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Sample records for array implosion obtained

  1. Ideal and non-ideal MHD regimes of wire array implosion obtained in 3D hybrid simulations and observed during experiments at NTF (Nevada Terawatt Facility)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent 3D hybrid simulation of a plasma current-carrying column revealed two regimes of sausage and kink instability development. In the first regime, with small Hall parameter, development of instabilities leads to appearance of large-scale axial perturbations and eventually to the bending of the plasma column. In the second regime, with five times larger Hall parameter, small-scale perturbations dominated and no bending of the plasma column was observed. Simulation results are compared to recent experimental data, including laser probing, x-ray spectroscopy and time-gated x-ray imaging during wire array implosions at NTF

  2. Implosion dynamics in double planar wire array Z pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The double planar wire array (DPWA) Z pinch is a highly efficient radiation source with unique implosion dynamics and precursor formations. The inductively divided current successively ablates the wires and injects the material to the interior of the array. Three uniquely imploding DPWA load types were identified and classified according to the critical load parameter: low, intermediate, or high aspect ratio. Radiation pulse shaping was obtained from secondary precursors: off-axis mass carrying high current densities during the implosion phase. Time-gated EUV spectroscopy of off-axis mass accumulations is used to assess a 60 eV electron temperature prior to the implosion phase. These structures are shown to form by a different mechanism than the secondary precursors. High yields, compact size, and shaped radiation pulses merit further consideration of the DPWA as a candidate for inertial confinement fusion research.

  3. Compact wire array sources: power scaling and implosion physics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, Jason Dimitri; Chuvatin, Alexander S. (Laboratoire du Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, France); Jones, M. C.; Vesey, Roger Alan; Waisman, Eduardo M.; Ivanov, V. V. (University of Nevada - Reno, Reno, NV); Esaulov, Andrey A. (University of Nevada - Reno, Reno, NV); Ampleford, David J.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Kantsyrev, Victor Leonidovich (University of Nevada - Reno, Reno, NV); Coverdale, Christine Anne; Rudakov, L. I. (Icarus Research, Bethesda, MD); Jones, Brent Manley; Safronova, Alla S. (University of Nevada - Reno, Reno, NV); Vigil, Marcelino Patricio

    2008-09-01

    A series of ten shots were performed on the Saturn generator in short pulse mode in order to study planar and small-diameter cylindrical tungsten wire arrays at {approx}5 MA current levels and 50-60 ns implosion times as candidates for compact z-pinch radiation sources. A new vacuum hohlraum configuration has been proposed in which multiple z pinches are driven in parallel by a pulsed power generator. Each pinch resides in a separate return current cage, serving also as a primary hohlraum. A collection of such radiation sources surround a compact secondary hohlraum, which may potentially provide an attractive Planckian radiation source or house an inertial confinement fusion fuel capsule. Prior to studying this concept experimentally or numerically, advanced compact wire array loads must be developed and their scaling behavior understood. The 2008 Saturn planar array experiments extend the data set presented in Ref. [1], which studied planar arrays at {approx}3 MA, 100 ns in Saturn long pulse mode. Planar wire array power and yield scaling studies now include current levels directly applicable to multi-pinch experiments that could be performed on the 25 MA Z machine. A maximum total x-ray power of 15 TW (250 kJ in the main pulse, 330 kJ total yield) was observed with a 12-mm-wide planar array at 5.3 MA, 52 ns. The full data set indicates power scaling that is sub-quadratic with load current, while total and main pulse yields are closer to quadratic; these trends are similar to observations of compact cylindrical tungsten arrays on Z. We continue the investigation of energy coupling in these short pulse Saturn experiments using zero-dimensional-type implosion modeling and pinhole imaging, indicating 16 cm/?s implosion velocity in a 12-mm-wide array. The same phenomena of significant trailing mass and evidence for resistive heating are observed at 5 MA as at 3 MA. 17 kJ of Al K-shell radiation was obtained in one Al planar array fielded at 5.5 MA, 57 ns and we

  4. Simulations of the implosion and stagnation of compact wire arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wire array z-pinches have been used successfully for many years as a powerful x-ray source, as a dynamic hohlraum, and as an intense K-shell radiation source. Significant progress has been made in the effective modeling of these three-dimensional (3D) resistive plasmas. However, successful modeling also requires an accurate representation of the power delivered to these loads from the generator, which is an uncertainty potentially as large as the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) implosion dynamics. We present 3D resistive MHD simulations of wire arrays that are coupled to transmission line equivalent models of the Z generator, driven by voltage sources derived directly from electrical measurements. Significant (multi-mega-ampere) current losses are shown to occur in both the convolute and the final feed. This limits the array performance and must be correctly accounted for to accurately represent the generator response to the load. Our simulations are validated against data for compact: 20 mm diameter, 10 mm long wire arrays that have produced the highest x-ray power densities on Z. This is one of the most comprehensive experimental data sets for single and nested wire arrays and includes voltage, current, x-ray power and energy, and multiple mass distribution measurements. These data tightly constrain our simulation results and allow us to describe in detail both the implosion and stagnation, and how energy is delivered to, and radiated from z-pinch loads. We show that the radiated power is consistent with the kinetic energy delivered to a distributed 3D mass profile over its implosion and stagnation. We also demonstrate how the local inductance of the transmission line connecting to the wire array is responsible for delivering more than 50% of the total radiated power. This makes the power output dependent on the design of specific elements of the generator, and their response to the imploding load, and not just on the peak current that can be delivered.

  5. Radiation characteristics and implosion dynamics of tungsten wire array Z-pinches on the YANG accelerator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Xian-Bin; Chen Guang-Hua; Zhang Zheng-Wei; Ouyang Kai; Li Jun; Zhang Zhao-Hui; Zhou Rong-Guo; Wang Gui-Lin; Yang Li-Bing; Li Jing; Zhou Shao-Tong; Ren Xiao-Dong; Zhang Si-Qun; Dan Jia-Kun; Cai Hong-Chun; Duan Shu-Chao

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the radiation characteristics and implosion dynamics of low-wire-number cylindrical tungsten wire array Z-pinches on the YANG accelerator with a peak current 0.8-1.1 M A and a rising time~90 ns.The arrays are made up of(8-32)x5 μm wires 6/10 mm in diameter and 15 mm in height.The highest X-ray power obtained in the experiments was about 0.37 TW with the total radiation energy~13 kJ and the energy conversion efficiency~9%(24x5 μm wires,6 mm in diameter).Most of the X-ray emissions from tungsten Z-pinch plasmas were distributed in the spectral band of 100-600 eV,peaked at 250 and 375 eV.The dominant wavelengths of the wire ablation and the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability were found and analyzed through measuring the time-gated self-emission and laser interferometric images.Through analyzing the implosion trajectories obtained by an optical streak camera,the run-in velocities of the Z-pinch plasmas at the end of the implosion phase were determined to be about(1.3-2.1)x 107 cm/s.

  6. Hybrid simulations of Z-Pinches in support of wire array implosion experiments at NTF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three-dimensional hybrid simulation of a plasma current-carrying column reveal two different regimes of sausage and kink instability development. In the first regime, with small Hall parameter, development of instabilities leads to the appearance of large-scale axial perturbations and eventually to bending of the plasma column. In the second regime, with a four-times-larger Hall parameter, small-scale perturbations dominate and no bending of the plasma column is observed. Simulation results are compared with laser probing experimental data obtained during wire array implosions on the Zebra pulse power generator at the Nevada Terawatt Facility.

