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Sample records for array-based fmr1 sequencing

  1. Array-based FMR1 sequencing and deletion analysis in patients with a fragile X syndrome-like phenotype.

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    Stephen C Collins

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fragile X syndrome (FXS is caused by loss of function mutations in the FMR1 gene. Trinucleotide CGG-repeat expansions, resulting in FMR1 gene silencing, are the most common mutations observed at this locus. Even though the repeat expansion mutation is a functional null mutation, few conventional mutations have been identified at this locus, largely due to the clinical laboratory focus on the repeat tract. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To more thoroughly evaluate the frequency of conventional mutations in FXS-like patients, we used an array-based method to sequence FMR1 in 51 unrelated males exhibiting several features characteristic of FXS but with normal CGG-repeat tracts of FMR1. One patient was identified with a deletion in FMR1, but none of the patients were found to have other conventional mutations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest that missense mutations in FMR1 are not a common cause of the FXS phenotype in patients who have normal-length CGG-repeat tracts. However, screening for small deletions of FMR1 may be of clinically utility.

  2. Analysis of a CGG sequence at the FMR-1 locus in fragile X families and in the general population

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    Snow, K.; Doud, L.K.; Thibodeau, S.N. (Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States)); Hagerman, R. (Denver Children' s Hospital, CO (United States)); Pergolizzi, R.G.; Erster, S.H. (North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, NY (United States))

    1993-12-01

    In this study, the authors have characterized a CGG repeat at the FMR-1 locus in more than 100 families (more than 500 individuals) presenting for fragile X testing and in 247 individuals from the general population. Both Southern blot and PCR-based assays were evaluated for their ability to detect premutations, full mutations, and variability in normal allele sizes. Among the Southern blot assays, the probes Ox1.09 or StB12.3 with a double restriction-enzyme digest were the most sensitive in detecting both small and large amplifications and, in addition, provided information on methylation of an adjacent CpG island. In the PCR-based assays, analysis of PCR products on denaturing DNA sequencing gels allowed the most accurate determination of CGG repeat number up to approximately 130 repeats. A combination of a Southern blot assay with a double digest and the PCR-sequencing-gel assay detected the spectrum of amplification-type mutations at the FMR-1 locus. In the patient population, a CGG repeat of 51 was the largest to be stably inherited, and a repeat of 57 was the smallest size of premutation to be unstably inherited. When premutations were transmitted by females, the size of repeat correlated with risk of expansion to a full mutation in the next generation. Full mutations (large repeats typically associated with an abnormal methylation pattern and mitotic instability) were associated with clinical and cytogenetic manifestations in males but not necessarily in females. In the control population, the CGG repeat changed from 13 to 61, but 94% of alleles had fewer than 40 repeats. The most frequent allele (34%) was a repeat of 30. One female had an allele (61 repeats) within a range consistent with fragile X premutations, while two other individuals each had a repeat of 52. This suggests that the frequency of unstable alleles in the general population may be [approximately]1%. 34 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. In Silico Analysis of FMR1 Gene Missense SNPs.

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    Tekcan, Akin

    2016-06-01

    The FMR1 gene, a member of the fragile X-related gene family, is responsible for fragile X syndrome (FXS). Missense single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are responsible for many complex diseases. The effect of FMR1 gene missense SNPs is unknown. The aim of this study, using in silico techniques, was to analyze all known missense mutations that can affect the functionality of the FMR1 gene, leading to mental retardation (MR) and FXS. Data on the human FMR1 gene were collected from the Ensembl database (release 81), National Centre for Biological Information dbSNP Short Genetic Variations database, 1000 Genomes Browser, and NHLBI Exome Sequencing Project Exome Variant Server. In silico analysis was then performed. One hundred-twenty different missense SNPs of the FMR1 gene were determined. Of these, 11.66 % of the FMR1 gene missense SNPs were in highly conserved domains, and 83.33 % were in domains with high variety. The results of the in silico prediction analysis showed that 31.66 % of the FMR1 gene SNPs were disease related and that 50 % of SNPs had a pathogenic effect. The results of the structural and functional analysis revealed that although the R138Q mutation did not seem to have a damaging effect on the protein, the G266E and I304N SNPs appeared to disturb the interaction between the domains and affect the function of the protein. This is the first study to analyze all missense SNPs of the FMR1 gene. The results indicate the applicability of a bioinformatics approach to FXS and other FMR1-related diseases. I think that the analysis of FMR1 gene missense SNPs using bioinformatics methods would help diagnosis of FXS and other FMR1-related diseases.

  4. A nonsense mutation in FMR1 causing fragile X syndrome

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    Grønskov, Karen; Brøndum-Nielsen, Karen; Dedic, Alma

    2011-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome is a common cause of inherited intellectual disability. It is caused by lack of the FMR1 gene product FMRP. The most frequent cause is the expansion of a CGG repeat located in the 5'UTR of FMR1. Alleles with 200 or more repeats become hypermethylated and transcriptionally silent....... Only few patients with intragenic point mutations in FMR1 have been reported and, currently, routine analysis of patients referred for fragile X syndrome includes solely analysis for repeat expansion and methylation status. We identified a substitution in exon 2 of FMR1, c.80C>A, causing a nonsense...... mutation p.Ser27X, in a patient with classical clinical symptoms of fragile X syndrome. The mother who carried the mutation in heterozygous form presented with mild intellectual impairment. We conclude that further studies including western blot and DNA sequence analysis of the FMR1 gene should...

  5. Methylization analysis of the FMR1 gene in carrier females

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    Meyers, S.; Cappon, S.; Khalifa, M.M. [Kingston General Hospital (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The fragile X syndrome mutation is associated with an expansion of a CGG repeat sequence and methylation of the CpG island in the promoter of the FMR1 gene. Methylation of the CpG island silences the FMR1 gene, thereby generating the disease phenotypes. Previous studies suggest that the normal FMR1 gene has the properties of an X-linked housekeeping gene that is subject to X inactivation, i.e., its CpG island is unmethylated on the active X chromosome and methylated on the inactive X. Because methylation of the mutant FMR1 gene occurs in both males and females with the full mutation, inactivating the FMR1 gene in these females might be a localized event independent from X inactivation. To test this hypothesis we compared the methylation pattern of two housekeeping genes, PGK1 and androgen receptor (AR) with that of the FMR1 in 46 female carriers of the fragile X syndrome. Twenty eight females were in the premutation range (63-193 repeats) and 16 were carriers of the full mutation (263-996 repeats). The data revealed complete correlation between the methylation pattern of PGK1 and AR. There was also a close correlation between X inactivation pattern detected by PGK1 and/or AR and that detected by FMR1 in female carriers of the premutation. In all female carriers of the full mutation there was complete methylation of the BssHII site in the expanded FMR1 allele. The X chromosome inactivation pattern in these females as detected by PGK1 and/or AR was as follows: in 10 cases the X inactivation was skewed in favor of the mutant FMR1, i.e. the mutant allele was on the inactive X chromosome, in 3 the inactivation was random and in 3 the inactivation was skewed in favor of the normal allele. These data suggest that the methylation of the FMR1 gene in females with the full mutation is a localized event and methylation of the FMR1 gene in these females cannot be used as a predictor of X inactivation.

  6. Evolutionary insights from suffix array-based genome sequence analysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anindya Poddar; Nagasuma Chandra; Madhavi Ganapathiraju; K Sekar; Judith Klein-Seetharaman; Raj Reddy; N Balakrishnan

    2007-08-01

    Gene and protein sequence analyses, central components of studies in modern biology are easily amenable to string matching and pattern recognition algorithms. The growing need of analysing whole genome sequences more efficiently and thoroughly, has led to the emergence of new computational methods. Suffix trees and suffix arrays are data structures, well known in many other areas and are highly suited for sequence analysis too. Here we report an improvement to the design of construction of suffix arrays. Enhancement in versatility and scalability, enabled by this approach, is demonstrated through the use of real-life examples. The scalability of the algorithm to whole genomes renders it suitable to address many biologically interesting problems. One example is the evolutionary insight gained by analysing unigrams, bi-grams and higher n-grams, indicating that the genetic code has a direct influence on the overall composition of the genome. Further, different proteomes have been analysed for the coverage of the possible peptide space, which indicate that as much as a quarter of the total space at the tetra-peptide level is left un-sampled in prokaryotic organisms, although almost all tri-peptides can be seen in one protein or another in a proteome. Besides, distinct patterns begin to emerge for the counts of particular tetra and higher peptides, indicative of a ‘meaning’ for tetra and higher n-grams. The toolkit has also been used to demonstrate the usefulness of identifying repeats in whole proteomes efficiently. As an example, 16 members of one COG, coded by the genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv have been found to contain a repeating sequence of 300 amino acids.

  7. Deletion in the FMR1 gene in a fragile-X male

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    Mannermaa, A.; Pulkkinen, L.; Kajanoja, E. [Kuopio Univ., Hospital (Finland)] [and others

    1996-08-09

    The pathogenesis of fragile-X syndrome is a consequence of absence of the FMR1 gene product associated with expansion of the CGG repeat and abnormal methylation of this and a CpG island 250 hp proximal to the CGG repeat located at exon 1 in the FMR1 gene. While this is usually the case, some suspected fragile-X syndrome patients have been described with a mutation other than CGG expansion. We describe here an affected fragile-X male, who was found to be mosaic of a full mutation of the CGG expansion and a deletion in the FMR1 gene. The patient`s phenotype is probably mainly due to the effect of the full mutation of the repeat sequence. Thus, the influence of the deletion is difficult to evaluate. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Modeling fragile X syndrome in the Fmr1 knockout mouse.

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    Kazdoba, Tatiana M; Leach, Prescott T; Silverman, Jill L; Crawley, Jacqueline N

    2014-11-01

    Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is a commonly inherited form of intellectual disability and one of the leading genetic causes for autism spectrum disorder. Clinical symptoms of FXS can include impaired cognition, anxiety, hyperactivity, social phobia, and repetitive behaviors. FXS is caused by a CGG repeat mutation which expands a region on the X chromosome containing the FMR1 gene. In FXS, a full mutation (> 200 repeats) leads to hypermethylation of FMR1, an epigenetic mechanism that effectively silences FMR1 gene expression and reduces levels of the FMR1 gene product, fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FMRP is an RNA-binding protein that is important for the regulation of protein expression. In an effort to further understand how loss of FMR1 and FMRP contribute to FXS symptomology, several FXS animal models have been created. The most well characterized rodent model is the Fmr1 knockout (KO) mouse, which lacks FMRP protein due to a disruption in its Fmr1 gene. Here, we review the behavioral phenotyping of the Fmr1 KO mouse to date, and discuss the clinical relevance of this mouse model to the human FXS condition. While much remains to be learned about FXS, the Fmr1 KO mouse is a valuable tool for understanding the repercussions of functional loss of FMRP and assessing the efficacy of pharmacological compounds in ameliorating the molecular and behavioral phenotypes relevant to FXS.

  9. Differential Impact of the "FMR1" Gene on Visual Processing in Fragile X Syndrome

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    Kogan, Cary S.; Boutet, Isabelle; Cornish, Kim; Zangenehpour, Shahin; Mullen, Kathy T.; Holden, Jeanette J. A.; Kaloustian, Vazken M. Der; Andermann, Eva; Chaudhuri, Avi

    2004-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common form of heritable mental retardation, affecting (~ around) 1 in 4000 males. The syndrome arises from expansion of a trinucleotide repeat in the 5'-untranslated region of the fragile X mental retardation 1 ("FMR1") gene, leading to methylation of the promoter sequence and lack of the fragile X mental…

  10. Modeling fragile X syndrome in the Fmr1 knockout mouse

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    Kazdoba, Tatiana M.; Leach, Prescott T.; Silverman, Jill L.; Crawley, Jacqueline N

    2014-01-01

    Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is a commonly inherited form of intellectual disability and one of the leading genetic causes for autism spectrum disorder. Clinical symptoms of FXS can include impaired cognition, anxiety, hyperactivity, social phobia, and repetitive behaviors. FXS is caused by a CGG repeat mutation which expands a region on the X chromosome containing the FMR1 gene. In FXS, a full mutation (> 200 repeats) leads to hypermethylation of FMR1, an epigenetic mechanism that effectively si...

  11. Phenobarbital use and neurological problems in FMR1 premutation carriers

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    Saldarriaga, Wilmar; Lein, Pamela; Teshima, Laura Yuriko González; Isaza, Carolina; Rosa, Lina; Polyak, Andrew; Hagerman, Randi; Girirajan, Santhosh; Silva, Marisol; Tassone, Flora

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by a CGG expansion in the FMR1 gene located at Xq27.3. Patients with the premutation in FMR1 present specific clinical problems associated with the number of CGG repeats (55–200 CGG repeats). Premutation carriers have elevated FMR1 mRNA expression levels, which have been associated with neurotoxicity potentially causing neurodevelopmental problems or neurological problems associated with aging. However, cognitive impairments or neurological problems may also be related to increased vulnerability of premutation carriers to neurotoxicants, including phenobarbital. Here we present a study of three sisters with the premutation who were exposed differentially to phenobarbital therapy throughout their lives, allowing us to compare the neurological effects of this drug in these patients. PMID:26802682

  12. The mGluR5 antagonist AFQ056 does not affect methylation and transcription of the mutant FMR1 gene in vitro

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    Tabolacci Elisabetta

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fragile X syndrome (FXS, the leading cause of inherited mental retardation, is due to expansion and methylation of a CGG sequence in the FMR1 gene, which result in its silencing and consequent absence of FMRP protein. This absence causes loss of repression of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5-mediated pathways resulting in the behavioral and cognitive impairments associated with FXS. In a randomized, double-blind trial it was recently demonstrated a beneficial effect of AFQ056, a selective inhibitor of metabotrobic glutamate receptor type 5 (mGluR5, on fully methylated FXS patients respect to partially methylated FXS ones. Methods To determine whether AFQ056 may have secondary effects on the methylation and transcription of FMR1, here we treated three FXS lymphoblastoid cell lines and one normal control male line. A quantitative RT-PCR was performed to assess transcriptional reactivation of the FMR1 gene. To assess the methylation status of the FMR1 gene promoter it was carried out a bisulphite sequencing analysis. Results Both FMR1-mRNA levels and DNA methylation were unmodified with respect to untreated controls. Conclusions These results demonstrate that the AFQ056 effect on fully methylated FXS patients is not due to a secondary effect on DNA methylation and consequent transcriptional activation of FMR1.

  13. Brief Report: Altered Social Behavior in Isolation-Reared "Fmr1" Knockout Mice

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    Heitzer, Andrew M.; Roth, Alexandra K.; Nawrocki, Lauren; Wrenn, Craige C.; Valdovinos, Maria G.

    2013-01-01

    Social behavior abnormalities in Fragile X syndrome (FXS) are characterized by social withdrawal, anxiety, and deficits in social cognition. To assess these deficits, a model of FXS, the "Fmr1" knockout mouse ("Fmr1" KO), has been utilized. This mouse model has a null mutation in the fragile X mental retardation 1 gene ("Fmr1") and displays…

  14. The fragile X phenotype in a mosaic male with a deletion showing expression of the FMR1 protein in 28% of the cells

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    Graaf, E. de; Vries, B.B.A. de; Willemsen, R. [Erasmus Univ., Rotterdam (Netherlands)] [and others

    1996-08-09

    The instability of the CGG repeat region of FMR1 is not restricted to the CGG repeat but expands to flanking sequences as well. A mosaic fragile X male is reported with a deletion of part of the CGG repeat and 30 bp immediately 3{prime} of the repeat, thus confirming the presence of a hotspot for deletions in the CGG region of FMR1. The deletion, detected in 28% of his lymphocytes, did not impair the transcription and translation of FMR1, suggesting that regulatory elements are not present in the deleted region. The patient has the characteristic fragile X phenotype and assuming that the mosaic pattern detected in the lymphocytes reflects the mosaic pattern in brain, 28% expression of FMRP may not be sufficient for normal cognitive functioning. 43 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Imbalance between Glutamate and GABA in Fmr1 Knockout Astrocytes Influences Neuronal Development

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    Lu Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome (FXS is a form of inherited mental retardation that results from the absence of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP, the product of the Fmr1 gene. Numerous studies have shown that FMRP expression in astrocytes is important in the development of FXS. Although astrocytes affect neuronal dendrite development in Fmr1 knockout (KO mice, the factors released by astrocytes are still unclear. We cultured wild type (WT cortical neurons in astrocyte-conditioned medium (ACM from WT or Fmr1 KO mice. Immunocytochemistry and Western blotting were performed to detect the dendritic growth of both WT and KO neurons. We determined glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA levels using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. The total neuronal dendritic length was reduced when cultured in the Fmr1 KO ACM. This neurotoxicity was triggered by an imbalanced release of glutamate and GABA from Fmr1 KO astrocytes. We found increased glutaminase and GABA transaminase (GABA-T expression and decreased monoamine oxidase B expression in Fmr1 KO astrocytes. The elevated levels of glutamate contributed to oxidative stress in the cultured neurons. Vigabatrin (VGB, a GABA-T inhibitor, reversed the changes caused by glutamate and GABA release in Fmr1 KO astrocytes and the abnormal behaviors in Fmr1 KO mice. Our results indicate that the imbalance in the astrocytic glutamate and GABA release may be involved in the neuropathology and the underlying symptoms of FXS, and provides a therapeutic target for treatment.

  16. Imbalance between Glutamate and GABA in Fmr1 Knockout Astrocytes Influences Neuronal Development

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    Wang, Lu; Wang, Yan; Zhou, Shimeng; Yang, Liukun; Shi, Qixin; Li, Yujiao; Zhang, Kun; Yang, Le; Zhao, Minggao; Yang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a form of inherited mental retardation that results from the absence of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), the product of the Fmr1 gene. Numerous studies have shown that FMRP expression in astrocytes is important in the development of FXS. Although astrocytes affect neuronal dendrite development in Fmr1 knockout (KO) mice, the factors released by astrocytes are still unclear. We cultured wild type (WT) cortical neurons in astrocyte-conditioned medium (ACM) from WT or Fmr1 KO mice. Immunocytochemistry and Western blotting were performed to detect the dendritic growth of both WT and KO neurons. We determined glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The total neuronal dendritic length was reduced when cultured in the Fmr1 KO ACM. This neurotoxicity was triggered by an imbalanced release of glutamate and GABA from Fmr1 KO astrocytes. We found increased glutaminase and GABA transaminase (GABA-T) expression and decreased monoamine oxidase B expression in Fmr1 KO astrocytes. The elevated levels of glutamate contributed to oxidative stress in the cultured neurons. Vigabatrin (VGB), a GABA-T inhibitor, reversed the changes caused by glutamate and GABA release in Fmr1 KO astrocytes and the abnormal behaviors in Fmr1 KO mice. Our results indicate that the imbalance in the astrocytic glutamate and GABA release may be involved in the neuropathology and the underlying symptoms of FXS, and provides a therapeutic target for treatment. PMID:27517961

  17. Effects of clonidine and methylphenidate on motor activity in Fmr1 knockout mice.

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    Wrenn, Craige C; Heitzer, Andrew M; Roth, Alexandra K; Nawrocki, Lauren; Valdovinos, Maria G

    2015-01-12

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), a disorder caused by a mutation in the FMR1 gene, is often associated with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Common treatments for the hyperactivity often seen in ADHD involve the use of stimulants and α2-adrenergic agonists. The Fmr1 knockout (KO) mouse has been found to be a valid model for FXS both biologically and behaviorally. Of particular interest to our research, the Fmr1 KO mouse has been demonstrated to show increased locomotion in comparison to wild type (WT) littermates. In the present study, we assessed the effects of clonidine (0.05 mg/kg) and methylphenidate (5 mg/kg) on motor activity in Fmr1 KO mice and their WT littermates in the open field test. Results showed that methylphenidate increased motor activity in both genotypes. Clonidine decreased motor activity in both genotypes, but the effect was delayed in the Fmr1 KO mice.

  18. Hyperactivity and lack of social discrimination in the adolescent Fmr1 knockout mouse

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    Sørensen, Emilie M; Bertelsen, Freja; Weikop, Pia;

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate behaviour relevant to human autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and the fragile X syndrome in adolescent Fmr1 knockout (KO) mice and to evaluate the tissue levels of striatal monoamines. Fmr1 KO mice were evaluated in the open field, marble burying and three......-chamber test for the presence of hyperactivity, anxiety, repetitive behaviour, sociability and observation of social novelty compared with wild-type (WT) mice. The Fmr1 KO mice expressed anxiety and hyperactivity in the open field compared with WT mice. This increased level of hyperactivity was confirmed...... in the three-chamber test. Fmr1 KO mice spent more time with stranger mice compared with the WT. However, after a correction for hyperactivity, their apparent increase in sociability became identical to that of the WT. Furthermore, the Fmr1 KO mice could not differentiate between a familiar or a novel mouse...

  19. How the FMR1 gene became relevant to female fertility and reproductive medicine

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    Norbert eGleicher

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript describes the 6-year evolution of our center’s research into ovarian functions of the FMR1 gene, which led to the identification of a new normal CGGn range of 26-34. This new normal range, in turn, led to definitions of different alleles (haplotypes based on whether no, one or both alleles are within range. Specific alleles then were demonstrated to represent distinct ovarian aging patterns, suggesting an important FMR1 function in follicle recruitment and ovarian depletion of follicles. So called low alleles, characterized by CGGn34 alleles. Because low FMR1 alleles present in approximately 25% of all females, FMR1 testing at young ages may offer an opportunity for earlier diagnosis of OPOI than current practice allows. Earlier diagnosis of OPOI, in turn, would give young women the options of reassessing their reproductive schedules and/or pursue fertility preservation via oocyte cryopreservation when most effective.

  20. Histone Modifications Depict an Aberrantly Heterochromatinized FMR1 Gene in Fragile X Syndrome

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    Coffee, Bradford; Zhang, Fuping; Ceman, Stephanie; Warren, Stephen T.; Reines, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome is caused by an expansion of a polymorphic CGG triplet repeat that results in silencing of FMR1 expression. This expansion triggers methylation of FMR1's CpG island, hypoacetylation of associated histones, and chromatin condensation, all characteristics of a transcriptionally inactive gene. Here, we show that there is a graded spectrum of histone H4 acetylation that is proportional to CGG repeat length and that correlates with responsiveness of the gene to DNA demethylation...

  1. Germinal mosaicism for a deletion of the FMR1 gene leading to fragile X syndrome.

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    Jiraanont, P; Hagerman, R J; Neri, G; Zollino, M; Murdolo, M; Tassone, F

    2016-09-01

    Aberrant CGG trinucleotide amplification within the FMR1 gene, which spans approximately 38 Kb of genomic DNA is almost always what leads to fragile X syndrome (FXS). However, deletions of part or the entire FMR1 gene can also cause FXS. Both CGG amplification-induced silencing and deletions result in the absence of the FMR1 gene product, FMRP. Here, we report a rare case of germinal mosaicism of a deletion encompassing approximately 300 Kb of DNA, which by removing the entire FMR1 gene led to FXS. The male proband, carrying the deletion, presented in clinic with the typical features of FXS. His mother was analyzed by FISH on metaphase chromosomes with cosmid probe c22.3 spanning the FMR1 locus, and she was found not to carry the deletion on 30 analyzed cells from peripheral blood lymphocytes. Prenatal examination of the mother's third pregnancy showed that the male fetus also had the same deletion as the proband. Following this prenatal diagnosis, FISH analysis in the mother was expanded to 400 metaphases from peripheral lymphocytes, and a heterozygous FMR1 deletion was found in three. Although this result could be considered questionable from a diagnostic point of view, it indicates that the deletion is in the ovary's germinal cells.

  2. Expression of GAD of cochlea in FMR1 gene Knock-out mice%Fmr1基因敲除小鼠耳蜗GAD的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李敏雄; 杜娜; 孙卫文; 黄月玲; 沈岩松; 戴丽军; 陈盛强; 马钊恩; 张建国

    2012-01-01

    目的 对4 周龄Fmr1 基因敲除小鼠的耳蜗的GAD 表达进行观察,探讨耳蜗GAD 的表达是否受FMRP 的影响.方法 使用PCR 技术对Fmr1 基因敲除小鼠鉴定后对4 周龄的Fmr1 基因敲除小鼠和野生型小鼠各15 只进行耳蜗的苏木精-伊红(HE) 染色和GAD 免疫组织化学的表达观察,数据采用多因素方差分析处理.结果 耳蜗HE 染色结果:4 周龄组KO 鼠较WT 鼠形态学观察无差异.4 周龄KO 小鼠的耳蜗中GAD 表达的平均阳性细胞数均高于WT 小鼠,P<0.01,差异具有统计学意义.结论 GAD 表达的改变可能与FMR1 基因KO 小鼠听源性惊厥发病有关.

  3. FMR1 genotype with autoimmunity-associated polycystic ovary-like phenotype and decreased pregnancy chance.

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    Gleicher, Norbert; Weghofer, Andrea; Lee, Irene H; Barad, David H

    2010-12-16

    The FMR1 gene partially appears to control ovarian reserve, with a specific ovarian sub-genotype statistically associated with a polycystic ovary (PCO)- like phenotype. Some forms of PCO have been associated with autoimmunity. We, therefore, investigated in multiple regression analyses associations of ovary-specific FMR1 genotypes with autoimmunity and pregnancy chances (with in vitro fertilization, IVF) in 339 consecutive infertile women (455 IVF cycles), 75 with PCO-like phenotype, adjusted for age, race/ethnicity, medication dosage and number of oocytes retrieved. Patients included 183 (54.0%) with normal (norm) and 156 (46%) with heterozygous (het) FMR1 genotypes; 133 (39.2%) demonstrated laboratory evidence of autoimmunity: 51.1% of het-norm/low, 38.3% of norm and 24.2% het-norm/high genotype and sub-genotypes demonstrated autoimmunity (p=0.003). Prevalence of autoimmunity increased further in PCO-like phenotype patients with het-norm/low genotype (83.3%), remained unchanged with norm (34.0%) and decreased in het-norm/high women (10.0%; PPregnancy rates were significantly higher with norm (38.6%) than het-norm/low (22.2%, p=0.001). FMR1 sub-genotype het-norm/low is strongly associated with autoimmunity and decreased pregnancy chances in IVF, reaffirming the importance of the distal long arm of the X chromosome (FMR1 maps at Xq27.3) for autoimmunity, ovarian function and, likely, pregnancy chance with IVF.

  4. Ovarian dysfunction and FMR1 alleles in a large Italian family with POF and FRAXA disorders: case report

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    D'Urso Michele

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The association between premature ovarian failure (POF and the FMR1 repeat number (41> CGGnFMR1 alleles. Case presentation We describe the coexistence in a large Italian kindred of Fragile X syndrome and familial POF in females with ovarian dysfunctions who carried normal or expanded FMR1 alleles. Genetic analysis of the FMR1 gene in over three generations of females revealed that six carried pre-mutated alleles (61–200, of which two were also affected by POF. However a young woman, who presented a severe ovarian failure with early onset, carried normal FMR1 alleles ( Conclusion Our case study represents a helpful observation and will provide familial cases with heterogeneous etiology that could be further studied when candidate genes in addition to the FMR1 premutation will be available.

  5. Increased Persistent Sodium Current Causes Neuronal Hyperexcitability in the Entorhinal Cortex of Fmr1 Knockout Mice.

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    Deng, Pan-Yue; Klyachko, Vitaly A

    2016-09-20

    Altered neuronal excitability is one of the hallmarks of fragile X syndrome (FXS), but the mechanisms underlying this critical neuronal dysfunction are poorly understood. Here, we find that pyramidal cells in the entorhinal cortex of Fmr1 KO mice, an established FXS mouse model, display a decreased AP threshold and increased neuronal excitability. The AP threshold changes in Fmr1 KO mice are caused by increased persistent sodium current (INaP). Our results indicate that this abnormal INaP in Fmr1 KO animals is mediated by increased mGluR5-PLC-PKC (metabotropic glutamate receptor 5/phospholipase C/protein kinase C) signaling. These findings identify Na(+) channel dysregulation as a major cause of neuronal hyperexcitability in cortical FXS neurons and uncover a mechanism by which abnormal mGluR5 signaling causes neuronal hyperexcitability in a FXS mouse model.

  6. Increased Persistent Sodium Current Causes Neuronal Hyperexcitability in the Entorhinal Cortex of Fmr1 Knockout Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan-Yue Deng

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Altered neuronal excitability is one of the hallmarks of fragile X syndrome (FXS, but the mechanisms underlying this critical neuronal dysfunction are poorly understood. Here, we find that pyramidal cells in the entorhinal cortex of Fmr1 KO mice, an established FXS mouse model, display a decreased AP threshold and increased neuronal excitability. The AP threshold changes in Fmr1 KO mice are caused by increased persistent sodium current (INaP. Our results indicate that this abnormal INaP in Fmr1 KO animals is mediated by increased mGluR5-PLC-PKC (metabotropic glutamate receptor 5/phospholipase C/protein kinase C signaling. These findings identify Na+ channel dysregulation as a major cause of neuronal hyperexcitability in cortical FXS neurons and uncover a mechanism by which abnormal mGluR5 signaling causes neuronal hyperexcitability in a FXS mouse model.

  7. Epigenetic Characterization of the FMR1 Promoter in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Human Fibroblasts Carrying an Unmethylated Full Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Esch, Celine E.F.; Ghazvini, Mehrnaz; Loos, Friedemann; Schelling-Kazaryan, Nune; Widagdo, W.; Munshi, Shashini T.; van der Wal, Erik; Douben, Hannie; Gunhanlar, Nilhan; Kushner, Steven A.; Pijnappel, W.W.M. Pim; de Vrij, Femke M.S.; Geijsen, Niels; Gribnau, Joost; Willemsen, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Summary Silencing of the FMR1 gene leads to fragile X syndrome, the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability. To study the epigenetic modifications of the FMR1 gene during silencing in time, we used fibroblasts and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) of an unmethylated full mutation (uFM) individual with normal intelligence. The uFM fibroblast line carried an unmethylated FMR1 promoter region and expressed normal to slightly increased FMR1 mRNA levels. The FMR1 expression in the uFM line corresponds with the increased H3 acetylation and H3K4 methylation in combination with a reduced H3K9 methylation. After reprogramming, the FMR1 promoter region was methylated in all uFM iPSC clones. Two clones were analyzed further and showed a lack of FMR1 expression, whereas the presence of specific histone modifications also indicated a repressed FMR1 promoter. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that the standard reprogramming procedure leads to epigenetic silencing of the fully mutated FMR1 gene. PMID:25358783

  8. Epigenetic Characterization of the FMR1 Promoter in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Human Fibroblasts Carrying an Unmethylated Full Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celine E.F. de Esch

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Silencing of the FMR1 gene leads to fragile X syndrome, the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability. To study the epigenetic modifications of the FMR1 gene during silencing in time, we used fibroblasts and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs of an unmethylated full mutation (uFM individual with normal intelligence. The uFM fibroblast line carried an unmethylated FMR1 promoter region and expressed normal to slightly increased FMR1 mRNA levels. The FMR1 expression in the uFM line corresponds with the increased H3 acetylation and H3K4 methylation in combination with a reduced H3K9 methylation. After reprogramming, the FMR1 promoter region was methylated in all uFM iPSC clones. Two clones were analyzed further and showed a lack of FMR1 expression, whereas the presence of specific histone modifications also indicated a repressed FMR1 promoter. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that the standard reprogramming procedure leads to epigenetic silencing of the fully mutated FMR1 gene.

  9. FMR1 alleles in Tasmania: a screening study of the special educational needs population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, R J; Holden, J J A; Zhang, C; Curlis, Y; Slater, H R; Burgess, T; Kirkby, K C; Carmichael, A; Heading, K D; Loesch, D Z

    2005-01-01

    The distribution of fragile X mental retardation-1 (FMR1) allele categories, classified by the number of CGG repeats, in the population of Tasmania was investigated in 1253 males with special educational needs (SEN). The frequencies of these FMR1 categories were compared with those seen in controls as represented by 578 consecutive male births. The initial screening was based on polymerase chain reaction analysis of dried blood spots. Inconclusive results were verified by Southern analysis of a venous blood sample. The frequencies of common FMR1 alleles in both samples, and of grey zone alleles in the controls, were similar to those in other Caucasian populations. Consistent with earlier reports, we found some (although insignificant) increase of grey zone alleles in SEN subjects compared with controls. The frequencies of predisposing flanking haplotypes among grey zone males FMR1 alleles were similar to those seen in other Caucasian SEN samples. Contrary to expectation, given the normal frequency of grey zone alleles, no premutation (PM) or full mutation (FM) allele was detected in either sample, with only 15 fragile X families diagnosed through routine clinical admissions registered in Tasmania up to 2002. An explanation of this discrepancy could be that the C19th founders of Tasmania carried few PM or FM alleles. The eight to ten generations since white settlement of Tasmania has been insufficient time for susceptible grey zone alleles to evolve into the larger expansions.

  10. Microdeletions Including FMR1 in Three Female Patients with Intellectual Disability – Further Delineation of the Phenotype and Expression Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, A.M.; Wohlleber, E.; Engels, H.; Rødningen, O.K.; Ravn, K.; Heilmann, S.; Rehnitz, J.; Katzorke, N.; Kraus, C.; Blichfeldt, S.; Hoffmann, P.; Reutter, H.; Brockschmidt, F.F.; Kreiß-Nachtsheim, M.; Vogt, P.H.; Prescott, T.E.; Tümer, Z.; Lee, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is one of the most common causes of intellectual disability/developmental delay (ID/DD), especially in males. It is caused most often by CGG trinucleotide repeat expansions, and less frequently by point mutations and partial or full deletions of the FMR1 gene. The wide clinical spectrum of affected females partly depends on their X-inactivation status. Only few female ID/DD patients with microdeletions including FMR1 have been reported. We describe 3 female patients with 3.5-, 4.2- and 9.2-Mb de novo microdeletions in Xq27.3-q28 containing FMR1. X-inactivation was random in all patients, yet they presented with ID/DD as well as speech delay, macrocephaly and other features attributable to FXS. No signs of autism were present. Here, we further delineate the clinical spectrum of female patients with microdeletions. FMR1 expression studies gave no evidence for an absolute threshold below which signs of FXS present. Since FMR1 expression is known to be highly variable between unrelated females, and since FMR1 mRNA levels have been suggested to be more similar among family members, we further explored the possibility of an intrafamilial effect. Interestingly, FMR1 mRNA levels in all 3 patients were significantly lower than in their respective mothers, which was shown to be specific for patients with microdeletions containing FMR1. PMID:24715853

  11. FMR1 genotype with autoimmunity-associated polycystic ovary-like phenotype and decreased pregnancy chance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert Gleicher

    Full Text Available The FMR1 gene partially appears to control ovarian reserve, with a specific ovarian sub-genotype statistically associated with a polycystic ovary (PCO- like phenotype. Some forms of PCO have been associated with autoimmunity. We, therefore, investigated in multiple regression analyses associations of ovary-specific FMR1 genotypes with autoimmunity and pregnancy chances (with in vitro fertilization, IVF in 339 consecutive infertile women (455 IVF cycles, 75 with PCO-like phenotype, adjusted for age, race/ethnicity, medication dosage and number of oocytes retrieved. Patients included 183 (54.0% with normal (norm and 156 (46% with heterozygous (het FMR1 genotypes; 133 (39.2% demonstrated laboratory evidence of autoimmunity: 51.1% of het-norm/low, 38.3% of norm and 24.2% het-norm/high genotype and sub-genotypes demonstrated autoimmunity (p=0.003. Prevalence of autoimmunity increased further in PCO-like phenotype patients with het-norm/low genotype (83.3%, remained unchanged with norm (34.0% and decreased in het-norm/high women (10.0%; P<0.0001. Pregnancy rates were significantly higher with norm (38.6% than het-norm/low (22.2%, p=0.001. FMR1 sub-genotype het-norm/low is strongly associated with autoimmunity and decreased pregnancy chances in IVF, reaffirming the importance of the distal long arm of the X chromosome (FMR1 maps at Xq27.3 for autoimmunity, ovarian function and, likely, pregnancy chance with IVF.

  12. Identifying intrinsic and extrinsic determinants that regulate internal initiation of translation mediated by the FMR1 5' leader

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timmerman Stephanie

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulating synthesis of the Fragile X gene (FMR1 product, FMRP alters neural plasticity potentially through its role in the microRNA pathway. Cap-dependent translation of the FMR1 mRNA, a process requiring ribosomal scanning through the 5' leader, is likely impeded by the extensive secondary structure generated by the high guanosine/cytosine nucleotide content including the CGG triplet nucleotide repeats in the 5' leader. An alternative mechanism to initiate translation – internal initiation often utilizes secondary structure to recruit the translational machinery. Consequently, studies were undertaken to confirm and extend a previous observation that the FMR1 5' leader contains an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES. Results Cellular transfection of a dicistronic DNA construct containing the FMR1 5' leader inserted into the intercistronic region yielded significant translation of the second cistron, but the FMR1 5' leader was also found to contain a cryptic promoter possibly confounding interpretation of these results. However, transfection of dicistronic and monocistronic RNA ex vivo or in vitro confirmed that the FMR1 5' leader contains an IRES. Moreover, inhibiting cap-dependent translation ex vivo did not affect the expression level of endogenous FMRP indicating a role for IRES-dependent translation of FMR1 mRNA. Analysis of the FMR1 5' leader revealed that the CGG repeats and the 5' end of the leader were vital for internal initiation. Functionally, exposure to potassium chloride or intracellular acidification and addition of polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid as mimics of neural activity and double stranded RNA, respectively, differentially affected FMR1 IRES activity. Conclusion Our results indicate that multiple stimuli influence IRES-dependent translation of the FMR1 mRNA and suggest a functional role for the CGG nucleotide repeats.

  13. FIRING PROPERTY OF INFERIOR COLLICULUS NEURONS AFFECTED BY FMR1 GENE MUTATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Brittany Mott; SUN Wei

    2014-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome is the most common form of inherited mental retardation affecting up to 1 in 4000 individuals. The syn-drome is induced by a mutation in the FMR1 gene, causing a deficiency in its gene by-product FMRP. Impairment in the nor-mal functioning of FMRP leads to learning and memory deficits and heightened sensitivity to sensory stimuli, including sound (hyperacusis). The molecular basis of fragile X syndrome is thoroughly understood;however, the neural mechanisms underly-ing hyperacusis have not yet been determined. As the inferior colliculus (IC) is the principal midbrain nucleus of the auditory pathway, the current study addresses the questions underlying the neural mechanism of hyperacusis within the IC of fragile X mice. Acute experiments were performed in which electrophysiological recordings of the IC in FMR1-KO and WT mice were measured. Results showed that Q-values for WT were significantly larger than that of FMR-1 KO mice, indicating that WT mice exhibit sharper tuning curves than FMR1-KO mice. We also found the ratio of the monotonic neurons in the KO mice was much higher than the WT mice. These results suggest that lack of FMRP in the auditory system affects the developmental maturation and function of structures within the auditory pathway, and in this case specifically the IC. The dysfunction ob-served within the auditory neural pathway and in particular the IC may be related to the increased susceptibility to sound as seen in individuals with fragile X syndrome. Our study may help on understanding the mechanisms of the fragile X syndrome and hyperacusis.

  14. Genetic variation of the FMR1 gene among four Mexican populations: Mestizo, Huichol, Purepecha, and Tarahumara.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros-Núñez, Patricio; Rosales-Reynoso, Mónica Alejandra; Sandoval, Lucila; Romero-Espinoza, Pavel; Troyo-Sanromán, Rogelio; Ibarra, Bertha

    2008-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome is the most common cause of inherited mental retardation; it is caused by expansion of CGG repeats in the first exon of the FMR1 gene. The number of CGG repeats varies between 6 and 50 triplets in normal individuals; the most common alleles have 29 or 30 repeats. Allelic patterns in the global populations are similar; however; some reports show statistical differences among several populations. In Mexico, except by a single report on a western Mestizo population, the allelic frequencies of the FMR1 gene are unknown. In this study, we analyze 207, 140, 138, and 40 chromosomes from Mestizos, Tarahumaras, Huichols, and Purepechas respectively. After PCR amplification on DNA modified by sodium bisulfite treatment, molecular analysis of the FMR1 gene showed 30 different alleles among the 525 chromosomes evaluated. Trinucleotide repeat number in the different Mexican populations varied from 15 to 87, with modal numbers of 32 and 30 in Mestizos and Tarahumaras, 29 and 32 in Purepechas and 30 among Huichols. Together, these allelic patterns differ significantly from those reported for Caucasian, Chinese, African, Indonesian, Brazilian, and Chilean populations. The increased number of the unusual allele of 32 repeats observed in the Mexican mestizo population can be explained from its frequency in at least two Mexican native populations.

  15. Molecular-clinical correlations in males with an expanded FMR1 mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merenstein, S.A.; Sobesky, W.E.; Tran, H.X. [Children`s Hospital, Denver, CO (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-09

    Fragile X syndrome is caused by an expansion of a CGG repeat in the FMR1 gene. The CGG repeat number of the FMR1 mutation and the percentage of cells with methylation of the gene were studied in 218 male patients. Physical and cognitive measurements were also performed. Patients were divided into three groups; those with full mutation and complete methylation (n = 160), those with full mutation and partial methylation (n = 12), and those with a mosaic pattern (n = 46). Statistical comparisons were made between males with the fully methylated full mutation and those with a mosaic pattern. Males having full mutation with complete methylation had the lowest IQ scores and greatest physical involvement. These significant differences were seen only in ages after puberty. CGG repeat length did not correlate with IQ or the physical index score in any group. These findings suggest that a partial production of FMR1 protein may predict milder clinical involvement in some males with fragile X syndrome. 39 refs., 4 tabs.

  16. Behavioral effects of chronic stress in the Fmr1 mouse model for fragile X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire-Mayo, Valerie; Subashi, Enejda; Henkous, Nadia; Beracochea, Daniel; Pietropaolo, Susanna

    2017-03-01

    Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is a pervasive developmental disorder due to a mutation in the FMR1 X-linked gene. Despite its clear genetic cause, the expression of FXS symptoms is known to be modulated by environmental factors, including stress. Furthermore, several studies have shown disturbances in stress regulatory systems in FXS patients and Fmr1 mice. These studies have mostly focused on the hormonal responses to stress, using the acute exposure to a single type of stressor. Hence, little is known about the behavioral effects of stress in FXS, and the importance of the nature of the stressing procedure, especially in the context of a repeated exposure that more closely resembles real life conditions. Here we evaluated the effects of chronic exposure to different types of stress (i.e., either repeated restraint or unpredictable stress) on the behavioral phenotype of adult Fmr1 mice. Our results demonstrated that chronic stress induced deficits in social interaction and working memory only in WT mice and the impact of stress depended on the type of stressors and the specific behavior tested. Our data suggest that the behavioral sensitivity to stress is dramatically reduced in FXS, opening new views on the impact of gene-environment interactions in this pathology.

  17. Refining transcriptional programs in kidney development by integration of deep RNA-sequencing and array-based spatial profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rumballe Bree A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The developing mouse kidney is currently the best-characterized model of organogenesis at a transcriptional level. Detailed spatial maps have been generated for gene expression profiling combined with systematic in situ screening. These studies, however, fall short of capturing the transcriptional complexity arising from each locus due to the limited scope of microarray-based technology, which is largely based on "gene-centric" models. Results To address this, the polyadenylated RNA and microRNA transcriptomes of the 15.5 dpc mouse kidney were profiled using strand-specific RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq to a depth sufficient to complement spatial maps from pre-existing microarray datasets. The transcriptional complexity of RNAs arising from mouse RefSeq loci was catalogued; including 3568 alternatively spliced transcripts and 532 uncharacterized alternate 3' UTRs. Antisense expressions for 60% of RefSeq genes was also detected including uncharacterized non-coding transcripts overlapping kidney progenitor markers, Six2 and Sall1, and were validated by section in situ hybridization. Analysis of genes known to be involved in kidney development, particularly during mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition, showed an enrichment of non-coding antisense transcripts extended along protein-coding RNAs. Conclusion The resulting resource further refines the transcriptomic cartography of kidney organogenesis by integrating deep RNA sequencing data with locus-based information from previously published expression atlases. The added resolution of RNA-Seq has provided the basis for a transition from classical gene-centric models of kidney development towards more accurate and detailed "transcript-centric" representations, which highlights the extent of transcriptional complexity of genes that direct complex development events.

  18. MicroRNA-130b targets Fmr1 and regulates embryonic neural progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Xi [State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, College of Life Sciences and Food Engineering, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330047 (China); Zhang, Kunshan [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Stem Cell Center, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200092 (China); Wang, Yanlu; Wang, Junbang; Cui, Yaru [State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, College of Life Sciences and Food Engineering, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330047 (China); Li, Siguang, E-mail: siguangli@163.com [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Stem Cell Center, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200092 (China); Luo, Yuping, E-mail: luoyuping@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, College of Life Sciences and Food Engineering, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330047 (China)

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •We found that the 3′ UTR of the Fmr1 mRNA is a target of miR-130b. •MiR-130b suppresses the expression of Fmr1 in mouse embryonic stem cell. •MiR-130b alters the proliferation of mouse embryonic stem cell. •MiR-130b alters fate specification of mouse embryonic stem cell. -- Abstract: Fragile X syndrome, one of the most common forms of inherited mental retardation, is caused by expansion of the CGG repeat in the 5′-untranslated region of the X-linked Fmr1 gene, which results in transcriptional silencing and loss of expression of its encoded protein FMRP. The loss of FMRP increases proliferation and alters fate specification in adult neural progenitor cells (aNPCs). However, little is known about Fmr1 mRNA regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. In the present study, we report that miR-130b regulated Fmr1 expression by directly targeting its 3′-untranslated region (3′ UTR). Up-regulation of miR-130b in mouse embryonic neural progenitor cells (eNPCs) decreased Fmr1 expression, markedly increased eNPC proliferation and altered the differentiation tendency of eNPCs, suggesting that antagonizing miR-130b may be a new therapeutic entry point for treating Fragile X syndrome.

  19. From array-based hybridization of Helicobacter pylori isolates to the complete genome sequence of an isolate associated with MALT lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mégraud Francis

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background elicobacter pylori infection is associated with several gastro-duodenal inflammatory diseases of various levels of severity. To determine whether certain combinations of genetic markers can be used to predict the clinical source of the infection, we analyzed well documented and geographically homogenous clinical isolates using a comparative genomics approach. Results A set of 254 H. pylori genes was used to perform array-based comparative genomic hybridization among 120 French H. pylori strains associated with chronic gastritis (n = 33, duodenal ulcers (n = 27, intestinal metaplasia (n = 17 or gastric extra-nodal marginal zone B-cell MALT lymphoma (n = 43. Hierarchical cluster analyses of the DNA hybridization values allowed us to identify a homogeneous subpopulation of strains that clustered exclusively with cagPAI minus MALT lymphoma isolates. The genome sequence of B38, a representative of this MALT lymphoma strain-cluster, was completed, fully annotated, and compared with the six previously released H. pylori genomes (i.e. J99, 26695, HPAG1, P12, G27 and Shi470. B38 has the smallest H. pylori genome described thus far (1,576,758 base pairs containing 1,528 CDSs; it contains the vacAs2m2 allele and lacks the genes encoding the major virulence factors (absence of cagPAI, babB, babC, sabB, and homB. Comparative genomics led to the identification of very few sequences that are unique to the B38 strain (9 intact CDSs and 7 pseudogenes. Pair-wise genomic synteny comparisons between B38 and the 6 H. pylori sequenced genomes revealed an almost complete co-linearity, never seen before between the genomes of strain Shi470 (a Peruvian isolate and B38. Conclusion These isolates are deprived of the main H. pylori virulence factors characterized previously, but are nonetheless associated with gastric neoplasia.

  20. Implicancias del gen FMR1 en la función ovárica

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    El gen FMR1, responsable del Síndrome de Fragilidad del X (SFX), se localiza en el sitio FRAXA en el brazo largo del cromosoma X (Xq27.3), está compuesto por 17 exones, abarca aproximadamente 38 kilobases (kb) y su producto transcripcional es un ARN mensajero de 3,9 kb que puede sufrir splicing alternativo. En su región 5’ no codificante presenta una zona de tripletes CGG que puede variar en longitud. Según el tamaño de la expansión, los alelos se clasifican en normales (5- 44 repeticiones), ...

  1. Translation of the FMR1 mRNA is not influenced by AGG interruptions

    OpenAIRE

    Ludwig, Anna L.; Raske, Christopher; Tassone, Flora; Garcia-Arocena, Dolores; Hershey, John W.; Hagerman, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    The fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene contains a CGG-repeat element within its 5′ untranslated region (5′UTR) which, for alleles with more than ∼40 repeats, increasingly affects both transcription (up-regulation) and translation (inhibition) of the repeat-containing RNA with increasing CGG-repeat length. Translational inhibition is thought to be due to impaired ribosomal scanning through the CGG-repeat region, which is postulated to form highly stable secondary/tertiary structure. On...

  2. Fmr1基因敲除小鼠耳蜗的GABAα1受体的表达%Expression of GABAα1 receptor of cochlea in FMR1 gene knock-out mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李敏雄; 杜娜; 孙卫文; 黄月玲; 沈岩松; 戴丽军; 陈盛强; 马钊恩; 张建国

    2012-01-01

    Objective To observe cochlea morphology and expression of GABA a 1 receptor of cochlea in 4 weeks FMR1 KO mice and WT mice. Methods Four-week old Fmrl knockout mice were identified using the PCR technique.and immunohistochemistry to compare with the changes of expression of GABA a 1 receptor between FMR1 KO mice and WT mice cochlea. Results There were no difference in cochlea morphology between FMR1 KO mice and WT mice by HE dyeing. The expression of GABA a 1 receptor in cochlear in FMR-1K0 mice was decreased. Conclusion The expression of GABA a 1 receptor is incerased in cochlear in four-week old FMR-1K0 mice that might be associated with audiogenic seizure susceptibility of Fmrl knockout mice.%目的 对4周龄Fmr1基因敲除小鼠耳蜗的GABAα1受体表达进行观察,探讨耳蜗GABAα1受体的表达是否受FMRP的影响.方法 使用PCR技术对Fmr1基因敲除小鼠鉴定后,对4周龄的Fmr1基因敲除小鼠和野生型小鼠进行耳蜗的GABAα1受体免疫组织化学的表达观察,数据采用多因素方差分析处理.结果 耳蜗HE染色结果:4周龄组KO鼠较WT鼠形态学观察无差异.4周龄KO小鼠的耳蜗中GABAα1受体表达的平均阳性细胞数均低于WT小鼠,P<0.01,差异具有统计学意义.结论 GABAα1受体表达的降低可能与FMR1基因KO小鼠听源性惊厥发病有关.

  3. 华南地区不明原因智力低下患者FMR1和FMR2基因突变分析%Analysis of fragilex mental retardation 1 and fragilex mental retardation 2 gene mutations in intellectually disabled population of unknown causes in Southern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段现来; 刘超; 李啬夫; 石奕武; 易咏红; 廖卫平

    2015-01-01

    Objective To screen the fragilex mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene mutations and explore the frequency of FMR1 gene mutation in the population with mental retardation in South China.Methods Seventy-two patients (65 males and 7 females) with suspected fragile X syndrome (FXS) in South China were enrolled in our hospitals from October 2009 to April 2014.The CGG trinucleotide repeats in 5'UTR of FMR1 gene and CCG trinucleotide repeats in FMR2 gene were screened respectively by PCR.Southern blotting and capillary electrophoresis sequencing were performed in male patients without normal target bands and suspected female patients;patients with normal CGG alleles were,then,performed exons and 3'-UTR ofFMR1 gene amplification and sequencing.The frequency of FMR1 gene mutation in patients with mental retardation in different countries and regions was compared with statistical analysis.Results Six pedigrees with full mutation (one female and five males being the probands),one pedigree (mother and son) with FMR1 gene deletion and one pedigree (mother and son) with mutation in the transition region were identified in 72 patients with mental retardation.The prevalence of total mutation was 9.7% (7/72) and that in male patients was 9.2% (6/65).These results showed significant differences in prevalence as compared with the results from different countries and areas (P<0.05);there were no variations in 3'UTR ofFMR1 gene and FMR2 gene mutation in the patients with FXS-like phenotype.Conclusions FMR1 mutation frequency may be higher in mental retardation population in southem China as compared with that in developed countries or areas.Targeted screening on the unexplained mental retardation pedigrees (family history) can improve the diagnosis of FXS.Importantly,deletion mutations screening should also be performed in suspected FXS subjects with normal CGG repeats.%目的 探讨华南地区不明原因智力低下患者中脆性X智力低下基因FMR1和FMR2

  4. Molecular Correlates and Recent Advancements in the Diagnosis and Screening of FMR1-Related Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indhu-Shree Rajan-Babu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome (FXS is the most common monogenic cause of intellectual disability and autism. Molecular diagnostic testing of FXS and related disorders (fragile X-associated primary ovarian insufficiency (FXPOI and fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS relies on a combination of polymerase chain reaction (PCR and Southern blot (SB for the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1 CGG-repeat expansion and methylation analyses. Recent advancements in PCR-based technologies have enabled the characterization of the complete spectrum of CGG-repeat mutation, with or without methylation assessment, and, as a result, have reduced our reliance on the labor- and time-intensive SB, which is the gold standard FXS diagnostic test. The newer and more robust triplet-primed PCR or TP-PCR assays allow the mapping of AGG interruptions and enable the predictive analysis of the risks of unstable CGG expansion during mother-to-child transmission. In this review, we have summarized the correlation between several molecular elements, including CGG-repeat size, methylation, mosaicism and skewed X-chromosome inactivation, and the extent of clinical involvement in patients with FMR1-related disorders, and reviewed key developments in PCR-based methodologies for the molecular diagnosis of FXS, FXTAS and FXPOI, and large-scale (CGGn expansion screening in newborns, women of reproductive age and high-risk populations.

  5. Distribution of FMR-1 and associated microsatellite alleles in a normal Chinese population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, N.; Houck, G.E. Jr.; Li, S.; Dobkin, C.; Brown, W.T. [New York State Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities, Staten Island, NY (United States); Xixian Liu; Shen Gou [Tongji Medical Univ., Wuhan (China)

    1994-07-15

    The CGG repeat size distribution of the fragile X mental retardation gene (FMR-1) was studied in a population of normal Chinese X chromosomes along with that of two proximal microsatellite polymorphic markers: FRAXAC1 and DXS548. The most common CGG repeat allele was 29 (47.2%) with 30 being second most common (26%). This distribution was different from that seen in Caucasian controls, where the most common allele was 30 repeats. Other differences with Caucasian controls included a secondary model peak at 36 repeats and the absence of peaks at 20 or 23 repeats. There were only two FRAXAC1 and five DXS548 alleles found in the Chinese sample. A striking linkage disequilibrium of FMR-1 alleles with FRAXAC1 alleles was observed, in that 90% of the 29 CGG repeat alleles but only 41% of the 30 CGG repeat alleles had the FRAXAC1 152 bp allele (18 AC repeats). This disequilibrium suggests that slippage between the closely spaced normal CGG repeat alleles, 29 and 30, and between 152 and 154 FRAXAC1 alleles is very rare. This study lays the groundwork for an understanding of founder chromosome effects in comparing Asian and Caucasian populations. 29 refs., 5 tabs.

  6. Expression of fragile X mental retardation protein and Fmr1 mRNA during folliculogenesis in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferder, Ianina; Parborell, Fernanda; Sundblad, Victoria; Chiauzzi, Violeta; Gómez, Karina; Charreau, Eduardo H; Tesone, Marta; Dain, Liliana

    2013-04-01

    Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) belongs to a small family of RNA-binding proteins. Its absence or inactivity is responsible for fragile X syndrome, the most common cause of inherited mental retardation. Despite its ubiquitous expression, FMRP function and expression remain almost understudied in non-neuronal tissues, though previous studies on germline development during oogenesis may suggest a special function of this protein also in ovarian tissue. In addition, the well-documented association of FMR1 premutation state with fragile X-related premature ovarian insufficiency adds interest to the role of FMRP in ovarian physiology. The aim of the present work was to investigate the expression of Fmr1 mRNA and its protein, FMRP, at different stages of rat follicular development. By immunohistochemical studies we demonstrated FMRP expression in granulosa, theca and germ cells in all stages of follicular development. In addition, changes in Fmr1 expression, both at the protein and mRNA levels, were observed. FMRP levels increased upon follicular development while preantral and early antral follicles presented similar levels of Fmr1 transcripts with decreased expression in preovulatory follicles. These observations suggest that Fmr1 expression in the ovary is regulated at different and perhaps independent levels. In addition, our results show expression of at least four different isoforms of FMRP during all stages of follicular growth with expression patterns that differ from those observed in brain and testis. Our study shows a regulated expression of Fmr1, both at mRNA and protein levels, during rat follicular development.

  7. Observation of tail suspension test in Fmr1 gene knockout mice%Fmr1基因敲除小鼠悬尾实验的观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡丽婵; 黄海樱; 郭艺; 孙祺章; 余国汉; 黄月玲; 戴丽军; 党亚梅; 黄雄; 陈盛强

    2016-01-01

    Objective To observe tail suspension test in Fmr1 gene knockout mice and to explore whether there are differences in mobility of KO and WT mice. Methods 1 80 test mice were divided into two groups:① KO group (4,6,8 weeks old,each age group of mice is 30,male and female in half,a total of 90)② WT group (4,6,8 weeks old,each group of mice is 30,male and female on half,a total of 90).Through forced swimming test and tail suspension test to observe gender, age effect on immobility time. Results With the same age of the same sex,the KO mice’s immobility time was longer than WT mice’s.P <0.05.With the same age,the male mice’s immobility time was shorter than female mice’s.With the age in-crease,the immobility time of KO mice was longer than WT mice.P <0.05. Conclusion Fmr1 gene knockout mice have anxiety and depressive behavior.%目的:对不同周龄的 KO 小鼠与 WT 小鼠进行悬尾实验进行观察,探讨 KO 小鼠与 WT 小鼠的行为差别。方法采用健康的试验动物180只分两组:①KO 组(4、6、8周龄,各周龄30只,雌雄各半,共90只)②WT 组(4、6、8周龄,各周龄30只,雌雄各半,共90只);通过悬尾实验观察性别,年龄对不动时间的影响。结果同龄 KO 雌性小鼠比雄性小鼠的静止时间差别不大;随着年龄增大,静止时间增长。同龄同性别的 KO 鼠比 WT 鼠的不动时间长。P <0.05;同龄雄性小鼠比雌性小鼠的不动时间短;随年龄增长各种系小鼠不动时间增长,KO 鼠的不动时间比 WT 鼠长,P <0.05。结论 KO 小鼠存在抑郁行为表型。

  8. Methylation analysis of CpG island DNA of FMR1 gene in the fragile X syndrome%脆性X综合征FMR1基因CpG岛的甲基化程度分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴鼎文; 竺智伟; 赵正言; 曲一平; 杨建滨

    2013-01-01

    目的 建立用甲基化敏感性限制性内切酶定量聚合酶链反应(methylation-sensitiverestriction enzymes-based quantitative PCR,MSRE-qPCR)分析FMR1基因CpG岛甲基化程度的方法,并探讨其对脆性X综合征的诊断价值.方法 以常规PCR初筛存在FMR1基因5′(CGG)n异常扩增的30例智力低下男童和20名母亲作为研究对象,用Eag Ⅰ酶消化DNA样品,针对FMR1基因CpG岛设计引物,定量PCR扩增Eag Ⅰ酶切前、后DNA,用2-△△Ct法计算CpG岛甲基化程度;以Southern印迹杂交确诊的3例患儿和正常体检男、女各30例DNA样品为质控样本,从而建立优化的MSRE-qPCR方法.结果 确立了正常甲基化、部分异常甲基化、全甲基化的区间值,并明确30例常规PCR初筛异常患儿中3例存在部分甲基化,27例为全甲基化,其中3例经Southern印迹杂交验证;13例母亲处于正常甲基化,7例存在异常甲基化.结论 MSRE-qPCR可以对FMR1基因CpG岛的甲基化程度进行快速可靠分析,为脆性X综合征的分子诊断提供新的策略.%Objective To establish a method of methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes-based quantitative PCR (MSRE-qPCR) for analysis of CpG island DNA of FMR1 gene,and to assess its value for molecular diagnosis of fragile X syndrome.Methods Thirty boys with mental retardation and abnormal repeats of 5' (CGG)n in the FMR1 gene and 20 mothers were analyzed by conventional PCR screening.Eag Ⅰ was used to digest genomic DNA,and qPCR was performed to amplify CpG island in the FMR1 gene using both undigested and digested templates.Raw Ct values were obtained through quantitative PCR amplification.The degree of CpG island methylation was calculated by 2-△△Ct.The result of MSRE-qPCR was verified by Southern blotting.30 healthy females and 30 healthy males were used as controls to optimize the established MSRE-qPCR method.Results The ranges of 2-△△Ct value for normal methylation,partial methylation and full methylation were

  9. FMR1基因敲除对雄性小鼠生殖功能的影响%The influence of FMR1 gene knockout on the reproduction of male mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祝亚桥; 周兴; 陈盛强

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the influence of fragile x mental retardation-1 (FMR1) gene on the spermatogenesis and reproduction of male mice. Methods FMR1 knockout (KO) male mice and wild type (WT) male mice were mated with wt female mice. The number of litters, pregnancy rate and male mice having offsprings were counted. Serum T, FSH and LH concentrations were also measured. The density, mortality and morphology of the left cauda epididymis sperms were analyzed, HE staining was performed on the right side. Results The pregnance rate of wt female mice mated with FMR1K0 males was significantly lower than the control group (41.7% vs. 87. 5% , P 0.05). Male fertility showed that 41.7% of KO mice had pups, whereas 91.7% of the mice had pups in the control group (P 0.05).两组小鼠血清T,FSH,LH浓度无统计学差异.KO组的睾丸附睾病理切片与WT组比较未见明显异常,其精子活率及各种畸形率与WT小鼠比较均没有统计学差异(P>0.05).结论:可以推测FMR1基因对雄性生殖系统发育有一定的影响,Fmr1基因的缺失降低了雄性小鼠生育率,但对精子生成、畸形率等未见明显影响,其对雄性生殖系统影响机制还有待进一步的实验研究.

