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Sample records for arrests

  1. Daily Arrests

    Data.gov (United States)

    Montgomery County of Maryland — This dataset provides the public with arrest information from the Montgomery County Central Processing Unit (CPU) systems. The data presented is derived from every...

  2. Deterrence and arrest ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Stephanie E; Piquero, Alex R

    2006-02-01

    In the limited research on the origins of sanction threat perceptions, researchers have focused on either the effects of actively engaging in crime or the effects of formal sanctioning but rarely on both (i.e., the arrest ratio or the number of arrests relative to the number of crimes committed). This article extends this line of research by using a sample of Colorado inmates and measures arrest ratios and sanction perceptions for eight different crime types. Analyses reveal that the offenders report both significant experiential and arrest ratio effects. Theoretical and policy implications, limitations, and directions for future research are outlined. PMID:16397123

  3. Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... scan, or MUGA, which shows how well your heart is pumping blood. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which gives doctors detailed pictures of your heart. How is SCA treated? Sudden cardiac arrest should ...

  4. Cardiac arrest in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tress Erika

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Major advances in the field of pediatric cardiac arrest (CA were made during the last decade, starting with the publication of pediatric Utstein guidelines, the 2005 recommendations by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation, and culminating in multicenter collaborations. The epidemiology and pathophysiology of in-hospital and out-of-hospital CA are now well described. Four phases of CA are described and the term "post-cardiac arrest syndrome" has been proposed, along with treatment goals for each of its four phases: immediate post-arrest, early post-arrest, intermediate and recovery phase. Hypothermia is recommended to be considered as a therapy for post-CA syndrome in comatose patients after CA, and large multicenter prospective studies are underway. We reviewed landmark articles related to pediatric CA published during the last decade. We present the current knowledge of epidemiology, pathophysiology and treatment of CA relevant to pre-hospital and acute care health practitioners.

  5. Cardiac arrest in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tress, Erika E; Kochanek, Patrick M; Saladino, Richard A; Manole, Mioara D

    2010-07-01

    Major advances in the field of pediatric cardiac arrest (CA) were made during the last decade, starting with the publication of pediatric Utstein guidelines, the 2005 recommendations by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation, and culminating in multicenter collaborations. The epidemiology and pathophysiology of in-hospital and out-of-hospital CA are now well described. Four phases of CA are described and the term "post-cardiac arrest syndrome" has been proposed, along with treatment goals for each of its four phases: immediate post-arrest, early post-arrest, intermediate and recovery phase. Hypothermia is recommended to be considered as a therapy for post-CA syndrome in comatose patients after CA, and large multicenter prospective studies are underway. We reviewed landmark articles related to pediatric CA published during the last decade. We present the current knowledge of epidemiology, pathophysiology and treatment of CA relevant to pre-hospital and acute care health practitioners. PMID:20930971

  6. Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Risk Factors & Prevention Heart Diseases & Disorders Atrial Fibrillation (AFib) Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) SCA: Who's At Risk? Prevention of SCA What Causes SCA? SCA Awareness Atrial Flutter Heart Block Heart Failure Sick Sinus Syndrome Substances & Heart Rhythm Disorders Symptoms & ...

  7. Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... often are found in public places, such as shopping malls, golf courses, businesses, airports, airplanes, casinos, ... arrest In a study published online today in the New England Journal of Medicine , ...

  8. Cardiac arrest - cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Basri Lenjani; Besnik Elshani; Nehat Baftiu; Kelmend Pallaska; Kadir Hyseni; Njazi Gashi; Nexhbedin Karemani; Ilaz Bunjaku; Taxhidin Zaimi; Arianit Jakupi

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate application of cardiopulmonary resuscitation(CPR) measures within the golden minutes inEurope.Methods:The material was taken from theUniversityClinical Center ofKosovo -EmergencyCentre inPristina, during the two(2) year period(2010-2011).The collected date belong to the patients with cardiac arrest have been recorded in the patients' log book protocol at the emergency clinic.Results:During the2010 to2011 in the emergency center of theCUCK inPristina have been treated a total of269 patients with cardiac arrest, of whom159 or59.1% have been treated in2010, and110 patients or40.9% in2011.Of the269 patients treated in the emergency centre,93 or34.6% have exited lethally in the emergency centre, and176 or 65.4% have been transferred to other clinics.In the total number of patients with cardiac arrest, males have dominated with186 cases, or69.1%.The average age of patients included in the survey was56.7 year oldSD±16.0 years.Of the269 patients with cardiac arrest, defibrillation has been applied for93 or34.6% of patients.In the outpatient settings defibrillation has been applied for3 or3.2% of patients.Patients were defibrillated with application of one to four shocks. Of27 cases with who have survived cardiac arrest, none of them have suffered cardiac arrest at home,3 or11.1% of them have suffered cardiac arrest on the street, and24 or88.9% of them have suffered cardiac arrest in the hospital.5 out of27 patients survived have ended with neurological impairment.Cardiac arrest cases were present during all days of the week, but frequently most reported cases have been onMonday with32.0% of cases, and onFriday with24.5% of cases. Conclusions:All survivors from cardiac arrest have received appropriate medical assistance within10 min from attack, which implies that if cardiac arrest occurs near an institution health care(with an opportunity to provide the emergent health care) the rate of survival is higher.

  9. Crack-arrest technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last several years, the Heavy Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program has conducted several fracture mechanics experiments on large specimens that produced crack-arrest fracture-toughness values above 220 MPa·√m, which is the limit imposed by the ASME Code and the limit included in the Issues on Pressurized Thermal Shock studies. It is therefore appropriate and timely to investigate the influence that these high crack-arrest data have on the integrity assessment of nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPVs). A review of the evolution of the Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS) issue and current methods of analysis provides insight into the motivation for the HSST Program performing the large-specimen fracture mechanics experiments. During the early 1970s, it was recognized that RPVs could be subjected to severe thermal shock as the result of a large-break loss-of-coolant accident (LBLOCA). Analyses performed at that time indicated that thermal shock alone would not result in failure (through-wall cracking) of the vessel. However, a combination of pressure and a less severe thermal shock, the result of some postulated transients, could result in vessel failure. In March 1978, such a transient occurred at the Rancho Seco nuclear power plant. As a result of these events, parametric PTS studies were undertaken. Because of the apparent need for and the existence of high-temperature crack-arrest capability, the NRC HSST Program and others began to investigate the effect of higher crack-arrest values on the probability of failure and to determine if these values actually exist for prototypical RPV materials. This report describes the results of HSST Program large-specimen crack-arrest testing

  10. Cardiac arrest – cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basri Lenjani

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: All survivors from cardiac arrest have received appropriate medical assistance within 10 min from attack, which implies that if cardiac arrest occurs near an institution health care (with an opportunity to provide the emergent health care the rate of survival is higher.

  11. Metoclopramide-induced cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha M. Rumore

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The authors report a case of cardiac arrest in a patient receiving intravenous (IV metoclopramide and review the pertinent literature. A 62-year-old morbidly obese female admitted for a gastric sleeve procedure, developed cardiac arrest within one minute of receiving metoclopramide 10 mg via slow intravenous (IV injection. Bradycardia at 4 beats/min immediately appeared, progressing rapidly to asystole. Chest compressions restored vital function. Electrocardiogram (ECG revealed ST depression indicative of myocardial injury. Following intubation, the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit. Various cardiac dysrrhythmias including supraventricular tachycardia (SVT associated with hypertension and atrial fibrillation occurred. Following IV esmolol and metoprolol, the patient reverted to normal sinus rhythm. Repeat ECGs revealed ST depression resolution without pre-admission changes. Metoclopramide is a non-specific dopamine receptor antagonist. Seven cases of cardiac arrest and one of sinus arrest with metoclopramide were found in the literature. The metoclopramide prescribing information does not list precautions or adverse drug reactions (ADRs related to cardiac arrest. The reaction is not dose related but may relate to the IV administration route. Coronary artery disease was the sole risk factor identified. According to Naranjo, the association was possible. Other reports of cardiac arrest, severe bradycardia, and SVT were reviewed. In one case, five separate IV doses of 10 mg metoclopramide were immediately followed by asystole repeatedly. The mechanism(s underlying metoclopramide’s cardiac arrest-inducing effects is unknown. Structural similarities to procainamide may play a role. In view of eight previous cases of cardiac arrest from metoclopramide having been reported, further elucidation of this ADR and patient monitoring is needed. Our report should alert clinicians to monitor patients and remain diligent in surveillance and

  12. Juvenile Arrests, 1998. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Howard N.

    This report provides a summary and analysis of national and state juvenile arrest data in the United States. In 1998, law enforcement agencies made an estimated 2.6 million arrests of persons under age 18. Federal Bureau of Investigations statistics indicate that juveniles account for 18% of all arrests, and 17% of all violent crime arrests in…

  13. 33 CFR 154.822 - Detonation arresters, flame arresters, and flame screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Detonation arresters, flame... BULK Vapor Control Systems § 154.822 Detonation arresters, flame arresters, and flame screens. (a) Each detonation arrester required by this part must: (1) Be capable of arresting a detonation from either side...

  14. Wide plate crack arrest testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To predict the behavior of a nuclear pressure vessel undergoing pressurized thermal shock, certain information on dynamic crack propagation and arrest is required. The purpose of the work described is to provide such data on wide plates fracturing at temperatures up to the upper shelf region. Four tests have been completed on the 26 MN Universal Testing Machine at NBS. The specimens are to be fractured in a thermal gradient that, in the most extreme case, might extend from -1000C to 2000 across the 1 meter specimen width. This is done so that the crack will initiate in a cold, brittle region and arrest in a hot, tough region. An important part of this study is data acquisition from the numerous strain gages, thermocouples, timing wires, crack mouth opening displacement gages, and acoustic emission transducers that are mounted on the specimen. Each test has been different with respect to conditions of testing, specimen configuration, and instrumentation used. The progressive changes in test procedure represent attempts to obtain the desired crack run and arrest behavior and to improve upon the quality of the data collected. In particular, efforts were made to initiate crack propagation at lower stress intensity factors. Also, strain gage combinations and locations were optimized to better deduce the crack position as a function of time. Another result of great interest that can be deduced from these tests is the initiation of fracture toughness and the arrest toughness

  15. Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find a Specialist Share Twitter Facebook SCA Risk Assessment Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) occurs abruptly and without ... of all ages and health conditions. Start Risk Assessment The Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Risk Assessment Tool ...

  16. Cardiac arrest: resuscitation and reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Kaustubha D; Halperin, Henry R; Becker, Lance B

    2015-06-01

    The modern treatment of cardiac arrest is an increasingly complex medical procedure with a rapidly changing array of therapeutic approaches designed to restore life to victims of sudden death. The 2 primary goals of providing artificial circulation and defibrillation to halt ventricular fibrillation remain of paramount importance for saving lives. They have undergone significant improvements in technology and dissemination into the community subsequent to their establishment 60 years ago. The evolution of artificial circulation includes efforts to optimize manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation, external mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation devices designed to augment circulation, and may soon advance further into the rapid deployment of specially designed internal emergency cardiopulmonary bypass devices. The development of defibrillation technologies has progressed from bulky internal defibrillators paddles applied directly to the heart, to manually controlled external defibrillators, to automatic external defibrillators that can now be obtained over-the-counter for widespread use in the community or home. But the modern treatment of cardiac arrest now involves more than merely providing circulation and defibrillation. As suggested by a 3-phase model of treatment, newer approaches targeting patients who have had a more prolonged cardiac arrest include treatment of the metabolic phase of cardiac arrest with therapeutic hypothermia, agents to treat or prevent reperfusion injury, new strategies specifically focused on pulseless electric activity, which is the presenting rhythm in at least one third of cardiac arrests, and aggressive post resuscitation care. There are discoveries at the cellular and molecular level about ischemia and reperfusion pathobiology that may be translated into future new therapies. On the near horizon is the combination of advanced cardiopulmonary bypass plus a cocktail of multiple agents targeted at restoration of normal metabolism and

  17. Cognitive and Functional Consequence of Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Claudia A; Samudra, Niyatee; Aiyagari, Venkatesh

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac arrest is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Better-quality bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation training, cardiocerebral resuscitation principles, and intensive post-resuscitation hospital care have improved survival. However, cognitive and functional impairment after cardiac arrest remain areas of concern. Research focus has shifted beyond prognostication in the immediate post-arrest period to identification of mechanisms for long-term brain injury and implementation of promising protocols to reduce neuronal injury. These include therapeutic temperature management (TTM), as well as pharmacologic and psychological interventions which also improve overall neurological function. Comprehensive assessment of cognitive function post-arrest is hampered by heterogeneous measures among studies. However, the domains of attention, long-term memory, spatial memory, and executive function appear to be affected. As more patients survive cardiac arrest for longer periods of time, there needs to be a greater focus on interventions that can enhance cognitive and psychosocial function post-arrest. PMID:27311306

  18. Simulated Cardiopulmonary Arrests in a Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishkin, Barbara H.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes a simulated interdisciplinary role rehearsal for cardiopulmonary arrest to prepare nurses to function effectively. Includes needs analysis, program components, and responses of program participants. (Author)

  19. [Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virkkunen, Ilkka; Hoppu, Sanna; Kämäräinen, Antti

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac arrest as the first symptom of coronary artery disease is not uncommon. Some of previously healthy people with sudden cardiac arrest may be saved by effective resuscitation and post-resuscitative therapy. The majority of cardiac arrest patients experience the cardiac arrest outside of the hospital, in which case early recognition of lifelessness, commencement of basic life support and entry to professional care without delay are the prerequisites for recovery. After the heart has started beating again, the clinical picture of post-resuscitation syndrome must be recognized and appropriate treatment utilized. PMID:22204143

  20. Psychopathology in Women Arrested for Domestic Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Gregory L.; Moore, Todd M.; Gordon, Kristina Coop; Ramsey, Susan E.; Kahler, Christopher W.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence of psychopathology among women arrested for violence and whether the experience of intimate partner violence (IPV) was associated with Axis I psychopathology. Women who were arrested for domestic violence perpetration and court referred to violence intervention programs (N=103) completed measures of IPV…

  1. The course of circulatory and cerebral recovery after circulatory arrest: influence of pre-arrest, arrest and post-arrest factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, E O; Holm, S

    1999-11-01

    We evaluated the influence of pre-arrest, arrest and post-arrest factors on circulatory and neurological recovery for up to 1 year following circulatory arrest of cardio-pulmonary aetiology in 231 patients. Initially, all patients were unconscious and 106 had some cortical activity recorded in the immediate post-resuscitation EEG (Group I), while 125 had no such activity initially (Group II). The following variables were explored: age, sex, medical history, cause and location of arrest, initial cardiac dysrhythmia, duration of life support, metabolic acidosis, pulse-pressure product and heart pump function capacity early after resuscitation. Outcome measures were duration and quality of circulatory survival, cause of death, neurological recovery and ultimate outcome. First year survival was 33% in Group I and 16% in Group II. Severe heart failure and brain death occurred mainly in Group II. Circulatory recovery was negatively influenced by out-of-hospital arrest, metabolic acidosis and pulse-pressure products below 150. Neurological recovery was negatively influenced by initial dysrhythmias other than ventricular fibrillation, pulse-pressure products below 150, post-arrest heart failure and/or pulmonary complications. It seems that circulatory and cerebral outcomes are mainly determined by the global ischaemic insults sustained during the circulatory arrest period. PMID:10625157

  2. Chromosomal Aneuploidies and Early Embryonic Developmental Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Maurer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Selecting the best embryo for transfer, with the highest chance of achieving a vital pregnancy, is a major goal in current in vitro fertilization (IVF technology. The high rate of embryonic developmental arrest during IVF treatment is one of the limitations in achieving this goal. Chromosomal abnormalities are possibly linked with chromosomal arrest and selection against abnormal fertilization products. The objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in preimplantation embryos with developmental arrest. Materials and Methods: This cohort study included blastomeres of embryos with early developmental arrest that were biopsied and analyzed by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH with probes for chromosomes 13, 16, 18, 21 and 22. Forty-five couples undergoing IVF treatment were included, and 119 arrested embryos were biopsied. All probes were obtained from the Kinderwunsch Zentrum, Linz, Austria, between August 2009 and August 2011. Results: Of these embryos, 31.6% were normal for all chromosomes tested, and 68.4% were abnormal. Eleven embryos were uniformly aneuploid, 20 were polyploid, 3 were haploid, 11 displayed mosaicism and 22 embryos exhibited chaotic chromosomal complement. Conclusion: Nearly 70% of arrested embryos exhibit chromosomal errors, making chromosomal abnormalities a major cause of embryonic arrest and may be a further explanation for the high developmental failure rates during culture of the embryos in the IVF setting.

  3. Composite Pressure Vessel Including Crack Arresting Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLay, Thomas K. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A pressure vessel includes a ported fitting having an annular flange formed on an end thereof and a tank that envelopes the annular flange. A crack arresting barrier is bonded to and forming a lining of the tank within the outer surface thereof. The crack arresting barrier includes a cured resin having a post-curing ductility rating of at least approximately 60% through the cured resin, and further includes randomly-oriented fibers positioned in and throughout the cured resin.

  4. Sonic Hedgehog Opposes Epithelial Cell Cycle Arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Hongran; Khavari, Paul A

    1999-01-01

    Stratified epithelium displays an equilibrium between proliferation and cell cycle arrest, a balance that is disrupted in basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway activation appears sufficient to induce BCC, however, the way it does so is unknown. Shh-induced epidermal hyperplasia is accompanied by continued cell proliferation in normally growth arrested suprabasal cells in vivo. Shh-expressing cells fail to exit S and G2/M phases in response to calcium-induced differentiation...

  5. Paclitaxel Arrests Growth of Intracellular Toxoplasma gondii

    OpenAIRE

    Estes, Randee; Vogel, Nicolas; Mack, Douglas; McLeod, Rima

    1998-01-01

    Addition of paclitaxel (Taxol) at a concentration of 1 μM to Toxoplasma gondii-infected human foreskin fibroblasts arrested parasite multiplication. Division of the T. gondii tachyzoite nucleus was inhibited, leading to syncytium-like parasite structures within the fibroblasts by 24 h after infection and treatment of the cultures. By 4 days after infection and treatment of the cultures with paclitaxel, this inhibition was irreversible, since the arrested intracellular form was incapable of le...

  6. Surviving out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Nick

    2016-05-01

    Emergency care nurses have been urged to play their part in Scotland's push to revolutionise care for cardiac arrest patients - by teaching others how to save a life. This article discusses the Scottish out-of-hospital cardiac arrest strategy, with particular focus on the drive to increase bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) rates, and on how emergency nurses are being enlisted to help promote the training of members of the public. PMID:27165393

  7. Predicting crack arrest in reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pressurized thermal shock (PTS) issue has provided increased motivation for the search for a reasonably accurate crack arrest prediction methodology. This issue has assumed greater significance recently as a consequence of the imposition of Regulatory Guide 1.99 Revision 2 procedures for determining the effects of radiation embrittlement in the context of the screening criteria in the PTS rule that is used by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission to assess the integrity of reactor pressure vessels. The currently accepted procedure for predicting crack arrest is the so-called KIa procedure, which is based on static linear elastic fracture mechanics principles, with a crack being presumed to arrest when the crack tip stress intensity factor KIST falls below a value KIa. The present paper reviews recent EPRI sponsored research, which shows that the static procedure is overly conservative when it is applied to the first arrest of a deep crack in the thickness of a reactor vessel. This conclusion is clearly important when assessing the consequences of the imposition of the procedures of Regulatory Guide 1.99 Revision 2. A more accurate crack arrest prediction procedure, i.e. the Combustion Engineering constrained static procedure or the reflectionless stress intensity factor procedure which are very similar in concept and their arrest prediction, should be considered to assess the impact of its use in the context of the screening criteria limits in the PTS rule. (orig.)

  8. Sex Disparities in Arrest Outcomes for Domestic Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Melissa; Worthen, Meredith G. F.

    2011-01-01

    Domestic violence arrests have been historically focused on protecting women and children from abusive men. Arrest patterns continue to reflect this bias with more men arrested for domestic violence compared to women. Such potential gender variations in arrest patterns pave the way to the investigation of disparities by sex of the offender in…

  9. Arrested coalescence of viscoelastic droplets: polydisperse doublets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahiya, Prerna; Caggioni, Marco; Spicer, Patrick T

    2016-07-28

    Arrested droplet coalescence produces stable anisotropic shapes and is a key mechanism for microstructure development in foods, petroleum and pharmaceutical formulations. Past work has examined the dynamic elastic arrest of coalescing monodisperse droplet doublets and developed a simple model of doublet strain as a function of physical variables. Although the work describes experimental data well, it is limited to describing same-size droplets. A new model incorporating a generalized description of doublet shape is developed to describe polydisperse doublet formation in more realistic emulsion systems. Polydisperse doublets are shown to arrest at lower strains than monodisperse doublets as a result of the smaller contribution of surface area in a given pair. Larger droplet size ratios have lower relative degrees of strain because coalescence is arrested at an earlier stage than in more monodisperse cases. Experimental observations of polydisperse doublet formation indicate that the model under-predicts arrest strains at low solid levels and small droplet sizes. The discrepancy is hypothesized to be the result of nonlinear elastic deformation at high strains.This article is part of the themed issue 'Soft interfacial materials: from fundamentals to formulation'. PMID:27298435

  10. Juvenile Arrests, 2007. Juvenile Justice Bulletin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puzzanchera, Charles

    2009-01-01

    This Bulletin summarizes 2007 juvenile crime and arrest data reported by local law enforcement agencies across the country and cited in the FBI report, "Crime in the United States 2007." The Bulletin describes the extent and nature of juvenile crime that comes to the attention of the justice system. It serves as a baseline for comparison for…

  11. Acute kidney injury after cardiac arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Tujjar, Omar; Mineo, Giulia; Dell’Anna, Antonio; Poyatos-Robles, Belen; Donadello, Katia; Scolletta, Sabino; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Taccone, Fabio Silvio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence and determinants of AKI in a large cohort of cardiac arrest patients. Methods We reviewed all patients admitted, for at least 48 hours, to our Dept. of Intensive Care after CA between January 2008 and October 2012. AKI was defined as oligo-anuria (daily urine output

  12. The Organizational Determinants of Police Arrest Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Allison T.; MacDonald, John M.; Manz, Patrick W.

    2006-01-01

    A limited amount of research has examined the relationship between characteristics of police organizations and policing styles. In particular, few studies have examined the link between organizational structures and police officer arrest decisions. Wilson's (1968) pioneering case study of police organizations suggested that individual police…

  13. Maternal Cardiac Arrest: A Practical and Comprehensive Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida M. Jeejeebhoy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrest during pregnancy is a dedicated chapter in the American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care; however, a robust maternal cardiac arrest knowledge translation strategy and emergency response plan is not usually the focus of institutional emergency preparedness programs. Although maternal cardiac arrest is rare, the emergency department is a high-risk area for receiving pregnant women in either prearrest or full cardiac arrest. It is imperative that institutions review and update emergency response plans for a maternal arrest. This review highlights the most recent science, guidelines, and recommended implementation strategies related to a maternal arrest. The aim of this paper is to increase the understanding of the important physiological differences of, and management strategies for, a maternal cardiac arrest, as well as provide institutions with the most up-to-date literature on which they can build emergency preparedness programs for a maternal arrest.

  14. Myocardial stunning after resuscitation from cardiac arrest following spinal anaesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Pranjali Madhav Kurhekar; VSG Yachendra; Simi P Babu; Raghavelu Govindasamy

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac arrest associated with spinal anaesthesia has been well researched. Myocardial stunning after successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest is seen in up to 2/3 rd of in-hospital cardiac arrests. Myocardial stunning after resuscitation from cardiac arrest associated with spinal anaesthesia has probably not been reported earlier. Our case, an ASA physical status I lady, posted for tubal reanastomosis surgery developed bradycardia followed by asystole, approximately 5 minutes after givin...

  15. Pediatric Cardiac Arrest Due to Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellemo, Hugo; Hansen, Andreas E; Øines, Dennis A; Nilsen, Thor O; Wik, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Survival from pediatric cardiac arrest due to trauma has been reported to be 0.0%-8.8%. Some argue that resuscitation efforts in the case of trauma-related cardiac arrests are futile. We describe a successful outcome in the case of a child who suffered cardiac arrest caused by external traumatic airway obstruction. Our case illustrates how to deal with pediatric traumatic cardiac arrests in an out-of-hospital environment. It also illustrates how good clinical treatment in these situations may be supported by correct treatment after hospital admission when it is impossible to ventilate the patient to provide sufficient oxygen delivery to vital organs. This case relates to a lifeless child of 3-5 years, blue, and trapped by an electrically operated garage door. The first ambulance arrived to find several men trying to bend the frame and the door apart in order to extricate the child, who was hanging in the air with head and neck squeezed between the horizontally-moving garage door and the vertical door frame. One paramedic found a car jack and used it to push the door and the frame apart, allowing the lifeless child to be extricated. Basic life support was then initiated. Intubation was performed by the anesthesiologist without drugs. With FiO2 1.0 the first documented SaO2 was <50%. Restoration of Spontaneous Circulation was achieved after thirty minutes, and she was transported to the hospital. After a few hours she was put on venous-arterial ECMO for 5.5 days and discharged home after two months. Outpatient examinations during the rest of 2013 were positive, and the child found not to be suffering from any injuries, either physical or mental. The last follow-up in October 2014 demonstrated she had made a 100% recovery and she started school in August 2014. PMID:26930137

  16. Nuclear reactor melt arrest and coolability device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theofanous, Theo G.; Dinh, Nam Truc; Wachowiak, Richard M.

    2016-06-14

    Example embodiments provide a Basemat-Internal Melt Arrest and Coolability device (BiMAC) that offers improved spatial and mechanical characteristics for use in damage prevention and risk mitigation in accident scenarios. Example embodiments may include a BiMAC having an inclination of less than 10-degrees from the basemat floor and/or coolant channels of less than 4 inches in diameter, while maintaining minimum safety margins required by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  17. Hypothermia improves outcome from cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, S A

    2005-12-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is common and patients who are initially resuscitated by ambulance officers and transported to hospital are usually admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). In the past, the treatment in the ICU consisted of supportive care only, and most patients remained unconscious due to the severe anoxic neurological injury. It was this neurological injury rather than cardiac complications that caused the high rate of morbidity and mortality. However, in the early 1990's, a series of animal experiments demonstrated convincingly that mild hypothermia induced after return of spontaneous circulation and maintained for several hours dramatically reduced the severity of the anoxic neurological injury. In the mid-1990's, preliminary human studies suggested that mild hypothermia could be induced and maintained in post-cardiac arrest patients without an increase in the rate of cardiac or other complications. In the late 1990's, two prospective, randomised, controlled trials were conducted and the results confirmed the animal data that mild hypothermia induced after resuscitation and maintained for 12 - 24 hours dramatically improved neurological and overall outcomes. On the basis of these studies, mild hypothermia was endorsed in 2003 by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation as a recommended treatment for comatose patients with an initial cardiac rhythm of ventricular fibrillation. However, the application of this therapy into routine clinical critical care practice has been slow. The reasons for this are uncertain, but may relate to the relative complexity of the treatment, unfamiliarity with the pathophysiology of hypothermia, lack of clear protocols and/or uncertainty of benefit in particular patients. Therefore, recent research in this area has focused on the development of feasible, inexpensive techniques for the early, rapid induction of mild hypothermia after cardiac arrest. Currently, the most promising strategy is a rapid

  18. Global arrest of translation during invertebrate quiescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, G E; Hand, S C

    1994-08-30

    Comparing the translational capacities of cell-free systems from aerobically developing embryos of the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana vs. quiescent embryos has revealed a global arrest of protein synthesis. Incorporation rates of [3H]leucine by lysates from 4-h anoxic embryos were 8% of those from aerobic (control) embryos, when assayed at the respective pH values measured for each treatment in vivo. Exposure of embryos to 4 h of aerobic acidosis (elevated CO2 in the presence of oxygen) suppressed protein synthesis to 3% of control values. These latter two experimental treatments promote developmental arrest of Artemia embryos and, concomitantly, cause acute declines in intracellular pH. When lysates from each treatment were assayed over a range of physiologically relevant pH values (pH 6.4-8.0), amino acid incorporation rates in lysates from quiescent embryos were consistently lower than values for the aerobic controls. Acute reversal of pH to alkaline values during the 6-min assays was not sufficient to return the incorporation rates of quiescent lysates to control values. Thus, a stable alteration in translational capacity of quiescent lysates is indicated. Addition of exogenous mRNA did not rescue the suppressed protein synthesis in quiescent lysates, which suggests that the acute blockage of amino acid incorporation is apparently not due to limitation in message. Thus, the results support a role for intracellular pH as an initial signaling event in translational control during quiescence yet, at the same time, indicate that a direct proton effect on the translational machinery is not the sole proximal agent for biosynthetic arrest in this primitive crustacean. PMID:8078909

  19. Abulia following an episode of cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Vismay Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    The word 'abulia' means a lack of will, initiative or drive. The symptoms of abulia include lack of spontaneous action and speech, reduced emotional responsiveness and social interaction, poor attention and easy distractibility. These symptoms are independent of reduced levels of consciousness or cognitive impairment. We describe a case of a socially active 72-year-old female patient who presented with symptoms of abulia which may have occurred due to damage of the frontosubcortical circuits following an episode of cardiac arrest. The patient's symptoms improved dramatically following treatment with bromocriptine. PMID:26135487

  20. Global arrest of translation during invertebrate quiescence.

    OpenAIRE

    Hofmann, G E; Hand, S C

    1994-01-01

    Comparing the translational capacities of cell-free systems from aerobically developing embryos of the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana vs. quiescent embryos has revealed a global arrest of protein synthesis. Incorporation rates of [3H]leucine by lysates from 4-h anoxic embryos were 8% of those from aerobic (control) embryos, when assayed at the respective pH values measured for each treatment in vivo. Exposure of embryos to 4 h of aerobic acidosis (elevated CO2 in the presence of oxygen) sup...

  1. Sublingual Microcirculation is Impaired in Post-cardiac Arrest Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    G. Omar, Yasser; Massey, Michael; Wiuff Andersen, Lars; A. Giberson, Tyler; Berg, Katherine; N. Cocchi, Michael; I. Shapiro, Nathan; W. Donnino, Michael

    2013-01-01

    markers in the post-cardiac arrest state. METHODS: We prospectively evaluated the sublingual microcirculation in post-cardiac arrest patients, severe sepsis/septic shock patients, and healthy control patients using Sidestream Darkfield microscopy. Microcirculatory flow was assessed using the...... microcirculation flow index (MFI) at 6 and 24h in the cardiac arrest patients, and within 6h of emergency department admission in the sepsis and control patients. RESULTS: We evaluated 30 post-cardiac arrest patients, 16 severe sepsis/septic shock patients, and 9 healthy control patients. Sublingual...... microcirculatory blood flow was significantly impaired in post-cardiac arrest patients at 6h (MFI 2.6 [IQR: 2-2.9]) and 24h (2.7 [IQR: 2.3-2.9]) compared to controls (3.0 [IQR: 2.9-3.0]; p<0.01 and 0.02, respectively). After adjustment for initial APACHE II score, post-cardiac arrest patients had significantly...

  2. A case of thyroid storm with cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakashima Y

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Yutaka Nakashima,1 Tsuneaki Kenzaka,2 Masanobu Okayama,3 Eiji Kajii31Department for Support of Rural Medicine, Yamaguchi Grand Medical Center, 2Division of General Medicine, Center for Community Medicine, Jichi Medical University School of Medicine, Shimotsuke, Japan; 3Division of Community and Family Medicine, Center for Community Medicine, Jichi Medical University School of Medicine, Shimotsuke, JapanAbstract: A 23-year-old man became unconscious while jogging. He immediately received basic life support from a bystander and was transported to our hospital. On arrival, his spontaneous circulation had returned from a state of ventricular fibrillation and pulseless electrical activity. Following admission, hyperthyroidism led to a suspicion of thyroid storm, which was then diagnosed as a possible cause of the cardiac arrest. Although hyperthyroidism-induced cardiac arrest including ventricular fibrillation is rare, it should be considered when diagnosing the cause of treatable cardiac arrest.Keywords: hyperthyroidism, ventricular fibrillation, treatable cardiac arrest, cardiac arrest, cardiopulmonary arrest

  3. Myocardial stunning after resuscitation from cardiac arrest following spinal anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranjali Madhav Kurhekar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrest associated with spinal anaesthesia has been well researched. Myocardial stunning after successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest is seen in up to 2/3 rd of in-hospital cardiac arrests. Myocardial stunning after resuscitation from cardiac arrest associated with spinal anaesthesia has probably not been reported earlier. Our case, an ASA physical status I lady, posted for tubal reanastomosis surgery developed bradycardia followed by asystole, approximately 5 minutes after giving subarachnoid block. Return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC was achieved within 2 minutes with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR and defibrillation for pulseless ventricular tachycardia. Patient developed delayed pulmonary oedema, which was probably due to myocardial stunning. In the present case, inadequate preloading could have precipitated bradycardia progressing to cardiac arrest which, after resuscitation led to reversible myocardial dysfunction. We conclude that early vasopressor infusion, titrated fluids and echocardiography should be considered in immediate post cardiac arrest phase following spinal anaesthesia.

  4. Postoperative cardiac arrest due to cardiac surgery complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To examine the role of anesthetists in the management of cardiac arrest occurring in association with cardiac anesthesia. In this retrospective study we studied the potential performances for each of the relevant incidents among 712 patients undergoing cardiac operations at Golestan and Naft Hospitals Ahwaz between November 2006 and July 2008. Out of total 712 patients undergoing cardiac surgery, cardiac arrest occurred in 28 cases (3.9%) due to different postoperative complications. This included massive bleeding (50% of cardiac arrest cases, 1.9% of patients); pulseless supra ventricular tachycardia (28.5% of cardiac arrest cases, 1.1% of patients); Heart Failure (7% of cardiac arrest cases, 0.2% of patients); Aorta Arc Rapture (3.5% of cardiac arrest cases, 0.1% of patients); Tamponade due to pericardial effusion (3.5% of cardiac arrest cases, 0.1% of total patients); Right Atrium Rupture (3.5% of cardiac arrest cases, 0.1% of patients) were detected after cardiac surgery. Out of 28 cases 7 deaths occurred (25% of cardiac arrest cases, 0.1% of patients). The most prevalent reason for cardiac arrest during post operative phase was massive bleeding (50%) followed by pulseless supra ventricular tachycardia (28.5%). Six patients had some morbidity and the remaining 15 patients recovered. There are often multiple contributing factors to a cardiac arrest under cardiac anesthesia, as much a complete systematic assessment of the patient, equipment, and drugs should be completed. We also found that the diagnosis and management of cardiac arrest in association with cardiac anesthesia differs considerably from that encountered elsewhere. (author)

  5. Hospital Variation in Survival After In‐hospital Cardiac Arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Merchant, Raina M.; Berg, Robert A.; Yang, Lin; Becker, Lance B.; Groeneveld, Peter W.; Chan, Paul S.; ,

    2014-01-01

    Background In‐hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) is common and often fatal. However, the extent to which hospitals vary in survival outcomes and the degree to which this variation is explained by patient and hospital factors is unknown. Methods and Results Within Get with the Guidelines‐Resuscitation, we identified 135 896 index IHCA events at 468 hospitals. Using hierarchical models, we adjusted for demographics comorbidities and arrest characteristics (eg, initial rhythm, etiology, arrest locat...

  6. Resuscitation, prolonged cardiac arrest, and an automated chest compression device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risom, Martin; Jørgensen, Henrik; Rasmussen, Lars S;

    2010-01-01

    The European Resuscitation Council's 2005 guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) emphasize the delivery of uninterrupted chest compressions of adequate depth during cardiac arrest.......The European Resuscitation Council's 2005 guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) emphasize the delivery of uninterrupted chest compressions of adequate depth during cardiac arrest....

  7. Buoyant currents arrested by convective dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMinn, Christopher W.; Juanes, Ruben

    2013-05-01

    When carbon dioxide (CO2) dissolves into water, the density of water increases. This seemingly insubstantial phenomenon has profound implications for geologic carbon sequestration. Here we show, by means of laboratory experiments with analog fluids, that the up-slope migration of a buoyant current of CO2 is arrested by the convective dissolution that ensues from a fingering instability at the moving CO2-groundwater interface. We consider the effectiveness of convective dissolution as a large-scale trapping mechanism in sloping aquifers, and we show that a small amount of slope is beneficial compared to the horizontal case. We study the development and coarsening of the fingering instability along the migrating current and predict the maximum migration distance of the current with a simple sharp-interface model. We show that convective dissolution exerts a powerful control on CO2 plume dynamics and, as a result, on the potential of geologic carbon sequestration.

  8. Growth arrest specific protein (GAS) 6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haase, T N; Rasmussen, Morten; Jaksch, C A M; Gaarn, L W; Petersen, Camilla K; Billestrup, N; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2013-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Maternal low-protein (LP) diet during gestation results in a reduced beta cell mass in the offspring at birth and this may hamper the ability to adapt to high-energy food and sedentary lifestyle later in life. To investigate the biology behind the LP-offspring phenotype, this study...... using RNA microarray and quantitative PCR. The role of a differentially expressed gene, growth arrest specific protein 6 (GAS6), was evaluated in vitro using neonatal rat islets. Results The mRNA level of Gas6, known to be mitogenic in other tissues, was reduced in LP offspring. The mRNA content of Mafa...... was increased in LP offspring suggesting an early maturation of beta cells. When applied in vitro, GAS6 increased proliferation of neonatal pancreatic beta cells, while reducing glucose-stimulated insulin secretion without changing the total insulin content of the islets. In addition, GAS6 decreased...

  9. Maturation arrest of human oocytes at germinal vesicle stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Qin Chen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Maturation arrest of human oocytes may occur at various stages of the cell cycle. A total failure of human oocytes to complete meiosis is rarely observed during assisted conception cycles. We describe here a case of infertile couples for whom all oocytes repeatedly failed to mature at germinal vesicle (GV stage during in vitro fertilization/Intra cytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF/ICSI. The patient underwent controlled ovarian stimulation followed by oocyte retrieval and IVF/ICSI. The oocytes were stripped off cumulus cells prior to the ICSI procedure and their maturity status was defined. The oocyte maturation was repeatedly arrested at the GV. Oocyte maturation arrest may be the cause of infertility in this couple. The recognition of oocyte maturation arrest as a specific medical condition may contribute to the characterization of the currently known as "oocyte factor." The cellular and genetic mechanisms causing oocyte maturation arrest should be the subject for further investigation.

  10. Evolution of the dragonfly head-arresting system

    OpenAIRE

    Gorb, S. N.

    1999-01-01

    The arrester or fixation system of the head in adult Odonata is unique among arthropods. This system involves the organs of two body segments: the head and the neck. It consists of a skeleton–muscle apparatus that sets the arrester parts in motion. The parts comprise formations covered with complicated microstructures: fields of microtrichia on the rear surface of the head and post-cervical sclerites of the neck. The arrester immobilizes the head during feeding or when the dragonfly is in tan...

  11. Soft Semicrystalline Thermoplastic Elastomers by Arrested Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Adam; Register, Richard

    2014-03-01

    Thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs) marry the solid-state behavior of vulcanized rubbers with the melt processability of thermoplastics. Archetypal soft TPEs consist of triblock copolymers comprising a rubbery mid-block flanked by two identical glassy end-blocks. Incorporating crystalline blocks into TPEs can confer solvent resistance as well as reduce the processing costs by giving access to single-phase melts. However, simply substituting crystalline for glassy end-blocks dramatically degrades the solid-state mechanical properties, particularly at large strains. We seek to integrate the benefits of crystallinity into TPEs, while maintaining the desired mechanical properties, using the block architecture: crystalline-glassy-rubbery-glassy-crystalline. Methods have been developed to synthesize highly symmetric, narrow-distribution block copolymers with this architecture using anionic polymerization of butadiene, styrene, and isoprene followed by hydrogenation. Judicious choices of block molecular weights indeed yield homogeneous melts above the melting point of the crystalline component. Upon cooling, crystallization--rather than interblock repulsion--establishes the solid-state microstructure which physically crosslinks the rubbery mid-block, ultimately conferring elasticity. Subsequent vitrification of the adjacent glassy blocks arrests the growth of the crystallites, and protects them from yielding under applied load. As a result, our materials show low initial moduli, strain hardening, and high extensibility, typical of commercial TPEs.

  12. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for pediatric cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Jennie

    2015-02-01

    Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) remains a promising treatment for pediatric patients in cardiac arrest unresponsive to traditional cardiopulmonary resuscitation. With venoarterial extracorporeal support, blood is drained from the right atrium, oxygenated through the extracorporeal circuit, and transfused back to the body, bypassing the heart and lungs. The use of artificial oxygenation and perfusion thus provides the body a period of hemodynamic stability, while allowing resolution of underlying disease processes. Survival rates for ECPR patients are higher than those for traditional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), although neurological outcomes require further investigation. The impact of duration of CPR and length of treatment with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation vary in published reports. Furthermore, current guidelines for the initiation and use of ECPR are limited and may lead to confusion about appropriate use of this support. Many ethical concerns arise with this advanced form of life support. More often than not, the dilemma is not whether to withhold ECPR, but rather when to withdraw it. Although clinicians must decide if ECPR is appropriate and when further intervention is futile, the ultimate burden of choice is left to the patient's caregivers. Offering support and guidance to the patient's family as well as the patient is essential. PMID:25639578

  13. MRI in the assessment of growth arrest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohman, Martina; Kivisaari, Arto; Kivisaari, Leena [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Radiology; Vehmas, Tapio [Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki (Finland); Kallio, Pentti; Puntila, Juha [Department of Paediatric Surgery, Hospital for Children and Adolescents, University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland)

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To compare MRI with X-ray tomography in the assessment of bone bridges across the growth plate. Materials and methods: The investigation consisted of two parts. (1) Eleven children with 13 epiphyses suspected of physeal growth arrests were examined with conventional X-ray tomography and MRI. The bar was post-traumatic in eight children, postinfectious in two and due to a congenital, operated pes equinovarus in one. Three blinded radiologists separately evaluated the examinations retrospectively. (2) The images of four children with known physeal bars in the ankle were mixed with 36 normal examinations obtained 1-year after trauma and evaluated blindly by three radiologists. Results: In 5 of 13 epiphysis, the bony bridge was considered smaller on MRI than on X-ray tomography, in 7 of 13 it was considered equal, while it was larger only in one. The interobserver agreement (weighted kappa) was 0.8 (very good) for MRI, 0.76 (good) for X-ray tomography and 0.60 (moderate) for radiographs. The four bony bridges were easily detected on MRI. Conclusions: Compared to MRI, the size of bridges was estimated larger by tomography in about half of the patients. (orig.)

  14. Emergency Neurological Life Support: Resuscitation Following Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittenberger, Jon C; Friess, Stuart; Polderman, Kees H

    2015-12-01

    Cardiac arrest is the most common cause of death in North America. Neurocritical care interventions, including targeted temperature management (TTM), have significantly improved neurological outcomes in patients successfully resuscitated from cardiac arrest. Therefore, resuscitation following cardiac arrest was chosen as an emergency neurological life support protocol. Patients remaining comatose following resuscitation from cardiac arrest should be considered for TTM. This protocol will review induction, maintenance, and re-warming phases of TTM, along with management of TTM side effects. Aggressive shivering suppression is necessary with this treatment to ensure the maintenance of a target temperature. Ancillary testing, including electrocardiography, computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, continuous electroencephalography monitoring, and correction of electrolyte, blood gas, and hematocrit changes, are also necessary to optimize outcomes. PMID:26438463

  15. [Effect of phenibut on the respiratory arrest caused by serotonin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarakanov, I A; Tarasova, N N; Belova, E A; Safonov, V A

    2006-01-01

    The role of the GABAergic system in mechanisms of the respiratory arrest caused by serotonin administration was studied in anaesthetized rats. Under normal conditions, the systemic administration of serotonin (20-60 mg/kg, i.v.) resulted in drastic changes of the respiratory pattern, whereby the initial phase of increased respiratory rate was followed by the respiratory arrest. The preliminary injection of phenibut (400 mg/kg, i.p.) abolished or sharply reduced the duration of the respiratory arrest phase induced by serotonin. Bilateral vagotomy following the phenibut injection potentiated the anti-apnoesic effect of phenibut, which was evidence of the additive action of vagotomy and phenibut administration. The mechanism of apnea caused by serotonin administration is suggested to include a central GABAergic element, which is activated by phenibut so as to counteract the respiratory arrest. PMID:16579056

  16. Diacetylmorphine (heroin) body packer presenting with respiratory arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseem, Arshad; Abbas, Shahid

    2009-04-01

    Intracorporeal concealment of illicit drugs known as 'body packing' is uncommonly reported. A body packer with swallowed capsules containing Diacetylmorphine (heroin) for smuggling purposes presented with respiratory arrest and recovered after ventilatory support and nalaxone infusion. PMID:19356347

  17. Early myoclonic status and outcome after cardiorespiratory arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, H; Howard, R; Brown, P.

    1998-01-01

    It has been suggested that early myoclonic status after cardiorespiratory arrest is an agonal event.1 Here we describe three cases who developed early myoclonic status during a coma after cardiorespiratory arrest due to acute asthma. As consciousness improved, each patient developed Lance-Adams type multifocal myoclonus, but the eventual outcome was satisfactory. Only one patient needed assistance to walk, and all three were self caring. One patient had persistent dyscalc...

  18. Crack arrest saturation model under combined electrical and mechanical loadings

    OpenAIRE

    R.R. Bhargava; A. Setia

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The investigation aims at proposing a model for cracked piezoelectric strip which is capable to arrest the crack.Design/methodology/approach: Under the combined effect of electrical and mechanical loadings applied at the edges of the strip, the developed saturation zone is produced at each tip of the crack. To arrest further opening of the crack, the rims of the developed saturation zones are subjected to in-plane cohesive, normal uniform constant saturation point electrical displace...

  19. Al-Qaeda arrest casts shadow over the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Dacey, James

    2010-01-01

    "Cern remains on course for the imminent switch-on of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) despite the media frenzy following the recent arrest of a physicist who had been working at the facility. The researcher in question is a 32-year-old man of Algerian descent who is expected to face trail in France - the country in which he was arrested" (0.5 page)

  20. The psychosocial outcome of anoxic brain injury following cardiac arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study The psychosocial outcome of anoxic brain injury following cardiac arrest is a relatively under researched, but clinically important area. The aim of the current study was to add to the limited existing literature exploring the psychosocial outcome for cardiac arrest survivors, but specifically explore if there is a greater impact on psychosocial outcome in individuals experiencing anoxic brain injury as a result. Methods A range of self report measures were used to c...

  1. Cardiopulmonary arrest in pregnancy with schizophrenia: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Kudo, Takako; Kaga, Akimune; Akagi, Kozo; Iwahashi, Hideki; Makino, Hiromitsu; WATANABE, YOKO; Kawamura, Takae; Sato, Taiju; Shinozaki, Tsuyoshi; Miwa, Shinya; Okazaki, Nobuo; Kure, Shigeo; Nakae, Shingi

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiopulmonary arrest in pregnancy has a very high maternal and fetal mortality rate. We report a case of successful maternal and neonatal survival in association with emergency cesarean section of a schizophrenic pregnant patient. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of cardiopulmonary arrest in a pregnant woman with schizophrenia. Case presentation The parents were Japanese. The mother was 39 years old and had no history of prior pregnancy. Her admission to our hosp...

  2. Usage of Lightning Arrester Line to Feed Light Electrical Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hani B. Odeh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In remote areas, light loads (tens of kilowatts are scattered and situated in the field of high voltage lines (66KV and above. These loads are very far from the main feeders/sub-stations (33KV-0.380KV. Feeding such loads in the traditional ways like provision of Diesel-Powered Stations, installation of new distribution lines from the Feeding Centers, or building new Sub-Stations are not practical ways from the economical point of view, because it requires huge additional expenses and will increase electrical power losses. These expenses are not worthy for such loads and therefore, it is necessary to search for other methods to supply them. One of these methods is to use the lightning arrester line as capacitive divider to supply the light loads. In this research, the induced voltage of the lightning arrester line was calculated when it is isolated from the earth. We found the capacitance between lightning arrester line versus the phases and lightning arrester. It was also found the selective power out of the lightning arrester line and the required length which is to be isolated from the earth keeping the main function of the lightning arrester line. When economically comparing between supplying the light electrical loads by traditional ways and the method of lightning arrester, it was found the advantage of using lightning arresters to supply such loads. Also, by using the traditional methods, it was noted that there is a power loss in the power transmission lines by a percentage of 1.8%.

  3. The stringent response and cell cycle arrest in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel J Ferullo; Lovett, Susan T.

    2008-01-01

    The bacterial stringent response, triggered by nutritional deprivation, causes an accumulation of the signaling nucleotides pppGpp and ppGpp. We characterize the replication arrest that occurs during the stringent response in Escherichia coli. Wild type cells undergo a RelA-dependent arrest after treatment with serine hydroxamate to contain an integer number of chromosomes and a replication origin-to-terminus ratio of 1. The growth rate prior to starvation determines the number of chromosomes...

  4. The Stringent Response and Cell Cycle Arrest in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel J Ferullo; Lovett, Susan T.

    2008-01-01

    The bacterial stringent response, triggered by nutritional deprivation, causes an accumulation of the signaling nucleotides pppGpp and ppGpp. We characterize the replication arrest that occurs during the stringent response in Escherichia coli. Wild type cells undergo a RelA-dependent arrest after treatment with serine hydroxamate to contain an integer number of chromosomes and a replication origin-to-terminus ratio of 1. The growth rate prior to starvation determines the number of chromosomes...

  5. Dynamic propagation and cleavage crack arrest in bainitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In complement of the studies of harmfulness of defects, generally realized in term of initiation, the concept of crack arrest could be used as complementary analyses to the studies of safety. The stop occurs when the stress intensity factor becomes lower than crack arrest toughness (KIa) calculated in elasto-statics (KI ≤ KIa). The aim of this thesis is to understand and predict the stop of a crack propagating at high speed in a 18MND5 steel used in the pressure water reactor (PWR). The test chosen to study crack arrest is the disc thermal shock test. The observations under the scanning electron microscope of the fracture surface showed that the crack arrest always occurs in cleavage mode and that the critical microstructural entity with respect to the propagation and crack arrest corresponds to at least the size of the prior austenitic grain. The numerical analyses in elasto-statics confirm the conservatism of the codified curve of the RCC-M with respect to the values of KIa. The dynamic numerical analyses show that the deceleration of the crack measured at the end of the propagation is related to the global dynamic of the structure (vibrations). The transferability to components of crack arrest toughness obtained from tests analysed in static is thus not assured. The disc thermal shock tests were also modelled by considering a criterion of propagation and arrest of the type 'RKR' characterized by a critical stress sc which depends on the temperature. The results obtained account well for the crack jump measured in experiments as well as the shape of the crack arrest front. (author)

  6. Situational ambiguity and gendered patterns of arrest for intimate partner violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durfee, Alesha

    2012-01-01

    Using data from the 2005 National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS), this analysis focuses on the impacts that domestic violence mandatory arrest policies have on arrest outcomes in "situationally ambiguous" cases: cases where both the female and male partners have been identified by police as both a victim and an offender. Results indicate that although officers arrest male partners more frequently than female partners, after controlling for incident and individual factors, mandatory arrest policies disproportionately affect women. Furthermore, correlates of arrest differ for male-only arrests versus female-only arrests. These findings are discussed in the context of changing legal responses to domestic violence. PMID:22411299

  7. Nursing students’ knowledge about arrest rhythms and their treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aikaterini Kyrgianidou

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases are one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Knowledge of health professionals for the arrest rhythms, is considered particularly important for the early recognition and proper treatment. Aim: The purpose of the present study was to assess the knowledge of nursing students on arrest rhythms and how to treat them. Material and Methods: The sample studied included 151 students from the Department of Nursing A' (n = 60, 40% and B' (n = 91, 60%, TEI of Athens, of whom 83% (n=125 were women and 17% (n=26 were men with a mean age of 23 years. Data collection was performed with specially designed questionnaire, that apart from demographics and students’ education level, it included ten questions about arrest rhythms’ knowledge and also self-assessment questions of their level of knowledge. The data were analyzed with the SPSS package v.19, using the criteria t-Test and χ2. Results: Of all the participants in the research, 95% (n = 144 did not answer correctly more than 6 questions from a total of 10. The students of the Department of Nursing A’ recognized with greater accuracy the arrest rhythms (p = 0.003. Those studying in lower semester acknowledged best the arrest rhythms (p = 0.002. Students who had recently attended course in basic or advanced resuscitation recognized best the arrest rhythms (p = 0.006. Older students knew better right treatment of the arrest rhythms (p = 0.037. Also, students who had attended the course of cardiac nursing in the last year, knew better the right treatment (p <0.001. Finally, the level of self-assessment was in line with the actual level of knowledge of students (p = 0.05. Conclusions: Continuous attendance of courses, education on certified programs and refresh courses help to maintain a good level of knowledge for longer periods.

  8. The stringent response and cell cycle arrest in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferullo, Daniel J; Lovett, Susan T

    2008-12-01

    The bacterial stringent response, triggered by nutritional deprivation, causes an accumulation of the signaling nucleotides pppGpp and ppGpp. We characterize the replication arrest that occurs during the stringent response in Escherichia coli. Wild type cells undergo a RelA-dependent arrest after treatment with serine hydroxamate to contain an integer number of chromosomes and a replication origin-to-terminus ratio of 1. The growth rate prior to starvation determines the number of chromosomes upon arrest. Nucleoids of these cells are decondensed; in the absence of the ability to synthesize ppGpp, nucleoids become highly condensed, similar to that seen after treatment with the translational inhibitor chloramphenicol. After induction of the stringent response, while regions corresponding to the origins of replication segregate, the termini remain colocalized in wild-type cells. In contrast, cells arrested by rifampicin and cephalexin do not show colocalized termini, suggesting that the stringent response arrests chromosome segregation at a specific point. Release from starvation causes rapid nucleoid reorganization, chromosome segregation, and resumption of replication. Arrest of replication and inhibition of colony formation by ppGpp accumulation is relieved in seqA and dam mutants, although other aspects of the stringent response appear to be intact. We propose that DNA methylation and SeqA binding to non-origin loci is necessary to enforce a full stringent arrest, affecting both initiation of replication and chromosome segregation. This is the first indication that bacterial chromosome segregation, whose mechanism is not understood, is a step that may be regulated in response to environmental conditions. PMID:19079575

  9. The stringent response and cell cycle arrest in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Ferullo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial stringent response, triggered by nutritional deprivation, causes an accumulation of the signaling nucleotides pppGpp and ppGpp. We characterize the replication arrest that occurs during the stringent response in Escherichia coli. Wild type cells undergo a RelA-dependent arrest after treatment with serine hydroxamate to contain an integer number of chromosomes and a replication origin-to-terminus ratio of 1. The growth rate prior to starvation determines the number of chromosomes upon arrest. Nucleoids of these cells are decondensed; in the absence of the ability to synthesize ppGpp, nucleoids become highly condensed, similar to that seen after treatment with the translational inhibitor chloramphenicol. After induction of the stringent response, while regions corresponding to the origins of replication segregate, the termini remain colocalized in wild-type cells. In contrast, cells arrested by rifampicin and cephalexin do not show colocalized termini, suggesting that the stringent response arrests chromosome segregation at a specific point. Release from starvation causes rapid nucleoid reorganization, chromosome segregation, and resumption of replication. Arrest of replication and inhibition of colony formation by ppGpp accumulation is relieved in seqA and dam mutants, although other aspects of the stringent response appear to be intact. We propose that DNA methylation and SeqA binding to non-origin loci is necessary to enforce a full stringent arrest, affecting both initiation of replication and chromosome segregation. This is the first indication that bacterial chromosome segregation, whose mechanism is not understood, is a step that may be regulated in response to environmental conditions.

  10. Changing the guard: Polymer replaces porcelain for surge arresters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skytt, T.; Gleimar, H. E. G.

    2002-07-01

    Surge arresters are safety devices which quickly and effectively limit the over voltages that can arise in transmission networks following lightning, switching and other transient events. The earliest forms of overvoltage protection, a simple air gap between electrodes, have long since been replaced by a new generation of gapless arresters with series-connected, non-linear zinc oxide varistors contained in a porcelain housing. Now these porcelain type surge arresters are being replaced by a new type, called PEXLIM (Polymeric EXcellent LIMiter), which uses the same block of zinc oxide as the porcelain type, but its housing is made of silicon rubber, a polymer. The new lightweight insulation material shows a number of properties superior to the porcelain, such as enhanced product safety and ease of handling. It is also more durable, resilient, yet solid and compact, water-repellent, lightweight, resistant to aging or light or ultra-violet radiation, as well as fire, has good electrical properties, and is environmentally friendly since it does not contain any substances harmful to the environment. These properties make this new type of surge arrester highly suitable for use in earthquake-prone areas; it can also replace more expensive and maintenance-intensive equipment. Having successfully broken into the lower voltage systems, these new type of surge arresters are now rapidly gaining ground at the higher voltage levels. ABB, the developer of PEXLIM, has already supplied these arresters to North America for use in an 800-kV grid. As further proof of its growing popularity, last year PEXLIM made up over half of the surge arrester production for applications up to and including 245 kV. 1 tab., 6 figs.

  11. Visualizing Vpr-induced G2 arrest and apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Murakami

    Full Text Available Vpr is an accessory protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 with multiple functions. The induction of G2 arrest by Vpr plays a particularly important role in efficient viral replication because the transcriptional activity of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat is most active in G2 phase. The regulation of apoptosis by Vpr is also important for immune suppression and pathogenesis during HIV infection. However, it is not known whether Vpr-induced apoptosis depends on the ability of Vpr to induce G2 arrest, and the dynamics of Vpr-induced G2 arrest and apoptosis have not been visualized. We performed time-lapse imaging to examine the temporal relationship between Vpr-induced G2 arrest and apoptosis using HeLa cells containing the fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator2 (Fucci2. The dynamics of G2 arrest and subsequent long-term mitotic cell rounding in cells transfected with the Vpr-expression vector were visualized. These cells underwent nuclear mis-segregation after prolonged mitotic processes and then entered G1 phase. Some cells subsequently displayed evidence of apoptosis after prolonged mitotic processes and nuclear mis-segregation. Interestingly, Vpr-induced apoptosis was seldom observed in S or G2 phase. Likewise, visualization of synchronized HeLa/Fucci2 cells infected with an adenoviral vector expressing Vpr clearly showed that Vpr arrests the cell cycle at G2 phase, but does not induce apoptosis at S or G2 phase. Furthermore, time-lapse imaging of HeLa/Fucci2 cells expressing SCAT3.1, a caspase-3-sensitive fusion protein, clearly demonstrated that Vpr induces caspase-3-dependent apoptosis. Finally, to examine whether the effects of Vpr on G2 arrest and apoptosis were reversible, we performed live-cell imaging of a destabilizing domain fusion Vpr, which enabled rapid stabilization and destabilization by Shield1. The effects of Vpr on G2 arrest and subsequent apoptosis were reversible. This study is the first to

  12. Current Pharmacological Advances in the Treatment of Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andry Papastylianou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrest is defined as the sudden cessation of spontaneous ventilation and circulation. Within 15 seconds of cardiac arrest, the patient loses consciousness, electroencephalogram becomes flat after 30 seconds, pupils dilate fully after 60 seconds, and cerebral damage takes place within 90–300 seconds. It is essential to act immediately as irreversible damage can occur in a short time. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is an attempt to restore spontaneous circulation through a broad range of interventions which are early defibrillation, high-quality and uninterrupted chest compressions, advanced airway interventions, and pharmacological interventions. Drugs should be considered only after initial shocks have been delivered (when indicated and chest compressions and ventilation have been started. During cardiopulmonary resuscitation, no specific drug therapy has been shown to improve survival to hospital discharge after cardiac arrest, and only few drugs have a proven benefit for short-term survival. This paper reviews current pharmacological treatment of cardiac arrest. There are three groups of drugs relevant to the management of cardiac arrest: vasopressors, antiarrhythmics, and other drugs such as sodium bicarbonate, calcium, magnesium, atropine, fibrinolytic drugs, and corticosteroids.

  13. Sculpting Pickering Emulsion Droplets by Arrest and Jamming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Christopher; Wei, Zengyi; Caggioni, Marco; Spicer, Patrick; Atherton, Tim

    Pickering emulsion droplets can be arrested into non-spherical shapes--useful for applications such as active delivery--through a general mechanism of deformation followed by absorption of additional colloidal particles onto the interface, relaxation of the droplet caused by surface tension and arrest at some point due to crowding of the particles. We perform simulations of the arrest process to clarify the relative importance of diffusive rearrangement of particles and collective forcing due to surface evolution. Experiment and theory are compared, giving insight into the stability of the resulting capsules and the robustness of the production process for higher-throughput production in, for example, microfluidic systems. We adapt theoretical tools from the jamming literature to better understand the arrested configurations and long timescale evolution of the system: using linear programming and a penalty function approach, we identify unjamming motions in kinetically arrested states. We propose a paradigm of ``metric jamming'' to describe the limiting behavior of this class of system: a structure is metric-jammed if it is stable with respect to collective motion of the particles as well as evolution of the hypersurface on which the packing is embedded. Supported by a Cottrell Award from the Research Corporation for Science Advancement.

