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Sample records for array scintillation detector

  1. Monte Carlo simulation of the standardization of {sup 22}Na using scintillation detector arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Y., E-mail: yss.sato@aist.go.j [National Metrology Institute of Japan, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Quantum Radiation Division, Radioactivity and Neutron Section, Tsukuba Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Murayama, H. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1, Anagawa, Inage, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yamada, T. [Japan Radioisotope Association, 2-28-45, Hon-komagome, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8941 (Japan); National Metrology Institute of Japan, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Quantum Radiation Division, Radioactivity and Neutron Section, Tsukuba Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Tohoku University, 6-6, Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Hasegawa, T. [Kitasato University, 1-15-1, Kitasato, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 228-8555 (Japan); Oda, K. [Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, 1-1 Nakacho, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-0022 (Japan); Unno, Y.; Yunoki, A. [National Metrology Institute of Japan, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Quantum Radiation Division, Radioactivity and Neutron Section, Tsukuba Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2010-07-15

    In order to calibrate PET devices by a sealed point source, we contrived an absolute activity measurement method for the sealed point source using scintillation detector arrays. This new method was verified by EGS5 Monte Carlo simulation.

  2. Mass Composition Sensitivity of an Array of Water Cherenkov and Scintillation Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, Javier G; Roth, Markus

    2011-01-01

    We consider a hybrid array composed of scintillation and water Cherenkov detectors designed to measure the cosmic ray primary mass composition at energies of about 1 EeV. We have developed a simulation and reconstruction chain to study the theoretical performance of such an array. In this work we investigate the sensitivity of mass composition observables in relation to the geometry of the array. The detectors are arranged in a triangular grid with fixed 750 m spacing and the configuration of the scintillator detectors is optimized for mass composition sensitivity. We show that the performance for composition determination can be compared favorably to that of Xmax measurements after the difference in duty cycles is considered.

  3. Image quality evaluation of linear plastic scintillating fiber array detector for X-ray imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Mehdi NASSERI; MA Qing-Li; YIN Ze-Jie

    2004-01-01

    It is important to assess image quality, in order to ensure that the imaging system is performing optimally and also identify the weak points in an imaging system. Three parameters mostly leading to image degradation are contrast, spatial resolution and noise. There is always a trade-off between spatial resolution and signal to noise ratio,but in scintillating fiber array detectors spatial resolution is not as important as signal to noise ratio, so we paid more attention to contrast and SNR of the system. By using GEANT4 Monte Carlo detector simulation toolkit, some effective parameters of the linear plastic scintillating fiber (PSF) array as an imaging detector were investigated. Finally we show that it is possible to use this kind of detector to take CT and DR (Digital Radiography) image under certain conditions.

  4. Development of Plastic Scintillator Detector Array Based on SPMT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU; Dan; ZHANG; Guo-guang; ZHAO; Xiao; FENG; Shu-qiang; ZHANG; Shuai

    2015-01-01

    Silicon photoelectric multiplier tuber(SPMT)is made of silicon chip,which can collect weak optical signal(Fig.1).When visible light irradiates SPMT,SPMT can change optical signal to electrical signal.The electrical signal size can be obtained through detecting optical signal size.When putting plastic scintillator before

  5. Detector block based on arrays of 144 SiPMs and monolithic scintillators: A performance study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González, A.J.; Conde, P.; Iborra, A. [Institute for Instrumentation in Molecular Imaging (I3M), Universidad Politécnica de Valencia – CSIC – CIEMAT (Spain); Aguilar, A. [Communications and Digital Systems Design Group (DSDC), Universidad de Valencia (Spain); Bellido, P. [Institute for Instrumentation in Molecular Imaging (I3M), Universidad Politécnica de Valencia – CSIC – CIEMAT (Spain); García-Olcina, R. [Communications and Digital Systems Design Group (DSDC), Universidad de Valencia (Spain); Hernández, L.; Moliner, L.; Rigla, J.P.; Rodríguez-Álvarez, M.J.; Sánchez, F.; Seimetz, M.; Soriano, A. [Institute for Instrumentation in Molecular Imaging (I3M), Universidad Politécnica de Valencia – CSIC – CIEMAT (Spain); Torres, J. [Communications and Digital Systems Design Group (DSDC), Universidad de Valencia (Spain); Vidal, L.F.; Benlloch, J.M. [Institute for Instrumentation in Molecular Imaging (I3M), Universidad Politécnica de Valencia – CSIC – CIEMAT (Spain)

    2015-07-01

    We have developed a detector block composed by a monolithic LYSO scintillator coupled to a custom made 12×12 SiPMs array. The design is mainly focused to applications such as Positron Emission Tomography. The readout electronics is based on 3 identical and scalable Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASIC). We have determined the main performance of the detector block namely spatial, energy, and time resolution but also the system capability to determine the photon depth of interaction, for different crystal surface treatments. Intrinsic detector spatial resolution values as good as 1.7 mm FWHM and energies of 15% for black painted crystals were measured.

  6. Assessment of array scintillation detector for follicle thyroid 2-D image acquisition using Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Carlos Borges da; Santanna, Claudio Reis de [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mails: borges@ien.gov.br; santanna@ien.gov.br; Braz, Delson [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear]. E-mail: delson@lin.ufrj.br; Carvalho, Denise Pires de [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho. Lab. de Fisiologia Endocrina]. E-mail: dencarv@ufrj.br

    2007-07-01

    This work presents an innovative study to find out the adequate scintillation inorganic detector array to be used coupled to a specific light photo sensor, a charge coupled device (CCD), through a fiber optic plate. The goal is to choose the type of detector that fits a 2-dimensional imaging acquisition of a cell thyroid tissue application with high resolution and detection efficiency in order to map a follicle image using gamma radiation emission. A point or volumetric source - detector simulation by using a MCNP4B general code, considering different source energies, detector materials and geometry including pixel sizes and reflector types was performed. In this study, simulations were performed for 7 x 7 and 127 x 127 arrays using CsI(Tl) and BGO scintillation crystals with pixel size ranging from 1 x 1 cm{sup 2} to 10 x 10 {mu}m{sup 2} and radiation thickness ranging from 1 mm to 10 mm. The effect of all these parameters was investigated to find the best source-detector system that result in an image with the best contrast details. The results showed that it is possible to design a specific imaging system that allows searching for in-vitro studies, specifically in radiobiology applied to endocrine physiology. (author)

  7. A novel, SiPM-array-based, monolithic scintillator detector for PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaart, Dennis R; Dam, Herman T van; Seifert, Stefan; Beekman, Freek J [Delft University of Technology, Radiation Detection and Medical Imaging, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Vinke, Ruud; Dendooven, Peter; Loehner, Herbert [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, Zernikelaan 25, 9747 AA, Groningen (Netherlands)], E-mail: d.r.schaart@tudelft.nl

    2009-06-07

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are of great interest to positron emission tomography (PET), as they enable new detector geometries, for e.g., depth-of-interaction (DOI) determination, are MR compatible, and offer faster response and higher gain than other solid-state photosensors such as avalanche photodiodes. Here we present a novel detector design with DOI correction, in which a position-sensitive SiPM array is used to read out a monolithic scintillator. Initial characterization of a prototype detector consisting of a 4 x 4 SiPM array coupled to either the front or back surface of a 13.2 mm x 13.2 mm x 10 mm LYSO:Ce{sup 3+} crystal shows that front-side readout results in significantly better performance than conventional back-side readout. Spatial resolutions <1.6 mm full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) were measured at the detector centre in response to an {approx}0.54 mm FWHM diameter test beam. Hardly any resolution losses were observed at angles of incidence up to 45 deg., demonstrating excellent DOI correction. About 14% FWHM energy resolution was obtained. The timing resolution, measured in coincidence with a BaF{sub 2} detector, equals 960 ps FWHM.

  8. Performance assessment of a 2D array of plastic scintillation detectors for IMRT quality assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillot, Mathieu; Gingras, Luc; Archambault, Louis; Beddar, Sam; Beaulieu, Luc

    2013-07-01

    The purposes of this work are to assess the performance of a 2D plastic scintillation detectors array prototype for quality assurance in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and to determine its sensitivity and specificity to positioning errors of one multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf and one MLC leaf bank by applying the principles of signal detection theory. Ten treatment plans (step-and-shoot delivery) and one volumetric modulated arc therapy plan were measured and compared to calculations from two treatment-planning systems (TPSs) and to radiochromic films. The averages gamma passing rates per beam found for the step-and-shoot plans were 95.8% for the criteria (3%, 2 mm), 97.8% for the criteria (4%, 2 mm), and 98.1% for the criteria (3%, 3 mm) when measurements were compared to TPS calculations. The receiver operating characteristic curves for the one leaf errors and one leaf bank errors were determined from simulations (theoretical upper limits) and measurements. This work concludes that arrays of plastic scintillation detectors could be used for IMRT quality assurance in clinics. The use of signal detection theory could improve the quality of dosimetric verifications in radiation therapy by providing optimal discrimination criteria for the detection of different classes of errors.

  9. Dosimetric performance and array assessment of plastic scintillation detectors for stereotactic radiosurgery quality assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagnon, Jean-Christophe; Theriault, Dany; Guillot, Mathieu; Archambault, Louis; Beddar, Sam; Gingras, Luc; Beaulieu, Luc [Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Department of Radiation Physics, Unit 94, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada)

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: To compare the performance of plastic scintillation detectors (PSD) for quality assurance (QA) in stereotactic radiosurgery conditions to a microion-chamber (IC), Gafchromic EBT2 films, 60 008 shielded photon diode (SD) and unshielded diodes (UD), and assess a new 2D crosshair array prototype adapted to small field dosimetry. Methods: The PSD consists of a 1 mm diameter by 1 mm long scintillating fiber (BCF-60, Saint-Gobain, Inc.) coupled to a polymethyl-methacrylate optical fiber (Eska premier, Mitsubishi Rayon Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan). Output factors (S{sub c,p}) for apertures used in radiosurgery ranging from 4 to 40 mm in diameter have been measured. The PSD crosshair array (PSDCA) is a water equivalent device made up of 49 PSDs contained in a 1.63 cm radius area. Dose profiles measurements were taken for radiosurgery fields using the PSDCA and were compared to other dosimeters. Moreover, a typical stereotactic radiosurgery treatment using four noncoplanar arcs was delivered on a spherical phantom in which UD, IC, or PSD was placed. Using the Xknife planning system (Integra Radionics Burlington, MA), 15 Gy was prescribed at the isocenter, where each detector was positioned. Results: Output Factors measured by the PSD have a mean difference of 1.3% with Gafchromic EBT2 when normalized to a 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} field, and 1.0% when compared with UD measurements normalized to the 35 mm diameter cone. Dose profiles taken with the PSD crosshair array agreed with other single detectors dose profiles in spite of the presence of the 49 PSDs. Gamma values comparing 1D dose profiles obtained with PSD crosshair array with Gafchromic EBT2 and UD measured profiles shows 98.3% and 100.0%, respectively, of detector passing the gamma acceptance criteria of 0.3 mm and 2%. The dose measured by the PSD for a complete stereotactic radiosurgery treatment is comparable to the planned dose corrected for its SD-based S{sub c,p} within 1.4% and 0.7% for 5 and 35 mm diameter cone

  10. Study on the energy response to neutrons for a new scintillating-fiber-array neutron detector

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang Qi; Wang Qun; Xie Zhong Shen

    2003-01-01

    The energy response of a new scintillating-fiber-array neutron detector to neutrons in the energy range 0.01 MeV<=E sub n<=14 MeV was modeled by combining a simplified Monte Carlo model and the MCNP 4b code. In order to test the model and get the absolute sensitivity of the detector to neutrons, one experiment was carried out for 2.5 and 14 MeV neutrons from T(p,n) sup 3 He and T(d,n) sup 4 He reactions at the Neutron Generator Laboratory at the Institute of Modern Physics, the Chinese Academy of Science. The absolute neutron fluence was obtained with a relative standard uncertainty 4.5% or 2.0% by monitoring the associated protons or sup 4 He particles, respectively. Another experiment was carried out for 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 MeV neutrons from T(p,n) sup 3 He reaction, and for 3.28, 3.50, 4.83, 5.74 MeV neutrons from D(d,n) sup 3 He reaction on the Model 5SDH-2 accelerator at China Institute of Atomic Energy. The absolute neutron fluence was obtained with a relative standard uncertainty 5.0% by usin...

  11. Microfluidic Scintillation Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Microfluidic scintillation detectors are devices of recent introduction for the detection of high energy particles, developed within the EP-DT group at CERN. Most of the interest for such technology comes from the use of liquid scintillators, which entails the possibility of changing the active material in the detector, leading to an increased radiation resistance. This feature, together with the high spatial resolution and low thickness deriving from the microfabrication techniques used to manufacture such devices, is desirable not only in instrumentation for high energy physics experiments but also in medical detectors such as beam monitors for hadron therapy.

  12. Design of Multi-unit Control System of High Voltage Power Supply for LASCAR Scintillator Detector Array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WuLijie; WangJinchuan; XiaoGuoqing; GuoZhongyan; ZhanWenlong; QiHuirong; XuZhiguo; ZhangLi; DingXianli; XuHushan; SunZhiyu; LiJiaxing; LiChen; WangMeng; ChenLixin; HuZhengguo; MaoRuishi; ZhaoTiecheng

    2003-01-01

    The power voltages of Photomultipliers (PMTs) at RIBLL LASCAR scintillator detector array are distributed between 900 V and 1 800 V irregularly. 392 CC123 modules are employed to supply high voltage for the PMT array. The CC123 module serves as PMT interface groupware package, and it can transform +12 V DC input voltage to ranges of 0~-2200 V for the PMT power supply corresponding to 0~+5 V output voltage from the control board crate. The relation of PMT power supply with the output voltage of the control crate is shown in Fig.1.

  13. Neutron detection and multiplicity counting using a boron-loaded plastic scintillator/bismuth germanate phoswich detector array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M.C.

    1998-03-01

    Neutron detection and multiplicity counting has been investigated using a boron-loaded plastic scintillator/bismuth germanate phoswich detector array. Boron-loaded plastic combines neutron moderation (H) and detection ({sup 10}B) at the molecular level, thereby physically coupling increasing detection efficiency and decreasing die-away time with detector volume. Both of these characteristics address a fundamental limitation of thermal-neutron multiplicity counters, where {sup 3}He proportional counters are embedded in a polyethylene matrix. Separation of the phoswich response into its plastic scintillator and bismuth germanate components was accomplished on a pulse-by-pulse basis using custom integrator and timing circuits. In addition, a custom time-tag module was used to provide a time for each detector event. Analysis of the combined energy and time event stream was performed by calibrating each detector`s response and filtering based on the presence of a simultaneous energy deposition corresponding to the {sup 10}B(n,alpha) reaction products in the plastic scintillator (93 keV{sub ee}) and the accompanying neutron-capture gamma ray in the bismuth germanate (478 keV). Time-correlation analysis was subsequently performed on the filtered event stream to obtain shift-register-type singles and doubles count rates. Proof-of-principle measurements were conducted with a variety of gamma-ray and neutron sources including {sup 137}Cs, {sup 54}Mn, AmLi, and {sup 252}Cf. Results of this study indicate that a neutron-capture probability of {approximately}10% and a die-away time of {approximately}10 {micro}s are possible with a 4-detector array with a detector volume of 1600 cm{sup 3}. Simulations were performed that indicate neutron-capture probabilities on the order of 50% and die-away times of less than 4 {micro}s are realistically achievable. While further study will be required for practical application of such a detection system, the results obtained in this

  14. Evaluation of a SiPM array detector coupled to a LFS-3 pixellated scintillator for PET/MR applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, Stratos; Fysikopoulos, Eleftherios [Technological Educational Institute of Athens (Greece); Georgiou, Maria [Technological Educational Institute of Athens (Greece); Department of Medical School, University of Thessaly, Larissa (Greece); Loudos, George [Technological Educational Institute of Athens (Greece)

    2015-05-18

    SiPM arrays are insensitive to magnetic fields and thus good candidates for hybrid PET/MR imaging systems. Moreover, due to their small size and flexibility can be used in dedicated small field of view small animal imaging detectors and especially in head PET/MR studies in mice. Co-doped LFS-3 scintillator crystals have higher light yield and slightly faster response than that of LSO:Ce mainly due to the co-doped activation of emission centers with varying materials such as Ce, Gd, Sc, Y, La, Tb, or Ca distributed at the molecular scale through the lutetium silicate crystal host. The purpose of this study is to investigate the behavior of the SensL ArraySL-4 (4x4 element array of 3x3 mm{sup 2} silicon photomultipliers) optical detector coupled to a 6x6 LFS-3 scintillator array, with 2x2x5 mm{sup 3} crystal size elements, for possible applications in small field of view PET/MR imaging detectors. We have designed a symmetric resistive charge division circuit to read out the signal outputs of 4x4 pixel SiPM array reducing the 16 pixel outputs of the photodetector to 4 position signals. The 4 position signals were digitized using free running Analog to Digital Converters. The ADCs sampling rate was 50 MHz. An FPGA (Spartan 6 LX150T) was used for triggering and digital signal processing of the pulses. Experimental evaluation was carried out with {sup 22}Na radioactive source and the parameters studied where energy resolution and peak to valley ratio. The first preliminary results of the evaluation shows a clear visualization of the discrete 2x2x5 mm{sup 3} LFS-3 scintillator elements. The mean peak to valley ratio of the horizontal profiles on the raw image was measured equal to 11 while the energy resolution was calculated equal to 30% at the central pixels.

  15. Investigation of behavior of scintillator detector of Alborz observatory array using Monte Carlo method with Geant4 code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abbasian Motlagh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available For their appropriate temporal resolution, scintillator detectors are used in the Alborz observatory. In this work, the behavior of the scintillation detectors for the passage of electrons with different energies and directions were studied using the simulation code GEANT4. Pulse shapes of scintillation light, and such characteristics as the total number of photons, the rise time and the falling time for the optical pulses were computed for the passage of electrons with energies of 10, 100 and 1000 MeV. Variations of the characteristics of optical pulse of scintillation with incident angle and the location of electrons were also investigated

  16. A high-spatial-resolution three-dimensional detector array for 30-200 keV X-rays based on structured scintillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Ulrik Lund; Schmidt, Søren; Poulsen, Henning Friis

    2008-01-01

    A three-dimensional X-ray detector for imaging 30-200 keV photons is described. It comprises a set of semi-transparent structured scintillators, where each scintillator is a regular array of waveguides in silicon, and with pores filled with CsI. The performance of the detector is described theore...... in efficiency by a factor of 5-15 is obtainable. The cross-talk between screens in the three-dimensional detector is shown to be negligible. The three-dimensional concept enables ray-tracing and super-resolution algorithms to be applied....

  17. Scintillating fiber detector

    CERN Document Server

    Vozak, Matous

    2016-01-01

    NA61 is one of the physics experiments at CERN dedicated to study hadron states coming from interactions of SPS beams with various targets. To determine the position of a secondary beam, three proportional chambers are placed along the beamline. However, these chambers tend to have slow response. In order to obtain more precise time information, use of another detector is being considered. Fast response and compact size is making scintillation fiber (SciFi) with silicon photomultiplier (Si-PM) read out a good candidate. This report is focused on analysing data from SciFi collected in a test beam at the beginning of July 2016.

  18. Scintillation detectors of Alborz-I experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pezeshkian, Yousef [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O.Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alborz Observatory, Sharif University of Technology, P.O.Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bahmanabadi, Mahmud, E-mail: bahmanabadi@sharif.edu [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O.Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alborz Observatory, Sharif University of Technology, P.O.Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abbasian Motlagh, Mehdi; Rezaie, Masume [Alborz Observatory, Sharif University of Technology, P.O.Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-02-11

    A new air shower experiment of the Alborz Observatory, Alborz-I, located at the Sharif University of Technology, Iran, will be constructed in near future. An area of about 30×40 m{sup 2} will be covered by 20 plastic scintillation detectors (each with an area of 50×50 cm{sup 2}). A series of experiments have been performed to optimize the height of light enclosures of the detectors for this array and the results have been compared to an extended code simulation of these detectors. Operational parameters of the detector obtained by this code are cross checked by the Geant4 simulation. There is a good agreement between the extended-code and Geant4 simulations. We also present further discussions on the detector characteristics, which can be applicable for all scintillation detectors with a similar configuration.

  19. Scintillation detectors of Alborz-I experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Pezeshkian, Yousef; Motlagh, Mehdi Abbasian; Rezaie, Masoume

    2014-01-01

    A new air shower experiment of the Alborz Observatory, Alborz-I, located at the Sharif University of Technology, Iran, will be constructed in near future. An area of about 30$\\times$40 m$^{2}$ will be covered by 20 plastic scintillation detectors (each with an area of 50$\\times$50 cm$^{2}$). A series of experiments have been performed to optimize the height of light enclosures of the detectors for this array and the results have been compared to an extended code simulation of these detectors. Operational parameters of the detector obtained by this code are cross checked by Geant4 simulation. There is a good agreement between extended-code and Geant4 simulations. We also present further discussions on the detector characteristics, which can be applicable for all scintillation detectors with a similar configuration.

  20. Characterization of liquid scintillation detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, D; Böttger, R; Klein, H; Lebreton, L; Neumann, S; Nolte, R; Pichenot, G

    2002-01-01

    Five scintillation detectors of different scintillator size and type were characterized. The pulse height scale was calibrated in terms of electron light output units using photon sources. The response functions for time-of-flight (TOF)-selected monoenergetic neutrons were experimentally determined and also simulated with the NRESP code over a wide energy range. A comparison of the measured and calculated response functions allows individual characteristics of the detectors to be determined and the response matrix to be reliably derived. Various applications are discussed.

  1. ScintSim1: A new Monte Carlo simulation code for transport of optical photons in 2D arrays of scintillation detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosleh-Shirazi, Mohammad Amin; Zarrini-Monfared, Zinat; Karbasi, Sareh; Zamani, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) arrays of thick segmented scintillators are of interest as X-ray detectors for both 2D and 3D image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Their detection process involves ionizing radiation energy deposition followed by production and transport of optical photons. Only a very limited number of optical Monte Carlo simulation models exist, which has limited the number of modeling studies that have considered both stages of the detection process. We present ScintSim1, an in-house optical Monte Carlo simulation code for 2D arrays of scintillation crystals, developed in the MATLAB programming environment. The code was rewritten and revised based on an existing program for single-element detectors, with the additional capability to model 2D arrays of elements with configurable dimensions, material, etc., The code generates and follows each optical photon history through the detector element (and, in case of cross-talk, the surrounding ones) until it reaches a configurable receptor, or is attenuated. The new model was verified by testing against relevant theoretically known behaviors or quantities and the results of a validated single-element model. For both sets of comparisons, the discrepancies in the calculated quantities were all detector optimization.

  2. Fabrication and characterization of cubic SrI{sub 2}(Eu) scintillators for use in array detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimazoe, K., E-mail: shimazoe@bioeng.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Koyama, A.; Takahashi, H. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Sakuragi, S. [Union Materials Inc., Tone-machi, Ibaraki (Japan); Yamasaki, Y. [Leading Edge Algorithm Co. Ltd., Hikaridai, Seikacho, Kyoto (Japan)

    2016-02-21

    Strontium iodide (SrI{sub 2}(Eu)) is a promising spectroscopic detector for use in both nuclear security and medical imaging owing to its excellent energy resolution and low internal background radiation. A cubic form is preferable when coupling with a silicon-based photosensor in order to build an array detector for use in applications such as Compton cameras. Here, cubic SrI{sub 2}(Eu) crystals with 10 mm sides were fabricated and evaluated. The cubic SrI{sub 2}(Eu) samples coupled to an avalanche photodiode exhibited an energy resolution of approximately 3.6% at 662 keV when using a shaping time of 3 µs. An increase in light output and an improvement of energy resolution were also observed at lower temperatures. The excellent energy resolution of these devices indicates that these crystals are promising potential detectors for use in Compton cameras and other imaging detectors.

  3. A remote reactor monitoring with plastic scintillation detector

    CERN Document Server

    Georgadze, A Sh; Ponkratenko, O A; Litvinov, D A

    2016-01-01

    Conceiving the possibility of using plastic scintillator bars as robust detectors for antineutrino detection for the remote reactor monitoring and nuclear safeguard application we study expected basic performance by Monte Carlo simulation. We present preliminary results for a 1 m3 highly segmented detector made of 100 rectangular scintillation bars forming an array which is sandwiched at both sides by the continuous light guides enabling light sharing between all photo detectors. Light detection efficiency is calculated for several light collection configurations, considering different scintillation block geometries and number of photo-detectors. The photo-detectors signals are forming the specific hit pattern, which is characterizing the impinging particle. The statistical analysis of hit patterns allows effectively select antineutrino events and rejects backgrounds. To evaluate detector sensitivity to fuel isotopic composition evolution during fuel burning cycle we have calculated antineutrino spectra. The ...

  4. Scintillation Detectors for Charged Particles and Photons

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, P

    2011-01-01

    Scintillation Detectors for Charged Particles and Photons in 'Charged Particle Detectors - Particle Detectors and Detector Systems', part of 'Landolt-Börnstein - Group I Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms: Numerical Data and Functional Relationships in Science and Technology, Volume 21B1: Detectors for Particles and Radiation. Part 1: Principles and Methods'. This document is part of Part 1 'Principles and Methods' of Subvolume B 'Detectors for Particles and Radiation' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the Subsection '3.1.1 Scintillation Detectors for Charged Particles and Photons' of Section '3.1 Charged Particle Detectors' of Chapter '3 Particle Detectors and Detector Systems' with the content: 3.1.1 Scintillation Detectors for Charged Particles and Photons 3.1.1.1 Basic detector principles and scintillator requirements 3.1.1.1.1 Interaction of ionizing radiation with scintillator material 3.1.1.1.2 Important scint...

  5. A new water-equivalent 2D plastic scintillation detectors array for the dosimetry of megavoltage energy photon beams in radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillot, Mathieu; Beaulieu, Luc; Archambault, Louis; Beddar, Sam; Gingras, Luc [Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Department of Radiation Physics, Unit 94, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada)

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: The objective of this work is to present a new 2D plastic scintillation detectors array (2D-PSDA) designed for the dosimetry of megavoltage (MV) energy photon beams in radiation therapy and to characterize its basic performance. Methods: We developed a 2D detector array consisting of 781 plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) inserted into a plane of a water-equivalent phantom. The PSDs were distributed on a 26 x 26 cm{sup 2} grid, with an interdetector spacing of 10 mm, except for two perpendicular lines centered on the detection plane, where the spacing was 5 mm. Each PSD was made of a 1 mm diameter by 3 mm long cylindrical polystyrene scintillating fiber coupled to a clear nonscintillating plastic optical fiber. All of the light signals emitted by the PSDs were read simultaneously with an optical system at a rate of one measurement per second. We characterized the performance of the optical system, the angular dependency of the device, and the perturbation of dose distributions caused by the hundreds of PSDs inserted into the phantom. We also evaluated the capacity of the system to monitor complex multileaf collimator (MLC) sequences such as those encountered in step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans. We compared our results with calculations performed by a treatment planning system and with measurements taken with a 2D ionization chamber array and with a radiochromic film. Results: The detector array that we developed allowed us to measure doses with an average precision of better than 1% for cumulated doses equal to or greater than 6.3 cGy. Our results showed that the dose distributions produced by the 6-MV photon beam are not perturbed (within {+-}1.1%) by the presence of the hundreds of PSDs located into the phantom. The results also showed that the variations in the beam incidences have little effect on the dose response of the device. For all incidences tested, the passing rates of the gamma tests between the 2D-PSDA and

  6. Microfluidic Scintillation Detectors for High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Maoddi, Pietro; Mapelli, Alessandro

    This thesis deals with the development and study of microfluidic scintillation detectors, a technology of recent introduction for the detection of high energy particles. Most of the interest for such devices comes from the use of a liquid scintillator, which entails the possibility of changing the active material in the detector, leading to increased radiation resistance. A first part of the thesis focuses on the work performed in terms of design and modelling studies of novel prototype devices, hinting to new possibilities and applications. In this framework, the simulations performed to validate selected designs and the main technological choices made in view of their fabrication are addressed. The second part of this thesis deals with the microfabrication of several prototype devices. Two different materials were studied for the manufacturing of microfluidic scintillation detectors, namely the SU-8 photosensitive epoxy and monocrystalline silicon. For what concerns the former, an original fabrication appro...

  7. Scintillation detectors in computerized tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilar, O.; Pavlicek, Z.; Jursova, L. (Tesla, Premysleni (Czechoslovakia). Vyzkumny Ustav Pristroju Jaderne Techniky)

    1984-07-01

    A new scintillator, Bi/sub 4/Ge/sub 3/O/sub 12/ (BGO), was tested for use in the detection part of computerized tomographs. In comparison with the NaI(Tl) scintillator it has a three-fold mass stopping power and allows the detection of medium and high energy gamma radiation with a higher detection efficiency, i.e., for the same detection efficiency its size is much smaller. Some other mechanical, physical and optical parameters of the BGO scintillator are given. BGO is prospective for use in high energy spectrometry and may replace NaI(Tl) wherever the following parameters are significant: crystal size, detection efficiency for gamma radiation, and good spatial resolution.

  8. Study Performance of Liquid Scintillation Fiber Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yongpeng; Lu, Haoqi; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Chengcai; Yang, Changgen

    2016-01-01

    Liquid scintillator (LS) with optical fiber detector (LSOF detector) is a new type of detector, which has been applied in large-scale particle physics experiments in recent years. We were proposing LSOF detector as one option of top veto detector in Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) experiment. The prototype detector was located in laboratory of the institute of high energy physics (IHEP). From prototype study, we found that the detector have a good performance and can satisfy JUNO requirement. The detection efficiency of cosmic ray muon is greater than 98% and can collect 58 photon electrons (p.e.) when muon is going through the detector. Further more, the relationship between p.e., material reflectivity and LS depth are studied. We also compared the data with Monte Carlo simulation, and they have a good agreement with each other.

  9. Semiconductor High-Energy Radiation Scintillation Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kastalsky, A; Spivak, B

    2006-01-01

    We propose a new scintillation-type detector in which high-energy radiation produces electron-hole pairs in a direct-gap semiconductor material that subsequently recombine producing infrared light to be registered by a photo-detector. The key issue is how to make the semiconductor essentially transparent to its own infrared light, so that photons generated deep inside the semiconductor could reach its surface without tangible attenuation. We discuss two ways to accomplish this, one based on doping the semiconductor with shallow impurities of one polarity type, preferably donors, the other by heterostructure bandgap engineering. The proposed semiconductor scintillator combines the best properties of currently existing radiation detectors and can be used for both simple radiation monitoring, like a Geiger counter, and for high-resolution spectrography of the high-energy radiation. The most important advantage of the proposed detector is its fast response time, about 1 ns, essentially limited only by the recombi...

  10. Characterization of the scintillation anisotropy in crystalline stilbene scintillator detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Schuster, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a series of measurements that characterize the directional dependence of the scintillation response of crystalline melt-grown and solution-grown stilbene to incident DT and DD neutrons. These measurements give the amplitude and pulse shape dependence on the proton recoil direction over one hemisphere of the crystal, confirming and extending previous results in the literature for melt-grown stilbene and providing the first measurements for solution-grown stilbene. In similar measurements of liquid and plastic detectors, no directional dependence was observed, confirming the hypothesis that the anisotropy in stilbene and other organic crystal scintillators is a result of internal effects due to the molecular or crystal structure and not an external effect on the measurement system.

  11. Development and Studies of Novel Microfabricated Radiation Hard Scintillation Detectors With High Spatial Resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Mapelli, A; Haguenauer, M; Jiguet, S; Renaud, P; Vico Triviño, N

    2011-01-01

    A new type of scintillation detector is being developed with standard microfabrication techniques. It consists of a dense array of scintillating waveguides obtained by coupling microfluidic channels filled with a liquid scintillator to photodetectors. Easy manipulation of liquid scintillators inside microfluidic devices allow their flushing, renewal, and exchange making the active medium intrinsically radiation hard. Prototype detectors have been fabricated by photostructuration of a radiation hard epoxy resin (SU-8) deposited on silicon wafers and coupled to a multi-anode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT) to read-out the scintillation light. They have been characterized by exciting the liquid scintillator in the 200 micrometers thick microchannels with electrons from a 90Sr yielding approximately 1 photoelectron per impinging Minimum Ionizing Particle (MIP). These promising results demonstrate the concept of microfluidic scintillating detection and are very encouraging for future developments.

  12. Scintillation Detectors in Experiments on Plasma Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Bystritsky, V M; Gerasimov, V V; Kublikov, R V; Nechaev, B A; Padalko, V M; Parzhitski, S S; Smirnov, V S; Wozniak, J

    2005-01-01

    The gating circuits for photomultipliers of scintillation detectors operating in powerful pulsed electromagnetic and nuclear radiation fields are investigated. PMTs with the jalousie-type dynode system and with the linear dynode system are considered. The basic gating circuits of the photomultipliers involving active and resistor high-voltage dividers are given. The results of the investigations are important for experiments in which it is necessary to discriminate in time the preceding background radiation and the process of interest.

  13. Study of the characteristics of SiPMs matrix as a photosensor for the scintillation detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Dzaparova, I M; Gavrilyuk, Yu M; Petkov, V B; Sergeev, A V; Volchenko, V I; Yakimenko, S P; Yanin, A F

    2015-01-01

    The matrices formed of silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are very promising photosensors for the scintillation detectors. The use of SiPM matrices with appropriate optical collector gives, in principle, a possibility to do a snapshot of glowing track of charged particle traversing a scintillator. The prototype of such scintillation detector is under development now in INR RAS. The preliminary results of characterization study of the matrix ArrayC-60035-64P-PCB (SensL company) for the prototype of such detector are presented.

  14. Energy & Position Reconstruction on CsI(Tl)Scintillator Detector Array in TEXONO Experiment%TEXONO实验中CsI(Tl)闪烁体探测器阵列的能量与位置重建

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱越锋; 李玉兰; 王子敬; 李金; Venktesh.Singh; 林兴德

    2005-01-01

    A high-Z nuclei detector based reactor neutrino spectra measurement is being operated by TEXONO collaboration,focusing on low energy low background experiments in neutrino and astroparticle physics.This article reviews the data processing procedures adopted on CsI(Tl)scintillator detector array,one of the two major detectors in TEXONO project.Owing to the complications in reconstructing energy spectra from the two-end output system,two approaches are introduced to improve the resolution of the final result.%简略叙述了TEXONO实验中的数据分析方法.对于双端读出的CsI(Tl)晶体探测器的能量重建中出现的两类问题分别提出了补偿方法,以提高能量谱的分辨率.

  15. Combined scintillation detector for gamma dose rate measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viererbl, L.; Novakova, O.; Jursova, L. (Tesla, Premysleni (Czechoslovakia). Vyzkumny Ustav Pristroju Jaderne Techniky)

    1990-01-01

    The specifications are described of a newly developed scintillation detector, essentially consisting of a plastic scintillator completed with inorganic scintillators ZnS(Ag) and NaI(Tl). The gamma dose rate is derived from the photomultiplier anode current. The composition and sizes of the scintillators and the capsule are selected so as to minimise the energy dependence errors and directional dependence errors of the detector response over a wide range of energies and/or angles. (author).

  16. Neutron spectroscopy with scintillation detectors using wavelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Jessica

    The purpose of this research was to study neutron spectroscopy using the EJ-299-33A plastic scintillator. This scintillator material provided a novel means of detection for fast neutrons, without the disadvantages of traditional liquid scintillation materials. EJ-299-33A provided a more durable option to these materials, making it less likely to be damaged during handling. Unlike liquid scintillators, this plastic scintillator was manufactured from a non-toxic material, making it safer to use, as well as easier to design detectors. The material was also manufactured with inherent pulse shape discrimination abilities, making it suitable for use in neutron detection. The neutron spectral unfolding technique was developed in two stages. Initial detector response function modeling was carried out through the use of the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. The response functions were developed for a monoenergetic neutron flux. Wavelets were then applied to smooth the response function. The spectral unfolding technique was applied through polynomial fitting and optimization techniques in MATLAB. Verification of the unfolding technique was carried out through the use of experimentally determined response functions. These were measured on the neutron source based on the Van de Graff accelerator at the University of Kentucky. This machine provided a range of monoenergetic neutron beams between 0.1 MeV and 24 MeV, making it possible to measure the set of response functions of the EJ-299-33A plastic scintillator detector to neutrons of specific energies. The response of a plutonium-beryllium (PuBe) source was measured using the source available at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. The neutron spectrum reconstruction was carried out using the experimentally measured response functions. Experimental data was collected in the list mode of the waveform digitizer. Post processing of this data focused on the pulse shape discrimination analysis of the recorded response functions to remove the

  17. Central Tracking Detector Based on Scintillating Fibres

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Scintillating fibres form a reasonable compromise for central tracking detectors in terms of price, resolution, response time, occupancy and heat production. \\\\ \\\\ New fluorescents with large Stokes shifts have been produced, capable of working without wavelength shifters. Coherent multibundles have been developed to achieve high packing fractions. Small segments of tracker shell have been assembled and beam tests have confirmed expectations on spatial resolution. An opto-electronic delay line has been designed to delay the track patterns and enable coincidences with a first level trigger. Replacement of the conventional phosphor screen anode with a Si pixel chip is achieved. This tube is called ISPA-tube and has already been operated in beam tests with a scintillating fibres tracker. \\\\ \\\\ The aim of the proposal is to improve hit densities for small diameter fibres by increasing the fraction of trapped light, by reducing absorption and reflection losses, by reflecting light at the free fibre end, and by inc...

  18. Scintillating fiber detectors for the HypHI project at GSI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nakajima, D.; Oezel-Tashenov, B.; Bianchin, S.; Borodina, O.; Bozkurt, V.; Gokuzum, B.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Minami, S.; Rappold, C.; Saito, T. R.; Achenbach, P.; Ajimura, S.; Ayerbe, C.; Fukuda, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Hiraiwa, T.; Hoffmann, J.; Koch, K.; Kurz, N.; Lepyoshkina, O.; Maas, F.; Mizoi, Y.; Mochizuki, T.; Moritsu, M.; Nagae, T.; Nungesser, L.; Okamura, A.; Ott, W.; Pochodzalla, J.; Sakaguchi, A.; Sako, M.; Schmidt, C. J.; Sugimura, H.; Tanida, K.; Traeger, M.; Trautmann, W.; Voltz, S.

    2009-01-01

    The construction and properties of three sets of two-dimensional scintillating fiber detector arrays for tracking of charged particles used in the HypHI Phase 0 experiment at GSI will be reported in this paper. The position resolutions and the detection efficiency of detectors have been obtained for

  19. Nonproportionality of Scintillator Detectors: Theory and Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payne, Stephen; Cherepy, Nerine; Hull, Giulia; Valentine, John; Moses, William; Choong, Woon-Seng

    2009-08-17

    On the basis of nonproportionality data obtained for several scintillators, we have developed a theory to describe the carrier dynamics to fit the light yield versus electron energy. The theory of Onsager was adapted to explain how the carriers form excitons or sequentially arrive at the activators to promote the ion to an excited state, and the theory of Birks was employed to allow for exciton-exciton annihilation. We then developed a second theory to deduce the degradation in resolution that results from nonproportionality by evoking Landau fluctuations, which are essentially variations in the deposited energy density that occur as the high energy electron travels along its trajectory. In general there is good agreement with the data, in terms of fitting the nonproportionality curves and reproducing the literature values of nonproportionality's contribution to the scintillator resolution. With the resurgence of interest in developing scintillator detectors that have good energy resolution, an improved understanding of nonproportionality has become a crucial matter since it presents the fundamental limit to the achievable resolution. In order to hasten an improved understanding of scintillator nonproportionality, we have constructed an instrument referred to as SLYNCI (Scintillator Light Yield Nonproportionality Compton Instrument). This is a second-generation instrument to the original device developed by Valentine and coworkers, wherein several new principles of operation have served to increase the data rate by an order of magnitude as discussed in detail in References. In the present article, the focus is on a theory to describe the measured electron response, which is the light yield as a function of the electron energy. To do this, we account for transport of carriers and excitons, in terms of how they transfer their energy to the activators with competition from nonradiative decay pathways. This work builds on the original work of Murray and coworkers

  20. Large-scale liquid scintillation detectors for solar neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benziger, Jay B.; Calaprice, Frank P. [Princeton University Princeton, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Large-scale liquid scintillation detectors are capable of providing spectral yields of the low energy solar neutrinos. These detectors require > 100 tons of liquid scintillator with high optical and radiopurity. In this paper requirements for low-energy neutrino detection by liquid scintillation are specified and the procedures to achieve low backgrounds in large-scale liquid scintillation detectors for solar neutrinos are reviewed. The designs, operations and achievements of Borexino, KamLAND and SNO+ in measuring the low-energy solar neutrino fluxes are reviewed. (orig.)

  1. Study on Signal Processing Circuit Based on Scintillation Detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO; Yong-gang; DENG; Chang-ming; LI; Jian-wei; XIAO; Cai-jin; ZHANG; Gui-ying; WANG; Ping-sheng; WANG; Xing-hua; JIN; Xiang-chun; HUA; Long; YUAN; Guo-jun; NI; Bang-fa

    2013-01-01

    Compared with silicon semiconductor detector,higher energy resolution and together with the high detection efficiency,big sensitive volume,good adaptability to environment and high sensitivityespecially in nature background environment are the characteristics of scintillation detector.The most widely applied scintillator includes inorganic crystals,of which sodium iodide is the favorite and

  2. TOF-PET detector concept based on organic scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Moskal, P; Białas, P; Ciszewska, M; Czerwiński, E; Heczko, A; Kajetanowicz, M; Kapłon, Ł; Kochanowski, A; Konopka-Cupiał, G; Korcyl, G; Krzemień, W; Łojek, K; Majewski, J; Migdał, W; Molenda, M; Niedźwiecki, Sz; Pałka, M; Rudy, Z; Salabura, P; Silarski, M; Słomski, A; Smyrski, J; Zdebik, J; Zieliński, M

    2013-01-01

    In this contribution we present a new concept of the large acceptance detector systems based on organic scintillators which may allow for simultaneous diagnostic of large fraction of the human body. Novelty of the concept lies in employing large blocks of polymer scintillators instead of crystals as detectors of annihilation quanta, and in using predominantly the timing of signals instead of their amplitudes.

  3. Optimization of the performance of a CsI(Tl) scintillator + Si pin photodiode detector for medium energy light charged particle hybride array

    CERN Document Server

    Kalinka, G; Gál, J; Hegyesi, G; Molnár, J; Elekes, Z; Motobayashi, T; Yanagisawa, Y; Saito, A

    2003-01-01

    NaI(TI), BGO and CsI(TI) crystals in compact arrays will be used at RIKEN RI Beam Factory in the near future to detect gamma-rays from fast moving nuclei produced in nuclear reactions with radioactive beams, and among them CsI(TI) for light charged particle identification as well. The latter system will consist of 312 Cs(TI) crystals coupled to silicon photodiodes in a hemispherical arrangement, four detectors packed together with their own preamplifiers in each of the 78 parallelepipedic thin walled aluminum containers. (R.P.)

  4. Monte Carlo simulation of a single detector unit for the neutron detector array NEDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaworski, G. [Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, ul. Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warszawa (Poland); Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 5A, PL 02-093 Warszawa (Poland); Palacz, M., E-mail: palacz@slcj.uw.edu.pl [Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 5A, PL 02-093 Warszawa (Poland); Nyberg, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Angelis, G. de [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Italy); France, G. de [GANIL, Caen (France); Di Nitto, A. [INFN Sezione di Napoli, Napoli (Italy); Egea, J. [Department of Electronic Engineering, University of Valencia, Burjassot (Valencia) (Spain); IFIC-CSIC, University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Erduran, M.N. [Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Istanbul Sabahattin Zaim University Istanbul (Turkey); Ertuerk, S. [Nigde Universitesi, Fen-Edebiyat Falkueltesi, Fizik Boeluemue, Nigde (Turkey); Farnea, E. [INFN Sezione di Padova, Padua (Italy); Gadea, A. [IFIC-CSIC, University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Gonzalez, V. [Department of Electronic Engineering, University of Valencia, Burjassot (Valencia) (Spain); Gottardo, A. [Padova University, Padua (Italy); Hueyuek, T. [IFIC-CSIC, University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Kownacki, J. [Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 5A, PL 02-093 Warszawa (Poland); Pipidis, A. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Italy); Roeder, B. [LPC-Caen, ENSICAEN, IN2P3/CNRS et Universite de Caen, Caen (France); Soederstroem, P.-A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Sanchis, E. [Department of Electronic Engineering, University of Valencia, Burjassot (Valencia) (Spain); Tarnowski, R. [Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 5A, PL 02-093 Warszawa (Poland); and others

    2012-05-01

    A study of the dimensions and performance of a single detector of the future neutron detector array NEDA was performed by means of Monte Carlo simulations, using GEANT4. Two different liquid scintillators were evaluated: the hydrogen based BC501A and the deuterated BC537. The efficiency and the probability that one neutron will trigger a signal in more than one detector were investigated as a function of the detector size. The simulations were validated comparing the results to experimental measurements performed with two existing neutron detectors, with different geometries, based on the liquid scintillator BC501.

  5. Performance comparison of scintillators for alpha particle detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Yuki; Yamamoto, Seiichi; Izaki, Kenji; Kaneko, Junichi H.; Toui, Kohei; Tsubota, Youichi; Higuchi, Mikio

    2014-11-01

    Scintillation detectors for alpha particles are often used in nuclear fuel facilities. Alpha particle detectors have also become important in the research field of radionuclide therapy using alpha emitters. ZnS(Ag) is the most often used scintillator for alpha particle detectors because its light output is high. However, the energy resolution of ZnS(Ag)-based scintillation detectors is poor because they are not transparent. A new ceramic sample, namely the cerium doped Gd2Si2O7 (GPS) scintillator, has been tested as alpha particle detector and its performances have been compared to that one of three different scintillating materials: ZnS(Ag), GAGG and a standard plastic scintillator. The different scintillating materials have been coupled to two different photodetectors, namely a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and a Silicon Photo-multiplier (Si-PM): the performances of each detection system have been compared. Promising results as far as the energy resolution performances (10% with PMT and 14% with Si-PM) have been obtained in the case of GPS and GAGG samples. Considering the quantum efficiencies of the photodetectors under test and their relation to the emission wavelength of the different scintillators, the best results were achieved coupling the GPS with the PMT and the GAGG with the Si-PM

  6. DESCANT - The DEuterated SCintillator Array for Neutron Tagging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bildstein, Vinzenz; Garrett, P. E.; Bandyopadhay, D.; Bangay, J.; Bianco, L.; Demand, G.; Hadinia, B.; Leach, K. G.; Sumithrarachchi, C.; Turko, J.; Wong, J.; Ashley, S. F.; Crider, B. P.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Prados-Estévez, F. M.; Yates, S. W.; Vanhoy, J. R.; Ball, G. C.; Bishop, D. P.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Hackman, G.; Pearson, C. J.; Shaw, B.; Saran, F.

    2016-09-01

    The DESCANT array at TRIUMF is designed to detect neutrons from RIB experiments. DESCANT is composed of 70 close-packed deuterated organic liquid scintillators coupled to digital fast read-out ADC modules. This configuration will permit online pulse-shape discrimination between neutron and γ-ray events. A prototype detector has been tested with monoenergetic neutrons at the accelerator laboratory of the University of Kentucky. A first commissioning experiment of the full array, using the decay of 145-146Cs, will be performed in August 2016. The results of the tests and a preliminary analysis of the commissioning experiment will be presented. Work supported by the Canada Foundation for Innovation, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, the National Research Council of Canada and the Canadian Research Chairs program.

  7. LHCb : A Scintillating Fibre Trackind Detector for the LHCb Upgrade

    CERN Multimedia

    Lindner, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    LHCb is preparing the upgrade which is scheduled to be installed in 2018/19. The Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker will be designed to replace the current tracking system downstream of the magnet, required to run at an increased luminosity of 1 - 2 10$^{33}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ and to collect a total of 50fb$^{-1}$ of data. The readout of the detector will be at 40MHz, applying a full software based trigger for every single bunch crossing. The SciFi Tracker consists of 12 planes covering a total surface of 350 m2. Modules are based on 2.5 m long multilayer ribbons made of 250 um diameter scintillating fibres as the active medium and signal transport. Silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays with 128 channels at a width of 250 um are used for the readout. The signals from the SiPMS are digitized on an ASIC chip before reconstructing the track hit position within an FPGA on the front-end board. Several challenges facing this detector and the significant progress over the last year will be presented regarding the p...

  8. Reactor Neutrino Experiments with a Large Liquid Scintillator Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kopp, J F; Merle, A; Rolinec, M

    2007-01-01

    We discuss several new ideas for reactor neutrino oscillation experiments with a Large Liquid Scintillator Detector. We consider two different scenarios for a measurement of the small mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ with a mobile $\\bar{\

  9. Scintillation Particle Detectors Based on Plastic Optical Fibres and Microfluidics

    CERN Document Server

    Mapelli, Alessandro; Renaud, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    This thesis presents the design, development, and experimental validation of two types of scintillation particle detectors with high spatial resolution. The first one is based on the well established scintillating fibre technology. It will complement the ATLAS (A Toroidal Large ApparatuS) detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The second detector consists in a microfabricated device used to demonstrate the principle of operation of a novel type of scintillation detector based on microfluidics. The first part of the thesis presents the work performed on a scintillating fibre tracking system for the ATLAS experiment. It will measure the trajectory of protons elastically scattered at very small angles to determine the absolute luminosity of the CERN LHC collider at the ATLAS interaction point. The luminosity of an accelerator characterizes its performance. It is a process-independent parameter that is completely determined by the properties of the colliding beams and it relates the cross section of a ...

  10. Improved Scintillator Materials For Compact Electron Antineutrino Detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Peter; Wortche, Heinrich J.; Browne, Wesley R.

    2012-01-01

    Recent developments provide new components holding the potential to improve the performance of liquid scintillation electron antineutrino detectors used as nuclear reactors monitors. Current systems raise issues regarding size, quantum efficiency, stability, and spatial resolution of the vertex dete

  11. Spatial response characterization of He-4 scintillation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Ryan P.; Steinberg, Noah; Murer, David; Ray, Heather; Jordan, Kelly A.

    2015-09-01

    The spatial response of pressurized helium-4 fast neutron scintillation detectors is characterized using collimated neutron source measurements and MCNPX-PoliMi simulations. A method for localizing the position of each detected event is also demonstrated using the two-sided photomultiplier readout. Results show that the position of particle interaction along the axis of the active volume has a measurable effect on the scintillation light response of the detector. An algorithm is presented that uses the probability distribution of relative interaction positions to perform source localization, further demonstrating the applicability of these detectors as tools for the detector of hidden shielded nuclear material.

  12. A region segmentation based algorithm for building crystal position lookup table in scintillation detector

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Hai Peng; Liu, Shuang Quan; Fan, Xin; Cao, Xue Xiang; Chai, Pei; Shan, Bao Ci

    2014-01-01

    In scintillation detector, scintillation crystals are typically made into 2-dimension modular array. The location of incident gamma-ray need be calibrated due to spatial response nonlinearity. Generally, position histograms, the characteristic flood response of scintillation detectors, are used for position calibration. In this paper, a position calibration method based on crystal position lookup table which maps the inaccurate location calculated by Anger logic to the exact hitting crystal position has been proposed, Firstly, position histogram is segmented into disconnected regions. Then crystal marking points are labeled by finding the centroids of regions. Finally, crystal boundaries are determined and crystal position lookup table is generated. The scheme is evaluated by the whole-body PET scanner and breast dedicated SPECT detector developed by Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The results demonstrate that the algorithm is accurate, efficient, robust and general purpose.

  13. Improving detector spatial resolution using pixelated scintillators with a barrier rib structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Langechuan; Lu, Minghui; Cao, Wanqing; Peng, Luke; Chen, Arthur

    2016-03-01

    Indirect conversion flat panel detectors (FPDs) based on amorphous silicon (a-Si) technology are widely used in digital X-ray imaging. In such FPDs a scintillator layer is used for converting X-rays into visible light photons. However, the lateral spread of these photons inside the scintillator layer reduces spatial resolution of the FPD. In this study, FPDs incorporating pixelated scintillators with a barrier rib structure were developed to limit lateral spread of light photons thereby improving spatial resolution. For the pixelated scintillator, a two-dimensional barrier rib structure was first manufactured on a substrate layer, coated with reflective materials, and filled to the rim with the scintillating material of gadolinium oxysulfide (GOS). Several scintillator samples were fabricated, with pitch size varying from 160 to 280 μm and rib height from 200 to 280 μm. The samples were directly coupled to an a-Si flat panel photodiode array with a pitch of 200 μm to convert optical photons to electronic signals. With the pixelated scintillator, the detector modulation transfer function was shown to improve significantly (by 94% at 2 cycle/mm) compared to a detector using an unstructured GOS layer. However, the prototype does show lower sensitivity due to the decrease in scintillator fill factor. The preliminary results demonstrated the feasibility of using the barrier-rib structure to improve the spatial resolution of FPDs. Such an improvement would greatly benefit nondestructive testing applications where the spatial resolution is the most important parameter. Further investigation will focus on improving the detector sensitivity and exploring its medical applications.

  14. Time-based position estimation in monolithic scintillator detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabacchini, V.; Borghi, G.; Schaart, D.R.

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray detectors based on bright monolithic scintillation crystals coupled to pixelated photodetectors are currently being considered for several applications in the medical imaging field. In a typical monolithic detector, both the light intensity and the time of arrival of the earliest scintilla

  15. Light output of EJ228 scintillation neutron detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevanato, L., E-mail: luca.stevanato@pd.infn.i [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Fabris, D. [INFN Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Hao, Xin [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); INFN Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Nebbia, G.; Pesente, S. [INFN Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Sajo-Bohus, L. [Universidad Simon-Bolivar, Laboratorio Fisica Nuclear, Apartado 8900, 1080 A. Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Viesti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); INFN Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy)

    2011-02-15

    The light output of neutron detectors based on the plastic scintillator EJ228 is studied as a function of neutron energy using a time tagged {sup 252}Cf source. Calibration of the light output scale is performed by fitting the experimental distribution of Compton scattering events of photons from a {sup 22}Na source with a response function obtained by Gaussian smearing of the predicted line-shape. The light output curve as well as the pulse height resolution for the EJ228 scintillators is very close (within 5%) to those recently reported for NE213 type organic liquid scintillators.

  16. The plastic scintillator detector calibration circuit for DAMPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haibo; Kong, Jie; Zhao, Hongyun; Su, Hong

    2016-07-01

    The Dark Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is being constructed as a scientific satellite to observe high energy cosmic rays in space. Plastic scintillator detector array (PSD), developed by Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IMPCAS), is one of the most important parts in the payload of DAMPE which is mainly used for the study of dark matter. As an anti-coincidence detector, and a charged-particle identification detector, the PSD has a total of 360 electronic readout channels, which are distributed at four sides of PSD using four identical front end electronics (FEE). Each FEE reads out 90 charge signals output by the detector. A special calibration circuit is designed in FEE. FPGA is used for on-line control, enabling the calibration circuit to generate the pulse signal with known charge. The generated signal is then sent to the FEE for calibration and self-test. This circuit mainly consists of DAC, operation amplifier, analog switch, capacitance and resistance. By using controllable step pulse, the charge can be coupled to the charge measuring chip using the small capacitance. In order to fulfill the system's objective of large dynamic range, the FEE is required to have good linearity. Thus, the charge-controllable signal is needed to do sweep test on all channels in order to obtain the non-linear parameters for off-line correction. On the other hand, the FEE will run on the satellite for three years. The changes of the operational environment and the aging of devices will lead to parameter variation of the FEE, highlighting the need for regular calibration. The calibration signal generation circuit also has a compact structure and the ability to work normally, with the PSD system's voltage resolution being higher than 0.6%.

  17. Results from the Puebla extensive air shower detector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, H.; Martinez, O.; Moreno, E.; Cotzomi, J.; Villaseñor, L.; Saavedrac, O.

    2003-07-01

    We describe the design and operation of the first stage of the EAS-UAP extensive air shower array, as a detector of very high energy cosmic rays ( Eo > 10 14eV). The array is located at the Campus of Puebla University and consists of 18 liquid scintillator detectors, with an active surface of 1 m2 each and a detector spacing of 20 m in a square grid. In this report we discuss the stability and the calibration of the detector array, as derived from the 10 detectors in operation in the first stage. The main characteristics of the array allow us also to use it as an educational and training facility. First distributions of the arrival direction and the lateral shower srpead are also given.

  18. Studies of air showers produced by primaries 10(16) eV using a combined scintillation and water-Cerenkov array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, G.; Perrett, J. C.; Watson, A. A.

    1986-01-01

    An array of 8 x 1.0 sq m plastic scintillation counters and 13 water-Cerenkov detectors (1 to 13.5 sq m) were operated at the center of the Haverah Park array to study some features of air showers produced by 10(16) eV primaries. Measurements of the scintillator lateral distribution function, the water-Cerenkov lateral distribution function, and of the distance dependence of the Cerenkov/scintillator ratio are described.

  19. Novel Scintillation Detectors for Prompt Fission γ-Ray Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billnert, R.; Andreotti, E.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Hult, M.; Karlsson, J.; Marissens, G.; Oberstedt, A.; Oberstedt, S.

    In this work we present first results from measurements of prompt fission γ-rays from the spontaneous fission in 252Cf. New and accurate data on corresponding γ-rays from the reactions 235U(nth,f) and 239Pu(nth,f) are highly demanded for the modeling of new Generation-IV nuclear reactor systems. For these experiments we employed scintillation detectors made out of new materials (LaBr3, LaCl3 and CeBr3), whose properties were necessary to know in order to obtain reliable results. Hence, we have characterized these detectors. In all the important properties these detectors outshine sodium-iodine detectors that where used in the 1970s, when the existing data had been acquired. Our finding is that the new generation of scintillation detectors is indeed promising, as far as an improved precision of the demanded data is concerned.

  20. Inorganic Scintillators for Detector Systems Physical Principles and Crystal Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2068219; Gektin, Alexander; Korzhik, Mikhail; Pédrini, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The development of new scintillators as components of modern detector systems is increasingly defined by the end user's needs. This book provides an introduction to this emerging topic at the interface of physics and materials sciences, with emphasis on bulk inorganic scintillators. After surveying the end user's needs in a vast range of applications, ranging from astrophysics to industrial R & D, the authors move on to review scintillating mechanisms and the properties of the most important materials used. A chapter on crystal engineering and examples of recent developments in the field of high-energy physics and medical imaging introduce the reader to the practical aspects. This book will benefit researchers and scientists working in academic and industrial R & D related to the development of scintillators.

  1. Inorganic scintillators for detector systems physical principles and crystal engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, Paul; Korzhik, Mikhail

    2017-01-01

    This second edition features new chapters highlighting advances in our understanding of the behavior and properties of scintillators, and the discovery of new families of materials with light yield and excellent energy resolution very close to the theoretical limit. The book focuses on the discovery of next-generation scintillation materials and on a deeper understanding of fundamental processes. Such novel materials with high light yield as well as significant advances in crystal engineering offer exciting new perspectives. Most promising is the application of scintillators for precise time tagging of events, at the level of 100 ps or higher, heralding a new era in medical applications and particle physics. Since the discovery of the Higgs Boson with a clear signature in the lead tungstate scintillating blocks of the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter detector, the current trend in particle physics is toward very high luminosity colliders, in which timing performance will ultimately be essential to mitigating...

  2. Explore nuclearites in a large liquid scintillator neutrino detector

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Wan-Lei; Lin, Tao; Wang, Zhi-Min

    2016-01-01

    We take the JUNO experiment as an example to explore nuclearites in the future large liquid scintillator detector. Comparing to the previous calculations, the visible energy of nuclearites across the liquid scintillator will be reestimated for the liquid scintillator based detector. Then the JUNO sensitivities to the nuclearite flux are presented. It is found that the JUNO projected sensitivities can be better than $7.7 \\times 10^{-17} {\\rm cm^{-2} s^{-1} sr^{-1}}$ for the nuclearite mass $10^{15} \\; {\\rm GeV} \\leq M \\leq 10^{24}$ GeV and initial velocity $10^{-4} \\leq \\beta_0 \\leq 10^{-1}$ with a 20 year running. Note that the JUNO will give the most stringent limits for downgoing nuclearites with $1.6 \\times 10^{13} \\; {\\rm GeV} \\leq M \\leq 4.0 \\times 10^{15}$ GeV and a typical galactic velocity $\\beta_0 = 10^{-3}$.

  3. Developing LAr Scintillation Light Collection Ideas in the Short Baseline Neutrino Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szelc, A. M. [Manchester U.

    2016-02-08

    Scintillation light is becoming the most rapidly developing feature of Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) neutrino detectors due to its capability to enhance and expand their physics reach traditionally based on charge readout. The SBND detector, set to be built on the Booster Neutrino Beam Line at Fermilab, is in a unique position to test novel liquid argon scintillation light readout systems in a detector with physics neutrino events. The different ideas under consideration by the collaboration are described, including an array of PMTs detecting direct light, SiPM coupled lightguide bars and a setup which uses PMTs/SiPMS and wavelength shifter covered reflector foils, as well as their respective strengths and physics foci and the benchmarks used to compare them.

  4. Monte-Carlo simulation for determining SNR and DQE of linear array plastic scintillating fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Mehdi NASSERI; MA Qing-Li; YIN Ze-Jie; WU Xiao-Yi

    2004-01-01

    Fundamental characteristics of the plastic-scintillating fiber (PSF) for wide energy range of electromagnetic radiation (X & γ) have been studied to evaluate possibility of using the PSF as an imaging detector for industrial purposes. Monte-Carlo simulation program (GEANT4.5.1, 2003) was used to generate the data. In order to evaluate image quality of the detector, fiber array was irradiated under various energy and fluxes. Signal to noise ratio (SNR)as well as detector quantum efficiency (DQE) were obtained.

  5. A scintillator purification system for the Borexino solar neutrino detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benziger, J.; Cadonati, L.; Calaprice, F.; Chen, M.; Corsi, A.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Fernholz, R.; Ford, R.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Harding, E.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Kidner, S.; Leung, M.; Loeser, F.; McCarty, K.; McKinsey, D.; Nelson, A.; Pocar, A.; Salvo, C.; Schimizzi, D.; Shutt, T.; Sonnenschein, A.

    2008-03-01

    Purification of the 278 tons of liquid scintillator and 889 tons of buffer shielding for the Borexino solar neutrino detector is performed with a system that combines distillation, water extraction, gas stripping, and filtration. This paper describes the principles of operation, design, and construction of that purification system, and reviews the requirements and methods to achieve system cleanliness and leak-tightness.

  6. Determination of spatial resolution of plastic scintillation fiber array with a simple method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The spatial resolution of a position sensitive gamma-ray detector configuration based on plastic scintillation fiber array was measured using a Monte Carlo simulation method. Both point spread function and modulation transfer function (MTF) were presented. The factors that influence the spatial resolution were also discussed. The results of the simulation showed that the intrinsic spatial resolution was consistent with the size of the physical pixels and a few centimeters spatial resolution could be obtained under certain circumstances.

  7. Position Reconstruction in a Dual Phase Xenon Scintillation Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Solovov, V N; Akimov, D Yu; Araújo, H M; Barnes, E J; Burenkov, A A; Chepel, V; Currie, A; DeViveiros, L; Edwards, B; Ghag, C; Hollingsworth, A; Horn, M; Kalmus, G E; Kobyakin, A S; Kovalenko, A G; Lebedenko, V N; Lindote, A; Lopes, M I; Lüscher, R; Majewski, P; Murphy, A St J; Neves, F; Paling, S M; da Cunha, J Pinto; Preece, R; Quenby, J J; Reichhart, L; Scovell, P R; Silva, C; Smith, N J T; Smith, P F; Stekhanov, V N; Sumner, T J; Thorne, C; Walker, R J

    2011-01-01

    We studied the application of statistical reconstruction algorithms, namely maximum likelihood and least squares methods, to the problem of event reconstruction in a dual phase liquid xenon detector. An iterative method was developed for in-situ reconstruction of the PMT light response functions from calibration data taken with an uncollimated gamma-ray source. Using the techniques described, the performance of the ZEPLIN-III dark matter detector was studied for 122 keV gamma-rays. For the inner part of the detector (R<100 mm), spatial resolutions of 13 mm and 1.6 mm FWHM were measured in the horizontal plane for primary and secondary scintillation, respectively. An energy resolution of 8.1% FWHM was achieved at that energy. The possibility of using this technique for improving performance and reducing cost of scintillation cameras for medical applications is currently under study.

  8. Monte Carlo simulation of a very high resolution thermal neutron detector composed of glass scintillator microfibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yushou; Conner, Joseph; Zhang, Xiaodong; Hayward, Jason P

    2016-02-01

    In order to develop a high spatial resolution (micron level) thermal neutron detector, a detector assembly composed of cerium doped lithium glass microfibers, each with a diameter of 1 μm, is proposed, where the neutron absorption location is reconstructed from the observed charged particle products that result from neutron absorption. To suppress the cross talk of the scintillation light, each scintillating fiber is surrounded by air-filled glass capillaries with the same diameter as the fiber. This pattern is repeated to form a bulk microfiber detector. On one end, the surface of the detector is painted with a thin optical reflector to increase the light collection efficiency at the other end. Then the scintillation light emitted by any neutron interaction is transmitted to one end, magnified, and recorded by an intensified CCD camera. A simulation based on the Geant4 toolkit was developed to model this detector. All the relevant physics processes including neutron interaction, scintillation, and optical boundary behaviors are simulated. This simulation was first validated through measurements of neutron response from lithium glass cylinders. With good expected light collection, an algorithm based upon the features inherent to alpha and triton particle tracks is proposed to reconstruct the neutron reaction position in the glass fiber array. Given a 1 μm fiber diameter and 0.1mm detector thickness, the neutron spatial resolution is expected to reach σ∼1 μm with a Gaussian fit in each lateral dimension. The detection efficiency was estimated to be 3.7% for a glass fiber assembly with thickness of 0.1mm. When the detector thickness increases from 0.1mm to 1mm, the position resolution is not expected to vary much, while the detection efficiency is expected to increase by about a factor of ten.

  9. A Minor Modification of Leading Edge Discriminator Circuitry with a Delay Line for Baseline Restoration of Scintillation Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izumi, N

    2003-05-27

    Multi-channel neutron time-of-flight detector arrays LaNSA, T-ion, Medusa, and Mandala, have been used for neutron spectroscopy in inertial confinement fusion experiments. These multi-channel neutron detector arrays consist of many identical scintillation detectors (842 {approx} 1024 channel), data acquisition electronics (discriminators, time-to digital converters, and controller). Each detector element is operated in neutron counting mode. Time-of-flight of individual detected neutrons are recorded by time to digital converters. The energy of each detected neutrons is determined from its time-of-flight. The accurate time measurement ({Delta}t {approx} 0.5 ns) and straightforward statistical features of the data obtained with these systems provides good integrity and reliability. The elements detector used in these systems are organic scintillators coupled with photo multiplier tubes. A scintillation detector operated in particle-counting mode requires finite recovery time after each detection event. The recovery time is determined by the time responses of scintillators, photo multiplier tubes, and the dead times of following discriminators and time-to digital converters. The harsh gamma ray background environment of fast ignitor experiments requires detectors that have fast recovery times. In high intensity laser experiments (I > 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}), strong gamma ray bursts are produced by relativistic laser plasma interactions. Prior to the neutron signal, these strong gamma ray bursts hit the detectors and interfere with the detection of following neutron signals. In these situations, the recovery time of the system after preceding gamma ray bursts is determined mainly by the base line shift of the PMT signal (due to slower decay components of scintillators ''after glow''). Discriminators cannot detect following signal pulses until the proceeding burst decays below its threshold voltage. The base line shift caused by the after glow

  10. New scintillating media based on liquid crystals for particle detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Barnik, M I; Vasilchenko, V G; Golovkin, S V; Medvedkov, A M; Soloviev, A S

    2000-01-01

    The study results of optical, photoluminiscent and scintillation properties of a liquid crystal 4-pentyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl are presented. The scintillation light output of this liquid crystal is about 35% of crystal anthracene, its main decay time constants are 4 and 14 ns, and the maximum of light emission spectrum is about 400 nm. The light output of a dissolution of green emitting light scintillation dopant R6 in the liquid crystal is about 120% of crystal anthracene. The light output of the frozen dissolution measured at -112 deg. C is about 2.5 times higher as observed at +20 deg. C. In the uniaxially oriented liquid crystal, the predominant intensity direction of emitted light is pointed perpendicular to the liquid crystal director and an appreciable part of the emitted light is elliptically polarized. The possibility to use scintillation properties of liquid crystals is considered both for the improvement of existing particle detector characteristics and for the creation of new gated particle detectors.