  10. Fmr1 knockout mice show reduced anxiety and alterations in neurogenesis that are specific to the ventral dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eadie, B D; Zhang, W N; Boehme, F; Gil-Mohapel, J; Kainer, L; Simpson, J M; Christie, B R

    2009-11-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by the selective loss of the expression of the Fmr1 gene. Key symptoms in FXS include intellectual impairment and abnormal anxiety-related behaviors. Fmr1 knockout (KO) mice exhibited reduced anxiety on two behavioral tests as well as a blunted corticosterone response to acute stress. Spatial learning and memory was not impaired when tested with both the classic Morris water and Plus-shaped mazes. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis has been associated with spatial learning and memory and emotions such as anxiety and depression. The process of neurogenesis appears abnormal in young adult Fmr1 KO mice, with significantly fewer bromodeoxyuridine-positive cells surviving for at least 4 weeks in the ventral subregion of the dentate gyrus (DG), a hippocampal subregion more closely associated with emotion than the dorsal DG. Within this smaller pool of surviving cells, we observed a concomitant increase in the proportion of surviving cells that acquire a neuronal phenotype. We did not observe a clear difference in cell proliferation using both endogenous and exogenous markers. This work indicates that loss of Fmr1 expression can alter anxiety-related behaviors in mice as well as produce region-specific alterations in hippocampal adult neurogenesis.

  11. The DNA replication program is altered at the FMR1 locus in fragile X embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Jeannine; Tomishima, Mark J; Zaninovic, Nikica; Colak, Dilek; Yan, Zi; Zhan, Qiansheng; Rosenwaks, Zev; Jaffrey, Samie R; Schildkraut, Carl L

    2014-01-09

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is caused by a CGG repeat expansion in the FMR1 gene that appears to occur during oogenesis and during early embryogenesis. One model proposes that repeat instability depends on the replication fork direction through the repeats such that (CNG)n hairpin-like structures form, causing DNA polymerase to stall and slip. Examining DNA replication fork progression on single DNA molecules at the endogenous FMR1 locus revealed that replication forks stall at CGG repeats in human cells. Furthermore, replication profiles of FXS human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) compared to nonaffected hESCs showed that fork direction through the repeats is altered at the FMR1 locus in FXS hESCs, such that predominantly the CCG strand serves as the lagging-strand template. This is due to the absence of replication initiation that would typically occur upstream of FMR1, suggesting that altered replication origin usage combined with fork stalling promotes repeat instability during early embryonic development.

  12. Molecular-intelligence correlations in young fragile X males with a mild CGG repeat expansion in the FMR1 gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steyaert, J. [Central of Clinical Genetics, Maastricht (Netherlands); Borghgraef, M.; Legius, E. [University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium)] [and others

    1996-08-09

    Several mechanisms can explain the occurrence of full-mutation fragile X males with an IQ level above -2 SD below mean, also called {open_quotes}high-functioning fragile X males.{close_quotes} Incomplete methylation of the CpG island at the 5{prime} end of the FMR1 gene is one of these mechanisms. The present study describes the physical and behavior phenotypes in 7 fragile X boys with CGG repeat insertions in the FMR1 gene between 600-2,400 base pairs. The degree of methylation at the FMR1-associated CpG island ranges in peripheral blood lymphocytes from 0-95%. Subjects with a low degree of methylation at this site have mild or absent physical characteristics of the fragile X syndrome, while subjects with a high degree of methylation at this site have more severe physical characteristics. In this range of CGG repeat insertion (600-2,400 base pairs), the degree of methylation at the FMR1-associated CpG island is a good predictor of intelligence, while CGG repeat insertion length is not. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  13. Quantitative phosphoproteomics of murine Fmr1-KO cell lines provides new insights into FMRP-dependent signal transduction mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matic, Katarina; Eninger, Timo; Bardoni, Barbara; Davidovic, Laetitia; Macek, Boris

    2014-10-03

    Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is an RNA-binding protein that has a major effect on neuronal protein synthesis. Transcriptional silencing of the FMR1 gene leads to loss of FMRP and development of Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common known hereditary cause of intellectual impairment and autism. Here we utilize SILAC-based quantitative phosphoproteomics to analyze murine FMR1(-) and FMR1(+) fibroblastic cell lines derived from FMR1-KO embryos to identify proteins and phosphorylation sites dysregulated as a consequence of FMRP loss. We quantify FMRP-related changes in the levels of 5,023 proteins and 6,133 phosphorylation events and map them onto major signal transduction pathways. Our study confirms global downregulation of the MAPK/ERK pathway and decrease in phosphorylation level of ERK1/2 in the absence of FMRP, which is connected to attenuation of long-term potentiation. We detect differential expression of several key proteins from the p53 pathway, pointing to the involvement of p53 signaling in dysregulated cell cycle control in FXS. Finally, we detect differential expression and phosphorylation of proteins involved in pre-mRNA processing and nuclear transport, as well as Wnt and calcium signaling, such as PLC, PKC, NFAT, and cPLA2. We postulate that calcium homeostasis is likely affected in molecular pathogenesis of FXS.

  14. Microdeletions including FMR1 in three female patients with intellectual disability - further delineation of the phenotype and expression studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zink, A M; Wohlleber, E; Engels, H;

    2014-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is one of the most common causes of intellectual disability/developmental delay (ID/DD), especially in males. It is caused most often by CGG trinucleotide repeat expansions, and less frequently by point mutations and partial or full deletions of the FMR1 gene. The wide...... clinical spectrum of affected females partly depends on their X-inactivation status. Only few female ID/DD patients with microdeletions including FMR1 have been reported. We describe 3 female patients with 3.5-, 4.2- and 9.2-Mb de novo microdeletions in Xq27.3-q28 containing FMR1. X-inactivation was random...... in all patients, yet they presented with ID/DD as well as speech delay, macrocephaly and other features attributable to FXS. No signs of autism were present. Here, we further delineate the clinical spectrum of female patients with microdeletions. FMR1 expression studies gave no evidence for an absolute...

  15. Reversion of FMR1 Methylation and Silencing by Editing the Triplet Repeats in Fragile X iPSC-Derived Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chul-Yong Park

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome (FXS is the most common form of inherited intellectual disability, resulting from a CGG repeat expansion in the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1 gene. Here, we report a strategy for CGG repeat correction using CRISPR/Cas9 for targeted deletion in both embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells derived from FXS patients. Following gene correction in FXS induced pluripotent stem cells, FMR1 expression was restored and sustained in neural precursor cells and mature neurons. Strikingly, after removal of the CGG repeats, the upstream CpG island of the FMR1 promoter showed extensive demethylation, an open chromatin state, and transcription initiation. These results suggest a silencing maintenance mechanism for the FMR1 promoter that is dependent on the existence of the CGG repeat expansion. Our strategy for deletion of trinucleotide repeats provides further insights into the molecular mechanisms of FXS and future therapies of trinucleotide repeat disorders.

  16. Pragmatic Language Features of Mothers with the "FMR1" Premutation Are Associated with the Language Outcomes of Adolescents and Young Adults with Fragile X Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klusek, Jessica; McGrath, Sara E.; Abbeduto, Leonard; Roberts, Jane E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Pragmatic language difficulties have been documented as part of the FMR1 premutation phenotype, yet the interplay between these features in mothers and the language outcomes of their children with fragile X syndrome is unknown. This study aimed to determine whether pragmatic language difficulties in mothers with the "FMR1"…

  17. Repeat-mediated genetic and epigenetic changes at the FMR1 locus in the Fragile X-related disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen eUsdin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe Fragile X-related disorders are a group of genetic conditions that include the neurodegenerative disorder, Fragile X-associated tremor and ataxia syndrome (FXTAS, the fertility disorder, Fragile X-associated primary ovarian insufficiency (FXPOI and the intellectual disability, Fragile X syndrome (FXS. The pathology in all these diseases is related to the number of CGG/CCG-repeats in the 5’ UTR of the FMR1 gene. The repeats are prone to continuous expansion and the increase in repeat number has paradoxical effects on gene expression increasing transcription on mid-sized alleles and decreasing it on longer ones. In some cases the repeats can simultaneously both increase FMR1 mRNA production and decrease the levels of the FMR1 gene product, FMRP. Since FXTAS and FXPOI result from the deleterious consequences of the expression of elevated levels of FMR1 mRNA and FXS is caused by reduced FMRP levels, the clinical picture is turning out to be more complex than once appreciated. Added complications are generated by the fact that increasing repeat numbers make the alleles somatically unstable, generating resulting in individuals sometimes having a complex mixture of different sized alleles. Furthermore, it has become apparent that the eponymous fragile site, once thought to be no more than a useful diagnostic criterion, may have clinical consequences for females who inherit chromosomes that express this site. This review will cover what is currently known about the mechanisms responsible for repeat instability, for the repeat-mediated epigenetic changes that affect expression of the FMR1 gene, and for chromosome fragility. It will also touch on what current and future options are for ameliorating some of these effects.

  18. Fmr1基因敲除雄性小鼠生长指标的变化%Observation on the results of body weight and length of male mince with Fmr1 gene knockout.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨乙; 刘国彬; 刘绪红; 林波; 黄月玲; 沈岩松; 张维雯; 孙卫文; 李敏雄; 陈盛强

    2011-01-01

    目的 对出生后0~56d的清洁级FVB小鼠和Fmr1基因敲除雄性小鼠的体重和体长指标进行分析比较,同时比较出生后28d的睾丸大小变化.方法 挑选10周龄FVB小鼠和Fmr1基因敲除小鼠各20只(雌、雄各半),采取1:I同居,全同胞兄妹近交繁殖,测定雄性子代生长发育指标,进行统计分析.结果 出生后0~56d清洁级Fmr1基因敲除雄性小鼠体重与体长的增长与FVB小鼠差异无统计学意义(t=0.93,t=1.24,P>0.05),但出生后28d的FVB小鼠和Fmr1基因敲除雄性小鼠睾丸大小差别有统计学意义(t=4.12,P<0.05).结论 Fmr1基因敲除不影响雄性小鼠正常的体重和体长的发育,但出生后28d的Fmr1基因敲除小鼠有巨睾征.%Objective To characterize the growth performance of FVB mice and Fmrl gene knockout mice. Methods There 20 seed FVB micedO males and 10 females,aged 10 weeks)were chosen and monogamously mated. The parameters of growth performance were analyzed. And these analysis also conducted on male Fmrl gene knockout mice. Results There no significant statistical differences in average weight and length of the newboms FVB and Fmrl gene knockout mice within 56 days after borth were observed. While significant differences were observed in size of testes of FVB mice and Fmrl gene knockout mice 28 days after birth. Conclusion Fmrl gene knockout does not affect the growth and weight of the mice but the mice may have giant testes.

  19. Detection of the CGG repeats and methylation of Fragile X mental retardation gene 1 (FMR1)%脆性X综合征FMR1基因CGG重复序列与甲基化的检测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    花茂方; 刘小云; 王文; 陈红; 刘福民; 严晓南

    2012-01-01

    目的 建立一种快速、可靠的脆性X综合征的群体筛查方法.方法 应用热启动PCR和甲基化特异性PCR ( MS - PCR)方法对62例智力低下儿童、12例父母外周血液以及5例高危胎儿的脐带血中FMRl基因CGG重复序列与甲基化状态进行检测.结果 采用热启动PCR方法检测79例标本,77例标本的CGG重复数在21 ~40之间,与正常对照组无明显差异;2例标本未扩增出明显条带.采用MS-PCR方法检测出2例FMRl基因甲基化但CGG重复数在正常范围的患者.结论 应用热启动PCR结合MS - PCR方法检测FMR1基因CGG重复数和甲基化,能提高诊断效率,可作为筛查脆性X综合征的首选方法.%Objective: To establish a time - efficient and sensitive method for screening the CGG repeats and methylation of Fragile X mental retardation gene 1 (FMR1). Methods: The Hot - start PCR and methylation specific PCR ( MS - PCR) were used to detect the CGG repeats and methylation in FMR1 gene of the Mental Retardation (MR) children, their parents and fetus of pregnancy women who had given birth MR children. Results; Detected by the Hot - start PCR, CGG repeats number in FMR1 gene of MR children and the control group were 21 -40, 15-34 respectively and no significant difference were observed between two groups. The CGG repeats number in FMR1 gene of two MR children did not be detected. However, the two MR children were observed methylated FMR1 gene but normal CGG repeats by MS - PCR. Conclusion : The Hot - start PCR and MS - PCR are efficient and sensitive methods for screening fragile X syndrome.

  20. FMR1基因敲除对雌性小鼠生殖功能的影响%Influence of FMR1 gene knockout on the reproduction of female mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖国宏; 叶球仙; 杨洁; 陈盛强; 孙卫文; 黄晓虹; 甘婷

    2014-01-01

    目的 利用FMR1基因敲除小鼠,研究FMR1基因缺失对雌性小鼠生殖功能的影响,并对其影响机制进行探讨.方法 将成年的KO纯合子、KO杂合子、WT雌鼠分别和成年的WT雄鼠合笼,观察合笼时间及产仔数;随机取10周的上述3种基因型雌鼠,HE染色观察卵巢形态;免疫组化测定NPY和GABA在下丘脑的分布,Image Pro Plus 6.0分析平均光密度值;ELISA测定血清NPY水平.结果 3组小鼠中,KO纯合子雌鼠的产仔数少于WT雌鼠(6.39±2.30)、(7.60±2.69)和(8.00±1.88);KO纯合子雌鼠的卵泡总数少于WT雌鼠(36.00±5)、(39.33±7.87)和(45.45±7.85);KO纯合子雌鼠下丘脑NPY的表达弱于WT雌鼠(0.27±0.016)、(0.29±0.04)和(0.31±0.041);血清NPY及下丘脑GABA的表达三组间差异均无显著性(P>0.05).结论 FMR1基因敲除可导致雌鼠生育功能下降,FMR1基因可能是通过下调NPY的表达来降低其生殖功能的.

  1. Behavioural comparision on Fmr1 knockout mice at 30 days age in spontaneous activity test%30日龄Fmr1基因敲除小鼠的自主活动观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张伟雯; 黄越玲; 刘国彬; 沈岩松; 孙卫文; 李敏雄; 戴丽军; 陈盛强

    2011-01-01

    Objective To compare the behavioural differences at 30 days age in spontaneous activity test. Methods Fmr1 knockout mice were identified using the PCR technica. and spontaneous activity test was used in the study .The data was analyzed with Multifactor Variance Analysis. Results Activities in their own experiments, as compared with WT mice, KO mice in the experiment of self-activity increase in the number of activities and reduction in the number of standing, with statistical significance ( P<0.05 ), but there were no significant differences on manure behaviour between two groups. Conclusion Fmr1 knockout animals exhibited higher locomotor activity in the spontaneous activity test at 30 days age.%目的 对30日龄的Fmr1基因敲除小鼠的自主活动进行观察.方法 采用30日龄的KO鼠和WT鼠分别连续进行2天的自主活动实验,根据所获得的数据进行多因素方差分析处理.结果 通过第1天的学习与第2天的记忆再现,在自主活动实验中,与WT鼠相比,KO鼠在自主活动实验中的活动和站立次数均增多,具有统计学意义(P<0.05),粪便数相比无明显差异.结论 30日龄Fmr1基因敲除小鼠的自主活动异常,运动性和兴奋性较野生型小鼠增高.

  2. Genetic and systems level analysis of Drosophila sticky/citron kinase and dFmr1 mutants reveals common regulation of genetic networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarnescu Daniela C

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Drosophila, the genes sticky and dFmr1 have both been shown to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics and chromatin structure. These genes also genetically interact with Argonaute family microRNA regulators. Furthermore, in mammalian systems, both genes have been implicated in neuronal development. Given these genetic and functional similarities, we tested Drosophila sticky and dFmr1 for a genetic interaction and measured whole genome expression in both mutants to assess similarities in gene regulation. Results We found that sticky mutations can dominantly suppress a dFmr1 gain-of-function phenotype in the developing eye, while phenotypes produced by RNAi knock-down of sticky were enhanced by dFmr1 RNAi and a dFmr1 loss-of-function mutation. We also identified a large number of transcripts that were misexpressed in both mutants suggesting that sticky and dFmr1 gene products similarly regulate gene expression. By integrating gene expression data with a protein-protein interaction network, we found that mutations in sticky and dFmr1 resulted in misexpression of common gene networks, and consequently predicted additional specific phenotypes previously not known to be associated with either gene. Further phenotypic analyses validated these predictions. Conclusion These findings establish a functional link between two previously unrelated genes. Microarray analysis indicates that sticky and dFmr1 are both required for regulation of many developmental genes in a variety of cell types. The diversity of transcripts regulated by these two genes suggests a clear cause of the pleiotropy that sticky and dFmr1 mutants display and provides many novel, testable hypotheses about the functions of these genes. As both of these genes are implicated in the development and function of the mammalian brain, these results have relevance to human health as well as to understanding more general biological processes.

  3. BRCA1/2 mutations appear embryo-lethal unless rescued by low (CGG n<26 FMR1 sub-genotypes: explanation for the "BRCA paradox"?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Weghofer

    Full Text Available BRCA1/2 mutations and recently described constitutional FMR1 genotypes have, independently, been associated with prematurely diminished ovarian reserve. Whether they interrelate in distribution, and whether observed effects of BRCA1/2 and FMR1 on ovaries are independent of each other, is unknown. In a prospective comparative cohort study, we, therefore, investigated the distribution of constitutional FMR1 genotypes, normal (norm, heterozygous (het and homozygous (hom, and of their respective sub-genotypes (high/low, in 99 BRCA1/2 mutation-positive women and 410 female controls to determine whether distribution patterns differed between study and control patients. In contrast to controls, BRCA1/2 carriers demonstrated almost complete absence of all constitutional FMR1 genotypes except for sub-genotypes with low (CGG (n<26 alleles. Cross tabulation between BRCA1/2-positive patients and controls confirmed significant group membership, related to FMR1 distribution (P<0.0001. These results offer as most likely explanation the conclusion that BRCA1/2 mutations are embryo-lethal, unless rescued by low (CGG (n<26 FMR1 sub-genotypes, present in approximately one quarter of all women. Women with low FMR1 sub-genotypes, therefore, should reflect increased BRCA1/2-associated cancer risks, while the remaining approximately 75 percent should face almost no such risks. If confirmed, this observation offers opportunities for more efficient and less costly BRCA1/2 cancer screening. The study also suggests that previously reported risk towards prematurely diminished ovarian reserve in association with BRCA mutations is FMR1-mediated, and offers a possible explanation for the so-called "BRCA paradox" by raising the possibility that the widely perceived BRCA1/2-associated tumor risk is actually FMR1-mediated.

  4. Depressed nNOS expression during spine transition in the developing hippocampus of FMR1 KO mice

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    Qin Xu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO, synthesized as needed by NO synthase (NOS, is involved in spinogenesis and synaptogenesis. Immature spine morphology is characteristic of fragile X syndrome (FXS. The objective of this research was to investigate and compare changes of postnatal neuronal NOS (nNOS expression in the hippocampus of male fragile X mental retardation 1 gene knockout mice (FMR1 KO mice, the animal model of FXS and male wild-type mice (WT at postnatal day 7 (P7, P14, P21, and P28. nNOS mRNA levels were analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR (N = 4-7 and nNOS protein was estimated by Western blot (N = 3 and immunohistochemistry (N = 1. In the PCR assessment, primers 5’-GTGGCCATCGTGTCCTACCATAC-3’ and 5’-GTTTCGAGGCAGGTGGAAGCTA-3’ were used for the detection of nNOS and primers 5’-CCGTTTCTCCTGGCTCAGTTTA-3’ and 5’-CCCCAATACCACATCATCCAT-3’ were used for the detection of β-actin. Compared to the WT group, nNOS mRNA expression was significantly decreased in FMR1 KO mice at P21 (KO: 0.2857 ± 0.0150, WT: 0.5646 ± 0.0657; P < 0.05. Consistently, nNOS immunoreactivity also revealed reduced staining intensity at P21 in the FMR1 KO group. Western blot analysis validated the immunostaining results by demonstrating a significant reduction in nNOS protein levels in the FMR1 KO group compared to the WT group at P21 (KO: 0.3015 ± 0.0897, WT: 1.7542 ± 0.5455; P < 0.05. These results suggest that nNOS was involved in the postnatal development of the hippocampus in FXS and impaired NO production may retard spine maturation in FXS.

  5. Depressed nNOS expression during spine transition in the developing hippocampus of FMR1 KO mice

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    Xu, Qin; Zhu, Zhiwei; Xu, Jialu [Department of Children' s Health Care, Children' s Hospital, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou Zhejiang (China); Gu, Weizhong [Department of Pathology, Children' s Hospital, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou Zhejiang (China); Zhao, Zhengyan [Department of Children' s Health Care, Children' s Hospital, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou Zhejiang (China)

    2012-10-05

    Nitric oxide (NO), synthesized as needed by NO synthase (NOS), is involved in spinogenesis and synaptogenesis. Immature spine morphology is characteristic of fragile X syndrome (FXS). The objective of this research was to investigate and compare changes of postnatal neuronal NOS (nNOS) expression in the hippocampus of male fragile X mental retardation 1 gene knockout mice (FMR1 KO mice, the animal model of FXS) and male wild-type mice (WT) at postnatal day 7 (P7), P14, P21, and P28. nNOS mRNA levels were analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR (N = 4-7) and nNOS protein was estimated by Western blot (N = 3) and immunohistochemistry (N = 1). In the PCR assessment, primers 5′-GTGGCCATCGTGTCCTACCATAC-3′ and 5′-GTTTCGAGGCAGGTGGAAGCTA-3′ were used for the detection of nNOS and primers 5′-CCGTTTCTCCTGGCTCAGTTTA-3′ and 5′-CCCCAATACCACATCATCCAT-3′ were used for the detection of β-actin. Compared to the WT group, nNOS mRNA expression was significantly decreased in FMR1 KO mice at P21 (KO: 0.2857 ± 0.0150, WT: 0.5646 ± 0.0657; P < 0.05). Consistently, nNOS immunoreactivity also revealed reduced staining intensity at P21 in the FMR1 KO group. Western blot analysis validated the immunostaining results by demonstrating a significant reduction in nNOS protein levels in the FMR1 KO group compared to the WT group at P21 (KO: 0.3015 ± 0.0897, WT: 1.7542 ± 0.5455; P < 0.05). These results suggest that nNOS was involved in the postnatal development of the hippocampus in FXS and impaired NO production may retard spine maturation in FXS.

  6. High rates of comorbid depressive and anxiety disorders among women with premutation of the FMR1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenna, Heather A; Tartter, Molly; Hall, Scott S; Lightbody, Amy A; Nguyen, Quynh; de los Angeles, C Paula; Reiss, Allan L; Rasgon, Natalie L

    2013-12-01

    Phenotypic variations are emerging from investigations of carriers of the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) premutation gene (55 to 200 CGG repeats). Initial studies suggest elevated psychiatric and reproductive system dysfunction, but have largely used self-reports for assessment of psychiatric history. The present study used diagnostic psychiatric interviews and assessed reproductive and menstrual history in women with FMR1 premutation. History of psychiatric diagnoses and data on reproductive functioning were collected in 46 women with FMR1 premutation who were mothers of at least one child with the fragile X full mutation. Results showed a significantly earlier age of menopause (mean age = 45.6 years) relative to the national average age of menopause (mean age = 51 years) and a high rate (76%) of lifetime depressive or anxiety history, with 43% of the overall sample reporting a comorbid history of both diagnoses. Compared to those free of psychiatric history, significantly longer premutation length was observed among women with psychiatric history after adjusting for age, with comorbid women having the highest number of CGG repeats (mean = 95.8) compared to women free of psychiatric history (mean = 79.9). Psychiatric history did not appear significantly related to reproductive system dysfunction, though results may have been obscured by the high rates of psychiatric dysfunction in the sample. These data add to the growing evidence base that women with the FMR1 premutation have an increased risk of psychiatric illness and risk for early menopause. Future investigations may benefit from inclusion of biochemical reproductive markers and longitudinal assessment of psychiatric and reproductive functioning.

  7. The fragile x mental retardation syndrome 20 years after the FMR1 gene discovery: an expanding universe of knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, François; Labelle, Yves; Bussières, Johanne; Lindsay, Carmen

    2011-08-01

    The fragile X mental retardation (FXMR) syndrome is one of the most frequent causes of mental retardation. Affected individuals display a wide range of additional characteristic features including behavioural and physical phenotypes, and the extent to which individuals are affected is highly variable. For these reasons, elucidation of the pathophysiology of this disease has been an important challenge to the scientific community. 1991 marks the year of the discovery of both the FMR1 gene mutations involved in this disease, and of their dynamic nature. Although a mouse model for the disease has been available for 16 years and extensive research has been performed on the FMR1 protein (FMRP), we still understand little about how the disease develops, and no treatment has yet been shown to be effective. In this review, we summarise current knowledge on FXMR with an emphasis on the technical challenges of molecular diagnostics, on its prevalence and dynamics among populations, and on the potential of screening for FMR1 mutations.

  8. Towards a Better Molecular Diagnosis of FMR1-Related Disorders—A Multiyear Experience from a Reference Lab

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    Sylwia Olimpia Rzońca

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article summarizes over 20 years of experience of a reference lab in fragile X mental retardation 1 gene (FMR1 molecular analysis in the molecular diagnosis of fragile X spectrum disorders. This includes fragile X syndrome (FXS, fragile X-associated primary ovarian insufficiency (FXPOI and fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS, which are three different clinical conditions with the same molecular background. They are all associated with an expansion of CGG repeats in the 5′UTR of FMR1 gene. Until 2016, the FMR1 gene was tested in 9185 individuals with the pre-screening PCR, supplemented with Southern blot analysis and/or Triplet Repeat Primed PCR based method. This approach allowed us to confirm the diagnosis of FXS, FXPOI FXTAS in 636/9131 (6.96%, 4/43 (9.3% and 3/11 (27.3% of the studied cases, respectively. Moreover, the FXS carrier status was established in 389 individuals. The technical aspect of the molecular analysis is very important in diagnosis of FXS-related disorders. The new methods were subsequently implemented in our laboratory. This allowed the significance of the Southern blot technique to be decreased until its complete withdrawal. Our experience points out the necessity of implementation of the GeneScan based methods to simplify the testing procedure as well as to obtain more information for the patient, especially if TP-PCR based methods are used.

  9. Towards a Better Molecular Diagnosis of FMR1-Related Disorders-A Multiyear Experience from a Reference Lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzońca, Sylwia Olimpia; Gos, Monika; Szopa, Daniel; Sielska-Rotblum, Danuta; Landowska, Aleksandra; Szpecht-Potocka, Agnieszka; Milewski, Michał; Czekajska, Jolanta; Abramowicz, Anna; Obersztyn, Ewa; Maciejko, Dorota; Mazurczak, Tadeusz; Bal, Jerzy

    2016-09-02

    The article summarizes over 20 years of experience of a reference lab in fragile X mental retardation 1 gene (FMR1) molecular analysis in the molecular diagnosis of fragile X spectrum disorders. This includes fragile X syndrome (FXS), fragile X-associated primary ovarian insufficiency (FXPOI) and fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS), which are three different clinical conditions with the same molecular background. They are all associated with an expansion of CGG repeats in the 5'UTR of FMR1 gene. Until 2016, the FMR1 gene was tested in 9185 individuals with the pre-screening PCR, supplemented with Southern blot analysis and/or Triplet Repeat Primed PCR based method. This approach allowed us to confirm the diagnosis of FXS, FXPOI FXTAS in 636/9131 (6.96%), 4/43 (9.3%) and 3/11 (27.3%) of the studied cases, respectively. Moreover, the FXS carrier status was established in 389 individuals. The technical aspect of the molecular analysis is very important in diagnosis of FXS-related disorders. The new methods were subsequently implemented in our laboratory. This allowed the significance of the Southern blot technique to be decreased until its complete withdrawal. Our experience points out the necessity of implementation of the GeneScan based methods to simplify the testing procedure as well as to obtain more information for the patient, especially if TP-PCR based methods are used.

  10. Repeat-mediated epigenetic dysregulation of the FMR1 gene in the Fragile X-related disorders

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    Karen eUsdin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Fragile X-related disorders are members of the Repeat Expansion Diseases, a group of genetic conditions resulting from an expansion in the size of a tandem repeat tract at a specific genetic locus. The repeat responsible for disease pathology in the Fragile X-related disorders is CGG/CCG and the repeat tract is located in the 5’ UTR of the FMR1 gene, whose protein product FMRP, is important for the proper translation of dendritic mRNAs in response to synaptic activation. There are two different pathological FMR1 allele classes that are distinguished only by the number of repeats. Premutation alleles have 55-200 repeats and confer risk of Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome and Fragile X-associated primary ovarian insufficiency. Full mutation alleles on the other hand have >200 repeats and result in Fragile X syndrome, a disorder that affects learning and behavior. Different symptoms are seen in carriers of premutation and full mutation alleles because the repeat number has paradoxical effects on gene expression: Epigenetic changes increase transcription from premutation alleles and decrease transcription from full mutation alleles. This review will cover what is currently known about the mechanisms responsible for these changes in FMR1 expression and how they may relate to other Repeat Expansion Diseases that also show repeat-mediated changes in gene expression.

  11. Independent role for presynaptic FMRP revealed by an FMR1 missense mutation associated with intellectual disability and seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrick, Leila K; Deng, Pan-Yue; Hashimoto, Hideharu; Oh, Young Mi; Cho, Yongcheol; Poidevin, Mickael J; Suhl, Joshua A; Visootsak, Jeannie; Cavalli, Valeria; Jin, Peng; Cheng, Xiaodong; Warren, Stephen T; Klyachko, Vitaly A

    2015-01-27

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) results in intellectual disability (ID) most often caused by silencing of the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene. The resulting absence of fragile X mental retardation protein 1 (FMRP) leads to both pre- and postsynaptic defects, yet whether the pre- and postsynaptic functions of FMRP are independent and have distinct roles in FXS neuropathology remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate an independent presynaptic function for FMRP through the study of an ID patient with an FMR1 missense mutation. This mutation, c.413G > A (R138Q), preserves FMRP's canonical functions in RNA binding and translational regulation, which are traditionally associated with postsynaptic compartments. However, neuronally driven expression of the mutant FMRP is unable to rescue structural defects at the neuromuscular junction in fragile x mental retardation 1 (dfmr1)-deficient Drosophila, suggesting a presynaptic-specific impairment. Furthermore, mutant FMRP loses the ability to rescue presynaptic action potential (AP) broadening in Fmr1 KO mice. The R138Q mutation also disrupts FMRP's interaction with the large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels that modulate AP width. These results reveal a presynaptic- and translation-independent function of FMRP that is linked to a specific subset of FXS phenotypes.

  12. Estudios de la región 5'UTRTR del gen FMR-1 en pacientes con falla ovárica prematura Studies of the 5' - UTRTR region in the FMR-1 gene in patients withe Premature Ovarian Failure

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    V.A. Chiauzzi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available La falla ovárica prematura (FOP es un síndrome de patogénesis multicausal que afecta aproximadamente al 1% de las mujeres en edad reproductiva. Numerosos estudios asocian el estado de premutación (amplificación del número de tripletes CGG entre 50/55 y 200 repeticiones en el gen FMR-1 y FOP. Alrededor de un 4% de las pacientes FOP presentan alelos con premutación. La amplificación del número de tripletes por encima de 200 repeticiones causa el Síndrome de Fragilidad del X (SFX. El objetivo del presente trabajo fue estudiar la región 5´ no codificante del gen en un grupo de pacientes FOP de Argentina. La región de interés se amplificó por PCR a partir de muestras de ADN de 100 pacientes FOP y 145 mujeres controles. Los alelos de las pacientes y controles fueron agrupados en 7 categorías de acuerdo al número de tripletes obtenidos. Se observó que el número de repeticiones más frecuente se encuentra en el rango de 26 a 30 tripletes, tanto en pacientes como en controles. En el grupo de pacientes FOP, 5/197 (2.6% alelos no relacionados estudiados presentaron un número de tripletes CGG mayor a 50, mientras que sólo 1 de 290 (0.34% para el grupo control. Todas las pacientes FOP con valores de tripletes CGG mayor a 50 presentaron amenorrea secundaria. Estos resultados están en concordancia con lo comunicado para otras poblaciones acerca de la existencia de una asociación entre la premutación del gen FMR-1 y el desarrollo de FOP. Asimismo, los resultados obtenidos refuerzan la importancia de la genotipificación del gen FMR-1 en las pacientes FOP, a los efectos de estimar el riesgo de su descendencia para el SFX.Premature ovarian failure (POF is a syndrome of multicausal pathogenesis that affects 1% of women before the age of 40. Several studies associate the premutation state (CGG repeats increased in number between 50/55 and 200 in the FMR-1 gene and POF. About 4% of POF women have alleles in the FMR-1 gene in the permutation

  13. Resilience to audiogenic seizures is associated with p-ERK1/2 dephosphorylation in the subiculum of Fmr1 knockout mice

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    Giulia eCuria

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Young, but not adult, Fmr1 knockout (KO mice display audiogenic seizures (AGS that can be prevented by inhibiting extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2 phosphorylation. In order to identify the cerebral regions involved in these phenomena, we characterized the response to AGS in Fmr1 KO mice and wild type (WT controls at postnatal day (P 45 and P90. To characterize the diverse response to AGS in various cerebral regions, we evaluated the activity markers FosB/ΔFosB and phosphorylated ERK1/2 (p-ERK1/2. Wild running (100% of tested mice followed by clonic/tonic seizures (30% were observed in P45 Fmr1 KO mice, but not in WT mice. In P90 Fmr1 KO mice, wild running was only present in 25% of tested animals. Basal FosB/ΔFosB immunoreactivity was higher (P<0.01 vs WT in the CA1 and subiculum of P45 Fmr1 KO mice. Following the AGS test, FosB/ΔFosB expression consistently increased in most of the analyzed regions in both groups at P45, but not at P90. Interestingly, FosB/ΔFosB immunoreactivity was significantly higher in P45 Fmr1 KO mice in the medial geniculate body (P<0.05 vs WT and CA3 (P<0.01. Neurons presenting with immunopositivity to p-ERK1/2 were more abundant in the subiculum of Fmr1 KO mice in control condition (P<0.05 vs WT, in both age groups. In this region, p-ERK1/2-immunopositive cells significantly decreased (-75%, P<0.01 in P90 Fmr1 KO mice exposed to the AGS test, but no changes were found in P45 mice or in other brain regions. In both age groups of WT mice, p-ERK1/2-immunopositive cells increased in the subiculum after exposure to the acoustic test. Our findings illustrate that FosB/ΔFosB markers are overexpressed in the medial geniculate body and CA3 in Fmr1 KO mice experiencing AGS, and that p-ERK1/2 is markedly decreased in the subiculum of Fmr1 KO mice resistant to AGS induction. These findings suggest that resilience to AGS is associated with dephosphorylation of p-ERK1/2 in the subiculum of mature Fmr1 KO mice.

  14. Segregation of the fragile X mutation from a male with a full mutation: Unusual somatic instability in the FMR-1 locus

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    Kambouris, M.; Bluhm, D.; Feldman, G.L. [Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-09

    Fragile X syndrome is associated with an unstable CGG-repeat in the FMR-1 gene. There are few reports of affected males transmitting the FMR-l gene to offspring. We report on a family in which the propositus and his twin sister each had a full mutation with abnormal methylation. Their mother had an FMR-1 allele in the normal range and a large premutation, with normal methylation. The maternal grandmother had two normal FMR-1 alleles. The maternal grandfather had an unusual somatic FMR-1 pattern, with allele size ranging from premutation to full mutation. No allele was detectable by PCR analysis. Multiple Southern blot analyses identified a hybridization pattern that originated at a distinct premutation band and extended into the full mutation range. Methylation studies revealed a mosaic pattern with both unmethylated premutations and methylated full mutations. This individual declined formal evaluation but did not finish high school and has difficulty in reading and writing. The size of the premutation FMR-1 allele passed to his daughter is larger than his most prominent premutation allele. This is most likely due to gonadal mosaicism similar to that in his peripheral lymphocytes. Alternatively, this expansion event may have occurred during his daughter`s early embryonic development and this large premutation allele is mitotically unstable. This pattern of FMR-1 alleles in a presumably mildly affected male is highly unusual. These findings are consistent with the absence of transmission of a full fragile X mutation through an expressing male. Studies of tissue-specific FMR-1 allele expansion and FMR-1 protein expression on this individual should help to determine the correlation of the molecular findings with the phenotypic effects. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Differences in ovarian aging patterns between races are associated with ovarian genotypes and sub-genotypes of the FMR1 gene

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    Gleicher Norbert

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ovarian aging patterns differ between races, and appear to affect fertility treatment outcomes. What causes these differences is, however, unknown. Variations in ovarian aging patterns have recently been associated with specific ovarian genotypes and sub-genotypes of the FMR1 gene. We, therefore, attempted to determine differences in how functional ovarian reserve (FOR changes with advancing age between races, and whether changes are associated with differences in distribution of ovarian genotypes and sub-genotypes of the FMR1 gene. Methods We determined in association with in vitro fertilization (IVF FOR in 62 young Caucasian, African and Asian oocyte donors and 536 older infertility patients of all three races, based on follicle stimulating hormone (FSH, anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH and oocyte yields, and investigated whether differences between races are associated with differences in distribution of FMR1 genotypes and sub-genotypes. Results Changes in distribution of mean FSH, AMH and oocyte yields between young donors and older infertility patients were significant (all P FMR1 genotypes and sub-genotypes in patients varied significantly between races, with Asians demonstrating fewer het-norm/low sub-genotypes than Caucasians and Africans (P = 0.012. Conclusion FOR changes in different races at different rates, and appears to parallel ovarian FMR1 genotypes and sub-genotype distributions. Differences in ovarian aging between races may, therefore, be FMR1-associated.

  16. A viable model for the study of GABAergic neurons in fmr1 knockout mice%fmr1基因敲除小鼠中间神经元发育研究的新方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    欧阳梅; 徐明明; 卢韬; 黄越玲; 易咏红

    2011-01-01

    目的:通过杂交技术获得能表达GAD67 -GFP的fmr1基因敲除小鼠模型.方法:fmr1基因敲除(fmr1-ko)雌性小鼠(X-X-)和GAD67-GFP敲入基因杂合雄性小鼠(2+2-)杂交.鼠尾巴提取基因组DNA,用PCR方法鉴定所有子代基因型.对杂交后代小鼠进行行为学观察,并行脑组织切片观察绿色荧光蛋白在γ-氨基丁酸能神经元的表达.结果:PCR方法证实通过杂交繁殖出四种基因型小鼠:同时带有杂合fmr1 ko及GAD67-GFP位点的雌性小鼠(X+ X-/2 +2-)、带有纯合fmr1-ko及GAD67-GFP位点的雄性小鼠(X-Y/2 +2-)、不带有GAD67-GFP的雌性和雄性小鼠(X+X-/2-2-,X-Y/2-2-).观察发现X-Y/2+2-小鼠具有fmr1 -ko小鼠类似的行为学表现,同时在显微镜下观察到X-Y/2+2-小鼠脑组织切片有发绿色荧光的GABA神经元.结论:该杂交小鼠成功表达了GAD67-GFP,为研究γ-氨基丁酸能神经元在脆性X综合征发病机制中的作用提供一种可靠的模型.%Objective: To obtain Fragile X syndrome rat models with GAD67-GFP expression by hybridization technique. Methods; One fmrl-knockout female (X~X~) rat was mated with GAD67-CFP heterozygous male (2 + 2-). All hybrid offspring were genotyped by polymerase chain reaction ( PCR) according to genomic DNA extracted from the tail. The behaviors and the expression of GFP on GABAergic neurons of brain slice were also observed. Results: Four genotypes of mice have been generated: the heterozygous female mice with both the fmrl-gfp-ko and GAD67-GFP locus (X+XV2-2-) , fmrl-ko male mice heterozygous with GAD67-GFP locus (X-Y/2+2-) .female and male mice without GAD67-GFP locus(X+ X/-2-2-,X-Y/2-2-). Mice X-Y2+2-were noted to have similar behaviors with fmrl ko mice. Morphological observation of GABAergic neuron had a good match between the mice X-Y/2+2~and fmrl ko mice. Conclusions:The hybrid mice X-Y/2-2- successfully expressed the GAD67-GFP protein, which provides a viable model for the study on the pathogenetic effect of

  17. Investigation on the mechanism of descended reproductive function in FMR1 gene knockout male mice%FMR1基因敲除雄鼠生殖功能下降的机制探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶球仙; 杨洁; 罗虹; 陈盛强; 黄晓虹; 甘婷; 陈燕; 肖国宏

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the mechanism of descended reproductive function induced by FMR1 gene knockout in male FMR1 gene knockout mice (KO) and male wild mice (WT).Methods The morphology of the testis of 10 weeks old KO and WT male mice were observed by HE staining.The mean optical density (MOD) of the expressions of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and gamma aminobutyricacid (GABA) in hypothalamus were tested and analyzed by immunohistochemistry and Image Pro Plus 6.0.Serum NPY concentrations were measured by ELISA.Results No obvious pathological differences in testis were found between KO and WT mice.The MOD of NPY in hypothalamus and the expression of NPY in serum in KO mice were weaken than those in WT mice,respectively [0.27 ± 0.031 vs.0.31 ± 0.031,P < 0.05; (179.21 ± 50.773)ng/L vs.(225.24 ± 52.293) ng/L,P <0.05].There was no significant difference in the MOD of GABA in hypothalamus between KO and WT mice (0.29 ±0.017 vs.0.28 ± 0.009,P > 0.05).Conclusions FMR1 gene may down-regulate the reproductive function of male mice through reducing the expression of NPY.%目的:利用FMR1基因敲除鼠(KO)和野生型FVB鼠(WT),研究FMR1基因敲除引起雄鼠生殖功能下降的可能机制.方法:随机取10周的KO及WT雄鼠,HE染色观察睾丸形态;免疫组化及Image ProPlus 6.0测定分析下丘脑神经肽Y(NPY)及γ-氨基丁酸(GABA)表达的平均光密度值;ELISA测定血清NPY水平.结果:KO、WT小鼠睾丸形态未见明显不同;KO雄鼠下丘脑NPY的表达弱于WT雄鼠(0.27±0.031,0.31±0.031,P<0.05);KO雄鼠血清NPY的表达弱于WT雄鼠(179.21±50.773,225.24±52.293,P< 0.05);两种基因型小鼠下丘脑GABA的表达差异无统计学意义(0.29±0.017,0.28±0.009,P> 0.05).结论:FMR1基因可能是通过下调NPY的表达来降低雄鼠生殖功能的.

  18. A single nucleotide variant in the FMR1 CGG repeat results in a "Pseudodeletion" and is not associated with the fragile X syndrome phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecconi, Massimiliano; Forzano, Francesca; Rinaldi, Rosanna; Cappellacci, Sandra; Grammatico, Paola; Faravelli, Francesca; Dagna Bricarelli, Franca; Di Maria, Emilio; Grasso, Marina

    2008-05-01

    The molecular diagnosis of fragile X syndrome relies on the detection of the pathogenic CGG repeat expansion in the FMR1 gene. Deletions and point mutations have occasionally been reported. Rare polymorphisms might mimic a deletion by Southern blot analysis, leading to false-positive results. We describe a novel rare nucleotide substitution within the CGG repeat. The proband was a woman with a positive family history of mental retardation. Southern blot analysis showed an additional band consistent with a deletion in the region detected by the StB12.3 probe. Sequencing of this region revealed a G>C transversion that interrupts the CGG repeat and introduces an EagI site. The same variant was observed in both the healthy son and father of the proband, supporting the hypothesis that the nucleotide substitution is a silent polymorphism, the frequency of which we estimated to be less than 1% in the general population. These findings argue for a pathogenic role of nucleotide variants within the CGG repeat and suggest possible consequences of unexpected findings in the molecular diagnostics of fragile X syndrome. Thus, although the sequence context of a single nucleotide substitution may not predict possible effects on mRNA or protein function, a specific change in the higher order structures of DNA or mRNA may be functionally relevant in the pathological phenotype.

  19. A Single Nucleotide Variant in the FMR1 CGG Repeat Results in a “Pseudodeletion” and Is Not Associated with the Fragile X Syndrome Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecconi, Massimiliano; Forzano, Francesca; Rinaldi, Rosanna; Cappellacci, Sandra; Grammatico, Paola; Faravelli, Francesca; Dagna Bricarelli, Franca; Di Maria, Emilio; Grasso, Marina

    2008-01-01

    The molecular diagnosis of fragile X syndrome relies on the detection of the pathogenic CGG repeat expansion in the FMR1 gene. Deletions and point mutations have occasionally been reported. Rare polymorphisms might mimic a deletion by Southern blot analysis, leading to false-positive results. We describe a novel rare nucleotide substitution within the CGG repeat. The proband was a woman with a positive family history of mental retardation. Southern blot analysis showed an additional band consistent with a deletion in the region detected by the StB12.3 probe. Sequencing of this region revealed a G>C transversion that interrupts the CGG repeat and introduces an EagI site. The same variant was observed in both the healthy son and father of the proband, supporting the hypothesis that the nucleotide substitution is a silent polymorphism, the frequency of which we estimated to be less than 1% in the general population. These findings argue for a pathogenic role of nucleotide variants within the CGG repeat and suggest possible consequences of unexpected findings in the molecular diagnostics of fragile X syndrome. Thus, although the sequence context of a single nucleotide substitution may not predict possible effects on mRNA or protein function, a specific change in the higher order structures of DNA or mRNA may be functionally relevant in the pathological phenotype. PMID:18403614

  20. Cell-Type Specific Channelopathies in the Prefrontal Cortex of the fmr1-/y Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmbach, Brian E; Johnston, Daniel; Brager, Darrin H

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is caused by transcriptional silencing of the fmr1 gene resulting in the loss of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) expression. FXS patients display several behavioral phenotypes associated with prefrontal cortex (PFC) dysfunction. Voltage-gated ion channels, some of which are regulated by FMRP, heavily influence PFC neuron function. Although there is evidence for brain region-specific alterations to the function a single type of ion channel in FXS, it is unclear whether subtypes of principal neurons within a brain region are affected uniformly. We tested for alterations to ion channels critical in regulating neural excitability in two subtypes of prefrontal L5 pyramidal neurons. Using somatic and dendritic patch-clamp recordings, we provide evidence that the functional expression of h-channels (Ih) is down-regulated, whereas A-type K(+) channel function is up-regulated in pyramidal tract-projecting (PT) neurons in the fmr1-/y mouse PFC. This is the opposite pattern of results from published findings from hippocampus where Ih is up-regulated and A-type K(+) channel function is down-regulated. Additionally, we find that somatic Kv1-mediated current is down-regulated, resulting in increased excitability of fmr1-/y PT neurons. Importantly, these h- and K(+) channel differences do not extend to neighboring intratelencephalic-projecting neurons. Thus, the absence of FMRP has divergent effects on the function of individual types of ion channels not only between brain regions, but also variable effects across cell types within the same brain region. Given the importance of ion channels in regulating neural circuits, these results suggest cell-type-specific phenotypes for the disease.

  1. 2-Methyl-6-(phenylethynyl pyridine (MPEP reverses maze learning and PSD-95 deficits in Fmr1 knock-out mice.

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    Réno Michelle Gandhi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome (FXS is caused by the lack of expression of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP, which results in intellectual disability and other debilitating symptoms including impairment of visual-spatial functioning. FXS is the only single-gene disorder that is highly co-morbid with autism spectrum disorder and can therefore provide insight into its pathophysiology. Lack of FMRP results in altered group I metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR signalling, which is a target for putative treatments. The Hebb-Williams (H-W mazes are a set of increasingly complex spatial navigation problems that depend on intact hippocampal and thus mGluR-5 functioning. In the present investigation, we examined whether an antagonist of mGluR-5 would reverse previously described behavioural deficits in Fmr1 KO mice. Mice were trained on a subset of the H-W mazes and then treated with either 20 mg/kg of an mGluR-5 antagonist, 2-Methyl-6-(phenylethynyl pyridine (MPEP; n = 11 or an equivalent dose of saline (n = 11 prior to running test mazes. Latency and errors were dependent variables recorded during the test phase. Immediately after completing each test, marble-burying behavior was assessed which confirmed that the drug treatment was pharmacologically active during maze learning. Although latency was not statistically different between the groups, MPEP treated Fmr1 KO mice made significantly fewer errors on mazes deemed more difficult suggesting a reversal of the behavioural deficit. MPEP treated mice were also less perseverative and impulsive when navigating mazes. Furthermore, MPEP treatment reversed PSD-95 protein deficits in Fmr1 KO treated mice, whereas levels of a control protein (β-tubulin remained unchanged. These data further validate MPEP as a potentially beneficial treatment for FXS. Our findings also suggest that adapted H-W mazes may be a useful tool to document alterations in behavioural functioning following pharmacological

  2. Brain structure in asymptomatic FMR1 premutation carriers at risk for fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battistella, Giovanni; Niederhauser, Julien; Fornari, Eleonora; Hippolyte, Loyse; Gronchi Perrin, Aline; Lesca, Gaetan; Forzano, Francesca; Hagmann, Patric; Vingerhoets, Francois J G; Draganski, Bogdan; Maeder, Philippe; Jacquemont, Sébastien

    2013-06-01

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS), a late-onset movement disorder affecting FMR1 premutation carriers, is associated with cerebral and cerebellar lesions. The aim of this study was to test whether computational anatomy can detect similar patterns in asymptomatic FMR1 premutation carriers (mean age 46.7 years) with qualitatively normal -appearing grey and white matter on brain MRI. We used a multimodal imaging protocol to characterize brain anatomy by automated assessment of gray matter volume and white matter properties. Structural changes in the hippocampus and in the cerebellar motor network with decreased gray matter volume in lobule VI and white matter alterations of the corresponding afferent projections through the middle cerebellar peduncles are demonstrated. Diffuse subcortical white matter changes in both hemispheres, without corresponding gray matter alterations, are only identified through age × group interactions. We interpret the hippocampal fimbria and cerebellar changes as early alterations with a possible neurodevelopmental origin. In contrast, progression of the diffuse cerebral hemispheric white matter changes suggests a neurodegenerative process, leading to late-onset lesions, which may mark the imminent onset of FXTAS.

  3. The impact in older women of ovarian FMR1 genotypes and sub-genotypes on ovarian reserve.

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    Norbert Gleicher

    Full Text Available We recently associated ovarian FMR1genotypes and sub-genotypes with distinct ovarian aging patterns. How they impact older females is, however, unknown. We, therefore, investigated 217 consecutive first in vitro fertilization (IVF cycles in women >40 assessing oocyte yields, stratified for better (anti-Müllerian hormone, AMH >1.05 ng/mL or poorer (AMH ≤ 1.05 ng/mL functional reserve (FOR. Mean age was 42.4 ± 2.0 years, mean AMH 0.76 ± 0.92 ng/mL and mean oocyte yield 5.3 ± 5.4. Overall, and in women with better FOR, FMR1 did not affect oocyte yields. With poorer FOR (AMH ≤ 1.05 ng/mL women with het-norm/high, however, demonstrated higher oocyte yields (5.0 ± 3.8 than those with het-norm/low sub-genotype 3.1 ± 2.5; P = 0.03, confirmed after log conversion. Known associated with low FOR at young age, het-norm/high, thus, appears to preserve FOR into older age, and both het sub-genotypes appear to expand female reproductive lifespan into opposite directions.

  4. A novel methylation PCR that offers standardized determination of FMR1 methylation and CGG repeat length without southern blot analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Marina; Boon, Elles M J; Filipovic-Sadic, Stela; van Bunderen, Patrick A; Gennaro, Elena; Cao, Ru; Latham, Gary J; Hadd, Andrew G; Coviello, Domenico A

    2014-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome and associated disorders are characterized by the number of CGG repeats and methylation status of the FMR1 gene for which Southern blot (SB) historically has been required for analysis. This study describes a simple PCR-only workflow (mPCR) to replace SB analysis, that incorporates novel procedural controls, treatment of the DNA in separate control and methylation-sensitive restriction endonuclease reactions, amplification with labeled primers, and two-color amplicon sizing by capillary electrophoresis. mPCR was evaluated in two independent laboratories with 76 residual clinical samples that represented typical and challenging fragile X alleles in both males and females. mPCR enabled superior size resolution and analytical sensitivity for size and methylation mosaicism compared to SB. Full mutation mosaicism was detected down to 1% in a background of 99% normal allele with 50- to 100-fold less DNA than required for SB. A low level of full mutation mosaicism in one sample was detected using mPCR but not observed using SB. Overall, the sensitivity for detection of full mutation alleles was 100% (95% CI: 89%-100%) with an accuracy of 99% (95% CI: 93%-100%). mPCR analysis of DNA from individuals with Klinefelter and Turner syndromes, and DNA from sperm and blood, were consistent with SB. As such, mPCR enables accurate, sensitive, and standardized methods of FMR1 analysis that can harmonize results across different laboratories.

  5. Mosaicism for FMR1 gene full mutation and intermediate allele in a female foetus: a postzygotic retraction event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Susana Isabel; Pires, Luís Miguel; Ferrão, José; Sá, Joaquim; Serra, Armando; Carreira, Isabel Marques

    2013-09-15

    Fragile X syndrome is caused by the expansion of an unstable CGG repeat in the 5'UTR of FMR1 gene. The occurrence of mosaicism is not uncommon, especially in male patients, whereas in females it is not so often reported. Here we report a female foetus that was subject to prenatal diagnosis, because of her mother being a premutation carrier. The foetus was identified as being a mosaic for an intermediate allele and a full mutation of FMR1 gene, in the presence of a normal allele. The mosaic status was confirmed in three different tissues of the foetus--amniotic fluid, skin biopsy and blood--the last two obtained after pregnancy termination. Karyotype analysis and X-chromosome STR markers analysis do not support the mosaicism as inheritance of both maternal alleles. Oligonucleotide array-CGH excluded an imbalance that could contain the primer binding site with a different repeat size. The obtained results give compelling evidence for a postzygotic expansion mechanism where the foetus mosaic pattern originated from expansion of the mother's premutation into a full mutation and consequent regression to an intermediate allele in a proportion of cells. These events occurred in early embryogenesis before the commitment of cells into the different tissues, as the three tested tissues of the foetus have the same mosaic pattern. The couple has a son with Fragile X mental retardation syndrome and choose to terminate this pregnancy after genetic counselling.

  6. 三十日龄Fmr1基因敲除小鼠的水迷宫实验观察%Behavioural comparision on Fmr1 knockout mice at 30 days age in Morris water maze experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙卫文; 黄越玲; 张维雯; 刘国彬; 沈岩松; 李敏雄; 戴丽军; 陈盛强

    2011-01-01

    目的 实验对30日龄的Fmr1基因敲除(KO)小鼠的经典Morris水迷宫实验进行观察.方法 采用Morris水迷宫实验,测试1月龄KO小鼠与WT小鼠的学习记忆功能.水迷宫实验共训练4 d,记录每天的潜伏期与游泳轨迹,第5天去除平台,记录小鼠停留各象限的时间百分比.根据所获得的数据进行多因素方差分析处理.结果 ①空间航行实验第1天至第3天实验中KO鼠与WT鼠的潜伏期和穿越平台次数差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);在第4天实验中KO鼠的潜伏期和穿越平台次数比WT鼠差异有统计学意义(JP<0.05).②空间搜索实验4周龄WT鼠在目标象限停留时间比其它象限停留时间长;4周龄KO鼠在第二象限停留时间长.结论 30日龄KO小鼠存在认知功能障碍.%Objective To compare the behaviour defferences at 30 days age in Morris water maze experiment.Methods Fmr1 knockout mice were identified using the PCR technique , and Morris water maze experiment were used in the study.The data was analyzed with Multifactor Variance Analysis.Results ①space navigation experiment from the first day to the third day, KO mice have no obviously difference with the WT mice in the Latency and number of crossing platform (P> 0.05) , but on the fourth day , there was a statistical significance (P< 0.05) ; ②Space search experiment.The four-week WT mice will stay longer than the other mice at the target quadrants; the four-week KO mice stay at the second quadrant longer.Conclusion Fmr1 knockout animals exhihited low ability of learning and memorizing in the Morris water maze task at 30 days Age.

  7. 钙结合蛋白Calbindin在FMR1基因敲除小鼠脑组织中的表达%The expression of calcium combined with protein Calbindin in little FMR-1 gene knockout rat brain tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭阳; 易咏红; 孙卫文

    2006-01-01

    目的探讨脆性X综合征中钙结合蛋白Calbindin在神经元树突棘形态异常中的作用.方法我们选用FVB品系的FMR1基因敲除型(KO)和野生型(WT)小鼠,分别取新生1、3、5、7、10、14 d,及成年(6周)的KO小鼠以及WT小鼠用免疫组织化学方法检测钙结合蛋白Calbindin在脑组织中的分布和表达情况,分别对大脑纹状皮质、海马、颞叶听区、梨状皮质、丘脑及小脑的免疫阳性显色细胞进行检测.结果在新生1 d龄WT型及KO型小鼠中Calbindin免疫阳性细胞首先出现于梨状皮质和小脑皮质中,随着天龄的增长脑内其他各区逐渐出现Calbindin免疫阳性细胞的表达,且≤10 dKO型小鼠Calbindin免疫阳性细胞平均光密度均显著高于WT型小鼠(P<0.05). 结论FMRP通过负性调节脑内钙结合蛋白Calbindin的表达,这推测与FMR1基因敲除小鼠神经元树突和树突棘形态异常有关.

  8. DNA diagnosis of the fragile X syndrome in a series of 236 mentally retarded subjects and evidence for a reversal of mutation in the FMR-1 gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouweland, A.M.W. van den; Vries, B.B.A. de; Bakker, P.L.G.; Deelen, W.H.; Graaff, E. de; Hemel, J.O. van; Oostra, B.A.; Niermeijer, M.F.; Halley, D.J.J. [Erasmus Univ., Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    1994-07-15

    The cloning of the FMR-1 gene and the identification of an expanded CGG repeat in DNA of fragile X patients has made reliable DNA diagnosis feasible. Southern blotting and PCR assays of the CGG repeat in an unselected series of 236 mentally retarded subjects resulted in the identification of 10 new fragile X families. Reevaluation of previously assessed fragile X families resulted in the first observation of the presence of a reversal of mutation in the FMR-1 gene. 21 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. Slight instability of a FMR-1 allele over three generations in a family from the general population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramowicz, M.J.; Parma, J.; Cochaux, P. [Brussels Univ. Clinic-Erasme Hospital, Brussels (Belgium)

    1996-08-09

    We report on a family segregating a FMR-1 allele within the {open_quotes}grey zone{close_quotes} of triplet repeat length (n = 51). The allele showed a 1-unit increment when transmitted through a female meiosis and a 1-unit increment when transmitted through a male of the next generation. At the following generation, a pregnant woman had amniocentesis performed. The latter showed she transmitted the allele unchanged (n = 53) to her male fetus. This family was not ascertained through an affected subject, and there was no family history of mental retardation. Thus our observation reflects the natural history of an unstable allele in the general population. Systematic analysis of such alleles may help refine our understanding of the grey zone of triplet repeat length. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  10. FMR1 CGG repeat distribution and linked microsatellite-SNP haplotypes in normal Mexican Mestizo and indigenous populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix-López, Xóchitl Adriana; Argüello-García, Raúl; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M; Peñaloza-Espinoza, Rosenda I; Buentello-Malo, Leonor; Estrada-Mena, Francisco Javier; Ramos-Kuri, Manuel; Gómez, Fabio Salamanca; Arenas-Aranda, Diego Julio

    2006-10-01

    The (CGG)n repeat size distribution in the FMR1 gene was studied in healthy individuals: 80 X chromosomes of Mexican Mestizos from Mexico City and 33 X chromosomes of Mexican Amerindians from three indigenous communities (Purepechas, Nahuas, and Tzeltales), along with alleles and haplotypes defined by two microsatellite polymorphic markers (DXS548 and FRAXAC1) and two single nucleotide polymorphisms (FMRA and FMRB). Genetic frequencies of Mestizo and Amerindian subpopulations were statistically similar in almost all cases and thus were considered one population for comparisons with other populations. Sixteen (CGG)n alleles in the 17-38 size range were observed, and the most common were the 25 (38.0%), 26 (28.3%), and 24 (12.3%) repeat alleles. This pattern differs from most other populations reported, but a closer relation to Amerindian, European, and African populations was found, as expected from the historical admixture that gave rise to Mexican Mestizos. The results of the CA repeats analysis at DXS548-FRAXAC1 were restricted to nine haplotypes, of which haplotypes 7-4 (52.2%), 8-4 (23.8%), and 7-3 (11.5%) were predominant. The modal haplotype 7-4, instead of the nearly universal haplotype 7-3, had been reported exclusively in Eastern Asian populations. Likewise, only seven different FRAXAC1-FMRA-FMRB haplotypes were observed, including five novel haplotypes (3TA, 4TA, 3 - A, 4 - A, and 5 - A), compared with Caucasians. Of these, haplotypes - A (78.7%) and 3 - A (13.2%) were the most common in the Mexican population. These data suggest a singular but relatively low genetic diversity at FMR1 in the studied Mexican populations that may be related to the recent origin of Mestizos and the low admixture rate of Amerindians.

  11. 针刺长强穴对FMR1基因敲除小鼠海马CA1区BDNF和SYN表达的影响%Effects of Acupuncturing at Changqiang on Expressions of BDNF and SYN in Hippocampal CA1 Area of FMR1 Gene Knockout Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩平; 俞萍; 陈可爱; 林栋; 张学君; 吴强

    2012-01-01

    目的 研究针刺长强穴对FMR1基因敲除小鼠海马CA1区脑源性神经营养因子(BDNF)与突触素(SYN)的表达. 方法 选取28日龄脆性X智力低下基因1(FMR1)缺失KO小鼠与野生型(WT)小鼠各30只,分为KO长强组、KO非穴组、KO空白组和WT长强组、WT非穴组、WT空白组,每组10只,检测小鼠海马CA1区BDNF、SYN蛋白的表达. 结果 FMR1基因敲除小鼠海马区BDNF的表达低于野生型小鼠;FMR1基因敲除小鼠长强组BDNF的表达明显高于非穴组和空白组;FMR1基因敲除小鼠海马区SYN的表达低于野生型小鼠;FMR1基因敲除小鼠长强组SYN的表达明显高于非穴组和空白组. 结论 针刺长强穴能上调FMR1基因敲除小鼠海马CA1区BDNF和SYN的表达.