  14. Capecitabine-induced ventricular fibrillation arrest: Possible Kounis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, Kazuhiko; Adams, Val R; Morehead, Richard S; Flannery, Alexander H

    2016-04-01

    We report the case of capecitabine-induced ventricular fibrillation arrest, possibly secondary to type I Kounis syndrome. A 47-year-old man with a history of T3N1 moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma of the colon, status-post sigmoid resection, was started on adjuvant capecitabine approximately five months prior to presentation of cardiac arrest secondary to ventricular fibrillation. An electrocardiogram (EKG) revealed ST segment elevation on the lateral leads and the patient was taken emergently to the cardiac catheterization laboratory. The catheterization revealed no angiographically significant stenosis and coronary artery disease was ruled out. After ruling out other causes of cardiac arrest, the working diagnosis was capecitabine-induced ventricular fibrillation arrest. As such, an inflammatory work up was sent to evaluate for the possibility of a capecitabine hypersensitivity, or Kounis syndrome, and is the first documented report in the literature to do so when evaluating Kounis syndrome. Immunoglobulin E (IgE), tryptase, and C-reactive protein were normal but histamine, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-10 were elevated. Histamine elevation supports the suspicion that our patient had type I Kounis syndrome. Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale indicates a probable adverse effect due to capecitabine with seven points. A case of capecitabine-induced ventricular fibrillation arrest is reported, with a potential for type 1 Kounis syndrome as an underlying pathology supported by immunologic work up. PMID:25870182

  15. Cardiac arrest following ventilator fire: A rare cause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Nazeer Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Operating room fires are rare events, but when occur they result in serious and sometimes fatal consequences. Anaesthesia ventilator fire leading to cardiac arrest is a rare incident and has not been reported. We report a near catastrophic ventilator fire leading to cardiac arrest in a patient undergoing subtotal thyroidectomy. In the present case sparks due to friction or electrical short circuit within the ventilator might have acted as source of ignition leading to fire and explosion in the oxygen rich environment. The patient was successfully resuscitated and revived with uneventful recovery and no adverse sequelae. The cardiac arrest was possibly due to severe hypoxia resulting from inhalation of smoke containing high concentrations of carbon monoxide and other noxious gases.

  16. Investigating Different ZnO Arresters Models against Transient Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Babaee

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Metal oxide surge arresters have dynamic characteristics that are significant for over voltage coordination studies involving fast front surges. Several models with acceptable accuracy have been proposed to simulate this frequency-dependent behavior. In this paper, various electrical models are presented for surge arrester performance simulation against lightning impulse. The desirable model is obtained by using simulation results of the existing models and experimental tests. The IEEE proposed model is a proportional model can give satisfactory results for discharge currents within a range of time to crest for 0.5 to 45 :s but due to no existing residual voltage resulting switching current on the manufacture's datasheets decrease its performance generally. In this study the maximum residual voltage due to current impulse is analyzed too. In additional, the amount of discharged energy by surge arrester is focused.

  17. Drug therapy in cardiac arrest: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, Andreas; Djärv, Therese; Engdahl, Johan; Hollenberg, Jacob; Nordberg, Per; Ravn-Fischer, Annika; Ringh, Mattias; Rysz, Susanne; Svensson, Leif; Herlitz, Johan; Lundgren, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review the literature on human studies of drug therapy in cardiac arrest during the last 25 years. In May 2015, a systematic literature search was performed in PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and CRD databases. Prospective interventional and observational studies evaluating a specified drug therapy in human cardiac arrest reporting a clinical endpoint [i.e. return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) or survival] and published in English 1990 or later were included, whereas animal studies, case series and reports, studies of drug administration, drug pharmacology, non-specified drug therapies, preventive drug therapy, drug administration after ROSC, studies with primarily physiological endpoints, and studies of traumatic cardiac arrest were excluded. The literature search identified a total of 8936 articles. Eighty-eight articles met our inclusion criteria and were included in the review. We identified no human study in which drug therapy, compared with placebo, improved long-term survival. Regarding adrenaline and amiodarone, the drugs currently recommended in cardiac arrest, two prospective randomized placebo-controlled trials, were identified for adrenaline, and one for amiodarone, but they were all underpowered to detect differences in survival to hospital discharge. Of all reviewed studies, only one recent prospective study demonstrated improved neurological outcome with one therapy over another using a combination of vasopressin, steroids, and adrenaline as the intervention compared with standard adrenaline administration. The evidence base for drug therapy in cardiac arrest is scarce. However, many human studies on drug therapy in cardiac arrest have not been powered to identify differences in important clinical outcomes such as survival to hospital discharge and favourable neurological outcome. Efforts are needed to initiate large multicentre prospective randomized clinical trials to evaluate both currently recommended and

  18. Swedish ambulance nurses' experiences of nursing patients suffering cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Ricard; Engström, Åsa

    2013-04-01

    Effective pre-hospital treatment of a person suffering cardiac arrest is a challenging task for the ambulance nurses. The aim of this study was to describe ambulance nurses' experiences of nursing patients suffering cardiac arrest. Qualitative personal interviews were conducted during 2011 in Sweden with seven ambulance nurses with experience of nursing patients suffering cardiac arrests. The interview texts were analyzed using qualitative thematic content analysis, which resulted in the formulation of one theme with six categories. Mutual preparation, regular training and education were important factors in the nursing of patients suffering cardiac arrest. Ambulance nurses are placed in ethically demanding situations regarding if and for how long they should continue cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to accord with pre-hospital cardiac guidelines and patients' wishes. When a cardiac arrest patient is nursed their relatives also need the attention of ambulance nurses. Reflection is one way for ambulance nurses to learn from, and talk about, their experiences. This study provides knowledge of ambulance nurses' experiences in the care of people with cardiac arrest. Better feedback about the care given by the ambulance nurses, and about the diagnosis and nursing care the patients received after they were admitted to the hospital are suggested as improvements that would allow ambulance nurses to learn more from their experience. Further development and research concerning the technical equipment might improve the situation for both the ambulance nurses and the patients. Ambulance nurses need regularly training and education to be prepared for saving people's lives and also to be able to make the right decisions. PMID:23577977

  19. Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wissenberg Jørgensen, Mads

    years ago in Denmark. These findings led to several national initiatives to strengthen bystander resuscitation attempts and advance care. Despite these nationwide efforts, it was unknown prior to this project whether these efforts resulted in changes in resuscitation attempts by bystanders and changes...... in patient survival following out-of hospital cardiac arrest; utilizing the Danish nationwide registries, we sought to answer these questions. Moreover, in order to further improve understanding and target future national strategies for cardiac arrest management, we examined whether there were sex...

  20. Carbamazepine induces mitotic arrest in mammalian Vero cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We reported recently that the anticonvulsant drug carbamazepine, at supratherapeutic concentrations, exerts antiproliferative effects in mammalian Vero cells, but the underlying mechanism has not been elucidated. This motivates us to examine rigorously whether growth arrest was associated with structural changes in cellular organization during mitosis. In the present work, we found that exposure of the cells to carbamazepine led to an increase in mitotic index, mainly due to the sustained block at the metaphase/anaphase boundary, with the consequent inhibition of cell proliferation. Indirect immunofluorescence, using antibodies directed against spindle apparatus proteins, revealed that mitotic arrest was associated with formation of monopolar spindles, caused by impairment of centrosome separation. The final consequence of the spindle defects induced by carbamazepine, depended on the duration of cell cycle arrest. Following the time course of accumulation of metaphase and apoptotic cells during carbamazepine treatments, we observed a causative relationship between mitotic arrest and induction of cell death. Conversely, cells released from the block of metaphase by removal of the drug, continued to progress through mitosis and resume normal proliferation. Our results show that carbamazepine shares a common antiproliferative mechanism with spindle-targeted drugs and contribute to a better understanding of the cytostatic activity previously described in Vero cells. Additional studies are in progress to extend these initial findings that define a novel mode of action of carbamazepine in cultured mammalian cells

  1. Police Management Training Factors Influencing DWI Arrests. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Edward W.

    The development of training material for police management personnel concerning command and supervisory actions appropriate for more effective driving-while-intoxicated (DWI) enforcement is desired. The training is based on two research studies that identified environmental and attitudinal factors influencing a patrolman's arrest decision. These…

  2. Cdc20 control of cell fate during prolonged mitotic arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    The fate of cells arrested in mitosis by antimitotic compounds is complex but is influenced by competition between pathways promoting cell death and pathways promoting mitotic exit. As components of both of these pathways are regulated by Cdc20-dependent degradation, I hypothesize that variations...

  3. Hemodynamics and vasopressor support in therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Jeppesen, John; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Søholm, Helle;

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Inducing therapeutic hypothermia (TH) in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest (OHCA) can be challenging due to its impact on central hemodynamics and vasopressors are frequently used to maintain adequate organ perfusion. The aim of this study was to assess the association between level of vasopres...

  4. Heart Attack or Sudden Cardiac Arrest: How Are They Different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Heart360 Cardiovascular Conditions • Conditions Home • Arrhythmia and Atrial Fibrillation • Cardiac Arrest • Cardiac Rehab • Cardiomyopathy • Cardiovascular Conditions of Childhood • Cholesterol • Congenital Heart Defects • Diabetes • Heart Attack • Heart Failure (HF) • Heart Valve Problems and Disease • High Blood ...

  5. Bad Behavior : Delinquency, Arrest and Early School Leaving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ward, Shannon; Williams, J.; van Ours, Jan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the effects of delinquency and arrest on school leaving using information on males from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997. We use a multivariate mixed proportional hazard framework in order to account for common unobserved confounders and reverse causality.

  6. Parenting and Women Arrested for Intimate Partner Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Catherine A.; Lehmann, Peter; Dia, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Exploring the relationship between parenting and women's use of violence the current study surveyed 106 mothers arrested for intimate partner violence (IPV) related crimes on parenting styles and attitudes toward when using violence against their partner is justified. Findings indicate parenting styles indicative of low belief in using physical…

  7. Carbamazepine induces mitotic arrest in mammalian Vero cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Martin, J.M.; Fernandez Freire, P.; Labrador, V. [Departamento de Biologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Hazen, M.J. [Departamento de Biologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: mariajose.hazen@uam.es

    2008-01-01

    We reported recently that the anticonvulsant drug carbamazepine, at supratherapeutic concentrations, exerts antiproliferative effects in mammalian Vero cells, but the underlying mechanism has not been elucidated. This motivates us to examine rigorously whether growth arrest was associated with structural changes in cellular organization during mitosis. In the present work, we found that exposure of the cells to carbamazepine led to an increase in mitotic index, mainly due to the sustained block at the metaphase/anaphase boundary, with the consequent inhibition of cell proliferation. Indirect immunofluorescence, using antibodies directed against spindle apparatus proteins, revealed that mitotic arrest was associated with formation of monopolar spindles, caused by impairment of centrosome separation. The final consequence of the spindle defects induced by carbamazepine, depended on the duration of cell cycle arrest. Following the time course of accumulation of metaphase and apoptotic cells during carbamazepine treatments, we observed a causative relationship between mitotic arrest and induction of cell death. Conversely, cells released from the block of metaphase by removal of the drug, continued to progress through mitosis and resume normal proliferation. Our results show that carbamazepine shares a common antiproliferative mechanism with spindle-targeted drugs and contribute to a better understanding of the cytostatic activity previously described in Vero cells. Additional studies are in progress to extend these initial findings that define a novel mode of action of carbamazepine in cultured mammalian cells.

  8. Ventilation and gas exchange management after cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherasan, Yuda; Raimondo, Pasquale; Pelosi, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    For several decades, physicians had integrated several interventions aiming to improve the outcomes in post-cardiac arrest patients. However, the mortality rate after cardiac arrest is still as high as 50%. Post-cardiac arrest syndrome is associated with high morbidity and mortality due to not only poor neurological outcome and cardiovascular failure but also respiratory dysfunction. To minimize ventilator-associated lung injury, protective mechanical ventilation by using low tidal volume ventilation and driving pressure may decrease pulmonary complications and improve survival. Low level of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) can be initiated and titrated with careful cardiac output and respiratory mechanics monitoring. Furthermore, optimizing gas exchange by avoiding hypoxia and hyperoxia as well as maintaining normocarbia may improve neurological and survival outcome. Early multidisciplinary cardiac rehabilitation intervention is recommended. Minimally invasive monitoring techniques, that is, echocardiography, transpulmonary thermodilution method measuring extravascular lung water, as well as transcranial Doppler ultrasound, might be useful to improve appropriate management of post-cardiac arrest patients. PMID:26670813

  9. 19 CFR 162.63 - Arrests and seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Arrests and seizures. 162.63 Section 162.63 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Controlled Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana §...

  10. Description of a collaborative community approach to impacting juvenile arrests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, James G; Janopaul-Naylor, Elizabeth

    2016-05-01

    Although the burden of mental health disorders among youth involved with the juvenile justice system is high, few communities have effectively integrated mental health resources with law enforcement (Myers & Farrell, 2008). The city of Cambridge, Massachusetts has developed the Safety Net Collaborative, which is a multiagency integrated model of preventive services for at-risk youth involving mental health providers, police officers, schools, and the department of youth and families. There are 6,000 youth in the city's public schools under the local police jurisdiction. Youth are referred to this program by schools, courts, and parents. There are approximately 30 active cases each year. Initial outcome measures were tracked, including number of arrests, diversions, and mental health referrals. Rate of decline in arrests was compared pre and post implementation. Community arrests have decreased by more than 50% since implementing this model. Contracting with mental health services has led to an average 94 outpatient mental health provider referral per year. The results show positive trends in arrest rates after implementation of this collaborative model of preventive services. These findings support greater research and utilization of integrated, preventive service models for at-risk youth. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27148947

  11. Mechanisms of immunosuppression by organotins : apoptosis vs. proliferative arrest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gennari, Alessandra

    2001-01-01

    Mechanisms of immunosuppression by organotins-apoptosis vs. proliferative arrest. The organotin compounds di-n-butyltin dichloride (DBTC) and trin-butyltin chloride (TBTC), used as stabilizers and biocides respectively, induce thymus atrophy inhibiting immature thymocyte proliferation. The aim of

  12. Anaphylactic shock and cardiac arrest caused by thiamine infusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Jacob; Pareek, Manan; Langfrits, Christian Sigvald;

    2013-01-01

    intoxication and developed cardiac arrest due to anaphylactic shock following intravenous thiamine infusion. The patient was successfully resuscitated after 15 min and repeated epinephrine administrations. He was discharged in good health after 14 days. This case report emphasises both the importance...

  13. Explaining Discrepancies in Arrest Rates Between Black and White Male Juveniles

    OpenAIRE

    Fite, Paula J.; Wynn, Porche’; Pardini, Dustin A.

    2009-01-01

    The authors investigated discrepancies in arrest rates between Black and White male juveniles by examining the role of early risk factors for arrest. Two hypotheses were evaluated: (a) Disproportionate minority arrest is due to increased exposure to early risk factors, and (b) a differential sensitivity to early risk factors contributes to disproportionate minority arrest. The study included 481 Black and White boys who were followed from childhood to early adulthood. A higher incidence of ea...

  14. Gender and Relational-Distance Effects in Arrests for Domestic Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lally, William; DeMaris, Alfred

    2012-01-01

    This study tests two hypotheses regarding factors affecting arrest of the perpetrator in domestic violence incidents. Black's relational-distance thesis is that the probability of arrest increases with increasing relational distance between perpetrator and victim. Klinger's leniency principle suggests that the probability of arrest is lower for…

  15. U.S. Juvenile Arrests: Gang Membership, Social Class, and Labeling Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Mike

    2011-01-01

    This study addresses the link between gang membership and arrest frequency, exploring the Gang x Socioeconomic status interaction on those arrests. Notoriously poor, delinquent, and often well-known to police, America's gang youth should have very high odds of arrest. Yet it is unclear whether mere membership in a gang increases the risk of arrest…

  16. Pediatric defibrillation after cardiac arrest: initial response and outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Núñez, Antonio; López-Herce, Jesús; García, Cristina; Domínguez, Pedro; Carrillo, Angel; Bellón, Jose María

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Shockable rhythms are rare in pediatric cardiac arrest and the results of defibrillation are uncertain. The objective of this study was to analyze the results of cardiopulmonary resuscitation that included defibrillation in children. Methods Forty-four out of 241 children (18.2%) who were resuscitated from inhospital or out-of-hospital cardiac arrest had been treated with manual defibrillation. Data were recorded according to the Utstein style. Outcome variables were a sustained return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and one-year survival. Characteristics of patients and of resuscitation were evaluated. Results Cardiac disease was the major cause of arrest in this group. Ventricular fibrillation (VF) or pulseless ventricular tachycardia (PVT) was the first documented electrocardiogram rhythm in 19 patients (43.2%). A shockable rhythm developed during resuscitation in 25 patients (56.8%). The first shock (dose, 2 J/kg) terminated VF or PVT in eight patients (18.1%). Seventeen children (38.6%) needed more than three shocks to solve VF or PVT. ROSC was achieved in 28 cases (63.6%) and it was sustained in 19 patients (43.2%). Only three patients (6.8%), however, survived at 1-year follow-up. Children with VF or PVT as the first documented rhythm had better ROSC, better initial survival and better final survival than children with subsequent VF or PVT. Children who survived were older than the finally dead patients. No significant differences in response rate were observed when first and second shocks were compared. The survival rate was higher in patients treated with a second shock dose of 2 J/kg than in those who received higher doses. Outcome was not related to the cause or the location of arrest. The survival rate was inversely related to the duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Conclusion Defibrillation is necessary in 18% of children who suffer cardiac arrest. Termination of VF or PVT after the first defibrillation dose is achieved in a low

  17. Arrest of rapid crack propagation in polymer pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flueler, P.; Farshad, M. [EMPA, Duebendorf (Switzerland)

    1995-12-31

    The design of rapid crack arresters for polymer pipes was studied. Mechanisms that would inhibit a running crack and strengthen existing pipes against dynamic fracture and to enhance their degree of safety were examined. The crack arresters examined were based on the principle that rapid crack propagation (RCP) could not occur in pipe walls that were less than a `critical thickness`. Sections of pipe whose walls were thinned were reinforced with a reinforcing ring. Another variation was to produce a pipe with partially adhered multilayer walls. A third variation tried was a multi-layer pipe segment with a damping element and reinforcing rings. Experiments were successful in reducing RCP, but these preliminary results were considered exploratory and would require further confirmation. 2 figs., 8 refs.

  18. Increased risk of sudden cardiac arrest in obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warnier, Miriam Jacoba; Blom, Marieke Tabo; Bardai, Abdennasser;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We aimed to determine whether (1) patients with obstructive pulmonary disease (OPD) have an increased risk of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) due to ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation (VT/VF), and (2) the SCA risk is mediated by cardiovascular risk-profile and/or respiratory drug use....... METHODS: A community-based case-control study was performed, with 1310 cases of SCA of the ARREST study and 5793 age, sex and SCA-date matched non-SCA controls from the PHARMO database. Only incident SCA cases, age older than 40 years, that resulted from unequivocal cardiac causes...... with electrocardiographic documentation of VT/VF were included. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to assess the association between SCA and OPD. Pre-specified subgroup analyses were performed regarding age, sex, cardiovascular risk-profile, disease severity, and current use of respiratory drugs. RESULTS...

  19. Cellular Growth Arrest and Persistence from Enzyme Saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, J. Christian J.; Wickersheim, Michelle L.; Jalihal, Ameya P.; Adeshina, Yusuf O.; Cooper, Tim F.; Balázsi, Gábor

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic efficiency depends on the balance between supply and demand of metabolites, which is sensitive to environmental and physiological fluctuations, or noise, causing shortages or surpluses in the metabolic pipeline. How cells can reliably optimize biomass production in the presence of metabolic fluctuations is a fundamental question that has not been fully answered. Here we use mathematical models to predict that enzyme saturation creates distinct regimes of cellular growth, including a phase of growth arrest resulting from toxicity of the metabolic process. Noise can drive entry of single cells into growth arrest while a fast-growing majority sustains the population. We confirmed these predictions by measuring the growth dynamics of Escherichia coli utilizing lactose as a sole carbon source. The predicted heterogeneous growth emerged at high lactose concentrations, and was associated with cell death and production of antibiotic-tolerant persister cells. These results suggest how metabolic networks may balance costs and benefits, with important implications for drug tolerance. PMID:27010473

  20. Cell cycle control after DNA damage: arrest, recovery and adaptation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA damage triggers surveillance mechanisms, the DNA checkpoints, that control the genome integrity. The DNA checkpoints induce several responses, either cellular or transcriptional, that favor DNA repair. In particular, activation of the DNA checkpoints inhibits cell cycle progression in all phases, depending on the stage when lesions occur. These arrests are generally transient and cells ultimately reenter the cell division cycle whether lesions have been repaired (this process is termed 'recovery') or have proved un-repairable (this option is called 'adaptation'). The mechanisms controlling cell cycle arrests, recovery and adaptation are largely conserved among eukaryotes, and much information is now available for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, that is used as a model organism in these studies. (author)

  1. Characteristics of in-hospital cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josip Ivić

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim We have studied epidemiology of in-hospital cardiac arrest, characteristics of organizing a reanimationand its,procedures as well as its documenting.Methods We analyzed all resuscitation procedure data where anesthesiology reanimation teams (RT providedcardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR during one-year period. We included resuscitation attemptsthat were initiated outside the Department of Anesthesiology, excluding incidents in operation rooms andIntensive Care Unit (ICU. Data on every cardiac arrest and CPR were entered in a special form.Results During one-year period 87 CPR were performed. Victims of cardiac arrest were principallyelderly patients (age 60 – 80, mostly male (60%. Most frequent victims were neurological patients(42%, surgical patients (21% and neurosurgical patients (10%. The leading cause of cardiac arrestwas primary heart disease, following neurological diseases and respiration disorders of severe etiology.In over 90% cases CPR was initiated by medical personnel in their respective departments, RT arrivedwithin 5 minutes in 73,56% cases. Initially survival was 32%, but full recovery was accomplished in 4patients out of 87 (4,6%.Conclusion Victims of cardiac arrest are patients whose primary disease contributes to occurrence ofcardiorespiratory complications. High mortality and low percentage of full recovery can be explainedby characteristics of patients (old age, nature and seriousness of primary disease which significantly affectthe outcome of CPR. In some cases a question is raised whether to initiate the CPR at all. We wouldlike to point out that continous monitoring of potentially critical patients may prevent cardiorespiratoryincidents whereas the quality and success of CPR may be improved by training of staff and better technicalequipment on the relevant locations in the in the hospital where such incidents usually occur.

  2. Crack arrest saturation model under combined electrical and mechanical loadings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.R. Bhargava

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The investigation aims at proposing a model for cracked piezoelectric strip which is capable to arrest the crack.Design/methodology/approach: Under the combined effect of electrical and mechanical loadings applied at the edges of the strip, the developed saturation zone is produced at each tip of the crack. To arrest further opening of the crack, the rims of the developed saturation zones are subjected to in-plane cohesive, normal uniform constant saturation point electrical displacement. The problem is solved using Fourier integral transform method which reduces the problem to the solution of Fredholm integral equation of the second kind. This integral equation in turn is solved numerically.Findings: The expressions are derived for different intensity factors and energy release rate. A qualitative analysis of the parameters affecting the arrest of opening of the crack and fatigue crack growth with respect to strip thickness and material constants are presented graphically.Research limitations/implications: The investigations are carried out by considering the material electrical brittle. Consequently, the zones protrude along the straight lines ahead of the crack tips. And further, the small scale electrical yielding conditions are used.Practical implications: Piezoelectric materials are widely getting used nowadays, even in day to day life like piezoelectric cigarette lighter, children toys etc. And, its advance used in technology like transducers, actuators has been already in progress. So, the aspect of cracking of piezoelectric materials are of great practical importance.Originality/value: The piezoelectric material under the combined effect of electrical and mechanical loadings gives the assessment of electrical displacement which is required to arrest the crack. The various useful interpretations are also drawn from the graphs.

  3. Nontrapping arrest of Langmuir wave damping near the threshold amplitude

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanov, A.V.; Cairns, Iver H.

    2005-01-01

    Evolution of a Langmuir wave is studied numerically for finite amplitudes slightly above the threshold which separates damping from nondamping cases. Arrest of linear damping is found to be a second-order effect due to ballistic evolution of perturbations, resonant power transfer between field and particles, and organization of phase space into a positive slope for the average distribution function $f_{av}$ around the resonant wave phase speed $v_\\phi$. Near the threshold trapping in the wave...

  4. Anaphylactic shock and cardiac arrest caused by thiamine infusion

    OpenAIRE

    Juel, Jacob; Pareek, Manan; Langfrits, Christian Sigvald; Jensen, Svend Eggert

    2013-01-01

    Parenteral thiamine has a very high safety profile. The most common adverse effect is local irritation; however, anaphylactic or anaphylactoid reactions may occur, mostly related to intravenous administration. We describe a 44-year-old man, a chronic alcoholic, who was admitted with alcohol intoxication and developed cardiac arrest due to anaphylactic shock following intravenous thiamine infusion. The patient was successfully resuscitated after 15 min and repeated epinephrine administrations....

  5. Electrocardiogram characteristics prior to in-hospital cardiac arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Attin, Mina; Feld, Gregory; Lemus, Hector; Najarian, Kayvan; Shandilya, Sharad; Wang, Lu; Sabouriazad, Pouya; Lin, Chii-Dean

    2014-01-01

    Survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest (I-HCA) remains < 30 %. There is very limited literature exploring the electrocardiogram changes prior to I-HCA. The purpose of the study was to determine demographics and electrocardiographic predictors prior to I-HCA. A retrospective study was conducted among 39 cardiovascular subjects who had cardiopulmonary resuscitation from I-HCA with initial rhythms of pulseless electrical activity (PEA) and asystole. Demographics including medical history, eje...

  6. Luminescence from Tube-Arrest Bubbles in Pure Glycerin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈岐岱; 王龙

    2004-01-01

    Single transient cavitation bubble with luminescence has been generated in pure glycerin by using the ‘tube arrest'method. The analyses of high-speed photograph and light emission data suggest that the light emission would be a single bubble sonoluminescence. The luminescence pulse width is observed to wry from sub-nanosecond to about 30 ns. The width and intensity of luminescence pulses increases with the height of the liquid column height and decreases with the liquid temperature.

  7. Hyperoxia toxicity after cardiac arrest: What is the evidence?

    OpenAIRE

    Llitjos, Jean-François; Mira, Jean-Paul; Duranteau, Jacques; Cariou, Alain

    2016-01-01

    This review gives an overview of current knowledge on hyperoxia pathophysiology and examines experimental and human evidence of hyperoxia effects after cardiac arrest. Oxygen plays a pivotal role in critical care management as a lifesaving therapy through the compensation of the imbalance between oxygen requirements and supply. However, growing evidence sustains the hypothesis of reactive oxygen species overproduction-mediated toxicity during hyperoxia, thus exacerbating organ failure by vari...

  8. Arresting Strategy Based on Dynamic Criminal Networks Changing over Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junqing Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate a sequence of dynamic criminal networks on a time series based on the dynamic network analysis (DNA. According to the change of networks’ structure, networks’ variation trend is analyzed to forecast its future structure. Finally, an optimal arresting time and priority list are designed based on our analysis. Better results can be expected than that based on social network analysis (SNA.

  9. Oral Phenytoin Toxicity Causing Sinus Arrest: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thimmisetty, Ravi K.; Gorthi, Janardhana Rao

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of sinus node arrest leading to symptomatic junctional bradycardia from oral phenytoin toxicity, which is a rare presentation. Our patient had no prior cardiac history and was on phenytoin therapy for seizure disorder. Although bradycardia is more commonly associated with intravenous phenytoin and there were few case reports of bradycardia with oral phenytoin reported, the literature is limited. In this case report, we also reviewed the pathophysiology of phenytoin-induced cardiac toxicity. PMID:25343048

  10. Patients with polycystic ovary syndrome have successful embryo arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Yin, Baoli; Hao, Haoying; Wei, Duo; Song, Xiaobing; Xie, Juanke; Zhang, Cuilian

    2015-01-01

    In this retrospective study, we investigate the relationship between embryo arrest and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) during in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer (IVF-ET). In this study, 667 subjects were enrolled, including 330 patients with PCOS and 337 subjects without PCOS. The subjects underwent in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection and embryo transfer (IVF/ICSI-ET) cycles at the Reproductive Medical Centre of Henan Provincial Hospital from January 2009 to December ...

  11. ADULTHOOD ANIMAL ABUSE AMONG MEN ARRESTED FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

    OpenAIRE

    Febres, Jeniimarie; Brasfield, Hope; Shorey, Ryan C.; Elmquist, Joanna; Ninnemann, Andrew; Schonbrun, Yael C.; Temple, Jeff R.; Recupero, Patricia R.; Stuart, Gregory L.

    2014-01-01

    Learning more about intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetrators could aid the development of more effective treatments. The prevalence of adulthood animal abuse (AAA) perpetration and its association with IPV perpetration, antisociality, and alcohol use in 307 men arrested for domestic violence was examined. 41% (n = 125) of the men committed at least one act of animal abuse since the age of 18, in contrast to the 3.0% prevalence rate reported by men in the general population. Controlling fo...

  12. Advances in crack-arrest technology for reactor pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, B.R.; Pugh, C.E.

    1988-01-01

    The Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is continuing to improve the understanding of conditions that govern the initiation, rapid propagation, arrest, and ductile tearing of cracks in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. This paper describes recent advances in a coordinated effort being conducted under the HSST Program by ORNL and several subcontracting groups to develop the crack-arrest data base and the analytical tools required to construct inelastic dynamic fracture models for RPV steels. Large-scale tests are being carried out to generate crack-arrest toughness data at temperatures approaching and above the onset of Charpy upper-shelf behavior. Small- and intermediate-size specimens subjected to static and dynamic loading are being developed and tested to provide additional fracture data for RPV steels. Viscoplastic effects are being included in dynamic fracture models and computer programs and their utility validated through analyses of data from carefully controlled experiments. Recent studies are described that examine convergence problems associated with energy-based fracture parameters in viscoplastic-dynamic fracture applications. Alternative techniques that have potential for achieving convergent solutions for fracture parameters in the context of viscoplastic-dynamic models are discussed. 46 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Hyperoxia toxicity after cardiac arrest: What is the evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llitjos, Jean-François; Mira, Jean-Paul; Duranteau, Jacques; Cariou, Alain

    2016-12-01

    This review gives an overview of current knowledge on hyperoxia pathophysiology and examines experimental and human evidence of hyperoxia effects after cardiac arrest. Oxygen plays a pivotal role in critical care management as a lifesaving therapy through the compensation of the imbalance between oxygen requirements and supply. However, growing evidence sustains the hypothesis of reactive oxygen species overproduction-mediated toxicity during hyperoxia, thus exacerbating organ failure by various oxidative cellular injuries. In the cardiac arrest context, evidence of hyperoxia effects on outcome is fairly conflicting. Although prospective data are lacking, retrospective studies and meta-analysis suggest that hyperoxia could be associated with an increased mortality. However, data originate from retrospective, heterogeneous and inconsistent studies presenting various biases that are detailed in this review. Therefore, after an original and detailed analysis of all experimental and clinical studies, we herein provide new ideas and concepts that could participate to improve knowledge on oxygen toxicity and help in developing further prospective controlled randomized trials on this topic. Up to now, the strategy recommended by international guidelines on cardiac arrest (i.e., targeting an oxyhemoglobin saturation of 94-98 %) should be applied in order to avoid deleterious hypoxia and potent hyperoxia. PMID:27003426

  14. An analysis of mandatory arrest policy on domestic violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Çelik

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Women are more likely to be beaten, raped, or killed because of domestic violence. Men have beaten their wives and partners for centuries with no payback from the criminal justice system. Recent decades domestic violence cases became an important focal point for criminal justice system. Despite increased public awareness, domestic violence remains a serious public policy issue in all around the world. Domestic violence was historically an area of policing where officers were reluctant to interfere because of its sensitive nature vary from one culture to another. Governments started to face with increased liability for police inaction. Therefore law makers passed laws requiring the warrantless arrests of individuals for misdemeanor assault of an intimate partner. This article tries to explain background information over domestic violence from public policy perspective at first. Then tries to explain mandatory arrest policies with its goals and effects. After evaluation and implications of mandatory arrest policies on domestic violence this article concludes by recommending various policy recommendation at the end.

  15. Descriptive Analysis of Medication Administration During Inpatient Cardiopulmonary Arrest Resuscitation (from the Mayo Registry for Telemetry Efficacy in Arrest Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snipelisky, David; Ray, Jordan; Matcha, Gautam; Roy, Archana; Dumitrascu, Adrian; Harris, Dana; Bosworth, Veronica; Clark, Brooke; Thomas, Colleen S; Heckman, Michael G; Vadeboncoeur, Tyler; Kusumoto, Fred; Burton, M Caroline

    2016-05-15

    Advanced cardiovascular life support guidelines exist, yet there are variations in clinical practice. Our study aims to describe the utilization of medications during resuscitation from in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest. A retrospective review of patients who suffered a cardiopulmonary arrest from May 2008 to June 2014 was performed. Clinical and resuscitation data, including timing and dose of medications used, were extracted from the electronic medical record and comparisons made. A total of 94 patients were included in the study. Patients were divided into different groups based on the medication combination used during resuscitation: (1) epinephrine; (2) epinephrine and bicarbonate; (3) epinephrine, bicarbonate, and calcium; (4) epinephrine, bicarbonate, and epinephrine drip; and (5) epinephrine, bicarbonate, calcium, and epinephrine drip. No difference in baseline demographics or clinical data was present, apart from history of dementia and the use of calcium channel blockers. The number of medications given was correlated with resuscitation duration (Spearman's rank correlation = 0.50, p <0.001). The proportion of patients who died during the arrest was 12.5% in those who received epinephrine alone, 30.0% in those who received only epinephrine and bicarbonate, and 46.7% to 57.9% in the remaining groups. Patients receiving only epinephrine had shorter resuscitation durations compared to that of the other groups (p <0.001) and improved survival (p = 0.003). In conclusion, providers frequently use nonguideline medications in resuscitation efforts for in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrests. Increased duration and mortality rates were found in those resuscitations compared with epinephrine alone, likely due to the longer resuscitation duration in the former groups. PMID:27015887

  16. Hospital Variation in Survival After In‐hospital Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Raina M.; Berg, Robert A.; Yang, Lin; Becker, Lance B.; Groeneveld, Peter W.; Chan, Paul S.

    2014-01-01

    Background In‐hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) is common and often fatal. However, the extent to which hospitals vary in survival outcomes and the degree to which this variation is explained by patient and hospital factors is unknown. Methods and Results Within Get with the Guidelines‐Resuscitation, we identified 135 896 index IHCA events at 468 hospitals. Using hierarchical models, we adjusted for demographics comorbidities and arrest characteristics (eg, initial rhythm, etiology, arrest location) to generate risk‐adjusted rates of in‐hospital survival. To quantify the extent of hospital‐level variation in risk‐adjusted rates, we calculated the median odds ratio (OR). Among study hospitals, there was significant variation in unadjusted survival rates. The median unadjusted rate for the bottom decile was 8.3% (range: 0% to 10.7%) and for the top decile was 31.4% (28.6% to 51.7%). After adjusting for 36 predictors of in‐hospital survival, there remained substantial variation in rates of in‐hospital survival across sites: bottom decile (median rate, 12.4% [0% to 15.6%]) versus top decile (median rate, 22.7% [21.0% to 36.2%]). The median OR for risk‐adjusted survival was 1.42 (95% CI: 1.37 to 1.46), which suggests a substantial 42% difference in the odds of survival for patients with similar case‐mix at similar hospitals. Further, significant variation persisted within hospital subgroups (eg, bed size, academic). Conclusion Significant variability in IHCA survival exists across hospitals, and this variation persists despite adjustment for measured patient factors and within hospital subgroups. These findings suggest that other hospital factors may account for the observed site‐level variations in IHCA survival. PMID:24487717

  17. Cardiac arrest caused by multiple recurrent pulmonary embolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannig, Kjartan Eskjaer; Husted, Steen Elkjaer; Grove, Erik Lerkevang

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism is a common condition with a high mortality. We describe a previously healthy 68-year-old male who suffered three pulmonary embolisms during a short period of time, including two embolisms while on anticoagulant treatment. This paper illustrates three important points. (1) The...... importance of optimal anticoagulant treatment in the prevention of pulmonary embolism reoccurrence. (2) The benefit of immediate accessibility to echocardiography in the handling of haemodynamically unstable patients with an unknown underlying cause. (3) Thrombolytic treatment should always be considered and...... may be life-saving in patients with cardiac arrest suspected to be caused by pulmonary embolism....

  18. Axial crack propagation and arrest in pressurized fuselage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosai, M.; Shimamoto, A.; Yu, C.-T.; Walker, S. I.; Kobayashi, A. S.; Tan, P.

    1994-01-01

    The crack arrest capability of a tear strap in a pressurized precracked fuselage was studied through instrumented axial rupture tests of small scale models of an idealized fuselage. Upon pressurization, rapid crack propagation initiated at an axial through crack along the stringer and immediately kinked due to the mixed modes 1 and 2 state caused by the one-sided opening of the crack flap. The diagonally running crack further turned at the tear straps. Dynamic finite element analysis of the rupturing cylinder showed that the crack kinked and also ran straight in the presence of a mixed mode state according to a modified two-parameter crack kinking criterion.

  19. Bleeding following deep hypothermia and circulatory arrest in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossad, Emad B; Machado, Sandra; Apostolakis, John

    2007-03-01

    Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) is a technique of extracorporeal circulation commonly used in children with complex congenital heart defects undergoing surgical repairs. The use of profound cooling (20 degrees C) and complete cessation of circulation allow adequate exposure and correction of these complex lesions, with enhanced cerebral protection. However, the profound physiologic state of DHCA results in significant derangement of the coagulation system and a high incidence of postoperative bleeding. This review examines the impact of DHCA on bleeding and transfusion requirements in children and the pathophysiology of DHCA-induced platelet dysfunction. It also focuses on possible pharmacologic interventions to decrease bleeding following DHCA in children. PMID:17484172

  20. Cerebral blood flow in humans following resuscitation from cardiac arrest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerebral blood flow was measured by xenon-133 washout in 13 patients 6-46 hours after being resuscitated from cardiac arrest. Patients regaining consciousness had relatively normal cerebral blood flow before regaining consciousness, but all patients who died without regaining consciousness had increased cerebral blood flow that appeared within 24 hours after resuscitation (except in one patient in whom the first measurement was delayed until 28 hours after resuscitation, by which time cerebral blood flow was increased). The cause of the delayed-onset increase in cerebral blood flow is not known, but the increase may have adverse effects on brain function and may indicate the onset of irreversible brain damage

  1. Venoarterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Adults With Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jignesh K; Schoenfeld, Elinor; Parnia, Sam; Singer, Adam J; Edelman, Norman

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac arrest (CA) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite the use of conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), rates of return of spontaneous circulation and survival with minimal neurologic impairment remain low. Utilization of venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for CA in adults is steadily increasing. Propensity-matched cohort studies have reported outcomes associated with ECMO use to be superior to that of conventional CPR alone in in-hospital patients with CA. In this review, we discuss the mechanism, indications, complications, and evidence for ECMO in CA in adults. PMID:25922385

  2. Development of New Type Gap Arrester for Earth Fault Protection in AC Feeding System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajiki, Kohji; Morimoto, Hiroaki; Hisamizu, Yasuzi; Kinoshita, Nobuo; Takai, Wataru; Sato, Ryogo

    A gap arrester is being used for ground fault protection in AC Feeding System. However there are faults in which a conventional gap arrester burns down in a normal state of circuit. We investigated the cause of the fault in which a gap arrester burns. Then, it was found out that the cause of the fault was the discharge of AC current from the surge voltage. Therefore, we developed a new type gap arrester which does not burn down. The new type gap arrester is composed of a discharge tube and a zinc oxide element which are connected in series. Unnecessary AC current discharge is prevented by this structure. The new type gap arrester is actually used at the railroad track.

  3. Developmentally arrested structures preceding cerebellar tumors in von Hippel–Lindau disease

    OpenAIRE

    Shively, Sharon B; Falke, Eric A; Li, Jie; Tran, Maxine G B; Thompson, Eli R; Maxwell, Patrick H; Roessler, Erich; Oldfield, Edward H; Lonser, Russell R.; Vortmeyer, Alexander O

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that suggests that knockout of tumor-suppressor gene function causes developmental arrest and protraction of cellular differentiation. In the peripheral nervous system of patients with the tumor-suppressor gene disorder, von Hippel–Lindau disease, we have demonstrated developmentally arrested structural elements composed of hemangioblast progenitor cells. Some developmentally arrested structural elements progress to a frank tumor, hemangioblastoma. However, in von...

  4. Crack propagation and arrest in CFRP materials with strain softening regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilligan, Matthew Anthony

    Understanding the growth and arrest of cracks in composite materials is critical for their effective utilization in fatigue-sensitive and damage susceptible applications such as primary aircraft structures. Local tailoring of the laminate stack to provide crack arrest capacity intermediate to major structural components has been investigated and demonstrated since some of the earliest efforts in composite aerostructural design, but to date no rigorous model of the crack arrest mechanism has been developed to allow effective sizing of these features. To address this shortcoming, the previous work in the field is reviewed, with particular attention to the analysis methodologies proposed for similar arrest features. The damage and arrest processes active in such features are investigated, and various models of these processes are discussed and evaluated. Governing equations are derived based on a proposed mechanistic model of the crack arrest process. The derived governing equations are implemented in a numerical model, and a series of simulations are performed to ascertain the general characteristics of the proposed model and allow qualitative comparison to existing experimental results. The sensitivity of the model and the arrest process to various parameters is investigated, and preliminary conclusions regarding the optimal feature configuration are developed. To address deficiencies in the available material and experimental data, a series of coupon tests are developed and conducted covering a range of arrest zone configurations. Test results are discussed and analyzed, with a particular focus on identification of the proposed failure and arrest mechanisms. Utilizing the experimentally derived material properties, the tests are reproduced with both the developed numerical tool as well as a FEA-based implementation of the arrest model. Correlation between the simulated and experimental results is analyzed, and future avenues of investigation are identified

  5. Brazilian production development of class 2 polymeric surge arresters for transmission line application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dellallibera, Adriano A. [Industria Eletromecanica Balestro, Mogi Mirim, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: adrianoad@balestro.com; Andrade, Antonio Donizetti de; Bezerra, Ana Cristina Guara; Duarte, Jose Vicente Pereira; Gois, Paulo Marcio Batista; Markiewicz, Rubens Leopoldo [Companhia Energetica de Minas Gerais (CEMIG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], Emails: andonize@cemig.com.br, anacris@cemig.com.br, vicente@cemig.com.br, pgois@cemig.com.br, rlmark@cemig.com.br

    2007-07-01

    This paper shows the steeps of Brazilian class 2 ZnO lightning surge arrester development and production, aiming to attend the goal of CEMIG transmission lines performance improvement against lightning discharges action. The description of CEMIG transmission lines performance, before and after the ZnO lightning arresters installation, the necessity of use of ZnO lightning surge arrester, the prototypes manufacture, tests, problems and solutions are presented. (author)

  6. Using force in arrests against those who are not resisting can mean more violent prisoners.

    OpenAIRE

    Klahm, Charles; Steiner, Benjamin; Meade, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Recent events have seen a re-evaluation of the relationship between the police and citizens, with increased concern about the use of force during arrests. In new research, Charles Klahm, Benjamin Steiner, and Benjamin Meade find another consequence of police using violent force during arrests: once in prison, inmates who did not resist their arrests were more likely to be involved in rule violations, including acts of violence. They argue that these inmates’ beliefs that their treatment was u...

  7. Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Diagnosis of Cor Triatriatum Sinistrum in Pediatric Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Kehrl,

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrest in the adolescent population secondary to congenital heart disease (CHD is rare. Focused cardiac ultrasound (FoCUS in the emergency department (ED can yield important clinical information, aid in resuscitative efforts during cardiac arrest and is commonly integrated into the evaluation of patients with pulseless electrical activity (PEA. We report a case of pediatric cardiac arrest in which FoCUS was used to diagnose a critical CHD known as cor triatriatum sinistrum as the likely cause for PEA cardiac arrest and help direct ED resuscitation.

  8. Altered brain energetics induces mitochondrial fission arrest in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Trushin, Sergey; Christensen, Trace A; Bachmeier, Benjamin V; Gateno, Benjamin; Schroeder, Andreas; Yao, Jia; Itoh, Kie; Sesaki, Hiromi; Poon, Wayne W; Gylys, Karen H; Patterson, Emily R; Parisi, Joseph E; Diaz Brinton, Roberta; Salisbury, Jeffrey L; Trushina, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Altered brain metabolism is associated with progression of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Mitochondria respond to bioenergetic changes by continuous fission and fusion. To account for three dimensional architecture of the brain tissue and organelles, we applied 3-dimensional electron microscopy (3D EM) reconstruction to visualize mitochondrial structure in the brain tissue from patients and mouse models of AD. We identified a previously unknown mitochondrial fission arrest phenotype that results in elongated interconnected organelles, "mitochondria-on-a-string" (MOAS). Our data suggest that MOAS formation may occur at the final stages of fission process and was not associated with altered translocation of activated dynamin related protein 1 (Drp1) to mitochondria but with reduced GTPase activity. Since MOAS formation was also observed in the brain tissue of wild-type mice in response to hypoxia or during chronological aging, fission arrest may represent fundamental compensatory adaptation to bioenergetic stress providing protection against mitophagy that may preserve residual mitochondrial function. The discovery of novel mitochondrial phenotype that occurs in the brain tissue in response to energetic stress accurately detected only using 3D EM reconstruction argues for a major role of mitochondrial dynamics in regulating neuronal survival. PMID:26729583

  9. Student perceptions of sudden cardiac arrest: a qualitative inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, Annette; Callan, Krista; Egizio, Katelyn; Kenney, Kaye; Gray, Gillian; Mundry, Gillian; Re, Gillian

    Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is the number one cause of death in young athletes in high school and university settings. Survival and outcomes of SCA is dependent on appropriate recognition of symptoms and immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), along with a shock from an automatic external defibrillator (AED). The three aims of the authors' study presented in this article were: to describe university students' perceptions and beliefs about sudden cardiac arrest, to describe university students' understanding of an AED and their level of preparedness to recognize and respond to a life threatening emergency event, and to identify university students' experiences of responding to handling life-threatening emergency events. Qualitative methodology was employed using semi-structured interviews and thematic analysis. Three major themes emerged from data analysis: confusion, uncertainty, and fear/uncomfortableness. These themes characterised participant's perceptions about SCA. The authors concluded that a lack of understanding of what SCA is and participants' inability to respond to an emergency event was evident. PMID:22585265

  10. Variation in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M. Jones

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate variation in airway management strategies in one suburban emergency medical services system treating patients experiencing out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA. Method. Retrospective chart review of all adult OHCA resuscitation during a 13-month period, specifically comparing airway management decisions. Results. Paramedics demonstrated considerable variation in their approaches to airway management. Approximately half of all OHCA patients received more than one airway management attempt (38/77 [49%], and one-quarter underwent three or more attempts (25/77 [25%]. One-third of patients arrived at the emergency department with a different airway device than initially selected (25/77 [32%]. Conclusion. This study confirmed our hypothesis that paramedics’ selection of ventilation strategies in cardiac arrest varies considerably. This observation raises concern because airway management diverts time and energy from interventions known to improve outcomes in OHCA management, such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation. More research is needed to identify more focused airway management strategies for prehospital care providers.

  11. Experience with bretylium tosylate by a hospital cardiac arrest team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, D A; Sniderman, A D; Fraser, G; Fallen, E L

    1977-03-01

    The effect of bretylium tosylate (BT) was determined in 27 consecutive cases of resistant ventricular fibrillation (VF) encountered by a hospital cardiac arrest team. The VF was sustained and completely resistant to multiple injections of lidocaine, sequential DC shocks at 400 watt-sec and one or a combination of intravenous propranolol, diphenylhydantoin or procainamide. Following 30 min of sustained cardiac massage, BT (5 mg/kg i.v.) was administered. In 20 patients, VF was terminated within 9-12 min after DC shock. Eight of these patients failed to recover while 12 (44%) of all patients resuscitated survived to be discharged from hospital. Eleven out of 20 (55%) of all patients who had a cardiac arrest outside the CCU were survivors; only one out of seven in the CCU were successfully resuscitated. While receiving maintanance BT post-resuscitation (5 mg/kg i.m. q 8-12 hrs x 48 hrs), half the patients developed hypotension and three required vasopressors and/or fluid replacement. The data indicate that BT is a useful agent in patients with sustained VF refractory to repeated lidocaine injections, some other antiarrhythmic agents, and multiple DC shocks. PMID:837490

  12. Non-equilibrium theory of arrested spinodal decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olais-Govea, José Manuel; López-Flores, Leticia; Medina-Noyola, Magdaleno [Instituto de Física “Manuel Sandoval Vallarta,” Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Álvaro Obregón 64, 78000 San Luis Potosí, SLP (Mexico)

    2015-11-07

    The non-equilibrium self-consistent generalized Langevin equation theory of irreversible relaxation [P. E. Ramŕez-González and M. Medina-Noyola, Phys. Rev. E 82, 061503 (2010); 82, 061504 (2010)] is applied to the description of the non-equilibrium processes involved in the spinodal decomposition of suddenly and deeply quenched simple liquids. For model liquids with hard-sphere plus attractive (Yukawa or square well) pair potential, the theory predicts that the spinodal curve, besides being the threshold of the thermodynamic stability of homogeneous states, is also the borderline between the regions of ergodic and non-ergodic homogeneous states. It also predicts that the high-density liquid-glass transition line, whose high-temperature limit corresponds to the well-known hard-sphere glass transition, at lower temperature intersects the spinodal curve and continues inside the spinodal region as a glass-glass transition line. Within the region bounded from below by this low-temperature glass-glass transition and from above by the spinodal dynamic arrest line, we can recognize two distinct domains with qualitatively different temperature dependence of various physical properties. We interpret these two domains as corresponding to full gas-liquid phase separation conditions and to the formation of physical gels by arrested spinodal decomposition. The resulting theoretical scenario is consistent with the corresponding experimental observations in a specific colloidal model system.

  13. 33 CFR Appendix A to Part 154 - Guidelines for Detonation Flame Arresters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Guidelines for Detonation Flame... Appendix A to Part 154—Guidelines for Detonation Flame Arresters This appendix contains the draft ASTM standard for detonation flame arresters. Devices meeting this standard will be accepted by the...

  14. 38 CFR 3.375 - Determination of inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis. 3.375 Section 3.375 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief...) in tuberculosis. (a) Pulmonary tuberculosis. A veteran shown to have had pulmonary tuberculosis will...) Nonpulmonary disease. Determination of complete arrest of nonpulmonary tuberculosis requires absence...

  15. Program Completion and Re-Arrest in a Batterer Intervention System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Larry W.; Stoops, Charles; Call, Christine; Flett, Heather

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors examine the effects of batterer intervention program (BIP) completion on domestic violence re-arrest in an urban system of 30 BIPs with a common set of state standards, common program completion criteria, and centralized criminal justice supervision. Method: 899 men arrested for domestic violence were assessed and completed…

  16. 46 CFR 30.10-63 - Spark arrester-TB/ALL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Spark arrester-TB/ALL. 30.10-63 Section 30.10-63...-63 Spark arrester—TB/ALL. The term spark arrester means any device, assembly, or method of a... sparks in exhaust pipes from internal combustion engines....

  17. Mutations in the Kv1.5 channel gene KCNA5 in cardiac arrest patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Nathalie H; Winkel, Bo G; Kanters, Jørgen K; Schmitt, Nicole; Hofman-Bang, Jacob; Jensen, Henrik S; Bentzen, Bo H; Sigurd, Bjarne; Larsen, Lars Allan; Andersen, Paal S; Kjeldsen, Keld; Grunnet, Morten; Christiansen, Michael; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Haunsø, Stig

    2007-01-01

    Mutations in one of the ion channels shaping the cardiac action potential can lead to action potential prolongation. However, only in a minority of cardiac arrest cases mutations in the known arrhythmia-related genes can be identified. In two patients with arrhythmia and cardiac arrest, we identi...

  18. Same-Sex and Race-Based Disparities in Statutory Rape Arrests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffin, Mark; Chenoweth, Stephanie; Letourneau, Elizabeth J

    2016-01-01

    This study tests a liberation hypothesis for statutory rape incidents, specifically that there may be same-sex and race/ethnicity arrest disparities among statutory rape incidents and that these will be greater among statutory rape than among forcible sex crime incidents. 26,726 reported incidents of statutory rape as defined under state statutes and 96,474 forcible sex crime incidents were extracted from National Incident-Based Reporting System data sets. Arrest outcomes were tested using multilevel modeling. Same-sex statutory rape pairings were rare but had much higher arrest odds. A victim-offender romantic relationship amplified arrest odds for same-sex pairings, but damped arrest odds for male-on-female pairings. Same-sex disparities were larger among statutory than among forcible incidents. Female-on-male incidents had uniformly lower arrest odds. Race/ethnicity effects were smaller than gender effects and more complexly patterned. The findings support the liberation hypothesis for same-sex statutory rape arrest disparities, particularly among same-sex romantic pairings. Support for race/ethnicity-based arrest disparities was limited and mixed. PMID:25416040

  19. A Summary and Analysis of Warrantless Arrest Statutes for Domestic Violence in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeoli, April M.; Norris, Alexis; Brenner, Hannah

    2011-01-01

    In the United States, all 50 states and the District of Columbia have enacted statutes that allow police officers to make warrantless arrests for domestic violence given probable cause; however, state laws differ from one another in multiple, important ways. Research on domestic violence warrantless arrest laws rarely describe them as anything…

  20. [Thoracic lavage and open cardiac massage as treatment of hypothermic cardiac arrest--case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koponen, Timo; Vänni, Ville; Kettunen, Minna; Reinikainen, Matti; Hakala, Tapio

    2016-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass is the treatment of choice for a severely hypothermic patient with cardiac arrest. However, the treatment is not always available. We describe a successful three-and-a-half hour resuscitation of a hypothermic cardiac arrest patient with manual chest compressions followed by open cardiac massage and rewarming with thoracic lavage. PMID:27188092

  1. [Cardiopulmonary resuscitation and post-cardiac arrest brain injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    One of the most important topics in the field of resuscitation at present is the drafting of the 2015 version of the Consensus on Science and Treatment Recommendation (CoSTR) by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation. The Japan Resuscitation Council is preparing its 2015 Guideline based on this CoSTR and plans to release it in October 2015. A critical change in the upcoming CoSTR is the adoption of the GRADE system. The new Guideline incorporating the GRADE system will surely be more scientific than the previous Guideline issued in 2010. Meanwhile, an important finding appeared in a report from Nielsen et al.: hypothermia at a targeted temperature of 33 degrees C did not confer a benefit versus 36 degrees in unconscious survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of presumed cardiac cause. PMID:26915250

  2. A Unique Case of Cardiac Arrest following K2 Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saif Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death (SCD accounts for up to 450,000 deaths every year in the United States (Zipes et al. (2006. Most cases of sudden cardiac death occur in subjects with no prior history of heart disease (Myerburg et al. (1998. The incidence of sudden death in a general population has been shown to increase contemporaneously with substance abuse (Phillips et al. (1999. The causative association of sudden death with cocaine, methadone, and volatile agents is well established (Adgey et al. (1995 and Isner et al. (1986. We describe a case of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest temporally related to abuse of the synthetic cannabinoid street drug known as K2. To our knowledge, there are no previously documented cases of sudden cardiac death associated with synthetic cannabinoids although they have been linked to myocardial infarction in teenagers despite normal coronary angiography (Mir et al. (2011.

  3. Dynamical Arrest, Structural Disorder, and Optimization of Organic Photovoltaic Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gould, Ian; Dmitry, Matyushov

    2014-09-11

    This project describes fundamental experimental and theoretical work that relates to charge separation and migration in the solid, heterogeneous or aggregated state. Marcus theory assumes a system in equilibrium with all possible solvent (dipolar) configurations, with rapid interconversion among these on the ET timescale. This project has addressed the more general situation where the medium is at least partially frozen on the ET timescale, i.e. under conditions of dynamical arrest. The approach combined theory and experiment and includes: (1) Computer simulations of model systems, (2) Development of analytical procedures consistent with computer experiment and (3) Experimental studies and testing of the formal theories on this data. Electron transfer processes are unique as a consequence of the close connection between kinetics, spectroscopy and theory, which is an essential component of this work.

  4. Anaphylactic shock and cardiac arrest caused by thiamine infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juel, Jacob; Pareek, Manan; Langfrits, Christian Sigvald; Jensen, Svend Eggert

    2013-01-01

    Parenteral thiamine has a very high safety profile. The most common adverse effect is local irritation; however, anaphylactic or anaphylactoid reactions may occur, mostly related to intravenous administration. We describe a 44-year-old man, a chronic alcoholic, who was admitted with alcohol intoxication and developed cardiac arrest due to anaphylactic shock following intravenous thiamine infusion. The patient was successfully resuscitated after 15 min and repeated epinephrine administrations. He was discharged in good health after 14 days. This case report emphasises both the importance of recognising the symptoms of anaphylaxis and the fact that facilities for treating anaphylaxis and cardiopulmonary resuscitation should be available when thiamine or for that matter, any drug is given in-hospital. PMID:23853017

  5. Cardiopulmonary arrest induced by anaphylactoid reaction with contrast media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Iwao; Hori, Shingo; Funabiki, Tomohiro; Sekine, Kazuhiko; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Fujishima, Seitaro; Aoki, Katsunori; Kuribayashi, Sachio; Aikawa, Naoki

    2002-05-01

    Anaphylactoid reactions to iodinated contrast media can cause life-threatening events and even death. A 44-year-old woman presented with cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA) immediately following the administration of nonionic iodinated contrast media for an intravenous pyelography. Her cardiac rhythm during CPA was asystole. She was successfully resuscitated by the radiologists supported by paged emergency physicians using the prompt intravenous administration of 1 mg of epinephrine. Neither laryngeal edema nor bronchial spasm was observed during the course of treatment, and she was discharged on the 4th day without any complications. The patient did not have a history of allergy, but had experienced a myocardial infarction and aortitis. She had undergone 11 angiographies and had been taking a beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist. Planned emergency medical backup is advisable to ensure resuscitation in the event of an anaphylactoid reaction to the use of contrast media in-hospital settings. PMID:12009227

  6. Cardiac arrest due to airway obstruction in hereditary angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuse, Takashi; Nakada, Taka-aki; Taniguchi, Masashi; Mizushima, Yasuaki; Matsuoka, Tetsuya

    2015-12-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare genetic disease caused by a deficiency of functional C1 esterase inhibitor that causes swelling attacks in various body tissues. We hereby report a case of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest due to airway obstruction in HAE. Cutaneous swelling and abdominal pain attacks caused by gastrointestinal wall swelling are common symptoms in HAE, whereas laryngeal swelling is rare. Emergency physicians may have few chances to experience cases of life-threatening laryngeal edema resulting in a delay from symptom onset to the diagnosis of HAE. Hereditary angioedema is diagnosed by performing complement blood tests. Because safe and effective treatment options are available for the life-threatening swellings in HAE, the diagnosis potentially reduces the risk of asphyxiation in patients and their blood relatives. PMID:25913082

  7. Opiate Withdrawal Complicated by Tetany and Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfanali R. Kugasia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with symptoms of opiate withdrawal, after the administration of opiate antagonist by paramedics, are a common presentation in the emergency department of hospitals. Though most of opiate withdrawal symptoms are benign, rarely they can become life threatening. This case highlights how a benign opiate withdrawal symptom of hyperventilation led to severe respiratory alkalosis that degenerated into tetany and cardiac arrest. Though this patient was successfully resuscitated, it is imperative that severe withdrawal symptoms are timely identified and immediate steps are taken to prevent catastrophes. An easier way to reverse the severe opiate withdrawal symptom would be with either low dose methadone or partial opiate agonists like buprenorphine. However, if severe acid-base disorder is identified, it would be safer to electively intubate these patients for better control of their respiratory and acid-base status.

  8. Making Food Protein Gels via an Arrested Spinodal Decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudi, Najet; Stradner, Anna

    2015-12-17

    We report an investigation of the structural and dynamic properties of mixtures of food colloid casein micelles and low molecular weight poly(ethylene oxide). A combination of visual observations, confocal laser scanning microscopy, diffusing wave spectroscopy, and oscillatory shear rheometry is used to characterize the state diagram of the mixtures and describe the structural and dynamic properties of the resulting fluid and solid-like structures. We demonstrate the formation of gel-like structures through an arrested spinodal decomposition mechanism. We discuss our observations in view of previous experimental and theoretical studies with synthetic and food colloids, and comment on the potential of such a route toward gels for food processing. PMID:26595592

  9. Electronic registration of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niels Dalsgaard; Dahl, Michael; Gade, John;

    2007-01-01

    patients according to whether they received first aid, the identity of the first aid provider and the initial cardiac rhythm as diagnosed by the patient monitor.   Results: 18,666 patients where in contact with an emergency ambulance in the study period. Of those 296 (89/100,000/year) met the definition of...... cardiac arrest. 83 of those (28 %) received first aid. The first aid was provided by layman (68 %), physicians (11 %), nurses (11 %) and first-aiders (4 %). In 6 % the identity of the first aid provider was unknown. The majority of the patients (n = 177 (58 %)) had asystole upon ambulance arrival. 37 (12...... considerably higher incidence rate for OHCA, than documented by the analogue nationwide registry. Further we discovered a high rate of first aid to OHCA-patients. Finally our data showed a high occurence of asystolia in patients who met the official criteria for OHCA....