  7. Realization of quasi-spherical implosion using pre-shaped prolate wire arrays with a compression foam target inside

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yang; Ding, Ning; Xiao, Delong; Sun, Shunkai; Xue, Chuang; Shu, Xiaojian; Wang, Jianguo [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Li, Zhenghong, E-mail: lee-march@sina.com; Xu, Rongkun; Chen, Dingyang; Ye, Fan; Chen, Faxin; Chen, Jinchuan; Li, Linbo [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, CAEP, Mianyang 621900 (China); Zhou, Xiuwen [Research Center of Laser Fusion, CAEP, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2015-02-15

    Quasi-spherical (QS) implosion of wire arrays and its impact on the foam target have been studied on the 100 ns 1.5 MA Qiangguang-I facility, which suggests that a high quality impact between the QS implosion and foam target can be achieved by adjusting load's initial shape carefully to match the external magnetic pressure. Implosions of loads with H/d ∼ 1.2 were studied with a self-emission x-ray pinhole image system and a dark field schlieren system. The radially developed spike-like instabilities indicate the spherical convergence of plasma. The observed radiation on the foam target surface suggests satisfying implosion symmetry and wire-foam impact simultaneity. An average implosion speed of 10.5 × 10{sup 6 }cm/s was obtained with an optical streak image system. The derived peak kinetic energy density ∼2.1 kJ/cm is remarkably higher than cylindrical cases, which agree with the expectations.

  8. Study of the precursor and non-precursor implosion regimes in wire array Z-pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Star-like and closely spaced nested wire array configurations were investigated in precursor and non-precursor implosions. Closely spaced nested cylindrical arrays have inner and outer arrays with equal wire numbers, and inner and outer wires aligned to each other. The gap between the outer and inner wires is not more than 1 mm. Calculation of magnetic fields shows that the small gap results in a reversed, outward j × B force on the inner wires. Closely spaced arrays of 6–16 wires with outer diameter of 16 mm and with gaps of ΔR = 0.25–1 mm were tested. 6–8-wire arrays with a gap of ΔR = 0.4–1 mm imploded without precursor, but precursor was present in loads with 12–16 wires and ΔR = 0.25–1 mm. Implosion dynamics of closely spaced arrays was similar to that of star-like arrays. Implosion time was found to decrease with decreased wire numbers. Star array configurations were designed with a numerical scheme to implode with or without precursor. The lack of precursor resulted in a marginal improvement in total x-ray yield and power, and up to 20% increase in Al K-shell yield. The Al K-shell radiated energy was found to increase with decreasing the number of arrays in closely spaced and star-like wire arrays.

  9. Wire array z pinch precursors, implosions and stagnation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent measurements of the precursor ablation velocity show that the velocity is reduced significantly when the gap to core size ratio is less than π, implying a higher mass ablation rate and a change in the precursor density profile at the time of implosion. This might explain why experimentally there appears to be an optimal inter-wire gap for the shortest rise time of the x-ray pulse. 2-D kinetic modelling of the precursor plasma shows how long mean-free-path ions can lead to the accumulation of a central dense, radiating column. Precursor interaction with a foam cylinder is also modelled with material mixing allowed. Three effects are being studied that can increase the final x-ray radiation. One is the effect of later implosion of trailing mass, diagnosed by laser probing and modelled by 2-D simulations. A second mechanism is the development of m=1 instabilities and associated increase in ohmic dissipation from current path lengthening. The third is ion viscous heating arising from saturated non-linear, short wavelength MHD m=0 instabilities. Experimental evidence at 20MA on the Z-accelerator shows Doppler broadened spectra at stagnation with ion temperature in the 100-300 keV range, lending support for this last mechanism. (author)

  10. Inner-shell radiation from wire array implosions on the Zebra generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouart, N. D.; Giuliani, J. L.; Dasgupta, A. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, District of Columbia 20375 (United States); Safronova, A. S.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Esaulov, A. A.; Shrestha, I.; Weller, M. E.; Shlyaptseva, V.; Osborne, G. C.; Stafford, A.; Keim, S. [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Apruzese, J. P. [Consultant to NRL through Engility Corp., Chantilly, Virginia 20151 (United States); Clark, R. W. [Berkeley Research Associates, Beltsville, Maryland 20705 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Implosions of brass wire arrays on Zebra have produced L-shell radiation as well as inner-shell Kα and Kβ transitions. The L-shell radiation comes from ionization stages around the Ne-like charge state that is largely populated by a thermal electron energy distribution function, while the K-shell photons are a result of high-energy electrons ionizing or exciting an inner-shell (1s) electron from ionization stages around Ne-like. The K- and L-shell radiations were captured using two time-gated and two axially resolved time-integrated spectrometers. The electron beam was measured using a Faraday cup. A multi-zone non-local thermodynamic equilibrium pinch model with radiation transport is used to model the x-ray emission from experiments for the purpose of obtaining plasma conditions. These plasma conditions are used to discuss some properties of the electron beam generated by runaway electrons. A simple model for runaway electrons is examined to produce the Kα radiation, but it is found to be insufficient.

  11. Modeling of Al wire-array implosions on existing generators with the ''ZPIMP'' Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aluminum wire-array implosion experiments have been performed on a number of pulsed-power generators, including Double EAGLE, SATURN, PHOENIX, and BLACKJACK 5. Recently, the measured K-shell emissions (> 1 keV) from the first three machines were compared with predictions of the Whitney-Thornhill scaling law. The present report employs a numerical simulation code to make a similar comparison. The code ZPIMP models the imploding Al plasma shell as a single, but variable width, zone. Two MMHD momentum equations, an electron energy, an ion energy, and a magnetic diffusion equation are solved in a coupled fashion to a lumped driver circuit model. Artificial viscosity is included in this Lagrangian formulation. Al ionization dynamics and probability-of-escape radiation transport are calculated self-consistently. Atomic structure is included for all ionization stages of the Al. Results for SATURN simulations and comparisons with data will be presented in an initial radius-mass loading plane. When the region interior to the primary plasma shell is treated as an adiabatic gas, the simulations match the existing data remarkably well for energetic implosions. The significant differences for the few small η implosion are discussed. Comparisons with the other three generators mentioned above are anticipated. The report will focus on significant trends between the studied generators

  12. X-ray power increase from symmetrized wire-array Z-pinch implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic experimental study of annular aluminum-wire z-pinches on the Saturn accelerator shows that, for the first time, the measured spatial characteristics and x-ray powers can approach those of two-dimensional, radiation-magneto-hydrodynamic simulations when large numbers of wires are used. Calculations show that the implosion begins to transition from that of individual plasma wires to that of a continuous plasma shell, when the circumferential gap between wires in the array is reduced below 1.4 +1.3/-0.7 mm. This calculated gap coincides with the measured transition of 1.4 ± 0.4 mm between the observed regimes of slow and rapid improvement in power output with decreasing gap. In the plasma-shell regime, x-ray powers in excess of a factor of three over that generated in the plasma-wire region are measured. (author). 5 figs., 16 refs

