with enhanced oxidative stress in these brain regions, as evident by an increase in lipid perioxidation, protein carbonyl and a decrease in the levels of glutathione and activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase with differential effects were observed in arsenic treated rats compared to controls. Simultaneous treatment with arsenic (sodium arsenite, 20 mg/kg body weight, p.o., 28 days) and curcumin (100 mg/kg body weight, p.o., 28 days) caused an increase in locomotor activity and grip strength and improved the rota-rod performance in comparison to arsenic treated rats. Binding of striatal dopamine receptors and TH expression increased while arsenic levels and oxidative stress decreased in these brain regions in co-treated rats as compared to those treated with arsenic alone. No significant effect on any of these parameters was observed in rats treated with curcumin (100 mg/kg body weight, p.o., 28 days) alone compared to controls. A significant protection in behavioral, neurochemical and immunohistochemical parameters in rats simultaneously treated with arsenic and curcumin suggest the neuroprotective efficacy of curcumin.

  1. Arsenic compounds and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelson, O

    1980-01-01

    Exposure to arsenic compounds has been epidemiologically associated with various types of cancers, particularly cancer of the lung among copper smelters and pesticide workers, whereas skin cancers and liver angiosarcomas have been associated with ingestion of arsenic for treatment of skin disorders, especially psoriasis. Attempts to reproduce cancer in animals have been mainly unsuccessful, however. Experimental evidence suggests that arsenic inhibits DNA repair; this might help to explain the somewhat conflicting observations from epidemiologic studies and animal experiments with regard to carcinogenicity, and perhaps also cardiovascular morbidity related to arsenic exposure. PMID:7463514

  2. Mechanism of arsenic tolerance and bioremoval of arsenic by Acidithiobacilus ferrooxidans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Prabha M N

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 This paper reports the studies on mechanism of arsenic tolerance and bioremoval of arsenic ions (arsenite or arsenate by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. Exposure of cells to arsenic ions resulted in increased cell surface hydrophobicity, decreased electrophoretic mobility and stronger adsorption affinity towards arsenopyrite. The mechanism of tolerance to arsenic ions were specific and could be attributed to the changes in specific protein expression in the outer membrane and cytosolic membrane fractions. Biosorption studies showed decrease in solution arsenic concentration only with ferrous–grown cells indicating that presence of ferric ions in the EPS was necessary for binding or entrapment of arsenic ions in the EPS. Bacterial EPS of ferrous–grown wild cells were able to uptake arsenate ions due to the strong affinity of ferric ions towards arsenate ions. Neither cells nor the ferric ions were capable of precipitating or oxidizing arsenite ions directly. Both arsenate ions and arsenite ions were co–precipitated with ferric ions formed during the growth of the bacteria.  

  3. Adsorption characteristics of arsenic and boron by soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakata, M.

    1986-01-01

    In order to obtain baseline data concerning the surface and ground water pollution caused by coal ash disposal, adsorption characteristics of arsenic (III) and boron by soil have been studied through laboratory experiments. The main results are as follows: (1) Arsenic (III) and boron adsorption on soil was strongly dependent on pH with adsorption maxima at pH 8 and 8-9, respectively. (2) Arsenic (III) and boron adsorption on soil over the entire concentration ranges investigated could be described by the Langmuir adsorption isotherm and the Freundlich adsorption isotherm, respectively. The Henry adsorption isotherm was also applicable over the lower concentration ranges of arsenic (III) and boron (As (III): < 0.1 deltag/ml; B: < 5deltag/ml.) (3) Arsenic (III) and boron adsorption on soil is controlled mainly by the contents of extractable Fe oxide and hydroxide for arsenic (III) and by the contents of extractable Al hydroxide and allophane (amorphous aluminium silicates) for boron. (4) Adsorption and movement of arsenic (III) and boron during the infiltration of coal ash leachate in soil layer were investigated by means of the unsteady-state, one-dimensional convective-diffusive mass transport model. This model is very useful for evaluation and prediction of the contamination of ground water by trace elements such as arsenic (III) and boron leached at coal ash disposal site.

  4. Arsenic biotransformation and volatilization in transgenic rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiang-Yan; Qin, Jie; Wang, Li-Hong; Duan, Gui-Lan; Sun, Guo-Xin; Wu, Hui-Lan; Chu, Cheng-Cai; Ling, Hong-Qing; Rosen, Barry P; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2011-07-01

    • Biotransformation of arsenic includes oxidation, reduction, methylation, and conversion to more complex organic arsenicals. Members of the class of arsenite (As(III)) S-adenosylmethyltransferase enzymes catalyze As(III) methylation to a variety of mono-, di-, and trimethylated species, some of which are less toxic than As(III) itself. However, no methyltransferase gene has been identified in plants. • Here, an arsM gene from the soil bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris was expressed in Japonica rice (Oryza sativa) cv Nipponbare, and the transgenic rice produced methylated arsenic species, which were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and high-performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS). • Both monomethylarsenate (MAs(V)) and dimethylarsenate (DMAs(V)) were detected in the roots and shoots of transgenic rice. After 12 d exposure to As(III), the transgenic rice gave off 10-fold greater volatile arsenicals. • The present study demonstrates that expression of an arsM gene in rice induces arsenic methylation and volatilization, theoretically providing a potential stratagem for phytoremediation. PMID:21517874

  5. Synthesis of Minerals with Iron Oxide and Hydroxide Contents as a Sorption Medium to Remove Arsenic from Water for Human Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-Hoyos, Sofia; Romero-Velazquez, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic has been classified as a toxic and carcinogenic chemical element. It therefore presents a serious environmental problem in different regions of the country and the world. In the present work, two adsorbent media were developed and evaluated to remove arsenic from water in the Pájaro Verde mine shaft, Huautla, Tlaquiltenango, Morelos. The media were synthesized and characterized, obtaining a surface area of 43.04 m²·g(-1) for the goethite and 2.44 m²·g(-1) for silica sand coated with Fe(III). To conduct the sorption kinetics and isotherms, a 2³ factorial design was performed for each medium in order to obtain the optimal conditions for the factors of arsenic concentration, pH and mass of the adsorbent. The best results were obtained for goethite, with a removal efficiency of 98.61% (C₀ of As(V) 0.360 mg·L(-1)), and an effluent concentration of 0.005 mg·L(-1), a value that complies with the modified Official Mexican Standard NOM-127-SSA1-1994 [1] and WHO guidelines (2004) [2]. The kinetic equation that best fit the experimental data was the pseudo-second-order, resulting in the highest values for the constants for synthetic goethite, with a rate constant sorption of 4.019·g·mg(-1)·min(-1). With respect to the sorption isotherms, both media were fitted to the Langmuir-II linear model with a sorption capacity (qm) of 0.4822 mg·g(-1) for goethite and 0.2494 mg·g(-1) for silica sand coated with Fe(III). PMID:26703707

  6. Synthesis of Minerals with Iron Oxide and Hydroxide Contents as a Sorption Medium to Remove Arsenic from Water for Human Consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Garrido-Hoyos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic has been classified as a toxic and carcinogenic chemical element. It therefore presents a serious environmental problem in different regions of the country and the world. In the present work, two adsorbent media were developed and evaluated to remove arsenic from water in the Pájaro Verde mine shaft, Huautla, Tlaquiltenango, Morelos. The media were synthesized and characterized, obtaining a surface area of 43.04 m2·g−1 for the goethite and 2.44 m2·g−1 for silica sand coated with Fe(III. To conduct the sorption kinetics and isotherms, a 23 factorial design was performed for each medium in order to obtain the optimal conditions for the factors of arsenic concentration, pH and mass of the adsorbent. The best results were obtained for goethite, with a removal efficiency of 98.61% (C0 of As(V 0.360 mg·L−1, and an effluent concentration of 0.005 mg·L−1, a value that complies with the modified Official Mexican Standard NOM-127-SSA1-1994 [1] and WHO guidelines (2004 [2]. The kinetic equation that best fit the experimental data was the pseudo-second-order, resulting in the highest values for the constants for synthetic goethite, with a rate constant sorption of 4.019·g·mg−1·min−1. With respect to the sorption isotherms, both media were fitted to the Langmuir-II linear model with a sorption capacity (qm of 0.4822 mg·g−1 for goethite and 0.2494 mg·g−1 for silica sand coated with Fe(III.

  7. Synthesis of Minerals with Iron Oxide and Hydroxide Contents as a Sorption Medium to Remove Arsenic from Water for Human Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-Hoyos, Sofia; Romero-Velazquez, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic has been classified as a toxic and carcinogenic chemical element. It therefore presents a serious environmental problem in different regions of the country and the world. In the present work, two adsorbent media were developed and evaluated to remove arsenic from water in the Pájaro Verde mine shaft, Huautla, Tlaquiltenango, Morelos. The media were synthesized and characterized, obtaining a surface area of 43.04 m²·g(-1) for the goethite and 2.44 m²·g(-1) for silica sand coated with Fe(III). To conduct the sorption kinetics and isotherms, a 2³ factorial design was performed for each medium in order to obtain the optimal conditions for the factors of arsenic concentration, pH and mass of the adsorbent. The best results were obtained for goethite, with a removal efficiency of 98.61% (C₀ of As(V) 0.360 mg·L(-1)), and an effluent concentration of 0.005 mg·L(-1), a value that complies with the modified Official Mexican Standard NOM-127-SSA1-1994 [1] and WHO guidelines (2004) [2]. The kinetic equation that best fit the experimental data was the pseudo-second-order, resulting in the highest values for the constants for synthetic goethite, with a rate constant sorption of 4.019·g·mg(-1)·min(-1). With respect to the sorption isotherms, both media were fitted to the Langmuir-II linear model with a sorption capacity (qm) of 0.4822 mg·g(-1) for goethite and 0.2494 mg·g(-1) for silica sand coated with Fe(III).

  8. Synthesis of Minerals with Iron Oxide and Hydroxide Contents as a Sorption Medium to Remove Arsenic from Water for Human Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-Hoyos, Sofia; Romero-Velazquez, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic has been classified as a toxic and carcinogenic chemical element. It therefore presents a serious environmental problem in different regions of the country and the world. In the present work, two adsorbent media were developed and evaluated to remove arsenic from water in the Pájaro Verde mine shaft, Huautla, Tlaquiltenango, Morelos. The media were synthesized and characterized, obtaining a surface area of 43.04 m2·g−1 for the goethite and 2.44 m2·g−1 for silica sand coated with Fe(III). To conduct the sorption kinetics and isotherms, a 23 factorial design was performed for each medium in order to obtain the optimal conditions for the factors of arsenic concentration, pH and mass of the adsorbent. The best results were obtained for goethite, with a removal efficiency of 98.61% (C0 of As(V) 0.360 mg·L−1), and an effluent concentration of 0.005 mg·L−1, a value that complies with the modified Official Mexican Standard NOM-127-SSA1-1994 [1] and WHO guidelines (2004) [2]. The kinetic equation that best fit the experimental data was the pseudo-second-order, resulting in the highest values for the constants for synthetic goethite, with a rate constant sorption of 4.019·g·mg−1·min−1. With respect to the sorption isotherms, both media were fitted to the Langmuir-II linear model with a sorption capacity (qm) of 0.4822 mg·g−1 for goethite and 0.2494 mg·g−1 for silica sand coated with Fe(III). PMID:26703707

  9. Comparative oxidation state specific analysis of arsenic species by high-performance liquid chromatography- inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic absorption spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Currier, J. M.; Saunders, R J; Ding, L.; Bodnar, W.; Cable, P.; Matoušek, T. (Tomáš); Creed, J. T.; Stýblo, M.

    2013-01-01

    The formation of methylarsonous acid (MAsIII) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMAsIII) in the course of inorganic arsenic (iAs) metabolism plays an important role in the adverse effects of chronic exposure to iAs. High-performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) and hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-CT-AAS) have been frequently used for the analysis of MAsIII and DMAsIII in biological samples. While HG-CT-AAS has con...

  10. The contribution of microbial mats to the arsenic geochemistry of an ancient gold mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewniak, Lukasz; Maryan, Natalia; Lewandowski, Wiktor; Kaczanowski, Szymon; Sklodowska, Aleksandra

    2012-03-01

    The ancient Zloty Stok (SW Poland) gold mine is such an environment, where different microbial communities, able to utilize inorganic arsenic species As(III) and As(V), are found. The purpose of the present study was to (i) estimate prokaryotic diversity in the microbial mats in bottom sediments of this gold mine, (ii) identify microorganisms that can metabolize arsenic, and (iii) estimate their potential role in the arsenic geochemistry of the mine and in the environment. The oxidation/reduction experiments showed that the microbial mat community may significantly contribute to arsenic contamination in groundwater. The presence of both arsenite oxidizing and dissimilatory arsenate reducing bacteria in the mat was confirmed by the detection of arsenite oxidase and dissimilatory arsenate reductase genes, respectively. This work also demonstrated that microorganisms utilizing other compounds that naturally co-occur with arsenic are present within the microbial mat community and may contribute to the arsenic geochemistry in the environment. PMID:22243864

  11. Arsenic poisoning in cattle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reagor, J.C.

    Reports of heavy metal intoxication submitted to the Texas Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory indicate that arsenic is the most common heavy metal intoxicant in Texas. The most frequent sources of arsenic are compounds used as herbicides and cotton defoliants. The misuse of these compounds and subsequent intoxication of cattle is discussed in this paper. 8 references, 1 table.

  12. Arsenic in Food

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Food Home Food Foodborne Illness & Contaminants Metals Arsenic Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... and previous or current use of arsenic-containing pesticides. Are there ... compounds in water, food, air, and soil: organic and inorganic (these together ...

  13. [Acute arsenic poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montelescaut, Etienne; Vermeersch, Véronique; Commandeur, Diane; Huynh, Sophie; Danguy des Deserts, Marc; Sapin, Jeanne; Ould-Ahmed, Mehdi; Drouillard, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Acute arsenic poisoning is a rare cause of suicide attempt. It causes a multiple organs failure caused by cardiogenic shock. We report the case of a patient admitted twelve hours after an ingestion of trioxide arsenic having survived thanks to a premature treatment.

  14. [Acute arsenic poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montelescaut, Etienne; Vermeersch, Véronique; Commandeur, Diane; Huynh, Sophie; Danguy des Deserts, Marc; Sapin, Jeanne; Ould-Ahmed, Mehdi; Drouillard, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Acute arsenic poisoning is a rare cause of suicide attempt. It causes a multiple organs failure caused by cardiogenic shock. We report the case of a patient admitted twelve hours after an ingestion of trioxide arsenic having survived thanks to a premature treatment. PMID:25486670

  15. Changes in serum thioredoxin among individuals chronically exposed to arsenic in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Gao, Yanhui; Zhao, Lijun; Wei, Yudan; Feng, Hongqi; Wang, Cheng; Wei, Wei; Ding, Yunpeng; Sun, Dianjun

    2012-02-15

    It is well known that oxidative damage plays a key role in the development of chronic arsenicosis. There is a complex set of mechanisms of redox cycling in vivo to protect cells from the damage. In this study, we examined the differences in the levels of serum thioredoxin1 (TRX1) among individuals exposed to different levels of arsenic in drinking water and detected early biomarkers of arsenic poisoning before the appearance of skin lesions. A total of 157 subjects from endemic regions of China were selected and divided into arsenicosis group with skin lesions (total intake of arsenic: 8.68-45.71mg-year) and non-arsenicosis group without skin lesions, which further divided into low (0.00-1.06mg-year), medium (1.37-3.55mg-year), and high (4.26-48.13mg-year) arsenic exposure groups. Concentrations of serum TRX1 were analyzed by an ELISA method. Levels of water arsenic and urinary speciated arsenics, including inorganic arsenic (iAs), monomethylated arsenic (MMA), and dimethylated arsenic (DMA), were determined by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry. Our results showed that the levels of serum TRX1 in arsenicosis patients were significantly higher than that of the subjects who were chronically exposed to arsenic, but without skin lesions. A positive correlation was seen between the levels of serum TRX1 and the total water arsenic intake or the levels of urinary arsenic species. The results of this study indicate that arsenic exposure could significantly change the levels of human serum TRX1, which can be detected before arsenic-specific dermatological symptoms occur. This study provides further evidence on revealing the mechanism of arsenic toxicity.

  16. Evaluation of gamma gluthamyl transferase and uric acid levels in arsenic exposed subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceylan Bal

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Arsenic is a metal with a widespread industrial usage and causing oxidative stress. Studies shows serum uric acid and gamma gluthamyl transferase (GGT levels are increasing in oxidative stress. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of arsenic exposure on serum uric acid and GGT levels. Methods: 500 patients who refer to Ankara Occupational Disease Hospital between 2010 to 2014 for periodic examination and urinary arsenic, serum uric acid and serum GGT levels assessed are included in this study. 268 patients with urinary arsenic levels over 35μg/L are defined as exposed and below 35μg/L are controls. Results: Data of 500 patients were analysed. 268 of them had high urine arsenic levels and 232 had normal urine arsenic levels. In the high urine arsenic level group the median serum uric acid level was 5.4 (2.60-7.20 and median serum GGT level was 27 (10-51 in the other group with normal urine arsenic levels the median serum uric acid level was 4.9 (2.5-7 and median serum GGT level was 22 (10-52. The difference between two groups was statistically significant (p value: 0.002 and <0.001 respectively Conclusion: Arsenic exposure may be associated with hyperuricemia and high levels of GGT and with prospective studies the causal relationship between arsenic exposure and hyperuricemia and GGT can be revealed.

  17. Evaluating the cement stabilization of arsenic-bearing iron wastes from drinking water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Tara M; Snyder, Kathryn V; Reddy, Raghav; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Amrose, Susan E; Raskin, Lutgarde; Hayes, Kim F

    2015-12-30

    Cement stabilization of arsenic-bearing wastes is recommended to limit arsenic release from wastes following disposal. Such stabilization has been demonstrated to reduce the arsenic concentration in the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), which regulates landfill disposal of arsenic waste. However, few studies have evaluated leaching from actual wastes under conditions similar to ultimate disposal environments. In this study, land disposal in areas where flooding is likely was simulated to test arsenic release from cement stabilized arsenic-bearing iron oxide wastes. After 406 days submersed in chemically simulated rainwater, wastes. Presenting the first characterization of cement stabilized waste using μXRF, these results revealed the majority of arsenic in cement stabilized waste remained associated with iron. This distribution of arsenic differed from previous observations of calcium-arsenic solid phases when arsenic salts were stabilized with cement, illustrating that the initial waste form influences the stabilized form. Overall, cement stabilization is effective for arsenic-bearing wastes when acidic conditions can be avoided.

  18. Kinetic and thermodynamic aspects of adsorption of arsenic onto granular ferric hydroxide (GFH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Kashi; Amy, Gary L; Prevost, Michele; Nour, Shokoufeh; Jekel, Martin; Gallagher, Paul M; Blumenschein, Charles D

    2008-07-01

    Relatively limited information is available regarding the impacts of temperature on the adsorption kinetics and equilibrium capacities of granular ferric hydroxide (GFH) for arsenic (V) and arsenic (III) in an aqueous solution. In general, very little information is available on the kinetics and thermodynamic aspects of adsorption of arsenic compounds onto other iron oxide-based adsorbents as well. In order to gain an understanding of the adsorption process kinetics, a detailed study was conducted in a controlled batch system. The effects of temperature and pH on the adsorption rates of arsenic (V) and arsenic (III) were investigated. Reaction rate constants were calculated at pH levels of 6.5 and 7.5. Rate data are best described by a pseudo first-order kinetic model at each temperature and pH condition studied. At lower pH values, arsenic (V) exhibits greater removal rates than arsenic (III). An increase in temperature increases the overall adsorption reaction rate constant values for both arsenic (V) and arsenic (III). An examination of thermodynamic parameters shows that the adsorption of arsenic (V) as well as arsenic (III) by GFH is an endothermic process and is spontaneous at the specific temperatures investigated.

  19. Exposure to inorganic arsenic in pregnancy and metabolism-nutrition interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Li

    2006-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic is metabolized by most mammals, including humans, via alternating reduction and oxidative methylation with S-adenosylmethionine as main methyl donor. Thus, it seems likely that it is influenced by the availability of methyl groups. The main arsenic metabolites excreted in human urine are monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), besides un-methylated inorganic arsenic (arsenate [As(V)] and arsenite [As(III)]). The aim of the present study wa...

  20. Complementary arsenic speciation methods: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nearing, Michelle M., E-mail: michelle.nearing@rmc.ca; Koch, Iris, E-mail: koch-i@rmc.ca; Reimer, Kenneth J., E-mail: reimer-k@rmc.ca

    2014-09-01

    The toxicity of arsenic greatly depends on its chemical form and oxidation state (speciation) and therefore accurate determination of arsenic speciation is a crucial step in understanding its chemistry and potential risk. High performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled mass spectrometry (HPLC–ICP-MS) is the most common analysis used for arsenic speciation but it has two major limitations: it relies on an extraction step (usually from a solid sample) that can be incomplete or alter the arsenic compounds; and it provides no structural information, relying on matching sample peaks to standard peaks. The use of additional analytical methods in a complementary manner introduces the ability to address these disadvantages. The use of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) with HPLC–ICP-MS can be used to identify compounds not extracted for HPLC–ICP-MS and provide minimal processing steps for solid state analysis that may help preserve labile compounds such as those containing arsenic-sulfur bonds, which can degrade under chromatographic conditions. On the other hand, HPLC–ICP-MS is essential in confirming organoarsenic compounds with similar white line energies seen by using XAS, and identifying trace arsenic compounds that are too low to be detected by XAS. The complementary use of electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI–MS) with HPLC–ICP-MS provides confirmation of arsenic compounds identified during the HPLC–ICP-MS analysis, identification of unknown compounds observed during the HPLC–ICP-MS analysis and further resolves HPLC–ICP-MS by identifying co-eluting compounds. In the complementary use of HPLC–ICP-MS and ESI–MS, HPLC–ICP-MS helps to focus the ESI–MS selection of ions. Numerous studies have shown that the information obtained from HPLC–ICP-MS analysis can be greatly enhanced by complementary approaches. - Highlights: • HPLC–ICP-MS is the most common method used for arsenic speciation. • HPLC limitations include

  1. Effect of well disinfection on arsenic in ground water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotkowitz, M.; Ellickson, K.; Clary, A.; Bowman, G.; Standridge, J.; Sonzogni, W.

    2008-01-01

    Domestic water wells are routinely subjected to in situ chemical disinfection treatments to control nuisance or pathogenic bacteria. Most treatments are chlorine based and presumably cause strongly oxidizing conditions in the wellbore. Water resource managers in Wisconsin were concerned that such treatments might facilitate release of arsenic from sulfide minerals disseminated within a confined sandstone aquifer. To test this hypothesis, a well was subjected to four disinfection treatments over 9 months time. The first treatment consisted of routine pumping of the well without chemical disinfection; three subsequent treatments included chlorine disinfection and pumping. Pretreatment arsenic concentrations in well water ranged from 7.4 to 18 ??g/L. Elevated arsenic concentrations up to 57 ??g/L in the chemical treatment solutions purged from the well are attributed to the disintegration or dissolution of biofilms or scale. Following each of the four treatments, arsenic concentrations decreased to less than 10 ??g/L during a period of pumping. Arsenic concentrations generally returned to pretreatment levels under stagnant, nonpumping conditions imposed following each treatment. Populations of iron-oxidizing, heterotrophic, and sulfate-reducing bacteria decreased following chemical treatments but were never fully eradicated from the well. Strongly oxidizing conditions were induced by the chlorine-based disinfections, but the treatments did not result in sustained increases in well water arsenic. Results suggest that disruption of biofilm and mineral deposits in the well and the water distribution system in tandem with chlorine disinfection can improve water quality in this setting. ?? 2008 The Author(s).

  2. Effects of Soil Composition and Mineralogy on the Bioaccessibility of Arsenic from Tailings and Soil in Gold Mine Districts of Nova Scotia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meunier, Louise; Walker, Stephen R.; Wragg, Joanna; Parsons, Michael B.; Koch, Iris; Jamieson, Heather E.; Reimer, Kenneth J. (Queens); (Brit. Geo.); (Royal); (NRC)

    2010-10-20

    Bioaccessibility tests and mineralogical analyses were performed on arsenic-contaminated tailings and soils from gold mine districts of Nova Scotia, Canada, to examine the links between soil composition, mineralogy, and arsenic bioaccessibility. Arsenic bioaccessibility ranges from 0.1% to 49%. A weak correlation was observed between total and bioaccessible arsenic concentrations, and the arsenic bioaccessibility was not correlated with other elements. Bulk X-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis shows arsenic in these near-surface samples is mainly in the pentavalent form, indicating that most of the arsenopyrite (As{sup 1-}) originally present in the tailings and soils has been oxidized during weathering reactions. Detailed mineralogical analyses of individual samples have identified up to seven arsenic species, the relative proportions of which appear to affect arsenic bioaccessibility. The highest arsenic bioaccessibility (up to 49%) is associated with the presence of calcium-iron arsenate. Samples containing arsenic predominantly as arsenopyrite or scorodite have the lowest bioaccessibility (<1%). Other arsenic species identified (predominantly amorphous iron arsenates and arsenic-bearing iron(oxy)hydroxides) are associated with intermediate bioaccessibility (1 to 10%). The presence of a more soluble arsenic phase, even at low concentrations, results in increased arsenic bioaccessibility from the mixed arsenic phases associated with tailings and mine-impacted soils.

  3. A novel method to remove arsenic from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Kyle J.

    Arsenic is a toxic metalloid that is found ubiquitously in earth's crust. The release of arsenic into the aqueous environment and the subsequent contamination in drinking water supplies is a worldwide health crisis. Arsenic is the culprit of the largest mass poisoning of a population in history and the number one contaminant of concern in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Priority List of Hazardous Substances. Practical, affordable, and reliable treatment technologies have yet to be developed due to the difficulty in overcoming many socioeconomic and geochemical barriers. Recent studies have reported that cupric oxide (CuO) nanoparticles have shown promising characteristics as a sorbent to remove arsenic from water. However, these studies were conducted in controlled environments and have yet to test the efficacy of this treatment technology in the field. In this manuscript, a flow through adsorption column containing CuO nanoparticles was developed for lab based studies to remove arsenic from water. These studies were expanded to include a field demonstration of the CuO nanoparticle flow through adsorption column to remove naturally occurring arsenic from groundwater associated with agriculture, domestic groundwater, and in situ recovery (ISR) uranium production process water. A major limitation for many treatment technologies is the difficulties presented in the disposal of waste byproducts such as sludge and spent media. In the research contained in this manuscript, we investigate the processes of regenerating the CuO nanoparticles using sodium hydroxide (NaOH). The use of the regenerated CuO nanoparticles was examined in batch experiments and implemented in the flow through column studies. The ability to regenerate and reuse a sorbent drastically reduces costs involved in manufacturing and disposal of spent media. Also, the CuO nanoparticles were evaluated in batch experiments for the removal of naturally

  4. Binational Arsenic Exposure Survey: Methodology and Estimated Arsenic Intake from Drinking Water and Urinary Arsenic Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberge, Jason; O’Rourke, Mary Kay; Meza-Montenegro, Maria Mercedes; Gutiérrez-Millán, Luis Enrique; Burgess, Jefferey L.; Harris, Robin B.

    2012-01-01

    The Binational Arsenic Exposure Survey (BAsES) was designed to evaluate probable arsenic exposures in selected areas of southern Arizona and northern Mexico, two regions with known elevated levels of arsenic in groundwater reserves. This paper describes the methodology of BAsES and the relationship between estimated arsenic intake from beverages and arsenic output in urine. Households from eight communities were selected for their varying groundwater arsenic concentrations in Arizona, USA and Sonora, Mexico. Adults responded to questionnaires and provided dietary information. A first morning urine void and water from all household drinking sources were collected. Associations between urinary arsenic concentration (total, organic, inorganic) and estimated level of arsenic consumed from water and other beverages were evaluated through crude associations and by random effects models. Median estimated total arsenic intake from beverages among participants from Arizona communities ranged from 1.7 to 14.1 µg/day compared to 0.6 to 3.4 µg/day among those from Mexico communities. In contrast, median urinary inorganic arsenic concentrations were greatest among participants from Hermosillo, Mexico (6.2 µg/L) whereas a high of 2.0 µg/L was found among participants from Ajo, Arizona. Estimated arsenic intake from drinking water was associated with urinary total arsenic concentration (p < 0.001), urinary inorganic arsenic concentration (p < 0.001), and urinary sum of species (p < 0.001). Urinary arsenic concentrations increased between 7% and 12% for each one percent increase in arsenic consumed from drinking water. Variability in arsenic intake from beverages and urinary arsenic output yielded counter intuitive results. Estimated intake of arsenic from all beverages was greatest among Arizonans yet participants in Mexico had higher urinary total and inorganic arsenic concentrations. Other contributors to urinary arsenic concentrations should be evaluated. PMID:22690182

  5. Binational Arsenic Exposure Survey: Methodology and Estimated Arsenic Intake from Drinking Water and Urinary Arsenic Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin B. Harris

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The Binational Arsenic Exposure Survey (BAsES was designed to evaluate probable arsenic exposures in selected areas of southern Arizona and northern Mexico, two regions with known elevated levels of arsenic in groundwater reserves. This paper describes the methodology of BAsES and the relationship between estimated arsenic intake from beverages and arsenic output in urine. Households from eight communities were selected for their varying groundwater arsenic concentrations in Arizona, USA and Sonora, Mexico. Adults responded to questionnaires and provided dietary information. A first morning urine void and water from all household drinking sources were collected. Associations between urinary arsenic concentration (total, organic, inorganic and estimated level of arsenic consumed from water and other beverages were evaluated through crude associations and by random effects models. Median estimated total arsenic intake from beverages among participants from Arizona communities ranged from 1.7 to 14.1 µg/day compared to 0.6 to 3.4 µg/day among those from Mexico communities. In contrast, median urinary inorganic arsenic concentrations were greatest among participants from Hermosillo, Mexico (6.2 µg/L whereas a high of 2.0 µg/L was found among participants from Ajo, Arizona. Estimated arsenic intake from drinking water was associated with urinary total arsenic concentration (p < 0.001, urinary inorganic arsenic concentration (p < 0.001, and urinary sum of species (p < 0.001. Urinary arsenic concentrations increased between 7% and 12% for each one percent increase in arsenic consumed from drinking water. Variability in arsenic intake from beverages and urinary arsenic output yielded counter intuitive results. Estimated intake of arsenic from all beverages was greatest among Arizonans yet participants in Mexico had higher urinary total and inorganic arsenic concentrations. Other contributors to urinary arsenic concentrations should be evaluated.

  6. Genes involved in arsenic transformation and resistance associated with different levels of arsenic-contaminated soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Gejiao

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arsenic is known as a toxic metalloid, which primarily exists in inorganic form [As(III and As(V] and can be transformed by microbial redox processes in the natural environment. As(III is much more toxic and mobile than As(V, hence microbial arsenic redox transformation has a major impact on arsenic toxicity and mobility which can greatly influence the human health. Our main purpose was to investigate the distribution and diversity of microbial arsenite-resistant species in three different arsenic-contaminated soils, and further study the As(III resistance levels and related functional genes of these species. Results A total of 58 arsenite-resistant bacteria were identified from soils with three different arsenic-contaminated levels. Highly arsenite-resistant bacteria (MIC > 20 mM were only isolated from the highly arsenic-contaminated site and belonged to Acinetobacter, Agrobacterium, Arthrobacter, Comamonas, Rhodococcus, Stenotrophomonas and Pseudomonas. Five arsenite-oxidizing bacteria that belonged to Achromobacter, Agrobacterium and Pseudomonas were identified and displayed a higher average arsenite resistance level than the non-arsenite oxidizers. 5 aoxB genes encoding arsenite oxidase and 51 arsenite transporter genes [18 arsB, 12 ACR3(1 and 21 ACR3(2] were successfully amplified from these strains using PCR with degenerate primers. The aoxB genes were specific for the arsenite-oxidizing bacteria. Strains containing both an arsenite oxidase gene (aoxB and an arsenite transporter gene (ACR3 or arsB displayed a higher average arsenite resistance level than those possessing an arsenite transporter gene only. Horizontal transfer of ACR3(2 and arsB appeared to have occurred in strains that were primarily isolated from the highly arsenic-contaminated soil. Conclusion Soils with long-term arsenic contamination may result in the evolution of highly diverse arsenite-resistant bacteria and such diversity was probably caused in

  7. Analysis of Arsenicals and Their Sulfur Analogs in Biological Samples Using HPLC with Collision Cell ICP-MS and ESI-MS/MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent arsenic speciation studies have indicated that the sulfur analogs of the more common arsenic oxides are present in environmental and biological systems. This discovery was previously impeded due to the strong affinity of these arsenic-sulfides for the stationary phases typ...

  8. Complementary arsenic speciation methods: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nearing, Michelle M.; Koch, Iris; Reimer, Kenneth J.

    2014-09-01

    The toxicity of arsenic greatly depends on its chemical form and oxidation state (speciation) and therefore accurate determination of arsenic speciation is a crucial step in understanding its chemistry and potential risk. High performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) is the most common analysis used for arsenic speciation but it has two major limitations: it relies on an extraction step (usually from a solid sample) that can be incomplete or alter the arsenic compounds; and it provides no structural information, relying on matching sample peaks to standard peaks. The use of additional analytical methods in a complementary manner introduces the ability to address these disadvantages. The use of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) with HPLC-ICP-MS can be used to identify compounds not extracted for HPLC-ICP-MS and provide minimal processing steps for solid state analysis that may help preserve labile compounds such as those containing arsenicsbnd sulfur bonds, which can degrade under chromatographic conditions. On the other hand, HPLC-ICP-MS is essential in confirming organoarsenic compounds with similar white line energies seen by using XAS, and identifying trace arsenic compounds that are too low to be detected by XAS. The complementary use of electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) with HPLC-ICP-MS provides confirmation of arsenic compounds identified during the HPLC-ICP-MS analysis, identification of unknown compounds observed during the HPLC-ICP-MS analysis and further resolves HPLC-ICP-MS by identifying co-eluting compounds. In the complementary use of HPLC-ICP-MS and ESI-MS, HPLC-ICP-MS helps to focus the ESI-MS selection of ions. Numerous studies have shown that the information obtained from HPLC-ICP-MS analysis can be greatly enhanced by complementary approaches.

  9. Anthropogenic influences on groundwater arsenic concentrations in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Rebecca B.; Ashfaque, Khandaker N.; Badruzzaman, A. B. M.; Ashraf Ali, M.; Shoemaker, Julie K.; Harvey, Charles F.

    2010-01-01

    The origin of dissolved arsenic in the Ganges Delta has puzzled researchers ever since the report of widespread arsenic poisoning two decades ago. Today, microbially mediated oxidation of organic carbon is thought to drive the geochemical transformations that release arsenic from sediments, but the source of the organic carbon that fuels these processes remains controversial. At a typical site in Bangladesh, where groundwater-irrigated rice fields and constructed ponds are the main sources of groundwater recharge, we combine hydrologic and biogeochemical analyses to trace the origin of contaminated groundwater. Incubation experiments indicate that recharge from ponds contains biologically degradable organic carbon, whereas recharge from rice fields contains mainly recalcitrant organic carbon. Chemical and isotopic indicators as well as groundwater simulations suggest that recharge from ponds carries this degradable organic carbon into the shallow aquifer, and that groundwater flow, drawn by irrigation pumping, transports pond water to the depth where dissolved arsenic concentrations are greatest. Results also indicate that arsenic concentrations are low in groundwater originating from rice fields. Furthermore, solute composition in arsenic-contaminated water is consistent with that predicted using geochemical models of pond-water-aquifer-sediment interactions. We therefore suggest that the construction of ponds has influenced aquifer biogeochemistry, and that patterns of arsenic contamination in the shallow aquifer result from variations in the source of water, and the complex three-dimensional patterns of groundwater flow.