  12. Pragmatic Language Features of Mothers With the FMR1 Premutation Are Associated With the Language Outcomes of Adolescents and Young Adults With Fragile X Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Sara E.; Abbeduto, Leonard; Roberts, Jane E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Pragmatic language difficulties have been documented as part of the FMR1 premutation phenotype, yet the interplay between these features in mothers and the language outcomes of their children with fragile X syndrome is unknown. This study aimed to determine whether pragmatic language difficulties in mothers with the FMR1 premutation are related to the language development of their children. Method Twenty-seven mothers with the FMR1 premutation and their adolescent/young adult sons with fragile X syndrome participated. Maternal pragmatic language violations were rated from conversational samples using the Pragmatic Rating Scale (Landa et al., 1992). Children completed standardized assessments of vocabulary, syntax, and reading. Results Maternal pragmatic language difficulties were significantly associated with poorer child receptive vocabulary and expressive syntax skills, with medium effect sizes. Conclusions This work contributes to knowledge of the FMR1 premutation phenotype and its consequences at the family level, with the goal of identifying modifiable aspects of the child's language-learning environment that may promote the selection of treatments targeting the specific needs of families affected by fragile X. Findings contribute to our understanding of the multifaceted environment in which children with fragile X syndrome learn language and highlight the importance of family-centered intervention practices for this group. PMID:26895548

  13. The RNA-binding proteins FMR1, rasputin and caprin act together with the UBA protein lingerer to restrict tissue growth in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Roland; Stocker, Hugo; Hafen, Ernst

    2013-01-01

    Appropriate expression of growth-regulatory genes is essential to ensure normal animal development and to prevent diseases like cancer. Gene regulation at the levels of transcription and translational initiation mediated by the Hippo and Insulin signaling pathways and by the TORC1 complex, respectively, has been well documented. Whether translational control mediated by RNA-binding proteins contributes to the regulation of cellular growth is less clear. Here, we identify Lingerer (Lig), an UBA domain-containing protein, as growth suppressor that associates with the RNA-binding proteins Fragile X mental retardation protein 1 (FMR1) and Caprin (Capr) and directly interacts with and regulates the RNA-binding protein Rasputin (Rin) in Drosophila melanogaster. lig mutant organs overgrow due to increased proliferation, and a reporter for the JAK/STAT signaling pathway is upregulated in a lig mutant situation. rin, Capr or FMR1 in combination as double mutants, but not the respective single mutants, display lig like phenotypes, implicating a redundant function of Rin, Capr and FMR1 in growth control in epithelial tissues. Thus, Lig regulates cell proliferation during development in concert with Rin, Capr and FMR1.

  14. The RNA-binding proteins FMR1, rasputin and caprin act together with the UBA protein lingerer to restrict tissue growth in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Baumgartner

    Full Text Available Appropriate expression of growth-regulatory genes is essential to ensure normal animal development and to prevent diseases like cancer. Gene regulation at the levels of transcription and translational initiation mediated by the Hippo and Insulin signaling pathways and by the TORC1 complex, respectively, has been well documented. Whether translational control mediated by RNA-binding proteins contributes to the regulation of cellular growth is less clear. Here, we identify Lingerer (Lig, an UBA domain-containing protein, as growth suppressor that associates with the RNA-binding proteins Fragile X mental retardation protein 1 (FMR1 and Caprin (Capr and directly interacts with and regulates the RNA-binding protein Rasputin (Rin in Drosophila melanogaster. lig mutant organs overgrow due to increased proliferation, and a reporter for the JAK/STAT signaling pathway is upregulated in a lig mutant situation. rin, Capr or FMR1 in combination as double mutants, but not the respective single mutants, display lig like phenotypes, implicating a redundant function of Rin, Capr and FMR1 in growth control in epithelial tissues. Thus, Lig regulates cell proliferation during development in concert with Rin, Capr and FMR1.

  15. Mapping Self-Reports of Working Memory Deficits to Executive Dysfunction in Fragile X Mental Retardation 1 ("FMR1") Gene Premutation Carriers Asymptomatic for FXTAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, Cary S.; Cornish, Kim M.

    2010-01-01

    Fragile X Syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder that is caused by the silencing of a single gene on the X chromosome, the Fragile X Mental Retardation 1 ("FMR1") gene. In recent years, the premutation ("carrier") status has received considerable attention and there is now an emerging consensus that despite intellectual functioning being within…

  16. Epigenetic characterization of the FMR1 gene and aberrant neurodevelopment in human induced pluripotent stem cell models of fragile X syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven D Sheridan

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome (FXS is the most common inherited cause of intellectual disability. In addition to cognitive deficits, FXS patients exhibit hyperactivity, attention deficits, social difficulties, anxiety, and other autistic-like behaviors. FXS is caused by an expanded CGG trinucleotide repeat in the 5' untranslated region of the Fragile X Mental Retardation (FMR1 gene leading to epigenetic silencing and loss of expression of the Fragile X Mental Retardation protein (FMRP. Despite the known relationship between FMR1 CGG repeat expansion and FMR1 silencing, the epigenetic modifications observed at the FMR1 locus, and the consequences of the loss of FMRP on human neurodevelopment and neuronal function remain poorly understood. To address these limitations, we report on the generation of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC lines from multiple patients with FXS and the characterization of their differentiation into post-mitotic neurons and glia. We show that clones from reprogrammed FXS patient fibroblast lines exhibit variation with respect to the predominant CGG-repeat length in the FMR1 gene. In two cases, iPSC clones contained predominant CGG-repeat lengths shorter than measured in corresponding input population of fibroblasts. In another instance, reprogramming a mosaic patient having both normal and pre-mutation length CGG repeats resulted in genetically matched iPSC clonal lines differing in FMR1 promoter CpG methylation and FMRP expression. Using this panel of patient-specific, FXS iPSC models, we demonstrate aberrant neuronal differentiation from FXS iPSCs that is directly correlated with epigenetic modification of the FMR1 gene and a loss of FMRP expression. Overall, these findings provide evidence for a key role for FMRP early in human neurodevelopment prior to synaptogenesis and have implications for modeling of FXS using iPSC technology. By revealing disease-associated cellular phenotypes in human neurons, these iPSC models will aid

  17. 中国女性对于FMR1突变产前筛查的态度调查%Acceptance of prenatal screening for FMR1 mutation in Chinese female population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张岚; 章远志

    2012-01-01

    Objective Study the attitude of Chinese female population on prenatal screening of FXS in order to investigate the feasibility of offering prenatal screening.Methods Two hundred and eighty four women with no family history of mental retardation or FXS were recruited in the study.They were grouped into:females married with child (ren) (67/284),females married without child (54/284),unmarried single women (163/284).Then the participants were tested whether they retained the basic genetic knowledge of fragile X by using the adapted questionnaire.Results The proportions of the women who preferred to have prenatal screening for FXS in each group were 77.6%,66.7% and 74.9%.Further more,95.5% of the women in the first female group would like to terminate the pregnancy if a positive result of FXS was reported,so did 92.6% of the women in the second female group and 90.2% of women in the third female group.Conclusion There is a big acceptance of prenatal screening for FMR1 mutation in Chinese female population.Most people would like to take prenatal screening of fragile X syndrome.%目的 调查中国女性对于脆性X综合征产前筛查的态度.方法 随机调查284位没有智力发育障碍及脆性X综合征家族史的女性,分为已婚已育(67/284)、已婚未育(54/284)及未婚未育(163/284)三组.结果 各组愿意接受产前筛查的比率分别为77.6%、66.7%及74.9%.而各组选择在得知产前筛查结果阳性时愿意终止妊娠的比率分别为95.5%、92.6%及90.2%.结论 在中国女性群体中对FMR1基因突变进行产前筛查有较高的接受度.大多数人选择接受针对脆X综合征的产前筛查.

  18. 30日龄Fmr1基因敲除小鼠的跳台实验观察%Behavioural Comparison of Fmr1 Knockout Mice at 30 Days Age in Step-down Test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄月玲; 沈岩松; 张维雯; 孙卫文; 李敏雄; 陈盛强; 戴丽军

    2011-01-01

    目的 对30日龄的Fmr1基因敲除小鼠的跳台实验进行观察.方法 采用30日龄的KO鼠和WT鼠分别连续进行2d的跳台实验,根据所获得的数据进行多因素方差分析处理.结果 同周龄KO鼠的潜伏期比WT鼠明显少(P<0.05);而KO鼠的错误次数比WT鼠明显多(P<0.05);不同周龄KO鼠或WT鼠的潜伏期、错误次数无差异(P>0.05);第1天KO鼠的潜伏期和错误次数与第2天相比无差异(P>0.05);第1天WT鼠的潜伏期和错误次数与第2天相比有显著差异(P<0.05).结论 30日龄Fmr1基因敲除小鼠存在认知功能障碍.%Objective This study was designed to observe the cognition of Fmrl knockout mice at 30 days Age instep-down test. Method Fmrl knockout mice were identified using the PCR technical and step-down test were used in the study. Animals were tested for two days. The latency and the number of errors were recorded. The data was analyzed with multifactor variance analysis. Result KO mice obviously had the shorter latency than WT mice, and KO mice obviously had more errors than WT mice ( P 0. 05 ) ; On the first day, the latency and number of errors of WT mice had significant difference compared with the second day ( P < 0.05 ). Conclusion Fmrl knockout mice displayed cognitive impairment in the step-down test.

  19. Health and reproductive experiences of women with an FMR1 premutation with and without fragile X premature ovarian insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Caroline Wheeler

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently, research has indicated an increased risk for greater medical and emotional comorbidity and physical health symptoms among women with an FMR1 expansion. However, these studies have generally been limited in their ability to model multiple risk factors associated with these symptoms by small numbers (n = 112 to 146 of participants. This study used survey methodology to examine the health experiences of 458 adult women with the premutation with and without a history of an FXPOI diagnosis. Results suggest similar findings to those reported in the literature with regard to the frequency of medical, emotional, and reproductive experiences of women with the premutation. In addition to expected reproductive differences, women with a diagnosis of FXPOI were also more likely to experience dizziness, nausea, and muscle weakness than women without a diagnosis of FXPOI. Women with and without FXPOI were more likely to have used reproductive assistance and were more likely to have experienced preeclampsia during at least one pregnancy than is reported in the general population. Having comorbid depression and anxiety was predictive of increased medical conditions and increased daily physical health symptoms.

  20. Extended gene diversity at the FMR1 locus and neighbouring CA repeats in a sub-Saharan population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiurazzi, Genuardi, M.; Neri, G. [Instituto di Genetica Medica, Roma (Italy)] [and others

    1996-07-12

    We report on the allele distributions in a normal black African population at two microsatellite loci neighbouring the FRAXA locus and at the CGG repeat in the 5{prime} end of the FMR1 gene, which causes the fragile X syndrome. The CGG repeat distribution was found to be similar to that of other ethnic groups, as well as to that of other non-human primates, possibly predicting a comparable prevalence of fragile X in Africa. Significant linkage disequilibrium has been observed between fragile X mutations and alleles of the DXS548 and FRAXAC1 loci in European and Asian populations, and some founder chromosomes may be extremely old. Those associated with FRAXAC1-A and DXS548-2 alleles are not present in the Asian fragile X samples. We searched for these alleles and their frequency in the well defined Bamileke population of Cameroon. All previously described alleles and some new ones were found in this sample, supporting the hypothesis of their pre-existence and subsequent loss in Asian populations. Finally, the heterozygosity of the Bamileke sample was significantly higher at both marker loci and comparable to that of Europeans at the CGG repeat, confirming the notion that genetic diversity is greater in Africans than in other groups and supporting the view that evolution of modern man started in Africa. 31 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  1. FMR-1 CGG transitions in male and female carriers of fragile X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolin, S.L.; Lewis, F.A. III; Ye, L.L. [New York State Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities, Staten Island, NY (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    We have conducted a preliminary analysis of the CGG transitions observed among the offspring of fragile X male and female carriers using the PCR method of Brown et al. A strong familial clustering was observed in maternal inheritance of the fragile X chromosome. Fifty-eight premutation females passed their fragile X alleles to mutiple offspring (total 134). Forty-nine of these women had 106 children with the full mutation. Nine mothers (2 in the 60-69 repeat range, 6 in the 80-89 range, 1 in the 90-99 range) had a total of 19 premutation and 3 full mutation children. These data suggest that a premutation carrier with 1 premutation child has a reduced risk for full mutation offspring independent of her CGG repeat size. Familial clustering was also observed in transmitting males. The daughters of transmitting males showed surprisingly little variation in CGG repeat size among each set of daughters. In twelve sibling sets, the daughters were within 10 CGGs of each other, 6 sets were within 11-18 repeats, and one set was within 40 repeats. Taken together, the male and female carrier data support the concept of a sequence or structure within or close to the CGG repeat which influences the expansion of the repeat during its transmission from parent to child. We also found that in transmitting males with > 90 repeats, the repeat was often meiotically unstable. In 5 of these males, 44% (7/16) meioses showed a reduction 2-20 CGGs inherited and all 5 fathers had at least 1 daughter with a size reduction. This finding suggests that repeats > 90 may not be stably transmitted in spermatocytes.

  2. Array-based techniques for fingerprinting medicinal herbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Charlie

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Poor quality control of medicinal herbs has led to instances of toxicity, poisoning and even deaths. The fundamental step in quality control of herbal medicine is accurate identification of herbs. Array-based techniques have recently been adapted to authenticate or identify herbal plants. This article reviews the current array-based techniques, eg oligonucleotides microarrays, gene-based probe microarrays, Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH-based arrays, Diversity Array Technology (DArT and Subtracted Diversity Array (SDA. We further compare these techniques according to important parameters such as markers, polymorphism rates, restriction enzymes and sample type. The applicability of the array-based methods for fingerprinting depends on the availability of genomics and genetics of the species to be fingerprinted. For the species with few genome sequence information but high polymorphism rates, SDA techniques are particularly recommended because they require less labour and lower material cost.

  3. Cell-Type Specific Channelopathies in the Prefrontal Cortex of the fmr1-/y Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome 1,2,3

    OpenAIRE

    Kalmbach, Brian E.; Johnston, Daniel; Brager, Darrin H.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is caused by transcriptional silencing of the fmr1 gene resulting in the loss of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) expression. FXS patients display several behavioral phenotypes associated with prefrontal cortex (PFC) dysfunction. Voltage-gated ion channels, some of which are regulated by FMRP, heavily influence PFC neuron function. Although there is evidence for brain region-specific alterations to the function a single type of ion channel in FXS, ...

  4. Development of Genetic Testing for Fragile X Syndrome and Associated Disorders, and Estimates of the Prevalence of FMR1 Expansion Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James N. Macpherson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The identification of a trinucleotide (CGG expansion as the chief mechanism of mutation in Fragile X syndrome in 1991 heralded a new chapter in molecular diagnostic genetics and generated a new perspective on mutational mechanisms in human genetic disease, which rapidly became a central paradigm (“dynamic mutation” as more and more of the common hereditary neurodevelopmental disorders were ascribed to this novel class of mutation. The progressive expansion of a CGG repeat in the FMR1 gene from “premutation” to “full mutation” provided an explanation for the “Sherman paradox,” just as similar expansion mechanisms in other genes explained the phenomenon of “anticipation” in their pathogenesis. Later, FMR1 premutations were unexpectedly found associated with two other distinct phenotypes: primary ovarian insufficiency and tremor-ataxia syndrome. This review will provide a historical perspective on procedures for testing and reporting of Fragile X syndrome and associated disorders, and the population genetics of FMR1 expansions, including estimates of prevalence and the influence of AGG interspersions on the rate and probability of expansion.

  5. The -413C > G substitution in the promoter of the FMR1 gene is not associated with the fragile X syndrome phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Marina; Cecconi, Massimiliano; Boni, Stefania; Forzano, Francesca; Barbaresi, Maurizio; Memo, Luigi; Perroni, Lucia; Faravelli, Francesca; Di Maria, Emilio

    2010-04-01

    Most common inherited form of intellectual disability, fragile X syndrome is associated to an expansion of greater than 200 CGG repeats in the 5' untranslated region of the FMR1 gene on the X chromosome which causes transcriptional silencing and deficiency of the encoded protein FMRP. Molecular diagnosis is performed through a combination of PCR to identify fewer than 100-150 repeats and of Southern blot analysis to identify longer alleles and the methylation status of the FMR1 promoter. We present a family with one patient with mild mental retardation who showed an atypical profile at Southern analysis due to the -413C > G transversion located in the FMR1 promoter which had been described as possibly associated with mental retardation. We demonstrated this variant in other four family members along three generations, including the maternal grandfather who did not manifest any pathological feature. Though the -413C > G substitution was not found in a large control series, these findings allowed to exclude its role in determining the disease phenotype.

  6. Fmr1基因在大鼠快速眼动睡眠剥夺后脑皮质、海马和丘脑区的表达%Expressions of gene Fmr1 in rat cortex, hippocampus and thalamus areas after the rapid eyes movement sleep deprivation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范贵民; 武冬梅; 王培君; 熊慧; 杨迎峰; 范洪儒; 王景涛

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression of gene Fmr1 in rats cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus areas after the rapid eyes movement ( REM ) sleep deprivation .Methods Using the modified multiple platform method (MMPM), 126 rats were randomly and averagely divided into three groups , the normal control group ( CC), the environmental control group (TC) and the sleep deprivation group (SD).Each group was detected on day 1, day 2, day 3, day 5, day 7, and day 9, and the sample tissues were extracted from 7 rats at each time point.Immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR were operated to analysis the expression of gene Fmr 1.Results The expressions of gene Fmr1 were increased gradually in the cortex and thalamus of the SD group after 3 days ( P 0.05).The expressions of gene Fmr1 were decreased gradually in hippocampus for SD after 3 days ( P 0.05 ) . Conclusion The expressions of gene Fmr 1 were increased gradually in the cortex and thalamus but decreased in the hippocampus in the SD group after 3 days.%目的:探讨快速眼动( REM)睡眠剥夺过程中Fmr1基因在大鼠皮质、海马和丘脑区的表达及变化。方法采用改良多平台水环境法( MMPM )制作大鼠睡眠剥夺模型,采用免疫组织化学法及RT-PCR方法检测Fmr1基因的表达变化。结果在皮质和丘脑中,与CC组和TC组相比,SD1d和SD2d组的Fmr1基因表达无明显变化,SD3d组开始增高(P<0.05),SD5d、SD7d组和SD9d组显著增高(P<0.01);在海马中,与CC组和TC组相比,SD1d和SD2d组的Fmr1基因表达无明显变化,SD3d组开始降低(P<0.05),SD5d、SD7d组和SD9d组显著降低(P<0.01)。结论Fmr1基因在大鼠睡眠剥夺第3天开始表达发生变化,在皮质和丘脑中表达增高,在海马中表达降低。

  7. Expression of neuregulin 1 and its significance in brain tissues of FMR1 gene knockout mice%Fmr1基因敲除小鼠脑组织神经调节蛋白1表达的改变及其意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢韬; 欧阳梅; 周林涛; 易咏红

    2013-01-01

    目的 明确神经调节蛋白1 (NRG1)在Fmr1基因敲除(KO)小鼠中的变化,探讨其在脆性X综合征发病机制中的作用. 方法 应用免疫组织化学染色法检测FVB近交系雄性2周龄Fmr1 KO小鼠(KO2w)、4周龄Fmr1 KO小鼠(KO4w)和同龄野生型(WT)小鼠大脑皮层及海马CA1区、CA3区、齿状回中神经调节蛋白1的阳性神经元的数量;Western blotting检测上述小鼠大脑皮层和海马组织NRG1蛋白的含量. 结果 与同龄WT小鼠相比,KO2w、KO4w小鼠大脑皮层、海马CA1和CA3区NRG1阳性神经元的数量明显减少,在海马齿状回却明显增多,差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05);KO2w、KO4w小鼠大脑皮层、海马中NRG1含量(相对分子质量为55 000亚型)分别较同龄的WT小鼠明显减少,差异亦有统计学意义(P<0.05). 结论 Fmr1 KO小鼠大脑皮层和海马组织NRG1阳性神经元及NRG1蛋白表达明显减少,NRG1可能参与脆性X综合征发病机制.%Objective To explore the expression changes ofneuregulin 1 (NRG1) in Fmr1 gene knockout (Fmr1 KO) mice,and its possible role in fragile X syndrome pathogenesis.Methods Immunohistochemistry and Western blotting were simultaneously employed to detect the expression levels of NRG 1 in the hippocampus and the cortex of FVB strain Fmr1 KO mice and wild type (WT) controls at the age of 2 and 4 weeks.Results The number of NRG1-positive cells in the CA1 and CA3 regions of hippocampus and the cortex of Fmr1 KO mice at the age of 2 and 4 weeks was significantly smaller than that in the age-matched WT mice (P<0.05).The NRG1 protein levels in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of Fmr1 KO mice at the age of 2 and 4 weeks were also decreased as compared with those in the age-matched WT mice (P<0.05).Conclusion The number of NRG1-positive cells and NRG1 protein levels in the CA1 and CA3 regions of hippocampus and the cortex of Fmr1 KO mice are decreased,indicating that NRG 1 might involve in the pathogenesis of Fragile X

  8. Biophysical characterization of G-quadruplex forming FMR1 mRNA and of its interactions with different fragile X mental retardation protein isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blice-Baum, Anna C; Mihailescu, Mihaela-Rita

    2014-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome, the most common form of inherited mental impairment in humans, is caused by the absence of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) due to a CGG trinucleotide repeat expansion in the 5'-untranslated region (UTR) and subsequent translational silencing of the fragile x mental retardation-1 (FMR1) gene. FMRP, which is proposed to be involved in the translational regulation of specific neuronal messenger RNA (mRNA) targets, contains an arginine-glycine-glycine (RGG) box RNA binding domain that has been shown to bind with high affinity to G-quadruplex forming mRNA structures. FMRP undergoes alternative splicing, and the binding of FMRP to a proposed G-quadruplex structure in the coding region of its mRNA (named FBS) has been proposed to affect the mRNA splicing events at exon 15. In this study, we used biophysical methods to directly demonstrate the folding of FMR1 FBS into a secondary structure that contains two specific G-quadruplexes and analyze its interactions with several FMRP isoforms. Our results show that minor splice isoforms, ISO2 and ISO3, created by the usage of the second and third acceptor sites at exon 15, bind with higher affinity to FBS than FMRP ISO1, which is created by the usage of the first acceptor site. FMRP ISO2 and ISO3 cannot undergo phosphorylation, an FMRP post-translational modification shown to modulate the protein translation regulation. Thus, their expression has to be tightly regulated, and this might be accomplished by a feedback mechanism involving the FMRP interactions with the G-quadruplex structures formed within FMR1 mRNA.

  9. Effects of FMR1 Gene Knockout on Reproductive Performance of C57BL/6 Mice Based on Gene Identification%基于子代基因型鉴定技术研究FMR1敲除对C57BL/6小鼠繁殖性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢金东; 杨燕燕; 林玮; 俞春英; 周建华; 刘德强; 王训立

    2015-01-01

    为探讨FMR1基因敲除对C57BL/6小鼠繁殖性能的影响,将FMR1基因敲除杂合子小鼠饲养于SPF环境,依照遗传学规则进行繁育,并采用PCR法利用小鼠尾部组织鉴定子代小鼠的基因型.结果表明,PCR技术可以检测小鼠的基因型,且具有方便快捷、直观可靠的特点.子代经过检测可得野生型、杂合子和纯合子3种基因型;在此鉴定基础上,挑选10周龄C57BL/6 FMR1 KO和同源SPF级C57BL/6种鼠各10对,采取1∶1全同胞兄妹近亲繁殖的方法,测定各对第2胎仔鼠的繁殖性能,并进行比较分析.结果显示,C57BL/6 FMR1 KO小鼠在窝产仔数、离乳率、初生鼠体重和体长、离乳体长及雌雄比例等数值偏低,但均差异不显著(P>0.05);而两者的离乳体重差异极显著(P<0.01).

  10. Analysis of FMR1 (CGG)(n) alleles and DXS548-FRAXAC1 haplotypes in three European circumpolar populations: traces of genetic relationship with Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, L A; Vuust, J; Nystad, M; Evseeva, I; Van Ghelue, M; Tranebjaerg, L

    2001-09-01

    Fragile X syndrome, the most common form of inherited mental retardation, is caused by expansion of a (CGG)(n) repeat located in the FMR1 gene. The molecular factors involved in the mutation process from stable (CGG)(n) alleles towards unstable alleles are largely unknown, although family transmission studies and population studies have suggested that loss of AGG interruptions in the (CGG)(n) repeat is essential. We have analysed the AGG interspersion pattern of the FMR1 (CGG)(n) repeat and the haplotype distribution of closely located microsatellite markers DXS548 and FRAXAC1, in three circumarctic populations: Norwegians, Nenets and Saami. The data confirm the conservation, reported in all human populations studied so far, of an AGG interruption for each 9-10 CGG and support the stabilising effect of AGG interruptions. The data also indicate the existence of chromosomes of Asian origin in the Saami and Nenets population, thereby confirming a genetic relationship between Northern Europe and Asia. DXS548-FRAXAC1 haplotype frequencies were compared between 24 Norwegian fragile X males and 119 normal males. Significant linkage disequilibrium were found between the fragile X mutation and haplotype 6-4 and between normal (CGG)(n) alleles and haplotype 7-3.

  11. FMR1基因敲除小鼠脑组织微白蛋白表达的改变及其意义%Changes and significance of expression of parvalbumin in brain tissues of FMR1 gene knockout mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邸伟; 易咏红; 曾志涌; 徐明明; 王玉良; 孙卫文; 廖卫平

    2010-01-01

    目的 探讨微白蛋白(PV)阳性中间神经元在脆性X综合征(FXS)癫痫易感性增加中的作用. 方法 应用免疫组织化学染色检测FVB近交系雄性2、4、6 W龄FMR1基因敲除型(KO)(KO2W、KO4W、KO6W)和同龄野生型(WT)(WT2W、WT4W、WT6W)小鼠大脑纹状皮质、颞听皮质、梨状皮质及海马CA1区、CA3区、齿状回中PV的表达(n=6);应用Western blot法检测上述小鼠大脑皮层、海马组织PV的含量(n=6). 结果 KO2W、KO44W小鼠的大脑纹状皮质、颞听皮质、梨状皮质、海马CA1和CA3区PV阳性中间神经元的数量分别较WT2W、WT4-小鼠减少,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);KO2W和KO4W小鼠大脑皮层、海马中PV含量分别较WT2W、WT4W小鼠减少,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05). 结论 PV阳性中间神经元及PV含量的减少.可能是引起FXS模型鼠癫痫易感性增加的主要原因.%Objective To explore the possible role of parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneuron in the pathogenesis of increased susceptibility to epileptic seizures in FMR1 gene knockout (FMR1 KO)mice. Methods Immunohistochemistry was employed to determine the expression of PV in CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus, the striate cortex, the temporal auditory cortex and the piriform cortex of FVB strain FMR1 KO mice and wild type (WT) controls at the age of 2, 4 and 6 w. Western blotting was used to detect the level of PV in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of the above mice. Results The numbers of PV-positive interneuron in CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus, the striate cortex,the temporal auditory cortex and the piriform cortex of FMR1 KO mice at the age of 2 and 4 w were significantly decreased as compared with those in the age-matched WT mice (P<0.05). The level of PV in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus in FMR1 KO mice at the age of 2 and 4 w was also significantly decreased than that in the age-matched WT mice (P<0.05). Conclusion Decreased numbers of PV-positive interneuron and level of PV

  12. Premutation in the Fragile X Mental Retardation 1 (FMR1 Gene Affects Maternal Zn-milk and Perinatal Brain Bioenergetics and Scaffolding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora eNapoli

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X premutation alleles have 55-200 CGG repeats in the 5' UTR of the FMR1 gene. Altered zinc (Zn homeostasis has been reported in fibroblasts from > 60 y old premutation carriers, in which Zn supplementation significantly restored Zn-dependent mitochondrial protein import/processing and function. Given that mitochondria play a critical role in synaptic transmission, brain function, and cognition, we tested FMRP protein expression, brain bioenergetics and expression of the Zn-dependent synaptic scaffolding protein SH3 and multiple ankyrin repeat domains 3 (Shank3 in a knock-in (KI premutation mouse model with 180 CGG repeats. Mitochondrial outcomes correlated with FMRP protein expression (but not FMR1 gene expression in KI mice and human fibroblasts from carriers of the pre- and full mutation. Significant deficits in brain bioenergetics, Zn levels, and Shank3 protein expression were observed in the Zn-rich regions KI hippocampus and cerebellum at PND21, with some of these effects lasting into adulthood (PND210. A strong genotype x age interaction was observed for most of the outcomes tested in hippocampus and cerebellum, whereas in cortex, age played a major role. Given that the most significant effects were observed at the end of the lactation period, we hypothesized that KI milk might have a role at compounding the deleterious effects on the FMR1 genetic background. A higher gene expression of ZnT4 and ZnT6, Zn transporters abundant in brain and lactating mammary glands, was observed in the latter tissue of KI dams. A cross-fostering experiment allowed improving cortex bioenergetics in KI pups nursing on WT milk. Conversely, WT pups nursing on KI milk showed deficits in hippocampus and cerebellum bioenergetics. A highly significant milk type x genotype interaction was observed for all three-brain regions, being cortex the most influenced. Finally, lower milk-Zn levels were recorded in milk from lactating women carrying the premutation as

  13. Depression and anxiety symptoms among women who carry the FMR1 premutation: impact of raising a child with fragile X syndrome is moderated by CRHR1 polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Jessica Ezzell; Leslie, Mary; Novak, Gloria; Hamilton, Debra; Shubeck, Lisa; Charen, Krista; Abramowitz, Ann; Epstein, Michael P; Lori, Adriana; Binder, Elisabeth; Cubells, Joseph F; Sherman, Stephanie L

    2012-07-01

    The fragile X mental retardation gene, FMR1, contains a polymorphic CGG repeat in the 5'-untranslated region of exon 1. Once unstable, this repeat is capable of expansion across generations. Women who carry a premutation allele (55-199 repeats) are at risk of passing on a full mutation allele (>200 repeats) to their offspring. A full mutation leads to the most common form of inherited intellectual disability, fragile X syndrome (FXS). Mounting evidence suggests that premutation carriers may be vulnerable to symptoms of anxiety and depression. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that among women who carry a premutation, the stress of raising a child with FXS would be moderated by genetic factors influencing endogenous cortisol responses, which could in turn modulate anxiety and depression symptoms. To this end, we genotyped single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at the corticotrophin releasing hormone receptor 1 locus (CRHR1) in 460 women. Participants completed self-report questionnaires assessing symptoms of depression [Centers for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CESD)], anxiety [State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory (SPAI)], and mood [Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS)]. Results indicate a statistically significant interaction between CRHR1 genotype and the status of raising a child with FXS to predict social anxiety symptoms reported on the SPAI (rs7209436, P = 0.0001). Our data suggest that genetic variants in CRHR1 that associate with differential cortisol activation may also modulate levels of anxiety related to the stress of raising a child with FXS among women who carry an FMR1 premutation.

  14. Intervention Effect of α-Asarone on the Locomotor Activity in Fmr1 Gene Knockout Mice%α-细辛醚对Fmr1基因敲除小鼠的自主活动的干预作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴杰贤; 陈希; 张伟雯; 黄月玲; 孙祺章; 黄小燕; 陈盛强; 孙卫文; 戴丽军

    2014-01-01

    目的 探讨α-细辛醚对Fmr1基因敲除小鼠的自主活动的干预作用.方法 选取30日龄Fmr1基因敲除小鼠(KO小鼠)和FVB野生型小鼠(WT小鼠)为研究对象,将KO和WT两种类型的小鼠分别分为7小组,每组15只.其中1组作为对照组给予生理盐水,另外6小组连续腹腔注射不同剂量α-细辛醚(3 mg/kg、6 mg/kg、9 mg/kg、12 mg/kg、24 mg/kg、36mg/kg)5天,用药第5天进行自主活动行为学实验,观察α-细辛醚能否改善KO鼠的过度活动的表型.结果 在行为学自主活动实验中,KO鼠的活动次数比WT鼠的活动次数多,站立次数比WT鼠的站立次数少,差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05);使用α-细辛醚后,KO鼠的活动次数明显减少,站立次数明显增多,差异均具有统计学意义(P均<0.05).结论 α-细辛醚能改善KO鼠的的活动过度的表型,可能对Fmr1基因敲除小鼠有治疗作用.

  15. 柴胡桂枝汤挥发油对Fmr1基因敲除小鼠脑组织超氧化物歧化酶和丙二醛及一氧化氮的影响%Influence of Bupleuri and Ramuli Cinnamomi Decoction on Levels of Malondialdehyde,Nitrogen Monoxidum and Superoxide Dismutase in FMR-1 Gene Knockout Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高飞; 黄庆晖; 黄越玲; 孙卫文; 戴丽军; 沈岩松; 李敏雄; 陈盛强; 刘忠民

    2010-01-01

    目的 利用超临界二氧化碳(CO2)萃取法获取柴胡桂枝汤挥发油,并在Fmr1基因敲除小鼠(脆性基因敲除小鼠)模型上观察柴胡桂枝汤挥发油的抗癫痫作用,及其与超氧化物歧化酶(SOD )、丙二醛(MDA)、一氧化氮(NO)的关系.方法 将30只30日龄的Fmr1基因敲除小鼠(KO)和30只30日龄的野生型小鼠(WT)分别分成两组(KO空白组和KO用药组,WT空白组和WT用药组),按1.7 ml/kg的剂量腹腔注射柴胡桂枝汤挥发油,观察柴胡桂枝汤挥发油对小鼠旷场行为的影响,并取不同部位的小鼠脑组织制成1∶ 10(重量体积比) 的组织匀浆,测定SOD活性及MDA、NO的水平.结果 与空白组比较,用药组小鼠在旷场实验中运动的平均速度、总路程、穿过各区的次数减少;脑组织中SOD活性增高,而MDA、NO水平均降低,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 柴胡桂枝汤挥发油对Fmr1基因敲除小鼠的探索性、兴奋性、运动性均有抑制作用;其抗癫痫作用与清除自由基、阻止过氧化物生成,减少NO的神经毒性相关.

  16. Abductive Inference using Array-Based Logic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jeppe Revall; Falster, Peter; Møller, Gert L.;

    The notion of abduction has found its usage within a wide variety of AI fields. Computing abductive solutions has, however, shown to be highly intractable in logic programming. To avoid this intractability we present a new approach to logicbased abduction; through the geometrical view of data...... employed in array-based logic we embrace abduction in a simple structural operation. We argue that a theory of abduction on this form allows for an implementation which, at runtime, can perform abductive inference quite efficiently on arbitrary rules of logic representing knowledge of finite domains....

  17. Normal number of CGG repeats in the FMR-1 gene and abnormal incorporation of fibrillin into the extracellular matrix in Lujan Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenhaw, G.A.; Stone, C.; Milewicz, D. [Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Lujan syndrome is an X-linked condition that includes mild-to-moderate mental retardation, poor social integration, normal secondary sexual development with normal testicular size, generalized hypotonia, hypernasal voice and dolichostenomelia. Major cardiac complications and lens dislocation have not been reported although severe myopia may occur. All reported cases have had negative cytogenetic screening for fra(X) syndrome but establishing this constellation of findings as a distinctive entity has been difficult. We report 4 males in two sibships with clinical findings consistent with Lujan syndrome, normal karyotypes, negative cytogenetic screening for fra(X) syndrome and a normal number of CGG repeats in the FMR-1 gene. Dermal fibroblasts explanted from one of the affected males were used to study fibrillin synthesis secretion and extracellular matrix incorporation into microfibrils. Cells from the affected individual showed normal synthesis and secretion of fibrillin when compared to control cells, but the fibrillin was not incorporated into the extracellular matrix. These results suggest the presence of a gene on the X chromosome which may play a role in microfibril assembly and when deficient may disrupt the incorporation of fibrillin into microfibrils. This may be important not only in normal body morphogenesis but also in the development/function of the brain. More affected individuals are needed to investigate these findings further.

  18. Associated Clinical Disorders Diagnosed by Medical Specialists in 188 FMR1 Premutation Carriers Found in the Last 25 Years in the Spanish Basque Country: A Retrospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, Sonia; Ibarluzea, Nekane; Maortua, Hiart; Prieto, Begoña; Rouco, Idoia; López-Aríztegui, Maria-Asunción; Tejada, Maria-Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) and fragile X-associated primary ovarian insufficiency (FXPOI) are definitely related to the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) premutation (PM). Additional medical problems have also been associated with the PM, such as fibromyalgia, endocrine, and psychiatric disorders. To improve our understanding in the field, we reviewed all PM carriers and their reasons for any medical referrals from 104 fragile X families molecularly diagnosed in our laboratory and living in the Spanish Basque Country. After signing the written informed consent, we studied their electronic medical records in order to identify the disorders associated with the PM and their frequencies. We obtained clinical data in 188 PM carriers (147 women and 41 men). In women, the frequency of FXPOI (22.61%) was similar to that previously reported in PM carriers. In men, the frequency of definite FXTAS (28.57%) was lower than reported elsewhere. Furthermore, thyroid pathology was associated with the PM, the frequency of hypothyroidism being much higher in the studied region than in the general population (8.84% vs. 0.93%). Finally, we found no association with fibromyalgia or psychiatric problems. These findings represent another population contribution in this field and may be useful for the clinical management of PM carriers. PMID:27775646

  19. A fragile X male with a broad smear on southern blot analysis representing 100-500 CGG repeats and no methylation at the EagI site of the FMR-1 gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lachiewicz, A.M.; Spiridigliozzi, G.A.; McConkie-Rosell, A. [Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-09

    Fragile X DNA studies were carried out on all obligate carriers of a large fragile X family with 10 mentally retarded individuals. One 64-year-old carrier man with an altered FMR-1 allele was not described as being mentally retarded or as having any limitations in function. He was married, raised 8 children, and worked as an auto mechanic. On examination, he had macrocephaly and mild macroorchidism but few of the other typical physical findings of males with fragile X syndrome. His Full Scale IQ is 73, and his Vineland Adaptive Behavior Composite is 73. On the Woodcock-Johnson Psycho-Educational Battery-Revised, he achieved standard scores of 64 in Reading, 55 in Math, and 83 in Knowledge. His DNA findings showed a broad smear on Southern blot analysis of 100-500 CGG repeats and no methylation at the EagI site upstream of the FMR-1 protein coding region. His FMR-1 protein production is 12% of normal. His daughters all have large premutations, with somatic instability in the size of the CGG repeat lengths. They all have evidence of academic underachievement and 2 have physical characteristics frequently described in individuals with fragile X. 21 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Expression of Nav1.1 and its significance in brain tissues of FMR1 knockout mice%FMR1基因敲除小鼠脑组织中Nav1.1的改变及其意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邸伟; 吕桦; 刘军; 廖卫平; 易咏红

    2015-01-01

    目的 探讨Nav1.1在脆性X综合征(FXS)癫痫易感性增加中的可能作用.方法 选用2周龄、4周龄的FVB品系FMR1基因敲除型小鼠(KO2周和KO4周)及同龄野生型小鼠(WT2周和WT4周)为实验对象,应用免疫组化染色方法检测小鼠大脑纹状皮质、颞听皮质、梨状皮质、海马CA1区、CA3区及齿状回中Nav1.1的表达;应用Western blotting检测小鼠大脑皮层和海马组织Nav1.1蛋白含量.结果 免疫组化染色结果显示:KO2周和KO4周小鼠大脑纹状皮质、颞听皮质、梨状皮质、海马CA1区及齿状回区Nav1.1表达的平均吸光度值(2周:0.058±0.006、0.054±0.006、0.130±0.015、0.090±0.009、0.142±0.010;4周:0.066±0.007、0.060±0.007、0.159±0.018、0.102±0.015、0.192±0.025)分别较WT2周和WT4周小鼠(2周:0.049±0.007、0.046±0.007、0.118±0.012、0.080±0.009、0.133±0.010;4周:0.051±0.007、0.048±0.005、0.127±0.012、0.089±0.012、0.175±0.024)明显增多,差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05).Western b1otting检测结果显示:KO2周和KO4周小鼠大脑皮层、海马组织Nav1.1蛋白含量(2周:0.635±0.082、0.954±0.111;4周:0.819±0.064、1.145±0.159)分别较WT2周和WT4周小鼠(2周:0.382±0.025、0.555±0.056;4周:0.550±0.040、0.847±0.127)明显增多,差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 Nav1.1表达增多可能是引起FXS模型小鼠癫痫易感性增加的原因之一.%Objective To explore the possible role of Nav 1.1 in the pathogenesis of increased susceptibility to epileptic seizures in FMR1 knockout (FMR1 KO) mice.Methods FVB strain FMR1 KO mice and wild type (WT) controls at ages of 2 and 4 weeks old were chosen;immunohistochemistry was used to determine the expression of Nav 1.1 in different brain regions (striate cortex,temporal cortex,piriform cortex,hippocampus CA1,CA3 and dentate gyrus),and Western blotting was used to determine the Nav1.1 level in the cerebral acustici cortex and hippocampus.Results The mean optical density

  1. MicroRNA-134在FMR1基因敲除鼠脑组织中的表达及意义%Expression and significance of microRNA-134 in mouse brain tissue with FMR1 gene knockout

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾志涌; 邸伟; 肖都; 孙逊沙; 王玉良; 欧阳梅; 易咏红

    2010-01-01

    Objective To observe the expression ofmicroRNA-134 (miR-134) in the mouse brain tissue with FMR1 gene knockout during the different development periods and its expression characteristic, and explore whether the deficiency of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) can induce the changes of miR-134 transcription. Methods FVB strain male mice, including FMR1 gene knockout (KO, n=15) and their wild type (WT, n=15) counterparts were chosen in the experiment. The expressions of miR-134 in the brain tissues of these KO mice that were 0 d, 4 and 6 w old and the age-matched WT mice were detected by qRT-PCR. Results The transcriptional level of miR-134 in the brain tissue of KO mice had no significant difference as compared with that of age-matched WT mice (P>0.05). The transcriptional levels of miR-134 in 6-w-old KO and WT mice were significantly decreased as compared with the newbom and 4-w-old same genotype mice (P<0.05). Conclusion The absence of FMRP does not influence the transcription of miR-134 and the transcriptional level of miR-134 in the brain tissues maintains a high level during the developmental stage of the nervous system and gradually decreases to a low level after grow-up, demonstrating its important role in regulating the development of nervous system.%目的 观察脆性X综合征(FXS)模型小鼠不同发育时期脑组织中microRNA-134(miR-134)的表达,明确miR-134的表达特点及脆性X智力低下蛋白(FMRP)缺失是否导致miR-134转录的改变. 方法 应用荧光实时定量PCR检测FVB近交系雄性0 d、4、6周(W)龄FMR1基因敲除型(KO)(KO0d、KO4w、KO6w)和同龄野生型(WT)(WT0d、WT4w、WT6w)小鼠脑组织中miR-134的表达(n=5). 结果同龄KO与WT小鼠miR-134的转录表达量差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);KO6w小鼠脑组织miR-134的转录表达量低于KO0d和KO2w小鼠,WT6w小鼠脑组织miR-134的转录表达量也低于WT0d和WT2w小鼠,差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05). 结论 FMRp

  2. Estrategia de genotipado del gen FMR1: Método de diagnóstico alternativo para el Síndrome X Frágil y otras enfermedades por expansión de trinucleotidos

    OpenAIRE

    Lindo-Samanamud, Saúl; Servicio de Neurogenética, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Neurológicas, Lima. Escuela de Genética y Biotecnología y Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima.; Cornejo-Olivas, Mario; Servicio de Neurogenética, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Neurológicas. Lima, Perú. Washington Universtity International Fogarty Scholar´s Program. Lima, Perú. Médico neurólogo.; Ortega, Olimpio; Servicio de Neurogenética, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Neurológicas. Lima, Perú. Biólogo, genetista.; Marca, Victoria; Servicio de Neurogenética, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Neurológicas, Lima; Espinoza-Huertas, Keren; Servicio de Neurogenética, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Neurológicas, Lima. Escuela de Genética y Biotecnología y Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima.; Mazzetti, Pilar; Servicio de Neurogenética, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Neurológicas. Lima, Perú. Facultad de Medicina Humana, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima, Perú. Médico neurólogo, Magíster en Gestión Pública.

    2013-01-01

    Objetivos: Diseñar una estrategia alternativa por PCR para el genotipado de secuencias ricas en citosinas, basada en modificación nucleotídica. Material y métodos: Se modificó el gen FMR1 nativo de ocho individuos clínicamente no afectados por el Síndrome X frágil, cambiando las citosinas por uracilos, empleando bisulfito de sodio. El ADN modificado fue purificado y cuantificado por espectrofotometría. Las estructuras alternativas y potenciales islas CpG que adopta el microsatélite inestable ...

  3. Novel agonists for serotonin 5-HT7 receptors reverse metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated long-term depression in the hippocampus of wild-type and Fmr1 KO mice, a model of Fragile X Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Lara; Sardone, Lara M; Lacivita, Enza; Leopoldo, Marcello; Ciranna, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin 5-HT7 receptors are expressed in the hippocampus and modulate the excitability of hippocampal neurons. We have previously shown that 5-HT7 receptors modulate glutamate-mediated hippocampal synaptic transmission and long-term synaptic plasticity. In particular, we have shown that activation of 5-HT7 receptors reversed metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated long-term depression (mGluR-LTD) in wild-type (wt) and in Fmr1 KO mice, a mouse model of Fragile X Syndrome in which mGluR-LTD is abnormally enhanced, suggesting that 5-HT7 receptor agonists might be envisaged as a novel therapeutic strategy for Fragile X Syndrome. In this perspective, we have characterized the basic in vitro pharmacokinetic properties of novel molecules with high binding affinity and selectivity for 5-HT7 receptors and we have tested their effects on synaptic plasticity using patch clamp on acute hippocampal slices. Here we show that LP-211, a high affinity selective agonist of 5-HT7 receptors, reverses mGluR-LTD in wt and Fmr1 KO mice, correcting a synaptic malfunction in the mouse model of Fragile X Syndrome. Among novel putative agonists of 5-HT7 receptors, the compound BA-10 displayed improved affinity and selectivity for 5-HT7 receptors and improved in vitro pharmacokinetic properties with respect to LP-211. BA-10 significantly reversed mGluR-LTD in the CA3-CA1 synapse in wt and Fmr1KO mice, indicating that BA-10 behaved as a highly effective agonist of 5-HT7 receptors and reduced exaggerated mGluR-LTD in a mouse model of Fragile X Syndrome. On the other side, the compounds RA-7 and PM-20, respectively arising from in vivo metabolism of LP-211 and BA-10, had no effect on mGluR-LTD thus did not behave as agonists of 5-HT7 receptors in our conditions. The present results provide information about the structure-activity relationship of novel 5-HT7 receptor agonists and indicate that LP-211 and BA-10 might be used as novel pharmacological tools for the therapy of Fragile X Syndrome.

  4. Novel agonists for serotonin 5-HT7 receptors reverse metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated long-term depression in the hippocampus of wild-type and Fmr1 KO mice, a model of Fragile X Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara eCosta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin 5-HT7 receptors are expressed in the hippocampus and modulate the excitability of hippocampal neurons. We have previously shown that 5-HT7 receptors modulate glutamate-mediated hippocampal synaptic transmission and long-term synaptic plasticity. In particular, we have shown that activation of 5-HT7 receptors reversed metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated long-term depression (mGluR-LTD in wild-type (wt and in Fmr1 KO mice, a mouse model of Fragile X syndrome in which mGluR-LTD is abnormally enhanced, suggesting that 5-HT7 receptor agonists might be envisaged as a novel therapeutic strategy for Fragile X syndrome. In this perspective, we have characterized the basic in vitro pharmacokinetic properties of novel molecules with high binding affinity and selectivity for 5-HT7 receptors and we have tested their effects on synaptic plasticity using patch clamp on acute hippocampal slices.Here we show that LP-211, a high affinity selective agonist of 5-HT7 receptors, reverses mGluR-LTD in wt and Fmr1 KO mice, correcting a synaptic malfunction in the mouse model of Fragile X syndrome. Among novel putative agonists of 5-HT7 receptors, the compound BA-10 displayed improved affinity and selectivity for 5-HT7 receptors and improved in vitro pharmacokinetic properties with respect to LP-211. BA-10 significantly reversed mGluR-LTD in the CA3-CA1 synapse in wt and Fmr1KO mice, indicating that BA-10 behaved as a highly effective agonist of 5-HT7 receptors and reduced exaggerated mGluR-LTD in a mouse model of Fragile X Syndrome. On the other side, the compounds RA-7 and PM-20, respectively arising from in vivo metabolism of LP-211 and BA-10, had no effect on mGluR-LTD thus did not behave as agonists of 5-HT7 receptors in our conditions.The present results provide information about the structure-activity relationship of novel 5-HT7 receptor agonists and indicate that LP-211 and BA-10 might be used as novel pharmacological tools for the therapy of

  5. Expressions of Drebrins and lcam-5 in mouse cerebral cortex with Fmr-1 gene knockout and their significance in fragile X syndrome%Drebrins和Icam-5在Fmr-1基因敲除鼠大脑皮层的表达和意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐琴; 竺智伟; 赵正言

    2012-01-01

    [Objective]To investigate and compare the changes of Drebrin A,Drebrin E and lcam-5 mRNA levels in the cerebral cortex of Frr-1 gene knockout mouse during brain development periods.[Methods]Fmr-1 gene knockout (KO) male mice and their wild type (WT) counterparts were chosen in our experiment (4≤n≤ 10);the levels of target mRNAs were detected by real time quantitative PCR;check points were set on the 7th,14th,21th and 28rh postnatal d.[Results] The mRNA level of Drebrin A in the KO group was significantly lower than that in the WT group on the 14th postnatal d,while that of Drebrin E was significantly higher than that in the WT group (P<0.05).The mRNA level of lcam-5 in the KO group was significantly higher than that in the WT group on the 14th and 21th postnatal d (P<0.05).[Conclusion] The delayed shift of Drebrin A to Drebrin E and transitional over-expression of lcam-5 in developmental cerebral cortex are the reasons for mental retardation in Fragile X Syndrome.%目的 观察脆性X综合征(FXS)模型小鼠不同发育时期大脑皮层中Drebrin A、Drebrin E及Icam-5 mRNA水平变化情况及意义.方法 应用荧光实时定量PCR(RT-PCR)法检测FmrJ基因敲除KO小鼠及野生健康对照小鼠H出生后第7天、第14天、第21天和第28天大脑皮层Drebrin A、Drebrin E及Icam-5 mRNA的表达(4≤n≤10).结果 KO组小鼠出生后第14天Drebrin A mRNA水平较健康对照组小鼠明显降低,而同时间Drebrin E mRNA水平较健康对照组小鼠明显增高,差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05);KO组小鼠Icam-5 mRNA水平在出生后第14和21天均明显高于健康对照组,差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 Drebrin A和Drebrin E在大脑皮层发育期的表达交替延迟及Icam-5的一过性过度表达是FXS智力低下的原因之一.

  6. Research on battery array based on solar power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junhong

    2017-03-01

    Almost all of the energy of solar power supply system comes from solar energy, which is a kind of pollution-free green energy, using independent photovoltaic system as base station power supply. In this paper, taking the solar power system as the research object, we made MATLAB simulation analysis of the independent solar photovoltaic system battery array. The simulation results showed that the output voltage and the output current of the solar array based on solar power system are affected by the illumination intensity and temperature change. In addition, it also showed that at any temperature and illumination intensity, there will a largest output power.

  7. Low Power Systolic Array Based Digital Filter for DSP Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Karthick

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Main concepts in DSP include filtering, averaging, modulating, and correlating the signals in digital form to estimate characteristic parameter of a signal into a desirable form. This paper presents a brief concept of low power datapath impact for Digital Signal Processing (DSP based biomedical application. Systolic array based digital filter used in signal processing of electrocardiogram analysis is presented with datapath architectural innovations in low power consumption perspective. Implementation was done with ASIC design methodology using TSMC 65 nm technological library node. The proposed systolic array filter has reduced leakage power up to 8.5% than the existing filter architectures.

  8. Low Power Systolic Array Based Digital Filter for DSP Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthick, S; Valarmathy, S; Prabhu, E

    2015-01-01

    Main concepts in DSP include filtering, averaging, modulating, and correlating the signals in digital form to estimate characteristic parameter of a signal into a desirable form. This paper presents a brief concept of low power datapath impact for Digital Signal Processing (DSP) based biomedical application. Systolic array based digital filter used in signal processing of electrocardiogram analysis is presented with datapath architectural innovations in low power consumption perspective. Implementation was done with ASIC design methodology using TSMC 65 nm technological library node. The proposed systolic array filter has reduced leakage power up to 8.5% than the existing filter architectures.

  9. Small Area Array-Based LED Luminaire Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Yuan

    2008-01-09

    This report contains a summary of technical achievements during a three-year project to demonstrate high efficiency LED luminaire designs based on small area array-based gallium nitride diodes. Novel GaN-based LED array designs are described, specifically addressing the thermal, optical, electrical and mechanical requirements for the incorporation of such arrays into viable solid-state LED luminaires. This work resulted in the demonstration of an integrated luminaire prototype of 1000 lumens cool white light output with reflector shaped beams and efficacy of 89.4 lm/W at CCT of 6000oK and CRI of 73; and performance of 903 lumens warm white light output with reflector shaped beams and efficacy of 63.0 lm/W at CCT of 2800oK and CRI of 82. In addition, up to 1275 lumens cool white light output at 114.2 lm/W and 1156 lumens warm white light output at 76.5 lm/W were achieved if the reflector was not used. The success to integrate small area array-based LED designs and address thermal, optical, electrical and mechanical requirements was clearly achieved in these luminaire prototypes with outstanding performance and high efficiency.

  10. Altered Bioenergetics in Primary Dermal Fibroblasts from Adult Carriers of the FMR1 Premutation Before the Onset of the Neurodegenerative Disease Fragile X-Associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, Eleonora; Song, Gyu; Wong, Sarah; Hagerman, Randi; Giulivi, Cecilia

    2016-10-01

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is a late onset neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by tremors, ataxia, impaired coordination, and cognitive decline. While all FXTAS individuals are carriers of a 55-200 CGG expansion at the 5'-UTR of the fragile X mental retardation gene (FMR1), also known as premutation, not all carriers develop FXTAS symptoms and some display other types of psychological/emotional disorders (e.g., autism, anxiety). The goal of this study was to investigate whether the mitochondrial dysfunction previously observed in fibroblasts from older premutation individuals (>60 years) was already present in younger (17-48 years), non-FXTAS-affected carriers and to identify the type and severity of the bioenergetic deficit. Since FXTAS affects mostly males, while females account for a small part of the FXTAS-affected population displaying less severe symptoms, only fibroblasts from males were evaluated in this study. Based on polarographic and enzymatic measurements, a generalized OXPHOS deficit was noted accompanied by increases in the matrix biomarker citrate synthase, oxidative stress (as increased mtDNA copy number and deletions), and mitochondrial network disruption/disorganization. Some of the outcomes (ATP-linked oxygen uptake, coupling, citrate synthase activity, and mitochondrial network organization) strongly correlated with the extent of the CGG expansion, with more severe deficits observed in cell lines carrying higher CGG number. Furthermore, mitochondrial outcomes can identify endophenotypes among carriers and are robust predictors of the premutation diagnosis before the onset of FXTAS, with the potential to be used as markers of prognosis and/or as readouts of pharmacological interventions.

  11. Radiation-hard/high-speed array-based optical engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, K. K.; Buchholz, P.; Heidbrink, S.; Kagan, H. P.; Kass, R. D.; Moore, J.; Smith, D. S.; Vogt, M.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2016-12-01

    We have designed and fabricated a compact array-based optical engine for transmitting data at 10 Gb/s. The device consists of a 4-channel ASIC driving a VCSEL (Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser) array in an optical package. The ASIC is designed using only core transistors in a 65 nm CMOS process to enhance the radiation-hardness. The ASIC contains an 8-bit DAC to control the bias and modulation currents of the individual channels in the VCSEL array. The DAC settings are stored in SEU (single event upset) tolerant registers. Several devices were irradiated with 24 GeV/c protons and the performance of the devices is satisfactory after the irradiation.

  12. Fiber-array based optogenetic prosthetic system for stimulation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ling; Cote, Chris; Tejeda, Hector; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2012-02-01

    Recent advent of optogenetics has enabled activation of genetically-targeted neuronal cells using low intensity blue light with high temporal precision. Since blue light is attenuated rapidly due to scattering and absorption in neural tissue, optogenetic treatment of neurological disorders may require stimulation of specific cell types in multiple regions of the brain. Further, restoration of certain neural functions (vision, and auditory etc) requires accurate spatio-temporal stimulation patterns rather than just precise temporal stimulation. In order to activate multiple regions of the central nervous system in 3D, here, we report development of an optogenetic prosthetic comprising of array of fibers coupled to independently-controllable LEDs. This design avoids direct contact of LEDs with the brain tissue and thus does not require electrical and heat isolation, which can non-specifically stimulate and damage the local brain regions. The intensity, frequency, and duty cycle of light pulses from each fiber in the array was controlled independently using an inhouse developed LabView based program interfaced with a microcontroller driving the individual LEDs. While the temporal profile of the light pulses was controlled by varying the current driving the LED, the beam profile emanating from each fiber tip could be sculpted by microfabrication of the fiber tip. The fiber array was used to stimulate neurons, expressing channelrhodopsin-2, in different locations within the brain or retina. Control of neural activity in the mice cortex, using the fiber-array based prosthetic, is evaluated from recordings made with multi-electrode array (MEA). We also report construction of a μLED array based prosthetic for spatio-temporal stimulation of cortex.

  13. Array-based detection of genetic alterations associated with disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkel, Daniel; Albertson, Donna G.; Gray, Joe W.

    2007-09-11

    The present invention relates to DNA sequences from regions of copy number change on chromosome 20. The sequences can be used in hybridization methods for the identification of chromosomal abnormalities associated with various diseases.

  14. Array-based GNSS Ionospheric Sensing: Estimability and Precision Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teunissen, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Array-based GNSS Ionospheric Sensing: Estimability and Precision Analyses PJG Teunissen1,2, A Khodabandeh1 and B Zhang1 1GNSS Research Centre, Curtin University, Perth, Australia 2Geoscience and Remote Sensing, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands Introduction: The Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) have proved to be an effective means of measuring the Earth's ionosphere. The well-known geometry-free linear combinations of the GNSS data serve as the input of an external ionospheric model to capture both the spatial and temporal characteristics of the ionosphere. Next to the slant ionospheric delays experienced by the GNSS antennas, the geometry-free combinations also contain additional unknown delays that are caused by the presence of the carrier-phase ambiguous cycles and/or the code instrumental delays. That the geometry-free combinations, without an external ionospheric model, cannot unbiasedly determine the slant ionospheric delays reveals the lack of information content in the GNSS data. Motivation and objectives: With the advent of modernized multi-frequency signals, one is confronted with many different combinations of the GNSS data that are capable of sensing the ionosphere. Owing to such diversity and the lack of information content in the GNSS data, various estimable ionospheric delays of different interpretations (and of different precision) can therefore be formed. How such estimable ionospheric delays should be interpreted and the extent to which they contribute to the precision of the unbiased slant ionosphere are the topics of this contribution. Approach and results: In this contribution, we apply S-system theory to study the estimability and precision of the estimable slant ionospheric delays that are measured by the multi-frequency GNSS data. Two different S-systems are presented, leading to two different estimable parameters of different precision: 1) the phase-driven ionospheric delays and 2) the code-driven ionospheric delays

  15. Stochastic segmentation models for array-based comparative genomic hybridization data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Tze Leung; Xing, Haipeng; Zhang, Nancy

    2008-04-01

    Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) is a high throughput, high resolution technique for studying the genetics of cancer. Analysis of array-CGH data typically involves estimation of the underlying chromosome copy numbers from the log fluorescence ratios and segmenting the chromosome into regions with the same copy number at each location. We propose for the analysis of array-CGH data, a new stochastic segmentation model and an associated estimation procedure that has attractive statistical and computational properties. An important benefit of this Bayesian segmentation model is that it yields explicit formulas for posterior means, which can be used to estimate the signal directly without performing segmentation. Other quantities relating to the posterior distribution that are useful for providing confidence assessments of any given segmentation can also be estimated by using our method. We propose an approximation method whose computation time is linear in sequence length which makes our method practically applicable to the new higher density arrays. Simulation studies and applications to real array-CGH data illustrate the advantages of the proposed approach.

  16. Sample processing for DNA chip array-based analysis of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enfors Sven-Olof

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exploitation of DNA-based analyses of microbial pathogens, and especially simultaneous typing of several virulence-related genes in bacteria is becoming an important objective of public health these days. Results A procedure for sample processing for a confirmative analysis of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC on a single colony with DNA chip array was developed and is reported here. The protocol includes application of fragmented genomic DNA from ultrasonicated colonies. The sample processing comprises first 2.5 min of ultrasonic treatment, DNA extraction (2×, and afterwards additional 5 min ultrasonication. Thus, the total sample preparation time for a confirmative analysis of EHEC is nearly 10 min. Additionally, bioinformatic revisions were performed in order to design PCR primers and array probes specific to most conservative regions of the EHEC-associated genes. Six strains with distinct pathogenic properties were selected for this study. At last, the EHEC chip array for a parallel and simultaneous detection of genes etpC-stx1-stx2-eae was designed and examined. This should permit to sense all currently accessible variants of the selected sequences in EHEC types and subtypes. Conclusion In order to implement the DNA chip array-based analysis for direct EHEC detection the sample processing was established in course of this work. However, this sample preparation mode may also be applied to other types of EHEC DNA-based sensing systems.

  17. 75 FR 32484 - Array-Based Cytogenetic Tests: Questions on Performance Evaluation, Result Reporting and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-08

    ... Performance Evaluation, Result Reporting and Interpretation. The purpose of the public meeting is to seek input on challenges related to performance evaluation, determination of clinical significance, result... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Array-Based Cytogenetic Tests: Questions on...

  18. Genetic characterization of dogs via chromosomal analysis and array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, M H; Reimann-Berg, N; Bullerdiek, J; Murua Escobar, H

    2012-01-01

    The results of cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic investigations revealed similarities in genetic background and biological behaviour between tumours and genetic diseases of humans and dogs. These findings classify the dog a good and accepted model for human cancers such as osteosarcomas, mammary carcinomas, oral melanomas and others. With the appearance of new studies and advances in canine genome sequencing, the number of known homologies in diseases between these species raised and still is expected to increase. In this context, array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) provides a novel tool to rapidly characterize numerical aberrations in canine tumours or to detect copy number aberrations between different breeds. As it is possible to spot probes covering the whole genome on each chip to discover copy number aberrations of all chromosomes simultaneously, this method is time-saving and cost-effective - considering the relation of costs and the amount of data obtained. Complemented with traditional methods like karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses, the aCGH is able to provide new insights into the underlying causes of canine carcinogenesis.

  19. Green electron-beam pumped laser arrays based on II-VI nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zverev, M.M.; Gamov, N.A.; Zdanova, E.V.; Studionov, V.B.; Peregoudov, D.V. [Moscow State Inst. of Radio Engineering, Electronics and Automations, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ivanov, S.V.; Sedova, I.V.; Gronin, S.V.; Sorokin, S.V.; Kop' ev, P.S. [Ioffe Physical Technical Inst., RAS Polytekhnicheskaya, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Olikhov, I.M. [Gamma Co. Ltd., SRC Platan, Fryazino (Russian Federation)

    2010-06-15

    Room temperature electron-beam pumped (U = 15-26 keV) green lasers and laser arrays based on multiple quantum well II-VI structures with an extended up to 2 {mu}m waveguide have been studied. The maximum achieved output pulse power is as high as 31 and 630 W per facet from a single 0.24-mm-wide laser element at the cavity length of 0.4 mm and a laser array consisting of 26 elements, respectively. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  20. An Array-based Approach to Modelling Production Management System Architectures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falster, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Several proposals to a conceptual framework for production management architecture are briefly reviewed. It is suggested that an array-based approach and a classic engineering-economic model, is used as tools for a conceptualisation of ideas. Traditional architectural design is usually based...... on a geometrical thinking. Accordingly, elements from measurement and array theory are introduced, but in a more abstract way than traditionally connected with 3D-geometry. The paper concludes that a few set of concepts, like products, resources, activities, events, stages, etc. can be synthesized and analogies...