  13. Experiments with a Gas-Puff-On-Wire-Array Load on the GIT-12 Generator for Al K-shell Radiation Production at Microsecond Implosion Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishlov, Alexander V.; Baksht, Rina B.; Chaikovsky, Stanislav A.; Fedunin, Anatoly V.; Fursov, Fedor I.; Kovalchuk, Boris M.; Kokshenev, Vladimir A.; Kurmaev, Nikolai E.; Labetsky, Aleksey Yu.; Oreshkin, Vladimir I.; Rousskikh, Alexander G.; Lassalle, Francis; Bayol, Frederic

    2006-01-01

    Results of the experiments carried out on the GIT-12 generator at the current level of 3.5 MA and the Z-pinch implosion times from 700 ns to 1.1 μs are presented. A multi-shell (triple-shell) load configuration with the outer gas puffs (neon) and the inner wire array (aluminum) was used in the experiments. In the course of the research, implosion dynamics of the triple-shell z-pinch was studied, and the radiation yield in the spectral range of neon and aluminum K-lines have been measured. Optimization of the inner wire array parameters aimed at obtaining the maximum aluminum K-shell radiation yield has been carried out. As a result of optimization of the gas-puff-on-wire-array Z-pinch load, the aluminum K-shell radiation yield (hv> 1.55 keV) up to 4 kJ/cm in the radiation pulse with FWHM less than 30 ns has been obtained. Comparison of the experimental results with the results of preliminary 1D RMHD simulations allows a conclusion that at least 2/3 of the generator current is switched from a gas puff to an aluminum wire array. The radiation yield in the spectral range of neon K-lines (0.92-1.55 keV) increases considerably in the shots with the inner wire array in comparison with the shots carried out with the outer gas puffs only. The radiation yield in the spectral range above 1 keV registered in the experiments reached 10 kJ/cm. The presence of a high portion of the neon plasma inside an inner wire array can limit the radiation yield in the spectral range above 1.55 keV.

  14. Effect of the Initial Load Parameters on the K-shell Output of Al Planar Wire Arrays Operating in the Microsecond Implosion Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishlov, A.; Chaikovsky, S.; Fedunin, A.; Fursov, F.; Kokshenev, V.; Kurmaev, N.; Labetsky, A.; Oreshkin, V.; Rousskikh, A.; Labetskaya, N.

    2009-01-01

    A set of microsecond implosion experiments was carried on the GIT-12 generator to study the radiative performance of Al planar wire arrays. The load parameters such as a wire diameter, a gap between the wires, the number of wires, and the total planar wire mass and width were varied during the experiments, however the implosion time and the peak implosion current were almost the same for all load configurations. This ensured equal energy deposition to the plasma due to kinetic mechanisms for all load configurations. Two implosion regimes with the implosion times of 1050 ns and 850 ns were investigated. The experimental data on the K-shell radiation yield and power at varying load parameters are presented.

  15. Soft X-ray spectrum dynamics in wire-array liner implosion plasma on S-300 generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the aim of helping to explain the X-ray emission mechanism of imploding multi-wire arrays, a number of diagnostic methods was used to study the S-300 generator (700 kV, 4 MA, 70 ns), a source of soft X-rays from the plasma produced by implosion of a wire-array liner. The diagnostic methods used included: three-frame laser shadowgraphy, optical streak-camera photography, three-frame optical ICT-photographs with a time resolution of ∼5 ns, three-frame soft X-ray ICT-photography with a time resolution of ∼5 ns, and a time-integrated two-pin-hole camera with different pairs of filters. The experiments were performed with wires of various mass and composition, always in the same geometry: the diameter of the wire-array was about 1 cm with a height of 1 cm. The highest X-ray outputs were observed at the implosion of tungsten wire arrays with masses of between 350 and 400 μg (60 to 80 wires of 6 μm diameter each). (A.K.)

  16. Wire number dependence of the implosion dynamics, stagnation, and radiation output of tungsten wire arrays at Z driver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report results of the experimental campaign, which studied the initiation, implosion dynamics, and radiation yield of tungsten wire arrays as a function of the wire number. The wire array dimensions and mass were those of interest for the Z-pinch driven Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program. An optimization study of the x-ray emitted peak power, rise time, and full width at half maximum was effectuated by varying the wire number while keeping the total array mass constant and equal to ∼5.8 mg. The driver utilized was the ∼20-MA Z accelerator before refurbishment in its usual short pulse mode of 100 ns. We studied single arrays of 20-mm diameter and 1-cm height. The smaller wire number studied was 30 and the largest 600. It appears that 600 is the highest achievable wire number with present day's technology. Radial and axial diagnostics were utilized including crystal monochromatic x-ray backlighter. An optimum wire number of ∼375 was observed which was very close to the routinely utilized 300 for the ICF program in Sandia.

  17. Wire number dependence of the implosion dynamics, stagnation, and radiation output of tungsten wire arrays at Z driver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazarakis, Michael G.; Stygar, William A.; Sinars, Daniel B.; Cuneo, Michael E.; Nash, Thomas J.; Chandler, Gordon A.; Keith Matzen, M.; Porter, John L.; Struve, Kenneth W.; McDaniel, Dillon H. [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Deeney, Christopher E. [National Nuclear Security Administration, Washington, D.C. 20585 (United States); Douglas, Melissa R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Chittenden, Jerry [Imperial College, London, SW and 2BW (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    We report results of the experimental campaign, which studied the initiation, implosion dynamics, and radiation yield of tungsten wire arrays as a function of the wire number. The wire array dimensions and mass were those of interest for the Z-pinch driven Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program. An optimization study of the x-ray emitted peak power, rise time, and full width at half maximum was effectuated by varying the wire number while keeping the total array mass constant and equal to {approx}5.8 mg. The driver utilized was the {approx}20-MA Z accelerator before refurbishment in its usual short pulse mode of 100 ns. We studied single arrays of 20-mm diameter and 1-cm height. The smaller wire number studied was 30 and the largest 600. It appears that 600 is the highest achievable wire number with present day's technology. Radial and axial diagnostics were utilized including crystal monochromatic x-ray backlighter. An optimum wire number of {approx}375 was observed which was very close to the routinely utilized 300 for the ICF program in Sandia.

  18. Study of ablation and implosion stages in wire arrays using coupled ultraviolet and X-ray probing diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Star and cylindrical wire arrays were studied using laser probing and X-ray radiography at the 1-MA Zebra pulse power generator at the University of Nevada, Reno. The Leopard laser provided backlighting, producing a laser plasma from a Si target which emitted an X-ray probing pulse at the wavelength of 6.65 Å. A spherically bent quartz crystal imaged the backlit wires onto X-ray film. Laser probing diagnostics at the wavelength of 266 nm included a 3-channel polarimeter for Faraday rotation diagnostic and two-frame laser interferometry with two shearing interferometers to study the evolution of the plasma electron density at the ablation and implosion stages. Dynamics of the plasma density profile in Al wire arrays at the ablation stage were directly studied with interferometry, and expansion of wire cores was measured with X-ray radiography. The magnetic field in the imploding plasma was measured with the Faraday rotation diagnostic, and current was reconstructed

  19. Study of ablation and implosion stages in wire arrays using coupled ultraviolet and X-ray probing diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, A. A.; Ivanov, V. V.; Astanovitskiy, A. L.; Papp, D.; Wiewior, P. P.; Chalyy, O.