  10. The contribution of microbial mats to the arsenic geochemistry of an ancient gold mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ancient Zloty Stok (SW Poland) gold mine is such an environment, where different microbial communities, able to utilize inorganic arsenic species As(III) and As(V), are found. The purpose of the present study was to (i) estimate prokaryotic diversity in the microbial mats in bottom sediments of this gold mine, (ii) identify microorganisms that can metabolize arsenic, and (iii) estimate their potential role in the arsenic geochemistry of the mine and in the environment. The oxidation/reduction experiments showed that the microbial mat community may significantly contribute to arsenic contamination in groundwater. The presence of both arsenite oxidizing and dissimilatory arsenate reducing bacteria in the mat was confirmed by the detection of arsenite oxidase and dissimilatory arsenate reductase genes, respectively. This work also demonstrated that microorganisms utilizing other compounds that naturally co-occur with arsenic are present within the microbial mat community and may contribute to the arsenic geochemistry in the environment. - Highlights: ► The microbial mats from this ancient gold mine are highly diverse community. ► As(III) oxidizing and As(V) reducing bacteria are present in the mats. ► As redox transformations are linked to the metabolism of microbial mats bacteria. ► Microbial mats play a crucial role in the As biogeochemical cycle within the mine. - The microbial mats from this ancient gold mine can mediate oxidation/reduction reaction of arsenic and in this way may significantly contribute to arsenic contamination in groundwater.

  11. Arsenic-induced toxicity and the protective role of ascorbic acid in mouse testis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxidative stress has been suggested to be a major cause of male reproductive failure. Here, we investigated whether arsenic, which impairs male reproductive functions in rodent models, acts by inducing oxidative stress. Male 8-week-old ICR mice were given drinking water containing 20 or 40 mg/l sodium arsenite with or without 0.75 or 1.5 g/l of the antioxidant ascorbic acid for 5 weeks. The arsenic-treated mice showed decreased epididymidal sperm counts and testicular weights compared to untreated mice. These effects were reversed in mice that were co-treated with ascorbic acid. Similarly, arsenic treatment lowered the activities of testicular 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD) and 17β-HSD, which play important roles in steroidogenesis, and this was reversed by co-treatment with ascorbic acid. The testicles of arsenic-treated mice had decreased glutathione (GSH) levels (which correlate inversely with the degree of cellular oxidative stress) and elevated levels of protein carbonyl (a marker of oxidative damage to tissue proteins). Ascorbic acid co-treatment reversed both of these effects. Thus, ascorbic acid blocks both the adverse effects of arsenic on male reproductive functions and the arsenic-induced testicular oxidative changes. These observations support the notion that arsenic impairs male reproductive function by inducing oxidative stress

  12. 砷化合物致人表皮癌A431细胞的毒性及氧化应激和砷代谢研究%Cytotoxicity,oxidative stress and arsenic metabolism in human skin basal cell carcinoma cell (A431) induced by different speciations of arsenic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆景坤; 田艳; 俞腾飞; 陈朝军; 王一博; 尹若熙

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the cytotoxicity and oxidative stress and arsenic metabolism induced by different speciations of arsenic in human skin basal carcinoma cell (A431). Methods Cultured A431 cells were exposed to 0.05—50.0 μmol/L methylarsonous acid (MMAⅢ), 0.05-200.0 μmol/L arsenic trioxide (As2O3,As3+) , 0.5-500.0 μmol/L disodium hydrogen arsenate(As5+) or sodium dimethylarsonate(DMAⅤ) for 24 h, respectively. MTT assay were used to evaluate the cell viability, the malondialdehyde (MDA) content and the activity of the superoxide dismutase (SOU) in HaCaT were detected respectively. The intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were detected with flow cytometry and the atomic fluorescence were used to analyze intracellular or extracellular levels of different speciations of arsenic. Results When the dose was in a certain range, MMAⅢ (≥0.5μmol/L), As2O3 (≥200.0 μmol/L), disodium hydrogen arsenate (0.5, ≥200.0 μmol/L)and sodium dimethylarsonate (500.0 μmoL/L) could all decrease the cell viability (P50.0 μmol/L As2O3> 100.0 μmol/L disodium hydrogen arsenate > 100.0 μmol/L sodium dimethylarsonate. As for As2O3 and disodium hydrogen arsenate, the methylation ratios in low—dose groups were higher than the high—dose ones' , and the ratios in As2O3 groups was higher than those in As5+ groups. Conclusion Arsenides may inhibit A431 cells proliferation in higher exposure levels and promote proliferation in lower exposure levels, the mechanism probably relates to oxidative stress and arsenic metabolism in A431 cells induced by different speciations of arsenide with various concentrations.%目的 探讨不同砷化合物致人表皮癌细胞(A431)的细胞毒性及氧化应激和砷代谢的情况.方法 培养的A431细胞分别暴露于0.05~50.0 μmol/L一甲基亚胂酸(MMAⅢ),0.05~200.0 μmol/L三氧化二砷(As2O3,As3+),0.5~500.0μmol/L砷酸氢二纳(As5+)和二甲基胂酸钠(DMAV)24 h,应用四甲基偶氮唑盐(MTT)法测定细

  13. Sulfide-driven arsenic mobilization from arsenopyrite and black shale pyrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W.; Young, L.Y.; Yee, N.; Serfes, M.; Rhine, E.D.; Reinfelder, J.R.

    2008-01-01

    We examined the hypothesis that sulfide drives arsenic mobilization from pyritic black shale by a sulfide-arsenide exchange and oxidation reaction in which sulfide replaces arsenic in arsenopyrite forming pyrite, and arsenide (As-1) is concurrently oxidized to soluble arsenite (As+3). This hypothesis was tested in a series of sulfide-arsenide exchange experiments with arsenopyrite (FeAsS), homogenized black shale from the Newark Basin (Lockatong formation), and pyrite isolated from Newark Basin black shale incubated under oxic (21% O2), hypoxic (2% O2, 98% N2), and anoxic (5% H2, 95% N2) conditions. The oxidation state of arsenic in Newark Basin black shale pyrite was determined using X-ray absorption-near edge structure spectroscopy (XANES). Incubation results show that sulfide (1 mM initial concentration) increases arsenic mobilization to the dissolved phase from all three solids under oxic and hypoxic, but not anoxic conditions. Indeed under oxic and hypoxic conditions, the presence of sulfide resulted in the mobilization in 48 h of 13-16 times more arsenic from arsenopyrite and 6-11 times more arsenic from isolated black shale pyrite than in sulfide-free controls. XANES results show that arsenic in Newark Basin black shale pyrite has the same oxidation state as that in FeAsS (-1) and thus extend the sulfide-arsenide exchange mechanism of arsenic mobilization to sedimentary rock, black shale pyrite. Biologically active incubations of whole black shale and its resident microorganisms under sulfate reducing conditions resulted in sevenfold higher mobilization of soluble arsenic than sterile controls. Taken together, our results indicate that sulfide-driven arsenic mobilization would be most important under conditions of redox disequilibrium, such as when sulfate-reducing bacteria release sulfide into oxic groundwater, and that microbial sulfide production is expected to enhance arsenic mobilization in sedimentary rock aquifers with major pyrite-bearing, black

  14. USEPA Arsenic Demonstration Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The presentation provides background information on the USEPA arsenic removal program. The summary includes information on the history of the program, sites and technology selected, and a summary of the data collected from two completed projects.

  15. Removal of arsenic from water streams: an overview of available techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaclavikova, Miroslava; Hredzak, Slavomir; Jakabsky, Stefan [Institute of Geotechnics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Kosice (Slovakia); Gallios, George P. [Aristotle University, Lab. Gen. and Inorg. Chemical Technology, School of Chemistry, Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2008-02-15

    Arsenic poisoning has become one of the major environmental worries worldwide, as millions of people, which have been exposed to high arsenic concentrations (through contaminated drinking water), developed severe health problems. The high toxicity of this element made necessary the enforcement of stringent maximum allowable limits in drinking water. So, the development of novel techniques for its removal from aqueous streams is a very important issue. This paper offers an overview of geochemistry, distribution, sources, toxicity, regulations and applications of selected techniques for arsenic removal. The contribution briefly summarizes adsorption processes and mechanism of arsenic species removal from water streams by means of iron oxide/oxyhydroxide based materials. Sorption capacities of various sorbents (e.g. akaganeite, goethite, hydrous ferric oxide, iron oxide coated sand, Fe(III) loaded resin, granular ferric hydroxide, Ce(IV) doped iron oxide, natural iron ores, iron oxide coated cement, magnetically modified zeolite, Fe-hydroxide coated alumina) have been compared. (orig.)

  16. EXAFS study on arsenic species and transformation in arsenic hyperaccumulator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG; Zechun; CHEN; Tongbin; LEI; Mei; HU; Tiandou; HUANG

    2004-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation extended X-ray absorption fine structure (SR EXAFS) was employed to study the transformation of coordination environment and the redox speciation of arsenic in a newly discovered arsenic hyperaccumulator, Cretan brake (Pteris cretica L. var nervosa Thunb). It showed that the arsenic in the plant mainly coordinated with oxygen, except that some arsenic coordinated with S as As-GSH in root. The complexation of arsenic with GSH might not be the predominant detoxification mechanism in Cretan brake. Although some arsenic in root presented as As(V) in Na2HAsO4 treatments, most of arsenic in plant presented as As(III)-O in both treatments, indicating that As(V) tended to be reduced to As(III) after it was taken up into the root, and arsenic was kept as As(III) when it was transported to the above-ground tissues. The reduction of As(V) primarily proceeded in the root.

  17. Individual Variations in Inorganic Arsenic Metabolism Associated with AS3MT Genetic Polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruo Takeshita

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Individual variations in inorganic arsenic metabolism may influence the toxic effects. Arsenic (+3 oxidation state methyltransferase (AS3MT that can catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet to trivalent arsenical, may play a role in arsenic metabolism in humans. Since the genetic polymorphisms of AS3MT gene may be associated with the susceptibility to inorganic arsenic toxicity, relationships of several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in AS3MT with inorganic arsenic metabolism have been investigated. Here, we summarize our recent findings and other previous studies on the inorganic arsenic metabolism and AS3MT genetic polymorphisms in humans. Results of genotype dependent differences in arsenic metabolism for most of SNPs in AS3MT were Inconsistent throughout the studies. Nevertheless, two SNPs, AS3MT 12390 (rs3740393 and 14458 (rs11191439 were consistently related to arsenic methylation regardless of the populations examined for the analysis. Thus, these SNPs may be useful indicators to predict the arsenic metabolism via methylation pathways.

  18. The impact of oscillating redox conditions: Arsenic immobilisation in contaminated calcareous floodplain soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic contamination of floodplain soils is extensive and additional fresh arsenic inputs to the pedosphere from human activities are ongoing. We investigate the cumulative effects of repetitive soil redox cycles, which occur naturally during flooding and draining, on a calcareous fluvisol, the native microbial community and arsenic mobility following a simulated contamination event. We show through bioreactor experiments, spectroscopic techniques and modelling that repetitive redox cycling can decrease arsenic mobility during reducing conditions by up to 45%. Phylogenetic and functional analyses of the microbial community indicate that iron cycling is a key driver of observed changes to solution chemistry. We discuss probable mechanisms responsible for the arsenic immobilisation observed in-situ. The proposed mechanisms include, decreased heterotrophic iron reduction due to the depletion of labile particulate organic matter (POM), increases to the proportion of co-precipitated vs. aqueous or sorbed arsenic with α-FeOOH/Fe(OH)3 and potential precipitation of amorphous ferric arsenate. Highlights: •Oscillating redox conditions and heterotrophic metabolism are implemented in PHREEQC. •Depletion of labile organic matter limits iron reduction and arsenic release. •Amorphous FeAsO4∙2H2O precipitation potentially limits arsenic mobility during redox cycling. •Water fluctuating zones may naturally attenuate arsenic liberation during flooding. -- We demonstrate through batch experiments, spectroscopy and modelling that repetitive cycles of oxidation and reduction decrease arsenic mobility in soils during subsequent reducing conditions

  19. Numerical Modeling of Arsenic Mobility during Reductive Iron-Mineral Transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, Joey; Prommer, Henning; Siade, Adam; Carr, Jackson; Berg, Michael; Davis, James A; Fendorf, Scott

    2016-03-01

    Millions of individuals worldwide are chronically exposed to hazardous concentrations of arsenic from contaminated drinking water. Despite massive efforts toward understanding the extent and underlying geochemical processes of the problem, numerical modeling and reliable predictions of future arsenic behavior remain a significant challenge. One of the key knowledge gaps concerns a refined understanding of the mechanisms that underlie arsenic mobilization, particularly under the onset of anaerobic conditions, and the quantification of the factors that affect this process. In this study, we focus on the development and testing of appropriate conceptual and numerical model approaches to represent and quantify the reductive dissolution of iron oxides, the concomitant release of sorbed arsenic, and the role of iron-mineral transformations. The initial model development in this study was guided by data and hypothesized processes from a previously reported,1 well-controlled column experiment in which arsenic desorption from ferrihydrite coated sands by variable loads of organic carbon was investigated. Using the measured data as constraints, we provide a quantitative interpretation of the processes controlling arsenic mobility during the microbial reductive transformation of iron oxides. Our analysis suggests that the observed arsenic behavior is primarily controlled by a combination of reductive dissolution of ferrihydrite, arsenic incorporation into or co-precipitation with freshly transformed iron minerals, and partial arsenic redox transformations. PMID:26835553

  20. Sulforaphane prevents pulmonary damage in response to inhaled arsenic by activating the Nrf2-defense response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Yi [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning 110001 (China); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, University of Arizona, 1703 East Mabel Street, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Tao, Shasha [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, University of Arizona, 1703 East Mabel Street, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Lian, Fangru [Department of Pathology, University of Arizona, 1501 North Campbell Ave, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States); Chau, Binh T. [Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, The University of Arizona, 1501 North Campbell Ave, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States); Chen, Jie; Sun, Guifan [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning 110001 (China); Fang, Deyu [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Lantz, R. Clark [Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, The University of Arizona, 1501 North Campbell Ave, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States); Arizona Cancer Center, University of Arizona, 1515 North Campbell Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States); Zhang, Donna D., E-mail: dzhang@pharmacy.arizona.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, University of Arizona, 1703 East Mabel Street, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Arizona Cancer Center, University of Arizona, 1515 North Campbell Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Exposure to arsenic is associated with an increased risk of lung disease. Novel strategies are needed to reduce the adverse health effects associated with arsenic exposure in the lung. Nrf2, a transcription factor that mediates an adaptive cellular defense response, is effective in detoxifying environmental insults and prevents a broad spectrum of diseases induced by environmental exposure to harmful substances. In this report, we tested whether Nrf2 activation protects mice from arsenic-induced toxicity. We used an in vivo arsenic inhalation model that is highly relevant to low environmental human exposure to arsenic-containing dusts. Two-week exposure to arsenic-containing dust resulted in pathological alterations, oxidative DNA damage, and mild apoptotic cell death in the lung; all of which were blocked by sulforaphane (SF) in an Nrf2-dependent manner. Mechanistically, SF-mediated activation of Nrf2 alleviated inflammatory responses by modulating cytokine production. This study provides strong evidence that dietary intervention targeting Nrf2 activation is a feasible approach to reduce adverse health effects associated with arsenic exposure. -- Highlights: ► Exposed to arsenic particles and/or SF have elevated Nrf2 and its target genes. ► Sulforaphane prevents pathological alterations, oxidative damage and cell death. ► Sulforaphane alleviates infiltration of inflammatory cells into the lungs. ► Sulforaphane suppresses arsenic-induced proinflammatory cytokine production.

  1. Multivariate analysis of the heterogeneous geochemical processes controlling arsenic enrichment in a shallow groundwater system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuangbing; Liu, Changrong; Wang, Yanxin; Zhan, Hongbin

    2014-01-01

    The effects of various geochemical processes on arsenic enrichment in a high-arsenic aquifer at Jianghan Plain in Central China were investigated using multivariate models developed from combined adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) and multiple linear regression (MLR). The results indicated that the optimum variable group for the AFNIS model consisted of bicarbonate, ammonium, phosphorus, iron, manganese, fluorescence index, pH, and siderite saturation. These data suggest that reductive dissolution of iron/manganese oxides, phosphate-competitive adsorption, pH-dependent desorption, and siderite precipitation could integrally affect arsenic concentration. Analysis of the MLR models indicated that reductive dissolution of iron(III) was primarily responsible for arsenic mobilization in groundwaters with low arsenic concentration. By contrast, for groundwaters with high arsenic concentration (i.e., > 170 μg/L), reductive dissolution of iron oxides approached a dynamic equilibrium. The desorption effects from phosphate-competitive adsorption and the increase in pH exhibited arsenic enrichment superior to that caused by iron(III) reductive dissolution as the groundwater chemistry evolved. The inhibition effect of siderite precipitation on arsenic mobilization was expected to exist in groundwater that was highly saturated with siderite. The results suggest an evolutionary dominance of specific geochemical process over other factors controlling arsenic concentration, which presented a heterogeneous distribution in aquifers. Supplemental materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of the Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part A, to view the supplemental file. PMID:24345245

  2. Arsenic Biotransformation as a Cancer Promoting Factor by Inducing DNA Damage and Disruption of Repair Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor D. Martinez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic exposure to arsenic in drinking water poses a major global health concern. Populations exposed to high concentrations of arsenic-contaminated drinking water suffer serious health consequences, including alarming cancer incidence and death rates. Arsenic is biotransformed through sequential addition of methyl groups, acquired from s-adenosylmethionine (SAM. Metabolism of arsenic generates a variety of genotoxic and cytotoxic species, damaging DNA directly and indirectly, through the generation of reactive oxidative species and induction of DNA adducts, strand breaks and cross links, and inhibition of the DNA repair process itself. Since SAM is the methyl group donor used by DNA methyltransferases to maintain normal epigenetic patterns in all human cells, arsenic is also postulated to affect maintenance of normal DNA methylation patterns, chromatin structure, and genomic stability. The biological processes underlying the cancer promoting factors of arsenic metabolism, related to DNA damage and repair, will be discussed here.

  3. Acute and chronic arsenic toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Ratnaike, R.

    2003-01-01

    Arsenic toxicity is a global health problem affecting many millions of people. Contamination is caused by arsenic from natural geological sources leaching into aquifers, contaminating drinking water and may also occur from mining and other industrial processes. Arsenic is present as a contaminant in many traditional remedies. Arsenic trioxide is now used to treat acute promyelocytic leukaemia. Absorption occurs predominantly from ingestion from the small intestine, though minimal absorption o...

  4. Occurrence of arsenic in brown rice and its relationship to soil properties from Hainan Island, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu Yangrong; Chen Mulong [Faculty of Earth Science, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Hainan Institute of Geological Survey, Haikou 570206 (China); Bi Xiangyang, E-mail: bixy@cug.edu.cn [Faculty of Earth Science, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); He Yusheng [Hainan Institute of Geological Survey, Haikou 570206 (China); Ren Limin [Faculty of Earth Science, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Xiang Wu; Qiao Shengying; Yan Sen [Faculty of Earth Science, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Li Zhonggen [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang 550002 (China); Ma Zhendong [Faculty of Earth Science, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2011-07-15

    The acquaintance of arsenic concentrations in rice grain is vital in risk assessment. In this study, we determined the concentration of arsenic in 282 brown rice grains sampled from Hainan Island, China, and discussed its possible relationships to the considered soil properties. Arsenic concentrations in the rice grain from Hainan Island varied from 5 to 309 {mu}g/kg, with a mean (92 {mu}g/kg) lower than most published data from other countries/regions and the maximum contaminant level (MCL) for As{sub i} in rice. The result of correlation analysis between grain and soil properties showed that grain As concentrations correlated significantly to soil arsenic speciation, organic matter and soil P contents and could be best predicted by humic acid bound and Fe-Mn oxides bound As fractions. Grain arsenic rises steeply at soil As concentrations lower than 3.6 mg/kg and gently at higher concentrations. - Highlights: > Arsenic concentration in brown rice from Hainan was lower than most published data. > Grain As was affected by soil As speciation, OM, and P. > Humic acid and Fe-Mn oxides bound As fractions were important pools for rice plant. > Grain arsenic rises steeply at lower soil As concentrations and gently at higher concentrations. - Arsenic in brown rice grain from Hainan, China showed low concentrations and correlated most closely to soil humic acid bound and Fe-Mn oxides bound As fractions.

  5. Occurrence of arsenic in brown rice and its relationship to soil properties from Hainan Island, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The acquaintance of arsenic concentrations in rice grain is vital in risk assessment. In this study, we determined the concentration of arsenic in 282 brown rice grains sampled from Hainan Island, China, and discussed its possible relationships to the considered soil properties. Arsenic concentrations in the rice grain from Hainan Island varied from 5 to 309 μg/kg, with a mean (92 μg/kg) lower than most published data from other countries/regions and the maximum contaminant level (MCL) for Asi in rice. The result of correlation analysis between grain and soil properties showed that grain As concentrations correlated significantly to soil arsenic speciation, organic matter and soil P contents and could be best predicted by humic acid bound and Fe-Mn oxides bound As fractions. Grain arsenic rises steeply at soil As concentrations lower than 3.6 mg/kg and gently at higher concentrations. - Highlights: → Arsenic concentration in brown rice from Hainan was lower than most published data. → Grain As was affected by soil As speciation, OM, and P. → Humic acid and Fe-Mn oxides bound As fractions were important pools for rice plant. → Grain arsenic rises steeply at lower soil As concentrations and gently at higher concentrations. - Arsenic in brown rice grain from Hainan, China showed low concentrations and correlated most closely to soil humic acid bound and Fe-Mn oxides bound As fractions.

  6. Hydrogen-enriched water restoration of impaired calcium propagation by arsenic in primary keratinocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wei-Tai; Chiu, Yi-Ching; Lee, Chih-Hung; Yoshioka, Tohru; Yu, Hsin-Su

    2013-11-01

    Endemic contamination of artesian water for drinking by arsenic is known to cause several human cancers, including cancers of the skin, bladder, and lungs. In skin, multiple arsenic-induced Bowen's disease (As-BD) can develop into invasive cancers after decades of arsenic exposure. The characteristic histological features of As-BD include full-layer epidermal dysplasia, apoptosis, and abnormal proliferation. Calcium propagation is an essential cellular event contributing to keratinocyte differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis, all of which occur in As-BD. This study investigated how arsenic interferes calcium propagation of skin keratinocytes through ROS production and whether hydrogen-enriched water would restore arsenic-impaired calcium propagation. Arsenic was found to induce oxidative stress and inhibit ATP- and thapsigaragin-induced calcium propagation. Pretreatment of arsenic-treated keratinocytes by hydrogen-enriched water or beta-mercaptoethanol with potent anti-oxidative effects partially restored the propagation of calcium by ATP and by thapsigaragin. It was concluded that arsenic may impair calcium propagation, likely through oxidative stress and interactions with thiol groups in membrane proteins.

  7. Arsenic in ground water of the United States: occurrence and geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Alan H.; Westjohn, D.B.; Helsel, Dennis R.; Wanty, Richard B.

    2000-01-01

    Concentrations of naturally occurring arsenic in ground water vary regionally due to a combination of climate and geology. Although slightly less than half of 30,000 arsenic analyses of ground water in the United States were ≤ 1 µg/L, about 10% exceeded 0 µg/L. At a broad regional scale, arsenic concentrations exceeding 10 µg/L appear to be more frequently observed in the western United States than in the eastern half. Arsenic concentrations in ground water of the Appalachian Highlands and the Atlantic plain generally are very low (≤ 1 µg/L). Concentrations are somewhat greater in the Interior Plains and the Rocky Mountain System, investigations of ground water in New England, Michigan, Minnesota, South Dakota, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin within the last decade suggest that arsenic concentrations exceeding 10 µg/L are more widespread and common than previously recognized. Arsenic release from iron oxide appears to be the most common cause of widespread arsenic concentrations exceeding 10 µg/L a ground water. This can occur in response to different geochemical conditions, including release of arsenic to ground water through reaction of iron oxide with either natural or anthropogenic (i.e., petroleum products) organic carbon. Iron oxide also can release arsenic to alkaline ground water, such as that found in some felsic volcanic rocks and alkaline aquifers of the Western United States. Sulfide minerals are both a source and sink for arsenic. Geothermal water and high evaporation rates also are associated with arsenic concentrations ≥ 10g/L in ground and surface water, particularly in the west.

  8. Aqueous and solid phase speciation of arsenic in a Bengali aquifer using IC-ICP-MS and EXAFS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gault, A. G.; Davidson, L. E.; Lythgoe, P. R.; Charnock, J. M.; Chatterjee, D.; Abou-Shakra, F. R.; Walker, H. J.; Polya, D. A.

    2003-04-01

    Contamination of groundwater and drinking water supplies with arsenic has been reported in many parts of the world and constitutes a serious public health threat. Nowhere is this more apparent than in West Bengal and Bangladesh where arsenic concentrations exceed both World Health Organisation (WHO) and national limits in drinking water supplies leading to what has been described as the worst mass poisoning of a human population in history. Knowledge of both aqueous and solid phase speciation of arsenic in such hazardous arsenic-rich groundwaters is crucial to understanding the processes controlling arsenic release. We report here preliminary work involving the determination of dissolved arsenic speciation in West Bengali groundwaters and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis of the associated sediment. Groundwater samples collected from Nadia district, West Bengal were analysed for arsenic speciation by ion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (IC-ICP-MS) within 14 days of collection. Total arsenic concentrations exceeding 850 ug/L were determined; inorganic arsenic constituted the bulk of the dissolved arsenic burden with As(III) as the dominant form. Minor amounts of methylated arsenicals were also detected, however, their concentration did not exceed 5 ug/L. The local coordination environment of arsenic in sediment associated with such groundwaters was probed using K-edge As EXAFS. This revealed that arsenic exists predominantly in its oxidised form, As(V), most likely adsorbed as bidentate arsenate tetrahedra on metal (Fe and/or Al) oxide/hydroxide surfaces, although incorporation of arsenic into a metal oxide structure cannot be unequivocally ruled out. Arsenic was found to occur in several different coordination environments and this, together with the low concentration (arsenic in the sediment, prevented the unambiguous assignment of the second coordination sphere. The analysis of the trends of key groundwater

  9. Changes in serum thioredoxin among individuals chronically exposed to arsenic in drinking water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Gao, Yanhui; Zhao, Lijun [Center for Endemic Disease Control, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Harbin Medical University, Key Lab of Etiology and Epidemiology, Education Bureau of Hei Long Jiang Province and Ministry of Health (23618104), Harbin 150081 (China); Wei, Yudan [Department of Community Medicine, Mercer University School of Medicine, Macon 31207, GA (United States); Feng, Hongqi; Wang, Cheng; Wei, Wei; Ding, Yunpeng [Center for Endemic Disease Control, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Harbin Medical University, Key Lab of Etiology and Epidemiology, Education Bureau of Hei Long Jiang Province and Ministry of Health (23618104), Harbin 150081 (China); Sun, Dianjun, E-mail: hrbmusdj@163.com [Center for Endemic Disease Control, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Harbin Medical University, Key Lab of Etiology and Epidemiology, Education Bureau of Hei Long Jiang Province and Ministry of Health (23618104), Harbin 150081 (China)

    2012-02-15

    It is well known that oxidative damage plays a key role in the development of chronic arsenicosis. There is a complex set of mechanisms of redox cycling in vivo to protect cells from the damage. In this study, we examined the differences in the levels of serum thioredoxin1 (TRX1) among individuals exposed to different levels of arsenic in drinking water and detected early biomarkers of arsenic poisoning before the appearance of skin lesions. A total of 157 subjects from endemic regions of China were selected and divided into arsenicosis group with skin lesions (total intake of arsenic: 8.68–45.71 mg-year) and non-arsenicosis group without skin lesions, which further divided into low (0.00–1.06 mg-year), medium (1.37–3.55 mg-year), and high (4.26–48.13 mg-year) arsenic exposure groups. Concentrations of serum TRX1 were analyzed by an ELISA method. Levels of water arsenic and urinary speciated arsenics, including inorganic arsenic (iAs), monomethylated arsenic (MMA), and dimethylated arsenic (DMA), were determined by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry. Our results showed that the levels of serum TRX1 in arsenicosis patients were significantly higher than that of the subjects who were chronically exposed to arsenic, but without skin lesions. A positive correlation was seen between the levels of serum TRX1 and the total water arsenic intake or the levels of urinary arsenic species. The results of this study indicate that arsenic exposure could significantly change the levels of human serum TRX1, which can be detected before arsenic-specific dermatological symptoms occur. This study provides further evidence on revealing the mechanism of arsenic toxicity. -- Highlights: ► Three regions are selected as the areas affected by endemic arsenicosis of China. ► We first examine changes in serum TRX1 among individuals exposed to arsenic. ► A positive correlation was seen between serum TRX1 and total water arsenic intake. ► The same relationship

  10. Arsenic and drinking water. Part 1. A review of the source, distribution and behaviour of arsenic in the environment; Arsen und Trinkwasser. Teil 1. Ein Ueberblick ueber Vorkommen, Verteilung und Verhalten von Arsen in der Umwelt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberacker, F.; Maier, D. [Heinrich-Sontheimer-Lab., DVGW-Technologiezentrum Wasser, Karlsruhe (Germany); Maier, M. [Stadtwerke Karlsruhe GmbH, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2002-11-01

    Arsenic is ubiquituously distributed in our environment and is subject to continuous bio-geochemical cycling. Besides the acute toxicity of arsenic its chronic effects are of special importance. The permanent uptake with drinking water for example might cause cancer. Today, arsenic compounds hardly serve as pesticides anymore, although chromated copper arsenate is still used to preserve wood. Furthermore, arsenic is used in the alloy, glass and semiconductor industry. The main part of the earths' arsenic resources are bound to sulfur in the lithosphere. By means of rock weathering and volcanism it is transferred into pedo-, hydro- and atmosphere, where it is mainly bound to oxygen. Microorganisms are able to methylate the arsenic, whereby gaseous arsenic compounds are carried into the atmosphere. Also, it is released from the lithosphere through anthropogenic mining activities, although only for a small part of the released amount useful applications exist. The arsenic behaviour in natural waters is closely related to sulfur on the one hand and to iron oxides on the other. Under strongly reducing conditions the arsenic is precipitated as sulfide, while under oxidising conditions it is adsorbed to the surfaces of iron oxides. Therefore, under aerobic conditions the arsenic concentrations of aqueous solutions are controlled by these adsorption processes rather than by the solubility of solid arsenic phases. Manganese oxides also play an important role as they are able to rapidly oxidise As(III) to As(V). These processes of release and fixation of arsenic in the nature must be studied carefully, because they are applied for arsenic elimination during drinking water production as well. (orig.)

  11. Speciation and health risk considerations of arsenic in the edible mushroom laccaria amethystina collected from contaminated and uncontaminated locations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt; Hansen, M.; Gössler, W.

    1998-01-01

    Samples of the edible mushroom Laccaria amethystina, which is known to accumulate arsenic, were collected from two uncontaminated beech forests and an arsenic-contaminated one in Denmark, The total arsenic concentration was 23 and 77 mu g As g(-1) (dry weight) in the two uncontaminated samples...... in the highly arsenate-contaminated soil (500-800 mu g As g(-1)) the mushrooms or their associated bacteria were able to biosynthesize dimethylarsinic acid from arsinic acid in the soil. Furthermore, arsenobetaine and trimethylarsine oxide were detected for the first time in Laccaria amethystina. Additionally......, unidentified arsenic species were detected in the mushroom, The finding of arsenobetaine and trimethylarsine oxide in low amounts in the mushrooms showed that synthesis of this arsenical in nature is not restricted to marine biota. In order to minimize the toxicological risk of arsenic to humans...

  12. Arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris Vittata L. and its arsenic accumulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    An arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata L. (Chinese brake) was first discovered in China by means of field survey and greenhouse cultivation. Field survey showed that Chinese brake had large accumulating capacity to arsenic; the orders of arsenic content in different parts of the fern were as follows: leaves>leafstalks>roots, which is totally different from that of ordinary plants; bioaccumulation coefficients of the above ground parts of the fern decreased as a power function of soil arsenic contents. In the control of pot trials with normal unpolluted soil containing 9 mg/kg of arsenic, the bioaccumulation coefficients of the above ground parts and rhizoids of Chinese brake were as high as 71 and 80 respectively. Greenhouse cultivation in the contaminated soil from mining areas has shown that more than 1 times greater arsenic can be accumulated in the leaves of the fern than that of field samples with the largest content of 5070 mg/kg As on a dry matter basis. During greenhouse cultivation, arsenic content in the leaves of the fern increased linearly with time prolonging. Not only has Chinese brake extraordinary tolerance and accumulation to arsenic, but it grew rapidly with great biomass, wide distribution and easy adaptation to different environmental conditions as well. Therefore, it has great potential in future remediation of arsenic contamination. It also demonstrates important value for studies of arsenic physiology and biochemistry such as arsenic absorption, translocation and detoxification mechanisms in plants.

  13. [Arsenic - Poison or medicine?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik-Kupka, Karolina; Koszowska, Aneta; Brończyk-Puzoń, Anna; Nowak, Justyna; Gwizdek, Katarzyna; Zubelewicz-Szkodzińska, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is commonly known as a poison. Only a few people know that As has also been widely used in medicine. In the past years As and its compounds were used as a medicine for the treatment of such diseases as diabetes, psoriasis, syphilis, skin ulcers and joint diseases. Nowadays As is also used especially in the treatment of patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has recognized arsenic as an element with carcinogenic effect evidenced by epidemiological studies, but as previously mentioned it is also used in the treatment of neoplastic diseases. This underlines the specificity of the arsenic effects. Arsenic occurs widely in the natural environment, for example, it is present in soil and water, which contributes to its migration to food products. Long exposure to this element may lead to liver damages and also to changes in myocardium. Bearing in mind that such serious health problems can occur, monitoring of the As presence in the environmental media plays a very important role. In addition, the occupational risk of As exposure in the workplace should be identified and checked. Also the standards for As presence in food should be established. This paper presents a review of the 2015 publications based on the Medical database like PubMed and Polish Medical Bibliography. It includes the most important information about arsenic in both forms, poison and medicine.