  11. The Research Progress of the Liquid Scintillation Detectors on Neutron Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG; Yi-mei; XU; Xiao-ming; ZHU; Li-qun; BAI; Lei; XU; Zhen; HE; Li-xia; YIN; Hong-he

    2012-01-01

    <正>The research for liquid scintillation detectors on neutron measurement is one of the study objects of technique research on neutron measurement. According to the task requirements, we accomplished the purchase of some detectors and related performance testing. The purchased liquid scintillation detectors BC-501A is produced by Saint-Gobain Company. According to the formulated performance testing outlines for liquid scintillation detectors, we conducted

  12. Scintillating fiber detectors for the HypHI project at GSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, D. [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)], E-mail: D.Nakajima@gsi.de; Ozel-Tashenov, B. [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Department of Physics, Nigde University, 51100 Nigde (Turkey)], E-mail: B.Oezel@gsi.de; Bianchin, S. [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Borodina, O. [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz, J.J.Becherweg 45, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Bozkurt, V.; Goekuezuem, B. [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Department of Physics, Nigde University, 51100 Nigde (Turkey); Kavatsyuk, M. [KVI, Zernikelaan 25, NL-9747 AA Groningen (Netherlands); Minami, S. [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Rappold, C. [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Universite Louis Pasteur Strasbourg, 4 rue Blaise Pascal, 67070 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Saito, T.R. [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz, J.J.Becherweg 45, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Achenbach, P. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz, J.J.Becherweg 45, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Ajimura, S. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, 10-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Ayerbe, C. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz, J.J.Becherweg 45, 55099 Mainz (Germany)] (and others)

    2009-09-11

    The construction and properties of three sets of two-dimensional scintillating fiber detector arrays for tracking of charged particles used in the HypHI Phase 0 experiment at GSI will be reported in this paper. The position resolutions and the detection efficiency of detectors have been obtained for each layer of detectors by using {sup 6}Li primary beams and particles with Z=1 produced by fragment reactions of {sup 136}Xe projectiles on the hydrogen target. Besides, the response of energy deposition of charged particles in the first detector set placed right behind the target has been studied by using light projectile fragments with Z=1, 2 and 3 produced by {sup 58}Ni and {sup 12}C beams. Extracted resolutions for energy deposition and position as well as the detection efficiency fulfill the requirements of the HypHI Phase 0 experiment.

  13. Neutron-gamma discrimination in elpasolite scintillator detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Brittany

    Existing nuclear stockpiles and weapons-making capabilities imperil the global community. Current nonproliferation efforts involve the research and development of newer, more efficient detection systems that can be deployed for the interdiction and monitoring of special nuclear materials (SNM). Spontaneous and induced fission events in SNM produce neutrons and gamma rays, which can be detected and analyzed, in particular, using scintillator detectors. Various electronic data acquisition systems and data analysis methods have been employed to record and characterize neutron and photon signatures. The goal of this thesis is to develop a new method of discrimination between neutrons and photons in the CLYC elpasolite scintillator detector. Because neutrons and photons interact uniquely with scintillator materials, they generate scintillation light decay signals of different time profiles. Several conventional and digital pulse shape discrimination (PSD) methods exist to exploit the different features of detector signal waveforms caused by the different time profiles of the scintillation decay. They can be categorized on the basis of their implementation: time domain only or time and frequency domain. In this study, wavelet analysis is implemented in the time domain. When the discrete wavelet transform is applied to each pulse, the Haar wavelet is sampled over the signal to generate a set of coefficients, which are then further analyzed using numerical integration. The wavelet-based signal analysis code was written in Matlab. The code processes a single detector waveform at a time. It first applies the discrete wavelet transform to smooth the waveform, and then calculates the power of this signal. After performing partial integrations on different parts of the coefficients' curve, it calculates the radiation identification (RID) value that serves as a threshold for neutron-gamma discrimination. Beyond the identifying threshold, the signal is categorized as a neutron

  14. Neutron detector array at IUAC: Design features and instrumentation developments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Sugathan; A Jhingan; K S Golda; T Varughese; S Venkataramanan; N Saneesh; V V Satyanarayana; S K Suman; J Antony; Ruby Shanti; K Singh; S K Saini; A Gupta; A Kothari; P Barua; Rajesh Kumar; J Zacharias; R P Singh; B R Behera; S K Mandal; I M Govil; R K Bhowmik

    2014-11-01

    The characteristics and performance of the newly commissioned neutron detector array at IUAC are described. The array consists of 100 BC501 liquid scintillators mounted in a semispherical geometry and are kept at a distance of 175 cm from the reaction point. Each detector is a 5″ × 5″ cylindrical cell coupled to 5″ diameter photomultiplier tube (PMT). Signal processing is realized using custom-designed home-made integrated electronic modules which perform neutron–gamma discrimination using zero cross timing and time-of-flight (TOF) technique. Compact custom-built high voltage power supply developed using DC–DC converters are used to bias the detector. The neutrons are recorded in coincidence with fission fragments which are detected using multi-wire proportional counters mounted inside a 1m diameter SS target chamber. The detectors and electronics have been tested off-line using radioactive sources and the results are presented.

  15. Organic liquid scintillation detector shape and volume impact on radiation portal monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paff, Marc G.; Clarke, Shaun D.; Pozzi, Sara A.

    2016-07-01

    We have developed and tested a radiation portal monitor using organic liquid scintillation detectors. In order to optimize our system designs, neutron measurements were carried out with three organic liquid scintillation detectors of different shapes and sizes, along with a 3He radiation portal monitor (RPM) as a reference. The three liquids tested were a 7.62 cm diameter by 7.62 cm length cylindrical active volume organic liquid scintillation detector, a 12.7 cm diameter by 12.7 cm length cylindrical active volume organic liquid scintillation detector, and a 25 cm by 25 cm by 10 cm "paddle" shaped organic liquid scintillation detector. Background and Cf-252 neutron measurements were recorded to allow for a comparison of neutron intrinsic efficiencies as well as receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves between detectors. The 12.7 cm diameter cylindrical active volume organic liquid scintillation detector exhibited the highest intrinsic neutron efficiency (54%) of all three liquid scintillators. An ROC curve analysis for a heavily moderated Cf-252 measurement showed that using the 12.7 cm diameter by 12.7 cm length cylindrical active volume Eljen EJ309 organic liquid scintillation detector would result in the fewest needed detector units in order to achieve a near 100% positive neutron alarm rate while maintaining a better than 1 in 10,000 false alarm rate on natural neutron background. A small number of organic liquid scintillation detectors could therefore be a valid alternative to 3He in some RPM applications.

  16. Instrumentation for multi-detector arrays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R K Bhowmik

    2001-07-01

    The new generation of detector arrays require complex instrumentation and data acquisition system to ensure increased reliability of operation, high degree of integration, software control and faster data handling capability. The main features of some of the existing multi-detector arrays like MSU 4 array, Gammasphere and Eurogam are summarized. The instrumentation for the proposed INGA array in India is discussed.

  17. Emulation workbench for position sensitive gaseous scintillation detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Pereira, L; Morozov, A; Solovov, V; Fraga, F A F

    2015-01-01

    Position sensitive detectors based on gaseous scintillation proportional counters with Anger-type readout are being used in several research areas such as neutron detection, search for dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay. Design and optimization of such detectors are complex and time consuming tasks. Simulations, while being a powerful tool, strongly depend on the light transport models and demand accurate knowledge of many parameters, which are often not available. Here we describe an alternative approach based on the experimental evaluation of a detector using an isotropic point-like light source with precisely controllable light emission properties, installed on a 3D positioning system. The results obtained with the developed setup at validation conditions, when the scattered light is strongly suppressed, show good agreement with simulations.

  18. Emulation workbench for position sensitive gaseous scintillation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, L.; Margato, L. M. S.; Morozov, A.; Solovov, V.; Fraga, F. A. F.

    2015-12-01

    Position sensitive detectors based on gaseous scintillation proportional counters with Anger-type readout are being used in several research areas such as neutron detection, search for dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay. Design and optimization of such detectors are complex and time consuming tasks. Simulations, while being a powerful tool, strongly depend on the light transfer models and demand accurate knowledge of many parameters, which are often not available. Here we describe an alternative approach based on the experimental evaluation of a detector using an isotropic point-like light source with precisely controllable light emission properties, installed on a 3D positioning system. The results obtained with the developed setup at validation conditions, when the scattered light is strongly suppressed show good agreement with simulations.

  19. Neutron response function characterization of {sup 4}He scintillation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley, Ryan P.; Rolison, Lucas M.; Lewis, Jason M. [University of Florida, Nuclear Engineering Program, Gainesville, FL 32611-6400 (United States); Murer, David [Arktis Radiation Detectors Ltd., Räffelstrasse 11, 8045 Zürich (Switzerland); Massey, Thomas N. [Ohio University, Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Enqvist, Andreas; Jordan, Kelly A. [University of Florida, Nuclear Engineering Program, Gainesville, FL 32611-6400 (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Time-of-flight measurements were conducted to characterize the neutron energy response of pressurized {sup 4}He fast neutron scintillation detectors for the first time, using the Van de Graaff generator at Ohio University. The time-of-flight spectra and pulse height distributions were measured. This data was used to determine the light output response function, which was found to be linear at energies below 3.5 MeV. The intrinsic efficiency of the detector as a function of incident energy was also calculated: the average efficiency up to 10 MeV was 3.1%, with a maximum efficiency of 6.6% at 1.05 MeV. These results will enable development of neutron spectrum unfolding algorithms for neutron spectroscopy applications with these detectors.

  20. Study of the characteristics of a scintillation array and single pixels for nuclear medicine imaging applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Jie; MA Hong-Guang; MA Wen-Yan; ZENG Hui; WANG Zhao-Min; XU Zi-Zong

    2009-01-01

    By using a pixelized Nal(T1) crystal array coupled to a R2486 PSPMT, the characteristics of the array and of a single pixel, such as the light output, energy resolution, peak-to-valley ratio (P/V) and imaging performance of the detector were studied. The pixel size of the NaI(TI) scintillation pixel array is 2 min×2 mm×5 mm. There are in total 484 pixels in a 22~22 matrix. In the pixel spectrum an average peak-to-valley ratio (P/V) of 16 was obtained. In the image of all the pixels, good values for the Peak-to-Valley ratios could be achieved, namely a mean of 17, a maximum of 45 and the average peak FWHM (the average value of intrinsic spatial resolution) of 2.3 mm. However, the PSPMT non-uniform response and the scintillation pixels array inhomogeneities degrade the imaging performance of the detector.

  1. Improving Photoelectron Counting and Particle Identification in Scintillation Detectors with Bayesian Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Akashi-Ronquest, M; Batygov, M; Beltran, B; Bodmer, M; Boulay, M G; Broerman, B; Buck, B; Butcher, A; Cai, B; Caldwell, T; Chen, M; Chen, Y; Cleveland, B; Coakley, K; Dering, K; Duncan, F A; Formaggio, J A; Gagnon, R; Gastler, D; Giuliani, F; Gold, M; Golovko, V V; Gorel, P; Graham, K; Grace, E; Guerrero, N; Guiseppe, V; Hallin, A L; Harvey, P; Hearns, C; Henning, R; Hime, A; Hofgartner, J; Jaditz, S; Jillings, C J; Kachulis, C; Kearns, E; Kelsey, J; Klein, J R; Kuzniak, M; LaTorre, A; Lawson, I; Li, O; Lidgard, J J; Liimatainen, P; Linden, S; McFarlane, K; McKinsey, D N; MacMullin, S; Mastbaum, A; Mathew, R; McDonald, A B; Mei, D -M; Monroe, J; Muir, A; Nantais, C; Nicolics, K; Nikkel, J A; Noble, T; O'Dwyer, E; Olsen, K; Gann, G D Orebi; Ouellet, C; Palladino, K; Pasuthip, P; Perumpilly, G; Pollmann, T; Rau, P; Retiere, F; Rielage, K; Schnee, R; Seibert, S; Skensved, P; Sonley, T; Vazquez-Jauregui, E; Veloce, L; Walding, J; Wang, B; Wang, J; Ward, M; Zhang, C

    2014-01-01

    Many current and future dark matter and neutrino detectors are designed to measure scintillation light with a large array of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The energy resolution and particle identification capabilities of these detectors depend in part on the ability to accurately identify individual photoelectrons in PMT waveforms despite large variability in pulse amplitudes and pulse pileup. We describe a Bayesian technique that can identify the times of individual photoelectrons in a sampled PMT waveform without deconvolution, even when pileup is present. To demonstrate the technique, we apply it to the general problem of particle identification in single-phase liquid argon dark matter detectors. Using the output of the Bayesian photoelectron counting algorithm described in this paper, we construct several test statistics for rejection of backgrounds for dark matter searches in argon. Compared to simpler methods based on either observed charge or peak finding, the photoelectron counting technique improves ...

  2. A liquid scintillator detector with wavelength-shifting fibre readout

    CERN Document Server

    Doucet, M; Grégoire, G; Panman, J; Zucchelli, P

    2000-01-01

    A technique based on liquid scintillator with wavelength-shiftingfibre readout is interesting for large-mass neutrino detectors.In this paper we present the first results obtained with a laboratoryprototype assembled at CERN. In the configuration tested, a large light yield has been observed and attenuation lengths of the order of 3.2~m have been measured. As a comparison, we also measured the attenuation length of the fibres in air using the same setup. No significant difference in attenuation length between the fibres in air and in liquid was measured.

  3. The Seeding tracking algorithm for a scintillating detector at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Amhis, Y; De Cian, M; Nikodem, T; Polci, F

    2014-01-01

    The project of the LHCb upgraded detector foreseens the presence of a Scintillating Fiber Tracker (SciFi). This note describes the algorithm used for reconstructing standalone tracks in the SciFi, called $Seeding$. This algorithm is crucial for reconstructing tracks generated by long lived particles such as $K^0_s$. The main performances on simulated samples for running conditions expected in future data taking after the upgrade, namely a luminosity larger than $\\mathcal{L} = 2 \\times 10^{33} cm^{-2}s^{1}$, are also discussed.

  4. Atmospheric Neutron Measurements using a Small Scintillator Based Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kole, Merlin; Pearce, Mark; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Fukuda, Kentaro; Ishizu, Sumito; Jackson, Miranda; Kamae, Tune; Kawaguchi, Noriaki; Kawano, Takafumi; Kiss, Mozsi; Moretti, Elena; Yanagida, Takayuki; Chauvin, Maxime; Mikhalev, Victor; Rydstrom, Stefan; Takahashi, Hiromitsu

    PoGOLino is a standalone scintillator-based neutron detector designed for balloon-borne missions. Its main purpose is to provide data of the neutron flux in 2 different energy ranges in the high altitude / high latitude region where the highest neutron flux in the atmosphere is found. Furthermore the influence of the Solar activity upon the neutron environment in this region is relatively strong. As a result both short and long term time fluctuations are strongest in this region. At high altitudes neutrons can form a source of background for balloon-borne scientific measurements. They can furthermore form a major source for single event upsets in electronics. A good understanding of the high altitude / high latitude neutron environment is therefore important. Measurements of the neutron environment in this region are however lacking. PoGOLino contains two 5 mm thick Lithium Calcium Aluminium Fluoride (LiCAF) scintillators used for neutron detection. The LiCAF crystals are sandwiched between 2 Bismuth Germanium Oxide (BGO) scintillating crystals, which serve to veto signals produced by gamma-rays and charged particles. The veto system makes measurements of the neutron flux possible even in high radiation environments. One LiCAF detector is shielded with polyethylene while the second remains unshielded, making the detectors sensitive in different energy ranges. The choice of a scintillator crystals as the detection material ensures a high detection efficiency while keeping the instrument small, robust and light weight. The full standalone cylindrical instrument has a radius of 120 mm, a height of 670 mm and a total mass of 13 kg, making it suitable as a piggy back mission. PoGOLino was successfully launched on March 20th 2013 from the Esrange Space Center in Northern Sweden to an altitude of 30.9 km. A detailed description of the detector design is presented, along with results of of the flight. The neutron flux measured during flight is compared to predictions based

  5. Ruby-based inorganic scintillation detectors for 192Ir brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertzscher, Gustavo; Beddar, Sam

    2016-11-01

    We tested the potential of ruby inorganic scintillation detectors (ISDs) for use in brachytherapy and investigated various unwanted luminescence properties that may compromise their accuracy. The ISDs were composed of a ruby crystal coupled to a poly(methyl methacrylate) fiber-optic cable and a charge-coupled device camera. The ISD also included a long-pass filter that was sandwiched between the ruby crystal and the fiber-optic cable. The long-pass filter prevented the Cerenkov and fluorescence background light (stem signal) induced in the fiber-optic cable from striking the ruby crystal, which generates unwanted photoluminescence rather than the desired radioluminescence. The relative contributions of the radioluminescence signal and the stem signal were quantified by exposing the ruby detectors to a high-dose-rate brachytherapy source. The photoluminescence signal was quantified by irradiating the fiber-optic cable with the detector volume shielded. Other experiments addressed time-dependent luminescence properties and compared the ISDs to commonly used organic scintillator detectors (BCF-12, BCF-60). When the brachytherapy source dwelled 0.5 cm away from the fiber-optic cable, the unwanted photoluminescence was reduced from  >5% to  5% within 10 s from the onset of irradiation and after the source had retracted. The ruby-based ISDs generated signals of up to 20 times that of BCF-12-based detectors. The study presents solutions to unwanted luminescence properties of ruby-based ISDs for high-dose-rate brachytherapy. An optic filter should be sandwiched between the ruby crystal and the fiber-optic cable to suppress the photoluminescence. Furthermore, we recommend avoiding ruby crystals that exhibit significant time-dependent luminescence.

  6. Towards monolithic scintillator based TOF-PET systems: practical methods for detector calibration and operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, Giacomo; Tabacchini, Valerio; Schaart, Dennis R.

    2016-07-01

    Gamma-ray detectors based on thick monolithic scintillator crystals can achieve spatial resolutions  published k-NN 1D method. Also, the procedures for estimating the DOI and time of interaction are revised to enable full detector calibration by means of fan-beam or flood irradiations only. Moreover, a new technique is presented to allow the use of events in which some of the photosensor pixel values and/or timestamps are missing (e.g. due to dead time), so as to further increase system sensitivity. The accelerated methods were tested on a monolithic scintillator detector specifically developed for clinical PET applications, consisting of a 32 mm  ×  32 mm  ×  22 mm LYSO : Ce crystal coupled to a digital photon counter (DPC) array. This resulted in a spatial resolution of 1.7 mm FWHM, an average DOI resolution of 3.7 mm FWHM, and a CRT of 214 ps. Moreover, the possibility of using events missing the information of up to 16 out of 64 photosensor pixels is shown. This results in only a small deterioration of the detector performance.

  7. Two-dimensional X-ray imaging using plastic scintillating fiber array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Due to its low cost,flexibility and convenience for long distance dala transfer,plastic scintillation fiber (PSF)have been increasingly used in building detectors or sensors for detecting various radiations and imaging.In this work,the performance of using PSF coupled with charge-coupled devices(CCD)to build are adetectors for 2D X-ray imaging is studied.We describe the experimental setup and show the obtained images from CCD.Modulation Transfer Function(MTF)of the PSF array is also presented and compared to earlier reports.

  8. Simulation and optimisation of a position sensitive scintillation detector with wavelength shifting fibers for thermal neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzkamp, Matthias; Engels, Ralf; Kemmerling, Guenter [ZEA-2, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Brueckel, Thomas [JCNS, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Stahl, Achim [III. Physikalisches Institut B, RWTH Aachen (Germany); Waasen, Stefan van [ZEA-2, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Faculty of Engineering, University of Duisburg-Essen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    In neutron scattering experiments it is important to have position sensitive large scale detectors for thermal neutrons. A detector based on a neutron scintillator with wave length shifting fibers is a new kind of such a detector. We present the simulation of the detector based on the microscopic structure of the scintillation material of the mentioned detector. It consists of a converter and a scintillation powder bound in a matrix. The converter in our case is lithium fluoride with enriched lithium 6, to convert thermal neutrons into high energetic alpha and triton particles. The scintillation material is silver doped zinc sulfide. We show that pulse height spectra obtained by these scintillators can be be explained by the simple model of randomly distributed spheres of zinc sulfide and lithium fluoride. With this model, it is possible to optimise the mass ratio of zinc sulfide to lithium fluoride with respect to detection efficiency and/or energy deposition in zinc sulfide.

  9. Characterization of array scintillation detector for follicle thyroid 2D imaging acquisition using Monte Carlo simulation; Caracterizacao de uma matriz detectora cintiladora para aquisicao de imagem 2D da regiao folicular da glandula tireoide por emissao radioativa usando simulacao Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Carlos Borges da

    2007-05-15

    The image acquisition methods applied to nuclear medicine and radiobiology are a valuable research study for determination of thyroid anatomy to seek disorders associated to follicular cells. The Monte Carlo (MC) simulation has also been used in problems related to radiation detection in order to map medical images since the improvement of data processing compatible with personnel computers (PC). This work presents an innovative study to find out the adequate scintillation inorganic detector array that could be coupled to a specific light photo sensor, a charge coupled device (CCD) through a fiber optic plate in order to map the follicles of thyroid gland. The goal is to choose the type of detector that fits the application suggested here with spatial resolution of 10 {mu}m and good detector efficiency. The methodology results are useful to map a follicle image using gamma radiation emission. A source - detector simulation is performed by using a MCNP4B (Monte Carlo for Neutron Photon transport) general code considering different source energies, detector materials and geometries including pixel sizes and reflector types. The results demonstrate that by using MCNP4B code is possible to searching for useful parameters related to the systems used in nuclear medicine, specifically in radiobiology applied to endocrine physiology studies to acquiring thyroid follicles images. (author)

  10. POSSuMUS: a position sensitive scintillating muon SiPM detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ruschke, Alexander

    The development of a modular designed large scale scintillation detector with a two-dimensional position sensitivity is presented in this thesis. This novel POsition Sensitive Scintillating MUon SiPM Detector is named POSSuMUS. The POSSuMUS detector is capable to determine the particle’s position in two space dimensions with a fast trigger capability. Each module is constructed from two trapezoidal shaped plastic scintillators to form one rectangular shaped detector module. Both trapezoids are optically insulated against each other. In both trapezoids the scintillation light is collected by plastic fibers and guided towards silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). SiPMs are light sensors which are capable to detect even smallest amounts of light. By combining several detector modules, position sensitive areas from 100 cm2 to few m2 are achievable with few readout channels. Therefore, POSSuMUS provides a cost effective detector concept. The position sensitivity along the trapezoidal geometry of one detector module ...

  11. Advanced Scintillator Detectors for Neutron Imaging in Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geppert-Kleinrath, Verena; Danly, Christopher; Merrill, Frank; Simpson, Raspberry; Volegov, Petr; Wilde, Carl

    2016-10-01

    The neutron imaging team at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been providing two-dimensional neutron imaging of the inertial confinement fusion process at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for over five years. Neutron imaging is a powerful tool in which position-sensitive detectors register neutrons emitted in the fusion reactions, producing a picture of the burning fuel. Recent images have revealed possible multi-dimensional asymmetries, calling for additional views to facilitate three-dimensional imaging. These will be along shorter lines of sight to stay within the existing facility at NIF. In order to field imaging capabilities equivalent to the existing system several technological challenges have to be met: high spatial resolution, high light output, and fast scintillator response to capture lower-energy neutrons, which have scattered from non-burning regions of fuel. Deuterated scintillators are a promising candidate to achieve the timing and resolution required; a systematic study of deuterated and non-deuterated polystyrene and liquid samples is currently ongoing. A test stand has been implemented to measure the response function, and preliminary data on resolution and light output have been obtained at the LANL Weapons Neutrons Research facility.

  12. Influence of Depth of Interaction upon the Performance of Scintillator Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Mark S.; Taylor, Alaric; Tummeltshammer, Clemens; Auffray, Etiennette; Lecoq, Paul; Papakonstantinou, Ioannis

    2014-01-01

    The uncertainty in time of particle detection within a scintillator detector, characterised by the coincidence time resolution (CTR), is explored with respect to the interaction position within the scintillator crystal itself. Electronic collimation between two scintillator detectors is utilised to determine the CTR with depth of interaction (DOI) for different materials, geometries and wrappings. Significantly, no relationship between the CTR and DOI is observed within experimental error. Confinement of the interaction position is seen to degrade the CTR in long scintillator crystals by 10%.

  13. Development of SiPM-based scintillator tile detectors for a multi-layer fast neutron tracker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakubek J.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We are developing thin tile scintillator detectors with silicon photomultiplier (SiPM readout for use in a multi-layer fast-neutron tracker. The tracker is based on interleaved Timepix and plastic scintillator layers. The thin 15 × 15 × 2 mm plastic scintillators require suitable optical readout in order to detect and measure the energy lost by energetic protons that have been recoiled by fast neutrons. Our first prototype used dual SiPMs, coupled to opposite edges of the scintillator tile using light-guides. An alternative readout geometry was designed in an effort to increase the fraction of scintillation light detected by the SiPMs. The new prototype uses a larger SiPM array to cover the entire top face of the tile. This paper details the comparative performance of the two prototype designs. A deuterium-tritium (DT fast-neutron source was used to compare the relative light collection efficiency of the two designs. A collimated UV light source was scanned across the detector face to map the uniformity. The new prototype was found to have 9.5 times better light collection efficiency over the original design. Both prototypes exhibit spatial non-uniformity in their response. Methods of correcting this non-uniformity are discussed.

  14. A mathematical formalism for hyperspectral, multipoint plastic scintillation detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archambault, Louis; Therriault-Proulx, François; Beddar, Sam; Beaulieu, Luc

    2012-11-07

    The aim of this paper is to generalize and extend the mathematical formalism used with plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs). By doing so, we show the feasibility of multi-point PSD. The new formalism is based on the sole hypothesis that a PSD optical signal is a linear superposition of spectra. Two calibration scenarios were developed. Both involve solving a linear equation of the form Y = XB, but the process and input data depend on the information available on the detector system. Simulations were carried out to validate both scenarios and demonstrate the advantages of the new formalism. In this paper, we prove the following results. (1) Multi-point PSDs are feasible. Simulations have shown that six different spectra could be resolved accurately even in the presence of up to 10% Gaussian noise. (2) The new formalism leads to more precise PSD measurements. (3) By using the condition number of the measurement matrix, the ideal sets of calibration measurements can be identified. (4) By using principal component analysis it was possible to identify the best set of wavelength filters. We have shown through numerical simulations that multi-point detectors are feasible. This has potential for applications such as in vivo dose verification. Furthermore, our new formalism can be used to improve the robustness and ease of use of PSDs.

  15. Developing Detectors for Scintillation Light in Liquid Argon for DUNE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, Bruce [Fermilab

    2016-12-22

    The Deep Underground Neutrino experiment will conduct a broad program of physics research by studying a beam of neutrinos from Fermilab, atmospheric neutrinos, neutrinos from potential supernovae, and potential nucleon decay events. In pursuit of these studies, the experiment will deploy four 10kt fiducial mass liquid argon time projection chambers underground in Lead, South Dakota. Liquid argon time projection chambers allow high-resolution tracking and energy measurements. A precise timing signal is needed to provide the necessary time stamp to localize events in the drift direction. As liquid argon is a natural scintillator, a photon detection system will be deployed to provide such a signal, especially for non-beam events. In the baseline design for the single-phase time projection chamber, the detectors are contained within the anode plane assemblies. The design of two prototypes utilizing wavelength shifters and light guides are presented, and aspects of the research and development program are discussed.

  16. Si:As BIB detector arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharat, R.; Petroff, M. D.; Speer, J. J.; Stapelbroek, M. G.

    1986-01-01

    Highlights of the results obtained on arsenic-doped silicon blocked impurity band (BIB) detectors and arrays since the invention of the BIB concept a few years ago are presented. After a brief introduction and a description of the BIB concept, data will be given on single detector performance. Then different arrays that were fabricated will be described and test data presented.

  17. Organic liquid scintillation detector shape and volume impact on radiation portal monitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paff, Marc G.; Clarke, Shaun D.; Pozzi, Sara A.

    2016-07-21

    We have developed and tested a radiation portal monitor using organic liquid scintillation detectors. In order to optimize our system designs, neutron measurements were carried out with three organic liquid scintillation detectors of different shapes and sizes, along with a {sup 3}He radiation portal monitor (RPM) as a reference. The three liquids tested were a 7.62 cm diameter by 7.62 cm length cylindrical active volume organic liquid scintillation detector, a 12.7 cm diameter by 12.7 cm length cylindrical active volume organic liquid scintillation detector, and a 25 cm by 25 cm by 10 cm “paddle” shaped organic liquid scintillation detector. Background and Cf-252 neutron measurements were recorded to allow for a comparison of neutron intrinsic efficiencies as well as receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves between detectors. The 12.7 cm diameter cylindrical active volume organic liquid scintillation detector exhibited the highest intrinsic neutron efficiency (54%) of all three liquid scintillators. An ROC curve analysis for a heavily moderated Cf-252 measurement showed that using the 12.7 cm diameter by 12.7 cm length cylindrical active volume Eljen EJ309 organic liquid scintillation detector would result in the fewest needed detector units in order to achieve a near 100% positive neutron alarm rate while maintaining a better than 1 in 10,000 false alarm rate on natural neutron background. A small number of organic liquid scintillation detectors could therefore be a valid alternative to {sup 3}He in some RPM applications.

  18. Scintillating fiber detectors for precise time and position measurements read out with Si-PMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damyanova, A.; Bravar, A.

    2017-02-01

    We present the development and performance of compact scintillating fiber detectors read out with silicon photo-multipliers (Si-PMs). The compact size, fast response, and insensitivity to magnetic fields make these detectors suitable for a variety of applications where precise tracking and timing information is required. These detectors will be used with different particle beams (electrons, protons, heavy ions) at very high rates. In particular, we present the SciFi tracker/time of flight detector that is being developed for the Mu3e experiment at PSI (search for the lepton flavor violating decay μ → eee at very high rates). We also present the SciFi beam position detectors that will be employed in NA61 at CERN to track the incoming proton and heavy ion beam particles. We are considering different readout scenarios in which (a) each fiber is individually coupled to a single Si-PM photo-sensor and (b) fibers are arranged in columns and coupled to a Si-PM arrays.

  19. Spatially distributed scintillator arrays for diagnosing runaway electron transport and energy behavior in tokamaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, A N; Hollmann, E M; Tynan, G R

    2010-10-01

    We present details of a new bismuth germanate [Bi(4)Ge(3)O(12) (BGO)] scintillator array used to diagnose the transport and energy behavior of runaway electrons (REs) in DIII-D. BGO exhibits important properties for these compact detectors including high light yield which sufficiently excites photodiode detectors (8500 photons/MeV), high density and atomic numbers of constituent materials which maximizes sensitivity, and relative neutron blindness which minimizes complications in data interpretation. The detectors observe primarily hard x-ray radiation emitted in a forward beamed pattern by RE when they strike first wall materials or bulk ions and neutrals in the plasma, although we also address photoneutron signals. The arrangement of the array enables time resolved location of x-ray emission and associated asymmetries which help identify instabilities and confinement properties of RE. By shielding a subset of detectors with different thicknesses of lead, and with interpretative support of the code EGSNRC, we also measure RE energy, although due to the often distributed nature of RE strike points and the forward beamed character of emitted hard x-rays, we restrict interpretation as a lower bound for RE energy.

  20. Spatially distributed scintillator arrays for diagnosing runaway electron transport and energy behavior in tokamaksa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, A. N.; Hollmann, E. M.; Tynan, G. R.

    2010-10-01

    We present details of a new bismuth germanate [Bi4Ge3O12 (BGO)] scintillator array used to diagnose the transport and energy behavior of runaway electrons (REs) in DIII-D. BGO exhibits important properties for these compact detectors including high light yield which sufficiently excites photodiode detectors (8500 photons/MeV), high density and atomic numbers of constituent materials which maximizes sensitivity, and relative neutron blindness which minimizes complications in data interpretation. The detectors observe primarily hard x-ray radiation emitted in a forward beamed pattern by RE when they strike first wall materials or bulk ions and neutrals in the plasma, although we also address photoneutron signals. The arrangement of the array enables time resolved location of x-ray emission and associated asymmetries which help identify instabilities and confinement properties of RE. By shielding a subset of detectors with different thicknesses of lead, and with interpretative support of the code EGSNRC, we also measure RE energy, although due to the often distributed nature of RE strike points and the forward beamed character of emitted hard x-rays, we restrict interpretation as a lower bound for RE energy.

  1. Monte Carlo simulation of a very high resolution thermal neutron detector composed of glass scintillator microfibers

    CERN Document Server

    Yushou, Song; Zhang, Xiaodong; Hayward, Jason P

    2016-01-01

    In order to develop a high spatial resolution (micron level) thermal neutron detector, a detector assembly composed of cerium doped lithium glass microfibers, each with a diameter of 1\\,$\\mu$m, is proposed, where the neutron absorption location is reconstructed from the observed charged particle products that result from neutron absorption. To suppress the cross talk of the scintillation light, each scintillating fiber is surrounded by air-filled glass capillaries with the same diameter as the fiber. This pattern is repeated to form a bulk microfiber detector. On one end, the surface of the detector is painted with a thin optical reflector to increase the light collection efficiency at the other end. Then the scintillation light emitted by any neutron interaction is transmitted to one end, magnified, and recorded by an intensified CCD camera. A simulation based on the Geant4 toolkit was developed to model this detector. All the relevant physics processes including neutron interaction, scintillation, and optic...

  2. Reconstruction of scintillations coordinates in cylindrical large detector with radial arrangement of photomultipliers

    CERN Document Server

    Alekseev, V M; Verbitskij, V S; Verbitskij, S S; Lapik, M A; Tselebrovskij, A N; Lapik, A M; Rusakov, A V; Savopulo, M L; Smirnov, V V; Chubarov, M N

    2002-01-01

    Paper describes algorithm to calculate scintillation coordinates elaborated for a coordinate-sensitive large detector based on liquid scintillator with radial arrangement of nine FEU-174 photomultipliers. Paper contains the simulation results of coordinate resolution dependence in detector centre on energy of gamma-quanta within 0.2-8 MeV range. Using this algorithm one processed the experimental data obtained with application of sup 6 sup 0 Co gamma-radiation source and the results of determination of scintillation coordinates for gamma-quanta beam. The accuracy of coordinate determination in detector centre when applying the descried algorithm constitutes approx 10 mm

  3. An analytic technique for the estimation of the light yield of a scintillation detector

    CERN Document Server

    Segreto, Ettore

    2011-01-01

    A simple model for the estimation of the light yield of a scintillation detector starting from the knowledge of its optical parameters and under general assumptions is developed. It is also shown how to take into account the effects related to Rayleigh scattering and absorption of the photons. The predictions of the model are benchmarked with the outcomes of a Monte Carlo simulation of a specific scintillation detector. The case of a real scintillation detector with internal surface covered by wavelength-shifter is explicitly treated and the model prediction is compared with the measured light yield.

  4. Testing a new NIF neutron time-of-flight detector with a bibenzyl scintillator on OMEGA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glebov, V Yu; Forrest, C; Knauer, J P; Pruyne, A; Romanofsky, M; Sangster, T C; Shoup, M J; Stoeckl, C; Caggiano, J A; Carman, M L; Clancy, T J; Hatarik, R; McNaney, J; Zaitseva, N P

    2012-10-01

    A new neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) detector with a bibenzyl crystal as a scintillator has been designed and manufactured for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This detector will replace a nTOF20-Spec detector with an oxygenated xylene scintillator currently operational on the NIF to improve the areal-density measurements. In addition to areal density, the bibenzyl detector will measure the D-D and D-T neutron yield and the ion temperature of indirect- and direct-drive-implosion experiments. The design of the bibenzyl detector and results of tests on the OMEGA Laser System are presented.

  5. Light yield measurements in a liquid scintillator detector with wavelength-shifting fibre readout

    CERN Document Server

    Doucet, M; Grégoire, G; Panman, J; Zucchelli, P

    2001-01-01

    A technique based on liquid scintillator with wavelength-shiftingfibre readout is interesting for large-mass neutrino detectors. In this paper, we present results obtained with a laboratoryprototype assembled at CERN. Mixtures made of economical chemicalcomponents were compared to commercial liquid scintillators. Thelight yield was also studied as a function of fibre diameter, fibreposition, and surface quality of the container.

  6. The Real-Time Dose Measurement Scintillating Fiber Array for Brachytherapy Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tynes, Lawrence

    2007-03-01

    Brachytherapy is a treatment modality that uses tiny radioactive sources (few mm in length) by delivering enough doses to kill cancer tumors or plaque build-up. The type of sources used in hospitals include both gamma and beta emitters. Presently, the technique suffers from not having a single detector with the capability of providing accurate dose distribution information within sub-mm accuracy. The current standard is based primarily on well chambers and film dosimetry. The Center for Advanced Medical Instrumentation (CAMI) at Hampton University is developing a Scintillating Fiber Based Beta Detector prototype in collaboration with the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) to address this problem. The device is composed of an array of 1x1 mm^2 scintillating fibers optically coupled to photo-multiplier tubes for photon-to-current conversion. A CAMAC LabView based data acquisition system is used for real time data collection and histogramming, data analysis. A set of data were collected at the nearby Bon Secours DePaul Medical Center using a GammaMed 12i HDR after-loader housing a 6.62 mCi Ir-192 source. Preliminary comparison between our device and film dosimetry will be discussed.

  7. Detection of Extensive Cosmic Air Showers by Small Scintillation Detectors with Wavelength-Shifting Fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiola, Salvatore; La Rocca, Paola; Riggi, Francesco; Riggi, Simone

    2012-01-01

    A set of three small scintillation detectors was employed to measure correlated events due to the passage of cosmic muons originating from extensive air showers. The coincidence rate between (any) two detectors was extracted as a function of their relative distance. The difference between the arrival times in three non-aligned detectors was used…

  8. Scintillation Detector for the Measurement of Ultra-Heavy Cosmic Rays on the Super-TIGER Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Jason

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the design and construction of the scintillation detectors for the Super-TIGER experiment. Super-TIGER is a large-area (5.4sq m) balloon-borne experiment designed to measure the abundances of cosmic-ray nuclei between Z= 10 and Z=56. It is based on the successful TIGER experiment that flew in Antarctica in 2001 and 2003. Super-TIGER has three layers of scintillation detectors, two Cherenkov detectors and a scintillating fiber hodoscope. The scintillation detector employs four wavelength shifter bars surrounding the edges of the scintillator to collect the light from particles traversing the detector. PMTs are optically coupled at both ends of the bars for light collection. We report on laboratory performance of the scintillation counters using muons. In addition we discuss the design challenges and detector response over this broad charge range including the effect of scintilator saturation.

  9. High-resolution ionization detector and array of such detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGregor, Douglas S. (Ypsilanti, MI); Rojeski, Ronald A. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2001-01-16

    A high-resolution ionization detector and an array of such detectors are described which utilize a reference pattern of conductive or semiconductive material to form interaction, pervious and measurement regions in an ionization substrate of, for example, CdZnTe material. The ionization detector is a room temperature semiconductor radiation detector. Various geometries of such a detector and an array of such detectors produce room temperature operated gamma ray spectrometers with relatively high resolution. For example, a 1 cm.sup.3 detector is capable of measuring .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays with room temperature energy resolution approaching 2% at FWHM. Two major types of such detectors include a parallel strip semiconductor Frisch grid detector and the geometrically weighted trapezoid prism semiconductor Frisch grid detector. The geometrically weighted detector records room temperature (24.degree. C.) energy resolutions of 2.68% FWHM for .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays and 2.45% FWHM for .sup.60 Co 1.332 MeV gamma rays. The detectors perform well without any electronic pulse rejection, correction or compensation techniques. The devices operate at room temperature with simple commercially available NIM bin electronics and do not require special preamplifiers or cooling stages for good spectroscopic results.

  10. Pulse shape discrimination using EJ-299-33 plastic scintillator coupled with a Silicon Photomultiplier array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Can; Yang, Haori

    2015-07-01

    Recent developments in organic plastic scintillators capable of pulse shape discrimination (PSD) have gained much interest. Novel photon detectors, such as Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs), offer numerous advantages and can be used as an alternative to conventional photo multiplier tubes (PMTs) in many applications. In this work, we evaluate the PSD performance of the EJ-299-33 plastic scintillator coupled with a SiPM array. 2D PSD plots as well as the Figure of Merit (FOM) parameters are presented to demonstrate the PSD capability of EJ-299-33 using a SiPM as the light sensor. The best FOM of 0.76 was observed with a 1.0 MeVee (MeV-electron-equivalent) energy threshold, despite the high noise level of the SiPM array. A high-speed digital oscilloscope was used to acquire data, which was then processed offline in MATLAB. A performance comparison between two different PSD algorithms was carried out. The dependence of PSD quality on the sampling rate was also evaluated, stimulated by the interest to implement this setup for handheld applications where power consumption is crucial.

  11. Effect of x-ray incident direction and scintillator layer design on image quality of indirect-conversion flat-panel detector with GOS phosphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, K.; Nariyuki, F.; Nomura, H.; Takasu, A.; Fukui, S.; Nakatsu, M.; Okada, Y.; Nabeta, T.; Hosoi, Y.

    2011-03-01

    In this study, we characterized the image quality of two types of indirect-conversion flat-panel detectors: an X-ray incident-side photo-detection system (IS) and an X-ray penetration-side photo-detection system (PS). These detectors consist of a Gd2O2S:Tb (GOS) scintillator coupled with a photodiode thin film transistor (PD-TFT) array on a glass substrate. The detectors have different X-ray incident directions, glass substrates, and scintillators. We also characterized the effects of layered scintillator structures on the image quality by using a single-layered scintillator containing large phosphor grains and a double-layered scintillator consisting of a layer of large phosphor grains and a layer of small phosphor grains. The IS system consistently demonstrated a higher MTF than the PS system for a scintillator of the same thickness. Moreover, the IS system showed a higher DQE than the PS system when a thick scintillator was used. While the double-layered scintillators were useful for improving the MTF in both systems, a thick single-layered scintillator was preferable for obtaining a high DQE when the IS system was applied. These results indicate that an IS system can efficiently utilize the light emitted from the phosphor at the far side of the PD without the occurrence of blurring. The use of IS systems makes it possible to increase the thickness of the scintillator layer for improving the sensitivity without reducing the MTF, which increases the DQE. The DQE of the IS system was 1.2 times that of the PS system, despite the absorption of X-rays at the glass substrate before entering the phosphor.

  12. Impact of geometry on light collection efficiency of scintillation detectors for cryogenic rare event searches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danevich, F.A.; Kobychev, V.V. [Institute for Nuclear Research, MSP 03680 Kyiv (Ukraine); Kobychev, R.V. [Institute for Nuclear Research, MSP 03680 Kyiv (Ukraine); National Technical University of Ukraine “Kyiv Polytechnic Institute”, 03056 Kyiv (Ukraine); Kraus, H. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Mikhailik, V.B., E-mail: vmikhai@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Diamond Light Source, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Mokina, V.M. [Institute for Nuclear Research, MSP 03680 Kyiv (Ukraine); Solsky, I.M. [Scientific Research Company CARAT, 79031 Lviv (Ukraine)

    2014-10-01

    Simulations of photon propagation in scintillation detectors were performed with the aim to find the optimal scintillator geometry, surface treatment, and shape of external reflector in order to achieve maximum light collection efficiency for detector configurations that avoid direct optical coupling, a situation that is commonly found in cryogenic scintillating bolometers in experimental searches for double beta decay and dark matter. To evaluate the light collection efficiency of various geometrical configurations we used the ZEMAX ray-tracing software. It was found that scintillators in the shape of a triangular prism with an external mirror shaped as truncated cone gives the highest light collection efficiency. The results of the simulations were confirmed by carrying out measurements of the light collection efficiencies of CaWO{sub 4} crystal scintillators. A comparison of simulated and measured values of light output shows good agreement.

  13. Segmented scintillation detectors with silicon photomultiplier readout for measuring antiproton annihilations

    CERN Document Server

    Sótér, A; Kobayashi, T; Barna, D; Horvath, D; Hori, M

    2014-01-01

    The Atomic Spectroscopy and Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons (ASACUSA) experiment at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) facility of CERN constructed segmented scintillators to detect and track the charged pions which emerge from antiproton annihilations in a future superconducting radiofrequency Paul trap for antiprotons. A system of 541 cast and extruded scintillator bars were arranged in 11 detector modules which provided a spatial resolution of 17 mm. Green wavelength-shifting fibers were embedded in the scintillators, and read out by silicon photomultipliers which had a sensitive area of 1 x 1 mm^2. The photoelectron yields of various scintillator configurations were measured using a negative pion beam of momentum p ~ 1 GeV/c. Various fibers and silicon photomultipliers, fiber end terminations, and couplings between the fibers and scintillators were compared. The detectors were also tested using the antiproton beam of the AD. Nonlinear effects due to the saturation of the silicon photomultiplier were seen a...

  14. Performance of liquid argon neutrino detectors with enhanced sensitivity to scintillation light

    CERN Document Server

    Sorel, M

    2014-01-01

    Scintillation light is used in liquid argon neutrino detectors to provide a trigger signal, veto information against cosmic rays, and absolute event timing. In this work, we discuss additional opportunities offered by detectors with enhanced sensitivity to scintillation light, that is with light collection efficiencies of about $10^{-3}$. We focus on two key detector performance indicators for neutrino oscillation physics: calorimetric neutrino energy reconstruction and neutrino/antineutrino separation in a non-magnetized detector. Our simulations indicate that a neutrino energy resolution as good as 3.3\\% RMS for 4 GeV electron neutrino charged-current interactions can in principle be obtained in a large detector of this type, by using both charge and light information. By exploiting muon capture in argon and scintillation light information to veto muon decay electrons, we also obtain muon neutrino identification efficiencies of about 50\\%, and muon antineutrino misidentification rates at the few percent lev...

  15. Rejection of Alpha Surface Background in Non-scintillating Bolometric Detectors: The ABSuRD Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biassoni, M.; Brofferio, C.; Bucci, C.; Canonica, L.; di Vacri, M. L.; Gorla, P.; Pavan, M.; Yeh, M.

    2016-08-01

    Due to their excellent energy resolution values and the vast choice of possible materials, bolometric detectors are currently widely used in the physics of rare events. A limiting aspect for bolometers rises from their inability to discriminate among radiation types or surface from bulk events. It has been demonstrated that the main limitation to sensitivity for purely bolometric detectors is represented by surface alpha contaminations, causing a continuous background that cannot be discriminated. A new scintillation-based technique for the rejection of surface alpha background in non-scintillating bolometric experiments is proposed in this work. The idea is to combine a scintillating and a high sensitivity photon detector with a non-scintillating absorber. We present results showing the possibility to reject events due to alpha decay at or nearby the surface of the crystal.

  16. How to observe 8B solar neutrinos in liquid scintillator detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Ianni, A; Villante, F L

    2016-01-01

    We show that liquid organic scintillator detectors (e.g., KamLAND and Borexino) can measure the 8B solar neutrino flux by means of the nu_e charged current interaction with the 13C nuclei naturally contained in the scintillators. The neutrino events can be identified by exploiting the time and space coincidence with the subsequent decay of the produced 13N nuclei. We perform a detailed analysis of the background in KamLAND, Borexino and in a possible liquid scintillator detector at SNOLab, showing that the 8B solar neutrino signal can be extracted with a reasonable uncertainty in a few years of data taking. KamLAND should be able to extract about 18 solar neutrino events from the already collected data. Prospects for gigantic scintillator detectors (such as LENA) are also studied.

  17. Measurement of loss of DT fusion products using scintillator detectors in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darrow, D.S.; Herrmann, H.W.; Johnson, D.W.; Marsala, R.J.; Palladino, R.W.; Zweben, S.J. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Tuszewski, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-03-01

    A poloidal array of MeV ion loss probes previously used to measure DD fusion product loss has been upgraded to measure the loss of alpha particles from DT plasmas in TFTR. The following improvements to the system have been made in preparation for the use of tritium in TFTR: (1) relocation of detectors to a neutronshielded enclosure in the basement to reduce neutron-induced background signals; (2) replacement of ZnS:Cu (P31) scintillators in the probes with the Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}0{sub 12}:Ce(P46) variety to minimize damage and assure linearity at the fluxes anticipated from DT plasmas; and (3) shielding of the fiber optic bundles which carry the fight from the probes to the detectors to reduce neutron- and gamma-induced light within them. In addition to the above preparations, the probes have been absolutely calibrated for alpha particles by using the Van de Graaf accelerator at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Alpha particle losses from DT plasmas have been observed, and losses at the detector 901 below the midplane are consistent with first orbit loss.

  18. Semiconductor scintillator detector for gamma radiation; Detector cintilador semicondutor para radiacao gama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laan, F.T.V. der; Borges, V.; Zabadal, J.R.S., E-mail: ftvdl@ufrgs.br, E-mail: borges@ufrgs.br, E-mail: jorge.zabadal@ufrgs.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (GENUC/DEMEC/UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Grupo de Estudos Nucleares. Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica

    2015-07-01

    Nowadays the devices employed to evaluate individual radiation exposition are based on dosimetric films and thermoluminescent crystals, whose measurements must be processed in specific transductors. Hence, these devices carry out indirect measurements. Although a new generation of detectors based on semiconductors which are employed in EPD's (Electronic Personal Dosemeters) being yet available, it high producing costs and large dimensions prevents the application in personal dosimetry. Recent research works reports the development of new detection devices based on photovoltaic PIN diodes, which were successfully employed for detecting and monitoring exposition to X rays. In this work, we step forward by coupling a 2mm anthracene scintillator NE1, which converts the high energy radiation in visible light, generating a Strong signal which allows dispensing the use of photomultipliers. A low gain high performance amplifier and a digital acquisition device are employed to measure instantaneous and cumulative doses for energies ranging from X rays to Gamma radiation up to 2 MeV. One of the most important features of the PIN diode relies in the fact that it can be employed as a detector for ionization radiation, since it requires a small energy amount for releasing electrons. Since the photodiode does not amplify the corresponding photon current, it must be coupled to a low gain amplifier. Therefore, the new sensor works as a scintillator coupled with a photodiode PIN. Preliminary experiments are being performed with this sensor, showing good results for a wide range of energy spectrum. (author)

  19. Recent progress of MPPC-based scintillation detectors in high precision X-ray and gamma-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, J.; Kishimoto, A.; Fujita, T.; Nishiyama, T.; Kurei, Y.; Tsujikawa, T.; Oshima, T.; Taya, T.; Iwamoto, Y.; Ogata, H.; Okochi, H.; Ohsuka, S.; Ikeda, H.; Yamamoto, S.

    2015-06-01

    The multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC) is a promising light sensor for various applications, not only in physics experiments but also in nuclear medicine, industry, and even high-energy astrophysics. In this paper, we present the current status and most recent progress of the MPPC-based scintillation detectors, such as (1) a high-precision X-ray and gamma-ray spectral image sensor, (2) next-generation PET detectors with MRI, TOF, and DOI measurement capabilities, and (3) a compact gamma camera for environmental radiation surveys. We first present a new method of fabricating a Ce:GAGG scintillator plate (1 or 2 mm thick) with ultra-fine resolution (0.2 mm/pixel), cut using a dicing saw to create 50 μm wide micro-grooves. When the plate is optically coupled with a large-area MPPC array, excellent spatial resolution of 0.48 mm (FWHM) and energy resolution of 14% (FWHM) are obtained for 122 keV gamma rays. Hence, the detector can act as a convenient "multi-color" imaging device that can potentially be used for future SPECT and photon-counting CT. We then show a prototype system for a high-resolution MPPC-based PET scanner that can realize ≃1 mm (FWHM) spatial resolution, even under a strong magnetic field of 4.7 T. We develop a front-end ASIC intended for future TOF-PET scanner with a 16-channel readout that achieves a coincidence time resolution of 489 ps (FWHM). A novel design for a module with DOI-measurement capability for gamma rays is also presented by measuring the pulse height ratio of double-sided MPPCs coupled at both ends of scintillation crystal block. Finally, we present the concept of a two-plane Compton camera consisting of Ce:GAGG scintillator arrays coupled with thin MPPC arrays. As a result of the thin and compact features of the MPPC device, the camera not only achieves a small size (14×14×15 cm3) and light weight (1.9 kg) but also excellent sensitivity, compared to the conventional PMT-based pinhole camera used in Fukushima. Finally, we briefly

  20. Characterization of detector scintillator effect on interventional device visualization in x-ray fluoroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuhao; Wilson, David L.

    2005-04-01

    Flat panel detectors have a large number of parameters that affect fluoroscopy image quality. Scintillator thickness is very important and can be changed in fabrication. In general, with increasing thickness, there is a degradation of MTF with spatial blurring but improved conversion efficiency. This design trade-off should be optimized for visualization. Using quantitative experimental and techniques, we simulated three detector models, including a direct detector and two indirect detectors with different scintillator thickness (160 and 210 mg/cm2) and displayed each "acquired" pixel directly on the screen without further processing in a sequence of fluoroscopy images. To measure image quality, we investigated detection of two interventional devices: stents and guide wires. Human observers and a channelized human observer model both demonstrated that detection depended on detector scintillator thickness and the type of interventional device. Detection performance was improved with the thicker scintillator, especially at low exposure. A simulated direct detector gave less blurring and even better detection performance for stent detection. The thick indirect detector gave contrast sensitivities equal to those for the direct detector for the case of guide wire detection. An ideal observer model gave trends similar to those for human observers, even though it does not account for many features of human viewing of image sequences and gives extraordinarily high detection SNR values because it uses all images in a sequence.

  1. Development of a Compton camera for medical applications based on silicon strip and scintillation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krimmer, J.; Ley, J.-L.; Abellan, C.; Cachemiche, J.-P.; Caponetto, L.; Chen, X.; Dahoumane, M.; Dauvergne, D.; Freud, N.; Joly, B.; Lambert, D.; Lestand, L.; Létang, J. M.; Magne, M.; Mathez, H.; Maxim, V.; Montarou, G.; Morel, C.; Pinto, M.; Ray, C.; Reithinger, V.; Testa, E.; Zoccarato, Y.

    2015-07-01

    A Compton camera is being developed for the purpose of ion-range monitoring during hadrontherapy via the detection of prompt-gamma rays. The system consists of a scintillating fiber beam tagging hodoscope, a stack of double sided silicon strip detectors (90×90×2 mm3, 2×64 strips) as scatter detectors, as well as bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillation detectors (38×35×30 mm3, 100 blocks) as absorbers. The individual components will be described, together with the status of their characterization.

  2. Development of a Compton camera for medical applications based on silicon strip and scintillation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krimmer, J., E-mail: j.krimmer@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Ley, J.-L. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Abellan, C.; Cachemiche, J.-P. [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS/IN2P3, CPPM UMR 7346, 13288 Marseille (France); Caponetto, L.; Chen, X.; Dahoumane, M.; Dauvergne, D. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Freud, N. [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA - Lyon, Université Lyon 1, Centre Léon Bérard (France); Joly, B.; Lambert, D.; Lestand, L. [Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); Létang, J.M. [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA - Lyon, Université Lyon 1, Centre Léon Bérard (France); Magne, M. [Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); and others

    2015-07-01

    A Compton camera is being developed for the purpose of ion-range monitoring during hadrontherapy via the detection of prompt-gamma rays. The system consists of a scintillating fiber beam tagging hodoscope, a stack of double sided silicon strip detectors (90×90×2 mm{sup 3}, 2×64 strips) as scatter detectors, as well as bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillation detectors (38×35×30 mm{sup 3}, 100 blocks) as absorbers. The individual components will be described, together with the status of their characterization.

  3. Prospects of the search for neutrino bursts from Supernovae with Baksan Large Volume Scintillation Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Petkov, V B

    2015-01-01

    Observing a high-statistics neutrino signal from the supernova explosions in the Galaxy is a major goal of low-energy neutrino astronomy. The prospects for detecting all flavors of neutrinos and antineutrinos from the core-collapse supernova (ccSN) in operating and forthcoming large liquid scintillation detectors (LLSD) are widely discussed now. One of proposed LLSD is Baksan Large Volume Scintillation Detector (BLVSD). This detector will be installed at the Baksan Neutrino Observatory (BNO) of the Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, at a depth of 4800 m.w.e. Low-energy neutrino astronomy is one of the main lines of research of the BLVSD.

  4. Discovery potential for supernova relic neutrinos with slow liquid scintillator detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Hanyu; Chen, Shaomin

    2016-01-01

    The detection of supernova relic neutrinos would provide a key support for our current understanding of stellar and cosmological evolution, and precise measurements of them would further give us an insight of the profound universe. In this paper we study the potential to detect supernova relic neutrinos using linear alkyl benzene, LAB, as a slow liquid scintillator, which features a good separation of Cherenkov and scintillation lights, thus providing a new ability in particle identification. We also address key issues of current experiments, including 1) the charged current background of atmospheric neutrinos in water Cherenkov detectors, and 2) the neutral current background of atmospheric neutrinos in typical liquid scintillator detectors. With LAB, a kiloton-scale detector, like the SNO, KamLAND, and the future Jinping neutrino detectors, with $\\mathcal{O}$(10) years of data, would have the sensitivity to discover supernova relic neutrinos, which is comparable to large-volume water Cherenkov, typical liqu...

  5. Radiation hardness of plastic scintillators for the Tile Calorimeter of the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Jivan, Harshna; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter of the ATLAS detector, is a hadronic calorimeter responsible for detecting hadrons as well as accommodating for the missing transverse energy that result from the p-p collisions within the LHC. Plastic scintillators form an integral component of this calorimeter due to their ability to undergo prompt fluorescence when exposed to ionising particles. The scintillators employed are specifically chosen for their properties of high optical transmission and fast rise and decay time which enables efficient data capture since fast signal pulses can be generated. The main draw-back of plastic scintillators however is their susceptibility to radiation damage. The damage caused by radiation exposure reduces the scintillation light yield and introduces an error into the time-of flight data acquired. During Run 1 of the LHC data taking period, plastic scintillators employed within the GAP region between the Tile Calorimeter’s central and extended barrels sustained a significant amount of damage. Wit...

  6. Subnanosecond scintillation detector for high energy cosmic rays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The task objective is to develop a gamma ray scintillator technology with subnanosecond temporal resolution and the capability to withstand unprecedented rates and...

  7. Photonic Crystals: Enhancing the Light Output of Scintillation Based Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Knapitsch, Arno Richard

    A scintillator is a material which emits light when excited by ionizing radiation. Such materials are used in a diverse range of applications; From high energy particle physics experiments, X-ray security, to nuclear cameras or positron emission tomography. Future high-energy physics (HEP) experiments as well as next generation medical imaging applications are more and more pushing towards better scintillation characteristics. One of the problems in heavy scintillating materials is related to their high index of refraction. As a consequence, most of the scintillation light produced in the bulk material is trapped inside the crystal due to total internal reflection. The same problem also occurs with light emitting diodes (LEDs) and has for a long time been considered as a limiting factor for their overall efficiency. Recent developments in the area of nanophotonics were showing now that those limitations can be overcome by introducing a photonic crystal (PhC) slab at the outcoupling surface of the substrate. P...

  8. ANTS — a simulation package for secondary scintillation Anger-camera type detector in thermal neutron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, A.; Defendi, I.; Engels, R.; Fraga, F. A. F.; Fraga, M. M. F. R.; Guerard, B.; Jurkovic, M.; Kemmerling, G.; Manzin, G.; Margato, L. M. S.; Niko, H.; Pereira, L.; Petrillo, C.; Peyaud, A.; Piscitelli, F.; Raspino, D.; Rhodes, N. J.; Sacchetti, F.; Schooneveld, E. M.; Van Esch, P.; Zeitelhack, K.

    2012-08-01

    A custom and fully interactive simulation package ANTS (Anger-camera type Neutron detector: Toolkit for Simulations) has been developed to optimize the design and operation conditions of secondary scintillation Anger-camera type gaseous detectors for thermal neutron imaging. The simulation code accounts for all physical processes related to the neutron capture, energy deposition pattern, drift of electrons of the primary ionization and secondary scintillation. The photons are traced considering the wavelength-resolved refraction and transmission of the output window. Photo-detection accounts for the wavelength-resolved quantum efficiency, angular response, area sensitivity, gain and single-photoelectron spectra of the photomultipliers (PMTs). The package allows for several geometrical shapes of the PMT photocathode (round, hexagonal and square) and offers a flexible PMT array configuration: up to 100 PMTs in a custom arrangement with the square or hexagonal packing. Several read-out patterns of the PMT array are implemented. Reconstruction of the neutron capture position (projection on the plane of the light emission) is performed using the center of gravity, maximum likelihood or weighted least squares algorithm. Simulation results reproduce well the preliminary results obtained with a small-scale detector prototype. ANTS executables can be downloaded from http://coimbra.lip.pt/~andrei/.

  9. Cryogenic phonon-scintillation detectors with PMT readout for rare event search experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Lin, J.; Mikhailik, V. B.; Kraus, H.

    2016-06-01

    Cryogenic phonon-scintillation detectors (CPSD) for rare event search experiments require reliable, efficient and robust photon detectors that can resolve individual photons in a scintillation event. We report on a cryogenic detector containing a scintillating crystal, equipped with an NTD-Ge phonon sensor and a photon detector based on a low-temperature photomultiplier tube (PMT) that is powered by a Cockcroft-Walton generator. Here we present results from the characterisation of two detector modules, one with CaWO4, the other with CaMoO4 as scintillator. The energy resolutions (FWHM) at 122.1 keV for the scintillation/PMT channel are 19.9% and 29.7% respectively for CaWO4 and CaMoO4 while the energy resolutions (FWHM) for the phonon channels are 2.17 keV (1.8%) and 0.97 keV (0.79%). These characteristics compare favourably with other CPSDs currently used in cryogenic rare-event search experiments. The detection module with PMT readout benefits from the implementation of a well-understood, reliable, and commercially available component and improved time resolution, while retaining the major advantages of conventional CPSD, such as high sensitivity, resolving power and discrimination ability.

  10. A systematic characterization of the low-energy photon response of plastic scintillation detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Jonathan; Beddar, Sam; Bonde, Chris; Schmidt, Daniel; Culberson, Wesley; Guillemette, Maxime; Beaulieu, Luc

    2016-08-01

    To characterize the low energy behavior of scintillating materials used in plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs), 3 PSDs were developed using polystyrene-based scintillating materials emitting in different wavelengths. These detectors were exposed to National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)-matched low-energy beams ranging from 20 kVp to 250 kVp, and to (137)Cs and (60)Co beams. The dose in polystyrene was compared to the dose in air measured by NIST-calibrated ionization chambers at the same location. Analysis of every beam quality spectrum was used to extract the beam parameters and the effective mass energy-absorption coefficient. Monte Carlo simulations were also performed to calculate the energy absorbed in the scintillators' volume. The scintillators' expected response was then compared to the experimental measurements and an energy-dependent correction factor was identified to account for low-energy quenching in the scintillators. The empirical Birks model was then compared to these values to verify its validity for low-energy electrons. The clear optical fiber response was below 0.2% of the scintillator's light for x-ray beams, indicating that a negligible amount of fluorescence contamination was produced. However, for higher-energy beams ((137)Cs and (60)Co), the scintillators' response was corrected for the Cerenkov stem effect. The scintillators' response increased by a factor of approximately 4 from a 20 kVp to a (60)Co beam. The decrease in sensitivity from ionization quenching reached a local minimum of about [Formula: see text] between 40 keV and 60 keV x-ray beam mean energy, but dropped by 20% for very low-energy (13 keV) beams. The Birks model may be used to fit the experimental data, but it must take into account the energy dependence of the kB quenching parameter. A detailed comprehension of intrinsic scintillator response is essential for proper calibration of PSD dosimeters for radiology.

  11. Performance of SEM scintillation detector evaluated by modulation transfer function and detective quantum efficiency function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bok, Jan; Schauer, Petr

    2014-01-01

    In the paper, the SEM detector is evaluated by the modulation transfer function (MTF) which expresses the detector's influence on the SEM image contrast. This is a novel approach, since the MTF was used previously to describe only the area imaging detectors, or whole imaging systems. The measurement technique and calculation of the MTF for the SEM detector are presented. In addition, the measurement and calculation of the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) as a function of the spatial frequency for the SEM detector are described. In this technique, the time modulated e-beam is used in order to create well-defined input signal for the detector. The MTF and DQE measurements are demonstrated on the Everhart-Thornley scintillation detector. This detector was alternated using the YAG:Ce, YAP:Ce, and CRY18 single-crystal scintillators. The presented MTF and DQE characteristics show good imaging properties of the detectors with the YAP:Ce or CRY18 scintillator, especially for a specific type of the e-beam scan. The results demonstrate the great benefit of the description of SEM detectors using the MTF and DQE. In addition, point-by-point and continual-sweep e-beam scans in SEM were discussed and their influence on the image quality was revealed using the MTF.

  12. Combination of a silicon photodiode and a scintillator as a dose rate detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilar, O. (Tesla, Premysleni (Czechoslovakia). Vyzkumny Ustav Pristroju Jaderne Techniky); Petr, I. (Ceske Vysoke Uceni Technicke, Prague (Czechoslovakia). Fakulta Jaderna a Fysikalne Inzenyrska)

    1985-03-16

    The combination of a silicon photodiode adjacent to a CsI(Tl) scintillator as a detector of ..gamma..-rays is described. Theoretical conclusions are verified by an experiment and prove that the photodiode absorption spectrum as well as the quantum efficiency can be varied by an appropriate photodiode technology. The contribution of scintillation photons emitted by the CsI(Tl) scintillator in the photon field can enhance the total photocurrent more than an order of magnitude compared to the current response of the photodiode alone, placed in a photon field of equal exposure rate.

  13. Combinatorial Screening of Advanced Scintillators for High Resolution X-ray Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Shifan; Tao, Dejie; Lynch, Michael; Yuan, Xianglong; Li, Yiqun

    2008-05-12

    The lack of efficient scintillators is a major problem for developing powerful x-ray detectors that are widely used in homeland security, industrial and scientific research. Intematix has developed and applied a high throughput screening process and corresponding crystal growth technology to significantly speed up the discovery process for new efficient scintillators. As a result, Intematix has invented and fabricated three new scintillators both in powder and bulk forms, which possess promising properties such as better radiation hardness and better matching for silicon diode.

  14. Standard guide for digital detector array radiology

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This standard is a user guide, which is intended to serve as a tutorial for selection and use of various digital detector array systems nominally composed of the detector array and an imaging system to perform digital radiography. This guide also serves as an in-detail reference for the following standards: Practices E2597, , and E2737. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  15. Astronomical Image Processing with Array Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Houde, Martin

    2007-01-01

    We address the question of astronomical image processing from data obtained with array detectors. We define and analyze the cases of evenly, regularly, and irregularly sampled maps for idealized (i.e., infinite) and realistic (i.e., finite) detectors. We concentrate on the effect of interpolation on the maps, and the choice of the kernel used to accomplish this task. We show how the normalization intrinsic to the interpolation process must be carefully accounted for when dealing with irregularly sampled grids. We also analyze the effect of missing or dead pixels in the array, and their consequences for the Nyquist sampling criterion.

  16. SU-C-201-01: Investigation of the Effects of Scintillator Surface Treatment On Light Output Measurements with SiPM Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valenciaga, Y; Prout, D; Chatziioannou, A [University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To examine the effect of different scintillator surface treatments (BGO crystals) on the fraction of scintillation photons that exit the crystal and reach the photodetector (SiPM). Methods: Positron Emission Tomography is based on the detection of light that exits scintillator crystals, after annihilation photons deposit energy inside these crystals. A considerable fraction of the scintillation light gets trapped or absorbed after going through multiple internal reflections on the interfaces surrounding the crystals. BGO scintillator crystals generate considerably less scintillation light than crystals made of LSO and its variants. Therefore, it is crucial that the small amount of light produced by BGO exits towards the light detector. The surface treatment of scintillator crystals is among the factors affecting the ability of scintillation light to reach the detectors. In this study, we analyze the effect of different crystal surface treatments on the fraction of scintillation light that is detected by the solid state photodetector (SiPM), once energy is deposited inside a BGO crystal. Simulations were performed by a Monte Carlo based software named GATE, and validated by measurements from individual BGO crystals coupled to Philips digital-SiPM sensor (DPC-3200). Results: The results showed an increment in light collection of about 4 percent when only the exit face of the BGO crystal, is unpolished; compared to when all the faces are polished. However, leaving several faces unpolished caused a reduction of at least 10 percent of light output when the interaction occurs as far from the exit face of the crystal as possible compared to when it occurs very close to the exit face. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the advantages on light collection from leaving unpolished the exit face of BGO crystals. The configuration with best light output will be used to obtain flood images from BGO crystal arrays coupled to SiPM sensors.