  1. Expression of calcium/calAulin kinaseⅡα in fragile X mental retardation 1 gene knockout brain tissues in mice%CaMKⅡα在FMR1基因敲除小鼠脑组织中的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韦朝霞; 陈盛强; 陈希; 戴丽军

    2013-01-01

    目的 观察FMRI基因敲除型(KO)小鼠脑组织中钙/钙调素依赖蛋白激酶Ⅱα(CaMKⅡα)表达的改变,探讨CaMKⅡα是否为脆性X综合征相关蛋白(FMRP)的下调蛋白. 方法 PCR鉴定FVB近交系小鼠的基因型,按基因型的不同分为KO组和野生型(WT)组,每组10只.免疫组化染色检测KO及WT小鼠脑组织CaMKⅡα的表达与分布,用图像分析仪分别采集不同脑区免疫信号的吸光度(A)值进行比较. 结果 免疫组化染色检测显示KO与WT小鼠各个脑区普遍存在阳性信号;神经元胞浆尤其是靠近胞体的近端突起上信号呈强阳性,树突中亦有阳性信号,轴突上信号较弱;KO小鼠各脑区CaMKⅡα阳性信号的A值均较WT小鼠显著增高,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05). 结论 CaMKⅡα在成年KO小鼠各脑区的表达均显著增多,提示FMRP负性调节CaMKⅡα的表达.%Objective To observe the expression of calcium/calAulin kinaseⅡα (CaMKⅡα) in the brain tissues of fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene knockout (KO) mice to investigate whether CaMKⅡα is regulated by fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP).Methods According to the gene types of the FVB inbred mice identified by PCR,20 mice were divided into KO group and WT (wide type) group (n=10).The subcellular distribution and expression of CaMKⅡα were observed by immunohistochemical staining; the mean optical density (A) values of immunostaining signal of CaMKⅡα in various brain regions,including the motor cortex,temporal cortex,amygdala,hypothalamus and hippocampus,were determined by IBAS 2.0 image-analyzed system.Results CaMKⅡα immunoreactive cells were abundantly found in all brain subregions of KO and WT mice; especial positive signal was noted in the proximal processes of neurons,so as to those in the dendrite; week signcal was observed in the axon.No distributional difference was found between KO and WT mice.As compared with those in the WT mice,the A values were

  2. A readout integrated circuit based on DBI-CTIA and cyclic ADC for MEMS-array-based focal plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Liu; Dong, Wu; Zheyao, Wang

    2016-11-01

    A readout integrated circuit (ROIC) for a MEMS (microelectromechanical system)-array-based focal plane (MAFP) intended for imaging applications is presented. The ROIC incorporates current sources for diode detectors, scanners, timing sequence controllers, differential buffered injection-capacitive trans-impedance amplifier (DBI-CTIA) and 10-bit cyclic ADCs, and is integrated with MAFP using 3-D integration technology. A small-signal equivalent model is built to include thermal detectors into circuit simulations. The biasing current is optimized in terms of signal-to-noise ratio and power consumption. Layout design is tailored to fulfill the requirements of 3-D integration and to adapt to the size of MAFP elements, with not all but only the 2 bottom metal layers to complete nearly all the interconnections in DBI-CTIA and ADC in a 40 μm wide column. Experimental chips are designed and fabricated in a 0.35 μm CMOS mixed signal process, and verified in a code density test of which the results indicate a (0.29/-0.31) LSB differential nonlinearity (DNL) and a (0.61/-0.45) LSB integral nonlinearity (INL). Spectrum analysis shows that the effective number of bits (ENOB) is 9.09. The ROIC consumes 248 mW of power at most if not to cut off quiescent current paths when not needed. Project supported by by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61271130), the Beijing Municipal Science and Tech Project (No. D13110100290000), the Tsinghua University Initiative Scientific Research Program (No. 20131089225), and the Shenzhen Science and Technology Development Fund (No. CXZZ20130322170740736).

  3. Analysis of unstable DNA sequence in FRM1 gene in Polish families with fragile X syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milewski, Michal; Bal, Jerzy; Obersztyn, Ewa; Bocian, Ewa; Mazurczak, Tadeusz [Instytut Matki i Dziecka, Warsaw (Poland); Zygulska, Marta; Horst, Juergen [Institute of Human Genetics, Muenster (Germany); Deelen, Wout H.; Halley, Dicky J.J. [Erasmus Univ., Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    1996-12-31

    The unstable DNA sequence in the FMR1 gene was analyzed in 85 individuals from Polish families with fragile X syndrome in order to characterize mutations responsible for the disease in Poland. In all affected individuals classified on the basis of clinical features and expression of the fragile site at X(q27.3) a large expansion of the unstable sequence (full mutation) was detected. About 5% (2 of 43) of individuals with full mutation did not express the fragile site. Among normal alleles, ranging in size from 20 to 41 CGC repeats, allele with 29 repeats was the most frequent (37%). Transmission of premutated and fully mutated alleles to the offspring was always associated with size increase. No change in repeat number was found when normal alleles were transmitted. (author). 19 refs., 4 figs, 1 tab.

  4. Determination of pork spoilage by colorimetric gas sensor array based on natural pigments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiao-wei; Zou, Xiao-bo; Shi, Ji-yong; Guo, Yanin; Zhao, Jie-wen; Zhang, Jianchun; Hao, Limin

    2014-02-15

    A new colorimetric gas-sensor array based on four natural pigments, that were extracted from spinach (Spinacia oleracea), red radish (Raphanus sativus L.), winter jasmine (Jasminum nudiflorum), and black rice (Oryza sativa L. indica), was developed for pork freshness evaluation. A colour change profile for each sample was obtained by differentiating the images of the sensor array before and after exposure to the odour of sample. The total viable count (TVC) per gram of pork was obtained by classical microbiological plating methods, and the biogenic amines were measured by HPLC. Biogenic amine index (BAI) for the determination of meat freshness was developed from the sum of putrescine and cadaverine. The colour change profiles were analysed using principal component analysis and correlated with conventional methods (BAI, TVC). A partial least squares (PLS) prediction model was obtained with r=0.854 and 0.933 for BAI and TVC, respectively.

  5. 1-Mb resolution array-based comparative genomic hybridization using a BAC clone set optimized for cancer gene analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greshock, J; Naylor, TL; Margolin, A; Diskin, S; Cleaver, SH; Futreal, PA; deJong, PJ; Zhao, SY; Liebman, M; Weber, BL

    2004-01-01

    Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) is a recently developed tool for genome-wide determination of DNA copy number alterations. This technology has tremendous potential for disease-gene discovery in cancer and developmental disorders as well as numerous other applications. However, w

  6. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization for genome-wide screening of DNA copy number in bladder tumors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, J.A.; Fridlyand, J.; Pejavar, S.; Olshen, A.B.; Korkola, J.E.; Vries, S. de; Carroll, P.; Kuo, W.L.; Pinkel, D.; Albertson, D.; Cordon-Cardo, C.; Jain, A.N.; Waldman, F.M.

    2003-01-01

    Genome-wide copy number profiles were characterized in 41 primary bladder tumors using array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH). In addition to previously identified alterations in large chromosomal regions, alterations were identified in many small genomic regions, some with high-l

  7. Flexible Neural Electrode Array Based-on Porous Graphene for Cortical Microstimulation and Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yichen; Lyu, Hongming; Richardson, Andrew G.; Lucas, Timothy H.; Kuzum, Duygu

    2016-09-01

    Neural sensing and stimulation have been the backbone of neuroscience research, brain-machine interfaces and clinical neuromodulation therapies for decades. To-date, most of the neural stimulation systems have relied on sharp metal microelectrodes with poor electrochemical properties that induce extensive damage to the tissue and significantly degrade the long-term stability of implantable systems. Here, we demonstrate a flexible cortical microelectrode array based on porous graphene, which is capable of efficient electrophysiological sensing and stimulation from the brain surface, without penetrating into the tissue. Porous graphene electrodes show superior impedance and charge injection characteristics making them ideal for high efficiency cortical sensing and stimulation. They exhibit no physical delamination or degradation even after 1 million biphasic stimulation cycles, confirming high endurance. In in vivo experiments with rodents, same array is used to sense brain activity patterns with high spatio-temporal resolution and to control leg muscles with high-precision electrical stimulation from the cortical surface. Flexible porous graphene array offers a minimally invasive but high efficiency neuromodulation scheme with potential applications in cortical mapping, brain-computer interfaces, treatment of neurological disorders, where high resolution and simultaneous recording and stimulation of neural activity are crucial.

  8. An LED-array-based range imaging system used for enhancing three-dimensional imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huanqin; Xu, Jun; He, Deyong; Zhao, Tianpeng; Wang, Anting; Ming, Hai; Kong, Deyi

    2010-11-01

    An LED-array-based range imaging system is proposed for three-dimensional (3-D) shape measurement. The range image is obtained by time-division electronic scanning of the LED Time-of-Flight (TOF) range finders in array, and no complex mechanical scanning is needed. By combining with a low cost CCD/CMOS sensor for capturing the twodimensional (2-D) image, the proposed range imaging system can be used to accomplish a high quality 3-D imaging. A sophisticated co-lens optical path is designed to assure the natural registration between the range image and 2-D image. Experimental tests for evaluation of the imaging system performance are described. It was found that the 3-D images can be acquired at a rate of 10 frames per second with a depth resolution better than 5mm in the range of 50 - 1000mm, which is sufficient for many practical applications, including the obstacle detection in robotics, machine automation, 3-D vision, virtual reality games and 3-D video.

  9. Wireless Remote Monitoring of Glucose Using a Functionalized ZnO Nanowire Arrays Based Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Willander

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a prototype wireless remote glucose monitoring system interfaced with a ZnO nanowire arrays-based glucose sensor, glucose oxidase enzyme immobilized onto ZnO nanowires in conjunction with a Nafion® membrane coating, which can be effectively applied for the monitoring of glucose levels in diabetics. Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM services like General Packet Radio Service (GPRS and Short Message Service (SMS have been proven to be logical and cost effective methods for gathering data from remote locations. A communication protocol that facilitates remote data collection using SMS has been utilized for monitoring a patient’s sugar levels. In this study, we demonstrate the remote monitoring of the glucose levels with existing GPRS/GSM network infra-structures using our proposed functionalized ZnO nanowire arrays sensors integrated with standard readily available mobile phones. The data can be used for centralized monitoring and other purposes. Such applications can reduce health care costs and allow caregivers to monitor and support to their patients remotely, especially those located in rural areas.

  10. Improving molecular diagnosis of aniridia and WAGR syndrome using customized targeted array-based CGH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallespín, Elena; Villaverde, Cristina; Martín-Arenas, Rubén; Vélez-Monsalve, Camilo; Lorda-Sánchez, Isabel; Nevado, Julián; Trujillo-Tiebas, María José; Lapunzina, Pablo; Ayuso, Carmen; Corton, Marta

    2017-01-01

    Chromosomal deletions at 11p13 are a frequent cause of congenital Aniridia, a rare pan-ocular genetic disease, and of WAGR syndrome, accounting up to 30% of cases. First-tier genetic testing for newborn with aniridia, to detect 11p13 rearrangements, includes Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) and karyotyping. However, neither of these approaches allow obtaining a complete picture of the high complexity of chromosomal deletions and breakpoints in aniridia. Here, we report the development and validation of a customized targeted array-based comparative genomic hybridization, so called WAGR-array, for comprehensive high-resolution analysis of CNV in the WAGR locus. Our approach increased the detection rate in a Spanish cohort of 38 patients with aniridia, WAGR syndrome and other related ocular malformations, allowing to characterize four undiagnosed aniridia cases, and to confirm MLPA findings in four additional patients. For all patients, breakpoints were accurately established and a contiguous deletion syndrome, involving a large number of genes, was identified in three patients. Moreover, we identified novel microdeletions affecting 3' PAX6 regulatory regions in three families with isolated aniridia. This tool represents a good strategy for the genetic diagnosis of aniridia and associated syndromes, allowing for a more accurate CNVs detection, as well as a better delineation of breakpoints. Our results underline the clinical importance of performing exhaustive and accurate analysis of chromosomal rearrangements for patients with aniridia, especially newborns and those without defects in PAX6 after diagnostic screening. PMID:28231309

  11. Using Array-Based Comparative Genomic Hybridization to Diagnose Pallister-Killian Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi Na; Lee, Jiwon; Yu, Hee Joon; Lee, Jeehun; Kim, Sun Hee

    2017-01-01

    Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS) is a rare multisystem disorder characterized by isochromosome 12p and tissue-limited mosaic tetrasomy 12p. In this study, we diagnosed three pediatric patients who were suspicious of having PKS using array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) and FISH analyses performed on peripheral lymphocytes. Patients 1 and 2 presented with craniofacial dysmorphic features, hypotonia, and a developmental delay. Array CGH revealed two to three copies of 12p in patient 1 and three copies in patient 2. FISH analysis showed trisomy or tetrasomy 12p. Patient 3, who had clinical features comparable to those of patients 1 and 2, was diagnosed by using FISH analysis alone. Here, we report three patients with mosaic tetrasomy 12p. There have been only reported cases diagnosed by chromosome analysis and FISH analysis on skin fibroblast or amniotic fluid. To our knowledge, patient 1 was the first case diagnosed by using array CGH performed on peripheral lymphocytes in Korea.

  12. High-resolution dynamic pressure sensor array based on piezo-phototronic effect tuned photoluminescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Mingzeng; Li, Zhou; Liu, Caihong; Zheng, Qiang; Shi, Xieqing; Song, Ming; Zhang, Yang; Du, Shiyu; Zhai, Junyi; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-03-24

    A high-resolution dynamic tactile/pressure display is indispensable to the comprehensive perception of force/mechanical stimulations such as electronic skin, biomechanical imaging/analysis, or personalized signatures. Here, we present a dynamic pressure sensor array based on pressure/strain tuned photoluminescence imaging without the need for electricity. Each sensor is a nanopillar that consists of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells. Its photoluminescence intensity can be modulated dramatically and linearly by small strain (0-0.15%) owing to the piezo-phototronic effect. The sensor array has a high pixel density of 6350 dpi and exceptional small standard deviation of photoluminescence. High-quality tactile/pressure sensing distribution can be real-time recorded by parallel photoluminescence imaging without any cross-talk. The sensor array can be inexpensively fabricated over large areas by semiconductor product lines. The proposed dynamic all-optical pressure imaging with excellent resolution, high sensitivity, good uniformity, and ultrafast response time offers a suitable way for smart sensing, micro/nano-opto-electromechanical systems.

  13. Genomic profiling of oral squamous cell carcinoma by array-based comparative genomic hybridization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunichi Yoshioka

    Full Text Available We designed a study to investigate genetic relationships between primary tumors of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC and their lymph node metastases, and to identify genomic copy number aberrations (CNAs related to lymph node metastasis. For this purpose, we collected a total of 42 tumor samples from 25 patients and analyzed their genomic profiles by array-based comparative genomic hybridization. We then compared the genetic profiles of metastatic primary tumors (MPTs with their paired lymph node metastases (LNMs, and also those of LNMs with non-metastatic primary tumors (NMPTs. Firstly, we found that although there were some distinctive differences in the patterns of genomic profiles between MPTs and their paired LNMs, the paired samples shared similar genomic aberration patterns in each case. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis grouped together 12 of the 15 MPT-LNM pairs. Furthermore, similarity scores between paired samples were significantly higher than those between non-paired samples. These results suggested that MPTs and their paired LNMs are composed predominantly of genetically clonal tumor cells, while minor populations with different CNAs may also exist in metastatic OSCCs. Secondly, to identify CNAs related to lymph node metastasis, we compared CNAs between grouped samples of MPTs and LNMs, but were unable to find any CNAs that were more common in LNMs. Finally, we hypothesized that subpopulations carrying metastasis-related CNAs might be present in both the MPT and LNM. Accordingly, we compared CNAs between NMPTs and LNMs, and found that gains of 7p, 8q and 17q were more common in the latter than in the former, suggesting that these CNAs may be involved in lymph node metastasis of OSCC. In conclusion, our data suggest that in OSCCs showing metastasis, the primary and metastatic tumors share similar genomic profiles, and that cells in the primary tumor may tend to metastasize after acquiring metastasis-associated CNAs.

  14. Gene expression profiles in squamous cell cervical carcinoma using array-based comparative genomic hybridization analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Y-W; Bae, S M; Kim, Y-W; Lee, H N; Kim, Y W; Park, T C; Ro, D Y; Shin, J C; Shin, S J; Seo, J-S; Ahn, W S

    2007-01-01

    Our aim was to identify novel genomic regions of interest and provide highly dynamic range information on correlation between squamous cell cervical carcinoma and its related gene expression patterns by a genome-wide array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH). We analyzed 15 cases of cervical cancer from KangNam St Mary's Hospital of the Catholic University of Korea. Microdissection assay was performed to obtain DNA samples from paraffin-embedded cervical tissues of cancer as well as of the adjacent normal tissues. The bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) array used in this study consisted of 1440 human BACs and the space among the clones was 2.08 Mb. All the 15 cases of cervical cancer showed the differential changes of the cervical cancer-associated genetic alterations. The analysis limit of average gains and losses was 53%. A significant positive correlation was found in 8q24.3, 1p36.32, 3q27.1, 7p21.1, 11q13.1, and 3p14.2 changes through the cervical carcinogenesis. The regions of high level of gain were 1p36.33-1p36.32, 8q24.3, 16p13.3, 1p36.33, 3q27.1, and 7p21.1. And the regions of homozygous loss were 2q12.1, 22q11.21, 3p14.2, 6q24.3, 7p15.2, and 11q25. In the high level of gain regions, GSDMDC1, RECQL4, TP73, ABCF3, ALG3, HDAC9, ESRRA, and RPS6KA4 were significantly correlated with cervical cancer. The genes encoded by frequently lost clones were PTPRG, GRM7, ZDHHC3, EXOSC7, LRP1B, and NR3C2. Therefore, array-CGH analyses showed that specific genomic alterations were maintained in cervical cancer that were critical to the malignant phenotype and may give a chance to find out possible target genes present in the gained or lost clones.

  15. Sequence analysis of the fragile X trinucleotide repeat: Correlations with stability and haplotype and implications for the origin of fragile X alleles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, K.; Tester, D.J.; Kruckeberg, K.E.; Thibodeau, S.N. [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Fragile X (FX) syndrome is associated with amplification of a CGG trinucleotide repeat in the 5{prime} untranslated region of the gene FMR-1. To address mechanism of instability and concern related to overlap between sizes of normal stable alleles and FX unstable alleles, we have sequenced 165 alleles to analyze patterns of AGG interruptions within the CGG repeat, and have typed the (CA)n at DXS548 for 204 chromosomes. Overall, our data is consistent with the idea that the length of uninterrupted CGG repeats determines instability. For 17 stably transmitted alleles with total repeat lengths between 33 and 51, the longest stretch of uninterrupted CGGs was 41. In contrast, for 13 premutation alleles, the shortest stretch of uninterrupted CGGs was 48, suggesting a threshold for expansion between 41 and 48 pure CGGs. For expansion from a premutation to a full mutation, the threshold appears to be {ge}70 uninterrupted repeats. Interestingly, an AGG was detected in some carriers of a full mutation. Comparison of the number of {open_quote}shadow bands{close_quote} in PCR products from similar size alleles with different AGG interruption patterns supports replication slippage as a potential mechanism, i.e. replication slippage occurs more readily as the length of pure repeat increases. Alleles with high total repeat lengths but up to 3 AGGs may be relatively protected against expansion, whereas smaller alleles with pure CGG sequence could be at higher risk for instability. Comparison of sequence data and DXS548 (CA)n data revealed specific sequence trends for each of the DXS548 alleles, explaining the previously reported haplotype association with FX. Incorporating these observations into models for the origin of FX alleles, we consider replication slippage, unequal crossover within the CGG repeat region, recombination between FMR-1 and DXS548, and loss of AGGs by A to C transversion.

  16. Left-handed compact MIMO antenna array based on wire spiral resonator for 5-GHz wireless applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqadami, Abdulrahman Shueai Mohsen; Jamlos, Mohd Faizal; Soh, Ping Jack; Rahim, Sharul Kamal Abdul; Narbudowicz, Adam

    2017-01-01

    A compact coplanar waveguide-fed multiple-input multiple-output antenna array based on the left-handed wire loaded spiral resonators (SR) is presented. The proposed antenna consists of a 2 × 2 wire SR with two symmetrical microstrip feed lines, each line exciting a 1 × 2 wire SR. Left-handed metamaterial unit cells are placed on its reverse side and arranged in a 2 × 3 array. A reflection coefficient of less than -16 dB and mutual coupling of less than -28 dB are achieved at 5.15 GHz WLAN band.

  17. Exclusion of APC and VHL gene deletions by array-based comparative hybridization in two patients with microscopically visible chromosomal aberrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallerstein, Robert J; Brooks, Susan Sklower; Streck, Deanna L; Kurvathi, Rohini; Toruner, Gokce A

    2007-10-15

    Karyotyping is a major component of the genetic work-up of patients with dysmorphism. Cytogenetic aberrations close to a known tumor suppressor gene raise important clinical issues because deletion of that tumor suppressor gene can cause genetic predisposition to cancer. We present two cancer-free dysmorphic patients with karyotypes of 46,XX,del(5)(q15q22.3) and 46,XX,del(3)(p25.2~pter). These deletions are close to the APC and VHL genes that confer susceptibility to familial Adenomatous polyposis (OMIM #17510) and von-Hippel-Lindau syndrome (OMIM #193300), respectively. The array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) analysis using a custom Agilent 44K oligonucleotide array demonstrated an interstitial 20.7-megabase (Mb) deletion on 5q (chr5: 89,725,638-110,491,345) and a terminal 9.45-Mb deletion on 3p (chr3:pter-9,450,984). According to the March 2006 human reference sequence, the APC gene is located at chr5: 112,101,483-112,209,835 and the VHL gene is located at chr3: 10,158,319-10,168,746. These results indicate that the APC gene is 2,300 kilobases (kb) and the VHL gene is 700 kb away from deleted regions. Southern blot analysis for APC and VHL genes were negative, consistent with array-CGH findings. These results demonstrate the power of array-CCH to assess potential tumor suppressor gene involvement and cancer risk in patients with microscopically visible deletions in areas near tumor suppressors.

  18. Peptide array-based characterization and design of ZnO-high affinity peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okochi, Mina; Sugita, Tomoya; Furusawa, Seiji; Umetsu, Mitsuo; Adschiri, Tadafumi; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2010-08-15

    Peptides with both an affinity for ZnO and the ability to generate ZnO nanoparticles have attracted attention for the self-assembly and templating of nanoscale building blocks under ambient conditions with compositional uniformity. In this study, we have analyzed the specific binding sites of the ZnO-binding peptide, EAHVMHKVAPRP, which was identified using a phage display peptide library. The peptide binding assay against ZnO nanoparticles was performed using peptides synthesized on a cellulose membrane using the spot method. Using randomized rotation of amino acids in the ZnO-binding peptide, 125 spot-synthesized peptides were assayed. The peptide binding activity against ZnO nanoparticles varied greatly. This indicates that ZnO binding does not depend on total hydrophobicity or other physical parameters of these peptides, but rather that ZnO recognizes the specific amino acid alignment of these peptides. In addition, several peptides were found to show higher binding ability compared with that of the original peptides. Identification of important binding sites in the EAHVMHKVAPRP peptide was investigated by shortened, stepwise sequence from both termini. Interestingly, two ZnO-binding sites were found as 6-mer peptides: HVMHKV and HKVAPR. The peptides identified by amino acid substitution of HKVAPR were found to show high affinity and specificity for ZnO nanoparticles.

  19. Global mass spectrometry and transcriptomics array based drug profiling provides novel insight into glucosamine induced endoplasmic reticulum stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carvalho, Ana Sofia; Ribeiro, Helena; Voabil, Paula;

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the molecular effects of glucosamine supplements, a popular and safe alternative to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, for decreasing pain, inflammation, and maintaining healthy joints. Numerous studies have reported an array of molecular effects after glucosamine treatment. We...... questioned whether the differences in the effects observed in previous studies were associated with the focus on a specific subproteome or with the use of specific cell lines or tissues. To address this question, global mass spectrometry- and transcription array-based glucosamine drug profiling was performed...... mainly observed glucosamine induced O-GlcNAcylation/O-GalNAcylation (O-HexNAcylation); however, we also observed global and local changes in acetylation, methylation, and phosphorylation. For example, our data provides two additional examples of "yin-yang" between phosphorylation and O...

  20. In situ optical sequencing and structure analysis of a trinucleotide repeat genome region by localization microscopy after specific COMBO-FISH nano-probing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuhlmüller, M.; Schwarz-Finsterle, J.; Fey, E.; Lux, J.; Bach, M.; Cremer, C.; Hinderhofer, K.; Hausmann, M.; Hildenbrand, G.

    2015-10-01

    Trinucleotide repeat expansions (like (CGG)n) of chromatin in the genome of cell nuclei can cause neurological disorders such as for example the Fragile-X syndrome. Until now the mechanisms are not clearly understood as to how these expansions develop during cell proliferation. Therefore in situ investigations of chromatin structures on the nanoscale are required to better understand supra-molecular mechanisms on the single cell level. By super-resolution localization microscopy (Spectral Position Determination Microscopy; SPDM) in combination with nano-probing using COMBO-FISH (COMBinatorial Oligonucleotide FISH), novel insights into the nano-architecture of the genome will become possible. The native spatial structure of trinucleotide repeat expansion genome regions was analysed and optical sequencing of repetitive units was performed within 3D-conserved nuclei using SPDM after COMBO-FISH. We analysed a (CGG)n-expansion region inside the 5' untranslated region of the FMR1 gene. The number of CGG repeats for a full mutation causing the Fragile-X syndrome was found and also verified by Southern blot. The FMR1 promotor region was similarly condensed like a centromeric region whereas the arrangement of the probes labelling the expansion region seemed to indicate a loop-like nano-structure. These results for the first time demonstrate that in situ chromatin structure measurements on the nanoscale are feasible. Due to further methodological progress it will become possible to estimate the state of trinucleotide repeat mutations in detail and to determine the associated chromatin strand structural changes on the single cell level. In general, the application of the described approach to any genome region will lead to new insights into genome nano-architecture and open new avenues for understanding mechanisms and their relevance in the development of heredity diseases.

  1. Two Dimensional Array Based Overlay Network for Balancing Load of Peer-to-Peer Live Video Streaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faruq Ibn Ibrahimy, Abdullah; Rafiqul, Islam Md; Anwar, Farhat; Ibn Ibrahimy, Muhammad

    2013-12-01

    The live video data is streaming usually in a tree-based overlay network or in a mesh-based overlay network. In case of departure of a peer with additional upload bandwidth, the overlay network becomes very vulnerable to churn. In this paper, a two dimensional array-based overlay network is proposed for streaming the live video stream data. As there is always a peer or a live video streaming server to upload the live video stream data, so the overlay network is very stable and very robust to churn. Peers are placed according to their upload and download bandwidth, which enhances the balance of load and performance. The overlay network utilizes the additional upload bandwidth of peers to minimize chunk delivery delay and to maximize balance of load. The procedure, which is used for distributing the additional upload bandwidth of the peers, distributes the additional upload bandwidth to the heterogeneous strength peers in a fair treat distribution approach and to the homogeneous strength peers in a uniform distribution approach. The proposed overlay network has been simulated by Qualnet from Scalable Network Technologies and results are presented in this paper.

  2. Simultaneous determination of pH, urea, acetylcholine and heavy metals using array-based enzymatic optical biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsiao-chung; Doong, Ruey-an

    2005-03-15

    An array-based optical biosensor for the simultaneous analysis of multiple samples in the presence of unrelated multi-analytes was fabricated. Urease and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) were used as model enzymes and were co-entrapped with the sensing probe, FITC-dextran, in the sol-gel matrix to measure pH, urea, acetylcholine (ACh) and heavy metals (enzyme inhibitors). Environmental and biological samples spiked with metal ions were also used to evaluate the application of the array biosensor to real samples. The biosensor exhibited high specificity in identifying multiple analytes. No obvious cross-interference was observed when a 50-spot array biosensor was used for simultaneous analysis of multiple samples in the presence of multiple analytes. The sensing system can determine pH over a dynamic range from 4 to 8.5. The limits of detection (LODs) of 2.5-50 microM with a dynamic range of 2-3 orders of magnitude for urea and ACh measurements were obtained. Moreover, the urease-encapsulated array biosensor was used to detect heavy metals. The analytical ranges of Cd(II), Cu(II), and Hg(II) were between 10 nM and 100 mM. When real samples were spiked with heavy metals, the array biosensor also exhibited potential effectiveness in screening enzyme inhibitors.

  3. Comprehensive genome characterization of solitary fibrous tumors using high-resolution array-based comparative genomic hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertucci, François; Bouvier-Labit, Corinne; Finetti, Pascal; Adélaïde, José; Metellus, Philippe; Mokhtari, Karima; Decouvelaere, Anne-Valérie; Miquel, Catherine; Jouvet, Anne; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Pedeutour, Florence; Chaffanet, Max; Birnbaum, Daniel

    2013-02-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs) are rare spindle cell tumors with limited therapeutic options. Their molecular basis is poorly known. No consistent cytogenetic abnormality has been reported. We used high-resolution whole-genome array-based comparative genomic hybridization (Agilent 244K oligonucleotide chips) to profile 47 samples, meningeal in >75% of cases. Few copy number aberrations (CNAs) were observed. Sixty-eight percent of samples did not show any gene CNA after exclusion of probes located in regions with referenced copy number variation (CNV). Only low-level CNAs were observed. The genomic profiles were very homogeneous among samples. No molecular class was revealed by clustering of DNA copy numbers. All cases displayed a "simplex" profile. No recurrent CNA was identified. Imbalances occurring in >20%, such as the gain of 8p11.23-11.22 region, contained known CNVs. The 13q14.11-13q31.1 region (lost in 4% of cases) was the largest altered region and contained the lowest percentage of genes with referenced CNVs. A total of 425 genes without CNV showed copy number transition in at least one sample, but only but only 1 in at least 10% of samples. The genomic profiles of meningeal and extra-meningeal cases did not show any differences.

  4. Array-based identification of triple-negative breast cancer cells using fluorescent nanodot-graphene oxide complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yu; Auguste, Debra T

    2016-07-15

    Early and accurate diagnosis of breast cancer holds great promise to improve treatability and curability. Here, we report the usage of six luminescent nanodot-graphene oxide complexes as novel fluorescent nanoprobes in a sensing array capable of effectively identifying healthy, cancerous, and metastatic human breast cells. The sensory system is based on the utilization of nanoprobe-graphene oxide sensor elements that can be disrupted in the presence of breast cells to give fluorescent readouts. Using this multichannel sensor, we have successfully identified breast cancer cells and distinguished between estrogen receptor positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 positive, and triple negative phenotypes. This approach also allows cell identification at high sensitivity (200 cells) with high reproducibility. The unknown cell sample analysis indicates that the sensor is able to identify 49 out of 50 breast cell samples correctly, with a detection accuracy of 98%. Taken together, this array-based luminescent nanoprobe-graphene oxide sensing platform presents a useful cell screening tool with potential applications in biomedical diagnostics.

  5. Design of thin-film filters for resolution improvements in filter-array based spectrometers using DSP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woong-Bi; Kim, Cheolsun; Ju, Gun Wu; Lee, Yong Tak; Lee, Heung-No

    2016-05-01

    Miniature spectrometers have been widely developed in various academic and industrial applications such as bio-medical, chemical and environmental engineering. As a family of spectrometers, optical filter-array based spectrometers fabricated using CMOS or Nano technology provide miniaturization, superior portability and cost effectiveness. In filterarray based spectrometers, the resolution which represents the ability how closely resolve two neighboring spectra, depends on the number of filters and the characteristics of the transmission functions (TFs) of the filters. In practice, due to the small-size and low-cost fabrication, the number of filters is limited and the shape of the TF of each filter is nonideal. As a development of modern digital signal processing (DSP), the spectrometers are equipped with DSP algorithms not only to alleviate distortions due to unexpected noise or interferences among filters but also reconstruct the original signal spectrum. For a high-resolution spectrum reconstruction by the DSP, the TFs of the filters need to be sufficiently uncorrelated with each other. In this paper, we present a design of optical thin-film filters which have the uncorrelated TFs. Each filter consists of multiple layers of high- and low-refractive index materials deposited on a substrate. The proposed design helps the DSP algorithm to improve resolution with a small number of filters. We demonstrate that a resolution of 5 nm within a range from 500 nm to 1100 nm can be achieved with only 64 filters.

  6. Fiber array based hyperspectral Raman imaging for chemical selective analysis of malaria-infected red blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brückner, Michael [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, 07745 Jena (Germany); Becker, Katja [Justus Liebig University Giessen, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 35392 Giessen (Germany); Popp, Jürgen [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, 07745 Jena (Germany); Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Institute for Physical Chemistry, 07745 Jena (Germany); Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Abbe Centre of Photonics, 07745 Jena (Germany); Frosch, Torsten, E-mail: torsten.frosch@uni-jena.de [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, 07745 Jena (Germany); Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Institute for Physical Chemistry, 07745 Jena (Germany); Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Abbe Centre of Photonics, 07745 Jena (Germany)

    2015-09-24

    A new setup for Raman spectroscopic wide-field imaging is presented. It combines the advantages of a fiber array based spectral translator with a tailor-made laser illumination system for high-quality Raman chemical imaging of sensitive biological samples. The Gaussian-like intensity distribution of the illuminating laser beam is shaped by a square-core optical multimode fiber to a top-hat profile with very homogeneous intensity distribution to fulfill the conditions of Koehler. The 30 m long optical fiber and an additional vibrator efficiently destroy the polarization and coherence of the illuminating light. This homogeneous, incoherent illumination is an essential prerequisite for stable quantitative imaging of complex biological samples. The fiber array translates the two-dimensional lateral information of the Raman stray light into separated spectral channels with very high contrast. The Raman image can be correlated with a corresponding white light microscopic image of the sample. The new setup enables simultaneous quantification of all Raman spectra across the whole spatial area with very good spectral resolution and thus outperforms other Raman imaging approaches based on scanning and tunable filters. The unique capabilities of the setup for fast, gentle, sensitive, and selective chemical imaging of biological samples were applied for automated hemozoin analysis. A special algorithm was developed to generate Raman images based on the hemozoin distribution in red blood cells without any influence from other Raman scattering. The new imaging setup in combination with the robust algorithm provides a novel, elegant way for chemical selective analysis of the malaria pigment hemozoin in early ring stages of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes. - Highlights: • Raman hyperspectral imaging allows for chemical selective analysis of biological samples with spatial heterogeneity. • A homogeneous, incoherent illumination is essential for reliable

  7. Affective SSVEP BCI to effectively control 3D objects by using a prism array-based display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Sungchul; Park, Min-Chul

    2014-06-01

    3D objects with depth information can provide many benefits to users in education, surgery, and interactions. In particular, many studies have been done to enhance sense of reality in 3D interaction. Viewing and controlling stereoscopic 3D objects with crossed or uncrossed disparities, however, can cause visual fatigue due to the vergenceaccommodation conflict generally accepted in 3D research fields. In order to avoid the vergence-accommodation mismatch and provide a strong sense of presence to users, we apply a prism array-based display to presenting 3D objects. Emotional pictures were used as visual stimuli in control panels to increase information transfer rate and reduce false positives in controlling 3D objects. Involuntarily motivated selective attention by affective mechanism can enhance steady-state visually evoked potential (SSVEP) amplitude and lead to increased interaction efficiency. More attentional resources are allocated to affective pictures with high valence and arousal levels than to normal visual stimuli such as white-and-black oscillating squares and checkerboards. Among representative BCI control components (i.e., eventrelated potentials (ERP), event-related (de)synchronization (ERD/ERS), and SSVEP), SSVEP-based BCI was chosen in the following reasons. It shows high information transfer rates and takes a few minutes for users to control BCI system while few electrodes are required for obtaining reliable brainwave signals enough to capture users' intention. The proposed BCI methods are expected to enhance sense of reality in 3D space without causing critical visual fatigue to occur. In addition, people who are very susceptible to (auto) stereoscopic 3D may be able to use the affective BCI.

  8. Global mass spectrometry and transcriptomics array based drug profiling provides novel insight into glucosamine induced endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Ana Sofia; Ribeiro, Helena; Voabil, Paula; Penque, Deborah; Jensen, Ole N; Molina, Henrik; Matthiesen, Rune

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the molecular effects of glucosamine supplements, a popular and safe alternative to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, for decreasing pain, inflammation, and maintaining healthy joints. Numerous studies have reported an array of molecular effects after glucosamine treatment. We questioned whether the differences in the effects observed in previous studies were associated with the focus on a specific subproteome or with the use of specific cell lines or tissues. To address this question, global mass spectrometry- and transcription array-based glucosamine drug profiling was performed on malignant cell lines from different stages of lymphocyte development. We combined global label-free MS-based protein quantitation with an open search for modifications to obtain the best possible proteome coverage. Our data were largely consistent with previous studies in a variety of cellular models. We mainly observed glucosamine induced O-GlcNAcylation/O-GalNAcylation (O-HexNAcylation); however, we also observed global and local changes in acetylation, methylation, and phosphorylation. For example, our data provides two additional examples of "yin-yang" between phosphorylation and O-HexNAcylation. Furthermore, we mapped novel O-HexNAc sites on GLU2B and calnexin. GLU2B and calnexin are known to be located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and involved in protein folding and quality control. The O-HexNAc sites were regulated by glucosamine treatment and correlated with the up-regulation of the ER stress marker GRP78. The occupancy of O-HexNAc on GLU2B and calnexin sites differed between the cytosolic and nuclear fractions with a higher occupancy in the cytosolic fraction. Based on our data we propose the hypothesis that O-HexNAc either inactivates calnexin and/or targets it to the cytosolic fraction. Further, we hypothesize that O-HexNAcylation induced by glucosamine treatment enhances protein trafficking.

  9. Fiber array based hyperspectral Raman imaging for chemical selective analysis of malaria-infected red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brückner, Michael; Becker, Katja; Popp, Jürgen; Frosch, Torsten

    2015-09-24

    A new setup for Raman spectroscopic wide-field imaging is presented. It combines the advantages of a fiber array based spectral translator with a tailor-made laser illumination system for high-quality Raman chemical imaging of sensitive biological samples. The Gaussian-like intensity distribution of the illuminating laser beam is shaped by a square-core optical multimode fiber to a top-hat profile with very homogeneous intensity distribution to fulfill the conditions of Koehler. The 30 m long optical fiber and an additional vibrator efficiently destroy the polarization and coherence of the illuminating light. This homogeneous, incoherent illumination is an essential prerequisite for stable quantitative imaging of complex biological samples. The fiber array translates the two-dimensional lateral information of the Raman stray light into separated spectral channels with very high contrast. The Raman image can be correlated with a corresponding white light microscopic image of the sample. The new setup enables simultaneous quantification of all Raman spectra across the whole spatial area with very good spectral resolution and thus outperforms other Raman imaging approaches based on scanning and tunable filters. The unique capabilities of the setup for fast, gentle, sensitive, and selective chemical imaging of biological samples were applied for automated hemozoin analysis. A special algorithm was developed to generate Raman images based on the hemozoin distribution in red blood cells without any influence from other Raman scattering. The new imaging setup in combination with the robust algorithm provides a novel, elegant way for chemical selective analysis of the malaria pigment hemozoin in early ring stages of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes.

  10. Multi-view Hilbert transformation in full-ring-transducer-array based photoacoustic computed tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Li, Guo; Zhu, Liren; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-03-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) exploits optical contrast and ultrasonic detection principles to form images of absorbed optical energy density within tissue. Based on the photoacoustic effect, PAT directly and quantitatively measures specific optical absorption. A full-ring ultrasonic transducer array based photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) system was recently developed for small animal whole-body imaging with a full-view detection angle and high in-plane resolution (100 µm). However, due to the band-pass frequency response of the piezoelectric transducer elements, the reconstructed images present bipolar (both positive and negative) pixel values, which is artificial and counterintuitive for physicians and biologists seeking to interpret the image. Moreover, bipolar pixel values hinder quantification of physiological parameters, such as oxygen saturation and blood flow speed. Unipolar images can be obtained by deconvolving the raw channel data with the transducer's electrical impulse response and applying non-negativity during iteration, but this process requires complex transducer modeling and time-consuming computation. Here, we present a multi-view Hilbert transformation method to recover the unipolar initial pressure for full-ring PACT. Multi-view Hilbert transformation along the acoustic wave propagation direction minimizes reconstruction artifacts during envelope extraction and maintains the signal-to-noise ratio of the reconstructed images. The in-plane isotropic spatial resolution of this method was quantified to 168 μm within a 20 × 20 mm2 field of view. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm was first validated by numerical simulations and then demonstrated with ex-vivo mouse brain structural imaging and in-vivo mouse wholebody imaging.

  11. Array-based transcriptional analysis of Clostridium sporogenes UC9000 during germination, cell outgrowth and vegetative life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassi, Daniela; Cappa, Fabrizio; Cocconcelli, Pier Sandro

    2013-02-01

    The members of the genus Clostridium, including the spore-forming anaerobic bacteria, have a complex and strictly regulated life cycle, but very little is known about the genetic pathways involved in the different stages of their life cycle. Clostridium sporogenes, a Gram-positive bacterium usually involved in food spoilage and frequently isolated from late blowing cheese, is genetically indistinguishable from the proteolytic Clostridium botulinum. As the non-neurotoxic counterpart, it is often used as an exemplar for the toxic subtypes. In this work, we performed a microscopic study combined with a custom array-based analysis of the C. sporogenes cycle, from dormant spores to the early stationary phase. We identified a total of 211 transcripts in spores, validating the hypothesis that mRNAs are abundant in spores and the pattern of mRNA expression is strikingly different from that present in growing cells. The spore transcripts included genes responsible for different life-sustaining functions, suggesting there was transcript entrapment or basic poly-functional gene activation for future steps. In addition, 3 h after the beginning of the germination process, 20% of the total up-regulated genes were temporally expressed in germinating spores. The vegetative condition appeared to be more active in terms of gene transcription and protein synthesis than the spore, and genes coding for germination and sporulation factors seemed to be expressed at this point. These results suggest that spores are not silent entities, and a broader knowledge of the genetic pathways involved in the Clostridium life cycle could provide a better understanding of pathogenic clostridia types.

  12. Automatic sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Haeseler, Friedrich

    2003-01-01

    Automatic sequences are sequences which are produced by a finite automaton. Although they are not random they may look as being random. They are complicated, in the sense of not being not ultimately periodic, they may look rather complicated, in the sense that it may not be easy to name the rule by which the sequence is generated, however there exists a rule which generates the sequence. The concept automatic sequences has special applications in algebra, number theory, finite automata and formal languages, combinatorics on words. The text deals with different aspects of automatic sequences, in particular:· a general introduction to automatic sequences· the basic (combinatorial) properties of automatic sequences· the algebraic approach to automatic sequences· geometric objects related to automatic sequences.

  13. Fast concurrent array-based stacks, queues and deques using fetch-and-increment-bounded, fetch-and-decrement-bounded and store-on-twin synchronization primitives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Gara, Alana; Heidelberger, Philip; Kumar, Sameer; Ohmacht, Martin; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard; Wisniewski, Robert

    2014-09-16

    Implementation primitives for concurrent array-based stacks, queues, double-ended queues (deques) and wrapped deques are provided. In one aspect, each element of the stack, queue, deque or wrapped deque data structure has its own ticket lock, allowing multiple threads to concurrently use multiple elements of the data structure and thus achieving high performance. In another aspect, new synchronization primitives FetchAndIncrementBounded (Counter, Bound) and FetchAndDecrementBounded (Counter, Bound) are implemented. These primitives can be implemented in hardware and thus promise a very fast throughput for queues, stacks and double-ended queues.

  14. Mosaicism for the FMR1 gene influences adaptive skills development in fragile X-affected males

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, I.L.; Sudhalter, V.; Nolin, S.L. [New York State Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities, Staten Island, NY (United States)

    1996-08-09

    Fragile X syndrome is one of the most common forms of inherited mental retardation, and the first of a new class of genetic disorders associated with expanded trinucleotide repeats. Previously, we found that about 41% of affected males are mosaic for this mutation in that some of their blood cells have an active fragile X gene and others do not. It has been hypothesized that these mosaic cases should show higher levels of functioning than those who have only the inactive full mutation gene, but previous studies have provided negative or equivocal results. In the present study, the cross-sectional development of communication, self-care, socialization, and motor skills was studied in 46 males with fragile X syndrome under age 20 years as a function of two variables: age and the presence or absence of mosaicism. The rate of adaptive skills development was 2-4 times as great in mosaic cases as in full mutation cases. There was also a trend for cases with autism to be more prevalent in the full-mutation group. These results have implications for prognosis, for the utility of gene or protein replacement therapies for this disorder, and for understanding the association between mental retardation, developmental disorders, and fragile X syndrome. 21 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Macroorchidism in FMR1 knockout mice is caused by increased Sertoli cell proliferation during testicular development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.E. Slegtenhorst-Eegdeman; D.G. de Rooij; M. Verhoef-Post (Miriam); H.J.G. van de Kant (Henk); C.E. Bakker (Cathy); B.A. Oostra (Ben); J.A. Grootegoed (Anton); A.P.N. Themmen (Axel)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractThe fragile X syndrome is the most frequent hereditary form of mental retardation. This X-linked disorder is, in most cases, caused by an unstable and expanding trinucleotide CGG repeat located in the 5'-untranslated region of the gene involved, the fragile

  16. Patologías asociadas a la premutación del gen FMR1

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Históricamente, los individuos portadores de alelos premutados se consideraban asintomáticos dado que no manifestaban discapacidad intelectual. Sin embargo, desde el año 2000 se han descrito dos patologías de aparición tardía asociadas específicamente a estos individuos: la insuficiencia ovárica primaria (FXPOI; OMIM#311360, ORPHA619) y el síndrome de temblor/ataxia asociado al X-Frágil (FXTAS; OMIM#300623, ORPHA93256). No obstante, cada vez es más evidente que existe un amplio espectro de ma...

  17. UV and visible light synergetic photodegradation using rutile TiO2 nanorod arrays based on a p-n Junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Tao; Cui, Ze; Zhang, Wenlong; Cao, Yunjiu; Zhang, Yongfang; He, Shu-Ang; Xu, Mingdong; Sun, Yangang; Zou, Rujia; Hu, Junqing

    2017-03-27

    Herein, we report a photocatalytic heterojunction device of rutile TiO2 nanorod arrays based on a p-n silicon junction (TiO2@PN) and its full absorption of ultraviolet and visible light for synergistic photodegradation. The fabricated TiO2@PN had excellent photocatalytic degradation of methyl orange (MO) under irradiation of a 300 W Xe lamp, and its pseudo-first-order rate constant k was 0.221 h(-1), which was greatly higher than that for TiO2 nanorod arrays based on an n-p silicon junction (TiO2@NP, 0.078 h(-1)) and glass (TiO2@G, 0.032 h(-1)). The higher photocatalytic performance of TiO2@PN could be attributed to the fact that the photovoltage (PV) of the p-n junction promotes separation of the electron-hole pairs of the TiO2, and the holes are thus left within the TiO2 nanorods to produce a strong oxidant of hydroxyl radicals (˙OH). Moreover, this heterojunction device could be easily fabricated in a large size for easy recovery and recycling, which shows its promise in the solar-driven degradation of environmental pollution.

  18. 基于RAP的垂直线列阵时反定位研究%Research on time reversal positioning of vertical line array based on RAP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王鸿吉; 韩建辉; 杨日杰

    2015-01-01

    在分析可靠声路径( RAP )的物理机理的基础上,将RAP与时间反转处理相结合,研究了基于RAP的垂直水听器阵时反定位问题,并在Munk声速剖面下的进行了仿真分析,结果表明了利用RAP进行垂直线列阵时反定位的有效性,通过适当提高阵元数量和间距可增强时反聚焦效果。%On the basis of analyzing physical mechanism of reliable acoustic path( RAP ) and time reversal processing is combined. Time reversal positioning problem of vertical hydrophone array based on RAP is researched. Simulation analysis under the condition of Munk sound speed profile is carried out,and the result shows validity of positioning of vertical line array based on RAP,improving sensor number and distance between sensors can enhance time-reversal energy focus effect.

  19. A Mismatch EndoNuclease Array-Based Methodology (MENA for Identifying Known SNPs or Novel Point Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep M. Comeron

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Accurate and rapid identification or confirmation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, point mutations and other human genomic variation facilitates understanding the genetic basis of disease. We have developed a new methodology (called MENA (Mismatch EndoNuclease Array pairing DNA mismatch endonuclease enzymology with tiling microarray hybridization in order to genotype both known point mutations (such as SNPs as well as identify previously undiscovered point mutations and small indels. We show that our assay can rapidly genotype known SNPs in a human genomic DNA sample with 99% accuracy, in addition to identifying novel point mutations and small indels with a false discovery rate as low as 10%. Our technology provides a platform for a variety of applications, including: (1 genotyping known SNPs as well as confirming newly discovered SNPs from whole genome sequencing analyses; (2 identifying novel point mutations and indels in any genomic region from any organism for which genome sequence information is available; and (3 screening panels of genes associated with particular diseases and disorders in patient samples to identify causative mutations. As a proof of principle for using MENA to discover novel mutations, we report identification of a novel allele of the beethoven (btv gene in Drosophila, which encodes a ciliary cytoplasmic dynein motor protein important for auditory mechanosensation.

  20. A Mismatch EndoNuclease Array-Based Methodology (MENA) for Identifying Known SNPs or Novel Point Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeron, Josep M.; Reed, Jordan; Christie, Matthew; Jacobs, Julia S.; Dierdorff, Jason; Eberl, Daniel F.; Manak, J. Robert

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and rapid identification or confirmation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), point mutations and other human genomic variation facilitates understanding the genetic basis of disease. We have developed a new methodology (called MENA (Mismatch EndoNuclease Array)) pairing DNA mismatch endonuclease enzymology with tiling microarray hybridization in order to genotype both known point mutations (such as SNPs) as well as identify previously undiscovered point mutations and small indels. We show that our assay can rapidly genotype known SNPs in a human genomic DNA sample with 99% accuracy, in addition to identifying novel point mutations and small indels with a false discovery rate as low as 10%. Our technology provides a platform for a variety of applications, including: (1) genotyping known SNPs as well as confirming newly discovered SNPs from whole genome sequencing analyses; (2) identifying novel point mutations and indels in any genomic region from any organism for which genome sequence information is available; and (3) screening panels of genes associated with particular diseases and disorders in patient samples to identify causative mutations. As a proof of principle for using MENA to discover novel mutations, we report identification of a novel allele of the beethoven (btv) gene in Drosophila, which encodes a ciliary cytoplasmic dynein motor protein important for auditory mechanosensation. PMID:27600073

  1. Sequence assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheibye-Alsing, Karsten; Hoffmann, S.; Frankel, Annett Maria

    2009-01-01

    Despite the rapidly increasing number of sequenced and re-sequenced genomes, many issues regarding the computational assembly of large-scale sequencing data have remain unresolved. Computational assembly is crucial in large genome projects as well for the evolving high-throughput technologies and...... in genomic DNA, highly expressed genes and alternative transcripts in EST sequences. We summarize existing comparisons of different assemblers and provide a detailed descriptions and directions for download of assembly programs at: http://genome.ku.dk/resources/assembly/methods.html....

  2. Genome Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sato, Shusei; Andersen, Stig Uggerhøj

    2014-01-01

    The current Lotus japonicus reference genome sequence is based on a hybrid assembly of Sanger TAC/BAC, Sanger shotgun and Illumina shotgun sequencing data generated from the Miyakojima-MG20 accession. It covers nearly all expressed L. japonicus genes and has been annotated mainly based on transcr......The current Lotus japonicus reference genome sequence is based on a hybrid assembly of Sanger TAC/BAC, Sanger shotgun and Illumina shotgun sequencing data generated from the Miyakojima-MG20 accession. It covers nearly all expressed L. japonicus genes and has been annotated mainly based...

  3. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization facilitates identification of breakpoints of a novel der(1)t(1;18)(p36.3;q23)dn in a child presenting with mental retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennon, P A; Cooper, M L; Curtis, M A; Lim, C; Ou, Z; Patel, A; Cheung, S W; Bacino, C A

    2006-06-01

    Monosomy of distal 1p36 represents the most common terminal deletion in humans and results in one of the most frequently diagnosed mental retardation syndromes. This deletion is considered a contiguous gene deletion syndrome, and has been shown to vary in deletion sizes that contribute to the spectrum of phenotypic anomalies seen in patients with monosomy 1p36. We report on an 8-year-old female with characteristics of the monosomy 1p36 syndrome who demonstrated a novel der(1)t(1;18)(p36.3;q23). Initial G-banded karyotype analysis revealed a deleted chromosome 1, with a breakpoint within 1p36.3. Subsequent FISH and array-based comparative genomic hybridization not only confirmed and partially characterized the deletion of chromosome 1p36.3, but also uncovered distal trisomy for 18q23. In this patient, the duplicated 18q23 is translocated onto the deleted 1p36.3 region, suggesting telomere capture. Molecular characterization of this novel der(1)t(1;18)(p36.3;q23), guided by our clinical array-comparative genomic hybridization, demonstrated a 3.2 Mb terminal deletion of chromosome 1p36.3 and a 200 kb duplication of 18q23 onto the deleted 1p36.3, presumably stabilizing the deleted chromosome 1. DNA sequence analysis around the breakpoints demonstrated no homology, and therefore this telomere capture of distal 18q is apparently the result of a non-homologous recombination. Partial trisomy for 18q23 has not been previously reported. The importance of mapping the breakpoints of all balanced and unbalanced translocations found in the clinical laboratory, when phenotypic abnormalities are found, is discussed.

  4. Clinical array-based karyotyping of breast cancer with equivocal HER2 status resolves gene copy number and reveals chromosome 17 complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zadeh Soheila

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HER2 gene copy status, and concomitant administration of trastuzumab (Herceptin, remains one of the best examples of targeted cancer therapy based on understanding the genomic etiology of disease. However, newly diagnosed breast cancer cases with equivocal HER2 results present a challenge for the oncologist who must make treatment decisions despite the patient's unresolved HER2 status. In some cases both immunohistochemistry (IHC and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH are reported as equivocal, whereas in other cases IHC results and FISH are discordant for positive versus negative results. The recent validation of array-based, molecular karyotyping for clinical oncology testing provides an alternative method for determination of HER2 gene copy number status in cases remaining unresolved by traditional methods. Methods In the current study, DNA extracted from 20 formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE tissue samples from newly diagnosed cases of invasive ductal carcinoma referred to our laboratory with unresolved HER2 status, were analyzed using a clinically validated genomic array containing 127 probes covering the HER2 amplicon, the pericentromeric regions, and both chromosome 17 arms. Results Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH analysis of chromosome 17 resolved HER2 gene status in [20/20] (100% of cases and revealed additional chromosome 17 copy number changes in [18/20] (90% of cases. Array CGH analysis also revealed two false positives and one false negative by FISH due to "ratio skewing" caused by chromosomal gains and losses in the centromeric region. All cases with complex rearrangements of chromosome 17 showed genome-wide chromosomal instability. Conclusions These results illustrate the analytical power of array-based genomic analysis as a clinical laboratory technique for resolution of HER2 status in breast cancer cases with equivocal results. The frequency of complex chromosome 17

  5. Field programmable gate array-based real-time optical Doppler tomography system for in vivo imaging of cardiac dynamics in the chick embryo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Lars; Larsen, Henning Engelbrecht; Norozi, Kambiz

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate a field programmable gate-array-based real-time optical Doppler tomography system. A complex-valued bandpass filter is used for the first time in optical coherence tomography signal processing to create the analytic signal. This method simplifies the filter design, and allows...... efficient and compact implementation by combining the conversion to an analytic signal with a pulse shaping function without the need for extra resources as compared to the Hilbert transform method. The conversion of the analytic signal to amplitude and phase is done by use of the coordinate rotation...... digital computer (CORDIC) algorithm, which is an efficient algorithm that maps well to the field programmable gate array. Flow phantom experiments, and the use of this system for in vivo imaging of cardiac dynamics in the chick embryo, are presented. We demonstrate the visualization of blood flow...

  6. Dna Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1995-04-25

    A method for sequencing a strand of DNA, including the steps off: providing the strand of DNA; annealing the strand with a primer able to hybridize to the strand to give an annealed mixture; incubating the mixture with four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, a DNA polymerase, and at least three deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates in different amounts, under conditions in favoring primer extension to form nucleic acid fragments complementory to the DNA to be sequenced; labelling the nucleic and fragments; separating them and determining the position of the deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates by differences in the intensity of the labels, thereby to determine the DNA sequence.

  7. Evaluation of an array-based method for human papillomavirus detection and genotyping in comparison with conventional methods used in cervical cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sierra, Nerea; Martró, Elisa; Castellà, Eva; Llatjós, Mariona; Tarrats, Antoni; Bascuñana, Elisabet; Díaz, Rosana; Carrasco, María; Sirera, Guillem; Matas, Lurdes; Ausina, Vicente

    2009-07-01

    Cervical cancer is the second-most prevalent cancer in young women around the world. Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV), especially high-risk HPV types (HR-HPV), is necessary for the development of this cancer. HPV-DNA detection is increasingly being used in cervical cancer screening programs, together with the Papanicolau smear test. We evaluated the usefulness of introducing this new array-based HPV genotyping method (i.e., Clinical Arrays Papillomavirus Humano) in the cervical cancer screening algorithm in our center. The results obtained using this method were compared to those obtained by the hybrid capture II high-risk HPV DNA test (HC-II) and Papanicolau in a selected group of 408 women. The array-based assay was performed in women that were HC-II positive or presented cytological alterations. Among 246 array-positive patients, 123 (50%) presented infection with >or=2 types, and HR-HPV types were detected in 206 (83.7%), mainly HPV-16 (24.0%). Up to 132 (33.2%) specimens were classified as ASCUS (for atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance), and only 48 (36.4%) of them were HPV-DNA positive by either assay; however, 78.7% of these cases were caused by HR-HPV types. The agreement between both HPV-DNA detection techniques was fairly good (n = 367). Screening with Papanicolau smear and HC-II tests, followed by HPV detection and genotyping, provided an optimal identification of women at risk for the development of cervical cancer. Furthermore, with the identification of specific genotypes, either in single or multiple infections, a better prediction of disease progression was achieved. The array method also made allowed us to determine the possible contribution of the available vaccines in our setting.

  8. Research on group analogy state evaluation method of photovoltaic array based on the vertical and horizontal dimensions%基于纵横维度的光伏阵列群体类比状态评估方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王景丹; 龚晓伟; 霍富强; 牛高远; 葛琪; 王留送; 苏战辉

    2016-01-01

    In photovoltaic array state estimation, the dimensionality of indicator selected is narrow and will lead to big error in the judgment of abnormal state and reason, therefore, this paper proposes one kind of state evaluation method for PV arrays based on the vertical and horizontal dimensions. The method divides the characteristics parameters of PV array in accordance with hierarchy structure and defines time sequence nodes and monitoring points of PV array. From the horizontal angle, it constructs evaluation model of running status of PV array based on the evaluation scheme of positive and negative ideal point, and then obtains the best distance degrees of an indicator in different PV array unit. Afterwards, it uses the Gauss curve fitting to structure the function relations of time between the best distance degrees and evaluation index from the vertical angle, and then acquires the group of running state curve of PV arrays. Thereby, it effectively identifies the abnormal array and relevant indicators, gives warning timely, and provides decision basis for operation and maintenance of PV array. It verifies the assessment method combined with solar data of practical engineering, experimental results show that the method can accurately reflect the actual running condition of PV array, and has a certain application value.%针对光伏阵列状态评估中指标选取维度较窄,异常状态及原因判定误差较大的问题,提出一种基于纵横维度的光伏阵列群体类比状态评估方法。将光伏阵列状态评估特征参量按照递阶层次结构划分,定义时间序列节点和光伏阵列监测点。从横向角度构造基于正负理想点评估法的光伏阵列运行状态评估模型,得出某项评估指标在不同光伏阵列单元中的最佳距离度。从纵向角度利用高斯曲线拟合法构造最佳距离度与评估指标的时间函数关系,得出光伏阵列群体运行状态曲线。从而准确识别异常阵列

  9. Comparison of buccal and blood-derived canine DNA, either native or whole genome amplified, for array-based genome-wide association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawley Cynthia

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The availability of array-based genotyping platforms for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs for the canine genome has expanded the opportunities to undertake genome-wide association (GWA studies to identify the genetic basis for Mendelian and complex traits. Whole blood as the source of high quality DNA is undisputed but often proves impractical for collection of the large numbers of samples necessary to discover the loci underlying complex traits. Further, many countries prohibit the collection of blood from dogs unless medically necessary thereby restricting access to critical control samples from healthy dogs. Alternate sources of DNA, typically from buccal cytobrush extractions, while convenient, have been suggested to have low yield and perform poorly in GWA. Yet buccal cytobrushes provide a cost-effective means of collecting DNA, are readily accepted by dog owners, and represent a large resource base in many canine genetics laboratories. To increase the DNA quantities, whole genome amplification (WGA can be performed. Thus, the present study assessed the utility of buccal-derived DNA as well as whole genome amplification in comparison to blood samples for use on the most recent iteration of the canine HD SNP array (Illumina. Findings In both buccal and blood samples, whether whole genome amplified or not, 97% of the samples had SNP call rates in excess of 80% indicating that the vast majority of the SNPs would be suitable to perform association studies regardless of the DNA source. Similarly, there were no significant differences in marker intensity measurements between buccal and blood samples for copy number variations (CNV analysis. Conclusions All DNA samples assayed, buccal or blood, native or whole genome amplified, are appropriate for use in array-based genome-wide association studies. The concordance between subsets of dogs for which both buccal and blood samples, or those samples whole genome amplified, was

  10. Main: Sequences [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Sequences Nucleotide Sequence Nucleotide sequence of full length cDNA (trimmed sequence) kome_ine_full_seq...uence_db.fasta.zip kome_ine_full_sequence_db.zip kome_ine_full_sequence_db ...