  14. Chronic arsenic poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Alan H

    2002-03-10

    Symptomatic arsenic poisoning is not often seen in occupational exposure settings. Attempted homicide and deliberate long-term poisoning have resulted in chronic toxicity. Skin pigmentation changes, palmar and plantar hyperkeratoses, gastrointestinal symptoms, anemia, and liver disease are common. Noncirrhotic portal hypertension with bleeding esophageal varices, splenomegaly, and hypersplenism may occur. A metallic taste, gastrointestinal disturbances, and Mee's lines may be seen. Bone marrow depression is common. 'Blackfoot disease' has been associated with arsenic-contaminated drinking water in Taiwan; Raynaud's phenomenon and acrocyanosis also may occur. Large numbers of persons in areas of India, Pakistan, and several other countries have been chronically poisoned from naturally occurring arsenic in ground water. Toxic delirium and encephalopathy can be present. CCA-treated wood (chromated copper arsenate) is not a health risk unless burned in fireplaces or woodstoves. Peripheral neuropathy may also occur. Workplace exposure or chronic ingestion of arsenic-contaminated water or arsenical medications is associated with development of skin, lung, and other cancers. Treatment may incklude the use of chelating agents such as dimercaprol (BAL), dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), and dimercaptopanesulfonic acid (DMPS).

  15. Inorganic arsenic toxicosis in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riviere, J E; Boosinger, T R; Everson, R J

    1981-03-01

    In 4 occurrences of arsenic poisoning in cattle, the principal clinical sign was acute hemorrhagic diarrhea attributable to hemorrhagic gastroenteritis. Arsenic concentrations in the liver, kidney and rumen contents varied. In one occurrence, arsenic in the hair of affected survivors was assayed at 0.8-3.40 ppm, vs 0.09-0.10 ppm in randomly selected control samples of hair. Sudden death was the only clinical sign in another occurrence in which gastric contents contained arsenic at 671 ppm. In another occurrence, arsenic poisoning caused lesions similar to those of salmonellosis.

  16. Chronic arsenic poisoning in the north of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cebrian, M.E.; Albores, A.; Aguilar, M.; Blakely, E.

    1983-01-01

    We compared the prevalence of signs and symptoms of chronic arsenic poisoning in two rural populations. The arsenic concentration in the drinking water of the exposed population was 0.41 mg/l, and 0.007 mg/l in the control population. The arsenic was present mainly (70%) in its pentavalent form. The objective was to quantitate health effects and risks derived from chronic ingestion of arsenic in contaminated water. In the exposed population, 21.6% of the sample, showed at least one of the cutaneous signs of chronic arsenic poisoning against 2.2% in the control town. Non-specific symptoms were more prevalent in the exposed population and they occurred more frequently in those individuals with skin signs. The relative risk of suffering a particular manifestation of poisoning, ranged from 1.9 to 36 times higher in the exposed population. We estimated the risks above mentioned, which were derived from exposure to minute quantities of arsenic in a known proportion of its oxidation states during a life time period.

  17. Electrochemical peroxidation as a tool to remove arsenic and copper from smelter wastewater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutiérrez, Claudia; Hansen, Henrik K.; Nuñez, Patricio;

    2010-01-01

    Electrochemical peroxidation (ECP) is a method that recently has been applied in the treatment of heavy metal polluted wastewater. This method is based on the anodic dissolution of iron to ferrous ions that reacts with H2O2 to produce tiny particles of ferric oxides. These oxides adsorb metals...... of copper and 80% removal of arsenic (at pH 6.5). When treating the real wastewater samples, both arsenic and copper could be removed more than 99% for all pH levels studied. It can be concluded that presence of other substances in the real wastewater favours the arsenic adsorption and/or precipitation...

  18. Mineralogical and Geochemical Constraints on Arsenic Mobility in a Philippine Geothermal Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chelo PASCUA; Tsutomu SATO; Glenn GOLLA

    2006-01-01

    Arsenic is usually associated with sulphide minerals formed in the geothermal environment.However, sulphide minerals are prone to dissolution after contact with meteoric water under surface oxidizing conditions. Secondary precipitates that form from the dissolution of the primary sulfides exert a greater influence on arsenic mobility in the geothermal environment. Fe-hydroxides have very good affinity with dissolved arsenate and are stable under most surface oxidizing conditions. Both amorphous silica directly precipitated from geothermal fluids and possibly a kaolinite alteration can host a small significant amount of arsenic. These silicates are also more stable under a wide range of pH and redox conditions.

  19. Arsenic poisoning in cattle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLennan, M.W.; Dodson, M.E.

    1972-06-01

    A case of acute arsenic poisoning in cattle was reported. The losses occurred on a property in the south east of South Australia. The weather had been hot for two or three days before the death occurred. The tank supplying the water trough had almost run dry. The cattle then attempted to meet their water requirements by drinking from the sheep dipping vat. A sample of rumen contents and a sample of water from the dipping vat were checked for arsenic. The rumen sample contained 45 ppM As/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and the sample of dipping fluid contained 200 ppM As. The lesions observed were similar to earlier reported arsenic poisoning. 5 references.

  20. Environmental Source of Arsenic Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jin-Yong; Yu, Seung-Do; Hong, Young-Seoub

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic is a ubiquitous, naturally occurring metalloid that may be a significant risk factor for cancer after exposure to contaminated drinking water, cigarettes, foods, industry, occupational environment, and air. Among the various routes of arsenic exposure, drinking water is the largest source of arsenic poisoning worldwide. Arsenic exposure from ingested foods usually comes from food crops grown in arsenic-contaminated soil and/or irrigated with arsenic-contaminated water. According to a recent World Health Organization report, arsenic from contaminated water can be quickly and easily absorbed and depending on its metabolic form, may adversely affect human health. Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration regulations for metals found in cosmetics to protect consumers against contaminations deemed deleterious to health; some cosmetics were found to contain a variety of chemicals including heavy metals, which are sometimes used as preservatives. Moreover, developing countries tend to have a growing number of industrial factories that unfortunately, harm the environment, especially in cities where industrial and vehicle emissions, as well as household activities, cause serious air pollution. Air is also an important source of arsenic exposure in areas with industrial activity. The presence of arsenic in airborne particulate matter is considered a risk for certain diseases. Taken together, various potential pathways of arsenic exposure seem to affect humans adversely, and future efforts to reduce arsenic exposure caused by environmental factors should be made. PMID:25284196

  1. Environmental source of arsenic exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jin-Yong; Yu, Seung-Do; Hong, Young-Seoub

    2014-09-01

    Arsenic is a ubiquitous, naturally occurring metalloid that may be a significant risk factor for cancer after exposure to contaminated drinking water, cigarettes, foods, industry, occupational environment, and air. Among the various routes of arsenic exposure, drinking water is the largest source of arsenic poisoning worldwide. Arsenic exposure from ingested foods usually comes from food crops grown in arsenic-contaminated soil and/or irrigated with arsenic-contaminated water. According to a recent World Health Organization report, arsenic from contaminated water can be quickly and easily absorbed and depending on its metabolic form, may adversely affect human health. Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration regulations for metals found in cosmetics to protect consumers against contaminations deemed deleterious to health; some cosmetics were found to contain a variety of chemicals including heavy metals, which are sometimes used as preservatives. Moreover, developing countries tend to have a growing number of industrial factories that unfortunately, harm the environment, especially in cities where industrial and vehicle emissions, as well as household activities, cause serious air pollution. Air is also an important source of arsenic exposure in areas with industrial activity. The presence of arsenic in airborne particulate matter is considered a risk for certain diseases. Taken together, various potential pathways of arsenic exposure seem to affect humans adversely, and future efforts to reduce arsenic exposure caused by environmental factors should be made.

  2. ARSENIC SPECIATION ANALYSIS IN HUMAN SALIVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Determination of arsenic species in human saliva is potentially useful for biomonitoring of human exposure to arsenic and for studying arsenic metabolism. However, there is no report on the speciation analysis of arsenic in saliva. Methods: Arsenic species in saliva ...

  3. The effect of nanocrystalline magnetite size on arsenic removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.T. Mayo et al

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Higher environmental standards have made the removal of arsenic from water an important problem for environmental engineering. Iron oxide is a particularly interesting sorbent to consider for this application. Its magnetic properties allow relatively routine dispersal and recovery of the adsorbent into and from groundwater or industrial processing facilities; in addition, iron oxide has strong and specific interactions with both As(III and As(V. Finally, this material can be produced with nanoscale dimensions, which enhance both its capacity and removal. The objective of this study is to evaluate the potential arsenic adsorption by nanoscale iron oxides, specifically magnetite (Fe3O4 nanoparticles. We focus on the effect of Fe3O4 particle size on the adsorption and desorption behavior of As(III and As(V. The results show that the nanoparticle size has a dramatic effect on the adsorption and desorption of arsenic. As particle size is decreased from 300 to 12 nm the adsorption capacities for both As(III and As(V increase nearly 200 times. Interestingly, such an increase is more than expected from simple considerations of surface area and suggests that nanoscale iron oxide materials sorb arsenic through different means than bulk systems. The desorption process, however, exhibits some hysteresis with the effect becoming more pronounced with small nanoparticles. This hysteresis most likely results from a higher arsenic affinity for Fe3O4 nanoparticles. This work suggests that Fe3O4 nanocrystals and magnetic separations offer a promising method for arsenic removal.

  4. Arsenic(III) and arsenic(V) speciation during transformation of lepidocrocite to magnetite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuheng; Morin, Guillaume; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Brown, Gordon E

    2014-12-16

    Bioreduction of As(V) and As-bearing iron oxides is considered to be one of the key processes leading to arsenic pollution in groundwaters in South and Southeast Asia. Recent laboratory studies with simple aqueous media showed that secondary Fe(II)-bearing phases (e.g., magnetite and green rust), which commonly precipitate during bioreduction of iron oxides, captured arsenic species. The aim of the present study was to follow arsenic speciation during the abiotic Fe(II)-induced transformation of As(III)- and As(V)-doped lepidocrocite to magnetite, and to evaluate the influence of arsenic on the transformation kinetics and pathway. We found green rust formation is an intermediate phase in the transformation. Both As(III) and As(V) slowed the transformation, with the effect being greater for As(III) than for As(V). Prior to the formation of magnetite, As(III) adsorbed on both lepidocrocite and green rust, whereas As(V) associated exclusively with green rust, When magnetite precipitated, As(III) formed surface complexes on magnetite nanoparticles and As(V) is thought to have been incorporated into the magnetite structure. These processes dramatically lowered the availability of As in the anoxic systems studied. These results provide insights into the behavior of arsenic during magnetite precipitation in reducing environments. We also found that As(V) removal from solution was higher than As(III) removal following magnetite formation, which suggests that conversion of As(III) to As(V) is preferred when using As-magnetite precipitation to treat As-contaminated groundwaters.

  5. Effects of redox conditions on the control of arsenic mobility in shallow alluvial aquifers on the Venetian Plain (Italy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carraro, A. [Institute of Geosciences and Earth Resources, National Research Council (CNR) of Italy, Padova, Italy c/o Department of Geosciences, University of Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy); Fabbri, P. [Institute of Geosciences and Earth Resources, National Research Council (CNR) of Italy, Padova, Italy c/o Department of Geosciences, University of Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy); Department of Geosciences, University of Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy); Giaretta, A.; Peruzzo, L.; Tateo, F.; Tellini, F. [Institute of Geosciences and Earth Resources, National Research Council (CNR) of Italy, Padova, Italy c/o Department of Geosciences, University of Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2015-11-01

    The Venetian Plain is known for the occurrence of areas with high concentrations of arsenic in groundwater (greater than 400 μg/L). The study area represents the typical residential, industrial and agricultural features of most Western countries and is devoid of hydrothermal, volcanic or anthropogenic sources of arsenic. The aim of the study is to model the arsenic mobilization and the water–rock interaction by a complete hydrogeochemical investigation (analyses of filtered and unfiltered groundwater sediment mineralogy and geochemistry). The groundwater arsenic contamination and redox conditions are highly variable. Groundwaters with oxidizing and strongly reducing potentials have much lower arsenic concentrations than do mildly reducing waters. The grain size of the aquifer sediments includes gravels, sands and silty-clays. A continuous range of organic material concentrations is observed (from zero to 40%). The amount of sedimentary organic matter is highly correlated with the arsenic content of the sediments (up to 300 mg/kg), whereas no relationships are detectable between arsenic and other chemical parameters. The occurrence of arsenic minerals was observed as a peculiar feature under the scanning electron microscope. Arsenic and sulfur are the sole constituents of small tufts or thin crystals concentrated in small masses. These arsenic minerals were clearly observed in the peat sediments, in agreement with the geochemical modeling that requires very reducing conditions for their precipitation from the groundwater. The modeling suggests that, under oxidizing conditions, arsenic is adsorbed; moreover, a continuous decrease in the redox potential causes increasing desorption of arsenic. If the reducing conditions become more intense, the formation of As-S minerals would explain the lower concentration of arsenic measured in the strongly reducing groundwater. Even if As-sulfides are rare under low-temperature conditions, the anomalous abundance of reductants

  6. Environmental geochemistry of high arsenic groundwater at western Hetao plain, Inner Mongolia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun HE; Teng MA; Yamin DENG; Hui YANG; Yanxin WANG

    2009-01-01

    Environmental geochemistry of high arsenic groundwater at Hetao plain was studied on the basis of geochemical survey of the groundwater and a core sediment. Arsenic concentration in groundwater samples varies from 76 to 1093 μg/L. The high arsenic groundwater mostly appears to be weakly alkaline. The concentrations of NO3 and SO42- are relatively low, while the concentrations ofDOC, NH4+, dissolved Fe and sulfide are relatively great. Analysis of arsenic speciation in 21 samples shows that arsenic is present in the solution predominantly as As(Ⅲ), while particulate arsenic constitutes about 10% of the total arsenic. Methane is detected in five samples with the greatest content being 5107 μg/L.The shallow aquifer in Hangjinhouqi of western Hetao plain is of strongly reducing condition. The arsenic content in 23 core sediment samples varies from 7.7 to 34.6 mg/kg, with great value in clay and mild clay layer. The obvious positive relationship in content between Fe203, Mn, Sb, B, V and As indicates that the distribution of arsenic in the sediments may be related to Fe and Mn oxides, and the mobilization of Sb, B and V may be affected by similar geochemical processes as that of As.

  7. Labile Organic Carbon in Recharge and its Impact on Groundwater Arsenic Concentrations in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, R. B.; Ashfaque, K. N.; Badruzzaman, A. M.; Ali, M.; Shoemaker, J. K.; Harvey, C. F.

    2009-12-01

    Researchers have puzzled over the origin of dissolved arsenic in the aquifers of the Ganges Delta since widespread arsenic poisoning from groundwater was publicized two decades ago. Previous work has concluded that biological oxidation of organic carbon drives geochemical transformations that mobilize arsenic from sediments; however, the source of the organic carbon that fuels these processes remains controversial. A combined hydrologic and biogeochemical analysis of a typical site in Bangladesh, where constructed ponds and groundwater-irrigated rice fields are the main sources of recharge, shows that only recharge through pond sediments provides the biologically degradable organic carbon that can drive arsenic mobilization. Numerical groundwater simulations as well as chemical and isotopic indicators suggest that contaminated groundwater originates from excavated ponds and that water originating from rice fields is low in arsenic. In fact, rice fields act as an arsenic sink. Irrigation moves arsenic-rich groundwater from the aquifers and deposits it on the rice fields. Most of the deposited arsenic does not return to the aquifers; it is sorbed by the field’s surface soil and bunds, and is swept away in the monsoon floods. The findings indicate that patterns of arsenic contamination in the shallow aquifer are due to recharge-source variation and complex three-dimensional flow.

  8. Arsenic toxicity: the effects on plant metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick eFinnegan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The two forms inorganic arsenic, arsenate (AsV and arsenite (AsIII, are easily taken up by the cells of the plant root. Once in the cell, AsV can be readily converted to AsIII, the more toxic of the two forms. AsV and AsIII both disrupt plant metabolism, but through distinct mechanisms. AsV is a chemical analogue of phosphate that can disrupt at least some phosphate-dependent aspects of metabolism. AsV can be translocated across cellular membranes by phosphate transport proteins, leading to imbalances in phosphate supply. It can compete with phosphate during phosphorylation reactions, leading to the formation of AsV adducts that are often unstable and short-lived. As an example, the formation and rapid autohydrolysis of AsV-ADP sets in place a futile cycle that uncouples photophosphorylation and oxidative phosphorylation, decreasing the ability of cells to produce ATP and carry out normal metabolism. AsIII is a dithiol reactive compound that binds to and potentially inactivates enzymes containing closely spaced cysteine residues or other sulfhydryl-containing groups. Arsenic exposure generally induces the production of reactive oxygen species that can lead to the production of antioxidant metabolites and numerous enzymes involved in antioxidant defense. Oxidative carbon metabolism, amino acid and protein relationships, and nitrogen and sulfur assimilation pathways are also impacted by As exposure. These effects are reflected in a dramatic restructuring of amino acid pools in Arabidopsis thaliana upon AsV exposure. Readjustment of several metabolic pathways, such as glutathione production, has been shown to lead to increased arsenic tolerance in plants. Species- and cultivar-dependent variation in arsenic sensitivity and the remodeling of metabolite pools that occurs in response to As exposure gives hope that additional metabolic pathways associated with As tolerance will be identified.

  9. Arsenic species interactions with a porous carbon electrode as determined with an electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morallón, Emilia; Arias-Pardilla, Joaquín; Calo, J.M.; Cazorla-Amorós, D.

    2009-01-01

    The interactions of arsenic species with platinum and porous carbon electrodes were investigated with an electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) and cyclic voltammetry in alkaline solutions. It is shown that the redox reactions in arsenic-containing solutions, due to arsenic reduction/deposition, oxidation/desorption, and electrocatalyzed oxidation by Pt can be readily distinguished with the EQCM. This approach was used to show that the arsenic redox reactions on the carbon electrode are mechanistically similar to that on the bare Pt electrode. This could not be concluded with just classical cyclic voltammetry alone due to the obfuscation of the faradaic features by the large capacitative effects of the carbon double layer. For the porous carbon electrode, a continual mass loss was always observed during potential cycling, with or without arsenic in the solution. This was attributed to electrogasification of the carbon. The apparent mass loss per cycle was observed to decrease with increasing arsenic concentration due to a net mass increase in adsorbed arsenic per cycle that increased with arsenic concentration, offsetting the carbon mass loss. Additional carbon adsorption sites involved in arsenic species interactions are created during electrogasification, thereby augmenting the net uptake of arsenic per cycle. It is demonstrated that EQCM, and in particular the information given by the behavior of the time derivative of the mass vs. potential, or massogram, is very useful for distinguishing arsenic species interactions with carbon electrodes. It may also prove to be effective for investigating redox/adsorption/desorption behavior of other species in solution with carbon materials as well. PMID:20161369

  10. Arsenic species interactions with a porous carbon electrode as determined with an electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morallón, Emilia; Arias-Pardilla, Joaquín; Calo, J M; Cazorla-Amorós, D

    2009-06-30

    The interactions of arsenic species with platinum and porous carbon electrodes were investigated with an electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) and cyclic voltammetry in alkaline solutions. It is shown that the redox reactions in arsenic-containing solutions, due to arsenic reduction/deposition, oxidation/desorption, and electrocatalyzed oxidation by Pt can be readily distinguished with the EQCM. This approach was used to show that the arsenic redox reactions on the carbon electrode are mechanistically similar to that on the bare Pt electrode. This could not be concluded with just classical cyclic voltammetry alone due to the obfuscation of the faradaic features by the large capacitative effects of the carbon double layer.For the porous carbon electrode, a continual mass loss was always observed during potential cycling, with or without arsenic in the solution. This was attributed to electrogasification of the carbon. The apparent mass loss per cycle was observed to decrease with increasing arsenic concentration due to a net mass increase in adsorbed arsenic per cycle that increased with arsenic concentration, offsetting the carbon mass loss. Additional carbon adsorption sites involved in arsenic species interactions are created during electrogasification, thereby augmenting the net uptake of arsenic per cycle.It is demonstrated that EQCM, and in particular the information given by the behavior of the time derivative of the mass vs. potential, or massogram, is very useful for distinguishing arsenic species interactions with carbon electrodes. It may also prove to be effective for investigating redox/adsorption/desorption behavior of other species in solution with carbon materials as well.

  11. [Fusion of field and laboratory studies on the investigation of arsenic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Yoshito

    2009-10-01

    Arsenic is ubiquitously distributed in nature throughout Earth's crust and thus the major source of exposure to this metalloid for the general population is naturally polluted drinking water from wells. In East Asia, more than 30 million people are chronically exposed to arsenic. Interestingly, the manifestations of vascular diseases caused by prolonged exposure to arsenic are consistent with those induced by impaired production of endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO). However, no information has been available on the relation between NO synthesis and chronic arsenic poisoning in humans. A cross-sectional study in an endemic area of chronic arsenic poisoning in Inner Mongolia and experimental animal studies indicated that long-term exposure to arsenic by drinking water causes reduction of NO production in endothelial cells. Subsequent examinations with rabbits showed that decreased NO production during arsenic exposure is, at least in part, due to an "uncoupling" of endothelial NO synthase evoked by decreased levels of (6R)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-L-biopterin (BH(4)), a cofactor of the enzyme, leading to endothelial dysfunction. Furthermore, an intervention study in the area of chronic arsenic poisoning in Inner Mongolia suggested that decreased NO levels and peripheral vascular disease in arsenosis patients can be reversed by exposure cessation. In our cellular experiments, we found that arsenic exposure causes adaptive responses against oxidative stress and arsenic cytotoxicity through Nrf2 activation. This review summarizes the results of our recent studies on a fusion of field and laboratory studies on the chronic arsenic poisoning and cellular protection against the metalloid.

  12. Detection of trace amount of arsenic in groundwater by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, A. F. M. Y.; Hedayet Ullah, M.; Khan, Z. H.; Kabir, Firoza; Abedin, K. M.

    2014-03-01

    LIBS technique coupled with adsorption has been applied for the efficient detection of arsenic in liquid. Several adsorbents like tea leaves, bamboo slice, charcoal and zinc oxide have been used to enable sensitive detection of arsenic presence in water using LIBS. Among these, zinc oxide and charcoal show the better results. The detection limits for arsenic in water were 1 ppm and 8 ppm, respectively, when ZnO and charcoal were used as adsorbents of arsenic. To date, the determination of 1 ppm of As in water is the lowest concentration of detected arsenic in water by the LIBS technique. The detection limit of As was lowered to even less than 100 ppb by a combination of LIBS technique, adsorption by ZnO and concentration enhancement technique. Using the combination of these three techniques the ultimate concentration of arsenic was found to be 0.083 ppm (83 ppb) for arsenic polluted water collected from a tube-well of Farajikandi union (longitude 90.64°, latitude 23.338° north) of Matlab Upozila of Chandpur district in Bangladesh. This result compares fairly well with the finding of arsenic concentration of 0.078 ppm in the sample by the AAS technique at the Bangladesh Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (BCSIR) lab. Such a low detection limit (1 ppm) of trace elements in liquid matrix has significantly enhanced the scope of LIBS as an analytical tool.

  13. Vascular dysfunction in patients with chronic arsenosis can be reversed by reduction of arsenic exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Jingbo; Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Sun, Guifan; Yoshida, Takahiko; Aikawa, Hiroyuki; Fujimoto, Wataru; Iso, Hiroyasu; Cui, Renzhe; Waalkes, Michael P; Kumagai, Yoshito

    2005-03-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure causes vascular diseases associated with systematic dysfunction of endogenous nitric oxide. Replacement of heavily arsenic-contaminated drinking water with low-arsenic water is a potential intervention strategy for arsenosis, although the reversibility of arsenic intoxication has not established. In the present study, we examined urinary excretion of cyclic guanosine 3 ,5 -monophosphate (cGMP), a second messenger of the vasoactive effects of nitric oxide, and signs and symptoms for peripheral vascular function in 54 arsenosis patients before and after they were supplied with low-arsenic drinking water in an endemic area of chronic arsenic poisoning in Inner Mongolia, China. The arsenosis patients showed a marked decrease in urinary excretion of cGMP (mean +/- SEM: male, 37.0 +/- 6.1; female, 37.2 +/- 5.4 nmol/mmol creatinine), and a 13-month period of consuming low-arsenic drinking water reversed this trend (male, 68.0 +/- 5.6; female, 70.6 +/- 3.0 nmol/mmol creatinine) and improved peripheral vascular response to cold stress. Our intervention study indicates that peripheral vascular disease in arsenosis patients can be reversed by exposure cessation and has important implications for the public health approach to arsenic exposure.

  14. Arsenic removal from water by iron-sulphide minerals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In bench-scaled experiments, iron-sulphide minerals, pyrite and pyrrhotite are used as adsorbents for arsenic removal from As-spiked water of As5+ and As3+ species. The adsorption rate, efficiency, As-adsorption stability and the associated pH conditions have been examined. Observations indicate that these iron-sulphide minerals are very efficient to adsorb arsenic from water for both As5+ and As3+ species. Similar to other studies, As3+-adsorption shows a slower rate than As3+. The stability of the adsorbed arsenic seems closely related to the pH values of the solution. A lower pH level commonly less than 4.0 is required to protect the adsorbed arsenic from serious oxidation and backward release. Fining of the mineral powders and shaking of the solution during adsorption enhance the adsorption efficiency and adsorption rate. For practical use of the method presented in this study, the waste produced should be managed with great care to keep it from redistribution over water system. A further study of the protection for the waste from oxidation on real water systems will greatly enhance the application of the strong ability of arsenic adsorption by these minerals, which is observed from this study.

  15. Photooxidation of arsenic(III) to arsenic(V) on the surface of kaolinite clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wei; Wang, Yajie; Yu, Yingtan; Zhang, Xiangzhi; Li, Jinjun; Wu, Feng

    2015-10-01

    As one of the most toxic heavy metals, the oxidation of inorganic arsenic has drawn great attention among environmental scientists. However, little has been reported on the solar photochemical behavior of arsenic species on top-soil. In the present work, the influencing factors (pH, relative humidity (RH), humic acid (HA), trisodium citrate, and additional iron ions) and the contributions of reactive oxygen species (ROS, mainly HO and HO2/O2(-)) to photooxidation of As(III) to As(V) on kaolinite surfaces under UV irradiation (λ=365nm) were investigated. Results showed that lower pH facilitated photooxidation, and the photooxidation efficiency increased with the increase of RH and trisodium citrate. Promotion or inhibition of As(III) photooxidation by HA was observed at low or high dosages, respectively. Additional iron ions greatly promoted the photooxidation, but excessive amounts of Fe(2+) competed with As(III) for oxidation by ROS. Experiments on scavengers indicated that the HO radical was the predominant oxidant in this system. Experiments on actual soil surfaces proved the occurrence of As(III) photooxidation in real topsoil. This work demonstrates that the photooxidation process of As(III) on the soil surface should be taken into account when studying the fate of arsenic in natural soil newly polluted with acidic wastewater containing As(III). PMID:26456603

  16. Understanding arsenic contamination of groundwater in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    underneath Bangladesh. Logically, arsenic is likely to be present as compounds within sediments comprising the aquifer systems and may be associated with iron oxides, organic matter, sulfides etc. High arsenic contamination of groundwater in Bangladesh is a serious issue requiring appropriate understanding of the phenomenon relating to the occurrence and release of arsenic in groundwater. The water supply challenge is as much one of quantity as of quality. In many regions of the world, it means bringing water closer to the house. Further, if the water supply is of good quality, it improves public health. Three developments of the past decades have spurred new approaches to water supply and public health. First, the capacity to analyze smaller amounts of constituents in water has advanced substantially. Second, the health status and life expectancy have risen substantially across most countries. Finally, health and epidemiological research have advanced as well, and we are now much better informed of longer-term health effects of prolonged ingestion of contaminants. There are, at present, few (if any) low-cost technology and affordable solutions for the treatment of arsenic in non-piped water systems. Proposed interventions in rural areas must include alternative water sources such as rainwater harvesting, more efficient use of non-contaminated wells in the area, treated surface water, selective well drilling to deeper aquifers, and simple arsenic removal techniques as they are found effective. Arsenic contamination apparently can occur in a wide variety of hydrogeological and socioeconomic conditions. Therefore, any mitigation strategy will have to be tailored to suit the local geological, institutional and financial situation. However, the experience with water supply across the world demonstrates that the offered technical options will be sustainable only when the local community, or the customers, are truly committed to it and are willing to contribute financially to (at

  17. Arsenic in groundwater of the Red River Floodplain, Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postma, Diederik Jan; Larsen, Flemming; Jessen, Søren;

    2007-01-01

    The mobilization of arsenic (As) to the groundwater was studied in a shallow Holocene aquifer on the Red River flood plain near Hanoi, Vietnam. Results show an anoxic aquifer featuring organic carbon decomposition with redox zonation dominated by the reduction of Fe-oxides and methanogenesis...

  18. Adsorptive removal of manganese, arsenic and iron from groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buamah, R.

    2009-01-01

    Arsenic, manganese and iron in drinking water at concentrations exceeding recommended guideline values pose health risks and aesthetic defects. Batch and pilot experiments on manganese adsorption equilibrium and kinetics using iron-oxide coated sand (IOCS), Aquamandix and other media have been inve

  19. Pathways for arsenic from sediments to groundwater to streams: Biogeochemical processes in the Inner Coastal Plain, New Jersey, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barringer, Julia L.; Mumford, Adam; Young, Lily Y.; Reilly, Pamela A.; Bonin, Jennifer L.; Rosman, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The Cretaceous and Tertiary sediments that underlie the Inner Coastal Plain of New Jersey contain the arsenic-rich mineral glauconite. Streambed sediments in two Inner Coastal Plain streams (Crosswicks and Raccoon Creeks) that traverse these glauconitic deposits are enriched in arsenic (15–25 mg/kg), and groundwater discharging to the streams contains elevated levels of arsenic (>80 μg/L at a site on Crosswicks Creek) with arsenite generally the dominant species. Low dissolved oxygen, low or undetectable levels of nitrate and sulfate, detectable sulfide concentrations, and high concentrations of iron and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the groundwater indicate that reducing environments are present beneath the streambeds and that microbial activity, fueled by the DOC, is involved in releasing arsenic and iron from the geologic materials. In groundwater with the highest arsenic concentrations at Crosswicks Creek, arsenic respiratory reductase gene (arrA) indicated the presence of arsenic-reducing microbes. From extracted DNA, 16s rRNA gene sequences indicate the microbial community may include arsenic-reducing bacteria that have not yet been described. Once in the stream, iron is oxidized and precipitates as hydroxide coatings on the sediments. Arsenite also is oxidized and co-precipitates with or is sorbed to the iron hydroxides. Consequently, dissolved arsenic concentrations are lower in streamwater than in the groundwater, but the arsenic contributed by groundwater becomes part of the arsenic load in the stream when sediments are suspended during high flow. A strong positive relation between concentrations of arsenic and DOC in the groundwater samples indicates that any process—natural or anthropogenic—that increases the organic carbon concentration in the groundwater could stimulate microbial activity and thus increase the amount of arsenic that is released from the geologic materials.

  20. Arsenite-oxidizing bacteria exhibiting plant growth promoting traits isolated from the rhizosphere of Oryza sativa L.: Implications for mitigation of arsenic contamination in paddies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Suvendu; Jean, Jiin-Shuh; Chou, Mon-Lin; Rathod, Jagat; Liu, Chia-Chuan

    2016-01-25

    Arsenite-oxidizing bacteria exhibiting plant growth promoting (PGP) traits can have the advantages of reducing As-uptake by rice and promoting plant growth in As-stressed soil. A gram-positive bacterium Bacillus flexus ASO-6 resistant to high levels of As (32 and 280 mM for arsenite and arsenate, respectively) and exhibiting elevated rates of As(III) oxidation (Vmax=1.34 μM min(-1) 10(-7) cell) was isolated from rhizosphere of rice. The presence of aoxB gene and exhibition of As(III)-oxidase enzyme activity of this strain was observed. The ability of the strain to produce siderophore, IAA, ACC-deaminase and to solubilize phosphate was verified. The rice seed treated with the strain exhibited significantly improved seed germination and seedling vigor compared with the un-inoculated seeds. The bacterial inoculation significantly increased root biomass, straw yield, grain yield, chlorophyll and carotenoid in the rice plant. Moreover, As uptake from root to shoot and As accumulation in straw and grain decreased significantly as a result of the bacterial inoculation. Noteworthy, the inoculation effect is more prominent in non-flooded soil than it is in flooded soil. Owing to its wide action spectrum, this As(III)-oxidizing PGPB could serve as a potential bio-inoculant for mitigation of As in paddies and sustainable rice production in As-contaminated areas. PMID:26448489

  1. Acute and chronic arsenic toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnaike, R N

    2003-07-01

    Arsenic toxicity is a global health problem affecting many millions of people. Contamination is caused by arsenic from natural geological sources leaching into aquifers, contaminating drinking water and may also occur from mining and other industrial processes. Arsenic is present as a contaminant in many traditional remedies. Arsenic trioxide is now used to treat acute promyelocytic leukaemia. Absorption occurs predominantly from ingestion from the small intestine, though minimal absorption occurs from skin contact and inhalation. Arsenic exerts its toxicity by inactivating up to 200 enzymes, especially those involved in cellular energy pathways and DNA synthesis and repair. Acute arsenic poisoning is associated initially with nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and severe diarrhoea. Encephalopathy and peripheral neuropathy are reported. Chronic arsenic toxicity results in multisystem disease. Arsenic is a well documented human carcinogen affecting numerous organs. There are no evidence based treatment regimens to treat chronic arsenic poisoning but antioxidants have been advocated, though benefit is not proven. The focus of management is to reduce arsenic ingestion from drinking water and there is increasing emphasis on using alternative supplies of water.

  2. Arsenic neurotoxicity--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahidnia, A; van der Voet, G B; de Wolff, F A

    2007-10-01

    Arsenic (As) is one of the oldest poisons known to men. Its applications throughout history are wide and varied: murder, make-up, paint and even as a pesticide. Chronic As toxicity is a global environmental health problem, affecting millions of people in the USA and Germany to Bangladesh and Taiwan. Worldwide, As is released into the environment by smelting of various metals, combustion of fossil fuels, as herbicides and fungicides in agricultural products. The drinking water in many countries, which is tapped from natural geological resources, is also contaminated as a result of the high level of As in groundwater. The environmental fate of As is contamination of surface and groundwater with a contaminant level higher than 10 particle per billion (ppb) as set by World Health Organization (WHO). Arsenic exists in both organic and inorganic species and either form can also exist in a trivalent or pentavalent oxidation state. Long-term health effects of exposure to these As metabolites are severe and highly variable: skin and lung cancer, neurological effects, hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. Neurological effects of As may develop within a few hours after ingestion, but usually are seen in 2-8 weeks after exposure. It is usually a symmetrical sensorimotor neuropathy, often resembling the Guillain-Barré syndrome. The predominant clinical features of neuropathy are paresthesias, numbness and pain, particularly in the soles of the feet. Electrophysiological studies performed on patients with As neuropathy have revealed a reduced nerve conduction velocity, typical of those seen in axonal degeneration. Most of the adverse effects of As, are caused by inactivated enzymes in the cellular energy pathway, whereby As reacts with the thiol groups of proteins and enzymes and inhibits their catalytic activity. Furthermore, As-induced neurotoxicity, like many other neurodegenerative diseases, causes changes in cytoskeletal protein composition and hyperphosphorylation

  3. Curcumin encapsulated in chitosan nanoparticles: a novel strategy for the treatment of arsenic toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Abhishek; Lomash, Vinay; Samim, M; Flora, Swaran J S

    2012-07-30

    Water-soluble nanoparticles of curcumin were synthesized, characterized and applied as a stable detoxifying agent for arsenic poisoning. Chitosan nanoparticles of less than 50 nm in diameter containing curcumin were prepared. The particles were characterized by TEM, DLS and FT-IR. The therapeutic efficacy of the encapsulated curcumin nanoparticles (ECNPs) against arsenic-induced toxicity in rats was investigated. Sodium arsenite (2mg/kg) and ECNPs (1.5 or 15 mg/kg) were orally administered to male Wistar rats for 4 weeks to evaluate the therapeutic potential of ECNPs in blood and soft tissues. Arsenic significantly decreased blood δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (δ-ALAD) activity, reduced glutathione (GSH) and increased blood reactive oxygen species (ROS). These changes were accompanied by increases in hepatic total ROS, oxidized glutathione, and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance levels. By contrast, hepatic GSH, superoxide dismutase and catalase activities significantly decreased on arsenic exposure, indicative of oxidative stress. Brain biogenic amines (dopamine, norepinephrine and 5-hydroxytryptamine) levels also showed significant changes on arsenic exposure. Co-administration of ECNPs provided pronounced beneficial effects on the adverse changes in oxidative stress parameters induced by arsenic. The results indicate that ECNPs have better antioxidant and chelating potential (even at the lower dose of 1.5 mg/kg) compared to free curcumin at 15 mg/kg. The significant neurochemical and immunohistochemical protection afforded by ECNPs indicates their neuroprotective efficacy. The formulation provides a novel therapeutic regime for preventing arsenic toxicity.