    2015-11-01

    Star and cylindrical wire arrays were studied using laser probing and X-ray radiography at the 1-MA Zebra pulse power generator at the University of Nevada, Reno. The Leopard laser provided backlighting, producing a laser plasma from a Si target which emitted an X-ray probing pulse at the wavelength of 6.65 Å. A spherically bent quartz crystal imaged the backlit wires onto X-ray film. Laser probing diagnostics at the wavelength of 266 nm included a 3-channel polarimeter for Faraday rotation diagnostic and two-frame laser interferometry with two shearing interferometers to study the evolution of the plasma electron density at the ablation and implosion stages. Dynamics of the plasma density profile in Al wire arrays at the ablation stage were directly studied with interferometry, and expansion of wire cores was measured with X-ray radiography. The magnetic field in the imploding plasma was measured with the Faraday rotation diagnostic, and current was reconstructed.

  20. Study of ablation and implosion stages in wire arrays using coupled ultraviolet and X-ray probing diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, A. A.; Ivanov, V. V.; Astanovitskiy, A. L.; Wiewior, P. P.; Chalyy, O. [University of Nevada Reno, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Papp, D. [University of Nevada Reno, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); ELI-ALPS, ELI-Hu Nkft., H-6720 Szeged (Hungary)

    2015-11-15

    Star and cylindrical wire arrays were studied using laser probing and X-ray radiography at the 1-MA Zebra pulse power generator at the University of Nevada, Reno. The Leopard laser provided backlighting, producing a laser plasma from a Si target which emitted an X-ray probing pulse at the wavelength of 6.65 Å. A spherically bent quartz crystal imaged the backlit wires onto X-ray film. Laser probing diagnostics at the wavelength of 266 nm included a 3-channel polarimeter for Faraday rotation diagnostic and two-frame laser interferometry with two shearing interferometers to study the evolution of the plasma electron density at the ablation and implosion stages. Dynamics of the plasma density profile in Al wire arrays at the ablation stage were directly studied with interferometry, and expansion of wire cores was measured with X-ray radiography. The magnetic field in the imploding plasma was measured with the Faraday rotation diagnostic, and current was reconstructed.

  1. The effect of current prepulse on wire array Z-pinch implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of a prepulse current on the behavior of wire array Z pinches is investigated. The experiments were performed on the MAGPIE generator (1 MA peak current at 240 ns) [I. Mitchell, J. M. Bayley, J. P. Chittenden et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 67, 1533 (1996)]. A linear ramp current, ∼500-ns long, was used as a prepulse. The array consisted of 32 15-μm aluminum wires, 23-mm long arranged in a 16-mm diameter circle. With a prepulse of 1 kA/wire, a low density precursor plasma column (ne∼2x1017 cm-3) is formed on the array axis before the start of the main current. Later, the soft x-ray emission shows the growth of an m=1 helical instability in the precursor plasma, which indicates the presence of a current. Without a prepulse current, the precursor plasma on axis is uniform and does not show any instability. The x-ray pulse at stagnation on axis is at least 30 times smaller with a prepulse current than without

  2. Measurement and modeling of the implosion of wire arrays with seeded instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to study wire array Z-pinch instabilities, perturbations have been seeded by etching 15 μm diameter aluminum wires to introduce 20% modulations in radius with a controlled axial wavelength. These perturbations seed additional imploding structures that are studied experimentally on the 1 MA, 250 ns MAGPIE generator [S. V. Lebedev et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 47, A91 (2005)] and with three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic calculations using the ALEGRA-HEDP [A. C. Robinson and C. J. Garasi, Comput. Phys. Commun. 164, 408 (2004)] and GORGON [J. P. Chittenden et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 46, B457 (2004)] codes. Simulations indicate that current path nonuniformity at discontinuities in the wire radius result in perturbation-induced magnetic bubble formation. Imploding bubbles originating from discontinuities are observed experimentally, and their collision on axis determines the start of the main x-ray pulse rise. These mechanisms likely govern dynamics of standard wire array Z pinches, and tailoring the profile of imploding mass may allow x-ray pulse shaping for inertial confinement fusion applications

  3. Implosion hydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Implosion hydrodynamics are examined, from the conditions in the imploded target to the initial target configuration and the driver performance. The subject is discussed under the topic headings: inertial configuration, thermonuclear fusion processes, ignition model, shock waves, acceleration by a constant pressure, spherical shock waves and imploding flows, drive pressure requirements, pulse shaping, pressure generation by lasers and ion beams, symmetry and hydrodynamic stability and typical target designs. (U.K.)

  4. Implosions and hypertoric geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dancer, A.; Kirwan, F.; Swann, A.

    The geometry of the universal hyperkahler implosion for SU (n) is explored. In particular, we show that the universal hyperkahler implosion naturally contains a hypertoric variety described in terms of quivers. Furthermore, we discuss a gauge theoretic approach to hyperkahler implosion.......The geometry of the universal hyperkahler implosion for SU (n) is explored. In particular, we show that the universal hyperkahler implosion naturally contains a hypertoric variety described in terms of quivers. Furthermore, we discuss a gauge theoretic approach to hyperkahler implosion....

  5. Study of soft X-ray emission during wire array implosion under plasma focus conditions at the PF-3 facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan’ko, S. A. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Mitrofanov, K. N., E-mail: mitrofan@triniti.ru [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Krauz, V. I.; Myalton, V. V.; Zhuzhunashvili, A. I.; Vinogradov, V. P.; Kharrasov, A. M.; Anan’ev, S. S.; Vinogradova, Yu. V.; Kalinin, Yu. G. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    Results of measurements of soft X-ray emission with photon energies of <1 keV under conditions of a plasma focus (PF) experiment are presented. The experiments were carried out at the world’s largest PF device—the PF-3 Filippov-type facility (I ⩽ 3 MA, T/4 ≈ 15–20 µs, W{sub 0} ⩽ 3 MJ). X-ray emission from both a discharge in pure neon and with a tungsten wire array placed on the axis of the discharge chamber was detected. The wire array imploded under the action of the electric current intercepted from the plasma current sheath of the PF discharge in neon. The measured soft X-ray powers from a conventional PF discharge in gas and a PF discharge in the presence of a wire array were compared for the first time.

  6. Diagnostics for Z-pinch implosion experiments on PTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, X. D.; Huang, X. B.; Zhou, S. T.; Zhang, S. Q.; Dan, J. K.; Li, J.; Cai, H. C.; Wang, K. L.; Ouyang, K.; Xu, Q.; Duan, S. C.; Chen, G. H.; Wang, M.; Feng, S. P.; Yang, L. B.; Xie, W. P.; Deng, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    The preliminary experiments of wire array implosion were performed on PTS, a 10 MA z-pinch driver with a 70 ns rise time. A set of diagnostics have been developed and fielded on PTS to study pinch physics and implosion dynamics of wire array. Radiated power measurement for soft x-rays was performed by multichannel filtered x-ray diode array, and flat spectral responses x-ray diode detector. Total x-ray yield was measured by a calibrated, unfiltered nickel bolometer which was also used to obtain pinch power. Multiple time-gated pinhole cameras were used to produce spatial-resolved images of x-ray self-emission from plasmas. Two time-integrated pinhole cameras were used respectively with 20-μm Be filter and with multilayer mirrors to record images produced by >1-keV and 277±5 eV self-emission. An optical streak camera was used to produce radial implosion trajectories, and an x-ray streak camera paired with a horizontal slit was used to record a continuous time-history of emission with one-dimensional spatial resolution. A frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser (532 nm) was used to produce four frame laser shadowgraph images with 6 ns time interval. We will briefly describe each of these diagnostics and present some typical results from them.