  17. Scintillation neutron detectors based on solid-state photomultipliers and lightguides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvin, V. S., E-mail: vlitvin@inr.ru; Marin, V. N.; Karaevsky, S. K.; Trunov, D. N.; Axenov, S. N.; Stolyarov, A. A.; Sadykov, R. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    Neutron detectors based on scintillation screens ZnS(Ag)/LiF and solid-state photomultipliers have been developed. Lightguides are used to collect light. The application of a coincidence scheme provides a low dark count and a neutron detection efficiency as high as 70%. A scheme of x-y neutron detector based on wavelength shifting fibers is also proposed. Tests of the proposed versions of detectors in a neutron beam have shown their efficiency.

  18. Electronics for the Extensive Air Shower Detector Array at the University of Puebla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, E.; Conde, R.; Martínez, O.; Murrieta, T.; Salazar, H.; Villaseñor, L.

    2006-09-01

    In this paper we describe in detail the electronics cards that were designed to be the basis of the data acquisition system (DAS) of the extensive air shower detector array built in the Campus of the University of Puebla. The purpose of this observatory is to measure the energy and arrival direction of primary cosmic rays with energies around 1015 eV. The array consists of 18 liquid scintillator detectors (12 in the first stage) and 6 water Cherenkov detectors (one of 10 m2 cross section and five smaller ones of 1.86 m2 cross section), distributed in a square grid with a detector spacing of 20 m over an area of 4000 m2. The electronics described here uses analog to digital converters of 10 bits working at a sampling speed of 40 MS/s and field-programmable gate array (FPGA).

  19. Scintillation characteristics of phosphich-detector for detection of beta- and gamma-radiations

    CERN Document Server

    Ananenko, A A; Gavrilyuk, V

    2002-01-01

    The results of the study on the influence of individual peculiarities of the compound scintillation detector structure on the value and stability of the light yield by the gamma- and beta-radiation combined registration are presented. The phosphich detector is manufactured from the sodium iodide monocrystal, activated by thallium, and the scintillation plastic on the polystyrol basis. The comparison of the experimental results with the mathematical modeling data revealed certain regularities of the process of forming the phosphich detector light signal. The recommendations are worked out by means whereof the following characteristics of the scintillation unit: the light yield and its stability, amplitude resolution and the peak-to-valley ratio by the gamma- and beta-radiation registration were improved

  20. Compensational scintillation detector with a flat energy response for flash X-ray measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Ouyang, Xiaoping; Liu, Bin; Liu, Jinliang; Quan, Lin; Zhang, Zhongbing

    2013-01-01

    To measure the intensity of flash X-ray sources directly, a novel scintillation detector with a fast time response and flat energy response is developed by combining film scintillators of doped ZnO crystal and fast organic scintillator together. Through compensation design, the dual-scintillator detector (DSD) achieved a flat energy response to X-rays from tens of keV to several MeV, and sub-nanosecond time response by coupling to ultrafast photo-electronic devices. A prototype detector was fabricated according to the theoretical design; it employed ZnO:In and EJ228 with thicknesses of 0.3 mm and 0.1 mm, respectively. The energy response of this detector was tested on monoenergetic X-ray and γ-ray sources. The detector performs very well with a sensitivity fluctuation below 5% for 8 discrete energy points within the 40-250 keV energy region and for other energies of 662 keV and 1.25 MeV as well, showing good accordance with the theoretical design. Additionally, the detector works properly for the application to the flash X-ray radiation field absolute intensity measurement. This DSD may be very useful for the diagnosis of time-resolved dynamic physical processes of flash X-ray sources without knowing the exact energy spectrum.

  1. A scintillating gas detector for 2D dose measurements in clinical carbon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seravalli, E; de Boer, M; Geurink, F; Huizenga, J; Kreuger, R; Schippers, J M; van Eijk, C W E; Voss, B

    2008-09-07

    A two-dimensional position sensitive dosimetry system based on a scintillating gas detector has been developed for pre-treatment verification of dose distributions in hadron therapy. The dosimetry system consists of a chamber filled with an Ar/CF4 scintillating gas mixture, inside which two cascaded gas electron multipliers (GEMs) are mounted. A GEM is a thin kapton foil with copper cladding structured with a regular pattern of sub-mm holes. The primary electrons, created in the detector's sensitive volume by the incoming beam, drift in an electric field towards the GEMs and undergo gas multiplication in the GEM holes. During this process, photons are emitted by the excited Ar/CF4 gas molecules and detected by a mirror-lens-CCD camera system. Since the amount of emitted light is proportional to the dose deposited in the sensitive volume of the detector by the incoming beam, the intensity distribution of the measured light spot is proportional to the 2D hadron dose distribution. For a measurement of a 3D dose distribution, the scintillating gas detector is mounted at the beam exit side of a water-bellows phantom, whose thickness can be varied in steps. In this work, the energy dependence of the output signal of the scintillating gas detector has been verified in a 250 MeV/u clinical 12C ion beam by means of a depth-dose curve measurement. The underestimation of the measured signal at the Bragg peak depth is only 9% with respect to an air-filled ionization chamber. This is much smaller than the underestimation found for a scintillating Gd2O2S:Tb ('Lanex') screen under the same measurement conditions (43%). Consequently, the scintillating gas detector is a promising device for verifying dose distributions in high LET beams, for example to check hadron therapy treatment plans which comprise beams with different energies.

  2. A Novel Particle Detector: Quantum Dot Doped Liquid Scintillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, Lindley; Conrad, Janet; Jerry, Ruel

    2010-02-01

    Quantum dots are semiconducting nanocrystals. When excited by light shorter then their characteristic wavelength, they re-emit in a narrow band around this wavelength. The size of the quantum is proportional to the characteristic wavelength so they can be tuned for many applications. CdS quantum dots are made in wavelengths from 360nm to 460nm, a perfect range for the sensitivity of photo-multiplier tubes. The synthesis of quantum dots automatically leaves them in toluene, a good organic scintillator and Cd is a particularly interesting material as it has one of the highest thermal neutron cross sections and has several neutrinoless double beta decay and double electron capture isotopes. The performance of quantum dot loaded scintillator compared to standard scintillators is measured and some unique properties presented. )

  3. Cross-talk in Scintillating Fiber Array Detector Irradiated by High-energy X-ray%塑料闪烁光纤阵列成像探测器在高能X射线辐照下的串扰分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马庆力; 唐世彪; 许士敏; 党双平; 邹继伟

    2011-01-01

    The cross-talk in plastic scintillating fiber array detector with high-energy gamma incident was studied through Monte-Carlo simulation. The relationship bet-ween cross-talk and lead layer was also analyzed. Modulate transfer function (MTF) , which shows quantity of spatial resolution of imaging detector, was analyzed and compared in order to get the MTF results caused from the difference thickness of lead layer. The results show that there exists severe cross-talk in the detector irradiated by high-energy particles, and the lead layer can reduce the effect. On the other hand, the pixel of detector may become big as the lead layer is introduced, which can reduce the spatial resolution. Through the simulation computation, it is proved that the right thickness of lead layer will reduce cross-talk and increase spatial resolution of imaging detector.%采用蒙特卡罗方法对闪烁光纤阵列探测器在高能X射线入射下的串扰进行了模拟研究,并且分析比较了加铅层对串扰的影响.研究中采用对表征成像系统空间分辨率参量--调制传递函数进行模拟分析和比较,得到在光纤阵列之间加入不同铅层厚度后对系统调制传递函数参量曲线的影响.研究结果表明:在高能射线下,采用闪烁光纤阵列作为成像探测器存在严重的次级粒子相互串扰的现象,而在阵列之间加入铅介质能够减少这种效应;但另一方面,若所加铅层太厚又会导致成像探测器像素过大而使得空间分辨率下降.通过模拟计算得出:只要在阵列之间加入适当厚度的铅介质,既可以有效抑止阵列之间次级粒子的串扰,同时又能提高闪烁光纤阵列探测器系统的空间分辨率.

  4. Luminosity measurement at ATLAS-Development, construction and test of scintillating fibre prototype detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ask, S. [CERN, PH Department, Geneva (Switzerland); Barrillon, P. [Laboratoire d' Accelerateur Lineaire, Orsay (France); Braem, A. [CERN, PH Department, Geneva (Switzerland); Cheiklali, C. [Laboratoire d' Accelerateur Lineaire, Orsay (France); Efthymiopoulos, I. [CERN, PH Department, Geneva (Switzerland); Fournier, D. [Laboratoire d' Accelerateur Lineaire, Orsay (France); Taille, C. de la [Laboratoire d' Accelerateur Lineaire, Orsay (France); Di Girolamo, B. [CERN, PH Department, Geneva (Switzerland); Grafstrom, P. [CERN, PH Department, Geneva (Switzerland); Joram, C. [CERN, PH Department, Geneva (Switzerland)]. E-mail: christian.joram@cern.ch; Haguenauer, M. [Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Hedberg, V. [University of Lund (Sweden); Lavigne, B. [Laboratoire d' Accelerateur Lineaire, Orsay (France); Maio, A. [LIP - Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas and CFNUL - Centro de Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal); Mapelli, A. [CERN, PH Department, Geneva (Switzerland); Mjoernmark, U. [University of Lund (Sweden); Puzo, P. [Laboratoire d' Accelerateur Lineaire, Orsay (France); Rijssenbeek, M. [Stony Brook University, New York (United States); Santos, J. [LIP - Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas and CFNUL - Centro de Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal); Saraiva, J.G. [LIP - Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas and CFNUL - Centro de Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal); Stenzel, H. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universitaet, Giessen (Germany); Thioye, M. [Stony Brook University, New York (United States); Valladolid, E. [CERN, PH Department, Geneva (Switzerland); Vorobel, V. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague (Czech Republic)

    2006-12-01

    We are reporting about a scintillating fibre tracking detector which is proposed for the precise determination of the absolute luminosity of the CERN LHC at interaction point 1 where the ATLAS experiment is located. The detector needs to track protons elastically scattered under {mu}rad angles in direct vicinity to the LHC beam. It is based on square shaped scintillating plastic fibres read out by multi-anode photomultiplier tubes and is housed in Roman Pots. We describe the design and construction of prototype detectors and the results of a beam test experiment at DESY. The excellent detector performance established in this test validates the detector design and supports the feasibility of the proposed challenging method of luminosity measurement.

  5. Luminosity Measurement at ATLAS Development, Construction and Test of Scintillating Fibre Prototype Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Ask, S; Braem, André; Cheiklali, C; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fournier, D; de La Taille, C; Di Girolamo, B; Grafström, P; Joram, C; Haguenauer, Maurice; Hedberg, V; Lavigne, B; Maio, A; Mapelli, A; Mjörnmark, U; Puzo, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Santos, J; Saraiva, J G; Stenzel, H; Thioye, M; Valladolid, E; Vorobel, V

    2006-01-01

    We are reporting about a scintillating fibre tracking detector which is proposed for the precise determination of the absolute luminosity of the CERN LHC at interaction point 1 where the ATLAS experiment is located. The detector needs to track protons elastically scattered under $\\mu$rad angles in direct vicinity to the LHC beam. It is based on square shaped scintillating plastic fibres read out by multi-anode photomultiplier tubes and is housed in Roman Pots. We describe the design and construction of prototype detectors and the results of a beam test experiment at DESY. The excellent detector performance established in this test validates the detector design and supports the feasibility of the proposed challenging method of luminosity measurement.

  6. Hybrid Extensive Air Shower Detector Array at the University of Puebla to Study Cosmic Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, O.; Pérez, E.; Salazar, H.; Villaseñor, L.

    We describe the design of an extensive air shower detector array built in the Campus of the University of Puebla (located at 19°N, 90°W, 800 gcm -2) to measure the energy and arrival direction of primary cosmic rays with energies around 1015 eV. The array consists of 18 liquid scintillator detectors (12 in the first stage) and 6 water Cherenkov detectors (one of 10 m 2 cross section and five smaller ones of 1.86 m 2 cross section), distributed in a square grid with a detector spacing of 20 m over an area of 4000 m 2. In this paper we discuss the calibration and stability of the array, and discuss the capability of hybrid arrays, such as this one consisting of water Cherenkov and liquid scintillator detectors, to allow a separation of the electromagnetic and muon components of extensive air showers. This separation plays an important role in the determination of the mass and identity of the primary cosmic ray. This facility is also used to train students interested in the field of cosmic rays.

  7. A scintillator based muon and KLong detector for the Belle II experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Aushev, T; Chilikin, K; Chistov, R; Danilov, M; Katrenko, P; Mizuk, R; Pakhlova, G; Pakhlov, P; Rusinov, V; Solovieva, E; Tarkovsky, E; Tikhomirov, I; Uglov, T

    2014-01-01

    A new muon and K_Long detector based on scintillators will be used for the endcap and inner barrel regions in the Belle II experiment, currently under construction. The increased luminosity of the e+e- SuperKEKB collider entails challenging detector requirements. We demonstrate that relatively inexpensive polystyrene scintillator stips with wave length shifting fibers ensure a sufficient light yield at the Silcon PhotoMultiplier (SiPM) photodetector, are robust and provide improved physics performance for the Belle II experiment compared to its predecessor, Belle.

  8. PoGOLino: a scintillator-based balloon-borne neutron detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kole, Merlin; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Fukuda, Kentaro; Ishizu, Sumito; Jackson, Miranda; Kamae, Tune; Kawaguchi, Noriaki; Kawano, Takafumi; Kiss, Mozsi; Moretti, Elena; Pearce, Mark; Rydström, Stefan; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Yanagida, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    PoGOLino is a balloon-borne scintillator-based experiment developed to study the largely unexplored high altitude neutron environment at high geomagnetic latitudes. The instrument comprises two detectors that make use of LiCAF, a novel neutron sensitive scintillator, sandwiched by BGO crystals for background reduction. The experiment was launched on March 20th 2013 from the Esrange Space Centre, Northern Sweden (geomagnetic latitude of $65^\\circ$), for a three hour flight during which the instrument took data up to an altitude of 30.9 km. The detector design and ground calibration results are presented together with the measurement results from the balloon flight.

  9. First-principles Electronic Structure Calculations for Scintillation Phosphor Nuclear Detector Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canning, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    Inorganic scintillation phosphors (scintillators) are extensively employed as radiation detector materials in many fields of applied and fundamental research such as medical imaging, high energy physics, astrophysics, oil exploration and nuclear materials detection for homeland security and other applications. The ideal scintillator for gamma ray detection must have exceptional performance in terms of stopping power, luminosity, proportionality, speed, and cost. Recently, trivalent lanthanide dopants such as Ce and Eu have received greater attention for fast and bright scintillators as the optical 5d to 4f transition is relatively fast. However, crystal growth and production costs remain challenging for these new materials so there is still a need for new higher performing scintillators that meet the needs of the different application areas. First principles calculations can provide a useful insight into the chemical and electronic properties of such materials and hence can aid in the search for better new scintillators. In the past there has been little first-principles work done on scintillator materials in part because it means modeling f electrons in lanthanides as well as complex excited state and scattering processes. In this talk I will give an overview of the scintillation process and show how first-principles calculations can be applied to such systems to gain a better understanding of the physics involved. I will also present work on a high-throughput first principles approach to select new scintillator materials for fabrication as well as present more detailed calculations to study trapping process etc. that can limit their brightness. This work in collaboration with experimental groups has lead to the discovery of some new bright scintillators. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and carried out under U.S. Department of Energy Contract no. DE-AC02-05CH11231 at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  10. Dosimetry in clinical static magnetic fields using plastic scintillation detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefanowicz, S.; Latzel, H.; Lindvold, Lars René

    2013-01-01

    . In conclusion, we found some deviations up to 7% of the supposed signal. Although the scintillators are of much denser material, we measured the same behavior in signal as in (Meijsing et al., 2009) for a Farmer ionization chamber or as in (Raaijmakers et al., 2007) for films described which indicates radiation...

  11. Data analysis in solar neutrinos liquid-scintillator detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Testera, G. [INFN, Genova (Italy)

    2016-04-15

    This paper focuses on the description of some of the methods developed to extract the solar neutrino signal from the background by the two running experiments (Borexino and Kamland) based on the use of a large volume of liquid scintillator. (orig.)

  12. Advanced Scintillator Detector Concept (ASDC): A Concept Paper on the Physics Potential of Water-Based Liquid Scintillator

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso, J R; Bergevin, M; Bernstein, A; Bignell, L; Blucher, E; Calaprice, F; Conrad, J M; Descamps, F B; Diwan, M V; Dwyer, D A; Dye, S T; Elagin, A; Feng, P; Grant, C; Grullon, S; Hans, S; Jaffe, D E; Kettell, S H; Klein, J R; Lande, K; Learned, J G; Luk, K B; Maricic, J; Marleau, P; Mastbaum, A; McDonough, W F; Oberauer, L; Gann, G D Orebi; Rosero, R; Rountree, S D; Sanchez, M C; Shaevitz, M H; Shokair, T M; Smy, M B; Strait, M; Svoboda, R; Tolich, N; Vagins, M R; van Bibber, K A; Viren, B; Vogelaar, R B; Wetstein, M J; Winslow, L; Wonsak, B; Worcester, E T; Wurm, M; Yeh, M; Zhang, C

    2014-01-01

    The recent development of Water-based Liquid Scintillator (WbLS), and the concurrent development of high-efficiency and high-precision-timing light sensors, has opened up the possibility for a new kind of large-scale detector capable of a very broad program of physics. The program would include determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy and observation of CP violation with long-baseline neutrinos, searches for proton decay, ultra-precise solar neutrino measurements, geo- and supernova neutrinos including diff?use supernova antineutrinos, and neutrinoless double beta decay. We outline here the basic requirements of the Advanced Scintillation Detector Concept (ASDC), which combines the use of WbLS, doping with a number of potential isotopes for a range of physics goals, high efficiency and ultra-fast timing photosensors, and a deep underground location. We are considering such a detector at the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) far site, where the ASDC could operate in conjunction with the liquid argon t...

  13. The scintillating fiber focal plane detector for the use of Kaos as a double arm spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayerbe Gayoso, Carlos Antonio

    2012-05-25

    The upgrade of the Mainz Mikrotron (MAMI) electron accelerator facility in 2007 which raised the beam energy up to 1.5 GeV, gives the opportunity to study strangeness production channels through electromagnetic process. The Kaon Spectrometer (KAOS) managed by the A1 Collaboration, enables the efficient detection of the kaons associated with strangeness electroproduction. Used as a single arm spectrometer, it can be combined with the existing high-resolution spectrometers for exclusive measurements in the kinematic domain accessible to them. For studying hypernuclear production in the {sup A}Z(e,e'K{sup +}){sup A}{sub {lambda}}(Z-1) reaction, the detection of electrons at very forward angles is needed. Therefore, the use of KAOS as a double-arm spectrometer for detection of kaons and the electrons at the same time is mandatory. Thus, the electron arm should be provided with a new detector package, with high counting rate capability and high granularity for a good spatial resolution. To this end, a new state-of-the-art scintillating fiber hodoscope has been developed as an electron detector. The hodoscope is made of two planes with a total of 18432 scintillating double-clad fibers of 0.83 mm diameter. Each plane is formed by 72 modules. Each module is formed from a 60 slanted multi-layer bundle, where 4 fibers of a tilted column are connected to a common read out. The read-out is made with 32 channels of linear array multianode photomultipliers. Signal processing makes use of newly developed double-threshold discriminators. The discriminated signal is sent in parallel to dead-time free time-to-digital modules and to logic modules for triggering purposes. Two fiber modules were tested with a carbon beam at GSI, showing a time resolution of {proportional_to}220 ps (FWHM) and a position resolution of {proportional_to}270 {mu}m (FWHM) with a detection efficiency {epsilon}>99%. The characterization of the spectrometer arm has been achieved through simulations

  14. Study of Scintillator thickness optimization of lens-coupled X-ray imaging detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, H.; Du, G.; Deng, B.; Chen, R.; Xiao, T.

    2016-03-01

    Lens-coupled X-ray in-direct imaging detectors are very popular for high-resolution X-ray imaging at the third generation synchrotron radiation facilities. This imaging system consists of a scintilator producing a visible-light image of X-ray beam, a microscope objective, a mirror reflecting at 90° and a CCD camera. When the thickness of the scintillator is matched with the numerical aperture (NA) of the microscope objective, the image quality of experimental results will be improved obviously. This paper used an imaging system at BL13W beamline of Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) to study the matching relation between the scintillator thickness and the NA of the microscope objective with a real sample. By use of the matching relation between the scintillator thickness and the NA of the microscope objective, the optimal imaging results have been obtained.

  15. Development of NANA: A Fast-Scintillator, Coincidence Gamma-ray Array for Radioactive Source Characterisation and Absolute Activity Measurements at the UK National Physical Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, P. H.; Shearman, R.; Judge, S. M.; Lorusso, G.; Main, P.; Bell, S.; Collins, S. M.; Ivanov, P.; Jerome, S. M.; Keightley, J. D.; Larijani, C.; Lotay, G.; Pearce, A. K.

    2015-06-01

    A multi-detector modular coincidence gamma-ray spectrometer is being designed and constructed for use at the UK's National Physical Laboratory (NPL) for use in direct measurement and metrological standardisation of nuclear decay activities. In its first generation, the NPL National Nuclear Array (NANA) will consist of twelve individual halide scintillation detectors placed in a high-efficiency geometry around a well-defined central point source position. This brief conference paper provides details of the measured detector module and coincidence energy and timing responses for the LaBr3(Ce) detectors which will be used in the NANA array. Preliminary GEANT4 simulations of the array's full energy peak efficiency and expected gamma-ray coincidence response are also presented.

  16. Investigation of Very Fast Light Detectors: Silicon Photomultiplier and Micro PMT for a Cosmic Ray Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, Omar; Reyes, Liliana; Hooks, Tyler; Perez, Luis; Ritt, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    To construct a cosmic detector array using 4 scintillation detectors, we investigated 2 recent light sensor technologies from Hamamatsu, as possible readout detectors. First, we investigated several homemade versions of the multipixel photon counter (MPPC) light sensors. These detectors were either biased with internal or external high voltage power supplies. We made extensive measurements to confirm for the coincidence of the MPPC devices. Each sensor is coupled to a wavelength shifting fiber (WSF) that is embedded along a plastic scintillator sheet (30cmx60cmx1/4''). Using energetic cosmic rays, we evaluated several of these homemade detector modules placed above one another in a light proof enclosure. Next, we assembled 2 miniaturized micro photomultiplier (micro PMT), a device recently marketed by Hamamatsu. These sensors showed very fast response times. With 3 WSF embedded in scintillator sheets, we performed coincidence experiments. The detector waveforms were captured using the 5GS/sec domino ring sampler, the DRS4 and our workflow using the CERN PAW package and data analysis results would be presented. Title V Grant.

  17. A comparison of CsI:Tl and GOS in a scintillator-CCD detector for nuclear medicine imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugby, S. L.; Jambi, L. K.; Lees, J. E.

    2016-09-01

    A number of portable gamma cameras for medical imaging use scintillator-CCD based detectors. This paper compares the performance of a scintillator-CCD based portable gamma camera with either a columnar CsI:Tl or a pixelated GOS scintillator installed. The CsI:Tl scintillator has a sensitivity of 40% at 140.5 keV compared to 54% with the GOS scintillator. The intrinsic spatial resolution of the pixelated GOS detector was 1.09 mm, over 4 times poorer than for CsI:Tl. Count rate capability was also found to be significantly lower when the GOS scintillator was used. The uniformity was comparable for both scintillators.

  18. Spallation reactions studied with 4-detector arrays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J Galin

    2001-07-01

    Recently there has been a renewed interest in the study of spallation reactions in basic nuclear physics as well as in potential applications. Spallation reactions induced by light projectiles (protons, antiprotons, pions, etc.) in the GeV range allow the formation of hot nuclei which do not suffer the collective excitations (compression, rotation, deformation) unavoidable when using massive projectiles. Such nuclei provide an ideal testbench for probing their decay as a function of excitation energy. In these investigations, 4-detector arrays for charged particles and neutrons play a major role in the event-by-event sorting according to the excitation energy of the nucleus. Spallation reactions induced on heavy nuclei allow the conversion of the incident GeV proton into several tens of evaporated neutrons. The neutron production in thick targets has been investigated in great detail thanks to the use of high efficiency neutron detector arrays. When scattered on samples of inert or biological materials, these neutrons can be used to study details of the material structure. They could also be utilized for the transmutation of long-lived nuclear wastes or for the feeding of sub-critical nuclear reactors. The role of different types of multi-detector arrays is highlighted in this paper. Several references are also given for different uses of high efficiency neutron detectors in other contexts.

  19. Ticor-based scintillation detectors for detection of mixed radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Litvinov, L A; Kolner, V B; Ryzhikov, V D; Volkov, V G; Tarasov, V A; Zelenskaya, O V

    2002-01-01

    Detection of mixed radiation of thermal neutrons and gamma-rays have been realized using a new ceramic material based on small-crystalline long-wave scintillator alpha-Al sub 2 O sub 3 :Ti (Ticor) and lithium fluoride. Characteristics are presented for scintillators with Si-PIN-PD type photoreceivers and PMT under sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu alpha-particles, sup 2 sup 0 sup 7 Bi internal conversion electrons,as well as sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am and sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs gamma-quanta. Detection efficiency of thermal neutron is estimated for composite materials based on Ticor and lithium fluoride.

  20. The research program of the Liquid Scintillation Detector (LSD) in the Mont Blanc Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadykin, V. L.; Yakushev, V. F.; Korchagin, P. V.; Korchagin, V. B.; Malgin, A. S.; Ryassny, F. G.; Ryazhskaya, O. G.; Talochkin, V. P.; Zatsepin, G. T.; Badino, G.

    1985-01-01

    A massive (90 tons) liquid scintillation detector (LSD) has been running since October 1984 in the Mont Blanc Laboratory at a depth of 5,200 hg/sq cm of standard rock. The research program of the experiment covers a variety of topics in particle physics and astrophysics. The performance of the detector, the main fields of research are presented and the preliminary results are discussed.

  1. SNM detection by means of thermal neutron interrogation and a liquid scintillation detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocherashvili, A.; Roesgen, E.; Beck, A.; Caspi, E. N.; Mosconi, M.; Crochemore, J.-M.; Pedersen, B.

    2012-03-01

    The feasibility of using a pulsed neutron generator in a graphite assembly together with a single liquid scintillation detector for the detection of special nuclear materials is investigated. Thermal source neutrons induce fission in fissile material present in the sample. By means of pulse shape discrimination the detector signals from fast fission neutrons are easily identified among the signals from gamma rays and the interrogating thermal neutrons. The method has potential in applications for detection of special nuclear materials in shielded containers.

  2. Measurements of the electron dose distribution near inhomogeneities using a plastic scintillation detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wells, C.M.M.; Mackie, T.R.; Podgorsak, M.B.; Holmes, M.A.; Papanikolaou, N.; Reckwerdt, P.J. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Cygler, J. [Ottawa Regional Cancer Center, Ontario (Canada); Rogers, D.W.O.; Bielajew, A.F. [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Schmidt, D.G. [Radiation Measurements, Inc., Middleton, WI (United States)] [and others

    1994-07-30

    Accurate measurement of the electron dose distribution near an inhomogeneity is difficult with traditional dosimeters which themselves perturb the electron field. The authors tested the performance of a new high resolution, water-equivalent plastic scintillation detector which has ideal properties for this application. A plastic scintillation detector with a 1 mm diameter, 3 mm long cylindrical sensitive volume was used to measure the dose distributions behind standard benchmark inhomogeneities in water phantoms. The plastic scintillator material is more water equivalent than polystyrene in terms of its mass collision stopping power and mass scattering power. Measurements were performed for beams of electrons having initial energies of 6 and 18 MeV at depths from 0.2-4.2 cm behind the inhomogeneities. The detector reveals hot and cold spots behind heterogeneities at resolutions equivalent to typical film digitizer spot sizes. Plots of the dose distributions behind air, aluminum, lead, and formulations for cortical and inner bone-equivalent materials are presented. The plastic scintillation detector is suited for measuring the electron dose distribution near an inhomogeneity. 14 refs., 9 figs.

  3. New scintillators for focal plane detectors in gamma-ray missions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buis, Ernst-Jan; Beijersbergen, Marco; Kraft, Stefan; Owens, Alan; Quarati, Francesco; Brandenburg, Sytze; Ostendorf, Reint

    2005-01-01

    Recent developments of cerium-doped lanthanum-halide scintillators like LaBr3:Ce show a remarkable performance in gamma-ray spectroscopy. When high energy resolution in combination with stopping power is required they provide excellent gamma-ray detector candidates for the use in space missions. Mor

  4. Affect of Distinguishing of Neutron and Gamma for Liquid Scintillation Detector by Methods of Baseline Compensation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Wei; LIU; Yi-na; LI; Chun-juan; WANG; Zhi-qiang; CHEN; Jun; LUO; Hai-long; ZHANG; Wei-hua; XU; Kun

    2015-01-01

    Most scintillation detectors are sensitive both for neutron and photon.Usually,there are photon in neutron fields which is coming from neutron source or reacting by neutron and materials around,so you must concern about the affect by photon which is below 10MeV.There will be a big effect for distinguishing

  5. Monte Carlo based calibration of scintillation detectors for laboratory and in situ gamma ray measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Graaf, E. R.; Limburg, J.; Koomans, R. L.; Tijs, M.

    2011-01-01

    The calibration of scintillation detectors for gamma radiation in a well characterized setup can be transferred to other geometries using Monte Carlo simulations to account for the differences between the calibration and the other geometry. In this study a calibration facility was used that is const

  6. Extensive Air Shower Detector Array at the Universidad Autonoma de Puebla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotzomi, J.; Moreno, E.; Aguilar, S.; Palma, B.; Martinez, O.; Salazar, H.; Villasenor, L.

    2002-07-01

    We describe the operation of an Extensive Air Shower Array located at the campus of the FCFM-BUAP. The array consists of 8 liquid scintillation detectors with a surface of 1 m2 each and a detector spacing of 20 m in a square grid. The array was designed to measure the energy and arrival direction of primary particles that generate extensive air showers (EAS) in the region of 1013 eV - 1016 eV. The angular distribution measured with this array, Cos8(Theta) xSin(Theta), agrees very well with the literature. We also present the measured energies of a number of vertical showers in the range of 5 x1012 eV to 5 x1013 eV.

  7. Comparison of polystyrene scintillator fiber array and monolithic polystyrene for neutron imaging and radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, R.; Cutler, T. E.; Danly, C. R.; Espy, M. A.; Goglio, J. H.; Hunter, J. F.; Madden, A. C.; Mayo, D. R.; Merrill, F. E.; Nelson, R. O.; Swift, A. L.; Wilde, C. H.; Zocco, T. G.

    2016-11-01

    The neutron imaging diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility has been operating since 2011 generating neutron images of deuterium-tritium (DT) implosions at peak compression. The current design features a scintillating fiber array, which allows for high imaging resolution to discern small-scale structure within the implosion. In recent years, it has become clear that additional neutron imaging systems need to be constructed in order to provide 3D reconstructions of the DT source and these additional views need to be on a shorter line of sight. As a result, there has been increased effort to identify new image collection techniques that improve upon imaging resolution for these next generation neutron imaging systems, such as monolithic deuterated scintillators. This work details measurements performed at the Weapons Neutron Research Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory that compares the radiographic abilities of the fiber scintillator with a monolithic scintillator, which may be featured in a future short line of sight neutron imaging systems.

  8. Reactor antineutrino monitoring with a plastic scintillator array as a new safeguards method

    CERN Document Server

    Oguri, S; Kato, Y; Nakata, R; Inoue, Y; Ito, C; Minowa, M

    2014-01-01

    We developed a segmented reactor-antineutrino detector made of plastic scintillators for application as a tool in nuclear safeguards inspection and performed mostly unmanned field operations at a commercial power plant reactor. At a position outside the reactor building, we measured the difference in reactor antineutrino flux above the ground when the reactor was active and inactive.

  9. Improvement of an X-ray imaging detector based on a scintillating guides screen

    CERN Document Server

    Badel, X; Linnros, J; Kleimann, P; Froejdh, C; Petersson, C S

    2002-01-01

    An X-ray imaging detector has been developed for dental applications. The principle of this detector is based on application of a silicon charge coupled device covered by a scintillating wave-guide screen. Previous studies of such a detector showed promising results concerning the spatial resolution but low performance in terms of signal to noise ratio (SNR) and sensitivity. Recent results confirm the wave-guiding properties of the matrix and show improvement of the detector in terms of response uniformity, sensitivity and SNR. The present study is focussed on the fabrication of the scintillating screen where the principal idea is to fill a matrix of Si pores with a CsI scintillator. The photoluminescence technique was used to prove the wave-guiding property of the matrix and to inspect the filling uniformity of the pores. The final detector was characterized by X-ray evaluation in terms of spatial resolution, light output and SNR. A sensor with a spatial resolution of 9 LP/mm and a SNR over 50 has been achie...

  10. Fast scintillation detectors for high-energy X-ray region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Shunji; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Haruki, Rie; Shibuya, Kengo; Koshimizu, Masanori

    2012-03-01

    We have developed fast scintillation detectors for nuclear resonant scattering experiments using synchrotron radiation and a nuclear excited level existing in >30 keV. A fast x-ray detector using an organic-inorganic perovskite scintillator of phenethylamine lead bromide (PhE-PbBr4) had a dominant light emission with a fast decay time of 9.9 ns. An x-ray detector equipped with a 0.9-mm-thick PhE-PbBr4 crystal (size: ˜8 × 7 mm2) was used to detect nuclear resonant scattering in 61Ni (the first excited level: 67.41 keV; half-life: 5.3 ns). We could successfully record the decaying gamma rays emitted from 61Ni with a relatively high detection efficiency of 24%. A lead-doped plastic scintillator (NE142, Pb ˜5 wt% doped) had been known to have a faster decay time of 1.7 ns. Following a test of a single NE142 detector, a four-channel NE142 detector was fabricated and successfully applied to the synchrotron-radiation based Mössbauer spectroscopy experiment on 61Ni.

  11. Sapphire scintillation tests for cryogenic detectors in the Edelweiss dark matter search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luca, M

    2007-07-15

    Identifying the matter in the universe is one of the main challenges of modern cosmology and astrophysics. An important part of this matter seems to be made of non-baryonic particles. Edelweiss is a direct dark matter search using cryogenic germanium bolometers in order to look for particles that interact very weakly with the ordinary matter, generically known as WIMPs (weakly interacting massive particles). An important challenge for Edelweiss is the radioactive background and one of the ways to identify it is to use a larger variety of target crystals. Sapphire is a light target which can be complementary to the germanium crystals already in use. Spectroscopic characterization studies have been performed using different sapphire samples in order to find the optimum doping concentration for good low temperature scintillation. Ti doped crystals with weak Ti concentrations have been used for systematic X ray excitation tests both at room temperature and down to 30 K. The tests have shown that the best Ti concentration for optimum room temperature scintillation is 100 ppm and 50 ppm at T = 45 K. All concentrations have been checked by optical absorption and fluorescence. After having shown that sapphire had interesting characteristics for building heat-scintillation detectors, we have tested if using a sapphire detector was feasible within a dark matter search. During the first commissioning tests of Edelweiss-II, we have proved the compatibility between a sapphire heat scintillation detector and the experimental setup. (author)

  12. A compact gamma-ray detector using wavelength-shifting fibers coupled to YAP scintillation crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The performance of a compact position sensitive gamma-ray detector based on wavelength-shifting fibers coupled to YAlO3:Ce scintillation crystal was evaluated using a Monte-Carlo simulation method.The simulation model has been setup using the GEANT4 codes.Compared with the gamma-ray detector based on the YAlO3:Ce scintillation crystal coupled to Hamamastu R2486 position sensitive photomultiplier tube.the results indicate that the gamma-ray detector based on wavelength-shifting fibers readout has good position linearity,good spatial resolution and larger effective field of view.The image and point spread function of measured point were presented.The spatial resolution reaponse as a function of position was obtained.The factors influencing spatial resolution and position linearity were discussed.

  13. Improved Growth Methods for LaBr3 Scintillation Radiation Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGregor, Douglas S

    2011-05-01

    The objective is to develop advanced materials for deployment as high-resolution gamma ray detectors. Both LaBr3 and CeBr3 are advanced scintillation materials, and will be studied in this research. Prototype devices, in collaboration Sandia National Laboratories, will be demonstrated along with recommendations for mass production and deployment. It is anticipated that improved methods of crystal growth will yield larger single crystals of LaBr3 for deployable room-temperature operated gamma radiation spectrometers. The growth methods will be characterized. The LaBr3 and CeBr3 scintillation crystals will be characterized for light yield, spectral resolution, and for hardness.

  14. Evaluation of Large Volume SrI2(Eu) Scintillator Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturm, B W; Cherepy, N J; Drury, O B; Thelin, P A; Fisher, S E; Magyar, A F; Payne, S A; Burger, A; Boatner, L A; Ramey, J O; Shah, K S; Hawrami, R

    2010-11-18

    There is an ever increasing demand for gamma-ray detectors which can achieve good energy resolution, high detection efficiency, and room-temperature operation. We are working to address each of these requirements through the development of large volume SrI{sub 2}(Eu) scintillator detectors. In this work, we have evaluated a variety of SrI{sub 2} crystals with volumes >10 cm{sup 3}. The goal of this research was to examine the causes of energy resolution degradation for larger detectors and to determine what can be done to mitigate these effects. Testing both packaged and unpackaged detectors, we have consistently achieved better resolution with the packaged detectors. Using a collimated gamma-ray source, it was determined that better energy resolution for the packaged detectors is correlated with better light collection uniformity. A number of packaged detectors were fabricated and tested and the best spectroscopic performance was achieved for a 3% Eu doped crystal with an energy resolution of 2.93% FWHM at 662keV. Simulations of SrI{sub 2}(Eu) crystals were also performed to better understand the light transport physics in scintillators and are reported. This study has important implications for the development of SrI{sub 2}(Eu) detectors for national security purposes.

  15. Hybrid metal organic scintillator materials system and particle detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Christina A.; Allendorf, Mark D.; Doty, F. Patrick; Simmons, Blake A.

    2011-07-26

    We describe the preparation and characterization of two zinc hybrid luminescent structures based on the flexible and emissive linker molecule, trans-(4-R,4'-R') stilbene, where R and R' are mono- or poly-coordinating groups, which retain their luminescence within these solid materials. For example, reaction of trans-4,4'-stilbenedicarboxylic acid and zinc nitrate in the solvent dimethylformamide (DMF) yielded a dense 2-D network featuring zinc in both octahedral and tetrahedral coordination environments connected by trans-stilbene links. Similar reaction in diethylformamide (DEF) at higher temperatures resulted in a porous, 3-D framework structure consisting of two interpenetrating cubic lattices, each featuring basic to zinc carboxylate vertices joined by trans-stilbene, analogous to the isoreticular MOF (IRMOF) series. We demonstrate that the optical properties of both embodiments correlate directly with the local ligand environments observed in the crystal structures. We further demonstrate that these materials produce high luminescent response to proton radiation and high radiation tolerance relative to prior scintillators. These features can be used to create sophisticated scintillating detection sensors.

  16. Spiral biasing adaptor for use in Si drift detectors and Si drift detector arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zheng; Chen, Wei

    2016-07-05

    A drift detector array, preferably a silicon drift detector (SDD) array, that uses a low current biasing adaptor is disclosed. The biasing adaptor is customizable for any desired geometry of the drift detector single cell with minimum drift time of carriers. The biasing adaptor has spiral shaped ion-implants that generate the desired voltage profile. The biasing adaptor can be processed on the same wafer as the drift detector array and only one biasing adaptor chip/side is needed for one drift detector array to generate the voltage profiles on the front side and back side of the detector array.

  17. Gamma Ray Array Detector Trigger Sub-System

    CERN Document Server

    Zhong-Wei, Du; Yi, Qian; KongJie,

    2012-01-01

    Gamma Ray Array Detector (GRAD) is one of External Target Facility (ETF) subsystems at the Heavy Ion Research Facility at Lanzhou. The trigger subsystem of the GRAD has been developed based on Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGAs) and PXI interface. The GRAD trigger subsystem makes prompt L1 trigger decisions to select valid events. These decisions are made by processing the hit signals from 1024 CsI scintillators of the GRAD. According to the physical requirements, the GRAD trigger subsystem generates 12-bit trigger signals that are passed to the ETF global trigger system. In addition, the GRAD trigger subsystem generates trigger data that are packed and transmitted to the host computer via PXI bus for off-line analysis. The trigger processing is implemented in the front-end electronics and one FPGA of the trigger module. The logic of PXI transmission and reconfiguration is implemented in the other FPGA of the trigger module. The reliable and efficient performance in the Gamma-ray experiments demonstrates th...

  18. Segmented crystalline scintillators: an initial investigation of high quantum efficiency detectors for megavoltage x-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Amit; Antonuk, Larry E; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua; Li, Yixin; Su, Zhong; Wang, Yi; Yamamoto, Jin; Du, Hong; Cunningham, Ian; Klugerman, Misha; Shah, Kanai

    2005-10-01

    Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) based on indirect detection, active matrix flat panel imagers (AMFPIs) have become the technology of choice for geometric verification of patient localization and dose delivery in external beam radiotherapy. However, current AMFPI EPIDs, which are based on powdered-phosphor screens, make use of only approximately 2% of the incident radiation, thus severely limiting their imaging performance as quantified by the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) (approximately 1%, compared to approximately 75% for kilovoltage AMFPIs). With the rapidly increasing adoption of image-guided techniques in virtually every aspect of radiotherapy, there exist strong incentives to develop high-DQE megavoltage x-ray imagers, capable of providing soft-tissue contrast at very low doses in megavoltage tomographic and, potentially, projection imaging. In this work we present a systematic theoretical and preliminary empirical evaluation of a promising, high-quantum-efficiency, megavoltage x-ray detector design based on a two-dimensional matrix of thick, optically isolated, crystalline scintillator elements. The detector is coupled with an indirect detection-based active matrix array, with the center-to-center spacing of the crystalline elements chosen to match the pitch of the underlying array pixels. Such a design enables the utilization of a significantly larger fraction of the incident radiation (up to 80% for a 6 MV beam), through increases in the thickness of the crystalline elements, without loss of spatial resolution due to the spread of optical photons. Radiation damage studies were performed on test samples of two candidate scintillator materials, CsI(Tl) and BGO, under conditions relevant to radiotherapy imaging. A detailed Monte Carlo-based study was performed in order to examine the signal, spatial spreading, and noise properties of the absorbed energy for several segmented detector configurations. Parameters studied included scintillator

  19. The PRESHOWER - a New Multichnnel Detector for the CDF. The Scintillator Plates of the New Detector: Design, Production, Quality Control

    CERN Document Server

    Artikov, A M; Chocheli, D; Danilov, V; Grinyov, B; Lebedev, V; Senchyshyn, V G

    2005-01-01

    To increase the CDF efficiency when studying heavy quark processes there was designed, constructed and put into operation a new multichannel detector --- the so called Central Preshower. It was positioned before the central electromagnetic calorimeter and increased the photon, lepton and hadron identification efficiency. JINR in cooperation with the Institute of Scintillating Materials (Kharkiv) has created a sensitive element of the new detector: about 2800 units of the scintillation tiles; the specially developed quality control procedure guaranteed the necessary high light yield for tiles mass production. The chosen tiles were equipped at FNAL by two loops (about 1 m long) of WLS fibers positioned inside the $\\Omega $-shape groove; it guaranteed a light yield of $\\sim$ 25--35 photoelectrons/MIP.

  20. Coincidence system for standardization of radionuclides using a 4pi plastic scintillator detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccarelli, Aída M; Dias, Mauro S; Koskinas, Marina F

    2003-02-01

    A coincidence system using a plastic scintillator detector in 4pi geometry has been developed and applied for the standardization of radionuclides. The scintillator shape and dimensions have been optimized for maximum charge particle detection efficiency, while keeping background low and a nearly constant gamma-ray efficiency for different points from the radioactive source. The gamma-ray events were measured with a NaI(Tl) scintillation counter. The electronic system for processing pulses consisted of logic gates and delay modules feeding a time-to-amplitude converter with output to a multichannel analyzer. The alpha detection efficiency measured with 241Am was around 95% and the beta detection efficiency for 60Co was around 67%. Activity measurements of 241Am and 60Co were performed and the results showed good agreement when compared with a conventional coincidence system employing a 4pi proportional counter.

  1. Coincidence system for standardization of radionuclides using a 4 pi plastic scintillator detector

    CERN Document Server

    Baccarelli, A M; Koskinas, M F

    2003-01-01

    A coincidence system using a plastic scintillator detector in 4 pi geometry has been developed and applied for the standardization of radionuclides. The scintillator shape and dimensions have been optimized for maximum charge particle detection efficiency, while keeping background low and a nearly constant gamma-ray efficiency for different points from the radioactive source. The gamma-ray events were measured with a NaI(Tl) scintillation counter. The electronic system for processing pulses consisted of logic gates and delay modules feeding a time-to-amplitude converter with output to a multichannel analyzer. The alpha detection efficiency measured with sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am was around 95% and the beta detection efficiency for sup 6 sup 0 Co was around 67%. Activity measurements of sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am and sup 6 sup 0 Co were performed and the results showed good agreement when compared with a conventional coincidence system employing a 4 pi proportional counter.

  2. Fast Neutron Detector for Fusion Reactor KSTAR Using Stilbene Scintillator

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Seung Kyu; Kim, Gi-Dong; Kim, Yong-Kyun

    2011-01-01

    Various neutron diagnostic tools are used in fusion reactors to evaluate different aspects of plasma performance, such as fusion power, power density, ion temperature, fast ion energy, and their spatial distributions. The stilbene scintillator has been proposed for use as a neutron diagnostic system to measure the characteristics of neutrons from the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) fusion reactor. Specially designed electronics are necessary to measure fast neutron spectra with high radiation from a gamma-ray background. The signals from neutrons and gamma-rays are discriminated by the digital charge pulse shape discrimination (PSD) method, which uses total to partial charge ratio analysis. The signals are digitized by a flash analog-to-digital convertor (FADC). To evaluate the performance of the fabricated stilbene neutron diagnostic system, the efficiency of 10 mm soft-iron magnetic shielding and the detection efficiency of fast neutrons were tested experimentally using a 252Cf neutr...

  3. An algorithm for automatic crystal identification in pixelated scintillation detectors using thin plate splines and Gaussian mixture models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, Graham; Stortz, Greg; Goertzen, Andrew L.

    2016-02-01

    A typical positron emission tomography detector is comprised of a scintillator crystal array coupled to a photodetector array or other position sensitive detector. Such detectors using light sharing to read out crystal elements require the creation of a crystal lookup table (CLUT) that maps the detector response to the crystal of interaction based on the x-y position of the event calculated through Anger-type logic. It is vital for system performance that these CLUTs be accurate so that the location of events can be accurately identified and so that crystal-specific corrections, such as energy windowing or time alignment, can be applied. While using manual segmentation of the flood image to create the CLUT is a simple and reliable approach, it is both tedious and time consuming for systems with large numbers of crystal elements. In this work we describe the development of an automated algorithm for CLUT generation that uses a Gaussian mixture model paired with thin plate splines (TPS) to iteratively fit a crystal layout template that includes the crystal numbering pattern. Starting from a region of stability, Gaussians are individually fit to data corresponding to crystal locations while simultaneously updating a TPS for predicting future Gaussian locations at the edge of a region of interest that grows as individual Gaussians converge to crystal locations. The algorithm was tested with flood image data collected from 16 detector modules, each consisting of a 409 crystal dual-layer offset LYSO crystal array readout by a 32 pixel SiPM array. For these detector flood images, depending on user defined input parameters, the algorithm runtime ranged between 17.5-82.5 s per detector on a single core of an Intel i7 processor. The method maintained an accuracy above 99.8% across all tests, with the majority of errors being localized to error prone corner regions. This method can be easily extended for use with other detector types through adjustment of the initial

  4. In-situ calibration of a PMT inside a scintillation detector by means of primary scintillation detection

    CERN Document Server

    Álvarez, V; Cárcel, S; Castel, J; Cebrián, S; Cervera, A; Conde, C A N; Dafni, T; Dias, T H V T; Díaz, J; Egorov, M; Esteve, R; Evtoukhovitch, P; Fernandes, L M P; Ferrario, P; Ferreira, A L; Freitas, E D C; Gehman, V M; Gil, A; Goldschmidt, A; Gómez, H; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; González-Díaz, D; Gutiérrez, R M; Hauptman, J; Morata, J A Hernando; Herrera, D C; Iguaz, F J; Irastorza, I G; Jinete, M A; Labarga, L; Laing, A; Liubarsky, I; Lopes, J A M; Lorca, D; Losada, M; Luzón, G; Marí, A; Martín-Albo, J; Martínez, A; Miller, T; Moiseenko, A; Monrabal, F; Monteiro, C M B; Mora, F J; Moutinho, L M; Vidal, J Muñoz; da Luz, H Natal; Navarro, G; Nebot, M; Nygren, D; Oliveira, C A B; Palma, R; Pérez, J; Aparicio, J L Pérez; Renner, J; Ripoll, L; Rodríguez, A; Rodríguez, J; Santos, F P; Santos, J M F dos; Segui, L; Serra, L; Shuman, D; Simón, A; Sofka, C; Sorel, M; Toledo, J F; Tomás, A; Torrent, J; Tsamalaidze, Z; Vázquez, D; Veloso, J F C A; Villar, J A; Webb, R C; White, J T; Yahlali, N

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the possibility of calibrating the PMTs of scintillation detectors, using the primary scintillation produced by X-rays to induce single photoelectron response of the PMT. The high-energy tail of this response, can be approximated to an exponential function, under some conditions. In these cases, it is possible to determine the average gain for each PMT biasing voltage from the inverse of the exponent of the exponential fit to the tail, which can be done even if the background and/or noise cover-up most of the distribution. We have compared our results with those obtained by the commonly used single electron response (SER) method, which uses a LED to induce a single photoelectron response of the PMT and determines the peak position of such response, relative to the pedestal peak (the electronic noise peak, which corresponds to 0 photoelectrons). The results of the exponential fit method agree with those obtained by the SER method when the average number of photoelectrons reaching the first...

  5. Prompt directional detection of galactic supernova by combining large liquid scintillator neutrino detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, V; Lasserre, T; Volpe, C; Cribier, M; Durero, M; Gaffiot, J; Houdy, T; Letourneau, A; Mention, G; Pequignot, M; Sibille, V; Vivier, M

    2015-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae produce an intense burst of electron antineutrinos in the few-tens-of-MeV range. Several Large Liquid Scintillator-based Detectors (LLSD) are currently operated worldwide, being very effective for low energy antineutrino detection through the Inverse Beta Decay (IBD) process. In this article, we develop a procedure for the prompt extraction of the supernova location by revisiting the details of IBD kinematics over the broad energy range of supernova neutrinos. Combining all current scintillator-based detector, we show that one can locate a canonical supernova at 10 kpc with an accuracy of 45 degrees (68% C.L.). After the addition of the next generation of scintillator-based detectors, the accuracy could reach 12 degrees (68% C.L.), therefore reaching the performances of the large water Cerenkov neutrino detectors. We also discuss a possible improvement of the SuperNova Early Warning System (SNEWS) inter-experiment network with the implementation of a directionality information in each...

  6. Low-energy CZT detector array for the ASIM mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cenkeramaddi, Linga Reddy; Genov, Georgi; Kohfeldt, Anja

    2012-01-01

    In this article we introduce the low-energy CZT (CdZnTe) 16 384-pixel detector array on-board the Atmosphere Space Interaction Monitor (ASIM), funded by the European Space Agency. This detector is a part of the larger Modular X-and Gamma-ray sensor (MXGS). The CZT detector array is sensitive...

  7. Discriminating cosmic muons and radioactivity using a liquid scintillation fiber detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y. P.; Xu, J. L.; Lu, H. Q.; Zhang, P.; Zhang, C. C.; Yang, C. G.

    2017-03-01

    In the case of underground experiments for neutrino physics or rare event searches, the background caused by cosmic muons contributes significantly and therefore must be identified and rejected. We proposed and optimized a new detector using liquid scintillator with wavelenghth-shifting fibers which can be employed as a veto detector for cosmic muons background rejection. From the prototype study, it has been found that the detector has good performances and is capable of discriminating between muons induced signals and environmental radiation background. Its muons detection efficiency is greater than 98%, and on average, 58 photo-electrons (p.e.) are collected when a muon passes through the detector. To optimize the design and enhance the collection of light, the reflectivity of the coating materials has been studied in detail. A Monte Carlo simulation of the detector has been developed and compared to the performed measurements showing a good agreement between data and simulation results.

  8. Characterization of liquid scintillation detector (BC-501A) and digital pulse shape discrimination (DPSD) system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombigit, L., E-mail: lojius@nm.gov.my; Yussup, N., E-mail: nolida@nm.gov.my; Ibrahim, Maslina Mohd; Rahman, Nur Aira Abd; Rawi, M. Z. M. [Instrumentation Group, Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-04-29

    A digital n/γ pulse shape discrimination (PSD) system is currently under development at Instrumentation and Automation Centre, Malaysian Nuclear Agency. This system aims at simultaneous detection of fast neutron and gamma ray in mixed radiations environment. This work reports the system characterization performed on the liquid scintillation detector (BC-501A) and digital pulse shape discrimination (DPSD) system. The characterization involves measurement of electron light output from the BC-501A detector and energy channels calibration of the pulse height spectra acquired with DPSD system using set of photon reference sources. The main goal of this experiment is to calibrate the ADC channel of our DPSD system, characterized the BC-501 detector and find the position of Compton edge which later could be used as threshold for the n/γ PSD experiment. The detector resolution however is worse as compared to other published data but it is expected as our detector has a smaller active volume.

  9. Development and Characterization of 6Li-doped Liquid Scintillator Detectors for PROSPECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaison, Jeremy; Prospect Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    PROSPECT, the Precision Reactor Oscillation and Spectrum experiment, is a phased reactor antineutrino experiment designed to search for eV-scale sterile neutrinos via short-baseline neutrino oscillations and to make a precision measurement of the 235U reactor antineutrino spectrum. A multi-ton, optically segmented detector will be deployed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to measure the reactor spectrum at baselines ranging from 7-12m. A two-segment detector prototype with 50 liters of active liquid scintillator target has been built to verify the detector design and to benchmark its performance. In this presentation, we will summarize the performance of this detector prototype and describe the optical and energy calibration of the segmented PROSPECT detectors.

  10. A gas scintillation counter with imaging optics and large area UV-detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickles, J. E-mail: nickles@hsb.uni-frankfurt.de; Braeuning, H.; Braeuning-Demian, A.; Dangendorf, V.; Breskin, A.; Chechik, R.; Rauschnabel, K.; Schmidt-Boecking, H

    2002-01-21

    We report on the improvements in the position sensitive readout of a xenon-filled gas scintillation proportional counter. Using an imaging optic for UV-light in the region of 170 nm, the position resolution could be improved by more than 30%. In addition, we have obtained first encouraging results for the use of the recently developed gas electron multiplier together with a CsI-photocathode as a large area UV-detector system.

  11. A gas scintillation counter with imaging optics and large area UV-detector

    CERN Document Server

    Nickles, J; Bräuning-Demian, A; Breskin, Amos; Chechik, R; Dangendorf, V; Rauschnabel, K; Schmidt-Böcking, H

    2002-01-01

    We report on the improvements in the position sensitive readout of a xenon-filled gas scintillation proportional counter. Using an imaging optic for UV-light in the region of 170 nm, the position resolution could be improved by more than 30%. In addition, we have obtained first encouraging results for the use of the recently developed gas electron multiplier together with a CsI-photocathode as a large area UV-detector system.

  12. Algorithms of Coordinates Scintillations Calculation in the Gamma-Camera Detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.A. Polyakov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The methods and algorithms of scintillation coordinates calculation in gamma-camera position-sensitive detector are considered in the paper. The results of numerical model experiments, which were carried out for clearing-up of relative operating speed of different coordinate calculation methods, are presented. The analysis of obtained results was carried out for determination of perspective for application algorithms and likelihood methods.

  13. Time Resolution and Linearity Measurements for a Scintillating Fiber Detector Instrumented with VLPC's

    CERN Document Server

    Bross, A D; Costa, J; Johnson, M; Moreira, L; Thompson, J; Bross, Alan; Chaves, Ana Lucia; Costa, Jesse; Johnson, Marvin; Moreira, Lourival; Thompson, Joey

    1997-01-01

    The time resolution for a charged particle detection is reported for a typical scintillating fiber detector instrumented with Rockwell HISTE-IV Visible Light Photon Counters. The resolution measurements are shown to agree with a simple Monte Carlo model, and the model is used to make recomendations for improved performance. In addition, the gain linearity of a sample of VLPC devices was measured. The gain is shown to be linear for incident light intensities which produce up to approximately 600 photoelectrons per event.

  14. Pulse shape discrimination in helium-4 scintillation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley, Ryan P., E-mail: rpkelley@ufl.edu; Enqvist, Andreas; Jordan, Kelly A.

    2016-09-11

    Three algorithms were investigated for discriminating between neutrons and gamma rays in a pressurized {sup 4}He gas fast neutron detector: charge comparison, weighted integration, and neutron-gamma model analysis (NGMA). For each algorithm, a comprehensive pulse shape discrimination study was conducted using time-of-flight measurements, receiver operator characteristic curves, figure of merit performance measures, and a comparison of performance between {sup 252}Cf and PuBe mixed neutron/gamma sources. The NGMA method was found to have the best overall performance by both the figure of merit and the receiver operator characteristic curve. The results also illustrated the high gamma rejection efficiency of these detectors, which is desirable in a variety of neutron monitoring applications.

  15. Modelling of scintillator based flat-panel detectors with Monte-Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reims, N.; Sukowski, F.; Uhlmann, N.

    2011-01-01

    Scintillator based flat panel detectors are state of the art in the field of industrial X-ray imaging applications. Choosing the proper system and setup parameters for the vast range of different applications can be a time consuming task, especially when developing new detector systems. Since the system behaviour cannot always be foreseen easily, Monte-Carlo (MC) simulations are keys to gain further knowledge of system components and their behaviour for different imaging conditions. In this work we used two Monte-Carlo based models to examine an indirect converting flat panel detector, specifically the Hamamatsu C9312SK. We focused on the signal generation in the scintillation layer and its influence on the spatial resolution of the whole system. The models differ significantly in their level of complexity. The first model gives a global description of the detector based on different parameters characterizing the spatial resolution. With relatively small effort a simulation model can be developed which equates the real detector regarding signal transfer. The second model allows a more detailed insight of the system. It is based on the well established cascade theory, i.e. describing the detector as a cascade of elemental gain and scattering stages, which represent the built in components and their signal transfer behaviour. In comparison to the first model the influence of single components especially the important light spread behaviour in the scintillator can be analysed in a more differentiated way. Although the implementation of the second model is more time consuming both models have in common that a relatively small amount of system manufacturer parameters are needed. The results of both models were in good agreement with the measured parameters of the real system.

  16. Characterization of a scintillating fibers read by MPPC detectors trigger prototype for the AMADEUS experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzi, M.; Berucci, C.; Curceanu, C.; D'Uffizi, A.; Piscicchia, K.; Poli Lener, M.; Romero Vidal, A.; Sbardella, E.; Scordo, A.; Vazquez Doce, O.

    2013-05-01

    Multi-Pixel Photon Counters (MPPC) consist of hundreds of micro silicon Avalanche PhotoDiodes (APD) working in Geiger mode. The high gain and the low noise, typical of these devices, together with their good performance in magnetic field, make them ideal readout detectors for scintillating fibers as trigger detectors in particle and nuclear physics experiments like AMADEUS, where such detectors are planned to be used to trigger on charged kaon pairs. In order to investigate the detection efficiency of such a system, a prototype setup consisting of 32, 1 mm diameter scintillating fibers, arranged in two double layers of 16 fibers each, and read out at both sides by 64 MPPCs with an ad-hoc built readout electronics, was tested at the πM-1 line of the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Villigen, Switzerland. The detection efficiency and the trigger capability were measured on a beam containing protons, electrons, muons and pions with a momentum of 440 MeV/c. The measured average efficiency for protons for a double layer of scintillating fibers (96.2±1.0%) represents a guarantee of the good performance of this system as a trigger for the AMADEUS experiment.

  17. The water Cherenkov detector array for studies of cosmic rays at the University of Puebla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotzomi, J.; Moreno, E.; Murrieta, T.; Palma, B.; Pérez, E.; Salazar, H.; Villaseñor, L.

    2005-11-01

    We describe the design and performance of a hybrid extensive air shower detector array built on the Campus of the University of Puebla ( 19∘N, 90∘W, 800 g/cm2) to measure the energy, arrival direction and composition of primary cosmic rays with energies around 1 PeV, i.e., around the knee of the cosmic ray spectrum. The array consists of 3 water Cherenkov detectors of 1.86 m2 cross-section and 12 liquid scintillator detectors of 1 m2 distributed in a square grid with a detector spacing of 20 m over an area of 4000 m2. We discuss the calibration and stability of the array for both sets of detectors and report on preliminary measurements and reconstruction of the lateral distributions for the electromagnetic (EM) and muonic components of extensive air showers. We also discuss how the hybrid character of the array can be used to measure mass composition of the primary cosmic rays by estimating the relative contents of muons with respect to the EM component of extensive air showers. This facility is also used to train students interested in the field of cosmic rays.

  18. R&D on scintillation materials for novel ionizing radiation detectors for High Energy Physics, medical imaging and industrial applications

    CERN Multimedia

    Hillemanns, H; Chipaux, R; Vasilev, A; Rinaldi, D; Martinez turtos, R; Morel, C; Choi, Y

    2002-01-01

    The Crystal Clear Collaboration (CCC) was approved by the Detector R&D Committee as RD18 in 1990 with the objective of developing new inorganic scintillators suitable for crystal electromagnetic calorimeters of LHC experiments. From 1990 to 1994, CCC made an intensive investigation for the quest of the most adequate ideal scintillator for the LHC; three main candidates were identified and extensively studied : CeF$_{3}$, PbWO$_{4}$ and heavy scintillating glasses. Lead tungstate was chosen by CMS and ALICE as the most cost effective crystal compliant to LHC conditions. Today 76648 PWO crystals are installed in CMS and 17920 in ALICE. After this success Crystal clear has continued its investigation on new scintillators and the understanding of scintillation mechanisms and light transfer properties in particular : The understanding of cerium ion as activator, The development of LuAP, LuYAP crystals for medical imaging applications, (CERN patent) Investigation of Ytterbium based scintillators for solar ne...

  19. LHCb Scintillating Fiber detector front end electronics design and quality assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, W. E. W.; Pellegrino, A.; Ietswaard, G. C. M.; Verkooijen, J. C.; Carneiro, U.; Massefferi, A.

    2017-03-01

    The on-detector electronics of the LHCb Scintillating Fiber Detector consists of multiple PCBs assembled in a unit called Read Out Box, capable of reading out 2048 channels with an output rate of 70 Gbps. There are three types of boards: PACIFIC, Clusterization and Master Board. The Pacific Boards host PACIFIC ASICs, with pre-amplifier and comparator stages producing two bits of data per channel. A cluster-finding algorithm is then run in an FPGA on the Clusterization Board. The Master Board distributes fast and slow control, and power. We describe the design, production and test of prototype PCBs.

  20. A large dynamic range readout design for the plastic scintillator detector of DAMPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; Sun, Zhiyu; Yu, Yuhong; Zhang, Yongjie; Fang, Fang; Chen, Junling; Hu, Bitao

    2016-08-01

    A large dynamic range is required by the Plastic Scintillator Detector (PSD) of DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) to detect particles from electron to heavy ions with Z ≤ 20. To expand the dynamic range, the readout design based on the double-dynodes signal extraction from the photomultiplier tube has been proposed and adopted by PSD. To verify this design, a prototype detector module has been constructed and tested with cosmic ray and relativistic ion beam. The results match with the estimation and the readout unit could easily cover the required dynamic range of about 4 orders of magnitude.

  1. Determination of the time resolution for neutron scintillation detectors by multi-coincidence measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yong-Ming; RUAN Xi-Chao; ZHOU Sin; MA Zhong-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Based on the multi-coincidence measurement, the time resolution of three liquid scintillation detectors (BC501A) were determined strictly by solving the coincidence equations, where the influence from electronics estimated by self coincidence measurement as well as the background had been considered. The result of this work agreed well with the result that was deduced from the traditional method, and it will be helpful to analyze the energy resolution of neutron time of flight spectra measured by using such detectors at CIAE (China Institute of Atomic Energy).

  2. Design Constraints for a WIMP Dark Matter and pp Solar Neutrino Liquid Neon Scintillation Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Boulay, M G; Lidgard, J

    2004-01-01

    Detailed Monte-Carlo simulations were used to evaluate the performance of a liquid neon scintillation detector for dark matter and low-energy solar neutrino interactions. A maximum-likelihood event vertex fitter including PMT time information was developed, which significantly improves position resolution over spatial-only algorithms, and substantially decreases the required detector size and achievable analysis energy threshold. The ultimate sensitivity to WIMP dark matter and the pp flux uncertainty are evaluated as a function of detector size. The dependence on the neon scintillation and PMT properties are evaluated. A 300 cm radius detector would allow a ~13 keV threshold, a pp flux uncertainty of ~1%, and limits on the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross-section of ~10^{-46} cm^2 for a 100 GeV WIMP, using commercially available PMTs. Detector response calibration and background requirements for a precision pp measurement are defined. Internal radioactivity requirements for uranium, thorium, and krypton a...

  3. Plastic scintillation detectors for precision time-of-flight measurements of relativistic heavy ions

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Wen-Jian; Sun, Bao-Hua; He, Liu-Chun; Lin, Wei-Ping; Liu, Chuan-Ye; Tanihata, Isao; Terashima, Satoru; Tian, Yi; Wang, Feng; Wang, Meng; Zhang, Guang-Xin; Zhang, Xue-Heng; Zhu, Li-Hua; Duan, Li-Min; Hu, Rong-Jiang; Liu, Zhong; Lu, Chen-Gui; Ren, Pei-Pei; Sheng, Li-Na; Sun, Zhi-Yu; Wang, Shi-Tao; Wang, Tao-Feng; Xu, Zhi-Guo; Yan, Duo; Yue, Ke; Zheng, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Plastic scintillation detectors for Time-of-Flight (TOF) measurements are almost essential for event-by-event identification of relativistic rare isotopes. In this work, a pair of plastic scintillation detectors of 50 $\\times$ 50 $\\times$ 3$^{t}$ mm$^3$ and 80 $\\times$ 100 $\\times$ 3$^{t}$ mm$^3$ have been set up at the external target facility (ETF), Institute of Modern Physics. Their time, energy and position responses are measured with $^{18}$O primary beam at 400 MeV/nucleon. After the off-line walk-effect and position corrections, the time resolution of the two detectors are determined to be 27 ps ($\\sigma$) and 36 ps ($\\sigma$), respectively. Both detectors have nearly the same energy resolution of 3$\\%$ ($\\sigma$) and position resolution of 2 mm ($\\sigma$). The detectors have been used successfully in nuclear reaction cross section measurements, and will be be employed for upgrading RIBLL2 beam line at IMP as well as for the high energy branch at HIAF.

  4. A Deuterated Neutron Detector Array For Nuclear (Astro)Physics Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaraz-Calderon, Sergio; Asher, B. W.; Barber, P.; Hanselman, K.; Perello, J. F.

    2016-09-01

    The properties of neutron-rich nuclei are at the forefront of research in nuclear structure, nuclear reactions and nuclear astrophysics. The advent of intense rare isotope beams (RIBs) has opened a new door for studies of systems with very short half-lives and possible fascinating properties. Neutron spectroscopic techniques become increasingly relevant when these neutron rich nuclei are used in a variety of experiments. At Florida State University, we are developing a neutron detector array that will allow us to perform high-resolution neutron spectroscopic studies with stable and radioactive beams. The neutron detection system consists of 16 deuterated organic liquid scintillation detectors with fast response and pulse-shape discrimination capabilities. In addition to these properties, there is the potential to use the structure in the pulse-height spectra to extract the energy of the neutrons and thus produce directly excitation spectra. This type of detector uses deuterated benzene (C6D6) as the liquid scintillation medium. The asymmetric nature of the scattering between a neutron and a deuterium in the center of mass produces a pulse-height spectrum from the deuterated scintillator which contains useful information on the initial energy of the neutron. Work supported in part by the State of Florida and NSF Grant No. 1401574.

