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Sample records for arrayed metal probes

  1. Scanning probe lithography for fabrication of Ti metal nanodot arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, B. [Department of Physics, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of); Jo, W., E-mail: wmjo@ewha.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of); Gwon, M.J.; Lee, E. [Department of Physics, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, D.-W. [Department of Physics, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemistry and Nano Science, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    We report fabrication of Ti metal nanodot arrays by scanning probe microscopic indentation. A thin poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA) layer was spin-coated on Si substrates with thickness of 70 nm. Nanometer-size pore arrays were formed by indenting the PMMA layer using a cantilever of a scanning probe microscope. Protuberances with irregular boundaries appeared during the indentation process. Control of approach and pulling-out speed during indentation was able to dispose of the protrusions. Ti metal films were deposited on the patterned PMMA layers by a radio-frequency sputtering method and subsequently lifted off to obtain metal nanodot arrays. The fabricated metal nanodot arrays have 200 nm of diameter and 500 nm of interdistance, which corresponds to a density of 4x10{sup 8}/cm{sup 2}. Scanning probe-based measurement of current-voltage (I-V) behaviors for a single Ti metal nanodot showed asymmetric characteristics. Applying external bias is likely to induce oxidation of Ti metal, since the conductance decreased and volume change of the dots was observed. I-V behaviors of Ti metal nanodots by conventional e-beam lithography were also characterized for comparison.

  2. A MEMS probe card with 2D dense-arrayed 'hoe'-shaped metal tips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we present a novel MEMS probe card with densely area-arrayed microprobes for the wafer-level test of advanced ICs. In a 4 inch silicon wafer, a total of about 110 000 probe tips can be simultaneously fabricated, with a two-dimensional tip pitch of 240 µm × 160 µm. The 'hoe-shaped' microprobe structure is composed of one or two planar arms and an up-tilted tip, both of which are high-yield fabricated with metal micromachining techniques including low-stress nickel electroplating. With micromachined cavities, the silicon wafer serves as moulds for the up-tilted metal probes. Then, the microprobes are finally flip-chip packaged to a ceramic board for further connection to automatic testing equipment (ATE). After the probe structures are formed, the silicon wafer is removed completely by using TMAH wet etching, while the probes are freed by silicon laterally etching. The measured spring constants for all the three types of probes agree well with the designed values. As both mechanical anchors and electrical interconnections, the Sn–Ag solder-bumps feature satisfactory properties. The tested contact resistance values for three different thin-film pads on dies under test are always below 0.8 Ω, while the current leakage between two adjacent probes is only about 150 pA under 3.3 V

  3. Arrays of nucleic acid probes on biological chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Mark; Cronin, Maureen T.; Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Huang, Xiaohua X.; Hubbell, Earl A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Lobban, Peter E.; Morris, MacDonald S.; Sheldon, Edward L.

    1998-11-17

    DNA chips containing arrays of oligonucleotide probes can be used to determine whether a target nucleic acid has a nucleotide sequence identical to or different from a specific reference sequence. The array of probes comprises probes exactly complementary to the reference sequence, as well as probes that differ by one or more bases from the exactly complementary probes.

  4. Development and field practical performance of smart array probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1999, NEL developed the transmit-receive type ECT array probe for steam generator (SG) tubing, called 'X-probe', in cooperation with foreign firms. Recently NEL has developed the advanced ECT array probe, 'Smart Array Probe', characterized with a significantly improved resolution for circumferential cracks. The doubled channels in the circumferential mode have greatly improved the circumferential resolution of Smart Array Probe. With all the circumferential mode channels on the same circle, there is no need for axial position correction of inspection data. This report describes both the field practical performance and the compliance assessment to a Japanese SG-ECT guideline 'JEAG4208' of Smart Array ECT System, composed of Smart Array Probe, pusher-in-tester 'OMNI-200', and NEL's ECT Analysis System. (author)

  5. Probe design for expression arrays using OligoWiz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wernersson, Rasmus

    Since all measurements from a DNA microarray is dependant on the probes used, a good choice of probes is of vital importa nce when designing custom micro-arrays. This chapter describes how to de sign expression arrays using the “ OligoWiz ” software suite. The general desired features of good...

  6. Gravity Probe B Completed With Solar Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    In this photo, the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) space vehicle is completed during the solar array installation. The GP-B is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. GP-B is scheduled for launch in April 2004 and managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Russ Underwood, Lockheed Martin Corporation).

  7. Efficient oligonucleotide probe selection for pan-genomic tiling arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Wei

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Array comparative genomic hybridization is a fast and cost-effective method for detecting, genotyping, and comparing the genomic sequence of unknown bacterial isolates. This method, as with all microarray applications, requires adequate coverage of probes targeting the regions of interest. An unbiased tiling of probes across the entire length of the genome is the most flexible design approach. However, such a whole-genome tiling requires that the genome sequence is known in advance. For the accurate analysis of uncharacterized bacteria, an array must query a fully representative set of sequences from the species' pan-genome. Prior microarrays have included only a single strain per array or the conserved sequences of gene families. These arrays omit potentially important genes and sequence variants from the pan-genome. Results This paper presents a new probe selection algorithm (PanArray that can tile multiple whole genomes using a minimal number of probes. Unlike arrays built on clustered gene families, PanArray uses an unbiased, probe-centric approach that does not rely on annotations, gene clustering, or multi-alignments. Instead, probes are evenly tiled across all sequences of the pan-genome at a consistent level of coverage. To minimize the required number of probes, probes conserved across multiple strains in the pan-genome are selected first, and additional probes are used only where necessary to span polymorphic regions of the genome. The viability of the algorithm is demonstrated by array designs for seven different bacterial pan-genomes and, in particular, the design of a 385,000 probe array that fully tiles the genomes of 20 different Listeria monocytogenes strains with overlapping probes at greater than twofold coverage. Conclusion PanArray is an oligonucleotide probe selection algorithm for tiling multiple genome sequences using a minimal number of probes. It is capable of fully tiling all genomes of a species on

  8. Active cancellation of probing in linear dipole phased array

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Hema; Jha, Rakesh Mohan

    2015-01-01

    In this book, a modified improved LMS algorithm is employed for weight adaptation of dipole array for the generation of beam pattern in multiple signal environments. In phased arrays, the generation of adapted pattern according to the signal scenario requires an efficient adaptive algorithm. The antenna array is expected to maintain sufficient gain towards each of the desired source while at the same time suppress the probing sources. This cancels the signal transmission towards each of the hostile probing sources leading to active cancellation. In the book, the performance of dipole phased array is demonstrated in terms of fast convergence, output noise power and output signal-to-interference-and noise ratio. The mutual coupling effect and role of edge elements are taken into account. It is established that dipole array along with an efficient algorithm is able to maintain multilobe beamforming with accurate and deep nulls towards each probing source. This work has application to the active radar cross secti...

  9. Multi-Channel Detector Arrays for Heavy Ion Beam Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceto, Steven; Beckstead, Jeffrey; Castracane, James; Iguchi, H.; Fujisawa, A.; Demers, Diane; Schatz, John

    1997-11-01

    InterScience, Inc. has developed a multiple slit detector array for use with heavy ion beam probes. The first array was a twenty element array installed on the TEXT tokamak. An initial set of data was obtained with this array prior to the shutdown on the TEXT tokamak in December of 1995. More recently, a smaller detector array has been developed for use in the CHS torsatron in Nagoya. This array is smaller than the TEXT array, with ten elements, but contains two prototype sets of detector plates to determine the beam position. The operating conditions in CHS are expected to be much harsher than in TEXT, with ECH and NBI plasmas. Trajectory simulations allowed for the design of a tilted detector array in the CHS vacuum vessel. First tests of the CHS array will begin in the late summer of 1997. Other candidate machines for detector arrays are the MST reversed field pinch, in which a beam probe is expected to be installed in late 1997 or early 1998 and the Large Helical Device (LHD) which is expected to be operational in 1998. Design issues, trajectory simulations and array test results will be presented. Supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy under Grant #DE-FG02-94ER81788

  10. Parallel scanning probe arrays: their applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Liu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the invention of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM1 and the atomic force microscope (AFM2, the field of scanning probe microscopy (SPM instruments has grown steadily and has had a profound influence in materials research, chemistry, biology, nanotechnology, and electronics3,4. Today, scanning probe instruments are used for metrology, characterization5, detection6, manipulation7, patterning8,9, and material modification. A wide range of scanning probe applications are available, taking advantage of various modes of tip–substrate interactions, including force, optics10,11, electrochemistry12, electromagnetics, electrostatics, thermal and mass transfer13,14, and vibration15,16.

  11. Tuning the Spring Constant of Cantilever-free Probe Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelsdoerfer, Daniel J.; Brown, Keith A.; Boya, Radha; Shim, Wooyoung; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2013-03-01

    The versatility of atomic force microscope (AFM) based techniques such as scanning probe lithography is due in part to the utilization of a cantilever that can be fabricated to match a desired application. In contrast, cantilever-free scanning probe lithography utilizes a low cost array of probes on a compliant backing layer that allows for high throughput nanofabrication but lacks the tailorability afforded by the cantilever in traditional AFM. Here, we present a method to measure and tune the spring constant of probes in a cantilever-free array by adjusting the mechanical properties of the underlying elastomeric layer. Using this technique, we are able to fabricate large-area silicon probe arrays with spring constants that can be tuned in the range from 7 to 150 N/m. This technique offers an advantage in that the spring constant depends linearly on the geometry of the probe, which is in contrast to traditional cantilever-based lithography where the spring constant varies as the cube of the beam width and thickness. To illustrate the benefit of utilizing a probe array with a lower spring constant, we pattern a block copolymer on a delicate 50 nm thick silicon nitride window.

  12. Metal nanorod arrays and their magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large-area, highly uniform metal nanorod arrays (iron, cobalt, nickel) with variable diameters have been successfully synthesized by electrochemical deposition method using polycarbonate (PC) membrane template. By means of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) at room temperature, their microstructures and magnetic properties were investigated. The mechanism of crystals nucleated and grown theories in metal nanorod arrays were also discussed

  13. Plasmonic Nanoslit Array Enhanced Metal-Semiconductor-Metal Optical Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Eryilmaz, Sukru Burc; Okyay, Ali K

    2014-01-01

    Metallic nanoslit arrays integrated on germanium metal-semiconductor-metal photodetectors show many folds of absorption enhancement for transverse-magnetic polarization in the telecommunication C-band. Such high enhancement is attributed to resonant interference of surface plasmon modes at the metal-semiconductor interface. Horizontal surface plasmon modes were reported earlier to inhibit photodetector performance. We computationally show, however, that horizontal modes enhance the efficiency of surface devices despite reducing transmitted light in the far field.

  14. Anderson localization in metallic nanoparticle arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Zhijie; Lin, Fang; Pang, Wei; Xu, Haitao; Tan, Suiyan; Fu, Shenhe; Li, Yongyao

    2016-06-01

    Anderson localization has been observed in various types of waves, such as matter waves, optical waves and acoustic waves. Here we reveal that the effect of Anderson localization can be also induced in metallic nonlinear nanoparticle arrays excited by a random electrically driving field. We find that the dipole-induced nonlinearity results in ballistic expansion of dipole intensity during evolution; while the randomness of the external driving field can suppress such an expansion. Increasing the strength of randomness above the threshold value, a localized pattern of dipole intensity can be generated in the metallic nanoparticle arrays. By means of statistics, the mean intensity distribution of the dipoles reveals the formation of Anderson localization. We further show that the generated Anderson localization is highly confined, with its size down to the scale of incident wavelength. The reported results might facilitate the manipulations of electromagnetic fields in the scale of wavelength.

  15. Anderson localization in metallic nanoparticle arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Mai, Zhijie; Pang, Wei; Xu, Haitao; Tan, Suiyan; Fu, Shenhe; Li, Yongyao

    2016-01-01

    Anderson localization has been observed in various types of waves, such as matter waves, optical waves and acoustic waves. Here we reveal that the effect of Anderson localization can be also induced in metallic nonlinear nanoparticle arrays excited by a random electrically driving field. We find that the dipole-induced nonlinearity results in ballistic expansion of dipole intensity during evolution; while the randomness of the external driving field can suppress such an expansion. Increasing the strength of randomness above the threshold value, a localized pattern of dipole intensity can be generated in the metallic nanoparticle arrays. By means of statistics, the mean intensity distribution of the dipoles reveals the formation of Anderson localization. We further show that the generated Anderson localization is highly confined, with its size down to the scale of incident wavelength. The reported results might facilitate the manipulations of electromagnetic fields in the scale of wavelength.

  16. Multi-Array Probing of Lower Mantle Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stipcevic, J.; Tkalcic, H.; Kennett, B. L. N.

    2014-12-01

    Array processing of seismic waveforms from many sensors allows the enhancement of coherent signals and the suppression of incoherent "noise". Time correction of a waveform enhances weak seismic phases and provides constraints on the azimuth and inclination of the incoming energy. Furthermore, signal amplification allows the use of higher frequencies, which effectively increases the imaging resolution. Although array stacking is effective in amplifying weak seismic signals, its inherent weakness lies in the assumption of the instantaneous plane wave arriving at the array. This assumption limits the size of the array (short aperture) to insure the signal coherence, which in turn limits the size of the area within the Earth's interior that we can probe. Small array size also means that we cannot use energy scattered off a great circle path. In this study we address the above-mentioned issues by installing new and combing the existing several short-aperture arrays in Australia. By exploiting these multiple short aperture arrays we can pinpoint the source of scattered energy to map detailed patterns of heterogeneity in the lower mantle. The concept of multiple arrays allows us to illuminate specific point in the Earth from many different directions. The method is based on a similar approach to that the back-projection technique uses, where the point in time (i.e. part of the seismic wavetrain) is mapped onto the specific point in space through ray tracing. This allows us to achieve multiple illumination of the same structure and thereby minimize source effects. Using scattered energy enables us to cover and probe a larger area of the Earth's interior. We test the feasibility of our approach deploying the precursors to PcP and PKP seismic phases. We also test our method on synthetically created traces (both monochromatic and multi-frequency waves) varying the depths of the scatterers. We detect significant improvements, both in the signal quality and resolution, with an

  17. The non-metallic materials sample array

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, H. M.; Webb, D. D.; Goldberg, B. E.

    1986-01-01

    The Non-Metallic Materials Sample Array (MSA) was flown as verification flight instrumentation (VFI) on both Spacelab 1 (SL-1) and Spacelab 2 (SL-2). The basis for materials selection was either previous flight history or probable flight suitability based upon analysis. The observed changes in the optical properties of the exposed materials are, in general, quite minimal; however, this data represents the short exposure of two Space Shuttle missions, and no attempt should be made to extrapolate the long-term exposure. The MSA was in orbit for 10 days at approximately 240 km on SL-1 and for 7 days at approximately 315 km on SL-2. The array was exposed to the solar flux for only a portion of the time in orbit.

  18. Tailorable chiroptical activity of metallic nanospiral arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Junhong; Fu, Junxue; Ng, Jack; Huang, Zhifeng

    2016-02-01

    The engineering of the chiroptical activity of the emerging chiral metamaterial, metallic nanospirals, is in its infancy. We utilize glancing angle deposition (GLAD) to facilely sculpture the helical structure of silver nanospirals (AgNSs), so that the scope of chiroptical engineering factors is broadened to include the spiral growth of homochiral AgNSs, the combination of left- and right-handed helical chirality to create heterochiral AgNSs, and the coil-axis alignment of the heterochiral AgNSs. It leads to flexible control over the chiroptical activity of AgNS arrays with respect to the sign, resonance wavelength and amplitude of circular dichroism (CD) in the UV and visible regime. The UV chiroptical mode has a distinct response from the visible mode. Finite element simulation together with LC circuit theory illustrates that the UV irradiation is mainly adsorbed in the metal and the visible is preferentially scattered by the AgNSs, accounting for the wavelength-related chiroptical distinction. This work contributes to broadening the horizons in understanding and engineering chiroptical responses, primarily desired for developing a wide range of potential chiroplasmonic applications.The engineering of the chiroptical activity of the emerging chiral metamaterial, metallic nanospirals, is in its infancy. We utilize glancing angle deposition (GLAD) to facilely sculpture the helical structure of silver nanospirals (AgNSs), so that the scope of chiroptical engineering factors is broadened to include the spiral growth of homochiral AgNSs, the combination of left- and right-handed helical chirality to create heterochiral AgNSs, and the coil-axis alignment of the heterochiral AgNSs. It leads to flexible control over the chiroptical activity of AgNS arrays with respect to the sign, resonance wavelength and amplitude of circular dichroism (CD) in the UV and visible regime. The UV chiroptical mode has a distinct response from the visible mode. Finite element simulation

  19. Field enhancement effect of metal probe in evanescent field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaogang Hong; Wendong Xu; Xiaogang Li; Chengqiang Zhao; Xiaodong Tang

    2009-01-01

    Field enhancement effect of metal probe in evanescent field, induced by using a multi-layers structure for exciting surface plasmon resonance (SPR), is analyzed numerically by utilizing two-dimensional (2D) TM wave finite difference time-domain (FDTD) method. In this letter, we used a fundamental mode Gaussian beam to induce evanescent field, and calculated the electric intensity. The results show that compared with the nonmetal probe, the metal probe has a larger field enhancement effect, and its scattering wave induced by field enhancement has a bigger decay coefficient. The field enhancement effect should conclude that the metal probe has an important application in nanolithography.

  20. Scanning probe microscopy of functionalised metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy (STM) has been used to investigate various properties of functionalised gold surfaces. The primary aim behind such studies has been to develop a 'molecular level' understanding of the mechanism of different surface processes at the solid-air and more importantly, at the solid-liquid interfaces. A small organic molecule, 4-amino-2-mercaptopyrimidine and a small biological molecule (a hexapeptide), KCTCCA, have been studied in their adsorbed state on gold (111) to understand their role in electrochemical promotion of cytochrome c and cytochrome b562 respectively. The process of protein adsorption at the gold (111)-air/liquid interfaces has been probed with Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin, Pseudomonas putida putidaredoxin and Pseudomonas putida cytochrome P450 to develop an understanding of the protein adsorption process in general. Isolated protein molecules as well as high coverage of molecules are observed. The process of adsorption can be monitored in real time and the results indicate the justification of applicability of Langmuir adsorption theory. Rubredoxin, a small iron-sulphur protein, has been studied for reasons associated with its structural characteristics. The metal site is solvent exposed in this protein. This aids in enhanced tunnelling near the metal site resulting in an enhancement in the contrast, leading to an achievement of a sub-molecular resolution in a metalloprotein by STM. 'Single molecule' imaging by STM has been extended from the level of discerning the shape of a protein/enzyme molecule adsorbed in the solid-liquid interface to that of monitoring a complex formation reaction between a protein molecule and an enzyme molecule. Complexes between putidaredoxin and cytochrome P450 molecules with various intermolecular distances and angular arrangements have been imaged at the gold-water interface. This indicates the possibility of deriving electrochemical information from a specific complex at a specific time

  1. Probing Solar Wind Turbulence with the Jansky Very Large Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobelski, A.; Bastian, T. S.; Betti, S.

    2016-04-01

    The solar wind offers an extraordinary laboratory for studying MHD turbulence, turbulent dissipation, and heating. Radio propagation phenomena can be exploited as probes of the solar wind in regions that are generally inaccessible to in situ spacecraft measurements. Here, we have undertaken a study with the Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to observe point-like sources drawn from the JVAS catalog, and 3 VLA calibrator sources, to trans-illuminate the outer corona/inner solar wind. In doing so, we will exploit angular broadening and refractive scintillation to deduce properties of the solar wind along ≍23 lines of sight within 7 solar radii of the Sun and a wide range of position angles. By fitting the complex visibilities using well-known techniques we can deduce or constrain a number of key parameters. In particular, we fit the visibilities to a function of the known source flux, displacement of the source due to refraction, source broadening due to an elliptical structure function, spectral slope of the turbulence, and the coherence scale. Of particular interest is α, the spectral slope of the turbulence which we probe at both small (km to 10s of km) and large (thousands of km) scales. This will help us determine the presence and evolution of an inner scale, measure the degree of anisotropy, and constrain the topology of the global coronal magnetic field. The inner scale is of particular interest for constraining current theories of turbulence dissipation and heating. Initial analysis show the visibilities vary notably on timescales of individual integrations (2 seconds) and that the source is not uniformly broadened. All sources appear to preferentially broaden perpendicular to the magnetic field, consistent with theories of kinetic Alfvén waves. This type of observation will also help to interpret data from the upcoming Solar Probe Plus and Solar Orbiter missions. A full set of results and analysis is forthcoming. More details on previous results can be found

  2. Biasing, Acquisition and Interpretation of a Dense Langmuir Probe Array in NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dense array of 99 Langmuir probes has been installed in the lower divertor region of the National Spherical Torus Experiments (NSTX). This array is instrumented with a system of elec- tronics that allows flexibility in the choice of probes to bias as well as the type of measurement (including standard swept, single probe, triple probe and operation as passive floating potential and scrape-off-layer (SOL) current monitors). The use of flush-mounted probes requires careful inter- pretation. The time dependent nature of the SOL makes swept-probe traces difficult to interpret. To overcome these challenges, the single- and triple-Langmuir probe signals are used in comple- mentary fashion to determine the temperature and density at the probe location. A comparison to mid-plane measurements is made.

  3. Fabrication of an all-metal atomic force microscope probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jan Pihl; Tang, Peter Torben; Hansen, Ole;

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a method for fabrication of an all-metal atomic force microscope probe (tip, cantilever and support) for optical read-out, using a combination of silicon micro-machining and electroforming. The paper describes the entire fabrication process for a nickel AFM-probe. In addition...

  4. A low-profile three-dimensional neural probe array using a silicon lead transfer structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ming-Yuan; Je, Minkyu; Tan, Kwan Ling; Lim Tan, Ee; Lim, Ruiqi; Yao, Lei; Li, Peng; Park, Woo-Tae; Phua, Eric Jian Rong; Lip Gan, Chee; Yu, Aibin

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents a microassembly method for low-profile three-dimensional probe arrays for neural prosthesis and neuroscience applications. A silicon (Si) lead transfer structure, Si interposer, is employed to form electrical connections between two orthogonal planes—the two dimensional probes and the dummy application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) chip. In order to hold the probe array and facilitate the alignment of probes during assembly, a Si platform is designed to have through-substrate slots for the insertion of probes and cavities for holding the Si interposers. The electrical interconnections between the probes and the dummy ASIC chip are formed by solder reflow, resulting in greatly improved throughput in the proposed assembly method. Moreover, since the backbone of the probe can be embedded inside the cavity of the Si platform, the profile of the probe array above the cortical surface can be controlled within 750 µm. This low-profile allows the probe array not to touch the skull after it is implanted on the brain. The impedance of the assembled probe is also measured and discussed.

  5. A low-profile three-dimensional neural probe array using a silicon lead transfer structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a microassembly method for low-profile three-dimensional probe arrays for neural prosthesis and neuroscience applications. A silicon (Si) lead transfer structure, Si interposer, is employed to form electrical connections between two orthogonal planes—the two dimensional probes and the dummy application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) chip. In order to hold the probe array and facilitate the alignment of probes during assembly, a Si platform is designed to have through-substrate slots for the insertion of probes and cavities for holding the Si interposers. The electrical interconnections between the probes and the dummy ASIC chip are formed by solder reflow, resulting in greatly improved throughput in the proposed assembly method. Moreover, since the backbone of the probe can be embedded inside the cavity of the Si platform, the profile of the probe array above the cortical surface can be controlled within 750 µm. This low-profile allows the probe array not to touch the skull after it is implanted on the brain. The impedance of the assembled probe is also measured and discussed. (paper)

  6. Scaling quantum probe for quantum phase transition in macroscopic qubit array

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Y D; Sun, C P; Xue, Fei

    2006-01-01

    Based on a superconducting circuit, we discuss the quantum phase transition of a qubit-array quantum Ising model with a quantum probe which is realized by the single mode quantized field in a superconducting transmission line resonator coupled to this qubit array. The scaling behavior of quantum probe near the critical point is analyzed for its quantum coherence. The critical index of decoherence factor is found to be 4.

  7. An approach to fabrication of metal nanoring arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayati, Maryam; Patoka, Piotr; Giersig, Michael; Savinova, Elena R

    2010-03-01

    Fabrication of tailored nanomaterials with desired structure and properties is the greatest challenge of modern nanotechnology. Herein, we describe a wet chemical method for the preparation of large area metal nanoring arrays. This method is based on self-assembly of polystyrene sphere template on a flat substrate and wicking/reducing metal precursor into the interstices between the template and the substrate. In this article, platinum, gold, and copper nanorings were fabricated by applying 505 nm polystyrene spheres onto highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and Si(100) substrates, followed by reducing the templated metal salt with NaBH(4). AFM images reveal formation of arrays of metal nanorings comprising metal nanoparticles with the average ring height of 5.7 +/- 0.8 nm and diameter of 167.3 +/- 8.9 nm. XPS confirms that these structures are metallic. PMID:20104920

  8. Massive subcritical compact arrays of plutonium metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothe, R.E.

    1998-04-01

    Two experimental critical-approach programs are reported. Both were performed at the Rocky Flats Plant near Denver, Colorado; and both date back to the late 1960s. Both involve very large arrays of massive plutonium ingots. These ingots had been cast in the foundry at the Rocky Flats Plant as part of their routine production operations; they were not specially prepared for either study. Consequently, considerable variation in ingot mass is encountered. This mass varied between approximately 7 kg and a little more than 10 kg. One program, performed in the spring of 1969, involved stacked arrays of ingots contained within cylindrical, disk-shaped, thin, steel cans. This program studied four arrays defined by the pattern of steel cans in a single layer. The four were: 1 x N, 3 x N, 2 x 2 x N, and 3 x 3 x N. The second was a tightly-packed, triangular-pitched patterns; the last two were square-pitched patterns. The other program, performed about a year earlier, involved similar ingots also contained in similar steel cans, but these canned plutonium ingots were placed in commercial steel drums. This study pertained to one-, two-, and three-layered horizontal arrays of drums. All cases proved to be well subcritical. Most would have remained subcritical had the parameters of the array under study been continued infinitely beyond the reciprocal multiplication safety limit. In one case for the drum arrays, an uncertain extrapolation of the data of the earlier program suggests that criticality might have eventually been attained had several thousand additional kilograms of plutonium been available for use.

  9. The Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization: 8 Station Results

    OpenAIRE

    Parsons, Aaron R.; Backer, Donald C.; Bradley, Richard F.; Aguirre, James E.; Benoit, Erin E.; Carilli, Chris L.; Foster, Griffin S.; Gugliucci, Nicole E.; Herne, David; Jacobs, Daniel C.; Lynch, Mervyn J.; Manley, Jason R.; Parashare, Chaitali R.; Werthimer, Daniel J.; Wright, Melvyn C. H.

    2009-01-01

    We are developing the Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER) to detect 21cm emission from the early Universe, when the first stars and galaxies were forming. We describe the overall experiment strategy and architecture and summarize two PAPER deployments: a 4-antenna array in the low-RFI environment of Western Australia and an 8-antenna array at our prototyping site in Green Bank, WV. From these activities we report on system performance, including primary beam model ve...

  10. Development and field validation of advanced array probes for steam generator inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two different types of array probes were designed, developed and tested in the steam generators at the Prairie Island Nuclear Power Plant. The probes under development were pancake array probes and reflection array probes. The size and shape of both the pancake and reflection coils in the array probes were optimized using a computer simulation study. The design study showed that the pancake coil used for most field tests today was not of optimum size and shape for maximum sensitivity to a small defect located on the far side (outer diameter) of the tube wall. An additional design was performed that included the ability to measure the defect size in the presence of variations in tube supports, copper deposits, magnetite deposits and lift-off (coil-to-conductor spacing). In these calculations, the reflection coil defect size measurement error was about 35% less than the pancake coil measurement error. A contract was placed with a commercial company, Zetec Inc., to make samples of both pancake and reflection array probes

  11. 3D probe array integrated with a front-end 100-channel neural recording ASIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain–machine interface technology can improve the lives of spinal cord injury victims and amputees. A neural interface system, consisting of a 3D probe array and a custom low-power (1 mW) 100-channel (100-ch) neural recording application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC), was designed and implemented to monitor neural activity. In this study, a microassembly 3D probe array method using a novel lead transfer technique was proposed to overcome the bonding plane mismatch encountered during orthogonal assembly. The proposed lead transfer technique can be completed using standard micromachining and packaging processes. The ASIC can be stacking-integrated with the probe array, minimizing the form factor of the assembled module. To minimize trauma to brain cells, the profile of the integrated probe array was controlled within 730 μm. The average impedance of the assembled probe was approximately 0.55 MΩ at 1 kHz. To verify the functionality of the integrated neural probe array, bench-top signal acquisitions were performed and discussed. (paper)

  12. Silica needle template fabrication of metal hollow microneedle arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drug delivery through hollow microneedle (HMN) arrays has now been recognized as one of the most promising techniques because it minimizes the shortcomings of the traditional drug delivery methods and has many exciting advantages—pain free and tunable release rates, for example. However, this drug delivery method has been hindered greatly from mass clinical application because of the high fabrication cost of HMN arrays. Hence, we developed a simple and cost-effective procedure using silica needles as templates to massively fabricate HMN arrays by using popular materials and industrially applicable processes of micro- imprint, hot embossing, electroplating and polishing. Metal HMN arrays with high quality are prepared with great flexibility with tunable parameters of area, length of needle, size of hollow and array dimension. This efficient and cost-effective fabrication method can also be applied to other applications after minor alterations, such as preparation of optic, acoustic and solar harvesting materials and devices

  13. Multifunctional cantilever-free scanning probe arrays coated with multilayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Wooyoung; Brown, Keith A; Zhou, Xiaozhu; Rasin, Boris; Liao, Xing; Mirkin, Chad A

    2012-11-01

    Scanning probe instruments have expanded beyond their traditional role as imaging or "reading" tools and are now routinely used for "writing." Although a variety of scanning probe lithography techniques are available, each one imposes different requirements on the types of probes that must be used. Additionally, throughput is a major concern for serial writing techniques, so for a scanning probe lithography technique to become widely applied, there needs to be a reasonable path toward a scalable architecture. Here, we use a multilayer graphene coating method to create multifunctional massively parallel probe arrays that have wear-resistant tips of uncompromised sharpness and high electrical and thermal conductivities. The optical transparency and mechanical flexibility of graphene allow this procedure to be used for coating exceptionally large, cantilever-free arrays that can pattern with electrochemical desorption and thermal, in addition to conventional, dip-pen nanolithography. PMID:23086161

  14. A microspectrometer based on subwavelength metal nanohole array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jun; Xia, Liangping; Yang, Zheng; Yin, Lu; Zheng, Guoxing; Yin, Shaoyun; Du, Chunlei

    2014-11-01

    Catering to the active demand of the miniaturization of spectrometers, a simple microspectrometer with small size and light weight is presented in this paper. The presented microspectrometer is a typical filter-based spectrometer using the extraordinary optical transmission property of subwavelength metal hole array structure. Different subwavelength metal nanohole arrays are designed to work as different filter units obtained by changing the lattice parameters. By processing the filter spectra with a unique algorithm based on sparse representation, the proposed spectrometer is demonstrated to have the capability of high spectral resolution and accuracy. Benefit for the thin filmed feature, the microspectrometer is expected to find its application in integrated optical systems.

  15. Fast single-pass Eddy Current array probe for steam generator inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inspection of Steam Generator (SG) tubes in aging Nuclear Generating Stations has become one of the most challenging aspects of eddy current testing. Over the past ten years development of new technology has helped address critical detection issues at defect-prone areas such as the tubesheet transition, U-bends and tube-support intersections. Fast-scanning eddy current transmit-receive (T/R) array probes have been used in Canada to address specific inspection needs. The C3 probe proved effective in detecting circumferential cracks at U-bend and top-of-tubesheet locations at Bruce NGS. The CTR2-C4 probe, capable of detecting axial cracks and volumetric flaws, has been used successfully at Pickering B NGS for detection and sizing of volumetric flaws (erosion-corrosion and pitting). The C5 probe, used at Darlington and Gentilly II has the ability to detect simultaneously axial and circumferential cracks and volumetric flaws but does not possess discrimination capabilities. The new generation eddy current probe, denoted as the X-probe, is a fast single-pass T/R array probe that combines C3 (circumferential mode) and C4 (axial mode) units in a single probe head. It is coupled with new and versatile instruments operated by fast computers, showing performance equivalent to rotating probes, for full-length inspection. As such, this probe is capable of discriminating between axial, circumferential and volumetric flaws in a single scan. It significantly decreases the need for re-inspection and tube pulling. The design of an X-probe for CANDU SG tubing presented great challenges to the manufacturer's mechanical design team due to the small tube diameter and to the presence of magnetite deposits on the tube inside surface. Probe components were required to fit in a small wear-resistant casing while achieving comparable performance to that of larger PWR SG probes. One of the most significant achievements in the past year has been the development of a version of the X-probe for

  16. Noninvasive noble metal nanoparticle arrays for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inya-Agha, Obianuju; Forster, Robert J.; Keyes, Tia E.

    2007-02-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles arrays are well established substrates for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Their ability to enhance optical fields is based on the interaction of their surface valence electrons with incident electromagnetic radiation. In the array configuration, noble metal nanoparticles have been used to produce SER spectral enhancements of up to 10 8 orders of magnitude, making them useful for the trace analysis of physiologically relevant analytes such as proteins and peptides. Electrostatic interactions between proteins and metal surfaces result in the preferential adsorption of positively charged protein domains onto metal surfaces. This preferential interaction has the effect of disrupting the native conformation of the protein fold, with a concomitant loss of protein function. A major historic advantage of Raman microspectroscopy has been is its non-invasive nature; protein denaturation on the metal surfaces required for SER spectroscopy renders it a much more invasive technique. Further, part of the analytical power of Raman spectroscopy lies in its use as a secondary conformation probe. The protein structural loss which occurs on the metal surface results in secondary conformation readings which are not true to the actual native state of the analyte. This work presents a method for chemical fabrication of noble metal SERS arrays with surface immobilized layers which can protect protein native conformation without excessively mitigating the electromagnetic enhancements of spectra. Peptide analytes are used as model systems for proteins. Raman spectra of alpha lactalbumin on surfaces and when immobilized on these novel arrays are compared. We discuss the ability of the surface layer to protect protein structure whilst improving signal intensity.

  17. Multipole surface plasmons in metallic nanohole arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Nishida, Munehiro; Kadoya, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    The quasi-bound electromagnetic modes for the arrays of nanoholes perforated in thin gold film are analyzed both numerically by the rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) method and semi-analytically by the coupled mode method. It is shown that when the size of the nanohole occupies large portion of the unit cell, the surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) at both sides of the film are combined by the higher order waveguide modes of the holes to produce multipole surface plasmons: coupled surface plasmon modes with multipole texture on the electric field distributions. Further, it is revealed that the multipole texture either enhances or suppresses the couplings between SPPs depending on their diffraction orders and also causes band inversion and reconstruction in the coupled SPP band structure. Due to the multipole nature of the quasi-bound modes, multiple dark modes coexist to produce variety of Fano resonance structures on the transmission and reflection spectra.

  18. Probing biopolymer conformation by metallization with noble metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a novel method for the simple visual (colorimetric) and spectroscopic monitoring of the conformational state of a biopolymer. We present an experimental example of the detection of the change in the conformation of a giant DNA molecule. This methodology is based on the difference in the manner of metallization with noble metals on a polymer scaffold depending on its conformation. Spectroscopic analysis of the metallization of DNA by metallic silver or gold provides information on the critical concentration of DNA binder, at which the folding transition from the elongated into the compact state occurs, together with the dimension and morphology of a compact DNA condensate. This method may be suitable for use in a rapid screening procedure for the high-throughput analysis of large chemical libraries to evaluate their ability to induce DNA compaction, protein folding and similar important processes

  19. Clustered field evaporation of metallic glasses in atom probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemp, J; Gerstl, S S A; Löffler, J F; Schönfeld, B

    2016-03-01

    Field evaporation of metallic glasses is a stochastic process combined with spatially and temporally correlated events, which are referred to as clustered evaporation (CE). This phenomenon is investigated by studying the distance between consecutive detector hits. CE is found to be a strongly localized phenomenon (up to 3nm in range) which also depends on the type of evaporating ions. While a similar effect in crystals is attributed to the evaporation of crystalline layers, CE of metallic glasses presumably has a different - as yet unknown - physical origin. The present work provides new perspectives on quantification methods for atom probe tomography of metallic glasses. PMID:26724469

  20. Deep-probe metal-clad waveguide biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skivesen, Nina; Horvath, Robert; Thinggaard, S.;

    2007-01-01

    Two types of metal-clad waveguide biosensors, so-called dip-type and peak-type, are analyzed and tested. Their performances are benchmarked against the well-known surface-plasmon resonance biosensor, showing improved probe characteristics for adlayer thicknesses above 150-200 nm. The dip-type metal......-clad waveguide sensor is shown to be the best all-round alternative to the surface-plasmon resonance biosensor. Both metal-clad waveguides are tested experimentally for cell detection, showing a detection linut of 8-9 cells/mm(2). (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  1. Fabrication of highly ordered metallic nanowire arrays by electrodeposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highly ordered hexagonal arrays of parallel metallic nanowires (Ni, Bi) with diameters of about 50 nm and lengths up to 50 μm were synthesized by electrodeposition. Hexagonal-close-packed nanochannel anodized aluminum oxide film was used as the deposition template. The deposition was performed in an organic bath of dimethylsulfoxide with metal chloride as the electrolyte. A high degree of ordering and uniformity in these arrays can be obtained with this technique by fine-tuning the electrodeposition parameters. Moreover, an unprecedentedly high level of uniformity and control of the wire length was achieved. The arrays are unique platforms for explorations of collective behavior in coupled mesoscopic systems, and are useful for applications in high-density data storage, field emission displays, and sensors. Copyright 2001 American Institute of Physics

  2. Eddy current probe development based on a magnetic sensor array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research deals with in the study of the use of innovating magnetic sensors in eddy current non destructive inspection. The author reports an analysis survey of magnetic sensor performances. This survey enables the selection of magnetic sensor technologies used in non destructive inspection. He presents the state-of-the-art of eddy current probes exploiting the qualities of innovating magnetic sensors, and describes the methods enabling the use of these magnetic sensors in non destructive testing. Two main applications of innovating magnetic sensors are identified: the detection of very small defects by means of magneto-resistive sensors, and the detection of deep defects by means of giant magneto-impedances. Based on the use of modelling, optimization, signal processing tools, probes are manufactured for these both applications

  3. Finger Probe Array for Topography-Tolerant Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy of Extended Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Lesch, Andreas; Chen, Po-Chung; Roelfs, Folkert; Dosche, Carsten; Momotenko, Dmitry; Cortes-Salazar, Fernando; Girault, Hubert H.; Wittstock, Gunther

    2014-01-01

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy with soft microelectrode array probes has recently been used to enable reactivity imaging of extended areas and to compensate sample corrugation perpendicular to the scanning direction. Here, the use of a new type of microelectrode arrays is described in which each individual microelectrode can independently compensate corrugations of the sample surface. It consists of conventional Pt microelectrodes enclosed in an insulating glass sheath. The microelectrod...

  4. Evaluation and field validation of Eddy-Current array probes for steam generator tube inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the Improved Eddy-Current ISI for Steam Generator Tubing program is to upgrade and validate eddy-current inspections, including probes, instrumentation, and data processing techniques for inservice inspection of new, used, and repaired steam generator tubes; to improve defect detection, classification, and characterization as affected by diameter and thickness variations, denting, probe wobble, tube sheet, tube supports, copper and sludge deposits, even when defect types and other variables occur in combination; to transfer this advanced technology to NRC's mobile NDE laboratory and staff. This report describes the design of specialized high-speed 16-coil eddy-current array probes. Both pancake and reflection coils are considered. Test results from inspections using the probes in working steam generators are given. Computer programs developed for probe calculations are also supplied

  5. Quantum superconductor-metal transition in a proximity array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feigel' man, M V; Larkin, A I; Skvortsov, M A [L D Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, ul. Kosygina 2, 117940 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2001-10-01

    A theory of the zero-temperature superconductor-metal transition is developed for an array of superconductive islands (of size d) coupled via a disordered two-dimensional conductor with the dimensionless conductance g = h/e{sup 2} R{sub {open_square}} >> 1. At T = 0 macroscopically superconductive state of the array with lattice spacing b >> d is destroyed at g < g{sub c} {approx} 0.1 ln{sup 2} (b/d). At high temperatures the normal-state resistance between neighboring islands at b = b{sub c} is much smaller than R{sub Q} = h/4e{sup 2}. (5. superconductor-metal-insulator transitions)

  6. Metallic Nanorod Arrays: Linear Optical Properties and Beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Kullock, René

    2011-01-01

    Arrays of free-standing metallic nanorods are promising candidates for sensors, switches and spectroscopy. They have structure sizes much smaller than the wavelength of visible light, feature a long-axis surface plasmonic resonance (LSPR) and show metamaterial-like properties. This thesis provides a detailed investigation of their linear optical properties and highlights some nonlinear optical aspects. By means of graded structures having a tunable LSPR and three different theoretical mod...

  7. Microtube Light-Emitting Diode Arrays with Metal Cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchoe, Youngbin; Lee, Chul-Ho; Park, Jun Beom; Baek, Hyeonjun; Chung, Kunook; Jo, Janghyun; Kim, Miyoung; Yi, Gyu-Chul

    2016-03-22

    We report the fabrication and characteristics of vertical microtube light-emitting diode (LED) arrays with a metal core inside the devices. To make the LEDs, gallium nitride (GaN)/indium gallium nitride (In(x)Ga(1-x)N)/zinc oxide (ZnO) coaxial microtube LED arrays were grown on an n-GaN/c-aluminum oxide (Al2O3) substrate. The microtube LED arrays were then lifted-off the substrate by wet chemical etching of the sacrificial ZnO microtubes and the silicon dioxide (SiO2) layer. The chemically lifted-off LED layer was then transferred upside-down on other supporting substrates. To create the metal cores, titanium/gold and indium tin oxide were deposited on the inner shells of the microtubes, forming n-type electrodes inside the metal-cored LEDs. The characteristics of the resulting devices were determined by measuring electroluminescence and current-voltage characteristic curves. To gain insights into the current-spreading characteristics of the devices and understand how to make them more efficient, we modeled them computationally. PMID:26855251

  8. A novel micromachining technique for the batch fabrication of scanning probe arrays with precisely defined tip contact areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports a novel micromachining technique for the batch fabrication of scanning probe arrays with different tip contact areas. Based on the bulk micromachining of silicon-on-insulator substrates, it eliminates the need for time-dependent etching processes and thus is capable of simultaneously fabricating both 'sharp' and 'blunt' scanning probes with precisely defined tip contact areas in a controllable and repeatable manner. As an example of the application of this probe fabrication technique, prototype scanning probe arrays have been successfully fabricated and used to demonstrate variable-resolution scanning probe lithography of fluorescent dyes in a parallel mode

  9. Use of Faraday probing to estimate current distribution in wire array z pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to understand the formation and dynamics of plasma in wire array z-pinch experiments, measurements of the distribution of current throughout the array are required. We present details of two Faraday probing diagnostics aimed at exploring the magnetic fields and hence distribution of current in an array. An imaging Faraday system utilizes a short laser pulse to make estimates of the current distribution in the precursor column formed on axis before implosion. In a second system, a rod of high Verdet constant glass is placed close to the wires of an array and the polarization of a cw laser passing through the rod is monitored to examine the variance of current with time

  10. Experimental validation of an 8 element EMAT phased array probe for longitudinal wave generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bourdais, Florian; Marchand, Benoit

    2015-03-01

    Sodium cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) use liquid sodium as a coolant. Liquid sodium being opaque, optical techniques cannot be applied to reactor vessel inspection. This makes it necessary to develop alternative ways of assessing the state of the structures immersed in the medium. Ultrasonic pressure waves are well suited for inspection tasks in this environment, especially using pulsed electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMAT) that generate the ultrasound directly in the liquid sodium. The work carried out at CEA LIST is aimed at developing phased array EMAT probes conditioned for reactor use. The present work focuses on the experimental validation of a newly manufactured 8 element probe which was designed for beam forming imaging in a liquid sodium environment. A parametric study is carried out to determine the optimal setup of the magnetic assembly used in this probe. First laboratory tests on an aluminium block show that the probe has the required beam steering capabilities.

  11. Experimental validation of an 8 element EMAT phased array probe for longitudinal wave generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Bourdais, Florian, E-mail: florian.lebourdais@cea.fr; Marchand, Benoit, E-mail: florian.lebourdais@cea.fr [CEA LIST, Centre de Saclay F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-03-31

    Sodium cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) use liquid sodium as a coolant. Liquid sodium being opaque, optical techniques cannot be applied to reactor vessel inspection. This makes it necessary to develop alternative ways of assessing the state of the structures immersed in the medium. Ultrasonic pressure waves are well suited for inspection tasks in this environment, especially using pulsed electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMAT) that generate the ultrasound directly in the liquid sodium. The work carried out at CEA LIST is aimed at developing phased array EMAT probes conditioned for reactor use. The present work focuses on the experimental validation of a newly manufactured 8 element probe which was designed for beam forming imaging in a liquid sodium environment. A parametric study is carried out to determine the optimal setup of the magnetic assembly used in this probe. First laboratory tests on an aluminium block show that the probe has the required beam steering capabilities.

  12. Subwavelength Plasmonic Lattice Solitons in Arrays of Metallic Nanowires

    CERN Document Server

    Ye, Fangwei; Hu, Bambi; Panoiu, Nicolae C

    2010-01-01

    We predict theoretically that stable subwavelength plasmonic lattice solitons (PLSs) are formed in arrays of metallic nanowires embedded in a nonlinear medium. The tight confinement of the guiding modes of the metallic nanowires, combined with the strong nonlinearity induced by the enhanced field at the metal surface, provide the main physical mechanisms for balancing the wave diffraction and the formation of PLSs. As the conditions required for the formation of PLSs are satisfied in a variety of plasmonic systems, we expect these nonlinear modes to have important applications to subwavelength nanophotonics. In particular, we show that the subwavelength PLSs can be used to optically manipulate with nanometer accuracy the power flow in ultracompact photonic systems.

  13. Optical Sensing with Simultaneous Electrochemical Control in Metal Nanowire Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janos Vörös

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This work explores the alternative use of noble metal nanowire systems in large-scale array configurations to exploit both the nanowires’ conductive nature and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR. The first known nanowire-based system has been constructed, with which optical signals are influenced by the simultaneous application of electrochemical potentials. Optical characterization of nanowire arrays was performed by measuring the bulk refractive index sensitivity and the limit of detection. The formation of an electrical double layer was controlled in NaCl solutions to study the effect of local refractive index changes on the spectral response. Resonance peak shifts of over 4 nm, a bulk refractive index sensitivity up to 115 nm/RIU and a limit of detection as low as 4.5 × 10−4 RIU were obtained for gold nanowire arrays. Simulations with the Multiple Multipole Program (MMP confirm such bulk refractive index sensitivities. Initial experiments demonstrated successful optical biosensing using a novel form of particle-based nanowire arrays. In addition, the formation of an ionic layer (Stern-layer upon applying an electrochemical potential was also monitored by the shift of the plasmon resonance.

  14. Scanning Kelvin probe study of metal/polymer interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A scanning Kelvin probe was used to study the metal/polymer contacts for models of epoxy, alkyd and polyaniline coatings. It was shown that the potential drop across the electrical double layer of oriented ionic dipoles at the metal/polymer interface contributes a major part of the measured Volta potentials. The Broensted acid/base interactions are responsible for the charge separation and the creation of a double electric layer. Polyaniline (an electron-conducting polymer) accepts electrons from the metal to its own Fermi level, thus producing a Schottky barrier. In this case, the Volta potential of the contact does not depend on the metal, but follows the polyaniline flat band potential. Exposure in water vapor neutralizes the potential drop at the interface due to water dipole orientation in a direction opposite to the intrinsic electric field. The kinetics of potential change during water uptake follow Fick's and Nernst's equations. After hydrolysis of the interfacial bonds, activation of the metal surface can takes place

  15. Handheld array-based photoacoustic probe for guiding needle biopsy of sentinel lymph nodes

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Chulhong; Todd N. Erpelding; Maslov, Konstantin; Jankovic, Ladislav; Akers, Walter J.; Liang SONG; Achilefu, Samuel; Margenthaler, Julie A.; Pashley, Michael D.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2010-01-01

    By modifying a clinical ultrasound array system, we develop a novel handheld photoacoustic probe for image-guided needle biopsy. The integration of optical fiber bundles for pulsed laser light delivery enables photoacoustic image-guided insertion of a needle into rat axillary lymph nodes with accumulated indocyanine green (ICG). Strong photoacoustic contrast of the needle is achieved. After subcutaneous injection of the dye in the left forepaw, sentinel lymph nodes are easily detected, in viv...

  16. Single-molecule protein arrays enabled by scanning probe block copolymer lithography

    OpenAIRE

    Chai, Jinan; Wong, Lu Shin; Giam, Louise; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to control the placement of individual protein molecules on surfaces could enable advances in a wide range of areas, from the development of nanoscale biomolecular devices to fundamental studies in cell biology. Such control, however, remains a challenge in nanobiotechnology due to the limitations of current lithographic techniques. Herein we report an approach that combines scanning probe block copolymer lithography with site-selective immobilization strategies to create arrays o...

  17. Metallic post-array loaded cylindrical dielectric resonator antenna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byeong-Yong Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An investigation of a novel cylindrical dielectric resonator antenna (DRA configuration has been carried out. It is shown that two resonances including the full- and half-cylindrical HE(11δ-like modes can coexist simultaneously at different frequencies by placing a metallic post array in the resonator. Moreover, compared with the conventional HE(11δ mode cylindrical DRA having the same size, the proposed antenna operates in lower frequency band and shows improved bandwidth. The experimental results including the return loss and the radiation patterns are demonstrated.

  18. Computer programs for the acquisition and analysis of eddy-current array probe data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective of the Improved Eddy-Curent ISI (in-service inspection) for Steam Generators Tubing program is to upgrade and validate eddy-current inspections, including probes, instrumentation, and data processing techniques for ISI of new, used, and repaired steam generator tubes; to improve defect detection, classification and characterization as affected by diameter and thickness variations, denting, probe wobble, tube sheet, tube supports, copper and sludge deposits, even when defect types and other variables occur in combination; to transfer this advanced technology to NRC's mobile NDE laboratory and staff. This report documents computer programs that were developed for acquisition of eddy-current data from specially designed 16-coil array probes. Complete code as well as instructions for use are provided

  19. Protocols for 16S rDNA Array Analyses of Microbial Communities by Sequence-Specific Labeling of DNA Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knut Rudi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Analyses of complex microbial communities are becoming increasingly important. Bottlenecks in these analyses, however, are the tools to actually describe the biodiversity. Novel protocols for DNA array-based analyses of microbial communities are presented. In these protocols, the specificity obtained by sequence-specific labeling of DNA probes is combined with the possibility of detecting several different probes simultaneously by DNA array hybridization. The gene encoding 16S ribosomal RNA was chosen as the target in these analyses. This gene contains both universally conserved regions and regions with relatively high variability. The universally conserved regions are used for PCR amplification primers, while the variable regions are used for the specific probes. Protocols are presented for DNA purification, probe construction, probe labeling, and DNA array hybridizations.

  20. Development of monitoring method for SG secondary side tube support plate using array probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Array ECT probe called Intelligent ECT probe (I-Probe) has a capability to inspect tubes of Steam Generator (SG) more productively and more accurately than conventional probes. It has been applied as full length inspection in Japan since 2003 and there is much field experience to date. On the other hand, a phenomenon in SG secondary side is known that scale deposits on the clog holes of quatrefoil type tube support plate(TSP). Water level oscillation of secondary side caused by excessive blockage of scale deposits may decrease operation efficiency and it will cause one of the unintended troubles. Therefore, periodical monitoring of blockage condition and applying cleaning are important. The new method has been developed to evaluate blockage condition of every tube support plate of all tubes automatically using I-Probe data. The software was also developed to visualize the evaluation results. This new method will contribute increase of reliability of SG maintenance, because the new method makes it possible to monitor the whole SG more precisely. (author)

  1. Synthesis, characterization and application of electroless metal assisted silicon nanowire arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Sumanta Kumar; Marikani, Arumugam

    2015-12-01

    Vertically aligned silicon nanowire arrays (SiNWs) have been synthesized by electroless metal deposition process. The fabricated SiNWs have an average diameter of 75 nm and 3.5-4.0 μm length, as confirmed from scanning electron microscopy. A characteristic asymmetric peak broadening at 520 cm-1 from Raman spectroscopy was obtained for the SiNWs as compared to the bulk silicon crystal due to phonon confinement. The as-prepared SiNWs exhibit good electron field-emission properties with turn-on field of about 8.26 V μm-1 at a current density of 4.9 μA cm-2. The SiNWs was functionalized by coating with a thin gold metallic film for 60 s, and then used as bio-probe for the detection of bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein molecules. From the linear sweep voltammetry analysis, the Au coated SiNWs, exhibit linear response to the BSA analyte with increase in concentration. The minimum detection limit of the protein molecule was calculated of about 1.16 μM by the as-synthesized SiNWs probe.

  2. Engineering Metallic Nanoparticles for Enhancing and Probing Catalytic Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Gillian; Holmes, Justin D

    2016-07-01

    Recent developments in tailoring the structural and chemical properties of colloidal metal nanoparticles (NPs) have led to significant enhancements in catalyst performance. Controllable colloidal synthesis has also allowed tailor-made NPs to serve as mechanistic probes for catalytic processes. The innovative use of colloidal NPs to gain fundamental insights into catalytic function will be highlighted across a variety of catalytic and electrocatalytic applications. The engineering of future heterogenous catalysts is also moving beyond size, shape and composition considerations. Advancements in understanding structure-property relationships have enabled incorporation of complex features such as tuning surface strain to influence the behavior of catalytic NPs. Exploiting plasmonic properties and altering colloidal surface chemistry through functionalization are also emerging as important areas for rational design of catalytic NPs. This news article will highlight the key developments and challenges to the future design of catalytic NPs. PMID:26823380

  3. Finger probe array for topography-tolerant scanning electrochemical microscopy of extended samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesch, Andreas; Chen, Po-Chung; Roelfs, Folkert; Dosche, Carsten; Momotenko, Dmitry; Cortés-Salazar, Fernando; Girault, Hubert H; Wittstock, Gunther

    2014-01-01

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy with soft microelectrode array probes has recently been used to enable reactivity imaging of extended areas and to compensate sample corrugation perpendicular to the scanning direction. Here, the use of a new type of microelectrode arrays is described in which each individual microelectrode can independently compensate corrugations of the sample surface. It consists of conventional Pt microelectrodes enclosed in an insulating glass sheath. The microelectrodes are individually fixed to a new holder system by magnetic forces. The concept was tested using a large 3D sample with heights up to 12 μm specially prepared by inkjet printing. The microelectrodes follow the topography in a constant working distance independently from each other while exerting low pressure on the surface. PMID:24328212

  4. Normalization and centering of array-based heterologous genome hybridization based on divergent control probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wheeler David

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hybridization of heterologous (non-specific nucleic acids onto arrays designed for model-organisms has been proposed as a viable genomic resource for estimating sequence variation and gene expression in non-model organisms. However, conventional methods of normalization that assume equivalent distributions (such as quantile normalization are inappropriate when applied to non-specific (heterologous hybridization. We propose an algorithm for normalizing and centering intensity data from heterologous hybridization that makes no prior assumptions of distribution, reduces the false appearance of homology, and provides a way for researchers to confirm whether heterologous hybridization is suitable. Results Data are normalized by adjusting for Gibbs free energy binding, and centered by adjusting for the median of a common set of control probes assumed to be equivalently dissimilar for all species. This procedure was compared to existing approaches and found to be as successful as Loess normalization at detecting sequence variations (deletions and even more successful than quantile normalization at reducing the accumulation of false positive probe matches between two related nematode species, Caenorhabditis elegans and C. briggsae. Despite the improvements, we still found that probe fluorescence intensity was too poorly correlated with sequence similarity to result in reliable detection of matching probe sequence. Conclusions Cross-species hybridizations can be a way to adapt genome-enabled tools for closely related non-model organisms, but data must be appropriately normalized and centered in a way that accommodates hybridization of nucleic acids with diverged sequence. For short, 25-mer probes, hybridization intensity alone may be insufficiently correlated with sequence similarity to allow reliable inference of homology at the probe level.

  5. The Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization: 8 Station Results

    CERN Document Server

    Parsons, Aaron R; Bradley, Richard F; Aguirre, James E; Benoit, Erin E; Carilli, Chris L; Foster, Griffin S; Gugliucci, Nicole E; Herne, David; Jacobs, Daniel C; Lynch, Mervyn J; Manley, Jason R; Parashare, Chaitali R; Werthimer, Daniel J; Wright, Melvyn C H

    2009-01-01

    We are developing the Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER) to detect 21cm emission from the early Universe, when the first stars and galaxies were forming. We describe the overall experiment strategy and architecture and summarize two PAPER deployments: a 4-antenna array in the low-RFI environment of Western Australia and an 8-antenna array at our prototyping site in Green Bank, WV. From these activities we report on system performance, including primary beam model verification, dependence of system gain on ambient temperature, measurements of receiver and overall system temperatures, and characterization of the RFI environment at each deployment site. We present an all-sky map synthesized between 139 MHz and 174 MHz using data from both arrays that reaches down to 80 mJy (4.9 K, for a beam size of 2.15e-5 steradians at 154 MHz), with a 10 mJy (620 mK) thermal noise level that indicates what would be achievable with better foreground subtraction. We calculate angular power spectra ($C...

  6. In vivo optical modulation of neural signals using monolithically integrated two-dimensional neural probe arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Yoojin; Jenny Lee, Hyunjoo; Kim, Jeongyeon; Shin, Hyogeun; Choi, Nakwon; Justin Lee, C.; Yoon, Eui-Sung; Yoon, Euisik; Wise, Kensall D.; Geun Kim, Tae; Cho, Il-Joo

    2015-10-01

    Integration of stimulation modalities (e.g. electrical, optical, and chemical) on a large array of neural probes can enable an investigation of important underlying mechanisms of brain disorders that is not possible through neural recordings alone. Furthermore, it is important to achieve this integration of multiple functionalities in a compact structure to utilize a large number of the mouse models. Here we present a successful optical modulation of in vivo neural signals of a transgenic mouse through our compact 2D MEMS neural array (optrodes). Using a novel fabrication method that embeds a lower cladding layer in a silicon substrate, we achieved a thin silicon 2D optrode array that is capable of delivering light to multiple sites using SU-8 as a waveguide core. Without additional modification to the microelectrodes, the measured impedance of the multiple microelectrodes was below 1 MΩ at 1 kHz. In addition, with a low background noise level (±25 μV), neural spikes from different individual neurons were recorded on each microelectrode. Lastly, we successfully used our optrodes to modulate the neural activity of a transgenic mouse through optical stimulation. These results demonstrate the functionality of the 2D optrode array and its potential as a next-generation tool for optogenetic applications.

  7. Electroless silver plating for metallization of near-field optical fiber probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chang'an; Xu, Lina; Gu, Ning

    2007-10-01

    By using mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTS) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), electroless silver plating is developed for the metallization of near-field optical fiber probes. This method has the advantages of controllability, no pinholes, convenience, low cost, and smooth tip surface. The metallized probes are characterized by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS).

  8. Coupling effects in bilayer thick metal films perforated with rectangular nanohole arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yuan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The coupling effects in bilayer thick metal (silver films perforated with rectangular nanohole arrays are investigated using the finite-difference time-domain technique. Many interesting light phenomena are observed as the distance between the metal rectangular nanohole arrays varies. Coupling effects are found to play very important roles on the optical and electronic properties of bilayer metal rectangular nanohole arrays: antisymmetric coupling between surface plasmon polaritons near the top and bottom film plane, and antisymmetric coupling between localized surface plasmon resonances near the two long sides of the rectangular hole, are probably excited in each layer of bilayer metal rectangular nanohole arrays; antisymmetric and symmetric magnetic coupling probably occur between the metal rectangular nanohole arrays.

  9. Optical Polarization Properties of Metal Nanowire Array Film Synthesized by Electrodeposition Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁燕萍; 史启祯; 吴振森; 王尧宇; 高胜利

    2005-01-01

    Metal nanowire array films were prepared by electrodepositing Cu, Ag, Ni, Co and Cu-Ag on porous anodic alumina film. Optical transmittance of both the porous anodic alumina film and metal nanowire array film was measured in the wavelength range of 400---2600 nm under an obliquely incident light. The experimental results show that metal nanowire array films exhibit a prominent polarization function. It was found that optical polarization properties can be improved by choosing suitable kinds of electrodepositing metal, controlling the shape and length of nanowire, and changing the incident angle.

  10. Identification of proteins bound to a thioaptamer probe on a proteomics array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rapid method to screen and identify unknown bound proteins to specific nucleic acid probes anchored on ProteinChip array surfaces from crude biological samples has been developed in this paper. It was demonstrated with screening specific binding proteins from LPS-stimulated mouse 70Z/3 pre-B cell nuclear extracts by direct coupling of thioaptamer XBY-S2 to the pre-activated ProteinChip array surfaces. With pre-fractionation of crude nuclear extracts by ion exchange method, specific 'on-chip' captured proteins have been obtained that were pure enough to do 'on-chip' digestion and the subsequent identification of the 'on-chip' bound proteins by microsequencing of the trypsin digested peptide fragments through tandem MS. Five mouse heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) A1, A2/B1, A3, A/B, and D0 were identified. To verify those bound hnRNPs, a novel thioaptamer/antibody sandwich assay provides highly sensitive and selective identification of proteins on ProteinChip arrays

  11. Development and field validation of advanced array probes for steam generator inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodd, C.V.; Pate, J.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-04-01

    The aging of the steam generators at the nation`s nuclear power plants has led to the appearance of new forms of degradation in steam generator tubes and an increase in the frequency of forced outages due to major tube leak events. The eddy-current techniques currently being used for the inspection of steam generator tubing are no longer adequate to ensure that flaws will be detected before they lead to a shutdown of the plant. To meet the need for a fast and reliable method of inspection, ORNL has designed a 16-coil eddy-current array probe which combines an inspection speed similar to that of the bobbin coil with a sensitivity to cracks of any orientation similar to the rotating pancake coil. In addition, neural network and least square methods have been developed for the automatic analysis of the data acquired with the new probes. The probes and analysis software have been tested at two working steam generators where we have found an increase in the signal-to-noise ratio of a factor of five an increase in the inspection speed of a factor of 75 over the rotating pancake coil which maintaining similar detection and characterization capabilities.