  7. Diagnostics for Z-pinch implosion experiments on PTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, X. D., E-mail: amosrxd@163.com; Huang, X. B., E-mail: amosrxd@163.com; Zhou, S. T., E-mail: amosrxd@163.com; Zhang, S. Q., E-mail: amosrxd@163.com; Dan, J. K., E-mail: amosrxd@163.com; Li, J., E-mail: amosrxd@163.com; Cai, H. C., E-mail: amosrxd@163.com; Wang, K. L., E-mail: amosrxd@163.com; Ouyang, K., E-mail: amosrxd@163.com; Xu, Q., E-mail: amosrxd@163.com; Duan, S. C., E-mail: amosrxd@163.com; Chen, G. H., E-mail: amosrxd@163.com; Wang, M., E-mail: amosrxd@163.com; Feng, S. P., E-mail: amosrxd@163.com; Yang, L. B., E-mail: amosrxd@163.com; Xie, W. P., E-mail: amosrxd@163.com; Deng, J. J., E-mail: amosrxd@163.com [Key Lab of Pulsed Power, Institute of Fluid Physics, CAEP, P.O. Box 919-108, Mianyang, Sichuan 621999 (China)

    2014-12-15

    The preliminary experiments of wire array implosion were performed on PTS, a 10 MA z-pinch driver with a 70 ns rise time. A set of diagnostics have been developed and fielded on PTS to study pinch physics and implosion dynamics of wire array. Radiated power measurement for soft x-rays was performed by multichannel filtered x-ray diode array, and flat spectral responses x-ray diode detector. Total x-ray yield was measured by a calibrated, unfiltered nickel bolometer which was also used to obtain pinch power. Multiple time-gated pinhole cameras were used to produce spatial-resolved images of x-ray self-emission from plasmas. Two time-integrated pinhole cameras were used respectively with 20-μm Be filter and with multilayer mirrors to record images produced by >1-keV and 277±5 eV self-emission. An optical streak camera was used to produce radial implosion trajectories, and an x-ray streak camera paired with a horizontal slit was used to record a continuous time-history of emission with one-dimensional spatial resolution. A frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser (532 nm) was used to produce four frame laser shadowgraph images with 6 ns time interval. We will briefly describe each of these diagnostics and present some typical results from them.

  8. Experimental study of implosion dynamics of multi-material nested wire-arrays on S-300 pulsed power generator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chernenko, AS; Smirnov, VP; Kingsep, AS; Kalinin, YG; Bakshaev, YL; Bartov, AV; Blinov, PI; Danko, SA; Dubas, LG; Korelskii, AV; Korolev, VD; Mizhiritsky, [No Value; Shaskov, AY; Ustroev, GI; Li, ZH; Hua, XS; Feng, SP; Guo, C; Jiang, SL; Ning, C; Peng, XJ; Song, FJ; Xu, RK; Xu, ZP; Yan, CL; Yang, JL; Yang, LB; Cai, HC

    2004-01-01

    On "S-300" generator (700 W, 4 MA, 70 ns) at the Kurchatov Institute, the experimental studies with multi-material wire array units are carried on aimed at creating the powerful X-ray source. The development of new diagnostic methods would definitely contribute to attain new data, which could help i

  9. An Update on Phased Array Results Obtained on the GE Counter-Rotating Open Rotor Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podboy, Gary; Horvath, Csaba; Envia, Edmane

    2013-01-01

    Beamform maps have been generated from 1) simulated data generated by the LINPROP code and 2) actual experimental phased array data obtained on the GE Counter-rotating open rotor model. The beamform maps show that many of the tones in the experimental data come from their corresponding Mach radius. If the phased array points to the Mach radius associated with a tone then it is likely that the tone is a result of the loading and thickness noise on the blades. In this case, the phased array correctly points to where the noise is coming from and indicates the axial location of the loudest source in the image but not necessarily the correct vertical location. If the phased array does not point to the Mach radius associated with a tone then some mechanism other than loading and thickness noise may control the amplitude of the tone. In this case, the phased array may or may not point to the actual source. If the source is not rotating it is likely that the phased array points to the source. If the source is rotating it is likely that the phased array indicates the axial location of the loudest source but not necessarily the correct vertical location. These results indicate that you have to be careful in how you interpret phased array data obtained on an open rotor since they may show the tones coming from a location other than the source location. With a subsonic tip speed open rotor the tones can come form locations outboard of the blade tips. This has implications regarding noise shielding.

  10. Transparent conductive coatings by printing coffee ring arrays obtained at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layani, Michael; Gruchko, Michael; Milo, Oded; Balberg, Isaac; Azulay, Doron; Magdassi, Shlomo

    2009-11-24

    We report here a concept for utilization of the "coffee ring effect" and inkjet printing to obtain transparent conductive patterns, which can replace the widely used transparent conductive oxides, such as ITO. The transparent conductive coating is achieved by forming a 2-D array of interconnected metallic rings. The rim of the individual rings is less than 10 microm in width and less than 300 nm in height, surrounding a "hole" with a diameter of about 150 microm; therefore the whole array of the interconnected rings is almost invisible to the naked eye. The rims of the rings are composed of self-assembled, closely packed silver nanoparticles, which make the individual rings and the resulting array electrically conductive. The resulting arrays of rings have a transparency of 95%; resistivity of 0.5 cm(2) was 4 +/- 0.5 Omega/, which is better than conventional ITO transparent thin films. The silver rings and arrays are fabricated by a very simple, low cost process, based on inkjet printing of a dispersion of 0.5 wt % silver nanoparticles (approximately 20 nm diameter) on plastic substrates. The performance of this transparent conductive coating was demonstrated by using it as an electrode for a plastic electroluminescent device, demonstrating the applicability of this concept in plastics electronics. It is expected that such transparent conductive coatings can be used in a wide range of applications such as displays (LCD, plasma, touch screens, e-paper), lighting devices (electroluminescence, OLED), and solar cells. PMID:19928933

  11. Polycarbonate-based ordered arrays of electrochemical nanoelectrodes obtained by e-beam lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordered arrays of nanoelectrodes for electrochemical use are prepared by electron beam lithography (EBL) using polycarbonate as a novel e-beam resist. The nanoelectrodes are fabricated by patterning arrays of holes in a thin film of polycarbonate spin-coated on a gold layer on Si/Si3N4 substrate. Experimental parameters for the successful use of polycarbonate as high resolution EBL resist are optimized. The holes can be filled partially or completely by electrochemical deposition of gold. This enables the preparation of arrays of nanoelectrodes with different recession degree and geometrical characteristics. The polycarbonate is kept on-site and used as the insulator that separates the nanoelectrodes. The obtained nanoelectrode arrays (NEAs) exhibit steady state current controlled by pure radial diffusion in cyclic voltammetry for scan rates up to approximately 50 mV s-1. Electrochemical results showed satisfactory agreement between experimental voltammograms and suitable theoretical models. Finally, the peculiarities of NEAs versus ensembles of nanoelectrodes, obtained by membrane template synthesis, are critically evaluated.

