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Sample records for arsenic oxides

  1. Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase and the methylation of arsenicals in the invertebrate chordate Ciona intestinalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biotransformation of inorganic arsenic (iAs) involves methylation catalyzed by arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt), yielding mono- , di- , and trimethylated arsenicals. To investigate the evolution of molecular mechanisms that mediate arsenic biotransformation,...

  2. Arsenic Adsorption Onto Iron Oxides Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aredes, S.; Klein, B.; Pawlik, M.

    2004-12-01

    The predominant form of arsenic in water is as an inorganic ion. Under different redox conditions arsenic in water is stable in the +5 and +3 oxidation states. Arsenic oxidation state governs its toxicity, chemical form and solubility in natural and disturbed environments. As (III) is found in anoxic environments such as ground water , it is toxic and the common species is the neutral form, H3AsO3. As (V) is found in aerobic conditions such as surface water, it is less toxic and the common species in water are: H2AsO4 - and HAsO4 {- 2}. The water pH determines the predominant arsenate or arsenite species, however, both forms of arsenic can be detected in natural water systems. Iron oxides minerals often form in natural waters and sediments at oxic-anoxic boundaries. Over time they undergo transformation to crystalline forms, such as goethite or hematite. Both As(V) and As(III) sorbs strongly to iron oxides, however the sorption behavior of arsenic is dependent on its oxidation state and the mineralogy of the iron oxides. Competition between arsenic and others ions, such fluoride, sulphate and phosphate also play a role. On the other hand, calcium may increase arsenic adsorption onto iron oxides. Electrokinetic studies and adsorption experiments were carried out in order to determine which conditions favour arsenic adsorption. Hematite, goethite and magnetite as iron based sorbents were used. Test were also conducted with a laterite soil rich in iron minerals. The focus of this study is to evaluate physical and chemical conditions which favour arsenic adsorption onto iron oxides minerals, the results contribute to an understanding of arsenic behaviour in natural and disturbed environments. Furthermore, results could contribute in developing an appropriate remediation technology for arsenic removal in water using iron oxides minerals.

  3. [Competitive Microbial Oxidation and Reduction of Arsenic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ting-ting; Bai, Yao-hui; Liang, Jin-song; Huo, Yang; Wang, Ming-xing; Yuan, Lin-ijang

    2016-02-15

    Filters are widely applied in drinking water treatment plants. Our previous study, which explored the asenic redox in a filter of drinking water plant treating underground water, found that As3+ could be oxidized to As5+ by biogenic manganese oxides, while As5+ could be reduced to As3+ by some microbial arsenic reductases in the biofilter system. This microbial competition could influence the system stability and treatment efficiency. To explore its mechanism, this study selected a manganese-oxidizing bacterial strain (Pseudomonas sp. QJX-1) and a arsenic-reducing strain (Brevibacterium sp. LSJ-9) to investigate their competitive relationship in nutrient acquisition and arsenic redox in the presence of Mn2+, As3+ or As5+ The results revealed that the concentration and valence of Mn and As varied with different reaction time; biological manganese oxides dominated the arsenic redox by rapidly oxidizing the As3+ in the existing system and the As3+ generated by arsenic reductase into As. PCR and RT-PCR results indicated that the arsenic reductase (arsC) was inhibited by the manganese oxidase (cumA). The expression of 16S rRNA in QJX-1 was two orders of magnitude higher than that in LSJ-9, which implied QJX-1 was dominant in the bacterial growth. Our data revealed that hydraulic retention time was critical to the valence of arsenic in the effluent of filter in drinking water treatment plant. PMID:27363151

  4. Association of oxidative stress with arsenic methylation in chronic arsenic-exposed children and adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Though oxidative stress is recognized as an important pathogenic mechanism of arsenic, and arsenic methylation capacity is suggested to be highly involved in arsenic-related diseases, the association of arsenic methylation capacity with arsenic-induced oxidative stress remains unclear. To explore oxidative stress and its association with arsenic methylation, cross-sectional studies were conducted among 208 high and 59 low arsenic-exposed subjects. Levels of urinary arsenic species [inorganic arsenic (iAs), monomethylated arsenic (MMA) and dimethylated arsenic (DMA)] were determined by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry. Proportions of urinary arsenic species, the first methylation ratio (FMR) and the secondary methylation ratio (SMR) were used as indicators for arsenic methylation capacity. Urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) concentrations were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. Reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in whole blood were determined to reflect anti-oxidative status. The high arsenic-exposed children and adults were significantly increased in urinary 8-OHdG concentrations but decreased in blood GSH levels compared with the low exposed children and adults. In multiple linear regression models, blood GSH levels and urinary 8-OHdG concentrations of arsenic-exposed children and adults showed strong associations with the levels of urinary arsenic species. Arsenic-exposed subjects in the lower and the upper quartiles of proportions of urinary arsenic species, FMR or SMR were significantly different in urinary 8-OHdG, blood GSH and SOD. The associations of arsenic methylation capacity with 8-OHdG, GSH and SOD were also observed in multivariate regression analyses. These results may provide linkage between arsenic methylation capacity and oxidative stress in humans and suggest that adverse health effects induced by arsenic are related to arsenic methylation through oxidative stress

  5. [Advance on oxidative stress mechanism of arsenic toxicology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; An, Yan

    2009-09-01

    Inorganic arsenic is one of proven human carcinogens, which there are so far no sound laboratory-based evidences and there are very few reports in the literature regarding arsenic carcinogenic effects in in vivo animal experiment. Because of this lack of adequate evidences, the mechanism for understanding arsenic toxicology remains vague. Recently, many modes of action for arsenic carcinogenesis have been proposed, oxidative stress is one of the stronger theories of arsenic action modes which have a substantial mass of supporting data. Further more, many researchers have pointed out that induction of oxidative stress by methylated metabolites of inorganic arsenics plays an important role in the toxicity and carcinogenicity of arsenics. The role of oxidative stress induced by arsenic in arsenic toxicology was reviewed. PMID:19877531

  6. Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase and the inorganic arsenic methylation phenotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inorganic arsenic is enzymatically methylated; hence, its ingestion results in exposure to the parent compound and various methylated arsenicals. Both experimental and epidemiological evidences suggest that some of the adverse health effects associated with chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic may be mediated by these methylated metabolites. If i As methylation is an activation process, then the phenotype for inorganic arsenic methylation may determine risk associated with exposure to this metalloid. We examined inorganic arsenic methylation phenotypes and arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase genotypes in four species: three that methylate inorganic arsenic (human (Homo sapiens), rat (Rattus norwegicus), and mouse (Mus musculus)) and one that does not methylate inorganic arsenic (chimpanzee, Pan troglodytes). The predicted protein products from arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase are similar in size for rat (369 amino acid residues), mouse (376 residues), and human (375 residues). By comparison, a 275-nucleotide deletion beginning at nucleotide 612 in the chimpanzee gene sequence causes a frameshift that leads to a nonsense mutation for a premature stop codon after amino acid 205. The null phenotype for inorganic arsenic methylation in the chimpanzee is likely due to the deletion in the gene for arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase that yields an inactive truncated protein. This lineage-specific loss of function caused by the deletion event must have occurred in the Pan lineage after Homo-Pan divergence about 5 million years ago

  7. Evidence against the nuclear in situ binding of arsenicals-oxidative stress theory of arsenic carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    A large amount of evidence suggests that arsenicals act via oxidative stress in causing cancer in humans and experimental animals. It is possible that arsenicals could bind in situ close to nuclear DNA followed by Haber-Weiss type oxidative DNA damage. Therefore, we tested this...

  8. Evidence against the nuclear in situ binding of arsenicals-oxidative stress theory of arsenic carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large amount of evidence suggests that arsenicals act via oxidative stress in causing cancer in humans and experimental animals. It is possible that arsenicals could bind in situ close to nuclear DNA followed by Haber-Weiss type oxidative DNA damage. Therefore, we tested this hypothesis by using radioactive 73As labeled arsenite and vacuum filtration methodology to determine the binding affinity and capacity of 73As arsenite to calf thymus DNA and Type 2A unfractionated histones, histone H3, H4 and horse spleen ferritin. Arsenicals are known to release redox active Fe from ferritin. At concentrations up to about 1 mM, neither DNA nor any of the three proteins studied, Type II-A histones, histone H3, H4 or ferritin, bound radioactive arsenite in a specific manner. Therefore, it appears highly unlikely that initial in situ binding of trivalent arsenicals, followed by in situ oxidative DNA damage, can account for arsenic's carcinogenicity. This experimental evidence (lack of arsenite binding to DNA, histone Type II-A and histone H3, H4) does not rule out other possible oxidative stress modes of action for arsenic such as (a) diffusion of longer lived oxidative stress molecules, such as H2O2 into the nucleus and ensuing oxidative damage, (b) redox chemistry by unbound arsenicals in the nucleus, or (c) arsenical-induced perturbations in Fe, Cu or other metals which are already known to oxidize DNA in vitro and in vivo

  9. Comparative Distribution and Retention of Arsenic in Arsenic (+3 Oxidation State) Methyltransferase Knockout and Wild Type Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mouse arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt) gene encodes a ~ 43 kDa protein that catalyzes conversion of inorganic arsenic into methylated products. Heterologous expression of AS3MT or its silencing by RNA interference controls arsenic methylation phenotypes...

  10. Improved Aeration Process - Catalytic Role Of The Iron Oxides In Arsenic Oxidation And Coprecipitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowalski, Krysztof; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen

    2013-01-01

    improved aeration process that can also help in developing better arsenic removal treatment. The results present advantages of arsenic oxidation in an aeration process in the presence of ferrihydrite surface that have been shown to adsorb arsenic simultaneously to its oxidation. The presence of...... aeration. Moreover, it was found that the adsorption rate was limited by an excess of dissolved iron, due to competition between arsenic and iron compounds for adsorption sites on iron oxyhydroxide surface. The results were obtained both in lab and pilot scale experiments, which enabled to illustrate...

  11. REMOVAL OF ARSENIC FROM GROUNDWATER USING NATURALLY OCCURRING IRON OXIDES IN RURAL REGIONS OF MONGOLIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have found that the iron oxide particles produced by grinding naturally occurring iron ores are very effective in removing arsenic from water. The arsenic adsorption isothermal of the particles h...

  12. Geochemical modelling of arsenic adsorption to oxide surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Gustafsson, Jon Petter; Bhattacharya, Prosun

    2007-01-01

    In natural environments, arsenic chemistry is dominated by the reactions of its two predominant soluble forms, arsenate and arsenite. To predict the fate of As in the environment, it is necessary to consider processes that act to restrict its mobility. The mobility of As is strongly influenced by adsorption reactions to particle surfaces. Arsenate and arsenite may form surface complexes with a number of different oxides, including Fe-, Al-, Mn- and Ti oxides. The focus of this chapter is on t...

  13. Arsenic in ground-water under oxidizing conditions, south-west United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, F.N.

    1989-01-01

    Concentrations of dissolved arsenic in ground-water in alluvial basins of Arizona commonly exceed 50 ??g L-1 and reach values as large as 1,300 ??g L-1. Arsenic speciation analyses show that arsenic occurs in the fully oxidized state of plus 5 (As+5), most likely in the form of HAsO4???2, under existing oxidizing and pH conditions. Arsenic in source areas presumably is oxidized to soluble As before transport into the basin or, if after transport, before burial. Probable sources of arsenic are the sulphide and arsenide deposits in the mineralized areas of the mountains surrounding the basins. Arsenic content of alluvial material ranged from 2 to 88 ppm. Occurrence and removal of arsenic in ground-water are related to the pH and the redox condition of the ground-water, the oxidation state of arsenic, and sorption or exchange. Within basins, dissolved arsenic correlates (Pwater. Silicate hydrolysis reactions, as defined within the alluvial basins, under closed conditions cause increases in pH basinward and would promote desorption. Within the region, large concentrations of arsenic are commonly associated with the central parts of basins whose chemistries evolve under closed conditions. Arsenic does not correlate with dissolved iron (r = 0.09) but may be partly controlled by iron in the solid phase. High solid-phase arsenic contents were found in red clay beds. Large concentrations of arsenic also were found in water associated with red clay beds. Basins that contain the larger concentrations are bounded primarily by basalt and andesite, suggesting that the iron content as well as the arsenic content of the basin fill may play a role in the occurrence of arsenic in ground-water. Under oxidizing conditions in Arizona, arsenic in ground-water appears to be controlled in part by sorption or desorption of HAsO4???2 on active ferric oxyhydroxide surfaces. ?? 1989 Sciences and Technology Letters.

  14. The metabolism of inorganic arsenic oxides, gallium arsenide, and arsine: a toxicochemical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this review is to compare the metabolism, chemistry, and biological effects to determine if either of the industrial arsenicals (arsine and gallium arsenide) act like the environmental arsenic oxides (arsenite and arsenate). The metabolism of the arsenic oxides has been extensively investigated in the past 4 years and the differences between the arsenic metabolites in the oxidation states +III versus +V and with one or two methyl groups added have shown increased importance. The arsenic oxide metabolism has been compared with arsine (oxidation state -III) and arsenide (oxidation state between 0 to -III). The different metabolites appear to have different strengths of reaction for binding aresenic (III) to thiol groups, their oxidation-reduction reactions and their forming an arsenic-carbon bond. It is unclear if the differences in parameters such as the presence or absence of methyl metabolities, the rates of AsV reduction compared to the rates of AsIII oxidation, or the competition of phosphate and arsenate for cellular uptake are large enough to change biological effects. The arsine rate of decomposition, products of metabolism, target organ of toxic action, and protein binding appeared to support an oxidized arsenic metabolite. This arsine metabolite was very different from anything made by the arsenic oxides. The gallium arsenide had a lower solubility than any other arsenic compound and it had a disproportionate intensity of lung damage to suggest that the GaAs had a site of contact interaction and that oxidation reactions were important in its toxicity. The urinary metabolites after GaAs exposure were the same as excreted by arsenic oxides but the chemical compounds responsible for the toxic effects of GaAs are different from the aresnic oxides. The review concludes that there is insufficient evidence to equate the different arsenic compounds. There are several differences in the toxicity of the arsenic compounds that will require substantial

  15. Arsenic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of countries, including Argentina, Bangladesh, Chile, China, India, Mexico, and the United States of America. Drinking-water, ... ingestion of inorganic arsenic include developmental effects, neurotoxicity, diabetes, pulmonary disease and cardiovascular disease. Arsenic-induced myocardial ...

  16. Oleuropein ameliorates arsenic induced oxidative stress in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogun, Metin; Ozcan, Ayla; Karaman, Musa; Merhan, Oguz; Ozen, Hasan; Kukurt, Abdulsamed; Karapehlivan, Mahmut

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the potential preventive effect of oleuropein in an experimental arsenic toxicity in mice. For this purpose, mice were exposed to 5mg/kg/day sodium arsenite (NaAsO2) in drinking water and treated with 30mg/kg/day oleuropein for 15 days. At the end of the experiment, animals were sacrificed and selected organs were processed for biochemical and histopahtological investigations. Blood, liver, kidney and brain malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) levels were determined by colorimetric methods. Protein carbonyl content is measured by a commercial kit. Liver morphology and immunoreactivity for inducible NOS (iNOS) and endothelial NOS (eNOS) was evaluated microscopically. Level of NO was determined to decrease in blood and tissues whereas MDA increased in arsenic given mice. Tissue protein carbonyl content also increased in this group. Immunoreactivity for iNOS and eNOS was noted to increase with arsenic treatment. Oleuropein treatment had significant effects in normalizing the MDA and NO levels as well as protein carbonyl content. Immunohistochemical staining also showed reduction of the expression of iNOS and eNOS in liver. The results indicate that oleuropein ameliorates oxidative tissue damage by scavenging free radicals. PMID:27259345

  17. Preparation of Fe oxide nanoparticles for environmental applications: arsenic removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beker, Ulker; Cumbal, Luis; Duranoglu, Dilek; Kucuk, Ilknur; Sengupta, Arup K

    2010-08-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the adsorption-desorption behavior of a magnetically active hybrid sorbent (MAHS) material, prepared by dispersing colloid-like hydrated iron oxide particles in the outer periphery of a macroporous ion-exchange resin (Amberlite XAD-2). The experimental results show that the new sorbent material can simultaneously remove arsenic (V) and a chlorinated organic compound (2,6-dichlorophenol [2,6-DCP]) from aqueous solutions at around neutral pH. The recovery of arsenic and 2,6-DCP from MAHS was conducted using a regenerant containing 50% (v/v) CH3OH + 3% (w/v) NaOH. In less than 10 bed volumes of regenerant, more than 90% of As(V) and 2,6-DCP were recovered. PMID:20387093

  18. Metallothionein blocks oxidative DNA damage induced by acute inorganic arsenic exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied how protein metallothionein (MT) impacts arsenic-induced oxidative DNA damage (ODD) using cells that poorly express MT (MT-I/II double knockout embryonic cells; called MT-null cells) and wild-type (WT) MT competent cells. Arsenic (as NaAsO2) was less cytolethal over 24 h in WT cells (LC50 = 11.0 ± 1.3 μM; mean ± SEM) than in MT-null cells (LC50 = 5.6 ± 1.2 μM). ODD was measured by the immuno-spin trapping method. Arsenic (1 or 5 μM; 24 h) induced much less ODD in WT cells (121% and 141% of control, respectively) than in MT-null cells (202% and 260%). In WT cells arsenic caused concentration-dependent increases in MT expression (transcript and protein), and in the metal-responsive transcription factor-1 (MTF-1), which is required to induce the MT gene. In contrast, basal MT levels were not detectable in MT-null cells and unaltered by arsenic exposure. Transfection of MT-I gene into the MT-null cells markedly reduced arsenic-induced ODD levels. The transport genes, Abcc1 and Abcc2 were increased by arsenic in WT cells but either showed no or very limited increases in MT-null cells. Arsenic caused increases in oxidant stress defense genes HO-1 and GSTα2 in both WT and MT-null cells, but to much higher levels in WT cells. WT cells appear more adept at activating metal transport systems and oxidant response genes, although the role of MT in these responses is unclear. Overall, MT protects against arsenic-induced ODD in MT competent cells by potential sequestration of scavenging oxidant radicals and/or arsenic. - Highlights: • Metallothionein blocks arsenic toxicity. • Metallothionein reduces arsenic-induced DNA damage. • Metallothionein may bind arsenic or radicals produced by arsenic

  19. Arsenic responsive microRNAs in vivo and their potential involvement in arsenic-induced oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Xuefeng, E-mail: xuefengr@buffalo.edu [Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, School of Public Health and Health Professions, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Biomedical Sciences, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States); Gaile, Daniel P. [Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health and Health Professions, the State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States); Gong, Zhihong [Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, School of Public Health and Health Professions, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States); Qiu, Wenting [School of Public Health, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325035 (China); Ge, Yichen [Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, School of Public Health and Health Professions, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States); Zhang, Chuanwu; Huang, Chenping; Yan, Hongtao [School of Public Health, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325035 (China); Olson, James R. [Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, School of Public Health and Health Professions, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Biomedical Sciences, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States); Kavanagh, Terrance J. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Wu, Hongmei, E-mail: hongmeiwwu@hotmail.com [School of Public Health, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325035 (China)

    2015-03-15

    Arsenic exposure is postulated to modify microRNA (miRNA) expression, leading to changes of gene expression and toxicities, but studies relating the responses of miRNAs to arsenic exposure are lacking, especially with respect to in vivo studies. We utilized high-throughput sequencing technology and generated miRNA expression profiles of liver tissues from Sprague Dawley (SD) rats exposed to various concentrations of sodium arsenite (0, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 mg/L) for 60 days. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis of the miRNA expression profiles clustered the SD rats into different groups based on the arsenic exposure status, indicating a highly significant association between arsenic exposure and cluster membership (p-value of 0.0012). Multiple miRNA expressions were altered by arsenic in an exposure concentration-dependent manner. Among the identified arsenic-responsive miRNAs, several are predicted to target Nfe2l2-regulated antioxidant genes, including glutamate–cysteine ligase (GCL) catalytic subunit (GCLC) and modifier subunit (GCLM) which are involved in glutathione (GSH) synthesis. Exposure to low concentrations of arsenic increased mRNA expression for Gclc and Gclm, while high concentrations significantly reduced their expression, which were correlated to changes in hepatic GCL activity and GSH level. Moreover, our data suggested that other mechanisms, e.g., miRNAs, rather than Nfe2l2-signaling pathway, could be involved in the regulation of mRNA expression of Gclc and Gclm post-arsenic exposure in vivo. Together, our findings show that arsenic exposure disrupts the genome-wide expression of miRNAs in vivo, which could lead to the biological consequence, such as an altered balance of antioxidant defense and oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Chronic arsenic exposure induces changes of hepatic miRNA expression profiles. • Hepatic GCL activity and GSH level in rats are altered following arsenic exposure. • Arsenic induced GCL expression change is

  20. Arsenic responsive microRNAs in vivo and their potential involvement in arsenic-induced oxidative stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic exposure is postulated to modify microRNA (miRNA) expression, leading to changes of gene expression and toxicities, but studies relating the responses of miRNAs to arsenic exposure are lacking, especially with respect to in vivo studies. We utilized high-throughput sequencing technology and generated miRNA expression profiles of liver tissues from Sprague Dawley (SD) rats exposed to various concentrations of sodium arsenite (0, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 mg/L) for 60 days. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis of the miRNA expression profiles clustered the SD rats into different groups based on the arsenic exposure status, indicating a highly significant association between arsenic exposure and cluster membership (p-value of 0.0012). Multiple miRNA expressions were altered by arsenic in an exposure concentration-dependent manner. Among the identified arsenic-responsive miRNAs, several are predicted to target Nfe2l2-regulated antioxidant genes, including glutamate–cysteine ligase (GCL) catalytic subunit (GCLC) and modifier subunit (GCLM) which are involved in glutathione (GSH) synthesis. Exposure to low concentrations of arsenic increased mRNA expression for Gclc and Gclm, while high concentrations significantly reduced their expression, which were correlated to changes in hepatic GCL activity and GSH level. Moreover, our data suggested that other mechanisms, e.g., miRNAs, rather than Nfe2l2-signaling pathway, could be involved in the regulation of mRNA expression of Gclc and Gclm post-arsenic exposure in vivo. Together, our findings show that arsenic exposure disrupts the genome-wide expression of miRNAs in vivo, which could lead to the biological consequence, such as an altered balance of antioxidant defense and oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Chronic arsenic exposure induces changes of hepatic miRNA expression profiles. • Hepatic GCL activity and GSH level in rats are altered following arsenic exposure. • Arsenic induced GCL expression change is

  1. Arsenic transformation and mobilization from minerals by the arsenite oxidizing strain WAO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhine, E.D.; Onesios, K.M.; Serfes, M.E.; Reinfelder, J.R.; Young, L.Y.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of arsenic concentrations in New Jersey well water from the Newark Basin showed up to 15% of the wells exceed 10 ??g L-1, with a maximum of 215 ??g L-1. In some geologic settings in the basin, this mobile arsenic could be from the weathering of pyrite (FeS2) found in black shale that contains up to 4% arsenic by weight. We hypothesized that under oxic conditions at circumneutral pH, the microbially mediated oxidation of sulfide in the pyrite lattice would lead to the release of pyrite-bound arsenic. Moreover, the oxidation of aqueous As(III) to As(V) by aerobic microorganisms could further enhance arsenic mobilization from the solid phase. Enrichment cultures under aerobic, As(III)-oxidizing conditions were established under circumneutral pH with weathered black shale from the Newark Basin as the inoculum source. Strain WAO, an autotrophic inorganic-sulfur and As(III)-oxidizer, was isolated and phylogenetically and physiologically characterized. Arsenic mobilization studies from arsenopyrite (FeAsS) mineral, conducted with strain WAO at circumneutral pH, showed microbially enhanced mobilization of arsenic and complete oxidation of released arsenic and sulfur to stoichiometric amounts of arsenate and sulfate. In addition, WAO preferentially colonized pyrite on the surface of arsenic-bearing, black shale thick sections. These findings support the hypothesis that microorganisms can directly mobilize and transform arsenic bound in mineral form at circumneutral pH and suggest that the microbial mobilization of arsenic into groundwater may be important in other arsenic-impacted aquifers. ?? 2008 American Chemical Society.

  2. Intrinsic properties of cupric oxide nanoparticles enable effective filtration of arsenic from water

    OpenAIRE

    McDonald, Kyle J.; Brandon Reynolds; Reddy, K J

    2015-01-01

    The contamination of arsenic in human drinking water supplies is a serious global health concern. Despite multiple years of research, sustainable arsenic treatment technologies have yet to be developed. This study demonstrates the intrinsic abilities of cupric oxide nanoparticles (CuO-NP) towards arsenic adsorption and the development of a point-of-use filter for field application. X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy experiments were used to examine adsorption, desorption, ...

  3. Electrophoretic deposition of adsorbed arsenic on fine iron oxide particles in tap water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Syahira Mohd; Bakar, Noor Fitrah Abu; Naim, M. Nazli; Rahman, Norazah Abd; Talib, Suhaimi Abdul

    2016-02-01

    Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) technique has been demonstrated to remove arsenic with natural adsorbent (fine iron oxide particles) in tap water samples. Characterizations of metal element particularly arsenic and fine iron oxide particles in tap water from two different locations, i.e. commercial and residential areas, were conducted. Results showed that the concentration of arsenic in tap water from residential area was higher than commercial area samples i.e. 0.022 ± 0.004 and 0.016 ± 0.008 ppm, respectively. The same finding was observed in zeta potential value where it was higher in the residential area than commercial area, i.e. -42.27 ± 0.12 and -34.83 ± 0.23 mV, respectively. During the removal of arsenic using the EPD technique, direct current (DC) voltage was varied from 5 to 25V at a constant electrode distance of 30 mm. Effect of zeta potential, voltage and electrode type were intensively investigated. High percentage removal of arsenic was obtained from carbon plate than carbon fibre electrode. The percentage removal of arsenic from all samples slightly decreased with increasing of the applied voltage. EDX analysis confirmed that arsenic has adsorbed onto deposited iron oxide particles on the anode electrode. Overall, EPD technique was found to be successful in removing arsenic onto fine iron oxide particles in tap water with 26% ± 1.05 of removal.

  4. Multifunctional Silver Coated E-33/Iron Oxide Water Filters: Inhibition of Biofilm Growth and Arsenic Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayoxide® E33 (E-33, Goethite) is a widely used commercial material for arsenic adsorption. It is a mixture of iron oxyhydroxide and oxides. E-33 is primarily used to remove arsenic from water and to a lesser extent, other anions, but generally lacks multifunctuality. It is a non...

  5. Oxidative Damage in Lymphocytes of Copper Smelter Workers Correlated to Higher Levels of Excreted Arsenic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Jorge; Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Coddou, Claudio; Nelson, Pablo; Maisey, Kevin; Valdés, Daniel; Aspee, Alexis; Espinosa, Victoria; Rozas, Carlos; Montoya, Margarita; Mandiola, Cristian; Rodríguez, Felipe E.; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Escobar, Alejandro; Fernández, Ricardo; Diaz, Hernán; Sandoval, Mario; Imarai, Mónica; Rios, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    Arsenic has been associated with multiple harmful effects at the cellular level. Indirectly these defects could be related to impairment of the integrity of the immune system, in particular in lymphoid population. To characterize the effect of Arsenic on redox status on this population, copper smelter workers and arsenic unexposed donors were recruited for this study. We analyzed urine samples and lymphocyte enriched fractions from donors to determinate arsenic levels and lymphocyte proliferation. Moreover, we studied the presence of oxidative markers MDA, vitamin E and SOD activity in donor plasma. Here we demonstrated that in human beings exposed to high arsenic concentrations, lymphocyte MDA and arsenic urinary levels showed a positive correlation with SOD activity, and a negative correlation with vitamin E serum levels. Strikingly, lymphocytes from the arsenic exposed population respond to a polyclonal stimulator, phytohemaglutinin, with higher rates of thymidine incorporation than lymphocytes of a control population. As well, similar in vitro responses to arsenic were observed using a T cell line. Our results suggest that chronic human exposure to arsenic induces oxidative damage in lymphocytes and could be considered more relevant than evaluation of T cell surveillance. PMID:21253489

  6. Chronic Arsenic Exposure-Induced Oxidative Stress is Mediated by Decreased Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Rat Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Chandra; Kumar, Vijay

    2016-09-01

    The present study was executed to study the effect of chronic arsenic exposure on generation of mitochondrial oxidative stress and biogenesis in rat liver. Chronic sodium arsenite treatment (25 ppm for 12 weeks) decreased mitochondrial complexes activity in rat liver. There was a decrease in mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) activity in arsenic-treated rats that might be responsible for increased protein and lipid oxidation as observed in our study. The messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of mitochondrial and nuclear-encoded subunits of complexes I (ND1 and ND2) and IV (COX I and COX IV) was downregulated in arsenic-treated rats only. The protein and mRNA expression of MnSOD was reduced suggesting increased mitochondrial oxidative damage after arsenic treatment. There was activation of Bax and caspase-3 followed by release of cytochrome c from mitochondria suggesting induction of apoptotic pathway under oxidative stress. The entire phenomenon was associated with decrease in mitochondrial biogenesis as evident by decreased protein and mRNA expression of nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1), nuclear respiratory factor 2 (NRF-2), peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma-coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) in arsenic-treated rat liver. The results of the present study indicate that arsenic-induced mitochondrial oxidative stress is associated with decreased mitochondrial biogenesis in rat liver that may present one of the mechanisms for arsenic-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:26767369

  7. Application of Metal Oxide Heterostructures in Arsenic Removal from Contaminated Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It has become one of the major environmental problems for people worldwide to be exposed to high arsenic concentrations through contaminated drinking water, and even the long-term intake of small doses of arsenic has a carcinogenic effect. As an efficient and economic approach for the purification of arsenic-containing water, the adsorbents in adsorption processes have been widely studied. Among a variety of adsorbents reported, the metal oxide heterostructures with high surface area and specific affinity for arsenic adsorption from aqueous systems have demonstrated a promising performance in practical applications. This review paper aims to summarize briefly the metal oxide heterostructures in arsenic removal from contaminated water, so as to provide efficient, economic, and robust solutions for water purification.

  8. Molecular basis for arsenic-Induced alteration in nitric oxide production and oxidative stress: implication of endothelial dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accumulated epidemiological studies have suggested that prolonged exposure of humans to arsenic in drinking water is associated with vascular diseases. The exact mechanism of how this occurs currently unknown. Nitric oxide (NO), formed by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), plays a crucial role in the vascular system. Decreased availability of biologically active NO in the endothelium is implicated in the pathophysiology of several vascular diseases and inhibition of eNOS by arsenic is one of the proposed mechanism s for arsenic-induced vascular diseases. In addition, during exposure to arsenic, overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can occur, resulting in oxidative stress, which is another major risk factor for vascular dysfunction. The molecular basis for decreased NO levels and increased oxidative stress during arsenic exposure is poorly understood. In this article, evidence for arsenic-mediated alteration in NO production and oxidative stress is reviewed. The results of a cross-sectional study in an endemic area of chronic arsenic poisoning and experimental animal studies to elucidate a potential mechanism for the impairment of NO formation and oxidative stress caused by prolonged exposure to arsenate in the drinking water are also reviewed

  9. Effects of a manganese oxide-modified biochar composite on adsorption of arsenic in red soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhihong; Zhou, Li; Huang, Yifan; Song, Zhengguo; Qiu, Weiwen

    2015-11-01

    The arsenic adsorption capacity of a manganese oxide-modified biochar composite (MBC), prepared by pyrolysis of a mixture of potassium permanganate and biochar, was investigated in red soil. Adsorption experiments using batch procedures were used to estimate the arsenic adsorption capacities of the absorbent materials. Adsorption and desorption isotherms, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterise the prepared adsorbent materials, and a plausible mechanism for arsenic removal by MBC was proposed. Arsenic in red soil-MBC mixtures exhibited lower mobility than that in soils amended with pristine biochar. The improved removal performance of soil-MBC mixtures was attributed to a lower H/C ratio, higher O/C ratio, higher surface hydrophilicity, and higher surface sorption capacity, even though the impregnation of manganese oxide decreased the specific surface area of the biochar. Arsenic retention increased as the biochar content increased, mainly owing to an increase in soil pH. Several oxygenated functional groups, especially O-H, CO, Mn-O, and Si-O, participated in the adsorption process, and manganese oxides played a significant role in the oxidation of arsenic. This study highlights the potential of MBC as an absorbent to immobilise arsenic for use in contaminated land remediation in the red soils region. PMID:26320008

  10. Metallothionein blocks oxidative DNA damage induced by acute inorganic arsenic exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Wei, E-mail: qu@niehs.nih.gov; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2015-02-01

    We studied how protein metallothionein (MT) impacts arsenic-induced oxidative DNA damage (ODD) using cells that poorly express MT (MT-I/II double knockout embryonic cells; called MT-null cells) and wild-type (WT) MT competent cells. Arsenic (as NaAsO{sub 2}) was less cytolethal over 24 h in WT cells (LC{sub 50} = 11.0 ± 1.3 μM; mean ± SEM) than in MT-null cells (LC{sub 50} = 5.6 ± 1.2 μM). ODD was measured by the immuno-spin trapping method. Arsenic (1 or 5 μM; 24 h) induced much less ODD in WT cells (121% and 141% of control, respectively) than in MT-null cells (202% and 260%). In WT cells arsenic caused concentration-dependent increases in MT expression (transcript and protein), and in the metal-responsive transcription factor-1 (MTF-1), which is required to induce the MT gene. In contrast, basal MT levels were not detectable in MT-null cells and unaltered by arsenic exposure. Transfection of MT-I gene into the MT-null cells markedly reduced arsenic-induced ODD levels. The transport genes, Abcc1 and Abcc2 were increased by arsenic in WT cells but either showed no or very limited increases in MT-null cells. Arsenic caused increases in oxidant stress defense genes HO-1 and GSTα2 in both WT and MT-null cells, but to much higher levels in WT cells. WT cells appear more adept at activating metal transport systems and oxidant response genes, although the role of MT in these responses is unclear. Overall, MT protects against arsenic-induced ODD in MT competent cells by potential sequestration of scavenging oxidant radicals and/or arsenic. - Highlights: • Metallothionein blocks arsenic toxicity. • Metallothionein reduces arsenic-induced DNA damage. • Metallothionein may bind arsenic or radicals produced by arsenic.

  11. Arsenic Attenuation By Oxidized Aquifer Sediments in Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stollenwerk, K.G.; Breit, G.N.; Welch, A.H.; Yount, J.C.; Whitney, J.W.; Foster, A.L.; Uddin, M.N.; Majumder, R.K.; Ahmed, N.; /Geological Survey, Denver /Geological

    2007-07-13

    Recognition of arsenic (As) contamination of shallow fluvio-deltaic aquifers in the Bengal Basin has resulted in increasing exploitation of groundwater from deeper aquifers that generally contain low concentrations of dissolved As. Pumping-induced infiltration of high-As groundwater could eventually cause As concentrations in these aquifers to increase. This study investigates the adsorption capacity for As of sediment from a low-As aquifer near Dhaka, Bangladesh. A shallow, chemically-reducing aquifer at this site extends to a depth of 50 m and has maximum As concentrations in groundwater of 900 {micro}g/L. At depths greater than 50 m, geochemical conditions are more oxidizing and groundwater has < 5 {micro}g/L As. There is no thick layer of clay at this site to inhibit vertical transport of groundwater. Arsenite [As(III)] is the dominant oxidation state in contaminated groundwater; however, data from laboratory batch experiments show that As(III) is oxidized to arsenate [As(V)] by manganese (Mn) minerals that are present in the oxidized sediment. Thus, the long-term viability of the deeper aquifers as a source of water supply is likely to depend on As(V) adsorption. The adsorption capacity of these sediments is a function of the oxidation state of As and the concentration of other solutes that compete for adsorption sites. Arsenite that was not oxidized did adsorb, but to a much lesser extent than As(V). Phosphate (P) caused a substantial decrease in As(V) adsorption. Increasing pH and concentrations of silica (Si) had lesser effects on As(V) adsorption. The effect of bicarbonate (HCO{sub 3}) on As(V) adsorption was negligible. Equilibrium constants for adsorption of As(V), As(III), P, Si, HCO3, and H were determined from the experimental data and a quantitative model developed. Oxidation of As(III) was modeled with a first-order rate constant. This model was used to successfully simulate As(V) adsorption in the presence of multiple competing solutes. Results

  12. Arsenic attenuation by oxidized aquifer sediments in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stollenwerk, K.G.; Breit, G.N.; Welch, A.H.; Yount, J.C.; Whitney, J.W.; Foster, A.L.; Uddin, M.N.; Majumder, R.K.; Ahmed, N.

    2007-01-01

    Recognition of arsenic (As) contamination of shallow fluvio-deltaic aquifers in the Bengal Basin has resulted in increasing exploitation of groundwater from deeper aquifers that generally contain low concentrations of dissolved As. Pumping-induced infiltration of high-As groundwater could eventually cause As concentrations in these aquifers to increase. This study investigates the adsorption capacity for As of sediment from a low-As aquifer near Dhaka, Bangladesh. A shallow, chemically-reducing aquifer at this site extends to a depth of 50??m and has maximum As concentrations in groundwater of 900????g/L. At depths greater than 50??m, geochemical conditions are more oxidizing and groundwater has < 5????g/L As. There is no thick layer of clay at this site to inhibit vertical transport of groundwater. Arsenite [As(III)] is the dominant oxidation state in contaminated groundwater; however, data from laboratory batch experiments show that As(III) is oxidized to arsenate [As(V)] by manganese (Mn) minerals that are present in the oxidized sediment. Thus, the long-term viability of the deeper aquifers as a source of water supply is likely to depend on As(V) adsorption. The adsorption capacity of these sediments is a function of the oxidation state of As and the concentration of other solutes that compete for adsorption sites. Arsenite that was not oxidized did adsorb, but to a much lesser extent than As(V). Phosphate (P) caused a substantial decrease in As(V) adsorption. Increasing pH and concentrations of silica (Si) had lesser effects on As(V) adsorption. The effect of bicarbonate (HCO3) on As(V) adsorption was negligible. Equilibrium constants for adsorption of As(V), As(III), P, Si, HCO3, and H were determined from the experimental data and a quantitative model developed. Oxidation of As(III) was modeled with a first-order rate constant. This model was used to successfully simulate As(V) adsorption in the presence of multiple competing solutes. Results from these

  13. Graphene oxide amplifies the phytotoxicity of arsenic in wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiangang; Kang, Jia; Lu, Kaicheng; Zhou, Ruiren; Mu, Li; Zhou, Qixing

    2014-08-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is widely used in various fields and is considered to be relatively biocompatible. Herein, ``indirect'' nanotoxicity is first defined as toxic amplification of toxicants or pollutants by nanomaterials. This work revealed that GO greatly amplifies the phytotoxicity of arsenic (As), a widespread contaminant, in wheat, for example, causing a decrease in biomass and root numbers and increasing oxidative stress, which are thought to be regulated by its metabolisms. Compared with As or GO alone, GO combined with As inhibited the metabolism of carbohydrates, enhanced amino acid and secondary metabolism and disrupted fatty acid metabolism and the urea cycle. GO also triggered damage to cellular structures and electrolyte leakage and enhanced the uptake of GO and As. Co-transport of GO-loading As and transformation of As(V) to high-toxicity As(III) by GO were observed. The generation of dimethylarsinate, produced from the detoxification of inorganic As, was inhibited by GO in plants. GO also regulated phosphate transporter gene expression and arsenate reductase activity to influence the uptake and transformation of As, respectively. Moreover, the above effects of GO were concentration dependent. Given the widespread exposure to As in agriculture, the indirect nanotoxicity of GO should be carefully considered in food safety.

  14. Methylation of Arsenic by Recombinant Human Wild-Type Arsenic (+3 Oxidation State) Methyltransferase and its Methionine 287 Threonine (M287T) Polymorph

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACT Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) is the key enzyme in the pathway for methylation of arsenicals. A common polymorphism in the AS3MT gene that replaces a threonyl residue in position 287 with a methionyl residue (AS3MT/M287T) occurs at a frequency...

  15. Capture of gas-phase arsenic oxide by lime: kinetic and mechanistic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, R A; Fan, L S

    2001-02-15

    Trace metal emission from coal combustion is a major concern for coal-burning utilities. Toxic compounds such as arsenic species are difficult to control because of their high volatility. Mineral sorbents such as lime and hydrated lime have been shown to be effective in capturing arsenic from the gas phase over a wide temperature range. In this study, the mechanism of interaction between arsenic oxide (As2O3) and lime (CaO) is studied over the range of 300-1000 degrees C. The interaction between these two components is found to depend on the temperature; tricalcium orthoarsenate (Ca3As2O8) is found to be the product of the reaction below 600 degrees C, whereas dicalcium pyroarsenate (Ca2As2O7) is found to be the reaction product in the range of 700-900 degrees C. Maximum capture of arsenic oxide is found to occur in the range of 500-600 degrees C. At 500 degrees C, a high reactivity calcium carbonate is found to capture arsenic oxide by a combination of physical and chemical adsorption. Intrinsic kinetics of the reaction between calcium oxide and arsenic oxide in the medium-temperature range of 300-500 degrees C is studied in a differential bed flow-through reactor. Using the shrinking core model, the order of reaction with respect to arsenic oxide concentration is found to be about 1, and the activation energy is calculated to be 5.1 kcal/mol. The effect of initial surface area of CaO sorbent is studied over a range of 2.7-45 m2/g using the grain model. The effect of other major acidic flue gas species (SO2 and HCl) on arsenic capture is found to be minimal under the conditions of the experiment. PMID:11349294

  16. THE ROLE OF ARSENIC (+3 OXIDATION STATE) METHYLTRANSFERASE IN ARSENIC METABOLISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenic (As) is widely distributed in the environment. Epidemiological studies have linked chronic exposures to inorganic As (iAs) to adverse health effects such as skin lesions, peripheral neuropathy, cardiovascular, hepatic and renal disorders, diabetes mellitus, skin cancer,...

  17. Arsenic-induced oxidative myocardial injury: protective role of arjunolic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manna, Prasenjit; Sinha, Mahua; Sil, Parames C. [Bose Institute, Department of Chemistry, Kolkata, West Bengal (India)

    2008-03-15

    Arsenic, one of the most harmful metalloids, is ubiquitous in the environment. The present study has been carried out to investigate the protective role of a triterpenoid saponin, arjunolic acid (AA) against arsenic-induced cardiac oxidative damage. In the study, NaAsO{sub 2} was chosen as the source of arsenic. The free radical scavenging activity and the effect of AA on the intracellular antioxidant power were determined from its 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl radical scavenging ability and ferric reducing/antioxidant power assay, respectively. Oral administration of NaAsO{sub 2} at a dose of 10 mg/kg body weight for 2 days caused significant accumulation of arsenic in cardiac tissues of the experimental mice in association with the reduction in cardiac antioxidant enzymes activities, namely superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase. Arsenic intoxication also decreased the cardiac glutathione (GSH) and total thiol contents and increased the levels of oxidized glutathione (GSSG), lipid peroxidation end products and protein carbonyl content. Treatment with AA at a dose of 20 mg/kg body weight for 4 days prior to NaAsO{sub 2} intoxication protected the cardiac tissue from arsenic-induced oxidative impairment. In addition to oxidative stress, arsenic administration increased total cholesterol level as well as the reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level in the sera of the experimental mice. AA pretreatment, however, could prevent this hyperlipidemia. Histological studies on the ultrastructural changes in cardiac tissue supported the protective activity of AA also. Combining all, results suggest that AA could protect cardiac tissues against arsenic-induced oxidative stress probably due to its antioxidant property. (orig.)

  18. Regeneration of Commercial SCR Catalysts: Probing the Existing Forms of Arsenic Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Li, Junhua; Peng, Yue; Si, Wenzhe; He, Xu; Hao, Jiming

    2015-08-18

    To investigate the poisoning and regeneration of SCR catalysts, fresh and arsenic-poisoned commercial V2O5-WO3/TiO2 catalysts are researched in the context of deactivation mechanisms and regeneration technology. The results indicate that the forms of arsenic oxide on the poisoned catalyst are related to the proportion of arsenic (As) on the catalyst. When the surface coverage of (V+W+As) is lower than 1, the trivalent arsenic species (As(III)) is the major component, and this species prefers to permeate into the bulk-phase channels. However, at high As concentrations, pentavalent arsenic species (As(IV)) cover the surface of the catalyst. Although both arsenic species lower the NOx conversion, they affect the formation of N2O differently. In particular, N2O production is limited when trivalent arsenic species predominate, which may be related to As2O3 clogging the pores of the catalyst. In contrast, the pentavalent arsenic oxide species (As2O5) possess several As-OH groups. These As-OH groups could not only enhance the ability of the catalyst to become reduced, but also provide several Brønsted acid sites with weak thermal stability that promote the formation of N2O. Finally, although our novel Ca(NO3)2-based regeneration method cannot completely remove As2O3 from the micropores of the catalyst, this approach can effectively wipe off surface arsenic oxides without a significant loss of the catalyst's active components. PMID:26186082

  19. Arsenic Methylation, Oxidative Stress and Cancer - Is there a Link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenic is a multiorgan human carcinogen. The best-known example of this effect occurred in subgroups of the Taiwanese population who were chronically exposed to high levels of naturally occurring arsenic in drinking water and developed cancers of the skin, lung, urinary bladde...

  20. Intrinsic properties of cupric oxide nanoparticles enable effective filtration of arsenic from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Kyle J.; Reynolds, Brandon; Reddy, K. J.

    2015-06-01

    The contamination of arsenic in human drinking water supplies is a serious global health concern. Despite multiple years of research, sustainable arsenic treatment technologies have yet to be developed. This study demonstrates the intrinsic abilities of cupric oxide nanoparticles (CuO-NP) towards arsenic adsorption and the development of a point-of-use filter for field application. X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy experiments were used to examine adsorption, desorption, and readsorption of aqueous arsenite and arsenate by CuO-NP. Field experiments were conducted with a point-of-use filter, coupled with real-time arsenic monitoring, to remove arsenic from domestic groundwater samples. The CuO-NP were regenerated by desorbing arsenate via increasing pH above the zero point of charge. Results suggest an effective oxidation of arsenite to arsenate on the surface of CuO-NP. Naturally occurring arsenic was effectively removed by both as-prepared and regenerated CuO-NP in a field demonstration of the point-of-use filter. A sustainable arsenic mitigation model for contaminated water is proposed.

  1. Aerobic oxidation of mackinawite (FeS) and its environmental implication for arsenic mobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hoon Y.; Han, Young-Soo; Park, Sung W.; Hayes, Kim F.

    2010-06-01

    Oxidation of mackinawite (FeS) and concurrent mobilization of arsenic were investigated as a function of pH under oxidizing conditions. At acidic pH, FeS oxidation is mainly initiated by the proton-promoted dissolution, which results in the release of Fe(II) and sulfide in the solution. While most of dissolved sulfide is volatilized before being oxidized, dissolved Fe(II) is oxidized into green rust-like precipitates and goethite ( α-FeOOH). At basic pH, the development of Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxide coating on the FeS surface inhibits the solution-phase oxidation following FeS dissolution. Instead, FeS is mostly oxidized into lepidocrocite ( γ-FeOOH) via the surface-mediated oxidation without dissolution. At neutral pH, FeS is oxidized via both the solution-phase oxidation following FeS dissolution and the surface-mediated oxidation mechanisms. The mobilization of arsenic during FeS oxidation is strongly affected by FeS oxidation mechanisms. At acidic pH (and to some extent at neutral pH), the rapid FeS dissolution and the slow precipitation of Fe (oxyhydr)oxides results in arsenic accumulation in water. In contrast, the surface-mediated oxidation of FeS at basic pH leads to the direct formation of Fe (oxyhydr)oxides, which provides effective adsorbents for As under oxic conditions. At acidic and neutral pH, the solution-phase oxidation of dissolved Fe(II) accelerates the oxidation of the less adsorbing As(III) to the more adsorbing As(V). This study reveals that the oxidative mobilization of As may be a significant pathway for arsenic enrichment of porewaters in sulfidic sediments.

  2. A field investigation of arsenic transport by colloidal iron oxides in the hyporheic zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Carroll, D. M.; Hartland, A.; Larsen, J.; Andersen, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    Conceptual models concerning the fate of arsenic, and many other heavy metals, in aqueous environments including groundwater do not traditionally include colloids as potential facilitators of transport. However, there is significant evidence that heavy metals and oxyanions, including arsenic, preferentially partition into oxide phases. Iron oxides are commonly present as colloids (e.g. Ferrihydrite) and have the potential to mobilise and transport arsenic further than typically assumed. Interactions between Fe-oxides and natural organic matter (NOM) may be particularly significant in hyporheic sediments, given the comparatively high concentrations of dissolved organic carbon present and the presence of pronounced and dynamic redox fronts. Colloidal Fe-oxide stability may be enhanced by NOM surface coatings, potentially limiting colloid sedimentation and making encapsulated colloids more mobile. Furthermore, NOM is a significant agent driving As release, through the consumption of dissolved oxygen by microorganisms (leading to reductive dissolution of Fe-oxides in sediments. In this study the size-distribution and speciation of colloidal phases were studied beneath an ephemeral stream. We determined the proportions of Fe and As in colloidal fractions and determined the proportions held in complexes with NOM. Redox conditions went from aerobic, immediately beneath the stream, to anoxic and finally aerobic away from the stream and into the aquifer. This presentation will discuss dominant arsenic transport pathways including the possible importance of iron and natural organic colloids on arsenic transport.

  3. DETERMINATION OF THE RATES AND PRODUCTS OF FERROUS IRON OXIDATION IN ARSENIC-CONTAMINATED POND WATER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissolved ferrous iron and arsenic in the presence of insufficient oxygenated ground water is released into a pond. When the mixing of ferrous iron and oxygenated water within the pond occurs, the ferrous iron is oxidized and precipitated as an iron oxide. Groups of experiments...

  4. Chemical behaviors of different arsenic-bearing sulphides bio-oxidated by thermophilic bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Hong-ying; GONG En-pu; YANG Li-li; WANG Da-wen

    2005-01-01

    The study on arsenopyrite and realgar of bacterial oxidation shows that the chemical behaviors of different arsenic-bearing sulphides oxidated by thermophilic bacteria are quite distinct. Arsenopyrite is active and quickly eroded in bacteria-bearing solution. With a high leaching rate over 95%, the arsenopyrite phase cannot be detected by X-ray diffraction(XRD). Arsenopyrite is highly toxic to bacteria that at the initial stage of bio-oxidation, bacterial growth is inhibited and the number of bacterium cell drops from 2.26 × 108/mL to the lowest 2.01 × 105/mL. At the later stages of bio-oxidation, bacteria grow fast and reach 2.23 × 108/mL. Comparably, realgar is inertial and resistive to bacterial corrosion and oxidation. Arsenic in realgar crystal is hard to be leached and the residue is still realgar phase, as indicated by XRD. The cell number of bacteria varies a little, decreasing from 2.26 × 108/mL to 2.01 × 107/mL, during the bacterial oxidation. The results show that the crystal structure and arsenic valency of arsenic-bearing sulphides play a vital role during the leaching process of bacterial oxidation.

  5. Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.; GADGIL, ASHOK J.; ADDY, SUSAN E.A.; KOWOLIK, KRISTIN

    2010-06-01

    We describe laboratory and field results of a novel arsenic removal adsorbent called 'Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash' (ARUBA). ARUBA is prepared by coating particles of coal bottom ash, a waste material from coal fired power plants, with iron (hydr)oxide. The coating process is simple and conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Material costs for ARUBA are estimated to be low (~;;$0.08 per kg) and arsenic remediation with ARUBA has the potential to be affordable to resource-constrained communities. ARUBA is used for removing arsenic via a dispersal-and-removal process, and we envision that ARUBA would be used in community-scale water treatment centers. We show that ARUBA is able to reduce arsenic concentrations in contaminated Bangladesh groundwater to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. Using the Langmuir isotherm (R2 = 0.77) ARUBA's adsorption capacity in treating real groundwater is 2.6x10-6 mol/g (0.20 mg/g). Time-to-90percent (defined as the time interval for ARUBA to remove 90percent of the total amount of arsenic that is removed at equilibrium) is less than one hour. Reaction rates (pseudo-second-order kinetic model, R2>_ 0.99) increase from 2.4x105 to 7.2x105 g mol-1 min-1 as the groundwater arsenic concentration decreases from 560 to 170 ppb. We show that ARUBA's arsenic adsorption density (AAD), defined as the milligrams of arsenic removed at equilibrium per gram of ARUBA added, is linearly dependent on the initial arsenic concentration of the groundwater sample, for initial arsenic concentrations of up to 1600 ppb and an ARUBA dose of 4.0 g/L. This makes it easy to determine the amount of ARUBA required to treat a groundwater source when its arsenic concentration is known and less than 1600 ppb. Storing contaminated groundwater for two to three days before treatment is seen to significantly increase ARUBA's AAD. ARUBA can be separated from treated water by coagulation and clarification, which is expected to

  6. Study of iron oxide nanoparticles in soil for remediation of arsenic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shipley, Heather J., E-mail: heather.shipley@utsa.edu; Engates, Karen E.; Guettner, Allison M. [University of Texas at San Antonio, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (United States)

    2011-06-15

    There is a growing interest in the use of nanoparticles for environmental applications due to their unique physical and chemical properties. One possible application is the removal of contaminants from water. In this study, the use of iron oxide nanoparticles (19.3 nm magnetite and 37.0 nm hematite) were examined to remove arsenate and arsenite through column studies. The columns contained 1.5 or 15 wt% iron oxide nanoparticles and soil. Arsenic experiments were conducted with 1.5 wt% iron oxides at 1.5 and 6 mL/h with initial arsenate and arsenite concentrations of 100 {mu}g/L. Arsenic release occurred after 400 PV, and 100% release was reached. A long-term study was conducted with 15 wt% magnetite nanoparticles in soil at 0.3 mL/h with an initial arsenate concentration of 100 {mu}g/L. A negligible arsenate concentration occurred for 3559.6 pore volumes (PVs) (132.1 d). Eventually, the arsenate concentration reached about 20% after 9884.1 PV (207.9 d). A retardation factor of about 6742 was calculated indicating strong adsorption of arsenic to the magnetite nanoparticles in the column. Also, increased adsorption was observed after flow interruption. Other experiments showed that arsenic and 12 other metals (V, Cr, Co, Mn, Se, Mo, Cd, Pb, Sb, Tl, Th, U) could be simultaneously removed by the iron oxide nanoparticles in soil. Effluent concentrations were less than 10% for six out of the 12 metals. Desorption experiment showed partial irreversible sorption of arsenic to the iron oxide nanoparticle surface. Strong adsorption, large retardation factor, and resistant desorption suggest that magnetite and hematite nanoparticles have the potential to be used to remove arsenic in sandy soil possibly through in situ techniques.

  7. Electron microscopic study on pyrolysis of CCA (chromium, copper and arsenic oxide)-treated wood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hata, T.; Bronsveld, P.M; Vystavel, T.; Kooi, B.J.; de Hosson, J.T.M.; Kakitani, T.; Otono, A.; Imamura, Y.

    2003-01-01

    The effectiveness of pyrolysis as a possible technique for disposing of CCA (chromium, copper and arsenic oxide)-treated wood was studied. A CCA-treated sample given an extra heat treatment at 450 degreesC for 10 min was thoroughly investigated in order to establish the details of the reaction in wh

  8. Oxidative DNA damage of peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes, selectively induced by chronic arsenic exposure, is associated with extent of arsenic-related skin lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is increasing evidence that oxidative stress is an important risk factor for arsenic-related diseases. Peripheral blood leukocytes constitute an important defense against microorganisms or pathogens, while the research on the impact of chronic arsenic exposure on peripheral blood leukocytes is much more limited, especially at low level arsenic exposure. The purpose of the present study was to explore whether chronic arsenic exposure affects oxidative stress of peripheral blood leukocytes and possible linkages between oxidative stress and arsenic-induced skin lesions. 75 male inhabitants recruited from an As-endemic region of China were investigated in the present study. The classification of arsenicosis was based on the degree of skin lesions. Arsenic levels were measured in drinking water and urine by Atomic Fluorescence Spectroscopy. Urinary 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) was tested by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. 8-OHdG of peripheral blood leukocytes was evaluated using immunocytochemical staining. 8-OHdG-positive reactions were only present in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), but not in monocytes (MNs). The 8-OHdG staining of PMN cytoplasm was observed in all investigated populations, while the 8-OHdG staining of PMN nuclei was frequently found along with the elevated amounts of cell debris in individuals with skin lesion. Urinary arsenic levels were increased in the severe skin lesion group compared with the normal group. No relationship was observed between drinking water arsenic or urine 8-OHdG and the degree of skin lesions. These findings indicated that the target and persistent oxidative stress in peripheral blood PMNs may be employed as a sensitive biomarker directly to assess adverse health effects caused by chronic exposure to lower levels of arsenic. -- Highlights: ► Male inhabitants were investigated from an As-endemic region of China. ► 8-OHdG-positive reactions were only present in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs).

  9. Oxidative DNA damage of peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes, selectively induced by chronic arsenic exposure, is associated with extent of arsenic-related skin lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, Qiuling, E-mail: 924969007@qq.com [Department of Toxicology, Public Health College, Shanxi Medical University, No 56 Xin Jian Nan Lu, Taiyuan (030001) (China); Ma, Ning [Faculty of Health Science, Suzuka University of Medical Science, Suzuka, 510-0293 (Japan); Zhang, Jing; Xu, Wenchao; Li, Yong; Ma, Zhifeng; Li, Yunyun; Tian, Fengjie; Zhang, Wenping [Department of Toxicology, Public Health College, Shanxi Medical University, No 56 Xin Jian Nan Lu, Taiyuan (030001) (China); Mu, Jinjun [The Second Hospital, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan (030001) (China); Li, Yuanfei [The First Hospital, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan (030001) (China); Wang, Dongxing; Liu, Haifang; Yang, Mimi; Ma, Caifeng; Yun, Fen [Department of Toxicology, Public Health College, Shanxi Medical University, No 56 Xin Jian Nan Lu, Taiyuan (030001) (China)

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that oxidative stress is an important risk factor for arsenic-related diseases. Peripheral blood leukocytes constitute an important defense against microorganisms or pathogens, while the research on the impact of chronic arsenic exposure on peripheral blood leukocytes is much more limited, especially at low level arsenic exposure. The purpose of the present study was to explore whether chronic arsenic exposure affects oxidative stress of peripheral blood leukocytes and possible linkages between oxidative stress and arsenic-induced skin lesions. 75 male inhabitants recruited from an As-endemic region of China were investigated in the present study. The classification of arsenicosis was based on the degree of skin lesions. Arsenic levels were measured in drinking water and urine by Atomic Fluorescence Spectroscopy. Urinary 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) was tested by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. 8-OHdG of peripheral blood leukocytes was evaluated using immunocytochemical staining. 8-OHdG-positive reactions were only present in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), but not in monocytes (MNs). The 8-OHdG staining of PMN cytoplasm was observed in all investigated populations, while the 8-OHdG staining of PMN nuclei was frequently found along with the elevated amounts of cell debris in individuals with skin lesion. Urinary arsenic levels were increased in the severe skin lesion group compared with the normal group. No relationship was observed between drinking water arsenic or urine 8-OHdG and the degree of skin lesions. These findings indicated that the target and persistent oxidative stress in peripheral blood PMNs may be employed as a sensitive biomarker directly to assess adverse health effects caused by chronic exposure to lower levels of arsenic. -- Highlights: ► Male inhabitants were investigated from an As-endemic region of China. ► 8-OHdG-positive reactions were only present in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs).

  10. Blood biochemistry, thyroid hormones, and oxidant/antioxidant status of guinea pigs challenged with sodium arsenite or arsenic trioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanta, Ranjan Kumar; Garg, Anil Kumar; Dass, Ram Sharan; Behera, Suvendu Kumar

    2014-08-01

    The present experiment aimed to compare the two most commonly used compounds of arsenic (sodium arsenite and arsenic trioxide) for their effect on blood metabolites, thyroid hormones, and oxidant/antioxidant status in guinea pigs. Twenty-one adult guinea pigs were randomly divided into three equal groups. Animals in group T1 (control) were fed a basal diet, whereas 50 ppm arsenic was added in the basal diet either as sodium arsenite (T2) or arsenic trioxide (T3) and fed for 11 weeks. Serum aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase activities were significantly increased along with a decrease in blood hemoglobin level in both the arsenic-administered groups. The level of erythrocytic antioxidants (catalase, superoxide dismutase, reduced glutathione, glutathione-S-transferase, and glutathione reductase) was decreased and lipid peroxidation was elevated upon arsenic exposure. Serum thyroid hormone levels were reduced and arsenic levels in tissues increased in both the arsenic-exposed groups, irrespective of the arsenic compound. Thus, sodium arsenite and arsenic trioxide exerted similar adverse effects on blood metabolic profile, antioxidant status, and thyroid hormones in guinea pigs. PMID:24948398

  11. Toxicological and chemical assessment of arsenic-contaminated groundwater after electrochemical and advanced oxidation treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radić, Sandra; Crnojević, Helena; Vujčić, Valerija; Gajski, Goran; Gerić, Marko; Cvetković, Želimira; Petra, Cvjetko; Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera; Oreščanin, Višnja

    2016-02-01

    Owing to its proven toxicity and mutagenicity, arsenic is regarded a principal pollutant in water used for drinking. The objective of this study was the toxicological and chemical evaluation of groundwater samples obtained from arsenic enriched drinking water wells before and after electrochemical and ozone-UV-H2O2-based advanced oxidation processes (EAOP). For this purpose, acute toxicity test with Daphnia magna and chronic toxicity test with Lemna minor L. were employed as well as in vitro bioassays using human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBLs). Several oxidative stress parameters were estimated in L.minor. Physicochemical analysis showed that EAOP treatment was highly efficient in arsenic but also in ammonia and organic compound removal from contaminated groundwater. Untreated groundwater caused only slight toxicity to HPBLs and D. magna in acute experiments. However, 7-day exposure of L. minor to raw groundwater elicited genotoxicity, a significant growth inhibition and oxidative stress injury. The observed genotoxicity and toxicity of raw groundwater samples was almost completely eliminated by EAOP treatment. Generally, the results obtained with L. minor were in agreement with those obtained in the chemical analysis suggesting the sensitivity of the model organism in monitoring of arsenic-contaminated groundwater. In parallel to chemical analysis, the implementation of chronic toxicity bioassays in a battery is recommended in the assessment of the toxic and genotoxic potential of such complex mixtures. PMID:26580737

  12. Effect of adsorbed polyaniline on the thermal stability of iron and arsenic oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robson Fernandes de Farias

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Iron and arsenic oxide grains are coated with the conducting organic polymer polyaniline. The obtained samples were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, SEM, conducting measurements and thermogravimetry. The thermal stability of both oxides are increased. For As2O3 the sublimation temperature is increased from 165ºC in the pure oxide to 206ºC in the polymer modified sample. The pure Fe3O4 sample exhibits sublimation at 780ºC whereas the polyaniline coated oxide is stable until at least 1000ºC.

  13. Arsenic availability in rice from a mining area: Is amorphous iron oxide-bound arsenic a source or sink?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of iron (Fe) redox cycling on the mobility and bioavailability of arsenic (As) in paddy soils has attracted increasing concerns, especially in Asia, where the paddy soil is characteristic of Fe with high abundance and activity. However, whether amorphous Fe oxide-bound As acts as a source or a sink of As in natural field conditions needs to be clarified further. In this study, 73 pairs of soil and rice were collected from paddy fields contaminated by As-containing acid mining drainage. The most significant correlations between the iron fractions and As fractions suggest that Fe redox cycling can directly affect As fractionation in soils, which can then indirectly affect As bioavailability. Significantly negative correlations between amorphous Fe oxide-bound As in soil and As in rice grain were found, indicating that amorphous Fe oxide-bound As acts a sink of As. - Highlights: • Fe redox cycling can affect As fractionation and thus As bioavailability in soil. • Amorphous Fe oxide-bound As acts a sink of As. • Fe is of great significance in controlling As mobility and availability to rice. - The effects of Fe redox cycling on As fractionation in the soil and As bioavailability to rice were investigated

  14. The Arsenite Oxidation Potential of Native Microbial Communities from Arsenic-Rich Freshwaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazi, Stefano; Crognale, Simona; Casentini, Barbara; Amalfitano, Stefano; Lotti, Francesca; Rossetti, Simona

    2016-07-01

    Microorganisms play an important role in speciation and mobility of arsenic in the environment, by mediating redox transformations of both inorganic and organic species. Since arsenite [As(III)] is more toxic than arsenate [As(V)] to the biota, the microbial driven processes of As(V) reduction and As(III) oxidation may play a prominent role in mediating the environmental impact of arsenic contamination. However, little is known about the ecology and dynamics of As(III)-oxidizing populations within native microbial communities exposed to natural high levels of As. In this study, two techniques for single cell quantification (i.e., flow cytometry, CARD-FISH) were used to analyze the structure of aquatic microbial communities across a gradient of arsenic (As) contamination in different freshwater environments (i.e., groundwaters, surface and thermal waters). Moreover, we followed the structural evolution of these communities and their capacity to oxidize arsenite, when experimentally exposed to high As(III) concentrations in experimental microcosms. Betaproteobacteria and Deltaproteobacteria were the main groups retrieved in groundwaters and surface waters, while Beta and Gammaproteobacteria dominated the bacteria community in thermal waters. At the end of microcosm incubations, the communities were able to oxidize up to 95 % of arsenite, with an increase of Alphaproteobacteria in most of the experimental conditions. Finally, heterotrophic As(III)-oxidizing strains (one Alphaproteobacteria and two Gammaproteobacteria) were isolated from As rich waters. Our findings underlined that native microbial communities from different arsenic-contaminated freshwaters can efficiently perform arsenite oxidation, thus contributing to reduce the overall As toxicity to the aquatic biota. PMID:27090902

  15. Oxidative stress and hepatic stellate cell activation are key events in arsenic induced liver fibrosis in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic is an environmental toxicant and carcinogen. Exposure to arsenic is associated with development of liver fibrosis and portal hypertension through ill defined mechanisms. We evaluated hepatic fibrogenesis after long term arsenic exposure in a murine model. BALB/c mice were exposed to arsenic by daily gavages of 6 μg/gm body weight for 1 year and were evaluated for markers of hepatic oxidative stress and fibrosis, as well as pro-inflammatory, pro-apoptotic and pro-fibrogenic factors at 9 and 12 months. Hepatic NADPH oxidase activity progressively increased in arsenic exposure with concomitant development of hepatic oxidative stress. Hepatic steatosis with occasional collection of mononuclear inflammatory cells and mild portal fibrosis were the predominant liver lesion observed after 9 months of arsenic exposure, while at 12 months, the changes included mild hepatic steatosis, inflammation, necrosis and significant fibrosis in periportal areas. The pathologic changes in the liver were associated with markers of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) activation, matrix reorganization and fibrosis including α-smooth muscle actin, transforming growth factor-β1, PDGF-Rβ, pro-inflammatory cytokines and enhanced expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 and pro(α) collagen type I. Moreover, pro-apoptotic protein Bax was dominantly expressed and Bcl-2 was down-regulated along with increased number of TUNEL positive hepatocytes in liver of arsenic exposed mice. Furthermore, HSCs activation due to increased hepatic oxidative stress observed after in vivo arsenic exposure was recapitulated in co-culture model of isolated HSCs and hepatocytes exposed to arsenic. These findings have implications not only for the understanding of the pathology of arsenic related liver fibrosis but also for the design of preventive strategies in chronic arsenicosis.

  16. Thermochemistry of complex oxides of uranium(6), arsenic and alkali metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Standard reaction enthalpies for stoichiometric mixtures of mono-potassium orthoarsenate, uranium(6) and alkali metal nitrate oxides as well as mixtures of complex oxides of the M1AsUO6 (M1 = Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs) general formulas and potassium nitrate with hydrofluoric acid are determined in adiabatic calorimeter at the temperature of 298.15 K. Standard enthalpies for formation of complex oxides of uranium(6), arsenic and alkali metals at the temperature of 298.15 K are calculated by the obtained results. 8 refs., 1 tab

  17. Arsenic triggers the nitric oxide (NO) and S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) metabolism in Arabidopsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental contamination by arsenic constitutes a problem in many countries, and its accumulation in food crops may pose health complications for humans. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are involved at various levels in the mechanism of responding to environmental stress in higher plants. Using Arabidopsis seedlings exposed to different arsenate concentrations, physiological and biochemical parameters were analyzed to determine the status of ROS and RNS metabolisms. Arsenate provoked a significant reduction in growth parameters and an increase in lipid oxidation. These changes were accompanied by an alteration in antioxidative enzymes and the nitric oxide (NO) metabolism, with a significant increase in NO content, S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) activity and protein tyrosine nitration as well as a concomitant reduction in glutathione and S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) content. Our results indicate that 500 μM arsenate (AsV) causes nitro-oxidative stress in Arabidopsis, being the glutathione reductase and the GSNOR activities clearly affected. - Highlights: ► In Arabidopsis, arsenate provokes damages in the membrane integrity of root cells. ► As induces an oxidative stress according to an increase in lipid oxidation. ► NO content and protein tyrosine nitration increases under arsenate stress. ► Arsenate provokes a reduction of GSH, GSSG and GSNO content. ► Arsenate induces a nitro-oxidative stress in Arabidopsis. - Arsenic stress affects nitric oxide (NO) and glutathione (GSH) metabolism which provokes a nitro-oxidative stress.

  18. Concomitant administration of Moringa oleifera seed powder in the remediation of arsenic-induced oxidative stress in mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Richa; Dubey, D K; Kannan, G M; Flora, S J S

    2007-01-01

    Contamination of ground water by arsenic has become a cause of global public health concern. In West Bengal, India, almost 6 million people are endemically exposed to inorganic arsenic by drinking heavily contaminated groundwater through hand-pumped tube wells. No safe, effective and specific preventive or therapeutic measures for treating arsenic poisoning are available. We recently reported that some of the herbal extracts possess properties effective in reducing arsenic concentration and in restoring some of the toxic effects of arsenic in animal models. Moringa oleifera Lamarack (English: Horseradish-tree, Drumstick-tree, Hindi: Saijan, Sanskrit: Shigru) belongs to the Moringaceae family, is generally known in the developing world as a vegetable, a medicinal plant and a source of vegetable oil. The objective of the present study was to determine whether Moringa oleifera (M. oleifera) seed powder could restore arsenic induced oxidative stress and reduce body arsenic burden. Exposure to arsenic (2.5 mg/kg, intraperitoneally for 6weeks) led to a significant increase in the levels of tissue reactive oxygen species (ROS), metallothionein (MT) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) which were accompanied by a decrease in the activities in the antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in mice. Arsenic exposed mice also exhibited liver injury as reflected by reduced acid phosphatase (ACP), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities and altered heme synthesis pathway as shown by inhibited blood delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (delta-ALAD) activity. Co-administration of M. oleifera seed powder (250 and 500 mg/kg, orally) with arsenic significantly increased the activities of SOD, catalase, GPx with elevation in reduced GSH level in tissues (liver, kidney and brain). These changes were accompanied by approximately 57%, 64% and 17% decrease in blood ROS, liver

  19. Efficient arsenic(V) and arsenic(III) removal from acidic solutions with Novel Forager Sponge-loaded superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morillo, D; Pérez, G; Valiente, M

    2015-09-01

    Nowadays, there is a wide variety of arsenic decontamination processes being adsorption processes the most efficient. In this concern, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) have been proposed as an appropriate system to improve arsenic adsorption from acidic wastewater. The number of mines, the amount of ore processed, and thus the amount of mine (acid) wastewaters have been rapidly increased in recent decades. For this reason, arsenic removal from contaminated water is an important goal to accomplish environmental regulations. It is noteworthy that aggregation of these nanoparticles has been detected as the main difficulty, hindering the promising adsorption. In order to overcome this drawback, it is proposed a system to avoid aggregation based on nanoparticles dispersion into an appropriate supporting material. To this purpose, SPION have been fixed on a cellulosic sponge achieving a decrease of the aggregation state, an increase of the active centers, and consequently, arsenic adsorption increases. Experimental results report a lower aggregation of supported SPION over sponge than the observed in the non supported nanoparticles. At this point, a remarkable improvement in the sponge system adsorption capacity is observed in comparison with superparamagnetic nanoparticles in suspension, reaching adsorption capacities about 2.1 mmol As/g SPION and 12.1 mmol As/g SPION for arsenite and arsenate, respectively at pH 3.8. Then, the developed system not only amends the aggregation problem but also keep their nanoproperties intact, making the system a suitable one for arsenic removal in acidic wastewater treatment. PMID:25982936

  20. Arsenic toxicity induced endothelial dysfunction and dementia: Pharmacological interdiction by histone deacetylase and inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Bhupesh, E-mail: drbhupeshresearch@gmail.com; Sharma, P.M.