  5. New application of scintillator ZnSe(Te) in scintielectronic detectors for detection of neutrons, medical imaging, explosive detection, and NDT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhikov, Volodymyr D.; Opolonin, Oleksandr D.; Fedorov, Alexander G.; Lysetska, Olena K.; Kostioukevitch, Sergey A.

    2008-08-01

    Scintillators on the basis of AIIBVI compounds, such as ZnSe(Te), can be used for detection of secondary charged particles coming from nuclear reactions in which neutrons interact with target nuclei of atoms present in transparent materials of dispersion scintillation detectors matrices. Using unique properties of scintillator ZnSe(Te) we show possibility of increase detection efficiency for soft x-ray radiation (20 - 90 keV). The amorphous silicon flat panels and the photodiode arrays wide used for non-destructive testing and medical imaging (spatial resolution 20 - 400 mkm). By our estimations, using of such detectors in combination with thin film of ZnSe(Te) can increase efficiency of registration of x-ray radiation (for the source of 60-140kV) in 1,2 - 2 times. We obtained thin films (10-450mkm) of scintillator ZnSe(Te) on the different substrate materials and estimated the relative light yield of the layers deposited on the graphite and Al2O3 ceramic substrates and the bulk ZnSe(Te) crystal. Use of ZnSe(Te) in the low-energy "scintillator - photodiode" type detector allowed to increase accuracy of authentication of explosives (HEIMANN X-RAY INSPECTION SYSTEM EDtS10080). Using the dual energy digital radiography system prototype we obtained the x-ray images (60 projections of each object). These images are basic data for computer tomography and three-dimensional reconstruction of density and effective atomic number. The color identification palette provides clearly show variations of effective atomic number in biological and inorganic objects. So, for example, changes of calcium concentration in a bone. The research described in this publication was supported by STCU #4115 and NATO SfP-982823.

  6. Advanced ACTPol Cryogenic Detector Arrays and Readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, S. W.; Allison, R.; Austermann, J.; Baildon, T.; Battaglia, N.; Beall, J. A.; Becker, D.; De Bernardis, F.; Bond, J. R.; Calabrese, E.; Choi, S. K.; Coughlin, K. P.; Crowley, K. T.; Datta, R.; Devlin, M. J.; Duff, S. M.; Dunkley, J.; Dünner, R.; van Engelen, A.; Gallardo, P. A.; Grace, E.; Hasselfield, M.; Hills, F.; Hilton, G. C.; Hincks, A. D.; Hloẑek, R.; Ho, S. P.; Hubmayr, J.; Huffenberger, K.; Hughes, J. P.; Irwin, K. D.; Koopman, B. J.; Kosowsky, A. B.; Li, D.; McMahon, J.; Munson, C.; Nati, F.; Newburgh, L.; Niemack, M. D.; Niraula, P.; Page, L. A.; Pappas, C. G.; Salatino, M.; Schillaci, A.; Schmitt, B. L.; Sehgal, N.; Sherwin, B. D.; Sievers, J. L.; Simon, S. M.; Spergel, D. N.; Staggs, S. T.; Stevens, J. R.; Thornton, R.; Van Lanen, J.; Vavagiakis, E. M.; Ward, J. T.; Wollack, E. J.

    2016-08-01

    Advanced ACTPol is a polarization-sensitive upgrade for the 6 m aperture Atacama Cosmology Telescope, adding new frequencies and increasing sensitivity over the previous ACTPol receiver. In 2016, Advanced ACTPol will begin to map approximately half the sky in five frequency bands (28-230 GHz). Its maps of primary and secondary cosmic microwave background anisotropies—imaged in intensity and polarization at few arcminute-scale resolution—will enable precision cosmological constraints and also a wide array of cross-correlation science that probes the expansion history of the universe and the growth of structure via gravitational collapse. To accomplish these scientific goals, the Advanced ACTPol receiver will be a significant upgrade to the ACTPol receiver, including four new multichroic arrays of cryogenic, feedhorn-coupled AlMn transition edge sensor polarimeters (fabricated on 150 mm diameter wafers); a system of continuously rotating meta-material silicon half-wave plates; and a new multiplexing readout architecture which uses superconducting quantum interference devices and time division to achieve a 64-row multiplexing factor. Here we present the status and scientific goals of the Advanced ACTPol instrument, emphasizing the design and implementation of the Advanced ACTPol cryogenic detector arrays.

  7. Characterization of a scintillating lithium glass ultra-cold neutron detector

    CERN Document Server

    Jamieson, Blair; Hansen-Romu, Sean; Lauss, Bernhard; Lindner, Thomas; Martin, Jeffery W; Pierre, Edgard

    2016-01-01

    A new 6-Li glass based scintillation detector developed for the TRIUMF neutron electric dipole moment experiment was characterized using the ultra-cold neutron source at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). The data acquisition system for this new detector was demonstrated to perform well at rejecting backgrounds. An estimate of the absolute efficiency of background rejection is made as a function of rate. For the variable ultra-cold neutron rate, varying from approx 1 kHz to 100 kHz per channel, and background rate seen at the Paul Scherrer Institut, we estimate that the absolute detector efficiency is 89.7+1.3-1.9 % and the background contamination is 0.3 +- 0.1 %. Finally a comparison with a commercial Cascade detector was performed for a specific setup at the West-2 beamline of the ultra-cold neutron source at PSI.

  8. A depth-of-interaction PET detector using a stair-shaped reflector arrangement and a single-ended scintillation light readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Jeong-Whan; Lee, Min Sun; Lee, Jae Sung

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) detectors with the ability to encode depth-of-interaction (DOI) information allow us to simultaneously improve the spatial resolution and sensitivity of PET scanners. In this study, we propose a DOI PET detector based on a stair-pattern reflector arrangement inserted between pixelated crystals and a single-ended scintillation light readout. The main advantage of the proposed method is its simplicity; DOI information is decoded from a flood map and the data can be simply acquired by using a single-ended readout system. Another potential advantage is that the two-step DOI detectors can provide the largest peak position distance in a flood map because two-dimensional peak positions can be evenly distributed. We conducted a Monte Carlo simulation and obtained flood maps. Then, we conducted experimental studies using two-step DOI arrays of 5  ×  5 Lu1.9Y0.1SiO5:Ce crystals with a cross-section of 1.7  ×  1.7 mm2 and different detector configurations: an unpolished single-layer (US) array, a polished single-layer (PS) array and a polished stacked two-layer (PT) array. For each detector configuration, both air gaps and room-temperature vulcanization (RTV) silicone gaps were tested. Detectors US and PT showed good peak separation in each scintillator with an average peak-to-valley ratio (PVR) and distance-to-width ratio (DWR) of 2.09 and 1.53, respectively. Detector PSRTV showed lower PVR and DWR (1.65 and 1.34, respectively). The configuration of detector PTAir is preferable for the construction of time-of-flight-DOI detectors because timing resolution was degraded by only about 40 ps compared with that of a non-DOI detector. The performance of detectors USAir and PSRTV was lower than that of a non-DOI detector, and thus these designs are favorable when the manufacturing cost is more important than timing performance. The results demonstrate that the proposed DOI-encoding method is a promising candidate for PET

  9. High spatial resolution radiation detectors based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon and scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, Tao [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Engineering-Nuclear Engineering

    1995-05-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) as a large-area thin film semiconductor with ease of doping and low-cost fabrication capability has given a new impetus to the field of imaging sensors; its high radiation resistance also makes it a good material for radiation detectors. In addition, large-area microelectronics based on a-Si:H or polysilicon can be made with full integration of peripheral circuits, including readout switches and shift registers on the same substrate. Thin a-Si:H p-i-n photodiodes coupled to suitable scintillators are shown to be suitable for detecting charged particles, electrons, and X-rays. The response speed of CsI/a-Si:H diode combinations to individual particulate radiation is limited by the scintillation light decay since the charge collection time of the diode is very short (< 10ns). The reverse current of the detector is analyzed in term of contact injection, thermal generation, field enhanced emission (Poole-Frenkel effect), and edge leakage. A good collection efficiency for a diode is obtained by optimizing the p layer of the diode thickness and composition. The CsI(Tl) scintillator coupled to an a-Si:H photodiode detector shows a capability for detecting minimum ionizing particles with S/N ~20. In such an arrangement a p-i-n diode is operated in a photovoltaic mode (reverse bias). In addition, a p-i-n diode can also work as a photoconductor under forward bias and produces a gain yield of 3--8 for shaping times of 1 {micro}s. The mechanism of the formation of structured CsI scintillator layers is analyzed. Initial nucleation in the deposited layer is sensitive to the type of substrate medium, with imperfections generally catalyzing nucleation. Therefore, the microgeometry of a patterned substrate has a significant effect on the structure of the CsI growth.

  10. Evaluation of various planar gaseous detectors with Cs1 photocathodes for the detection of primary scintillation light from noble gases

    CERN Document Server

    Periale, L; Carlson, Per J; Iacobaeus, C; Francke, T; Pavlopoulos, N; Pietropaoplo, F; Sokolova, T; Picchi, P

    2003-01-01

    Noble gases and liquids are excellent scintillators and this opens a unique opportunity to directly detect the primary scintillation light produced in these media by photons or particles. This signal can be used for several purposes, for example as a start signal for TPCs or for particle's identification. Usually photomultipliers (PMs) are used for the detection of the scintillation light. In our previous work we have demonstrated that costly PMs could be replaced by gaseous detectors with CsI photocathodes. Such detectors have the same quantum efficiency as the best PMs but at the same time are cheap, simple and have high position and time resolutions. The aim of this work is to evaluate various planar type gaseous detectors with CsI photocathodes in order to choose the best one for the detection of the primary scintillation light from noble gases and liquids. (10 refs).

  11. Triton burnup study using scintillating fiber detector on JT-60U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harano, Hideki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    1997-09-01

    The DT fusion reactor cannot be realized without knowing how the fusion-produced 3.5 MeV {alpha} particles behave. The {alpha} particles` behavior can be simulated using the 1 MeV triton. To investigate the 1 MeV triton`s behavior, a new type of directional 14 MeV neutron detector, scintillating fiber (Sci-Fi) detector has been developed and installed on JT-60U in the cooperation with LANL as part of a US-Japan collaboration. The most remarkable feature of the Sci-Fi detector is that the plastic scintillating fibers are employed for the neutron sensor head. The Sci-Fi detector measures and extracts the DT neutrons from the fusion radiation field in high time resolution (10 ms) and wide dynamic range (3 decades). Triton burnup analysis code TBURN has been made in order to analyze the time evolution of DT neutron emission rate obtained by the Sci-Fi detector. The TBURN calculations reproduced the measurements fairly well, and the validity of the calculation model that the slowing down of the 1 MeV triton was classical was confirmed. The Sci-Fi detector`s directionality indicated the tendency that the DT neutron emission profile became more and more peaked with the time progress. In this study, in order to examine the effect of the toroidal field ripple on the triton burnup, R{sub p}-scan and n{sub e}-scan experiments have been performed. The R{sub p}-scan experiment indicates that the triton`s transport was increased as the ripple amplitude over the triton became larger. In the n{sub e}-scan experiment, the DT neutron emission showed the characteristic changes after the gas puffing injection. It was theoretically confirmed that the gas puffing was effective for the collisionality scan. (J.P.N.) 127 refs.

  12. Assessment of a simulation software for scintillation detector

    CERN Document Server

    Crespin, S; Brette, P; Falvard, A; Maublant, J

    2004-01-01

    Aim: A Monte Carlo code based on GEANT 3.21 and Linux platform has been developed and adaptated to simulate gamma detectors dedicated to specific scintigraphic applications. Materials and methods: GEANT 3.21 is freely available at the CERN program library. It has been written for simulating the interactions of particles with energy greater than 10keV. The energy of the gamma rays used in scintigraphic imaging never exceeds 511keV. Interaction cross- sections for energies between 10keV and 10MeV and three media of interest obtained with this program have been compared with data available on the NIST web site. A gamma peroperative hand-held probe has then been simulated. Sensitivity and spatial resolution were evaluated. Results: The high standard deviation for total attenuation coefficient is 4.7% with an uncertainty around 4% given by NIST. The good results obtained have allowed us to go farther in computer programming. In the hope of integrating all the detection lines new routines have been introduced for t...

  13. First Data with the Hybrid Array of Gamma-Ray Detectors (HAGRiD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Karl; Burcher, S.; Carter, A. B.; Gryzwacz, R.; Jones, K. L.; Munoz, S.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Schmitt, K.; Thornsberry, C.; Chipps, K. A.; Febbraro, M.; Pain, S. D.; Baugher, T.; Cizewski, J. A.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Toomey, B.

    2016-09-01

    The structure of nuclei provides insight into astrophysical reaction rates that are difficult to measure directly. These studies are often performed with transfer reaction and beta-decay measurements. These experiments benefit from particle-gamma coincident measurements providing information beyond that of particle detection alone. The Hybrid Array of Gamma Ray Detectors (HAGRiD) of LaBr3(Ce) scintillators has been designed with this purpose in mind. The design of the array permits it to be coupled with particle detector systems, such as the Oak Ridge Rutgers University Barrel Array (ORRUBA) of silicon detectors and the Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE). It is also designed to operate with the Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics (JENSA) advanced target system. HAGRiD's design avoids compromising the charged-particle angular resolution due to compact geometries often used to increase the gamma efficiency in other systems. First experimental data with HAGRiD coupled to VANDLE as well as ORRUBA and JENSA will be presented. This work is supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science Nuclear Physics and the National Science Foundation.

  14. Conceptual design of the early implementation of the NEutron Detector Array (NEDA) with AGATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hueyuek, Tayfun; Gadea, Andres; Domingo-Pardo, Cesar [Universidad de Valencia, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, CSIC, Paterna (Valencia) (Spain); Di Nitto, Antonio [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Napoli (Italy); Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Jaworski, Grzegorz; Javier Valiente-Dobon, Jose; De Angelis, Giacomo; Modamio, Victor; Triossi, Andrea [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Legnaro (Italy); Nyberg, Johan [Uppsala University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala (Sweden); Palacz, Marcin [University of Warsaw, Heavy Ion Laboratory, Warsaw (Poland); Soederstroem, Paer-Anders [RIKEN Nishina Center, Saitama (Japan); Aliaga-Varea, Ramon Jose [Universidad de Valencia, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, CSIC, Paterna (Valencia) (Spain); Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, I3M, Valencia (Spain); Atac, Ayse [Ankara University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Ankara (Turkey); The Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Collado, Javier; Egea, Francisco Javier; Gonzalez, Vicente; Sanchis, Enrique [University of Valencia, Department of Electronic Engineering, Burjassot (Valencia) (Spain); Erduran, Nizamettin [Istanbul Sabahattin Zaim University, Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Istanbul (Turkey); Ertuerk, Sefa [University of Nigde, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Arts, Nigde (Turkey); France, Gilles de [CNRS/IN2P3, GANIL, CEA/DSAM, Caen (France); Gadea, Rafael; Herrero-Bosch, Vicente [Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, I3M, Valencia (Spain); Kaskas, Ayse [Ankara University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Ankara (Turkey); Moszynski, Marek [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Wadsworth, Robert [University of York, Department of Physics, York (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-15

    The NEutron Detector Array (NEDA) project aims at the construction of a new high-efficiency compact neutron detector array to be coupled with large γ -ray arrays such as AGATA. The application of NEDA ranges from its use as selective neutron multiplicity filter for fusion-evaporation reaction to a large solid angle neutron tagging device. In the present work, possible configurations for the NEDA coupled with the Neutron Wall for the early implementation with AGATA has been simulated, using Monte Carlo techniques, in order to evaluate their performance figures. The goal of this early NEDA implementation is to improve, with respect to previous instruments, efficiency and capability to select multiplicity for fusion-evaporation reaction channels in which 1, 2 or 3 neutrons are emitted. Each NEDA detector unit has the shape of a regular hexagonal prism with a volume of about 3.23l and it is filled with the EJ301 liquid scintillator, that presents good neutron- γ discrimination properties. The simulations have been performed using a fusion-evaporation event generator that has been validated with a set of experimental data obtained in the {sup 58}Ni + {sup 56}Fe reaction measured with the Neutron Wall detector array. (orig.)

  15. Conceptual design of the early implementation of the NEutron Detector Array (NEDA) with AGATA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüyük, Tayfun; Di Nitto, Antonio; Jaworski, Grzegorz; Gadea, Andrés; Javier Valiente-Dobón, José; Nyberg, Johan; Palacz, Marcin; Söderström, Pär-Anders; Jose Aliaga-Varea, Ramon; de Angelis, Giacomo; Ataç, Ayşe; Collado, Javier; Domingo-Pardo, Cesar; Egea, Francisco Javier; Erduran, Nizamettin; Ertürk, Sefa; de France, Gilles; Gadea, Rafael; González, Vicente; Herrero-Bosch, Vicente; Kaşkaş, Ayşe; Modamio, Victor; Moszynski, Marek; Sanchis, Enrique; Triossi, Andrea; Wadsworth, Robert

    2016-03-01

    The NEutron Detector Array (NEDA) project aims at the construction of a new high-efficiency compact neutron detector array to be coupled with large γ-ray arrays such as AGATA. The application of NEDA ranges from its use as selective neutron multiplicity filter for fusion-evaporation reaction to a large solid angle neutron tagging device. In the present work, possible configurations for the NEDA coupled with the Neutron Wall for the early implementation with AGATA has been simulated, using Monte Carlo techniques, in order to evaluate their performance figures. The goal of this early NEDA implementation is to improve, with respect to previous instruments, efficiency and capability to select multiplicity for fusion-evaporation reaction channels in which 1, 2 or 3 neutrons are emitted. Each NEDA detector unit has the shape of a regular hexagonal prism with a volume of about 3.23l and it is filled with the EJ301 liquid scintillator, that presents good neutron- γ discrimination properties. The simulations have been performed using a fusion-evaporation event generator that has been validated with a set of experimental data obtained in the 58Ni + 56Fe reaction measured with the Neutron Wall detector array.

  16. Scalability, scintillation readout and charge drift in a kilogram scale solid xenon particle detector

    CERN Document Server

    Yoo, J; Jaskierny, W F; Markley, D; Pahlka, R B; Balakishiyeva, D; Saab, T; Filipenko, M

    2014-01-01

    We report a demonstration of the scalability of optically transparent xenon in the solid phase for use as a particle detector above a kilogram scale. We employ a liquid nitrogen cooled cryostat combined with a xenon purification and chiller system to measure the scintillation light output and electron drift speed from both the solid and liquid phases of xenon. Scintillation light output from sealed radioactive sources is measured by a set of high quantum efficiency photomultiplier tubes suitable for cryogenic applications. We observed a reduced amount of photons in solid phase compared to that in liquid phase. We used a conventional time projection chamber system to measure the electron drift time in a kilogram of solid xenon and observed faster electron drift speed in the solid phase xenon compared to that in the liquid phase.

  17. Scalability, Scintillation Readout and Charge Drift in a Kilogram Scale Solid Xenon Particle Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, J. [Fermilab; Cease, H. [Fermilab; Jaskierny, W. F. [Fermilab; Markley, D. [Fermilab; Pahlka, R. B. [Fermilab; Balakishiyeva, D. [Florida U.; Saab, T. [Florida U.; Filipenko, M. [Erlangen - Nuremberg U., ECAP

    2014-10-23

    We report a demonstration of the scalability of optically transparent xenon in the solid phase for use as a particle detector above a kilogram scale. We employ a liquid nitrogen cooled cryostat combined with a xenon purification and chiller system to measure the scintillation light output and electron drift speed from both the solid and liquid phases of xenon. Scintillation light output from sealed radioactive sources is measured by a set of high quantum efficiency photomultiplier tubes suitable for cryogenic applications. We observed a reduced amount of photons in solid phase compared to that in liquid phase. We used a conventional time projection chamber system to measure the electron drift time in a kilogram of solid xenon and observed faster electron drift speed in the solid phase xenon compared to that in the liquid phase.

  18. Differentiation method for localization of Compton edge in organic scintillation detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Safari, M J; Afarideh, H

    2016-01-01

    This paper, presents a simple method for accurate calibration of organic scintillation detectors. The method is based on the fact that differentiating the response function leads to accurate estimation of the Compton edge. The differentiation method in addition to the location of the Compton edge, gives insights into the parameters of the folded Gaussian function which is useful for determination of the energy resolution. Moreover, it is observed that the uncorrelated noise in the measurement of the response function does not impose significant uncertainties in the evaluations. By simulation of the bounded electrons and considering the Doppler effects, we are able to calculate a first estimation for the intrinsic Doppler resolution of a plastic scintillator, benefiting from the capability of the differentiation method.

  19. Development of Yangbajing Air shower Core detector array for a new EAS hybrid Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jinsheng; Chen, Ding; Zhang, Ying; Zhai, Liuming; Chen, Xu; Hu, Xiaobin; Lin, Yuhui; Zhang, Xueyao; Feng, Cunfeng; Jia, Huanyu; Zhou, Xunxiu; DanZengLuoBu,; Chen, Tianlu; Li, Haijin; Liu, Maoyuan; Yuan, Aifang

    2015-01-01

    Aiming at the observation of cosmic-ray chemical composition at the "knee" energy region, we have been developinga new type air-shower core detector (YAC, Yangbajing Air shower Core detector array) to be set up at Yangbajing (90.522$^\\circ$ E, 30.102$^\\circ$ N, 4300 m above sea level, atmospheric depth: 606 g/m$^2$) in Tibet, China. YAC works together with the Tibet air-shower array (Tibet-III) and an underground water cherenkov muon detector array (MD) as a hybrid experiment. Each YAC detector unit consists of lead plates of 3.5 cm thick and a scintillation counter which detects the burst size induced by high energy particles in the air-shower cores. The burst size can be measured from 1 MIP (Minimum Ionization Particle) to $10^{6}$ MIPs. The first phase of this experiment, named "YAC-I", consists of 16 YAC detectors each having the size 40 cm $\\times$ 50 cm and distributing in a grid with an effective area of 10 m$^{2}$. YAC-I is used to check hadronic interaction models. The second phase of the experiment,...

  20. Fabrication of Pop-up Detector Arrays on Si Wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mary J.; Allen, Christine A.; Gordon, Scott A.; Kuhn, Jonathan L.; Mott, David B.; Stahle, Caroline K.; Wang, Liqin L.

    1999-01-01

    High sensitivity is a basic requirement for a new generation of thermal detectors. To meet the requirement, close-packed, two-dimensional silicon detector arrays have been developed in NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The goal of the task is to fabricate detector arrays configured with thermal detectors such as infrared bolometers and x-ray calorimeters to use in space fliGht missions. This paper focuses on the fabrication and the mechanical testing of detector arrays in a 0.2 mm pixel size, the smallest pop-up detectors being developed so far. These array structures, nicknamed "PUDS" for "Pop-Up Detectors", are fabricated on I pm thick, single-crystal, silicon membranes. Their designs have been refined so we can utilize the flexibility of thin silicon films by actually folding the silicon membranes to 90 degrees in order to obtain close-packed two-dimensional arrays. The PUD elements consist of a detector platform and two legs for mechanical support while also serving as electrical and thermal paths. Torsion bars and cantilevers connecting the detector platform to the legs provide additional flexures for strain relief. Using micro-electromechanical structure (MEMS) fabrication techniques, including photolithography, anisotropic chemical etching, reactive-ion etching, and laser dicing, we have fabricated PLTD detector arrays of fourteen designs with a variation of four parameters including cantilever length, torsion bar length and width, and leg length. Folding tests were conducted to test mechanical stress distribution for the array structures. We obtained folding yields and selected optimum design parameters to reach minimal stress levels. Computer simulation was also employed to verify mechanical behaviors of PUDs in the folding process. In addition, scanning electron microscopy was utilized to examine the flatness of detectors and the alignment of detector pixels in arrays. The fabrication of thermistors and heaters on the pop-up detectors is under way

  1. Electronics design of a PET detector module with APD array

    CERN Document Server

    Wang Yong

    2002-01-01

    The author summarizes the advantages of APD-array for using in PET scanner. The front-end electronics for an experimental APD detector module was built and tested. According to the characteristics of APD-array and the demands of the signal readout in PET scanner, the full electronics system of an APD detector module was designed and presented in detail

  2. The Impact of Array Detectors on Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denson, Stephen C.; Pommier, Carolyn J. S.; Denton, M. Bonner

    2007-01-01

    The impact of array detectors in the field of Raman spectroscopy and all low-light-level spectroscopic techniques is examined. The high sensitivity of array detectors has allowed Raman spectroscopy to be used to detect compounds at part per million concentrations and to perform Raman analyses at advantageous wavelengths.

  3. Development of large area gamma-ray camera with GSO(Ce) scintillator arrays and PSPMTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, H. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-oiwake, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)]. E-mail: nisimura@cr.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Hattori, K. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-oiwake, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Kabuki, S. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-oiwake, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Kubo, H. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-oiwake, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Miuchi, K. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-oiwake, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Nagayoshi, T. [Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 17 Kikui-cho, Shinjyuku, Tokyo 162-0044 (Japan); Okada, Y. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-oiwake, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Orito, R. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkoudai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Sekiya, H. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-oiwake, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Takada, A. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-oiwake, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Takeda, A. [Kamioka Observatory, ICRR, University of Tokyo, 456 Higasi-mozumi, Hida-shi, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Tanimori, T. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-oiwake, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Ueno, K. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-oiwake, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2007-04-01

    We have developed a position-sensitive scintillation camera with a large area as an absorber of an advanced Compton gamma-ray camera. At first we tested GSO(Ce) crystals. We compared light output from the GSO(Ce) crystals under various conditions: the method of surface polishing, the concentration of Ce, and co-doping Zr. As a result, we chose the GSO(Ce) crystals doped only 0.5mol% Ce, surface of which was polished by chemical etching for the scintillator of our camera. We also made a 16x16cm{sup 2} scintillation camera which consisted of nine position-sensitive PMTs (PSPMTs Hamamatsu flat-panel H8500 ), the each of which had 8x8 anodes with a pitch of 6mm and coupled to 8x8 arrays of pixelated 6x6x13mm{sup 3} GSO(Ce) scintillators. For the readout system of 576 anodes of the PMTs, we used chained resistors to reduce the number of readout channels down to 48 for saving power consumption. The camera has the position resolution of less than 6mm and a typical energy resolution of 10.5% (FWHM) at 662keV at each pixel in a large area of 16x16cm{sup 2}. Furthermore, we constructed a 16x16 array of 3x3x13mm{sup 3} pixelated GSO(Ce) scintillators, and glued it to a PMT H8500. This camera had the position resolution of less than 3mm in area of 5x5cm{sup 2}, except for some of edge pixels; the energy resolution was typically 13% (FWHM) at 662keV.

  4. Reaching time resolution of less than 10 ps with plastic scintillation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, J. W.; Sun, B. H.; Tanihata, I.; Terashima, S.; Zhu, L. H.; Enomoto, A.; Nagae, D.; Nishimura, T.; Omika, S.; Ozawa, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Yamaguchi, T.

    2016-07-01

    Timing-pick up detectors with excellent timing resolutions are essential in many modern nuclear physics experiments. Aiming to develop a Time-Of-Flight system with precision down to about 10 ps, we have made a systematic study of the timing characteristic of TOF detectors, which consist of several combinations of plastic scintillators and photomultiplier tubes. With the conventional electronics, the best timing resolution of about 5.1 ps (σ) has been achieved for detectors with an area size of 3 × 1cm2 . It is found that for data digitalization a combination of TAC and ADC can achieve a better time resolution than the currently available TDC. Simultaneous measurements of both time and pulse height are very valuable for the correction of time-walk effect.

  5. Development of a fast plastic scintillation detector with time resolution of less than 10 ps

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, J W; Tanihata, I; Terashima, S; Zhu, L H; Enomoto, A; Nagae, D; Nishimura, T; Omika, S; Ozawa, A; Takeuchi, Y; Yamaguchi, T

    2016-01-01

    Timing-pick up detectors with excellent timing resolutions are essential in many modern nuclear physics experiments. Aiming to develop a Time-Of-Flight system with precision down to about 10 ps, we have made a systematic study of the timing characteristic of TOF detectors, which consist of several combinations of plastic scintillators and photomultiplier tubes. With the conventional electronics, the best timing resolution of about 5.1 ps ({\\sigma}) has been achieved for detectors with an area size of 3x1 cm2. It is found that for data digitalization a combination of TAC and ADC can achieve a better time resolution than currently available TDC. Simultaneously measurements of both time and pulse height are very valuable for correction of time-walk effect.

  6. High-pressure plastic scintillation detector for measuring radiogenic gases in flow systems

    CERN Document Server

    Schell, W R; Yoon, S R; Tobin, M J

    1999-01-01

    Radioactive gases are emitted into the atmosphere from nuclear electric power and nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, from hospitals discarding xenon used in diagnostic medicine, as well as from nuclear weapons tests. A high-pressure plastic scintillation detector was constructed to measure atmospheric levels of such radioactive gases by detecting the beta and internal conversion (IC) electron decays. Operational tests and calibrations were made that permit integration of the flow detectors into a portable Gas Analysis, Separation and Purification system (GASP). The equipment developed can be used for measuring fission gases released from nuclear reactor sources and/or as part of monitoring equipment for enforcing the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty. The detector is being used routinely for in-line gas separation efficiency measurements, at the elevated operational pressures used for the high-pressure swing analysis system (2070 kPa) and at flow rates of 5-15 l/min . This paper presents the design features, opera...

  7. MeV X-ray imaging using plastic scintillating fiber area detectors: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shi-Biao; Ma, Qingli; Yin, Zejie; Zhu, Daming

    2008-02-01

    Due to their low cost, flexibility, and convenience for long distance data transfer, plastic scintillating fibers (PSFs) have been increasingly used in building detectors or sensors for detecting various radiations and imaging. In this work, the possibility of using PSF coupled with charge-coupled devices (CCD) to build area detectors for X-ray imaging is studied using a Monte Carlo simulation. The focus is on X-ray imaging with energy from a few 100 keV to about 20 MeV. It is found that the efficiency of PSF in detecting X-ray in this energy range is low. The performance can be improved by coating a PSF with X-ray absorption layers and the MTF of the system is presented. It seems possible to build such area detectors with PSFs for imaging hard X-rays under certain environment.

  8. The Aachen muon detector prototype. Muon measurement using scintillator tiles with SiPM readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meissner, Rebecca; Bretz, Thomas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Lauscher, Markus; Middendorf, Lukas; Niggemann, Tim; Peters, Christine; Schumacher, Johannes [III. Physikalisches Institut A, RWTH Aachen University (Germany); Collaboration: Pierre Auger-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    Muons being produced in air showers of ultra high energy cosmic rays carry important information on their characteristics such as the mass of the primary particle and the first hadronic interactions at the highest energies. In the context of the Pierre Auger Observatory this upgrade would enable an enhanced primary particle identification as well as the verification of shower simulation models. For this purpose, a simple and robust detector design with scintillator tiles and SiPM readout is being developed, the Aachen Muon Detector (AMD). AMD could be situated below the SD tanks which would provide shielding from the electromagnetic part of the shower. In total, 64 scintillating tiles form the sensitive area of the detector. Wavelength-shifting fibres are inserted into the tiles in sigma-shape to collect the light and are coupled to optical fibres to guide it onto the photosensitive SiPMs. By reading out each SiPM individually, an excellent and low-background performance is expected. Currently the AMD prototype is being built in Aachen and in parallel SiPM and electronics characteristics are being evaluated.

  9. Characterization of a scintillating fibers read by MPPC detectors trigger prototype for the AMADEUS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Scordo, A; Berucci, C; Curceanu, C; D'Uffizi, A; Piscicchia, K; Lener, M Poli; Vidal, A Romero; Sbardella, E; Doce, O Vazquez

    2013-01-01

    Multi-Pixel Photon Counters (MPPC) consist of hundreds of micro silicon Avalanche PhotoDiodes (APD) working in Geiger mode. The high gain and the low noise, typical of these devices, together with their good performance in magnetic field, make them ideal readout detectors for scintillating fibers as trigger detectors in particle and nuclear physics experiments like AMADEUS, where such detectors are planned to be used to trigger on charged kaon pairs. In order to investigate the detection efficiency of such a system, a prototype setup consisting of 32, 1 mm diameter scintillating fibers, arranged in two double layers of 16 fibers each, and read out by 64 MPPCs with an ad-hoc built readout electronics, was tested at the piM-1 line of the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Villigen, Switzerland. The detection efficiency and the trigger capability were measured on a beam containing protons, electrons, muons and pions with a momentum of 440 MeV/c. The measured average efficiency for protons for a double layer of sci...

  10. Fission signal detection using helium-4 gas fast neutron scintillation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, J. M.; Kelley, R. P.; Murer, D.; Jordan, K. A.

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate the unambiguous detection of the fission neutron signal produced in natural uranium during active neutron interrogation using a deuterium-deuterium fusion neutron generator and a high pressure 4He gas fast neutron scintillation detector. The energy deposition by individual neutrons is quantified, and energy discrimination is used to differentiate the induced fission neutrons from the mono-energetic interrogation neutrons. The detector can discriminate between different incident neutron energies using pulse height discrimination of the slow scintillation component of the elastic scattering interaction between a neutron and the 4He atom. Energy histograms resulting from this data show the buildup of a detected fission neutron signal at higher energies. The detector is shown here to detect a unique fission neutron signal from a natural uranium sample during active interrogation with a (d, d) neutron generator. This signal path has a direct application to the detection of shielded nuclear material in cargo and air containers. It allows for continuous interrogation and detection while greatly minimizing the potential for false alarms.

  11. The customized groud test platforms for the plastic scintillator detector of DAMPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; Sun, Zhiyu; Yu, Yuhong; Fang, Fang; Chen, Junling; Zhang, Yongjie

    2016-07-01

    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is a high-precision satellite-borne spectrometer aiming for dark matter search, understanding of the origin and propagation of cosmic rays and gamma-ray astronomy. The Plastic Scintillator Detector (PSD) is a key sub-detector of DAMPE, which provides the function of e/γ discrimination and charge measurement from proton to calcium. It consists of 82 plastic scintillator bars with the dimension of 884mm×28mm×10mm, each readout by two photomultiplier tubes (PMT) at both ends. To ensure the quality and achieve the best performance, various ground tests have been carried out during the construction phase of PSD both on the module and system scale. Customized test platforms are designed and constructed to facilitate these works which includes a test bench for batch PMT characterization and qualification with the capacity of 25 tubes, a test bench for batch scintillator bar characterization with the capacity of 24 bars, and an integrated platform which emulates the vacuum condition in space and provides accurate tracking of the incident cosmic ray particle for precise calibration of the PSD detector as a whole. A dedicated analysis software based on ROOT library has also been developed for PSD ground test, which can process both the engineering and science data, and combines decoding, analysis and data visualization into a single framework. These facilities constitute a complete test suite for PSD development and are applied successfully in the construction of both the Engineering Qualified Model and the Flight Model of PSD.

  12. A large acceptance scintillator detector with wavelength shifting fibre readout for search of η-nucleus bound states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betigeri, M. G.; Biswas, P. K.; Budzanowski, A.; Chatterjee, A.; Jahn, R.; Guha, S.; Hawranek, P.; Jain, B. K.; Jawale, S. B.; Jha, V.; Kilian, K.; Kliczewski, S.; Kirillov, Da.; Kirillov, Di.; Kolev, D.; Kravcikova, M.; Kutsarova, T.; Lesiak, M.; Lieb, J.; Machner, H.; Magiera, A.; Maier, R.; Martinska, G.; Nedev, S.; Piskunov, N.; Prasuhn, D.; Protić, D.; Ritman, J.; von Rossen, P.; Roy, B. J.; Shukla, P.; Sitnik, I.; Siudak, R.; Tsenov, R.; Ulicny, M.; Urban, J.; Vankova, G.; GEM Collaboration

    2007-07-01

    A large acceptance scintillator detector with wavelength shifting optical fibre readout has been designed and built to detect the decay particles of η-nucleus bound system (the so-called η-mesic nuclei), namely, protons and pions. The detector, named as ENSTAR detector, consists of 122 pieces of plastic scintillator of various shapes and sizes, which are arranged in a cylindrical geometry to provide particle identification, energy loss and coarse position information for these particles. A solid angle coverage of ˜95% of total 4 π is obtained in the present design of the detector. Monte Carlo phase space calculations performed to simulate the formation and decay of η-mesic nuclei suggest that its decay particles, the protons and pions are emitted with an opening angle of 150±20∘, and with energies in the range of 25-300 and 225-450 MeV, respectively. The detailed GEANT simulations show that ˜80 % of the decay particles (protons and pions) can be detected within ENSTAR. Several test measurements using alpha source, cosmic-ray muons, etc. have been carried out to study the response of ENSTAR scintillator pieces. The in-beam tests of fully assembled detector with proton beam of momentum 870 MeV/c from the Cooler synchrotron COSY have been performed. The test results show that the scintillator fibre design chosen for the detector has performed satisfactorily well. The present article describes the detector design, simulation studies, construction details and test results.

  13. A large acceptance scintillator detector with wavelength shifting fibre readout for search of {eta}-nucleus bound states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betigeri, M.G.; Chatterjee, A.; Roy, B.J.; Shukla, P. [Nuclear Physics Div., BARC, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Biswas, P.K.; Guha, S.; Jawale, S.B. [Centre for Design and Manufacture, BARC, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Budzanowski, A. [Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow (Poland); Jahn, R. [Helmholtz-Inst. fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik der Univ. Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Hawranek, P. [Inst. of Physics, Jagellonian Univ., Krakow (Poland); Jain, B.K. [Physics Dept., Mumbai Univ., Vidyanagari, Mumbai (India); Jha, V. [Nuclear Physics Div., BARC, Mumbai 400 085 (India)]. E-mail: vjha@barc.gov.in; Kilian, K.; Kirillov, Da.; Lesiak, M.; Maier, R.; Prasuhn, D.; Protic, D.; Ritman, J.; von Rossen, P. [Inst. fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Kliczewski, S. [Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow (Poland); Kirillov, Di.; Piskunov, N.; Sitnik, I. [Lab. for High Energies, JINR Dubna (Russian Federation); Kolev, D. [Physics Faculty, Univ. of Sofia, Sofia (Bulgaria); Kravcikova, M. [Technical Univ. Kosice, Kosice (Slovakia); Kutsarova, T. [Inst. of Nuclear Physics and Nuclear Energy, Sofia (Bulgaria); Lieb, J. [Physics Dept., George Mason Univ., Fairfax, VA (United States); Machner, H. [Inst. fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany)]|[Fachbereich Physik, Univ. Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg (Germany); Magiera, A. [Inst. of Physics, Jagellonian Univ., Krakow (Poland); Martinska, G.; Ulicny, M.; Urban, J. [P. J. Safarik Univ., Kosice, (Slovakia); Nedev, S. [Univ. of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, Sofia (Bulgaria); Siudak, R. [Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow (Poland)]|[Inst. fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Tsenov, R. [Physics Faculty, Univ. of Sofia, Sofia (Bulgaria); Vankova, G. [Inst. fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany)]|[Physics Faculty, Univ. of Sofia, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2007-07-21

    A large acceptance scintillator detector with wavelength shifting optical fibre readout has been designed and built to detect the decay particles of {eta}-nucleus bound system (the so-called {eta}-mesic nuclei), namely, protons and pions. The detector, named as ENSTAR detector, consists of 122 pieces of plastic scintillator of various shapes and sizes, which are arranged in a cylindrical geometry to provide particle identification, energy loss and coarse position information for these particles. A solid angle coverage of {approx}95% of total 4{pi} is obtained in the present design of the detector. Monte Carlo phase space calculations performed to simulate the formation and decay of {eta}-mesic nuclei suggest that its decay particles, the protons and pions are emitted with an opening angle of 150+/-20{sup a}t, and with energies in the range of 25-300 and 225-450MeV, respectively. The detailed GEANT simulations show that {approx}80 % of the decay particles (protons and pions) can be detected within ENSTAR. Several test measurements using alpha source, cosmic-ray muons, etc. have been carried out to study the response of ENSTAR scintillator pieces. The in-beam tests of fully assembled detector with proton beam of momentum 870MeV/c from the Cooler synchrotron COSY have been performed. The test results show that the scintillator fibre design chosen for the detector has performed satisfactorily well. The present article describes the detector design, simulation studies, construction details and test results.

  14. Analysis of the scintillation mechanism in a pressurized 4He fast neutron detector using pulse shape fitting

    OpenAIRE

    R.P. Kelley; Murer, D.; Ray, H.; K.A. Jordan

    2015-01-01

    An empirical investigation of the scintillation mechanism in a pressurized 4He gas fast neutron detector was conducted using pulse shape fitting. Scintillation signals from neutron interactions were measured and averaged to produce a single generic neutron pulse shape from both a 252Cf spontaneous fission source and a (d,d) neutron generator. An expression for light output over time was then developed by treating the decay of helium excited states in the same manner as the decay of radioactiv...

  15. Discrimination of charged particles in a neutral beam line by using a solid scintillation detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Jong-Kwan; Ko, Jewou; Liu, Dong

    2017-01-01

    In the past several decades, many studies have been conducted to search for non-baryonic dark matter, such as weakly interactive massive particles (WIMPs). In the search for WIMPs, charged particles incident on the detector are background particles because WIMPs are neutral. Charged particles originate from various sources, such as cosmic rays and laboratory materials surrounding the main detector. Therefore, a veto that discriminates charged particles can improve the particle-detection efficiency of the entire experiment for detecting WIMPs. Here, we investigate in the thickness range of 1 mm to 5 mm, the optimal thickness of a polystyrene scintillator as a chargedparticle veto detector. We found that 3-mm-thick polystyrene provides the best performance to veto charged particles and the charged-particle background in the search for the WIMP signal. Furthermore, we fabricated 3-mm-thick and 5-mm-thick polystyrene charged particle veto detectors that will be used in an underground laboratory in the search for WIMP dark matter. After exposing those detectors are the actual beam line, we compared the rate of charged particles measured using those detectors and the rate simulated through a Monte Carlo simulation.

  16. Development of a new neutron monitor using a boron-loaded organic liquid scintillation detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasolonjatovo, A.H.D.; Shiomi, T.; Kim, E.; Nakamura, T. E-mail: nakamura@cyric.tohoku.ac.jp; Nunomiya, T.; Endo, A.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yoshizawa, M

    2002-10-21

    A new type of neutron dose monitor was developed by using a 12.7 cm diameterx12.7 cm long boron-loaded organic liquid scintillation detector BC523A. This detector aims to have a response in the wide energy range of thermal energy to 100 MeV by using the H and C reactions to the fast neutrons of organic liquid and the {sup 10}B(n, {alpha}) reaction to thermalized neutrons in the liquid. The response functions of this detector were determined by the Monte Carlo simulation in the energy region from thermal energy to 100 MeV. Using these response functions, the spectrum-weighted dose function, G-function, to get the neutron dose from the light output spectrum of the detector was also determined by the unfolding technique. The calculated G-function was applied to determine the neutron dose in real neutron fields having energies ranging from thermal energy to several tens of MeV, where the light output spectra were measured with the BC523A detector. The thus-obtained ambient doses and effective doses show rather good agreement with the fluence-to-dose conversion factor given by ICRP 74. This detector will be useful as a wide-energy range neutron monitor.

  17. A rope-net support system for the liquid scintillator detector for the SNO+ experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bialek, A., E-mail: abialek@snolab.ca [University of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Chen, M. [Queen' s University, Kingston (Canada); Cleveland, B. [SNOLAB, Lively (Canada); Gorel, P.; Hallin, A. [University of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Harvey, P.J.; Heise, J. [Queen' s University, Kingston (Canada); Kraus, C. [Laurentian University, Sudbury (Canada); Krauss, C.B. [University of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Lawson, I. [SNOLAB, Lively (Canada); Ng, C.J.; Pinkney, B. [University of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Rogowsky, D.M. [Rogowsky Engineering Ltd, AECOM Canada Ltd (Canada); Sibley, L.; Soluk, R.; Soukup, J. [University of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Vázquez-Jáuregui, E. [SNOLAB, Lively (Canada); Laurentian University, Sudbury (Canada)

    2016-08-11

    The detector for the SNO+ experiment consists of 780 000 kg of liquid scintillator contained in an acrylic vessel that is surrounded by water. A mechanical system has been installed to counteract the 1.25 MN of buoyant force on the acrylic and prevent the vessel from moving. The system is a rope net, designed using a Finite Element Analysis to calculate the amount of stress on the acrylic induced by the ropes, hydrostatic pressures and gravity. A dedicated test was performed to measure strains in the acrylic arising from the complex geometry of the knots in the rope system. The ratio between measured and FEA calculated strains was 1.3.

  18. Measurements of prompt fission gamma-rays and neutrons with lanthanide halide scintillation detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Oberstedt, A; Billnert, R; Borcea, R; Brys, T; Chaves, C; Gamboni, T; Geerts, W; Göök, A; Guerrero, C; Hambsch, F-J; Kis, Z; Martinez, T; Oberstedt, S; Szentmiklosi, L; Takács, K; Vivaldi, M

    2014-01-01

    Photons have been measured with lanthanide halide scintillation detectors in coincidence with fission fragments. Using the time-of-flight information, reactions from γ-rays and neutrons could easily be distinguished. In several experiments on $^{252}$Cf(sf), $^{235}$U(n$_{th}$,f) and $^{241}$Pu(n$_{th}$,f) prompt fission γ-ray spectra characteristics were determined with high precision and the results are presented here. Moreover, a measured prompt fission neutron spectrum for $^{235}$U(n$_{th}$,f) is shown in order to demonstrate a new detection technique.

  19. The Front End Electronics of the Scintillator Pad Detector of LHCb Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Gascon, David; Bota, S; Comerma, A; Diéguez, A; Garrido, L; Gaspar, A; Graciani, R; Graciani, E; Herms, A; Llorens, M; Luengo, S; Picatoste, E; Riera, J; Rosselló, M; Ruiz, H; Tortella, S; Vilasís, X

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the Front End electronics of the Scintillator Pad Detector (SPD) is outlined. The SPD is a sub-system of the Calorimeter of the LHCb experiment designed to discriminate between charged and neutral particles for the first level trigger. The system design is presented, describing its different functionalities implemented through three different cards and several ASICs. These functionalities are signal processing and digitization, data transmission, interface with control and timing systems of the experiment, low voltage power supply distribution and monitoring. Special emphasis is placed on installation and commissioning subjects such as cabling, grounding, shielding and power distribution.

  20. Imaging the LHC beams with silicon and scintillating fibre vertex detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihl, M.

    2017-02-01

    The LHCb Vertex Locator (VELO) is used to reconstruct beam-gas interaction vertices which allows one to obtain precise profiles of the LHC beams. In LHCb, this information is combined with the profile of the reconstructed beam-beam collisions and with the LHC beam currents to perform precise measurements of the luminosity. This beam-gas imaging (BGI) method also allows one to study the transverse beam shapes, beam positions and angles in real time. Therefore, a demonstrator beam-gas vertex detector (BGV) based on scintillating fibre modules has been built and installed in LHC Ring 2 at point 4.

  1. Imaging the LHC beams with silicon and scintillating fibre vertex detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Rihl, M

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb Vertex Locator (VELO) is used to reconstruct beam–gas interaction vertices which allows one to obtain precise profiles of the LHC beams. In LHCb, this information is combined with the profile of the reconstructed beam–beam collisions and with the LHC beam currents to perform precise measurements of the luminosity. This beam–gas imaging (BGI) method also allows one to study the transverse beam shapes, beam positions and angles in real time. Therefore, a demonstrator beam–gas vertex detector (BGV) based on scintillating fibre modules has been built and installed in LHC Ring 2 at point 4.

  2. Extensive studies of MRS APDs for plastic scintillator muon veto detectors of cryogenic experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falkenstein, R., E-mail: falkenst@pit.physik.uni-tuebingen.de [Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, University of Tuebingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Bezrukov, L.B. [Institute for Nuclear Research of RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Freund, K. [Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, University of Tuebingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Golovin, A.V.; Golovin, V.M. [Centre for Perspective Technology and Apparatus, Moscow (Russian Federation); Grabmayr, P.; Jochum, J. [Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, University of Tuebingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Lubsandorzhiev, B.K. [Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, University of Tuebingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Institute for Nuclear Research of RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lubsandorzhiev, N.B.; Poleshuk, R.V. [Institute for Nuclear Research of RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Polyansky, I.N. [Centre for Perspective Technology and Apparatus, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ritter, F.; Sailer, C. [Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, University of Tuebingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Shaibonov, B.A.M. [Institute for Nuclear Research of RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-12-11

    Low background experiments need active muon veto detectors to shield them from cosmic muons. Plastic scintillator panels with WLS fiber and multi-pixel Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes readout are widely used in such experiments due to their compactness and robustness. In this paper, results from the study of the basic MRS APD parameters, such as breakdown voltages, quenching resistors, internal gain and dark count rates are presented, as well as temperature dependencies of some of these parameters. In a small fraction of the MRS APDs, some strange dips in the I-V curves just preceding the breakdown voltage point have been observed.

  3. Alignment of the Near Detector scintillator modules using cosmic ray muons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ospanov, Rustem; Lang, Karol; /Texas U.

    2008-05-01

    The authors describe the procedures and the results of the first alignment of the Near Detector. Using 15.5 million cosmic ray muon tracks, collected from October, 2004 through early january, 2005, they derive the effective transverse positions of the calorimeter scintillator modules. The residuals from straight line fits indicate that the current alignment has achieved better than 1 mm precision. They estimate the size of the remaining misalignment and using tracks recorded with a magnetic field test the effect of the magnetic field on the alignment.

  4. Development and Testing of Scintillating Detectors for the Muon g-2 Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Benjamin; Diamond, Edward; Sblendorio, Alec; Gray, Frederick

    2016-09-01

    The precise value of the muon's anomalous magnetic moment that was measured at Brookhaven National Laboratory E821 differed by more than three standard deviations from predictions of the Standard Model. The Muon g-2 Experiment at Fermilab will attain a more precise measurement by a factor of three by observing the muon spin precession frequency in a magnetic field. This improved measurement could lead to evidence of physics beyond the Standard Model. A thin-scintillator entrance (T0) counter prototype is being tested for possible use in the experiment to determine the intensity and temporal profile of the beam as it is injected into the muon storage ring. The counter is also being evaluated to determine whether it can monitor undesired particles that arrive after the main beam pulse. The unique design of the entrance counter uses a silicon photomultiplier to read the light output from a scintillator. The progress of the design of the T0 entrance counter along with the results of light output tests from a beta source and the SLAC high-energy electron beam are the primary foci of this presentation. The status of scintillating fiber harp beam monitor detectors that will also be used in the g-2 Experiment to detect the position and width of the muon beam will also be presented. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1505887.

  5. A systematic characterization of the low-energy photon response of plastic scintillation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Jonathan; Beddar, Sam; Bonde, Chris; Schmidt, Daniel; Culberson, Wesley; Guillemette, Maxime; Beaulieu, Luc

    2016-08-01

    To characterize the low energy behavior of scintillating materials used in plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs), 3 PSDs were developed using polystyrene-based scintillating materials emitting in different wavelengths. These detectors were exposed to National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)-matched low-energy beams ranging from 20 kVp to 250 kVp, and to 137Cs and 60Co beams. The dose in polystyrene was compared to the dose in air measured by NIST-calibrated ionization chambers at the same location. Analysis of every beam quality spectrum was used to extract the beam parameters and the effective mass energy-absorption coefficient. Monte Carlo simulations were also performed to calculate the energy absorbed in the scintillators’ volume. The scintillators’ expected response was then compared to the experimental measurements and an energy-dependent correction factor was identified to account for low-energy quenching in the scintillators. The empirical Birks model was then compared to these values to verify its validity for low-energy electrons. The clear optical fiber response was below 0.2% of the scintillator’s light for x-ray beams, indicating that a negligible amount of fluorescence contamination was produced. However, for higher-energy beams (137Cs and 60Co), the scintillators’ response was corrected for the Cerenkov stem effect. The scintillators’ response increased by a factor of approximately 4 from a 20 kVp to a 60Co beam. The decrease in sensitivity from ionization quenching reached a local minimum of about 11%+/- 1% between 40 keV and 60 keV x-ray beam mean energy, but dropped by 20% for very low-energy (13 keV) beams. The Birks model may be used to fit the experimental data, but it must take into account the energy dependence of the kB quenching parameter. A detailed comprehension of intrinsic scintillator response is essential for proper calibration of PSD dosimeters for radiology.

  6. 1-D array of perforated diode neutron detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNeil, Walter J. [Kansas State University, Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Department, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States)], E-mail: wjm4444@ksu.edu; Bellinger, Steven L.; Unruh, Troy C.; Henderson, Chris M.; Ugorowski, Phil; Morris-Lee, Bryce [Kansas State University, Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Department, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States); Taylor, Russell D. [Electronics Design Laboratory, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States); McGregor, Douglas S. [Kansas State University, Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Department, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States)], E-mail: mcgregor@ksu.edu

    2009-06-01

    Performance of a 4 cm long 64-pixel perforated diode neutron detector array is compared with an identical array of thin-film coated diodes. The perforated neutron detector design has been adapted to a 1-D pixel array capable of 120 {mu}m spatial resolution and counting efficiency greater than 12%. Deep vertical trenches filled with {sup 6}LiF provide outstanding improvement in efficiency over thin-film coated diode designs limited to only 4.5%. This work marks the final step towards the construction of a much larger array consisting of 1024 pixels spanning 10 cm. The larger detector array will be constructed with a sub-array of 64-pixel sensors, and will be used for small-angle neutron scattering experiments at the Spallation Neutron Source of Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  7. Active neutron methods for nuclear safeguards applications using Helium-4 gas scintillation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jason M.

    Active neutron methods use a neutron source to interrogate fissionable material. In this work a 4He gas scintillation fast neutron detection system is used to measure neutrons created by the interrogation. Three new applications of this method are developed: spent nuclear fuel assay, fission rate measurement, and special nuclear material detection. Three active neutron methods are included in this thesis. First a non-destructive plutonium assay technique called Multispectral Active Neutron Interrogation Analysis is developed. It is based on interrogating fuel with neutrons at several different energies. The induced fission rates at each interrogation energy are compared with results from a neutron transport model of the irradiation geometry in a system of equations to iteratively solve the inverse problem for isotopic composition. The model is shown to converge on the correct composition for a material with 3 different fissionable components, a representative neutron absorber, and any neutron transparent material such as oxygen in a variety of geometries. Next an experimental fission rate measurement technique is developed using 4He gas scintillation fast neutron detector. Several unique features of this detector allow it to detect and provide energy information on fast neutrons with excellent gamma discrimination efficiency. The detector can measure induced fission rate by energetically differentiating between interrogation neutrons and higher energy fission neutrons. The detector response to a mono-energetic deuterium-deuterium fusion neutron generator and a 252Cf source are compared to examine the difference in detected energy range. Finally we demonstrate a special nuclear material detection technique by detecting an unambiguous fission neutron signal produced in natural uranium during active neutron interrogation using a deuterium-deuterium neutron generator and a high pressure 4He gas fast neutron scintillation detector. Energy histograms resulting from this

  8. Digital discrimination of neutrons and gamma-rays in organic scintillation detectors using moment analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xufei; Zhang, Xing; Yuan, Xi; Chen, Jinxiang; Li, Xiangqing; Zhang, Guohui; Fan, Tieshuan; Yuan, Guoliang; Yang, Jinwei; Yang, Qingwei

    2012-09-01

    Digital discrimination of neutron and gamma-ray events in an organic scintillator has been investigated by moment analysis. Signals induced by an americium-beryllium (Am/Be) isotropic neutron source in a stilbene crystal detector have been sampled with a flash analogue-to-digital converter (ADC) of 1 GSamples/s sampling rate and 10-bit vertical resolution. Neutrons and gamma-rays have been successfully discriminated with a threshold corresponding to gamma-ray energy about 217 keV. Moment analysis has also been verified against the results assessed by a time-of-flight (TOF) measurement. It is shown that the classification of neutrons and gamma-rays afforded by moment analysis is consistent with that achieved by digital TOF measurement. This method has been applied to analyze the data acquired from the stilbene crystal detector in mixed radiation field of the HL-2A tokamak deuterium plasma discharges and the results are described.

  9. Unfolding the fast neutron spectra of a BC501A liquid scintillation detector using GRAVEL method

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yonghao; Lei, Jiarong; An, Li; Zhang, Xiaodong; Shao, Jianxiong; Zheng, Pu; Wang, Xinhua

    2013-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of the neutron energy spectra is useful in basic research and applications. The overall procedure of measuring and unfolding the fast neutron energy spectra with BC501A liquid scintillation detector is described. The recoil proton spectrum of Am-Be neutrons was obtained experimentally. With the NRESP7 code, the response matrix of detector was simulated. Combining the recoil proton spectrum and response matrix, the unfolding of neutron spectra was performed by GRAVEL iterative algorithm. A MatLab program based on the GRAVEL method was developed. The continuous neutron spectrum of Am-Be source and monoenergetic neutron spectrum of D-T source have been unfolded successfully and are in good agreement with their standard reference spectra. The unfolded Am-Be spectrum are more accurate than the spectra unfolded by artificial neural networks in recent years.

  10. Unfolding the fast neutron spectra of a BC501A liquid scintillation detector using GRAVEL method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, YongHao; Chen, XiMeng; Lei, JiaRong; An, Li; Zhang, XiaoDong; Shao, JianXiong; Zheng, Pu; Wang, XinHua

    2014-10-01

    Accurate knowledge of the neutron energy spectra is useful in basic research and applications. The overall procedure of measuring and unfolding the fast neutron energy spectra with BC501A liquid scintillation detector is described. The recoil proton spectrum of 241Am-Be neutrons was obtained experimentally. With the NRESP7 code, the response matrix of detector was simulated. Combining the recoil proton spectrum and response matrix, the unfolding of neutron spectra was performed by GRAVEL iterative algorithm. A MatLab program based on the GRAVEL method was developed. The continuous neutron spectrum of 241Am-Be source and monoenergetic neutron spectrum of D-T source have been unfolded successfully and are in good agreement with their standard reference spectra. The unfolded 241Am-Be spectrum are more accurate than the spectra unfolded by artificial neural networks in recent years.

  11. Development of a new neutron monitor using a boron-loaded organic liquid scintillation detector

    CERN Document Server

    Rasolonjatovo, A H D; Kim, E; Nakamura, T; Nunomiya, T; Endo, A; Yamaguchi, Y; Yoshizawa, M

    2002-01-01

    A new type of neutron dose monitor was developed by using a 12.7 cm diameterx12.7 cm long boron-loaded organic liquid scintillation detector BC523A. This detector aims to have a response in the wide energy range of thermal energy to 100 MeV by using the H and C reactions to the fast neutrons of organic liquid and the sup 1 sup 0 B(n, alpha) reaction to thermalized neutrons in the liquid. The response functions of this detector were determined by the Monte Carlo simulation in the energy region from thermal energy to 100 MeV. Using these response functions, the spectrum-weighted dose function, G-function, to get the neutron dose from the light output spectrum of the detector was also determined by the unfolding technique. The calculated G-function was applied to determine the neutron dose in real neutron fields having energies ranging from thermal energy to several tens of MeV, where the light output spectra were measured with the BC523A detector. The thus-obtained ambient doses and effective doses show rather ...

  12. Recent upgrades and performance of the CACTUS detector array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiller, A.; Bergholt, L.; Guttormsen, M. [and others

    1998-03-01

    The SCANDITRONIX MC-35 cyclotron laboratory, including the Oslo Cyclotron, has been in operation since 1980. The main auxiliary equipment consists of the multi-detector system CACTUS. During the last years, new, high efficiency Ge(HP) detectors were purchased and integrated in the CACTUS detector array. In this connection, the electronical setup was revised and altered. Several drawbacks of the old setup could be pointed out and eliminated. A test of the performance of all detector array elements was made with high accuracy. 27 refs.

  13. Improved image quality using monolithic scintillator detectors with dual-sided readout in a whole-body TOF-PET ring: a simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabacchini, Valerio; Surti, Suleman; Borghi, Giacomo; Karp, Joel S.; Schaart, Dennis R.

    2017-03-01

    We have recently built and characterized the performance of a monolithic scintillator detector based on a 32 mm  ×  32 mm  ×  22 mm LYSO:Ce crystal read out by digital silicon photomultiplier (dSiPM) arrays coupled to the crystal front and back surfaces in a dual-sided readout (DSR) configuration. The detector spatial resolution appeared to be markedly better than that of a detector consisting of the same crystal with conventional back-sided readout (BSR). Here, we aim to evaluate the influence of this difference in the detector spatial response on the quality of reconstructed images, so as to quantify the potential benefit of the DSR approach for high-resolution, whole-body time-of-flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET) applications. We perform Monte Carlo simulations of clinical PET systems based on BSR and DSR detectors, using the results of our detector characterization experiments to model the detector spatial responses. We subsequently quantify the improvement in image quality obtained with DSR compared to BSR, using clinically relevant metrics such as the contrast recovery coefficient (CRC) and the area under the localized receiver operating characteristic curve (ALROC). Finally, we compare the results with simulated rings of pixelated detectors with DOI capability. Our results show that the DSR detector produces significantly higher CRC and increased ALROC values than the BSR detector. The comparison with pixelated systems indicates that one would need to choose a crystal size of 3.2 mm with three DOI layers to match the performance of the BSR detector, while a pixel size of 1.3 mm with three DOI layers would be required to get on par with the DSR detector.

  14. Mercury Cadmium Telluride Photoconductive Long Wave Infrared Linear Array Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risal Singh

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Mercury cadmium telluride (Hg1-x, CdxTe (MCT photoconductive long wave infrared linear arrays are still in demand due to several advantages. The linear array technology is well established, easier, economical and is quite relevant to thermal imaging even today. The scan thermal imaging systems based on this technology offer wider field of view coverage and capacity for higher resolution in the scan direction relative to staring systems that use expensive and yet to mature focal plane array detector technology. A critical review on photoconductive n-Hg1-x CdxTe linear array detector technology for the long wave infrared range has been presented. The emphasis lies on detector design and processing technology. The critical issues of diffusion and drift effects, Hi-Lo and heterostructure blocking contacts, surface passivation, and other related aspects have been considered from the detector design angle. The device processing technology aspects are of vital importance

  15. Characterization of scintillator materials for fast-ion loss detectors in nuclear fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Ramos, M. C.; García López, J.; García-Muñoz, M.; Rodríguez-Ramos, M.; Carmona Gázquez, M.; Zurro, B.

    2014-08-01

    In fusion plasma reactors, fast ion generated by heating systems and fusion born particles must be well confined. The presence of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities can lead to a significant loss of these ions, which may reduce drastically the heating efficiency and may cause damage to plasma facing components in the vacuum vessel. In order to understand the physics underlying the fast ion loss mechanism, scintillator based detectors have been installed in several fusion devices. In this work we present the absolute photon yield and its degradation with ion fluence in terms of the number of photons emitted per incident ion of several scintillators thin coatings: SrGa2S4:Eu2+ (TG-Green), Y3Al5O12:Ce3+ (P46) and Y2O3:Eu3+ (P56) when irradiated with light ions of different masses (deuterium ions, protons and α-particles) at energies between approximately 575 keV and 3 MeV. The photon yield will be discussed in terms of the energy deposited by the particles into the scintillator. For that, the actual composition and thickness of the thin layers were determined by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). A collimator with 1 mm of diameter, which defines the beam size for the experiments, placed at the entrance of the chamber. An electrically isolated sample holder biased to +300 V to collect the secondary electrons, connected to a digital current integrator (model 439 by Ortec) to measure the incident beam current. A home made device has been used to store the real-time evolution of the beam current in a computer file allowing the correction of the IL yields due to the current fluctuations. The target holder is a rectangle of 150 × 112 mm2 and can be tilted. The X and Y movements are controlled through stepping motors, which permits a fine control of the beam spot positioning as well as the study of several samples without venting the chamber. A silica optical fiber of 1 mm diameter fixed to the vacuum chamber, which collects the light from the scintillators

  16. Zr and Ba edge phenomena in the scintillation intensity of fluorozirconate-based glass-ceramic X-ray detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, Bastian; Schweizer, Stefan; Johnson, Jacqueline A; Keane, Denis T

    2007-05-01

    The energy-dependent scintillation intensity of Eu-doped fluorozirconate glass-ceramic X-ray detectors has been investigated in the energy range from 10 to 40 keV. The experiments were performed at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, USA. The glass ceramics are based on Eu-doped fluorozirconate glasses, which were additionally doped with chlorine to initiate the nucleation of BaCl(2) nanocrystals therein. The X-ray excited scintillation is mainly due to the 5d-4f transition of Eu(2+) embedded in the BaCl(2) nanocrystals; Eu(2+) in the glass does not luminesce. Upon appropriate annealing the nanocrystals grow and undergo a phase transition from a hexagonal to an orthorhombic phase of BaCl(2). The scintillation intensity is investigated as a function of the X-ray energy, particle size and structure of the embedded nanocrystals. The scintillation intensity versus X-ray energy dependence shows that the intensity is inversely proportional to the photoelectric absorption of the material, i.e. the more photoelectric absorption the less scintillation. At 18 and 37.4 keV a significant decrease in the scintillation intensity can be observed; this energy corresponds to the K-edge of Zr and Ba, respectively. The glass matrix as well as the structure and size of the embedded nanocrystals have an influence on the scintillation properties of the glass ceramics.

  17. Particle Identification in the NIMROD-ISiS Detector Array

    CERN Document Server

    Wuenschel, S; May, L W; Wada, R; Yennello, S J

    2009-01-01

    Interest in the influence of the neutron-to-proton (N/Z) ratio on multifragmenting nuclei has demanded an improvement in the capabilities of multi-detector arrays as well as the companion analysis methods. The particle identification method used in the NIMROD-ISiS 4 $\\pi$ array is described. Performance of the detectors and the analysis method are presented for the reaction of 86Kr+64Ni at 35MeV/u.

  18. Data acquisition for experiments with multi-detector arrays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Chatterjee; Sushil Kamerkar; A K Jethra; S Padmini; M P Diwakar; S S Pande; M D Ghodgaonkar

    2001-07-01

    Experiments with multi-detector arrays have special requirements and place higher demands on computer data acquisition systems. In this contribution we discuss data acquisition systems with special emphasis on multi-detector arrays and in particular we describe a new data acquisition system, AMPS which we have developed recently which is in regular use in experiments at the Pelletron Laboratory, Mumbai. This includes the in-house development of a dedicated crate controller, PC interface card and software.

  19. High-position-resolution scintillation neutron-imaging detector by crossed-fiber readout with novel centroid-finding method

    CERN Document Server

    Katagiri, M; Sakasai, K; Matsubayashi, M; Birumachi, A; Takahashi, H; Nakazawa, M

    2002-01-01

    Aiming at high-position-resolution and high-counting-rate neutron imaging, a novel centroid-finding method is proposed for a scintillation neutron-imaging detector with crossed-fiber readout. Crossed wavelength-shifting fibers are arranged on and under the scintillator. Luminescences generated in the scintillator are emitted and detected by a few fibers surrounding the incident point of a neutron. In the novel method, X and Y positions of the incident neutron are decided by coincidence of a central signal and neighboring signals, respectively. By fundamental experiments using a ZnS:Ag/ sup 6 LiF scintillator of 0.5-mm thickness and crossed wavelength-shifting fibers with a size of 0.5 x 0.5 mm sup 2 , it was confirmed that the position resolution is about 0.5 mm and the limitation of the neutron-counting rate is 320 kcps. (orig.)

  20. Production and Quality Assurance of a Scintillating Fibre Detector for the LHCb Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Nieswand, Simon

    2016-01-01

    At the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, scientists from around the world are using complex detector systems to test the predictions of the Standard Model and to search for indications of new physics. One of those detectors is the LHCb experiment which was specifically designed for the study of heavy hadrons containing bottom and charm quarks (heavy flavour physics). To deal with the increased beam energy and instantaneous luminosity of the LHC after the Long Shutdown 2 in 2018/19, several subsystems of the LHCb detector have to be exchanged and upgraded. For this purpose, a new tracking system that will replace the so-called Inner and Outer Tracker of the current detector is currently being developed and built. The base of this new tracker are 2:5m long scintillating fibres ($\\varnothing 250 \\mu$) into which light is induced by passing charged particles. The fibres are arranged in six-layered fibre mats which are read out with the help of silicon photomultipliers at the edge of the tracker’s acceptance....