  4. Redox proteomics changes in the fungal pathogen Trichosporon asahii on arsenic exposure: identification of protein responses to metal-induced oxidative stress in an environmentally-sampled isolate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidra Ilyas

    Full Text Available Trichosporon asahii is a yeast pathogen implicated in opportunistic infections. Cultures of an isolate collected from industrial wastewater were exposed for 2 days to 100 mg/L sodium arsenite (NaAsO2 and cadmium (CdCl2. Both metals reduced glutathione transferase (GST activity but had no effect on superoxide dismutase or catalase. NaAsO2 exposure increased glutathione reductase activity while CdCl2 had no effect. Protein thiols were labeled with 5-iodoacetamido fluorescein followed by one dimensional electrophoresis which revealed extensive protein thiol oxidation in response to CdCl2 treatment but thiol reduction in response to NaAsO2. Two dimensional electrophoresis analyses showed that the intensity of some protein spots was enhanced on treatment as judged by SameSpots image analysis software. In addition, some spots showed decreased IAF fluorescence suggesting thiol oxidation. Selected spots were excised and tryptic digested for identification by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. Twenty unique T. asahii proteins were identified of which the following proteins were up-regulated in response to NaAsO2: 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase, phospholipase B, alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase, ATP synthase alpha chain, 20S proteasome beta-type subunit Pre3p and the hypothetical proteins A1Q1_08001, A1Q2_03020, A1Q1_06950, A1Q1_06913. In addition, the following showed decreased thiol-associated fluorescence consistent with thiol oxidation; aconitase; aldehyde reductase I; phosphoglycerate kinase; translation elongation factor 2; heat shock protein 70 and hypothetical protein A1Q2_04745. Some proteins showed both increase in abundance coupled with decrease in IAF fluorescence; 3-hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA hydrolase; homoserine dehydrogenase Hom6 and hypothetical proteins A1Q2_03020 and A1Q1_00754. Targets implicated in redox response included 10 unique metabolic enzymes, heat shock proteins, a component of the 20S proteasome and translation elongation factor 2. These data

  5. In situ treatment of arsenic contaminated groundwater by aquifer iron coating: Experimental Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Xianjun; Wang, Yanxin; Pi, Kunfu; Liu, Chongxuan; Li, Junxia; Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Zhiqiang; Duan, Mengyu

    2015-09-15

    In situ arsenic removal from groundwater by an iron coating method has great potential to be a cost effective and simple groundwater remediation technique, especially in rural and remote areas where groundwater is used as the main source of drinking water. The in situ arsenic removal technique was first optimized by simulating arsenic removal in various quartz sand columns under anoxic conditions., Its effectiveness was then evaluated in an actual high-arsenic groundwater environment. The mechanism of arsenic removal by the iron coating was investigated under different conditions using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/X-ray absorption spectroscopy, an electron microprobe, and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy. A 4-step alternative cycle aquifer iron coating method was developed. A continuous injection of 5 mmol/L FeSO4 and 2.5 mmol/L NaClO for 96 hours can create a uniform coating of crystalline goethite on the surface of quartz sand in the columns without causing clogging. At a flow rate of 0.45 cm/min of the injection reagents (vi), the time for arsenic (as Na2HAsO4) to pass through the iron-coated quartz sand column was approximately 35 hours, which was much longer than that for tracer fluorescein sodium (approximately 2 hours). The retardation factor of arsenic was 23, and its adsorption capacity was 0.11 mol As per mol Fe, leading to an excellent arsenic removal. In situ arsenic removal from groundwater in an aquifer was achieved by simultaneous injections of As (V) and Fe (II) reagents. When the arsenic content in the groundwater was 233 μg/L, the aqueous phase arsenic was completely removed with an arsenic adsorption of 0.05 mol As per mol Fe. Arsenic fixation resulted from a process of adsorption/co-precipitation, in which arsenic and iron likely formed the arsenic-bearing iron mineral phases with poor crystallinity by way of bidentate binuclear complexes. Thus, the high arsenic removal efficiency of the technique likely resulted from the

  6. Accurate quantification and transformation of arsenic compounds during wet ashing with nitric acid and microwave assisted heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goessler, W; Pavkov, M

    2003-06-01

    Arsenous acid, dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), methylarsonic acid (MA), arsenic acid, arsenobetaine bromide (AB), trimethylarsine oxide (TMAO), arsenocholine iodide (AC), and tetramethylarsonium iodide (TETRA) were heated in a microwave autoclave with nitric acid to 100-300 degrees C. The arsenic compounds in the digests were separated with anion- and cation-exchange chromatography and determined with an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer as arsenic-specific detector. Arsenous acid was completely oxidized to arsenic acid at 100 degrees C. For a complete oxidation of MA and DMA to arsenic acid temperatures > 220 degrees C and > 280 degrees C were necessary. AB decomposed to arsenic acid via TMAO. Complete conversion was only obtained after heating the sample for 90 min to 300 degrees C. For a complete conversion of TMAO similar harsh conditions were necessary. AC was already substantially degraded to TMAO, TETRA and two unknown compounds at 100 degrees C. The unknown arsenic compounds were found only in the digests up to 160 degrees C. Quantitative conversion of AC to arsenic acid went also via TMAO. At temperatures above 220 degrees C TETRA started to convert to TMAO, which then was further converted to arsenic acid. To investigate whether the results obtained for the arsenic standards are transferable to real samples, the certified reference material DORM-2 was also heated in nitric acid with variable digestion temperatures and times. For an almost complete conversion of the AB present in DORM-2 90 min at 300 degrees C were necessary. Total organic carbon (TOC) was less or = 260 degrees C for 60 min. UV photo-oxidation of DORM-2 was investigated as an alternative sample decomposition. Only 6% of AB was converted to arsenic acid when DORM-2 was irradiated for 2 h at 1000 W. In contrast to microwave heating substantial amounts of MA were observed as degradation product.

  7. Chronic arsenic poisoning from burning high-arsenic-containing coal in Guizhou, China.

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jie; Zheng, Baoshan; Aposhian, H. Vasken; Zhou, Yunshu; Chen, Ming-liang; Zhang, Aihua; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2002-01-01

    Arsenic is an environmental hazard and the reduction of drinking water arsenic levels is under consideration. People are exposed to arsenic not only through drinking water but also through arsenic-contaminated air and food. Here we report the health effects of arsenic exposure from burning high arsenic-containing coal in Guizhou, China. Coal in this region has undergone mineralization and thus produces high concentrations of arsenic. Coal is burned inside the home in open pits for daily cooki...

  8. Physical, Chemical, and Biological Methods for the Removal of Arsenic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. T. Lim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic is a toxic metalloid which is widely distributed in nature. It is normally present as arsenate under oxic conditions while arsenite is predominant under reducing condition. The major discharges of arsenic in the environment are mainly due to natural sources such as aquifers and anthropogenic sources. It is known that arsenite salts are more toxic than arsenate as it binds with vicinal thiols in pyruvate dehydrogenase while arsenate inhibits the oxidative phosphorylation process. The common mechanisms for arsenic detoxification are uptaken by phosphate transporters, aquaglyceroporins, and active extrusion system and reduced by arsenate reductases via dissimilatory reduction mechanism. Some species of autotrophic and heterotrophic microorganisms use arsenic oxyanions for their regeneration of energy. Certain species of microorganisms are able to use arsenate as their nutrient in respiratory process. Detoxification operons are a common form of arsenic resistance in microorganisms. Hence, the use of bioremediation could be an effective and economic way to reduce this pollutant from the environment.

  9. Possible treatments for arsenic removal in Latin American waters for human consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litter, Marta I., E-mail: litter@cnea.gov.a [Gerencia Quimica, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, CP 1650, San Martin, Prov. de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Av. Rivadavia 1917, CP 1033, Ciudad de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Investigacion e Ingenieria Ambiental, Universidad Nacional de Gral. San Martin, Peatonal Belgrano 3563, 1o piso, CP 1650, San Martin, Prov. de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Morgada, Maria E. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Av. Rivadavia 1917, CP 1033, Ciudad de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bundschuh, Jochen [University of Applied Sciences, Institute of Applied Research, Moltkestr. 30, 76133 Karlsruhe (Germany); Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, University Road, Tainan City 701, Taiwan (China)

    2010-05-15

    Considering the toxic effects of arsenic, the World Health Organization recommends a maximum concentration of 10 mug L{sup -1} of arsenic in drinking water. Latin American populations present severe health problems due to consumption of waters with high arsenic contents. The physicochemical properties of surface and groundwaters are different from those of other more studied regions of the planet, and the problem is still publicly unknown. Methods for arsenic removal suitable to be applied in Latin American waters are here summarized and commented. Conventional technologies (oxidation, coagulation-coprecipitation, adsorption, reverse osmosis, use of ion exchangers) are described, but emphasis is made in emergent decentralized economical methods as the use of inexpensive natural adsorbents, solar light technologies or biological treatments, as essential to palliate the situation in poor, isolated and dispersed populations of Latin American regions. - Low-cost techniques should be urgently investigated to remove arsenic in drinking water in poor disperse rural and urban Latin American populations.

  10. Occurrence of arsenic in brown rice and its relationship to soil properties from Hainan Island, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yangrong; Chen, Mulong; Bi, Xiangyang; He, Yusheng; Ren, Limin; Xiang, Wu; Qiao, Shengying; Yan, Sen; Li, Zhonggen; Ma, Zhendong

    2011-07-01

    The acquaintance of arsenic concentrations in rice grain is vital in risk assessment. In this study, we determined the concentration of arsenic in 282 brown rice grains sampled from Hainan Island, China, and discussed its possible relationships to the considered soil properties. Arsenic concentrations in the rice grain from Hainan Island varied from 5 to 309 μg/kg, with a mean (92 μg/kg) lower than most published data from other countries/regions and the maximum contaminant level (MCL) for As(i) in rice. The result of correlation analysis between grain and soil properties showed that grain As concentrations correlated significantly to soil arsenic speciation, organic matter and soil P contents and could be best predicted by humic acid bound and Fe-Mn oxides bound As fractions. Grain arsenic rises steeply at soil As concentrations lower than 3.6 mg/kg and gently at higher concentrations. PMID:21549462

  11. Inorganic arsenic - SPE HG-AAS method for RICE tested in-house and collaboratively

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rie Romme; Qian, Yiting; Sloth, Jens Jørgen

    Arsenic (As) is a trace element present in the environment and consequently in various food items, e.g. rice, which may contain relatively high concentration of arsenic compared to other foodstuffs of plant origin. Rice contains most often three forms of arsenic; inorganic arsenic (i...... and is one of the major contributors to the iAs exposure in many countries. The work presented here describes the development, validation and application of a simple and inexpensive method for inorganic arsenic (iAs) determination in rice samples. The separation of iAs from organoarsenic compounds (MA...... and DMA) was done by off-line solidphase extraction (SPE) followed by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-AAS) detection. Water bath heating (90 °C, 60 min) of samples with dilute nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide solubilised and oxidized all iAs to arsenate (AsV). Loading of buffered...

  12. Moonshine-related arsenic poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, R E; Crecelius, E A; Hudson, J B

    1980-02-01

    Twelve sequential cases of arsenic poisoning were reviewed for possible sources of ingestion. Contaminated illicit whiskey (moonshine) appeared to be the source in approximately 50% of the patients. An analysis of.confiscated moonshine revealed that occasional specimens contained high levels of arsenic as a contaminant. Although arsenic poisoning occurs relatively infrequently, contaminated moonshine may be an important cause of the poisoning in some areas of the country.

  13. Use of MgO doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation for removing arsenic from water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Robert C; Holt-Larese, Kathleen C; Bontchev, Ranko

    2013-08-13

    Systems and methods for use of magnesium hydroxide, either directly or through one or more precursors, doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation, for removing arsenic from drinking water, including water distribution systems. In one embodiment, magnesium hydroxide, Mg(OH).sub.2 (a strong adsorbent for arsenic) doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation is used to adsorb arsenic. The complex consisting of arsenic adsorbed on Mg(OH).sub.2 doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation is subsequently removed from the water by conventional means, including filtration, settling, skimming, vortexing, centrifugation, magnetic separation, or other well-known separation systems. In another embodiment, magnesium oxide, MgO, is employed, which reacts with water to form Mg(OH).sub.2. The resulting Mg(OH).sub.2 doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation, then adsorbs arsenic, as set forth above. The method can also be used to treat human or animal poisoning with arsenic.

  14. Arsenic poisoning of Bangladesh groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickson, Ross; McArthur, John; Burgess, William; Ahmed, Kazi Matin; Ravenscroft, Peter; Rahmanñ, Mizanur

    1998-09-01

    In Bangladesh and West Bengal, alluvial Ganges aquifers used for public water supply are polluted with naturally occurring arsenic, which adversely affects the health of millions of people. Here we show that the arsenic derives from the reductive dissolution of arsenic-rich iron oxyhydroxides, which in turn are derived from weathering of base-metal sulphides. This finding means it should now be possible, by sedimentological study of the Ganges alluvial sediments, to guide the placement of new water wells so they will be free of arsenic.

  15. Arsenic content of homeopathic medicines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, H.D.; Saryan, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    In order to test the widely held assumption that homeopathic medicines contain negligible quantities of their major ingredients, six such medicines labeled in Latin as containing arsenic were purchased over the counter and by mail order and their arsenic contents measured. Values determined were similar to those expected from label information in only two of six and were markedly at variance in the remaining four. Arsenic was present in notable quantities in two preparations. Most sales personnel interviewed could not identify arsenic as being an ingredient in these preparations and were therefore incapable of warning the general public of possible dangers from ingestion. No such warnings appeared on the labels.

  16. Arsenic hazards to humans, plants, and animals from gold mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisler, R.

    2004-01-01

    Arsenic sources to the biosphere associated with gold mining include waste soil and rocks, residual water from ore concentrations, roasting of some types of gold-containing ores to remove sulfur and sulfur oxides, and bacterially-enhanced leaching. Arsenic concentrations near gold mining operations were elevated in abiotic materials and biota: maximum total arsenic concentrations measured were 560 ug/L in surface waters, 5.16 mg/L in sediment pore waters, 5.6 mg/kg dry weight (DW) in bird liver, 27 mg/kg DW in terrestrial grasses, 50 mg/kg DW in soils, 79 mg/kg DW in aquatic plants, 103 mg/kg DW in bird diets, 225 mg/kg DW in soft parts of bivalve molluscs, 324 mg/L in mine drainage waters, 625 mg/kg DW in aquatic insects, 7700 mg/kg DW in sediments, and 21,000 mg/kg DW in tailings. Single oral doses of arsenicals that were fatal to 50% of tested species ranged from 17 to 48 mg/kg body weight (BW) in birds and from 2.5 to 33 mg/kg BW in mammals. Susceptible species of mammals were adversely affected at chronic doses of 1 to 10 mg As/kg BW, or 50 mg As/kg diet. Sensitive aquatic species were damaged at water concentrations of 19 to 48 ug As/L, 120 mg As/kg diet, or tissue residues (in the case of freshwater fish) >1.3 mg/kg fresh weight. Adverse effects to crops and vegetation were recorded at 3 to 28 mg of water-soluble As/L (equivalent to about 25 to 85 mg total As/kg soil) and at atmospheric concentrations >3.9 ug As/m3. Gold miners had a number of arsenic-associated health problems including excess mortality from cancer of the lung, stomach, and respiratory tract. Miners and schoolchildren in the vicinity of gold mining activities had elevated urine arsenic of 25.7 ug/L (range 2.2-106.0 ug/L). Of the total population at this location, 20% showed elevated urine arsenic concentrations associated with future adverse health effects; arsenic-contaminated drinking water is the probable causative factor of elevated arsenic in urine. Proposed arsenic criteria to protect

  17. Atorvastatin ameliorates arsenic-induced hypertension and enhancement of vascular redox signaling in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarath, Thengumpallil Sasindran; Waghe, Prashantkumar; Gupta, Priyanka; Choudhury, Soumen; Kannan, Kandasamy [Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar, 243122 Bareilly, Uttar Pradesh (India); Pillai, Ayyappan Harikrishna [Division of Animal Biochemistry, Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar, 243122 Bareilly, Uttar Pradesh (India); Harikumar, Sankaran Kutty; Mishra, Santosh Kumar [Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar, 243122 Bareilly, Uttar Pradesh (India); Sarkar, Souvendra Nath, E-mail: snsarkar1911@rediffmail.com [Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar, 243122 Bareilly, Uttar Pradesh (India)

    2014-11-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure has been linked to elevated blood pressure and cardiovascular diseases, while statins reduce the incidence of cardiovascular disease predominantly by their low density lipoprotein-lowering effect. Besides, statins have other beneficial effects, including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. We evaluated whether atorvastatin, a widely used statin, can ameliorate arsenic-induced increase in blood pressure and alteration in lipid profile and also whether the amelioration could relate to altered NO and ROS signaling. Rats were exposed to sodium arsenite (100 ppm) through drinking water for 90 consecutive days. Atorvastatin (10 mg/kg bw, orally) was administered once daily during the last 30 days of arsenic exposure. On the 91st day, blood was collected for lipid profile. Western blot of iNOS and eNOS protein, NO and 3-nitrotyrosine production, Nox-4 and p22Phox mRNA expression, Nox activity, ROS generation, lipid peroxidation and antioxidants were evaluated in thoracic aorta. Arsenic increased systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure, while it decreased HDL-C and increased LDL-C, total cholesterol and triglycerides in serum. Arsenic down-regulated eNOS and up-regulated iNOS protein expression and increased basal NO and 3-nitrotyrosine level. Arsenic increased aortic Nox-4 and p22Phox mRNA expression, Nox activity, ROS generation and lipid peroxidation. Further, arsenic decreased the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase and depleted aortic GSH content. Atorvastatin regularized blood pressure, improved lipid profile and attenuated arsenic-mediated redox alterations. The results demonstrate that atorvastatin has the potential to ameliorate arsenic-induced hypertension by improving lipid profile, aortic NO signaling and restoring vascular redox homeostasis. - Highlights: • Arsenic increased systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure and caused dyslipidemia. • Arsenic increased

  18. Atorvastatin ameliorates arsenic-induced hypertension and enhancement of vascular redox signaling in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic arsenic exposure has been linked to elevated blood pressure and cardiovascular diseases, while statins reduce the incidence of cardiovascular disease predominantly by their low density lipoprotein-lowering effect. Besides, statins have other beneficial effects, including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. We evaluated whether atorvastatin, a widely used statin, can ameliorate arsenic-induced increase in blood pressure and alteration in lipid profile and also whether the amelioration could relate to altered NO and ROS signaling. Rats were exposed to sodium arsenite (100 ppm) through drinking water for 90 consecutive days. Atorvastatin (10 mg/kg bw, orally) was administered once daily during the last 30 days of arsenic exposure. On the 91st day, blood was collected for lipid profile. Western blot of iNOS and eNOS protein, NO and 3-nitrotyrosine production, Nox-4 and p22Phox mRNA expression, Nox activity, ROS generation, lipid peroxidation and antioxidants were evaluated in thoracic aorta. Arsenic increased systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure, while it decreased HDL-C and increased LDL-C, total cholesterol and triglycerides in serum. Arsenic down-regulated eNOS and up-regulated iNOS protein expression and increased basal NO and 3-nitrotyrosine level. Arsenic increased aortic Nox-4 and p22Phox mRNA expression, Nox activity, ROS generation and lipid peroxidation. Further, arsenic decreased the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase and depleted aortic GSH content. Atorvastatin regularized blood pressure, improved lipid profile and attenuated arsenic-mediated redox alterations. The results demonstrate that atorvastatin has the potential to ameliorate arsenic-induced hypertension by improving lipid profile, aortic NO signaling and restoring vascular redox homeostasis. - Highlights: • Arsenic increased systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure and caused dyslipidemia. • Arsenic increased

  19. Bacterial activities driving arsenic speciation and solubility in marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia-Brunet, F.; Seby, F.; Crouzet, C.; Joulian, C.; Mamindy-Pajany, Y.; Guezennec, A. G.; Hurel, C.; Marmier, N.; Bataillard, P.

    2012-04-01

    include dissolution of FeS (which confers to the muddy sediment its deep dark color), oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III), oxidation of As(III) to As(V), oxidation of S(-II) to S°, S(VI) and maybe other intermediate species, adsorption of As(V) onto fresh iron oxides. Bacterial activity tests applied to the crude sediments indicated that As(III)-oxidizing and As(V)-reducing micro-organisms have the potential to be active at both sites. Detection of aoxB and arrA genes, respectively specific to As(III)-oxidation and respiratory As(V)-reduction, revealed the presence of diverse bacterial communities able to contribute to As transformation in both St-Mandrier and l'Estaque marina sediments. As(III)-oxidizing bacteria probably contribute to the biogeochemical stabilization of arsenic, wherever electron acceptors are available. Whereas reducing conditions prevail in organic carbon-rich marina sediment, bacteria able to oxidize As(III) are present and can be rapidly active as soon as electron acceptors are available. The present study showed that arsenic, which inorganic forms As(III) and As(V) are particularly toxic, is one of the most mobile pollutants in polluted marina sediments. The biogeochemical reactions governing its mobility should thus be considered in the management of sediment dredging operations. This work was performed in the framework of ASEDMAR project supported by the French National Research Agency, under reference "2008 CESA-003".

  20. Biochemical mechanisms of signaling: perspectives in plants under arsenic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Ejazul; Khan, Muhammad Tahir; Irem, Samra

    2015-04-01

    Plants are the ultimate food source for humans, either directly or indirectly. Being sessile in nature, they are exposed to various biotic and abiotic stresses because of changing climate that adversely effects their growth and development. Contamination of heavy metals is one of the major abiotic stresses because of anthropogenic as well as natural factors which lead to increased toxicity and accumulation in plants. Arsenic is a naturally occurring metalloid toxin present in the earth crust. Due to its presence in terrestrial and aquatic environments, it effects the growth of plants. Plants can tolerate arsenic using several mechanisms like phytochelation, vacuole sequestration and activation of antioxidant defense systems. Several signaling mechanisms have evolved in plants that involve the use of proteins, calcium ions, hormones, reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide as signaling molecules to cope with arsenic toxicity. These mechanisms facilitate plants to survive under metal stress by activating their defense systems. The pathways by which these stress signals are perceived and responded is an unexplored area of research and there are lots of gaps still to be filled. A good understanding of these signaling pathways can help in raising the plants which can perform better in arsenic contaminated soil and water. In order to increase the survival of plants in contaminated areas there is a strong need to identify suitable gene targets that can be modified according to needs of the stakeholders using various biotechnological techniques. This review focuses on the signaling mechanisms of plants grown under arsenic stress and will give an insight of the different sensory systems in plants. Furthermore, it provides the knowledge about several pathways that can be exploited to develop plant cultivars which are resistant to arsenic stress or can reduce its uptake to minimize the risk of arsenic toxicity through food chain thus ensuring food security.

  1. Arsenic and fluoride in the groundwater of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armienta, M A; Segovia, N

    2008-08-01

    Concentrations of arsenic and fluoride above Mexican drinking water standards have been detected in aquifers of various areas of Mexico. This contamination has been found to be mainly caused by natural sources. However, the specific processes releasing these toxic elements into groundwater have been determined in a few zones only. Many studies, focused on arsenic-related health effects, have been performed at Comarca Lagunera in northern México. High concentrations of fluoride in water were also found in this area. The origin of the arsenic there is still controversial. Groundwater in active mining areas has been polluted by both natural and anthropogenic sources. Arsenic-rich minerals contaminate the fractured limestone aquifer at Zimapán, Central México. Tailings and deposits smelter-rich fumes polluted the shallow granular aquifer. Arsenic contamination has also been reported in the San Antonio-El Triunfo mining zone, southern Baja California, and Santa María de la Paz, in San Luis Potosí state. Even in the absence of mining activities, hydrogeochemistry and statistical techniques showed that arsenopyrite oxidation may also contaminate water, as in the case of the Independencia aquifer in the Mexican Altiplano. High concentrations of arsenic have also been detected in geothermal areas like Los Azufres, Los Humeros, and Acoculco. Prevalence of dental fluorosis was revealed by epidemiological studies in Aguascalientes and San Luis Potosí states. Presence of fluoride in water results from dissolution of acid-volcanic rocks. In Mexico, groundwater supplies most drinking water. Current knowledge and the geology of Mexico indicate the need to include arsenic and fluoride determinations in groundwater on a routine basis, and to develop interdisciplinary studies to assess the contaminant's sources in all enriched areas.

  2. Arsenic and fluoride in the groundwater of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armienta, M A; Segovia, N

    2008-08-01

    Concentrations of arsenic and fluoride above Mexican drinking water standards have been detected in aquifers of various areas of Mexico. This contamination has been found to be mainly caused by natural sources. However, the specific processes releasing these toxic elements into groundwater have been determined in a few zones only. Many studies, focused on arsenic-related health effects, have been performed at Comarca Lagunera in northern México. High concentrations of fluoride in water were also found in this area. The origin of the arsenic there is still controversial. Groundwater in active mining areas has been polluted by both natural and anthropogenic sources. Arsenic-rich minerals contaminate the fractured limestone aquifer at Zimapán, Central México. Tailings and deposits smelter-rich fumes polluted the shallow granular aquifer. Arsenic contamination has also been reported in the San Antonio-El Triunfo mining zone, southern Baja California, and Santa María de la Paz, in San Luis Potosí state. Even in the absence of mining activities, hydrogeochemistry and statistical techniques showed that arsenopyrite oxidation may also contaminate water, as in the case of the Independencia aquifer in the Mexican Altiplano. High concentrations of arsenic have also been detected in geothermal areas like Los Azufres, Los Humeros, and Acoculco. Prevalence of dental fluorosis was revealed by epidemiological studies in Aguascalientes and San Luis Potosí states. Presence of fluoride in water results from dissolution of acid-volcanic rocks. In Mexico, groundwater supplies most drinking water. Current knowledge and the geology of Mexico indicate the need to include arsenic and fluoride determinations in groundwater on a routine basis, and to develop interdisciplinary studies to assess the contaminant's sources in all enriched areas. PMID:18335171

  3. Screening and Identification of an Achromobacter Strain for Both Arsenic Oxidizing and Denitrifying Abilities%一株具砷氧化和反硝化功能的无色杆菌的筛选和鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾琳; 朱琼芳; 卢贯能; 陈来琳; 匡庐峰; 柯林

    2011-01-01

    利用含As(3+)肉汤培养基,从广西河池砷污染地区水样和沉积物样中通过多次分离、纯化获取砷耐受菌.进一步从砷耐受菌中筛选出在好氧条件下可以同时进行砷氧化和反硝化的多功能菌株cll-35.对该菌株进行形态观察,并利用16SrDNA序列分析方法进行鉴定,发现该菌株为革兰氏阴性菌,与Achromobacter denitrificans strain 22426和Achromobacter xylosoxidans strain C8B的同源性均达99%;该菌株在NO(3)-和As(3+)同时存在的条件下好氧反硝化能力和砷氧化速率均得到提高;在只含NO(3)-的条件下,NO(3)-的去除率为53.65%,而在As(3+)和NO(3)-同时存在的条件下,NO(3)-的去除率为75.27%.在不含NO(3)-和含NO(3)-的条件下,As(3+)的转化率都在99%以上,而在含NONO(3)-的条件下,As(3+)的氧化速率更快.这种相互促进可能与反硝化过程中的电子传递和砷氧化过程中的动态平衡有关.%Water and sediment samples were taken from an arsenic-contaminated region in Hechi, Cuangxi Province. Arsenite-resisting strains were isolated and purified several times from broth medium containing As3+. Cll-35, the arsenite-oxidizer and aerobic denitrifier was further screened from arsenite-resisting strains. Morphological studies and 16S rDNA sequencing revealed that the isolate was Gram negative, and had 99% homogeneity to Achromobacter denitrificans strain 22426 and Achromobacter xylosoxidans strain C8B. The aerobic denitrifying and arsenite-oxidizing ability of this strain was enhanced when arsenite and nitrate were present together. The removal rate of nitrate was 53. 65% when only nitrate was present, while the removal rate increased to 75. 27% when both arsenite and nitrate were present. The conversion rate of As3+ was above 99% with and without nitrate, and the oxidation rate was enhanced by the presence of nitrate. This phenomenon may be related to the electron transmission process of aerobic denitrification and the dynamic balance

  4. Mapping of spatial multi-scale sources of arsenic variation in groundwater on ChiaNan floodplain of Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yun-Bin; Lin, Yu-Pin; Liu, Chen-Wuing; Tan, Yih-Chi

    2006-10-15

    This study applied multivariate factorial kriging to derive the characteristics of the spatial variations of groundwater arsenic distributions at different scales on the ChiaNan floodplain, Taiwan. Seven variables (dissolved oxygen, oxidation-reduction potential, alkalinity, sulfate, iron cations, manganese cations and total organic carbon) and Arsenic were adopted to analyze the mechanisms of arsenic enrichments in groundwater. The hydrogeological environment had spatial and quantitative influences on arsenic enrichments at different scales. The regional scale was set to 32 km referring to the extension distance of flow paths to reflect the effects of flushing in the aquifer, while the local scale was set to 16 km referring to the farthest distance of seawater intrusion to determine the influence of seawater intrusion. The results of factorial kriging suggested that arsenic releases resulted partially from pyrite oxidation during the flushing at the regional scale and partially due to the siderite dissolution at the local scale. Overall, the alkalinity dominated arsenic distribution in groundwater at both the regional and local scales. The multivariate factorial kriging results also demonstrated that seawater intrusion slightly affected the increase of arsenic in groundwater, accounting for only 17.3% of total variation. However, the interaction of seawater intrusion and arsenic distribution in space indicated that seawater intrusion restrained the distribution of arsenic from the areas where seawater was located. High dissolved oxygen was found at where over-pumping induced drawdown cones occurred and also limited the spatial variation of arsenic. Our findings indicate that multivariate factorial kriging can be a useful mapping tool to improve understanding of the mechanism of arsenic release in groundwater at different scales. And the results conducted from the application of multivariate factorial kriging in southwestern Taiwan reveal the important influences

  5. Remediation of arsenic contaminated soil by coupling oxalate washing with subsequent ZVI/Air treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Menghua; Ye, Yuanyao; Chen, Jing; Lu, Xiaohua

    2016-02-01

    The application of a novel coupled process with oxalate washing and subsequent zero-valent iron (ZVI)/Air treatment for remediation of arsenic contaminated soil was investigated in the present study. Oxalate is biodegradable and widely present in the environment. With addition of 0.1 mol L(-1) oxalate under circumneutral condition, 83.7% and 52.6% of arsenic could be removed from a spiked kaolin and an actual contaminated soil respectively. Much more oxalate adsorption on the actual soil was attributed to the higher soil organic matter and clay content. Interestingly, oxalate retained in the washing effluent could act as an organic ligand to promote the oxidation efficiency of ZVI/Air at near neutral pH. Compared with the absence of oxalate, much more As(III) was oxidized. Arsenic was effectively adsorbed on iron (hydr)oxides as the consumption of oxalate and the increase of pH value. For the actual soil washing effluent, about 94.9% of total arsenic was removed after 120 min's treatment without pH adjustment. It has been demonstrated that As(V) was the dominant arsenic speciation adsorbed on iron (hydr)oxides. This study provides a promising alternative for remediation of arsenic contaminated soil in view of its low cost and environmental benign.