  10. Standardized EEG interpretation accurately predicts prognosis after cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westhall, Erik; Rossetti, Andrea O; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; Wesenberg Kjaer, Troels; Horn, Janneke; Ullén, Susann; Friberg, Hans; Nielsen, Niklas; Rosén, Ingmar; Åneman, Anders; Erlinge, David; Gasche, Yvan; Hassager, Christian; Hovdenes, Jan; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Kuiper, Michael; Pellis, Tommaso; Stammet, Pascal; Wanscher, Michael; Wetterslev, Jørn; Wise, Matt P; Cronberg, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify reliable predictors of outcome in comatose patients after cardiac arrest using a single routine EEG and standardized interpretation according to the terminology proposed by the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society. METHODS: In this cohort study, 4 EEG specialists......, blinded to outcome, evaluated prospectively recorded EEGs in the Target Temperature Management trial (TTM trial) that randomized patients to 33°C vs 36°C. Routine EEG was performed in patients still comatose after rewarming. EEGs were classified into highly malignant (suppression, suppression with...... periodic discharges, burst-suppression), malignant (periodic or rhythmic patterns, pathological or nonreactive background), and benign EEG (absence of malignant features). Poor outcome was defined as best Cerebral Performance Category score 3-5 until 180 days. RESULTS: Eight TTM sites randomized 202...

  11. Standardized EEG interpretation accurately predicts prognosis after cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Andrea O.; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; Wesenberg Kjaer, Troels; Horn, Janneke; Ullén, Susann; Friberg, Hans; Nielsen, Niklas; Rosén, Ingmar; Åneman, Anders; Erlinge, David; Gasche, Yvan; Hassager, Christian; Hovdenes, Jan; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Kuiper, Michael; Pellis, Tommaso; Stammet, Pascal; Wanscher, Michael; Wetterslev, Jørn; Wise, Matt P.; Cronberg, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify reliable predictors of outcome in comatose patients after cardiac arrest using a single routine EEG and standardized interpretation according to the terminology proposed by the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society. Methods: In this cohort study, 4 EEG specialists, blinded to outcome, evaluated prospectively recorded EEGs in the Target Temperature Management trial (TTM trial) that randomized patients to 33°C vs 36°C. Routine EEG was performed in patients still comatose after rewarming. EEGs were classified into highly malignant (suppression, suppression with periodic discharges, burst-suppression), malignant (periodic or rhythmic patterns, pathological or nonreactive background), and benign EEG (absence of malignant features). Poor outcome was defined as best Cerebral Performance Category score 3–5 until 180 days. Results: Eight TTM sites randomized 202 patients. EEGs were recorded in 103 patients at a median 77 hours after cardiac arrest; 37% had a highly malignant EEG and all had a poor outcome (specificity 100%, sensitivity 50%). Any malignant EEG feature had a low specificity to predict poor prognosis (48%) but if 2 malignant EEG features were present specificity increased to 96% (p < 0.001). Specificity and sensitivity were not significantly affected by targeted temperature or sedation. A benign EEG was found in 1% of the patients with a poor outcome. Conclusions: Highly malignant EEG after rewarming reliably predicted poor outcome in half of patients without false predictions. An isolated finding of a single malignant feature did not predict poor outcome whereas a benign EEG was highly predictive of a good outcome. PMID:26865516

  12. Arrest as a General Property of the Supercooled Liquid State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluyters, Jan H; Sluyters-Rehbach, Margaretha

    2016-04-21

    Owing to the universal presence of intermolecular interactions, it has to be expected that at some well-defined lower temperature a liquid loses its dynamic properties like fluidity and self-diffusion. As a sequel to two earlier papers on the discovery of such an arrest temperature T0 for supercooled water at 243 K, where also the coexisting vapor pressure was found to become zero, in this paper a further study is undertaken of the behavior of a selection of other liquids. At first, two simple equations of state (van der Waals and virial) are shown in principle to predict a zero vapor pressure at a finite temperature. The interaction parameters B (second virial coefficient) and μJT (Joule-Thomson coefficient) of the vapor are found to become virtually infinite at a temperature T0,B, with a value equal or close to the T0 derived from the liquid properties. Just as earlier found for water, the latter is obtained by extrapolation of several available dynamic and equilibrium data, which should produce an intersection with the temperature axis at the same T0 value. With the exception of molten salts and liquid pure metals, this condition appears to be fulfilled quite accurately. Thus, the temperature of arrest is a general phenomenon for supercooled liquids. As an illustration, it is shown how the PVT diagram of carbon dioxide can be extended into the supercooled temperature region. It is argued that T0 is the temperature below which the Boltzmann energy, kT, is lower than the minimal energy needed for a molecule to break the interactions with its surrounding molecules. We propose to name this minimal energy, kT0, the multimolecular potential of the liquid object. The relationship of the liquid multimolecular potential with the pair potential, ε, of the molecular species is established for various examples and appears to be a proportionality with ε ≈ 2kT0. PMID:27070201

  13. Cardiac arrest during gamete release in chum salmon regulated by the parasympathetic nerve system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuya Makiguchi

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrest caused by startling stimuli, such as visual and vibration stimuli, has been reported in some animals and could be considered as an extraordinary case of bradycardia and defined as reversible missed heart beats. Variability of the heart rate is established as a balance between an autonomic system, namely cholinergic vagus inhibition, and excitatory adrenergic stimulation of neural and hormonal action in teleost. However, the cardiac arrest and its regulating nervous mechanism remain poorly understood. We show, by using electrocardiogram (ECG data loggers, that cardiac arrest occurs in chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta at the moment of gamete release for 7.39+/-1.61 s in females and for 5.20+/-0.97 s in males. The increase in heart rate during spawning behavior relative to the background rate during the resting period suggests that cardiac arrest is a characteristic physiological phenomenon of the extraordinarily high heart rate during spawning behavior. The ECG morphological analysis showed a peaked and tall T-wave adjacent to the cardiac arrest, indicating an increase in potassium permeability in cardiac muscle cells, which would function to retard the cardiac action potential. Pharmacological studies showed that the cardiac arrest was abolished by injection of atropine, a muscarinic receptor antagonist, revealing that the cardiac arrest is a reflex response of the parasympathetic nerve system, although injection of sotalol, a beta-adrenergic antagonist, did not affect the cardiac arrest. We conclude that cardiac arrest during gamete release in spawning release in spawning chum salmon is a physiological reflex response controlled by the parasympathetic nervous system. This cardiac arrest represents a response to the gaping behavior that occurs at the moment of gamete release.

  14. Ionic and Wigner Glasses, Superionic Conductors, and Spinodal Electrostatic Gels: Dynamically Arrested Phases of the Primitive Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the recently proposed self-consistent generalized Langevin equation theory of dynamic arrest, in this letter we show that the ergodic-nonergodic phase diagram of a classical mixture of charged hard spheres (the so-called 'primitive model' of ionic solutions and molten salts) includes arrested phases corresponding to nonconducting ionic glasses, partially arrested states that represent solid electrolytes (or 'superionic' conductors), low-density colloidal Wigner glasses, and low-density electrostatic gels associated with arrested spinodal decomposition.

  15. Arrest Decisions as Precludes To? An Evaluation of Policy Related Research. Volume I: Administrative Summary and Training Script.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neithercutt, M. G.; And Others

    The document is the first part of a study conducted to evaluate policy-related research on police arrest discretion as an alternative solution to arrest. It presents the administrative summary of the Arrest Decisions as Preludes To? (ADAPT) project and contains scripts intended for use by police departments as a staff training device. The…

  16. Growth arrest and differentiation-associated phosphoproteins in mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer is thought to result from the expression of defects in the control of both cell proliferation and differentiation. In murine mesenchymal stem cells they have established that differentiation and proliferation can be mediated at a variety of distinct states in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. In order to evaluate the role of cellular phosphoprotein (PP) expression in these regulatory processes, five different growth and differentiation-dependent states were compared. Cells in the following states were studied: (1) exponential growth; (2) arrest in serum-deficient medium; (3) arrest at the predifferentiation arrest state; (4) arrest at a state of nonterminal differentiation; and (5) arrest at a state of terminal differentiation. Whole cell lysates from each group were phosphorylated in vitro using [γ-32P]ATP and analyzed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Two most interesting observations were established. First, a distinct PP with a molecular weight of 37 kD was expressed in all growth arrested cells but was not evident in rapidly growing cells. Second, two distinct differentiation-associated PP with molecular weights of 72 kD and 29 kD were expressed exclusively in nonterminally and terminally differentiated cells. Since the identification of the 37 kD cell cycle-dependent growth arrest-associated PP could be of great significance, they plan to further investigate the functional role of this phosphoprotein in the control of cellular proliferation

  17. Use of forces from instrumented Charpy V-notch testing to determine crack-arrest toughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this investigation is an estimation of the crack-arrest toughness, particularly of irradiated materials, from voltage versus time output of an instrumented setup during a test on a Charpy V-notch (CVN) specimen. This voltage versus time trace (which can be converted to force versus displacement) displays events during fracture of the specimen. Various stages of the fracture process can be identified on the trace, including an arrest point indicating arrest of brittle fracture. The force at arrest, Fa, versus test temperature, T, relationship is examined to explore possible relationships to other experimental measures of crack-arrest toughness such as the drop-weight nil-ductility temperature (NDT), or crack-arrest toughness, Ka. For a wide range of weld and plate materials, the temperature at which Fa = 2.45 kN correlates with NDT with a standard deviation, sigma, of about 11 K. Excluding the so-called low upper-shelf energy (USE) welds from the analysis resulted in Fa = 4.12 kN and σ = 6.6 K. The estimates of the correlation of the temperature for Fa = 7.4 kN with the temperature at 100-MPa√m level for a mean American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) type KIa curve through crack-arrest toughness values show that prediction of conservative values of Ka are possible

  18. Experimental study and local approach of cleavage crack arrest in a bainitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EDF wants to complete the assessment of reactor pressure vessels, usually based on crack initiation concept, by crack arrest concept. The work aims at improving the knowledge of cleavage crack arrest in a reactor pressure vessel steel. For that purpose, isothermal crack arrest experiments were performed for temperatures ranging from - 150 C up to - 50 C on compact tensile specimens and on pre-cracked rings submitted to compressive loading. Fractographic observations revealed that the whole crack propagation and arrest occurs by cleavage even if ductile tearing occurs before initiation of the unstable crack propagation. A local cleavage crack arrest criterion is applied in finite element computations carried out in elasto-visco-plasticity and in full dynamics: the crack propagates since the largest principal stress reaches a critical stress. The application of this criterion on the experiments leads to a good prediction of the crack speed and of the crack length and shows that the critical stress increases with the temperature in relation with dissipation features observed on the fracture surfaces. Dependence to the geometry is observed; it can be due to the assumption used for the 2D computations. The study of the structural dynamic shows that the crack arrest phenomenon is very linked to the global dynamics of the structure: crack arrest and crack closure occur approximately at the same time. (author)

  19. Performance analysis of surge arrester on high voltage systems using ATP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nallagownden, P.; Magumane, A.H. [Univ. Teknologi Petronas, Perak (Malaysia); Kanth, K.S.R. [Tenaga National Berhad (Malaysia)

    2008-07-01

    Lightning strikes are among the major factors that cause failures in electrical power systems. Phase to ground arresters are commonly installed at power transformer terminals to offer some lightning protection. However, it is important to understand the performance of metal oxide arresters under very fast transient overvoltages in order to determine the protection zone of the arrester and to achieve economical benefits. This study investigated lightning overvoltage protection in a complete three-phase scheme of a 500 KV substation. Overvoltages originated from direct lightning stroke on a phase of a real overhead line (OHL) model. The effect of the separation distance of the arrester from the transformer connected at the open end of the substations was investigated as well as the performance of the arrester for different substation configurations. In the first scenario, the connection of the arrester and transformer was done with a direct connection of an overhead line. In the second scenario, the connection of these devices was done through a cable. Both the overhead line and cable lengths were varied and the maximum overvoltages coming to the transformer were recorded. The results showed that there is a direct proportionality between overvoltages and length of the overhead line or cable. As long the length of the line or cable between the arrester and the transformer was increased, the vulnerability of the transformer to receive high overvoltages also increased. Surge overvoltages were found to be very sensitive to impedance of the line or cable. The direct connections of overhead lines between the arrester and transformer make it necessary to add some protective device. It was suggested that surge arresters should be installed every 200 meters along the overhead lines in order to ensure the safety of equipment. 12 refs., 4 tabs., 8 figs.

  20. Hypothermic cardiac arrest: an 11 year review of ED management and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunette, D D; McVaney, K

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the emergency department (ED) management of hypothermic cardiac arrest and its outcome. The medical records of all patients with hypothermic cardiac arrest treated in the ED from January 1, 1988 to January 31, 1999 were retrospectively reviewed. Data collected included initial body temperature, serum potassium, methods of rewarming, return of perfusing rhythm, and morbidity and mortality. Data were analyzed by descriptive methods. Eleven patients were treated in the ED resuscitation room for hypothermic cardiac arrest. Six patients were found in cardiac arrest in the field, one patient arrested during transport, and four patients arrested after ED arrival. The average initial temperature was 79.1 degrees F (range 69.0 degrees F to 86.7 degrees F). Seven patients received an ED thoracotomy with internal cardiac massage and warm mediastinal irrigation. Four patients had airway management in the ED and then direct transport to the operating room for cardiac bypass rewarming. Three of the seven patients who received an ED thoracotomy subsequently went to intraoperative cardiac bypass rewarming. Five of the seven (71.4%) patients who received an ED thoracotomy survived, versus none of the four patients (0%) who went directly to intraoperative cardiac bypass. A direct comparison of immediate ED thoracotomy versus intraoperative cardiac bypass without ED thoracotomy is cautiously made as this was an unmatched and nonrandomized study. Three of the surviving patients underwent intraoperative cardiac bypass rewarming after receiving an ED thoracotomy. In two of these patients a perfusing rhythm had been established after thoracotomy in the ED and before transport to the operating room for cardiac bypass. Only one of seven (14.3%) patients who arrested prehospital survived versus four of four (100%) who arrested in the ED. ED thoracotomy with internal cardiac massage and mediastinal irrigation rewarming is effective in the management

  1. Sudden Cardiac Death and Post Cardiac Arrest Syndrome. An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zima Endre

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A satisfactory neurologic outcome is the key factor for survival in patients with sudden cardiac death (SCD, however this is highly dependent on the haemodynamic status. Short term cardiopulmonary resuscitation and regained consciousness on the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC is indicative of a better prognosis. The evaluation and treatment of SCD triggering factors and of underlying acute and chronic diseases will facilitate prevention and lower the risk of cardiac arrest. Long term CPR and a prolonged unconscious status after ROSC, in the Intensive Care Units or Coronary Care Units, indicates the need for specific treatment and supportive therapy including efforts to prevent hyperthermia. The prognosis of these patients is unpredictable within the first seventy two hours, due to unknown responses to therapeutic management and the lack of specific prognostic factors. Patients in these circumstances require the highest level of intensive care and aetiology driven treatment without any delay, independently of their coma state. Current guidelines sugest the use of multiple procedures in arriving at a diagnosis and prognosis of these critical cases.

  2. Dexmedetomidine Related Bradycardia Leading to Cardiac Arrest in a Dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Y. Chen2, K-S. Chen1,2, K. M. Chang2, W. M. Lee1,2, S. C. Chang1,2 and H. C. Wang1,2

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A 2-year-old, mixed breed female dog (16 kg underwent an exploratory laparotomy following ultrasonographic diagnosis of foreign body and a segment of small intestine intussusceptions. The patient was classified as an ASA II. Ketamine (1mg/kg, IV, and dexmedetomidine (2.5 µg/kg, IV, and morphine (0.6 mg/kg, SC were given as anesthetic premedication. Propofol (0.1 mg/kg, IV titrated to a total amount of 4 ml (2.5 mg/ kg was given for intubation. Asystole was occurred. Cardiac resuscitation was then conducted immediately. Atipamezole (0.1 ml was injected, but showed no response on ECG. Atropine (0.02 mg/kg was then injected, and a second dosage was given. Two-three mins later, the heart rate at 84 beats/min. The NIBP showed 203/132 with MAP 153 mmHg, and the SpO2 showed 95% after the cardiac function was regained. Dexmedetomidine related bradycardia leading to cardiac arrest has been suggested in this case.

  3. A conservative approach to esthetically treat stained arrested caries lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Angari, Sarah S; Hara, Anderson T

    2016-01-01

    Esthetic treatment of stained arrested caries lesions (ACLs) has mostly been done using invasive restorative techniques. The aim of this paper was to propose and report the efficacy of a conservative approach based on dental bleaching to esthetically treat these lesions, both experimentally (extracted teeth) and clinically. In a laboratory experiment, ten extracted human teeth with stained ACLs in either pit and fissure or smooth surface were selected and treated with 15% carbamide peroxide gel, 4 h per day, for a total of 6 days. The second part of the paper reports a clinical case of pit and fissure-stained ACLs in four posterior teeth, which were treated with 40% hydrogen peroxide in-office bleaching. Digital photographs were taken in both parts to document the efficacy of the treatment. The lesions showed noticeable increase in color lightness indicating the efficacy and suitability of the proposed approach. By using the conservative clinical technique presented, the esthetics of most stained ACLs could be improved, eliminating the need for invasive restorative treatments. PMID:27092359

  4. Nitisinone Arrests but Does Not Reverse Ochronosis in Alkaptonuric Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Craig M; Preston, Andrew J; Sutherland, Hazel; Wilson, Peter J; Psarelli, Eftychia E; Cox, Trevor F; Ranganath, Lakshminarayan R; Jarvis, Jonathan C; Gallagher, James A

    2015-01-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is an ultrarare autosomal recessive disorder resulting from a deficiency of homogentisate 1,2 dioxygenase (HGD), an enzyme involved in the catabolism of phenylalanine and tyrosine. Loss of HGD function prevents metabolism of homogentisic acid (HGA), leading to increased levels of plasma HGA and urinary excretion. Excess HGA becomes deposited in collagenous tissues and subsequently undergoes polymerisation, principally in the cartilages of loaded joints, in a process known as ochronosis. This results in an early-onset, devastating osteoarthropathy for which there is currently no effective treatment. We recently described the natural history of ochronosis in a murine model of AKU, demonstrating that deposition of ochronotic pigment begins very early in life and accumulates with age. Using this model, we were able to show that lifetime treatment with nitisinone, a potential therapy for AKU, was able to completely prevent deposition of ochronotic pigment. However, although nitisinone has been shown to inhibit ochronotic deposition, whether it can also facilitate removal of existing pigment has not yet been examined. We describe here that midlife administration of nitisinone to AKU mice arrests further deposition of ochronotic pigment in the tibiofemoral joint, but does not result in the clearance of existing pigment. We also demonstrate the dose-dependent response of plasma HGA to nitisinone, highlighting its efficacy for personalised medicine, where dosage can be tailored to the individual AKU patient. PMID:25940034

  5. Efficiency of Super-Eddington Magnetically-Arrested Accretion

    CERN Document Server

    McKinney, Jonathan C; Avara, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The radiative efficiency of super-Eddington accreting black holes (BHs) is explored for magnetically-arrested disks (MADs), where magnetic flux builds-up to saturation near the BH. Our three-dimensional general relativistic radiation magnetohydrodynamic (GRRMHD) simulation of a spinning BH (spin $a/M=0.8$) accreting at $\\sim 50$ times Eddington shows a total efficiency $\\sim 50\\%$ when time-averaged and total efficiency $\\gtrsim 100\\%$ in moments. Magnetic compression by the magnetic flux near the rotating BH leads to a thin disk, whose radiation escapes via advection by a magnetized wind and via transport through a low-density channel created by a Blandford-Znajek (BZ) jet. The BZ efficiency is sub-optimal due to inertial loading of field lines by optically thick radiation, leading to BZ efficiency $\\sim 40\\%$ on the horizon and BZ efficiency $\\sim 5\\%$ by $r\\sim 400r_g$ (gravitational radii) via absorption by the wind. Importantly, radiation escapes at $r\\sim 400r_g$ with efficiency $\\eta\\approx 15\\%$ (lumi...

  6. Efficiency of Thin Magnetically-Arrested Disks Around Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Avara, Mark J; Reynolds, Chris S

    2015-01-01

    The radiative and jet efficiencies of thin magnetized accretion disks around black holes (BHs) are affected by BH spin and the presence of a magnetic field that, when strong, could lead to large deviations from Novikov-Thorne (NT) thin disk theory. To seek the maximum deviations, we perform general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) simulations of radiatively efficient thin (half-height $H$ to radius $R$ of $H/R\\approx 0.10$) disks around moderately rotating BHs with $a/M=0.5$. First, our simulations, evolved for $108,000r_g/c$ (gravitational radius $r_g$ and speed of light $c$), show that large-scale magnetic field readily accretes inward even through our thin disk and builds-up to the magnetically-arrested disk (MAD) state. Second, our simulations of thin MADs show the disk achieves a radiative efficiency of $\\eta_{\\rm r}\\approx 15\\%$ (after estimating photon capture), which is about twice the NT value of $\\eta_{\\rm r}\\sim 8\\%$ for $a/M=0.5$ and gives the same luminosity as a NT disk with $a/M\\approx ...

  7. The perception of children of elementary education about cardiorespiratory arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariélli Terassi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cardiorespiratory arrest (CRA is a serious situation that occurs frequently in public environments, which makes assistance training of the general population of great importance. The objective was to understand the perception of children on CRA. Qualitative research conducted with children 8-10 years old enrolled in a private elementary school with a constructive proposal. Data collection occurred between the months of October and November 2013 in a recorded collective interview. As a criterion for inclusion students should be enrolled in the institution and accept to participate in the research with the consent of a guardian. Thirty children participated in the study. The students were divided into four groups: 5th year, 4th year, 3rd year A and 3rd year B, with an average of 08 students per group. The interviews were analyzed using the Bardin content analysis methodology. From the speeches, two categories emerged: Child's prior knowledge on CRA and how to act on the event of a CRA. Children associate the event of sudden CRA to a condition in which the heart and/or lungs suddenly stop acting. Seeking emergency assistance was reported as one of the main actions to be taken if a person is unconscious. It was observed that the 5th graders had best prior knowledge about the topic CRA when compared to students in the 3rd year. The thematic approach of CRA in schools contributes to the exchange of experiences, awareness of children and building new knowledge-oriented health education.

  8. Intravenous ranitidine: Rapid bolus can lead to cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamlesh J Upadhyay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a rare case report of a 30-year-old male, who was admitted to the Maxillofacial Surgery Department of the Dental College for a malunited fracture of the mandible and zygomatic bones. He was given oral medications namely, cefixime, metronidazole, ondansetron, and ranitidine for three days prior to the operation with complete normal preoperative workup. He had no significant past medical or family history. On the day of the operation, he was given injectable dexamethasone, cefotaxime, ondansetron, ranitidine, and metronidazole half-an-hour prior to the operation. In less than five minutes of giving a bolus ranitidine injection, the patient developed a cardiac arrest and was resuscitated by the anesthetist team on duty. He was transferred to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU on a ventilator, which was soon removed and the patient was off vasopressors, with stable vitals for 24 hours after the event. He was then transferred to the general ward of Medicine Department and observed for a further two days during which the patient remained uneventful and was finally transferred back to the Dental Department.

  9. Intravenous ranitidine: Rapid bolus can lead to cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Kamlesh J; Parmar, Sarita J; Parikh, Rohan Pravinbhai; Gauswami, Prashant K; Dadhaniya, Nikunj; Surela, Abhilash

    2015-01-01

    This is a rare case report of a 30-year-old male, who was admitted to the Maxillofacial Surgery Department of the Dental College for a malunited fracture of the mandible and zygomatic bones. He was given oral medications namely, cefixime, metronidazole, ondansetron, and ranitidine for three days prior to the operation with complete normal preoperative workup. He had no significant past medical or family history. On the day of the operation, he was given injectable dexamethasone, cefotaxime, ondansetron, ranitidine, and metronidazole half-an-hour prior to the operation. In less than five minutes of giving a bolus ranitidine injection, the patient developed a cardiac arrest and was resuscitated by the anesthetist team on duty. He was transferred to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) on a ventilator, which was soon removed and the patient was off vasopressors, with stable vitals for 24 hours after the event. He was then transferred to the general ward of Medicine Department and observed for a further two days during which the patient remained uneventful and was finally transferred back to the Dental Department. PMID:25969659

  10. A Literature Review Revisiting Phenytoin-Induced Sinus Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsai, Shireen; Hariri, Imad; Taleb, Mohammad; Yoon, Youngsook

    2016-01-01

    Classically, phenytoin (PTN) infusion for the treatment of status epilepticus has been proven to be associated with cardiovascular toxicity, including dysrhythmias, hypotension, and cardiovascular collapse. Subsequently, fosphenytoin (FOS) was introduced on the market in 1997 with claims of having less cardiac toxicity. However, since then, many accounts of cardiac events have been reported undermining these claims. FOS gained popularity due to its water solubility, which allows 3 times faster infusion in comparison with PTN with less venous irritation and local toxicity. FOS is the phosphate ester prodrug of PTN and is rapidly converted to PTN independent of the dose and rate of administration. Intravenous FOS and PTN are bioequivalent. Adverse cardiac effects of both intravenous FOS and PTN have been correlated to the rate of infusion, concentration of the agent, known risk factors, or pre-existing hypersensitivity, and most cases have been identified after infusing a loading dose of these medications. This case report is unique, in that, the patient developed sinus arrest while concurrently receiving oral PTN and intravenous FOS. Clinicians should be more cognizant of the association of FOS and PTN with adverse cardiac events. Baseline electrocardiogram should be obtained on all patients prescribed FOS or PTN to identify underlying cardiac problems that may place the patient in a higher risk category. Telemetry should be performed on all patients receiving PTN in an inpatient setting. PMID:25549077

  11. Cadmium and zinc reversibly arrest development of Artemia larvae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagshaw, J.C.; Rafiee, P.; Matthews, C.O.; MacRae, T.H.

    1986-08-01

    Despite the widespread distribution of heavy metals such as cadmium and zinc in the environment and their well-known cytotoxicity and embryotoxicity in mammals, comparatively little is known about their effect on aquatic organisms, particularly invertebrates. Post-gastrula and early larval development of the brine shrimp, Artemia, present some useful advantages for studies of developmental aspects of environmental toxicology. Dormant encysted gastrulae, erroneously called brine shrimp eggs, can be obtained commercially and raised in the laboratory under completely defined conditions. Following a period of post-gastrula development within the cyst, pre-nauplius larvae emerge through a crack in the cyst shell. A few hours later, free-swimming nauplius larvae hatch. Cadmium is acutely toxic to both adults and nauplius larvae of Artemia, but the reported LC50s are as high as 10 mM, depending on larval age. In this paper the authors show that pre-nauplius larvae prior to hatching are much more sensitive to cadmium than are hatched nauplius larvae. At 0.1 ..mu..m, cadmium retards development and hatching of larvae; higher concentrations block hatching almost completely and thus are lethal. However, the larvae arrested at the emergence stage survive for 24 hours or more before succumbing to the effects of cadmium, and during this period the potentially lethal effect is reversible if the larvae are placed in cadmium-free medium. The effects of zinc parallel those of cadmium, although zinc is somewhat less toxic than cadmium at equal concentrations.

  12. Intravenous ranitidine: Rapid bolus can lead to cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Kamlesh J; Parmar, Sarita J; Parikh, Rohan Pravinbhai; Gauswami, Prashant K; Dadhaniya, Nikunj; Surela, Abhilash

    2015-01-01

    This is a rare case report of a 30-year-old male, who was admitted to the Maxillofacial Surgery Department of the Dental College for a malunited fracture of the mandible and zygomatic bones. He was given oral medications namely, cefixime, metronidazole, ondansetron, and ranitidine for three days prior to the operation with complete normal preoperative workup. He had no significant past medical or family history. On the day of the operation, he was given injectable dexamethasone, cefotaxime, ondansetron, ranitidine, and metronidazole half-an-hour prior to the operation. In less than five minutes of giving a bolus ranitidine injection, the patient developed a cardiac arrest and was resuscitated by the anesthetist team on duty. He was transferred to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) on a ventilator, which was soon removed and the patient was off vasopressors, with stable vitals for 24 hours after the event. He was then transferred to the general ward of Medicine Department and observed for a further two days during which the patient remained uneventful and was finally transferred back to the Dental Department. PMID:25969659

  13. Association of National Initiatives to Improve Cardiac Arrest Management With Rates of Bystander Intervention and Patient Survival After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wissenberg, Mads; Lippert, Freddy K; Folke, Fredrik;

    2013-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is a major health problem associated with poor outcomes. Early recognition and intervention are critical for patient survival. Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is one factor among many associated with improved survival. OBJECTIVE To examine...... temporal changes in bystander resuscitation attempts and survival during a 10-year period in which several national initiatives were taken to increase rates of bystander resuscitation and improve advanced care. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest for which...

  14. Separation of craniopagus Siamese twins using cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermic circulatory arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, D E; Reitz, B A; Carson, B S; Long, D M; Dufresne, C R; Vander Kolk, C A; Maxwell, L G; Tilghman, D M; Nichols, D G; Wetzel, R C

    1989-11-01

    Occipitally joined craniopagus Siamese twins were separated with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermic circulatory arrest. The 7-month-old infants shared a large sagittal venous sinus that precluded conventional neurosurgical approach because of risk of exsanguination and air embolism. After craniotomy and preliminary exposure of the sinus, each twin underwent sternotomy and total cardiopulmonary bypass with deep hypothermia. Hypothermic circulatory arrest allowed safe division and subsequent reconstruction of the sinus remnants. Several unusual problems were encountered, including transfusion of a large blood volume from one extracorporeal circuit to the other through the common venous sinus, deleterious warming of the exposed brain during circulatory arrest, and thrombosis of both pump oxygenators. Both infants survived, although recovery was complicated in each by neurologic injury, cranial wound infection, and hydrocephalus. This case demonstrates the valuable supportive role of cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermic circulatory arrest in the management of complex surgical problems of otherwise inoperable patients. PMID:2682024

  15. Therapeutic Hypothermia and Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in a Child with Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Spurkeland

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurologic outcomes following pediatric cardiac arrest are consistently poor. Early initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation has been shown to have positive effects on both survival to hospital discharge, and improved neurological outcomes after cardiac arrest. Additionally, the use of therapeutic hypothermia may improve survival in pediatric cardiac arrest patients admitted to the intensive care unit. We report a child with congenital hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, in whom the early initiation of effective prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation and subsequent administration of therapeutic hypothermia contributed to a positive outcome with no gross neurologic sequelae. Continuing efforts should be made to promote and employ high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation, which likely contributed to the positive outcome of this case. Further research will be necessary to develop and solidify national guidelines for the implementation of therapeutic hypothermia in selected subpopulations of children with OHCA.

  16. EU Citizenship and European Arrest Warrant: The Same Rights for All?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Marguery

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In the case Wolzenburg, the principle of non-discrimination of European Union citizens is applied to the European arrest warrant. The implementation of the European arrest warrant by the Member States cannot escape a control of proportional- ity made by the Court. Member States may impose a period of residence of five years to foreign Europeans citizens in order for them to rely on an optional ground for non-execution of a European arrest warrant (Article 4(6 of the Framework Deci- sion on the European arrest warrant. Home nationals are not obliged to comply with a residence requirement. It is possible for Member States to justify an exception to the principle of non-discrimination of European citizens with a legitimate inter- est. The chances of social reintegration of a person convicted constitute such an interest. The national measure resulting in a difference of treatment must be proportional to that interest.

  17. Biofilm Community Dynamics in Bench-Scale Annular Reactors Simulating Arrestment of Chloraminated Drinking Water Nitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annular reactors (ARs) were used to study biofilm community succession and provide an ecological insight during nitrification arrestment through simultaneously increasing monochloramine (NH2Cl) and chlorine to nitrogen mass ratios, resulting in four operational periods (I to IV)....

  18. Arrest of metamorphosis induced by x rays in flesh fly, Sarcophaga peregrina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrest of metamorphosis induced by x irradiation at prepupal stage was studied histologically, and age dependency of radiosensitivity with regard to this effect was examined. Prepupae did not cease their development soon after irradiation, but continued to develop and evaginated the head and the thorax. At this point, development came to a stop. In these animals, not only the histogenesis of imaginal tissues but also the histolysis of larval tissues was arrested. Since the arrest of development was not observed after irradiation at the pupal stage, the effect was considered to result from inhibition of initiation of postpupation development. A possible mechanism of the arrest of postpupation development in the irradiated animals was discussed in connection with the neuroendocrine control of insect development

  19. Temporal differences in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest incidence and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagai, Akshay; McNally, Bryan F.; Al-Khatib, Sana M.;

    2013-01-01

    Understanding temporal differences in the incidence and outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) has important implications for developing preventative strategies and optimizing systems for OHCA care....

  20. Optimizing Neurologically Intact Survival from Sudden Cardiac Arrest: A Call to Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M. Goodloe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The U.S. national out-of-hospital and in-hospital cardiac arrest survival rates, although improving recently, have remained suboptimal despite the collective efforts of individuals, communities, and professional societies. Only until very recently, and still with inconsistency, has focus been placed specifically on survival with pre-arrest neurologic function. The reality of current approaches to sudden cardiac arrest is that they are often lacking an integrative, multi-disciplinary approach, and without deserved funding and outcome analysis. In this manuscript, a multidisciplinary group of authors propose practice, process, technology, and policy initiatives to improve cardiac arrest survival with a focus on neurologic function. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(7:-0.

  1. Hospital discharge diagnoses of ventricular arrhythmias and cardiac arrest were useful for epidemiologic research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Bruin, M L; van Hemel, N M; Leufkens, H G M;

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We investigated the validity of hospital discharge diagnosis regarding ventricular arrhythmias and cardiac arrest. METHODS: We identified patients whose record in the PHARMO record linkage system database showed a code for ventricular or unspecified cardiac arrhythmias according to codes...

  2. Radiological analyses of France Telecom surge arresters. Study performed for the CGT FAPT Cantal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document reports the radiological characterization of various versions of surge arresters used in the past to protect telephone lines against over-voltages. These equipment, which use various radioactive materials, were assessed by gamma radiation flow measurements, alpha-beta-gamma count rate measurements, dose rate measurements, gamma spectrometry analyses, tritium emanation test, radon 222 emanation test, smearing. Recommendations are formulated to manage radioactive surge arresters which are still being operated

  3. Difference of cell cycle arrests induced by lidamycin in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xia; He, Hongwei; Feng, Yun; Zhang, Min; Ren, Kaihuan; Shao, Rongguang

    2006-02-01

    Lidamycin (LDM) is a member of the enediyne antibiotic family. It is undergoing phase I clinical trials in China as a potential chemotherapeutic agent. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism by which LDM induced cell cycle arrest in human breast cancer cells. The results showed that LDM induced G1 arrest in p53 wild-type MCF-7 cells at low concentrations, and caused both G1 and G2/M arrests at higher concentrations. In contrast, LDM induced only G2/M arrest in p53-mutant MCF-7/DOX cells. Western blotting analysis indicated that LDM-induced G1 and G2/M arrests in MCF-7 cells were associated with an increase of p53 and p21, and a decrease of phosphorylated retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein, cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk), Cdc2 and cyclin B1 protein levels. However, LDM-induced G2/M arrest in MCF-7/DOX cells was correlated with the reduction of cyclin B1 expression. Further study indicated that the downregulation of cyclin B1 by LDM in MCF-7 cells was associated with decreasing cyclin B1 mRNA levels and promoting protein degradation, whereas it was only due to inducing cyclin B1 protein degradation in MCF-7/DOX cells. In addition, activation of checkpoint kinases Chk1 or Chk2 maybe contributed to LDM-induced cell cycle arrest. Taken together, we provide the first evidence that LDM induces different cell cycle arrests in human breast cancer cells, which are dependent on drug concentration and p53 status. These findings are helpful in understanding the molecular anti-cancer mechanisms of LDM and support its clinical trials. PMID:16428935

  4. Crack arrest model for a piezoelectric strip subjected to Mode-I loadings

    OpenAIRE

    R.R. Bhargava; Amit Setia

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The present paper aims at proposing a crack arrest model for an infinitely long narrow, poledceramic strip weakened by a finite hairline straight crack when the edges of the strip are subjected to combinedmechanical and electrical loads.Design/methodology/approach: (Model) As a consequence of loads the rims of crack open forming a yieldzone ahead of each tip of the crack. To arrest the crack from further opening the rims of the yield zones aresubjected to normal cohesive quadraticall...

  5. TGEV nucleocapsid protein induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through activation of p53 signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Li [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A and F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); College of Life Sciences, Hainan Normal University, Haikou, Hainan 571158 (China); Huang, Yong; Du, Qian; Dong, Feng; Zhao, Xiaomin; Zhang, Wenlong; Xu, Xingang [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A and F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Tong, Dewen, E-mail: dwtong@nwsuaf.edu.cn [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A and F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China)

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • TGEV N protein reduces cell viability by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. • TGEV N protein induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by regulating p53 signaling. • TGEV N protein plays important roles in TGEV-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. - Abstract: Our previous studies showed that TGEV infection could induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via activation of p53 signaling in cultured host cells. However, it is unclear which viral gene causes these effects. In this study, we investigated the effects of TGEV nucleocapsid (N) protein on PK-15 cells. We found that TGEV N protein suppressed cell proliferation by causing cell cycle arrest at the S and G2/M phases and apoptosis. Characterization of various cellular proteins that are involved in regulating cell cycle progression demonstrated that the expression of N gene resulted in an accumulation of p53 and p21, which suppressed cyclin B1, cdc2 and cdk2 expression. Moreover, the expression of TGEV N gene promoted translocation of Bax to mitochondria, which in turn caused the release of cytochrome c, followed by activation of caspase-3, resulting in cell apoptosis in the transfected PK-15 cells following cell cycle arrest. Further studies showed that p53 inhibitor attenuated TGEV N protein induced cell cycle arrest at S and G2/M phases and apoptosis through reversing the expression changes of cdc2, cdk2 and cyclin B1 and the translocation changes of Bax and cytochrome c induced by TGEV N protein. Taken together, these results demonstrated that TGEV N protein might play an important role in TGEV infection-induced p53 activation and cell cycle arrest at the S and G2/M phases and apoptosis occurrence.

  6. Why Do Increased Arrest Rates Appear to Reduce Crime: Deterrence, Incapacitation, or Measurement Error?

    OpenAIRE

    Steven D. Levitt

    1995-01-01

    A strong, negative empirical correlation exists between arrest rates and reported crime rates. While this relationship has often been interpreted as support for the deterrence hypothesis, it is equally consistent with incapacitation effects, and/or a spurious correlation that would be induced by measurement error in reported crime rates. This paper attempts to discriminate between deterrence, incapacitation, and measurement error as explanations for the empirical relationship between arrest r...

  7. Effect of four resuscitation methods on lung ventilation of pigs with respiratory arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Ya-hua LIU; Xiu-man LI; Li-xiang WANG

    2012-01-01

    Objective To observe the effects of four cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) methods on lung ventilation of pigs with respiratory arrest. The four CPR methods included chest compression CPR (C-CPR), compression under the diaphragm CPR (D-CPR), abdominal compression CPR (A-CPR), and abdominal wall lifting and compression CPR (L-CPR). Methods  A total of 28 healthy domestic pigs were randomly divided into four groups. The pig respiratory arrest model was reproduced by intravenous injection of s...

  8. Establishing the Aus-ROC Australian and New Zealand out-of-hospital cardiac arrest Epistry

    OpenAIRE

    Beck, Ben; Bray, Janet; Smith, Karen; Walker, Tony; Grantham, Hugh; Hein, Cindy; Thorrowgood, Melanie; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Tony; Dicker, Bridget; Swain, Andy; Bailey, Mark; Bosley, Emma; Pemberton, Katherine; Cameron, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a global health problem with low survival. Regional variation in survival has heightened interest in combining cardiac arrest registries to understand and improve OHCA outcomes. While individual OHCA registries exist in Australian and New Zealand ambulance services, until recently these registries have not been combined. The aim of this protocol paper is to describe the rationale and methods of the Australian Resuscitation Outcomes Consort...

  9. Caries remineralisation and arresting effect in children by professionally applied fluoride treatment – a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Sherry Shiqian; Zhang, Shinan; Mei, May Lei; Lo, Edward Chin-Man; Chu, Chun-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Background As a low-cost and easily operated treatment, the use of professionally applied topical fluoride was approved for preventing dental caries and remineralising early enamel caries or white spot lesions. It is also used to arrest dentine caries. The aim of this study is to investigate the clinical efficacy of professional fluoride therapy in remineralising and arresting caries in children. Method A systematic search of publications from 1948 to 2014 was conducted using four databases: ...

  10. Effects of Abusive Parenting, Caretaker Arrests, and Deviant Behavior on Dating Violence among Homeless Young Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Tyler, Kimberly A.; Schmitz, Rachel M.

    2015-01-01

    Though dating violence is widespread among young adult homeless populations, its risk factors are poorly understood by scholars. To address this gap, the current study uses a social learning theory to examine the effects of abusive parenting and caretaker arrests on dating violence among 172 homeless young adults. Results from path analyses revealed that child physical abuse and caretaker arrests were positively associated with engaging in a greater number of school fights, which, in turn, wa...

  11. The Oxygen-Rich Postnatal Environment Induces Cardiomyocyte Cell-Cycle Arrest through DNA Damage Response

    OpenAIRE

    Bao\\xa0N. Puente; Wataru Kimura; Shalini\\xa0A. Muralidhar; Jesung Moon; James\\xa0F. Amatruda; Kate\\xa0L. Phelps; David Grinsfelder; Beverly\\xa0A. Rothermel; Rui Chen; Joseph\\xa0A. Garcia; Celio\\xa0X. Santos; SuWannee Thet; Eiichiro Mori; Michael\\xa0T. Kinter; Paul\\xa0M. Rindler

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian heart has a remarkable regenerative capacity for a short period of time after birth, after which the majority of cardiomyocytes permanently exit cell cycle. We sought to determine the primary post-natal event that results in cardiomyocyte cell-cycle arrest. We hypothesized that transition to the oxygen rich postnatal environment is the upstream signal that results in cell cycle arrest of cardiomyocytes. Here we show that reactive oxygen species (ROS), oxidative DNA damage, and D...

  12. A randomized clinical trial on arresting dentin caries in preschool children by topical fluorides

    OpenAIRE

    Duangthip, Duangporn

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Silver diammine fluoride (SDF) has been found to be effective in preventing and arresting dental caries in children. The annual or semi-annual application of SDF may not be practical in migratory populations or effective high caries risk patients. So far, no data are available about the effectiveness of intensive fluoride treatment in arresting dental caries in primary teeth. Objectives: This study aimed to compare the effectiveness of three topical fluoride application prot...

  13. Local stresses, dyke arrest and surface deformation in volcanic edificesand rift zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. Brenner

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Field studies indicate that nearly all eruptions in volcanic edifices and rift zones are supplied with magma through fractures (dykes that are opened by magmatic overpressure. While (inferred dyke injections are frequent during unrest periods, volcanic eruptions are, in comparison, infrequent, suggesting that most dykes become arrested at certain depths in the crust, in agreement with field studies. The frequency of dyke arrest can be partly explained by the numerical models presented here which indicate that volcanic edifices and rift zones consisting of rocks of contrasting mechanical properties, such as soft pyroclastic layers and stiff lava flows, commonly develop local stress fields that encourage dyke arrest. During unrest, surface deformation studies are routinely used to infer the geometries of arrested dykes, and some models (using homogeneous, isotropic half-spaces infer large grabens to be induced by such dykes. Our results, however, show that the dyke-tip tensile stresses are normally much greater than the induced surface stresses, making it difficult to explain how a dyke can induce surface stresses in excess of the tensile (or shear strength while the same strength is not exceeded at the (arrested dyke tip. Also, arrested dyke tips in eroded or active rift zones are normally not associated with dyke-induced grabens or normal faults, and some dykes arrested within a few metres of the surface do not generate faults or grabens. The numerical models show that abrupt changes in Young's moduli(stiffnesses, layers with relatively high dyke-normal compressive stresses (stress barriers, and weak horizontal contacts may make the dyke-induced surface tensile stresses too small for significant fault or graben formation to occur in rift zones or volcanic edifices. Also, these small surface stresses may have no simple relation to the dyke geometry or the depth to its tip. Thus, for a layered crust with weak contacts, straightforward

  14. Double Bolus Thrombolysis for Suspected Massive Pulmonary Embolism during Cardiac Arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Gerard O’Connor; Gareth Fitzpatrick; Ayman El-Gammal; Peadar Gilligan

    2015-01-01

    More than 70% of cardiac arrest cases are caused by acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or pulmonary embolism (PE). Although thrombolytic therapy is a recognised therapy for both AMI and PE, its indiscriminate use is not routinely recommended during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We present a case describing the successful use of double dose thrombolysis during cardiac arrest caused by pulmonary embolism. Notwithstanding the relative lack of high-level evidence, this case suggests a scena...

  15. THE RACE/ETHNICITY DISPARITY IN MISDEMEANOR MARIJUANA ARRESTS IN NEW YORK CITY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, Andrew; Johnson, Bruce D; Dunlap, Eloise

    2007-01-01

    RESEARCH SUMMARY: This article examines the growth in marijuana misdemeanor arrests in New York City (NYC) from 1980 to 2003 and its differential impact on blacks and Hispanics. Since 1980, the New York City Police Department (NYPD) expanded its use of arrest and detention for minor offenses under its quality-of-life (QOL) policing initiative. Arrest data indicate that during the 1990s the primary focus of QOL policing became smoking marijuana in public view (MPV). By 2000, MPV had become the most common misdemeanor arrest, accounting for 15% of all NYC adult arrests and rivaling controlled substance arrests as the primary focus of drug abuse control. Of note, most MPV arrestees have been black or Hispanic. Furthermore, black and Hispanic MPV arrestees have been more likely to be detained prior to arraignment, convicted, and sentenced to jail than their white counterparts. POLICY IMPLICATIONS: In light of the disparities, we recommend that the NYPD consider scaling back on MPV enforcement and reducing the harshness of treatment by routinely issuing Desk Appearance Tickets when the person is not wanted on other charges, so that most MPV arrestees would not be detained. Furthermore, we recommend that legislators should consider making smoking marijuana in public a violation and not a misdemeanor. Lastly, we suggest ways that NYC could monitor the effectiveness of these policy modifications to assure that the city continues to meet its goals for order maintenance. PMID:18841246

  16. Protein synthetic requirements for caffeine amelioration of radiation-induced G/sub 2/-arrest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiated cells are arrested in G/sub 2/ (transition point [TP] = 32 min before cell selection in mitosis). Irradiated cells do not recover from G/sub 2/ arrest in the presence of cycloheximide (CHM) indicating dependence of recovery on protein synthesis. Irradiated cells in the presence of caffeine progress to mitosis without arrest. The authors investigate whether irradiated cells in the presence of caffeine require protein synthesis to progress to mitosis. Mitotic cell selection was used to monitor the progression of irradiated CHO cells (150 rad) during exposure to 5 mM caffeine and/or 50 μg/ml CHM. Protein synthesis inhibition was confirmed using /sup 3/H-leucine incorporation. Cells exposed to CHM alone are arrested in G/sub 2/ (TP=49 min), thus cells beyond this point have synthesized all proteins necessary for entry into mitosis. In the presence of caffeine, unirradiated cells exposed to CHM are not arrested at all in G/sub 2/, instead arrest occurs near the S/G/sub 2/ boundary (TP=95 min) indicating that caffeine alleviates the dependence of G/sub 2/ cell progression on protein synthesis. However, irradiated cells exposed to both caffeine and CHM are only able to progress to mitosis if beyond the CHM-TP. Irradiated cells in the presence of caffeine thus behave as untreated cells and require protein synthesis for progression to mitosis when prior to the CHM-TP

  17. Sudden cardiac arrest in a patient with epilepsy induced by chronic inflammation on the cerebral surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuxi Liu; Weicheng Hao; Xiaoming Yang; Yimin Wang; Yu Su

    2012-01-01

    The present study analyzed a patient with epilepsy due to chronic inflammation on the cerebral surface underwent sudden cardiac arrest. Paradoxical brain discharge, which occurred prior to epileptic seizures, induced a sudden cardiac arrest. However, when the focal brain pressure was relieved, cardiac arrest disappeared. A 27-year-old male patient underwent pre-surgical video-electroencephalogram monitoring for 160 hours. During monitoring, secondary tonic-clonic seizures occurred five times. A burst of paradoxical brain discharges occurred at 2-19 seconds (mean 8 seconds) prior to epileptic seizures. After 2-3 seconds, sudden cardiac arrest occurred and lasted for 12-22 seconds (average 16 seconds). The heart rate subsequently returned to a normal rate. Results revealed arachnoid pachymenia and adhesions, as well as mucus on the focal cerebral surface, combined with poor circulation and increased pressure. Intracranial electrodes were placed using surgical methods. Following removal of the arachnoid adhesions and mucus on the local cerebral surface, paradoxical brain discharge and epileptic seizures occurred three times, but sudden cardiac arrest was not recorded during 150-hour monitoring. Post-surgical histological examination indicated meningitis. Experimental findings suggested that paradoxical brain discharge led to cardiac arrest instead of epileptic seizures; the insult was associated with chronic inflammation on the cerebral surface, which subsequently led to hypertension and poor blood circulation in focal cerebral areas.

  18. Role of Surface to Volume Ratio of Zinc Oxide Arrester Blocks on the Energy Absorption Capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The functional life of a zinc oxide arrester block is largely dependent on its energy absorption capability. This capability is an important performance characteristic of a lighting arrester which leads to enhanced reliability of a surge protection system. An arrester block is usually cylindrical in shape with two flat surfaces. Injected energy of transient electrical surge into the arrester body is transformed into heat and dissipated through the surface of the disc body. This study has been conducted to observe whether the higher surface to volume (S/V) ratio of an arrester block enhances the capability of energy absorption or not. The round side or C-surface of the cylindrical disc was ground by diamond wheel to transform into hexagonal shape. By making the modification of the geometrical shape an increase of about 11% in S/V ratio was achieved. ZnO arrester blocks of both shapes were tested for energy. The average energy absorption capability for the hexagonal discs was found to be 483 J.cm−3 compared to that of 357 J.cm−3 for the discs having the cylindrical shape. Thus, about 35% increase in energy absorption capability is observed for the hexagonal discs. This knowledge can be useful in designing the geometry of the device for improved functional reliability of electrical system.

  19. Master curve based correlation between static initiation toughness KIC and crack arrest toughness KIa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Historically the ASME reference curve concept assumes a constant relation between static fracture toughness initiation toughness and crack arrest toughness. In reality, this is not the case. Experimental results show that the difference between KIC and KIa is material specific. For some materials there is a big difference while for others they nearly coincide. So far, however, no systematic study regarding a possible correlation between the two parameters has been performed. The recent Master curve method, developed for brittle fracture initiation estimation, has enabled a consistent analysis of fracture initiation toughness data. The Master curve method has been modified to be able to describe also crack arrest toughness. Here, this modified 'crack arrest master curve' is further validated and used to develop a simple, but yet (for safety assessment purpose) adequately accurate correlation between the two fracture toughness parameters. The correlation enables the estimation of crack arrest toughness from small Charpy-sized static fracture toughness tests. The correlation is valid for low Nickel steels ≤ (1.2% Ni). If a more accurate description of the crack arrest toughness is required, it can either be measured experimentally or estimated from instrumented Charpy-V crack arrest load information. (orig.)

  20. Use of Sodium Bicarbonate in Cardiac Arrest: Current Guidelines and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velissaris, Dimitrios; Karamouzos, Vassilios; Pierrakos, Charalampos; Koniari, Ioanna; Apostolopoulou, Christina; Karanikolas, Menelaos

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the review was to summarize the literature over the last 25 years regarding bicarbonate administration in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. A PubMed search was conducted using the terms "bicarbonates" and "cardiac arrest", limited to human studies and reviews published in English (or at least with a meaningful abstract in English) in the last 25 years. Clinical and experimental data raised questions regarding the safety and effectiveness of sodium bicarbonate (SB) administration during cardiac arrest. Earlier advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) guidelines recommended routine bicarbonate administration as part of the ACLS algorithm, but recent guidelines no longer recommend its use. The debate in the literature is ongoing, but at the present time, SB administration is only recommended for cardiac arrest related to hypokalemia or overdose of tricyclic antidepressants. Several studies challenge the assumption that bicarbonate administration is beneficial for treatment of acidosis in cardiac arrest. At the present time, there is a trend against using bicarbonates in cardiac arrest, and this trend is supported by guidelines published by professional societies and organizations. PMID:26985247

  1. Incidence of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, Thomas D; Pearce, Rachel M; Raghunathan, Trivellore E; Lemaitre, Rozenn N; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Jouven, Xavier; Siscovick, David S

    2004-06-15

    Estimates of the incidence of out-of-hospital primary cardiac arrest (CA) have typically relied solely upon emergency medical service or death certificate records and have not investigated incidence in clinical subgroups. Overall and temporal patterns of CA incidence were investigated in clinically defined groups using systematic methods to ascertain CA. Estimates of incidence were derived from a population-based case-control study in a large health plan from 1986 to 1994. Subjects were enrollees aged 50 to 79 years who had had CA (n = 1,275). A stratified random sample of enrollees who had not had CA was used to estimate the population at risk with various clinical characteristics (n = 2,323). Poisson's regression was used to estimate incidence overall and for 3-year time periods (1986 to 1988, 1989 to 1991, and 1992 to 1994). The overall CA incidence was 1.89/1,000 subject-years and varied up to 30-fold across clinical subgroups. For example, incidence was 5.98/1,000 subject-years in subjects with any clinically recognized heart disease compared with 0.82/1,000 subject-years in subjects without heart disease. In subgroups with heart disease, incidence was 13.69/1,000 subject-years in subjects with prior myocardial infarction and 21.87/1,000 subject-years in subjects with heart failure. Risk decreased by 20% from the initial to the final time period, with a greater decrease observed in those with (25%) compared with those without (12%) clinical heart disease. Thus, CA incidence varied considerably across clinical groups. The results provide insights regarding absolute and population-attributable risk in clinically defined subgroups, information that may aid strategies aimed at reducing mortality from CA. PMID:15194012

  2. Mechanisms involved in alternariol-induced cell cycle arrest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alternariol (AOH), a mycotoxin produced by Alternaria sp, is often found as a contaminant in fruit and cereal products. Here we employed the murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 to test the hypothesis that AOH causes toxicity as a response to DNA damage. AOH at concentrations of 15–30 μM almost completely blocked cell proliferation. Within 30 min treatment, AOH (30 μM) significantly increased the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, DNA base oxidations as well as DNA strand breaks and/or alkaline labile sites were detected by the comet assay after 2 h exposure of AOH. Cell death (mostly necrosis) was observed after prolonged exposure to the highest concentration of AOH (60 μM for 24 and 48 h) in our study. The DNA damage response involved phosphorylation (activation) of histone H2AX and check point kinase-1- and 2 (Chk-1/2). Moreover, AOH activated p53 and increased the expression of p21, Cyclin B, MDM2, and Sestrin 2; likewise the level of several miRNA was affected. AOH-induced Sestrin 2 expression was regulated by p53 and could at least partly be inhibited by antioxidants, suggesting a role of ROS in the response. Interestingly, the addition of antioxidants did not inhibit cell cycle arrest. Although the formation of ROS by itself was not directly linked cell proliferation, AOH-induced DNA damage and resulting transcriptional changes in p21, MDM2, and Cyclin B likely contribute to the reduced cell proliferation; while Sestrin 2 would contribute to the oxidant defense.

  3. Mechanisms involved in alternariol-induced cell cycle arrest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solhaug, A., E-mail: Anita.Solhaug@vetinst.no [Norwegian Veterinary Institute, Oslo (Norway); Vines, L.L. [Michigan State University, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, East Lansing, MI (United States); Ivanova, L.; Spilsberg, B. [Norwegian Veterinary Institute, Oslo (Norway); Holme, J.A. [Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Division of Environmental Medicine, Oslo (Norway); Pestka, J. [Michigan State University, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, East Lansing, MI (United States); Collins, A. [University of Oslo, Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, Oslo (Norway); Eriksen, G.S. [Norwegian Veterinary Institute, Oslo (Norway)

    2012-10-15

    Alternariol (AOH), a mycotoxin produced by Alternaria sp, is often found as a contaminant in fruit and cereal products. Here we employed the murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 to test the hypothesis that AOH causes toxicity as a response to DNA damage. AOH at concentrations of 15-30 {mu}M almost completely blocked cell proliferation. Within 30 min treatment, AOH (30 {mu}M) significantly increased the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, DNA base oxidations as well as DNA strand breaks and/or alkaline labile sites were detected by the comet assay after 2 h exposure of AOH. Cell death (mostly necrosis) was observed after prolonged exposure to the highest concentration of AOH (60 {mu}M for 24 and 48 h) in our study. The DNA damage response involved phosphorylation (activation) of histone H2AX and check point kinase-1- and 2 (Chk-1/2). Moreover, AOH activated p53 and increased the expression of p21, Cyclin B, MDM2, and Sestrin 2; likewise the level of several miRNA was affected. AOH-induced Sestrin 2 expression was regulated by p53 and could at least partly be inhibited by antioxidants, suggesting a role of ROS in the response. Interestingly, the addition of antioxidants did not inhibit cell cycle arrest. Although the formation of ROS by itself was not directly linked cell proliferation, AOH-induced DNA damage and resulting transcriptional changes in p21, MDM2, and Cyclin B likely contribute to the reduced cell proliferation; while Sestrin 2 would contribute to the oxidant defense.

  4. Snake constriction rapidly induces circulatory arrest in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boback, Scott M; McCann, Katelyn J; Wood, Kevin A; McNeal, Patrick M; Blankenship, Emmett L; Zwemer, Charles F

    2015-07-01

    As legless predators, snakes are unique in their ability to immobilize and kill their prey through the process of constriction, and yet how this pressure incapacitates and ultimately kills the prey remains unknown. In this study, we examined the cardiovascular function of anesthetized rats before, during and after being constricted by boas (Boa constrictor) to examine the effect of constriction on the prey's circulatory function. The results demonstrate that within 6 s of being constricted, peripheral arterial blood pressure (PBP) at the femoral artery dropped to 1/2 of baseline values while central venous pressure (CVP) increased 6-fold from baseline during the same time. Electrocardiographic recordings from the anesthetized rat's heart revealed profound bradycardia as heart rate (fH) dropped to nearly half of baseline within 60 s of being constricted, and QRS duration nearly doubled over the same time period. By the end of constriction (mean 6.5±1 min), rat PBP dropped 2.9-fold, fH dropped 3.9-fold, systemic perfusion pressure (SPP=PBP-CVP) dropped 5.7-fold, and 91% of rats (10 of 11) had evidence of cardiac electrical dysfunction. Blood drawn immediately after constriction revealed that, relative to baseline, rats were hyperkalemic (serum potassium levels nearly doubled) and acidotic (blood pH dropped from 7.4 to 7.0). These results are the first to document the physiological response of prey to constriction and support the hypothesis that snake constriction induces rapid prey death due to circulatory arrest. PMID:26202779

  5. The Arrested Black Men in Europe: Criminal or Victim?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Platzer

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The Africans detained in Austria have been targeted by police by their skin color, often are arrested with violence, are poorly defended by assigned defense lawyers, given longer sentences than Austrian citizens and have less access to alternatives or bail.A modified form of the United Nations Crime Victim questionnaire was administered to all the African prisoners at the Vienna’s Central Detention Facility. It revealed that the Africans were not only victims of violence (sometimes even torture and crimes (assault-58%, burglary-32%, fraud-27%, bribery-33% in their home countries, but also 24 percent had experienced assault, 16% theft, and 13% had been defrauded in Austria-much higher rates than the EU citizen. On the other hand, the Africans are rarely charged with burglary, robbery, or violent crimes. They are primarily arrested for the possession or sale of narcotic drugs (83% and an additional four percent for resisting arrest. This is primarily the result of insufficient financial support provided to asylum seekers and the prohibition to work pending their determination of immigrant status. Because of the long appeal processes and the practical impossibility of deporting certain nationalities, a type of underground community is taking root where simple survival is the determining factor whether to commit a non-violent offence. Les Africains détenus en Autriche sont visés par la police à cause de la couleur de leur peau; ils sont souvent arrêtés avec violence, sont mal défendus par leurs avocats de défense, doivent passer de plus longues périodes en prison que des citoyens autrichiens ayant commis un crime pareil, et ils ont moins d'accès aux mesures extrajudiciaires et au système de liberté sous caution. Une forme modifiée du questionnaire de victimes de crime des Nations Unies fut administrée à tous les prisonniers africains au Service Central de la Détention de Vienne. Les résultats indiquèrent que les Africains furent

  6. Clinical investigation: thyroid function test abnormalities in cardiac arrest associated with acute coronary syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iltumur, Kenan; Olmez, Gonul; Arıturk, Zuhal; Taskesen, Tuncay; Toprak, Nizamettin

    2005-01-01

    Introduction It is known that thyroid homeostasis is altered during the acute phase of cardiac arrest. However, it is not clear under what conditions, how and for how long these alterations occur. In the present study we examined thyroid function tests (TFTs) in the acute phase of cardiac arrest caused by acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and at the end of the first 2 months after the event. Method Fifty patients with cardiac arrest induced by ACS and 31 patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) who did not require cardioversion or cardiopulmonary resuscitation were enrolled in the study, as were 40 healthy volunteers. The patients were divided into three groups based on duration of cardiac arrest (10 min). Blood samples were collected for thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), tri-iodothyronine (T3), free T3, thyroxine (T4), free T4, troponin-I and creatine kinase-MB measurements. The blood samples for TFTs were taken at 72 hours and at 2 months after the acute event in the cardiac arrest and AMI groups, but only once in the control group. Results The T3 and free T3 levels at 72 hours in the cardiac arrest group were significantly lower than in both the AMI and control groups (P 0.05). At the 2-month evaluation, a dramatic improvement was observed in T3 and free T3 levels in the cardiac arrest group (P < 0.0001). In those patients whose cardiac arrest duration was in excess of 10 min, levels of T3, free T3, T4 and TSH were significantly lower than those in patients whose cardiac arrest duration was under 5 min (P < 0.001, P < 0.001, P < 0.005 and P < 0.05, respectively). Conclusion TFTs are significantly altered in cardiac arrest induced by ACS. Changes in TFTs are even more pronounced in patients with longer periods of resuscitation. The changes in the surviving patients were characterized by euthyroid sick syndrome, and this improved by 2 months in those patients who did not progress into a vegetative state. PMID:16137355

  7. The Principle of Proportionality and the European Arrest Warrant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Haggenmüller

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The European Arrest Warrant (EAW is a grossly coercive instrument that was designed for the persecution of serious cross-border crimes. In recent years, however, Member States have increasingly reported cases in which EAWs have not been issued for serious, but rather for harmless and minor offences. This article analyses the reasons behind the disproportionate use of the EAW and outlines measures to alleviate the problem. Thereby, it claims that in current debates different categories of disproportionate use of EAWs are often lumped together, and only concentrate on the introduction of a (binding proportionality test, failing to consider other alternative legislative solutions regarding minor crimes, such as the introduction of new comparable and effective alternative measures. These, however, are considered to be crucial for an alleviation of disproportionate warrants. La orden de detención europea (ODE es un instrumento extremadamente coercitivo que fue diseñado para la persecución de delitos transfronterizos graves. En años recientes, sin embargo, los Estados miembro han notificado cada vez más casos en los que la ODE no se debía a delitos serios, sino a casos menores e inofensivos.. En este artículo se analizan las razones que hay detrás del uso desproporcionado de la orden de detención europea y propone medidas para paliar el problema. De esta manera, se defiende que el debate actual, frecuentemente agrupan diferentes categorías de uso desproporcionado de la ODE, y sólo se concentran en la introducción de un test de proporcionalidad (vinculante, sin tener en cuenta otras soluciones legislativas alternativas, en lo que respecta a delitos menores, como la introducción de nuevas medidas alternativas, comparables y eficaces. Sin embargo, se considera que estas medidas son cruciales para reducir las órdenes de arresto desproporcionadas. DOWNLOAD THIS PAPER FROM SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2200874

  8. Cell cycle arrest and cell survival induce reverse trends of cardiolipin remodeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jen Chao

    Full Text Available Cell survival from the arrested state can be a cause of the cancer recurrence. Transition from the arrest state to the growth state is highly regulated by mitochondrial activity, which is related to the lipid compositions of the mitochondrial membrane. Cardiolipin is a critical phospholipid for the mitochondrial integrity and functions. We examined the changes of cardiolipin species by LC-MS in the transition between cell cycle arrest and cell reviving in HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells. We have identified 41 cardiolipin species by MS/MS and semi-quantitated them to analyze the detailed changes of cardiolipin species. The mass spectra of cardiolipin with the same carbon number form an envelope, and the C64, C66, C68, C70 C72 and C74 envelopes in HT1080 cells show a normal distribution in the full scan mass spectrum. The cardiolipin quantity in a cell decreases while entering the cell cycle arrest, but maintains at a similar level through cell survival. While cells awakening from the arrested state and preparing itself for replication, the groups with short acyl chains, such as C64, C66 and C68 show a decrease of cardiolipin percentage, but the groups with long acyl chains, such as C70 and C72 display an increase of cardiolipin percentage. Interestingly, the trends of the cardiolipin species changes during the arresting state are completely opposite to cell growing state. Our results indicate that the cardiolipin species shift from the short chain to long chain cardiolipin during the transition from cell cycle arrest to cell progression.