  11. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization is more informative than conventional karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization in the analysis of first-trimester spontaneous abortion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Jinsong

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH is a new technique for detecting submicroscopic deletions and duplications, and can overcome many of the limitations associated with classic cytogenetic analysis. However, its clinical use in spontaneous abortion needs comprehensive evaluation. We used aCGH to investigate chromosomal imbalances in 100 spontaneous abortions and compared the results with G-banding karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH. Inconsistent results were verified by quantitative fluorescence PCR. Results Abnormalities were detected in 61 cases. aCGH achieved the highest detection rate (93.4%, 57/61 compared with traditional karyotyping (77%, 47/61 and FISH analysis (68.9%, 42/61. aCGH identified all chromosome abnormalities reported by traditional karyotyping and interphase FISH analysis, with the exception of four triploids. It also detected three additional aneuploidy cases in 37 specimens with ‘normal’ karyotypes, one mosaicism and 10 abnormalities in 14 specimens that failed to grow in vitro. Conclusions aCGH analysis circumvents many limitations in traditional karyotyping or FISH. The accuracy and efficiency of aCGH in spontaneous abortions highlights its clinical usefulness for the future. As aborted tissues have the potential to be contaminated with maternal cells, the threshold value of detection in aCGH should be lowered to avoid false negatives.

  12. Array based characterization of a terminal deletion involving chromosome subband 15q26.2: an emerging syndrome associated with growth retardation, cardiac defects and developmental delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björkhem Gudrun

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subtelomeric regions are gene rich and deletions in these chromosomal segments have been demonstrated to account for approximately 2.5% of patients displaying mental retardation with or without association of dysmorphic features. However, cases that report de novo terminal deletions on chromosome arm 15q are rare. Methods In this study we present the first example of a detailed molecular genetic mapping of a de novo deletion in involving 15q26.2-qter, caused by the formation of a dicentric chromosome 15, using metaphase FISH and tiling resolution (32 k genome-wide array-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH. Results After an initial characterization of the dicentric chromosome by metaphase FISH, array CGH analysis mapped the terminal deletion to encompass a 6.48 megabase (Mb region, ranging from 93.86–100.34 Mb on chromosome 15. Conclusion In conclusion, we present an additional case to the growing family of reported cases with 15q26-deletion, thoroughly characterized at the molecular cytogenetic level. In the deleted regions, four candidate genes responsible for the phenotype of the patient could be delineated: IGFR1, MEF2A, CHSY1, and TM2D3. Further characterization of additional patients harboring similar 15q-aberrations might hopefully in the future lead to the description of a clear cut clinically recognizable syndrome.

  13. Fxr1 knockout mice show a striated muscle phenotype: implications for Fxr1p function in vivo.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J. Mientjes (Edwin); R. Willemsen (Rob); L.L. Kirkpatrick (Laura); I.M. Nieuwenhuizen (Ingeborg); M. Hoogeveen-Westerveld (Marianne); M. Verweij (Marcel); S. Reis (Surya); B. Bardoni (Barbara); A.T. Hoogeveen (Andre); B.A. Oostra (Ben); D.L. Nelson (David)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractFXR1 is one of the two known homologues of FMR1. FXR1 shares a high degree of sequence homology with FMR1 and also encodes two KH domains and an RGG domain, conferring RNA-binding capabilities. In comparison with FMRP, very little is known about the function of FXR1P in

  14. Array-based photoacoustic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autrey, S. Thomas; Posakony, Gerald J.; Chen, Yu

    2005-03-22

    Methods and apparatus for simultaneous or sequential, rapid analysis of multiple samples by photoacoustic spectroscopy are disclosed. A photoacoustic spectroscopy sample array including a body having at least three recesses or affinity masses connected thereto is used in conjunction with a photoacoustic spectroscopy system. At least one acoustic detector is positioned near the recesses or affinity masses for detection of acoustic waves emitted from species of interest within the recesses or affinity masses.

  15. Single nucleotide polymorphism array-based karyotyping in acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome with trisomy 8 as the sole chromosomal abnormality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahm, Chorong; Mun, Yeung Chul; Seong, Chu Myong; Han, Sung-Hee; Chung, Wha Soon; Huh, Jungwon

    2013-01-01

    The clinical heterogeneity of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) with trisomy 8 as the sole abnormality may result from cytogenetically undetectable genetic changes. The purpose of this study was to identify hidden genomic aberrations not detected by metaphase cytogenetics (MC) using high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism array (SNP-A)-based karyotyping in AML/MDS patients with a sole trisomy 8. The study group included 8 patients (3 AML and 5 MDS) and array-based karyotyping was done using whole-genome SNP-A (SNP 6.0 and SNP 2.7M). By SNP-A, additional genomic aberrations not detected by MC were identified in 2 patients: 1 AML patient exhibited a copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (CN-LOH) of 3q21.1-q29 and 11q13.1-q25 and the other patient with MDS (refractory cytopenia with unilineage dysplasia) had CN-LOH of 2p25.3-p15. In particular, the latter patient progressed to AML 18 months after the diagnosis. In 3 patients, aberrations in addition to trisomy 8 were not identified by SNP-A. In the remaining 3 patients, SNP-A could not detect trisomy 8, while trisomy 8 was found in 25-67% of metaphase cells by MC. This study suggests that additional genomic aberrations may in fact be present even in cases of trisomy 8 as sole abnormality by MC, and SNP-A could be a useful karyotyping tool to identify hidden aberrations such as CN-LOH.

  16. Determination of Rayleigh wave ellipticity across the Earthscope Transportable Array using single-station and array-based processing of ambient seismic noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Eli; Lin, Fan-Chi; Koper, Keith D.

    2017-01-01

    We present a single station method for the determination of Rayleigh wave ellipticity, or Rayleigh wave horizontal to vertical amplitude ratio (H/V) using Frequency Dependent Polarization Analysis (FDPA). This procedure uses singular value decomposition of 3-by-3 spectral covariance matrices over 1-hr time windows to determine properties of the ambient seismic noise field such as particle motion and dominant wave-type. In FPDA, if the noise is mostly dominated by a primary singular value and the phase difference is roughly 90° between the major horizontal axis and the vertical axis of the corresponding singular vector, we infer that Rayleigh waves are dominant and measure an H/V ratio for that hour and frequency bin. We perform this analysis for all available data from the Earthscope Transportable Array between 2004 and 2014. We compare the observed Rayleigh wave H/V ratios with those previously measured by multicomponent, multistation noise cross-correlation (NCC), as well as classical noise spectrum H/V ratio analysis (NSHV). At 8 s the results from all three methods agree, suggesting that the ambient seismic noise field is Rayleigh wave dominated. Between 10 and 30 s, while the general pattern agrees well, the results from FDPA and NSHV are persistently slightly higher (˜2 per cent) and significantly higher (>20 per cent), respectively, than results from the array-based NCC. This is likely caused by contamination from other wave types (i.e. Love waves, body waves, and tilt noise) in the single station methods, but it could also reflect a small, persistent error in NCC. Additionally, we find that the single station method has difficulty retrieving robust Rayleigh wave H/V ratios within major sedimentary basins, such as the Williston Basin and Mississippi Embayment, where the noise field is likely dominated by reverberating Love waves and tilt noise.

  17. Study of collimator array based on single collimating lens%基于单准直透镜的阵列准直器研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁志林; 杨睿; 杨柳; 宋丽丹; 孙莉萍; 马雨虹; 王猛; 陈定康; 郭金平; 唐丽红

    2012-01-01

    提出了一种基于单准直透镜和光纤阵列的阵列准直器,深入研究了此种方案的光路无胶和光路有胶的两种实现方式:并基于高斯光束传输矩阵和q参数相关理论,从理论上详细地计算、推导了各变量之间的关系,并进行了模拟仿真及实验验证,得到了理论和实验一致的结果.对两种实现方式的结构及封装设计也进行了初步的摸索和实验,并制作出了性能良好的阵列准直器.理论和实验表明,该方案具有易加工、低成本、易封装、性能优等特点,也易于扩展成多维阵列准直器,可为可重构光分插复用器系统和光交叉连接系统的发展提供强有力的器件支撑.%A new collimator array based on single collimating lens and fiber array is proposed in the paper. An in-depth study is conducted on the two realizing methods, one is with glue in the optical path and the other is without glue in the optical path. Based on Gauss optics transmission matrix and q parameter theory, the relationship among the variables is deduced and computed theoretically, simulated virtually and confirmed experimentally. Good agreement between theoretical results and simulation, experimental results is obtained. The mechanical and packaging designs of the two realizing methods are first studied, then the proposed collimator arrays, with good performance are made. Both the theoretical and experimental results show that the scheme has the merits of easy-to-make, low cost, easy-to-package, good performance, good scalability, etc., which can strongly support the development of reconfigurable optical add- drop multiplexer system and optical cross-connect system.

  18. RIsearch2: suffix array-based large-scale prediction of RNA-RNA interactions and siRNA off-targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkan, Ferhat; Wenzel, Anne; Palasca, Oana

    2017-01-01

    and high level of complementarity between two RNA sequences is a powerful predictor of such interactions. Here, we present RIsearch2, a large-scale RNA-RNA interaction prediction tool that enables quick localization of potential near-complementary RNA-RNA interactions between given query and target...

  19. Classifying Genomic Sequences by Sequence Feature Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Hua Liu; Dian Jiao; Xiao Sun

    2005-01-01

    Traditional sequence analysis depends on sequence alignment. In this study, we analyzed various functional regions of the human genome based on sequence features, including word frequency, dinucleotide relative abundance, and base-base correlation. We analyzed the human chromosome 22 and classified the upstream,exon, intron, downstream, and intergenic regions by principal component analysis and discriminant analysis of these features. The results show that we could classify the functional regions of genome based on sequence feature and discriminant analysis.

  20. Structural-functional connectivity deficits of neocortical circuits in the Fmr1 (-/y) mouse model of autism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haberl, M.G.; Zerbi, V.; Veltien, A.A.; Ginger, M.; Heerschap, A.; Frick, A.

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common inherited form of intellectual disability disorder and a frequent cause of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), is characterized by a high prevalence of sensory symptoms. Perturbations in the anatomical connectivity of neocortical circuits resulting in their func

  1. GENERAL OVERGROWTH IN THE FRAGILE-X SYNDROME - VARIABILITY IN THE PHENOTYPIC-EXPRESSION OF THE FMR1 GENE MUTATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEVRIES, BBA; ROBINSON, H; STOLTEDIJKSTRA, [No Value; GI, CVTP; DIJKSTRA, PF; VANDOOM, J; HALLEY, DJJ; OOSTRA, BA; TURNER, G; NIERMEIJER, MF

    1995-01-01

    The fragile X syndrome, which often presents in childhood with overgrowth, may in some cases show some diagnostic overlap with classical Sotos syndrome. We describe four fragile X patients with general overgrowth, all of whom are from families with other affected relatives who show the classic Marti

  2. Main: Sequences [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Sequences Amino Acid Sequence Amino Acid sequence of full length cDNA (Longest ORF) kome_ine_full_seq...uence_amino_db.fasta.zip kome_ine_full_sequence_amino_db.zip kome_ine_full_sequence_amino_db ...

  3. Shotgun protein sequencing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Heffelfinger, Grant S.

    2009-06-01

    A novel experimental and computational technique based on multiple enzymatic digestion of a protein or protein mixture that reconstructs protein sequences from sequences of overlapping peptides is described in this SAND report. This approach, analogous to shotgun sequencing of DNA, is to be used to sequence alternative spliced proteins, to identify post-translational modifications, and to sequence genetically engineered proteins.

  4. Sequence Read Archive (SRA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Sequence Read Archive (SRA) stores raw sequencing data from the next generation of sequencing platforms including Roche 454 GS System®, Illumina Genome...

  5. Multimodal sequence learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemény, Ferenc; Meier, Beat

    2016-02-01

    While sequence learning research models complex phenomena, previous studies have mostly focused on unimodal sequences. The goal of the current experiment is to put implicit sequence learning into a multimodal context: to test whether it can operate across different modalities. We used the Task Sequence Learning paradigm to test whether sequence learning varies across modalities, and whether participants are able to learn multimodal sequences. Our results show that implicit sequence learning is very similar regardless of the source modality. However, the presence of correlated task and response sequences was required for learning to take place. The experiment provides new evidence for implicit sequence learning of abstract conceptual representations. In general, the results suggest that correlated sequences are necessary for implicit sequence learning to occur. Moreover, they show that elements from different modalities can be automatically integrated into one unitary multimodal sequence.

  6. Coordinate cytokine regulatory sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazer, Kelly A.; Rubin, Edward M.; Loots, Gabriela G.

    2005-05-10

    The present invention provides CNS sequences that regulate the cytokine gene expression, expression cassettes and vectors comprising or lacking the CNS sequences, host cells and non-human transgenic animals comprising the CNS sequences or lacking the CNS sequences. The present invention also provides methods for identifying compounds that modulate the functions of CNS sequences as well as methods for diagnosing defects in the CNS sequences of patients.

  7. Comparison of three targeted enrichment strategies on the SOLiD sequencing platform.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale J Hedges

    Full Text Available Despite the ever-increasing throughput and steadily decreasing cost of next generation sequencing (NGS, whole genome sequencing of humans is still not a viable option for the majority of genetics laboratories. This is particularly true in the case of complex disease studies, where large sample sets are often required to achieve adequate statistical power. To fully leverage the potential of NGS technology on large sample sets, several methods have been developed to selectively enrich for regions of interest. Enrichment reduces both monetary and computational costs compared to whole genome sequencing, while allowing researchers to take advantage of NGS throughput. Several targeted enrichment approaches are currently available, including molecular inversion probe ligation sequencing (MIPS, oligonucleotide hybridization based approaches, and PCR-based strategies. To assess how these methods performed when used in conjunction with the ABI SOLID3+, we investigated three enrichment techniques: Nimblegen oligonucleotide hybridization array-based capture; Agilent SureSelect oligonucleotide hybridization solution-based capture; and Raindance Technologies' multiplexed PCR-based approach. Target regions were selected from exons and evolutionarily conserved areas throughout the human genome. Probe and primer pair design was carried out for all three methods using their respective informatics pipelines. In all, approximately 0.8 Mb of target space was identical for all 3 methods. SOLiD sequencing results were analyzed for several metrics, including consistency of coverage depth across samples, on-target versus off-target efficiency, allelic bias, and genotype concordance with array-based genotyping data. Agilent SureSelect exhibited superior on-target efficiency and correlation of read depths across samples. Nimblegen performance was similar at read depths at 20× and below. Both Raindance and Nimblegen SeqCap exhibited tighter distributions of read depth

  8. Genome Sequence Databases (Overview): Sequencing and Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidus, Alla L.

    2009-01-01

    From the date its role in heredity was discovered, DNA has been generating interest among scientists from different fields of knowledge: physicists have studied the three dimensional structure of the DNA molecule, biologists tried to decode the secrets of life hidden within these long molecules, and technologists invent and improve methods of DNA analysis. The analysis of the nucleotide sequence of DNA occupies a special place among the methods developed. Thanks to the variety of sequencing technologies available, the process of decoding the sequence of genomic DNA (or whole genome sequencing) has become robust and inexpensive. Meanwhile the assembly of whole genome sequences remains a challenging task. In addition to the need to assemble millions of DNA fragments of different length (from 35 bp (Solexa) to 800 bp (Sanger)), great interest in analysis of microbial communities (metagenomes) of different complexities raises new problems and pushes some new requirements for sequence assembly tools to the forefront. The genome assembly process can be divided into two steps: draft assembly and assembly improvement (finishing). Despite the fact that automatically performed assembly (or draft assembly) is capable of covering up to 98% of the genome, in most cases, it still contains incorrectly assembled reads. The error rate of the consensus sequence produced at this stage is about 1/2000 bp. A finished genome represents the genome assembly of much higher accuracy (with no gaps or incorrectly assembled areas) and quality ({approx}1 error/10,000 bp), validated through a number of computer and laboratory experiments.

  9. Contamination of sequence databases with adaptor sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Takeo; Sanders, A.R.; Detera-Wadleigh, S.D. [National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Because of the exponential increase in the amount of DNA sequences being added to the public databases on a daily basis, it has become imperative to identify sources of contamination rapidly. Previously, contaminations of sequence databases have been reported to alert the scientific community to the problem. These contaminations can be divided into two categories. The first category comprises host sequences that have been difficult for submitters to manage or control. Examples include anomalous sequences derived from Escherichia coli, which are inserted into the chromosomes (and plasmids) of the bacterial hosts. Insertion sequences are highly mobile and are capable of transposing themselves into plasmids during cloning manipulation. Another example of the first category is the infection with yeast genomic DNA or with bacterial DNA of some commercially available cDNA libraries from Clontech. The second category of database contamination is due to the inadvertent inclusion of nonhost sequences. This category includes incorporation of cloning-vector sequences and multicloning sites in the database submission. M13-derived artifacts have been common, since M13-based vectors have been widely used for subcloning DNA fragments. Recognizing this problem, the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) started to screen, in April 1994, all sequences directly submitted to GenBank, against a set of vector data retrieved from GenBank by use of key-word searches, such as {open_quotes}vector.{close_quotes} In this report, we present evidence for another sequence artifact that is widespread but that, to our knowledge, has not yet been reported. 11 refs., 1 tab.

  10. Automated DNA Sequencing System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, G.A.; Ekkebus, C.P.; Hauser, L.J.; Kress, R.L.; Mural, R.J.

    1999-04-25

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is developing a core DNA sequencing facility to support biological research endeavors at ORNL and to conduct basic sequencing automation research. This facility is novel because its development is based on existing standard biology laboratory equipment; thus, the development process is of interest to the many small laboratories trying to use automation to control costs and increase throughput. Before automation, biology Laboratory personnel purified DNA, completed cycle sequencing, and prepared 96-well sample plates with commercially available hardware designed specifically for each step in the process. Following purification and thermal cycling, an automated sequencing machine was used for the sequencing. A technician handled all movement of the 96-well sample plates between machines. To automate the process, ORNL is adding a CRS Robotics A- 465 arm, ABI 377 sequencing machine, automated centrifuge, automated refrigerator, and possibly an automated SpeedVac. The entire system will be integrated with one central controller that will direct each machine and the robot. The goal of this system is to completely automate the sequencing procedure from bacterial cell samples through ready-to-be-sequenced DNA and ultimately to completed sequence. The system will be flexible and will accommodate different chemistries than existing automated sequencing lines. The system will be expanded in the future to include colony picking and/or actual sequencing. This discrete event, DNA sequencing system will demonstrate that smaller sequencing labs can achieve cost-effective the laboratory grow.

  11. Array based detection of antibiotic resistance genes in Gram negative bacteria isolated from retail poultry meat in the UK and Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeece, Grainne; Naughton, Violetta; Woodward, Martin J; Dooley, James S G; Naughton, Patrick J

    2014-06-02

    The use of antibiotics in birds and animals intended for human consumption within the European Union (EU) and elsewhere has been subject to regulation prohibiting the use of antimicrobials as growth promoters and the use of last resort antibiotics in an attempt to reduce the spread of multi-resistant Gram negative bacteria. Given the inexorable spread of antibiotic resistance there is an increasing need for improved monitoring of our food. Using selective media, Gram negative bacteria were isolated from retail chicken of UK-Intensively reared (n=27), Irish-Intensively reared (n=19) and UK-Free range (n=30) origin and subjected to an oligonucleotide based array system for the detection of 47 clinically relevant antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and two integrase genes. High incidences of β-lactamase genes were noted in all sample types, acc (67%), cmy (80%), fox (55%) and tem (40%) while chloramphenicol resistant determinants were detected in bacteria from the UK poultry portions and were absent in bacteria from the Irish samples. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) was used to qualitatively analyse the Gram negative population in the samples and showed the expected diversity based on band stabbing and DNA sequencing. The array system proved to be a quick method for the detection of antibiotic resistance gene (ARG) burden within a mixed Gram negative bacterial population.

  12. Array-based genome-wide RNAi screening to identify shRNAs that enhance p53-related apoptosis in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idogawa, Masashi; Ohashi, Tomoko; Sugisaka, Jun; Sasaki, Yasushi; Suzuki, Hiromu; Tokino, Takashi

    2014-09-15

    p53 transduction is a potentially effective cancer therapy but does not result in a good therapeutic response in all human cancers due to resistance to apoptosis. To discover factors that overcome resistance to p53-induced apoptosis, we attempted to identify RNAi sequences that enhance p53-induced apoptosis. We screened a genome-wide lentiviral shRNA library in liver cancer Huh-7 and pancreatic cancer Panc-1 cells, both of which resist p53-induced apoptosis. After the infection of adenovirus expressing p53 or LacZ as a control, shRNA-treated populations were analyzed by microarray. We identified shRNAs that were significantly decreased in p53-infected cells compared with control cells. Among these shRNAs, shRNA-58335 was markedly decreased in both cancer cell lines tested. shRNA-58335 enhanced p53-related apoptosis in vitro and augmented the inhibitory effect of adenoviral p53 transduction on tumor growth in vivo. Furthermore, the enhanced apoptotic response by shRNA-58335 was also confirmed by treatment with PRIMA-1, which reactivates mutant p53, instead of adenoviral p53 transduction. We found that shRNA-58335 evokes the apoptotic response following p53 transduction or functional restoration of p53 with a small molecule drug in cancer cells resistant to p53-induced apoptosis. The combination of p53 restoration and RNAi-based drugs is expected to be a promising novel cancer therapy.

  13. Diagnosis and Prognostication of Ductal Adenocarcinomas of the Pancreas Based on Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Profiling by Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Array-Based Methylated CpG Island Amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Gotoh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To establish diagnostic criteria for ductal adenocarcinomas of the pancreas (PCs, bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC array-based methylated CpG island amplification was performed using 139 tissue samples. Twelve BAC clones, for which DNA methylation status was able to discriminate cancerous tissue (T from noncancerous pancreatic tissue in the learning cohort with a specificity of 100%, were identified. Using criteria that combined the 12 BAC clones, T-samples were diagnosed as cancers with 100% sensitivity and specificity in both the learning and validation cohorts. DNA methylation status on 11 of the BAC clones, which was able to discriminate patients showing early relapse from those with no relapse in the learning cohort with 100% specificity, was correlated with the recurrence-free and overall survival rates in the validation cohort and was an independent prognostic factor by multivariate analysis. Genome-wide DNA methylation profiling may provide optimal diagnostic markers and prognostic indicators for patients with PCs.

  14. sequenceMiner algorithm

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Detecting and describing anomalies in large repositories of discrete symbol sequences. sequenceMiner has been open-sourced! Download the file below to try it out....

  15. DNA sequencing conference, 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook-Deegan, R.M. [Georgetown Univ., Kennedy Inst. of Ethics, Washington, DC (United States); Venter, J.C. [National Inst. of Neurological Disorders and Strokes, Bethesda, MD (United States); Gilbert, W. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Mulligan, J. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Mansfield, B.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1991-06-19

    This conference focused on DNA sequencing, genetic linkage mapping, physical mapping, informatics and bioethics. Several were used to study this sequencing and mapping. This article also discusses computer hardware and software aiding in the mapping of genes.

  16. Anomaly Detection in Sequences

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We present a set of novel algorithms which we call sequenceMiner, that detect and characterize anomalies in large sets of high-dimensional symbol sequences that...

  17. Roles of repetitive sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, G.I.

    1991-12-31

    The DNA of higher eukaryotes contains many repetitive sequences. The study of repetitive sequences is important, not only because many have important biological function, but also because they provide information on genome organization, evolution and dynamics. In this paper, I will first discuss some generic effects that repetitive sequences will have upon genome dynamics and evolution. In particular, it will be shown that repetitive sequences foster recombination among, and turnover of, the elements of a genome. I will then consider some examples of repetitive sequences, notably minisatellite sequences and telomere sequences as examples of tandem repeats, without and with respectively known function, and Alu sequences as an example of interspersed repeats. Some other examples will also be considered in less detail.

  18. Enhanced virome sequencing using targeted sequence capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Todd N; Wylie, Kristine M; Herter, Brandi N; Storch, Gregory A

    2015-12-01

    Metagenomic shotgun sequencing (MSS) is an important tool for characterizing viral populations. It is culture independent, requires no a priori knowledge of the viruses in the sample, and may provide useful genomic information. However, MSS can lack sensitivity and may yield insufficient data for detailed analysis. We have created a targeted sequence capture panel, ViroCap, designed to enrich nucleic acid from DNA and RNA viruses from 34 families that infect vertebrate hosts. A computational approach condensed ∼1 billion bp of viral reference sequence into <200 million bp of unique, representative sequence suitable for targeted sequence capture. We compared the effectiveness of detecting viruses in standard MSS versus MSS following targeted sequence capture. First, we analyzed two sets of samples, one derived from samples submitted to a diagnostic virology laboratory and one derived from samples collected in a study of fever in children. We detected 14 and 18 viruses in the two sets, comprising 19 genera from 10 families, with dramatic enhancement of genome representation following capture enrichment. The median fold-increases in percentage viral reads post-capture were 674 and 296. Median breadth of coverage increased from 2.1% to 83.2% post-capture in the first set and from 2.0% to 75.6% in the second set. Next, we analyzed samples containing a set of diverse anellovirus sequences and demonstrated that ViroCap could be used to detect viral sequences with up to 58% variation from the references used to select capture probes. ViroCap substantially enhances MSS for a comprehensive set of viruses and has utility for research and clinical applications.

  19. DNA sequences encoding erythropoietin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, F.K.

    1987-10-27

    A purified and isolated DNA sequence is described consisting essentially of a DNA sequence encoding a polypeptide having an amino acid sequence sufficiently duplicative of that of erythropoietin to allow possession of the biological property of causing bone marrow cells to increase production of reticulocytes and red blood cells, and to increase hemoglobin synthesis or iron uptake.

  20. Low autocorrelation binary sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packebusch, Tom; Mertens, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    Binary sequences with minimal autocorrelations have applications in communication engineering, mathematics and computer science. In statistical physics they appear as groundstates of the Bernasconi model. Finding these sequences is a notoriously hard problem, that so far can be solved only by exhaustive search. We review recent algorithms and present a new algorithm that finds optimal sequences of length N in time O(N {1.73}N). We computed all optimal sequences for N≤slant 66 and all optimal skewsymmetric sequences for N≤slant 119.

  1. Repdigits in -Lucas Sequences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jhon J J Bravo; Florian Luca

    2014-05-01

    For an integer ≥ 2, let $(L_n^{(k)})_n$ be the -Lucas sequence which starts with $0,\\ldots,0,2,1$ ( terms) and each term afterwards is the sum of the preceding terms. In 2000, Luca (Port. Math. 57(2) 2000 243-254) proved that 11 is the largest number with only one distinct digit (the so-called repdigit) in the sequence $(L_n^{(2)})_n$. In this paper, we address a similar problem in the family of -Lucas sequences. We also show that the -Lucas sequences have similar properties to those of -Fibonacci sequences and occur in formulae simultaneously with the latter.

  2. On Maximal Green Sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Brüstle, Thomas; Pérotin, Matthieu

    2012-01-01

    Maximal green sequences are particular sequences of quiver mutations which were introduced by Keller in the context of quantum dilogarithm identities and independently by Cecotti-Cordova-Vafa in the context of supersymmetric gauge theory. Our aim is to initiate a systematic study of these sequences from a combinatorial point of view. Interpreting maximal green sequences as paths in various natural posets arising in representation theory, we prove the finiteness of the number of maximal green sequences for cluster finite quivers, affine quivers and acyclic quivers with at most three vertices. We also give results concerning the possible numbers and lengths of these maximal green sequences. Finally we describe an algorithm for computing maximal green sequences for arbitrary valued quivers which we used to obtain numerous explicit examples that we present.

  3. Cosmetology: Scope and Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashville - Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN.

    This scope and sequence guide, developed for a cosmetology vocational education program, represents an initial step in the development of a systemwide articulated curriculum sequence for all vocational programs within the Metropolitan Nashville Public School System. It was developed as a result of needs expressed by teachers, parents, and the…

  4. DNA sequencing by CE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karger, Barry L; Guttman, András

    2009-06-01

    Sequencing of human and other genomes has been at the center of interest in the biomedical field over the past several decades and is now leading toward an era of personalized medicine. During this time, DNA-sequencing methods have evolved from the labor-intensive slab gel electrophoresis, through automated multiCE systems using fluorophore labeling with multispectral imaging, to the "next-generation" technologies of cyclic-array, hybridization based, nanopore and single molecule sequencing. Deciphering the genetic blueprint and follow-up confirmatory sequencing of Homo sapiens and other genomes were only possible with the advent of modern sequencing technologies that were a result of step-by-step advances with a contribution of academics, medical personnel and instrument companies. While next-generation sequencing is moving ahead at breakneck speed, the multicapillary electrophoretic systems played an essential role in the sequencing of the Human Genome, the foundation of the field of genomics. In this prospective, we wish to overview the role of CE in DNA sequencing based in part of several of our articles in this journal.

  5. Hardware bitstream sequence recognizer

    OpenAIRE

    Karpin, Oleksandr; Sokil, Volodymyr

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes how to implement in hardware a bistream sequence recognizer using the PSoC Pseudo Random Sequence Generator (PRS) User Module. The PRS can be used in digital communication systems with the serial data interface for automatic preamble detection and extraction, control words selection, etc.

  6. Sequencing the maize genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martienssen, Robert A; Rabinowicz, Pablo D; O'Shaughnessy, Andrew; McCombie, W Richard

    2004-04-01

    Sequencing of complex genomes can be accomplished by enriching shotgun libraries for genes. In maize, gene-enrichment by copy-number normalization (high C(0)t) and methylation filtration (MF) have been used to generate up to two-fold coverage of the gene-space with less than 1 million sequencing reads. Simulations using sequenced bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones predict that 5x coverage of gene-rich regions, accompanied by less than 1x coverage of subclones from BAC contigs, will generate high-quality mapped sequence that meets the needs of geneticists while accommodating unusually high levels of structural polymorphism. By sequencing several inbred strains, we propose a strategy for capturing this polymorphism to investigate hybrid vigor or heterosis.

  7. RIKEN Integrated Sequence Analysis (RISA) System—384-Format Sequencing Pipeline with 384 Multicapillary Sequencer

    OpenAIRE

    Shibata, Kazuhiro; Itoh, Masayoshi; Aizawa, Katsunori; Nagaoka, Sumiharu; Sasaki, Nobuya; Carninci, Piero; Konno, Hideaki; AKIYAMA, Junichi; Nishi, Katsuo; Kitsunai, Tokuji; Tashiro, Hideo; Itoh, Mari; Sumi, Noriko; Ishii, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Shin

    2000-01-01

    The RIKEN high-throughput 384-format sequencing pipeline (RISA system) including a 384-multicapillary sequencer (the so-called RISA sequencer) was developed for the RIKEN mouse encyclopedia project. The RISA system consists of colony picking, template preparation, sequencing reaction, and the sequencing process. A novel high-throughput 384-format capillary sequencer system (RISA sequencer system) was developed for the sequencing process. This system consists of a 384-multicapillary auto seque...

  8. HIV Sequence Compendium 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, Brian Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Leitner, Thomas Kenneth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Apetrei, Cristian [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Hahn, Beatrice [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Mizrachi, Ilene [National Center for Biotechnology Information, Bethesda, MD (United States); Mullins, James [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Rambaut, Andrew [Univ. of Edinburgh, Scotland (United Kingdom); Wolinsky, Steven [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Korber, Bette Tina Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-05

    This compendium is an annual printed summary of the data contained in the HIV sequence database. We try to present a judicious selection of the data in such a way that it is of maximum utility to HIV researchers. Each of the alignments attempts to display the genetic variability within the different species, groups and subtypes of the virus. This compendium contains sequences published before January 1, 2015. Hence, though it is published in 2015 and called the 2015 Compendium, its contents correspond to the 2014 curated alignments on our website. The number of sequences in the HIV database is still increasing. In total, at the end of 2014, there were 624,121 sequences in the HIV Sequence Database, an increase of 7% since the previous year. This is the first year that the number of new sequences added to the database has decreased compared to the previous year. The number of near complete genomes (>7000 nucleotides) increased to 5834 by end of 2014. However, as in previous years, the compendium alignments contain only a fraction of these. A more complete version of all alignments is available on our website, http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/ content/sequence/NEWALIGN/align.html As always, we are open to complaints and suggestions for improvement. Inquiries and comments regarding the compendium should be addressed to seq-info@lanl.gov.

  9. Phylogenetic Trees From Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryvkin, Paul; Wang, Li-San

    In this chapter, we review important concepts and approaches for phylogeny reconstruction from sequence data.We first cover some basic definitions and properties of phylogenetics, and briefly explain how scientists model sequence evolution and measure sequence divergence. We then discuss three major approaches for phylogenetic reconstruction: distance-based phylogenetic reconstruction, maximum parsimony, and maximum likelihood. In the third part of the chapter, we review how multiple phylogenies are compared by consensus methods and how to assess confidence using bootstrapping. At the end of the chapter are two sections that list popular software packages and additional reading.

  10. Titania nanotube array based photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, C. T.; Cheung, K. Y.; Djurišić, A. B.; Chan, W. K.

    2007-09-01

    It has been shown that dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) based on porous titanium dioxide (titania) layers have efficiencies exceeding 10%. Although porous structure has the advantage of large surface area for light harvesting, electron transport through the random nanoparticle network forming a porous film results in electron mobilities which are two orders of magnitude lower compared to the single crystal materials. Therefore, considerable efforts have been made to fabricate DSSC based on one dimensional nanostructures, such as nanowires or nanotubes. Titania nanotube arrays are typically made by anodization of titanium, followed by annealing to improve crystallinity. In this work, we investigated the influence of annealing temperature and annealing atmosphere on the crystal structure, the electron transport, and the solar cell performance of titania nanotube arrays. The titania nanotube arrays were prepared from electrochemically anodized titanium foils and their morphology and crystal structure were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The crystal phases and the compositions of nanotube arrays were further investigated by X-ray diffraction for different annealing temperatures and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for different annealing atmospheres. For optimal annealing conditions, the short circuit current density of 4.27 mA/cm2 and power conversion efficiency of 1.30% could be achieved under AM 1.5 simulated solar irradiation for 2 μm long nanotubes.

  11. Phased array based ultrasound scanning system development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagdiev, R. K.; Denisov, E. S.; Evdokimov, Yu K.; Fazlyyyakhmatov, M. G.; Kashapov, N. F.

    2014-12-01

    Multichannel ultrasound scanning system based on phased arrays development is presented in this paper. Substantiation of system parameters is presented. The description of block diagram and hardware development is presented. The combination of the self-developed receiving and a transmitting units and commercially available FPGA unit and Personal Computer can solve our scientific goals, while providing a relatively low device cost.

  12. Yeast genome sequencing:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piskur, Jure; Langkjær, Rikke Breinhold

    2004-01-01

    For decades, unicellular yeasts have been general models to help understand the eukaryotic cell and also our own biology. Recently, over a dozen yeast genomes have been sequenced, providing the basis to resolve several complex biological questions. Analysis of the novel sequence data has shown...... of closely related species helps in gene annotation and to answer how many genes there really are within the genomes. Analysis of non-coding regions among closely related species has provided an example of how to determine novel gene regulatory sequences, which were previously difficult to analyse because...... they are short and degenerate and occupy different positions. Comparative genomics helps to understand the origin of yeasts and points out crucial molecular events in yeast evolutionary history, such as whole-genome duplication and horizontal gene transfer(s). In addition, the accumulating sequence data provide...

  13. In Favor of Sequencing?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Borgh, G.J.C.

    2014-01-01

    This short article is a contribution to an online discussion about political sequencing and stability. It argues that despite all the risks of democratization in fragile states,a more gradual approach should be preferred.

  14. Scope and Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callison, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Discusses scope and sequence plans for curriculum coordination in elementary and secondary education related to school libraries. Highlights include library skills; levels of learning objectives; technology skills; media literacy skills; and information inquiry skills across disciplines by grade level. (LRW)

  15. Pierre Robin sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre Robin syndrome; Pierre Robin complex; Pierre Robin anomaly ... The exact causes of Pierre Robin sequence are unknown. It may be part of many genetic syndromes. The lower jaw develops slowly before birth, but may grow ...

  16. A novel fragile X syndrome mutation reveals a conserved role for the carboxy-terminus in FMRP localization and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okray, Zeynep; de Esch, Celine E F; Van Esch, Hilde; Devriendt, Koen; Claeys, Annelies; Yan, Jiekun; Verbeeck, Jelle; Froyen, Guy; Willemsen, Rob; de Vrij, Femke M S; Hassan, Bassem A

    2015-02-17

    Loss of function of the FMR1 gene leads to fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common form of intellectual disability. The loss of FMR1 function is usually caused by epigenetic silencing of the FMR1 promoter leading to expansion and subsequent methylation of a CGG repeat in the 5' untranslated region. Very few coding sequence variations have been experimentally characterized and shown to be causal to the disease. Here, we describe a novel FMR1 mutation and reveal an unexpected nuclear export function for the C-terminus of FMRP. We screened a cohort of patients with typical FXS symptoms who tested negative for CGG repeat expansion in the FMR1 locus. In one patient, we identified a guanine insertion in FMR1 exon 15. This mutation alters the open reading frame creating a short novel C-terminal sequence, followed by a stop codon. We find that this novel peptide encodes a functional nuclear localization signal (NLS) targeting the patient FMRP to the nucleolus in human cells. We also reveal an evolutionarily conserved nuclear export function associated with the endogenous C-terminus of FMRP. In vivo analyses in Drosophila demonstrate that a patient-mimetic mutation alters the localization and function of Dfmrp in neurons, leading to neomorphic neuronal phenotypes.

  17. HIV Sequence Compendium 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuiken, Carla [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Foley, Brian [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Leitner, Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Apetrei, Christian [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Hahn, Beatrice [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Mizrachi, Ilene [National Center for Biotechnology Information, Bethesda, MD (United States); Mullins, James [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Rambaut, Andrew [Univ. of Edinburgh, Scotland (United Kingdom); Wolinsky, Steven [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Korber, Bette [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2010-12-31

    This compendium is an annual printed summary of the data contained in the HIV sequence database. In these compendia we try to present a judicious selection of the data in such a way that it is of maximum utility to HIV researchers. Each of the alignments attempts to display the genetic variability within the different species, groups and subtypes of the virus. This compendium contains sequences published before January 1, 2010. Hence, though it is called the 2010 Compendium, its contents correspond to the 2009 curated alignments on our website. The number of sequences in the HIV database is still increasing exponentially. In total, at the time of printing, there were 339,306 sequences in the HIV Sequence Database, an increase of 45% since last year. The number of near complete genomes (>7000 nucleotides) increased to 2576 by end of 2009, reflecting a smaller increase than in previous years. However, as in previous years, the compendium alignments contain only a small fraction of these. Included in the alignments are a small number of sequences representing each of the subtypes and the more prevalent circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) such as 01 and 02, as well as a few outgroup sequences (group O and N and SIV-CPZ). Of the rarer CRFs we included one representative each. A more complete version of all alignments is available on our website, http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/content/sequence/NEWALIGN/align.html. Reprints are available from our website in the form of both HTML and PDF files. As always, we are open to complaints and suggestions for improvement. Inquiries and comments regarding the compendium should be addressed to seq-info@lanl.gov.

  18. Biological sequence analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durbin, Richard; Eddy, Sean; Krogh, Anders Stærmose

    This book provides an up-to-date and tutorial-level overview of sequence analysis methods, with particular emphasis on probabilistic modelling. Discussed methods include pairwise alignment, hidden Markov models, multiple alignment, profile searches, RNA secondary structure analysis, and phylogene......This book provides an up-to-date and tutorial-level overview of sequence analysis methods, with particular emphasis on probabilistic modelling. Discussed methods include pairwise alignment, hidden Markov models, multiple alignment, profile searches, RNA secondary structure analysis...

  19. Text Mining: (Asynchronous Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheema Khan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we tried to correlate text sequences those provides common topics for semantic clues. We propose a two step method for asynchronous text mining. Step one check for the common topics in the sequences and isolates these with their timestamps. Step two takes the topic and tries to give the timestamp of the text document. After multiple repetitions of step two, we could give optimum result.

  20. Adaptive Processing for Sequence Alignment

    KAUST Repository

    Zidan, Mohammed Affan

    2012-01-26

    Disclosed are various embodiments for adaptive processing for sequence alignment. In one embodiment, among others, a method includes obtaining a query sequence and a plurality of database sequences. A first portion of the plurality of database sequences is distributed to a central processing unit (CPU) and a second portion of the plurality of database sequences is distributed to a graphical processing unit (GPU) based upon a predetermined splitting ratio associated with the plurality of database sequences, where the database sequences of the first portion are shorter than the database sequences of the second portion. A first alignment score for the query sequence is determined with the CPU based upon the first portion of the plurality of database sequences and a second alignment score for the query sequence is determined with the GPU based upon the second portion of the plurality of database sequences.

  1. Controlled processing during sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malathi eThothathiri

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Longstanding evidence has identified a role for the frontal cortex in sequencing within both linguistic and non-linguistic domains. More recently, neuropsychological studies have suggested a specific role for the left premotor-prefrontal junction (BA 44/6 in selection between competing alternatives during sequencing. In this study, we used neuroimaging with healthy adults to confirm and extend knowledge about the neural correlates of sequencing. Participants reproduced visually presented sequences of syllables and words using manual button presses. Items in the sequence were presented either consecutively or concurrently. Concurrent presentation is known to trigger the planning of multiple responses, which might compete with one another. Therefore, we hypothesized that regions involved in controlled processing would show greater recruitment during the concurrent than the consecutive condition. Whole-brain analysis showed concurrent > consecutive activation in sensory, motor and somatosensory cortices and notably also in rostral-dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC. Region of interest analyses showed increased activation within left BA 44/6 and correlation between this region’s activation and behavioral response times. Functional connectivity analysis revealed increased connectivity between left BA 44/6 and the posterior lobe of the cerebellum during the concurrent than the consecutive condition. These results corroborate recent evidence and demonstrate the involvement of BA 44/6 and other control regions when ordering co-activated representations.

  2. Controlled processing during sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thothathiri, Malathi; Rattinger, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Longstanding evidence has identified a role for the frontal cortex in sequencing within both linguistic and non-linguistic domains. More recently, neuropsychological studies have suggested a specific role for the left premotor-prefrontal junction (BA 44/6) in selection between competing alternatives during sequencing. In this study, we used neuroimaging with healthy adults to confirm and extend knowledge about the neural correlates of sequencing. Participants reproduced visually presented sequences of syllables and words using manual button presses. Items in the sequence were presented either consecutively or concurrently. Concurrent presentation is known to trigger the planning of multiple responses, which might compete with one another. Therefore, we hypothesized that regions involved in controlled processing would show greater recruitment during the concurrent than the consecutive condition. Whole-brain analysis showed concurrent > consecutive activation in sensory, motor and somatosensory cortices and notably also in rostral-dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. Region of interest analyses showed increased activation within left BA 44/6 and correlation between this region's activation and behavioral response times. Functional connectivity analysis revealed increased connectivity between left BA 44/6 and the posterior lobe of the cerebellum during the concurrent than the consecutive condition. These results corroborate recent evidence and demonstrate the involvement of BA 44/6 and other control regions when ordering co-activated representations.

  3. Program Synthesizes UML Sequence Diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Matthew R.; Osborne, Richard N.

    2006-01-01

    A computer program called "Rational Sequence" generates Universal Modeling Language (UML) sequence diagrams of a target Java program running on a Java virtual machine (JVM). Rational Sequence thereby performs a reverse engineering function that aids in the design documentation of the target Java program. Whereas previously, the construction of sequence diagrams was a tedious manual process, Rational Sequence generates UML sequence diagrams automatically from the running Java code.

  4. Sequencing BPS Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Gukov, Sergei; Saberi, Ingmar; Stosic, Marko; Sulkowski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides both a detailed study of color-dependence of link homologies, as realized in physics as certain spaces of BPS states, and a broad study of the behavior of BPS states in general. We consider how the spectrum of BPS states varies as continuous parameters of a theory are perturbed. This question can be posed in a wide variety of physical contexts, and we answer it by proposing that the relationship between unperturbed and perturbed BPS spectra is described by a spectral sequence. These general considerations unify previous applications of spectral sequence techniques to physics, and explain from a physical standpoint the appearance of many spectral sequences relating various link homology theories to one another. We also study structural properties of colored HOMFLY homology for links and evaluate Poincar\\'e polynomials in numerous examples. Among these structural properties is a novel "sliding" property, which can be explained by using (refined) modular $S$-matrix. This leads to the identifi...

  5. Twin anemia polycythemia sequence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slaghekke, Femke

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis we describe that Twin Anemia Polycythemia Sequence (TAPS) is a form of chronic feto-fetal transfusion in monochorionic (identical) twins based on a small amount of blood transfusion through very small anastomoses. For the antenatal diagnosis of TAPS, Middle Cerebral Artery – Peak Syst

  6. Family Sequencing and Cooperation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grundel, S.; Ciftci, B.B.; Borm, P.E.M.; Hamers, H.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the allocation problem of the maximal cost savings of the whole group of jobs, we define and analyze a so-called corresponding cooperative family sequencing game which explicitly takes into account the maximal cost savings for any coalition of jobs. Using nonstandard techniques we prove t

  7. Design and Fabrication of the Micro Lens Array Based on SU- 8%基于SU-8的微透镜阵列的设计和制作

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘建林; 张斌珍; 崔敏; 张剑; 季长红

    2012-01-01

    Using SU- 8 as a structural material, the micro lens arrays with the primary optical axis parallel to the substrate were processed by UV light lithography process, especially inclined exposure technology, and the diameter of a single micro lens is about 500 μm. The exposure dosage, pre-baking time, post-baking time and development time for processing the lens were confirmed preliminarily, providing a reference for processing lens with different size. Micro lens arrays based on the processing method can obtain the focusing, reflection, diffraction, phase modulation and other control for the beam to finally realize functions such as photo switch, attenuation, sweep and image formation, providing convenient for other micro optical device integration, such as spectroscope and reflector. Meanwhile, the micro lens arrays can be integrated in the micro flow cytometry to make fluorescence detection of sample flow, which greatly improves the detection accuracy.%以SU-8作为结构材料,采用紫外光刻工艺,尤其以斜曝光工艺为主,加工出主光轴平行于衬底基片的微透镜阵列,单个微透镜的直径大约为500 μm.初步确定出加工此透镜所需要的曝光剂量、前烘时间、后烘时间和显影时间,为加工其他尺寸的透镜提供参考.基于此方法加工的微透镜阵列能够对光束进行聚焦、反射、衍射、相位调制等控制,从而可最终实现光开关、衰减、扫描和成像等功能,为其他微型光学器件,如分光镜和反射镜等的系统集成提供极大的便利.同时,此微透镜阵列也会被集成在微流细胞仪中用来对流式细胞仪中样本流做荧光检测,极大地提高了检测的精度.

  8. Sub-megabase resolution tiling (SMRT array-based comparative genomic hybridization profiling reveals novel gains and losses of chromosomal regions in Hodgkin Lymphoma and Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lam Wan L

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hodgkin lymphoma (HL and Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL, are forms of malignant lymphoma defined by unique morphologic, immunophenotypic, genotypic, and clinical characteristics, but both overexpress CD30. We used sub-megabase resolution tiling (SMRT array-based comparative genomic hybridization to screen HL-derived cell lines (KMH2 and L428 and ALCL cell lines (DEL and SR-786 in order to identify disease-associated gene copy number gains and losses. Results Significant copy number gains and losses were observed on several chromosomes in all four cell lines. Assessment of copy number alterations with 26,819 DNA segments identified an average of 20 genetic alterations. Of the recurrent minimally altered regions identified, 11 (55% were within previously published regions of chromosomal alterations in HL and ALCL cell lines while 9 (45% were novel alterations not previously reported. HL cell lines L428 and KMH2 shared gains in chromosome cytobands 2q23.1-q24.2, 7q32.2-q36.3, 9p21.3-p13.3, 12q13.13-q14.1, and losses in 13q12.13-q12.3, and 18q21.32-q23. ALCL cell lines SR-786 and DEL, showed gains in cytobands 5p15.32-p14.3, 20p12.3-q13.11, and 20q13.2-q13.32. Both pairs of HL and ALCL cell lines showed losses in 18q21.32-18q23. Conclusion This study is considered to be the first one describing HL and ALCL cell line genomes at sub-megabase resolution. This high-resolution analysis allowed us to propose novel candidate target genes that could potentially contribute to the pathogenesis of HL and ALCL. FISH was used to confirm the amplification of all three isoforms of the trypsin gene (PRSS1/PRSS2/PRSS3 in KMH2 and L428 (HL and DEL (ALCL cell lines. These are novel findings that have not been previously reported in the lymphoma literature, and opens up an entirely new area of research that has not been previously associated with lymphoma biology. The findings raise interesting possibilities about the role of signaling

  9. High-throughput epitope binning assays on label-free array-based biosensors can yield exquisite epitope discrimination that facilitates the selection of monoclonal antibodies with functional activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmina Noubia Abdiche

    Full Text Available Here, we demonstrate how array-based label-free biosensors can be applied to the multiplexed interaction analysis of large panels of analyte/ligand pairs, such as the epitope binning of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs. In this application, the larger the number of mAbs that are analyzed for cross-blocking in a pairwise and combinatorial manner against their specific antigen, the higher the probability of discriminating their epitopes. Since cross-blocking of two mAbs is necessary but not sufficient for them to bind an identical epitope, high-resolution epitope binning analysis determined by high-throughput experiments can enable the identification of mAbs with similar but unique epitopes. We demonstrate that a mAb's epitope and functional activity are correlated, thereby strengthening the relevance of epitope binning data to the discovery of therapeutic mAbs. We evaluated two state-of-the-art label-free biosensors that enable the parallel analysis of 96 unique analyte/ligand interactions and nearly ten thousand total interactions per unattended run. The IBIS-MX96 is a microarray-based surface plasmon resonance imager (SPRi integrated with continuous flow microspotting technology whereas the Octet-HTX is equipped with disposable fiber optic sensors that use biolayer interferometry (BLI detection. We compared their throughput, versatility, ease of sample preparation, and sample consumption in the context of epitope binning assays. We conclude that the main advantages of the SPRi technology are its exceptionally low sample consumption, facile sample preparation, and unparalleled unattended throughput. In contrast, the BLI technology is highly flexible because it allows for the simultaneous interaction analysis of 96 independent analyte/ligand pairs, ad hoc sensor replacement and on-line reloading of an analyte- or ligand-array. Thus, the complementary use of these two platforms can expedite applications that are relevant to the discovery of therapeutic

  10. Next-generation sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rieneck, Klaus; Bak, Mads; Jønson, Lars

    2013-01-01

    , Illumina); several millions of PCR sequences were analyzed. RESULTS: The results demonstrated the feasibility of diagnosing the fetal KEL1 or KEL2 blood group from cell-free DNA purified from maternal plasma. CONCLUSION: This method requires only one primer pair, and the large amount of sequence......BACKGROUND: Maternal immunization against KEL1 of the Kell blood group system can have serious adverse consequences for the fetus as well as the newborn baby. Therefore, it is important to determine the phenotype of the fetus to predict whether it is at risk. We present data that show...... information obtained allows well for statistical analysis of the data. This general approach can be integrated into current laboratory practice and has numerous applications. Besides DNA-based predictions of blood group phenotypes, platelet phenotypes, or sickle cell anemia, and the determination of zygosity...

  11. Rapid-Sequence Intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelina Dávila Cabo de Villa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In medical practice there are several situations that require immediate intervention of the airway in some patients, in order to ensure proper entrance and exit of gases into and out of the lungs and prevent aspiration. Rapid-sequence intubation has been considered as the administration of a hypnotic agent and a neuromuscular relaxant consecutively (virtually simultaneously to facilitate orotracheal intubation in critically ill patients and minimize the risk of aspiration. This paper aims to collect elements that promote a successful medical management according to the situation presented, since there is no single way of proceeding in case of rapid-sequence intubation. The elements to consider include: knowing the anatomy of the upper respiratory tract, having a group of drugs to choose from, receiving adequate training and having an alternative plan for the difficulties that may arise.

  12. Sequencing of aromatase inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Since the development of the third-generation aromatase inhibitors (AIs), anastrozole, letrozole and exemestane, these agents have been the subject of intensive research to determine their optimal use in advanced breast cancer. Not only have they replaced progestins in second-line therapy and challenged the role of tamoxifen in first-line, but there is also evidence for a lack of cross-resistance between the steroidal and nonsteroidal AIs, meaning that they may be used in sequence to obtain p...

  13. Learning Sequence Neighbourhood Metrics

    CERN Document Server

    Bayer, Justin; van der Smagt, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Recurrent neural networks (RNNs) in combination with a pooling operator and the neighbourhood components analysis (NCA) objective function are able to detect the characterizing dynamics of sequences and embed them into a fixed-length vector space of arbitrary dimensionality. Subsequently, the resulting features are meaningful and can be used for visualization or nearest neighbour classification in linear time. This kind of metric learning for sequential data enables the use of algorithms tailored towards fixed length vector spaces such as R^n.

  14. Sequence Classification: 885394 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 703); The expression pattern of this gene is described in PMID:12000842; possible frameshift detected when compare...Non-TMB TMH Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB >gi|23619146|ref|NP_705108.1| Slight difference exist when compa...red to the published sequence of EBL-1 from Dd2 strain of P. falciparum (PMID:10613

  15. Properties of Semijoin Sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BengC.Ooi; B.Srinivasan

    1989-01-01

    The problem of finding optimum semijoin sequ4ence of an arbitrary query under linear cost function for the transmission cost is NP.hard.Hence heuristic algorithms with desirable properties are explored.In this paper four properties of semijoin programs for distributed query processing are identified,The use of these properties in constructing semijoin sequence is justified.An existing algorithm is modified incorporating these properties.Empirical comparison with existing algorithms shows the superiority of the proposed algorithm.

  16. Image sequence analysis

    CERN Document Server

    1981-01-01

    The processing of image sequences has a broad spectrum of important applica­ tions including target tracking, robot navigation, bandwidth compression of TV conferencing video signals, studying the motion of biological cells using microcinematography, cloud tracking, and highway traffic monitoring. Image sequence processing involves a large amount of data. However, because of the progress in computer, LSI, and VLSI technologies, we have now reached a stage when many useful processing tasks can be done in a reasonable amount of time. As a result, research and development activities in image sequence analysis have recently been growing at a rapid pace. An IEEE Computer Society Workshop on Computer Analysis of Time-Varying Imagery was held in Philadelphia, April 5-6, 1979. A related special issue of the IEEE Transactions on Pattern Anal­ ysis and Machine Intelligence was published in November 1980. The IEEE Com­ puter magazine has also published a special issue on the subject in 1981. The purpose of this book ...

  17. Sequencing BPS spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gukov, Sergei; Nawata, Satoshi; Saberi, Ingmar; Stošić, Marko; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-03-01

    This paper provides both a detailed study of color-dependence of link homologies, as realized in physics as certain spaces of BPS states, and a broad study of the behavior of BPS states in general. We consider how the spectrum of BPS states varies as continuous parameters of a theory are perturbed. This question can be posed in a wide variety of physical contexts, and we answer it by proposing that the relationship between unperturbed and perturbed BPS spectra is described by a spectral sequence. These general considerations unify previous applications of spectral sequence techniques to physics, and explain from a physical standpoint the appearance of many spectral sequences relating various link homology theories to one another. We also study structural properties of colored HOMFLY homology for links and evaluate Poincaré polynomials in numerous examples. Among these structural properties is a novel "sliding" property, which can be explained by using (refined) modular S-matrix. This leads to the identification of modular transformations in Chern-Simons theory and 3d {N}=2 theory via the 3d/3d correspondence. Lastly, we introduce the notion of associated varieties as classical limits of recursion relations of colored superpolynomials of links, and study their properties.

  18. The Galaxy End Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eales, Stephen; de Vis, Pieter; Smith, Matthew W. L.; Appah, Kiran; Ciesla, Laure; Duffield, Chris; Schofield, Simon

    2017-03-01

    A common assumption is that galaxies fall in two distinct regions of a plot of specific star formation rate (SSFR) versus galaxy stellar mass: a star-forming galaxy main sequence (GMS) and a separate region of 'passive' or 'red and dead galaxies'. Starting from a volume-limited sample of nearby galaxies designed to contain most of the stellar mass in this volume, and thus representing the end-point of ≃12 billion years of galaxy evolution, we investigate the distribution of galaxies in this diagram today. We show that galaxies follow a strongly curved extended GMS with a steep negative slope at high galaxy stellar masses. There is a gradual change in the morphologies of the galaxies along this distribution, but there is no clear break between early-type and late-type galaxies. Examining the other evidence that there are two distinct populations, we argue that the 'red sequence' is the result of the colours of galaxies changing very little below a critical value of the SSFR, rather than implying a distinct population of galaxies. Herschel observations, which show at least half of early-type galaxies contain a cool interstellar medium, also imply continuity between early-type and late-type galaxies. This picture of a unitary population of galaxies requires more gradual evolutionary processes than the rapid quenching process needed to explain two distinct populations. We challenge theorists to predict quantitatively the properties of this 'Galaxy End Sequence'.

  19. Information Theory of DNA Sequencing

    CERN Document Server

    Motahari, Abolfazl; Tse, David

    2012-01-01

    DNA sequencing is the basic workhorse of modern day biology and medicine. Shotgun sequencing is the dominant technique used: many randomly located short fragments called reads are extracted from the DNA sequence, and these reads are assembled to reconstruct the original sequence. By drawing an analogy between the DNA sequencing problem and the classic communication problem, we define an information theoretic notion of sequencing capacity. This is the maximum number of DNA base pairs that can be resolved reliably per read, and provides a fundamental limit to the performance that can be achieved by any assembly algorithm. We compute the sequencing capacity explicitly for a simple statistical model of the DNA sequence and the read process. Using this framework, we also study the impact of noise in the read process on the sequencing capacity.

  20. A vision for ubiquitous sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlich, Yaniv

    2015-10-01

    Genomics has recently celebrated reaching the $1000 genome milestone, making affordable DNA sequencing a reality. With this goal successfully completed, the next goal of the sequencing revolution can be sequencing sensors--miniaturized sequencing devices that are manufactured for real-time applications and deployed in large quantities at low costs. The first part of this manuscript envisions applications that will benefit from moving the sequencers to the samples in a range of domains. In the second part, the manuscript outlines the critical barriers that need to be addressed in order to reach the goal of ubiquitous sequencing sensors.

  1. Psychoacoustic Properties of Fibonacci Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sokoll

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available 1202, Fibonacci set up one of the most interesting sequences in number theory. This sequence can be represented by so-called Fibonacci Numbers, and by a binary sequence of zeros and ones. If such a binary Fibonacci Sequence is played back as an audio file, a very dissonant sound results. This is caused by the “almost-periodic”, “self-similar” property of the binary sequence. The ratio of zeros and ones converges to the golden ratio, as do the primary and secondary spectral components intheir frequencies and amplitudes. These Fibonacci Sequences will be characterized using listening tests and psychoacoustic analyses. 

  2. Protocols for 16S rDNA Array Analyses of Microbial Communities by Sequence-Specific Labeling of DNA Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knut Rudi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Analyses of complex microbial communities are becoming increasingly important. Bottlenecks in these analyses, however, are the tools to actually describe the biodiversity. Novel protocols for DNA array-based analyses of microbial communities are presented. In these protocols, the specificity obtained by sequence-specific labeling of DNA probes is combined with the possibility of detecting several different probes simultaneously by DNA array hybridization. The gene encoding 16S ribosomal RNA was chosen as the target in these analyses. This gene contains both universally conserved regions and regions with relatively high variability. The universally conserved regions are used for PCR amplification primers, while the variable regions are used for the specific probes. Protocols are presented for DNA purification, probe construction, probe labeling, and DNA array hybridizations.

  3. Infinite sequences and series

    CERN Document Server

    Knopp, Konrad

    1956-01-01

    One of the finest expositors in the field of modern mathematics, Dr. Konrad Knopp here concentrates on a topic that is of particular interest to 20th-century mathematicians and students. He develops the theory of infinite sequences and series from its beginnings to a point where the reader will be in a position to investigate more advanced stages on his own. The foundations of the theory are therefore presented with special care, while the developmental aspects are limited by the scope and purpose of the book. All definitions are clearly stated; all theorems are proved with enough detail to ma

  4. Lack of expansion of triplet repeats in the FMR1, FRAXE, and FRAXF loci in male multiplex families with autism and pervasive developmental disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, J.J.A.; Julien-Inalsingh, C. [Queen`s Univ., Kingston (Canada); Wing, M. [Ongwanada Resource Centre, Kingston (Canada)] [and others

    1996-08-09

    Sib, twin, and family studies have shown that a genetic cause exists in many cases of autism, with a portion of cases associated with a fragile X chromosome. Three folate-sensitive fragile sites in the Xq27{r_arrow}Xq28 region have been cloned and found to have polymorphic trinucleotide repeats at the respective sites; these repeats are amplified and methylated in individuals who are positive for the different fragile sites. We have tested affected boys and their mothers from 19 families with two autistic/PDD boys for amplification and/or instability of the triplet repeats at these loci and concordance of inheritance of alleles by affected brothers. In all cases, the triplet repeat numbers were within the normal range, with no individuals having expanded or premutation-size alleles. For each locus, there was no evidence for an increased frequency of concordance, indicating that mutations within these genes are unlikely to be responsible for the autistic/PDD phenotypes in the affected boys. Thus, we think it is important to retest those autistic individuals who were cytogenetically positive for a fragile X chromosome, particularly cases where there is no family history of the fragile X syndrome, using the more accurate DNA-based testing procedures. 29 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  5. The number of CGG repeats of the FMR1 locus in premutated and fully mutated heterozygotes and their offspring: Implications for the origin of mosaicism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingroni-Netto, R.C.; Vianna-Morgante, A.M. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (Brazil); Haddad, L.A. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    1996-08-09

    The size of the CGG repeat of the FMRl gene was investigated with probe StB12.3 in 154 transmissions to the offspring of heterozygotes for the premutation and the full mutation. Among the 135 offspring of premutated heterozygotes there were three decreases in size of the repeats: in two of these cases a full mutation was present along with the decreased premutation, and in a third mosaic (46,fra(X)(q27.3),Y), a normal allele was observed. In the 19 offspring of fully mutated females with no detected mosaicism, there were three mosaics and three individuals who had full mutations that included a number of repeats smaller than those present in their mothers. Among the 32 offspring who received a premutation from their premutated mothers, 27 alleles were increased in size and 5 remained unaltered. Among 11 mosaic offspring of premutated mothers, the premutation increased in 4, decreased in 3, and was unchanged in 4. In contrast to the trend of an increasing premutation size in the non-mosaic offspring, the premutation present in mosaics can be smaller, larger, or of unaltered size with approximately equal frequencies. These data suggest that the premutations present in mosaics result from mitotic instability of the inherited full mutations. This is further supported by the finding of a mosaic male with a normal sized allele. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Cortisol Response to Behavior Problems in FMR1 Premutation Mothers of Adolescents and Adults with Fragile X Syndrome: A Diathesis-Stress Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Sigan L.; Seltzer, Marsha Mailick; Hong, Jinkuk; Greenberg, Jan S.; Smith, Leann; Almeida, David; Coe, Chris; Abbeduto, Leonard

    2012-01-01

    Mothers of adolescents and adults with fragile X syndrome (FXS) are faced with high levels of parenting stress. The extent to which mothers are negatively impacted by this stress, however, may be influenced by their own genetic status. The present study uses a diathesis-stress model to examine the ways in which a genetic vulnerability in mothers…

  7. The effect of an mGluR5 inhibitor on procedural memory and avoidance discrimination impairments in Fmr1 KO mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.F. Vinueza Veloz (Maria); R.A.M. Buijsen (Ronald); R. Willemsen (Rob); A. Cupido (Alexander); L.W.J. Bosman (Laurens); S.K.E. Koekkoek (Bas); J.W. Potters (Jan Willem); B.A. Oostra (Ben); C.I. de Zeeuw (Chris)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractFragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common inherited form of intellectual disability. Patients with FXS do not only suffer from cognitive problems, but also from abnormalities/deficits in procedural memory formation. It has been proposed that a lack of fragile X mental retardation prote

  8. Genetic deletion of regulator of G-protein signaling 4 (RGS4) rescues a subset of fragile X related phenotypes in the FMR1 knockout mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacey, Laura K K; Doss, Lilian; Cifelli, Carlo; van der Kooy, Derek; Heximer, Scott P; Hampson, David R

    2011-03-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common cause of inherited mental retardation, is caused by the loss of the mRNA binding protein, FMRP. Persons with FXS also display epileptic seizures, social anxiety, hyperactivity, and autistic behaviors. The metabotropic glutamate receptor theory of FXS postulates that in the absence of FMRP, enhanced signaling though G-protein coupled group I metabotropic glutamate receptors in the brain contributes to many of the abnormalities observed in the disorder. However, recent evidence suggests that alterations in cellular signaling through additional G-protein coupled receptors may also be involved in the pathogenesis of FXS, thus providing impetus for examining downstream molecules. One group of signaling molecules situated downstream of the receptors is the regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins. Notably, RGS4 is highly expressed in brain and has been shown to negatively regulate signaling through Group I mGluRs and GABA(B) receptors. To examine the potential role for RGS4 in the pathogenesis of FXS, we generated FXS/RGS4 double knockout mice. Characterization of these mice revealed that a subset of FXS related phenotypes, including increased body weight, altered synaptic protein expression, and abnormal social behaviors, were rescued in the double knockout mice. Other phenotypes, such as hyperactivity and macroorchidism, were not affected by the loss of RGS4. These findings suggest that tissue and cell-type specific differences in GPCR signaling and RGS function may contribute to the spectrum of phenotypic differences observed in FXS.