  12. THE PRECISION ARRAY FOR PROBING THE EPOCH OF RE-IONIZATION: EIGHT STATION RESULTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are developing the Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Re-ionization (PAPER) to detect 21 cm emission from the early universe, when the first stars and galaxies were forming. We describe the overall experiment strategy and architecture and summarize two PAPER deployments: a four-antenna array in the low radio frequency interference (RFI) environment of Western Australia and an eight-antenna array at a prototyping site at the NRAO facilities near Green Bank, WV. From these activities we report on system performance, including primary beam model verification, dependence of system gain on ambient temperature, measurements of receiver and overall system temperatures, and characterization of the RFI environment at each deployment site. We present an all-sky map synthesized between 139 MHz and 174 MHz using data from both arrays that reaches down to 80 mJy (4.9 K, for a beam size of 2.15e-5 sr at 156 MHz), with a 10 mJy (620 mK) thermal noise level that indicates what would be achievable with better foreground subtraction. We calculate angular power spectra (C l) in a cold patch and determine them to be dominated by point sources, but with contributions from galactic synchrotron emission at lower radio frequencies and angular wavemodes. Although the sample variance of foregrounds dominates errors in these power spectra, we measure a thermal noise level of 310 mK at l = 100 for a 1.46 MHz band centered at 164.5 MHz. This sensitivity level is approximately 3 orders of magnitude in temperature above the level of the fluctuations in 21 cm emission associated with re-ionization.

  13. Nanopatterning of transition metal surfaces via electrochemical dimple array formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sherdeep; Barden, Warren R T; Kruse, Peter

    2008-12-23

    Nanoscale surface patterning is of great importance for applications ranging from catalysts to biomaterials. We show the formation of ordered nanoscale dimple arrays on titanium, tungsten, and zirconium during electropolishing, demonstrating versatility of a process previously only reported for tantalum. This is a rare example of an electrochemical pattern formation process that can be translated to other materials. The dimpled surfaces have been characterized with scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and electrochemical conditions were optimized for each material. While conditions for titanium and tungsten resemble those for tantalum, zirconium requires a different type of electrolyte. Given the appropriate electropolishing chemistry, formation of these patterns should be possible on any metal surface. The process is very robust on homogeneous surfaces, but sensitive to inhomogeneities in chemical composition, such as in the case of differentially etched alloys. An alternative process for some materials such as platinum is the coating of a dimpled substrate with a thin film of the required material. PMID:19206279

  14. Broadband Polarimetry with the Square Kilometre Array: A Unique Astrophysical Probe

    CERN Document Server

    Gaensler, B M; Akahori, Takuya; Banfield, Julie; Beck, Rainer; Carretti, Ettore; Farnes, Jamie; Haverkorn, Marijke; Heald, George; Jones, David; Landecker, Thomas; Mao, Sui Ann; Norris, Ray; O'Sullivan, Shane; Rudnick, Lawrence; Schnitzeler, Dominic; Seymour, Nicholas; Sun, Xiaohui

    2015-01-01

    Faraday rotation of polarised background sources is a unique probe of astrophysical magnetic fields in a diverse range of foreground objects. However, to understand the properties of the polarised sources themselves and of depolarising phenomena along the line of sight, we need to complement Faraday rotation data with polarisation observations over very broad bandwidths. Just as it is impossible to properly image a complex source with limited u-v coverage, we can only meaningfully understand the magneto-ionic properties of polarised sources if we have excellent coverage in $\\lambda^2$-space. We here propose a set of broadband polarisation surveys with the Square Kilometre Array, which will provide a singular set of scientific insights on the ways in which galaxies and their environments have evolved over cosmic time.

  15. Electromagnetic methods for measuring materials properties of cylindrical rods and array probes for rapid flaw inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Haiyan

    2005-05-01

    field in the presence of a finite a two-layer rod and a conductive tube. The results are in very good agreement with those obtained by using a 2D finite element code. In the third part, a new probe technology with enhanced flaw detection capability is described. The new probe can reduce inspection time through the use of multiple Hall sensors. A prototype Hall array probe has been built and tested with eight individual Hall sensor ICs and a racetrack coil. Electronic hardware was developed to interface the probes to an oscilloscope or an eddy current instrument. To achieve high spatial resolution and to limit the overall probe size, high-sensitivity Hall sensor arrays were fabricated directly on a wafer using photolithographic techniques and then mounted in their unencapsulated form. The electronic hardware was then updated to interface the new probes to a laptop computer.

  16. Recognition- and reactivity-based fluorescent probes for studying transition metal signaling in living systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aron, Allegra T; Ramos-Torres, Karla M; Cotruvo, Joseph A; Chang, Christopher J

    2015-08-18

    Metals are essential for life, playing critical roles in all aspects of the central dogma of biology (e.g., the transcription and translation of nucleic acids and synthesis of proteins). Redox-inactive alkali, alkaline earth, and transition metals such as sodium, potassium, calcium, and zinc are widely recognized as dynamic signals, whereas redox-active transition metals such as copper and iron are traditionally thought of as sequestered by protein ligands, including as static enzyme cofactors, in part because of their potential to trigger oxidative stress and damage via Fenton chemistry. Metals in biology can be broadly categorized into two pools: static and labile. In the former, proteins and other macromolecules tightly bind metals; in the latter, metals are bound relatively weakly to cellular ligands, including proteins and low molecular weight ligands. Fluorescent probes can be useful tools for studying the roles of transition metals in their labile forms. Probes for imaging transition metal dynamics in living systems must meet several stringent criteria. In addition to exhibiting desirable photophysical properties and biocompatibility, they must be selective and show a fluorescence turn-on response to the metal of interest. To meet this challenge, we have pursued two general strategies for metal detection, termed "recognition" and "reactivity". Our design of transition metal probes makes use of a recognition-based approach for copper and nickel and a reactivity-based approach for cobalt and iron. This Account summarizes progress in our laboratory on both the development and application of fluorescent probes to identify and study the signaling roles of transition metals in biology. In conjunction with complementary methods for direct metal detection and genetic and/or pharmacological manipulations, fluorescent probes for transition metals have helped reveal a number of principles underlying transition metal dynamics. In this Account, we give three recent

  17. Weak localization in arrays of metallic quantum dots

    OpenAIRE

    Golubev, Dmitri S.; Zaikin, Andrei D.

    2006-01-01

    Combining scattering matrix formalism with non-linear $\\sigma$-model technique we analyze weak localization effects in arrays of chaotic quantum dots connected via barriers with arbitrary distribution of channel transmissions. With the aid of our approach we evaluate magnetoconductance of two arbitrarily connected quantum dots as well as of $N\\times M$ arrays of identical quantum dots.

  18. Proceedings of the flat-plate solar array project research forum on photovoltaic metallization systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1983-11-15

    A Photovoltaic Metallization Research Forum, under the sponsorship of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Flat-Plate Solar Array Project and the US Department of Energy, was held March 16-18, 1983 at Pine Mountain, Georgia. The Forum consisted of five sessions, covering (1) the current status of metallization systems, (2) system design, (3) thick-film metallization, (4) advanced techniques and (5) future metallization challenges. Twenty-three papers were presented.

  19. An artificial tongue fluorescent sensor array for identification and quantitation of various heavy metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wang; Ren, Changliang; Teoh, Chai Lean; Peng, Juanjuan; Gadre, Shubhankar Haribhau; Rhee, Hyun-Woo; Lee, Chi-Lik Ken; Chang, Young-Tae

    2014-09-01

    Herein, a small-molecule fluorescent sensor array for rapid identification of seven heavy metal ions was designed and synthesized, with its sensing mechanism mimicking that of a tongue. The photoinduced electron transfer and intramolecular charge transfer mechanism result in combinatorial interactions between sensor array and heavy metal ions, which lead to diversified fluorescence wavelength shifts and emission intensity changes. Upon principle component analysis (PCA), this result renders clear identification of each heavy metal ion on a 3D spatial dispersion graph. Further exploration provides a concentration-dependent pattern, allowing both qualitative and quantitative measurements of heavy metal ions. On the basis of this information, a "safe-zone" concept was proposed, which provides rapid exclusion of versatile hazardous species from clean water samples based on toxicity characteristic leaching procedure standards. This type of small-molecule fluorescent sensor array could open a new avenue for multiple heavy metal ion detection and simplified water quality analysis. PMID:25144824

  20. A fluorometric paper-based sensor array for the discrimination of heavy-metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Liang; Li, Hui; Niu, Li-Ya; Guan, Ying-Shi; Duan, Chun-Feng; Guan, Ya-Feng; Tung, Chen-Ho; Yang, Qing-Zheng

    2013-04-15

    A fluorometric paper-based sensor array has been developed for the sensitive and convenient determination of seven heavy-metal ions at their wastewater discharge standard concentrations. Combining with nine cross-reactive BODIPY fluorescent indicators and array technologies-based pattern-recognition, we have obtained the discrimination capability of seven different heavy-metal ions at their wastewater discharge standard concentrations. After the immobilization of indicators and the enrichment of analytes, identification of the heavy-metal ions was readily acquired using a standard chemometric approach. Clear differentiation among heavy-metal ions as a function of concentration was also achieved, even down to 10(-7)M. A semi-quantitative estimation of the heavy-metal ion concentration was obtained by comparing color changes with a set of known concentrations. The sensor array was tentatively investigated in spiked tap water and sea water, and showed possible feasibility for real sample testing. PMID:23601876

  1. Study on electrostatic and electromagnetic probes operated in ceramic and metallic depositing plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses plasma probe diagnostics, namely the multipole resonance probe (MRP) and Langmuir probe (LP), operated in depositing plasmas. The aim of this work is to show that the combination of both probes provides stable and robust measurements and clear determination of plasma parameters for metallic and ceramic coating processes. The probes use different approaches to determine plasma parameters, e.g. electron density ne and electron temperature Te. The LP is a well-established plasma diagnostic, and its applicability in technological plasmas is well documented. The LP is a dc probe that performs a voltage sweep and analyses the measured current, which makes it insensitive against conductive metallic coating. However, once the LP is dielectrically coated with a ceramic film, its functionality is constricted. In contrast, the MRP was recently presented as a monitoring tool, which is insensitive to coating with dielectric ceramics. It is a new plasma diagnostic based on the concept of active plasma resonance spectroscopy, which uses the universal characteristic of all plasmas to resonate on or near the electron plasma frequency. The MRP emits a frequency sweep and the absorption of the signal, the |S11| parameter, is analysed. Since the MRP concept is based on electromagnetic waves, which are able to transmit dielectrics, it is insensitive to dielectric coatings. But once the MRP is metallized with a thin conductive film, no undisturbed RF-signal can be emitted into the plasma, which leads to falsified plasma parameter. In order to compare both systems, during metallic or dielectric coating, the probes are operated in a magnetron CCP, which is equipped with a titanium target. We present measurements in metallic and dielectric coating processes with both probes and elaborate advantages and problems of each probe operated in each coating environment. (paper)

  2. Broadband Metallic Planar Microlenses in an Array: the Focusing Coupling Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yiting; Wang, Ping; Zhu, Yechuan; Diao, Jinshuai

    2016-12-01

    The microlens arrays (MLAs) are widely utilized for various applications. However, when the lens size and the spacing between two adjacent microlenses are of the length scale of the working wavelength, the diffraction effect plays a vital role in the final focusing performance. We suggest a kind of broadband metallic planar microlenses, based on which the ultra-compact microlens arrays are also constructed. The focusing coupling effect revealing for such devices is then investigated in detail by using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, with the emphasis on the changing spacing between adjacent microlenses, the working wavelength, the diameter of microlenses, and the array size. The results show that a larger spacing, a larger lens size, a shorter wavelength, or a smaller array scale can lead to a weaker focusing coupling effect. This research provides an important technological reference to design an array of metallic planar microlenses with the well-controlled focusing performance. PMID:26922796

  3. A cross-reactive sensor array for the fluorescence qualitative analysis of heavy metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Huaizhi; Lin, Liping; Rong, Mingcong; Chen, Xi

    2014-11-01

    A cross-reactive sensor array using mercaptopropionic acid modified cadmium telluride (CdTe), glutathione modified CdTe, poly(methacrylic acid) modified silver nanoclusters, bovine serum albumin modified gold nanoclusters, rhodamine derivative and calcein blue as fluorescent indicators has been designed for the detection of seven heavy metal ions (Ag(+), Hg(2+), Pb(2+), Cu(2+), Cr(3+), Mn(2+) and Cd(2+)). The discriminatory capacity of the sensor array to different heavy metal ions in different pH solutions has been tested and the results have been analyzed with linear discriminant analysis. Results showed that the sensor array could be used to qualitatively analyze the selected heavy metal ions. The array performance was also evaluated in the identification of known and unknown samples and the preliminary results suggested the promising practicability of the designed sensor assay. PMID:25127598

  4. Measurements of spheromak formation and field buildup at SSPX using a double magnetic probe array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Talamas, C. A.; Ohia, O. O.; Jayakumar, R.

    2007-11-01

    A specially designed magnetic probe consisting of two linear arrays that measure Bx, By, and Bz, is being used to investigate magnetic evolution during spheromak formation, and during multiple gun current pulses on top of a baseline current at SSPX. The measurements reveal that at the start of each pulse there is a time lag in the magnetic response of the closed flux region, while the open flux (intercepting the gun electrodes) responds immediately. This is interpreted as the time to build enough helicity on the open flux, before reconnecting and adding flux to the closed surfaces. Magnetic reconstructions after pulsed buildup using CORSICA show good agreement with the data. A code that simulates the magnetic field from current-carrying flux ropes is used to reproduce the field measured during flux buildup. The code includes an optimization routine that finds the rope shape that best fits the data in order to estimate helicity in the open flux. Work performed under the auspices of the US DOE by University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract W-7405-ENG-48.

  5. A fiber-array probe technique for measuring the viscosity of a substance under shock compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fiber-array probe is designed to measure the damping behavior of a small perturbed shock wave in an opaque substance, by which the effective viscosity of substance under the condition of high temperature and high pressure can be constrained according to the flyer-impact technique. It shows that the measurement precision of the shock arrival time by using this technique is within 2 ns. To easily compare with the results given by electrical pin technique, the newly developed method is used to investigate the effective viscosity of aluminum (Al). The shear viscosity coefficient of Al is determined to be 1700 Pa·s at 71 GPa with a strain rate of 3.6 × 106 s−1, which is in good agreement with the results of other methods. The advantage of the new technique over the electrical pin one is that it is applicable for studying the non-conductive substances. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  6. Crosstalk in a KID Array Caused by the Thickness Variation of Superconducting Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adane, A.; Boucher, C.; Coiffard, G.; Leclercq, S.; Schuster, K. F.; Goupy, J.; Calvo, M.; Hoarau, C.; Monfardini, A.

    2016-07-01

    The work presented in this paper is focused on the improvement of the kinetic detectors used on NIKA2 instrument (New IRAM KID array 2). Based on the simulation and low temperature measurements, it aims at showing how the variations of the superconducting metal corrupt the frequency comb of the kinetic Inductance detectors (KID) in the frequency range (between 1 and 3 GHz), i.e., how the superconducting metal inhomogeneity induces the resonance-to-resonance cross-coupling which deteriorates the homogeneity of the resonance quality factor and the frequency resonance separation. Solutions are then proposed to fight against the effect of these metallic variations when designing the KID array.

  7. Asymmetric light reflectance from metal nanoparticle arrays on dielectric surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, K.; Pan, W.; Zhu, J. F.; Li, J.C.; Gao, N; Liu, C; Ji, L.; Yu, E. T.; Kang, J Y

    2015-01-01

    Asymmetric light reflectance associated with localized surface plasmons excited in metal nanoparticles on a quartz substrate is observed and analyzed. This phenomenon is explained by the superposition of two waves, the wave reflected by the air/quartz interface and that reflected by the metal nanoparticles, and the resulting interference effects. Far field behavior investigation suggests that zero reflection can be achieved by optimizing the density of metal nanoparticles. Near field behavior...

  8. Development of Radar Control system for Multi-mode Active Phased Array Radar for atmospheric probing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasodha, Polisetti; Jayaraman, Achuthan; Thriveni, A.

    2016-07-01

    Modern multi-mode active phased array radars require highly efficient radar control system for hassle free real time radar operation. The requirement comes due to the distributed architecture of the active phased array radar, where each antenna element in the array is connected to a dedicated Transmit-Receive (TR) module. Controlling the TR modules, which are generally few hundreds in number, and functioning them in synchronisation, is a huge task during real time radar operation and should be handled with utmost care. Indian MST Radar, located at NARL, Gadanki, which is established during early 90's, as an outcome of the middle atmospheric program, is a remote sensing instrument for probing the atmosphere. This radar has a semi-active array, consisting of 1024 antenna elements, with limited beam steering, possible only along the principle planes. To overcome the limitations and difficulties, the radar is being augmented into fully active phased array, to accomplish beam agility and multi-mode operations. Each antenna element is excited with a dedicated 1 kW TR module, located in the field and enables to position the radar beam within 20° conical volume. A multi-channel receiver makes the radar to operate in various modes like Doppler Beam Swinging (DBS), Spaced Antenna (SA), Frequency Domain Interferometry (FDI) etc. Present work describes the real-time radar control (RC) system for the above described active phased array radar. The radar control system consists of a Spartan 6 FPGA based Timing and Control Signal Generator (TCSG), and a computer containing the software for controlling all the subsystems of the radar during real-time radar operation and also for calibrating the radar. The main function of the TCSG is to generate the control and timing waveforms required for various subsystems of the radar. Important components of the RC system software are (i) TR module configuring software which does programming, controlling and health parameter monitoring of the

  9. GaN nanowire arrays by a patterned metal-assisted chemical etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K. C.; Yuan, G. D.; Wu, R. W.; Lu, H. X.; Liu, Z. Q.; Wei, T. B.; Wang, J. X.; Li, J. M.; Zhang, W. J.

    2016-04-01

    We developed an one-step and two-step metal-assisted chemical etching method to produce self-organized GaN nanowire arrays. In one-step approach, GaN nanowire arrays are synthesized uniformly on GaN thin film surface. However, in a two-step etching processes, GaN nanowires are formed only in metal uncovered regions, and GaN regions with metal-covering show nano-porous sidewalls. We propose that nanowires and porous nanostructures are tuned by sufficient and limited etch rate, respectively. PL spectra shows a red-shift of band edge emission in GaN nanostructures. The formation mechanism of nanowires was illustrated by two separated electrochemical reactions occur simultaneously. The function of metals and UV light was illustrated by the scheme of potential relationship between energy bands in Si, GaN and standard hydrogen electrode potential of solution and metals.

  10. Radiation Resistant, Reconfigurable, Shape Memory Metal Rubber Space Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NanoSonic has demonstrated that Shape Memory Metal RubberTM (SM-MR) adaptive skins exhibit reconfigurable and durable RF properties. It is hypothesized that such...

  11. Multifunctional cantilever-free scanning probe arrays coated with multilayer graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Shim, Wooyoung; Brown, Keith A.; Zhou, Xiaozhu; Rasin, Boris; Liao, Xing; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2012-01-01

    Scanning probe instruments have expanded beyond their traditional role as imaging or “reading” tools and are now routinely used for “writing.” Although a variety of scanning probe lithography techniques are available, each one imposes different requirements on the types of probes that must be used. Additionally, throughput is a major concern for serial writing techniques, so for a scanning probe lithography technique to become widely applied, there needs to be a reasonable path toward a scala...

  12. Plasmonic lasing of nanocavity embedding in metallic nanoantenna array

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Cheng; Ni, Yuan; Li, Mingzhuo; Mao, Lei; Liu, Chen; Zhang, Douguo; Ming, Hai; Wang, Pei

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonic nanolasers have ultrahigh lasing thresholds, especially those devices for which all three dimensions are truly subwavelength. Because of a momentum mismatch between the propagating light and localized optical field of the subwavelength nanocavity, poor optical pumping efficiency is another important reason for the ultrahigh threshold but is normally always ignored. Based on a cavity-embedded nanoantenna array design, we demonstrate a room-temperature low-threshold plasmonic nanolaser that is robust, reproducible, and easy-to-fabricate using chemical-template lithography. The mode volume of the device is~0.22({\\lambda}/2n)3 (here,{\\lambda} is resonant wavelength and n is the refractive index), and the experimental lasing threshold produced is ~2.70MW/mm2. The lasing polarization and the function of nanoantenna array are investigated in detail. Our work provides a new strategy to achieve room-temperature low-threshold plasmonic nanolasers of interest in applications to biological sensoring and informa...

  13. Fabrication of porous silicon by metal-assisted etching using highly ordered gold nanoparticle arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Scheeler, Sebastian P; Ullrich, Simon; Kudera, Stefan; Pacholski, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    A simple method for the fabrication of porous silicon (Si) by metal-assisted etching was developed using gold nanoparticles as catalytic sites. The etching masks were prepared by spin-coating of colloidal gold nanoparticles onto Si. An appropriate functionalization of the gold nanoparticle surface prior to the deposition step enabled the formation of quasi-hexagonally ordered arrays by self-assembly which were translated into an array of pores by subsequent etching in HF solution containing H...

  14. Pure Electric and Pure Magnetic Resonances in Near-Infrared Metal Double-Triangle Metamaterial Arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Zhi-Shen; PAN Jian; CHEN Zhuo; ZHAN Peng; MIN Nai-Ben; WANG Zhen-Lin

    2011-01-01

    @@ We experimentally and numerically investigate the optical properties of metamaterial arrays composed of double partially-overlapped metallic nanotriangles fabricated by an angle-resolved nanosphere lithography.We demonstrate that each double-triangle can be viewed as an artificial magnetic element analogous to the conventional metal split-ring-resonator.It is shown that under normal-incidence conditions,individual double-triangle can exhibit a strong local magnetic resonance,but the collective response of the metamaterial arrays is purely electric because magnetic resonances of the two double-triangles in a unit cell having opposite openings are out of phase.For oblique incidences the metamaterial arrays are shown to support a pure magnetic response at the same frequency band.Therefore,switchable electric and magnetic resonances are achieved in double-triangle arrays.Moreover,both the electric and magnetic resonances axe shown to allow for a tunability over a large spectral range down to near-infrared.%We experimentally and numerically investigate the optical properties of metamaterial arrays composed of double partially-overlapped metallic nanotriangles fabricated by an angle-resolved nanosphere lithography. We demonstrate that each double-triable can be viewed as an artificial magnetic element analogous to the conventional metal split-ring-resonator. It is shown that under normal-incidence conditions, individual double-triangle can exhibit a strong local magnetic resonance, but the collective response of the metamaterial arrays is purely electric because magnetic resonances of the two double-triangles in a unit cell having opposite openings are out of phase.For oblique incidences the metamaterial arrays are shown to support a pure magnetic response at the same frequency band. Therefore, switchable electric and magnetic resonances are achieved in double-triangle arrays.Moreover, both the electric and magnetic resonances are shown to allow for a tunability over

  15. Superdirective Magnetic Dipole Array as a First-Order Probe for Spherical Near-Field Antenna Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Oleksiy S.; Pivnenko, Sergey; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2012-01-01

    The theory as well as numerical and experimental results are presented for a superdirective array composed of closely spaced electrically small resonant magnetic dipole elements. The array operates on a metal ground plane and can exhibit a maximum directivity of 11.5 dBi, 15.2 dBi, and 17.8 d......Bi (including 3 dB due to the ground plane), for 2, 3, and 4 magnetic dipoles, respectively. The array is self-resonant and is directly excited by a 50-ohm coaxial cable through the ground plane. The array radiates essentially the $\\vert\\mu\\vert=1$ spherical modes, which, despite a narrow bandwidth, makes it an...

  16. Contrast analysis of near-field scanning microscopy using a metal slit probe at millimeter wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozokido, Tatsuo; Ishino, Manabu; Seto, Ryosuke; Bae, Jongsuck

    2015-09-01

    We describe an analytical method for investigating the signal contrast obtained in near-field scanning microscopy using a metal slit probe. The probe has a slit-like aperture at the open end of a rectangular or a parallel plate waveguide. In our method, the electromagnetic field around the metal slit aperture at the probe tip is calculated from Maxwell's equations in the Fourier domain in order to derive the electrical admittance of a sample system consisting of layered dielectrics as seen from the probe tip. A simple two-port electrical circuit terminated by this admittance is then established to calculate the complex reflection coefficient of the probe as a signal. The validity of the method is verified at millimeter wavelengths by a full-wave high frequency 3-D finite element modeler and also by experiment. The signal contrast when varying the short dimension of the slit aperture, the separation between the probe tip and the sample, and the sample thickness are successfully explained in terms of the variation in the product of the admittance and the characteristic impedance of the waveguide at the probe tip. In particular, the cause of the local minimum in the signal intensity when varying the separation is clarified.

  17. Antennas for Terahertz Applications: Focal Plane Arrays and On-chip Non-contact Measurement Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trichopoulos, Georgios C.

    The terahertz (THz) band provides unique sensing opportunities that enable several important applications such as biomedical imaging, remote non-destructive inspection of packaged goods, and security screening. THz waves can penetrate most materials and can provide unique spectral information in the 0.1--10 THz band with high resolution. In contrast, other imaging modalities, like infrared (IR), suffer from low penetration depths and are thus not attractive for non-destructive evaluation. However, state-of-the-art THz imaging systems typically employ mechanical raster scans using a single detector to acquire two-dimensional images. Such devices tend to be bulky and complicated due to the mechanical parts, and are thus rather expensive to develop and operate. Thus, large-format (e.g. 100x100 pixels) and all-electronics based THz imaging systems are badly needed to alleviate the space, weight and power (SWAP) factors and enable cost effective utilization of THz waves for sensing and high-data-rate communications. In contrast, photonic sensors are very compact because light can couple directly to the photodiode without residing to radiation coupling topologies. However, in the THz band, due to the longer wavelengths and much lower photon energies, highly efficient antennas with optimized input impedance have to be integrated with THz sensors. Here, we implement novel antenna engineering techniques that are optimized to take advantage of recent technological advances in solid-state THz sensing devices. For example, large-format focal plane arrays (FPAs) have been the Achilles' heel of THz imaging systems. Typically, optical components (lenses, mirrors) are employed in order to improve the optical performance of FPAs, however, antenna sensors suffer from degraded performance when they are far from the optical axis, thus minimizing the number of useful FPA elements. By modifying the radiation pattern of FPA antennas we manage to alleviate the off-axis aberration

  18. Kelvin probe force microscopy of C60 on metal substrates: towards molecular resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface workfunction changes upon C60 adsorption onto different metal single crystals are investigated by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). Literature values for similar metal/organic systems, showing a broad variation for both the measured metal workfunction and workfunction change, are compared to the acquired KPFM values. Good agreement is found between nanoscopic KPFM results and macroscopic photoelectron spectroscopy or Kelvin probe literature data. The model of a linear dependence between the metal substrate workfunction and the C60-induced workfunction change is confirmed. Former numerical simulations predicted a lateral quantitative KPFM resolution in the range of 10 nm, in this work results are published that show the achievement of this resolution with Cr coated, sharp tips. Furthermore, numerical simulations are presented that show the possibility of molecular contrast for KPFM

  19. Nonlocal Response of Metallic Nanospheres Probed by Light, Electrons, and Atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas; Yan, Wei; Raza, Søren;

    2014-01-01

    Inspired by recent measurements on individual metallic nanospheres that cannot be explained with traditional classical electrodynamics, we theoretically investigate the effects of nonlocal response by metallic nanospheres in three distinct settings: atomic spontaneous emission, electron energy loss...... blueshifted surface plasmon but also an infinite series of bulk plasmons that have no counterpart in a local-response approximation. We show that these increasingly blueshifted multipole plasmons become spectrally more prominent at shorter probe-to-surface separations and for decreasing nanosphere radii. For...

  20. Chemical probes of metal cluster structure--Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical reactivity is one of the few methods currently available for investigating the geometrical structure of isolated transition metal clusters. In this paper we summarize what is currently known about the structures of clusters of four transition metals, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu, in the size range from 13 to 180 atoms. Chemical probes used to determine structural information include reactions with H2(D2), H20, NH3 and N2. Measurements at both low coverage and at saturation are discussed

  1. Electronically tunable extraordinary optical transmission in graphene plasmonic ribbons coupled to subwavelength metallic slit arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seyoon; Jang, Min Seok; Brar, Victor W.; Tolstova, Yulia; Mauser, Kelly W.; Atwater, Harry A.

    2016-08-01

    Subwavelength metallic slit arrays have been shown to exhibit extraordinary optical transmission, whereby tunnelling surface plasmonic waves constructively interfere to create large forward light propagation. The intricate balancing needed for this interference to occur allows for resonant transmission to be highly sensitive to changes in the environment. Here we demonstrate that extraordinary optical transmission resonance can be coupled to electrostatically tunable graphene plasmonic ribbons to create electrostatic modulation of mid-infrared light. Absorption in graphene plasmonic ribbons situated inside metallic slits can efficiently block the coupling channel for resonant transmission, leading to a suppression of transmission. Full-wave simulations predict a transmission modulation of 95.7% via this mechanism. Experimental measurements reveal a modulation efficiency of 28.6% in transmission at 1,397 cm-1, corresponding to a 2.67-fold improvement over transmission without a metallic slit array. This work paves the way for enhancing light modulation in graphene plasmonics by employing noble metal plasmonic structures.

  2. Electronic control of extraordinary terahertz transmission through subwavelength metal hole arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Hou-Tong; LU, Hong; Azad, Abul K.; Averitt, Richard D.; Gossard, Arthur C.; Trugman, Stuart A.; O'Hara, John F.; Antoinette J. Taylor

    2008-01-01

    We describe the electronic control of extraordinary terahertz transmission through subwavelength metal hole arrays fabricated on doped semiconductor substrates. The hybrid metal-semiconductor forms a Schottky diode structure, where the active depletion region modifies the substrate conductivity in real-time by applying an external voltage bias. This enables effective control of the resonance enhanced terahertz transmission. Our proof of principle device achieves an intensity modulation depth ...

  3. Surface-plasmon-polariton-induced suppressed transmission through ultrathin metal disk arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, Asger

    2011-01-01

    We report surface-plasmon-polariton-induced suppressed transmission through two-dimensional arrays of isolated metal disks with a thickness comparable to optical skin depth of the metal. A transmittance dip of −17:5 dB is achieved at the resonant wavelength of 1524 nm, compared to −12 dB for closed...... film. Coupling the light into the surface-plasmon polariton results in enhanced absorption, which is potentially interesting in solar cell applications....

  4. Probe characterization of high-current driven metal plasma in a vacuum-arc rail gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of metal plasma launched by high-current electric arc in a vacuum-arc rail gun are determined by employing electrical and magnetic probes. These measurements are validated by results from theoretical simulations. The arc coupled nonlinear circuit equations are solved simultaneously with the Newtonian arc motion and revealed the undercritically damped behavior of the arc current identical to the arc-current signal recorded by the Rogowski magnetic probe. Similarly the arc velocity and displacement derived from the signatures of B-dot probes are shown to concur closely with the results of JxB propulsion from simulation. The heating of plasma is formulated in a three-electron population regime with direct arc energy coupling through magnetohydrodynamic, ion-acoustic, Coulomb, and neutral interactions. This results in high temperature (Te) of hundreds of eV in the arc as revealed by the simulation. Hence Te of the rapidly cooling and equilibrating plasma that emerged from the muzzle is high around 80-90 eV, which is confirmed by Langmuir electric probe measurements. Density ne of this metal plasma is shown to be in the range 4x1021-6x1021 m-3 and includes multiple ion charge states. The exit velocity of the plasma measured by a pair of Langmuir probes is close to 2.2x106 cm/s and matched well with the arc velocity determined by the B-dot probes and the results from simulation

  5. Characterization of interfacial strength of dissimilar metallic joints using a scanning Kelvin probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is very important to understand the interfacial behavior for effective evaluation of welding quality. This letter reports a simple nondestructive characterization method of the interfacial strength of dissimilar metallic joints. Using a scanning Kelvin probe, the electron work function of Cu–steel joints was measured and a strong correlation between the electron work function and the interfacial tensile strength was found.

  6. Interferences of metal-based nanoparticles with fluorescent probes used for in vitro testings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lovric, M.; Ferhatovic Hamzic, L.; Zuntar, I.; Gajovic, S.; Horák, Daniel; Vinkovic Vrcek, I.

    Braga : 3B´s Research Group, University of Minho, 2014. s. 63. [TERM STEM 2014 NanoTools for diagnosis and regeneration of tissues with PT|Korea symposium. 23.10.2014-24.10.2014, Porto] EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 316120 - GLOWBRAIN Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : metal-based nanoparticles * fluorescent probes Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  7. Study of ablation and implosion stages in wire arrays using coupled ultraviolet and X-ray probing diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Star and cylindrical wire arrays were studied using laser probing and X-ray radiography at the 1-MA Zebra pulse power generator at the University of Nevada, Reno. The Leopard laser provided backlighting, producing a laser plasma from a Si target which emitted an X-ray probing pulse at the wavelength of 6.65 Å. A spherically bent quartz crystal imaged the backlit wires onto X-ray film. Laser probing diagnostics at the wavelength of 266 nm included a 3-channel polarimeter for Faraday rotation diagnostic and two-frame laser interferometry with two shearing interferometers to study the evolution of the plasma electron density at the ablation and implosion stages. Dynamics of the plasma density profile in Al wire arrays at the ablation stage were directly studied with interferometry, and expansion of wire cores was measured with X-ray radiography. The magnetic field in the imploding plasma was measured with the Faraday rotation diagnostic, and current was reconstructed

  8. Study of ablation and implosion stages in wire arrays using coupled ultraviolet and X-ray probing diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, A. A.; Ivanov, V. V.; Astanovitskiy, A. L.; Papp, D.; Wiewior, P. P.; Chalyy, O.

    2015-11-01

    Star and cylindrical wire arrays were studied using laser probing and X-ray radiography at the 1-MA Zebra pulse power generator at the University of Nevada, Reno. The Leopard laser provided backlighting, producing a laser plasma from a Si target which emitted an X-ray probing pulse at the wavelength of 6.65 Å. A spherically bent quartz crystal imaged the backlit wires onto X-ray film. Laser probing diagnostics at the wavelength of 266 nm included a 3-channel polarimeter for Faraday rotation diagnostic and two-frame laser interferometry with two shearing interferometers to study the evolution of the plasma electron density at the ablation and implosion stages. Dynamics of the plasma density profile in Al wire arrays at the ablation stage were directly studied with interferometry, and expansion of wire cores was measured with X-ray radiography. The magnetic field in the imploding plasma was measured with the Faraday rotation diagnostic, and current was reconstructed.

  9. Study of ablation and implosion stages in wire arrays using coupled ultraviolet and X-ray probing diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, A. A.; Ivanov, V. V.; Astanovitskiy, A. L.; Wiewior, P. P.; Chalyy, O. [University of Nevada Reno, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Papp, D. [University of Nevada Reno, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); ELI-ALPS, ELI-Hu Nkft., H-6720 Szeged (Hungary)

    2015-11-15

    Star and cylindrical wire arrays were studied using laser probing and X-ray radiography at the 1-MA Zebra pulse power generator at the University of Nevada, Reno. The Leopard laser provided backlighting, producing a laser plasma from a Si target which emitted an X-ray probing pulse at the wavelength of 6.65 Å. A spherically bent quartz crystal imaged the backlit wires onto X-ray film. Laser probing diagnostics at the wavelength of 266 nm included a 3-channel polarimeter for Faraday rotation diagnostic and two-frame laser interferometry with two shearing interferometers to study the evolution of the plasma electron density at the ablation and implosion stages. Dynamics of the plasma density profile in Al wire arrays at the ablation stage were directly studied with interferometry, and expansion of wire cores was measured with X-ray radiography. The magnetic field in the imploding plasma was measured with the Faraday rotation diagnostic, and current was reconstructed.

  10. Spatial and spectral selective characteristics of the plasmonic sensing using metallic nanoslit arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Caiwang; Guo, Zhongyi; Sun, Yongxuan; Shen, Fei; Tao, Yifei; Zhang, Jingran; Li, Rongzhen; Luo, Linbao

    2016-01-01

    A novel spatial and spectral selective plasmonic sensing based on the metal nanoslit arrays has been proposed and investigated theoretically, which shows a high performance in the multiplexing biomolecular detections. By properly tuning the geometric parameters of metal nanoslit arrays, the enhanced optical fields at different regions can be obtained selectively due to the excitation of SPP, cavity mode (CM), and their coupling effects. Simulation results show that the resonances of the metal nanoslit arrays at different spatial locations and different wavelengths can be achieved simultaneously. A relative bigger red-shift of 57 nm can be realized when a layer of biomolecular film is adsorbing at the slit walls, and the corresponding total intensity difference will be enhanced near 10 times compared to that at the top surface. In addition, when a BSA protein monolayer is adsorbing at slit walls with different slit widths, the corresponding wavelength shifts can reach to more than 80 nm by modulating the widths of the slit. The simulated results demonstrate that our designed metal nanoslit arrays can serve as a portable, low-cost biosensing with a high spatial and spectral selective performance.

  11. A micromachined freestanding terahertz absorber with an array of metallic patches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdi Torun

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available An array of square metallic patches on a thin suspended dielectric layer is introduced as an effective terahertz absorber. The suspended structure is placed on a metalized substrate and the device exhibits metamaterial behavior at specific frequencies determined by the size of the patches. It is feasible to place patches with different sizes in an array formation for a broadband absorber. In array configuration, individual elements induce distinct resonances yielding narrow band absorption regions. Design of the absorber is described using electromagnetic simulations. The absorber structure was fabricated on a silicon wafer using standard microfabrication techniques. The characteristics of the absorber were measured using a terahertz time domain spectroscope. The measured data match well the simulations indicating strong absorption peaks in a band of 0.5-2 THz.

  12. Electromagnetic Probes of Metal and Ceramic Surfaces at Low Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzchowski, Mark Steven

    1988-12-01

    This thesis presents, in three parts, topics dealing with the low temperature electro-magnetic surface properties of metals and ceramics. Part I discusses the development and operation of an apparatus to spatially resolve metallic surface potentials as a function of temperature between 2.8K and room temperature. This experiment operates under UHV conditions with a voltage resolution of 1 millivolt and a spatial resolution of 1200 microns. We use this equipment to search for temperature dependent changes in spatial fluctuations of the surface potential. A screening of these fluctuations by a surface conducting layer is suggested by the experiments of Lockhart, Witteborn, and Fairbank, who reported temperature dependent shielding of random electric fields inside a copper tube. Sharp changes with temperature in the microwave surface conductivity of copper and aluminum have also been reported. We have found some aluminum samples to be contaminated with sufficient tin to explain recent microwave results as superconducting impurity transitions. For copper, where both increased and decreased conductivities have been reported, we explain increasing conductivity results in the same way. The present experiment measures surface potential directly, but shows no evidence of temperature dependent shielding. Part II of this thesis presents a calculation of random fields outside a metal surface and their effect on TOF spectroscopy. We calculate the statistical properties of the fields in one-dimensional and cylindrical geometries, then use these results to investigate TOF effects. Calculated quantities include the autocovariance function of the potential, the rms electric field, corrections to the free particle time of flight, and the mean minimum energy required to transit the random potential. The results compare well with our numerical simulations, and with the available experimental data. In part III we investigate the 9.12 GHz complex surface impedance of bulk and thin film

  13. Transmittance of long-wavelength infrared surface plasmon by hexagonal periodic metal hole arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byungwoo; Kwak, Hoe Min; Kim, Ha Sul

    2016-03-01

    For long wave length infrared transmission, a surface plasmonic device, having the periodic subwavelength metal hole array on Si substrate, was fabricated using photo-lithography and electron beam evaporation. The maximum transmitted wavelength was adjustable arbitrarily as a function of the period hole arrays. The maximum transmittance was measured 70.3% at 15.4 μm with a plasmonic device composed of a pitch of 5 μm and hole arrays of 3 μm. When the hole size became larger than a half pitch of the hole array, the transmitted infrared spectrum was split into two peaks. The surface plasmon mode of the six degenerated (1,0) Ag/Si was split from three to five modes depending on the incident beam angle. The blue and red wavelength shifts were measured at the same time.

  14. Development of depth measurement technique for a flaw in weld area of stainless steel with twin matrix array ultrasonic probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A twin matrix array transducer to make possible to detect and measure a flaw with test direction through weld of austenitic stainless steel has been developed. Each transducer performs as transmitter and receiver and has 2 lines and 16 columns array elements respectively. With this transducer depth measurement tests for cracks by stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and fatigue on austenitic stainless steel weld pipe specimens have been carried out. As the results: (1) Corner echoes and tip echoes from SCCs and fatigue cracks could be detected with test direction through the weld of the 25 mm thickness stainless steel pipe specimens. (2) The depth measurements through the weld and in base metal corresponded well. Therefore we have evaluated that the twin matrix array transducer mode possible to measure flaw depth with both the test direction and was effective ultrasonic testing technique to be able to estimate and evaluate flaw depth with more accuracy and reliability. (author)

  15. 3D highly oriented nanoparticulate and microparticulate array of metal oxide materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced nano and micro particulate thin films of 3d transition and post-transition metal oxides consisting of nanorods and microrods with parallel and perpendicular orientation with respect to the substrate normal, have been successfully grown onto various substrates by heteronucleation, without template and/or surfactant, from the aqueous condensation of solution of metal salts or metal complexes (aqueous chemical growth). Three-dimensional arrays of iron oxide nanorods and zinc oxide nanorods with parallel and perpendicular orientation are presented as well as the oxygen K-edge polarization dependent x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) study of anisotropic perpendicularly oriented microrod array of ZnO performed at synchrotron radiation source facility

  16. Microfluidic-based metal enhanced fluorescence for capillary electrophoresis by Ag nanorod arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Chenyu; Cao, Zhen; Deng, Junhong; Huang, Zhifeng; Xu, Zheng; Fu, Junxue; Yobas, Levent

    2014-06-01

    As metal nanorods show much higher metal enhanced fluorescence (MEF) than metal nanospheres, microfluidic-based MEF is first explored with Ag nanorod (ND) arrays made by oblique angle deposition. By measuring the fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) solution sandwiched between the Ag NDs and a piece of cover slip, the enhancement factors (EFs) are found as 3.7 ± 0.64 and 6.74 ± 2.04, for a solution thickness at 20.8 μm and 10 μm, respectively. Because of the strong plasmonic coupling between the adjacent Ag NDs, only the emission of the fluorophores present in the three-dimensional NDs array gets enhanced. Thus, the corresponding effective enhancement factors (EEFs) are revealed to be relatively close, 259 ± 92 and 340 ± 102, respectively. To demonstrate the application of MEF in microfluidic systems, a multilayer of SiO2 NDs/Ag NDs is integrated with a capillary electrophoresis device. At a microchannel depth of 10 μm, an enhancement of 6.5 fold is obtained for amino acids separation detection. These results are very encouraging and open the possibility of MEF applications for the Ag ND arrays decorated microchannels. With the miniaturization of microfluidic devices, microfluidic-based MEF by Ag ND arrays will likely find more applications with further enhancement.

  17. Optical transmission through hexagonal sub-wavelength hole arrays in thin metal films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ctistis, Georgios; Patoka, Piotr; Giersig, Michael [Center of Advanced European Studies and Research (caesar), Ludwig-Erhard-Allee 2, 53175 Bonn (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Nanostructured surfaces exhibit extraordinary optical properties as plasmon assisted transmission through sub-wavelength hole arrays. In this study we present near-field optical results of the light transmission through a nano-hole array in a metal film (gold and aluminium) produced by means of nanosphere lithography. The film thickness varied between 20 and 120 nm while the hole diameter and the inter-hole distance were kept constant at approx. 270 and 500 nm, respectively. Dependent on the thickness, a change in the transmission mechanism could be observed.

  18. Bilayer–metal assisted chemical etching of silicon microwire arrays for photovoltaic applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. W. Wu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Silicon microwires with lateral dimension from 5 μm to 20 μm and depth as long as 20 μm are prepared by bilayer metal assisted chemical etching (MaCE. A bilayer metal configuration (Metal 1 / Metal 2 was applied to assist etching of Si where metal 1 acts as direct catalyst and metal 2 provides mechanical support. Different metal types were investigated to figure out the influence of metal catalyst on morphology of etched silicon. We find that silicon microwires with vertical side wall are produced when we use Ag/Au bilayer, while cone–like and porous microwires formed when Pt/Au is applied. The different micro-/nano-structures in as-etched silicon are demonstrated to be due to the discrepancy of work function of metal catalyst relative to Si. Further, we constructed a silicon microwire arrays solar cells in a radial p–n junction configurations in a screen printed aluminum paste p–doping process.

  19. Bilayer-metal assisted chemical etching of silicon microwire arrays for photovoltaic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, R. W.; Yuan, G. D.; Wang, K. C.; Wei, T. B.; Liu, Z. Q.; Wang, G. H.; Wang, J. X.; Li, J. M.

    2016-02-01

    Silicon microwires with lateral dimension from 5 μm to 20 μm and depth as long as 20 μm are prepared by bilayer metal assisted chemical etching (MaCE). A bilayer metal configuration (Metal 1 / Metal 2) was applied to assist etching of Si where metal 1 acts as direct catalyst and metal 2 provides mechanical support. Different metal types were investigated to figure out the influence of metal catalyst on morphology of etched silicon. We find that silicon microwires with vertical side wall are produced when we use Ag/Au bilayer, while cone-like and porous microwires formed when Pt/Au is applied. The different micro-/nano-structures in as-etched silicon are demonstrated to be due to the discrepancy of work function of metal catalyst relative to Si. Further, we constructed a silicon microwire arrays solar cells in a radial p-n junction configurations in a screen printed aluminum paste p-doping process.

  20. Design and fabrication of an electrode array sensor for probing the electric potential distribution at the mesoscopic scale in antistatic felts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an original voltage probe design for measuring the electric potential distribution at the mesoscopic scale (i.e., 1 mm–1 cm) in antistatic felts. The felts are composed of a mixture of non-conductive and metallic fibers and exhibit complex nonlinear electric behavior—including possibly nonlinearity and hysteresis effects—which may be due to localized electrical or electromechanical phenomena. The sensor consists of an array of 8 × 9 needle electrodes (ϕ 160 µm at the shaft and less than ϕ 50 µm toward the apex), which are mechanically maintained at fixed relative positions while their tips are inserted inside the fabric of the sample. The interelectrode distance is 1.5 mm and the overall active area is 12 × 12 mm2. The electrical insulation resistance for nearest neighbor pairs of electrodes was found to be larger than 860 GΩ, thus making the sensor suitable for measuring antistatic felts with an electric resistance that typically does not exceed a few GΩ. The sensor was successfully used for measuring the distribution of the electric potential in a polyester fabric subjected to voltages of up to 6.2 kV, and in a sample containing 2% in weight of metallic fibers, demonstrating the presence of irreversible changes in that felt sample (i.e., with conductive fibers) at high voltages. It is concluded that the developed probe voltage is a promising technique that could be used for the assessment of the conduction mechanisms in the antistatic materials at the mesoscopic scale. (paper)

  1. Optical probes for the detection of protons, and alkali and alkaline earth metal cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Graham R C; Sahoo, Suban K; Kamila, Sukanta; Singh, Narinder; Kaur, Navneet; Hyland, Barry W; Callan, John F

    2015-07-01

    Luminescent sensors and switches continue to play a key role in shaping our understanding of key biochemical processes, assist in the diagnosis of disease and contribute to the design of new drugs and therapies. Similarly, their contribution to the environment cannot be understated as they offer a portable means to undertake field testing for hazardous chemicals and pollutants such as heavy metals. From a physiological perspective, the Group I and II metal ions are among the most important in the periodic table with blood plasma levels of H(+), Na(+) and Ca(2+) being indicators of several possible disease states. In this review, we examine the progress that has been made in the development of luminescent probes for Group I and Group II ions as well as protons. The potential applications of these probes and the mechanism involved in controlling their luminescent response upon analyte binding will also be discussed. PMID:25742963

  2. Phased Array Ultrasonic Examination of Reactor Coolant System (Carbon Steel-to-CASS) Dissimilar Metal Weld Mockup Specimen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, S. L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cinson, A. D. [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Washington, DC (United States); Diaz, A. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Anderson, M. T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-11-23

    In the summer of 2009, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff traveled to the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) NDE Center in Charlotte, North Carolina, to conduct phased-array ultrasonic testing on a large bore, reactor coolant pump nozzle-to-safe-end mockup. This mockup was fabricated by FlawTech, Inc. and the configuration originated from the Port St. Lucie nuclear power plant. These plants are Combustion Engineering-designed reactors. This mockup consists of a carbon steel elbow with stainless steel cladding joined to a cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) safe-end with a dissimilar metal weld and is owned by Florida Power & Light. The objective of this study, and the data acquisition exercise held at the EPRI NDE Center, were focused on evaluating the capabilities of advanced, low-frequency phased-array ultrasonic testing (PA-UT) examination techniques for detection and characterization of implanted circumferential flaws and machined reflectors in a thick-section CASS dissimilar metal weld component. This work was limited to PA-UT assessments using 500 kHz and 800 kHz probes on circumferential flaws only, and evaluated detection and characterization of these flaws and machined reflectors from the CASS safe-end side only. All data were obtained using spatially encoded, manual scanning techniques. The effects of such factors as line-scan versus raster-scan examination approaches were evaluated, and PA-UT detection and characterization performance as a function of inspection frequency/wavelength, were also assessed. A comparative assessment of the data is provided, using length-sizing root-mean-square-error and position/localization results (flaw start/stop information) as the key criteria for flaw characterization performance. In addition, flaw signal-to-noise ratio was identified as the key criterion for detection performance.

  3. Flexible complementary metal oxide semiconductor microelectrode arrays with applications in single cell characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajouhi, H.; Jou, A. Y.; Jain, R.; Ziabari, A.; Shakouri, A.; Savran, C. A.; Mohammadi, S.

    2015-11-01

    A highly flexible microelectrode array with an embedded complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) instrumentation amplifier suitable for sensing surfaces of biological entities is developed. The array is based on ultrathin CMOS islands that are thermally isolated from each other and are interconnected by meandered nano-scale wires that can adapt to cellular surfaces with micro-scale curvatures. CMOS temperature sensors are placed in the islands and are optimally biased to have high temperature sensitivity. While no live cell thermometry is conducted, a measured temperature sensitivity of 0.15 °C in the temperature range of 35 to 40 °C is achieved by utilizing a low noise CMOS lock-in amplifier implemented in the same technology. The monolithic nature of CMOS sensors and amplifier circuits and their versatile flexible interconnecting wires overcome the sensitivity and yield limitations of microelectrode arrays fabricated in competing technologies.

  4. Leaky domino-modes in regular arrays of substantially thick metal nanostrips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voroshilov, Pavel M.; Simovski, Constantin R.

    2016-07-01

    In previous works, an efficient light trapping performed by arrays of metal nanoantennas whose building block was a slightly tapered (trapezoidal) substantially thick nanostrip was revealed. This light trapping implied a broad spectrum of solar light concentrated in a subwavelength depth of the semiconductor substrate. This is a very advantageous feature allowing our structure to enhance thin-film solar cells. However, the physics of the broadband resonant absorption in the substrate was not investigated. In the present paper, we show that our arrays support so-called leaky domino-modes, responsible for such the light trapping. These modes are multipole oscillations of the array of substantially thick nanostrips. In this work we have thoroughly studied these leaky modes relating them to resonances of high-order multipole moments and to broadband light-trapping effect.

  5. Size-controlled simple fabrication of free-standing, ultralong metal nanobelt array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Wakana; Hayakawa, Harumi; Miyoshi, Kentaro; Fujikawa, Shigenori

    2011-01-01

    Free-standing, ultralong (up to several millimeters) nanobelts of gold, silver, and copper were fabricated by a template approach. Firstly, a metal nanofin array was prepared on a substrate via metal nanocoating of the template surface and selective removal of the metal top layer and template. Electroless plating and sputtering were employed for the metal nanocoating. In this approach, the minimum width and thickness of the Au nanobelt were 95 and 30 nm, respectively. Systematic control of the nanobelt width (from 95 to 350 nm) was successfully achieved by adjusting the template height. Free-standing nanobelts of several millimeters in length were fabricated and maintained their unique structure and alignment, even on a mesh grid. PMID:21446416

  6. Construction of static 3D ultrasonography image by radiation beam tracking method from 1D array probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doh, Il; Kim, Yong Tae; Ahn, Bong Young [Center for Medical Metrology, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwang Youn [Meta biomed Co.,Ltd, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    This paper describes the construction of a static 3D ultrasonography image by tracking the radiation beam position during the handy operation of a 1D array probe to enable point-of-care use. The theoretical model of the transformation from the translational and rotational information of the sensor mounted on the probe to the reference Cartesian coordinate system was given. The signal amplification and serial communication interface module was made using a commercially available sensor. A test phantom was also made using silicone putty in a donut shape. During the movement of the hand-held probe, B-mode movie and sensor signals were recorded. B-mode images were periodically selected from the movie, and the gray levels of the pixels for each image were converted to the gray levels of 3D voxels. 3D and 2D images of arbitrary cross-section of the B-mode type were also constructed from the voxel data, and agreed well with the shape of the test phantom.

  7. A Metasurface Anti-reflection Coating for Enhancing Surface Plasmon-Polariton of Metallic Hole Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, Khagendra; Jeon, Jiyeon; Kim, Jun; Ku, Zahyun; Lee, Sang Jun; Zhou, Jiangfeng; Usf, Usa Collaboration; Kriss, Korea Collaboration; Afrl, Usa Collaboration

    We demonstrate a metasurface made of metallic disk resonator array as an anti-reflection (AR) coating to enhance (reduce) the transmission (reflection) through metal hole array (MHA). Our result show that the simulated (measured) transmission at the first order surface plasmon-polariton (SPP) resonance is increased up to 82 %(88%) compared to uncoated MHA. The electric field of the surface wave is also enhanced by 33%. Using an effective medium theory, we show that the metasurface operates at off-resonance wavelengths and can be understood as a thin film that exhibits high effective permittivity (~30) with very low loss (loss tangent ~0.005). Thus we reveal the mechanism of the metasurface AR coating as the traditional thin film AR coating. With tunable effective permittivity, our structure provides great flexibility to achieve AR coating for general substance at any wavelength.

  8. Fabrication of porous silicon by metal-assisted etching using highly ordered gold nanoparticle arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheeler, Sebastian P; Ullrich, Simon; Kudera, Stefan; Pacholski, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    A simple method for the fabrication of porous silicon (Si) by metal-assisted etching was developed using gold nanoparticles as catalytic sites. The etching masks were prepared by spin-coating of colloidal gold nanoparticles onto Si. An appropriate functionalization of the gold nanoparticle surface prior to the deposition step enabled the formation of quasi-hexagonally ordered arrays by self-assembly which were translated into an array of pores by subsequent etching in HF solution containing H2O2. The quality of the pattern transfer depended on the chosen preparation conditions for the gold nanoparticle etching mask. The influence of the Si surface properties was investigated by using either hydrophilic or hydrophobic Si substrates resulting from piranha solution or HF treatment, respectively. The polymer-coated gold nanoparticles had to be thermally treated in order to provide a direct contact at the metal/Si interface which is required for the following metal-assisted etching. Plasma treatment as well as flame annealing was successfully applied. The best results were obtained for Si substrates which were flame annealed in order to remove the polymer matrix - independent of the substrate surface properties prior to spin-coating (hydrophilic or hydrophobic). The presented method opens up new resources for the fabrication of porous silicon by metal-assisted etching. Here, a vast variety of metal nanoparticles accessible by well-established wet-chemical synthesis can be employed for the fabrication of the etching masks. PMID:22876790

  9. The Effect of Rotational Disorder on the Microwave Transmission of Checkerboard Metal Square Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremain, B; Durrant, C J; Carter, I E; Hibbins, A P; Sambles, J R

    2015-01-01

    The effect of rotational disorder on the microwave transmission through thin metallic checkerboard arrays has been experimentally studied. Broad resonant features below the onset of diffraction, attributed to electromagnetic radiation coupling through the structure via the evanescent fields of bound surface waves, are found to be strongly dependent on the electrical connectivity of the surface. By applying rotational disorder to the elements comprising the arrays, with the lattice constant and element size unchanged, the electrical connectivity of the structure can be controlled whilst maintaining periodicity. The results show that rotational disorder can significantly affect transmission only when it changes the structure's connectivity. When the initial structure is just above the connectivity threshold (where the metallic occupancy is 50%), increasing disorder causes the resonant features in transmission to invert as the structure switches from a predominantly connected array to a disconnected array. When approximately half of the connections are broken, the resonant features are suppressed, with scattering loss shown to dramatically increase to as much as 40% of the incident power over a broad frequency range. The result is a thin, highly effective scatterer of microwaves. PMID:26568170

  10. Stable field emission from arrays of vertically aligned free-standing metallic nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xavier, S.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan; Ferain, E.;

    2008-01-01

    We present a fully elaborated process to grow arrays of metallic nanowires with controlled geometry and density, based on electrochemical filling of nanopores in track-etched templates. Nanowire growth is performed at room temperature, atmospheric pressure and is compatible with low cost fabricat...... density is ∼1 mA cm for a 30 V μm applied electric field. © IOP Publishing Ltd....

  11. Postage stamp-sized array sensor for the sensitive screening test of heavy-metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Li, Xiao; Li, Hui; Song, Ming; Feng, Liang; Guan, Yafeng

    2014-10-01

    The sensitive determination of heavy-metal ions has been widely investigated in recent years due to their threat to the environment and to human health. Among various analytical detection techniques, inexpensive colorimetric testing papers/strips play a very important role. The limitation, however, is also clear: the sensitivity is usually low and the selectivity is poor. In this work, we have developed a postage stamp-sized array sensor composed of nine commercially available heterocyclic azo indicators. Combining filtration-based enrichment with an array of technologies-based pattern-recognition, we have obtained the discrimination capability for seven heavy-metal ions (Hg(2+), Pb(2+), Ag(+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), and Co(2+)) at their Chinese wastewater discharge standard concentrations. The allowable detection level of Hg(2+) was down to 0.05 mg L(-1). The heavy-metal ions screening test was readily achieved using a standard chemometric approach. And the array sensor applied well in real water samples. PMID:25068762

  12. Interim report on updated microarray probes for the LLNL Burkholderia pseudomallei SNP array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, S; Jaing, C

    2012-03-27

    The overall goal of this project is to forensically characterize 100 unknown Burkholderia isolates in the US-Australia collaboration. We will identify genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from B. pseudomallei and near neighbor species including B. mallei, B. thailandensis and B. oklahomensis. We will design microarray probes to detect these SNP markers and analyze 100 Burkholderia genomic DNAs extracted from environmental, clinical and near neighbor isolates from Australian collaborators on the Burkholderia SNP microarray. We will analyze the microarray genotyping results to characterize the genetic diversity of these new isolates and triage the samples for whole genome sequencing. In this interim report, we described the SNP analysis and the microarray probe design for the Burkholderia SNP microarray.

  13. Metal Enrichment in the Fermi Bubbles as a Probe of Their Origin

    CERN Document Server

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Tahara, Masaya; Kataoka, Jun; Totani, Tomonori; Fujita, Yutaka; Sofue, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    The Fermi bubbles are gigantic gamma-ray structure in our Galaxy. The physical origin of the bubbles is still under debate. The leading scenarios can be divided into two categories. One is the nuclear star forming activity like extragalactic starburst galaxies and the other is the past active galactic nucleus (AGN) like activity of the Galactic center supermassive black hole. In this letter, we propose that metal abundance measurements will provide an important clue to probe their origin. Based on a simple spherically symmetric bubble model, we find that the generated metallicity and abundance pattern of the bubbles gas strongly depend on assumed star formation or AGN activities. Star formation scenarios predict higher metallicities and abundance ratios of [O/Fe] and [Ne/Fe] than AGN scenarios do because of supernovae ejecta. Furthermore, the resultant abundance depends on the gamma-ray emission process because different mass injection histories are required for different the gamma-ray emission processes due ...

  14. Spatially correlated two-dimensional arrays of semiconductor and metal quantum dots in GaAs-based heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A single molecular-beam epitaxy process is used to produce GaAs-based heterostructures containing two-dimensional arrays of InAs semiconductor quantum dots and AsSb metal quantum dots. The twodimensional array of AsSb metal quantum dots is formed by low-temperature epitaxy which provides a large excess of arsenic in the epitaxial GaAs layer. During the growth of subsequent layers at a higher temperature, excess arsenic forms nanoinclusions, i.e., metal quantum dots in the GaAs matrix. The two-dimensional array of such metal quantum dots is created by the δ doping of a low-temperature GaAs layer with antimony which serves as a precursor for the heterogeneous nucleation of metal quantum dots and accumulates in them with the formation of AsSb metal alloy. The two-dimensional array of InAs semiconductor quantum dots is formed via the Stranski–Krastanov mechanism at the GaAs surface. Between the arrays of metal and semiconductor quantum dots, a 3-nm-thick AlAs barrier layer is grown. The total spacing between the arrays of metal and semiconductor quantum dots is 10 nm. Electron microscopy of the structure shows that the arrangement of metal quantum dots and semiconductor quantum dots in the two-dimensional arrays is spatially correlated. The spatial correlation is apparently caused by elastic strain and stress fields produced by both AsSb metal and InAs semiconductor quantum dots in the GaAs matrix

  15. Spatially correlated two-dimensional arrays of semiconductor and metal quantum dots in GaAs-based heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nevedomskiy, V. N., E-mail: nevedom@mail.ioffe.ru; Bert, N. A.; Chaldyshev, V. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Preobrazhernskiy, V. V.; Putyato, M. A.; Semyagin, B. R. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    A single molecular-beam epitaxy process is used to produce GaAs-based heterostructures containing two-dimensional arrays of InAs semiconductor quantum dots and AsSb metal quantum dots. The twodimensional array of AsSb metal quantum dots is formed by low-temperature epitaxy which provides a large excess of arsenic in the epitaxial GaAs layer. During the growth of subsequent layers at a higher temperature, excess arsenic forms nanoinclusions, i.e., metal quantum dots in the GaAs matrix. The two-dimensional array of such metal quantum dots is created by the δ doping of a low-temperature GaAs layer with antimony which serves as a precursor for the heterogeneous nucleation of metal quantum dots and accumulates in them with the formation of AsSb metal alloy. The two-dimensional array of InAs semiconductor quantum dots is formed via the Stranski–Krastanov mechanism at the GaAs surface. Between the arrays of metal and semiconductor quantum dots, a 3-nm-thick AlAs barrier layer is grown. The total spacing between the arrays of metal and semiconductor quantum dots is 10 nm. Electron microscopy of the structure shows that the arrangement of metal quantum dots and semiconductor quantum dots in the two-dimensional arrays is spatially correlated. The spatial correlation is apparently caused by elastic strain and stress fields produced by both AsSb metal and InAs semiconductor quantum dots in the GaAs matrix.

  16. The nature of graphene-metal bonding probed by Raman spectroscopy: the special case of cobalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Esparza, Inés; Fan, Jiyu; Michalik, Jan M.; Alfredo Rodríguez, Luis; Ibarra, Manuel Ricardo; María de Teresa, José

    2016-03-01

    The nature of graphene-metal bonding is crucial for the performance of graphene-based electronic devices. Raman spectroscopy is a powerful technique for probing the electronic behaviour of graphene-metal interfaces. The changes in the Raman spectrum of pristine graphene upon contact with standard metal layers are reported here. In particular, the study is focused on metallization by electron-beam evaporation using chromium or titanium (commonly used as an adhesion layer to improve the bonding of other metals such as gold) and nickel or cobalt (ferromagnetic materials used for spintronics). The results obtained indicate that the main changes in the Raman spectra can be explained in terms of a biaxial strain generated by graphene trying to match the crystalline lattice of the metal. In the case of cobalt, we find that the strong binding of some cobalt atoms to graphene generates a spectrum with a duplication of the characteristic graphene peaks: those corresponding to cobalt physisorbed to graphene and those corresponding to cobalt chemisorbed to graphene, strongly redshifted. Such special behaviour of the graphene-cobalt interface is correlated to the low contact resistance and the enhanced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of cobalt on graphene.