    2013-11-15

    Arsenic toxicity has been reported to damage all the major organs including the brain and vasculature. Dementia including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) are posing greater risk to the world population as it is now increasing at a faster rate. We have investigated the role of sodium butyrate, a selective histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor and aminoguanidine, a selective inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor in pharmacological interdiction of arsenic toxicity induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and dementia in rats. Arsenic toxicity was done by administering arsenic drinking water to rats. Morris water-maze (MWM) test was used for assessment of learning and memory. Endothelial function was assessed using student physiograph. Oxidative stress (aortic superoxide anion, serum and brain thiobarbituric acid reactive species, brain glutathione) and nitric oxide levels (serum nitrite/nitrate) were also measured. Arsenic treated rats have shown impairment of endothelial function, learning and memory, reduction in serum nitrite/nitrate and brain GSH levels along with increase in serum and brain TBARS. Sodium butyrate as well as aminoguanidine significantly convalesce arsenic induced impairment of learning, memory, endothelial function, and alterations in various biochemical parameters. It may be concluded that arsenic induces endothelial dysfunction and dementia, whereas, sodium butyrate, a HDAC inhibitor as well as aminoguanidine, a selective iNOS inhibitor may be considered as potential agents for the management of arsenic induced endothelial dysfunction and dementia. - Highlights: • As has induced endothelial dysfunction (Edf) and vascular dementia (VaD). • As has increased oxidative stress, AChE activity and decreased serum NO. • Inhibitors of HDAC and iNOS have attenuated As induced Edf and VaD. • Both the inhibitors have attenuated As induced biochemical changes. • Inhibitor of HDAC and iNOS has shown good potential

  1. Arsenic toxicity induced endothelial dysfunction and dementia: Pharmacological interdiction by histone deacetylase and inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic toxicity has been reported to damage all the major organs including the brain and vasculature. Dementia including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) are posing greater risk to the world population as it is now increasing at a faster rate. We have investigated the role of sodium butyrate, a selective histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor and aminoguanidine, a selective inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor in pharmacological interdiction of arsenic toxicity induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and dementia in rats. Arsenic toxicity was done by administering arsenic drinking water to rats. Morris water-maze (MWM) test was used for assessment of learning and memory. Endothelial function was assessed using student physiograph. Oxidative stress (aortic superoxide anion, serum and brain thiobarbituric acid reactive species, brain glutathione) and nitric oxide levels (serum nitrite/nitrate) were also measured. Arsenic treated rats have shown impairment of endothelial function, learning and memory, reduction in serum nitrite/nitrate and brain GSH levels along with increase in serum and brain TBARS. Sodium butyrate as well as aminoguanidine significantly convalesce arsenic induced impairment of learning, memory, endothelial function, and alterations in various biochemical parameters. It may be concluded that arsenic induces endothelial dysfunction and dementia, whereas, sodium butyrate, a HDAC inhibitor as well as aminoguanidine, a selective iNOS inhibitor may be considered as potential agents for the management of arsenic induced endothelial dysfunction and dementia. - Highlights: • As has induced endothelial dysfunction (Edf) and vascular dementia (VaD). • As has increased oxidative stress, AChE activity and decreased serum NO. • Inhibitors of HDAC and iNOS have attenuated As induced Edf and VaD. • Both the inhibitors have attenuated As induced biochemical changes. • Inhibitor of HDAC and iNOS has shown good potential in

  2. Arsenic Transformation Predisposes Human Skin Keratinocytes To UV-induced DNA Damage Yet Enhances Their Survival Apparently by Diminishing Oxidant Response

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Yang(Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China); Kojima, Chikara; Chignell, Colin; Mason, Ronald; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic and UV, both human skin carcinogens, may act together as skin co-carcinogens. We find human skin keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) are malignantly transformed by low-level arsenite (100 nM, 30 weeks; termed As-TM cells) and with transformation concurrently undergo full adaptation to arsenic toxicity involving reduced apoptosis and oxidative stress response to high arsenite concentrations. Oxidative DNA damage (ODD) is a possible mechanism in arsenic carcinogenesis and a hallmark o...

  3. Simple and Efficient Synthesis of Iron Oxide-Coated Silica Gel Adsorbents for Arsenic Removal: Adsorption Isotherms and Kinetic Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron oxide (ferrihydrite, hematite, and magnetite) coated silica gels were prepared using a low-cost, easily-scalable and straightforward method as the adsorbent material for arsenic removal application. Adsorption of the anionic form of arsenic oxyacids, arsenite (AsO2-) and arsenate (AsO4-3), onto hematite coated silica gel was fitted against non-linear 3-parameter-model Sips isotherm and 2-parameter-model Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm. Adsorption kinetics of arsenic could be well described by pseudo-second-order kinetic model and value of adsorption energy derived from non-linear Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm suggests chemical adsorption. Although arsenic adsorption process was not affected by the presence of sulfate, chloride, and nitrate anions, as expected, bicarbonate and silicate gave moderate negative effects while the presence of phosphate anions significantly inhibited adsorption process of both arsenite and arsenate. When the actual efficiency to remove arsenic was tested against 1 L of artificial arsenic-contaminated groundwater (0.6 mg/L) in the presence competing anions, the reasonable amount (20 g) of hematite coated silica gel could reduce arsenic concentration to below the WHO permissible safety limit of drinking water of 10 μg/L without adjusting pH and temperature, which would be highly advantageous for practical field application

  4. Grape Seed Proanthocyanidin Extract Alleviates Arsenic-induced Oxidative Reproductive Toxicity in Male Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shu Gang; GUO Shu Xia; DING Yu Song; NIU Qiang; XU Shang Zhi; PANG Li Juan; MA Ru Lin; JING Ming Xia; FENG Gang Ling; LIU Jia Ming

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the ability of grape seed proanthocyanidin extract (GSPE) in alleviating arsenic-induced reproductive toxicity. Methods Sixty male Kunming mice received the following treatments by gavage: normal saline solution (control); arsenic trioxide (ATO; 4 mg/kg); GSPE (400 mg/kg); ATO+GSPE (100 mg/kg);ATO+GSPE (200 mg/kg) and ATO+GSPE (400 mg/kg). Thereafter, the mice were sacrificed and weighed, and the testis was examined for pathological changes. Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), heme oxygenase 1 (HO1), glutathione S-transferase (GST), NAD(P)H dehydrogenase, and quinone 1 (NQO1) expression in the testis was detected by real-time PCR. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione (GSH), total antioxidative capability (T-AOC), malondialdehyde (MDA), 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), and reproductive indexes were analyzed. Results ATO-treated mice showed a significantly decreased sperm count and testis somatic index and activity levels of SOD, GSH, and T-AOC than control group. Compared to the ATO-treated group, ATO+GSPE group showed recovery of the measured parameters. Mice treated with ATO+high-dose GSPE showed the highest level of mRNA expression of Nrf2, HO, NQO1, and GST. Conclusion GSPE alleviates oxidative stress damage in mouse testis by activating Nrf2 signaling, thus counteracting arsenic-induced reproductive toxicity.

  5. Massive acute arsenic poisonings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Teresa; Trela, Franciszek

    2005-07-16

    Arsenic poisonings are still important in the field of toxicology, though they are not as frequent as about 20-30 years ago. In this paper, the arsenic concentrations in ante- and post-mortem materials, and also forensic and anatomo-pathological aspects in three cases of massive acute poisoning with arsenic(III) oxide (two of them with unexplained criminalistic background, in which arsenic was taken for amphetamine and one suicide), are presented. Ante-mortem blood and urine arsenic concentrations ranged from 2.3 to 6.7 microg/ml, respectively. Post-mortem tissue total arsenic concentrations were also detected in large concentrations. In case 3, the contents of the duodenum contained as much as 30.1% arsenic(III) oxide. The high concentrations of arsenic detected in blood and tissues in all presented cases are particularly noteworthy in that they are very rarely detected at these concentrations in fatal arsenic poisonings. PMID:15939162

  6. Transformation and removal of arsenic in groundwater by sequential anodic oxidation and electrocoagulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Tong, Man; Yuan, Songhu; Liao, Peng

    2014-08-01

    Oxidation of As(III) to As(V) is generally essential for the efficient remediation of As(III)-contaminated groundwater. The performance and mechanisms of As(III) oxidation by an as-synthesized active anode, SnO2 loaded onto Ti-based TiO2 nanotubes (Ti/TiO2NTs/Sb-SnO2), were investigated. The subsequent removal of total arsenic by electrocoagulation (EC) was further tested. The Ti/TiO2NTs/Sb-SnO2 anode showed a high and lasting electrochemical activity for As(III) oxidation. 6.67 μM As(III) in synthetic groundwater was completely oxidized to As(V) within 60 min at 50 mA. Direct electron transfer was mainly responsible at the current below 30 mA, while hydroxyl radicals contributed increasingly with the increase in the current above 30 mA. As(III) oxidation was moderately inhibited by the presence of bicarbonate (20 mM), while was dramatically increased with increasing the concentration of chloride (0-10 mM). After the complete oxidation of As(III) to As(V), total arsenic was efficiently removed by EC in the same reactor by reversing electrode polarity. The removal efficiency increased with increasing the current but decreased by the presence of phosphate and silica. Anodic oxidation represents an effective pretreatment approach to increasing EC removal of As(III) in groundwater under O2-limited conditions.

  7. Arsenic adsorption in pre-treatment natural zeolite with magnesium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A methodology was developed to modify a natural zeolite (chabazite) with magnesium oxide in order to remove arsenic (As+5) from water for human consumption. It is proposed a magnesium oxide while regarded as an efficient adsorbent for removing metals in water. X-ray diffraction analyses show significant changes in the chabazite due to the presence of oxides and amorphous hydroxides incorporated during the pre-treatment. Experimental design results show an efficiency greater than 90% of As+5 adsorbed in five minutes. The results indicate that the most significant variables affecting the adsorption of As+5 are the initial concentration of As and the solid/liquid ratio. Experimental data fitted better to Freundlich isotherm with a 20.17 mg/g adsorption capability. (Author)

  8. Construction of the recombinant broad-host-range plasmids providing their bacterial hosts arsenic resistance and arsenite oxidation ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewniak, Lukasz; Ciezkowska, Martyna; Radlinska, Monika; Sklodowska, Aleksandra

    2015-02-20

    The plasmid pSinA of Sinorhizobium sp. M14 was used as a source of functional phenotypic modules, encoding proteins involved in arsenite oxidation and arsenic resistance, to obtain recombinant broad-host-range plasmids providing their bacterial hosts arsenic resistance and arsenite oxidative ability. An arsenite oxidation module was cloned into pBBR1MCS-2 vector yielding plasmid vector pAIO1, while an arsenic resistance module was cloned into pCM62 vector yielding plasmid pARS1. Both plasmid constructs were introduced (separately and together) into the cells of phylogenetically distant (representing Alpha-, Beta-, and Gammaproteobacteria) and physiologically diversified (unable to oxidize arsenite and susceptible/resistant to arsenite and arsenate) bacteria. Functional analysis of the modified strains showed that: (i) the plasmid pARS1 can be used for the construction of strains with an increased resistance to arsenite [up to 20mM of As(III), (ii) the presence of the plasmid pAIO1 in bacteria previously unable to oxidize As(III) to As(V), contributes to the acquisition of arsenite oxidation abilities by these cells, (iii) the highest arsenite utilization rate are observed in the culture of strains harbouring both the plasmids pAIO1 and pARS1, (iv) the strains harbouring the plasmid pAIO1 were able to grow on arsenic-contaminated mine waters (∼ 3.0 mg As L(-1)) without any supplementation. PMID:25617684

  9. EFFECTS OF ADDROGRAPHIS PANICULATA (NEES. ON ARSENIC- INDUCED ALTERED GLUCOSE HOMEOSTASIS AND OXIDATIVE IMPAIRMENT IN PANCREAS OF SWISS MICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MANDAVA V. RAO

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Andrographis paniculata (Nees. on arsenic-induced changes in biochemical and cellular antioxident sytem was studies in adult female mice. Daily oral administration of arsenic trioxide (0.5 and 1.0mg/kg b.w for 30days induced a significant increase in blood glucose level which was associated with impaired glucose tolrence. Arsenic treatment also resulted in elevated level panreatic tissue specific makers such as activities of amylase and lipase in serum indicating pancreatic dysfunction. Interestingly, this biochemical dysfuntion was accompanied by a marked dose related enchancement of lipid peroxidation indicating significant induction of oxidative damage. Additional evidence such as deletion in reduced gluatathione levels and alterations in enzymic antioxidant defences like superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase in pancreas suggested induction of oxidative stress. Concomitant administration of Adrographis paniculata (50 mg/kg b.w. with arsenic significant restored all these parameters. These results suggest that Adrographis paniculata is capable to reducing arsenic-induce cellular oxidative and inflammatory changes in pancreas.

  10. Validation of In-Situ Iron-Manganese Oxide Coated Stream Pebbles as Sensors for Arsenic Source Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, J.; Peters, S. C.; Casteel, A.

    2013-12-01

    Locating nonpoint source contaminant fluxes can be challenging due to the inherent heterogeneity of source and of the subsurface. Contaminants such as arsenic are a concern for drinking water quality and ecosystem health. Arsenic contamination can be the result of several natural and anthropogenic sources, and therefore it can be difficult to trace and identify major areas of arsenic in natural systems. Identifying a useful source indicator for arsenic is a crucial step for environmental remediation efforts. Previous studies have found iron-manganese oxide coated streambed pebbles as useful source indicators due to their high attraction for heavy metals in water. In this study, pebbles, surface water at baseflow and nearby rocks were sampled from the Pennypack Creek and its tributaries, in southwestern Pennsylvania, to test the ability of coated streambed pebbles as environmental source indicators for arsenic. Quartz pebbles, 5-7 cm in diameter, were sampled to minimize elemental contamination from rock chemistry. In addition, quartz provides an excellent substrate for iron and manganese coatings to form. These coatings were leached from pebbles using 4M nitric acid with 0.1% concentrated hydrochloric acid. Following sample processing, analyses were performed using an ICP-MS and the resulting data were spatially organized using ArcGIS software. Arsenic, iron and manganese concentrations in the leachate are normalized to pebble surface area and each location is reported as a ratio of arsenic to iron and manganese. Results suggest that iron-manganese coated stream pebbles are useful indicators of arsenic location within a watershed.

  11. Ferrous-activated persulfate oxidation of arsenic(III) and diuron in aquatic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Effective oxidation of As(III)/diuron is achieved by Fe(II)-activated persulfate. • Hydroxyl and sulfate radical play important roles in As(III) and diuron oxidation. • CA and Na2S2O3 are efficient and environmental friendly chelating agents. • DFT calculation is found to be useful for degradation products prediction. -- Abstract: In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) can be an effective technology for the remediation of soil and groundwater polluted by organic and inorganic contaminants. This study investigated the oxidation of arsenic(III) (As(III)) and diuron using ferrous activated persulfate-based ISCO. The results indicated that Fe(II)/persulfate oxidation could be an effective method to oxidize As(III) and diuron. Effects of pH, S2O82− and Fe(II) amounts on the destruction of As(III) and diuron were examined in batch experiments. Acidic conditions favored the removal of As(III) and diuron. Four chelating agents, citric acid (CA), Na2S2O3, diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) and ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid disodium (EDTA-Na2) were used in attempt to maintain the quantity of ferrous ion in solution. In our experiments, CA and Na2S2O3 were found to be more effective than DTPA and EDTA-Na2. Our results also revealed a widely practical prospect of inorganic chelating agent Na2S2O3. Hydroxyl and sulfate radical were determined to play key roles in the oxidation process by using ethanol and tertiary butanol as molecular probes. Oxidation of As(III) yielded As(V) via the electron-transfer reaction. In the oxidation process of diuron, a stepwise nucleophilic substitution of chlorine by hydroxyl and a stepwise oxidation process of the methyl on the dimethylurea group by hydroxyl and sulfate radical were proposed

  12. Arsenite and ferrous iron oxidation linked to chemolithotrophic denitrification for the immobilization of arsenic in anoxic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, W.; Sierra-Alvarez, R.; Milner, L.; Oremland, R.; Field, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore a bioremediation strategy based on injecting NO3- to support the anoxic oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) and arsenite (As(III)) in the subsurface as a means to immobilize As in the form of arsenate (As(V)) adsorbed onto biogenic ferric (Fe(III)) (hydr)oxides. Continuous flows and filled columns were used to simulate a natural anaerobic groundwater and sediment system with co-occurring As(III) and Fe(II) in the presence (column SF1) or absence (column SF2) of nitrate, respectively. During operation for 250 days, the average influent arsenic concentration of 567 ??g L-1 was reduced to 10.6 (??9.6) ??g L-1 in the effluent of column SF1. The cumulative removal of Fe(II) and As(III) in SF1 was 6.5 to 10-fold higher than that in SF2. Extraction and measurement of the mass of iron and arsenic immobilized on the sand packing of the columns were close to the iron and arsenic removed from the aqueous phase during column operation. The dominant speciation of the immobilized iron and arsenic was Fe(III) and As(V) in SF1, compared with Fe(II) and As(III) in SF2. The speciation was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicate that microbial oxidation of As(III) and Fe(II) linked to denitrification resulted in the enhanced immobilization of aqueous arsenic in anaerobic environments by forming Fe(III) (hydr)oxide coated sands with adsorbed As(V). ?? 2009 American Chemical Society.

  13. Arsenic transformation predisposes human skin keratinocytes to UV-induced DNA damage yet enhances their survival apparently by diminishing oxidant response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inorganic arsenic and UV, both human skin carcinogens, may act together as skin co-carcinogens. We find human skin keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) are malignantly transformed by low-level arsenite (100 nM, 30 weeks; termed As-TM cells) and with transformation concurrently undergo full adaptation to arsenic toxicity involving reduced apoptosis and oxidative stress response to high arsenite concentrations. Oxidative DNA damage (ODD) is a possible mechanism in arsenic carcinogenesis and a hallmark of UV-induced skin cancer. In the current work, inorganic arsenite exposure (100 nM) did not induce ODD during the 30 weeks required for malignant transformation. Although acute UV-treatment (UVA, 25 J/cm2) increased ODD in passage-matched control cells, once transformed by arsenic to As-TM cells, acute UV actually further increased ODD (> 50%). Despite enhanced ODD, As-TM cells were resistant to UV-induced apoptosis. The response of apoptotic factors and oxidative stress genes was strongly mitigated in As-TM cells after UV exposure including increased Bcl2/Bax ratio and reduced Caspase-3, Nrf2, and Keap1 expression. Several Nrf2-related genes (HO-1, GCLs, SOD) showed diminished responses in As-TM cells after UV exposure consistent with reduced oxidant stress response. UV-exposed As-TM cells showed increased expression of cyclin D1 (proliferation gene) and decreased p16 (tumor suppressor). UV exposure enhanced the malignant phenotype of As-TM cells. Thus, the co-carcinogenicity between UV and arsenic in skin cancer might involve adaptation to chronic arsenic exposure generally mitigating the oxidative stress response, allowing apoptotic by-pass after UV and enhanced cell survival even in the face of increased UV-induced oxidative stress and increased ODD. - Highlights: → Arsenic transformation adapted to UV-induced apoptosis. → Arsenic transformation diminished oxidant response. → Arsenic transformation enhanced UV-induced DNA damage.

  14. Arsenic alters monocyte superoxide anion and nitric oxide production in environmentally exposed children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic (As) exposure has been associated with alterations in the immune system, studies in experimental models and adults have shown that these effects involve macrophage function; however, limited information is available on what type of effects could be induced in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of As exposure, through the association of inorganic As (iAs) and its metabolites [monomethylated arsenic (MMA) and dimethylated arsenic (DMA)] with basal levels of nitric oxide (NO·-) and superoxide anion (O2·-), in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and monocytes, and NO·- and O2·- produced by activated monocytes. Hence, a cross-sectional study was conducted in 87 children (6-10 years old) who had been environmentally exposed to As through drinking water. Levels of urinary As species (iAs, MMA and DMA) were determined by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry, total As (tAs) represents the sum of iAs and its species; tAs urine levels ranged from 12.3 to 1411 μg/g creatinine. Using multiple linear regression models, iAs presented a positive and statistical association with basal NO·- in PBMC (β = 0.0048, p = 0.049) and monocytes (β = 0.0044, p = 0.044), while basal O2·- had a significant positive association with DMA (β = 0.0025, p = 0.046). In activated monocytes, O2·- showed a statistical and positive association with iAs (β = 0.0108, p = 0.023), MMA (β = 0.0066, p = 0.022), DMA (β = 0.0018, p = 0.015), and tAs (β = 0.0013, p = 0.015). We conclude that As exposure in the studied children was positively associated with basal levels of NO·- and O2·- in PBMC and monocytes, suggesting that As induces oxidative stress in circulating blood cells. Additionally, this study showed a positive association of O2·- production with iAs and its metabolites in stimulated monocytes, supporting previous data that suggests that these cells, and particularly the O2·- activation pathway, are relevant targets for As toxicity.

  15. Removal of arsenic from Janghang smelter site and energy crops-grown soil with soil washing using magnetic iron oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jaemaro; Zhao, Xin; Lee, Jong Keun; Kim, Jae Young

    2014-05-01

    Arsenic compounds are considered carcinogen and easily enter drinking water supplies with their natural abundance. US Environmental Protection Agency is finalizing a regulation to reduce the public health risks from arsenic in drinking water by revising the current drinking water standard for arsenic from 50 ppb to 10 ppb in 2001 (USEPA, 2001). Therefore, soil remediation is also growing field to prevent contamination of groundwater as well as crop cultivation. Soil washing is adjusted as ex-situ soil remediation technique which reduces volume of the contaminated soil. The technique is composed of physical separation and chemical extraction to extract target metal contamination in the soil. Chemical extraction methods have been developed solubilizing contaminants containing reagents such as acids or chelating agents. And acid extraction is proven as the most commonly used technology to treat heavy metals in soil, sediment, and sludge (FRTR, 2007). Due to the unique physical and chemical properties, magnetic iron oxide have been used in diverse areas including information technology and biomedicine. Magnetic iron oxides also can be used as adsorbent to heavy metal enhancing removal efficiency of arsenic concentration. In this study, magnetite is used as the washing agent with acid extraction condition so that the injected oxide can be separated by magnetic field. Soil samples were collected from three separate areas in the Janghang smelter site and energy crops-grown soil to have synergy effect with phytoremediation. Each sample was air-dried and sieved (2mm). Soil washing condition was adjusted on pH in the range of 0-12 with hydrogen chloride and sodium hydroxide. After performing soil washing procedure, arsenic-extracted samples were analyzed for arsenic concentration by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES). All the soils have exceeded worrisome level of soil contamination for region 1 (25mg/kg) so the soil remediation techniques are

  16. Arsenic removal from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Robert C.; Anderson, D. Richard

    2007-07-24

    Methods for removing arsenic from water by addition of inexpensive and commonly available magnesium oxide, magnesium hydroxide, calcium oxide, or calcium hydroxide to the water. The hydroxide has a strong chemical affinity for arsenic and rapidly adsorbs arsenic, even in the presence of carbonate in the water. Simple and commercially available mechanical methods for removal of magnesium hydroxide particles with adsorbed arsenic from drinking water can be used, including filtration, dissolved air flotation, vortex separation, or centrifugal separation. A method for continuous removal of arsenic from water is provided. Also provided is a method for concentrating arsenic in a water sample to facilitate quantification of arsenic, by means of magnesium or calcium hydroxide adsorption.

  17. Microbially-mediated thiocyanate oxidation and manganese cycling control arsenic mobility in groundwater at an Australian gold mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, A. S.; Baldisimo, J. G.; Moreau, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    Arsenic contamination of groundwater poses a serious environmental and human health problem in many regions around the world. Historical groundwater chemistry data for a Western-Central Victorian gold mine (Australia) revealed a strong inverse correlation between dissolved thiocyanate and iron(II), supporting the interpretation that oxidation of thiocyanate, a major groundwater contaminant by-product of cyanide-based gold leaching, was coupled to reductive dissolution of iron ox(yhydrox)ides in tailings dam sediments. Microbial growth was observed in this study in a selective medium using SCN- as the sole carbon and nitrogen source. The potential for use of SCN- as a tracer of mining contamination in groundwater was evaluated in the context of biological SCN- oxidation potential in the aquifer. Geochemical data also revealed a high positive correlation between dissolved arsenic and manganese, indicating that sorption on manganese-oxides most likely controls arsenic mobility at this site. Samples of groundwater and sediments along a roughly straight SW-NE traverse away from a large mine tailings storage facility, and parallel to the major groundwater flow direction, were analysed for major ions and trace metals. Groundwater from wells approaching the tailings along this traverse showed a nearly five-fold increase (roughly 25-125 ppb) in dissolved arsenic concentrations relative to aqueous Mn(II) concentrations. Thus, equivalent amounts of dissolved manganese released a five-fold difference in the amount of adsorbed arsenic. The interpretation that reductive dissolution of As-bearing MnO2 at the mine site has been mediated by groundwater (or aquifer) microorganisms is consistent with our recovery of synthetic birnessite-reducing enrichment cultures that were inoculated with As-contaminated groundwaters.

  18. EVALUATING ARSENIC AND MANGANESE REMOVAL FROM WATER BY CHLORINE OXIDATION FOLLOWED BY CLARIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. R. Pires

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThis paper investigates the simultaneous removal of arsenic [As(V or As(III] and manganese [Mn(II] from natural waters of low and high turbidity by clarification (with polyaluminum chloride and aluminum sulfate as primary coagulants associated or not with chlorine pre-oxidation. The results showed that the clarification process exhibited low Mn(II removal, that varied from 6% to 18% and from 19% to 27% for natural waters of low and high turbidity, respectively. The use of chlorine as pre-oxidant increased Mn(II removal up to 77% and was associated with the formation of birnessite. Regarding As(V removal by clarification, particularly for high turbidity water, a concentration lower than that established by the National Drinking Water Quality Standards (10 μg.L-1 was achieved in almost all tests. Oxidation preceding the clarification led to AsIII removal efficiencies from 80% to 90% for both coagulants and types of water.

  19. Schwertmannite Synthesis through Ferrous Ion Chemical Oxidation under Different H2O2 Supply Rates and Its Removal Efficiency for Arsenic from Contaminated Groundwater

    OpenAIRE

    Fenwu Liu; Jun Zhou; Shasha Zhang; Lanlan Liu; Lixiang Zhou; Wenhua Fan

    2015-01-01

    Schwertmannite-mediated removal of arsenic from contaminated water has attracted increasing attention. However, schwertmannite chemical synthesis behavior under different H2O2 supply rates for ferrous ions oxidation is unclear. This study investigated pH, ferrous ions oxidation efficiency, and total iron precipitation efficiency during schwertmannite synthesis by adding H2O2 into FeSO4 · 7H2O solution at different supply rates. Specific surface area and arsenic (III) removal capacity of schwe...

  20. Applications of nano-structured metal oxides for treatment of arsenic in water and for antimicrobial coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadu, Rakesh Babu

    Dependency of technology has been increasing radically through cellular phones for communication, data storage devices for education, drinking water purifiers for healthiness, antimicrobial-coated textiles for cleanliness, nanomedicines for deadliest diseases, solar cells for natural power, nanorobots for engineering and many more. Nanotechnology develops many unprecedented products and methodologies with its adroitness in this modern scientific world. Syntheses of nanomaterials play a significant role in the development of technology. Solution combustion and hydrothermal syntheses produce many nanomaterials with different structures and pioneering applications. Nanometal oxides, like titania, silver oxide, manganese oxide and iron oxide have their unique applications in engineering, chemistry and biochemistry. Likewise, this study talks about the syntheses and applications of nanomaterials such as magnetic graphene nanoplatelets (M-Gras) decorated with uniformly dispersed NPs, manganese doped titania nanotubes (Mn-TNTs), and silver doped titania nanopartcles (nAg-TNPs) and their polyurethane based polymer nanocomposite coating (nAg-TiO2 /PU). Basically, M-Gras, and Mn-TNTs were applied for the treatment of arsenic contaminated water, and nAg- TiO2/PU applied for antimicrobial coatings on textiles. Adsorption of arsenic over Mn- TNTs, and M-Gras was discussed while considering all the regulations of arsenic contamination in drinking water and oxidation of arsenic over Mn-TNTs also discussed with the possible surface reactions. Silver doped titania and its polyurethane nanocomposite was coated on polyester fabric and examined the coated fabric for bactericidal activity for gram-negative (E. coli) and gram-positive ( S. epidermidis) bacteria. This study elucidates the development of suitable nanomaterials and their applications to treat or rectify the environmental hazards while following the scientific standards and regulations.

  1. Characterization of arsenite-oxidizing bacteria isolated from arsenic-contaminated groundwater of West Bengal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Dhiraj; Poddar, Soumya; Sar, Pinaki

    2014-01-01

    Nine arsenic (As)-resistant bacterial strains isolated from As-rich groundwater samples of West Bengal were characterized to elucidate their potential in geomicrobial transformation and bioremediation aspects. The 16S rRNA gene-based phylogenetic analysis revealed that the strains were affiliated with genera Actinobacteria, Microbacterium, Pseudomonas and Rhizobium. The strains exhibited high resistance to As [Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ≥ 10 mM As(3+) and MIC ≥ 450 mM As(5+)] and other heavy metals, e.g., Cu(2+), Cr(2+), Ni(2+), etc. (MIC ≥ 2 mM) as well as As transformation (As(3+) oxidation and As(5+) reduction) capabilities. Their ability to utilize diverse carbon source(s) including hydrocarbons and different alternative electron acceptor(s) (As(5+), SO4(2-), S2O3(2-), etc.) during anaerobic growth was noted. Growth at wide range of pH, temperature and salinity, production of siderophore and biofilm were observed. Together with these, growth pattern and transformation kinetics indicated a high As(3+) oxidation activity of the isolates Rhizobium sp. CAS934i, Microbacterium sp. CAS905i and Pseudomonas sp. CAS912i. A positive relation between high As(3+) resistance and As(3+) oxidation and the supportive role of As(3+) in bacterial growth was noted. The results highlighted As(3+) oxidation process and metabolic repertory of strains indigenous to contaminated groundwater and indicates their potential in As(3+) detoxification. Thus, such metabolically well equipped bacterial strains with highest As(3+) oxidation activities may be used for bioremediation of As contaminated water and effluents in the near future. PMID:25137536

  2. XPS characteristics of sulfur of bio-oxidized arsenic-bearing gold concentrate and changes of surface nature of bio-oxidation residue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨洪英; 巩恩普; 杨立; 陈刚; 范有静; 张玉山; 吕久吉

    2004-01-01

    During bio-oxidation of sulfides, the chemical state change of sulfur is a complex and key factor. It is not only an indicator of the extent and intensity of the bio-oxidation, but also controls the property of bio-leaching medium and the period of oxidation. The chemical state of sulfur in sulfides oxidized by leaching bacteria was studied with XPS. Sulfide minerals in the arsenic-hearing gold concentrate consist of pyrite, arsenopyrite, chalcopyrite, galena, sphalerite and so on. In order to probe the pattern of the chemical state change of sulfur in the bio-oxidation residue of arsenic-bearing gold concentrate, the structure of the grains, and the surface nature of the residue, XPS test was carried out through different sputtering duration. The study of XPS clearly shows that: sulfides is progressively oxidized from the surface of minerals to the core by leaching bacteria; the chemical valence of sulfur changes from S2- or [S2]2- to [SO4]2-; sulfur in the core is in a reduction state, S2- or [S2]2- , but exists in an oxidation state S6+ on the surface; due to the chemical state change of sulfur, mineral phase of the bio-oxidation residue is also changed(sulfides inside, while sulfates outside); the layered structure is found in the grains of the bio-oxidation residue.

  3. Rural methods to mitigate arsenic contaminated water

    OpenAIRE

    Parajuli, Krishna

    2013-01-01

    Consumption of arsenic contaminated water is one of the burning issues in the rural world. Poor public awareness program about health effects of drinking arsenic contaminated water and the rural methods to mitigate this problem poses a great threat of arsenic poisoning many people of the rural world. In this thesis, arsenic removal efficiency and the working mechanism of four rural and economical arsenic mitigation technologies i.e. solar oxidation and reduction of arsenic (SORAS), Bucket tr...

  4. Proteomic Analysis of Arsenic-Induced Oxidative Stress in Human Epidermal Keratinocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (IAs) has been associated with the development of several human cancers, including those found in the skin, lung, urinary bladder, liver, prostate and kidney. The precise mechanisms by which arsenic causes cancer are unknown. Defining the mod...

  5. Arsenic Release from a Natural Rock under Near-natural Oxidizing Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Noubactep, C.; Chen-Braucher, D.; Schlothauer, Th.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of carbonate concentration and the presence of iron hydroxide phases on the process of arsenic release from an ore material were investigated under experimental oxic conditions and in the pH range from 6.0 to 9.0. These experimental conditions are pertinent to arsenic leaching from tailings and mining wastes. The leaching tests lasted for

  6. Selective arsenic purification during the oxidizing digestion by a carbonated liquor of a uraniferous ore containing some

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An uranium bearing ore containing arsenical substances as impurities is digested in the presence of an oxidant by an aqueous liquor composed of a recycling solution containing alkaline carbonates and bicarbonates, as well as the uranium approaching its solubility limit, in conditions of concentration, temperature and pressure bringing about the solubilization of the uranium present in the ore and its precipitation in the digesting medium. A solid phase suspension is collected from a liquid phase which, after cooling, undergoes separation. During digestion the liquid phase is recycled and the separated solid phase is treated with an aqueous liquor to redissolve the precipitated uranium. The arsenic solubilized during the digestion is extracted by means of a magnesium compound, introduced in a quantity not less than the stoichiometric amount needed to bring about the precipitation of the magnesium arsenate

  7. Elevated naturally occurring arsenic in a semiarid oxidizing system, Southern High Plains aquifer, Texas, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High groundwater As concentrations in oxidizing systems are generally associated with As adsorption onto hydrous metal (Al, Fe or Mn) oxides and mobilization with increased pH. The objective of this study was to evaluate the distribution, sources and mobilization mechanisms of As in the Southern High Plains (SHP) aquifer, Texas, relative to those in other semiarid, oxidizing systems. Elevated groundwater As levels are widespread in the southern part of the SHP (SHP-S) aquifer, with 47% of wells exceeding the current EPA maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 μg/L (range 0.3-164 μg/L), whereas As levels are much lower in the north (SHP-N: 9% ≥ As MCL of 10 μg/L; range 0.2-43 μg/L). The sharp contrast in As levels between the north and south coincides with a change in total dissolved solids (TDS) from 395 mg/L (median north) to 885 mg/L (median south). Arsenic is present as arsenate (As V) in this oxidizing system and is correlated with groundwater TDS (Spearman's ρ = 0.57). The most likely current source of As is sorbed As onto hydrous metal oxides based on correlations between As and other oxyanion-forming elements (V, ρ = 0.88; Se, ρ = 0.54; B, ρ = 0.51 and Mo, ρ = 0.46). This source is similar to that in other oxidizing systems and constitutes a secondary source; the most likely primary source being volcanic ashes in the SHP aquifer or original source rocks in the Rockies, based on co-occurrence of As and F (ρ = 0.56), oxyanion-forming elements and SiO2 (ρ = 0.41), which are found in volcanic ashes. High groundwater As concentrations in some semiarid oxidizing systems are related to high evaporation. Although correlation of As with TDS in the SHP aquifer may suggest evaporative concentration, unenriched stable isotopes (δ2H: -65 to -27; δ18O: -9.1 to -4.2) in the SHP aquifer do not support evaporation. High TDS in the SHP aquifer is most likely related to upward movement of saline water from the underlying Triassic Dockum aquifer. Mobilization of As

  8. Oxidative DNA damage and repair in children exposed to low levels of arsenic in utero and during early childhood: Application of salivary and urinary biomarkers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study aimed to assess arsenic exposure and its effect on oxidative DNA damage and repair in young children exposed in utero and continued to live in arsenic-contaminated areas. To address the need for biological specimens that can be acquired with minimal discomfort to children, we used non-invasive urinary and salivary-based assays for assessing arsenic exposure and early biological effects that have potentially serious health implications. Levels of arsenic in nails showed the greatest magnitude of difference between exposed and control groups, followed by arsenic concentrations in saliva and urine. Arsenic levels in saliva showed significant positive correlations with other biomarkers of arsenic exposure, including arsenic accumulation in nails (r = 0.56, P < 0.001) and arsenic concentration in urine (r = 0.50, P < 0.05). Exposed children had a significant reduction in arsenic methylation capacity indicated by decreased primary methylation index and secondary methylation index in both urine and saliva samples. Levels of salivary 8-OHdG in exposed children were significantly higher (∼ 4-fold, P < 0.01), whereas levels of urinary 8-OHdG excretion and salivary hOGG1 expression were significantly lower in exposed children (∼ 3-fold, P < 0.05), suggesting a defect in hOGG1 that resulted in ineffective cleavage of 8-OHdG. Multiple regression analysis results showed that levels of inorganic arsenic (iAs) in saliva and urine had a significant positive association with salivary 8-OHdG and a significant negative association with salivary hOGG1 expression. - Highlights: • The effects of arsenic exposure in utero and through early childhood were studied. • Arsenic-exposed children had a reduction in arsenic methylation capacity. • Exposed children had more DNA damage, observed as elevated salivary 8-OHdG. • Lower salivary hOGG1 in exposed children indicated impairment of 8-OHdG repair. • Salivary and urinary 8-OHdG levels were discordant

  9. Oxidative DNA damage and repair in children exposed to low levels of arsenic in utero and during early childhood: Application of salivary and urinary biomarkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinhumpatch, Pantip; Navasumrit, Panida [Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Laksi, Bangkok (Thailand); Chulabhorn Graduate Institute, Laksi, Bangkok (Thailand); Center of Excellence on Environmental Health and Toxicology, CHE, Ministry of Education (Thailand); Chaisatra, Krittinee; Promvijit, Jeerawan [Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Laksi, Bangkok (Thailand); Mahidol, Chulabhorn [Laboratory of Chemical Carcinogenesis, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Laksi, Bangkok (Thailand); Ruchirawat, Mathuros, E-mail: mathuros@cri.or.th [Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Laksi, Bangkok (Thailand); Chulabhorn Graduate Institute, Laksi, Bangkok (Thailand); Center of Excellence on Environmental Health and Toxicology, CHE, Ministry of Education (Thailand); Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Phayathai, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2013-12-15

    The present study aimed to assess arsenic exposure and its effect on oxidative DNA damage and repair in young children exposed in utero and continued to live in arsenic-contaminated areas. To address the need for biological specimens that can be acquired with minimal discomfort to children, we used non-invasive urinary and salivary-based assays for assessing arsenic exposure and early biological effects that have potentially serious health implications. Levels of arsenic in nails showed the greatest magnitude of difference between exposed and control groups, followed by arsenic concentrations in saliva and urine. Arsenic levels in saliva showed significant positive correlations with other biomarkers of arsenic exposure, including arsenic accumulation in nails (r = 0.56, P < 0.001) and arsenic concentration in urine (r = 0.50, P < 0.05). Exposed children had a significant reduction in arsenic methylation capacity indicated by decreased primary methylation index and secondary methylation index in both urine and saliva samples. Levels of salivary 8-OHdG in exposed children were significantly higher (∼ 4-fold, P < 0.01), whereas levels of urinary 8-OHdG excretion and salivary hOGG1 expression were significantly lower in exposed children (∼ 3-fold, P < 0.05), suggesting a defect in hOGG1 that resulted in ineffective cleavage of 8-OHdG. Multiple regression analysis results showed that levels of inorganic arsenic (iAs) in saliva and urine had a significant positive association with salivary 8-OHdG and a significant negative association with salivary hOGG1 expression. - Highlights: • The effects of arsenic exposure in utero and through early childhood were studied. • Arsenic-exposed children had a reduction in arsenic methylation capacity. • Exposed children had more DNA damage, observed as elevated salivary 8-OHdG. • Lower salivary hOGG1 in exposed children indicated impairment of 8-OHdG repair. • Salivary and urinary 8-OHdG levels were discordant.

  10. Taurine prevents arsenic-induced cardiac oxidative stress and apoptotic damage: Role of NF-κB, p38 and JNK MAPK pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac dysfunction is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide due to its complex pathogenesis. However, little is known about the mechanism of arsenic-induced cardiac abnormalities and the use of antioxidants as the possible protective agents in this pathophysiology. Conditionally essential amino acid, taurine, accounts for 25% to 50% of the amino acid pool in myocardium and possesses antioxidant properties. The present study has, therefore, been carried out to investigate the underlying mechanism of the beneficial role of taurine in arsenic-induced cardiac oxidative damage and cell death. Arsenic reduced cardiomyocyte viability, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and intracellular calcium overload, and induced apoptotic cell death by mitochondrial dependent caspase-3 activation and poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage. These changes due to arsenic exposure were found to be associated with increased IKK and NF-κB (p65) phosphorylation. Pre-exposure of myocytes to an IKK inhibitor (PS-1145) prevented As-induced caspase-3 and PARP cleavage. Arsenic also markedly increased the activity of p38 and JNK MAPKs, but not ERK to that extent. Pre-treatment with SP600125 (JNK inhibitor) and SB203580 (p38 MAPK inhibitor) attenuated NF-κB and IKK phosphorylation indicating that p38 and JNK MAPKs are mainly involved in arsenic-induced NF-κB activation. Taurine treatment suppressed these apoptotic actions, suggesting that its protective role in arsenic-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis is mediated by attenuation of p38 and JNK MAPK signaling pathways. Similarly, arsenic intoxication altered a number of biomarkers related to cardiac oxidative stress and other apoptotic indices in vivo and taurine supplementation could reduce it. Results suggest that taurine prevented arsenic-induced myocardial pathophysiology, attenuated NF-κB activation via IKK, p38 and JNK MAPK signaling pathways and could possibly provide a protection against As

  11. Ethnic differences in five intronic polymorphisms associated with arsenic metabolism within human arsenic (+ 3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human arsenic (+ 3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) is known to catalyze the methylation of arsenite, and intronic single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs: G7395A, G12390C, T14215C, T35587C, and G35991A) in the AS3MT gene were shown to be related to inter-individual variation in the arsenic metabolism. In the present study, the genotyping for these SNPs was developed using the polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism technique. Applying this method, the genotype distribution among the Ovambo, Turkish, Mongolian, Korean, and Japanese populations was investigated, and our results were compared with those from other studies. G7395, G12390, T35587, and A35991 were predominant among the five populations in our study. However, a previous study in Argentina, C12390 and G35991 showed the highest allele frequency among the eight populations studied in other studies. The dominant allele of T14215C differed among populations: the T14215 allele was predominant in Argentina, the allele frequency of C14215 was higher than that of T14215 among Turks, Mongolians, Europeans, and American ancestry. In Korea and Japan, similar allele frequencies were observed in T14215 and C14215. Higher allele frequencies were observed in haplotype G7395/G12390/C14215/T35587 with frequencies of 0.40 (Turks), 0.28 (Mongolians), and 0.23 (Koreans). On the other hand, the allele frequency for G7395/G14215/T35587/A35991 was the highest among the Ovambos (0.32), and the frequency for G7395/G12390/C35587/G35991 was the highest among the Japanese (0.27). It is noteworthy that the Japanese haplotype differs from that of the Koreans and Mongolians, which indicates the importance of investigating other intronic polymorphisms in AS3MT, especially in Asians

  12. Oxidation of the arsenic-rich concentrate at the Prebuz abandoned mine (Erzgebirge Mts., CZ): mineralogical evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippi, Michal

    2004-04-25

    Ore concentrate with up to 65 wt.% of arsenic (by-product of cassiterite extraction) exposed to climatic conditions was studied from the mineralogical point of view. Detailed sampling, X-ray diffraction analyses, energy-dispersive microanalysis (EDAX) and especially scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were applied to study the arsenopyrite-löllingite-concentrate weathering. The studied concentrate contains very small proportion (gangue minerals such as quartz and feldspars; the oxidation of arsenopyrite and löllingite (and accessory pyrite) is thus practically not complicated by interference with additional minerals and elements. Arsenolite, scorodite, kaatialaite and native sulphur were found to be the main secondary phases originating by dissolution of arsenopyrite and löllingite. New secondary phases precipitate on the surface of the ore-concentrate body but also form cement among the grains of finely milled material. The following succession of secondary minerals was determined: arsenolite, scorodite+native sulphur and kaatialaite. Significant arsenic migration into the proximal environment was revealed: 2580 and 13,622 mgkg(-1) were the highest arsenic concentrations in two sections excavated at distances of 0.5 and 1.5 m from the concentrate body. PMID:15081754

  13. Evaluation of Arsenic Trioxide Potential for Lung Cancer Treatment: Assessment of Apoptotic Mechanisms and Oxidative Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Alice M; Stevens, Jacqueline J; Ndebele, Kenneth; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2016-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is one of the most lethal and common cancers in the world, causing up to 3 million deaths annually. The chemotherapeutic drugs that have been used in treating lung cancer include cisplatin-pemetrexed, cisplastin-gencitabinoe, carboplatin-paclitaxel and crizotinib. Arsenic trioxide (ATO) has been used in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. However, its effects on lung cancer are not known. We hypothesize that ATO may also have a bioactivity against lung cancer, and its mechanisms of action may involve apoptosis, DNA damage and changes in stress-related proteins in lung cancer cells. Methods To test the above stated hypothesis, lung carcinoma (A549) cells were used as the test model. The effects of ATO were examined by performing 6-diamidine-2 phenylindole (DAPI) nuclear staining for morphological characterization of apoptosis, flow cytometry analysis for early apoptosis, and western blot analysis for stress-related proteins (Hsp70 and cfos) and apoptotic protein expressions. Also, the single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet) assay was used to evaluate the genotoxic effect. Results ATO-induced apoptosis was evidenced by chromatin condensation and formation of apoptotic bodies as revealed by DAPI nuclear staining. Cell shrinkage and membrane blebbing were observed at 4 and 6 µg/ml of ATO. Data from the western blot analysis revealed a significant dose-dependent increase (p < 0.05) in the Hsp 70, caspase 3 and p53 protein expression, and a significant (p < 0.05) decrease in the cfos, and bcl-2 protein expression at 4 and 6 µg/ml of ATO. There was a slight decrease in cytochrome c protein expression at 4 and 6 µg/ ml of ATO. Comet assay data revealed significant dose-dependent increases in the percentages of DNA damage, Comet tail lengths, and Comet tail moment. Conclusion Taken together our results indicate that ATO is cytotoxic to lung cancer cells and its bioactivity is associated with oxidative damage, changes in cellular

  14. Long-term Fate of Arsenic under the Oxidation of Ferrous Iron by Nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, J.; Prommer, H.; Siade, A. J.; Chillrud, S. N.; Mailloux, B. J.; Bostick, B. C.

    2015-12-01

    In situ precipitation of iron (Fe) minerals can be an effective means of remediating groundwater arsenic (As) contamination. Among different Fe minerals, magnetite is promising as a host-mineral for As in situ immobilization in that it is stable under a wide range of geochemical conditions, including Fe(III) reducing conditions under which As are often mobilized. Our previous laboratory studies suggest that the formation of nanoparticulate magnetite can be achieved by the oxidation of ferrous Fe with nitrate. Magnetite can incorporate As into its structure during formation, in which case desorption and As(V) reduction are less likely. Nanoparticulate magnetite, once formed, can also immobilize As by surface adsorption, and thus serve as a reactive filter when contaminated groundwater migrates through the treatment zone. In this study, a reactive transport model is develop for the magnetite based As immobilization strategy. The initial numerical model development was guided by experimental data and hypothesized processes from the laboratory one-dimensional column studies. Our modeling results suggest that the ratio between Fe(II) and nitrate in the injectant regulates the extent and distribution of magnetite and ferrihydrite formation, and thus regulates the long-term potential of As immobilization. Based on these results, two-dimensional field-scale model scenarios were developed to predict and compare the impact of chemical and operational parameters on the efficiency of the remediation technology. The modeling results, which suggest that long-term groundwater As removal is feasible, favor scenarios that rely on the chromatographic mixing of Fe(II) and nitrate after injection. This study highlights the importance of combining laboratory studies and reactive transport modeling for elucidating the complex hydro-biogeochemical processes that control the fate of As and for up-scaling of the technology.

  15. Methylation of arsenic by recombinant human wild-type arsenic (+ 3 oxidation state) methyltransferase and its methionine 287 threonine (M287T) polymorph: Role of glutathione

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic (+ 3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) is the key enzyme in the pathway for methylation of arsenicals. A common polymorphism in the AS3MT gene that replaces a threonyl residue in position 287 with a methionyl residue (AS3MT/M287T) occurs at a frequency of about 10% among populations worldwide. Here, we compared catalytic properties of recombinant human wild-type (wt) AS3MT and AS3MT/M287T in reaction mixtures containing S-adenosylmethionine, arsenite (iAsIII) or methylarsonous acid (MAsIII) as substrates and endogenous or synthetic reductants, including glutathione (GSH), a thioredoxin reductase (TR)/thioredoxin (Trx)/NADPH reducing system, or tris (2-carboxyethyl) phosphine hydrochloride (TCEP). With either TR/Trx/NADPH or TCEP, wtAS3MT or AS3MT/M287T catalyzed conversion of iAsIII to MAsIII, methylarsonic acid (MAsV), dimethylarsinous acid (DMAsIII), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMAsV); MAsIII was converted to DMAsIII and DMAsV. Although neither enzyme required GSH to support methylation of iAsIII or MAsIII, addition of 1 mM GSH decreased Km and increased Vmax estimates for either substrate in reaction mixtures containing TR/Trx/NADPH. Without GSH, Vmax and Km values were significantly lower for AS3MT/M287T than for wtAS3MT. In the presence of 1 mM GSH, significantly more DMAsIII was produced from iAsIII in reactions catalyzed by the M287T variant than in wtAS3MT-catalyzed reactions. Thus, 1 mM GSH modulates AS3MT activity, increasing both methylation rates and yield of DMAsIII. AS3MT genotype exemplified by differences in regulation of wtAS3MT and AS3MT/M287T-catalyzed reactions by GSH may contribute to differences in the phenotype for arsenic methylation and, ultimately, to differences in the disease susceptibility in individuals chronically exposed to inorganic arsenic. -- Highlights: ► Human AS3MT and AS3MT(M287T) require a dithiol reductant for optimal activity. ► Both enzymes methylate arsenite to tri- and pentavalent methylated

  16. Arsenic augments the uptake of oxidized LDL by upregulating the expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor in mouse aortic endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, Ekhtear [Department of Biochemistry, Aichi Medical University School of Medicine, Nagakute, Aichi (Japan); Ota, Akinobu, E-mail: aota@aichi-med-u.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry, Aichi Medical University School of Medicine, Nagakute, Aichi (Japan); Karnan, Sivasundaram; Damdindorj, Lkhagvasuren [Department of Biochemistry, Aichi Medical University School of Medicine, Nagakute, Aichi (Japan); Takahashi, Miyuki [Department of Biochemistry, Aichi Medical University School of Medicine, Nagakute, Aichi (Japan); Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, Aichi Medical University School of Medicine, Nagakute, Aichi (Japan); Konishi, Yuko; Konishi, Hiroyuki; Hosokawa, Yoshitaka [Department of Biochemistry, Aichi Medical University School of Medicine, Nagakute, Aichi (Japan)

    2013-12-15

    Although chronic arsenic exposure is a well-known risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, the molecular mechanism underlying arsenic-induced atherosclerosis remains obscure. Therefore, this study aimed to elucidate this molecular mechanism. We examined changes in the mRNA level of the lectin-like oxidized LDL (oxLDL) receptor (LOX-1) in a mouse aortic endothelial cell line, END-D, after sodium arsenite (SA) treatment. SA treatment significantly upregulated LOX-1 mRNA expression; this finding was also verified at the protein expression level. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy analyses showed that the cellular uptake of fluorescence (Dil)-labeled oxLDL was significantly augmented with SA treatment. In addition, an anti-LOX-1 antibody completely abrogated the augmented uptake of Dil-oxLDL. We observed that SA increased the levels of the phosphorylated forms of nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B cells (NF-κB)/p65. SA-induced upregulation of LOX-1 protein expression was clearly prevented by treatment with an antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), or an NF-κB inhibitor, caffeic acid phenethylester (CAPE). Furthermore, SA-augmented uptake of Dil-oxLDL was also prevented by treatment with NAC or CAPE. Taken together, our results indicate that arsenic upregulates LOX-1 expression through the reactive oxygen species-mediated NF-κB signaling pathway, followed by augmented cellular oxLDL uptake, thus highlighting a critical role of the aberrant LOX-1 signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of arsenic-induced atherosclerosis. - Highlights: • Sodium arsenite (SA) increases LOX-1 expression in mouse aortic endothelial cells. • SA enhances cellular uptake of oxidized LDL in dose-dependent manner. • SA-induced ROS generation enhances phosphorylation of NF-κB. • SA upregulates LOX-1 expression through ROS-activated NF-κB signaling pathway.

  17. Arsenic augments the uptake of oxidized LDL by upregulating the expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor in mouse aortic endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although chronic arsenic exposure is a well-known risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, the molecular mechanism underlying arsenic-induced atherosclerosis remains obscure. Therefore, this study aimed to elucidate this molecular mechanism. We examined changes in the mRNA level of the lectin-like oxidized LDL (oxLDL) receptor (LOX-1) in a mouse aortic endothelial cell line, END-D, after sodium arsenite (SA) treatment. SA treatment significantly upregulated LOX-1 mRNA expression; this finding was also verified at the protein expression level. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy analyses showed that the cellular uptake of fluorescence (Dil)-labeled oxLDL was significantly augmented with SA treatment. In addition, an anti-LOX-1 antibody completely abrogated the augmented uptake of Dil-oxLDL. We observed that SA increased the levels of the phosphorylated forms of nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B cells (NF-κB)/p65. SA-induced upregulation of LOX-1 protein expression was clearly prevented by treatment with an antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), or an NF-κB inhibitor, caffeic acid phenethylester (CAPE). Furthermore, SA-augmented uptake of Dil-oxLDL was also prevented by treatment with NAC or CAPE. Taken together, our results indicate that arsenic upregulates LOX-1 expression through the reactive oxygen species-mediated NF-κB signaling pathway, followed by augmented cellular oxLDL uptake, thus highlighting a critical role of the aberrant LOX-1 signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of arsenic-induced atherosclerosis. - Highlights: • Sodium arsenite (SA) increases LOX-1 expression in mouse aortic endothelial cells. • SA enhances cellular uptake of oxidized LDL in dose-dependent manner. • SA-induced ROS generation enhances phosphorylation of NF-κB. • SA upregulates LOX-1 expression through ROS-activated NF-κB signaling pathway

  18. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as arsenic adsorbent. Development of Nanofiber SPION Supports and Arsenic Speciation Using Synchrotron and Hyphenated Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Morillo Martín, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Los estudios que se han realizado en la presente tesis doctoral se basan en el desarrollo de una metodología de síntesis y caracterización de sistemas nanoestructurados como recurso innovador para la recuperación de arsénico en efluentes contaminados y la depuración de dichos efluentes. Estos materiales tienen como elemento común, el uso de las Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (SPION), con las que se han realizado diferentes estudios de adsorción para evaluar los parámetros de adsor...

  19. Simultaneous oxidation of arsenic and antimony at low and circumneutral pH, with and without microbial catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asta, Maria P.; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; McCleskey, R. Blaine

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic and Sb are common mine-water pollutants and their toxicity and fate are strongly influenced by redox processes. In this study, simultaneous Fe(II), As(III) and Sb(III) oxidation experiments were conducted to obtain rates under laboratory conditions similar to those found in the field for mine waters of both low and circumneutral pH. Additional experiments were performed under abiotic sterile conditions to determine the biotic and abiotic contributions to the oxidation processes. The results showed that under abiotic conditions in aerated Fe(III)–H2SO4 solutions, Sb(III) oxidizes slightly faster than As(III). The oxidation rates of both elements were accelerated by increasing As(III), Sb(III), Fe(III), and Cl- concentrations in the presence of light. For unfiltered circumneutral water from the Giant Mine (Yellowknife, NWT, Canada), As(III) oxidized at 15–78 μmol/L/h whereas Sb(III) oxidized at 0.03–0.05 μmol/L/h during microbial exponential growth. In contrast, As(III) and Sb(III) oxidation rates of 0.01–0.03 and 0.01–0.02 μmol/L/h, respectively, were obtained in experiments performed with acid unfiltered mine waters from the Iberian Pyritic Belt (SW Spain). These results suggest that the Fe(III) formed from microbialoxidation abiotically oxidized As(III) and Sb(III). After sterile filtration of both mine water samples, neither As(III), Sb(III), nor Fe(II) oxidation was observed. Hence, under the experimental conditions, bacteria were catalyzing As and Sb oxidation in the Giant Mine waters and Fe oxidation in the acid waters of the Iberian Pyrite Belt.

  20. Arsenic speciation and bioaccessibility in arsenic-contaminated soils: Sequential extraction and mineralogical investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, a combination of sequential extraction and mineralogical investigation by X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was employed in order to evaluate arsenic solid-state speciation and bioaccessibility in soils highly contaminated with arsenic from mining and smelting. Combination of these techniques indicated that iron oxides and the weathering products of sulfide minerals played an important role in regulating the arsenic retention in the soils. Higher bioaccessibility of arsenic was observed in the following order; i) arsenic bound to amorphous iron oxides (smelter-2), ii) arsenic associated with crystalline iron oxides and arsenic sulfide phase (smelter-1), and iii) arsenic associated with the weathering products of arsenic sulfide minerals, such as scorodite, orpiment, jarosite, and pyrite (mine). Even though the bioaccessibility of arsenic was very low in the mine soil, its environmental impact could be significant due to its high arsenic concentration and mobility. Highlights: • Combination of sequential extraction and mineralogical investigation was employed. • Arsenic was primarily associated with iron oxides and sulfide minerals in soils. • Bioaccessibility of arsenic was affected by arsenic solid-phase speciation. -- We investigated arsenic solid-state speciation in soils, which is crucial for risk assessment and developing suitable remediation strategies in arsenic contaminated sites

  1. Ultra-trace determination of arsenic species in environmental waters, food and biological samples using a modified aluminum oxide nanoparticle sorbent and AAS detection after multivariate optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a simple and efficient method for solid phase extraction and speciation of trace quantities of arsenic. It is based on the use of functionalized aluminum oxide nanoparticles and does not require any oxidation or reduction steps. The experimental parameters affecting extraction and quantitation were optimized using fractional factorial design methods. Adsorbed arsenic was eluted from the sorbent with 1 M hydrochloric acid and determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Preconcentration factors up to 750 were achieved depending on the sample volume. Studies on potential interferences by various anions and cations showed the method to be highly selective. Under optimum conditions, the calibration plots are linear in the 5.0 to 280 ng L−1 and 8.0 to 260 ng L−1 concentration ranges for As(III) and total arsenic, respectively. The detection limits (calculated for S/N ratios of 3) are 1.81 and 1.97 ng L−1 for As(III) and total arsenic, respectively. The method was successfully applied to the determination and speciation of arsenic in (spiked) environmental, food and biological samples and gave good recoveries. The method was validated using a certified geological reference material. (author)

  2. The synthesis, characterization and application of iron oxide nanocrystals in magnetic separations for arsenic and uranium removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, John Thomas

    Arsenic and uranium in the environment are hazardous to human health and require better methods for detection and remediation. Nanocrystalline iron oxides offer a number of advantages as sorbents for water purification and environmental remediation. First, highly uniform and crystalline iron oxide nanocrystals (nMAG) were prepared using thermal decomposition of iron salts in organic solutions; for the applications of interest in this thesis, a central challenge was the adaptation of these conventional synthetic methods to the needs of low infrastructure and economically disadvantaged settings. We show here that it is possible to form highly uniform and magnetically responsive nanomaterials using starting reagents and equipment that are readily available and economical. The products of this approach, termed the 'Kitchen Synthesis', are of comparable quality and effectiveness to laboratory materials. The narrow size distributions of the iron oxides produced in the laboratory synthesis made it possible to study the size-dependence of the magnetic separation efficiency of nanocrystals; generally as the diameter of particles increased they could be removed under lower applied magnetic fields. In this work we take advantage of this size-dependence to use magnetic separation as a tool to separate broadly distributed populations of magnetic materials. Such work makes it possible to use these materials in multiplexed separation and sensing schemes. With the synthesis and magnetic separation studies of these materials completed, it was possible to optimize their applications in water purification and environmental remediation. These materials removed both uranium and arsenic from contaminated samples, and had remarkably high sorption capacities --- up to 12 wt% for arsenic and 30 wt% for uranium. The contaminated nMAG is removed from the drinking water by either retention in a sand column, filter, or by magnetic separation. The uranium adsorption process was also utilized

  3. Residues in human arsenic (+3 oxidation state methyltransferase forming potential hydrogen bond network around S-adenosylmethionine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangli Li

    Full Text Available Residues Tyr59, Gly78, Ser79, Met103, Gln107, Ile136 and Glu137 in human arsenic (+3 oxidation state methyltransferase (hAS3MT were deduced to form a potential hydrogen bond network around S-adenosylmethionine (SAM from the sequence alignment between Cyanidioschyzon merolae arsenite S-adenosylmethyltransferase (CmArsM and hAS3MT. Herein, seven mutants Y59A, G78A, S79A, M103A, Q107A, I136A and E137A were obtained. Their catalytic activities and conformations were characterized and models were built. Y59A and G78A were completely inactive. Only 7.0%, 10.6% and 13.8% inorganic arsenic (iAs was transformed to monomethylated arsenicals (MMA when M103A, Q107A and I136A were used as the enzyme. The Vmax (the maximal velocity of the reaction values of M103A, Q107A, I136A and E137A were decreased to 8%, 22%, 15% and 50% of that of WT-hAS3MT, respectively. The KM(SAM (the Michaelis constant for SAM values of mutants M103A, I136A and E137A were 15.7, 8.9 and 5.1 fold higher than that of WT-hAS3MT, respectively, indicating that their affinities for SAM were weakened. The altered microenvironment of SAM and the reduced capacity of binding arsenic deduced from KM(As (the Michaelis constant for iAs value probably synergetically reduced the catalytic activity of Q107A. The catalytic activity of S79A was higher than that of WT despite of the higher KM(SAM , suggesting that Ser79 did not impact the catalytic activity of hAS3MT. In short, residues Tyr59 and Gly78 significantly influenced the catalytic activity of hAS3MT as well as Met103, Ile136 and Glu137 because they were closely associated with SAM-binding, while residue Gln107 did not affect SAM-binding regardless of affecting the catalytic activity of hAS3MT. Modeling and our experimental results suggest that the adenine ring of SAM is sandwiched between Ile136 and Met103, the amide group of SAM is hydrogen bonded to Gly78 in hAS3MT and SAM is bonded to Tyr59 with van der Waals, cation-π and hydrogen bonding

  4. Water-dispersible magnetite-reduced graphene oxide composites for arsenic removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Vimlesh; Park, Jaesung; Chun, Young; Lee, Jung Woo; Hwang, In-Chul; Kim, Kwang S

    2010-07-27

    Magnetite-graphene hybrids have been synthesized via a chemical reaction with a magnetite particle size of approximately 10 nm. The composites are superparamagnetic at room temperature and can be separated by an external magnetic field. As compared to bare magnetite particles, the hybrids show a high binding capacity for As(III) and As(V), whose presence in the drinking water in wide areas of South Asia has been a huge problem. Their high binding capacity is due to the increased adsorption sites in the M-RGO composite which occurs by reducing the aggregation of bare magnetite. Since the composites show near complete (over 99.9%) arsenic removal within 1 ppb, they are practically usable for arsenic separation from water. PMID:20552997

  5. Comparative study of arsenic removal efficiency from water by adsorption and photocatalytic oxidation with titanium dioxide

    OpenAIRE

    Kocabaş, Özlem Züleyha; Kocabas, Ozlem Zuleyha; YÜRÜM, YUDA; Yurum, Yuda

    2010-01-01

    Titanium dioxide, a well-known adsorbent material, has been extensively tested in environmental applications, especially in separation technologies. In the present study, TiO2 nanoparticles were synthesized by using sol-gel method for removing arsenic ions from water. Several water/titanium molar ratios were prepared in order to obtain optimum crystalline structure, morphology, and particle size of titanium dioxide nanoparticles. Two types of TiO2 minerals which were rutile and anatese were m...

  6. Effect of water hyacinth root extract on arsenic level in different organs of arsenic-treated rat

    OpenAIRE

    Shaheen Lipika Quayum

    2007-01-01

    The present study investigated whether the administration of the ethanol extract of water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) ameliorates arsenic from arsenic-treated rats. To induce arsenic accumulation in different organs, arsenic trioxide was administered orally by gavage at a dose of 500 µg/rat/day for 7 days. In search of an effective therapeutic agent to counteract arsenic accumulation and arsenic-induced oxidative stress, different concentrations of ethanol extract of root of water hyacint...

  7. Protective Effects of Combined Selenium and Punica granatum Treatment on Some Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress Markers in Arsenic-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafik, Noha M; El Batsh, Maha M

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is one of the major mechanisms implicated in inorganic arsenic poisoning. Punica granatum is known by its free radical scavenging properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective role of combined selenium and P. granatum against arsenic-induced liver injury. Seventy-five female albino rats were divided into five groups (of 15 rats each). Toxicity was induced by oral sodium arsenite (5.5 mg/kg body weight (bw) daily) (group ІІ). Treatment of arsenic-intoxicated rats was induced by daily oral administration of sodium selenite (3 mg/kg bw) (group ІІІ), 100 mg of P. granatum ethanol extract per kilogram body weight dissolved in 300 mL distilled water in three divided doses (100 mL of this suspension every 8 h) (group IV), and combined daily oral treatment with both selenite and P. granatum ethanol extract (group V). After 3 weeks, serum and liver tissues were obtained from the decapitated rats for different estimations. Hepatotoxicity was demonstrated by significant elevation in liver weights and activities of liver enzymes, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and decrease in serum total proteins and albumin (p granatum and selenium. It was concluded that combined P. granatum and selenium treatment had a synergistic hepatoprotective effect against arsenic toxicity through activation of Nrf2 anti-oxidant pathway. PMID:26085057

  8. Tolerance, arsenic uptake, and oxidative stress in Acacia farnesiana under arsenate-stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcantara-Martinez, Nemi; Guizar, Sandra; Rivera-Cabrera, Fernando; Anicacio-Acevedo, Blanca E; Buendia-Gonzalez, Leticia; Volke-Sepulveda, Tania

    2016-07-01

    Acacia farnesiana is a shrub widely distributed in soils heavily polluted with arsenic in Mexico. However, the mechanisms by which this species tolerates the phytotoxic effects of arsenic are unknown. This study aimed to investigate the tolerance and bioaccumulation of As by A. farnesiana seedlings exposed to high doses of arsenate (AsV) and the role of peroxidases (POX) and glutathione S-transferases (GST) in alleviating As-stress. For that, long-period tests were performed in vitro under different AsV treatments. A. farnesiana showed a remarkable tolerance to AsV, achieving a half-inhibitory concentration (IC50) of about 2.8 mM. Bioaccumulation reached about 940 and 4380 mg As·kg(-1) of dry weight in shoots and roots, respectively, exposed for 60 days to 0.58 mM AsV. Seedlings exposed to such conditions registered a growth delay during the first 15 days, when the fastest As uptake rate (117 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) occurred, coinciding with both the highest rate of lipid peroxidation and the strongest up-regulation of enzyme activities. GST activity showed a strong correlation with the As bioaccumulated, suggesting its role in imparting AsV tolerance. This study demonstrated that besides tolerance to AsV, A. farnesiana bioaccumulates considerable amounts of As, suggesting that it may be useful for phytostabilization purposes. PMID:26618535

  9. Effect of Acetyl-L-Carnitine on Antioxidant Status, Lipid Peroxidation, and Oxidative Damage of Arsenic in Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepand, Mohammad Reza; Razavi-Azarkhiavi, Kamal; Omidi, Ameneh; Zirak, Mohammad Reza; Sabzevari, Samin; Kazemi, Ali Reza; Sabzevari, Omid

    2016-05-01

    Arsenic (As) is a widespread environmental contaminant present around the world in both organic and inorganic forms. Oxidative stress is postulated as the main mechanism for As-induced toxicity. This study was planned to examine the protective effect of acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) on As-induced oxidative damage in male rats. Animals were randomly divided into four groups of control (saline), sodium arsenite (NaAsO2, 20 mg/kg), ALC (300 mg/kg), and NaAsO2 plus ALC. Animals were dosed orally for 28 successive days. Blood and tissue samples including kidney, brain, liver, heart, and lung were collected on the 28th day and evaluated for oxidative damage and histological changes. NaAsO2 exposure caused a significant lipid peroxidation as evidenced by elevation in thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS). The activity of antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione-S-transferase (GST), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), as well as sulfhydryl group content (SH group) was significantly suppressed in various organs following NaAsO2 treatment (P < 0.05). Furthermore, NaAsO2 administration increased serum values of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and bilirubin. Our findings revealed that co-administration of ALC and NaAsO2 significantly suppressed the oxidative damage induced by NaAsO2. Tissue histological studies have confirmed the biochemical findings and provided evidence for the beneficial role of ALC. The results concluded that ALC attenuated NaAsO2-induced toxicity, and this protective effect may result from the ability of ALC in maintaining oxidant-antioxidant balance. PMID:26349760

  10. Arsenic Exposure and Toxicology: A Historical Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Michael F.; Beck, Barbara D.; Chen, Yu; Lewis, Ari S.; Thomas, David J

    2011-01-01

    The metalloid arsenic is a natural environmental contaminant to which humans are routinely exposed in food, water, air, and soil. Arsenic has a long history of use as a homicidal agent, but in the past 100 years arsenic, has been used as a pesticide, a chemotherapeutic agent and a constituent of consumer products. In some areas of the world, high levels of arsenic are naturally present in drinking water and are a toxicological concern. There are several structural forms and oxidation states o...