  6. Remediation of arsenic contaminated soil by coupling oxalate washing with subsequent ZVI/Air treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Menghua; Ye, Yuanyao; Chen, Jing; Lu, Xiaohua

    2016-02-01

    The application of a novel coupled process with oxalate washing and subsequent zero-valent iron (ZVI)/Air treatment for remediation of arsenic contaminated soil was investigated in the present study. Oxalate is biodegradable and widely present in the environment. With addition of 0.1 mol L(-1) oxalate under circumneutral condition, 83.7% and 52.6% of arsenic could be removed from a spiked kaolin and an actual contaminated soil respectively. Much more oxalate adsorption on the actual soil was attributed to the higher soil organic matter and clay content. Interestingly, oxalate retained in the washing effluent could act as an organic ligand to promote the oxidation efficiency of ZVI/Air at near neutral pH. Compared with the absence of oxalate, much more As(III) was oxidized. Arsenic was effectively adsorbed on iron (hydr)oxides as the consumption of oxalate and the increase of pH value. For the actual soil washing effluent, about 94.9% of total arsenic was removed after 120 min's treatment without pH adjustment. It has been demonstrated that As(V) was the dominant arsenic speciation adsorbed on iron (hydr)oxides. This study provides a promising alternative for remediation of arsenic contaminated soil in view of its low cost and environmental benign. PMID:26476769

  7. Mechanism of erythrocyte death in human population exposed to arsenic through drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic contamination in drinking water is one of the biggest natural calamities, which has become an imperative threat to human health throughout the world. Abbreviation of erythrocyte lifespan leading to the development of anemia is a common sequel in arsenic exposed population. This study was undertaken to explore the mechanism of cell death in human erythrocytes during chronic arsenic exposure. Results revealed transformation of smooth discoid red cells into evaginated echinocytic form in the exposed individuals. Further distortion converted reversible echinocytes to irreversible spheroechinocytes. Arsenic toxicity increased membrane microviscosity along with an elevation of cholesterol/phospholipid ratio, which hampered the flexibility of red cell membrane and made them less deformable. Significant increase in the binding of merocyanine 540 with erythrocyte membrane due to arsenic exposure indicated disruption of lipid packing in the outer leaflet of the cell membrane resulting from altered transbilayer phospholipid asymmetry. Arsenic induced eryptosis was characterized by cell shrinkage and exposure of phosphatidylserine at the cell surface. Furthermore, metabolic starvation with depletion of cellular ATP triggered apoptotic removal of erythrocytes from circulation. Significant decrease in reduced glutathione content indicating defective antioxidant capacity was coupled with enhancement of malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl levels, which pointed to oxidative damage to erythrocyte membrane. Arsenic toxicity intervened into red cell membrane integrity eventually leading to membrane destabilization and hemoglobin release. The study depicted the involvement of both erythrophagocytosis and hemolysis in the destruction of human erythrocytes during chronic arsenic exposure

  8. Toxicological and biochemical responses of the earthworm Eisenia fetida exposed to contaminated soil: Effects of arsenic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhifeng; Cui, Zhaojie; Liu, Lei; Ma, Qianchi; Xu, Xiaoming

    2016-07-01

    Arsenic is a pollutant that can be detected in different chemical forms in soil. However, the toxicological effects of different arsenic species on organisms have received little attention. In this study, we exposed earthworms Eisenia fetida to artificial soils contaminated by arsenite [As(III)], arsenate [As(V)], monomethylarsonate (MMA) and dimethylarsinate (DMA) for 28 and 56 days. Three biomarkers including lipid peroxidation (LPO), metallothioneins (MTs) and lysosomal membrane stability (LMS) were analyzed in the organisms. In addition, the contents of total arsenic and arsenic species in earthworms were also determined to investigate the effects of bioaccumulation and biotransformation of arsenic on biomarkers and to evaluate the dose-response relationships. The results showed that the relationship between the three biomarkers and the two inorganic arsenic species were dose dependent, and the correlation levels between the biomarkers and As(III) were higher than that between the biomarkers and As(V). Trivalent arsenic species shows more toxicity than pentavalent arsenic on the earthworms at molecular and subcellular level, including oxidative damage, MTs induction and lysosomal membrane damage. The toxicity of MMA and DMA was lower than inorganic arsenic species. However, the occurrence of demethylation of organic arsenics could lead to the generation of highly toxic inorganic arsenics and induce adverse effects on organisms. The biotransformation of highly toxic inorganic arsenics to the less toxic organic species in the earthworms was also validated in this study. The biomarker responses of the earthworm to different arsenic species found in this study could be helpful in future environment monitoring programs. PMID:27045633

  9. The Influence of Dosing Modes of Coagulate on Arsenic Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhibin Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Three different dosing modes, including one single dosing mode and two sequential dosing modes, were applied in high-arsenic contaminated water treatment. The results illustrated that the As (V soluble and the As (V nonspecifically sorbed were the insignificant species from Fe-As (V samples in the sequential dosing mode, while they were higher in the single dosing mode. However, it could be further concluded that the mobility of the Fe-As (V in sequential dosing mode was greater than that in single dosing mode. Besides, the main arsenic speciation governing the arsenic-borne coagulates was the As (V associated with poorly crystalline hydrous oxides of Fe in sequential or single dosing mode. Moreover, the particle size distribution analysis indicated that the sequential dosing mode was more prevalent in neutralizing and adsorbing the As (V compared with the single dosing mode. In the FT-IR spectra, the presence of arsenic was highlighted by a well resolved band at 825–829 cm−1. The positions of the As–O stretching vibration bands were shifted gradually as the dosing mode changed from the single to the sequential. This result could be related to the distribution of arsenic speciation in different dosing modes.

  10. Homicidal arsenic poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Andrew; Taylor, Andrew; Leese, Elizabeth; Allen, Sam; Morton, Jackie; McAdam, Julie

    2015-07-01

    The case of a 50-year-old man who died mysteriously after being admitted to hospital is reported. He had raised the possibility of being poisoned prior to his death. A Coroner's post-mortem did not reveal the cause of death but this was subsequently established by post-mortem trace element analysis of liver, urine, blood and hair all of which revealed very high arsenic concentrations.

  11. Arsenic-induced Aurora-A activation contributes to chromosome instability and tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chin-Han; Tseng, Ya-Shih; Yang, Chao-Chun; Kao, Yu-Ting; Sheu, Hamm-Ming; Liu, Hsiao-Sheng

    2013-11-01

    Arsenic may cause serious environmental pollution and is a serious industrial problem. Depending on the dosage, arsenic may trigger the cells undergoing either proliferation or apoptosis-related cell death. Because of lack of the proper animal model to study arsenic induced tumorigenesis, the accurate risk level of arsenic exposure has not been determined. Arsenic shows genotoxic effect on human beings who uptake water contaminated by arsenic. Chromosome aberration is frequently detected in arsenic exposure-related diseases and is associated with increased oxidative stress and decreased DNA repairing activity, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Aurora-A is a mitotic kinase, over-expression of Aurora-A leads to centrosome amplification, chromosomal instability and cell transformation. We revealed that Aurora-A is over-expressed in the skin and bladder cancer patients from blackfoot-disease endemic areas. Our cell line studies reveal that arsenic exposure between 0.5 μM and 1 μM for 2-7 days are able to induce Aurora-A expression and activation based on promoter activity, RNA and protein analysis. Aurora-A overexpression further increases the frequency of unsymmetrical chromosome segregation through centrosome amplification followed by cell population accumulated at S phase in immortalized keratinocyte (HaCaT) and uroepithelial cells (E7). Furthermore, Aurora-A over-expression was sustained for 1-4 weeks by chronic treatment of immortalized bladder and skin cells with NaAsO2. Aurora-A promoter methylation and gene amplification was not detected in the long-term arsenic treated E7 cells. Furthermore, the expression level of E2F1 transcription factor (E2F1) is increased in the presence of arsenic, and arsenic-related Aurora-A over-expression is transcriptionally regulated by E2F1. We further demonstrated that overexpression of Aurora-A and mutant Ha-ras or Aurora-A and mutant p53 may act additively to trigger arsenic-related bladder and skin cancer

  12. A Phytoremediation Strategy for Arsenic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meagher, Richard B.

    2005-06-01

    A Phytoremediation Strategy for Arsenic Progress Report May, 2005 Richard B. Meagher Principal Investigator Arsenic pollution affects the health of several hundred millions of people world wide, and an estimated 10 million Americans have unsafe levels of arsenic in their drinking water. However, few environmentally sound remedies for cleaning up arsenic contaminated soil and water have been proposed. Phytoremediation, the use of plants to extract and sequester environmental pollutants, is one new technology that offers an ecologically sound solution to a devastating problem. We propose that it is less disruptive to the environment to harvest and dispose of several thousand pounds per acre of contaminated aboveground plant material, than to excavate and dispose of 1 to 5 million pounds of contaminated soil per acre (assumes contamination runs 3 ft deep). Our objective is to develop a genetics-based phytoremediation strategy for arsenic removal that can be used in any plant species. This strategy requires the enhanced expression of several transgenes from diverse sources. Our working hypothesis is that organ-specific expression of several genes controlling the transport, electrochemical state, and binding of arsenic will result in the efficient extraction and hyperaccumulation of arsenic into aboveground plant tissues. This hypothesis is supported by theoretical arguments and strong preliminary data. We proposed six Specific Aims focused on testing and developing this arsenic phytoremediation strategy. During the first 18 months of the grant we made significant progress on five Specific Aims and began work on the sixth as summarized below. Specific Aim 1: Enhance plant arsenic resistance and greatly expand sinks for arsenite by expressing elevated levels of thiol-rich, arsenic-binding peptides. Hyperaccumulation of arsenic depends upon making plants that are both highly tolerant to arsenic and that have the capacity to store large amounts of arsenic aboveground

  13. Protective effects of plasma alpha-tocopherols on the risk of inorganic arsenic-related urothelial carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Chi-Jung [School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Pu, Yeong-Shiau [Department of Urology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Ying-Ting [Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Su, Chien-Tien [Department of Family Medicine, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chia-Chang [School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Urology, Taipei Medical Universtiy-Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Shiue, Horng-Sheng [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Huang, Chao-Yuan [Department of Urology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsueh, Yu-Mei, E-mail: ymhsueh@tmu.edu.tw [Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2011-02-15

    Arsenic plays an important role in producing oxidative stress in cultured cells. To investigate the interaction between high oxidative stress and low arsenic methylation capacity on arsenic carcinogenesis, a case-control study was conducted to evaluate the relationship among the indices of oxidative stress, such as urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyquanine (8-OHdG), as well as plasma micronutrients and urinary arsenic profiles on urothelial carcinoma (UC) risk. Urinary 8-OHdG was measured using high-sensitivity enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. The urinary arsenic species were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography and hydride generator-atomic absorption spectrometry. Plasma micronutrient levels were analyzed using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The present study showed a significant protective effect of plasma alpha-tocopherol on UC risk. Plasma alpha-tocopherol levels were significantly inversely related to urinary total arsenic concentrations and inorganic arsenic percentage (InAs%), and significantly positively related to dimethylarsinic acid percentage (DMA%). There were no correlations between plasma micronutrients and urinary 8-OHdG. Study participants with lower alpha-tocopherol and higher urinary total arsenic, higher InAs%, higher MMA%, and lower DMA% had a higher UC risk than those with higher alpha-tocopherol and lower urinary total arsenic, lower InAs%, lower MMA%, and higher DMA%. These results suggest that plasma alpha-tocopherol might modify the risk of inorganic arsenic-related UC. - Research Highlights: {yields} Plasma alpha-tocopherol levels were significantly inversely related to UC risk. {yields} There were no correlations between plasma micronutrients and urinary 8-OHdG. {yields} People with lower alpha-tocopherol and higher total arsenic had increased UC risk.

  14. Protective effects of plasma alpha-tocopherols on the risk of inorganic arsenic-related urothelial carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic plays an important role in producing oxidative stress in cultured cells. To investigate the interaction between high oxidative stress and low arsenic methylation capacity on arsenic carcinogenesis, a case-control study was conducted to evaluate the relationship among the indices of oxidative stress, such as urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyquanine (8-OHdG), as well as plasma micronutrients and urinary arsenic profiles on urothelial carcinoma (UC) risk. Urinary 8-OHdG was measured using high-sensitivity enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. The urinary arsenic species were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography and hydride generator-atomic absorption spectrometry. Plasma micronutrient levels were analyzed using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The present study showed a significant protective effect of plasma alpha-tocopherol on UC risk. Plasma alpha-tocopherol levels were significantly inversely related to urinary total arsenic concentrations and inorganic arsenic percentage (InAs%), and significantly positively related to dimethylarsinic acid percentage (DMA%). There were no correlations between plasma micronutrients and urinary 8-OHdG. Study participants with lower alpha-tocopherol and higher urinary total arsenic, higher InAs%, higher MMA%, and lower DMA% had a higher UC risk than those with higher alpha-tocopherol and lower urinary total arsenic, lower InAs%, lower MMA%, and higher DMA%. These results suggest that plasma alpha-tocopherol might modify the risk of inorganic arsenic-related UC. - Research Highlights: → Plasma alpha-tocopherol levels were significantly inversely related to UC risk. → There were no correlations between plasma micronutrients and urinary 8-OHdG. → People with lower alpha-tocopherol and higher total arsenic had increased UC risk.

  15. Environmental Arsenic Exposure and Urinary 8-OHdG in Arizona and Sonora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Jefferey L; Meza, María M; Josyula, Arun B; Poplin, Gerald S; Kopplin, Michael J; McClellen, Hannah E; Stürup, Stefan; Lantz, R Clark

    2007-01-01

    Although at high levels arsenic exposure is associated with increased cancer incidence, information on the health effects of lower exposure levels is limited. The objective of this study was to determine whether arsenic at concentrations below 40 microg/L in drinking water is associated with increased urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), a biomarker of DNA oxidative damage and repair. Urine samples were collected from 73 nonsmoking adults residing in two communities in Arizona (mean tap water arsenic (microg/L) 4.0 +/- 2.3 and 20.3 +/- 3.7), and 51 subjects in four communities in Sonora, Mexico (mean tap water arsenic (microg/L) ranging from 4.8 +/- 0.1 to 33.3 +/- 0.6). Although urinary arsenic concentration increased with higher exposure in tap water, urinary 8-OHdG concentration did not differ by community within Arizona or Sonora, and was not associated with urinary arsenic concentration. At the exposure levels evaluated in this study, drinking water arsenic was not associated with increased DNA oxidation as measured by urinary 8-OHdG.

  16. Electro-removal of arsenic(III) and arsenic(V) from aqueous solutions by capacitive deionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chen-Shiuan; Tseng, Ssu-Chia; Li, Kung-Cheh; Hou, Chia-Hung

    2016-07-15

    The feasibility of the electro-removal of arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(III)) from aqueous solutions via capacitive deionization was investigated. The effects of applied voltage (0.0-1.2V) and initial concentration (0.1-200mgL(-1)) on arsenic removal were examined. As evidenced, an enhancement of arsenic removal can be achieved by capacitive deionization. The capacity to remove As(V) at an initial concentration of 0.2mgL(-1) on the activated carbon electrode at 1.2V was determined to be 2.47×10(-2)mgg(-1), which is 1.8-fold higher than that of As(III) (1.37×10(-2)mgg(-1)). Notably, the possible transformation of arsenic species was further characterized. The higher effectiveness of As(V) removal via electrosorption at 1.2V was attributed to the formation of an electrical double layer at the electrode/solution interface. The removal of As(III) could be achieved by the oxidation of As(III) to As(V) and subsequent electrosorption of the As(V) onto the electrode surface of the anode. The presence of sodium chloride or natural organic matter was found to considerably decrease arsenic removal. Single-pass electrosorption-desorption experiments conducted at 1.2V further demonstrated that capacitive deionization is a potential means of effectively removing arsenic from aqueous solutions. PMID:27037475

  17. ARSENIC - SUSCEPTIBILITY & IN UTERO EFFECTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to inorganic arsenic remains a serious public health problem at many locations worldwide. If has often been noted that prevalences of signs and symptoms of chronic arsenic poisoning differ among various populations. For example, skin lesions or peripheral vascular dis...

  18. Possible mechanisms for arsenic-induced proliferative diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetterhahn, K.E.; Dudek, E.J.; Shumilla, J.A. [Dartmouth College and Medical School, Hanover, NH (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Possible mechanisms for cardiovascular diseases and cancers which have been observed on chronic exposure to arsenic have been investigated. We tested the hypothesis that nonlethal levels of arsenic are mitogenic, cause oxidative stress, increase nuclear translocation of trans-acting factors, and increase expression of genes involved in proliferation. Cultured porcine vascular (from aorta) endothelial cells were used as a model cell system to study the effects of arsenic on the target cells for cardiovascular diseases. Treatment of postconfluent cell cultures with nonovertly toxic concentrations of arsenite increased DNA synthesis, similar to the mitogenic response observed with hydrogen peroxide. Within 1 hour of adding noncytotoxic concentrations of arsenite, cellular levels of oxidants increased relative to control levels, indicating that arsenite promotes cellular oxidations. Arsenite treatment increased nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B, an oxidative stress-responsive transcription factor, in a manner similar to that observed with hydrogen peroxide. Pretreatment of intact cells with the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine and dimethylfumarate prevented the arsenite-induced increases in cellular oxidant formation and NF-KB translocation. Arsenite had little or no effect on binding of NF-KB to its DNA recognition sequence in vitro, indicating that it is unlikely that arsenite directly affects NF-KB. The steady-state mRNA levels of intracellular adhesion molecule and urokinase-like plasminogen activator, genes associated with the active endothelial phenotype in arteriosclerosis and cancer metastasis, were increased by nontoxic concentrations of arsenite. These data suggest that arsenite promotes proliferative diseases like heart disease and cancer by activating oxidant-sensitive endothelial cell signaling and gene expression. It is possible that antioxidant therapy would be useful in preventing arsenic-induced cardiovascular disease and cancer.

  19. Mineralogical and Geochemical Controls of Arsenic in an Active Tailings Dam

    OpenAIRE

    Samuel A. Ndur; William K. Buah

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess arsenic (As) mobilization in an active tailings dam through mineralogical and geochemical characterization study. Arsenite is the predominant As species in the dam with more than 50% of the arsenic bound to the organic fraction. Pyrite and arsenopyrite are the principal opaque minerals remaining in the tailings with relic grains showing rims of oxidation (hematite/goethite). Illite, kaolinite and carbonates act as pH buffers and consume the acid generated d...

  20. Technologies for Arsenic Removal from Water: Current Status and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Ricci Nicomel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This review paper presents an overview of the available technologies used nowadays for the removal of arsenic species from water. Conventionally applied techniques to remove arsenic species include oxidation, coagulation-flocculation, and membrane techniques. Besides, progress has recently been made on the utility of various nanoparticles for the remediation of contaminated water. A critical analysis of the most widely investigated nanoparticles is presented and promising future research on novel porous materials, such as metal organic frameworks, is suggested.

  1. Mechanism of Arsenic Sequestration in High-Iron Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, R. A.; Campbell, K. M.; Hering, J. G.; O'Day, P. A.

    2005-12-01

    Naturally occurring elevated concentrations of arsenic in the runoff of the eastern Sierra Nevada and feed waters of the Los Angeles Aqueduct are remediated by the Los Angeles Department of Power and Water (LADPW) up stream of the Haiwee Reservoir (Olancha, CA). To reduce total arsenic in drinking water supplies, the LADPW adds ferric chloride and a cationic polymer coagulant to the aqueduct. The treatment precipitates as an amorphous iron oxide, spectrally similar to 6-line ferrihydrite, that adsorbs and sequesters arsenic as arsenate. As the channeled flow enters North Haiwee Reservoir, the As(V)-enriched iron floc settles as sediments in the inlet channel. Buried As(V) is reduced to As(III) near the sediment-water interface (0-10cm), and only As(III) is observed at depths below the steep (1-2cm) near-surface redox gradient. Sediment samples from 30-cm push cores were collected from the edge of the reservoir along the inlet channel in tandem with in situ porewater measurements using an inert polyacrylamide gel probe sampler. Sediments were analyzed to characterize the redox gradient, host mineralogy, and variation in bulk elemental composition with depth. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was used to determine the depth of the microbially driven redox boundary where As (V) is reduced to As (III) and to investigate the molecular bonding of arsenic adsorbed to iron hydroxide surfaces. Specific and characteristic iron and arsenic phases were isolated by sequential extraction; extracted and bulk concentrations were determined by ICP-MS. Splits of specific extraction steps were analyzed by synchrotron EXAFS and XRD to determine the identity of separated phases. The primary mineralogy of sediments along the inlet channel is detrital quartz, plagioclase feldspar, and phyllosilicates weathered from the Sierra Nevada granitic batholith. Notably, crystalline magnetite, hematite, and goethite, phases that would indicate transformation of hydrous iron phases to more stable

  2. Distribution of arsenic on micro-interfaces in a kind of Cr, Nb and Ti microalloyed low carbon steel produced by a compact strip production process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Y.Z., E-mail: tozyz1@163.com [Key Laboratory for Ferrous Metallurgy and Resources Utilization of Ministry of Education, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China) and School of Materials and Metallurgy, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Li, J.C.; Liang, D.M.; Liu, P. [School of Materials and Metallurgy, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China)

    2011-10-17

    Highlights: {yields} We evaluate the effect of Ti, V and Nb on grain boundary segregation of arsenic in steel. {yields} Arsenic segregates strongly on grain boundary at the base-metal/scale interface. {yields} Arsenic segregates on subgrain boundaries in the hot rolled steel strip. - Abstract: Distribution of arsenic on micro-interfaces in the Cr, Nb and Ti microalloyed low carbon steel strip was investigated by SEM, TEM and EDS in a compact strip production (CSP) and a following reheating processes. It is discovered that, in the CSP processes, the arsenic content within grains at the half thickness of the strip was a little higher than that at the grain boundaries, which was attributed to a quicker occupying of vacancies by carbon, Nb and Ti atoms on grain boundaries. However, arsenic segregated strongly on grain boundaries at the interface between the base metal and the oxide scale, where it had a maximum arsenic content of 2.93 wt.%. The strongly segregation of arsenic on grain boundaries at the interface between the base metal and the oxide scale may lead to difficulties in the subsequent production galvanized sheet with the hot rolled CSP strip that contains arsenic. When the hot rolled strip (CSP) was reheated to 1100 deg. C, held for half an hour, arsenic segregated strongly on subgrain boundaries for the availability of more vacancies caused by the solid solution of alloy carbonitrides.

  3. Arsenic concentrations in Chinese coals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The arsenic concentrations in 297 coal samples were collected from the main coal-mines of 26 provinces in China were determined by molybdenum blue coloration method. These samples were collected from coals that vary widely in coal rank and coal-forming periods from the five main coal-bearing regions in China. Arsenic content in Chinese coals range between 0.24 to 71 mg/kg. The mean of the concentration of Arsenic is 6.4 ± 0.5 mg/kg and the geometric mean is 4.0 ± 8.5 mg/kg. The level of arsenic in China is higher in northeastern and southern provinces, but lower in northwestern provinces. The relationship between arsenic content and coal-forming period, coal rank is studied. It was observed that the arsenic contents decreases with coal rank in the order: Tertiary > Early Jurassic > Late Triassic > Late Jurassic > Middle Jurassic > Late Permian > Early Carboniferous > Middle Carboniferous > Late Carboniferous > Early Permian; It was also noted that the arsenic contents decrease in the order: Subbituminous > Anthracite > Bituminous. However, compared with the geological characteristics of coal forming region, coal rank and coal-forming period have little effect on the concentration of arsenic in Chinese coal. The average arsenic concentration of Chinese coal is lower than that of the whole world. The health problems in China derived from in coal (arsenism) are due largely to poor local life-style practices in cooking and home heating with coal rather than to high arsenic contents in the coal

  4. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Oxidation/Filtration and Adsorptive Media, U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Clinton Christian School in Goshen, IN - Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed for and the results obtained from the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Clinton Christian School in Goshen, IN. The objectives of the project were to evaluate the effectiveness of AdEdge Technologies’...

  5. Arsenicosis status and urinary malondialdehyde (MDA) in people exposed to arsenic contaminated-coal in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian Ping; Maddalena, Robyn; Zheng, Baoshan; Zai, Chen; Liu, Faye; Ng, Jack C

    2009-04-01

    The current arsenic exposure condition, arsenicosis prevalence, urinary arsenic and MDA (malondialdehyde) concentrations in people were studied. The study area, a village in Xing Ren County in Guizhou Province, PR China, is a coal-borne arsenicosis endemic area that was identified several decades ago. The residents in Xing Ren have been using coal containing high arsenic levels all their life. Urinary arsenic levels of villagers were 192.2+/-22 microg/g creatinine (n=113) in the coal-borne endemic area (Xing Ren county) and were significantly higher than 63.6+/-5.9 microg/g creatinine (n=30) in a neighbouring control site (a village in Xing Yi county). The urinary MDA concentrations of villagers from the endemic area were also significantly higher compared to those of the control area. There was a strong correlation between age and urinary arsenic and MDA concentrations in the endemic area of Xing Ren; urinary arsenic and MDA levels decreased with age. Fifty out of 113 (44.3%) villagers in the endemic area had arsenicosis symptoms and the prevalence in villagers older than 40 y was 100% in male (92.2% overall). Urinary MDA concentration was significantly higher in people with arsenicosis symptoms in the endemic areas. Oxidative stress (urinary MDA concentration) was strongly related to arsenic exposure but not to the age and smoking habit. Higher urinary arsenic and MDA levels in younger villagers from the endemic area suggest that they are having a higher exposure to coal-borne emitted arsenic because they spend more time indoor. There is an urgent need to develop proper intervention methods in the Guizhou endemic areas in order to reduce the risk to the local communities who are still using arsenic contaminated-coal.

  6. Effect of redox potential and pH on arsenic speciation and solubility in a contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masscheleyn, P.H.; Delaune, R.D.; Patrick, W.H. Jr. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge (United States))

    1991-08-01

    The influence of redox potential and pH on arsenic speciation and solubility was studied in a contaminated soil. Alterations in the oxidation state of arsenic, and influenced by redox potential and pH, greatly affected its solubility in soil. At higher soil redox levels (500-200 mV), arsenic solubility was low and the major part (65-98%) of the arsenic in solution was present as As(V). An alkaline pH, or the reduction of As(V) to As(III), released substantial proportions of arsenic into solution. Under moderately reduced soil conditions (0-100 mV), arsenic solubility was controlled by the dissolution of iron oxyhydroxides. Arsenic was coprecipitated (as As(V)) with iron oxyhydroxides and released upon their solubilization. Upon reduction to {minus}200 mV, the soluble arsenic content increased 13-fold as compared to 500 mV. The observed slow kinetics of the As(V)-As(III) transformation and the high concentrations of Mn present indicate that, under reduced soil conditions, arsenic solubility could be controlled by a Mn{sub 3}(AsO{sub 4}){sub 2} phase.

  7. Effect of organic matter amendment, arsenic amendment and water management regime on rice grain arsenic species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic accumulation in rice grain has been identified as a major problem in some regions of Asia. A study was conducted to investigate the effect of increased organic matter in the soil on the release of arsenic into soil pore water and accumulation of arsenic species within rice grain. It was observed that high concentrations of soil arsenic and organic matter caused a reduction in plant growth and delayed flowering time. Total grain arsenic accumulation was higher in the plants grown in high soil arsenic in combination with high organic matter, with an increase in the percentage of organic arsenic species observed. The results indicate that the application of organic matter should be done with caution in paddy soils which have high soil arsenic, as this may lead to an increase in accumulation of arsenic within rice grains. Results also confirm that flooding conditions substantially increase grain arsenic. -- Highlights: ► High soil arsenic and organic matter caused a reduction in plant growth. ► A delayed flowering time was observed in high arsenic and organic matter soil. ► Total grain arsenic increased in high arsenic and organic matter soil. ► Percentage organic arsenic in the grain altered in arsenic and organic matter soil. -- The addition of high amounts of organic matter to soils led to an increase in total rice grain arsenic, as well as alteration in the percentage arsenic species in the rice grains

  8. Groundwater arsenic contamination affecting different geologic domains in India - a review: influence of geological setting, fluvial geomorphology and Quaternary stratigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acharyya, S.K.; Shah, B.A. [Jadavpur University, Calcutta (India). Dept. of Geological Science

    2007-10-15

    Arsenic contamination in groundwater is pervasive within lowland organic-rich Bengal Delta and narrow entrenched channels in the Middle Ganga floodplains. Local areas of Damodar fan-delta and isolated areas within the Dongargarh Proterozoic rift-zone in central India are also contaminated. In this rift-zone, arsenic is enriched in felsic magmatic rocks and weathered rocks and soils from local areas are enriched further in arsenic and iron. Late Quaternary stratigraphy, geomorphology and sedimentation have influenced groundwater arsenic contamination in alluvium that aggraded during the Holocene sea-level rise. No specific source of arsenic could be identified, although Himalaya is the main provenance for the Ganga floodplain and the Bengal Delta. Gondwana coal seams and other Peninsular Indian rocks might be sources for arsenic in the Damodar fan-delta. As-bearing pyrite or any As-mineral is nearly absent in the aquifer sediments. Arsenic mainly occurs adsorbed on hydrated-iron-oxide (HFO), which coat sediment grains and minerals. Arsenic and iron are released to groundwater by bio-mediated reductive dissolution of HFO with corresponding oxidation of organic matter.

  9. Arsenic encapsulation using Portland cement with ferrous sulfate/lime and Terra-Bond™ technologies - Microcharacterization and leaching studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Paul M

    2012-03-15

    This work reports the results of an investigation on the treatment and encapsulation of arsenic-containing materials by Portland cement with ferrous sulfate and lime (PFL) and Terra-Bond™, a commercially available patented technology. The arsenic materials included: chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood materials; scorodite-rich mine tailings from the La Trinidad Mine in California; and a soil/smelter dust mixture from the Anaconda Superfund site spiked with monosodium methyl arsenate (MSMA) to simulate an organoarsenic soil material. SEM/EDS and XRD spectra of PFL treated samples showed similarity across all three waste materials while Terra-Bond treated samples showed predominance of elemental sulfur. SEM/EDS of PFL treated samples showed that calcium was imbedded in the structure while micrographs of Terra-Bond treated samples showed the appearance of an epoxy material on the surface. The epoxy material appears to be responsible for encapsulating and reducing the leachability of arsenic. XANES spectra for the PFL treatment of CCA-containing samples showed that arsenic has a predominant pentavalent form (As +5), and the PFL treatment process did not alter the arsenic oxidation state. But, distinct differences were observed for XANES spectra of untreated and PFL treated scorodite-rich mine tailing which changed the arsenic coordination structure from a mixture of As (+3/+5) to exclusively As (+5). Both S/S techniques reduced the amount of arsenic released in the leaching tests. Most cases show lower amounts of arsenic released from wastes treated by the Terra-Bond™ technique when compared to the PFL technique. The pH of the solution significantly affected the leachability, with the amount of arsenic released increasing with pH. Sequential extraction results indicate that sodium hydroxide was favorable in releasing arsenic in the mine tailings. This is due to ligand displacement reactions of hydroxyl ions with arsenic species and high pH conditions that

  10. Osteoresorptive arsenic intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dani, Sergio Ulhoa

    2013-04-01

    A 47-year-old woman consulted her dermatologist complaining whole body dermatitis, urticaria and irritating bullous eruptions on the plantar and side surfaces of her feet. She had had multiple hypopigmented spots on her skin since her early adulthood. The patient was treated with topical medication without significant improvement of symptoms. One year later she suffered a myocardial infarction, accompanied by refractory anaemia. At the age of 49, a breast cancer was diagnosed and shortly thereafter her last menstruation occurred. At age 50years, upon complaint of weight loss despite normal food intake, Hashimoto thyroiditis with latent hyperthyroidism, vitamin D insufficiency with secondary hyperparathyroidism, and poikilocytic anaemia with anisochromia, hypochromia, anisocytosis, elliptocytes, drepanocytes, dacryocytes, acanthocytes, echinocytes, schizocytes, stomatocytes and target cells were diagnosed. The osteodensitometric and laboratory examinations revealed osteoporosis with sustained elevation of urinary Dipyridinolin-crosslinks (u-Dpd), and urinary arsenic (u-As) of 500μg/l (equivalent to 0.5 parts per million-ppm, 2.5μg/mg creatinine/dl, u-As: Phosphate of 26μg/mmol; the estimated bone As:P and As/kg body weight were 500μg/g and 11.3mg/kg, respectively). Thalassemia, immunoglobinopathy and iron deficiency were excluded. Supplementation with oral vitamin D and calcium, and antiresorptive therapy with intravenous zolendronate normalised the u-Dpd, significantly decreased the urinary arsenic concentration, and cured the anemia and the urticaria. A diagnosis of osteoresorptive arsenic intoxication (ORAI) was established. PMID:23337042

  11. Removing arsenic from drinking water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hathaway, S.W.; Rubel, R. (Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (USA))

    1987-08-01

    Pilot-plant tests of two treatment methods, activated alumina and ion exchange, for removing arsenic from drinking water were evaluated at the Fallon, Nevada, Naval Air Station (NAS). The arsenic concentration was 0.080-0.116 mg/liter, exceeding the 0.05 mg/liter maximum contaminant level. Although the valence of arsenic was not determined, in prechlorination process and test results suggest it was probably arsenic V. Chlorinated drinking water from the NAS was used for evaluating the efficacy of treatment under several different conditions. The activated alumina and ion exchange systems were operated through three different loading and regeneration cycles each. The major water quality factors affecting the removal of arsenic by these methods were pH of feedwater, arsenic concentration, sulfate concentration, and alkalinity. The major operational factors affecting removal were flow rate, down time, and media clogging. Capital and operating costs for arsenic removal are estimated for the activated alumina method at optimum pH (5.5) for each of the three small community systems drawing water from the same aquifer. In addition, several containers of the regeneration waste were used for a special study to characterize, dewater, and render the waste non-toxic for disposal in a sanitary landfill.

  12. ELECTROCHEMICAL REMEDIATION OF ARSENIC-CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER — RESULTS OF PROTOTYPE FIELD TESTS IN BANGLADESH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowolik, K; Addy, S.E.A.; Gadgil, A.

    2009-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization (WHO), more than 50 million people in Bangladesh drink arsenic-laden water, making it the largest case of mass poisoning in human history. Many methods of arsenic removal (mostly using chemical adsorbents) have been studied, but most of these are too expensive and impractical to be implemented in poor countries such as Bangladesh. This project investigates ElectroChemical Arsenic Remediation (ECAR) as an affordable means of removing arsenic. Experiments were performed on site in Bangladesh using a prototype termed “sushi”. This device consists of carbon steel sheets that serve as electrodes wrapped into a cylinder, separated by plastic mesh and surrounded by a tube-like container that serves as a holding cell in which the water is treated electrochemically. During the electrochemical process, current is applied to both electrodes causing iron to oxidize to various forms of iron (hydr)oxides. These species bind to arsenic(V) with very high affi nity. ECAR also has the advantage that As(III), the more toxic form of arsenic, oxidizes to As(V) in situ. Only As(V) is known to complex with iron (hydr)oxides. One of the main objectives of this research is to demonstrate the ability of the new prototype to reduce arsenic concentrations in Bangladesh groundwater from >200 ppb to below the WHO limit of 10 ppb. In addition, varying fl ow rate and dosage and the effect on arsenic removal was investigated. Experiments showed that ECAR reduced Bangladeshi water with an initial arsenic concentration as high as 250 ppb to below 10 ppb. ECAR proved to be effective at dosages as high as 810 Coulombs/Liter (C/L) and as low as 386 C/L (current 1 A, voltage 12 V). These results are encouraging and provide great promise that ECAR is an effi cient method in the remediation of arsenic from contaminated groundwater. A preliminary investigation of arsenic removal trends with varying Coulombic dosage, complexation time and fi ltration methods is

  13. Acetaminophen increases the risk of arsenic-mediated development of hepatic damage in rats by enhancing redox-signaling mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majhi, Chhaya Rani; Khan, Saleem; Leo, Marie Dennis Marcus; Prawez, Shahid; Kumar, Amit; Sankar, Palanisamy; Telang, Avinash Gopal; Sarkar, Souvendra Nath

    2014-02-01

    We evaluated whether the commonly used analgesic-antipyretic drug acetaminophen can modify the arsenic-induced hepatic oxidative stress and also whether withdrawal of acetaminophen administration during the course of long-term arsenic exposure can increase susceptibility of liver to arsenic toxicity. Acetaminophen was co-administered orally to rats for 3 days following 28 days of arsenic pre-exposure (Phase-I) and thereafter, acetaminophen was withdrawn, but arsenic exposure was continued for another 28 days (Phase-II). Arsenic increased lipid peroxidation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, depleted glutathione (GSH), and decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione reductase (GR) activities. Acetaminophen caused exacerbation of arsenic-mediated lipid peroxidation and ROS generation and further enhancement of serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activities. In Phase-I, acetaminophen caused further GSH depletion and reduction in SOD, catalase, GPx and GR activities, but in Phase-II, only GPx and GR activities were more affected. Arsenic did not alter basal and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-mediated NO production, but decreased constitutive NOS (cNOS)-mediated NO release. Arsenic reduced expression of endothelial NOS (eNOS) and iNOS genes. Acetaminophen up-regulated eNOS and iNOS expression and NO production in Phase-I, but reversed these effects in Phase-II. Results reveal that acetaminophen increased the risk of arsenic-mediated hepatic oxidative damage. Withdrawal of acetaminophen administration also increased susceptibility of liver to hepatotoxicity. Both ROS and NO appeared to mediate lipid peroxidation in Phase-I, whereas only ROS appeared responsible for peroxidative damage in Phase-II.