  1. The surface detector array of the Telescope Array experiment to explore the highest energy cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Abu-Zayyad, T; Allen, M; Anderson, R; Azuma, R; Barcikowski, E; Belz, J W; Bergman, D R; Blake, S A; Cady, R; Cheon, B G; Chiba, J; Chikawa, M; Cho, E J; Cho, W R; Fujii, H; Fujii, T; Fukuda, T; Fukushima, M; Gorbunov, D; Hanlon, W; Hayashi, K; Hayashi, Y; Hayashida, N; Hibino, K; Hiyama, K; Honda, K; Iguchi, T; Ikeda, D; Ikuta, K; Inoue, N; Ishii, T; Ishimori, R; Ivanov, D; Iwamoto, S; Jui, C C H; Kadota, K; Kakimoto, F; Kalashev, O; Kanbe, T; Kasahara, K; Kawai, H; Kawakami, S; Kawana, S; Kido, E; Kim, H B; Kim, H K; Kim, J H; Kim, J H; Kitamoto, K; Kobayashi, K; Kobayashi, Y; Kondo, Y; Kuramoto, K; Kuzmin, V; Kwon, Y J; Lim, S I; Machida, S; Martens, K; Martineau, J; Matsuda, T; Matsuura, T; Matsuyama, T; Matthews, J N; Myers, I; Minamino, M; Miyata, K; Miyauchi, H; Murano, Y; Nakamura, T; Nam, S W; Nonaka, T; Ogio, S; Ohnishi, M; Ohoka, H; Oki, K; Oku, D; Okuda, T; Oshima, A; Ozawa, S; Park, I H; Pshirkov, M S; Rodriguez, D; Roh, S Y; Rubtsov, G; Ryu, D; Sagawa, H; Sakurai, N; Sampson, A L; Scott, L M; Shah, P D; Shibata, F; Shibata, T; Shimodaira, H; Shin, B K; Shin, J I; Shirahama, T; Smith, J D; Sokolsky, P; Sonley, T J; Springer, R W; Stokes, B T; Stratton, S R; Stroman, T A; Suzuki, S; Takahashi, Y; Takeda, M; Taketa, A; Takita, M; Tameda, Y; Tanaka, H; Tanaka, K; Tanaka, M; Thomas, S B; Thomson, G B; Tinyakov, P; Tkachev, I; Tokuno, H; Tomida, T; Troitsky, S; Tsunesada, Y; Tsutsumi, K; Tsuyuguchi, Y; Uchihori, Y; Udo, S; Ukai, H; Vasiloff, G; Wada, Y; Wong, T; Wood, M; Yamakawa, Y; Yamaoka, H; Yamazaki, K; Yang, J; Yoshida, S; Yoshii, H; Zollinger, R; Zundel, Z

    2012-01-01

    The Telescope Array (TA) experiment, located in the western desert of Utah,USA, is designed for observation of extensive air showers from extremely high energy cosmic rays. The experiment has a surface detector array surrounded by three fluorescence detectors to enable simultaneous detection of shower particles at ground level and fluorescence photons along the shower track. The TA surface detectors and fluorescence detectors started full hybrid observation in March, 2008. In this article we describe the design and technical features of the TA surface detector.

  2. An integrated single photon detector array using porous anodic alumina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melai, J.; Salm, C.; Schmitz, J.; Smits, S.M.; Visschers, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the work is fabrication of a photon detector array made using IC compatible wafer-scale post-processing stepts. Plans will be presented to outline these fabrication steps. The detector comprises an integrated Micro-Channel-Plate and an imaging chip like Medipix2. The aim of the work is fa

  3. Numerical study of point spread function of a fast neutron radiography system based on scintillating-fiber array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; FaQiang

    2007-01-01

    For a scintillating-fiber array fast-neutron radiography system, a point-spread- function computing model was introduced, and the simulation code was developed. The results of calculation show that fast-neutron radiographs vary with the size of fast neutron sources, the size of fiber cross-section and the imaging geometry. The results suggest that the following qualifications are helpful for a good point spread function: The cross-section of scintillating fibers not greater than 200μm×200μm, the size of neutron source as small as a few millimeters, the distance between the source and the scintillating fiber array greater than 1 m, and inspected samples placed as close as possible to the array. The results give suggestions not only to experiment considerations but also to the estimation of spatial resolution for a specific system.……

  4. Numerical study of point spread function of a fast neutron radiography system based on scintillating-fiber array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ For a scintillating-fiber array fast-neutron radiography system, a point-spread- function computing model was introduced, and the simulation code was developed. The results of calculation show that fast-neutron radiographs vary with the size of fast neutron sources, the size of fiber cross-section and the imaging geometry. The results suggest that the following qualifications are helpful for a good point spread function: The cross-section of scintillating fibers not greater than 200μm×200μm, the size of neutron source as small as a few millimeters, the distance between the source and the scintillating fiber array greater than 1 m, and inspected samples placed as close as possible to the array. The results give suggestions not only to experiment considerations but also to the estimation of spatial resolution for a specific system.

  5. Scintillator counters with multi-pixel avalanche photodiode readout for the ND280 detector of the T2K experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mineev, O. [Institute for Nuclear Research of RAS, INR RAS, 60th October Revolution Pr. 7a, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: oleg@inr.ru; Afanasjev, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research of RAS, INR RAS, 60th October Revolution Pr. 7a, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); Bondarenko, G.; Golovin, V. [Center of Perspective Technology and Apparatus, 107076 Moscow (Russian Federation); Gushchin, E.; Izmailov, A.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research of RAS, INR RAS, 60th October Revolution Pr. 7a, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kudenko, Yu. [Institute for Nuclear Research of RAS, INR RAS, 60th October Revolution Pr. 7a, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kurimoto, Y. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Kutter, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-4001 (United States); Lubsandorzhiev, B. [Institute for Nuclear Research of RAS, INR RAS, 60th October Revolution Pr. 7a, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); Mayatski, V. [AO Uniplast, 600016 Vladimir (Russian Federation); Musienko, Yu. [Institute for Nuclear Research of RAS, INR RAS, 60th October Revolution Pr. 7a, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); Nakaya, T.; Nobuhara, T. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Shaibonov, B.A.J.; Shaikhiev, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research of RAS, INR RAS, 60th October Revolution Pr. 7a, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); Taguchi, M. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Yershov, N. [Institute for Nuclear Research of RAS, INR RAS, 60th October Revolution Pr. 7a, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); Yokoyama, M. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2007-07-11

    The Tokai-to-Kamioka (T2K) experiment is a second generation long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment which aims at a sensitive search for {nu}{sub e} appearance. The main design features of the T2K near neutrino detectors located at 280m from the target are presented, and the scintillator counters are described. The counters are readout via WLS fibers embedded into S-shaped grooves in the scintillator from both ends by multi-pixel avalanche photodiodes operating in a limited Geiger mode. Operating principles and results of tests of photosensors with a sensitive area of 1mm{sup 2} are presented. A time resolution of 1.75ns, a spatial resolution of 9.9-12.4cm, and a detection efficiency for minimum ionizing particles of more than 99% were obtained for scintillator detectors in a beam test.

  6. Scintillator-Lucite sandwich detector for n/gamma separation in the GeV energy region

    CERN Document Server

    Watanabe, H; Harada, E; Inoue, S; Inagaki, T; Kobayashi, S; Kurilin, A S; Lim, G Y; Ogawa, I; Okuno, H; Omata, K; Sato, T; Shinkawa, T; Tsamalaidze, Z; Tsukamoto, T; Yoshimura, Y

    2002-01-01

    A Scintillator-Lucite Sandwich Detector (SLSD) has been developed for n/gamma separation in the GeV energy region. An efficient n/gamma separation is achieved by measuring a correlation between the scintillation and Cherenkov light yields. The basic performance of the detector has been tested with e, pi and p beams with momenta between 0.5 and 2.0 GeV/c; the results were compared with a Monte-Carlo simulation. The n/gamma separation capability of this detector has been studied by simulations in the energy range from 5 MeV to 12 GeV. The SLSD detector was successfully used for a beam survey of the new K sub L sup 0 beam line built for a K sub L sup 0-> pi sup 0 nu nu-bar experiment at the KEK 12-GeV proton synchrotron.

  7. Performance of Large Neutron Detectors Containing Lithium-Gadolinium-Borate Scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaughter, David M.; Stuart, Cory R.; Klaass, R. Fred; Merrill, David B. [MSI/Photogenics Division, Orem, Utah (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes the development and testing of a neutron counter, spectrometer, and dosimeter that is compact, efficient, and accurate. A self-contained neutron detection instrument has wide applications in health physics, scientific research, and programs to detect, monitor, and control strategic nuclear materials (SNM). The 1.3 liter detector head for this instrument is a composite detector with an organic scintillator containing uniformly distributed {sup 6}Li{sub 6}{sup nat}Gd{sup 10}B{sub 3}O{sub 9}:Ce (LGB:Ce) microcrystals. The plastic scintillator acts to slow impinging neutrons and emits light proportional to the energy lost by the neutrons as they moderate in the detector body. Moderating neutrons that have slowed sufficiently capture in one of the Lithium-6, Boron-10, or Gadolinium-157 atoms in the LGB:Ce scintillator, which then releases the capture energy in a characteristic cerium emission pulse. The measured captured pulses indicate the presence of neutrons. When a scintillating fluor is present in the plastic, the light pulse resulting from the neutron moderating in the plastic is paired with the LGB:Ce capture pulse to identify the energy of the neutron. About 2% of the impinging neutrons lose all of their energy in a single collision with the detector. There is a linear relationship between the pulse areas of this group of neutrons and energy. The other 98% of neutrons have a wide range of collision histories within the detector body. When these neutrons are 'binned' into energy groups, each group contains a distribution of pulse areas. This data was used to assist in the unfolding of the neutron spectra. The unfolded spectra were then validated with known spectra, at both neutron emitting isotopes and fission/accelerator facilities. Having validated spectra, the dose equivalent and dose rate are determined by applying standard, regulatory damage coefficients to the measured neutron counts for each energy bin of the spectra. Testing

  8. A quantitative PGNAA study for use in aqueous solution measurements using Am–Be neutron source and BGO scintillation detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghal-Eh, N., E-mail: ghal-eh@du.ac.ir [School of Physics, Damghan University, P.O. Box 36716-41167, Damghan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ahmadi, P. [School of Physics, Damghan University, P.O. Box 36716-41167, Damghan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Doost-Mohammadi, V. [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Center, AEOI, P.O. Box 11365-8486, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-02-01

    A prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) system including an Am–Be neutron source and BGO scintillation detector are used for quantitative analysis of bulk samples. Both Monte Carlo-simulated and experimental data are considered as input data libraries for two different procedures based on neural network and least squares methods. The results confirm the feasibility and precision of the proposed methods.

  9. Liquid Scintillation Detectors for Gamma and Neutron Diagnostic at Textor and Results of Runaway and Sawtooth Oscillations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoenen, F.; Graffmann, E.; Finken, K.H.; Barrenscheen, H. J.; Klein, H.; R. Jaspers,

    1994-01-01

    Time and energy resolved neutron and gamma measurements are performed at the TEXTOR tokamak with a fast liquid NE-213 scintillator. To distinguish between neutron and gamma (gamma)-ray induced events, pulse shape discrimination is used. To suppress scattered radiation, the detector is installed in w

  10. Response function study of a scintillator detector of NaI(Tl); Estudo da funcao resposta de um detector cintilador de NaI(Tl)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villa, Marcelo Barros; Costa, Alessandro Martins da, E-mail: amcosta@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras. Dept. de Fisica

    2014-07-01

    In measurements of gamma rays with Nai (Tl) scintillator, the detectors output data are pulse height spectra, that corresponding to distorted information about the radiation source due to various errors associated with the crystal scintillation process and electronics associated, instead of power spectra photons. Pulse height spectra are related to the real power spectra by means of scintillator detector response function NaI (Tl). In this work, the response function for a cylindrical crystal of Nal (Tl) of 7,62 x 7,62 cm (diameter x length) was studied, by Monte Carlo method, using the EGSnrc tool to model the transport of radiation, combined with experimental measurements. An inverse response matrix, even with the energy of the square root, which transforms the pulse height spectrum of photon energy spectrum was obtained. The results of this transformation of pulse height spectrum for photon energy spectrum is presented, showing that the methodology employed in this study is suitable.

  11. Microstructured boron foil scintillating G-GEM detector for neutron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Takeshi; Bautista, Unico; Mitsuya, Yuki; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Norifumi L.; Otake, Yoshie; Taketani, Atsushi; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Toyokawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-12-01

    In this study, a new simple neutron imaging gaseous detector was successfully developed by combining a micro-structured 10B foil, a glass gas electron multiplier (G-GEM), and a mirror-lens-charge-coupled device (CCD)-camera system. The neutron imaging system consists of a chamber filled with Ar/CF4 scintillating gas mixture. Inside this system, the G-GEM is mounted for gas multiplication. The neutron detection in this system is based on the reaction between 10B and neutrons. A micro-structured 10B is developed to overcome the issue of low detection efficiency. Secondary electrons excite Ar/CF4 gas molecules, and high-yield visible photons are emitted from those excited gas molecules during the gas electron multiplication process in the G-GEM holes. These photons are easily detected by a mirror-lens-CCD-camera system. A neutron radiograph is then simply formed. We obtain the neutron images of different materials with a compact accelerator-driven neutron source. We confirm that the new scintillating G-GEM-based neutron imager works properly with low gamma ray sensitivity and exhibits a good performance as a new simple digital neutron imaging device.

  12. Scintillation particle detection based on microfluidics

    CERN Document Server

    Mapelli, A; Renaud, P; Gorini, B; Trivino, N Vico; Jiguet, S; Vandelli, W; Haguenauer, M

    2010-01-01

    A novel type of particle detector based on scintillation, with precise spatial resolution and high radiation hardness, is being studied. It consists of a single microfluidic channel filled with a liquid scintillator and is designed to define an array of scintillating waveguides each independently coupled to a photodetector. Prototype detectors built using an SU-8 epoxy resin have been tested with electrons from a radioactive source. The experimental results show a light yield compatible with the theoretical expectations and confirm the validity of the approach. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Used fuel storage monitoring using novel 4He scintillation fast neutron detectors and neutron energy discrimination analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Ryan P.

    With an increasing quantity of spent nuclear fuel being stored at power plants across the United States, the demand exists for a new method of cask monitoring. Certifying these casks for transportation and long-term storage is a unique dilemma: their sealed nature lends added security, but at the cost of requiring non-invasive measurement techniques to verify their contents. This research will design and develop a new method of passively scanning spent fuel casks using 4He scintillation detectors to make this process more accurate. 4He detectors are a relatively new technological development whose full capabilities have not yet been exploited. These detectors take advantage of the high 4He cross section for elastic scattering at fast neutron energies, particularly the resonance around 1 MeV. If one of these elastic scattering interactions occurs within the detector, the 4He nucleus takes energy from the incident neutron, then de-excites by scintillation. Photomultiplier Tubes (PMTs) at either end of the detector tube convert this emitted light into an electrical signal. The goal of this research is to use the neutron spectroscopy features of 4He scintillation detectors to maintain accountability of spent fuel in storage. This project will support spent fuel safeguards and the detection of fissile material, in order to minimize the risk of nuclear proliferation and terrorism.

  14. New air fluorescence detectors employed in the Telescope Array experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Tokuno, H; Takeda, M; Kadota, K; Ikeda, D; Chikawa, M; Fujii, T; Fukushima, M; Honda, K; Inoue, N; Kakimoto, F; Kawana, S; Kido, E; Matthews, J N; Nonaka, T; Ogio, S; Okuda, T; Ozawa, S; Sagawa, H; Sakurai, N; Shibata, T; Taketa, A; Thomas, S B; Tomida, T; Tsunesada, Y; Udo, S; Abu-zayyad, T; Aida, R; Allen, M; Anderson, R; Azuma, R; Barcikowski, E; Belz, J W; Bergman, D R; Blake, S A; Cady, R; Cheon, B G; Chiba, J; Cho, E J; Cho, W R; Fujii, H; Fukuda, T; Gorbunov, D; Hanlon, W; Hayashi, K; Hayashi, Y; Hayashida, N; Hibino, K; Hiyama, K; Iguchi, T; Ikuta, K; Ishii, T; Ishimori, R; Ivanov, D; Iwamoto, S; Jui, C C H; Kalashev, O; Kanbe, T; Kasahara, K; Kawai, H; Kawakami, S; Kim, H B; Kim, H K; Kim, J H; Kim, J H; Kitamoto, K; Kobayashi, K; Kobayashi, Y; Kondo, Y; Kuramoto, K; Kuzmin, V; Kwon, Y J; Lim, S I; Machida, S; Martens, K; Martineau, J; Matsuda, T; Matsuura, T; Matsuyama, T; Myers, I; Minamino, M; Miyata, K; Miyauchi, H; Murano, Y; Nakamura, T; Nam, S W; Ohnishi, M; Ohoka, H; Oki, K; Oku, D; Oshima, A; Park, I H; Pshirkov, M S; Rodriguez, D; Roh, S Y; Rubtsov, G; Ryu, D; Sampson, A L; Scott, L M; Shah, P D; Shibata, F; Shimodaira, H; Shin, B K; Shin, J I; Shirahama, T; Smith, J D; Sokolsky, P; Sonley, T J; Springer, R W; Stokes, B T; Stratton, S R; Stroman, T; Suzuki, S; Takahashi, Y; Takita, M; Tanaka, H; Tanaka, K; Tanaka, M; Thomson, G B; Tinyakov, P; Tkachev, I; Troitsky, S; Tsutsumi, K; Tsuyuguchi, Y; Uchihori, Y; Ukai, H; Vasiloff, G; Wada, Y; Wong, T; Wood, M; Yamakawa, Y; Yamaoka, H; Yamazaki, K; Yang, J; Yoshida, S; Yoshii, H; Zollinger, R; Zundel, Z

    2012-01-01

    Since 2007, the Telescope Array (TA) experiment, based in Utah, USA, has been observing ultra high energy cosmic rays to understand their origins. The experiment involves a surface detector (SD) array and three fluorescence detector (FD) stations. FD stations, installed surrounding the SD array, measure the air fluorescence light emitted from extensive air showers (EASs) for precise determination of their energies and species. The detectors employed at one of the three FD stations were relocated from the High Resolution Fly's Eye experiment. At the other two stations, newly designed detectors were constructed for the TA experiment. An FD consists of a primary mirror and a camera equipped with photomultiplier tubes. To obtain the EAS parameters with high accuracies, understanding the FD optical characteristics is important. In this paper, we report the characteristics and installation of new FDs and the performances of the FD components. The results of the monitored mirror reflectance during the observation ti...

  15. A practical method for depth of interaction determination in monolithic scintillator PET detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Dam, Herman T; Seifert, Stefan; Beekman, Freek J; Schaart, Dennis R [Delft University of Technology, Radiation Detection and Medical Imaging, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Vinke, Ruud; Dendooven, Peter; Loehner, Herbert, E-mail: h.t.vandam@tudelft.nl [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, Zernikelaan 25, 9747 AA Groningen (Netherlands)

    2011-07-07

    Several new methods for determining the depth of interaction (DOI) of annihilation photons in monolithic scintillator detectors with single-sided, multi-pixel readout are investigated. The aim is to develop a DOI decoding method that allows for practical implementation in a positron emission tomography system. Specifically, calibration data, obtained with perpendicularly incident gamma photons only, are being used. Furthermore, neither detector modifications nor a priori knowledge of the light transport and/or signal variances is required. For this purpose, a clustering approach is utilized in combination with different parameters correlated with the DOI, such as the degree of similarity to a set of reference light distributions, the measured intensity on the sensor pixel(s) closest to the interaction position and the peak intensity of the measured light distribution. The proposed methods were tested experimentally on a detector comprised of a 20 mm x 20 mm x 12 mm polished LYSO:Ce crystal coupled to a 4 x 4 multi-anode photomultiplier. The method based on the linearly interpolated measured intensities on the sensor pixels closest to the estimated (x, y)-coordinate outperformed the other methods, yielding DOI resolutions between {approx}1 and {approx}4.5 mm FWHM depending on the DOI, the (x, y) resolution and the amount of reference data used.

  16. LHCb: The Front-End electronics for the LHCb scintillating fibres detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Chanal, H; Pillet, N

    2014-01-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded during the next LHC shutdown in 2018/19. The tracker system will have a major overhaul. Its components will be replaced with new technologies in order to cope with the increased hit occupancy and radiation environment. A detector made of scintillating fibres read out by silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) is studied for this upgrade. Even if this technology has proven to achieve high efficiency and spatial resolution, its integration within a LHC experiment bears new challenges. This detector will consist of 12 planes of 5 to 6 layers of 250 $\\mu$m fibres with an area of 5×6 m$^2$. Its lead to a total of 500k SiPM channels which need to will be read out at 40MHz. This talk gives an overview of the R&D status of the readout board and the PACIFIC chip. The readout board is connected to the SiPM on one side and to the experiment data-acquisition, experimental control system and services on the other side . The PACIFIC chip is a 128 channel ASIC which can be connected to one 12...

  17. Optimization of the NSCL Digital Data Acquisition System For Use With Fast Scintillator Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokop, Christopher; Liddick, Sean; Larson, Nicole; Suchyta, Scott; Tompkins, Jeromy

    2013-10-01

    The Digital Data Acquisition System (DDAS) at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory is composed of several XIA Pixie-16 modules utilizing 12-bit digitizers sampling at 100 Mega-Samples-Per-Second. DDAS has been applied to fast organic and inorganic scintillator detectors intended for level lifetime and neutron time-of-flight studies, for which the time resolution is critical. Simultaneous high-resolution time and energy determination using online digital CFD and trapezoidal filtering algorithms is non-intuitive due to the short characteristic rise and decay times of the signals with respect to the sampling time of the digitizers. A new technique has been developed to identify the optimum filter parameters to maximize the time and energy resolution of each detector signal in an offline analysis. The parameters were subsequently verified online and have resulted in a 30% improvement in the measured time resolution between two LaBr3 detectors. Additional results and applications of the technique will be presented.

  18. The Front-End electronics for the LHCb scintillating fibres detector

    CERN Document Server

    Chanal, Hervé; Pillet, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded during the next LHC shutdown in 2018/19 [ 1 ]. The tracker system will have a major overhaul. Its components will be replaced with new technologies in order to cope with the increased hit occupancy and radiation environment. A detector made of scintillating fibres read out by silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) is studied for this upgrade. Even if this technology has proven to achieve high efficiency and spatial resolution, its integration within a LHC experiment bears new challenges. This detector will consist of 12 planes of 5 to 6 layers of 250 m m fibres with an area of 5 6 m 2 . It leads to a total of 500k SiPM channels which need to be read out at 40 MHz. This article gives an overview of the R&D; status of the readout board and the PACIFIC chip. The readout board is connected to the SiPM on one side and to the experiment data-acquisition, experimental control system and services on the other side. The PACIFIC chip is a 128-channels ASIC which can be connected to one 1...

  19. A Study of Lane Differentiation Using An Array of Detectors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKigney E. A. (Edward A.); Gholkar, R. V. (Rohun V.); Vega, D. A. (Daniel A.)

    2004-01-01

    The authors discuss a method for locating a radioactive source in the context of determining which lane a source is in on a roadway. This method is appropriate for use over a large range of source velocities, and could provide an advance alarm prior to a vehicle passing a portal monitor. This is a novel method which uses data from the entire array simultaneously to locate the source, rather than relying on only one or two sensors. A description of the underlying method will be given, along with results from five and six detector arrays. The five detector array was used mainly for static tests. The six detector array was used for dynamic tests, including slow movement of a source in a vehicle.

  20. Time and position sensitive single photon detector for scintillator read-out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schössler, S.; Bromberger, B.; Brandis, M.; Schmidt, L. Ph H.; Tittelmeier, K.; Czasch, A.; Dangendorf, V.; Jagutzki, O.

    2012-02-01

    We have developed a photon counting detector system for combined neutron and γ radiography which can determine position, time and intensity of a secondary photon flash created by a high-energy particle or photon within a scintillator screen. The system is based on a micro-channel plate photomultiplier concept utilizing image charge coupling to a position- and time-sensitive read-out anode placed outside the vacuum tube in air, aided by a standard photomultiplier and very fast pulse-height analyzing electronics. Due to the low dead time of all system components it can cope with the high throughput demands of a proposed combined fast neutron and dual discrete energy γ radiography method (FNDDER). We show tests with different types of delay-line read-out anodes and present a novel pulse-height-to-time converter circuit with its potential to discriminate γ energies for the projected FNDDER devices for an automated cargo container inspection system (ACCIS).

  1. Time and position sensitive single photon detector for scintillator read-out

    CERN Document Server

    Schössler, Sven; Brandis, Michal; Schmidt, Lothar Ph H; Tittelmeier, Kai; Czasch, Achim; Dangendorf, Volker; Jagutzki, Ottmar

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a photon counting detector system for combined neutron and gamma radiography which can determine position, time and intensity of a secondary photon flash created by a high-energy particle or photon within a scintillator screen. The system is based on a micro-channel plate photomultiplier concept utilizing image charge coupling to a position- and time-sensitive read-out anode placed outside the vacuum tube in air, aided by a standard photomultiplier and very fast pulse-height analyzing electronics. Due to the low dead time of all system components it can cope with the high throughput demands of a proposed combined fast neutron and dual discrete energy gamma radiography method (FNDDER). We show tests with different types of delay-line read-out anodes and present a novel pulse-height-to-time converter circuit with its potential to discriminate gamma energies for the projected FNDDER devices for an automated cargo container inspection system (ACCIS).

  2. Borexino A real time liquid scintillator detector for low energy solar neutrino study

    CERN Document Server

    Miramonti, L

    2002-01-01

    Borexino is a large unsegmented calorimeter featuring 300 tons of liquid scintillator, contained in a 8.5 meter nylon vessel, viewed by 2200 PMTs. The main goal of Borexino is the study, in real time, of low energy solar neutrinos, and in particular, the monoenergetic neutrinos coming from $^7Be$, which is one of the missing links on the solar neutrino problem. The achievement of high radiopurity level, in the order of $10^{-16} g/g$ of U/Th equivalent, necessary to the detection of the low energy component of the solar neutrino flux, was proved in the Borexino prototype: the Counting Test Facility. The detector is located underground in the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso in the center of Italy at 3500 meter water equivalent depth. In this paper the science and technology of Borexino are reviewed and its main capabilities are presented.

  3. Measurement-based characterization of multipixel avalanche photodiodes for scintillating detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Dziewiecki, M

    2012-01-01

    Multipixel avalanche photodiodes (MAPD) are recently gaining popularity in high energy physics experiments as an attractive replacement for photomultiplier tubes, which have been extensively used for many years as a part of various scintillating detectors. Their low price, small dimensions and another features facilitating their use (like mechanical shock resistance, magnetic field immunity or moderate supply voltage) make the MAPDs a good choice for commercial use as well, what is reflected in growing number of producers as well as MAPD models available on the market. This dissertation presents Author’s experience with MAPD measurements and modelling, gained during his work on the T2K (Tokai-to-Kamioka) long-baseline neutrino experiment, carried out by an international collaboration in Japan. First, operation principle of the MAPD, definitions of various parameters and measurement methods are discussed. Then, a device for large-scale MAPD measurements and related data processing methods are described. Fina...

  4. ecCNO solar neutrinos: A challenge for gigantic ultra-pure liquid scintillator detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villante, F. L.

    2015-03-01

    Neutrinos produced in the Sun by electron capture reactions on 13N, 15O and 17F, to which we refer as ecCNO neutrinos, are not usually considered in solar neutrino analysis since the expected fluxes are extremely low. The experimental determination of this sub-dominant component of the solar neutrino flux is very difficult but could be rewarding since it provides a determination of the metallic content of the solar core and, moreover, probes the solar neutrino survival probability in the transition region at Eν ∼ 2.5 MeV. In this Letter, we suggest that this difficult measure could be at reach for future gigantic ultra-pure liquid scintillator detectors, such as LENA.

  5. ecCNO solar neutrinos: A challenge for gigantic ultra-pure liquid scintillator detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.L. Villante

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Neutrinos produced in the Sun by electron capture reactions on 13N, 15O and 17F, to which we refer as ecCNO neutrinos, are not usually considered in solar neutrino analysis since the expected fluxes are extremely low. The experimental determination of this sub-dominant component of the solar neutrino flux is very difficult but could be rewarding since it provides a determination of the metallic content of the solar core and, moreover, probes the solar neutrino survival probability in the transition region at Eν∼2.5 MeV. In this Letter, we suggest that this difficult measure could be at reach for future gigantic ultra-pure liquid scintillator detectors, such as LENA.

  6. Measurements on semiconductor and scintillator detectors at the Advanced Light Source (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarda, Giuseppe S.; Bolotnikov, Aleksey E.; Cui, Yonggang; Gul, Rubi; Hossain, Anwar; Roy, Utpal N.; Yang, Ge; James, Ralph B.; Vanier, Peter E.

    2016-09-01

    During the transition period between closure of Beamline X27B at BNL's NSLS and the opening of Beamline MID at NSLS-II, we began operation of LBNL's ALS Beamline 3.3.2 to carry out our radiation detection materials RD. Measurements performed at this Beamline include, X-ray Detector Response Mapping and White Beam X-ray Diffraction Topography (WBXDT), among others. We will introduce the capabilities of the Beamline and present the most recent results obtained on CdZnTe and scintillators. The goal of the studies on CdZnTe is to understand the origin and effects of subgrain boundaries and help to visualize the presence of a higher concentration of impurities, which might be responsible for the deterioration of the energy resolution and response uniformity in the vicinity of the sub-grain boundaries. The results obtained in the second year of measurements will be presented.

  7. Studies of the performance of different front-end systems for flat-panel multi-anode PMTs with CsI(Tl) scintillator arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekiya, H. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)]. E-mail: sekiya@cr.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Hattori, K. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Kubo, H. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Miuchi, K. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Nagayoshi, T. [Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 17 Kikui-cho, Shinjuku, Tokyo 162-0044 (Japan); Nishimura, H. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Okada, Y. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Orito, R. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkoudai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Takada, A. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Takeda, A. [Kamioka Observatory, ICRR, University of Tokyo, 456 Higasi-mozumi, Hida-shi, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Tanimori, T. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Ueno, K. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2006-07-01

    We have studied the performance of two different types of front-end systems for our gamma camera based on Hamamatsu H8500 (flat-panel 64 channels multi-anode PSPMT) with a CsI(Tl) scintillator array. The array consists of 64 pixels of 6x6x20mm{sup 3} which corresponds to the anode pixels of H8500. One of the system is based on commercial ASIC chips in order to read out every anode. The others are based on resistive charge divider network between anodes to reduce readout channels. In both systems, each pixel (6mm) was clearly resolved by flood field irradiation of {sup 137}Cs. We also investigated the energy resolution of these systems and showed the performance of the cascade connection of resistive network between some PMTs for large area detectors.

  8. Studies of the performance of different front-end systems for flat-panel multi-anode PMTs with CsI(Tl) scintillator arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Sekiya, H; Kubo, H; Miuchi, K; Nagayoshi, T; Nishimura, H; Okada, Y; Orito, R; Takada, A; Takeda, A; Tanimori, T; Ueno, K

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the performance of two different types of front-end systems for our gamma camera based on Hamamatsu H8500 (flat-panel 64 channels multi-anode PSPMT) with a CsI(Tl) scintillator array. The array consists of 64 pixels of $6\\times6\\times20{\\rm mm}^3$ which corresponds to the anode pixels of H8500. One of the system is based on commercial ASIC chips in order to readout every anode. The others are based on resistive charge divider network between anodes to reduce readout channels. In both systems, each pixel (6mm) was clearly resolved by flood field irradiation of $^{137}$Cs. We also investigated the energy resolution of these systems and showed the performance of the cascade connection of resistive network between some PMTs for large area detectors.

  9. Studies of the performance of different front-end systems for flat-panel multi-anode PMTs with CsI(Tl) scintillator arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiya, H.; Hattori, K.; Kubo, H.; Miuchi, K.; Nagayoshi, T.; Nishimura, H.; Okada, Y.; Orito, R.; Takada, A.; Takeda, A.; Tanimori, T.; Ueno, K.

    2006-07-01

    We have studied the performance of two different types of front-end systems for our gamma camera based on Hamamatsu H8500 (flat-panel 64 channels multi-anode PSPMT) with a CsI(Tl) scintillator array. The array consists of 64 pixels of 6×6×20 mm3 which corresponds to the anode pixels of H8500. One of the system is based on commercial ASIC chips in order to read out every anode. The others are based on resistive charge divider network between anodes to reduce readout channels. In both systems, each pixel (6 mm) was clearly resolved by flood field irradiation of 137Cs. We also investigated the energy resolution of these systems and showed the performance of the cascade connection of resistive network between some PMTs for large area detectors.

  10. Bolometeric detector arrays for CMB polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, C. L.; Bock, J. J.; Day, P.; Goldin, A.; Golwala, S.; Holmes, W.; Irwin, K.; Kenyon, M.; Lange, A. E.; LeDuc, H. G.; Rossinot, P.; Sterb, J.; Vayonakis, A.; Wang, G.; Yun, M.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2005-01-01

    We describe the development of antenna coupled bolometers for CMB polarization experiments. The necessary components of a bolometric CMB polarimeter - a beam forming element, a band defining filter, and detectors - are all fabricated on a silicon chip with photolithography.

  11. Nanorod Array Solid State Neutron Detectors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase I SBIR project, Synkera proposes to develop and commercialize solid-state neutron detectors of a unique architecture that will enable sensor modules...

  12. Surface detector array for the Pierre Auger observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, H.; Garipov, G. K.; Khrenov, B. A.; Martínez, O.; Moreno, E.; Villaseñor, L.; Zepeda, A.

    2001-05-01

    The Pierre Auger international collaboration will install two observatories, one in the southern hemisphere and other in the northern hemisphere. Each observatory will consist of two different subsystem: a surface detector array of about 1600 water Cherenkov detectors (WCD) and a set of fluorescence eyes to measure the longitudinal development of air showers. The large area covered by the surface detectors requires efficient calibration and monitoring methods that can be implemented remotely. We present several complementary methods to calibrate and monitor the performance of the individual surface detector stations. We also present some results of the studies made with a full size prototype tank in Puebla, Mexico and in Malargue, Argentina. .

  13. Research of High Sensitivity Uncooled Infrared Detector Array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Pingchuan [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhang, Bo, E-mail: redmoon123456@126.com, E-mail: lhzyzb@126.com [Luohe Vocational Technology College, Luohe 462002 (China)

    2011-02-01

    The infrared thermal imaging technology has been widely used in military and civilian fields and the field of the infrared detection and infrared thermal imaging technology has been of concern for a long time. On infrared thermal imaging, its core components for the infrared focal plane arrays, how to develop a high sensitivity of the multi-focal plane infrared detector is a key issue. Although the Common focal plane array of quantum has high sensitivity, but it requires low temperature cooling work environment and led to complexity and high cost, difficult to compact. Conventional uncooled infrared focal plane array is contrast to the quantum focal plane arrays. Therefore, this article preceded by the uncooled infrared detector array to improve the wide temperature sensitivity in examining the feasibility PMN composite film, materials composition, structure design and preparation process technology.

  14. Development of neutron-monitor detector using liquid organic scintillator coupled with 6Li + ZnS(Ag) Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tatsuhiko; Endo, Akira; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Fumiaki

    2004-01-01

    A phoswitch-type detector has been developed for monitoring neutron doses in high-energy accelerator facilities. The detector is composed of a liquid organic scintillator (BC501A) coupled with ZnS(Ag) sheets doped with 6Li. The dose from neutrons with energies above 1 MeV is evaluated from the light output spectrum of the BC501A by applying the G-function, which relates the spectrum to the neutron dose directly. The dose from lower energy neutrons, on the other hand, is estimated from the number of scintillations emitted from the ZnS(Ag) sheets. Characteristics of the phoswitch-type detector were studied experimentally in some neutron fields. It was found from the experiments that the detector has an excellent property of pulse-shape discrimination between the scintillations of BC501A and the ZnS(Ag) sheets. The experimental results also indicate that the detector is capable of reproducing doses from thermal neutrons as well as neutrons with energies from one to several tens of megaelectronvolts (MeV).

  15. Imaging characterization of a new gamma ray detector based on CRY019 scintillation crystal for PET and SPECT applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polito, C.; Pani, R.; Trigila, C.; Cinti, M. N.; Fabbri, A.; Frantellizzi, V.; De Vincentis, G.; Pellegrini, R.; Pani, R.

    2017-02-01

    In the last 40 years, in the field of Molecular Medicine imaging there has been a huge growth in the employment and in the improvement of detectors for PET and SPECT applications in order to reach accurate diagnosis of the diseases. The most important feature required to these detectors is an high quality of images that is usually obtained benefitting from the development of a wide number of new scintillation crystals with high imaging performances. In this contest, features like high detection efficiency, short decay time, great spectral match with photodetectors, absence of afterglow and low costs are surely attractive. However, there are other factors playing an important role in the realization of high quality images such as energy and spatial resolutions, position linearity and contrast resolution. With the aim to realize an high performace gamma ray detector for PET and SPECT applications, this work is focused on the evaluation of the imaging characteristics of a recently developed scintillation crystal, CRY019.

  16. Electronics and data acquisition system of the extensive air shower detector array at the University of Puebla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, E.; Salazar, H.; Villasenor, L.; Martinez, O.; Conde, R.; Murrieta, T.

    Field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) are playing an increasing role in DAQ systems in cosmic ray experiments due to their high speed and integration and their low cost and low power comsumption. In this paper we describe in detail the new electronics and data acquisition system based on FPGA boards of the extensive air shower detector array built in the Campus of the University of Puebla. The purpose of this detector array is to measure the energy and arrival direction of primary cosmic rays with energies around 1015 eV. The array consists of 10 liquid scintillator detectors and 6 water Cherenkov detectors (of 1.86 m2 cross section), distributed in a square grid with a detector spacing of 20 m over an area of 4000 m2. The electronics described also makes use of analog to digital converters with a resolution of 10 bits and sampling speeds of 100 MS/s to digitize the PMT signals. We also discuss the advantages of discriminating the PMT signals inside the FPGAs with respect to the conventional use of dedicated discrimination circuits.

  17. An indirect flat-panel detector with avalanche gain for low dose x-ray imaging: SAPHIRE (scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Li, Dan; Rowlands, J. A.; Egami, N.; Takiguchi, Y.; Nanba, M.; Honda, Y.; Ohkawa, Y.; Kubota, M.; Tanioka, K.; Suzuki, K.; Kawai, T.

    2008-03-01

    An indirect flat-imager with programmable avalanche gain and field emitter array (FEA) readout is being investigated for low-dose x-ray imaging with high resolution. It is made by optically coupling a structured x-ray scintillator CsI (Tl) to an amorphous selenium (a-Se) avalanche photoconductor called HARP (high-gain avalanche rushing photoconductor). The charge image created by HARP is read out by electron beams generated by the FEA. The proposed detector is called SAPHIRE (Scintillator Avalanche Photoconductor with HIgh Resolution Emitter readout). The avalanche gain of HARP depends on both a-Se thickness and applied electric field E Se. At E Se of > 80 V/μm, the avalanche gain can enhance the signal at low dose (e.g. fluoroscopy) and make the detector x-ray quantum noise limited down to a single x-ray photon. At high exposure (e.g. radiography), the avalanche gain can be turned off by decreasing E Se to < 70 V/μm. In this paper the imaging characteristics of the FEA readout method, including the spatial resolution and noise, were investigated experimentally using a prototype optical HARP-FEA image sensor. The potential x-ray imaging performance of SAPHIRE, especially the aspect of programmable gain to ensure wide dynamic range and x-ray quantum noise limited performance at the lowest exposure in fluoroscopy, was investigated.

  18. AIGO: a southern hemisphere detector for the worldwide array of ground-based interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barriga, P; Blair, D G; Coward, D; Davidson, J; Dumas, J-C; Howell, E; Ju, L; Wen, L; Zhao, C [School of Physics, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); McClelland, D E; Scott, S M; Slagmolen, B J J; Inta, R [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Munch, J; Ottaway, D J; Veitch, P; Hosken, D [Department of Physics, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Melatos, A; Chung, C; Sammut, L, E-mail: pbarriga@cyllene.uwa.edu.a [School of Physics University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic 3010 (Australia)

    2010-04-21

    This paper describes the proposed AIGO detector for the worldwide array of interferometric gravitational wave detectors. The first part of the paper summarizes the benefits that AIGO provides to the worldwide array of detectors. The second part gives a technical description of the detector, which will follow closely the Advanced LIGO design. Possible technical variations in the design are discussed.

  19. Digital Data Acquisition For the Low Energy Neutron Detector Array (LENDA)

    CERN Document Server

    Lipschutz, S; Hill, J; Liddick, S N; Noji, S; Prokop, C J; Scott, M; Solt, M; Sullivan, C; Tompkins, J

    2016-01-01

    A digital data acquisition system (DDAS) has been implemented for the Low Energy Neutron Detector Array (LENDA). LENDA is an array of 24 BC-408 plastic-scintillator bars designed to measure low-energy neutrons with kinetic energies in the range of 100 keV to 10 MeV from (p,n)-type charge-exchange reactions. Compared to the previous data acquisition (DAQ) system for LENDA, DDAS offers the possibility to lower the neutron detection threshold, increase the overall neutron-detection efficiency, decrease the dead time of the system, and allow for easy expansion of the array. The system utilized in this work was XIA's Digital Gamma Finder Pixie-16 250 MHz digitizers. A detector-limited timing resolution of 400 ps was achieved for a single LENDA bar. Using DDAS, the neutron detection threshold of the system was reduced compared to the previous analog system, now reaching below 100 keV. The new DAQ system was successfully used in a recent charge-exchange experiment using the $^{16}$C(p,n) reaction at the National Sup...

  20. Digital data acquisition for the Low Energy Neutron Detector Array (LENDA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipschutz, S., E-mail: lipschutz@nscl.msu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics Center for the Evolution of the Elements, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Zegers, R.G.T.; Hill, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics Center for the Evolution of the Elements, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Liddick, S.N. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States); Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Noji, S., E-mail: noji@rcnp.osaka-u.ac.jp [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics Center for the Evolution of the Elements, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Prokop, C.J. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States); Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Scott, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics Center for the Evolution of the Elements, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Solt, M., E-mail: mrsolt@stanford.edu [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics Center for the Evolution of the Elements, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Department of Physics, Oakland University, Rochester, MI (United States); and others

    2016-04-11

    A digital data acquisition system (DDAS) has been implemented for the Low Energy Neutron Detector Array (LENDA). LENDA is an array of 24 BC-408 plastic-scintillator bars designed to measure low-energy neutrons with kinetic energies in the range of 100 keV–10 MeV from (p,n)-type charge-exchange reactions. Compared to the previous data acquisition (DAQ) system for LENDA, DDAS offers the possibility to lower the neutron detection threshold, increase the overall neutron-detection efficiency, decrease the dead time of the system, and allow for easy expansion of the array. The system utilized in this work was XIA's Digital Gamma Finder Pixie-16 250 MHz digitizers. A detector-limited timing resolution of 400 ps was achieved for a single LENDA bar. Using DDAS, the neutron detection threshold of the system was reduced compared to the previous analog system, now reaching below 100 keV. The new DAQ system was successfully used in a recent charge-exchange experiment using the {sup 16}C(p,n) reaction at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL).

  1. DANSS: Detector of the reactor AntiNeutrino based on Solid Scintillator

    CERN Document Server

    Alekseev, I; Brudanin, V; Danilov, M; Egorov, V; Filosofov, D; Fomina, M; Hons, Z; Kazartsev, S; Kobyakin, A; Kuznetsov, A; Machikhiliyan, I; Medvedev, D; Nesterov, V; Olshevsky, A; Ponomarev, D; Rozova, I; Rumyantseva, N; Rusinov, V; Salamatin, A; Shevchik, Ye; Shirchenko, M; Shitov, Yu; Skrobova, N; Starostin, A; Svirida, D; Tarkovsky, E; Tikhomirov, I; Vlasek, J; Zhitnikov, I; Zinatulina, D

    2016-01-01

    The DANSS project is aimed at creating a relatively compact neutrino spectrometer which does not contain any flammable or other dangerous liquids and may therefore be located very close to the core of an industrial power reactor. As a result, it is expected that high neutrino flux would provide about 15,000 IBD interactions per day in the detector with a sensitive volume of 1 m$^3$. High segmentation of the plastic scintillator will allow to suppress a background down to a 1% level. Numerous tests performed with a simplified pilot prototype DANSSino under a 3 GW$_{th}$ reactor of the Kalinin NPP have demonstrated operability of the chosen design. The DANSS detector surrounded with a composite shield is movable by means of a special lifting gear, varying the distance to the reactor core in a range from 10 m to 12 m. Due to this feature, it could be used not only for the reactor monitoring, but also for fundamental research including short-range neutrino oscillations to the sterile state. Supposing one-year mea...

  2. The Detector Calibration System for the CUORE cryogenic bolometer array

    CERN Document Server

    Cushman, J S; Davis, C J; Ejzak, L; Lenz, D; Lim, K E; Heeger, K M; Maruyama, R H; Nucciotti, A; Sangiorgio, S; Wise, T

    2016-01-01

    The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE) is a ton-scale cryogenic experiment designed to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of $^{130}$Te and other rare events. The CUORE detector consists of 988 TeO$_2$ bolometers operated underground at 10~mK in a dilution refrigerator at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. Candidate events are identified through a precise measurement of their energy. The absolute energy response of the detectors is established by the regular calibration of each individual bolometer using gamma sources. The close-packed configuration of the CUORE bolometer array combined with the extensive shielding surrounding the detectors requires the placement of calibration sources within the array itself. The CUORE Detector Calibration System is designed to insert radioactive sources into and remove them from the cryostat while respecting the stringent heat load, radiopurity, and operational requirements of the experiment. This paper describes the design, commissioning...

  3. High-energy interactions in Kinetic Inductance Detectors arrays

    CERN Document Server

    D'Addabbo, A; Goupy, J; Benoit, A; Bourrion, O; Catalano, A; Macias-Perez, J F; Monfardini, A

    2015-01-01

    The impacts of Cosmic Rays on the detectors are a key problem for space-based missions. We are studying the effects of such interactions on arrays of Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KID), in order to adapt this technology for use on board of satellites. Before proposing a new technology such as the Kinetic Inductance Detectors for a space-based mission, the problem of the Cosmic Rays that hit the detectors during in-flight operation has to be studied in detail. We present here several tests carried out with KID exposed to radioactive sources, which we use to reproduce the physical interactions induced by primary Cosmic Rays, and we report the results obtained adopting different solutions in terms of substrate materials and array geometries. We conclude by outlining the main guidelines to follow for fabricating KID for space-based applications.

  4. Integrated Miniature Arrays of Optical Biomolecule Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iltchenko, Vladimir; Maleki, Lute; Lin, Ying; Le, Thanh

    2009-01-01

    Integrated miniature planar arrays of optical sensors for detecting specific biochemicals in extremely small quantities have been proposed. An array of this type would have an area of about 1 cm2. Each element of the array would include an optical microresonator that would have a high value of the resonance quality factor (Q . 107). The surface of each microresonator would be derivatized to make it bind molecules of a species of interest, and such binding would introduce a measurable change in the optical properties of the microresonator. Because each microresonator could be derivatized for detection of a specific biochemical different from those of the other microresonators, it would be possible to detect multiple specific biochemicals by simultaneous or sequential interrogation of all the elements in the array. Moreover, the derivatization would make it unnecessary to prepare samples by chemical tagging. Such interrogation would be effected by means of a grid of row and column polymer-based optical waveguides that would be integral parts of a chip on which the array would be fabricated. The row and column polymer-based optical waveguides would intersect at the elements of the array (see figure). At each intersection, the row and column waveguides would be optically coupled to one of the microresonators. The polymer-based waveguides would be connected via optical fibers to external light sources and photodetectors. One set of waveguides and fibers (e.g., the row waveguides and fibers) would couple light from the sources to the resonators; the other set of waveguides and fibers (e.g., the column waveguides and fibers) would couple light from the microresonators to the photodetectors. Each microresonator could be addressed individually by row and column for measurement of its optical transmission. Optionally, the chip could be fabricated so that each microresonator would lie inside a microwell, into which a microscopic liquid sample could be dispensed.

  5. INTERPLANETARY SCINTILLATION RADIO SOURCES DETECTED WITH THE MEXICAN ARRAY RADIO TELESCOPE (MEXART)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia Ambriz, J. C.; Villanueva-Hernandez, P.; Gonzalez-Esparza, A.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Andrade-Mascote, E.; Carrillo-Vargas, A.

    2009-12-01

    The Mexican Array Radio Telescope (MEXART) has an antenna composed by 4096 full-wavelength dipoles, covering about 9800 square meters. The instrument is primary devoted to carry out observations of compact stelar radio sources presenting Interplanetary Scintillation (IPS) at 140 MHz. The IPS technique is a very useful tool to perform observations of large-scale solar wind density disturbances in the inner heliosphere at heliocentric ranges where no other instruments can cover. These observations can help to track the evolution of CMEs and shocks in the interplanetary medium. We present the first catalog of IPS sources detected with the MEXART. We show the power spectrum analysis to obtain information of solar wind velocity and density.

  6. Conference on physics from large {gamma}-ray detector arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    The conference on {open_quotes}Physics from Large {gamma}-ray Detector Arrays{close_quotes} is a continuation of the series of conferences that have been organized every two years by the North American Heavy-ion Laboratories. The aim of the conference this year was to encourage discussion of the physics that can be studied with such large arrays. This volume is the collected proceedings from this conference. It discusses properties of nuclear states which can be created in heavy-ion reactions, and which can be observed via such detector systems.

  7. A fast, primary-interaction Monte Carlo methodology for determination of total efficiency of cylindrical scintillation gamma-ray detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehman Shakeel U.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A primary-interaction based Monte Carlo algorithm has been developed for determination of the total efficiency of cylindrical scintillation g-ray detectors. This methodology has been implemented in a Matlab based computer program BPIMC. For point isotropic sources at axial locations with respect to the detector axis, excellent agreement has been found between the predictions of the BPIMC code with the corresponding results obtained by using hybrid Monte Carlo as well as by experimental measurements over a wide range of g-ray energy values. For off-axis located point sources, the comparison of the BPIMC predictions with the corresponding results obtained by direct calculations as well as by conventional Monte Carlo schemes shows good agreement validating the proposed algorithm. Using the BPIMC program, the energy dependent detector efficiency has been found to approach an asymptotic profile by increasing either thickness or diameter of scintillator while keeping the other fixed. The variation of energy dependent total efficiency of a 3'x3' NaI(Tl scintillator with axial distance has been studied using the BPIMC code. About two orders of magnitude change in detector efficiency has been observed for zero to 50 cm variation in the axial distance. For small values of axial separation, a similar large variation has also been observed in total efficiency for 137Cs as well as for 60Co sources by increasing the axial-offset from zero to 50 cm.

  8. Two dimensional extensible array configuration for EMCCD-based solid state x-ray detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, P.; Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Cartwright, A. N.; Titus, A. H.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2012-03-01

    We have designed and developed from the discrete component level a high resolution dynamic x-ray detector to be used for fluoroscopic and angiographic medical imaging. The heart of the detector is a 1024 ×1024 pixel electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) with a pixel size of 13 × 13 μm2 (Model CCD201-20, e2v Technologies, Inc.), bonded to a fiber optic plate (FOP), and optically coupled to a 350 μm thick micro-columnar CsI(TI) scintillator via a fiber optic taper (FOT). Our aim is to design an array of these detectors that could be extended to any arbitrary X × Y size in two dimensions to provide a larger field of view (FOV). A physical configuration for a 3×3 array is presented that includes two major sub-systems. First is an optical front end that includes (i) a phosphor to convert the x-ray photons into light photons, and (ii) a fused array of FOTs that focuses light photons from the phosphor onto an array of EMCCD's optically coupled using FOPs. Second is an electronic front end that includes (i) an FPGA board used for generating clocks and for data acquisition (ii) driver boards to drive and digitize the analog output from the EMCCDs, (iii) a power board, and (iv) headboards to hold the EMCCD's while they are connected to their respective driver board using flex cables. This configuration provides a larger FOV as well as region-of-interest (ROI) high-resolution imaging as required by modern neurovascular procedures.

  9. Two dimensional extensible array configuration for EMCCD-based solid state x-ray detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, P; Vasan, S N Swetadri; Cartwright, A N; Titus, A H; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    2012-01-01

    We have designed and developed from the discrete component level a high resolution dynamic x- ray detector to be used for fluoroscopic and angiographic medical imaging. The heart of the detector is a 1024 × 1024 pixel electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) with a pixel size of 13 × 13 μm(2) (Model CCD201-20, e2v Technologies, Inc.), bonded to a fiber optic plate (FOP), and optically coupled to a 350 μm thick micro-columnar CsI(TI) scintillator via a fiber optic taper (FOT). Our aim is to design an array of these detectors that could be extended to any arbitrary X × Y size in two dimensions to provide a larger field of view (FOV). A physical configuration for a 3×3 array is presented that includes two major sub-systems. First is an optical front end that includes (i) a phosphor to convert the x-ray photons into light photons, and (ii) a fused array of FOTs that focuses light photons from the phosphor onto an array of EMCCD's optically coupled using FOPs. Second is an electronic front end that includes (i) an FPGA board used for generating clocks and for data acquisition (ii) driver boards to drive and digitize the analog output from the EMCCDs, (iii) a power board, and (iv) headboards to hold the EMCCD's while they are connected to their respective driver board using flex cables. This configuration provides a larger FOV as well as region-of- interest (ROI) high-resolution imaging as required by modern neurovascular procedures.

  10. Use of a large time-compensated scintillation detector in neutron time-of-flight measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Charles D.

    1979-01-01

    A scintillator for neutron time-of-flight measurements is positioned at a desired angle with respect to the neutron beam, and as a function of the energy thereof, such that the sum of the transit times of the neutrons and photons in the scintillator are substantially independent of the points of scintillations within the scintillator. Extrapolated zero timing is employed rather than the usual constant fraction timing. As a result, a substantially larger scintillator can be employed that substantially increases the data rate and shortens the experiment time.

  11. Development and characterization of a 2D scintillation detector for quality assurance in scanned carbon ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamborini, A.; Raffaele, L.; Mirandola, A.; Molinelli, S.; Viviani, C.; Spampinato, S.; Ciocca, M.

    2016-04-01

    At the Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO Foundation), a two-dimensional high resolution scintillating dosimetry system has been developed and tested for daily Quality Assurance measurements (QA) in carbon ion radiotherapy with active scanning technique, for both single pencil beams and scanned fields produced by a synchrotron accelerator. The detector consists of a thin plane organic scintillator (25×25 cm2, 2 mm thick) coupled with a high spatial resolution CCD camera (0.25 mm) in a light-tight box. A dedicated Labview software was developed for image acquisition triggered with the beam extraction, data post-processing and analysis. The scintillator system was preliminary characterized in terms of short-term reproducibility (found to be within±0.5%), linearity with the number of particles (linear fit χ2 = 0.996) and dependence on particle flux (measured to be < 1.5 %). The detector was then tested for single beam spot measurements (Full Width at Half Maximum and position) and for 6×6 cm2 reference scanned field (determination of homogeneity) for carbon ions with energy from 115 MeV/u up to 400 MeV/u. No major differences in the investigated beam parameters measured with scintillator system and the radiochromic EBT3 reference films were observed. The system allows therefore real-time monitoring of the carbon ion beam relevant parameters, with a significant daily time saving with respect to films currently used. The results of this study show the suitability of the scintillation detector for daily QA in a carbon ion facility with an active beam delivery system.

  12. Monte Carlo investigations of megavoltage cone-beam CT using thick, segmented scintillating detectors for soft tissue visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Antonuk, Larry E; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua; Sawant, Amit; Du, Hong

    2008-01-01

    Megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (MV CBCT) is a highly promising technique for providing volumetric patient position information in the radiation treatment room. Such information has the potential to greatly assist in registering the patient to the planned treatment position, helping to ensure accurate delivery of the high energy therapy beam to the tumor volume while sparing the surrounding normal tissues. Presently, CBCT systems using conventional MV active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs), which are commonly used in portal imaging, require a relatively large amount of dose to create images that are clinically useful. This is due to the fact that the phosphor screen detector employed in conventional MV AMFPIs utilizes only approximately 2% of the incident radiation (for a 6 MV x-ray spectrum). Fortunately, thick segmented scintillating detectors can overcome this limitation, and the first prototype imager has demonstrated highly promising performance for projection imaging at low doses. It is therefore of definite interest to examine the potential performance of such thick, segmented scintillating detectors for MV CBCT. In this study, Monte Carlo simulations of radiation energy deposition were used to examine reconstructed images of cylindrical CT contrast phantoms, embedded with tissue-equivalent objects. The phantoms were scanned at 6 MV using segmented detectors having various design parameters (i.e., detector thickness as well as scintillator and septal wall materials). Due to constraints imposed by the nature of this study, the size of the phantoms was limited to approximately 6 cm. For such phantoms, the simulation results suggest that a 40 mm thick, segmented CsI detector with low density septal walls can delineate electron density differences of approximately 2.3% and 1.3% at doses of 1.54 and 3.08 cGy, respectively. In addition, it was found that segmented detectors with greater thickness, higher density scintillator material, or lower density

  13. FFTS readout for large arrays of Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Yates, S J C; Baselmans, J J A; Klein, B; Güsten, R

    2009-01-01

    Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) have great potential for large very sensitive detector arrays for use in, for example, sub-mm imaging. Being intrinsically readout in the frequency domain, they are particularly suited for frequency domain multiplexing allowing $\\sim$1000s of devices to be readout with one pair of coaxial cables. However, this moves the complexity of the detector from the cryogenics to the warm electronics. We present here the concept and experimental demonstration of the use of Fast Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FFTS) readout, showing no deterioration of the noise performance compared to low noise analog mixing while allowing high multiplexing ratios.

  14. Advanced ACTPol Cryogenic Detector Arrays and Readout

    CERN Document Server

    Henderson, S W; Austermann, J; Baildon, T; Battaglia, N; Beall, J A; Becker, D; De Bernardis, F; Bond, J R; Calabrese, E; Choi, S K; Coughlin, K P; Crowley, K T; Datta, R; Devlin, M J; Duff, S M; Dunner, R; Dunkley, J; van Engelen, A; Gallardo, P A; Grace, E; Hasselfield, M; Hills, F; Hilton, G C; Hincks, A D; Hlozek, R; Ho, S P; Hubmayr, J; Huffenberger, K; Hughes, J P; Irwin, K D; Koopman, B J; Kosowsky, A B; Li, D; McMahon, J; Munson, C; Nati, F; Newburgh, L; Niemack, M D; Niraula, P; Page, L A; Pappas, C G; Salatino, M; Schillaci, A; Schmitt, B L; Sehgal, N; Sherwin, B D; Sievers, J L; Simon, S M; Spergel, D N; Staggs, S T; Stevens, J R; Thornton, R; Van Lanen, J; Vavagiakis, E M; Ward, J T; Wollack, E J

    2015-01-01

    Advanced ACTPol is a polarization-sensitive upgrade for the 6 m aperture Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT), adding new frequencies and increasing sensitivity over the previous ACTPol receiver. In 2016, Advanced ACTPol will begin to map approximately half the sky in five frequency bands (28-230 GHz). Its maps of primary and secondary cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies -- imaged in intensity and polarization at few arcminute-scale resolution -- will enable precision cosmological constraints and also a wide array of cross-correlation science that probes the expansion history of the universe and the growth of structure via gravitational collapse. To accomplish these scientific goals, the Advanced ACTPol receiver will be a significant upgrade to the ACTPol receiver, including four new multichroic arrays of cryogenic, feedhorn-coupled AlMn transition edge sensor (TES) polarimeters (fabricated on 150 mm diameter wafers); a system of continuously rotating meta-material silicon half-wave plates; and a new ...

  15. Direct Observation of Neutron Scattering in MoNA Scintillator Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, W. F.; Mosby, S.; Frank, N.; Kuchera, A. N.; Thoennessen, M.; MoNA Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations provide an important tool for the interpretation of neutron scattering data in the MoNA and LISA arrays at NSCL. Neutron energy and trajectory are determined by time of flight and position of first light produced in the array. Neutrons elastically scattered from H and inelastically from C typically produce light above detector threshold, while those elastically scattered from C produce light below threshold (``dark scattering'') and are redirected in flight, thus lowering energy and trajectory resolution. In order to test the effectiveness of our Geant4/MENATE_R simulations, we conducted an experiment at the LANSCE facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory to observe scattering of individual neutrons with well defined energy and trajectory in 16 MoNA detector bars arranged in two different stack geometries. Neutrons with energies ranging from 0.5 to 800 MeV emerged from a 3 mm collimator in the 90m shed on the WNR 4FP15L flight path to enter the array at a well defined point. Several features of neutron scattering are compared with simulation predictions, including hit multiplicity, scattering angle, mean distance between scatters, and the effect of dark scatter redirection. Results to date will be presented. Work supported by NSF Grant PHY-1506402.

  16. Characteristics of a thermal neutrons scintillation detector with the [ZnS(Ag)+$^6$LiF] at different conditions of measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Alekseenko, V. V.; Barabanov, I. R.; Etezov, R. A.; Gavrilyuk, Yu. M.; Gangapshev, A. M.; Gezhaev, A. M.; Kazalov, V. V.; Khokonov, A. Kh.; V.V. Kuzminov; Panasenko, S. I.; Ratkevich, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    A construction of a thermal neutron testing detector with a thin [ZnS(Ag)+$^6$LiF] scintillator is described. Results of an investigation of sources of the detector pulse origin and the pulse features in a ground and underground conditions are presented. Measurements of the scintillator own background, registration efficiency and a neutron flux at different objects of the BNO INR RAS were performed. The results are compared with the ones measured by the $^3$He proportional counter.

  17. Early clinical experience utilizing scintillator with optical fiber (SOF) detector in clinical boron neutron capture therapy: its issues and solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Ishikawa, Masayori; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Matsumura, Akira; Hiratsuka, Junichi; Miyatake, Shin-Ichi; Kato, Itsuro; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kumada, Hiroaki; Shrestha, Shubhechha J.; ONO, KOJI

    2016-01-01

    Background Real-time measurement of thermal neutrons in the tumor region is essential for proper evaluation of the absorbed dose in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) treatment. The gold wire activation method has been routinely used to measure the neutron flux distribution in BNCT irradiation, but a real-time measurement using gold wire is not possible. To overcome this issue, the scintillator with optical fiber (SOF) detector has been developed. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate...

  18. A readout for large arrays of Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    McHugh, Sean; Serfass, Bruno; Meeker, Seth; O'Brien, Kieran; Duan, Ran; Raffanti, Rick; Werthimer, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) are superconducting detectors capable of counting single photons and measuring their energy in the UV, optical, and near-IR. MKIDs feature intrinsic frequency domain multiplexing (FDM) at microwave frequencies, allowing the construction and readout of large arrays. Due to the microwave FDM, MKIDs do not require the complex cryogenic multiplexing electronics used for similar detectors, such as Transition Edge Sensors (TESs), but instead transfer this complexity to room temperature electronics where they present a formidable signal processing challenge. In this paper we describe the first successful effort to build a readout for a photon counting optical/near-IR astronomical instrument, the ARray Camera for Optical to Near-infrared Spectrophotometry (ARCONS). This readout is based on open source hardware developed by the Collaboration for Astronomy Signal Processing and Electronics Research (CASPER). Designed principally for radio telescope backends, it is flexible...

  19. A readout for large arrays of microwave kinetic inductance detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Sean; Mazin, Benjamin A; Serfass, Bruno; Meeker, Seth; O'Brien, Kieran; Duan, Ran; Raffanti, Rick; Werthimer, Dan

    2012-04-01

    Microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) are superconducting detectors capable of counting single photons and measuring their energy in the UV, optical, and near-IR. MKIDs feature intrinsic frequency domain multiplexing (FDM) at microwave frequencies, allowing the construction and readout of large arrays. Due to the microwave FDM, MKIDs do not require the complex cryogenic multiplexing electronics used for similar detectors, such as transition edge sensors, but instead transfer this complexity to room temperature electronics where they present a formidable signal processing challenge. In this paper, we describe the first successful effort to build a readout for a photon counting optical/near-IR astronomical instrument, the ARray Camera for Optical to Near-infrared Spectrophotometry. This readout is based on open source hardware developed by the Collaboration for Astronomy Signal Processing and Electronics Research. Designed principally for radio telescope backends, it is flexible enough to be used for a variety of signal processing applications.

  20. Installation and Operation of the SNO Neutral Current Detector Array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heise, J. [Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, 87545 (United States); McGee, S. [Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, and Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 98195 (United States); Rielage, K. [Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, and Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 98195 (United States)

    2005-06-15

    An array of low background detectors designed to capture neutrons liberated by interactions with solar neutrinos was recently installed in the heavy water region of the SNO experiment. The neutral current detector (NCD) array consists of 36 proportional counters filled with {sup 3}He-CF{sub 4} gas and 4 proportional counters filled with {sup 4}He-CF{sub 4}. Special hardware conforming to the high radiopurity requirements in SNO was used to assemble and deploy these counters. Neutron events detected by the NCD array are distinguished from various types of backgrounds on an event-by-event basis using the NCD data acquisition system (NCDDAQ), which employs a mixture of commercial and custom-built electronics equipment. The NCDDAQ is controlled by a custom-built Object-oriented Realtime Control and Acquisition (ORCA) software program, and is fully integrated into the SNO PMT data acquisition system to provide shared trigger information and a combined data stream.

  1. Installation and Operation of the SNO Neutral Current Detector Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    SNO Collaboration; McGee, S.; Rielage, K.

    2005-06-01

    An array of low background detectors designed to capture neutrons liberated by interactions with solar neutrinos was recently installed in the heavy water region of the SNO experiment. The neutral current detector (NCD) array consists of 36 proportional counters filled with 3He-CF4 gas and 4 proportional counters filled with 4He-CF4. Special hardware conforming to the high radiopurity requirements in SNO was used to assemble and deploy these counters. Neutron events detected by the NCD array are distinguished from various types of backgrounds on an event-by-event basis using the NCD data acquisition system (NCDDAQ), which employs a mixture of commercial and custom-built electronics equipment. The NCDDAQ is controlled by a custom-built Object-oriented Realtime Control and Acquisition (ORCA) software program, and is fully integrated into the SNO PMT data acquisition system to provide shared trigger information and a combined data stream.

  2. Prototype imaging Cd-Zn-Te array detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloser, P.F.; Narita, T.; Grindlay, J.E. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Shah, K. [Radiation Monitoring Devices, Inc., Watertown, MA (United States)

    1998-12-31

    The authors describe initial results of their program to develop and test Cd-Zn-Te (CZT) detectors with a pixellated array readout. Their primary interest is in the development of relatively thick CZT detectors for use in astrophysical coded aperture telescopes with response extending over the energy range {approximately}10--600 keV. The coded aperture imaging configuration requires only relatively large area pixels (1--3 mm), whereas the desired high energy response requires detector thicknesses of at least 3--5 mm. They have developed a prototype detector employing a 10 x 10 x 5 mm CZT substrate and 4 x 4 pixel (1.5 mm each) readout with gold metal contacts for the pixels and continuous gold contact for the bias on the opposite detector face. This MSM contact configuration was fabricated by RMD and tested at Harvard for uniformity, efficiency and spatial as well as spectral resolution. The authors have developed an ASIC readout (IDE-VA-1) and analysis system and report results, including {approximately}4% (FWHM) energy resolution at 60 keV. A prototype design for a full imaging detector array is discussed.

  3. SuperTIGER scintillator detector calibration with 30 GeV/nucleon Pb and its fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Makoto

    2016-07-01

    The SuperTIGER (Super Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder) long-duration balloon instrument has measured the abundances of galactic cosmic-ray elements to provide sensitive tests and clarification of the OB-association model of Galactic cosmic-ray origins. More than 600 nuclei with atomic number Z > 30 were observed on its first flight and the abundances of nuclei have been determined with clear individual element resolution and high statistical precision for 30 energy 30 GeV/nucleon Pb and its fragments to measure the saturation response of the scintillator detectors, which are essential to determine the abundances of nuclei with atomic number Z > 40. The beamtest results have been used to optimize the Geant4 simulation to represent the flight data, and will be used to interpret the flight data to extend the abundance determination to about _{60}Nd. SuperTIGER was developed by Washington University in St. Louis, NASA Goddard Flight Center, the California Institute of Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and the University of Minnesota.