  9. Allele Re-sequencing Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byrne, Stephen; Farrell, Jacqueline Danielle; Asp, Torben

    2013-01-01

    The development of next-generation sequencing technologies has made sequencing an affordable approach for detection of genetic variations associated with various traits. However, the cost of whole genome re-sequencing still remains too high to be feasible for many plant species with large and com...... alternative to whole genome re-sequencing to identify causative genetic variations in plants. One challenge, however, will be efficient bioinformatics strategies for data handling and analysis from the increasing amount of sequence information.......The development of next-generation sequencing technologies has made sequencing an affordable approach for detection of genetic variations associated with various traits. However, the cost of whole genome re-sequencing still remains too high to be feasible for many plant species with large...

  10. Spaces of Ideal Convergent Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mursaleen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, we introduce some sequence spaces using ideal convergence and Musielak-Orlicz function ℳ=Mk. We also examine some topological properties of the resulting sequence spaces.

  11. Sequence Handling by Sequence Analysis Toolbox v1.0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingrell, Christian Ravnsborg; Matthiesen, Rune; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2006-01-01

    The fact that mass spectrometry have become a high-throughput method calls for bioinformatic tools for automated sequence handling and prediction. For efficient use of bioinformatic tools, it is important that these tools are integrated or interfaced with each other. The purpose of sequence...... analysis toolbox v1.0 was to have a general purpose sequence analyzing tool that can import sequences obtained by high-throughput sequencing methods. The program includes algorithms for calculation or prediction of isoelectric point, hydropathicity index, transmembrane segments, and glycosylphosphatidyl...

  12. Rapid Polymer Sequencer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolc, Viktor (Inventor); Brock, Matthew W (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Method and system for rapid and accurate determination of each of a sequence of unknown polymer components, such as nucleic acid components. A self-assembling monolayer of a selected substance is optionally provided on an interior surface of a pipette tip, and the interior surface is immersed in a selected liquid. A selected electrical field is impressed in a longitudinal direction, or in a transverse direction, in the tip region, a polymer sequence is passed through the tip region, and a change in an electrical current signal is measured as each polymer component passes through the tip region. Each of the measured changes in electrical current signals is compared with a database of reference electrical change signals, with each reference signal corresponding to an identified polymer component, to identify the unknown polymer component with a reference polymer component. The nanopore preferably has a pore inner diameter of no more than about 40 nm and is prepared by heating and pulling a very small section of a glass tubing.

  13. The Galaxy End Sequence

    CERN Document Server

    Eales, Stephen; Smith, Matthew; Appah, Kiran; Ciesla, Laure; Duffield, Chris; Schofield, Simon

    2016-01-01

    A common assumption is that galaxies fall in two distinct regions on a plot of specific star-formation rate (SSFR) versus galaxy stellar mass: a star-forming Galaxy Main Sequence (GMS) and a separate region of `passive' or `red and dead galaxies'. Starting from a volume-limited sample of nearby galaxies designed to contain most of the stellar mass in this volume, and thus being a fair representation of the Universe at the end of 12 billion years of galaxy evolution, we investigate the distribution of galaxies in this diagram today. We show that galaxies follow a strongly curved extended GMS with a steep negative slope at high galaxy stellar masses. There is a gradual change in the morphologies of the galaxies along this distribution, but there is no clear break between early-type and late-type galaxies. Examining the other evidence that there are two distinct populations, we argue that the `red sequence' is the result of the colours of galaxies changing very little below a critical value of the SSFR, rather t...

  14. Novel sequences propel familiar folds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawad, Zahra; Paoli, Massimo

    2002-04-01

    Recent structure determinations have made new additions to a set of strikingly different sequences that give rise to the same topology. Proteins with a beta propeller fold are characterized by extreme sequence diversity despite the similarity in their three-dimensional structures. Several fold predictions, based in part on sequence repeats thought to match modular beta sheets, have been proved correct.

  15. RIKEN integrated sequence analysis (RISA) system--384-format sequencing pipeline with 384 multicapillary sequencer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, K; Itoh, M; Aizawa, K; Nagaoka, S; Sasaki, N; Carninci, P; Konno, H; Akiyama, J; Nishi, K; Kitsunai, T; Tashiro, H; Itoh, M; Sumi, N; Ishii, Y; Nakamura, S; Hazama, M; Nishine, T; Harada, A; Yamamoto, R; Matsumoto, H; Sakaguchi, S; Ikegami, T; Kashiwagi, K; Fujiwake, S; Inoue, K; Togawa, Y

    2000-11-01

    The RIKEN high-throughput 384-format sequencing pipeline (RISA system) including a 384-multicapillary sequencer (the so-called RISA sequencer) was developed for the RIKEN mouse encyclopedia project. The RISA system consists of colony picking, template preparation, sequencing reaction, and the sequencing process. A novel high-throughput 384-format capillary sequencer system (RISA sequencer system) was developed for the sequencing process. This system consists of a 384-multicapillary auto sequencer (RISA sequencer), a 384-multicapillary array assembler (CAS), and a 384-multicapillary casting device. The RISA sequencer can simultaneously analyze 384 independent sequencing products. The optical system is a scanning system chosen after careful comparison with an image detection system for the simultaneous detection of the 384-capillary array. This scanning system can be used with any fluorescent-labeled sequencing reaction (chain termination reaction), including transcriptional sequencing based on RNA polymerase, which was originally developed by us, and cycle sequencing based on thermostable DNA polymerase. For long-read sequencing, 380 out of 384 sequences (99.2%) were successfully analyzed and the average read length, with more than 99% accuracy, was 654.4 bp. A single RISA sequencer can analyze 216 kb with >99% accuracy in 2.7 h (90 kb/h). For short-read sequencing to cluster the 3' end and 5' end sequencing by reading 350 bp, 384 samples can be analyzed in 1.5 h. We have also developed a RISA inoculator, RISA filtrator and densitometer, RISA plasmid preparator which can handle throughput of 40,000 samples in 17.5 h, and a high-throughput RISA thermal cycler which has four 384-well sites. The combination of these technologies allowed us to construct the RISA system consisting of 16 RISA sequencers, which can process 50,000 DNA samples per day. One haploid genome shotgun sequence of a higher organism, such as human, mouse, rat, domestic animals, and plants, can be

  16. Solid phase sequencing of biopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantor, Charles (Del Mar, CA); Koster, Hubert (La Jolla, CA)

    2010-09-28

    This invention relates to methods for detecting and sequencing target nucleic acid sequences, to mass modified nucleic acid probes and arrays of probes useful in these methods, and to kits and systems which contain these probes. Useful methods involve hybridizing the nucleic acids or nucleic acids which represent complementary or homologous sequences of the target to an array of nucleic acid probes. These probes comprise a single-stranded portion, an optional double-stranded portion and a variable sequence within the single-stranded portion. The molecular weights of the hybridized nucleic acids of the set can be determined by mass spectroscopy, and the sequence of the target determined from the molecular weights of the fragments. Nucleic acids whose sequences can be determined include DNA or RNA in biological samples such as patient biopsies and environmental samples. Probes may be fixed to a solid support such as a hybridization chip to facilitate automated molecular weight analysis and identification of the target sequence.

  17. Review of alignment and SNP calling algorithms for next-generation sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielczarek, M; Szyda, J

    2016-02-01

    Application of the massive parallel sequencing technology has become one of the most important issues in life sciences. Therefore, it was crucial to develop bioinformatics tools for next-generation sequencing (NGS) data processing. Currently, two of the most significant tasks include alignment to a reference genome and detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In many types of genomic analyses, great numbers of reads need to be mapped to the reference genome; therefore, selection of the aligner is an essential step in NGS pipelines. Two main algorithms-suffix tries and hash tables-have been introduced for this purpose. Suffix array-based aligners are memory-efficient and work faster than hash-based aligners, but they are less accurate. In contrast, hash table algorithms tend to be slower, but more sensitive. SNP and genotype callers may also be divided into two main different approaches: heuristic and probabilistic methods. A variety of software has been subsequently developed over the past several years. In this paper, we briefly review the current development of NGS data processing algorithms and present the available software.

  18. Graphene nanodevices for DNA sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heerema, Stephanie J.; Dekker, Cees

    2016-02-01

    Fast, cheap, and reliable DNA sequencing could be one of the most disruptive innovations of this decade, as it will pave the way for personalized medicine. In pursuit of such technology, a variety of nanotechnology-based approaches have been explored and established, including sequencing with nanopores. Owing to its unique structure and properties, graphene provides interesting opportunities for the development of a new sequencing technology. In recent years, a wide range of creative ideas for graphene sequencers have been theoretically proposed and the first experimental demonstrations have begun to appear. Here, we review the different approaches to using graphene nanodevices for DNA sequencing, which involve DNA passing through graphene nanopores, nanogaps, and nanoribbons, and the physisorption of DNA on graphene nanostructures. We discuss the advantages and problems of each of these key techniques, and provide a perspective on the use of graphene in future DNA sequencing technology.

  19. Solid phase sequencing of biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantor, Charles R.; Hubert, Koster

    2014-06-24

    This invention relates to methods for detecting and sequencing target nucleic acid sequences, to mass modified nucleic acid probes and arrays of probes useful in these methods, and to kits and systems which contain these probes. Useful methods involve hybridizing the nucleic acids or nucleic acids which represent complementary or homologous sequences of the target to an array of nucleic acid probes. These probes comprise a single-stranded portion, an optional double-stranded portion and a variable sequence within the single-stranded portion. The molecular weights of the hybridized nucleic acids of the set can be determined by mass spectroscopy, and the sequence of the target determined from the molecular weights of the fragments. Probes may be affixed to a solid support such as a hybridization chip to facilitate automated molecular weight analysis and identification of the target sequence.

  20. Short sequence motifs, overrepresented in mammalian conservednon-coding sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minovitsky, Simon; Stegmaier, Philip; Kel, Alexander; Kondrashov,Alexey S.; Dubchak, Inna

    2007-02-21

    Background: A substantial fraction of non-coding DNAsequences of multicellular eukaryotes is under selective constraint. Inparticular, ~;5 percent of the human genome consists of conservednon-coding sequences (CNSs). CNSs differ from other genomic sequences intheir nucleotide composition and must play important functional roles,which mostly remain obscure.Results: We investigated relative abundancesof short sequence motifs in all human CNSs present in the human/mousewhole-genome alignments vs. three background sets of sequences: (i)weakly conserved or unconserved non-coding sequences (non-CNSs); (ii)near-promoter sequences (located between nucleotides -500 and -1500,relative to a start of transcription); and (iii) random sequences withthe same nucleotide composition as that of CNSs. When compared tonon-CNSs and near-promoter sequences, CNSs possess an excess of AT-richmotifs, often containing runs of identical nucleotides. In contrast, whencompared to random sequences, CNSs contain an excess of GC-rich motifswhich, however, lack CpG dinucleotides. Thus, abundance of short sequencemotifs in human CNSs, taken as a whole, is mostly determined by theiroverall compositional properties and not by overrepresentation of anyspecific short motifs. These properties are: (i) high AT-content of CNSs,(ii) a tendency, probably due to context-dependent mutation, of A's andT's to clump, (iii) presence of short GC-rich regions, and (iv) avoidanceof CpG contexts, due to their hypermutability. Only a small number ofshort motifs, overrepresented in all human CNSs are similar to bindingsites of transcription factors from the FOX family.Conclusion: Human CNSsas a whole appear to be too broad a class of sequences to possess strongfootprints of any short sequence-specific functions. Such footprintsshould be studied at the level of functional subclasses of CNSs, such asthose which flank genes with a particular pattern of expression. Overallproperties of CNSs are affected by

  1. Biosensors for DNA sequence detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercoutere, Wenonah; Akeson, Mark

    2002-01-01

    DNA biosensors are being developed as alternatives to conventional DNA microarrays. These devices couple signal transduction directly to sequence recognition. Some of the most sensitive and functional technologies use fibre optics or electrochemical sensors in combination with DNA hybridization. In a shift from sequence recognition by hybridization, two emerging single-molecule techniques read sequence composition using zero-mode waveguides or electrical impedance in nanoscale pores.

  2. Nonlinear analysis of biological sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torney, D.C.; Bruno, W.; Detours, V. [and others

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The main objectives of this project involved deriving new capabilities for analyzing biological sequences. The authors focused on tabulating the statistical properties exhibited by Human coding DNA sequences and on techniques of inferring the phylogenetic relationships among protein sequences related by descent.

  3. ABS: Sequence alignment by scanning

    KAUST Repository

    Bonny, Mohamed Talal

    2011-08-01

    Sequence alignment is an essential tool in almost any computational biology research. It processes large database sequences and considered to be high consumers of computation time. Heuristic algorithms are used to get approximate but fast results. We introduce fast alignment algorithm, called Alignment By Scanning (ABS), to provide an approximate alignment of two DNA sequences. We compare our algorithm with the well-known alignment algorithms, the FASTA (which is heuristic) and the \\'Needleman-Wunsch\\' (which is optimal). The proposed algorithm achieves up to 76% enhancement in alignment score when it is compared with the FASTA Algorithm. The evaluations are conducted using different lengths of DNA sequences. © 2011 IEEE.

  4. Fast global sequence alignment technique

    KAUST Repository

    Bonny, Mohamed Talal

    2011-11-01

    Bioinformatics database is growing exponentially in size. Processing these large amount of data may take hours of time even if super computers are used. One of the most important processing tool in Bioinformatics is sequence alignment. We introduce fast alignment algorithm, called \\'Alignment By Scanning\\' (ABS), to provide an approximate alignment of two DNA sequences. We compare our algorithm with the wellknown sequence alignment algorithms, the \\'GAP\\' (which is heuristic) and the \\'Needleman-Wunsch\\' (which is optimal). The proposed algorithm achieves up to 51% enhancement in alignment score when it is compared with the GAP Algorithm. The evaluations are conducted using different lengths of DNA sequences. © 2011 IEEE.

  5. Assembly sequencing with toleranced parts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latombe, J.C. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Robotics Lab.; Wilson, R.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center

    1995-02-21

    The goal of assembly sequencing is to plan a feasible series of operations to construct a product from its individual parts. Previous research has thoroughly investigated assembly sequencing under the assumption that parts have nominal geometry. This paper considers the case where parts have toleranced geometry. Its main contribution is an efficient procedure that decides if a product admits an assembly sequence with infinite translations that is feasible for all possible instances of the components within the specified tolerances. If the product admits one such sequence, the procedure can also generate it. For the cases where there exists no such assembly sequence, another procedure is proposed which generates assembly sequences that are feasible only for some values of the toleranced dimensions. If this procedure produces no such sequence, then no instance of the product is assemblable. Finally, this paper analyzes the relation between assembly and disassembly sequences in the presence of toleranced parts. This work assumes a simple, but non-trivial tolerance language that falls short of capturing all imperfections of a manufacturing process. Hence, it is only one step toward assembly sequencing with toleranced parts.

  6. SNMR pulse sequence phase cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, David O; Grunewald, Elliot D

    2013-11-12

    Technologies applicable to SNMR pulse sequence phase cycling are disclosed, including SNMR acquisition apparatus and methods, SNMR processing apparatus and methods, and combinations thereof. SNMR acquisition may include transmitting two or more SNMR pulse sequences and applying a phase shift to a pulse in at least one of the pulse sequences, according to any of a variety cycling techniques. SNMR processing may include combining SNMR from a plurality of pulse sequences comprising pulses of different phases, so that desired signals are preserved and indesired signals are canceled.

  7. Blazar Sequence in Fermi Era

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Liang Chen

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we review the latest research results on the topic of blazar sequence. It seems that the blazar sequence is phenomenally ruled out, while the theoretical blazar sequence still holds. We point out that black hole mass is a dominated parameter accounting for high-power-high-synchrotron-peaked and low-power-low-sychrotron-peaked blazars. Because most blazars have similar size of emission region, theoretical blazar sequence implies that the break of Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) is a cooling break in nature.

  8. Sequence Algebra, Sequence Decision Diagrams and Dynamic Fault Trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauzy, Antoine B., E-mail: Antoine.Rauzy@lix.polytechnique.f [LIX-CNRS, Computer Science, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2011-07-15

    A large attention has been focused on the Dynamic Fault Trees in the past few years. By adding new gates to static (regular) Fault Trees, Dynamic Fault Trees aim to take into account dependencies among events. Merle et al. proposed recently an algebraic framework to give a formal interpretation to these gates. In this article, we extend Merle et al.'s work by adopting a slightly different perspective. We introduce Sequence Algebras that can be seen as Algebras of Basic Events, representing failures of non-repairable components. We show how to interpret Dynamic Fault Trees within this framework. Finally, we propose a new data structure to encode sets of sequences of Basic Events: Sequence Decision Diagrams. Sequence Decision Diagrams are very much inspired from Minato's Zero-Suppressed Binary Decision Diagrams. We show that all operations of Sequence Algebras can be performed on this data structure.

  9. Bayesian analysis of binary sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torney, David C.

    2005-03-01

    This manuscript details Bayesian methodology for "learning by example", with binary n-sequences encoding the objects under consideration. Priors prove influential; conformable priors are described. Laplace approximation of Bayes integrals yields posterior likelihoods for all n-sequences. This involves the optimization of a definite function over a convex domain--efficiently effectuated by the sequential application of the quadratic program.

  10. Gambling strategies for random sequences

    OpenAIRE

    George Davie

    2010-01-01

    There is a general consensus that it is not possible to gamble successfully against a random se-quence. This consensus is based on results from probability theory that all gambling systems arein some sense futile and the idea that at any stage of the sequence, the next outcome is entirelyunpredictable.

  11. DNA Sequencing Sensors: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Antonio Garrido-Cardenas

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The first sequencing of a complete genome was published forty years ago by the double Nobel Prize in Chemistry winner Frederick Sanger. That corresponded to the small sized genome of a bacteriophage, but since then there have been many complex organisms whose DNA have been sequenced. This was possible thanks to continuous advances in the fields of biochemistry and molecular genetics, but also in other areas such as nanotechnology and computing. Nowadays, sequencing sensors based on genetic material have little to do with those used by Sanger. The emergence of mass sequencing sensors, or new generation sequencing (NGS meant a quantitative leap both in the volume of genetic material that was able to be sequenced in each trial, as well as in the time per run and its cost. One can envisage that incoming technologies, already known as fourth generation sequencing, will continue to cheapen the trials by increasing DNA reading lengths in each run. All of this would be impossible without sensors and detection systems becoming smaller and more precise. This article provides a comprehensive overview on sensors for DNA sequencing developed within the last 40 years.

  12. PERIODIC COMPLEMENTARY BINARY SEQUENCE PAIRS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XuChengqian; ZhaoXiaoqun

    2002-01-01

    A new set of binary sequences-Periodic Complementary Binary Sequence Pair (PCSP)is proposed .A new class of block design-Difference Family Pair (DFP)is also proposed .The relationship between PCSP and DFP,the properties and exising conditions of PCSP and the recursive constructions for PCSP are given.

  13. PERIODIC COMPLEMENTARY BINARY SEQUENCE PAIRS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Chengqian; Zhao Xiaoqun

    2002-01-01

    A new set of binary sequences-Periodic Complementary Binary Sequence Pair (PCSP) is proposed. A new class of block design-Difference Family Pair (DFP) is also proposed.The relationship between PCSP and DFP, the properties and existing conditions of PCSP and the recursive constructions for PCSP are given.

  14. Sequence conserved for subcellular localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Rajesh; Rost, Burkhard

    2002-01-01

    The more proteins diverged in sequence, the more difficult it becomes for bioinformatics to infer similarities of protein function and structure from sequence. The precise thresholds used in automated genome annotations depend on the particular aspect of protein function transferred by homology. Here, we presented the first large-scale analysis of the relation between sequence similarity and identity in subcellular localization. Three results stood out: (1) The subcellular compartment is generally more conserved than what might have been expected given that short sequence motifs like nuclear localization signals can alter the native compartment; (2) the sequence conservation of localization is similar between different compartments; and (3) it is similar to the conservation of structure and enzymatic activity. In particular, we found the transition between the regions of conserved and nonconserved localization to be very sharp, although the thresholds for conservation were less well defined than for structure and enzymatic activity. We found that a simple measure for sequence similarity accounting for pairwise sequence identity and alignment length, the HSSP distance, distinguished accurately between protein pairs of identical and different localizations. In fact, BLAST expectation values outperformed the HSSP distance only for alignments in the subtwilight zone. We succeeded in slightly improving the accuracy of inferring localization through homology by fine tuning the thresholds. Finally, we applied our results to the entire SWISS-PROT database and five entirely sequenced eukaryotes. PMID:12441382

  15. Rapid Diagnostics of Onboard Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starbird, Thomas W.; Morris, John R.; Shams, Khawaja S.; Maimone, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    Keeping track of sequences onboard a spacecraft is challenging. When reviewing Event Verification Records (EVRs) of sequence executions on the Mars Exploration Rover (MER), operators often found themselves wondering which version of a named sequence the EVR corresponded to. The lack of this information drastically impacts the operators diagnostic capabilities as well as their situational awareness with respect to the commands the spacecraft has executed, since the EVRs do not provide argument values or explanatory comments. Having this information immediately available can be instrumental in diagnosing critical events and can significantly enhance the overall safety of the spacecraft. This software provides auditing capability that can eliminate that uncertainty while diagnosing critical conditions. Furthermore, the Restful interface provides a simple way for sequencing tools to automatically retrieve binary compiled sequence SCMFs (Space Command Message Files) on demand. It also enables developers to change the underlying database, while maintaining the same interface to the existing applications. The logging capabilities are also beneficial to operators when they are trying to recall how they solved a similar problem many days ago: this software enables automatic recovery of SCMF and RML (Robot Markup Language) sequence files directly from the command EVRs, eliminating the need for people to find and validate the corresponding sequences. To address the lack of auditing capability for sequences onboard a spacecraft during earlier missions, extensive logging support was added on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) sequencing server. This server is responsible for generating all MSL binary SCMFs from RML input sequences. The sequencing server logs every SCMF it generates into a MySQL database, as well as the high-level RML file and dictionary name inputs used to create the SCMF. The SCMF is then indexed by a hash value that is automatically included in all command

  16. Quantum Exchangeable Sequences of Algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Curran, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    We extend the notion of quantum exchangeability, introduced by K\\"ostler and Speicher in arXiv:0807.0677, to sequences (\\rho_1,\\rho_2,...c) of homomorphisms from an algebra C into a noncommutative probability space (A,\\phi), and prove a free de Finetti theorem: an infinite quantum exchangeable sequence (\\rho_1,\\rho_2,...c) is freely independent and identically distributed with respect to a conditional expectation. As a corollary we obtain a free analogue of the Hewitt Savage zero-one law. As in the classical case, the theorem fails for finite sequences. We give a characterization of finite quantum exchangeable sequences, which can be viewed as a noncommutative analogue of sampling without replacement. We then give an approximation to how far a finite quantum exchangeable sequence is from being freely independent with amalgamation.

  17. Spatiotemporal correlations of aftershock sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Peixoto, Tiago P; Davidsen, Jörn

    2010-01-01

    Aftershock sequences are of particular interest in seismic research since they may condition seismic activity in a given region over long time spans. While they are typically identified with periods of enhanced seismic activity after a large earthquake as characterized by the Omori law, our knowledge of the spatiotemporal correlations between events in an aftershock sequence is limited. Here, we study the spatiotemporal correlations of two aftershock sequences form California (Parkfield and Hector Mine) using the recently introduced concept of "recurrent" events. We find that both sequences have very similar properties and that most of them are captured by the space-time epidemic-type aftershock sequence (ETAS) model if one takes into account catalog incompleteness. However, the stochastic model does not capture the spatiotemporal correlations leading to the observed structure of seismicity on small spatial scales.

  18. Generation and analysis of expressed sequence tags from the medicinal plant Salvia miltiorrhiza

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SPENCER; David; F

    2010-01-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza Bge.is a well-known traditional Chinese herb.Its roots have been formulated and used clinically for the treatment of various diseases.However,little genetic information has so far been available and this fact has become a major obstacle for molecular studies.To address this lack of genetic information,an Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) library from whole plantlets of S.miltiorrhiza was generated.From the 12959 cDNA clones that were randomly selected and subjected to single-pass sequencing from their 5′ ends,10288 ESTs (with sizes≥100 bp) were selected and assembled into 1288 contigs,leaving 2937 singletons,for a total of 4225 unigenes.These were analyzed using BLASTX (against protein databases),RPS-BLAST (against a conserved domain database) as well as the web-based KEGG Automatic Annotation Server for metabolic enzyme assignment.Based on the metabolic enzyme assignment,expression patterns of 14 secondary metabolic enzyme genes in different organs and under different treatments were verified using real-time PCR analysis.Additionally,a total of 122 microsatellites were identified from the ESTs,with 89 having sufficient flanking sequences for primer design.This set of ESTs represents a significant proportion of the S.miltiorrhiza transcriptome,and gives preliminary insights into the gene complement of S.miltiorrhiza.They will prove useful for uncovering secondary metabolic pathways,analyzing cDNA-array based gene expression,genetic manipulation to improve yield of desirable secondary products,and molecular marker identification.

  19. Multilocus Sequence Typing of Total-Genome-Sequenced Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mette Voldby; Cosentino, Salvatore; Rasmussen, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Accurate strain identification is essential for anyone working with bacteria. For many species, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) is considered the "gold standard" of typing, but it is traditionally performed in an expensive and time-consuming manner. As the costs of whole-genome sequencing (WGS......) continue to decline, it becomes increasingly available to scientists and routine diagnostic laboratories. Currently, the cost is below that of traditional MLST. The new challenges will be how to extract the relevant information from the large amount of data so as to allow for comparison over time...... and between laboratories. Ideally, this information should also allow for comparison to historical data. We developed a Web-based method for MLST of 66 bacterial species based on WGS data. As input, the method uses short sequence reads from four sequencing platforms or preassembled genomes. Updates from...

  20. Ossification sequence heterochrony among amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Sean M; Harrison, Luke B; Sheil, Christopher A

    2013-01-01

    Heterochrony is an important mechanism in the evolution of amphibians. Although studies have centered on the relationship between size and shape and the rates of development, ossification sequence heterochrony also may have been important. Rigorous, phylogenetic methods for assessing sequence heterochrony are relatively new, and a comprehensive study of the relative timing of ossification of skeletal elements has not been used to identify instances of sequence heterochrony across Amphibia. In this study, a new version of the program Parsimov-based genetic inference (PGi) was used to identify shifts in ossification sequences across all extant orders of amphibians, for all major structural units of the skeleton. PGi identified a number of heterochronic sequence shifts in all analyses, the most interesting of which seem to be tied to differences in metamorphic patterns among major clades. Early ossification of the vomer, premaxilla, and dentary is retained by Apateon caducus and members of Gymnophiona and Urodela, which lack the strongly biphasic development seen in anurans. In contrast, bones associated with the jaws and face were identified as shifting late in the ancestor of Anura. The bones that do not shift late, and thereby occupy the earliest positions in the anuran cranial sequence, are those in regions of the skull that undergo the least restructuring throughout anuran metamorphosis. Additionally, within Anura, bones of the hind limb and pelvic girdle were also identified as shifting early in the sequence of ossification, which may be a result of functional constraints imposed by the drastic metamorphosis of most anurans.

  1. A Criterion for Regular Sequences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D P Patil; U Storch; J Stückrad

    2004-05-01

    Let be a commutative noetherian ring and $f_1,\\ldots,f_r \\in R$. In this article we give (cf. the Theorem in $\\mathcal{x}$2) a criterion for $f_1,\\ldots,f_r$ to be regular sequence for a finitely generated module over which strengthens and generalises a result in [2]. As an immediate consequence we deduce that if $V(g_1,\\ldots,g_r) \\subseteq V(f_1,\\ldots,f_r)$ in Spec and if $f_1,\\ldots,f_r$ is a regular sequence in , then $g_1,\\ldots,g_r$ is also a regular sequence in .

  2. Weak disorder in Fibonacci sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Naim, E [Theoretical Division and Center for Nonlinear Studies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Krapivsky, P L [Department of Physics and Center for Molecular Cybernetics, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2006-05-19

    We study how weak disorder affects the growth of the Fibonacci series. We introduce a family of stochastic sequences that grow by the normal Fibonacci recursion with probability 1 - {epsilon}, but follow a different recursion rule with a small probability {epsilon}. We focus on the weak disorder limit and obtain the Lyapunov exponent that characterizes the typical growth of the sequence elements, using perturbation theory. The limiting distribution for the ratio of consecutive sequence elements is obtained as well. A number of variations to the basic Fibonacci recursion including shift, doubling and copying are considered. (letter to the editor)

  3. DNA Sequencing Using capillary Electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Barry Karger

    2011-05-09

    The overall goal of this program was to develop capillary electrophoresis as the tool to be used to sequence for the first time the Human Genome. Our program was part of the Human Genome Project. In this work, we were highly successful and the replaceable polymer we developed, linear polyacrylamide, was used by the DOE sequencing lab in California to sequence a significant portion of the human genome using the MegaBase multiple capillary array electrophoresis instrument. In this final report, we summarize our efforts and success. We began our work by separating by capillary electrophoresis double strand oligonucleotides using cross-linked polyacrylamide gels in fused silica capillaries. This work showed the potential of the methodology. However, preparation of such cross-linked gel capillaries was difficult with poor reproducibility, and even more important, the columns were not very stable. We improved stability by using non-cross linked linear polyacrylamide. Here, the entangled linear chains could move when osmotic pressure (e.g. sample injection) was imposed on the polymer matrix. This relaxation of the polymer dissipated the stress in the column. Our next advance was to use significantly lower concentrations of the linear polyacrylamide that the polymer could be automatically blown out after each run and replaced with fresh linear polymer solution. In this way, a new column was available for each analytical run. Finally, while testing many linear polymers, we selected linear polyacrylamide as the best matrix as it was the most hydrophilic polymer available. Under our DOE program, we demonstrated initially the success of the linear polyacrylamide to separate double strand DNA. We note that the method is used even today to assay purity of double stranded DNA fragments. Our focus, of course, was on the separation of single stranded DNA for sequencing purposes. In one paper, we demonstrated the success of our approach in sequencing up to 500 bases. Other

  4. Classification of Base Sequences (+1,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragomir Ž. Ðoković

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Base sequences BS(+1, are quadruples of {±1}-sequences (;;;, with A and B of length +1 and C and D of length n, such that the sum of their nonperiodic autocor-relation functions is a -function. The base sequence conjecture, asserting that BS(+1, exist for all n, is stronger than the famous Hadamard matrix conjecture. We introduce a new definition of equivalence for base sequences BS(+1, and construct a canonical form. By using this canonical form, we have enumerated the equivalence classes of BS(+1, for ≤30. As the number of equivalence classes grows rapidly (but not monotonically with n, the tables in the paper cover only the cases ≤13.

  5. Molecular beacon sequence design algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, W Todd; Haselton, Frederick R

    2003-01-01

    A method based on Web-based tools is presented to design optimally functioning molecular beacons. Molecular beacons, fluorogenic hybridization probes, are a powerful tool for the rapid and specific detection of a particular nucleic acid sequence. However, their synthesis costs can be considerable. Since molecular beacon performance is based on its sequence, it is imperative to rationally design an optimal sequence before synthesis. The algorithm presented here uses simple Microsoft Excel formulas and macros to rank candidate sequences. This analysis is carried out using mfold structural predictions along with other free Web-based tools. For smaller laboratories where molecular beacons are not the focus of research, the public domain algorithm described here may be usefully employed to aid in molecular beacon design.

  6. Pythagorean Triples from Harmonic Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiDomenico, Angelo S.; Tanner, Randy J.

    2001-01-01

    Shows how all primitive Pythagorean triples can be generated from harmonic sequences. Use inductive and deductive reasoning to explore how Pythagorean triples are connected with another area of mathematics. (KHR)

  7. ISIS Individualized Support In Sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drachsler, Hendrik; Hummel, Hans

    2007-01-01

    Drachsler, H., & Hummel, H. G. K. (2007). ISIS Individualized Support In Sequencing. Presentation given during the PIP meeting on March 22, 2007. Open University of the Netherlands: Heerlen, The Netherlands.

  8. Using comparative genomic hybridization to survey genomic sequence divergence across species: a proof-of-concept from Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulathinal Rob J

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide analysis of sequence divergence among species offers profound insights into the evolutionary processes that shape lineages. When full-genome sequencing is not feasible for a broad comparative study, we propose the use of array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH in order to identify orthologous genes with high sequence divergence. Here we discuss experimental design, statistical power, success rate, sources of variation and potential confounding factors. We used a spotted PCR product microarray platform from Drosophila melanogaster to assess sequence divergence on a gene-by-gene basis in three fully sequenced heterologous species (D. sechellia, D. simulans, and D. yakuba. Because complete genome assemblies are available for these species this study presents a powerful test for the use of aCGH as a tool to measure sequence divergence. Results We found a consistent and linear relationship between hybridization ratio and sequence divergence of the sample to the platform species. At higher levels of sequence divergence (D. melanogaster ~84% of features had significantly less hybridization to the array in the heterologous species than the platform species, and thus could be identified as "diverged". At lower levels of divergence (≥ 97% identity, only 13% of genes were identified as diverged. While ~40% of the variation in hybridization ratio can be accounted for by variation in sequence identity of the heterologous sample relative to D. melanogaster, other individual characteristics of the DNA sequences, such as GC content, also contribute to variation in hybridization ratio, as does technical variation. Conclusions Here we demonstrate that aCGH can accurately be used as a proxy to estimate genome-wide divergence, thus providing an efficient way to evaluate how evolutionary processes and genomic architecture can shape species diversity in non-model systems. Given the increased number of species for which

  9. Overview of Sequence Data Formats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongen

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing experiment can generate billions of short reads for each sample and processing of the raw reads will add more information. Various file formats have been introduced/developed in order to store and manipulate this information. This chapter presents an overview of the file formats including FASTQ, FASTA, SAM/BAM, GFF/GTF, BED, and VCF that are commonly used in analysis of next-generation sequencing data.

  10. Genome Sequence of Canine Herpesvirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos V Papageorgiou

    Full Text Available Canine herpesvirus is a widespread alphaherpesvirus that causes a fatal haemorrhagic disease of neonatal puppies. We have used high-throughput methods to determine the genome sequences of three viral strains (0194, V777 and V1154 isolated in the United Kingdom between 1985 and 2000. The sequences are very closely related to each other. The canine herpesvirus genome is estimated to be 125 kbp in size and consists of a unique long sequence (97.5 kbp and a unique short sequence (7.7 kbp that are each flanked by terminal and internal inverted repeats (38 bp and 10.0 kbp, respectively. The overall nucleotide composition is 31.6% G+C, which is the lowest among the completely sequenced alphaherpesviruses. The genome contains 76 open reading frames predicted to encode functional proteins, all of which have counterparts in other alphaherpesviruses. The availability of the sequences will facilitate future research on the diagnosis and treatment of canine herpesvirus-associated disease.

  11. Long-range barcode labeling-sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Feng; Zhang, Tao; Singh, Kanwar K.; Pennacchio, Len A.; Froula, Jeff L.; Eng, Kevin S.

    2016-10-18

    Methods for sequencing single large DNA molecules by clonal multiple displacement amplification using barcoded primers. Sequences are binned based on barcode sequences and sequenced using a microdroplet-based method for sequencing large polynucleotide templates to enable assembly of haplotype-resolved complex genomes and metagenomes.

  12. Pig genome sequence - analysis and publication strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Archibald, A.L.; Bolund, L.; Churcher, C.; Fredholm, M.; Groenen, M.A.M.; Harlizius, B.

    2010-01-01

    Background - The pig genome is being sequenced and characterised under the auspices of the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium. The sequencing strategy followed a hybrid approach combining hierarchical shotgun sequencing of BAC clones and whole genome shotgun sequencing. Results - Assemblies of the B

  13. Sequencing and comparative analysis of the gorilla MHC genomic sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilming, Laurens G; Hart, Elizabeth A; Coggill, Penny C; Horton, Roger; Gilbert, James G R; Clee, Chris; Jones, Matt; Lloyd, Christine; Palmer, Sophie; Sims, Sarah; Whitehead, Siobhan; Wiley, David; Beck, Stephan; Harrow, Jennifer L

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes play a critical role in vertebrate immune response and because the MHC is linked to a significant number of auto-immune and other diseases it is of great medical interest. Here we describe the clone-based sequencing and subsequent annotation of the MHC region of the gorilla genome. Because the MHC is subject to extensive variation, both structural and sequence-wise, it is not readily amenable to study in whole genome shotgun sequence such as the recently published gorilla genome. The variation of the MHC also makes it of evolutionary interest and therefore we analyse the sequence in the context of human and chimpanzee. In our comparisons with human and re-annotated chimpanzee MHC sequence we find that gorilla has a trimodular RCCX cluster, versus the reference human bimodular cluster, and additional copies of Class I (pseudo)genes between Gogo-K and Gogo-A (the orthologues of HLA-K and -A). We also find that Gogo-H (and Patr-H) is coding versus the HLA-H pseudogene and, conversely, there is a Gogo-DQB2 pseudogene versus the HLA-DQB2 coding gene. Our analysis, which is freely available through the VEGA genome browser, provides the research community with a comprehensive dataset for comparative and evolutionary research of the MHC.

  14. A syndromic form of Pierre Robin sequence is caused by 5q23 deletions encompassing FBN2 and PHAX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Morad; Rainger, Jacqueline K; Murray, Jennie E; Hanson, Isabel; Firth, Helen V; Mehendale, Felicity; Amiel, Jeanne; Gordon, Christopher T; Percesepe, Antonio; Mazzanti, Laura; Fryer, Alan; Ferrari, Paola; Devriendt, Koenraad; Temple, I Karen; FitzPatrick, David R

    2014-10-01

    Pierre Robin sequence (PRS) is an aetiologically distinct subgroup of cleft palate. We aimed to define the critical genomic interval from five different 5q22-5q31 deletions associated with PRS or PRS-associated features and assess each gene within the region as a candidate for the PRS component of the phenotype. Clinical array-based comparative genome hybridisation (aCGH) data were used to define a 2.08 Mb minimum region of overlap among four de novo deletions and one mother-son inherited deletion associated with at least one component of PRS. Commonly associated anomalies were talipes equinovarus (TEV), finger contractures and crumpled ear helices. Expression analysis of the orthologous genes within the PRS critical region in embryonic mice showed that the strongest candidate genes were FBN2 and PHAX. Targeted aCGH of the critical region and sequencing of these genes in a cohort of 25 PRS patients revealed no plausible disease-causing mutations. In conclusion, deletion of ∼2 Mb on 5q23 region causes a clinically recognisable subtype of PRS. Haploinsufficiency for FBN2 accounts for the digital and auricular features. A possible critical region for TEV is distinct and telomeric to the PRS region. The molecular basis of PRS in these cases remains undetermined but haploinsufficiency for PHAX is a plausible mechanism.

  15. ARC Code TI: sequenceMiner

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The sequenceMiner was developed to address the problem of detecting and describing anomalies in large sets of high-dimensional symbol sequences. sequenceMiner works...

  16. Sequence-dependent nucleosome positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ho-Ryun; Vingron, Martin

    2009-03-13

    Eukaryotic DNA is organized into a macromolecular structure called chromatin. The basic repeating unit of chromatin is the nucleosome, which consists of two copies of each of the four core histones and DNA. The nucleosomal organization and the positions of nucleosomes have profound effects on all DNA-dependent processes. Understanding the factors that influence nucleosome positioning is therefore of general interest. Among the many determinants of nucleosome positioning, the DNA sequence has been proposed to have a major role. Here, we analyzed more than 860,000 nucleosomal DNA sequences to identify sequence features that guide the formation of nucleosomes in vivo. We found that both a periodic enrichment of AT base pairs and an out-of-phase oscillating enrichment of GC base pairs as well as the overall preference for GC base pairs are determinants of nucleosome positioning. The preference for GC pairs can be related to a lower energetic cost required for deformation of the DNA to wrap around the histones. In line with this idea, we found that only incorporation of both signal components into a sequence model for nucleosome formation results in maximal predictive performance on a genome-wide scale. In this manner, one achieves greater predictive power than published approaches. Our results confirm the hypothesis that the DNA sequence has a major role in nucleosome positioning in vivo.

  17. Sequencing Needs for Viral Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, S N; Lam, M; Mulakken, N J; Torres, C L; Smith, J R; Slezak, T

    2004-01-26

    We built a system to guide decisions regarding the amount of genomic sequencing required to develop diagnostic DNA signatures, which are short sequences that are sufficient to uniquely identify a viral species. We used our existing DNA diagnostic signature prediction pipeline, which selects regions of a target species genome that are conserved among strains of the target (for reliability, to prevent false negatives) and unique relative to other species (for specificity, to avoid false positives). We performed simulations, based on existing sequence data, to assess the number of genome sequences of a target species and of close phylogenetic relatives (''near neighbors'') that are required to predict diagnostic signature regions that are conserved among strains of the target species and unique relative to other bacterial and viral species. For DNA viruses such as variola (smallpox), three target genomes provide sufficient guidance for selecting species-wide signatures. Three near neighbor genomes are critical for species specificity. In contrast, most RNA viruses require four target genomes and no near neighbor genomes, since lack of conservation among strains is more limiting than uniqueness. SARS and Ebola Zaire are exceptional, as additional target genomes currently do not improve predictions, but near neighbor sequences are urgently needed. Our results also indicate that double stranded DNA viruses are more conserved among strains than are RNA viruses, since in most cases there was at least one conserved signature candidate for the DNA viruses and zero conserved signature candidates for the RNA viruses.

  18. Sequence Patterns of Identity Authentication Protocols

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Hongcai; He Dake

    2006-01-01

    From the viewpoint of protocol sequence, analyses are made of the sequence patterns of possible identity authentication protocol under two cases: with or without the trusted third party (TTP). Ten feasible sequence patterns of authentication protocol with TTP and 5 sequence patterns without TTP are gained. These gained sequence patterns meet the requirements for identity authentication,and basically cover almost all the authentication protocols with TTP and without TTP at present. All of the sequence patterns gained are classified into unilateral or bilateral authentication. Then , according to the sequence symmetry, several good sequence patterns with TTP are evaluated. The accompolished results can provide a reference to design of new identity authentication protocols.

  19. Comparative analysis of sequences from PT 2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Susie Sommer

    . All but one sequence mapped to the MCP gene while the last sequence mapped to the Neurofilament gene. Approx. half of the sequences contained no errors while the rest differed with 88-99 percent similarity with most having 99% similarity. One sequence, when BLASTed, showed most similarity to European...... Sheatfish and not EHNV. Generally, mistakes occurred at the ends of the sequences. This can be due to several factors. One is that the sequence has not been trimmed of the sequence primer sites. Another is the lack of quality control of the chromatogram. Finally, sequencing in just one direction can result...

  20. On the base sequence conjecture

    CERN Document Server

    Djokovic, Dragomir Z

    2010-01-01

    Let BS(m,n) denote the set of base sequences (A;B;C;D), with A and B of length m and C and D of length n. The base sequence conjecture (BSC) asserts that BS(n+1,n) exist (i.e., are non-empty) for all n. This is known to be true for n <= 36 and when n is a Golay number. We show that it is also true for n=37 and n=38. It is worth pointing out that BSC is stronger than the famous Hadamard matrix conjecture. In order to demonstrate the abundance of base sequences, we have previously attached to BS(n+1,n) a graph Gamma_n and computed the Gamma_n for n <= 27. We now extend these computations and determine the Gamma_n for n=28,...,35. We also propose a conjecture describing these graphs in general.

  1. Explaining the harmonic sequence paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Ulrich; Zimper, Alexander

    2012-05-01

    According to the harmonic sequence paradox, an expected utility decision maker's willingness to pay for a gamble whose expected payoffs evolve according to the harmonic series is finite if and only if his marginal utility of additional income becomes zero for rather low payoff levels. Since the assumption of zero marginal utility is implausible for finite payoff levels, expected utility theory - as well as its standard generalizations such as cumulative prospect theory - are apparently unable to explain a finite willingness to pay. This paper presents first an experimental study of the harmonic sequence paradox. Additionally, it demonstrates that the theoretical argument of the harmonic sequence paradox only applies to time-patient decision makers, whereas the paradox is easily avoided if time-impatience is introduced.

  2. Transgressive Surface as Sequence Boundary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Analysis of the four cases of the sequence boundary (SB)-transgressive surface (TS) relation in nature shows that applying transgressive surfaces as sequence boundaries has the following merits: it improves the methodology of stratigraphic subdivision; the position of transgressive surface in a sea level curve is relatively fixed; the transgressive surface is a transforming surface of the stratal structure; in platforms or ramps, the transgressive surface is the only choice for determining the sequence boundary; the transgressive surface is a readily recognized physical surface reflected by seismic records in seismostratigraphy. The paper reaches a conclusion that to delineate a SB in terms of the TS is theoretically and practically better than to delineate it between highstand and lowstand sediments as has been done traditionally.

  3. Sequences and series involving the sequence of composite numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panayiotis Vlamos

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Denoting by pn and cn the nth prime number and the nth composite number, respectively, we prove that both the sequence (xnn≥1, defined by xn=∑k=1n (ck+1−ck / k−pn / n, and the series ∑n=1∞ (pcn−cpn / npn are convergent.

  4. KERNEL WORDS AND GAP SEQUENCE OF THE TRIBONACCI SEQUENCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuke HUANG; Zhiying WEN

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the factor properties and gap sequence of the Tri-bonacci sequence, the fixed point of the substitution σ(a, b, c) = (ab, ac, a). Let ωp be the p-th occurrence of ω and Gp(ω) be the gap between ωp and ωp+1. We introduce a notion of kernel for each factor ω, and then give the decomposition of the factor ω with respect to its kernel. Using the kernel and the decomposition, we prove the main result of this paper:for each factorω, the gap sequence{Gp(ω)}p≥1 is the Tribonacci sequence over the alphabet{G1(ω), G2(ω), G4(ω)}, and the expressions of gaps are determined completely. As an appli-cation, for each factorω and p∈N, we determine the position ofωp. Finally we introduce a notion of spectrum for studying some typical combinatorial properties, such as power, overlap and separate of factors.

  5. Convergence of Fuzzy Set Sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Yu-hu

    2002-01-01

    There are more than one mode of convergence with respect to the fuzzy set sequences. In this paper,common six modes of convergence and their relationships are discussed. These six modes are convergence in uniform metric D, convergence in separable metric Dp or D*p, 1 ≤ p <∞, convergence in level set, strong convergence in level set and weak convergence. Suitable counterexamples are given. The necessary and sufficient conditions of convergence in uniform metric D are described. Some comme nts on the convergence of LRfuzzy number sequences are represented.

  6. Integrated sequence analysis. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, K.; Pyy, P

    1998-02-01

    The NKS/RAK subprojet 3 `integrated sequence analysis` (ISA) was formulated with the overall objective to develop and to test integrated methodologies in order to evaluate event sequences with significant human action contribution. The term `methodology` denotes not only technical tools but also methods for integration of different scientific disciplines. In this report, we first discuss the background of ISA and the surveys made to map methods in different application fields, such as man machine system simulation software, human reliability analysis (HRA) and expert judgement. Specific event sequences were, after the surveys, selected for application and testing of a number of ISA methods. The event sequences discussed in the report were cold overpressure of BWR, shutdown LOCA of BWR, steam generator tube rupture of a PWR and BWR disturbed signal view in the control room after an external event. Different teams analysed these sequences by using different ISA and HRA methods. Two kinds of results were obtained from the ISA project: sequence specific and more general findings. The sequence specific results are discussed together with each sequence description. The general lessons are discussed under a separate chapter by using comparisons of different case studies. These lessons include areas ranging from plant safety management (design, procedures, instrumentation, operations, maintenance and safety practices) to methodological findings (ISA methodology, PSA,HRA, physical analyses, behavioural analyses and uncertainty assessment). Finally follows a discussion about the project and conclusions are presented. An interdisciplinary study of complex phenomena is a natural way to produce valuable and innovative results. This project came up with structured ways to perform ISA and managed to apply the in practice. The project also highlighted some areas where more work is needed. In the HRA work, development is required for the use of simulators and expert judgement as

  7. DNA Sequencing Using capillary Electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Barry Karger

    2011-05-09

    The overall goal of this program was to develop capillary electrophoresis as the tool to be used to sequence for the first time the Human Genome. Our program was part of the Human Genome Project. In this work, we were highly successful and the replaceable polymer we developed, linear polyacrylamide, was used by the DOE sequencing lab in California to sequence a significant portion of the human genome using the MegaBase multiple capillary array electrophoresis instrument. In this final report, we summarize our efforts and success. We began our work by separating by capillary electrophoresis double strand oligonucleotides using cross-linked polyacrylamide gels in fused silica capillaries. This work showed the potential of the methodology. However, preparation of such cross-linked gel capillaries was difficult with poor reproducibility, and even more important, the columns were not very stable. We improved stability by using non-cross linked linear polyacrylamide. Here, the entangled linear chains could move when osmotic pressure (e.g. sample injection) was imposed on the polymer matrix. This relaxation of the polymer dissipated the stress in the column. Our next advance was to use significantly lower concentrations of the linear polyacrylamide that the polymer could be automatically blown out after each run and replaced with fresh linear polymer solution. In this way, a new column was available for each analytical run. Finally, while testing many linear polymers, we selected linear polyacrylamide as the best matrix as it was the most hydrophilic polymer available. Under our DOE program, we demonstrated initially the success of the linear polyacrylamide to separate double strand DNA. We note that the method is used even today to assay purity of double stranded DNA fragments. Our focus, of course, was on the separation of single stranded DNA for sequencing purposes. In one paper, we demonstrated the success of our approach in sequencing up to 500 bases. Other

  8. Network motifs in music sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Zanette, Damian H

    2010-01-01

    In this note, I summarize ongoing research on motif distribution in networks built up out of symbolic sequences of Western musical origin. Their motif significance profiles exhibit remarkable consistency over different styles and periods, and define a class that cannot be identified with any of the four "superfamilies" to which most real networks seem to belong. Networks from music sequences possess an unusual abundance of bidirectional connections, due to the inherent reversibility of short musical note patterns. This property contributes to motif significance from both local and large-scale features of musical structure.

  9. The origin of biased sequence depth in sequence-independent nucleic acid amplification and optimization for efficient massive parallel sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toon Rosseel

    Full Text Available Sequence Independent Single Primer Amplification is one of the most widely used random amplification approaches in virology for sequencing template preparation. This technique relies on oligonucleotides consisting of a 3' random part used to prime complementary DNA synthesis and a 5' defined tag sequence for subsequent amplification. Recently, this amplification method was combined with next generation sequencing to obtain viral sequences. However, these studies showed a biased distribution of the resulting sequence reads over the analyzed genomes. The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanisms that lead to biased sequence depth when using random amplification. Avian paramyxovirus type 8 was used as a model RNA virus to investigate these mechanisms. We showed, based on in silico analysis of the sequence depth in relation to GC-content, predicted RNA secondary structure and sequence complementarity to the 3' part of the tag sequence, that the tag sequence has the main contribution to the observed bias in sequence depth. We confirmed this finding experimentally using both fragmented and non-fragmented viral RNAs as well as primers differing in random oligomer length (6 or 12 nucleotides and in the sequence of the amplification tag. The observed oligonucleotide annealing bias can be reduced by extending the random oligomer sequence and by in silico combining sequence data from SISPA experiments using different 5' defined tag sequences. These findings contribute to the optimization of random nucleic acid amplification protocols that are currently required for downstream applications such as viral metagenomics and microarray analysis.

  10. Sequences in language and text

    CERN Document Server

    Mikros, George K

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this volume is to present the diverse but highly interesting area of the quantitative analysis of the sequence of various linguistic structures. The collected articles present a wide spectrum of quantitative analyses of linguistic syntagmatic structures and explore novel sequential linguistic entities. This volume will be interesting to all researchers studying linguistics using quantitative methods.

  11. Farey Sequences and Resistor Networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sameen Ahmed Khan

    2012-05-01

    In this article, we employ the Farey sequence and Fibonacci numbers to establish strict upper and lower bounds for the order of the set of equivalent resistances for a circuit constructed from equal resistors combined in series and in parallel. The method is applicable for networks involving bridge and non-planar circuits.

  12. Multifractal analyses of music sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhi-Yuan; Wu, Tzuyin

    2006-09-01

    Multifractal analysis is applied to study the fractal property of music. In this paper, a method is proposed to transform both the melody and rhythm of a music piece into individual sets of distributed points along a one-dimensional line. The structure of the musical composition is thus manifested and characterized by the local clustering pattern of these sequences of points. Specifically, the local Hölder exponent and the multifractal spectrum are calculated for the transformed music sequences according to the multifractal formalism. The observed fluctuations of the Hölder exponent along the music sequences confirm the non-uniformity feature in the structures of melodic and rhythmic motions of music. Our present result suggests that the shape and opening width of the multifractal spectrum plot can be used to distinguish different styles of music. In addition, a characteristic curve is constructed by mapping the point sequences converted from the melody and rhythm of a musical work into a two-dimensional graph. Each different pieces of music has its own unique characteristic curve. This characteristic curve, which also exhibits a fractal trait, unveils the intrinsic structure of music.

  13. Single-primer fluorescent sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, J.L.; Morgan, C.A.; Middendorf, L.R.; Grone, D.L.; Brumbaugh, J.A.

    1987-05-01

    Modified linker arm oligonucleotides complementary to standard M13 priming sites were synthesized, labelled with either one, two, or three fluoresceins, and purified by reverse-phase HPLC. When used as primers in standard dideoxy M13 sequencing with /sup 32/P-dNTPs, normal autoradiographic patterns were obtained. To eliminate the radioactivity, direct on-line fluorescence detection was achieved by the use of a scanning 10 mW Argon laser emitting 488 nm light. Fluorescent bands were detected directly in standard 0.2 or 0.35 mm thick polyacrylamide gels at a distance of 24 cm from the loading wells by a photomultiplier tube filtered at 520 nm. Horizontal and temporal location of each band was displayed by computer as a band in real time, providing visual appearance similar to normal 4-lane autoradiograms. Using a single primer labelled with two fluoresceins, sequences of between 500 and 600 bases have been read in a single loading with better than 98% accuracy; up to 400 bases can be read reproducibly with no errors. More than 50 sequences have been determined by this method. This approach requires only 1-2 ug of cloned template, and produces continuous sequence data at about one band per minute.

  14. Fractals in DNA sequence analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Zu-Guo(喻祖国); Vo Anh; Gong Zhi-Min(龚志民); Long Shun-Chao(龙顺潮)

    2002-01-01

    Fractal methods have been successfully used to study many problems in physics, mathematics, engineering, finance,and even in biology. There has been an increasing interest in unravelling the mysteries of DNA; for example, how can we distinguish coding and noncoding sequences, and the problems of classification and evolution relationship of organisms are key problems in bioinformatics. Although much research has been carried out by taking into consideration the long-range correlations in DNA sequences, and the global fractal dimension has been used in these works by other people, the models and methods are somewhat rough and the results are not satisfactory. In recent years, our group has introduced a time series model (statistical point of view) and a visual representation (geometrical point of view)to DNA sequence analysis. We have also used fractal dimension, correlation dimension, the Hurst exponent and the dimension spectrum (multifractal analysis) to discuss problems in this field. In this paper, we introduce these fractal models and methods and the results of DNA sequence analysis.

  15. The Toothpick Sequence and Other Sequences from Cellular Automata

    CERN Document Server

    Applegate, David; Sloane, N J A

    2010-01-01

    A two-dimensional arrangement of toothpicks is constructed by the following iterative procedure. At stage 1, place a single toothpick of length 1 on a square grid, aligned with the y-axis. At each subsequent stage, for every exposed toothpick end, place an orthogonal toothpick centered at that end. The resulting structure has a fractal-like appearance. We will analyze the toothpick sequence, which gives the total number of toothpicks after n steps. We also study several related sequences that arise from enumerating active cells in cellular automata. Some unusual recurrences appear: a typical example is that instead of the Fibonacci recurrence, which we may write as a(2+i) = a(i) + a(i+1), we set n = 2^k+i (0 = 0} (1+x^{2^k-1}+2x^{2^k}) and variations thereof.

  16. Pig genome sequence - analysis and publication strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Archibald, Alan L.; Bolund, Lars; Churcher, Carol;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pig genome is being sequenced and characterised under the auspices of the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium. The sequencing strategy followed a hybrid approach combining hierarchical shotgun sequencing of BAC clones and whole genome shotgun sequencing. RESULTS: Assemblies......) is under construction and will incorporate whole genome shotgun sequence (WGS) data providing > 30x genome coverage. The WGS sequence, most of which comprise short Illumina/Solexa reads, were generated from DNA from the same single Duroc sow as the source of the BAC library from which clones were...

  17. Stream cipher based on GSS sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Yupu; XIAO Guozhen

    2004-01-01

    Generalized self-shrinking sequences, simply named the GSS sequences,are novel periodic sequences that have many advantages in cryptography. In this paper,we give several results about GSS sequence's application to cryptography. First, we give a simple method for selecting those GSS sequences whose least periods reach the maximum. Second, we give a method for describing and computing the auto-correlation coefficients of GSS sequences. Finally, we point out that some GSS sequences, when used as stream ciphers, have a security weakness.

  18. Sequence-structure relations of biopolymers

    CERN Document Server

    Barrett, Christopher; Reidys, Christian M

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: DNA data is transcribed into single-stranded RNA, which folds into specific molecular structures. In this paper we pose the question to what extent sequence- and structure-information correlate. We view this correlation as structural semantics of sequence data that allows for a different interpretation than conventional sequence alignment. Structural semantics could enable us to identify more general embedded "patterns" in DNA and RNA sequences. Results: We compute the partition function of sequences with respect to a fixed structure and connect this computation to the mutual information of a sequence-structure pair for RNA secondary structures. We present a Boltzmann sampler and obtain the a priori probability of specific sequence patterns. We present a detailed analysis for the three PDB-structures, 2JXV (hairpin), 2N3R (3-branch multi-loop) and 1EHZ (tRNA). We localize specific sequence patterns, contrast the energy spectrum of the Boltzmann sampled sequences versus those sequences that refold ...

  19. Expressing stochastic filters via number sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Capponi, A.; Farina, A; Pilotto, C.

    2010-01-01

    We generalize the results presented in [1] regarding the relation between the Kalman filter and the Fibonacci sequence. We consider more general filtering models and relate the finite dimensional Kalman and Benes filters to the Fibonacci sequence and to the Golden Section. We also prove that Fibonacci numbers may be expressed as the convolution of the Fibonacci and Padovan sequence, thus extending the connection between stochastic filtering and Fibonacci sequence to the Padovan sequence.

  20. Nonparametric Inference for Periodic Sequences

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Ying

    2012-02-01

    This article proposes a nonparametric method for estimating the period and values of a periodic sequence when the data are evenly spaced in time. The period is estimated by a "leave-out-one-cycle" version of cross-validation (CV) and complements the periodogram, a widely used tool for period estimation. The CV method is computationally simple and implicitly penalizes multiples of the smallest period, leading to a "virtually" consistent estimator of integer periods. This estimator is investigated both theoretically and by simulation.We also propose a nonparametric test of the null hypothesis that the data have constantmean against the alternative that the sequence of means is periodic. Finally, our methodology is demonstrated on three well-known time series: the sunspots and lynx trapping data, and the El Niño series of sea surface temperatures. © 2012 American Statistical Association and the American Society for Quality.

  1. Genome Sequence of Mycobacteriophage Momo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Welkin H; Bina, Elizabeth A; Brahme, Indraneel S; Hill, Amy B; Himmelstein, Philip H; Hunsicker, Sara M; Ish, Amanda R; Le, Tinh S; Martin, Mary M; Moscinski, Catherine N; Shetty, Sameer A; Swierzewski, Tomasz; Iyengar, Varun B; Kim, Hannah; Schafer, Claire E; Grubb, Sarah R; Warner, Marcie H; Bowman, Charles A; Russell, Daniel A; Hatfull, Graham F

    2015-06-18

    Momo is a newly discovered phage of Mycobacterium smegmatis mc(2)155. Momo has a double-stranded DNA genome 154,553 bp in length, with 233 predicted protein-encoding genes, 34 tRNA genes, and one transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) gene. Momo has a myoviral morphology and shares extensive nucleotide sequence similarity with subcluster C1 mycobacteriophages.