  9. The Effects of Local Police Surges on Crime and Arrests in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, John; Fagan, Jeffrey; Geller, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    The New York Police Department (NYPD) under Operation Impact deployed extra police officers to high crime areas designated as impact zones. Officers were encouraged to conduct investigative stops in these areas. City officials credited the program as one of the leading causes of New York City's low crime rate. We tested the effects of Operation Impact on reported crimes and arrests from 2004 to 2012 using a difference-in-differences approach. We used Poisson regression models to compare differences in crime and arrest counts before and after census block groups were designated as impact zones compared to census block groups in the same NYPD precincts but outside impact zones. Impact zones were significantly associated with reductions in total reported crimes, assaults, burglaries, drug violations, misdemeanor crimes, felony property crimes, robberies, and felony violent crimes. Impact zones were significantly associated with increases in total reported arrests, arrests for burglary, arrests for weapons, arrests for misdemeanor crimes, and arrests for property felony crimes. Impact zones were also significantly associated with increases in investigative stops for suspected crimes, but only the increase in stops made based on probable cause indicators of criminal behaviors were associated with crime reductions. The largest increase in investigative stops in impact zones was based on indicators of suspicious behavior that had no measurable effect on crime. The findings suggest that saturating high crime blocks with police helped reduce crime in New York City, but that the bulk of the investigative stops did not play an important role in the crime reductions. The findings indicate that crime reduction can be achieved with more focused investigative stops. PMID:27310252

  10. The Effects of Local Police Surges on Crime and Arrests in New York City.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John MacDonald

    Full Text Available The New York Police Department (NYPD under Operation Impact deployed extra police officers to high crime areas designated as impact zones. Officers were encouraged to conduct investigative stops in these areas. City officials credited the program as one of the leading causes of New York City's low crime rate. We tested the effects of Operation Impact on reported crimes and arrests from 2004 to 2012 using a difference-in-differences approach. We used Poisson regression models to compare differences in crime and arrest counts before and after census block groups were designated as impact zones compared to census block groups in the same NYPD precincts but outside impact zones. Impact zones were significantly associated with reductions in total reported crimes, assaults, burglaries, drug violations, misdemeanor crimes, felony property crimes, robberies, and felony violent crimes. Impact zones were significantly associated with increases in total reported arrests, arrests for burglary, arrests for weapons, arrests for misdemeanor crimes, and arrests for property felony crimes. Impact zones were also significantly associated with increases in investigative stops for suspected crimes, but only the increase in stops made based on probable cause indicators of criminal behaviors were associated with crime reductions. The largest increase in investigative stops in impact zones was based on indicators of suspicious behavior that had no measurable effect on crime. The findings suggest that saturating high crime blocks with police helped reduce crime in New York City, but that the bulk of the investigative stops did not play an important role in the crime reductions. The findings indicate that crime reduction can be achieved with more focused investigative stops.

  11. The Effects of Local Police Surges on Crime and Arrests in New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, John; Fagan, Jeffrey; Geller, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    The New York Police Department (NYPD) under Operation Impact deployed extra police officers to high crime areas designated as impact zones. Officers were encouraged to conduct investigative stops in these areas. City officials credited the program as one of the leading causes of New York City’s low crime rate. We tested the effects of Operation Impact on reported crimes and arrests from 2004 to 2012 using a difference-in-differences approach. We used Poisson regression models to compare differences in crime and arrest counts before and after census block groups were designated as impact zones compared to census block groups in the same NYPD precincts but outside impact zones. Impact zones were significantly associated with reductions in total reported crimes, assaults, burglaries, drug violations, misdemeanor crimes, felony property crimes, robberies, and felony violent crimes. Impact zones were significantly associated with increases in total reported arrests, arrests for burglary, arrests for weapons, arrests for misdemeanor crimes, and arrests for property felony crimes. Impact zones were also significantly associated with increases in investigative stops for suspected crimes, but only the increase in stops made based on probable cause indicators of criminal behaviors were associated with crime reductions. The largest increase in investigative stops in impact zones was based on indicators of suspicious behavior that had no measurable effect on crime. The findings suggest that saturating high crime blocks with police helped reduce crime in New York City, but that the bulk of the investigative stops did not play an important role in the crime reductions. The findings indicate that crime reduction can be achieved with more focused investigative stops. PMID:27310252

  12. Effect of Multiple Lightning Strikes on .the Performance of ZnOLightning Arrester Block%Effect of Multiple Lightning Strikes on .the Performance of ZnOLightning Arrester Block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haryono T; Sirait K T; Tumiran; Hamzah Berahim

    2011-01-01

    A lightning arrester is used for electrical equipment protection against damage due to lightning strikes. One example of protected electrical equipment is electrical power transformer. If there is no lightning arrester installed to the transformer, when a lightning strike happens, it may receive a very high lightning overvoltage, which is certainly resulted in the transformer damage at its insulation. Usually, a lightning arrester specification data attached to a light- ning arrester contains the rating data of the lightning arrester current and voltage. In the use of lightning arrester, the possibility of receiving multiple lightning strikes is not taken into account sometimes. In fact, in some places, the number of multiple strikes in short duration is quiet high in number. This condition makes the lightning arrester being stroked by multiple lightning strikes. Therefore, it may change the lightning arrester's properties, and then the arrester may not be able to provide good electrical equipment protection against lightning strike anymore. This condition will result in great loss to electrical companies and electrical consumers. Therefore, this research studied the effect of applying multiple lightning strikes to ZnO lightning arrester block. Every time a group of lightning impulse current is applied to the ZnO lightning arrester block, it is followed by the measuring of its 50 Hz voltage and current characteristic. The changing in the ZnO lightning arrester block 50 Hz characteristic then can be analyzed. It was found that by applying more numbers of lightning strikes which made the arrester becoming worse, even though, actually, the lightning impulse peak current was still under the rating of the lightning arrester current. In this ease for a 5 kA, 24 kV lightning arrester, even though the lightning impulse peak current flowing through the ZnO lightning arrester block was still 2500 A, the lightning arrester ZnO block had already been damaged. Having been

  13. Potential for the G2/M arrest assay to predict patient susceptibility to severe reactions following radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, A.; Grabenbauer, G.G.; Sauer, R.; Distel, L.V.R. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Friedrich Alexander Univ. Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany); Sprung, C.N. [Div. of Research, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, and Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Melbourne Univ., VIC (Australia)

    2007-02-15

    Background and purpose: cell-cycle regulation and checkpoint activation are crucial factors for radiation-induced DNA damage processing. The G2/M phase arrest was assessed in lymphoblastoid cell lines and phytohemagglutinin-stimulated T-lymphocytes of different radiosensitivities to study the relationship of G2/M arrest to radiosensitivity. Material and methods: G2/M arrest was analyzed after in vitro irradiation by 2 and 5 Gy of ionizing radiation up to 6 days using 17 lymphoblastoid cell lines from healthy individuals, ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) patients, Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) patients and cancer patients with clinically increased radiosensitivity. In a second approach, phytohemagglutinin-stimulated T-lymphocytes from 15 healthy individuals, twelve cancer patients, and five cancer patients hypersensitive to ionizing radiation were studied. Image cytometry was performed to analyze G2/M arrest. Results: two of the three AT cell lines showed markedly increased G2/M arrest compared to controls. NBS cells were comparable to controls up to day 3, but then demonstrated a slightly increased G2/M arrest. Two of the six radiosensitive lymphoblast cell lines and the five radiosensitive cancer patients' T-lymphocytes assayed showed a reduction in G2/M arrest, while healthy individuals showed no difference from cancer patients. Conclusion: the interrelation between G2/M arrest and radiosensitivity is not readily apparent since a variety of radiosensitive cells from patients with radiosensitive syndromes and patients identified as radiosensitive following radiation treatment showed inconsistent G2/M arrest dynamics. Secondary effects, like loss of clonogenicity, G1/S phase arrest and failure of G2/M arrest may contribute to variation of the G2/M arrest endpoint and obscure assessment of cellular radiosensitivity using this method. (orig.)

  14. Structural Characterization of RNA Polymerase II Complexes Arrested by a Cyclobutane Pyrimidine Dimer in the Transcribed Strand of Template DNA*

    OpenAIRE

    Tornaletti, Silvia; Reines, Daniel; Hanawalt, Philip C.

    1999-01-01

    We have characterized the properties of immunopurified transcription complexes arrested at a specifically located cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) using enzymatic probes and an in vitro transcription system with purified RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) and initiation factors. To help understand how RNAP II distinguishes between a natural impediment and a lesion in the DNA to initiate a repair event, we have compared the conformation of RNAP II complexes arrested at a CPD with complexes arrested...

  15. The administration of dextrose during in-hospital cardiac arrest is associated with increased mortality and neurologic morbidity

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Teng J; Andersen, Lars W.; Saindon, Brian Z.; Giberson, Tyler A; Kim, Won Young; Berg, Katherine; Novack, Victor; Donnino, Michael W; ,

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Dextrose may be used during cardiac arrest resuscitation to prevent or reverse hypoglycemia. However, the incidence of dextrose administration during cardiac arrest and the association of dextrose administration with survival and other outcomes are unknown. Methods We used the Get With The Guidelines®-Resuscitation national registry to identify adult patients with an in-hospital cardiac arrest between the years 2000 and 2010. To assess the adjusted effects of dextrose administrat...

  16. Gender differences in street economy and social network correlates of arrest among heroin injectors in Baltimore, Maryland

    OpenAIRE

    Curry, Aaron D.; Latkin, Carl A.

    2003-01-01

    In a sample of 761 heroin injectors in Baltimore, Maryland, correlates of arrest for drug-related and non-drug-related criminal offenses, by gender, were examined. This investigation examined gender differences in involvement in the drug economy and correlates of arrest. Correlates included roles in the street drug economy, social network attributes, and economic and demographic variables. Gender differences were found. Selling drugs was strongly associated with drug-related arrests for males...

  17. DNA damage-induced metaphase I arrest is mediated by the spindle assembly checkpoint and maternal age

    OpenAIRE

    Marangos, P; Stevense, M.; Niaka, K.; Lagoudaki, M.; Nabti, I.; Jessberger, R.; Carroll, J.

    2015-01-01

    In mammalian oocytes DNA damage can cause chromosomal abnormalities that potentially lead to infertility and developmental disorders. However, there is little known about the response of oocytes to DNA damage. Here we find that oocytes with DNA damage arrest at metaphase of the first meiosis (MI). The MI arrest is induced by the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) because inhibiting the SAC overrides the DNA damage-induced MI arrest. Furthermore, this MI checkpoint is compromised in oocytes fro...

  18. Smoking marijuana in public: the spatial and policy shift in New York City arrests, 1992–2003

    OpenAIRE

    Golub Andrew; Johnson Bruce D; Dunlap Eloise

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background During the 1990s, the New York Police Department (NYPD) greatly expanded arrests for smoking marijuana in public view (MPV). By 2000, MPV accounted for 15% of all arrests. The NYPD's supporters report this arrest activity is just part of quality-of-life (QOL) policing, which seeks to promote order in public locations by aggressively patrolling for behaviors that offend the general population. The NYPD's critics contend the NYPD has disproportionately targeted poor, black a...

  19. A novel parameter estimation method for metal oxide surge arrester models

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mehdi Nafar; Gevork B Gharehpetian; Taher Niknam

    2011-12-01

    Accurate modelling and exact determination of Metal Oxide (MO) surge arrester parameters are very important for arrester allocation, insulation coordination studies and systems reliability calculations. In this paper, a new technique, which is the combination of Adaptive Particle Swarm Optimization (APSO) and Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) algorithms and linking the MATLAB and EMTP, is proposed to estimate the parameters of MO surge arrester models. The proposed algorithm is named Modified Adaptive Particle Swarm Optimization (MAPSO). In the proposed algorithm, to overcome the drawback of the PSO algorithm (convergence to local optima), the inertia weight is tuned by using fuzzy rules and the cognitive and the social parameters are self-adaptively adjusted. Also, to improve the global search capability and prevent the convergence to local minima, ACO algorithm is combined to the proposed APSO algorithm. The transient models of MO surge arrester have been simulated by using ATP-EMTP. The results of simulations have been applied to the program, which is based on MAPSO algorithm and can determine the fitness and parameters of different models. The validity and the accuracy of estimated parameters of surge arrester models are assessed by comparing the predicted residual voltage with experimental results.

  20. The Practice of Therapeutic Hypothermia after Cardiac Arrest in France: A National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orban, Jean-Christophe; Cattet, Florian; Lefrant, Jean-Yves; Leone, Marc; Jaber, Samir; Constantin, Jean-Michel; Allaouchiche, Bernard; Ichai, Carole

    2012-01-01

    Aims Cardiac arrest is a major health concern worldwide accounting for 375,000 cases per year in Europe with a survival rate of <10%. Therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to improve patients’ neurological outcome and is recommended by scientific societies. Despite these guidelines, different surveys report a heterogeneous application of this treatment. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical practice of therapeutic hypothermia in cardiac arrest patients. Methods This self-declarative web based survey was proposed to all registered French adult intensive care units (ICUs) (n = 357). Paediatrics and neurosurgery ICUs were excluded. The different questions addressed the structure, the practical modalities of therapeutic hypothermia and the use of prognostic factors in patients admitted after cardiac arrest. Results One hundred and thirty-two out of 357 ICUs (37%) answered the questionnaire. Adherence to recommendations regarding the targeted temperature and hypothermia duration were 98% and 94% respectively. Both guidelines were followed in 92% ICUs. During therapeutic hypothermia, sedative drugs were given in 99% ICUs, mostly midazolam (77%) and sufentanil (59%). Neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBA) were used in 97% ICUs, mainly cisatracurium (77%). Numerous prognostic factors were used after cardiac arrest such as clinical factors (95%), biomarkers (53%), electroencephalography (78%) and evoked potentials (35%). Conclusions In France, adherence to recommendations for therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest is higher than those previously reported in other countries. Numerous prognostic factors are widely used even if their reliability remains controversial. PMID:23049783

  1. Main Complications of Mild Induced Hypothermia after Cardiac Arrest: A Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Soleimanpour

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to assess the complications of mild induced hypothermia (MIH in patients with cardiac arrest. Presently, based on the guidelines of the American heart Association, MIH following successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR in unconscious adult patients due to ventricular fibrillation (VF with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OOHCA is essential and required. However, MIH could be associated with complications in Patients with cardiac arrest. Studies conducted on the precautions and care following cardiac arrest and MIH were included. Valid scientific data bases were used for data collection. The obtained results from different studies revealed that mild MIH could be associated with numerous complications and the knowledge and awareness of the medical staff from the complications is required to guarantee successful therapeutic approaches in MIH following cardiac arrest which is a novel medical facility with different styles and complications. Overall, further future studies are required to improve the quality of MIH, to increase survival and to decrease complications rates.

  2. Management of survivors of cardiac arrest - the importance of genetic investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Peter J; Dagradi, Federica

    2016-09-01

    Management of survivors of cardiac arrest is largely based on a traditional approach. However, during the past decade, arrhythmias of genetic origin have increasingly been recognized as contributing to many more cases than previously appreciated. This realization is forcing physicians managing the survivors of cardiac arrest also to consider family members. In this Perspectives article, we examine the appropriate management approaches for survivors of cardiac arrests related to channelopathies, cardiomyopathies, or ischaemic heart disease, and for their families. Important implications for families of individuals who have experienced sudden cardiac death as part of sudden infant death syndrome or during sport activity are also discussed. Congenital long QT syndrome provides a paradigm of the logical sequence of the steps that should be performed. When a diagnosis of the cause of the cardiac arrest is certain or probable, every effort should be made to identify the genetic basis of disease, because this approach will enable the identification and early protection of similarly affected family members. Accordingly, the availability in hospitals of at least one cardiologist with cardiovascular genetics expertise would improve the management of survivors of cardiac arrest as well as of their families. PMID:27383078

  3. Dimensional study of the dynamical arrest in a random Lorentz gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yuliang; Charbonneau, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    The random Lorentz gas (RLG) is a minimal model for transport in heterogeneous media. Upon increasing the obstacle density, it exhibits a growing subdiffusive transport regime and then a dynamical arrest. Here, we study the dimensional dependence of the dynamical arrest, which can be mapped onto the void percolation transition for Poisson-distributed point obstacles. We numerically determine the arrest in dimensions d=2-6. Comparison of the results with standard mode-coupling theory reveals that the dynamical theory prediction grows increasingly worse with d. In an effort to clarify the origin of this discrepancy, we relate the dynamical arrest in the RLG to the dynamic glass transition of the infinite-range Mari-Kurchan-model glass former. Through a mixed static and dynamical analysis, we then extract an improved dimensional scaling form as well as a geometrical upper bound for the arrest. The results suggest that understanding the asymptotic behavior of the random Lorentz gas may be key to surmounting fundamental difficulties with the mode-coupling theory of glasses. PMID:25974497

  4. STUDY ON SURGE ARRESTER PERFORMANCE DUE TO LIGHTNING STROKE IN 20 KV DISTRIBUTION LINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agung Warsito

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Electric energy has been transmiting from power station to end user with transmission and distribution lines.Lightning strokes are problems that occure in transmission and distribution lines and make them fault when theelectric energy were transmited. Surge Diverter or Lightning Arrester has been installing to reduce these faults.In this paper the simulation of lightning stroke and lightning arrester performance on distribution lines 20 kVwere done using EMTP (Electromagnetic Transient Program. Some parameters such us impuls voltage andincreasing voltage on distribution line was inverstigated. As case study in this simulation, Mojosongo 1 mainfeeder 20 kV three phase lines were used.The simulation results show that the lightning stroke 20 kA in By1-61-61E-84-9I on S phase at 0,1 ms, makevoltage on S phase was increased about 1,3054 MV. For R phase and T phase will increase of induced voltagewere 0.79539 MV and 0.80484 MV. We also show the performance of MOV Arrester (Metal Oxide Varistor inovercoming lightning stroke trouble, where arrester can decrease voltage up to 15.198 kV on S phase, while atR phase and T phase arrester can decrease voltage up to 11.375 kV and 13.616 kV.

  5. [Ability of typical greenery shrubs of Beijing to adsorb and arrest PM2.5 ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Dan; Wang, Bin; Wang, Yun-qi; Zhang, Hui-lan; Yang, Song-nan; Li, Ang

    2014-09-01

    Four typical types of green shrubs of Beijing (Euonymus japonicus, Buxus microphylla, Berberis thunbergii cv. atropurpurea, Taxus cuspidate cv. nana) were selected to study their capacities in adsorbing and arresting PM2.5 using both field observations and air chamber simulations. Concurrently, in order to analyze the pollution characteristics of Beijing in winter and spring, the PM2.5 concentrations of December 2012 to May 2013 were collected. Experimental results showed that: From the gas chamber experiments, the ability to adsorb and arrest PM2.5 was in the order of Berberis thunbergii cv. atropurpurea > Buxus microphylla > Taxus cuspidate cv. nana > Euonymus japonicus, mainly due to the differences in leaf characteristics; Outside measurement results showed that the ability to adsorb and arrest PM2.5 was ranked as Buxus microphylla > Berberis thunbergii cv. atropurpurea > Taxus cuspidate cv. nana > Euonymus japonicus. Chamber simulation and outdoor observation showed that Buxus microphylla and Berberis thunbergii cv. atropurpurea had strong ability to adsorb and arrest PM2.5; Meanwhile, the slight differences between the chamber simulation and outdoor observation results might be related to plant structure. Compared to tree species, the planting condition of shrub species was loose, and it greened quickly; By analyzing the Beijing PM2.5 concentration values in winter and spring, it was found that the PM2.5 concentration was particularly high in the winter of Beijing, and evergreen shrubs maintained the ability to adsorb and arrest PM2.5. PMID:25518685

  6. A novel program focused on women survivors who were enrolled in a cardiac arrest pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Eyal; Tamis, Jacqueline; Aziz, Emad F; Shapiro, Janet M

    2013-03-01

    The number of cases of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is estimated to be 300,000/year in the United States. Two landmark studies published in 2002 demonstrated that therapeutic hypothermia decreased mortality and improved neurological outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Our institutional pathway for the management of survivors of cardiac arrest stresses teamwork involving multiple disciplines, including cardiology, critical care, nursing, neurology, infectious diseases, physical therapy, social work, and pastoral care. Involvement of the patients' families is critical in the understanding of the process and in the decision making and goals of care when neurological prognosis is poor. In a unique approach, we have included the survivors in the process. Our approach to quality improvement includes a yearly conference incorporating the voices of survivors and families. This conference serves as a means to review our experience, educate clinicians, involve all healthcare providers in the outcome, and provide a model of communication and professionalism to trainees. During review of our experience, we noted the small number of women undergoing therapeutic hypothermia, accounting for only 21% of all patients undergoing this therapy after cardiac arrest. This led to a conference that focused on cardiac disease and cardiac arrest in women. PMID:23411605

  7. Double Bolus Thrombolysis for Suspected Massive Pulmonary Embolism during Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard O’Connor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available More than 70% of cardiac arrest cases are caused by acute myocardial infarction (AMI or pulmonary embolism (PE. Although thrombolytic therapy is a recognised therapy for both AMI and PE, its indiscriminate use is not routinely recommended during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. We present a case describing the successful use of double dose thrombolysis during cardiac arrest caused by pulmonary embolism. Notwithstanding the relative lack of high-level evidence, this case suggests a scenario in which recombinant tissue Plasminogen Activator (rtPA may be beneficial in cardiac arrest. In addition to the strong clinical suspicion of pulmonary embolism as the causative agent of the patient’s cardiac arrest, the extremely low end-tidal CO2 suggested a massive PE. The absence of dilatation of the right heart on subxiphoid ultrasound argued against the diagnosis of PE, but not conclusively so. In the context of the circulatory collapse induced by cardiac arrest, this aspect was relegated in terms of importance. The second dose of rtPA utilised in this case resulted in return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC and did not result in haemorrhage or an adverse effect.

  8. Double Bolus Thrombolysis for Suspected Massive Pulmonary Embolism during Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Gerard; Fitzpatrick, Gareth; El-Gammal, Ayman; Gilligan, Peadar

    2015-01-01

    More than 70% of cardiac arrest cases are caused by acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or pulmonary embolism (PE). Although thrombolytic therapy is a recognised therapy for both AMI and PE, its indiscriminate use is not routinely recommended during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We present a case describing the successful use of double dose thrombolysis during cardiac arrest caused by pulmonary embolism. Notwithstanding the relative lack of high-level evidence, this case suggests a scenario in which recombinant tissue Plasminogen Activator (rtPA) may be beneficial in cardiac arrest. In addition to the strong clinical suspicion of pulmonary embolism as the causative agent of the patient's cardiac arrest, the extremely low end-tidal CO2 suggested a massive PE. The absence of dilatation of the right heart on subxiphoid ultrasound argued against the diagnosis of PE, but not conclusively so. In the context of the circulatory collapse induced by cardiac arrest, this aspect was relegated in terms of importance. The second dose of rtPA utilised in this case resulted in return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and did not result in haemorrhage or an adverse effect. PMID:26664765

  9. Reversible cryo-arrest for imaging molecules in living cells at high spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masip, Martin E; Huebinger, Jan; Christmann, Jens; Sabet, Ola; Wehner, Frank; Konitsiotis, Antonios; Fuhr, Günther R; Bastiaens, Philippe I H

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of molecules in living cells hampers precise imaging of molecular patterns by functional and super-resolution microscopy. We developed a method that circumvents lethal chemical fixation and allows on-stage cryo-arrest for consecutive imaging of molecular patterns within the same living, but arrested, cells. The reversibility of consecutive cryo-arrests was demonstrated by the high survival rate of different cell lines and by intact growth factor signaling that was not perturbed by stress response. Reversible cryo-arrest was applied to study the evolution of ligand-induced receptor tyrosine kinase activation at different scales. The nanoscale clustering of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in the plasma membrane was assessed by single-molecule localization microscopy, and endosomal microscale activity patterns of ephrin receptor A2 (EphA2) were assessed by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. Reversible cryo-arrest allows the precise determination of molecular patterns while conserving the dynamic capabilities of living cells. PMID:27400419

  10. Acute right ventricular myocardial injury and sudden cardiac arrest in a patient with persistent spontaneous coronary vasospasm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hung Ming-Yow; Li Ju-Chi; Hao Wen-Rui; Wu Cheng-Hsueh; Hung Ming-Jui

    2011-01-01

    Coronary vasospasm is a rare diagnosis resulting in sudden arrhythmic cardiac arrest. We report a case of a healthy,non-smoking elderly woman resuscitated from arrhythmic cardiac arrest. She had persistent spontaneous coronaxy vasospasm, leading to right ventricular myocardial injury and failure, and shock. She responded quickly to intravenous normal saline bolus infusion, but had irreversible neurological sequelae. Additionally, she had atrial fibrillation preceding ischemic ventricular fibrillation, a rare finding in coronary vasospasm-related cardiac arrest. We suggest immediate coronary angiography of patients in sudden arrhythmic cardiac arrest with acute right ventricular failure for a prompt,accurate diagnosis and appropriate management of the coronary vasospasm.

  11. Disturbances of sensation occasioned by experimental arrest of blood flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Auersperg

    1949-12-01

    Full Text Available Disturbances of sensation in the hand were studied during and after experimental arrest of circulation to the arm. Blockage of circulation was performed as outlined by Lewis and Pochin, by putting the cuff of a sphygmomanometer on the upper arm and bringing the pressure rapidly up to 200 mm/Hg. The experiments listed below were intended to demonstrate the variability of a central reaction brought about by fairly definite disturbances of the ischaemic periphery. All experiments were made on the present writers and repeated on nine other subjects, none of whom had systolic pressure reaching 150 mm/Hg. I - Blockage of circulation in both arms led to symmetrical phenomena in both hands (thermal paresthesias, tingling and hyposthesia, both under symmetrical experimental circumstances, and under the following variations: So long as the cuff pressure on both arms was above the systolic blood pressure, differences as great as 300 mm/Hg in one cuff and 150 mm in the other did not alter the symmetry of the effects. Neither was symmetry and synchronism of paresthesias affected when compression on one side preceded equal compression on the other up to 20 seconds. II - When a punctate pressure is applied to the paresthetic field the paresthesias disappear around that point and the latter is clearly brought out from the indifferent background produced in the area of depressed skin. On the basis of Kugelberg's findings, it seems that this occurs because the impulses caused by pressure have a higher frequency and substitute the spontaneous abnormal discharges of the ischaemic nerve fibers. III - Repeated mechanical stimulation of a fingertip during the experiment failed to show any influence on sensory (touch thresholds, in contrast, therefore, to what would be expected on the basis of the physiologic experiments which show rapid fatigue of ischaemic structures. IV - In contrast to what might be expected from the intense changes undergone by receptors in the

  12. Sudden Cardiac Arrest due to Brugada Syndrome: a Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Soleimanirad

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Brugada Syndrome is a rare cause of sudden cardiac arrest and has a unique ECG pattern. In fact, with ST-segment elevation down sloping in the right precordial leads (v1-v3, RBBB pattern in lateral leads and J-point elevation is revealed. We must notice and avoid trigger factors of this syndrome during general anesthesia. Patient is a 39 old man who attended to emergency department with sudden cardiac arrest and resuscitate. He was transferred to ICU for management of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. Complementary studies concluded the diagnosis of Brugada syndrome. We must consider Brugada syndrome within patients with family history of sudden cardiac arrest. Moreover, we must avoid trigger factors of this syndrome such as fever, bradicardia and electrolyte abnormality (specialy Na, Ca abnormalities during general anesthesia and if they appear, we should treat them.

  13. Arrested pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus mimicking intraosseous lesions of the skull base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrested pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus is a developmental variant that is not always well recognized and is often confused with other pathologies associated with the skull base. This report describes the case of a patient referred for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging for dental implant therapy. CBCT demonstrated a well-defined incidental lesion in the left sphenoid sinus with soft tissue-like density and sclerotic borders with internal curvilinear opacifications. The differential diagnoses included intraosseous lipoma, arrested pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus, chondrosarcoma, chondroid chordoma, and ossifying fibroma. The radiographic diagnosis of arrested pneumatization was based on the location of the lesion, its well-defined nature, the presence of internal opacifications, and lack of expansion. Gray-scale CBCT imaging of the area demonstrated values similar to fatty tissue. This case highlighted the fact that benign developmental variants associated with the skull base share similar radiographic features with more serious pathological entities.

  14. Spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage as a differential diagnosis of pre-hospital cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohil Pothiawala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage is the most common neurological disorder leading to pre-hospital cardiac arrest. ECG changes in SAH may mimic myocardial infarction or ischemia, and thus lead to delayed treatment of the primary problem. Early identification of SAH-induced cardiac arrest with the use of computed tomography scan of the brain obtained immediately after resuscitation will aid emergency physicians make further decisions. The overall prognosis of patients who are resuscitated is extremely poor. But, prompt neurosurgical referral and multidisciplinary intensive care management can improve the survival rate and the functional outcome. Thus, physicians should consider SAH as a differential diagnosis in patients presenting with pre-hospital cardiac arrest.

  15. Effect of caffeine on radiation-induced mitotic delay: delayed expression of G2 arrest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the presence of 5 mM caffeine, irradiated (1.5 Gy) S and G2 cells progressed to mitosis in register and without arrest in G2. Caffeine (5 mM) markedly reduced mitotic delay even after radiation doses up to 20 Gy. When caffeine was removed from irradiated (1.5 Gy) and caffeine-treated cells, a period of G2 arrest followed, similar in length to that produced by radiation alone. The arrest expressed was independent of the duration of the caffeine treatment for exposures up to 3 hr. The similarity of the response to the cited effects of caffeine on S-phase delay suggests a common basis for delay induction in S and G2 phases

  16. Arrested pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus mimicking intraosseous lesions of the skull base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalali, Elnaz; Tadinada, Aditya [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine, Farmington (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Arrested pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus is a developmental variant that is not always well recognized and is often confused with other pathologies associated with the skull base. This report describes the case of a patient referred for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging for dental implant therapy. CBCT demonstrated a well-defined incidental lesion in the left sphenoid sinus with soft tissue-like density and sclerotic borders with internal curvilinear opacifications. The differential diagnoses included intraosseous lipoma, arrested pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus, chondrosarcoma, chondroid chordoma, and ossifying fibroma. The radiographic diagnosis of arrested pneumatization was based on the location of the lesion, its well-defined nature, the presence of internal opacifications, and lack of expansion. Gray-scale CBCT imaging of the area demonstrated values similar to fatty tissue. This case highlighted the fact that benign developmental variants associated with the skull base share similar radiographic features with more serious pathological entities.

  17. Assessment of risks for employees of France Telecom regarding overvoltage arresters containing radio-elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a great number of overvoltage arresters used by France Telecom to protect its telecommunication network against disturbing voltages (notably lightning) contain radio-elements, this report aims at assessing dose levels and associated risks for employees exposed to radioactive overvoltage arrester when setting them up, exploiting installations containing such arresters, or when removing them. After a presentation of these devices, a modelling of activities and geometries is proposed, as well as computation tools. Different scenarios and exposure situations are considered. As far as risks are concerned, after a recall on cancers and ionizing radiation, and on the exposure of France Telecom employees, the report comments the knowledge on radio-induced cancers; notably breast cancer, skin cancer, and mouth and pharynx cancers

  18. Targeted Temperature Management at 33°C versus 36°C after Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niklas; Wetterslev, Jørn; Cronberg, Tobias;

    2013-01-01

    unknown. Our objective was to compare two target temperatures, both intended to prevent fever. Methods In an international trial, we randomly assigned 950 unconscious adults after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of presumed cardiac cause to targeted temperature management at either 33°C or 36°C. The......Background Unconscious survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest have a high risk of death or poor neurologic function. Therapeutic hypothermia is recommended by international guidelines, but the supporting evidence is limited, and the target temperature associated with the best outcome is...... (risk ratio, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.89 to 1.14; P=0.87). The results of analyses adjusted for known prognostic factors were similar. Conclusions In unconscious survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of presumed cardiac cause, hypothermia at a targeted temperature of 33°C did not confer a benefit as...

  19. Utilization of polymer enclosed intermediate class arresters to improve the performance of modern power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper introduces the first commercially available polymer enclosed intermediate class metal oxide surge arrester. It describes the unique construction of the design, including reduced size, increased flexibility, a collared seal on the polymer housing and an open webbed fiberglass-epoxy module which houses the metal oxide disc elements. Performance advantages are discussed. These include improved short term contamination performance of the insulator-like polymer design when compared to multi-unit porcelain housed designs. Data will show that polymer housed open-webbed fiberglass module construction extends the pressure relief capability beyond that of typical porcelain enclosed designs. The capability of the polymer enclosed design to withstand repeated pressure relief tests, simulating system reclose on a failed arrester, is also discussed. This paper discusses the circumstances at one utility which has considered utilizing polymer enclosed intermediate class arresters to effectively upgrade their system protection capabilities

  20. Barriers to recognition of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest during emergency medical calls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alfsen, David; Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Egerod, Ingrid; Lippert, Freddy K

    2015-01-01

    inductive thematic analysis of recordings of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest emergency calls from December 2012. Participants were the callers (bystanders) and the emergency medical dispatchers. Data were analysed using a hermeneutic approach. RESULTS: Based on the concept of data saturation, 13 recordings...... influences the dispatchers' recognition of OHCA, focusing on the communication during the emergency call. The purpose of this study is to identify factors affecting medical dispatchers' recognition of OHCA during emergency calls in a qualitative analysis of calls. METHODS: An investigator triangulated...... of not recognised cardiac arrest and 8 recordings of recognised cardiac arrests were analysed. Three main themes, six subthemes and an embedded theme emerged from the analysis: caller's physical distance (caller near patient, caller not near patient), caller's emotional distance (keeping calm, losing...

  1. Cell cycle arrest by a gradient of Dpp signaling during Drosophila eye development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya Abhishek

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The secreted morphogen Dpp plays important roles in spatial regulation of gene expression and cell cycle progression in the developing Drosophila eye. Dpp signaling is required for timely cell cycle arrest ahead of the morphogenetic furrow as a prelude to differentiation, and is also important for eye disc growth. The dpp gene is expressed at multiple locations in the eye imaginal disc, including the morphogenetic furrow that sweeps across the eye disc as differentiation initiates. Results Studies of Brinker and Dad expression, and of Mad phosphorylation, establish that there is a gradient of Dpp signaling in the eye imaginal disc anterior to the morphogenetic furrow, predominantly in the anterior-posterior axis, and also Dpp signaling at the margins of the disc epithelium and in the dorsal peripodial membrane. Almost all signaling activity seems to spread through the plane of the epithelia, although peripodial epithelium cells can also respond to underlying disc cells. There is a graded requirement for Dpp signaling components for G1 arrest in the eye disc, with more stringent requirements further anteriorly where signaling is lower. The signaling level defines the cell cycle response, because elevated signaling through expression of an activated Thickveins receptor molecule arrested cells at more anterior locations. Very anterior regions of the eye disc were not arrested in response to activated receptor, however, and evidence is presented that expression of the Homothorax protein may contribute to this protection. By contrast to activated Thickveins, ectopic expression of processed Dpp leads to very high levels of Mad phosphorylation which appear to have non-physiological consequences. Conclusions G1 arrest occurs at a threshold level of Dpp signaling within a morphogen gradient in the anterior eye. G1 arrest is specific for one competent domain in the eye disc, allowing Dpp signaling to promote growth at earlier

  2. Surviving Sudden Cardiac Arrest: A Pilot Qualitative Survey Study of Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Kelly N; Brown, Frances; Christensen, Roxanne; Damino, Colleen; Newman, Mary M; Kurz, Michael C

    2016-06-01

    Research describing survivors of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) has centered on quantifying functional ability, perceived quality of life, and neurocognitive assessment. Many gaps remain, however, regarding survivors' psychosocial perceptions of life in the aftermath of cardiac arrest. An important influence upon those perceptions is the presence of support and its role in a survivor's life. An Internet-based pilot survey study was conducted to gather data from SCA survivors and friends and/or family members (FFMs) representing their support system. The survey was distributed to members of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation (SCAF) via the Internet by SCAF leadership. Questions included both discrete multiple-choice and open-ended formats. Inductive thematic analyses were completed by three independent researchers trained in qualitative research methodology to identify primary themes consistent among study participants until thematic saturation was achieved. No statistical inferences were made. A total of 205 surveys were returned over the 5-month study period (July to November 2013); nine were received blank, leaving 196 surveys available for review. Major themes identified for survivors (N = 157) include the significance of and desire to share experiences with others; subculture identification (unique experience from those suffering a heart attack); and the need to seek a new normal, both personally and inter-personally. Major themes identified for FFMs (N = 39) include recognition of loved one's memory loss; a lack of information at discharge, including expectations after discharge; and concern for the patient experiencing another cardiac arrest. This pilot, qualitative survey study suggests several common themes important to survivors, and FFMs, of cardiac arrest. These themes may serve as a basis for future patient-centered focus groups and the development of patient-centered guidelines for patients and support persons of those surviving cardiac arrest

  3. Survival to admission after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Seoul, South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim JH

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Jin-Hue Kim,1 Tai-Hwan Uhm2 1Department of Emergency Medical Technology, Sun Moon University, Asan-si, Chungnam, South Korea; 2Department of Emergency Medical Services, Eulji University, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea Purpose: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA data derived according to the Utstein Style guidelines was used to try to determine factors influencing survival to admission (STA and epidemiological rates of OHCA. Patients and methods: This was an observational study of all age groups based on data from prehospital care reports in Seoul, South Korea. The collected data were reported according to the Utstein Style template for OHCA and analyzed in order to compare STA with non-STA. Univariate analysis was conducted using a binomial logistic regression model to identify predictors associated with trauma patients. Results: Eighty-three (4.8% OHCA survivors were admitted to the emergency department with carotid pulse. The median time from arrest to emergency medical personnel defibrillation was statistically significantly shorter in STA cases (8.0 minutes than in non-STA cases (12.0 minutes; P<0.001. Factors independently associated with better prognosis in terms of trauma patients were female sex (odds ratio [OR]: 0.67; 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 0.50–0.91; P=0.01, arrest at home (OR: 0.36; 95% CI: 0.27–0.49; P<0.001, and witnessed arrest (OR: 2.64; 95% CI: 1.94–3.39; P<0.001. Conclusion: Early basic life support, performed by either a layperson or emergency medical personnel, had a positive effect on STA. Male sex, arrest outside of the home, and witnessed arrest are significantly associated with trauma. Keywords: Utstein Style, prehospital, defibrillation, basic life support

  4. Modeling and Simulation of Arresting Gear System with Multibody Dynamic Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Wenhou Shen; Zhihua Zhao; Gexue Ren; Jiapeng Liu

    2013-01-01

    The arresting dynamics of the aircraft on the aircraft carrier involves both a transient wave propagation process in rope and a smooth decelerating of aircraft. This brings great challenge on simulating the whole process since the former one needs small time-step to guarantee the stability, while the later needs large time-step to reduce calculation time. To solve this problem, this paper proposes a full-scale multibody dynamics model of arresting gear system making use of variable time-step ...

  5. Crack arrest model for a piezoelectric strip subjected to Model loadings

    OpenAIRE

    R.R. Bhargava; A. Setia

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The present paper aims at proposing a crack arrest model for an infinitely long narrow, poled ceramic strip weakened by a finite hairline straight crack when the edges of the strip are subjected to combined mechanical and electrical loads.Design/methodology/approach: (Model) As a consequence of loads the rims of crack open forming a yield zone ahead of each tip of the crack. To arrest the crack from further opening the rims of the yield zones are subjected to normal cohesive quadra...

  6. p53-Induced Growth Arrest Is Regulated by the Mitochondrial SirT3 Deacetylase

    OpenAIRE

    SiDe Li; Michaela Banck; Shiraz Mujtaba; Ming-Ming Zhou; Mary M Sugrue; Walsh, Martin J

    2010-01-01

    A hallmark of p53 function is to regulate a transcriptional program in response to extracellular and intracellular stress that directs cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and cellular senescence. Independent of the role of p53 in the nucleus, some of the anti-proliferative functions of p53 reside within the mitochondria [1]. p53 can arrest cell growth in response to mitochondrial p53 in an EJ bladder carcinoma cell environment that is naïve of p53 function until induced to express p53 [2]. TP53 can...

  7. Cardiac arrest in intensive care unit: Case report and future recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Initiation of hemofiltration in a patient in septic shock can cause hemodynamic compromise potentially leading to cardiac arrest. We propose that the standard ′4Hs and 4Ts′ approach to the differential diagnosis of a cardiac arrest should be supplemented in critically ill patients with anaphylaxis and human and technical errors involving drug administration (the 5 th H and T. To illustrate the point, we report a case where norepinephrine infused through a central venous catheter (CVC was being removed by the central venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH catheter causing the hemodynamic instability. CVVH has this potential of interfering with the systemic availability of drugs infused via a closely located CVC.

  8. Withaferin-A induces mitotic catastrophe and growth arrest in prostate cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Ram V; Suman, Suman; Das, Trinath P; Luevano, Joe; Damodaran, Chendil

    2013-01-01

    Cell cycle deregulation is strongly associated with the pathogenesis of prostate cancer (CaP). Clinical trials of cell cycle regulators that target either the G0/G1 or G2/M phase to inhibit the growth of cancers including CaP are increasing. In this study, we determined the cell-cycle regulatory potential of the herbal molecule Withaferin-A (WA) on CaP cells. WA induced irreversible G2/M arrest in both CaP cell lines (PC3 and DU145) for 48 h. The G2/M arrest was accompanied by upregulation of...

  9. The ATM signaling cascade promotes recombination-dependent pachytene arrest in mouse spermatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarai Pacheco

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Most mutations that compromise meiotic recombination or synapsis in mouse spermatocytes result in arrest and apoptosis at the pachytene stage of the first meiotic prophase. Two main mechanisms are thought to trigger arrest: one independent of the double-strand breaks (DSBs that initiate meiotic recombination, and another activated by persistent recombination intermediates. Mechanisms underlying the recombination-dependent arrest response are not well understood, so we sought to identify factors involved by examining mutants deficient for TRIP13, a conserved AAA+ ATPase required for the completion of meiotic DSB repair. We find that spermatocytes with a hypomorphic Trip13 mutation (Trip13mod/mod arrest with features characteristic of early pachynema in wild type, namely, fully synapsed chromosomes without incorporation of the histone variant H1t into chromatin. These cells then undergo apoptosis, possibly in response to the arrest or in response to a defect in sex body formation. However, TRIP13-deficient cells that additionally lack the DSB-responsive kinase ATM progress further, reaching an H1t-positive stage (i.e., similar to mid/late pachynema in wild type despite the presence of unrepaired DSBs. TRIP13-deficient spermatocytes also progress to an H1t-positive stage if ATM activity is attenuated by hypomorphic mutations in Mre11 or Nbs1 or by elimination of the ATM-effector kinase CHK2. These mutant backgrounds nonetheless experience an apoptotic block to further spermatogenic progression, most likely caused by failure to form a sex body. DSB numbers are elevated in Mre11 and Nbs1 hypomorphs but not Chk2 mutants, thus delineating genetic requirements for the ATM-dependent negative feedback loop that regulates DSB numbers. The findings demonstrate for the first time that ATM-dependent signaling enforces the normal pachytene response to persistent recombination intermediates. Our work supports the conclusion that recombination defects trigger

  10. Prehospital behaviour of patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome or witnessed cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Michael Mundt; Dixen, Ulrik; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Køber, Lars

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study prehospital behaviour of patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome or witnessed cardiac arrest. DESIGN: Structured interview of 250 consecutive patients with acute coronary syndrome and relatives of 48 patients with witnessed cardiac arrest. The following courses of action...... hundred and thirteen patients (45%) knew of thrombolytic therapy. Twenty-seven of 75 patients with knowledge of the benefit of prompt treatment with thrombolysis, acted in accordance with this awareness. CONCLUSION: Patients misinterpret symptoms of acute coronary syndrome and are misguided when calling...

  11. Prehospital therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest--from current concepts to a future standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kämäräinen, Antti; Hoppu, Sanna; Silfvast, Tom; Virkkunen, Ilkka

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to improve survival and neurological outcome after prehospital cardiac arrest. Existing experimental and clinical evidence supports the notion that delayed cooling results in lesser benefit compared to early induction of mild hypothermia soon after return of spontaneous circulation. Therefore a practical approach would be to initiate cooling already in the prehospital setting. The purpose of this review was to evaluate current clinical studies on prehospital induction of mild hypothermia after cardiac arrest. Most reported studies present data on cooling rates, safety and feasibility of different methods, but are inconclusive as regarding to outcome effects. PMID:19821967

  12. Prehospital therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest - from current concepts to a future standard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoppu Sanna

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to improve survival and neurological outcome after prehospital cardiac arrest. Existing experimental and clinical evidence supports the notion that delayed cooling results in lesser benefit compared to early induction of mild hypothermia soon after return of spontaneous circulation. Therefore a practical approach would be to initiate cooling already in the prehospital setting. The purpose of this review was to evaluate current clinical studies on prehospital induction of mild hypothermia after cardiac arrest. Most reported studies present data on cooling rates, safety and feasibility of different methods, but are inconclusive as regarding to outcome effects.

  13. Prehospital therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest - from current concepts to a future standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kämäräinen, Antti; Hoppu, Sanna; Silfvast, Tom; Virkkunen, Ilkka

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to improve survival and neurological outcome after prehospital cardiac arrest. Existing experimental and clinical evidence supports the notion that delayed cooling results in lesser benefit compared to early induction of mild hypothermia soon after return of spontaneous circulation. Therefore a practical approach would be to initiate cooling already in the prehospital setting. The purpose of this review was to evaluate current clinical studies on prehospital induction of mild hypothermia after cardiac arrest. Most reported studies present data on cooling rates, safety and feasibility of different methods, but are inconclusive as regarding to outcome effects. PMID:19821967

  14. The G2-arrest in the BALB/c embryo: relationship with transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One-cell embryos of the BALB/c strain are extremely sensitive to the radiation-induced G2-arrest. Earlier studies suggested that the period of sensitivity to this effect is restricted to the S phase. This point was now studied more in details, using very synchronous embryonic populations and a higher dose of X-rays. The sensitivity towards radiation-induced G2-arrest was also investigated at the two immediately following stages of preimplantation development, i.e. the two-cell and the four-cell stages. (authors)

  15. Technology-facilitated Organized Abuse: An Examination of Law Enforcement Arrest Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janis Wolak

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper looks at cases of organized abuse (that is, two or more offenders working in concert and having two or more victims, not solely familial reported by law enforcement respondents during the three waves of the National Juvenile Online Victimization (NJOV Study (n=29. The NJOV Study collected data from a national US sample of law enforcement agencies about technology-facilitated crimes ending in arrest at three time points: mid-2000 to mid-2001, 2005 and 2009. The paper reports on the prevalence of technology-facilitated organized abuse ending in arrest, contexts of cases and characteristics of offenders and victims. 

  16. The Influence of Electrode Material on Gas-Filled Surge Arresters Response Time in gamma and X radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the influence of electrode material on the gas filled surge arrester' model pulse shape characteristic in gamma and X radiation field. We found that both radiations have increased gas filled surge arresters response time. The obtained results show that the optimal solution for GFSA model is with Al electrodes. (author)

  17. Inhibition of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway induces a senescence-like arrest mediated by p27Kip1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collado, M.; Medema, R.H.; Garcia-Cao, I.; Dubuisson, M.L.N.; Barradas, M.; Glassford, J.; Rivas, C.; Burgering, B.M.T.; Serrano, M.; Lam, E.W.-F.

    2000-01-01

    A senescence-like growth arrest is induced in mouse primary embryo fibroblasts by inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K). We observed that senescence-like growth arrest is correlated with an increase in p27Kip1 but that down-regulation of other cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors, inclu

  18. Distinct Initiation and Maintenance Mechanisms Cooperate to Induce G1 Cell Cycle Arrest in Response to DNA Damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agami, R.; Bernards, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    DNA damage causes stabilization of p53, leading to G1 arrest through induction of p21cip1. As this process requires transcription, several hours are needed to exert this response. We show that DNA damage causes an immediate and p53-independent G1 arrest, caused by rapid proteolysis of cyclin D1. Deg

  19. Gender differences in street economy and social network correlates of arrest among heroin injectors in Baltimore, Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Aaron D; Latkin, Carl A

    2003-09-01

    In a sample of 761 heroin injectors in Baltimore, Maryland, correlates of arrest for drug-related and non-drug-related criminal offenses, by gender, were examined. This investigation examined gender differences in involvement in the drug economy and correlates of arrest. Correlates included roles in the street drug economy, social network attributes, and economic and demographic variables. Gender differences were found. Selling drugs was strongly associated with drug-related arrests for males. Steering (i.e., publicizing drug brands) was highly associated with drug-related arrests for females. Level of heroin addiction was associated with drug-related arrests for males, but not for females. The associations of social network variables with arrests also differed by gender. For females but not males, a higher number of females in one's network was associated with a lower frequency of arrests. For males, having at least one heroin injector in the personal network was associated with a decreased frequency of arrest, while for females the direction of the association was reversed. These findings suggest the importance of modeling drug behaviors by gender. PMID:12930885

  20. Complex Systems Analysis of Arrested Neural Cell Differentiation during Development and Analogous Cell Cycling Models in Carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Baianu, Professor I.C.; Prisecaru, M.S. V

    2004-01-01

    A new approach to the modular, complex systems analysis of nonlinear dynamics of arrested neural cell Differentiation--induced cell proliferation during organismic development and the analogous cell cycling network transformations involved in carcinogenesis is proposed. Neural tissue arrested differentiation that induces cell proliferation during perturbed development and Carcinogenesis are complex processes that involve dynamically inter-connected biomolecules in the intercellular, membrane...

  1. Automated external defibrillators inaccessible to more than half of nearby cardiac arrests in public locations during evening, nighttime, and weekends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Carolina Malta; Wissenberg, Mads; Weeke, Peter;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite wide dissemination, use of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) in community settings is limited. We assessed how AED accessibility affected coverage of cardiac arrests in public locations. METHODS AND RESULTS: We identified cardiac arrests in public locations (1994-2011) in...

  2. Efficacy analysis of intravenous thrombolysis after cardiopulmonary resuscitation for patients with acute myocardial infarction and cardiac arrest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓丽

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical value of intravenous thrombolysis in the treatment of patients with acute myocardial infarction(AMI)and cardiac arrest after cardiopulmonary resuscitation.Methods 120 patients with AMI and cardiac arrest admitted in our hospital from Mar2009 to Mar 2013 were divided into thrombolytic group(n=50)and control group(n=70)according to the

  3. Comparison of different test methods to assess thermal stresses of metal oxide surge arresters under pollution conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report deals with the research conducted by ENEL, the Italian Electricity Board, to assess the performance of zinc oxide surge arresters under pollution condition, with special reference to the consequent thermal stress on internal active parts which can affect the energy handling capabality of the arrester and may lead, in particular conditions, even to thermal runaway

  4. Survival of male patients with spinal cord injury after cardiac arrest in Department of Veterans Affairs hospital: Pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Caruso, MD

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Survivability characteristics after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the population with spinal cord injury (SCI are unclear but may be useful for advanced care planning discussions with patients. Retrospective evaluation from records of all SCI patients over 10 yr at a Department of Veterans Affairs medical center who experienced in-hospital cardiac arrest was performed. Demographic data and other common measurements were recorded. Thirty-six male subjects were identified, and only two patients survived to discharge (5.5% survival rate, both of whom were admitted for nonacute issues and were asymptomatic shortly before the cardiac arrest. The mean age at the time of cardiopulmonary arrest was 62.4 yr, with a mean time from cardiac arrest to death of 3.02 d. No significant demographic parameters were identified. Overall, SCI likely portends worse outcome for acutely ill patients in the situation of a cardiac arrest. Conclusions are limited by sample size.

  5. Location of cardiac arrest in a city center: strategic placement of automated external defibrillators in public locations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folke, Fredrik; Lippert, Freddy; Nielsen, Søren Loumann;

    2009-01-01

    arrests were defined as those with 1 cardiac arrest every 2 or 5 years, respectively. There were 1274 cardiac arrests in public locations. According to the European Resuscitation Council or AHA guidelines, AEDs needed to be deployed in 1.2% and 10.6% of the city area, providing coverage for 19.5% (n=249......: All cardiac arrests in public in Copenhagen, Denmark, from 1994 through 2005 were geographically located, as were 104 public AEDs placed by local initiatives. In accordance with European Resuscitation Council and American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines, areas with a high incidence of cardiac......) and 66.8% (n=851) of all cardiac arrests, respectively. The excessive cost of such AED deployments was estimated to be $33 100 or $41 000 per additional quality-adjusted life year, whereas unguided AED placement covering the entire city had an estimated cost of $108 700 per quality-adjusted life year...

  6. Prolonged cardiac arrest and resuscitation by extracorporeal life support: favourable outcome without preceding anticoagulation in an experimental setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foerster, K; D'Inka, M; Beyersdorf, F; Benk, C; Nguyen-Thanh, T; Mader, I; Fritsch, B; Ihling, C; Mueller, K; Heilmann, C; Trummer, G

    2013-11-01

    State-of-the-art cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) restores circulation with inconsistent blood-flow and pressure. Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) following CPR opens the opportunity for "controlled reperfusion". In animal experiments investigating CPR with ECLS, systemic anticoagulation before induced cardiac arrest is normal, but a major point of dispute, since preliminary heparinization in patients undergoing unwitnessed cardiac arrest is impossible. In this study, we investigated options for ECLS after an experimental 15 minutes normothermic cardiac arrest, without preceding anticoagulation, in pigs. Neurological recovery was assessed by a scoring system, electroencephalography and brain magnetic resonance imaging. Additionally, brain histology was performed on day seven after cardiac arrest. We demonstrated that preliminary heparin administration was not necessary for survival or neurological recovery in this setting. Heparin flushing of the cannulae seemed sufficient to avoid thrombus formation. These findings may ease the way to using ECLS in patients with sudden cardiac arrest. PMID:23827862

  7. Arrested development: early prefrontal lesions impair the maturation of moral judgement

    OpenAIRE

    Taber-Thomas, Bradley C.; Asp, Erik W.; Koenigs, Michael; Sutterer, Matthew; Anderson, Steven W; Tranel, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Atypical moral development is associated with antisocial behavior, but the neural systems required for moral development are unclear. Taber-Thomas, Asp et al. study patients with ventromedial prefrontal cortex lesions acquired during development, and find that such lesions result in arrested moral development, as revealed by an increase in self-interested morality.

  8. European experiences of the proposed ASTM test method for crack arrest toughness of ferritic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proposed ASTM test method for measuring the crack arrest toughness of ferritic materials using wedge-loaded, side-grooved, compact specimens was applied to three steels: A514 bridge steel, A588 bridge steel, and A533B pressure vessel steel. Five sets of results from different laboratories are discussed here. Notches were prepared by spark erosion, although root radii varied from ∝0.1-1.5 mm. Although fast fractures were successfully initiated, arrest did not occur in a significant number of cases. The results showed no obvious dependence of crack arrest toughness, Ka, (determined by a static analysis) on crack initiation toughness, K0. It was found that Ka decreases markedly with increasing crack jump distance. A limited amount of further work on smaller specimens of the A533B steel showed that lower Ka values tended to be recorded. It is concluded that a number of points relating to the proposed test method and notch preparation are worthy of further consideration. It is pointed out that the proposed validity criteria may screen out lower bound data. Nevertheless, for present practical purposes, Ka values may be regarded as useful in providing an estimate of arrest toughness - although not necessarily a conservative estimate. (orig./HP)

  9. Total triterpenoids from Ganoderma Lucidum suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Xie, Zi-ping; Huang, Zhan-sen; Li, Hao; Wei, An-yang; Di, Jin-ming; Xiao, Heng-jun; Zhang, Zhi-gang; Cai, Liu-hong; Tao, Xin; Qi, Tao; Chen, Di-ling; Chen, Jun

    2015-10-01

    In this study, one immortalized human normal prostatic epithelial cell line (BPH) and four human prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP, 22Rv1, PC-3, and DU-145) were treated with Ganoderma Lucidum triterpenoids (GLT) at different doses and for different time periods. Cell viability, apoptosis, and cell cycle were analyzed using flow cytometry and chemical assays. Gene expression and binding to DNA were assessed using real-time PCR and Western blotting. It was found that GLT dose-dependently inhibited prostate cancer cell growth through induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G1 phase. GLT-induced apoptosis was due to activation of Caspases-9 and -3 and turning on the downstream apoptotic events. GLT-induced cell cycle arrest (mainly G1 arrest) was due to up-regulation of p21 expression at the early time and down-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and E2F1 expression at the late time. These findings demonstrate that GLT suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis, which might suggest that GLT or Ganoderma Lucidum could be used as a potential therapeutic drug for prostate cancer. PMID:26489631

  10. Arrested development of sheep strongyles: onset and resumption under field conditions of Central Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Langrová, I.; Makovcová, K.; Vadlejch, J.; Jankovská, I.; Petrtýl, M.; Fechtner, J.; Keil, P.; Lytvynets, Andrej; Borkovcová, M.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 103, č. 2 (2008), s. 387-392. ISSN 0932-0113 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : arrested development * gastrointestinal nematodes * sheep Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.473, year: 2008

  11. 39 CFR 230.4 - Arrest and investigative powers of criminal investigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Arrest and investigative powers of criminal... criminal investigators. (a) Under the authority of 18 U.S.C. 3061, criminal investigators employed by the...) Carry firearms; and (5) Make seizures of property as provided by law. (b) Administrative subpoenas...

  12. A case of sinus arrest caused by opening the mouth under general anesthesia.

    OpenAIRE

    Seo, K; Takayama, H.; Araya, Y.; Miura, K; Someya, G.

    1994-01-01

    We report a case in which transient sinus arrest was observed under general anesthesia. This was associated with opening the mouth and was thought to be caused by a trigeminovagal reflex. The reflex was interrupted by blocking bilaterally the third division of trigeminal nerve.