  4. Fast neutron tomography with real-time pulse-shape discrimination in organic scintillation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Malcolm J.; Agar, Stewart; Aspinall, Michael D.; Beaumont, Jonathan S.; Colley, Edmund; Colling, Miriam; Dykes, Joseph; Kardasopoulos, Phoevos; Mitton, Katie

    2016-10-01

    A fast neutron tomography system based on the use of real-time pulse-shape discrimination in 7 organic liquid scintillation detectors is described. The system has been tested with a californium-252 source of dose rate 163 μSv/h at 1 m and neutron emission rate of 1.5×107 per second into 4π and a maximum acquisition time of 2 h, to characterize two 100×100×100 mm3 concrete samples. The first of these was a solid sample and the second has a vertical, cylindrical void. The experimental data, supported by simulations with both Monte Carlo methods and MATLAB®, indicate that the presence of the internal cylindrical void, corners and inhomogeneities in the samples can be discerned. The potential for fast neutron assay of this type with the capability to probe hydrogenous features in large low-Z samples is discussed. Neutron tomography of bulk porous samples is achieved that combines effective penetration not possible with thermal neutrons in the absence of beam hardening.

  5. Neutron and photon spectrometry with liquid scintillation detectors in mixed fields

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, H

    2002-01-01

    Liquid scintillation detectors of type NE213 or BC501A are well suited and routinely used for spectrometry in mixed n-gamma-fields. Neutron- and photon-induced pulse height spectra may be simultaneously recorded making use of the n/gamma-discrimination capability based on pulse shape analysis. The light output functions for the detected secondary charged particles, i.e. electrons, positrons, protons and other charged reaction products, and the pulse height resolution function must carefully be determined. This can be done experimentally, in part via an iterative procedure by comparison with calculations. The response functions can then be reliably calculated by Monte Carlo simulations. Photon response functions calculated with the PHRESP code, which was developed on the basis of the EGS4+PRESTA program package, are in very good agreement with calibrations up to 17 MeV, both in shape and absolute scale. Similarly, neutron response functions calculated with the NRESP7 code well describe the pulse height spectra...

  6. Radiopurity of a CeBr{sub 3} crystal used as scintillation detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutter, Guillaume, E-mail: guillaume.lutter@ec.europa.eu [European Commission, DG JRC, Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), Retieseweg 111, 2440 Geel (Belgium); Hult, Mikael [European Commission, DG JRC, Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), Retieseweg 111, 2440 Geel (Belgium); Billnert, Robert [European Commission, DG JRC, Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), Retieseweg 111, 2440 Geel (Belgium); Fundamental Fysik, Chalmers Tekniska Högskola, 41296 Göteborg (Sweden); Oberstedt, Andreas [Fundamental Fysik, Chalmers Tekniska Högskola, 41296 Göteborg (Sweden); Oberstedt, Stephan; Andreotti, Erica; Marissens, Gerd; Rosengård, Ulf; Tzika, Faidra [European Commission, DG JRC, Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), Retieseweg 111, 2440 Geel (Belgium)

    2013-03-01

    Cerium bromide (CeBr{sub 3}) has recently been shown to exhibit several properties making it a suitable material as a scintillation detector in nuclear physics applications. The intrinsic activity of gamma-ray emitting radionuclides in a 38.1 mm×38.1 mm (diameter×height) crystal of CeBr{sub 3} was investigated. The measurements were carried out in the HADES underground laboratory located 225 m underground. Two primordial radionuclides were detected; {sup 227}Ac (and its daughters) with massic activity of 0.30±0.02 Bq/kg and {sup 138}La with massic activity of 7.4±1.0 mBq/kg. Two activation products were also detected; {sup 139}Ce and {sup 82}Br. Their massic activities (assuming a homogeneous distribution in the crystal) just before taking the CeBr{sub 3} crystal underground were 4.3±0.3 mBq/kg and 18±4 mBq/kg correspondingly. None of the other common primordial radionuclides ({sup 40}K, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 228}Th, and {sup 235}U) were detected and their detection limits were below 2 mBq/kg except for {sup 238}U for which the upper limit was 135 mBq/kg and {sup 210}Pb with an upper limit of 600 mBq/kg.

  7. Characterization of a LaBr3 scintillator with multi-cell Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuschino, F.; Labanti, C.; Campana, R.; Gangemi, G. C.; Marisaldi, M.; Rignanese, L. P.; Baldazzi, G.; Elmi, I.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.; Rashevsky, A.; Vacchi, A.; Rashevskaya, I.; Fabiani, S.; Zorzi, N.; Piemonte, C.; Bellutti, P.; Ficorella, F.; Borghi, G.; Burderi, L.

    2016-07-01

    A scintillation gamma-ray detector, composed of a commercial 0.5" thick, 0.5" diameter LaBr3(Ce) crystal coupled to a 7-cell hexagonal Silicon Drift Detector has been developed and tested. The characterization with X-rays and gamma rays is presented and discussed also within the context of the optical properties of the readout system. A final comparison between our results and state of the art is also discussed in order to propose this prototype for astrophysical applications.

  8. Simulation and Design of Multi-modulars Detector System of Gadolinium-Loaded Liquid Scintillator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU; Long; WANG; Zhao-hui; YU; Guo-liang; WANG; Qi; KANG; Guo-guo; SU; Xiao-bin; ZHANG; Xiao-peng; ZHANG; Kai

    2012-01-01

    <正>The gadolinium-loaded liquid scintillator has the superiority of high detecting efficiency, and it can be used to measure many kinds of nucleus. We improved this technique and construct a 4π liquid scintillator detecting systems which is composed by many liquid scintillators. By coupling with fission chamber, we form a novel research platform which can be used to measure the (n, 2n) and (n, 3n) cross sections of many nuclei.

  9. The MINDView brain PET detector, feasibility study based on SiPM arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González, Antonio J., E-mail: agonzalez@i3m.upv.es [Institute for Instrumentation in Molecular Imaging (I3M), 46022 Valencia (Spain); Majewski, Stan [Radiology Research, Department of Radiology, University of Virginia, VA 22903 (United States); Sánchez, Filomeno [Institute for Instrumentation in Molecular Imaging (I3M), 46022 Valencia (Spain); Aussenhofer, Sebastian [NORAS MRI products GmbH, Hochberg (Germany); Aguilar, Albert; Conde, Pablo; Hernández, Liczandro; Vidal, Luis F. [Institute for Instrumentation in Molecular Imaging (I3M), 46022 Valencia (Spain); Pani, Roberto; Bettiol, Marco; Fabbri, Andrea [Department of Molecular Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome (Italy); Bert, Julien; Visvikis, Dimitris [Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest (France); Jackson, Carl; Murphy, John; O’Neill, Kevin [SensL Technologies, Cork (Ireland); Benlloch, Jose M. [Institute for Instrumentation in Molecular Imaging (I3M), 46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2016-05-11

    The Multimodal Imaging of Neurological Disorders (MINDView) project aims to develop a dedicated brain Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanner with sufficient resolution and sensitivity to visualize neurotransmitter pathways and their disruptions in mental disorders for diagnosis and follow-up treatment. The PET system should be compact and fully compatible with a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) device in order to allow its operation as a PET brain insert in a hybrid imaging setup with most MRI scanners. The proposed design will enable the currently-installed MRI base to be easily upgraded to PET/MRI systems. The current design for the PET insert consists of a 3-ring configuration with 20 modules per ring and an axial field of view of ~15 cm and a geometrical aperture of ~33 cm in diameter. When coupled to the new head Radio Frequency (RF) coil, the inner usable diameter of the complete PET-RF coil insert is reduced to 26 cm. Two scintillator configurations have been tested, namely a 3-layer staggered array of LYSO with 1.5 mm pixel size, with 35×35 elements (6 mm thickness each) and a black-painted monolithic LYSO block also covering about 50×50 mm{sup 2} active area with 20 mm thickness. Laboratory test results associated with the current MINDView PET module concept are presented in terms of key parameters' optimization, such as spatial and energy resolution, sensitivity and Depth of Interaction (DOI) capability. It was possible to resolve all pixel elements from the three scintillator layers with energy resolutions as good as 10%. The monolithic scintillator showed average detector resolutions varying from 3.5 mm in the entrance layer to better than 1.5 mm near the photosensor, with average energy resolutions of about 17%.

  10. Low background detector with enriched 116CdWO4 crystal scintillators to search for double beta decay of 116Cd

    CERN Document Server

    Barabash, A S; Bernabei, R; Boiko, R S; Cappella, F; Caracciolo, V; Chernyak, D M; Cerulli, R; Danevich, F A; Di Vacri, M L; Dossovitskiy, A E; Galashov, E N; Incicchitti, A; Kobychev, V V; Konovalov, S I; Kovtun, G P; Kudovbenko, V M; Laubenstein, M; Mikhlin, A L; Nisi, S; Poda, D V; Podviyanuk, R B; Polischuk, O G; Shcherban, A P; Shlegel, V N; Solopikhin, D A; Stenin, Yu G; Tretyak, V I; Umatov, V I; Vasiliev, Ya V; Virich, V D

    2011-01-01

    A cadmium tungstate crystal boule enriched in $^{116}$Cd to 82% with mass of 1868 g was grown by the low-thermal-gradient Czochralski technique. The isotopic composition of cadmium and the trace contamination of the crystal were estimated by High Resolution Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass-Spectrometry. The crystal scintillators produced from the boule were subjected to characterization that included measurements of transmittance and energy resolution. A low background scintillation detector with two $^{116}$CdWO$_4$ crystal scintillators (586 g and 589 g) was developed. The detector was running over 1727 h deep underground at the Gran Sasso National Laboratories of the INFN (Italy), which allowed to estimate the radioactive contamination of the enriched crystal scintillators. The radiopurity of a third $^{116}$CdWO$_4$ sample (326 g) was tested with the help of ultra-low background high purity germanium $\\gamma$ detector. Monte Carlo simulations of double $\\beta$ processes in $^{116}$Cd were used to estimate ...

  11. The TALE Infill Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Douglas

    2009-05-01

    The TALE Infill Array in conjunction with the TALE Tower Detector will provide hybrid coverage of the cosmic ray energy spectrum down to 3x10^16 eV. It will consist of about 100, two square meter scintillators on the surface spaced at 400 m; and 24 buried twelve square meter scintillators. The combination of surface and underground detectors will allow for the determination of the muon content of showers and thus give a handle on cosmic ray composition.

  12. LENDA, a Low Energy Neutron Detector Array for experiments with radioactive beams in inverse kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Perdikakis, G; Austin, Sam M; Bazin, D; Caesar, C; Cannon, S; Deaven, J M; Doster, H J; Guess, C J; Hitt, G W; Marks, J; Meharchand, R; Nguyen, D T; Peterman, D; Prinke, A; Scott, M; Shimbara, Y; Thorne, K; Valdez, L; Zegers, R G T

    2011-01-01

    The Low Energy Neutron Detector Array (LENDA) is a neutron time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer developed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab- oratory (NSCL) for use in inverse kinematics experiments with rare isotope beams. Its design has been motivated by the need to study the spin-isospin response of unstable nuclei using (p, n) charge-exchange reactions at intermediate energies (> 100 MeV/u). It can be used, however, for any reaction study that involves emission of low energy neutrons (150 keV - 10 MeV). The array consists of 24 plastic scintillator bars and is capable of registering the recoiling neutron energy and angle with high detection efficiency. The neutron energy is determined by the time-of-flight technique, while the position of interaction is deduced using the timing and energy information from the two photomultipliers of each bar. A simple test setup utilizing radioactive sources has been used to characterize the array. Results of test measurements are compared with simulations. A neut...

  13. A 2×2 array of EMCCD-based solid state x-ray detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, P; Swetadri Vasan, S N; Titus, A H; Cartwright, A N; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    2012-01-01

    We have designed and developed a new solid-state x-ray imaging system that consists of a 2×2 array of electron multiplying charge coupled devices (EMCCDs). This system is intended for fluoroscopic and angiographic medical imaging. The key components are the four 1024 × 1024 pixel EMCCDs with a pixel size of 13 × 13 µm(2). Each EMCCD is bonded to a fiber optic plate (FOP), and optically coupled to a 350 µm thick micro-columnar CsI(TI) scintillator via a 3.22∶1 fiber optic taper (FOT). The detector provides x-ray images of 9 line pairs/mm resolution at 15 frames/sec and real-time live video at 30 frames/sec with binning at a lower resolution, independent of the electronic gain applied to the EMCCD. The total field of view (FOV) of the array is 8.45 cm × 8.45 cm. The system is designed to also provide the ability to do region-of- interest imaging (ROI) by selectively enabling individual modules of the array.

  14. A novel fast-neutron tomography system based on a plastic scintillator array and a compact D-D neutron generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Robert; Zboray, Robert; Prasser, Horst-Michael

    2016-01-01

    Very few experimental imaging studies using a compact neutron generator have been published, and to the knowledge of the authors none have included tomography results using multiple projection angles. Radiography results with a neutron generator, scintillator screen, and camera can be seen in Bogolubov et al. (2005), Cremer et al. (2012), and Li et al. (2014). Comparable results with a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube can be seen in Popov et al. (2011). One study using an array of individual fast neutron detectors in the context of cargo scanning for security purposes is detailed in Eberhardt et al. (2005). In that case, however, the emphasis was on very large objects with a resolution on the order of 1cm, whereas this study focuses on less massive objects and a finer spatial resolution. In Andersson et al. (2014) three fast neutron counters and a D-T generator were used to perform attenuation measurements of test phantoms. Based on the axisymmetry of the test phantoms, the single-projection information was used to calculate radial attenuation distributions of the object, which was compared with the known geometry. In this paper a fast-neutron tomography system based on an array of individual detectors and a purpose-designed compact D-D neutron generator is presented. Each of the 88 detectors consists of a plastic scintillator read out by two Silicon photomultipliers and a dedicated pulse-processing board. Data acquisition for all channels was handled by four single-board microcontrollers. Details of the individual detector design and testing are elaborated upon. Using the complete array, several fast-neutron images of test phantoms were reconstructed, one of which was compared with results using a Co-60 gamma source. The system was shown to be capable of 2mm resolution, with exposure times on the order of several hours per reconstructed tomogram. Details about these measurements and the analysis of the reconstructed images are given, along with a discussion

  15. A large acceptance scintillator detector with wavelength shifting fibre read-out for search of eta-nucleus bound states

    CERN Document Server

    Kilian, K; Kirillov, Da; Kirillov, Di; Kolev, D; Kravcikova, M; Kutsarova, T; Lesiak, M; Lieb, J; Machner, H; Magiera, A; Maier, R; Martinská, G; Nedev, S; Piskunov, N; Prasuhn, D; Prottic, D; Ritman, J; Von Rossen, P; Roy, B J; Shukla, P; Sitnik, I; Siudak, R; Tsenov, R; Ulicny, M; Urbán, J; Vankova, G

    2007-01-01

    A large acceptance scintillator detector with wavelength shifting optical fibre readout has been designed and built to detect the decay particles of $\\eta$-nucleus bound system (the so-called $\\eta$-mesic nuclei), namely, protons and pions. The detector, named as ENSTAR detector, consists of 122 pieces of plastic scintillator of various shapes and sizes, which are arranged in a cylindrical geometry to provide particle identification, energy loss and coarse position information for these particles. A solid angle coverage of $\\sim$95% of total 4$\\pi$ is obtained in the present design of the detector. Monte Carlo phase space calculations performed to simulate the formation and decay of $\\eta$-mesic nuclei suggest that its decay particles, the protons and pions are emitted with an opening angle of 150$^\\circ \\pm 20^\\circ$, and with energies in the range of 25 to 300 MeV and 225 to 450 MeV respectively. The detailed GEANT simulations show that $\\sim$ 80 % of the decay particles (protons and pions) can be detected ...

  16. Validating plastic scintillation detectors for photon dosimetry in the radiologic energy range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lessard, Francois; Archambault, Louis; Plamondon, Mathieu [Departement de physique, de genie physique et d' optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4, Canada and Departement de radio-oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Departement de physique, de genie physique et d' optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada); Departement de radio-oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada) and Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Departement de physique, de genie physique et d' optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4, Canada and Departement de radio-oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); and others

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: Photon dosimetry in the kilovolt (kV) energy range represents a major challenge for diagnostic and interventional radiology and superficial therapy. Plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) are potentially good candidates for this task. This study proposes a simple way to obtain accurate correction factors to compensate for the response of PSDs to photon energies between 80 and 150 kVp. The performance of PSDs is also investigated to determine their potential usefulness in the diagnostic energy range. Methods: A 1-mm-diameter, 10-mm-long PSD was irradiated by a Therapax SXT 150 unit using five different beam qualities made of tube potentials ranging from 80 to 150 kVp and filtration thickness ranging from 0.8 to 0.2 mmAl + 1.0 mmCu. The light emitted by the detector was collected using an 8-m-long optical fiber and a polychromatic photodiode, which converted the scintillation photons to an electrical current. The PSD response was compared with the reference free air dose rate measured with a calibrated Farmer NE2571 ionization chamber. PSD measurements were corrected using spectra-weighted corrections, accounting for mass energy-absorption coefficient differences between the sensitive volumes of the ionization chamber and the PSD, as suggested by large cavity theory (LCT). Beam spectra were obtained from x-ray simulation software and validated experimentally using a CdTe spectrometer. Correction factors were also obtained using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Percent depth dose (PDD) measurements were compensated for beam hardening using the LCT correction method. These PDD measurements were compared with uncorrected PSD data, PDD measurements obtained using Gafchromic films, Monte Carlo simulations, and previous data. Results: For each beam quality used, the authors observed an increase of the energy response with effective energy when no correction was applied to the PSD response. Using the LCT correction, the PSD response was almost energy independent, with

  17. Study of scintillation, fluorescence and scattering in mineral oil for the MiniBooNE neutrino detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Bruce C.; Brice, Stephen; Hawker, Eric; Maza, Shannon; Meyer, Hans-Otto; Pla-Dalmau, Anna; Tayloe, Rex; Tanaka, Hirohisa A.; Toptygin, Dmitri; /Fermilab /Western

    2004-11-01

    The MiniBooNE neutrino detector at Fermilab (FNAL) is filled with 250,000 gallons of pure mineral oil. The principal signal for MiniBooNE is light observed in a prompt Cherenkov cone. Scattering and fluorescence modify our detection of this light. Scintillation is also created by ionization in the oil. Studies of fluorescence of this oil have been carried out over a wide spectrum of exciting light and time resolved fluorescence with a narrower range of excitation. Polarized scattering measurements have been carried out at longer wavelengths. Time resolved and spectrally resolved scintillation has been studied with a 200 MeV Proton beam at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility. Results of these studies will be reported.

  18. Imaging MAMA detector systems. [Multi-Anode Microchannel Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, David C.; Timothy, J. G.; Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Kasle, David B.

    1990-01-01

    Imaging multianode microchannel array (MAMA) detector systems with 1024 x 1024 pixel formats have been produced for visible and UV wavelengths; the UV types employ 'solar blind' photocathodes whose detective quantum efficiencies are significantly higher than those of currently available CCDs operating at far-UV and EUV wavelengths. Attention is presently given to the configurations and performance capabilities of state-of-the-art MAMA detectors, with a view to the development requirements of the hybrid electronic circuits needed for forthcoming spacecraft-sensor applications. Gain, dark noise, uniformity, and dynamic range performance data are presented for the curved-channel 'chevron', 'Z-plate', and helical-channel high gain microchannel plate configurations that are currently under evaluation with MAMA detector systems.

  19. READOUT SYSTEM FOR ARRAYS OF FRISCH-RING CDZNTE DETECTORS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CUI, Y.; BOLOTNIKOV, A.E.; CAMARDA, G.S.; DE GERONIMO, G.; O' CONNOR, P.; JAMES, R.B.; KARGAR, A.; HARRISON, M.J.; MCGREGOR, D.S.

    2006-10-29

    Frisch-ring CdZnTe detectors have demonstrated good energy resolution for identifying isotopes, <1% FWHM at 662 keV, and good efficiency for detecting gamma rays. We will fabricate and test at Brookhaven National Laboratory an integrated module of a 64-element array of 6 x 6 x 12 mm{sup 3} Frisch-ring detectors, coupled with a readout electronics system. It supports 64 readout channels, and includes front-end electronics, signal processing circuit, USB interface and high-voltage power supply. The data-acquisition software is used to process the data stream, which includes amplitude and timing information for each detected event. This paper describes the design and assembly of the detector modules, readout electronics, and a conceptual prototype system. Some test results are also reported.

  20. The Telescope Array Middle Drum fluorescence detector simulation on GPUs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Zayyad, Tareq; Telescope-Array Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    In recent years, the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) has been recognized and widely used as an accelerator for many scientific calculations. In general, problems amenable to parallelization are ones that benefit most from the use of GPUs. The Monte Carlo simulation of fluorescence detector response to air showers presents many opportunities for parallelization. In this paper we report on a Monte Carlo program used for the simulation of the Telescope Array Fluorescence Detector located at the Middle Drum site which uses GPU acceleration. All of the physics simulation from shower development, light production and atmospheric attenuation, as well as, the realistic detector optics and electronics simulations are done on the GPU. A detailed description of the code implementation is given, and results on the accuracy and performance of the simulation are presented as well. Improvements in computational throughput in excess of 50× are reported and the accuracy of the results is on par with the CPU implementation of the simulation.

  1. SHIELDING AND DETECTOR RESPONSE CALCULATIONS PERTAINING TO CATEGORY 1 QUANTITIES OF PLUTONIUM AND HAND-HELD PLASTIC SCINTILLATORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couture, A.

    2013-06-07

    Nuclear facilities sometimes use hand-held plastic scintillator detectors to detect attempts to divert special nuclear material in situations where portal monitors are impractical. MCNP calculations have been performed to determine the neutron and gamma radiation field arising from a Category I quantity of weapons-grade plutonium in various shielding configurations. The shields considered were composed of combinations of lead and high-density polyethylene such that the mass of the plutonium plus shield was 22.7 kilograms. Monte-Carlo techniques were also used to determine the detector response to each of the shielding configurations. The detector response calculations were verified using field measurements of high-, medium-, and low- energy gamma-ray sources as well as a Cf-252 neutron source.

  2. The detector calibration system for the CUORE cryogenic bolometer array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushman, Jeremy S.; Dally, Adam; Davis, Christopher J.; Ejzak, Larissa; Lenz, Daniel; Lim, Kyungeun E.; Heeger, Karsten M.; Maruyama, Reina H.; Nucciotti, Angelo; Sangiorgio, Samuele; Wise, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE) is a ton-scale cryogenic experiment designed to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of 130Te and other rare events. The CUORE detector consists of 988 TeO2 bolometers operated underground at 10 mK in a dilution refrigerator at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. Candidate events are identified through a precise measurement of their energy. The absolute energy response of the detectors is established by the regular calibration of each individual bolometer using gamma sources. The close-packed configuration of the CUORE bolometer array combined with the extensive shielding surrounding the detectors requires the placement of calibration sources within the array itself. The CUORE Detector Calibration System is designed to insert radioactive sources into and remove them from the cryostat while respecting the stringent heat load, radiopurity, and operational requirements of the experiment. This paper describes the design, commissioning, and performance of this novel source calibration deployment system for ultra-low-temperature environments.

  3. Development of an optical fiber type detector using a Eu:LiCaAlF{sub 6} scintillator for neutron monitoring in boron neutron capture therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Kenichi, E-mail: k-watanabe@nucl.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, 464-8603 (Japan); Kawabata, Yuya; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Uritani, Akira; Iguchi, Tetsuo [Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, 464-8603 (Japan); Fukuda, Kentaro [Tokuyama Corp., 1-1 Mikage-cho, Shunan-shi, Yamaguchi, 745-8648 (Japan); Yanagida, Takayuki [Nara Institute of Science and Technology, 8916-5 Takayama, Ikoma, Nara, 630-0192 (Japan)

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a small neutron detector probe as a thermal neutron flux monitor for boron neutron capture therapy. The detector consists of an optical fiber and a small Eu:LiCaAlF{sub 6} scintillator. In order to improve neutron-gamma ray discrimination capability, we use the small-size scintillator, whose size is controlled to be smaller than fast electron range produced by gamma-rays and larger than the range of charged particles induced by {sup 6}Li(n,t) reactions. We confirmed the improved neutron-gamma ray discrimination capability by comparing the detector responses between a small-size scintillator and a slab one. We also evaluated the neutron sensitivity of the fabricated optical fiber type neutron detector to be 2×10{sup −4} cm{sup 2}.

  4. Test of digital neutron–gamma discrimination with four different photomultiplier tubes for the NEutron Detector Array (NEDA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, X.L., E-mail: luo.xiaoliang@physics.uu.se [Department of Instrument Science and Technology, College of Mechatronics and Automation, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha (China); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Modamio, V. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Nyberg, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Valiente-Dobón, J.J. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Nishada, Q. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Angelis, G. de [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Agramunt, J. [IFIC-CSIC, University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Egea, F.J. [IFIC-CSIC, University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Istanbul Sabahattin Zaim University, Istanbul (Turkey); Erduran, M.N.; Ertürk, S. [Nigde Universitesi, Fen-Edebiyat Falkültesi, Fizik Bölümü, Nigde (Turkey); France, G. de [GANIL, CEA/DSAM and CNRS/IN2P3, Bd Henri Becquerel, BP 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex 05 (France); Gadea, A. [IFIC-CSIC, University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); González, V. [Department of Electronic Engineering, University of Valencia, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Hüyük, T. [IFIC-CSIC, University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Jaworski, G. [Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, ul. Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warszawa (Poland); Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 5A, 02-093 Warszawa (Poland); Moszyński, M. [Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 5A, 02-093 Warszawa (Poland); National Centre for Nuclear Research, A. Soltana 7, PL 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); and others

    2014-12-11

    A comparative study of the neutron–γ discrimination performance of a liquid scintillator detector BC501A coupled to four different 5 in. photomultiplier tubes (ET9390kb, R11833-100, XP4512 and R4144) was carried out. Both the Charge Comparison method and the Integrated Rise-Time method were implemented digitally to discriminate between neutrons and γ rays emitted by a {sup 252}Cf source. In both methods, the neutron–γ discrimination capabilities of the four photomultiplier tubes were quantitatively compared by evaluating their figure-of-merit values at different energy regions between 50 keVee and 1000 keVee. Additionally, the results were further verified qualitatively using time-of-flight to distinguish γ rays and neutrons. The results consistently show that photomultiplier tubes R11833-100 and ET9390kb generally perform best regarding neutron–γ discrimination with only slight differences in figure-of-merit values. This superiority can be explained by their relatively higher photoelectron yield, which indicates that a scintillator detector coupled to a photomultiplier tube with higher photoelectron yield tends to result in better neutron–γ discrimination performance. The results of this work will provide reference for the choice of photomultiplier tubes for future neutron detector arrays like NEDA.

  5. Muon-hadron detector of the carpet-2 array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhappuev, D. D.; Kudzhaev, A. U.; Klimenko, N. F.

    2016-05-01

    The 1-GeV muon-hadron detector of the Carpet-2 multipurpose shower array at the Baksan Neutrino Observatory, Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences (INR, Moscow, Russia) is able to record simultaneously muons and hadrons. The procedure developed for this device makes it possible to separate the muon and hadron components to a high degree of precision. The spatial and energy features of the muon and hadron extensive-air-shower components are presented. Experimental data from the Carpet-2 array are contrasted against data from the EAS-TOP and KASCADE arrays and against the results of the calculations based on the CORSIKA (GHEISHA + QGSJET01) code package and performed for primary protons and iron nuclei.

  6. The light-yield response of a NE-213 liquid-scintillator detector measured using 2 -- 6 MeV tagged neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Scherzinger, J; Annand, J R M; Fissum, K G; Hall-Wilton, R; Kanaki, K; Lundin, M; Nilsson, B; Perrey, H; Rosborg, A; Svensson, H

    2016-01-01

    The response of a NE-213 liquid-scintillator detector has been measured using tagged neutrons from 2--6 MeV originating from an Am/Be neutron source. The neutron energies were determined using the time-of-flight technique. Pulse-shape discrimination was employed to discern between gamma-rays and neutrons. The behavior of both the fast (35 ns) and the combined fast and slow (475 ns) components of the neutron scintillation-light pulses were studied. Three different prescriptions were used to relate the neutron maximum energy-transfer edges to the corresponding recoil-proton scintillation-light yields, and the results were compared to simulations. Parametrizations which predict the fast or total light yield of the scintillation pulses were also tested. Our results agree with both existing data and existing parametrizations. We observe a clear sensitivity to the portion and length of the neutron scintillation-light pulse considered.

  7. Mechanical design and development of TES bolometer detector arrays for the Advanced ACTPol experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ward, Jonathan T; Beall, James A; Choi, Steve K; Crowley, Kevin T; Devlin, Mark J; Duff, Shannon M; Gallardo, Patricio M; Henderson, Shawn W; Ho, Shuay-Pwu Patty; Hilton, Gene; Hubmayr, Johannes; Khavari, Niloufar; Klein, Jeffrey; Koopman, Brian J; Li, Dale; McMahon, Jeffrey; Mumby, Grace; Nati, Federico; Niemack, Michael D; Page, Lyman A; Salatino, Maria; Schillaci, Alessandro; Schmitt, Benjamin L; Simon, Sara M; Staggs, Suzanne T; Thornton, Robert; Ullom, Joel N; Vavagiakis, Eve M; Wollack, Edward J

    2016-01-01

    The next generation Advanced ACTPol (AdvACT) experiment is currently underway and will consist of four Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometer arrays, with three operating together, totaling ~5800 detectors on the sky. Building on experience gained with the ACTPol detector arrays, AdvACT will utilize various new technologies, including 150mm detector wafers equipped with multichroic pixels, allowing for a more densely packed focal plane. Each set of detectors includes a feedhorn array of stacked silicon wafers which form a spline profile leading to each pixel. This is then followed by a waveguide interface plate, detector wafer, back short cavity plate, and backshort cap. Each array is housed in a custom designed structure manufactured from high purity copper and then gold plated. In addition to the detector array assembly, the array package also encloses cryogenic readout electronics. We present the full mechanical design of the AdvACT high frequency (HF) detector array package along with a detailed look at t...

  8. Digital pulse-timing technique for the neutron detector array NEDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modamio, V., E-mail: victor.modamio@lnl.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro (Italy); Valiente-Dobón, J.J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro (Italy); Jaworski, G. [Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, 00-662 Warszawa (Poland); Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, 02-093 Warszawa (Poland); Hüyük, T. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universitat de València, E-46980 Valencia (Spain); Triossi, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro (Italy); Egea, J. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universitat de València, E-46980 Valencia (Spain); Department of Electronic Engineering, Universitat de València, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain); Di Nitto, A. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Söderström, P.-A. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, 351-0198 Saitama (Japan); Agramunt Ros, J. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universitat de València, E-46980 Valencia (Spain); Angelis, G. de [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro (Italy); France, G. de [GANIL, CEA/DSAM and CNRS/IN2P3, F-14076 Caen (France); Erduran, M.N. [Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Istanbul Sabahattin Zaim University, 34303 Istanbul (Turkey); and others

    2015-03-01

    A new digital pulse-timing algorithm, to be used with the future neutron detector array NEDA, has been developed and tested. The time resolution of four 5 in. diameter photomultiplier tubes (XP4512, R4144, R11833-100, and ET9390-kb), coupled to a cylindrical 5 in. by 5 in. BC501A liquid scintillator detector was measured by employing digital sampling electronics and a constant fraction discriminator (CFD) algorithm. The zero crossing of the CFD algorithm was obtained with a cubic spline interpolation, which was continuous up to the second derivative. The performance of the algorithm was studied at sampling rates of 500 MS/s and 200 MS/s. The time resolution obtained with the digital electronics was compared to the values acquired with a standard analog CFD. The result of this comparison shows that the time resolution from the analog and the digital measurements at 500 MS/s and at 200 MS/s are within 15% for all the tested photomultiplier tubes.

  9. Study of digital pulse shape discrimination method for n-{\\gamma} separation of EJ-301 liquid scintillation detector

    CERN Document Server

    Wan, Bo; Chen, Liang; Ge, Honglin; Ma, Fei; Zhang, Hongbin; Ju, Yongqin; Zhang, Yanbin; Li, Yanyan; Xu, Xiaowei

    2015-01-01

    A digital pulse shape discrimination system based on a programmable module NI-5772 has been established and tested with EJ-301 liquid scintillation detector. The module was operated by means of running programs developed in LabVIEW with the sampling frequency up to 1.6GS/s. Standard gamma sources 22Na, 137Cs and 60Co were used to calibrate the EJ-301 liquid scintillation detector, and the gamma response function has been obtained. Digital algorithms for charge comparison method and zero-crossing method have been developed. The experimental results showed that both digital signal processing (DSP) algorithms could discriminate neutrons from gamma-rays. Moreover, the zero-crossing method shows better n-{\\gamma} discrimination at 80 keVee and lower, whereas the charge comparison method gives better results at higher thresholds. In addition, the figure-of-merit (FOM) of two different dimension detectors were extracted at 9 energy thresholds, and it was found that the smaller one presented a better n-{\\gamma} separ...

  10. LHCb Upgrade: Scintillating Fibre Tracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Mark

    2016-07-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded during the Long Shutdown 2 (LS2) of the LHC in order to cope with higher instantaneous luminosities and to read out the data at 40 MHz using a trigger-less read-out system. All front-end electronics will be replaced and several sub-detectors must be redesigned to cope with higher occupancy. The current tracking detectors downstream of the LHCb dipole magnet will be replaced by the Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker. The SciFi Tracker will use scintillating fibres read out by Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). State-of-the-art multi-channel SiPM arrays are being developed to read out the fibres and a custom ASIC will be used to digitise the signals from the SiPMs. The evolution of the design since the Technical Design Report in 2014 and the latest R & D results are presented.

  11. A helical scintillating fiber hodoscope

    CERN Document Server

    Altmeier, M; Bisplinghoff, J; Bissel, T; Bollmann, R; Busch, M; Büsser, K; Colberg, T; Demiroers, L; Diehl, O; Dohrmann, F; Engelhardt, H P; Eversheim, P D; Felden, O; Gebel, R; Glende, M; Greiff, J; Gross, A; Gross-Hardt, R; Hinterberger, F; Jahn, R; Jeske, M; Jonas, E; Krause, H; Lahr, U; Langkau, R; Lindemann, T; Lindlein, J; Maier, R; Maschuw, R; Mayer-Kuckuck, T; Meinerzhagen, A; Naehle, O; Pfuff, M; Prasuhn, D; Rohdjess, H; Rosendaal, D; Von Rossen, P; Sanz, B; Schirm, N; Schulz-Rojahn, M; Schwarz, V; Scobel, W; Thomas, S; Trelle, H J; Weise, E; Wellinghausen, A; Wiedmann, W; Woller, K; Ziegler, R

    1999-01-01

    A novel scintillating fiber hodoscope in helically cylindric geometry has been developed for detection of low multiplicity events of fast protons and other light charged particles in the internal target experiment EDDA at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY. The hodoscope consists of 640 scintillating fibers (2.5 mm diameter), arranged in four layers surrounding the COSY beam pipe. The fibers are helically wound in opposing directions and read out individually using 16-channel photomultipliers connected to a modified commercial encoding system. The detector covers an angular range of 9 deg. <= THETA<=72 deg. and 0 deg. <=phi (cursive,open) Greek<=360 deg. in the lab frame. The detector length is 590 mm, the inner diameter 161 mm. Geometry and granularity of the hodoscope afford a position resolution of about 1.3 mm. The detector design took into consideration a maximum of reliability and a minimum of maintenance. An LED array may be used for monitoring purposes. (author)

  12. Prototype Imaging Cd-Zn-Te Array Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Bloser, P F; Grindlay, J E; Shah, K

    1998-01-01

    We describe initial results of our program to develop and test Cd-Zn-Te (CZT) detectors with a pixellated array readout. Our primary interest is in the development of relatively thick CZT detectors for use in astrophysical coded aperture telescopes with response extending over the energy range $\\sim 10-600$ keV. The coded aperture imaging configuration requires only relatively large area pixels (1-3 mm), whereas the desired high energy response requires detector thicknesses of at least 3-5 mm. We have developed a prototype detector employing a 10 x 10 x 5 mm CZT substrate and 4 x 4 pixel (1.5 mm each) readout with gold metal contacts for the pixels and continuous gold contact for the bias on the opposite detector face. This MSM contact configuration was fabricated by RMD and tested at Harvard for uniformity, efficiency and spatial as well as spectral resolution. We have developed an ASIC readout (IDE-VA-1) and analysis system and report results, including $\\sim 4$% (FWHM) energy resolution at 60 keV. A protot...

  13. A new detector array for charged particle spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Cowin, R L; Chappell, S P G; Clarke, N M; Freer, M; Fulton, B R; Cunningham, R A; Curtis, N; Dillon, G; Lilley, J; Jones, C D; Lee, P; Rae, W D M

    1999-01-01

    A compact and highly segmented detector array consisting of 44 gas-silicon-caesium iodide, position sensitive, particle identification detector telescopes and up to 10 position-sensitive, silicon strip detectors has been constructed for the study of light-ion-heavy-ion reactions including cluster break-up in the energy range 5-15 MeV/nucleon. The detectors are housed in a purpose built vacuum chamber. The telescopes are placed in fixed positions, covering the forward hemisphere from 3 to 30 deg. in the laboratory with the target placed at 535 mm from the front of the telescopes or 6-52 deg. with the target placed at 215 mm. The strip detectors are placed in any of 30 fixed positions in the forward hemisphere. For 85 MeV sup 1 sup 2 C ions the telescope energy resolution (gas plus silicon) is 345 keV with an angular resolution of 0.03 deg. . Using the gas-silicon section ions with Z up to 21 can be identified. For ions that pass through the silicon isotopic identification is achieved using the silicon-CsI comb...

  14. A scintillator-based online detector for the angularly resolved measurement of laser-accelerated proton spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metzkes, J.; Kraft, S. D.; Sobiella, M.; Stiller, N.; Zeil, K.; Schramm, U. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Karsch, L.; Schuerer, M. [OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, TU Dresden, Fetscherstr. 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Pawelke, J.; Richter, C. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, TU Dresden, Fetscherstr. 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    In recent years, a new generation of high repetition rate ({approx}10 Hz), high power ({approx}100 TW) laser systems has stimulated intense research on laser-driven sources for fast protons. Considering experimental instrumentation, this development requires online diagnostics for protons to be added to the established offline detection tools such as solid state track detectors or radiochromic films. In this article, we present the design and characterization of a scintillator-based online detector that gives access to the angularly resolved proton distribution along one spatial dimension and resolves 10 different proton energy ranges. Conceived as an online detector for key parameters in laser-proton acceleration, such as the maximum proton energy and the angular distribution, the detector features a spatial resolution of {approx}1.3 mm and a spectral resolution better than 1.5 MeV for a maximum proton energy above 12 MeV in the current design. Regarding its areas of application, we consider the detector a useful complement to radiochromic films and Thomson parabola spectrometers, capable to give immediate feedback on the experimental performance. The detector was characterized at an electrostatic Van de Graaff tandetron accelerator and tested in a laser-proton acceleration experiment, proving its suitability as a diagnostic device for laser-accelerated protons.

  15. Results of low energy background measurements with the Liquid Scintillation Detector (LSD) of the Mont Blanc Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aglietta, M.; Badino, G.; Bologna, G. F.; Castagnoli, C.; Fulgione, W.; Galeotti, P.; Saavedra, O.; Trinchero, G. C.; Vernetto, S.; Dadykin, V. L.

    1985-01-01

    The 90 tons liquid scintillation detector (LSD) is fully running since October 1984, at a depth of 5,200 hg/sq cm of standard rock underground. The main goal is to search for neutrino bursts from collapsing stars. The experiment is very sensitive to detect low energy particles and has a very good signature to gamma-rays from (n,p) reaction which follows the upsilon e + p yields n + e sup + neutrino capture. The analysis of data is presented and the preliminary results on low energy measurements are discussed.

  16. Liquid scintillators and liquefied rare gases for particle detectors. Background-determination in Double Chooz and scintillation properties of liquid argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, Martin Alexander

    2012-11-27

    }(g)/(g)). Both gamma spectroscopy measurements and the BiPo analysis show the high level of radiopurity reached in Double Chooz. In addition, with the BiPo analysis the {alpha}-quenching factors for the Target and the GammaCatcher liquids have been determined, respectively, to 9.94{+-}0.04 and 13.69{+-}0.02 at 7.7 MeV, and 9.05{+-}0.01 and 14.3{+-}0.1 at 8.8 MeV. The former values show a good agreement with the values obtained in a dedicated laboratory measurement. The time stability of the peak position of the {sup 214}Po {alpha}-peak could be proven, too, showing a stable detector performance at low visible energies. The direct search for Dark Matter can, amongst others, be performed with liquid rare gas detectors, which make use of the scintillation light. However, a good background discrimination is needed. Studies on the wavelength- and time-resolved scintillation properties of liquid argon have therefore been carried out with high resolution and best statistics. The results obtained for different ion beams show that particle discrimination is not feasible in any realistic experiment by means of the wavelength-resolved scintillation light only, but the time structure of the emitted light provides a good handle to distinguish between different incident particles. For heavy ions (sulfur) a ratio of the fast to the slow scintillation component of (1.6 {+-} 0.6) is found, while lighter particles (protons) exhibit a ratio of (0.25 {+-} 0.05). The outcome of the present studies shows that this ratio can also be used in wavelength-integrating measurements which have a comparable detection efficiency for wavelengths below and above {proportional_to}170 nm. The present results demonstrate that for a number of 90 detected photons the singlet-to-triplet distributions obtained for sulfur ions and protons as exciting particles cease to overlap. In a Dark Matter experiment, if all photons produced can be detected, this corresponds to a discrimination threshold of only 2.25 keV.

  17. Topological detector: measuring continuous dosimetric quantities with few-element detector array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhaohui; Brivio, Davide; Sajo, Erno; Zygmanski, Piotr

    2016-08-21

    A prototype topological detector was fabricated and investigated for quality assurance of radiation producing medical devices. Unlike a typical array or flat panel detector, a topological detector, while capable of achieving a very high spatial resolution, consists of only a few elements and therefore is much simpler in construction and more cost effective. The key feature allowing this advancement is a geometry-driven design that is customized for a specific dosimetric application. In the current work, a topological detector of two elements was examined for the positioning verification of the radiation collimating devices (jaws, MLCs, and blades etc). The detector was diagonally segmented from a rectangular thin film strip (2.5 cm  ×  15 cm), giving two contiguous but independent detector elements. The segmented area was the central portion of the strip measuring 5 cm in length. Under irradiation, signals from each detector element were separately digitized using a commercial multichannel data acquisition system. The center and size of an x-ray field, which were uniquely determined by the collimator positions, were shown mathematically to relate to the difference and sum of the two signals. As a proof of concept, experiments were carried out using slit x-ray fields ranging from 2 mm to 20 mm in size. It was demonstrated that, the collimator positions can be accurately measured with sub-millimeter precisions.

  18. Topological detector: measuring continuous dosimetric quantities with few-element detector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhaohui; Brivio, Davide; Sajo, Erno; Zygmanski, Piotr

    2016-08-01

    A prototype topological detector was fabricated and investigated for quality assurance of radiation producing medical devices. Unlike a typical array or flat panel detector, a topological detector, while capable of achieving a very high spatial resolution, consists of only a few elements and therefore is much simpler in construction and more cost effective. The key feature allowing this advancement is a geometry-driven design that is customized for a specific dosimetric application. In the current work, a topological detector of two elements was examined for the positioning verification of the radiation collimating devices (jaws, MLCs, and blades etc). The detector was diagonally segmented from a rectangular thin film strip (2.5 cm  ×  15 cm), giving two contiguous but independent detector elements. The segmented area was the central portion of the strip measuring 5 cm in length. Under irradiation, signals from each detector element were separately digitized using a commercial multichannel data acquisition system. The center and size of an x-ray field, which were uniquely determined by the collimator positions, were shown mathematically to relate to the difference and sum of the two signals. As a proof of concept, experiments were carried out using slit x-ray fields ranging from 2 mm to 20 mm in size. It was demonstrated that, the collimator positions can be accurately measured with sub-millimeter precisions.

  19. Fast, High-Precision Readout Circuit for Detector Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, David M.; Hancock, Bruce R.; Key, Richard W.; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Wrigley, Chris J.; Seshadri, Suresh; Sander, Stanley P.; Blavier, Jean-Francois L.

    2013-01-01

    The GEO-CAPE mission described in NASA's Earth Science and Applications Decadal Survey requires high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution measurements to monitor and characterize the rapidly changing chemistry of the troposphere over North and South Americas. High-frame-rate focal plane arrays (FPAs) with many pixels are needed to enable such measurements. A high-throughput digital detector readout integrated circuit (ROIC) that meets the GEO-CAPE FPA needs has been developed, fabricated, and tested. The ROIC is based on an innovative charge integrating, fast, high-precision analog-to-digital circuit that is built into each pixel. The 128×128-pixel ROIC digitizes all 16,384 pixels simultaneously at frame rates up to 16 kHz to provide a completely digital output on a single integrated circuit at an unprecedented rate of 262 million pixels per second. The approach eliminates the need for off focal plane electronics, greatly reducing volume, mass, and power compared to conventional FPA implementations. A focal plane based on this ROIC will require less than 2 W of power on a 1×1-cm integrated circuit. The ROIC is fabricated of silicon using CMOS technology. It is designed to be indium bump bonded to a variety of detector materials including silicon PIN diodes, indium antimonide (InSb), indium gallium arsenide (In- GaAs), and mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) detector arrays to provide coverage over a broad spectral range in the infrared, visible, and ultraviolet spectral ranges.

  20. Standard practice for radiological examination using digital detector arrays

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice establishes the minimum requirements for radiological examination for metallic and nonmetallic material using a digital detector array (DDA) system. 1.2 The requirements in this practice are intended to control the quality of radiologic images and are not intended to establish acceptance criteria for parts or materials. 1.3 This practice covers the radiologic examination with DDAs including DDAs described in Practice E2597 such as a device that contains a photoconductor attached to a Thin Film Transistor (TFT) read out structure, a device that has a phosphor coupled directly to an amorphous silicon read-out structure, and devices where a phosphor is coupled to a CMOS (Complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor) array, a Linear Detector Array (LDA) or a CCD (charge coupled device) crystalline silicon read-out structure. 1.4 The DDA shall be selected for an NDT application based on knowledge of the technology described in Guide , and of the selected DDA properties provided by the manufactu...

  1. Photonic crystals: A novel approach to enhance the light output of scintillation based detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Knapitsch, A; Leclercq, J L; Letartre, X; Auffray, E; Fabjan, C W

    2011-01-01

    Future high-energy physics (HEP) experiments as well as next generation medical imaging applications are more and more pushing towards better scintillation characteristics. One of the problems in heavy scintillating materials is related to their high electronic density, resulting in a large index of refraction. As a consequence, most of the scintillation light produced in the bulk material is trapped inside the crystal due to total internal reflection. The same problem also occurs with light emitting diodes (LEDs) and has for a long time been considered as a limiting factor for their overall efficiency. Recent studies have shown that those limits can be overcome by means of light scattering effects of photonic crystals (PhCs). In our simulations we could show light yield improvements between 90\\% and 110\\% when applying PhC structures to different scintillator materials. To evaluate the results, a PhC modified scintillator was produced in cooperation with the NIL (Nanotechnology Institute of Lyon). By using s...

  2. Development of InP solid state detector and liquid scintillator containing metal complex for measurement of pp/7Be solar neutrinos and neutrinoless double beta decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Yoshiyuki; Moriyama, Shigetaka

    2012-07-01

    A large volume solid state detector using a semi-insulating Indium Phosphide (InP) wafer have been developed for measurement of pp/7Be solar neutrinos. Basic performance such as the charge collection efficiency and the energy resolution were measured by 60% and 20%, respectively. In order to detect two gammas (115keV and 497keV) from neutrino capture, we have designed hybrid detector which consist InP detector and liquid xenon scintillator for IPNOS experiment. New InP detector with thin electrode (Cr 50Å- Au 50Å). For another possibility, an organic liquid scintillator containing indium complex and zirconium complex were studied for a measurement of low energy solar neutrinos and neutrinosless double beta decay, respectively. Benzonitrile was chosen as a solvent because of good solubility for the quinolinolato complexes (2 wt%) and of good light yield for the scintillation induced by gamma-ray irradiation. The photo-luminescence emission spectra of InQ3 and ZrQ4 in benzonitrile was measured and liquid scintillator cocktail using InQ3 and ZrQ4 (50mg) in benzonitrile solutions (20 mL) with secondary scintillators with PPO (100mg) and POPOP (10mg) was made. The energy spectra of incident gammas were measured, and they are first results of the gamma-ray energy spectra using luminescent of metal complexes.

  3. An Experiment to Demonstrate Cherenkov / Scintillation Signal Separation

    CERN Document Server

    Caravaca, J; Land, B J; Wallig, J; Yeh, M; Gann, G D Orebi

    2016-01-01

    The ability to separately identify the Cherenkov and scintillation light components produced in scintillating mediums holds the potential for a major breakthrough in neutrino detection technology, allowing development of a large, low-threshold, directional detector with a broad physics program. The CHESS (CHErenkov / Scintillation Separation) experiment employs an innovative detector design with an array of small, fast photomultiplier tubes and state-of-the-art electronics to demonstrate the reconstruction of a Cherenkov ring in a scintillating medium based on photon hit time and detected photoelectron density. This paper describes the physical properties and calibration of CHESS along with first results. The ability to reconstruct Cherenkov rings is demonstrated in a water target, and a time precision of 338 +/- 12 ps FWHM is achieved. Monte Carlo based predictions for the ring imaging sensitivity with a liquid scintillator target predict an efficiency for identifying Cherenkov hits of 94 +/- 1% and 81 +/- 1...

  4. The ROSPHERE γ-ray spectroscopy array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucurescu, D.; Căta-Danil, I.; Ciocan, G.; Costache, C.; Deleanu, D.; Dima, R.; Filipescu, D.; Florea, N.; Ghiţă, D. G.; Glodariu, T.; Ivaşcu, M.; Lică, R.; Mărginean, N.; Mărginean, R.; Mihai, C.; Negret, A.; Niţă, C. R.; Olăcel, A.; Pascu, S.; Sava, T.; Stroe, L.; Şerban, A.; Şuvăilă, R.; Toma, S.; Zamfir, N. V.; Căta-Danil, G.; Gheorghe, I.; Mitu, I. O.; Suliman, G.; Ur, C. A.; Braunroth, T.; Dewald, A.; Fransen, C.; Bruce, A. M.; Podolyák, Zs.; Regan, P. H.; Roberts, O. J.

    2016-11-01

    The ROmanian array for SPectroscopy in HEavy ion REactions (ROSPHERE) has been designed as a multi-detector setup dedicated to γ-ray spectroscopy studies at the Bucharest 9 MV Tandem accelerator. Consisting of up to 25 detectors (either Compton suppressed HPGe detectors or fast LaBr3(Ce) scintillator detectors) together with a state of the art plunger device, ROSPHERE is a powerful tool for lifetime measurements using the Recoil Distance Doppler Shift (RDDS) and the in-beam Fast Electronic Scintillation Timing (FEST) methods. The array's geometry, detectors, electronics and data acquisition system are described. Selected results from the first experimental campaigns are also presented.

  5. Radiation detector developments in medical applications: inorganic scintillators in positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eijk, Carel W E

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, a number of new gamma-ray scintillators are commercially available. These scintillators are either derived from known scintillators, e.g. Lu1-xYxAlO3: Ce (LuYAP) from LuAlO3:Ce and Lu(2(1-x))Y2xSiO5:Ce (LYSO) from Lu2SiO5:Ce or are the result of new discoveries, e.g. LaCl3:Ce and LaBr3:Ce. The first two materials are primarily of interest because of the relatively high detection efficiency and fast response; LYSO has found application in time-of-flight (TOF) positron-emission tomography (TOF PET) and the LuYAP-LYSO combination is used in small-animal PET. The halide scintillators have an excellent energy resolution of approximately 3% at 662 keV and they have a relatively high light yield. LaBr3:Ce is being studied for application in TOF PET. At the same time, the search for and research on new scintillator materials are going on. For example, LuI3:Ce is a new material with a very high light yield (approximately 90,000 photons MeV(-1)). Other examples of new materials are (C6H13NH3)2PbI4 and (C3H7NH3)2PbBr4, organic-inorganic hybrid compounds, of which the former has a very fast sub-nanosecond response. The new scintillators show great promise for new developments in medical applications, in particular, for PET systems.

  6. Ultracold neutron detection with {sup 6}Li-doped glass scintillators. NANOSC: A fast ultracold neutron detector for the nEDM experiment at the Paul Scherrer Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ban, G.; Lefort, T.; Lemiere, Y.; Naviliat-Cuncic, O.; Pierre, E.; Quemener, G.; Rogel, G. [Normandie Univ, ENSICAEN, UNICAEN, CNRS/IN2P3, LPC Caen, Caen (France); Bison, G.; Chowdhuri, Z.; Henneck, R.; Lauss, B.; Mtchedlishvili, A.; Schmidt-Wellenburg, P.; Zsigmond, G. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Bodek, K.; Zejma, J. [Jagiellonian University, Marian Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Cracow (Poland); Geltenbort, P. [Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France); Griffith, W.C.; Musgrave, M. [University of Sussex, Falmer, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brighton (United Kingdom); Helaine, V. [Normandie Univ, ENSICAEN, UNICAEN, CNRS/IN2P3, LPC Caen, Caen (France); Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Kasprzak, M.; Koss, P.A.; Severijns, N.; Wursten, E. [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Instituut voor Kernen Stralingsfysica, Leuven (Belgium); Kermaidic, Y.; Pignol, G.; Rebreyend, D. [LPSC, Universite Grenoble Alpes, CNRS/IN2P3, Grenoble (France); Kirch, K.; Komposch, S.; Krempel, J.; Ries, D. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Institute for Particle Physics, ETH Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Kozela, A. [Henryk Niedwodniczanski Institute for Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland); Piegsa, F.M.; Rawlik, M. [Institute for Particle Physics, ETH Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Roccia, S. [CSNSM, Universite Paris Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, Orsay (France)

    2016-10-15

    This paper summarizes the results from measurements aiming to characterize ultracold neutron detection with {sup 6}Li-doped glass scintillators. Single GS10 or GS20 scintillators, with a thickness of 100-200μm, fulfill the ultracold neutron detection requirements with an acceptable neutron-gamma discrimination. This discrimination is clearly improved with a stack of two scintillators: a {sup 6}Li-depleted glass bonded to a {sup 6}Li-enriched glass. The technique of optical contact bonding is used between the two glasses in order to eliminate the need for optical glue or grease between them. Relative to a {sup 3}He Strelkov gas detector, the scintillator's detection efficiency is lower for UCN energies close to the scintillator's Fermi potential (85-100 neV), but becomes larger at higher UCN energies. Coupled to a digital data acquisition system, counting rates up to a few 10{sup 5} counts/s can be handled. A detector based on such a scintillator stack arrangement was built and has been used in the neutron electric dipole moment experiment at the Paul Scherrer Institute since 2010. Its response for routine runs of the neutron electric dipole moment experiment is presented. (orig.)

  7. Ultracold neutron detection with 6Li-doped glass scintillators, NANOSC: a fast ultracold neutron detector for the nEDM experiment at the Paul Scherrer Institute

    CERN Document Server

    Ban, G; Bodek, K; Chowdhuri, Z; Geltenbort, P; Griffith, W C; Hélaine, V; Henneck, R; Kasprzak, M; Kermaidic, Y; Kirch, K; Komposch, S; Koss, P A; Kozela, A; Krempel, J; Lauss, B; Lefort, T; Lemière, Y; Mtchedlishvili, A; Musgrave, M; Naviliat-Cuncic, O; Piegsa, F M; Pierre, E; Pignol, G; Quéméner, G; Rawlik, M; Ries, D; Rebreyend, D; Roccia, S; Rogel, G; Schmidt-Wellenburg, P; Severijns, N; Wursten, E; Zejma, J; Zsigmond, G

    2016-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results from measurements aiming to characterize ultracold neutron detection with 6Li-doped glass scintillators. Single GS10 or GS20 scintillators, with a thickness of 100-200 micrometer, fulfill the ultracold neutron detection requirements with an acceptable neutron-gamma discrimination. This discrimination is clearly improved with a stack of two scintillators: a 6Li-depleted glass bonded to a 6Li-enriched glass. The optical contact bonding is used between the scintillators in order to obtain a perfect optical contact. The scintillator's detection efficiency is similar to that of a 3He Strelkov gas detector. Coupled to a digital data acquisition system, counting rates up to a few 10^5 counts/s can be handled. A detector based on such a scintillator stack arrangement was built and has been used in the neutron electric dipole moment experiment at the Paul Scherrer Institute since 2010. Its response for the regular runs of the neutron electric dipole moment experiment is presented.

  8. Ultracold neutron detection with 6Li-doped glass scintillators. NANOSC: A fast ultracold neutron detector for the nEDM experiment at the Paul Scherrer Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, G.; Bison, G.; Bodek, K.; Chowdhuri, Z.; Geltenbort, P.; Griffith, W. C.; Hélaine, V.; Henneck, R.; Kasprzak, M.; Kermaidic, Y.; Kirch, K.; Komposch, S.; Koss, P. A.; Kozela, A.; Krempel, J.; Lauss, B.; Lefort, T.; Lemière, Y.; Mtchedlishvili, A.; Musgrave, M.; Naviliat-Cuncic, O.; Piegsa, F. M.; Pierre, E.; Pignol, G.; Quéméner, G.; Rawlik, M.; Ries, D.; Rebreyend, D.; Roccia, S.; Rogel, G.; Schmidt-Wellenburg, P.; Severijns, N.; Wursten, E.; Zejma, J.; Zsigmond, G.

    2016-10-01

    This paper summarizes the results from measurements aiming to characterize ultracold neutron detection with 6Li-doped glass scintillators. Single GS10 or GS20 scintillators, with a thickness of 100-200μm, fulfill the ultracold neutron detection requirements with an acceptable neutron-gamma discrimination. This discrimination is clearly improved with a stack of two scintillators: a 6Li-depleted glass bonded to a 6Li-enriched glass. The technique of optical contact bonding is used between the two glasses in order to eliminate the need for optical glue or grease between them. Relative to a 3He Strelkov gas detector, the scintillator's detection efficiency is lower for UCN energies close to the scintillator's Fermi potential (85-100 neV), but becomes larger at higher UCN energies. Coupled to a digital data acquisition system, counting rates up to a few 105 counts/s can be handled. A detector based on such a scintillator stack arrangement was built and has been used in the neutron electric dipole moment experiment at the Paul Scherrer Institute since 2010. Its response for routine runs of the neutron electric dipole moment experiment is presented.

  9. Indirect flat-panel detector with avalanche gain: fundamental feasibility investigation for SHARP-AMFPI (scintillator HARP active matrix flat panel imager).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Li, Dan; Reznik, Alla; Lui, B J M; Hunt, D C; Rowlands, J A; Ohkawa, Yuji; Tanioka, Kenkichi

    2005-09-01

    An indirect flat-panel imager (FPI) with avalanche gain is being investigated for low-dose x-ray imaging. It is made by optically coupling a structured x-ray scintillator CsI(Tl) to an amorphous selenium (a-Se) avalanche photoconductor called HARP (high-gain avalanche rushing photoconductor). The final electronic image is read out using an active matrix array of thin film transistors (TFT). We call the proposed detector SHARP-AMFPI (scintillator HARP active matrix flat panel imager). The advantage of the SHARP-AMFPI is its programmable gain, which can be turned on during low dose fluoroscopy to overcome electronic noise, and turned off during high dose radiography to avoid pixel saturation. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the important design considerations for SHARP-AMFPI such as avalanche gain, which depends on both the thickness d(Se) and the applied electric field E(Se) of the HARP layer. To determine the optimal design parameter and operational conditions for HARP, we measured the E(Se) dependence of both avalanche gain and optical quantum efficiency of an 8 microm HARP layer. The results were used in a physical model of HARP as well as a linear cascaded model of the FPI to determine the following x-ray imaging properties in both the avalanche and nonavalanche modes as a function of E(Se): (1) total gain (which is the product of avalanche gain and optical quantum efficiency); (2) linearity; (3) dynamic range; (4) gain nonuniformity resulting from thickness nonuniformity; and (5) effects of direct x-ray interaction in HARP. Our results showed that a HARP layer thickness of 8 microm can provide adequate avalanche gain and sufficient dynamic range for x-ray imaging applications to permit quantum limited operation over the range of exposures needed for radiography and fluoroscopy.

  10. New semiconductor scintillators ZnSe(Te,O) and integrated radiation detectors based thereon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ryzhikov, [No Value; Starzhinskiy, N; Gal'chinetskii, L; Gashin, P; Kozin, D; Danshin, E

    2001-01-01

    Data are presented on properties of a new type of scintillator based on isovalently doped crystals of zinc selenide. Depending upon concentration of activating dopants Te and O, the wavelength of the luminescence maximum is 590-640 nm, response time is 1-50 mus, and afterglow level after 5 ms is not

  11. Low-energy neutron detector based upon lithium lanthanide borate scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czirr, John B.

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus for detecting neutrons includes a cerium activated scintillation crystal containing .sup.10 B, with the scintillation crystal emitting light in response to .alpha. particles emitted from the .sup.10 B(n,.alpha.)Li* reaction. The apparatus also includes a gamma scintillator positioned adjacent the crystal and which generates light in response to gamma rays emitted from the decay of Li*. The apparatus further includes a first and a second light-to-electronic signal converter each positioned to respectively receive light from the crystal and the gamma scintillator, and each respectively outputting first and second electronic signals representative of .alpha. particles from the .sup.10 B(n,.alpha.)Li* reaction and gamma rays from the .sup.10 B(n,.alpha.)Li* reaction. The apparatus includes a coincidence circuit connected to receive the first and second signals and which generates a coincidence signal when the first and second signals coincide. The apparatus also includes a data analyzer for receiving an additional signal from at least one of the first and second converters, and for operating in response to the coincidence signal.

  12. Solid State Recrystallization of Single Crystal Ce:LSO Scintillator Crystals for High Resolution Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    this report. The property measurements that have been focused on were the assessment of density ( Archimedes ). grain structure {optical and SEM...Scintillator", Materials Letters 60 1960-1963 (2006) [15] J.S. Reed, Forming Processes, Chapter 20 in Introduction to the Principles of Ceramic

  13. Low-Background Experiments with High Pressure Gas Scintillation Proportional Detector

    OpenAIRE

    Akimov, D.Yu.; Burenkov, A. A; Kuzichev, V. F.; Morgunov, V. L.; Solovov, V.N.

    1997-01-01

    A scintillation proportional counter with wavelength shifting fiber readout filled with Xe or Kr under a pressure of up to 20 atm is proposed for the low-background experiments on search for dark matter of the Universe and 2K-decay of 78 Kr.

  14. L3+C air shower array

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2000-01-01

    Photo 01: a view of the L3+C air shower array; 50 scintillators on the roof of the SX-hall above L3. Photo 02: view of one of the detectors of the array.Photo 04: detectors seen against the background of the LEP Point 2 facilities.

  15. High-Speed, Low Power 256 Channel Gamma Radiation Array Detector ASIC Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Building on prior success in detector electronics, we propose to design and fabricate a 256 channel readout ASIC for solid state gamma radiation array detectors...

  16. Structured scintillators for X-ray imaging with micrometre resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Ulrik Lund; Schmidt, Søren; Poulsen, Henning Friis

    2009-01-01

    A 3D X-ray detector for imaging of 30–200 keV photons is described. It comprises a stack of semitransparent structured scintillators, where each scintillator is a regular array of waveguides in silicon, and with pores filled with CsI. The performance of the detector is described theoretically...... and explored in detail through simulations. The resolution of a single screen is shown to be determined only by the pitch, at least up to 100 keV. In comparison to conventional homogenous screens an improvement in efficiency by a factor 5–15 is obtainable. The cross-talk between screens in the 3D detector...... used regular scintillators with similar resolution an efficiency increase by a factor 4 has been found for the structured scintillator....

  17. Characterization of a GEM-based scintillation detector with He-CF4 gas mixture in clinical proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichiporov, D.; Coutinho, L.; Klyachko, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    Accurate, high-spatial resolution dosimetry in proton therapy is a time consuming task, and may be challenging in the case of small fields, due to the lack of adequate instrumentation. The purpose of this work is to develop a novel dose imaging detector with high spatial resolution and tissue equivalent response to dose in the Bragg peak, suitable for beam commissioning and quality assurance measurements. A scintillation gas electron multiplier (GEM) detector based on a double GEM amplification structure with optical readout was filled with a He/CF4 gas mixture and evaluated in pristine and modulated proton beams of several penetration ranges. The detector’s performance was characterized in terms of linearity in dose rate, spatial resolution, short- and long-term stability and tissue-equivalence of response at different energies. Depth-dose profiles measured with the GEM detector in the 115-205 MeV energy range were compared with the profiles measured under similar conditions using the PinPoint 3D small-volume ion chamber. The GEM detector filled with a He-based mixture has a nearly tissue equivalent response in the proton beam and may become an attractive and efficient tool for high-resolution 2D and 3D dose imaging in proton dosimetry, and especially in small-field applications.

  18. MUST: A silicon strip detector array for radioactive beam experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Blumenfeld, Y; Sauvestre, J E; Maréchal, F; Ottini, S; Alamanos, N; Barbier, A; Beaumel, D; Bonnereau, B; Charlet, D; Clavelin, J F; Courtat, P; Delbourgo-Salvador, P; Douet, R; Engrand, M; Ethvignot, T; Gillibert, A; Khan, E; Lapoux, V; Lagoyannis, A; Lavergne, L; Lebon, S; Lelong, P; Lesage, A; Le Ven, V; Lhenry, I; Martin, J M; Musumarra, A; Pita, S; Petizon, L; Pollacco, E; Pouthas, J; Richard, A; Rougier, D; Santonocito, D; Scarpaci, J A; Sida, J L; Soulet, C; Stutzmann, J S; Suomijärvi, T; Szmigiel, M; Volkov, P; Voltolini, G

    1999-01-01

    A new and innovative array, MUST, based on silicon strip technology and dedicated to the study of reactions induced by radioactive beams on light particles is described. The detector consists of 8 silicon strip - Si(Li) telescopes used to identify recoiling light charged particles through time of flight, energy loss and energy measurements and to determine precisely their scattering angle through X, Y position measurements. Each 60x60 mm sup 2 double sided silicon strip detector with 60 vertical and 60 horizontal strips yields an X-Y position resolution of 1 mm, an energy resolution of 50 keV, a time resolution of around 1 ns and a 500 keV energy threshold for protons. The backing Si(Li) detectors stop protons up to 25 MeV with a resolution of approximately 50 keV. CsI crystals read out by photo-diodes which stop protons up to 70 MeV are added to the telescopes for applications where higher energy particles need to be detected. The dedicated electronics in VXIbus standard allow us to house the 968 logic and a...

  19. A count-rate model for PET scanners using pixelated Anger-logic detectors with different scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surti, S; Karp, J S [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, 110 Donner Building (HUP), 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2005-12-07

    A high count-rate simulation (HCRSim) model has been developed so that all results are derived from fundamental physics principles. Originally developed to study the behaviour of continuous sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) detectors, this model is now applied to PET scanners based on pixelated Anger-logic detectors using lanthanum bromide (LaBr{sub 3}), gadolinium orthosilicate (GSO) and lutetium orthosilicate (LSO) scintillators. This simulation has been used to study the effect on scanner deadtime and pulse pileup at high activity levels due to the scintillator stopping power ({mu}), decay time ({tau}) and energy resolution. Simulations were performed for a uniform 20 cm diameter x 70 cm long cylinder (NEMA NU2-2001 standard) in a whole-body scanner with an 85 cm ring diameter and a 25 cm axial field-of-view. Our results for these whole-body scanners demonstrate the potential of a pixelated Anger-logic detector and the relationship of its performance with the scanner NEC rate. Faster signal decay and short coincidence timing window lead to a reduction in deadtime and randoms fraction in the LaBr{sub 3} and LSO scanners compared to GSO. The excellent energy resolution of LaBr{sub 3} leads to the lowest scatter fraction for all scanners and helps compensate for reduced sensitivity compared to the GSO and LSO scanners, leading to the highest NEC values at high activity concentrations. The LSO scanner has the highest sensitivity of all the scanner designs investigated here, therefore leading to the highest peak NEC value but at a lower activity concentration than that of LaBr{sub 3}.