  2. Multiplicative LSTM for sequence modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Krause, Ben; Lu, Liang; Murray, Iain; Renals, Steve

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces multiplicative LSTM, a novel hybrid recurrent neural network architecture for sequence modelling that combines the long short-term memory (LSTM) and multiplicative recurrent neural network architectures. Multiplicative LSTM is motivated by its flexibility to have very different recurrent transition functions for each possible input, which we argue helps make it more expressive in autoregressive density estimation. We show empirically that multiplicative LSTM outperforms ...

  3. Multineuronal Spike Sequences Repeat with Millisecond Precision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koki eMatsumoto

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Cortical microcircuits are nonrandomly wired by neurons. As a natural consequence, spikes emitted by microcircuits are also nonrandomly patterned in time and space. One of the prominent spike organizations is a repetition of fixed patterns of spike series across multiple neurons. However, several questions remain unsolved, including how precisely spike sequences repeat, how the sequences are spatially organized, how many neurons participate in sequences, and how different sequences are functionally linked. To address these questions, we monitored spontaneous spikes of hippocampal CA3 neurons ex vivo using a high-speed functional multineuron calcium imaging technique that allowed us to monitor spikes with millisecond resolution and to record the location of spiking and nonspiking neurons. Multineuronal spike sequences were overrepresented in spontaneous activity compared to the statistical chance level. Approximately 75% of neurons participated in at least one sequence during our observation period. The participants were sparsely dispersed and did not show specific spatial organization. The number of sequences relative to the chance level decreased when larger time frames were used to detect sequences. Thus, sequences were precise at the millisecond level. Sequences often shared common spikes with other sequences; parts of sequences were subsequently relayed by following sequences, generating complex chains of multiple sequences.

  4. Method and apparatus for biological sequence comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, T.G.; Chang, W.I.

    1997-12-23

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for comparing biological sequences from a known source of sequences, with a subject (query) sequence. The apparatus takes as input a set of target similarity levels (such as evolutionary distances in units of PAM), and finds all fragments of known sequences that are similar to the subject sequence at each target similarity level, and are long enough to be statistically significant. The invention device filters out fragments from the known sequences that are too short, or have a lower average similarity to the subject sequence than is required by each target similarity level. The subject sequence is then compared only to the remaining known sequences to find the best matches. The filtering member divides the subject sequence into overlapping blocks, each block being sufficiently large to contain a minimum-length alignment from a known sequence. For each block, the filter member compares the block with every possible short fragment in the known sequences and determines a best match for each comparison. The determined set of short fragment best matches for the block provide an upper threshold on alignment values. Regions of a certain length from the known sequences that have a mean alignment value upper threshold greater than a target unit score are concatenated to form a union. The current block is compared to the union and provides an indication of best local alignment with the subject sequence. 5 figs.

  5. Detection of copy number variation from array intensity and sequencing read depth using a stepwise Bayesian model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerstein Mark B

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Copy number variants (CNVs have been demonstrated to occur at a high frequency and are now widely believed to make a significant contribution to the phenotypic variation in human populations. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH and newly developed read-depth approach through ultrahigh throughput genomic sequencing both provide rapid, robust, and comprehensive methods to identify CNVs on a whole-genome scale. Results We developed a Bayesian statistical analysis algorithm for the detection of CNVs from both types of genomic data. The algorithm can analyze such data obtained from PCR-based bacterial artificial chromosome arrays, high-density oligonucleotide arrays, and more recently developed high-throughput DNA sequencing. Treating parameters--e.g., the number of CNVs, the position of each CNV, and the data noise level--that define the underlying data generating process as random variables, our approach derives the posterior distribution of the genomic CNV structure given the observed data. Sampling from the posterior distribution using a Markov chain Monte Carlo method, we get not only best estimates for these unknown parameters but also Bayesian credible intervals for the estimates. We illustrate the characteristics of our algorithm by applying it to both synthetic and experimental data sets in comparison to other segmentation algorithms. Conclusions In particular, the synthetic data comparison shows that our method is more sensitive than other approaches at low false positive rates. Furthermore, given its Bayesian origin, our method can also be seen as a technique to refine CNVs identified by fast point-estimate methods and also as a framework to integrate array-CGH and sequencing data with other CNV-related biological knowledge, all through informative priors.

  6. 基于微阵列芯片的比较基因组杂交技术在临床实验室产前诊断中的应用%Prenatal diagnosis by array-based comparative genomic hybridization in the clinical laboratory setting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amy M. BREMAN; 毕为民; 张秀慧

    2009-01-01

    Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH), a method used to detect gains or losses of genetic material, has recently been applied to prenatal diagnosis of genomic imbalance in the clinical laboratory setting. This new and exciting diagnostic tool represents a major technological step forward in cytogenetic testing and addresses many of the limitations of current cytogenetic methods.Conventional chromosome analysis, the current gold standard in prenatal diagnosis, focuses primarily on the detection of common aneuploidies and is limited by its capacity to detect only those copy number changes that are large enough to be microscopically visible (typically 5-6 Mb in size at the 500 band level). In contrast, array CGH analysis simultaneously evaluates regions across the entire genome and al-lows for detection of unbalanced structural and numerical chromosome abnormalities of less than one hun-dred kb. Array CGH analysis also overcomes some of the limitations of chromosome analysis, such as the requirement for cell culture and longer reporting time, by using direct uncultured fetal specimens. With many diagnostic laboratories now embracing this technology, the past year has seen tremendous growth in the use of array CGH analysis for prenatal diagnosis. This review aims to summarize array CGH methodology and its current applications in prenatal diagnosis.

  7. Static multiplicities in heterogeneous azeotropic distillation sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjerg, Klavs; Andersen, Torben Ravn; Jørgensen, Sten Bay;

    1998-01-01

    In this paper the results of a bifurcation analysis on heterogeneous azeotropic distillation sequences are given. Two sequences suitable for ethanol dehydration are compared: The 'direct' and the 'indirect' sequence. It is shown, that the two sequences, despite their similarities, exhibit very...... performances are compared for minimal impurities in both products, where the direct sequence exhibits output multiplicity, while the indirect sequence exhibits state multiplicity. The latter multiplicity may be avoided by accepting a slightly increased impurity in the ethanol product. Copyright (C) 1998 IFAC....

  8. On Inclusion Relations between Some Sequence Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Çolak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We determine the relations between the classes S^λ of almost λ-statistically convergent sequences and the relations between the classes V^,λ of strongly almost V,λ-summable sequences for various sequences λ, μ in the class Λ. Furthermore we also give the relations between the classes S^λ of almost λ-statistically convergent sequences and the classes V^,λ of strongly almost V,λ-summable sequences for various sequences λ,μ∈Λ.

  9. Bernoulli measure of complex admissible kneading sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Bruin, Henk

    2012-01-01

    Iterated quadratic polynomials give rise to a rich collection of different dynamical systems that are parametrized by a simple complex parameter $c$. The different dynamical features are encoded by the \\emph{kneading sequence} which is an infinite sequence over $\\{0,\\1\\}$. Not every such sequence actually occurs in complex dynamics. The set of admissible kneading sequences was described by Milnor and Thurston for real quadratic polynomials, and by the authors in the complex case. We prove that the set of admissible kneading sequences has positive Bernoulli measure within the set of sequences over $\\{0,\\1\\}$.

  10. Modified Genetic Algorithm for DNA Sequence Assembly by Shotgun and Hybridization Sequencing Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prof.Narayan Kumar Sahu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the advent of rapid DNA sequencing methods in 1976, scientists have had the problem of inferring DNA sequences from sequenced fragments. Shotgun sequencing is a well-established biological and computational method used in practice. Many conventional algorithms for shotgun sequencing are based on the notion of pair wise fragment overlap. While shotgun sequencing infers a DNA sequence given the sequences of overlapping fragments, a recent and complementary method, called sequencing by hybridization (SBH, infers a DNA sequence given the set of oligomers that represents all sub words of some fixed length, k. In this paper, we propose a new computer algorithm for DNA sequence assembly that combines in a novel way the techniques of both shotgun and SBH methods. Based on our preliminary investigations, the algorithm promises- to be very fast and practical for DNA sequence assembly [1].

  11. Biomolecule Sequencer: Nanopore Sequencing Technology for In-Situ Environmental Monitoring and Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, K. K.; Botkin, D. J.; Burton, A. S.; Castro-Wallace, S. L.; Chaput, J. D.; Dworkin, J. P.; Lupisella, M. L.; Mason, C. E.; Rubins, K. H.; Smith, D. J.; Stahl, S.; Switzer, C.

    2016-10-01

    Biomolecule Sequencer will demonstrate, for the first time, that DNA sequencing is feasible as a tool for in-situ environmental monitoring and astrobiology. A space-based sequencer could identify microbes, diseases, and help detect DNA-based life.

  12. Integration of retinal image sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballerini, Lucia

    1998-10-01

    In this paper a method for noise reduction in ocular fundus image sequences is described. The eye is the only part of the human body where the capillary network can be observed along with the arterial and venous circulation using a non invasive technique. The study of the retinal vessels is very important both for the study of the local pathology (retinal disease) and for the large amount of information it offers on systematic haemodynamics, such as hypertension, arteriosclerosis, and diabetes. In this paper a method for image integration of ocular fundus image sequences is described. The procedure can be divided in two step: registration and fusion. First we describe an automatic alignment algorithm for registration of ocular fundus images. In order to enhance vessel structures, we used a spatially oriented bank of filters designed to match the properties of the objects of interest. To evaluate interframe misalignment we adopted a fast cross-correlation algorithm. The performances of the alignment method have been estimated by simulating shifts between image pairs and by using a cross-validation approach. Then we propose a temporal integration technique of image sequences so as to compute enhanced pictures of the overall capillary network. Image registration is combined with image enhancement by fusing subsequent frames of a same region. To evaluate the attainable results, the signal-to-noise ratio was estimated before and after integration. Experimental results on synthetic images of vessel-like structures with different kind of Gaussian additive noise as well as on real fundus images are reported.

  13. Discrete low-discrepancy sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Angel, Omer; Martin, James B; Propp, James

    2009-01-01

    Holroyd and Propp used Hall's marriage theorem to show that, given a probability distribution pi on a finite set S, there exists an infinite sequence s_1,s_2,... in S such that for all integers k >= 1 and all s in S, the number of i in [1,k] with s_i = s differs from k pi(s) by at most 1. We prove a generalization of this result using a simple explicit algorithm. A special case of this algorithm yields an extension of Holroyd and Propp's result to the case of discrete probability distributions on infinite sets.

  14. Infinite matrices and sequence spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Cooke, Richard G

    2014-01-01

    This clear and correct summation of basic results from a specialized field focuses on the behavior of infinite matrices in general, rather than on properties of special matrices. Three introductory chapters guide students to the manipulation of infinite matrices, covering definitions and preliminary ideas, reciprocals of infinite matrices, and linear equations involving infinite matrices.From the fourth chapter onward, the author treats the application of infinite matrices to the summability of divergent sequences and series from various points of view. Topics include consistency, mutual consi

  15. Asymptotics of Lagged Fibonacci Sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Mertens, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    Consider "lagged" Fibonacci sequences $a(n) = a(n-1)+a(\\lfloor n/k\\rfloor)$ for $k > 1$. We show that $\\lim_{n\\to\\infty} a(kn)/a(n)\\cdot\\ln n/n = k\\ln k$ and we demonstrate the slow numerical convergence to this limit and how to deal with this slow convergence. We also discuss the connection between two classical results of N.G. de Bruijn and K. Mahler on the asymptotics of $a(n)$.

  16. Infrared Focal Plane Arrays Based on Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    studied in the framework of this, including the collaborating researchers in each of them, are detailed below: 1. “Ultra Small InAs/GaInP/ InP Quantum Dots ”: with...of detectors, which will be attached to Si based signal processors. D:\\FINAL REPORT.doc 4 Part 1 Ultra Small InAs/GaInP/ InP Quantum Dots The heights of...an ensemble of self-assembled InAs/GaAs or InAs/ InP quantum dots (QDs) are typically in the range of 10-30 monolayers [1]. Here, we report on InAs

  17. Fluorescence detection in capillary arrays based on galvanometer step scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, G; Yeung, E S

    2001-10-01

    A computer-controlled galvanometer scanner is adapted for scanning a focused laser beam across a 96-capillary array for laser-induced fluorescence detection. The signal at a single photomultiplier tube is temporally sorted to distinguish among the capillaries. The limit of detection for fluoresceins is 3 x 10(-11) M (S/N = 3) for 5 mW of total laser power scanned at 4 Hz. The observed cross-talk among capillaries is 0.2%. Advantages include the efficient utilization of light due to the high duty-cycle of step scan, good detection performance due to the reduction of stray light, ruggedness due to the small mass of the galvanometer mirror, low cost due to the simplicity of components, and flexibility due to the independent paths for excitation and emission.

  18. DOA Estimation of Cylindrical Conformal Array Based on Geometric Algebra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minjie Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the variable curvature of the conformal carrier, the pattern of each element has a different direction. The traditional method of analyzing the conformal array is to use the Euler rotation angle and its matrix representation. However, it is computationally demanding especially for irregular array structures. In this paper, we present a novel algorithm by combining the geometric algebra with Multiple Signal Classification (MUSIC, termed as GA-MUSIC, to solve the direction of arrival (DOA for cylindrical conformal array. And on this basis, we derive the pattern and array manifold. Compared with the existing algorithms, our proposed one avoids the cumbersome matrix transformations and largely decreases the computational complexity. The simulation results verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  19. Field programmable gate array based data digitisation with commercial elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugur, C.; Koening, W.; Michel, J.; Palka, M.; Traxler, M.

    2013-01-01

    One of the most important aspects of particle identification experiments is the digitisation of time, amplitude and charge data from detectors. These conversions are mostly undertaken with Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs). However, recent developments in Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) technology allow us to use commercial electronic components for the required Front-End Electronics (FEE) and to do the digitisation in the FPGA. It is possible to do Time-of-Flight (ToF), Time-over-Threshold (ToT), amplitude and charge measurements with converters implemented in FPGA. We call this principle come & kiss: use COmplex ComMErcial Elements & Keep It Small and Simple.

  20. Time multiplexed pinhole array based lensless three-dimensional imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Ariel; Wang, Jingang; Shemer, Amir; Zalevsky, Zeev; Javidi, Bahram

    2016-06-01

    We present an overview of multi variable coded aperture (MVCA) for lensless three-dimensional integral imaging (3D II) systems. The new configuration is based on a time multiplexing method using a variable pinholes array design. The system provides higher resolution 3D images with improved light intensity and signal to noise ratio as compared to single pinhole system. The MVCA 3D II system configuration can be designed to achieve high light intensity for practical use as micro lenslets arrays. This new configuration preserves the advantages of pinhole optics while solving the resolution limitation problem and the long exposure time of such systems. The three dimensional images are obtained with improved resolution, signal to noise ratio and sensitivity efficiency. This integral imaging lensless system is characterized by large depth of focus, simplicity and low cost. In this paper we present numerical simulations as well as experimental results that validate the proposed lensless imaging configuration.

  1. Transparent and flexible force sensor array based on optical waveguide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngsung; Park, Suntak; Park, Seung Koo; Yun, Sungryul; Kyung, Ki-Uk; Sun, Kyung

    2012-06-18

    This paper suggests a force sensor array measuring contact force based on intensity change of light transmitted throughout optical waveguide. For transparency and flexibility of the sensor, two soft prepolymers with different refractive index have been developed. The optical waveguide consists of two cladding layers and a core layer. The top cladding layer is designed to allow light scattering at the specific area in response to finger contact. The force sensor shows a distinct tendency that output intensity decreases with input force and measurement range is from 0 to -13.2 dB.

  2. Development of Plastic Scintillator Detector Array Based on SPMT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU; Dan; ZHANG; Guo-guang; ZHAO; Xiao; FENG; Shu-qiang; ZHANG; Shuai

    2015-01-01

    Silicon photoelectric multiplier tuber(SPMT)is made of silicon chip,which can collect weak optical signal(Fig.1).When visible light irradiates SPMT,SPMT can change optical signal to electrical signal.The electrical signal size can be obtained through detecting optical signal size.When putting plastic scintillator before

  3. Genome Sequences of Eight Morphologically Diverse Alphaproteobacteria▿

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Pamela J.B.; Kysela, David T.; Buechlein, Aaron; Hemmerich, Chris; Brun, Yves V

    2011-01-01

    The Alphaproteobacteriacomprise morphologically diverse bacteria, including many species of stalked bacteria. Here we announce the genome sequences of eight alphaproteobacteria, including the first genome sequences of species belonging to the genera Asticcacaulis, Hirschia, Hyphomicrobium, and Rhodomicrobium.

  4. Genome sequences of eight morphologically diverse Alphaproteobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Pamela J B; Kysela, David T; Buechlein, Aaron; Hemmerich, Chris; Brun, Yves V

    2011-09-01

    The Alphaproteobacteria comprise morphologically diverse bacteria, including many species of stalked bacteria. Here we announce the genome sequences of eight alphaproteobacteria, including the first genome sequences of species belonging to the genera Asticcacaulis, Hirschia, Hyphomicrobium, and Rhodomicrobium.

  5. Genome Sequences of Eight Morphologically Diverse Alphaproteobacteria▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Pamela J. B.; Kysela, David T.; Buechlein, Aaron; Hemmerich, Chris; Brun, Yves V.

    2011-01-01

    The Alphaproteobacteriacomprise morphologically diverse bacteria, including many species of stalked bacteria. Here we announce the genome sequences of eight alphaproteobacteria, including the first genome sequences of species belonging to the genera Asticcacaulis, Hirschia, Hyphomicrobium, and Rhodomicrobium. PMID:21705585

  6. On topological spaces possessing uniformly distributed sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Bogachev, V I

    2007-01-01

    Two classes of topological spaces are introduced on which every probability Radon measure possesses a uniformly distributed sequence or a uniformly tight uniformly distributed sequence. It is shown that these classes are stable under multiplication by completely regular Souslin spaces

  7. The Art of Gymnastics: Creating Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovegno, Inez

    1988-01-01

    Offering students opportunities for creating movement sequences in gymnastics allows them to understand the essence of gymnastics, have creative experiences, and learn about themselves. The process of creating sequences is described. (MT)

  8. FOGSAA: Fast Optimal Global Sequence Alignment Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Angana; Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra

    2013-04-01

    In this article we propose a Fast Optimal Global Sequence Alignment Algorithm, FOGSAA, which aligns a pair of nucleotide/protein sequences faster than any optimal global alignment method including the widely used Needleman-Wunsch (NW) algorithm. FOGSAA is applicable for all types of sequences, with any scoring scheme, and with or without affine gap penalty. Compared to NW, FOGSAA achieves a time gain of (70-90)% for highly similar nucleotide sequences (> 80% similarity), and (54-70)% for sequences having (30-80)% similarity. For other sequences, it terminates with an approximate score. For protein sequences, the average time gain is between (25-40)%. Compared to three heuristic global alignment methods, the quality of alignment is improved by about 23%-53%. FOGSAA is, in general, suitable for aligning any two sequences defined over a finite alphabet set, where the quality of the global alignment is of supreme importance.

  9. On Paranorm Zweier -Convergent Sequence Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vakeel A. Khan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce the paranorm Zweier -convergent sequence spaces , , and , a sequence of positive real numbers. We study some topological properties, prove the decomposition theorem, and study some inclusion relations on these spaces.

  10. On General Fibonacci Sequences in Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Özkan, Engin

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we have constituted 3-step general Fibonacci sequences in a nilpotent group with exponent p (p is a prime number) and nilpotency class 4 and given formulas to find the a term of the sequence.

  11. Cross-correlation properties of cyclotomic sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, Kai; Zheng, Zhiming

    2009-01-01

    Sequences with good correlation properties are widely used in engineering applications, especially in the area of communications. Among the known sequences, cyclotomic families have the optimal autocorrelation property. In this paper, we decide the cross-correlation function of the known cyclotomic sequences completely. Moreover, to get our results, the relations between the multiplier group and the decimations of the characteristic sequence are also established for an arbitrary difference set.

  12. Information Analysis of DNA Sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Mohammed, Riyazuddin

    2010-01-01

    The problem of differentiating the informational content of coding (exons) and non-coding (introns) regions of a DNA sequence is one of the central problems of genomics. The introns are estimated to be nearly 95% of the DNA and since they do not seem to participate in the process of transcription of amino-acids, they have been termed "junk DNA." Although it is believed that the non-coding regions in genomes have no role in cell growth and evolution, demonstration that these regions carry useful information would tend to falsify this belief. In this paper, we consider entropy as a measure of information by modifying the entropy expression to take into account the varying length of these sequences. Exons are usually much shorter in length than introns; therefore the comparison of the entropy values needs to be normalized. A length correction strategy was employed using randomly generated nucleonic base strings built out of the alphabet of the same size as the exons under question. Our analysis shows that intron...

  13. Strong sequences and independent sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Jureczko

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A family $\\mathcal{S} \\in \\mathcal{P}(\\omega$ is \\textit{an independent family} if for each pair $\\mathcal{A, B}$ of disjoint finite subsets of $\\mathcal{S}$ the set $\\bigcap \\mathcal{A} \\cap (\\omega \\setminus \\bigcup \\mathcal{B}$ is nonempty. The fact that there is an independent family on $\\omega$ of size continuum was proved by Fichtenholz and Kantorowicz in \\cite{FK}. If we substitute $\\mathcal{P}(\\omega$ by a set $(X, r$ with arbitrary relation \\textit{r} it is natural question about existence and length of an independent set on $(X, r$. In this paper special assumptions of such existence will be considered. On the other hand in 60s' of the last century the strong sequences method was introduced by Efimov. He used it for proving some famous theorems in dyadic spaces like: Marczewski theorem on cellularity, Shanin theorem on a calibre, Esenin-Volpin theorem and others. In this paper there will be considered: length of strong sequences, the length of independent sets and other well known cardinal invariants and there will be examined inequalities among them.

  14. Sequence Analysis in Demographic Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Billari, Francesco C.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available EnglishThis paper examines the salient features of sequence analysis in demogrpahicresearch. The new approach allows a holistic perspective on life course analysis and is based on arepresentation of lives as sequences of states. Some of the methods for analyzing such data aresketched, from complex description to optimal matching ot monoethetic divisive algorithms. Afer ashort ilustration of a demographically-relevant example, the needs in terms of data collection and theopportunities of applying the same aproach to synthetic data are discussed.FrenchOn examine ici les principaux éléments de l’analyse par séquence endémographie. Cette nouvelle technique permet une perspective unifiée del’analyse du cours de la vie, en représentant la vie comme une série d’états.Certaines des méthodes pour de telles analyses sont décrites, en commençant parla description complexe, pour considérer ensuite les alignements optimales, etles algorithmes de division. Après un court exemple en démographie, onconsidère les besoins en données et les possibilités d’application aux donnéessynthétique.

  15. Hardware Acceleration of Bioinformatics Sequence Alignment Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hasan, L.

    2011-01-01

    Biological sequence alignment is an important and challenging task in bioinformatics. Alignment may be defined as an arrangement of two or more DNA or protein sequences to highlight the regions of their similarity. Sequence alignment is used to infer the evolutionary relationship between a set of pr

  16. Incidental Sequence Learning across the Lifespan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiermann, Brigitte; Meier, Beat

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate incidental sequence learning across the lifespan. We tested 50 children (aged 7-16), 50 young adults (aged 20-30), and 50 older adults (aged >65) with a sequence learning paradigm that involved both a task and a response sequence. After several blocks of practice, all age groups slowed down…

  17. Comparative genomics beyond sequence-based alignments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Þórarinsson, Elfar; Yao, Zizhen; Wiklund, Eric D.;

    2008-01-01

    Recent computational scans for non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) in multiple organisms have relied on existing multiple sequence alignments. However, as sequence similarity drops, a key signal of RNA structure--frequent compensating base changes--is increasingly likely to cause sequence-based alignment me...

  18. PacBio Sequencing and Its Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anthony Rhoads; Kin Fai Au

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule, real-time sequencing developed by Pacific BioSciences offers longer read lengths than the second-generation sequencing (SGS) technologies, making it well-suited for unsolved problems in genome, transcriptome, and epigenetics research. The highly-contiguous de novo assemblies using PacBio sequencing can close gaps in current reference assemblies and characterize structural variation (SV) in personal genomes. With longer reads, we can sequence through extended repetitive regions and detect mutations, many of which are associated with dis-eases. Moreover, PacBio transcriptome sequencing is advantageous for the identification of gene isoforms and facilitates reliable discoveries of novel genes and novel isoforms of annotated genes, due to its ability to sequence full-length transcripts or fragments with significant lengths. Addition-ally, PacBio’s sequencing technique provides information that is useful for the direct detection of base modifications, such as methylation. In addition to using PacBio sequencing alone, many hybrid sequencing strategies have been developed to make use of more accurate short reads in conjunction with PacBio long reads. In general, hybrid sequencing strategies are more affordable and scalable especially for small-size laboratories than using PacBio Sequencing alone. The advent of PacBio sequencing has made available much information that could not be obtained via SGS alone.

  19. The recurrence sequence via the Fibonacci groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aküzüm, Yeşim; Deveci, Ömür

    2016-04-01

    This work develops properties of the recurrence sequence defined by the aid of the relation matrix of the Fibonacci groups. The study of this sequence modulo m yields cyclic groups and semigroups from generating matrix. Finally, we extend the sequence defined to groups and then, we obtain its period in the Fibonacci groups.

  20. RNAome sequencing delineates the complete RNA landscape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.W.J. Derks (Kasper); J. Pothof (Joris)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractStandard RNA expression profiling methods rely on enrichment steps for specific RNA classes, thereby not detecting all RNA species. For example, small and large RNAs from the same sample cannot be sequenced in a single sequence run. We designed RNAome sequencing, which is a strand-specif

  1. Tidying up international nucleotide sequence databases: ecological, geographical and sequence quality annotation of its sequences of mycorrhizal fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leho Tedersoo

    Full Text Available Sequence analysis of the ribosomal RNA operon, particularly the internal transcribed spacer (ITS region, provides a powerful tool for identification of mycorrhizal fungi. The sequence data deposited in the International Nucleotide Sequence Databases (INSD are, however, unfiltered for quality and are often poorly annotated with metadata. To detect chimeric and low-quality sequences and assign the ectomycorrhizal fungi to phylogenetic lineages, fungal ITS sequences were downloaded from INSD, aligned within family-level groups, and examined through phylogenetic analyses and BLAST searches. By combining the fungal sequence database UNITE and the annotation and search tool PlutoF, we also added metadata from the literature to these accessions. Altogether 35,632 sequences belonged to mycorrhizal fungi or originated from ericoid and orchid mycorrhizal roots. Of these sequences, 677 were considered chimeric and 2,174 of low read quality. Information detailing country of collection, geographical coordinates, interacting taxon and isolation source were supplemented to cover 78.0%, 33.0%, 41.7% and 96.4% of the sequences, respectively. These annotated sequences are publicly available via UNITE (http://unite.ut.ee/ for downstream biogeographic, ecological and taxonomic analyses. In European Nucleotide Archive (ENA; http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ena/, the annotated sequences have a special link-out to UNITE. We intend to expand the data annotation to additional genes and all taxonomic groups and functional guilds of fungi.

  2. Exome sequencing: what clinicians need to know

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sastre L

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Leandro SastreInstituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas, CSIC/UAM, C/Arturo Duperier 4, Madrid, Spain; Terapias Experimentales y Biomarcadores en Cáncer, IdiPaz, Madrid, Spain; CIBER de Enfermedades Raras, CIBERER, Valencia, SpainAbstract: The recent development of high throughput methods of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA sequencing has made it possible to determine individual genome sequences and their specific variations. A region of particular interest is the protein-coding part of the genome, or exome, which is composed of gene exons. The principles of exome purification and sequencing will be described in this review, as well as analyses of the data generated. Results will be discussed in terms of their possible functional and clinical significance. The advantages and limitations of exome sequencing will be compared to those of other massive sequencing approaches such as whole-genome sequencing, ribonucleic acid sequencing or selected DNA sequencing. Exome sequencing has been used recently in the study of various diseases. Monogenic diseases with Mendelian inheritance are among these, but studies have also been carried out on genetic variations that represent risk factors for complex diseases. Cancer is another intensive area for exome sequencing studies. Several examples of the use of exome sequencing in the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of these diseases will be described. Finally, remaining challenges and some practical and ethical considerations for the clinical application of exome sequencing will be discussed.Keywords: massively parallel sequencing, RNA sequencing, whole-genome sequencing, genetic variants, molecular diagnosis, pharmacogenomics, personalized medicine, NGS, SGS, SNP, SNV

  3. Value of a newly sequenced bacterial genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbosa, Eudes; Aburjaile, Flavia F; Ramos, Rommel Tj;

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have made high-throughput sequencing available to medium- and small-size laboratories, culminating in a tidal wave of genomic information. The quantity of sequenced bacterial genomes has not only brought excitement to the field of genomics but also...... in an exponential increase in draft (partial data) genome deposits in public databases. If no further interests are expressed for a particular bacterial genome, it is more likely that the sequencing of its genome will be limited to a draft stage, and the painstaking tasks of completing the sequencing of its genome...

  4. MatrixPlot: visualizing sequence constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorodkin, Jan; Stærfeldt, Hans Henrik; Lund, Ole

    1999-01-01

    MatrixPlot: visualizing sequence constraints. Sub-title Abstract Summary : MatrixPlot is a program for making high-quality matrix plots, such as mutual information plots of sequence alignments and distance matrices of sequences with known three-dimensional coordinates. The user can add information...... about the sequences (e.g. a sequence logo profile) along the edges of the plot, as well as zoom in on any region in the plot. Availability : MatrixPlot can be obtained on request, and can also be accessed online at http://www. cbs.dtu.dk/services/MatrixPlot. Contact : gorodkin@cbs.dtu.dk...

  5. Chip-based sequencing nucleic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Neil Reginald

    2014-08-26

    A system for fast DNA sequencing by amplification of genetic material within microreactors, denaturing, demulsifying, and then sequencing the material, while retaining it in a PCR/sequencing zone by a magnetic field. One embodiment includes sequencing nucleic acids on a microchip that includes a microchannel flow channel in the microchip. The nucleic acids are isolated and hybridized to magnetic nanoparticles or to magnetic polystyrene-coated beads. Microreactor droplets are formed in the microchannel flow channel. The microreactor droplets containing the nucleic acids and the magnetic nanoparticles are retained in a magnetic trap in the microchannel flow channel and sequenced.

  6. Permutation Entropy for Random Binary Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingfeng Liu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we generalize the permutation entropy (PE measure to binary sequences, which is based on Shannon’s entropy, and theoretically analyze this measure for random binary sequences. We deduce the theoretical value of PE for random binary sequences, which can be used to measure the randomness of binary sequences. We also reveal the relationship between this PE measure with other randomness measures, such as Shannon’s entropy and Lempel–Ziv complexity. The results show that PE is consistent with these two measures. Furthermore, we use PE as one of the randomness measures to evaluate the randomness of chaotic binary sequences.

  7. Computing with Hereditarily Finite Sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Tarau, Paul

    2011-01-01

    e use Prolog as a flexible meta-language to provide executable specifications of some fundamental mathematical objects and their transformations. In the process, isomorphisms are unraveled between natural numbers and combinatorial objects (rooted ordered trees representing hereditarily finite sequences and rooted ordered binary trees representing G\\"odel's System {\\bf T} types). This paper focuses on an application that can be seen as an unexpected "paradigm shift": we provide recursive definitions showing that the resulting representations are directly usable to perform symbolically arbitrary-length integer computations. Besides the theoretically interesting fact of "breaking the arithmetic/symbolic barrier", the arithmetic operations performed with symbolic objects like trees or types turn out to be genuinely efficient -- we derive implementations with asymptotic performance comparable to ordinary bitstring implementations of arbitrary-length integer arithmetic. The source code of the paper, organized as a ...

  8. [DNA sequencing technology and automatization of it].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraev, A S

    1991-01-01

    Precise manipulations with genetic material, typical for modern experiments in molecular biology and in new biotechnology, require a capability to determine DNA base sequence. This capability enables today to exploit specific genetic knowledge for the dissection of complex cell processes and for modulation of cell metabolism in transgenic organisms. The review focuses on such DNA sequencing technologies that are widespread in general laboratory practice. They can safely be called, with the availability of commercial reagents, industrial techniques. Modern DNA sequencing requires recurrent breakdown of large genomic DNA into smaller pieces, that are then amplified, sequenced and the initial long stretch reconstructed via overlap of small pieces. The DNA sequencing process has several steps: a DNA fragment is obtained in sufficient quantity and purity, it is converted to a form suitable for a particular sequencing method, a sequencing reaction is performed and its products fractionated; and finally the resultant data are interpreted (i.e. an autoradiograph is read into a computer memory) and a long sequence in reconstructed via overlap of short stretches. These steps are considered in separate parts; an accent is made on sequencing strategies with respect to their biological task. In the last part, possibilities for automation of sequencing experiment are considered, followed by a discussion of domestic problems in DNA sequencing.

  9. Design of Digital Hybrid Chaotic Sequence Generator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RAO Nini; ZENG Dong

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of the hybrid chaotic sequences as the spreading codes in code divided multiple access(CDMA) system is analyzed.The design and realization of the digital hybrid chaotic sequence generator by very high speed integrated circuit hardware description language(VHDL) are described.A valid hazard canceledl method is presented.Computer simulations show that the stable digital sequence waveforms can be produced.The correlations of the digital hybrid chaotic sequences are compared with those of m-sequences.The results show that the correlations of the digital hybrid chaotic sequences are almost as good as those of m-sequences.The works in this paper explored a road for the practical applications of chaos.

  10. Prenatal diagnosis of a fetus with partial trisomy 8p resulting from a balanced maternal translocation by array-based comparative genomic hybridization%微阵列比较基因组杂交技术产前诊断母源性8p部分三体胎儿一例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭彩琴; 王峻峰; 赵丽; 刘俊; 王俊; 肖建平

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the karyotype of a fetus with transverse aortic arch hypoplasia,and to investigate the feasibility of array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) for molecular genetic diagnosis.Methods G-banding was performed to analyze the karyotypes of the fetus and its parents,and array CGH was applied to identify the chromosomal abnormality of the fetus.Results G-banding analysis revealed that the pregnant woman has carried a balanced translocation 46,XX,t(8;16) (p21;q24),while the fetus has carried an unbalanced translocation 46,XX,der(16)t(8;16)(p21;q24)mat.Array-CGH analysis suggested that the derivative chromosomal fragment has originated from 8p with breakpoints in 8p23.3 p21.3.Conclusion Trisomy 8p23.3-p21.3 may have predisposed to transverse aortic arch hypoplasia in the fetus.Parental karyotype analysis could help to characterize the translocation and evaluate the recurrent risk.Compared with routine karyotype analysis,aCGH has a higher resolution and greater accuracy for mapping chromosomal aberrations.%目的 确定1例主动脉横弓发育不良胎儿的染色体核型,探讨微阵列比较基因组杂交(array based comparative genomic hybridization,array-CGH)技术在分子遗传学及产前诊断中的应用及优越性.方法 应用G显带分析胎儿及其父母的染色体核型,用array-CGH技术明确胎儿衍生染色体片段的来源和区域.结果 G显带染色体分析显示孕妇为46,XX,t(8;16)(p21;q24)平衡易位携带者,胎儿携带46,XX,der(16)t(8;16) (p21;q24)mat的非平衡易位.array-CGH检测证实胎儿衍生染色体片段源自8号染色体短臂,患儿为8p23.3 p21.3三体患儿.结论 胎儿的异常表型(主动脉横弓发育不良)与8p23.3p21.3三体密切相关,父母染色体分析可帮助明确易位性质及来源,从而有利于评估再发风险.array-CGH在染色体异常分析中具有更高的分辨率和准确性.

  11. Assembly Sequence Planning for Mechanical Products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    A method for assembly sequence planning is proposed in this paper. First, two methods for assembly sequence planning are compared, which are indirect method and direct method. Then, the limits of the previous assembly planning system are pointed out. On the basis of indirect method, an improved method for assembly sequence planning is put forward. This method is composed of four parts, which are assembly modeling for products, assembly sequence representing, assembly sequence planning, and evaluation and optimization. The assembly model is established by human machine interaction, and the assembly model contains components' information and the assembly relation among the components. The assembly sequence planning is based on the breaking up of the assembly model. And/or graph is used to represent assembly sequence set. Every component which satisfies the disassembly condition is recorded as a node of an and/or graph. After the disassembly sequence and/or graph is generated, heuristic algorithm - AO* algorithm is used to search the disassembly sequence and/or graph, and the optimum assembly sequence planning is realized. This method is proved to be effective in a prototype system which is a sub-project of a state 863/CIMS research project of China - ‘Concurrent Engineering’.

  12. Randomness in Sequence Evolution Increases over Time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangyu Wang

    Full Text Available The second law of thermodynamics states that entropy, as a measure of randomness in a system, increases over time. Although studies have investigated biological sequence randomness from different aspects, it remains unknown whether sequence randomness changes over time and whether this change consists with the second law of thermodynamics. To capture the dynamics of randomness in molecular sequence evolution, here we detect sequence randomness based on a collection of eight statistical random tests and investigate the randomness variation of coding sequences with an application to Escherichia coli. Given that core/essential genes are more ancient than specific/non-essential genes, our results clearly show that core/essential genes are more random than specific/non-essential genes and accordingly indicate that sequence randomness indeed increases over time, consistent well with the second law of thermodynamics. We further find that an increase in sequence randomness leads to increasing randomness of GC content and longer sequence length. Taken together, our study presents an important finding, for the first time, that sequence randomness increases over time, which may provide profound insights for unveiling the underlying mechanisms of molecular sequence evolution.

  13. Comparison of sequence reads obtained from three next-generation sequencing platforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingo Suzuki

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing technologies enable the rapid cost-effective production of sequence data. To evaluate the performance of these sequencing technologies, investigation of the quality of sequence reads obtained from these methods is important. In this study, we analyzed the quality of sequence reads and SNP detection performance using three commercially available next-generation sequencers, i.e., Roche Genome Sequencer FLX System (FLX, Illumina Genome Analyzer (GA, and Applied Biosystems SOLiD system (SOLiD. A common genomic DNA sample obtained from Escherichia coli strain DH1 was applied to these sequencers. The obtained sequence reads were aligned to the complete genome sequence of E. coli DH1, to evaluate the accuracy and sequence bias of these sequence methods. We found that the fraction of "junk" data, which could not be aligned to the reference genome, was largest in the data set of SOLiD, in which about half of reads could not be aligned. Among data sets after alignment to the reference, sequence accuracy was poorest in GA data sets, suggesting relatively low fidelity of the elongation reaction in the GA method. Furthermore, by aligning the sequence reads to the E. coli strain W3110, we screened sequence differences between two E. coli strains using data sets of three different next-generation platforms. The results revealed that the detected sequence differences were similar among these three methods, while the sequence coverage required for the detection was significantly small in the FLX data set. These results provided valuable information on the quality of short sequence reads and the performance of SNP detection in three next-generation sequencing platforms.

  14. Pareto optimal pairwise sequence alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRonne, Kevin W; Karypis, George

    2013-01-01

    Sequence alignment using evolutionary profiles is a commonly employed tool when investigating a protein. Many profile-profile scoring functions have been developed for use in such alignments, but there has not yet been a comprehensive study of Pareto optimal pairwise alignments for combining multiple such functions. We show that the problem of generating Pareto optimal pairwise alignments has an optimal substructure property, and develop an efficient algorithm for generating Pareto optimal frontiers of pairwise alignments. All possible sets of two, three, and four profile scoring functions are used from a pool of 11 functions and applied to 588 pairs of proteins in the ce_ref data set. The performance of the best objective combinations on ce_ref is also evaluated on an independent set of 913 protein pairs extracted from the BAliBASE RV11 data set. Our dynamic-programming-based heuristic approach produces approximated Pareto optimal frontiers of pairwise alignments that contain comparable alignments to those on the exact frontier, but on average in less than 1/58th the time in the case of four objectives. Our results show that the Pareto frontiers contain alignments whose quality is better than the alignments obtained by single objectives. However, the task of identifying a single high-quality alignment among those in the Pareto frontier remains challenging.

  15. Continued fractions and heavy sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Boshernitzan, Michael

    2009-01-01

    We initiate the study of the sets $H(c)$, $0=x-[x]$ stands for the fractional part of $x\\in \\mathbb R$. We prove that, for rational $c$, the sets $H(c)$ are of positive Hausdorff dimension and, in particular, are uncountable. For integers $m\\geq1$, we obtain a surprising characterization of the numbers $\\alpha\\in H_m= H(\\frac1m)$ in terms of their continued fraction expansions: The odd entries (partial quotients) of these expansions are divisible by $m$. The characterization implies that $x\\in H_m$ if and only if $\\frac 1{mx} \\in H_m$, for $x>0$. We are unaware of a direct proof of this equivalence, without making a use of the mentioned characterization of the sets $H_m$. We also introduce the dual sets $\\hat H_m$ of reals $y$ for which the sequence of integers $\\big([ky]\\big)_{k\\geq1}$ consistently hits the set $m\\mathbb Z$ with the at least expected frequency $\\frac1m$ and establish the connection with the sets $H_m$: {2mm} If $xy=m$ for $x,y>0$, then $x\\in H_m$ if and only if $y\\in \\hat H_m$. The motivatio...

  16. Predicting Contextual Sequences via Submodular Function Maximization

    CERN Document Server

    Dey, Debadeepta; Hebert, Martial; Bagnell, J Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Sequence optimization, where the items in a list are ordered to maximize some reward has many applications such as web advertisement placement, search, and control libraries in robotics. Previous work in sequence optimization produces a static ordering that does not take any features of the item or context of the problem into account. In this work, we propose a general approach to order the items within the sequence based on the context (e.g., perceptual information, environment description, and goals). We take a simple, efficient, reduction-based approach where the choice and order of the items is established by repeatedly learning simple classifiers or regressors for each "slot" in the sequence. Our approach leverages recent work on submodular function maximization to provide a formal regret reduction from submodular sequence optimization to simple cost-sensitive prediction. We apply our contextual sequence prediction algorithm to optimize control libraries and demonstrate results on two robotics problems: ...

  17. Evolutionarily conserved sequences on human chromosome 21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazer, Kelly A.; Sheehan, John B.; Stokowski, Renee P.; Chen, Xiyin; Hosseini, Roya; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Fodor, Stephen P.A.; Cox, David R.; Patil, Nila

    2001-09-01

    Comparison of human sequences with the DNA of other mammals is an excellent means of identifying functional elements in the human genome. Here we describe the utility of high-density oligonucleotide arrays as a rapid approach for comparing human sequences with the DNA of multiple species whose sequences are not presently available. High-density arrays representing approximately 22.5 Mb of nonrepetitive human chromosome 21 sequence were synthesized and then hybridized with mouse and dog DNA to identify sequences conserved between humans and mice (human-mouse elements) and between humans and dogs (human-dog elements). Our data show that sequence comparison of multiple species provides a powerful empiric method for identifying actively conserved elements in the human genome. A large fraction of these evolutionarily conserved elements are present in regions on chromosome 21 that do not encode known genes.

  18. Sequencing intractable DNA to close microbial genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A Hurt

    Full Text Available Advancement in high throughput DNA sequencing technologies has supported a rapid proliferation of microbial genome sequencing projects, providing the genetic blueprint for in-depth studies. Oftentimes, difficult to sequence regions in microbial genomes are ruled "intractable" resulting in a growing number of genomes with sequence gaps deposited in databases. A procedure was developed to sequence such problematic regions in the "non-contiguous finished" Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 genome (6 intractable gaps and the Desulfovibrio africanus genome (1 intractable gap. The polynucleotides surrounding each gap formed GC rich secondary structures making the regions refractory to amplification and sequencing. Strand-displacing DNA polymerases used in concert with a novel ramped PCR extension cycle supported amplification and closure of all gap regions in both genomes. The developed procedures support accurate gene annotation, and provide a step-wise method that reduces the effort required for genome finishing.

  19. Some fundamenltal problems in outcrop sequence stratigraphy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王训练

    1999-01-01

    Some fundamental problems in outcrop sequence stratigraphy are discussed, and the following ideas are obtained: (i) Detailed sedimentary facies analysis and study on stacking pattern of parasequences, careful and accurate study of biostratigraphy, and stratigraphical correlation of different facies areas are the essential conditions for proper identification of sequences. (ii) The first flooding surface may be an ideal sequence boundary in outcrop sequence stratigraphy, where the most distinct palaeontological and sedimentary changes take place and make the surface readily recognizable in outcrop. (iii) The distribution in space, specially in different facies belts, is regarded as an important criterion for defining and recognizing the various orders of sequences. The third-order sequence is probably global in nature , which may be discerned in various depositional facies belts at least on one continental margin, and can be correlated over long distances, sometimes worldwide. (iv) The first flooding surf

  20. Application of ecostratigraphy to sequences tratigraphy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    殷鸿福; 童金南; 张克信; 吴顺宝

    1997-01-01

    The results of ecostratigraphy can directly serve sequence stratigraphy. The habitat type curve is useful not only in the analysis of sequences and parasequences, but also in demonstration of the process of regional sea level change. The various biological surfaces usually coincide with or relate to the boundaries of sequences or system tracts. The ecostratigraphic framework composed of coenozones, community sequences and ecotracts with good timing completely corresponds to the sequence stratigraphic framework of the sedimentary basin. Therefore, through establishment of the habitat type curve in individual section, recognition of the various biological surfaces, regional ecostratigraphic correlation and the formation of an ecostratigraphic framework of the sedimentary basin, ecostratigraphy plays an important role in the study of sequence stratigraphy and the reconstruction of regional and even global sea level changes.

  1. Sequencing intractable DNA to close microbial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, Richard A; Brown, Steven D; Podar, Mircea; Palumbo, Anthony V; Elias, Dwayne A

    2012-01-01

    Advancement in high throughput DNA sequencing technologies has supported a rapid proliferation of microbial genome sequencing projects, providing the genetic blueprint for in-depth studies. Oftentimes, difficult to sequence regions in microbial genomes are ruled "intractable" resulting in a growing number of genomes with sequence gaps deposited in databases. A procedure was developed to sequence such problematic regions in the "non-contiguous finished" Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 genome (6 intractable gaps) and the Desulfovibrio africanus genome (1 intractable gap). The polynucleotides surrounding each gap formed GC rich secondary structures making the regions refractory to amplification and sequencing. Strand-displacing DNA polymerases used in concert with a novel ramped PCR extension cycle supported amplification and closure of all gap regions in both genomes. The developed procedures support accurate gene annotation, and provide a step-wise method that reduces the effort required for genome finishing.

  2. Comparison of next-generation sequencing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Li, Yinhu; Li, Siliang; Hu, Ni; He, Yimin; Pong, Ray; Lin, Danni; Lu, Lihua; Law, Maggie

    2012-01-01

    With fast development and wide applications of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, genomic sequence information is within reach to aid the achievement of goals to decode life mysteries, make better crops, detect pathogens, and improve life qualities. NGS systems are typically represented by SOLiD/Ion Torrent PGM from Life Sciences, Genome Analyzer/HiSeq 2000/MiSeq from Illumina, and GS FLX Titanium/GS Junior from Roche. Beijing Genomics Institute (BGI), which possesses the world's biggest sequencing capacity, has multiple NGS systems including 137 HiSeq 2000, 27 SOLiD, one Ion Torrent PGM, one MiSeq, and one 454 sequencer. We have accumulated extensive experience in sample handling, sequencing, and bioinformatics analysis. In this paper, technologies of these systems are reviewed, and first-hand data from extensive experience is summarized and analyzed to discuss the advantages and specifics associated with each sequencing system. At last, applications of NGS are summarized.

  3. Preparing DNA libraries for multiplexed paired-end deep sequencing for Illumina GA sequencers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Mike S; Taylor, Ronald K

    2011-02-01

    Whole-genome sequencing, also known as deep sequencing, is becoming a more affordable and efficient way to identify SNP mutations, deletions, and insertions in DNA sequences across several different strains. Two major obstacles preventing the widespread use of deep sequencers are the costs involved in services used to prepare DNA libraries for sequencing and the overall accuracy of the sequencing data. This unit describes the preparation of DNA libraries for multiplexed paired-end sequencing using the Illumina GA series sequencer. Self-preparation of DNA libraries can help reduce overall expenses, especially if optimization is required for the different samples, and use of the Illumina GA Sequencer can improve the quality of the data.

  4. Identification of human chromosome 22 transcribed sequences with ORF expressed sequence tags

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Souza, S J; Camargo, A A; Briones, M R;

    2000-01-01

    by EST or full length cDNA sequences available in GenBank but not utilized in the initial annotation of the first human chromosome sequence. Thus despite representing less than 15% of all expressed human sequences in the public databases at the time of the present analysis, ORESTES sequences defined 48......Transcribed sequences in the human genome can be identified with confidence only by alignment with sequences derived from cDNAs synthesized from naturally occurring mRNAs. We constructed a set of 250,000 cDNAs that represent partial expressed gene sequences and that are biased toward the central...... coding regions of the resulting transcripts. They are termed ORF expressed sequence tags (ORESTES). The 250,000 ORESTES were assembled into 81,429 contigs. Of these, 1, 181 (1.45%) were found to match sequences in chromosome 22 with at least one ORESTES contig for 162 (65.6%) of the 247 known genes...

  5. cis sequence effects on gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobs Kevin

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequence and transcriptional variability within and between individuals are typically studied independently. The joint analysis of sequence and gene expression variation (genetical genomics provides insight into the role of linked sequence variation in the regulation of gene expression. We investigated the role of sequence variation in cis on gene expression (cis sequence effects in a group of genes commonly studied in cancer research in lymphoblastoid cell lines. We estimated the proportion of genes exhibiting cis sequence effects and the proportion of gene expression variation explained by cis sequence effects using three different analytical approaches, and compared our results to the literature. Results We generated gene expression profiling data at N = 697 candidate genes from N = 30 lymphoblastoid cell lines for this study and used available candidate gene resequencing data at N = 552 candidate genes to identify N = 30 candidate genes with sufficient variance in both datasets for the investigation of cis sequence effects. We used two additive models and the haplotype phylogeny scanning approach of Templeton (Tree Scanning to evaluate association between individual SNPs, all SNPs at a gene, and diplotypes, with log-transformed gene expression. SNPs and diplotypes at eight candidate genes exhibited statistically significant (p cis sequence effects in our study, respectively. Conclusion Based on analysis of our results and the extant literature, one in four genes exhibits significant cis sequence effects, and for these genes, about 30% of gene expression variation is accounted for by cis sequence variation. Despite diverse experimental approaches, the presence or absence of significant cis sequence effects is largely supported by previously published studies.

  6. Exome sequencing and genetic testing for MODY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Johansson

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Genetic testing for monogenic diabetes is important for patient care. Given the extensive genetic and clinical heterogeneity of diabetes, exome sequencing might provide additional diagnostic potential when standard Sanger sequencing-based diagnostics is inconclusive. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to examine the performance of exome sequencing for a molecular diagnosis of MODY in patients who have undergone conventional diagnostic sequencing of candidate genes with negative results. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We performed exome enrichment followed by high-throughput sequencing in nine patients with suspected MODY. They were Sanger sequencing-negative for mutations in the HNF1A, HNF4A, GCK, HNF1B and INS genes. We excluded common, non-coding and synonymous gene variants, and performed in-depth analysis on filtered sequence variants in a pre-defined set of 111 genes implicated in glucose metabolism. RESULTS: On average, we obtained 45 X median coverage of the entire targeted exome and found 199 rare coding variants per individual. We identified 0-4 rare non-synonymous and nonsense variants per individual in our a priori list of 111 candidate genes. Three of the variants were considered pathogenic (in ABCC8, HNF4A and PPARG, respectively, thus exome sequencing led to a genetic diagnosis in at least three of the nine patients. Approximately 91% of known heterozygous SNPs in the target exomes were detected, but we also found low coverage in some key diabetes genes using our current exome sequencing approach. Novel variants in the genes ARAP1, GLIS3, MADD, NOTCH2 and WFS1 need further investigation to reveal their possible role in diabetes. CONCLUSION: Our results demonstrate that exome sequencing can improve molecular diagnostics of MODY when used as a complement to Sanger sequencing. However, improvements will be needed, especially concerning coverage, before the full potential of exome sequencing can be realized.

  7. WEAK CONVERGENCE OF HENSTOCK INTEGRABLE SEQUENCES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LuisaDiPiazza

    1994-01-01

    Some relationships between pointwise and weak convergence of a sequence of Henstock integrable functions are studied, In particular it is provided an example of a sequence of Henstock integrable functions whose pointwise limit is different from the weak one. By introducing an asymptotic version of the Henstock equiintegrability notion it is given a necessary and sufficient condition in order that a pointwisely convergent sequence of Henstock integrable functions is weakly convergent to its pointwise limit.

  8. EGNAS: an exhaustive DNA sequence design algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kick Alfred

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The molecular recognition based on the complementary base pairing of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA is the fundamental principle in the fields of genetics, DNA nanotechnology and DNA computing. We present an exhaustive DNA sequence design algorithm that allows to generate sets containing a maximum number of sequences with defined properties. EGNAS (Exhaustive Generation of Nucleic Acid Sequences offers the possibility of controlling both interstrand and intrastrand properties. The guanine-cytosine content can be adjusted. Sequences can be forced to start and end with guanine or cytosine. This option reduces the risk of “fraying” of DNA strands. It is possible to limit cross hybridizations of a defined length, and to adjust the uniqueness of sequences. Self-complementarity and hairpin structures of certain length can be avoided. Sequences and subsequences can optionally be forbidden. Furthermore, sequences can be designed to have minimum interactions with predefined strands and neighboring sequences. Results The algorithm is realized in a C++ program. TAG sequences can be generated and combined with primers for single-base extension reactions, which were described for multiplexed genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Thereby, possible foldback through intrastrand interaction of TAG-primer pairs can be limited. The design of sequences for specific attachment of molecular constructs to DNA origami is presented. Conclusions We developed a new software tool called EGNAS for the design of unique nucleic acid sequences. The presented exhaustive algorithm allows to generate greater sets of sequences than with previous software and equal constraints. EGNAS is freely available for noncommercial use at http://www.chm.tu-dresden.de/pc6/EGNAS.

  9. Some properties of generalized Fibonacci sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Chin-Yoon; Ho, C. K.

    2015-12-01

    For all non-negative integer n and real constants a, b, p and q, the generalized Fibonacci sequence {U n } is defined by Un+2 = pUn+1 + qUn with the initial values U0 = a and U1 = b. Throughout the paper, we study some properties of the generalized Fibonacci sequence. Our results will motivate some new research problems concerning the contribution of the generalized sequence.

  10. Researches on Sequence of Plant Cystatin: Phytocystatin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QINQingfeng; HEWei; LIANGJun; ZHANGXingyao

    2005-01-01

    Plant cystatins or phytocystatins are cysteine proteinase inhibitors exist widely in different plant species. Because they can kill insects by inhibiting the digestive function of the cysteine proteinase in gut, they are believed to play an important role in plant's defense against pests. Phytocystatins contain the conserved QXVXG motif and show some features on their sequence different to animal cystatins.After sequencing the protein directly and the cDNA clone, a large number of plant cystatins have been characterized. A multialignment with BLAST software and a detail analysis of 38 phytocystatins show that phytocystatins possess a specific conserved amino acid sequence [LRVI]-[AGT]-[RQKE]-[FY]-[AS]-[VI]-X-[EGHDQV]-[HYFQ]-N different to the conserved sequence demonstrated by Margis in 1998. This conserved sequence can be enough to detect with exclusivity phytocystatin sequences on protein data banks. A classification of these phytocystatins is performed and they can be divided into 3 groups according to their features on amino acid sequence, and the group-I can be still divided into 3 subgroups based on the feature of their amino acid and genomic sequence. By the CLUSTALX software,the most conserved nucleotide sequences of phytocystatins were found, which could be used to design the degenerate premiers to search new phytocystatins with PCR reaction.

  11. Multiplexed microsatellite recovery using massively parallel sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, T N; Knaus, B J; Mullins, T D; Haig, S M; Cronn, R C

    2011-11-01

    Conservation and management of natural populations requires accurate and inexpensive genotyping methods. Traditional microsatellite, or simple sequence repeat (SSR), marker analysis remains a popular genotyping method because of the comparatively low cost of marker development, ease of analysis and high power of genotype discrimination. With the availability of massively parallel sequencing (MPS), it is now possible to sequence microsatellite-enriched genomic libraries in multiplex pools. To test this approach, we prepared seven microsatellite-enriched, barcoded genomic libraries from diverse taxa (two conifer trees, five birds) and sequenced these on one lane of the Illumina Genome Analyzer using paired-end 80-bp reads. In this experiment, we screened 6.1 million sequences and identified 356,958 unique microreads that contained di- or trinucleotide microsatellites. Examination of four species shows that our conversion rate from raw sequences to polymorphic markers compares favourably to Sanger- and 454-based methods. The advantage of multiplexed MPS is that the staggering capacity of modern microread sequencing is spread across many libraries; this reduces sample preparation and sequencing costs to less than $400 (USD) per species. This price is sufficiently low that microsatellite libraries could be prepared and sequenced for all 1373 organisms listed as 'threatened' and 'endangered' in the United States for under $0.5 M (USD).

  12. Locomotor sequence learning in visually guided walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Julia T; Jensen, Peter; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-04-01

    Voluntary limb modifications must be integrated with basic walking patterns during visually guided walking. In this study we tested whether voluntary gait modifications can become more automatic with practice. We challenged walking control by presenting visual stepping targets that instructed subjects to modify step length from one trial to the next. Our sequence learning paradigm is derived from the serial reaction-time (SRT) task that has been used in upper limb studies. Both random and ordered sequences of step lengths were used to measure sequence-specific and sequence-nonspecific learning during walking. In addition, we determined how age (i.e., healthy young adults vs. children) and biomechanical factors (i.e., walking speed) affected the rate and magnitude of locomotor sequence learning. The results showed that healthy young adults (age 24 ± 5 yr,n= 20) could learn a specific sequence of step lengths over 300 training steps. Younger children (age 6-10 yr,n= 8) had lower baseline performance, but their magnitude and rate of sequence learning were the same compared with those of older children (11-16 yr,n= 10) and healthy adults. In addition, learning capacity may be more limited at faster walking speeds. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that spatial sequence learning can be integrated with a highly automatic task such as walking. These findings suggest that adults and children use implicit knowledge about the sequence to plan and execute leg movement during visually guided walking.

  13. Detecting Emotions from Connected Action Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Daniel; Robinson, Peter

    In this paper we deal with the problem of detecting emotions from the body movements produced by naturally connected action sequences. Although action sequences are one of the most common forms of body motions in everyday scenarios their potential for emotion recognition has not been explored in the past. We show that there are fundamental differences between actions recorded in isolation and in natural sequences and demonstrate a number of techniques which allow us to correctly label action sequences with one of four emotions up to 86% of the time. Our results bring us an important step closer to recognizing emotions from body movements in natural scenarios.

  14. Recursive sequences in first-year calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainer, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    This article provides ready-to-use supplementary material on recursive sequences for a second-semester calculus class. It equips first-year calculus students with a basic methodical procedure based on which they can conduct a rigorous convergence or divergence analysis of many simple recursive sequences on their own without the need to invoke inductive arguments as is typically required in calculus textbooks. The sequences that are accessible to this kind of analysis are predominantly (eventually) monotonic, but also certain recursive sequences that alternate around their limit point as they converge can be considered.

  15. Visible periodicity of strong nucleosome DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Bilal; Tripathi, Vijay; Trifonov, Edward N

    2015-01-01

    Fifteen years ago, Lowary and Widom assembled nucleosomes on synthetic random sequence DNA molecules, selected the strongest nucleosomes and discovered that the TA dinucleotides in these strong nucleosome sequences often appear at 10-11 bases from one another or at distances which are multiples of this period. We repeated this experiment computationally, on large ensembles of natural genomic sequences, by selecting the strongest nucleosomes--i.e. those with such distances between like-named dinucleotides, multiples of 10.4 bases, the structural and sequence period of nucleosome DNA. The analysis confirmed the periodicity of TA dinucleotides in the strong nucleosomes, and revealed as well other periodic sequence elements, notably classical AA and TT dinucleotides. The matrices of DNA bendability and their simple linear forms--nucleosome positioning motifs--are calculated from the strong nucleosome DNA sequences. The motifs are in full accord with nucleosome positioning sequences derived earlier, thus confirming that the new technique, indeed, detects strong nucleosomes. Species- and isochore-specific variations of the matrices and of the positioning motifs are demonstrated. The strong nucleosome DNA sequences manifest the highest hitherto nucleosome positioning sequence signals, showing the dinucleotide periodicities in directly observable rather than in hidden form.

  16. Genomic sequencing of Pleistocene cave bears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noonan, James P.; Hofreiter, Michael; Smith, Doug; Priest, JamesR.; Rohland, Nadin; Rabeder, Gernot; Krause, Johannes; Detter, J. Chris; Paabo, Svante; Rubin, Edward M.

    2005-04-01

    Despite the information content of genomic DNA, ancient DNA studies to date have largely been limited to amplification of mitochondrial DNA due to technical hurdles such as contamination and degradation of ancient DNAs. In this study, we describe two metagenomic libraries constructed using unamplified DNA extracted from the bones of two 40,000-year-old extinct cave bears. Analysis of {approx}1 Mb of sequence from each library showed that, despite significant microbial contamination, 5.8 percent and 1.1 percent of clones in the libraries contain cave bear inserts, yielding 26,861 bp of cave bear genome sequence. Alignment of this sequence to the dog genome, the closest sequenced genome to cave bear in terms of evolutionary distance, revealed roughly the expected ratio of cave bear exons, repeats and conserved noncoding sequences. Only 0.04 percent of all clones sequenced were derived from contamination with modern human DNA. Comparison of cave bear with orthologous sequences from several modern bear species revealed the evolutionary relationship of these lineages. Using the metagenomic approach described here, we have recovered substantial quantities of mammalian genomic sequence more than twice as old as any previously reported, establishing the feasibility of ancient DNA genomic sequencing programs.

  17. Maize genome sequencing by methylation filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Lance E; Rabinowicz, Pablo D; O'Shaughnessy, Andrew L; Balija, Vivekanand S; Nascimento, Lidia U; Dike, Sujit; de la Bastide, Melissa; Martienssen, Robert A; McCombie, W Richard

    2003-12-19

    Gene enrichment strategies offer an alternative to sequencing large and repetitive genomes such as that of maize. We report the generation and analysis of nearly 100,000 undermethylated (or methylation filtration) maize sequences. Comparison with the rice genome reveals that methylation filtration results in a more comprehensive representation of maize genes than those that result from expressed sequence tags or transposon insertion sites sequences. About 7% of the repetitive DNA is unmethylated and thus selected in our libraries, but potentially active transposons and unmethylated organelle genomes can be identified. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction can be used to finish the maize transcriptome.