  17. An amorphous titanium dioxide metal insulator metal selector device for resistive random access memory crossbar arrays with tunable voltage margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, Simone; Khiat, Ali; Carta, Daniela; Light, Mark E.; Prodromakis, Themistoklis

    2016-01-01

    Resistive random access memory (ReRAM) crossbar arrays have become one of the most promising candidates for next-generation non volatile memories. To become a mature technology, the sneak path current issue must be solved without compromising all the advantages that crossbars offer in terms of electrical performances and fabrication complexity. Here, we present a highly integrable access device based on nickel and sub-stoichiometric amorphous titanium dioxide (TiO2-x), in a metal insulator metal crossbar structure. The high voltage margin of 3 V, amongst the highest reported for monolayer selector devices, and the good current density of 104 A/cm2 make it suitable to sustain ReRAM read and write operations, effectively tackling sneak currents in crossbars without compromising fabrication complexity in a 1 Selector 1 Resistor (1S1R) architecture. Furthermore, the voltage margin is found to be tunable by an annealing step without affecting the device's characteristics.

  18. Using a Semiconductor-to-Metal Transition to Control Optical Transmission through Subwavelength Hole Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. F. Haglund Jr.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available We describe a simple configuration in which the extraordinary optical transmission effect through subwavelength hole arrays in noble-metal films can be switched by the semiconductor-to-metal transition in an underlying thin film of vanadium dioxide. In these experiments, the transition is brought about by thermal heating of the bilayer film. The surprising reverse hysteretic behavior of the transmission through the subwavelength holes in the vanadium oxide suggest that this modulation is accomplished by a dielectric-matching condition rather than plasmon coupling through the bilayer film. The results of this switching, including the wavelength dependence, are qualitatively reproduced by a transfer matrix model. The prospects for effecting a similar modulation on a much faster time scale by using ultrafast laser pulses to trigger the semiconductor-to-metal transition are also discussed.

  19. Metal-modified and vertically aligned carbon nanotube sensors array for landfill gas monitoring applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penza, M; Rossi, R; Alvisi, M [ENEA, Department of Physical Technologies and New Materials, PO Box 51 Br-4, I-72100 Brindisi (Italy); Serra, E, E-mail: michele.penza@enea.it [ENEA, Department of Physical Technologies and New Materials, Via Anguillarese 301, I-00060 Rome (Italy)

    2010-03-12

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) layers were synthesized on Fe-coated low-cost alumina substrates using radio-frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (RF-PECVD) technology. A miniaturized CNT-based gas sensor array was developed for monitoring landfill gas (LFG) at a temperature of 150 deg. C. The sensor array was composed of 4 sensing elements with unmodified CNT, and CNT loaded with 5 nm nominally thick sputtered nanoclusters of platinum (Pt), ruthenium (Ru) and silver (Ag). Chemical analysis of multicomponent gas mixtures constituted of CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, CO and NO{sub 2} has been performed by the array sensor responses and pattern recognition based on principal component analysis (PCA). The PCA results demonstrate that the metal-decorated and vertically aligned CNT sensor array is able to discriminate the NO{sub 2} presence in the multicomponent mixture LFG. The NO{sub 2} gas detection in the mixture LFG was proved to be very sensitive, e.g.: the CNT:Ru sensor shows a relative change in the resistance of 1.50% and 0.55% for NO{sub 2} concentrations of 3.3 ppm and 330 ppb dispersed in the LFG, respectively, with a wide NO{sub 2} gas concentration range measured from 0.33 to 3.3 ppm, at the sensor temperature of 150 deg. C. The morphology and structure of the CNT networks have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. A forest-like nanostructure of vertically aligned CNT bundles in the multi-walled form appeared with a height of about 10 {mu}m and a single-tube diameter varying in the range of 5-35 nm. The intensity ratio of the Raman spectroscopy D-peak and G-peak indicates the presence of disorder and defects in the CNT networks. The size of the metal (Pt, Ru, Ag) nanoclusters decorating the CNT top surface varies in the range of 5-50 nm. Functional characterization based on electrical charge transfer sensing mechanisms in the metal

  20. Metal-modified and vertically aligned carbon nanotube sensors array for landfill gas monitoring applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penza, M.; Rossi, R.; Alvisi, M.; Serra, E.

    2010-03-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) layers were synthesized on Fe-coated low-cost alumina substrates using radio-frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (RF-PECVD) technology. A miniaturized CNT-based gas sensor array was developed for monitoring landfill gas (LFG) at a temperature of 150 °C. The sensor array was composed of 4 sensing elements with unmodified CNT, and CNT loaded with 5 nm nominally thick sputtered nanoclusters of platinum (Pt), ruthenium (Ru) and silver (Ag). Chemical analysis of multicomponent gas mixtures constituted of CO2, CH4, H2, NH3, CO and NO2 has been performed by the array sensor responses and pattern recognition based on principal component analysis (PCA). The PCA results demonstrate that the metal-decorated and vertically aligned CNT sensor array is able to discriminate the NO2 presence in the multicomponent mixture LFG. The NO2 gas detection in the mixture LFG was proved to be very sensitive, e.g.: the CNT:Ru sensor shows a relative change in the resistance of 1.50% and 0.55% for NO2 concentrations of 3.3 ppm and 330 ppb dispersed in the LFG, respectively, with a wide NO2 gas concentration range measured from 0.33 to 3.3 ppm, at the sensor temperature of 150 °C. The morphology and structure of the CNT networks have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. A forest-like nanostructure of vertically aligned CNT bundles in the multi-walled form appeared with a height of about 10 µm and a single-tube diameter varying in the range of 5-35 nm. The intensity ratio of the Raman spectroscopy D-peak and G-peak indicates the presence of disorder and defects in the CNT networks. The size of the metal (Pt, Ru, Ag) nanoclusters decorating the CNT top surface varies in the range of 5-50 nm. Functional characterization based on electrical charge transfer sensing mechanisms in the metal-modified CNT-chemoresistor array demonstrates high sensitivity by

  1. Metal-modified and vertically aligned carbon nanotube sensors array for landfill gas monitoring applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) layers were synthesized on Fe-coated low-cost alumina substrates using radio-frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (RF-PECVD) technology. A miniaturized CNT-based gas sensor array was developed for monitoring landfill gas (LFG) at a temperature of 150 deg. C. The sensor array was composed of 4 sensing elements with unmodified CNT, and CNT loaded with 5 nm nominally thick sputtered nanoclusters of platinum (Pt), ruthenium (Ru) and silver (Ag). Chemical analysis of multicomponent gas mixtures constituted of CO2, CH4, H2, NH3, CO and NO2 has been performed by the array sensor responses and pattern recognition based on principal component analysis (PCA). The PCA results demonstrate that the metal-decorated and vertically aligned CNT sensor array is able to discriminate the NO2 presence in the multicomponent mixture LFG. The NO2 gas detection in the mixture LFG was proved to be very sensitive, e.g.: the CNT:Ru sensor shows a relative change in the resistance of 1.50% and 0.55% for NO2 concentrations of 3.3 ppm and 330 ppb dispersed in the LFG, respectively, with a wide NO2 gas concentration range measured from 0.33 to 3.3 ppm, at the sensor temperature of 150 deg. C. The morphology and structure of the CNT networks have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. A forest-like nanostructure of vertically aligned CNT bundles in the multi-walled form appeared with a height of about 10 μm and a single-tube diameter varying in the range of 5-35 nm. The intensity ratio of the Raman spectroscopy D-peak and G-peak indicates the presence of disorder and defects in the CNT networks. The size of the metal (Pt, Ru, Ag) nanoclusters decorating the CNT top surface varies in the range of 5-50 nm. Functional characterization based on electrical charge transfer sensing mechanisms in the metal-modified CNT-chemoresistor array demonstrates high sensitivity

  2. Metal enhanced fluorescence improved protein and DNA detection by zigzag Ag nanorod arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiaofan; Xiao, Chenyu; Lau, Wai-Fung; Li, Jianping; Fu, Junxue

    2016-08-15

    As metal nano-arrays show great potential on metal enhanced fluorescence (MEF) than random nanostructures, MEF of Ag zigzag nanorod (ZNR) arrays made by oblique angle deposition has been studied for biomolecule-protein interaction and DNA hybridization. By changing the folding number and the deposition substrate temperature, a 14-fold enhancement factor (EF) is obtained for biotin-neutravidin detection. The optimal folding number is decided as Z=7, owing to the high scattering intensity of Ag ZNRs. The substrate temperature T=25°C and 0°C slightly alters the morphology of Ag ZNRs but has no big difference in EF. Further, Ag ZNRs deposited on a layer of Ag film have been introduced to the DNA hybridization and a significant signal enhancement has been observed through the fluorescence microscope. Through a detailed quantitative EF analysis, which excludes the enhancing effect from the increased surface area of ZNRs and only considers the contribution of MEF, an EF of 28 is achieved for the hybridization of two single-stranded oligonucleotides with 33 bases. Furthermore, a limit of detection is determined as 0.01pM. We believe that the Ag ZNR arrays can serve as a universal and sensitive bio-detection platform. PMID:27088369

  3. An effective method to probe local magnetostatic properties in a nanometric FePd antidot array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beron, F; Pirota, K R; Knobel, M [Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Rua Sergio Buarque de Holanda, 777, Cidade Universitaria ' Zeferino Vaz' , Campinas 13083-859, SP (Brazil); Vega, V; Prida, V M; Fernandez, A; Hernando, B, E-mail: fberon@ifi.unicamp.br [Depto. Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, Calvo Sotelo s/n, 33007 Oviedo, Asturias (Spain)

    2011-01-15

    A simple method to quantitatively characterize the local magnetic behaviour of a patterned nanostructure, like a ferromagnetic thin film of antidot arrays, is proposed. The first-order reversal curve (FORC) analysis, coupled with simulations using physically meaningful hysterons, allows us to obtain a quantitative and physically related description of the interaction field and each magnetization reversal process. The hysterons system is built from previously known hypotheses on the magnetic behaviour of the sample. This method was successfully applied to a highly hexagonal ordered FePd antidot array with nanometric dimensions. We achieved a complete characterization of the two different magnetization reversal mechanisms in function of the in-plane applied field angle. For a narrow range of high fields, the magnetization initiates rotating reversibly around the pores, while at lower fields, domain walls are nucleated and propagated. This in-plane magnetization reversal mechanism, partly reversible and partly irreversible, is the only angularly dependent one. While going away from the easy axis, its reversible proportion increases, as well as its switching field distribution. Finally, the results indicate that the high surface roughness between adjacent holes of the antidot thin film induces a parallel interaction field. The proposed method demonstrates its ability also to be applied to characterizing patterned nanostructures with rather complex magnetization reversal processes.

  4. Tailed Radio Galaxies as Probes of Cluster Physics in the Square Kilometre Array Era

    CERN Document Server

    Dehghan, S

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the use of tailed radio galaxies as environmental probes has gained momentum as a method for galaxy cluster detection, examining the dynamics of individual clusters, measuring the density and velocity flows in the intra-cluster medium, and for probing cluster magnetic fields. To date instrumental limitations in terms of resolution and sensitivity have confined this research to the local (z < 0.7) Universe. The advent of SKA-1 surveys however will allow detection of well over 1 million tailed radio galaxies and their associated galaxy clusters out to redshifts of 2 or more. This is in fact ten times more than the current number of known clusters in the Universe. Such a substantial sample of tailed galaxies will provide an invaluable tool not only for detecting clusters, but also for characterizing their intra-cluster medium, magnetic fields and dynamical state as a function of cosmic time. In this paper we present an analysis of the usability of tailed radio galaxies as tracers of dense env...

  5. A design of Resper probe, employing a noisy IQ down-sampler, and configured in both the Wenner's and dipole-dipole arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Settimi, Alessandro; Baskaradas, James A; Bianchi, Cesidio; Zirizzotti, Achille E; Santarato, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    The RESPER probe has been assembled, except the ferrules that must ensure the contact, by insulating materials and more specifically in Tufnol, as regards the support plates, and Teflon, as regards the standoffs. A series of holes has been drilled on the surface of support plates in order to allow approaching each other of the two central electrodes to external ones, from a minimum of 4.29 cm to a maximum of 10 cm. The dipole-dipole array defined by the integer parameter n = 6 could not be implemented, as the positioning of suitable "spring" shafts requires 6 mm holes and an adequate space could not be available to carry out the drilling. The presence of these "spring" shafts allows reaching a right prominence of the tip from the base and, at the same time, a certain amount of pressure which ensures the proper adherence to the artifact that must be tested. There is a brass screw within each shaft, which edge has been turned to the measurement of 1.4 mm. Four metal spacers are replaced of time in time dependin...

  6. A complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor compatible monocantilever 12-point probe for conductivity measurements on the nanoscale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Lauge; Bøggild, Peter; Wells, J.W.;

    2008-01-01

    We present a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor compatible, nanoscale 12-point-probe based on TiW electrodes placed on a SiO2 monocantilever. Probes are mass fabricated on Si wafers by a combination of electron beam and UV lithography, realizing TiW electrode tips with a width down to 250 nm...... and a probe pitch of 500 nm. In-air four-point measurements have been performed on indium tin oxide, ruthenium, and titanium-tungsten, showing good agreement with values obtained by other four-point probes. In-vacuum four-point resistance measurements have been performed on clean Bi(111) using...

  7. Nanomechanical and nanotribological characterization of noble metal-coated AFM tips for probe-based ferroelectric data recording

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Probe-based data recording is being developed as an alternative technology for ultrahigh areal density. In ferroelectric data storage, a conductive atomic force microscope (AFM) probe with a noble metal coating is placed in contact on lead zirconate titanate (PZT) film, which serves as the ferroelectric material. A crucial mechanical reliability concern is tip wear during contact of the ferroelectric material with the probe. To achieve high wear resistance, the mechanical properties (such as elastic modulus and hardness) of the metal-coated probe should be high. Nanoindentation experiments were performed in order to evaluate the mechanical properties of four commercial noble metal coatings, namely, Pt, Pt-Ni, Au-Ni and Pt-Ir, deposited on AFM probes. The effective hardness and elastic modulus were evaluated, using a contact mechanics model that accounts for the effect of the underlying silicon substrate. The Pt-Ir coating was found to exhibit the highest hardness, highest elastic modulus and lowest creep resistance. Nanoscratch studies reveal that the noble metal coatings are removed primarily by plastic deformation. The Pt-Ir and Pt coatings show the highest and lowest scratch resistance, respectively, which is consistent with results obtained from wear tests of the noble metal-coated AFM probes on a PZT surface

  8. High-density metallic nano-emitter arrays and their field emission characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the fabrication and field emission properties of high-density nano-emitter arrays with on-chip electron extraction gate electrodes and up to 106 metallic nanotips that have an apex curvature radius of a few nanometers and a the tip density exceeding 108 cm−2. The gate electrode was fabricated on top of the nano-emitter arrays using a self-aligned polymer mask method. By applying a hot-press step for the polymer planarization, gate–nanotip alignment precision below 10 nm was achieved. Fabricated devices exhibited stable field electron emission with a current density of 0.1 A cm−2, indicating that these are promising for applications that require a miniature high-brightness electron source. (paper)

  9. Detection of Trace Heavy Metals Ions by Arrays of Titania Nanotubes Annealed in Nitrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Zhi-man; XIAO Peng; CAO Guo-zhong

    2009-01-01

    Redox response of trace heavy metals ions(THMIs) has better performance on highly ordered vertically oriented titania nanotube arrays(TNA) annealed in nitrogen. Experimental data showed that different THMIs possess different reaction peak shapes and charge and discharge capacities. Therefore, the TNA will become an important tool used for environmental protection and facilitating the rapid determination of THMIs. THMIs of 5×10~(-4) mol/L concentration were measured at a scan rate of 100 mV/s. The analytical utility of TNA is demonstrated in a neutral 0.5 mol/L Na_2SO_4 solution. The results sufficiently show that titania nanotube arrays electrodes(TNAE) will be used to measure THMIs.

  10. Metallic nanowires can lead to wavelength-scale microlenses and microlens arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaiba, Soraya; Kouriba, Timothe; Ziane, Omar; Stéphan, Olivier; Bosson, Jocelyne; Vitrant, Guy; Baldeck, Patrice L

    2012-07-01

    We theoretically and experimentally demonstrate that the diffraction of microstructures based on silver nanowires leads to very efficient microfocusing effects. Pairs of parallel nanowires act as ultrasmall cylindrical microlenses with diffraction-limited resolution in the Fresnel region. This is a new diffraction scheme to make micron-sized optical lenses with higher transmittance than plasmonic microlens based on nano-aperture arrays. Calculations based on the scalar Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integral highlights the pure scalar diffractive contribution. Thus, the plasmon contribution is negligible in such micron-sized metallic geometry. We demonstrate that two-dimensional grids of nanowires can be used to fabricate dense arrays of microlenses, i.e. 10000x10000 DPI (dots per inch). PMID:22772246

  11. Arrays of metallic micro-/nano-structures by means of colloidal lithography and laser dewetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinescu, C.; Deepak, K. L. N.; Delaporte, P.; Utéza, O.; Grojo, D.

    2016-06-01

    Long-range arrays of prismatoid metal nanostructures are fabricated by a hybrid methodology, i.e. using Langmuir microsphere films and laser-assisted dewetting. As the initial step, we use colloidal lithography. Monolayers of 1-5 μm polystyrene microspheres covered with a thermally evaporated Ag or Au thin film of controlled thickness (5-50 nm) are then used as masks to pattern the surface of quartz, BK7 glass or silicon substrates, typically in the order of cm2. When removing the spheres by physico-chemical means (ultrasound bath and solvent wash), the resulting surface shows an array of nm-size prismatoid structures (Fischer patterns), that can be further processed by laser. Thus, by using two different lasers (355-nm wavelength, 50-ps duration and 193-nm wavelength, 15-ns duration) for the metal dewetting, we control the shape of the deposited nanostructures. A detailed study is presented here on the reshaping of such metal structures through laser annealing. This new hybrid methodology expands the panel of microsphere-assisted technologies employed in preparing surface nanomaterials.

  12. Lung counting: Comparison of a four detector array that has either metal or carbon fiber end caps, and the effect on array performance characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study described the performance of an array of HPGe detectors, made by ORTEC. In the existing system, a metal end cap was used in the detector construction. In general, the natural metal contains some radioactive materials, create high background noises and signals during in vivo counting. ORTEC proposed a novel carbon fiber to be used in end cap, without any radio active content. This paper described the methodology of developing a model of the given HPGe array-detectors, comparing the detection efficiency and cross talk among the detectors using two end cap materials: either metal or carbon fiber and to provide a recommendation about the end cap material. The detector's counting efficiency were studied using point and plane sources. The cross talk among the array detectors were studied using a homogeneous attenuating medium made of tissue equivalent material. The cross talk was significant when single or multiple point sources (simulated to heterogeneous hot spots) were embedded inside the attenuating medium. With carbon fiber, the cross talk increased about 100% for photon energy at about 100 keV. For a uniform distribution of radioactive material, the cross talk increased about 5-10% when the end cap was made of carbon instead of steel. Metal end cap was recommended for the array of HPGe detectors.

  13. Time-dependent dielectric breakdown measurements of porous organosilicate glass using mercury and solid metal probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) is one of the major concerns for low-k dielectric materials. During plasma processing, low-k dielectrics are subjected to vacuum ultraviolet photon radiation and charged-particle bombardment. To examine the change of TDDB properties, time-to-breakdown measurements are made to porous SiCOH before and after plasma exposure. Significant discrepancies between mercury and solid-metal probes are observed and have been shown to be attributed to mercury diffusion into the dielectric porosities

  14. Oil-in-water emulsion as fabrication platform for uniform plasmon-controlled two-dimensional metallic nanoparticle array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Ryusuke; Takeyasu, Nobuyuki; Kaneta, Takashi; Takemoto, Yoshito

    2016-07-01

    Gold/silver nanoparticles were trapped at the oil/water interface of oil droplets dispersed in water. The metallic nanoparticles were self-assembled into a uniform two-dimensional large array structure through the aggregation and coalescence of the nanoparticle-covered oil droplets. The plasmon resonance of the array structure was tunable and a surface-enhanced Raman scattering measurement was performed with the silver nanoparticle array. The enhancement factor was ∼105 and enhanced Raman signals were observed over the whole array ( ≳ \\text{cm}2) with high reproducibility, which is an advantage of a self-assembly method using a liquid/liquid interface.

  15. A new angle for probing field-aligned irregularities with the Murchison Widefield Array

    CERN Document Server

    Loi, Shyeh Tjing; Cairns, Iver H; Trott, Cathryn M; Hurley-Walker, Natasha; Feng, Lu; Hancock, Paul J; Kaplan, David L

    2016-01-01

    Electron density irregularities in the ionosphere are known to be magnetically anisotropic, preferentially elongated along the lines of force. While many studies of their morphology have been undertaken by topside sounding and whistler measurements, it is only recently that detailed regional-scale reconstructions have become possible, enabled by the advent of widefield radio telescopes. Here we present a new approach for visualising and studying field-aligned irregularities (FAIs), which involves transforming interferometric measurements of TEC gradients onto a magnetic shell tangent plane. This removes the perspective distortion associated with the oblique viewing angle of the irregularities from the ground, facilitating the decomposition of dynamics along and across magnetic field lines. We apply this transformation to the dataset of Loi et al. [2015a], obtained on 15 October 2013 by the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) radio telescope and displaying prominent FAIs. We study these FAIs in the new reference f...

  16. Structural anomalies induced by the metal deposition methods in 2D silver nanoparticle arrays prepared by nanosphere lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver nanoparticle arrays with 2-dimensional hexagonal arrangement were fabricated on the silicon substrates by nanosphere lithography. The silver film was deposited either by thermal evaporation or by magnetron sputtering under different conditions. The nanostructures of the achieved sphere template and the array units were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, and were found to be anomalous under different deposition parameters. Comparative study indicated that the formation of the various 2-dimensional silver nanoparticle array structures was dominated by the thermal energy (temperature), kinetic energy and deposition direction of the deposited metal atoms as well as the size and nanocurvature of the colloidal particles and the metal clusters. - Highlights: • Silver nanoparticle arrays with different nanostructures on silicon substrates. • Various deposition parameters in arrays formation systematically examined. • Possible mechanisms and optimization of nanostructures formation addressed

  17. Nano-Metal Film Thermal Conductivity Measurement by using the Femtosecond Laser Pump and Probe Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heat management at nanoscale is a critical issue across many areas of science and engineering, where the size effect of thermal properties plays an important role. We measure the transient thermoreflectance signals of thin metal films with thicknesses from 50 to 200 nm by using the femtosecond laser pump and probe method, and the experimental data are combined with the parabolic two-step model to enable us to measure thermal conductivity of the thin metal films. The measurement results of Ni and Al films show that, in the thickness range from tens to hundreds of nanometer, the thermal conductivity increases with the increasing thicknesses of the films, which agrees well with the previous conclusions. (condensed matter: structure, mechanical and thermal properties)

  18. Control of optical orbital angular momentum by Vogel spiral arrays of metallic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Nate; Trevino, Jacob; Dal Negro, Luca

    2012-12-15

    In this Letter, we experimentally demonstrate structured light carrying multiple values of orbital angular momentum (OAM) in the farfield scattering region of Vogel spiral arrays of metallic nanoparticles. Using Fourier-Hankel mode decomposition analysis and interferometric reconstruction of the complex amplitude of scattered waves, we show the ability to encode well-defined numerical sequences, determined by the aperiodic spiral geometry, into azimuthal OAM values, in excellent agreement with analytical scattering theory. The generation of azimuthal sequences of OAM values by light scattering from engineered aperiodic surfaces is relevant to a number of device applications for secure optical communication, classical cryptography, and quantum cryptography. PMID:23258010

  19. Beam Focusing by a Non-Uniformly-Spaced Nanoslit Array in a Metallic Film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAO Xiao-Jin; WANG Pei; ZHANG Dou-Guo; LU Yong-Hua; XIE Jian-Ping; MING Hai

    2006-01-01

    @@ A finite difference time domain simulation has been performed to analyse the optical transmission through a non-uniformly-spaced nanoslit array in silver film. The phase change of surface plasmons propagating on the silver film is used to modulate the initial phase of the output beam. The beam deflection and focusing function are designed, and the focal depth of the focusing metallic structure are mainly considered. It is found that the focal depth can be controlled by altering the effective width of this structure, i.e. the number of slits, when the relative spacing is fixed.

  20. The fabrication of metal silicide nanodot arrays using localized ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jin; Kim, Tae-Gon; Min, Byung-Kwon; Lee, Sang Jo, E-mail: bkmin@yonsei.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-03

    We propose a process for fabricating nanodot arrays with a pitch size of less than 25 nm. The process consists of localized ion implantation in a metal thin film on a Si wafer using a focused ion beam (FIB), followed by chemical etching. This process utilizes the etching resistivity changes of the ion beam irradiated region that result from metal silicide formation by ion implantation. To control the nanodot diameter, a threshold ion dose model is proposed using the Gaussian distribution of the ion beam intensities. The process is verified by fabricating nanodots with various diameters. The mechanism of etching resistivity is investigated via x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES).

  1. Probing Titan's Complex Atmospheric Chemistry Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordiner, Martin A.; Nixon, Conor; Charnley, Steven B.; Teanby, Nick; Irwin, Pat; Serigano, Joseph; Palmer, Maureen; Kisiel, Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    Titan is Saturn's largest moon, with a thick (1.45 bar) atmosphere composed primarily of molecular nitrogen and methane. Atmospheric photochemistry results in the production of a wide range of complex organic molecules, including hydrocarbons, nitriles, aromatics and other species of possible pre-biotic relevance. Titan's carbon-rich atmosphere may be analogous to that of primitive terrestrial planets throughout the universe, yet its origin, evolution and complete chemical inventory are not well understood. Here we present spatially-resolved maps of emission from C2H5CN, HNC, HC3N, CH3CN and CH3CCH in Titan's atmosphere, observed using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in 2012-2013. These data show previously-undetected spatial structures for the observed species and provide the first spectroscopic detection of C2H5CN on Titan. Our maps show spatially resolved peaks in Titan's northern and southern hemispheres, consistent with photochemical production and transport in the upper atmosphere followed by subsidence over the poles. The HNC emission peaks are offset from the polar axis, indicating that Titan's mesosphere may be more longitudinally variable than previously thought.

  2. Probing cellular traction forces with magnetic nanowires and microfabricated force sensor arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Chia; Kramer, Corinne M.; Chen, Christopher S.; Reich, Daniel H.

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, the use of magnetic nanowires for the study of cellular response to force is demonstrated. High-aspect ratio Ni rods with diameter 300 nm and lengths up to 20 μm were bound to or internalized by pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (SMCs) cultured on arrays of flexible micropost force sensors. Forces and torques were applied to the cells by driving the nanowires with AC magnetic fields in the frequency range 0.1-10 Hz, and the changes in cellular contractile forces were recorded with the microposts. These local stimulations yield global force reinforcement of the cells’ traction forces, but this contractile reinforcement can be effectively suppressed upon addition of a calcium channel blocker, ruthenium red, suggesting the role of calcium channels in the mechanical response. The responsiveness of the SMCs to actuation depends on the frequency of the applied stimulation. These results show that the combination of magnetic nanoparticles and micropatterned, flexible substrates can provide new approaches to the study of cellular mechanotransduction.

  3. Probing Jovian Decametric Emission with the Long Wavelength Array Station 1

    CERN Document Server

    Clarke, T E; Skarda, Jinhie; Imai, Kazumasa; Imai, Masafumi; Reyes, Francisco; Thieman, Jim; Jaeger, Ted; Schmitt, Henrique; Dalal, Nagini Paravastu; Dowell, Jayce; Ellingson, S W; Hicks, Brian; Schinzel, Frank; Taylor, G B

    2014-01-01

    New observations of Jupiter's decametric radio emissions have been made with the Long Wavelength Array Station 1 (LWA1) which is capable of making high quality observations as low as 11 MHz. Full Stokes parameters were determined for bandwidths of 16 MHz. Here we present the first LWA1 results for the study of six Io-related events at temporal resolutions as fine as 0.25 ms. LWA1 data show excellent spectral detail in Jovian DAM such as simultaneous left hand circular (LHC) and right hand circular (RHC) polarized Io-related arcs and source envelopes, modulation lane features, S-bursts structures, narrow band N-events, and interactions between S-bursts and N-events. The sensitivity of the LWA1 combined with the low radio frequency interference environment allow us to trace the start of the LHC Io-C source region to much earlier CMLIII than typically found in the literature. We find the Io-C starts as early as CMLIII = 230 degrees at frequencies near 11 MHz. This early start of the Io-C emission may be valuable...

  4. Fabrication of micro-dot arrays and micro-walls of acrylic acid/melamine resin on aluminum by AFM probe processing and electrophoretic coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurokawa, S.; Kikuchi, T.; Sakairi, M. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N-13, W-8, Kita-Ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Takahashi, H. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N-13, W-8, Kita-Ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)], E-mail: takahasi@elechem1-mc.eng.hokudai.ac.jp

    2008-11-30

    Micro-dot arrays and micro-walls of acrylic acid/melamine resin were fabricated on aluminum by anodizing, atomic force microscope (AFM) probe processing, and electrophoretic deposition. Barrier type anodic oxide films of 15 nm thickness were formed on aluminum and then the specimen was scratched with an AFM probe in a solution containing acrylic acid/melamine resin nano-particles to remove the anodic oxide film locally. After scratching, the specimen was anodically polarized to deposit acrylic acid/melamine resin electrophoretically at the film-removed area. The resin deposited on the specimen was finally cured by heating. It was found that scratching with the AFM probe on open circuit leads to the contamination of the probe with resin, due to positive shifts in the potential during scratching. Scratching of the specimen under potentiostatic conditions at -1.0 V, however, resulted in successful resin deposition at the film-removed area without probe contamination. The rate of resin deposition increased as the specimen potential becomes more positive during electrophoretic deposition. Arrays of resin dots with a few to several tens {mu}m diameter and 100-1000 nm height, and resin walls with 100-1000 nm height and 1 {mu}m width were obtained on specimens by successive anodizing, probe processing, and electrophoretic deposition.

  5. Fabrication of micro-dot arrays and micro-walls of acrylic acid/melamine resin on aluminum by AFM probe processing and electrophoretic coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micro-dot arrays and micro-walls of acrylic acid/melamine resin were fabricated on aluminum by anodizing, atomic force microscope (AFM) probe processing, and electrophoretic deposition. Barrier type anodic oxide films of 15 nm thickness were formed on aluminum and then the specimen was scratched with an AFM probe in a solution containing acrylic acid/melamine resin nano-particles to remove the anodic oxide film locally. After scratching, the specimen was anodically polarized to deposit acrylic acid/melamine resin electrophoretically at the film-removed area. The resin deposited on the specimen was finally cured by heating. It was found that scratching with the AFM probe on open circuit leads to the contamination of the probe with resin, due to positive shifts in the potential during scratching. Scratching of the specimen under potentiostatic conditions at -1.0 V, however, resulted in successful resin deposition at the film-removed area without probe contamination. The rate of resin deposition increased as the specimen potential becomes more positive during electrophoretic deposition. Arrays of resin dots with a few to several tens μm diameter and 100-1000 nm height, and resin walls with 100-1000 nm height and 1 μm width were obtained on specimens by successive anodizing, probe processing, and electrophoretic deposition

  6. Improvements in 500-kHz Ultrasonic Phased-Array Probe Designs for Evaluation of Thick Section Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Piping Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, Susan L.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Moran, Traci L.; Anderson, Michael T.; Diaz, Aaron A.

    2011-02-01

    PNNL has been studying and performing confirmatory research on the inspection of piping welds in coarse-grained steels for over 30 years. More recent efforts have been the application of low frequency phased array technology to this difficult to inspect material. The evolution of 500 kHz PA probes and the associated electronics and scanning protocol are documented in this report. The basis for the probe comparisons are responses from one mechanical fatigue crack and two thermal fatigue cracks in large-bore cast mockup specimens on loan from the Electric Power Research Institution. One of the most significant improvements was seen in the use of piezo-composite elements in the later two probes instead of the piezo-ceramic material used in the prototype array. This allowed a reduction in system gain of 30 dB and greatly reduced electronic noise. The latest probe had as much as a 5 dB increase in signal to noise, adding to its flaw discrimination capability. The system electronics for the latest probe were fully optimized for a 500 kHz center frequency, however significant improvements were not observed in the center frequency of the flaw responses. With improved scanner capabilities, smaller step sizes were used, allowing both line and raster data improvements to be made with the latest probe. The small step sizes produce high resolution images that improve flaw discrimination and, along with the increased signal-to-noise ratio inherent in the latest probe design, enhanced detection of the upper regions of the flaw make depth sizing more plausible. Finally, the physical sizes of the probes were progressively decreased allowing better access to the area of interest on specimens with weld crowns, and the latest probe was designed with non-integral wedges providing flexibility in focusing on different specimen geometries.

  7. Metamaterial-based theoretical description of light scattering by metallic nano-hole array structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have experimentally and theoretically investigated the light-matter interaction in metallic nano-hole array structures. The scattering cross section spectrum was measured for three samples each having a unique nano-hole array radius and periodicity. Each measured spectrum had several peaks due to surface plasmon polaritons. The dispersion relation and the effective dielectric constant of the structure were calculated using transmission line theory and Bloch's theorem. Using the effective dielectric constant and the transfer matrix method, the surface plasmon polariton energies were calculated and found to be quantized. Using these quantized energies, a Hamiltonian for the surface plasmon polaritons was written in the second quantized form. Working with the Hamiltonian, a theory of scattering cross section was developed based on the quantum scattering theory and Green's function method. For both theory and experiment, the location of the surface plasmon polariton spectral peaks was dependant on the array periodicity and radii of the nano-holes. Good agreement was observed between the experimental and theoretical results. It is proposed that the newly developed theory can be used to facilitate optimization of nanosensors for medical and engineering applications

  8. Integration of silicon-based neural probes and micro-drive arrays for chronic recording of large populations of neurons in behaving animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michon, Frédéric; Aarts, Arno; Holzhammer, Tobias; Ruther, Patrick; Borghs, Gustaaf; McNaughton, Bruce; Kloosterman, Fabian

    2016-08-01

    Objective. Understanding how neuronal assemblies underlie cognitive function is a fundamental question in system neuroscience. It poses the technical challenge to monitor the activity of populations of neurons, potentially widely separated, in relation to behaviour. In this paper, we present a new system which aims at simultaneously recording from a large population of neurons from multiple separated brain regions in freely behaving animals. Approach. The concept of the new device is to combine the benefits of two existing electrophysiological techniques, i.e. the flexibility and modularity of micro-drive arrays and the high sampling ability of electrode-dense silicon probes. Main results. Newly engineered long bendable silicon probes were integrated into a micro-drive array. The resulting device can carry up to 16 independently movable silicon probes, each carrying 16 recording sites. Populations of neurons were recorded simultaneously in multiple cortical and/or hippocampal sites in two freely behaving implanted rats. Significance. Current approaches to monitor neuronal activity either allow to flexibly record from multiple widely separated brain regions (micro-drive arrays) but with a limited sampling density or to provide denser sampling at the expense of a flexible placement in multiple brain regions (neural probes). By combining these two approaches and their benefits, we present an alternative solution for flexible and simultaneous recordings from widely distributed populations of neurons in freely behaving rats.

  9. A complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor compatible monocantilever 12-point probe for conductivity measurements on the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammelgaard, L.; Bøggild, P.; Wells, J. W.; Handrup, K.; Hofmann, Ph.; Balslev, M. B.; Hansen, J. E.; Petersen, P. R. E.

    2008-09-01

    We present a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor compatible, nanoscale 12-point-probe based on TiW electrodes placed on a SiO2 monocantilever. Probes are mass fabricated on Si wafers by a combination of electron beam and UV lithography, realizing TiW electrode tips with a width down to 250nm and a probe pitch of 500nm. In-air four-point measurements have been performed on indium tin oxide, ruthenium, and titanium-tungsten, showing good agreement with values obtained by other four-point probes. In-vacuum four-point resistance measurements have been performed on clean Bi(111) using different probe spacings. The results show the expected behavior for bulk Bi, indicating that the contribution of electronic surface states to the transport properties is very small.

  10. A complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor compatible monocantilever 12-point probe for conductivity measurements on the nanoscale

    OpenAIRE

    Gammelgaard, Lauge; Bøggild, Peter; Wells, J. W.; Handrup, K.; Hofmann, Ph; Balslev, M.B.; Hansen, J E; Petersen, P.R.E.

    2008-01-01

    We present a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor compatible, nanoscale 12-point-probe based on TiW electrodes placed on a SiO2 monocantilever. Probes are mass fabricated on Si wafers by a combination of electron beam and UV lithography, realizing TiW electrode tips with a width down to 250 nm and a probe pitch of 500 nm. In-air four-point measurements have been performed on indium tin oxide, ruthenium, and titanium-tungsten, showing good agreement with values obtained by other four-point ...

  11. Probing the magnetism of nanostructures buried in metallic surfaces and their possible utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brovko, Oleg O.; Stepanyuk, Valeri S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Halle (Germany)

    2010-05-15

    We discuss the possibility to probe magnetic properties of nanostructures buried beneath a metallic surface by means of local probe techniques. We prove, that those properties can be deduced from the spin-resolved local density of states (LDOS) above the surface. In-plane polarization maps in vacuum above the surface are shown to allow one to simultaneously detect electronic, magnetic, and even geometric properties of subsurface structures. It is argued, that the coupling of buried nanostructures to each other can be deduced from the symmetry of the polarization map. To underline the importance of studying buried nanostructures several possible applications of buried magnetic impurities are pointed out. The exchange coupling of an adatom to a nanostructure or a monolayer (ML) across a paramagnetic spacer is shown to oscillate with the thickness of the latter. This could provide one with reliable means to stabilize the spin of a magnetic adatom in either a ferromagnetic or an antiferromagnetic configuration with respect to the magnetic orientation of the monolayer or nanostructure. The possibility to tailor the exchange coupling between single magnetic impurities on a surface through the adjustment of the overlayer thickness and the interatomic separation in a dimer, is discussed. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  12. Fractal Nature of Metallic and Insulating Domain Configurations in a VO2 Thin Film Revealed by Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Sohn, Ahrum; Kanki, Teruo; Sakai, Kotaro; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the surface work function (W S ) and its spatial distribution for epitaxial VO2/TiO2 thin films using Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). Nearly grain-boundary-free samples allowed observation of metallic and insulating domains with distinct W S values, throughout the metal–insulator transition. The metallic fraction, estimated from W S maps, describes the evolution of the resistance based on a two-dimensional percolation model. The KPFM measurements also revealed the fracta...

  13. Profiling Photoinduced Carrier Generation in Semiconductor Microwire Arrays via Photoelectrochemical Metal Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasog, Mita; Carim, Azhar I; Yalamanchili, Sisir; Atwater, Harry A; Lewis, Nathan S

    2016-08-10

    Au was photoelectrochemically deposited onto cylindrical or tapered p-Si microwires on Si substrates to profile the photoinduced charge-carrier generation in individual wires in a photoactive semiconductor wire array. Similar experiments were repeated for otherwise identical Si microwires doped to be n-type. The metal plating profile was conformal for n-type wires, but for p-type wires was a function of distance from the substrate and was dependent on the illumination wavelength. Spatially resolved charge-carrier generation profiles were computed using full-wave electromagnetic simulations, and the localization of the deposition at the p-type wire surfaces observed experimentally correlated well with the regions of enhanced calculated carrier generation in the volumes of the microwires. This technique could potentially be extended to determine the spatially resolved carrier generation profiles in a variety of mesostructured, photoactive semiconductors. PMID:27322391

  14. Strong optical transmission through the ellipsoid metal-film nanohole arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The transmission characteristics of a metallic film with subwavelength ellipsoid nanohole arrays are investigated by using the three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (3D-FDTD) method. The extraordinary transmission is attributed to the collaboration of localized waveguide resonance and surface plasmon resonance. The influences of the lattice constant and the hole shape on the transmission are studied. By analyzing the picture of electric field and electromagnetic energy distribution, we show the mechanisms of the two different resonances: Localized waveguide resonance mode can be confined inside the ellipsoid holes region, while electric field and electromagnetic energy are localized separately at the two ends of ellipsoid holes for the surface plasma resonance mode.

  15. Enhanced Sensitivity of Surface Acoustic Wave-Based Rate Sensors Incorporating Metallic Dot Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A new surface acoustic wave (SAW-based rate sensor pattern incorporating metallic dot arrays was developed in this paper. Two parallel SAW delay lines with a reverse direction and an operation frequency of 80 MHz on a same X-112°Y LiTaO3 wafer are fabricated as the feedback of two SAW oscillators, and mixed oscillation frequency was used to characterize the external rotation. To enhance the Coriolis force effect acting on the SAW propagation, a copper (Cu dot array was deposited along the SAW propagation path of the SAW devices. The approach of partial-wave analysis in layered media was referred to analyze the response mechanisms of the SAW based rate sensor, resulting in determination of the optimal design parameters. To improve the frequency stability of the oscillator, the single phase unidirectional transducers (SPUDTs and combed transducer were used to form the SAW device to minimize the insertion loss and accomplish the single mode selection, respectively. Excellent long-term (measured in hours frequency stability of 0.1 ppm/h was obtained. Using the rate table with high precision, the performance of the developed SAW rate sensor was evaluated experimentally; satisfactory detection sensitivity (16.7 Hz∙deg∙s−1 and good linearity were observed.

  16. Flexible Organic Phototransistor Array with Enhanced Responsivity via Metal-Ligand Charge Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xien; Lee, Eun Kwang; Kim, Dong Yeong; Yu, Hojeong; Oh, Joon Hak

    2016-03-23

    Phototransistors based on organic photoactive materials combine tunable light absorption in the spectral region from ultraviolet to near-infrared with low-temperature processability over large areas on flexible substrates. However, they often exhibit low photoresponsivity because of low molar extinction coefficient of photoactive components. We report a simple, yet highly efficient solution method for enhancing the performance of organic phototransistors using ruthenium complex 1 (Ru-complex 1). An air-stable n-type organic semiconductor, N,N'-bis(2-phenylethyl)-perylene-3,4:9,10-tetracarboxylic diimide (BPE-PTCDI), has been deposited on a silicon wafer and a transparent polyimide (PI) substrate via thermal evaporation under vacuum. The BPE-PTCDI phototransistors functionalized with Ru-complex 1 exhibit ∼5000 times higher external quantum efficiency (EQE) than that of pristine BPE-PTCDI phototransistors, owing to the metal-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) from Ru-complex 1 to the active component of the device. In addition, a large 10 × 10 phototransistor array (2.5 × 2.5 cm(2)) has been prepared on a transparent PI substrate, showing distinct light mapping. The fabricated phototransistor array is highly flexible and twistable and works well under tensile and compressive strains. We believe that our simple method will pave a viable way for improvements in the photoresponsivity of organic semiconductors for applications in wearable organic optoelectronic devices. PMID:26926464

  17. AC losses in arrays of superconducting strips on buffered metallic substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The effect of subdividing superconducting YBCO films on YSZ-buffered hastelloy substrates into arrays of parallel strips on the AC loss was investigated theoretically and experimentally. The hysteretic and eddy current contributions to the AC loss of such arrays were calculated as a function of temperature and applied AC magnetic field amplitude and frequency for different width and lateral separation of the strips as well as substrate and film thickness. It is shown that subdivision of a strip into sub-strips reduces the hysteretic loss proportional to the number of sub-strips. Measurements of the loss component of the AC susceptibility, X'', confirm the theoretical predictions. When the film is subdivided into N parallel strips, the frequency-independent hysteretic contribution to X'', which is dominant at lower frequencies (f ∼ 100 Hz), decreases to 1/N of its original value. As the strips become wider or their separation becomes smaller, the hysteretic X'' increases. The eddy current contribution to X'', which originates from the metallic substrate, becomes prominent as the frequency increases, approaching a linear frequency dependence at high frequencies. Its weak temperature dependence reflects that of the hastelloy resistivity

  18. Stable field emission from arrays of vertically aligned free-standing metallic nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Stephane; Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan; Ferain, Etienne; Purcell, Stephen; Enouz-Védrenne, Shaïma; Gangloff, Laurent; Minoux, Eric; Hudanski, Ludovic; Vincent, Pascal; Schnell, Jean-Philippe; Pribat, Didier; Piraux, Luc; Legagneux, Pierre

    2008-05-01

    We present a fully elaborated process to grow arrays of metallic nanowires with controlled geometry and density, based on electrochemical filling of nanopores in track-etched templates. Nanowire growth is performed at room temperature, atmospheric pressure and is compatible with low cost fabrication and large surfaces. This technique offers an excellent control of the orientation, shape and nanowires density. It is applied to fabricate field emission arrays with a good control of the emission site density. We have prepared Co, Ni, Cu and Rh nanowires with a height of 3 µm, a diameter of 80 nm and a density of ~107 cm-2. The electron field emission measurements and total energy distributions show that the as-grown nanowires exhibit a complex behaviour, first with emission activation under high field, followed by unstable emission. A model taking into account the effect of an oxide layer covering the nanowire surface is developed to explain this particular field emission behaviour. Finally, we present an in situ cleaning procedure by ion bombardment that collectively removes this oxide layer, leading to a stable and reproducible emission behaviour. After treatment, the emission current density is ~1 mA cm-2 for a 30 V µm-1 applied electric field.

  19. Fabrication of silicon nanowire arrays by macroscopic galvanic cell-driven metal catalyzed electroless etching in aerated HF solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Peng, Kui-Qing; Hu, Ya; Wu, Xiao-Ling; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2014-03-01

    Macroscopic galvanic cell-driven metal catalyzed electroless etching (MCEE) of silicon in aqueous hydrofluoric acid (HF) solution is devised to fabricate silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays with dissolved oxygen acting as the one and only oxidizing agent. The key aspect of this strategy is the use of a graphite or other noble metal electrode that is electrically coupled with silicon substrate. PMID:24323873

  20. Fusion boundary precipitation in thermally aged dissimilar metal welds studied by atom probe tomography and nanoindentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Kim, Taeho; Yoo, Seung Chang; Kim, Seunghyun; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2016-04-01

    In this study, microstructural and mechanical characterizations were performed to investigate the effect of long-term thermal aging on the fusion boundary region between low-alloy steel and Nickel-based weld metal in dissimilar metal welds used in operating power plant systems. The effects of thermal aging treatment on the low-alloy steel side near the fusion boundary were an increase in the ratio of Cr constituents and Cr-rich precipitates and the formation and growth of Cr23C6. Cr concentrations were calculated using atom probe tomography. The accuracy of simulations of thermal aging effects of heat treatment was verified, and the activation energy for Cr diffusion in the fusion boundary region was calculated. The mechanical properties of fusion boundary region changed based on the distribution of Cr-rich precipitates, where the material initially hardened with the formation of Cr-rich precipitates and then softened because of the reduction of residual strain or coarsening of Cr-rich precipitates.

  1. Buried polymer/metal interfaces examined with Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Device performance in organic electronics depends on electronic properties of buried interfaces between thin (< 100 nm) polymer films and metal. Such properties are determined here for two model systems using Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy. First, three types of micro-patterns of self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on Au (COOH-SAM/Au, COOH-SAM/CH3-SAM, CH3-SAM/COOH-SAM), all covered by polystyrene (PS), are detected with Contact Potential Difference (CPD) to yield maps with different (enhanced or reversed) contrasts. In turn, capacitance gradient signal dC/dz is uniform and PS topography is flat (except for ∼ 1 nm variation on COOH-SAM/Au). Second, domains rich in PS and polyaniline (doped with camphorsulfonic acid) (PANI(CSA)), phase-separated in film blends cast on Au, are reflected by topography and dC/dz maps. Surprisingly, CPD signal varies between individual PANI(CSA) domains, indicating their modified interaction with metal substrate. - Highlights: ► Buried interfaces between thin (< 100 nm) polymer films and Au are revealed. ► Micro-patterns of self-assembled monolayer on Au covered by polystyrene are detected. ► Different interactions between individual polyaniline domains and Au are shown

  2. Measurement of the thermal conductivity of HTS by a transient method using a liquid metal probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the coolant and blanket material for fast breeder reactors and nuclear fusion reactors, high temperature fused materials such as melted salt and liquid metal are considered. For the research on the heat transfer of high temperature fused materials, the coefficient of viscosity, heat conductivity and others are necessary, but the reliable measured values are few, and the method of theoretical estimation has not been established. The objectives of this study were to develop the method of measuring the heat conductivity of high temperature fused materials, and to obtain the measured values of the heat conductivity by actually applying it to high temperature salt. In this study, a special probe in which liquid metal was filled in a very fine glass capillary was devised. In that case, the calibrating method suitable for relative measurement was required, therefore it was investigated also. The researches made heretofore are outlined. When minute current is passed through a very fine linear heat source in sample liquid, its temperature rises, and the rise is affected by the heat transfer to surrounding medium. The equipment, the determination of the equipment constant, the estimation of the error, and the results of measurement of HTS 1 are described. (Kako, I.)

  3. Probing near-interface ferroelectricity by conductance modulation of a nano-granular metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huth, M.; Rippert, A.; Sachser, R.; Keller, L.

    2014-12-01

    The electronic functionality of thin films is governed by their interfaces. This is very important for the ferroelectric (FE) state which depends on thin-film clamping and interfacial charge transfer. Here we show that in a heterostructure consisting of a nano-granular metal and an organic FE layer of [tetrathiafulvalene]+δ [p-chloranil]-δ the nano-granular layer's conductance provides a sensitive and non-invasive probe of the temperature-dependent dielectric properties of the FE layer. We provide a theoretical framework that is able to qualitatively reproduce the observed conductance changes taking the anisotropy of the dielectric anomaly at the paraelectric-FE phase transition into account. The approach is also suitable for observing dynamical effects close to the phase transition. Focused electron beam induced deposition as fabrication method for the nano-granular metal guarantees excellent down-scaling capabilities, so that monitoring the FE state on the lateral scale down to 20-30 nm can be envisioned.

  4. Probing near-interface ferroelectricity by conductance modulation of a nano-granular metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electronic functionality of thin films is governed by their interfaces. This is very important for the ferroelectric (FE) state which depends on thin-film clamping and interfacial charge transfer. Here we show that in a heterostructure consisting of a nano-granular metal and an organic FE layer of [tetrathiafulvalene]+δ[p-chloranil]−δ the nano-granular layer's conductance provides a sensitive and non-invasive probe of the temperature-dependent dielectric properties of the FE layer. We provide a theoretical framework that is able to qualitatively reproduce the observed conductance changes taking the anisotropy of the dielectric anomaly at the paraelectric–FE phase transition into account. The approach is also suitable for observing dynamical effects close to the phase transition. Focused electron beam induced deposition as fabrication method for the nano-granular metal guarantees excellent down-scaling capabilities, so that monitoring the FE state on the lateral scale down to 20–30 nm can be envisioned. (paper)

  5. Metal Absorption Lines as Probes of the Intergalactic Medium Prior to the Reionization Epoch

    CERN Document Server

    Furlanetto, S; Furlanetto, Steven; Loeb, Abraham

    2003-01-01

    Winds from star-forming galaxies provide the most promising explanation for the enrichment of the intergalactic medium with heavy elements. Theoretical and observational arguments indicate that the pollution may have occurred at z > 6; however, direct observational tests of such a scenario are needed. We model starburst winds in the high-redshift universe and find that the fraction of space filled by enriched material varies strongly with the assumed star formation efficiency f_* and the fraction of supernova energy powering each wind, f_esc. We show that metals carried by these winds can be seen in absorption against bright background sources, such as quasars or gamma-ray bursts, in narrow lines with characteristic equivalent widths ~0.5 < W < 5 Angstrom. We argue that a substantial fraction of the metals in high-redshift winds are likely to reside in low ionization states (CII, OI, SiII, and FeII), but higher ionization states (CIV and SiIV) could also provide useful probes of the winds. The number of...

  6. Exploring metal detoxification and accumulation potential during vermicomposting of Tea factory coal ash: sequential extraction and fluorescence probe analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Linee; Pratihar, Sanjay; Dasgupta, Suman; Bhattacharyya, Pradip; Mudoi, Pronab; Bora, Jayanta; Bhattacharya, Satya Sundar; Kim, Ki Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Metal contamination from coal ashes (CAs) is widely recognized as a significant environmental concern. To learn more about metal detoxification and accumulation potential of earthworm species, metal-rich tea factory coal ashes (TFCA) were fed to Eisenia fetida and Lampito mauritii by employing a fluorescent tag detection method. Fascinatingly, on feeding fluorescence probed Zn and Cd along with cow dung to Eisenia fetida, the detection of the gut-proteins with a molecular mass higher than 100 kDa was a distinct evidence of metal binding. Significant increases were observed in the content of humified organic C [humic acid (HAC) and fulvic acid C (FAC)] and degree of humification during vermicomposting. Concurrently, considerably large amount of toxic metals (Cr, Cd, Pb, and Zn) was transformed from exchangeable to recalcitrant (organic matter and mineral bound) fractions. Moreover, total metal concentrations were reduced with high removal efficiency upon vermicomposting. PMID:27456167

  7. A hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) method for metal oxide and their alloy nanowire arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A concept for synthesizing nanowire arrays of transition metal oxides and their alloys using hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) is discussed. Here, unlike conventional HWCVD, the hot filaments act as the source of the metal for the synthesis of one dimensional nanostructures. In the present concept, the chemical vapor transport of metal oxides generated by heating the filaments in low amounts of oxygen, onto substrates maintained at lower temperatures leads to the formation of metal oxide nanowires. Experiments performed using tungsten and molybdenum filaments showed that the nucleation density of the resulting metal oxide nanowires could be varied by varying the substrate temperature. Experiments performed using a magnesium source inside the reactor, in addition to tungsten filaments, resulted in the formation of MgWO4 nanowires. This clearly indicates the possibility of either doping the metal oxide nanowires or alloying during synthesis.

  8. Repetitive operation of an L-band magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator with metal array cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Fen; Wang, Dong; Xu, Sha; Zhang, Yong; Fan, Zhi-kai

    2016-04-01

    We present the repetitive operation research results of an L-band magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator with metal array cathode (MAC-MILO) in this paper. To ensure a more uniform emission of electrons emitted from the cathode, metal plates with different outer radii and thicknesses are periodically arranged in longitudinal direction on the cathode substrate to act as emitters. The higher order mode depressed MILO (HDMILO) structure is applied to ensure stability of the tube. Comparison experiments are carried out between velvet cathode and MAC MILO driven by a 20 GW/40 Ω/40 ns/20 Hz pulse power system. Experimental results reveal that the MAC has much lower outgassing rate, much longer life time, and higher repetitive stability. The MAC-MILO could work stably with a rep-rate up to 20 Hz at a power level of 550 MW when employing a 350 kV/35 kA electric pulse. The TE11 mode radiation pattern in the farfield region reveals the tube works steadily on the dominant mode. More than 2000 shots have been tested in repetitive mode without any obvious degradation of the detected microwave parameters.

  9. Development of eddy current testing probe for thick-walled metal plate and quantitative evaluation of cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper demonstrates the crack detection of thick-walled non-magnetic metal plates by eddy current testing, which is difficult because of Kelvin skin effect generally. The purpose of this research is the development of an new eddy current testing probe for cracks in thick-walled plates and crack shapes quantitative evaluation. The probe was designed, based on the numerical computation using 3D fast eddy current code. The advantages of this new probe are strong eddy current on the back of specimens and gentle decrement of eddy current in the thickness direction. Through experiments, we confirmed that this probe can detect the back artificial defect with 0.5 mm thickness on IN-CONEL 718 specimen with 7.0 mm thickness. Reconstruction of crack shapes was performed based on the experimental results with the inverse problem code developed by authors. The length and depth of reconstructed defects approximately agree with those of real crack. (author)

  10. Development of eddy current testing probe for thick-walled metal plate and quantitative evaluation of cracks

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, K; Uchimoto, T; Takagi, T

    2003-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the crack detection of thick-walled non-magnetic metal plates by eddy current testing, which is difficult because of Kelvin skin effect generally. The purpose of this research is the development of an new eddy current testing probe for cracks in thick-walled plates and crack shapes quantitative evaluation. The probe was designed, based on the numerical computation using 3D fast eddy current code. The advantages of this new probe are strong eddy current on the back of specimens and gentle decrement of eddy current in the thickness direction. Through experiments, we confirmed that this probe can detect the back artificial defect with 0.5 mm thickness on IN-CONEL 718 specimen with 7.0 mm thickness. Reconstruction of crack shapes was performed based on the experimental results with the inverse problem code developed by authors. The length and depth of reconstructed defects approximately agree with those of real crack. (author)

  11. Sensor Array Devices Utilizing Nano-structured Metal-oxides for Hazardous Gas Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andio, Mark A.

    Methane and carbon monoxide are two hazardous gases which require continuous monitoring by gas sensors in underground coal mines for explosion prevention and toxicity, respectively. This work explored implementing miniaturized gas sensors in this area to simultaneously detect both gases for benefits of increased portability and reduced power consumption of the chemiresistive gas sensor device. The focus of this research was to understand how the particle size, morphology, and microstructure of the metaloxide film affected the gas sensor performance to the two gases of interest on miniaturized gas sensor devices in the form of microhotplate platforms. This was done through three main research studies. The first was conducted by growing SnO2 nanowires from SnO 2 particles using an Au-catalyst. Growth conditions including temperature, time, and oxygen partial pressure were explored to determine the formation aspects of the SnO2 nanowires. Gas sensor studies were completed that provided evidence that the SnO2 nanowires increased detection to a fixed concentration of carbon monoxide compared to SnO2 particles without nano-structure formation. A second research study was performed to compare the gas sensor performance of SnO2 nanoparticles, hierarchical particles, and micron-size particles. The nanoparticles were developed into an ink and deposited via ink-jet printing on the microhotplate substrates to control the microstructure of the metal-oxide film. By preventing agglomeration of the nanoparticle film, the SnO2 nanoparticles displayed similar gas sensor performance to methane and carbon monoxide as the hierarchical particles. Both nano-structures had much higher gas sensor response than the micron-size particles which confirms the surface area of the metal-oxide film is critical for reaction of the analyte gas at the surface. The last research study presented in the dissertation describes an oxide nanoparticle array developed for detecting methane and carbon

  12. Wall-like hierarchical metal oxide nanosheet arrays grown on carbon cloth for excellent supercapacitor electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zongyu; Zhang, Zhen; Qi, Xiang; Ren, Xiaohui; Xu, Guanghua; Wan, Pengbo; Sun, Xiaoming; Zhang, Han

    2016-07-01

    Recently, considerable efforts have been made to satisfy the future requirements of electrochemical energy storage using novel functional electrode materials. Binary transition metal oxides (BTMOs) possess multiple oxidation states that enable multiple redox reactions, showing higher supercapacitive properties than single component metal oxides. In this work, a facile hydrothermal method is provided for the synthesis of wall-like hierarchical metal oxide MMoO4 (M = Ni, Co) nanosheet arrays, which are directly grown on flexible carbon cloth for use as advanced binder-free electrodes for supercapacitors. By virtue of their intriguing structure, the resulted active material nanosheets with a high specific surface area can provide a large electroactive region, which could facilitate easy accession of electrolyte ions and fast charge transport, resulting in an enhanced electrochemical performance. Separately, the as-synthesized MMoO4 (M = Ni, Co) samples have exhibited superior specific capacitances (1483 F g-1 of NiMoO4 and 452 F g-1 of CoMoO4 at a current density of 2 A g-1), as well as excellent cycling stability (93.1% capacitance retention of NiMoO4 and 95.9% capacitance retention of CoMoO4 after 2000 cycles). The results show that the binder-free electrodes constructed by deposition of MMoO4 (M = Ni, Co) nanosheets on carbon cloth are promising candidates for the application of supercapacitors.Recently, considerable efforts have been made to satisfy the future requirements of electrochemical energy storage using novel functional electrode materials. Binary transition metal oxides (BTMOs) possess multiple oxidation states that enable multiple redox reactions, showing higher supercapacitive properties than single component metal oxides. In this work, a facile hydrothermal method is provided for the synthesis of wall-like hierarchical metal oxide MMoO4 (M = Ni, Co) nanosheet arrays, which are directly grown on flexible carbon cloth for use as advanced binder

  13. Plasmonic black metals via radiation absorption by two-dimensional arrays of ultra-sharp convex grooves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beermann, Jonas; Eriksen, René L.; Stær, Tobias Holmgaard;

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonic black surfaces formed by two-dimensional arrays of ultra-sharp convex metal grooves, in which the incident radiation is converted into gap surface plasmon polaritons (GSPPs) and subsequently absorbed (via adiabatic nanofocusing), are fabricated and investigated experimentally for gold...... absorption, e. g., within thermophotovoltaics. For one-dimensional arrays, GSPPs are excited only with the electric field polarized perpendicular to the groove orientation, resulting in 94-96% absorption of the appropriately polarized light for the arrays in nickel and palladium while featuring practically...... flat surface reflectivity spectra for the orthogonal polarization. The largest ratio (similar to 10.7) between averaged reflectivities for orthogonal polarizations is achieved with the groove arrays in palladium, pointing thereby towards applications as broadband and low-dispersion linear polarizers...