  11. Arsenic in contaminated soil and river sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bombach, G. (Freiberg Univ. of Mining and Technology, Inst. of Mineralogy, Geochemistry and Ore Deposits, Freiberg (Germany)); Pierra, A. (Freiberg Univ. of Mining and Technology, Inst. of Mineralogy, Geochemistry and Ore Deposits, Freiberg (Germany)); Klemm, W. (Freiberg Univ. of Mining and Technology, Inst. of Mineralogy, Geochemistry and Ore Deposits, Freiberg (Germany))

    1994-09-01

    Different areas in the Erzgebirge mountains are contaminated by high arsenic concentration which is caused by the occurrence of ore and industrial sources. The study showed clearly a high concentration of arsenic in the surface and under soil (A and B horizons) in the Freiberg district. The distribution of the arsenic concentration in the area, the content of water soluble arsenic, the several oxidation states (As[sup 3+], As[sup 5+]) and the bonding types have been analyzed. (orig.)

  12. Arsenic in contaminated soil and river sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different areas in the Erzgebirge mountains are contaminated by high arsenic concentration which is caused by the occurrence of ore and industrial sources. The study showed clearly a high concentration of arsenic in the surface and under soil (A and B horizons) in the Freiberg district. The distribution of the arsenic concentration in the area, the content of water soluble arsenic, the several oxidation states (As3+, As5+) and the bonding types have been analyzed. (orig.)

  13. Sorptive Uptake Studies of an Aryl-Arsenical with Iron Oxide Composites on an Activated Carbon Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae H. Kwon

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sorption uptake kinetics and equilibrium studies for 4-hydroxy-3-nitrobenzene arsonic acid (roxarsone was evaluated with synthetic magnetite (Mag-P, commercial magnetite (Mag-C, magnetite 10%, 19%, and 32% composite material (CM-10, -19, -32 that contains granular activated carbon (GAC, and synthetic goethite at pH 7.00 in water at 21 °C for 24 h. GAC showed the highest sorptive removal of roxarsone and the relative uptake for each sorbent material with roxarsone are listed in descending order as follows: GAC (471 mg/g > goethite (418 mg/g > CM-10 (377 mg/g CM-19 (254 mg/g > CM-32 (227 mg/g > Mag-P (132 mg/g > Mag-C (29.5 mg/g. The As (V moiety of roxarsone is adsorbed onto the surface of the iron oxide/oxyhydrate and is inferred as inner-sphere surface complexes; monodentate-mononuclear, bidentate-mononuclear, and bidentate-binuclear depending on the protolytic speciation of roxarsone. The phenyl ring of roxarsone provides the primary driving force for the sorptive interaction with the graphene surface of GAC and its composites. Thus, magnetite composites are proposed as multi-purpose adsorbents for the co-removal of inorganic and organic arsenicals due to the presence of graphenic and iron oxide active adsorption sites.

  14. Arsenic Adsorption on Iron Oxides in the Presence of Soluble Organic Carbon and the Influence of Arsenic on Radish and Lettuce Development

    OpenAIRE

    Grafe, Markus

    2000-01-01

    Chapter 2: Germination and Growth of Radish (Raphanus sativus) and Lettuce (Lactuca sativus) Exposed to Arsenite and Arsenate in Hydroponic Growth Solution Little information is available on the survival, uptake, and dry mass production of vegetable seedlings and maturing plants in arsenic enriched environments. Such information is however very important to many vegetable growers in areas of subsistent agricultural like Bangladesh or home-gardeners in closer proximity of As source...

  15. Arsenic hyperaccumulation induces metabolic reprogramming in Pityrogramma calomelanos to reduce oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Naiara V; Araújo, Talita O; Arcanjo-Silva, Samara; Freitas-Silva, Larisse; Azevedo, Aristéa A; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano

    2016-06-01

    Arsenic (As) pollution is a major environmental concern due to its worldwide distribution and high toxicity to organisms. The fern Pityrogramma calomelanos is one of the few plant species known to be able to hyperaccumulate As, although the mechanisms involved are largely unknown. This study aimed to investigate the metabolic adjustments involved in the As-tolerance of P. calomelanos. For this purpose, ferns with five to seven fronds were exposed to a series of As concentrations. Young fronds were used for biochemical analysis and metabolite profiling using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. As treatment increased the total concentration of proteins and soluble phenols, enhanced peroxidase activities, and promoted disturbances in nitrogen and carbon metabolism. The reduction of the glucose pool was one of the striking responses to As. Remarkable changes in amino acids levels were observed in As-treated plants, including those related to biosynthesis of glutathione and phenols, osmoregulation and two photorespiratory intermediates. In addition, increases in polyamines levels and antioxidant enzyme activities were observed. In summary, this study indicates that P. calomelanos tolerates high concentration of As due to its capacity to upregulate biosynthesis of amino acids and antioxidants, without greatly disturbing central carbon metabolism. At extremely high As concentrations, however, this protective mechanism fails to block reactive oxygen species production, leading to lipid peroxidation and leaf necrosis. PMID:26853807

  16. Effect of competing solutes on arsenic(V) adsorption using iron and aluminum oxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The study focused on the effect of several typical competing solutes on removal of arsenic with Fe2O3 and Al2O3. The test results indicate that chloride, nitrate and sulfate did not have detectable effects, and that selenium(IV) (Se(IV)) and vanadium(V) (V(V)) show slight effects on the adsorption of As(V) with Fe2O3. The results also showed that adsorption of As(V) on Al2O3 was not affected by chloride and nitrate anions, but slightly by Se(IV) and V(V) ions. Unlike the adsorption of As(V) with Fe2O3, that with Fe2O3 was affected by the presence of sulfate in water solutions. Both phosphate and silica have significant adverse effects on the adsorption of As(V) adsorption with Fe2O3 and Al2O3. Compared to the other tested anions, phosphate anion was found to be the most prominent solute affecting the As(V) adsorption with Fe2O3 and Al2O3. In general, Fe2O3 has a better performance than Al2O3 in removal of As(V) within a water environment where multi competing solutes are present.

  17. Anaerobic arsenite oxidation with an electrode serving as the sole electron acceptor: A novel approach to the bioremediation of arsenic-polluted groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pous, Narcis [Laboratory of Chemical and Environmental Engineering (LEQUiA), Institute of the Environment, University of Girona, C/Maria Aurèlia Capmany, 69 E-17071 Girona (Spain); Casentini, Barbara; Rossetti, Simona; Fazi, Stefano [Water Research Institute (IRSA-CNR), National Research Council, Via Salaria Km 29.300, 00015 Monterotondo (Italy); Puig, Sebastià [Laboratory of Chemical and Environmental Engineering (LEQUiA), Institute of the Environment, University of Girona, C/Maria Aurèlia Capmany, 69 E-17071 Girona (Spain); Aulenta, Federico, E-mail: aulenta@irsa.cnr.it [Water Research Institute (IRSA-CNR), National Research Council, Via Salaria Km 29.300, 00015 Monterotondo (Italy)

    2015-02-11

    Highlights: • As(III) was oxidized to As(V) in a bioelectrochemical system. • A polarized graphite electrode served as electron acceptor. • Gammaproteobacteria were the dominating organisms at the electrode. - Abstract: Arsenic contamination of soil and groundwater is a serious problem worldwide. Here we show that anaerobic oxidation of As(III) to As(V), a form which is more extensively and stably adsorbed onto metal-oxides, can be achieved by using a polarized (+497 mV vs. SHE) graphite anode serving as terminal electron acceptor in the microbial metabolism. The characterization of the microbial populations at the electrode, by using in situ detection methods, revealed the predominance of gammaproteobacteria. In principle, the proposed bioelectrochemical oxidation process would make it possible to provide As(III)-oxidizing microorganisms with a virtually unlimited, low-cost and low-maintenance electron acceptor as well as with a physical support for microbial attachment.

  18. Anaerobic arsenite oxidation with an electrode serving as the sole electron acceptor: A novel approach to the bioremediation of arsenic-polluted groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • As(III) was oxidized to As(V) in a bioelectrochemical system. • A polarized graphite electrode served as electron acceptor. • Gammaproteobacteria were the dominating organisms at the electrode. - Abstract: Arsenic contamination of soil and groundwater is a serious problem worldwide. Here we show that anaerobic oxidation of As(III) to As(V), a form which is more extensively and stably adsorbed onto metal-oxides, can be achieved by using a polarized (+497 mV vs. SHE) graphite anode serving as terminal electron acceptor in the microbial metabolism. The characterization of the microbial populations at the electrode, by using in situ detection methods, revealed the predominance of gammaproteobacteria. In principle, the proposed bioelectrochemical oxidation process would make it possible to provide As(III)-oxidizing microorganisms with a virtually unlimited, low-cost and low-maintenance electron acceptor as well as with a physical support for microbial attachment

  19. Process for the selective removal of arsenic in the course of the oxidizing attack by means of a carbonated liquor on a uraniferous ore containing same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process for the selective removal of arsenical materials, in the course of a continuous hot oxidizing attack process, comprises attacking a uraniferous ore containing arsenical materials as impurities in the presence of an oxidizing agent in the reaction medium by means of an aqueous liquor formed by a recycling solution containing alkali metal carbonate and bicarbonate, and uranium close to the limit of solubility thereof, under concentration, temperature and pressure conditions which causes solubilization of the uranium present in the ore, and re-precipitation thereof in the attack medium. A suspension of a solid phase in a liquid phase is collected which, after cooling, is subjected to a separation operation. The liquid phase is recycled to the attack operation, and the separated solid phase is treated by means of an aqueous liquor to re-dissolve the precipitated uranium which is characterized in that the arsenic which is solubilized in the attack operation is extracted by means of a magnesium compound which is introduced in an amount that is at least equal to the stoichiometric amount required to cause precipitation of magnesium arsenate

  20. Toxicity mechanisms of arsenic that are shared with neurodegenerative diseases and cognitive impairment: Role of oxidative stress and inflammatory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero-Lourdes, Claudia

    2016-03-01

    Arsenic (As) is a worldwide naturally occurring metalloid. Human chronic exposure to inorganic As compounds (iAs), which are at the top of hazardous substances (ATSDR, 2013), is associated with different diseases including cancer and non- cancerous diseases. The neurotoxic effects of iAs and its methylated metabolites have been demonstrated in exposed populations and experimental models. Impaired cognitive abilities have been described in children and adults chronically exposed to iAs through drinking water. Even though different association studies failed to demonstrate that As causes neurodegenerative diseases, several toxicity mechanisms of iAs parallel those mechanisms associated with neurodegeneration, including oxidative stress and inflammation, impaired protein degradation, autophagy, and intracellular accumulation, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Additionally, different reports have shown that specifically in brain tissue, iAs and its metabolites induce hyper-phosphorylation of the tau protein and over-regulation of the amyloid precursor protein, impaired neurotransmitters synthesis and synaptic transmission, increased glutamate receptors activation, and decreased glutamate transporters expression. Interestingly, increased and sustained pro-inflammatory responses mediated by cytokines and related factors, seems to be the triggering factor for all of such cellular pathological effects. Therefore, this review proposes that iAs-associated cognitive impairment could be the result of the activation of pro-inflammatory responses in the brain tissue, which also may favor neurodegeneration or increase the risk for neurodegenerative diseases in exposed human populations. PMID:26868456

  1. The role of biogenic Fe-Mn oxides formed in situ for arsenic oxidation and adsorption in aquatic ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yaohui; Yang, Tingting; Liang, Jinsong; Qu, Jiuhui

    2016-07-01

    As(III&V), Mn(II), and Fe(II) may occur simultaneously in some groundwater and surface water. Studying their redox reactions and interactions is essential to unravel the biogeochemical cycles of these metal ions in aquatic ecosystems and to find effective methods to remove them simultaneously in drinking water treatment. Here, the formation of biogenic Fe-Mn oxides (BFMO, defined as a mixture of biogenic Mn oxide (BMO) and Fe oxide) as well as its oxidation and adsorption of As in a Fe(II)-Mn(II)-As(III&V)-Mn-oxidizing microbe (Pseudomonas sp. QJX-1) system were investigated. Batch experiments and structure characterization revealed that the BFMO was formed via a sequential precipitation of Fe oxide and BMO. The first formed Fe oxide was identified as FeOOH (lepidocrocite) and the latter formed BMO was identified as MnO2 (similar to hexagonal birnessite). In the BFMO mixture, the BMO part was mainly responsible for As(III) oxidation, and the Fe oxide part dominated As adsorption. Remarkably, the BMO could oxidize Fe(II) to form FeOOH, which may improve As adsorption. The optimum Mn(II)/Fe(II) ratio for As removal was approximately 1:3 (mol/mol). Taken together, in Fe(II)-Mn(II)-As(III&V)-Mn-oxidizing microbe ecosystems, the in situ formation of BFMO could eliminate or decrease Fe(II), Mn(II), and As(III&V) species simultaneously. Therefore, based on this study, new approaches may be developed for As removal from water containing high concentrations of Fe(II) and Mn(II). PMID:27088246

  2. Ameliorative effect of polydatin on oxidative stress-mediated testicular damage by chronic arsenic exposure in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ince, S; Avdatek, F; Demirel, H H; Arslan-Acaroz, D; Goksel, E; Kucukkurt, I

    2016-06-01

    Arsenic causes lipid peroxidation leading to alterations in antioxidant status in organisms. In this study, the reproductive effects of chronic exposure to arsenic and the protective effects of polydatin (PD) were evaluated in 35 Wistar male rats, which were divided equally into five groups. The control group received a normal diet and tap water, arsenic (100 mg l(-1) , approximately 1/50 of oral LD50 ) was given via drinking water to experimental groups except control group, and PD was orally given to the other groups at dose of 50, 100 and 200 mg kg(-1) for 60 days. Arsenic administration decreased sperm motility, glutathione level, superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in testicular tissue of rats. In contrast, malondialdehyde level and DNA damage were found to be high levels in arsenic-treated group. Histopathologically, it was observed that decreased sperm concentration and degeneration of Sertoli cells in testicular tissue. PD administration, partially 200 mg kg(-1) , reversed arsenic-induced lipid peroxidation, DNA damage, antioxidant enzyme activity and cell integrity in testis of rats. These results demonstrate that PD decreases arsenic-induced lipid peroxidation, enhances the antioxidant defence mechanism and regenerates tissue damage in testis of rats. PMID:26302725

  3. Atorvastatin restores arsenic-induced vascular dysfunction in rats: Modulation of nitric oxide signaling and inflammatory mediators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated whether atorvastatin, an extensively prescribed statin for reducing the risks of cardiovascular diseases, can reduce the risk of arsenic-induced vascular dysfunction and inflammation in rats and whether the modulation could be linked to improvement in vascular NO signaling. Rats were exposed to sodium arsenite (100 ppm) through drinking water for 90 consecutive days. Atorvastatin (10 mg/kg bw, orally) was administered once daily during the last 30 days of arsenic exposure. On the 91st day, blood was collected for measuring serum C-reactive protein. Thoracic aorta was isolated for assessing reactivity to phenylephrine, sodium nitroprusside and acetylcholine; evaluating eNOS and iNOS mRNA expression and measuring NO production, while abdominal aorta was used for ELISA of cytokines, chemokine and vascular cell adhesion molecules. Histopathology was done in aortic arches. Arsenic did not alter phenylephrine-elicited contraction. Atorvastatin inhibited Emax of phenylephrine, but it augmented the contractile response in aortic rings from arsenic-exposed animals. Sodium nitroprusside-induced relaxation was not altered with any treatment. However, arsenic reduced acetylcholine-induced relaxation and affected aortic eNOS at the levels of mRNA expression, protein concentration, phosphorylation and NO production. Further, it increased aortic iNOS mRNA expression, iNOS-derived NO synthesis, production of pro-inflammatory mediators (IL-1β, IL-6, MCP-1, VCAM, sICAM) and serum C-reactive protein and aortic vasculopathic lesions. Atorvastatin attenuated these arsenic-mediated functional, biochemical and structural alterations. Results show that atorvastatin has the potential to ameliorate arsenic-induced vascular dysfunction and inflammation by restoring endothelial function with improvement in NO signaling and attenuating production of pro-inflammatory mediators and cell adhesion molecules. - Highlights: • We evaluated if atorvastatin reduce arsenic

  4. Atorvastatin restores arsenic-induced vascular dysfunction in rats: Modulation of nitric oxide signaling and inflammatory mediators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kesavan, Manickam; Sarath, Thengumpallil Sasindran; Kannan, Kandasamy; Suresh, Subramaniyam; Gupta, Priyanka; Vijayakaran, Karunakaran; Sankar, Palanisamy; Kurade, Nitin Pandurang; Mishra, Santosh Kumar; Sarkar, Souvendra Nath, E-mail: snsarkar1911@rediffmail.com

    2014-10-01

    We evaluated whether atorvastatin, an extensively prescribed statin for reducing the risks of cardiovascular diseases, can reduce the risk of arsenic-induced vascular dysfunction and inflammation in rats and whether the modulation could be linked to improvement in vascular NO signaling. Rats were exposed to sodium arsenite (100 ppm) through drinking water for 90 consecutive days. Atorvastatin (10 mg/kg bw, orally) was administered once daily during the last 30 days of arsenic exposure. On the 91{sup st} day, blood was collected for measuring serum C-reactive protein. Thoracic aorta was isolated for assessing reactivity to phenylephrine, sodium nitroprusside and acetylcholine; evaluating eNOS and iNOS mRNA expression and measuring NO production, while abdominal aorta was used for ELISA of cytokines, chemokine and vascular cell adhesion molecules. Histopathology was done in aortic arches. Arsenic did not alter phenylephrine-elicited contraction. Atorvastatin inhibited E{sub max} of phenylephrine, but it augmented the contractile response in aortic rings from arsenic-exposed animals. Sodium nitroprusside-induced relaxation was not altered with any treatment. However, arsenic reduced acetylcholine-induced relaxation and affected aortic eNOS at the levels of mRNA expression, protein concentration, phosphorylation and NO production. Further, it increased aortic iNOS mRNA expression, iNOS-derived NO synthesis, production of pro-inflammatory mediators (IL-1β, IL-6, MCP-1, VCAM, sICAM) and serum C-reactive protein and aortic vasculopathic lesions. Atorvastatin attenuated these arsenic-mediated functional, biochemical and structural alterations. Results show that atorvastatin has the potential to ameliorate arsenic-induced vascular dysfunction and inflammation by restoring endothelial function with improvement in NO signaling and attenuating production of pro-inflammatory mediators and cell adhesion molecules. - Highlights: • We evaluated if atorvastatin reduce arsenic

  5. Denitrification-coupled iron(ii) oxidation: a key process regulating the fate and transport of nitrate, phosphate, and arsenic in a wastewater-contaminated aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard L.; Kent, Douglas B.; Repert, Deborah A.; Hart, C. P.

    2008-01-01

    Denitrification in the subsurface is often viewed as a heterotrophic process. However, some denitrifiers can also utilize inorganic electron donors. In particular, Fe(II), which is common in many aquifers, could be an important reductant for contaminant nitrate. Anoxic iron oxidation would have additional consequences, including decreased mobility for species like arsenic and phosphate, which bind strongly to hydrous Fe(III) oxide. A study was conducted in a wastewater contaminant plume on Cape Cod to assess the potential for denitrification- coupled Fe(II) oxidation. Previous changes in wastewater disposal upgradient of the study area had resulted in nitrate being transported into a portion of the anoxic zone of the plume and decreased concentrations of Fe(II), phosphate, and arsenic. A series of anoxic tracers (groundwater + nitrate + bromide) were injected into the unaffected, Fe(II)-containing zone under natural gradient conditions. Denitrification was stimulated within 1 m of transport (4 days) for both low and high (100 & 1000 μM) nitrate additions, initially producing stiochiometric quantities of nitrous oxide (>300 μM N) and trace amounts of nitrite. Subsequent injections at the same site reduced nitrate even more rapidly and produced less nitrous oxide, especially over longer transport distances. Fe(II) and nitrate concentrations decreased together and this was accompanied by an increase in colloidal Fe(III) and decreases in pH, total arsenic, and phosphate concentrations. All plume constituents returned to background levels several weeks after the tracer tests were completed. Groundwater microorganisms collected on filters during the tracer test rapidly and immediately reduced nitrite and oxidized Fe(II) in 3-hr laboratory incubations. Several pure cultures of Fe(II)-oxidizing denitrifying bacteria were isolated from core material and subsequently characterized. All of the isolates were mixotrophic, simultaneously oxidizing organic carbon and Fe

  6. Denitrification-Coupled Iron(II) Oxidation: A Key Process Regulating the Fate and Transport of Nitrate, Phosphate, and Arsenic in a Wastewater-Contaminated Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. L.; Kent, D. B.; Repert, D. A.; Hart, C. P.

    2007-12-01

    Denitrification in the subsurface is often viewed as a heterotrophic process. However, some denitrifiers can also utilize inorganic electron donors. In particular, Fe(II), which is common in many aquifers, could be an important reductant for contaminant nitrate. Anoxic iron oxidation would have additional consequences, including decreased mobility for species like arsenic and phosphate, which bind strongly to hydrous Fe(III) oxide. A study was conducted in a wastewater contaminant plume on Cape Cod to assess the potential for denitrification- coupled Fe(II) oxidation. Previous changes in wastewater disposal upgradient of the study area had resulted in nitrate being transported into a portion of the anoxic zone of the plume and decreased concentrations of Fe(II), phosphate, and arsenic. A series of anoxic tracers (groundwater + nitrate + bromide) were injected into the unaffected, Fe(II)-containing zone under natural gradient conditions. Denitrification was stimulated within 1 m of transport (4 days) for both low and high (100 & 1000 μM) nitrate additions, initially producing stiochiometric quantities of nitrous oxide (>300 μM N) and trace amounts of nitrite. Subsequent injections at the same site reduced nitrate even more rapidly and produced less nitrous oxide, especially over longer transport distances. Fe(II) and nitrate concentrations decreased together and this was accompanied by an increase in colloidal Fe(III) and decreases in pH, total arsenic, and phosphate concentrations. All plume constituents returned to background levels several weeks after the tracer tests were completed. Groundwater microorganisms collected on filters during the tracer test rapidly and immediately reduced nitrite and oxidized Fe(II) in 3-hr laboratory incubations. Several pure cultures of Fe(II)-oxidizing denitrifying bacteria were isolated from core material and subsequently characterized. All of the isolates were mixotrophic, simultaneously oxidizing organic carbon and Fe

  7. Chemical stabilization of metals and arsenic in contaminated soils using oxides – A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxides and their precursors have been extensively studied, either singly or in combination with other amendments promoting sorption, for in situ stabilization of metals and As in contaminated soils. This remediation option aims at reducing the available fraction of metal(loid)s, notably in the root zone, and thus lowering the risks associated with their leaching, ecotoxicity, plant uptake and human exposure. This review summarizes literature data on mechanisms involved in the immobilization process and presents results from laboratory and field experiments, including the subsequent influence on higher plants and aided phytostabilization. Despite the partial successes in the field, recent knowledge highlights the importance of long-term and large-scale field studies evaluating the stability of the oxide-based amendments in the treated soils and their efficiency in the long-term. - In situ stabilization of metals and As in contaminated soils using oxides combined with phytostabilization is a potential alternative to conventional remediation techniques.

  8. Manufacture of high purity low arsenic anhydrous hydrogen fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process for manufacturing anhydrous hydrogen fluoride with reduced levels of arsenic impurity from arsenic contaminated anhydrous hydrogen fluoride is described which comprises: (a) contacting the anhydrous hydrogen fluoride with an effective amount of hydrogen peroxide to oxidize the arsenic impurity in the presence of a catalyst which comprises a catalytic amount of (i) molybdenum or an inorganic molybdenum compound and (ii) a phosphate compound, at a temperature and for a period of time sufficient to oxidize volatile trivalent arsenic impurities in the anhydrous hydrogen fluoride to non-volatile pentavalent arsenic compounds, and (b) distilling the resulting mixture and recovering anhydrous hydrogen fluoride with reduced levels of arsenic impurity

  9. A feasibility study on oxidation state of arsenic in cut tobacco, mainstream cigarette smoke and cigarette ash by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes the application of synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure spectroscopy to study the oxidation state of arsenic in cigarette mainstream smoke, cut tobacco and cigarette ash. The level of arsenic in the total particulate matter of the smoke is approximately 1 ppm for the standard research reference cigarette 2R4F and its replacement 3R4F. Smoke particulate samples collected by a conventional glass-fiber membrane (commercially known as Cambridge filter pad) and a jet-impaction method were analyzed and compared. In addition smoke particulate samples were aged either at ambient temperature or at 195 K. X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure spectroscopy results revealed that the cut tobacco powder and cigarette ash contained almost exclusively AsV. The smoke particulate samples however contained a mixture of AsIII and AsV. The AsV in the smoke particulate was reduced to AsIII upon aging. Stabilizing the smoke particulate matter at 195 K by solid CO2 slowed down this aging reaction and revealed a higher percentage of AsV. This behavior is consistent with the redox properties of the arsenic species and the smoke particulate matrix.

  10. Arsenic adsorption in pre-treatment natural zeolite with magnesium oxides; Adsorcion de arsenico en zeolita natural pretratada con oxidos de magnesio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejia Z, F. [Universidad Autonoma de Baja California, Instituto de Ingenieria, Blvd. Benito Juarez s/n, 21900 Mexicali, Baja California (Mexico); Valenzuela G, J. L.; Aguayo S, S.; Meza F, D., E-mail: fleridam@iq.uson.m [Universidad de Sonora, Departamentos de Geologia e Ingenieria Quimica y Metalurgia, Blvd. Luis Encinas y Rosales s/n, Col. Centro, 83000 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

    2009-07-01

    A methodology was developed to modify a natural zeolite (chabazite) with magnesium oxide in order to remove arsenic (As{sup +5}) from water for human consumption. It is proposed a magnesium oxide while regarded as an efficient adsorbent for removing metals in water. X-ray diffraction analyses show significant changes in the chabazite due to the presence of oxides and amorphous hydroxides incorporated during the pre-treatment. Experimental design results show an efficiency greater than 90% of As{sup +5} adsorbed in five minutes. The results indicate that the most significant variables affecting the adsorption of As{sup +5} are the initial concentration of As and the solid/liquid ratio. Experimental data fitted better to Freundlich isotherm with a 20.17 mg/g adsorption capability. (Author)

  11. Variability in human metabolism of arsenic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimating the nature and extent of human cancer risks due to arsenic (As) in drinking water is currently of great concern, since millions of persons worldwide are exposed to arsenic, primarily through natural enrichment of drinking water drawn from deep wells. Humans metabolize and eliminate As through oxidative methylation and subsequent urinary excretion. While there is debate as to the role of methylation in activation/detoxification, variations in arsenic metabolism may affect individual risks of toxicity and carcinogenesis. Using data from three populations, from Mexico, China, and Chile, we have analyzed the distribution in urine of total arsenic and arsenic species (inorganic arsenic (InAs), monomethyl arsenic (MMA), and dimethyl arsenic (DMA). Data were analyzed in terms of the concentration of each species and by evaluating MMA:DMA and (MMA+DMA):InAs ratios. In all persons most urinary As was present as DMA. Male:female differences were discernible in both high- and low-exposure groups from all three populations, but the gender differences varied by populations. The data also indicated bimodal distributions in the ratios of DMA to InAs and to MMA. While the gene or genes responsible for arsenic methylation are still unknown, the results of our studies among the ethnic groups in this study are consistent with the presence of functional genetic polymorphisms in arsenic methylation leading to measurable differences in toxicity. This analysis highlights the need for continuing research on the health effects of As in humans using molecular epidemiologic methods

  12. Application of Graphene Oxide-MnFe2O4 Magnetic Nanohybrids as Magnetically Separable Adsorbent for Highly Efficient Removal of Arsenic from Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huong, Pham Thi Lan; Huy, Le Thanh; Phan, Vu Ngoc; Huy, Tran Quang; Nam, Man Hoai; Lam, Vu Dinh; Le, Anh-Tuan

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a functional magnetic nanohybrid consisting of manganese ferrite magnetic nanoparticles (MnFe2O4) deposited onto graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets was successfully synthesized using a modified co-precipitation method. The as-prepared GO-MnFe2O4 magnetic nanohybrids were characterized using x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer measurements. Adsorption experiments were performed to evaluate the adsorption capacities and efficient removal of arsenic of the nanohybrid and compared with bare MnFe2O4 nanoparticles and GO nanosheets. Our obtained results reveal that the adsorption process of the nanohybrids was well fitted with a pseudo-second-order kinetic equation and a Freundlich isotherm model; the maximum adsorption capacity and removal efficiency of the nanohybrids obtained ~240.385 mg/g and 99.9% with a fast response of equilibrium adsorption time ~20 min. The larger adsorption capacity and shorter equilibrium time of the GO-MnFe2O4 nanohybrids showed better performance than that of bare MnFe2O4 nanoparticles and GO nanosheets. The advantages of reusability, magnetic separation, high removal efficiency, and quick kinetics make these nanohybrids very promising as low-cost adsorbents for fast and effective removal of arsenic from water.

  13. The effect of carbon type on arsenic and trichloroethylene removal capabilities of iron (hydr)oxide nanoparticle-impregnated granulated activated carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Anne Marie; Hristovski, Kiril D; Möller, Teresia; Westerhoff, Paul; Sylvester, Paul

    2010-11-15

    This study investigates the impact of the type of virgin granular activated carbon (GAC) media used to synthesize iron (hydr)oxide nanoparticle-impregnated granular activated carbon (Fe-GAC) on its properties and its ability to remove arsenate and organic trichloroethylene (TCE) from water. Two Fe-GAC media were synthesized via a permanganate/ferrous ion synthesis method using bituminous and lignite-based virgin GAC. Data obtained from an array of characterization techniques (pore size distribution, surface charge, etc.) in correlation with batch equilibrium tests, and continuous flow modeling suggested that GAC type and pore size distribution control the iron (nanoparticle) contents, Fe-GAC synthesis mechanisms, and contaminant removal performances. Pore surface diffusion model calculations predicted that lignite Fe-GAC could remove ∼6.3 L g(-1) dry media and ∼4 L g(-1) dry media of water contaminated with 30 μg L(-1) TCE and arsenic, respectively. In contrast, the bituminous Fe-GAC could remove only ∼0.2 L/g dry media for TCE and ∼2.8 L/g dry media for As of the same contaminated water. The results show that arsenic removal capability is increased while TCE removal is decreased as a result of Fe nanoparticle impregnation. This tradeoff is related to several factors, of which changes in surface properties and pore size distributions appeared to be the most dominant. PMID:20688429

  14. The effect of carbon type on arsenic and trichloroethylene removal capabilities of iron (hydr)oxide nanoparticle-impregnated granulated activated carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigates the impact of the type of virgin granular activated carbon (GAC) media used to synthesize iron (hydr)oxide nanoparticle-impregnated granular activated carbon (Fe-GAC) on its properties and its ability to remove arsenate and organic trichloroethylene (TCE) from water. Two Fe-GAC media were synthesized via a permanganate/ferrous ion synthesis method using bituminous and lignite-based virgin GAC. Data obtained from an array of characterization techniques (pore size distribution, surface charge, etc.) in correlation with batch equilibrium tests, and continuous flow modeling suggested that GAC type and pore size distribution control the iron (nanoparticle) contents, Fe-GAC synthesis mechanisms, and contaminant removal performances. Pore surface diffusion model calculations predicted that lignite Fe-GAC could remove ∼6.3 L g-1 dry media and ∼4 L g-1 dry media of water contaminated with 30 μg L-1 TCE and arsenic, respectively. In contrast, the bituminous Fe-GAC could remove only ∼0.2 L/g dry media for TCE and ∼2.8 L/g dry media for As of the same contaminated water. The results show that arsenic removal capability is increased while TCE removal is decreased as a result of Fe nanoparticle impregnation. This tradeoff is related to several factors, of which changes in surface properties and pore size distributions appeared to be the most dominant.

  15. Dispersion of Natural Arsenic in the Malcantone Watershed, Southern Switzerland: Field Evidence for Repeated Sorption-Desorption and Oxidation-Reduction Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeifer,H.; Gueye-Girardet, A.; Reymond, D.; Schlegel, C.; Temgoua, E.; Hesterberg, D.; Chou, J.

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, elevated arsenic concentrations have been found in waters and soils of many countries, often resulting in a health threat for the local population. Switzerland is not an exception and this paper deals with the release and subsequent fate of arsenic in a 200-km{sup 2} mountainous watershed, characterized by crystalline silicate rocks (gneisses, schists, amphibolites) that contain abundant As-bearing sulfide ore deposits, some of which have been mined for iron and gold in the past. Using analytical methods common for mineralogical, ground water and soil studies (XRD, XRF, XAS-XANES and -EXAFS, electron microprobe, extraction, ICP, AAS with hydride generator, ion chromatography), seven different field situations and related dispersion processes of natural arsenic have been studied: (1) release by rock weathering; (2) transport and deposition by water and ice; (3) release of As to the ground and surface water due to increasing pH; (4) accumulation in humic soil horizons; (5) remobilization by reduction in water-saturated soils and stagnant ground waters; (6) remobilization by using P-rich fertilizers or dung and (7) oxidation, precipitation and dilution in surface waters. Comparison of the results with experimental adsorption studies and speciation diagrams from the literature allows us to reconstruct and identify the typical behavior of arsenic in a natural environment under temperate climatic conditions. The main parameters identified are: (a) once liberated from the primary minerals, sorption processes on Fe-oxy-hydroxides dominate over Al-phases, such as Al-hydroxides or clay minerals and limit the As concentrations in the spring and well waters between 20 and 300 {mu}g/l. (b) Precipitation as secondary minerals is limited to the weathering domain, where the As concentrations are still high and not yet too diluted by rain and soils waters. (c) Although neutral and alkaline pH conditions clearly increase the mobility of As, the main factor to

  16. Arsenic trioxide induces oxidative stress, DNA damage, and mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis in human leukemia (HL-60) cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Sanjay; Yedjou, Clement G.; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), which accounts for approximately 10% of all acute myloid leukemia cases. It is a blood cancer that is formed by chromosomal mutation. Each year in the United States, APL affects about 1,500 patients of all age groups and causes approximately 1.2% of cancer deaths. Arsenic trioxide (ATO) has been used successfully for treatment of APL patients, and both induction and consolidated therapy have resulted i...

  17. Arsenic speciation and susceptibility to oxidative stress in the fanworm Sabella spallanzanii (Gmelin) (Annelida, Sabellidae) under naturally acidified conditions: An in situ transplant experiment in a Mediterranean CO2 vent system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricevuto, E; Lanzoni, I; Fattorini, D; Regoli, F; Gambi, M C

    2016-02-15

    The fanworm Sabella spallanzanii (Gmelin, 1791) (Annelida, Sabellidae) is considered tolerant to several types of stressors but is generally absent from the CO2 vents. A peculiar characteristic of this species is the elevated content of arsenic in the gills, particularly dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), stored as an anti-predatory compound. In this study, modulation of trace metal levels, chemical speciation of arsenic and oxidative stress biomarkers were quantified in S. spallanzanii after a 30days transplant experiment into naturally acidified conditions in a Mediterranean vent system. No significant bioaccumulation of metals was observed in the thoracic tissues and branchial crowns after the translocation period, whereas variations occurred in the relative abundance of different arsenic compounds with the appearance of inorganic forms. The antioxidant system of translocated polychaetes exhibited a significant decrease of enzymatic activities of both catalase and glutathione peroxidases, and the impairment of the overall capability to neutralize hydroxyl radicals (OH). This highlighted an oxidative challenge primarily on the detoxification pathway of hydrogen peroxide. Overall low pH-elevated pCO2 may have detrimental effects on arsenic metabolism and oxidative status of S. spallanzanii, supporting the hypothesis of species-specific differences in vulnerability to ocean acidification. PMID:26688050

  18. Arsenic chemistry in soils and sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fendorf, S.; Nico, P.; Kocar, B.D.; Masue, Y.; Tufano, K.J.

    2009-10-15

    Arsenic is a naturally occurring trace element that poses a threat to human and ecosystem health, particularly when incorporated into food or water supplies. The greatest risk imposed by arsenic to human health results from contamination of drinking water, for which the World Health Organization recommends a maximum limit of 10 {micro}g L{sup -1}. Continued ingestion of drinking water having hazardous levels of arsenic can lead to arsenicosis and cancers of the bladder, skin, lungs and kidneys. Unfortunately, arsenic tainted drinking waters are a global threat and presently having a devastating impact on human health within Asia. Nearly 100 million people, for example, are presently consuming drinking water having arsenic concentrations exceeding the World Health Organization's recommended limit (Ahmed et al., 2006). Arsenic contamination of the environment often results from human activities such as mining or pesticide application, but recently natural sources of arsenic have demonstrated a devastating impact on water quality. Arsenic becomes problematic from a health perspective principally when it partitions into the aqueous rather than the solid phase. Dissolved concentrations, and the resulting mobility, of arsenic within soils and sediments are the combined result of biogeochemical processes linked to hydrologic factors. Processes favoring the partitioning of As into the aqueous phase, potentially leading to hazardous concentrations, vary extensively but can broadly be grouped into four categories: (1) ion displacement, (2) desorption (or limited sorption) at pH values > 8.5, (3) reduction of arsenate to arsenite, and (4) mineral dissolution, particularly reductive dissolution of Fe and Mn (hydr)oxides. Although various processes may liberate arsenic from solids, a transition from aerobic to anaerobic conditions, and commensurate arsenic and iron/manganese reduction, appears to be a dominant, but not exclusive, means by which high concentrations of

  19. N-6-Adenine-Specific DNA Methyltransferase 1 (N6AMT1) Polymorphisms and Arsenic Methylation in Andean Women

    OpenAIRE

    Harari, Florencia; Engström, Karin; Concha, Gabriela; Colque, Graciela; Vahter, Marie; Broberg, Karin

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In humans, inorganic arsenic is metabolized to methylated metabolites mainly by arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT). AS3MT polymorphisms are associated with arsenic metabolism efficiency. Recently, a putative N-6-adenine-specific DNA methyltransferase 1 (N6AMT1) was found to methylate arsenic in vitro. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the role of N6AMT1 polymorphisms in arsenic methylation efficiency in humans. METHODS: We assessed arsenic methylation efficiency in 188 w...

  20. Improved diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) measurement of total dissolved inorganic arsenic in waters and soils using a hydrous zirconium oxide binding layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qin; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Hao; Ding, Shiming; Li, Zhu; Williams, Paul N; Cheng, Hao; Han, Chao; Wu, Longhua; Zhang, Chaosheng

    2014-03-18

    A high-capacity diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) technique has been developed for measurement of total dissolved inorganic arsenic (As) using a long shelf life binding gel layer containing hydrous zirconium oxide (Zr-oxide). Both As(III) and As(V) were rapidly accumulated in the Zr-oxide gel and could be quantitatively recovered by elution using 1.0 M NaOH for freshwater or a mixture of 1.0 M NaOH and 1.0 M H2O2 for seawater. DGT uptake of As(III) and As(V) increased linearly with deployment time and was independent of pH (2.0-9.1), ionic strength (0.01-750 mM), the coexistence of phosphate (0.25-10 mg P L(-1)), and the aging of the Zr-oxide gel up to 24 months after production. The capacities of the Zr-oxide DGT were 159 μg As(III) and 434 μg As(V) per device for freshwater and 94 μg As(III) and 152 μg As(V) per device for seawater. These values were 5-29 times and 3-19 times more than those reported for the commonly used ferrihydrite and Metsorb DGTs, respectively. Deployments of the Zr-oxide DGT in As-spiked synthetic seawater provided accurate measurements of total dissolved inorganic As over the 96 h deployment, whereas ferrihydrite and Metsorb DGTs only measured the concentrations accurately up to 24 and 48 h, respectively. Deployments in soils showed that the Zr-oxide DGT was a reliable and robust tool, even for soil samples heavily polluted with As. In contrast, As in these soils was underestimated by ferrihydrite and Metsorb DGTs due to insufficient effective capacities, which were likely suppressed by the competing effects of phosphate. PMID:24528281

  1. Arsenic Removal from Water Using Various Adsorbents: Magnetic Ion Exchange Resins, Hydrous Ion Oxide Particles, Granular Ferric Hydroxide, Activated Alumina, Sulfur Modified Iron, and Iron Oxide-Coated Microsand

    KAUST Repository

    Sinha, Shahnawaz

    2011-09-30

    The equilibrium and kinetic adsorption of arsenic on six different adsorbents were investigated with one synthetic and four natural types (two surface and two ground) of water. The adsorbents tested included magnetic ion exchange resins (MIEX), hydrous ion oxide particles (HIOPs), granular ferric hydroxide (GFH), activated alumina (AA), sulfur modified iron (SMI), and iron oxide-coated mic - rosand (IOC-M), which have different physicochemical properties (shape, charge, surface area, size, and metal content). The results showed that adsorption equilibriums were achieved within a contact period of 20 min. The optimal doses of adsorbents determined for a given equilibrium concentration of C eq = 10 μg/L were 500 mg/L for AA and GFH, 520–1,300 mg/L for MIEX, 1,200 mg/L for HIOPs, 2,500 mg/L for SMI, and 7,500 mg/L for IOC-M at a contact time of 60 min. At these optimal doses, the rate constants of the adsorbents were 3.9, 2.6, 2.5, 1.9, 1.8, and 1.6 1/hr for HIOPs, AA, GFH, MIEX, SMI, and IOC-M, respectively. The presence of silicate significantly reduced the arsenic removal efficiency of HIOPs, AA, and GFH, presumably due to the decrease in chemical binding affinity of arsenic in the presence of silicate. Additional experiments with natural types of water showed that, with the exception of IOC-M, the adsorbents had lower adsorption capacities in ground water than with surface and deionized water, in which the adsorption capacities decreased by approximately 60–95 % .

  2. Behavior of arsenic in hydrometallurgical zinc production and environmental impact

    OpenAIRE

    Peltekov A.B.; Boyanov B.S.; Markova T.S.

    2014-01-01

    The presence of arsenic in zinc sulphide concentrates is particularly harmful, because it creates problems in zinc electrolysis. The main source of arsenic in non-ferrous metallurgy is arsenopyrite (FeAsS). In oxidative roasting of zinc concentrates, FeAsS oxidizes to arsenic oxides (As2O3, As2O5). In this connection a natural FeAsS was examined, and also the distribution of arsenic in the products of the roasting process, the cycle of sulphuric acid obtaining and the leaching of zinc calcine...

  3. Proposal for novel metabolic pathway of highly toxic dimethylated arsenics accompanied by enzymatic sulfuration, desulfuration and oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoda, Yasuyo; Kurosawa, Hidetoshi; Kato, Koichi; Endo, Yoko; Yamanaka, Kenzo; Endo, Ginji

    2015-04-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has concluded that dimethylarsinic acid [(CH3)2AsO(OH), DMA(V)], a main metabolite of inorganic arsenic, is responsible for carcinogenesis in urinary bladder and lung in rodents, and various modes of carcinogenic action have been proposed. One theory concerning the mode of action is that the biotransformation of dimethylarsinous acid [(CH3)2AsOH, DMA(III)] from DMA(V) plays an important role in the carcinogenesis by way of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Furthermore, dimethylmonothioarsinic acid [(CH3)2AsS(OH), DMMTA(V)], a metabolite of DMA(V), has also been noted because of its higher toxicity. However, the metabolic mechanisms of formation and disappearance of DMA(III) and DMMTA(V), and their toxicity are not fully understood. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to clarify the mechanism of metabolic formation of DMMTA(V) and DMA(V) from DMA(III). The in vitro transformation of arsenicals by treatment with liver homogenate from rodents and sulfur transferase was detected by HPLC-ICP-MS and HPLC-tandem MS. DMMTA(V) is produced from DMA(III) but not DMA(V) by cellular fractions from mouse liver homogenates and by rhodanese from bovine liver in the presence of thiosulfate, a sulfur donor. Not only DMMTA(V) thus produced but also DMA(III) are re-converted into DMA(V) by an in vitro addition of S9 mix. These findings indicate that the metabolic process not only of DMA(III) to DMA(V) or DMMTA(V) but also of DMMTA(V) to DMA(V) consists of a complicated mode of interaction between monooxygenase including cytochrome P450 (CYP) and/or sulfur transferase. PMID:25559201

  4. Oxidation state specific generation of arsines from methylated arsenicals based on L-cysteine treatment in buffered media for speciation analysis by hydride generation-automated cryotrapping-gas chromatography-atomic absorption spectrometry with the multiatomizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An automated system for hydride generation-cryotrapping-gas chromatography-atomic absorption spectrometry with the multiatomizer is described. Arsines are preconcentrated and separated in a Chromosorb filled U-tube. An automated cryotrapping unit, employing nitrogen gas formed upon heating in the detection phase for the displacement of the cooling liquid nitrogen, has been developed. The conditions for separation of arsines in a Chromosorb filled U-tube have been optimized. A complete separation of signals from arsine, methylarsine, dimethylarsine, and trimethylarsine has been achieved within a 60 s reading window. The limits of detection for methylated arsenicals tested were 4 ng l-1. Selective hydride generation is applied for the oxidation state specific speciation analysis of inorganic and methylated arsenicals. The arsines are generated either exclusively from trivalent or from both tri- and pentavalent inorganic and methylated arsenicals depending on the presence of L-cysteine as a prereductant and/or reaction modifier. A TRIS buffer reaction medium is proposed to overcome narrow optimum concentration range observed for the L-cysteine modified reaction in HCl medium. The system provides uniform peak area sensitivity for all As species. Consequently, the calibration with a single form of As is possible. This method permits a high-throughput speciation analysis of metabolites of inorganic arsenic in relatively complex biological matrices such as cell culture systems without sample pretreatment, thus preserving the distribution of tri- and pentavalent species

  5. Removal of arsenic from ground water samples collected from West Bengal, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic contamination in ground water is one of the major concerns in many parts of the world including Bangladesh and India. Considering the high toxicity of arsenic, World Health Organization (WHO) has set a provisional guideline value of 10 μg L-1 for arsenic in drinking water. Several methods have been adopted for the removal of arsenic from drinking water. Most of the methods fail to remove As(III), the most toxic form of arsenic. An extra oxidative treatment step is essential for effective removal of total arsenic. Manganese dioxide (MnO2) oxidizes As(III) to As(V). Removal of arsenic from water using manganese dioxide has been reported. During this work, removal of arsenic from ground water samples collected from arsenic contaminated area of West Bengal, India were carried out using MnO2

  6. A methodological approach for the identification of arsenic bearing phases in polluted soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matera, V.; Le Hecho, I.; Laboudigue, A.; Thomas, P.; Tellier, S.; Astruc, M

    2003-11-01

    Arsenic in the three polluted soils is mainly associated with neoformed amorphous iron (hydr)oxides. - A methodological approach is used to characterize arsenic pollution in three soils and to determine arsenic speciation and association with solid phases in three polluted soils. HPLC-ICP-MS was used for arsenic speciation analysis, SEM-EDS and XRD for physical characterization of arsenic pollution, and sequential chemical extractions to identify arsenic distribution. Arsenic was concentrated in the finest size fractions also enriched in iron and aluminium. Total arsenic concentrations in soils are close to 1%. Arsenic was mainly present as arsenate, representing more than 90% of total arsenic. No crystallised arsenic minerals were detected by XRD analysis. SEM-EDS observations indicated arsenic/iron associations. Modified Tessier's procedure showed that arsenic was mainly extracted from amorphous iron oxide phase. The results of this methodological approach lead to predict the formation of iron arsenates in the case of one of the studied soils while arsenic sorption on iron amorphous (hydr)oxides seemed to be the determinant in the two other soils.

  7. A methodological approach for the identification of arsenic bearing phases in polluted soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic in the three polluted soils is mainly associated with neoformed amorphous iron (hydr)oxides. - A methodological approach is used to characterize arsenic pollution in three soils and to determine arsenic speciation and association with solid phases in three polluted soils. HPLC-ICP-MS was used for arsenic speciation analysis, SEM-EDS and XRD for physical characterization of arsenic pollution, and sequential chemical extractions to identify arsenic distribution. Arsenic was concentrated in the finest size fractions also enriched in iron and aluminium. Total arsenic concentrations in soils are close to 1%. Arsenic was mainly present as arsenate, representing more than 90% of total arsenic. No crystallised arsenic minerals were detected by XRD analysis. SEM-EDS observations indicated arsenic/iron associations. Modified Tessier's procedure showed that arsenic was mainly extracted from amorphous iron oxide phase. The results of this methodological approach lead to predict the formation of iron arsenates in the case of one of the studied soils while arsenic sorption on iron amorphous (hydr)oxides seemed to be the determinant in the two other soils

  8. Effects of organic matter and ageing on the bioaccessibility of arsenic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meunier, Louise; Koch, Iris [Environmental Sciences Group, Royal Military College, P.O. Box 17 000, Station Forces, Kingston, Ontario K7K7B4 (Canada); Reimer, Kenneth J., E-mail: reimer-k@rmc.ca [Environmental Sciences Group, Royal Military College, P.O. Box 17 000, Station Forces, Kingston, Ontario K7K7B4 (Canada)

    2011-10-15

    Arsenic-contaminated soils may pose a risk to human health. Redevelopment of contaminated sites may involve amending soils with organic matter, which potentially increases arsenic bioaccessibility. The effects of ageing on arsenic-contaminated soils mixed with peat moss were evaluated in a simulated ageing period representing two years, during which arsenic bioaccessibility was periodically measured. Significant increases (p = 0.032) in bioaccessibility were observed for 15 of 31 samples tested, particularly in comparison with samples originally containing >30% bioaccessible arsenic in soils naturally rich in organic matter (>25%). Samples where percent arsenic bioaccessibility was unchanged with age were generally poor in organic matter (average 7.7%) and contained both arsenopyrite and pentavalent arsenic forms that remained unaffected by the organic matter amendments. Results suggest that the addition of organic matter may lead to increases in arsenic bioaccessibility, which warrants caution in the evaluation of risks associated with redevelopment of arsenic-contaminated land. - Highlights: > Adding organic matter to contaminated soils may increase arsenic bioaccessibility. > Ageing soils with >25% organic matter can lead to increased arsenic bioaccessibility. > No changes in arsenic bioaccessibility for soils poor in organic matter (mean 7.7%). > No changes in arsenic bioaccessibility for samples containing arsenopyrite. > Organic matter in soil may favour oxidation of trivalent arsenic to pentavalent form. - Adding organic carbon may increase arsenic bioaccessibility, especially in samples originally containing >30% bioaccessible arsenic in organic carbon-rich soils (>25%).

  9. Comparison of Low Concentration and High Concentration Arsenic Removal Techniques and Evaluation of Concentration of Arsenic in Ground Water: A Case Study of Lahore, Pakistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasar, Abdullah; Tabinda, Amtul Bari; Shahzadi, Uzma; Saleem, Pakeeza [GC University, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2014-10-15

    The main focus of this study was the evaluation of arsenic concentration in the ground water of Lahore at different depth and application of different mitigation techniques for arsenic removal. Twenty four hours of solar oxidation gives 90% of arsenic removal as compared to 8 hr. or 16 hr. Among oxides, calcium oxide gives 96% of As removal as compared to 93% by lanthanum oxide. Arsenic removal efficiency was up to 97% by ferric chloride, whereas 95% by alum. Activated alumina showed 99% removal as compared to 97% and 95% removal with bauxite and charcoal, respectively. Elemental analysis of adsorbents showed that the presence of phosphate and silica can cause a reduction of arsenic removal efficiency by activated alumina, bauxite and charcoal. This study has laid a foundation for further research on arsenic in the city of Lahore and has also provided suitable techniques for arsenic removal.

  10. Earth Abides Arsenic Biotransformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yong-Guan; Yoshinaga, Masafumi; Zhao, Fang-Jie; Rosen, Barry P.

    2014-05-01

    Arsenic is the most prevalent environmental toxic element and causes health problems throughout the world. The toxicity, mobility, and fate of arsenic in the environment are largely determined by its speciation, and arsenic speciation changes are driven, at least to some extent, by biological processes. In this article, biotransformation of arsenic is reviewed from the perspective of the formation of Earth and the evolution of life, and the connection between arsenic geochemistry and biology is described. The article provides a comprehensive overview of molecular mechanisms of arsenic redox and methylation cycles as well as other arsenic biotransformations. It also discusses the implications of arsenic biotransformation in environmental remediation and food safety, with particular emphasis on groundwater arsenic contamination and arsenic accumulation in rice.

  11. Nitric oxide alleviated arsenic toxicity by modulation of antioxidants and thiol metabolism in rice (Oryza sativa L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Pal Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide is a gaseous signalling molecule and has a profound impact on plant growth and development. It is reported to serve as pro oxidant as well as antioxidant in plant system. In present study, we evaluated the protective role of nitric oxide against AsV toxicity in rice plants. Arsenate exposure has hampered the plant growth, reduced the chlorophyll content and enhanced the oxidative stress while the exogenous NO supplementation has reverted these symptoms. Nitric oxide supplementation has reduced the As accumulation in root as well as shoot. Nitric oxide supplementation to AsV exposed plants has reduced the gene expression level of OsLsi1 and OsLsi2. Arsenate stress significantly impacted thiol metabolism, it reduced GSH content and GSH/GSSG ratio and enhanced the level of PCs. Nitric oxide supplementation maintained the GSH/GSSG ratio and reduced the level of PCs. Nitric oxide supplementation reverted AsV induced iron deficiency in shoot and had significant impact of gene expression level of various iron transporters (OsYSL2, OsFRDL1, OsIRT1 and OsIRO2. Conclusively, exogenous application of nitric oxide could be advantageous against AsV toxicity and could confer the tolerance to AsV stress in rice.

  12. Earth Abides Arsenic Biotransformations

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Yong-Guan; Yoshinaga, Masafumi; Zhao, Fang-Jie; Rosen, Barry P.

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic is the most prevalent environmental toxic element and causes health problems throughout the world. The toxicity, mobility, and fate of arsenic in the environment are largely determined by its speciation, and arsenic speciation changes are driven, at least to some extent, by biological processes. In this article, biotransformation of arsenic is reviewed from the perspective of the formation of Earth and the evolution of life, and the connection between arsenic geochemistry and biology ...

  13. Cryptic exposure to arsenic

    OpenAIRE

    Rossy Kathleen; Janusz Christopher; Schwartz Robert

    2005-01-01

    Arsenic is an odorless, colorless and tasteless element long linked with effects on the skin and viscera. Exposure to it may be cryptic. Although human intake can occur from four forms, elemental, inorganic (trivalent and pentavalent arsenic) and organic arsenic, the trivalent inorganic arsenicals constitute the major human hazard. Arsenic usually reaches the skin from occupational, therapeutic, or environmental exposure, although it still may be employed as a poison. Occupations involving ne...

  14. 含砷金矿细菌氧化提金废渣综合回收砷%Comprehensive Recovery of Arsenic from Bio-oxidation Gold Ore Slag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙光勇; 王卫亭; 杨军; 杨譞; 张永奎

    2011-01-01

    With bio-oxidation gold ore slag as raw material, arsenic was recycled from the slag. In arsenic leaching test, four factors had been studied including the usage of sodium hydroxide, leaching temperature, ratio of liquid to solid(L/S), and leaching time. In arsenic precipitate test, three factors including the initial solution pH, mole ratio between Ca and As and the reaction time had been studied. The optimum conditions for arsenic leaching include the optimal amount of NaOH of 240 g/L, 60 ℃, L/S = 4/l, 2 h. Under the optimum conditions, the leaching rate of arsenic was 85%. The optimum conditions for arsenic precipitating include the initial solution pH of 12. 0 and the mole ratio between Ca and As of 2 :1, 30 min, under which more than 97% of arsenic would be precipitated.%以细菌氧化提金废渣为原料,对其中所含的砷进行回收.分别考察了碱用量、浸出温度、液固比和浸出时间对砷浸出率的影响及溶液初始pH、钙砷摩尔比和沉淀时间对砷沉淀率的影响.通过单因素条件试验确定了浸砷的较优条件为:氢氧化钠浓度240 g/L,反应温度60℃,液固比4∶1,搅拌浸出2h.在副优条件下砷浸出率达到85%.从浸出液中沉砷的较优条件为:溶液初始pH=12.0,钙砷摩尔比2∶ 1,沉淀时间30 min.在优化条件下砷沉淀率达到97%以上.

  15. Groundwater arsenic concentrations in Vietnam controlled by sediment age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postma, Dieke; Larsen, Flemming; Thai, Nguyen Thi; Trang, Pham Thi Kim; Jakobsen, Rasmus; Nhan, Pham Quy; Long, Tran Vu; Viet, Pham Hung; Murray, Andrew Sean

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic contamination of groundwater continues to threaten the health of millions of people in southeast Asia. The oxidation of organic carbon, coupled to the reductive dissolution of arsenic-bearing iron oxides, is thought to control the release of sediment-bound arsenic into groundwater. However......, the cause of the high spatial variability in groundwater arsenic concentrations—which can range from 5 to 500 μg l−1 within distances of a few kilometres—has been uncertain. Here, we combine measurements of sediment age, organic-matter reactivity and water chemistry at four locations along a cross......-section of the arsenic-contaminated Red River floodplain in Vietnam to determine the origin of variations in groundwater arsenic concentrations. The burial age of the aquifer sediments, determined using optical stimulated luminescence, ranged from 460 years near the course of the present-day river to 5...

  16. Cleaning-induced arsenic mobilization and chromium oxidation from CCA-wood deck: Potential risk to children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gress, J; de Oliveira, L M; da Silva, E B; Lessl, J M; Wilson, P C; Townsend, T; Ma, L Q

    2015-09-01

    Concern about children's exposure to arsenic (As) from wood treated with chromated-copper-arsenate (CCA) led to its withdrawal from residential use in 2004. However, due to its effectiveness, millions of American homes still have CCA-wood decks on which children play. This study evaluated the effects of three deck-cleaning methods on formation of dislodgeable As and hexavalent chromium (CrVI) on CCA-wood surfaces and in leachate. Initial wipes from CCA-wood wetted with water showed 3-4 times more dislodgeable As than on dry wood. After cleaning with a bleach solution, 9.8-40.3μg/100cm(2) of CrVI was found on the wood surface, with up to 170μg/L CrVI in the leachate. Depending on the cleaning method, 699-2473mg of As would be released into the environment from cleaning a 18.6-m(2)-deck. Estimated As doses in children aged 1-6 after 1h of playing on a wet CCA-wood deck were 0.25-0.41μg/kg. This is the first study to identify increased dislodgeable As on wet CCA-wood and to evaluate dislodgeable CrVI after bleach application. Our data suggest that As and CrVI in 25-year old CCA-wood still show exposure risks for children and potential for soil contamination. PMID:26004992

  17. Arsenic biotransformation and volatilization in transgenic rice

    OpenAIRE

    Meng, Xiang-yan; Qin, Jie; Wang, Li-Hong; Duan, Gui-Lan; Sun, Guo-Xin; Wu, Hui-Lan; Chu, Cheng-Cai; Ling, Hong-Qing; Rosen, Barry P.; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2011-01-01

    Biotransformation of arsenic includes oxidation, reduction, methylation and conversion to more complex organic arsenicals. Members of the class of arsenite [As(III)] S-adenosylmethyltransferase enzymes catalyze As(III) methylation to a variety of mono-, di- and trimethylated species, some of which are less toxic than As(III) itself. However, no methyltransferase gene has been identified in plants.Here, an arsM gene from the soil bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris was expressed in Japonica r...

  18. The preparation of forage-grade cupric sulfate with copper oxide ore containing arsenic%含砷氧化铜矿氨浸法制备饲料级硫酸铜

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易求实

    2001-01-01

    采用NH3—(NH4)2SO4浸取氧化铜矿,通过(NH4)2S分离重金属,硫酸亚铁除砷等措施净化浸出液制备硫酸铜饲料添加剂,对浸取条件作了试验研究,对除砷机理进行了分析讨论。总结了氨—硫酸铵浸取剂的优点。%A process for preparing forage-grade cupric sulfate from copper oxide ore containing arsenic was proposed.It includes copper oxide ore leaching with NH3-(NH4)2SO4 solution,separating heavy metals with (NH4)2S and removing arsenic with ferrous sulfate.The leaching conditions are researched and the mechanism for removing arsenic is analyzed.The advantages of ammonia and ammonium sulphate leaching are summarized.

  19. The Role of Photochemistry the Transport and Transformation of Arsenic

    OpenAIRE

    Sedlak, David L.; Bentley, Abra

    1997-01-01

    Arsenic, a toxic trace element, enters surface waters from abandoned mines and geothermal springs. Once arsenic is discharged to surface waters, photochemical reactions can alter the oxidation state of the metal or cause the dissolution of the mineral phases onto which it could adsorb. To assess the role of these photochemical reactions arsenic fate and transport, we conducted laboratory studies and collected samples from arseniccontaminated surface waters. Results of laboratory studies indic...

  20. Arsenic, reactive oxygen, and endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellinsworth, David C

    2015-06-01

    Human exposure to drinking water contaminated with arsenic is a serious global health concern and predisposes to cardiovascular disease states, such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, and microvascular disease. The most sensitive target of arsenic toxicity in the vasculature is the endothelium, and incubation of these cells with low concentrations of arsenite, a naturally occurring and highly toxic inorganic form of arsenic, rapidly induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation via activation of a specific NADPH oxidase (Nox2). Arsenite also induces ROS accumulation in vascular smooth muscle cells, but this is relatively delayed because, depending on the vessel from which they originate, these cells often lack Nox2 and/or its essential regulatory cytosolic subunits. The net effect of such activity is attenuation of endothelium-dependent conduit artery dilation via superoxide anion-mediated scavenging of nitric oxide (NO) and inhibition and downregulation of endothelial NO synthase, events that are temporally matched to the accumulation of oxidants across the vessel wall. By contrast, ROS induced by the more toxic organic trivalent arsenic metabolites (monomethylarsonous and dimethylarsinous acids) may originate from sources other than Nox2. As such, the mechanisms through which vascular oxidative stress develops in vivo under continuous exposure to all three of these potent arsenicals are unknown. This review is a comprehensive analysis of the mechanisms that mediate arsenic effects associated with Nox2 activation, ROS activity, and endothelial dysfunction, and also considers future avenues of research into what is a relatively poorly understood topic with major implications for human health. PMID:25788710

  1. Effect of iron oxide reductive dissolution on the transformation and immobilization of arsenic in soils: New insights from X-ray photoelectron and X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Immobility and transformation of As on different Eh soils were investigated. • μ-XRF, XANES, and XPS were used to gain As distribution and speciation in soil. • Sorption capacity of As on anaerobic soil was much higher than that on oxic soil. • Fe oxides reductive dissolution is a key factor for As sorption and transformation. - Abstract: The geochemical behavior and speciation of arsenic (As) in paddy soils is strongly controlled by soil redox conditions and the sequestration by soil iron oxyhydroxides. Hence, the effects of iron oxide reductive dissolution on the adsorption, transformation and precipitation of As(III) and As(V) in soils were investigated using batch experiments and synchrotron based techniques to gain a deeper understanding at both macroscopic and microscopic scales. The results of batch sorption experiments revealed that the sorption capacity of As(V) on anoxic soil was much higher than that on control soil. Synchrotron based X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) mapping studies indicated that As was heterogeneously distributed and was mainly associated with iron in the soil. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), micro-X-ray absorption near edge structure (μ-XANES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses revealed that the primary speciation of As in the soil is As(V). These results further suggested that, when As(V) was introduced into the anoxic soil, the rapid coprecipitation of As(V) with ferric/ferrous ion prevented its reduction to As(III), and was the main mechanism controlling the immobilization of As. This research could improve the current understanding of soil As chemistry in paddy and wetland soils

  2. Effect of iron oxide reductive dissolution on the transformation and immobilization of arsenic in soils: New insights from X-ray photoelectron and X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Jian-Xin [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); School of River and Ocean Engineering, Chongqing Jiaotong University, Chongqing 400074 (China); Wang, Yu-Jun, E-mail: yjwang@issas.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Liu, Cun [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Wang, Li-Hua; Yang, Ke [Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of sciences, Shanghai 201204 (China); Zhou, Dong-Mei, E-mail: dmzhou@issas.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Li, Wei; Sparks, Donald L. [Environmental Soil Chemistry Group, Delaware Environmental Institute and Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19717-1303 United States (United States)

    2014-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Immobility and transformation of As on different Eh soils were investigated. • μ-XRF, XANES, and XPS were used to gain As distribution and speciation in soil. • Sorption capacity of As on anaerobic soil was much higher than that on oxic soil. • Fe oxides reductive dissolution is a key factor for As sorption and transformation. - Abstract: The geochemical behavior and speciation of arsenic (As) in paddy soils is strongly controlled by soil redox conditions and the sequestration by soil iron oxyhydroxides. Hence, the effects of iron oxide reductive dissolution on the adsorption, transformation and precipitation of As(III) and As(V) in soils were investigated using batch experiments and synchrotron based techniques to gain a deeper understanding at both macroscopic and microscopic scales. The results of batch sorption experiments revealed that the sorption capacity of As(V) on anoxic soil was much higher than that on control soil. Synchrotron based X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) mapping studies indicated that As was heterogeneously distributed and was mainly associated with iron in the soil. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), micro-X-ray absorption near edge structure (μ-XANES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses revealed that the primary speciation of As in the soil is As(V). These results further suggested that, when As(V) was introduced into the anoxic soil, the rapid coprecipitation of As(V) with ferric/ferrous ion prevented its reduction to As(III), and was the main mechanism controlling the immobilization of As. This research could improve the current understanding of soil As chemistry in paddy and wetland soils.

  3. High-performance single-crystalline arsenic-doped indium oxide nanowires for transparent thin-film transistors and active matrix organic light-emitting diode displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Po-Chiang; Shen, Guozhen; Chen, Haitian; Ha, Young-geun; Wu, Chao; Sukcharoenchoke, Saowalak; Fu, Yue; Liu, Jun; Facchetti, Antonio; Marks, Tobin J; Thompson, Mark E; Zhou, Chongwu

    2009-11-24

    We report high-performance arsenic (As)-doped indium oxide (In(2)O(3)) nanowires for transparent electronics, including their implementation in transparent thin-film transistors (TTFTs) and transparent active-matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) displays. The As-doped In(2)O(3) nanowires were synthesized using a laser ablation process and then fabricated into TTFTs with indium-tin oxide (ITO) as the source, drain, and gate electrodes. The nanowire TTFTs on glass substrates exhibit very high device mobilities (approximately 1490 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)), current on/off ratios (5.7 x 10(6)), steep subthreshold slopes (88 mV/dec), and a saturation current of 60 microA for a single nanowire. By using a self-assembled nanodielectric (SAND) as the gate dielectric, the device mobilities and saturation current can be further improved up to 2560 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and 160 microA, respectively. All devices exhibit good optical transparency (approximately 81% on average) in the visible spectral range. In addition, the nanowire TTFTs were utilized to control green OLEDs with varied intensities. Furthermore, a fully integrated seven-segment AMOLED display was fabricated with a good transparency of 40% and with each pixel controlled by two nanowire transistors. This work demonstrates that the performance enhancement possible by combining nanowire doping and self-assembled nanodielectrics enables silicon-free electronic circuitry for low power consumption, optically transparent, high-frequency devices assembled near room temperature. PMID:19842677

  4. Characterizations of arsenic-doped zinc oxide films produced by atmospheric metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    p-type ZnO films were prepared by atmospheric metal-organic chemical vapor deposition technique using arsine (AsH3) as the doping source. The electrical and optical properties of arsenic-doped ZnO (ZnO:As) films fabricated at 450–600 °C with various AsH3 flow rates ranging from 8 to 21.34 μmol/min were analyzed and compared. Hall measurements indicate that stable p-type ZnO films with hole concentrations varying from 7.2 × 1015 to 5.8 × 1018 cm−3 could be obtained. Besides, low temperature (17 K) photoluminescence spectra of all ZnO:As films also demonstrate the dominance of the line related to the neutral acceptor-bound exciton. Moreover, the elemental identity and chemical bonding information for ZnO:As films were examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Based on the results obtained, the effects of doping conditions on the mechanism responsible for the p-type conduction were studied. Conclusively, a simple technique to fabricate good-quality p-type ZnO films has been recognized in this work. Depositing the film at 550 °C with an AsH3 flow rate of 13.72 μmol/min is appropriate for producing hole concentrations on the order of 1017 cm−3 for it. Ultimately, by increasing the AsH3 flow rate to 21.34 μmol/min for doping and depositing the film at 600 °C, ZnO:As films with a hole concentration over 5 × 1018 cm−3 together with a mobility of 1.93 cm2V−1 s−1 and a resistivity of 0.494 ohm-cm can be achieved.

  5. Apoptotic efficacy of etomoxir in human acute myeloid leukemia cells. Cooperation with arsenic trioxide and glycolytic inhibitors, and regulation by oxidative stress and protein kinase activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estañ, María Cristina; Calviño, Eva; Calvo, Susana; Guillén-Guío, Beatriz; Boyano-Adánez, María Del Carmen; de Blas, Elena; Rial, Eduardo; Aller, Patricio

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acid synthesis and oxidation are frequently exacerbated in leukemia cells, and may therefore represent a target for therapeutic intervention. In this work we analyzed the apoptotic and chemo-sensitizing action of the fatty acid oxidation inhibitor etomoxir in human acute myeloid leukemia cells. Etomoxir caused negligible lethality at concentrations up to 100 µM, but efficaciously cooperated to cause apoptosis with the anti-leukemic agent arsenic trioxide (ATO, Trisenox), and with lower efficacy with other anti-tumour drugs (etoposide, cisplatin), in HL60 cells. Etomoxir-ATO cooperation was also observed in NB4 human acute promyelocytic cells, but not in normal (non-tumour) mitogen-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Biochemical determinations in HL60 cells indicated that etomoxir (25-200 µM) dose-dependently inhibited mitochondrial respiration while slightly stimulating glycolysis, and only caused marginal alterations in total ATP content and adenine nucleotide pool distribution. In addition, etomoxir caused oxidative stress (increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation, decrease in reduced glutathione content), as well as pro-apoptotic LKB-1/AMPK pathway activation, all of which may in part explain the chemo-sensitizing capacity of the drug. Etomoxir also cooperated with glycolytic inhibitors (2-deoxy-D-glucose, lonidamine) to induce apoptosis in HL60 cells, but not in NB4 cells. The combined etomoxir plus 2-deoxy-D-glucose treatment did not increase oxidative stress, caused moderate decrease in net ATP content, increased the AMP/ATP ratio with concomitant drop in energy charge, and caused defensive Akt and ERK kinase activation. Apoptosis generation by etomoxir plus 2-deoxy-D-glucose was further increased by co-incubation with ATO, which is apparently explained by the capacity of ATO to attenuate Akt and ERK activation. In summary, co-treatment with etomoxir may represent an interesting strategy to increase the apoptotic

  6. Apoptotic efficacy of etomoxir in human acute myeloid leukemia cells. Cooperation with arsenic trioxide and glycolytic inhibitors, and regulation by oxidative stress and protein kinase activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Cristina Estañ

    Full Text Available Fatty acid synthesis and oxidation are frequently exacerbated in leukemia cells, and may therefore represent a target for therapeutic intervention. In this work we analyzed the apoptotic and chemo-sensitizing action of the fatty acid oxidation inhibitor etomoxir in human acute myeloid leukemia cells. Etomoxir caused negligible lethality at concentrations up to 100 µM, but efficaciously cooperated to cause apoptosis with the anti-leukemic agent arsenic trioxide (ATO, Trisenox, and with lower efficacy with other anti-tumour drugs (etoposide, cisplatin, in HL60 cells. Etomoxir-ATO cooperation was also observed in NB4 human acute promyelocytic cells, but not in normal (non-tumour mitogen-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Biochemical determinations in HL60 cells indicated that etomoxir (25-200 µM dose-dependently inhibited mitochondrial respiration while slightly stimulating glycolysis, and only caused marginal alterations in total ATP content and adenine nucleotide pool distribution. In addition, etomoxir caused oxidative stress (increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation, decrease in reduced glutathione content, as well as pro-apoptotic LKB-1/AMPK pathway activation, all of which may in part explain the chemo-sensitizing capacity of the drug. Etomoxir also cooperated with glycolytic inhibitors (2-deoxy-D-glucose, lonidamine to induce apoptosis in HL60 cells, but not in NB4 cells. The combined etomoxir plus 2-deoxy-D-glucose treatment did not increase oxidative stress, caused moderate decrease in net ATP content, increased the AMP/ATP ratio with concomitant drop in energy charge, and caused defensive Akt and ERK kinase activation. Apoptosis generation by etomoxir plus 2-deoxy-D-glucose was further increased by co-incubation with ATO, which is apparently explained by the capacity of ATO to attenuate Akt and ERK activation. In summary, co-treatment with etomoxir may represent an interesting strategy to increase the

  7. Behavior of arsenic in hydrometallurgical zinc production and environmental impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peltekov A.B.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The presence of arsenic in zinc sulphide concentrates is particularly harmful, because it creates problems in zinc electrolysis. The main source of arsenic in non-ferrous metallurgy is arsenopyrite (FeAsS. In oxidative roasting of zinc concentrates, FeAsS oxidizes to arsenic oxides (As2O3, As2O5. In this connection a natural FeAsS was examined, and also the distribution of arsenic in the products of the roasting process, the cycle of sulphuric acid obtaining and the leaching of zinc calcine were studied. The arsenic contamination of soils in the vicinity of nonferrous metals smelter KCM SA, Plovdiv, Bulgaria as a result of zinc and lead productions has been studied.