  13. Dux4 induces cell cycle arrest at G1 phase through upregulation of p21 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Hongliang; Wang, Zhaoxia; Jin, Suqin; Hao, Hongjun [Department of Neurology, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing 100034 (China); Zheng, Lemin [The Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Key Laboratory of Molecular Cardiovascular Sciences of Education Ministry, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Molecular Biology and Regulatory Peptides of Health Ministry, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhou, Boda [The Department of Cardiology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhang, Wei; Lv, He [Department of Neurology, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing 100034 (China); Yuan, Yun, E-mail: yuanyun2002@sohu.com [Department of Neurology, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing 100034 (China)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Dux4 induced TE671 cell proliferation defect and G1 phase arrest. • Dux4 upregulated p21 expression without activating p53. • Silencing p21 rescued Dux4 mediated proliferation defect and cell cycle arrest. • Sp1 binding site was required for Dux4-induced p21 promoter activation. - Abstract: It has been implicated that Dux4 plays crucial roles in development of facioscapulohumeral dystrophy. But the underlying myopathic mechanisms and related down-stream events of this retrogene were far from clear. Here, we reported that overexpression of Dux4 in a cell model TE671 reduced cell proliferation rate, and increased G1 phase accumulation. We also determined the impact of Dux4 on p53/p21 signal pathway, which controls the checkpoint in cell cycle progression. Overexpression of Dux4 increased p21 mRNA and protein level, while expression of p53, phospho-p53 remained unchanged. Silencing p21 rescued Dux4 mediated proliferation defect and cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, we demonstrated that enhanced Dux4 expression increased p21 promoter activity and elevated expression of Sp1 transcription factor. Mutation of Sp1 binding site decreased dux4 induced p21 promoter activation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays confirmed the Dux4-induced binding of Sp1 to p21 promoter in vivo. These results suggest that Dux4 might induce proliferation inhibition and G1 phase arrest through upregulation of p21.

  14. Time-differentiated target temperature management after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Hans; Rasmussen, Bodil S; de Haas, Inge;

    2016-01-01

    24 or 48 hours. Inclusion criteria are: age older than 17 and below 80 years; presumed cardiac origin of arrest; and Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) <8, on admission. The primary outcome is neurological outcome at 6 months using the Cerebral Performance Category score (CPC) by an assessor blinded to...

  15. Out-of-Hospital Perimortem Cesarean Section as Resuscitative Hysterotomy in Maternal Posttraumatic Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Gatti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The optimal treatment of a severe hemodynamic instability from shock to cardiac arrest in late term pregnant women is subject to ongoing studies. However, there is an increasing evidence that early “separation” between the mother and the foetus may increase the restoration of the hemodynamic status and, in the cardiac arrest setting, it may raise the likelihood of a return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC in the mother. This treatment, called Perimortem Cesarean Section (PMCS, is now termed as Resuscitative Hysterotomy (RH to better address the issue of an early Cesarean section (C-section. This strategy is in contrast with the traditional treatment of cardiac arrest characterized by the maintenance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR maneuvers without any emergent surgical intervention. We report the case of a prehospital perimortem delivery by Caesarean (C section of a foetus at 36 weeks of gestation after the mother’s traumatic cardiac arrest. Despite the negative outcome of the mother, the choice of performing a RH seems to represent up to date the most appropriate intervention to improve the outcome in both mother and foetus.

  16. Adverse Childhood Experiences and Arrest Patterns in a Sample of Sexual Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson, Jill S; Socia, Kelly M

    2016-06-01

    Developmental psychopathology theories suggest that childhood adversity can contribute to antisocial conduct and delinquent activities. The purpose of this study was to explore the influence of adverse childhood experiences (ACE) on arrest patterns in a sample of sexual offenders (N = 740). Higher ACE scores were associated with a variety of arrest outcomes, indicating that the accumulation of early trauma increased the likelihood of versatility and persistence of criminal behavior. Rapists of adults had higher ACE scores, lower levels of specialization, and higher levels of persistence than sex offenders with minor victims only. Child sexual abuse, emotional neglect, and domestic violence in the childhood home were significant predictors of a higher number of sex crime arrests. For measures of nonsexual arrests and criminal versatility, it was the household dysfunction factors-substance abuse, unmarried parents, and incarceration of a family member-that were predictive, suggesting that family dysfunction and a chaotic home environment contributed significantly to increased risk of general criminal behavior. Sex offenders inspire little sympathy in our society but may be among those most in need of trauma-informed models of treatment that recognize the influence of early adversity on maladaptive schema and self-regulation deficits related to criminal behavior. PMID:25711615

  17. Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in relation to sex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wissenberg, Mads; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Folke, Fredrik;

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Crude survival has increased following an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We aimed to study sex-related differences in patient characteristics and survival during a 10-year study period. METHODS: Patients≥12 years old with OHCA of a presumed cardiac cause, and in whom resuscitation wa...

  18. Successful management of cold-induced urticaria during hypothermic circulatory arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Anne K; Saha, Tarit; Arellano, Ramiro; Zajac, Andrew; Payne, Darrin M

    2013-11-01

    Cold-induced urticaria (CIU) is a potentially life-threatening immunologic disorder characterized by swelling and edema of exposed tissue in response to a cold stimulus. We describe the successful management of a patient with a history of severe CIU who required coronary bypass and repair of an ascending aortic aneurysm using hypothermic circulatory arrest. PMID:24182476

  19. Teenagers' High Arrest Rates: Features of Young Age or Youth Poverty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Males, Mike A.; Brown, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    The association of more crime with youthful age is widely accepted in social science. However, a literature search revealed no studies of the age-crime relationship that controlled for young ages' economic disadvantage. This research gap is addressed using the California Criminal Justice Statistics Center's arrest detail and Census…

  20. Evaluation of an Innovative Post-Arrest Diversion Program: 12-Month Recidivism Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembo, Richard; Walters, Wansley; Wareham, Jennifer; Burgos, Catherimarty; Schmeidler, James; Hoge, Robert; Underwood, Lee

    2008-01-01

    We report the results of an evaluation study of a diversion program, operated by the Miami-Dade County Juvenile Assessment Center in Florida. The Post-Arrest Diversion (PAD) program represents an innovative approach to treatment and intervention within the juvenile justice system that utilizes standardized psychosocial risks and needs assessment…

  1. Genetic, clinical and pharmacological determinants of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blom, M T; van Hoeijen, D A; Bardai, A;

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a major public health problem. Recognising the complexity of the underlying causes of OHCA in the community, we aimed to establish the clinical, pharmacological, environmental and genetic factors and their interactions that may cause OHCA......-reviewed journals and presented at relevant scientific symposia....

  2. Role of micronised progesterone in maintenance therapy following arrested preterm labor: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gitika Shankar Mishra

    2014-08-01

    Conclusions: We conclude that, maintenance tocolytic therapy with micronised progesterone (400 mg up-to 37 weeks of gestation in patients with arrested preterm labor significantly prolongs the latency period and results in better perinatal outcome. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2014; 3(4.000: 1050-1055

  3. Successful emergency splenectomy during cardiac arrest due to cytomegalovirus-induced atraumatic splenic rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glesner, Matilde Kanstrup; Madsen, Kristian Rørbæk; Nielsen, Jesper Meng Rahn;

    2015-01-01

    A 27-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency department with fever and a petechial rash on suspicion of meningitis. Shortly after arriving she developed cardiac arrest. Blood work up showed severe lactate acidosis, anaemia and thrombocytopenia. A focused assessment with sonography in trauma...... essential for the management and the eventual recovery of the patient....

  4. Sinus bradycardia during hypothermia in comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig; Hassager, Christian; Bro-Jeppesen, John;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bradycardia is a common finding in patients undergoing therapeutic hypothermia (TH) following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), presumably as a normal physiological response to low body temperature. We hypothesized that a normal physiological response with sinus bradycardia (SB) ...

  5. The role of peer arrests on the development of youths' attitudes towards the justice system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Adam; Cavanagh, Caitlin; Donley, Sachiko; Steinberg, Laurence; Frick, Paul J; Cauffman, Elizabeth

    2016-04-01

    During adolescence, youths develop attitudes about the justice system. Although there is consistent evidence that personal experiences with legal actors contribute to attitudes toward the justice system, adolescents' attitudes may also be influenced vicariously through their friends' experiences with the justice system. Using data from a sample of 1,216 first-time male adolescent offenders, the present study examines how attitudes toward the justice system develop over 24 months following the adolescent's first arrest. Even after accounting for personal justice system experiences, including self-reported offending, time on the streets, and contacts with the police, results indicate that adolescents with friends who were arrested report more negative attitudes toward the justice system than those without friends who were arrested. Further, experiencing a friend's arrest has a larger impact on the attitudes of youths who are experiencing it for the first time. We provide evidence that attitudes toward the justice system are a product of accumulated social experiences-both personal and vicarious-with the justice system. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26595702

  6. Evaluation of intensified prehospital treatment in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, F; Nielsen, J R; Gram, L;

    1991-01-01

    form of a test for dementia was assessed in long-term survivors (n = 30) together with 28 patients surviving acute myocardial infarction and 11 control persons. The results of the investigation demonstrate that the more intensive the prehospital treatment of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, the more...

  7. [Heart and vascular surgery interventions with hypothermic circulatory arrest in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipfer, B; Leupi, F; Althaus, U

    1990-10-01

    In the period between 1981 and 1988, 51 patients were operated on the thoracic aorta using the hypothermic circulatory arrest technique. 31 patients had a dissection of the thoracic aorta, in 16 cases, an aneurysm was the reason for the intervention. In addition, we used the hypothermic circulatory arrest for a thrombectomy in the aortic arch and two mitral-valve replacements. The following operations were performed: 14 x composite graft, 19 x supracoronar prosthesis (6 x with aortic valve replacement, 3 x with partial replacement of aortic arch), 17 operations were performed either for aortic arch or aorta descendens replacement. In our retrospective study, 7 courses were fata (14%), 3 patients had complications with residuals. Compared with a group of 105 patients operated on the thoracic aorta in the same period without circulatory arrest, we found no difference with regard to the lethality and morbidity. We conclude that the hypothermic circulatory arrest is a safe technique for selected problems in cardiovascular surgery in adults. PMID:2074178

  8. Airway Delivery of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Prevents Arrested Alveolar Growth in Neonatal Lung Injury in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    van Haaften, Timothy; Byrne, Roisin; Bonnet, Sebastien; Rochefort, Gael Y.; Akabutu, John; Bouchentouf, Manaf; Rey-Parra, Gloria J.; Galipeau, Jacques; Haromy, Alois; Eaton, Farah; Chen, Ming; Hashimoto, Kyoko; Abley, Doris; Korbutt, Greg; Archer, Stephen L.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and emphysema are characterized by arrested alveolar development or loss of alveoli; both are significant global health problems and currently lack effective therapy. Bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) prevent adult lung injury, but their therapeutic potential in neonatal lung disease is unknown.

  9. 4-Formylaminooxyvinylglycine, an Herbicidal Germination-Arrest Factor (GAF) from Pseudomonas Rhizosphere Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new oxyvinylglycine has been identified as a naturally occurring herbicide that irreversibly arrests germination of the seeds of grassy weeds; such as annual bluegrass (Poa annua), without significantly affecting the growth of established grass seedlings and mature plants, or germination of the se...

  10. Cardiac arrest during treatment of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia with intravenous pentamidine isethionate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, U; Berild, D; Nielsen, T L

    1992-01-01

    A 27-year-old man, HIV-positive for 4 years, developed ventricular fibrillation and cardiac arrest during treatment of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia with intravenous pentamidine isethionate. The dosage was 4 mg/kg/day for 18 days. Nephrotoxicity occurred and raised serum potassium. The plasma...

  11. Characterized Discharge Current Waveforms of Metal Oxide Surge Arresters on 77kV Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyachi, Iwao; Yoda, Masayuki; Ueda, Toshiaki; Kanehara, Kazuto

    The behaviors of metal oxide surge arresters installed at substation terminal, generally without spark gaps are well-known by the excellent performances of automatic fault clearance and of reliable overvoltage protection of substation apparatus. As the result of four-year research experiences on the 77kV operating power systems including observed substations T and F halfway between the protection terminals, authors have proved the characterized discharge current of those arresters can be divided into three types of waveforms such as instantaneous heavy pulse, low level lingering continuance and medium continued damping oscillation. The negative lightning discharge with subsequent multiple strokes against de-energized power lines may be the distinct and frequent causes of damping current oscillation of surge arresters. Moreover, the negative discharge current on the sound phase has been encountered not a little in the case of related double-line-to-ground fault. In this paper, the combination of those parameters is clearly expressed through several representing figures of arrester current waveforms together with those of corresponding voltage of surge fronts and 60Hz voltage transients if available.

  12. Respiratory arrest due to nitrofurantoin treatment in the absence of pulmonary pathology

    OpenAIRE

    Çoban, Hikmet

    2015-01-01

    In the case we present, an elderly female patient developed respiratory arrest in the absence of pulmonary pathology after using nitrofurantoin (NF). To our current knowledge, this case is the first in the literature. The patient was monitored on mechanical ventilation, and her condition improved only after discontinuing NF treatment.

  13. The transcriptional network that controls growth arrest and differentiation in a human myeloid leukemia cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suzuki, Harukazu; Forrest, Alistair R R; van Nimwegen, Erik;

    2009-01-01

    Using deep sequencing (deepCAGE), the FANTOM4 study measured the genome-wide dynamics of transcription-start-site usage in the human monocytic cell line THP-1 throughout a time course of growth arrest and differentiation. Modeling the expression dynamics in terms of predicted cis-regulatory sites...

  14. Role of crack arrest in the evaluation of PWR pressure vessel integrity during PTS transients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheverton, R.D.; Ball, D.G.

    1984-01-01

    The HSST program is investigating flaw behavior in large cylinders and is also obtaining fracture-mechanics-related material properties, while the Integrated Pressurized Thermal-Shock (IPTS) program is primarily concerned with an estimation of the overall frequency of vessel failure and identification of dominant transients and design and operating features contributing thereto for specific nuclear plants. One important component of the IPTS study is a probabilistic fracture-mechanics analysis of the reactor vessel, and a point of particular interest therein is the role of crack arrest in mitigating the consequences of the postulated PTS transients. The HSST program has provided crack-arrest data from small specimens and large thermal- and pressure-loaded cylinders that tend to establish the validity of the crack-arrest concept for application to the PTS problem. Unfortunately, recent results of the IPTS studies indicate that the inclusion of crack arrest in the probabilistic fracture-mechanics model does not substantially influence the calculated frequency of vessel failure. However, there are still significant questions regarding flaw behavior at upper-shelf temperatures, and the HSST program is continuing to pursue this area of uncertainty.

  15. Return to Work in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragholm, Kristian; Wissenberg, Mads; Mortensen, Rikke Normark;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data on long-term function of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors are sparse. We examined return to work as a proxy of preserved function without major neurologic deficits in survivors. METHODS AND RESULTS: In Denmark, out-of-hospital cardiac arrests have been systematically...... reported to the Danish Cardiac Arrest Register since 2001. During 2001-2011, we identified 4354 patients employed before arrest among 12 332 working-age patients (18-65 years), of whom 796 survived to day 30. Among 796 survivors (median age, 53 years [quartile 1-3, 46-59 years]; 81.5% men), 610 (76.......6%) returned to work in a median time of 4 months [quartile 1-3, 1-19 months], with a median time of 3 years spent back at work. A total of 74.6% (N=455) remained employed without using sick leave during the first 6 months after returning to work. This latter proportion of survivors returning to work increased...

  16. 14 CFR 1203b.105 - Use of non-deadly physical force when making an arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... believes to be the use or threat of imminent use of non-deadly physical force by the offender. Verbal abuse... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of non-deadly physical force when... Use of non-deadly physical force when making an arrest. When a security force officer has the right...

  17. 10 CFR 1047.6 - Use of physical force when making an arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... physical force by the offender. It should be noted that verbal abuse alone by the offender cannot be the... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of physical force when making an arrest. 1047.6... BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS General Provisions § 1047.6 Use of physical force when making an...

  18. Gene expression signature in organized and growth arrested mammaryacini predicts good outcome in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, Marcia V.; Martin, Katherine J.; Kenny, Paraic A.; Xhaja, Kris; Bosch, Irene; Yaswen, Paul; Bissell, Mina J.

    2006-02-08

    To understand how non-malignant human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) transit from a disorganized proliferating to an organized growth arrested state, and to relate this process to the changes that occur in breast cancer, we studied gene expression changes in non-malignant HMEC grown in three-dimensional cultures, and in a previously published panel of microarray data for 295 breast cancer samples. We hypothesized that the gene expression pattern of organized and growth arrested mammary acini would share similarities with breast tumors with good prognoses. Using Affymetrix HG-U133A microarrays, we analyzed the expression of 22,283 gene transcripts in two HMEC cell lines, 184 (finite life span) and HMT3522 S1 (immortal non-malignant), on successive days post-seeding in a laminin-rich extracellular matrix assay. Both HMECs underwent growth arrest in G0/G1 and differentiated into polarized acini between days 5 and 7. We identified gene expression changes with the same temporal pattern in both lines. We show that genes that are significantly lower in the organized, growth arrested HMEC than in their proliferating counterparts can be used to classify breast cancer patients into poor and good prognosis groups with high accuracy. This study represents a novel unsupervised approach to identifying breast cancer markers that may be of use clinically.

  19. Divergence to apoptosis from ROS induced cell cycle arrest: Effect of cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, the role of cadmium (Cd) in immunosupression has gained importance. Nevertheless, the signaling pathways underlying cadmium-induced immune cell death remains largely unclear. In accordance to our previous in vivo report, and to evaluate the further details of the mechanism, we have investigated the effects of cadmium (CdCl2, H2O) on cell cycle regulation and apoptosis in splenocytes in vitro. Our results have revealed that reactive oxygen species (ROS) and p21 are involved in cell cycle arrest in a p53 independent manner but late hour apoptotic response was accompanied by the p53 up-regulation, loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (MTP), down-regulation of Bcl-xl, activation of caspase-3 and release of cytochrome c (Cyt c). However, pifithrin alfa (PFT-α), an inhibitor of p53, fails to rescue the cells from the cadmium-induced cell cycle arrest but prevents Bcl-xl down-regulation and loss of Δψm, which indicates that there is an involvement of p53 in apoptosis. In contrast, treatment with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) can prevent cell cycle arrest and p21 up-regulation at early hours. Although it is clear that, NAC has no effect on apoptosis, p53 expression and MPT changes at late stage events. Taken together, we have demonstrated that cadmium promotes ROS generation, which potently initiates the cell cycle arrest at early hours and finally induces p53-dependent apoptosis at later part of the event.

  20. Should prehospital resuscitative thoracotomy be incorporated in advanced life support after traumatic cardiac arrest?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalkias, A; Xanthos, T

    2014-06-01

    The survival of traumatic cardiac arrest patients poses a challenge for Emergency Medical Services initiating advanced life support on-scene, especially with regard to having to decide immediately whether to initiate prehospital emergency thoracotomy. Although the necessity for carrying out the procedure remains a cause for debate, it can be life-saving when performed with the correct indications and approaches. PMID:26816077

  1. Willingness to Perform Chest Compression Only in Witnessed Cardiac Arrest Victims versus Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesreen Yaghmour

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Performing immediate bystander Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR is the most important factor that determines survival from cardiac arrest. Recommended mouth to mouth ventilation maneuver during CPR has led to lower rate of CPR performance in the population. Objectives: The present survey aimed to evaluate the willingness of nurses at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences for performing CPR versus chest-compression-only CPR. Patients and Methods: During a CPR course, we performed a survey on 25 nurses from Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. This survey included age and gender of the participants. In the first question, they were asked about their willingness to perform CPR with mouth to mouth breathing for witnessed cardiac arrest victims. In the second question, they were asked about their willingness to perform chest compression only for cardiac arrest victims. Results: Among the participating nurses, 96% were female with a mean age of 31 years. Only 40% were willing to perform CPR that requires mouth to mouth ventilation. On the other hand, 92% were willing to perform chest compression only without mouth to mouth ventilation. The mean age of the nurses who would do CPR was lower compared to those who would not. Conclusions: In this survey, we demonstrated that eliminating mouth to mouth ventilation maneuver could lead to markedly higher willingness to perform CPR for witnessed cardiac arrest victims in CPR trained nursing personnel. Our study is in agreement with other studies advocating that chest-compression-only CPR could lead to higher bystander resuscitation efforts.

  2. Role of crack arrest in the evaluation of PWR pressure vessel integrity during PTS transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PWR pressurized thermal-shock (PTS) issue, which is concerned with the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel during postulated overcooling transients, is under intensive investigation by the USNRC. The USNRC-sponsored Integrated Pressurized Thermal-Shock (IPTS) and Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Programs are dedicated to a better understanding and a timely resolution of the problem. The HSST program is investigating flaw behavior in large cylinders and is also obtaining fracture-mechanics-related material properties, while the IPTS program is primarily concerned with an estimation of the overall frequency of vessel failure and identification of dominant transients and design and operating features contributing thereto for specific nuclear plants. One important component of the IPTS study is a probabilistic fracture-mechanics analysis of the reactor vessel, and a point of particular interest therein is the role of crack arrest in mitigating the consequences of the postulated PTS transients. The HSST program has provided crack-arrest data from small specimens and large thermally and pressure-loaded cylinders that tend to establish the validity of the crack-arrest concept for application to the PTS problem. Unfortunately, recent results of the IPTS studies indicate that the inclusion of crack arrest in the probabilistic fracture-mechanics model does not substantially influence the calculated frequency of vessel failure. However, there are still significant questions regarding flaw behavior at upper-shelf temperatures, and the HSST program is continuing to pursue this area of uncertainty

  3. F-MARC: promoting the prevention and management of sudden cardiac arrest in football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Efraim Benjamin; Dvorak, J; Schmied, C; Meyer, T

    2015-05-01

    Sudden cardiac death is the most common cause of unnatural death in football. To prevent and urgently manage sudden cardiac arrest on the football field-of-play, F-MARC (FIFA Medical and Research Centre) has been fully committed to a programme of research, education, standardisation and practical implementation. This strategy has detected football players at medical risk during mandatory precompetition medical assessments. Additionally, FIFA has (1) sponsored internationally accepted guidelines for the interpretation of an athlete's ECG, (2) developed field-of-play-specific protocols for the recognition, response, resuscitation and removal of a football player having sudden cardiac arrest and (3) introduced and distributed the FIFA medical emergency bag which has already resulted in the successful resuscitation of a football player who had a sudden cardiac arrest on the field-of-play. Recently FIFA, in association with the Institute of Sports and Preventive Medicine in Saarbrücken, Germany, established a worldwide Sudden Death Registry with a view to documenting fatal events on the football field-of-play. These activities by F-MARC are testimony to FIFA's continued commitment to minimising sudden cardiac arrest while playing football. PMID:25878076

  4. Cardiac arrest during spinal anesthesia for cervical conization: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Ikuko; Numata, Masahiro; Ikegami, Atsushi; Teramoto, Katsuhiro; Hirata, Shuji

    2016-05-01

    Spinal anesthesia is regularly performed worldwide and is an integral part of the modern day anesthesia practice. Although unexpected cardiac arrests during this procedure are very rare, medical professionals should be aware of the potential for this complication. In making the decision to use spinal anesthesia, judicious patient selection, adequate preventive measures, and strict monitoring are important. PMID:27190608

  5. Modulation of Ionizing Radiation-Induced G2 Arrest by Cyclooxygenase-2 and its Inhibitor Celecoxib

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Prolongation or attenuation of ionizing radiation (IR)-induced G2-M arrest in cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) overexpressing or celecoxib-treated cells, respectively, has been previously observed. To better understand the molecular mechanisms involved, we investigated the molecules involved in G2 checkpoint pathways after treatment with IR ± celecoxib. Methods and Materials: Various molecules in the G2 checkpoint pathways were investigated in HCT-116-Mock and -COX-2 cells. Western blot, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, confocal microscopy, and fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS) analyses were performed to investigate whether expression and activity of the ataxia telangiectasia and rad3-related (ATR) could be modulated by COX-2 and its selective inhibitors. Results: COX-2 overexpression increased expression and activity of ATR after IR exposure. Celecoxib downregulated ATR in all tested cell lines independent of COX-2 expression, but downregulation was greater in COX-2 overexpressing cells after cells were irradiated. Celecoxib pretreatment before radiation caused strongly inhibited G2 arrest. Conclusions: COX-2 appears to prolong IR-induced G2 arrest by upregulating ATR. Celecoxib downregulated ATR preferentially in irradiated COX-2 overexpressing cells. Celecoxib may radiosensitize cancer cells by inhibiting G2 arrest through ATR downregulation.

  6. Costunolide causes mitotic arrest and enhances radiosensitivity in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chih-Jen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose This work aimed to investigate the effect of costunolide, a sesquiterpene lactone isolated from Michelia compressa, on cell cycle distribution and radiosensitivity of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC cells. Methods The assessment used in this study included: cell viability assay, cell cycle analysis by DNA histogram, expression of phosphorylated histone H3 (Ser 10 by flow cytometer, mitotic index by Liu's stain and morphological observation, mitotic spindle alignment by immunofluorescence of alpha-tubulin, expression of cell cycle-related proteins by Western blotting, and radiation survival by clonogenic assay. Results Our results show that costunolide reduced the viability of HA22T/VGH cells. It caused a rapid G2/M arrest at 4 hours shown by DNA histogram. The increase in phosphorylated histone H3 (Ser 10-positive cells and mitotic index indicates costunolide-treated cells are arrested at mitosis, not G2, phase. Immunofluorescence of alpha-tubulin for spindle formation further demonstrated these cells are halted at metaphase. Costunolide up-regulated the expression of phosphorylated Chk2 (Thr 68, phosphorylated Cdc25c (Ser 216, phosphorylated Cdk1 (Tyr 15 and cyclin B1 in HA22T/VGH cells. At optimal condition causing mitotic arrest, costunolide sensitized HA22T/VGH HCC cells to ionizing radiation with sensitizer enhancement ratio up to 1.9. Conclusions Costunolide could reduce the viability and arrest cell cycling at mitosis in hepatoma cells. Logical exploration of this mitosis-arresting activity for cancer therapeutics shows costunolide enhanced the killing effect of radiotherapy against human HCC cells.

  7. Effect of four resuscitation methods on lung ventilation of pigs with respiratory arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-hua LIU

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the effects of four cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR methods on lung ventilation of pigs with respiratory arrest. The four CPR methods included chest compression CPR (C-CPR, compression under the diaphragm CPR (D-CPR, abdominal compression CPR (A-CPR, and abdominal wall lifting and compression CPR (L-CPR. Methods  A total of 28 healthy domestic pigs were randomly divided into four groups. The pig respiratory arrest model was reproduced by intravenous injection of suxamethonium. Instantly after respiratory arrest, one of the 4 CPR methods was performed immediately on the groups of pigs respectively. After 2min of CPR, compression was stopped. The experimental pigs were given assisted respiration using a ventilator until autonomous respiration recovered. The tidal volume (VT in basic status and that during resuscitation by the four respective resuscitation methods was determined, and minute ventilation (MV was calculated. Furthermore, heart rate (HR, mean arterial blood pressure, and recovery time of autonomous respiration were compared between all the groups. Results In basic status, there was no statistical difference (P > 0.05 in VT and MV between the four groups. Approximately 2min after resuscitation, the VT and MV of D-CPR were higher than that of C-CPR; that of A-CPR was higher than that of D-CPR; and that of L-CPR was higher than that of A-CPR. The differences were statistically significant (P 0.05. HR in C-CPR and D-CPR were notably lower than the basic value (P < 0.01. Two minutes after resuscitation, mechanical ventilation was given, and HR in all the groups was close to the basic value 5 min after resuscitation. In the respiratory arrest pig model, L-CPR could provide more effective VT and MV than the other methods. Conclusion For the porcine respiratory arrest model, L-CPR can provide more effective lung ventilation than the other methods.

  8. Psychotic Experiences and Risk of Violence Perpetration and Arrest in the General Population: A Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drukker, Marjan; ten Have, Margreet; de Graaf, Ron; van Dorsselaer, Saskia; van Os, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Background In cross-sectional, general population studies, psychotic experiences have been associated with an increased risk of physical violence perpetration and arrest. However, longitudinal research on this topic is lacking. Moreover, it remains unclear whether subjects with psychotic experiences are also at risk of displaying psychological violence. The present study aims to investigate these associations. Method The longitudinal association between baseline psychotic experiences and six-year incidence of violence perpetration and three-year incidence of arrest was studied in a prospective cohort of 6646 general population adults. Logistic regression analyses with varying levels of adjustment were performed in the complete sample and in subsamples stratified by presence or absence of baseline mental disorders. Results The presence of psychotic experiences at baseline increased the risk of physical violence, psychological violence and arrest at follow-up. However, adjustment for dimensional measures of psychopathology and contextual confounders reduced all associations considerably. After adjustment, both clinically validated (OR = 3.59, 95% CI 1.09–11.81) and self-reported hallucinations (OR = 2.83, 95% CI 1.05 7.65) remained significantly associated with physical violence perpetration. Self-reported (OR = 3.06, 95% CI 1.55–6.03) and clinically validated delusions (OR = 3.24, 95% CI 1.47–7.13) were associated with an increased risk of arrest. There was no significant association between psychotic experiences and incident psychological violence in the fully adjusted model. Conclusion Specific psychotic experiences may differentially predict physical violence perpetration and arrest, even after adjustment for demographics, dimensional measures of psychopathology and contextual confounders. However, more longitudinal research with larger sample sizes is required to confirm these findings. PMID:27447190

  9. Crack-arrest tests on two irradiated high-copper welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program Sixth Irradiation Series is to determine the effect of neutron irradiation on the shift and shape of the lower-bound curve to crack-arrest toughness data. Two submerged-arc welds with copper contents of 0.23 and 0.31 wt % were commercially fabricated in 220-mm-thick plate. Crack-arrest specimens fabricated from these welds were irradiated at a nominal temperature of 288 degrees C to an average fluence of 1.9 x 1019 neutrons/cm2 (>1 MeV). This is the second report giving the results of the tests on irradiated duplex-type crack-arrest specimens. A previous report gave results of tests on irradiated weld-embrittled-type specimens. Charpy V-notch (CVN) specimens irradiated in the same capsules as the crack-arrest specimens were also tested, and a 41-J transition temperature shift was determined from these specimens. open-quotes Mean close-quote curves of the same form as the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Kla curve were fit to the data with only the open-quotes reference temperatureclose quotes as a parameter. The shift between the mean curves agrees well with the 41-J transition temperature shift obtained from the CVN specimen tests. Moreover, the four data points resulting from tests on the duplex crack-arrest specimens of the present study did not make a significant change to mean curve fits to either the previously obtained data or all the data combined

  10. Dynamical arrest, percolation, gelation, and glass formation in model nanoparticle dispersions with thermoreversible adhesive interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, Aaron P R; Castañeda-Priego, Ramón; Kim, Jung M; Wagner, Norman J

    2012-01-24

    We report an experimental study of the dynamical arrest transition for a model system consisting of octadecyl coated silica suspended in n-tetradecane from dilute to concentrated conditions spanning the state diagram. The dispersion's interparticle potential is tuned by temperature affecting the brush conformation leading to a thermoreversible model system. The critical temperature for dynamical arrest, T*, is determined as a function of dispersion volume fraction by small-amplitude dynamic oscillatory shear rheology. We corroborate this transition temperature by measuring a power-law decay of the autocorrelation function and a loss of ergodicity via fiber-optic quasi-elastic light scattering. The structure at T* is measured using small-angle neutron scattering. The scattering intensity is fit to extract the interparticle pair-potential using the Ornstein-Zernike equation with the Percus-Yevick closure approximation, assuming a square-well interaction potential with a short-range interaction (1% of particle diameter). (1) The strength of attraction is characterized using the Baxter temperature (2) and mapped onto the adhesive hard sphere state diagram. The experiments show a continuous dynamical arrest transition line that follows the predicted dynamical percolation line until ϕ ≈ 0.41 where it subtends the predictions toward the mode coupling theory attractive-driven glass line. An alternative analysis of the phase transition through the reduced second virial coefficient B(2)* shows a change in the functional dependence of B(2)* on particle concentration around ϕ ≈ 0.36. We propose this signifies the location of a gel-to-glass transition. The results presented herein differ from those observed for depletion flocculated dispersion of micrometer-sized particles in polymer solutions, where dynamical arrest is a consequence of multicomponent phase separation, suggesting dynamical arrest is sensitive to the physical mechanism of attraction. PMID:22148874

  11. Failure Model Research of MOA Arrester%MOA避雷器失效模型研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    申创; 姚毅; 尹鑫

    2013-01-01

    研究了氧化锌压敏电阻的失效模式和MOA避雷器的失效原因.从数学上讨论阀片串并联时电位分布不均匀问题,并完善了基波阻性电流的整个数学计算模型.从理论上考虑各干扰要素的补偿.提出了避雷器器寿命衰减率、衰减系数矩阵、破坏力度和破坏力函数等相关概念.在考虑了出现热崩溃的临界功率损耗的基础上,构建了避雷器寿命衰减模型,并提供了避雷器失效估计的假设检验方法.与工程上的失效检测模型做了对比.%On the basis of the analysis through failure mode of the ZnO varistor and the reason of MO A arrester failure, the problem of uneven potential distribution for parallel and series valve plate from mathematics is discussed , and perfected the whole mathematics calculation model for the fundamental wave impedance current in consideration of the compensation of all theoretically interference elements. It puts forward the arrester life decay rate, attenuation coefficient matrix, damage dynamics and destructive power function and other related concepts, and constructs the arrester life attenuation model while consider the critical power loss when the arrester appear heat collapse. Otherwise, it presents hypothesis test method for the arrester failure estimate comparing with the engineering failure detection model.

  12. Developmentally arrested Austrofundulus limnaeus embryos have changes in post-translational modifications of histone H3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toni, Lee S; Padilla, Pamela A

    2016-02-01

    Although vertebrate embryogenesis is typically a continuous and dynamic process, some embryos have evolved mechanisms to developmentally arrest. The embryos of Austrofundulus limnaeus, a killifish that resides in ephemeral ponds, routinely enter diapause II (DII), a reversible developmental arrest promoted by endogenous cues rather than environmental stress. DII, which starts at 24-26 days post-fertilization and can persist for months, is characterized by a significant decline in heart rate and an arrest of development and differentiation. Thus, A. limnaeus is a unique model to study epigenetic features associated with embryonic arrest. To investigate chromosome structures associated with mitosis or gene expression, we examined the post-translational modifications of histone H3 (phosphorylation of serine 10, mono-, di- and tri-methylation of lysine 4 or 27) in preDII, DII and postDII embryos. As seen by microscopy analysis, DII embryos have a significant decrease in the H3S10P marker for mitotic nuclei and an inner nuclear membrane localization of the H3K27me2 marker associated with silencing of gene expression. ELISA experiments reveal that the levels of methylation at H3K4 and H3K27 are significantly different between preDII, DII and postDII embryos, indicating that there are molecular differences between embryos of different chronological age and stage of development. Furthermore, in DII embryos relative to preDII embryos, there are differences in the level of H3K27me3 and H3K4me3, which may reflect critical chromatin remodeling that occurs prior to arrest of embryogenesis. This work helps lay a foundation for chromatin analysis of vertebrate embryo diapause, an intriguing yet greatly understudied phenomenon. PMID:26685169

  13. Costunolide causes mitotic arrest and enhances radiosensitivity in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work aimed to investigate the effect of costunolide, a sesquiterpene lactone isolated from Michelia compressa, on cell cycle distribution and radiosensitivity of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. The assessment used in this study included: cell viability assay, cell cycle analysis by DNA histogram, expression of phosphorylated histone H3 (Ser 10) by flow cytometer, mitotic index by Liu's stain and morphological observation, mitotic spindle alignment by immunofluorescence of alpha-tubulin, expression of cell cycle-related proteins by Western blotting, and radiation survival by clonogenic assay. Our results show that costunolide reduced the viability of HA22T/VGH cells. It caused a rapid G2/M arrest at 4 hours shown by DNA histogram. The increase in phosphorylated histone H3 (Ser 10)-positive cells and mitotic index indicates costunolide-treated cells are arrested at mitosis, not G2, phase. Immunofluorescence of alpha-tubulin for spindle formation further demonstrated these cells are halted at metaphase. Costunolide up-regulated the expression of phosphorylated Chk2 (Thr 68), phosphorylated Cdc25c (Ser 216), phosphorylated Cdk1 (Tyr 15) and cyclin B1 in HA22T/VGH cells. At optimal condition causing mitotic arrest, costunolide sensitized HA22T/VGH HCC cells to ionizing radiation with sensitizer enhancement ratio up to 1.9. Costunolide could reduce the viability and arrest cell cycling at mitosis in hepatoma cells. Logical exploration of this mitosis-arresting activity for cancer therapeutics shows costunolide enhanced the killing effect of radiotherapy against human HCC cells

  14. Pyruvate stabilizes electrocardiographic and hemodynamic function in pigs recovering from cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Brandon H; Nguyen, Anh Q; Hollrah, Roger A; Williams, Arthur G; Hoxha, Besim; Olivencia-Yurvati, Albert H; Mallet, Robert T

    2015-12-01

    Cardiac electromechanical dysfunction may compromise recovery of patients who are initially resuscitated from cardiac arrest, and effective treatments remain elusive. Pyruvate, a natural intermediary metabolite, energy substrate, and antioxidant, has been found to protect the heart from ischemia-reperfusion injury. This study tested the hypothesis that pyruvate-enriched resuscitation restores hemodynamic, metabolic, and electrolyte homeostasis following cardiac arrest. Forty-two Yorkshire swine underwent pacing-induced ventricular fibrillation and, after 6 min pre-intervention arrest, 4 min precordial compressions followed by transthoracic countershocks. After defibrillation and recovery of spontaneous circulation, the pigs were monitored for another 4 h. Sodium pyruvate or NaCl were infused i.v. (0.1 mmol·kg(-1)·min(-1)) throughout precordial compressions and the first 60 min recovery. In 8 of the 24 NaCl-infused swine, the first countershock converted ventricular fibrillation to pulseless electrical activity unresponsive to subsequent countershocks, but only 1 of 18 pyruvate-treated swine developed pulseless electrical activity (relative risk 0.17; 95% confidence interval 0.13-0.22). Pyruvate treatment also lowered the dosage of vasoconstrictor phenylephrine required to maintain systemic arterial pressure at 15-60 min recovery, hastened clearance of excess glucose, elevated arterial bicarbonate, and raised arterial pH; these statistically significant effects persisted up to 3 h after sodium pyruvate infusion, while infusion-induced hypernatremia subsided. These results demonstrate that pyruvate-enriched resuscitation achieves electrocardiographic and hemodynamic stability in swine during the initial recovery from cardiac arrest. Such metabolically based treatment may offer an effective strategy to support cardiac electromechanical recovery immediately after cardiac arrest. PMID:26088865

  15. Distinct properties and metabolic mechanisms of postresuscitation myocardial injuries in ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest versus asphyxiation cardiac arrest in a porcine model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Caijun; Li Chunsheng; Zhang Yi; Yang Jun

    2014-01-01

    Background The two most prevalent causes of sudden cardiac death are ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest (VFCA) and asphyxiation cardiac arrest (ACA).Profound postresuscitation myocardial dysfunction has been demonstrated in both VFCA and ACA animal models.Our study aimed to characterize the two porcine models of cardiac arrest and postresuscitation myocardial metabolism dysfunction.Methods Thirty-two pigs were randomized into two groups.The VFCA group (n=16) were subject to programmed electrical stimulation and the ACA group (n=16) underwent endotracheal tube clamping to induce cardiac arrest (CA).Once induced,CA remained untreated for a period of 8 minutes.Two minutes following initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR),defibrillation was attempted until return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) was achieved or animals died.To assess myocardial metabolism,18F-FluoroDeoxyGlucose Positron Emission Tomography was performed at baseline and 4 hours after ROSC.Results ROSC was 100% successful in VFCA and 50% successful in ACA.VFCA had better mean arterial pressure and cardiac output after ROSC than ACA.Arterial blood gas analysis indicated more detrimental metabolic disturbances in ACA compared with VFCA after ROSC (ROSC 0.5 hours,pH:7.01±0.06 vs.7.21±0.03,P<0.01; HCO3-:(15.83±2.31 vs.20.11±1.83) mmol/L,P<0.01; lactate:(16.22±1.76 vs.5.84±1.44) mmol/L,P<0.01).Myocardial metabolism imaging using Positron Emission Tomography demonstrated that myocardial injuries after ACA were more severe and widespread than after VFCA at 4 hours after ROSC (the maximum standardized uptake value of the whole left ventricular:1.00±0.17 vs.1.93±0.27,P<0.01).Lower contents of myocardial energy metabolism enzymes (Na+-K+-ATPase enzyme activity,Ca2+-ATPase enzyme activity,superoxide dismutase and phosphodiesterase) were found in ACA relative to VFCA.Conclusions Compared with VFCA,ACA causes more severe myocardium injury and metabolism hindrance,therefore they

  16. Berberine, a genotoxic alkaloid, induces ATM-Chk1 mediated G2 arrest in prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Yu; Liu Qiao; Liu Zhaojian; Li Boxuan; Sun Zhaoliang; Zhou Haibin; Zhang Xiyu; Gong Yaoqin [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Experimental Teratology and Institute of Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan (China); Shao Changshun, E-mail: changshun.shao@gmail.com [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Experimental Teratology and Institute of Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan (China)

    2012-06-01

    Berberine has been shown to possess anti-tumor activity against a wide spectrum of cancer cells. It inhibits cancer cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest, at G1 and/or G2/M, and apoptosis. While it has been documented that berberine induces G1 arrest by activating the p53-p21 cascade, it remains unclear what mechanism underlies the berberine-induced G2/M arrest, which is p53-independent. In this study, we tested the anti-proliferative effect of berberine on murine prostate cancer cell line RM-1 and characterized the underlying mechanisms. Berberine dose-dependently induced DNA double-strand breaks and apoptosis. At low concentrations, berberine was observed to induce G1 arrest, concomitant with the activation of p53-p21 cascade. Upon exposure to berberine at a higher concentration (50 {mu}M) for 24 h, cells exhibited G2/M arrest. Pharmacological inhibition of ATM by KU55933, or Chk1 by UCN-01, could efficiently abrogate the G2/M arrest in berberine-treated cells. Downregulation of Chk1 by RNA interference also abolished the G2/M arrest caused by berberine, confirming the role of Chk1 in the pathway leading to G2/M arrest. Abrogation of G2/M arrest by ATM inhibition forced more cells to undergo apoptosis in response to berberine treatment. Chk1 inhibition by UCN-01, on the other hand, rendered cells more sensitive to berberine only when p53 was inhibited. Our results suggest that combined administration of berberine and caffeine, or other ATM inhibitor, may accelerate the killing of cancer cells.

  17. American Heart Association Response to the 2015 Institute of Medicine Report on Strategies to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumar, Robert W; Eigel, Brian; Callaway, Clifton W; Estes, N A Mark; Jollis, James G; Kleinman, Monica E; Morrison, Laurie J; Peberdy, Mary Ann; Rabinstein, Alejandro; Rea, Thomas D; Sendelbach, Sue

    2015-09-15

    The American Heart Association (AHA) commends the recently released Institute of Medicine (IOM) report, Strategies to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival: A Time to Act (2015). The AHA recognizes the unique opportunity created by the report to meaningfully advance the objectives of improving outcomes for sudden cardiac arrest. For decades, the AHA has focused on the goal of reducing morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease though robust support of basic, translational, clinical, and population research. The AHA also has developed a rigorous process using the best available evidence to develop scientific, advisory, and guideline documents. These core activities of development and dissemination of scientific evidence have served as the foundation for a broad range of advocacy initiatives and programs that serve as a foundation for advancing the AHA and IOM goal of improving cardiac arrest outcomes. In response to the call to action in the IOM report, the AHA is announcing 4 new commitments to increase cardiac arrest survival: (1) The AHA will provide up to $5 million in funding over 5 years to incentivize resuscitation data interoperability; (2) the AHA will actively pursue philanthropic support for local and regional implementation opportunities to increase cardiac arrest survival by improving out-of-hospital and in-hospital systems of care; (3) the AHA will actively pursue philanthropic support to launch an AHA resuscitation research network; and (4) the AHA will cosponsor a National Cardiac Arrest Summit to facilitate the creation of a national cardiac arrest collaborative that will unify the field and identify common goals to improve survival. In addition to the AHA's historic and ongoing commitment to improving cardiac arrest care and outcomes, these new initiatives are responsive to each of the IOM recommendations and demonstrate the AHA's leadership in the field. However, successful implementation of the IOM recommendations will require a timely

  18. Results of crack-arrest tests on irradiated a 508 class 3 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iskander, S.K.; Milella, P.P.; Pini, M.A.

    1998-02-01

    Ten crack-arrest toughness values for irradiated specimens of A 508 class 3 forging steel have been obtained. The tests were performed according to the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Standard Test Method for Determining Plane-Strain Crack-Arrest Fracture Toughness, K{sub la} of Ferritic Steels, E 1221-88. None of these values are strictly valid in all five ASTM E 1221-88 validity criteria. However, they are useful when compared to unirradiated crack-arrest specimen toughness values since they show the small (averaging approximately 10{degrees}C) shifts in the mean and lower-bound crack-arrest toughness curves. This confirms that a low copper content in ASTM A 508 class 3 forging material can be expected to result in small shifts of the transition toughness curve. The shifts due to neutron irradiation of the lower bound and mean toughness curves are approximately the same as the Charpy V-notch (CVN) 41-J temperature shift. The nine crack-arrest specimens were irradiated at temperatures varying from 243 to 280{degrees}C, and to a fluence varying from 1.7 to 2.7 x 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (> 1 MeV). The test results were normalized to reference values that correspond to those of CVN specimens irradiated at 284{degrees}C to a fluence of 3.2 x 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (> 1 MeV) in the same capsule as the crack-arrest specimens. This adjustment resulted in a shift to lower temperatures of all the data, and in particular moved two data points that appeared to lie close to or lower than the American Society of Mechanical Engineers K{sub la} curve to positions that seemed more reasonable with respect to the remaining data. A special fixture was designed, fabricated, and successfully used in the testing. For reasons explained in the text, special blocks to receive the Oak Ridge National Laboratory clip gage were designed, and greater-than-standard crack-mouth opening displacements measured were accounted for. 24 refs., 13 figs., 12 tabs.

  19. Cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, two alternative mechanisms for PMKT2 killer activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Antonio; Alonso, Alejandro; Belda, Ignacio; Marquina, Domingo

    2013-01-01

    Pichia membranifaciens CYC 1086 secretes a unique 30kDa killer toxin (PMKT2) that inhibits a variety of spoilage yeasts and fungi of agronomical interest. The cytocidal effect of PMKT2 on Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells was studied. Metabolic events associated with the loss of S. cerevisiae viability caused by PMKT2 were qualitatively identical to those reported for K28 killer toxin activity, but different to those reported for PMKT. At higher doses, none of the cellular events accounting for the action of PMKT, the killer toxin secreted by P. membranifaciens CYC 1106, was observed for PMKT2. Potassium leakage, sodium influx and the decrease of intracellular pH were not among the primary effects of PMKT2. We report here that this protein is unable to form ion-permeable channels in liposome membranes, suggesting that channel formation is not the mechanism of cytotoxic action of PMKT2. Nevertheless, flow cytometry studies have revealed a cell cycle arrest at an early S-phase with an immature bud and pre-replicated 1n DNA content. By testing the sensitivity of cells arrested at different stages in the cell cycle, we hoped to identify the execution point for lethality more precisely. Cells arrested at the G1-phase by α-factor or arrested at G2-phase by the spindle poison methyl benzimidazol-2-yl-carbamate (MBC) were protected against the toxin. Cells released from the arrest in both cases were killed by PMKT2 at a similar rate. Nevertheless, cells released from MBC-arrest were able to grow for a short time, and then viability dropped rapidly. These findings suggest that cells released from G2-phase are initially able to divide, but die in the presence of PMKT2 after initiating the S-phase in a new cycle, adopting a terminal phenotype within that cycle. By contrast, low doses of PMKT and PMKT2 were able to generate the same cellular response. The evidence presented here shows that treating yeast with low doses of PMKT2 leads to the typical membranous, cytoplasmic

  20. Interference with Ca2+ release activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channel function delays T-cell arrest in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Waite, Janelle C.; Vardhana, Santosh; Shaw, Patrick J.; Jang, Jung-Eun; McCarl, Christie-Ann; Cameron, Thomas O; Feske, Stefan; Dustin, Michael L

    2013-01-01

    Entry of lymphocytes into secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs) involves intravascular arrest and intracellular calcium ion ([Ca2+]i) elevation. TCR activation triggers increased [Ca2+]i and can arrest T-cell motility in vitro. However the requirement for [Ca2+]i elevation in arresting T cells in vivo has not been tested. Here, we have manipulated the Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channel pathway required for [Ca2+]i elevation in T cells through genetic deletion of stromal interaction molecul...

  1. Simultaneous Radial Lengthening and Ulnar Shortening for a Delayed Presentation of Radius Distal Physeal Arrest: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdal Uzun

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Distal radius fractures are common injuries in both children and in the elderly (25%; 18%. Distal radius physeal fractures have a high incidence, but physeal growth arrest occurs at a low rate. As a main deformity, radial shortening occurs with relative ulnar overgrowth leading to significant complaints of pain and functional limitations after distal radial growth arrest. In this paper we aim to report on the restoration of the wrist mechanics attained by performing a surgical technique of simultaneous radial lengthening and ulnar shortening procedures in an adolescent with a significant ulnar overgrowth deformity due to a posttraumatic growth arrest of distal radius.

  2. Microstructural evaluation of a varistor block utilized in high voltage surge arresters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varistor is a semiconductor ceramic device characterized to have a high non-linear electrical resistance, it is used as active element of surge arresters with purpose of protecting of electro-electronics systems. Its properties are directly dependents of chemical composition and microstructural characteristics, such as grain size, porosity, twins and phases distribution. This work has the objective to characterize microstructurally a commercial varistor block of ZnO used in high voltage surge arrest and from this characterization to infer aspects about of its electrical macroscopic performance. DRX and SEM-EDS were used for microstructural analysis. The microstructural evaluation allows pointing the critical points of microstructure and, suggest relevant aspects to the improvement of commercial varistor microstructure, optimizing the electrothermal behavior of the device. (author)

  3. Generation of Aspherical Optical Lenses via Arrested Spreading and Pinching of a Cross-Linkable Liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Abhijit Chandra; Yadav, Mridul; Arul, Edward Peter; Khanna, Anubhav; Ghatak, Animangsu

    2016-05-31

    Aspherical optical lenses with spatially varying curvature are desired for capturing high quality, aberration free images in numerous optical applications. Conventionally such lenses are prepared by multistep top-down processes which are expensive, time-consuming, and prone to high failure rate. In this context, an alternate method is presented here based on arrested spreading of a sessile drop of a transparent, cross-linkable polymeric liquid on a solid substrate heated to an elevated temperature. Whereas surface tension driven flow tends to render it spherical, rapid cross-linking arrests such flow so that nonequilibrium aspherical shapes are attained. It is possible to tune also the initial state of the drop via delayed pinching of a liquid cylinder which precedes its release on the substrate. This method has led to the generation of a wide variety of optical lenses, ranging from spherical plano convex to superspherical solid immersion to exotic lenses not achieved via conventional methods. PMID:27200461

  4. Development of a theoretical guide for nursing care in cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliandra Bittencourt da Silva

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify the knowledge on cardiorespiratory arrest among nurses in a hospital of Vale do Paraíba, São Paulo, Brazil, and develop a theoretical guide for care of this emergency. We prepared an instrument of data collection based on relevant literature and the 2010 AHA Guidelines for CPR, from August to October 2012. The sample consisted of 41 nurses who deliver care activities in various units of the hospital. The study showed that professional participants said they were able to act in cardiopulmonary resuscitation, however, there were limitations of knowledge about the theme. Given the above, we developed a theoretical guide for cardiac arrest care based on scientific literature and covering questions submitted by nurses.

  5. Case series: CT scan in cardiac arrest and imminent cardiogenic shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging a patient having a cardiac arrest on the examination table is not a common occurrence. Altered hemodynamics resulting from pump failure causes stasis of blood in the dependent organs of the body, which is manifested on imaging by dependent contrast pooling and layering. Often a patient with imminent cardiogenic shock also shows a similar dependent contrast pooling and layering, which is a marker of the worsening clinical condition. We report the contrast-enhanced CT scan features in four cases, two of whom had cardiac arrest during imaging, while the other two developed cardiogenic shock soon after the examination. Dependent contrast pooling and layering were found in all of them, with faint or no opacification of the left cardiac chambers. Contrast pooling was noted in the dependent lumbar veins, hepatic veins, hepatic parenchyma, and the right renal vein, as well as in the dependent part of the IVC and the right heart chambers

  6. In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: An Update on Pulseless Electrical Activity and Asystole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attin, Mina; Tucker, Rebecca G; Carey, Mary G

    2016-09-01

    Nonshockable rhythms, including pulseless electrical activity (PEA) and asystole, precede more than 70% of in-hospital cardiac arrests (I-HCA). Compared with shockable rhythms (ventricular fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia), nonshockable rhythms have higher mortality and morbidity. Therefore, investigating the underlying mechanisms of these arrhythmias to improve the quality of care and outcome for patients who suffer cardiac arrest is a priority. As the first responders to I-HCA, nurses must have the proper knowledge and training to provide timely and efficient cardiopulmonary resuscitation therapy. This article provides an overview of nonshockable cardiac arrhythmias preceding I-HCA as a means of addressing the gap between science and clinical practice. PMID:27484665

  7. Directed percolation identified as equilibrium pre-transition towards non-equilibrium arrested gel states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurati, Marco; Capellmann, Ronja; Kohl, Matthias; Egelhaaf, Stefan; Schmiedeberg, Michael

    The macroscopic properties of gels arise from their slow dynamics and load bearing network structure, which are exploited by nature and in numerous industrial products. However, a link between these structural and dynamical properties has remained elusive. Here we present confocal microscopy exper- iments and simulations of gel-forming colloid-polymer mixtures with competing interactions. They reveal that gel formation is preceded by continuous and directed percolation. Both transitions lead to system spanning networks, but only directed percolation results in extremely slow dynamics, ageing and a shrinking of the gel that resembles syneresis. Therefore, dynamical arrest in gels is found to be linked to a structural transition, namely directed percolation, which is quantitatively associated with the mean number of bonded neighbours. Directed percolation is a universality class of transitions out of equilibrium, our study hence connects gel formation to a well-developed theoretical framework which now can be exploited to achieve a detailed understanding of arrested gels.

  8. Synthesis, characterization, cytotoxicity, a poptosis and cell cycle arrest of dibenzoxanthenes derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiu-Zhen; Yao, Jun-Hua; Jiang, Guang-Bin; Wang, Ji; Huang, Hong-Liang; Liu, Yun-Jun

    2014-12-01

    Two new dibenzoxanthenes compounds 1 and 2 have been synthesized and characterized by analytical and spectral methods. The crystal structure of compound 2 informs that the five rings of compound are almost planar. The DNA binding properties of two compounds were studied by absorption titration, viscosity measurement and luminescence. These results indicate that two compounds interact with calf thymus DNA through intercalative mode. Agarose gel electrophoresis experiment shows that PBR 322 DNA can be induced to cleave by two compounds under photoactivated condition. Compound 1 exhibits higher cytotoxicity than compound 2 toward MG-63, BEL-7402 and A549 cells. The apoptosis and cellular uptake of MG-63 cells were studied by fluorescence microscopy. Two compounds can also enhance the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decrease the mitochondrial membrane potential. Compound 1 induces cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase and compound 2 induces cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase in MG-63.

  9. Directed percolation identified as equilibrium pre-transition towards non-equilibrium arrested gel states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, M.; Capellmann, R. F.; Laurati, M.; Egelhaaf, S. U.; Schmiedeberg, M.

    2016-06-01

    The macroscopic properties of gels arise from their slow dynamics and load-bearing network structure, which are exploited by nature and in numerous industrial products. However, a link between these structural and dynamical properties has remained elusive. Here we present confocal microscopy experiments and simulations of gel-forming colloid-polymer mixtures. They reveal that gel formation is preceded by continuous and directed percolation. Both transitions lead to system-spanning networks, but only directed percolation results in extremely slow dynamics, ageing and a shrinking of the gel that resembles synaeresis. Therefore, dynamical arrest in gels is found to be linked to a structural transition, namely directed percolation, which is quantitatively associated with the mean number of bonded neighbours. Directed percolation denotes a universality class of transitions. Our study hence connects gel formation to a well-developed theoretical framework, which now can be exploited to achieve a detailed understanding of arrested gels.

  10. A descriptive analysis of public school educators arrested for sex offenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratliff, Lindon; Watson, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    This study examined trends and patterns in public school teacher convictions in order to create a descriptive profile of teachers who have offended against their students. To accomplish this goal, the authors reviewed public records for demographic information as well as the history and frequency of teacher arrests and convictions in the southeastern United States from 2007 to 2011 and created an offender profile. Subsequent analyses were conducted to assess whether gender differences among sexual misconduct offenders existed in terms of the age of their alleged victim, the grade level in which they were employed at the time of arrest or indictment, and the manner by which their alleged crimes were revealed and charges were brought against them. PMID:24512438

  11. Advantages of a cohort study on cardiac arrest conducted by nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássia Regina Vancini Campanharo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractOBJECTIVEIdentifying factors associated to survival after cardiac arrest.METHODAn experience report of a cohort study conducted in a university hospital, with a consecutive sample comprised of 285 patients. Data were collected for a year by trained nurses. The training strategy was conducted through an expository dialogue lecture. Collection monitoring was carried out by nurses via telephone calls, visits to the emergency room and by medical record searches. The neurological status of survivors was evaluated at discharge, after six months and one year.RESULTSOf the 285 patients, 16 survived until hospital discharge, and 13 remained alive after one year, making possible to identify factors associated with survival. There were no losses in the process.CONCLUSIONCohort studies help identify risks and disease outcomes. Considering cardiac arrest, they can subsidize public policies, encourage future studies and training programs for CPR, thereby improving the prognosis of patients.

  12. Advantages of a cohort study on cardiac arrest conducted by nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanharo, Cássia Regina Vancini; Vancini, Rodrigo Luiz; Lopes, Maria Carolina Barbosa Teixeira; Okuno, Meiry Fernanda Pinto; Batista, Ruth Ester Assayag; Atallah, Álvaro Nagib; Góis, Aécio Flávio Teixeira de

    2015-10-01

    OBJECTIVEIdentifying factors associated to survival after cardiac arrest.METHODAn experience report of a cohort study conducted in a university hospital, with a consecutive sample comprised of 285 patients. Data were collected for a year by trained nurses. The training strategy was conducted through an expository dialogue lecture. Collection monitoring was carried out by nurses via telephone calls, visits to the emergency room and by medical record searches. The neurological status of survivors was evaluated at discharge, after six months and one year.RESULTSOf the 285 patients, 16 survived until hospital discharge, and 13 remained alive after one year, making possible to identify factors associated with survival. There were no losses in the process.CONCLUSIONCohort studies help identify risks and disease outcomes. Considering cardiac arrest, they can subsidize public policies, encourage future studies and training programs for CPR, thereby improving the prognosis of patients. PMID:26516745

  13. Hospital admissions and pharmacotherapy before out-of-hospital cardiac arrest according to age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weeke, Peter; Folke, Fredrik; Gislason, Gunnar H; Lippert, Freddy K; Olesen, Jonas B; Andersson, Charlotte; Wissenberg, Mads; Poulsen, Henrik E; Nielsen, Søren L; Køber, Lars; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The underlying etiology of sudden cardiac death varies with age and is likely to be reflected in type and number of healthcare contacts. We aimed to determine the specific type of healthcare contact shortly before out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) across ages. METHODS: OHCA patients...... were identified in the nationwide Danish Cardiac Arrest Register and Copenhagen Medical Emergency Care Unit (2001-2006). We matched every OHCA patients with 10 controls on sex and age. Healthcare contacts were evaluated 30 days before event by individual-level-linkage of nationwide registers. RESULTS......: We identified 16,924 OHCA patients, median age 70.0 years (Q1-Q3: 59-80). OHCA patients had a higher number of hospitalizations and received more pharmacotherapy compared to the control population across all ages (p for difference 89) were...

  14. Effect of electroconvulsive stimulation on morphological and physiological aspects of post-cardiac arrest cerebral microcirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheleg, Sergey; Hixon, Hugh; Aizberg, Oleg R; Korotkevich, Alexander E; Nedzved, Mikhail K

    2008-09-01

    We investigated the effect of electroconvulsive stimulation (ECS) on cerebral circulation in vivo using the method for measuring microcirculation in real time with the photosensitizer dye Photosense and the fiber optic spectrofluorometer LESA-01-BIOSPEC. We have found that electroconvulsive stimulation significantly improved cerebral microcirculation (fourfold higher comparing to the control cerebral perfusion) after 30 min of room-temperature cardiac arrest. Morphologic study of the brain tissue showed the absence of rouleaux formation of erythrocytes ("sludged blood") in the cerebral cortex microcirculation after the application of electrical stimulus. Electroconvulsive stimulation may be useful for improving cerebral microcirculation (blood flow) in cases of long-term brain hypoxia/anoxia after prolonged cardiac arrest. PMID:18586374

  15. Investigations on Electro-Thermal Ageing of Metal Oxide Surge Arrester Elements: A Realistic Laboratory Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Vipin, PM; Nagabhushana, GR; Jayaram, BN

    1991-01-01

    The ageing of metal oxide surge arresters (MOSA) under field operating conditions caused by a combination of electrical and thermal stresses is simulated in the laboratory in an attempt to characterize the degradation phenomena as well as to identify the significant indices of such a degradation. Other than the widely adopted leakage current index, the prospects of parameters such as barrier height$(\\emptyset B)$, capacitance, tan delta, nonlinearity coefficient$(\\alpha)$, and area ratio as s...