  14. The local surface plasmon resonance property and refractive index sensitivity of metal elliptical nano-ring arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we systematically investigate the optical property and refractive index sensitivity (RIS) of metal elliptical nano-ring (MENR) arranged in rectangle lattice by finite-difference time-domain method. Eight kinds of considered MENRs are divided into three classes, namely fixed at the same outer size, at the same inner size, and at the same middle size. All MENR arrays show a bonding mode local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) peak in the near-infrared region under longitudinal and transverse polarizations, and lattice diffraction enhanced LSPR peaks emerge, when the LSPR peak wavelength (LSPRPW) matches the effective lattice constant of the array. The LSPRPW is determined by the charge moving path length, the parallel and cross interactions induced by the stable distributed charges, and the moving charges inter-attraction. High RIS can be achieved by small particle distance arrays composed of MENRs with big inner size and small ring-width. On the other hand, for a MENR array, the comprehensive RIS (including RIS and figure of merit) under transverse polarization is superior to that under longitudinal polarization. Furthermore, on condition that compared arrays are fixed at the same lattice constant, the phenomenon that the RIS of big ring-width MENR arrays may be higher than that of small ring-width MENR arrays only appears in the case of compared arrays with relatively small lattice constant and composed of MENRs fixed at the same inner size simultaneously. Meanwhile, the LSPRPW of the former MENR arrays is also larger than that of the latter MENR arrays. Our systematic results may help experimentalists work with this type of systems

  15. Colorimetric sensor array based on gold nanoparticles and amino acids for identification of toxic metal ions in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sener, Gulsu; Uzun, Lokman; Denizli, Adil

    2014-01-01

    A facile colorimetric sensor array for detection of multiple toxic heavy metal ions (Hg(2+), Cd(2+), Fe(3+), Pb(2+), Al(3+), Cu(2+), and Cr(3+)) in water is demonstrated using 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA)-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and five amino acids (lysine, cysteine, histidine, tyrosine, and arginine). The presence of amino acids (which have functional groups that can form complexes with metal ions and MUA) regulates the aggregation of MUA-capped particles; it can either enhance or diminish the particle aggregation. The combinatorial colorimetric response of all channels of the sensor array (i.e., color change in each of AuNP and amino acid couples) enables naked-eye discrimination of all of the metal ions tested in this study with excellent selectivity. PMID:25330256

  16. Coaxial carbon/metal oxide/aligned carbon nanotube arrays as high-performance anodes for lithium ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Fengliu; Zhou, Haitao; Tran, Trung Dung; Melandsø Buan, Marthe Emelie; Vullum-Bruer, Fride; Rønning, Magnus; Walmsley, John Charles; Chen, De

    2014-05-01

    Coaxial carbon/metal oxide/aligned carbon nanotube (ACNT) arrays over stainless-steel foil are reported as high-performance binder-free anodes for lithium ion batteries. The coaxial arrays were prepared by growth of ACNTs over stainless-steel foil followed by coating with metal oxide and carbon. The carbon/manganese oxide/ACNT arrays can deliver an initial capacity of 738 mAh g(-1) with 99.9 % capacity retention up to 100 cycles and a capacity of 374 mAh g(-1) at a high current density of 6000 mA g(-1). The external carbon layer was recognized as a key component for high performance, and the mechanism of performance enhancement was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction analysis. The layer increases rate capability by enhancing electrical conductivity and maintaining a low mass-transfer resistance and also improves cyclic stability by avoiding aggregation of metal-oxide particles and stabilizing the solid electrolyte interface. The resultant principle of rational electrode design was applied to an iron oxide-based system, and similar improvements were found. These coaxial nanotube arrays present a promising strategy for the rational design of high-performance binder-free anodes for lithium ion batteries. PMID:24578068

  17. Probing baryonic processes and gastrophysics in the formation of the Milky Way dwarf satellites. I. Metallicity distribution properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Milky Way (MW) dwarf satellites, as the smallest galaxies discovered in the present-day universe, are potentially powerful probes to various baryonic processes in galaxy formation occurring in the early universe. In this paper, we study the chemical properties of the stars in the dwarf satellites around the MW-like host galaxies, and explore the possible effects of several baryonic processes, including supernova (SN) feedback, the reionization of the universe, and H2 cooling, and how current and future observations may put some constraints on these processes. We use a semianalytical model to generate MW-like galaxies, for which a fiducial model can reproduce the luminosity function and the stellar metallicity-stellar mass correlation of the MW dwarfs. Using the simulated MW-like galaxies, we focus on investigating three metallicity properties of their dwarfs: the stellar metallicity-stellar mass correlation of the dwarf population, and the metal-poor and metal-rich tails of the stellar metallicity distribution in individual dwarfs. We find that (1) the slope of the stellar metallicity-stellar mass correlation is sensitive to the SN feedback strength and the reionization epoch; (2) the extension of the metal-rich tails is mainly sensitive to the SN feedback strength; (3) the extension of the metal-poor tails is mainly sensitive to the reionization epoch; (4) none of the three chemical properties are sensitive to the H2 cooling process; and (5) a comparison of our model results with the current observational slope of the stellar metallicity-stellar mass relation suggests that the local universe is reionized earlier than the cosmic average, local sources may have a significant contribution to the reionization in the local region, and an intermediate to strong SN feedback strength is preferred. Future observations of metal-rich and metal-poor tails of stellar metallicity distributions will put further constraints on the SN feedback and the reionization processes.

  18. Control of Metal Arrays Based on Heterometallics Masquerading in Heterochiral Aggregations of Chiral Clothespin-Shaped Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Masaya; Inoue, Ryo; Iida, Masayuki; Kuwajima, Yuuki; Kawamorita, Soichiro; Komiya, Naruyoshi; Naota, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    Heterometal arrays in molecular aggregations were obtained by the spontaneous and ultrasound-induced gelation of organic liquids containing the chiral, clothespin-shaped trans-bis(salicylaldiminato) d8 transition-metal complexes 1. Heterometallic mixtures of complexes 1 a (Pd) and 1 b (Pt) underwent strict heterochiral aggregation entirely due to the organic shell structure of the clothespin shape, with no effect of the metal cores. This phenomenon provides an unprecedented means of generating highly controlled heterometallic arrangements such as alternating sequences [(+)-Pd(-)-Pt(+)-Pd(-)-Pt⋅⋅⋅] as well as a variety of single metal-enriched arrays (e.g., [(+)-Pt(-)-Pd(+)-Pd(-)-Pd(+)-Pd(-)-Pd⋅⋅⋅] and [(+)-Pd(-)-Pt(+)-Pt(-)-Pt(+)-Pt(-)-Pt⋅⋅⋅]) upon the introduction of an optically active masquerading unit with a different metal core in the heterochiral single-metal sequence. The present method can be applied to form various new aggregates with optically active Pd and Pt units, to allow 1) tuning of the gelation ultrasound sensitivity based on the different hearing abilities of the metal units; 2) aggregation-induced chirality transfer between heterometallic species; and 3) aggregation-induced chirality enhancement. A mechanistic rationale is proposed for these molecular aggregations based on the molecular structures of the units and the morphologies of the aggregates. PMID:26212577

  19. Ultrasonic fingerprint sensor using a piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducer array integrated with complementary metal oxide semiconductor electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an ultrasonic fingerprint sensor based on a 24 × 8 array of 22 MHz piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducers (PMUTs) with 100 μm pitch, fully integrated with 180 nm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuitry through eutectic wafer bonding. Each PMUT is directly bonded to a dedicated CMOS receive amplifier, minimizing electrical parasitics and eliminating the need for through-silicon vias. The array frequency response and vibration mode-shape were characterized using laser Doppler vibrometry and verified via finite element method simulation. The array's acoustic output was measured using a hydrophone to be ∼14 kPa with a 28 V input, in reasonable agreement with predication from analytical calculation. Pulse-echo imaging of a 1D steel grating is demonstrated using electronic scanning of a 20 × 8 sub-array, resulting in 300 mV maximum received amplitude and 5:1 contrast ratio. Because the small size of this array limits the maximum image size, mechanical scanning was used to image a 2D polydimethylsiloxane fingerprint phantom (10 mm × 8 mm) at a 1.2 mm distance from the array

  20. Ultrasonic fingerprint sensor using a piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducer array integrated with complementary metal oxide semiconductor electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Y.; Fung, S.; Wang, Q.; Horsley, D. A. [Berkeley Sensor and Actuator Center, University of California, Davis, 1 Shields Avenue, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Tang, H.; Boser, B. E. [Berkeley Sensor and Actuator Center, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Tsai, J. M.; Daneman, M. [InvenSense, Inc., 1745 Technology Drive, San Jose, California 95110 (United States)

    2015-06-29

    This paper presents an ultrasonic fingerprint sensor based on a 24 × 8 array of 22 MHz piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducers (PMUTs) with 100 μm pitch, fully integrated with 180 nm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuitry through eutectic wafer bonding. Each PMUT is directly bonded to a dedicated CMOS receive amplifier, minimizing electrical parasitics and eliminating the need for through-silicon vias. The array frequency response and vibration mode-shape were characterized using laser Doppler vibrometry and verified via finite element method simulation. The array's acoustic output was measured using a hydrophone to be ∼14 kPa with a 28 V input, in reasonable agreement with predication from analytical calculation. Pulse-echo imaging of a 1D steel grating is demonstrated using electronic scanning of a 20 × 8 sub-array, resulting in 300 mV maximum received amplitude and 5:1 contrast ratio. Because the small size of this array limits the maximum image size, mechanical scanning was used to image a 2D polydimethylsiloxane fingerprint phantom (10 mm × 8 mm) at a 1.2 mm distance from the array.

  1. Evaluation of flooded 3 x3x3 arrays of plutonium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the early 1980's, thirteen experiments using plutonium metal cylinders were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory. The experimental method consisted of flooding a 3 x3 x3 array with water until criticality was achieved. Ten of the thirteen experiments went critical while the other three remained subcritical upon full reflection. This paper evaluates these experiments to develop benchmark descriptions for validation of computational tools used by criticality safety specialists. Six of the ten critical experiments were found acceptable as benchmark experiments. Sensitivity studies were performed to find the effect of experimental limits and uncertainties on the keff value. Analysis of the experiments was performed by MCNP with continuous energy ENDF/B-V cross section data. Keff values for all benchmark experiments were computed using MCNP with ENDF/B-V data, KENO-Va with Hansen Roach cross section, and KENO-Va with 27-group ENDF/B-IV cross sections. Although these experiments were flooded, KENO-Va calculations show that these were, in fact, fast systems. 3 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs

  2. Radially arrayed nanopillar formation on metallic stent wire surface via radio-frequency plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loya, Mariana C; Park, Eunsung; Chen, Li Han; Brammer, Karla S; Jin, Sungho

    2010-04-01

    MP35N (Co-Ni-Cr-Mo alloy) is an important stent implant material for which many aspects, that include nanostructured surfaces, are yet to be understood. The present study provides the first creation of radially emanating metallic nanopillar structures on the surface of MP35N stent alloy wires; a novel textured surface structuring derived via controlled RF processing technique. The goal of this study was to characterize the newly found structures, identify evolution stages of nanopillar formations, as well as optimize RF process parameters for controlled surface texturing technique for stent wire materials. The exposure of a stent alloy wire, 250 microm diameter Co-Ni-Cr-Mo alloy (MP35N), to parameter-controlled RF environment resulted in dense surface nanostructures consisting of high-aspect-ratio dendritic nanopillars/nanowires. Extensive surface characterization and local compositional analyses by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) show increased values of Mo contents on the outer edges of protruding nanopillars, indicating a possibility of the higher Mo content phase contributing to the differential plasma sputter etching on the MP35N surface and resultant nanowire formation. A comparative investigation on single phase alloy versus multi-phase alloy seems to point to the importance of phase segregation for successful nanowire formation by RF plasma treatment. In addition to MP35N, some specific single phased materials, such as Fe-Ni and Fe-Cr alloys or Pt metal wire, were exposed in same RF plasma conditions and results did not form the complex structures found on MP35N samples. For the purpose of this study, metallic stent wires that have nanostructured surfaces can be considered a "polymer-less" approach to surface modification, The creation and characterization of radially arrayed nanostructured surfaces has been demonstrated on MP35N stent alloy wires using this RF plasma

  3. Design and geometry optimization of a conductivity probe with a vertical multiple electrode array for measuring volume fraction and axial velocity of two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the design and geometry optimization of a conductivity probe with a vertical multiple electrode array (VMEA), which can be used to measure the volume fraction and axial velocity of two-phase flow. The designed VMEA electrodes are axially flush mounted on the inside wall of an insulating duct. On the basis of a finite element analysis method, some new sensor optimization concepts of the electric field such as uniform degree, spatial sensitivity and effective information content are proposed. The designed VMEA measurement system has been tested through the multiphase flow loop and shows that the optimized VMEA can be used to measure cross-correlation velocity and predict volume fraction in vertical upward gas–water two-phase flow with satisfactory accuracy. The proposed optimization method of VMEA can also be useful in investigating other types of conductivity probes

  4. Ultrafast Dynamics of the VO2 Insulator-to-Metal Transition Observed by Nondegenerate Pump-Probe Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haglund R. F.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-degenerate pump (1.5 eV-probe (0.4 eV transmission spectroscopy on vanadium dioxide films grown on glass and three different sapphire substrates shows systematic variations with substrate that correlate with VO2 grain size and laser fluence. Temperature dependent measurements showed changes in the electronic response that is proportional to the metallic fraction.

  5. Comprehensive Screening of Gene Copy Number Aberrations in Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Solid Tumors Using Molecular Inversion Probe-Based Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajesh R; Mehrotra, Meenakshi; Chen, Hui; Almohammedsalim, Alaa A; Sahin, Ayesagul; Bosamra, Alex; Patel, Keyur P; Routbort, Mark J; Lu, Xinyan; Ronald, Abraham; Mishra, Bal Mukund; Virani, Shumaila; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi

    2016-09-01

    Gene copy number aberrations (CNAs) represent a major class of cancer-related genomic alterations that drive solid tumors. Comprehensive and sensitive detection of CNAs is challenging because of often low quality and quantity of DNA isolated from the formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) solid tumor samples. Here, in a clinical molecular diagnostic laboratory, we tested the utility and validated a molecular inversion probe-based (MIP) array to routinely screen for CNAs in solid tumors. Using low-input FFPE DNA, the array detects genome-wide CNAs with a special focus on 900 cancer-related genes. A cohort of 76 solid tumors of various types and tumor cellularity (20% to 100%), and four cancer cell lines were used. These harbored CNAs in clinically important genes (ERBB2, EGFR, FGFR1, KRAS, MYC) as detected by orthogonal techniques like next-generation sequencing or fluorescence in situ hybridization. Results of the MIP array were concordant with results from orthogonal techniques, and also provided additional information regarding the allelic nature of the CNAs. Limit-of-detection and assay reproducibility studies showed a high degree of sensitivity and reproducibility of detection, respectively. FFPE compatibility, ability to detect CNAs with high sensitivity, accuracy, and provide valuable information such as loss of heterozygosity along with relatively short turnaround times makes the MIP array a desirable clinical platform for routine screening of solid tumors in a clinical laboratory. PMID:27392636

  6. Large probe arrays for measuring mean and time dependent local oil volume fraction and local oil velocity component distributions in inclined oil-in-water flows

    OpenAIRE

    Lucas, Gary; Zhao, X.

    2013-01-01

    Arrays of dual-sensor and four-sensor needle conductance probes have been used to measure the mean and time dependent local properties of upward inclined, bubbly oil-in-water flows (also known as dispersed oil-in-water flows) in a 153mm diameter pipe. The flow properties that were measured were (i) the local in-situ oil volume fraction ; (ii) the local oil velocity in the axial direction of the pipe (the direction); and (iii) the local oil velocity in the direction from the lower side ...

  7. Amperometric detection of heavy metal ions in ion pair chromatography at an array of water/nitrobenzene micro interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, S; Wang, H; Muraczewska, M; Müller, H

    1996-09-01

    A novel amperometric detector for heavy metal ions has been developed and successfully applied for ion pair chromatography. The detector is based on the electrochemical transfer of the metal ions across an array of water/nitrobenzene micro interfaces. The ion transfer is facilitated by the neutral ionophores methylenebis(diphenylphosphineoxide) and methylenebis(di- phenylphosphinesulfide). More than eight metals are separated in less than 15 min on an RP18 column using octyl sulfonate as ion pair reagent. For the heavy metals, the limits of decision are 19(Pb(2+)), 9(Zn(2+)), 9l (Co(2+)), 8(Cd(2+)) and 1.6(Mn(2+)) microg/L. The applicability of the new method for water samples is demonstrated. PMID:15048359

  8. A self-adjustable four-point probing system using polymeric three dimensional coils and non-toxic liquid metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyunbaatar, Nomin-Erdene; Choi, Young Soo; Lee, Dong-Weon

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes a self-adjustable four-point probe (S4PP) system with a square configuration. The S4PP system consists of 3D polymer coil springs for the independent operation of each tungsten (W) probe, microfluidic channels filled with a nontoxic liquid metal, and a LabView-based control system. The 3D coil springs made by PMMA are fabricated with a 3D printer and are positioned in a small container filled with the non-toxic liquid metal. This unique configuration allows independent self-adjustment of the probe heights for precise measurements of the electrical properties of both flexible and large-step-height microsamples. The feasibility of the fabricated S4PP system is evaluated by measuring the specific resistance of Cr and Au thin films deposited on silicon wafers. The system is then employed to evaluate the electrical properties of a Au thin film deposited onto a flexible and easily breakable silicon diaphragm (spring constant: ˜3.6 × 10-5 N/m). The resistance of the Cr thin films (thickness: 450 nm) with step heights of 60 and 90 μm is also successfully characterized. These experimental results indicate that the proposed S4PP system can be applied to common metals and semiconductors as well as flexible and large-step-height samples.

  9. A library-screening approach for developing a fluorescence sensing array for the detection of metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David G; Sajid, Naveed; Rehn, Simone; Chandramohan, Ramya; Carney, Isaac J; Khan, Misbahul A; New, Elizabeth J

    2016-08-01

    Detection of individual metal ions is of importance across a range of fields of chemistry including environmental monitoring, and health and disease. Fluorescence is a highly sensitive technique and small fluorescent molecules are widely used for the detection and quantification of metal ions in various applications. Achieving specificity for a single metal from a single sensor is always a challenge. An alternative to selective sensing is the use of a number of non-specific sensors, in an array, which together respond in a unique pattern to each analyte. Here we show that screening a library of compounds can give a small sensor set that can be used to identify a range of metal ions following PCA and LDA. We explore a method for screening the initial compounds to identify the best performing sensors. We then present our method for reducing the size of the sensor array, resulting in a four-membered system, which is capable of identifying nine distinct metal ion species in lake water. PMID:27291513

  10. Assessment of an ultramicroelectrode array (UMEA) sensor for the determination of trace concentrations of heavy metals in water [online

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Xudong

    2004-01-01

    The main objectives of this book are (i) to investigate the electrochemical behavior and the analytical performance of a novel ultramicroelectrode array (UMEA); (ii) to assess the analytical parameters of square-wave anodic stripping voltammetric measurements (SWASV) using the UMEA; and (iii) to estimate the potential of the UMEA in developing decentralised analytical equipments for the determination of trace concentrations of heavy metals in natural waters. Surface analytical techniques ...

  11. Metallic Co4N Porous Nanowire Arrays Activated by Surface Oxidation as Electrocatalysts for the Oxygen Evolution Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pengzuo; Xu, Kun; Fang, Zhiwei; Tong, Yun; Wu, Junchi; Lu, Xiuli; Peng, Xu; Ding, Hui; Wu, Changzheng; Xie, Yi

    2015-12-01

    Designing highly efficient electrocatalysts for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) plays a key role in the development of various renewable energy storage and conversion devices. In this work, we developed metallic Co4N porous nanowire arrays directly grown on flexible substrates as highly active OER electrocatalysts for the first time. Benefiting from the collaborative advantages of metallic character, 1D porous nanowire arrays, and unique 3D electrode configuration, surface oxidation activated Co4N porous nanowire arrays/carbon cloth achieved an extremely small overpotential of 257 mV at a current density of 10 mA cm(-2), and a low Tafel slope of 44 mV dec(-1) in an alkaline medium, which is the best OER performance among reported Co-based electrocatalysts to date. Moreover, in-depth mechanistic investigations demonstrate the active phases are the metallic Co4N core inside with a thin cobalt oxides/hydroxides shell during the OER process. Our finding introduces a new concept to explore the design of high-efficiency OER electrocatalysts. PMID:26437900

  12. A nested array of rRNA targeted probes for the detection and identification of enterococci by reverse hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, T; Koob, C; Schedl, M; Mehlen, A; Meier, H; Knopp, D; Frahm, E; Obst, U; Schleifer, K; Niessner, R; Ludwig, W

    2000-12-01

    Complete 23S and almost complete 16S rRNA gene sequences were determined for the type strains of the validly described Enterococcus species, Melissococcus pluton and Tetragenococcus halophilus. A comprehensive set of rRNA targeted specific oligonucleotide hybridization probes was designed according to the multiple probe concept. In silico probe design and evaluation was performed using the respective tools of the ARB program package in combination with the ARB databases comprising the currently available 16S as well as 23S rRNA primary structures. The probes were optimized with respect to their application for reverse hybridization in microplate format. The target comprising 16S and 23S rDNA was amplified and labeled by PCR (polymerase chain reaction) using general primers targeting a wide spectrum of bacteria. Alternatively, amplification of two adjacent rDNA fragments of enterococci was performed by using specific primers. In vitro evaluation of the probe set was done including all Enterococcus type strains, and a selection of other representatives of the gram-positive bacteria with a low genomic DNA G+C content. The optimized probe set was used to analyze enriched drinking water samples as well as original samples from waste water treatment plants. PMID:11249027

  13. A Customized Metal Oxide Semiconductor-Based Gas Sensor Array for Onion Quality Evaluation: System Development and Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharun Konduru

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A gas sensor array, consisting of seven Metal Oxide Semiconductor (MOS sensors that are sensitive to a wide range of organic volatile compounds was developed to detect rotten onions during storage. These MOS sensors were enclosed in a specially designed Teflon chamber equipped with a gas delivery system to pump volatiles from the onion samples into the chamber. The electronic circuit mainly comprised a microcontroller, non-volatile memory chip, and trickle-charge real time clock chip, serial communication chip, and parallel LCD panel. User preferences are communicated with the on-board microcontroller through a graphical user interface developed using LabVIEW. The developed gas sensor array was characterized and the discrimination potential was tested by exposing it to three different concentrations of acetone (ketone, acetonitrile (nitrile, ethyl acetate (ester, and ethanol (alcohol. The gas sensor array could differentiate the four chemicals of same concentrations and different concentrations within the chemical with significant difference. Experiment results also showed that the system was able to discriminate two concentrations (196 and 1964 ppm of methlypropyl sulfide and two concentrations (145 and 1452 ppm of 2-nonanone, two key volatile compounds emitted by rotten onions. As a proof of concept, the gas sensor array was able to achieve 89% correct classification of sour skin infected onions. The customized low-cost gas sensor array could be a useful tool to detect onion postharvest diseases in storage.

  14. Fabrication of silicon nanowire arrays by near-field laser ablation and metal-assisted chemical etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodoceanu, D.; Alhmoud, H. Z.; Elnathan, R.; Delalat, B.; Voelcker, N. H.; Kraus, T.

    2016-02-01

    We present an elegant route for the fabrication of ordered arrays of vertically-aligned silicon nanowires with tunable geometry at controlled locations on a silicon wafer. A monolayer of transparent microspheres convectively assembled onto a gold-coated silicon wafer acts as a microlens array. Irradiation with a single nanosecond laser pulse removes the gold beneath each focusing microsphere, leaving behind a hexagonal pattern of holes in the gold layer. Owing to the near-field effects, the diameter of the holes can be at least five times smaller than the laser wavelength. The patterned gold layer is used as catalyst in a metal-assisted chemical etching to produce an array of vertically-aligned silicon nanowires. This approach combines the advantages of direct laser writing with the benefits of parallel laser processing, yielding nanowire arrays with controlled geometry at predefined locations on the silicon surface. The fabricated VA-SiNW arrays can effectively transfect human cells with a plasmid encoding for green fluorescent protein.

  15. Controlled photoluminescence from self-assembled semiconductor-metal quantum dot hybrid array films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin films of hybrid arrays of cadmium selenide quantum dots and polymer grafted gold nanoparticles have been prepared using a BCP template. Controlling the dispersion and location of the respective nanoparticles allows us to tune the exciton-plasmon interaction in such hybrid arrays and hence control their optical properties. The observed photoluminescence of the hybrid array films is interpreted in terms of the dispersion and location of the gold nanoparticles and quantum dots in the block copolymer matrix.

  16. EELS and atom probe tomography study of the evolution of the metal/oxide interface during zirconium alloy oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabory, Benoit de [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Dong, Yan, E-mail: yand@umich.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Motta, Arthur T. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Marquis, Emmanuelle A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    In an effort to understand the mechanisms resulting in the variations of corrosion rate observed throughout corrosion including at the first kinetic transition when the oxide temporarily loses its protective character, the oxide/metal interfaces of autoclave corroded Zircaloy-4 and ZIRLO™ before and after the transition are characterized using electron energy loss spectroscopy and atom probe tomography. The results reveal a complex structure of different phases at different stages of corrosion. The oxide/metal interface exhibits an intermediate layer, with an oxygen content between 45 and 55 O at.% and a suboxide layer corresponding to an oxygen-saturated solid solution in the metal matrix side (∼30 O at.%). Local variations are observed in the width of these characteristic structural features, especially near the transition. Good agreement on the layers present as well as their order, composition, and width was seen with the two techniques.

  17. EELS and atom probe tomography study of the evolution of the metal/oxide interface during zirconium alloy oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an effort to understand the mechanisms resulting in the variations of corrosion rate observed throughout corrosion including at the first kinetic transition when the oxide temporarily loses its protective character, the oxide/metal interfaces of autoclave corroded Zircaloy-4 and ZIRLO™ before and after the transition are characterized using electron energy loss spectroscopy and atom probe tomography. The results reveal a complex structure of different phases at different stages of corrosion. The oxide/metal interface exhibits an intermediate layer, with an oxygen content between 45 and 55 O at.% and a suboxide layer corresponding to an oxygen-saturated solid solution in the metal matrix side (∼30 O at.%). Local variations are observed in the width of these characteristic structural features, especially near the transition. Good agreement on the layers present as well as their order, composition, and width was seen with the two techniques

  18. Multiwell Assay for the Analysis of Sugar Gut Permeability Markers: Discrimination of Sugar Alcohols with a Fluorescent Probe Array Based on Boronic Acid Appended Viologens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resendez, Angel; Panescu, Priera; Zuniga, Ruth; Banda, Isaac; Joseph, Jorly; Webb, Dominic-Luc; Singaram, Bakthan

    2016-05-17

    With the aim of discerning between different sugar and sugar alcohols of biomedical relevance, such as gut permeability, arrays of 2-component probes were assembled with up to six boronic acid-appended viologens (BBVs): 4,4'-o-BBV, 3,3'-o-BBV, 3,4'-o-BBV, 4,4'-o,m-BBV, 4,7'-o-PBBV, and pBoB, each coupled to the fluorophore 8-hydroxypyrene, 1,3,6-trisulfonic acid trisodium salt (HPTS). These probes were screened for their ability to discriminate between lactulose, l-rhamnose, 3-O-methyl-d-glucose, and xylose. Binding studies of sugar alcohols mannitol, sorbitol, erythritol, adonitol, arabitol, galactitol, and xylitol revealed that diols containing threo-1,2-diol units have higher affinity for BBVs relative diols containing erythro-1,2 units. Those containing both threo-1,2- and 1,3-syn diol motifs showed high affinity for boronic acid binding. Fluorescence from the arrays were examined by principle component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Arrays with only three BBVs sufficed to discriminate between sugars (e.g., lactulose) and sugar alcohols (e.g., mannitol), establishing a differential probe. Compared with 4,4'-o-BBV, 2-fold reductions in lower limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) were achieved for lactulose with 4,7-o-PBBV (LOD 41 μM, LOQ 72 μM). Using a combination of 4,4'-o-BBV, 4,7-o-PBBV, and pBoB, LDA statistically segregated lactulose/mannitol (L/M) ratios from 0.1 to 0.5, consistent with values encountered in small intestinal permeability tests. Another triad containing 3,3'-o-BBV, 4,4'-o-BBV, and 4,7-o-PBBV also discerned similar L/M ratios. This proof-of-concept demonstrates the potential for BBV arrays as an attractive alternate to HPLC to analyze mixtures of sugars and sugar alcohols in biomedical applications and sheds light on structural motifs that make this possible. PMID:27116118

  19. Arrays of hollow out-of-plane microneedles made by metal electrodeposition onto solvent cast conductive polymer structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transdermal drug delivery using microneedles is a technique to potentially replace hypodermic needles for injection of many vaccines and drugs. Fabrication of hollow metallic microneedles so far has been associated with time-consuming steps that restrict batch production of these devices. Here, we are presenting a novel method for making metallic microneedles with any desired height, spacing, and lumen size. In our process, we use solvent casting to coat a mold, which contains an array of pillars, with a conductive polymer composite layer. The conductive layer is then used as a seed layer in a metal electrodeposition process. To characterize the process, the conductivity of the polymer composite with respect to different filler concentrations was investigated. In addition, plasma etching of the polymer was characterized. The electroplating process was also studied further to control the thickness of the microneedle array plate. The strength of the microneedle devices was evaluated through a series of compression tests, while their performance for transdermal drug delivery was tested by injection of 2.28 µm fluorescent microspheres into animal skin. The fabricated metallic microneedles seem appropriate for subcutaneous delivery of drugs and microspheres. (paper)

  20. Magnetic force-assisted self-locking metallic bead array for fabrication of diverse concave microwell geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gi-Hun; Park, Ye Eun; Cho, Minhaeng; Park, Hansoo; Park, Joong Yull

    2016-09-21

    Spheroid cell culture is very useful for further understanding cellular behavior including motility and biochemical reaction since it mimics three-dimensional (3D) in vivo organ tissue. Among previously proposed various methods for spheroid production, such as hanging drop and spinner flask, microwell is a recently developed method harnessing microtechnology to produce uniform-sized spheroids. Although soft-lithography has been popular for creating microwell arrays, a 3D spherical geometry has been regarded as difficult to fabricate using conventional methods, or often requires complex fabrication processes and expensive equipment. Here, we propose a new method for fabricating concave microwells for cell spheroid production and culture. To demonstrate this method, we fabricated a 30 × 30 microwell array in 3 × 3 cm plates, utilizing metal beads, a through-hole array, and an assembly of small magnets. The spherical metal beads were used as a mold for the microwell, naturally creating the desired 3D concave microwell geometry. One of the key ideas was to place and hold each metal bead in the designated through-hole using the small magnet array. We also performed computational simulation of the magnetostatic force to design and observe the magnetic force field in detail. In addition, to provide a practical demonstration of the proposed system in cell biology, we created and cultured adipose-derived stem cell spheroids for 14 days for chondrogenic differentiation. This method allows further variations in microwell geometry that will enhance the method's applicability as a helpful tool for various studies in cell biology, cancer research, and tissue engineering. PMID:27509885

  1. Hydrothermal synthesis of mesoporous metal oxide arrays with enhanced properties for electrochemical energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • NiO mesoporous nanowall arrays are prepared via hydrothermal method. • Mesoporous nanowall arrays are favorable for fast ion/electron transfer. • NiO mesoporous nanowall arrays show good supercapacitor performance. - Abstract: Mesoporous nanowall NiO arrays are prepared by a facile hydrothermal synthesis method with a following annealing process. The NiO nanowall shows continuous mesopores ranging from 5 to 10 nm and grows vertically on the substrate forming a porous net-like structure with macropores of 20–300 nm. A plausible mechanism is proposed for the growth of mesoporous nanowall NiO arrays. As cathode material of pseudocapacitors, the as-prepared mesoporous nanowall NiO arrays show good pseudocapacitive performances with a high capacitance of 600 F g−1 at 2 A g−1 and impressive high-rate capability with a specific capacitance of 338 F g−1 at 40 A g−1. In addition, the mesoporous nanowall NiO arrays possess good cycling stability. After 6000 cycles at 2 A g−1, a high capacitance of 660 F g−1 is attained, and no obvious degradation is observed. The good electrochemical performance is attributed to its highly porous morphology, which provides large reaction surface and short ion diffusion paths, leading to enhanced electrochemical properties

  2. Hydrothermal synthesis of mesoporous metal oxide arrays with enhanced properties for electrochemical energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Anguo, E-mail: hixiaoanguo@126.com; Zhou, Shibiao; Zuo, Chenggang; Zhuan, Yongbing; Ding, Xiang

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • NiO mesoporous nanowall arrays are prepared via hydrothermal method. • Mesoporous nanowall arrays are favorable for fast ion/electron transfer. • NiO mesoporous nanowall arrays show good supercapacitor performance. - Abstract: Mesoporous nanowall NiO arrays are prepared by a facile hydrothermal synthesis method with a following annealing process. The NiO nanowall shows continuous mesopores ranging from 5 to 10 nm and grows vertically on the substrate forming a porous net-like structure with macropores of 20–300 nm. A plausible mechanism is proposed for the growth of mesoporous nanowall NiO arrays. As cathode material of pseudocapacitors, the as-prepared mesoporous nanowall NiO arrays show good pseudocapacitive performances with a high capacitance of 600 F g{sup −1} at 2 A g{sup −1} and impressive high-rate capability with a specific capacitance of 338 F g{sup −1} at 40 A g{sup −1}. In addition, the mesoporous nanowall NiO arrays possess good cycling stability. After 6000 cycles at 2 A g{sup −1}, a high capacitance of 660 F g{sup −1} is attained, and no obvious degradation is observed. The good electrochemical performance is attributed to its highly porous morphology, which provides large reaction surface and short ion diffusion paths, leading to enhanced electrochemical properties.

  3. Electrochemical pore filling strategy for controlled growth of magnetic and metallic nanowire arrays with large area uniformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arefpour, M.; Almasi Kashi, M.; Ramazani, A.; Montazer, A. H.

    2016-07-01

    While a variety of template-based strategies have been developed in the fabrication of nanowires (NWs), a uniform pore filling across the template still poses a major challenge. Here, we present a large area controlled pore filling strategy in the reproducible fabrication of various magnetic and metallic NW arrays, embedded inside anodic aluminum oxide templates. Using a diffusive pulsed electrodeposition (DPED) technique, this versatile strategy relies on the optimized filling of branched nanopores at the bottom of templates with Cu. Serving the Cu filled nanopores as appropriate nucleation sites, the DPED is followed by a uniform and homogeneous deposition of magnetic (Ni and Fe) and metallic (Cu and Zn) NWs at a current density of 50 mA cm‑2 for an optimal thickness of alumina barrier layer (∼18 nm). Our strategy provides large area uniformity (exceeding 400 μm2) in the fabrication of 16 μm long free-standing NW arrays. Using hysteresis loop measurements and scanning electron microscopy images, the electrodeposition efficiency (EE) and pore filling percentage (F p) are evaluated, leading to maximum EE and F p values of 91% and 95% for Ni and Zn, respectively. Moreover, the resulting NW arrays are found to be highly crystalline. Accordingly, the DPED technique is capable of cheaply and efficiently controlling NW growth over a large area, providing a tool for various nanoscale applications including biomedical devices, electronics, photonics, magnetic storage medium and nanomagnet computing.

  4. Effect of hydrodynamic interaction on energy harvesting in arrays of ionic polymer metal composites vibrating in a viscous fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we investigate underwater energy harvesting of a parallel array of nominally identical ionic polymer metal composites (IPMCs) subjected to low frequency base excitation in water. The IPMCs are connected in parallel and shunted with a varying resistor. We model the IPMCs as slender beams with uniform cross section undergoing small oscillations in an otherwise quiescent viscous fluid. We utilize a boundary element approach to compute the hydrodynamic loading on each structure, which is due to the oscillations of the whole array. Leveraging recent findings on sensing in ionic polymer metal composites, we propose a coupled electromechanical model for predicting energy harvesting as a function of the IPMCs’ impedance and the base excitation. To validate our theoretical predictions, we perform experiments on an in-house-fabricated array of five centimeter-size composites, which we characterize on a dedicated test rig. We experimentally determine the power harvested by varying the excitation frequency in the broad range 2–35 Hz and the shunting resistance from 1 to 1000 Ω. (paper)

  5. Surface plasmon enhanced quantum transport in a hybrid metal nanoparticle array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lin; Nan, Yali; Xu, Shang; Zhang, Sishi; Han, Min

    2014-07-01

    Hybrid Pd-Ag nanoparticle arrays composed of randomly distributed Pd nanoparticles in dense packing and a small number of dispersed Ag nanoparticles were fabricated with controlled coverage. Photo-enhanced conductance was observed in the nanoparticle arrays. Largest enhancement, which can be higher than 20 folds, was obtained with 450 nm light illumination. This wavelength was found to correlate with the surface plasmon resonance of the Ag nanoparticles. Electron transport measurements showed there were significant Coulomb blockade in the nanoparticle arrays and the blockade could be overcome with the surface plasmon enhanced local field of Ag nanoparticles induced by light illumination.

  6. Electronically controlled optical beam-steering by an active phased array of metallic nanoantennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRose, C T; Kekatpure, R D; Trotter, D C; Starbuck, A; Wendt, J R; Yaacobi, A; Watts, M R; Chettiar, U; Engheta, N; Davids, P S

    2013-02-25

    An optical phased array of nanoantenna fabricated in a CMOS compatible silicon photonics process is presented. The optical phased array is fed by low loss silicon waveguides with integrated ohmic thermo-optic phase shifters capable of 2π phase shift with ∼ 15 mW of applied electrical power. By controlling the electrical power to the individual integrated phase shifters fixed wavelength steering of the beam emitted normal to the surface of the wafer of 8° is demonstrated for 1 × 8 phased arrays with periods of both 6 and 9 μm. PMID:23482053

  7. Optimal control of light propagation and exciton transfer in arrays of molecular-like noble-metal clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisinetskaya, Polina G.; Mitrić, Roland

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate theoretically the possibility of optimal control of light propagation and exciton transfer in arrays constructed of subnanometer sized noble-metal clusters by using phase-shaped laser pulses and analyze the mechanism underlying this process. The theoretical approach for simulation of light propagation in the arrays is based on the numerical solution of the coupled time-dependent Schrödinger equation and the classical electric field propagation in an iterative self-consistent manner. The electronic eigenstates of individual clusters and the dipole couplings are obtained from ab initio TDDFT calculations. The total electric field is propagated along the array by coupling an external excitation electric field with the electric fields produced by all clusters. A genetic algorithm is used to determine optimal pulse shapes which drive the excitation in a desired direction. The described theoretical approach is applied to control the light propagation and exciton transfer dynamics into a T-shaped structure built of seven Ag8 clusters. We demonstrate that a selective switching of light localization is possible in ˜5 nm sized cluster arrays which might serve as a building block for plasmonic devices with an ultrafast operation regime.

  8. Surface plasmon enhanced quantum transport in a hybrid metal nanoparticle array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Lin; Nan, Yali; Xu, Shang; Zhang, Sishi; Han, Min, E-mail: sjhanmin@nju.edu.cn

    2014-07-18

    Hybrid Pd–Ag nanoparticle arrays composed of randomly distributed Pd nanoparticles in dense packing and a small number of dispersed Ag nanoparticles were fabricated with controlled coverage. Photo-enhanced conductance was observed in the nanoparticle arrays. Largest enhancement, which can be higher than 20 folds, was obtained with 450 nm light illumination. This wavelength was found to correlate with the surface plasmon resonance of the Ag nanoparticles. Electron transport measurements showed there were significant Coulomb blockade in the nanoparticle arrays and the blockade could be overcome with the surface plasmon enhanced local field of Ag nanoparticles induced by light illumination. - Highlights: • We study photo-enhanced electron conductance of a hybrid Pd–Ag nanoparticle array. • The light-induced conductance enhancement is as high as 20 folds at 10 K. • The enhancement is correlate with the surface plasmon resonance of Ag nanoparticles. • Coulomb blockades is overcome with the surface plasmon enhanced local field.

  9. Electrically isolated, high melting point, metal wire arrays and method of making same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, John T.; Cunningham, Joseph P.; D' Urso, Brian R.; Hendricks, Troy R.; Schaeffer, Daniel A.

    2016-01-26

    A method of making a wire array includes the step of providing a tube of a sealing material and having an interior surface, and positioning a wire in the tube, the wire having an exterior surface. The tube is heated to soften the tube, and the softened tube is drawn and collapsed by a mild vacuum to bring the interior surface of the tube into contact with the wire to create a coated wire. The coated wires are bundled. The bundled coated wires are heated under vacuum to fuse the tube material coating the wires and create a fused rod with a wire array embedded therein. The fused rod is cut to form a wire array. A wire array is also disclosed.

  10. Polymer packaging for arrayed ionic polymer–metal composites and its application to micro air vehicle control surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, ionic polymer–metal composite (IPMC) actuators arrayed in horizontal as well as vertical directions were investigated for more effective actuation performance. A very thin polymer packaging structure named 'glove' was designed and fabricated, and the IPMC package, composed of the glove and the arrayed IPMCs, was applied to the multifunctional control surface of a micro air vehicle (MAV). The IPMC package is light and space-saving, and therefore appropriate for the application of a MAV which has a limitation in weight and size. A wind tunnel test was performed to demonstrate the capability of the IPMC package for the control surface of a MAV and it was confirmed that the package generates enough force to maneuver a MAV

  11. Recognition- and Reactivity-Based Fluorescent Probes for Studying Transition Metal Signaling in Living Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Aron, Allegra T.; Ramos-Torres, Karla M.; Cotruvo, Joseph A.; Chang, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus Metals are essential for life, playing critical roles in all aspects of the central dogma of biology (e.g., the transcription and translation of nucleic acids and synthesis of proteins). Redox-inactive alkali, alkaline earth, and transition metals such as sodium, potassium, calcium, and zinc are widely recognized as dynamic signals, whereas redox-active transition metals such as copper and iron are traditionally thought of as sequestered by protein ligands, including as static enzy...

  12. Sub-10 nm feature chromium photomasks for contact lithography patterning of square metal ring arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Woongkyu; Rhie, Jiyeah; Kim, Na Yeon; Hong, Seunghun; Kim, Dai-Sik

    2016-03-01

    Advances in photolithographic processes have allowed semiconductor industries to manufacture smaller and denser chips. As the feature size of integrated circuits becomes smaller, there has been a growing need for a photomask embedded with ever narrower patterns. However, it is challenging for electron beam lithography to obtain film, on 1 cm by 1 cm quartz substrate. These patterns were then used as a contact-lithography photomask using 365 nm I-line, to generate metal ring arrays on silicon substrate.

  13. Experimental study on the effect of boundary condition for transmission properties of periodical metal hole arrays in terahertz range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiaming; Xie, Le; Gao, Chunmei; Li, Zhou; Chen, Lin; Zhu, Yiming

    2013-08-01

    A metal hole arrays terahertz filter based on surface plasmon polaritons and fabricated by aluminum slab of different holes scales have been experimentally investigated by using THz time-domain spectroscopy system from 0.1 to 2.7 THz. The experiment results indicated there is a transmission peak at 0.26 THz, approximately. The results in simulation by finite element method agree well with the experimental one for the big scale sample. The mismatch of experimental and simulated results for small scale sample can be attributed to boundary condition and insufficient periodical extension. Further, the theoretical analyses about extraordinary optical transmission and filter phenomena are also discussed.

  14. Assessment of Material Properties of Gallium Orthophosphate Piezoelectric Elements for Development of Phased Array Probes for Continuous Operation at 580°C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostan, Mario; Mohimi, Abbas; Nageswaran, Channa; Kappatos, Vassilios; Cheng, Liang; Gan, Tat-Hean; Wrobel, Luiz; Selcuk, Cem

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the thickness extension mode gallium orthophosphate single crystal elements were characterised using the impedance analyser. Impedance characteristics of piezoelectric elements were investigated at temperatures from 25°C up to 580°C at first and then at a constant temperature of 580°C for a period of 25 days. The resonant and anti-resonant frequencies extracted from the impedance characteristics, capacitance (measured at 1 kHz), density and dimensions of the gallium orthophosphate elements were used to calculate electromechanical, piezoelectric and elastic properties of these elements at high temperatures as a function of time. The tested gallium orthophosphate elements proved to possess very stable efficiency and sensing capability when subjected to high temperature. The results are very encouraging for proceeding with development of phased array probes using gallium orthophosphate, for inspection and condition monitoring of high temperature pipelines in power plants at a temperature up to 580°C.

  15. Metal-based optical probes for live cell imaging of nitroxyl (HNO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Fuentes, Pablo; Lippard, Stephen J

    2015-11-17

    Nitroxyl (HNO) is a biological signaling agent that displays distinctive reactivity compared to nitric oxide (NO). As a consequence, these two reactive nitrogen species trigger different physiological responses. Selective detection of HNO over NO has been a challenge for chemists, and several fluorogenic molecular probes have been recently developed with that goal in mind. Common constructs take advantage of the HNO-induced reduction of Cu(II) to Cu(I). The sensing mechanism of such probes relies on the ability of the unpaired electron in a d orbital of the Cu(II) center to quench the fluorescence of a photoemissive ligand by either an electron or energy transfer mechanism. Experimental and theoretical mechanistic studies suggest that proton-coupled electron transfer mediates this process, and careful tuning of the copper coordination environment has led to sensors with optimized selectivity and kinetics. The current optical probes cover the visible and near-infrared regions of the spectrum. This palette of sensors comprises structurally and functionally diverse fluorophores such as coumarin (blue/green emission), boron dipyrromethane (BODIPY, green emission), benzoresorufin (red emission), and dihydroxanthenes (near-infrared emission). Many of these sensors have been successfully applied to detect HNO production in live cells. For example, copper-based optical probes have been used to detect HNO production in live mammalian cells that have been treated with H2S and various nitrosating agents. These studies have established a link between HSNO, the smallest S-nitrosothiol, and HNO. In addition, a near-infrared HNO sensor has been used to perform multicolor/multianalyte microscopy, revealing that exogenously applied HNO elevates the concentration of intracellular mobile zinc. This mobilization of zinc ions is presumably a consequence of nitrosation of cysteine residues in zinc-chelating proteins such as metallothionein. Future challenges for the optical imaging of

  16. CuCl2 for the isolation of a broad array of endohedral fullerenes containing metallic, metallic carbide, metallic nitride, and metallic oxide clusters, and separation of their structural isomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Steven; Rottinger, Khristina A

    2013-08-19

    A typical arc-synthesis generates many types of fullerenes and endohedrals. Resulting soot extracts contain a complex mixture of >50 types of fullerenes, metallofullerenes, and their structural isomers. Prior to application development, novel separation methods are required to fractionate this rich array of metallic, metallic carbide, metallic nitride, and metallic oxide endohedrals, all of which can be present in a single, soot extract. Herein, we report the discovery of CuCl2 as a Lewis acid that will selectively precipitate only the more reactive members of each of these endohedral families. The more reactive Sc4O2@Ih-C80, Sc3C2@Ih-C80, and Sc3N@D3h-C78 endohedrals are quickly removed from extracts to greatly decrease the number of endohedrals present in a sample. Experiments indicate that enrichment factors of several orders of magnitude can be achieved within minutes of reaction time. CuCl2 also has sufficient selectivity to resolve and separate structural isomers, as demonstrated with Er2@C82 (isomer I, Cs(6)-C82 versus isomer III). The selective complexation of CuCl2 with fullerenes can be correlated to their first oxidation potential. We estimate a significantly lower threshold of precipitation for CuCl2 (strategies for metallofullerenes. PMID:23952569

  17. Self-organized growth of small arrays of metal nanoislands on the surface of poled ion-exchange glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reduto, I. V.; Chervinskii, S. D.; Kamenskii, A. N.; Karpov, D. V.; Lipovskii, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    Self-organized metal nanostructures have been obtained by an original method on the surface of soda-lime glasses. The nanostructures are grown by heat treatment of poled glass substrates in hydrogen upon preliminary ion-exchange introduction of silver. The poling is produced with the aid of a profiled anode electrode. Using the proposed method, it is possible to grow separate metal nanoislands and ordered nanostructures of several islands on the glass surface. The islands are formed in submicron-sized unpoled regions as a result of self-assembly during out-diffusion of silver. Minimum spacing in linear groups of two or three silver islands is 20-30 nm at their characteristic size of about 100 nm. The proposed method allows nanoisland arrays and groups of a few islands to be grown and multiplicated.

  18. Plasmonic Based Sensing Using an Array of Au-Metal Oxide Thin Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joy, N.; Rogers, Phillip H.; Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Carpenter, Michael A.

    2012-12-04

    An optical plasmonic-based sensing array has been developed and tested for the selective and sensitive detection of H2, CO, and NO2 at a temperature of 500°C in an oxygen-containing background. The three element sensing array used Au nanoparticles embedded in separate thin films of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ), CeO2, and TiO2. A peak in the absorbance spectrum due to a localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) on the Au nanoparticles was monitored for each film during gas exposures and showed a blue shift in the peak positions for the reducing gases, H2 and CO, and a red shift for the oxidizing gas NO2. A more in-depth look at the sensing response was performed using the multivariate methods of principal component analysis (PCA) analysis and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) on data from across the entire absorbance spectrum range. Qualitative results from both methods showed good separation between the three analytes for both the full array and the Au-TiO2 sample. Quantification of LDA cluster separation using the Mahalanobis distance showed better cluster separation for the array, but there were some instances with the lowest concentrations where the single Au-TiO2 film had better separation than the array. A second method to quantify cluster separation in LDA space was developed using multidimensional volume analysis of the individual cluster volume, overlapped cluster volume and empty volume between clusters. Compared to the individual sensing elements, the array showed less cluster overlap, smaller cluster volumes, and more space between clusters, all of which were expected for improved separability between the analytes.

  19. Design and development of microwave frequency probes for detecting fatigue micro-cracks at the surface of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fatigue and ageing of metal materials under operation conditions are major concerns in energy production plants. An early and non-destructive diagnostic of surface defects would allow one to carry out relevant preventive maintenance operations without dismantling or prematurely changing healthy components. Nowadays, most of the automated non-destructive testing (NDT) solutions available to detect the surface-breaking defects are based on ultrasound or eddy current techniques. Despite their high sensitivity and spatial resolution, they are unable to meet all the requirements of every real situation. Consequently, in order to supplement the available acoustic and electromagnetic NDT tool-kits, it sounds relevant to evaluate the potential of new techniques to detect micro-cracks on metal surfaces. The aim of this work is the development of microwave methods allowing the detection of surface-breaking defects on metals. In this report, we demonstrate how micro-cracks at the surface of metals can be detected and imaged by using near-field microwave resonators. In particular, we present simulation data and measurement results carried out on mock-ups with EDM rectangular surface notches highlighting the high sensitivity and spatial resolution of the original dual-behavior resonator (DBR) filter probes. (author)

  20. Probing molecular dynamics of metal borohydrides on the surface of mesoporous scaffolds by multinuclear high resolution solid state NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Son-Jong, E-mail: Sonjong@cheme.caltech.edu [Division of Chemistry and Chemical Eng., California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Lee, Hyun-Sook [High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); To, Magnus [Division of Chemistry and Chemical Eng., California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Lee, Young-Su; Cho, Young Whan [High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hyungkeun; Kim, Chul [Department of Chemistry, Hannam University, Daejeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-05

    Graphical abstract: In situ variable temperature multinuclear solid state NMR allows to probe surface wetting, diffusivity, and confinement of metal borohydrides into nanopores. - Abstract: Understanding of surface interactions between borohydride molecules and the surfaces of porous supports have gained growing attention for successful development of nano-confinement engineering. By use of in situ variable temperature (VT) magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR, molecular mobility changes of LiBH{sub 4} crystalline solid has been investigated in the presence of silica based and carbonaceous surfaces. Spin–spin J-coupling of {sup 1}H–{sup 11}B in LiBH{sub 4} was monitored in series of VT NMR spectra to probe translational mobility of LiBH{sub 4} that appeared to be greatly enhanced upon surface contact. Such enhanced diffusivity was found to be effective in the formation of solid solution and co-confinement with other metal borohydrides. Co-confinement of LiBH{sub 4}–Ca(BH{sub 4}){sub 2} mixture was demonstrated at temperature as low as 100 °C, much lower than the reported bulk eutectic melting temperature. The discovery adds a novel property of LiBH{sub 4} that has been proven to be highly versatile in many energy related applications.

  1. Probing molecular dynamics of metal borohydrides on the surface of mesoporous scaffolds by multinuclear high resolution solid state NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: In situ variable temperature multinuclear solid state NMR allows to probe surface wetting, diffusivity, and confinement of metal borohydrides into nanopores. - Abstract: Understanding of surface interactions between borohydride molecules and the surfaces of porous supports have gained growing attention for successful development of nano-confinement engineering. By use of in situ variable temperature (VT) magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR, molecular mobility changes of LiBH4 crystalline solid has been investigated in the presence of silica based and carbonaceous surfaces. Spin–spin J-coupling of 1H–11B in LiBH4 was monitored in series of VT NMR spectra to probe translational mobility of LiBH4 that appeared to be greatly enhanced upon surface contact. Such enhanced diffusivity was found to be effective in the formation of solid solution and co-confinement with other metal borohydrides. Co-confinement of LiBH4–Ca(BH4)2 mixture was demonstrated at temperature as low as 100 °C, much lower than the reported bulk eutectic melting temperature. The discovery adds a novel property of LiBH4 that has been proven to be highly versatile in many energy related applications

  2. [Derivative fluorescence probe recognition results of the light physical mechanism of metal ions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yu-mei; Hu, Xiao-jun; Li, Fu-jun; Xie, Yu-meng; Zhao, Yang-yang; Zhou, Qiao

    2015-02-01

    As people deeply study the electronic spectra of fluorescent compounds and photophysical behavior, enormous progress has been made in the aspect of changes and states of different systems in the use of fluorescent molecules as probes. PTC-DA is a kind of typical fluorescent molecular probe that is highly sensitive and selective in water environment. This paper makes a research on the physical mechanism of light of PTCDA by TDF (Density Functional Theory), calculates the optimal configuration the charge population and excitation spectra of PTCDA molecules under ideal condition and acquires PTCDA fluorescence emission spectra then analyses that PTCDA is a kind of quenching and dual colorimetric signal probe response. Its optical signal response mechanism belongs to ICT (Intramolecular Charge Transfer) mechanism. According to the results, this perylene derivatives is fitted with Cu2+ excited state absorption spectra. Before and after the combination with Cu2+, the peak shape of absorption spectrum is similar. When copper is added, the overall absorption peak position occurred redshift, quenching discoloration happens. By comparing with experimental values, the calculated molecular configuration is reasonable and effective and the peak of excitation spectra is realistic. Analysis shows that: PTCDA molecules divalent copper ions have better fluorescence detection activity, the optical signal response mechanisms are intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) mechanisms. When a molecule receives divalent copper ions, the absorption spectrum peak position redshifts, intramolecular charge transfer direction and intensity changes. There occur both quenching signal and discoloration signal. It is a kind of fluorescent probe material with double quenching and discoloration fluorescent signal, which has great potential for development. This paper makes an early-stage exploration of the physical mechanism of light response mechanism analysis in molecular fluorescent probe field and

  3. Type II-Plateau supernovae as metallicity probes of the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Dessart, L; Hamuy, M; Hillier, D J; Lanz, T; Anderson, J P; Folatelli, G; Freedman, W L; Ley, F; Morrell, N; Persson, S E; Phillips, M M; Stritzinger, M; Suntzeff, N B

    2014-01-01

    We explore a method for metallicity determinations based on quantitative spectroscopy of type II-Plateau (II-P) supernovae (SNe). For consistency, we first evolve a set of 15Msun main sequence stars at 0.1, 0.4, 1, and 2 x the solar metallicity. At the onset of core collapse, we trigger a piston-driven explosion and model the resulting ejecta and radiation. Our theoretical models of such red-supergiant-star explosions at different metallicity show that synthetic spectra of SNe II-P possess optical signatures during the recombination phase that are sensitive to metallicity variations. This sensitivity can be quantified and the metallicity inferred from the strength of metal-line absorptions. Furthermore, these signatures are not limited to O, but also include Na, Ca, Sc, Ti, or Fe. When compared to a sample of SNe II-P from the Carnegie SN Project and previous SN followup programs, we find that most events lie at a metallicity between 0.4 and 2 x solar, with a marked scarcity of SN II-P events at SMC metallici...

  4. Type II-Plateau supernovae as metallicity probes of the Universe

    OpenAIRE

    Dessart, L.; Gutierrez, C. P.; Hamuy, M.; Hillier, D. J.; Lanz, T.; Anderson, J. P.; Folatelli, G.; Freedman, W. L.; De Ley, F.; Morrell, N.; Persson, S. E.; Phillips, M. M.; Stritzinger, M.; Suntzeff, N. B.

    2014-01-01

    We explore a method for metallicity determinations based on quantitative spectroscopy of type II-Plateau (II-P) supernovae (SNe). For consistency, we first evolve a set of 15Msun main sequence stars at 0.1, 0.4, 1, and 2 x the solar metallicity. At the onset of core collapse, we trigger a piston-driven explosion and model the resulting ejecta and radiation. Our theoretical models of such red-supergiant-star explosions at different metallicity show that synthetic spectra of SNe II-P possess op...

  5. Fabrication of periodic arrays of metallic nanoparticles by block copolymer templates on HfO2 substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frascaroli, Jacopo; Seguini, Gabriele; Spiga, Sabina; Perego, Michele; Boarino, Luca

    2015-05-29

    Block copolymer-based templates can be exploited for the fabrication of ordered arrays of metal nanoparticles (NPs) with a diameter down to a few nanometers. In order to develop this technique on metal oxide substrates, we studied the self-assembly of polymeric templates directly on the HfO₂ surface. Using a random copolymer neutralization layer, we obtained an effective HfO₂ surface neutralization, while the effects of surface cleaning and annealing temperature were carefully examined. Varying the block copolymer molecular weight, we produced regular nanoporous templates with feature size variable between 10 and 30 nm and a density up to 1.5 × 10¹¹ cm⁻². With the adoption of a pattern transfer process, we produced ordered arrays of Pt and Pt/Ti NPs with diameters of 12, 21 and 29 nm and a constant size dispersion (σ) of 2.5 nm. For the smallest template adopted, the NP diameter is significantly lower than the original template dimension. In this specific configuration, the granularity of the deposited film probably influences the pattern transfer process and very small NPs of 12 nm were achieved without a significant broadening of the size distribution. PMID:25948389

  6. Investigation of the effects of metal-wire resonators in sub-wavelength array based on time-reversal technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Hui-Lin; Xiao, Shao-Qiu

    2016-05-01

    The resonant metalens consisting of metal-wire resonators with equally finite length can break the diffraction barrier well suited for super-resolution imaging. In this study, a basic combination constructed by two metal-wire resonators with different lengths is proposed, and its resonant characteristics is analyzed using the method of moments (MoM). Based on the time reversal (TR) technique, this kind of combination can be applied to a sub-wavelength two-element antenna array with a 1/40-wavelength interval to make the elements work simultaneously with little interference in the frequency band of 1.0-1.5 GHz and 1.5-2.0 GHz, respectively. The simulations and experiments show that analysis of MoM and the application of the resonators can be used to design multi-frequency sub-wavelength antenna arrays efficiently. This general design method is convenient and can be used for many applications, such as weakening jamming effectiveness in communication systems, and sub-wavelength imaging in a broad frequency band.

  7. Submolecular Imaging by Noncontact Atomic Force Microscopy with an Oxygen Atom Rigidly Connected to a Metallic Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mönig, Harry; Hermoso, Diego R; Díaz Arado, Oscar; Todorović, Milica; Timmer, Alexander; Schüer, Simon; Langewisch, Gernot; Pérez, Rubén; Fuchs, Harald

    2016-01-26

    In scanning probe microscopy, the imaging characteristics in the various interaction channels crucially depend on the chemical termination of the probe tip. Here we analyze the contrast signatures of an oxygen-terminated copper tip with a tetrahedral configuration of the covalently bound terminal O atom. Supported by first-principles calculations we show how this tip termination can be identified by contrast analysis in noncontact atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopy (NC-AFM, STM) on a partially oxidized Cu(110) surface. After controlled tip functionalization by soft indentations of only a few angstroms in an oxide nanodomain, we demonstrate that this tip allows imaging an organic molecule adsorbed on Cu(110) by constant-height NC-AFM in the repulsive force regime, revealing its internal bond structure. In established tip functionalization approaches where, for example, CO or Xe is deliberately picked up from a surface, these probe particles are only weakly bound to the metallic tip, leading to lateral deflections during scanning. Therefore, the contrast mechanism is subject to image distortions, artifacts, and related controversies. In contrast, our simulations for the O-terminated Cu tip show that lateral deflections of the terminating O atom are negligible. This allows a detailed discussion of the fundamental imaging mechanisms in high-resolution NC-AFM experiments. With its structural rigidity, its chemically passivated state, and a high electron density at the apex, we identify the main characteristics of the O-terminated Cu tip, making it a highly attractive complementary probe for the characterization of organic nanostructures on surfaces. PMID:26605698

  8. Enhanced transmission of slit arrays in an extremely thin metallic film

    CERN Document Server

    Moreau, A; Laurent, N; Edee, K; Granet, G; Moreau, Antoine; Lafarge, Christophe; Laurent, Nicolas; Edee, Kofi

    2006-01-01

    We explore the behaviour of slit arrays for very low thicknesses and found that they could constitute very interesting filters. Two mechanisms are responsible for the enhanced transmission depending on the thickness : first, cavity resonances, for a suprisingly low thickness and a resonance whose nature still has to be understood for extremely small thicknesses.

  9. Design of Water Jet for Annular Ultrasonic Phased Array Probe%超声相控阵环阵探头水套设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    岳翔; 徐娜; 沙正骁

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonic annular array water spray testing system was applied to detect electron beam welded defects of major aviation titanium alloy weld assembly.Based on the system,water jet was designed for ultrasonic annular array probe.According to probe sound field curve calculated by CIVA-software,lumen diameter and lumen shape were discussed in order to obtain designing parameter of water jet.Afterwards four types of water jet were designed for the experiment.In view of the experiment it was concluded that the water jet lumen curve should contain probe sound field curve,lumen diameter had greater effect on detection than the lumen shape and adopting vertical wall cylinder water jet could achieve the best effect of detection.In the end,field test verified that using vertical wall cylinder water jet could achieve high sensitivity and meet the needs of the field test.%为了实现大型航空钛合金电子束焊接件的无损检测,采用超声相控阵环阵喷水检测系统。基于此系统,需要为选用的超声相控阵环阵探头设计水套。首先依据 CIVA 仿真软件计算超声相控阵探头声场曲线,通过讨论水套内腔直径及内腔形式,获得水套设计参数。然后设计四种水套并对钛合金试块进行试验。结果表明:水套内腔曲线应当完全包络声场曲线;水套内腔直径比内腔结构对检测效果影响大;采取直筒形水套能获得最佳检测效果。最后通过现场检测,发现采取直筒形水套灵敏度高,能满足现场检测要求。

  10. ATOM PROBE MICROANALYSIS OF WELD METAL IN A SUBMERGED ARC WELDED CHROMIUM-MOLYBDENUM STEEL

    OpenAIRE

    Josefsson, B.; Kvist, A.; Andrén, H.

    1987-01-01

    A submerged arc welded 2.25Cr - 1Mo steel has been investigated using electron microscopy and atom probe field ion microscopy. The bainitic microstructure of the as-welded steel consisted of ferrite and martensite. During heat treatment at 690°C the martensite transformed to ferrite and cementite and needle-shaped (Cr,Mo)2C carbides precipitated. Together with a substantial decrease in dislocation density, this resulted in an improvement of the toughness.