  14. Studies on the removal of arsenic (III) from water by a novel hybrid material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, Sandip, E-mail: sandipmandal9@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, NIT, Rourkela 769008 (India); Padhi, T. [Department of Chemistry, NIT, Rourkela 769008 (India); Patel, R.K., E-mail: rkpatel@nitrkl.ac.in [Department of Chemistry, NIT, Rourkela 769008 (India)

    2011-08-30

    Highlights: {yields} The removal of As (III) is about 98% at pH 7 with the hybrid material (ZrO-EA). {yields} The hybrid material exhibits specific surface area of 201.62 m{sup 2}/g. {yields} The adsorption of arsenic (III) from aqueous solution by the hybrid material is spontaneous. {yields} The material could be easily regenerated with sodium hydroxide at pH 12. - Abstract: The present work provides a method for removal of the arsenic (III) from water. An ion-exchanger hybrid material zirconium (IV) oxide-ethanolamine (ZrO-EA) is synthesized and characterized which is subsequently used for the removal of selective arsenic (III) from water containing 10,50,100 mg/L of arsenic (III) solution. The probable practical application for arsenic removal from water by this material has also been studied. The various parameters affecting the removal process like initial concentration of As (III), adsorbent dose, contact time, temperature, ionic strength, and pH are investigated. From the data of results, it is indicated that, the adsorbent dose of 0.7 mg/L, contact time 50 min after which the adsorption process comes to equilibrium, temperature (25 {+-} 2), solution pH (5-7), which are the optimum conditions for adsorption. The typical adsorption isotherms are calculated to know the suitability of the process. The column studies showed 98% recovery of arsenic from water especially at low concentration of arsenic in water samples.

  15. Evidence for arsenic metabolism and cycling by microorganisms 2.7 billion years ago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sforna, Marie Catherine; Philippot, Pascal; Somogyi, Andrea; van Zuilen, Mark A.; Medjoubi, Kadda; Schoepp-Cothenet, Barbara; Nitschke, Wolfgang; Visscher, Pieter T.

    2014-11-01

    The ability of microbes to metabolize arsenic may have emerged more than 3.4 billion years ago. Some of the modern environments in which prominent arsenic metabolism occurs are anoxic, as were the Precambrian oceans. Early oceans may also have had a relatively high abundance of arsenic. However, it is unclear whether arsenic cycling occurred in ancient environments. Here we assess the chemistry and nature of cell-like globules identified in salt-encrusted portions of 2.72-billion-year-old fossil stromatolites from Western Australia. We use Raman spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence to show that the globules are composed of organic carbon and arsenic (As). We argue that our data are best explained by the occurrence of a complete arsenic cycle at this site, with As(III) oxidation and As(V) reduction by microbes living in permanently anoxic conditions. We therefore suggest that arsenic cycling could have occurred more widely in marine environments in the several hundred million years before the Earth’s atmosphere and shallow oceans were oxygenated.

  16. Arsenic transforming abilities of groundwater bacteria and the combined use of Aliihoeflea sp. strain 2WW and goethite in metalloid removal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Corsini; P. Zaccheo; G. Muyzer; V. Andreoni; L. Cavalca

    2014-01-01

    Several technologies have been developed for lowering arsenic in drinking waters below the World Health Organization limit of 10 μg/L. When in the presence of the reduced form of inorganic arsenic, i.e. arsenite, one options is pre-oxidation of arsenite to arsenate and adsorption on iron-based mater

  17. Catalase Has a Key Role in Protecting Cells from the Genotoxic Effects of Monomethylarsonous Acid, a Highly Active Metabolite of Arsenic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACT Although it is widely known that arsenic-contaminated drinking water causes many diseases, arsenic’s exact mode of action (MOA) is not fully understood. Induction of oxidative stress has been proposed as an important key event in the toxic MOA of arsenic. The author's...

  18. Subsurface iron and arsenic removal for shallow tube well drinking water supply in rural Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Halem, D; Olivero, S; de Vet, W W J M; Verberk, J Q J C; Amy, G L; van Dijk, J C

    2010-11-01

    Subsurface iron and arsenic removal has the potential to be a cost-effective technology to provide safe drinking water in rural decentralized applications, using existing shallow tube wells. A community-scale test facility in Bangladesh was constructed for injection of aerated water (∼1 m(3)) into an anoxic aquifer with elevated iron (0.27 mmolL(-1)) and arsenic (0.27μmolL(-1)) concentrations. The injection (oxidation) and abstraction (adsorption) cycles were monitored at the test facility and simultaneously simulated in the laboratory with anoxic column experiments. Dimensionless retardation factors (R) were determined to represent the delayed arrival of iron or arsenic in the well compared to the original groundwater. At the test facility the iron removal efficacies increased after every injection-abstraction cycle, with retardation factors (R(Fe)) up to 17. These high removal efficacies could not be explained by the theory of adsorptive-catalytic oxidation, and therefore other ((a)biotic or transport) processes have contributed to the system's efficacy. This finding was confirmed in the anoxic column experiments, since the mechanism of adsorptive-catalytic oxidation dominated in the columns and iron removal efficacies did not increase with every cycle (stable at R(Fe)=∼8). R(As) did not increase after multiple cycles, it remained stable around 2, illustrating that the process which is responsible for the effective iron removal did not promote the co-removal of arsenic. The columns showed that subsurface arsenic removal was an adsorptive process and only the freshly oxidized adsorbed iron was available for the co-adsorption of arsenic. This indicates that arsenic adsorption during subsurface treatment is controlled by the amount of adsorbed iron that is oxidized, and not by the amount of removed iron. For operational purposes this is an important finding, since apparently the oxygen concentration of the injection water does not control the subsurface arsenic

  19. In situ treatment of arsenic contaminated groundwater by aquifer iron coating: Experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Xianjun, E-mail: xjxie@cug.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, 430074 Wuhan (China); Wang, Yanxin, E-mail: yx.wang@cug.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, 430074 Wuhan (China); Pi, Kunfu [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, 430074 Wuhan (China); Liu, Chongxuan [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, 430074 Wuhan (China); Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Li, Junxia; Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Zhiqiang; Duan, Mengyu [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, 430074 Wuhan (China)

    2015-09-15

    In situ arsenic removal from groundwater by an aquifer iron coating method has great potential to be a cost effective and simple groundwater remediation technology, especially in rural and remote areas where groundwater is used as the main water source for drinking. The in situ arsenic removal technology was first optimized by simulating arsenic removal in various quartz sand columns under anoxic conditions. The effectiveness was then evaluated in an actual high-arsenic groundwater environment. The arsenic removal mechanism by the coated iron oxide/hydroxide was investigated under different conditions using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/X-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy. Aquifer iron coating method was developed via a 4-step alternating injection of oxidant, iron salt and oxygen-free water. A continuous injection of 5.0 mmol/L FeSO{sub 4} and 2.5 mmol/L NaClO for 96 h can form a uniform goethite coating on the surface of quartz sand without causing clogging. At a flow rate of 7.2 mL/min of the injection reagents, arsenic (as Na{sub 2}HAsO{sub 4}) and tracer fluorescein sodium to pass through the iron-coated quartz sand column were approximately at 126 and 7 column pore volumes, respectively. The retardation factor of arsenic was 23.0, and the adsorption capacity was 0.11 mol As per mol Fe. In situ arsenic removal from groundwater in an aquifer was achieved by simultaneous injections of As(V) and Fe(II) reagents. Arsenic fixation resulted from a process of adsorption/co-precipitation with fine goethite particles by way of bidentate binuclear complexes. Therefore, the study results indicate that the high arsenic removal efficiency of the in situ aquifer iron coating technology likely resulted from the expanded specific surface area of the small goethite particles, which enhanced arsenic sorption capability and/or from co-precipitation of arsenic on the surface of goethite particles

  20. In situ treatment of arsenic contaminated groundwater by aquifer iron coating: Experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In situ arsenic removal from groundwater by an aquifer iron coating method has great potential to be a cost effective and simple groundwater remediation technology, especially in rural and remote areas where groundwater is used as the main water source for drinking. The in situ arsenic removal technology was first optimized by simulating arsenic removal in various quartz sand columns under anoxic conditions. The effectiveness was then evaluated in an actual high-arsenic groundwater environment. The arsenic removal mechanism by the coated iron oxide/hydroxide was investigated under different conditions using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/X-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy. Aquifer iron coating method was developed via a 4-step alternating injection of oxidant, iron salt and oxygen-free water. A continuous injection of 5.0 mmol/L FeSO4 and 2.5 mmol/L NaClO for 96 h can form a uniform goethite coating on the surface of quartz sand without causing clogging. At a flow rate of 7.2 mL/min of the injection reagents, arsenic (as Na2HAsO4) and tracer fluorescein sodium to pass through the iron-coated quartz sand column were approximately at 126 and 7 column pore volumes, respectively. The retardation factor of arsenic was 23.0, and the adsorption capacity was 0.11 mol As per mol Fe. In situ arsenic removal from groundwater in an aquifer was achieved by simultaneous injections of As(V) and Fe(II) reagents. Arsenic fixation resulted from a process of adsorption/co-precipitation with fine goethite particles by way of bidentate binuclear complexes. Therefore, the study results indicate that the high arsenic removal efficiency of the in situ aquifer iron coating technology likely resulted from the expanded specific surface area of the small goethite particles, which enhanced arsenic sorption capability and/or from co-precipitation of arsenic on the surface of goethite particles. - Highlights: • An

  1. In situ treatment of arsenic contaminated groundwater by aquifer iron coating: Experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xianjun; Wang, Yanxin; Pi, Kunfu; Liu, Chongxuan; Li, Junxia; Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Zhiqiang; Duan, Mengyu

    2015-09-15

    In situ arsenic removal from groundwater by an aquifer iron coating method has great potential to be a cost effective and simple groundwater remediation technology, especially in rural and remote areas where groundwater is used as the main water source for drinking. The in situ arsenic removal technology was first optimized by simulating arsenic removal in various quartz sand columns under anoxic conditions. The effectiveness was then evaluated in an actual high-arsenic groundwater environment. The arsenic removal mechanism by the coated iron oxide/hydroxide was investigated under different conditions using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/X-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy. Aquifer iron coating method was developed via a 4-step alternating injection of oxidant, iron salt and oxygen-free water. A continuous injection of 5.0 mmol/L FeSO4 and 2.5 mmol/L NaClO for 96 h can form a uniform goethite coating on the surface of quartz sand without causing clogging. At a flow rate of 7.2 mL/min of the injection reagents, arsenic (as Na2HAsO4) and tracer fluorescein sodium to pass through the iron-coated quartz sand column were approximately at 126 and 7 column pore volumes, respectively. The retardation factor of arsenic was 23.0, and the adsorption capacity was 0.11 mol As per mol Fe. In situ arsenic removal from groundwater in an aquifer was achieved by simultaneous injections of As(V) and Fe(II) reagents. Arsenic fixation resulted from a process of adsorption/co-precipitation with fine goethite particles by way of bidentate binuclear complexes. Therefore, the study results indicate that the high arsenic removal efficiency of the in situ aquifer iron coating technology likely resulted from the expanded specific surface area of the small goethite particles, which enhanced arsenic sorption capability and/or from co-precipitation of arsenic on the surface of goethite particles. PMID:25956146

  2. Microbial Community Structure and Arsenic Biogeochemistry in an Acid Vapor-Formed Spring in Tengchong Geothermal Area, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiang

    Full Text Available Arsenic biogeochemistry has been studied extensively in acid sulfate-chloride hot springs, but not in acid sulfate hot springs with low chloride. In this study, Zhenzhuquan in Tengchong geothermal area, a representative acid sulfate hot spring with low chloride, was chosen to study arsenic geochemistry and microbial community structure using Illumina MiSeq sequencing. Over 0.3 million 16S rRNA sequence reads were obtained from 6-paired parallel water and sediment samples along its outflow channel. Arsenic oxidation occurred in the Zhenxhuquan pool, with distinctly high ratios of arsenate to total dissolved arsenic (0.73-0.86. Coupled with iron and sulfur oxidation along the outflow channel, arsenic accumulated in downstream sediments with concentrations up to 16.44 g/kg and appeared to significantly constrain their microbial community diversity. These oxidations might be correlated with the appearance of some putative functional microbial populations, such as Aquificae and Pseudomonas (arsenic oxidation, Sulfolobus (sulfur and iron oxidation, Metallosphaera and Acidicaldus (iron oxidation. Temperature, total organic carbon and dissolved oxygen significantly shaped the microbial community structure of upstream and downstream samples. In the upstream outflow channel region, most microbial populations were microaerophilic/anaerobic thermophiles and hyperthermophiles, such as Sulfolobus, Nocardia, Fervidicoccus, Delftia, and Ralstonia. In the downstream region, aerobic heterotrophic mesophiles and thermophiles were identified, including Ktedonobacteria, Acidicaldus, Chthonomonas and Sphingobacteria. A total of 72.41-95.91% unassigned-genus sequences were derived from the downstream high arsenic sediments 16S rRNA clone libraries. This study could enable us to achieve an integrated understanding on arsenic biogeochemistry in acid hot springs.

  3. Microbial Community Structure and Arsenic Biogeochemistry in an Acid Vapor-Formed Spring in Tengchong Geothermal Area, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhou; Li, Ping; Jiang, Dawei; Dai, Xinyue; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Yanhong; Wang, Yanxin

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic biogeochemistry has been studied extensively in acid sulfate-chloride hot springs, but not in acid sulfate hot springs with low chloride. In this study, Zhenzhuquan in Tengchong geothermal area, a representative acid sulfate hot spring with low chloride, was chosen to study arsenic geochemistry and microbial community structure using Illumina MiSeq sequencing. Over 0.3 million 16S rRNA sequence reads were obtained from 6-paired parallel water and sediment samples along its outflow channel. Arsenic oxidation occurred in the Zhenxhuquan pool, with distinctly high ratios of arsenate to total dissolved arsenic (0.73-0.86). Coupled with iron and sulfur oxidation along the outflow channel, arsenic accumulated in downstream sediments with concentrations up to 16.44 g/kg and appeared to significantly constrain their microbial community diversity. These oxidations might be correlated with the appearance of some putative functional microbial populations, such as Aquificae and Pseudomonas (arsenic oxidation), Sulfolobus (sulfur and iron oxidation), Metallosphaera and Acidicaldus (iron oxidation). Temperature, total organic carbon and dissolved oxygen significantly shaped the microbial community structure of upstream and downstream samples. In the upstream outflow channel region, most microbial populations were microaerophilic/anaerobic thermophiles and hyperthermophiles, such as Sulfolobus, Nocardia, Fervidicoccus, Delftia, and Ralstonia. In the downstream region, aerobic heterotrophic mesophiles and thermophiles were identified, including Ktedonobacteria, Acidicaldus, Chthonomonas and Sphingobacteria. A total of 72.41-95.91% unassigned-genus sequences were derived from the downstream high arsenic sediments 16S rRNA clone libraries. This study could enable us to achieve an integrated understanding on arsenic biogeochemistry in acid hot springs.

  4. Mineralogical and Geochemical Controls of Arsenic in an Active Tailings Dam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel A. Ndur

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess arsenic (As mobilization in an active tailings dam through mineralogical and geochemical characterization study. Arsenite is the predominant As species in the dam with more than 50% of the arsenic bound to the organic fraction. Pyrite and arsenopyrite are the principal opaque minerals remaining in the tailings with relic grains showing rims of oxidation (hematite/goethite. Illite, kaolinite and carbonates act as pH buffers and consume the acid generated during pyrite oxidation and raise the pH to near neutral measured in the tailings dam. At near neutral conditions As is mobilized, which likely combines with the Fe and Ca oxides formed to form ferric-calcium arsenates and deposited in the tailings dam. Some As appear to equilibrate with atmospheric CO2 and are converted into calcium carbonates with release of arsenic into solution.

  5. Discovery of the Arsenic Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Shore, A; Heim, M; Schuh, A; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-nine arsenic isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  6. Effects of sulfur in flooded paddy soils: Implications for iron chemistry and arsenic mobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avancha, S.; Boye, K.

    2013-12-01

    In the Mekong delta in Cambodia, naturally occurring arsenic (amplified by erosion in the Himalaya Mountains) in paddy soils is mobilized during the seasonal flooding. As a consequence, rice grown on the flooded soils may take up arsenic and expose people eating the rice to this carcinogenic substance. Iron and sulfur both interact strongly with arsenic in paddy soils: iron oxides are strong adsorbents for arsenic in oxic conditions, and sulfur (in the form of sulfide) is a strong adsorbent under anoxic conditions. In the process of reductive dissolution of iron oxides, arsenic, which had been adsorbed to the iron oxides, is released. Therefore, higher levels of reduced iron (ferrous iron) will likely correlate with higher levels of mobilized arsenic. However, the mobilized arsenic may then co-precipitate with or adsorb to iron sulfides, which form under sulfate-reducing conditions and with the aid of certain microbes already present in the soil. In a batch experiment, we investigated how these processes correlate and which has the greatest influence on arsenic mobilization and potential plant availability. The experiment was designed to measure the effects of various sources of sulfur (dried rice straw, charred rice straw, and gypsum) on the iron and arsenic release in an arsenic-contaminated paddy soil from Cambodia under flooded conditions. The two types of rice straw were designed to introduce the same amount of organic sulfur (7.7 μg/g of soil), but different levels of available carbon, since carbon stimulates microbial activity in the soil. In comparison, two different levels of gypsum (calcium sulfate) were used, 7.7 and 34.65 μg/g of soil, to test the effect of directly available inorganic sulfate without carbon addition. The soil was flooded with a buffer solution at pH 7.07 in airtight serum vials and kept as a slurry on a shaker at 25 °C. We measured pH, alkalinity, ferrous iron, ferric iron, sulfide, sulfate, total iron, sulfur, and arsenic in the

  7. Features of arsenic coordination in AsXn complexes (X=F, Cl, Br, I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigation into stoichiometry of F-, Cl-, Br-, and I-containing arsenic complexes was conducted using Voronoi-Dirichlet polyhedrons (VDP). Decrease of third-dimensional effect of unshared electron pairs of As(3) atoms is established as decrease of electronegativity of surrounding atom in the AsFn-AsCln-AsBrn-AsIn system. Method of interlaced spheres may be used for determination of coordination number of arsenic atoms in the crystal structure. Whatever oxidation degree of arsenic atoms and their coordination numbers common linear dependences between solid angles of VDP Ω grains and internuclear distances r(As-X) corresponding those grains are observed. For I-containing arsenic compounds the equilibrium Ω(As-I) = 40(1) - 8.1(3) r(As-I) { = -0.940.91 contact As-I} is employed

  8. Studies on Arsenic Toxicity in Male Rat Gonads and its Protection by High Dietary Protein Supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjit Mukherjee

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic was given orally to rats as arsenic tri oxide, 3mg /kg body wt/day in a single dose for 28 consecutive days. This treatment in male Wistar rats caused increase in seminiferous tubular luminal size coupled with reduced accumulation of spermatozoa, and signs of necrotic changes with disarray in cellular organization. Other significant changes were decrease in sperm count, viability and motility (p<0.001. On high protein diet (containing pea 37gm/100 gm of diet and casein 9gm/100gm of diet supplementation along with same arsenic exposure caused partial restoration of normalcy. All these sperm physiological changes and altered gonadal features, both histomorphometric and histological observations, were found significantly ameliorated. Results of this study propose that high protein diet supplementation may be effective to recovery from the toxic effect of arsenic on male gonad of rat.

  9. Arsenic content of soils from three regions of Santa Catarina State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Cristina de Souza

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The determination of trace elements is necessary in order to monitor their entry into the soil system and to remediate contaminated areas. The purpose of this study was to determine the natural content of arsenic (As in soils of three regions of Santa Catarina State (SC: the Southern Plateau, the Metropolitan area and the Southern Coast. Arsenic content was obtained after digestion in a microwave oven, following the USEPA 3051 A protocol and quantification was made by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization. The results were analyzed by the Scott-Knott test at a 5% significance level. Soil attributes that best correlated with arsenic content were clay, organic carbon, cation exchange capacity and Al and Fe oxides. The arsenic levels are related to the source material and the slope of regional soils.

  10. Arsenic and drinking water. Part 2. A review of the arsenic elimination processes for drinking water production and sustainable handling options for arsenic containing water works sludges; Arsen und Trinkwasser. Teil 2. Ein Ueberblick ueber Arsenentfernungsverfahren zur Trinkwasseraufbereitung und umweltvertraegliche Entsorgungsmoeglichkeiten der entstehenden arsenbelasteten Wasserwerksschlaemme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberacker, F.; Maier, D. [Heinrich-Sontheimer-Lab., DVGW-Technologiezentrum Wasser, Karlsruhe (Germany); Maier, M. [Stadtwerke Karlsruhe GmbH, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    For arsenic elimination in drinking water production usually adsorption processes of the arsenic onto iron oxides are employed. Most of all, the iron oxide ferrihydrite possesses positively charged surfaces for pH {<=} 8 and a high amount of specific adsorption sites for As(III) and As(V). Ferrihydrite is created during iron removal processes or precipitation/coagulation of the raw water with iron salts. Thereby, the arsenic is not only adsorbed, but also coprecipitated. The adsorption capacity of the iron oxides for arsenic might be diminished by also specificaly adsorbing phosphate or silicate anions. The adsorption kinetics of As(III) is slower than of As(V), because in the pH range = 9 the As(III) is not charged and will not be attracted by the positively charged iron oxid surfaces. Therefore As(III) must be oxidised to As(V) to be effectively removed at drinking water production. The oxidation can be achieved by the dosing of oxidants, but it also takes place in water works filters containing biofilms and/or manganese oxide coatings. In Germany, about 40,000 tons dry weight per year of iron oxide sludges are created at the drinking water production. They might show arsenic concentrations of more than 10 g/kg dry weight. This arsenic is firmly bound and hardly mobilised by leaching the sludges with water. It is leached under high alkaline conditions by desorption or under strongly reducing conditions, where the iron oxides are dissolved, as well. In the presence of calcium the arsenic mobilisation under alkaline conditions is reduced. The iron oxide sludges can be used in the building material industry, for precipitant/coagulant production or in the sewage water treatment. The most economic recycling option is their application in the sewage water treatment, as therefore no pretreatment of the sludges is needed and they can be dosed directly into the sewerage system for example. By incinerating the sewage sludge virtually all of the arsenic is contained within

  11. Arsenic removal by lime softening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaosol, T.; Suksaroj, C.; Bregnhøj, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    This paper focuses on the study of arsenic removal for drinking water by lime softening. The initial arsenic (V) concentration was 500 and 1,000 ug/L in synthetic groundwater. The experiments were performed as batch tests with varying lime dosages and mixing time. For the synthetic groundwater......, arsenic (V) removal increased with increasing lime dosage and mixing time, as well as with the resulting pH. The residual arsenic (V) in all cases was lower than the WHO guideline of 10 ug/L at pH higher than 11.5. Kinetic of arsenic (V) removal can be described by a first-order equation as C1 = C0*e......^-k*t. The relation between the constant (k value) and increasing lime dosage was found to be linear, described by k = 0.0034 (Dlime). The results support a theory from the literature that the arsenic (V) was removed by precipitation af Ca3(AsO4)2. The results obtained in the present study suggest that lime...

  12. Arsenic-resistant bacteria solubilized arsenic in the growth media and increased growth of arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Piyasa; Rathinasabapathi, Bala; Ma, Lena Q

    2011-10-01

    The role of arsenic-resistant bacteria (ARB) in arsenic solubilization from growth media and growth enhancement of arsenic-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata L. was examined. Seven ARB (tolerant to 10 mM arsenate) were isolated from the P. vittata rhizosphere and identified by 16S rRNA sequencing as Pseudomonas sp., Comamonas sp. and Stenotrophomonas sp. During 7-d hydroponic experiments, these bacteria effectively solubilized arsenic from the growth media spiked with insoluble FeAsO₄ and AlAsO₄ minerals (from organic C) by P. vittata may be responsible for As solubilization. Increase in P. vittata root biomass from 1.5-2.2 to 3.4-4.2 g/plant dw by ARB and by arsenic was associated with arsenic-induced plant P uptake. Arsenic resistant bacteria may have potential to enhance phytoremediation of arsenic-contaminated soils by P. vittata. PMID:21840210

  13. Approaches to Increase Arsenic Awareness in Bangladesh: An Evaluation of an Arsenic Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Christine Marie; Factor-Litvak, Pam; Khan, Khalid; Islam, Tariqul; Singha, Ashit; Moon-Howard, Joyce; van Geen, Alexander; Graziano, Joseph H.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to design and evaluate a household-level arsenic education and well water arsenic testing intervention to increase arsenic awareness in Bangladesh. The authors randomly selected 1,000 study respondents located in 20 villages in Singair, Bangladesh. The main outcome was the change in knowledge of arsenic from…

  14. Arsenic pilot plant operation and results:Weatherford, Oklahoma.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aragon, Malynda Jo; Arora, H. (Narasimhan Consulting Services Inc., Phoenix, Arizona); Karori, Saqib (Narasimhan Consulting Services Inc., Phoenix, Arizona); Pathan, Sakib (Narasimhan Consulting Services Inc., Phoenix, Arizona)

    2007-05-01

    Narasimhan Consulting Services, Inc. (NCS), under a contract with the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), designed and operated pilot scale evaluations of the adsorption and coagulation/filtration treatment technologies aimed at meeting the recently revised arsenic maximum contaminant level (MCL) for drinking water. The standard of 10 {micro}g/L (10 ppb) is effective as of January 2006. The pilot demonstration is a project of the Arsenic Water Technology Partnership program, a partnership between the American Water Works Association Research Foundation (AwwaRF), SNL and WERC (A Consortium for Environmental Education and Technology Development). The pilot evaluation was conducted at Well 30 of the City of Weatherford, OK, which supplies drinking water to a population of more than 10,400. Well water contained arsenic in the range of 16 to 29 ppb during the study. Four commercially available adsorption media were evaluated side by side for a period of three months. Both adsorption and coagulation/filtration effectively reduced arsenic from Well No.30. A preliminary economic analysis indicated that adsorption using an iron oxide media was more cost effective than the coagulation/ filtration technology.

  15. Arsenic speciation in xylem sap of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihucz, Victor G. [Joint Research Group of Environmental Chemistry of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences and L. Eoetvoes University, Budapest (Hungary); Hungarian Satellite Centre of Trace Elements Institute to UNESCO, Budapest (Hungary); Tatar, Eniko [Hungarian Satellite Centre of Trace Elements Institute to UNESCO, Budapest (Hungary); L. Eoetvoes University, Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Budapest (Hungary); Virag, Istvan [L. Eoetvoes University, Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Budapest (Hungary); Cseh, Edit; Fodor, Ferenc [L. Eoetvoes University, Department of Plant Physiology, Budapest (Hungary); Zaray, Gyula [Joint Research Group of Environmental Chemistry of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences and L. Eoetvoes University, Budapest (Hungary); Hungarian Satellite Centre of Trace Elements Institute to UNESCO, Budapest (Hungary); L. Eoetvoes University, Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Budapest (Hungary)

    2005-10-01

    Flow injection analysis (FIA) and high-performance liquid chromatography double-focusing sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-DF-ICP-MS) were used for total arsenic determination and arsenic speciation of xylem sap of cucumber plants (Cucumis sativus L.) grown in hydroponics containing 2 {mu}mol dm{sup -3} arsenate or arsenite, respectively. Arsenite [As(III)], arsenate [As(V)] and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) were identified in the sap of the plants. Arsenite was the predominant arsenic species in the xylem saps regardless of the type of arsenic treatment, and the following concentration order was determined: As(III) > As(V) > DMA. The amount of total As, calculated taking into consideration the mass of xylem sap collected, was almost equal for both treatments. Arsenite was taken up more easily by cucumber than arsenate. Partial oxidation of arsenite to arsenate (<10% in 48 h) was observed in the case of arsenite-containing nutrient solutions, which may explain the detection of arsenate in the saps of plants treated with arsenite. (orig.)

  16. Arsenic exposure causes human 8-hydroxyguanine DNA glycosidase 1 gene methylation and DNA oxidative damage%砷暴露致人8-羟基鸟嘌呤 DNA 糖苷酶1基因甲基化及 DNA 氧化损伤

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈黎媛; 张爱华; 于春; 董学新; 黄晓欣

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate DNA hypermethylation of human 8-hydroxyguanine glycosy-lase(hOGG1 )gene and and the level of oxidative stress and DNA oxidative damage relations with arse-nic poisoning.METHODS In ende mic coal-pollution-borne arsenism area,Xinren county,Guizhou Province,according to the diagnostic criteria of ende mic arsenism(WS /T21 1 -2001 ),207 people with ende mic arsenism were selected and divided into four groups(The arsenic exposure group:46 cases, mild arsenism group:46 cases,moderate arsenism group:60 cases and severe arsenism group:55 cases).64 residents were selected as controls in a village about 12 km away fro m the ende mic arsenism area.With the informed consent principle,peripheral blood of all respondents was collected in order to analyze DNA methylation.Methylation-specific poly merase chain reaction were respectively performed to analyze hOGG1 Hypermethylation in arsenism respondents.Che mical methods were performed on the activity of super oxide dis mutase (SOD)and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px),while the contents of malondialdehyde (MDA)in the blood of patients were measured,and the contents of 8-hydroxy-2′-deox-yguanine(8-OHdG)urine of patients were measured and analysed.On the basis of methylation status are divided into hOGG1 gene methylation group (34 cases)and hOGG1 gene no methylation group (237cases).Analysis was performd on hOGG1 gene DNA methylation and the relationship between oxi-dative stress and arsenic poisoning.RESULTS The positive rates of hypermethylation of hOGG1 were associated with the degree of arsenic poisonin (co mpared with control group,χ2 =23.916,P 0.05).CONCLUSION Coal arsenic exposure can cause hOGG1 gene high methylation and oxidation and anti-oxidation system imbalance,causing DNA oxidative damage,it is one of the reasons to pro mote the develop ment of arsenic poisoning occurred.%目的:了解人8-羟基鸟嘌呤 DNA 糖苷酶(hOGG1)基因 DNA 甲基化水平和机体氧化应激及DNA 氧化

  17. Bacterial respiration of arsenic and selenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, J.F.; Oremland, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    Oxyanions of arsenic and selenium can be used in microbial anaerobic respiration as terminal electron acceptors. The detection of arsenate and selenate respiring bacteria in numerous pristine and contaminated environments and their rapid appearance in enrichment culture suggest that they are widespread and metabolically active in nature. Although the bacterial species that have been isolated and characterized are still few in number, they are scattered throughout the bacterial domain and include Gram- positive bacteria, beta, gamma and epsilon Proteobacteria and the sole member of a deeply branching lineage of the bacteria, Chrysiogenes arsenatus. The oxidation of a number of organic substrates (i.e. acetate, lactate, pyruvate, glycerol, ethanol) or hydrogen can be coupled to the reduction of arsenate and selenate, but the actual donor used varies from species to species. Both periplasmic and membrane-associated arsenate and selenate reductases have been characterized. Although the number of subunits and molecular masses differs, they all contain molybdenum. The extent of the environmental impact on the transformation and mobilization of arsenic and selenium by microbial dissimilatory processes is only now being fully appreciated.

  18. Urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine and urothelial carcinoma risk in low arsenic exposure area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic is a well-documented human carcinogen and is known to cause oxidative stress in cultured cells and animals. A hospital-based case-control study was conducted to evaluate the relationship among the levels of urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), the arsenic profile, and urothelial carcinoma (UC). Urinary 8-OHdG was measured by using high-sensitivity enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. The urinary species of inorganic arsenic and their metabolites were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and hydride generator-atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-AAS). This study showed that the mean urinary concentration of total arsenics was significantly higher, at 37.67 ± 2.98 μg/g creatinine, for UC patients than for healthy controls of 21.10 ± 0.79 μg/g creatinine (p < 0.01). Urinary 8-OHdG levels correlated with urinary total arsenic concentrations (r = 0.19, p < 0.01). There were significantly higher 8-OHdG levels, of 7.48 ± 0.97 ng/mg creatinine in UC patients, compared to healthy controls of 5.95 ± 0.21 ng/mg creatinine. Furthermore, female UC patients had higher 8-OHdG levels of 9.22 ± 0.75 than those of males at 5.76 ± 0.25 ng/mg creatinine (p < 0.01). Multiple linear regression analyses revealed that high urinary 8-OHdG levels were associated with increased total arsenic concentrations, inorganic arsenite, monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), and dimethylarsenate (DMA) as well as the primary methylation index (PMI) even after adjusting for age, gender, and UC status. The results suggest that oxidative DNA damage was associated with arsenic exposure, even at low urinary level of arsenic

  19. Interaction between arsenic exposure from drinking water and genetic susceptibility in carotid intima-media thickness in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fen; Jasmine, Farzana; Kibriya, Muhammad G.; Liu, Mengling; Cheng, Xin; Parvez, Faruque; Paul-Brutus, Rachelle; Islam, Tariqul; Paul, Rina Rani; Sarwar, Golam; Ahmed, Alauddin; Jiang, Jieying; Islam, Tariqul; Slavkovich, Vesna; Rundek, Tatjana; Demmer, Ryan T.; Desvarieux, Moise; Ahsan, Habibul; Chen, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies that evaluated genetic susceptibility to the effects of arsenic exposure from drinking water on subclinical atherosclerosis are limited. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 1,078 participants randomly selected from the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study in Bangladesh to evaluate whether the association between arsenic exposure and carotid artery intima-medial thickness (cIMT) differs by 207 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 18 genes related to arsenic metabolism, oxidative stress, inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction. Although not statistically significant after correcting for multiple testing, nine SNPs in APOE, AS3MT, PNP, and TNF genes had a nominally statistically significant interaction with well-water arsenic in cIMT. For instance, the joint presence of a higher level of well-water arsenic (≥ 40.4 μg/L) and the GG genotype of AS3MT rs3740392 was associated with a difference of 40.9 μm (95% CI = 14.4, 67.5) in cIMT, much greater than the difference of cIMT associated with the genotype alone (β = -5.1 μm, 95% CI = -31.6, 21.3) or arsenic exposure alone (β = 7.2 μm, 95% CI = -3.1, 17.5). The pattern and magnitude of the interactions were similar when urinary arsenic was used as the exposure variable. Additionally, the at-risk genotypes of the AS3MT SNPs were positively related to proportion of monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) in urine, which is indicative of arsenic methylation capacity. The findings provide novel evidence that genetic variants related to arsenic metabolism may play an important role in arsenic-induced subclinical atherosclerosis. Future replication studies in diverse populations are needed to confirm the findings. PMID:24593923

  20. Interaction between arsenic exposure from drinking water and genetic susceptibility in carotid intima-media thickness in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fen; Jasmine, Farzana; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Liu, Mengling; Cheng, Xin; Parvez, Faruque; Paul-Brutus, Rachelle; Paul, Rina Rani; Sarwar, Golam; Ahmed, Alauddin; Jiang, Jieying; Islam, Tariqul; Slavkovich, Vesna; Rundek, Tatjana; Demmer, Ryan T; Desvarieux, Moise; Ahsan, Habibul; Chen, Yu

    2014-05-01

    Epidemiologic studies that evaluated genetic susceptibility for the effects of arsenic exposure from drinking water on subclinical atherosclerosis are limited. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 1078 participants randomly selected from the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study in Bangladesh to evaluate whether the association between arsenic exposure and carotid artery intima-media thickness (cIMT) differs by 207 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 18 genes related to arsenic metabolism, oxidative stress, inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction. Although not statistically significant after correcting for multiple testing, nine SNPs in APOE, AS3MT, PNP, and TNF genes had a nominally statistically significant interaction with well-water arsenic in cIMT. For instance, the joint presence of a higher level of well-water arsenic (≥ 40.4 μg/L) and the GG genotype of AS3MT rs3740392 was associated with a difference of 40.9 μm (95% CI = 14.4, 67.5) in cIMT, much greater than the difference of cIMT associated with the genotype alone (β = -5.1 μm, 95% CI = -31.6, 21.3) or arsenic exposure alone (β = 7.2 μm, 95% CI = -3.1, 17.5). The pattern and magnitude of the interactions were similar when urinary arsenic was used as the exposure variable. Additionally, the at-risk genotypes of the AS3MT SNPs were positively related to the proportion of monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) in urine, which is indicative of arsenic methylation capacity. The findings provide novel evidence that genetic variants related to arsenic metabolism may play an important role in arsenic-induced subclinical atherosclerosis. Future replication studies in diverse populations are needed to confirm the findings.