  8. Ground water pollution by arsenic and its effects on health. Involvement of metabolic methylation in arsenic-induced genetic damage and tumorigenesis; Muki hiso no mechiru ka taisha to idenshi shogaisei narabini shuyo yuhatsusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanaka, K. [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan)] Okada, S. [Shizuoka Prefecture (Japan)

    1997-07-10

    Drinking water contamination has become a worldwide problem. It is pointed out that re-evaluation of genetic damage with carcinogen is considered as an important problem particularly arsenic`s effects on health. To explain the genetic damage development mechanism of arsenic compound, results of the research conducted on the action of arsenic compound which develops during metabolic methylation process and inorganic arsenic are explained in this paper. The results of the study are summarized as follows. Arsenic genetic damage mutation is caused by dimethyl arsenic in main metabolism than inorganic arsenic. Lung DNA damage is induced by the interaction of O2 and arsenic peroxide radical. Dimethyl arsenic shows very important effect on lung cancer formation process which is induced based on 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO). It not only promotes lung cancer but it also plays an important role in malignant tumor`s mutation. 25 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Arsenic chemistry in the rhizosphere of Pteris vittata L. and Nephrolepis exaltata L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This greenhouse experiment evaluated the influence of arsenic uptake by arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata L. and non-arsenic hyperaccumulator Nephrolepis exaltata L. on arsenic chemistry in bulk and rhizosphere soil. The plants were grown for 8 weeks in a rhizopot with a soil containing 105 mg kg-1 arsenic. The soil arsenic was fractionated into five fractions with decreasing availability: non-specifically bound (N), specifically bound (S), amorphous hydrous-oxide bound (A), crystalline hydrous-oxide bound (C), and residual (R). P. vittata produced larger plant biomass (7.38 vs. 2.32 mg plant-1) and removed more arsenic (2.61 vs. 0.09 mg pot-1 arsenic) than N. exaltata. Plant growth reduced water-soluble arsenic, and increased soil pH (P. vittata only) in the rhizosphere soil. P. vittata was more efficient than N. exaltata to access arsenic from all fractions (39-64% vs. 5-39% reduction). However, most of the arsenic taken up by both plants was from the A fraction (67-77%) in the rhizosphere soil, the most abundant (61.5%) instead of the most available (N fraction). - Plant arsenic uptake altered arsenic distribution in different fractions in the rhizosphere soil

  10. Arsenic Trioxide Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenic trioxide is used to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL; a type of cancer in which there ... worsened following treatment with other types of chemotherapy. Arsenic trioxide is in a class of medications called ...

  11. Arsenic efflux from Microcystis aeruginosa under different phosphate regimes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changzhou Yan

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton plays an important role in arsenic speciation, distribution, and cycling in freshwater environments. Little information, however, is available on arsenic efflux from the cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa under different phosphate regimes. This study investigated M. aeruginosa arsenic efflux and speciation by pre-exposing it to 10 µM arsenate or arsenite for 24 h during limited (12 h and extended (13 d depuration periods under phosphate enriched (+P and phosphate depleted (-P treatments. Arsenate was the predominant species detected in algal cells throughout the depuration period while arsenite only accounted for no greater than 45% of intracellular arsenic. During the limited depuration period, arsenic efflux occurred rapidly and only arsenate was detected in solutions. During the extended depuration period, however, arsenate and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA were found to be the two predominant arsenic species detected in solutions under -P treatments, but arsenate was the only species detected under +P treatments. Experimental results also suggest that phosphorus has a significant effect in accelerating arsenic efflux and promoting arsenite bio-oxidation in M. aeruginosa. Furthermore, phosphorus depletion can reduce arsenic efflux from algal cells as well as accelerate arsenic reduction and methylation. These findings can contribute to our understanding of arsenic biogeochemistry in aquatic environments and its potential environmental risks under different phosphorus levels.

  12. Arsenic concentrations, related environmental factors, and the predicted probability of elevated arsenic in groundwater in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Eliza L.; Low, Dennis J.

    2013-01-01

    Analytical results for arsenic in water samples from 5,023 wells obtained during 1969–2007 across Pennsylvania were compiled and related to other associated groundwater-quality and environmental factors and used to predict the probability of elevated arsenic concentrations, defined as greater than or equal to 4.0 micrograms per liter (µg/L), in groundwater. Arsenic concentrations of 4.0 µg/L or greater (elevated concentrations) were detected in 18 percent of samples across Pennsylvania; 8 percent of samples had concentrations that equaled or exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s drinking-water maximum contaminant level of 10.0 µg/L. The highest arsenic concentration was 490.0 µg/L. Comparison of arsenic concentrations in Pennsylvania groundwater by physiographic province indicates that the Central Lowland physiographic province had the highest median arsenic concentration (4.5 µg/L) and the highest percentage of sample records with arsenic concentrations greater than or equal to 4.0 µg/L (59 percent) and greater than or equal to 10.0 µg/L (43 percent). Evaluation of four major aquifer types (carbonate, crystalline, siliciclastic, and surficial) in Pennsylvania showed that all types had median arsenic concentrations less than 4.0 µg/L, and the highest arsenic concentration (490.0 µg/L) was in a siliciclastic aquifer. The siliciclastic and surficial aquifers had the highest percentage of sample records with arsenic concentrations greater than or equal to 4.0 µg/L and 10.0 µg/L. Elevated arsenic concentrations were associated with low pH (less than or equal to 4.0), high pH (greater than or equal to 8.0), or reducing conditions. For waters classified as anoxic (405 samples), 20 percent of sampled wells contained water with elevated concentrations of arsenic; for waters classified as oxic (1,530 samples) only 10 percent of sampled wells contained water with elevated arsenic concentrations. Nevertheless, regardless of the reduction-oxidation

  13. Abiotic reductive extraction of arsenic from contaminated soils enhanced by complexation: Arsenic extraction by reducing agents and combination of reducing and chelating agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Jung [Department of Bioactive Material Sciences, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju, Jeollabukdo 561-675 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae-Cheol [Department of Environmental Engineering, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju, Jeollabukdo 561-675 (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Kitae, E-mail: kbaek@jbnu.ac.kr [Department of Bioactive Material Sciences, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju, Jeollabukdo 561-675 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Environmental Engineering, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju, Jeollabukdo 561-675 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-11

    Highlights: • Abiotic reductive extraction of As from contaminated soils was studied. • Oxalate/ascorbate were effective in extracting As bound to amorphous iron oxides. • Reducing agents were not effective in extracting As bound to crystalline oxides. • Reductive As extraction was greatly enhanced by complexation. • Combination of dithionite and EDTA could extract about 90% of the total As. - Abstract: Abiotic reductive extraction of arsenic from contaminated soils was studied with various reducing agents and combinations of reducing and chelating agents in order to remediate arsenic-contaminated soils. Oxalate and ascorbic acid were effective to extract arsenic from soil in which arsenic was associated with amorphous iron oxides, but they were not effective to extract arsenic from soils in which arsenic was bound to crystalline oxides or those in which arsenic was mainly present as a scorodite phase. An X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study showed that iron oxides present in soils were transformed to Fe(II,III) or Fe(II) oxide forms such as magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, Fe{sup II}Fe{sub 2}{sup III}O{sub 4}) by reduction with dithionite. Thus, arsenic extraction by dithionite was not effective due to the re-adsorption of arsenic to the newly formed iron oxide phase. Combination of chelating agents with reducing agents greatly improved arsenic extraction from soil samples. About 90% of the total arsenic could be extracted from all soil samples by using a combination of dithionite and EDTA. Chelating agents form strong complexation with iron, which can prevent precipitation of a new iron oxide phase and also enhance iron oxide dissolution via a non-reductive dissolution pathway.

  14. Treatment of arsenic-contaminated water using akaganeite adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadena C., Fernando; Johnson, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    The present invention comprises a method and composition using akaganeite, an iron oxide, as an ion adsorption medium for the removal of arsenic from water and affixing it onto carrier media so that it can be used in filtration systems.

  15. Arsenic removal from aqueous solution using ferrous based red mud sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiran; Wang, Jun; Luan, Zhaokun; Liang, Zhen

    2010-05-15

    Ferrous based red mud sludge (FRS) which combined the iron-arsenic co-precipitation and the high arsenic adsorption features was developed aimed at low arsenic water treatment in rural areas. Arsenic removal studies shown that FRS in dosage of 0.2 or 0.3g/l can be used effectively to remove arsenic from aqueous solutions when initial As(V) concentration was 0.2 or 0.3mg/l. Meanwhile, turbidity of supernatant in disturbing water was lower than 2 NTU after 24h. The pH range (4.5-8.0) for FRS in effective arsenic removal was applicable in natural circumstance. Phosphate can greatly reduce the arsenic removal efficiency while the presence of carbonate had no significant effect on arsenic removal. Arsenic fractionation experiments showed that amorphous hydrous oxide-bound arsenic was the major components. When aqueous pH was decreased from 8.0 to 4.5, arsenic in FRS was not obviously released. The high arsenic uptake capability, good settlement performance and cost-effective characteristic of FRS make it potentially attractive material for the arsenic removal in rural areas. PMID:20034742

  16. Arsenic release metabolically limited to permanently water-saturated soil in Mekong Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckey, Jason W.; Schaefer, Michael V.; Kocar, Benjamin D.; Benner, Shawn G.; Fendorf, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Microbial reduction of arsenic-bearing iron oxides in the deltas of South and Southeast Asia produces widespread arsenic-contaminated groundwater. Organic carbon is abundant both at the surface and within aquifers, but the source of organic carbon used by microbes in the reduction and release of arsenic has been debated, as has the wetland type and sedimentary depth where release occurs. Here we present data from fresh-sediment incubations, in situ model sediment incubations and a controlled field experiment with manipulated wetland hydrology and organic carbon inputs. We find that in the minimally disturbed Mekong Delta, arsenic release is limited to near-surface sediments of permanently saturated wetlands where both organic carbon and arsenic-bearing solids are sufficiently reactive for microbial oxidation of organic carbon and reduction of arsenic-bearing iron oxides. In contrast, within the deeper aquifer or seasonally saturated sediments, reductive dissolution of iron oxides is observed only when either more reactive exogenous forms of iron oxides or organic carbon are added, revealing a potential thermodynamic restriction to microbial metabolism. We conclude that microbial arsenic release is limited by the reactivity of arsenic-bearing iron oxides with respect to native organic carbon, but equally limited by organic carbon reactivity with respect to the native arsenic-bearing iron oxides.

  17. BIMEL is a key effector molecule in oxidative stress-mediated apoptosis in acute myeloid leukemia cells when combined with arsenic trioxide and buthionine sulfoximine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) is reported to be an effective therapeutic agent in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) through inducing apoptotic cell death. Buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), an oxidative stress pathway modulator, is suggested as a potential combination therapy for ATO-insensitive leukemia. However, the precise mechanism of BSO-mediated augmentation of ATO-induced apoptosis is not fully understood. In this study we compared the difference in cell death of HL60 leukemia cells treated with ATO/BSO and ATO alone, and investigated the detailed molecular mechanism of BSO-mediated augmentation of ATO-induced cell death. HL60 APL cells were used for the study. The activation and expression of a series of signal molecules were analyzed with immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting. Apoptotic cell death was detected with caspases and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activation. Generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was determined using a redox-sensitive dye. Mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization was observed with a confocal microscopy using NIR dye and cytochrome c release was determined with immunoblotting. Small interfering (si) RNA was used for inhibition of gene expression. HL60 cells became more susceptible to ATO in the presence of BSO. ATO/BSO-induced mitochondrial injury was accompanied by reduced mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, cytochrome c release and caspase activation. ATO/BSO-induced mitochondrial injury was inhibited by antioxidants. Addition of BSO induced phosphorylation of the pro-apoptotic BCL2 protein, BIMEL, and anti-apoptotic BCL2 protein, MCL1, in treated cells. Phosphorylated BIMEL was dissociated from MCL1 and interacted with BAX, followed by conformational change of BAX. Furthermore, the knockdown of BIMEL with small interfering RNA inhibited the augmentation of ATO-induced apoptosis by BSO. The enhancing effect of BSO on ATO-induced cell death was characterized at the molecular level for clinical use

  18. Arsenic resistant bacteria isolated from arsenic contaminated river in the Atacama Desert (Chile).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalante, G; Campos, V L; Valenzuela, C; Yañez, J; Zaror, C; Mondaca, M A

    2009-11-01

    In this study, arsenic resistant bacteria were isolated from sediments of an arsenic contaminated river. Arsenic tolerance of bacteria isolated was carried out by serial dilution on agar plate. Redox abilities were investigated using KMnO4. arsC and aox genes were detected by PCR and RT-PCR, respectively. Bacterial populations were identified by RapID system. Forty nine bacterial strains were isolated, of these, 55 % corresponded to the reducing bacteria, 4% to oxidizing bacteria, 8% presented both activities and in 33% of the bacteria none activity was detected. arsC gene was detected in 11 strains and aox genes were not detected. The activity of arsenic transforming microorganisms in river sediment has significant implications for the behavior of the metalloid. PMID:19779656

  19. Comparative oxidation state specific analysis of arsenic species by high-performance liquid chromatography- inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic absorption spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Currier, J. M.; Saunders, R. J.; Ding, L.; Bodnar, W.; Cable, P.; Matoušek, Tomáš; Creed, J. T.; Stýblo, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 6 (2013), s. 843-852. ISSN 0267-9477 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12040 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : arsenic * speciaton analysis * As metabolism Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.396, year: 2013

  20. Environmental Source of Arsenic Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Jin-Yong; Yu, Seung-Do; Hong, Young-Seoub

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic is a ubiquitous, naturally occurring metalloid that may be a significant risk factor for cancer after exposure to contaminated drinking water, cigarettes, foods, industry, occupational environment, and air. Among the various routes of arsenic exposure, drinking water is the largest source of arsenic poisoning worldwide. Arsenic exposure from ingested foods usually comes from food crops grown in arsenic-contaminated soil and/or irrigated with arsenic-contaminated water. According to a ...

  1. Tracking the transformation and transport of arsenic sulfide pigments in paints : synchrotron-based X-ray micro-analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keune, Katrien; Mass, Jennifer; Meirer, Florian; Pottasch, Carol; van Loon, Annelies; Hull, Alyssa; Church, Jonathan; Pouyet, Emeline; Cotte, Marine; Mehta, Apurva

    2015-01-01

    Realgar and orpiment, arsenic sulfide pigments used in historic paints, degrade under the influence of light, resulting in transparent, whitish, friable and/or crumbling paints. So far, para-realgar and arsenic trioxide have been identified as the main oxidation products of arsenic sulfide pigments.

  2. Tracking the transformation and transport of arsenic sulfide pigments in paints: synchrotron-based X-ray micro-analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Keune; J. Mass; F. Meirer; C. Pottasch; A. van Loon; A. Hull; J. Church; E. Pouyet; M. Cotte; A. Mehta

    2015-01-01

    Realgar and orpiment, arsenic sulfide pigments used in historic paints, degrade under the influence of light, resulting in transparent, whitish, friable and/or crumbling paints. So far, para-realgar and arsenic trioxide have been identified as the main oxidation products of arsenic sulfide pigments.

  3. Binational Arsenic Exposure Survey: Methodology and Estimated Arsenic Intake from Drinking Water and Urinary Arsenic Concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Robin B; Burgess, Jefferey L.; Maria Mercedes Meza-Montenegro; Luis Enrique Gutiérrez-Millán; Mary Kay O’Rourke; Jason Roberge

    2012-01-01

    The Binational Arsenic Exposure Survey (BAsES) was designed to evaluate probable arsenic exposures in selected areas of southern Arizona and northern Mexico, two regions with known elevated levels of arsenic in groundwater reserves. This paper describes the methodology of BAsES and the relationship between estimated arsenic intake from beverages and arsenic output in urine. Households from eight communities were selected for their varying groundwater arsenic concentrations in Arizona, USA and...

  4. Anionic sorbents for arsenic and technetium species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two sorbents, zirconium coated zeolite and magnesium hydroxide, were tested for their effectiveness in removing arsenic from Albuquerque municipal water. Results for the zirconium coated zeolite indicate that phosphate present in the water interfered with the sorption of arsenic. Additionally, there was a large quantity of iron and copper present in the water, corrosion products from the piping system, which may have interfered with the uptake of arsenic by the sorbent. Magnesium hydroxide has also been proven to be a strong sorbent for arsenic as well as other metals. Carbonate, present in water, has been shown to interfere with the sorption of arsenic by reacting with the magnesium hydroxide to form magnesium carbonate. The reaction mechanism was investigated by FT-IR and shows that hydrogen bonding between an oxygen on the arsenic species and a hydrogen on the Mg(OH)2 is most likely the mechanism of sorption. This was also confirmed by RAMAN spectroscopy and XRD. Technetium exists in multiple oxidation states (IV and VII) and is easily oxidized from the relatively insoluble Tc(IV) form to the highly water soluble and mobile Tc(VII) form. The two oxidation states exhibit different sorption characteristics. Tc(VII) does not sorb to most materials whereas Tc(IV) will strongly sorb to many materials. Therefore, it was determined that it is necessary to first reduce the Tc (using SnCl2) before sorption to stabilize Tc in the environment. Additionally, the effect of carbonate and phosphate on the sorption of technetium by hydroxyapatite was studied and indicated that both have a significant effect on reducing Tc sorption

  5. Arsenic Removal by Liquid Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Marino

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Water contamination with harmful arsenic compounds represents one of the most serious calamities of the last two centuries. Natural occurrence of the toxic metal has been revealed recently for 21 countries worldwide; the risk of arsenic intoxication is particularly high in Bangladesh and India but recently also Europe is facing similar problem. Liquid membranes (LMs look like a promising alternative to the existing removal processes, showing numerous advantages in terms of energy consumption, efficiency, selectivity, and operational costs. The development of different LM configurations has been a matter of investigation by several researching groups, especially for the removal of As(III and As(V from aqueous solutions. Most of these LM systems are based on the use of phosphine oxides as carriers, when the metal removal is from sulfuric acid media. Particularly promising for water treatment is the hollow fiber supported liquid membrane (HFSLM configuration, which offers high selectivity, easy transport of the targeted metal ions, large surface area, and non-stop flow process. The choice of organic extractant(s plays an essential role in the efficiency of the arsenic removal. Emulsion liquid membrane (ELM systems have not been extensively investigated so far, although encouraging results have started to appear in the literature. For such LM configuration, the most relevant step toward efficiency is the choice of the surfactant type and its concentration.

  6. A review of the enzymology of arsenic metabolism and a new potential role of hydrogen peroxide in the detoxication of the trivalent arsenic species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This laboratory has studied the enzymology involved in the biotransformation of inorganic arsenic to dimethylarsinous acid (DMA(III)) and in human studies established that monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) and DMA(III) appear in urine of people chronically exposed to arsenic. It appears that only two proteins are required for inorganic arsenic biotransformation in the human, namely, monomethylarsonic acid (MMA(V)) reductase and arsenic methyltransferase. MMA(V) reductase and the unique glutathione transferase omega (hGST-O) are identical proteins. Arsenicals with a +3 oxidation state are more toxic than the +5 species. While methylation of arsenite, MMA(III), and DMA(III) produces less toxic +5 oxidation arsenic species containing an additional methyl group such as MMA(V), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)), and TMAO, a new mechanism involving hydrogen peroxide for detoxifying arsenite, MMA(III), and DMA(III) is proposed based on in vitro experiments

  7. Behavior, distribution and environmental influence of arsenic in a typical lead smelter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柴立元; 史美清; 梁彦杰; 汤景文; 李青竹

    2015-01-01

    A field study was conducted to determine the behavior and distribution of arsenic during the pyrometallurgy process in a typical SKS (Shuikoushan) lead smelter in Hunan province, China. Environmental influences of arsenic in selected samples were evaluated. Arsenic contents in all input and output samples vary from 0.11%in raw lead to 6.66%in collected dust-2. More arsenic is volatilized in blast furnace and fuming furnace (73.02% of arsenic input) than bottom blowing furnace (10.29%of arsenic input). There are 78.97%, 13.69%, 7.31% of total arsenic distributed in intermediate materials, stockpiled materials and unorganized emissions, respectively. Matte slag-2, collected dust-1 and secondary zinc oxide are hazardous based on the arsenic concentrations of toxicity characteristic leaching procedure. According to risk assessment code (RAC) guideline, arsenic in collected dust-1 poses a very serious risk to the surrounding environment, arsenic in speiss, matte slag-2, water-quenched slag and secondary zinc oxide show low risk, while arsenic in matte slag-1, collected dust-2 and post dust has no risk to the environment.

  8. The global menace of arsenic and its conventional remediation - A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Arpan; Paul, Biswajit

    2016-09-01

    Arsenic is a ubiquitous element found in the earth crust with a varying concentration in the earth soil and water. Arsenic has always been under the scanner due to its toxicity in human beings. Contamination of arsenic in drinking water, which generally finds its source from arsenic-containing aquifers; has severely threatened billions of people all over the world. Arsenic poisoning is worse in Bangladesh where As(III) is abundant in waters of tube wells. Natural occurrence of arsenic in groundwater could result from both, oxidative and reductive dissolution. Geothermally heated water has the potential to liberate arsenic from surrounding rocks. Inorganic arsenic has been found to have more toxicity than the organic forms of arsenic. MMA and DMA are now been considered as the organic arsenic compounds having the potential to impair DNA and that is why MMA and DMA are considered as carcinogens. Endless efforts of researchers have elucidated the source, behavior of arsenic in various parts of the environment, mechanism of toxicity and various remediation processes; although, there are lots of areas still to be addressed. In this article, attempts have been made to lay bare an overview of geochemistry, toxicity and current removal techniques of arsenic together. PMID:27239969

  9. Arsenic removal from flowing irrigation water in bangladesh: impacts of channel properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lineberger, Ethan M; Badruzzaman, A Borhan M; Ali, M Ashraf; Polizzotto, Matthew L

    2013-11-01

    Across Bangladesh, dry-season irrigation with arsenic-contaminated well water is loading arsenic onto rice paddies, leading to increased arsenic concentrations in plants, diminished crop yields, and increased human health risks. As irrigation water flows through conveyance channels between wells and rice fields, arsenic concentrations change over space and time, indicating that channels may provide a location for removing arsenic from solution. However, few studies have systematically evaluated the processes controlling arsenic concentrations in irrigation channels, limiting the ability to manipulate these systems and enhance arsenic removal from solution. The central goal of this study was to quantify how channel design affected removal of dissolved arsenic from flowing irrigation water. Field experiments were conducted in Bangladesh using a chemically constant source of arsenic-contaminated irrigation water and an array of constructed channels with varying geometries. The resulting hydraulic conditions affected the quantity of arsenic removed from solution within the channels by promoting known hydrogeochemical processes. Channels three times the width of control channels removed ∼3 times the mass of arsenic over 32 min of flowing conditions, whereas negligible arsenic removal was observed in tarp-lined channels, which prevented soil-water contact. Arsenic removal from solution was ∼7 times higher in a winding, 200-m-long channel than in the straight, 45-m-long control channels. Arsenic concentrations were governed by oxidative iron-arsenic coprecipitation within the water column, sorption to soils, and phosphate competition. Collectively, these results suggest that better design and management of irrigation channels may play a part in arsenic mitigation strategies for rice fields in Southern Asia. PMID:25602413

  10. Can sample treatments based on advanced oxidation processes assisted by high-intensity focused ultrasound be used for toxic arsenic determination in human urine by flow-injection hydride-generation atomic absorption spectrometry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, A; Galesio, M; Santos, H; Rial-Otero, R; Lodeiro, C; Oehmen, A; Conceição, Antonio C L; Capelo, J L

    2007-05-15

    Two advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), based on high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), namely, KMnO(4)/HCl/HIFU and H(2)O(2)/HCl/HIFU are studied and compared for the determination of toxic arsenic in human urine [As(III)+As(V)+MMA+DMA] by flow-injection hydride-generation atomic absorption spectrometry (FI-HG-AAS). The KMnO(4)/HCl/HIFU procedure was found to be adequate for organic matter degradation in human urine. l-cysteine (letra minuscula) was used for As reduction to the trivalent state. The new procedure was assessed with seven urines certified in different As species. Results revealed that with KMnO(4)/HCl/HIFU plus l-cysteine the toxic arsenic can be accurately measured in human urine whilst the H(2)O(2)/HCl/HIFU procedure underestimates toxic As. DMA and MMA degradation in urine were observed, due to the effects of the ultrasonic field. Recoveries for As(III), As(V), MMA and DMA were within the certified ranges. Arsenobetaine was not degraded by the AOPs. The new procedure adheres well to the principles of analytical minimalism: (i) low reagent consumption, (ii) low reagent concentration, (iii) low waste production and (iv) low amount of time required for sample preparation and analysis. PMID:19071711

  11. Attenuation of arsenic neurotoxicity by curcumin in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In view of continued exposure to arsenic and associated human health risk including neurotoxicity, neuroprotective efficacy of curcumin, a polyphenolic antioxidant, has been investigated in rats. A significant decrease in locomotor activity, grip strength (26%) and rota-rod performance (82%) was observed in rats treated with arsenic (sodium arsenite, 20 mg/kg body weight, p.o., 28 days) as compared to controls. The arsenic treated rats also exhibited a decrease in the binding of striatal dopamine receptors (32%) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactivity (19%) in striatum. Increased arsenic levels in corpus striatum (6.5 fold), frontal cortex (6.3 fold) and hippocampus (7.0 fold) associated with enhanced oxidative stress in these brain regions, as evident by an increase in lipid perioxidation, protein carbonyl and a decrease in the levels of glutathione and activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase with differential effects were observed in arsenic treated rats compared to controls. Simultaneous treatment with arsenic (sodium arsenite, 20 mg/kg body weight, p.o., 28 days) and curcumin (100 mg/kg body weight, p.o., 28 days) caused an increase in locomotor activity and grip strength and improved the rota-rod performance in comparison to arsenic treated rats. Binding of striatal dopamine receptors and TH expression increased while arsenic levels and oxidative stress decreased in these brain regions in co-treated rats as compared to those treated with arsenic alone. No significant effect on any of these parameters was observed in rats treated with curcumin (100 mg/kg body weight, p.o., 28 days) alone compared to controls. A significant protection in behavioral, neurochemical and immunohistochemical parameters in rats simultaneously treated with arsenic and curcumin suggest the neuroprotective efficacy of curcumin.

  12. Toxic Compounds in Our Food: Arsenic Uptake By Rice and Potential Mitigation By Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfferth, A.; Gill, R.; Penido, E.

    2014-12-01

    Arsenic is a ubiquitous element in soils worldwide and has the potential to negatively impact human and ecosystem health under certain biogeochemical conditions. While arsenic is relatively immobile in most oxidized soils due to a high affinity for soil solids, arsenic becomes mobilized under reduced soil conditions due to the reductive dissolution of iron(III) oxides thereby releasing soil-bound arsenic. Since arsenic is a well-known carcinogen, this plant-soil process has the potential to negatively impact the lives of billions of rice consumers worldwide upon plant uptake and grain storage of released arsenic. Moreover, arsenic uptake by rice is excacerbated by the use of As-laden groundwater for rice irrigation. One proposed strategy to decrease arsenic uptake by rice plants is via an increase in dissolved silicon in paddy soil solution (pore-water), since silicic acid and arsenous acid share an uptake pathway. However, several soil processes that influence arsenic cycling may be affected by silicon including desorption from bulk soil, formation and mineralogy of iron(III) oxide plaque, and adsorption/desorption onto/from iron plaque; the effect of silicon on these soil processes will ultimately dictate the effectiveness of altered dissolved silicon in decreasing arsenic uptake at the root, which in turn dictates the concentration of arsenic found in grains. Furthermore, the source of silicon may impact carbon cycling and, in particular, methane emissions. Here, impacts of altered dissolved silicon on processes that affect rhizospheric biogeochemical cycling of arsenic and subsequent plant-uptake, and how it influences other biogeochemical cycles such as carbon and iron are investigated. We show that silicon can decrease arsenic uptake and grain storage under certain conditions, and that altered silicon affects the type of iron (III) oxide that comprises iron plaque.

  13. Mechanism of arsenic tolerance and bioremoval of arsenic by Acidithiobacilus ferrooxidans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Prabha M N

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 This paper reports the studies on mechanism of arsenic tolerance and bioremoval of arsenic ions (arsenite or arsenate by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. Exposure of cells to arsenic ions resulted in increased cell surface hydrophobicity, decreased electrophoretic mobility and stronger adsorption affinity towards arsenopyrite. The mechanism of tolerance to arsenic ions were specific and could be attributed to the changes in specific protein expression in the outer membrane and cytosolic membrane fractions. Biosorption studies showed decrease in solution arsenic concentration only with ferrous–grown cells indicating that presence of ferric ions in the EPS was necessary for binding or entrapment of arsenic ions in the EPS. Bacterial EPS of ferrous–grown wild cells were able to uptake arsenate ions due to the strong affinity of ferric ions towards arsenate ions. Neither cells nor the ferric ions were capable of precipitating or oxidizing arsenite ions directly. Both arsenate ions and arsenite ions were co–precipitated with ferric ions formed during the growth of the bacteria.  

  14. Fotocatálise heterogênea com TiO2 para oxidação de arsênio e sua remoção de águas por coprecipitação com sulfato férrico Heterogeneous photocatalysis with TiO2 for the oxidation of arsenic and its removal from water by coprecipitation with ferric sulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Mendes

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The oxidation of arsenic (As(III to As(V in water samples was performed by heterogeneous photocatalysis using a TiO2 film immobilized inside a photochemical reactor. After oxidation, As(V was removed from the water samples by coprecipitation with ferric sulfate. The final conditions of oxidation and arsenic removal (TiO2 film prepared with a suspension: 10% (w/v; pH: 7.0; oxidation time: 30 min and Fe3+ concentration: 50 mg L-1 were applied in natural water samples which were supplemented with 1.0 mg L-1 of As(III to verify the influence of the matrix. After treatment, more than 99% of arsenic was removed from the water.

  15. Adsorption characteristics of arsenic and boron by soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakata, M.

    1986-01-01

    In order to obtain baseline data concerning the surface and ground water pollution caused by coal ash disposal, adsorption characteristics of arsenic (III) and boron by soil have been studied through laboratory experiments. The main results are as follows: (1) Arsenic (III) and boron adsorption on soil was strongly dependent on pH with adsorption maxima at pH 8 and 8-9, respectively. (2) Arsenic (III) and boron adsorption on soil over the entire concentration ranges investigated could be described by the Langmuir adsorption isotherm and the Freundlich adsorption isotherm, respectively. The Henry adsorption isotherm was also applicable over the lower concentration ranges of arsenic (III) and boron (As (III): < 0.1 deltag/ml; B: < 5deltag/ml.) (3) Arsenic (III) and boron adsorption on soil is controlled mainly by the contents of extractable Fe oxide and hydroxide for arsenic (III) and by the contents of extractable Al hydroxide and allophane (amorphous aluminium silicates) for boron. (4) Adsorption and movement of arsenic (III) and boron during the infiltration of coal ash leachate in soil layer were investigated by means of the unsteady-state, one-dimensional convective-diffusive mass transport model. This model is very useful for evaluation and prediction of the contamination of ground water by trace elements such as arsenic (III) and boron leached at coal ash disposal site.

  16. Drinking Water Fact Sheet: Arsenic

    OpenAIRE

    Mesner, Nancy; Daniels, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    This fact sheet provides information about arsenic in drinking water. It includes sections about what arsenic is, where it comes from, health concerns from exposure, drinking water standards, how to know if there is arsenic in a water supply and how to reduce arsenic in drinking water.

  17. Arsenic in Food

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Food Home Food Foodborne Illness & Contaminants Metals Arsenic Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... and previous or current use of arsenic-containing pesticides. Are there ... compounds in water, food, air, and soil: organic and inorganic (these together ...

  18. The effect of microbial iron oxidation on arsenic mobility and transformation%微生物铁氧化作用对砷迁移转化的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兆苏; 王新军; 陈学萍; 朱永官

    2011-01-01

    采用厌氧培养的方法,从砷污染的水稻上中富集依赖硝酸盐的铁氧化菌群,通过监测培养体系中Fe和A$的形态变化模拟水稻厌氧条件下微生物铁氧化过程对As迁移转化的影响.结果表明,约96%外源添加的Fe(Ⅱ)可在10d内氧化成Fe(Ⅲ),As(Ⅲ)对Fe(Ⅱ)的初期氧化速率具有一定的抑制作用;在微生物铁氧化过程中,As(Ⅲ)被氧化成As(Ⅴ),并吸附在生成的铁氧化物表面或与其共沉淀.微牛物的铁氧化过程可能降低了As的移动性,从而抑制水稻对砷的吸收,降低了砷污染对人体健康的风险.%To observe the effect of the Fe( Ⅱ )-oxidizing process on As mobility and transformation, anaerobic nitrate-dependent Fe-oxidizing bacteria were enriched from an arsenic (As) polluted paddy soil. The Fe and As speciation and concentrations were monitored throughout an incubation experiment.The results showed that 96% Fe( Ⅱ ) was oxidized in 10 days; and simultaneously, As( Ⅲ ) was oxidized to As(Ⅴ), which was adsorbed or coprecipitated by the newly formed Fe( Ⅲ) oxide. The oxidizing rate of Fe(Ⅱ) was restrained by As( Ⅲ ) at the initial stage. These results indicate that As mobility is potentially limited by microbial iron oxidation in the paddy soil, and subsequently As uptake by rice could be decreased.

  19. Green approach for ultratrace determination of divalent metal ions and arsenic species using total-reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and mercapto-modified graphene oxide nanosheets as a novel adsorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitko, Rafal; Janik, Paulina; Zawisza, Beata; Talik, Ewa; Margui, Eva; Queralt, Ignasi

    2015-03-17

    A new method based on dispersive microsolid phase extraction (DMSPE) and total-reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (TXRF) is proposed for multielemental ultratrace determination of heavy metal ions and arsenic species. In the developed methodology, the crucial issue is a novel adsorbent synthesized by grafting 3-mercaptopropyl trimethoxysilane on a graphene oxide (GO) surface. Mercapto-modified graphene oxide (GO-SH) can be applied in quantitative adsorption of cobalt, nickel, copper, cadmium, and lead ions. Moreover, GO-SH demonstrates selectivity toward arsenite in the presence of arsenate. Due to such features of GO-SH nanosheets as wrinkled structure and excellent dispersibility in water, GO-SH seems to be ideal for fast and simple preconcentration and determination of heavy metal ions using methodology based on DMSPE and TXRF measurement. The suspension of GO-SH was injected into an analyzed water sample; after filtration, the GO-SH nanosheets with adsorbed metal ions were redispersed in a small volume of internal standard solution and deposited onto a quartz reflector. The high enrichment factor of 150 allows obtaining detection limits of 0.11, 0.078, 0.079, 0.064, 0.054, and 0.083 ng mL(-1) for Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), As(III), Cd(II), and Pb(II), respectively. Such low detection limits can be obtained using a benchtop TXRF system without cooling media and gas consumption. The method is suitable for the analysis of water, including high salinity samples difficult to analyze using other spectroscopy techniques. Moreover, GO-SH can be applied to the arsenic speciation due to its selectivity toward arsenite. PMID:25707847

  20. Role of mitochondria, ROS, and DNA damage in arsenic induced carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chih-Hung; Yu, Hsin-Su

    2016-01-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) declared arsenic a class I carcinogen. Arsenic exposure induces several forms of human cancers, including cancers of skin, lung, liver, and urinary bladder. The majority of the arsenic-induced cancers occur in skin. Among these, the most common is Bowen's disease, characterized by epidermal hyperplasia, full layer epidermal dysplasia, leading to intraepidermal carcinoma as well as apoptosis, and moderate dermal infiltrates, which require the participation of mitochondria. The exact mechanism underlying arsenic induced carcinogenesis remains unclear, although increased reactive oxidative stresses, leading to chromosome abnormalities and uncontrolled growth, and aberrant immune regulations might be involved. Here, we highlight how increased mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative stress lead to mitochondrial DNA damage and mutation in arsenic induced cancers. We also provide therapeutic rationale for targeting mitochondria in the treatment of arsenic induced cancers. PMID:27100709

  1. The contribution of microbial mats to the arsenic geochemistry of an ancient gold mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewniak, Lukasz; Maryan, Natalia; Lewandowski, Wiktor; Kaczanowski, Szymon; Sklodowska, Aleksandra

    2012-03-01

    The ancient Zloty Stok (SW Poland) gold mine is such an environment, where different microbial communities, able to utilize inorganic arsenic species As(III) and As(V), are found. The purpose of the present study was to (i) estimate prokaryotic diversity in the microbial mats in bottom sediments of this gold mine, (ii) identify microorganisms that can metabolize arsenic, and (iii) estimate their potential role in the arsenic geochemistry of the mine and in the environment. The oxidation/reduction experiments showed that the microbial mat community may significantly contribute to arsenic contamination in groundwater. The presence of both arsenite oxidizing and dissimilatory arsenate reducing bacteria in the mat was confirmed by the detection of arsenite oxidase and dissimilatory arsenate reductase genes, respectively. This work also demonstrated that microorganisms utilizing other compounds that naturally co-occur with arsenic are present within the microbial mat community and may contribute to the arsenic geochemistry in the environment. PMID:22243864

  2. Complementary arsenic speciation methods: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nearing, Michelle M., E-mail: michelle.nearing@rmc.ca; Koch, Iris, E-mail: koch-i@rmc.ca; Reimer, Kenneth J., E-mail: reimer-k@rmc.ca

    2014-09-01

    The toxicity of arsenic greatly depends on its chemical form and oxidation state (speciation) and therefore accurate determination of arsenic speciation is a crucial step in understanding its chemistry and potential risk. High performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled mass spectrometry (HPLC–ICP-MS) is the most common analysis used for arsenic speciation but it has two major limitations: it relies on an extraction step (usually from a solid sample) that can be incomplete or alter the arsenic compounds; and it provides no structural information, relying on matching sample peaks to standard peaks. The use of additional analytical methods in a complementary manner introduces the ability to address these disadvantages. The use of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) with HPLC–ICP-MS can be used to identify compounds not extracted for HPLC–ICP-MS and provide minimal processing steps for solid state analysis that may help preserve labile compounds such as those containing arsenic-sulfur bonds, which can degrade under chromatographic conditions. On the other hand, HPLC–ICP-MS is essential in confirming organoarsenic compounds with similar white line energies seen by using XAS, and identifying trace arsenic compounds that are too low to be detected by XAS. The complementary use of electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI–MS) with HPLC–ICP-MS provides confirmation of arsenic compounds identified during the HPLC–ICP-MS analysis, identification of unknown compounds observed during the HPLC–ICP-MS analysis and further resolves HPLC–ICP-MS by identifying co-eluting compounds. In the complementary use of HPLC–ICP-MS and ESI–MS, HPLC–ICP-MS helps to focus the ESI–MS selection of ions. Numerous studies have shown that the information obtained from HPLC–ICP-MS analysis can be greatly enhanced by complementary approaches. - Highlights: • HPLC–ICP-MS is the most common method used for arsenic speciation. • HPLC limitations include

  3. Complementary arsenic speciation methods: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The toxicity of arsenic greatly depends on its chemical form and oxidation state (speciation) and therefore accurate determination of arsenic speciation is a crucial step in understanding its chemistry and potential risk. High performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled mass spectrometry (HPLC–ICP-MS) is the most common analysis used for arsenic speciation but it has two major limitations: it relies on an extraction step (usually from a solid sample) that can be incomplete or alter the arsenic compounds; and it provides no structural information, relying on matching sample peaks to standard peaks. The use of additional analytical methods in a complementary manner introduces the ability to address these disadvantages. The use of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) with HPLC–ICP-MS can be used to identify compounds not extracted for HPLC–ICP-MS and provide minimal processing steps for solid state analysis that may help preserve labile compounds such as those containing arsenic-sulfur bonds, which can degrade under chromatographic conditions. On the other hand, HPLC–ICP-MS is essential in confirming organoarsenic compounds with similar white line energies seen by using XAS, and identifying trace arsenic compounds that are too low to be detected by XAS. The complementary use of electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI–MS) with HPLC–ICP-MS provides confirmation of arsenic compounds identified during the HPLC–ICP-MS analysis, identification of unknown compounds observed during the HPLC–ICP-MS analysis and further resolves HPLC–ICP-MS by identifying co-eluting compounds. In the complementary use of HPLC–ICP-MS and ESI–MS, HPLC–ICP-MS helps to focus the ESI–MS selection of ions. Numerous studies have shown that the information obtained from HPLC–ICP-MS analysis can be greatly enhanced by complementary approaches. - Highlights: • HPLC–ICP-MS is the most common method used for arsenic speciation. • HPLC limitations include

  4. Binational Arsenic Exposure Survey: Methodology and Estimated Arsenic Intake from Drinking Water and Urinary Arsenic Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin B. Harris

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The Binational Arsenic Exposure Survey (BAsES was designed to evaluate probable arsenic exposures in selected areas of southern Arizona and northern Mexico, two regions with known elevated levels of arsenic in groundwater reserves. This paper describes the methodology of BAsES and the relationship between estimated arsenic intake from beverages and arsenic output in urine. Households from eight communities were selected for their varying groundwater arsenic concentrations in Arizona, USA and Sonora, Mexico. Adults responded to questionnaires and provided dietary information. A first morning urine void and water from all household drinking sources were collected. Associations between urinary arsenic concentration (total, organic, inorganic and estimated level of arsenic consumed from water and other beverages were evaluated through crude associations and by random effects models. Median estimated total arsenic intake from beverages among participants from Arizona communities ranged from 1.7 to 14.1 µg/day compared to 0.6 to 3.4 µg/day among those from Mexico communities. In contrast, median urinary inorganic arsenic concentrations were greatest among participants from Hermosillo, Mexico (6.2 µg/L whereas a high of 2.0 µg/L was found among participants from Ajo, Arizona. Estimated arsenic intake from drinking water was associated with urinary total arsenic concentration (p < 0.001, urinary inorganic arsenic concentration (p < 0.001, and urinary sum of species (p < 0.001. Urinary arsenic concentrations increased between 7% and 12% for each one percent increase in arsenic consumed from drinking water. Variability in arsenic intake from beverages and urinary arsenic output yielded counter intuitive results. Estimated intake of arsenic from all beverages was greatest among Arizonans yet participants in Mexico had higher urinary total and inorganic arsenic concentrations. Other contributors to urinary arsenic concentrations should be evaluated.

  5. Evaluation of gamma gluthamyl transferase and uric acid levels in arsenic exposed subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceylan Bal

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Arsenic is a metal with a widespread industrial usage and causing oxidative stress. Studies shows serum uric acid and gamma gluthamyl transferase (GGT levels are increasing in oxidative stress. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of arsenic exposure on serum uric acid and GGT levels. Methods: 500 patients who refer to Ankara Occupational Disease Hospital between 2010 to 2014 for periodic examination and urinary arsenic, serum uric acid and serum GGT levels assessed are included in this study. 268 patients with urinary arsenic levels over 35μg/L are defined as exposed and below 35μg/L are controls. Results: Data of 500 patients were analysed. 268 of them had high urine arsenic levels and 232 had normal urine arsenic levels. In the high urine arsenic level group the median serum uric acid level was 5.4 (2.60-7.20 and median serum GGT level was 27 (10-51 in the other group with normal urine arsenic levels the median serum uric acid level was 4.9 (2.5-7 and median serum GGT level was 22 (10-52. The difference between two groups was statistically significant (p value: 0.002 and <0.001 respectively Conclusion: Arsenic exposure may be associated with hyperuricemia and high levels of GGT and with prospective studies the causal relationship between arsenic exposure and hyperuricemia and GGT can be revealed.

  6. Synthesis of Minerals with Iron Oxide and Hydroxide Contents as a Sorption Medium to Remove Arsenic from Water for Human Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-Hoyos, Sofia; Romero-Velazquez, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic has been classified as a toxic and carcinogenic chemical element. It therefore presents a serious environmental problem in different regions of the country and the world. In the present work, two adsorbent media were developed and evaluated to remove arsenic from water in the Pájaro Verde mine shaft, Huautla, Tlaquiltenango, Morelos. The media were synthesized and characterized, obtaining a surface area of 43.04 m2·g−1 for the goethite and 2.44 m2·g−1 for silica sand coated with Fe(III). To conduct the sorption kinetics and isotherms, a 23 factorial design was performed for each medium in order to obtain the optimal conditions for the factors of arsenic concentration, pH and mass of the adsorbent. The best results were obtained for goethite, with a removal efficiency of 98.61% (C0 of As(V) 0.360 mg·L−1), and an effluent concentration of 0.005 mg·L−1, a value that complies with the modified Official Mexican Standard NOM-127-SSA1-1994 [1] and WHO guidelines (2004) [2]. The kinetic equation that best fit the experimental data was the pseudo-second-order, resulting in the highest values for the constants for synthetic goethite, with a rate constant sorption of 4.019·g·mg−1·min−1. With respect to the sorption isotherms, both media were fitted to the Langmuir-II linear model with a sorption capacity (qm) of 0.4822 mg·g−1 for goethite and 0.2494 mg·g−1 for silica sand coated with Fe(III). PMID:26703707

  7. Exposure to inorganic arsenic in pregnancy and metabolism-nutrition interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Li

    2006-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic is metabolized by most mammals, including humans, via alternating reduction and oxidative methylation with S-adenosylmethionine as main methyl donor. Thus, it seems likely that it is influenced by the availability of methyl groups. The main arsenic metabolites excreted in human urine are monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), besides un-methylated inorganic arsenic (arsenate [As(V)] and arsenite [As(III)]). The aim of the present study wa...

  8. Intra-annual variations of arsenic totals and species in tropical estuary surface sediments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, P.; Jayachandran, S.; Babu, P.V.R.; Karri, S.; Tyadi, P.; Yao, K.M.; Sharma, B.M.

    . Introduction: Arsenic is, a toxic metalloid, widely encountered in different environments and organisms (Ng et al., 2003; Milton and Johnson, 1999; Parsons et al., 2008). Most environmental arsenic problems are the result of mobilization under natural... conditions. However, mining activities, use of arsenic as pesticides and additives create additional impact. Oxidation of volatile arsine in air, and dust from burning fossil fuels can also increase the accumulation of this metalloid in different...

  9. Comparative oxidation state specific analysis of arsenic species by high-performance liquid chromatography- inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic absorption spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Currier, J. M.; Saunders, R J; Ding, L.; Bodnar, W.; Cable, P.; Matoušek, T. (Tomáš); Creed, J. T.; Stýblo, M.

    2013-01-01

    The formation of methylarsonous acid (MAsIII) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMAsIII) in the course of inorganic arsenic (iAs) metabolism plays an important role in the adverse effects of chronic exposure to iAs. High-performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) and hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-CT-AAS) have been frequently used for the analysis of MAsIII and DMAsIII in biological samples. While HG-CT-AAS has con...

  10. Effects of Soil Composition and Mineralogy on the Bioaccessibility of Arsenic from Tailings and Soil in Gold Mine Districts of Nova Scotia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meunier, Louise; Walker, Stephen R.; Wragg, Joanna; Parsons, Michael B.; Koch, Iris; Jamieson, Heather E.; Reimer, Kenneth J. (Queens); (Brit. Geo.); (Royal); (NRC)

    2010-10-20

    Bioaccessibility tests and mineralogical analyses were performed on arsenic-contaminated tailings and soils from gold mine districts of Nova Scotia, Canada, to examine the links between soil composition, mineralogy, and arsenic bioaccessibility. Arsenic bioaccessibility ranges from 0.1% to 49%. A weak correlation was observed between total and bioaccessible arsenic concentrations, and the arsenic bioaccessibility was not correlated with other elements. Bulk X-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis shows arsenic in these near-surface samples is mainly in the pentavalent form, indicating that most of the arsenopyrite (As{sup 1-}) originally present in the tailings and soils has been oxidized during weathering reactions. Detailed mineralogical analyses of individual samples have identified up to seven arsenic species, the relative proportions of which appear to affect arsenic bioaccessibility. The highest arsenic bioaccessibility (up to 49%) is associated with the presence of calcium-iron arsenate. Samples containing arsenic predominantly as arsenopyrite or scorodite have the lowest bioaccessibility (<1%). Other arsenic species identified (predominantly amorphous iron arsenates and arsenic-bearing iron(oxy)hydroxides) are associated with intermediate bioaccessibility (1 to 10%). The presence of a more soluble arsenic phase, even at low concentrations, results in increased arsenic bioaccessibility from the mixed arsenic phases associated with tailings and mine-impacted soils.

  11. Complementary arsenic speciation methods: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nearing, Michelle M.; Koch, Iris; Reimer, Kenneth J.

    2014-09-01

    The toxicity of arsenic greatly depends on its chemical form and oxidation state (speciation) and therefore accurate determination of arsenic speciation is a crucial step in understanding its chemistry and potential risk. High performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) is the most common analysis used for arsenic speciation but it has two major limitations: it relies on an extraction step (usually from a solid sample) that can be incomplete or alter the arsenic compounds; and it provides no structural information, relying on matching sample peaks to standard peaks. The use of additional analytical methods in a complementary manner introduces the ability to address these disadvantages. The use of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) with HPLC-ICP-MS can be used to identify compounds not extracted for HPLC-ICP-MS and provide minimal processing steps for solid state analysis that may help preserve labile compounds such as those containing arsenicsbnd sulfur bonds, which can degrade under chromatographic conditions. On the other hand, HPLC-ICP-MS is essential in confirming organoarsenic compounds with similar white line energies seen by using XAS, and identifying trace arsenic compounds that are too low to be detected by XAS. The complementary use of electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) with HPLC-ICP-MS provides confirmation of arsenic compounds identified during the HPLC-ICP-MS analysis, identification of unknown compounds observed during the HPLC-ICP-MS analysis and further resolves HPLC-ICP-MS by identifying co-eluting compounds. In the complementary use of HPLC-ICP-MS and ESI-MS, HPLC-ICP-MS helps to focus the ESI-MS selection of ions. Numerous studies have shown that the information obtained from HPLC-ICP-MS analysis can be greatly enhanced by complementary approaches.

  12. Investigation of Hydrologic and Biogeochemical Controls on Arsenic Mobilization Using Distributed Sensing at a Field Site in Munshiganj, Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Ramanathan, Nithya; Rothenberg, Sarah; Estrin, D; Harmon, T C; Harvey, Charles; Jay, J A; Kohler, Eddie

    2006-01-01

    The presence of arsenic in the groundwater has led to the largest environmental poisoning in history; tens of millions of people in the Ganges Delta continue to drink groundwater that is dangerously contaminated with arsenic. A current working hypothesis is that arsenic is mobilized in the near surface environment where sediments are weathered by seasonal changes in the redox state that drive a cycle of pyrite oxidation and iron oxide reduction. In order to test the supporting hypothesis th...

  13. Arsenic transport in irrigation water across rice-field soils in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments were conducted to analyze processes impacting arsenic transport in irrigation water flowing over bare rice-field soils in Bangladesh. Dissolved concentrations of As, Fe, P, and Si varied over space and time, according to whether irrigation water was flowing or static. Initially, under flowing conditions, arsenic concentrations in irrigation water were below well-water levels and showed little spatial variability across fields. As flowing-water levels rose, arsenic concentrations were elevated at field inlets and decreased with distance across fields, but under subsequent static conditions, concentrations dropped and were less variable. Laboratory experiments revealed that over half of the initial well-water arsenic was removed from solution by oxidative interaction with other water-column components. Introduction of small quantities of soil further decreased arsenic concentrations in solution. At higher soil-solution ratios, however, soil contributed arsenic to solution via abiotic and biotic desorption. Collectively, these results suggest careful design is required for land-based arsenic-removal schemes. -- Highlights: •We analyzed the processes impacting arsenic transport in flowing irrigation water. •Arsenic in Bangladesh rice-field irrigation water varied over space and time. •Arsenic was correlated with Fe, P, and Si in flowing and static water. •Oxidation, adsorption and desorption reactions controlled arsenic concentrations. •Land-based arsenic removal from water will be impacted by hydraulic conditions. -- Arsenic concentrations in flowing and static irrigation water in Bangladesh varied over space and time, suggesting careful design is required for land-based pre-treatment schemes that aim to remove As from solution

  14. Analysis of Arsenicals and Their Sulfur Analogs in Biological Samples Using HPLC with Collision Cell ICP-MS and ESI-MS/MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent arsenic speciation studies have indicated that the sulfur analogs of the more common arsenic oxides are present in environmental and biological systems. This discovery was previously impeded due to the strong affinity of these arsenic-sulfides for the stationary phases typ...

  15. USEPA Arsenic Demonstration Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The presentation provides background information on the USEPA arsenic removal program. The summary includes information on the history of the program, sites and technology selected, and a summary of the data collected from two completed projects.

  16. Arsenic pollution in the Yellowknife area from gold smelter activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold mined at Yelloknife in the North West Territories of Canada is associated with arsenopyrite ores which necessitates the oxidation of the arsenic and sulphur by roasting at two Yellowknife smelters. As2O3 and SO2 are emitted into the atmosphere, and despite improvements in emission control, significant emissions still occur. In order to asses the arsenic contamination in the local environment and the potential exposures to man, soil samples and samples of the native vegetation were collected in and around Yellowknife and the two smelters. Arsenic and antimony analyses were done by instrumental neutron activation analysis using the SLOWPOKE facility at University of Toronto. Zinc, copper, lead and cadmium analyses were done by atomic adsorption spectrophotometry. Arsenic was found to be accumulated in the soils in the vicinity of the two smelters to levels of several thousand ppm. Antimony levels were about 10% of arsenic and were highly correlated with arsenic. Zinc occured to 500 ppm around the smelters. Soil arsenic levels are sufficiently high to inhibit root growth in soils over a very extensive area. (author)

  17. EXAFS study on arsenic species and transformation in arsenic hyperaccumulator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Zechun; CHEN Tongbin; LEI Mei; HU Tiandou; HUANG Qifei

    2004-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation extended X-ray absorption fine structure (SR EXAFS) was employed to study the transformation of coordination environment and the redox speciation of arsenic in a newly discovered arsenic hyperaccumulator, Cretan brake (Pteris cretica L. var nervosa Thunb). It showed that the arsenic in the plant mainly coordinated with oxygen, except that some arsenic coordinated with S as As-GSH in root. The complexation of arsenic with GSH might not be the predominant detoxification mechanism in Cretan brake. Although some arsenic in root presented as As(V) in Na2HAsO4 treatments, most of arsenic in plant presented as As(III)-O in both treatments, indicating that As(V) tended to be reduced to As(III) after it was taken up into the root, and arsenic was kept as As(III) when it was transported to the above-ground tissues. The reduction of As(V) primarily proceeded in the root.

  18. Complexity of Arsenic Biogeochemistry in Surface Water Systems as Influenced by a Hydrologic Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markley, C. T.; Herbert, B. E.

    2006-12-01

    The arsenic cycle in oxic, surface water environments is often controlled by oxy-hydroxide minerals through sorption/desorption and precipitation/dissolution reactions. However, there are numerous instances where these minerals are found in low concentrations and/or are minimally reactive with respect to aqueous arsenic species. The presence of other anions may competitively inhibit arsenic sorption to oxy-hydroxide surfaces, thus increasing the bioavailability of arsenic and the potential toxic impacts. Microbe-mediated reactions can further impact arsenic fate and transport through accumulation and biotransformation. Arsenic biotransformation via reduction and/or methylation may result in an increased proportion of thermodynamically unfavorable arsenic species such as arsenite and methylated arsenicals in oxic surface waters. The reduced arsenic species, arsenite, is considered more mobile and toxic than the oxic species, arsenate while methylated arsenicals are often considered less toxic species. The complexity of these biogeochemical characteristics highlights the importance of studying arsenic in surface water environments. Particulate and aqueous phase metals (Fe, Mn, Al) and anions (As, P, S) were measured in surface water samples collected from the outflow creek of an arsenic-contaminated lake at high and low flow rates. Arsenic speciation, quantified via HPLC-ICP-MS, was dominated by methylated arsenicals at concentrations up to 82.7 μg/l. The common oxide-forming elements, Fe, Mn and Al were measured via ICP-AES at concentrations up to 2.4 mg/l, 0.88 mg/l and 3.3 mg/l, respectively. However, arsenic was not associated with the particulate phase mineralogy, being approximately 100% in the aqueous (< 0.2 μm ) phase, indicating high arsenic bioavailability. High alkalinity, phosphorous and sulfur concentrations up to 516 mgHCO3/meq, 2.0mg/l and 50 mg/l, respectively, likely out-competed arsenic for sorption to these oxide mineral surfaces. Geochemical

  19. Dynamics of organic and inorganic arsenic in the solution phase of an acidic fen in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J.-H.; Matzner, E.

    2006-04-01

    Wetland soils play a key role for the transformation of heavy metals in forested watersheds, influencing their mobility, and ecotoxicity. Our goal was to investigate the mechanisms of release from solid to solution phase, the mobility, and the transformation of arsenic species in a fen soil. In methanol-water extracts, monomethylarsonic acid, dimethylarsinic acid, trimethylarsine oxide, arsenobetaine, and two unknown organic arsenic species were found with concentrations up to 14 ng As g -1 at the surface horizon. Arsenate is the dominant species at the 0-30 cm depth, whereas arsenite predominated at the 30-70 cm depth. Only up to 2.2% of total arsenic in fen was extractable with methanol-water. In porewaters, depth gradient spatial variation of arsenic species, pH, redox potentials, and the other chemical parameters along the profile was observed in June together with high proportion of organic arsenic species (up to 1.2 μg As L -1, 70% of total arsenic). Tetramethylarsonium ion and an unknown organic arsenic species were additionally detected in porewaters at deeper horizons. In comparison, the arsenic speciation in porewaters in April was homogeneous with depth and no organic arsenic species were found. Thus, the occurrence of microbial methylation of arsenic in fen was demonstrated for the first time. The 10 times elevated total arsenic concentrations in porewaters in June compared to April were accompanied by elevated concentrations of total iron, lower concentrations of sulfate and the presence of ammonium and phosphate. The low proportion of methanol-water extractable total arsenic suggests a generally low mobility of arsenic in fen soils. The release of arsenic from solid to solution phases in fen is dominantly controlled by dissolution of iron oxides, redox transformation, and methylation of arsenic, driven by microbial activity in the growing season. As a result, increased concentrations of total arsenic and potentially toxic arsenic species in fen

  20. The contribution of microbial mats to the arsenic geochemistry of an ancient gold mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ancient Zloty Stok (SW Poland) gold mine is such an environment, where different microbial communities, able to utilize inorganic arsenic species As(III) and As(V), are found. The purpose of the present study was to (i) estimate prokaryotic diversity in the microbial mats in bottom sediments of this gold mine, (ii) identify microorganisms that can metabolize arsenic, and (iii) estimate their potential role in the arsenic geochemistry of the mine and in the environment. The oxidation/reduction experiments showed that the microbial mat community may significantly contribute to arsenic contamination in groundwater. The presence of both arsenite oxidizing and dissimilatory arsenate reducing bacteria in the mat was confirmed by the detection of arsenite oxidase and dissimilatory arsenate reductase genes, respectively. This work also demonstrated that microorganisms utilizing other compounds that naturally co-occur with arsenic are present within the microbial mat community and may contribute to the arsenic geochemistry in the environment. - Highlights: ► The microbial mats from this ancient gold mine are highly diverse community. ► As(III) oxidizing and As(V) reducing bacteria are present in the mats. ► As redox transformations are linked to the metabolism of microbial mats bacteria. ► Microbial mats play a crucial role in the As biogeochemical cycle within the mine. - The microbial mats from this ancient gold mine can mediate oxidation/reduction reaction of arsenic and in this way may significantly contribute to arsenic contamination in groundwater.

  1. IN-FIELD PRESERVATION OF ARSENIC SPECIES IN DRINKING WATER USING EDTA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The two predominant inorganic arsenic species found in drinking waters are As(III) and As(V). As(III) is commonly associated with ground waters while As(V) is associated with surface waters. The efficiency of arsenic removal from a drinking water supply is dependent on the oxid...

  2. Arsenic-induced toxicity and the protective role of ascorbic acid in mouse testis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxidative stress has been suggested to be a major cause of male reproductive failure. Here, we investigated whether arsenic, which impairs male reproductive functions in rodent models, acts by inducing oxidative stress. Male 8-week-old ICR mice were given drinking water containing 20 or 40 mg/l sodium arsenite with or without 0.75 or 1.5 g/l of the antioxidant ascorbic acid for 5 weeks. The arsenic-treated mice showed decreased epididymidal sperm counts and testicular weights compared to untreated mice. These effects were reversed in mice that were co-treated with ascorbic acid. Similarly, arsenic treatment lowered the activities of testicular 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD) and 17β-HSD, which play important roles in steroidogenesis, and this was reversed by co-treatment with ascorbic acid. The testicles of arsenic-treated mice had decreased glutathione (GSH) levels (which correlate inversely with the degree of cellular oxidative stress) and elevated levels of protein carbonyl (a marker of oxidative damage to tissue proteins). Ascorbic acid co-treatment reversed both of these effects. Thus, ascorbic acid blocks both the adverse effects of arsenic on male reproductive functions and the arsenic-induced testicular oxidative changes. These observations support the notion that arsenic impairs male reproductive function by inducing oxidative stress

  3. The impact of oscillating redox conditions: Arsenic immobilisation in contaminated calcareous floodplain soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic contamination of floodplain soils is extensive and additional fresh arsenic inputs to the pedosphere from human activities are ongoing. We investigate the cumulative effects of repetitive soil redox cycles, which occur naturally during flooding and draining, on a calcareous fluvisol, the native microbial community and arsenic mobility following a simulated contamination event. We show through bioreactor experiments, spectroscopic techniques and modelling that repetitive redox cycling can decrease arsenic mobility during reducing conditions by up to 45%. Phylogenetic and functional analyses of the microbial community indicate that iron cycling is a key driver of observed changes to solution chemistry. We discuss probable mechanisms responsible for the arsenic immobilisation observed in-situ. The proposed mechanisms include, decreased heterotrophic iron reduction due to the depletion of labile particulate organic matter (POM), increases to the proportion of co-precipitated vs. aqueous or sorbed arsenic with α-FeOOH/Fe(OH)3 and potential precipitation of amorphous ferric arsenate. Highlights: •Oscillating redox conditions and heterotrophic metabolism are implemented in PHREEQC. •Depletion of labile organic matter limits iron reduction and arsenic release. •Amorphous FeAsO4∙2H2O precipitation potentially limits arsenic mobility during redox cycling. •Water fluctuating zones may naturally attenuate arsenic liberation during flooding. -- We demonstrate through batch experiments, spectroscopy and modelling that repetitive cycles of oxidation and reduction decrease arsenic mobility in soils during subsequent reducing conditions

  4. Acute and chronic arsenic toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Ratnaike, R.

    2003-01-01

    Arsenic toxicity is a global health problem affecting many millions of people. Contamination is caused by arsenic from natural geological sources leaching into aquifers, contaminating drinking water and may also occur from mining and other industrial processes. Arsenic is present as a contaminant in many traditional remedies. Arsenic trioxide is now used to treat acute promyelocytic leukaemia. Absorption occurs predominantly from ingestion from the small intestine, though minimal absorption o...

  5. Sulforaphane prevents pulmonary damage in response to inhaled arsenic by activating the Nrf2-defense response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Yi [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning 110001 (China); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, University of Arizona, 1703 East Mabel Street, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Tao, Shasha [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, University of Arizona, 1703 East Mabel Street, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Lian, Fangru [Department of Pathology, University of Arizona, 1501 North Campbell Ave, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States); Chau, Binh T. [Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, The University of Arizona, 1501 North Campbell Ave, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States); Chen, Jie; Sun, Guifan [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning 110001 (China); Fang, Deyu [Department of Pathology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Lantz, R. Clark [Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, The University of Arizona, 1501 North Campbell Ave, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States); Arizona Cancer Center, University of Arizona, 1515 North Campbell Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States); Zhang, Donna D., E-mail: dzhang@pharmacy.arizona.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, University of Arizona, 1703 East Mabel Street, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Arizona Cancer Center, University of Arizona, 1515 North Campbell Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Exposure to arsenic is associated with an increased risk of lung disease. Novel strategies are needed to reduce the adverse health effects associated with arsenic exposure in the lung. Nrf2, a transcription factor that mediates an adaptive cellular defense response, is effective in detoxifying environmental insults and prevents a broad spectrum of diseases induced by environmental exposure to harmful substances. In this report, we tested whether Nrf2 activation protects mice from arsenic-induced toxicity. We used an in vivo arsenic inhalation model that is highly relevant to low environmental human exposure to arsenic-containing dusts. Two-week exposure to arsenic-containing dust resulted in pathological alterations, oxidative DNA damage, and mild apoptotic cell death in the lung; all of which were blocked by sulforaphane (SF) in an Nrf2-dependent manner. Mechanistically, SF-mediated activation of Nrf2 alleviated inflammatory responses by modulating cytokine production. This study provides strong evidence that dietary intervention targeting Nrf2 activation is a feasible approach to reduce adverse health effects associated with arsenic exposure. -- Highlights: ► Exposed to arsenic particles and/or SF have elevated Nrf2 and its target genes. ► Sulforaphane prevents pathological alterations, oxidative damage and cell death. ► Sulforaphane alleviates infiltration of inflammatory cells into the lungs. ► Sulforaphane suppresses arsenic-induced proinflammatory cytokine production.

  6. Multivariate analysis of the heterogeneous geochemical processes controlling arsenic enrichment in a shallow groundwater system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuangbing; Liu, Changrong; Wang, Yanxin; Zhan, Hongbin

    2014-01-01

    The effects of various geochemical processes on arsenic enrichment in a high-arsenic aquifer at Jianghan Plain in Central China were investigated using multivariate models developed from combined adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) and multiple linear regression (MLR). The results indicated that the optimum variable group for the AFNIS model consisted of bicarbonate, ammonium, phosphorus, iron, manganese, fluorescence index, pH, and siderite saturation. These data suggest that reductive dissolution of iron/manganese oxides, phosphate-competitive adsorption, pH-dependent desorption, and siderite precipitation could integrally affect arsenic concentration. Analysis of the MLR models indicated that reductive dissolution of iron(III) was primarily responsible for arsenic mobilization in groundwaters with low arsenic concentration. By contrast, for groundwaters with high arsenic concentration (i.e., > 170 μg/L), reductive dissolution of iron oxides approached a dynamic equilibrium. The desorption effects from phosphate-competitive adsorption and the increase in pH exhibited arsenic enrichment superior to that caused by iron(III) reductive dissolution as the groundwater chemistry evolved. The inhibition effect of siderite precipitation on arsenic mobilization was expected to exist in groundwater that was highly saturated with siderite. The results suggest an evolutionary dominance of specific geochemical process over other factors controlling arsenic concentration, which presented a heterogeneous distribution in aquifers. Supplemental materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of the Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part A, to view the supplemental file. PMID:24345245

  7. Numerical Modeling of Arsenic Mobility during Reductive Iron-Mineral Transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, Joey; Prommer, Henning; Siade, Adam; Carr, Jackson; Berg, Michael; Davis, James A; Fendorf, Scott

    2016-03-01

    Millions of individuals worldwide are chronically exposed to hazardous concentrations of arsenic from contaminated drinking water. Despite massive efforts toward understanding the extent and underlying geochemical processes of the problem, numerical modeling and reliable predictions of future arsenic behavior remain a significant challenge. One of the key knowledge gaps concerns a refined understanding of the mechanisms that underlie arsenic mobilization, particularly under the onset of anaerobic conditions, and the quantification of the factors that affect this process. In this study, we focus on the development and testing of appropriate conceptual and numerical model approaches to represent and quantify the reductive dissolution of iron oxides, the concomitant release of sorbed arsenic, and the role of iron-mineral transformations. The initial model development in this study was guided by data and hypothesized processes from a previously reported,1 well-controlled column experiment in which arsenic desorption from ferrihydrite coated sands by variable loads of organic carbon was investigated. Using the measured data as constraints, we provide a quantitative interpretation of the processes controlling arsenic mobility during the microbial reductive transformation of iron oxides. Our analysis suggests that the observed arsenic behavior is primarily controlled by a combination of reductive dissolution of ferrihydrite, arsenic incorporation into or co-precipitation with freshly transformed iron minerals, and partial arsenic redox transformations. PMID:26835553

  8. 砷化合物致人表皮癌A431细胞的毒性及氧化应激和砷代谢研究%Cytotoxicity,oxidative stress and arsenic metabolism in human skin basal cell carcinoma cell (A431) induced by different speciations of arsenic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆景坤; 田艳; 俞腾飞; 陈朝军; 王一博; 尹若熙

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the cytotoxicity and oxidative stress and arsenic metabolism induced by different speciations of arsenic in human skin basal carcinoma cell (A431). Methods Cultured A431 cells were exposed to 0.05—50.0 μmol/L methylarsonous acid (MMAⅢ), 0.05-200.0 μmol/L arsenic trioxide (As2O3,As3+) , 0.5-500.0 μmol/L disodium hydrogen arsenate(As5+) or sodium dimethylarsonate(DMAⅤ) for 24 h, respectively. MTT assay were used to evaluate the cell viability, the malondialdehyde (MDA) content and the activity of the superoxide dismutase (SOU) in HaCaT were detected respectively. The intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were detected with flow cytometry and the atomic fluorescence were used to analyze intracellular or extracellular levels of different speciations of arsenic. Results When the dose was in a certain range, MMAⅢ (≥0.5μmol/L), As2O3 (≥200.0 μmol/L), disodium hydrogen arsenate (0.5, ≥200.0 μmol/L)and sodium dimethylarsonate (500.0 μmoL/L) could all decrease the cell viability (P50.0 μmol/L As2O3> 100.0 μmol/L disodium hydrogen arsenate > 100.0 μmol/L sodium dimethylarsonate. As for As2O3 and disodium hydrogen arsenate, the methylation ratios in low—dose groups were higher than the high—dose ones' , and the ratios in As2O3 groups was higher than those in As5+ groups. Conclusion Arsenides may inhibit A431 cells proliferation in higher exposure levels and promote proliferation in lower exposure levels, the mechanism probably relates to oxidative stress and arsenic metabolism in A431 cells induced by different speciations of arsenide with various concentrations.%目的 探讨不同砷化合物致人表皮癌细胞(A431)的细胞毒性及氧化应激和砷代谢的情况.方法 培养的A431细胞分别暴露于0.05~50.0 μmol/L一甲基亚胂酸(MMAⅢ),0.05~200.0 μmol/L三氧化二砷(As2O3,As3+),0.5~500.0μmol/L砷酸氢二纳(As5+)和二甲基胂酸钠(DMAV)24 h,应用四甲基偶氮唑盐(MTT)法测定细

  9. Intervention effects of curcumin on hepatic oxidative stress injury in water arsenic-exposed rats%姜黄素对饮水砷暴露大鼠肝脏氧化损伤的干预作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李昌哲; 李军; 张爱华; 于春; 徐玉艳; 熊鑫; 杨燕妮

    2015-01-01

    Objective To observe the effects of curcumin on hepatic oxidant stress in water arsenic-exposed rats and to study its mechanism,which can offer references for curcumin used in antioxidant therapy of arsenic poisoning.Methods Thirty-two SD rats were divided into 4 groups according to body weight by random number table,half male and half female.Including control group (lavaged 135 days with deionized water),arsenic poisoning group (lavaged 45 days with deionized water after lavaging 90 days with 10 mg/kg sodium arsenite),pure curcumin group (lavaged 135 days with 1 000 mg/kg curcumin solution) and curcumin treatment group (lavaged 45 days with 1 000 mg/kg curcumin solution after lavaging 90 days with 10 mg/kg sodium arsenite),8 rats in each group.The arsenic contents of urine (urine creatinine corrected) and liver were detected by hydride generation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (HG-ICP-OES);the activity of Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) and catalase (CAT),the contents of malondialdehyde (MDA) in serum and liver homogenate by colorimetric method;the protein expression of liver antioxidant enzyme (SOD 1 and CAT) was assayed by Western blotting.Results The arsenic contents of urine and liver in arsenic poisoning group [(5.83 ± 0.29)μg/g Cr,(15.76 ± 1.65)μg/g] and the arsenic contents of urine in curcumin treatment group [(1.07 ± 0.14)μg/g Cr] were obviously higher than those of control group [(0.40 ± 0.14)μg/g Cr,(4.56 ± 1.05)μg/g,all P < 0.05];compared to arsenic poisoning group,the arsenic contents of urine and liver in curcumin treatment group [(1.07 ± 0.14)μg/g Cr,(5.42 ± 1.76)μg/g] were obviously lower (all P < 0.05).The contents of serum and liver SOD1,CAT and MDA in control group respectively were (102.46 ± 5.03),(29.33 ± 8.13)U/ml,(3.11 ± 0.49)μ mol/L and (204.05 ± 18.33),(126.26 ± 13.19)U/mg prot,(1.62 ± 0.42) μmol/g prot.Compared to the control,the activity of serum and liver SOD1 and CAT in arsenic

  10. Arsenic in groundwater of the Red River Floodplain, Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postma, Diederik Jan; Larsen, Flemming; Jessen, Søren; Hue, Nguyen Thi Minh; Duc, Mai Thanh; Viet, Pham Hung; Nhan, Pham Quy

    The mobilization of arsenic (As) to the groundwater was studied in a shallow Holocene aquifer on the Red River flood plain near Hanoi, Vietnam. Results show an anoxic aquifer featuring organic carbon decomposition with redox zonation dominated by the reduction of Fe-oxides and methanogenesis. The...... concentration of As increases over depth to a concentration of up to 550 μg/L. Most As is present as As(III) but some As(V) is always found. Arsenic correlates well with NH4, relating its release to organic matter decomposition and the source of As appears to be the Fe-oxides being reduced....