  12. S-300装置铝丝阵内爆X光辐射特性%Characteristics of soft X-ray emission generated in implosion of Al wire array Z-pinch experiments on S-300 facility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋世伦; 宁家敏; 夏广新; 徐荣昆

    2011-01-01

    零维模型负载优化设计制作的单层和双层铝丝阵负载,在俄罗斯S-300强流发生器上,利用"狭缝+闪烁体+光电探测器"X光功率测量系统对X光辐射特性参数进行了诊断.实验获得单层丝阵负载的辐射功率为(0.31±0.19)TW,辐射总能量为(16.93±7.45)kJ,脉宽为(18.41±5.00)ns;双层丝阵负载的辐射功率为(0.37±0.12)TW,辐射总能量为(16.40±3.99)kJ,脉宽为(13.45±3.50)ns.实验结果表明,双层丝阵负载辐射功率高于单层19.4%,信号脉宽窄4.96 ns.%An X-ray power measuring system composed of slit, scintillator and phototube is used to diagnose the characteristic parameters of soft X-ray generated in the implosion of Al wire array Z-pinch experiments on the S-300 facility at Kurchatov Institute. Wire array loads based on zero-dimension thin shell model are designed for experiments. For single wire array load, the experiment gets an X-ray power of (0.31±0.19) TW, total radiated energy of (16.40±7.45) kJ, and pulse width of (18. 41± 5.00) ns. For nested wire array load, an X-ray power of (0. 37±0. 12 ) TW, total radiated energy of (16.93±3.99) kJ, and pulse width of (13.45 ± 3.50) ns are achieved. The experimental results of different wire array loads show that the total energy achieved by nested wire array is 19.4% higher than that of single wire array, and the pulse width for nested wire array decreases by 4.96 ns compared to that for single wire array.

  13. Compton Radiography of ICF implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommasini, Riccardo

    2011-10-01

    Laser-produced, micro-wire backlighters in a point-projection geometry, generating X-ray photons with energies ranging from 50keV to 200 keV, have been used to record time-resolved 2D radiographs of the dense cold fuel surrounding the hot spot of inertial confinement fusion implosions at the OMEGA facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. The radiographs have spatial and temporal resolution of ~10 μm and ~10 ps, respectively, and allow localized measurements of areal mass densities with 7% accuracy. The experimental results show 3D non-uniformities and lower than 1D expected areal densities attributed to drive asymmetries and hydroinstabilities. The areal density measurements from radiographs compare well to the values obtained from charged particle spectrometry. We are preparing similar experiments using this technique to obtain radiographs of cryogenic implosions at the National Ignition Facility. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  14. Earthquake observation database in JAERI Oarai Site obtained by vertical instrument arrays from 1987-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to obtain the seismic design data for the construction of High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) in the Oarai Research Establishment of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The observation of earthquakes has been carried out since 1987 by using vertical instrument array system, which was installed to investigate the soil behavior in the Oarai site under the earthquake ground motions. This system consists of four acceleration seismographs which are attached at the depth of GL -1.2, -31, -95 and -174 m (shear velocity: 1020 m/sec). Afterward two seismographs were added at the GL -35 and -250 m. All seismographs are the servo types with NS, EW and UD directions. 71-earthquakes were observed during December 1987 to March 2000. The database of acceleration time histories by these earthquakes are being pigeonholed based on the format of the Association for Earthquake Disaster Prevention. This report compiles earthquake observation database and the soil properties such as velocities of P wave and S wave of soil in the site and frequency characteristics of acceleration time histories. (author)

  15. Laser implosion fusion experiments at Ile Osaka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter investigates the scaling laws for ablative compression driven by either thermal electrons, hot electrons or X-ray radiations as well as non-ablative compression (Cannon ball target), by applying the ''GEKKO'' glass lasers and its higher harmonics, and the ''LEKKO'' CO2 laser. Topics covered include energy drivers, scaling of implosion pressure, hot electron driven ablation, X-ray driven ablation, and the implosion process in various targets. Ablation properties of different wavelength irradiation (10 μm, 1 μm and its 2nd and 3rd harmonics and X-ray) are studied. Shorter wavelength irradiation, especially soft X-ray, is observed to have high efficiency in generating the ablation pressure. Hot electron driven ablation is verified to be effective in driving the pellet implosion. It is demonstrated that the quantitative evaluations of the pre-heat, and R-T or nonuniformity instability on pellet implosion are the key issues for obtaining high compression. Cannon ball targets, double shell and foam ablator structures are compared to evaluate the performance of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) examining the absorption, hydrodynamic efficiency, uniformity improvement effect, and preheat reduction. Includes 2 tables, 3 drawings, and 18 photos

  16. On the validity of tidal turbine array configurations obtained from steady-state adjoint optimisation

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobs, Christian T.; Piggott, Matthew D.; Kramer, Stephan C; Funke, Simon W.

    2016-01-01

    Extracting the optimal amount of power from an array of tidal turbines requires an intricate understanding of tidal dynamics and the effects of turbine placement on the local and regional scale flow. Numerical models have contributed significantly towards this understanding, and more recently, adjoint-based modelling has been employed to optimise the positioning of the turbines in an array in an automated way and improve on simple, regular man-made configurations. Adjoint-based optimisation o...

  17. Progress in symmetric ICF capsule implosions and wire-array z-pinch source physics for double z-pinch driven hohlraums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last several years, rapid progress has been made evaluating the double-z-pinch indirect-drive, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) high-yield target concept (Hammer et al 1999 Phys. Plasmas 6 2129). We have demonstrated efficient coupling of radiation from two wire-array-driven primary hohlraums to a secondary hohlraum that is large enough to drive a high yield ICF capsule. The secondary hohlraum is irradiated from two sides by z-pinches to produce low odd-mode radiation asymmetry. This double-pinch source is driven from a single electrical power feed (Cuneo et al 2002 Phys. Rev. Lett. 88 215004) on the 20 MA Z accelerator. The double z-pinch has imploded ICF capsules with even-mode radiation symmetry of 3.1 ± 1.4% and to high capsule radial convergence ratios of 14-21 (Bennett et al 2002 Phys. Rev. Lett. 89 245002; Bennett et al 2003 Phys. Plasmas 10 3717; Vesey et al 2003 Phys. Plasmas 10 1854). Advances in wire-array physics at 20 MA are improving our understanding of z-pinch power scaling with increasing drive current. Techniques for shaping the z-pinch radiation pulse necessary for low adiabat capsule compression have also been demonstrated.