  18. Hardware Accelerated Sequence Alignment with Traceback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Lloyd

    2009-01-01

    in a timely manner. Known methods to accelerate alignment on reconfigurable hardware only address sequence comparison, limit the sequence length, or exhibit memory and I/O bottlenecks. A space-efficient, global sequence alignment algorithm and architecture is presented that accelerates the forward scan and traceback in hardware without memory and I/O limitations. With 256 processing elements in FPGA technology, a performance gain over 300 times that of a desktop computer is demonstrated on sequence lengths of 16000. For greater performance, the architecture is scalable to more processing elements.

  19. A measurement of disorder in binary sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Longyan; Wang, Haihong; Cheng, Weiwen; Zhao, Shengmei

    2015-03-01

    We propose a complex quantity, AL, to characterize the degree of disorder of L-length binary symbolic sequences. As examples, we respectively apply it to typical random and deterministic sequences. One kind of random sequences is generated from a periodic binary sequence and the other is generated from the logistic map. The deterministic sequences are the Fibonacci and Thue-Morse sequences. In these analyzed sequences, we find that the modulus of AL, denoted by |AL | , is a (statistically) equivalent quantity to the Boltzmann entropy, the metric entropy, the conditional block entropy and/or other quantities, so it is a useful quantitative measure of disorder. It can be as a fruitful index to discern which sequence is more disordered. Moreover, there is one and only one value of |AL | for the overall disorder characteristics. It needs extremely low computational costs. It can be easily experimentally realized. From all these mentioned, we believe that the proposed measure of disorder is a valuable complement to existing ones in symbolic sequences.

  20. Strebel differentials and Hamilton sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Zhong(

    2001-01-01

    [1]Strebel, K., Point shift differentials and extremal quasiconformal mappings, Annale Acad. Scle. Fenn. Math., 1998, 23: 475 -494.[2]Gardiner, F. P., Approximation of infinite dimensional Teichmutller space, Trans. Amer. Soc., 1999, 282: 367-383.[3]Lakic, N. , The Strebel points, Comptemp. Math. , 1997, 211: 417-431.[4]Wu Sheng jian, Hamilton sequences for extremal quasiconformal mappings of the unit disc, Science in China, Ser. A, 1999,42(10): 1033-1042.[5]Li Zhong, Qi Yi, A note on point shift differentials, Science in China, Ser. A, 1999, 42(5): 449-455.[6]Hamilton, R. S., Extremal quasiconformal mappings with prescribed boundary values, Trans. Amer. Math. Soc. , 1969,138: 399-406.[7]Krushkal, S. , Extremal quasiconformal mappings, Sirbirsk. Mat. Zh., 1969, 10: 573-583.[8]Reich, E., Strebel, K., Extremal quasiconformal mappings with given boundary values, Contributions to Analysis, New York: Academic Press, 1974, 375-391.[9]Strebel, K. , On quasiconformal mappings of open Riemann surfaces, Commemt. Math. Helr., 1978, 53: 301-321.[10]Earle, C., Li Zhong, Extremal quasiconformal mappings in plane domains, Quasiconformal Mappings and Analysis A Col-lection of Papers Honoring F. W. Gehring, New York: Springer-Verlag, 1998, 141-158.[11]Strebel, K., On quadratic differentials and extremal quasiconforrnal mappings, in Proc. of the Intern. Congress of Math.,Vancouver, 1974.[12]Li Zhong, Some new results on the geometry of infinite dimensional Teichmuller space, in Proceedings of the 3rd International Colloquium on Finite or Infinite Dimensional Complex Analysis, 1995, 369-378.

  1. Compressing DNA sequence databases with coil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendy Michael D

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Publicly available DNA sequence databases such as GenBank are large, and are growing at an exponential rate. The sheer volume of data being dealt with presents serious storage and data communications problems. Currently, sequence data is usually kept in large "flat files," which are then compressed using standard Lempel-Ziv (gzip compression – an approach which rarely achieves good compression ratios. While much research has been done on compressing individual DNA sequences, surprisingly little has focused on the compression of entire databases of such sequences. In this study we introduce the sequence database compression software coil. Results We have designed and implemented a portable software package, coil, for compressing and decompressing DNA sequence databases based on the idea of edit-tree coding. coil is geared towards achieving high compression ratios at the expense of execution time and memory usage during compression – the compression time represents a "one-off investment" whose cost is quickly amortised if the resulting compressed file is transmitted many times. Decompression requires little memory and is extremely fast. We demonstrate a 5% improvement in compression ratio over state-of-the-art general-purpose compression tools for a large GenBank database file containing Expressed Sequence Tag (EST data. Finally, coil can efficiently encode incremental additions to a sequence database. Conclusion coil presents a compelling alternative to conventional compression of flat files for the storage and distribution of DNA sequence databases having a narrow distribution of sequence lengths, such as EST data. Increasing compression levels for databases having a wide distribution of sequence lengths is a direction for future work.

  2. Timing-Sequence Testing of Parallel Programs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Yu; LI Shu; ZHANG Hui; HAN Chengde

    2000-01-01

    Testing of parallel programs involves two parts-testing of controlflow within the processes and testing of timing-sequence.This paper focuses on the latter, particularly on the timing-sequence of message-passing paradigms.Firstly the coarse-grained SYN-sequence model is built up to describe the execution of distributed programs. All of the topics discussed in this paper are based on it. The most direct way to test a program is to run it. A fault-free parallel program should be of both correct computing results and proper SYN-sequence. In order to analyze the validity of observed SYN-sequence, this paper presents the formal specification (Backus Normal Form) of the valid SYN-sequence. Till now there is little work about the testing coverage for distributed programs. Calculating the number of the valid SYN-sequences is the key to coverage problem, while the number of the valid SYN-sequences is terribly large and it is very hard to obtain the combination law among SYN-events. In order to resolve this problem, this paper proposes an efficient testing strategy-atomic SYN-event testing, which is to linearize the SYN-sequence (making it only consist of serial atomic SYN-events) first and then test each atomic SYN-event independently. This paper particularly provides the calculating formula about the number of the valid SYN-sequences for tree-topology atomic SYN-event (broadcast and combine). Furthermore,the number of valid SYN-sequences also,to some degree, mirrors the testability of parallel programs. Taking tree-topology atomic SYN-event as an example, this paper demonstrates the testability and communication speed of the tree-topology atomic SYN-event under different numbers of branches in order to achieve a more satisfactory tradeoff between testability and communication efficiency.

  3. Direct chloroplast sequencing: comparison of sequencing platforms and analysis tools for whole chloroplast barcoding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Brozynska

    Full Text Available Direct sequencing of total plant DNA using next generation sequencing technologies generates a whole chloroplast genome sequence that has the potential to provide a barcode for use in plant and food identification. Advances in DNA sequencing platforms may make this an attractive approach for routine plant identification. The HiSeq (Illumina and Ion Torrent (Life Technology sequencing platforms were used to sequence total DNA from rice to identify polymorphisms in the whole chloroplast genome sequence of a wild rice plant relative to cultivated rice (cv. Nipponbare. Consensus chloroplast sequences were produced by mapping sequence reads to the reference rice chloroplast genome or by de novo assembly and mapping of the resulting contigs to the reference sequence. A total of 122 polymorphisms (SNPs and indels between the wild and cultivated rice chloroplasts were predicted by these different sequencing and analysis methods. Of these, a total of 102 polymorphisms including 90 SNPs were predicted by both platforms. Indels were more variable with different sequencing methods, with almost all discrepancies found in homopolymers. The Ion Torrent platform gave no apparent false SNP but was less reliable for indels. The methods should be suitable for routine barcoding using appropriate combinations of sequencing platform and data analysis.

  4. Generalized Identities of Companion Fibonacci-Like Sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Shikha Bhatnagar; Bijendra Singh; Omprakash Sikhwal

    2013-01-01

    The Fibonacci sequence, Lucas sequence, Pell sequence, Pell-Lucas sequence, Jacobsthalsequence and Jacobsthal-Lucas sequence are most prominent examples of second order recursivesequences. In this paper, we deal with two companion Fibonacci- Like sequences which aregeneralization of Fibonacci-Like sequence. Further we obtain some generalized identities amongthe terms of companion Fibonacci-Like sequences, Jacobsthal and Jacobsthal-Lucas sequencesthrough Binet’s formulae.

  5. Sequencing for the cream of the crop

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this invited commentary, we discuss how next-generation sequencing methods are beginning to find their way into plant genetics, promising substantial improvements in crop yields over the coming decades. Next-generation sequencing facilitates the construction of high-resolution variation maps, whi...

  6. Massively parallel sequencing of forensic STRs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parson, Walther; Ballard, David; Budowle, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    accessible genome assembly, and in place before the uptake of MPS by the general forensic community starts to generate sequence data on a large scale. While the established nomenclature for CE-based STR analysis will remain unchanged in the future, the nomenclature of sequence-based STR genotypes will need...

  7. SPARSE SEQUENCE CONSTRUCTION OF LDPC CODES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    This letter proposes a novel and simple construction of regular Low-Density Parity-Check (LDPC) codes using sparse binary sequences. It utilizes the cyclic cross correlation function of sparse sequences to generate codes with girth8. The new codes perform well using the sumproduct decoding. Low encodingcomplexity can also be achieved due to the inherent quasi-cyclic structure of the codes.

  8. Archaebacterial rhodopsin sequences: Implications for evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanyi, J. K.

    1991-01-01

    It was proposed over 10 years ago that the archaebacteria represent a separate kingdom which diverged very early from the eubacteria and eukaryotes. It follows that investigations of archaebacterial characteristics might reveal features of early evolution. So far, two genes, one for bacteriorhodopsin and another for halorhodopsin, both from Halobacterium halobium, have been sequenced. We cloned and sequenced the gene coding for the polypeptide of another one of these rhodopsins, a halorhodopsin in Natronobacterium pharaonis. Peptide sequencing of cyanogen bromide fragments, and immuno-reactions of the protein and synthetic peptides derived from the C-terminal gene sequence, confirmed that the open reading frame was the structural gene for the pharaonis halorhodopsin polypeptide. The flanking DNA sequences of this gene, as well as those of other bacterial rhodopsins, were compared to previously proposed archaebacterial consensus sequences. In pairwise comparisons of the open reading frame with DNA sequences for bacterio-opsin and halo-opsin from Halobacterium halobium, silent divergences were calculated. These indicate very considerable evolutionary distance between each pair of genes, even in the dame organism. In spite of this, three protein sequences show extensive similarities, indicating strong selective pressures.

  9. Novel algorithms for protein sequence analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ye, Kai

    2008-01-01

    Each protein is characterized by its unique sequential order of amino acids, the so-called protein sequence. Biology”s paradigm is that this order of amino acids determines the protein”s architecture and function. In this thesis, we introduce novel algorithms to analyze protein sequences. Chapter 1

  10. Controlling monomer-sequence using supramolecular templates

    OpenAIRE

    ten Brummelhuis, Niels

    2014-01-01

    The transcription and translation of information contained in nucleic acids that has been perfected by nature serves as inspiration for chemists to devise strategies for the creation of polymers with welldefined monomer sequences. In this review the various approaches in which templates (either biopolymers or synthetic ones) are used to influence the monomer-sequence are discussed.

  11. Bonobos extract meaning from call sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zanna Clay

    Full Text Available Studies on language-trained bonobos have revealed their remarkable abilities in representational and communication tasks. Surprisingly, however, corresponding research into their natural communication has largely been neglected. We address this issue with a first playback study on the natural vocal behaviour of bonobos. Bonobos produce five acoustically distinct call types when finding food, which they regularly mix together into longer call sequences. We found that individual call types were relatively poor indicators of food quality, while context specificity was much greater at the call sequence level. We therefore investigated whether receivers could extract meaning about the quality of food encountered by the caller by integrating across different call sequences. We first trained four captive individuals to find two types of foods, kiwi (preferred and apples (less preferred at two different locations. We then conducted naturalistic playback experiments during which we broadcasted sequences of four calls, originally produced by a familiar individual responding to either kiwi or apples. All sequences contained the same number of calls but varied in the composition of call types. Following playbacks, we found that subjects devoted significantly more search effort to the field indicated by the call sequence. Rather than attending to individual calls, bonobos attended to the entire sequences to make inferences about the food encountered by a caller. These results provide the first empirical evidence that bonobos are able to extract information about external events by attending to vocal sequences of other individuals and highlight the importance of call combinations in their natural communication system.

  12. Sequencing Events: Exploring Art and Art Jobs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Pamela Geiger; Shaddix, Robin K.

    2000-01-01

    Presents an activity for upper-elementary students that correlates the actions of archaeologists, patrons, and artists with the sequencing of events in a logical order. Features ancient Egyptian art images. Discusses the preparation of materials, motivation, a pre-writing activity, and writing a story in sequence. (CMK)

  13. Sequencing the Cotton Genomes-Gossypium spp.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PATERSON Andrew H

    2008-01-01

    @@ The genomes of most major crops,including cotton,will be fully sequenced in the next fewyears.Cotton is unusual,although not unique,in that we will need to sequence not only cultivated(tetraploid) genotypes but their diploid progenitors,to understand how elite cottons have surpassedthe productivity and quality of their progenitors.

  14. Convergence of a Linear Recursive Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, E. G.; Toh, T. L.; Dong, F. M.; Lee, T. Y.

    2004-01-01

    A necessary and sufficient condition is found for a linear recursive sequence to be convergent, no matter what initial values are given. Its limit is also obtained when the sequence is convergent. Methods from various areas of mathematics are used to obtain the results.

  15. Pig genome sequence - analysis and publication strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Archibald, Alan L.; Bolund, Lars; Churcher, Carol

    2010-01-01

    preferentially selected for sequencing. In accordance with the Bermuda and Fort Lauderdale agreements and the more recent Toronto Statement the data have been released into public sequence repositories (Genbank/EMBL, NCBI/Ensembl trace repositories) in a timely manner and in advance of publication. CONCLUSIONS...

  16. Using Conventional Sequences in L2 French

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Fanny

    2010-01-01

    By means of a phraseological identification method, this study provides a general description of the use of conventional sequences (CSs) in interviews at four different levels of spoken L2 French as well as in interviews with native speakers. Use of conventional sequences is studied with regard to overall quantity, category distribution and type…

  17. Discrepancy of LS-sequences of partitions

    CERN Document Server

    Carbone, Ingrid

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we give a precise estimate of the discrepancy of a class of uniformly distributed sequences of partitions. Among them we found a large class having low discrepancy (which means of order 1/N. One of them is the Kakutani-Fibonacci sequence.

  18. Some identities of generalized Fibonacci sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Chin-Yoon; Cheah, C. L.; Ho, C. K.

    2014-07-01

    We introduced the generalized Fibonacci sequence {Un} defined by U0 = 0, U1 = 1, and Un+2 = pUn+1+qUn for all p, q∈Z+ and for all non-negative integers n. In this paper, we obtained some recursive formulas of the sequence.

  19. On the sum of generalized Fibonacci sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Chin-Yoon; Ho, C. K.

    2014-06-01

    We consider the generalized Fibonacci sequence {Un defined by U0 = 0, U1 = 1, and Un+2 = pUn+1+qUn for all n∈Z0+ and p, q∈Z+. In this paper, we derived various sums of the generalized Fibonacci sequence from their recursive relations.

  20. Regular Pentagons and the Fibonacci Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Doug

    1989-01-01

    Illustrates how to draw a regular pentagon. Shows the sequence of a succession of regular pentagons formed by extending the sides. Calculates the general formula of the Lucas and Fibonacci sequences. Presents a regular icosahedron as an example of the golden ratio. (YP)

  1. Wolbachia Sequence Typing in Butterflies Using Pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sungmi; Shin, Su-Kyoung; Jeong, Gilsang; Yi, Hana

    2015-09-01

    Wolbachia is an obligate symbiotic bacteria that is ubiquitous in arthropods, with 25-70% of insect species estimated to be infected. Wolbachia species can interact with their insect hosts in a mutualistic or parasitic manner. Sequence types (ST) of Wolbachia are determined by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of housekeeping genes. However, there are some limitations to MLST with respect to the generation of clone libraries and the Sanger sequencing method when a host is infected with multiple STs of Wolbachia. To assess the feasibility of massive parallel sequencing, also known as next-generation sequencing, we used pyrosequencing for sequence typing of Wolbachia in butterflies. We collected three species of butterflies (Eurema hecabe, Eurema laeta, and Tongeia fischeri) common to Korea and screened them for Wolbachia STs. We found that T. fischeri was infected with a single ST of Wolbachia, ST41. In contrast, E. hecabe and E. laeta were each infected with two STs of Wolbachia, ST41 and ST40. Our results clearly demonstrate that pyrosequencing-based MLST has a higher sensitivity than cloning and Sanger sequencing methods for the detection of minor alleles. Considering the high prevalence of infection with multiple Wolbachia STs, next-generation sequencing with improved analysis would assist with scaling up approaches to Wolbachia MLST.

  2. What's Next? Judging Sequences of Binary Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskarsson, An T.; Van Boven, Leaf; McClelland, Gary H.; Hastie, Reid

    2009-01-01

    The authors review research on judgments of random and nonrandom sequences involving binary events with a focus on studies documenting gambler's fallacy and hot hand beliefs. The domains of judgment include random devices, births, lotteries, sports performances, stock prices, and others. After discussing existing theories of sequence judgments,…

  3. Concept For Generation Of Long Pseudorandom Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. C.

    1990-01-01

    Conceptual very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) digital circuit performs exponentiation in finite field. Algorithm that generates unusually long sequences of pseudorandom numbers executed by digital processor that includes such circuits. Concepts particularly advantageous for such applications as spread-spectrum communications, cryptography, and generation of ranging codes, synthetic noise, and test data, where usually desirable to make pseudorandom sequences as long as possible.

  4. Fibonacci-triple sequences and some fundamental properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijendra Singh

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Fibonacci sequence stands as a kind of super sequence with fabulous properties. This note presents Fibonacci-Triple sequences that may also be called 3-F sequences. This is the explosive development in the region of Fibonacci sequence. Our purpose of this paper is to demonstrate fundamental properties of Fibonacci-Triple sequence.

  5. Fibonacci-triple sequences and some fundamental properties

    OpenAIRE

    Bijendra Singh; Omprakash Sikhwal

    2010-01-01

    Fibonacci sequence stands as a kind of super sequence with fabulous properties. This note presents Fibonacci-Triple sequences that may also be called 3-F sequences. This is the explosive development in the region of Fibonacci sequence. Our purpose of this paper is to demonstrate fundamental properties of Fibonacci-Triple sequence.

  6. NGS-based deep bisulfite sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Suman; Kim, Joomyeong

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an NGS-based deep bisulfite sequencing protocol for the DNA methylation analysis of genomes. This approach allows the rapid and efficient construction of NGS-ready libraries with a large number of PCR products that have been individually amplified from bisulfite-converted DNA. This approach also employs a bioinformatics strategy to sort the raw sequence reads generated from NGS platforms and subsequently to derive DNA methylation levels for individual loci. The results demonstrated that this NGS-based deep bisulfite sequencing approach provide not only DNA methylation levels but also informative DNA methylation patterns that have not been seen through other existing methods.•This protocol provides an efficient method generating NGS-ready libraries from individually amplified PCR products.•This protocol provides a bioinformatics strategy sorting NGS-derived raw sequence reads.•This protocol provides deep bisulfite sequencing results that can measure DNA methylation levels and patterns of individual loci.

  7. Locomotor sequence learning in visually guided walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Julia T; Jensen, Peter; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-01-01

    at faster walking speeds. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that spatial sequence learning can be integrated with a highly automatic task like walking. These findings suggest that adults and children use implicit knowledge about the sequence to plan and execute leg movement during...... walking. In addition, we determined how age (i.e., healthy young adults vs. children) and biomechanical factors (i.e., walking speed) affected the rate and magnitude of locomotor sequence learning. The results showed that healthy young adults (age 24 ± 5 years, N = 20) could learn a specific sequence...... of step lengths over 300 training steps. Younger children (age 6-10 years, N = 8) have lower baseline performance, but their magnitude and rate of sequence learning was the same compared to older children (11-16 years, N = 10) and healthy adults. In addition, learning capacity may be more limited...

  8. Sequencing and comparing whole mitochondrial genomes ofanimals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boore, Jeffrey L.; Macey, J. Robert; Medina, Monica

    2005-04-22

    Comparing complete animal mitochondrial genome sequences is becoming increasingly common for phylogenetic reconstruction and as a model for genome evolution. Not only are they much more informative than shorter sequences of individual genes for inferring evolutionary relatedness, but these data also provide sets of genome-level characters, such as the relative arrangements of genes, that can be especially powerful. We describe here the protocols commonly used for physically isolating mtDNA, for amplifying these by PCR or RCA, for cloning,sequencing, assembly, validation, and gene annotation, and for comparing both sequences and gene arrangements. On several topics, we offer general observations based on our experiences to date with determining and comparing complete mtDNA sequences.

  9. Metagenomics using next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg, Lauren; Tyson, Gene W

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, microbial genome sequencing has been restricted to the small number of species that can be grown in pure culture. The progressive development of culture-independent methods over the last 15 years now allows researchers to sequence microbial communities directly from environmental samples. This approach is commonly referred to as "metagenomics" or "community genomics". However, the term metagenomics is applied liberally in the literature to describe any culture-independent analysis of microbial communities. Here, we define metagenomics as shotgun ("random") sequencing of the genomic DNA of a sample taken directly from the environment. The metagenome can be thought of as a sampling of the collective genome of the microbial community. We outline the considerations and analyses that should be undertaken to ensure the success of a metagenomic sequencing project, including the choice of sequencing platform and methods for assembly, binning, annotation, and comparative analysis.

  10. Strategies for complete plastid genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twyford, Alex D; Ness, Rob W

    2016-10-28

    Plastid sequencing is an essential tool in the study of plant evolution. This high-copy organelle is one of the most technically accessible regions of the genome, and its sequence conservation makes it a valuable region for comparative genome evolution, phylogenetic analysis and population studies. Here, we discuss recent innovations and approaches for de novo plastid assembly that harness genomic tools. We focus on technical developments including low-cost sequence library preparation approaches for genome skimming, enrichment via hybrid baits and methylation-sensitive capture, sequence platforms with higher read outputs and longer read lengths, and automated tools for assembly. These developments allow for a much more streamlined assembly than via conventional short-range PCR. Although newer methods make complete plastid sequencing possible for any land plant or green alga, there are still challenges for producing finished plastomes particularly from herbarium material or from structurally divergent plastids such as those of parasitic plants.

  11. Reading biological processes from nucleotide sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugan, Anand

    Cellular processes have traditionally been investigated by techniques of imaging and biochemical analysis of the molecules involved. The recent rapid progress in our ability to manipulate and read nucleic acid sequences gives us direct access to the genetic information that directs and constrains biological processes. While sequence data is being used widely to investigate genotype-phenotype relationships and population structure, here we use sequencing to understand biophysical mechanisms. We present work on two different systems. First, in chapter 2, we characterize the stochastic genetic editing mechanism that produces diverse T-cell receptors in the human immune system. We do this by inferring statistical distributions of the underlying biochemical events that generate T-cell receptor coding sequences from the statistics of the observed sequences. This inferred model quantitatively describes the potential repertoire of T-cell receptors that can be produced by an individual, providing insight into its potential diversity and the probability of generation of any specific T-cell receptor. Then in chapter 3, we present work on understanding the functioning of regulatory DNA sequences in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Here we use experiments that measure the transcriptional activity of large libraries of mutagenized promoters and enhancers and infer models of the sequence-function relationship from this data. For the bacterial promoter, we infer a physically motivated 'thermodynamic' model of the interaction of DNA-binding proteins and RNA polymerase determining the transcription rate of the downstream gene. For the eukaryotic enhancers, we infer heuristic models of the sequence-function relationship and use these models to find synthetic enhancer sequences that optimize inducibility of expression. Both projects demonstrate the utility of sequence information in conjunction with sophisticated statistical inference techniques for dissecting underlying biophysical

  12. Finding Common Sequence and Structure Motifs in a set of RNA sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorodkin, Jan; Heyer, Laurie J.; Stormo, Gary D.

    1997-01-01

    We present a computational scheme to search for the most common motif, composed of a combination of sequence and structure constraints, among a collection of RNA sequences. The method uses a simplified version of the Sankoff algorithm for simultaneous folding and alignment of RNA sequences...

  13. Targeted next-generation sequencing can replace Sanger sequencing in clinical diagnostics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sikkema-Raddatz, B.; Johansson, L.F.; de Boer, E.N.; Almomani, R.; Boven, L.G.; van den Berg, M.P.; van Spaendonck-Zwarts, K.Y.; van Tintelen, J.P.; Sijmons, R.H.; Jongbloed, J.D.H.; Sinke, R.J.

    2013-01-01

    Mutation detection through exome sequencing allows simultaneous analysis of all coding sequences of genes. However, it cannot yet replace Sanger sequencing (SS) in diagnostics because of incomplete representation and coverage of exons leading to missing clinically relevant mutations. Targeted next-g

  14. SOME GEOMETRIC PROPERTIES OF A NEW DIFFERENCE SEQUENCE SPACE INVOLVING LACUNARY SEQUENCES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Murat KARAKAŞ; Mikail ET; Vatan KARAKAYA

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we define a new generalized difference sequence space involving lacunary sequence. Then, we examine k-NUC property and property (β) for this space and also show that it is not rotund where p=(pr) is a bounded sequence of positive real numbers with pr ≥1 for all r∈N.

  15. On some difference sequence spaces defined by a sequence of Orlicz functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ASMA BEKTA(S) (C)i(g)dem

    2006-01-01

    The idea of difference sequence spaces was introduced in (Kizmaz, 1981) and this concept was generalized in (Et and Colak, 1995). In this paper we define some difference sequence spaces by a sequence of Orlicz functions and establish some inclusion relations.

  16. Sequencing and Analysis of a Genomic Fragment Provide an Insight into the Dunaliella viridis Genomic Sequence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Ming SUN; Yuan-Ping TANG; Xiang-Zong MENG; Wen-Wen ZHANG; Shan LI; Zhi-Rui DENG; Zheng-Kai XU; Ren-Tao SONG

    2006-01-01

    Dunaliella is a genus of wall-less unicellular eukaryotic green alga. Its exceptional resistances to salt and various other stresses have made it an ideal model for stress tolerance study. However, very little is known about its genome and genomic sequences. In this study, we sequenced and analyzed a 29,268 bp genomic fragment from Dunaliella viridis. The fragment showed low sequence homology to the GenBank database. At the nucleotide level, only a segment with significant sequence homology to 18S rRNA was found. The fragment contained six putative genes, but only one gene showed significant homology at the protein level to GenBank database. The average GC content of this sequence was 51.1%, which was much lower than that of close related green algae Chlamydomonas (65.7%). Significant segmental duplications were found within this fragment. The duplicated sequences accounted for about 35.7% of the entire region. Large amounts of simple sequence repeats (microsatellites) were found, with strong bias towards (AC)n type (76%). Analysis of other Dunaliella genomic sequences in the GenBank database (total 25,749 bp) was in agreement with these findings. These sequence features made it difficult to sequence Dunaliella genomic sequences. Further investigation should be made to reveal the biological significance of these unique sequence features.

  17. Value of a newly sequenced bacterial genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eudes; GV; Barbosa; Flavia; F; Aburjaile; Rommel; TJ; Ramos; Adriana; R; Carneiro; Yves; Le; Loir; Jan; Baumbach; Anderson; Miyoshi; Artur; Silva; Vasco; Azevedo

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing(NGS) technologies have made high-throughput sequencing available to medium- and small-size laboratories, culminating in a tidal wave of genomic information. The quantity of sequenced bacterial genomes has not only brought excitement to the field of genomics but also heightened expectations that NGS would boost antibacterial discovery and vaccine development. Although many possible drug and vaccine targets have been discovered, the success rate of genome-based analysis has remained below expectations. Furthermore, NGS has had consequences for genome quality, resulting in an exponential increase in draft(partial data) genome deposits in public databases. If no further interests are expressed for a particular bacterial genome, it is more likely that the sequencing of its genome will be limited to a draft stage, and the painstaking tasks of completing the sequencing of its genome and annotation will not be undertaken. It is important to know what is lost when we settle for a draft genome and to determine the "scientific value" of a newly sequenced genome. This review addresses the expected impact of newly sequenced genomes on antibacterial discovery and vaccinology. Also, it discusses the factors that could be leading to the increase in the number of draft deposits and the consequent loss of relevant biological information.

  18. Fungal genome sequencing: basic biology to biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Krishna Kant

    2016-08-01

    The genome sequences provide a first glimpse into the genomic basis of the biological diversity of filamentous fungi and yeast. The genome sequence of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with a small genome size, unicellular growth, and rich history of genetic and molecular analyses was a milestone of early genomics in the 1990s. The subsequent completion of fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and genetic model, Neurospora crassa initiated a revolution in the genomics of the fungal kingdom. In due course of time, a substantial number of fungal genomes have been sequenced and publicly released, representing the widest sampling of genomes from any eukaryotic kingdom. An ambitious genome-sequencing program provides a wealth of data on metabolic diversity within the fungal kingdom, thereby enhancing research into medical science, agriculture science, ecology, bioremediation, bioenergy, and the biotechnology industry. Fungal genomics have higher potential to positively affect human health, environmental health, and the planet's stored energy. With a significant increase in sequenced fungal genomes, the known diversity of genes encoding organic acids, antibiotics, enzymes, and their pathways has increased exponentially. Currently, over a hundred fungal genome sequences are publicly available; however, no inclusive review has been published. This review is an initiative to address the significance of the fungal genome-sequencing program and provides the road map for basic and applied research.

  19. CATEGORIZATION OF EVENT SEQUENCES FOR LICENSE APPLICATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.E. Ragan; P. Mecheret; D. Dexheimer

    2005-04-14

    The purposes of this analysis are: (1) Categorize (as Category 1, Category 2, or Beyond Category 2) internal event sequences that may occur before permanent closure of the repository at Yucca Mountain. (2) Categorize external event sequences that may occur before permanent closure of the repository at Yucca Mountain. This includes examining DBGM-1 seismic classifications and upgrading to DBGM-2, if appropriate, to ensure Beyond Category 2 categorization. (3) State the design and operational requirements that are invoked to make the categorization assignments valid. (4) Indicate the amount of material put at risk by Category 1 and Category 2 event sequences. (5) Estimate frequencies of Category 1 event sequences at the maximum capacity and receipt rate of the repository. (6) Distinguish occurrences associated with normal operations from event sequences. It is beyond the scope of the analysis to propose design requirements that may be required to control radiological exposure associated with normal operations. (7) Provide a convenient compilation of the results of the analysis in tabular form. The results of this analysis are used as inputs to the consequence analyses in an iterative design process that is depicted in Figure 1. Categorization of event sequences for permanent retrieval of waste from the repository is beyond the scope of this analysis. Cleanup activities that take place after an event sequence and other responses to abnormal events are also beyond the scope of the analysis.

  20. Gelada vocal sequences follow Menzerath's linguistic law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustison, Morgan L; Semple, Stuart; Ferrer-I-Cancho, Ramon; Bergman, Thore J

    2016-05-10

    Identifying universal principles underpinning diverse natural systems is a key goal of the life sciences. A powerful approach in addressing this goal has been to test whether patterns consistent with linguistic laws are found in nonhuman animals. Menzerath's law is a linguistic law that states that, the larger the construct, the smaller the size of its constituents. Here, to our knowledge, we present the first evidence that Menzerath's law holds in the vocal communication of a nonhuman species. We show that, in vocal sequences of wild male geladas (Theropithecus gelada), construct size (sequence size in number of calls) is negatively correlated with constituent size (duration of calls). Call duration does not vary significantly with position in the sequence, but call sequence composition does change with sequence size and most call types are abbreviated in larger sequences. We also find that intercall intervals follow the same relationship with sequence size as do calls. Finally, we provide formal mathematical support for the idea that Menzerath's law reflects compression-the principle of minimizing the expected length of a code. Our findings suggest that a common principle underpins human and gelada vocal communication, highlighting the value of exploring the applicability of linguistic laws in vocal systems outside the realm of language.

  1. Exploration of noncoding sequences in metagenomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabián Tobar-Tosse

    Full Text Available Environment-dependent genomic features have been defined for different metagenomes, whose genes and their associated processes are related to specific environments. Identification of ORFs and their functional categories are the most common methods for association between functional and environmental features. However, this analysis based on finding ORFs misses noncoding sequences and, therefore, some metagenome regulatory or structural information could be discarded. In this work we analyzed 23 whole metagenomes, including coding and noncoding sequences using the following sequence patterns: (G+C content, Codon Usage (Cd, Trinucleotide Usage (Tn, and functional assignments for ORF prediction. Herein, we present evidence of a high proportion of noncoding sequences discarded in common similarity-based methods in metagenomics, and the kind of relevant information present in those. We found a high density of trinucleotide repeat sequences (TRS in noncoding sequences, with a regulatory and adaptive function for metagenome communities. We present associations between trinucleotide values and gene function, where metagenome clustering correlate with microorganism adaptations and kinds of metagenomes. We propose here that noncoding sequences have relevant information to describe metagenomes that could be considered in a whole metagenome analysis in order to improve their organization, classification protocols, and their relation with the environment.

  2. Enhanced Dynamic Algorithm of Genome Sequence Alignments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arabi E. keshk

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The merging of biology and computer science has created a new field called computational biology that explore the capacities of computers to gain knowledge from biological data, bioinformatics. Computational biology is rooted in life sciences as well as computers, information sciences, and technologies. The main problem in computational biology is sequence alignment that is a way of arranging the sequences of DNA, RNA or protein to identify the region of similarity and relationship between sequences. This paper introduces an enhancement of dynamic algorithm of genome sequence alignment, which called EDAGSA. It is filling the three main diagonals without filling the entire matrix by the unused data. It gets the optimal solution with decreasing the execution time and therefore the performance is increased. To illustrate the effectiveness of optimizing the performance of the proposed algorithm, it is compared with the traditional methods such as Needleman-Wunsch, Smith-Waterman and longest common subsequence algorithms. Also, database is implemented for using the algorithm in multi-sequence alignments for searching the optimal sequence that matches the given sequence.

  3. Identification of 10 882 porcine microsatellite sequences and virtual mapping of 4528 of these sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlskov-Mortensen, Peter; Hu, Z.L.; Gorodkin, Jan

    2007-01-01

    the human genome (BLAST cut-off threshold = 1 x 10-5). All microsatellite sequences placed on the comparative map are accessible at http://www.animalgenome.org/QTLdb/pig.html . These sequences increase the number of identified microsatellites in the porcine genome by several orders of magnitude......A total of 10 882 porcine microsatelite repeats were identified in genomic shotgun sequences from the Sino-Danish Pig Genome Sequencing Consortium ( http://piggenome.dk ). Of these, 4528 microsatellites were placed on a pig-human comparative map by BLAST analysis of porcine sequences against...

  4. Large Zero Autocorrelation Zone of Golay Sequences and $4^q$-QAM Golay Complementary Sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Guang; Yang, Yang

    2011-01-01

    Sequences with good correlation properties have been widely adopted in modern communications, radar and sonar applications. In this paper, we present our new findings on some constructions of single $H$-ary Golay sequence and $4^q$-QAM Golay complementary sequence with a large zero autocorrelation zone, where $H\\ge 2$ is an arbitrary even integer and $q\\ge 2$ is an arbitrary integer. Those new results on Golay sequences and QAM Golay complementary sequences can be explored during synchronization and detection at the receiver end and thus improve the performance of the communication system.

  5. Robot Sequencing and Visualization Program (RSVP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Brian K.; Maxwell,Scott A.; Hartman, Frank R.; Wright, John R.; Yen, Jeng; Toole, Nicholas T.; Gorjian, Zareh; Morrison, Jack C

    2013-01-01

    The Robot Sequencing and Visualization Program (RSVP) is being used in the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission for downlink data visualization and command sequence generation. RSVP reads and writes downlink data products from the operations data server (ODS) and writes uplink data products to the ODS. The primary users of RSVP are members of the Rover Planner team (part of the Integrated Planning and Execution Team (IPE)), who use it to perform traversability/articulation analyses, take activity plan input from the Science and Mission Planning teams, and create a set of rover sequences to be sent to the rover every sol. The primary inputs to RSVP are downlink data products and activity plans in the ODS database. The primary outputs are command sequences to be placed in the ODS for further processing prior to uplink to each rover. RSVP is composed of two main subsystems. The first, called the Robot Sequence Editor (RoSE), understands the MSL activity and command dictionaries and takes care of converting incoming activity level inputs into command sequences. The Rover Planners use the RoSE component of RSVP to put together command sequences and to view and manage command level resources like time, power, temperature, etc. (via a transparent realtime connection to SEQGEN). The second component of RSVP is called HyperDrive, a set of high-fidelity computer graphics displays of the Martian surface in 3D and in stereo. The Rover Planners can explore the environment around the rover, create commands related to motion of all kinds, and see the simulated result of those commands via its underlying tight coupling with flight navigation, motor, and arm software. This software is the evolutionary replacement for the Rover Sequencing and Visualization software used to create command sequences (and visualize the Martian surface) for the Mars Exploration Rover mission.

  6. Sequencing, analysis, and annotation of expressed sequence tags for Camelus dromedarius.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulaziz M Al-Swailem

    Full Text Available Despite its economical, cultural, and biological importance, there has not been a large scale sequencing project to date for Camelus dromedarius. With the goal of sequencing complete DNA of the organism, we first established and sequenced camel EST libraries, generating 70,272 reads. Following trimming, chimera check, repeat masking, cluster and assembly, we obtained 23,602 putative gene sequences, out of which over 4,500 potentially novel or fast evolving gene sequences do not carry any homology to other available genomes. Functional annotation of sequences with similarities in nucleotide and protein databases has been obtained using Gene Ontology classification. Comparison to available full length cDNA sequences and Open Reading Frame (ORF analysis of camel sequences that exhibit homology to known genes show more than 80% of the contigs with an ORF>300 bp and approximately 40% hits extending to the start codons of full length cDNAs suggesting successful characterization of camel genes. Similarity analyses are done separately for different organisms including human, mouse, bovine, and rat. Accompanying web portal, CAGBASE (http://camel.kacst.edu.sa/, hosts a relational database containing annotated EST sequences and analysis tools with possibility to add sequences from public domain. We anticipate our results to provide a home base for genomic studies of camel and other comparative studies enabling a starting point for whole genome sequencing of the organism.

  7. Effects of the Ion PGM™ Hi-Q™ sequencing chemistry on sequence data quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, Jennifer D; King, Jonathan L; Chakraborty, Ranajit; Budowle, Bruce

    2016-09-01

    Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) offers substantial improvements over current forensic DNA typing methodologies such as increased resolution, scalability, and throughput. The Ion PGM™ is a promising MPS platform for analysis of forensic biological evidence. The system employs a sequencing-by-synthesis chemistry on a semiconductor chip that measures a pH change due to the release of hydrogen ions as nucleotides are incorporated into the growing DNA strands. However, implementation of MPS into forensic laboratories requires a robust chemistry. Ion Torrent's Hi-Q™ Sequencing Chemistry was evaluated to determine if it could improve on the quality of the generated sequence data in association with selected genetic marker targets. The whole mitochondrial genome and the HID-Ion STR 10-plex panel were sequenced on the Ion PGM™ system with the Ion PGM™ Sequencing 400 Kit and the Ion PGM™ Hi-Q™ Sequencing Kit. Concordance, coverage, strand balance, noise, and deletion ratios were assessed in evaluating the performance of the Ion PGM™ Hi-Q™ Sequencing Kit. The results indicate that reliable, accurate data are generated and that sequencing through homopolymeric regions can be improved with the use of Ion Torrent's Hi-Q™ Sequencing Chemistry. Overall, the quality of the generated sequencing data supports the potential for use of the Ion PGM™ in forensic genetic laboratories.

  8. The double main sequence of Omega Centauri

    CERN Document Server

    Bedin, L R

    2004-01-01

    Recent, high precision photometry of Omega Centauri, the biggest Galactic globular cluster, has been obtained with Hubble Space Telescope. The color magnitude diagram reveals an unexpected bifurcation of colors in the main sequence (MS). The newly found double MS, the multiple turnoffs and subgiant branches, and other sequences discovered in the past along the red giant branch of this cluster add up to a fascinating but frustrating puzzle. Among the possible explanations for the blue main sequence an anomalous overabundance of helium is suggested. The hypothesis will be tested with a set of FLAMES@VLT data we have recently obtained (ESO DDT program), and with forthcoming ACS@HST images.

  9. Initial retrieval sequence and blending strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pemwell, D.L.; Grenard, C.E.

    1996-09-01

    This report documents the initial retrieval sequence and the methodology used to select it. Waste retrieval, storage, pretreatment and vitrification were modeled for candidate single-shell tank retrieval sequences. Performance of the sequences was measured by a set of metrics (for example,high-level waste glass volume, relative risk and schedule).Computer models were used to evaluate estimated glass volumes,process rates, retrieval dates, and blending strategy effects.The models were based on estimates of component inventories and concentrations, sludge wash factors and timing, retrieval annex limitations, etc.

  10. Persistence and NIP in the characteristic sequence

    CERN Document Server

    Malliaris, M E

    2009-01-01

    For a first-order formula $\\phi(x;y)$ we introduce and study the characteristic sequence $$ of hypergraphs defined by $P_n(y_1,...,y_n) := (\\exists x) \\bigwedge_{i \\leq n} \\phi(x;y_i)$. We show that combinatorial and classification theoretic properties of the characteristic sequence reflect classification theoretic properties of $\\varphi$ and vice versa. Specifically, we show that some tree properties are detected by the presence of certain combinatorial configurations in the characteristic sequence while other properties such as instability and the independence property manifest themselves in the persistence of complicated configurations under localization.

  11. Scale-PC shielding analysis sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, S.M.

    1996-05-01

    The SCALE computational system is a modular code system for analyses of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. With the release of SCALE-PC Version 4.3, the radiation shielding analysis community now has the capability to execute the SCALE shielding analysis sequences contained in the control modules SAS1, SAS2, SAS3, and SAS4 on a MS- DOS personal computer (PC). In addition, SCALE-PC includes two new sequences, QADS and ORIGEN-ARP. The capabilities of each sequence are presented, along with example applications.

  12. Nanopore-CMOS Interfaces for DNA Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magierowski, Sebastian; Huang, Yiyun; Wang, Chengjie; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim

    2016-08-06

    DNA sequencers based on nanopore sensors present an opportunity for a significant break from the template-based incumbents of the last forty years. Key advantages ushered by nanopore technology include a simplified chemistry and the ability to interface to CMOS technology. The latter opportunity offers substantial promise for improvement in sequencing speed, size and cost. This paper reviews existing and emerging means of interfacing nanopores to CMOS technology with an emphasis on massively-arrayed structures. It presents this in the context of incumbent DNA sequencing techniques, reviews and quantifies nanopore characteristics and models and presents CMOS circuit methods for the amplification of low-current nanopore signals in such interfaces.

  13. How Long is an Aftershock Sequence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godano, Cataldo; Tramelli, Anna

    2016-07-01

    The occurrence of a mainschok is always followed by aftershocks spatially distributed within the fault area. The aftershocks rate decay with time is described by the empirical Omori law which was inferred by catalogues analysis. The sequences discrimination within catalogues is not a straightforward operation, especially for low-magnitude mainshocks. Here, we describe the rate decay of the Omori law obtained using different sequence discrimination tools and we discover that, when the background seismicity is excluded, the sequences tend to last for the temporal extension of the catalogue.

  14. Microbial genomics: from sequence to function.

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, I

    2000-01-01

    The era of genomics (the study of genes and their function) began a scant dozen years ago with a suggestion by James Watson that the complete DNA sequence of the human genome be determined. Since that time, the human genome project has attracted a great deal of attention in the scientific world and the general media; the scope of the sequencing effort, and the extraordinary value that it will provide, has served to mask the enormous progress in sequencing other genomes. Microbial genome seque...

  15. DNA Sequence Determination by Hybridization: A Strategy for Efficient Large-Scale Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drmanac, R.; Drmanac, S.; Strezoska, Z.; Paunesku, T.; Labat, I.; Zeremski, M.; Snoddy, J.; Funkhouser, W. K.; Koop, B.; Hood, L.; Crkvenjakov, R.

    1993-06-01

    The concept of sequencing by hybridization (SBH) makes use of an array of all possible n-nucleotide oligomers (n-mers) to identify n-mers present in an unknown DNA sequence. Computational approaches can then be used to assemble the complete sequence. As a validation of this concept, the sequences of three DNA fragments, 343 base pairs in length, were determined with octamer oligonucleotides. Possible applications of SBH include physical mapping (ordering) of overlapping DNA clones, sequence checking, DNA fingerprinting comparisons of normal and disease-causing genes, and the identification of DNA fragments with particular sequence motifs in complementary DNA and genomic libraries. The SBH techniques may accelerate the mapping and sequencing phases of the human genome project.

  16. Optimization of a sequence of reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui

    1991-01-01

    Concerns the optimal production of sulphuric acid in a sequence of reactors. Using a suitable approximation to the objective function, this problem can easily be solved using the maximum principle. A numerical example documents the applicability of the suggested approach...

  17. Characterizing leader sequences of CRISPR loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkhnbashi, Omer; Shah, Shiraz Ali; Garrett, Roger Antony

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR-Cas system is an adaptive immune system in many archaea and bacteria, which provides resistance against invading genetic elements. The first phase of CRISPR-Cas immunity is called adaptation, in which small DNA fragments are excised from genetic elements and are inserted into a CRISPR...... array generally adjacent to its so called leader sequence at one end of the array. It has been shown that transcription initiation and adaptation signals of the CRISPR array are located within the leader. However, apart from promoters, there is very little knowledge of sequence or structural motifs...... sequences by focusing on the consensus repeat of the adjacent CRISPR array and weak upstream conservation signals. We applied our tool to the analysis of a comprehensive genomic database and identified several characteristic properties of leader sequences specific to archaea and bacteria, ranging from...

  18. Sequencing Information Management System (SIMS). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, C.

    1996-02-15

    A feasibility study to develop a requirements analysis and functional specification for a data management system for large-scale DNA sequencing laboratories resulted in a functional specification for a Sequencing Information Management System (SIMS). This document reports the results of this feasibility study, and includes a functional specification for a SIMS relational schema. The SIMS is an integrated information management system that supports data acquisition, management, analysis, and distribution for DNA sequencing laboratories. The SIMS provides ad hoc query access to information on the sequencing process and its results, and partially automates the transfer of data between laboratory instruments, analysis programs, technical personnel, and managers. The SIMS user interfaces are designed for use by laboratory technicians, laboratory managers, and scientists. The SIMS is designed to run in a heterogeneous, multiplatform environment in a client/server mode. The SIMS communicates with external computational and data resources via the internet.

  19. Extracting biological knowledge from DNA sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De La Vega, F.M. [CINVESTAV-IPN (Mexico); Thieffry, D. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Rhode-Saint-Genese (Belgium)]|[Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Morelos (Mexico); Collado-Vides, J. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Morelos (Mexico)

    1996-12-31

    This session describes the elucidation of information from dna sequences and what challenges computational biologists face in their task of summarizing and deciphering the human genome. Techniques discussed include methods from statistics, information theory, artificial intelligence and linguistics. 1 ref.

  20. Fathead minnow genome sequencing and assembly

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The dataset provides the URLs for accessing the genome sequence data and two draft assemblies as well as fathead minnow genotyping data associated with estimating...

  1. Glycome mapping on DNA sequencing equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroy, Wouter; Contreras, Roland; Callewaert, Nico

    2006-01-01

    Here we provide a detailed protocol for the analysis of protein-linked glycans on DNA sequencing equipment. This protocol satisfies the glyco-analytical needs of many projects and can form the basis of 'glycomics' studies, in which robustness, high throughput, high sensitivity and reliable quantification are of paramount importance. The protocol routinely resolves isobaric glycan stereoisomers, which is much more difficult by mass spectrometry (MS). Earlier methods made use of polyacrylamide gel-based sequencers, but we have now adapted the technique to multicapillary DNA sequencers, which represent the state of the art today. In addition, we have integrated an option for HPLC-based fractionation of highly anionic 8-amino-1,3,6-pyrenetrisulfonic acid (APTS)-labeled glycans before rapid capillary electrophoretic profiling. This option facilitates either two-dimensional profiling of complex glycan mixtures and exoglycosidase sequencing, or MS analysis of particular compounds of interest rather than of the total pool of glycans in a sample.

  2. Long range correlations in DNA sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Mohanty, A K

    2002-01-01

    The so called long range correlation properties of DNA sequences are studied using the variance analyses of the density distribution of a single or a group of nucleotides in a model independent way. This new method which was suggested earlier has been applied to extract slope parameters that characterize the correlation properties for several intron containing and intron less DNA sequences. An important aspect of all the DNA sequences is the properties of complimentarity by virtue of which any two complimentary distributions (like GA is complimentary to TC or G is complimentary to ATC) have identical fluctuations at all scales although their distribution functions need not be identical. Due to this complimentarity, the famous DNA walk representation whose statistical interpretation is still unresolved is shown to be a special case of the present formalism with a density distribution corresponding to a purine or a pyrimidine group. Another interesting aspect of most of the DNA sequences is that the factorial m...

  3. Identifying driver mutations in sequenced cancer genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raphael, Benjamin J; Dobson, Jason R; Oesper, Layla

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput DNA sequencing is revolutionizing the study of cancer and enabling the measurement of the somatic mutations that drive cancer development. However, the resulting sequencing datasets are large and complex, obscuring the clinically important mutations in a background of errors, noise......, and random mutations. Here, we review computational approaches to identify somatic mutations in cancer genome sequences and to distinguish the driver mutations that are responsible for cancer from random, passenger mutations. First, we describe approaches to detect somatic mutations from high-throughput DNA...... sequencing data, particularly for tumor samples that comprise heterogeneous populations of cells. Next, we review computational approaches that aim to predict driver mutations according to their frequency of occurrence in a cohort of samples, or according to their predicted functional impact on protein...

  4. Sequence finishing and mapping of Drosophila melanogasterheterochromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoskins, Roger A.; Carlson, Joseph W.; Kennedy, Cameron; Acevedo,David; Evans-Holm, Martha; Frise, Erwin; Wan, Kenneth H.; Park, Soo; Mendez-Lago, Maria; Rossi, Fabrizio; Villasante, Alfredo; Dimitri,Patrizio; Karpen, Gary H.; Celniker, Susan E.

    2007-06-15

    Genome sequences for most metazoans are incomplete due tothe presence of repeated DNA in the pericentromeric heterochromatin. Theheterochromatic regions of D. melanogaster contain 20 Mb of sequenceamenable to mapping, sequence assembly and finishing. Here we describethe generation of 15 Mb of finished or improved heterochromatic sequenceusing available clone resources and assembly and mapping methods. We alsoconstructed a BAC-based physical map that spans approximately 13 Mb ofthe pericentromeric heterochromatin, and a cytogenetic map that positionsapproximately 11 Mb of BAC contigs and sequence scaffolds in specificchromosomal locations. The integrated sequence assembly and maps greatlyimprove our understanding of the structure and composition of this poorlyunderstood fraction of a metazoan genome and provide a framework forfunctional analyses.

  5. Improved polynomial remainder sequences for Ore polynomials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaroschek, Maximilian

    2013-11-01

    Polynomial remainder sequences contain the intermediate results of the Euclidean algorithm when applied to (non-)commutative polynomials. The running time of the algorithm is dependent on the size of the coefficients of the remainders. Different ways have been studied to make these as small as possible. The subresultant sequence of two polynomials is a polynomial remainder sequence in which the size of the coefficients is optimal in the generic case, but when taking the input from applications, the coefficients are often larger than necessary. We generalize two improvements of the subresultant sequence to Ore polynomials and derive a new bound for the minimal coefficient size. Our approach also yields a new proof for the results in the commutative case, providing a new point of view on the origin of the extraneous factors of the coefficients.

  6. The DWPF Melter proposed heat up sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.E.

    1989-08-11

    Per the request of DWPT supervision, a proposed heatup sequence for the DWPF Melter has been documented in this report. DWPF personnel will use this report as a guide to write the detailed DWPF Melter startup plan. 6 refs.

  7. Supervised Sequence Labelling with Recurrent Neural Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Graves, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Supervised sequence labelling is a vital area of machine learning, encompassing tasks such as speech, handwriting and gesture recognition, protein secondary structure prediction and part-of-speech tagging. Recurrent neural networks are powerful sequence learning tools—robust to input noise and distortion, able to exploit long-range contextual information—that would seem ideally suited to such problems. However their role in large-scale sequence labelling systems has so far been auxiliary.    The goal of this book is a complete framework for classifying and transcribing sequential data with recurrent neural networks only. Three main innovations are introduced in order to realise this goal. Firstly, the connectionist temporal classification output layer allows the framework to be trained with unsegmented target sequences, such as phoneme-level speech transcriptions; this is in contrast to previous connectionist approaches, which were dependent on error-prone prior segmentation. Secondly, multidimensional...

  8. Nanopore DNA sequencing using kinetic proofreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Xinsheng

    We propose a method of DNA sequencing by combining the physical method of nanopore electrical measurements and Southern's sequencing-by-hybridization. The new key ingredient, essential to both lowering the costs and increasing the precision, is an asymmetric nanopore sandwich device capable of measuring the DNA hybridization probe twice separated by a designed waiting time. Those incorrect probes appearing only once in nanopore ionic current traces are discriminated from the correct ones that appear twice. This method of discrimination is similar to the principle of kinetic proofreading proposed by Hopfield and Ninio in gene transcription and translation processes. An error analysis is of this nanopore kinetic proofreading (nKP) technique for DNA sequencing is carried out in comparison with the most precise 3' dideoxy termination method developed by Sanger. Nanopore DNA sequencing using kinetic proofreading.

  9. Network of tRNA Gene Sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Fang-ping; LI Sheng; MA Hong-ru

    2008-01-01

    A network of 3719 tRNA gene sequences was constructed using simplest alignment. Its topology, degree distribution and clustering coefficient were studied. The behaviors of the network shift from fluctuated distribution to scale-free distribution when the similarity degree of the tRNA gene sequences increases. The tRNA gene sequences with the same anticodon identity are more self-organized than those with different anticodon identities and form local clusters in the network. Some vertices of the local cluster have a high connection with other local clusters, and the probable reason was given. Moreover, a network constructed by the same number of random tRNA sequences was used to make comparisons. The relationships between the properties of the tRNA similarity network and the characters of tRNA evolutionary history were discussed.

  10. New stopping criteria for segmenting DNA sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Li, W

    2001-01-01

    We propose a solution on the stopping criterion in segmenting inhomogeneous DNA sequences with complex statistical patterns. This new stopping criterion is based on Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) in the model selection framework. When this stopping criterion is applied to a left telomere sequence of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the complete genome sequence of bacterium Escherichia coli, borders of biologically meaningful units were identified (e.g. subtelomeric units, replication origin, and replication terminus), and a more reasonable number of domains was obtained. We also introduce a measure called segmentation strength which can be used to control the delineation of large domains. The relationship between the average domain size and the threshold of segmentation strength is determined for several genome sequences.

  11. Simultaneous sensorimotor adaptation and sequence learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overduin, Simon A; Richardson, Andrew G; Bizzi, Emilio; Press, Daniel Z

    2008-01-01

    Sensorimotor adaptation and sequence learning have often been treated as distinct forms of motor learning. But frequently the motor system must acquire both types of experience simultaneously. Here, we investigated the interaction of these two forms of motor learning by having subjects adapt to predictable forces imposed by a robotic manipulandum while simultaneously reaching to an implicit sequence of targets. We show that adaptation to novel dynamics and learning of a sequence of movements can occur simultaneously and without significant interference or facilitation. When both conditions were presented simultaneously to subjects, their trajectory error and reaction time decreased to the same extent as those of subjects who experienced the force field or sequence independently.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: isolated lissencephaly sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions isolated lissencephaly sequence isolated lissencephaly ...

  13. Female-specific DNA sequences in geese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, M C; Lin, W C; Horng, Y M; Rouvier, R; Huang, C W

    2003-07-01

    1. The OPAE random primers (Operon Technologies, Inc., CA) were used for random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting in Chinese, White Roman and Landaise geese. One of these primers, OPAE-06, produced a 938-bp sex-specific fragment in all females and in no males of Chinese geese only. 2. A novel female-specific DNA sequence in Chinese goose was cloned and sequenced. Two primers, CGSex-F and CGSex-R, were designed in order to amplify a 912-bp sex-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fragment on genomic DNA from female geese. 3. It was shown that a simple and effective PCR-based sexing technique could be used in the three goose breeds studied. 4. Nucleotide sequencing of the sex-specific fragments in White Roman and Landaise geese was performed and sequence differences were observed among these three breeds.

  14. "X"-tending the Fibonacci Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Glenn T.

    2002-01-01

    Outlines a lesson on the Fibonacci and Lucas sequences that captures student interest by presenting the opportunity for computation practice, mental mathematics, and proof for algebra students. Discusses an extension for solving simultaneous equations. (YDS)

  15. Fibonacci Sequence and Supramolecular Structure of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabalkin, I P; Grigor'eva, E Yu; Gudkova, M V; Shabalkin, P I

    2016-05-01

    We proposed a new model of supramolecular DNA structure. Similar to the previously developed by us model of primary DNA structure [11-15], 3D structure of DNA molecule is assembled in accordance to a mathematic rule known as Fibonacci sequence. Unlike primary DNA structure, supramolecular 3D structure is assembled from complex moieties including a regular tetrahedron and a regular octahedron consisting of monomers, elements of the primary DNA structure. The moieties of the supramolecular DNA structure forming fragments of regular spatial lattice are bound via linker (joint) sequences of the DNA chain. The lattice perceives and transmits information signals over a considerable distance without acoustic aberrations. Linker sequences expand conformational space between lattice segments allowing their sliding relative to each other under the action of external forces. In this case, sliding is provided by stretching of the stacked linker sequences.

  16. The complete DNA sequence of vaccinia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, S J; Johnson, G P; Perkus, M E; Davis, S W; Winslow, J P; Paoletti, E

    1990-11-01

    The complete DNA sequence of the genome of vaccinia virus has been determined. The genome consisted of 191,636 bp with a base composition of 66.6% A + T. We have identified 198 "major" protein-coding regions and 65 overlapping "minor" regions, for a total of 263 potential genes. Genes encoded by the virus were located by examination of DNA sequence characteristics and compared with existing vaccinia virus mapping analyses, sequence data, and transcription data. These genes were found to be compactly organized along the genome with relatively few regions of noncoding sequences. Whereas several similarities to proteins of known function were discerned, the function of the majority of proteins encoded by these open reading frames is as yet undetermined.

  17. ASAP: Amplification, sequencing & annotation of plastomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folta Kevin M

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Availability of DNA sequence information is vital for pursuing structural, functional and comparative genomics studies in plastids. Traditionally, the first step in mining the valuable information within a chloroplast genome requires sequencing a chloroplast plasmid library or BAC clones. These activities involve complicated preparatory procedures like chloroplast DNA isolation or identification of the appropriate BAC clones to be sequenced. Rolling circle amplification (RCA is being used currently to amplify the chloroplast genome from purified chloroplast DNA and the resulting products are sheared and cloned prior to sequencing. Herein we present a universal high-throughput, rapid PCR-based technique to amplify, sequence and assemble plastid genome sequence from diverse species in a short time and at reasonable cost from total plant DNA, using the large inverted repeat region from strawberry and peach as proof of concept. The method exploits the highly conserved coding regions or intergenic regions of plastid genes. Using an informatics approach, chloroplast DNA sequence information from 5 available eudicot plastomes was aligned to identify the most conserved regions. Cognate primer pairs were then designed to generate ~1 – 1.2 kb overlapping amplicons from the inverted repeat region in 14 diverse genera. Results 100% coverage of the inverted repeat region was obtained from Arabidopsis, tobacco, orange, strawberry, peach, lettuce, tomato and Amaranthus. Over 80% coverage was obtained from distant species, including Ginkgo, loblolly pine and Equisetum. Sequence from the inverted repeat region of strawberry and peach plastome was obtained, annotated and analyzed. Additionally, a polymorphic region identified from gel electrophoresis was sequenced from tomato and Amaranthus. Sequence analysis revealed large deletions in these species relative to tobacco plastome thus exhibiting the utility of this method for structural and

  18. Sequencing and Analysis of Neanderthal Genomic DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Noonan, James P.; Coop, Graham; Kudaravalli, Sridhar; Smith, Doug; Krause, Johannes; Alessi, Joe; Chen, Feng; Platt, Darren; Paabo, Svante; Pritchard, Jonathan K; Rubin, Edward M.

    2006-01-01

    Our knowledge of Neanderthals is based on a limited number of remains and artifacts from which we must make inferences about their biology, behavior, and relationship to ourselves. Here, we describe the characterization of these extinct hominids from a new perspective, based on the development of a Neanderthal metagenomic library and its high-throughput sequencing and analysis. Several lines of evidence indicate that the 65,250 base pairs of hominid sequence so far identified in the library a...

  19. Inconsistencies in Neanderthal genomic DNA sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey D Wall

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Two recently published papers describe nuclear DNA sequences that were obtained from the same Neanderthal fossil. Our reanalyses of the data from these studies show that they are not consistent with each other and point to serious problems with the data quality in one of the studies, possibly due to modern human DNA contaminants and/or a high rate of sequencing errors.

  20. Parallel motif extraction from very long sequences

    KAUST Repository

    Sahli, Majed

    2013-01-01

    Motifs are frequent patterns used to identify biological functionality in genomic sequences, periodicity in time series, or user trends in web logs. In contrast to a lot of existing work that focuses on collections of many short sequences, modern applications require mining of motifs in one very long sequence (i.e., in the order of several gigabytes). For this case, there exist statistical approaches that are fast but inaccurate; or combinatorial methods that are sound and complete. Unfortunately, existing combinatorial methods are serial and very slow. Consequently, they are limited to very short sequences (i.e., a few megabytes), small alphabets (typically 4 symbols for DNA sequences), and restricted types of motifs. This paper presents ACME, a combinatorial method for extracting motifs from a single very long sequence. ACME arranges the search space in contiguous blocks that take advantage of the cache hierarchy in modern architectures, and achieves almost an order of magnitude performance gain in serial execution. It also decomposes the search space in a smart way that allows scalability to thousands of processors with more than 90% speedup. ACME is the only method that: (i) scales to gigabyte-long sequences; (ii) handles large alphabets; (iii) supports interesting types of motifs with minimal additional cost; and (iv) is optimized for a variety of architectures such as multi-core systems, clusters in the cloud, and supercomputers. ACME reduces the extraction time for an exact-length query from 4 hours to 7 minutes on a typical workstation; handles 3 orders of magnitude longer sequences; and scales up to 16, 384 cores on a supercomputer. Copyright is held by the owner/author(s).