  11. Arsenic: The Silent Killer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, Andrea (USGS)

    2006-02-28

    Andrea Foster uses x-rays to determine the forms of potentially toxic elements in environmentally-important matrices such as water, sediments, plants, and microorganisms. In this free public lecture, Foster will discuss her research on arsenic, which is called the silent killer because dissolved in water, it is colorless, odorless, and tasteless, yet consumption of relatively small doses of this element in its most toxic forms can cause rapid and violent death. Arsenic is a well-known poison, and has been used as such since ancient times. Less well known is the fact that much lower doses of the element, consumed over years, can lead to a variety of skin and internal cancers that can also be fatal. Currently, what has been called the largest mass poisoning in history is occurring in Bangladesh, where most people are by necessity drinking ground water that is contaminated with arsenic far in excess of the maximum amounts determined to be safe by the World Health Organization. This presentation will review the long and complicated history with arsenic, describe how x-rays have helped explain the high yet spatially variable arsenic concentrations in Bangladesh, discuss the ways in which land use in Bangladesh may be exacerbating the problem, and summarize the impact of this silent killer on drinking water systems worldwide.

  12. Arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris Vittata L. and its arsenic accumulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    An arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata L. (Chinese brake) was first discovered in China by means of field survey and greenhouse cultivation. Field survey showed that Chinese brake had large accumulating capacity to arsenic; the orders of arsenic content in different parts of the fern were as follows: leaves>leafstalks>roots, which is totally different from that of ordinary plants; bioaccumulation coefficients of the above ground parts of the fern decreased as a power function of soil arsenic contents. In the control of pot trials with normal unpolluted soil containing 9 mg/kg of arsenic, the bioaccumulation coefficients of the above ground parts and rhizoids of Chinese brake were as high as 71 and 80 respectively. Greenhouse cultivation in the contaminated soil from mining areas has shown that more than 1 times greater arsenic can be accumulated in the leaves of the fern than that of field samples with the largest content of 5070 mg/kg As on a dry matter basis. During greenhouse cultivation, arsenic content in the leaves of the fern increased linearly with time prolonging. Not only has Chinese brake extraordinary tolerance and accumulation to arsenic, but it grew rapidly with great biomass, wide distribution and easy adaptation to different environmental conditions as well. Therefore, it has great potential in future remediation of arsenic contamination. It also demonstrates important value for studies of arsenic physiology and biochemistry such as arsenic absorption, translocation and detoxification mechanisms in plants.

  13. Hydrogen-enriched water restoration of impaired calcium propagation by arsenic in primary keratinocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wei-Tai; Chiu, Yi-Ching; Lee, Chih-Hung; Yoshioka, Tohru; Yu, Hsin-Su

    2013-11-01

    Endemic contamination of artesian water for drinking by arsenic is known to cause several human cancers, including cancers of the skin, bladder, and lungs. In skin, multiple arsenic-induced Bowen's disease (As-BD) can develop into invasive cancers after decades of arsenic exposure. The characteristic histological features of As-BD include full-layer epidermal dysplasia, apoptosis, and abnormal proliferation. Calcium propagation is an essential cellular event contributing to keratinocyte differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis, all of which occur in As-BD. This study investigated how arsenic interferes calcium propagation of skin keratinocytes through ROS production and whether hydrogen-enriched water would restore arsenic-impaired calcium propagation. Arsenic was found to induce oxidative stress and inhibit ATP- and thapsigaragin-induced calcium propagation. Pretreatment of arsenic-treated keratinocytes by hydrogen-enriched water or beta-mercaptoethanol with potent anti-oxidative effects partially restored the propagation of calcium by ATP and by thapsigaragin. It was concluded that arsenic may impair calcium propagation, likely through oxidative stress and interactions with thiol groups in membrane proteins.

  14. Occurrence of arsenic in brown rice and its relationship to soil properties from Hainan Island, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu Yangrong; Chen Mulong [Faculty of Earth Science, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Hainan Institute of Geological Survey, Haikou 570206 (China); Bi Xiangyang, E-mail: bixy@cug.edu.cn [Faculty of Earth Science, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); He Yusheng [Hainan Institute of Geological Survey, Haikou 570206 (China); Ren Limin [Faculty of Earth Science, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Xiang Wu; Qiao Shengying; Yan Sen [Faculty of Earth Science, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Li Zhonggen [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang 550002 (China); Ma Zhendong [Faculty of Earth Science, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2011-07-15

    The acquaintance of arsenic concentrations in rice grain is vital in risk assessment. In this study, we determined the concentration of arsenic in 282 brown rice grains sampled from Hainan Island, China, and discussed its possible relationships to the considered soil properties. Arsenic concentrations in the rice grain from Hainan Island varied from 5 to 309 {mu}g/kg, with a mean (92 {mu}g/kg) lower than most published data from other countries/regions and the maximum contaminant level (MCL) for As{sub i} in rice. The result of correlation analysis between grain and soil properties showed that grain As concentrations correlated significantly to soil arsenic speciation, organic matter and soil P contents and could be best predicted by humic acid bound and Fe-Mn oxides bound As fractions. Grain arsenic rises steeply at soil As concentrations lower than 3.6 mg/kg and gently at higher concentrations. - Highlights: > Arsenic concentration in brown rice from Hainan was lower than most published data. > Grain As was affected by soil As speciation, OM, and P. > Humic acid and Fe-Mn oxides bound As fractions were important pools for rice plant. > Grain arsenic rises steeply at lower soil As concentrations and gently at higher concentrations. - Arsenic in brown rice grain from Hainan, China showed low concentrations and correlated most closely to soil humic acid bound and Fe-Mn oxides bound As fractions.

  15. Occurrence of arsenic in brown rice and its relationship to soil properties from Hainan Island, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The acquaintance of arsenic concentrations in rice grain is vital in risk assessment. In this study, we determined the concentration of arsenic in 282 brown rice grains sampled from Hainan Island, China, and discussed its possible relationships to the considered soil properties. Arsenic concentrations in the rice grain from Hainan Island varied from 5 to 309 μg/kg, with a mean (92 μg/kg) lower than most published data from other countries/regions and the maximum contaminant level (MCL) for Asi in rice. The result of correlation analysis between grain and soil properties showed that grain As concentrations correlated significantly to soil arsenic speciation, organic matter and soil P contents and could be best predicted by humic acid bound and Fe-Mn oxides bound As fractions. Grain arsenic rises steeply at soil As concentrations lower than 3.6 mg/kg and gently at higher concentrations. - Highlights: → Arsenic concentration in brown rice from Hainan was lower than most published data. → Grain As was affected by soil As speciation, OM, and P. → Humic acid and Fe-Mn oxides bound As fractions were important pools for rice plant. → Grain arsenic rises steeply at lower soil As concentrations and gently at higher concentrations. - Arsenic in brown rice grain from Hainan, China showed low concentrations and correlated most closely to soil humic acid bound and Fe-Mn oxides bound As fractions.

  16. Arsenic in ground water of the United States: occurrence and geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Alan H.; Westjohn, D.B.; Helsel, Dennis R.; Wanty, Richard B.

    2000-01-01

    Concentrations of naturally occurring arsenic in ground water vary regionally due to a combination of climate and geology. Although slightly less than half of 30,000 arsenic analyses of ground water in the United States were ≤ 1 µg/L, about 10% exceeded 0 µg/L. At a broad regional scale, arsenic concentrations exceeding 10 µg/L appear to be more frequently observed in the western United States than in the eastern half. Arsenic concentrations in ground water of the Appalachian Highlands and the Atlantic plain generally are very low (≤ 1 µg/L). Concentrations are somewhat greater in the Interior Plains and the Rocky Mountain System, investigations of ground water in New England, Michigan, Minnesota, South Dakota, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin within the last decade suggest that arsenic concentrations exceeding 10 µg/L are more widespread and common than previously recognized. Arsenic release from iron oxide appears to be the most common cause of widespread arsenic concentrations exceeding 10 µg/L a ground water. This can occur in response to different geochemical conditions, including release of arsenic to ground water through reaction of iron oxide with either natural or anthropogenic (i.e., petroleum products) organic carbon. Iron oxide also can release arsenic to alkaline ground water, such as that found in some felsic volcanic rocks and alkaline aquifers of the Western United States. Sulfide minerals are both a source and sink for arsenic. Geothermal water and high evaporation rates also are associated with arsenic concentrations ≥ 10g/L in ground and surface water, particularly in the west.

  17. Arsenic and drinking water. Part 1. A review of the source, distribution and behaviour of arsenic in the environment; Arsen und Trinkwasser. Teil 1. Ein Ueberblick ueber Vorkommen, Verteilung und Verhalten von Arsen in der Umwelt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberacker, F.; Maier, D. [Heinrich-Sontheimer-Lab., DVGW-Technologiezentrum Wasser, Karlsruhe (Germany); Maier, M. [Stadtwerke Karlsruhe GmbH, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2002-11-01

    Arsenic is ubiquituously distributed in our environment and is subject to continuous bio-geochemical cycling. Besides the acute toxicity of arsenic its chronic effects are of special importance. The permanent uptake with drinking water for example might cause cancer. Today, arsenic compounds hardly serve as pesticides anymore, although chromated copper arsenate is still used to preserve wood. Furthermore, arsenic is used in the alloy, glass and semiconductor industry. The main part of the earths' arsenic resources are bound to sulfur in the lithosphere. By means of rock weathering and volcanism it is transferred into pedo-, hydro- and atmosphere, where it is mainly bound to oxygen. Microorganisms are able to methylate the arsenic, whereby gaseous arsenic compounds are carried into the atmosphere. Also, it is released from the lithosphere through anthropogenic mining activities, although only for a small part of the released amount useful applications exist. The arsenic behaviour in natural waters is closely related to sulfur on the one hand and to iron oxides on the other. Under strongly reducing conditions the arsenic is precipitated as sulfide, while under oxidising conditions it is adsorbed to the surfaces of iron oxides. Therefore, under aerobic conditions the arsenic concentrations of aqueous solutions are controlled by these adsorption processes rather than by the solubility of solid arsenic phases. Manganese oxides also play an important role as they are able to rapidly oxidise As(III) to As(V). These processes of release and fixation of arsenic in the nature must be studied carefully, because they are applied for arsenic elimination during drinking water production as well. (orig.)

  18. Arsenic Speciation of Terrestrial Invertebrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriarty, M.M.; Koch, I.; Gordon, R.A.; Reimer, K.J. ((Simon)); ((Royal))

    2009-07-01

    The distribution and chemical form (speciation) of arsenic in terrestrial food chains determines both the amount of arsenic available to higher organisms, and the toxicity of this metalloid in affected ecosystems. Invertebrates are part of complex terrestrial food webs. This paper provides arsenic concentrations and arsenic speciation profiles for eight orders of terrestrial invertebrates collected at three historical gold mine sites and one background site in Nova Scotia, Canada. Total arsenic concentrations, determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), were dependent upon the classification of invertebrate. Arsenic species were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) ICP-MS and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Invertebrates were found by HPLC ICP-MS to contain predominantly arsenite and arsenate in methanol/water extracts, while XAS revealed that most arsenic is bound to sulfur in vivo. Examination of the spatial distribution of arsenic within an ant tissue highlighted the differences between exogenous and endogenous arsenic, as well as the extent to which arsenic is transformed upon ingestion. Similar arsenic speciation patterns for invertebrate groups were observed across sites. Trace amounts of arsenobetaine and arsenocholine were identified in slugs, ants, and spiders.

  19. Liquid-liquid extraction of arsenic, antimony, selenium and tellurium by zinc diethyldithiocarbamate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors report the solvent extraction, oxidation, reduction, extraction in the presence of iron, and reextraction of arsenic, antimony, selenium and tellurium. These processes were studied using radioactive tracers. (G.T.H.)

  20. Microbial dynamics and arsenic speciation in rice paddy soil under two water management practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenic (As) undergoes several microbial transformations, including oxidation/reduction, methylation/demethylation, and volatilization in soil, which impact As bioavailability. Different water management systems for rice cultivation alter soil-redox conditions and As biogeochemistry. Soil microbial ...

  1. Geochemical processes controlling fate and transport of arsenic in acid mine drainage (AMD) and natural systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hefa; Hu, Yuanan; Luo, Jian; Xu, Bin; Zhao, Jianfu

    2009-06-15

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is often accompanied with elevated concentrations of arsenic, in the forms of arsenite, As(III), and/or arsenate, As(V), due to the high affinity of arsenic for sulfide mineral ores. This review summarizes the major geochemical processes controlling the release, speciation, fate, and distribution of inorganic arsenic in mine drainage and natural systems. Arsenic speciation depends highly on redox potential and pH of the solution, and arsenite can be oxidized to the less toxic arsenate form. Homogeneous oxidation of arsenite occurs rather slowly while its heterogeneous oxidation on mineral surfaces can greatly enhance the reaction rates. Little evidence suggests that precipitation reaction limits the concentrations of arsenic in natural water, while co-precipitation may lead to rapid arsenic removal when large amount of iron hydroxides precipitate out of the aqueous phase upon neutralization of the mine drainage. Both arsenate and arsenite adsorb on common metal oxides and clay minerals through formation of inner-sphere and/or outer-sphere complexes, controlling arsenic concentration in natural water bodies. Arsenite adsorbs less strongly than arsenate in the typical pH range of natural water and is more mobile. Part of the adsorbed arsenic species can be exchanged by common anions (e.g., PO(4)(3-) and SO(4)(2-)), especially phosphate, which leads to their re-mobilization. Understanding the geochemistry of arsenic is helpful for predicting its mobility and fate in AMD and natural systems, and for designing of cost-effective remediation/treatment strategies to reduce the occurrence and risk of arsenic contamination. PMID:19070955

  2. ARSENIC REMOVAL TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR SINGLE FAMILY HOMES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The presentation provides information on POU and POE arsenic removal drinking water treatment systems. The presentation provides information on the arsenic rule, arsenic chemistry and arsenic treatment. The arsenic treatment options proposed for POU and POE treatment consist prim...

  3. Arsenic toxicity: the effects on plant metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PatrickFinnegan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The two forms inorganic arsenic, arsenate (AsV and arsenite (AsIII, are easily taken up by the cells of the plant root. Once in the cell, AsV can be readily converted to AsIII, the more toxic of the two forms. AsV and AsIII both disrupt plant metabolism, but through distinct mechanisms. AsV is a chemical analogue of phosphate that can disrupt at least some phosphate-dependent aspects of metabolism. AsV can be translocated across cellular membranes by phosphate transport proteins, leading to imbalances in phosphate supply. It can compete with phosphate during phosphorylation reactions, leading to the formation of AsV adducts that are often unstable and short-lived. As an example, the formation and rapid autohydrolysis of AsV-ADP sets in place a futile cycle that uncouples photophosphorylation and oxidative phosphorylation, decreasing the ability of cells to produce ATP and carry out normal metabolism. AsIII is a dithiol reactive compound that binds to and potentially inactivates enzymes containing closely spaced cysteine residues or other sulfhydryl-containing groups. Arsenic exposure generally induces the production of reactive oxygen species that can lead to the production of antioxidant metabolites and numerous enzymes involved in antioxidant defense. Oxidative carbon metabolism, amino acid and protein relationships, and nitrogen and sulfur assimilation pathways are also impacted by As exposure. These effects are reflected in a dramatic restructuring of amino acid pools in Arabidopsis thaliana upon AsV exposure. Readjustment of several metabolic pathways, such as glutathione production, has been shown to lead to increased arsenic tolerance in plants. Species- and cultivar-dependent variation in arsenic sensitivity and the remodeling of metabolite pools that occurs in response to As exposure gives hope that additional metabolic pathways associated with As tolerance will be identified.

  4. Effects of redox conditions on the control of arsenic mobility in shallow alluvial aquifers on the Venetian Plain (Italy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Venetian Plain is known for the occurrence of areas with high concentrations of arsenic in groundwater (greater than 400 μg/L). The study area represents the typical residential, industrial and agricultural features of most Western countries and is devoid of hydrothermal, volcanic or anthropogenic sources of arsenic. The aim of the study is to model the arsenic mobilization and the water–rock interaction by a complete hydrogeochemical investigation (analyses of filtered and unfiltered groundwater sediment mineralogy and geochemistry). The groundwater arsenic contamination and redox conditions are highly variable. Groundwaters with oxidizing and strongly reducing potentials have much lower arsenic concentrations than do mildly reducing waters. The grain size of the aquifer sediments includes gravels, sands and silty-clays. A continuous range of organic material concentrations is observed (from zero to 40%). The amount of sedimentary organic matter is highly correlated with the arsenic content of the sediments (up to 300 mg/kg), whereas no relationships are detectable between arsenic and other chemical parameters. The occurrence of arsenic minerals was observed as a peculiar feature under the scanning electron microscope. Arsenic and sulfur are the sole constituents of small tufts or thin crystals concentrated in small masses. These arsenic minerals were clearly observed in the peat sediments, in agreement with the geochemical modeling that requires very reducing conditions for their precipitation from the groundwater. The modeling suggests that, under oxidizing conditions, arsenic is adsorbed; moreover, a continuous decrease in the redox potential causes increasing desorption of arsenic. If the reducing conditions become more intense, the formation of As-S minerals would explain the lower concentration of arsenic measured in the strongly reducing groundwater. Even if As-sulfides are rare under low-temperature conditions, the anomalous abundance of reductants

  5. Effects of redox conditions on the control of arsenic mobility in shallow alluvial aquifers on the Venetian Plain (Italy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carraro, A. [Institute of Geosciences and Earth Resources, National Research Council (CNR) of Italy, Padova, Italy c/o Department of Geosciences, University of Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy); Fabbri, P. [Institute of Geosciences and Earth Resources, National Research Council (CNR) of Italy, Padova, Italy c/o Department of Geosciences, University of Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy); Department of Geosciences, University of Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy); Giaretta, A.; Peruzzo, L.; Tateo, F.; Tellini, F. [Institute of Geosciences and Earth Resources, National Research Council (CNR) of Italy, Padova, Italy c/o Department of Geosciences, University of Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2015-11-01

    The Venetian Plain is known for the occurrence of areas with high concentrations of arsenic in groundwater (greater than 400 μg/L). The study area represents the typical residential, industrial and agricultural features of most Western countries and is devoid of hydrothermal, volcanic or anthropogenic sources of arsenic. The aim of the study is to model the arsenic mobilization and the water–rock interaction by a complete hydrogeochemical investigation (analyses of filtered and unfiltered groundwater sediment mineralogy and geochemistry). The groundwater arsenic contamination and redox conditions are highly variable. Groundwaters with oxidizing and strongly reducing potentials have much lower arsenic concentrations than do mildly reducing waters. The grain size of the aquifer sediments includes gravels, sands and silty-clays. A continuous range of organic material concentrations is observed (from zero to 40%). The amount of sedimentary organic matter is highly correlated with the arsenic content of the sediments (up to 300 mg/kg), whereas no relationships are detectable between arsenic and other chemical parameters. The occurrence of arsenic minerals was observed as a peculiar feature under the scanning electron microscope. Arsenic and sulfur are the sole constituents of small tufts or thin crystals concentrated in small masses. These arsenic minerals were clearly observed in the peat sediments, in agreement with the geochemical modeling that requires very reducing conditions for their precipitation from the groundwater. The modeling suggests that, under oxidizing conditions, arsenic is adsorbed; moreover, a continuous decrease in the redox potential causes increasing desorption of arsenic. If the reducing conditions become more intense, the formation of As-S minerals would explain the lower concentration of arsenic measured in the strongly reducing groundwater. Even if As-sulfides are rare under low-temperature conditions, the anomalous abundance of reductants

  6. Mineralogical and Geochemical Constraints on Arsenic Mobility in a Philippine Geothermal Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chelo PASCUA; Tsutomu SATO; Glenn GOLLA

    2006-01-01

    Arsenic is usually associated with sulphide minerals formed in the geothermal environment.However, sulphide minerals are prone to dissolution after contact with meteoric water under surface oxidizing conditions. Secondary precipitates that form from the dissolution of the primary sulfides exert a greater influence on arsenic mobility in the geothermal environment. Fe-hydroxides have very good affinity with dissolved arsenate and are stable under most surface oxidizing conditions. Both amorphous silica directly precipitated from geothermal fluids and possibly a kaolinite alteration can host a small significant amount of arsenic. These silicates are also more stable under a wide range of pH and redox conditions.

  7. The effect of nanocrystalline magnetite size on arsenic removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.T. Mayo et al

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Higher environmental standards have made the removal of arsenic from water an important problem for environmental engineering. Iron oxide is a particularly interesting sorbent to consider for this application. Its magnetic properties allow relatively routine dispersal and recovery of the adsorbent into and from groundwater or industrial processing facilities; in addition, iron oxide has strong and specific interactions with both As(III and As(V. Finally, this material can be produced with nanoscale dimensions, which enhance both its capacity and removal. The objective of this study is to evaluate the potential arsenic adsorption by nanoscale iron oxides, specifically magnetite (Fe3O4 nanoparticles. We focus on the effect of Fe3O4 particle size on the adsorption and desorption behavior of As(III and As(V. The results show that the nanoparticle size has a dramatic effect on the adsorption and desorption of arsenic. As particle size is decreased from 300 to 12 nm the adsorption capacities for both As(III and As(V increase nearly 200 times. Interestingly, such an increase is more than expected from simple considerations of surface area and suggests that nanoscale iron oxide materials sorb arsenic through different means than bulk systems. The desorption process, however, exhibits some hysteresis with the effect becoming more pronounced with small nanoparticles. This hysteresis most likely results from a higher arsenic affinity for Fe3O4 nanoparticles. This work suggests that Fe3O4 nanocrystals and magnetic separations offer a promising method for arsenic removal.

  8. Understanding arsenic contamination of groundwater in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    underneath Bangladesh. Logically, arsenic is likely to be present as compounds within sediments comprising the aquifer systems and may be associated with iron oxides, organic matter, sulfides etc. High arsenic contamination of groundwater in Bangladesh is a serious issue requiring appropriate understanding of the phenomenon relating to the occurrence and release of arsenic in groundwater. The water supply challenge is as much one of quantity as of quality. In many regions of the world, it means bringing water closer to the house. Further, if the water supply is of good quality, it improves public health. Three developments of the past decades have spurred new approaches to water supply and public health. First, the capacity to analyze smaller amounts of constituents in water has advanced substantially. Second, the health status and life expectancy have risen substantially across most countries. Finally, health and epidemiological research have advanced as well, and we are now much better informed of longer-term health effects of prolonged ingestion of contaminants. There are, at present, few (if any) low-cost technology and affordable solutions for the treatment of arsenic in non-piped water systems. Proposed interventions in rural areas must include alternative water sources such as rainwater harvesting, more efficient use of non-contaminated wells in the area, treated surface water, selective well drilling to deeper aquifers, and simple arsenic removal techniques as they are found effective. Arsenic contamination apparently can occur in a wide variety of hydrogeological and socioeconomic conditions. Therefore, any mitigation strategy will have to be tailored to suit the local geological, institutional and financial situation. However, the experience with water supply across the world demonstrates that the offered technical options will be sustainable only when the local community, or the customers, are truly committed to it and are willing to contribute financially to (at

  9. Arsenic Geochemistry and Hydrostratigraphy in Midwestern U.S. Glacial Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, T.L.; Gotkowitz, M.B.; Bahr, J.M.; Attig, J.W.

    2010-01-01

    Arsenic concentrations exceeding the U.S. EPA's 10 ??g/L standard are common in glacial aquifers in the midwestern United States. Previous studies have indicated that arsenic occurs naturally in these aquifers in association with metal-(hydr)oxides and is released to groundwater under reducing conditions generated by microbial oxidation of organic matter. Despite this delineation of the arsenic source and mechanism of arsenic mobilization, identification of arsenic-impacted aquifers is hindered by the heterogeneous and discontinuous nature of glacial sediments. In much of the Midwest, the hydrostratigraphy of glacial deposits is not sufficiently characterized to predict where elevated arsenic concentrations are likely to occur. This case study from southeast Wisconsin presents a detailed characterization of local stratigraphy, hydrostratigraphy, and geochemistry of the Pleistocene glacial deposits and underlying Silurian dolomite. Analyses of a single core, water chemistry data, and well construction reports enabled identification of two aquifers separated by an organic-rich aquitard. The upper, unconfined aquifer provides potable water, whereas arsenic generally exceeds 10 ??g/L in the deeper aquifer. Although coring and detailed hydrostratigraphic characterization are often considered impractical, our results demonstrate that a single core improved interpretation of the complex lithology and hydrostratigraphy. This detailed characterization of hydrostratigraphy facilitated development of well construction guidelines and lays the ground work for further studies of the complex interactions among aquifer sediments, hydrogeology, water chemistry, and microbiology that lead to elevated arsenic in groundwater. Copyright ?? 2009 The Author(s). Journal compilation ?? 2009 National Ground Water Association.

  10. Arsenic removal from water by iron-sulphide minerals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In bench-scaled experiments, iron-sulphide minerals, pyrite and pyrrhotite are used as adsorbents for arsenic removal from As-spiked water of As5+ and As3+ species. The adsorption rate, efficiency, As-adsorption stability and the associated pH conditions have been examined. Observations indicate that these iron-sulphide minerals are very efficient to adsorb arsenic from water for both As5+ and As3+ species. Similar to other studies, As3+-adsorption shows a slower rate than As3+. The stability of the adsorbed arsenic seems closely related to the pH values of the solution. A lower pH level commonly less than 4.0 is required to protect the adsorbed arsenic from serious oxidation and backward release. Fining of the mineral powders and shaking of the solution during adsorption enhance the adsorption efficiency and adsorption rate. For practical use of the method presented in this study, the waste produced should be managed with great care to keep it from redistribution over water system. A further study of the protection for the waste from oxidation on real water systems will greatly enhance the application of the strong ability of arsenic adsorption by these minerals, which is observed from this study.

  11. Effects of water chemistry on arsenic removal from drinking water by electrocoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Wei; Pepping, Troy J; Banerji, Tuhin; Chaudhari, Sanjeev; Giammar, Daniel E

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to arsenic through drinking water poses a threat to human health. Electrocoagulation is a water treatment technology that involves electrolytic oxidation of anode materials and in-situ generation of coagulant. The electrochemical generation of coagulant is an alternative to using chemical coagulants, and the process can also oxidize As(III) to As(V). Batch electrocoagulation experiments were performed in the laboratory using iron electrodes. The experiments quantified the effects of pH, initial arsenic concentration and oxidation state, and concentrations of dissolved phosphate, silica and sulfate on the rate and extent of arsenic removal. The iron generated during electrocoagulation precipitated as lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH), except when dissolved silica was present, and arsenic was removed by adsorption to the lepidocrocite. Arsenic removal was slower at higher pH. When solutions initially contained As(III), a portion of the As(III) was oxidized to As(V) during electrocoagulation. As(V) removal was faster than As(III) removal. The presence of 1 and 4 mg/L phosphate inhibited arsenic removal, while the presence of 5 and 20 mg/L silica or 10 and 50 mg/L sulfate had no significant effect on arsenic removal. For most conditions examined in this study, over 99.9% arsenic removal efficiency was achieved. Electrocoagulation was also highly effective at removing arsenic from drinking water in field trials conducted in a village in Eastern India. By using operation times long enough to produce sufficient iron oxide for removal of both phosphate and arsenate, the performance of the systems in field trials was not inhibited by high phosphate concentrations. PMID:20800261

  12. Photooxidation of arsenic(III) to arsenic(V) on the surface of kaolinite clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wei; Wang, Yajie; Yu, Yingtan; Zhang, Xiangzhi; Li, Jinjun; Wu, Feng

    2015-10-01

    As one of the most toxic heavy metals, the oxidation of inorganic arsenic has drawn great attention among environmental scientists. However, little has been reported on the solar photochemical behavior of arsenic species on top-soil. In the present work, the influencing factors (pH, relative humidity (RH), humic acid (HA), trisodium citrate, and additional iron ions) and the contributions of reactive oxygen species (ROS, mainly HO and HO2/O2(-)) to photooxidation of As(III) to As(V) on kaolinite surfaces under UV irradiation (λ=365nm) were investigated. Results showed that lower pH facilitated photooxidation, and the photooxidation efficiency increased with the increase of RH and trisodium citrate. Promotion or inhibition of As(III) photooxidation by HA was observed at low or high dosages, respectively. Additional iron ions greatly promoted the photooxidation, but excessive amounts of Fe(2+) competed with As(III) for oxidation by ROS. Experiments on scavengers indicated that the HO radical was the predominant oxidant in this system. Experiments on actual soil surfaces proved the occurrence of As(III) photooxidation in real topsoil. This work demonstrates that the photooxidation process of As(III) on the soil surface should be taken into account when studying the fate of arsenic in natural soil newly polluted with acidic wastewater containing As(III). PMID:26456603

  13. Chronic arsenic poisoning from burning high-arsenic-containing coal in Guizhou, China.

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jie; Zheng, Baoshan; Aposhian, H. Vasken; Zhou, Yunshu; Chen, Ming-liang; Zhang, Aihua; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2002-01-01

    Arsenic is an environmental hazard and the reduction of drinking water arsenic levels is under consideration. People are exposed to arsenic not only through drinking water but also through arsenic-contaminated air and food. Here we report the health effects of arsenic exposure from burning high arsenic-containing coal in Guizhou, China. Coal in this region has undergone mineralization and thus produces high concentrations of arsenic. Coal is burned inside the home in open pits for daily cooki...

  14. Transplacental Arsenic Carcinogenesis in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Waalkes, Michael P.; Liu, Jie; Diwan, Bhalchandra A.

    2007-01-01

    Our work has focused on the carcinogenic effects of in utero arsenic exposure in mice. Our data show a short period of maternal exposure to inorganic arsenic in the drinking water is an effective, multi-tissue carcinogen in the adult offspring. These studies have been reproduced in three temporally separate studies using two different mouse strains. In these studies pregnant mice were treated with drinking water containing sodium arsenite at up to 85 ppm arsenic from day 8 to 18 of gestation,...

  15. In situ treatment of arsenic contaminated groundwater by aquifer iron coating: Experimental Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Xianjun; Wang, Yanxin; Pi, Kunfu; Liu, Chongxuan; Li, Junxia; Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Zhiqiang; Duan, Mengyu

    2015-09-15

    In situ arsenic removal from groundwater by an iron coating method has great potential to be a cost effective and simple groundwater remediation technique, especially in rural and remote areas where groundwater is used as the main source of drinking water. The in situ arsenic removal technique was first optimized by simulating arsenic removal in various quartz sand columns under anoxic conditions., Its effectiveness was then evaluated in an actual high-arsenic groundwater environment. The mechanism of arsenic removal by the iron coating was investigated under different conditions using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/X-ray absorption spectroscopy, an electron microprobe, and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy. A 4-step alternative cycle aquifer iron coating method was developed. A continuous injection of 5 mmol/L FeSO4 and 2.5 mmol/L NaClO for 96 hours can create a uniform coating of crystalline goethite on the surface of quartz sand in the columns without causing clogging. At a flow rate of 0.45 cm/min of the injection reagents (vi), the time for arsenic (as Na2HAsO4) to pass through the iron-coated quartz sand column was approximately 35 hours, which was much longer than that for tracer fluorescein sodium (approximately 2 hours). The retardation factor of arsenic was 23, and its adsorption capacity was 0.11 mol As per mol Fe, leading to an excellent arsenic removal. In situ arsenic removal from groundwater in an aquifer was achieved by simultaneous injections of As (V) and Fe (II) reagents. When the arsenic content in the groundwater was 233 μg/L, the aqueous phase arsenic was completely removed with an arsenic adsorption of 0.05 mol As per mol Fe. Arsenic fixation resulted from a process of adsorption/co-precipitation, in which arsenic and iron likely formed the arsenic-bearing iron mineral phases with poor crystallinity by way of bidentate binuclear complexes. Thus, the high arsenic removal efficiency of the technique likely resulted from the

  16. Microwave-assisted combustion synthesis of nano iron oxide/iron-coated activated carbon, anthracite, cellulose fiber, and silica, with arsenic adsorption studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combustion synthesis of iron oxide/iron coated carbons such as activated carbon, anthracite, cellulose fiber and silica is described. The reactions were carried out in alumina crucibles using a Panasonic kitchen microwave with inverter technology, and the reaction process was com...

  17. METHYLATION OF ARSENIC BY RECOMBINANT HUMAN AS3MT/287M AND AS3MT/287T POLYMORPHS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) is the key enzyme in the pathway for methylation of inorganic arsenic (iAs). AS3MT polymorphism is, in part, responsible for interindividual differences in iAs metabolism. AS3MT/M287T polymorphism that is found in ~ 10% of C...

  18. The potential biological mechanisms of arsenic-induced diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although epidemiologic studies carried out in Taiwan, Bangladesh, and Sweden have demonstrated a diabetogenic effect of arsenic, the mechanisms remain unclear and require further investigation. This paper reviewed the potential biological mechanisms of arsenic-induced diabetes mellitus based on the current knowledge of the biochemical properties of arsenic. Arsenate can substitute phosphate in the formation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and other phosphate intermediates involved in glucose metabolism, which could theoretically slow down the normal metabolism of glucose, interrupt the production of energy, and interfere with the ATP-dependent insulin secretion. However, the concentration of arsenate required for such reaction is high and not physiologically relevant, and these effects may only happen in acute intoxication and may not be effective in subjects chronically exposed to low-dose arsenic. On the other hand, arsenite has high affinity for sulfhydryl groups and thus can form covalent bonds with the disulfide bridges in the molecules of insulin, insulin receptors, glucose transporters (GLUTs), and enzymes involved in glucose metabolism (e.g., pyruvate dehydrogenase and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase). As a result, the normal functions of these molecules can be hampered. However, a direct effect on these molecules caused by arsenite at physiologically relevant concentrations seems unlikely. Recent evidence has shown that treatment of arsenite at lower and physiologically relevant concentrations can stimulate glucose transport, in contrary to an inhibitory effect exerted by phenylarsine oxide (PAO) or by higher doses of arsenite. Induction of oxidative stress and interferences in signal transduction or gene expression by arsenic or by its methylated metabolites are the most possible causes to arsenic-induced diabetes mellitus through mechanisms of induction of insulin resistance and β cell dysfunction. Recent studies have shown that, in subjects with chronic

  19. Theoretical predictions of arsenic and selenium species under atmospheric conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monahan-Pendergast, M.T.; Przybylek, M.; Lindblad, M.; Wilcox, J. [Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2008-03-15

    Thermochemical properties of arsenic and selenium species thought to be released into the atmosphere during the coal combustion were examined using ab initio methods. At various levels of theory, calculated geometries and vibrational frequencies of the species were compared with experimental data, where available. Through a comparison of equilibrium constants for a series of gaseous arsenic and selenium oxidation reactions involving OH and HO{sub 2}, five thermodynamically favored reactions were found. In addition, it was determined that all favored reactions were more likely to go to completion tinder tropospheric, rather than stratospheric, conditions.

  20. Physical, Chemical, and Biological Methods for the Removal of Arsenic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. T. Lim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic is a toxic metalloid which is widely distributed in nature. It is normally present as arsenate under oxic conditions while arsenite is predominant under reducing condition. The major discharges of arsenic in the environment are mainly due to natural sources such as aquifers and anthropogenic sources. It is known that arsenite salts are more toxic than arsenate as it binds with vicinal thiols in pyruvate dehydrogenase while arsenate inhibits the oxidative phosphorylation process. The common mechanisms for arsenic detoxification are uptaken by phosphate transporters, aquaglyceroporins, and active extrusion system and reduced by arsenate reductases via dissimilatory reduction mechanism. Some species of autotrophic and heterotrophic microorganisms use arsenic oxyanions for their regeneration of energy. Certain species of microorganisms are able to use arsenate as their nutrient in respiratory process. Detoxification operons are a common form of arsenic resistance in microorganisms. Hence, the use of bioremediation could be an effective and economic way to reduce this pollutant from the environment.

  1. Possible treatments for arsenic removal in Latin American waters for human consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litter, Marta I., E-mail: litter@cnea.gov.a [Gerencia Quimica, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, CP 1650, San Martin, Prov. de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Av. Rivadavia 1917, CP 1033, Ciudad de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Investigacion e Ingenieria Ambiental, Universidad Nacional de Gral. San Martin, Peatonal Belgrano 3563, 1o piso, CP 1650, San Martin, Prov. de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Morgada, Maria E. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Av. Rivadavia 1917, CP 1033, Ciudad de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bundschuh, Jochen [University of Applied Sciences, Institute of Applied Research, Moltkestr. 30, 76133 Karlsruhe (Germany); Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, University Road, Tainan City 701, Taiwan (China)

    2010-05-15

    Considering the toxic effects of arsenic, the World Health Organization recommends a maximum concentration of 10 mug L{sup -1} of arsenic in drinking water. Latin American populations present severe health problems due to consumption of waters with high arsenic contents. The physicochemical properties of surface and groundwaters are different from those of other more studied regions of the planet, and the problem is still publicly unknown. Methods for arsenic removal suitable to be applied in Latin American waters are here summarized and commented. Conventional technologies (oxidation, coagulation-coprecipitation, adsorption, reverse osmosis, use of ion exchangers) are described, but emphasis is made in emergent decentralized economical methods as the use of inexpensive natural adsorbents, solar light technologies or biological treatments, as essential to palliate the situation in poor, isolated and dispersed populations of Latin American regions. - Low-cost techniques should be urgently investigated to remove arsenic in drinking water in poor disperse rural and urban Latin American populations.

  2. Seasonal Arsenic Accumulation in Stream Sediments at a Groundwater Discharge Zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacKay, Allison A.; Gan, Ping; Yu, Ran;

    2014-01-01

    losses of arsenic and iron from bead column coatings at. depths below 2-6 cm. Batch incubations indicated iron releases from solids to be induced by biological reduction of iron (oxy)hydroxide solids. Congruent arsenic releases during incubation were limited by the high arsenic sorption capacity (0.......536 mg(As)/mg(Fe)) of unreacted iron oxide solids. The flooded spring (March-June) with high surface water flows showed the lowest arsenic and iron accumulation rates in the sediments. Comparisons of accumulation rates across a shoreline transect were consistent with greater rates at regions exposed...... above surface water levels for longer times and greater losses at locations submerged below surface water. Iron (oxy)hydroxide solids in the shallowest sediments likely serve as a passive barrier to sorb arsenic released to pore water at depth by biological iron reduction....

  3. Possible treatments for arsenic removal in Latin American waters for human consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considering the toxic effects of arsenic, the World Health Organization recommends a maximum concentration of 10 μg L-1 of arsenic in drinking water. Latin American populations present severe health problems due to consumption of waters with high arsenic contents. The physicochemical properties of surface and groundwaters are different from those of other more studied regions of the planet, and the problem is still publicly unknown. Methods for arsenic removal suitable to be applied in Latin American waters are here summarized and commented. Conventional technologies (oxidation, coagulation-coprecipitation, adsorption, reverse osmosis, use of ion exchangers) are described, but emphasis is made in emergent decentralized economical methods as the use of inexpensive natural adsorbents, solar light technologies or biological treatments, as essential to palliate the situation in poor, isolated and dispersed populations of Latin American regions. - Low-cost techniques should be urgently investigated to remove arsenic in drinking water in poor disperse rural and urban Latin American populations.

  4. Adsorptive removal of manganese, arsenic and iron from groundwater

    OpenAIRE

    Buamah, R.

    2009-01-01

    Arsenic, manganese and iron in drinking water at concentrations exceeding recommended guideline values pose health risks and aesthetic defects. Batch and pilot experiments on manganese adsorption equilibrium and kinetics using iron-oxide coated sand (IOCS), Aquamandix and other media have been investigated and modeled. Effect of manganese and iron loading on manganese removal and rate of oxidation of adsorbed iron and manganese have been studied. Aquamandix and IOCS demonstrated iron and mang...

  5. Use of MgO doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation for removing arsenic from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Robert C; Holt-Larese, Kathleen C; Bontchev, Ranko

    2013-08-13

    Systems and methods for use of magnesium hydroxide, either directly or through one or more precursors, doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation, for removing arsenic from drinking water, including water distribution systems. In one embodiment, magnesium hydroxide, Mg(OH).sub.2 (a strong adsorbent for arsenic) doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation is used to adsorb arsenic. The complex consisting of arsenic adsorbed on Mg(OH).sub.2 doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation is subsequently removed from the water by conventional means, including filtration, settling, skimming, vortexing, centrifugation, magnetic separation, or other well-known separation systems. In another embodiment, magnesium oxide, MgO, is employed, which reacts with water to form Mg(OH).sub.2. The resulting Mg(OH).sub.2 doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation, then adsorbs arsenic, as set forth above. The method can also be used to treat human or animal poisoning with arsenic.

  6. Atorvastatin ameliorates arsenic-induced hypertension and enhancement of vascular redox signaling in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarath, Thengumpallil Sasindran; Waghe, Prashantkumar; Gupta, Priyanka; Choudhury, Soumen; Kannan, Kandasamy [Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar, 243122 Bareilly, Uttar Pradesh (India); Pillai, Ayyappan Harikrishna [Division of Animal Biochemistry, Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar, 243122 Bareilly, Uttar Pradesh (India); Harikumar, Sankaran Kutty; Mishra, Santosh Kumar [Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar, 243122 Bareilly, Uttar Pradesh (India); Sarkar, Souvendra Nath, E-mail: snsarkar1911@rediffmail.com [Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar, 243122 Bareilly, Uttar Pradesh (India)

    2014-11-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure has been linked to elevated blood pressure and cardiovascular diseases, while statins reduce the incidence of cardiovascular disease predominantly by their low density lipoprotein-lowering effect. Besides, statins have other beneficial effects, including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. We evaluated whether atorvastatin, a widely used statin, can ameliorate arsenic-induced increase in blood pressure and alteration in lipid profile and also whether the amelioration could relate to altered NO and ROS signaling. Rats were exposed to sodium arsenite (100 ppm) through drinking water for 90 consecutive days. Atorvastatin (10 mg/kg bw, orally) was administered once daily during the last 30 days of arsenic exposure. On the 91st day, blood was collected for lipid profile. Western blot of iNOS and eNOS protein, NO and 3-nitrotyrosine production, Nox-4 and p22Phox mRNA expression, Nox activity, ROS generation, lipid peroxidation and antioxidants were evaluated in thoracic aorta. Arsenic increased systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure, while it decreased HDL-C and increased LDL-C, total cholesterol and triglycerides in serum. Arsenic down-regulated eNOS and up-regulated iNOS protein expression and increased basal NO and 3-nitrotyrosine level. Arsenic increased aortic Nox-4 and p22Phox mRNA expression, Nox activity, ROS generation and lipid peroxidation. Further, arsenic decreased the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase and depleted aortic GSH content. Atorvastatin regularized blood pressure, improved lipid profile and attenuated arsenic-mediated redox alterations. The results demonstrate that atorvastatin has the potential to ameliorate arsenic-induced hypertension by improving lipid profile, aortic NO signaling and restoring vascular redox homeostasis. - Highlights: • Arsenic increased systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure and caused dyslipidemia. • Arsenic increased

  7. Atorvastatin ameliorates arsenic-induced hypertension and enhancement of vascular redox signaling in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic arsenic exposure has been linked to elevated blood pressure and cardiovascular diseases, while statins reduce the incidence of cardiovascular disease predominantly by their low density lipoprotein-lowering effect. Besides, statins have other beneficial effects, including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. We evaluated whether atorvastatin, a widely used statin, can ameliorate arsenic-induced increase in blood pressure and alteration in lipid profile and also whether the amelioration could relate to altered NO and ROS signaling. Rats were exposed to sodium arsenite (100 ppm) through drinking water for 90 consecutive days. Atorvastatin (10 mg/kg bw, orally) was administered once daily during the last 30 days of arsenic exposure. On the 91st day, blood was collected for lipid profile. Western blot of iNOS and eNOS protein, NO and 3-nitrotyrosine production, Nox-4 and p22Phox mRNA expression, Nox activity, ROS generation, lipid peroxidation and antioxidants were evaluated in thoracic aorta. Arsenic increased systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure, while it decreased HDL-C and increased LDL-C, total cholesterol and triglycerides in serum. Arsenic down-regulated eNOS and up-regulated iNOS protein expression and increased basal NO and 3-nitrotyrosine level. Arsenic increased aortic Nox-4 and p22Phox mRNA expression, Nox activity, ROS generation and lipid peroxidation. Further, arsenic decreased the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase and depleted aortic GSH content. Atorvastatin regularized blood pressure, improved lipid profile and attenuated arsenic-mediated redox alterations. The results demonstrate that atorvastatin has the potential to ameliorate arsenic-induced hypertension by improving lipid profile, aortic NO signaling and restoring vascular redox homeostasis. - Highlights: • Arsenic increased systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure and caused dyslipidemia. • Arsenic increased

  8. Understanding arsenic carcinogenicity by the use of animal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although numerous epidemiological studies have indicated that human arsenic exposure is associated with increased incidences of bladder, liver, skin, and lung cancers, limited attempts have been made to understand mechanisms of carcinogenicity using animal models. Dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), an organic arsenic compound, is a major metabolite of ingested inorganic arsenics in mammals. Recent in vitro studies have proven DMA to be a potent clastogenic agent, capable of inducing DNA damage including double strand breaks and cross-link formation. In our attempts to clarify DMA carcinogenicity, we have recently shown carcinogenic effects of DMA and its related metabolites using various experimental protocols in rats and mice: (1) a multi-organ promotion bioassay in rats; (2) a two-stage promotion bioassay by DMA of rat urinary bladder and liver carcinogenesis; (3) a 2-year carcinogenicity test of DMA in rats; (4) studies on the effects of DMA on lung carcinogenesis in rats; (5) promotion of skin carcinogenesis by DMA in keratin (K6)/ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) transgenic mice; (6) carcinogenicity of DMA in p53(+/-) knockout and Mmh/8-OXOG-DNA glycolase (OGG1) mutant mice; (7) promoting effects of DMA and related organic arsenicals in rat liver; (8) promoting effects of DMA and related organic arsenicals in a rat multi-organ carcinogenesis test; and (9) 2-year carcinogenicity tests of monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and trimethylarsine oxide (TMAO) in rats. The results revealed that the adverse effects of arsenic occurred either by promoting and initiating carcinogenesis. These data, as covered in the present review, suggest that several mechanisms may be involved in arsenic carcinogenesis

  9. Arsenic and fluoride in the groundwater of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armienta, M A; Segovia, N

    2008-08-01

    Concentrations of arsenic and fluoride above Mexican drinking water standards have been detected in aquifers of various areas of Mexico. This contamination has been found to be mainly caused by natural sources. However, the specific processes releasing these toxic elements into groundwater have been determined in a few zones only. Many studies, focused on arsenic-related health effects, have been performed at Comarca Lagunera in northern México. High concentrations of fluoride in water were also found in this area. The origin of the arsenic there is still controversial. Groundwater in active mining areas has been polluted by both natural and anthropogenic sources. Arsenic-rich minerals contaminate the fractured limestone aquifer at Zimapán, Central México. Tailings and deposits smelter-rich fumes polluted the shallow granular aquifer. Arsenic contamination has also been reported in the San Antonio-El Triunfo mining zone, southern Baja California, and Santa María de la Paz, in San Luis Potosí state. Even in the absence of mining activities, hydrogeochemistry and statistical techniques showed that arsenopyrite oxidation may also contaminate water, as in the case of the Independencia aquifer in the Mexican Altiplano. High concentrations of arsenic have also been detected in geothermal areas like Los Azufres, Los Humeros, and Acoculco. Prevalence of dental fluorosis was revealed by epidemiological studies in Aguascalientes and San Luis Potosí states. Presence of fluoride in water results from dissolution of acid-volcanic rocks. In Mexico, groundwater supplies most drinking water. Current knowledge and the geology of Mexico indicate the need to include arsenic and fluoride determinations in groundwater on a routine basis, and to develop interdisciplinary studies to assess the contaminant's sources in all enriched areas. PMID:18335171

  10. Arsenite-oxidizing bacteria exhibiting plant growth promoting traits isolated from the rhizosphere of Oryza sativa L.: Implications for mitigation of arsenic contamination in paddies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Suvendu; Jean, Jiin-Shuh; Chou, Mon-Lin; Rathod, Jagat; Liu, Chia-Chuan

    2016-01-25

    Arsenite-oxidizing bacteria exhibiting plant growth promoting (PGP) traits can have the advantages of reducing As-uptake by rice and promoting plant growth in As-stressed soil. A gram-positive bacterium Bacillus flexus ASO-6 resistant to high levels of As (32 and 280 mM for arsenite and arsenate, respectively) and exhibiting elevated rates of As(III) oxidation (Vmax=1.34 μM min(-1) 10(-7) cell) was isolated from rhizosphere of rice. The presence of aoxB gene and exhibition of As(III)-oxidase enzyme activity of this strain was observed. The ability of the strain to produce siderophore, IAA, ACC-deaminase and to solubilize phosphate was verified. The rice seed treated with the strain exhibited significantly improved seed germination and seedling vigor compared with the un-inoculated seeds. The bacterial inoculation significantly increased root biomass, straw yield, grain yield, chlorophyll and carotenoid in the rice plant. Moreover, As uptake from root to shoot and As accumulation in straw and grain decreased significantly as a result of the bacterial inoculation. Noteworthy, the inoculation effect is more prominent in non-flooded soil than it is in flooded soil. Owing to its wide action spectrum, this As(III)-oxidizing PGPB could serve as a potential bio-inoculant for mitigation of As in paddies and sustainable rice production in As-contaminated areas. PMID:26448489

  11. A Phytoremediation Strategy for Arsenic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meagher, Richard B.

    2005-06-01

    A Phytoremediation Strategy for Arsenic Progress Report May, 2005 Richard B. Meagher Principal Investigator Arsenic pollution affects the health of several hundred millions of people world wide, and an estimated 10 million Americans have unsafe levels of arsenic in their drinking water. However, few environmentally sound remedies for cleaning up arsenic contaminated soil and water have been proposed. Phytoremediation, the use of plants to extract and sequester environmental pollutants, is one new technology that offers an ecologically sound solution to a devastating problem. We propose that it is less disruptive to the environment to harvest and dispose of several thousand pounds per acre of contaminated aboveground plant material, than to excavate and dispose of 1 to 5 million pounds of contaminated soil per acre (assumes contamination runs 3 ft deep). Our objective is to develop a genetics-based phytoremediation strategy for arsenic removal that can be used in any plant species. This strategy requires the enhanced expression of several transgenes from diverse sources. Our working hypothesis is that organ-specific expression of several genes controlling the transport, electrochemical state, and binding of arsenic will result in the efficient extraction and hyperaccumulation of arsenic into aboveground plant tissues. This hypothesis is supported by theoretical arguments and strong preliminary data. We proposed six Specific Aims focused on testing and developing this arsenic phytoremediation strategy. During the first 18 months of the grant we made significant progress on five Specific Aims and began work on the sixth as summarized below. Specific Aim 1: Enhance plant arsenic resistance and greatly expand sinks for arsenite by expressing elevated levels of thiol-rich, arsenic-binding peptides. Hyperaccumulation of arsenic depends upon making plants that are both highly tolerant to arsenic and that have the capacity to store large amounts of arsenic aboveground

  12. Arsenic speciation in edible mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nearing, Michelle M; Koch, Iris; Reimer, Kenneth J

    2014-12-16

    The fruiting bodies, or mushrooms, of terrestrial fungi have been found to contain a high proportion of the nontoxic arsenic compound arsenobetaine (AB), but data gaps include a limited phylogenetic diversity of the fungi for which arsenic speciation is available, a focus on mushrooms with higher total arsenic concentrations, and the unknown formation and role of AB in mushrooms. To address these, the mushrooms of 46 different fungus species (73 samples) over a diverse range of phylogenetic groups were collected from Canadian grocery stores and background and arsenic-contaminated areas. Total arsenic was determined using ICP-MS, and arsenic speciation was determined using HPLC-ICP-MS and complementary X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The major arsenic compounds in mushrooms were found to be similar among phylogenetic groups, and AB was found to be the major compound in the Lycoperdaceae and Agaricaceae families but generally absent in log-growing mushrooms, suggesting the microbial community may influence arsenic speciation in mushrooms. The high proportion of AB in mushrooms with puffball or gilled morphologies may suggest that AB acts as an osmolyte in certain mushrooms to help maintain fruiting body structure. The presence of an As(III)-sulfur compound, for the first time in mushrooms, was identified in the XAS analysis. Except for Agaricus sp. (with predominantly AB), inorganic arsenic predominated in most of the store-bought mushrooms (albeit with low total arsenic concentrations). Should inorganic arsenic predominate in these mushrooms from contaminated areas, the risk to consumers under these circumstances should be considered. PMID:25417842

  13. Bacterial activities driving arsenic speciation and solubility in marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia-Brunet, F.; Seby, F.; Crouzet, C.; Joulian, C.; Mamindy-Pajany, Y.; Guezennec, A. G.; Hurel, C.; Marmier, N.; Bataillard, P.

    2012-04-01

    include dissolution of FeS (which confers to the muddy sediment its deep dark color), oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III), oxidation of As(III) to As(V), oxidation of S(-II) to S°, S(VI) and maybe other intermediate species, adsorption of As(V) onto fresh iron oxides. Bacterial activity tests applied to the crude sediments indicated that As(III)-oxidizing and As(V)-reducing micro-organisms have the potential to be active at both sites. Detection of aoxB and arrA genes, respectively specific to As(III)-oxidation and respiratory As(V)-reduction, revealed the presence of diverse bacterial communities able to contribute to As transformation in both St-Mandrier and l'Estaque marina sediments. As(III)-oxidizing bacteria probably contribute to the biogeochemical stabilization of arsenic, wherever electron acceptors are available. Whereas reducing conditions prevail in organic carbon-rich marina sediment, bacteria able to oxidize As(III) are present and can be rapidly active as soon as electron acceptors are available. The present study showed that arsenic, which inorganic forms As(III) and As(V) are particularly toxic, is one of the most mobile pollutants in polluted marina sediments. The biogeochemical reactions governing its mobility should thus be considered in the management of sediment dredging operations. This work was performed in the framework of ASEDMAR project supported by the French National Research Agency, under reference "2008 CESA-003".

  14. Arsenic toxicity at low doses: epidemiological and mode of action considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current approaches to risk assessment typically assume a linear dose-response for mutagenic compounds that directly interact with DNA or when the carcinogenic mechanism is unknown. Because the mode of action of arsenic-induced carcinogenesis is not well established, recent dose-response assessments for arsenic have assumed linearity at low doses despite evidence that arsenic is not a direct-acting mutagen. Several modes of action, including generation of oxidative stress, perturbation of DNA methylation patterns, inhibition of DNA repair, and modulation of signal transduction pathways, have been proposed to characterize arsenic's toxicity. It is probable that these mechanisms do not act in isolation, but overlap, and contribute to the complex nature of arsenic-induced carcinogenesis. All of the proposed mechanisms are likely to be nonlinear at low does. Furthermore, studies of populations outside the US exposed to arsenic in drinking water show increases in cancer only at relatively high concentrations, that is, concentrations in drinking water of several hundred micrograms per liter (μg/l). Studies in the US of populations exposed to average concentrations in drinking water up to about 190 μg/l do not provide evidence of increased cancer. Consideration of arsenic's plausible mechanisms and evidence from epidemiological studies support the use of nonlinear methods, either via biologically based modeling or use of a margin-of-exposure analysis, to characterize arsenic risks

  15. Metagenomic study of red biofilms from Diamante Lake reveals ancient arsenic bioenergetics in haloarchaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rascovan, Nicolás; Maldonado, Javier; Vazquez, Martín P; Eugenia Farías, María

    2016-02-01

    Arsenic metabolism is proposed to be an ancient mechanism in microbial life. Different bacteria and archaea use detoxification processes to grow under high arsenic concentration. Some of them are also able to use arsenic as a bioenergetic substrate in either anaerobic arsenate respiration or chemolithotrophic growth on arsenite. However, among the archaea, bioenergetic arsenic metabolism has only been found in the Crenarchaeota phylum. Here we report the discovery of haloarchaea (Euryarchaeota phylum) biofilms forming under the extreme environmental conditions such as high salinity, pH and arsenic concentration at 4589 m above sea level inside a volcano crater in Diamante Lake, Argentina. Metagenomic analyses revealed a surprisingly high abundance of genes used for arsenite oxidation (aioBA) and respiratory arsenate reduction (arrCBA) suggesting that these haloarchaea use arsenic compounds as bioenergetics substrates. We showed that several haloarchaea species, not only from this study, have all genes required for these bioenergetic processes. The phylogenetic analysis of aioA showed that haloarchaea sequences cluster in a novel and monophyletic group, suggesting that the origin of arsenic metabolism in haloarchaea is ancient. Our results also suggest that arsenite chemolithotrophy likely emerged within the archaeal lineage. Our results give a broad new perspective on the haloarchaea metabolism and shed light on the evolutionary history of arsenic bioenergetics. PMID:26140530

  16. Mechanism of erythrocyte death in human population exposed to arsenic through drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic contamination in drinking water is one of the biggest natural calamities, which has become an imperative threat to human health throughout the world. Abbreviation of erythrocyte lifespan leading to the development of anemia is a common sequel in arsenic exposed population. This study was undertaken to explore the mechanism of cell death in human erythrocytes during chronic arsenic exposure. Results revealed transformation of smooth discoid red cells into evaginated echinocytic form in the exposed individuals. Further distortion converted reversible echinocytes to irreversible spheroechinocytes. Arsenic toxicity increased membrane microviscosity along with an elevation of cholesterol/phospholipid ratio, which hampered the flexibility of red cell membrane and made them less deformable. Significant increase in the binding of merocyanine 540 with erythrocyte membrane due to arsenic exposure indicated disruption of lipid packing in the outer leaflet of the cell membrane resulting from altered transbilayer phospholipid asymmetry. Arsenic induced eryptosis was characterized by cell shrinkage and exposure of phosphatidylserine at the cell surface. Furthermore, metabolic starvation with depletion of cellular ATP triggered apoptotic removal of erythrocytes from circulation. Significant decrease in reduced glutathione content indicating defective antioxidant capacity was coupled with enhancement of malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl levels, which pointed to oxidative damage to erythrocyte membrane. Arsenic toxicity intervened into red cell membrane integrity eventually leading to membrane destabilization and hemoglobin release. The study depicted the involvement of both erythrophagocytosis and hemolysis in the destruction of human erythrocytes during chronic arsenic exposure

  17. Arsenic-induced alteration in the expression of genes related to type 2 diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic exposure to high concentrations of arsenic in drinking water is associated with an increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes. The present revision focuses on the effect of arsenic on tissues that participate directly in glucose homeostasis, integrating the most important published information about the impairment of the expression of genes related to type 2 diabetes by arsenic as one of the possible mechanisms by which it leads to the disease. Many factors are involved in the manner in which arsenic contributes to the occurrence of diabetes. The reviewed studies suggest that arsenic might increase the risk for type 2 diabetes via multiple mechanisms, affecting a cluster of regulated events, which in conjunction trigger the disease. Arsenic affects insulin sensitivity in peripheral tissue by modifying the expression of genes involved in insulin resistance and shifting away cells from differentiation to the proliferation pathway. In the liver arsenic disturbs glucose production, whereas in pancreatic beta-cells arsenic decreases insulin synthesis and secretion and reduces the expression of antioxidant enzymes. The consequences of these changes in gene expression include the reduction of insulin secretion, induction of oxidative stress in the pancreas, alteration of gluconeogenesis, abnormal proliferation and differentiation pattern of muscle and adipocytes as well as peripheral insulin resistance

  18. Heterogeneous arsenic enrichment in meta-sedimentary rocks in central Maine, United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Shea, Beth, E-mail: bethoshea@sandiego.edu [Department of Marine Science and Environmental Studies, University of San Diego, 5998 Alcala Park, San Diego, CA 92110 (United States); Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, 61 Route 9W, Palisades, NY 10964 (United States); Stransky, Megan; Leitheiser, Sara [Department of Marine Science and Environmental Studies, University of San Diego, 5998 Alcala Park, San Diego, CA 92110 (United States); Brock, Patrick [School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Queens College, City University of New York, 65-30 Kissena Blvd., Flushing, NY 11367 (United States); Marvinney, Robert G. [Maine Geological Survey, 93 State House Station, Augusta, ME 04333 (United States); Zheng, Yan [School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Queens College, City University of New York, 65-30 Kissena Blvd., Flushing, NY 11367 (United States); Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, 61 Route 9W, Palisades, NY 10964 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Arsenic is enriched up to 28 times the average crustal abundance of 4.8 mg kg{sup −1} for meta-sedimentary rocks of two adjacent formations in central Maine, USA where groundwater in the bedrock aquifer frequently contains elevated As levels. The Waterville Formation contains higher arsenic concentrations (mean As 32.9 mg kg{sup −1}, median 12.1 mg kg{sup −1}, n = 38) than the neighboring Vassalboro Group (mean As 19.1 mg kg{sup −1}, median 6.0 mg kg{sup −1}, n = 38). The Waterville Formation is a pelitic meta-sedimentary unit with abundant pyrite either visible or observed by scanning electron microprobe. Concentrations of As and S are strongly correlated (r = 0.88, p < 0.05) in the low grade phyllite rocks, and arsenic is detected up to 1944 mg kg{sup −1} in pyrite measured by electron microprobe. In contrast, statistically significant (p < 0.05) correlations between concentrations of As and S are absent in the calcareous meta-sediments of the Vassalboro Group, consistent with the absence of arsenic-rich pyrite in the protolith. Metamorphism converts the arsenic-rich pyrite to arsenic-poor pyrrhotite (mean As 1 mg kg{sup −1}, n = 15) during de-sulfidation reactions: the resulting metamorphic rocks contain arsenic but little or no sulfur indicating that the arsenic is now in new mineral hosts. Secondary weathering products such as iron oxides may host As, yet the geochemical methods employed (oxidative and reductive leaching) do not conclusively indicate that arsenic is associated only with these. Instead, silicate minerals such as biotite and garnet are present in metamorphic zones where arsenic is enriched (up to 130.8 mg kg{sup −1} As) where S is 0%. Redistribution of already variable As in the protolith during metamorphism and contemporary water–rock interaction in the aquifers, all combine to contribute to a spatially heterogeneous groundwater arsenic distribution in bedrock aquifers. - Highlights: • Arsenic is enriched up to 138 mg kg

  19. Heterogeneous arsenic enrichment in meta-sedimentary rocks in central Maine, United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic is enriched up to 28 times the average crustal abundance of 4.8 mg kg−1 for meta-sedimentary rocks of two adjacent formations in central Maine, USA where groundwater in the bedrock aquifer frequently contains elevated As levels. The Waterville Formation contains higher arsenic concentrations (mean As 32.9 mg kg−1, median 12.1 mg kg−1, n = 38) than the neighboring Vassalboro Group (mean As 19.1 mg kg−1, median 6.0 mg kg−1, n = 38). The Waterville Formation is a pelitic meta-sedimentary unit with abundant pyrite either visible or observed by scanning electron microprobe. Concentrations of As and S are strongly correlated (r = 0.88, p < 0.05) in the low grade phyllite rocks, and arsenic is detected up to 1944 mg kg−1 in pyrite measured by electron microprobe. In contrast, statistically significant (p < 0.05) correlations between concentrations of As and S are absent in the calcareous meta-sediments of the Vassalboro Group, consistent with the absence of arsenic-rich pyrite in the protolith. Metamorphism converts the arsenic-rich pyrite to arsenic-poor pyrrhotite (mean As 1 mg kg−1, n = 15) during de-sulfidation reactions: the resulting metamorphic rocks contain arsenic but little or no sulfur indicating that the arsenic is now in new mineral hosts. Secondary weathering products such as iron oxides may host As, yet the geochemical methods employed (oxidative and reductive leaching) do not conclusively indicate that arsenic is associated only with these. Instead, silicate minerals such as biotite and garnet are present in metamorphic zones where arsenic is enriched (up to 130.8 mg kg−1 As) where S is 0%. Redistribution of already variable As in the protolith during metamorphism and contemporary water–rock interaction in the aquifers, all combine to contribute to a spatially heterogeneous groundwater arsenic distribution in bedrock aquifers. - Highlights: • Arsenic is enriched up to 138 mg kg−1 in meta-sedimentary rocks in central Maine.

  20. Toxicological and biochemical responses of the earthworm Eisenia fetida exposed to contaminated soil: Effects of arsenic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhifeng; Cui, Zhaojie; Liu, Lei; Ma, Qianchi; Xu, Xiaoming

    2016-07-01

    Arsenic is a pollutant that can be detected in different chemical forms in soil. However, the toxicological effects of different arsenic species on organisms have received little attention. In this study, we exposed earthworms Eisenia fetida to artificial soils contaminated by arsenite [As(III)], arsenate [As(V)], monomethylarsonate (MMA) and dimethylarsinate (DMA) for 28 and 56 days. Three biomarkers including lipid peroxidation (LPO), metallothioneins (MTs) and lysosomal membrane stability (LMS) were analyzed in the organisms. In addition, the contents of total arsenic and arsenic species in earthworms were also determined to investigate the effects of bioaccumulation and biotransformation of arsenic on biomarkers and to evaluate the dose-response relationships. The results showed that the relationship between the three biomarkers and the two inorganic arsenic species were dose dependent, and the correlation levels between the biomarkers and As(III) were higher than that between the biomarkers and As(V). Trivalent arsenic species shows more toxicity than pentavalent arsenic on the earthworms at molecular and subcellular level, including oxidative damage, MTs induction and lysosomal membrane damage. The toxicity of MMA and DMA was lower than inorganic arsenic species. However, the occurrence of demethylation of organic arsenics could lead to the generation of highly toxic inorganic arsenics and induce adverse effects on organisms. The biotransformation of highly toxic inorganic arsenics to the less toxic organic species in the earthworms was also validated in this study. The biomarker responses of the earthworm to different arsenic species found in this study could be helpful in future environment monitoring programs. PMID:27045633

  1. Arsenic-induced Aurora-A activation contributes to chromosome instability and tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chin-Han; Tseng, Ya-Shih; Yang, Chao-Chun; Kao, Yu-Ting; Sheu, Hamm-Ming; Liu, Hsiao-Sheng

    2013-11-01

    Arsenic may cause serious environmental pollution and is a serious industrial problem. Depending on the dosage, arsenic may trigger the cells undergoing either proliferation or apoptosis-related cell death. Because of lack of the proper animal model to study arsenic induced tumorigenesis, the accurate risk level of arsenic exposure has not been determined. Arsenic shows genotoxic effect on human beings who uptake water contaminated by arsenic. Chromosome aberration is frequently detected in arsenic exposure-related diseases and is associated with increased oxidative stress and decreased DNA repairing activity, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Aurora-A is a mitotic kinase, over-expression of Aurora-A leads to centrosome amplification, chromosomal instability and cell transformation. We revealed that Aurora-A is over-expressed in the skin and bladder cancer patients from blackfoot-disease endemic areas. Our cell line studies reveal that arsenic exposure between 0.5 μM and 1 μM for 2-7 days are able to induce Aurora-A expression and activation based on promoter activity, RNA and protein analysis. Aurora-A overexpression further increases the frequency of unsymmetrical chromosome segregation through centrosome amplification followed by cell population accumulated at S phase in immortalized keratinocyte (HaCaT) and uroepithelial cells (E7). Furthermore, Aurora-A over-expression was sustained for 1-4 weeks by chronic treatment of immortalized bladder and skin cells with NaAsO2. Aurora-A promoter methylation and gene amplification was not detected in the long-term arsenic treated E7 cells. Furthermore, the expression level of E2F1 transcription factor (E2F1) is increased in the presence of arsenic, and arsenic-related Aurora-A over-expression is transcriptionally regulated by E2F1. We further demonstrated that overexpression of Aurora-A and mutant Ha-ras or Aurora-A and mutant p53 may act additively to trigger arsenic-related bladder and skin cancer

  2. Arsenic Is A Genotoxic Carcinogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenic is a recognized human carcinogen; however, there is controversy over whether or not it should be considered a genotoxic carcinogen. Many possible modes of action have been proposed on how arsenic induces cancer, including inhibiting DNA repair, altering methylation patter...