  18. Progress in symmetric ICF capsule implosions and wire-array z-pinch source physics for double z-pinch driven hohlraums.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bliss, David Emery; Vesey, Roger Alan; Rambo, Patrick K.; Lebedev, Sergey V. (Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London, UK); Hanson, David L.; Nash, Thomas J.; Yu, Edmund P.; Matzen, Maurice Keith; Afeyan, Bedros B. (Polymath Research, Inc., Pleasanton, CA); Smith, Ian Craig; Stygar, William A.; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Bennett, Guy R.; Campbell, Robert B.; Sinars, Daniel Brian; Chittenden, Jeremy Paul (Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London, UK); Waisman, Eduardo Mario; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan

    2005-07-01

    Over the last several years, rapid progress has been made evaluating the double-z-pinch indirect-drive, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) high-yield target concept (Hammer et al 1999 Phys. Plasmas 6 2129). We have demonstrated efficient coupling of radiation from two wire-array-driven primary hohlraums to a secondary hohlraum that is large enough to drive a high yield ICF capsule. The secondary hohlraum is irradiated from two sides by z-pinches to produce low odd-mode radiation asymmetry. This double-pinch source is driven from a single electrical power feed (Cuneo et al 2002 Phys. Rev. Lett. 88 215004) on the 20 MA Z accelerator. The double z-pinch has imploded ICF capsules with even-mode radiation symmetry of 3.1 {+-} 1.4% and to high capsule radial convergence ratios of 14-21 (Bennett et al 2002 Phys. Rev. Lett. 89 245002; Bennett et al 2003 Phys. Plasmas 10 3717; Vesey et al 2003 Phys. Plasmas 10 1854). Advances in wire-array physics at 20 MA are improving our understanding of z-pinch power scaling with increasing drive current. Techniques for shaping the z-pinch radiation pulse necessary for low adiabat capsule compression have also been demonstrated.

  19. Scaling Laws for Hydrodynamically Equivalent Implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Masakatsu

    2001-10-01

    The EPOC (equivalent physics of confinement) scenario for the proof of principle of high gain inertial confinement fusion is presented, where the key concept "hydrodynamically equivalent implosions" plays a crucial role. Scaling laws on the target and confinement parameters are derived by applying the Lie group analysis to the PDE (partially differential equations) chain of the hydrodynamic system. It turns out that the conventional scaling law based on adiabatic approximation significantly differs from one which takes such energy transport effect as electron heat conduction into account. Confinement plasma parameters of the hot spot such as the central temperature and the areal mass density at peak compression are obtained with a self-similar solution for spherical implosions.

  20. On the validity of tidal turbine array configurations obtained from steady-state adjoint optimisation

    CERN Document Server

    Jacobs, Christian T; Kramer, Stephan C; Funke, Simon W

    2016-01-01

    Extracting the optimal amount of power from an array of tidal turbines requires an intricate understanding of tidal dynamics and the effects of turbine placement on the local and regional scale flow. Numerical models have contributed significantly towards this understanding, and more recently, adjoint-based modelling has been employed to optimise the positioning of the turbines in an array in an automated way and improve on simple, regular man-made configurations. Adjoint-based optimisation of high-resolution and ideally 3D transient models is generally a very computationally expensive problem. As a result, existing work on the adjoint optimisation of tidal turbine placement has been mostly limited to steady-state simulations in which very high, non-physical values of the background viscosity are required to ensure that a steady-state solution exists. However, such compromises may affect the reliability of the modelled turbines, their wakes and interactions, and thus bring into question the validity of the co...

  1. Implosion of quadrupole gravitational waves

    OpenAIRE

    Bonnor, W. B.; Piper, M. S.

    1996-01-01

    Einstein's vacuum equations are solved up to the second approximation for imploding quadrupole gravitational waves. The implosion generates a black hole singularity irrespective of the strength of the waves.

  2. First high dynamic range and high resolution images of the sky obtained with a diffractive Fresnel array telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koechlin, Laurent; Rivet, Jean-Pierre; Deba, Paul; Serre, Denis; Raksasataya, Truswin; Gili, René; David, Jules

    2012-03-01

    This paper presents high contrast images of sky sources, obtained from the ground with a novel optical concept: Fresnel arrays. We demonstrate the efficiency of a small 20 cm prototype Fresnel array for making images with high brightness ratios, achieving contrasts up to 4 × 105 on sky sources such as Mars and its satellites, and the Sirius A-B couple. These validation results are promising for future applications in space, for example the 4 m array we have proposed to ESA in the frame of the "Call for a Medium-size mission opportunity for a launch in 2022". Fresnel imagers are the subject of a topical issue of Experimental Astronomy published in 2011, but only preliminary results were presented at the time. Making images of astronomical bodies requires an optical component to focus light. This component is usually a mirror or a lens, the quality of which is critical for sharp and high contrast images. However, reflection on a mirror and refraction through a lens are not the only ways to focus light: an alternative is provided by diffraction through binary masks (opaque foils with multiple precisely etched sub-apertures). Our Fresnel arrays are such diffractive focusers, they offer weight, price and size advantages over traditional optics in space-based astronomical instruments. This novel approach requires only void apertures of special shapes in an opaque material to form sharp images, thus avoiding the wavefront distortion, diffusion and spectral absorption associated with traditional optical media. In our setup, lenses and/or mirrors are involved only downstream (at small sizes) for focal instrumentation and chromatic correction. Fresnel arrays produce high contrast images, the resolution of which reaches the theoretical limit of diffraction. Unlike mirrors, they do not require high precision polishing or positioning, and can be used in a large domain of wavelengths from far IR to far UV, enabling the study of many science cases in astrophysics from exoplanet

  3. Isochoric Implosions for Fast Ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various gain models have shown the potentially great advantages of Fast Ignition (FI) Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) over its conventional hot spot ignition counterpart [e.g., S. Atzeni, Phys. Plasmas 6, 3316 (1999); M. Tabak et al., Fusion Sci. and Technology 49, 254 (2006)]. These gain models, however, all assume nearly uniform-density fuel assemblies. In contrast, conventional ICF implosions yield hollowed fuel assemblies with a high-density shell of fuel surrounding a low-density, high-pressure hot spot. Hence, to realize fully the advantages of FI, an alternative implosion design must be found which yields nearly isochoric fuel assemblies without substantial hot spots. Here, it is shown that a self-similar spherical implosion of the type originally studied by Guderley [Luftfahrtforschung 19, 302 (1942)] may be employed to yield precisely such quasi-isochoric imploded states. The difficulty remains, however, of accessing these self-similarly imploding configurations from initial conditions representing an actual ICF target, namely a uniform, solid-density shell at rest. Furthermore, these specialized implosions must be realized for practicable drive parameters and at the scales and energies of interest in ICF. A direct-drive implosion scheme is presented which meets all of these requirements and reaches a nearly isochoric assembled density of 300 g=cm3 and areal density of 2.4 g=cm2 using 485 kJ of laser energy

  4. Buoyancy instability of homologous implosions

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Bryan M

    2015-01-01

    I consider the hydrodynamic stability of imploding gases as a model for inertial confinement fusion capsules, sonoluminescent bubbles and the gravitational collapse of astrophysical gases. For oblate modes under a homologous flow, a monatomic gas is governed by the Schwarzschild criterion for buoyant stability. Under buoyantly unstable conditions, fluctuations experience power-law growth in time, with a growth rate that depends upon mean flow gradients and is independent of mode number. If the flow accelerates throughout the implosion, oblate modes amplify by a factor (2C)^(|N0| ti)$, where C is the convergence ratio of the implosion, N0 is the initial buoyancy frequency and ti is the implosion time scale. If, instead, the implosion consists of a coasting phase followed by stagnation, oblate modes amplify by a factor exp(pi |N0| ts), where N0 is the buoyancy frequency at stagnation and ts is the stagnation time scale. Even under stable conditions, vorticity fluctuations grow due to the conservation of angular...