  11. Thermal stability and hcp-fcc allotropic transformation in supported Co metal catalysts probed near operando by ferromagnetic NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, Andrey S; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste; Lapina, Olga B; Gerashenko, Alexander

    2015-06-14

    Despite the fact that cobalt based catalysts are used at the industrial scale for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, it is not yet clear which cobalt metallic phase is actually at work under operando conditions and what is its state of dispersion. As it turns out, the different phases of metallic cobalt, fcc and hcp, give rise to distinct ferromagnetic nuclear magnetic resonance. Furthermore, within one Co metal particle, the occurrence of several ferromagnetic domains of limited sizes can be evidenced by the specific resonance of Co in multi-domain particles. Consequently, by ferromagnetic NMR, one can follow quantitatively the sintering and phase transitions of dispersed Co metal particles in supported catalysts under near operando conditions. The minimal size probed by ferromagnetic Co NMR is not precisely known but is considered to be in the order of 10 nm for supported Co particles at room temperature and increases to about 35 nm at 850 K. Here, in Co metal Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalysts supported on β-SiC, the resonances of the fcc multi-domain, fcc single-domain and hcp Co were clearly distinguished. A careful rationalization of their frequency and width dependence on temperature allowed a quantitative analysis of the spectra in the temperature range of interest, thus reflecting the state of the catalysts under near operando conditions that is without the uncertainty associated with prior quenching. The allotropic transition temperature was found to start at 600-650 K, which is about 50 K below the bulk transition temperature. The phase transition was fully reversible and a significant part of the hcp phase was found to be stable up to 850 K. This anomalous behavior that was observed without quenching might prove to be crucial to understand and model active species not only in catalysts but also in battery materials. PMID:25970204

  12. Bimetallic Metal-Organic Frameworks: Probing the Lewis Acid Site for CO2 Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Ruyi; Li, Pei-Zhou; Zeng, Yong-Fei; Liu, Jia; Zhao, Ruo; Duan, Hui; Luo, Zhong; Wang, Jin-Gui; Zou, Ruqiang; Zhao, Yanli

    2016-05-01

    A highly porous metal-organic framework (MOF) incorporating two kinds of second building units (SBUs), i.e., dimeric paddlewheel (Zn2 (COO)4 ) and tetrameric (Zn4 (O)(CO2 )6 ), is successfully assembled by the reaction of a tricarboxylate ligand with Zn(II) ion. Subsequently, single-crystal-to-single-crystal metal cation exchange using the constructed MOF is investigated, and the results show that Cu(II) and Co(II) ions can selectively be introduced into the MOF without compromising the crystallinity of the pristine framework. This metal cation-exchangeable MOF provides a useful platform for studying the metal effect on both gas adsorption and catalytic activity of the resulted MOFs. While the gas adsorption experiments reveal that Cu(II) and Co(II) exchanged samples exhibit comparable CO2 adsorption capability to the pristine Zn(II) -based MOF under the same conditions, catalytic investigations for the cycloaddition reaction of CO2 with epoxides into related carbonates demonstrate that Zn(II) -based MOF affords the highest catalytic activity as compared with Cu(II) and Co(II) exchanged ones. Molecular dynamic simulations are carried out to further confirm the catalytic performance of these constructed MOFs on chemical fixation of CO2 to carbonates. This research sheds light on how metal exchange can influence intrinsic properties of MOFs. PMID:26900671

  13. Type II supernovae as probes of environment metallicity: observations of host HII regions

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, J P; Dessart, L; Hamuy, M; Galbany, L; Morrell, N I; Stritzinger, M D; Phillips, M M; Folatelli, G; Boffin, H M J; de Jaeger, T; Kuncarayakti, H; Prieto, J L

    2016-01-01

    Spectral modelling of SNII atmospheres indicates a clear dependence of metal line strengths on progenitor metallicity. This motivates further work to evaluate the accuracy with which these SNe can be used as metallicity indicators. To assess this accuracy we present a sample of SNII HII-region spectroscopy, from which environment abundances are derived. These environment abundances are compared to the observed strength of metal lines in SN spectra. Combining our sample with measurements from the literature, we present oxygen abundances of 119 host HII regions, by extracting emission line fluxes and using abundance diagnostics. Then, following Dessart et al., these abundances are compared to equivalent widths of Fe 5018 A at various time and colour epochs. Our distribution of inferred SNII host HII-region abundances has a range of ~0.6 dex. We confirm the dearth of SNeII exploding at metallicities lower than those found (on average) in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The equivalent width of Fe 5018 A at 50 days po...

  14. Optical transmission through hexagonal arrays of subwavelength holes in thin metal films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ctistis, G; Patoka, P; Wang, X; Kempa, K; Giersig, M

    2007-09-01

    We have studied the light transmission through hexagonal arrays of subwavelength holes in thin gold and aluminum films, varying the film thickness between 20 and 120 nm while the hole diameter as well as the interhole distance have been kept constant at approximately 300 and approximately 500 nm, respectively. The films were characterized by means of UV-vis spectroscopy and scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM). PMID:17715985

  15. Electron beam collimation with a 40 000 tip metallic double-gate field emitter array and in-situ control of nanotip sharpness distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Helfenstein, P.; Guzenko, V.A.; Fink, H W; Tsujino, S

    2013-01-01

    The generation of highly collimated electron beams from a double-gate field emitter array with 40000 metallic tips and large collimation gate apertures is reported. Field emission beam measurements demonstrated the reduction of the beam envelope down to the array size by applying a negative potential to the on-chip gate electrode for the collimation of individual field emission beamlets. Owing to the optimized gate structure, the concomitant decrease of the emission current was minimal, leadi...

  16. Triangle pore arrays fabricated on Si (111) substrate by sphere lithography combined with metal-assisted chemical etching and anisotropic chemical etching

    OpenAIRE

    Asoh, Hidetaka; Fujihara, Kosuke; Ono, Sachiko

    2012-01-01

    The morphological change of silicon macropore arrays formed by metal-assisted chemical etching using shape-controlled Au thin film arrays was investigated during anisotropic chemical etching in tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) aqueous solution. After the deposition of Au as the etching catalyst on (111) silicon through a honeycomb mask prepared by sphere lithography, the specimens were etched in a mixed solution of HF and H2O2 at room temperature, resulting in the formation of ordered mac...

  17. Human Leukocyte Antigen Typing Using a Knowledge Base Coupled with a High Throughput Oligonucleotide Probe Array Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir eBrusic

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Human leukocyte antigens (HLA are important biomarkers since multiple diseases, drug toxicity, and vaccine responses reveal strong HLA associations. Current clinical HLA typing is an elimination process requiring serial testing. We present an alternative an in situ synthesized DNA-based microarray method that contains hundreds of thousands of probes representing a complete overlapping set covering 1,610 clinically relevant HLA class I alleles accompanied by computational tools for assigning HLA type to 4-digit resolution. Our proof-of-concept experiment included 21 blood samples, 18 cell lines, and multiple controls. The method is accurate, robust, and amenable to automation. Typing errors were restricted to homozygous samples or those with very closely related alleles from the same locus, but readily resolved by targeted DNA sequencing validation of flagged samples. High-throughput HLA typing technologies that are effective, yet inexpensive, can be used to analyze the world’s populations, benefiting both global public health and personalized health care.

  18. Double-resonance NMR probes of structural distortions in alkali-metal{endash}fulleride superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennington, C.H.; Hahm, C.; Stenger, V.A.; Gorny, K.; Recchia, C.H.; Martindale, J.A. [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, 174 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Buffinger, D.R.; Ziebarth, R.P. [Department of Chemistry, The Ohio State University, 120 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The {sup 87}Rb NMR line shape of the Rb{sub 3}C{sub 60} superconductor contains three distinct peaks: one associated with octahedrally coordinated Rb in the fcc lattice of C{sub 60} molecules and two others, labeled {ital T} and {ital T}{sup {prime}}, both associated with tetrahedrally coordinated Rb. This contrasts with the accepted crystal structure, in which all tetrahedral Rb sites are equivalent. We report multinuclear single and double resonance NMR experiments which probe for effects which could lead to the unexpected splitting, and discuss implications for electronic structure. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  19. Hydrogen detection in metals: a review and introduction of a Kelvin probe approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Evers, Ceylan Senöz and Michael Rohwerder

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen in materials is an important topic for many research fields in materials science. Hence in the past quite a number of different techniques for determining the amount of hydrogen in materials and for measuring hydrogen permeation through them have been developed. Some of these methods have found widespread application. But for many problems the achievable sensitivity is usually not high enough and ready-to-use techniques providing also good spatial resolution, especially in the submicron range, are very limited, and mostly not suitable for widespread application. In this work this situation will be briefly reviewed and a novel scanning probe technique based method introduced.

  20. Organometallic Probe for the Electronics of Base-Stabilized Group 11 Metal Cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunschweig, Holger; Ewing, William C; Kramer, Thomas; Mattock, James D; Vargas, Alfredo; Werner, Christine

    2015-08-24

    A number of trimetalloborides have been synthesized through the reactions of base-stabilized coinage metal chlorides with a dimanganaborylene lithium salt in the hope of using this organometallic platform to compare and evaluate the electronics of these popular coinage metal fragments. The adducts of Cu(I), Ag(I), and Au(I) ions, stabilized by tricyclohexylphosphine (PCy3), N-1,3-bis(4-methylphenyl)imidazol-2-ylidene (ITol), or 1-(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)-3,3,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidin-2-ylidene (CAAC), with [{Cp(CO)2Mn}2B](-) were studied spectroscopically, structurally, and computationally. The geometries of the adducts fall into two classes, one symmetric and one asymmetric, each relying on the combined characteristics of both the metal and ligand. The energetic factors proposed as the causes of the structural differences were investigated by ETS-NOCV (extended transition state-natural orbitals for chemical valence) analysis, which showed the final geometry to be controlled by the competition between the tendency of the coinage metal to adopt a higher or lower coordination number and the willingness of the cationic fragment to participate in back-bonding interactions. PMID:26178571

  1. Fluctuations of the local density of states probe localized surface plasmons on disordered metal films

    CERN Document Server

    Krachmalnicoff, V; De Wilde, Y; Carminati, R

    2010-01-01

    We measure the statistical distribution of the local density of optical states (LDOS) on disordered semi-continuous metal films. We show that LDOS fluctuations exhibit a maximum in a regime where fractal clusters dominate the film surface. These large fluctuations are a signature of surface-plasmon localization on the nanometer scale.

  2. Morphology of sulfonated polyimide ionomers from ESR spectra of paramagnetic transition metal cations and nitroxide spin probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a study of sulfonated polyimide block ionomer membranes (SPIs) in the dry state, and swollen by water, methanol, ethanol, and dioxane. The ionomers are based on a naphthalenic dianhydride, and differ in the ionic exchange capacity and the type of diamine in the hydrophobic block. The ionomers were studied by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy of the paramagnetic transition metal cations Cu+ and VO2+, and of two nitroxide spin probes. The results indicated the existence of separate hydrophobic and hydrophilic domains in the dry and in the swollen membranes. Water clusters with a diameter + or K+. The irreversible increase of the signal intensity upon heating of the dry membranes above 360 K suggests the formation of reactive intermediates that may be involved in ionomer degradation processes. (author)

  3. Probing buried organic-organic and metal-organic heterointerfaces by hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibuta, Masahiro; Eguchi, Toyoaki; Watanabe, Yoshio; Nakajima, Atsushi [JST, ERATO, Nakajima Designer Nanocluster Assembly Project, 3-2-1 Sakado, Takatsu-ku, Kawasaki 213-0012 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Son, Jin-Young; Oji, Hiroshi [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute/SPring8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2012-11-26

    We present a nondestructive characterization method for buried hetero-interfaces for organic/organic and metal/organic systems using hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) which can probe electronic states at depths deeper than {approx}10 nm. A significant interface-derived signal showing a strong chemical interaction is observed for Au deposited onto a C{sub 60} film, while there is no such additional feature for copper phthalocyanine deposited onto a C{sub 60} film reflecting the weak interaction between the molecules in the latter case. A depth analysis with HAXPES reveals that a Au-C{sub 60} intermixed layer with a thickness of 5.1 nm is formed at the interface.

  4. Determination of effective tip geometries in Kelvin probe force microscopy on thin insulating films on metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In scanning probe techniques, accurate height measurements on heterogeneous surfaces are a major requirement. Different electrostatic potentials of various materials have a significant influence on the measured force/current and therefore a direct influence on the tip-sample distance. Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) is based on a dynamic compensation of the electrostatic force while performing non-contact atomic force microscopy measurements. Thus, the influence of the electrostatic potentials can be minimized and accurate height measurements become possible. Here, the study of ultra-thin alkali halide films on Cu(111) investigated by KPFM is presented. This work is focused on the interface between areas of bare Cu(111) and the first layers of salt. The compensation of the electrostatic potential allow us to determine layer heights with high accuracy. The second objective was to elaborate on the characterization of tip geometries across suitable nanostructures. Simulations of measured images are performed with different input parameters, which gives a direct estimation of the effective tip radius and geometry used for the measurements.

  5. Conduction of DNA molecules attached to a disconnected array of metallic Ga nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chepelianskii, A D; Kasumov, A; Gueron, S; Bouchiat, H [Universite Paris-Sud, CNRS, UMR 8502, F-91405 Orsay (France); Klinov, D [Shemyakin-Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya 16/10, Moscow 117871 (Russian Federation); Pietrement, O [UMR 8126 CNRS-IGR-UPS, Institut Gustave-Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France); Lyonnais, S, E-mail: bouchiat@lps.u-psud.fr [Museum National d' Histoire Naturelle, CNRS, UMR7196, Inserm, U565, 43 rue Cuvier, 75005 Paris (France)

    2011-06-15

    We have investigated the conduction over a wide range of temperatures of {lambda} DNA molecules deposited across slits etched through a few-nanometers-thick platinum film. The slits were insulating before DNA deposition but contained metallic Ga nanoparticles, a result of focused ion beam etching. When these nanoparticles were superconducting, we found that they can induce superconductivity through the DNA molecules, even though the main electrodes are nonsuperconducting. These results indicate that minute metallic particles can easily transfer charge carriers to attached DNA molecules and provide a possible reconciliation between apparently contradictory previous experimental results concerning the length over which DNA molecules can conduct electricity.

  6. Light extinction and scattering from individual and arrayed high-aspect-ratio trenches in metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roberts, Alexander Sylvester; Søndergaard, Thomas; Chirumamilla, Manohar; Pors, Anders Lambertus; Beermann, Jonas; Pedersen, Kjeld; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the scattering properties of two-dimensional high-aspect-ratio metal trenches acting as resonators for gap-surface plasmons and show that these resonators are highly efficient scatterers of free waves, reaching at resonance in the perfect-conductor limit the unitary dipolar limit for...... only on the resonance wavelength. For real metals with nonzero absorption, efficient monomaterial absorbers and emitters can be fabricated. We extend the analysis to tapering trenches that can be readily fabricated employing common milling or etching techniques and verify by reflection spectroscopy and...

  7. Probing ferroic transitions in a multiferroic framework family: a neutron diffraction study of the ammonium transition metal formates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, James M M; Manuel, Pascal; Thompson, Amber L; Saines, Paul J

    2015-07-01

    This study probes the magnetic and ferroelectric ordering of the NH4M(HCO2)3 (M = Mn(2+), Fe(2+), Co(2+) and Ni(2+)) frameworks using neutron diffraction, improving the understanding of the origins of the properties of these fascinating multiferroics. This rare study of the magnetic structure of a family of metal-organic frameworks shows that all four compounds exhibit antiferromagnetic coupling between neighbouring cations bridged by formate ligands. The orientation of the spin, however, changes in a highly unusual way across the series with the spins aligned along the c-axis for the Fe(2+) and Ni(2+) frameworks but lying in the ab plane for the other members of the series. This work also sheds new light on the nature of the ferroelectric order-disorder transition in these materials; probing changes in the ammonium cation across the transition and also shows that the Ni(2+) framework does not undergo a transition to the polar P63 phase due to the smaller size of the Ni(2+) cation. Finally trends in their anisotropic negative thermal expansion, which potentially enhances their ferroic behaviour, are quantified. PMID:26040906

  8. Transmission enhancement through square coaxial apertures arrays in metallic film: when leaky modes filter infrared light

    CERN Document Server

    Vial, Benjamin; Dallaporta, Hervé; Commandré, Mireille; Demésy, Guillaume; Nicolet, André; Zolla, Frédéric; Tisserand, Stéphane; Roux, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    We consider arrays of square coaxial apertures in a gold layer and study their diffractive behavior in the far infrared region. These structures exhibit a resonant transmission enhancement that is used to design tunable bandpass filters. We provide a study of their spectral features and show by a modal analysis that the resonance peak is due to the excitation of leaky modes of the open photonic structure. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrophotometry transmission measurements of samples deposited on Si substrate show good agreement with numerical results and demonstrate angular tolerance up to 30 degrees of the fabricated filters.

  9. Extreme optical activity and circular dichroism of chiral metal hole arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Gorkunov, M V; Artemov, V V; Rogov, O Y; Yudin, S G

    2014-01-01

    We report extremely strong optical activity and circular dichroism exhibited by subwavelength arrays of four-start-screw holes fabricated with one-pass focused ion beam milling of freely suspended silver films. Having the fourth order rotational symmetry, the structures exhibit the polarization rotation up to 90 degrees and peaks of full circular dichroism and operate as circular polarizers within certain ranges of wavelengths in the visible. We discuss the observations on the basis of general principles (symmetry, reciprocity and reversibility) and conclude that the extreme optical chirality is determined by the chiral localized plasmonic resonances.

  10. A versatile LabVIEW and field-programmable gate array-based scanning probe microscope for in operando electronic device characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Andrew J.; Page, Michael R.; Jacob, Jan; Young, Justin R.; Lewis, Jim; Wenzel, Lothar; Bhallamudi, Vidya P.; Johnston-Halperin, Ezekiel; Pelekhov, Denis V.; Hammel, P. Chris

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the complex properties of electronic and spintronic devices at the micro- and nano-scale is a topic of intense current interest as it becomes increasingly important for scientific progress and technological applications. In operando characterization of such devices by scanning probe techniques is particularly well-suited for the microscopic study of these properties. We have developed a scanning probe microscope (SPM) which is capable of both standard force imaging (atomic, magnetic, electrostatic) and simultaneous electrical transport measurements. We utilize flexible and inexpensive FPGA (field-programmable gate array) hardware and a custom software framework developed in National Instrument's LabVIEW environment to perform the various aspects of microscope operation and device measurement. The FPGA-based approach enables sensitive, real-time cantilever frequency-shift detection. Using this system, we demonstrate electrostatic force microscopy of an electrically biased graphene field-effect transistor device. The combination of SPM and electrical transport also enables imaging of the transport response to a localized perturbation provided by the scanned cantilever tip. Facilitated by the broad presence of LabVIEW in the experimental sciences and the openness of our software solution, our system permits a wide variety of combined scanning and transport measurements by providing standardized interfaces and flexible access to all aspects of a measurement (input and output signals, and processed data). Our system also enables precise control of timing (synchronization of scanning and transport operations) and implementation of sophisticated feedback protocols, and thus should be broadly interesting and useful to practitioners in the field.

  11. A versatile LabVIEW and field-programmable gate array-based scanning probe microscope for in operando electronic device characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Andrew J., E-mail: berger.156@osu.edu; Page, Michael R.; Young, Justin R.; Bhallamudi, Vidya P.; Johnston-Halperin, Ezekiel; Pelekhov, Denis V.; Hammel, P. Chris [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Jacob, Jan [Werum Software and Systems CIS AG, Wulf-Werum-Straße 3, 21337 Lüneburg (Germany); Lewis, Jim; Wenzel, Lothar [National Instruments, Austin, Texas 78759 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Understanding the complex properties of electronic and spintronic devices at the micro- and nano-scale is a topic of intense current interest as it becomes increasingly important for scientific progress and technological applications. In operando characterization of such devices by scanning probe techniques is particularly well-suited for the microscopic study of these properties. We have developed a scanning probe microscope (SPM) which is capable of both standard force imaging (atomic, magnetic, electrostatic) and simultaneous electrical transport measurements. We utilize flexible and inexpensive FPGA (field-programmable gate array) hardware and a custom software framework developed in National Instrument's LabVIEW environment to perform the various aspects of microscope operation and device measurement. The FPGA-based approach enables sensitive, real-time cantilever frequency-shift detection. Using this system, we demonstrate electrostatic force microscopy of an electrically biased graphene field-effect transistor device. The combination of SPM and electrical transport also enables imaging of the transport response to a localized perturbation provided by the scanned cantilever tip. Facilitated by the broad presence of LabVIEW in the experimental sciences and the openness of our software solution, our system permits a wide variety of combined scanning and transport measurements by providing standardized interfaces and flexible access to all aspects of a measurement (input and output signals, and processed data). Our system also enables precise control of timing (synchronization of scanning and transport operations) and implementation of sophisticated feedback protocols, and thus should be broadly interesting and useful to practitioners in the field.

  12. A versatile LabVIEW and field-programmable gate array-based scanning probe microscope for in operando electronic device characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Andrew J; Page, Michael R; Jacob, Jan; Young, Justin R; Lewis, Jim; Wenzel, Lothar; Bhallamudi, Vidya P; Johnston-Halperin, Ezekiel; Pelekhov, Denis V; Hammel, P Chris

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the complex properties of electronic and spintronic devices at the micro- and nano-scale is a topic of intense current interest as it becomes increasingly important for scientific progress and technological applications. In operando characterization of such devices by scanning probe techniques is particularly well-suited for the microscopic study of these properties. We have developed a scanning probe microscope (SPM) which is capable of both standard force imaging (atomic, magnetic, electrostatic) and simultaneous electrical transport measurements. We utilize flexible and inexpensive FPGA (field-programmable gate array) hardware and a custom software framework developed in National Instrument's LabVIEW environment to perform the various aspects of microscope operation and device measurement. The FPGA-based approach enables sensitive, real-time cantilever frequency-shift detection. Using this system, we demonstrate electrostatic force microscopy of an electrically biased graphene field-effect transistor device. The combination of SPM and electrical transport also enables imaging of the transport response to a localized perturbation provided by the scanned cantilever tip. Facilitated by the broad presence of LabVIEW in the experimental sciences and the openness of our software solution, our system permits a wide variety of combined scanning and transport measurements by providing standardized interfaces and flexible access to all aspects of a measurement (input and output signals, and processed data). Our system also enables precise control of timing (synchronization of scanning and transport operations) and implementation of sophisticated feedback protocols, and thus should be broadly interesting and useful to practitioners in the field. PMID:25554296

  13. A versatile LabVIEW and field-programmable gate array-based scanning probe microscope for in operando electronic device characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding the complex properties of electronic and spintronic devices at the micro- and nano-scale is a topic of intense current interest as it becomes increasingly important for scientific progress and technological applications. In operando characterization of such devices by scanning probe techniques is particularly well-suited for the microscopic study of these properties. We have developed a scanning probe microscope (SPM) which is capable of both standard force imaging (atomic, magnetic, electrostatic) and simultaneous electrical transport measurements. We utilize flexible and inexpensive FPGA (field-programmable gate array) hardware and a custom software framework developed in National Instrument's LabVIEW environment to perform the various aspects of microscope operation and device measurement. The FPGA-based approach enables sensitive, real-time cantilever frequency-shift detection. Using this system, we demonstrate electrostatic force microscopy of an electrically biased graphene field-effect transistor device. The combination of SPM and electrical transport also enables imaging of the transport response to a localized perturbation provided by the scanned cantilever tip. Facilitated by the broad presence of LabVIEW in the experimental sciences and the openness of our software solution, our system permits a wide variety of combined scanning and transport measurements by providing standardized interfaces and flexible access to all aspects of a measurement (input and output signals, and processed data). Our system also enables precise control of timing (synchronization of scanning and transport operations) and implementation of sophisticated feedback protocols, and thus should be broadly interesting and useful to practitioners in the field

  14. Apparatus for measuring local stress of metallic films, using an array of parallel laser beams during rapid thermal processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The novel apparatus described here was developed to investigate the thermo-mechanical behavior of metallic films on a substrate by acquiring the wafer curvature. It comprises an optical module producing and measuring an array of parallel laser beams, a high resolution scanning stage, a rapid thermal processing (RTP) chamber and several accessorial gas control modules. Unlike most traditional systems which only calculate the average wafer curvature, this system has the capability to measure the curvature locally in 30 ms. Consequently, the real-time development of biaxial stress involved in thin films can be fully captured during any thermal treatments such as temperature cycling or annealing processes. In addition, the multiple parallel laser beam technique cancels electrical, vibrational and other random noise sources that would otherwise make an in situ measurement very difficult. Furthermore, other advanced features such as the in situ acid treatment and active cooling extend the experimental conditions to provide new insights into thin film properties and material behavior

  15. Enhanced Optical Transmission and Sensing of a Thin Metal Film Perforated with a Compound Subwavelength Circular Hole Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangnan; Liu, Guiqiang; Liu, Zhengqi; Hu, Ying; Cai, Zhengjie

    2015-12-01

    We propose and numerically investigate the optical transmission behaviors of a sub-wavelength metal film perforated with a two-dimensional square array of compound circular holes. Enhanced optical transmission is obtained by using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, which can be mainly attributed to the excitation and coupling of localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) and surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), and Fano Resonances. The redshift of the transmission peak can be achieved by enlarging the size and number of small holes, the environmental dielectric constant. These indicate that the proposed structure has potential applications in integrated optoelectronic devices such as plasmonic filters and sensors. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11464019, 11264017, 11004088), Young Scientist Development Program of China (No. 20142BCB23008) and the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangxi Province, China (Nos. 2014BAB212001, 20112BBE5033)

  16. Imaging and analysis of closed stress corrosion cracks in Ni-based alloy weld metal using subharmonic phased array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Closed stress corrosion cracks (SCCs) in Ni-based alloy weld metal (NBAWM) lead to a problem of underestimation or overlook in ultrasonic inspection, resulting in catastrophic accidents such as radiation leaks. For application of new inspection methods to solve this problem, and for training/education of inspection, fabrication of realistic of realistic closed SCC specimens is required, through it takes many years. Here we propose a two-step process to form closed SCCs in NBAWM in relatively short time of several months. This method first forms an open SCC by accelerated chemical methods and then close it by a short time immersion in high temperature pressurized water (HTPW). The crack closure was verified by subharmonic phased array for crack evaluation (SPACE), capable of measuring closed SCC. In addition, we developed an FDTD (finite difference time domain) method with damped double node (DDN) model of closed crack for 2D simulation of subharmonic generation. (author)

  17. Apparatus for measuring local stress of metallic films, using an array of parallel laser beams during rapid thermal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, R.; Taylor, C. A.; Himmelsbach, S.; Ceric, H.; Detzel, T.

    2010-05-01

    The novel apparatus described here was developed to investigate the thermo-mechanical behavior of metallic films on a substrate by acquiring the wafer curvature. It comprises an optical module producing and measuring an array of parallel laser beams, a high resolution scanning stage, a rapid thermal processing (RTP) chamber and several accessorial gas control modules. Unlike most traditional systems which only calculate the average wafer curvature, this system has the capability to measure the curvature locally in 30 ms. Consequently, the real-time development of biaxial stress involved in thin films can be fully captured during any thermal treatments such as temperature cycling or annealing processes. In addition, the multiple parallel laser beam technique cancels electrical, vibrational and other random noise sources that would otherwise make an in situ measurement very difficult. Furthermore, other advanced features such as the in situ acid treatment and active cooling extend the experimental conditions to provide new insights into thin film properties and material behavior.

  18. Effect of a dielectric substrate with a subwavelength thickness on light diffraction by rectangular hole arrays on metallic film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, D. J.; Jeong, M. S. [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, S. B. [Incheon National University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    A theoretical study of the effect of ultrathin dielectric substrate in THz wave diffraction phenomena on a subwavelength nanostructured system is conducted. The proposed system is composed of a dielectric substrate with a thickness of ∼ λ/1000 and a subwavelength-scaled rectangular hole array on a metal thin film in THz wavelength region. A modified Rayleigh diffraction theory has been developed to take into account the contribution of reflection at the air-substrate interface. A calculation of the terahertz transmission while varying the thickness shows that the effect of a thin dielectric substrate starts to vanish when the thickness becomes ∼1/100 of the incident light's wavelength. Theoretically, the results are well explained because most electric fields are confined near the rectangular aperture, which results in the dominant existence of the field inside the thin substrate. Additionally, the effect of a thin dispersive substrate is discussed.

  19. Photo-induced charge-orbital switching in transition-metal compounds probed by photoemission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takubo, K; Mizokawa, T [Department of Physics and Department of Complexity Science and Engineering, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan); Takubo, N; Miyano, K [Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology (RCAST), University of Tokyo, Tokyo 153-8904 (Japan); Matsumoto, N; Nagata, S, E-mail: takubo@sces.k.u-tokyo.ac.j [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Muroran Institute of Technology, 27-1 Mizumoto-cho, Muroran, Hokkaido, 050-8585 Japan (Japan)

    2009-02-01

    Transition-metal compounds with spin, charge, and orbital degrees of freedom tend to have frustrated electronic states coupled with local lattice distortions and to show drastic response to external stimuli such as photo-excitation. We have studied the charge-orbital states in perovskite-type Pr{sub 0.55}(Ca{sub 1-y}Sr{sub y}){sub 0.45}MnO{sub 3} thin films (PCSMO) and spinel-type CuIr{sub 2}S{sub 4} using photoemission spectroscopy combined with additional laser illumination. PCSMO and CuIr{sub 2}S{sub 4} are clear-cut examples of transition-metal compounds showing photo-induced metallic conductivities but the charge-orbital states in the two systems show contrasting responses to the photo-excitation. The charge-orbital states in PCSMO are stabilized by Jahn-Teller or Breathing-type lattice distortions and can be destroyed by photo-excitation. On the other hand, the charge-orbital states in CuIr{sub 2}S{sub 4} are stabilized by dimer formation and tend to be robust against photo-excitation.

  20. Probing the galactic disk and halo: Metal abundances in the Magellanic Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Limin; Savage, Blair D.; Sembach, Kenneth R.

    1994-01-01

    We derive metal abundance limits for two clouds in the Magellanic Stream using Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) medium resolution spectra of the Seyfert galaxy Fairall 9. We find Si/H is greater than or equal to 0.2 solar and S/H is less than or equal to 0.9 solar for the +170 km/s cloud with a N(H I) = 2 x 10(exp 19)/sq cm and Si/H is greater than or equal to 0.07 solar and S/H is less than or equal to 0.3 solar for the +210 km/s cloud with a N(H I) = 6 x 10(exp 19)/sq cm. These abundance limits rule out the Magellanic Stream as primordial gas. The metal abundance limits are consistent with the Magellanic Cloud abundances. If the two Magellanic Stream clouds have the same metal abundances, then Si/H is greater than or equal to 0.2 solar and S/H is less than or equal to 0.3 solar for the gas. The ratio Si/S is then greater than or equal to 0.6 of the solar ratio, suggesting that dust depletion is probably not very significant in the Magellanic Stream.

  1. Photoinduced energy-transfer in covalently and non-covalently linked supramolecular arrays of metal polypyridyl complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Ward

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Photoinduced energy-transfer has been studied between the component parts of two types of multichromophoric array. In the first type the components (metal polypyridyl complexes are covalently linked by using the bridging ligand 2,2′:3′,2″:6″,2′″-quaterpyridine, which has two inequivalent bipyridyl chelating sites in close proximity. Structural, redox and photophysical studies of the complexes based on this ligand show how the properties of each metal fragment vary between the two inequivalent binding sites, and show also how efficient inter-component energy transfer can occur between components, with an example of the antenna effect being demonstrated by energy transfer from three peripheral {Re(bipy(CO3CL} fragments to one central {Ru(bipy3}2+ fragment. In the second type of supramolecular array, the mononuclear complex component parts are held together by hydrogen-bonding between peripheral adenine, thymine, cytosine or guanine nucleobase groups. Thus a {Ru(bipy3}2+ derivative with a pendant cytosine group strongly associates in CH2CL2 solution with an {Os(bipy3}2+ complex bearing a pendant guanine group, by Watson-Crick base-pair formation (Ka≈5000M-1, and Ru→Os photoinduced energy-transfer can occur across the triple hydrogen-bonded bridge.

  2. Progress in the development and demonstration of a 2D-matrix phased array ultrasonic probe for under-sodium viewing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larche, M. R.; Baldwin, D. L.; Edwards, M. K.; Mathews, R. A.; Prowant, M. S.; Diaz, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    Optically opaque liquid sodium used in liquid metal fast reactors poses a unique set of challenges for nondestructive evaluation. The opaque nature of the sodium prevents visual examinations of components within this medium, but ultrasonic waves are able to propagate through sodium so an ultrasonic testing (UT) technique can be applied for imaging objects in sodium. A UT sensor used in liquid sodium during a refueling outage must be capable of withstanding the 260°C corrosive environment and must also be able to wet (couple the ultrasonic waves) so that sound can propagate into the sodium. A multi-year iterative design effort, based on earlier work in the 1970s, has set out to improve the design and fabrication processes needed for a UT sensor technology capable of overcoming the temperature and wetting issues associated with this environment. Robust materials and improved fabrication processes have resulted in single-element sensors and two different linear-array sensors that have functioned in liquid sodium. More recent efforts have been focused on improving signal-to-noise ratio and image resolution in the highly attenuating liquid sodium. In order to accomplish this, modeling and simulation tools were used to design a 60-element 2D phased-array sensor operating at 2 MHz that features a separate transmitter and receiver. This design consists of 30 transmit elements and another 30 receive elements, each arranged in a rectangular matrix pattern that is 10 rows tall and 3 wide. The fabrication of this 2D array is currently underway and will be followed by a series of performance tests in water, hot oil, and finally in liquid sodium at 260°C. The performance testing cycle will evaluate multiple characteristics of the sensor that are crucial to performance including: transmit-uniformity, element sensitivity variations, element-to-element energy leakage, sound field dimensions, and spatial resolution. This paper will present a summary of results from the previous UT

  3. Kelvin probe imaging of photo-injected electrons in metal oxide nanosheets from metal sulfide quantum dots under remote photochromic coloration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, A.; Yin, G.; Srinivasan, N.; Atarashi, D.; Sakai, E.; Miyauchi, M.

    2015-07-01

    Metal oxide and quantum dot (QD) heterostructures have attracted considerable recent attention as materials for developing efficient solar cells, photocatalysts, and display devices, thus nanoscale imaging of trapped electrons in these heterostructures provides important insight for developing efficient devices. In the present study, Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) of CdS quantum dot (QD)-grafted Cs4W11O362- nanosheets was performed before and after visible-light irradiation. After visible-light excitation of the CdS QDs, the Cs4W11O362- nanosheet surface exhibited a decreased work function in the vicinity of the junction with CdS QDs, even though the Cs4W11O362- nanosheet did not absorb visible light. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that W5+ species were formed in the nanosheet after visible-light irradiation. These results demonstrated that excited electrons in the CdS QDs were injected and trapped in the Cs4W11O362- nanosheet to form color centers. Further, the CdS QDs and Cs4W11O362- nanosheet composite films exhibited efficient remote photochromic coloration, which was attributed to the quantum nanostructure of the film. Notably, the responsive wavelength of the material is tunable by adjusting the size of QDs, and the decoloration rate is highly efficient, as the required length for trapped electrons to diffuse into the nanosheet surface is very short owing to its nanoscale thickness. The unique properties of this photochromic device make it suitable for display or memory applications. In addition, the methodology described in the present study for nanoscale imaging is expected to aid in the understanding of electron transport and trapping processes in metal oxide and metal chalcogenide heterostructure, which are crucial phenomena in QD-based solar cells and/or photocatalytic water-splitting systems.Metal oxide and quantum dot (QD) heterostructures have attracted considerable recent attention as materials for developing efficient solar cells

  4. Volmer-Weber growth stages of polycrystalline metal films probed by in situ and real-time optical diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadias, G.; Simonot, L.; Colin, J. J.; Michel, A.; Camelio, S.; Babonneau, D.

    2015-11-01

    The Volmer-Weber growth of high-mobility metal films is associated with the development of a complex compressive-tensile-compressive stress behavior as the film deposition proceeds through nucleation of islands, coalescence, and formation of a continuous layer. The tensile force maximum has been attributed to the end of the islands coalescence stage, based on ex situ morphological observations. However, microstructural rearrangements are likely to occur in such films during post-deposition, somewhat biasing interpretations solely based on ex situ analysis. Here, by combining two simultaneous in situ and real-time optical sensing techniques, based on surface differential reflectance spectroscopy (SDRS) and change in wafer curvature probed by multibeam optical stress sensor (MOSS), we provide direct evidence that film continuity does coincide with tensile stress maximum during sputter deposition of a series of metal (Ag, Au, and Pd) films on amorphous SiOx. Stress relaxation after growth interruption was testified from MOSS, whose magnitude scaled with adatom mobility, while no change in SDRS signal could be revealed, ruling out possible changes of the surface roughness at the micron scale.

  5. A Wireless and Batteryless Microsystem with Implantable Grid Electrode/3-Dimensional Probe Array for ECoG and Extracellular Neural Recording in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Wei Chang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design and implementation of an integrated wireless microsystem platform that provides the possibility to support versatile implantable neural sensing devices in free laboratory rats. Inductive coupled coils with low dropout regulator design allows true long-term recording without limitation of battery capacity. A 16-channel analog front end chip located on the headstage is designed for high channel account neural signal conditioning with low current consumption and noise. Two types of implantable electrodes including grid electrode and 3D probe array are also presented for brain surface recording and 3D biopotential acquisition in the implanted target volume of tissue. The overall system consumes less than 20 mA with small form factor, 3.9 × 3.9 cm2 mainboard and 1.8 × 3.4 cm2 headstage, is packaged into a backpack for rats. Practical in vivo recordings including auditory response, brain resection tissue and PZT-induced seizures recording demonstrate the correct function of the proposed microsystem. Presented achievements addressed the aforementioned properties by combining MEMS neural sensors, low-power circuit designs and commercial chips into system-level integration.

  6. Kelvin probe imaging of photo-injected electrons in metal oxide nanosheets from metal sulfide quantum dots under remote photochromic coloration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, A; Yin, G; Srinivasan, N; Atarashi, D; Sakai, E; Miyauchi, M

    2015-08-01

    Metal oxide and quantum dot (QD) heterostructures have attracted considerable recent attention as materials for developing efficient solar cells, photocatalysts, and display devices, thus nanoscale imaging of trapped electrons in these heterostructures provides important insight for developing efficient devices. In the present study, Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) of CdS quantum dot (QD)-grafted Cs4W11O36(2-) nanosheets was performed before and after visible-light irradiation. After visible-light excitation of the CdS QDs, the Cs4W11O36(2-) nanosheet surface exhibited a decreased work function in the vicinity of the junction with CdS QDs, even though the Cs4W11O36(2-) nanosheet did not absorb visible light. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that W(5+) species were formed in the nanosheet after visible-light irradiation. These results demonstrated that excited electrons in the CdS QDs were injected and trapped in the Cs4W11O36(2-) nanosheet to form color centers. Further, the CdS QDs and Cs4W11O36(2-) nanosheet composite films exhibited efficient remote photochromic coloration, which was attributed to the quantum nanostructure of the film. Notably, the responsive wavelength of the material is tunable by adjusting the size of QDs, and the decoloration rate is highly efficient, as the required length for trapped electrons to diffuse into the nanosheet surface is very short owing to its nanoscale thickness. The unique properties of this photochromic device make it suitable for display or memory applications. In addition, the methodology described in the present study for nanoscale imaging is expected to aid in the understanding of electron transport and trapping processes in metal oxide and metal chalcogenide heterostructure, which are crucial phenomena in QD-based solar cells and/or photocatalytic water-splitting systems. PMID:26139287

  7. Bottom-Up Nanofabrication of Supported Noble Metal Alloy Nanoparticle Arrays for Plasmonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nugroho, Ferry A. A.; Iandolo, Beniamino; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Langhammer, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    concept, we focus on Au-based binary and ternary alloy systems with Ag, Cu, and Pd, due to their high relevance for nanoplasmonics and complete miscibility, and characterize their optical properties. Moreover, as an example for the relevance of the obtained materials for integration in devices, we......Mixing different elements at the nanoscale to obtain alloy nanostructures with fine-tuned physical and chemical properties offers appealing opportunities for nanotechnology and nanoscience. However, despite widespread successful application of alloy nanoparticles made by colloidal synthesis in...... optimization of the surface density. These cannot be fulfilled even using state-of-the-art self -assembly strategies of colloids. As a solution, we present here a generic bottom-up nanolithography-compatible fabrication approach for large-area arrays of alloy nanoparticles on surfaces. To illustrate the...

  8. Probing superconducting phase fluctuations from the current noise spectrum of pseudogaped metal-superconductor tunnel junctions

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Xi; Xiang, Tao; Ng, Tai-Kai; Su, Zhao-Bin

    2000-01-01

    We study the current noise spectra of a tunnel junction of a metal with strong pairing phase fluctuation and a superconductor. It is shown that there is a characteristic peak in the noise spectrum at the intrinsic Josephson frequency $\\omega_J=2eV$ when $\\omega_J$ is smaller than the pairing gap but larger than the pairing scattering rate. In the presence of an AC voltage, the tunnelling current noise shows a series of characteristic peaks with increasing DC voltage. Experimental observation ...

  9. Reversal of atomic contrast in scanning probe microscopy on (111) metal surfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ondráček, Martin; González, C.; Jelínek, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 24, 08 (2012), 084003/1-084003/7. ISSN 0953-8984 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GPP204/11/P578; GA ČR GAP204/10/0952; GA ČR GA202/09/0545; GA MŠk(CZ) ME10076 Grant ostatní: AVČR(CZ) M100100904 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : atomic force microscopy * metallic surfaces * atomic contrast * scanning tunneling microscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.355, year: 2012 http://iopscience.iop.org/0953-8984/24/8/084003

  10. Optical properties of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides probed by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Hsiang-Lin

    2014-11-17

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to characterize the complex refractive index of chemical-vapor-deposited monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). The extraordinary large value of the refractive index in the visible frequency range is obtained. The absorption response shows a strong correlation between the magnitude of the exciton binding energy and band gap energy. Together with the observed giant spin-orbit splitting, these findings advance the fundamental understanding of their novel electronic structures and the development of monolayer TMDs-based optoelectronic and spintronic devices.

  11. Probing dielectric-response effects with attosecond time-resolved streaked photoelectron spectroscopy of metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, C.-H.; Thumm, U. [Department of Physics, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    The release of conduction-band electrons from a metal surface by a subfemtosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulse and their propagation through the solid provoke a dielectric response in the solid that acts back on the photoelectron wave packet. We calculated the (wake) potential associated with this photoelectron self-interaction in terms of bulk and surface plasmon excitations and show that it induces a considerable, XUV-frequency-dependent temporal shift in laser-streaked XUV photoemission spectra, suggesting the observation of the ultrafast solid-state dielectric response in contemporary streaked photoemission experiments.

  12. Study of semiconductor and metal surfaces using a novel scanning Kelvin probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis reports design and construction of a novel Scanning Kelvin probe (SKP) compatible with the Ultra-High-Vacuum (UHV) environment - the first automatic, high resolution, UHV-SKP in the UK. The Kelvin Probe is a capacitor device used to measure the work function φ between a vibrating reference electrode (the tip) and the surface under investigation. It utilises a non-contact, non-destructive measurement mode allowing work function measurements at temperatures in the range from (300 - 1100) K. The work function is a multi-parameter variable highly sensitive to changes in surface and interface chemical composition, adsorbate induced surface dipole and surface atomic geometry. We have also followed the variable temperature oxidation kinetics of Si(111) in the range (100 - 600) K and show that magnitude of the Δφpeak during the initial adsorption curve decreases in a linear fashion with increasing substrate temperature. Moreover, the transient work function measurements on the O2/Si(111) surface at 300 K show that the lifetime of the precursor states depend strongly on oxygen exposure. We examined high (Rhenium Re, Tungsten W, Molybdenum Mo and Platinum Pt) and low (Calcium Ca, Lanthanum Hexaboride LaB6, Gadolinium Gd) work function materials as target surfaces for Hyperthermal Surface Ionisation (HSI) used in a new mass spectroscopy ionisation technique. We particularly investigated the high work function materials with respect to their oxidation behaviour as it substantially increases their φ's. We present and discuss the following experimental evidence: a) the magnitude and sign of φ changes in terms of adsorbate induced dipoles, b) the effect of molecular hydrogen exposure on the clean surface, and c) the effect of subsequent oxygen exposure. The oxidised Rhenium exhibited the highest work function with φ = (7.15 ± 0.1) eV at a temperature of ∼900 K. LaB6 indicated the lowest work function with φ = (2.45 ± 0.1) eV, while Ca gave the best results

  13. Probing the Metal-Insulator Transition in BaTiO3 by Electrostatic Doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Santosh; Zhang, Jack Y.; Shoron, Omor F.; Stemmer, Susanne

    2016-07-01

    The metal-to-insulator transition in BaTiO3 is investigated using electrostatic doping, which avoids effects from disorder and strain that would accompany chemical doping. SmTiO3/BaTiO3/SrTiO3 heterostructures are doped with a constant sheet carrier density of 3 ×1014 cm-2 that is introduced via the polar SmTiO3/BaTiO3 interface. Below a critical BaTiO3 thickness, the structures exhibit metallic behavior with high carrier mobilities at low temperatures, similar to SmTiO3/SrTiO3 interfaces. Above this thickness, data indicate that the BaTiO3 layer becomes ferroelectric. The BaTiO3 lattice parameters increase to a value consistent with a strained, tetragonal unit cell, the structures are insulating below ˜125 K , and the mobility drops by more than an order of magnitude, indicating self-trapping of carriers. The results shed light on the interplay between charge carriers and ferroelectricity.

  14. Kelvin probe force microscopy of metallic surfaces used in Casimir force measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behunin, R. O.; Dalvit, D. A. R.; Decca, R. S.; Genet, C.; Jung, I. W.; Lambrecht, A.; Liscio, A.; López, D.; Reynaud, S.; Schnoering, G.; Voisin, G.; Zeng, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy at normal pressure was performed by two different groups on the same Au-coated planar sample used to measure the Casimir interaction in a sphere-plane geometry. The obtained voltage distribution was used to calculate the separation dependence of the electrostatic pressure Pres(D ) in the configuration of the Casimir experiments. In the calculation it was assumed that the potential distribution in the sphere has the same statistical properties as the measured one, and that there are no correlation effects on the potential distributions due to the presence of the other surface. The result of this calculation, using the currently available knowledge, is that Pres(D ) does not explain the magnitude or the separation dependence of the difference Δ P (D ) between the measured Casimir pressure and the one calculated using a Drude model for the electromagnetic response of Au. We discuss in the conclusions the points which have to be checked out by future work, including the influence of pressure and a more accurate determination of the patch distribution, in order to confirm these results.

  15. Probing the interface between semiconducting nanocrystals and molecular metal chalcogenide surface ligands: insights from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalise, Emilio; Wippermann, Stefan; Galli, Giulia; Talapin, Dmitri

    Colloidal nanocrystals (NCs) are emerging as cost-effective materials offering exciting prospects for solar energy conversion, light emission and electronic applications. Recent experimental advances demonstrate the synthesis of fully inorganic nanocrystal solids from chemical solution processing. The properties of the NC-solids are heavily determined by the NCs surface and their interactions with the host matrix. However, information on the atomistic structure of such composites is hard to obtain, due to the complexity of the synthesis conditions and the unavailability of robust experimental techniques to probe nanointerfaces at the microscopic level. Here we present a systematic theoretical study of the interaction between InAs and InP NCs with Sn2S64- ligands. Employing a grand canonical ab initio thermodynamic approach we investigate the relative stability of a multitude of configurations possibly realized at the NC-ligand interface. Our study highlights the importance of different structural details and their strong impact on the resulting composite's properties. We show that to obtain a detailed understanding of experimental data it is necessary to take into account complex interfacial structures beyond simplified NC-ligand model interfaces. S. W. acknowledges BMBF NanoMatFutur Grant No. 13N12972. G.G. acknowledges DOE-BES for funding part of this work.

  16. Properties of vacancies in germanium probed by fast diffusing transition metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerner, Ludmila; Stolwijk, Nicolaas [Universitaet Muenster (Germany). Institut fuer Materialphysik

    2009-07-01

    The equilibrium concentration and diffusivity of vacancies (V) in Ge were assessed as a function of temperature from a detailed analysis of the diffusion behaviour of Co and Fe in electronic-grade Ge wafers. Surprisingly, it was found that the resulting equilibrium concentrations C{sub V}{sup eq} exceed the published experimental data by one order of magnitude. Accordingly, the diffusivities D{sub V} fall below existing estimates by roughly a factor of ten in order to reproduce the well-established Ge self-diffusivity via the vacancy mechanism. In addition, the enthalpy of vacancy formation appears to be much smaller than the values calculated by ab initio theoretical methods. Diffusion experiments were performed with the radiotracers {sup 57}Co and {sup 59}Fe over the temperature range 600-900 C. The sensitivity of Co and Fe diffusion for the vacancy properties of the Ge host lattice relies on the observation that these impurities migrate via the dissociative mechanism involving V-mediated interstitial-substitutional exchange. In particular, Co was found to be an interesting probe atom as it crosses the borderline - upon increase of temperature - between a V-controlled mode of diffusion and a Co-interstitial-controlled one. Also the fact that the solubility of substitutional Co proved to be similar in magnitude to C{sub V}{sup eq} constitutes a crucial feature in the evaluation of the V-related data.

  17. Preliminary study - by measurement in nature - of the desorption of metals attached to sediment probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of labelling by precipitation has recently been extrapolated to the double-labelling of fine particles. The first, ''conservative'' radioisotope (scandium-46 or hafnium-175+181) is fixed on the sediment particles in order to keep track of them in the natural environment. A second ''reactive'' radioisotope selected from among the pollutant elements (zinc-65, chromium-51 or mercury-203) is deposited at the same time on the same particles. This new technique is aimed at clarifying the mechanisms by which certain pollutant metal elements are redissolved during their entrainment by suspended sediments in a tidal estuary. A laboratory investigation has shown that hafnium or scandium hydroxide remains bound to the particles, whereas zinc hydroxide may be solubilized by certain chemical agents, particularly those present in estuaries in variable quantities, such as sodium chloride

  18. Metallicity Distribution Functions of Dwarf Galaxies: A Probe of Star Formation History and Baryonic Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escala, Ivanna; Kirby, Evan N.; Wetzel, Andrew R.; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2016-06-01

    We examine the metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) of simulated, isolated dwarf galaxies (M_{star} = 4 × 10^{4} - 3 × 10^{8} M_{⊙}) from the Feedback in Realistic Environments (FIRE) project to quantify the impact of star formation history (SFH) and baryonic physics. These high-resolution cosmological simulations include realistic treatments of stellar evolution and complex gas dynamics and do not require the usual approximations (e.g., instantaneous recycling and instantaneous mixing) of analytic chemical evolution models. The evolution of the MDF with redshift informs which processes drive the dominant contributions to the distribution at z = 0, thus enabling a reconstruction of the SFH and gas loss/accretion history. We then compare the theoretical MDFs to the observed MDFs of Local Group dwarf galaxies to infer plausible SFHs for each matched galaxy.

  19. Soft point contact spectroscopy to probe superconductor-normal metal junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parab, Pradnya; Chauhan, Prashant; Bose, Sangita

    2016-05-01

    Point contact Andreev Reflection (PCAR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool to study superconductors, in particular the superconducting energy gap and its symmetry. We report on the use of the "soft point contact technique" which has been integrated with a cryogen free platform where its vibrations does not disturb the stability of the contact giving noise free PCAR spectra. We further show for large area, high transparency junctions between normal metals and superconductors, an additional peak is observed in the PCAR spectra at the zero bias referred to as the zero bias conductance (ZBC) anomaly. Through our studies on various superconducting films and various contacts, we associate the ZBC anomaly with the increased influence of the superconducting proximity effect which suppresses the transition temperature (Tc) of the junction.

  20. Long range electronic transport in DNA molecules deposited across a disconnected array of metallic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chepelianskii, Alexei D.; Klinov, D.; Kasumov, A.; Guéron, S.; Pietrement, O.; Lyonnais, S.; Bouchiat, H.

    2012-11-01

    We report in detail our experiments on the conduction of DNA molecules over a wide range of temperature deposited across slits in a few nanometer thick platinum film. These insulating slits were fabricated using focused ion beam etching and characterized extensively using near field and electron microscopy. This characterization revealed the presence of metallic Ga nanoparticles inside the slits, as a result of the ion etching. After deposition of DNA molecules, using a protocol that we describe in detail, some of the slits became conducting and exhibited superconducting fluctuations at low temperatures. We argue that the observed conduction was due to transport along DNA molecules, that interacted with the Ga nanoparticles present in the slit. At low temperatures when Ga becomes superconducting, induced superconductivity could therefore be observed. These results indicate that minute metallic particles can easily transfer charge carriers to attached DNA molecules and provide a possible reconciliation between apparently contradictory previous experimental results concerning the length over which DNA molecules can conduct electricity.

  1. Metal capped polystyrene nanotubes arrays as super-hydrophobic substrates for SERS applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovera, Pierre; Creedon, Niamh; Alatawi, Hanan; O'Riordan, Alan

    2014-05-01

    We present a low-cost and rapid fabrication and characterisations of polymer nanotubes based substrates inspired by a Gecko's foot, and demonstrate its suitability for Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) applications. Substrates are fabricated in a simple, scalable and cost efficient way by melt wetting of polystyrene (PS) in an anodised alumina (AAO) template, followed by silver or gold evaporation. Scanning electron microscopy reveals the substrates are composed of a dense array of free-standing polystyrene nanotubes topped by silver nanocaps. The gaps (electromagnetic hot spots) between adjacent nanotubes are measured to be 30nm +/-15nm. SERS characterisation of the substrates, employing a monolayer of 4-aminothiophenol (4-ABT) as a model molecule, exhibits an enhancement factor of ~1.6 × 106. This value is consistent with the one obtained from 3D-Finite Difference Time Domain (3D-FDTD) simulations of a simplified version of the sample. The contact angle of the substrates is measured to be 150°, making them super-hydrophobic. This later property renders the samples compatible to very low sample volumes and highly sensitive detection (down to 408ppt) of the environmental pollutant crystal violet in water is demonstrated.

  2. Theory of light scattering in subwavelength metallic slot antenna array fabricated on subwavelength thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, S. B.; Park, D. J.

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate an analytic model that describes the near-field electromagnetic field profile near a subwavelength-sized metallic slot antenna fabricated on a thin dielectric substrate having a subwavelength thickness reaching λ/1000 in the terahertz frequency region. We found two-dimensional light diffraction induced by the two-dimensional nature of the slot antenna, and back-reflected waves interfered with each other in a complicated manner, resulting in a coupling of the Fourierdecomposed field amplitudes between the diffraction orders along the x and the y directions. We applied these findings to our model by modifying a previously developed model [D. J. Park et al., J. Korean Phys. Soc. 65, 1390 (2014)], and we monitor the effect on far-field transmission. This coupling effect was found to contribute to removal of physically-meaningless spikes or divergences in the transmission spectra, especially for relatively thick substrates.

  3. Metal-Catalyzed Chemical Reaction of Single Molecules Directly Probed by Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Han-Kyu; Park, Won-Hwa; Park, Chan-Gyu; Shin, Hyun-Hang; Lee, Kang Sup; Kim, Zee Hwan

    2016-04-01

    The study of heterogeneous catalytic reactions remains a major challenge because it involves a complex network of reaction steps with various intermediates. If the vibrational spectra of individual molecules could be monitored in real time, one could characterize the structures of the intermediates and the time scales of reaction steps without ensemble averaging. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy does provide vibrational spectra with single-molecule sensitivity, but typical single-molecule SERS signals exhibit spatial heterogeneities and temporal fluctuations, making them difficult to be used in single-molecule kinetics studies. Here we show that SERS can monitor the single-molecule catalytic reactions in real time. The surface-immobilized reactants placed at the junctions of well-defined nanoparticle-thin film structures produce time-resolved SERS spectra with discrete, step-transitions of photoproducts. We interpret that such SERS-steps correspond to the reaction events of individual molecules occurring at the SERS hotspot. The analyses of the yield, dynamics, and the magnitude of such SERS steps, along with the associated spectral characteristics, fully support our claim. In addition, a model that is based on plasmonic field enhancement and surface photochemistry reproduces the key features of experimental observation. Overall, the result demonstrates that it is possible, under well-controlled conditions, to differentiate the chemical and physical processes contributing to the single-molecule SERS signals, and thus shows the use of single-molecule SERS as a tool for studying the metal-catalyzed organic reactions. PMID:26964567

  4. Communication: Photoactivation of nucleobase bound platinumII metal complexes: Probing the influence of the nucleobase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present UV laser action spectra (220-300 nm) of isolated nucleobase-bound PtII(CN)42− complexes, i.e., Pt(CN)42−⋅M, where M = uracil, thymine, cytosine, and adenine. These metal complex-nucleobase clusters represent model systems for identifying the fundamental photophysical and photochemical processes occurring in photodynamic platinum (II) drug therapies that target DNA. This is the first study to explore the specific role of the nucleobase in the photophysics of the aggregate complex. Each of the complexes studied displays a broadly similar absorption spectra, with a strong λmax ∼ 4.7 eV absorption band (nucleobase localized chromophore) and a subsequent increase in the absorption intensity towards higher spectral-energy (Pt(CN)42− localized chromophore). However, strikingly different band widths are observed across the series of complexes, decreasing in the order Pt(CN)42−⋅Thymine > Pt(CN)42−⋅Uracil > Pt(CN)42−⋅Adenine > Pt(CN)42−⋅Cytosine. Changes in the bandwidth of the ∼4.7 eV band are accompanied by distinctive changes in the photofragment product ions observed following photoexcitation, with the narrower-bandwidth complexes showing a greater propensity to decay via electron detachment decay. We discuss these observations in the context of the distinctive nucleobase-dependent excited state lifetimes

  5. Analysis of genomic alterations in neuroblastoma by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and array comparative genomic hybridization: a comparison of results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combaret, Valérie; Iacono, Isabelle; Bréjon, Stéphanie; Schleiermacher, Gudrun; Pierron, Gäelle; Couturier, Jérôme; Bergeron, Christophe; Blay, Jean-Yves

    2012-12-01

    In cases of neuroblastoma, recurring genetic alterations--losses of the 1p, 3p, 4p, and 11q and/or gains of 1q, 2p, and 17q chromosome arms--are currently used to define the therapeutic strategy in therapeutic protocols for low- and intermediate-risk patients. Different genome-wide analysis techniques, such as array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) or multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), have been suggested for detecting chromosome segmental abnormalities. In this study, we compared the results of the two technologies in the analyses of the DNA of tumor samples from 91 neuroblastoma patients. Similar results were obtained with the two techniques for 75 samples (82%). In five cases (5.5%), the MLPA results were not interpretable. Discrepancies between the aCGH and MLPA results were observed in 11 cases (12%). Among the discrepancies, a 18q21.2-qter gain and 16p11.2 and 11q14.1-q14.3 losses were detected only by aCGH. The MLPA results showed that the 7p, 7q, and 14q chromosome arms were affected in six cases, while in two cases, 2p and 17q gains were observed; these results were confirmed by neither aCGH nor fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. Because of the higher sensitivity and specificity of genome-wide information, reasonable cost, and shorter time of aCGH analysis, we recommend the aCGH procedure for the analysis of genomic alterations in neuroblastoma. PMID:23265803

  6. Determination of the metallic/semiconducting ratio in bulk single-wall carbon nanotube samples by cobalt porphyrin probe electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambré, Sofie; Wenseleers, Wim; Goovaerts, Etienne; Resasco, Daniel E

    2010-11-23

    A simple and quantitative, self-calibrating spectroscopic technique for the determination of the ratio of metallic to semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in a bulk sample is presented. The technique is based on the measurement of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum of the SWCNT sample to which cobalt(II)octaethylporphyrin (CoOEP) probe molecules have been added. This yields signals from both CoOEP molecules on metallic and on semiconducting tubes, which are easily distinguished and accurately characterized in this work. By applying this technique to a variety of SWCNT samples produced by different synthesis methods, it is shown that these signals for metallic and semiconducting tubes are independent of other factors such as tube length, defect density, and diameter, allowing the intensities of both signals for arbitrary samples to be retrieved by a straightforward least-squares regression. The technique is self-calibrating in that the EPR intensity can be directly related to the number of spins (number of CoOEP probe molecules), and as the adsorption of the CoOEP molecules is itself found to be unbiased toward metallic or semiconducting tubes, the measured intensities can be directly related to the mass percentage of metallic and semiconducting tubes in the bulk SWCNT sample. With the use of this method it was found that for some samples the metallic/semiconducting ratios strongly differed from the usual 1:2 ratio. PMID:20958073

  7. Paired cut-wire arrays for enhanced transmission of transverse-electric fields through sub-wavelength slits in a thin metallic screen

    CERN Document Server

    Gallina, Ilaria; Galdi, Vincenzo; Di Gennaro, Emiliano; Andreone, Antonello

    2009-01-01

    It has recently been shown that the transmission of electromagnetic fields through sub-wavelength slits (parallel to the electric field direction) in a thin metallic screen can be greatly enhanced by covering one side of the screen with a cut-wire array laid on a dielectric layer. In this Letter, we show that a richer phenomenology (which involves both electric- and magnetic-type resonances) can be attained by pairing a second cut-wire array at the other side of the screen. Via a full-wave comprehensive parametric study, we illustrate the underlying mechanisms and explore the additional degrees of freedom endowed.

  8. Fabrication of a micro-hole array on metal foil by nanosecond pulsed laser beam machining using a cover plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel laser beam machining (LBM) method is proposed to achieve higher precision and better quality beyond the limits of a commercialized nanosecond pulsed laser system. The use of a cover plate is found to be effective for the precision machining of a thin metal foil at micro scale. For verifying the capability of cover plate laser beam machining (c-LBM) technology, a 30 by 30 array of micro-holes was fabricated on 8 µm-thick stainless steel 304 (STS) foil. As a result, thermal deformation and cracks were significantly reduced in comparison with the results using LBM without a cover plate. The standard deviation of the inscribed and circumscribed circle of the holes with a diameter of 12 µm was reduced to 33% and 81%, respectively and the average roundness improved by 77%. Moreover, the smallest diameter obtainable by c-LBM in the given equipment was found to be 6.9 µm, which was 60% less than the minimum size hole by LBM without a cover plate. (technical note)

  9. Paired Cut-Wire Arrays for Enhanced Transmission of Transverse-Electric Fields Through Subwavelength Slits in a Thin Metallic Screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallina, Ilaria; Castaldi, Giuseppe; Galdi, Vincenzo; Di Gennaro, Emiliano; Andreone, Antonello

    It has recently been shown that the transmission of electromagnetic fields through sub-wavelength slits (parallel to the electric field direction) in a thin metallic screen can be greatly enhanced by covering one side of the screen with a metallic cut-wire array laid on a dielectric layer. In this Letter, we show that a richer phenomenology (which involves both electric- and magnetic-type resonances) can be attained by pairing a second cut-wire array at the other side of the screen. Via a full-wave comprehensive parametric study, we illustrate the underlying mechanisms and explore the additional degrees of freedom endowed, as well as their possible implications in the engineering of enhanced transmission phenomena.