  1. Effect of organic matter amendment, arsenic amendment and water management regime on rice grain arsenic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Gareth J; Adomako, Eureka E; Deacon, Claire M; Carey, Anne-Marie; Price, Adam H; Meharg, Andrew A

    2013-06-01

    Arsenic accumulation in rice grain has been identified as a major problem in some regions of Asia. A study was conducted to investigate the effect of increased organic matter in the soil on the release of arsenic into soil pore water and accumulation of arsenic species within rice grain. It was observed that high concentrations of soil arsenic and organic matter caused a reduction in plant growth and delayed flowering time. Total grain arsenic accumulation was higher in the plants grown in high soil arsenic in combination with high organic matter, with an increase in the percentage of organic arsenic species observed. The results indicate that the application of organic matter should be done with caution in paddy soils which have high soil arsenic, as this may lead to an increase in accumulation of arsenic within rice grains. Results also confirm that flooding conditions substantially increase grain arsenic.

  2. RARE CASE REPORT OF CHRONIC ARSENIC POISONING

    OpenAIRE

    Mundle; Neelima; Sushrut; Yogesh; Shukan; Shalik; Siddharth

    2014-01-01

    Today, arsenic is primarily used in the produc tion of glass and semiconductors., Arsenic may be found as a water or food contaminant, particularly in shellfish and other seafood, and often contaminates fruits and vegetables, particularly rice

  3. Inorganic arsenic poisoning in pastured feeder lambs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, H.A.; Crane, M.R.; Tomson, K.

    1971-01-01

    Clinical signs and necropsy findings in a group of feeder lambs were suggestive of inorganic arsenic poisoning. Source of exposure was established and toxic concentrations of arsenic were detected in the tissues. 13 references, 1 table.

  4. Airborne exposure and estimated bioavailability of arsenic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yager, J.W. [Electric Power Research Inst., Madison, WI (United States); Clewell, H.J. III [ICF Consulting, Fairfax, VA (United States); Hicks, J. [Geomatrix, (United States)

    2000-07-01

    A pilot group of workers were used in a study to determine the relationship between exposure to arsenic present in fly ash particles and urinary excretion of inorganic arsenic and its methylated metabolites. Arsenic was measured in the breathing zone of workers during full shift work schedules and daily urine samples were collected to determine the concentration of arsenic and its metabolites. Airborne particle size distribution samples were collected on six-stage personal cascade impactors. Previous studies of airborne exposure to arsenic in copper smelters predict urinary values nearly three times higher than those seen in exposure to arsenic in fly ash. The results suggest that differences in biological uptake of airborne arsenic probably depend on characteristics such as solubility, particle size and distribution and matrix composition of the arsenic compounds.

  5. Arsenic in the aetiology of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapio, Soile; Grosche, Bernd

    2006-06-01

    Arsenic, one of the most significant hazards in the environment affecting millions of people around the world, is associated with several diseases including cancers of skin, lung, urinary bladder, kidney and liver. Groundwater contamination by arsenic is the main route of exposure. Inhalation of airborne arsenic or arsenic-contaminated dust is a common health problem in many ore mines. This review deals with the questions raised in the epidemiological studies such as the dose-response relationship, putative confounders and synergistic effects, and methods evaluating arsenic exposure. Furthermore, it describes the metabolic pathways of arsenic, and its biological modes of action. The role of arsenic in the development of cancer is elucidated in the context of combined epidemiological and biological studies. However, further analyses by means of molecular epidemiology are needed to improve the understanding of cancer aetiology induced by arsenic.

  6. RARE CASE REPORT OF CHRONIC ARSENIC POISONING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mundle

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Today, arsenic is primarily used in the produc tion of glass and semiconductors., Arsenic may be found as a water or food contaminant, particularly in shellfish and other seafood, and often contaminates fruits and vegetables, particularly rice

  7. Influence of chelating ligands on arsenic uptake by hydroponically grown rice seedlings (Oryza sativa L.): a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Mohammad A.; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Ueda, Kazumasa; Maki, Teruya [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa (Japan); Rahman, M.M. [Department of Botany, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    2008-06-15

    Ferric (oxyhydro-)oxides (FeO{sub x}) precipitate in the rhizosphere at neutral or alkaline pH and are adsorbed on the plant root surfaces. Consequently, the higher binding affinity of arsenate to FeO{sub x} and the low iron phytoavailability of the precipitated FeO{sub x} make the phytoremediation of arsenic difficult. In the present study, the influence of chelating ligands on arsenic and iron uptake by hydroponically grown rice seedlings (Oryza sativa L.) was investigated. When chelating ligands were not treated to the growth medium, about 63 and 71% of the total arsenic and iron were distributed in the root extract (outer root surfaces) of rice, respectively. On the other hand, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid (EDDS) and hydroxyiminodisuccinic acid (HIDS) desorbed a significant amount of arsenic from FeO{sub x} of the outer root surfaces. Therefore, the uptake of arsenic and iron into the roots and their subsequent translocation to the shoots of the rice seedlings increased significantly. The order of increasing arsenic uptake by chelating ligands was HIDS > EDTA > EDDS. Methylglycinediacetic acid (MGDA) and iminodisuccinic acid (IDS) might not be effective in arsenic solubilization from FeO{sub x}. The results suggest that EDDS and HIDS would be a good and environmentally safe choice to accelerate arsenic phytoavailability in the phytoremediation process because of their biodegradability and would be a competent alternative to the widely used non-biodegradable and environmentally persistent EDTA. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  8. Arsenic metabolism by microbial communities from an arsenic-rich shallow-water hydrothermal system in Ambitle Island, Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Chancho, M.; Pichler, T.; Amend, J. P.; Akerman, N. H.

    2011-12-01

    Arsenic, although toxic, is used as an energy source by certain microbes, some of which can catalyse the reduction of arsenate by using different electron donors, while others oxidize arsenite with oxygen or nitrate as electron acceptors. The marine shallow-water hydrothermal system in Tutum Bay, Ambitle Island, Papua New Guinea is ideal for investigating the metabolism of microbes involved in arsenic cycling, because there hydrothermal vents discharge fluids with arsenite concentrations as high as 950 μg/L. Vent fluids are hot (˜100°C), slightly acidic (pH˜6) and reducing. Upon mixing with colder and oxygen-rich seawater the fluid chemistry changes rapidly within a few meters from the hydrothermal source. The objective of this work was to study arsenic metabolism due to microbial activity in Tutum Bay. Sediments collected at 7.5 and 30 m along a transect beginning at a hydrothermal vent were used as inocula in the microbial culturing experiments. Media were designed using chemical analyses of the hydrothermal fluids. Following culture experiments, arsenic species identification and quantification were performed for the growth media with HPLC-ICP(HR)MS, using anion exchange and reversed phase chromatography. Quality control included mass balance calculations and spiking experiments. A fast reduction of arsenate to arsenite was observed in the first 24 hours leading to the conclusion that the microbial communities were capable of reducing arsenic. However, mass balance calculations revealed that more than 30% of the arsenic had been transformed to one or more unknown species, which could not be detected by ion exchange chromatography. The addition of peroxide combined with reversed phase chromatography revealed the presence of several unknown species. Following the addition of peroxide some of the unknown species were identified to be thio-arsenic compounds, because they were oxidized to their oxo-analogues. Nevertheless, a significant fraction of unknown

  9. The effectiveness of water-treatment systems for arsenic used in 11 homes in Southwestern and Central Ohio, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Mary Ann; Ekberg, Mike

    2016-02-23

    In 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey and the Miami Conservancy District investigated the effectiveness of methods used to remove arsenic from drinking water at 11 homes in southwestern and central Ohio. The untreated (raw) ground-water had arsenic concentrations of 7.7–382 micrograms per liter (µg/L), and the median concentration was 30 µg/L. The pH was neutral to slightly alkaline, and redox conditions were strongly reducing, as indicated by high concentrations of iron. The predominant arsenic species was arsenite (As3+), which is difficult to treat because it exists in water as an uncharged compound (H3AsO3).The water-treatment systems included (1) seven single-tap reverse-osmosis systems, (2) two whole-house oxidation/filtration systems, and (3) two systems that included wholehouse anion exchange and single-tap reverse osmosis. All but one system included pretreatment by a water softener, and two systems included preoxidation to convert arsenite (As3+) to arsenate (As5+) before treatment by anion exchange.None of the treatment systems removed all of the arsenic from the drinking water. About one-half of the systems decreased the arsenic concentration to less than the maximum contamination level of 10 µg/L. The effectiveness of the systems varied widely; the percentage of arsenic removed ranged from 2 to 90 percent, and the median was 65 percent.At some sites, the low effectiveness of arsenic removal may have been related to system maintenance and(or) operation issues. At two sites, homeowners acknowledged that the treatment systems had not been maintained for several years. At two other sites, the treatment systems were being maintained, but the water-quality data indicated that one of the components was not working, unbeknownst to the homeowner. EPA research at a small number of sites in Ohio indicated that operation and maintenance of some arsenic-treatment systems was not always simple.Another factor that affected system effectiveness was the quality of

  10. The effectiveness of water-treatment systems for arsenic used in 11 homes in Southwestern and Central Ohio, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Mary Ann; Ekberg, Mike

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey and the Miami Conservancy District investigated the effectiveness of methods used to remove arsenic from drinking water at 11 homes in southwestern and central Ohio. The untreated (raw) ground-water had arsenic concentrations of 7.7–382 micrograms per liter (µg/L), and the median concentration was 30 µg/L. The pH was neutral to slightly alkaline, and redox conditions were strongly reducing, as indicated by high concentrations of iron. The predominant arsenic species was arsenite (As3+), which is difficult to treat because it exists in water as an uncharged compound (H3AsO3).The water-treatment systems included (1) seven single-tap reverse-osmosis systems, (2) two whole-house oxidation/filtration systems, and (3) two systems that included wholehouse anion exchange and single-tap reverse osmosis. All but one system included pretreatment by a water softener, and two systems included preoxidation to convert arsenite (As3+) to arsenate (As5+) before treatment by anion exchange.None of the treatment systems removed all of the arsenic from the drinking water. About one-half of the systems decreased the arsenic concentration to less than the maximum contamination level of 10 µg/L. The effectiveness of the systems varied widely; the percentage of arsenic removed ranged from 2 to 90 percent, and the median was 65 percent.At some sites, the low effectiveness of arsenic removal may have been related to system maintenance and(or) operation issues. At two sites, homeowners acknowledged that the treatment systems had not been maintained for several years. At two other sites, the treatment systems were being maintained, but the water-quality data indicated that one of the components was not working, unbeknownst to the homeowner. EPA research at a small number of sites in Ohio indicated that operation and maintenance of some arsenic-treatment systems was not always simple.Another factor that affected system effectiveness was the quality of

  11. Arsenic - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Arsenic URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/arsenic.html Other topics A-Z A B C ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Arsenic - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  12. 21 CFR 556.60 - Arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Arsenic. 556.60 Section 556.60 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND... New Animal Drugs § 556.60 Arsenic. Tolerances for total residues of combined arsenic (calculated as...

  13. 29 CFR 1910.1018 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... container in the change-room which prevents dispersion of inorganic arsenic outside the container. (vi) The... readily through the skin. Because inorganic arsenic is a poison, you should wash your hands thoroughly... 29 Labor 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1910.1018 Section 1910.1018...

  14. Chloride sublimation of gold-arsenic concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present article is devoted to chloride sublimation of gold-arsenic concentrates. The results of studies of chloride sublimation of gold-arsenic comprising concentrates of Chore deposit of Tajikistan are considered. It is found that by application sodium chloride for gold-arsenic comprising concentrates it is possible to extract gold and silver from flotation concentrates.

  15. Arsenic intoxication associated with tubulointerstitial nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, G V; Rossi, N F

    1995-08-01

    Arsenic poisoning is an often unrecognized cause of renal insufficiency. We report a case of tubulointerstitial nephritis associated with an elevated urinary arsenic concentration. Removal of the putative source of arsenic resulted in symptomatic improvement, resolution of abnormal abdominal radiographs, and stabilization of renal function. This case emphasizes the importance of heavy metal screening in patients with multisystem complaints and tubulointerstitial nephritis.

  16. Compositions and methods for removing arsenic in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadgil, Ashok Jagannth

    2011-02-22

    Compositions and methods and for contaminants from water are provided. The compositions comprise ferric hydroxide and ferric oxyhydride coated substrates for use in removing the contaminant from the water. Contacting water bearing the contaminant with the substrates can substantially reduce contaminant levels therein. Methods of oxidizing the contaminants in water to facilitate their removal by the ferric hydroxide and ferric oxyhydride coated substrates are also provided. The contaminants include, but are not limited to, arsenic, selenium, uranium, lead, cadmium, nickel, copper, zinc, chromium and vanadium, their oxides and soluble salts thereof.

  17. Arsenic in groundwaters in the Northern Appalachian Mountain belt: A review of patterns and processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Stephen C.

    2008-07-01

    Naturally occurring arsenic in the bedrock of the Northern Appalachian Mountain belt was first recognized in the late 19th century. The knowledge of the behavior of arsenic in groundwater in this region has lagged behind nearly a century, with the popular press reporting on local studies in the early 1980s, and most peer-reviewed research articles on regional patterns conducted and written in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Research reports have shown that within this high arsenic region, between 6% and 22% of households using private drinking water wells contain arsenic in excess of 10 µg/L, the United States Environmental Protection Agency's maximum contaminant level. In nearly all reports, arsenic in drinking water was derived from naturally occurring geologic sources, typically arsenopyrite, substituted sulfides such as arsenian pyrite, and nanoscale minerals such as westerveldite. In most studies, arsenic concentrations in groundwater were controlled by pH dependent adsorption to mineral surfaces, most commonly iron oxide minerals. In some cases, reductive dissolution of iron minerals has been shown to increase arsenic concentrations in groundwater, more commonly associated with anthropogenic activities such as landfills. Evidence of nitrate reduction promoting the presence of arsenic(V) and iron(III) minerals in anoxic environments has been shown to occur in surface waters, and in this manuscript we show this process perhaps applies to groundwater. The geologic explanation for the high arsenic region in the Northern Appalachian Mountain belt is most likely the crustal recycling of arsenic as an incompatible element during tectonic activity. Accretion of multiple terranes, in particular Avalonia and the Central Maine Terrane of New England appear to be connected to the presence of high concentrations of arsenic. Continued tectonic activity and recycling of these older terranes may also be responsible for the high arsenic observed in the Triassic rift basins

  18. Arsenic speciation by hydride generation-quartz furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Optimization of analytical parameters and application to environmental samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molenat, N.; Astruc, A.; Holeman, M.; Pinel, R. [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique Bioinorganique et Environnement, Dept. de Chimie, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, 64 - Pau (France); Maury, G. [Montpellier-2 Univ., 34 (France). Dept. de Chimie Organique Fine

    1999-11-01

    Analytical parameters of hydride generation, trapping, gas chromatography and atomic absorption spectrometry detection in a quartz cell furnace (HG/GC/QFAAS) device have been optimized in order to develop an efficient and sensitive method for arsenic compounds speciation. Good performances were obtained with absolute detection limits in the range of 0.1 - 0.5 ng for arsenite, arsenate, mono-methyl-arsonic acid (MMAA), dimethyl-arsinic acid (DMAA) and trimethyl-arsine oxide (TMAO). A pH selective reduction for inorganic arsenic speciation was successfully reported. Application to the accurate determination of arsenic compounds in different environmental samples was performed. (authors)

  19. Speciation analysis of arsenic in biological matrices by automated hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic absorption spectrometry with multiple microflame quartz tube atomizer (multiatomizer).

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper describes an automated system for the oxidation state specific speciation of inorganic and methylated arsenicals by selective hydride generation - cryotrapping- gas chromatography - atomic absorption spectrometry with the multiatomizer. The corresponding arsines are ge...

  20. Genomic analysis of stress response against arsenic in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Surasri N; Lewis, Jada; Patel, Isha; Bozdag, Serdar; Lee, Jeong H; Sprando, Robert; Cinar, Hediye Nese

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic, a known human carcinogen, is widely distributed around the world and found in particularly high concentrations in certain regions including Southwestern US, Eastern Europe, India, China, Taiwan and Mexico. Chronic arsenic poisoning affects millions of people worldwide and is associated with increased risk of many diseases including arthrosclerosis, diabetes and cancer. In this study, we explored genome level global responses to high and low levels of arsenic exposure in Caenorhabditis elegans using Affymetrix expression microarrays. This experimental design allows us to do microarray analysis of dose-response relationships of global gene expression patterns. High dose (0.03%) exposure caused stronger global gene expression changes in comparison with low dose (0.003%) exposure, suggesting a positive dose-response correlation. Biological processes such as oxidative stress, and iron metabolism, which were previously reported to be involved in arsenic toxicity studies using cultured cells, experimental animals, and humans, were found to be affected in C. elegans. We performed genome-wide gene expression comparisons between our microarray data and publicly available C. elegans microarray datasets of cadmium, and sediment exposure samples of German rivers Rhine and Elbe. Bioinformatics analysis of arsenic-responsive regulatory networks were done using FastMEDUSA program. FastMEDUSA analysis identified cancer-related genes, particularly genes associated with leukemia, such as dnj-11, which encodes a protein orthologous to the mammalian ZRF1/MIDA1/MPP11/DNAJC2 family of ribosome-associated molecular chaperones. We analyzed the protective functions of several of the identified genes using RNAi. Our study indicates that C. elegans could be a substitute model to study the mechanism of metal toxicity using high-throughput expression data and bioinformatics tools such as FastMEDUSA. PMID:23894281

  1. Genomic analysis of stress response against arsenic in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Surasri N; Lewis, Jada; Patel, Isha; Bozdag, Serdar; Lee, Jeong H; Sprando, Robert; Cinar, Hediye Nese

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic, a known human carcinogen, is widely distributed around the world and found in particularly high concentrations in certain regions including Southwestern US, Eastern Europe, India, China, Taiwan and Mexico. Chronic arsenic poisoning affects millions of people worldwide and is associated with increased risk of many diseases including arthrosclerosis, diabetes and cancer. In this study, we explored genome level global responses to high and low levels of arsenic exposure in Caenorhabditis elegans using Affymetrix expression microarrays. This experimental design allows us to do microarray analysis of dose-response relationships of global gene expression patterns. High dose (0.03%) exposure caused stronger global gene expression changes in comparison with low dose (0.003%) exposure, suggesting a positive dose-response correlation. Biological processes such as oxidative stress, and iron metabolism, which were previously reported to be involved in arsenic toxicity studies using cultured cells, experimental animals, and humans, were found to be affected in C. elegans. We performed genome-wide gene expression comparisons between our microarray data and publicly available C. elegans microarray datasets of cadmium, and sediment exposure samples of German rivers Rhine and Elbe. Bioinformatics analysis of arsenic-responsive regulatory networks were done using FastMEDUSA program. FastMEDUSA analysis identified cancer-related genes, particularly genes associated with leukemia, such as dnj-11, which encodes a protein orthologous to the mammalian ZRF1/MIDA1/MPP11/DNAJC2 family of ribosome-associated molecular chaperones. We analyzed the protective functions of several of the identified genes using RNAi. Our study indicates that C. elegans could be a substitute model to study the mechanism of metal toxicity using high-throughput expression data and bioinformatics tools such as FastMEDUSA.

  2. Genomic analysis of stress response against arsenic in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surasri N Sahu

    Full Text Available Arsenic, a known human carcinogen, is widely distributed around the world and found in particularly high concentrations in certain regions including Southwestern US, Eastern Europe, India, China, Taiwan and Mexico. Chronic arsenic poisoning affects millions of people worldwide and is associated with increased risk of many diseases including arthrosclerosis, diabetes and cancer. In this study, we explored genome level global responses to high and low levels of arsenic exposure in Caenorhabditis elegans using Affymetrix expression microarrays. This experimental design allows us to do microarray analysis of dose-response relationships of global gene expression patterns. High dose (0.03% exposure caused stronger global gene expression changes in comparison with low dose (0.003% exposure, suggesting a positive dose-response correlation. Biological processes such as oxidative stress, and iron metabolism, which were previously reported to be involved in arsenic toxicity studies using cultured cells, experimental animals, and humans, were found to be affected in C. elegans. We performed genome-wide gene expression comparisons between our microarray data and publicly available C. elegans microarray datasets of cadmium, and sediment exposure samples of German rivers Rhine and Elbe. Bioinformatics analysis of arsenic-responsive regulatory networks were done using FastMEDUSA program. FastMEDUSA analysis identified cancer-related genes, particularly genes associated with leukemia, such as dnj-11, which encodes a protein orthologous to the mammalian ZRF1/MIDA1/MPP11/DNAJC2 family of ribosome-associated molecular chaperones. We analyzed the protective functions of several of the identified genes using RNAi. Our study indicates that C. elegans could be a substitute model to study the mechanism of metal toxicity using high-throughput expression data and bioinformatics tools such as FastMEDUSA.

  3. Arsenic – Poison or medicine?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Kulik-Kupka

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic (As is commonly known as a poison. Only a few people know that As has also been widely used in medicine. In the past years As and its compounds were used as a medicine for the treatment of such diseases as diabetes, psoriasis, syphilis, skin ulcers and joint diseases. Nowadays As is also used especially in the treatment of patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC has recognized arsenic as an element with carcinogenic effect evidenced by epidemiological studies, but as previously mentioned it is also used in the treatment of neoplastic diseases. This underlines the specificity of the arsenic effects. Arsenic occurs widely in the natural environment, for example, it is present in soil and water, which contributes to its migration to food products. Long exposure to this element may lead to liver damages and also to changes in myocardium. Bearing in mind that such serious health problems can occur, monitoring of the As presence in the environmental media plays a very important role. In addition, the occupational risk of As exposure in the workplace should be identified and checked. Also the standards for As presence in food should be established. This paper presents a review of the 2015 publications based on the Medical database like PubMed and Polish Medical Bibliography. It includes the most important information about arsenic in both forms, poison and medicine. Med Pr 2016;67(1:89–96

  4. Mineral resource of the month: arsenic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, William E.

    2008-01-01

    Arsenic has a long and varied history: Although it was not isolated as an element until the 13th century, it was known to the ancient Chinese, Egyptians and Greeks in compound form in the minerals arsenopyrite, realgar and orpiment. In the 1400s, “Scheele’s Green” was first used as an arsenic pigment in wallpaper, and leached arsenic from wallpaper may have contributed to Napoleon’s death in 1821. The 1940s play and later movie, Arsenic and Old Lace, dramatizes the metal’s more sinister role. Arsenic continues to be an important mineral commodity with many modern applications.

  5. Reduction of arsenic content in a complex galena concentrate by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López Alejandro

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bioleaching is a process that has been used in the past in mineral pretreatment of refractory sulfides, mainly in the gold, copper and uranium benefit. This technology has been proved to be cheaper, more efficient and environmentally friendly than roasting and high pressure moisture heating processes. So far the most studied microorganism in bioleaching is Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. There are a few studies about the benefit of metals of low value through bioleaching. From all of these, there are almost no studies dealing with complex minerals containing arsenopyrite (FeAsS. Reduction and/or elimination of arsenic in these ores increase their value and allows the exploitation of a vast variety of minerals that today are being underexploited. Results Arsenopyrite was totally oxidized. The sum of arsenic remaining in solution and removed by sampling represents from 22 to 33% in weight (yield of the original content in the mineral. The rest of the biooxidized arsenic form amorphous compounds that precipitate. Galena (PbS was totally oxidized too, anglesite (PbSO4 formed is virtually insoluble and remains in the solids. The influence of seven factors in a batch process was studied. The maximum rate of arsenic dissolution in the concentrate was found using the following levels of factors: small surface area of particle exposure, low pulp density, injecting air and adding 9 K medium to the system. It was also found that ferric chloride and carbon dioxide decreased the arsenic dissolution rate. Bioleaching kinetic data of arsenic solubilization were used to estimate the dilution rate for a continuous culture. Calculated dilution rates were relatively small (0.088–0.103 day-1. Conclusion Proper conditions of solubilization of arsenic during bioleaching are key features to improve the percentage (22 to 33% in weight of arsenic removal. Further studies are needed to determine other factors that influence specifically the

  6. Arsenic contamination in food-chain: transfer of arsenic into food materials through groundwater irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huq, S M Imamul; Joardar, J C; Parvin, S; Correll, Ray; Naidu, Ravi

    2006-09-01

    Arsenic contamination in groundwater in Bangladesh has become an additional concern vis-à-vis its use for irrigation purposes. Even if arsenic-safe drinking-water is assured, the question of irrigating soils with arsenic-laden groundwater will continue for years to come. Immediate attention should be given to assess the possibility of accumulating arsenic in soils through irrigation-water and its subsequent entry into the food-chain through various food crops and fodders. With this possibility in mind, arsenic content of 2,500 water, soil and vegetable samples from arsenic-affected and arsenic-unaffected areas were analyzed during 1999-2004. Other sources of foods and fodders were also analyzed. Irrigating a rice field with groundwater containing 0.55 mg/L of arsenic with a water requirement of 1,000 mm results in an estimated addition of 5.5 kg of arsenic per ha per annum. Concentration of arsenic as high as 80 mg per kg of soil was found in an area receiving arsenic-contaminated irrigation. A comparison of results from affected and unaffected areas revealed that some commonly-grown vegetables, which would usually be suitable as good sources of nourishment, accumulate substantially-elevated amounts of arsenic. For example, more than 150 mg/kg of arsenic has been found to be accumulated in arum (kochu) vegetable. Implications of arsenic ingested in vegetables and other food materials are discussed in the paper. PMID:17366772

  7. Thermodynamics for arsenic and antimony in copper matte converting—computer simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaubal, P. C.; Nagamori, M.

    1988-08-01

    Thermodynamic data for arsenic and antimony and their sulfide and oxide gases have been critically reviewed and compiled. The entropy values for AsS(g), SbS(g), and BiS(g) have been recalculated based on a statistical thermodynamic method. The standard heat of formation and entropy of As2O3(g) have been newly assessed to be △H{298/0} = -81,500 cal/mole and S{298/0} = 81.5 cal/deg/mole. Copper matte converting has been mathematically described using the stepwise equilibrium simulation technique together with quadratic approximations of oxygen and magnetite solubilities in molten mattes. A differential equation for the volatilization of arsenic and antimony has been derived and solved for successive reaction microsteps, whereby the volatilization, slagging, and alloying of the minor elements in copper matte converting have been examined as functions of reaction time and other process variables. Only the first (slag-making) stage of converting is responsible for the elimination of arsenic and antimony by volatilization. Arsenic volatilizes mainly as AsS(g) and AsO(g), with As2(g) also contributing when initial mattes are unusually rich in arsenic (above 0.5 pct arsenic). Antimony volatilizes chiefly as SbS(g), and the contributions of other gases such as SbO(g) and Sb(g) always remain negligibly low. The results of the stepwise equilibrium simulation compare favorably with the industrial operating data.

  8. Isolation and characterization of arsenic-resistant bacteria and possible application in bioremediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uttiya Dey

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ground water arsenic contamination is a widespread problem in many developing countries including Bangladesh and India. In recent years development of modern innovative technologies for the removal of arsenic from aqueous system has become an interesting topic for research. In this present study, two rod shaped Gram-positive bacteria are being reported, isolated from arsenic affected ground water of Purbasthali block of Burdwan, West Bengal, India, which can tolerate arsenate concentration up to 4500 ppm and 550 ppm of arsenite concentration. From biochemical analysis and 16S rRNA sequencing, they were identified as Bacillus sp. and Aneurinibacillus aneurinilyticus respectively. The isolates SW2 and SW4 can remove 51.45% and 51.99% of arsenite and 53.29% and 50.37% of arsenate, respectively from arsenic containing culture media. Both of the isolate can oxidize arsenite to less toxic arsenate. These two arsenic resistant bacteria can be used as a novel pathway for the bioremediation of arsenic.

  9. Arsenic, asbestos and radon: emerging players in lung tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubaux Roland

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The cause of lung cancer is generally attributed to tobacco smoking. However lung cancer in never smokers accounts for 10 to 25% of all lung cancer cases. Arsenic, asbestos and radon are three prominent non-tobacco carcinogens strongly associated with lung cancer. Exposure to these agents can lead to genetic and epigenetic alterations in tumor genomes, impacting genes and pathways involved in lung cancer development. Moreover, these agents not only exhibit unique mechanisms in causing genomic alterations, but also exert deleterious effects through common mechanisms, such as oxidative stress, commonly associated with carcinogenesis. This article provides a comprehensive review of arsenic, asbestos, and radon induced molecular mechanisms responsible for the generation of genetic and epigenetic alterations in lung cancer. A better understanding of the mode of action of these carcinogens will facilitate the prevention and management of lung cancer related to such environmental hazards.

  10. Arsenic-cadmium interaction in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Barriga, F; Llamas, E; Mejía, J J; Carrizales, L; Santoyo, M E; Vega-Vega, L; Yáñez, L

    1990-11-01

    Simultaneous exposure to cadmium and arsenic is highly probable in the urban area of San Luis Potosi, Mexico due to common localization of copper and zinc smelters. Therefore, in this work, rats were intraperitoneally exposed either to cadmium or arsenic alone, or simultaneously to both metals. The effects of these treatments on three different toxicological parameters were studied. Cadmium modified the LD50 of arsenic and conversely arsenic modified the LD50 for cadmium. At the histopathological level, arsenic appeared to protect against the cadmium effects, especially on testes. This protective effect seemed to be related to the glutathione levels found in this tissue: rats exposed to both arsenic and cadmium, presented glutathione values intermediate to those observed after exposure to either metal alone; arsenic had the highest value and cadmium the lowest. In liver, rats exposed to arsenic, cadmium or arsenic and cadmium, presented glutathione values below those in the saline group, with the lowest value corresponding to the arsenic and cadmium treatment. The results appear to support the proposed interaction between arsenic and cadmium and coexposure to both metals seems to alter certain effects produced by either metal alone. PMID:2219140

  11. Arsenic occurrence in New Hampshire drinking water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, S.C.; Blum, J.D.; Klaue, B. [Dartmouth Coll., Hanover, NH (United States). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Karagas, M.R. [Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH (United States). Dept. of Community and Family Medicine

    1999-05-01

    Arsenic concentrations were measured in 992 drinking water samples collected from New Hampshire households using online hydride generation ICP-MS. These randomly selected household water samples contain much less arsenic than those voluntarily submitted for analysis to the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (NHDES). Extrapolation of the voluntarily submitted sample set to all New Hampshire residents significantly overestimates arsenic exposure. In randomly selected households, concentrations ranged from <0.0003 to 180 {micro}g/L, with water from domestic wells containing significantly more arsenic than water from municipal sources. Water samples from drilled bedrock wells had the highest arsenic concentrations, while samples from surficial wells had the lowest arsenic concentrations. The authors suggest that much of the groundwater arsenic in New Hampshire is derived from weathering of bedrock materials and not from anthropogenic contamination. The spatial distribution of elevated arsenic concentrations correlates with Late-Devonian Concord-type granitic bedrock. Field observations in the region exhibiting the highest groundwater arsenic concentrations revealed abundant pegmatite dikes associated with nearby granites. Analysis of rock digests indicates arsenic concentrations up to 60 mg/kg in pegmatites, with much lower values in surrounding schists and granites. Weak acid leaches show that approximately half of the total arsenic in the pegmatites is labile and therefore can be mobilized during rock-water interaction.

  12. Linking Microbial Activity with Arsenic Fate during Cow Dung Disposal of Arsenic-Bearing Wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, T. M.; Reddy, R.; Tan, J.; Hayes, K. F.; Raskin, L.

    2014-12-01

    To address widespread arsenic contamination of drinking water sources numerous technologies have been developed to remove arsenic. All technologies result in the production of an arsenic-bearing waste that must be evaluated and disposed in a manner to limit the potential for environmental release and human exposure. One disposal option that is commonly recommended for areas without access to landfills is the mixing of arsenic-bearing wastes with cow dung. These recommendations are made based on the ability of microorganisms to create volatile arsenic species (including mono-, di-, and tri-methylarsine gases) to be diluted in the atmosphere. However, most studies of environmental microbial communities have found only a small fraction (arsenic present in soils or rice paddies is released via volatilization. Additionally, past studies often have not monitored arsenic release in the aqueous phase. Two main pathways for microbial arsenic volatilization are known and include methylation of arsenic during methanogenesis and methylation by arsenite S-adenosylmethionine methyltransferase. In this study, we compare the roles of these two pathways in arsenic volatilization and aqueous mobilization through mesocosm experiments with cow dung and arsenic-bearing wastes produced during drinking water treatment in West Bengal, India. Arsenic in gaseous, aqueous, and solid phases was measured. Consistent with previous reports, less than 0.02% of the total arsenic present was volatilized. A much higher amount (~5%) of the total arsenic was mobilized into the liquid phase. Through the application of molecular tools, including 16S rRNA sequencing and quantification of gene transcripts involved in methanogenesis, this study links microbial community activity with arsenic fate in potential disposal environments. These results illustrate that disposal of arsenic-bearing wastes by mixing with cow dung does not achieve its end goal of promoting arsenic volatilization but rather appears to

  13. OXIDATION OF AS(III) BY AERATION AND STORAGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study of the effects of aeration and storage on the oxidation of arsenic(III) was undertaken at three utilities in the US to establish the engineering significance of aeration as a potential pre-treatment method for arsenic removal. The results of this study clearly establish t...

  14. Effects of Carbon in Flooded Paddy Soils: Implications for Microbial Activity and Arsenic Mobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avancha, S.; Boye, K.

    2014-12-01

    In the Mekong delta in Cambodia, naturally occurring arsenic (originating from erosion in the Himalaya Mountains) in paddy soils is mobilized during the seasonal flooding. As a consequence, rice grown on the flooded soils may take up arsenic and expose people eating the rice to this carcinogenic substance. Microbial activity will enhance or decrease the mobilization of arsenic depending on their metabolic pathways. Among the microbes naturally residing in the soil are denitrifying bacteria, sulfate reducers, metal reducers (Fe, Mn), arsenic reducers, methanogens, and fermenters, whose activity varies based on the presence of oxygen. The purpose of the experiment was to assess how different amendments affect the microbial activity and the arsenic mobilization during the transition from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism after flooding of naturally contaminated Cambodian soil. In a batch experiment, we investigated how the relative metabolic rate of naturally occurring microbes could vary with different types of organic carbon. The experiment was designed to measure the effects of various sources of carbon (dried rice straw, charred rice straw, manure, and glucose) on the microbial activity and arsenic release in an arsenic-contaminated paddy soil from Cambodia under flooded conditions. All amendments were added based on the carbon content in order to add 0.036 g of carbon per vial. The soil was flooded with a 10mM TRIS buffer solution at pH 7.04 in airtight 25mL serum vials and kept at 25 °C. We prepared 14 replicates per treatment to sample both gas and solution. On each sampling point, the solution replicates were sampled destructively. The gas replicates continued on and were sampled for both gas and solution on the final day of the experiment. We measured pH, total arsenic, methane, carbon dioxide, and nitrous oxide at 8 hours, 1.5 days, 3.33 days, and 6.33 days from the start of the experiment.