  3. Redox proteomics changes in the fungal pathogen Trichosporon asahii on arsenic exposure: identification of protein responses to metal-induced oxidative stress in an environmentally-sampled isolate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidra Ilyas

    Full Text Available Trichosporon asahii is a yeast pathogen implicated in opportunistic infections. Cultures of an isolate collected from industrial wastewater were exposed for 2 days to 100 mg/L sodium arsenite (NaAsO2 and cadmium (CdCl2. Both metals reduced glutathione transferase (GST activity but had no effect on superoxide dismutase or catalase. NaAsO2 exposure increased glutathione reductase activity while CdCl2 had no effect. Protein thiols were labeled with 5-iodoacetamido fluorescein followed by one dimensional electrophoresis which revealed extensive protein thiol oxidation in response to CdCl2 treatment but thiol reduction in response to NaAsO2. Two dimensional electrophoresis analyses showed that the intensity of some protein spots was enhanced on treatment as judged by SameSpots image analysis software. In addition, some spots showed decreased IAF fluorescence suggesting thiol oxidation. Selected spots were excised and tryptic digested for identification by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. Twenty unique T. asahii proteins were identified of which the following proteins were up-regulated in response to NaAsO2: 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase, phospholipase B, alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase, ATP synthase alpha chain, 20S proteasome beta-type subunit Pre3p and the hypothetical proteins A1Q1_08001, A1Q2_03020, A1Q1_06950, A1Q1_06913. In addition, the following showed decreased thiol-associated fluorescence consistent with thiol oxidation; aconitase; aldehyde reductase I; phosphoglycerate kinase; translation elongation factor 2; heat shock protein 70 and hypothetical protein A1Q2_04745. Some proteins showed both increase in abundance coupled with decrease in IAF fluorescence; 3-hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA hydrolase; homoserine dehydrogenase Hom6 and hypothetical proteins A1Q2_03020 and A1Q1_00754. Targets implicated in redox response included 10 unique metabolic enzymes, heat shock proteins, a component of the 20S proteasome and translation elongation factor 2. These data

  4. Remediation of arsenic contaminated soil by coupling oxalate washing with subsequent ZVI/Air treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Menghua; Ye, Yuanyao; Chen, Jing; Lu, Xiaohua

    2016-02-01

    The application of a novel coupled process with oxalate washing and subsequent zero-valent iron (ZVI)/Air treatment for remediation of arsenic contaminated soil was investigated in the present study. Oxalate is biodegradable and widely present in the environment. With addition of 0.1 mol L(-1) oxalate under circumneutral condition, 83.7% and 52.6% of arsenic could be removed from a spiked kaolin and an actual contaminated soil respectively. Much more oxalate adsorption on the actual soil was attributed to the higher soil organic matter and clay content. Interestingly, oxalate retained in the washing effluent could act as an organic ligand to promote the oxidation efficiency of ZVI/Air at near neutral pH. Compared with the absence of oxalate, much more As(III) was oxidized. Arsenic was effectively adsorbed on iron (hydr)oxides as the consumption of oxalate and the increase of pH value. For the actual soil washing effluent, about 94.9% of total arsenic was removed after 120 min's treatment without pH adjustment. It has been demonstrated that As(V) was the dominant arsenic speciation adsorbed on iron (hydr)oxides. This study provides a promising alternative for remediation of arsenic contaminated soil in view of its low cost and environmental benign. PMID:26476769

  5. Facile one-pot and rapid synthesis of surfactant-free Au-reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite for trace arsenic (III) detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A very simple and effective approach of fabricating Au-reduced graphene oxide (Au-RGO) nanocomposite is herein reported. The nanocomposite was synthesized through a one-pot in situ reduction of graphene oxide (GO) and HAuCl4 under ultraviolet (UV) irradiation without using any additional chemical reducing agents, capping agents, stabilizer or surfactant. The surface characterization with various techniques such as UV–vis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that GO was effectively reduced and Au nanoparticles with a uniform size were well dispersed on the surface of RGO. This UV light assisted synthesis of Au-RGO nanocomposite is expected to be a universal and clean approach for the formation of various RGO-based nanocomposites. Significantly, the as-prepared nanocomposite possessed high activity in the redox behavior of As (III). Based on the Au-RGO nanocomposite modified electrode, a simple, sensitivity and selective sensing platform for the detection of As (III) was developed. Under optimum conditions, a detection range of 0.3–20 ppb and a low detection limit of 0.1 ppb were obtained, which is found to be well below the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines of 10 ppb

  6. Heterogeneous arsenic enrichment in meta-sedimentary rocks in central Maine, United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Beth; Stransky, Megan; Leitheiser, Sara; Brock, Patrick; Marvinney, Robert G; Zheng, Yan

    2015-02-01

    Arsenic is enriched up to 28 times the average crustal abundance of 4.8 mg kg(-1) for meta-sedimentary rocks of two adjacent formations in central Maine, USA where groundwater in the bedrock aquifer frequently contains elevated As levels. The Waterville Formation contains higher arsenic concentrations (mean As 32.9 mg kg(-1), median 12.1 mg kg(-1), n=38) than the neighboring Vassalboro Group (mean As 19.1 mg kg(-1), median 6.0 mg kg(-1), n=38). The Waterville Formation is a pelitic meta-sedimentary unit with abundant pyrite either visible or observed by scanning electron microprobe. Concentrations of As and S are strongly correlated (r=0.88, ppyrrhotite (mean As 1 mg kg(-1), n=15) during de-sulfidation reactions: the resulting metamorphic rocks contain arsenic but little or no sulfur indicating that the arsenic is now in new mineral hosts. Secondary weathering products such as iron oxides may host As, yet the geochemical methods employed (oxidative and reductive leaching) do not conclusively indicate that arsenic is associated only with these. Instead, silicate minerals such as biotite and garnet are present in metamorphic zones where arsenic is enriched (up to 130.8 mg kg(-1) As) where S is 0%. Redistribution of already variable As in the protolith during metamorphism and contemporary water-rock interaction in the aquifers, all combine to contribute to a spatially heterogeneous groundwater arsenic distribution in bedrock aquifers. PMID:24861530

  7. Protective effects of plasma alpha-tocopherols on the risk of inorganic arsenic-related urothelial carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic plays an important role in producing oxidative stress in cultured cells. To investigate the interaction between high oxidative stress and low arsenic methylation capacity on arsenic carcinogenesis, a case-control study was conducted to evaluate the relationship among the indices of oxidative stress, such as urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyquanine (8-OHdG), as well as plasma micronutrients and urinary arsenic profiles on urothelial carcinoma (UC) risk. Urinary 8-OHdG was measured using high-sensitivity enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. The urinary arsenic species were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography and hydride generator-atomic absorption spectrometry. Plasma micronutrient levels were analyzed using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The present study showed a significant protective effect of plasma alpha-tocopherol on UC risk. Plasma alpha-tocopherol levels were significantly inversely related to urinary total arsenic concentrations and inorganic arsenic percentage (InAs%), and significantly positively related to dimethylarsinic acid percentage (DMA%). There were no correlations between plasma micronutrients and urinary 8-OHdG. Study participants with lower alpha-tocopherol and higher urinary total arsenic, higher InAs%, higher MMA%, and lower DMA% had a higher UC risk than those with higher alpha-tocopherol and lower urinary total arsenic, lower InAs%, lower MMA%, and higher DMA%. These results suggest that plasma alpha-tocopherol might modify the risk of inorganic arsenic-related UC. - Research Highlights: → Plasma alpha-tocopherol levels were significantly inversely related to UC risk. → There were no correlations between plasma micronutrients and urinary 8-OHdG. → People with lower alpha-tocopherol and higher total arsenic had increased UC risk.

  8. Electro-removal of arsenic(III) and arsenic(V) from aqueous solutions by capacitive deionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chen-Shiuan; Tseng, Ssu-Chia; Li, Kung-Cheh; Hou, Chia-Hung

    2016-07-15

    The feasibility of the electro-removal of arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(III)) from aqueous solutions via capacitive deionization was investigated. The effects of applied voltage (0.0-1.2V) and initial concentration (0.1-200mgL(-1)) on arsenic removal were examined. As evidenced, an enhancement of arsenic removal can be achieved by capacitive deionization. The capacity to remove As(V) at an initial concentration of 0.2mgL(-1) on the activated carbon electrode at 1.2V was determined to be 2.47×10(-2)mgg(-1), which is 1.8-fold higher than that of As(III) (1.37×10(-2)mgg(-1)). Notably, the possible transformation of arsenic species was further characterized. The higher effectiveness of As(V) removal via electrosorption at 1.2V was attributed to the formation of an electrical double layer at the electrode/solution interface. The removal of As(III) could be achieved by the oxidation of As(III) to As(V) and subsequent electrosorption of the As(V) onto the electrode surface of the anode. The presence of sodium chloride or natural organic matter was found to considerably decrease arsenic removal. Single-pass electrosorption-desorption experiments conducted at 1.2V further demonstrated that capacitive deionization is a potential means of effectively removing arsenic from aqueous solutions. PMID:27037475

  9. Arsenic concentrations in Chinese coals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The arsenic concentrations in 297 coal samples were collected from the main coal-mines of 26 provinces in China were determined by molybdenum blue coloration method. These samples were collected from coals that vary widely in coal rank and coal-forming periods from the five main coal-bearing regions in China. Arsenic content in Chinese coals range between 0.24 to 71 mg/kg. The mean of the concentration of Arsenic is 6.4 ± 0.5 mg/kg and the geometric mean is 4.0 ± 8.5 mg/kg. The level of arsenic in China is higher in northeastern and southern provinces, but lower in northwestern provinces. The relationship between arsenic content and coal-forming period, coal rank is studied. It was observed that the arsenic contents decreases with coal rank in the order: Tertiary > Early Jurassic > Late Triassic > Late Jurassic > Middle Jurassic > Late Permian > Early Carboniferous > Middle Carboniferous > Late Carboniferous > Early Permian; It was also noted that the arsenic contents decrease in the order: Subbituminous > Anthracite > Bituminous. However, compared with the geological characteristics of coal forming region, coal rank and coal-forming period have little effect on the concentration of arsenic in Chinese coal. The average arsenic concentration of Chinese coal is lower than that of the whole world. The health problems in China derived from in coal (arsenism) are due largely to poor local life-style practices in cooking and home heating with coal rather than to high arsenic contents in the coal

  10. Urinary Arsenic Metabolites of Subjects Exposed to Elevated Arsenic Present in Coal in Shaanxi Province, China

    OpenAIRE

    Linsheng Yang; Jianwei Gao; Jiangping Yu

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to arsenic (As) poisoning caused by naturally occurring inorganic arsenic-contaminated water consumption, coal arsenic poisoning (CAP) induced by elevated arsenic exposure from coal combustion has rarely been reported. In this study, the concentrations and distributions of urinary arsenic metabolites in 57 volunteers (36 subjects with skin lesions and 21 subjects without skin lesions), who had been exposed to elevated levels of arsenic present in coal in Changshapu village in the ...

  11. Possible mechanisms for arsenic-induced proliferative diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetterhahn, K.E.; Dudek, E.J.; Shumilla, J.A. [Dartmouth College and Medical School, Hanover, NH (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Possible mechanisms for cardiovascular diseases and cancers which have been observed on chronic exposure to arsenic have been investigated. We tested the hypothesis that nonlethal levels of arsenic are mitogenic, cause oxidative stress, increase nuclear translocation of trans-acting factors, and increase expression of genes involved in proliferation. Cultured porcine vascular (from aorta) endothelial cells were used as a model cell system to study the effects of arsenic on the target cells for cardiovascular diseases. Treatment of postconfluent cell cultures with nonovertly toxic concentrations of arsenite increased DNA synthesis, similar to the mitogenic response observed with hydrogen peroxide. Within 1 hour of adding noncytotoxic concentrations of arsenite, cellular levels of oxidants increased relative to control levels, indicating that arsenite promotes cellular oxidations. Arsenite treatment increased nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B, an oxidative stress-responsive transcription factor, in a manner similar to that observed with hydrogen peroxide. Pretreatment of intact cells with the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine and dimethylfumarate prevented the arsenite-induced increases in cellular oxidant formation and NF-KB translocation. Arsenite had little or no effect on binding of NF-KB to its DNA recognition sequence in vitro, indicating that it is unlikely that arsenite directly affects NF-KB. The steady-state mRNA levels of intracellular adhesion molecule and urokinase-like plasminogen activator, genes associated with the active endothelial phenotype in arteriosclerosis and cancer metastasis, were increased by nontoxic concentrations of arsenite. These data suggest that arsenite promotes proliferative diseases like heart disease and cancer by activating oxidant-sensitive endothelial cell signaling and gene expression. It is possible that antioxidant therapy would be useful in preventing arsenic-induced cardiovascular disease and cancer.

  12. Ultra-long Magnetic Nanochains for Highly Efficient Arsenic Removal from Water

    OpenAIRE

    Das, GK; Bonifacio, CS; Rojas, J.; Liu, K.; Van Benthem, K; Kennedy, IM

    2014-01-01

    The contamination of drinking water with naturally occurring arsenic is a global health threat. Filters that are packed with adsorbent media with a high affinity for arsenic have been used to de-contaminate water - generally iron or aluminium oxides are favored materials. Recently, nanoparticles have been introduced as adsorbent media due to their superior efficiency compared to their bulk counter-parts. An efficient nanoadsorbent should ideally possess high surface area, be easy to synthesiz...

  13. Mineralogical and Geochemical Controls of Arsenic in an Active Tailings Dam

    OpenAIRE

    Samuel A. Ndur; William K. Buah

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess arsenic (As) mobilization in an active tailings dam through mineralogical and geochemical characterization study. Arsenite is the predominant As species in the dam with more than 50% of the arsenic bound to the organic fraction. Pyrite and arsenopyrite are the principal opaque minerals remaining in the tailings with relic grains showing rims of oxidation (hematite/goethite). Illite, kaolinite and carbonates act as pH buffers and consume the acid generated d...

  14. Technologies for Arsenic Removal from Water: Current Status and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Ricci Nicomel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This review paper presents an overview of the available technologies used nowadays for the removal of arsenic species from water. Conventionally applied techniques to remove arsenic species include oxidation, coagulation-flocculation, and membrane techniques. Besides, progress has recently been made on the utility of various nanoparticles for the remediation of contaminated water. A critical analysis of the most widely investigated nanoparticles is presented and promising future research on novel porous materials, such as metal organic frameworks, is suggested.

  15. Effect of organic matter amendment, arsenic amendment and water management regime on rice grain arsenic species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic accumulation in rice grain has been identified as a major problem in some regions of Asia. A study was conducted to investigate the effect of increased organic matter in the soil on the release of arsenic into soil pore water and accumulation of arsenic species within rice grain. It was observed that high concentrations of soil arsenic and organic matter caused a reduction in plant growth and delayed flowering time. Total grain arsenic accumulation was higher in the plants grown in high soil arsenic in combination with high organic matter, with an increase in the percentage of organic arsenic species observed. The results indicate that the application of organic matter should be done with caution in paddy soils which have high soil arsenic, as this may lead to an increase in accumulation of arsenic within rice grains. Results also confirm that flooding conditions substantially increase grain arsenic. -- Highlights: ► High soil arsenic and organic matter caused a reduction in plant growth. ► A delayed flowering time was observed in high arsenic and organic matter soil. ► Total grain arsenic increased in high arsenic and organic matter soil. ► Percentage organic arsenic in the grain altered in arsenic and organic matter soil. -- The addition of high amounts of organic matter to soils led to an increase in total rice grain arsenic, as well as alteration in the percentage arsenic species in the rice grains

  16. Arsenic induces apoptosis in mouse liver is mitochondria dependent and is abrogated by N-acetylcysteine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenicosis, caused by arsenic contamination of drinking water supplies, is a major public health problem in India and Bangladesh. Chronic liver disease, often with portal hypertension occurs in chronic arsenicosis, contributes to the morbidity and mortality. The early cellular events that initiate liver cell injury due to arsenicosis have not been studied. Our aim was to identify the possible mechanisms related to arsenic-induced liver injury in mice. Liver injury was induced in mice by arsenic treatment. The liver was used for mitochondrial oxidative stress, mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT). Evidence of apoptosis was sought by TUNEL test, caspase assay and histology. Pretreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) was done to modulate hepatic GSH level. Arsenic treatment in mice caused liver injury associated with increased oxidative stress in liver mitochondria and alteration of MPT. Altered MPT facilitated cytochrome c release in the cytosol, activation of caspase 9 and caspase 3 activities and apoptotic cell death. Pretreatment of NAC to arsenic-treated mice abrogated all these alteration suggesting a glutathione (GSH)-dependent mechanism. Oxidative stress in mitochondria and inappropriate MPT are important in the pathogenesis of arsenic induced apoptotic liver cell injury. The phenomenon is GSH dependent and supplementation of NAC might have beneficial effects

  17. Effect of redox potential and pH on arsenic speciation and solubility in a contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masscheleyn, P.H.; Delaune, R.D.; Patrick, W.H. Jr. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge (United States))

    1991-08-01

    The influence of redox potential and pH on arsenic speciation and solubility was studied in a contaminated soil. Alterations in the oxidation state of arsenic, and influenced by redox potential and pH, greatly affected its solubility in soil. At higher soil redox levels (500-200 mV), arsenic solubility was low and the major part (65-98%) of the arsenic in solution was present as As(V). An alkaline pH, or the reduction of As(V) to As(III), released substantial proportions of arsenic into solution. Under moderately reduced soil conditions (0-100 mV), arsenic solubility was controlled by the dissolution of iron oxyhydroxides. Arsenic was coprecipitated (as As(V)) with iron oxyhydroxides and released upon their solubilization. Upon reduction to {minus}200 mV, the soluble arsenic content increased 13-fold as compared to 500 mV. The observed slow kinetics of the As(V)-As(III) transformation and the high concentrations of Mn present indicate that, under reduced soil conditions, arsenic solubility could be controlled by a Mn{sub 3}(AsO{sub 4}){sub 2} phase.

  18. Association between body mass index and arsenic methylation efficiency in adult women from southwest U.S. and northwest Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human arsenic methylation efficiency has been consistently associated with arsenic-induced disease risk. Interindividual variation in arsenic methylation profiles is commonly observed in exposed populations, and great effort has been put into the study of potential determinants of this variability. Among the factors that have been evaluated, body mass index (BMI) has not been consistently associated with arsenic methylation efficiency; however, an underrepresentation of the upper BMI distribution was commonly observed in these studies. This study investigated potential factors contributing to variations in the metabolism of arsenic, with specific interest in the effect of BMI where more than half of the population was overweight or obese. We studied 624 adult women exposed to arsenic in drinking water from three independent populations. Multivariate regression models showed that higher BMI, arsenic (+ 3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) genetic variant 7388, and higher total urinary arsenic were significantly associated with low percentage of urinary arsenic excreted as monomethylarsonic acid (%uMMA) or high ratio between urinary dimethylarsinic acid and uMMA (uDMA/uMMA), while AS3MT genetic variant M287T was associated with high %uMMA and low uDMA/uMMA. The association between BMI and arsenic methylation efficiency was also evident in each of the three populations when studied separately. This strong association observed between high BMI and low %uMMA and high uDMA/uMMA underscores the importance of BMI as a potential arsenic-associated disease risk factor, and should be carefully considered in future studies associating human arsenic metabolism and toxicity.

  19. Groundwater arsenic contamination affecting different geologic domains in India - a review: influence of geological setting, fluvial geomorphology and Quaternary stratigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acharyya, S.K.; Shah, B.A. [Jadavpur University, Calcutta (India). Dept. of Geological Science

    2007-10-15

    Arsenic contamination in groundwater is pervasive within lowland organic-rich Bengal Delta and narrow entrenched channels in the Middle Ganga floodplains. Local areas of Damodar fan-delta and isolated areas within the Dongargarh Proterozoic rift-zone in central India are also contaminated. In this rift-zone, arsenic is enriched in felsic magmatic rocks and weathered rocks and soils from local areas are enriched further in arsenic and iron. Late Quaternary stratigraphy, geomorphology and sedimentation have influenced groundwater arsenic contamination in alluvium that aggraded during the Holocene sea-level rise. No specific source of arsenic could be identified, although Himalaya is the main provenance for the Ganga floodplain and the Bengal Delta. Gondwana coal seams and other Peninsular Indian rocks might be sources for arsenic in the Damodar fan-delta. As-bearing pyrite or any As-mineral is nearly absent in the aquifer sediments. Arsenic mainly occurs adsorbed on hydrated-iron-oxide (HFO), which coat sediment grains and minerals. Arsenic and iron are released to groundwater by bio-mediated reductive dissolution of HFO with corresponding oxidation of organic matter.

  20. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Oxidation/Filtration and Adsorptive Media, U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Clinton Christian School in Goshen, IN - Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed for and the results obtained from the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Clinton Christian School in Goshen, IN. The objectives of the project were to evaluate the effectiveness of AdEdge Technologies’...

  1. ELECTROCHEMICAL REMEDIATION OF ARSENIC-CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER — RESULTS OF PROTOTYPE FIELD TESTS IN BANGLADESH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowolik, K; Addy, S.E.A.; Gadgil, A.

    2009-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization (WHO), more than 50 million people in Bangladesh drink arsenic-laden water, making it the largest case of mass poisoning in human history. Many methods of arsenic removal (mostly using chemical adsorbents) have been studied, but most of these are too expensive and impractical to be implemented in poor countries such as Bangladesh. This project investigates ElectroChemical Arsenic Remediation (ECAR) as an affordable means of removing arsenic. Experiments were performed on site in Bangladesh using a prototype termed “sushi”. This device consists of carbon steel sheets that serve as electrodes wrapped into a cylinder, separated by plastic mesh and surrounded by a tube-like container that serves as a holding cell in which the water is treated electrochemically. During the electrochemical process, current is applied to both electrodes causing iron to oxidize to various forms of iron (hydr)oxides. These species bind to arsenic(V) with very high affi nity. ECAR also has the advantage that As(III), the more toxic form of arsenic, oxidizes to As(V) in situ. Only As(V) is known to complex with iron (hydr)oxides. One of the main objectives of this research is to demonstrate the ability of the new prototype to reduce arsenic concentrations in Bangladesh groundwater from >200 ppb to below the WHO limit of 10 ppb. In addition, varying fl ow rate and dosage and the effect on arsenic removal was investigated. Experiments showed that ECAR reduced Bangladeshi water with an initial arsenic concentration as high as 250 ppb to below 10 ppb. ECAR proved to be effective at dosages as high as 810 Coulombs/Liter (C/L) and as low as 386 C/L (current 1 A, voltage 12 V). These results are encouraging and provide great promise that ECAR is an effi cient method in the remediation of arsenic from contaminated groundwater. A preliminary investigation of arsenic removal trends with varying Coulombic dosage, complexation time and fi ltration methods is

  2. Discovery of the Arsenic Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    SHORE, A.; A. Fritsch; Heim, M.; Schuh, A.; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-nine arsenic isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  3. Studies on the removal of arsenic (III) from water by a novel hybrid material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, Sandip, E-mail: sandipmandal9@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, NIT, Rourkela 769008 (India); Padhi, T. [Department of Chemistry, NIT, Rourkela 769008 (India); Patel, R.K., E-mail: rkpatel@nitrkl.ac.in [Department of Chemistry, NIT, Rourkela 769008 (India)

    2011-08-30

    Highlights: {yields} The removal of As (III) is about 98% at pH 7 with the hybrid material (ZrO-EA). {yields} The hybrid material exhibits specific surface area of 201.62 m{sup 2}/g. {yields} The adsorption of arsenic (III) from aqueous solution by the hybrid material is spontaneous. {yields} The material could be easily regenerated with sodium hydroxide at pH 12. - Abstract: The present work provides a method for removal of the arsenic (III) from water. An ion-exchanger hybrid material zirconium (IV) oxide-ethanolamine (ZrO-EA) is synthesized and characterized which is subsequently used for the removal of selective arsenic (III) from water containing 10,50,100 mg/L of arsenic (III) solution. The probable practical application for arsenic removal from water by this material has also been studied. The various parameters affecting the removal process like initial concentration of As (III), adsorbent dose, contact time, temperature, ionic strength, and pH are investigated. From the data of results, it is indicated that, the adsorbent dose of 0.7 mg/L, contact time 50 min after which the adsorption process comes to equilibrium, temperature (25 {+-} 2), solution pH (5-7), which are the optimum conditions for adsorption. The typical adsorption isotherms are calculated to know the suitability of the process. The column studies showed 98% recovery of arsenic from water especially at low concentration of arsenic in water samples.

  4. Arsenic-Microbe-Mineral Interactions in Mining-Affected Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen A. Hudson-Edwards

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The toxic element arsenic (As occurs widely in solid and liquid mine wastes. Aqueous forms of arsenic are taken up in As-bearing sulfides, arsenides, sulfosalts, oxides, oxyhydroxides, Fe-oxides, -hydroxides, -oxyhydroxides and -sulfates, and Fe-, Ca-Fe- and other arsenates. Although a considerable body of research has demonstrated that microbes play a significant role in the precipitation and dissolution of these As-bearing minerals, and in the alteration of the redox state of As, in natural and simulated mining environments, the molecular-scale mechanisms of these interactions are still not well understood. Further research is required using traditional and novel mineralogical, spectroscopic and microbiological techniques to further advance this field, and to help design remediation schemes.

  5. Effect of arsenic on nitrification of simulated mining water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papirio, S; Zou, G; Ylinen, A; Di Capua, F; Pirozzi, F; Puhakka, J A

    2014-07-01

    Mining and mineral processing of gold-bearing ores often release arsenic to the environment. Ammonium is released when N-based explosives or cyanide are used. Nitrification of simulated As-rich mining waters was investigated in batch bioassays using nitrifying cultures enriched in a fluidized-bed reactor (FBR). Nitrification was maintained at 100mg AsTOT/L. In batch assays, ammonium was totally oxidized by the FBR enrichment in 48 h. As(III) oxidation to As(V) occurred during the first 3h attenuating arsenic toxicity to nitrification. At 150 and 200mg AsTOT/L, nitrification was inhibited by 25%. Candidatus Nitrospira defluvii and other nitrifying species mainly colonized the FBR. In conclusion, the FBR enriched cultures of municipal activated sludge origins tolerated high As concentrations making nitrification a potent process for mining water treatment. PMID:24852647

  6. Arsenic removal by lime softening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaosol, T.; Suksaroj, C.; Bregnhøj, Henrik

    This paper focuses on the study of arsenic removal for drinking water by lime softening. The initial arsenic (V) concentration was 500 and 1,000 ug/L in synthetic groundwater. The experiments were performed as batch tests with varying lime dosages and mixing time. For the synthetic groundwater......, arsenic (V) removal increased with increasing lime dosage and mixing time, as well as with the resulting pH. The residual arsenic (V) in all cases was lower than the WHO guideline of 10 ug/L at pH higher than 11.5. Kinetic of arsenic (V) removal can be described by a first-order equation as C1 = C0*e......^-k*t. The relation between the constant (k value) and increasing lime dosage was found to be linear, described by k = 0.0034 (Dlime). The results support a theory from the literature that the arsenic (V) was removed by precipitation af Ca3(AsO4)2. The results obtained in the present study suggest that lime...

  7. In situ treatment of arsenic contaminated groundwater by aquifer iron coating: Experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Xianjun, E-mail: xjxie@cug.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, 430074 Wuhan (China); Wang, Yanxin, E-mail: yx.wang@cug.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, 430074 Wuhan (China); Pi, Kunfu [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, 430074 Wuhan (China); Liu, Chongxuan [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, 430074 Wuhan (China); Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Li, Junxia; Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Zhiqiang; Duan, Mengyu [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, 430074 Wuhan (China)

    2015-09-15

    In situ arsenic removal from groundwater by an aquifer iron coating method has great potential to be a cost effective and simple groundwater remediation technology, especially in rural and remote areas where groundwater is used as the main water source for drinking. The in situ arsenic removal technology was first optimized by simulating arsenic removal in various quartz sand columns under anoxic conditions. The effectiveness was then evaluated in an actual high-arsenic groundwater environment. The arsenic removal mechanism by the coated iron oxide/hydroxide was investigated under different conditions using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/X-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy. Aquifer iron coating method was developed via a 4-step alternating injection of oxidant, iron salt and oxygen-free water. A continuous injection of 5.0 mmol/L FeSO{sub 4} and 2.5 mmol/L NaClO for 96 h can form a uniform goethite coating on the surface of quartz sand without causing clogging. At a flow rate of 7.2 mL/min of the injection reagents, arsenic (as Na{sub 2}HAsO{sub 4}) and tracer fluorescein sodium to pass through the iron-coated quartz sand column were approximately at 126 and 7 column pore volumes, respectively. The retardation factor of arsenic was 23.0, and the adsorption capacity was 0.11 mol As per mol Fe. In situ arsenic removal from groundwater in an aquifer was achieved by simultaneous injections of As(V) and Fe(II) reagents. Arsenic fixation resulted from a process of adsorption/co-precipitation with fine goethite particles by way of bidentate binuclear complexes. Therefore, the study results indicate that the high arsenic removal efficiency of the in situ aquifer iron coating technology likely resulted from the expanded specific surface area of the small goethite particles, which enhanced arsenic sorption capability and/or from co-precipitation of arsenic on the surface of goethite particles

  8. In situ treatment of arsenic contaminated groundwater by aquifer iron coating: Experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In situ arsenic removal from groundwater by an aquifer iron coating method has great potential to be a cost effective and simple groundwater remediation technology, especially in rural and remote areas where groundwater is used as the main water source for drinking. The in situ arsenic removal technology was first optimized by simulating arsenic removal in various quartz sand columns under anoxic conditions. The effectiveness was then evaluated in an actual high-arsenic groundwater environment. The arsenic removal mechanism by the coated iron oxide/hydroxide was investigated under different conditions using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/X-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy. Aquifer iron coating method was developed via a 4-step alternating injection of oxidant, iron salt and oxygen-free water. A continuous injection of 5.0 mmol/L FeSO4 and 2.5 mmol/L NaClO for 96 h can form a uniform goethite coating on the surface of quartz sand without causing clogging. At a flow rate of 7.2 mL/min of the injection reagents, arsenic (as Na2HAsO4) and tracer fluorescein sodium to pass through the iron-coated quartz sand column were approximately at 126 and 7 column pore volumes, respectively. The retardation factor of arsenic was 23.0, and the adsorption capacity was 0.11 mol As per mol Fe. In situ arsenic removal from groundwater in an aquifer was achieved by simultaneous injections of As(V) and Fe(II) reagents. Arsenic fixation resulted from a process of adsorption/co-precipitation with fine goethite particles by way of bidentate binuclear complexes. Therefore, the study results indicate that the high arsenic removal efficiency of the in situ aquifer iron coating technology likely resulted from the expanded specific surface area of the small goethite particles, which enhanced arsenic sorption capability and/or from co-precipitation of arsenic on the surface of goethite particles. - Highlights: • An

  9. In situ treatment of arsenic contaminated groundwater by aquifer iron coating: Experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xianjun; Wang, Yanxin; Pi, Kunfu; Liu, Chongxuan; Li, Junxia; Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Zhiqiang; Duan, Mengyu

    2015-09-15

    In situ arsenic removal from groundwater by an aquifer iron coating method has great potential to be a cost effective and simple groundwater remediation technology, especially in rural and remote areas where groundwater is used as the main water source for drinking. The in situ arsenic removal technology was first optimized by simulating arsenic removal in various quartz sand columns under anoxic conditions. The effectiveness was then evaluated in an actual high-arsenic groundwater environment. The arsenic removal mechanism by the coated iron oxide/hydroxide was investigated under different conditions using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/X-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy. Aquifer iron coating method was developed via a 4-step alternating injection of oxidant, iron salt and oxygen-free water. A continuous injection of 5.0 mmol/L FeSO4 and 2.5 mmol/L NaClO for 96 h can form a uniform goethite coating on the surface of quartz sand without causing clogging. At a flow rate of 7.2 mL/min of the injection reagents, arsenic (as Na2HAsO4) and tracer fluorescein sodium to pass through the iron-coated quartz sand column were approximately at 126 and 7 column pore volumes, respectively. The retardation factor of arsenic was 23.0, and the adsorption capacity was 0.11 mol As per mol Fe. In situ arsenic removal from groundwater in an aquifer was achieved by simultaneous injections of As(V) and Fe(II) reagents. Arsenic fixation resulted from a process of adsorption/co-precipitation with fine goethite particles by way of bidentate binuclear complexes. Therefore, the study results indicate that the high arsenic removal efficiency of the in situ aquifer iron coating technology likely resulted from the expanded specific surface area of the small goethite particles, which enhanced arsenic sorption capability and/or from co-precipitation of arsenic on the surface of goethite particles. PMID:25956146

  10. Arsenic-resistant bacteria solubilized arsenic in the growth media and increased growth of arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Piyasa; Rathinasabapathi, Bala; Ma, Lena Q

    2011-10-01

    The role of arsenic-resistant bacteria (ARB) in arsenic solubilization from growth media and growth enhancement of arsenic-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata L. was examined. Seven ARB (tolerant to 10 mM arsenate) were isolated from the P. vittata rhizosphere and identified by 16S rRNA sequencing as Pseudomonas sp., Comamonas sp. and Stenotrophomonas sp. During 7-d hydroponic experiments, these bacteria effectively solubilized arsenic from the growth media spiked with insoluble FeAsO₄ and AlAsO₄ minerals (from organic C) by P. vittata may be responsible for As solubilization. Increase in P. vittata root biomass from 1.5-2.2 to 3.4-4.2 g/plant dw by ARB and by arsenic was associated with arsenic-induced plant P uptake. Arsenic resistant bacteria may have potential to enhance phytoremediation of arsenic-contaminated soils by P. vittata. PMID:21840210

  11. Arsenic Toxicity in Male Reproduction and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon-Jae; Kim, Jong-Min

    2015-12-01

    Arsenic is a toxic metalloid that exists ubiquitously in the environment, and affects global health problems due to its carcinogenicity. In most populations, the main source of arsenic exposure is the drinking water. In drinking water, chronic exposure to arsenic is associated with increased risks of various cancers including those of skin, lung, bladder, and liver, as well as numerous other non-cancer diseases including gastrointestinal and cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and neurologic and cognitive problems. Recent emerging evidences suggest that arsenic exposure affects the reproductive and developmental toxicity. Prenatal exposure to inorganic arsenic causes adverse pregnancy outcomes and children's health problems. Some epidemiological studies have reported that arsenic exposure induces premature delivery, spontaneous abortion, and stillbirth. In animal studies, inorganic arsenic also causes fetal malformation, growth retardation, and fetal death. These toxic effects depend on dose, route and gestation periods of arsenic exposure. In males, inorganic arsenic causes reproductive dysfunctions including reductions of the testis weights, accessory sex organs weights, and epididymal sperm counts. In addition, inorganic arsenic exposure also induces alterations of spermatogenesis, reductions of testosterone and gonadotrophins, and disruptions of steroidogenesis. However, the reproductive and developmental problems following arsenic exposure are poorly understood, and the molecular mechanism of arsenic-induced reproductive toxicity remains unclear. Thus, we further investigated several possible mechanisms underlying arsenic-induced reproductive toxicity. PMID:26973968

  12. Approaches to Increase Arsenic Awareness in Bangladesh: An Evaluation of an Arsenic Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Christine Marie; Factor-Litvak, Pam; Khan, Khalid; Islam, Tariqul; Singha, Ashit; Moon-Howard, Joyce; van Geen, Alexander; Graziano, Joseph H.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to design and evaluate a household-level arsenic education and well water arsenic testing intervention to increase arsenic awareness in Bangladesh. The authors randomly selected 1,000 study respondents located in 20 villages in Singair, Bangladesh. The main outcome was the change in knowledge of arsenic from…

  13. Microbial Community Structure and Arsenic Biogeochemistry in an Acid Vapor-Formed Spring in Tengchong Geothermal Area, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiang

    Full Text Available Arsenic biogeochemistry has been studied extensively in acid sulfate-chloride hot springs, but not in acid sulfate hot springs with low chloride. In this study, Zhenzhuquan in Tengchong geothermal area, a representative acid sulfate hot spring with low chloride, was chosen to study arsenic geochemistry and microbial community structure using Illumina MiSeq sequencing. Over 0.3 million 16S rRNA sequence reads were obtained from 6-paired parallel water and sediment samples along its outflow channel. Arsenic oxidation occurred in the Zhenxhuquan pool, with distinctly high ratios of arsenate to total dissolved arsenic (0.73-0.86. Coupled with iron and sulfur oxidation along the outflow channel, arsenic accumulated in downstream sediments with concentrations up to 16.44 g/kg and appeared to significantly constrain their microbial community diversity. These oxidations might be correlated with the appearance of some putative functional microbial populations, such as Aquificae and Pseudomonas (arsenic oxidation, Sulfolobus (sulfur and iron oxidation, Metallosphaera and Acidicaldus (iron oxidation. Temperature, total organic carbon and dissolved oxygen significantly shaped the microbial community structure of upstream and downstream samples. In the upstream outflow channel region, most microbial populations were microaerophilic/anaerobic thermophiles and hyperthermophiles, such as Sulfolobus, Nocardia, Fervidicoccus, Delftia, and Ralstonia. In the downstream region, aerobic heterotrophic mesophiles and thermophiles were identified, including Ktedonobacteria, Acidicaldus, Chthonomonas and Sphingobacteria. A total of 72.41-95.91% unassigned-genus sequences were derived from the downstream high arsenic sediments 16S rRNA clone libraries. This study could enable us to achieve an integrated understanding on arsenic biogeochemistry in acid hot springs.

  14. Microbial Community Structure and Arsenic Biogeochemistry in an Acid Vapor-Formed Spring in Tengchong Geothermal Area, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhou; Li, Ping; Jiang, Dawei; Dai, Xinyue; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Yanhong; Wang, Yanxin

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic biogeochemistry has been studied extensively in acid sulfate-chloride hot springs, but not in acid sulfate hot springs with low chloride. In this study, Zhenzhuquan in Tengchong geothermal area, a representative acid sulfate hot spring with low chloride, was chosen to study arsenic geochemistry and microbial community structure using Illumina MiSeq sequencing. Over 0.3 million 16S rRNA sequence reads were obtained from 6-paired parallel water and sediment samples along its outflow channel. Arsenic oxidation occurred in the Zhenxhuquan pool, with distinctly high ratios of arsenate to total dissolved arsenic (0.73-0.86). Coupled with iron and sulfur oxidation along the outflow channel, arsenic accumulated in downstream sediments with concentrations up to 16.44 g/kg and appeared to significantly constrain their microbial community diversity. These oxidations might be correlated with the appearance of some putative functional microbial populations, such as Aquificae and Pseudomonas (arsenic oxidation), Sulfolobus (sulfur and iron oxidation), Metallosphaera and Acidicaldus (iron oxidation). Temperature, total organic carbon and dissolved oxygen significantly shaped the microbial community structure of upstream and downstream samples. In the upstream outflow channel region, most microbial populations were microaerophilic/anaerobic thermophiles and hyperthermophiles, such as Sulfolobus, Nocardia, Fervidicoccus, Delftia, and Ralstonia. In the downstream region, aerobic heterotrophic mesophiles and thermophiles were identified, including Ktedonobacteria, Acidicaldus, Chthonomonas and Sphingobacteria. A total of 72.41-95.91% unassigned-genus sequences were derived from the downstream high arsenic sediments 16S rRNA clone libraries. This study could enable us to achieve an integrated understanding on arsenic biogeochemistry in acid hot springs. PMID:26761709

  15. Features of arsenic coordination in AsXn complexes (X=F, Cl, Br, I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigation into stoichiometry of F-, Cl-, Br-, and I-containing arsenic complexes was conducted using Voronoi-Dirichlet polyhedrons (VDP). Decrease of third-dimensional effect of unshared electron pairs of As(3) atoms is established as decrease of electronegativity of surrounding atom in the AsFn-AsCln-AsBrn-AsIn system. Method of interlaced spheres may be used for determination of coordination number of arsenic atoms in the crystal structure. Whatever oxidation degree of arsenic atoms and their coordination numbers common linear dependences between solid angles of VDP Ω grains and internuclear distances r(As-X) corresponding those grains are observed. For I-containing arsenic compounds the equilibrium Ω(As-I) = 40(1) - 8.1(3) r(As-I) { = -0.940.91 contact As-I} is employed

  16. Therapeutic efficacy of silymarin and naringenin in reducing arsenic-induced hepatic damage in young rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Anshu; Yadav, Abhishek; Bozhkov, A I; Padalko, V I; Flora, S J S

    2011-05-01

    We investigated the effects of silymarin and naringenin in counteracting arsenic-induced hepatic oxidative stress post exposure. Male wistar rats were chronically exposed to sodium arsenite for eight months followed by oral treatment with silymarin and naringenin (50 mg/kg each) for 15 consecutive days to evaluate hepatic damage and antioxidant potential. Our results demonstrate a significant decrease in hepatic GSH levels, SOD and catalase activities and an increase in GST and TBARS levels after arsenic administration. Silymarin or naringenin administration increased GSH levels and was beneficial in the recovery of altered SOD and catalase activity besides significantly reducing blood and tissue arsenic concentration. Our results point to the antioxidant potential of these flavonoids, which might be of benefit in the clinical recovery of subject exposed to arsenic. These flavonoids can be incorporated into the diet or co-supplemented during chelation treatment, and thus may afford a protective effect against arsenite-induced cytotoxicity. PMID:20719385

  17. Arsenic content of soils from three regions of Santa Catarina State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Cristina de Souza

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The determination of trace elements is necessary in order to monitor their entry into the soil system and to remediate contaminated areas. The purpose of this study was to determine the natural content of arsenic (As in soils of three regions of Santa Catarina State (SC: the Southern Plateau, the Metropolitan area and the Southern Coast. Arsenic content was obtained after digestion in a microwave oven, following the USEPA 3051 A protocol and quantification was made by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization. The results were analyzed by the Scott-Knott test at a 5% significance level. Soil attributes that best correlated with arsenic content were clay, organic carbon, cation exchange capacity and Al and Fe oxides. The arsenic levels are related to the source material and the slope of regional soils.

  18. Arsenic pilot plant operation and results:Weatherford, Oklahoma.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aragon, Malynda Jo; Arora, H. (Narasimhan Consulting Services Inc., Phoenix, Arizona); Karori, Saqib (Narasimhan Consulting Services Inc., Phoenix, Arizona); Pathan, Sakib (Narasimhan Consulting Services Inc., Phoenix, Arizona)

    2007-05-01

    Narasimhan Consulting Services, Inc. (NCS), under a contract with the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), designed and operated pilot scale evaluations of the adsorption and coagulation/filtration treatment technologies aimed at meeting the recently revised arsenic maximum contaminant level (MCL) for drinking water. The standard of 10 {micro}g/L (10 ppb) is effective as of January 2006. The pilot demonstration is a project of the Arsenic Water Technology Partnership program, a partnership between the American Water Works Association Research Foundation (AwwaRF), SNL and WERC (A Consortium for Environmental Education and Technology Development). The pilot evaluation was conducted at Well 30 of the City of Weatherford, OK, which supplies drinking water to a population of more than 10,400. Well water contained arsenic in the range of 16 to 29 ppb during the study. Four commercially available adsorption media were evaluated side by side for a period of three months. Both adsorption and coagulation/filtration effectively reduced arsenic from Well No.30. A preliminary economic analysis indicated that adsorption using an iron oxide media was more cost effective than the coagulation/ filtration technology.

  19. Arsenic speciation in xylem sap of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihucz, Victor G. [Joint Research Group of Environmental Chemistry of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences and L. Eoetvoes University, Budapest (Hungary); Hungarian Satellite Centre of Trace Elements Institute to UNESCO, Budapest (Hungary); Tatar, Eniko [Hungarian Satellite Centre of Trace Elements Institute to UNESCO, Budapest (Hungary); L. Eoetvoes University, Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Budapest (Hungary); Virag, Istvan [L. Eoetvoes University, Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Budapest (Hungary); Cseh, Edit; Fodor, Ferenc [L. Eoetvoes University, Department of Plant Physiology, Budapest (Hungary); Zaray, Gyula [Joint Research Group of Environmental Chemistry of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences and L. Eoetvoes University, Budapest (Hungary); Hungarian Satellite Centre of Trace Elements Institute to UNESCO, Budapest (Hungary); L. Eoetvoes University, Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Budapest (Hungary)

    2005-10-01

    Flow injection analysis (FIA) and high-performance liquid chromatography double-focusing sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-DF-ICP-MS) were used for total arsenic determination and arsenic speciation of xylem sap of cucumber plants (Cucumis sativus L.) grown in hydroponics containing 2 {mu}mol dm{sup -3} arsenate or arsenite, respectively. Arsenite [As(III)], arsenate [As(V)] and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) were identified in the sap of the plants. Arsenite was the predominant arsenic species in the xylem saps regardless of the type of arsenic treatment, and the following concentration order was determined: As(III) > As(V) > DMA. The amount of total As, calculated taking into consideration the mass of xylem sap collected, was almost equal for both treatments. Arsenite was taken up more easily by cucumber than arsenate. Partial oxidation of arsenite to arsenate (<10% in 48 h) was observed in the case of arsenite-containing nutrient solutions, which may explain the detection of arsenate in the saps of plants treated with arsenite. (orig.)

  20. Bacterial respiration of arsenic and selenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, J.F.; Oremland, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    Oxyanions of arsenic and selenium can be used in microbial anaerobic respiration as terminal electron acceptors. The detection of arsenate and selenate respiring bacteria in numerous pristine and contaminated environments and their rapid appearance in enrichment culture suggest that they are widespread and metabolically active in nature. Although the bacterial species that have been isolated and characterized are still few in number, they are scattered throughout the bacterial domain and include Gram- positive bacteria, beta, gamma and epsilon Proteobacteria and the sole member of a deeply branching lineage of the bacteria, Chrysiogenes arsenatus. The oxidation of a number of organic substrates (i.e. acetate, lactate, pyruvate, glycerol, ethanol) or hydrogen can be coupled to the reduction of arsenate and selenate, but the actual donor used varies from species to species. Both periplasmic and membrane-associated arsenate and selenate reductases have been characterized. Although the number of subunits and molecular masses differs, they all contain molybdenum. The extent of the environmental impact on the transformation and mobilization of arsenic and selenium by microbial dissimilatory processes is only now being fully appreciated.

  1. Arsenic chemistry and remediation in Hawaiian soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hue, Nguyen V

    2013-01-01

    Past use of arsenical pesticides has resulted in elevated levels of arsenic (As) in some Hawaiian soils. Total As concentrations of 20-100 mg/kg are not uncommon, and can exceed 900 mg/kg in some lands formerly planted with sugarcane. With high contents of amorphous aluminosilicates and iron oxides in many Hawaii's volcanic ash-derived Andisols, a high proportion (25-30%) of soil As was associated with either these mineral phases or with organic matter. Less than 1% of the total As was water soluble or exchangeable. Furthermore, the soils can sorb As strongly: the addition of 1000 mg/kg as As (+5) resulted in only between 0.03 and 0.30 mg/L As in soil solution. In contrast, soils having more crystalline minerals (e.g., Oxisols) sorb less As and thus often contain less As. Phosphate fertilization increases As bioaccessibility, whereas the addition of Fe(OH)3 decreases it. Brake fern (Pteris vittata L.) can be used to remove some soil As. Concentrations of As in fronds varied on average from 60 mg/kg when grown on a low-As Oxisol to 350 mg/kg when grown on a high-As Andisol. Ratios of leaf As to CaCl2-extractable soil As were 12 and 222 for the Oxisol and Andisol, respectively. PMID:23487989

  2. Mineralogical and Geochemical Controls of Arsenic in an Active Tailings Dam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel A. Ndur

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess arsenic (As mobilization in an active tailings dam through mineralogical and geochemical characterization study. Arsenite is the predominant As species in the dam with more than 50% of the arsenic bound to the organic fraction. Pyrite and arsenopyrite are the principal opaque minerals remaining in the tailings with relic grains showing rims of oxidation (hematite/goethite. Illite, kaolinite and carbonates act as pH buffers and consume the acid generated during pyrite oxidation and raise the pH to near neutral measured in the tailings dam. At near neutral conditions As is mobilized, which likely combines with the Fe and Ca oxides formed to form ferric-calcium arsenates and deposited in the tailings dam. Some As appear to equilibrate with atmospheric CO2 and are converted into calcium carbonates with release of arsenic into solution.

  3. Arsenic speciation in saliva of acute promyelocytic leukemia patients undergoing arsenic trioxide treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Baowei; Cao, Fenglin; Yuan, Chungang; Lu, Xiufen; Shen, Shengwen; Zhou, Jin; Le, X Chris

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide has been successfully used as a therapeutic in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Detailed monitoring of the therapeutic arsenic and its metabolites in various accessible specimens of APL patients can contribute to improving treatment efficacy and minimizing arsenic-induced side effects. This article focuses on the determination of arsenic species in saliva samples from APL patients undergoing arsenic treatment. Saliva samples were collected from nine APL pa...

  4. Urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine and urothelial carcinoma risk in low arsenic exposure area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic is a well-documented human carcinogen and is known to cause oxidative stress in cultured cells and animals. A hospital-based case-control study was conducted to evaluate the relationship among the levels of urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), the arsenic profile, and urothelial carcinoma (UC). Urinary 8-OHdG was measured by using high-sensitivity enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. The urinary species of inorganic arsenic and their metabolites were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and hydride generator-atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-AAS). This study showed that the mean urinary concentration of total arsenics was significantly higher, at 37.67 ± 2.98 μg/g creatinine, for UC patients than for healthy controls of 21.10 ± 0.79 μg/g creatinine (p < 0.01). Urinary 8-OHdG levels correlated with urinary total arsenic concentrations (r = 0.19, p < 0.01). There were significantly higher 8-OHdG levels, of 7.48 ± 0.97 ng/mg creatinine in UC patients, compared to healthy controls of 5.95 ± 0.21 ng/mg creatinine. Furthermore, female UC patients had higher 8-OHdG levels of 9.22 ± 0.75 than those of males at 5.76 ± 0.25 ng/mg creatinine (p < 0.01). Multiple linear regression analyses revealed that high urinary 8-OHdG levels were associated with increased total arsenic concentrations, inorganic arsenite, monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), and dimethylarsenate (DMA) as well as the primary methylation index (PMI) even after adjusting for age, gender, and UC status. The results suggest that oxidative DNA damage was associated with arsenic exposure, even at low urinary level of arsenic

  5. 21 CFR 556.60 - Arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Arsenic. 556.60 Section 556.60 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND... New Animal Drugs § 556.60 Arsenic. Tolerances for total residues of combined arsenic (calculated as...

  6. Arsenic removal from industrial effluent through electrocoagulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balasubramanian, N. [Central Electrochemical Research Inst., Karaikudi (India). Dept. of Pollution Control; Madhavan, K. [Coimbatore Inst. of Technology, Coimbatore (India). Dept. of Chemistry

    2001-05-01

    In the present investigation, it is attempted to remove arsenic from smelter industrial wastewater through electro-coagulation. Experiments covering a wide range of operating conditions for removal of the arsenic present in the smelter wastewater are carried out in a batch electrochemical reactor. It has been observed from the present work that arsenic can be removed effectively through electrocoagulation. (orig.)

  7. Chloride sublimation of gold-arsenic concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present article is devoted to chloride sublimation of gold-arsenic concentrates. The results of studies of chloride sublimation of gold-arsenic comprising concentrates of Chore deposit of Tajikistan are considered. It is found that by application sodium chloride for gold-arsenic comprising concentrates it is possible to extract gold and silver from flotation concentrates.

  8. Oxidation state specific generation of arsines from methylated arsenicals based on L-cysteine treatment in buffered media for speciation analysis by hydride generation-automated cryotrapping-GC-AAS with the multiatomizer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matoušek, Tomáš; Hernández-Zavala, A.; Svoboda, Milan; Langrová, L.; Adair, B.M.; Drobná, Z.; Thomas, D. J.; Stýblo, M.; Dědina, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 3 (2008), s. 396-406. ISSN 0584-8547 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400310507 Grant ostatní: NIH-FIRCA(US) 1 R03 TW007057-01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Source of funding: N - neverejné zdroje Keywords : arsenic * speciation analysis * hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.853, year: 2008

  9. Influence of chelating ligands on arsenic uptake by hydroponically grown rice seedlings (Oryza sativa L.): a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Mohammad A.; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Ueda, Kazumasa; Maki, Teruya [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa (Japan); Rahman, M.M. [Department of Botany, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    2008-06-15

    Ferric (oxyhydro-)oxides (FeO{sub x}) precipitate in the rhizosphere at neutral or alkaline pH and are adsorbed on the plant root surfaces. Consequently, the higher binding affinity of arsenate to FeO{sub x} and the low iron phytoavailability of the precipitated FeO{sub x} make the phytoremediation of arsenic difficult. In the present study, the influence of chelating ligands on arsenic and iron uptake by hydroponically grown rice seedlings (Oryza sativa L.) was investigated. When chelating ligands were not treated to the growth medium, about 63 and 71% of the total arsenic and iron were distributed in the root extract (outer root surfaces) of rice, respectively. On the other hand, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid (EDDS) and hydroxyiminodisuccinic acid (HIDS) desorbed a significant amount of arsenic from FeO{sub x} of the outer root surfaces. Therefore, the uptake of arsenic and iron into the roots and their subsequent translocation to the shoots of the rice seedlings increased significantly. The order of increasing arsenic uptake by chelating ligands was HIDS > EDTA > EDDS. Methylglycinediacetic acid (MGDA) and iminodisuccinic acid (IDS) might not be effective in arsenic solubilization from FeO{sub x}. The results suggest that EDDS and HIDS would be a good and environmentally safe choice to accelerate arsenic phytoavailability in the phytoremediation process because of their biodegradability and would be a competent alternative to the widely used non-biodegradable and environmentally persistent EDTA. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  10. Arsenic metabolism by microbial communities from an arsenic-rich shallow-water hydrothermal system in Ambitle Island, Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Chancho, M.; Pichler, T.; Amend, J. P.; Akerman, N. H.

    2011-12-01

    Arsenic, although toxic, is used as an energy source by certain microbes, some of which can catalyse the reduction of arsenate by using different electron donors, while others oxidize arsenite with oxygen or nitrate as electron acceptors. The marine shallow-water hydrothermal system in Tutum Bay, Ambitle Island, Papua New Guinea is ideal for investigating the metabolism of microbes involved in arsenic cycling, because there hydrothermal vents discharge fluids with arsenite concentrations as high as 950 μg/L. Vent fluids are hot (˜100°C), slightly acidic (pH˜6) and reducing. Upon mixing with colder and oxygen-rich seawater the fluid chemistry changes rapidly within a few meters from the hydrothermal source. The objective of this work was to study arsenic metabolism due to microbial activity in Tutum Bay. Sediments collected at 7.5 and 30 m along a transect beginning at a hydrothermal vent were used as inocula in the microbial culturing experiments. Media were designed using chemical analyses of the hydrothermal fluids. Following culture experiments, arsenic species identification and quantification were performed for the growth media with HPLC-ICP(HR)MS, using anion exchange and reversed phase chromatography. Quality control included mass balance calculations and spiking experiments. A fast reduction of arsenate to arsenite was observed in the first 24 hours leading to the conclusion that the microbial communities were capable of reducing arsenic. However, mass balance calculations revealed that more than 30% of the arsenic had been transformed to one or more unknown species, which could not be detected by ion exchange chromatography. The addition of peroxide combined with reversed phase chromatography revealed the presence of several unknown species. Following the addition of peroxide some of the unknown species were identified to be thio-arsenic compounds, because they were oxidized to their oxo-analogues. Nevertheless, a significant fraction of unknown

  11. The effectiveness of water-treatment systems for arsenic used in 11 homes in Southwestern and Central Ohio, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Mary Ann; Ekberg, Mike

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey and the Miami Conservancy District investigated the effectiveness of methods used to remove arsenic from drinking water at 11 homes in southwestern and central Ohio. The untreated (raw) ground-water had arsenic concentrations of 7.7–382 micrograms per liter (µg/L), and the median concentration was 30 µg/L. The pH was neutral to slightly alkaline, and redox conditions were strongly reducing, as indicated by high concentrations of iron. The predominant arsenic species was arsenite (As3+), which is difficult to treat because it exists in water as an uncharged compound (H3AsO3).The water-treatment systems included (1) seven single-tap reverse-osmosis systems, (2) two whole-house oxidation/filtration systems, and (3) two systems that included wholehouse anion exchange and single-tap reverse osmosis. All but one system included pretreatment by a water softener, and two systems included preoxidation to convert arsenite (As3+) to arsenate (As5+) before treatment by anion exchange.None of the treatment systems removed all of the arsenic from the drinking water. About one-half of the systems decreased the arsenic concentration to less than the maximum contamination level of 10 µg/L. The effectiveness of the systems varied widely; the percentage of arsenic removed ranged from 2 to 90 percent, and the median was 65 percent.At some sites, the low effectiveness of arsenic removal may have been related to system maintenance and(or) operation issues. At two sites, homeowners acknowledged that the treatment systems had not been maintained for several years. At two other sites, the treatment systems were being maintained, but the water-quality data indicated that one of the components was not working, unbeknownst to the homeowner. EPA research at a small number of sites in Ohio indicated that operation and maintenance of some arsenic-treatment systems was not always simple.Another factor that affected system effectiveness was the quality of

  12. Arsenic removal from acidic solutions with biogenic ferric precipitates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahoranta, Sarita H; Kokko, Marika E; Papirio, Stefano; Özkaya, Bestamin; Puhakka, Jaakko A

    2016-04-01

    Treatment of acidic solution containing 5g/L of Fe(II) and 10mg/L of As(III) was studied in a system consisting of a biological fluidized-bed reactor (FBR) for iron oxidation, and a gravity settler for iron precipitation and separation of the ferric precipitates. At pH 3.0 and FBR retention time of 5.7h, 96-98% of the added Fe(II) precipitated (99.1% of which was jarosite). The highest iron oxidation and precipitation rates were 1070 and 28mg/L/h, respectively, and were achieved at pH 3.0. Subsequently, the effect of pH on arsenic removal through sorption and/or co-precipitation was examined by gradually decreasing solution pH from 3.0 to 1.6 (feed pH). At pH 3.0, 2.4 and 1.6, the highest arsenic removal efficiencies obtained were 99.5%, 80.1% and 7.1%, respectively. As the system had ferric precipitates in excess, decreased arsenic removal was likely due to reduced co-precipitation at pH<2.4. As(III) was partially oxidized to As(V) in the system. In shake flask experiments, As(V) sorbed onto jarosite better than As(III). Moreover, the sorption capacity of biogenic jarosite was significantly higher than that of synthetic jarosite. The developed bioprocess simultaneously and efficiently removes iron and arsenic from acidic solutions, indicating potential for mining wastewater treatment. PMID:26705889

  13. Arsenic – Poison or medicine?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Kulik-Kupka

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic (As is commonly known as a poison. Only a few people know that As has also been widely used in medicine. In the past years As and its compounds were used as a medicine for the treatment of such diseases as diabetes, psoriasis, syphilis, skin ulcers and joint diseases. Nowadays As is also used especially in the treatment of patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC has recognized arsenic as an element with carcinogenic effect evidenced by epidemiological studies, but as previously mentioned it is also used in the treatment of neoplastic diseases. This underlines the specificity of the arsenic effects. Arsenic occurs widely in the natural environment, for example, it is present in soil and water, which contributes to its migration to food products. Long exposure to this element may lead to liver damages and also to changes in myocardium. Bearing in mind that such serious health problems can occur, monitoring of the As presence in the environmental media plays a very important role. In addition, the occupational risk of As exposure in the workplace should be identified and checked. Also the standards for As presence in food should be established. This paper presents a review of the 2015 publications based on the Medical database like PubMed and Polish Medical Bibliography. It includes the most important information about arsenic in both forms, poison and medicine. Med Pr 2016;67(1:89–96

  14. Arsenic in groundwaters in the Northern Appalachian Mountain belt: A review of patterns and processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Stephen C.

    2008-07-01

    Naturally occurring arsenic in the bedrock of the Northern Appalachian Mountain belt was first recognized in the late 19th century. The knowledge of the behavior of arsenic in groundwater in this region has lagged behind nearly a century, with the popular press reporting on local studies in the early 1980s, and most peer-reviewed research articles on regional patterns conducted and written in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Research reports have shown that within this high arsenic region, between 6% and 22% of households using private drinking water wells contain arsenic in excess of 10 µg/L, the United States Environmental Protection Agency's maximum contaminant level. In nearly all reports, arsenic in drinking water was derived from naturally occurring geologic sources, typically arsenopyrite, substituted sulfides such as arsenian pyrite, and nanoscale minerals such as westerveldite. In most studies, arsenic concentrations in groundwater were controlled by pH dependent adsorption to mineral surfaces, most commonly iron oxide minerals. In some cases, reductive dissolution of iron minerals has been shown to increase arsenic concentrations in groundwater, more commonly associated with anthropogenic activities such as landfills. Evidence of nitrate reduction promoting the presence of arsenic(V) and iron(III) minerals in anoxic environments has been shown to occur in surface waters, and in this manuscript we show this process perhaps applies to groundwater. The geologic explanation for the high arsenic region in the Northern Appalachian Mountain belt is most likely the crustal recycling of arsenic as an incompatible element during tectonic activity. Accretion of multiple terranes, in particular Avalonia and the Central Maine Terrane of New England appear to be connected to the presence of high concentrations of arsenic. Continued tectonic activity and recycling of these older terranes may also be responsible for the high arsenic observed in the Triassic rift basins

  15. Genomic analysis of stress response against arsenic in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surasri N Sahu

    Full Text Available Arsenic, a known human carcinogen, is widely distributed around the world and found in particularly high concentrations in certain regions including Southwestern US, Eastern Europe, India, China, Taiwan and Mexico. Chronic arsenic poisoning affects millions of people worldwide and is associated with increased risk of many diseases including arthrosclerosis, diabetes and cancer. In this study, we explored genome level global responses to high and low levels of arsenic exposure in Caenorhabditis elegans using Affymetrix expression microarrays. This experimental design allows us to do microarray analysis of dose-response relationships of global gene expression patterns. High dose (0.03% exposure caused stronger global gene expression changes in comparison with low dose (0.003% exposure, suggesting a positive dose-response correlation. Biological processes such as oxidative stress, and iron metabolism, which were previously reported to be involved in arsenic toxicity studies using cultured cells, experimental animals, and humans, were found to be affected in C. elegans. We performed genome-wide gene expression comparisons between our microarray data and publicly available C. elegans microarray datasets of cadmium, and sediment exposure samples of German rivers Rhine and Elbe. Bioinformatics analysis of arsenic-responsive regulatory networks were done using FastMEDUSA program. FastMEDUSA analysis identified cancer-related genes, particularly genes associated with leukemia, such as dnj-11, which encodes a protein orthologous to the mammalian ZRF1/MIDA1/MPP11/DNAJC2 family of ribosome-associated molecular chaperones. We analyzed the protective functions of several of the identified genes using RNAi. Our study indicates that C. elegans could be a substitute model to study the mechanism of metal toxicity using high-throughput expression data and bioinformatics tools such as FastMEDUSA.

  16. Whole-house arsenic water treatment provided more effective arsenic exposure reduction than point-of-use water treatment at New Jersey homes with arsenic in well water

    OpenAIRE

    Spayd, Steven E.; Robson, Mark G.; Buckley, Brian T.

    2014-01-01

    A comparison of the effectiveness of whole house (point-of-entry) and point-of-use arsenic water treatment systems in reducing arsenic exposure from well water was conducted. The non-randomized observational study recruited 49 subjects having elevated arsenic in their residential home well water in New Jersey. The subjects obtained either point-of-entry or point-of-use arsenic water treatment. Prior ingestion exposure to arsenic in well water was calculated by measuring arsenic concentrations...

  17. Arsenic mobility in contaminated lake sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An arsenic contaminated lake sediment near a landfill in Maine was used to characterize the geochemistry of arsenic and assess the influence of environmental conditions on its mobility. A kinetic model was developed to simulate the leaching ability of arsenic in lake sediments under different environmental conditions. The HM1D chemical transport model was used to model the column experiments and determine the rates of arsenic mobility from the sediment. Laboratory studies provided the information to construct a conceptual model to demonstrate the mobility of arsenic in the lake sediment. The leaching ability of arsenic in lake sediments greatly depends on the flow conditions of ground water and the geochemistry of the sediments. Large amounts of arsenic were tightly bound to the sediments. The amount of arsenic leaching out of the sediment to the water column was substantially decreased due to iron/arsenic co-precipitation at the water-sediment interface. Overall, it was found that arsenic greatly accumulated at the ground water/lake interface and it formed insoluble precipitates. - Arsenic accumulates at the ground water/lake interface, where it forms insoluble precipitates

  18. Neutron activation analysis of arsenic in Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic is considered a toxic trace element for plant, animal, and human organisms. Arsenic and certain arsenic compounds have been listed as carcinogens by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Arsenic is emitted in appreciable quantities into the atmosphere by coal combustion and the production of cement. Arsenic enters the aquatic environment through industrial activities such as smelting of metallic ores, metallurgical glassware, and ceramics as well as insecticide production and use. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) is a very sensitive, precise, and accurate method for determining arsenic. This paper is a review of research studies of arsenic in the Greek environment by NAA performed at our radioanalytical laboratory. The objectives of these studies were (a) to determine levels of arsenic concentrations in environmental materials, (b) to pinpoint arsenic pollution sources and estimate the extent of arsenic pollution, and (c) to find out whether edible marine organisms from the gulfs of Greece receiving domestic, industrial, and agricultural wastes have elevated concentrations of arsenic in their tissues that could render them dangerous for human consumption

  19. Removal processes for arsenic in constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizama A, Katherine; Fletcher, Tim D; Sun, Guangzhi

    2011-08-01

    Arsenic pollution in aquatic environments is a worldwide concern due to its toxicity and chronic effects on human health. This concern has generated increasing interest in the use of different treatment technologies to remove arsenic from contaminated water. Constructed wetlands are a cost-effective natural system successfully used for removing various pollutants, and they have shown capability for removing arsenic. This paper reviews current understanding of the removal processes for arsenic, discusses implications for treatment wetlands, and identifies critical knowledge gaps and areas worthy of future research. The reactivity of arsenic means that different arsenic species may be found in wetlands, influenced by vegetation, supporting medium and microorganisms. Despite the fact that sorption, precipitation and coprecipitation are the principal processes responsible for the removal of arsenic, bacteria can mediate these processes and can play a significant role under favourable environmental conditions. The most important factors affecting the speciation of arsenic are pH, alkalinity, temperature, dissolved oxygen, the presence of other chemical species--iron, sulphur, phosphate--,a source of carbon, and the wetland substrate. Studies of the microbial communities and the speciation of arsenic in the solid phase using advanced techniques could provide further insights on the removal of arsenic. Limited data and understanding of the interaction of the different processes involved in the removal of arsenic explain the rudimentary guidelines available for the design of wetlands systems. PMID:21549410

  20. Reduction of arsenic content in a complex galena concentrate by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López Alejandro

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bioleaching is a process that has been used in the past in mineral pretreatment of refractory sulfides, mainly in the gold, copper and uranium benefit. This technology has been proved to be cheaper, more efficient and environmentally friendly than roasting and high pressure moisture heating processes. So far the most studied microorganism in bioleaching is Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. There are a few studies about the benefit of metals of low value through bioleaching. From all of these, there are almost no studies dealing with complex minerals containing arsenopyrite (FeAsS. Reduction and/or elimination of arsenic in these ores increase their value and allows the exploitation of a vast variety of minerals that today are being underexploited. Results Arsenopyrite was totally oxidized. The sum of arsenic remaining in solution and removed by sampling represents from 22 to 33% in weight (yield of the original content in the mineral. The rest of the biooxidized arsenic form amorphous compounds that precipitate. Galena (PbS was totally oxidized too, anglesite (PbSO4 formed is virtually insoluble and remains in the solids. The influence of seven factors in a batch process was studied. The maximum rate of arsenic dissolution in the concentrate was found using the following levels of factors: small surface area of particle exposure, low pulp density, injecting air and adding 9 K medium to the system. It was also found that ferric chloride and carbon dioxide decreased the arsenic dissolution rate. Bioleaching kinetic data of arsenic solubilization were used to estimate the dilution rate for a continuous culture. Calculated dilution rates were relatively small (0.088–0.103 day-1. Conclusion Proper conditions of solubilization of arsenic during bioleaching are key features to improve the percentage (22 to 33% in weight of arsenic removal. Further studies are needed to determine other factors that influence specifically the

  1. Isolation and characterization of arsenic-resistant bacteria and possible application in bioremediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uttiya Dey

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ground water arsenic contamination is a widespread problem in many developing countries including Bangladesh and India. In recent years development of modern innovative technologies for the removal of arsenic from aqueous system has become an interesting topic for research. In this present study, two rod shaped Gram-positive bacteria are being reported, isolated from arsenic affected ground water of Purbasthali block of Burdwan, West Bengal, India, which can tolerate arsenate concentration up to 4500 ppm and 550 ppm of arsenite concentration. From biochemical analysis and 16S rRNA sequencing, they were identified as Bacillus sp. and Aneurinibacillus aneurinilyticus respectively. The isolates SW2 and SW4 can remove 51.45% and 51.99% of arsenite and 53.29% and 50.37% of arsenate, respectively from arsenic containing culture media. Both of the isolate can oxidize arsenite to less toxic arsenate. These two arsenic resistant bacteria can be used as a novel pathway for the bioremediation of arsenic.

  2. Uranium valorisation process from an uranium ore containing arsenic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this process is to remove the arsenic from a uraniferous liquor resulting from the oxidizing sulfuric digestion of an uranium ore. It is characterized in that the arsenic solubilized during the digestion is rendered insoluble as iron arsenate, prior to uranium extraction, by the addition of an alkaline agent to adjust the pH of the solution resulting from the digestion to a figure between 1.5 and 3.5 in the presence of ferric ions, so that the molar ratio (Fe111)/(As) is greater than 1. The iron intervening in this precipitation can come from the ore itself since it is an impurity contained in the uranium ore gang

  3. Arsenic in groundwater: a summary of sources and the biogeochemical and hydrogeologic factors affecting arsenic occurrence and mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barringer, Julia L.; Reilly, Pamela A.

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is a metalloid element (atomic number 33) with one naturally occurring isotope of atomic mass 75, and four oxidation states (-3, 0, +3, and +5) (Smedley and Kinniburgh, 2002). In the aqueous environment, the +3 and +5 oxidation states are most prevalent, as the oxyanions arsenite (H3AsO3 or H2AsO3- at pH ~9-11) and arsenate (H2AsO4- and HAsO42- at pH ~4-10) (Smedley and Kinniburgh, 2002). In soils, arsine gases (containing As3-) may be generated by fungi and other organisms (Woolson, 1977). The different forms of As have different toxicities, with arsine gas being the most toxic form. Of the inorganic oxyanions, arsenite is considered more toxic than arsenate, and the organic (methylated) arsenic forms are considered least toxic (for a detailed discussion of toxicity issues, the reader is referred to Mandal and Suzuki (2002)). Arsenic is a global health concern due to its toxicity and the fact that it occurs at unhealthful levels in water supplies, particularly groundwater, in more than 70 countries (Ravenscroft et al., 2009) on six continents.