  10. Supported noble metals on hydrogen-treated TiO2 nanotube arrays as highly ordered electrodes for fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Changkun; Yu, Hongmei; Li, Yongkun; Gao, Yuan; Zhao, Yun; Song, Wei; Shao, Zhigang; Yi, Baolian

    2013-04-01

    Hydrogen-treated TiO2 nanotube (H-TNT) arrays serve as highly ordered nanostructured electrode supports, which are able to significantly improve the electrochemical performance and durability of fuel cells. The electrical conductivity of H-TNTs increases by approximately one order of magnitude in comparison to air-treated TNTs. The increase in the number of oxygen vacancies and hydroxyl groups on the H-TNTs help to anchor a greater number of Pt atoms during Pt electrodeposition. The H-TNTs are pretreated by using a successive ion adsorption and reaction (SIAR) method that enhances the loading and dispersion of Pt catalysts when electrodeposited. In the SIAR method a Pd activator can be used to provide uniform nucleation sites for Pt and leads to increased Pt loading on the H-TNTs. Furthermore, fabricated Pt nanoparticles with a diameter of 3.4 nm are located uniformly around the pretreated H-TNT support. The as-prepared and highly ordered electrodes exhibit excellent stability during accelerated durability tests, particularly for the H-TNT-loaded Pt catalysts that have been annealed in ultrahigh purity H2 for a second time. There is minimal decrease in the electrochemical surface area of the as-prepared electrode after 1000 cycles compared to a 68 % decrease for the commercial JM 20 % Pt/C electrode after 800 cycles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that after the H-TNT-loaded Pt catalysts are annealed in H2 for the second time, the strong metal-support interaction between the H-TNTs and the Pt catalysts enhances the electrochemical stability of the electrodes. Fuel-cell testing shows that the power density reaches a maximum of 500 mWcm(-2) when this highly ordered electrode is used as the anode. When used as the cathode in a fuel cell with extra-low Pt loading, the new electrode generates a specific power density of 2.68 kWg(Pt) (-1) . It is indicated that H-TNT arrays, which have highly ordered nanostructures, could be used as ordered electrode supports

  11. Large-Scale Precise Printing of Ultrathin Sol-Gel Oxide Dielectrics for Directly Patterned Solution-Processed Metal Oxide Transistor Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won-June; Park, Won-Tae; Park, Sungjun; Sung, Sujin; Noh, Yong-Young; Yoon, Myung-Han

    2015-09-01

    Ultrathin and dense metal oxide gate di-electric layers are reported by a simple printing of AlOx and HfOx sol-gel precursors. Large-area printed indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) thin-film transistor arrays, which exhibit mobilities >5 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and gate leakage current of 10(-9) A cm(-2) at a very low operation voltage of 2 V, are demonstrated by continuous simple bar-coated processes. PMID:26222338

  12. Selective coupling of HE11 and TM01 modes into microfabricated fully metal-coated quartz probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report computational and experimental investigations on injection and transmission of light in microfabricated fully Aluminum-coated quartz probes. In particular, we show that a selective coupling of either the HE11 or the TM01 mode can be carried out by injecting focused linearly or radially polarized beams into the probe. Optical fields, emitted by the probe after a controlled injection, are characterized in intensity and phase with the help of an interferometric technique. With the help of near-field measurement, we finally demonstrate that a longitudinally polarized spot localized at the tip apex is actually produced when the TM01 mode is coupled into the probe

  13. Templating growth of gold nanostructures with a CdSe quantum dot array

    OpenAIRE

    Paul, Neelima; Metwalli, Ezzeldin; Yao, Yuan; Schwartzkopf, Matthias; Yu, Shun; Roth, Stephan V.; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter; Paul, Amitesh

    2015-01-01

    In optoelectronic devices based on quantum dot arrays, thin nanolayers of gold are preferred as stable metal contacts and for connecting recombination centers. The optimal morphology requirements are uniform arrays with precisely controlled positions and sizes over a large area with long range ordering since this strongly affects device performance. To understand the development of gold layer nanomorphology, the detailed mechanism of structure formation are probed with time-resolved grazing i...

  14. Photoelectrochemical Infiltration of a Conducting Polymer (PEDOT) into Metal-Chalcogenide Decorated TiO2 Nanotube Arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: In situ photoelectrosynthesis of nanostructured TiO2/CdX/PEDOT ternary hybrid assemblies was achieved exploiting the semiconductor behavior of both inorganic components. - Highlights: • Concept of light induced electrodeposition of conducting polymers has been extended to TiO2/ metal chalcogenide (CdX) scaffolds. • Interfacial energetics affected the concurrent nucleation and growth of the PEDOT oligomers. • Both collective and selective excitation of the SC components was exploited for the photoelectrochemical polymerization of EDOT and bis-EDOT. • Sensitizer QDs act as seeds for the initial growth of PEDOT. • Parallel optimization of the monomer, irradiation wavelength, and the electrochemical method is indeed necessary. - ABSTRACT: Photoelectrochemical synthesis of TiO2/CdX/PEDOT [X: S, Se; PEDOT = poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)] ternary hybrids was carried out by exploiting the semiconductor (SC) nature of both the oxide and the chalcogenide component. To this end, TiO2 nanotube arrays were initially electrosynthesized on titanium foils by anodization in fluoride-containing aqueous media. CdS and CdSe quantum dots were subsequently deposited on the nanotubes using successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR). The conjugated polymer, PEDOT, was then grafted using photoelectrochemical excitation of the SC matrix and potentiodynamic deposition, to ultimately afford the ternary hybrid architecture. The morphology, structural properties, and chemical composition of these assemblies were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, diffuse reflectance UV-Vis spectrophotometry, and Raman spectroscopy, while their electroactivity was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry. Photoelectrochemical deposition of the conducting polymer was carried out both through selective excitation of the chalcogenide sensitizer and the collective photoexcitation of the two SC components. Two precursor molecules, namely, EDOT or bis-EDOT were compared and

  15. Surface-enhanced Raman Scattering of Pyridine Adsorbed on Some Metal Nanowire Arrays%吡啶在几种金属纳米线阵列上的表面增强喇曼光谱

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘谷平; 薛宽宏; 孙冬梅; 徐士民; 孔景临; 姚建林; 谢泳; 田中群; 王广厚

    2001-01-01

    Nanowire arrays of various metals were fabricated from the template of porous alumina. We observed the strong surface-enhanced Raman scattering(SERS) signals of the adsorbed molecules such as pyridine not only at the noble metals nanowires that exhibit a high SERS activity, but also at Ni, Co nanowires that are normally considered to be non-SERS active substrates. The intensity of the species adsorbed at Ni nanowires is stronger than that on the conventionally roughened metal surface, and depends on the length of the nanowires out of alumina matrix. The metal nanowire arrays can be used as SERS active substrates.

  16. Anthropogenic signature of sediment organic matter probed by UV-Visible and fluorescence spectroscopy and the association with heavy metal enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Lee, Jong-Hyun; Hur, Jin

    2016-05-01

    Sediment organic matter (SOM) was extracted in an alkaline solution from 43 stream sediments in order to explore the anthropogenic signatures. The SOM spectroscopic characteristics including excitation-emission matrix (EEM)-parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) were compared for five sampling site groups classified by the anthropogenic variables of land use, population density, the loadings of organics and nutrients, and metal enrichment. The conventional spectroscopic characteristics including specific UV absorbance, absorbance ratio, and humification index did not properly discriminate among the different cluster groups except in the case of metal enrichment. Of the four decomposed PARAFAC components, humic-like and tryptophan-like fluorescence responded negatively and positively, respectively, to increasing degrees of the anthropogenic variables except for land use. The anthropogenic enrichment of heavy metals was positively associated with the abundance of tryptophan-like component. In contrast, humic-like component, known to be mostly responsible for metal binding, exhibited a decreasing trend corresponding with metal enrichment. These conflicting trends can be attributed to the overwhelmed effects of the coupled discharges of heavy metals and organic pollutants into sediments. Our study suggests that the PARAFAC components can be used as functional signatures to probe the anthropogenic influences on sediments. PMID:26901475

  17. All-Metal Dual-Polarized W-band Patch Element for Phased Array Antenna Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Metal patches were developed for the Juno Microwave radiometer instrument at P-band and L-band. The absence of dielectric in the metal patch design obviated issues...

  18. Electron beam collimation with a 40 000 tip metallic double-gate field emitter array and in-situ control of nanotip sharpness distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helfenstein, P.; Guzenko, V. A.; Tsujino, S. [Laboratory for Micro- and Nanotechnology, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Fink, H.-W. [Physik Institut, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2013-01-28

    The generation of highly collimated electron beams from a double-gate field emitter array with 40000 metallic tips and large collimation gate apertures is reported. Field emission beam measurements demonstrated the reduction of the beam envelope down to the array size by applying a negative potential to the on-chip gate electrode for the collimation of individual field emission beamlets. Owing to the optimized gate structure, the concomitant decrease of the emission current was minimal, leading to a net enhancement of the current density. Furthermore, a noble gas conditioning process was successfully applied to the double-gate device to improve the beam uniformity in-situ with orders of magnitude increase of the active emission area. The results show that the proposed double-gate field emission cathodes are promising for high current and high brightness electron beam applications such as free-electron lasers and THz power devices.

  19. Electron beam collimation with a 40 000 tip metallic double-gate field emitter array and in-situ control of nanotip sharpness distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfenstein, P.; Guzenko, V. A.; Fink, H.-W.; Tsujino, S.

    2013-01-01

    The generation of highly collimated electron beams from a double-gate field emitter array with 40000 metallic tips and large collimation gate apertures is reported. Field emission beam measurements demonstrated the reduction of the beam envelope down to the array size by applying a negative potential to the on-chip gate electrode for the collimation of individual field emission beamlets. Owing to the optimized gate structure, the concomitant decrease of the emission current was minimal, leading to a net enhancement of the current density. Furthermore, a noble gas conditioning process was successfully applied to the double-gate device to improve the beam uniformity in-situ with orders of magnitude increase of the active emission area. The results show that the proposed double-gate field emission cathodes are promising for high current and high brightness electron beam applications such as free-electron lasers and THz power devices.

  20. Triangle pore arrays fabricated on Si (111) substrate by sphere lithography combined with metal-assisted chemical etching and anisotropic chemical etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asoh, Hidetaka; Fujihara, Kosuke; Ono, Sachiko

    2012-07-01

    The morphological change of silicon macropore arrays formed by metal-assisted chemical etching using shape-controlled Au thin film arrays was investigated during anisotropic chemical etching in tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) aqueous solution. After the deposition of Au as the etching catalyst on (111) silicon through a honeycomb mask prepared by sphere lithography, the specimens were etched in a mixed solution of HF and H2O2 at room temperature, resulting in the formation of ordered macropores in silicon along the [111] direction, which is not achievable by conventional chemical etching without a catalyst. In the anisotropic etching in TMAH, the macropores changed from being circular to being hexagonal and finally to being triangular, owing to the difference in etching rate between the crystal planes.

  1. Pure ion current collection in ion sensitive probe measurement with a metal mesh guard electrode for evaluation of ion temperature in magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a new design of ion sensitive probe (ISP) that enables collection of pure ion current for accurate measurement of the perpendicular ion temperature in magnetized plasmas. The new type of ISP resolves a longstanding issue widely observed in ISP type measurements, namely, that the current-voltage characteristic is smeared by an unexpected electron current in the standard ISP model. The new ISP is equipped with a fine scale metal mesh on the sensor entrance to prevent electrons from flowing to the sensor, a phenomenon considered to be caused by the space-charge effect. The new ISP successfully measured the ion temperature of electron cyclotron resonance plasmas.

  2. Pure ion current collection in ion sensitive probe measurement with a metal mesh guard electrode for evaluation of ion temperature in magnetized plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Tung-Yuan; Kawamori, Eiichirou [Institute of Space, Astrophysical and Plasma Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan (China); Nishida, Yasushi [Plasma and Space Science Center, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan (China)

    2013-02-15

    This paper presents a new design of ion sensitive probe (ISP) that enables collection of pure ion current for accurate measurement of the perpendicular ion temperature in magnetized plasmas. The new type of ISP resolves a longstanding issue widely observed in ISP type measurements, namely, that the current-voltage characteristic is smeared by an unexpected electron current in the standard ISP model. The new ISP is equipped with a fine scale metal mesh on the sensor entrance to prevent electrons from flowing to the sensor, a phenomenon considered to be caused by the space-charge effect. The new ISP successfully measured the ion temperature of electron cyclotron resonance plasmas.

  3. Rational design of binder-free noble metal/metal oxide arrays with nanocauliflower structure for wide linear range nonenzymatic glucose detection

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Zhenzhen

    2015-06-12

    One-dimensional nanocomposites of metal-oxide and noble metal were expected to present superior performance for nonenzymatic glucose detection due to its good conductivity and high catalytic activity inherited from noble metal and metal oxide respectively. As a proof of concept, we synthesized gold and copper oxide (Au/CuO) composite with unique one-dimensional nanocauliflowers structure. Due to the nature of the synthesis method, no any foreign binder was needed in keeping either Au or CuO in place. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt in combining metal oxide and noble metal in a binder-free style for fabricating nonenzymatic glucose sensor. The Au/CuO nanocauliflowers with large electrochemical active surface and high electrolyte contact area would promise a wide linear range and high sensitive detection of glucose with good stability and reproducibility due to its good electrical conductivity of Au and high electrocatalytic activity of CuO.

  4. Near-field enhancement and sub-wavelength imaging in the optical region using a pair of two-dimensional arrays of metal nanospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Alitalo, P; Tretyakov, S; Viitanen, A; Alitalo, Pekka; Simovski, Constantin; Tretyakov, Sergei; Viitanen, Ari

    2006-01-01

    Near-field enhancement and sub-wavelength imaging properties of a system comprising a coupled pair of two-dimensional arrays of resonant nanospheres are studied. The concept of using two coupled material sheets possessing surface mode resonances for evanescent field enhancement is already well established in the microwave region. This paper shows that the same principles can be applied also in the optical region, where the performance of the resonant sheets can be realized with the use of metallic nanoparticles. In this paper we present design of such structures and study the electric field distributions in the image plane of such superlens.

  5. Research and Training of Using Neutron Scattering to Probe the Collective Phenomena in Doped Transition-Metal Oxides. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this funded research program include: explore and understand the microscopic origins of collective phenomena in doped transition-metal oxides (TMOs) using neutrons as one of the primary tools, and train new generation of neutron scatters and collaborate with Oak Ridge National Lab in both materials synthesis and characterization. The major physics issues focused on in this project consist of the microscopic correlations between lattice structure and magnetic ordering, the nature of elementary lattice and spin excitations, the origin of nanometer-scale phase separations, and the effects of dimensional confinement and broken symmetry. The main materials are doped TMOs grown as single crystals by a floating-zone technique at ORNL as well as multiplayer films grown with a laser-MBE facility at Florida International University (FIU). Our educational objective is the training of our graduate and undergraduate students, especially Hispanic and other minority students, to use neutrons as a probe for materials research by taking advantage of national neutron facilities and to grow novel materials by using the floating-zone and laser-MBE technique. The main achievements of the project include the systematic study of the spin dynamics, especially the spin wave excitations in ferromagnetic manganites; the discovery of the critical doping concentration for the magnetic phase separation of the charge-ordered state in Pr1-xCaxMnO3-; the study of Σ4 phonon softening associated with the lattice instability near the quantum critical point as well as the discovery of an anomalous mode in single-layered ruthenates. These results gain some important insights into the collective excitations in both spin and lattice degrees of freedom as well as their close coupling in these correlated TMO systems. Furthermore, this project also accomplished the synthesis and some characterization of the single crystals of a new material Ba2-xSrxCoO4, a compound in which Co ions are in

  6. Analyses of Genotypes and Phenotypes of Ten Chinese Patients with Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome by Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification and Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Xu Yang

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: The combined use of MLPA and array CGH is an effective and specific means to diagnose WHS and allows for the precise identification of the breakpoints and sizes of deletions. The deletion of genes in the WHS candidate region is closely correlated with the core WHS phenotype.

  7. Probing the low-redshift star formation rate as a function of metallicity through the local environments of type II supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Stoll, R; Stanek, K Z; Pogge, R W

    2012-01-01

    Type II SNe can be used as a star formation tracer to probe the metallicity distribution of global low-redshift star formation. We present oxygen and iron abundance distributions of type II supernova progenitor regions that avoid many previous sources of bias, and can serve as a standard of comparison for properly observationally evaluating how different classes of supernovae depend on progenitor metallicity. In contrast to previous supernova host metallicity studies, this sample is homogeneous and is drawn from an areal rather than a targeted survey, so supernovae in the lowest-mass galaxies are not excluded. We spectroscopically measure the gas-phase oxygen abundance near a representative subsample of the hosts of type II supernovae from the first-year Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) supernova search. The median metallicity is 12+log(O/H) = 8.65 and the median host galaxy stellar mass from fits to SDSS photometry is 10^9.9 solar masses. Though iron abundance is more central to the evolution of massive stars...

  8. Comparison of Metal-Backed Free-Space and Open-Ended Coaxial Probe Techniques for the Dielectric Characterization of Aeronautical Composites †

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Rodríguez, Patricia; Escot-Bocanegra, David; Poyatos-Martínez, David; Weinmann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The trend in the last few decades is that current unmanned aerial vehicles are completely made of composite materials rather than metallic, such as carbon-fiber or fiberglass composites. From the electromagnetic point of view, this fact forces engineers and scientists to assess how these materials may affect their radar response or their electronics in terms of electromagnetic compatibility. In order to evaluate this, electromagnetic characterization of different composite materials has become a need. Several techniques exist to perform this characterization, all of them based on the utilization of different sensors for measuring different parameters. In this paper, an implementation of the metal-backed free-space technique, based on the employment of antenna probes, is utilized for the characterization of composite materials that belong to an actual drone. Their extracted properties are compared with those given by a commercial solution, an open-ended coaxial probe (OECP). The discrepancies found between both techniques along with a further evaluation of the methodologies, including measurements with a split-cavity resonator, conclude that the implemented free-space technique provides more reliable results for this kind of composites than the OECP technique. PMID:27347966

  9. Comparison of Metal-Backed Free-Space and Open-Ended Coaxial Probe Techniques for the Dielectric Characterization of Aeronautical Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia López-Rodríguez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The trend in the last few decades is that current unmanned aerial vehicles are completely made of composite materials rather than metallic, such as carbon-fiber or fiberglass composites. From the electromagnetic point of view, this fact forces engineers and scientists to assess how these materials may affect their radar response or their electronics in terms of electromagnetic compatibility. In order to evaluate this, electromagnetic characterization of different composite materials has become a need. Several techniques exist to perform this characterization, all of them based on the utilization of different sensors for measuring different parameters. In this paper, an implementation of the metal-backed free-space technique, based on the employment of antenna probes, is utilized for the characterization of composite materials that belong to an actual drone. Their extracted properties are compared with those given by a commercial solution, an open-ended coaxial probe (OECP. The discrepancies found between both techniques along with a further evaluation of the methodologies, including measurements with a split-cavity resonator, conclude that the implemented free-space technique provides more reliable results for this kind of composites than the OECP technique.

  10. Metal-Organic Frameworks: Bimetallic Metal-Organic Frameworks: Probing the Lewis Acid Site for CO2 Conversion (Small 17/2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Ruyi; Li, Pei-Zhou; Zeng, Yong-Fei; Liu, Jia; Zhao, Ruo; Duan, Hui; Luo, Zhong; Wang, Jin-Gui; Zou, Ruqiang; Zhao, Yanli

    2016-05-01

    On page 2334, R. Q. Zou, Y. L. Zhao, and co-workers present a porous metal-organic framework (MOF) that serves as a platform for studying the metal exchange effect on both CO2 adsorption and catalytic fixation. The effect is demonstrated by catalytic CO2 cycloaddition with propylene oxide to produce propylene carbonate. Molecular dynamic simulations are carried out to further confirm the catalytic performance of these MOFs on chemical fixation of CO2 to carbonates. This research sheds light on how metal exchange could influence the intrinsic properties of MOFs. PMID:27124007

  11. Probing the possibility of coexistence of martensite transition and half-metallicity in Ni and Co-based full-Heusler alloys: An ab initio calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Tufan; Pandey, Dhanshree; Chakrabarti, Aparna

    2016-05-01

    Using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory, we have studied the mechanical, electronic, and magnetic properties of Heusler alloys, namely, Ni2B C and Co2B C (B = Sc, Ti, V, Cr, and Mn as well as Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Tc; C = Ga and Sn). On the basis of electronic structure (density of states) and mechanical properties (tetragonal shear constant), as well as magnetic interactions (Heisenberg exchange coupling parameters), we probe the properties of these materials in detail. We calculate the formation energy of these alloys in the (face-centered) cubic austenite structure to probe the stability of all these materials. From the energetic point of view, we have studied the possibility of the electronically stable alloys having a tetragonal phase lower in energy compared to the respective cubic phase. A large number of the magnetic alloys is found to have the cubic phase as their ground state. On the other hand, for another class of alloys, the tetragonal phase has been found to have lower energy compared to the cubic phase. Further, we find that the values of tetragonal shear constant show a consistent trend: a high positive value for materials not prone to tetragonal transition and low or negative for others. In the literature, materials which have been seen to undergo the martensite transition are found to be metallic in nature. We probe here if there is any Heusler alloy which has a tendency to undergo a tetragonal transition and at the same time possesses a high spin polarization at the Fermi level. From our study, it is found that out of the four materials which exhibit a martensite phase as their ground state, three of these, namely, Ni2MnGa , Ni2MoGa , and Co2NbSn have a metallic nature; on the contrary, Co2MoGa exhibits a high spin polarization.

  12. Molecular Occupancy of Nanodot Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Haogang; Wolfenson, Haguy; Depoil, David; Dustin, Michael L; Sheetz, Michael P; Wind, Shalom J

    2016-04-26

    Single-molecule nanodot arrays, in which a biomolecule of choice (protein, nucleic acid, etc.) is bound to a metallic nanoparticle on a solid substrate, are becoming an increasingly important tool in the study of biomolecular and cellular interactions. We have developed an on-chip measurement protocol to monitor and control the molecular occupancy of nanodots. Arrays of widely spaced nanodots and nanodot clusters were fabricated on glass surfaces by nanolithography and functionalized with fluorescently labeled proteins. The molecular occupancy was determined by monitoring individual fluorophore bleaching events, while accounting for fluorescence quenching effects. We found that the occupancy can be interpreted as a packing problem, and depends on nanodot size and binding ligand concentration, where the latter is easily adjusted to compensate the flexibility of dimension control in nanofabrication. The results are scalable with nanodot cluster size, extending to large area close packed arrays. As an example, the nanoarray platform was used to probe the geometric requirement of T-cell activation at the single-molecule level. PMID:26966946

  13. Eddy current probe development based on a magnetic sensor array; Developpement d'un imageur magnetique pour le controle non destructif par courants de Foucault

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vacher, F

    2007-06-15

    This research deals with in the study of the use of innovating magnetic sensors in eddy current non destructive inspection. The author reports an analysis survey of magnetic sensor performances. This survey enables the selection of magnetic sensor technologies used in non destructive inspection. He presents the state-of-the-art of eddy current probes exploiting the qualities of innovating magnetic sensors, and describes the methods enabling the use of these magnetic sensors in non destructive testing. Two main applications of innovating magnetic sensors are identified: the detection of very small defects by means of magneto-resistive sensors, and the detection of deep defects by means of giant magneto-impedances. Based on the use of modelling, optimization, signal processing tools, probes are manufactured for these both applications.

  14. The hydride anion in an extended transition metal oxide array: LaSrCoO3H0.7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, M A; Cussen, E J; Claridge, J B; Bieringer, M; Rosseinsky, M J; Kiely, C J; Blundell, S J; Marshall, I M; Pratt, F L

    2002-03-01

    We present the synthesis and structural characterization of a transition metal oxide hydride, LaSrCoO3H0.7, which adopts an unprecedented structure in which oxide chains are bridged by hydride anions to form a two-dimensional extended network. The metal centers are strongly coupled by their bonding with both oxide and hydride ligands to produce magnetic ordering at temperatures up to at least 350 kelvin. The synthetic route is sufficiently general to allow the prediction of a new class of transition metal--containing electronic and magnetic materials. PMID:11884751

  15. Probe-based data storage

    CERN Document Server

    Koelmans, Wabe W; Abelmann, L

    2015-01-01

    Probe-based data storage attracted many researchers from academia and industry, resulting in unprecendeted high data-density demonstrations. This topical review gives a comprehensive overview of the main contributions that led to the major accomplishments in probe-based data storage. The most investigated technologies are reviewed: topographic, phase-change, magnetic, ferroelectric and atomic and molecular storage. Also, the positioning of probes and recording media, the cantilever arrays and parallel readout of the arrays of cantilevers are discussed. This overview serves two purposes. First, it provides an overview for new researchers entering the field of probe storage, as probe storage seems to be the only way to achieve data storage at atomic densities. Secondly, there is an enormous wealth of invaluable findings that can also be applied to many other fields of nanoscale research such as probe-based nanolithography, 3D nanopatterning, solid-state memory technologies and ultrafast probe microscopy.

  16. Selective reflection technique as a probe to monitor the growth of a metallic thin film on dielectric surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Martins, Weliton Soares; Chevrollier, Martine; de Silans, Thierry Passerat

    2013-01-01

    Controlling thin film formation is technologically challenging. The knowledge of physical properties of the film and of the atoms in the surface vicinity can help improve control over the film growth. We investigate the use of the well-established selective reflection technique to probe the thin film during its growth, simultaneously monitoring the film thickness, the atom-surface van der Waals interaction and the vapor properties in the surface vicinity.

  17. The Surface Interface Characteristics of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube and Graphitic Carbon Fiber Arrays Grown by Thermal and Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzeit, Lance; Nguyen, Cattien; Li, Jun; Han, Jie; Meyyappan, M.

    2002-01-01

    The development of nano-arrays for sensors and devices requires the growth of arrays with the proper characteristics. One such application is the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphitic carbon fibers (GCFs) for the chemical attachment of probe molecules. The effectiveness of such an array is dependent not only upon the effectiveness of the probe and the interface between that probe and the array, but also the array and the underlaying substrate. If that array is a growth of vertically aligned CNTs or GCFs then the attachment of that array to the surface is of the utmost importance. This attachment provides the mechanical stability and durability of the array, as well as, the electrical properties of that array. If the detection is to be acquired through an electrical measurement, then the appropriate resistance between the array and the surface need to be fabricated into the device. I will present data on CNTs and GCFs grown from both thermal and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The focus will be on the characteristics of the metal film from which the CNTs and GCFs are grown and the changes that occur due to changes within the growth process.

  18. Laser interferometer array for Big Dee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A twelve channel interferometer array is planned for obtaining electron density profiles on Big Dee. Three of the channels are vertical; the remainder are radial or diagonal in an azimuthal plane. Each channel consists of coaxial CO/sub 2/ and HeNe laser beams. The reference beam is formed by splitting off half of the laser power at each wavelength by using acousto-optic modulators which introduce a 40 MHz frequency shift in the reference beam. In the radial channels the probe beam passes through a barium fluoride window to a plane metal mirror on the inside wall of the vacuum vessel. The reflected beam passes back out of the vacuum vessel, through the same window, to a beam splitter where the probe beam and the reference beam are again combined

  19. The orbital structure of {pi}-conjugated organic molecules on metal surfaces probed by angle-resolved photoemission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziroff, Johannes; Wiessner, Michael; Forster, Frank; Schoell, Achim [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Experimentelle Physik VII, D-97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Puschnig, Peter [University of Leoben, Chair of Atomistic Modelling and Design of Materials, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Reinert, Friedrich [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Experimentelle Physik VII, D-97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); FZ Karlsruhe, Gemeinschaftslabor fuer Nanoanalytik, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    We present angle resolved photoemission spectra of monolayers of {pi}-conjugated molecules adsorbed on single-crystalline metal surfaces. Comparing the experimental k-dependant intensity distribution of the molecular states to DFT calculations for the free molecule allows to detect sophisticated modifications of the molecular orbitals at the interface. In case of the single-domain system PTCDA on Ag(110) the 2D emission pattern confirms that the now occupied interface state is mainly derived from the former LUMO-orbital. Moreover, a clear contribution of metal states is evident from additional intensity in normal emission. In the contrary, the structure of the molecular HOMO changes only slightly upon chemisorption on Ag surfaces. Additional data on other planar {pi}-conjugated organic molecules such as coronene or NTCDA demonstrates the potential of this approach in analysing the interaction at metal-organic interfaces in great detail.

  20. Probing Ion-Ion and Electron-Ion Correlations in Liquid Metals within the Quantum Hypernetted Chain Approximation

    OpenAIRE

    Anta, J. A.; Louis, A.A.

    1999-01-01

    We use the Quantum Hypernetted Chain Approximation (QHNC) to calculate the ion-ion and electron-ion correlations for liquid metallic Li, Be, Na, Mg, Al, K, Ca, and Ga. We discuss trends in electron-ion structure factors and radial distribution functions, and also calculate the free-atom and metallic-atom form-factors, focusing on how bonding effects affect the interpretation of X-ray scattering experiments, especially experimental measurements of the ion-ion structure factor in the liquid met...

  1. Strong Metal Support Interaction of Pt and Ru Nanoparticles Deposited on HOPG Probed by the H-D Exchange Reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiordaliso, Elisabetta M.; Dahl, Søren; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2012-01-01

    adsorbed and gas phase at 1 bar is measured before and after annealing. The rate is measured in the temperature range of 40–200 °C at 1 bar, by utilization of the H-D exchange reaction. Experiments are performed on fresh cleaved and sputtered HOPG, which give similar results. We find that annealing the...... films from 150 up to 700 °C increases the amount of carbon present in the films up to 95%, as derived by surface analysis, indicating the formation of a carbon layer on top of the metal films. The exchange rate decreases dramatically with increasing carbon content on the films for both metals, pointing...

  2. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvaa, Uffe; Ørngreen, Rikke; Weinkouff Mathiasen, Anne-Gitte;

    2013-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time and space......). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings point to...... mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face). The development of...

  3. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvaa, Uffe; Ørngreen, Rikke; Weinkouff, Anne-Gitte;

    2012-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, which has been developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time...... and space). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company....... Findings point to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face). The...

  4. The evolution of the dust-to-metals ratio in high-redshift galaxies probed by GRB-DLAs

    CERN Document Server

    Wiseman, P; Bolmer, J; Krühler, T; Yates, R M; Greiner, J; Fynbo, J P U

    2016-01-01

    Context: Several issues regarding the nature of dust at high redshift remain unresolved: its composition, its production and growth mechanisms, and its effect on background sources. Aims: This paper aims to provide a more accurate relation between dust depletion levels and dust-to-metals ratio (DTM), and to use the DTM to investigate the origin and evolution of dust in the high redshift Universe via GRB-DLAs. Methods: We use absorption-line measured metal column densities for a total of 19 GRB-DLAs, including five new GRB afterglow spectra from VLT/X-shooter. We use the latest linear models to calculate the dust depletion strength factor in each DLA. Using this we calculate total dust and metal column densities to determine a DTM. We explore the evolution of DTM with metallicity, and compare this to previous trends in DTM measured with different methods. Results: We find significant dust depletion in 16 of our 19 GRB-DLAs, yet 18 of the 19 have a DTM significantly lower than the Milky Way. We find that DTM is...

  5. Metal-insulator transition in Nd1-xEuxNiO3 probed by specific heat and anelastic measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Barbeta, V. B.; Jardim, R. F.; Torikachvili, M. S.; Escote, M. T.; Cordero, F; Pontes, F. M.; Trequattrini, F.

    2010-01-01

    Oxides RNiO3 (R = rare-earth, R # La) exhibit a metal-insulator (MI) transition at a temperature TMI and an antiferromagnetic (AF) transition at TN. Specific heat (CP) and anelastic spectroscopy measurements were performed in samples of Nd1-xEuxNiO3, 0

  6. Theoretical study of the role of metallic contacts in probing transport features of pure and defected graphene nanoribbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    La Magna Antonino

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Understanding the roles of disorder and metal/graphene interface on the electronic and transport properties of graphene-based systems is crucial for a consistent analysis of the data deriving from experimental measurements. The present work is devoted to the detailed study of graphene nanoribbon systems by means of self-consistent quantum transport calculations. The computational formalism is based on a coupled Schrödinger/Poisson approach that respects both chemistry and electrostatics, applied to pure/defected graphene nanoribbons (ideally or end-contacted by various fcc metals. We theoretically characterize the formation of metal-graphene junctions as well as the effects of backscattering due to the presence of vacancies and impurities. Our results evidence that disorder can infer significant alterations on the conduction process, giving rise to mobility gaps in the conductance distribution. Moreover, we show the importance of metal-graphene coupling that gives rise to doping-related phenomena and a degradation of conductance quantization characteristics.

  7. Diffusion of hydrogen isotopes as a probe to study the atomic microstructure of metals. [Ni; CuAu; NiPt; FeZr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirscher, M.; Kronmueller, H. (Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Metallforschung, Inst. fuer Physik, Stuttgart (Germany))

    1991-08-30

    Magnetic after-effect measurements are very sensitive to short-range reorientation relaxations and represent an ideal tool for the study of hydrogen diffusion even at low concentrations. In this paper we deal with the interaction of hydrogen with defects or different microstructures and with the local reorientation in the vicinity of these structures. Results of hydrogen diffusion in a pure metal with radiation-induced intrinsic atomic defects, in chemically ordered and disordered binary f.c.c. alloys, and in chemically as well as structurally disordered amorphous alloys are presented. The three examples illustrate the use of hydrogen as an internal probe to detect microstructural defects on an atomic scale. (orig.).

  8. Micromachined electrode array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okandan, Murat (Edgewood, NM); Wessendorf, Kurt O. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-12-11

    An electrode array is disclosed which has applications for neural stimulation and sensing. The electrode array, in certain embodiments, can include a plurality of electrodes each of which is flexibly attached to a common substrate using a plurality of springs to allow the electrodes to move independently. In other embodiments of the electrode array, the electrodes can be fixed to the substrate. The electrode array can be formed from a combination of bulk and surface micromachining, and can include electrode tips having an electroplated metal (e.g. platinum, iridium, gold or titanium) or a metal oxide (e.g. iridium oxide) for biocompatibility. The electrode array can be used to form a part of a neural prosthesis, and is particularly well adapted for use in an implantable retinal prosthesis.

  9. Generic Synthesis of Carbon Nanotube Branches on Metal Oxide Arrays Exhibiting Stable High-Rate and Long-Cycle Sodium-Ion Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xinhui; Chao, Dongliang; Zhang, Yongqi; Zhan, Jiye; Zhong, Yu; Wang, Xiuli; Wang, Yadong; Shen, Ze Xiang; Tu, Jiangping; Fan, Hong Jin

    2016-06-01

    A new and generic strategy to construct interwoven carbon nanotube (CNT) branches on various metal oxide nanostructure arrays (exemplified by V2 O3 nanoflakes, Co3 O4 nanowires, Co3 O4 -CoTiO3 composite nanotubes, and ZnO microrods), in order to enhance their electrochemical performance, is demonstrated for the first time. In the second part, the V2 O3 /CNTs core/branch composite arrays as the host for Na(+) storage are investigated in detail. This V2 O3 /CNTs hybrid electrode achieves a reversible charge storage capacity of 612 mAh g(-1) at 0.1 A g(-1) and outstanding high-rate cycling stability (a capacity retention of 100% after 6000 cycles at 2 A g(-1) , and 70% after 10 000 cycles at 10 A g(-1) ). Kinetics analysis reveals that the Na(+) storage is a pseudocapacitive dominating process and the CNTs improve the levels of pseudocapacitive energy by providing a conductive network. PMID:27128527

  10. Radiofrequency current source (RFCS) drive and decoupling technique for parallel transmit arrays using a high-power metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonje; Boskamp, Eddy; Grist, Thomas; Kurpad, Krishna

    2009-07-01

    A radiofrequency current source (RFCS) design using a high-power metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) that enables independent current control for parallel transmit applications is presented. The design of an RFCS integrated with a series tuned transmitting loop and its associated control circuitry is described. The current source is operated in a gated class AB push-pull configuration for linear operation at high efficiency. The pulsed RF current amplitude driven into the low impedance transmitting loop was found to be relatively insensitive to the various loaded loop impedances ranging from 0.4 to 10.3 ohms, confirming current mode operation. The suppression of current induced by a neighboring loop was quantified as a function of center-to-center loop distance, and was measured to be 17 dB for nonoverlapping, adjacent loops. Deterministic manipulation of the B(1) field pattern was demonstrated by the independent control of RF phase and amplitude in a head-sized two-channel volume transmit array. It was found that a high-voltage rated RF power MOSFET with a minimum load resistance, exhibits current source behavior, which aids in transmit array design. PMID:19353658

  11. Radial metallicity gradients in spiral galaxies from H II regions and planetary nebulae: probing galactic chemical evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanghellini, Letizia

    2015-08-01

    Radial metallicity gradients, typically observed in spiral galaxies, are excellent constraints for chemical evolution models. The contemporary studies of the two stellar populations, whose progenitors have formed at different times, yield to the chemical and time constraining of the models. In this context, planetary nebula and HII region analysis proved to be ideal two-epochs test populations. We present an assortment of galaxies whose oxygen abundances have been determined both with weak- and strong-line methods, and whose radial metallicity gradients and their evolution in time have disclosed very interesting correlations with the galaxy characteristics. New results from our Gemini/GMOS observations, and a review of the best literature data, set the stage for a better understanding of spiral galaxy evolution.

  12. Nanoscaled redox active protein adsorption on Au-dot arrays: An electrochemical scanning probe microscopic investigation for application in nano-biodevices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagati, Ajay Kumar; Jung, Mi; Kim, Sang-Uk [Interdisciplinary Program of Integrated Biotechnology, Sogang University, 1 Shinsu-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Min, Junhong [College of Bionanotechnology, Kyungwon University, Bokjung-dong, Sujung-gu, Seongnam 461-701 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jeong-Woo, E-mail: jwchoi@sogang.ac.k [Interdisciplinary Program of Integrated Biotechnology, Sogang University, 1 Shinsu-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Interdisciplinary Program of Integrated Biotechnology Sogang University, 1 Shinsu-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-11-30

    Highly dense and uniform protein dot arrays on Au-nanodots using size controllable method were fabricated on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate in order to develop an electrochemical nanobiochip. Cysteine modified azurin was directly immobilized on the fabricated Au-nanodots without any linker materials. Atomic force microscopy was used for characterizing Au-dots formed on ITO substrate. Electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (ECSTM) revealed the monolayer formation with an in situ cyclic voltammetry to observe redox behaviour of both bare Au-dots and protein immobilized Au-dots. I-V characteristics were obtained on both bare Au-dots and protein immobilized Au-dots structured on ITO conductive electrodes.

  13. Probing critical point energies of transition metal dichalcogenides: surprising indirect gap of single layer $SL-WSe_2$

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Chendong; Chen, Yuxuan; Johnson, Amber; Li, Ming-Yang; Li, Lain-Jong; Mende, Patrick C.; Feenstra, Randall M.; Shih, Chih-Kang

    2014-01-01

    Understanding quasiparticle band structures of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) is critical for technological advances of these materials for atomic layer electronics and photonics. Although theoretical calculations to date have shown qualitatively similar features, there exist subtle differences which can lead to important consequences in the device characteristics. For example, most calculations have shown that all single layer (SL) TMDs have direct band gaps, while some have shown t...

  14. Exon Array Analysis using re-defined probe sets results in reliable identification of alternatively spliced genes in non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gröne Jörn

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment of non-small cell lung cancer with novel targeted therapies is a major unmet clinical need. Alternative splicing is a mechanism which generates diverse protein products and is of functional relevance in cancer. Results In this study, a genome-wide analysis of the alteration of splicing patterns between lung cancer and normal lung tissue was performed. We generated an exon array data set derived from matched pairs of lung cancer and normal lung tissue including both the adenocarcinoma and the squamous cell carcinoma subtypes. An enhanced workflow was developed to reliably detect differential splicing in an exon array data set. In total, 330 genes were found to be differentially spliced in non-small cell lung cancer compared to normal lung tissue. Microarray findings were validated with independent laboratory methods for CLSTN1, FN1, KIAA1217, MYO18A, NCOR2, NUMB, SLK, SYNE2, TPM1, (in total, 10 events and ADD3, which was analysed in depth. We achieved a high validation rate of 69%. Evidence was found that the activity of FOX2, the splicing factor shown to cause cancer-specific splicing patterns in breast and ovarian cancer, is not altered at the transcript level in several cancer types including lung cancer. Conclusions This study demonstrates how alternatively spliced genes can reliably be identified in a cancer data set. Our findings underline that key processes of cancer progression in NSCLC are affected by alternative splicing, which can be exploited in the search for novel targeted therapies.

  15. A study of low-metallicity DLAs at high redshift and C II* as a probe of their physical conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Dutta, R; Rahmani, H; Petitjean, P; Noterdaeme, P; Ledoux, C

    2014-01-01

    We present a detailed high spectral resolution (R $\\sim$ 40000) study of five high-z damped Lyman $\\alpha$ systems (DLAs) and one sub-DLA detected along four QSO sightlines. Four of these DLAs are very metal-poor with [Fe/H] $\\le$ $-$2. One of them, at z$_{abs}$ = 4.20287 towards J0953$-$0504, is the most metal-poor DLA at z $>$ 4 known till date. This system shows no enhancement of C over Fe and O, and standard Population II star yields can explain its relative abundance pattern. The DLA at z$_{abs}$ = 2.34006 towards J0035$-$0918 has been claimed to be the most carbon-enhanced metal-poor DLA. However, we show that thermal broadening is dominant in this system and, when this effect is taken into account, the measured carbon enhancement ([C/Fe] = 0.45 $\\pm$ 0.19) becomes $\\sim$ 10 times less than what was reported previously. The gas temperature in this DLA is estimated to be in the range of 5000 $-$ 8000 K, consistent with a warm neutral medium phase. From photoionization modelling of two of the DLAs showing...

  16. Probing the structural dependency of photoinduced properties of colloidal quantum dots using metal-oxide photo-active substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patty, Kira; Campbell, Quinn; Hamilton, Nathan; West, Robert G. [Department of Physics, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); Sadeghi, Seyed M., E-mail: seyed.sadeghi@uah.edu [Department of Physics, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); Nano and Micro Device Center, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); Mao, Chuanbin [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Stephenson Life Sciences Research Center, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States)

    2014-09-21

    We used photoactive substrates consisting of about 1 nm coating of a metal oxide on glass substrates to investigate the impact of the structures of colloidal quantum dots on their photophysical and photochemical properties. We showed during irradiation these substrates can interact uniquely with such quantum dots, inducing distinct forms of photo-induced processes when they have different cores, shells, or ligands. In particular, our results showed that for certain types of core-shell quantum dot structures an ultrathin layer of a metal oxide can reduce suppression of quantum efficiency of the quantum dots happening when they undergo extensive photo-oxidation. This suggests the possibility of shrinking the sizes of quantum dots without significant enhancement of their non-radiative decay rates. We show that such quantum dots are not influenced significantly by Coulomb blockade or photoionization, while those without a shell can undergo a large amount of photo-induced fluorescence enhancement via such blockade when they are in touch with the metal oxide.

  17. Oxygen pumping II: Probing the Inhomogeneous Metal Enrichment at the Epoch of Reionization with High Frequency CMB Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos; Verde, Licia; Jimenez, Raul

    2007-01-01

    At the epoch of reionization, when the high-redshift inter-galactic medium (IGM) is being enriched with metals, the 63.2 micron fine structure line of OI is pumped by the ~ 1300 AA soft UV background and introduces a spectral distortion in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). Here we use a toy model for the spatial distribution of neutral oxygen, assuming metal bubbles surround dark matter halos, and compute the fluctuations of this distortion, and the angular power spectrum it imprints on the CMB. We discuss the dependence of the power spectrum on the velocity of the winds polluting the IGM with metals, the minimum mass of the halos producing these winds, and on the cosmic epoch when the OI pumping occurs. We find that, although the clustering signal of the CMB distortion is weak \\delta y_{rms} ~ 10^{-7} (roughly corresponding to a temperature anisotropy of few nK), it may be reachable in deep integrations with high-sensitivity infrared detectors. Even without a detection, these instruments should be able ...

  18. Ablation of metals using ultrashort laser pulses in a pump-probe experiment dynamics of laser induced particle emission from metal surfaces on the femto and picosecond time scale

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, V

    2001-01-01

    The main part of this work deals with the dynamics of the laser ablation process of metals (Al, Ag, Fe and Ni) initiated by approx. 50 fs laser pulses. The phenomena have been investigated by interferometric time resolved pump and probe measurements. This work reports one of the first yield measurements of emitted singly charged ions and neutrals from a metal surface induced by laser light. The experiments have been performed using a two-pulse autocorrelation setup in which the differential yield of emitted metal ions is measured as a function of the temporal separation between a pair of excitation pulses with a reflectron-type time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer. The intensity of each pulse is kept below the ablation threshold, thus only the combined interaction of both pulses causes particle emission. It must be pointed out, that the time information obtained in this way concerns only the initial excitation responsible for ablation, but does not yield information about the dynamics of the way this excitation ...

  19. The surface metal site in Blc. viridis photosynthetic bacterial reaction centers: Cu2+ as a probe of structure, location, and flexibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metal ion binding to a surface site on photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) modulates light-induced electron and proton transfer events in the RC. Whereas many studies have elucidated aspects of metal ion modulation events in Rhodobacter sphaeroides RCs, much less is understood about the surface site in Blastochloris viridis (Blc. viridis) RCs. Interestingly, electron paramagnetic resonance studies revealed two spectroscopically distinct Cu2+ surface site environments in Blc. viridis RCs. Herein, Cu2+ has been used to spectroscopically probe the structure of these Cu2+ site(s) in response to freezing conditions, temperature, and charge separation. One Cu2+ environment in Blc. viridis RCs, termed CuA, exhibits temperature-dependent conformational flexibility. Different conformation states of the CuA2+ site are trapped when the RC is frozen in the dark either by fast-freeze or slow-freeze procedure. The second Cu2+ environment, termed CuB, is structurally invariant to different freezing conditions and shows resolved hyperfine coupling to three nitrogen atoms. Cu2+ is most likely binding at the same location on the RC, but in different coordination environments which may reflect two distinct conformational states of the isolated Blc. viridis RC protein.

  20. Studying nearest neighbor correlations by atom probe tomography (APT) in metallic glasses as exemplified for Fe40Ni40B20 glassy ribbons

    KAUST Repository

    Shariq, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    A next nearest neighbor evaluation procedure of atom probe tomography data provides distributions of the distances between atoms. The width of these distributions for metallic glasses studied so far is a few Angstrom reflecting the spatial resolution of the analytical technique. However, fitting Gaussian distributions to the distribution of atomic distances yields average distances with statistical uncertainties of 2 to 3 hundredth of an Angstrom. Fe 40Ni40B20 metallic glass ribbons are characterized this way in the as quenched state and for a state heat treated at 350 °C for 1 h revealing a change in the structure on the sub-nanometer scale. By applying the statistical tool of the χ2 test a slight deviation from a random distribution of B-atoms in the as quenched sample is perceived, whereas a pronounced elemental inhomogeneity of boron is detected for the annealed state. In addition, the distance distribution of the first fifteen atomic neighbors is determined by using this algorithm for both annealed and as quenched states. The next neighbor evaluation algorithm evinces a steric periodicity of the atoms when the next neighbor distances are normalized by the first next neighbor distance. A comparison of the nearest neighbor atomic distribution for as quenched and annealed state shows accumulation of Ni and B. Moreover, it also reveals the tendency of Fe and B to move slightly away from each other, an incipient step to Ni rich boride formation. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  1. Simple, Fast and Selective Detection of Adenosine Triphosphate at Physiological pH Using Unmodified Gold Nanoparticles as Colorimetric Probes and Metal Ions as Cross-Linkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Pang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We report a simple, fast and selective colorimetric assay of adenosine triphosphate (ATP using unmodified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs as probes and metal ions as cross-linkers. ATP can be assembled onto the surface of AuNPs through interaction between the electron-rich nitrogen atoms and the electron-deficient surface of AuNPs. Accordingly, Cu2+ ions induce a change in the color and UV/Vis absorbance of AuNPs by coordinating to the triphosphate groups and a ring nitrogen of ATP. A detection limit of 50 nM was achieved, which is comparable to or lower than that achievable by the currently used electrochemical, spectroscopic or chromatographic methods. The theoretical simplicity and high selectivity reported herein demonstrated that AuNPs-based colorimetric assay could be applied in a wide variety of fields by rationally designing the surface chemistry of AuNPs. In addition, our results indicate that ATP-modified AuNPs are less stable in Cu2+, Cd2+ or Zn2+-containing solutions due to the formation of the corresponding dimeric metal-ATP complexes.

  2. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  3. Probing the structural flexibility of MOFs by constructing metal oxide@MOF-based heterostructures for size-selective photoelectrochemical response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Wenwen; He, Yue; Guo, Jiangbin; Chen, Luning; Kong, Xiangjian; Zhao, Haixia; Kuang, Qin; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Zheng, Lansun

    2016-07-01

    It is becoming a challenge to achieve simpler characterization and wider application of flexible metal organic frameworks (MOFs) exhibiting the gate-opening or breathing behavior. Herein, we designed an intelligent MOF-based system where the gate-opening or breathing behavior of MOFs can be facially visualized in solution. Two types of metal oxide@MOF core-shell heterostructures, ZnO@ZIF-7 and ZnO@ZIF-71, were prepared using ZnO nanorods as self-sacrificial templates. The structural flexibility of both the MOFs can be easily judged from the distinct molecular-size-related formation modes and photoelectrochemical performances between the two ZnO@ZIF heterostructures. Moreover, the rotational dynamics of the flexible parts of ZIF-7 were studied by analyzing the intrinsic physical properties, such as dielectric constants, of the structure. The present work reminds us to pay particular attention to the influences of the structural flexibility of MOFs on the structure and properties of MOF-involved heterostructures in future studies.It is becoming a challenge to achieve simpler characterization and wider application of flexible metal organic frameworks (MOFs) exhibiting the gate-opening or breathing behavior. Herein, we designed an intelligent MOF-based system where the gate-opening or breathing behavior of MOFs can be facially visualized in solution. Two types of metal oxide@MOF core-shell heterostructures, ZnO@ZIF-7 and ZnO@ZIF-71, were prepared using ZnO nanorods as self-sacrificial templates. The structural flexibility of both the MOFs can be easily judged from the distinct molecular-size-related formation modes and photoelectrochemical performances between the two ZnO@ZIF heterostructures. Moreover, the rotational dynamics of the flexible parts of ZIF-7 were studied by analyzing the intrinsic physical properties, such as dielectric constants, of the structure. The present work reminds us to pay particular attention to the influences of the structural flexibility of

  4. The radial metallicity gradient and the history of elemental enrichment in M81 through emission-line probes

    CERN Document Server

    Stanghellini, Letizia; Casasola, Viviana; Villaver, Eva

    2014-01-01

    We present a new set of weak-line abundances of HII regions in M81, based on Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (GMOS) observations. The aim is to derive plasma and abundance analysis for a sizable set of emission-line targets to study the galactic chemical contents in the framework of galactic metallicity gradients. We used the weak-line abundance approach by deriving electron density and temperatures for several HII regions in M81. Gradient analysis is based on oxygen abundances.Together with a set of HII region abundances determined similarly by us with Multi-Mirror Telescope (MMT) spectra, the new data yield to a radial oxygen gradient of -0.088$\\pm$0.013 dex kpc$^{-1}$, which is steeper than the metallicity gradient obtained for planetary nebulae (-0.044$\\pm$0.007 dex kpc$^{-1}$). This result could be interpreted as gradient evolution with time: Models of galactic evolution with inside-out disk formation associated to pre-enriched gas infall would produce such difference of gradients, although stellar migr...

  5. Ultra-Thin Flexible Eddy Current Sensor Array for Gap Measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁天怀; 陈祥林; 黄毅平

    2004-01-01

    An ultra-thin flexible eddy current proximity sensor array was developed for online measurements of tiny gaps between large smooth metallic and nonmetallic surfaces of arbitrary shapes. The probe of the flexible eddy current sensor array, which includes a set of sensor coils, is fabricated on a thin flexible substrate using the flexible printed circuit board process which allows the probe to be very thin and flexible so that it can conform to the surface geometry of the measured objects. The sensor coils are connected to an inductance-capacitance oscillator, which converts the distance between the sensor coil and the metallic target to a frequency output. Experimental results show that the measurement accuracy of the sensor system can reach ±0.5% for a 2-mm gap and the sensor system is suitable for online gap measurements.

  6. Detection of Early Stage Apoptotic Cells Based on Label-Free Cytochrome c Assay Using Bioconjugated Metal Nanoclusters as Fluorescent Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Molaabasi, Fatemeh; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Rahmati, Fereshteh

    2016-02-16

    Cytochrome c (Cyt c) is an important biomarker in cell lysates for the early stage of apoptosis or anticancer agents. Here, two novel label-free fluorescence assays based on hemoglobin-stabilized gold nanoclusters (Hb/AuNCs) and aptamer-stabilized silver nanoclusters (DNA/AgNCs) for analysis of Cyt c are presented. The heme group of the protein induces sensitive sensing platforms accompanied by the decreased fluorescence of both metal nanoclusters. The quenching processes observed found to be based on the fluorescence resonance energy transfer mechanism from Hb/AuNCs to Cyt c and photoinduced electron transfer from DNA/AgNCs to the aptamer-Cyt c complex. The linear range for Cyt c was found to be 0-10 μM for Hb/AuNCs and from 0 to 1 μM for DNA/AgNCs, with limits of detection of ∼15 nM. On the basis of strong binding affinity of DNA aptamers for their target proteins, the DNA/AgNCs probe was successfully applied to the quantitative determination of Cyt c in cell lysates, which opens a new avenue to early diagnostics and drug screening with high sensitivity. Compared to the conventional Western blot method, the presented assays are low cost, easy to prepare the fluorescent probes, and sensitive, while overall time for the detection and quantitation of Cyt c from isolated mitochondria is only 20 min. The proposed method for Cyt c detection may also be useful for the study of those materials that cause mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptotic cell death. PMID:26812937

  7. Color Bricks: Building Highly Organized and Strongly Absorbing Multicomponent Arrays of Terpyridyl Perylenes on Metal Oxide Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sariola-Leikas, Essi; Ahmed, Zafar; Vivo, Paola; Ojanperä, Anniina; Lahtonen, Kimmo; Saari, Jesse; Valden, Mika; Lemmetyinen, Helge; Efimov, Alexander

    2016-01-22

    Terpyridine-substituted perylenes containing cyclic anhydrides in the peri position were synthesized. The anhydride group served as an anchor for assembly of the terpyridyl-crowned chromophores as monomolecular layers on metal oxide surfaces. Further coordination with Zn(2+) ions allowed for layer-by-layer formation of supramolecular assemblies of perylene imides on the solid substrates. With properly selected anchor and linker molecules it was possible to build high quality structures of greater than ten successive layers by a simple and straightforward procedure. The prepared films were stable and had a broad spectral coverage and high absorbance. To demonstrate their potential use, the synthesized dyes were employed in solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells, and electron injection from the perylene antennas to titanium dioxide was observed. PMID:26632758

  8. Transistor memory devices with large memory windows, using multi-stacking of densely packed, hydrophobic charge trapping metal nanoparticle array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organic field-effect transistor (OFET) memories have rapidly evolved from low-cost and flexible electronics with relatively low-memory capacities to memory devices that require high-capacity memory such as smart memory cards or solid-state hard drives. Here, we report the high-capacity OFET memories based on the multilayer stacking of densely packed hydrophobic metal NP layers in place of the traditional transistor memory systems based on a single charge trapping layer. We demonstrated that the memory performances of devices could be significantly enhanced by controlling the adsorption isotherm behavior, multilayer stacking structure and hydrophobicity of the metal NPs. For this study, tetraoctylammonium (TOA)-stabilized Au nanoparticles (TOA-AuNPs) were consecutively layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled with an amine-functionalized poly(amidoamine) dendrimer (PAD). The formed (PAD/TOA-AuNP)n films were used as a multilayer stacked charge trapping layer at the interface between the tunneling dielectric layer and the SiO2 gate dielectric layer. For a single AuNP layer (i.e. PAD/TOA-AuNP)1) with a number density of 1.82 × 1012 cm−2, the memory window of the OFET memory device was measured to be approximately 97 V. The multilayer stacked OFET memory devices prepared with four AuNP layers exhibited excellent programmable memory properties (i.e. a large memory window (ΔVth) exceeding 145 V, a fast switching speed (1 μs), a high program/erase (P/E) current ratio (greater than 106) and good electrical reliability) during writing and erasing over a relatively short time scale under an operation voltage of 100 V applied at the gate. (paper)

  9. Rational design of carbonitrile-carboxaldehyde cation receptor models: probing the nature of the heteroatom-metal interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosli, Ahmad Nazmi; Abu Bakar, Maizathul Akmam; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran; Zain, Sharifuddin Md; Ahmad, Mohd Rais; Abdul Manan, Ninie Suhana; Alias, Yatimah; Woi, Pei Meng

    2014-09-01

    In this work, hybrid functional and G4 methods were employed in the rational design of carbonitrile-carboxaldehyde receptor models for cation recognition. Electron-sharing and ionic interactions between the models and the cations were analyzed utilizing the concepts of overlap population, atomic valence, electrostatic potential, and CHELPG charge in order to elucidate the nature of the heteroatom-metal interaction, the N versus O disparity, and the effect of pH. Receptor fragment models from ionomycin were employed to rationalize the selection of receptor models for discriminating group I cations and enhancing the selectivity for Mg(II) rather than Ca(II), and to examine the effects of keto-enol forms and negatively charged sites. The changes in geometries, overlap population, metal valence, and CHELPG charge upon solvation in heptane medium as compared to the gas phase were negligible. The optimized geometries reveal that the interaction between group II cations and the keto, enol, and enolate forms of 2-cyanoethanal causes 12 % bending of the C-C-N angle from linearity. Overlap populations show that the electron-sharing interaction favors group II cations but that the same mechanism allows Li(I) to compete. The total spin of Li(I) is 17 % greater than that of Ca(II), but the G4 binding energies of the two are separated by more than 50 kcal/mol, favoring group II cations, which may eliminate interference from Li(I). 1,2-Dicyanoethylene, which has only one form, shows similar characteristics. CHELPG analysis shows that Mg(II) transfers 25 and 18 % of its positive charge to 2-cyanoethanal enolate and 1,2-dicyanoethylene, respectively. Hydrogen atoms receive most of the positive charge in both receptors, but the N-termini exhibit strikingly different characteristics. Electrostatic potential contour profiles were found to be in good agreement with the atomic charge distributions. The application of uncharged 1,3-dicarbonyl and 2-cyanocarbonyl receptors and a judicious

  10. Flexible retinal electrode array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okandan, Murat (Albuquerque, NM); Wessendorf, Kurt O. (Albuquerque, NM); Christenson, Todd R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-10-24

    An electrode array which has applications for neural stimulation and sensing. The electrode array can include a large number of electrodes each of which is flexibly attached to a common substrate using a plurality of springs to allow the electrodes to move independently. The electrode array can be formed from a combination of bulk and surface micromachining, with electrode tips that can include an electroplated metal (e.g. platinum, iridium, gold or titanium) or a metal oxide (e.g. iridium oxide) for biocompatibility. The electrode array can be used to form a part of a neural prosthesis, and is particularly well adapted for use in an implantable retinal prosthesis where the electrodes can be tailored to provide a uniform gentle contact pressure with optional sensing of this contact pressure at one or more of the electrodes.

  11. Probing M subdwarf metallicity with an esdK5+esdM5.5 binary

    CERN Document Server

    Pavlenko, Ya V; Gálvez-Ortiz, M C; Kushniruk, I O; Jones, H R A

    2015-01-01

    We present a spectral analysis of the binary G 224-58 AB that consists of the coolest M extreme subdwarf (esdM5.5) and a brighter primary (esdK5). This binary may serve as a benchmark for metallicity measurement calibrations and as a test-bed for atmospheric and evolutionary models for esdM objects. We determine abundances primarily using high resolution optical spectra of the primary. Other parameters were determined from the fits of synthetic spectra computed with these abundances to the observed spectra from 0.4 to 2.5 microns for both components. We determine \\Tef =4625 $\\pm$ 100 K, \\logg = 4.5 $\\pm$ 0.5 for the A component and \\Tef = 3200 $\\pm$ 100 K, \\logg = 5.0 $\\pm$ 0.5, for the B component. We obtained abundances of [Mg/H]=$-$1.51$\\pm$0.08, [Ca/H]=$-$1.39$\\pm$0.03, [Ti/H]=$-$1.37$\\pm$0.03 for alpha group elements and [CrH]=$-$1.88$\\pm$0.07, [Mn/H]=$-$1.96$\\pm$0.06, [Fe/H]=$-$1.92$\\pm$0.02, [Ni/H]=$-$1.81$\\pm$0.05 and [Ba/H]W=$-$1.87$\\pm$0.11 for iron group elements from fits to the spectral lines obs...

  12. Analysis of dynamic segregation and crystallisation in Mg{sub 65}Cu{sub 25}Y{sub 10} bulk metallic glass using atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laws, K.J., E-mail: k.laws@unsw.edu.au [Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals (Australia); School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Saxey, D.W. [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); School of Physics, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia. (Australia); McKenzie, W.R. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Electron Microscopy Unit, Mark Wainwright Analytical Centre, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Marceau, R.K.W. [Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals (Australia); Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Max-Planck Institut fuer Eisenforschung, Max-Planck-Str.1, Duesseldorf, D-40237 (Germany); Gun, B. [Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals (Australia); School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Ringer, S.P. [Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals (Australia); Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Ferry, M. [Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals (Australia); School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2012-10-30

    In order to develop an in-depth understanding of the flow behaviour and dynamic devitrification processes of metallic glasses in the supercooled liquid region, tensile testing of amorphous Mg{sub 65}Cu{sub 25}Y{sub 10} samples was carried out at temperatures from 150 to 170 Degree-Sign C and at strain rates from 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} s{sup -1} to 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Tensile data showed a consistent and reproducible inflexion in flow stress at a particular strain that was largely independent of strain rate. This was followed by a dramatic increase in flow stress occuring prior to the determined onset times of static crystallisation. Samples were analysed using atom probe tomography and the results indicate that tensile straining of the initially homogeneous amorphous alloy results in segregation into two distinct glassy phases via a shear-related process, coincident with the maximum shear plane angle, followed by the evolution of regions corresponding to the composition of a number of equilibrium binary and ternary intermetallic phases.

  13. Synthesis, structure and photoelectrochemical properties of single crystalline silicon nanowire arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalchiele, E.A., E-mail: dalchiel@fing.edu.u [Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Herrera y Reissig 565, C.C. 30, 11000 Montevideo (Uruguay); Martin, F.; Leinen, D. [Laboratorio de Materiales y Superficie (Unidad Asociada al CSIC), Departamentos de Fisica Aplicada and Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad de Malaga, Campus de Teatinos s/n, E29071 Malaga (Spain); Marotti, R.E. [Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Herrera y Reissig 565, C.C. 30, 11000 Montevideo (Uruguay); Ramos-Barrado, J.R. [Laboratorio de Materiales y Superficie (Unidad Asociada al CSIC), Departamentos de Fisica Aplicada and Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad de Malaga, Campus de Teatinos s/n, E29071 Malaga (Spain)

    2010-01-31

    In the present work, n-type silicon nanowire (n-SiNW) arrays have been synthesized by self-assembly electroless metal deposition (EMD) nanoelectrochemistry. The synthesized n-SiNW arrays have been submitted to scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and optical studies. Initial probes of the solar device conversion properties and the photovoltaic parameters such as short-circuit current, open-circuit potential, and fill factor of the n-SiNW arrays have been explored using a liquid-junction in a photoelectrochemical (PEC) system under white light. Moreover, a direct comparison between the PEC performance of a polished n-Si(100) and the synthesized n-SiNW array photoelectrodes has been done. The PEC performance was significantly enhanced on the n-SiNWs photoelectrodes compared with that on polished n-Si(100).