  16. Representative bureaucracy:does female police leadership affect gender-based violence arrests?

    OpenAIRE

    Johnston, K.; Houston, John

    2016-01-01

    Representative bureaucracy theory postulates that passive representation leads to active representation of minority groups. This article investigates the passive representation of female police officers at leadership levels and the active representation of women vis-a-vis gender-based violence arrest rates in the UK. Much of the extant research on representative bureaucracy is located at street level, with evidence showing that discretionary power of minority bureaucrats can lead to active re...

  17. Critical incidents related to cardiac arrests reported to the Danish Patient Safety Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Oluf; Maaløe, Rikke; Andersen, Henning Boje

    2010-01-01

    hundred and seven reports describing 122 separate incidents were identified and classified into incidents related to: alerting the resuscitation team (n = 32; 26%), human performance (n = 22; 18%), equipment failure (n = 19; 16%), resuscitation equipment not available (n = 13; 11%), physical environment...... (n = 14; 11%), insufficient monitoring (n = 14; 11%), and medication error (n = 8; 7%). Conclusion Critical incidents related to cardiac arrest occur due to logistical, technical, teamworking and knowledge problems. These findings should be considered when planning education and implementing...

  18. Application of cyanoacrylate in difficult-to-arrest acute non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    Kurek, Krzysztof; Baniukiewicz, Andrzej; Świdnicka-Siergiejko, Agnieszka; Dąbrowski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency. Although endoscopic treatment is effective in controlling non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding, in cases of persistent bleeding radiological or surgical interventions are required. Application of cyanoacrylate for treatment of difficult-to-arrest non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding is poorly investigated. We describe patients in whom cyanoacrylate for acute non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding was used to stop the ble...

  19. Sudden cardiac arrest following ventricular fibrillation attributed to anabolic steroid use in an adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenfeld, Jana; Deal, Barbara J; Crawford, Susan

    2016-06-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids are synthetic derivatives of testosterone that promote the growth of skeletal muscles and have many recognised cardiovascular effects. We report the clinical presentation and pathological findings of an adolescent male whose sudden cardiac arrest following ventricular fibrillation was attributed to anabolic androgenic steroid use. The age of our patient reflects the usage of anabolic androgenic steroids among younger athletes and highlights the need for increased awareness among practitioners. PMID:26980272

  20. Factors associated with the clinical outcomes of paediatric out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Nagata, Takashi; Abe, Takeru; Noda, Eiichiro; Hasegawa, Manabu; Hashizume, Makoto; Hagihara, Akihito

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To better understand and predict clinical outcomes of paediatric out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Design A population-based, observational study. Setting The National Japan Utstein Registry. Participants 2900 children aged 5–17 years who experienced OHCA and received resuscitation by emergency responders. Signal detection analysis using 17 variables was applied to identify factors associated with OHCA outcomes; the primary endpoint was cerebral performance category (CPC) 1 or...

  1. Prolyl oligopeptidase inhibition-induced growth arrest of human gastric cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Kanayo [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Sakaguchi, Minoru, E-mail: sakaguti@gly.oups.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Tanaka, Satoshi [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Yoshimoto, Tadashi [Department of Life Science, Setsunan University, 17-8 Ikeda-Nakamachi, Neyagawa, Osaka 572-8508 (Japan); Takaoka, Masanori [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •We examined the effects of prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) inhibition on p53 null gastric cancer cell growth. •POP inhibition-induced cell growth suppression was associated with an increase in a quiescent G{sub 0} state. •POP might regulate the exit from and/or reentry into the cell cycle. -- Abstract: Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) is a serine endopeptidase that hydrolyzes post-proline peptide bonds in peptides that are <30 amino acids in length. We recently reported that POP inhibition suppressed the growth of human neuroblastoma cells. The growth suppression was associated with pronounced G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle arrest and increased levels of the CDK inhibitor p27{sup kip1} and the tumor suppressor p53. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of POP inhibition-induced cell growth arrest using a human gastric cancer cell line, KATO III cells, which had a p53 gene deletion. POP specific inhibitors, 3-((4-[2-(E)-styrylphenoxy]butanoyl)-L-4-hydroxyprolyl)-thiazolidine (SUAM-14746) and benzyloxycarbonyl-thioprolyl-thioprolinal, or RNAi-mediated POP knockdown inhibited the growth of KATO III cells irrespective of their p53 status. SUAM-14746-induced growth inhibition was associated with G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle phase arrest and increased levels of p27{sup kip1} in the nuclei and the pRb2/p130 protein expression. Moreover, SUAM-14746-mediated cell cycle arrest of KATO III cells was associated with an increase in the quiescent G{sub 0} state, defined by low level staining for the proliferation marker, Ki-67. These results indicate that POP may be a positive regulator of cell cycle progression by regulating the exit from and/or reentry into the cell cycle by KATO III cells.

  2. Unexpected Arrest-Related Deaths in America: 12 Months of Open Source Surveillance

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Jeffrey D; Heegaard, William G; Dawes, Donald M.; Natarajan, Sridhar; Reardon, Robert F.; Miner, James R.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Sudden, unexpected arrest-related death (ARD) has been associated with drug abuse, extreme delirium or certain police practices. There is insufficient surveillance and causation data available. We report 12 months of surveillance data using a novel data collection methodology. Methods: We used an open-source, prospective method to collect 12 consecutive months of data, including demographics, behavior, illicit substance use, control methods used, and time of collapse af...

  3. Willingness to Perform Chest Compression Only in Witnessed Cardiac Arrest Victims versus Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Nesreen Yaghmour; Mohammad Reza Movahed

    2015-01-01

    Background: Performing immediate bystander Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) is the most important factor that determines survival from cardiac arrest. Recommended mouth to mouth ventilation maneuver during CPR has led to lower rate of CPR performance in the population. Objectives: The present survey aimed to evaluate the willingness of nurses at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences for performing CPR versus chest-compression-only CPR. Patients and Methods: During a CPR course, we...

  4. Interposed Abdominal Compression CPR for an Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Victim Failing Traditional CPR

    OpenAIRE

    McClung, Christian D.; Alexander J. Anshus

    2015-01-01

    Interposed abdominal compression cardiopulmonary resuscitation (IAC-CPR) is an alternative technique to traditional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) that can improve perfusion and lead to restoration of circulation in patients with chest wall deformity either acquired through vigorous CPR or co-morbidity such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We report a case of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest where IAC-CPR allowed for restoration of spontaneous circulation and eventual ...

  5. Die Rolle von growth arrest specific protein 6 im Aldosteron induzierten Endorganschaden

    OpenAIRE

    Theuer, Stefanie

    2013-01-01

    Growth arrest specific protein 6 (Gas 6) is involved in inflammatory kidney diseases, vascular remodeling, cell adhesion, and thrombus formation. We explored a role for Gas 6 in aldosterone-induced target organ damage. We observed that Gas 6 was upregulated in rats with high aldosterone levels. Mineralocorticoid receptor blockade prevented target organ damage and decreased the elevated Gas 6 expression. Vascular smooth muscle cells given aldosterone increased their Gas 6 expression in vitro. ...

  6. The Impact of Legalizing Syringe Exchange Programs on Arrests Among Injection Drug Users in California

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez, Alexis N.; Bluthenthal, Ricky N.; Lorvick, Jennifer; Anderson, Rachel; Flynn, Neil; Kral, Alex H.

    2007-01-01

    Legislation passed in 2000 allowed syringe exchange programs (SEPs) in California to operate legally if local jurisdictions declare a local HIV public health emergency. Nonetheless, even in locales where SEPs are legal, the possession of drug paraphernalia, including syringes, remained illegal. The objective of this paper is to examine the association between the legal status of SEPs and individual arrest or citation for drug paraphernalia among injection drug users (IDUs) in California from ...

  7. Occlusive ascending aorta and arch atheroma treated with deep hypothermic circulatory arrest and thromboendarterectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’ Sullivan, Katie E.; Early, Sarah A.; Lawler, Leo; Hurley, John

    2013-01-01

    We describe an uncommon presentation of severely advanced aortic atherosclerosis in a 48-year old man with a history of hypertension and heavy smoking. Initial presentation with upper limb ischaemia led to the diagnosis of an aortic arch atheroma occluding 90% of the aortic lumen, managed with deep hypothermic circulatory arrest and aortic thromboendarterectomy. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of atherosclerotic plaque resulting in aortic occlusion and requiring emergent operative intervention. PMID:23956265

  8. Ibogaine-associated cardiac arrest and death: case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Meisner, Jessica A.; Wilcox, Susan R.; Jeremy B. Richards

    2016-01-01

    A naturally occurring hallucinogenic plant alkaloid, ibogaine has been used as an adjuvant for opiate withdrawal for the past 50 years. In the setting of an escalating nationwide opiate epidemic, use of substances such as ibogaine may also increase. Therefore, familiarity with the mechanisms and potential adverse effects of ibogaine is important for clinicians. We present the case report of a man whose use of ibogaine resulted in cardiac arrest and death, complemented by a review of the liter...

  9. Efficacy of Mild Hypothermia for the Treatment of Patients with Cardiac Arrest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Gao; Kang-Li Hui; Yu-Jie Wang; Lin Wu; Man-Lin Duan; Jian-Guo Xu; De-Xin Li

    2015-01-01

    Background:Therapeutic hypothermia has been recommended for the treatment of cardiac arrest patients who remain comatose after the return of spontaneous circulation.The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of mild hypothermia on patients with cardiac arrest by conducting a meta-analysis.Methods:The relevant trials were searched in Cochrane Library,PubMed,Web of Science,Embase,CNKI and Wan Fang Data from the date of their establishment to October 2014.Thereafter,the studies retrieved were screened based on predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria.Data were extracted,and the quality of the included studies was evaluated.A meta-analysis was conducted using the Cochrane Collaboration Review Manager 5.2 software.Results:Six randomized controlled trials involving 531 cases were included,among which 273 cases were assigned to the treatment group and the other 258 cases to the control group.The meta-analysis indicated that mild hypothermia therapy after cardiac arrest produced significant differences in survival rate (relative risk [RR] =1.23,95% confidence interval [CI]:1.02-1.48,P =0.03) and neurological function (RR =1.33,95% CI:1.08-1.65,P =0.007) after 6 months compared with normothermia therapy.However,no significant differences were observed in the survival to the hospital discharge (RR =1.35,95% CI:0.87-2.10,P =0.18),favorable neurological outcome at hospital discharge (RR =1.53,95% CI:0.95-2.45,P =0.08) and adverse events.Conclusions:The meta-analysis demonstrated that mild hypothermia can improve the survival rate and neurological function of patients with cardiac arrest after 6 months.On the other hand,regarding the survival to hospital discharge,favorable neurological outcome at hospital discharge,and adverse events,our meta-analysis produced nonsignificant results.

  10. Courts and Compliance in the European Union: The European Arrest Warrant in National Constitutional Courts

    OpenAIRE

    Siegel, Scott

    2008-01-01

    The member states of the European Union have expanded the tools they use to cooperate in combating transnational crime and terrorism. Chief among these is the Framework Decision on the European Arrest Warrant, which requires judicial and police authorities to bypass all national extradition procedures involving suspects residing in an EU member state. Only Germany, Poland, Italy, and the Republic of Cyprus experienced severe delays in implementing the required national legislat...

  11. Prehospital therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest - from current concepts to a future standard

    OpenAIRE

    Hoppu Sanna; Kämäräinen Antti; Silfvast Tom; Virkkunen Ilkka

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to improve survival and neurological outcome after prehospital cardiac arrest. Existing experimental and clinical evidence supports the notion that delayed cooling results in lesser benefit compared to early induction of mild hypothermia soon after return of spontaneous circulation. Therefore a practical approach would be to initiate cooling already in the prehospital setting. The purpose of this review was to evaluate current clinical studies o...

  12. Identifying non-technical skills and barriers for improvement of teamwork in cardiac arrest teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P.O.; Jensen, Michael Kammer; Lippert, A.;

    2010-01-01

    2006 to November 2006. Interviews were focussed on barriers and recommendations for teamwork in the cardiac arrest team, optimal policy for improvement of resuscitation training and clinical practice, use of cognitive aids and adoption of European Resuscitation Council (ERC) Guidelines 2005. Interviews...... task management. Important barriers that were identified were inexperienced team leaders, task overload and hierarchic structure in the teams' inability to maintain focus on chest compressions. Conclusion: Interview participants pointed out that NTSs of teams could improve the treatment of cardiac...

  13. Advantages of a cohort study on cardiac arrest conducted by nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Cássia Regina Vancini Campanharo; Rodrigo Luiz Vancini; Maria Carolina Barbosa Teixeira Lopes; Meiry Fernanda Pinto Okuno; Ruth Ester Assayag Batista; Álvaro Nagib Atallah; Aécio Flávio Teixeira de Góis

    2015-01-01

    AbstractOBJECTIVEIdentifying factors associated to survival after cardiac arrest.METHODAn experience report of a cohort study conducted in a university hospital, with a consecutive sample comprised of 285 patients. Data were collected for a year by trained nurses. The training strategy was conducted through an expository dialogue lecture. Collection monitoring was carried out by nurses via telephone calls, visits to the emergency room and by medical record searches. The neurological status of...

  14. The utility of cardiac sonography and capnography in predicting outcome in cardiac arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Bret P; Patel, Vaishali R.; Norris, Marlaina M.; Richardson, Barbara K.

    2008-01-01

    Emergency physicians and intensivists are increasingly utilizing capnography and bedside echocardiography during medical resuscitations. These techniques have shown promise in predicting outcomes in cardiac arrest, and no cases of return of spontaneous circulation in the setting of sonographic cardiac standstill and low end-tidal carbon dioxide have been reported. This case report illustrates an example of such an occurrence. Our aims are to report a case of return of spontaneous circulation ...

  15. Occlusive ascending aorta and arch atheroma treated with deep hypothermic circulatory arrest and thromboendarterectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O' Sullivan, Katie E

    2013-12-01

    We describe an uncommon presentation of severely advanced aortic atherosclerosis in a 48-year old man with a history of hypertension and heavy smoking. Initial presentation with upper limb ischaemia led to the diagnosis of an aortic arch atheroma occluding 90% of the aortic lumen, managed with deep hypothermic circulatory arrest and aortic thromboendarterectomy. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of atherosclerotic plaque resulting in aortic occlusion and requiring emergent operative intervention.

  16. Occlusive ascending aorta and arch atheroma treated with deep hypothermic circulatory arrest and thromboendarterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O' Sullivan, Katie E; Early, Sarah A; Lawler, Leo; Hurley, John

    2013-12-01

    We describe an uncommon presentation of severely advanced aortic atherosclerosis in a 48-year old man with a history of hypertension and heavy smoking. Initial presentation with upper limb ischaemia led to the diagnosis of an aortic arch atheroma occluding 90% of the aortic lumen, managed with deep hypothermic circulatory arrest and aortic thromboendarterectomy. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of atherosclerotic plaque resulting in aortic occlusion and requiring emergent operative intervention. PMID:23956265

  17. Occlusive ascending aorta and arch atheroma treated with deep hypothermic circulatory arrest and thromboendarterectomy

    OpenAIRE

    O’ Sullivan, Katie E.; Early, Sarah A; Lawler, Leo; Hurley, John

    2013-01-01

    We describe an uncommon presentation of severely advanced aortic atherosclerosis in a 48-year old man with a history of hypertension and heavy smoking. Initial presentation with upper limb ischaemia led to the diagnosis of an aortic arch atheroma occluding 90% of the aortic lumen, managed with deep hypothermic circulatory arrest and aortic thromboendarterectomy. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of atherosclerotic plaque resulting in aortic occlusion and requiring emergent ope...

  18. Cardiac Arrest following a Myocardial Infarction in a Child Treated with Methylphenidate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Kim; Gormsen, Lise Kirstine; Kim, Won Yong;

    2015-01-01

    -years, did not report any cases of myocardial infarction in current users of methylphenidate, and the risk of serious adverse cardiac events was not found to be increased. We present a case with an 11-year-old child, treated with methylphenidate, who suffered cardiac arrest and was diagnosed with a remote...... myocardial infarction. This demonstrates that myocardial infarction can happen due to methylphenidate exposure in a cardiac healthy child, without cardiovascular risk factors....

  19. Dynamic Arrest in Polymer Melts: Competition between Packing and Intramolecular Barriers

    OpenAIRE

    Bernabei, Marco; Moreno, Ángel J.; Colmenero, Juan

    2008-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics simulations of a simple model for polymer melts with intramolecular barriers. We investigate structural relaxation as a function of the barrier strength. Dynamic correlators can be consistently analyzed within the framework of the mode coupling theory of the glass transition. Control parameters are tuned in order to induce a competition between general packing effects and polymer-specific intramolecular barriers as mechanisms for dynamic arrest. This competition ...

  20. Automated analysis of background EEG and reactivity during therapeutic hypothermia in comatose patients after cardiac arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Noirhomme, Quentin; Lehembre, Rémy; Lugo, Zulay; Lesenfants, Damien; Luxen, André; Laureys, Steven; Oddo, Mauro; Rossetti, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Visual analysis of electroencephalography (EEG) background and reactivity during therapeutic hypothermia provides important outcome information, but is time-consuming and not always consistent between reviewers. Automated EEG analysis may help quantify the brain damage. Forty-six comatose patients in therapeutic hypothermia, after cardiac arrest, were included in the study. EEG background was quantified with burst-suppression ratio (BSR) and approximate entropy, both used to monitor anesthesi...

  1. Demographics, Bystander CPR, and AED Use in Out-of-Hospital Pediatric Arrests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M. Austin; Grahan, Brian J. H.; Haukoos, Jason S.; McNally, Bryan; Campbell, Robert; Sasson, Comilla; Slattery, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Background In 2005 the American Heart Association released guidelines calling for routine use of automated external defibrillators during pediatric out-of-hospital arrest. The goal of this study was to determine if these guidelines are used during resuscitations. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of prospectively collected data from 29 U.S. cities that participate in the Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival (CARES). Patients were included if they were older than 1 year of age and had a documented resuscitation attempt from October 1, 2005 through December 31, 2009 from an arrest presumed to be cardiac in nature. Hierarchical multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the associations between age, demographic factors, and AED use. Results 129 patients were 1–8 years of age (younger children), 88 patients were 9–17 years of age (older children), and 19,338 patients were ≥18 years of age (adults). When compared to adults, younger children were less likely to be found in a shockable rhythm (young children 11.6%, adults 23.7%) and were less likely to have an AED used (young children 16.3%, adults 28.3%). Older children had a similar prevalence of shockable rhythms as adults (31.8%) and AED use (20.5%). A multivariable analysis demonstrated that, when compared to adults, younger children had decreased odds of having an AED used (OR 0.42, 95% CI 0.26–0.69), but there was no difference in AED use among older children and adults. Conclusions Young children suffering from presumed out-of-hospital cardiac arrests are less likely to have a shockable rhythm when compared to adults, and are less likely to have an AED used during resuscitation. PMID:24681302

  2. Growth arrest-specific protein 6 plasma concentrations during septic shock

    OpenAIRE

    Gibot, Sébastien; Massin, Frédéric; Cravoisy, Aurélie; Dupays, Rachel; Barraud, Damien; Nace, Lionel; Bollaert, Pierre-Edouard

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The product of growth arrest-specific gene 6 (Gas6) is a vitamin K dependent protein that is secreted by leucocytes and endothelial cells in response to injury and participates in cell survival, proliferation, migration and adhesion. Our purpose was to investigate plasma Gas6 concentration and its relation to organ dysfunction in patients with septic shock. Methods Forty-five patients with septic shock admitted to a medical adult intensive care unit were enrolled. Plasma Gas6 con...

  3. Leukocyte arrest: Biomechanics and molecular mechanisms of β2 integrin activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhichao; Ley, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Integrins are a group of heterodimeric transmembrane receptors that play essential roles in cell–cell and cell–matrix interaction. Integrins are important in many physiological processes and diseases. Integrins acquire affinity to their ligand by undergoing molecular conformational changes called activation. Here we review the molecular biomechanics during conformational changes of integrins, integrin functions in leukocyte biorheology (adhesive functions during rolling and arrest) and molecules involved in integrin activation. PMID:26684674

  4. Cerebral perfusion in cardiac surgery : with special reference to circulatory arrest during profound hypothermia

    OpenAIRE

    Astudillo Ley, Rafael

    1998-01-01

    Thirty-nine pediatric and 82 adult patients were studied during cardiac surgery with cardio pulmonary bypass (CPB) performed with moderate hypothermia or with deep hypothermia and circulatory arrest (DHCA) with or-without retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP). Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was estimated from Doppler measurements of the blood velocity in the middle cerebral artery (MCAv). Arterio-venous (jugular bulb) differences of blood lactate and oxygen were used to study cereb...

  5. From the school yard to the squad car: school discipline, truancy, and arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, Kathryn C; VanDerhei, Susan; Bechtold, Jordan; Cauffman, Elizabeth

    2014-07-01

    Since the 1990's, implementation of zero tolerance policies in schools has led to increased use of school suspension and expulsion as disciplinary techniques for students with varying degrees of infractions. An unintended consequence of zero tolerance policies is that school suspension or expulsion may increase risk for contact with the juvenile justice system. In the present study, we test how forced absence from school via suspension or expulsion and chosen absence from school (truancy) are associated with the likelihood of being arrested. Using month-level data from 6,636 months from a longitudinal study of delinquent adolescents (N = 1,354; 13.5 % female; 41.5 % Black, 33.5 % Hispanic-American, 20.2 % White), we compare the likelihood of being arrested, within individuals, for months when youth were and were not suspended or expelled from school and for months when youth were and were not truant. Finally, we test if these associations were moderated by stable demographic characteristics (sex, race, age, history of problem behaviors) and time-varying contextual factors (peer delinquency, parental monitoring, and commitment to school). Being suspended or expelled from school increased the likelihood of arrest in that same month and this effect was stronger among youth who did not have a history of behavior problems and when youth associated with less delinquent peers. Truancy independently contributed to the likelihood of arrest, but this association was explained by differences in parental monitoring and school commitment. Thus, school disciplinary action places youth at risk for involvement in the juvenile justice system and this may be especially true for less risky youth. PMID:24526497

  6. Cortical brain microdialysis and temperature monitoring during hypothermic circulatory arrest in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Mendelowitsch, A; Mergner, G; Shuaib, A.; Sekhar, L

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Critical vascular surgery of the brain or the heart occasionally requires total cessation of the circulatory system. Profound hypothermia is used to protect the brain from ischaemic injury. This study explores the use of microdialysis to measure metabolic indices of ischaemia: glutamate, lactate, and pH, and cerebral temperature during profound hypothermia and circulatory arrest.
METHODS—Effluent from a microdialysis catheter placed in the cerebral cortex of three...

  7. Divergence to apoptosis from ROS induced cell cycle arrest: Effect of cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Soumya; Kundu, Subhadip; Sengupta, Suman [Department of Environmental Science, University of Kalyani, West Bengal 741235 (India); Department of Zoology, University of Calcutta, Calcutta-700019, West Bengal (India); Bhattacharyya, Arindam, E-mail: arindam19@yahoo.com [Department of Environmental Science, University of Kalyani, West Bengal 741235 (India); Department of Zoology, University of Calcutta, Calcutta-700019, West Bengal (India)

    2009-04-26

    Recently, the role of cadmium (Cd) in immunosupression has gained importance. Nevertheless, the signaling pathways underlying cadmium-induced immune cell death remains largely unclear. In accordance to our previous in vivo report, and to evaluate the further details of the mechanism, we have investigated the effects of cadmium (CdCl{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O) on cell cycle regulation and apoptosis in splenocytes in vitro. Our results have revealed that reactive oxygen species (ROS) and p21 are involved in cell cycle arrest in a p53 independent manner but late hour apoptotic response was accompanied by the p53 up-regulation, loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (MTP), down-regulation of Bcl-xl, activation of caspase-3 and release of cytochrome c (Cyt c). However, pifithrin alfa (PFT-{alpha}), an inhibitor of p53, fails to rescue the cells from the cadmium-induced cell cycle arrest but prevents Bcl-xl down-regulation and loss of {Delta}{psi}{sub m}, which indicates that there is an involvement of p53 in apoptosis. In contrast, treatment with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) can prevent cell cycle arrest and p21 up-regulation at early hours. Although it is clear that, NAC has no effect on apoptosis, p53 expression and MPT changes at late stage events. Taken together, we have demonstrated that cadmium promotes ROS generation, which potently initiates the cell cycle arrest at early hours and finally induces p53-dependent apoptosis at later part of the event.

  8. Human neutrophil Fc receptor-mediated adhesion under flow: a hollow fibre model of intravascular arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arrigo, C; Candal-Couto, J J; Greer, M; Veale, D J; Woof, J M

    1995-04-01

    Human polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) were found to adhere to a novel model of blood vessel wall-associated IgG. The internal surfaces of cellulose acetate hollow fibres, of comparable internal diameter to small blood vessels, were coated with normal serum human IgG, heat-aggregated IgG (HAIgG), laminin or fibrinogen. Under conditions of flow mimicking those in a small vessel, PMN were found to adhere markedly only to immunoglobulin-coated fibres. Arrest on HAIgG was inhibited by excess soluble IgG but not by bovine serum albumin (BSA), demonstrating that the adhesion was IgG-specific and presumably mediated by Fc gamma R on the PMN surface. Pre-adsorption of serum components onto HAIgG-coated fibres enhanced PMN arrest, due most probably to fixation of complement components by immobilized HAIgG, resulting in additional potential to entrap PMN via complement receptors such as CR3. Treatment of PMN with the regulatory neuropeptide substance P also enhanced adhesion to HAIgG-coated fibres and caused increased surface expression of Fc gamma RI, Fc gamma RII and Fc gamma RIII. A mouse cell line derived from L cells, hR4C6, stably transfected with human Fc gamma RII, was found to adhere under flow to HAIgG-coated fibres, whilst untransfected parent L cells did not. This adhesion was similarly inhibited by excess soluble IgG, confirming the capability of Fc gamma R to mediate cell arrest. The study strongly suggests that Fc gamma R may play an important role in intravascular PMN arrest and we speculate that in inflammatory diseases PMN may adhere via Fc gamma R to immobilized immunoglobulin on the vascular endothelium, with subsequent degranulation and tissue damage. PMID:7535210

  9. SPARC expression induces cell cycle arrest via STAT3 signaling pathway in medulloblastoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chetty, Chandramu [Department of Cancer Biology and Pharmacology, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, One Illini Drive, Peoria, IL-61605 (United States); Dontula, Ranadheer [Section of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Chicago, 840 South Wood Street, Suite 820-E, Chicago, IL-60612 (United States); Ganji, Purnachandra Nagaraju [Department of Cancer Biology and Pharmacology, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, One Illini Drive, Peoria, IL-61605 (United States); Gujrati, Meena [Department of Pathology, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, One Illini Drive, Peoria, IL-61605 (United States); Lakka, Sajani S., E-mail: slakka@uic.edu [Section of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Chicago, 840 South Wood Street, Suite 820-E, Chicago, IL-60612 (United States)

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ectopic expression of SPARC impaired cell proliferation in medulloblastoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SPARC expression induces STAT3 mediated cell cycle arrest in medulloblastoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SPARC expression significantly inhibited pre-established tumor growth in nude-mice. -- Abstract: Dynamic cell interaction with ECM components has profound influence in cancer progression. SPARC is a component of the ECM, impairs the proliferation of different cell types and modulates tumor cell aggressive features. We previously reported that SPARC expression significantly impairs medulloblastoma tumor growth in vivo. In this study, we demonstrate that expression of SPARC inhibits medulloblastoma cell proliferation. MTT assay indicated a dose-dependent reduction in tumor cell proliferation in adenoviral mediated expression of SPARC full length cDNA (Ad-DsRed-SP) in D425 and UW228 cells. Flow cytometric analysis showed that Ad-DsRed-SP-infected cells accumulate in the G2/M phase of cell cycle. Further, immunoblot and immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that SPARC induced G2/M cell cycle arrest was mediated through inhibition of the Cyclin-B-regulated signaling pathway involving p21 and Cdc2 expression. Additionally, expression of SPARC decreased STAT3 phosphorylation at Tyr-705; constitutively active STAT3 expression reversed SPARC induced G2/M arrest. Ad-DsRed-SP significantly inhibited the pre-established orthotopic tumor growth and tumor volume in nude-mice. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor sections from mice treated with Ad-DsRed-SP showed decreased immunoreactivity for pSTAT3 and increased immunoreactivity for p21 compared to tumor section from mice treated with mock and Ad-DsRed. Taken together our studies further reveal that STAT3 plays a key role in SPARC induced G2/M arrest in medulloblastoma cells. These new findings provide a molecular basis for the mechanistic understanding of the

  10. Postnatal telomere dysfunction induces cardiomyocyte cell-cycle arrest through p21 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aix, Esther; Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez, Óscar; Sánchez-Ferrer, Carlota; Aguado, Tania; Flores, Ignacio

    2016-06-01

    The molecular mechanisms that drive mammalian cardiomyocytes out of the cell cycle soon after birth remain largely unknown. Here, we identify telomere dysfunction as a critical physiological signal for cardiomyocyte cell-cycle arrest. We show that telomerase activity and cardiomyocyte telomere length decrease sharply in wild-type mouse hearts after birth, resulting in cardiomyocytes with dysfunctional telomeres and anaphase bridges and positive for the cell-cycle arrest protein p21. We further show that premature telomere dysfunction pushes cardiomyocytes out of the cell cycle. Cardiomyocytes from telomerase-deficient mice with dysfunctional telomeres (G3 Terc(-/-)) show precocious development of anaphase-bridge formation, p21 up-regulation, and binucleation. In line with these findings, the cardiomyocyte proliferative response after cardiac injury was lost in G3 Terc(-/-) newborns but rescued in G3 Terc(-/-)/p21(-/-) mice. These results reveal telomere dysfunction as a crucial signal for cardiomyocyte cell-cycle arrest after birth and suggest interventions to augment the regeneration capacity of mammalian hearts. PMID:27241915

  11. Modeling and Simulation of Arresting Gear System with Multibody Dynamic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhou Shen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The arresting dynamics of the aircraft on the aircraft carrier involves both a transient wave propagation process in rope and a smooth decelerating of aircraft. This brings great challenge on simulating the whole process since the former one needs small time-step to guarantee the stability, while the later needs large time-step to reduce calculation time. To solve this problem, this paper proposes a full-scale multibody dynamics model of arresting gear system making use of variable time-step integration scheme. Especially, a kind of new cable element that is capable of describing the arbitrary large displacement and rotation in three-dimensional space is adopted to mesh the wire cables, and damping force is used to model the effect of hydraulic system. Then, the stress of the wire ropes during the landing process is studied. Results show that propagation, reflection, and superposition of the stress wave between the deck sheaves contribute mainly to the peak value of stress. And the maximum stress in the case of landing deviate from the centerline is a little bit smaller than the case of landing along centerline. The multibody approach and arresting gear system model proposed here also provide an efficient way to design and optimize the whole mechanism.

  12. Nuclear reactor pressure vessel integrity insurance by crack arrestability evaluation using load from CVN tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work is undertaken in the framework of nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) surveillance and aims at revisiting the crack arrest approach to structural integrity insurance. This approach, performed under normal plant operation conditions, can also offer an attractive alternative to the crack initiation philosophy promoted for accidental analysis. To this end, an accidental conservative, cost effective and robust methodology is forwarded and demonstrated: it makes use of the crack arrest information contained in the instrumented Charpy V-notch impact test and/or in the shear fracture appearance of broken samples. Particular attention is paid to the appraisal of uncertainties and the related safety margin. The resulting capability is placed in perspective with the state-of-the-art crack initiation methodology based on the slow bend testing of recracked specimens, presently under standardization world-wide. The investigation leads to highlight three conceptual weaknesses of current enfgineering and regulatory practices. Improved crack arrestability evaluation emerges as an optimal approach to insure safe PWR operation up to design end-of-life and beyond

  13. Mitochondrial Malfunctioning, Proteasome Arrest and Apoptosis in Cancer Cells by Focused Intracellular Generation of Oxygen Radicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Postiglione

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Photofrin/photodynamic therapy (PDT at sub-lethal doses induced a transient stall in proteasome activity in surviving A549 (p53+/+ and H1299 (p53−/− cells as indicated by the time-dependent decline/recovery of chymotrypsin-like activity. Indeed, within 3 h of incubation, Photofrin invaded the cytoplasm and localized preferentially within the mitochondria. Its light activation determined a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and a reversible arrest in proteasomal activity. A similar result is obtained by treating cells with Antimycin and Rotenone, indicating, as a common denominator of this effect, the ATP decrease. Both inhibitors, however, were more toxic to cells as the recovery of proteasomal activity was incomplete. We evaluated whether combining PDT (which is a treatment for killing tumor cells, per se, and inducing proteasome arrest in the surviving ones with Bortezomib doses capable of sustaining the stall would protract the arrest with sufficient time to induce apoptosis in remaining cells. The evaluation of the mitochondrial membrane depolarization, residual proteasome and mitochondrial enzymatic activities, colony-forming capabilities, and changes in protein expression profiles in A549 and H1299 cells under a combined therapeutic regimen gave results consistent with our hypothesis.

  14. The centrosome protein NEDD1 as a potential pharmacological target to induce cell cycle arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etievant Chantal

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background NEDD1 is a protein that binds to the gamma-tubulin ring complex, a multiprotein complex at the centrosome and at the mitotic spindle that mediates the nucleation of microtubules. Results We show that NEDD1 is expressed at comparable levels in a variety of tumor-derived cell lines and untransformed cells. We demonstrate that silencing of NEDD1 expression by treatment with siRNA has differential effects on cells, depending on their status of p53 expression: p53-positive cells arrest in G1, whereas p53-negative cells arrest in mitosis with predominantly aberrant monopolar spindles. However, both p53-positive and -negative cells arrest in mitosis if treated with low doses of siRNA against NEDD1 combined with low doses of the inhibitor BI2536 against the mitotic kinase Plk1. Simultaneous reduction of NEDD1 levels and inhibition of Plk1 act in a synergistic manner, by potentiating the anti-mitotic activity of each treatment. Conclusion We propose that NEDD1 may be a promising target for controlling cell proliferation, in particular if targeted in combination with Plk1 inhibitors.

  15. Heavy-Section Steel Technology Program: Recent developments in crack initiation and arrest research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technology for the analysis of crack initiation and arrest is central to the reactor pressure vessel fracture-margin-assessment process. Regulatory procedures for nuclear plants utilize this technology to assure the retention of adequate fracture-prevention margins throughout the plant operating license period. As nuclear plants age and regulatory procedures dictate that fracture-margin assessments be performed, interest in the fracture-mechanics technology incorporated into those procedures has heightened. This has led to proposals from a number of sources for development and refinement of the underlying crack-initiation and arrest-analysis technology. An important element of the Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program is devoted to the investigation and evaluation of these proposals. This paper presents the technological bases and fracture-margin assessment objectives for some of the recently proposed crack-initiation and arrest-technology developments. The HSST Program approach to the evaluation of the proposals is described and the results and conclusions obtained to date are presented

  16. Simultaneous measurement of cerebral and muscle tissue parameters during cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosrati, Reyhaneh; Ramadeen, Andrew; Hu, Xudong; Woldemichael, Ermias; Kim, Siwook; Dorian, Paul; Toronov, Vladislav

    2015-03-01

    In this series of animal experiments on resuscitation after cardiac arrest we had a unique opportunity to measure hyperspectral near-infrared spectroscopy (hNIRS) parameters directly on the brain dura, or on the brain through the intact pig skull, and simultaneously the muscle hNIRS parameters. Simultaneously the arterial blood pressure and carotid and femoral blood flow were recorded in real time using invasive sensors. We used a novel hyperspectral signalprocessing algorithm to extract time-dependent concentrations of water, hemoglobin, and redox state of cytochrome c oxidase during cardiac arrest and resuscitation. In addition in order to assess the validity of the non-invasive brain measurements the obtained results from the open brain was compared to the results acquired through the skull. The comparison of hNIRS data acquired on brain surface and through the adult pig skull shows that in both cases the hemoglobin and the redox state cytochrome c oxidase changed in similar ways in similar situations and in agreement with blood pressure and flow changes. The comparison of simultaneously measured brain and muscle changes showed expected differences. Overall the results show feasibility of transcranial hNIRS measurements cerebral parameters including the redox state of cytochrome oxidase in human cardiac arrest patients.

  17. August 2014 Tucson critical care journal club: bacteremia in cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hypes C

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA is an uncommon, but important, condition encountered in the emergency department (ED. While cardiac arrest represents the final common pathway of multiple conditions, early evaluation often focuses on cardiac abnormalities. However, observed associations between infection, particularly pneumonia, and in-hospital cardiac arrest led Coba et al. (1 to investigate the incidence of bacteremia among OHCA patients. The study prospectively investigated 250 adult patients who presented to an academic ED with OHCA between 2007 and 2009. Two blood culture samples were drawn during resuscitation or shortly after return of spontaneous circulation through vascular devices placed for clinical purposes. Children, pregnant women, victims of trauma were excluded. To minimize false positive results, patients were classified as bacteremic if one sample was positive for a typical pathogen or both samples were positive for the same skin colonizing organism. Patients in whom only 1 sample was positive for suspected skin contaminant ...

  18. Evaluation of the presence of constraint in crack run/arrest events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crack arrest studies currently being conducted by the Heavy-Section Steel Technology Program are designed to improve our understanding of the conditions contributing to the arrest of a propagating fracture in a pressure vessel. These studies are generating data spanning a wide temperature range for a variety of experimental configurations. Dynamic crack arrest parameters are back-figured from these experiments through 'generation mode' dynamic viscoplastic finite element calculations driven by the measured crack tip history input. A major approximation in these analyses, which is dictated by the practical limitations of current supercomputer hardware, is the assumption of two-dimensional plane stress conditions. Although this approximation is reasonable over most of the problem domain for many test specimen geometries, it deteriorates at locations near the crack tip due to triaxial constraint effects. This paper describes plans for a fine-grained three-dimensional computational study to investigate the importance of these near-tip triaxial constraint effects on crack tip yielding and to develop appropriate algorithms for incorporating these effects into conventional two-dimensional plane stress approximations. (author)

  19. Ibogaine-associated cardiac arrest and death: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisner, Jessica A; Wilcox, Susan R; Richards, Jeremy B

    2016-04-01

    A naturally occurring hallucinogenic plant alkaloid, ibogaine has been used as an adjuvant for opiate withdrawal for the past 50 years. In the setting of an escalating nationwide opiate epidemic, use of substances such as ibogaine may also increase. Therefore, familiarity with the mechanisms and potential adverse effects of ibogaine is important for clinicians. We present the case report of a man whose use of ibogaine resulted in cardiac arrest and death, complemented by a review of the literature regarding ibogaine's clinical effects. A 40-year-old man who used ibogaine for symptoms of heroin withdrawal suffered acute cardiac arrest leading to cerebral edema and brain death. His presentation was consistent with ibogaine-induced cardiotoxicity and ibogaine-induced cardiac arrest, and a review of the literature regarding the history, mechanisms, risks and clinical outcomes associated with ibogaine is presented. The case presented underscores the significant potential clinical risks of ibogaine. It is important the healthcare community be aware of the possible effects of ibogaine such that clinicians can provide informed counseling to their patients regarding the risks of attempting detoxification with ibogaine. PMID:27141291

  20. The prognostic value of cardiac ultrasonography in patients with cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Bolvardi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Echocardiography or cardiac imaging is proposed as a gold standard method for identifying high risk patients for cardiac arrest. In this systematic review, we studied the prognostic value of cardiac sonography in patients with cardiac arrest. Methods: PubMed was searched for the relevant articles. Case reports were not included. Inclusion criteria were all the studies applied transthorasic echocardiography in patients with cardiac arrest arrived at emergency department that studied the efficacy of this modality on patients survived to emergency discharge and returned to spontaneous circulation.Result: Overall, 870 articles were obtained through initial search and only nine articles were included after the evaluation of the title, abstract, and the full text. Echocardiography has high sensitivity and specificity in predicting the return of spontaneous circulation.Conclusion: Cardiac sonography is a fairly effective (not definitive modality in predicting death in patients with lack of cardiac activity during resuscitation. Echocardiography should not be the sole basis for the decision to cease resuscitative efforts.

  1. Multivitamin and micronutrient treatment improves semen parameters of azoospermic patients with maturation arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amit K; Tiwari, Anil K; Singh, Pratap B; Dwivedi, Udai S; Trivedi, Sameer; Singh, Surya K; Agrawal, Neeraj K; Deshpande, Shripad B

    2010-01-01

    The study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of multivitamin and micronutrient supplementation in azoospermic patients with maturation arrest. A total of 35 azoospermic patients showing maturation arrest on testicular biopsy were recruited in this study. The patients were divided into two groups. Untreated group (n=11) without any treatment and treated group (n=24) who received multivitamins, micronutrients and co-enzyme Q10. The sperm concentration, motility and morphology were evaluated at monthly interval. The results showed reduction in liquefaction time and relative viscosity of the semen in the treated group. Further, in treated group there was appearance of spermatozoa (4.0 million/ml) exhibiting progressive motility (7%) and normal morphology (6%), even in the first follow up visit. The sperm count, motility and normal morphology increased significantly on subsequent visits. Within 3 months (3 visits) 2 pregnancies were reported. These observations indicate that multivitamin and micronutrient supplementation improve the qualitative and quantitative parameters of seminogram in patients with azoospermia of maturation arrest. PMID:21090533

  2. Cyclin E Is Stabilized in Response to Replication Fork Barriers Leading to Prolonged S Phase Arrest*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Jia; Legerski, Randy J.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclin E is a regulator of cyclin-dependent protein kinases (Cdks) and is involved in mediating the cell cycle transition from G1 to S phase. Here, we describe a novel function for cyclin E in the long term maintenance of checkpoint arrest in response to replication barriers. Exposure of cells to mitomycin C or UV irradiation, but not ionizing radiation, induces stabilization of cyclin E. Stabilization of cyclin E reduces the activity of Cdk2-cyclin A, resulting in a slowing of S phase progression and arrest. In addition, cyclin E is shown to be required for stabilization of Cdc6, which is required for activation of Chk1 and the replication checkpoint pathway. Furthermore, the stabilization of cyclin E in response to replication fork barriers depends on ATR, but not Nbs1 or Chk1. These results indicate that in addition to its well studied role in promoting cell cycle progression, cyclin E also has a role in regulating cell cycle arrest in response to DNA damage. PMID:19812034

  3. Somatostatin receptor-1 induces cell cycle arrest and inhibits tumor growth in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Wang, Xiaochi; Li, Wei; Li, Fei; Yang, Hui; Wang, Hao; Brunicardi, F Charles; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi; Fisher, William E

    2008-11-01

    Functional somatostatin receptors (SSTR) are lost in human pancreatic cancer. Transfection of SSTR-1 inhibited pancreatic cancer cell proliferation in vitro. We hypothesize that stable transfection of SSTR-1 may inhibit pancreatic cancer growth in vivo possibly through cell cycle arrest. In this study, we examined the expression of SSTR-1 mRNA in human pancreatic cancer tissue specimens, and investigated the effect of SSTR-1 overexpression on cell proliferation, cell cycle, and tumor growth in a subcutaneous nude mouse model. We found that SSTR-1 mRNA was downregulated in the majority of pancreatic cancer tissue specimens. Transfection of SSTR-1 caused cell cycle arrest at the G(0)/G(1) growth phase, with a corresponding decline of cells in the S (mitotic) phase. The overexpression of SSTR-1 significantly inhibited subcutaneous tumor size by 71% and 43% (n = 5, P < 0.05, Student's t-test), and inhibited tumor weight by 69% and 47% (n = 5, P < 0.05, Student's t-test), in Panc-SSTR-1 and MIA-SSTR-1 groups, respectively, indicating the potent inhibitory effect of SSTR-1 on pancreatic cancer growth. Our data demonstrate that overexpression of SSTR-1 significantly inhibits pancreatic cancer growth possibly through cell cycle arrest. This study suggests that gene therapy with SSTR-1 may be a potential adjuvant treatment for pancreatic cancer. PMID:18823376

  4. Involvement of ATM/ATR-p38 MAPK cascade in MNNG induced G1-S arrest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke-Qing Zhu; Suo-Jiang Zhang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To understand the effect of low concentration of Nmethyl-N′-nitro-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), which is a widely distributed environmental mutagen and carcinogen especially for human gastric cancer, on DNA damage and to study its possible pathway in regulating cell cycle arrest.METHODS: The DNA damage effect was measured by Comet assay. A specific phospho-(Ser/Thr) ATM/ATR substrate antibody was used to detect the damage sensor by Western blot. p38 kinase activity was measured by direct kinase assay,and immunoprecipitation for the possible connection between ATM/ATR and p38 MAPK. Flow cytometry analysis and p38MAPK specific inhibitor SB203580 were combined to detect the possible cell cycle arrest by p38 MAPK.RESULTS: With the same low concentration MNNG exposure (0.2μM 2.5 h), Comet assays indicated that strand breaks accumulated, Western blot and kinase assay showed ATM/ATR and p38 kinase activated, immunoprecipitation showed phospho-ATM/ATR substrate antibody combined with both p38 MAPK antibody and phospho-p38 MAPK antibody, p38MAPK pathway was involved in the G1-S arrest.CONCLUSION: Activation of ATM/ATR by MNNG induced DNA damage leads to activation of p38 MAPK, which involves in the G1 checkpoint in mammalian cells.

  5. Study of nuclear heat application systems for arresting CO2 emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the paper is to investigate the systems for arresting CO2 emission and for the effective utilization of fossil fuel. We studied the fossil fuel reforming systems to decrease the CO2 emission rate per unit amount of heat generation by fossil fuel. Feed materials for reforming system were natural gas, crude oil, oil sand, oil shale and coal. Products by reforming were hydrogen, methane, methanol and gasoline. We examined CO2 emission ratio of ten systems with different feed material and product. The CO2 emission ratio was the ratio of CO2 emission rate per unit amount of heat generation between the products and the feed materials, and was the important index. As the results, the CO2 emission ratio for the coal to methane reforming system using steam gasifier had the lowest value of 51%. It means that the CO2 emission rate of the product from the coal to methane reforming system was 51% of the emission rate of the feed material, that is, the system is very effective to arrest the CO2 emission. The CO2 emission ratio increases in the following order: the reforming systems from coal to methanol, heavy oil to hydrogen and natural gas to hydrogen. It was clarified that the system of coal to methane reforming was very effective for arresting CO2 emission compared to the other systems, moreover the nuclear heat using rate and thermal efficiency of the plant of the system were the highest. (author)

  6. Ultrastructural evaluation of recurrent and in-vitro maturation resistant metaphase I arrested oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windt, M L; Coetzee, K; Kruger, T F; Marino, H; Kitshoff, M S; Sousa, M

    2001-11-01

    An infertile couple whose female partner showed recurrent retrieval of immature metaphase I (MI) oocytes that were resistant to in-vitro maturation, was studied. Four spermiograms revealed teratozoospermia. Consistent non-fertilization and negative pregnancy outcomes were obtained after intrauterine insemination, gamete intra-Fallopian transfer and IVF. Two intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles were finally performed. All oocytes (n = 17) in both cycles were arrested at MI and failed to mature after 48 h culture. ICSI also resulted in total non-fertilization. In the last cycle, two oocytes were analysed by transmission electron microscopy and showed almost identical results. All organelles showed normal characteristics of an MI oocyte. The main abnormality found was related to the MI spindle, with absence of microtubules and dispersion of the female chromosomes. Minor abnormalities were observed (immature fibrous appearance of the zona pellucida; the presence of small vesicle aggregates which formed a foam-like body). The injected sperm nucleus was arrested in the middle of the chromatin decondensation process, with no visible nuclear envelope reformation. Normal disruption of sperm acrosomal and flagellar components were observed. Only a partial cortical reaction was observed. This represents the first documented case of developmental arrest due to complete absence of spindle formation in association with an otherwise mature ooplasm. PMID:11679527

  7. [Recent treatment of postischaemic anoxic brain damage after cardiac arrest by using therapeutic hypothermia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andjelić, Sladjana

    2008-01-01

    Organ injury caused by ischaemia and anoxia during prolonged cardiac arrest is compounded by reperfusion injury that occurs when spontaneous circulation is restored. Mild hypothermia (32-35 degrees C) is neuroprotective through several mechanisms, including suppression of apoptosis, reduced production of excitotoxins and free radicals, and anti-inflammatory actions. Experimental studies show that hypothermia is more effective the earlier it is started after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Two randomised clinical trials show improved survival and neurological outcome in adults who remained comatose after initial resuscitation from prehospital VF cardiac arrest, and who were cooled after ROSC. Different strategies can be used to induce hypothermia. Optimal timing of therapeutic hypothermia for cardiac ischaemia is unknown. In patients who failed to respond to standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation, intra-arrest cooling using ice-cold intravenous (i.v.) fluid improved the chance of survival. Recently, fasudil, a Rho kinase inhibitor, was reported to prevent cerebral ischaemia in vivo by increasing cerebral blood flow and inhibiting inflammatory responses. In future, two different kinds of protective therapies, BCL-2 overexpression and hypothermia,will both inhibit aspects of apoptotic cell death cascades, and that combination treatment can prolong the temporal "therapeutic window" for gene therapy. PMID:19069351

  8. Recent treatment of postischaemic anoxic brain damage after cardiac arrest by using therapeutic hypothermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anđelić Slađana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Organ injury caused by ischemia and anoxia during prolonged cardiac arrest is compounded by reperfusion injury that occurs when spontaneous circulation is restored. Mild hypothermia (32-35ºC is neuroprotective through several mechanisms, including suppression of apoptosis, reduced production of excitotoxins and free radicals, and anti-inflammatory actions. Experimental studies show that hypothermia is more effective the earlier it is started after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC. Two randomized clinical trials show improved survival and neurological outcome in adults who remained comatose after initial resuscitation from prehospital VF cardiac arrest, and who were cooled after ROSC. Different strategies can be used to induce hypothermia. Optimal timing of therapeutic hypothermia for cardiac ischemia is unknown. In patients who failed to respond to standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation, intra-arrest cooling using ice-cold intravenous (i.v. fluid improved the chance of survival. Recently, fasudil, a Rho kinase inhibitor, was reported to prevent cerebral ischaemia in vivo by increasing cerebral blood flow and inhibiting inflammatory responses. In future, two different kinds of protective therapies, BCL-2 overexpression and hypothermia, will both inhibit aspects of apoptotic cell death cascades, and that combination treatment can prolong the temporal 'therapeutic window' for gene therapy.

  9. Outcome after resuscitation beyond 30 minutes in drowned children with cardiac arrest and hypothermia : Dutch nationwide retrospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieboom, J. K.; Verkade, H. J.; Burgerhof, J. G.; Bierens, J. J.; van Rheenen, P. F.; Kneyber, M. C.; Albers, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To evaluate the outcome of drowned children with cardiac arrest and hypothermia, and to determine distinct criteria for termination of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in drowned children with hypothermia and absence of spontaneous circulation. DESIGN Nationwide retrospective cohort study. S

  10. Reversing the historical tide of iatrogenic harm: A therapeutic jurisprudence analysis of increases in arrests of domestic batterers and rapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Leonore M J; Ellwanger, Steven J; Haggerty, John

    2010-01-01

    Therapeutic jurisprudence (TJ) proposes that the law is a social force that can heal or cause harm to parties in a legal action. Historically, women victims of intimate partner rape and domestic violence could not seek justice in the legal system because police, like other actors in the justice system, treated these offenses as private matters or fabrications. In domestic violence and intimate rape cases, TJ is concerned with the needs of the victims, and how the law and police play a role in increasing their well-being. In this article, we use a TJ approach to the study of police responsiveness to victims of these offenses by investigating arrests of the offenders pursuant to law reforms that encourage or mandate arrest. Given that in these offenses, victims have the lowest reporting rates of any violent crime, the victim decision to call the police represents an expectation that the mere physical presence of a police officer may redefine the nature of the violence from a private conflict to a societal wrong that will not be tolerated. Police partnership with and treatment of the victim with respect and dignity can change the dynamics of the violence, terminate the violence, and set the criminal justice process in motion by arresting the offender in most cases. Police arrest, and subsequent prosecution and conviction, sends a message to offenders that society does not tolerate their violence, and allows the victim to begin to heal. Yet, past research indicates that police are less likely to arrest intimates than acquaintances and strangers in misdemeanor and aggravated assault, rape, and sexual assault cases. Using the National Incidence Reporting System (NIBRS) for the year 2000, we examine police arrests of intimate partner rape and domestic violence in jurisdictions with mandatory and presumptive arrest policies compared to police arrests in full discretion jurisdictions. We also ascertain whether arrest rates are higher for strangers and acquaintances than for

  11. RRR-α-tocopheryl succinate inhibits human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cell growth by inducing apoptosis and DNA synthesis arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Kun; ZHAO Yan; Liu, Bai-He; Li, Yao; Liu, Fang; Guo, Jian; Yu, Wei-Ping

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of growth inhibition of human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cell with RRR-α-tocopheryl succinate (VES), a derivative of natural Vitamin E, via inducing apoptosis and DNA synthesis arrest.

  12. Use of cold intravenous fluid to induce hypothermia in a comatose child after cardiac arrest due to a lightning strike.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Min; Jeong, Ju-Hwan; Kyong, Yeon-Young; Kim, Han-Joon; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Park, Jeong-Ho; Park, Kyu-Nam

    2008-11-01

    We report a case in which mild hypothermia was induced successfully using a cold intravenous fluid infusion in a 12-year-old boy who was comatose following 21 min of cardiac arrest caused by a lightning strike. PMID:18805616

  13. Evaluation of coronary blood flow velocity during cardiac arrest with circulation maintained through mechanical chest compressions in a porcine model

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner Henrik; Madsen Hardig Bjarne; Steen Stig; Sjoberg Trygve; Harnek Jan; Olivecrona Goran K

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Mechanical chest compressions (CCs) have been shown capable of maintaining circulation in humans suffering cardiac arrest for extensive periods of time. Reports have documented a visually normalized coronary blood flow during angiography in such cases (TIMI III flow), but it has never been actually measured. Only indirect measurements of the coronary circulation during cardiac arrest with on-going mechanical CCs have been performed previously through measurement of the cor...

  14. Bystander-initiated chest compression-only CPR is better than standard CPR in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Cabrini, L; Biondi-Zoccai, G; Landoni, G; Greco, M.; Vinciguerra, F; Greco, T; Ruggeri, L; Sayeg, J; Zangrillo, A

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest has a low survival rate to hospital discharge. Recent studies compared a simplified form of CPR, based on chest compression alone versus standard CPR including ventilation. We performed systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials, focusing on survival at hospital discharge. Methods We extensively searched the published literature on out-of hospital CPR for non traumatic cardiac arrest in different databases. Results We identi...

  15. Smoking marijuana in public: the spatial and policy shift in New York City arrests, 1992–2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golub Andrew

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the 1990s, the New York Police Department (NYPD greatly expanded arrests for smoking marijuana in public view (MPV. By 2000, MPV accounted for 15% of all arrests. The NYPD's supporters report this arrest activity is just part of quality-of-life (QOL policing, which seeks to promote order in public locations by aggressively patrolling for behaviors that offend the general population. The NYPD's critics contend the NYPD has disproportionately targeted poor, black and Hispanic communities. Methods This paper analyzes the geographic distribution of MPV arrests from 1992 to 2003 to evaluate these alternative perspectives. A sequence of maps identify that the focus of MPV arrests shifted over time. Results In the early 1990s, most MPV arrests were recorded in the lower half of Manhattan (NYC's business and cultural center and by the transit police. However, in the later 1990s and into the 2000s, most MPV arrests were recorded in high poverty, minority communities outside the lower Manhattan area and by the NYPD's policing of low-income housing projects. Conclusion These findings suggest that current levels of MPV arrests in NYC may not be justifiable, at least based solely on the purpose of QOL policing. Accordingly, we suggest the NYPD seriously consider less stringent measures for public marijuana smokers, especially for use outside of highly public locations in recessed locations hidden from open view (like the stairwell of a housing project. Alternatives could include Desk Appearance Tickets, fines, or simply requiring smokers to desist, discard their product, and move along.

  16. The Discretion That Matters: Federal Immigration Enforcement, State and Local Arrests, and the Civil-Criminal Line

    OpenAIRE

    MOTOMURA, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    This Article starts by analyzing the conventional wisdom, crystallized in the Ninth Circuit’s 1983 decision in Gonzales v. City of Peoria, that state and local law enforcement officers do not require express federal authorization to make arrests for criminal violations of federal immigration law. This view, I explain, is based on overreliance on the line between civil and criminal. Even if a state or local arrest for an immigration crime still leaves federal prosecutors with substantial discr...

  17. Involvement of Mos-MEK-MAPK pathway in cytostatic factor (CSF) arrest in eggs of the parthenogenetic insect, Athalia rosae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Daisuke S; Tachibana, Kazunori; Sumitani, Megumi; Lee, Jae Min; Hatakeyama, Masatsugu

    2008-01-01

    Extensive survey of meiotic metaphase II arrest during oocyte maturation in vertebrates revealed that the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway regulated by the c-mos proto-oncogene product, Mos, has an essential role in cytostatic activity, termed cytostatic factor (CSF). In contrast, little is known in invertebrates in which meiotic arrest occurs in most cases at metaphase I (MI arrest). A parthenogenetic insect, the sawfly Athalia rosae, in which artificial egg activation is practicable, has advantages to investigate the mechanisms of MI arrest. Both the MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase kinase (MEK) and MAPK were phosphorylated and maintained active in MI-arrested sawfly eggs, whereas they were dephosphorylated soon after egg activation. Treatment of MI-arrested eggs with U0126, an inhibitor of MEK, resulted in dephosphorylation of MAPK and MI arrest was resumed. The sawfly c-mos gene orthologue encoding a serine/threonine kinase was cloned and analyzed. It was expressed in nurse cells in the ovaries. To examine CSF activity of the sawfly Mos, synthesized glutathione S-transferase (GST)-fusion sawfly Mos protein was injected into MI-resumed eggs in which MEK and MAPK were dephosphorylated. Both MEK and MAPK were phosphorylated again upon injection. In these GST-fusion sawfly Mos-injected eggs subsequent mitotic (syncytial) divisions were blocked and embryonic development was ceased. These results demonstrated that the MEK-MAPK pathway was involved in maintaining CSF arrest in sawfly eggs and Mos functioned as its upstream regulatory molecule. PMID:18793721

  18. Retinoids arrest breast cancer cell proliferation: retinoic acid selectively reduces the duration of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Tighe, Ann P.; Talmage, David A

    2004-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) induces cell cycle arrest of hormone-dependent human breast cancer (HBC) cells. Previously, we demonstrated that RA-induced growth arrest of T-47D HBC cells required the activity of the RA-induced protein kinase, protein kinase Cα (PKCα) [J. Cell Physiol. 172 (1997) 306]. Here, we demonstrate that RA treatment of T-47D cells interfered with growth factor signaling to downstream, cytoplasmic and nuclear targets. RA treatment did not inhibit epidermal growth factor (EGF) rece...