  4. Difference in uptake and toxicity of trivalent and pentavalent inorganic arsenic in rat heart microvessel endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Seishiro; Cui, Xing; Kanno, Sanae; Kobayashi, Yayoi [Environmental Health Sciences Division, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, 305-8506, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Li, Song [Research Center for Environmental Risk, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, 305-8506, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Hayakawa, Toru [Environmental Health Sciences Division, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, 305-8506, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Yayoi, Inage, 263-8522, Chiba (Japan); Shraim, Amjad [Research Center for Environmental Risk, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, 305-8506, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology, Brisbane (Australia)

    2003-06-01

    Intake of inorganic arsenic is known to cause vascular diseases as well as skin lesions and cancer in humans. We investigated the differences in cytotoxicity, uptake rate of arsenic, and gene expression of antioxidative enzymes between arsenite (As{sup 3+})- and arsenate (As{sup 5+})-exposed rat heart microvessel endothelial cells. As{sup 3+} was more cytotoxic than As{sup 5+}, and LC{sub 50} values were calculated to be 36 and 220 {mu}M, respectively. As{sup 3+} (1-25 {mu}M) increased mRNA levels of antioxidant enzymes such as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), thioredoxin peroxidase 2, NADPH dehydrogenase, and glutathione S-transferase P subunit. HO-1 mRNA levels showed the most remarkable increase in response to As{sup 3+}. cDNA microarray analysis indicated that there was no prominent difference in arsenic-induced transcriptional changes between As{sup 3+}- and As{sup 5+}-exposed cells, when the cells were exposed to one-fourth the LC{sub 50} concentration of arsenic (9 and 55 {mu}M for As{sup 3+} and As{sup 5+}, respectively). N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) reduced both the cytotoxicity of inorganic arsenic and the HO-1 mRNA level, and buthionine sulfoximine enhanced cytotoxicity of inorganic arsenic. As{sup 3+} was taken up by the endothelial cells 6-7 times faster than As{sup 5+}, and the presence of NAC in the culture medium did not change the uptake rate of As{sup 3+}.These results suggest that the effects of NAC on arsenic-induced cytotoxicity and oxidative stress were due to the antioxidative role of non-protein thiols and not to chelation of arsenic in the culture medium. The difference in cellular uptake of arsenic between As{sup 3+} and As{sup 5+} appeared not to be due to the ionic charge on arsenic (at physiological pH, trivalent arsenic is neutral whereas pentavalent arsenic is negatively charged). These results suggest that the higher toxicity of As{sup 3+} compared with that of As{sup 5+} is probably due to the faster uptake of As{sup 3+} by endothelial cells

  5. Effects of plant arsenic uptake and heavy metals on arsenic distribution in an arsenic-contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fayiga, Abioye O. [Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-0290 (United States); Ma, Lena Q. [Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-0290 (United States) and Key Laboratory of Terrestrial Ecological Process, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)]. E-mail: lqma@ifas.ufl.edu; Zhou Qixing [Key Laboratory of Terrestrial Ecological Process, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2007-06-15

    This study examined the effects of heavy metals and plant arsenic uptake on soil arsenic distribution. Chemical fractionation of an arsenic-contaminated soil spiked with 50 or 200 mg kg{sup -1} Ni, Zn, Cd or Pb was performed before and after growing the arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata L for 8 weeks using NH{sub 4}Cl (water-soluble plus exchangeable, WE-As), NH{sub 4}F (Al-As), NaOH (Fe-As), and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (Ca-As). Arsenic in the soil was present primarily as the recalcitrant forms with Ca-As being the dominant fraction (45%). Arsenic taken up by P. vittata was from all fractions though Ca-As contributed the most (51-71% reduction). After 8 weeks of plant growth, the Al-As and Fe-As fractions were significantly (p < 0.01) greater in the metal-spiked soils than the control, with changes in the WE-As fraction being significantly (p = 0.007) correlated with plant arsenic removal. The plant's ability to solubilize soil arsenic from recalcitrant fractions may have enhanced its ability to hyperaccumulate arsenic. - Arsenic taken up by P. vittata was from all fractions with most from the Ca-fraction.

  6. Effects of Carbon in Flooded Paddy Soils: Implications for Microbial Activity and Arsenic Mobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avancha, S.; Boye, K.

    2014-12-01

    In the Mekong delta in Cambodia, naturally occurring arsenic (originating from erosion in the Himalaya Mountains) in paddy soils is mobilized during the seasonal flooding. As a consequence, rice grown on the flooded soils may take up arsenic and expose people eating the rice to this carcinogenic substance. Microbial activity will enhance or decrease the mobilization of arsenic depending on their metabolic pathways. Among the microbes naturally residing in the soil are denitrifying bacteria, sulfate reducers, metal reducers (Fe, Mn), arsenic reducers, methanogens, and fermenters, whose activity varies based on the presence of oxygen. The purpose of the experiment was to assess how different amendments affect the microbial activity and the arsenic mobilization during the transition from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism after flooding of naturally contaminated Cambodian soil. In a batch experiment, we investigated how the relative metabolic rate of naturally occurring microbes could vary with different types of organic carbon. The experiment was designed to measure the effects of various sources of carbon (dried rice straw, charred rice straw, manure, and glucose) on the microbial activity and arsenic release in an arsenic-contaminated paddy soil from Cambodia under flooded conditions. All amendments were added based on the carbon content in order to add 0.036 g of carbon per vial. The soil was flooded with a 10mM TRIS buffer solution at pH 7.04 in airtight 25mL serum vials and kept at 25 °C. We prepared 14 replicates per treatment to sample both gas and solution. On each sampling point, the solution replicates were sampled destructively. The gas replicates continued on and were sampled for both gas and solution on the final day of the experiment. We measured pH, total arsenic, methane, carbon dioxide, and nitrous oxide at 8 hours, 1.5 days, 3.33 days, and 6.33 days from the start of the experiment.

  7. Differential cytotoxic effects of arsenic compounds in human acute promyelocytic leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic trioxide, As2O3, has successfully been used to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Induction of apoptosis in cancerous cells has been proposed to be the underlying mechanism for the therapeutic efficacy of arsenic. To further understand the cytotoxicity of arsenic compounds in APL cells, HL-60 cells were exposed to graded concentrations of the following arsenicals for up to 48 h: arsenic trioxide (AsIII), sodium arsenate (AsV), phenylarsine oxide (PAOIII), monomethylarsonous acid (MMAIII), monomethylarsonic acid (MMAV) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMAV), and the viability and modes of cell death assessed. The arsenic-exposed cells were stained with annexin V-PE and 7-aminoactinomycin D (7-AAD) and analyzed by flow cytometry in order to detect apoptotic and viable cells while cell morphology was visualized using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Acridine orange staining and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (MAP-LC3) detection were used to recognize autophagic cell death. The results showed that the compounds reduced viable HL-60 cells by inducing apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. None of the compounds tested caused a significant change in binding of acridine orange or redistribution of MAP-LC3. Potencies of the six different arsenic compounds tested were ranked as PAOIII > MMAIII ≥ AsIII > AsV > MMAV > DMAV. An increase in caspase-3 activity by PAOIII, MMAIII and DMAV implied that these compounds induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells through a caspase-dependent mechanism, but the other arsenic compounds failed to activate caspase-3, suggesting that they induce apoptosis by an alternative pathway.

  8. Transcriptomic Responses During Early Development Following Arsenic Exposure in Western Clawed Frogs, Silurana tropicalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Koch, Iris; Gibson, Laura A; Loughery, Jennifer R; Martyniuk, Christopher J; Button, Mark; Caumette, Guilhem; Reimer, Kenneth J; Cullen, William R; Langlois, Valerie S

    2015-12-01

    Arsenic compounds are widespread environmental contaminants and exposure elicits serious health issues, including early developmental anomalies. Depending on the oxidation state, the intermediates of arsenic metabolism interfere with a range of subcellular events, but the fundamental molecular events that lead to speciation-dependent arsenic toxicity are not fully elucidated. This study therefore assesses the impact of arsenic exposure on early development by measuring speciation and gene expression profiles in the developing Western clawed frog (Silurana tropicalis) larvae following the environmental relevant 0.5 and 1 ppm arsenate exposure. Using HPLC-ICP-MS, arsenate, dimethylarsenic acid, arsenobetaine, arsenocholine, and tetramethylarsonium ion were detected. Microarray and pathway analyses were utilized to characterize the comprehensive transcriptomic responses to arsenic exposure. Clustering analysis of expression data showed distinct gene expression patterns in arsenate treated groups when compared with the control. Pathway enrichment revealed common biological themes enriched in both treatments, including cell signal transduction, cell survival, and developmental pathways. Moreover, the 0.5 ppm exposure led to the enrichment of pathways and biological processes involved in arsenic intake or efflux, as well as histone remodeling. These compensatory responses are hypothesized to be responsible for maintaining an in-body arsenic level comparable to control animals. With no appreciable changes observed in malformation and mortality between control and exposed larvae, this is the first study to suggest that the underlying transcriptomic regulations related to signal transduction, cell survival, developmental pathways, and histone remodeling may contribute to maintaining ongoing development while coping with the potential arsenic toxicity in S. tropicalis during early development. PMID:26427749

  9. Interaction between arsenic exposure from drinking water and genetic susceptibility in carotid intima–media thickness in Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Fen [Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Jasmine, Farzana; Kibriya, Muhammad G. [Department of Health Studies, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); The University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Liu, Mengling; Cheng, Xin [Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Parvez, Faruque [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York City, NY (United States); Paul-Brutus, Rachelle [Department of Health Studies, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); The University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Islam, Tariqul; Paul, Rina Rani; Sarwar, Golam; Ahmed, Alauddin [U-Chicago Research Bangladesh, Ltd., Dhaka (Bangladesh); Jiang, Jieying [Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Islam, Tariqul [U-Chicago Research Bangladesh, Ltd., Dhaka (Bangladesh); Slavkovich, Vesna [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York City, NY (United States); Rundek, Tatjana [Department of Neurology, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Department of Public Health Sciences, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Demmer, Ryan T.; Desvarieux, Moise [Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York City, NY (United States); and others

    2014-05-01

    Epidemiologic studies that evaluated genetic susceptibility for the effects of arsenic exposure from drinking water on subclinical atherosclerosis are limited. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 1078 participants randomly selected from the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study in Bangladesh to evaluate whether the association between arsenic exposure and carotid artery intima–media thickness (cIMT) differs by 207 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 18 genes related to arsenic metabolism, oxidative stress, inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction. Although not statistically significant after correcting for multiple testing, nine SNPs in APOE, AS3MT, PNP, and TNF genes had a nominally statistically significant interaction with well-water arsenic in cIMT. For instance, the joint presence of a higher level of well-water arsenic (≥ 40.4 μg/L) and the GG genotype of AS3MT rs3740392 was associated with a difference of 40.9 μm (95% CI = 14.4, 67.5) in cIMT, much greater than the difference of cIMT associated with the genotype alone (β = − 5.1 μm, 95% CI = − 31.6, 21.3) or arsenic exposure alone (β = 7.2 μm, 95% CI = − 3.1, 17.5). The pattern and magnitude of the interactions were similar when urinary arsenic was used as the exposure variable. Additionally, the at-risk genotypes of the AS3MT SNPs were positively related to the proportion of monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) in urine, which is indicative of arsenic methylation capacity. The findings provide novel evidence that genetic variants related to arsenic metabolism may play an important role in arsenic-induced subclinical atherosclerosis. Future replication studies in diverse populations are needed to confirm the findings. - Highlights: • Nine SNPs had a nominally significant interaction with well-water arsenic in cIMT. • Three SNPs in AS3MT showed nominally significant interactions with urinary arsenic. • cIMT was much higher among subjects with higher arsenic exposure and AS3MT

  10. Interaction between arsenic exposure from drinking water and genetic susceptibility in carotid intima–media thickness in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidemiologic studies that evaluated genetic susceptibility for the effects of arsenic exposure from drinking water on subclinical atherosclerosis are limited. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 1078 participants randomly selected from the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study in Bangladesh to evaluate whether the association between arsenic exposure and carotid artery intima–media thickness (cIMT) differs by 207 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 18 genes related to arsenic metabolism, oxidative stress, inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction. Although not statistically significant after correcting for multiple testing, nine SNPs in APOE, AS3MT, PNP, and TNF genes had a nominally statistically significant interaction with well-water arsenic in cIMT. For instance, the joint presence of a higher level of well-water arsenic (≥ 40.4 μg/L) and the GG genotype of AS3MT rs3740392 was associated with a difference of 40.9 μm (95% CI = 14.4, 67.5) in cIMT, much greater than the difference of cIMT associated with the genotype alone (β = − 5.1 μm, 95% CI = − 31.6, 21.3) or arsenic exposure alone (β = 7.2 μm, 95% CI = − 3.1, 17.5). The pattern and magnitude of the interactions were similar when urinary arsenic was used as the exposure variable. Additionally, the at-risk genotypes of the AS3MT SNPs were positively related to the proportion of monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) in urine, which is indicative of arsenic methylation capacity. The findings provide novel evidence that genetic variants related to arsenic metabolism may play an important role in arsenic-induced subclinical atherosclerosis. Future replication studies in diverse populations are needed to confirm the findings. - Highlights: • Nine SNPs had a nominally significant interaction with well-water arsenic in cIMT. • Three SNPs in AS3MT showed nominally significant interactions with urinary arsenic. • cIMT was much higher among subjects with higher arsenic exposure and AS3MT

  11. Probing for the Activities of Arsenic and Selenium Metabolizing Microbes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, J. F.

    2007-12-01

    Microbial activities can directly impact the mobility and toxicity of arsenic and selenium in the environment. Arsenic is cycled through oxidation/reduction and methylation/demethylation reactions as part of resistance and respiratory processes. The requirement for selenium is primarily for incorporation into selenocysteine and its function in selenoenzymes. Selenium oxyanions can also serve as an electron acceptor in anaerobic respiration. Both culture and culture-independent methods have been developed to detect the presence and activity of organisms capable of arsenic and selenium transformations. Enrichment media have been successful at cultivating arsenate respiring bacteria from a variety of environments, however, both electron donor and the concentration of arsenic can exert strong selective pressure. Thus, the organisms in the enrichment culture may not be the dominant organisms in the environment. Culture-independent methods, including immunological approaches (e.g., polyclonal antibodies to ArrA) and PCR-based technologies, have also had mixed success. PCR-primers designed to amplify portions of genes involved in resistance (e.g., arsC, acr3), respiration (e.g., arrA), and oxidation (e.g., aoxB) have been useful in several environments. Applications include T-RFLP, rt-PCR, and DGGE analyses. Nevertheless, these primers do not work with certain organisms suggesting the existence of additional enzymes and pathways. Although the biosynthetic pathway (and the proteins involved) for selenocysteine has been described in detail, much less is known about selenium methylation, assimilation and respiration. Only one respiratory selenate reductase has been characterized and its close sequence identity with chlorate and perchlorate reductases has complicated efforts to design a functional probe. Thus many aspects of the biogeochemical cycle of selenium remains to be explored.

  12. Urinary Arsenic Metabolites of Subjects Exposed to Elevated Arsenic Present in Coal in Shaanxi Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linsheng Yang

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to arsenic (As poisoning caused by naturally occurring inorganic arsenic-contaminated water consumption, coal arsenic poisoning (CAP induced by elevated arsenic exposure from coal combustion has rarely been reported. In this study, the concentrations and distributions of urinary arsenic metabolites in 57 volunteers (36 subjects with skin lesions and 21 subjects without skin lesions, who had been exposed to elevated levels of arsenic present in coal in Changshapu village in the south of Shaanxi Province (China, were reported. The urinary arsenic species, including inorganic arsenic (iAs [arsenite (iAsIII and arsenate (iAsV], monomethylarsonic acid (MMAV and dimethylarsinic acid (DMAV, were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC combined with inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS. The relative distributions of arsenic species, the primary methylation index (PMI = MMAV/iAs and the secondary methylation index (SMI = DMAV/MMAV were calculated to assess the metabolism of arsenic. Subjects with skin lesions had a higher concentration of urinary arsenic and a lower arsenic methylation capability than subjects without skin lesions. Women had a significantly higher methylation capability of arsenic than men, as defined by a higher percent DMAV and SMI in urine among women, which was the one possible interpretation of women with a higher concentration of urinary arsenic but lower susceptibility to skin lesions. The findings suggested that not only the dose of arsenic exposure but also the arsenic methylation capability have an impact on the individual susceptibility to skin lesions induced by coal arsenic exposure.

  13. Plasma-aminothiols status and inverse correlation of total homocysteine with B-vitamins in arsenic exposed population of West Bengal, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Ashit K; Manna, Sujoy K; Roy, Sanjit K; Chakraborty, Manisha; Das, Surajit; Naskar, Jnan P

    2016-09-18

    Chronic arsenic toxicity is a serious environmental health problem across the world. Bangladesh and India (particularly the state of West Bengal) are the worst affected countries with such problem. The present study reports plasma-aminothiols (p-aminothiols) like L-cysteine (L-Cys), cysteinyl glycine (Cys-gly), total homocysteine (t-Hcy) and glutathione (GSH) status, and the inverse relationship of t-Hcy with B-vitamins (B1, B6, B9 and B12) in arsenic exposed population of West Bengal, India. Reverse phase HPLC was used to measure p-aminothiols and serum B-vitamins in different arsenic exposed population. Arsenic in drinking water and urine were measured by flow injection analysis system - Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (FIAS-AAS) and Transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA-AAS) techniques, respectively. Water arsenic exposure was >50 µg/L in 50% population, of which majority (33.58%) belong to the range of >50-500 µg/L and more than 8% were even >1000 µg/L. Urine arsenic (µg/g creatinine) levels increased with arsenic exposure. The variability among p-aminothiols was also observed with higher exposure to arsenic in drinking water. A significant difference between exposed and control population was noticed for plasma L-Cys. The difference of B-vitamins between the population exposed to 50 µg/L arsenic in drinking water was also found to be significant. B9 and B12 deficiency with increased consumption of arsenic in water corroborates the anemic conditions commonly observed among arsenic exposed population. The aminothiol status indicated oxidative stress in exposed population. This study demonstrated progressive increase in plasma t-Hcy as well as inverse relationships of serum B-vitamins with increased water arsenic concentration. PMID:27336853

  14. Bimetallic nanoparticles for arsenic detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghimi, Nafiseh; Mohapatra, Mamata; Leung, Kam Tong

    2015-06-01

    Effective and sensitive monitoring of heavy metal ions, particularly arsenic, in drinking water is very important to risk management of public health. Arsenic is one of the most serious natural pollutants in soil and water in more than 70 countries in the world. The need for very sensitive sensors to detect ultralow amounts of arsenic has attracted great research interest. Here, bimetallic FePt, FeAu, FePd, and AuPt nanoparticles (NPs) are electrochemically deposited on the Si(100) substrate, and their electrochemical properties are studied for As(III) detection. We show that trace amounts of As(III) in neutral pH could be determined by using anodic stripping voltammetry. The synergistic effect of alloying with Fe leads to better performance for Fe-noble metal NPs (Au, Pt, and Pd) than pristine noble metal NPs (without Fe alloying). Limit of detection and linear range are obtained for FePt, FeAu, and FePd NPs. The best performance is found for FePt NPs with a limit of detection of 0.8 ppb and a sensitivity of 0.42 μA ppb(-1). The selectivity of the sensor has also been tested in the presence of a large amount of Cu(II), as the most detrimental interferer ion for As detection. The bimetallic NPs therefore promise to be an effective, high-performance electrochemical sensor for the detection of ultratrace quantities of arsenic. PMID:25938763

  15. Arsenic, Prokaryotes, and Closed Basin Soda Lakes of the Western USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oremland, R. S.

    2006-12-01

    A number of saline, alkaline soda lakes in the Great Basin and Mojave Desert of the United States have unusually high concentrations of inorganic arsenic dissolved in their brine-waters. The arsenic originates from natural rather than anthropogenic sources, namely volcanic hydrothermal inputs. When this influx is coupled with evapo-concentration and the unique chemical behavior of arsenic oxyanions in alkaline waters, it results in extremely elevated As concentrations. For example, the salinity and arsenate levels of 3 comparable soda lakes (pH 9.8) are: Big Soda Lake, NV (27 g/L; 20 uM), Mono Lake, CA (90 g/L; 200 uM), and Searles Lake, CA (340 g/L; 3,900 uM). The arsenic oxidation state changes from As5+ (arsenate) to As3+ (arsenite) with vertical transition from their oxygenated surface water to their anoxic bottom water. Similar phenomena occur in their littoral sediments. These lakes also harbor active populations of prokaryotes that achieve these As redox changes either by using arsenate as an electron acceptor for respiration, or by employing arsenite as a chemoautotrophic electron donor. Diverse microorganisms have been identified in these systems that are involved in the biogeochemical cycling of arsenic therein, and in situ studies made with radiotracer (73As) and other means showed that these redox reactions occur at rapid rates. However, other than their use for waterfowl hunting (Big Soda Lake), as a region of scenic beauty (Mono Lake), or as a resource for the chemical industry (Searles Lake), there is little concern about the arsenic in these systems because the waters are not potable and their chemistry is too extreme to allow for the presence of fish. Nonetheless, microbial processes that govern arsenic biogeochemistry can greatly influence the hydrologic mobility and toxicity of this element in freshwater systems, such as drinking water aquifers. Moreover, anthropogenic inputs of arsenic can also occur in closed basin lakes in this region, such as

  16. Determination of arsenic compounds in earthworms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiszinger, A.; Goessler, W.; Kuehnelt, D.; Kosmus, W. [Karl-Franzens-Univ., Graz (Austria). Inst. for Analytical Chemistry; Francesconi, K. [Odense Univ. (Denmark). Inst. of Biology

    1998-08-01

    Earthworms and soil collected from six sites in Styria, Austria, were investigated for total arsenic concentrations by ICP-MS and for arsenic compounds by HPLC-ICP-MS. Total arsenic concentrations ranged from 3.2 to 17.9 mg/kg dry weight in the worms and from 5.0 to 79.7 mg/kg dry weight in the soil samples. There was no strict correlation between the total arsenic concentrations in the worms and soil. Arsenic compounds were extracted from soil and a freeze-dried earthworm sample with a methanol/water mixture (9:1, v/v). The extracts were evaporated to dryness, redissolved in water, and chromatographed on an anion- and a cation-exchange column. Arsenic compounds were identified by comparison of the retention times with known standards. Only traces of arsenic acid could be extracted from the soil with the methanol/water (9:1, v/v) mixture. The major arsenic compounds detected in the extracts of the earthworms were arsenous acid and arsenic acid. Arsenobetaine was present as a minor constituent, and traces of dimethylarsinic acid were also detected. Two dimethylarsinoyltribosides were also identified in the extracts by co-chromatography with standard compounds. This is the first report of the presence of dimethylarsinoylribosides in a terrestrial organism. Two other minor arsenic species were present in the extract, but their retention times did not match with the retention times of the available standards.

  17. Studies on arsenic transforming groundwater bacteria and their role in arsenic release from subsurface sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Angana; Kazy, Sufia K; Sar, Pinaki

    2014-01-01

    Ten different Gram-negative arsenic (As)-resistant and As-transforming bacteria isolated from As-rich groundwater of West Bengal were characterized to assess their role in As mobilization. 16S rRNA gene analysis confirmed the affiliation of these bacteria to genera Achromobacter, Brevundimonas, Rhizobium, Ochrobactrum, and Pseudoxanthomonas. Along with superior As-resistance and As-transformation abilities, the isolates showed broad metabolic capacity in terms of utilizing a variety of electron donors and acceptors (including As) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively. Arsenic transformation studies performed under various conditions indicated highly efficient As(3+) oxidation or As(5+) reduction kinetics. Genes encoding As(3+) oxidase (aioA), cytosolic As(5+) reductase (arsC), and As(3+) efflux pump (arsB and acr3) were detected within the test isolates. Sequence analyses suggested that As homeostasis genes (particularly arsC, arsB, and acr3) were acquired by most of the bacteria through horizontal gene transfer. A strong correlation between As resistance phenotype and the presence of As(3+) transporter genes was observed. Microcosm study showed that bacterial strain having cytosolic As(5+) reductase property could play important role in mobilizing As (as As(3+)) from subsurface sediment. PMID:24764001

  18. Breast-feeding Protects against Arsenic Exposure in Bangladeshi Infants

    OpenAIRE

    Fängström, Britta; Moore, Sophie; Nermell, Barbro; Kuenstl, Linda; Goessler, Walter; Grandér, Margaretha; Kabir, Iqbal; Palm, Brita; Arifeen, Shams El; Vahter, Marie

    2008-01-01

    Background Chronic arsenic exposure causes a wide range of health effects, but little is known about critical windows of exposure. Arsenic readily crosses the placenta, but the few available data on postnatal exposure to arsenic via breast milk are not conclusive. Aim Our goal was to assess the arsenic exposure through breast milk in Bangladeshi infants, living in an area with high prevalence of arsenic-rich tube-well water. Methods We analyzed metabolites of inorganic arsenic in breast milk ...

  19. Factors Affecting Arsenic Methylation in Arsenic-Exposed Humans: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Hui; Niu, Qiang; Xu, Mengchuan; Rui, Dongsheng; Xu, Shangzhi; Feng, Gangling; Ding, Yusong; Li, Shugang; Jing, Mingxia

    2016-01-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure is a critical public health issue in many countries. The metabolism of arsenic in vivo is complicated because it can be influenced by many factors. In the present meta-analysis, two researchers independently searched electronic databases, including the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Springer, Embase, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure, to analyze factors influencing arsenic methylation. The concentrations of the following arsenic metabolites increase (p< 0.000001)...

  20. Approaches to Increase Arsenic Awareness in Bangladesh: An Evaluation of an Arsenic Education Program

    OpenAIRE

    George, Christine Marie; Factor-Litvak, Pam; Khan, Khalid; ISLAM, Tariqul; Singha, Ashit; Moon-Howard, Joyce; van Geen, Alexander; Graziano, Joseph H.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to design and evaluate a household-level arsenic education and well water arsenic testing intervention to increase arsenic awareness in Bangladesh. The authors randomly selected 1,000 study respondents located in 20 villages in Singair, Bangladesh. The main outcome was the change in knowledge of arsenic from baseline to follow-up 4 to 6 months after the household received the intervention. This was assessed through a pre- and postintervention quiz concerning kn...

  1. IDENTIFICATION OF INTERSPECIES CONCORDANCE OF MECHANISMS OF ARSENIC-INDUCED BLADDER CANCER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to arsenic causes cancer by inducing a variety of responses that affect the expression of genes associated with numerous biological pathways leading to altered cell growth and proliferation, signaling, apoptosis and oxidative stress response. Affymetrix GeneChip® arrays ...

  2. Determination of inorganic arsenic in white fish using microwave-assisted alkaline alcoholic sample dissolution and HPLC-ICP-MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Erik H.; Hansen, Marianne [Danish Institute for Food and Veterinary Research (DFVF), Department of Chemistry, Soeborg (Denmark); Engman, Joakim; Jorhem, Lars [National Food Administration, Research and Development Department, Uppsala (Sweden); Sloth, Jens J. [National Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research (NIFES), Bergen (Norway)

    2005-01-01

    An analytical method for the determination of inorganic arsenic in fish samples using HPLC-ICP-MS has been developed. The fresh homogenised sample was subjected to microwave-assisted dissolution by sodium hydroxide in ethanol, which dissolved the sample and quantitatively oxidised arsenite (As(III)) to arsenate (As(V)). This allowed for the determination of inorganic arsenic as a single species, i.e. As(V), by anion-exchange HPLC-ICP-MS. The completeness of the oxidation was verified by recovery of As(V) which was added to the samples as As(III) prior to the dissolution procedure. The full recovery of As(V) at 104{+-}7% (n=5) indicated good analytical accuracy. The uncertified inorganic arsenic content in the certified reference material TORT-2 was 0.186{+-}0.014 ng g{sup -1} (n=6). The method was employed for the determination of total arsenic and inorganic arsenic in 60 fish samples including salmon from fresh and saline waters and in plaice. The majority of the results for inorganic arsenic were lower than the LOD of 3 ng g{sup -1}, which corresponded to less than one per thousand of the total arsenic content in the fish samples. For mackerel, however, the recovery of As(III) was incomplete and the method was not suited for this fat-rich fish. (orig.)

  3. Linking Microbial Activity with Arsenic Fate during Cow Dung Disposal of Arsenic-Bearing Wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, T. M.; Reddy, R.; Tan, J.; Hayes, K. F.; Raskin, L.

    2014-12-01

    To address widespread arsenic contamination of drinking water sources numerous technologies have been developed to remove arsenic. All technologies result in the production of an arsenic-bearing waste that must be evaluated and disposed in a manner to limit the potential for environmental release and human exposure. One disposal option that is commonly recommended for areas without access to landfills is the mixing of arsenic-bearing wastes with cow dung. These recommendations are made based on the ability of microorganisms to create volatile arsenic species (including mono-, di-, and tri-methylarsine gases) to be diluted in the atmosphere. However, most studies of environmental microbial communities have found only a small fraction (wastes produced during drinking water treatment in West Bengal, India. Arsenic in gaseous, aqueous, and solid phases was measured. Consistent with previous reports, less than 0.02% of the total arsenic present was volatilized. A much higher amount (~5%) of the total arsenic was mobilized into the liquid phase. Through the application of molecular tools, including 16S rRNA sequencing and quantification of gene transcripts involved in methanogenesis, this study links microbial community activity with arsenic fate in potential disposal environments. These results illustrate that disposal of arsenic-bearing wastes by mixing with cow dung does not achieve its end goal of promoting arsenic volatilization but rather appears to increase arsenic mobilization in the aqueous phase, raising concerns with this approach.

  4. Arsenic redox transformation by Pseudomonas sp. HN-2 isolated from arsenic-contaminated soil in Hunan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhennan; Yin, Naiyi; Cai, Xiaolin; Wang, Zhenzhou; Cui, Yanshan

    2016-09-01

    A mesophilic, Gram-negative, arsenite[As(III)]-oxidizing and arsenate[As(V)]-reducing bacterial strain, Pseudomonas sp. HN-2, was isolated from an As-contaminated soil. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing indicated that the strain was closely related to Pseudomonas stutzeri. Under aerobic conditions, this strain oxidized 92.0% (61.4μmol/L) of arsenite to arsenate within 3hr of incubation. Reduction of As(V) to As(III) occurred in anoxic conditions. Pseudomonas sp. HN-2 is among the first soil bacteria shown to be capable of both aerobic As(III) oxidation and anoxic As(V) reduction. The strain, as an efficient As(III) oxidizer and As(V) reducer in Pseudomonas, has the potential to impact arsenic mobility in both anoxic and aerobic environments, and has potential application in As remediation processes. PMID:27593283

  5. Current developments in toxicological research on arsenic

    OpenAIRE

    Bolt, Hermann M.

    2013-01-01

    There is a plethora of recent publications on all aspects relevant to the toxicology of arsenic (As). Over centuries exposures to arsenic continue to be a major public health problem in many countries. In particular, the occurrence of high As concentrations in groundwater of Southeast Asia receives now much attention. Therefore, arsenic is a high-priority matter for toxicological research. Key exposure to As are (traditional) medicines, combustion of As-rich coal, presence of As in groundwate...

  6. Dissolved Air Flotation of arsenic adsorbent particles

    OpenAIRE

    Santander, M.; Valderrama, L.

    2015-01-01

    The removal of arsenic from synthetic effluent was studied using the adsorbent particle flotation technique (APF) and dissolved air flotation (DAF). A sample of an iron mineral was used as adsorbent particles of arsenic, ferric chloride as coagulant, cationic polyacrylamide (NALCO 9808) as flocculants, and sodium oleate as collector. Adsorption studies to determine the pH influence, contact time, and adsorbent particles concentration on the adsorption of arsenic were carried out along with fl...

  7. Arsenic Toxicity in Male Reproduction and Development

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yoon-Jae; Kim, Jong-Min

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic is a toxic metalloid that exists ubiquitously in the environment, and affects global health problems due to its carcinogenicity. In most populations, the main source of arsenic exposure is the drinking water. In drinking water, chronic exposure to arsenic is associated with increased risks of various cancers including those of skin, lung, bladder, and liver, as well as numerous other non-cancer diseases including gastrointestinal and cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and neurologic a...

  8. Effect of dietary treatment with dimethylarsinous acid (DMAIII) on the urinary bladder epithelium of arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt) knockout and C57BL/6 wild type female mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► As3mt KO and WT mice were treated with DMAIII for 4 weeks in drinking water. ► No treatment-related death or whole body toxicity observed in any of the groups. ► Urothelium showed simple hyperplasia in treated KO and WT mice. ► BrdU labeling index of urothelium was significantly increased in treated KO mice. - Abstract: Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) is carcinogenic to the human urinary bladder. It produces urothelial cytotoxicity and proliferation in rats and mice. DMAV, a major methylated urinary metabolite of iAs, is a rat bladder carcinogen, but without effects on the mouse urothelium. DMAIII was shown to be the likely urinary metabolite of DMAV inducing urothelial changes and is also postulated to be one of the active metabolites of iAs. To evaluate potential DMAIII-induced urothelial effects, it was administered to As3mt knockout mice which cannot methylate arsenicals. Female C57BL/6 wild type and As3mt knockout mice (10/group) were administered DMAIII, 77.3 ppm in water for four weeks. Urothelial effects were evaluated by light and scanning electron microscopy (EM) and immunohistochemical detection of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation. EM findings were rated 1–5, with higher rating indicating greater extent of cytotoxicity visualized. DMAIII significantly increased the BrdU labeling index, a ratio of BrdU labeled cells to non-labeled cells, in the treated knockout group compared to control and wild type treated groups. DMAIII induced simple hyperplasia in more knockout mice (4/10) compared to wild type mice (2/10). All treated knockout mice had more and larger intracytoplasmic granules compared to the treated wild type mice. Changes in EM classification were not significant. In conclusion, DMAIII induces urothelial toxicity and regenerative hyperplasia in mice and most likely plays a role in inorganic arsenic-induced urothelial changes. However, DMAV does not induce hyperplasia in mice, suggesting that urinary

  9. Acute arsenic poisoning in two siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Melisa W; Boyer, Edward W; Kleinman, Monica E; Rodig, Nancy M; Ewald, Michele Burns

    2005-07-01

    We report a case series of acute arsenic poisoning of 2 siblings, a 4-month-old male infant and his 2-year-old sister. Each child ingested solubilized inorganic arsenic from an outdated pesticide that was misidentified as spring water. The 4-month-old child ingested a dose of arsenic that was lethal despite extraordinary attempts at arsenic removal, including chelation therapy, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, exchange transfusion, and hemodialysis. The 2-year-old fared well with conventional therapy. PMID:15995066

  10. XAS Studies of Arsenic in the Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic is present in low concentrations in much of the Earth's crust and changes in its speciation are vital to understanding its transport and toxicity in the environment. We have used X-ray absorption spectroscopy to investigate the coordination sites of arsenic in a wide variety of samples, including soil and earthworm tissues from arsenic-contaminated land, and human hair and nail samples from people exposed to arsenic in Cambodia. Our results confirm the effectiveness of using X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy to determine speciation changes in environmental samples

  11. Arsenic in the soils of Zimapan, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic concentrations of 73 soil samples collected in the semi-arid Zimapan Valley range from 4 to 14 700 mg As kg-1. Soil arsenic concentrations decrease with distance from mines and tailings and slag heaps and exceed 400 mg kg-1 only within 500 m of these arsenic sources. Soil arsenic concentrations correlate positively with Cu, Pb, and Zn concentrations, suggesting a strong association with ore minerals known to exist in the region. Some As was associated with Fe and Mn oxyhydroxides, this association is less for contaminated than for uncontaminated samples. Very little As was found in the mobile water-soluble or exchangeable fractions. The soils are not arsenic contaminated at depths greater than 100 cm below the surface. Although much of the arsenic in the soils is associated with relatively immobile solid phases, this represents a long-term source of arsenic to the environment. -- Much of the arsenic is relatively immobile but presents long-term source of arsenic

  12. Arsenic biotransformation and release by bacteria indigenous to arsenic contaminated groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Dhiraj; Kazy, Sufia K; Banerjee, Tirtha Das; Gupta, Ashok K; Pal, Taraknath; Sar, Pinaki

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic (As) biotransformation and release by indigenous bacteria from As rich groundwater was investigated. Metabolic landscape of 173 bacterial isolates indicated broad catabolic repertoire including abundance of As(5+) reductase activity and abilities in utilizing wide ranges of organic and inorganic respiratory substrates. Abundance of As homeostasis genes and utilization of hydrocarbon as carbon/electron donor and As(5+) as electron acceptor were noted within the isolates. Sediment microcosm study (for 300 days) showed a pivotal role of metal reducing facultative anaerobic bacteria in toxic As(3+) release in aqueous phase. Inhabitant bacteria catalyze As transformation and facilitate its release through a cascade of reactions including mineral bioweathering and As(5+) and/or Fe(3+) reduction activities. Compared to anaerobic incubation with As(5+) reducing strains, oxic state and/or incubation with As(3+) oxidizing bacteria resulted in reduced As release, thus indicating a strong role of such condition or biocatalytic mechanism in controlling in situ As contamination. PMID:25782634

  13. Urinary arsenic metabolism in a Western Chinese population exposed to high-dose inorganic arsenic in drinking water: Influence of ethnicity and genetic polymorphisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the differences in urinary arsenic metabolism patterns of individuals exposed to a high concentration of inorganic arsenic (iAs) in drinking water, an epidemiological investigation was conducted with 155 individuals living in a village where the arsenic concentration in the drinking water was 969 μg/L. Blood and urine samples were collected from 66 individuals including 51 cases with skin lesions and 15 controls without skin lesions. The results showed that monomethylated arsenic (MMA), the percentage of MMA (%MMA) and the ratio of MMA to iAs (MMA/iAs) were significantly increased in patients with skin lesions as compared to controls, while dimethylated arsenic (DMA), the percentage of DMA (%DMA) and the ratio of DMA to MMA (DMA/MMA) were significantly reduced. The percent DMA of individuals with the Ala/Asp genotype of glutathione S-transferase omega 1 (GSTO1) was significantly lower than those with Ala/Ala. The percent MMA of individuals with the A2B/A2B genotype of arsenic (+ 3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) was significantly lower than those with AB/A2B. The iAs and total arsenic (tAs) content in the urine of a Tibetan population were significantly higher than that of Han and Hui ethnicities, whereas MMA/iAs was significantly lower than that of Han and Hui ethnicities. Our results showed that when exposed to the same arsenic environment, different individuals exhibited different urinary arsenic metabolism patterns. Gender and ethnicity affect these differences and above polymorphisms may be effectors too. - Highlights: • We first survey a village with high iAs content in the drinking water (969 μg/L). • 90 villagers suffered typical skin lesions with a morbidity rate of 58%. • Cases exhibited higher %MMA and MMA/iAs, and lower %DMA and DMA/MMA than controls. • Gender and ethnicity affect the differences of iAs methylation metabolism levels. • GSTO1 and AS3MT gene polymorphisms may be factors too

  14. Chromatographic Separation of Selenium and Arsenic: A Potential 72Se/72As Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wycoff, Donald E.; Gott, Matthew D.; DeGraffenreid, Anthony J.; Morrow, Ryan P.; Sisay, Nebiat; Embree, Mary F.; Ballard, Beau; Fassbender, Michael E.; Cutler, Cathy S.; Ketring, Alan R.; Jurisson, Silvia S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary An anion exchange method was developed to separate selenium and arsenic for potential utility in a 72Se/72As generator. The separation of the daughter 72As from the 72Se parent is based on the relative acid-base behavior of the two oxo-anions in their highest oxidation states. At pH 1.5, selenate is retained on strongly basic anion exchange resin as HSeO4− and SeO42−, while neutral arsenic acid, H3AsO4, is eluted. PMID:24679827

  15. Chromatographic separation of selenium and arsenic: A potential (72)Se/(72)As generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wycoff, Donald E; Gott, Matthew D; DeGraffenreid, Anthony J; Morrow, Ryan P; Sisay, Nebiat; Embree, Mary F; Ballard, Beau; Fassbender, Michael E; Cutler, Cathy S; Ketring, Alan R; Jurisson, Silvia S

    2014-05-01

    An anion exchange method was developed to separate selenium and arsenic for potential utility in a (72)Se/(72)As generator. The separation of the daughter (72)As from the (72)Se parent is based on the relative acid-base behavior of the two oxo-anions in their highest oxidation states. At pH 1.5, selenate is retained on strongly basic anion exchange resin as HSeO4(-) and SeO4(2-), while neutral arsenic acid, H3AsO4, is eluted. PMID:24679827

  16. Chromatographic Separation of Selenium and Arsenic: A Potential 72Se/72As Generator

    OpenAIRE

    Wycoff, Donald E.; Gott, Matthew D.; DeGraffenreid, Anthony J.; Morrow, Ryan P.; Sisay, Nebiat; Embree, Mary F.; Ballard, Beau; Fassbender, Michael E.; Cutler, Cathy S.; Ketring, Alan R.; Jurisson, Silvia S.

    2014-01-01

    An anion exchange method was developed to separate selenium and arsenic for potential utility in a 72Se/72As generator. The separation of the daughter 72As from the 72Se parent is based on the relative acid-base behavior of the two oxo-anions in their highest oxidation states. At pH 1.5, selenate is retained on strongly basic anion exchange resin as HSeO4− and SeO42−, while neutral arsenic acid, H3AsO4, is eluted.

  17. Speciation and health risk considerations of arsenic in the edible mushroom laccaria amethystina collected from contaminated and uncontaminated locations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt; Hansen, M.; Gössler, W.

    1998-01-01

    in the highly arsenate-contaminated soil (500-800 mu g As g(-1)) the mushrooms or their associated bacteria were able to biosynthesize dimethylarsinic acid from arsinic acid in the soil. Furthermore, arsenobetaine and trimethylarsine oxide were detected for the first time in Laccaria amethystina. Additionally......Samples of the edible mushroom Laccaria amethystina, which is known to accumulate arsenic, were collected from two uncontaminated beech forests and an arsenic-contaminated one in Denmark, The total arsenic concentration was 23 and 77 mu g As g(-1) (dry weight) in the two uncontaminated samples...... and 1420 mu g As g(-1) in the contaminated sample. The arsenic species were liberated from the samples using focused microwave-assisted extraction, and were separated and detected by anion- and cation-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography with an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer...

  18. Genetic polymorphisms in glutathione S-transferase (GST) superfamily and arsenic metabolism in residents of the Red River Delta, Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To elucidate the role of genetic factors in arsenic metabolism, we investigated associations of genetic polymorphisms in the members of glutathione S-transferase (GST) superfamily with the arsenic concentrations in hair and urine, and urinary arsenic profile in residents in the Red River Delta, Vietnam. Genotyping was conducted for GST ω1 (GSTO1) Ala140Asp, Glu155del, Glu208Lys, Thr217Asn, and Ala236Val, GST ω2 (GSTO2) Asn142Asp, GST π1 (GSTP1) Ile105Val, GST μ1 (GSTM1) wild/null, and GST θ1 (GSTT1) wild/null. There were no mutation alleles for GSTO1 Glu208Lys, Thr217Asn, and Ala236Val in this population. GSTO1 Glu155del hetero type showed higher urinary concentration of AsV than the wild homo type. Higher percentage of DMAV in urine of GSTM1 wild type was observed compared with that of the null type. Strong correlations between GSTP1 Ile105Val and arsenic exposure level and profile were observed in this study. Especially, heterozygote of GSTP1 Ile105Val had a higher metabolic capacity from inorganic arsenic to monomethyl arsenic, while the opposite trend was observed for ability of metabolism from AsV to AsIII. Furthermore, other factors including sex, age, body mass index, arsenic level in drinking water, and genotypes of As (+ 3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) were also significantly co-associated with arsenic level and profile in the Vietnamese. To our knowledge, this is the first study indicating the associations of genetic factors of GST superfamily with arsenic metabolism in a Vietnamese population.

  19. OXIDATION OF AS(III) BY AERATION AND STORAGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study of the effects of aeration and storage on the oxidation of arsenic(III) was undertaken at three utilities in the US to establish the engineering significance of aeration as a potential pre-treatment method for arsenic removal. The results of this study clearly establish t...

  20. Novel chitosan goethite bionanocomposite beads for arsenic remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jing; Bardelli, Fabrizio; Gehin, Antoine; Silvester, Ewen; Charlet, Laurent

    2016-09-15

    We report on the synthesis and As adsorption properties of a novel chitosan - iron (oxyhydr)oxide composite material for the remediation of arsenic-contaminated water supplies. FE-SEM, Mössbauer spectroscopy, ICP-OES and synchrotron (Bulk XAS, μXRF) techniques were applied to determine the composition of the new material and investigate the As uptake efficiency and mechanism. The iron (oxyhydr)oxide phase has been identified as a nano-sized goethite, well dispersed in the chitosan matrix, leading to the name 'chitosan goethite bionanocomposite' (CGB). The CGB material is prepared in the form of beads of high density and excellent compression strength; the embedding of the goethite nanoparticles in the chitosan matrix allows for the high adsorption capacity of nanoparticles to be realized. CGB beads remove both As(III) and As(V) efficiently from water, over the pH range 5-9, negating the need for pre-oxidation of As(III). Kinetic studies and μXRF analysis of CGB bead sections show that diffusion-adsorption of As(V) into CGB beads is faster than for As(III). Using CGB beads, synthetic high-arsenic water (0.5 mg-As/L) could be purified to world drinking standard level (<0.01 mg-As/L) using only 1.4 g/L CGB. When considered in combination with the advantages of the low-cost of raw materials required, and facile (green) synthesis route, CGB is a promising material for arsenic remediation, particularly in developing countries, which suffer a diversity of socio-economical-traditional constraints for water purification and sanitation. PMID:27240296

  1. Infrared spectrum of arsenic pentafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a literature review about arsenic fluorides, we give several methods of obtaining very pure AsF5 in order to ascertain the right spectrum of this compound. Our spectra fit well with Akers's observations, and we note that AsF5 structure can be explained in terms of C3v molecular symmetry, with the As-F bond stretching lying at 786 cm-1 and 811 cm-1. (author)

  2. Study of groundwater arsenic pollution in Lanyang Plain using multivariate statistical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    chan, S.

    2013-12-01

    The study area, Lanyang Plain in the eastern Taiwan, has highly developed agriculture and aquaculture, which consume over 70% of the water supplies. Groundwater is frequently considered as an alternative water source. However, the serious arsenic pollution of groundwater in Lanyan Plain should be well studied to ensure the safety of groundwater usage. In this study, 39 groundwater samples were collected. The results of hydrochemistry demonstrate two major trends in Piper diagram. The major trend with most of groundwater samples is determined with water type between Ca+Mg-HCO3 and Na+K-HCO3. This can be explained with cation exchange reaction. The minor trend is obviously corresponding to seawater intrusion, which has water type of Na+K-Cl, because the localities of these samples are all in the coastal area. The multivariate statistical analysis on hydrochemical data was conducted for further exploration on the mechanism of arsenic contamination. Two major factors can be extracted with factor analysis. The major factor includes Ca, Mg and Sr while the minor factor includes Na, K and As. This reconfirms that cation exchange reaction mainly control the groundwater hydrochemistry in the study area. It is worth to note that arsenic is positively related to Na and K. The result of cluster analysis shows that groundwater samples with high arsenic concentration can be grouped into that with high Na, K and HCO3. This supports that cation exchange would enhance the release of arsenic and exclude the effect of seawater intrusion. In other words, the water-rock reaction time is key to obtain higher arsenic content. In general, the major source of arsenic in sediments include exchangeable, reducible and oxidizable phases, which are adsorbed ions, Fe-Mn oxides and organic matters/pyrite, respectively. However, the results of factor analysis do not show apparent correlation between arsenic and Fe/Mn. This may exclude Fe-Mn oxides as a major source of arsenic. The other sources

  3. Application of granular ferric hydroxides for removal elevated concentrations of arsenic from mine waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szlachta, Małgorzata; Włodarczyk, Paweł; Wójtowicz, Patryk

    2015-04-01

    Arsenic is naturally occurring element in the environment. Over three hundred minerals are known to contain some form of arsenic and among them arsenopyrite is the most common one. Arsenic-bearing minerals are frequently associated with ores containing mined metals such as copper, tin, nickel, lead, uranium, zinc, cobalt, platinum and gold. In the aquatic environment arsenic is typically present in inorganic forms, mainly in two oxidation states (+5, +3). As(III) is dominant in more reduced conditions, whereas As(V) is mostly present in an oxidizing environment. However, due to certain human activities the elevated arsenic levels in aquatic ecosystems are arising to a serious environmental problem. High arsenic concentrations found in surface and groundwaters, in some regions originate from mining activities and ore processing. Therefore, the major concern of mining industry is to maintain a good quality of effluents discharged in large volumes. This requires constant monitoring of effluents quality that guarantee the efficient protection of the receiving waters and reacting to possible negative impact of contamination on local communities. A number of proven technologies are available for arsenic removal from waters and wastewaters. In the presented work special attention is given to the adsorption method as a technically feasible, commonly applied and effective technique for the treatment of arsenic rich mine effluents. It is know that arsenic has a strong affinity towards iron rich materials. Thus, in this study the granular ferric hydroxides (CFH 12, provided by Kemira Oyj, Finland) was applied to remove As(III) and As(V) from aqueous solutions. The batch adsorption experiments were carried out to assess the efficiency of the tested Fe-based material under various operating parameters, including composition of treated water, solution pH and temperature. The results obtained from the fixed bed adsorption tests demonstrated the benefits of applying granular

  4. Arsenic mineralogy and mobility in the arsenic-rich historical mine waste dump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filippi, Michal, E-mail: filippi@gli.cas.cz [Institute of Geology, The Czech Academy of Sciences, v.v.i., Rozvojová 269, 165 00 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Drahota, Petr [Institute of Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Mineral Resources, Faculty of Science, Charles University, Albertov 6, 128 43 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Machovič, Vladimír [Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, Technická 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Böhmová, Vlasta [Institute of Geology, The Czech Academy of Sciences, v.v.i., Rozvojová 269, 165 00 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Mihaljevič, Martin [Institute of Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Mineral Resources, Faculty of Science, Charles University, Albertov 6, 128 43 Prague 2 (Czech Republic)

    2015-12-01

    A more than 250 year-old mine dump was studied to document the products of long-term arsenopyrite oxidation under natural conditions in a coarse-grained mine waste dump and to evaluate the environmental hazards associated with this material. Using complementary mineralogical and chemical approaches (SEM/EDS/WDS, XRD, micro-Raman spectroscopy, pore water analysis, chemical extraction techniques and thermodynamic PHREEQC-2 modeling), we documented the mineralogical/geochemical characteristics of the dumped arsenopyrite-rich material and environmental stability of the newly formed secondary minerals. A distinct mineralogical zonation was found (listed based on the distance from the decomposed arsenopyrite): scorodite (locally associated with native sulfur pseudomorphs) plus amorphous ferric arsenate (AFA/pitticite), kaňkite, As-bearing ferric (hydr)oxides and jarosite. Ferric arsenates and ferric (hydr)oxides were found to dissolve and again precipitate from downward migrating As-rich solutions cementing rock fragments. Acidic pore water (pH 3.8) has elevated concentrations of As with an average value of about 2.9 mg L{sup −1}. Aqueous As is highly correlated with pH (R{sup 2} = 0.97, p < 0.001) indicating that incongruent dissolution of ferric arsenates controls dissolved As well as the pH of the percolating waste solution. Arsenic released from the dissolution of ferric arsenates into the pore water is, however, trapped by latter and lower-down precipitating jarosite and especially ferric (hydr)oxides. The efficiency of As sequestration by ferric (hydr)oxides in the waste dump and underlying soil has been found to be very effective, suggesting limited environmental impact of the mine waste dump on the surrounding soil ecosystems. - Highlights: • More than 250 year-old arsenopyrite-rich mine waste dump was studied. • Mineral transformation and the environmental stability of different secondary arsenic mineral phases were assessed. • High efficiency of As

  5. Arsenic mineralogy and mobility in the arsenic-rich historical mine waste dump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A more than 250 year-old mine dump was studied to document the products of long-term arsenopyrite oxidation under natural conditions in a coarse-grained mine waste dump and to evaluate the environmental hazards associated with this material. Using complementary mineralogical and chemical approaches (SEM/EDS/WDS, XRD, micro-Raman spectroscopy, pore water analysis, chemical extraction techniques and thermodynamic PHREEQC-2 modeling), we documented the mineralogical/geochemical characteristics of the dumped arsenopyrite-rich material and environmental stability of the newly formed secondary minerals. A distinct mineralogical zonation was found (listed based on the distance from the decomposed arsenopyrite): scorodite (locally associated with native sulfur pseudomorphs) plus amorphous ferric arsenate (AFA/pitticite), kaňkite, As-bearing ferric (hydr)oxides and jarosite. Ferric arsenates and ferric (hydr)oxides were found to dissolve and again precipitate from downward migrating As-rich solutions cementing rock fragments. Acidic pore water (pH 3.8) has elevated concentrations of As with an average value of about 2.9 mg L−1. Aqueous As is highly correlated with pH (R2 = 0.97, p < 0.001) indicating that incongruent dissolution of ferric arsenates controls dissolved As well as the pH of the percolating waste solution. Arsenic released from the dissolution of ferric arsenates into the pore water is, however, trapped by latter and lower-down precipitating jarosite and especially ferric (hydr)oxides. The efficiency of As sequestration by ferric (hydr)oxides in the waste dump and underlying soil has been found to be very effective, suggesting limited environmental impact of the mine waste dump on the surrounding soil ecosystems. - Highlights: • More than 250 year-old arsenopyrite-rich mine waste dump was studied. • Mineral transformation and the environmental stability of different secondary arsenic mineral phases were assessed. • High efficiency of As sequestration

  6. Removal of arsenic from drinking water by the electrocoagulation using Fe and Al electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Removal percentages of arsenic from drinking water at optimum operating conditions in electrocoagulation process were 93.5% for Fe electrode and 95.7% for Al electrode. → Operating costs at the optimum conditions were 0.020 Euro m-3 for Fe and 0.017 Euro m-3 for Al electrodes. → Surface topography of the solid particles at Fe/Al electrodes was analyzed with scanning electron microscope. → The adsorption of arsenic followed pseudo second-order adsorption model. - Abstract: A novel technique of electrocoagulation (EC) was attempted in the present investigation to remove arsenic from drinking waters. Experiments were carried out in a batch electrochemical reactor using Al and Fe electrodes with monopolar parallel electrode connection mode to assess their efficiency. The effects of several operating parameters on arsenic removal such as pH (4-9), current density (2.5-7.5 A m-2), initial concentration (75-500 μg L-1) and operating time (0-15 min) were examined. Optimum operating conditions were determined as an operating time of 12.5 min and pH 6.5 for Fe electrode (93.5%) and 15 min and pH 7 for Al electrode (95.7%) at 2.5 A m-2, respectively. Arsenic removal obtained was highest with Al electrodes. Operating costs at the optimum conditions were calculated as 0.020 Euro m-3 for Fe and 0.017 Euro m-3 for Al electrodes. EC was able to bring down aqueous phase arsenic concentration to less than 10 μg L-1 with Fe and Al electrodes. The adsorption of arsenic over electrochemically produced hydroxides and metal oxide complexes was found to follow pseudo second-order adsorption model. Scanning electron microscopy was also used to analyze surface topography of the solid particles at Fe/Al electrodes during the EC process.

  7. Arsenic removal in water by means of coagulation-flocculation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic and arsenical compounds are considered as carcinogenic and risky for humans according to epidemiological evidence related with the ingestion of arsenical water during a long period. In many places the only source of drinking water contains arsenic and, therefore, removal strategies have to be investigated. This work shows experimental results of coagulation-flocculation processes implemented to evaluate the efficiency in the removal of arsenic from drinking water. The main objectives include the evaluation of the relevant aspect that controls the removal efficiency. Experimental tests were performed with coagulant concentrations from 5 to 500 mg/L, solid particle concentrations from 0 to 6000 mg/L, and initial arsenic concentrations from 0.5 to 5 mg/L. These variables were simultaneously varied in more than 100 experiments. The efficiency in remediation ranged from 0% to 95%. Removal efficiency near 95% was obtained when using ferric chloride as coagulant, and was close to 80% when using aluminium sulfate as coagulant in arsenate solutions. The remediation efficiency decreased significantly when the ferric chloride concentration was higher than 50 mg/L in relation to the obtained results for aluminum sulfate for different type and concentration of soil particles. The highest removal efficiency were obtained at ph between 3 and 5 in oxidized solutions. Obtained results simulated by means of multiple linear regression analysis (R>0.90) allow determining that the main parameters that control the removal of arsenic from drinking water are coagulant concentration, ph, and solid particles concentration. Conversely, particle mineralogy and coagulant type have less significant effect on the removal by means of coagulation-flocculation mechanisms. Obtained results are relevant for the removal of As in water treatment plants as well as for the development of small scale filters. The samples were studied by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X

  8. Chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shekhar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to study the chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle. Materials and Methods: 27 female cattle (21 arsenic affected and 6 normal were selected for cytogenetical study. The blood samples were collected, incubated, and cultured using appropriate media and specific methods. The samples were analyzed for chromosome number and morphology, relative length of the chromosome, arm ratio, and centromere index of X chromosome and chromosomal abnormalities in arsenic affected cattle to that of normal ones. Results: The diploid number of metaphase chromosomes in arsenic affected cattle as well as in normal cattle were all 2n=60, 58 being autosomes and 2 being sex chromosomes. From the centromeric position, karyotyping studies revealed that all the 29 pair of autosomes was found to be acrocentric or telocentric, and the sex chromosomes (XX were submetacentric in both normal and arsenic affected cattle. The relative length of all the autosome pairs and sex chrosomosome pair was found to be higher in normal than that of arsenic affected cattle. The mean arm ratio of X-chromosome was higher in normal than that of arsenic affected cattle, but it is reverse in case of centromere index value of X-chromosome. There was no significant difference of arm ratio and centromere index of X-chromosomes between arsenic affected and normal cattle. No chromosomal abnormalities were found in arsenic affected cattle. Conclusion: The chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle in West Bengal reported for the first time in this present study which may serve as a guideline for future studies in other species. These reference values will also help in comparison of cytological studies of arsenic affected cattle to that of various toxicants.

  9. Interactions between arsenic species and marine algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, J.G.

    1978-01-01

    The arsenic concentration and speciation of marine algae varies widely, from 0.4 to 23 ng.mg/sup -1/, with significant differences in both total arsenic content and arsenic speciation occurring between algal classes. The Phaeophyceae contain more arsenic than other algal classes, and a greater proportion of the arsenic is organic. The concentration of inorganic arsenic is fairly constant in macro-algae, and may indicate a maximum level, with the excess being reduced and methylated. Phytoplankton take up As(V) readily, and incorporate a small percentage of it into the cell. The majority of the As(V) is reduced, methylated, and released to the surrounding media. The arsenic speciation in phytoplankton and Valonia also changes when As(V) is added to cultures. Arsenate and phosphate compete for uptake by algal cells. Arsenate inhibits primary production at concentrations as low as 5 ..mu..g.1/sup -1/ when the phosphate concentration is low. The inhibition is competitive. A phosphate enrichment of > 0.3 ..mu..M alleviates this inhibition; however, the As(V) stress causes an increase in the cell's phosphorus requirement. Arsenite is also toxic to phytoplankton at similar concentrations. Methylated arsenic species did not affect cell productivity, even at concentrations of 25 ..mu..g.1/sup -1/. Thus, the methylation of As(V) by the cell produces a stable, non-reactive compound which is nontoxic. The uptake and subsequent reduction and methylation of As(V) is a significant factor in determining the arsenic biogeochemistry of productive systems, and also the effect that the arsenic may have on algal productivity. Therefore, the role of marine algae in determining the arsenic speciation of marine systems cannot be ignored. (ERB)

  10. Impaired arsenic metabolism in children during weaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Methylation of inorganic arsenic (iAs) via one-carbon metabolism is a susceptibility factor for a range of arsenic-related health effects, but there is no data on the importance of arsenic metabolism for effects on child development. Aim: To elucidate the development of arsenic metabolism in early childhood. Methods: We measured iAs, methylarsonic acid (MA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), the metabolites of iAs, in spot urine samples of 2400 children at 18 months of age. The children were born to women participating in a population-based longitudinal study of arsenic effects on pregnancy outcomes and child development, carried out in Matlab, a rural area in Bangladesh with a wide range of arsenic concentrations in drinking water. Arsenic metabolism was evaluated in relation to age, sex, anthropometry, socio-economic status and arsenic exposure. Results: Arsenic concentrations in child urine (median 34 μg/L, range 2.4-940 μg/L), adjusted to average specific gravity of 1.009 g/mL, were considerably higher than that measured at 3 months of age, but lower than that in maternal urine. Child urine contained on average 12% iAs, 9.4% MA and 78% DMA, which implies a marked change in metabolite pattern since infancy. In particular, there was a marked increase in urinary %MA, which has been associated with increased risk of health effects. Conclusion: The arsenic metabolite pattern in urine of children at 18 months of age in rural Bangladesh indicates a marked decrease in arsenic methylation efficiency during weaning.

  11. ARSENIC REMOVAL AND ECOLOGICALLY SAFE CONTAINMENT OF ARSENIC-WASTE: A SUSTAINABLE SOLUTION FOR ARSENIC CRISIS IN CAMBODIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    An appalling degree of arsenic contamination in groundwater has affected more than a million people in wide region of Mekong delta flood plain in Cambodia. Arsenic is by far the most toxic species of all naturally occurring groundwater contaminants and disposal of removed arse...

  12. Occurrence and sorption properties of arsenicals in marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fauser, Patrik; Sanderson, Hans; Hedegaard, Rikke Susanne Vingborg;

    2013-01-01

    The content of total arsenic, the inorganic forms: arsenite (As(III)) and arsenate (As(V)), the methylated forms: monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), trimethylarsenic oxide, tetramethylarsenonium ion and arsenobetaine was measured in 95 sediment samples and 11 pore water samples...... from the Baltic Sea near the island of Bornholm at depths of up to 100 m. As(III+V) and DMA were detected in the sediment and As(III+V) was detected in the sediment pore water. Average total As concentration of 10.6 ± 7.4 mg/kg dry matter (DM) in the sediment corresponds to previously reported values...

  13. Inorganic arsenic in drinking water accelerates N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine-induced bladder tissue damage in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Paul-Yann [Department of Pathology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Chiayi, Chang Gung University, Chiayi, Taiwan (China); Lin, Yung-Lun; Huang, Chin-Chin; Chen, Sin-Syu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Biopharmaceuticals, College of Life Sciences, National Chiayi University, Chiayi, Taiwan (China); Liu, Yi-Wen, E-mail: ywlss@mail.ncyu.edu.tw [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Biopharmaceuticals, College of Life Sciences, National Chiayi University, Chiayi, Taiwan (China)

    2012-02-15

    Epidemiological studies have revealed that exposure to an arsenic-contaminated environment correlates with the incidence of bladder cancer. Bladder cancer is highly recurrent after intravesical therapy, and most of the deaths from this disease are due to invasive metastasis. In our present study, the role of inorganic arsenic in bladder carcinogenesis is characterized in a mouse model. This work provides the first evidence that inorganic arsenic in drinking water promotes N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN)-induced bladder tissue damage, including the urothelium and submucosal layer. This damage to the bladder epithelium induced by BBN includes thickening of the submucosal layer, the loss of the glycosaminoglycan layer and an increase in both the deoxyguanosine oxidation and cytosine methylation levels in the DNA. Further, when 10 ppm inorganic arsenic is combined with BBN, the number of bladder submucosal capillaries is increased. In addition, inorganic arsenic also increases the deoxyguanosine oxidation level, alters the cytosine methylation state, decreases the activities of glutathione reductase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, decreases the protein expression of NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase-1 (NQO-1) and increases the protein expression of specific protein 1 (Sp1) in bladder tissues. In summary, our data reveal that inorganic arsenic in drinking water promotes the BBN-induced pre-neoplastic damage of bladder tissue in mice, and that the 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine, 5-methylcytosine, NQO-1 protein and Sp1 protein levels may be pre-neoplastic markers of bladder tumors. -- Highlights: ► The role of inorganic arsenic in bladder carcinogenesis is characterized in mice. ► We examine the changes in the histology and biochemistry of bladder tissues. ► Inorganic arsenic enhances BBN-induced DNA oxidation while decreases BBN-induced DNA methylation in the mouse bladder. ► Inorganic arsenic alters the activities of the anti-oxidant enzymes in

  14. Signal transduction pathways and transcription factors triggered by arsenic trioxide in leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) is widely used to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Several lines of evidence have indicated that As2O3 affects signal transduction and transactivation of transcription factors, resulting in the stimulation of apoptosis in leukemia cells, because some transcription factors are reported to associate with the redox condition of the cells, and arsenicals cause oxidative stress. Thus, the disturbance and activation of the cellular signaling pathway and transcription factors due to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation during arsenic exposure may explain the ability of As2O3 to induce a complete remission in relapsed APL patients. In this report, we review recent findings on ROS generation and alterations in signal transduction and in transactivation of transcription factors during As2O3 exposure in leukemia cells.

  15. Leaching of molybdenum and arsenic from uranium ore and mill tailings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landa, E.R.

    1984-01-01

    A sequential, selective extraction procedure was used to assess the effects of sulfuric acid milling on the geochemical associations of molybdenum and arsenic in a uranium ore blend, and the tailings derived therefrom. The milling process removed about 21% of the molybdenum and 53% of the arsenic initially present in the ore. While about one-half of the molybdenum in the ore was water soluble, only about 14% existed in this form in the tailings. The major portion of the extractable molybdenum in the tailings appears to be associated with hydrous oxides of iron, and with alkaline earth sulfate precipitates. In contrast with the pattern seen for molybdenum, the partitioning of arsenic into the various extractable fractions differs little between the ore and the tailings. ?? 1984.

  16. Bioaccumulation of Arsenic by Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ademola O. Adeyemi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Arsenic is a known toxic element and its presence and toxicity in nature is a worldwide environmental problem. The use of microorganisms in bioremediation is a potential method to reduce as concentration in contaminated areas. Approach: In order to explore the possible bioremediation of this element, three filamentous fungi-Aspergillus niger, Serpula himantioides and Trametes versicolor were investigated for their potential abilities to accumulate (and possibly solubilize arsenic from an agar environment consisting of non buffered mineral salts media amended with 0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8% (w/v arsenopyrite (FeAsS. Growth rates, dry weights, arsenic accumulation and oxalate production by the fungi as well as the pH of the growth media were all assessed during this study. Results: There was no visible solubilization of FeAsS particles underneath any of the growing fungal colonies or elsewhere in the respective agar plates. No specific patterns of growth changes were observed from the growth ratios of the fungi on agar amended with different amounts of FeAsS although growth of all fungi was stimulated by the incorporation of varying amounts of FeAsS into the agar with the exception of A. niger on 0.4% (w/v amended agar and T. versicolor on 0.8% (w/v amended agar. The amounts of dry weights obtained for all three fungi also did not follow any specific patterns with different amounts of FeAsS and the quantities obtained were in the order A. niger > S. himantioides > T. versicolor. All fungi accumulated as in their biomasses with all amounts of FeAsS although to varying levels and T. versicolor was the most effective with all amounts of FeAsS while A. niger was the least effective. Conclusion: The accumulation of arsenic in the biomasses of the test fungi as shown in this study may suggested a role for fungi through their bioaccumulating capabilities as agents in the possible bioremediation of arsenic contaminated environments.

  17. Relationship between adsorption of arsenic(III) and boron by soil and soil properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakata, M.

    1987-11-01

    The distribution coefficients (K/sub d/) for arsenic(III) and boron in a linear adsorption isotherm were determined for 15 subsurface soils collected from different sites in Japan, and the relationship between those K/sub d/ values and soil properties was examined. The soils differed greatly in their chemical and physical properties. The K/sub d/ value for arsenic(III) was significantly correlated with the dithionite-extractable Fe content in the soils (r = 0.90), whereas a high positive correlation was also found between the K/sub d/ value for boron and the oxalate-extractable Al content in the soils (r = 0.98). These relationships imply that the adsorption of arsenic(III) and boron by soil is controlled mainly by levels of amorphous iron oxides and hydroxides for arsenic(III) and by levels of allophane for boron and are very useful for assessing the adsorption of arsenic(III) and boron released in the underlying soil layer at coal ash disposal sites. 22 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

  18. Arsenic pilot plant operation and results - Socorro Springs, New Mexico - phase 1.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aragon, Malynda Jo; Everett, Randy L.; Siegel, Malcolm Dean; Kottenstette, Richard Joseph; Holub, William E. Jr; Wright, Jeremy B.; Dwyer, Brian P.

    2007-05-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is conducting pilot scale evaluations of the performance and cost of innovative water treatment technologies aimed at meeting the recently revised arsenic maximum contaminant level (MCL) for drinking water. The standard of 10 {micro}g/L (10 ppb) is effective as of January 2006. The first pilot tests have been conducted in New Mexico where over 90 sites that exceed the new MCL have been identified by the New Mexico Environment Department. The pilot test described in this report was conducted in Socorro New Mexico between January 2005 and July 2005. The pilot demonstration is a project of the Arsenic Water Technology Partnership program, a partnership between the American Water Works Association Research Foundation (AwwaRF), SNL and WERC (A Consortium for Environmental Education and Technology Development). The Sandia National Laboratories pilot demonstration at the Socorro Springs site obtained arsenic removal performance data for five different adsorptive media under constant ambient flow conditions. Well water at Socorro Springs has approximately 42 ppb arsenic in the oxidized (arsenate-As(V)) redox state with moderate amounts of silica, low concentrations of iron and manganese and a slightly alkaline pH (8). The study provides estimates of the capacity (bed volumes until breakthrough at 10 ppb arsenic) of adsorptive media in the same chlorinated water. Near the end of the test the feedwater pH was lowered to assess the affect on bed capacity and as a prelude to a controlled pH study (Socorro Springs Phase 2).

  19. Arsenic in Ironite fertilizer: The absorption by hamsters and the chemical form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aposhian, M.M.; Koch, I.; Avram, M.D.; Chowdhury, U.K.; Smith, P.G.; Reimer, K.J.; Aposhian, H.V.; (Ariz); (Royal)

    2009-09-11

    We determined the gastrointestinal absorption of the arsenic in Ironite, a readily available fertilizer, for male hamsters (Golden Syrian), considered to be an excellent model for how the human processes inorganic arsenic. Urine and feces were collected after administering an aqueous suspension of Ironite by stomach tube. In addition, we studied the forms and oxidation states of arsenic in Ironite by synchrotron spectroscopic techniques. The absorption of the arsenic in Ironite (1-0-0) was 21.2% and the absorption relative to sodium arsenite was 31.0%. Our results using XANES spectra determinations indicate that Ironite contains scorodite (AsV) as well as previously reported arsenopyrite (As(-1)). Since the 1-0-0 Ironite is readily available for purchase, its risk assessment for children by professionals is recommended. This is especially important because it is used to fertilize large areas of grass in playgrounds and parks where children play. The absorption of the arsenic in it, the hand to mouth activity of children, and the potential of ground water contamination makes the use of 1-0-0 Ironite as a fertilizer a potential environmental hazard.

  20. 29 CFR 1915.1018 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1915.1018 Section 1915.1018 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1018 Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under...

  1. 29 CFR 1926.1118 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1926.1118 Section 1926.1118 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are...

  2. The Chemistry and Metabolism of Arsenic

    Science.gov (United States)

    I. IntrodctionA century of study of the process by which many organisms convert inorganic arsenic into an array of methylated metabolites has answered many questions and has posed some new ones. The capacity of microorganisms to. form volatile arsenic compounds was first recogniz...