  14. Electrode array for neural stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wessendorf, Kurt O. (Albuquerque, NM); Okandan, Murat (Edgewood, NM); Stein, David J. (Albuquerque, NM); Yang, Pin (Albuquerque, NM); Cesarano, III, Joseph (Albuquerque, NM); Dellinger, Jennifer (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-08-16

    An electrode array for neural stimulation is disclosed which has particular applications for use in a retinal prosthesis. The electrode array can be formed as a hermetically-sealed two-part ceramic package which includes an electronic circuit such as a demultiplexer circuit encapsulated therein. A relatively large number (up to 1000 or more) of individually-addressable electrodes are provided on a curved surface of a ceramic base portion the electrode array, while a much smaller number of electrical connections are provided on a ceramic lid of the electrode array. The base and lid can be attached using a metal-to-metal seal formed by laser brazing. Electrical connections to the electrode array can be provided by a flexible ribbon cable which can also be used to secure the electrode array in place.

  15. The Cherenkov Telescope Array

    OpenAIRE

    Bigongiari, Ciro

    2016-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is planned to be the next generation ground based observatory for very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray astronomy. Gamma-rays provide a powerful insight into the non-thermal universe and hopefully a unique probe for new physics. Imaging Cherenkov telescopes have already discovered more than 170 VHE gamma-ray emitters providing plentiful of valuable data and clearly demonstrating the power of this technique. In spite of the impressive results there are indication...

  16. 亚波长金属块阵列的太赫兹传感芯片%Terahertz Sensing Chip of Sub-wavelength Metallic Arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王思江; 毛洪艳; 夏良平; 杨忠波; 魏东山; 崔洪亮; 杜春雷

    2016-01-01

    光波波段的生化传感器件已很常见且可实现单分子探测,但由于光波波长在纳米量级,制作出的器件的结构尺寸小、加工难度大、传感重复性较差。因此,本文提出一种亚波长金属块阵列结构的太赫兹(Terahertz, THz)传感芯片,在理论上基于法布里-珀罗(FP)共振建立了其传感模型,结合有限元方法分析了亚波长金属结构局域表面等离子体共振对其传感灵敏度的影响规律。然后采用正交光刻工艺制作出了结构均一的传感芯片,传感实验表明,该芯片对0.025 mol/L的D(+)-葡萄糖水溶液可产生53 GHz的频移量,传感灵敏度高,有望应用于高灵敏的太赫兹生物传感。%Recently, light wave band biochemical sensors of single molecule detection are common to be seen. However, because of the light wave’s nano-scale length, the devices of small size are difficult to process and have poor sensing repeatability. Therefore, we proposed a terahertz (Terahertz, THz) sensor chip constituted of simple sub-wavelength metal block arrays. In theory, we established its sensing model based on Fabry-Perot (FP) resonance, combined with the analysis of the influence of the localized surface plasmon resonance of sub-wavelength metal structure of sensitivity in the Finite Element Method (FEM). Based on this, a large area and homogeneous structure was fabricated with the orthogonal lithography. The experimental result indicates that the resonance frequency shift 53 GHz for 0.025 mol/L D(+)-Glucose solution, which possess high sensitivity. Our works can provide theoretical guidance for the design of high sensitive terahertz sensor.

  17. Technical Letter Report, An Evaluation of Ultrasonic Phased Array Testing for Reactor Piping System Components Containing Dissimilar Metal Welds, JCN N6398, Task 2A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, Aaron A.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2009-11-30

    Research is being conducted for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to assess the effectiveness and reliability of advanced nondestructive examination (NDE) methods for the inspection of light-water reactor components. The scope of this research encom¬passes primary system pressure boundary materials including dissimilar metal welds (DMWs), cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS), piping with corrosion-resistant cladding, weld overlays, inlays and onlays, and far-side examinations of austenitic piping welds. A primary objective of this work is to evaluate various NDE methods to assess their ability to detect, localize, and size cracks in steel components that challenge standard and/or conventional inspection methodologies. This interim technical letter report provides a summary of a technical evaluation aimed at assessing the capabilities of phased-array (PA) ultrasonic testing (UT) methods as applied to the inspection of small-bore DMW components that exist in the reactor coolant systems (RCS) of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Operating experience and events such as the circumferential cracking in the reactor vessel nozzle-to-RCS hot leg pipe at V.C. Summer nuclear power station, identified in 2000, show that in PWRs where primary coolant water (or steam) are present under normal operation, Alloy 82/182 materials are susceptible to pressurized water stress corrosion cracking. The extent and number of occurrences of DMW cracking in nuclear power plants (domestically and internationally) indicate the necessity for reliable and effective inspection techniques. The work described herein was performed to provide insights for evaluating the utility of advanced NDE approaches for the inspection of DMW components such as a pressurizer surge nozzle DMW, a shutdown cooling pipe DMW, and a ferritic (low-alloy carbon steel)-to-CASS pipe DMW configuration.

  18. Impact ionization in high resistivity silicon induced by an intense terahertz field enhanced by an antenna array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarekegne, Abebe Tilahun; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Zalkovskij, Maksim;

    2015-01-01

    antenna array. The carrier multiplication is probed by the frequency shift of the resonance of the antenna array due to the change of the local refractive index of the substrate. Experimental results and simulations show that the carrier density in silicon increases by over seven orders of magnitude in......We report on the observation of ultrafast impact ionization and carrier generation in high resistivity silicon induced by intense subpicosecond terahertz transients. Local terahertz peak electric fields of several MV cm−1 are obtained by field enhancement in the near field of a resonant metallic...

  19. ISIDORE, a probe for in situ trace metal speciation based on Donnan membrane technique with related electrochemical detection part 1: Equilibrium measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parat, Corinne; Pinheiro, J P

    2015-10-01

    This work presents the development of a new probe (ISIDORE probe) based on the hyphenation of a Donnan Membrane Technique device (DMT) to a screen-printed electrode through a flow-cell to determine the free zinc, cadmium and lead ion concentration in natural samples, such as a freshwater river. The probe displays many advantages namely: (i) the detection can be performed on-site, which avoids all problems inherent to sampling, transport and storage; (ii) the low volume of the acceptor solution implies shorter equilibration times; (ii) the electrochemical detection system allows monitoring the free ion concentration in the acceptor solution without sampling. PMID:26481984

  20. Heterometallic Alkaline Earth-Lanthanide Ba(II)-La(III) Microporous Metal-Organic Framework as Bifunctional Luminescent Probes of Al(3+) and MnO4(.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Bin; Liu, Shi Xin; Cheng, Yue; Guo, Chao; Wu, Xiang Xia; Guo, Jian Hua; Liu, Yuan Yuan; Li, Yan

    2016-05-01

    In this work a rigid asymmetrical tricarboxylate ligand p-terphenyl-3,4″,5-tricarboxylic acid (H3L) has been employed, and a unique heterometallic alkaline earth-lanthanide microporous luminescent metal-organic framework (MOF) {[Ba3La0.5(μ3-L)2.5(H2O)3(DMF)]·(3DMF)}n (1·3DMF) (DMF = dimethylformamide) has been isolated under solvothermal conditions. Single-crystal X-ray structural analysis demonstrates that 2D inorganic Ba-O-La connectivity can be observed in 1, which are further bridged via rigid terphenyl backbones of L(3-), forming a unique I(2)O(1)-type microporous luminescent framework. A 1D microporous channel with dimensionality of 9.151(3) Å × 10.098(1) Å can be observed along the crystallographic a axis. PXRD patterns have been investigated indicating pure phases of 1. The luminescence explorations demonstrated that 1 exhibits highly selective and sensitive sensing for Al(3+) over other cations with high quenching efficiency Ksv value of 1.445 × 10(4) L·mol(-1) and low detection limit (1.11 μM (S/N = 3)). Meanwhile 1 also exhibits highly selective and sensitive sensing for MnO4(-) over other anions with quenching efficiency Ksv = 7.73 × 10(3) L·mol(-1) and low detection limit (0.28 μM (S/N = 3)). It is noted that, when different concentrations of MnO4(-) solutions (0.5 to 100 μM) were dropped into the suspension of 1, the bright blue luminescence of the suspension observed under UV light can gradually change into pink color, indicating visually luminescent sensing, which makes the detection process of MnO4(-) more convenient in practical. The result also reveals that 1 represents the first example of bifunctional heterometallic alkaline earth-lanthanide MOF-based luminescent probes for selectively detecting Al(3+) and MnO4(-) in the water solutions. PMID:27088966

  1. Selective coupling of HE{sub 11} and TM{sub 01} modes into microfabricated fully metal-coated quartz probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tortora, P. [Institute of Microtechnology, University of Neuchatel, Rue A.L. Breguet 2, CH-2000 Neuchatel (Switzerland)]. E-mail: piero.tortora@unine.ch; Descrovi, E. [Institute of Microtechnology, University of Neuchatel, Rue A.L. Breguet 2, CH-2000 Neuchatel (Switzerland)]. E-mail: emiliano.descrovi@polito.it; Aeschimann, L. [Institute of Microtechnology, University of Neuchatel, Rue A.L. Breguet 2, CH-2000 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Vaccaro, L. [Institute of Microtechnology, University of Neuchatel, Rue A.L. Breguet 2, CH-2000 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Herzig, H.-P. [Institute of Microtechnology, University of Neuchatel, Rue A.L. Breguet 2, CH-2000 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Daendliker, R. [Institute of Microtechnology, University of Neuchatel, Rue A.L. Breguet 2, CH-2000 Neuchatel (Switzerland)

    2007-02-15

    We report computational and experimental investigations on injection and transmission of light in microfabricated fully Aluminum-coated quartz probes. In particular, we show that a selective coupling of either the HE{sub 11} or the TM{sub 01} mode can be carried out by injecting focused linearly or radially polarized beams into the probe. Optical fields, emitted by the probe after a controlled injection, are characterized in intensity and phase with the help of an interferometric technique. With the help of near-field measurement, we finally demonstrate that a longitudinally polarized spot localized at the tip apex is actually produced when the TM{sub 01} mode is coupled into the probe.

  2. Arc inhibitors for lower hybrid waveguide arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discontinuity at the mouth of a phased array between waveguide fields and plasma fields gives rise to strong, localized electric fields at the septa, especially if the array is excited asymetrically. Methods are suggested for modifying these fields to reduce the possibility of arcing. Probe measurements of the fields near the septa show that small but significant reductions of the local fields are possible and might raise the maximum power handling capability of an array

  3. Formation of binary and ternary metal deposits on glass-ceramic carbon electrode surfaces: electron-probe X-ray microanalysis, total-reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The features of the formation of binary and ternary alloys during the electrochemical deposition and co-deposition of copper, cadmium and lead from aqueous solutions on disc glass-ceramic carbon electrode surfaces were studied by electron-probe X-ray microanalysis, total-reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The macroscopic properties of electrodeposits such as morphology, lateral distribution of the elements along the disc electrode surface and depth distribution of the elements in the electrodeposit bulk were established. The mechanisms of metal nucleation and growth of thin films of electrodeposits were discussed

  4. Electroless nickel plating on optical fiber probe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Huang; Zhoufeng Wang; Zhuomin Li; Wenli Deng

    2009-01-01

    As a component of near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM),optical fiber probe is an important factor influncing the equipment resolution.Electroless nickel plating is introduced to metallize the optical fiber probe.The optical fibers are etched by 40% HF with Turner etching method.Through pretreatment,the optical fiber probe is coated with Ni-P film by clectrolcss plating in a constant temperature water tank.Atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS),scanning electron microscopy (SEM),and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDXS) are carried out to charaeterizc the deposition on fiber probe.We have rcproducibly fabricated two kinds of fiber probes with a Ni-P fihn:aperture probe and apertureless probe.In addition,reductive particle transportation on the surface of fiber probe is proposed to explain the cause of these probes.

  5. Microreactor Array Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiktor, Peter; Brunner, Al; Kahn, Peter; Qiu, Ji; Magee, Mitch; Bian, Xiaofang; Karthikeyan, Kailash; Labaer, Joshua

    2015-03-01

    We report a device to fill an array of small chemical reaction chambers (microreactors) with reagent and then seal them using pressurized viscous liquid acting through a flexible membrane. The device enables multiple, independent chemical reactions involving free floating intermediate molecules without interference from neighboring reactions or external environments. The device is validated by protein expressed in situ directly from DNA in a microarray of ~10,000 spots with no diffusion during three hours incubation. Using the device to probe for an autoantibody cancer biomarker in blood serum sample gave five times higher signal to background ratio compared to standard protein microarray expressed on a flat microscope slide. Physical design principles to effectively fill the array of microreactors with reagent and experimental results of alternate methods for sealing the microreactors are presented.

  6. Array tomography: imaging stained arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheva, Kristina D; O'Rourke, Nancy; Busse, Brad; Smith, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Array tomography is a volumetric microscopy method based on physical serial sectioning. Ultrathin sections of a plastic-embedded tissue are cut using an ultramicrotome, bonded in an ordered array to a glass coverslip, stained as desired, and imaged. The resulting two-dimensional image tiles can then be reconstructed computationally into three-dimensional volume images for visualization and quantitative analysis. The minimal thickness of individual sections permits high-quality rapid staining and imaging, whereas the array format allows reliable and convenient section handling, staining, and automated imaging. Also, the physical stability of the arrays permits images to be acquired and registered from repeated cycles of staining, imaging, and stain elution, as well as from imaging using multiple modalities (e.g., fluorescence and electron microscopy). Array tomography makes it possible to visualize and quantify previously inaccessible features of tissue structure and molecular architecture. However, careful preparation of the tissue is essential for successful array tomography; these steps can be time-consuming and require some practice to perfect. In this protocol, tissue arrays are imaged using conventional wide-field fluorescence microscopy. Images can be captured manually or, with the appropriate software and hardware, the process can be automated. PMID:21041399

  7. Array tomography: production of arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheva, Kristina D; O'Rourke, Nancy; Busse, Brad; Smith, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Array tomography is a volumetric microscopy method based on physical serial sectioning. Ultrathin sections of a plastic-embedded tissue are cut using an ultramicrotome, bonded in an ordered array to a glass coverslip, stained as desired, and imaged. The resulting two-dimensional image tiles can then be reconstructed computationally into three-dimensional volume images for visualization and quantitative analysis. The minimal thickness of individual sections permits high-quality rapid staining and imaging, whereas the array format allows reliable and convenient section handling, staining, and automated imaging. Also, the physical stability of the arrays permits images to be acquired and registered from repeated cycles of staining, imaging, and stain elution, as well as from imaging using multiple modalities (e.g., fluorescence and electron microscopy). Array tomography makes it possible to visualize and quantify previously inaccessible features of tissue structure and molecular architecture. However, careful preparation of the tissue is essential for successful array tomography; these steps can be time consuming and require some practice to perfect. This protocol describes the sectioning of embedded tissues and the mounting of the serial arrays. The procedures require some familiarity with the techniques used for ultramicrotome sectioning for electron microscopy. PMID:21041397

  8. SU-E-J-205: Monte Carlo Modeling of Ultrasound Probes for Real-Time Ultrasound Image-Guided Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hristov, D; Schlosser, J; Bazalova, M [Stanford Universtiy, Stanford, CA (United States); Chen, J [UCSF Comprehensive Cancer Center, Lafayette, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the effect of ultrasound (US) probe beam attenuation for radiation therapy delivered under real-time US image guidance by means of Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: MC models of two Philips US probes, an X6-1 matrix-array transducer and a C5-2 curved-array transducer, were built based on their CT images in the EGSnrc BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc codes. Due to the metal parts, the probes were scanned in a Tomotherapy machine with a 3.5 MV beam. Mass densities in the probes were assigned based on an electron density calibration phantom consisting of cylinders with mass densities between 0.2–8.0 g/cm{sup 3}. Beam attenuation due to the probes was measured in a solid water phantom for a 6 MV and 15 MV 15x15 cm{sup 2} beam delivered on a Varian Trilogy linear accelerator. The dose was measured with the PTW-729 ionization chamber array at two depths and compared to MC simulations. The extreme case beam attenuation expected in robotic US image guided radiotherapy for probes in upright position was quantified by means of MC simulations. Results: The 3.5 MV CT number to mass density calibration curve was found to be linear with R{sup 2} > 0.99. The maximum mass densities were 4.6 and 4.2 g/cm{sup 3} in the C5-2 and X6-1 probe, respectively. Gamma analysis of the simulated and measured doses revealed that over 98% of measurement points passed the 3%/3mm criteria for both probes and measurement depths. The extreme attenuation for probes in upright position was found to be 25% and 31% for the C5-2 and X6-1 probe, respectively, for both 6 and 15 MV beams at 10 cm depth. Conclusion: MC models of two US probes used for real-time image guidance during radiotherapy have been built. As a Result, radiotherapy treatment planning with the imaging probes in place can now be performed. J Schlosser is an employee of SoniTrack Systems, Inc. D Hristov has financial interest in SoniTrack Systems, Inc.

  9. DNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The creation of DNA probes for detection of specific nucleotide segments differs from ligand detection in that it is a chemical rather than an immunological reaction. Complementary DNA or RNA is used in place of the antibody and is labelled with 32P. So far, DNA probes have been successfully employed in the diagnosis of inherited disorders, infectious diseases, and for identification of human oncogenes. The latest approach to the diagnosis of communicable and parasitic infections is based on the use of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probes. The genetic information of all cells is encoded by DNA and DNA probe approach to identification of pathogens is unique because the focus of the method is the nucleic acid content of the organism rather than the products that the nucleic acid encodes. Since every properly classified species has some unique nucleotide sequences that distinguish it from every other species, each organism's genetic composition is in essence a finger print that can be used for its identification. In addition to this specificity, DNA probes offer other advantages in that pathogens may be identified directly in clinical specimens

  10. Probing Capacity

    CERN Document Server

    Asnani, Himanshu; Weissman, Tsachy

    2010-01-01

    We consider the problem of optimal probing of states of a channel by transmitter and receiver for maximizing rate of reliable communication. The channel is discrete memoryless (DMC) with i.i.d. states. The encoder takes probing actions dependent on the message. It then uses the state information obtained from probing causally or non-causally to generate channel input symbols. The decoder may also take channel probing actions as a function of the observed channel output and use the channel state information thus acquired, along with the channel output, to estimate the message. We refer to the maximum achievable rate for reliable communication for such systems as the 'Probing Capacity'. We characterize this capacity when the encoder and decoder actions are cost constrained. To motivate the problem, we begin by characterizing the trade-off between the capacity and fraction of channel states the encoder is allowed to observe, while the decoder is aware of channel states. In this setting of 'to observe or not to o...

  11. The Progress of Nano-probes for Heavy Metal Contaminants Detection in the Environments%纳米探针用于检测环境中重金属污染物的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王金梁; 李光明; 缪昭华; 成晶; 郭彩欣

    2012-01-01

    重金属污染对生态环境和人类健康具有极大的危害,建立灵敏、快捷、高效的重金属检测方法具有非常重要的意义.现有的检测技术依赖大型仪器设备,在检测条件、时间以及成本上都有较高的要求,难以满足当前检测工作的需要.随着纳米技术的飞速发展,各种纳米材料不同于块体材料的优异特性被广泛开发,在化学和生物检测领域已有广泛的应用.本文主要综述了近几年来常用的几种纳米探针在重金属检测应用中的研究进展,并对各种纳米探针的特点及检测原理进行了阐述和总结.这些纳米探针包括半导体荧光量子点,荧光纳米粒子、金纳米颗粒等材料,由于他们独特的荧光特性、吸收特性、表面等离子共振(SPR)效应、表面能量转移(SET)效应等,在重金属离子检测领域有很大的应用前景.并且根据目前实际环境监测工作的需要,对基于纳米探针的检测手段进行了讨论和展望,旨在为重金属污染物检测研究的发展和进步提供参考.%Heavy metal contaminants are harmful to both ecological environment and human health, so it is important and urgent to establish sensitive, fast and efficient methods for detecting heavy metal. The current detection techniques were established on the basis of large instruments, but the requirements on the detection conditions, time and cost are higher. So it's difficult to meet the needs of heavy metal detection. With the rapid development of nanotechnology, many nano-scaled materials have been widely used in chemical and biological analysis due to their outstanding properties different from the bulk materials. Herein, the developments of several commonly used nano-probes applied in heavy metal detection were reviewed, and the characteristics and detection mechanisms of these nano-probes were summarized. These nano-probes included semiconductor quantum dots, fluorescent nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles

  12. Probing the possibility of coexistence of martensite transition and half-metallicity in Ni and Co-based full Heusler Alloys : An ab initio Calculation

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Tufan; Pandey, Dhanshree; Chakrabarti, Aparna

    2016-01-01

    Using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory, we have studied the mechanical, electronic, and magnetic properties of Heusler alloys, namely, Ni$_{2}BC$ and Co$_{2}BC$ ($B$ = Sc, Ti, V, Cr and Mn as well as Y, Zr, Nb, Mo and Tc; $C$ = Ga and Sn). On the basis of electronic structure (density of states) and mechanical properties (tetragonal shear constant), as well as magnetic interactions (Heisenberg exchange coupling parameters), we probe the properties of these mate...

  13. Near-field enhancement and sub-wavelength imaging in the optical region using a pair of two-dimensional arrays of metal nanospheres

    OpenAIRE

    Alitalo, Pekka; Simovski, Constantin; Viitanen, Ari; Tretyakov, Sergei

    2006-01-01

    Near-field enhancement and sub-wavelength imaging properties of a system comprising a coupled pair of two-dimensional arrays of resonant nanospheres are studied. The concept of using two coupled material sheets possessing surface mode resonances for evanescent field enhancement is already well established in the microwave region. This paper shows that the same principles can be applied also in the optical region, where the performance of the resonant sheets can be realized with the use of met...

  14. Law of substitution for mixed arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear safety justification of a mixed array of dissimilar fissile units of metal units and dilute solution units, according to Clayton, has been a persistent and nagging problem. Dissimilar uranium metal or dissimilar uranium solution units in a mixed array can also create a modeling nightmare for the nuclear criticality safety engineer. Now, a calculational method known as the Law of Substitution has been developed to ensure that the k/sub eff/ of an array of uranium metal and uranium solution units will satisfy any k/sub eff/ limit set by the nuclear safety engineer. The nuclear criticality safety engineer can utilize the Law of Substitution to safely mix or substitute different uranium metal units, different uranium solution units, and more importantly, uranium metal and dilute UO2 solution units in an array. The Law of Substitution is as follows: (1) calculate the k/sub eff/ of each unit type in its own infinite planar array. (2) Determine the edge-to-edge spacing of the infinite planar array of each type of unit to satisfy a desired k/sub eff/. (3) Select the largest edge-to-edge spacing from among the similar units in their infinite planar arrays and use that spacing for the finite or infinite planar array of mixed units

  15. Magnetic-probe diagnostics for railgun plasma armatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, J.V.

    1989-06-01

    Magnetic probes were employed on the first plasma armature railgun experiments, and they have been used continuously since then for position determination and qualitative determination of the armature current. In the last few years, improvements in experimental technique and analysis have permitted more accurate measurements of the plasma-armature current distribution. This paper reviews the various probe configurations in use today and presents analytic approximations for the dependence of the probe signal on probe location and railgun geometry. Rail current and armature current probes are compared and contrasted with respect to resolution and accuracy. Further improvements in measurement accuracy are predicted for close-spaced magnetic-probe arrays.

  16. Note: Multi-confocal fluorescence correlation spectroscopy in living cells using a complementary metal oxide semiconductor-single photon avalanche diode array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloster-Landsberg, M.; Tyndall, D.; Wang, I.; Walker, R.; Richardson, J.; Henderson, R.; Delon, A.

    2013-07-01

    Living cells are heterogeneous and rapidly changing biological samples. It is thus desirable to measure molecular concentration and dynamics in many locations at the same time. In this note, we present a multi-confocal setup capable of performing simultaneous fluorescence correlation spectroscopy measurements, by focusing the spots with a spatial light modulator and acquiring data with a monolithic 32 × 32 single-photon avalanche photodiode array. A post-processing method is proposed to correct cross-talk effects between neighboring spots. We demonstrate the applicability of our system by simultaneously measuring the diffusion of free enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (eGFP) molecules at nine different points in living cells.

  17. Probe modeling for millimeter-wave integrated-circuit horn antennas

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Yong; Chiao, Jung-Chih; Potter, Kent A.; Rutledge, David B.

    1992-01-01

    Integrated-circuit probe-excited horn-antenna arrays etched in silicon are well developed. They are a very promising class of antenna arrays for milli-meter and submillimeter applications. Further development of this technology involves integrating mixers and amplifiers into the antenna arrays. In an effort to develop an antenna-mixer array based on the existing technology, various antenna probes inside the pyramidal horns have been examined on scaled model-horns at the micr...

  18. Use of functional gene arrays for elucidating in situ biodegradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JoyD.Van Nostrand

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Microarrays have revolutionized the study of microbiology by providing a high-throughput method for examining thousands of genes with a single test and overcome the limitations of many culture-independent approaches. Functional gene arrays (FGA probe a wide range of genes involved in a variety of functions of interest to microbial ecology (e.g., carbon degradation, N-fixation, metal resistance from many different microorganisms, cultured and uncultured. The most comprehensive FGA to date is the GeoChip array, which targets tens of thousands of genes involved in the geochemical cycling of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulphur, metal resistance and reduction, energy processing, antibiotic resistance and contaminant degradation as well as phylogenetic information (gyrB. Since the development of GeoChips, many studies have been performed using this FGA and have shown it to be a powerful tool for rapid, sensitive and specific examination of microbial communities in a high-throughput manner. As such, the GeoChip is well-suited for linking geochemical processes with microbial community function and structure. This technology has been used successfully to examine microbial communities before, during and after in situ bioremediation at a variety of contaminated sites. These studies have expanded our understanding of biodegradation and bioremediation processes and the associated microorganisms and environmental conditions responsible. This review provides an overview of FGA development with a focus on the GeoChip and highlights specific GeoChip studies involving in situ bioremediation.

  19. Matrix phased array (MPA) imaging technology for resistance spot welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A three-dimensional MPA probe has been incorporated with a high speed phased array electronic board to visualize nugget images of resistance spot welds. The primary application area of this battery operated portable MPA ultrasonic imaging system is in the automotive industry which a conventional destructive testing process is commonly adopted to check the quality of resistance spot welds in auto bodies. Considering an average of five-thousand spot welds in a medium size passenger vehicle, the amount of time and effort given to popping the welds and measuring nugget size are immeasurable in addition to the millions of dollars' worth of scrap metals recycled per plant per year. This wasteful labor intensive destructive testing process has become less reliable as auto body sheet metal has transitioned from thick and heavy mild steels to thin and light high strength steels. Consequently, the necessity of developing a non-destructive inspection methodology has become inevitable. In this paper, the fundamental aspects of the current 3-D probe design, data acquisition algorithms, and weld nugget imaging process are discussed

  20. Annealing behaviors of vacancy-type defects near interfaces between metal contacts and GaN probed using a monoenergetic positron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacancy-type defects near interfaces between metal contacts and GaN grown on Si substrates by metal organic chemical vapor deposition have been studied using a monoenergetic positron beam. Measurements of Doppler broadening spectra of the annihilation radiation for Ti-deposited GaN showed that optically active vacancy-type defects were introduced below the Ti/GaN interface after annealing at 800 °C. Charge transition of those defects due to electron capture was observed and was found to correlate with a yellow band in the photoluminescence spectrum. The major defect species was identified as vacancy clusters such as three to five Ga-vacancies coupled with multiple nitrogen-vacancies. The annealing behaviors of vacancy-type defects in Ti-, Ni-, and Pt-deposited GaN were also examined

  1. In-plane magnetic-field-induced metal-insulator transition in (311)A GaAs two-dimensional hole systems probed by thermopower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faniel, S.; Moldovan, L.; Vlad, A.; Tutuc, E.; Bishop, N.; Melinte, S.; Shayegan, M.; Bayot, V.

    2007-10-01

    We report thermopower measurements in dilute (311)A GaAs two-dimensional holes subjected to an in-plane magnetic field B that drives the system through a metal-insulator transition (MIT). The diffusion thermopower Sd decreases linearly with temperature at low B for both low-mobility [011¯] and high-mobility [2¯33] directions, as expected for metallic systems. At high B , in the insulating phase, Sd changes sign along [011¯] , while Sd drops to zero along [2¯33] . This behavior suggests that the system does not undergo any ground-state modification but, rather, that the apparent MIT transition is accompanied by a dramatic change in the dominant scattering mechanisms.

  2. Sampling probe for microarray read out using electrospray mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2004-10-12

    An automated electrospray based sampling system and method for analysis obtains samples from surface array spots having analytes. The system includes at least one probe, the probe including an inlet for flowing at least one eluting solvent to respective ones of a plurality of spots and an outlet for directing the analyte away from the spots. An automatic positioning system is provided for translating the probe relative to the spots to permit sampling of any spot. An electrospray ion source having an input fluidicly connected to the probe receives the analyte and generates ions from the analyte. The ion source provides the generated ions to a structure for analysis to identify the analyte, preferably being a mass spectrometer. The probe can be a surface contact probe, where the probe forms an enclosing seal along the periphery of the array spot surface.

  3. The IMF of Extremely Metal-Poor Stars and the Probe into the Star-Formation Process of the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Komiya, Yutaka; Habe, Asao; Fujimoto, Masayuki Y

    2007-01-01

    We discuss the star formation history of the Galaxy, based on the observations of extremely metal-poor stars (EMP) in the Galactic halo, to gain an insight into the evolution and structure formation in the early universe. The initialmass function (IMF) of EMP stars is derived from the observed fraction of carbon-enhanced EXP (CEMP) stars among the EMP survivors, which are thought to originate from the evolution in the close binary systems with mass transfer. Relying upon the theory of the evolution of EMP stars and of their binary evolution, we find that stars of metallicity [Fe/H]<-2.5 were formed at typical mass of ~10M_sun. The top heavy IMF thus obtained is applied to study the early chemical evolution of the Galaxy. We construct the merging history of our Galaxy semi-analytically and derive the metallicity distribution function (MDF) of low-mass EMP stars that survive to date with taking into account the contribution of binary systems. It is shown that the resultant MDF can well reproduce the observed...

  4. Patterned nanocontacts on blended photovoltaic films for probing of local photoresponse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhitenev, Nikolai; Jung, Suyong; Haney, Paul; Hamadani, Behrang

    2010-03-01

    Probing of nanoscale photocurrent by photoconductive atomic force microscopy (PCAFM) provides spatially resolved information on the nature of inhomogeneity related to material blending in organic bulk heterojunction solar cells. However, interpretation of the data is often complicated due to the nontrivial nature of tip/sample contact. Here, we pattern the active layer of the P3HT:PCBM solar cells by arrays of silver nanodots with sub-micron spatial resolution, and probe the photoresponse from each metal dot by a PCAFM system under illumination. The rigid geometry of the nanodot, the well-defined contact and the low work function of silver allows for better characterization of photoresponse from the film and a trend that allows us to generalize their response to macroscopic devices. We also show modeling results based on equivalent circuit elements to better understand the current-voltage characteristics of these photovoltaic nanodevices.

  5. The IMF of Extremely Metal-Poor Stars and the Probe into the Star-Formation Process of the Milky Way

    OpenAIRE

    Komiya, Yutaka; Suda, Takuma; Habe, Asao; Fujimoto, Masayuki Y.

    2007-01-01

    We discuss the star formation history of the Galaxy, based on the observations of extremely metal-poor stars (EMP) in the Galactic halo, to gain an insight into the evolution and structure formation in the early universe. The initialmass function (IMF) of EMP stars is derived from the observed fraction of carbon-enhanced EXP (CEMP) stars among the EMP survivors, which are thought to originate from the evolution in the close binary systems with mass transfer. Relying upon the theory of the evo...

  6. Size dependent reactivity of metal nanoparticles and alloys supported on HOPG, probed by the H-D exchange and the NH3 decomposition reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiordaliso, Elisabetta Maria

    has been investigated in the case of Pt and Ru deposited on HOPG, which were annealed to high temperatures in the UHV chamber. It is found that upon annealing the amount of carbon present in the films increases up to 95%, as derived by surface analysis, indicating the formation of a carbon layer on......, which has been performed on Ru, Ir, Rh and Pt thin films, on Ru nanoparticles and on Ir/Ru alloys. Preliminary results indicated that Ru is the most active among the selected metals, but no definitive conclusions can be drawn on the effect of the particle diameter on the decomposition rate. In the case...

  7. The Square Kilometre Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Minh; Lazio, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will be the premier instrument to study radiation at centimetre and metre wavelengths from the cosmos, and in particular neutral hydrogen, the most abundant element in the universe. The SKA will probe the dawn of galaxy formation as well as allow advances in many other areas of astronomy, such as fundamental physics, astro-biology and cosmology. The SKA will have a collecting area of up to one million square metres spread over at least 3000 km, providing a collecting area more than twenty times greater than the current largest radio telescope. Its field of view on the sky will be several tens of square degrees with potentially several large (100 square degrees) independent beams at the lower frequencies, providing a survey speed many thousands of times greater than current facilities. This paper summarises the key science drivers of the SKA and provides an update on the international project.

  8. Direct evaluation of injection efficiency from metals into trap-free small-molecule-based transport layers: probing the details of interface formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abkowitz, Martin A.; Ioannidis, Andronique; Facci, John S.

    1999-10-01

    For devices based on the use of electronic polymers there is practical interest in exploring the variations in contact behavior that might result under realistic manufacturing conditions like multilayer device assembly based on solution coating technology. Small molecule doped polymers (MDPs) developed principally as large area coatings for electrophotographic use are now finding wider device applications. These polymers are insulators capable of transporting excess injected charge with a unipolar drift mobility which can be tuned over a wide range by varying the concentration of transport active species. Most significant in the present context, MDPs can be rendered trap free by molecular design. These unique characteristics of MDPs make it possible to analyze the relative injection efficiencies of their interfaces with various contacts simply by a direct comparison of current voltage characteristics with time of flight drift mobility measurements carried out on the same film coatings. Measurements were carried out by measuring dark hole injection into the MDP film TPD/polycarbonate and a polymeric analog, PTPB, from various preformed metal substrates as well as evaporated top contacts. For preformed metal substrates under fully relaxed conditions, it was found that while injection efficiency nominally scaled with the estimated interfacial energy step there was significant variance that in some cases could be clearly associated with the specific details of interfacial chemistry. Time and temperature dependent phenomenon were also delineated and analyzed. Here contact injection efficiencies were observed to increase monotonically, following initial formation, from an emission limited to final steady state which could be ohmic.

  9. A SINFONI Integral Field Spectroscopy Survey for Galaxy Counterparts to Damped Lyman-alpha Systems - VI. Metallicity and Geometry as Gas Flow Probes

    CERN Document Server

    Peroux, Celine; Rahmani, Hadi; Kulkarni, Varsha P; Epinat, Benoit; Milliard, Bruno; Straka, Lorrie; York, Donald G; Rahmati, Alireza; Contini, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The use of background quasars provides a powerful tool to probe the cool gas in the circum-galactic medium of foreground galaxies. Here, we present new observations with SINFONI and X-Shooter of absorbing-galaxy candidates at z=0.7-1. We report the detection with both instruments of the H-alpha emission line of one sub-DLA at z_abs=0.94187 with log N(HI)=19.38^+0.10_-0.15 towards SDSS J002133.27+004300.9. We estimate the star formation rate: SFR=3.6+/-2.2 solar masses per year in that system. A detailed kinematic study indicates a dynamical mass M_dyn=10^9.9+/-0.4 solar masses and a halo mass M_halo=10^11.9+/-0.5 solar masses. In addition, we report the OII detection with X-Shooter of another DLA at z_abs=0.7402 with log N(HI)=20.4+/-0.1 toward Q0052+0041 and an estimated SFR of 5.3+/-0.7 solar masses per year. Three other objects are detected in the continuum with X-Shooter but the nature and redshift of two of these objects are unconstrained due to the absence of emission lines, while the third object might...

  10. Multi-Electrode Resistivity Probe for Investigation of Local Temperature Inside Metal Shell Battery Cells via Resistivity: Experiments and Evaluation of Electrical Resistance Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobin Hong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct Current (DC electrical resistivity is a material property that is sensitive to temperature changes. In this paper, the relationship between resistivity and local temperature inside steel shell battery cells (two commercial 10 Ah and 4.5 Ah lithium-ion cells is innovatively studied by Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT. The Schlumberger configuration in ERT is applied to divide the cell body into several blocks distributed in different levels, where the apparent resistivities are measured by multi-electrode surface probes. The investigated temperature ranges from −20 to 80 °C. Experimental results have shown that the resistivities mainly depend on temperature changes in each block of the two cells used and the function of the resistivity and temperature can be fitted to the ERT-measurement results in the logistical-plot. Subsequently, the dependence of resistivity on the state of charge (SOC is investigated, and the SOC range of 70%–100% has a remarkable impact on the resistivity at low temperatures. The proposed approach under a thermal cool down regime is demonstrated to monitor the local transient temperature.

  11. ArrayInitiative - a tool that simplifies creating custom Affymetrix CDFs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Kevin J

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Probes on a microarray represent a frozen view of a genome and are quickly outdated when new sequencing studies extend our knowledge, resulting in significant measurement error when analyzing any microarray experiment. There are several bioinformatics approaches to improve probe assignments, but without in-house programming expertise, standardizing these custom array specifications as a usable file (e.g. as Affymetrix CDFs is difficult, owing mostly to the complexity of the specification file format. However, without correctly standardized files there is a significant barrier for testing competing analysis approaches since this file is one of the required inputs for many commonly used algorithms. The need to test combinations of probe assignments and analysis algorithms led us to develop ArrayInitiative, a tool for creating and managing custom array specifications. Results ArrayInitiative is a standalone, cross-platform, rich client desktop application for creating correctly formatted, custom versions of manufacturer-provided (default array specifications, requiring only minimal knowledge of the array specification rules and file formats. Users can import default array specifications, import probe sequences for a default array specification, design and import a custom array specification, export any array specification to multiple output formats, export the probe sequences for any array specification and browse high-level information about the microarray, such as version and number of probes. The initial release of ArrayInitiative supports the Affymetrix 3' IVT expression arrays we currently analyze, but as an open source application, we hope that others will contribute modules for other platforms. Conclusions ArrayInitiative allows researchers to create new array specifications, in a standard format, based upon their own requirements. This makes it easier to test competing design and analysis strategies that depend on probe

  12. Metallization and investigation of electrical properties of in vitro recrystallized mSbsC-eGFP assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korkmaz, Nuriye; Roedel, Gerhard [Institut fuer Genetik, Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01217 Dresden (Germany); Boerrnert, Felix; Mendes, Rafael G; Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Ruemmeli, Mark H; Buechner, Bernd [Leibniz-Institut fuer Festkoerper- und Werkstoffforschung Dresden, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Koehler, Denny; Eng, Lukas M, E-mail: korkmaz@yahoo.com, E-mail: f.boerrnert@ifw-dresden.de, E-mail: denny.koehler@iapp.de, E-mail: r.g.mendes@ifw-dresden.de, E-mail: a.bachmatiuk@ifw-dresden.de, E-mail: m.ruemmeli@ifw-dresden.de, E-mail: b.buechner@ifw-dresden.de, E-mail: lukas.eng@iapp.de, E-mail: gerhard.roedel@tu-dresden.de [Institut fuer Angewandte Photophysik, Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-09-16

    Surface layer (SL) proteins are self-assembling nanosized arrays which can be recrystallized in solution or on surfaces. In this paper, we investigate the metallization, contact potential difference and conductivity of in vitro recrystallized mSbsC-eGFP tube-like assemblies for possible applications in nanobiotechnology. Treatment of mSbsC-eGFP tube-like structures with 150 mM Pt salt solution resulted in the formation of metallized SL assemblies decorated with Pt nanoparticles (> 3 nm) which were closely packed and aggregated into metal clusters. Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) measurements revealed that metallized and unmetallized SL templates showed different surface potential behaviours, demonstrating that the metal coating changes the electrostatic surface characteristics of SL assemblies. In situ conductivity measurements showed that unmetallized SL assemblies were not conductive. Metallized samples showed linear I-V dependence between - 1 and + 1 V with a conductivity of {approx} 10{sup 3} S m{sup -1}.

  13. Revolving Eddy-Current Probe Detects Cracks Near Rivets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namkung, Min; Wincheski, Buzz; Fulton, James P.; Nath, Shridhar; Simpson, John

    1995-01-01

    Scanning eddy-current probe in circular pattern increases sensitivity with which probe indicates fatigue cracks and other defects in metal surfaces in vicinity of rivets. Technique devised to facilitate inspection of riveted joints in aircraft. Eddy-current probe in question described in "Electro-magnetic Flaw Detector Is Easier To Use" (LAR-15046).

  14. Array-based approaches to bacterial transcriptome analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Mäder, Ulrike; Nicolas, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Microarray technology has been extensively used to compare or quantify genome-wide mRNA levels, a key factor in the adaptive response of bacteria to the environment. Classical gene expression arrays based on an existing genome annotation with relatively few probes for each gene, are well suited to assess the expression levels of all annotated transcripts under many different conditions. Newer genomic tiling arrays that cover both strands of a genome by overlapping probes and, more recently, R...

  15. Fast and reliable method of conductive carbon nanotube-probe fabrication for scanning probe microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dremov, Vyacheslav, E-mail: dremov@issp.ac.ru; Fedorov, Pavel; Grebenko, Artem [Institute of Solid State Physics, RAS, 142432 Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Interdisciplinary Center for Basic Research, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, 141700 Dolgoprudniy (Russian Federation); Fedoseev, Vitaly [Institute of Solid State Physics, RAS, 142432 Chernogolovka (Russian Federation)

    2015-05-15

    We demonstrate the procedure of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) conductive probe fabrication with a single multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) on a silicon cantilever pyramid. The nanotube bundle reliably attached to the metal-covered pyramid is formed using dielectrophoresis technique from the MWNT suspension. It is shown that the dimpled aluminum sample can be used both for shortening/modification of the nanotube bundle by applying pulse voltage between the probe and the sample and for controlling the probe shape via atomic force microscopy imaging the sample. Carbon nanotube attached to cantilever covered with noble metal is suitable for SPM imaging in such modulation regimes as capacitance contrast microscopy, Kelvin probe microscopy, and scanning gate microscopy. The majority of such probes are conductive with conductivity not degrading within hours of SPM imaging.

  16. Periodic nano/micro-hole array silicon solar cell

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Guan-Yu; Kumar, Dinesh P; Pei, Zingway

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we applied a metal catalyst etching method to fabricate a nano/microhole array on a Si substrate for application in solar cells. In addition, the surface of an undesigned area was etched because of the attachment of metal nanoparticles that is dissociated in a solution. The nano/microhole array exhibited low specular reflectance (

  17. GRB091127/SN2009nz and the VLT/X-shooter spectroscopy of its host galaxy: probing the faint end of the mass-metallicity relation

    CERN Document Server

    Vergani, S D; Covino, S; Fugazza, D; Gorosabel, J; Levan, A J; Puech, M; Salvaterra, R; Tello, J C; Postigo, A de Ugarte; D'Avanzo, P; D'Elia, V; Fernández, M; Fynbo, J P U; Jelínek, M; Malesani, D; Palazzi, E; Piranomonte, S; Rodrigues, M; Sánchez-Ramírez, R; Terrón, V; Thöne, C C; Antonelli, L A; Campana, S; Castro-Tirado, A J; Goldoni, P; Hammer, F; Hjorth, J; Jakobsson, P; Kaper, L; Melandri, A; Milvang-Jensen, B; Sollerman, J; Tagliaferri, G; Tanvir, N R; Wiersema, K; Wijers, R A M J

    2011-01-01

    We perform a detailed study of the gamma-ray burst GRB091127/SN2009nz host galaxy at z=0.490 using the VLT/X-shooter spectrograph in long-slit and integral-field unit (IFU). From the analysis of the optical and X-ray afterglow data obtained from ground-based telescopes and Swift-XRT we confirm the presence of a bump associated with SN2009nz and find evidence of a possible jet break in the afterglow lightcurve. The X-shooter afterglow long-slit spectra reveal several emission lines from the underlying host, from which we derive its integrated properties. These are in agreement with those of previously studied GRB-SN hosts and, more generally, with those of the long GRB host population. We use the Hubble Space Telescope and ground based images of the host to determine its stellar mass (M_star). Our results extend to lower values the M_star and metallicities (Z) derived for the sample of long GRB hosts at 0.3

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry as a spectroscopic probe of the coordination sphere of a paramagnetic metal bound to a humic acid mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protons on water molecules are strongly affected by paramagnetic ions. Since the acid-base properties of water facilitate rapid proton exchange, a single proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal is seen in aqueous solutions of paramagnetic ions. Proton relaxation times are significantly affected by paramagnetic species and the readily detectable single signal serves as a powerful amplifier of the information contained concerning the protons in the paramagnetic environment. Where water molecules coordinated to free paramagnetic ions and to metal complexes of ligands that form non-labile (on the NMR time scale) complexes, the effects on water in the two environments can be distinguished. This can provide information on the nature of the ligand binding sites. The example of Cu2+ bound to the Laurentian humic acid mixture reported here using convenient low field NMR relaxometers shows that the information can enrich our understanding of complexation and speciation in the presence of complex mixture ligands characteristic of natural water systems. In this case, the data underline the role of aggregation and conformation in defining the complexation sites

  19. Electron-energy-loss spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy as complementary probes for complex f-electron metals: cerium and plutonium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, K. T.; Wall, M. A.; Schwartz, A. J.; Chung, B. W.; Morton, S. A.; Tobin, J. G.; Lazar, S.; Tichelaar, F. D.; Zandbergen, H. W.; Söderlind, P.; van der Laan, G.

    2004-04-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the power of electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in a transmission electron microscope by investigating the electron structure of two f-electron metals: Ce and Pu. It is shown that EELS in a transmission electron microscope may be used to circumvent the difficulty of producing single-phase or single-crystal samples owing to its high spatial resolution, and that diffraction patterns and images can be acquired, providing unambiguous phase determination when acquiring spectra. EELS results are supported by synchrotron-radiation-based X-ray absorption, multielectron atomic spectral simulations, and local density approximation calculations based on density-functional theory with the generalized gradient approximation. For Ce, it is shown that changes in {111} stacking sequences can drive substantial modifications in the electronic structure of close-packed phases of Ce that have similar atomic volumes, contrary to previous assumptions in literature. For Pu, it is shown that Russell-Saunders (L-S) coupling fails for the 5f states and that either a j-j or an intermediate scheme must be used for the actinides because of the considerable spin-orbit interaction in the 5f states. We present a model showing how the 5f states behave along the light actinide series.

  20. Visualization and measurements of two-phase flows in metallic ducts using neutrons as microscopic probes. 3. Quantitative measurement of neutron radiography image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quantitative measurement of an image obtained by neutron radiography technique was proposed in order to accurately measure the void fraction of a two-phase flow in a metallic duct. It was shown experimentally that the spatial distribution of the dark-current component was homogeneous and the temporal variation could not be ignored. Since the scattered neutrons falling on the image converter could be homogenized by setting the test section at a distance from the converter, it was clarified that the corrections for dark-current and scattered neutrons could be represented by an offset value. It was proposed that the offset value could be determined by using the total macroscopic cross section of the material (Σ-scaling method). By comparing the calculated void fractions with the measured ones obtained by simulating the known void profile using a standard test section, the void fraction could be measured by this method within 2% error. The measurement error was estimated to be up to 10% when no corrections for scattered neutrons were made or no arbitrary offset value was used. (author)

  1. Miniaturized optical sensors based on lens arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanson, Steen Grüner; Jakobsen, M.L.; Larsen, H.E.

    2005-01-01

    A suite of optical sensors based on the use of lenticular arrays for probing mechanical deflections will be displayed. The optical systems are well suited for miniaturization, and utilize speckles as the information-carriers. This implementation allows for acquiring directional information...

  2. Broadband antenna arrays using planar horns

    OpenAIRE

    Braude, V. B.; Sukhovetskaya, S. B.

    1997-01-01

    Broadband antennas are vitally important for various applications ranging from TV broadcasting to carrier-free ground-probing radars. We propose a microwave broadband antenna array (BAA), which may be realised using microstrip planar horns — flared end-fire radiating slot lines, known as Vivaldi-type antennas.

  3. Probing the nano-bio interface with nanoplasmonic optical probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, X.; Wu, Linxi; Khanehzar, Ali; Feizpour, Amin; Xu, Fangda; Reinhard, Björn M.

    2014-08-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles have large cross-sections in both optical and electron microscopy and plasmon coupling between noble metal nanoparticles facilitate the characterization of subdiffraction limit separations through spectral analysis of the scattered light in Plasmon Coupling Microscopy (PCM). The size compatibility of noble metal nanoparticles together with the ability to encode specific functionality in a rational fashion by control of the nanoparticle surface makes noble metal nanoparticles unique probes for a broad range of biological processes. Recent applications of the technology include i.) characterization of cellular heterogeneity in nanomaterial uptake and processing through macrophages, ii.) testing the role of viral membrane lipids in mediating viral binding and trafficking, and iii.) characterizing the spatial organization of cancer biomarkers in plasma membranes. This paper reviews some of these applications and introduces the physical and material science principles underlying them. We will also introduce the use of membrane wrapped noble metal nanoparticles, which combine the superb photophysical properties of a nanoparticle core with the biological functionality of a membrane, as probes in PCM.

  4. Pencil probe system for electrochemical analysis and modification in nanometer dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasching, Rainer J.; Tao, Ye; Hammerick, Kyle; Prinz, Fritz B.

    2003-04-01

    A pencil-shaped electrochemical transducer system for analysis or surface modification in nanometer dimension has been developed. High aspect ratio tip structures are shaped combining isotropic and anisotropic deep reactive etch processes to form the body of the transducer. In this way, tips with an aspect ratio higher than 20 and a tip radius of smaller than 50 nm can be achieved. Subsequently, a three-layer system (an isolation layer: silicon nitride, a metal layer: platinum or gold and an isolation layer: silicon nitride) was deposited on the tip structure. Planarization of this structure in combination with a back etch process enables a precise exposure of the buried metal layer down to an electrode dimension of 200 nm on the tip. Electrochemical and impedance spectroscopic characterization showed full electrochemical functionality of the transducer system. Due to the high aspect ratio topography, this probe is particularly suited for Scanning Electrochemical Microscope (SECM) - methodologies. Furthermore this technology promises a feasible production possibility for both probe-arrays and probes on cantilevers.

  5. Toward the Limits of Uniformity of Mixed Metallicity SWCNT TFT Arrays with Spark-Synthesized and Surface-Density-Controlled Nanotube Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaskela, Antti; Mustonen, Kimmo; Laiho, Patrik; Ohno, Yutaka; Kauppinen, Esko I

    2015-12-30

    We report the fabrication of thin film transistors (TFTs) from networks of nonbundled single-walled carbon nanotubes with controlled surface densities. Individual nanotubes were synthesized by using a spark generator-based floating catalyst CVD process. High uniformity and the control of SWCNT surface density were realized by mixing of the SWCNT aerosol in a turbulent flow mixer and monitoring the online number concentration with a condensation particle counter at the reactor outlet in real time. The networks consist of predominantly nonbundled SWCNTs with diameters of 1.0-1.3 nm, mean length of 3.97 μm, and metallic to semiconducting tube ratio of 1:2. The ON/OFF ratio and charge carrier mobility of SWCNT TFTs were simultaneously optimized through fabrication of devices with SWCNT surface densities ranging from 0.36 to 1.8 μm(-2) and channel lengths and widths from 5 to 100 μm and from 100 to 500 μm, respectively. The density optimized TFTs exhibited excellent performance figures with charge carrier mobilities up to 100 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and ON/OFF current ratios exceeding 1 × 10(6), combined with high uniformity and more than 99% of devices working as theoretically expected. PMID:26666626

  6. Functional gene array-based analysis of microbial community structure in groundwaters with a gradient of contaminant levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldron, P.J.; Wu, L.; Van Nostrand, J.D.; Schadt, C.W.; Watson, D.B.; Jardine, P.M.; Palumbo, A.V.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.

    2009-06-15

    To understand how contaminants affect microbial community diversity, heterogeneity, and functional structure, six groundwater monitoring wells from the Field Research Center of the U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Remediation Science Program (ERSP; Oak Ridge, TN), with a wide range of pH, nitrate, and heavy metal contamination were investigated. DNA from the groundwater community was analyzed with a functional gene array containing 2006 probes to detect genes involved in metal resistance, sulfate reduction, organic contaminant degradation, and carbon and nitrogen cycling. Microbial diversity decreased in relation to the contamination levels of the wells. Highly contaminated wells had lower gene diversity but greater signal intensity than the pristine well. The microbial composition was heterogeneous, with 17-70% overlap between different wells. Metal-resistant and metal-reducing microorganisms were detected in both contaminated and pristine wells, suggesting the potential for successful bioremediation of metal-contaminated groundwaters. In addition, results of Mantel tests and canonical correspondence analysis indicate that nitrate, sulfate, pH, uranium, and technetium have a significant (p < 0.05) effect on microbial community structure. This study provides an overall picture of microbial community structure in contaminated environments with functional gene arrays by showing that diversity and heterogeneity can vary greatly in relation to contamination.

  7. Spherical Arrays for Wireless Channel Characterization and Emulation

    OpenAIRE

    Franek, Ondrej; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2014-01-01

    Three types of spherical arrays for use in wireless communication research are presented. First, a spherical array of 32 monopoles with beam steering in arbitrary direction and with arbitrary polarization is described. Next, a spherical array with 16 quad-ridged open-flared horns is introduced, offering better wideband performance and easier beam steering. Finally, a multi-probe setup for over-the-air testing of multiple-input multiple-output mobile devices is presented, being essentially a s...

  8. A gold nanohole array based surface-enhanced Raman scattering biosensor for detection of silver(I) and mercury(II) in human saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Peng; Li, Ming; Jurevic, Richard; Cushing, Scott K; Liu, Yuxin; Wu, Nianqiang

    2015-07-01

    A surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) biosensor has been developed by incorporating a gold nanohole array with a SERS probe (a gold nanostar@Raman-reporter@silica sandwich structure) into a single detection platform via DNA hybridization, which circumvents the nanoparticle aggregation and the inefficient Raman scattering issues. Strong plasmonic coupling between the Au nanostar and the Au nanohole array results in a large enhancement of the electromagnetic field, leading to amplification of the SERS signal. The SERS sensor has been used to detect Ag(I) and Hg(II) ions in human saliva because both the metal ions could be released from dental amalgam fillings. The developed SERS sensor can be adapted as a general detection platform for non-invasive measurements of a wide range of analytes such as metal ions, small molecules, DNA and proteins in body fluids. PMID:26008641

  9. Cyclodextrin-Based Metal-Organic Nanotube as Fluorescent Probe for Selective Turn-On Detection of Hydrogen Sulfide in Living Cells Based on H2S-Involved Coordination Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Xuelian; Wang, Jingxin; Gong, Chuanfang; Xu, Hai; Wang, Rongming; Ji, Shijie; Dong, Hanxiao; Meng, Qingguo; Zhang, Liangliang; Dai, Fangna; Sun, Daofeng

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been considered as the third biologically gaseous messenger (gasotransmitter) after nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO). Fluorescent detection of H2S in living cells is very important to human health because it has been found that the abnormal levels of H2S in human body can cause Alzheimer’s disease, cancers and diabetes. Herein, we develop a cyclodextrin-based metal-organic nanotube, CD-MONT-2, possessing a {Pb14} metallamacrocycle for efficient detection of H2S. CD-MONT-2′ (the guest-free form of CD-MONT-2) exhibits turn-on detection of H2S with high selectivity and moderate sensitivity when the material was dissolved in DMSO solution. Significantly, CD-MONT-2′ can act as a fluorescent turn-on probe for highly selective detection of H2S in living cells. The sensing mechanism in the present work is based on the coordination of H2S as the auxochromic group to the central Pb(II) ion to enhance the fluorescence intensity, which is studied for the first time. PMID:26911657

  10. Cyclodextrin-Based Metal-Organic Nanotube as Fluorescent Probe for Selective Turn-On Detection of Hydrogen Sulfide in Living Cells Based on H2S-Involved Coordination Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Xuelian; Wang, Jingxin; Gong, Chuanfang; Xu, Hai; Wang, Rongming; Ji, Shijie; Dong, Hanxiao; Meng, Qingguo; Zhang, Liangliang; Dai, Fangna; Sun, Daofeng

    2016-02-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been considered as the third biologically gaseous messenger (gasotransmitter) after nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO). Fluorescent detection of H2S in living cells is very important to human health because it has been found that the abnormal levels of H2S in human body can cause Alzheimer’s disease, cancers and diabetes. Herein, we develop a cyclodextrin-based metal-organic nanotube, CD-MONT-2, possessing a {Pb14} metallamacrocycle for efficient detection of H2S. CD-MONT-2‧ (the guest-free form of CD-MONT-2) exhibits turn-on detection of H2S with high selectivity and moderate sensitivity when the material was dissolved in DMSO solution. Significantly, CD-MONT-2‧ can act as a fluorescent turn-on probe for highly selective detection of H2S in living cells. The sensing mechanism in the present work is based on the coordination of H2S as the auxochromic group to the central Pb(II) ion to enhance the fluorescence intensity, which is studied for the first time.

  11. Targeted Protein Degradation of Outer Membrane Decaheme Cytochrome MtrC Metal Reductase in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Measured Using Biarsenical Probe CrAsH-EDT2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Yijia; Chen, Baowei; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2011-10-14

    Development of efficient microbial biofuel cells requires an ability to exploit interfacial electron transfer reactions to external electron acceptors, such as metal oxides; such reactions occur in the facultative anaerobic gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 through the catalytic activity of the outer membrane decaheme c-type cytochrome MtrC. Central to the utility of this pathway to synthetic biology is an understanding of cellular mechanisms that maintain optimal MtrC function, cellular localization, and renewal by degradation and resynthesis. In order to monitor trafficking to the outer membrane, and the environmental sensitivity of MtrC, we have engineered a tetracysteine tag (i.e., CCPGCC) at its C-terminus that permits labeling by the cell impermeable biarsenical fluorophore, carboxy-FlAsH (CrAsH) of MtrC at the surface of living Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells. In comparison, the cell permeable reagent FlAsH permits labeling of the entire population of MtrC, including proteolytic fragments resulting from incorrect maturation. We demonstrate specific labeling by CrAsH of engineered MtrC which is dependent on the presence of a functional type-2 secretion system (T2S), as evidenced by T2S system gspD or gspG deletion mutants which are incapable of CrAsH labeling. Under these latter conditions, MtrC undergoes proteolytic degradation to form a large 35-38 kDa fragment; this degradation product is also resolved during normal turnover of the CrAsH-labeled MtrC protein. No MtrC protein is released into the medium during turnover, suggesting the presence of cellular turnover systems involving MtrC reuptake and degradation. The mature MtrC localized on the outer membrane is a long-lived protein, with a turnover rate of 0.043 hr-1 that is insensitive to O2 concentration. Maturation of MtrC is relatively inefficient, with substantial rates of turnover of the immature protein prior to export to the outer membrane (i.e., 0.028 hr-1) that are consistent

  12. Molecular probe technology detects bacteria without culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyman Richard W

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our ultimate goal is to detect the entire human microbiome, in health and in disease, in a single reaction tube, and employing only commercially available reagents. To that end, we adapted molecular inversion probes to detect bacteria using solely a massively multiplex molecular technology. This molecular probe technology does not require growth of the bacteria in culture. Rather, the molecular probe technology requires only a sequence of forty sequential bases unique to the genome of the bacterium of interest. In this communication, we report the first results of employing our molecular probes to detect bacteria in clinical samples. Results While the assay on Affymetrix GenFlex Tag16K arrays allows the multiplexing of the detection of the bacteria in each clinical sample, one Affymetrix GenFlex Tag16K array must be used for each clinical sample. To multiplex the clinical samples, we introduce a second, independent assay for the molecular probes employing Sequencing by Oligonucleotide Ligation and Detection. By adding one unique oligonucleotide barcode for each clinical sample, we combine the samples after processing, but before sequencing, and sequence them together. Conclusions Overall, we have employed 192 molecular probes representing 40 bacteria to detect the bacteria in twenty-one vaginal swabs as assessed by the Affymetrix GenFlex Tag16K assay and fourteen of those by the Sequencing by Oligonucleotide Ligation and Detection assay. The correlations among the assays were excellent.

  13. Templating growth of gold nanostructures with a CdSe quantum dot array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Neelima; Metwalli, Ezzeldin; Yao, Yuan; Schwartzkopf, Matthias; Yu, Shun; Roth, Stephan V.; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter; Paul, Amitesh

    2015-05-01

    In optoelectronic devices based on quantum dot arrays, thin nanolayers of gold are preferred as stable metal contacts and for connecting recombination centers. The optimal morphology requirements are uniform arrays with precisely controlled positions and sizes over a large area with long range ordering since this strongly affects device performance. To understand the development of gold layer nanomorphology, the detailed mechanism of structure formation are probed with time-resolved grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) during gold sputter deposition. Gold is sputtered on a CdSe quantum dot array with a characteristic quantum dot spacing of ~7 nm. In the initial stages of gold nanostructure growth, a preferential deposition of gold on top of quantum dots occurs. Thus, the quantum dots act as nucleation sites for gold growth. In later stages, the gold nanoparticles surrounding the quantum dots undergo a coarsening to form a complete layer comprised of gold-dot clusters. Next, growth proceeds dominantly via vertical growth of gold on these gold-dot clusters to form an gold capping layer. In this capping layer, a shift of the cluster boundaries due to ripening is found. Thus, a templating of gold on a CdSe quantum dot array is feasible at low gold coverage.

  14. A comparison of alternative 60-mer probe designs in an in-situ synthesized oligonucleotide microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fairbanks Benjamin D

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA microarrays have proven powerful for functional genomics studies. Several technologies exist for the generation of whole-genome arrays. It is well documented that 25mer probes directed against different regions of the same gene produce variable signal intensity values. However, the extent to which this is true for probes of greater length (60mers is not well characterized. Moreover, this information has not previously been reported for whole-genome arrays designed against bacteria, whose genomes may differ substantially in characteristics directly affecting microarray performance. Results We report here an analysis of alternative 60mer probe designs for an in-situ synthesized oligonucleotide array for the GC rich, β-proteobacterium Burkholderia cenocepacia. Probes were designed using the ArrayOligoSel3.5 software package and whole-genome microarrays synthesized by Agilent, Inc. using their in-situ, ink-jet technology platform. We first validated the quality of the microarrays as demonstrated by an average signal to noise ratio of >1000. Next, we determined that the variance of replicate probes (1178 total probes examined of identical sequence was 3.8% whereas the variance of alternative probes (558 total alternative probes examined designs was 9.5%. We determined that depending upon the definition, about 2.4% of replicate and 7.8% of alternative probes produced outlier conclusions. Finally, we determined none of the probe design subscores (GC content, internal repeat, binding energy and self annealment produced by ArrayOligoSel3.5 were predictive or probes that produced outlier signals. Conclusion Our analysis demonstrated that the use of multiple probes per target sequence is not essential for in-situ synthesized 60mer oligonucleotide arrays designed against bacteria. Although probes producing outlier signals were identified, the use of ratios results in less than 10% of such outlier conclusions. We also determined that

  15. Metal-organic frameworks from zinc sulfite clusters, chains, and sheets: 4-connected, (3,4)-connected 3-D frameworks and 2-D arrays of catenane-like interlocking rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dan-Tam; Chew, Emily; Zhang, Qichun; Choi, Alice; Bu, Xianhui

    2006-12-25

    Even though open-framework solids have been made in a variety of compositions such as silicates, phosphates, germanates, borates, and phosphites, few are known that are based on trigonal-pyramidal sulfite anions. We report here the first synthetic and structural studies of metal-organic framework materials in the zinc sulfite composition. It is demonstrated here that Zn2+ and SO32- can form various neutral inorganic subunits that can be 0-D clusters, 1-D chains, or 2-D sheets. These inorganic subunits of different dimensionality can subsequently be connected into extended frameworks of higher dimensionality through bifunctional ligands. In (ZnSO3)2en, infinite corrugated ZnSO3 layers are pillared by ethylenediamine (en) molecules into a 3-D network that can be classified as a (3,4)-connected net based on tetrahedral Zn nodes and trigonal-pyramidal S nodes. In (ZnSO3)pip, infinite ZnSO3 chains are cross-linked with piperazine molecules into a 3-D framework that can be classified as 4-connected net based on tetrahedral Zn nodes only. In (ZnSO3)2(TMDPy)2, (ZnSO3)2 dimers are doubly bridged by trimethylenedipyridine molecules into an infinite chain with a string of circles. Each circle along the chain is interlocked with another circle from a chain in the perpendicular direction, creating a 2-D pattern with an infinite-square array of catenane-like units. PMID:17173428

  16. Proximal Probes Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Proximal Probes Facility consists of laboratories for microscopy, spectroscopy, and probing of nanostructured materials and their functional properties. At the...