  19. On the mechanisms governing dike arrest: Insight from the 2000 Miyakejima dike injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccaferri, F.; Rivalta, E.; Passarelli, L.; Aoki, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Magma stored beneath volcanoes is sometimes transported out of the magma chambers by means of laterally propagating dikes, which can lead to fissure eruptions if they intersect the Earth's surface. The driving force for lateral dike propagation can be a lateral tectonic stress gradient, the stress gradient due to the topographic loads, the overpressure of the magma chamber, or a combination of those forces. The 2000 dike intrusion at Miyakejima volcano, Izu arc, Japan, propagated laterally for about 30 km and stopped in correspondence of a strike-slip system, sub-perpendicular to the dike plane. Then the dike continued to inflate, without further propagation. Abundant seismicity was produced, including five M > 6 earthquakes, one of which occurred on the pre-existing fault system close to the tip of the dike, at approximately the time of arrest. It has been proposed that the main cause for the dike arrest was the fault-induced stress. Here we use a boundary element numerical approach to study the interplay between a propagating dike and a pre-stressed strike-slip fault and check the relative role played by dike-fault interaction and topographic loading in arresting the Miyakejima dike. We calibrate the model parameters according to previous estimates of dike opening and fault displacement based on crustal deformation observations. By computing the energy released during the propagation, our model indicates whether the dike will stop at a given location. We find that the stress gradient induced by the topography is needed for an opening distribution along the dike consistent with the observed seismicity, but it cannot explain its arrest at the prescribed location. On the other hand, the interaction of dike with the fault explains the arrest but not the opening distribution. The joint effect of the topographic load and the stress interaction with strike-slip fault is consistent with the observations, provided the pre-existing fault system is pre-loaded with a

  20. Radiation-induced apoptosis, necrosis and G2 arrest in Fadu and Hep2 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation damage is produced and viable cell number is reduced. We need to know the type of cell death by the ionizing radiation and the amount and duration of cell cycle arrest. In this study, we want to identified the main cause of the cellular damage in the oral cancer cells and normal keratinocytes with clinical useful radiation dosage. Human gingival tissue specimens obtained from healthy volunteers were used for primary culture of the normal human oral keratinocytes (NHOK). Primary NHOK were prepared from separated epithelial tissue and maintained in keratinocyte growth medium containing 0.15 mM calcium and a supplementary growth factor bullet kit as described previously. Fadu and Hep-2 cell lines were obtained from KCLB. Cells were irradiated in a (137) Cs gamma-irradiator at the dose of 10 Gy. The dose rate was 5.38 Gy/min. The necrotic cell death was examined with Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) activity in the culture medium. Every 4 day after irradiation, LDH activities were read and compared control group. Cell cycle phase distribution and preG1-incidence after radiation was analyzed by flow cytometry using Propidium Iodine (PI) staining. Cell cycle analysis were carried out with a FAC Star plus flowcytometry (FACS, Becton Dickinson, USA) and DNA histograms were processed with CELLFIT software (Becton Dickinson, USA). LDH activity increased in all of the experimental cells by the times. This pattern could be seen in the non-irradiated cells, and there was no difference between the non-irradiated cells and irradiated cells. We detected an induction of apoptosis after irradiation with a single dose of 10 Gy. The maximal rate of apoptosis ranged from 4.0% to 8.0% 4 days after irradiation. In all experimental cells, we detected G2/M arrest after irradiation with a single dose of 10 Gy. Yet there were differences in the number of G2/M arrested cells. The maximal rate of the G2/M ranges from 60.0% to 80.0% 24h after irradiation. There is no significant changes on

  1. Radiosensitization of NSCLC cells by EGFR inhibition is the result of an enhanced p53-dependent G1 arrest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: How EGF receptor (EGFR) inhibition induces cellular radiosensitization and with that increase in tumor control is still a matter of discussion. Since EGFR predominantly regulates cell cycle and proliferation, we studied whether a G1-arrest caused by EGFR inhibition may contribute to these effects. Materials and methods: We analyzed human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines either wild type (wt) or mutated in p53 (A549, H460, vs. H1299, H3122) and HCT116 cells (p21 wt and negative). EGFR was inhibited by BIBX1382BS, erlotinib or cetuximab; p21 was knocked down by siRNA. Functional endpoints analyzed were cell signaling, proliferation, G1-arrest, cell survival as well as tumor control using an A549 tumor model. Results: When combined with IR, EGFR inhibition enhances the radiation-induced permanent G1 arrest, though solely in cells with intact p53/p21 signaling. This increase in G1-arrest was always associated with enhanced cellular radiosensitivity. Strikingly, this effect was abrogated when cells were re-stimulated, suggesting the initiation of dormancy. In line with this, only a small non-significant increase in tumor control was observed for A549 tumors treated with fractionated RT and EGFR inhibition. Conclusion: For NSCLC cells increase in radiosensitivity by EGFR inhibition results from enhanced G1-arrest. However, this effect does not lead to improved tumor control because cells can be released from this arrest by re-stimulation

  2. Berberine induces p53-dependent cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of human osteosarcoma cells by inflicting DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Zhaojian; Liu Qiao; Xu Bing; Wu Jingjing [Key Laboratory of Experimental Teratology of Ministry of Education and Institute of Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China); Guo Chun; Zhu Faliang [Institute of Immunology, Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China); Yang Qiaozi [Department of Genetics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Gao Guimin [Key Laboratory of Experimental Teratology of Ministry of Education and Institute of Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China); Gong Yaoqin [Key Laboratory of Experimental Teratology of Ministry of Education and Institute of Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China)], E-mail: yxg8@sdu.edu.cn; Shao Changshun [Key Laboratory of Experimental Teratology of Ministry of Education and Institute of Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China); Department of Genetics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)], E-mail: shao@biology.rutgers.edu

    2009-03-09

    Alkaloid berberine is widely used for the treatment of diarrhea and other diseases. Many laboratory studies showed that it exhibits anti-proliferative activity against a wide spectrum of cancer cells in culture. In this report we studied the mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effects of berberine on human osteosarcoma cells and on normal osteoblasts. The inhibition was largely attributed to cell cycle arrest at G1 and G2/M, and to a less extent, to apoptosis. The G1 arrest was dependent on p53, as G1 arrest was abolished in p53-deficient osteosarcoma cells. The induction of G1 arrest and apoptosis was accompanied by a p53-dependent up-regulation of p21 and pro-apoptotic genes. However, the G2/M arrest could be induced by berberine regardless of the status of p53. Interestingly, DNA double-strand breaks, as measured by the phosphorylation of H2AX, were remarkably accumulated in berberine-treated cells in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, one major mechanism by which berberine exerts its growth-inhibitory effect is to inflict genomic lesions on cells, which in turn trigger the activation of p53 and the p53-dependent cellular responses including cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

  3. CRIF1 interacting with CDK2 regulates bone marrow microenvironment-induced G0/G1 arrest of leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Ran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To assess the level of CR6-interacting factor 1 (CRIF1, a cell cycle negative regulator, in patients with leukemia and investigate the role of CRIF1 in regulating leukemia cell cycle. METHODS: We compared the CRIF1 level in bone marrow (BM samples from healthy and acute myeloid leukemia (AML, iron deficiency anemia (IDA and AML-complete remission (AML-CR subjects. We also manipulated CRIF1 level in the Jurkat cells using lentivirus-mediated overexpression or siRNA-mediated depletion. Co-culture with the BM stromal cells (BMSCs was used to induce leukemia cell cycle arrest and mimic the BM microenvironment. RESULTS: We found significant decreases of CRIF1 mRNA and protein in the AML group. CRIF1 overexpression increased the proportion of Jurkat cells arrested in G0/G1, while depletion of endogenous CRIF1 decreased cell cycle arrest. Depletion of CRIF1 reversed BMSCs induced cell cycle arrest in leukemia cells. Co-immunoprecipitation showed a specific binding of CDK2 to CRIF1 in Jurkat cells during cell cycle arrest. Co-localization of two proteins in both nucleus and cytoplasm was also observed with immunofluorescent staining. CONCLUSION: CRIF1 may play a regulatory role in the BM microenvironment-induced leukemia cell cycle arrest possibly through interacting with CDK2 and acting as a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor.

  4. Growth inhibitory effect of 4-phenyl butyric acid on human gastric cancer cells is associated with cell cycle arrest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Long-Zhu Li; Hong-Xia Deng; Wen-Zhu Lou; Xue-Yan Sun; Meng-Wan Song; Jing Tao; Bing-Xiu Xiao; Jun-Ming Guo

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the growth effects of 4-phenyl butyric acid (PBA) on human gastric carcinoma cells and their mechanisms. METHODS: Moderately-differentiated human gastric carcinoma SGC-7901 and lowly-differentiated MGC-803 cells were treated with 5, 10, 20, 40, and 60 μmol/L PBA for 1-4 d. Cell proliferation was detected using the MTT colorimetric assay. Cell cycle distributions were examined using flow cytometry. RESULTS: The proliferation of gastric carcinoma cells was inhibited by PBA in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Flow cytometry showed that SGC-7901 cells treated with low concentrations of PBA were arrested at the G0/G1 phase, whereas cells treated with high concentrations of PBA were arrested at the G2/M phase. Although MGC-803 cells treated with low concentrations of PBA were also arrested at the G0/G1 phase, cells treated with high concentrations of PBA were arrested at the S phase. CONCLUSION: The growth inhibitory effect of PBA on gastric cancer cells is associated with alteration of the cell cycle. For moderately-differentiated gastric cancer cells, the cell cycle was arrested at the G0/G1 and G2/M phases. For lowly-differentiated gastric cancer cells, the cell cycle was arrested at the G0/G1 and S phases.

  5. Predicting the outcomes for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients using multiple biomarkers and suspension microarray assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chien-Hua; Tsai, Min-Shan; Chien, Kuo-Liong; Chang, Wei-Tien; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Chen, Shyr-Chyr; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming; Hsu, Hsin-Yun; Chen, Wen-Jone

    2016-01-01

    Predicting the prognosis for cardiac arrest is still challenging. Combining biomarkers from diverse pathophysiological pathways may provide reliable indicators for the severity of injury and predictors of long-term outcomes. We investigated the feasibility of using a multimarker strategy with key independent biomarkers to improve the prediction of outcomes in cardiac arrest. Adult out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients with sustained return of spontaneous circulation were prospectively enrolled in this study. Blood samples were taken at 2 and 24 hours after cardiac arrest. Suspension microarray assays were used to test 21 different biomarkers. A total of 99 patients were enrolled, 45 of whom survived to hospital discharge. We identified 11 biomarkers that, when combined with clinical variables and factors of APACHE II score and history of arrhythmia, were independent determinants for outcome of in-hospital mortality (concordance = 0.9249, standard error = 0.0779). Three biomarkers combined with APACHE II and age were independent determinants for favorable neurological outcome at hospital discharge (area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve, 0.938; 95% confidence interval, 0.854 ~ 1.0). In conclusion, a systemic multiple biomarker approach using suspension microarray assays can identify independent predictors and model the outcomes of cardiac arrest patients during the post-cardiac arrest period. PMID:27256246

  6. Respiratory syncytial virus matrix protein induces lung epithelial cell cycle arrest through a p53 dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Tao; Gibbs, John D; Örvell, Claes; Imani, Farhad

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of viral respiratory infections in children. Our previous study showed that the RSV infection induced lung epithelial cell cycle arrest, which enhanced virus replication. To address the mechanism of RSV-induced cell cycle arrest, we examined the contribution of RSV-matrix (RSV-M) protein. In this report, we show that in both the A549 cell line and primary human bronchial epithelial (PHBE) cells, transfection with RSV-M protein caused the cells to proliferate at a slower rate than in control cells. The cell cycle analysis showed that RSV-M protein induced G1 phase arrest in A549 cells, and G1 and G2/M phase arrest in PHBE cells. Interestingly, RSV-M expression induced p53 and p21 accumulation and decreased phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (Rb). Further, induction of cell cycle arrest by RSV-M was not observed in a p53-deficient epithelial cell line (H1299). However, cell cycle arrest was restored after transfection of p53 cDNA into H1299 cells. Taken together, these results indicate that RSV-M protein regulates lung epithelial cell cycle through a p53-dependent pathway, which enhances RSV replication. PMID:22662266

  7. Respiratory syncytial virus matrix protein induces lung epithelial cell cycle arrest through a p53 dependent pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Bian

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the major cause of viral respiratory infections in children. Our previous study showed that the RSV infection induced lung epithelial cell cycle arrest, which enhanced virus replication. To address the mechanism of RSV-induced cell cycle arrest, we examined the contribution of RSV-matrix (RSV-M protein. In this report, we show that in both the A549 cell line and primary human bronchial epithelial (PHBE cells, transfection with RSV-M protein caused the cells to proliferate at a slower rate than in control cells. The cell cycle analysis showed that RSV-M protein induced G1 phase arrest in A549 cells, and G1 and G2/M phase arrest in PHBE cells. Interestingly, RSV-M expression induced p53 and p21 accumulation and decreased phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (Rb. Further, induction of cell cycle arrest by RSV-M was not observed in a p53-deficient epithelial cell line (H1299. However, cell cycle arrest was restored after transfection of p53 cDNA into H1299 cells. Taken together, these results indicate that RSV-M protein regulates lung epithelial cell cycle through a p53-dependent pathway, which enhances RSV replication.

  8. Serial measurement of neuron specific enolase improves prognostication in cardiac arrest patients treated with hypothermia: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Storm Christian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuron specific enolase (NSE has repeatedly been evaluated for neurological prognostication in patients after cardiac arrest. However, it is unclear whether current guidelines for NSE cutoff levels also apply to cardiac arrest patients treated with hypothermia. Thus, we investigated the prognostic significance of absolute NSE levels and NSE kinetics in cardiac arrest patients treated with hypothermia. Methods In a prospective study of 35 patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest, NSE was measured daily for four days following admission. Outcome was assessed at ICU discharge using the CPC score. All patients received hypothermia treatment for 24 hours at 33°C with a surface cooling device according to current guidelines. Results The cutoff for absolute NSE levels in patients with unfavourable outcome (CPC 3-5 72 hours after cardiac arrest was 57 μg/l with an area under the curve (AUC of 0.82 (sensitivity 47%, specificity 100%. The cutoff level for NSE kinetics in patients with unfavourable outcome (CPC 3-5 was an absolute increase of 7.9 μg/l (AUC 0.78, sensitivity 63%, specificity 100% and a relative increase of 33.1% (AUC 0.803, sensitivity 67%, specificity 100% at 48 hours compared to admission. Conclusion In cardiac arrest patients treated with hypothermia, prognostication of unfavourable outcome by NSE kinetics between admission and 48 hours after resuscitation may be superior to prognostication by absolute NSE levels.

  9. Incidence, predisposing factors, management and survival following cardiac arrest due to subarachnoid haemorrhage: a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skrifvars Markus B

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The prevalence of cardiac arrest among patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage [SAH], and the prevalence of SAH as the cause following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest [OHCA] or in-hospital cardiac arrest [IHCA] is unknown. In addition it is unclear whether cardiopulmonary resuscitation [CPR] and post-resuscitation care management differs, and to what extent this will lead to meaningful survival following cardiac arrest [CA] due to SAH. Aim We reviewed the literature in order to describe; 1.The prevalence and predisposing factors of CA among patients with SAH 2.The prevalence of SAH as the cause of OHCA or IHCA and factors characterising CPR 3.The survival and management of SAH patients with CA. Material and methods The following sources, PubMed, CinAHL and The Cochrane DataBase were searched using the following Medical Subheadings [MeSH]; 1. OHCA, IHCA, heart arrest and 2. subarachnoid haemorrhage. Articles containing relevant data based on the abstract were reviewed in order to find results relevant to the proposed research questions. Manuscripts in other languages than English, animal studies, reviews and case reports were excluded. Results A total of 119 publications were screened for relevance and 13 papers were included. The prevalence of cardiac or respiratory arrest among all patients with SAH is between 3-11%, these patients commonly have a severe SAH with coma, large bleeds and evidence of raised intracerebral pressure on computed tomography scans compared to those who did not experience a CA. The prevalence of patients with SAH as the cause of the arrest among OHCA cases vary between 4 to 8% among those who die before hospital admission, and between 4 to 18% among those who are admitted. The prevalence of SAH as the cause following IHCA is low, around 0.5% according to one recent study. In patients with OHCA survival to hospital discharge is poor with 0 to 2% surviving. The initial rhythm is commonly asystole or

  10. Nucleation and Arrest of Dynamic Fault Rupture on a Pressurized Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garagash, D.; Germanovich, L. N.

    2010-12-01

    Locally elevated pore pressure is a viable mechanism for reduction of fault strength and earthquake triggering. Possible sources of elevated pressure near faults that are associated with induced or triggered seismicity include (1) deep fluid injection into the crust (e.g., Healy et al, Science 1968); (2) fault-valve systems (inter-seismically impermeable fault transecting the suprahydrostatic pressure gradient, Sibson, Tectonophysics 1992); (3) metamorphic dehydration in thrust and normal fault systems. Although the mechanics of fault reactivation due to the pore pressure perturbation is generally well understood, there is a considerable lack of understanding of (1) the condition(s) under which the reactivation of fault slip leads to the nucleation of dynamic (earthquake) rupture; and (2) what is the extent of the dynamic rupture propagation before it is arrested (what separates micro-seismic events from earthquakes)? We address these questions by analyzing nucleation and possible arrest of the dynamic slip on a pressurized fault in the otherwise uniform background stress field. Evolving, locally-peaked pore pressure profile is generated by along-the-fault diffusion from a fluid source characterized by either a constant overpressure or constant flow rate. As a result, frictional strength of the fault, given by the product of the local normal effective stress and slip-weakening friction coefficient, reduces below the background stress within the pressurized region, which is expanding with time. This causes a shear crack, which growth is initially moderated by the pressure diffusion and, thus, quasi-static. The slip-weakening nature of friction suggests that the quasi-static growth may become eventually unstable, for example, leading to the nucleation of dynamic rupture. We extend the approach of Uenishi and Rice (JGR, 2003) to develop a solution for the extent of the nucleation patch and the time to the nucleation. A similar approach has been independently used by

  11. Inhibition of autophagy enhances DNA damage-induced apoptosis by disrupting CHK1-dependent S phase arrest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA damage has been shown to induce autophagy, but the role of autophagy in the DNA damage response and cell fate is not fully understood. BO-1012, a bifunctional alkylating derivative of 3a-aza-cyclopenta[a]indene, is a potent DNA interstrand cross-linking agent with anticancer activity. In this study, BO-1012 was found to reduce DNA synthesis, inhibit S phase progression, and induce phosphorylation of histone H2AX on serine 139 (γH2AX) exclusively in S phase cells. Both CHK1 and CHK2 were phosphorylated in response to BO-1012 treatment, but only depletion of CHK1, but not CHK2, impaired BO-1012-induced S phase arrest and facilitated the entry of γH2AX-positive cells into G2 phase. CHK1 depletion also significantly enhanced BO-1012-induced cell death and apoptosis. These results indicate that BO-1012-induced S phase arrest is a CHK1-dependent pro-survival response. BO-1012 also resulted in marked induction of acidic vesicular organelle (AVO) formation and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) processing and redistribution, features characteristic of autophagy. Depletion of ATG7 or co-treatment of cells with BO-1012 and either 3-methyladenine or bafilomycin A1, two inhibitors of autophagy, not only reduced CHK1 phosphorylation and disrupted S phase arrest, but also increased cleavage of caspase-9 and PARP, and cell death. These results suggest that cells initiate S phase arrest and autophagy as pro-survival responses to BO-1012-induced DNA damage, and that suppression of autophagy enhances BO-1012-induced apoptosis via disruption of CHK1-dependent S phase arrest. - Highlights: • Autophagy inhibitors enhanced the cytotoxicity of a DNA alkylating agent, BO-1012. • BO-1012-induced S phase arrest was a CHK1-dependent pro-survival response. • Autophagy inhibition enhanced BO-1012 cytotoxicity via disrupting the S phase arrest

  12. Inhibition of autophagy enhances DNA damage-induced apoptosis by disrupting CHK1-dependent S phase arrest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liou, Jong-Shian; Wu, Yi-Chen; Yen, Wen-Yen; Tang, Yu-Shuan [Institute of Cellular and Organismic Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan, ROC (China); Kakadiya, Rajesh B.; Su, Tsann-Long [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan, ROC (China); Yih, Ling-Huei, E-mail: lhyih@gate.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Cellular and Organismic Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2014-08-01

    DNA damage has been shown to induce autophagy, but the role of autophagy in the DNA damage response and cell fate is not fully understood. BO-1012, a bifunctional alkylating derivative of 3a-aza-cyclopenta[a]indene, is a potent DNA interstrand cross-linking agent with anticancer activity. In this study, BO-1012 was found to reduce DNA synthesis, inhibit S phase progression, and induce phosphorylation of histone H2AX on serine 139 (γH2AX) exclusively in S phase cells. Both CHK1 and CHK2 were phosphorylated in response to BO-1012 treatment, but only depletion of CHK1, but not CHK2, impaired BO-1012-induced S phase arrest and facilitated the entry of γH2AX-positive cells into G2 phase. CHK1 depletion also significantly enhanced BO-1012-induced cell death and apoptosis. These results indicate that BO-1012-induced S phase arrest is a CHK1-dependent pro-survival response. BO-1012 also resulted in marked induction of acidic vesicular organelle (AVO) formation and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) processing and redistribution, features characteristic of autophagy. Depletion of ATG7 or co-treatment of cells with BO-1012 and either 3-methyladenine or bafilomycin A1, two inhibitors of autophagy, not only reduced CHK1 phosphorylation and disrupted S phase arrest, but also increased cleavage of caspase-9 and PARP, and cell death. These results suggest that cells initiate S phase arrest and autophagy as pro-survival responses to BO-1012-induced DNA damage, and that suppression of autophagy enhances BO-1012-induced apoptosis via disruption of CHK1-dependent S phase arrest. - Highlights: • Autophagy inhibitors enhanced the cytotoxicity of a DNA alkylating agent, BO-1012. • BO-1012-induced S phase arrest was a CHK1-dependent pro-survival response. • Autophagy inhibition enhanced BO-1012 cytotoxicity via disrupting the S phase arrest.

  13. Piperine causes G1 phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in melanoma cells through checkpoint kinase-1 activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neel M Fofaria

    Full Text Available In this study, we determined the cytotoxic effects of piperine, a major constituent of black and long pepper in melanoma cells. Piperine treatment inhibited the growth of SK MEL 28 and B16 F0 cells in a dose and time-dependent manner. The growth inhibitory effects of piperine were mediated by cell cycle arrest of both the cell lines in G1 phase. The G1 arrest by piperine correlated with the down-regulation of cyclin D1 and induction of p21. Furthermore, this growth arrest by piperine treatment was associated with DNA damage as indicated by phosphorylation of H2AX at Ser139, activation of ataxia telangiectasia and rad3-related protein (ATR and checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1. Pretreatment with AZD 7762, a Chk1 inhibitor not only abrogated the activation of Chk1 but also piperine mediated G1 arrest. Similarly, transfection of cells with Chk1 siRNA completely protected the cells from G1 arrest induced by piperine. Piperine treatment caused down-regulation of E2F1 and phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (Rb. Apoptosis induced by piperine was associated with down-regulation of XIAP, Bid (full length and cleavage of Caspase-3 and PARP. Furthermore, our results showed that piperine treatment generated ROS in melanoma cells. Blocking ROS by tiron protected the cells from piperine mediated cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. These results suggest that piperine mediated ROS played a critical role in inducing DNA damage and activation of Chk1 leading to G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

  14. Cardiac arrest upon induction of anesthesia in children with cardiomyopathy: an analysis of incidence and risk factors.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lynch, Johanne

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: It is thought that patients with cardiomyopathy have an increased risk of cardiac arrest on induction of anesthesia, but there is little available data. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence and potential risk factors for cardiac arrest upon induction of anesthesia in children with cardiomyopathy in our institution. METHODS: A retrospective chart review was performed. Eligible patients included patients admitted between 1998 and 2008 with the International Statistical Classification of Disease code for cardiomyopathy (ICD-9 code 425) who underwent airway intervention for sedation or general anesthesia in the operating room, cardiac diagnostic and interventional unit (CDIU) or intensive care unit. Patients undergoing emergency airway intervention following cardiovascular collapse were excluded. For each patient, we recorded patient demographics, disease severity, anesthesia location, and anesthetic technique. RESULTS: One hundred and twenty-nine patients with cardiomyopathy underwent a total of 236 anesthetic events, and four cardiac arrests were identified. One was related to bradycardia (HR<60), two were attributed to bradycardia in association with severe hypotension (systolic blood pressure<45), and the fourth arrest was related to isolated severe hypotension. Two occurred in the operating suite and two in the CDIU. There was no resulting mortality. One patient progressed to heart transplantation. Multiple combinations of anesthetic drugs were used for induction of anesthesia. CONCLUSION: We performed a review of the last 10 years of anesthesia events in children with cardiomyopathy. We report four cardiac arrests in two patients and 236 anesthetic events (1.7%). To the best of our knowledge, this is the largest review of these patients to date but is limited by its retrospective nature. The low cardiac arrest incidence prevents the identification of risk factors and the development of a cardiac arrest risk predictive clinical

  15. Crack arrest model for a piezoelectric strip subjected to Model loadings

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    R.R. Bhargava

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The present paper aims at proposing a crack arrest model for an infinitely long narrow, poled ceramic strip weakened by a finite hairline straight crack when the edges of the strip are subjected to combined mechanical and electrical loads.Design/methodology/approach: (Model As a consequence of loads the rims of crack open forming a yield zone ahead of each tip of the crack. To arrest the crack from further opening the rims of the yield zones are subjected to normal cohesive quadratically varying yield point stress. Two cases are presented when edges of the strip are subjected to: Case-I~in-plane stresses and electrical displacement or Case-II~in-plane stresses and in-plane electric field. Problems are solved using Fourier integral transform method.Findings: The stress intensity factor, yield zone length, crack opening displacement, crack growth rate have been calculated. Their variation with respect to affecting parameters viz. yield zone length, width of the strip, material constant, electrical and mechanical loads has been depicted graphically.Research limitations/implications: The material of the strip is assumed mechanically brittle and electrically ductile consequently mechanically singularity is encountered first. The investigations in this paper are carried at this level. Also the crack yielding under the loads is considered small scale hence the yield zone is assumed to be lying on the line segment ahead of the crack.Practical implications: Piezoelectric ceramics are widely used as sensors and actuators, this necessity prompts the fracture study on such ceramics under different loading conditions.Originality/value: The paper gives an assessment of the quadratically varying load required to be prescribed on yield zones so as to arrest the opening of the crack. The investigations are useful to smart material design technology where sensors and actuators are manufactured.

  16. Crack arrest model for a piezoelectric strip subjected to Mode-I loadings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.R. Bhargava

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The present paper aims at proposing a crack arrest model for an infinitely long narrow, poledceramic strip weakened by a finite hairline straight crack when the edges of the strip are subjected to combinedmechanical and electrical loads.Design/methodology/approach: (Model As a consequence of loads the rims of crack open forming a yieldzone ahead of each tip of the crack. To arrest the crack from further opening the rims of the yield zones aresubjected to normal cohesive quadratically varying yield point stress. Two cases are presented when edges ofthe strip are subjected to: Case-I~in-plane stresses and electrical displacement or Case-II~in-plane stresses andin-plane electric field. Problems are solved using Fourier integral transform method.Findings: The stress intensity factor, yield zone length, crack opening displacement, crack growth rate havebeen calculated. Their variation with respect to affecting parameters viz. yield zone length, width of the strip,material constant, electrical and mechanical loads has been depicted graphically.Research limitations/implications: The material of the strip is assumed mechanically brittle and electricallyductile consequently mechanically singularity is encountered first. The investigations in this paper are carried atthis level. Also the crack yielding under the loads is considered small scale hence the yield zone is assumed tobe lying on the line segment ahead of the crack.Practical implications: Piezoelectric ceramics are widely used as sensors and actuators, this necessity promptsthe fracture study on such ceramics under different loading conditions.Originality/value: The paper gives an assessment of the quadratically varying load required to be prescribedon yield zones so as to arrest the opening of the crack. The investigations are useful to smart material designtechnology where sensors and actuators are manufactured.

  17. Lysophosphatidate induces chemo-resistance by releasing breast cancer cells from taxol-induced mitotic arrest.

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    Nasser Samadi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Taxol is a microtubule stabilizing agent that arrests cells in mitosis leading to cell death. Taxol is widely used to treat breast cancer, but resistance occurs in 25-69% of patients and it is vital to understand how Taxol resistance develops to improve chemotherapy. The effects of chemotherapeutic agents are overcome by survival signals that cancer cells receive. We focused our studies on autotaxin, which is a secreted protein that increases tumor growth, aggressiveness, angiogenesis and metastasis. We discovered that autotaxin strongly antagonizes the Taxol-induced killing of breast cancer and melanoma cells by converting the abundant extra-cellular lipid, lysophosphatidylcholine, into lysophosphatidate. This lipid stimulates specific G-protein coupled receptors that activate survival signals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we determined the basis of these antagonistic actions of lysophosphatidate towards Taxol-induced G2/M arrest and cell death using cultured breast cancer cells. Lysophosphatidate does not antagonize Taxol action in MCF-7 cells by increasing Taxol metabolism or its expulsion through multi-drug resistance transporters. Lysophosphatidate does not lower the percentage of cells accumulating in G2/M by decreasing exit from S-phase or selective stimulation of cell death in G2/M. Instead, LPA had an unexpected and remarkable action in enabling MCF-7 and MDA-MB-468 cells, which had been arrested in G2/M by Taxol, to normalize spindle structure and divide, thus avoiding cell death. This action involves displacement of Taxol from the tubulin polymer fraction, which based on inhibitor studies, depends on activation of LPA receptors and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This work demonstrates a previously unknown consequence of lysophosphatidate action that explains why autotaxin and lysophosphatidate protect against Taxol-induced cell death and promote resistance to the action of this

  18. Pulmonary embolism as a cause of cardiac arrest: Hypothermia in post-resuscitation period (cooling therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niković Vuk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pulmonary embolism as a possible cause of acute heart failure is a potentially fatal condition that can cause death in all age groups. Patients successfully resuscitated after cardiac arrest have a high risk of increased mortality and their poor long­term outcome is often associated with severe neurological complications. Case Outline. This is a case report of a 67­year­old man after a successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR which was followed by therapeutic hypothermia (TH. The patient visited the dermatological outpatients’ department with clinical presentation of pain and swelling of the right leg, shortness of breath and chest pain. During examination the patient lost consciousness, stopped breathing and had cardiac arrest. ECG was done which registered asystole. We began CPR. After 59 minutes of resuscitation return of heartbeat was achieved. The patient was transported to the Emergency Department. On admission, after computerized tomography (CT of the chest confirmed massive pulmonary embolism (PE, the patient was administered thrombolytic therapy with Metalyse (tenecteplase and anti­coagulation therapy (heparin. After stabilization, therapeutic hypothermia was applied. Combination of EMCOOLSpad on the chest and abdomen and cold Ringer lactate 500 ml at 4°C was flushed. Temperature was decreased to 33°C and kept stabile for 24 hours. After eight days the patient was conscious with a minimal neurological deficit. Conclusion. As shown in this case report, and according to the rich experience elsewhere, cooling therapy after out­of­hospital cardiac arrest and successful CRP may be useful in preventing neurological complications.

  19. Time course of the meiotic arrest in sheep cumulus-oocyte complexes treated with roscovitine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocomo, Letícia Ferrari; Marques Filho, Wolff Camargo; Ackermann, Camila Louise; Paschoal, Daniela Martins; Guastali, Midyan Daroz; Dias Maziero, Rosiára Rosária; Sudano, Mateus José; Landim-Alvarenga, Fernanda da Cruz; Bicudo, Sony Dimas

    2016-04-01

    Temporary meiosis arrest with cyclin-dependent kinases inhibitors has been proposed in order to improve the quality of in vitro matured oocytes. In sheep, however, this phenomenon has been rarely investigated. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the effect of different incubation times with roscovitine on nuclear maturation and cumulus cell expansion of sheep cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs). For this, COCs were cultured for 0, 6, 12 or 20 h in basic maturation medium (Control) containing 75 μM roscovitine (Rosco). After, they were in vitro matured (IVM) for 18 h in the presence of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). At the end of each treatment, cumulus cell expansion and nuclear maturation were assessed under a stereomicroscope and by Hoechst 33342 staining, respectively. In the Control and Rosco groups, the absence of cumulus cell expansion prevailed at 0, 6, 12 and 20 h. After IVM for 18 h, total cumulus cell expansion in the Rosco treatments was dependent on the exposure time to roscovitine. A significantly high percentage of oocytes treated with roscovitine for 6 h (87%), 12 h or 20 h (65%) were arrested at the germinal vesicle (GV) stage. In contrast, 23% GVBD, 54% metaphase I (MI) and 61% MII oocytes were observed in the Control groups at 6, 12 and 20 h, respectively. In all treatments, a significant percentage of oocytes reached MII after IVM for 18 h. Therefore, roscovitine reversibly arrested the meiosis of sheep oocytes during different culture times with the maximal efficiency of meiotic inhibition reached at 6 h. In addition, reversibility of its inhibitory action on cumulus cells was exposure-time dependent. PMID:26170094

  20. Role of DNA methylation in cell cycle arrest induced by Cr (VI in two cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianlin Lou

    Full Text Available Hexavalent chromium [Cr(IV], a well-known industrial waste product and an environmental pollutant, is recognized as a human carcinogen. But its mechanisms of carcinogenicity remain unclear, and recent studies suggest that DNA methylation may play an important role in the carcinogenesis of Cr(IV. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of Cr(IV on cell cycle progress, global DNA methylation, and DNA methylation of p16 gene. A human B lymphoblastoid cell line and a human lung cell line A549 were exposed to 5-15 µM potassium dichromate or 1.25-5 µg/cm² lead chromate for 2-24 hours. Cell cycle was arrested at G₁ phase by both compounds in 24 hours exposure group, but global hypomethylation occurred earlier than cell cycle arrest, and the hypomethylation status maintained for more than 20 hours. The mRNA expression of p16 was significantly up-regulated by Cr(IV, especially by potassium dichromate, and the mRNA expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK4 and CDK6 was significantly down-regulated. But protein expression analysis showed very little change of p16 gene. Both qualitative and quantitative results showed that DNA methylation status of p16 remained unchanged. Collectively, our data suggested that global hypomethylation was possibly responsible for Cr(IV-induced G₁ phase arrest, but DNA methylation might not be related to up-regulation of p16 gene by Cr(IV.

  1. DNA Damage, Cell Cycle Arrest, and Apoptosis Induction Caused by Lead in Human Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedjou, Clement G; Tchounwou, Hervey M; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the industrial use of lead has been significantly reduced from paints and ceramic products, caulking, and pipe solder. Despite this progress, lead exposure continues to be a significant public health concern. The main goal of this research was to determine the in vitro mechanisms of lead nitrate [Pb(NO₃)₂] to induce DNA damage, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest in human leukemia (HL-60) cells. To reach our goal, HL-60 cells were treated with different concentrations of Pb(NO₃)₂ for 24 h. Live cells and necrotic death cells were measured by the propidium idiode (PI) assay using the cellometer vision. Cell apoptosis was measured by the flow cytometry and DNA laddering. Cell cycle analysis was evaluated by the flow cytometry. The result of the PI demonstrated a significant (p rupture by Pb(NO₃)₂ compared to the control. Data generated from the comet assay indicated a concentration-dependent increase in DNA damage, showing a significant increase (p < 0.05) in comet tail-length and percentages of DNA cleavage. Data generated from the flow cytometry assessment indicated that Pb(NO₃)₂ exposure significantly (p < 0.05) increased the proportion of caspase-3 positive cells (apoptotic cells) compared to the control. The flow cytometry assessment also indicated Pb(NO₃)₂ exposure caused cell cycle arrest at the G₀/G₁ checkpoint. The result of DNA laddering assay showed presence of DNA smear in the agarose gel with little presence of DNA fragments in the treated cells compared to the control. In summary, Pb(NO₃)₂ inhibits HL-60 cells proliferation by not only inducing DNA damage and cell cycle arrest at the G₀/G₁ checkpoint but also triggering the apoptosis through caspase-3 activation and nucleosomal DNA fragmentation accompanied by secondary necrosis. We believe that our study provides a new insight into the mechanisms of Pb(NO₃)₂ exposure and its associated adverse health effects. PMID:26703663

  2. Necdin, a p53-target gene, is an inhibitor of p53-mediated growth arrest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Lafontaine

    Full Text Available In vitro, cellular immortalization and transformation define a model for multistep carcinogenesis and current ongoing challenges include the identification of specific molecular events associated with steps along this oncogenic pathway. Here, using NIH3T3 cells, we identified transcriptionally related events associated with the expression of Polyomavirus Large-T antigen (PyLT, a potent viral oncogene. We propose that a subset of these alterations in gene expression may be related to the early events that contribute to carcinogenesis. The proposed tumor suppressor Necdin, known to be regulated by p53, was within a group of genes that was consistently upregulated in the presence of PyLT. While Necdin is induced following p53 activation with different genotoxic stresses, Necdin induction by PyLT did not involve p53 activation or the Rb-binding site of PyLT. Necdin depletion by shRNA conferred a proliferative advantage to NIH3T3 and PyLT-expressing NIH3T3 (NIHLT cells. In contrast, our results demonstrate that although overexpression of Necdin induced a growth arrest in NIH3T3 and NIHLT cells, a growing population rapidly emerged from these arrested cells. This population no longer showed significant proliferation defects despite high Necdin expression. Moreover, we established that Necdin is a negative regulator of p53-mediated growth arrest induced by nutlin-3, suggesting that Necdin upregulation could contribute to the bypass of a p53-response in p53 wild type tumors. To support this, we characterized Necdin expression in low malignant potential ovarian cancer (LMP where p53 mutations rarely occur. Elevated levels of Necdin expression were observed in LMP when compared to aggressive serous ovarian cancers. We propose that in some contexts, the constitutive expression of Necdin could contribute to cancer promotion by delaying appropriate p53 responses and potentially promote genomic instability.

  3. Radioprotection and Cell Cycle Arrest of Intestinal Epithelial Cells by Darinaparsin, a Tumor Radiosensitizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Junqiang; Doi, Hiroshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Saar, Matthias; Santos, Jennifer [Department of Urology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Li, Xuejun; Peehl, Donna M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Knox, Susan J., E-mail: sknox@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: It was recently reported that the organic arsenic compound darinaparsin (DPS) is a cytotoxin and radiosensitizer of tumor cells in vitro and in subcutaneous xenograft tumors. Surprisingly, it was also found that DPS protects normal intestinal crypt epithelial cells (CECs) from clonogenic death after ionizing radiation (IR). Here we tested the DPS radiosensitizing effect in a clinically relevant model of prostate cancer and explored the radioprotective effect and mechanism of DPS on CECs. Methods and Materials: The radiation modification effect of DPS was tested in a mouse model of orthotopic xenograft prostate cancer and of IR-induced acute gastrointestinal syndrome. The effect of DPS on CEC DNA damage and DNA damage responses was determined by immunohistochemistry. Results: In the mouse model of IR-induced gastrointestinal syndrome, DPS treatment before IR accelerated recovery from body weight loss and increased animal survival. DPS decreased post-IR DNA damage and cell death, suggesting that the radioprotective effect was mediated by enhanced DNA damage repair. Shortly after DPS injection, significant cell cycle arrest was observed in CECs at both G1/S and G2/M checkpoints, which was accompanied by the activation of cell cycle inhibitors p21 and growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible protein 45 alpha (GADD45A). Further investigation revealed that DPS activated ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), an important inducer of DNA damage repair and cell cycle arrest. Conclusions: DPS selectively radioprotected normal intestinal CECs and sensitized prostate cancer cells in a clinically relevant model. This effect may be, at least in part, mediated by DNA damage response activation and has the potential to significantly increase the therapeutic index of radiation therapy.

  4. Study of nuclear heat application systems for arresting CO{sub 2} emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fumizawa, Motoo; Inaba, Yoshitomo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Hishida, Makoto; Ogata, Kan; Yamada, Seiya

    1996-11-01

    The objective of the paper is to investigate the systems for arresting CO{sub 2} emission and for the effective utilization of fossil fuel. We studied the fossil fuel reforming systems to decrease the CO{sub 2} emission rate per unit amount of heat generation by fossil fuel. Feed materials for reforming system were natural gas, crude oil, oil sand, oil shale and coal. Products by reforming were hydrogen, methane, methanol and gasoline. We examined CO{sub 2} emission ratio of ten systems with different feed material and product. The CO{sub 2} emission ratio was the ratio of CO{sub 2} emission rate per unit amount of heat generation between the products and the feed materials, and was the important index. As the results, the CO{sub 2} emission ratio for the coal to methane reforming system using steam gasifier had the lowest value of 51%. It means that the CO{sub 2} emission rate of the product from the coal to methane reforming system was 51% of the emission rate of the feed material, that is, the system is very effective to arrest the CO{sub 2} emission. The CO{sub 2} emission ratio increases in the following order: the reforming systems from coal to methanol, heavy oil to hydrogen and natural gas to hydrogen. It was clarified that the system of coal to methane reforming was very effective for arresting CO{sub 2} emission compared to the other systems, moreover the nuclear heat using rate and thermal efficiency of the plant of the system were the highest. (author)

  5. Apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in human and murine tumor cells are initiated by isoprenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, H; Elson, C E

    1999-04-01

    Diverse classes of phytochemicals initiate biological responses that effectively lower cancer risk. One class of phytochemicals, broadly defined as pure and mixed isoprenoids, encompasses an estimated 22,000 individual components. A representative mixed isoprenoid, gamma-tocotrienol, suppresses the growth of murine B16(F10) melanoma cells, and with greater potency, the growth of human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) and human leukemic (HL-60) cells. beta-Ionone, a pure isoprenoid, suppresses the growth of B16 cells and with greater potency, the growth of MCF-7, HL-60 and human colon adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells. Results obtained with diverse cell lines differing in ras and p53 status showed that the isoprenoid-mediated suppression of growth is independent of mutated ras and p53 functions. beta-Ionone suppressed the growth of human colon fibroblasts (CCD-18Co) but only when present at three-fold the concentration required to suppress the growth of Caco-2 cells. The isoprenoids initiated apoptosis and, concomitantly arrested cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Both suppress 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase activity. beta-Ionone and lovastatin interfered with the posttranslational processing of lamin B, an activity essential to assembly of daughter nuclei. This interference, we postulate, renders neosynthesized DNA available to the endonuclease activities leading to apoptotic cell death. Lovastatin-imposed mevalonate starvation suppressed the glycosylation and translocation of growth factor receptors to the cell surface. As a consequence, cells were arrested in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. This rationale may apply to the isoprenoid-mediated G1-phase arrest of tumor cells. The additive and potentially synergistic actions of these isoprenoids in the suppression of tumor cell proliferation and initiation of apoptosis coupled with the mass action of the diverse isoprenoid constituents of plant products may explain, in part, the impact of fruit, vegetable

  6. Radioprotection and Cell Cycle Arrest of Intestinal Epithelial Cells by Darinaparsin, a Tumor Radiosensitizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: It was recently reported that the organic arsenic compound darinaparsin (DPS) is a cytotoxin and radiosensitizer of tumor cells in vitro and in subcutaneous xenograft tumors. Surprisingly, it was also found that DPS protects normal intestinal crypt epithelial cells (CECs) from clonogenic death after ionizing radiation (IR). Here we tested the DPS radiosensitizing effect in a clinically relevant model of prostate cancer and explored the radioprotective effect and mechanism of DPS on CECs. Methods and Materials: The radiation modification effect of DPS was tested in a mouse model of orthotopic xenograft prostate cancer and of IR-induced acute gastrointestinal syndrome. The effect of DPS on CEC DNA damage and DNA damage responses was determined by immunohistochemistry. Results: In the mouse model of IR-induced gastrointestinal syndrome, DPS treatment before IR accelerated recovery from body weight loss and increased animal survival. DPS decreased post-IR DNA damage and cell death, suggesting that the radioprotective effect was mediated by enhanced DNA damage repair. Shortly after DPS injection, significant cell cycle arrest was observed in CECs at both G1/S and G2/M checkpoints, which was accompanied by the activation of cell cycle inhibitors p21 and growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible protein 45 alpha (GADD45A). Further investigation revealed that DPS activated ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), an important inducer of DNA damage repair and cell cycle arrest. Conclusions: DPS selectively radioprotected normal intestinal CECs and sensitized prostate cancer cells in a clinically relevant model. This effect may be, at least in part, mediated by DNA damage response activation and has the potential to significantly increase the therapeutic index of radiation therapy

  7. Oxygen, pHi and arrest of biosynthesis in brine shrimp embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, S C

    1997-12-01

    Embryos of the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana are able to withstand bouts of environmental anoxia for several years by entering a quiescent state, during which time metabolism is greatly depressed. Within minutes of oxygen removal, intracellular pH (pHi) drops at least 1.0 unit. This acidification has been strongly implicated in the arrest of both catabolic and anabolic processes in the cytoplasm. A global arrest of cytoplasmic translation accompanies the transition into anoxia or into aerobic acidosis (artificial quiescence imposed by intracellular acidification with CO2 in the presence of oxygen). Similarly, protein synthesis in isolated mitochondria from these embryos is also reduced markedly in response to acidic pH (80% reduction) or anoxia (79% reduction). The constancy of mRNA levels during quiescence indicates that protein synthesis is likely to be controlled at the translational level. Mitochondrial matrix pH is 8.2 during protein synthesis assays performed at the extramitochondrial pH optimum of 7.5. When this proton gradient is abolished with the K+/H+ ionophore nigericin, the extramitochondrial pH optimum for protein synthesis displays an alkaline shift of approximately 0.7 pH unit. These data suggest the presence of proton-sensitive translational components within the mitochondrion. The oxygen dependency of mitochondrial protein synthesis is not explained simply by blockage of the electron transport chain or by the increased redox state. Whereas oxygen deprivation substantially depresses protein synthesis by 77% after 1 h, normoxic incubations with saturating concentrations of cyanide or antimycin A have only a modest effect (36% reduction, cyanide; 20%, antimycin A). This cyanide- and antimycin-insensitive, but hypoxia-sensitive, inhibitory signature for the arrest of protein synthesis suggests the presence of a molecular oxygen sensor within the mitochondrion. PMID:9429663

  8. An exonic insertion within Tex14 gene causes spermatogenic arrest in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sironen Anu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Male infertility is an increasing problem in all domestic species including man. Localization and identification of genes involved in defects causing male infertility provide valuable information of specific events in sperm development. Sperm development is a complex process, where diploid spermatogonia develop into haploid, highly specialized spermatozoa. Correct expression and function of various genes and their protein products are required for production of fertile sperm. We have identified an infertility defect in Finnish Yorkshire boars caused by spermatogenic arrest. The aim of this study was to locate the disease associated region using genome wide screen with the PorcineSNP60 Beadchip and identify the causal mutation by candidate gene approach. Results In the Finnish Yorkshire pig population the spermatogenic arrest (SA defect appears to be of genetic origin and causes severe degeneration of germ cells and total absence of spermatozoa. Genome wide scan with the PorcineSNP60 Beadchip localized the SA defect to porcine chromosome 12 in a 2 Mbp region. Sequencing of a candidate gene Tex14 revealed a 51 bp insertion within exon 27, which caused differential splicing of the exon and created a premature translation stop codon. The expression of Tex14 was markedly down regulated in the testis of a SA affected boar compared to control boars and no protein product was identified by Western blotting. The SA insertion sequence was also found within intron 27 in all analyzed animals, thus the insertion appears to be a possible duplication event. Conclusion In this study we report the identification of a causal mutation for infertility caused by spermatogenic arrest at an early meiotic phase. Our results highlight the role of TEX14 specifically in spermatogenesis and the importance of specific genomic remodeling events as causes for inherited defects.

  9. Kinetic arrest behavior in martensitic transformation of NiCoMnSn metamagnetic shape memory alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → NiMnZ (Z = Ga, Al, In, Sn, Sb) Heusler alloys are now very attractive because of their unique physical properties, such as, magnetic shape memory effect, magnetic field-induced phase transition, inverse magnetocaloric effect, magnetoresistance effect and the giant magnetothermal conductivity. → In our previous investigations for the NiCoMnSn alloy, the behavior of the shape recovery due to the magnetic field induced reverse transformation has been reported. However, the detailed investigations on the magnetic properties such as metamagnetic behavior have not been made. → In our present manuscript, we show the experimental results of the magnetic properties under the magnetic fields up to 12 T for NiCoMnSn alloy. We demonstrated the kinetic arresting behavior of the martensitic transformation under the high magnetic fields and thermodynamically discussed it. In addition, we analyzed the structure of the martensitic phase with a long period stacking structure and showed a lattice change between the before and the after the martensitic transformation. We believe that these results are high importance for understanding the interesting physical properties of the Ni-based ferromagnetic shape memory alloys and its applications. - Abstract: High-field magnetic measurements were carried out in order to investigate behaviors of field-induced reverse martensitic transformation and kinetic arrest of NiCoMnSn metamagnetic shape memory alloy. In the thermomagnetization curves, it was confirmed that the reverse martensitic transformation temperature decreases 67 K by applying magnetic field of 5 T, while in the magnetic field cooling process under 5 T, martensitic transformation does not occur down to low temperatures. Equilibrium magnetic field, defined from the critical magnetic fields of the metamagnetic evidence in the magnetization curves, exhibits almost constant below about 100 K, suggesting that the entropy change becomes zero, which is

  10. Cytotoxic Activity and G1 Cell Cycle Arrest of a Dienynone from Echinacea pallida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chicca, Andrea; Adinolfi, Barbara; Pellati, Federica; Orlandini, Giulia; Benvenuti, Stefania; Nieri, Paola

    2009-01-01

    (Jurkat and HL-60), breast carcinoma (MCF-7), and melanoma (MeWo) cells. As part of its mechanism of action, the ability of this constituent to arrest the cell cycle in the G1 phase was demonstrated on HL-60 cells. Furthermore, a stability test of the target compound over 72 h was carried out, indicating......In the present study, a further investigation of the cytotoxic activity of an acetylenic constituent of ECHINACEA PALLIDA roots, namely, pentadeca-(8 Z,13 Z)-dien-11-yn-2-one, was performed, revealing a concentration-dependent cytotoxicity on several human cancer cell lines, including leukemia...

  11. Repair of ascending aorta pseudoaneurysm without circulatory arrest in redo patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auriemma Stefano

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A pseudoaneurysm of the ascending aorta is an unusual and potentially fatal complication after aortic surgical operations. TEE and CT scan are the investigations of choice. Surgical treatment is mandatory. We describe the successful management of a pseudoaneurysm of the ascending aorta, with aorto-sternal-cutaneous fistula requiring right axillary and femoral artery cannulation with Remote Access Perfusion® aortic cannula (Estech®, California, USA. Behaving like this we avoid hypotermic circulatory arrest, provide safe reentry and prevent an impending rupture.

  12. Comparing anesthesia with isoflurane and fentanyl/fluanisone/midazolam in a rat model of cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, Niels; Malte, Christian Lind; Tønnesen, Else;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Only one in ten patients survives cardiac arrest (CA), underscoring the need to improve CA management. Isoflurane has shown cardio- and neuroprotective effects in animal models of ischemia/reperfusion injury. Therefore, beneficial effect of isoflurane should be tested in an experimental...... CA model. We hypothesize that isoflurane anesthesia improves short-term outcome following resuscitation from CA compared with a subcutaneous fentanyl/fluanisone/midazolam anesthesia. METHODS: Male Sprague Dawley rats were randomized to anesthesia with isoflurane (n=11) or fentanyl...... function, all of which are important parameters in CA models....

  13. Antipsychotics and Associated Risk of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weeke, Peter; Jensen, Aksel; Folke, Fredrik;

    2014-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs have been associated with sudden cardiac death, but differences in the risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) associated with different antipsychotic drug classes are not clear. We identified all OHCA in Denmark (2001-2010). Risk of OHCA associated with antipsychotic drug...... use was evaluated by conditional logistic regression analysis in case-time-control models. In total, 2,205 (7.6%) of 28,947 OHCA patients received treatment with an antipsychotic drug at the time of event. Overall treatment with any antipsychotic was associated with OHCA (odds ratio [OR]= 1.53, 95...

  14. Analysis of Anchors and Bracing Configurations for Personal Fall Arrest Systems in Residential Construction

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, Justin Collins

    2013-01-01

    AbstractAnalysis of Anchors and Bracing Configurations with Personal Fall Arrest Systems in Residential ConstructionJustin Collins Morris    Falls continue to be a major problem in the residential construction industry and account for a large number of injuries and fatalities each year (US Department of Labor, 2012).  The effects of a fall are catastrophic to the workers and their families as well as the construction company and surrounding community.  Prevention of these incidents has been t...

  15. Interposed Abdominal Compression CPR for an Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Victim Failing Traditional CPR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian D. McClung

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Interposed abdominal compression cardiopulmonary resuscitation (IAC-CPR is an alternative technique to traditional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR that can improve perfusion and lead to restoration of circulation in patients with chest wall deformity either acquired through vigorous CPR or co-morbidity such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We report a case of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest where IAC-CPR allowed for restoration of spontaneous circulation and eventual full neurologic recovery when traditional CPR was failing to generate adequate pulses with chest compression alone.

  16. EMuRgency: Addressing cardiac arrest with socio-technical innovation in a smart learning region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Jeschke

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces the EMuRgency project. The project has the goal to increase awareness and competences regarding the problem of cardiac arrest in the Euregio Meuse-Rhine (EMR and to use socio-technical innovations to transfer it into a smart learning region. Based on the conscious competence framework solutions for stakeholders on different levels of the framework are introduced, namely a public display network, mobile learning apps and a volunteer notification system. Finally, a future research outlook is given.

  17. Central origin of respiratory arrest in beta-blocker intoxication in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Langemeijer, J.J.M.; de Wildt, D J; de Groot, G.; Sangster, B.

    1987-01-01

    Propranolol HCl (7.5 mg·kg−1), timolol maleate (7.0 mg·kg−1), and sotalol HCl (10 mg·kg−1) were administered intracerebroventricularly (icv) to spontaneously breathing (SB) rats. The respiratory rate declined until the rats all died from respiratory arrest. Artificial ventilation resulted in survival of the rats for a 3-hr observation period. Intravenous (iv) administration of the same doses of the three beta blockers to SB rats did not result in either respiratory depression or death. Except...

  18. MR imaging of pituitary hyperplasia in a child with growth arrest and primary hypothyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging of pituitary hyperplasia has been rarely described in children with primary hypothyroidism. We report a case of pituitary hyperplasia in a child presented with significant growth arrest and laboratory evidence of hypothyroidism. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed symmetrical pituitary enlargement simulating macroadenoma. After thyroid hormone replacement therapy, the child's height increased and pituitary enlargement regressed to normal. Awareness of MRI appearance of pituitary hyperplasia in children with laboratory evidence of hypothyroidism might avoid misdiagnosis for pituitary tumor, which may also manifest as growth disorder, obviating unnecessary surgery. (orig.)

  19. DNA Damage, Cell Cycle Arrest, and Apoptosis Induction Caused by Lead in Human Leukemia Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yedjou, Clement G.; Tchounwou, Hervey M.; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the industrial use of lead has been significantly reduced from paints and ceramic products, caulking, and pipe solder. Despite this progress, lead exposure continues to be a significant public health concern. The main goal of this research was to determine the in vitro mechanisms of lead nitrate [Pb(NO3)2] to induce DNA damage, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest in human leukemia (HL-60) cells. To reach our goal, HL-60 cells were treated with different concentrations of Pb(NO3)...

  20. Pharmacologic inhibition of cdk4/6 arrests the growth of glioblastoma multiforme intracranial xenografts

    OpenAIRE

    Michaud, Karine; Solomon, David A.; Oermann, Eric; Kim, Jung-Sik; Zhong, Wei-Zhu; Prados, Michael D.; Ozawa, Tomoko; James, C. David; Waldman, Todd

    2010-01-01

    Activation of cyclin-dependent kinases 4 and 6 (cdk4/6) occurs in the majority of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors, and represents a promising molecular target for the development of small molecule inhibitors. In the current study we investigated the molecular determinants and in vivo response of diverse GBM cell lines and xenografts to PD-0332991, a cdk4/6 specific inhibitor. In vitro testing of PD-0332991 against a panel of GBM cell lines revealed a potent G1 cell cycle arrest and induc...

  1. Cardiac arrest after anesthetic management in a patient with hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ergül Yakup

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV is a rare disorder with an autosomal recessive transmission and characterized by self-mutilation due to a lack in pain and heat sensation. Recurrent hyperpyrexia and anhydrosis are seen in patients as a result of a lack of sweat gland innervation. Self-mutilation and insensitivity to pain result in orthopedic complications and patients undergone recurrent surgical interventions with anesthesia. However, these patients are prone to perioperative complications such as hyperthermia, hypothermia, and cardiac complications like bradycardia and hypotension. We report a 5-year-old boy with hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV, developing hyperpyrexia and cardiac arrest after anesthesia.

  2. Cyclin E Is Stabilized in Response to Replication Fork Barriers Leading to Prolonged S Phase Arrest*

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Xiaoyan; Jia LIU; Legerski, Randy J.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclin E is a regulator of cyclin-dependent protein kinases (Cdks) and is involved in mediating the cell cycle transition from G1 to S phase. Here, we describe a novel function for cyclin E in the long term maintenance of checkpoint arrest in response to replication barriers. Exposure of cells to mitomycin C or UV irradiation, but not ionizing radiation, induces stabilization of cyclin E. Stabilization of cyclin E reduces the activity of Cdk2-cyclin A, resulting in a slowing of S phase progre...

  3. Oridonin induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest of gallbladder cancer cells via the mitochondrial pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallbladder cancer is the most frequent malignancy of the bile duct with high aggressive and extremely poor prognosis. The main objective of the paper was to investigate the inhibitory effects of oridonin, a diterpenoid isolated from Rabdosia rubescens, on gallbladder cancer both in vitro and in vivo and to explore the mechanisms underlying oridonin-induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. The anti-tumor activity of oridonin on SGC996 and NOZ cells was assessed by the MTT and colony forming assays. Cell cycle changes were detected by flow cytometric analysis. Apoptosis was detected by annexin V/PI double-staining and Hoechst 33342 staining assays. Loss of mitochondrial membrane potential was observed by Rhodamine 123 staining. The in vivo efficacy of oridonin was evaluated using a NOZ xenograft model in athymic nude mice. The expression of cell cycle- and apoptosis-related proteins in vitro and in vivo was analyzed by western blot analysis. Activation of caspases (caspase-3, -8 and -9) was measured by caspases activity assay. Oridonin induced potent growth inhibition, S-phase arrest, apoptosis, and colony-forming inhibition in SGC996 and NOZ cells in a dose-dependent manner. Intraperitoneal injection of oridonin (5, 10, or 15 mg/kg) for 3 weeks significantly inhibited the growth of NOZ xenografts in athymic nude mice. We demonstrated that oridonin regulated cell cycle-related proteins in response to S-phase arrest by western blot analysis. In contrast, we observed inhibition of NF-κB nuclear translocation and an increase Bax/Bcl-2 ratio accompanied by activated caspase-3, caspase-9 and PARP-1 cleavage after treatment with oridonin, which indicate that the mitochondrial pathway is involved in oridonin-mediated apoptosis. Oridonin possesses potent anti-gallbladder cancer activities that correlate with regulation of the mitochondrial pathway, which is critical for apoptosis and S-phase arrest. Therefore, oridonin has potential as a novel anti-tumor therapy for the

  4. The role of the immuno-inflammatory response in patients after cardiac arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Samborska-Sablik, Anna; Sablik, Zbigniew; Gaszynski, Wojciech

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the research was to assess whether concentrations of inflammatory markers in blood of patients after cardiac arrest (CA) are related to their clinical state and survival. Material and methods Forty-six patients, aged 63 ±12 years, 21 of them after out-of-hospital CA and 25 after in-hospital CA, were enrolled in the study. Twenty-five patients survived and were discharged from hospital (CA-S); 21 died during hospitalization (CA-D). The clinical state of the patients was...

  5. [Aspiration of milk in healthy infant--cause of acute respiratory arrest?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erler, Thomas

    2007-02-01

    We present the case of 4month old female infant, who obviously suffered from a respiratory arrest during bottle-feed ing. After primary successful resuscitation the baby died after 49 days due to large intracranial hemorrages. The diagnosis of shaking trauma was based on the detailed medical examinations and on the case history taken from the police file. The life-threatening shaking trauma is rare as an emergency. Therefore every doctor should be aware of a potential victim in cases of infants who are normal developed without signs of injuries, have no history of a severe disease and show life-threatening symptomes. PMID:17378325

  6. Arrest in flagrante delicto as a measure restricting the Right to Freedom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majlinda Andrea

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Arrest in flagrante delicto is one of the cases in which the international and national legal framework allows the restriction of the right to freedom. Currently, the individual and his fundamental rights are in the focus of human society. Some of them are absolute and some others have a relative character. The right to freedom, notwithstanding its importance, is a right of relative character but with cases of its restriction exhaustively defined. The protection of this right is extended both in horizontal perspective versus the actions of other persons, providing a legal-criminal defense and in vertical context, in the face of repressive power of the state, which adopted the most significant position in the case of someone’s arrest or detention. The latter constitute an indicator of an incomparable relation between the force of state power and a person’s vulnerability. The exact meaning of arrest in flagrante delicto and its application only in the conditions and criteria set out by the criminal procedural legislation prevents arbitrary restriction of the right to freedom. A key importance in the analysis of this institute is attached to ECtHR jurisprudence that is consolidated and detailed in addressing the right to freedom. The respect and application of standards affirmed by this court on part of the state institutions directly affects the consolidation of rule of law. The criminal procedural legislation has consented to the general principle according to which “only the judge has the power to apply a security measure restricting personal liberty, a measure that has continuous effects over time, although such measures have a specific maximum duration”. According to this approach, the arrest in flagrante delicto is qualified due to its character, as a temporary measure applied in situations of emergency when the procedure for security measure cannot be effectively applied. As already known, it is linked with the power of judicial

  7. Sensitivity of arrest in mode-coupling glasses to low-qstructure

    OpenAIRE

    Greenall, M. J.; Voigtmann, Th.; Monthoux, P.; Cates, M. E.

    2006-01-01

    We quantify, within mode coupling theory, how changes in the liquid structure affect that of the glass. Apart from the known sensitivity to the structure factor $S(q)$ at wavevectors around the first sharp diffraction peak $q_0$, we find a strong (and inverted) response to structure at wavevectors \\emph{below} this peak: an increase in $S(q_0/2)$ {\\em lowers} the degree of arrest over a wide $q$-range. This strong sensitivity to `caged cage' packing effects, on length scales of order 2d, is m...

  8. A case of Ventricular Tachycardia and Cardiac Arrest Associated with Sertraline and Mirtazapine Combination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murad Atmaca

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A 67-year-old male suffering from depressive symptomatology was admitted to the inpatient clinic at Firat University School of Medicine; and his psychiatric evaluation revealed major depressive episode according to DSM-IV. He developed chest discomfort, chest pain and shortness of breath of acute onset accompanying pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VT leading to cardiac arrest following sertraline and mirtazapine combination treatment. He died after two days in the Intensive Care Unit. The present case suggests that psychiatrists should be aware of unexpected cardiac events, especially when they use combination treatments.