  3. ARSENIC EFFECTS ON TELOMERE AND TELOMERASE ACTIVITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenic effects on telomere and telomerase activity. T-C. Zhang, M. T. Schmitt, J. Mo, J. L. Mumford, National Research Council and U.S Environmental Protection Agency, NHEERL, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711Arsenic is a known carcinogen and also an anticancer agent for acut...

  4. Arsenic and human health effects: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul, Khaja Shameem Mohammed; Jayasinghe, Sudheera Sammanthi; Chandana, Ediriweera P S; Jayasumana, Channa; De Silva, P Mangala C S

    2015-11-01

    Arsenic (As) is ubiquitous in nature and humans being exposed to arsenic via atmospheric air, ground water and food sources are certain. Major sources of arsenic contamination could be either through geological or via anthropogenic activities. In physiological individuals, organ system is described as group of organs that transact collectively and associate with other systems for conventional body functions. Arsenic has been associated with persuading a variety of complications in body organ systems: integumentary, nervous, respiratory, cardiovascular, hematopoietic, immune, endocrine, hepatic, renal, reproductive system and development. In this review, we outline the effects of arsenic on the human body with a main focus on assorted organ systems with respective disease conditions. Additionally, underlying mechanisms of disease development in each organ system due to arsenic have also been explored. Strikingly, arsenic has been able to induce epigenetic changes (in utero) and genetic mutations (a leading cause of cancer) in the body. Occurrence of various arsenic induced health effects involving emerging areas such as epigenetics and cancer along with their respective mechanisms are also briefly discussed. PMID:26476885

  5. Arsenic Consumption in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Denise

    2015-10-01

    Exposure limits for arsenic in drinking water and minimal risk levels (MRLs) for total dietary exposure to arsenic have long been established in the U.S. Multiple studies conducted over the last five years have detected arsenic in foods and beverages including juice, rice, milk, broth (beef and chicken), and others. Understanding whether or not each of these foods or drinks is a concern to certain groups of individuals requires examining which types of and how much arsenic is ingested. In this article, recent studies are reviewed and placed in the context of consumption patterns. When single sources of food or drink are considered in isolation, heavy rice eaters can be exposed to the most arsenic among adults while infants consuming formula containing contaminated organic brown rice syrup are the most exposed group among children. Most food and drink do not contain sufficient arsenic to exceed MRLs. For individuals consuming more than one source of contaminated water or food, however, adverse health effects are more likely. In total, recent studies on arsenic contamination in food and beverages emphasize the need for individual consumers to understand and manage their total dietary exposure to arsenic. PMID:26591332

  6. Biogeochemical cyclic activity of bacterial arsB in arsenic-contaminated mines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Jin-Soo; PEN Xianghao; KIM Kyoung-Woong

    2008-01-01

    Biogeochemical cyclic activity of the ars (arsenic resistance system) operon is arsB influx/efflux encoded by the ecological of Pseudomonas putida. This suggests that studying arsenite-oxidizing bacteria may lead to a better understanding of molecular geomicrobiology, which can be applied to the bioremediation of arsenic-contaminated mines. This is the first report in which multiple arsB-binding mechanisms have been used on indigenous bacteria. In ArsB (swains OS-5; ABB83931; OS-19; ABB04282 and RW-28;ABB88574), there are ten putative enzyme, Histidine (His) 131, His 133, His 137, Arginine (Arg) 135, Arg 137, Arg 161, Trptohan (Trp) 142, Trp 164, Trp 166, and Trp 171, which are each located in different regions of the partial sequence. The adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transports, binding affinities and associating ratable constants show that As-binding is comparatively insensitive to the location of the residues within the moderately stable a-helical structure. The α-helical structures in ArsB-permease and anion permease arsB have been shown to import/export arsenic in P. putida. We proposed that arsB residues, His 131, His 133, His 137, Arg 135, Arg 137, Arg 161, Trp 142, Trp 164, Trp 166, and Trp 171 are required for arsenic binding and activation ofarsA/arsB or arsAB.This arsB influx/efflux pum-ping is important, and the effect in arsenic species change and mobility in mine soil has got a significantly ecological role because it allows arsenic oxidizing/reducing bacteria to control biogeochemical cycle of abandoned mines.

  7. Biogeochemical cyclic activity of bacterial arsB in arsenic-contaminated mines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jin-Soo; Ren, Xianghao; Kim, Kyoung-Woong

    2008-01-01

    Biogeochemical cyclic activity of the ars (arsenic resistance system) operon is arsB influx/efflux encoded by the ecological of Pseudomonas putida. This suggests that studying arsenite-oxidizing bacteria may lead to a better understanding of molecular geomicrobiology, which can be applied to the bioremediation of arsenic-contaminated mines. This is the first report in which multiple arsB-binding mechanisms have been used on indigenous bacteria. In ArsB (strains OS-5; ABB83931; OS-19; ABB04282 and RW-28; ABB88574), there are ten putative enzyme, Histidine (His) 131, His 133, His 137, Arginine (Arg) 135, Arg 137, Arg 161, Trptohan (Trp) 142, Trp 164, Trp 166, and Trp 171, which are each located in different regions of the partial sequence. The adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transports, binding affinities and associating ratable constants show that As-binding is comparatively insensitive to the location of the residues within the moderately stable alpha-helical structure. The alpha-helical structures in ArsB-permease and anion permease arsB have been shown to import/export arsenic in P. putida. We proposed that arsB residues, His 131, His 133, His 137, Arg 135, Arg 137, Arg 161, Trp 142, Trp 164, Trp 166, and Trp 171 are required for arsenic binding and activation of arsA/arsB or arsAB. This arsB influx/efflux pum-ping is important, and the effect in arsenic species change and mobility in mine soil has got a significantly ecological role because it allows arsenic oxidizing/reducing bacteria to control biogeochemical cycle of abandoned mines. PMID:19202875

  8. Inhibition of arsenic induced-rat liver injury by grape seed exact through suppression of NADPH oxidase and TGF-β/Smad activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic arsenic exposure induces oxidative damage to liver leading to liver fibrosis. We aimed to define the effect of grape seed extract (GSE), an antioxidant dietary supplement, on arsenic-induced liver injury. First, Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to a low level of arsenic in drinking water (30 ppm) with or without GSE (100 mg/kg, every other day by oral gavage) for 12 months and the effect of GSE on arsenic-induced hepatotoxicity was examined. The results from this study revealed that GSE co-treatment significantly attenuated arsenic-induced low antioxidant defense, oxidative damage, proinflammatory cytokines and fibrogenic genes. Moreover, GSE reduced arsenic-stimulated Smad2/3 phosphorylation and protein levels of NADPH oxidase subunits (Nox2, Nox4 and p47phox). Next, we explored the molecular mechanisms underlying GSE inhibition of arsenic toxicity using cultured rat hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). From the in vitro study, we found that GSE dose-dependently reduced arsenic-stimulated ROS production and NADPH oxidase activities. Both NADPH oxidases flavoprotein inhibitor DPI and Nox4 siRNA blocked arsenic-induced ROS production, whereas Nox4 overexpression suppressed the inhibitory effects of GSE on arsenic-induced ROS production and NADPH oxidase activities, as well as expression of TGF-β1, type I procollagen (Coll-I) and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) mRNA. We also observed that GSE dose-dependently inhibited TGF-β1-induced transactivation of the TGF-β-induced smad response element p3TP-Lux, and that forced expression of Smad3 attenuated the inhibitory effects of GSE on TGF-β1-induced mRNA expression of Coll-I and α-SMA. Collectively, GSE could be a potential dietary therapeutic agent for arsenic-induced liver injury through suppression of NADPH oxidase and TGF-β/Smad activation. - Research Highlights: → GSE attenuated arsenic-induced low antioxidant defense, oxidative damage, proinflammatory cytokines and fibrogenic genes. → GSE reduced

  9. Speciation of Arsenic in An Anaerobic Treatment System at a Pb-Zn Smelter Site, Gold Roaster Products, Cu Smelter Stack Dust And Impacted Soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paktunc, D.

    2009-05-28

    Mining and metallurgical processing of gold and base metal ores often results in solid wastes and effluents containing high concentrations of arsenic. In addition, arsenic can be released to the atmosphere from gold roasters and base metal smelters. Speciation of arsenic in roaster products, in a stack sample from a copper smelter, in organic soils impacted by smelter emissions, and in an anaerobic effluent treatment system at a smelter site was determined in order to broaden our understanding of the nature and occurrence of arsenic in a wider range of metallurgical wastes. Micro-XANES spectra obtained from iron oxide particles forming in a gold roaster indicate preferential enrichment of As{sup 3+} species in maghemite-rich domains and microlayers. In comparison, haematite-rich iron oxide particles are dominated by As{sup 5+} species. It appears that maghemite is retarding oxidation of arsenic and its volatilisation during roasting. Arsenic occurs as both As{sup 3+} and As{sup 5+} species in a stack sample emitted from a Cu smelter, confined to fine-grained secondary product layers accumulated on the surfaces of spherical Cu particles. This is probably resulting from condensation of As species upon cooling following their volatilisation during the combustion process. Soil samples collected at various distances from the Cu smelter are dominated by As{sup 5+} species including monomethylarsonic acid and tetramethylarsonium iodide as the organic arsenic species. The presence of reduced As{sup 3+} species highlights the importance of organic material influencing the speciation of arsenic and mineralogical transformations taking place within the soil profile. The XANES spectra indicate that arsenic occurs predominantly as aqueous arsenite species in the anaerobic treatment system, contrary to the conventional thinking of As retention by the formation of secondary sulfides.

  10. Speciation of arsenic in an anaerobic treatment system at a Pb-Zn smelter site, gold roaster products, Cu smelter stack dust and impacted soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paktunc, D. (CCM)

    2008-09-30

    Mining and metallurgical processing of gold and base metal ores often results in solid wastes and effluents containing high concentrations of arsenic. In addition, arsenic can be released to the atmosphere from gold roasters and base metal smelters. Speciation of arsenic in roaster products, in a stack sample from a copper smelter, in organic soils impacted by smelter emissions, and in an anaerobic effluent treatment system at a smelter site was determined in order to broaden our understanding of the nature and occurrence of arsenic in a wider range of metallurgical wastes. Micro-XANES spectra obtained from iron oxide particles forming in a gold roaster indicate preferential enrichment of As{sup 3+} species in maghemite-rich domains and microlayers. In comparison, haematite-rich iron oxide particles are dominated by As{sup 5+} species. It appears that maghemite is retarding oxidation of arsenic and its volatilisation during roasting. Arsenic occurs as both As{sup 3+} and As{sup 5+} species in a stack sample emitted from a Cu smelter, confined to fine-grained secondary product layers accumulated on the surfaces of spherical Cu particles. This is probably resulting from condensation of As species upon cooling following their volatilisation during the combustion process. Soil samples collected at various distances from the Cu smelter are dominated by As{sup 5+} species including monomethylarsonic acid and tetramethylarsonium iodide as the organic arsenic species. The presence of reduced As{sup 3+} species highlights the importance of organic material influencing the speciation of arsenic and mineralogical transformations taking place within the soil profile. The XANES spectra indicate that arsenic occurs predominantly as aqueous arsenite species in the anaerobic treatment system, contrary to the conventional thinking of As retention by the formation of secondary sulfides.

  11. Arsenic Uptake by Muskmelon (Cucumis melo) Plants from Contaminated Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettick, Bryan E; Cañas-Carrell, Jaclyn E; Martin, Kirt; French, Amanda D; Klein, David M

    2016-09-01

    Arsenic is a carcinogenic element that occurs naturally in the environment. High levels of arsenic are found in water in some parts of the world, including Texas. The aims of this study were to determine the distribution of arsenic in muskmelon (Cucumis melo) plants accumulated from arsenic spiked water and to observe effects on plant biomass. Plants were grown and irrigated using water spiked with variable concentrations of arsenic. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to quantify arsenic in different parts of the plant and fruit. Under all conditions tested in this study, the highest concentrations of arsenic were found in the leaves, soil, and roots. Arsenic in the water had no significant effect on plant biomass. Fruits analyzed in this study had arsenic concentrations of 101 μg/kg or less. Consuming these fruits would result in less arsenic exposure than drinking water at recommended levels. PMID:27460822

  12. Methylation of inorganic arsenic by murine fetal tissue explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broka, Derrick; Ditzel, Eric; Quach, Stephanie; Camenisch, Todd D

    2016-07-01

    Although it is generally believed that the developing fetus is principally exposed to inorganic arsenic and the methylated metabolites from the maternal metabolism of arsenic, little is known about whether the developing embryo can autonomously metabolize arsenic. This study investigates inorganic arsenic methylation by murine embryonic organ cultures of the heart, lung, and liver. mRNA for AS3mt, the gene responsible for methylation of arsenic, was detected in all embryonic tissue types studied. In addition, methylated arsenic metabolites were generated by all three tissue types. The fetal liver explants yielded the most methylated arsenic metabolites (∼7% of total arsenic/48 h incubation) while the heart, and lung preparations produced slightly greater than 2% methylated metabolites. With all tissues the methylation proceeded mostly to the dimethylated arsenic species. This has profound implications for understanding arsenic-induced fetal toxicity, particularly if the methylated metabolites are produced autonomously by embryonic tissues. PMID:26446802

  13. Elucidating the pathway for arsenic methylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although biomethylation of arsenic has been studied for more than a century, unequivocal demonstration of the methylation of inorganic arsenic by humans occurred only about 30 years ago. Because methylation of inorganic arsenic activates it to more reactive and toxic forms, elucidating the pathway for the methylation of this metalloid is a topic of considerable importance. Understanding arsenic metabolism is of public health concern as millions of people chronically consume drinking water that contains high concentrations of inorganic arsenic. Hence, the focus of our research has been to elucidate the molecular basis of the steps in the pathway that leads from inorganic arsenic to methylated and dimethylated arsenicals. Here we describe a new S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet)-dependent methyltransferase from rat liver cytosol that catalyzes the conversion of arsenite to methylated and dimethylated species. This 42-kDa protein has sequence motifs common to many non-nucleic acid methyltransferases and is closely related to methyltransferases of previously unknown function that have been identified by conceptual translations of cyt19 genes of mouse and human genomes. Hence, we designate rat liver arsenic methyltransferase as cyt19 and suggest that orthologous cyt19 genes encode an arsenic methyltransferase in the mouse and human genomes. Our studies with recombinant rat cyt19 find that, in the presence of an exogenous or a physiological reductant, this protein can catalyze the entire sequence of reactions that convert arsenite to methylated metabolites. A scheme linking cyt19 and thioredoxin-thioredoxin reductase in the methylation and reduction of arsenicals is proposed

  14. Arsenic burden survey among refuse incinerator workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Chung-Liang

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Incinerator workers are not considered to have arsenic overexposure although they have the risk of overexposure to other heavy metals. Aim: To examine the relationship between arsenic burden and risk of occupational exposure in employees working at a municipal refuse incinerator by determining the concentrations of arsenic in the blood and urine. Settings and Design: The workers were divided into three groups based on their probability of contact with combustion-generated residues, namely Group 1: indirect contact, Group 2: direct contact and Group 3: no contact. Healthy age- and sex-matched residents living in the vicinity were enrolled as the control group. Materials and Methods: Heavy metal concentrations were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Downstream rivers and drinking water of the residents were examined for environmental arsenic pollution. A questionnaire survey concerning the contact history of arsenic was simultaneously conducted. Statistical analysis: Non-parametric tests, cross-tabulation and multinomial logistic regression. Results: This study recruited 122 incinerator workers. The urine and blood arsenic concentrations as well as incidences of overexposure were significantly higher in the workers than in control subjects. The workers who had indirect or no contact with combustion-generated residues had significantly higher blood arsenic level. Arsenic contact history could not explain the difference. Airborne and waterborne arsenic pollution were not detected. Conclusion: Incinerator workers run the risk of being exposed to arsenic pollution, especially those who have incomplete protection in the workplace even though they only have indirect or no contact with combustion-generated pollutants.

  15. Expression of the sFLT1 gene in cord blood cells is associated to maternal arsenic exposure and decreased birth weight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Remy, Sylvie; Govarts, Eva; Bruckers, Liesbeth; Paulussen, Melissa; Wens, Britt; Hond, Elly Den; Nelen, Vera; Baeyens, Willy; van Larebeke, Nicolas; Loots, Ilse; Sioen, Isabelle; Schoeters, Greet

    2014-01-01

    birth weight decreased with 47 g (95% CI: 16-78 g) for an interquartile range increase of 0.99 μg/L arsenic. The model was adjusted for child's sex, maternal smoking during pregnancy, gestational age, and parity. Higher arsenic concentrations and reduced birth weight were positively associated with...... fetal development, inhibition of placental angiogenesis leads to impaired nutrition and hence to growth retardation. Various genes related to DNA methylation and oxidative stress showed also changed expression in relation to arsenic exposure but were not related to birth outcome parameters. In...

  16. Arsenic Geochemistry in Source Waters of the Los Angeles Aqueduct

    OpenAIRE

    Hering, Janet G; Wilkie, Jennifer A; Chiu, Van Q

    1997-01-01

    Arsenic is a widely distributed constituent of geologic materials, with an average crustal abundance of 1.8 ppm. The natural processes of weathering of arsenic-containing minerals and volcanism contribute arsenic to groundwaters, surface freshwaters, and seawater. Recently, increased attention has focused on arsenic geochemistry in natural waters. This attention has been motivated by concern over the human health effects of arsenic exposure; consumption of drinking water can be a significant,...

  17. Summary of four scientific studies on Arsenicum album high dilution effect against Arsenic intoxication in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Terzan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Groundwater arsenic affects millions of people in about 20 countries. In West Bengal (India and Bangladesh alone over 100 million people are exposed. The arsenic concentration in contaminated groundwater in Bangladesh was above the maximum permissible level of 0.05 mg/l as recommended by WHO for developing countries [1]. Drinking water is not the only source of poisoning. In arsenic contaminated areas, crops, vegetables, cereals, poultry, cattle, etc, also contain traces of arsenic. Chronic arsenic intoxication has been associated with several diseases such as melanosis, leuco-melanosis, hyperkeratosis, oedema, skin cancer… Cazin et al [2], have demonstrated the effect of high dilutions of arsenic compounds. They noted increased arsenic elimination from blood through urine and faeces in intoxicated rats. According to these research, the aim of Khuda Buksh studies [3-4-5] was to investigate whether high dilution Arsenicum album have any effect on arsenic accumulation in different tissues and to understand also how this high dilution could produce a protective effect on all the different organs. Methodology: Firstly, the effect of Arsenicum album 30 cH on the amount of arsenic accumulation was determined by spectrophotometric analysis in four tissues namely liver, kidney and testis in mice intoxicated by arsenic. The protective effect in chronic and acute arsenic intoxicated mice of Arsenicum Album 6cH, 30cH and 200cH has been evaluated using not only the activities of enzymatic and biomarker toxicity (aspartate amino transferase (AST, alanine amino transferase (ALT, acid phosphatase (AcP, alkaline phosphatase (AlkP, lipid peroxidation (LPO and reduced glutathione (GSH but also the cytogenetical parameters (chromosome aberrations (CA, mitotic index (MI, sperm head anomaly (SHA etc., . Because, it is well demonstrated that these enzymes biomarkers reflect the degree of hepatotoxicity and oxidative stress caused by

  18. A review on environmental factors regulating arsenic methylation in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subjects exposed to arsenic show significant inter-individual variation in urinary patterns of arsenic metabolites but insignificant day-to-day intra-individual variation. The inter-individual variation in arsenic methylation can be partly responsible for the variation in susceptibility to arsenic toxicity. Wide inter-ethnic variation and family correlation in urinary arsenic profile suggest a genetic effect on arsenic metabolism. In this paper the environmental factors affecting arsenic metabolism are reviewed. Methylation capacity might reduce with increasing dosage of arsenic exposure. Furthermore, women, especially at pregnancy, have better methylation capacity than their men counterparts, probably due to the effect of estrogen. Children might have better methylation capacity than adults and age shows inconsistent relevance in adults. Smoking and alcohol consumption might be associated with a poorer methylation capacity. Nutritional status is important in the methylation capacity and folate may facilitate the methylation and excretion of arsenic. Besides, general health conditions and medications might influence the arsenic methylation capacity; and technical problems can cause biased estimates. The consumption of seafood, seaweed, rice and other food with high arsenic contents and the extent of cooking and arsenic-containing water used in food preparation may also interfere with the presentation of the urinary arsenic profile. Future studies are necessary to clarify the effects of the various arsenic metabolites including the trivalent methylated forms on the development of arsenic-induced human diseases with the consideration of the effects of confounding factors and the interactions with other effect modifiers

  19. Therapeutic effects of Moringa oleifera on arsenic-induced toxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Richa; Kannan, Gurusamy M; Sharma, Mamta; S Flora, Swaran J

    2005-11-01

    the seed powder of M. oleifera has significant role in protecting animals from arsenic-induced oxidative stress and in the depletion of arsenic concentration. Further studies thus can be recommended for determining the effect of co-administrating seed powder of M. oleifera during chelation therapy with a thiol chelator. PMID:21783626

  20. A broad view of arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, F T

    2007-01-01

    In the mind of the general public, the words "arsenic" and "poison" have become almost synonymous. Yet, As is a natural metallic element found in low concentrations in virtually every part of the environment, including foods. Mining and smelting activities are closely associated with As, and the largest occurrence of As contamination in the United States is near the gold mines of northern Nevada. Inhabitants of Bangladesh and surrounding areas have been exposed to water that is naturally and heavily contaminated with As, causing what the World Health Organization has described as the worst mass poisoning in history. Although readily absorbed by humans, most inorganic As (>90%) is rapidly cleared from the blood with a half-life of 1 to 2 h, and 40 to 70% of the As intake is absorbed, metabolized, and excreted within 48 h. Arsenic does not appreciably bioaccumulate, nor does it biomagnify in the food chain. The United States has for some time purchased more As than any other country in the world, but As usage is waning, and further reductions appear likely. Arsenic is used in a wide variety of industrial applications, from computers to fireworks. All feed additives used in US poultry feeds must meet the strict requirements of the US Food and Drug Administration Center for Veterinary Medicine (Rockville, MD) before use. Although some public health investigators have identified poultry products as a potentially significant source of total As exposure for Americans, studies consistently demonstrate that <1% of samples tested are above the 0.5 ppm limit established by the US Food and Drug Administration Center for Veterinary Medicine. Although laboratory studies have demonstrated the possibility that As in poultry litter could pollute ground waters, million of tons of litter have been applied to the land, and no link has been established between litter application and As contamination of ground water. Yet, the fact that <2% of the United States population is involved in

  1. When Parasites Are Good for Health: Cestode Parasitism Increases Resistance to Arsenic in Brine Shrimps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Haro, Mónica; Taggart, Mark A.; Lenormand, Thomas; Green, Andy J.

    2016-01-01

    Parasites and pollutants can both affect any living organism, and their interactions can be very important. To date, repeated studies have found that parasites and heavy metals or metalloids both have important negative effects on the health of animals, often in a synergistic manner. Here, we show for the first time that parasites can increase host resistance to metalloid arsenic, focusing on a clonal population of brine shrimp from the contaminated Odiel and Tinto estuary in SW Spain. We studied the effect of cestodes on the response of Artemia to arsenic (acute toxicity tests, 24h LC50) and found that infection consistently reduced mortality across a range of arsenic concentrations. An increase from 25°C to 29°C, simulating the change in mean temperature expected under climate change, increased arsenic toxicity, but the benefits of infection persisted. Infected individuals showed higher levels of catalase and glutathione reductase activity, antioxidant enzymes with a very important role in the protection against oxidative stress. Levels of TBARS were unaffected by parasites, suggesting that infection is not associated with oxidative damage. Moreover, infected Artemia had a higher number of carotenoid-rich lipid droplets which may also protect the host through the “survival of the fattest” principle and the antioxidant potential of carotenoids. This study illustrates the need to consider the multi-stress context (contaminants and temperature increase) in which host-parasite interactions occur. PMID:26938743

  2. When Parasites Are Good for Health: Cestode Parasitism Increases Resistance to Arsenic in Brine Shrimps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Marta I; Pons, Inès; Martínez-Haro, Mónica; Taggart, Mark A; Lenormand, Thomas; Green, Andy J

    2016-03-01

    Parasites and pollutants can both affect any living organism, and their interactions can be very important. To date, repeated studies have found that parasites and heavy metals or metalloids both have important negative effects on the health of animals, often in a synergistic manner. Here, we show for the first time that parasites can increase host resistance to metalloid arsenic, focusing on a clonal population of brine shrimp from the contaminated Odiel and Tinto estuary in SW Spain. We studied the effect of cestodes on the response of Artemia to arsenic (acute toxicity tests, 24h LC50) and found that infection consistently reduced mortality across a range of arsenic concentrations. An increase from 25°C to 29°C, simulating the change in mean temperature expected under climate change, increased arsenic toxicity, but the benefits of infection persisted. Infected individuals showed higher levels of catalase and glutathione reductase activity, antioxidant enzymes with a very important role in the protection against oxidative stress. Levels of TBARS were unaffected by parasites, suggesting that infection is not associated with oxidative damage. Moreover, infected Artemia had a higher number of carotenoid-rich lipid droplets which may also protect the host through the "survival of the fattest" principle and the antioxidant potential of carotenoids. This study illustrates the need to consider the multi-stress context (contaminants and temperature increase) in which host-parasite interactions occur. PMID:26938743

  3. ARSENIC SPECIATION IN CARROT EXTRACTS WITH AN EMPHASIS ON THE DETECTION OF MMA(III) AND MMTA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The two predominant routes of arsenic exposure are dietary ingestion and drinking water consumption. Dietary arsenic, unlike drinking water arsenic, contains a variety of arsenicals with dramatically different toxicities. The list of arsenicals detected in dietary samples conti...

  4. Iron Polymerization and Arsenic Removal During In-Situ Iron Electrocoagulation in Synthetic Bangladeshi Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Genuchten, C. M.; Pena, J.; Addy, S.; Gadgil, A.

    2010-12-01

    Millions of people worldwide are exposed to arsenic-contamination in groundwater drinking supplies. The majority of affected people live in rural Bangladesh. Electrocoagulation (EC) using iron electrodes is a promising arsenic removal strategy that is based on the generation of iron precipitates with a high affinity for arsenic through the electrochemical dissolution of a sacrificial iron anode. Many studies of iron hydrolysis in the presence of co-occurring ions in groundwater such as PO43-, SiO44-, and AsO43- suggest that these ions influence the polymerization and formation of iron oxide phases. However, the combined impact of these ions on precipitates generated by EC is not well understood. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was used to examine EC precipitates generated in synthetic Bangladeshi groundwater (SBGW). The iron oxide structure and arsenic binding geometry were investigated as a function of EC operating conditions. As and Fe k-edge spectra were similar between samples regardless of the large range of current density (0.02, 1.1, 5.0, 100 mA/cm2) used during sample generation. This result suggests that current density does not play a large role in the formation EC precipitates in SBGW. Shell-by-shell fits of Fe K-edge data revealed the presence of a single Fe-Fe interatomic distance at approximately 3.06 Å. The absence of longer ranged Fe-Fe correlations suggests that EC precipitates consist of nano-scale chains (polymers) of FeO6 octahedra sharing equatorial edges. Shell-by-shell fits of As K-edge spectra show arsenic bound in primarily bidentate, binuclear corner sharing complexes. In this coordination geometry, arsenic prevents the formation of FeO6 corner-sharing linkages, which are necessary for 3-dimensional crystal growth. The individual and combined effects of other anions, such as PO43- and SiO44- present in SBGW are currently being investigated to determine the role of these ions in stunting crystal growth. The results provided by this

  5. Nrf2 activation ameliorates cytotoxic effects of arsenic trioxide in acute promyelocytic leukemia cells through increased glutathione levels and arsenic efflux from cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, Shoichi; Suzuki, Toshihiro; Koike, Shin; Yuan, Bo; Takagi, Norio; Ogasawara, Yuki

    2016-08-15

    Carnosic acid (CA), a phenolic diterpene isolated from Rosmarinus officinalis, has been shown to activate nuclear transcription factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which plays a central role in cytoprotective responses to oxidative and electrophilic stress. Recently, the Nrf2-Kelch ECH associating protein 1 (Keap1) pathway has been associated with cancer drug resistance attributable to modulation of the expression and activation of antioxidant and detoxification enzymes. However, the exact mechanisms by which Nrf2 activation results in chemoresistance are insufficiently understood to date. This study investigated the mechanisms by which the cytotoxic effects of arsenic trioxide (ATO), an anticancer drug, were decreased in acute promyelocytic leukemia cells treated with CA, a typical activator of Nrf2 used to stimulate the Nrf2/Keap1 system. Our findings suggest that arsenic is non-enzymatically incorporated into NB4 cells and forms complexes that are dependent on intracellular glutathione (GSH) concentrations. In addition, the arsenic complexes are recognized as substrates by multidrug resistance proteins and subsequently excreted from the cells. Therefore, Nrf2-associated activation of the GSH biosynthetic pathway, followed by increased levels of intracellular GSH, are key mechanisms underlying accelerated arsenic efflux and attenuation of the cytotoxic effects of ATO. PMID:27317373

  6. Microbial contributions to coupled arsenic and sulfur cycling in the acid-sulfide hot spring Champagne Pool, New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin eHug

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Acid-sulfide hot springs are analogs of early Earth geothermal systems where microbial metal(loid resistance likely first evolved. Arsenic is a metalloid enriched in the acid-sulfide hot spring Champagne Pool (Waiotapu, New Zealand. Arsenic speciation in Champagne Pool follows reaction paths not yet fully understood with respect to biotic contributions and coupling to biogeochemical sulfur cycling. Here we present quantitative arsenic speciation from Champagne Pool, finding arsenite dominant in the pool, rim and outflow channel (55-75% total arsenic, and dithio- and trithioarsenates ubiquitously present as 18-25% total arsenic. In the outflow channel, dimethylmonothioarsenate comprised ≤9% total arsenic, while on the outflow terrace thioarsenates were present at 55% total arsenic. We also quantified sulfide, thiosulfate, sulfate and elemental sulfur, finding sulfide and sulfate as major species in the pool and outflow terrace, respectively. Elemental sulfur reached a maximum at the terrace. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA genes from metagenomic sequencing revealed the dominance of Sulfurihydrogenibium at all sites and an increased archaeal population at the rim and outflow channel. Several phylotypes were found closely related to known sulfur- and sulfide-oxidizers, as well as sulfur- and sulfate-reducers. Bioinformatic analysis revealed genes underpinning sulfur redox transformations, consistent with sulfur speciation data, and illustrating a microbial role in sulfur-dependent transformation of arsenite to thioarsenate. Metagenomic analysis also revealed genes encoding for arsenate reductase at all sites, reflecting the ubiquity of thioarsenate and a need for microbial arsenate resistance despite anoxic conditions. Absence of the arsenite oxidase gene, aio, at all sites suggests prioritization of arsenite detoxification over coupling to energy conservation. Finally, detection of methyl arsenic in the outflow channel, in conjunction with

  7. Arsenic contamination and arsenicosis in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenicosis is a serious environmental chemical disease in China mainly caused by drinking water from pump wells contaminated by high levels of arsenic. Chronic exposure of humans to high concentrations of arsenic in drinking water is associated with skin lesions, peripheral vascular disease, hypertension, blackfoot disease, and high risk of cancers. Lead by the Ministry of Health of China, we carried out a research about arsenicosis in China recently. Areas contaminated with arsenic from drinking water are determined by 10% pump well water sample method while areas from burning coal are determined by existing data. Two epidemic areas of Shanxi Province and Inner Mongolia are investigated for the distribution of pump wells containing high arsenic. Well water in all the investigated villages of Shanxi Province showed polluted by high arsenic, and the average rate of unsafe pump well water is 52%. In Inner Mongolia, the high percentage of pump wells containing elevated arsenic is found only in a few villages. The average rate of unsafe pump well water is 11%. From our research, we find that new endemic areas are continuously emerging in China. Up to now, epidemic areas of arsenicosis mainly involve eight provinces and 37 counties in China. In the affected areas, the discovery of wells and coal with high levels of arsenic is continuing sporadically, and a similar scattered distribution pattern of patients is also being observed

  8. Arsenic adsorption of lateritic soil, limestone powder, lime and fly ash on arsenic-contaminated soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wuthiphun, L.

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic adsorption efficiency of soil covering materials (lateritic soil, limestone powder, lime and fly ash on arsenic-contaminated soil obtained from Ronpiboon District, Nakhon Sri Thammarat Province tosolve arsenic air pollution problem was investigated using batch experiments. The four types of the aforementioned soil covering materials were examined to determine their arsenic adsorption efficiency, equilibriumtime as well as adsorption isotherms.The results revealed that among soil covering materials mixed with arsenic-contaminated soil at 10% w/w, the efficiency of arsenic adsorption of fly ash, lateritic soil, lime and limestone powder were 84, 60,38 and 1% respectively. The equilibrium time for lateritic soil at pH 4 was achieved within 4 hrs, whereas pH 7 and 12, the equilibrium time was 6 hrs. For fly ash, 2 hrs were required to reach the equilibrium at pH 12, while the equilibrium time was attained within 6 hrs at pH 4 and 7. Furthermore, lateritic soil possessedhigh arsenic adsorption efficiency at pH 7 and 4 and best fit with the Langmuir isotherm. The fly ash showing high arsenic adsorption efficiency at pH 12 and 7 fit the Freundlich isotherm at pH 12 and Langmuirisotherm at pH 7.This indicated that lateritic soil was suitable for arsenic adsorption at low pH, whilst at high pH,arsenic was well adsorbed by fly ash. The Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm could be used to determine quantities of soil covering materials for arsenic adsorption to prevent arsenic air pollution from arseniccontaminated soils.

  9. In-situ arsenic remediation in Carson Valley, Douglas County, west-central Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Angela P.; Maurer, Douglas K.; Stollenwerk, Kenneth G.; Welch, Alan H.

    2010-01-01

    Conventional arsenic remediation strategies primarily involve above-ground treatment that include costs involved in the disposal of sludge material. The primary advantages of in-situ remediation are that building and maintaining a large treatment facility are not necessary and that costs associated with the disposal of sludge are eliminated. A two-phase study was implemented to address the feasibility of in-situ arsenic remediation in Douglas County, Nevada. Arsenic concentrations in groundwater within Douglas County range from 1 to 85 micrograms per liter. The primary arsenic species in groundwater at greater than 250 ft from land surface is arsenite; however, in the upper 150 ft of the aquifer arsenate predominates. Where arsenite is the primary form of arsenic, the oxidation of arsenite to arsenate is necessary. The results of the first phase of this investigation indicated that arsenic concentrations can be remediated to below the drinking-water standard using aeration, chlorination, iron, and pH adjustment. Arsenic concentrations were remediated to less than 10 micrograms per liter in groundwater from the shallow and deep aquifer when iron concentrations of 3-6 milligrams per liter and pH adjustments to less than 6 were used. Because of the rapid depletion of dissolved oxygen, the secondary drinking-water standards for iron (300 micrograms per liter) and manganese (100 micrograms per liter) were exceeded during treatment. Treatment was more effective in the shallow well as indicated by a greater recovery of water meeting the arsenic standard. Laboratory and field tests were included in the second phase of this study. Laboratory column experiments using aquifer material indicated the treatment process followed during the first phase of this study will continue to work, without exceeding secondary drinking-water standards, provided that groundwater was pre-aerated and an adequate number of pore volumes treated. During the 147-day laboratory experiment, no

  10. Current Status and Prevention Strategy for Coal-arsenic Poisoning in Guizhou, China

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Dasheng; An, Dong; Zhou, Yunsu; Liu, Jie; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2006-01-01

    Arsenic exposure from burning coal with high arsenic contents occurs in southwest Guizhou, China. Coal in this region contains extremely high concentrations of inorganic arsenic. Arsenic exposure from coal-burning is much higher than exposure from arsenic-contaminated water in other areas of China. The current status and prevention strategies for arsenic poisoning from burning high-arsenic coal in southwest Guizhou, China, is reported here. Over 3,000 arsenic-intoxicated patients were diagnos...

  11. Environmental arsenic exposure and sputum metalloproteinase concentrations.

    OpenAIRE

    Josyula, Arun B.; Poplin, Gerald S.; Kurzius-Spencer, Margaret; McClellen, Hannah E.; Kopplin, Michael J.; Stürup, Stefan; Clark Lantz, R.; Jefferey L. Burgess

    2006-01-01

    Biomarkers of exposure & early effects: field studiesBiomarker: arsenic, creatinin, MMP levelsExposure/effect represented: arsenicStudy design: cross-sectionalStudy size: 73 subjectsAnalytical technique: ELISA, HPLCTissue/biological material/sample size: urine samplesRelationship with exposure or effect of interest (including dose-response): inorganic arsenic positively correlated with logMMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio in sputum (Pearson's r Ό 0:351, P Ό 0:009) and negatively correlated with the log of s...

  12. Electrochemical arsenic remediation for rural Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Addy, Susan Amrose [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Arsenic in drinking water is a major public health problem threatening the lives of over 140 million people worldwide. In Bangladesh alone, up to 57 million people drink arsenic-laden water from shallow wells. ElectroChemical Arsenic Remediation(ECAR) overcomes many of the obstacles that plague current technologies and can be used affordably and on a small-scale, allowing for rapid dissemination into Bangladesh to address this arsenic crisis. In this work, ECAR was shown to effectively reduce 550 - 580 μg=L arsenic (including both As[III]and As[V]in a 1:1 ratio) to below the WHO recommended maximum limit of 10 μg=L in synthetic Bangladesh groundwater containing relevant concentrations of competitive ions such as phosphate, silicate, and bicarbonate. Arsenic removal capacity was found to be approximately constant within certain ranges of current density, but was found to change substantially between ranges. In order of decreasing arsenic removal capacity, the pattern was: 0.02 mA=cm2> 0.07 mA=cm2> 0.30 - 1.1 mA=cm2> 5.0 - 100 mA=cm2. Current processing time was found to effect arsenic removal capacity independent of either charge density or current density. Electrode polarization studies showed no passivation of the electrode in the tested range (up to current density 10 mA=cm2) and ruled out oxygen evolution as the cause of decreasing removal capacity with current density. Simple settling and decantation required approximately 3 days to achieve arsenic removal comparable to filtration with a 0.1 mu m membrane. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) showed that (1) there is no significant difference in the arsenic removal mechanism of ECAR during operation at different current densities and (2) the arsenic removal mechanism in ECAR is consistent with arsenate adsorption onto a homogenous Fe(III)oxyhydroxide similar in structure to 2-line ferrihydrite. ECAR effectively reduced high arsenic concentrations (100

  13. Electrochemical arsenic remediation for rural Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Addy, Susan Amrose

    2009-01-01

    Arsenic in drinking water is a major public health problem threatening the lives of over 140 million people worldwide. In Bangladesh alone, up to 57 million people drink arsenic-laden water from shallow wells. ElectroChemical Arsenic Remediation(ECAR) overcomes many of the obstacles that plague current technologies and can be used affordably and on a small-scale, allowing for rapid dissemination into Bangladesh to address this arsenic crisis. In this work, ECAR was shown to effectively reduce 550 - 580 mu g=L arsenic (including both As[III]and As[V]in a 1:1 ratio) to below the WHO recommended maximum limit of 10 mu g=L in synthetic Bangladesh groundwater containing relevant concentrations of competitive ions such as phosphate, silicate, and bicarbonate. Arsenic removal capacity was found to be approximately constant within certain ranges of current density, but was found to change substantially between ranges. In order of decreasing arsenic removal capacity, the pattern was: 0.02 mA=cm2> 0.07 mA=cm2> 0.30 - 1.1 mA=cm2> 5.0 - 100 mA=cm2. Current processing time was found to effect arsenic removal capacity independent of either charge density or current density. Electrode polarization studies showed no passivation of the electrode in the tested range (up to current density 10 mA=cm2) and ruled out oxygen evolution as the cause of decreasing removal capacity with current density. Simple settling and decantation required approximately 3 days to achieve arsenic removal comparable to filtration with a 0.1 mu m membrane. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) showed that (1) there is no significant difference in the arsenic removal mechanism of ECAR during operation at different current densities and (2) the arsenic removal mechanism in ECAR is consistent with arsenate adsorption onto a homogenous Fe(III)oxyhydroxide similar in structure to 2-line ferrihydrite. ECAR effectively reduced high arsenic concentrations (100 - 500 mu g=L) in real Bangladesh tube well water

  14. Arsenic in rice: A cause for concern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hojsak, Iva; Braegger, Christian; Bronsky, Jiri;

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic intake is likely to affect long-term health. High concentrations are found in some rice-based foods and drinks widely used in infants and young children. In order to reduce exposure we recommend avoidance of rice drinks for infants and young children. For all rice products, strict...... regulation should be enforced regarding arsenic content. Moreover, infants and young children should consume a balanced diet including a variety of grains as carbohydrate sources. While rice protein based infant formulas are an option for infants with cows' milk protein allergy, the inorganic arsenic content...

  15. Arsenic(III) Immobilization on Rice Husk

    OpenAIRE

    Malay Chaudhuri; Mohammed Ali Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    A number of large aquifers in various parts of the world have been identified with contamination by arsenic. Long-term exposure to arsenic in drinking water causes cancer of the skin, lungs, urinary bladder and kidney, as well as skin pigmentation and hyperkeratosis. Arsenic occurs in groundwater in two valence states, as trivalent arsenite [As(III)] and pentavalent arsenate [As(V)]. As(III) is more toxic and more difficult to remove from water by adsorption on activated alumina. In this stud...

  16. Reactive oxygen species contribute to arsenic-induced EZH2 phosphorylation in human bronchial epithelial cells and lung cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lingzhi; Qiu, Ping; Chen, Bailing; Lu, Yongju; Wu, Kai; Thakur, Chitra; Chang, Qingshan; Sun, Jiaying; Chen, Fei, E-mail: fchen@wayne.edu

    2014-05-01

    Our previous studies suggested that arsenic is able to induce serine 21 phosphorylation of the EZH2 protein through activation of JNK, STAT3, and Akt signaling pathways in the bronchial epithelial cell line, BEAS-2B. In the present report, we further demonstrated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) were involved in the arsenic-induced protein kinase activation that leads to EZH2 phosphorylation. Several lines of evidence supported this notion. First, the pretreatment of the cells with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), a potent antioxidant, abolishes arsenic-induced EZH2 phosphorylation along with the inhibition of JNK, STAT3, and Akt. Second, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, the most important form of ROS in the cells in response to extracellular stress signals, can induce phosphorylation of the EZH2 protein and the activation of JNK, STAT3, and Akt. By ectopic expression of the myc-tagged EZH2, we additionally identified direct interaction and phosphorylation of the EZH2 protein by Akt in response to arsenic and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Furthermore, both arsenic and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} were able to induce the translocation of ectopically expressed or endogenous EZH2 from nucleus to cytoplasm. In summary, the data presented in this report indicate that oxidative stress due to ROS generation plays an important role in the arsenic-induced EZH2 phosphorylation. - Highlights:: • Arsenic (As{sup 3+}) induces EZH phosphorylation. • JNK, STAT3, and Akt contribute to EZH2 phosphorylation. • Oxidative stress is involved in As{sup 3+}-induced EZH2 phosphorylation. • As{sup 3+} induces direct interaction of Akt and EZH2. • Phosphorylated EZH2 localized in cytoplasm.

  17. Reactive oxygen species contribute to arsenic-induced EZH2 phosphorylation in human bronchial epithelial cells and lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our previous studies suggested that arsenic is able to induce serine 21 phosphorylation of the EZH2 protein through activation of JNK, STAT3, and Akt signaling pathways in the bronchial epithelial cell line, BEAS-2B. In the present report, we further demonstrated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) were involved in the arsenic-induced protein kinase activation that leads to EZH2 phosphorylation. Several lines of evidence supported this notion. First, the pretreatment of the cells with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), a potent antioxidant, abolishes arsenic-induced EZH2 phosphorylation along with the inhibition of JNK, STAT3, and Akt. Second, H2O2, the most important form of ROS in the cells in response to extracellular stress signals, can induce phosphorylation of the EZH2 protein and the activation of JNK, STAT3, and Akt. By ectopic expression of the myc-tagged EZH2, we additionally identified direct interaction and phosphorylation of the EZH2 protein by Akt in response to arsenic and H2O2. Furthermore, both arsenic and H2O2 were able to induce the translocation of ectopically expressed or endogenous EZH2 from nucleus to cytoplasm. In summary, the data presented in this report indicate that oxidative stress due to ROS generation plays an important role in the arsenic-induced EZH2 phosphorylation. - Highlights:: • Arsenic (As3+) induces EZH phosphorylation. • JNK, STAT3, and Akt contribute to EZH2 phosphorylation. • Oxidative stress is involved in As3+-induced EZH2 phosphorylation. • As3+ induces direct interaction of Akt and EZH2. • Phosphorylated EZH2 localized in cytoplasm

  18. Global Atmospheric Transport and Source-Receptor Relationships for Arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wai, Ka-Ming; Wu, Shiliang; Li, Xueling; Jaffe, Daniel A; Perry, Kevin D

    2016-04-01

    Arsenic and many of its compounds are toxic pollutants in the global environment. They can be transported long distances in the atmosphere before depositing to the surface, but the global source-receptor relationships between various regions have not yet been assessed. We develop the first global model for atmospheric arsenic to better understand and quantify its intercontinental transport. Our model reproduces the observed arsenic concentrations in surface air over various sites around the world. Arsenic emissions from Asia and South America are found to be the dominant sources for atmospheric arsenic in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, respectively. Asian emissions are found to contribute 39% and 38% of the total arsenic deposition over the Arctic and Northern America, respectively. Another 14% of the arsenic deposition to the Arctic region is attributed to European emissions. Our results indicate that the reduction of anthropogenic arsenic emissions in Asia and South America can significantly reduce arsenic pollution not only locally but also globally. PMID:26906891

  19. Mathematical model insights into arsenic detoxification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nijhout H Frederik

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arsenic in drinking water, a major health hazard to millions of people in South and East Asia and in other parts of the world, is ingested primarily as trivalent inorganic arsenic (iAs, which then undergoes hepatic methylation to methylarsonic acid (MMAs and a second methylation to dimethylarsinic acid (DMAs. Although MMAs and DMAs are also known to be toxic, DMAs is more easily excreted in the urine and therefore methylation has generally been considered a detoxification pathway. A collaborative modeling project between epidemiologists, biologists, and mathematicians has the purpose of explaining existing data on methylation in human studies in Bangladesh and also testing, by mathematical modeling, effects of nutritional supplements that could increase As methylation. Methods We develop a whole body mathematical model of arsenic metabolism including arsenic absorption, storage, methylation, and excretion. The parameters for arsenic methylation in the liver were taken from the biochemical literature. The transport parameters between compartments are largely unknown, so we adjust them so that the model accurately predicts the urine excretion rates of time for the iAs, MMAs, and DMAs in single dose experiments on human subjects. Results We test the model by showing that, with no changes in parameters, it predicts accurately the time courses of urinary excretion in mutiple dose experiments conducted on human subjects. Our main purpose is to use the model to study and interpret the data on the effects of folate supplementation on arsenic methylation and excretion in clinical trials in Bangladesh. Folate supplementation of folate-deficient individuals resulted in a 14% decrease in arsenicals in the blood. This is confirmed by the model and the model predicts that arsenicals in the liver will decrease by 19% and arsenicals in other body stores by 26% in these same individuals. In addition, the model predicts that arsenic

  20. Arsenic pollution in groundwater: a self-organizing complex geochemical process in the deltaic sedimentary environment, Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tareq, Shafi M; Safiullah, S; Anawar, H M; Rahman, M Majibur; Ishizuka, T

    2003-09-01

    The presence of considerable concentrations of As (Sonargon: below detection limit (bdl)-1.46 mg/l; Faridpur: bdl-1.66 mg/l) and some other elements (like B, F, U) in groundwater of the Ganges-Meghna-Brahmaputra (G-M-B) rivers flood plain indicate that several millions of people are consuming contaminated water. Conditions regulating the mobilization and diagenetic behavior of arsenic in sediments are not well characterized, although understanding these conditions is essential in order to predict the modes of transfer of this contaminant from sediments to groundwater. Analyses of vertical profiles of total arsenic and iron as well as easily soluble As and reducible (reactive) iron concentrations in sediments of the Ganges and Meghna flood plains show no arsenic-enriched layer up to 36-m depth. However, arsenic content in sediments is relatively higher than mean crustal concentration, showing some peaks (Sonargaon: 27.9 mg/kg; 3 m, 31.5 mg/kg; 9 m, 27.30 mg/kg; 16 m, 37.70 mg/kg; 29.5 m, Faridpur: 19.80 mg/kg; 6 m, 26.60 mg/kg; 14.5 m, 29.40 mg/kg; 25 m) depending on the periodical differences in sedimentary cycling of arsenic, metal (hydr)oxides and organic matter. Seasonal changes have no clear or consistent effect on the groundwater arsenic concentrations; with the exception of a small-scale localized irregular change (10-16%). However, easily reducible metal oxides and hydroxides were significant factors affecting the retention of arsenic by sediments during leaching. The biogeochemical cycling of arsenic and iron is closely coupled in deltaic systems where iron oxy-hydroxides provide a carrier phase for the deposition of arsenic in sediments. Analytical results of mimic leaching experiments strongly supported the reduction (Fe oxy-hydroxides) mechanism for arsenic mobilization in alluvial aquifer of deltaic sedimentary environment of G-M-B rivers flood plain. PMID:12922072

  1. Genomic Analysis of the Archaeon Ferroplasma acidarmanus: New Insights Into the Evolution of Arsenic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gihring, T. M.; Banfield, J. F.

    2001-12-01

    Arsenic resistance allows microbes to live in As-rich solutions and in proximity to As-bearing minerals and thus, to impact dissolution and precipitation reactions. As-resistance is a characteristic of both Bacteria and Archaea. In some cases, it is conferred by the acquisition of a plasmid, in other instances the genes are located on the chromosome. Through analysis of newly acquired genomic data for the highly arsenic-resistant, iron-oxidizing extreme acidophile Ferroplasma acidarmanus and genomic data for other organisms we can gain insight into the mechanisms, origin, and evolution of genes that confer arsenic resistance. The deduced protein sequences of all known arsenic resistance genes were compiled from genomic and protein databases. Sequence alignments and phylogenic analyses were performed. Comparisons of arsenite efflux pump (ArsB) and 16S rDNA phylogenies indicated a parallel evolutionary history for the two genes. Results indicate that the As(III) efflux pump was present in the ancestor common to the Bacterial and Archaeal domains. This pump, conferring resistance to arsenite, was probably important to early life living in metal-rich environments. Previous work has shown that the gene encoding for ArsA, an ATPase that increases the efficiency of arsenic efflux, clearly arose via gene duplication. Ferroplasma and related Thermoplasmales group organisms contain a pre-duplication subunit of uncertain function. ArsA phylogeny shows two separate and distinct lines of evolution for the chromosomal- and plasmid-based proteins. This study provides the first evidence of metal resistance developing early in the evolution of life and gives new insights into the evolutionary history of the arsenic resistance proteins.

  2. Association of AS3MT polymorphisms and the risk of premalignant arsenic skin lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to naturally occurring inorganic arsenic (iAs), primarily from contaminated drinking water, is considered one of the top environmental health threats worldwide. Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) is the key enzyme in the biotransformation pathway of iAs. AS3MT catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine to trivalent arsenicals, resulting in the production of methylated (MAs) and dimethylated arsenicals (DMAs). MAs is a susceptibility factor for iAs-induced toxicity. In this study, we evaluated the association of the polymorphism in AS3MT gene with iAs metabolism and with the presence of arsenic (As) premalignant skin lesions. This is a case-control study of 71 cases with skin lesions and 51 controls without skin lesions recruited from a iAs endemic area in Mexico. We measured urinary As metabolites, differentiating the trivalent and pentavalent arsenical species, using the hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry. In addition, the study subjects were genotyped to analyze three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), A-477G, T14458C (nonsynonymus SNP; Met287Thr), and T35587C, in the AS3MT gene. We compared the frequencies of the AS3MT alleles, genotypes, and haplotypes in individuals with and without skin lesions. Marginal differences in the frequencies of the Met287Thr genotype were identified between individuals with and without premalignant skin lesions (p = 0.055): individuals carrying the C (TC+CC) allele (Thr) were at risk [odds ratio = 4.28; 95% confidence interval (1.0-18.5)]. Also, individuals with C allele of Met287Thr displayed greater percentage of MAs in urine and decrease in the percentage of DMAs. These findings indicate that Met287Thr influences the susceptibility to premalignant As skin lesions and might be at increased risk for other adverse health effects of iAs exposure.

  3. Subsurface iron and arsenic removal: Low-cost technology for community-based water supply in Bangladesh

    KAUST Repository

    Van Halem, Doris

    2010-12-01

    The principle of subsurface or in situ iron and arsenic removal is that aerated water is periodically injected into an anoxic aquifer through a tube well, displacing groundwater containing Fe(II). An oxidation zone is created around the tube well where Fe(II) is oxidised. The freshly formed iron hydroxide surfaces provide new sorption sites for soluble Fe(II) andarsenic. The system\\'s efficiency is determined based on the ratio between abstracted volume with reduced iron/arsenic concentrations (V) and the injected volume (Vi). In the field studypresented in this paper, the small-scale application of this technology was investigated in rural Bangladesh. It was found that at small injection volumes (>1m3) iron removal was successful and became more effective with every successive cycle. For arsenic, however, the system did not prove to be very effective yet. Arsenic retardation was only limited and breakthrough of 10mg/L (WHO guideline) was observed before V/Vi = 1, which corresponds to arrival of groundwater at the well. Possible explanations for insufficient arsenic adsorption are the short contact times within the oxidation zone, and the presence of competing anions, like phosphate. © IWA Publishing 2010.

  4. Arsenic removal from water employing heterogeneous photocatalysis with TiO2 immobilized in PET bottles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fostier, Anne Hélène; Pereira, Maria do Socorro Silva; Rath, Susanne; Guimarães, José Roberto

    2008-05-01

    Arsenic oxidation (As(III) to As(V)) and As(V) removal from water were assessed by using TiO2 immobilized in PET (polyethylene terephthalate) bottles in the presence of natural sunlight and iron salts. The effect of many parameters was sequentially studied: TiO2 concentration of the coating solution, Fe(II) concentration, pH, solar irradiation time; dissolved organic carbon concentration. The final conditions (TiO2 concentration of the coating solution: 10%; Fe(II): 7.0 mg l(-1); solar exposure time: 120 min) were applied to natural water samples spiked with 500 microg l(-1) As(III) in order to verify the influence of natural water matrix. After treatment, As(III) and total As concentrations were lower than the limit of quantitation (2 microg l(-1)) of the voltammetric method used, showing a removal over 99%, and giving evidence that As(III) was effectively oxidized to As(V). The results obtained demonstrated that TiO2 can be easily immobilized on a PET surface in order to perform As(III) oxidation in water and that this TiO2 immobilization, combined with coprecipitation of arsenic on Fe(III) hydroxides(oxides) could be an efficient way for inorganic arsenic removal from groundwaters. PMID:18342358

  5. Arsenic release from shallow aquifers of the Hetao Basin, Inner Mongolia: Evidence from bacterial community in aquifer sediments and groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Guo, H.

    2013-12-01

    with glucose and lactose showed minimal release of As. These results implied that processes governing arsenic release were controlled by anaerobic microbial activity. In addition, the natural organic matter containing sufficient labile organic carbon in the sediments might play important roles to drive microbially mediated processes, even without the addition of external organic matter. However, the organic matter responsible for arsenic mobilization in situ within the Hetao basin aquifers remains uncertain and is the subject of further investigation. The sequential extraction studies revealed that chemically active arsenic was mainly bound to Fe-Mn oxides in the sediments. It was therefore speculated that the release of arsenic was triggered by the reductive dissolution of Fe(III) oxides/oxyhydroxides in the sediment. To some extent, Fe(III) and SO42- reducing bacteria also influenced arsenic mobilization by reducing As(V) to As(III). The potential role of siderophores produced by Pseudomonas sp., representative of NO3--reducing bacteria, needs further confirmation in the future investigation. This study suggested that arsenic mobilization from the aquifer sediments in the Hetao basin would be mediated by indigenous nitrate reducers, iron reducers and sulfate reducers.

  6. MDI Biological Laboratory Arsenic Summit: Approaches to Limiting Human Exposure to Arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Bruce A; Caldwell, Kathleen; Congdon, Clare Bates; Disney, Jane; Donahue, Maria; Ferguson, Elizabeth; Flemings, Elsie; Golden, Meredith; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Highman, Jay; James, Karen; Kim, Carol; Lantz, R Clark; Marvinney, Robert G; Mayer, Greg; Miller, David; Navas-Acien, Ana; Nordstrom, D Kirk; Postema, Sonia; Rardin, Laurie; Rosen, Barry; SenGupta, Arup; Shaw, Joseph; Stanton, Elizabeth; Susca, Paul

    2015-09-01

    This report is the outcome of the meeting "Environmental and Human Health Consequences of Arsenic" held at the MDI Biological Laboratory in Salisbury Cove, Maine, August 13-15, 2014. Human exposure to arsenic represents a significant health problem worldwide that requires immediate attention according to the World Health Organization (WHO). One billion people are exposed to arsenic in food, and more than 200 million people ingest arsenic via drinking water at concentrations greater than international standards. Although the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has set a limit of 10 μg/L in public water supplies and the WHO has recommended an upper limit of 10 μg/L, recent studies indicate that these limits are not protective enough. In addition, there are currently few standards for arsenic in food. Those who participated in the Summit support citizens, scientists, policymakers, industry, and educators at the local, state, national, and international levels to (1) establish science-based evidence for setting standards at the local, state, national, and global levels for arsenic in water and food; (2) work with government agencies to set regulations for arsenic in water and food, to establish and strengthen non-regulatory programs, and to strengthen collaboration among government agencies, NGOs, academia, the private sector, industry, and others; (3) develop novel and cost-effective technologies for identification and reduction of exposure to arsenic in water; (4) develop novel and cost-effective approaches to reduce arsenic exposure in juice, rice, and other relevant foods; and (5) develop an Arsenic Education Plan to guide the development of science curricula as well as community outreach and education programs that serve to inform students and consumers about arsenic exposure and engage them in well water testing and development of remediation strategies. PMID:26231509

  7. Arsenic stress after the Proterozoic glaciations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi Fru, Ernest; Arvestål, Emma; Callac, Nolwenn; El Albani, Abderrazak; Kilias, Stephanos; Argyraki, Ariadne; Jakobsson, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Protection against arsenic damage in organisms positioned deep in the tree of life points to early evolutionary sensitization. Here, marine sedimentary records reveal a Proterozoic arsenic concentration patterned to glacial-interglacial ages. The low glacial and high interglacial sedimentary arsenic concentrations, suggest deteriorating habitable marine conditions may have coincided with atmospheric oxygen decline after ~2.1 billion years ago. A similar intensification of near continental margin sedimentary arsenic levels after the Cryogenian glaciations is also associated with amplified continental weathering. However, interpreted atmospheric oxygen increase at this time, suggests that the marine biosphere had widely adapted to the reorganization of global marine elemental cycles by glaciations. Such a glacially induced biogeochemical bridge would have produced physiologically robust communities that enabled increased oxygenation of the ocean-atmosphere system and the radiation of the complex Ediacaran-Cambrian life.

  8. TELOMERASE AND CHRONIC ARSENIC EXPOSURE IN HUMANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenic exposure has been associated with increased risk of skin, lung and bladder cancer in humans. The mechanisms of carcinogenesis are not well understood. Telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein containing human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), can extend telomeres of eukary...

  9. Toxicokinetics and Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Arsenic

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter provides an overview of arsenic toxicokinetics and physiologically-basedpharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling with particular emphasis on key 'actors needed fordevelopment of a model useful for dose-response analysis, applications of arsenicmodels, as well research needs.U...

  10. ARSENIC REMOVAL BY SOFTENING AND COAGULATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinking water regulations for arsenic (As) and disinfection by-product precursor materials (measured as TOC) are becoming increasingly stringent. Among the modifications to conventional treatment that can improve removal of As and TOC, precipitative softening and coagulation are...

  11. Disposal of water treatment wastes containing arsenic - A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solid waste management in developing countries is often unsustainable, relying on uncontrolled disposal in waste dumps. Particular problems arise from the disposal of treatment residues generated by removing arsenic (As) from drinking water because As can be highly mobile and has the potential to leach back to ground and surface waters. This paper reviews the disposal of water treatment wastes containing As, with a particular emphasis on stabilisation/solidification (S/S) technologies which are currently used to treat industrial wastes containing As. These have been assessed for their appropriateness for treating As containing water treatment wastes. Portland cement/lime mixes are expected (at least in part) to be appropriate for wastes from sorptive filters, but may not be appropriate for precipitative sludges, because ferric flocs often used to sorb As can retard cement hydration. Brine resulting from the regeneration of activated alumina filters is likely to accelerate cement hydration. Portland cement can immobilise soluble arsenites and has been successfully used to stabilise As-rich sludges and it may also be suitable for treating sludges generated from precipitative removal units. Oxidation of As(III) to As(V) and the formation of calcium-arsenic compounds are important immobilisation mechanisms for As in cements. Geopolymers are alternative binder systems that are effective for treating wastes rich in alumina and metal hydroxides and may have potential for As wastes generated using activated alumina. The long-term stability of cemented, arsenic-bearing wastes is however uncertain, as like many cements, they are susceptible to carbonation effects which may result in the subsequent re-release of As.

  12. Speciation of arsenic in water samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two methods are presented in this report for the determination of inorganic species of arsenic. For both methods, the parameters influencing the separations have been investigated using radiotracers. Following optimization of the methods; the applicability was tested by determining As(III) and As(V) in real water samples. The detection limit of these arsenic species in both fresh and sea water was about 0.02 μg/L. (author). 2 refs, 3 figs, 3 tabs

  13. Arsenic Induced Decreases in the Vascular Matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Hays, Allison M.; Lantz, R. Clark; Rodgers, Laurel S.; Sollome, James J.; Vaillancourt, Richard R.; Andrew, Angeline S; Hamilton, Joshua W.; Camenisch, Todd D.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic ingestion of arsenic is associated with increased incidence of respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. To investigate the role of arsenic in early events in vascular pathology, C57BL/6 mice ingested drinking water with or without 50 ppb sodium arsenite (AsIII) for four, five or eight weeks. At five and eight weeks, RNA from the lungs of control and AsIII exposed animals was processed for microarray. Sixty-five genes were significantly and differentially expressed. Differential expres...

  14. Arsenic: Not So Evil After All?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykknes, Annette; Kvittingen, Lise

    2003-05-01

    This article presents parts of the history of the element arsenic in order to illustrate processes behind development of knowledge in chemistry. The particular aspects presented here are the use of arsenic as a stimulant by Styrian peasants, in Fowler's solution, in drugs of the 19th century (e.g., salvarsan), and in current medical treatment, all of which challenge the myth of this element as exclusively poisonous.

  15. Arsenic accumulation in some higher fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Stijve, T.; Vellinga, Else C.; Herrmann, A.

    1990-01-01

    The high arsenic concentrations reported in literature for Laccaria amethystina were amply confirmed. In addition, it was demonstrated that Laccaria fraterna also accumulates the element, whereas in other species of Laccaria the phenomenon was far less outspoken. Few other basidiomycetes proved to have an affinity for the toxic element. The arsenic concentrations in the principal edible mushrooms of commerce were found to be very low, i.e. on the average 0.5 mg/kg on dry matter. Among the asc...

  16. Arsenic in groundwater of the Red River floodplain, Vietnam: Controlling geochemical processes and reactive transport modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postma, Diederik Jan; Larsen, Flemming; Hue, N.T.M.;

    2007-01-01

    The mobilization of arsenic (As) to the groundwater was studied in a shallow Holocene aquifer on the Red River flood plain near Hanoi, Vietnam. The groundwater chemistry was investigated in a transect of 100 piezometers. Results show an anoxic aquifer featuring organic carbon decomposition...... with redox zonation dominated by the reduction of Fe-oxides and methanogenesis. Enhanced PCO2 pressure causes carbonate dissolution to take place but mainly in the soil and unsaturated zone. The concentration of As increases over depth to a concentration of up to 550 mu g/L. Most As is present as As......(III) but some As(V) is always found. Arsenic correlates well with NH4, relating its release to organic matter decomposition and the source of As appears to be the Fe-oxides being reduced. Part of the produced Fe(II) is apparently reprecipitated as siderite containing less As. Results from sediment extraction...

  17. Aquatic arsenic: phytoremediation using floating macrophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M Azizur; Hasegawa, H

    2011-04-01

    Phytoremediation, a plant based green technology, has received increasing attention after the discovery of hyperaccumulating plants which are able to accumulate, translocate, and concentrate high amount of certain toxic elements in their above-ground/harvestable parts. Phytoremediation includes several processes namely, phytoextraction, phytodegradation, rhizofiltration, phytostabilization and phytovolatilization. Both terrestrial and aquatic plants have been tested to remediate contaminated soils and waters, respectively. A number of aquatic plant species have been investigated for the remediation of toxic contaminants such as As, Zn, Cd, Cu, Pb, Cr, Hg, etc. Arsenic, one of the deadly toxic elements, is widely distributed in the aquatic systems as a result of mineral dissolution from volcanic or sedimentary rocks as well as from the dilution of geothermal waters. In addition, the agricultural and industrial effluent discharges are also considered for arsenic contamination in natural waters. Some aquatic plants have been reported to accumulate high level of arsenic from contaminated water. Water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes), duckweeds (Lemna gibba, Lemna minor, Spirodela polyrhiza), water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica), water ferns (Azolla caroliniana, Azolla filiculoides, and Azolla pinnata), water cabbage (Pistia stratiotes), hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata) and watercress (Lepidium sativum) have been studied to investigate their arsenic uptake ability and mechanisms, and to evaluate their potential in phytoremediation technology. It has been suggested that the aquatic macrophytes would be potential for arsenic phytoremediation, and this paper reviews up to date knowledge on arsenic phytoremediation by common aquatic macrophytes. PMID:21435676

  18. Earthworms produce phytochelatins in response to arsenic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Liebeke

    Full Text Available Phytochelatins are small cysteine-rich non-ribosomal peptides that chelate soft metal and metalloid ions, such as cadmium and arsenic. They are widely produced by plants and microbes; phytochelatin synthase genes are also present in animal species from several different phyla, but there is still little known about whether these genes are functional in animals, and if so, whether they are metal-responsive. We analysed phytochelatin production by direct chemical analysis in Lumbricus rubellus earthworms exposed to arsenic for a 28 day period, and found that arsenic clearly induced phytochelatin production in a dose-dependent manner. It was necessary to measure the phytochelatin metabolite concentrations directly, as there was no upregulation of phytochelatin synthase gene expression after 28 days: phytochelatin synthesis appears not to be transcriptionally regulated in animals. A further untargetted metabolomic analysis also found changes in metabolites associated with the transsulfuration pathway, which channels sulfur flux from methionine for phytochelatin synthesis. There was no evidence of biological transformation of arsenic (e.g. into methylated species as a result of laboratory arsenic exposure. Finally, we compared wild populations of earthworms sampled from the field, and found that both arsenic-contaminated and cadmium-contaminated mine site worms had elevated phytochelatin concentrations.

  19. Determination of leachable arsenic from glass ampoules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appreciable amounts of different arsenic compounds are used in the manufacture of glass and glass ampoules (injection vials and bottles) used to store drugs. Exposure/intake of arsenic to human beings may result in skin ulceration, injury to mucous membranes, perforation of nasal septum, skin cancer and keratoses, especially of the palms and soles and may cause detrimental effects. Considering the toxicity of arsenic, even if traces of arsenic from such glass containers/ampoules are leached out, it can impart damage to human beings. To check the possibility of leaching of arsenic from glass ampoules, a simple methodology has been developed. Different makes and varieties of glass ampoules filled with de-ionized water were subjected to high pressure and temperature leaching for varying amount of time using autoclave to create extreme conditions for the maximum leaching out of the analyte. Subsequently, the determination of the arsenic contents in leached water using neutron activation analysis is reported in detail with observations. (author)

  20. A novel arsenic methyltransferase gene of Westerdykella aurantiaca isolated from arsenic contaminated soil: phylogenetic, physiological, and biochemical studies and its role in arsenic bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Shikha; Verma, Pankaj Kumar; Meher, Alok Kumar; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Bansiwal, Amit Kumar; Pande, Veena; Srivastava, Pankaj Kumar; Verma, Praveen Chandra; Tripathi, Rudra Deo; Chakrabarty, Debasis

    2016-03-01

    Elevated arsenic concentration in the environment and agricultural soil is a serious concern to crop production and human health. Among different detoxification mechanisms, the methylation of arsenic is a widespread phenomenon in nature. A number of microorganisms are able to methylate arsenic, but less is known about the arsenic metabolism in fungi. We identified a novel arsenic methyltransferase (WaarsM) gene from a soil fungus, Westerdykella aurantiaca. WaarsM showed sequence homology with all known arsenic methyltransferases having three conserved SAM binding motifs. The expression of WaarsM enhanced arsenic resistance in E. coli (Δars) and S. cerevisiae (Δacr2) strains by biomethylation and required endogenous reductants, preferably GSH, for methyltransferase activity. The purified WaarsM catalyzes the production of methylated arsenicals from both AsIII and AsV, and also displays AsV reductase activity. It displayed higher methyltransferase activity and lower KM 0.1945 ± 0.021 mM and KM 0.4034 ± 0.078 mM for AsIII and AsV, respectively. S. cerevisiae (Δacr2) cells expressing WaarsM produced 2.2 ppm volatile arsenic and 0.64 ppm DMA(v) with 0.58 ppm volatile arsenicals when exposed to 20 ppm AsV and 2 ppm AsIII, respectively. Arsenic tolerance in rice after co-culture with genetically engineered yeast suggested its potential role in arsenic bioremediation. Thus, characterization of WaarsM provides a potential strategy to reduce arsenic concentration in soil with reduced arsenic accumulation in crops grown in arsenic contaminated areas, and thereby alleviating human health risks. PMID:26776948

  1. Arsenic, mode of action at biologically plausible low doses: What are the implications for low dose cancer risk?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic is an established human carcinogen. However, there has been much controversy about the shape of the arsenic response curve, particularly at low doses. This controversy has been exacerbated by the fact that the mechanism(s) of arsenic carcinogenesis are still unclear and because there are few satisfactory animal models for arsenic-induced carcinogenesis. Recent epidemiological studies have shown that the relative risk for cancer among populations exposed to ≤60 ppb As in their drinking water is often lower than the risk for the unexposed control population. We have found that treatment of human keratinocyte and fibroblast cells with 0.1 to 1 μM arsenite (AsIII) also produces a low dose protective effect against oxidative stress and DNA damage. This response includes increased transcription, protein levels and enzyme activity of several base excision repair genes, including DNA polymerase β and DNA ligase I. At higher concentrations (> 10 μM), As induces down-regulation of DNA repair, oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis. This low dose adaptive (protective) response by a toxic agent is known as hormesis and is characteristic of many agents that induce oxidative stress. A mechanistic model for arsenic carcinogenesis based on these data would predict that the low dose risk for carcinogenesis should be sub-linear. The threshold dose where toxicity outweighs protection is hard to predict based on in vitro dose response data, but might be estimated if one could determine the form (metabolite) and concentration of arsenic responsible for changes in gene regulation in the target tissues

  2. Perturbations in immune responses induced by concurrent subchronic exposure to arsenic and endosulfan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)