  17. A gold nanohole array based surface-enhanced Raman scattering biosensor for detection of silver(i) and mercury(ii) in human saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Peng; Li, Ming; Jurevic, Richard; Cushing, Scott K.; Liu, Yuxin; Wu, Nianqiang

    2015-06-01

    A surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) biosensor has been developed by incorporating a gold nanohole array with a SERS probe (a gold nanostar@Raman-reporter@silica sandwich structure) into a single detection platform via DNA hybridization, which circumvents the nanoparticle aggregation and the inefficient Raman scattering issues. Strong plasmonic coupling between the Au nanostar and the Au nanohole array results in a large enhancement of the electromagnetic field, leading to amplification of the SERS signal. The SERS sensor has been used to detect Ag(i) and Hg(ii) ions in human saliva because both the metal ions could be released from dental amalgam fillings. The developed SERS sensor can be adapted as a general detection platform for non-invasive measurements of a wide range of analytes such as metal ions, small molecules, DNA and proteins in body fluids.A surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) biosensor has been developed by incorporating a gold nanohole array with a SERS probe (a gold nanostar@Raman-reporter@silica sandwich structure) into a single detection platform via DNA hybridization, which circumvents the nanoparticle aggregation and the inefficient Raman scattering issues. Strong plasmonic coupling between the Au nanostar and the Au nanohole array results in a large enhancement of the electromagnetic field, leading to amplification of the SERS signal. The SERS sensor has been used to detect Ag(i) and Hg(ii) ions in human saliva because both the metal ions could be released from dental amalgam fillings. The developed SERS sensor can be adapted as a general detection platform for non-invasive measurements of a wide range of analytes such as metal ions, small molecules, DNA and proteins in body fluids. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr02142a

  18. Experimental demonstration of a broadband array of invisibility cloaks in the visible frequency range

    OpenAIRE

    Smolyaninova, V. N.; Smolyaninov, I. I.; Ermer, H. K.

    2012-01-01

    Very recently Farhat et al. [1] have suggested that arrays of invisibility cloaks may find important applications in low-interference communication, noninvasive probing, sensing and communication networks, etc. We report on the first experimental realization of such an array of broadband invisibility cloaks, which operates in the visible frequency range. Wavelength and angular dependencies of the cloak array performance have been studied.

  19. Ultrasonic Evaluation of Two Dissimilar Metal Weld Overlay Specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, Susan L.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Moran, Traci L.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-06-30

    Two dissimilar metal weld (DMW) pipe-to-nozzle specimens were implanted with thermal fatigue cracks in the 13% to 90% through-wall depth range. The specimens were ultrasonically evaluated with phased-array probes having center frequencies of 0.8, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 megahertz (MHz). An Alloy 82/182 weld overlay (WOL) was applied and the specimens were ultrasonically re-evaluated for flaw detection and characterization. The Post-WOL flaw depths were approximately 10% to 56% through-wall. This study has shown the effectiveness of ultrasonic examinations of Alloy 82/182 overlaid DMW specimens. Phased-array probes with center frequency in the 0.8- to 1.0-MHz range provide a strong coherent signal but the greater ultrasonic wavelength and larger beam spot size prevent the reliable detection of small flaws. These small flaws had nominal through-wall depths of less than 15% and length in the 50-60 mm (2-2.4 in.) range. Flaws in the 19% and greater through-wall depth range were readily detected with all four probes. At the higher frequencies, the reflected signals are less coherent but still provide adequate signal for flaw detection and characterization. A single inspection at 2.0 MHz could provide adequate detection and sizing information but a supplemental inspection at 1.0 or 1.5 MHz is recommended.

  20. Superconducting Microwave Resonator Arrays for Submillimeter/Far-Infrared Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noroozian, Omid

    Superconducting microwave resonators have the potential to revolutionize submillimeter and far-infrared astronomy, and with it our understanding of the universe. The field of low-temperature detector technology has reached a point where extremely sensitive devices like transition-edge sensors are now capable of detecting radiation limited by the background noise of the universe. However, the size of these detector arrays are limited to only a few thousand pixels. This is because of the cost and complexity of fabricating large-scale arrays of these detectors that can reach up to 10 lithographic levels on chip, and the complicated SQUID-based multiplexing circuitry and wiring for readout of each detector. In order to make substantial progress, next-generation ground-based telescopes such as CCAT or future space telescopes require focal planes with large-scale detector arrays of 104--10 6 pixels. Arrays using microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKID) are a potential solution. These arrays can be easily made with a single layer of superconducting metal film deposited on a silicon substrate and pattered using conventional optical lithography. Furthermore, MKIDs are inherently multiplexable in the frequency domain, allowing ˜ 10 3 detectors to be read out using a single coaxial transmission line and cryogenic amplifier, drastically reducing cost and complexity. An MKID uses the change in the microwave surface impedance of a superconducting thin-film microresonator to detect photons. Absorption of photons in the superconductor breaks Cooper pairs into quasiparticles, changing the complex surface impedance, which results in a perturbation of resonator frequency and quality factor. For excitation and readout, the resonator is weakly coupled to a transmission line. The complex amplitude of a microwave probe signal tuned on-resonance and transmitted on the feedline past the resonator is perturbed as photons are absorbed in the superconductor. The perturbation can be

  1. Electromagnetically Clean Solar Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem, Theodore G.; Kenniston, Anthony E.

    2008-01-01

    wiring on the back of the panel. Each step increases the potential for occurrence of latent defects, loss of process control, and attrition of components. An EMCSA panel includes an integral cover made from a transparent material. The silicone cover supplants the individual cover glasses on the cells and serves as an additional unitary structural support that offers the advantage, relative to glass, of the robust, forgiving nature of the silcone material. The cover contains pockets that hold the solar cells in place during the lamination process. The cover is coated with indium tin oxide to make its surface electrically conductive, so that it serves as a contiguous, electrically grounded shield over the entire panel surface. The cells are mounted in proximity to metallic printed wiring. The painted-wiring layer comprises metal-film traces on a sheet of Kapton (or equivalent) polyimide. The traces include contact pads on one side of the sheet for interconnecting the cells. Return leads are on the opposite side of the sheet, positioned to form the return currents substantially as mirror images of, and in proximity to, the cell sheet currents, thereby minimizing magnetic moments. The printed-wiring arrangement mimics the back-wiring arrangement of conventional solar arrays, but the current-loop areas and the resulting magnetic moments are much smaller because the return-current paths are much closer to the solar-cell sheet currents. The contact pads are prepared with solder fo electrical and mechanical bonding to the cells. The pocketed cover/shield, the solar cells, the printed-wiring layer, an electrical bonding agent, a mechanical-bonding agent, a composite structural front-side face sheet, an aluminum honeycomb core, and a composite back-side face sheet are all assembled, then contact pads are soldered to the cells and the agents are cured in a single lamination process.

  2. Design Concept of Array ECT Sensor for Steam Generator Tubing Inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Chan Hee; Lee, Tae Hun; Yoo, Hyun Ju [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd. CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The eddy current testing, which is one of the nondestructive examination methods, is widely used for the inspection of heat exchangers including steam generator tubing in the nuclear power plant. It uses electromagnetic induction to detect flaws in conductive materials. Two types of eddy current probes are conventionally used for the inspection of steam generator tubing according to the main purpose. One is the bobbin probe technology and the other is the rotating probe. During the inspection, they have restrictions for the flaw detection or the inspection speed. An array probe can be alternative to the bobbin and rotating probes. The design concept of array coils with high sensitivity is described in this paper. It is expected that the eddy current testing using this type of array sensors may provide high detectability and resolution for flaws in steam generator tubing. Eddy current technology has some barriers for the inspection of steam generator tubing in the nuclear power plant. Bobbin probes offer poor circumferential crack detection and rotating probes are time and money consuming due to the mechanical rotation. Array probe inspection technique can replace bobbin and rotating probe techniques due to its sensitivity for flaw detection and inspection speed. In general, circular-shaped coils are considered in an array eddy current probe.

  3. Design Concept of Array ECT Sensor for Steam Generator Tubing Inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The eddy current testing, which is one of the nondestructive examination methods, is widely used for the inspection of heat exchangers including steam generator tubing in the nuclear power plant. It uses electromagnetic induction to detect flaws in conductive materials. Two types of eddy current probes are conventionally used for the inspection of steam generator tubing according to the main purpose. One is the bobbin probe technology and the other is the rotating probe. During the inspection, they have restrictions for the flaw detection or the inspection speed. An array probe can be alternative to the bobbin and rotating probes. The design concept of array coils with high sensitivity is described in this paper. It is expected that the eddy current testing using this type of array sensors may provide high detectability and resolution for flaws in steam generator tubing. Eddy current technology has some barriers for the inspection of steam generator tubing in the nuclear power plant. Bobbin probes offer poor circumferential crack detection and rotating probes are time and money consuming due to the mechanical rotation. Array probe inspection technique can replace bobbin and rotating probe techniques due to its sensitivity for flaw detection and inspection speed. In general, circular-shaped coils are considered in an array eddy current probe

  4. Silicon-based wire electrode array for neural interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives. Metal-wire electrode arrays are widely used to record and stimulate neurons. Commonly, these devices are fabricated from a long insulated metal wire by cutting it into the proper length and using the cross-section as the electrode site. The assembly of a micro-wire electrode array with regular spacing is difficult. With the help of micro-machine technology, a silicon-based wire electrode array (SWEA) is proposed to simplify the assembling process and provide a wire-type electrode with tapered tips. Approach. Silicon wires with regular spacing coated with metal are generated from a silicon wafer through micro-fabrication and are ordered into a 3D array. A silicon wafer is cut into a comb-like structure with hexagonal teeth on both sides by anisotropic etching. To establish an array of silicon-based linear needles through isotropic wet etching, the diameters of these hexagonal teeth are reduced; their sharp edges are smoothed out and their tips are sharpened. The needle array is coated with a layer of parylene after metallization. The tips of the needles are then exposed to form an array of linear neural electrodes. With these linear electrode arrays, an array of area electrodes can be fabricated. Main results. A 6  ×  6 array of wire-type electrodes based on silicon is developed using this method. The time required to manually assemble the 3D array decreases significantly with the introduction of micro-fabricated 2D array. Meanwhile, the tip intervals in the 2D array are accurate and are controlled at no more than 1%. The SWEA is effective both in vitro and in vivo. Significance. Using this method, the SWEA can be batch-prepared in advance along with its parameters, such as spacing, length, and diameter. Thus, neural scientists can assemble proper electrode arrays in a short time. (paper)

  5. Visualization and quantitative research of stress corrosion cracking using the three-dimensional phased array ultrasonic technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The three-dimensional phased-array (3D-PA) ultrasonic technique has been applied to a stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in base metal, and its results for sizing have been quantitatively evaluated. The 3D-PA allows operators to scan objects volumetrically and to display results as 3D images facilitating evaluation processes considerably. The scanning pattern used is called the moving rotational sectorial-scan (MRS-scan) and it is composed of many sectors of different azimuth angles as moving the probe linearly. The MRS-scan significantly improves the inspection of flaws without skillful searching motion of the probe, because the flaws are stereoscopically insonified by a number of ultrasonic beams coming from various directions. The SCC was evaluated by the MRS-scan with a matrix array probe. Not only the deepest tip but also all parts of the crack were able to be successfully visualized and sized with an accuracy of the root mean square error of 0.9 mm. (author)

  6. Phosphorus and boron diffusion paths in polycrystalline silicon gate of a trench-type three-dimensional metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor investigated by atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Bin, E-mail: hanbin@imr.tohoku.ac.jp; Takamizawa, Hisashi, E-mail: takamizawa.hisashi@jaea.go.jp; Shimizu, Yasuo; Inoue, Koji; Nagai, Yasuyoshi [The Oarai Center, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2145-2 Narita, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Yano, Fumiko [Department of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tokyo City University, 1-28-1 Tamazutsumi, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8557 (Japan); Kunimune, Yorinobu [Renesas Semiconductor Manufacturing Co., Ltd., 1120 Shimokuzawa, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5298 (Japan); Inoue, Masao; Nishida, Akio [Renesas Electronics Corporation, 751 Horiguchi, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-8504 (Japan)

    2015-07-13

    The dopant (P and B) diffusion path in n- and p-types polycrystalline-Si gates of trench-type three-dimensional (3D) metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) were investigated using atom probe tomography, based on the annealing time dependence of the dopant distribution at 900 °C. Remarkable differences were observed between P and B diffusion behavior. In the initial stage of diffusion, P atoms diffuse into deeper regions from the implanted region along grain boundaries in the n-type polycrystalline-Si gate. With longer annealing times, segregation of P on the grain boundaries was observed; however, few P atoms were observed within the large grains or on the gate/gate oxide interface distant from grain boundaries. These results indicate that P atoms diffuse along grain boundaries much faster than through the bulk or along the gate/gate oxide interface. On the other hand, in the p-type polycrystalline-Si gate, segregation of B was observed only at the initial stage of diffusion. After further annealing, the B atoms became uniformly distributed, and no clear segregation of B was observed. Therefore, B atoms diffuse not only along the grain boundary but also through the bulk. Furthermore, B atoms diffused deeper than P atoms along the grain boundaries under the same annealing conditions. This information on the diffusion behavior of P and B is essential for optimizing annealing conditions in order to control the P and B distributions in the polycrystalline-Si gates of trench-type 3D MOSFETs.

  7. Phosphorus and boron diffusion paths in polycrystalline silicon gate of a trench-type three-dimensional metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor investigated by atom probe tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dopant (P and B) diffusion path in n- and p-types polycrystalline-Si gates of trench-type three-dimensional (3D) metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) were investigated using atom probe tomography, based on the annealing time dependence of the dopant distribution at 900 °C. Remarkable differences were observed between P and B diffusion behavior. In the initial stage of diffusion, P atoms diffuse into deeper regions from the implanted region along grain boundaries in the n-type polycrystalline-Si gate. With longer annealing times, segregation of P on the grain boundaries was observed; however, few P atoms were observed within the large grains or on the gate/gate oxide interface distant from grain boundaries. These results indicate that P atoms diffuse along grain boundaries much faster than through the bulk or along the gate/gate oxide interface. On the other hand, in the p-type polycrystalline-Si gate, segregation of B was observed only at the initial stage of diffusion. After further annealing, the B atoms became uniformly distributed, and no clear segregation of B was observed. Therefore, B atoms diffuse not only along the grain boundary but also through the bulk. Furthermore, B atoms diffused deeper than P atoms along the grain boundaries under the same annealing conditions. This information on the diffusion behavior of P and B is essential for optimizing annealing conditions in order to control the P and B distributions in the polycrystalline-Si gates of trench-type 3D MOSFETs

  8. A selective metabolite array for the detection of phosphometabolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Metal affinity based selective array for the screening of phosphometabolites. ► A simple one-step plasma polymer coating and direct metal immobilisation. ► ToF-SIMS detection of phosphometabolite array. ► Ga and Zr suitable metals. - Abstract: Immobilised metal ion affinity (IMA) has been traditionally used specifically for the separation of phosphorylated proteins and nucleic acids, in proteomics and genomics, respectively. This report describes the novel application of IMA in metabolomics for the development of metabolite arrays to detect phosphometabolites using a plasma polymer-modified surface. Immobilisation of gallium, zirconium, cobalt, copper, zinc, nickel, iron, and chromium to acrylic acid plasma polymer followed by subsequent exposure to metabolites (phospho- and non-phosphometabolites) was investigated. Results analysed using ToF-SIMS suggests that gallium and zirconium exhibit higher phosphometabolite affinity and specificity compared to other metals, and can be used to develop metabolite arrays for the detection of phosphometabolites.

  9. Large Format Transition Edge Sensor Microcalorimeter Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervenak, J. A.; Adams, J. A.; Bandler, S. b.; Busch, S. E.; Eckart, M. E.; Ewin, A. E.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Kelley, R. L.; Porst, J. P.; Porter, F. S.; Ray, C.; Sadleir, J. E.; Smith, S. J.; Wassell, E. J.

    2012-01-01

    We have produced a variety of superconducting transition edge sensor array designs for microcalorimetric detection of x-rays. Designs include kilopixel scale arrays of relatively small sensors (approximately 75 micron pitch) atop a thick metal heat sinking layer as well as arrays of membrane-isolated devices on 250 micron and up to 600 micron pitch. We discuss fabrication and performance of microstripline wiring at the small scales achieved to date. We also address fabrication issues with reduction of absorber contact area in small devices.

  10. The Cherenkov Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    Bigongiari, Ciro

    2016-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is planned to be the next generation ground based observatory for very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray astronomy. Gamma-rays provide a powerful insight into the non-thermal universe and hopefully a unique probe for new physics. Imaging Cherenkov telescopes have already discovered more than 170 VHE gamma-ray emitters providing plentiful of valuable data and clearly demonstrating the power of this technique. In spite of the impressive results there are indications that the known sources represent only the tip of the iceberg. A major step in sensitivity is needed to increase the number of detected sources, observe short time-scale variability and improve morphological studies of extended sources. An extended energy coverage is advisable to observe far-away extragalactic objects and improve spectral analysis. CTA aims to increase the sensitivity by an order of magnitude compared to current facilities, to extend the accessible gamma-ray energies from a few tens of GeV to a hundred o...

  11. Electrical Conductivity in Transition Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Christopher; Vickneson, Kishanda

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this "Science Note" is to describe how to test the electron-sea model to determine whether it accurately predicts relative electrical conductivity for first-row transition metals. In the electron-sea model, a metal crystal is viewed as a three-dimensional array of metal cations immersed in a sea of delocalised valence…

  12. Dual active surface heat flux gage probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Kolodziej, Paul

    1995-02-01

    A unique plug-type heat flux gage probe was tested in the NASA Ames Research Center 2x9 turbulent flow duct facility. The probe was fabricated by welding a miniature dual active surface heat flux gage body to the end of a hollow metal cylindrical bolt containing a metal inner tube. Cooling air flows through the inner tube, impinges onto the back of the gage body and then flows out through the annulus formed between the inner tube and the hollow bolt wall. Heat flux was generated in the duct facility with a Huels arc heater. The duct had a rectangular cross section and one wall was fabricated from 2.54 centimeter thick thermal insulation rigid surface material mounted onto an aluminum plate. To measure heat flux, the probe was inserted through the plate and insulating materials with the from of the gage located flush with the hot gas-side insulation surface. Absorbed heat fluxes measured with the probe were compared with absorbed heat fluxes measured with six water-cooled reference calorimeters. These calorimeters were located in a water-cooled metal duct wall which was located across from the probe position. Correspondence of transient and steady heat fluxes measured with the reference calorimeters and heat flux gage probe was generally within a satisfactory plus or minus 10 percent. This good correspondence was achieved even though the much cooler probe caused a large surface temperature disruption of 1000K between the metal gage and the insulation. However, this temperature disruption did not seriously effect the accuracy of the heat flux measurement. A current application for dual active surface heat flux gages is for transient and steady absorbed heat flux, surface temperature and heat transfer coefficient measurements on the surface of an oxidizer turbine inlet deflector operating in a space shuttle test bed engine.

  13. Sublethal Heavy Metal Stress Stimulates Innate Immunity in Tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilanjan Chakraborty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of sublethal heavy metal stress as plant biotic elicitor for triggering innate immunity in tomato plant was investigated. Copper in in vivo condition induced accumulation of defense enzymes like peroxidase (PO, polyphenol oxidase (PPO, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL, and β-1,3 glucanase along with higher accumulation of total phenol, antioxidative enzymes (catalase and ascorbate peroxidase, and total chlorophyll content. Furthermore, the treatment also induced nitric oxide (NO production which was confirmed by realtime visualization of NO burst using a fluorescent probe 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate (DAF-2DA and spectrophotometric analysis. The result suggested that the sublethal dose of heavy metal can induce an array of plant defense responses that lead to the improvement of innate immunity in plants.

  14. Performance of Large Format Transition Edge Sensor Microcalorimeter Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervenak, J. A.; Adams, J. A.; Bandler, S. B.; Busch, S. E.; Eckart, M. E.; Ewin, A. E.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Kelley, R. L.; Porst, J. P.; Porter, F. S.; Ray, C.; Sadleir, J. E.; Smith, S. J.; Wassell, E. J.

    2012-01-01

    We have produced a variety of superconducting transition edge sensor array designs for microcalorimetric detection of x-rays. Arrays are characterized with a time division SQUID multiplexer such that greater than 10 devices from an array can be measured in the same cooldown. Designs include kilo pixel scale arrays of relatively small sensors (-75 micron pitch) atop a thick metal heatsinking layer as well as arrays of membrane-isolated devices on 250 micron and up to 600 micron pitch. We discuss fabrication and performance of microstripline wiring at the small scales achieved to date. We also address fabrication issues with reduction of absorber contact area in small devices.

  15. Probing plasmonic nanostructures by photons and electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneipp, Katrin; Kneipp, Harald; Kneipp, Janina

    2015-01-01

    We discuss recent developments for studying plasmonic metal nanostructures. Exploiting photons and electrons opens up new capabilities to probe the complete plasmon spectrum including bright and dark modes and related local optical fields at subnanometer spatial resolution. This comprehensive...... characterization of plasmonic properties of metal nanostructures provides new basic insight into the fundamental physics of "surface enhanced" spectroscopy in hottest hot spots and enables us to optimize plasmon supported processes and devices....

  16. Mobile Game Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup Lynggaard, Aviaja

    2006-01-01

    This paper will examine how probes can be useful for game designers in the preliminary phases of a design process. The work is based upon a case study concerning pervasive mobile phone games where Mobile Game Probes have emerged from the project. The new probes are aimed towards a specific target...... group and the goal is to specify the probes so they will cover the most relevant areas for our project. The Mobile Game Probes generated many interesting results and new issues occurred, since the probes came to be dynamic and favorable for the process in new ways....

  17. THE ORNL ATOM PROBE

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, M

    1986-01-01

    The ORNL Atom Probe is a microanalytical tool for studies in materials science. The instrument is a combination of a customized version of the vacuum system of the VG FIM-100 atom probe, an ORNL-designed microcomputer-controlled digital timing system, and a double curved CEMA Imaging Atom Probe detector. The atom probe combines four instruments into one - namely a field ion microscope, an energy compensated time-of-flight mass spectrometer, an imaging atom probe, and a pulsed laser atom probe.

  18. BOLOMETRIC ARRAYS FOR MILLIMETER WAVELENGTHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Castillo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available During last years, semiconductor bolometers using thin lms have been developed at INAOE, speci cally boron-doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon lms. The characteristics shown by these devices made them attractive to be used in astronomical instrumentation, mainly in two-dimentional arrays. These detector arrays used at the Large Millimeter Telescope will make possible to obtain astronomical images in millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths. With this in mind, we are developing a method to produce, with enough reliability, bolometer arrays at INAOE. Until now, silicon nitride diaphragm arrays, useful as radiation absorbers, have succesfully been obtained. Sizes going from one to four millimeter by element in a consistent way; however we have not tested thermometers and metallic contact deposition yet. At the same time, we are working on two possible con gurations for the readout electronics; one of them using commercial components while the other will be an integrated circuit speci cally designed for this application. Both versions will work below 77K.

  19. Eddy current arrays for wheel inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Rémi

    2001-04-01

    Wheel inspections are routine and very time-consuming, especially for large aircraft wheels where a single-coil probe is moved manually taking precious long minutes. Eddy current arrays can decrease the inspection time by reducing to one the number of rotations needed to completely cover the wheel surface. Since the EC array probe fits the profile of the wheel, manipulation is easy and the lift-off is kept constant improving signal quality. C-scan displays assist the analysis and help locate the defect by dividing the inspected wheel surface into a small grid. Furthermore, the impedance plane and the strip chart, for all the channels used to build the C-scan, are accessible to provide better sizing accuracy of the defect.

  20. Stretchable Micro-Electrode Array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maghribi, M; Hamilton, J; Polla, D; Rose, K; Wilson, T; Krulevitch, P

    2002-03-08

    This paper focuses on the design consideration, fabrication processes and preliminary testing of the stretchable micro-electrode array. We are developing an implantable, stretchable micro-electrode array using polymer-based microfabrication techniques. The device will serve as the interface between an electronic imaging system and the human eye, directly stimulating retinal neurons via thin film conducting traces and electroplated electrodes. The metal features are embedded within a thin ({approx}50 micron) substrate fabricated using poly (dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), a biocompatible elastomeric material that has very low water permeability. The conformable nature of PDMS is critical for ensuring uniform contact with the curved surface of the retina. To fabricate the device, we developed unique processes for metalizing PDMS to produce robust traces capable of maintaining conductivity when stretched (5%, SD 1.5), and for selectively passivating the conductive elements. An in situ measurement of residual strain in the PDMS during curing reveals a tensile strain of 10%, explaining the stretchable nature of the thin metalized devices.

  1. The Hera Saturn Entry Probe Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Mousis, O; Spilker, T; Venkatapathy, E; Poncy, J; Frampton, R; Coustenis, A; Reh, K; Lebreton, J -P; Fletcher, L N; Hueso, R; Amato, M J; Colaprete, A; Ferri, F; Stam, D; Wurz, P; Atreya, S; Aslam, S; Banfield, D J; Calcutt, S; Fischer, G; Holland, A; Keller, C; Kessler, E; Leese, M; Levacher, P; Morse, A; Munoz, O; Renard, J -B; Sheridan, S; Schmider, F -X; Snik, F; Waite, J H; Bird, M; Cavalié, T; Deleuil, M; Fortney, J; Gautier, D; Guillot, T; Lunine, J I; Marty, B; Nixon, C; Orton, G S; Sanchez-Lavega, A

    2015-01-01

    The Hera Saturn entry probe mission is proposed as an M--class mission led by ESA with a contribution from NASA. It consists of one atmospheric probe to be sent into the atmosphere of Saturn, and a Carrier-Relay spacecraft. In this concept, the Hera probe is composed of ESA and NASA elements, and the Carrier-Relay Spacecraft is delivered by ESA. The probe is powered by batteries, and the Carrier-Relay Spacecraft is powered by solar panels and batteries. We anticipate two major subsystems to be supplied by the United States, either by direct procurement by ESA or by contribution from NASA: the solar electric power system (including solar arrays and the power management and distribution system), and the probe entry system (including the thermal protection shield and aeroshell). Hera is designed to perform in situ measurements of the chemical and isotopic compositions as well as the dynamics of Saturn's atmosphere using a single probe, with the goal of improving our understanding of the origin, formation, and ev...

  2. Nanostructured micro-electrode arrays for electrophysiological measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wierzbicki, Rafal Dominik

    -channel and intracellular measurements. In applications that require multichannel measurements, this approach is, however, impractical and planar arrays of metal electrodes are usually employed. Yet, with planar geometry, they allow extracellular measurements only. Several approaches to developing functional...

  3. Disordered array of Au covered Silicon nanowires for SERS biosensing combined with electrochemical detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, Annalisa; Mussi, Valentina; Maiolo, Luca

    2016-01-01

    We report on highly disordered array of Au coated silicon nanowires (Au/SiNWs) as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) probe combined with electrochemical detection for biosensing applications. SiNWs, few microns long, were grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition on common microscope slides and covered by Au evaporated film, 150 nm thick. The capability of the resulting composite structure to act as SERS biosensor was studied via the biotin-avidin interaction: the Raman signal obtained from this structure allowed to follow each surface modification step as well as to detect efficiently avidin molecules over a broad range of concentrations from micromolar down to the nanomolar values. The metallic coverage wrapping SiNWs was exploited also to obtain a dual detection of the same bioanalyte by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Indeed, the SERS signal and impedance modifications induced by the biomolecule perturbations on the metalized surface of the NWs were monitored on the very same three-electrode device with the Au/SiNWs acting as both working electrode and SERS probe. PMID:27112197

  4. Array-based techniques for fingerprinting medicinal herbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Charlie

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Poor quality control of medicinal herbs has led to instances of toxicity, poisoning and even deaths. The fundamental step in quality control of herbal medicine is accurate identification of herbs. Array-based techniques have recently been adapted to authenticate or identify herbal plants. This article reviews the current array-based techniques, eg oligonucleotides microarrays, gene-based probe microarrays, Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH-based arrays, Diversity Array Technology (DArT and Subtracted Diversity Array (SDA. We further compare these techniques according to important parameters such as markers, polymorphism rates, restriction enzymes and sample type. The applicability of the array-based methods for fingerprinting depends on the availability of genomics and genetics of the species to be fingerprinted. For the species with few genome sequence information but high polymorphism rates, SDA techniques are particularly recommended because they require less labour and lower material cost.

  5. The Methodology of Probe Design with Better Resolution and Less Resistive Donut Probe to Achieve the Best Performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Ismail Talukder; Pepe Siy; Gregory Auner; Jinsheng Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Probes are the interface between microsystems and bio-cells. The ideal interface is one-to-one interface. Though various research groups have been able to establish some sort of interfaces after many years of research, they are very crude. Neurons are millions in numbers, whereas the prostheses successfully built so far have only a few hundred probes at best. Creating an ef-fective interface is still far away. Though we have micro-and nano-technologies, we couldn't build a prosthesis with an effective resolution. Main reasons behind it are the type of probe being used and the poor design of the probe. To address this problem, we developed a methodology to design a probe and an array of probes with better resolution and less resistive donut probe. This methodology helps us to design a probe optimizing all the parameters. We presented our methodology through a design that is capable of 70 pan penetration inside the tissue. The tissue heating by our designed probe is only 0.411℃. We also characterized the donut probe, which could be used by any research group to design a donut probe of their specific need.

  6. Probing the limits of topological protection in a designer surface plasmon structure

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Yang, Zhaoju; Lin, Xiao; Joannopoulos, John D; Soljacic, Marin; Chen, Hongsheng; Lu, Ling; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-01-01

    Topological photonic states are a novel class of electromagnetic modes that are immune to scattering from imperfections. This phenomenon has been demonstrated experimentally, including recently in an array of coupled on-chip ring resonators at communication wavelengths. However, the topological protection in such time-reversal-invariant photonic systems is not absolute, but applies only to certain classes of defects, and these limits have not been probed. Here, we report on the realization of similar topological states in a designer surface plasmon platform consisting of metallic sub-wavelength structures. Using this tunable platform, we are able to characterize in detail the field distributions of the topological edge states, and their level of robustness against a variety of defect classes, including those that can break the topological protection. This is also the first experimental realization of anomalous Floquet topological edge states, which cannot be predicted by the usual Chern number topological inv...

  7. Subwavelength modulational instability and plasmon oscillons in nanoparticle arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noskov, Roman E; Belov, Pavel A; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2012-03-01

    We study modulational instability in nonlinear arrays of subwavelength metallic nanoparticles and analyze numerically nonlinear scenarios of the instability development. We demonstrate that modulational instability can lead to the formation of regular periodic or quasiperiodic modulations of the polarization. We reveal that such nonlinear nanoparticle arrays can support long-lived standing and moving oscillating nonlinear localized modes--plasmon oscillons. PMID:22463637

  8. The D3-probe-D7 brane holographic fractional topological insulator

    CERN Document Server

    Kristjansen, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    The D3-probe-D7 brane system, oriented so as to have 2+1-dimensional Poincare symmetry, is argued to be the holographic representation of a strongly correlated fractional topological insulator which exhibits a zero-field quantized Hall effect with half-units of Hall conductivity. The phase diagram of the system with charge density and external magnetic field is found and, as well as charge gapped quantum Hall states, it exhibits metallic and semi-metallic phases with interesting behaviours. The relationship of this to other models of fractional topological insulators is discussed.

  9. 用于水污染重金属检测的微电极阵列传感器芯片%Microelectrode array sensor chip for detection of heavy metals in water pollution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵会欣; 万浩; 蔡巍; 哈达; 王平

    2013-01-01

    基于溶出伏安法,采用一种新型的汞膜金微电极阵列传感器芯片,实现了水污染痕量重金属离子Zn2+、Cd2+、pb2+和Cu2+的同时检测.在K3[Fe(CN)6]溶液中对微电极阵列传感器进行循环伏安扫描,分析其电化学特性及实际表面积,采用电化学阻抗谱法检验微电极阵列传感器表面汞膜沉积的程度.镀汞后的微电极阵列传感器采用差分脉冲阳极溶出伏安法,同时检测样本溶液中的重金属元素:Zn2+、Cd2+、pb2+和Cu2+,得到的Cd2+、pb2+和Cu2+的标准工作曲线线性度良好,检测下限分别为0.1、0.5和0.3 μg/L,但Zn2+的标准工作曲线线性度较差,这主要是由测试基线的漂移及不准确的加标造成的.%Based on stripping voltammetry,a novel gold microelectrode array (MEA) sensor chip with mercury film plated was used for simultaneously detection of trace heavy metal ions Zn2+,Cd2+,Pb2+ and Cu2+ in water pollution.The electrochemical behavior and the actual surface area of the MEA were investigated by cyclic voltammetry in K3[Fe(CN)6] solution.Electrochemical impedance spectrum (EIS) was utilized to examine the mercury deposition extent on the surface of the MEA.Mercury film plated MEA was then applied to simultaneously detect four heavy metal elements Zn2+,Cd2+,Pb2+ and Cu2+ in sample solutions using differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry,where good linearities of the standard working curves were obtained for Cd2+,Pb2+ and Cu2+ with the detection limits of 0.1,0.5 and 0.3 μ,g/L,separately.But the linearity of the standard working curve was poor for Zn2+,which was mainly caused by the excursion of the testing baseline and the inaccurate addition.

  10. Genotyping and annotation of Affymetrix SNP arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamy, Philippe; Andersen, Claus Lindbjerg; Wikman, Friedrik;

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we develop a new method for genotyping Affymetrix single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. The method is based on (i) using multiple arrays at the same time to determine the genotypes and (ii) a model that relates intensities of individual SNPs to each other. The latter point...... allows us to annotate SNPs that have poor performance, either because of poor experimental conditions or because for one of the alleles the probes do not behave in a dose-response manner. Generally, our method agrees well with a method developed by Affymetrix. When both methods make a call they agree in...... 99.25% (using standard settings) of the cases, using a sample of 113 Affymetrix 10k SNP arrays. In the majority of cases where the two methods disagree, our method makes a genotype call, whereas the method by Affymetrix makes a no call, i.e. the genotype of the SNP is not determined. By visualization...

  11. Flexible ultrasonic array sensors for health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, M.; Wu, K.-T.; Song, L.; Liu, Q.; Jen, C.-K.

    2007-04-01

    Flexible ultrasonic array transducers which can be attached to the desired structures or materials for nondestructive testing and structural health monitoring applications at room and elevated temperatures are developed. These flexible ultrasonic transducers (UTs) arrays consist of a thin polyimide membrane with a bottom electrode or stainless steel foil, a piezoelectric lead-zirconate-titanate (PZT) composite film and top electrodes. The flexibility is realized owing to the porosity of piezoelectric film and the thinness of substrate and electrodes. Top and bottom electrode materials are silver paste, silver paint or electroless plated nickel alloys. The UT array is configured by the several top electrodes. The flexible UT has been successfully tested at 150°C and also immersed into water as immersion ultrasonic probe operated in the pulse-echo mode with good signal to noise ratio.

  12. Redundant Array Configurations for 21 cm Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Dillon, Joshua S

    2016-01-01

    Realizing the potential of 21 cm tomography to statistically probe the intergalactic medium before and during the Epoch of Reionization requires large telescopes and precise control of systematics. Next-generation telescopes are now being designed and built to meet these challenges, drawing lessons from first-generation experiments that showed the benefits of densely packed, highly redundant arrays--in which the same mode on the sky is sampled by many antenna pairs--for achieving high sensitivity, precise calibration, and robust foreground mitigation. In this work, we focus on the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) as an interferometer with a dense, redundant core designed following these lessons to be optimized for 21 cm cosmology. We show how modestly supplementing or modifying a compact design like HERA's can still deliver high sensitivity while enhancing strategies for calibration and foreground mitigation. In particular, we compare the imaging capability of several array configurations, both ins...

  13. Low-cost laser diode array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, B.L.; Skidmore, J.A.

    1999-06-01

    A substrate is used to fabricate a low-cost laser diode array. A substrate is machined from an electrically insulative material that is thermally conductive, or two substrates can be bonded together in which the top substrate is electrically as well as thermally conductive. The substrate thickness is slightly longer than the cavity length, and the width of the groove is wide enough to contain a bar and spring (which secures the laser bar firmly along one face of the groove). The spring also provides electrical continuity from the backside of the bar to the adjacent metalization layer on the laser bar substrate. Arrays containing one or more bars can be formed by creating many grooves at various spacings. Along the groove, many bars can be adjoined at the edges to provide parallel electrical conduction. This architecture allows precise and predictable registration of an array of laser bars to a self-aligned microlens array at low cost. 19 figs.

  14. An improved fabrication method for carbon nanotube probe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Zong-wei; GUO Li-qiu; DONG Shen; ZHAO Qing-liang

    2008-01-01

    An improved arc discharge method is developed to fabricate the carbon nanotube probe.In this method,the silicon probe and the carbon nanotube were manipulated under an optical microscope.When the silicon probe and the carbon nanotube were very close,30-60 V dc or ac was applied between them,and the carbon nanotube was divided and attached to the end of the silicon probe.Comparing with the arc discharge method,the new method need not coat the silicon probe with metal in advance,which Can greatly reduce the fabrication difficulty and cost.The fabricated carbon nanotube probe exhibits the good property of hish aspect ratio and can reflect the true topography more accurately than the silicon probe.

  15. Traversing probe system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention comprises a rotatable annular probe-positioner which carries at least one radially disposed sensing probe, such as a Pitot tube having a right-angled tip. The positioner can be coaxially and rotatably mounted within a compressor casing or the like and then actuated to orient the sensing probe as required to make measurements at selected stations in the annulus between the positioner and compressor casing. The positioner can be actuated to (a) selectively move the probe along its own axis, (b) adjust the yaw angle of the right-angled probe tip, and (c) revolve the probe about the axis common to the positioner and casing. A cam plate engages a cam-follower portion of the probe and normally rotates with the positioner. The positioner includes a first-motor-driven ring gear which effects slidable movement of the probe by rotating the positioner at a time when an external pneumatic cylinder is actuated to engage the cam plate and hold it stationary. When the pneumatic cylinder is not actuated, this ring gear can be driven to revolve the positioner and thus the probe to a desired circumferential location about the above-mentioned common axis. A second motor-driven ring gear included in the positioner can be driven to rotate the probe about its axis, thus adjusting the yaw angle of the probe tip. The positioner can be used in highly corrosive atmosphere, such as gaseous uranium hexafluoride. 10 claims, 6 figures

  16. Langmuir probe diagnostic suite in the C-2 field-reversed configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roche, T., E-mail: troche@trialphaenergy.com; Armstrong, S.; Knapp, K.; Slepchenkov, M. [Tri Alpha Energy Inc., PO Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Sun, X. [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei Anhui 230026 (China)

    2014-11-15

    Several in situ probes have been designed and implemented into the diagnostic array of the C-2 field-reversed configuration (FRC) at Tri Alpha Energy [M. Tuszewski et al. (the TAE Team), Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 255008 (2012)]. The probes are all variations on the traditional Langmuir probe. They include linear arrays of triple probes, linear arrays of single-tipped swept probes, a multi-faced Gundestrup probe, and an ion-sensitive probe. The probes vary from 5 to 7 mm diameter in size to minimize plasma perturbations. They also have boron nitride outer casings that prevent unwanted electrical breakdown and reduce the introduction of impurities. The probes are mounted on motorized linear-actuators allowing for programmatic scans of the various plasma parameters over the course of several shots. Each probe has a custom set of electronics that allows for measurement of the desired signals. High frequency ( > 5MHz) analog optical-isolators ensure that plasma parameters can be measured at sub-microsecond time scales while providing electrical isolation between machine and data acquisition systems. With these probes time-resolved plasma parameters (temperature, density, spatial potential, flow, and electric field) can be directly/locally measured in the FRC jet and edge/scrape-off layer.

  17. Langmuir probe diagnostic suite in the C-2 field-reversed configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several in situ probes have been designed and implemented into the diagnostic array of the C-2 field-reversed configuration (FRC) at Tri Alpha Energy [M. Tuszewski et al. (the TAE Team), Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 255008 (2012)]. The probes are all variations on the traditional Langmuir probe. They include linear arrays of triple probes, linear arrays of single-tipped swept probes, a multi-faced Gundestrup probe, and an ion-sensitive probe. The probes vary from 5 to 7 mm diameter in size to minimize plasma perturbations. They also have boron nitride outer casings that prevent unwanted electrical breakdown and reduce the introduction of impurities. The probes are mounted on motorized linear-actuators allowing for programmatic scans of the various plasma parameters over the course of several shots. Each probe has a custom set of electronics that allows for measurement of the desired signals. High frequency ( > 5MHz) analog optical-isolators ensure that plasma parameters can be measured at sub-microsecond time scales while providing electrical isolation between machine and data acquisition systems. With these probes time-resolved plasma parameters (temperature, density, spatial potential, flow, and electric field) can be directly/locally measured in the FRC jet and edge/scrape-off layer

  18. Topological order in the insulating Josephson junction array

    OpenAIRE

    Douçot, B.; Feigel'Man, M.V.; Ioffe, L. B.

    2002-01-01

    We propose a Josephson junction array which can be tuned into an unconventional insulating state by varying external magnetic field. This insulating state retains a gap to half vortices; as a consequence, such array with non-trivial global geometry exhibits a ground state degeneracy. This degeneracy is protected from the effects of external noise. We compute the gaps separating higher energy states from the degenerate ground state and we discuss experiments probing the unusual properties of t...

  19. Super phase array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wee, W H; Pendry, J B [Condensed Matter Theory Group Department of Physics Imperial College London London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: w.wee07@imperial.ac.uk

    2010-03-15

    For a long time phase arrays have been used in a variety of wave transmission applications because of their simplicity and versatility. Conventionally there is a trade-off between the compactness of a phase array and its directivity. In this paper we demonstrate how by embedding a normal phase array within a superlens (made of negative refractive index material) we can overcome this constraint and create compact phase arrays with a virtual extent much larger than the physical size of the array. In this paper we also briefly discuss the apparent unphysical field divergences in superlenses and how to resolve this issue.

  20. Super phase array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a long time phase arrays have been used in a variety of wave transmission applications because of their simplicity and versatility. Conventionally there is a trade-off between the compactness of a phase array and its directivity. In this paper we demonstrate how by embedding a normal phase array within a superlens (made of negative refractive index material) we can overcome this constraint and create compact phase arrays with a virtual extent much larger than the physical size of the array. In this paper we also briefly discuss the apparent unphysical field divergences in superlenses and how to resolve this issue.

  1. Conformable eddy current array delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summan, Rahul; Pierce, Gareth; Macleod, Charles; Mineo, Carmelo; Riise, Jonathan; Morozov, Maxim; Dobie, Gordon; Bolton, Gary; Raude, Angélique; Dalpé, Colombe; Braumann, Johannes

    2016-02-01

    The external surface of stainless steel containers used for the interim storage of nuclear material may be subject to Atmospherically Induced Stress Corrosion Cracking (AISCC). The inspection of such containers poses a significant challenge due to the large quantities involved; therefore, automating the inspection process is of considerable interest. This paper reports upon a proof-of-concept project concerning the automated NDT of a set of test containers containing artificially generated AISCCs. An Eddy current array probe with a conformable padded surface from Eddyfi was used as the NDT sensor and end effector on a KUKA KR5 arc HW robot. A kinematically valid cylindrical raster scan path was designed using the KUKA|PRC path planning software. Custom software was then written to interface measurement acquisition from the Eddyfi hardware with the motion control of the robot. Preliminary results and analysis are presented from scanning two canisters.

  2. Three-dimensional broadband intensity probe for measuring acoustical parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Khalid Hossain

    Measuring different acoustical properties have been the key in reducing noise and improving the sound quality from various sources. In this report, a broadband (200 Hz -- 6.5 kHz) three-dimensional seven-microphone intensity probe system is developed to measure the sound intensity, and total energy density in different acoustical environments. Limitations of most commercial intensity probes in measuring the three-dimensional intensity for a broadband sound field was the main motivation in developing this probe. The finite-difference error and the phase mismatch error which are the two main errors associated with the intensity measurements are addressed in this report. As for the physical design, seven microphones were arranged in a two-concentric arrays with one microphone located at the center of the probe. The outer array is for low-frequencies (200 Hz -- 1.0 kHz), and the inner one is for high-frequencies (1.0 kHz -- 6.5 kHz). The screw adjustable center microphone is used for the microphone calibration, and as the reference microphone of the probe. The simultaneous calibrations of all the microphones in the probe were done in the anechoic room. Theories for the intensity and the energy densities calculations for the probe were derived from the existing four-microphone probe configuration. Reflection and diffraction effects on the intensity measurements due to the presence of the microphones, and the supporting structures were also investigated in this report. Directivity patterns of the calculated intensity showed the omnidirectional nature of the probe. The intensity, and total energy density were calculated and compared with the ideal values in the anechoic room environment. Characterization of sound fields in a reverberant enclosed space, and sound source identification are some applications that were investigated using this probe. Results of different measurements showed effectiveness of the probe as a tool to measure key acoustical properties in many

  3. A Brassica exon array for whole-transcript gene expression profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher G Love

    Full Text Available Affymetrix GeneChip® arrays are used widely to study transcriptional changes in response to developmental and environmental stimuli. GeneChip® arrays comprise multiple 25-mer oligonucleotide probes per gene and retain certain advantages over direct sequencing. For plants, there are several public GeneChip® arrays whose probes are localised primarily in 3' exons. Plant whole-transcript (WT GeneChip® arrays are not yet publicly available, although WT resolution is needed to study complex crop genomes such as Brassica, which are typified by segmental duplications containing paralogous genes and/or allopolyploidy. Available sequence data were sampled from the Brassica A and C genomes, and 142,997 gene models identified. The assembled gene models were then used to establish a comprehensive public WT exon array for transcriptomics studies. The Affymetrix GeneChip® Brassica Exon 1.0 ST Array is a 5 µM feature size array, containing 2.4 million 25-base oligonucleotide probes representing 135,201 gene models, with 15 probes per gene distributed among exons. Discrimination of the gene models was based on an E-value cut-off of 1E(-5, with ≤98% sequence identity. The 135 k Brassica Exon Array was validated by quantifying transcriptome differences between leaf and root tissue from a reference Brassica rapa line (R-o-18, and categorisation by Gene Ontologies (GO based on gene orthology with Arabidopsis thaliana. Technical validation involved comparison of the exon array with a 60-mer array platform using the same starting RNA samples. The 135 k Brassica Exon Array is a robust platform. All data relating to the array design and probe identities are available in the public domain and are curated within the BrassEnsembl genome viewer at http://www.brassica.info/BrassEnsembl/index.html.

  4. Preparation and Characterization of Fluorescence Probe from Assembly Hydroxyapatite Nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Guang-Ming

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A new nanocomposite fluorescence probe with thioglycolic acid (TA functional layers embedded inside the hydroxyapatite nanoribbon spherulites has been synthesized. The fluorescence intensity of the novel probe is about 1.5–3.3-fold increase compared with the probe containing no TA. When used to detect cadmium ion, the most of original assembly nanoribbon spherulites structure in the novel probe is found to have been damaged to new flake structures. The mechanism of determining cadmium ion in alcohol solution has been studied. The present systematic study provides significant information on the effect of assembly nanostructure on the metal-enhanced fluorescence phenomenon.

  5. Arrays of magnetic nanoparticles capped with alkylamines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P John Thomas; P Saravanan; G U Kulkarni; C N R Rao

    2002-02-01

    Magnetic metal and metal oxide nanoparticles capped with alkylamines have been synthesized and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and magnetization measurements. Core-shell Pd–Ni particles with composition, Pd561Ni3000, (diameter ∼ 3.3 nm) are superparamagnetic at 5 K and organize themselves into two-dimensional crystalline arrays. Similar arrays are obtained with Pd561Ni3000Pd1500 nanoparticles containing an additional Pd shell. Magnetic spinel particles of -Fe2O3, Fe3O4 and CoFe2O4 of average diameters in the 4–6 nm range coated with octylamine are all supermagnetic at room temperature and yield close-packed disordered arrays. Relatively regular arrays are formed by dodecylamine-capped Fe3O4 nanoparticles (∼ 8.6 nm diameter) while well-ordered hexagonal arrays were obtained with octylamine-covered Co3O4 nanoparticles (∼ 4.2 nm diameter).

  6. High-density fiber optic biosensor arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Jason R.; Walt, David R.

    2002-02-01

    Novel approaches are required to coordinate the immense amounts of information derived from diverse genomes. This concept has influenced the expanded role of high-throughput DNA detection and analysis in the biological sciences. A high-density fiber optic DNA biosensor was developed consisting of oligonucleotide-functionalized, 3.1 mm diameter microspheres deposited into the etched wells on the distal face of a 500 micrometers imaging fiber bundle. Imaging fiber bundles containing thousands of optical fibers, each associated with a unique oligonucleotide probe sequence, were the foundation for an optically connected, individually addressable DNA detection platform. Different oligonucleotide-functionalized microspheres were combined in a stock solution, and randomly dispersed into the etched wells. Microsphere positions were registered from optical dyes incorporated onto the microspheres. The distribution process provided an inherent redundancy that increases the signal-to-noise ratio as the square root of the number of sensors examined. The representative amount of each probe-type in the array was dependent on their initial stock solution concentration, and as other sequences of interest arise, new microsphere elements can be added to arrays without altering the existing detection capabilities. The oligonucleotide probe sequences hybridize to fluorescently-labeled, complementary DNA target solutions. Fiber optic DNA microarray research has included DNA-protein interaction profiles, microbial strain differentiation, non-labeled target interrogation with molecular beacons, and single cell-based assays. This biosensor array is proficient in DNA detection linked to specific disease states, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP's) discrimination, and gene expression analysis. This array platform permits multiple detection formats, provides smaller feature sizes, and enables sensor design flexibility. High-density fiber optic microarray biosensors provide a fast

  7. Research on metal tubing pit corrosion monitoring based on potential-array method%基于电位列阵的金属管道坑蚀监测研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万正军; 廖俊必; 王裕康; 殷国富

    2011-01-01

    基于电位列阵的金属管道(容器)在线腐蚀检测方法又称为场指纹法(field signature method,FSM).FSM将被测电极列阵分布在被测管道外部,通过电阻与管道厚度的相关关系,可以实时在线监测管道内部的腐蚀程度.FSM方法在21世纪90年代已经开始应用于海底管道监测,由于效果很好,国外已比较广泛地将此方法应用于陆上油气运输管道和重要容器上.FSM方法虽然是基于看似简单的欧姆定律,但是在使用上不加以注意,其牵扯效应将使测试结果产生很大的误差.本文在介绍FSM方法的基础上,指出了FSM方法在理论上和实际工程应用中的局限性,提出了FSM方法中牵扯效应的定义,分析了牵扯效应的成因和影响的大小,介绍了牵扯因子的求解和消除牵扯效应的方法.理论分析和试验表明,牵扯效应消除后可大幅度地提高FSM方法的精度,特别是提高了局部坑蚀的检测精度.本文在理论上发展和完善了FSM方法.%Online metal pipe corrosion monitoring method based on potential-anay is also known as Field Signature Method (FSM). In FSM, electrode array is arranged on tube exterior; and according to the relations between electrical resistances and thickness of the tube, the degree of corrosion is calculated in real time and on-line. FSM has been widely applied since 1990s in the field of submarine tube monitoring. Due to its significant effect, the method has been extended to land oil/gas transit tubes and important capacitors abroad. It seems that FSM is based on simple Ohm' Law, however; if no used properly, the relevant Drag Effect could incur a large margin of error. This paper defines the Drag Effect, analyzes the cause of the effect and its influence based on the introduction of FSM, and presents the method for calculating the drag factors and removing its errors. Theoretical analysis and experiments show that the test accuracy could be greatly enhanced by eliminating the

  8. Analytical applications of near-infrared fluorescent probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patonay, Gabor; Tarazi, Leila A.; George, Abraham; Van Aken, Koen; Gorecki, Tadeusz; Strekowski, Lucjan

    1997-05-01

    By combining near-infrared (NIR) fluorophores and commercially available laser diodes, a promising technique emerges where visible probes are less effective due to background interference. The application of NIR fluorophores in fiber-optic probes for the determination of metal ions in the environment and for biological assays will be discussed. The spectral behavior of a new NIR fluorophore TG-170 in the presence of metal ions and the first synthesis and spectral characterization of a NIR dye KVA-22 substituted with a crown ether, a metal complexing functionality, will be presented.

  9. Fully-integrated, bezel-less transistor arrays using reversibly foldable interconnects and stretchable origami substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mijung; Park, Jihun; Ji, Sangyoon; Shin, Sung-Ho; Kim, So-Yun; Kim, Young-Cheon; Kim, Ju-Young; Park, Jang-Ung

    2016-05-14

    Here we demonstrate fully-integrated, bezel-less transistor arrays using stretchable origami substrates and foldable conducting interconnects. Reversible folding of these arrays is enabled by origami substrates which are composed of rigid support fixtures and foldable elastic joints. In addition, hybrid structures of thin metal films and metallic nanowires worked as foldable interconnects which are located on the elastomeric joints. PMID:27101972

  10. Photothermal probing of plasmonic hotspots with nanomechanical resonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmid, Silvan; Wu, Kaiyu; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Boisen, Anja

    Plasmonic nanostructures (hotspots) are key components e.g. in plasmon-enhanced spectroscopy, plasmonic solar cells, or as nano heat sources. The characterization of single hotspots is still challenging due to a lack of experimental tools. We present the direct photothermal probing and mapping of...... nanoslit array....

  11. Electric field gradients in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the recent works on electric field gradient in metals is given. The main emphasis is put on the temperature dependence of the electric field gradient in nonmagnetic metals. Some methods of investigation of this effect using nuclear probes are described. One of them is nuclear accoustic resonance method. (S.B.)

  12. Ultrasound imaging probe with sigma-delta beamformer and apodization therein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    An ultrasound transducer probe (104) includes a transducer array (108) of elements ( 1 10) that emit an ultrasound signal and receive analog echo signals produced in response thereto and a beamformer (1 12), housed by the probe, that converts the analog echo signals to digital signals, applies de...

  13. Multichannel, time-resolved picosecond laser ultrasound imaging and spectroscopy with custom complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a multichannel, time-resolved picosecond laser ultrasound system that uses a custom complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor linear array detector. This novel sensor allows parallel phase-sensitive detection of very low contrast modulated signals with performance in each channel comparable to that of a discrete photodiode and a lock-in amplifier. Application of the instrument is demonstrated by parallelizing spatial measurements to produce two-dimensional thickness maps on a layered sample, and spectroscopic parallelization is demonstrated by presenting the measured Brillouin oscillations from a gallium arsenide wafer. This paper demonstrates the significant advantages of our approach to pump probe systems, especially picosecond ultrasonics.

  14. Hands-Free Transcranial Color Doppler Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Robert; Madala, Srihdar; Sattler, Graham

    2012-01-01

    Current transcranial color Doppler (TCD) transducer probes are bulky and difficult to move in tiny increments to search and optimize TCD signals. This invention provides miniature motions of a TCD transducer probe to optimize TCD signals. The mechanical probe uses a spherical bearing in guiding and locating the tilting crystal face. The lateral motion of the crystal face as it tilts across the full range of motion was achieved by minimizing the distance between the pivot location and the crystal face. The smallest commonly available metal spherical bearing was used with an outer diameter of 12 mm, a 3-mm tall retaining ring, and 5-mm overall height. Small geared motors were used that would provide sufficient power in a very compact package. After confirming the validity of the basic positioning concept, optimization design loops were completed to yield the final design. A parallel motor configuration was used to minimize the amount of space wasted inside the probe case while minimizing the overall case dimensions. The distance from the front edge of the crystal to the edge of the case was also minimized to allow positioning of the probe very close to the ear on the temporal lobe. The mechanical probe is able to achieve a +/-20deg tip and tilt with smooth repeatable action in a very compact package. The enclosed probe is about 7 cm long, 4 cm wide, and 1.8 cm tall. The device is compact, hands-free, and can be adjusted via an innovative touchscreen. Positioning of the probe to the head is performed via conventional transducer gels and pillows. This device is amendable to having advanced software, which could intelligently focus and optimize the TCD signal.

  15. Automated Non-Destructive Testing Array Evaluation System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utilities perform eddy current tests on nuclear power plant steam generator (SG) tubes to detect degradation. This report summarizes the status of ongoing research to develop signal processing algorithms that automate analysis of eddy current test data. The research focuses on analyzing array probe data for detecting, classifying, and characterizing degradation in SG tubes

  16. Automated Non-Destructive Testing Array Evaluation System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, T.; Zavaljevski, N.; Bakhtiari, S.; Miron, A.; Jupperman, D.

    2004-12-31

    Utilities perform eddy current tests on nuclear power plant steam generator (SG) tubes to detect degradation. This report summarizes the status of ongoing research to develop signal processing algorithms that automate analysis of eddy current test data. The research focuses on analyzing array probe data for detecting, classifying, and characterizing degradation in SG tubes.

  17. Monte Carlo modeling of ultrasound probes for image guided radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena, E-mail: bazalova@uvic.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia V8W 2Y2 (Canada); Schlosser, Jeffrey [SoniTrack Systems, Inc., Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); Chen, Josephine [Department of Radiation Oncology, UCSF, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Hristov, Dimitre [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: To build Monte Carlo (MC) models of two ultrasound (US) probes and to quantify the effect of beam attenuation due to the US probes for radiation therapy delivered under real-time US image guidance. Methods: MC models of two Philips US probes, an X6-1 matrix-array transducer and a C5-2 curved-array transducer, were built based on their megavoltage (MV) CT images acquired in a Tomotherapy machine with a 3.5 MV beam in the EGSnrc, BEAMnrc, and DOSXYZnrc codes. Mass densities in the probes were assigned based on an electron density calibration phantom consisting of cylinders with mass densities between 0.2 and 8.0 g/cm{sup 3}. Beam attenuation due to the US probes in horizontal (for both probes) and vertical (for the X6-1 probe) orientation was measured in a solid water phantom for 6 and 15 MV (15 × 15) cm{sup 2} beams with a 2D ionization chamber array and radiographic films at 5 cm depth. The MC models of the US probes were validated by comparison of the measured dose distributions and dose distributions predicted by MC. Attenuation of depth dose in the (15 × 15) cm{sup 2} beams and small circular beams due to the presence of the probes was assessed by means of MC simulations. Results: The 3.5 MV CT number to mass density calibration curve was found to be linear with R{sup 2} > 0.99. The maximum mass densities in the X6-1 and C5-2 probes were found to be 4.8 and 5.2 g/cm{sup 3}, respectively. Dose profile differences between MC simulations and measurements of less than 3% for US probes in horizontal orientation were found, with the exception of the penumbra region. The largest 6% dose difference was observed in dose profiles of the X6-1 probe placed in vertical orientation, which was attributed to inadequate modeling of the probe cable. Gamma analysis of the simulated and measured doses showed that over 96% of measurement points passed the 3%/3 mm criteria for both probes placed in horizontal orientation and for the X6-1 probe in vertical orientation. The

  18. A microbial detection array (MDA for viral and bacterial detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McLoughlin Kevin S

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identifying the bacteria and viruses present in a complex sample is useful in disease diagnostics, product safety, environmental characterization, and research. Array-based methods have proven utility to detect in a single assay at a reasonable cost any microbe from the thousands that have been sequenced. Methods We designed a pan-Microbial Detection Array (MDA to detect all known viruses (including phages, bacteria and plasmids and developed a novel statistical analysis method to identify mixtures of organisms from complex samples hybridized to the array. The array has broader coverage of bacterial and viral targets and is based on more recent sequence data and more probes per target than other microbial detection/discovery arrays in the literature. Family-specific probes were selected for all sequenced viral and bacterial complete genomes, segments, and plasmids. Probes were designed to tolerate some sequence variation to enable detection of divergent species with homology to sequenced organisms, and to have no significant matches to the human genome sequence. Results In blinded testing on spiked samples with single or multiple viruses, the MDA was able to correctly identify species or strains. In clinical fecal, serum, and respiratory samples, the MDA was able to detect and characterize multiple viruses, phage, and bacteria in a sample to the family and species level, as confirmed by PCR. Conclusions The MDA can be used to identify the suite of viruses and bacteria present in complex samples.

  19. Fireside corrosion probes--an update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Holcomb, G.R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Matthes, S.A.

    2007-01-01

    The ability to monitor the corrosion degradation of key metallic components in fossil fuel power plants will become increasingly important for FutureGen and ultra-supercritical power plants. A number of factors (ash deposition, coal composition changes, thermal gradients, and low NOx conditions, among others) which occur in the high temperature sections of energy production facilities, will contribute to fireside corrosion. Several years of research have shown that high temperature corrosion rate probes need to be better understood before corrosion rate can be used as a process variable by power plant operators. Our recent research has shown that electrochemical corrosion probes typically measure lower corrosion rates than those measured by standard mass loss techniques. While still useful for monitoring changes in corrosion rates, absolute probe corrosion rates will need a calibration factor to be useful. Continuing research is targeted to help resolve these issues.

  20. Plasmonic corrugated cylinder-cone terahertz probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Haizi; Zhong, Shuncong

    2014-08-01

    The spoof surface plasmon polariton (SPP) effect on the electromagnetic field distribution near the tip of a periodically corrugated metal cylinder-cone probe working at the terahertz regime was studied. We found that radially polarized terahertz radiation could be coupled effectively through a spoof SPP into a surface wave and propagated along the corrugated surface, resulting in more than 20× electric field enhancement near the tip of probe. Multiple resonances caused by the antenna effect were discussed in detail by finite element computation and theoretical analysis of dispersion relation for spoof SPP modes. Moreover, the key figures of merit such as the resonance frequency of the SPP can be flexibly tuned by modifying the geometry of the probe structure, making it attractive for application in an apertureless background-free terahertz near-field microscope. PMID:25121543