  15. Interaction between arsenic exposure from drinking water and genetic susceptibility in carotid intima–media thickness in Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Fen [Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Jasmine, Farzana; Kibriya, Muhammad G. [Department of Health Studies, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); The University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Liu, Mengling; Cheng, Xin [Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Parvez, Faruque [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York City, NY (United States); Paul-Brutus, Rachelle [Department of Health Studies, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); The University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Islam, Tariqul; Paul, Rina Rani; Sarwar, Golam; Ahmed, Alauddin [U-Chicago Research Bangladesh, Ltd., Dhaka (Bangladesh); Jiang, Jieying [Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Islam, Tariqul [U-Chicago Research Bangladesh, Ltd., Dhaka (Bangladesh); Slavkovich, Vesna [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York City, NY (United States); Rundek, Tatjana [Department of Neurology, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Department of Public Health Sciences, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Demmer, Ryan T.; Desvarieux, Moise [Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York City, NY (United States); and others

    2014-05-01

    Epidemiologic studies that evaluated genetic susceptibility for the effects of arsenic exposure from drinking water on subclinical atherosclerosis are limited. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 1078 participants randomly selected from the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study in Bangladesh to evaluate whether the association between arsenic exposure and carotid artery intima–media thickness (cIMT) differs by 207 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 18 genes related to arsenic metabolism, oxidative stress, inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction. Although not statistically significant after correcting for multiple testing, nine SNPs in APOE, AS3MT, PNP, and TNF genes had a nominally statistically significant interaction with well-water arsenic in cIMT. For instance, the joint presence of a higher level of well-water arsenic (≥ 40.4 μg/L) and the GG genotype of AS3MT rs3740392 was associated with a difference of 40.9 μm (95% CI = 14.4, 67.5) in cIMT, much greater than the difference of cIMT associated with the genotype alone (β = − 5.1 μm, 95% CI = − 31.6, 21.3) or arsenic exposure alone (β = 7.2 μm, 95% CI = − 3.1, 17.5). The pattern and magnitude of the interactions were similar when urinary arsenic was used as the exposure variable. Additionally, the at-risk genotypes of the AS3MT SNPs were positively related to the proportion of monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) in urine, which is indicative of arsenic methylation capacity. The findings provide novel evidence that genetic variants related to arsenic metabolism may play an important role in arsenic-induced subclinical atherosclerosis. Future replication studies in diverse populations are needed to confirm the findings. - Highlights: • Nine SNPs had a nominally significant interaction with well-water arsenic in cIMT. • Three SNPs in AS3MT showed nominally significant interactions with urinary arsenic. • cIMT was much higher among subjects with higher arsenic exposure and AS3MT

  16. Interaction between arsenic exposure from drinking water and genetic susceptibility in carotid intima–media thickness in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidemiologic studies that evaluated genetic susceptibility for the effects of arsenic exposure from drinking water on subclinical atherosclerosis are limited. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 1078 participants randomly selected from the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study in Bangladesh to evaluate whether the association between arsenic exposure and carotid artery intima–media thickness (cIMT) differs by 207 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 18 genes related to arsenic metabolism, oxidative stress, inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction. Although not statistically significant after correcting for multiple testing, nine SNPs in APOE, AS3MT, PNP, and TNF genes had a nominally statistically significant interaction with well-water arsenic in cIMT. For instance, the joint presence of a higher level of well-water arsenic (≥ 40.4 μg/L) and the GG genotype of AS3MT rs3740392 was associated with a difference of 40.9 μm (95% CI = 14.4, 67.5) in cIMT, much greater than the difference of cIMT associated with the genotype alone (β = − 5.1 μm, 95% CI = − 31.6, 21.3) or arsenic exposure alone (β = 7.2 μm, 95% CI = − 3.1, 17.5). The pattern and magnitude of the interactions were similar when urinary arsenic was used as the exposure variable. Additionally, the at-risk genotypes of the AS3MT SNPs were positively related to the proportion of monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) in urine, which is indicative of arsenic methylation capacity. The findings provide novel evidence that genetic variants related to arsenic metabolism may play an important role in arsenic-induced subclinical atherosclerosis. Future replication studies in diverse populations are needed to confirm the findings. - Highlights: • Nine SNPs had a nominally significant interaction with well-water arsenic in cIMT. • Three SNPs in AS3MT showed nominally significant interactions with urinary arsenic. • cIMT was much higher among subjects with higher arsenic exposure and AS3MT

  17. Sequencing and expression of two arsenic resistance operons with different functions in the highly arsenic-resistant strain Ochrobactrum tritici SCII24T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Ana-Paula

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arsenic (As is a natural metalloid, widely used in anthropogenic activities, that can exist in different oxidation states. Throughout the world, there are several environments contaminated with high amounts of arsenic where many organisms can survive. The most stable arsenical species are arsenate and arsenite that can be subject to chemically and microbiologically oxidation, reduction and methylation reactions. Organisms surviving in arsenic contaminated environments can have a diversity of mechanisms to resist to the harmful effects of arsenical compounds. Results The highly metal resistant Ochrobactrum tritici SCII24 was able to grow in media with arsenite (50 mM, arsenate (up to 200 mM and antimonite (10 mM. This strain contains two arsenic and antimony resistance operons (ars1 and ars2, which were cloned and sequenced. Sequence analysis indicated that ars1 operon contains five genes encoding the following proteins: ArsR, ArsD, ArsA, CBS-domain-containing protein and ArsB. The ars2 operon is composed of six genes that encode two other ArsR, two ArsC (belonging to different families of arsenate reductases, one ACR3 and one ArsH-like protein. The involvement of ars operons in arsenic resistance was confirmed by cloning both of them in an Escherichia coli ars-mutant. The ars1 operon conferred resistance to arsenite and antimonite on E. coli cells, whereas the ars2 operon was also responsible for resistance to arsenite and arsenate. Although arsH was not required for arsenate resistance, this gene seems to be important to confer high levels of arsenite resistance. None of ars1 genes were detected in the other type strains of genus Ochrobactrum, but sequences homologous with ars2 operon were identified in some strains. Conclusion A new strategy for bacterial arsenic resistance is described in this work. Two operons involved in arsenic resistance, one giving resistance to arsenite and antimonite and the other giving resistance

  18. Managing hazardous pollutants in Chile: arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancha, Ana María; O'Ryan, Raul

    2008-01-01

    Chile is one of the few countries that faces the environmental challenge posed by extensive arsenic pollution, which exists in the northern part of the country. Chile has worked through various options to appropriately address the environmental challenge of arsenic pollution of water and air. Because of cost and other reasons, copying standards used elsewhere in the world was not an option for Chile. Approximately 1.8 million people, representing about 12% of the total population of the country, live in arsenic-contaminated areas. In these regions, air, water, and soil are contaminated with arsenic from both natural and anthropogenic sources. For long periods, water consumed by the population contained arsenic levels that exceeded values recommended by the World Health Organization. Exposure to airborne arsenic also occurred near several large cities, as a consequence of both natural contamination and the intensive mining activity carried out in those areas. In rural areas, indigenous populations, who lack access to treated water, were also exposed to arsenic by consuming foods grown locally in arsenic-contaminated soils. Health effects in children and adults from arsenic exposure first appeared in the 1950s. Such effects included vascular, respiratory, and skin lesions from intake of high arsenic levels in drinking water. Methods to remove arsenic from water were evaluated, developed, and implemented that allowed significant reductions in exposure at a relatively low cost. Construction and operation of treatment plants to remove arsenic from water first began in the 1970s. Beginning in the 1990s, epidemiological studies showed that the rate of lung and bladder cancer in the arsenic-polluted area was considerably higher than mean cancer rates for the country. Cancer incidence was directly related to arsenic exposure. During the 1990s, international pressure and concern by Chile's Health Ministry prompted action to regulate arsenic emissions from copper smelters. A

  19. 臭氧与混凝组合工艺处理高砷水的试验研究%Research on Process of Ozone Combined with Coagulation for Arsenic Removal in Water of High Arsenic Content

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张竹君; 黄显怀; 郑杰; 王小立; 李新; 彭燕; 唐敏

    2011-01-01

    Drinking water source of high arsenic content was studied. Influence of coexistence of iron, manganese, arsenic in water samples on arsenic removal effect and its mechanism were analyzed. Influence of process of ozone pre - oxidation combined with coagulation on arsenic removal effects was studied under different experimental conditions. The results showed that in ozone oxidation process iron or manganese ions alone presence can improve arsenic removal efficiency, in which arsenic removal effect by iron ions is better than by manganese I-ons. Under conditions of coexistence of iron and manganese ions, arsenic removal effect by iron ions will be inhibited by manganese ions. When original high arsenic content water is pre - oxidized by ozone, arsenic removal effect will be improved. When aeration time is 5 min and settling time 15 min, arsenic removal rate will be 50% ~ 60%. Process of coagulation and sedimentation combined with oxidation by ozone can significantly improve arsenic removal effect.%以高砷饮用水源为研究对象,分析了铁、锰、砷共存水样除砷效果的影响及机理,通过改变不同试验条件,研究了臭氧预氧化以及与混凝结合工艺对于除砷效果的影响,结果表明,臭氧预氧化过程中,铁锰离子单独存在时可以提高除砷效率,其中铁离子除砷效果比锰离子强,当铁锰共存时,锰离子会抑制铁离子的除砷效果;原高砷水经过臭氧预氧化沉淀,除砷的效果明显,当曝气时间为5 min,沉淀时间为15 min时,砷去除率50%~60%,混凝沉淀与臭氧预氧化结合工艺可大幅度提高除砷的效果.

  20. Lead isotopic compositions of soil and near-surface till profiles from a watershed containing arsenic-enriched groundwater in coastal Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuso, Robert; Foley, Nora; Wandless, Gregory; Dillingham, Jeremy; Colvin, Anna

    2005-01-01

    Lead isotope compositions of soils and near-surface tills from an area of coastal Maine known to have groundwater with anomalously high arsenic contents were measured in order to determine the source of the lead and, by inference, possible sources of arsenic. Five soil and till sites were selected for detailed chemical and isotopic analysis. To construct profiles of the soil and till horizons, five samples were collected at 10-cm intervals from the surface to the base of each horizon. Total lead and arsenic concentrations and lead isotopic compositions were measured for 48 leaches and bulk residues. The soils and tills are underlain by sulfidic schists of the Penobscot Formation. Several generations of minerals containing arsenic and lead exist in the regional bedrock, including rock-forming silicates (feldspar and micas), sulfide minerals formed during diagenesis (for example, arsenic-rich pyrite), and sulfide and oxide minerals that formed as a result of Silurian metamorphic and igneous events (for example, arsenopyrite, galena, iron-oxides, and arsenic-sulfides). A young group of secondary minerals (for example, iron-hydroxides, arsenic-hydroxides, lead-sulfate, and arsenic-jarosite) formed from recent weathering and pedogenic processes.

  1. Speciation analysis of arsenic in groundwater from Inner Mongolia with an emphasis on acid-leachable particulate arsenic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong Zhilong [Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Alberta, 10-102 Clinical Sciences Building, Edmonton, Alta., T6G 2G3 (Canada); Lu Xiufen [Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Alberta, 10-102 Clinical Sciences Building, Edmonton, Alta., T6G 2G3 (Canada); Watt, Corinna [Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Alberta, 10-102 Clinical Sciences Building, Edmonton, Alta., T6G 2G3 (Canada); Wen Bei [Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Alberta, 10-102 Clinical Sciences Building, Edmonton, Alta., T6G 2G3 (Canada); He Bin [Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Alberta, 10-102 Clinical Sciences Building, Edmonton, Alta., T6G 2G3 (Canada); Mumford, Judy [National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Environmental Protection Agency, Human Studies Division, Epidemiology and Biomarkers Branch, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Ning Zhixiong [Ba Men Anti-Epidemic Station, Lin He, Inner Mongolia (China); Xia Yajuan [Inner Mongolia Center for Endemic Disease Control and Research, Huhhot, Inner Mongolia (China); Le, X. Chris [Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Alberta, 10-102 Clinical Sciences Building, Edmonton, Alta., T6G 2G3 (Canada)]. E-mail: xc.le@ualberta.ca

    2006-01-05

    Arsenic in drinking water affects millions of people around the world. While soluble arsenic is commonly measured, the amount of particulate arsenic in drinking water has often been overlooked. We report here determination of the acid-leachable particulate arsenic and soluble arsenicals in well water from an arsenic-poisoning endemic area in Inner Mongolia, China. Water samples (583) were collected from 120 wells in Ba Men, Inner Mongolia, where well water was the primary drinking water source. Two methods were demonstrated for the determination of soluble arsenic species (primarily inorganic arsenate and arsenite) and total particulate arsenic. The first method used solid phase extraction cartridges and membrane filters to separate arsenic species on-site, followed by analysis of the individual arsenic species eluted from the cartridges and filters. The other method uses liquid chromatography separation with hydride generation atomic fluorescence detection to determine soluble arsenic species. Analysis of acidified water samples using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry provided the total arsenic concentration. Arsenic concentrations in water samples from the 120 wells ranged from <1 to {approx}1000 {mu}g L{sup -1}. On average, particulate arsenic accounted for 39 {+-} 38% (median 36%) of the total arsenic. In some wells, particulate arsenic was six times higher than the soluble arsenic concentration. Particulate arsenic can be effectively removed using membrane filtration. The information on particulate and soluble arsenic in water is useful for optimizing treatment options and for understanding the geochemical behavior of arsenic in groundwater.

  2. Levels of toxic arsenic species in native terrestrial plants from soils polluted by former mining activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Salgado, Sara; Quijano, M Ángeles

    2014-03-01

    Ten native terrestrial plants from soils polluted by former mining activities (Mónica mine, NW Madrid, Spain), with high total arsenic concentration levels (up to 3500 μg g(-1)), have been studied to determine the fraction of arsenic present as toxic forms (inorganic and methylated species), which present a higher mobility and therefore the potential risk associated with their reintegration into the environment is high. Roots and aboveground parts were analyzed separately to assess possible transformations from translocation processes. Extractions were carried out with deionized water by microwave-assisted extraction at a temperature of 90 °C and three extraction steps of 7.5 min each. Total extracted arsenic concentrations were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry, showing extraction percentages from 9 to 39% (calculated as the ratio between total extracted arsenic (Asext) and total arsenic (AsT) concentrations in plants). Speciation studies, performed by high performance liquid chromatography-photo-oxidation-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry, showed the main presence of arsenate (As(v)) (up to 350 μg g(-1)), followed by arsenite (As(iii)), in both plant parts. Monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and trimethylarsine oxide (TMAO) were also found only in some plants. On the other hand, the use of 0.5 mol L(-1) acetic acid as an extractant led to higher extraction percentages (33-87%), but lower column recoveries, probably due to the extraction of arsenic compounds different to the toxic free ions studied, which may come from biotransformation mechanisms carried out by plants to reduce arsenic toxicity. However, As(v) concentrations increased up to 800 μg g(-1) in acid medium, indicating the probable release of As(v) from organoarsenic compounds and therefore a higher potential risk for the environment.

  3. Plasma-aminothiols status and inverse correlation of total homocysteine with B-vitamins in arsenic exposed population of West Bengal, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Ashit K; Manna, Sujoy K; Roy, Sanjit K; Chakraborty, Manisha; Das, Surajit; Naskar, Jnan P

    2016-09-18

    Chronic arsenic toxicity is a serious environmental health problem across the world. Bangladesh and India (particularly the state of West Bengal) are the worst affected countries with such problem. The present study reports plasma-aminothiols (p-aminothiols) like L-cysteine (L-Cys), cysteinyl glycine (Cys-gly), total homocysteine (t-Hcy) and glutathione (GSH) status, and the inverse relationship of t-Hcy with B-vitamins (B1, B6, B9 and B12) in arsenic exposed population of West Bengal, India. Reverse phase HPLC was used to measure p-aminothiols and serum B-vitamins in different arsenic exposed population. Arsenic in drinking water and urine were measured by flow injection analysis system - Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (FIAS-AAS) and Transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA-AAS) techniques, respectively. Water arsenic exposure was >50 µg/L in 50% population, of which majority (33.58%) belong to the range of >50-500 µg/L and more than 8% were even >1000 µg/L. Urine arsenic (µg/g creatinine) levels increased with arsenic exposure. The variability among p-aminothiols was also observed with higher exposure to arsenic in drinking water. A significant difference between exposed and control population was noticed for plasma L-Cys. The difference of B-vitamins between the population exposed to 50 µg/L arsenic in drinking water was also found to be significant. B9 and B12 deficiency with increased consumption of arsenic in water corroborates the anemic conditions commonly observed among arsenic exposed population. The aminothiol status indicated oxidative stress in exposed population. This study demonstrated progressive increase in plasma t-Hcy as well as inverse relationships of serum B-vitamins with increased water arsenic concentration. PMID:27336853

  4. Effects of plant arsenic uptake and heavy metals on arsenic distribution in an arsenic-contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fayiga, Abioye O. [Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-0290 (United States); Ma, Lena Q. [Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-0290 (United States) and Key Laboratory of Terrestrial Ecological Process, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)]. E-mail: lqma@ifas.ufl.edu; Zhou Qixing [Key Laboratory of Terrestrial Ecological Process, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2007-06-15

    This study examined the effects of heavy metals and plant arsenic uptake on soil arsenic distribution. Chemical fractionation of an arsenic-contaminated soil spiked with 50 or 200 mg kg{sup -1} Ni, Zn, Cd or Pb was performed before and after growing the arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata L for 8 weeks using NH{sub 4}Cl (water-soluble plus exchangeable, WE-As), NH{sub 4}F (Al-As), NaOH (Fe-As), and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (Ca-As). Arsenic in the soil was present primarily as the recalcitrant forms with Ca-As being the dominant fraction (45%). Arsenic taken up by P. vittata was from all fractions though Ca-As contributed the most (51-71% reduction). After 8 weeks of plant growth, the Al-As and Fe-As fractions were significantly (p < 0.01) greater in the metal-spiked soils than the control, with changes in the WE-As fraction being significantly (p = 0.007) correlated with plant arsenic removal. The plant's ability to solubilize soil arsenic from recalcitrant fractions may have enhanced its ability to hyperaccumulate arsenic. - Arsenic taken up by P. vittata was from all fractions with most from the Ca-fraction.

  5. Arsenic speciation in sinter mineralization from a hydrothermal channel of El Tatio geothermal field, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsina, Marco A.; Zanella, Luciana; Hoel, Cathleen; Pizarro, Gonzalo E.; Gaillard, Jean-François; Pasten, Pablo A.

    2014-10-01

    El Tatio geothermal field is the principal natural source of arsenic for the Loa River, the main surface water resource in the hyper-arid Atacama Desert (Antofagasta Region, Northern Chile). Prior investigations by bulk X-ray absorption spectroscopy have identified hydrous ferric oxides as the principal arsenic-containing phase in sinter material from El Tatio, suggesting sorption as the main mechanism for arsenic scavenging by the solid phases of these hot spring environments. Here we examine siliceous sinter material sampled from a hydrothermal channel using synchrotron based X-ray micro-probe techniques, including As and Fe Kα X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF), As K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (μ-XANES), and X-ray diffraction (μ-XRD). Least-squares linear fitting of μ-XANES spectra shows that arsenic is predominantly present as arsenate sorbed on hydrous ferric oxides (63% molar proportion), but we also identify nodular arsenide micro-mineralizations (37% molar proportion) similar to loellingite (FeAs2), not previously detected during bulk-scale analysis of the sinter material. Presence of arsenide mineralizations indicates development of anoxic environments on the surface of the siliceous sinter, and suggests a more complex biogeochemistry for arsenic than previously observed for circum-neutral pH brine hot spring environments.

  6. ARSENIC INDUCES SUSTAINED IMPAIRMENT OF SKELETAL MUSCLE AND MUSCLE PROGENITOR CELL ULTRASTRUCTURE AND BIOENERGETICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrisia, Ambrosio; Elke, Brown; Donna, Stolz; Ricardo, Ferrari; Bret, Goodpaster; Bridget, Deasy; Giovanna, Distefano; Alexandra, Roperti; Amin, Cheikhi; Yesica, Garciafigueroa; Aaron, Barchowsky

    2014-01-01

    Over 4 million individuals in the US, and over 140 million individuals worldwide, are exposed daily to arsenic-contaminated drinking water. Human exposures can range from below the current limit of 10 µg/L to over 1 mg/L, with 100 µg/L promoting disease in a large portion of those exposed. Although increased attention has recently been paid to myopathy following arsenic exposure, the pathogenic mechanisms underlying clinical symptoms remain poorly understood. This study tested the hypothesis that arsenic induces lasting muscle mitochondrial dysfunction and impairs metabolism. When compared to non-exposed controls, mice exposed to drinking water containing 100µg/L arsenite for 5 weeks demonstrated impaired muscle function, mitochondrial myopathy, and altered oxygen consumption that were concomitant with increased mitochondrial fusion gene transcription. There was no difference in levels of inorganic arsenic or its mononomethyl- and dimethyl- metabolites between controls and exposed muscles, confirming that arsenic does not accumulate in muscle. Nevertheless, muscle progenitor cells isolated from exposed mice recapitulated the aberrant myofiber phenotype and were more resistant to oxidative stress, generated more reactive oxygen species, and displayed autophagic mitochondrial morphology, as compared to cells isolated from non-exposed mice. These pathological changes from a possible maladaptive oxidative stress response provide insight into declines in muscle functioning caused by exposure to this common environmental contaminant. PMID:24960579

  7. The efficacy of monoisoamyl ester of dimercaptosuccinic acid in chronic experimental arsenic poisoning in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flora, S J S; Kannan, G M; Pant, B P; Jaiswal, D K

    2003-01-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of monoisoamyl meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (MiADMSA), a new monoester of 2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid on arsenic induced oxidative stress in liver and kidneys, alterations in hematopoietic system and depletion of arsenic burden was assessed, in mice. Three different doses of MiADMSA (25, 50 or 100 mg/kg) for five consecutive days were administered in chronically arsenic exposed mice (10 ppm in drinking water for six months). Oral administration of MiADMSA particularly at a dose of 50 mg/kg, produced relatively more pronounced beneficial effects on the inhibited blood delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD), biochemical variables indicative of hepatic and renal oxidative stress and depletion of arsenic concentration in blood, liver and kidneys, compared with intraperitoneal administration of the drug. The treatment with MiADMSA although, produced essential metals imbalance which could be a restrictive factor for the possible therapeutic use of this compound in chronic arsenic poisoning and thus require further exploration.

  8. Arsenic, Prokaryotes, and Closed Basin Soda Lakes of the Western USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oremland, R. S.

    2006-12-01

    A number of saline, alkaline soda lakes in the Great Basin and Mojave Desert of the United States have unusually high concentrations of inorganic arsenic dissolved in their brine-waters. The arsenic originates from natural rather than anthropogenic sources, namely volcanic hydrothermal inputs. When this influx is coupled with evapo-concentration and the unique chemical behavior of arsenic oxyanions in alkaline waters, it results in extremely elevated As concentrations. For example, the salinity and arsenate levels of 3 comparable soda lakes (pH 9.8) are: Big Soda Lake, NV (27 g/L; 20 uM), Mono Lake, CA (90 g/L; 200 uM), and Searles Lake, CA (340 g/L; 3,900 uM). The arsenic oxidation state changes from As5+ (arsenate) to As3+ (arsenite) with vertical transition from their oxygenated surface water to their anoxic bottom water. Similar phenomena occur in their littoral sediments. These lakes also harbor active populations of prokaryotes that achieve these As redox changes either by using arsenate as an electron acceptor for respiration, or by employing arsenite as a chemoautotrophic electron donor. Diverse microorganisms have been identified in these systems that are involved in the biogeochemical cycling of arsenic therein, and in situ studies made with radiotracer (73As) and other means showed that these redox reactions occur at rapid rates. However, other than their use for waterfowl hunting (Big Soda Lake), as a region of scenic beauty (Mono Lake), or as a resource for the chemical industry (Searles Lake), there is little concern about the arsenic in these systems because the waters are not potable and their chemistry is too extreme to allow for the presence of fish. Nonetheless, microbial processes that govern arsenic biogeochemistry can greatly influence the hydrologic mobility and toxicity of this element in freshwater systems, such as drinking water aquifers. Moreover, anthropogenic inputs of arsenic can also occur in closed basin lakes in this region, such as

  9. Combined administration of iron and monoisoamyl-DMSA in the treatment of chronic arsenic intoxication in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, M; Flora, S J S

    2007-11-01

    Co-administration of iron in combination with monoisoamyl dimercaptosuccinic acid (MiADMSA) against chronic arsenic poisoning in mice was studied. Mice preexposed to arsenic (25 ppm in drinking water for 6 months) mice were treated with MiADMSA (50 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) either alone or in combination with iron (75 or 150 mg/kg, orally) once daily for 5 days. Arsenic exposure led to a significant depletion of blood delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) activity, hematocrit, and white blood cell (WBC) counts accompanied by small decline in blood hemoglobin level. Hepatic reduced glutathione (GSH) level, catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities showed a significant decrease while, oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) levels increased on arsenic exposure, indicating arsenic-induced hepatic oxidative stress. Liver aspartate and alanine transaminases (AST and ALT) activities also decreased significantly on arsenic exposure. Kidney GSH, GSSG, catalase level and SOD activities remained unchanged, while, TBARS level increased significantly following arsenic exposure. Brain GSH, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and SOD activities decreased, accompanied by a significant elevation of TBARS level after chronic arsenic exposure. Treatment with MiADMSA was marginally effective in reducing ALAD activity, while administration of iron was ineffective when given alone. Iron when co-administered with MiADMSA restored blood ALAD activity. Administration of iron alone had no beneficial effects on hepatic oxidative stress, while in combination with MiADMSA it produced significant decline in hepatic TBARS level compared to the individual effect of MiADMSA. Renal biochemical variables were insensitive to any of the treatments. Combined administration of iron with MiADMSA also had no additional beneficial effect over the individual protective effect of MiADMSA on brain oxidative stress. Interestingly, combined administration of

  10. Urinary Arsenic Metabolites of Subjects Exposed to Elevated Arsenic Present in Coal in Shaanxi Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linsheng Yang

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to arsenic (As poisoning caused by naturally occurring inorganic arsenic-contaminated water consumption, coal arsenic poisoning (CAP induced by elevated arsenic exposure from coal combustion has rarely been reported. In this study, the concentrations and distributions of urinary arsenic metabolites in 57 volunteers (36 subjects with skin lesions and 21 subjects without skin lesions, who had been exposed to elevated levels of arsenic present in coal in Changshapu village in the south of Shaanxi Province (China, were reported. The urinary arsenic species, including inorganic arsenic (iAs [arsenite (iAsIII and arsenate (iAsV], monomethylarsonic acid (MMAV and dimethylarsinic acid (DMAV, were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC combined with inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS. The relative distributions of arsenic species, the primary methylation index (PMI = MMAV/iAs and the secondary methylation index (SMI = DMAV/MMAV were calculated to assess the metabolism of arsenic. Subjects with skin lesions had a higher concentration of urinary arsenic and a lower arsenic methylation capability than subjects without skin lesions. Women had a significantly higher methylation capability of arsenic than men, as defined by a higher percent DMAV and SMI in urine among women, which was the one possible interpretation of women with a higher concentration of urinary arsenic but lower susceptibility to skin lesions. The findings suggested that not only the dose of arsenic exposure but also the arsenic methylation capability have an impact on the individual susceptibility to skin lesions induced by coal arsenic exposure.

  11. Chronic arsenic poisoning from burning high-arsenic-containing coal in Guizhou, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, J.; Zheng, B.S.; Aposhian, H.V.; Zhou, Y.S.; Chen, M.L.; Zhang, A.H.; Waalkes, M.P. [NIEHS, Research Triangle Park, NC (USA)

    2002-07-01

    Arsenic is an environmental hazard and the reduction of drinking water arsenic levels is under consideration. People are exposed to arsenic not only through drinking water but also through arsenic-contaminated air and food. Here the health effects of arsenic exposure from burning high arsenic-containing coal in Guizhou, China was investigated. Coal is burned inside the home in open pits for daily cooking and crop drying, producing a high concentration of arsenic in indoor air. Arsenic in the air coats and permeates food being dried producing high concentrations in food; however, arsenic concentrations in the drinking water are in the normal range. The estimated sources of total arsenic exposure in this area are from arsenic-contaminated food (50-80%), air (10-20%), water (1-5%), and direct contact in coal-mining workers (1%). At least 3,000 patients with arsenic poisoning were found in the Southwest Prefecture of Guizhou, and approximately 200,000 people are at risk for such over exposures. Skin lesions are common, including keratosis of the hands and feet, pigmentation on the trunk, skin ulceration, and skin cancers. Toxicities to internal organs, including lung dysfunction, neuropathy, and nephrotoxicity, are clinically evident. The prevalence of hepatomegaly was 20%, and cirrhosis, ascites, and liver cancer are the most serious outcomes of arsenic poisoning. The Chinese government and international organizations are attempting to improve the house conditions and the coal source, and thereby protect human health in this area.

  12. Linking Microbial Activity with Arsenic Fate during Cow Dung Disposal of Arsenic-Bearing Wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, T. M.; Reddy, R.; Tan, J.; Hayes, K. F.; Raskin, L.

    2014-12-01

    To address widespread arsenic contamination of drinking water sources numerous technologies have been developed to remove arsenic. All technologies result in the production of an arsenic-bearing waste that must be evaluated and disposed in a manner to limit the potential for environmental release and human exposure. One disposal option that is commonly recommended for areas without access to landfills is the mixing of arsenic-bearing wastes with cow dung. These recommendations are made based on the ability of microorganisms to create volatile arsenic species (including mono-, di-, and tri-methylarsine gases) to be diluted in the atmosphere. However, most studies of environmental microbial communities have found only a small fraction (cow dung and arsenic-bearing wastes produced during drinking water treatment in West Bengal, India. Arsenic in gaseous, aqueous, and solid phases was measured. Consistent with previous reports, less than 0.02% of the total arsenic present was volatilized. A much higher amount (~5%) of the total arsenic was mobilized into the liquid phase. Through the application of molecular tools, including 16S rRNA sequencing and quantification of gene transcripts involved in methanogenesis, this study links microbial community activity with arsenic fate in potential disposal environments. These results illustrate that disposal of arsenic-bearing wastes by mixing with cow dung does not achieve its end goal of promoting arsenic volatilization but rather appears to increase arsenic mobilization in the aqueous phase, raising concerns with this approach.

  13. Studies on arsenic transforming groundwater bacteria and their role in arsenic release from subsurface sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Angana; Kazy, Sufia K; Sar, Pinaki

    2014-01-01

    Ten different Gram-negative arsenic (As)-resistant and As-transforming bacteria isolated from As-rich groundwater of West Bengal were characterized to assess their role in As mobilization. 16S rRNA gene analysis confirmed the affiliation of these bacteria to genera Achromobacter, Brevundimonas, Rhizobium, Ochrobactrum, and Pseudoxanthomonas. Along with superior As-resistance and As-transformation abilities, the isolates showed broad metabolic capacity in terms of utilizing a variety of electron donors and acceptors (including As) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively. Arsenic transformation studies performed under various conditions indicated highly efficient As(3+) oxidation or As(5+) reduction kinetics. Genes encoding As(3+) oxidase (aioA), cytosolic As(5+) reductase (arsC), and As(3+) efflux pump (arsB and acr3) were detected within the test isolates. Sequence analyses suggested that As homeostasis genes (particularly arsC, arsB, and acr3) were acquired by most of the bacteria through horizontal gene transfer. A strong correlation between As resistance phenotype and the presence of As(3+) transporter genes was observed. Microcosm study showed that bacterial strain having cytosolic As(5+) reductase property could play important role in mobilizing As (as As(3+)) from subsurface sediment. PMID:24764001

  14. Arsenic redox transformation by Pseudomonas sp. HN-2 isolated from arsenic-contaminated soil in Hunan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhennan; Yin, Naiyi; Cai, Xiaolin; Wang, Zhenzhou; Cui, Yanshan

    2016-09-01

    A mesophilic, Gram-negative, arsenite[As(III)]-oxidizing and arsenate[As(V)]-reducing bacterial strain, Pseudomonas sp. HN-2, was isolated from an As-contaminated soil. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing indicated that the strain was closely related to Pseudomonas stutzeri. Under aerobic conditions, this strain oxidized 92.0% (61.4μmol/L) of arsenite to arsenate within 3hr of incubation. Reduction of As(V) to As(III) occurred in anoxic conditions. Pseudomonas sp. HN-2 is among the first soil bacteria shown to be capable of both aerobic As(III) oxidation and anoxic As(V) reduction. The strain, as an efficient As(III) oxidizer and As(V) reducer in Pseudomonas, has the potential to impact arsenic mobility in both anoxic and aerobic environments, and has potential application in As remediation processes. PMID:27593283

  15. Arsenic in Drinking Water-A Global Environmental Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Joanna Shaofen; Wai, Chien M.

    2004-01-01

    Information on the worldwide occurrence of groundwater pollution by arsenic, the ensuing health hazards, and the debatable government regulations of arsenic in drinking water, is presented. Diagnostic identification of arsenic, and methods to eliminate it from water are also discussed.

  16. Poisoning of bees by industrial arsenic emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaroslav, S.

    1962-01-01

    Massive poisoning of bees by industrial arsenic emissions in Czechoslovakia are reviewed. Arsenic emissions from an ore processing plant in Tesin were responsible for massive bee deaths after World War I. Massive death of bees was observed in 1938 in the Krompach region around a copper ore smelting plant which emitted arsenic. Other accidents were reported in 1954 and 1957 in areas around industrial plants and power plants using arsenopyrite-containing low-grade coal or lignite. Arsenic was emitted bound in fly-ash in the form of arsenic trioxide or, in the case of coals containing alkaline chlorides, in the form of arsenic trichloride. The arsenic contamination extended to areas within a radius of 3 to 7 km. Settled fly-ash contained 0.0004 to 0.75 percent arsenic, which was soluble in a citrate-hydrochloric acid solution of pH 3.9, which corresponds to the gastric acid of bees. The arsenic uptake by the bees from pollen was calculated to amount to 1 microgram daily, against a toxic dose of 0.37 microgram. The toxic effect of arsenic on bees can be abated by adding colloidal iron hydroxide to the sugar solution which they are fed.

  17. Poisoning of bees by industrial arsenic emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svoboda, J.

    1962-01-01

    Massive poisoning of bees by industrial arsenic emissions in Czechoslovakia are reviewed. Arsenic emissions from an ore processing plant in Tesin were responsible for massive bee deaths after World War I. Massive death of bees was observed in 1938 in the Krompach region around a copper ore smelting plant which emitted