  9. Cardiac Arrest in a Heart Transplant Patient Receiving Dexmedetomidine During Cardiac Catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Lawrence Israel; Miyamoto, Shelley D; Stenquist, Scott; Twite, Mark David

    2016-06-01

    Dexmedetomidine is an α-2 agonist with a sedative and cardiopulmonary profile that makes it an attractive anesthetic in pediatric cardiac patients. Cardiac transplant patients may suffer from acute cellular rejection of the cardiac conduction system and, therefore, are at an increased risk of the electrophysiological effect of dexmedetomidine. We present such a patient who had a cardiac arrest while receiving dexmedetomidine during cardiac catheterization. Because acute cellular rejection of the cardiac conduction system is difficult to diagnose, dexmedetomidine should be used with caution in pediatric heart transplant patients. PMID:26721807

  10. Medical attention proposal for patients under the iodo therapy in cardiac arrest cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research has like aim to present a proposition about how to attend the patients which are under the iodo therapy, and the possibility they can show a cardiac arrest during their hospitalization. The physical medical department with the nurse group and the team of ICU (Intensive Care Unit) looked for to establish basic norms of radiological protection in order to avoid the radiation and contamination of all workers involved with one patient, without changing the routine of attendance service. We analyzed all rules of service including the attendance the hospital room and mainly if it is necessary to lead the patient to the ICU. (authors). 4 refs

  11. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survival in rural Northwest Ireland: 17 years' experience.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Masterson, Siobhán

    2011-05-01

    SAVES, the name used to describe a register of survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), was established in rural Northwest Ireland in 1992. From 1992 to 2008, 80 survivors were identified (population 239,000 (2006)). Most incidents were witnessed (69\\/70) and all were in shockable rhythm at the time of first rhythm analysis (66\\/66). Of 66 patients who could be traced, 46 were alive in December 2008. Average survival rates appeared to increase over the lifetime of the database. SAVES has also contributed to the development of a national OHCA register.

  12. Severe bronchospasm followed by respiratory arrest during thallium-dipyridamole imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the occurrence of sudden severe bronchospasm and respiratory arrest following dipyridamole infusion in a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease predominantly of the emphysematous type. The severe reaction was unexpected because the patient had tolerated well withdrawal of aminophylline derivatives for 48 hours and was receiving chronic prednisone 20 mg qd. Although the diagnostic and prognostic gains from dipyridamole imaging far outweigh the small risk associated with the test, patients with chronic pulmonary obstructive disease must be closely monitored during thallium-dipyridamole imaging

  13. Severe bronchospasm followed by respiratory arrest during thallium-dipyridamole imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lette, J.; Cerino, M.; Laverdiere, M.; Tremblay, J.; Prenovault, J.

    1989-06-01

    We describe the occurrence of sudden severe bronchospasm and respiratory arrest following dipyridamole infusion in a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease predominantly of the emphysematous type. The severe reaction was unexpected because the patient had tolerated well withdrawal of aminophylline derivatives for 48 hours and was receiving chronic prednisone 20 mg qd. Although the diagnostic and prognostic gains from dipyridamole imaging far outweigh the small risk associated with the test, patients with chronic pulmonary obstructive disease must be closely monitored during thallium-dipyridamole imaging.

  14. Role of Baculovirus IE2 and Its RING Finger in Cell Cycle Arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Prikhod’ko, Elena A.; Miller, Lois K.

    1998-01-01

    The ie2 gene of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) is known to transactivate transient expression from viral promoters in a host cell-specific manner. We report that transfection of Spodoptera frugiperda (SF-21) cells with ie2 was sufficient to arrest the cell cycle, resulting in the accumulation of enlarged cells with abnormally high DNA contents. By 72 h posttransfection, more than 50% of ie2-transfected cells had DNA contents greater than 4N. There was no evidence o...

  15. PREFACE: Dynamically slow processes and near-arrest phenomena in soft matter Dynamically slow processes and near-arrest phenomena in soft matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this special issue is to summarize what has been learnt by both the network (the Marie Curie Research and Training Network on Arrested Matter) and the broader international community on dynamically slow processes and near-arrest phenomena. Another aspect of this special issue is to highlight new directions in which dynamical slowing down is, or may be, important. In particular, this issue is dedicated to a member of this network, Professor Francesco Mallamace, who reached the venerable age of 60 in 2008. Professor Francesco Mallamace is one of the group leaders of the complex materials and systems worldwide network. In particular he is a pioneer who has successfully investigated aggregation phenomena and the dynamics of colloids, and the properties of water in the deeply supercooled phase region. The scientific activities of Professor Mallamace are mainly experimental, making use of different scattering and spectroscopic techniques. He is a very active and well-known scientist not only for his research but also for training young scientists by organizing many international networks, congresses and schools. Under his influence, mainly by taking advantage of large international collaborative activities, the University of Messina has become one of the major European centers for complex systems. Among the invited speakers to the final conference of the network, we have collected the following 11 interesting articles. In this special issue, we roughly classify the papers according to three major groups: the first four papers deal with the theory and experiments on the dynamic crossover phenomena in general glass-forming liquids, the next four papers deal explicitly with slow dynamics in supercooled confined water and the last three papers deal with the interpretation of the near-arrest phenomena in colloids. Chong et al used an extended mode coupling theory, which includes the hopping effect, to predict a dynamic crossover at Tc in the α-relaxation time and

  16. Post return of spontaneous circulation factors associated with mortality in pediatric in-hospital cardiac arrest: A prospective multicenter multinational observational study

    OpenAIRE

    López Herce, Jesús; del Castillo, Jimena; Matamoros, Marta; (et al.); Rey Galán, Corsino

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Most studies have analyzed pre-arrest and resuscitation factors associated with mortality after cardiac arrest (CA) in children, but many patients that reach return of spontaneous circulation die within the next days or weeks. The objective of our study was to analyze post-return of spontaneous circulation factors associated with in-hospital mortality after cardiac arrest in children. Methods A prospective multicenter, multinational, observational study in 48 hospitals from 12 co...

  17. Standard test method for determining plane-strain crack-arrest fracture toughness, kIa, of ferritic steels

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method employs a side-grooved, crack-line-wedge-loaded specimen to obtain a rapid run-arrest segment of flat-tensile separation with a nearly straight crack front. This test method provides a static analysis determination of the stress intensity factor at a short time after crack arrest. The estimate is denoted Ka. When certain size requirements are met, the test result provides an estimate, termed KIa, of the plane-strain crack-arrest toughness of the material. 1.2 The specimen size requirements, discussed later, provide for in-plane dimensions large enough to allow the specimen to be modeled by linear elastic analysis. For conditions of plane-strain, a minimum specimen thickness is also required. Both requirements depend upon the crack arrest toughness and the yield strength of the material. A range of specimen sizes may therefore be needed, as specified in this test method. 1.3 If the specimen does not exhibit rapid crack propagation and arrest, Ka cannot be determined. 1.4 The values stat...

  18. Perinuclear localization of the HIV-1 regulatory protein Vpr is important for induction of G2-arrest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The HIV-1 accessory protein Vpr induces G2 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Previous studies indicate that the induction of G2-arrest requires the localization of Vpr to the nuclear envelope. Here we show that treatment of Vpr-expressing HeLa cells with the caspase 3 inhibitor Z-DEVD-fmk induced accumulation of Vpr at the nuclear lamina, while other proteins or structures of the nuclear envelope were not influenced. Furthermore, Z-DEVD-fmk enhances the Vpr-mediated G2-arrest that even occurred in HIV-1NL4–3-infected T-cells. Mutation of Pro-35, which is important for the integrity of helix-α1 in Vpr, completely abrogated the Z-DEVD-fmk-mediated accumulation of Vpr at the nuclear lamina and the enhancement of G2-arrest. As expected, inhibition of caspase 3 reduced the induction of apoptosis by Vpr. Taken together, we could show that besides its role in Vpr-mediated apoptosis induction caspase 3 influences the localization of Vpr at the nuclear envelope and thereby augments the Vpr-induced G2-arrest.

  19. Contact with Fluoride-Releasing Restorative Materials Can Arrest Simulated Approximal Caries Lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila de Almeida Brandão Guglielmi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that the presence of white-spot lesion is very probable when adjacent surface is affected by cavitated lesions. This study evaluated the potential of different fluoride-releasing restorative materials in arresting enamel white-spot lesions in approximal surface in contact with them, in vitro (I and in situ (II. White-spot lesions were formed in 240 primary enamel specimens via pH-cycling. They were put in contact with cylindrical blocks of 6 materials (n=20: composite resin, 2 high-viscous glass ionomer cements (HVGIC, resin-modified GIC, resin-modified nanoionomer, and polyacid-modified resin. In both studies I and II, these settings were designed to simulate the contact point between the restoration and simulated approximal lesion. For study I, they were subjected to a new pH-cycling cariogenic challenge for 7 or 14 days (n=10. For study II, a randomized double-blind in situ design was conducted in two phases (7/14 days to promote cariogenic challenge. At the end of both studies, specimens were collected for mineral analysis by cross-sectional microhardness. Higher mineral loss was observed for lesions in contact with resin (p<0.001. HVGICs were the most efficient in preventing mineral loss, whereas other materials presented an intermediate behavior. It is concluded that fluoride-releasing materials can moderately reduce white-spot lesions progression, and HVGIC can arrest enamel lesion in approximal surface in contact with them.

  20. Forgotten Children: Law Enforcement Agencies, Child Protective Services, and Children of Arrested Parents in Michigan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neville, Kristin R.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available When a child’s sole caretaker is arrested, a number of different outcomes can happen depending on how a law enforcement agency handles the situation. There is no single set of guidelines that all police departments follow. In fact, many departments do not have a policy that dictates practice. This can cause children to “fall through the cracks,” ranging from being left alone, to being turned over to unqualified care- givers, to being placed in the custody of someone they don’t know. This is a problem because not only can it put the child/children in physically dangerous situations, but also it can have long lasting psychological effects. There are some procedures and approaches that police departments have in place that can decrease the harm suffered by these children, their parents and the community when caregivers of minor children are arrested. However, more could be done in this important area. The goal of this research is to identify the possible gaps between law enforcement agencies and Child Protective Services in an effort to reduce harm and provide both agencies with a tool to aide in the development of more effective policies and practices.

  1. Effect of artificial aging on polymeric surge arresters and polymer insulators for electricity distribution networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Carlos A.; Coser, E. [Laboratorio de Materiais Polimericos, Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)], e-mail: ferreira.carlos@ufrgs.br; Angelini, Joceli M.G. [Departamento de Materiais Eletricos, CPqD, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Rossi, Jose A.D. [Materiais Alta Tensao, CPqD, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Martinez, Manuel L.B. [Departamento de Engenharia Eletrica, UNIFEI, Itajuba, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate new and laboratory-aged samples of surge arresters and anchorage polymeric insulators, for 12 and 24 kV networks, which are used by the Rio Grande Energia (RGE). Power utility polymeric compounds were analyzed by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TG), Dynamic-Mechanic Analysis (DMA), Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM) to verify changes in the insulator properties due to degradation occurred during the experiments. The analyses were carried out before and after 6 months of aging in laboratory devices (weather meter, 120 deg C, salt spray, immersion in water). After the aging experiments, high-voltage electrical tests were also conducted: a radio interference voltage test and, simultaneously, the total and the internal leakage currents were measured to verify the surface degradation of the polymeric material used in the housing. The impulse current test was applied with current values close to 5, 10 and 30 k A, in order to force an internal degradation. Results showed that only surface degradation is detected at the polymer. The main properties of the parts were not affected by the aging. It confirms that polymer insulator and surge arrester are appropriate for use in electricity distribution networks. (author)

  2. Arrested chain growth during magnetic directed particle assembly in yield stress matrix fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Jason P; McKinley, Gareth H; Doyle, Patrick S

    2012-02-28

    The process of assembling particles into organized functional structures is influenced by the rheological properties of the matrix fluid in which the assembly takes place. Therefore, tuning these properties represents a viable and as yet unexplored approach for controlling particle assembly. In this Letter, we examine the effect of the matrix fluid yield stress on the directed assembly of polarizable particles into linear chains under a uniform external magnetic field. Using particle-level simulations with a simple yield stress model, we find that chain growth follows the same trajectory as in Newtonian matrix fluids up to a critical time that depends on the balance between the yield stress and the strength of magnetic interactions between particles; subsequently, the system undergoes structural arrest. Appropriate dimensionless groups for characterizing the arresting behavior are determined and relationships between these groups and the resulting structural properties are presented. Since field-induced structures can be indefinitely stabilized by the matrix fluid yield stress and "frozen" into place as desired, this approach may facilitate the assembly of more complex and sophisticated structures. PMID:22335399

  3. Hypothermia ameliorates gastrointestinal ischemic injury sustained in a porcine cardiac arrest model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Yi; WANG Shuo; LI Chun-sheng

    2012-01-01

    Background During cardiac arrest,the gastrointestinal tract is sensitive to ischemia.Protection of the gastrointestinal tract is a critical factor in determining prognosis following cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).This study seeks to determine the extent of gastrointestinal tract injury and the potential protective effect of inducing hypothermia following a porcine cardiac arrest model and CPR.Methods Ventricular fibrillation was induced by programmed electrical stimulation in 16 male domestic pigs (n=8 per group).Four minutes after ventricular fibrillation,CPR was performed.Pigs that successfully restored spontaneous circulation then received intravenous infusions of saline at either 4C or room temperature to produce hypothermic and control conditions respectively.Serum diamine oxidase and gastrointestinal adenosine triphosphate enzyme activity were determined and histopathology of the gastrointestinal tract was performed by light microscopy and electron microscopy.Results Significant injury of the gastrointestinal tract after CPR was found.Na+-K+ and Ca2+ adenosine triphosphate enzyme activity in the gastric tissue were significantly high in animals receiving hypothermia treatment compared to controls.Hypothermia also significantly reduced serum diamine oxidase after CPR compared to the control group.Moreover,severe injury sustained by the gastrointestinal tissue was significantly ameliorated under hypothermic conditions compared to controls.Conclusions Gastrointestinal injury and abnormal energy metabolism are strikingly evident following CPR.Hypothermia,which is induced by an infusion of 4C saline,can rapidly reduce internal body temperature,improve energy metabolism,and ameliorate injury to the gastrointestinal mucosa after CPR.

  4. Mechanisms involved in ceramide-induced cell cycle arrest in human hepatocarcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Wang; Xiao-Wen Lv; Jie-Ping Shi; Xiao-Song Hu

    2007-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the effect of ceramide on the cell cycle in human hepatocarcinoma Bel7402 cells.Possible molecular mechanisms were explored.METHODS:[3-(4,5)-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide(MTT)assay,plasmid transfection,reporter assay,FACS and Western blotting analyses were employed to investigate the effect and the related molecular mechanisms of C2-ceramide on the cell cycle of Bel7402 cells.RESULTS:C2-ceramide was found to inhibit the growth of Bel7402 cells by inducing cell cycle arrest.During the process,the expression of p21 protein increased,while that of cyclinD1,phospho-ERK1/2 and c-myc decreased.Furthermore,the level of CDK7 was downregulated,while the transcriptional activity of PPARγ was upregulated.Addition of GW9662,which is a PPARγ specific antagonist,could reserve the modulation action on CDK7.CONCLUSION:Our results support the hypothesis that cell cycle arrest induced by C2-ceramide may be mediated via accumulation of p21 and reduction of cyclinD1 and CDK7,at least partly,through PPARγ activation.The ERK signaling pathway was involved in this process.

  5. Tea pigments induce cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in HepG2 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu-Dong Jia; Chi Han; Jun-Shi Chen

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the molecular mechanisms by which tea pigments exert preventive effects on liver carcinogenesis.METHODS: HepG2 cells were seeded at a density of 5×105/well in six-well culture dishes and incubated overnight. The cells then were treated with various concentrations of tea pigments over 3 d, harvested by trypsinization, and counted using a hemocytometer. Flow cytometric analysis was performed by a flow cytometer after propidium iodide labeling. Bcl-2 and p21WAF1 proteins were determined by Western blotting. In addition, DNA laddering assay was performed on treated and untreated cultured HepG2 cells.RESULTS: Tea pigments inhibited the growth of HepG2 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Flow-cytometric analysis showed that tea pigments arrested cell cycle progression at G1 phase. DNA laddering was used to investigate apoptotic cell death, and the result showed that 100 mg/L of tea pigments caused typical DNA laddering. Our study also showed that tea pigments induced upregulation of p21WAF1 protein and downregulation of Bcl-2 protein.CONCLUSION: Tea pigments induce cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. Tea pigments may be used as an ideal chemopreventive agent.

  6. Bach1 Induces Endothelial Cell Apoptosis and Cell-Cycle Arrest through ROS Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinhong; Liu, Junxu; Jiang, Li; Wei, Xiangxiang; Niu, Cong; Wang, Rui; Zhang, Jianyi; Yao, Kang

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor BTB and CNC homology 1 (Bach1) regulates genes involved in the oxidative stress response and cell-cycle progression. We have recently shown that Bach1 impairs cell proliferation and promotes apoptosis in cultured endothelial cells (ECs), but the underlying mechanisms are largely uncharacterized. Here we demonstrate that Bach1 upregulation impaired the blood flow recovery from hindlimb ischemia and this effect was accompanied both by increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cleaved caspase 3 levels and by declines in the expression of cyclin D1 in the injured tissues. We found that Bach1 overexpression induced mitochondrial ROS production and caspase 3-dependent apoptosis and its depletion attenuated H2O2-induced apoptosis in cultured human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs). Bach1-induced apoptosis was largely abolished when the cells were cultured with N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC), a ROS scavenger. Exogenous expression of Bach1 inhibited the cell proliferation and the expression of cyclin D1, induced an S-phase arrest, and increased the expression of cyclin E2, which were partially blocked by NAC. Taken together, our results suggest that Bach1 suppresses cell proliferation and induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis by increasing mitochondrial ROS production, suggesting that Bach1 may be a promising treatment target for the treatment of vascular diseases. PMID:27057283

  7. When a Cleared Rape Is Not Cleared: A Multilevel Study of Arrest and Exceptional Clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walfield, Scott M

    2016-05-01

    As rape remains one of the most underreported and least likely to be cleared of the violent crimes, it is of paramount importance to understand the factors associated with the likelihood of a case being cleared by law enforcement. This study uses data from the National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) and the Law Enforcement Management and Administrative Statistics (LEMAS), and a multilevel modeling approach to examine the relationship between victim, offender, incident, and police department characteristics contrasting the two types of clearance: arrest and exceptional clearance. The latter occurs due to reasons outside of law enforcement's control and despite being considered cleared, the offender is not arrested, charged, nor turned over for prosecution. Of the 16,231 cleared rapes in 238 departments, nearly half (47%) results in exceptional clearance when the victim refuses to cooperate or when prosecution is declined. Incident-level variables have a greater effect on the likelihood of exceptional clearance than victim and offender variables. The department explained a nontrivial amount of variation in the dependent variable, as 37% of the variance in type of clearance was between-department variation. Implications for future research on exceptional clearance and NIBRS are discussed. PMID:25646164

  8. Unattached kinetochores rather than intrakinetochore tension arrest mitosis in taxol-treated cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magidson, Valentin; He, Jie; Ault, Jeffrey G; O'Connell, Christopher B; Yang, Nachen; Tikhonenko, Irina; McEwen, Bruce F; Sui, Haixin; Khodjakov, Alexey

    2016-02-01

    Kinetochores attach chromosomes to the spindle microtubules and signal the spindle assembly checkpoint to delay mitotic exit until all chromosomes are attached. Light microscopy approaches aimed to indirectly determine distances between various proteins within the kinetochore (termed Delta) suggest that kinetochores become stretched by spindle forces and compact elastically when the force is suppressed. Low Delta is believed to arrest mitotic progression in taxol-treated cells. However, the structural basis of Delta remains unknown. By integrating same-kinetochore light microscopy and electron microscopy, we demonstrate that the value of Delta is affected by the variability in the shape and size of outer kinetochore domains. The outer kinetochore compacts when spindle forces are maximal during metaphase. When the forces are weakened by taxol treatment, the outer kinetochore expands radially and some kinetochores completely lose microtubule attachment, a condition known to arrest mitotic progression. These observations offer an alternative interpretation of intrakinetochore tension and question whether Delta plays a direct role in the control of mitotic progression. PMID:26833787

  9. Unattached kinetochores rather than intrakinetochore tension arrest mitosis in taxol-treated cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magidson, Valentin; He, Jie; Ault, Jeffrey G.; O’Connell, Christopher B.; Yang, Nachen; Tikhonenko, Irina; McEwen, Bruce F.

    2016-01-01

    Kinetochores attach chromosomes to the spindle microtubules and signal the spindle assembly checkpoint to delay mitotic exit until all chromosomes are attached. Light microscopy approaches aimed to indirectly determine distances between various proteins within the kinetochore (termed Delta) suggest that kinetochores become stretched by spindle forces and compact elastically when the force is suppressed. Low Delta is believed to arrest mitotic progression in taxol-treated cells. However, the structural basis of Delta remains unknown. By integrating same-kinetochore light microscopy and electron microscopy, we demonstrate that the value of Delta is affected by the variability in the shape and size of outer kinetochore domains. The outer kinetochore compacts when spindle forces are maximal during metaphase. When the forces are weakened by taxol treatment, the outer kinetochore expands radially and some kinetochores completely lose microtubule attachment, a condition known to arrest mitotic progression. These observations offer an alternative interpretation of intrakinetochore tension and question whether Delta plays a direct role in the control of mitotic progression. PMID:26833787

  10. Efficient Generation of Jets from Magnetically Arrested Accretion on a Rapidly Spinning Black Hole

    CERN Document Server

    Tchekhovskoy, Alexander; McKinney, Jonathan C

    2011-01-01

    We describe global, 3D, time-dependent, non-radiative, general-relativistic, magnetohydrodynamic simulations of accreting black holes (BHs). The simulations are designed to transport a large amount of magnetic flux to the center, more than the BH can swallow. The excess magnetic flux remains outside the BH, impedes accretion, and leads to a magnetically arrested disc. We find powerful outflows. For a BH with spin parameter a = 0.5, the efficiency with which the accretion system generates outflowing energy in jets and winds is eta ~ 30%. For a = 0.99, we find eta ~ 140%, which means that more energy flows out of the BH than flows in. Thus, the gravitational mass of the BH decreases with time. This simulation represents an unambiguous demonstration, within an astrophysically plausible scenario, of the extraction of net energy from a spinning BH via the Penrose-Blandford-Znajek mechanism. We suggest that magnetically arrested accretion might explain observations of AGN with apparent eta ~ few x 100%.

  11. Withaferin-A induces mitotic catastrophe and growth arrest in prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ram V; Suman, Suman; Das, Trinath P.; Luevano, Joe; Damodaran, Chendil

    2014-01-01

    Cell cycle deregulation is strongly associated with the pathogenesis of prostate cancer (CaP). Clinical trials of cell cycle regulators that target either the G0/G1 or G2/M phase to inhibit the growth of cancers including CaP are increasing. In this study, we determined the cell-cycle regulatory potential of the herbal molecule Withaferin-A (WA) on CaP cells. WA induced irreversible G2/M arrest in both CaP cell lines (PC3 and DU145) for 48 h. The G2/M arrest was accompanied by upregulation of phosphorylated Wee1, phophorylated histone H3, p21 and Aurora-B. On the other hand, downregulation of cyclins (E2, A, and B1) and phorphorylated Cdc2 (Tyr15) was observed in WA-treated CaP cells. In addition, decreased levels of phosphorylated Chk1 (Ser345) and Chk2 (Thr68) were evident in WA-treated CaP cells. Our results suggest that activation of Cdc2 leads to accumulation in M-phase, with abnormal duplication, and initiation of mitotic catastrophe that results in cell death. In conclusion, these results clearly highlight the potential of WA as a regulator of the G2/M phase of the cell cycle and as a therapeutic agent for CaP. PMID:24079846

  12. X-ray-induced G 2 arrest in ataxia telangiectasia lymphoblastoid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sensitivity to X-ray-induced G-2 arrest was compared between ataxia telangiectasia (AT) lymphoblastoid cells and normal human cells. Flow cytometrical analysis of cells following X-ray irradiation revealed that the fraction of cells with 4n DNA content was greater in AT cells than in normal cells as previously reported by other investigators. However, the other parameterss for cell-cycle progression kinetics including mitotic indices, cumulative mitotic indices and cumulative labelled mitotic indices indicated that X-ray-induced G-2 arrest as a function of dose in AT cells was indistinguishable from that in normal cells. Moreover, no significant difference in cell viability was noted between AT and normal cells until 48 h following X-irradiation up to 2.6 Gy, although X-irradiated At cells, compared to normal cells, showed a significantly decrease survival in terms of cell multiplication in growth medium and colony formation in soft agar. These data collectively suggest that the greater accumulation of AT cells with 4n DNA content in flow cytometry cannot be attributed to more stringent irreversible blockage of cell-cycle progression at the G-2 phase and eventual cell death there. The possible reasons for this greater accumulation are discussed. (Author). 19 refs.; 5 figs.; 2 tabs

  13. Knockdown of human deubiquitinase PSMD14 induces cell cycle arrest and senescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrne, Ann; McLaren, Rajashree P.; Mason, Paul; Chai, Lilly; Dufault, Michael R.; Huang, Yinyin; Liang, Beirong; Gans, Joseph D.; Zhang, Mindy; Carter, Kara; Gladysheva, Tatiana B.; Teicher, Beverly A.; Biemann, Hans-Peter N.; Booker, Michael; Goldberg, Mark A.; Klinger, Katherine W.; Lillie, James [Genzyme Corporation, 49 New York Avenue, Framingham, MA 01701 (United States); Madden, Stephen L., E-mail: steve.madden@genzyme.com [Genzyme Corporation, 49 New York Avenue, Framingham, MA 01701 (United States); Jiang, Yide, E-mail: yide.jiang@genzyme.com [Genzyme Corporation, 49 New York Avenue, Framingham, MA 01701 (United States)

    2010-01-15

    The PSMD14 (POH1, also known as Rpn11/MPR1/S13/CepP1) protein within the 19S complex (19S cap; PA700) is responsible for substrate deubiquitination during proteasomal degradation. The role of PSMD14 in cell proliferation and senescence was explored using siRNA knockdown in carcinoma cell lines. Our results reveal that down-regulation of PSMD14 by siRNA transfection had a considerable impact on cell viability causing cell arrest in the G0-G1 phase, ultimately leading to senescence. The molecular events associated with decreased cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest and senescence include down-regulation of cyclin B1-CDK1-CDC25C, down-regulation of cyclin D1 and up-regulation of p21{sup /Cip} and p27{sup /Kip1}. Most notably, phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein was markedly reduced in PSMD14 knockdown cells. A comparative study with PSMB5, a subunit of the 20S proteasome, revealed that PSMB5 and PSMD14 have different effects on cell cycle, senescence and associated molecular events. These data support the view that the 19S and 20S subunits of the proteasome have distinct biological functions and imply that targeting 19S and 20S would have distinct molecular consequences on tumor cells.

  14. Detection of ROSC in Patients with Cardiac Arrest During Chest Compression Using NIRS: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Tsukasa; Nagao, Ken; Kawamorita, Tsuyoshi; Soga, Taketomo; Ishii, Mitsuru; Chiba, Nobutaka; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Tani, Shigemasa; Yoshino, Atsuo; Hirayama, Atsushi; Sakatani, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    Return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) during chest compression is generally detected by arterial pulse palpation and end-tidal CO2 monitoring; however, it is necessary to stop chest compression during pulse palpation, and to perform endotracheal intubation for monitoring end-tidal CO2. In the present study, we evaluated whether near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) allows the detection of ROSC during chest compression without interruption. We monitored cerebral blood oxygenation in 19 patients with cardiac arrest using NIRS (NIRO-200NX, Hamamatsu Photonics, Japan). On arrival at the emergency room, the attending physicians immediately assessed whether a patient was eligible for this study after conventional advanced life support (ALS) and employed NIRS to measure cerebral blood oxygenation (CBO) in the bilateral frontal lobe in patients. We found cerebral blood flow waveforms in synchrony with chest compressions in all patients. In addition, we observed abrupt increases of oxy-hemoglobin concentration and tissue oxygen index (TOI), which were associated with ROSC detected by pulse palpation. The present findings indicate that NIRS can be used to assess the quality of chest compression in patients with cardiac arrest as demonstrated by the detection of synchronous waveforms during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). NIRS appears to be applicable for detection of ROSC without interruption of chest compression and without endotracheal intubation. PMID:26782207

  15. Osthole inhibits proliferation of human breast cancer cells by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lintao Wang; Yanyan Peng; Kaikai Shi; Haixiao Wang; Jianlei Lu; Yanli Li; Changyan Ma

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that osthole,an active constituent isolated from the fruit of Cnidium monnieri (L.) Cusson,a traditional Chinese medicine,possesses anticancer activity.However,its effect on breast cancer cells so far has not been elucidated clearly.In the present study,we evaluated the effects of osthole on the proliferation,cell cycle and apoptosis of human breast cancer cells MDA-MB 435.We demonstrated that osthole is effective in inhibiting the proliferation of MDA-MB 435 cells,The mitochondrion-mediated apoptotic pathway was involved in apoptosis induced by osthole,as indicated by activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3 followed by PARP degradation.The mechanism underlying its effect on the induction of G1 phase arrest was due to the up-regulation of p53 and p21 and down-regulation of Cdk2 and cyclin D1 expression.Were observed taken together,these findings suggest that the anticancer efficacy of osthole is mediated via induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells and osthole may be a potential chemotherapeutic agent against human breast cancer.

  16. TRICHOSTATIN A INHIBITS PROLIFERATION, INDUCES APOPTOSIS AND CELL CYCLE ARREST IN HELA CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Zhou-min; WANG Yi-qun; MEI Qi; CHEN Jian; DU Jia; WEI Yan; XU Ying-chun

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIS) have been shown to inhibit cancer cell proliferation, stimulate apoptosis, an induce cell cycle arrest. Our purpose was to investigate the antiproliferative effects of a HDACI, trichostatin A (TSA), against human cervical cancer cells (HeLa). Methods: HeLa cells were treated in vitro with various concentrations of TSA. The inhibitory effect of TSA on the growth of HeLa cells was measured by MTT assay. To detect the characteristic of apoptosis chromatin condensation, HeLa cells were stained with Hoechst 33258 in the presence of TSA. Induction of cell cycle arrest was studied by flow cytometry. Changes in gene expression of p53, p21Waf1 and p27Kip1 were studied by semiquantitative RT-PCR. Results: TSA inhibited cell growth in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Hoechst 33258 staining assay showed that TSA induced apoptosis. Cell cycle analysis indicated that treatment with TSA decreased the proportion of cells in S phase and increased the proportion of cells in G0/G1 and/or G2/M phases of the cell cycle. This was concomitant with overexpression of genes related to malignant phenotype, including an increase in p53, p21Waf1 and p27Kip1. Conclusion: These results suggest that TSA is effective in inhibiting growth of HeLa cells in vitro. The findings raise the possibility that TSA may prove particularly effective in treatment of cervical cancers.

  17. Propagation and arrest of cleavage cracks in a nuclear pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety of nuclear structures is crucial while the service time of nuclear power stations is planned to be extended up to 60 years. Initiation stage of cracks is still considered as a key issue, but more and more component integrity analyses investigate the crack arrest possibility. This study deals with physical mechanisms of cleavage crack propagation and numerical computations related to brittle fracture. Experiments using standard measuring techniques and a high-speed framing camera system, as well as Scanning Electron Microscope fracture surface analyses were carried out on thin CT specimens made of 16MND5 PWR vessel steel. The elastic-viscoplastic behavior of the ferritic steel has been studied and taken into account in numerical simulations. The extended Finite Element Method (X-FEM) is used in CAST3M finite element analysis software to model crack propagation. Numerical computations combine a local non-linear dynamic approach and a fracture criterion based on critical cleavage stress, whereas current standards in the nuclear field use a global static approach to fracture to depict crack initiation and arrest. The links of the criterion with temperature and strain rate are considered thanks to experiments, SEM fractographies and 2D computations in order to get a robust physical model which can be effective for model-based predictions of industrial structures. (authors)

  18. Nucleostemin Depletion Induces Post-G1 Arrest Apoptosis in Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia K562 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Seyed-Gogani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Despite significant improvements in treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML, the emergence of leukemic stem cell (LSC concept questioned efficacy of current therapeutical protocols. Remaining issue on CML includes finding and targeting of the key genes responsible for self-renewal and proliferation of LSCs. Nucleostemin (NS is a new protein localized in the nucleolus of most stem cells and tumor cells which regulates their self-renewal and cell cycle progression. The aim of this study was to investigate effects of NS knocking down in K562 cell line as an in vitro model of CML. Methods: NS gene silencing was performed using a specific small interfering RNA (NS-siRNA. The gene expression level of NS was evaluated by RT-PCR. The viability and growth rate of K562 cells were determined by trypan blue exclusion test. Cell cycle distribution of the cells was analyzed by flow cytometry. Results: Our results showed that NS knocking down inhibited proliferation and viability of K562 cells in a time-dependent manner. Cell cycle studies revealed that NS depletion resulted in G1 cell cycle arrest at short times of transfection (24 h followed with apoptosis at longer times (48 and 72 h, suggest that post-G1 arrest apoptosis is occurred in K562 cells. Conclusion: Overall, these results point to essential role of NS in K562 cells, thus, this gene might be considered as a promising target for treatment of CML.

  19. Salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Xiaolan, E-mail: huxiaolan1998@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Pathology and Pathophysiology, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Zhang, Xianqi [The 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Qiu, Shuifeng [Department of Pathology and Pathophysiology, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Yu, Daihua; Lin, Shuxin [Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China)

    2010-07-16

    Research highlights: {yields} Salidroside inhibits the growth of human breast cancer cells. {yields} Salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest of human breast cancer cells. {yields} Salidroside induces apoptosis of human breast cancer cell lines. -- Abstract: Recently, salidroside (p-hydroxyphenethyl-{beta}-D-glucoside) has been identified as one of the most potent compounds isolated from plants of the Rhodiola genus used widely in traditional Chinese medicine, but pharmacokinetic data on the compound are unavailable. We were the first to report the cytotoxic effects of salidroside on cancer cell lines derived from different tissues, and we found that human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells (estrogen receptor negative) were sensitive to the inhibitory action of low-concentration salidroside. To further investigate the cytotoxic effects of salidroside on breast cancer cells and reveal possible ER-related differences in response to salidroside, we used MDA-MB-231 cells and MCF-7 cells (estrogen receptor-positive) as models to study possible molecular mechanisms; we evaluated the effects of salidroside on cell growth characteristics, such as proliferation, cell cycle duration, and apoptosis, and on the expression of apoptosis-related molecules. Our results demonstrated for the first time that salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells and may be a promising candidate for breast cancer treatment.

  20. Type-1-cytokines synergize with oncogene inhibition to induce tumor growth arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acquavella, Nicolas; Clever, David; Yu, Zhiya; Roelke-Parker, Melody; Palmer, Douglas C.; Xi, Liqiang; Pflicke, Holger; Ji, Yun; Gros, Alena; Hanada, Ken-ichi; Goldlust, Ian S.; Mehta, Gautam U.; Klebanoff, Christopher A.; Crompton, Joseph G.; Sukumar, Madhusudhanan; Morrow, James J.; Franco, Zulmarie; Gattinoni, Luca; Liu, Hui; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco; Stroncek, David F.; Lee, Chyi-Chia R.; Raffeld, Mark; Bosenberg, Marcus W.; Roychoudhuri, Rahul; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2014-01-01

    Both targeted inhibition of oncogenic driver mutations and immune-based therapies show efficacy in treatment of patients with metastatic cancer but responses can be either short-lived or incompletely effective. Oncogene inhibition can augment the efficacy of immune-based therapy but mechanisms by which these two interventions might cooperate are incompletely resolved. Using a novel transplantable BRAFV600E-mutant murine melanoma model (SB-3123), we explore potential mechanisms of synergy between the selective BRAFV600E inhibitor vemurafenib and adoptive cell transfer (ACT)-based immunotherapy. We found that vemurafenib cooperated with ACT to delay melanoma progression without significantly affecting tumor infiltration or effector function of endogenous or adoptively transferred CD8+ T cells as previously observed. Instead, we found that the T-cell cytokines IFNγ and TNFα synergized with vemurafenib to induce cell-cycle arrest of tumor cells in vitro. This combinatorial effect was recapitulated in human melanoma-derived cell lines and was restricted to cancers bearing a BRAFV600E-mutation. Molecular profiling of treated SB-3123 indicated that the provision of vemurafenib promoted the sensitization of SB-3123 to the anti-proliferative effects of T-cell effector cytokines. The unexpected finding that immune cytokines synergize with oncogene inhibitors to induce growth arrest have major implications for understanding cancer biology at the intersection of oncogenic and immune signaling and provides a basis for design of combinatorial therapeutic approaches for patients with metastatic cancer. PMID:25358764

  1. Summary of HSST wide-plate crack-arrest tests and analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eleven wide-plate crack-arrest tests have been completed to date, seven utilizing specimens fabricated from A533B class 1 material (WP-1 series), and four fabricated from a low upper-shelf base material (WP-2 series). With the exception of one test in the WP-1 series and two tests in the WP-2 series which utilized 152-mm-thick specimens, each test utilized a single-edge notched (SEN) plate specimen 1 by 1 by 0.1 m that was subjected to a linear thermal gradient along the plane of crack propagation. Test results exhibit an increase in crack-arrest toughness with temperature, with the rate of increase becoming greater as the temperature increases. When the wide-place test results are combined with other large-specimen results (Japanese ESSO, thermal-shock experiments and pressurized-thermal-shock experiments) the data show a consistent trend in which the KIa data extends above the limit provided in ASME Section XI. (author)

  2. Summary of HSST wide-plate crack-arrest tests and analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eleven wide-plate crack-arrest tests have been completed to date, seven utilizing specimens fabricated from A533B class 1 material (WP-1 series), and four fabricated from a low upper-shelf base material (WP-2 series). With the exception of one test in the WP-1 series and two tests in the WP-2 series which utilized 152-mm-thick specimens, each test utilized a single-edge notched (SEN) plate specimen 1 by 1 by 0.1 m that was subjected to a linear thermal gradient along the plane of crack propagation. Test results exhibit an increase in crack-arrest toughness with temperature, with the rate of increase becoming greater as the temperature increases. When the wide-plate test results are combined with other large-specimen results (Japanese ESSO, thermal-shock experiments and pressurized-thermal-shock experiments), the data show a consistent trend in which the K/sub Ia/ data extends above the limit provided in ASME Section XI

  3. Child Welfare and the Transition to Adulthood: Investigating Placement Status and Subsequent Arrests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Joseph P; Perron, Brian E; Huang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the transition to adulthood in child welfare focus almost exclusively on youth in foster care. Yet, research indicates that maltreated children who remain in the home may display similar risks as compared with their peers in formal foster care settings. Utilizing administrative data from child welfare, juvenile justice and adult corrections, the current study fills a gap in the literature by analyzing justice outcomes for older adolescents involved with the child welfare system regardless of their placement status. We focus on both intact family cases and formal foster care placements. The diverse sample (11% Hispanic, 8% African American, 6% Native American, 9% multi-racial, 56% female) included open child welfare cases involving 17 year olds (n = 9874). Twenty-nine percent of adolescents were associated with a long term out of home placement and 62% were associated with an intact family case. Event history models were developed to estimate the risk of subsequent offending. Adolescents associated with long term foster care placement were significantly less likely to experience a subsequent arrest as compared with adolescents associated with a long term intact family case. Males, African Americans and adolescents associated with neglect were also more likely to experience a subsequent arrest. Limited focus on the intact family population in child welfare represents a lost opportunity to support critical developmental gains and facilitate a smooth transition to adulthood. PMID:26014611

  4. The optimum timing of resuscitative thoracotomy for non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takino, M; Okada, Y

    1993-08-01

    Open-chest cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a promising method for non-traumatic cardiac arrest. In this preliminary study, we investigated the optimum timing of thoracotomy which brings high rate of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and keeps the incidence of unnecessary thoracotomy minimal. Ninety-five adult patients with non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest were analyzed. Of those, 26 patients were treated by the open-chest CPR in a prospective consecutive fashion. In this group, the ROSC rate was investigated in connection with the interval from hospital arrival, or ambulance call, to thoracotomy. Another 69 patients were treated by standard CPR. In this uncontrolled group, the interval from arrival at hospital to ROSC was investigated to define the 'natural hospital course' by the conventional treatment. Patient characteristics in the open-chest CPR group and the standard CPR group were similar. In the open-chest CPR group, 15 patients obtained ROSC. There was a tendency that the ROSC rate was highest in the patients with thoracotomy within 5 min of hospital arrival and declined as the timing of thoracotomy was delayed. Similar tendency was noted when the timing of thoracotomy was counted from the ambulance call. In the standard CPR group, only two patients obtained ROSC during the initial 5 min of hospital course. These results suggest that thoracotomy within 5 min of hospital arrival brings the highest ROSC rate while keeps the incidence of unnecessary thoracotomy acceptable. PMID:8210734

  5. Joints and Mineral Veins in Limestone-Marl Alternations: Arrest and Fracture Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipp, S. L.; Reyer, D.

    2009-05-01

    Layering is a common feature of many rock masses. In particular, many sedimentary rocks are layered because of depositional changes (stratification), and diagenetic processes. Mechanical layering, where the mechanical properties, particularly the Young's moduli (stiffness), change between layers, may coincide with changes in grain size, mineral content or facies. The mechanical layering of the rock is important because layering commonly results in abrupt changes in local stress fields that may lead to fracture arrest. However, if all the beds in a rock mass have essentially the same Young's modulus and their contacts are welded together (sealed or healed) the beds may function mechanically as a single layer. Here we explore how mechanical layers relate to sedimentary layers in limestone-marl alternations. This we do by investigating the effects of sedimentary layering of the host rock, on the emplacement and geometries of extension fractures such as joints and mineral veins. Detailed field studies were carried out at two localities of well-exposed limestone-marl alternations: (1) the Jurassic Blue Lias at the Glamorgan Coast of South Wales, UK, and (2) the Triassic Muschelkalk in the Kraichgau area, Southwest Germany. In both study areas, calcite veins occur almost exclusively in the cores and damage zones of faults, whereas jointing is pervasive. Fracture arrest, common in mechanically layered host rocks, is primarily controlled by local variations in the stress field, mainly due to three factors: discontinuities (fractures and contacts), changes in host rock mechanical properties, and stress barriers, where the local stress field is unfavorable to fracture propagation. These factors are related in that changes in stiffness and stress barriers are common at contacts between different rock types. A fourth mechanism, namely the material toughness (critical strain energy release rate) of the contact in relation to that of the adjacent layers has been much studied in

  6. Viscoplastic-dynamic analyses of small-scale fracture tests to obtain crack arrest toughness values for PTS conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reliable predictions of crack arrest at the high upper shelf toughness conditions involved in postulated pressurized thermal shock (PTS) events require procedures beyond those utilized in conventional fracture mechanics treatments. To develop such a procedure, viscoplastic-dynamic fracture mechanics finite element analyses, viscoplastic material characterization testing, and small-scale crack propagation and arrest experimentation are being combines in this research. The approach couples SwRI's viscoplastic-dynamic fracture mechanics finite element code VISCRK with experiments using duplex 4340/A533B steel compact specimens. The experiments are simulated by VISCRK computations employing the Bodner-Partom viscoplastic constitutive relation and the nonlinear fracture mechanics parameter T. The goal is to develop temperature-dependent crack arrest toughness values for A533B steel. While only room temperature KIa values have been obtained so far, these have been found to agree closely with those obtained from wide plate tests. (author)

  7. DNA damage-induced metaphase I arrest is mediated by the spindle assembly checkpoint and maternal age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marangos, Petros; Stevense, Michelle; Niaka, Konstantina; Lagoudaki, Michaela; Nabti, Ibtissem; Jessberger, Rolf; Carroll, John

    2015-01-01

    In mammalian oocytes DNA damage can cause chromosomal abnormalities that potentially lead to infertility and developmental disorders. However, there is little known about the response of oocytes to DNA damage. Here we find that oocytes with DNA damage arrest at metaphase of the first meiosis (MI). The MI arrest is induced by the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) because inhibiting the SAC overrides the DNA damage-induced MI arrest. Furthermore, this MI checkpoint is compromised in oocytes from aged mice. These data lead us to propose that the SAC is a major gatekeeper preventing the progression of oocytes harbouring DNA damage. The SAC therefore acts to integrate protection against both aneuploidy and DNA damage by preventing production of abnormal mature oocytes and subsequent embryos. Finally, we suggest escaping this DNA damage checkpoint in maternal ageing may be one of the causes of increased chromosome anomalies in oocytes and embryos from older mothers. PMID:26522734

  8. Spontaneous defibrillation after cessation of resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a case of Lazarus phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kämäräinen, Antti; Virkkunen, Ilkka; Holopainen, Leevi; Erkkilä, Elja-Pekka; Yli-Hankala, Arvi; Tenhunen, Jyrki

    2007-12-01

    This report describes a case of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with spontaneous defibrillation and subsequent return of circulation after cessation of resuscitative efforts. A 47-year-old man was found in cardiac arrest and resuscitation was initiated. As no response was achieved, the efforts were withdrawn and final registered cardiac rhythm was ventricular fibrillation. Fifteen minutes later the patient was found to be normotensive and breathing spontaneously. The patient made a poor neurological recovery and died 3 months after the arrest. The authors are unable to give an explanation to the event, but suspect the effect of adrenaline combined with mild hypothermia to have contributed to the self-defibrillation of the myocardium. PMID:17629389

  9. Juvenile sex offender re-arrest rates for sexual, violent nonsexual and property crimes: a 10-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Dennis; Keller, Adrienne; McGarvey, Elizabeth L; Wieckowski, Edward; Pinkerton, Relana; Brown, Gerald L

    2005-07-01

    We report the results of a 10-year follow-up recidivism study of two sex offender treatment programs for incarcerated juvenile sex offenders (JSOs) in Virginia. The programs vary in environment and intensity. The more intense JSO program ("self-contained") operates in specialized living units that are separate from those of the general juvenile incarcerated population. In the less intense program ("prescriptive"), JSOs remain housed with the general population of juvenile offenders. Arrest and incarceration data through January 2003 were obtained for 261 male JSOs released between 1992 and 2001. The inclusion of adult incarceration data allowed for a more accurate assessment of the actual time at risk for sexual re-offending. Outcomes are re-arrest rates, length of time to re-arrest and type of offense (property, nonsexual assault, sexual) on re-arrest, with analyses using survival curve functions. For both groups, actual re-arrest is most likely to be for a nonsexual person offense (31 and 47%, respectively) and least likely to be for a sexual offense (rate and a longer mean time to re-arrest, for all types of offenses, than the prescriptive treatment group. In addition, juveniles who indicate high levels of impulsive/antisocial behaviors are significantly more likely to recidivate compared to juveniles with low-levels of impulsive/antisocial behaviors, regardless of treatment type. This is the first 10-year follow-up study of treatment outcomes for a relatively large sample of males who were incarcerated for sexual offenses as juveniles. PMID:16121841

  10. Naphthalimides Induce G2 Arrest Through the ATM-Activated Chk2-Executed Pathway in HCT116 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zhu

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Naphthalimides, particularly amonafide and 2-(2-dimethylamino-6-thia-2-aza-benzo[def]chrysene-1,3-diones (R16, have been identified to possess anticancer activities and to induce G2-M arrest through inhibiting topoisomerase II accompanied by Chk1 degradation. The current study was designed to precisely dissect the signaling pathway(s responsible for the naphthalimide-induced cell cycle arrest in human colon carcinoma HCT116 cells. Using phosphorylated histone H3 and mitotic protein monoclonal 2 as mitosis markers, we first specified the G2 arrest elicited by the R16 and amonafide. Then, R16 and amonafide were revealed to induce phosphorylation of the DNA damage sensor ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM responding to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. Inhibition of ATM by both the pharmacological inhibitor caffeine and the specific small interference RNA (siRNA rescued the G2 arrest elicited by R16, indicating its ATM-dependent characteristic. Furthermore, depletion of Chk2, but not Chk1 with their corresponding siRNA, statistically significantly reversed the R16- and amonafide-triggered G2 arrest. Moreover, the naphthalimides phosphorylated Chk2 in an ATM-dependent manner but induced Chk1 degradation. These data indicate that R16 and amonafide preferentially used Chk2 as evidenced by the differential ATM-executed phosphorylation of Chk1 and Chk2. Thus, a clear signaling pathway can be established, in which ATM relays the DNA DSBs signaling triggered by the naphthalimides to the checkpoint kinases, predominantly to Chk2,which finally elicits G2 arrest. The mechanistic elucidation not only favors the development of the naphthalimides as anticancer agents but also provides an alternative strategy of Chk2 inhibition to potentiate the anticancer activities of these agents.

  11. PTEN enhances G2/M arrest in etoposide-treated MCF‑7 cells through activation of the ATM pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruopeng; Zhu, Li; Zhang, Lirong; Xu, Anli; Li, Zhengwei; Xu, Yijuan; He, Pei; Wu, Maoqing; Wei, Fengxiang; Wang, Chenhong

    2016-05-01

    As an effective tumor suppressor, phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) has attracted the increased attention of scientists. Recent studies have shown that PTEN plays unique roles in the DNA damage response (DDR) and can interact with the Chk1 pathway. However, little is known about how PTEN contributes to DDR through the ATM-Chk2 pathway. It is well-known that etoposide induces G2/M arrest in a variety of cell lines, including MCF-7 cells. The DNA damage-induced G2/M arrest results from the activation of protein kinase ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), followed by the activation of Chk2 that subsequently inactivates CDC25C, resulting in G2/M arrest. In the present study, we assessed the contribution of PTEN to the etoposide-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest. PTEN was knocked down in MCF-7 cells by specific shRNA, and the effects of PTEN on the ATM-Chk2 pathway were investigated through various approaches. The results showed that knockdown of PTEN strongly antagonized ATM activation in response to etoposide treatment, and thereby reduced the phosphorylation level of ATM substrates, including H2AX, P53 and Chk2. Furthermore, depletion of PTEN reduced the etoposide-induced phosphorylation of CDC25C and strikingly compromised etoposide-induced G2/M arrest in the MCF-7 cells. Altogether, we demonstrated that PTEN plays a unique role in etoposide-induced G2/M arrest by facilitating the activation of the ATM pathway, and PTEN was required for the proper activation of checkpoints in response to DNA damage in MCF-7 cells. PMID:26986476

  12. Evaluation of coronary blood flow velocity during cardiac arrest with circulation maintained through mechanical chest compressions in a porcine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Henrik

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mechanical chest compressions (CCs have been shown capable of maintaining circulation in humans suffering cardiac arrest for extensive periods of time. Reports have documented a visually normalized coronary blood flow during angiography in such cases (TIMI III flow, but it has never been actually measured. Only indirect measurements of the coronary circulation during cardiac arrest with on-going mechanical CCs have been performed previously through measurement of the coronary perfusion pressure (CPP. In this study our aim was to correlate average peak coronary flow velocity (APV to CPP during mechanical CCs. Methods In a closed chest porcine model, cardiac arrest was established through electrically induced ventricular fibrillation (VF in eleven pigs. After one minute, mechanical chest compressions were initiated and then maintained for 10 minutes upon which the pigs were defibrillated. Measurements of coronary blood flow in the left anterior descending artery were made at baseline and during VF with a catheter based Doppler flow fire measuring APV. Furthermore measurements of central (thoracic venous and arterial pressures were also made in order to calculate the theoretical CPP. Results Average peak coronary flow velocity was significantly higher compared to baseline during mechanical chests compressions and this was observed during the entire period of mechanical chest compressions (12 - 39% above baseline. The APV slowly declined during the 10 min period of mechanical chest compressions, but was still higher than baseline at the end of mechanical chest compressions. CPP was simultaneously maintained at > 20 mmHg during the 10 minute episode of cardiac arrest. Conclusion Our study showed good correlation between CPP and APV which was highly significant, during cardiac arrest with on-going mechanical CCs in a closed chest porcine model. In addition APV was even higher during mechanical CCs compared to baseline. Mechanical

  13. Prehospital randomised assessment of a mechanical compression device in cardiac arrest (PaRAMeDIC trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCabe Chris

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is closely linked to the quality of CPR, but in real life, resuscitation during prehospital care and ambulance transport is often suboptimal. Mechanical chest compression devices deliver consistent chest compressions, are not prone to fatigue and could potentially overcome some of the limitations of manual chest compression. However, there is no high-quality evidence that they improve clinical outcomes, or that they are cost effective. The Prehospital Randomised Assessment of a Mechanical Compression Device In Cardiac Arrest (PARAMEDIC trial is a pragmatic cluster randomised study of the LUCAS-2 device in adult patients with non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Methods/design The primary objective of this trial is to evaluate the effect of chest compression using LUCAS-2 on mortality at 30 days post out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, compared with manual chest compression. Secondary objectives of the study are to evaluate the effects of LUCAS-2 on survival to 12 months, cognitive and quality of life outcomes and cost-effectiveness. Methods: Ambulance service vehicles will be randomised to either manual compression (control or LUCAS arms. Adult patients in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, attended by a trial vehicle will be eligible for inclusion. Patients with traumatic cardiac arrest or who are pregnant will be excluded. The trial will recruit approximately 4000 patients from England, Wales and Scotland. A waiver of initial consent has been approved by the Research Ethics Committees. Consent will be sought from survivors for participation in the follow-up phase. Conclusion The trial will assess the clinical and cost effectiveness of the LUCAS-2 mechanical chest compression device. Trial Registration: The trial is registered on the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number Registry (ISRCTN08233942.

  14. Structural integrity and damage assessment of high performance arresting cable systems using an embedded distributed fiber optic sensor (EDIFOS) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Edgar A.; Kempen, Cornelia; Sun, Sunjian; Esterkin, Yan; Prohaska, John; Bentley, Doug; Glasgow, Andy; Campbell, Richard

    2010-04-01

    Redondo Optics in collaboration with the Cortland Cable Company, TMT Laboratories, and Applied Fiber under a US Navy SBIR project is developing an embedded distributed fiber optic sensor (EDIFOSTM) system for the real-time, structural health monitoring, damage assessment, and lifetime prediction of next generation synthetic material arresting gear cables. The EDIFOSTM system represents a new, highly robust and reliable, technology that can be use for the structural damage assessment of critical cable infrastructures. The Navy is currently investigating the use of new, all-synthetic- material arresting cables. The arresting cable is one of the most stressed components in the entire arresting gear landing system. Synthetic rope materials offer higher performance in terms of the strength-to-weight characteristics, which improves the arresting gear engine's performance resulting in reduced wind-over-deck requirements, higher aircraft bring-back-weight capability, simplified operation, maintenance, supportability, and reduced life cycle costs. While employing synthetic cables offers many advantages for the Navy's future needs, the unknown failure modes of these cables remains a high technical risk. For these reasons, Redondo Optics is investigating the use of embedded fiber optic sensors within the synthetic arresting cables to provide real-time structural assessment of the cable state, and to inform the operator when a particular cable has suffered impact damage, is near failure, or is approaching the limit of its service lifetime. To date, ROI and its collaborators have developed a technique for embedding multiple sensor fibers within the strands of high performance synthetic material cables and use the embedded fiber sensors to monitor the structural integrity of the cable structures during tensile and compressive loads exceeding over 175,000-lbsf without any damage to the cable structure or the embedded fiber sensors.

  15. Arrests, Recent Life Circumstances, and Recurrent Job Loss for At-Risk Young Men: An Event-History Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Wiesner, Margit; Capaldi, Deborah M.; Kim, Hyoun K.

    2010-01-01

    This study used longitudinal data from 202 at-risk young men to examine effects of arrests, prior risk factors, and recent life circumstances on job loss across a 7-year period in early adulthood. Repeated failure-time continuous event-history analysis indicated that occurrence of job loss was primarily related to prior mental health problems, recent arrests, recent drug use, and recent being married/cohabitation. It is argued that long-term effects of criminal justice contact on employment o...

  16. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Matrix Protein Induces Lung Epithelial Cell Cycle Arrest through a p53 Dependent Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Bian, Tao; John D Gibbs; Örvell, Claes; Imani, Farhad

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of viral respiratory infections in children. Our previous study showed that the RSV infection induced lung epithelial cell cycle arrest, which enhanced virus replication. To address the mechanism of RSV-induced cell cycle arrest, we examined the contribution of RSV-matrix (RSV-M) protein. In this report, we show that in both the A549 cell line and primary human bronchial epithelial (PHBE) cells, transfection with RSV-M protein caused the ce...

  17. Canopy shade causes a rapid and transient arrest in leaf development through auxin-induced cytokinin oxidase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabelli, Monica; Possenti, Marco; Sessa, Giovanna; Ciolfi, Andrea; Sassi, Massimiliano; Morelli, Giorgio; Ruberti, Ida

    2007-08-01

    A plant grown under canopies perceives the reduction in the ratio of red (R) to far-red (FR) light as a warning of competition, and enhances elongation growth in an attempt to overgrow its neighbors. Here, we report that the same low R/FR signal that induces hypocotyl elongation also triggers a rapid arrest of leaf primordium growth, ensuring that plant resources are redirected into extension growth. The growth arrest induced by low R/FR depends on auxin-induced cytokinin breakdown in incipient vein cells of developing primordia, thus demonstrating the existence of a previously unrecognized regulatory circuit underlying plant response to canopy shade. PMID:17671088

  18. Brain stem death as the vital determinant for resumption of spontaneous circulation after cardiac arrest in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Y W Chang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Spontaneous circulation returns to less than half of adult cardiac arrest victims who received in-hospital resuscitation. One clue for this disheartening outcome arises from the prognosis that asystole invariably takes place, after a time lag, on diagnosis of brain stem death. The designation of brain stem death as the point of no return further suggests that permanent impairment of the brain stem cardiovascular regulatory machinery precedes death. It follows that a crucial determinant for successful revival of an arrested heart is that spontaneous circulation must resume before brain stem death commences. Here, we evaluated the hypothesis that maintained functional integrity of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM, a neural substrate that is intimately related to brain stem death and central circulatory regulation, holds the key to the vital time-window between cardiac arrest and resumption of spontaneous circulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An animal model of brain stem death employing the pesticide mevinphos as the experimental insult in Sprague-Dawley rats was used. Intravenous administration of lethal doses of mevinphos elicited an abrupt cardiac arrest, accompanied by elevated systemic arterial pressure and anoxia, augmented neuronal excitability and enhanced microvascular perfusion in RVLM. This period represents the vital time-window between cardiac arrest and resumption of spontaneous circulation in our experimental model. Animals with restored spontaneous circulation exhibited maintained neuronal functionality in RVLM beyond this critical time-window, alongside resumption of baseline tissue oxygen and enhancement of local blood flow. Intriguingly, animals that subsequently died manifested sustained anoxia, diminished local blood flow, depressed mitochondrial electron transport activities and reduced ATP production, leading to necrotic cell death in RVLM. That amelioration of mitochondrial dysfunction and

  19. Implications of temperature dependent ferrite arrest toughness to an invariant master curve shape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: The toughness temperature Kjc(T-T0) curves of ferritic-martensitic steels may have a remarkably invariant master curve (MC) shape, where the reference temperature, T0, depends on material and environmental/test conditions. For unirradiated alloys, with T0 jc(T) is governed almost entirely by the temperature dependence of σy(T). Irradiation hardening, Δσy, increases T0(ΔT0). When T0 is in the athermal σy regime, the assumption of a temperature independent σ* predicts changes (layovers) in the shape of Kjc(T). This apparent contradiction with observation is resolved by assuming a mildly temperature dependent σ*(T) at higher temperatures. The temperature dependence is, in turn, controlled by the micro-arrest toughness of the material controlling the conditions for the propagation of microcracks formed at brittle trigger particles. Here we describe results of an independent study of the temperature dependent initiation (KIc) and arrest toughness (Ka) for (100)[010] and (100)[011] Fe single crystals oriented for cleavage, using specially designed composite specimen test techniques. The Ka(T) is weakly temperature dependent below about -100 deg. C, increasing from a minimum of 3.5 MPa√(m), but rises more rapidly to 9 MPa√(m) at higher temperatures near 0 deg. C. Static and dynamic Kic/d(T) curves were also measured over a wide range of loading rates from about 0.1 to 20,000 MPa √(m)/s. In all cases, the cleavage fracture dynamics were found to be controlled by nucleation of double kinks on screw dislocations, that also control the flow stress dynamics. When plotted on a strain rate compensated temperature, T', the arrest and initiation data overlap to form a Ka(T') master curve. The results were extended complex alloys by proposing that both the thermal and athermal contributions to σy combine to control Ka(T) as a fitted model Ka(T') = C(σy)/σy(T) with a minimum Ka of about 3.5 MPa and where C(σy) is a weak function of

  20. Analysis of HIV-1 Vpr determinants responsible for cell growth arrest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Xiao-Jian

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HIV-1 genome encodes a well-conserved accessory gene product, Vpr, that serves multiple functions in the retroviral life cycle, including the enhancement of viral replication in nondividing macrophages, the induction of G2 cell-cycle arrest, and the modulation of HIV-1-induced apoptosis. We previously reported the genetic selection of a panel of di-tryptophan (W-containing peptides capable of interacting with HIV-1 Vpr and inhibiting its cytostatic activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Yao, X.-J., J. Lemay, N. Rougeau, M. Clément, S. Kurtz, P. Belhumeur, and E. A. Cohen, J. Biol. Chem. v. 277, p. 48816–48826, 2002. In this study, we performed a mutagenic analysis of Vpr to identify sequence and/or structural determinants implicated in the interaction with di-W-containing peptides and assessed the effect of mutations on Vpr-induced cytostatic activity in S. cerevisiae. Results Our data clearly shows that integrity of N-terminal α-helix I (17–33 and α-helix III (53–83 is crucial for Vpr interaction with di-W-containing peptides as well as for the protein-induced cytostatic effect in budding yeast. Interestingly, several Vpr mutants, mainly in the N- and C-terminal domains, which were previously reported to be defective for cell-cycle arrest or apoptosis in human cells, still displayed a cytostatic activity in S. cerevisiae and remained sensitive to the inhibitory effect of di-W-containing peptides. Conclusions Vpr-induced growth arrest in budding yeast can be effectively inhibited by GST-fused di-W peptide through a specific interaction of di-W peptide with Vpr functional domain, which includes α-helix I (17–33 and α-helix III (53–83. Furthermore, the mechanism(s underlying Vpr-induced cytostatic effect in budding yeast are likely to be distinct from those implicated in cell-cycle alteration and apoptosis in human cells.