  20. Advanced Antenna-Coupled Superconducting Detector Arrays for CMB Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, James

    2014-01-01

    We are developing high-sensitivity millimeter-wave detector arrays for measuring the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This development is directed to advance the technology readiness of the Inflation Probe mission in NASA's Physics of the Cosmos program. The Inflation Probe is a fourth-generation CMB satellite that will measure the polarization of the CMB to astrophysical limits, characterizing the inflationary polarization signal, mapping large-scale structure based on polarization induced by gravitational lensing, and mapping Galactic magnetic fields through measurements of polarized dust emission. The inflationary polarization signal is produced by a background of gravitational waves from the epoch of inflation, an exponential expansion of space-time in the early universe, with an amplitude that depends on the physical mechanism producing inflation. The inflationary polarization signal may be distinguished by its unique 'B-mode' vector properties from polarization from the density variations that predominantly source CMB temperature anisotropy. Mission concepts for the Inflation Probe are being developed in the US, Europe and Japan. The arrays are based on planar antennas that provide integral beam collimation, polarization analysis, and spectral band definition in a compact lithographed format that eliminates discrete fore-optics such as lenses and feedhorns. The antennas are coupled to transition-edge superconducting bolometers, read out with multiplexed SQUID current amplifiers. The superconducting sensors and readouts developed in this program share common technologies with NASA X-ray and FIR detector applications. Our program targets developments required for space observations, and we discuss our technical progress over the past two years and plans for future development. We are incorporating arrays into active sub-orbital and ground-based experiments, which advance technology readiness while producing state of the art CMB

  1. In-line X-slot element focal plane array of kinetic inductance detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iacono, A.; Freni, A.; Neto, A.; Gerini, G.

    2011-01-01

    Kinetic Inductance Detectors are very promising THz imaging devices to be used in Focal Plane Array configuration. In this work a new antenna feed element has been studied and optimized. Preliminary results on array configuration are also shown.

  2. Capillary Array Waveguide Amplified Fluorescence Detector for mHealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsam, Joshua; Bruck, Hugh Alan; Rasooly, Avraham

    2013-09-01

    array can potentially be used for sensitive analysis of multiple fluorescent detection assays simultaneously. The simple phone based capillary array approach presented in this paper is capable of amplifying weak fluorescent signals thereby improving the sensitivity of optical detectors based on mobile phones. This may allow sensitive biological assays to be measured with low sensitivity detectors and may make mHealth practical for many diagnostics applications, especially in resource-poor and global health settings.

  3. A high-rate sup 1 sup 0 B-loaded liquid scintillation detector for parity-violation studies in neutron resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Yen Yi Fen; Bolton, R D; Crawford, B E; Delheij, P P J; Hart, G W; Haseyama, T; Frankle, C M; Iinuma, M; Knudson, J N; Masaike, A; Masuda, Y; Matsuda, Y; Mitchell, G E; Penttilae, S I; Roberson, N R; Seestrom, S J; Sharapov, E I; Shimizu, H M; Smith, D A; Stephenson, S L; Szymanski, J J; Yoo, S H; Yuan, V W

    2000-01-01

    We have developed a large-area sup 1 sup 0 B-loaded liquid scintillation detector for parity-violation studies in neutron resonances with high instantaneous neutron fluxes from the LANSCE short-pulse spallation source. The detector has an efficiency of 95%, 85% and 71% at neutron energies of 10, 100 and 1000 eV, respectively. The neutron mean capture time in the detector is (416+-5) ns. We describe the detector and the current-mode signal processing system, that can handle neutron rates up to 500 MHz.

  4. Scintillation detector using an europium-doped calcium fluoride single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilar, O.; Pavlicek, Z.; Jursova, L. (Tesla, Premysleni (Czechoslovakia). Vyzkumny Ustav Pristroju Jaderne Techniky)

    1981-06-01

    A europium-doped calcium fluoride monocrystal-based scintillator is suitable for detecting X, alpha, beta and low-energy gamma radiations. It is resistant to thermal and mechanical shocks. Its outstanding physical properties include the index of refraction of 1.443. The results are reported of measuring the spectra of selected radionuclides and the energy resolution dependence on the gamma radiation energy.

  5. Upgrade of the POLDI diffractometer with a ZnS(Ag)/6LiF scintillation detector read out with WLS fibers coupled to SiPMs

    OpenAIRE

    Mosset, J. -B.; Stoykov, A.; Davydov, V.; Hildebrandt, M.; Van Swygenhoven, H.; W. Wagner

    2013-01-01

    A thermal neutron detector based on ZnS(Ag)/6LiF scintillator, wavelength-shifting fibers (WLS) and silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) is under development at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) for upgrading the POLDI instrument, a pulse-overlap diffractometer. The design of the detector is outlined, and the measurements performed on a single channel prototype are presented. An innovative signal processing system based on a photon counting approach is under development. Its principle of operation...

  6. Characterization of prototype full-field breast tomosynthesis by using a CMOS array coupled with a columnar CsI(Tl) scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jae-Gu; Choi, Young-Wook; Ham, Tae-Hee [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hye-Suk; Kim, Ye-Seul; Kim, Hee-Joung [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    We have developed a prototype full-field digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) system by using a complementary-metal-oxide semiconductive (CMOS) array coupled with a columnar CsI(Tl) scintillator. The imaging system consists of a matrix with an active detector area of 3072 x 3888 pixels and a pixel pitch of 74.8 μm. For tomosynthesis imaging, the X-ray tube is automatically rotated in 3 .deg. increments in the shoot mode to acquire projection images at 15 different angles over a ±21 .deg. angular range in less than 10 s. The digital detector is stationary during image acquisition. In this research, we also carried out evaluation studies to characterize the performance of the system in different operational modes designed for the DBT system, e.g., binning mode and the range of view angles, in terms of the modulation transfer function (MTF), the normalized noise power spectra (NNPS), and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE): The MTF value measured at the Nyquist frequency was 18.49%, the NNPS value at zero frequency was about 1.93 x 10{sup -5} (mm{sup 2}), and the maximum value of DQE was about 47.09% for the full resolution. For the pixel binning mode, the MTF decreased more than it did for the full resolution mode due to the increased effective pixel size. However, the full resolution mode was more sensitive to noise than the pixel binning mode. For the scan angle of the DBT system, oblique incidence of X-rays on a detector caused blurring that reduced resolution. These results seem to be promising for the use of the DBT system in potential clinical applications and will provide important information when comparisons with other DBT systems are made.

  7. Cone beam breast CT with a high pitch (75 μm), thick (500 μm) scintillator CMOS flat panel detector: Visibility of simulated microcalcifications

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To measure and investigate the improvement of microcalcification (MC) visibility in cone beam breast CT with a high pitch (75 μm), thick (500 μm) scintillator CMOS/CsI flat panel detector (Dexela 2923, Perkin Elmer).

  8. Separating Double-Beta Decay Events from Solar Neutrino Interactions in a Kiloton-Scale Liquid Scintillator Detector By Fast Timing

    CERN Document Server

    Elagin, Andrey; Naranjo, Brian; Ouellet, Jonathan; Winslow, Lindley; Wongjirad, Taritree

    2016-01-01

    We present a technique for separating nuclear double beta decay ($\\beta\\beta$-decay) events from background neutrino interactions due to $^{8}$B decays in the sun. This background becomes dominant in a kiloton-scale liquid-scintillator detector deep underground and is usually considered as irreducible due to an overlap in deposited energy with the signal. However, electrons from 0$\

  9. Investigations of surface coatings to reduce memory effect in plastic scintillator detectors used for radioxenon detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bläckberg, L.; Fay, A.; Jõgi, I.; Biegalski, S.; Boman, M.; Elmgren, K.; Fritioff, T.; Johansson, A.; Mårtensson, L.; Nielsen, F.; Ringbom, A.; Rooth, M.; Sjöstrand, H.; Klintenberg, M.

    2011-11-01

    In this work Al2O3 and SiO2 coatings are tested as Xe diffusion barriers on plastic scintillator substrates. The motivation is improved beta-gamma coincidence detection systems, used to measure atmospheric radioxenon within the verification regime of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. One major drawback with the current setup of these systems is that the radioxenon tends to diffuse into the plastic scintillator material responsible for the beta detection, resulting in an unwanted memory effect. Here, coatings with thicknesses between 20 and 900 nm have been deposited onto plastic scintillators, and investigated using two different experimental techniques. The results show that all tested coatings reduce the Xe diffusion into the plastic. The reduction is observed to increase with coating thickness for both coating materials. The 425 nm Al2O3 coating is the most successful one, presenting a diffusion reduction of a factor 100, compared to uncoated plastic. In terms of memory effect reduction this coating is thus a viable solution to the problem in question.

  10. Impact of the Fano Factor on Position and Energy Estimation in Scintillation Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bora, Vaibhav; Barrett, Harrison H; Jha, Abhinav K; Clarkson, Eric

    2015-02-01

    The Fano factor for an integer-valued random variable is defined as the ratio of its variance to its mean. Light from various scintillation crystals have been reported to have Fano factors from sub-Poisson (Fano factor factor > 1). For a given mean, a smaller Fano factor implies a smaller variance and thus less noise. We investigated if lower noise in the scintillation light will result in better spatial and energy resolutions. The impact of Fano factor on the estimation of position of interaction and energy deposited in simple gamma-camera geometries is estimated by two methods - calculating the Cramér-Rao bound and estimating the variance of a maximum likelihood estimator. The methods are consistent with each other and indicate that when estimating the position of interaction and energy deposited by a gamma-ray photon, the Fano factor of a scintillator does not affect the spatial resolution. A smaller Fano factor results in a better energy resolution.

  11. Investigations of surface coatings to reduce memory effect in plastic scintillator detectors used for radioxenon detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaeckberg, L., E-mail: lisa.blackberg@physics.uu.se [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Fay, A. [University of Texas at Austin, Nuclear Engineering Teaching Lab, J.J. Pickle Research Campus, R-9000 Austin, TX (United States); Jogi, I. [Department of Materials Chemistry, Uppsala University, Box 538, SE-75121 Uppsala (Sweden); Biegalski, S. [University of Texas at Austin, Nuclear Engineering Teaching Lab, J.J. Pickle Research Campus, R-9000 Austin, TX (United States); Boman, M. [Department of Materials Chemistry, Uppsala University, Box 538, SE-75121 Uppsala (Sweden); Elmgren, K.; Fritioff, T. [Division of Defence and Security Systems, Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI), SE-17290 Stockholm (Sweden); Johansson, A. [Nanexa AB, Virdings Alle 32B, SE-75450 Uppsala (Sweden); Martensson, L.; Nielsen, F.; Ringbom, A. [Division of Defence and Security Systems, Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI), SE-17290 Stockholm (Sweden); Rooth, M. [Nanexa AB, Virdings Alle 32B, SE-75450 Uppsala (Sweden); Sjoestrand, H.; Klintenberg, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2011-11-11

    In this work Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} coatings are tested as Xe diffusion barriers on plastic scintillator substrates. The motivation is improved beta-gamma coincidence detection systems, used to measure atmospheric radioxenon within the verification regime of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. One major drawback with the current setup of these systems is that the radioxenon tends to diffuse into the plastic scintillator material responsible for the beta detection, resulting in an unwanted memory effect. Here, coatings with thicknesses between 20 and 900 nm have been deposited onto plastic scintillators, and investigated using two different experimental techniques. The results show that all tested coatings reduce the Xe diffusion into the plastic. The reduction is observed to increase with coating thickness for both coating materials. The 425 nm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating is the most successful one, presenting a diffusion reduction of a factor 100, compared to uncoated plastic. In terms of memory effect reduction this coating is thus a viable solution to the problem in question.

  12. Mechanical Design and Development of TES Bolometer Detector Arrays for the Advanced ACTPol Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jonathan T.; Austermann, Jason; Beall, James A.; Choi, Steve K.; Crowley, Kevin T.; Devlin, Mark J.; Duff, Shannon M.; Gallardo, Patricio M.; Henderson, Shawn W.; Ho, Shuay-Pwu Patty; Hilton, Gene; Hubmayr, Johannes; Khavari, Niloufar; Klein, Jeffrey; Koopman, Brian J.; Li, Dale; McMahon, Jeffrey; Mumby, Grace; Nati, Federico; Wollack, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    The next generation Advanced ACTPol (AdvACT) experiment is currently underway and will consist of four Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometer arrays, with three operating together, totaling 5800 detectors on the sky. Building on experience gained with the ACTPol detector arrays, AdvACT will utilize various new technologies, including 150 mm detector wafers equipped with multichroic pixels, allowing for a more densely packed focal plane. Each set of detectors includes a feedhorn array of stacked silicon wafers which form a spline pro le leading to each pixel. This is then followed by a waveguide interface plate, detector wafer, back short cavity plate, and backshort cap. Each array is housed in a custom designed structure manufactured from high purity copper and then gold plated. In addition to the detector array assembly, the array package also encloses cryogenic readout electronics. We present the full mechanical design of the AdvACT high frequency (HF) detector array package along with a detailed look at the detector array stack assemblies. This experiment will also make use of extensive hardware and software previously developed for ACT, which will be modi ed to incorporate the new AdvACT instruments. Therefore, we discuss the integration of all AdvACT arrays with pre-existing ACTPol infrastructure.

  13. An investigation of the digital discrimination of neutrons and {gamma} rays with organic scintillation detectors using an artificial neural network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, G.; Aspinall, M.D.; Ma, X. [Department of Engineering, Lancaster University, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4YR (United Kingdom); Joyce, M.J. [Department of Engineering, Lancaster University, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4YR (United Kingdom)], E-mail: m.joyce@lancaster.ac.uk

    2009-08-21

    The discrimination of neutron and {gamma}-ray events in an organic scintillator has been investigated by using a method based on an artificial neural network (ANN). Voltage pulses arising from an EJ-301 organic liquid scintillation detector in a mixed radiation field have been recorded with a fast digital sampling oscilloscope. Piled-up events have been disentangled using a pile-up management unit based on a fitting method. Each individual pulse has subsequently been sent to a discrimination unit which discriminates neutron and {gamma}-ray events with a method based on an artificial neural network. This discrimination technique has been verified by the corresponding mixed-field data assessed by time of flight (TOF). It is shown that the characterization of the neutrons and photons achieved by the discrimination method based on the ANN is consistent with that afforded by TOF. This approach enables events that are often as a result of scattering or pile-up to be identified and returned to the data set and affords digital discrimination of mixed radiation fields in a broad range of environments on the basis of training obtained with a single TOF dataset.

  14. Evaluation of the photon transmission efficiency of light guides used in scintillation detectors using LightTools code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hye Min; Joo, Koan Sik; Kim, Jeong Ho; Kim, Dong Sung; Park, Ki Hyun; Park, Chan Jong; Han, Woo Jin [Dept. of Physics, Myongji University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    To optimize the photon transmission efficiency of light guides used in scintillation detectors, LightTools code, which can construct and track light, was used to analyze photon transmission effectiveness with respect to light guides thickness. This analysis was carried out using the commercial light guide, N-BK 7 Optical Glass by SCHOTT, as a model for this study. The luminous exitance characteristic of the LYSO scintillator was used to analyze the photon transmission effectiveness according to the thickness of the light guide. The results of the simulations showed the effectiveness of the photon transmission according to the thickness of the light guide, which was found to be distributed from 13.38% to 33.57%. In addition, the photon transmission efficiency was found to be the highest for light guides of 4 mm of thickness and a receiving angle of 49 .deg. . Through such simulations, it is confirmed that photon transmission efficiency depends on light guide thickness and subsequent changes in the internal angle of reflection. The aim is to produce an actual light guide based on these results and to evaluate its performance.

  15. A detector insert based on continuous scintillators for hybrid MR-PET imaging of the human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rato Mendes, P.; Cuerdo, R.; Sarasola, I.; García de Acilu, P.; Navarrete, J.; Vela, O.; Oller, J. C.; Cela, J. M.; Núñez, L.; Pastrana, M.; Romero, L.; Willmott, C.

    2013-02-01

    We are developing a positron emission tomography (PET) insert for existing magnetic resonance (MR) equipment, aiming at hybrid MR-PET imaging. Our detector block design is based on trapezoid-shaped LYSO:Ce monolithic scintillators coupled to magnetically compatible Hamamatsu S8550-02 silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) matrices with a dedicated ASIC front-end readout from GammaMedica-Ideas (Fornebu, Norway). The detectors are position sensitive, capable of determining the incidence point of 511 keV gammas with an intrinsic spatial resolution on the order of 2 mm by means of supervised learning neural-network (NN) algorithms. These algorithms, apart from providing continuous coordinates, are also intrinsically corrected for depth of interaction effects and thus parallax-free. Recently we have implemented an advanced prototype featuring two heads with four detector blocks each and final front-end and readout electronics, improving the spatial resolution of reconstructed point source images down to 1.7 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM). Presently we are carrying out operational tests of components and systems under magnetic fields using a 3 T MR scanner. In this paper we present a description of our project, a summary of the results obtained with laboratory prototypes, and the strategy to build and install the complete system at the nuclear medicine department of a collaborating hospital.

  16. A detector insert based on continuous scintillators for hybrid MR–PET imaging of the human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rato Mendes, P., E-mail: pedro.rato@ciemat.es [CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Cuerdo, R.; Sarasola, I.; García de Acilu, P.; Navarrete, J.; Vela, O.; Oller, J.C.; Cela, J.M. [CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Núñez, L.; Pastrana, M. [Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro Majadahonda, Manuel de Falla 1, 28222 Majadahonda (Spain); Romero, L.; Willmott, C. [CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-02-21

    We are developing a positron emission tomography (PET) insert for existing magnetic resonance (MR) equipment, aiming at hybrid MR–PET imaging. Our detector block design is based on trapezoid-shaped LYSO:Ce monolithic scintillators coupled to magnetically compatible Hamamatsu S8550-02 silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) matrices with a dedicated ASIC front-end readout from GammaMedica-Ideas (Fornebu, Norway). The detectors are position sensitive, capable of determining the incidence point of 511 keV gammas with an intrinsic spatial resolution on the order of 2 mm by means of supervised learning neural-network (NN) algorithms. These algorithms, apart from providing continuous coordinates, are also intrinsically corrected for depth of interaction effects and thus parallax-free. Recently we have implemented an advanced prototype featuring two heads with four detector blocks each and final front-end and readout electronics, improving the spatial resolution of reconstructed point source images down to 1.7 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM). Presently we are carrying out operational tests of components and systems under magnetic fields using a 3 T MR scanner. In this paper we present a description of our project, a summary of the results obtained with laboratory prototypes, and the strategy to build and install the complete system at the nuclear medicine department of a collaborating hospital.

  17. Separating double-beta decay events from solar neutrino interactions in a kiloton-scale liquid scintillator detector by fast timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elagin, Andrey; Frisch, Henry J.; Naranjo, Brian; Ouellet, Jonathan; Winslow, Lindley; Wongjirad, Taritree

    2017-03-01

    We present a technique for separating nuclear double beta decay (ββ -decay) events from background neutrino interactions due to 8B decays in the sun. This background becomes dominant in a kiloton-scale liquid-scintillator detector deep underground and is usually considered as irreducible due to an overlap in deposited energy with the signal. However, electrons from 0 νββ -decay often exceed the Cherenkov threshold in liquid scintillator, producing photons that are prompt and correlated in direction with the initial electron direction. The use of large-area fast photodetectors allows some separation of these prompt photons from delayed isotropic scintillation light and, thus, the possibility of reconstructing the event topology. Using a simulation of a 6.5 m radius liquid scintillator detector with 100 ps resolution photodetectors, we show that a spherical harmonics analysis of early-arrival light can discriminate between 0 νββ -decay signal and 8B solar neutrino background events on a statistical basis. Good separation will require the development of a slow scintillator with a 5 ns risetime.

  18. Further study of CdWO4 crystal scintillators as detectors for high sensitivity double beta experiments: scintillation properties and pulse-shape discrimination

    CERN Document Server

    Bardelli, L; Bizzeti, P G; Carraresi, L; Danevich, F A; Fazzini, T F; Grinyov, B V; Ivannikova, N V; Kobychev, V V; Kropivyansky, B N; Maurenzig, P R; Nagornaya, L L; Nagorny, S S; Nikolaiko, A S; Pavlyuk, A A; Poda, D V; Solsky, I M; Sopinskyy, M V; Stenin, Y G; Taccetti, F; Tretyak, V I; Vasiliev, Y V; Yurchenko, S S; Stenin, Yu. G.; Vasiliev, Ya. V.

    2006-01-01

    Energy resolution, light yield, non-proportionality in the scintillation response, alpha/beta ratio, pulse shape for gamma rays and alpha particles were studied with CdWO4 crystal scintillators. Some indication for a difference in the emission spectra for gamma rays and alpha particles was observed. No dependence of CdWO4 pulse shape on emission spectrum wavelengths under laser, alpha particles and gamma ray excitation was observed. Dependence of scintillation pulse shape for gamma quanta and alpha particles and pulse-shape discrimination ability on temperature was measured in the range of 0-24 degrees.

  19. Further study of CdWO{sub 4} crystal scintillators as detectors for high sensitivity 2{beta} experiments: Scintillation properties and pulse-shape discrimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardelli, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Firenze and INFN, 50019 Florence (Italy); Bini, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Firenze and INFN, 50019 Florence (Italy); Bizzeti, P.G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Firenze and INFN, 50019 Florence (Italy); Carraresi, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Firenze and INFN, 50019 Florence (Italy); Danevich, F.A. [Institute for Nuclear Research, MSP 03680 Kiev (Ukraine)]. E-mail: danevich@kinr.kiev.ua; Fazzini, T.F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Firenze and INFN, 50019 Florence (Italy); Grinyov, B.V. [Institute for Scintillation Materials, 61001 Kharkov (Ukraine); Ivannikova, N.V. [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Kobychev, V.V. [Institute for Nuclear Research, MSP 03680 Kiev (Ukraine); Kropivyansky, B.N. [Institute for Nuclear Research, MSP 03680 Kiev (Ukraine); Maurenzig, P.R. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Firenze and INFN, 50019 Florence (Italy); Nagornaya, L.L. [Institute for Scintillation Materials, 61001 Kharkov (Ukraine); Nagorny, S.S. [Institute for Nuclear Research, MSP 03680 Kiev (Ukraine); Nikolaiko, A.S. [Institute for Nuclear Research, MSP 03680 Kiev (Ukraine); Pavlyuk, A.A. [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Poda, D.V. [Institute for Nuclear Research, MSP 03680 Kiev (Ukraine); Solsky, I.M. [Institute for Materials, 79031 Lviv (Ukraine); Sopinskyy, M.V. [Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, 03028 Kiev (Ukraine); Stenin, Yu.G. [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Taccetti, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Firenze and INFN, 50019 Florence (Italy); Tretyak, V.I.; Yurchenko, S.S. [Institute for Nuclear Research, MSP 03680 Kiev (Ukraine); Vasiliev, Ya.V. [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2006-12-21

    Energy resolution, non-proportionality in the scintillation response, {alpha}/{beta} ratio, pulse shape for {gamma} rays and {alpha} particles were studied with CdWO{sub 4} crystal scintillators. Some indication for a difference in the emission spectra for {gamma} rays and {alpha} particles was observed. No dependence of CdWO{sub 4} pulse shape on emission spectrum wavelengths under laser, {alpha} particles and {gamma} ray excitation was observed. Dependence of scintillation pulse shape for {gamma} quanta and {alpha} particles and pulse-shape discrimination ability on temperature was measured in the range of 0-24{sup o}C.

  20. Spectral modeling of scintillator for the NEMO-3 and SuperNEMO detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Argyriades, J; Augier, C; Baker, J; Barabash, A S; Bongrand, M; Broudin-Bay, G; Brudanin, V B; Caffrey, A J; Cebrián, S; Chapon, A; Chauveau, E; Dafni, Th; Daraktchieva, Z; iaz, J D; Durand, D; Egorov, V G; Evans, J J; Fatemi-Ghomi, N; Flack, R; Basharina-Freshville, A; Fushimi, K-I; Garrido, X; Gómez, H; Guillon, B; Holin, A; Holy, K; Horkey, J J; Hubert, Ph; Hugon, C; Iguaz, F J; Irastorza, I G; Ishihara, N; Jackson, C M; Jullian, S; Kanamaru, S; Kauer, M; Kochetov, O I; Konovalov, S I; Kovalenko, V E; Lalanne, D; Lang, K; ere, Y Lemi; Lutter, G; Luzón, G; Mamedov, F; Marquet, Ch; Martin-Albo, J; Mauger, F; Monrabal, F; Nachab, A; Nasteva, I; Nemchenok, I B; Nguyen, C H; Nova, F; Novella, P; Ohsumi, H; Pahlka, R B; Perrot, F; Piquemal, F; Povinec, P P; Richards, B; Ricol, J S; Riddle, C L; Rodriguez, A; Saakyan, R; Sarazin, X; Sedgbeer, J K; Serra, L; Simard, L; Šimkovic, F; Shitov, Yu A; Smolnikov, A A; Soldner-Rembold, S; Štekl, I; Sugaya, Y; Sutton, C S; Szklarz, G; Tamagawa, Y; Thomas, J; Thompson, R; Timkin, V V; Tretyak, V I; Tretyak, Vl I; Umatov, V I; ala, L V; Vanyushin, I A; Vasiliev, R; Vorobel, V; Vylov, Ts; Waters, D; Yahlali, N; Žukauskas, A

    2010-01-01

    We have constructed a GEANT4-based detailed software model of photon transport in plastic scintillator blocks and have used it to study the NEMO-3 and SuperNEMO calorimeters employed in experiments designed to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. We compare our simulations to measurements using conversion electrons from a calibration source of $\\rm ^{207}Bi$ and show that the agreement is improved if wavelength-dependent properties of the calorimeter are taken into account. In this article, we briefly describe our modeling approach and results of our studies.

  1. Direct and indirect signal detection of 122 keV photons with a novel detector combining a pnCCD and a CsI(Tl) scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlosser, D.M., E-mail: dieter.schlosser@pnsensor.de [PNSensor GmbH, Sckellstraße 3, 81667 München (Germany); Huth, M.; Hartmann, R. [PNSensor GmbH, Sckellstraße 3, 81667 München (Germany); Abboud, A.; Send, S. [Universität Siegen, Walter-Flex-Straße 3, 57072 Siegen (Germany); Conka-Nurdan, T. [Türkisch-Deutsche Universität, Sakinkaya Cad. 86, Beykoz, 34820 Istanbul (Turkey); Shokr, M.; Pietsch, U. [Universität Siegen, Walter-Flex-Straße 3, 57072 Siegen (Germany); Strüder, L. [PNSensor GmbH, Sckellstraße 3, 81667 München (Germany); Universität Siegen, Walter-Flex-Straße 3, 57072 Siegen (Germany)

    2016-01-01

    By combining a low noise fully depleted pnCCD detector with a CsI(Tl) scintillator, an energy-dispersive area detector can be realized with a high quantum efficiency (QE) in the range from below 1 keV to above 100 keV. In direct detection mode the pnCCD exhibits a relative energy resolution of 1% at 122 keV and spatial resolution of less than 75 µm, the pixel size of the pnCCD. In the indirect detection mode, i.e. conversion of the incoming X-rays in the scintillator, the measured energy resolution was about 9–13% at 122 keV, depending on the depth of interaction in the scintillator, while the position resolution, extracted with the help of simulations, was 30 µm only. We show simulated data for incident photons of 122 keV and compare the various interaction processes and relevant physical parameters to experimental results obtained with a radioactive {sup 57}Co source. - Highlights: • Position and energy resolving pnCCD+CsI(Tl) detector for energies from 1-150 keV • Detection in the pnCCD (122keV): 1% energy and <75µm spatial resolution • Detection in the scintillator (122keV): 9-12% energy and ~30µm spatial resolution.

  2. Fast scintillation timing detector using proportional-mode avalanche photodiode for nuclear resonant scattering experiments in high-energy synchrotron X-ray region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Keisuke; Kishimoto, Shunji

    2016-01-01

    To obtain both a high count rate of >107 s-1 and a detection efficiency sufficient for high-energy X-rays of >30 keV, we propose a scintillation timing detector using a proportional-mode silicon avalanche photodiode (Si-APD) for synchrotron radiation nuclear resonant scattering. We here present results obtained with a prototype detector using a lead-loaded plastic scintillator (EJ-256) mounted on a proportional-mode Si-APD (active area size: 3 mm in diameter). The detector was operated at ‒35 °C for a better signal-to-noise ratio. Using synchrotron X-rays of 67.41 keV, which is the same energy as the first excited level of 61Ni, we successfully measured pulse-height and time spectra of the scintillation light. A good time resolution of 0.50±0.06 ns (full width at half-maximum) was obtained for 67.41 keV X-rays with a scintillator 3 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick.

  3. Determination of the region of sensitivity of a scintillator detector NaI(Tl) (2 x 2)″ submerged in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candeiro, Ricardo E. de Miranda, E-mail: ricardocandeiro@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN/DIFOR), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Distrito de Fortaleza; Brandao, Luis E. Barreira, E-mail: brandao@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Souza, Elder M. de, E-mail: elder@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), RIo de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents the development of a methodology used to calculate the region of sensitivity of a scintillator detector NaI (Tl) (2 x 2)” submerged in water. The procedure was based in the simulation of a radioactive cloud (radiotracer), emitting anisotropy photons, that approximate of the submerged detector. This detector will be fixed into large industrial mixing. The detector registers the increase of the number of photons, because the solid angle and concentration of radiotracer also increase. Considering the absence of data in the literature, the methodology presented has your adequacy verified indirectly with a simple geometry that consists in a circular detector and one disk source in front of the detector. The theoretical and experimental tests were used for the determination of the region of sensitivity. The Simpson integration Method was used for the solid angle calculations and Monte Carlo Method was used for the validation of the employed geometry. The two methods were compared showing an error between 1.5% and 5%. In the experimental test was employed one disk source of the {sup 137}Cs, with radius of 1.2 cm and a collimated and not collimated scintillator detector NaI (Tl) (2 x 2)”. The counts were registered in three different plans enabling to determine the region of sensitivity of the detector. (author)

  4. Mathematical method for optimal digitization and discrimination of scintillation detectors' pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, H. I.

    2015-12-01

    The crystal identification and particle identification require applying pulse shape discrimination (PSD) methods to differentiate between two or more types of scintillation pulses according to their decay times. The sampling rate and the number of used samples of scintillation pulses significantly affect the performance and the complexity of the PSD. Despite their importance, there is no method in the literature, to the best of our knowledge, regarding how to optimally select these parameters. This paper introduces a mathematical analysis of the frequency spectra to determine the most discriminated frequency band of any two different pulse-types. The proposed analysis showed that the most discriminated frequency band depends on the two decay times of the pulse-types. Based on this analysis, a digitization criterion is proposed to determine the optimum sampling rate, number of used samples and the cutoff frequency of the anti-aliasing filter. Furthermore, determining the most discriminated frequency band reduces the number of needed frequency components and provides the highest discrimination performance with the lowest number of required computations. The proposed digitization criterion is applied on two pulse-types with different decay times (20 ns and 40 ns) and shows that the most discriminated frequency is 8 MHz . It also recommends using 32 MHz sampling rate, 8 samples and an anti-aliasing filter with 10 MHz cutoff frequency for these two pulse-types.

  5. Demonstration of a passive, low-noise, millimeter-wave detector array for imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikner, David; Grossman, Erich

    2009-05-01

    The design of a millimeter-wave (MMW) camera is presented. The camera is meant to serve as a demonstration platform for a new 32-channel MMW detector array that requires no pre-amplification prior to detection. The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have worked with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and several contractors for four years to develop an affordable MMW detector array technology suitable for use in a large staring array. The camera described uses one particular embodiment of detector array that resulted from the program. This paper reviews the design of the MMW optics that will be used to form imagery with the linear array and the tradeoffs made in that design. Also presented are the results of laboratory tests of the detector array that were made at both ARL and NIST.

  6. Digital signal processing for a thermal neutron detector using ZnS(Ag):6LiF scintillating layers read out with WLS fibers and SiPMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosset, J.-B.; Stoykov, A.; Greuter, U.; Hildebrandt, M.; Schlumpf, N.

    2016-07-01

    We present a digital signal processing system based on a photon counting approach which we developed for a thermal neutron detector consisting of ZnS(Ag):6LiF scintillating layers read out with WLS fibers and SiPMs. Three digital filters have been evaluated: a moving sum, a moving sum after differentiation and a digital CR-RC4 filter. The performances of the detector with these filters are presented. A full analog signal processing using a CR-RC4 filter has been emulated digitally. The detector performance obtained with this analog approach is compared with the one obtained with the best performing digital approach.

  7. Digital signal processing for a thermal neutron detector using ZnS(Ag):6LiF scintillating layers read out with WLS fibers and SiPMs

    CERN Document Server

    Mosset, J -B; Greuter, U; Hildebrandt, M; Schlumpf, N

    2015-01-01

    We present a digital signal processing system based on a photon counting approach which we developed for a thermal neutron detector consisting of ZnS(Ag):6LiF scintillating layers read out with WLS fibers and SiPMs. Three digital filters have been evaluated: a moving sum, a moving sum after differentiation and a digital CR-RC^4 filter. The performances of the detector with these filters are presented. A full analog signal processing using a CR-RC^4 filter has been emulated digitally. The detector performance obtained with this analog approach is compared with the one obtained with the best performing digital approach.

  8. Development of a scintillator detector set with counter and data acquisition for flow measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, F E D

    2002-01-01

    A portable counter with data acquisition system for flow measurements was developed, using the pulse velocity technique. This consists in determining the tracer transit time mixed homogeneously to the liquid or gas pipelines. The counter comprises: (a) two CsI(Tl) crystals solid state detectors, associated with Si PIN photodiodes, with compatible sensitivity to the injected radiotracers activities; (b) amplification units; (c) analogue-to-digital interface, which processes and displays the detectors counting separately and in real time, but in a same temporal axis, via a computer screen and (d) 30-m coaxial cables for signals transmission from each detector to the processing unit. Experiments were carried out for the detector and associated electronic characterizations. The equipment showed to be suitable for flow measurements in an industrial plant, in the real situation.

  9. Nanocrystalline Mg-doped Zinc Oxide Scintillator for UV detectors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA uses detectors for a broad range of wavelengths from UV to gamma for applications in astrophysics, earth science, heliophysics, and planetary science. Mg-doped...

  10. Radiation damages in chemical components of organic scintillator detectors; Danos de radiacao em componentes quimicos de detectores cintiladores organicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes Neto, Jose Maria

    2003-07-01

    Samples containing PPO (1%, g/ml), diluted in toluene, they were irradiated in a {sup 60}Co irradiator (6.46 kGy/h) at different doses. The PPO concentration decay bi-exponentially with the dose, generating the degradation products: benzoic acid, benzamide and benzilic alcohol. The liquid scintillator system was not sensitive to the radiation damage until 20 kGy. Otherwise, the pulse height analysis showed that dose among 30 to 40 kGy generate significant loss of quality of the sensor (liquid scintillating) and the light yield was reduced in half with the dose of (34.04 {+-} 0.80) kGy. This value practically was confirmed by the photo peak position analysis that resulted D{sub 1/2} = (31.7 {+-} 1,4) kGy, The transmittance, at 360 nm, of the irradiated solution decreased exponentially. The compartmental model using five compartments (fast decay PPO, slow decay PPO, benzamide, benzoic acid and benzilic alcohol) it was satisfactory to explain the decay of the PPO in its degradation products in function of the dose. The explanation coefficient r{sup 2} = 0.985636 assures that the model was capable to explain 98.6% of the experimental variations. The Target Theory together with the Compartmental Analysis showed that PPO irradiated in toluene solution presents two sensitive molecular diameters both of them larger than the true PPO diameter. >From this analysis it showed that the radiolytic are generated, comparatively, at four toluene molecules diameter far from PPO molecules. For each one PPO-target it was calculated the G parameter (damage/100 eV). For the target expressed by the fast decay the G value was (418.4 {+-} 54.1) damages/100 eV, and for the slow decay target the G value was (54.5 {+-} 8.9) damages/100 eV. The energies involved in the chemical reactions were w (0.239 {+-} 0.031) eV/damage (fast decay) and w = (1 834 {+-} 0.301) eV/damage (slow decay). (author)

  11. The sensitivity of LaBr{sub 3}:Ce scintillation detectors to low energy neutrons: Measurement and Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tain, J.L., E-mail: tain@ific.uv.es [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC–Universidad de Valencia, Apdo. Correos 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Agramunt, J.; Algora, A. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC–Universidad de Valencia, Apdo. Correos 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Aprahamian, A. [University of Notre Dame, Department of Physics, IN 46556, Notre Dame (United States); Cano-Ott, D. [Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas Medioambientales y Tecnológicas, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Fraile, L.M. [Universidad Complutense, Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, CEI Moncloa, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Guerrero, C. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Jordan, M.D. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC–Universidad de Valencia, Apdo. Correos 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Mach, H. [University of Notre Dame, Department of Physics, IN 46556, Notre Dame (United States); Universidad Complutense, Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, CEI Moncloa, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Martinez, T.; Mendoza, E. [Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas Medioambientales y Tecnológicas, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Mosconi, M.; Nolte, R. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, D-38116 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2015-02-21

    The neutron sensitivity of a cylindrical ⊘1.5 in.×1.5 in. LaBr{sub 3}:Ce scintillation detector was measured using quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams in the energy range from 40 keV to 2.5 MeV. In this energy range the detector is sensitive to γ-rays generated in neutron inelastic and capture processes. The experimental energy response was compared with Monte Carlo simulations performed with the Geant4 simulation toolkit using the so-called High Precision Neutron Models. These models rely on relevant information stored in evaluated nuclear data libraries. The performance of the Geant4 Neutron Data Library as well as several standard nuclear data libraries was investigated. In the latter case this was made possible by the use of a conversion tool that allowed the direct use of the data from other libraries in Geant4. Overall it was found that there was good agreement with experiment for some of the neutron data bases like ENDF/B-VII.0 or JENDL-3.3 but not with the others such as ENDF/B-VI.8 or JEFF-3.1.

  12. Extension of dynamic range in X-ray radiography using multi-color scintillation detector

    CERN Document Server

    Nittoh, K; Sakurai, T; Yoshida, T; Mochiki, K I

    2003-01-01

    A new imaging system using the multi-color scintillator Gd sub 2 O sub 2 S:Eu has been developed for the X-ray radiography. In this method a color Charge Coupled Device detects the weak blue and green photons associated with the transitions from the terms like sup 5 D sub 1 and sup 5 D sub 2 in the Eu-ions as well as the dominant red photons. As these transitions become appreciable and saturate at quite different intensity levels of the X-ray, we can realize a big extension of the dynamic range of the imaging almost by hundred times in comparison with the conventional monochromatic method. As a result, the new system makes it possible to take a clear image of any complex object, which consists of various parts of the different X-ray penetrability, from plastic to heavy metal, at a single shot.

  13. Precision charge amplification and digitization system for a scintillating and lead glass array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delchamps, S.W.; Rameika, R.; Arenton, M.; Chen, T.Y.; Conetti, S.; Cox, B.; Etemadi, B.; Fortney, L.; Guffey, K.; Haire, M.

    1989-01-01

    A 544-channel low-noise, high-rate, precision charge amplification and ADC system was constructed for the Fermilab Experiment 705 electromagnetic calorimeter, which employs SCG1-C scintillating glass and SF5 lead glass instrumented with photo-multiplier tubes. A general discussion of the system is given, and the charge amplification, fast trigger pulse generation, and analog to digital conversion aspects of the system are presented in more detail. Performance is evaluated using data from Experiment 705 and from off-line tests. Short and long term pedestal stability, baseline recovery and rate capability, linearity of response, and crosstalk between channels are discussed. 8 refs., 2 tabs.

  14. The Energy Spectrum of Telescope Array's Middle Drum Detector and the Direct Comparison to the High Resolution Fly's Eye Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Abu-Zayyad, T; Allen, M; Anderson, R; Azuma, R; Barcikowski, E; Belz, J W; Bergman, D R; Blake, S A; Cady, R; Cheon, B G; Chiba, J; Chikawa, M; Cho, E J; Cho, W R; Fujii, H; Fujii, T; Fukuda, T; Fukushima, M; Gorbunov, D; Hanlon, W; Hayashi, K; Hayashi, Y; Hayashida, N; Hibino, K; Hiyama, K; Honda, K; Iguchi, T; Ikeda, D; Ikuta, K; Inoue, N; Ishii, T; Ishimori, R; Ivanov, D; Iwamoto, S; Jui, C C H; Kadota, K; Kakimoto, F; Kalashev, O; Kanbe, T; Kasahara, K; Kawai, H; Kawakami, S; Kawana, S; Kido, E; Kim, H B; Kim, H K; Kim, J H; Kim, J H; Kitamoto, K; Kitamura, S; Kitamura, Y; Kobayashi, K; Kobayashi, Y; Kondo, Y; Kuramoto, K; Kuzmin, V; Kwon, Y J; Lim, S I; Machida, S; Martens, K; Martineau, J; Matsuda, T; Matsuura, T; Matsuyama, T; Matthews, J N; Minamino, M; Miyata, K; Murano, Y; Nagataki, S; Nakamura, T; Nam, S W; Nonaka, T; Ogio, S; Ohnishi, M; Ohoka, H; Oki, K; Oku, D; Okuda, T; Oshima, A; Ozawa, S; Park, I H; Pshirkov, M S; Rodriguez, D C; Roh, S Y; Rubtsov, G; Ryu, D; Sagawa, H; Sakurai, N; Sampson, A L; Scott, L M; Shah, P D; Shibata, F; Shibata, T; Shimodaira, H; Shin, B K; Shin, J I; Shirahama, T; Smith, J D; Sokolsky, P; Sonley, T J; Springer, R W; Stokes, B T; Stratton, S R; Stroman, T; Suzuki, S; Takahashi, Y; Takeda, M; Taketa, A; Takita, M; Tameda, Y; Tanaka, H; Tanaka, K; Tanaka, M; Thomas, S B; Thomson, G B; Tinyakov, P; Tkachev, I; Tokuno, H; Tomida, T; Troitsky, S; Tsunesada, Y; Tsutsumi, K; Tsuyuguchi, Y; Uchihori, Y; Udo, S; Ukai, H; Vasiloff, G; Wada, Y; Wong, T; Wood, M; Yamakawa, Y; Yamane, R; Yamaoka, H; Yamazaki, K; Yang, J; Yoneda, Y; Yoshida, S; Yoshii, H; Zollinger, R; Zundel, Z

    2012-01-01

    The Telescope Array's Middle Drum fluorescence detector was instrumented with telescopes refurbished from the High Resolution Fly's Eye's HiRes-1 site. The data observed by Middle Drum in monocular mode was analyzed via the HiRes-1 profile-constrained geometry reconstruction technique and utilized the same calibration techniques enabling a direct comparison of the energy spectra and energy scales between the two experiments. The spectrum measured using the Middle Drum telescopes is based on a three-year exposure collected between December 16, 2007 and December 16, 2010. The calculated difference between the spectrum of the Middle Drum observations and the published spectrum obtained by the data collected by the HiRes-1 site allows the HiRes-1 energy scale to be transferred to Middle Drum. The HiRes energy scale is applied to the entire Telescope Array by making a comparison between Middle Drum monocular events and hybrid events that triggered both Middle Drum and the Telescope Array's scintillator Ground Arra...

  15. hybridMANTIS: a CPU-GPU Monte Carlo method for modeling indirect x-ray detectors with columnar scintillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Diksha; Badal, Andreu; Badano, Aldo

    2012-04-21

    The computational modeling of medical imaging systems often requires obtaining a large number of simulated images with low statistical uncertainty which translates into prohibitive computing times. We describe a novel hybrid approach for Monte Carlo simulations that maximizes utilization of CPUs and GPUs in modern workstations. We apply the method to the modeling of indirect x-ray detectors using a new and improved version of the code MANTIS, an open source software tool used for the Monte Carlo simulations of indirect x-ray imagers. We first describe a GPU implementation of the physics and geometry models in fastDETECT2 (the optical transport model) and a serial CPU version of the same code. We discuss its new features like on-the-fly column geometry and columnar crosstalk in relation to the MANTIS code, and point out areas where our model provides more flexibility for the modeling of realistic columnar structures in large area detectors. Second, we modify PENELOPE (the open source software package that handles the x-ray and electron transport in MANTIS) to allow direct output of location and energy deposited during x-ray and electron interactions occurring within the scintillator. This information is then handled by optical transport routines in fastDETECT2. A load balancer dynamically allocates optical transport showers to the GPU and CPU computing cores. Our hybridMANTIS approach achieves a significant speed-up factor of 627 when compared to MANTIS and of 35 when compared to the same code running only in a CPU instead of a GPU. Using hybridMANTIS, we successfully hide hours of optical transport time by running it in parallel with the x-ray and electron transport, thus shifting the computational bottleneck from optical tox-ray transport. The new code requires much less memory than MANTIS and, asa result, allows us to efficiently simulate large area detectors.

  16. MCNP modelling of scintillation-detector gamma-ray spectra from natural radionuclides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Peter; Maucec, M; de Meijer, RJ

    2002-01-01

    gamma-ray spectra of natural radionuclides are simulated for a BGO detector in a borehole geometry using the Monte Carlo code MCNP. All gamma-ray emissions of the decay of K-40 and the series of Th-232 and U-238 are used to describe the source. A procedure is proposed which excludes the time-consumi

  17. SCINTILLA A European project for the development of scintillation detectors and new technologies for nuclear security

    CERN Document Server

    Alemberti, A; Botta, E; De Vita, R; Fanchini, E; Firpo, G

    2014-01-01

    Europe monitors transits using radiation detectors to prevent illicit trafficking of nuclear materials. The SCINTILLA project aims to develop a toolbox of innovative technologies designed to address different usage cases. This article will review the scope, approach, results of the first benchmark campaign and future plans of the SCINTILLA project.

  18. Multiplexed readout of MMC detector arrays using non-hysteretic rf-SQUIDs

    OpenAIRE

    Kempf, S.; Wegner, M; Gastaldo, L.; Fleischmann, A.; Enss, C.

    2013-01-01

    Metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs) are widely used for various experiments in fields ranging from atomic and nuclear physics to x-ray spectroscopy, laboratory astrophysics or material science. Whereas in previous experiments single pixel detectors or small arrays have been used, for future applications large arrays are needed. Therefore, suitable multiplexing techniques for MMC arrays are currently under development. A promising approach for the readout of large arrays is the microwave SQU...

  19. Scintillator counters with WLS fiber/MPPC readout for the side muon range detector (SMRD)of the T2K experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Izmaylov, A; Blocki, J; Brinson, J; Dabrowska, A; Danko, I; Dziewiecki, M; Ellison, B; Golyshkin, L; Gould, R; Hara, T; Hartfiel, B; Holeczek, J; Khabibullin, M; Khotjantsev, A; Kielczewska, D; Kisiel, J; Kozlovskii, T; Kudenko, Yu; Kurjata, R; Kutter, T; Lagoda, J; Liu, J; Marzec, J; Metcalf, W; Mijakowski, P; Mineev, O; Musienko, Yu; Naples, D; Nauman, M; Northacker, D; Nowak, J; Paolone, V; Posiadala, M; Przewlocki, P; Reid, J; Rondio, E; Shaykhiev, A; Sienkiewicz, M; Smith, D; Sobczyk, J; Stodulski, M; Straczek, A; Sulej, R; Suzuki, A; Swierblewski, J; Szeglowski, T; Szeptycka, M; Wachala, T; Warner, D; Yershov, N; Yano, T; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zaremba, K; Ziembicki, M

    2009-01-01

    The T2K neutrino experiment at J-PARC uses a set of near detectors to measure the properties of an unoscillated neutrino beam and neutrino interaction cross-sections. One of the sub-detectors of the near-detector complex, the side muon range detector (SMRD), is described in the paper. The detector is designed to help measure the neutrino energy spectrum, to identify background and to calibrate the other detectors. The active elements of the SMRD consist of 0.7 cm thick extruded scintillator slabs inserted into air gaps of the UA1 magnet yokes. The readout of each scintillator slab is provided through a single WLS fiber embedded into a serpentine shaped groove. Two Hamamatsu multi-pixel avalanche photodiodes (MPPC's) are coupled to both ends of the WLS fiber. This design allows us to achieve a high MIP detection efficiency of greater than 99%. A light yield of 25-50 p.e./MIP, a time resolution of about 1 ns and a spatial resolution along the slab better than 10 cm were obtained for the SMRD counters.

  20. Nonproportionality of inorganic scintillators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khodyuk, I.V.

    2013-01-01

    A scintillator is a transparent material that emits a flash of light when it absorbs a γ-ray photon or an energetic particle. Scintillation crystals are widely used as spectroscopic detectors of ionizing radiation in nuclear science, space exploration, medical imaging, homeland security, etc. This t

  1. A Scintillating Fiber Tracker With SiPM Readout

    CERN Document Server

    Yearwood, G Roper; Chung, Ch -H; Doetinchem, Ph v; Gast, H; Greim, R; Kirn, T; Schael, S; Zimmermann, N; Nakada, T; Ambrosi, G; Azzarello, P; Battiston, R; Piemonte, C

    2008-01-01

    We present a prototype for the first tracking detector consisting of 250 micron thin scintillating fibers and silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays. The detector has a modular design, each module consists of a mechanical support structure of 10mm Rohacell foam between two 100 micron thin carbon fiber skins. Five layers of scintillating fibers are glued to both top and bottom of the support structure. SiPM arrays with a channel pitch of 250 micron are placed in front of the fibers. We show the results of the first module prototype using multiclad fibers of types Bicron BCF-20 and Kuraray SCSF-81M that were read out by novel 32-channel SiPM arrays from FBK-irst/INFN Perugia as well as 32-channel SiPM arrays produced by Hamamatsu. A spatial resolution of 88 micron +/- 6 micron at an average yield of 10 detected photons per minimal ionizig particle has been achieved.

  2. Monitoring gross alpha and beta activity in liquids by using ZnS(Ag) scintillation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevanato, L.; Cester, D.; Filippi, D.; Lunardon, M.; Mistura, G.; Moretto, S.; Viesti, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy ' Galileo Galilei' , University of Padova, (Italy); Badocco, D.; Pastore, P.; Romanini, F. [Department of Chemical Sciences, University of Padova, (Italy)

    2015-07-01

    In this work the possibility of monitoring gross alpha and beta activity in liquids using EJ-444 was investigated. Specific tests were carried out to determine the change of the detector properties in water tests. Possible protecting coating is also proposed and tested. Alpha/beta real-time monitoring in liquids is a goal of the EU project TAWARA{sub R}TM. (authors)

  3. Monte Carlo simulation studies on scintillation detectors and image reconstruction of brain-phantom tumors in TOFPET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mondal Nagendra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS results of detection efficiencies, spatial resolutions and resolving powers of a time-of-flight (TOF PET detector systems. Cerium activated Lutetium Oxyorthosilicate (Lu 2 SiO 5 : Ce in short LSO, Barium Fluoride (BaF 2 and BriLanCe 380 (Cerium doped Lanthanum tri-Bromide, in short LaBr 3 scintillation crystals are studied in view of their good time and energy resolutions and shorter decay times. The results of MCS based on GEANT show that spatial resolution, detection efficiency and resolving power of LSO are better than those of BaF 2 and LaBr 3 , although it possesses inferior time and energy resolutions. Instead of the conventional position reconstruction method, newly established image reconstruction (talked about in the previous work method is applied to produce high-tech images. Validation is a momentous step to ensure that this imaging method fulfills all purposes of motivation discussed by reconstructing images of two tumors in a brain phantom.

  4. Achieving a Linear Dose Rate Response in Pulse-Mode Silicon Photodiode Scintillation Detectors Over a Wide Range of Excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Lewis

    2014-02-01

    We are developing a new dose calibrator for nuclear pharmacies that can measure radioactivity in a vial or syringe without handling it directly or removing it from its transport shield “pig”. The calibrator's detector comprises twin opposing scintillating crystals coupled to Si photodiodes and current-amplifying trans-resistance amplifiers. Such a scheme is inherently linear with respect to dose rate over a wide range of radiation intensities, but accuracy at low activity levels may be impaired, beyond the effects of meager photon statistics, by baseline fluctuation and drift inevitably present in high-gain, current-mode photodiode amplifiers. The work described here is motivated by our desire to enhance accuracy at low excitations while maintaining linearity at high excitations. Thus, we are also evaluating a novel “pulse-mode” analog signal processing scheme that employs a linear threshold discriminator to virtually eliminate baseline fluctuation and drift. We will show the results of a side-by-side comparison of current-mode versus pulse-mode signal processing schemes, including perturbing factors affecting linearity and accuracy at very low and very high excitations. Bench testing over a wide range of excitations is done using a Poisson random pulse generator plus an LED light source to simulate excitations up to ˜106 detected counts per second without the need to handle and store large amounts of radioactive material.

  5. Digital signal processing for a thermal neutron detector using ZnS(Ag):6LiF scintillating layers read out with WLS fibers and SiPMs

    OpenAIRE

    Mosset, J. -B.; Stoykov, A.; Greuter, U.; Hildebrandt, M.; Schlumpf, N.

    2015-01-01

    We present a digital signal processing system based on a photon counting approach which we developed for a thermal neutron detector consisting of ZnS(Ag):6LiF scintillating layers read out with WLS fibers and SiPMs. Three digital filters have been evaluated: a moving sum, a moving sum after differentiation and a digital CR-RC^4 filter. The performances of the detector with these filters are presented. A full analog signal processing using a CR-RC^4 filter has been emulated digitally. The dete...

  6. Superconducting Thin-Film Interconnects for Cryogenic Photon Detector Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced imaging spectrometers for x-ray astronomy will require significant improvements in the high density interconnects between the detector arrays and the first...

  7. Characteristics of stereo images from detectors in focal plane array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Jung-Young; Yeom, Seokwon; Chun, Joo-Hwan; Guschin, Vladmir P; Lee, Dong-Su

    2011-07-01

    The equivalent ray geometry of two horizontally aligned detectors at the focal plane of the main antenna in a millimeter wave imaging system is analyzed to reveal the reason why the images from the detectors are fused as an image with a depth sense. Scanning the main antenna in both horizontal and vertical directions makes each detector perform as a camera, and the two detectors can work like a stereo camera in the millimeter wave range. However, the stereo camera geometry is different from that of the stereo camera used in the visual spectral range because the detectors' viewing directions are diverging to each other and they are a certain distance apart. The depth sense is mainly induced by the distance between detectors. The images obtained from the detectors in the millimeter imaging system are perceived with a good depth sense. The disparities responsible for the depth sense are identified in the images.

  8. Enhancement of concentration range of chromatographically detectable components with array detector mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enke, Christie

    2013-02-19

    Methods and instruments for high dynamic range analysis of sample components are described. A sample is subjected to time-dependent separation, ionized, and the ions dispersed with a constant integration time across an array of detectors according to the ions m/z values. Each of the detectors in the array has a dynamically adjustable gain or a logarithmic response function, producing an instrument capable of detecting a ratio of responses or 4 or more orders of magnitude.

  9. Neutron spectrometry with organic scintillation detector; Espectrometria de nuetrones con cristales de centelleo organicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butragueno Casdo, J. L.

    1972-07-01

    This work describes a fast neutron spectrometer using a stilbene crystal as head detector with pulse shape discrimination (P.S.D.) to reject gamma background. Tre experimental procedure involves the P.S.D., the measurements to calibrate the spectrometer and the corrections for several factors, mainly the non-linear response of the stilbene. Results of the measurements with the reaction D{sup 2}(d,n)He{sup 3}, and with an Am-Be neutron source are presented. It is also presented the measurement of the spectrum of the fast reactor CCRAl-1. (Author) 17 refs.

  10. Multiplexed readout of MMC detector arrays using non-hysteretic rf-SQUIDs

    CERN Document Server

    Kempf, S; Gastaldo, L; Fleischmann, A; Enss, C

    2013-01-01

    Metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs) are widely used for various experiments in fields ranging from atomic and nuclear physics to x-ray spectroscopy, laboratory astrophysics or material science. Whereas in previous experiments single pixel detectors or small arrays have been used, for future applications large arrays are needed. Therefore, suitable multiplexing techniques for MMC arrays are currently under development. A promising approach for the readout of large arrays is the microwave SQUID multiplexer that operates in the frequency domain and that employs non-hysteretic rf-SQUIDs to transduce the detector signals into a frequency shift of high $Q$ resonators which can be monitored by using standard microwave measurement techniques. In this paper we discuss the design and the expected performance of a recently developed and fabricated 64 pixel detector array with integrated microwave SQUID multiplexer. First experimental data were obtained characterizing dc-SQUIDs with virtually identical washer design.

  11. Performance evaluation of a sub-millimeter spatial resolution PET detector module using a digital silicon photomultiplier coupled LGSO array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leem, Hyun Tae; Choi, Yong; Kim, Kyu Bom; Lee, Sangwon; Yamamoto, Seiichi; Yeom, Jung-Yeol

    2017-02-01

    In positron emission tomography (PET) for breast, brain and small animal imaging, the spatial resolution of a PET detector is crucial to obtain high quality PET images. In this study, a PET detector for sub-millimeter spatial resolution imaging purpose was assembled using 4×4 pixels of a digital silicon photomultiplier (dSiPM, DPC-3200-22-44, Philips) coupled with a 15×15 LGSO array with BaSO4 reflector, and a 1 mm thick acrylic light guide for light distribution between the dSiPM pixels. The active area of each dSiPM pixel was 3.2×3.9 mm2 and the size of each LGSO scintillator element was 0.7×0.7×6 mm3. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrated the performance of the PET detector by measuring the energy resolution, 2D flood map, peak to valley (P/V) ratio, and coincidence resolving time (CRT). All measurements were performed at a temperature of 10±1 ℃. The average energy resolution was 15.6% (without correcting for saturation effects) at 511 keV and the best CRT was 242±5 ps. The 2D flood map obtained with an energy window of 400-600 keV demonstrated clear identification of all pixels, and the average P/V ratio of the X- and Y-directions were 7.31 and 7.81, respectively. This study demonstrated that the PET detector could be suitable for application in high resolution PET while achieving good timing resolution.

  12. Chemical imaging of cotton fibers using an infrared microscope and a focal-plane array detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this presentation, the chemical imaging of cotton fibers with an infrared microscope and a Focal-Plane Array (FPA) detector will be discussed. Infrared spectroscopy can provide us with information on the structure and quality of cotton fibers. In addition, FPA detectors allow for simultaneous spe...

  13. Fast Fourier transform spectrometer readout for large arrays of microwave kinetic inductance detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yates, S. J. C.; Baryshev, A. M.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Klein, B.; Guesten, R.

    2009-01-01

    Microwave kinetic inductance detectors have great potential for large, very sensitive detector arrays for use in, for example, submillimeter imaging. Being intrinsically readout in the frequency domain, they are particularly suited for frequency domain multiplexing allowing similar to 1000 s of devi

  14. MCNP6 and DRiFT modeling efforts for the NEUANCE/DANCE detector array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinilla, Maria Isabel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-30

    This report seeks to study and benchmark code predictions against experimental data; determine parameters to match MCNP-simulated detector response functions to experimental stilbene measurements; add stilbene processing capabilities to DRiFT; and improve NEUANCE detector array modeling and analysis using new MCNP6 and DRiFT features.

  15. Brief Introduction to the γ-DETECTOR Array at Institute of Modern Physics in Lanzhou

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, W.; Zhang, N. T.; Liu, M. L.; Zheng, Y.; Fang, Y. D.; Zhou, X. H.; Zhang, Y. H.; Lei, X. G.; Guo, Y. X.

    2013-11-01

    A new γ-detector array at Institute of modern physics in Lanzhou is now in construction. The spherical frame is designed using Solidworks, and is assembled by 4 kinds of irregular polygons. 32 detectors could be placed on this frame in maximum, which are arranged with 4-4-4-8-4-4-4 configuration.

  16. Trigger and aperture of the surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anticic, T.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arisaka, K.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Baecker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Belletoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bergmann, T.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceicao, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; Di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Castro, M. L. Diaz; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; DuVernois, M. A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fleck, I.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Froehlich, U.; Fulgione, W.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; Garcia, B.; Garcia Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Goggin, L. M.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gora, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Gozzini, S. R.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hague, J. D.; Halenka, V.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hoerandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huege, T.; Hussain, M.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jiraskova, S.; Kadija, K.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Karova, T.; Kasper, P.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D. -H.; Krieger, A.; Kroemer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, K.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lautridou, P.; Leao, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, J.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Lopez, R.; Lopez Aguera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McEwen, M.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Meurer, C.; Micanovic, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Ragaigne, D. Monnier; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafa, M.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nhung, P. T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nozka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschlaeger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Selmi-Dei, D. Pakk; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Parra, A.; Parrisius, J.; Parsons, R. D.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Redondo, A.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Riviere, C.; Rizi, V.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouille-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sanchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santo, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovanek, P.; Schroeder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schuessler, F.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Semikoz, D.; Settimo, M.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Siffert, B. B.; Sigl, G.; Smialkowski, A.; Smida, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijarvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Susa, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Tapia, A.; Tarutina, T.; Tascau, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tcherniakhovski, D.; Tegolo, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Peixoto, C. J. Todero; Tome, B.; Tonachini, A.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdes Galicia, J. F.; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Vazquez, J. R.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villasenor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Winnick, M. G.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2010-01-01

    The surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory consists of 1600 water-Cherenkov detectors, for the study of extensive air showers (EAS) generated by ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. We describe the trigger hierarchy, from the identification of candidate showers at the level of a single det

  17. LORA : A scintillator array for LOFAR to measure extensive air showers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thoudam, S.; Buitink, S.; Corstanje, A.; Enriquez, J. E.; Falcke, H.; Frieswijk, W.; Horandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Krause, M.; Nelles, A.; Schellart, P.; Scholten, O.; ter Veen, S.; van den Akker, M.

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of the radio emission from extensive air showers, induced by high-energy cosmic rays, is one of the key science projects of the LOFAR radio telescope. The LOfar Radboud air shower Array (LORA) has been installed in the core of LOFAR in the Netherlands. The main purpose of LORA is to

  18. The X-Array and SATURN: A new decay-spectroscopy station for CARIBU

    CERN Document Server

    Mitchell, A J; DiGiovine, B; Lister, C J; Carpenter, M P; Chowdhury, P; Clark, J A; D'Olympia, N; Deo, A Y; Kondev, F G; McCutchan, E A; Rohrer, J; Savard, G; Seweryniak, D; Zhu, S

    2015-01-01

    A new decay-spectroscopy station has been commissioned for experiments with low-energy, fission-fragment radioactive beams from the CARIBU ion source. The new set-up consists of the 'X-array', a highly-efficient array of HPGe clover detectors, and 'SATURN' (Scintillator And Tape Using Radioactive Nuclei), a plastic scintillator detector combined with a tape-transport system for detection of beta particles and removal of long-lived isobaric decay products.

  19. Measurement of environmental radiation using medical scintillation detector in well counter system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyu, Kwang Yeul; Park, Yeon Joon; Kim, Min Jeong; Ham, Eun Hye; Yoon, Ji Yeol; Kim, Hyun in; Min, Jung Hwan; Park, Hoon Hee [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Shingu College, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    After the Fukushima nuclear accident in 2011, concerns about radiation by people are increasing rapidly. If people could know how much they will be exposed by radiation, it may help them avoiding it and understand what exactly radiation is. By doing this, we were helping to reduce the anxiety of radiation contamination. In this study, we have researched figures of radioactivity with ‘Captus-3000 thyroid uptake measurement systems’ in well counter detector system. The materials were measured with Briquette, Shiitake, Pollock, Button type battery, Alkaline battery, Topsoil, Asphalt, Gasoline, Milk powder, Pine, Basalt stone, Pencil lead, Wasabi, Coarse salt, Tuna(can) Cigar, Beer, and then we categorized those samples into Land resources, Water resources, Foodstuff and Etc (Beer classified as a water resources has been categorized into Foodstuff). Also, we selected the standard radiation source linear 137Cs to measure the sensitivity of well counter detector. After that, we took cpm(counter per minute) for the well counter detector of thyroid uptake system’s sensitivity. Then we compared the results of each material’s cpm and converted those results to Bq/kg unit. There were a little limitation with the measurement equipment because it has less sensitivity than other professional equipment like ‘High purity germanium radiation detector’. Moreover, We didn’t have many choices to decide the materials. As a result, there are macroscopic differences among the rates of material’s spectrum. Therefore, it had meaningful results that showed how much each material had emitted radiation. To compare the material’s cpm with BKG, we’ve compounded their spectrums. By doing that, we were able to detect some differences among the spectrums at specific peak section. Lastly, Button type battery, Alkaline Battery, Briquette, Asphalt and Topsoil showed high value. There were classified emitting high radiation Group A and emitted lower radiation Group B. The Group A

  20. Design of a muon tomography system with a plastic scintillator and wavelength-shifting fiber arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Woo Jin; Kim, Hyun-Il; An, Su Jung; Lee, Chae Young; Baek, Cheol-Ha; Chung, Yong Hyun

    2013-12-01

    Recently, monitoring nuclear materials to avoid nuclear terrorism has become an important area of national security. It can be difficult to detect gamma rays from nuclear material because they are easily shielded by shielding material. Muon tomography using multiple -Coulomb scattering derived from muons can be utilized to detect special nuclear materials (SNMs) such as uranium-235 and plutonium-239. We designed a muon tomography system composed of four detector modules. The incident and scattered muon tracks can be calculated by two top and two bottom detectors, respectively. 3D tomographic images are obtained by extracting the crossing points of muon tracks with a point-of-closest-approach algorithm. The purpose of this study was to optimize the muon tomography system using Monte Carlo simulation code. The effects of the geometric parameters of the muon tomography system on material Z-discrimination capability were simulated and evaluated.

  1. Thin-film scintillators for extended ultraviolet /UV/ response silicon detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viehmann, W.

    1979-01-01

    The preparation and radiometric properties of silicon detectors coated with fluorescent thin films are described. The films are deposited from solutions of clear plastics, such as acrylic resins, polyvinyl toluene or polystyrene, and of organic laser dyes in a common solvent. They are optically clear, mechanically and chemically stable, yet easily applied and removed. Multiple doped films of a few microns thickness exhibit broad-band absorption from less than 250 nm to about 450 nm and narrow band emissions with peaks ranging from 380 nm to 600 nm. Internal quantum efficiencies are close to 100 percent and fluorescence decay times are in the nanosecond range. When deposited on optically denser media, a large fraction of the fluorescent emission is trapped in the substrate. Silicon photodiodes coated with multiple doped films exhibit high external quantum efficiencies and virtually flat photon response in the near UV.

  2. Modeling interactions of intermediate-energy neutrons in a plastic scintillator array with GEANT4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohley, Z., E-mail: zkohley@gmail.com [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Lunderberg, E.; DeYoung, P.A. [Department of Physics, Hope College, Holland, MI 49423 (United States); Roeder, B.T. [LPC-Caen, ENSICAEN, IN2P3/CNRS et Universite de Caen, 14050 Caen cedex (France); Baumann, T. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Christian, G.; Mosby, S.; Smith, J.K.; Snyder, J.; Spyrou, A.; Thoennessen, M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2012-08-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation of a large-area neutron time-of-flight detector, built on the GEANT4 framework, has been compared with an experimental measurement of the {sup 16}B{yields}{sup 15}B+n decay produced from a 55 MeV/u{sup 17}C beam. The ability of the Monte Carlo simulation to reproduce the intermediate-energy neutron interactions within the detector has been explored using both the stock GEANT4 physics processes and a custom neutron interaction model, MENATE{sub R}. The stock GEANT4 physics processes were unable to reproduce the experimental observables, while excellent agreement was obtained through the inclusion of the MENATE{sub R} model within GEANT4. The differences between the two approaches are shown to be related to the modeling of the neutron-carbon inelastic reactions. Additionally, the use of MENATE{sub R} provided accurate reproduction of experimental signals associated with neutron scattering within the detector. These results provide validation of the Monte Carlo simulation for modeling measurements of multiple neutrons where the identification and removal of false neutron signals, due to multiple neutron scattering, are required.

  3. National Array of Neutron Detectors (NAND): A versatile tool for nuclear reaction studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golda, K.S., E-mail: goldaks@gmail.com [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Jhingan, A.; Sugathan, P. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Singh, Hardev [Department of Physics, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra 136119 (India); Singh, R.P. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Behera, B.R. [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Mandal, S. [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Delhi University, New Delhi 110007 (India); Kothari, A.; Gupta, Arti; Zacharias, J.; Archunan, M.; Barua, P.; Venkataramanan, S.; Bhowmik, R.K. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Govil, I.M. [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Datta, S.K.; Chatterjee, M.B. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2014-11-01

    The first phase of the National Array of Neutron Detectors (NAND) consisting of 26 neutron detectors has been commissioned at the Inter University Accelerator Centre (IUAC), New Delhi. The motivation behind setting up of such a detector system is the need for more accurate and efficient study of reaction mechanisms in the projectile energy range of 5–8 MeV/n using heavy ion beams from a 15 UD Pelletron and an upgraded LINAC booster facility at IUAC. The above detector array can be used for inclusive as well as exclusive measurements of reaction products of which at least one product is a neutron. While inclusive measurements can be made using only the neutron detectors along with the time of flight technique and a pulsed beam, exclusive measurements can be performed by detecting neutrons in coincidence with charged particles and/or fission fragments detected with ancillary detectors. The array can also be used for neutron tagged gamma-ray spectroscopy in (HI, xn) reactions by detecting gamma-rays in coincidence with the neutrons in a compact geometrical configuration. The various features and the performance of the different aspects of the array are described in the present paper. -- Highlights: •We report the design, fabrication and installation of a 26 element modular neutron detection system (NAND). •The array has been designed for the fusion–fission studies at near and above the barrier energies. •The relevant characteristics of the array are studied exhaustively and reported. •The efficiency of the detectors are measured and compared with the monte carlo simulations. •The second phase of the array will be augmented with 80 more neutron detectors which will enable the system to measure the neutron multiplicity distribution.

  4. Kinetic Inductance Detectors Based Receiver Array Architectures for Imaging at THz Frequency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iacono, A.; Neto, A.; Gerini, G.; Baselmans, J.; Yates, S.; Baryshev, A.; Hoevers, H.

    2009-01-01

    A novel strategy for broad band focal plane array design, resulting from the two years long cooperation between TNO and SRON (Space Research Organization Netherlands), is proposed. Its purpose is to couple the radiation from a Large F/D reflector system to an array of Kinetic Inductance detectors th

  5. A near-infrared 64-pixel superconducting nanowire single photon detector array with integrated multiplexed readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allman, M. S., E-mail: shane.allman@boulder.nist.gov; Verma, V. B.; Stevens, M.; Gerrits, T.; Horansky, R. D.; Lita, A. E.; Mirin, R.; Nam, S. W. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 325 Broadway, Boulder, Colorado 80305-3328 (United States); Marsili, F.; Beyer, A.; Shaw, M. D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, California 91109 (United States); Kumor, D. [Purdue University, 610 Purdue Mall, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2015-05-11

    We demonstrate a 64-pixel free-space-coupled array of superconducting nanowire single photon detectors optimized for high detection efficiency in the near-infrared range. An integrated, readily scalable, multiplexed readout scheme is employed to reduce the number of readout lines to 16. The cryogenic, optical, and electronic packaging to read out the array as well as characterization measurements are discussed.

  6. A Near-Infrared 64-pixel Superconducting Nanowire Single Photon Detector Array with Integrated Multiplexed Readout

    CERN Document Server

    Allman, M S; Stevens, M; Gerrits, T; Horansky, R D; Lita, A E; Marsili, F; Beyer, A; Shaw, M D; Kumor, D; Mirin, R; Nam, S W

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a 64-pixel free-space-coupled array of superconducting nanowire single photon detectors optimized for high detection efficiency in the near-infrared range. An integrated, readily scalable, multiplexed readout scheme is employed to reduce the number of readout lines to 16. The cryogenic, optical, and electronic packaging to read out the array, as well as characterization measurements are discussed.

  7. X-ray and gamma-ray response of a 2 '' x 2 '' LaBr3 : Ce scintillation detector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quarati, F.; Bos, A. J. J.; Brandenburg, S.; Dathy, C.; Dorenbos, P.; Kraft, S.; Ostendorf, R. W.; Ouspenski, V.; Owens, Alan

    2007-01-01

    Advances in material growth techniques have recently made large volume LaBr3:Ce crystals commercially available. These scintillators are currently being assessed by ESA for use as remote sensing gamma-ray spectrometers on future planetary missions. In addition to their superior scintillation propert

  8. A linear monolithic 4-6 on silicon IR detector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandamme, J.; Vermeiren, J.; Zogg, H.; Masek, J.; Fabbricotti, M.

    1992-12-01

    A linear array of monolithically grown PbTe and PbSnSe detectors on (111)-Si for MWIR and TIR imaging applications was designed and processed. The array consists of a staggered row of 2 by 128 detectors on a 100 micrometers pitch. The readout circuitry, integrated on the Si substrate consists of a COS multiplexer with a direct injection input stage, a charge reduction stage and charge to voltage conversion stage for each individual detector. This XDI (MultipeXed Direct Injection) circuit also allows for on-chip nonuniformity compensation with a switched capacitor network.

  9. Study on data acquisition circuit used in SSPA linear array detector X-ray detection

    CERN Document Server

    Wei Biao; Che Zhen Ping

    2002-01-01

    After SSPA used as X-ray array detector is developed, the authors take a research on the data acquisition circuit applied to the detector. The experiment designed has verified the feasibility of application of this array detector and its data acquisition circuit to X-ray computed tomography (X-CT). The preliminary test results indicate that the method of the X-ray detection is feasible for industry X-CT nondestructive testing, which brings about advantage for detecting and measuring with high resolution, good efficiency and low cost

  10. Nuclear structure at high spin using multidetector gamma array and ancillary detectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Muralithar

    2014-04-01

    A multidetector gamma array (GDA), for studying nuclear structure was built with ancillary devices namely gamma multiplicity filter and charged particle detector array. This facility was designed for in-beam gamma spectroscopy measurements in fusion evaporation reactions at Inter-University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi. Description of the facility and in-beam performance with two experimental studies done are presented. This array was used in a number of nuclear spectroscopic and reaction investigations.

  11. Development of cryogenic low background detector based on enriched zinc molybdate crystal scintillators to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{100}$Mo

    CERN Document Server

    Chernyak, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    ZnMoO$_4$ scintillators with a mass of $\\sim$ 0.3 kg, as well as Zn$^{100}$MoO$_4$ crystals enriched in the isotope $^{100}$Mo were produced for the first time by using the low-thermal-gradient Czochralski technique. The optical and luminescent properties of the produced crystals were studied to estimate the progress in crystal growth quality. The low-temperature tests with a 313 g ZnMoO$_4$ and two enriched Zn$^{100}$MoO$_4$ crystals were performed aboveground in the Centre de Sciences Nucl\\'eaires et de Sciences de la Mati\\`ere. The low background measurements with a three ZnMoO$_4$ and two enriched detectors installed in the EDELWEISS set-up at the Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane were carried out. To optimize the light collection in ZnMoO$_4$ scintillating bolometers, we have simulated the collection of scintillation photons in a detector module for different geometries by Monte Carlo method using the GEANT4 package. Response to the 2$\

  12. Direct and indirect signal detection of 122 keV photons with a novel detector combining a pnCCD and a CsI(Tl) scintillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, D. M.; Huth, M.; Hartmann, R.; Abboud, A.; Send, S.; Conka-Nurdan, T.; Shokr, M.; Pietsch, U.; Strüder, L.

    2016-01-01

    By combining a low noise fully depleted pnCCD detector with a CsI(Tl) scintillator, an energy-dispersive area detector can be realized with a high quantum efficiency (QE) in the range from below 1 keV to above 100 keV. In direct detection mode the pnCCD exhibits a relative energy resolution of 1% at 122 keV and spatial resolution of less than 75 μm, the pixel size of the pnCCD. In the indirect detection mode, i.e. conversion of the incoming X-rays in the scintillator, the measured energy resolution was about 9-13% at 122 keV, depending on the depth of interaction in the scintillator, while the position resolution, extracted with the help of simulations, was 30 μm only. We show simulated data for incident photons of 122 keV and compare the various interaction processes and relevant physical parameters to experimental results obtained with a radioactive 57Co source.

  13. Topological track reconstruction in liquid scintillator and LENA as a far-detector in an LBNO experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Sebastian

    2016-12-15

    Unsegmented liquid scintillator (LSc) neutrino detectors have proven to be successful instruments of neutrino physics. They usually measure terrestrial and astrophysical low-energy (LE) neutrinos and antineutrinos with energies up to some tens of MeV. Designs for next-generation detectors based on this technology intend to use several tens of kilotons of LSc. Two examples are the Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy (LENA) project with 50 kt considered in Europe and the Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) with 20 kt already under construction in China. A key factor to reach the scientific goals of these projects, e.g., the determination of the neutrino mass ordering (MO) in the case of JUNO, will be the efficient rejection of background from radioisotopes produced by cosmogenic muons. This requires accurate reconstructions of extended muon event topologies in the LSc volume.The first part of this work is about the implementation of a novel, iterative track reconstruction procedure for unsegmented LSc detectors and a basic evaluation of its performance with the LENA detector simulation. The ultimate goal of the new method is to reconstruct the spatial number density distribution of optical photon emissions. This will give access to a charged particle's differential energy loss dE/dx in LSc and resolve details of an event's topology, e.g., induced particle showers. Visual comparisons of reconstruction outcomes with Monte Carlo (MC) truths already provide evidence for this capability. First quantitative results were extracted from the 3D reconstruction data of fully-contained muons in the kinetic energy range from 1 to 10 GeV: Despite some well understood systematic effects in the current method to find start and end point of a track, resolutions

  14. High-efficiency microstructured semiconductor neutron detectors that are arrayed, dual-integrated, and stacked

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellinger, Steven L., E-mail: slb3888@ksu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States); Fronk, Ryan G. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States); Sobering, Timothy J. [Electronics Design Laboratory, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States); McGregor, Douglas S. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Silicon diodes with large aspect ratio 3D microstructures backfilled with {sup 6}LiF show a significant increase in neutron detection efficiency beyond that of conventional thin-film coated planar devices. Described in this work are advancements in the technology using detector stacking methods and summed-detector 6 Multiplication-Sign 6-element arraying methods to dramatically increase the sensitivity to thermal neutrons. The intrinsic detection efficiency of the 6 Multiplication-Sign 6 array for normal-incident 0.0253 eV neutrons was found 6.8% compared against a calibrated {sup 3}He proportional counter. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid-state semiconductor neutron detectors utilizing {sup 6}LiF. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Large aspect ratio 3D microstructured silicon diodes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Arrayed solid-state semiconductor neutron detectors.

  15. Trigger and aperture of the surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Antičić, T.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arisaka, K.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Bäcker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellétoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; Benzvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bergmann, T.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Domenico, M.; de Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; de Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; Del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; Dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Duvernois, M. A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fleck, I.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fröhlich, U.; Fulgione, W.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; García Gámez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Goggin, L. M.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Gozzini, S. R.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hague, J. D.; Halenka, V.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Hussain, M.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jiraskova, S.; Kadija, K.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Karova, T.; Kasper, P.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Krieger, A.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, K.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lautridou, P.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, J.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McEwen, M.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Meurer, C.; Mičanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafá, M.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nhung, P. T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Parra, A.; Parrisius, J.; Parsons, R. D.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; PeĶala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Redondo, A.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivière, C.; Rizi, V.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-D'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santo, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovánek, P.; Schroeder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schüssler, F.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Semikoz, D.; Settimo, M.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Siffert, B. B.; Sigl, G.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Šuša, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Tapia, A.; Tarutina, T.; Taşcău, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tcherniakhovski, D.; Tegolo, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Winnick, M. G.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2010-01-01

    The surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory consists of 1600 water-Cherenkov detectors, for the study of extensive air showers (EAS) generated by ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. We describe the trigger hierarchy, from the identification of candidate showers at the level of a single detector, amongst a large background (mainly random single cosmic ray muons), up to the selection of real events and the rejection of random coincidences. Such trigger makes the surface detector array fully efficient for the detection of EAS with energy above 3×1018eV, for all zenith angles between 0∘ and 60∘, independently of the position of the impact point and of the mass of the primary particle. In these range of energies and angles, the exposure of the surface array can be determined purely on the basis of the geometrical acceptance.

  16. Trigger and aperture of the surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham, J. [National Technological University, Faculty Mendoza (CONICET/CNEA), Mendoza (Argentina); Abreu, P. [LIP and Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal); Aglietta, M. [Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario (INAF), Universita di Torino and Sezione INFN, Torino (Italy); Ahn, E.J. [Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States); Allard, D. [Laboratoire AstroParticule et Cosmologie (APC), Universite Paris 7, CNRS-IN2P3, Paris (France); Allekotte, I. [Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro (CNEA-UNCuyo-CONICET), San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Allen, J. [New York University, New York, NY (United States); Alvarez-Muniz, J. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Ambrosio, M. [Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' and Sezione INFN, Napoli (Italy); Anchordoqui, L. [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Andringa, S. [LIP and Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal); Anticic, T. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Anzalone, A. [Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Palermo (INAF), Palermo (Italy); Aramo, C. [Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' and Sezione INFN, Napoli (Italy); Arganda, E. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Arisaka, K. [University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Arqueros, F. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Asorey, H. [Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro (CNEA-UNCuyo-CONICET), San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Assis, P. [LIP and Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal); Aublin, J. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire et de Hautes Energies (LPNHE), Universites Paris 6 et Paris 7, CNRS-IN2P3, Paris (France)

    2010-01-21

    The surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory consists of 1600 water-Cherenkov detectors, for the study of extensive air showers (EAS) generated by ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. We describe the trigger hierarchy, from the identification of candidate showers at the level of a single detector, amongst a large background (mainly random single cosmic ray muons), up to the selection of real events and the rejection of random coincidences. Such trigger makes the surface detector array fully efficient for the detection of EAS with energy above 3x10{sup 18}eV, for all zenith angles between 0 deg. and 60 deg., independently of the position of the impact point and of the mass of the primary particle. In these range of energies and angles, the exposure of the surface array can be determined purely on the basis of the geometrical acceptance.

  17. Trigger and Aperture of the Surface Detector Array of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Abraham, J; Aglietta, M; Aguirre, C; Ahn, E J; Allard, D; Allekotte, I; Allen, J; Alvarez-Muñiz, J; Ambrosio, M; Anchordoqui, L; Andringa, S; Anzalone, A; Aramo, C; Arganda, E; Argirò, S; Arisaka, K; Arneodo, F; Arqueros, F; Asch, T; Asorey, H; Assis, P; Aublin, J; Ave, M; Avila, G; Bäcker, T; Badagnani, D; Barber, K B; Barbosa, A F; Barroso, S L C; Baughman, B; Bauleo, P; Beatty, J J; Beau, T; Becker, B R; Becker, K H; Bellétoile, A; Bellido, J A; BenZvi, S; Berat, C; Bernardini, P; Bertou, X; Biermann, P L; Billoir, P; Blanch-Bigas, O; Blanco, F; Bleve, C; Blümer, H; Boháčová, M; Boncioli, D; Bonifazi, C; Bonino, R; Borodai, N; Brack, J; Brogueira, P; Brown, W C; Bruijn, R; Buchholz, P; Bueno, A; Burton, R E; Busca, N G; Caballero-Mora, K S; Caramete, L; Caruso, R; Carvalho, W; Castellina, A; Catalano, O; Cazon, L; Cester, R; Chauvin, J; Chiavassa, A; Chinellato, J A; Chou, A; Chudoba, J; Chye, J; Clay, R W; Colombo, E; Conceição, R; Connolly, B; Contreras, F; Coppens, J; Cordier, A; Cotti, U; Coutu, S; Covault, C E; Creusot, A; Criss, A; Cronin, J; Curutiu, A; Dagoret-Campagne, S; Dallier, R; Daumiller, K; Dawson, B R; de Almeida, R M; De Domenico, M; De Donato, C; de Jong, S J; De La Vega, G; Junior, W J M de Mello; Neto, J R T de Mello; De Mitri, I; de Souza, V; de Vries, K D; Decerprit, G; del Peral, L; Deligny, O; Della Selva, A; Fratte, C Delle; Dembinski, H; Di Giulio, C; Diaz, J C; Diep, P N; Dobrigkeit, C; D'Olivo, J C; Dong, P N; Dorofeev, A; Anjos, J C dos; Dova, M T; D'Urso, D; Dutan, I; DuVernois, M A; Engel, R; Erdmann, M; Escobar, C O; Etchegoyen, A; Luis, P Facal San; Falcke, H; Farrar, G; Fauth, A C; Fazzini, N; Ferrer, F; Ferrero, A; Fick, B; Filevich, A; Filipčič, A; Fleck, I; Fliescher, S; Fracchiolla, C E; Fraenkel, E D; Fulgione, W; Gamarra, R F; Gambetta, S; García, B; Gámez, D García; Garcia-Pinto, D; Garrido, X; Gelmini, G; Gemmeke, H; Ghia, P L; Giaccari, U; Giller, M; Glass, H; Goggin, L M; Gold, M S; Golup, G; Albarracin, F Gomez; Berisso, M Gómez; Gonçalves, P; Amaral, M Gonçalves do; Gonzalez, D; Gonzalez, J G; Góra, D; Gorgi, A; Gouffon, P; Gozzini, S R; Grashorn, E; Grebe, S; Grigat, M; Grillo, A F; Guardincerri, Y; Guarino, F; Guedes, G P; Gutiérrez, J; Hague, J D; Halenka, V; Hansen, P; Harari, D; Harmsma, S; Harton, J L; Haungs, A; Healy, M D; Hebbeker, T; Hebrero, G; Heck, D; Hojvat, C; Holmes, V C; Homola, P; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Hrabovský, M; Huege, T; Hussain, M; Iarlori, M; Insolia, A; Ionita, F; Italiano, A; Jiraskova, S; Kaducak, M; Kampert, K H; Karova, T; Kasper, P; Kégl, B; Keilhauer, B; Kemp, E; Kieckhafer, R M; Klages, H O; Kleifges, M; Kleinfeller, J; Knapik, R; Knapp, J; Koang, D -H; Krieger, A; Krömer, O; Kruppke-Hansen, D; Kuehn, F; Kuempel, D; Kulbartz, K; Kunka, N; Kusenko, A; La Rosa, G; Lachaud, C; Lago, B L; Lautridou, P; Leão, M S A B; Lebrun, D; Lebrun, P; Lee, J; de Oliveira, M A Leigui; Lemiere, A; Letessier-Selvon, A; Leuthold, M; Lhenry-Yvon, I; López, R; Agüera, A Lopez; Louedec, K; Bahilo, J Lozano; Lucero, A; Lyberis, H; Maccarone, M C; Macolino, C; Maldera, S; Mandat, D; Mantsch, P; Mariazzi, A G; Maris, I C; Falcon, H R Marquez; Martello, D; Bravo, O Martínez; Mathes, H J; Matthews, J; Matthews, J A J; Matthiae, G; Maurizio, D; Mazur, P O; McEwen, M; McNeil, R R; Medina-Tanco, G; Melissas, M; Melo, D; Menichetti, E; Menshikov, A; Meyhandan, R; Micheletti, M I; Miele, G; Miller, W; Miramonti, L; Mollerach, S; Monasor, M; Ragaigne, D Monnier; Montanet, F; Morales, B; Morello, C; Moreno, J C; Morris, C; Mostafá, M; Moura, C A; Mueller, S; Muller, M A; Mussa, R; Navarra, G; Navarro, J L; Navas, S; Necesal, P; Nellen, L; Newman-Holmes, C; Newton, D; Nhung, P T; Nierstenhoefer, N; Nitz, D; Nosek, D; Nožka, L; Nyklicek, M; Oehlschläger, J; Olinto, A; Oliva, P; Olmos-Gilbaja, V M; Ortiz, M; Pacheco, N; Selmi-Dei, D Pakk; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Parente, G; Parizot, E; Parlati, S; Pastor, S; Patel, M; Paul, T; Pavlidou, V; Payet, K; Pech, M; Pȩkala, J; Pepe, I M; Perrone, L; Pesce, R; Petermann, E; Petrera, S; Petrinca, P; Petrolini, A; Petrov, Y; Petrovic, J; Pfendner, C; Piegaia, R; Pierog, T; Pimenta, M; Pinto, T; Pirronello, V; Pisanti, O; Platino, M; Pochon, J; Ponce, V H; Pontz, M; Privitera, P; Prouza, M; Quel, E J; Rautenberg, J; Ravel, O; Ravignani, D; Redondo, A; Revenu, B; Rezende, F A S; Ridky, J; Riggi, S; Risse, M; Rivière, C; Rizi, V; Robledo, C; Rodriguez, G; Martino, J Rodriguez; Rojo, J Rodriguez; Rodriguez-Cabo, I; Rodríguez-Frías, M D; Ros, G; Rosado, J; Rossler, T; Roth, M; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B; Roulet, E; Rovero, A C; Salamida, F; Salazar, H; Salina, G; Sánchez, F; Santander, M; Santo, C E; Santos, E M; Sarazin, F; Sarkar, S; Sato, R; Scharf, N; Scherini, V; Schieler, H; Schiffer, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, F; Schmidt, T; Scholten, O; Schoorlemmer, H; Schovancova, J; Schovánek, P; Schroeder, F; Schulte, S; Schüssler, F; Schuster, D; Sciutto, S J; Scuderi, M; Segreto, A; Semikoz, D; Settimo, M; Shellard, R C; Sidelnik, I; Siffert, B B; Sigl, G; Śmiałkowski, A; Šmída, R; Smith, B E; Snow, G R; Sommers, P; Sorokin, J; Spinka, H; Squartini, R; Strazzeri, E; Stutz, A; Suarez, F; Suomijärvi, T; Supanitsky, A D; Sutherland, M S; Swain, J; Szadkowski, Z; Tamashiro, A; Tamburro, A; Tarutina, T; Taşcău, O; Tcaciuc, R; Tcherniakhovski, D; Tegolo, D; Thao, N T; Thomas, D; Ticona, R; Tiffenberg, J; Timmermans, C; Tkaczyk, W; Peixoto, C J Todero; Tomé, B; Tonachini, A; Torres, I; Travnicek, P; Tridapalli, D B; Tristram, G; Trovato, E; Tueros, M; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Urban, M; Galicia, J F Valdés; Valiño, I; Valore, L; Berg, A M van den; Vázquez, J R; Vázquez, R A; Veberič, D; Velarde, A; Venters, T; Verzi, V; Videla, M; Villaseñor, L; Vorobiov, S; Voyvodic, L; Wahlberg, H; Wahrlich, P; Wainberg, O; Warner, D; Watson, A A; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Wieczorek, G; Wiencke, L; Wilczyńska, B; Wilczyński, H; Wileman, C; Winnick, M G; Wu, H; Wundheiler, B; Yamamoto, T; Younk, P; Yuan, G; Yushkov, A; Zas, E; Zavrtanik, D; Zavrtanik, M; Zaw, I; Zepeda, A; Ziolkowski, M

    2011-01-01

    The surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory consists of 1600 water-Cherenkov detectors, for the study of extensive air showers (EAS) generated by ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. We describe the trigger hierarchy, from the identification of candidate showers at the level of a single detector, amongst a large background (mainly random single cosmic ray muons), up to the selection of real events and the rejection of random coincidences. Such trigger makes the surface detector array fully efficient for the detection of EAS with energy above $3\\times 10^{18}$ eV, for all zenith angles between 0$^\\circ$ and 60$^\\circ$, independently of the position of the impact point and of the mass of the primary particle. In these range of energies and angles, the exposure of the surface array can be determined purely on the basis of the geometrical acceptance.

  18. Terahertz 3D printed diffractive lens matrices for field-effect transistor detector focal plane arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szkudlarek, Krzesimir; Sypek, Maciej; Cywiński, Grzegorz; Suszek, Jarosław; Zagrajek, Przemysław; Feduniewicz-Żmuda, Anna; Yahniuk, Ivan; Yatsunenko, Sergey; Nowakowska-Siwińska, Anna; Coquillat, Dominique; But, Dmytro B; Rachoń, Martyna; Węgrzyńska, Karolina; Skierbiszewski, Czesław; Knap, Wojciech

    2016-09-05

    We present the concept, the fabrication processes and the experimental results for materials and optics that can be used for terahertz field-effect transistor detector focal plane arrays. More specifically, we propose 3D printed arrays of a new type - diffractive multi-zone lenses of which the performance is superior to that of previously used mono-zone diffractive or refractive elements and evaluate them with GaN/AlGaN field-effect transistor terahertz detectors. Experiments performed in the 300-GHz atmospheric window show that the lens arrays offer both a good efficiency and good uniformity, and may improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the terahertz field-effect transistor detectors by more than one order of magnitude. In practice, we tested 3 × 12 lens linear arrays with printed circuit board THz detector arrays used in postal security scanners and observed significant signal-to-noise improvements. Our results clearly show that the proposed technology provides a way to produce cost-effective, reproducible, flat optics for large-size field-effect transistor THz-detector focal plane arrays.

  19. A novel scintillation imager with charge-spread discrimination. Analytical models suitable for crystal-arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scafè, Raffaele; Pellegrini, Rosanna; Cinti, Maria N.; Puccini, Marco; Pani, Roberto

    2016-10-01

    Present paper describes a method for obtaining the physical quantities characterizing single-events based on fitting experimental 2-D charge-profiles to two analytical models. First results are presented regarding a 10×10 LuYAP:Ce array of 2×2×10 mm3 crystal pixels coupled to a H10966 Hamamatsu 8×8 multi-anode assembly under radio-isotopic irradiations and from self-activity. Results show that a photo multiplier tube with cross plate anode configuration would be preferable than a multi anode one due to uniformity, cost, and connections constraints. Among the results a plot of charge spread Vs. charge is to be cited because it was not yet published in scientific literature.

  20. Non-volatile resistive photo-switches for flexible image detector arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nau, Sebastian; Wolf, Christoph; Sax, Stefan; List-Kratochvil, Emil J. W.

    2015-09-01

    The increasing quest to find lightweight, conformable or flexible image detectors for machine vision or medical imaging brings organic electronics into the spotlight for these fields of application. Here were we introduce a unique imaging device concept and its utilization in an organic, flexible detector array with simple passive matrix wiring. We present a flexible organic image detector array built up from non-volatile resistive multi-bit photo-switchable elements. This unique realization is based on an organic photodiode combined with an organic resistive memory device wired in a simple crossbar configuration. The presented concept exhibits significant advantages compared to present organic and inorganic detector array technologies, facilitating the detection and simultaneous storage of the image information in one detector pixel, yet also allowing for simple read-out of the information from a simple passive-matrix crossbar wiring. This concept is demonstrated for single photo-switchable pixels as well as for arrays with sizes up to 32 by 32 pixels (1024 bit). The presented results pave the way for a versatile flexible and easy-to-fabricate sensor array technology. In a final step, the concept was expanded to detection of x-rays.

  1. Measurements and analysis of optical crosstalk in a microwave kinetic inductance detector array

    CERN Document Server

    Bisigello, L; Ferrari, L; Baselmans, J J A; Baryshev, A M

    2016-01-01

    The main advantage of Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detector arrays (MKID) is their multiplexing capability, which allows for building cameras with a large number of pixels and good sensitivity, particularly suitable to perform large blank galaxy surveys. However, to have as many pixels as possible it is necessary to arrange detectors close in readout frequency. Consequently KIDs overlap in frequency and are coupled to each other producing crosstalk. Because crosstalk can be only minimised by improving the array design, in this work we aim to correct for this effect a posteriori. We analysed a MKID array consisting of 880 KIDs with readout frequencies at 4-8 GHz. We measured the beam patterns for every detector in the array and described the response of each detector by using a two-dimensional Gaussian fit. Then, we identified detectors affected by crosstalk above -30 dB level from the maximum and removed the signal of the crosstalking detectors. Moreover, we modelled the crosstalk level for each KID as a func...

  2. Dosimetric characterization of a commercial two-dimensional array detector; Caracterizacao dosimetrica de um detector matricial bidimensional comercial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gialluisi, Bruno L.; Santos, Gabriela R. dos; Sales, Camila P. de; Resende, Guilherme R.A.; Habitzreuter, Angela B.; Rodrigues, Laura N., E-mail: brunogialluisi@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (HCFMRP/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Servico de Radioterapia

    2013-04-15

    This paper investigates the dosimetric characteristics and performance of an array detector commercially available. The device is the I'mRT MatriXX® which is a two-dimensional detector array used in the verification of complex radiotherapy plans. It consists of 1,020 parallel plate ion chamber arranged in a 32x32 grid. Dose linearity was studied and its response was linear within the range of 5 to 1000 MU (R{sup 2} = 1). Dose rate dependence showed a maximum deviation of 0,62% comparatively with readings to 320 cGy/min. The detector stability was verified through repeated irradiations. Output factors matched well with measurements made with a Farmer chamber with an average deviation of 1,54%. The detector's effective point of measurement was determined and the inverse square law was also verified with a percentage deviation smaller than 3%. The results show that this detector can be used for quality control in IMRT thus reducing the time spent in the dosimetric verification of radiation fields. (author)

  3. Surface Micromachined Arrays of Transition-Edge Detectors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An innovative surface micromachining technique is described for the fabrication of closely-packed arrays of transition edge sensor (TES) x-ray microcalorimeters....

  4. Proton irradiation results for long-wave HgCdTe infrared detector arrays for NEOCam

    CERN Document Server

    Dorn, M; McMurtry, C; Hartman, S; Mainzer, A; McKelvey, M; McMurray, R; Chevara, D; Rosser, J

    2016-01-01

    HgCdTe detector arrays with a cutoff wavelength of ~10 ${\\mu}$m intended for the NEOCam space mission were subjected to proton beam irradiation at the University of California Davis Crocker Nuclear Laboratory. Three arrays were tested - one with 800 $\\mu$m substrate intact, one with 30 $\\mu$m substrate, and one completely substrate-removed. The CdZnTe substrate, on which the HgCdTe detector is grown, has been shown to produce luminescence in shorter wave HgCdTe arrays that causes elevated signal in non-hit pixels when subjected to proton irradiation. This testing was conducted to ascertain whether or not full substrate removal is necessary. At the dark level of the dewar, we detect no luminescence in non-hit pixels during proton testing for both the substrate-removed detector array and the array with 30 ${\\mu}$m substrate. The detector array with full 800 ${\\mu}$m substrate exhibited substantial photocurrent for a flux of 103 protons/cm$^2$-s at a beam energy of 18.1 MeV (~ 750 e$^-$/s) and 34.4 MeV ($\\sim$ 6...

  5. Development and calibration of a real-time airborne radioactivity monitor using direct gamma-ray spectrometry with two scintillation detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanovas, R; Morant, J J; Salvadó, M

    2014-07-01

    The implementation of in-situ gamma-ray spectrometry in an automatic real-time environmental radiation surveillance network can help to identify and characterize abnormal radioactivity increases quickly. For this reason, a Real-time Airborne Radioactivity Monitor using direct gamma-ray spectrometry with two scintillation detectors (RARM-D2) was developed. The two scintillation detectors in the RARM-D2 are strategically shielded with Pb to permit the separate measurement of the airborne isotopes with respect to the deposited isotopes.In this paper, we describe the main aspects of the development and calibration of the RARM-D2 when using NaI(Tl) or LaBr3(Ce) detectors. The calibration of the monitor was performed experimentally with the exception of the efficiency curve, which was set using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations with the EGS5 code system. Prior to setting the efficiency curve, the effect of the radioactive source term size on the efficiency calculations was studied for the gamma-rays from (137)Cs. Finally, to study the measurement capabilities of the RARM-D2, the minimum detectable activity concentrations for (131)I and (137)Cs were calculated for typical spectra at different integration times.

  6. Light sharing in multi-flat-panel-PMT PEM detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raylman, Raymond R; Majewski, Stan; Mayhugh, Michael R

    2006-01-01

    Large are a detectors, such as those used in positron emission mammography (PEM) and scintimammography, utilize arrays of discrete semtillator elements mounted on arrays of position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMT). Scintillator elements can be packed very densely (minimizing area between elements), allowing good detection sensitivity and spatial resolution. And, while new flat panel PSPMTS have minimal inactive edges, when they are placed in arrays significant dead spaces where scintillation light is undetectable are created. To address this problem, a light guide is often placed between the detector and PSPMT array to spread scintillation light so that these gaps can be bridged. In this investigation we studied the effect of light guides of various thickness on system performance. A 10x10 element array of LYSO detector elements was coupled to the center of a 2x2 array of PSPMTs through varying thicknesses (1 to 4 mm) of UV glass. The spot size of the imaged elements and distortions in the regular square pattern of the imaged scintillator arrays were evaluated. Energy resolution was measured by placing single elements of LYSO at several locations of the PSPMT array. Spatial distortions in the images of the array were reduced by using thicker light guides (3-4 mm). Use of thicker light guides, however, resulted in reduced pixel resolution and slight degradation of energy resolution. Therefore, some loss of pixel and energy resolution will accompany the use of thick light guides (minimum of 3 mm) required for optimum identification of detector elements.

  7. The DUV Stability of Superlattice-Doped CMOS Detector Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenk, M. E.; Carver, A. G.; Jones, T.; Dickie, M.; Cheng, P.; Greer, H. F.; Nikzad, S.; Sgro, J.; Tsur, S.

    2013-01-01

    JPL and Alacron have recently developed a high performance, DUV camera with a superlattice doped CMOS imaging detector. Supperlattice doped detectors achieve nearly 100% internal quantum efficiency in the deep and far ultraviolet, and a single layer, Al2O3 antireflection coating enables 64% external quantum efficiency at 263nm. In lifetime tests performed at Applied Materials using 263 nm pulsed, solid state and 193 nm pulsed excimer laser, the quantum efficiency and dark current of the JPL/Alacron camera remained stable to better than 1% precision during long-term exposure to several billion laser pulses, with no measurable degradation, no blooming and no image memory at 1000 fps.

  8. Search for $2\\beta$ decay of $^{106}$Cd with enriched $^{106}$CdWO$_4$ crystal scintillator in coincidence with four HPGe detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Belli, P; Brudanin, V B; Cappella, F; Caracciolo, V; Cerulli, R; Chernyak, D M; Danevich, F A; d'Angelo, S; Di Marco, A; Incicchitti, A; Laubenstein, M; Mokina, V M; Poda, D V; Polischuk, O G; Tretyak, V I; Tupitsyna, I A

    2016-01-01

    A radiopure cadmium tungstate crystal scintillator, enriched in $^{106}$Cd to 66%, with mass of 216 g ($^{106}$CdWO$_4$), was used to search for double beta decay processes in $^{106}$Cd in coincidence with four ultra-low background high purity germanium detectors in a single cryostat. New improved limits on the double beta processes in $^{106}$Cd have been set on the level of $10^{20}- 10^{21}$ yr after 13085 h of data taking. In particular, the half-life limit on the two neutrino electron capture with positron emission, $T_{1/2}^{2\

  9. Taheri-Saramad x-ray detector (TSXD): A novel high spatial resolution x-ray imager based on ZnO nano scintillator wires in polycarbonate membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taheri, A., E-mail: at1361@aut.ac.ir; Saramad, S.; Ghalenoei, S.; Setayeshi, S. [Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran 15875-4413 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    A novel x-ray imager based on ZnO nanowires is designed and fabricated. The proposed architecture is based on scintillation properties of ZnO nanostructures in a polycarbonate track-etched membrane. Because of higher refractive index of ZnO nanowire compared to the membrane, the nanowire acts as an optical fiber that prevents the generated optical photons to spread inside the detector. This effect improves the spatial resolution of the imager. The detection quantum efficiency and spatial resolution of the fabricated imager are 11% and <6.8 μm, respectively.

  10. Taheri-Saramad x-ray detector (TSXD): A novel high spatial resolution x-ray imager based on ZnO nano scintillator wires in polycarbonate membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, A.; Saramad, S.; Ghalenoei, S.; Setayeshi, S.

    2014-01-01

    A novel x-ray imager based on ZnO nanowires is designed and fabricated. The proposed architecture is based on scintillation properties of ZnO nanostructures in a polycarbonate track-etched membrane. Because of higher refractive index of ZnO nanowire compared to the membrane, the nanowire acts as an optical fiber that prevents the generated optical photons to spread inside the detector. This effect improves the spatial resolution of the imager. The detection quantum efficiency and spatial resolution of the fabricated imager are 11% and <6.8 μm, respectively.

  11. Application of neural networks to digital pulse shape analysis for an array of silicon strip detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, J. L.; Martel, I.; Jiménez, R.; Galán, J.; Salmerón, P.

    2016-09-01

    The new generation of nuclear physics detectors that used to study nuclear reactions is considering the use of digital pulse shape analysis techniques (DPSA) to obtain the (A,Z) values of the reaction products impinging in solid state detectors. This technique can be an important tool for selecting the relevant reaction channels at the HYDE (HYbrid DEtector ball array) silicon array foreseen for the Low Energy Branch of the FAIR facility (Darmstadt, Germany). In this work we study the feasibility of using artificial neural networks (ANNs) for particle identification with silicon detectors. Multilayer Perceptron networks were trained and tested with recent experimental data, showing excellent identification capabilities with signals of several isotopes ranging from 12C up to 84Kr, yielding higher discrimination rates than any other previously reported.

  12. A tiled CCD detector with 2x2 array and tapered fibre optics for electron microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Faruqi, A R; Cattermole, D M; Stubbings, S

    2002-01-01

    Charge coupled devices (CCD)-based detectors have made a major impact on data collection in electron microscopy over the past few years. There have been a number of successful applications of CCDs in electron crystallography of two-dimensional protein crystal arrays but high-resolution imaging has been hampered by the relatively poor spatial resolution (and fewer independent pixels) compared to film. A partial solution to this problem, presented in this paper, are to design detectors with larger effective pixel sizes and with more pixels. A CCD detector with a much greater number of 'independent' pixels, achieved by tiling a 2x2 array of CCDs, each of which has 1242x1152 pixels is described here. The sensitive area of the detector, using fibre optics with a demagnification of 2.5 : 1, is 140x130 mm sup 2; the pixel size is 56 mu m square and there is a total of approx 2500x2300 pixels.

  13. Analysis of upper and lower bounds of the frame noise in linear detector arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaggi, S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper estimates the upper and lower bounds of the frame noise of a linear detector array that uses a one-dimensional scan pattern. Using chi-square distribution, it is analytically shown why it is necessary to use the average of the variances and not the average of the standard deviations to estimate these bounds. Also, a criteria for determining whether any excessively noisy lines exist among the detectors is derived from these bounds. Using a Gaussian standard random variable generator, these bounds are demonstrated to be accurate within the specified confidence interval. A silicon detector array is then used for actual dark current measurements. The criterion developed for determination of noisy detectors is checked on the experimentally obtained data.

  14. IR Imaging Using Arrays of SiO2 Micromechanical Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grbovic, Dragoslav [ORNL; Lavrik, Nickolay V [ORNL; Rajic, Slobodan [ORNL; Datskos, Panos G [ORNL; Hunter, Scott Robert [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    In this letter, we describe the fabrication of an array of bimaterial detectors for infrared (IR) imaging that utilize SiO2 as a structural material. All the substrate material underneath the active area of each detector element was removed. Each detector element incorporates an optical resonant cavity layer in the IR absorbing region of the sensing element. The simplified microfabrication process requires only four photolithographic steps with no wet etching or sacrificial layers. The thermomechanical deflection sensitivity was 7.9 10-3 rad/K which corresponds to a noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD) of 2.9 mK. In the present work the array was used to capture IR images while operating at room temperature and atmospheric pressure and no need for vacuum packaging. The average measured NETD of our IR detector system was approximately 200 mK but some sensing elements exhibited an NETD of 50 mK.

  15. Application of neural networks to digital pulse shape analysis for an array of silicon strip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores, J.L. [Dpto de Ingeniería Eléctrica y Térmica, Universidad de Huelva (Spain); Martel, I. [Dpto de Física Aplicada, Universidad de Huelva (Spain); CERN, ISOLDE, CH 1211 Geneva, 23 (Switzerland); Jiménez, R. [Dpto de Ingeniería Electrónica, Sist. Informáticos y Automática, Universidad de Huelva (Spain); Galán, J., E-mail: jgalan@diesia.uhu.es [Dpto de Ingeniería Electrónica, Sist. Informáticos y Automática, Universidad de Huelva (Spain); Salmerón, P. [Dpto de Ingeniería Eléctrica y Térmica, Universidad de Huelva (Spain)

    2016-09-11

    The new generation of nuclear physics detectors that used to study nuclear reactions is considering the use of digital pulse shape analysis techniques (DPSA) to obtain the (A,Z) values of the reaction products impinging in solid state detectors. This technique can be an important tool for selecting the relevant reaction channels at the HYDE (HYbrid DEtector ball array) silicon array foreseen for the Low Energy Branch of the FAIR facility (Darmstadt, Germany). In this work we study the feasibility of using artificial neural networks (ANNs) for particle identification with silicon detectors. Multilayer Perceptron networks were trained and tested with recent experimental data, showing excellent identification capabilities with signals of several isotopes ranging from {sup 12}C up to {sup 84}Kr, yielding higher discrimination rates than any other previously reported.

  16. Calibration and quality control of a multi leaf collimator using linear array of detectors; Calibracion y control de calidad de un colimador multilaminas mediante array lineal de detectores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suero Rodrigo, M. A.; Marques Fraguela, E.

    2011-07-01

    The protocol for calibration and quality control established by Siemens for the multi leaf collimator (MLC) of Primus electron linear accelerators, using the light field coincidence with the beam of radiation to determine the position of the blades. In this paper, we illustrate the use of a calibration method for determining the positions of MLC plates radiologically with the help of a linear array of detectors, based on the proposal Lopes et al (2007).

  17. A measurement of the time profile of scintillation induced by low energy gamma-rays in liquid xenon with the XMASS-I detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiya, H.; Abe, K.; Hiraide, K.; Ichimura, K.; Kishimoto, Y.; Kobayashi, K.; Kobayashi, M.; Moriyama, S.; Nakahata, M.; Norita, T.; Ogawa, H.; Sekiya, H.; Takachio, O.; Takeda, A.; Tasaka, S.; Yamashita, M.; Yang, B. S.; Kim, N. Y.; Kim, Y. D.; Itow, Y.; Kegasa, R.; Kobayashi, K.; Masuda, K.; Fushimi, K.; Martens, K.; Suzuki, Y.; Fujita, R.; Hosokawa, K.; Miuchi, K.; Oka, N.; Onishi, Y.; Takeuchi, Y.; Kim, Y. H.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, M. K.; Fukuda, Y.; Nishijima, K.; Nakamura, S.

    2016-10-01

    We report the measurement of the emission time profile of scintillation from gamma-ray induced events in the XMASS-I 832 kg liquid xenon scintillation detector. Decay time constant was derived from a comparison of scintillation photon timing distributions between the observed data and simulated samples in order to take into account optical processes such as absorption and scattering in liquid xenon. Calibration data of radioactive sources, 55Fe, 241Am, and 57Co were used to obtain the decay time constant. Assuming two decay components, τ1 and τ2, the decay time constant τ2 increased from 27.9 ns to 37.0 ns as the gamma-ray energy increased from 5.9 keV to 122 keV. The accuracy of the measurement was better than 1.5 ns at all energy levels. A fast decay component with τ1 ∼ 2 ns was necessary to reproduce data. Energy dependencies of τ2 and the fraction of the fast decay component were studied as a function of the kinetic energy of electrons induced by gamma-rays. The obtained data almost reproduced previously reported results and extended them to the lower energy region relevant to direct dark matter searches.

  18. A measurement of the time profile of scintillation induced by low energy gamma-rays in liquid xenon with the XMASS-I detector

    CERN Document Server

    Takiya, H; Hiraide, K; Ichimura, K; Kishimoto, Y; Kobayashi, K; Kobayashi, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Norita, T; Ogawa, H; Sekiya, H; Takachio, O; Takeda, A; Tasaka, S; Yamashita, M; Yang, B S; Kim, N Y; Kim, Y D; Itow, Y; Kegasa, R; Kobayashi, K; Masuda, K; Fushimi, K; Martens, K; Suzuki, Y; Fujita, R; Hosokawa, K; Miuchi, K; Oka, N; Onishi, Y; Takeuchi, Y; Kim, Y H; Lee, J S; Lee, K B; Lee, M K; Fukuda, Y; Nishijima, K; Nakamura, S

    2016-01-01

    We report the measurement of the emission time profile of scintillation from gamma-ray induced events in the XMASS-I 832 kg liquid xenon scintillation detector. Decay time constant was derived from a comparison of scintillation photon timing distributions between the observed data and simulated samples in order to take into account optical processes such as absorption and scattering in liquid xenon. Calibration data of radioactive sources, $^{55}$Fe, $^{241}$Am, and $^{57}$Co were used to obtain the decay time constant. The decay time constant $\\tau$ increased from 27.9 ns to 37.0 ns as the gamma-ray energy increased from 5.9 keV to 122 keV. The accuracy of the measurement was better than 1.5 ns at all energy levels. Furthermore, a fast decay component with $\\tau \\sim$2 ns was necessary to reproduce data. The obtained data almost reproduced previously reported data and extended it to the lower energy region relevant to the direct dark matter search.

  19. Energy spectrum of UHECRs measured by newly constructed fluorescence detectors in Telescope Array experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujii Toshihiro

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Telescope Array (TA experiment is the largest hybrid detector to observe ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs in the northern hemisphere. In the TA experiment, we newly designed and constructed 24 fluorescence detectors (FDs located at two stations. We report the energy spectrum of UHECRs with energies above 1017.5 eV from analyzing data collected by the new FDs during the first 3.7 years in monocular mode.

  20. Measuring 235U(n,xnγ) Cross Sections with HPGe Detector Array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Zhao-hui; WANG; Qi; SU; Xiao-bin; LI; Xia; HOU; Long; ZHANG; Kai; CHEN; Hong-tao; ZHAO; Fang

    2015-01-01

    We had built the array of HPGe detectors,which is used to measure theγrays from(n,xn)reaction.The detection system,acquisition system and analysis method have been improved to meet the requirement of prompt gamma ray measurement.According to the research of angular distribution of secondary gamma ray,we adjust the location and angle of detectors(Fig.1).Due to the absence of suitable sample,

  1. Implementation of digital multiplexing for high resolution X-ray detector arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, P; Swetadri Vasan, S N; Titus, A H; Cartwright, A N; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    2012-01-01

    We describe and demonstrate for the first time the use of the novel Multiple Module Multiplexer (MMMIC) for a 2×2 array of new electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) based x-ray detectors. It is highly desirable for x-ray imaging systems to have larger fields of view (FOV) extensible in two directions yet to still be capable of doing high resolution imaging over regions-of-interest (ROI). The MMMIC achieves these goals by acquiring and multiplexing data from an array of imaging modules thereby enabling a larger FOV, and at the same time allowing high resolution ROI imaging through selection of a subset of modules in the array. MMMIC also supports different binning modes. This paper describes how a specific two stage configuration connecting three identical MMMICs is used to acquire and multiplex data from a 2×2 array of EMCCD based detectors. The first stage contains two MMMICs wherein each MMMIC is getting data from two EMCCD detectors. The multiplexed data from these MMMICs is then forwarded to the second stage MMMIC in the similar fashion. The second stage that has only one MMMIC gives the final 12 bit multiplexed data from four modules. This data is then sent over a high speed Camera Link interface to the image processing computer. X-ray images taken through the 2×2 array of EMCCD based detectors using this two stage configuration of MMMICs are shown successfully demonstrating the concept.

  2. Measurement of the Proton-Air Cross Section with Telescope Array's Middle Drum Detector and Surface Array in Hybrid Mode

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasi, R U; Abu-Zayyad, T; Allen, M; Anderson, R; Azuma, R; Barcikowski, E; Belz, J W; Bergman, D R; Blake, S A; Cady, R; Chae, M J; Cheon, B G; Chiba, J; Chikawa, M; Cho, W R; Fujii, T; Fukushima, M; Goto, T; Hanlon, W; Hayashi, Y; Hayashida, N; Hibino, K; Honda1, K; Ikeda, D; Inoue, N; Ishii, T; Ishimori, R; Ito, H; Ivanov, D; Jui, C C H; Kadota, K; Kakimoto, F; Kalashev, O; Kasahara, K; Kawai, H; Kawakami, S; Kawana, S; Kawata, K; Kido, E; Kim, H B; Kim, J H; Kitamura, S; Kitamura, Y; Kuzmin, V; Kwon, Y J; Lan1, J; Lim, S I; Lundquist, J P; Machida, K; Martens, K; Matsuda, T; Matsuyama, T; Matthews, J N; Minamino, M; Mukai, K; Myers, I; Nagasawa, K; Nagataki1, S; Nakamura, T; Nonaka, T; Nozato, A; Ogio, S; Ogura, J; Ohnishi, M; Ohoka, H; Oki, K; Okuda, T; Ono, M; Oshima, A; Ozawa, S; Park, I H; Pshirkov, M S; Rodriguez, D C; Rubtsov, G; Ryu, D; Sagawa, H; Sakurai, N; Sampson, A L; Scott, L M; Shah, P D; Shibata, F; Shibata, T; Shimodaira, H; Shin, B K; Smith, J D; Sokolsky, P; Springer, R W; Stokes, B T; Stratton, S R; Stroman, T A; Suzawa, T; Takamura, M; Takeda, M; Takeishi, R; Taketa, A; Takita, M; Tameda, Y; Tanaka, H; Tanaka, K; Tanaka, M; Thomas, S B; Thomson, G B; Tinyakov, P; Tkachev, I; Tokuno, H; Tomida, T; Troitsky, S; Tsunesada, Y; Tsutsumi, K; Uchihori, Y; Udo, S; Urban, F; Vasiloff, G; Wong, T; Yamane, R; Yamaoka, H; Yamazaki, K; Yang, J; Yashiro, K; Yoneda, Y; Yoshida, S; Yoshii, H; Zollinger, R; Zundel, Z

    2015-01-01

    In this work we are reporting on the measurement of the proton-air inelastic cross section $\\sigma^{\\rm inel}_{\\rm p-air}$ using the Telescope Array (TA) detector. Based on the measurement of the $\\sigma^{\\rm inel}_{\\rm p-air}$ the proton-proton cross section $\\sigma_{\\rm p-p}$ value is also determined at $\\sqrt{s} = 95$ TeV. Detecting cosmic ray events at ultra high energies with Telescope Array enables us to study this fundamental parameter that we are otherwise unable to access with particle accelerators. The data used in this report is collected over five years using hybrid events observed by the Middle Drum fluorescence detector together with the surface array detector. The value of the $\\sigma^{\\rm inel}_{\\rm p-air}$ is found to be equal to $ 567.0 \\pm 70.5 [{\\rm Stat.}] ^{+25}_{-29} [{\\rm Sys.}]$ mb. The total proton-proton cross section is subsequently inferred from Glauber Formalism and Block, Halzen and Stanev QCD inspired fit and is found to be equal to $170_{-44}^{+48} [{\\rm Stat.}] \\pm _{-19}^{+1...

  3. Measurements of high energy neutrons penetrated through iron shields using the Self-TOF detector and an NE213 organic liquid scintillator

    CERN Document Server

    Sasaki, M; Nunomiya, T; Nakamura, T; Fukumura, A; Takada, M

    2002-01-01

    Neutron energy spectra penetrated through iron shields were measured using the Self-TOF detector and an NE213 organic liquid scintillator which have been newly developed by our group at the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) of National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Japan. Neutrons were generated by bombarding 400 MeV/nucleon C ion on a thick (stopping-length) copper target. The neutron spectra in the energy range from 20 to 800 MeV were obtained through the FORIST unfolding code with their response functions and compared with the MCNPX calculations combined with the LA150 cross section library. The neutron fluence measured by the NE213 detector was simulated by the track length estimator in the MCNPX, and evaluated the contribution of the room-scattered neutrons. The calculations are in fairly good agreement with the measurements. Neutron fluence attenuation lengths were obtained from the experimental results and the calculation.

  4. Monte Carlo simulation of prompt gamma-ray spectra from depleted uranium under D-T neutron irradiation and electron recoil spectra in a liquid scintillator detector

    CERN Document Server

    Qin, Jianguo; Liu, Rong; Zhu, Tonghua; Zhang, Xinwei; Ye, Bangjiao

    2015-01-01

    To overcome the problem of inefficient computing time and unreliable results in MCNP5 calculation, a two-step method is adopted to calculate the energy deposition of prompt gamma-rays in detectors for depleted uranium spherical shells under D-T neutrons irradiation. In the first step, the gamma-ray spectrum for energy below 7 MeV is calculated by MCNP5 code; secondly, the electron recoil spectrum in a BC501A liquid scintillator detector is simulated based on EGSnrc Monte Carlo Code with the gamma-ray spectrum from the first step as input. The comparison of calculated results with experimental ones shows that the simulations agree well with experiment in the energy region 0.4-3 MeV for the prompt gamma-ray spectrum and below 4 MeVee for the electron recoil spectrum. The reliability of the two-step method in this work is validated.

  5. THz Direct Detector and Heterodyne Receiver Arrays in Silicon Nanoscale Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzyb, Janusz; Pfeiffer, Ullrich

    2015-10-01

    The main scope of this paper is to address various implementation aspects of THz detector arrays in the nanoscale silicon technologies operating at room temperatures. This includes the operation of single detectors, detectors operated in parallel (arrays), and arrays of detectors operated in a video-camera mode with an internal reset to support continuous-wave illumination without the need to synchronize the source with the camera (no lock-in receiver required). A systematic overview of the main advantages and limitations in using silicon technologies for THz applications is given. The on-chip antenna design challenges and co-design aspects with the active circuitry are thoroughly analyzed for broadband detector/receiver operation. A summary of the state-of-the-art arrays of broadband THz direct detectors based on two different operation principles is presented. The first is based on the non-quasistatic resistive mixing process in a MOSFET channel, whereas the other relies on the THz signal rectification by nonlinearity of the base-emitter junction in a high-speed SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT). For the MOSFET detector arrays implemented in a 65 nm bulk CMOS technology, a state-of-the-art optical noise equivalent power (NEP) of 14 pW/ at 720 GHz was measured, whereas for the HBT detector arrays in a 0.25 μm SiGe process technology, an optical NEP of 47 pW/ at 700 GHz was found. Based on the implemented 1k-pixel CMOS camera with an average power consumption of 2.5 μW/pixel, various design aspects specific to video-mode operation are outlined and co-integration issues with the readout circuitry are analyzed. Furthermore, a single-chip 2 × 2 array of heterodyne receivers for multi-color active imaging in a 160-1000 GHz band is presented with a well-balanced NEP across the operation bandwidth ranging from 0.1 to 0.24 fW/Hz (44.1-47.8 dB single-sideband NF) and an instantaneous IF bandwidth of 10 GHz. In its present implementation, the receiver RF

  6. Digital Radiography and Computed Tomography Project -- Fully Integrated Linear Detector ArrayStatus Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tim Roney; Robert Seifert; Bob Pink; Mike Smith

    2011-09-01

    The field-portable Digital Radiography and Computed Tomography (DRCT) x-ray inspection systems developed for the Project Manager for NonStockpile Chemical Materiel (PMNSCM) over the past 13 years have used linear diode detector arrays from two manufacturers; Thomson and Thales. These two manufacturers no longer produce this type of detector. In the interest of insuring the long term viability of the portable DRCT single munitions inspection systems and to improve the imaging capabilities, this project has been investigating improved, commercially available detectors. During FY-10, detectors were evaluated and one in particular, manufactured by Detection Technologies (DT), Inc, was acquired for possible integration into the DRCT systems. The remainder of this report describes the work performed in FY-11 to complete evaluations and fully integrate the detector onto a representative DRCT platform.

  7. Dual source and dual detector arrays tetrahedron beam computed tomography for image guided radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joshua; Lu, Weiguo; Zhang, Tiezhi

    2014-02-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important online imaging modality for image guided radiotherapy. But suboptimal image quality and the lack of a real-time stereoscopic imaging function limit its implementation in advanced treatment techniques, such as online adaptive and 4D radiotherapy. Tetrahedron beam computed tomography (TBCT) is a novel online imaging modality designed to improve on the image quality provided by CBCT. TBCT geometry is flexible, and multiple detector and source arrays can be used for different applications. In this paper, we describe a novel dual source-dual detector TBCT system that is specially designed for LINAC radiation treatment machines. The imaging system is positioned in-line with the MV beam and is composed of two linear array x-ray sources mounted aside the electrical portal imaging device and two linear arrays of x-ray detectors mounted below the machine head. The detector and x-ray source arrays are orthogonal to each other, and each pair of source and detector arrays forms a tetrahedral volume. Four planer images can be obtained from different view angles at each gantry position at a frame rate as high as 20 frames per second. The overlapped regions provide a stereoscopic field of view of approximately 10-15 cm. With a half gantry rotation, a volumetric CT image can be reconstructed having a 45 cm field of view. Due to the scatter rejecting design of the TBCT geometry, the system can potentially produce high quality 2D and 3D images with less radiation exposure. The design of the dual source-dual detector system is described, and preliminary results of studies performed on numerical phantoms and simulated patient data are presented.

  8. Dual source and dual detector arrays tetrahedron beam computed tomography for image guided radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joshua; Lu, Weiguo; Zhang, Tiezhi

    2014-02-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important online imaging modality for image guided radiotherapy. But suboptimal image quality and the lack of a real-time stereoscopic imaging function limit its implementation in advanced treatment techniques, such as online adaptive and 4D radiotherapy. Tetrahedron beam computed tomography (TBCT) is a novel online imaging modality designed to improve on the image quality provided by CBCT. TBCT geometry is flexible, and multiple detector and source arrays can be used for different applications. In this paper, we describe a novel dual source-dual detector TBCT system that is specially designed for LINAC radiation treatment machines. The imaging system is positioned in-line with the MV beam and is composed of two linear array x-ray sources mounted aside the electrical portal imaging device and two linear arrays of x-ray detectors mounted below the machine head. The detector and x-ray source arrays are orthogonal to each other, and each pair of source and detector arrays forms a tetrahedral volume. Four planer images can be obtained from different view angles at each gantry position at a frame rate as high as 20 frames per second. The overlapped regions provide a stereoscopic field of view of approximately 10-15 cm. With a half gantry rotation, a volumetric CT image can be reconstructed having a 45 cm field of view. Due to the scatter rejecting design of the TBCT geometry, the system can potentially produce high quality 2D and 3D images with less radiation exposure. The design of the dual source-dual detector system is described, and preliminary results of studies performed on numerical phantoms and simulated patient data are presented.

  9. Cosmic Ray Measurements by Scintillators with Metal Resistor Semiconductor Avalanche Photo Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Francesco; La Rocca, Paola; Riggi, Francesco; Akindinov, Alexandre; Mal'kevich, Dmitry

    2008-01-01

    An educational set-up for cosmic ray physics experiments is described. The detector is based on scintillator tiles with a readout through metal resistor semiconductor (MRS) avalanche photo diode (APD) arrays. Typical measurements of the cosmic angular distribution at sea level and a study of the East-West asymmetry obtained by such a device are…

  10. Rejection of randomly coinciding events in Li$_2$$^{100}$MoO$_4$ scintillating bolometers using light detectors based on the Neganov-Luke effect

    CERN Document Server

    Chernyak, D M; Dumoulin, L; Giuliani, A; Mancuso, M; de Marcillac, P; Marnieros, S; Nones, C; Olivieri, E; Poda, D V; Tretyak, V I

    2016-01-01

    Random coincidences of nuclear events can be one of the main background sources in low-temperature calorimetric experiments looking for neutrinoless double-beta decay, especially in those searches based on scintillating bolometers embedding the promising double-beta candidate $^{100}$Mo, because of the relatively short half-life of the two-neutrino double-beta decay of this nucleus. We show in this work that randomly coinciding events of the two-neutrino double decay of $^{100}$Mo in enriched Li$_2$$^{100}$MoO$_4$ detectors can be effectively discriminated by pulse-shape analysis in the light channel if the scintillating bolometer is provided with a Neganov-Luke light detector, which can improve the signal-to-noise ratio by a large factor, assumed here at the level of $\\sim 750$ on the basis of preliminary experimental results obtained with these devices. The achieved pile-up rejection efficiency results in a very low contribution, of the order of $\\sim 6\\times10^{-5}$ counts/(keV$\\cdot$kg$\\cdot$y), to the ba...

  11. Scintillation counter with MRS APD light readout

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00061314; Malkevich, D.; Martemyanov, A.; Ryabinin, M.; Smirnitsky, A.; Voloshin, K.; Bondarenko, G.; Golovin, V.; Grigoriev, E.

    2005-01-01

    START, a high-efficiency and low-noise scintillation detector for ionizing particles, was developed for the purpose of creating a high-granular system for triggering cosmic muons. Scintillation light in START is detected by MRS APDs (Avalanche Photo-Diodes with Metal-Resistance-Semiconductor structure), operated in the Geiger mode, which have 1 mm^2 sensitive areas. START is assembled from a 15 x 15 x 1 cm^3 scintillating plastic plate, two MRS APDs and two pieces of wavelength-shifting optical fiber stacked in circular coils inside the plastic. The front-end electronic card is mounted directly on the detector. Tests with START have confirmed its operational consistency, over 99% efficiency of MIP registration and good homogeneity. START demonstrates a low intrinsic noise of about 10^{-2} Hz. If these detectors are to be mass-produced, the cost of a mosaic array of STARTs is estimated at a moderate level of 2-3 kUSD/m^2.

  12. Astroparticle Physics: Detectors for Cosmic Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Humberto; Villaseñor, Luis

    2006-09-01

    We describe the work that we have done over the last decade to design and construct instruments to measure properties of cosmic rays in Mexico. We describe the measurement of the muon lifetime and the ratio of positive to negative muons in the natural background of cosmic ray muons at 2000 m.a.s.l. Next we describe the detection of decaying and crossing muons in a water Cherenkov detector as well as a technique to separate isolated particles. We also describe the detection of isolated muons and electrons in a liquid scintillator detector and their separation. Next we describe the detection of extensive air showers (EAS) with a hybrid detector array consisting of water Cherenkov and liquid scintillator detectors, located at the campus of the University of Puebla. Finally we describe work in progress to detect EAS at 4600 m.a.s.l. with a water Cherenkov detector array and a fluorescence telescope at the Sierra Negra mountain.

  13. High Dynamic Range Pixel Array Detector for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Mark W; Purohit, Prafull; Chamberlain, Darol; Nguyen, Kayla X; Hovden, Robert; Chang, Celesta S; Deb, Pratiti; Turgut, Emrah; Heron, John T; Schlom, Darrell G; Ralph, Daniel C; Fuchs, Gregory D; Shanks, Katherine S; Philipp, Hugh T; Muller, David A; Gruner, Sol M

    2016-02-01

    We describe a hybrid pixel array detector (electron microscope pixel array detector, or EMPAD) adapted for use in electron microscope applications, especially as a universal detector for scanning transmission electron microscopy. The 128×128 pixel detector consists of a 500 µm thick silicon diode array bump-bonded pixel-by-pixel to an application-specific integrated circuit. The in-pixel circuitry provides a 1,000,000:1 dynamic range within a single frame, allowing the direct electron beam to be imaged while still maintaining single electron sensitivity. A 1.1 kHz framing rate enables rapid data collection and minimizes sample drift distortions while scanning. By capturing the entire unsaturated diffraction pattern in scanning mode, one can simultaneously capture bright field, dark field, and phase contrast information, as well as being able to analyze the full scattering distribution, allowing true center of mass imaging. The scattering is recorded on an absolute scale, so that information such as local sample thickness can be directly determined. This paper describes the detector architecture, data acquisition system, and preliminary results from experiments with 80-200 keV electron beams.

  14. Testing and assembly of the detectors for the Millimeter Bolometer Array Camera on ACT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriage, T. A.; Chervenak, J. A.; Doriese, W. B.

    2006-04-01

    The Millimeter Bolometer Array Camera (MBAC) for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope consists of three Transition Edge Sensor (TES) arrays to make simultaneous observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background in three frequency bands. MBAC TESs are NASA Goddard Pop-Up Detectors (PUD) which are read-out by NIST time-domain multiplexers. MBAC is constructed by stacking 1×32 TES columns to form the 32×32 element arrays. The arrays are modular (connectorized) at the 1×32 column level such that array assembly is reversible and camera repair possible. Prior to assembly, each column is tested in a quick (2h) cycling 4He/3He adsorption refrigerator. Tests include measurements of TES current voltage curves and TES complex impedance.

  15. Detection of charged particles and X-rays by scintillator layers coupled to amorphous silicon photodiode arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, T.; Drewery, J.; Hong, W.S.; Lee, H.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Goodman, C.A.; Wildermuth, D. [Air Techniques, Inc. Hicksville, NY (United States)

    1995-04-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) p-i-n diodes with transparent metallic contacts are shown to be suitable for detecting charged particles, electrons, and X-rays. When coupled to a suitable scintillator using CsI(Tl) as the scintillator we show a capability to detect minimum ionizing particles with S/N {approximately}20. We demonstrate such an arrangement by operating a p-i-n diode in photovoltaic mode (reverse bias). Moreover, we show that a p-i-n diode can also work as a photoconductor under forward bias and produces a gain yield of 3-8 higher light sensitivity for shaping times of 1 {mu}s. n-i-n devices have similar optical gain as the p-i-n photoconductor for short integrating times ( < 10{mu}s). However, n-i-n devices exhibit much higher gain for a long term integration (10ms) than the p-i-n ones. High sensitivity photosensors are very desirable for X-ray medical imaging because radiation exposure dose can be reduced significantly. The scintillator CsI layers we made have higher spatial resolution than the Kodak commercial scintillator screens due to their internal columnar structure which can collimate the scintillation light. Evaporated CsI layers are shown to be more resistant to radiation damage than the crystalline bulk CsI(Tl).

  16. ZnMgO Nanowire Based Detectors and Detector Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this STTR program, Structured Materials Industries (SMI) and partners propose to develop an electrically contacted zinc magnesium oxide (ZnMgO) nanowire array for...

  17. Some characteristics of X-ray imaging for energy region of over 100 keV using plastic scintillation fiber array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Shibiao; MA Qingli; YIN Zejie; HUANG Huan

    2007-01-01

    In this work, characteristics of using PSFs (plastic scintillation fibers) coupled with CCD (charge-coupled devices ) to build area detectors for high energy X-ray imaging are studied with a Monte Carlo simulation, which cover an energy range of a few hundred kev to about 20 MeV. It was found that the efficiency of PSF in detecting X-ray with energy above a few hundred kev is low. We can use large incident flux to increase the output signal to noise ratio (SNR). The performance can also be improved by coating PSF with X-ray absorption layers and the MTF of the system is presented. By optimizing the absorption layer thickness, the crosstalk of the area detector built with PSF decreases.

  18. Performance Measurements On A 32X32 InSb-CID Detector Array For Astronomical Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiphene, D.; Lacombe, F.; Rouan, D.

    1989-01-01

    The use at liquid helium temperature of a InSb-CID detector array differs significantly from opera-tion at conditions usually adopted by the manufacturer (77K). In particular, the dark current behaviour hugely changes between the two temperatures. Only the tunnel current, independant of temperature conditions, is still active at 4.2K while the thermal-family currents vanish. We have studied the tunnel current of one InSb-MIS detector to determine its suitability to the low background conditions that will be met in the space experiment ISO. The search for the maximum integration time and the best quantum efficiency, the constraint about the photonic response linearity (especially at low photon flux), and the reduction of the readout noise constitute the main points of this study. Moreover, laboratory measurements showed secondary effects due to the detector (lag) or to the wiring (crosstalk). The CID array reactions to high energy radiations (Gamma rays) are finally discussed.

  19. Multiplexed Readout of MMC Detector Arrays Using Non-hysteretic rf-SQUIDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempf, S.; Wegner, M.; Gastaldo, L.; Fleischmann, A.; Enss, C.

    2014-08-01

    Metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs) are widely used for various experiments in fields ranging from atomic and nuclear physics to X-ray spectroscopy, laboratory astrophysics or material science. Whereas in previous experiments single pixel detectors or small arrays have been used, for future applications large arrays are needed. Therefore, suitable multiplexing techniques for MMC arrays are currently under development. A promising approach for the readout of large arrays is the microwave SQUID multiplexer that employs non-hysteretic rf-SQUIDs to create a frequency shift of high resonators that is in accordance with the detector signal and that can be monitored by using standard microwave measurement techniques. In this paper we discuss the design of a recently developed and fabricated 64 pixel detector array with integrated microwave SQUID multiplexer that was produced to test the suitability of this readout technique. The characterization of dc-SQUIDs with virtually identical washer design compared to the rf-SQUIDs of the SQUID multiplexer revealed that the crucial SQUID parameters such as the critical current of the Josephson junctions or the washer inductance are close to the design values and anticipates a successful operation of the SQUID multiplexer.

  20. FLARES: A flexible scintillation light apparatus for rare event searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisti, M.; Baldazzi, G.; Bonvicini, V.; Campana, R.; Capelli, S.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Fuschino, F.; Gironi, L.; Labanti, C.; Marisaldi, M.; Previtali, E.; Rignanese, L.; Rachevsky, A.; Vacchi, A.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.; Zuffa, M.

    2016-07-01

    FLARES is a project for an innovative detector technology to be applied to rare event searches, and in particular to neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. Its novelty is the enhancement and optimization of the collection of the scintillation light emitted by ultra-pure crystals through the use of arrays of high performance silicon photodetectors cooled to 120 K. This would provide scintillation detectors with 1% level energy resolution, with the advantages of a technology offering relatively simple low cost mass scalability and powerful background reduction handles, as requested by future neutrinoless double beta decay experimental programs. The performances of a first production of matrices of Silicon Drift Detectors are presented and discussed in this paper.