  5. Characterization of converging shock waves generated by underwater electrical wire array explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of ∼200 kbar pressure generation at 50 μm distance from the implosion axis of the converging shock wave produced by an underwater electrical explosion of a cylindrical wire array are reported. The array was exploded using a submicrosecond high-current generator (stored energy of ∼4.2 kJ, current amplitude of ∼325 kA, rise time of ∼1 μs). Multiframe shadow imaging of the shock wave was used to determine its time of flight. These data were applied for calculating the pressure at the vicinity of the implosion axis using one dimensional hydrodynamic calculations and the Whitham approach. However, it was found that in the case of wire array radius ≤5 mm, multiframe imaging cannot be used at the final stage of the shock wave implosion because of possible changes in the optical properties of the water. Optical and spectroscopic methods based on either the change in the refraction index of the optical fiber or spectroscopy of the plasma formed inside the capillary placed at the implosion axes were used for shock wave characterization. A satisfactory agreement was found between the results obtained by these methods.

  6. Multispectral x-ray imaging for core temperature and density maps retrieval in direct drive implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the experiments aimed at obtaining core temperature and density maps in direct drive implosions at the Omega laser facility using multimonochromatic x-ray imagers. These instruments use an array of pinholes and a flat multilayer mirror to provide unique multispectral images distributed over a wide spectral range. Using argon as a dopant in the direct-drive filled plastic shells produces emission images in the Ar He-β and Ly-β spectral regions. These images allow the retrieval of temperature and density maps of the plasma. We deployed three identical multimonochromatic x-ray imagers in a quasiorthogonal line-of-sight configuration to allow tomographic reconstruction of the structure of the imploding core

  7. Simple spherical ablative-implosion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple model of the ablative implosion of a high-aspect-ratio (shell radius to shell thickness ratio) spherical shell is described. The model is similar in spirit to Rosenbluth's snowplow model. The scaling of the implosion time was determined in terms of the ablation pressure and the shell parameters such as diameter, wall thickness, and shell density, and compared these to complete hydrodynamic code calculations. The energy transfer efficiency from ablation pressure to shell implosion kinetic energy was examined and found to be very efficient. It may be possible to attach a simple heat-transport calculation to our implosion model to describe the laser-driven ablation-implosion process. The model may be useful for determining other energy driven (e.g., ion beam) implosion scaling

  8. Simple ablative implosion model: shell dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple model, derived from Newton's Second Law, for the ablative implosion of a thin spherical shell is presented. The scaling dependence of the implosion time, shell velocity, and mass loss on shell dimensions and the critical physical parameter, the ablation pressure, is derived. Finally, the model is used to examine implosion energy efficiency and to describe an interesting application, wall-recoil heating of a contained fuel gas

  9. Foil implosion studies with a plasma flow switch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A plasma flow switch has been developed for the 1.5 MJ Pegasus capacitor bank to efficiently utilize the bank energy to drive a foil implosion. The object of this activity is to generate an intense burst of soft x-rays when the foil stagnates and thermalizes on axis. The peak current of the Pegasus bank, determined from the charge voltage divided by the characteristic impedance of the capacitor bank is -- 10 MA. When used to perform direct-drive, foil implosion experiments, the foil collapses to the axis when the current has risen to only -- 3 MA. The kinetic energy of the imploding foil for the direct-drive configuration cannot exceed -- 25% of the bank energy (lossless calculation). The plasma flow switch has been designed to have a conduction time of -- 4 μsec and a commutation time of -- 0.2 μsec. This permits flow implosion experiments to be performed at peak current. The soft x-ray output, as determined by volometry and by an array of filtered x-ray diodes, is compared for the two modes of operation

  10. Implosion Source Development and Diego Garcia Reflections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harben, P E; Boro, C

    2001-06-01

    Calibration of hydroacoustic stations for nuclear explosion monitoring is important for increasing monitoring capability and confidence from newly installed stations and from existing stations. Past work at Ascension Island has shown that ship-towed airguns can be effectively used for local calibrations such as sensor location, amplitude and phase response, and T-phase coupling in the case of T-phase stations. At regional and ocean-basin distances from a station, the calibration focus is on acoustic travel time, transmission loss, bathymetric shadowing, diffraction, and reflection as recorded at a particular station. Such station calibrations will lead to an overall network calibration that seeks to maximize detection, location, and discrimination capability of events with acoustic signatures. Active-source calibration of hydroacoustic stations at regional and ocean-basin scales has not been attempted to date, but we have made significant headway addressing how such calibrations could be accomplished. We have developed an imploding sphere source that can be used instead of explosives on research and commercial vessels without restriction. The imploding sphere has been modeled using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory hydrodynamic code CALE and shown to agree with field data. The need for boosted energy in the monitoring band (2-100 Hz) has led us to develop a 5-sphere implosion device that was tested in the Pacific Ocean earlier this year. Boosting the energy in the monitoring band can be accomplished by a combination of increasing the implosion volume (i.e. the 5-sphere device) and imploding at shallower depths. Although active source calibrations will be necessary at particular locations and for particular objectives, the newly installed Diego Garcia station in the Indian Ocean has shown that earthquakes can be used to help understand regional blockages and the locations responsible for observed hydroacoustic reflections. We have analyzed several events

  11. Direct-drive implosion physics: Results from OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radha, P. B.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hohenberger, M.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Craxton, R. S.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Froula, D. H.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Michel, D. T.; Hu, S. X.; Seka, W.; Shvydky, A.; Skupsky, S.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D.; Ma, T.; Le Pape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.

    2016-03-01

    Direct-drive-implosion experiments from both OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are critical to gain confidence in ignition predictions on the NIF. Adequate performance of hydrodynamically scaled 1.8-MJ ignition designs must be obtained on OMEGA at 26 kJ. Implosions on the NIF must be used to identify and mitigate the effect of laser-plasma interactions (LPI's) on hydrodynamic parameters at the NIF scale. Results from spherically driven OMEGA cryogenic implosion experiments are described. Mitigation of nonuniformity sources and cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) is important for improving target performance on OMEGA. Initial polar-driven implosion experiments on the NIF have provided valuable measurements of trajectory and symmetry. Simulations that include the effect of CBET more closely reproduce the observed velocity.

  12. Dual-mode photosensitive arrays based on the integration of liquid crystal microlenses and CMOS sensors for obtaining the intensity images and wavefronts of objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Qing; Lei, Yu; Xin, Zhaowei; Zhang, Xinyu; Sang, Hongshi; Xie, Changsheng

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we present a kind of dual-mode photosensitive arrays (DMPAs) constructed by hybrid integration a liquid crystal microlens array (LCMLA) driven electrically and a CMOS sensor array, which can be used to measure both the conventional intensity images and corresponding wavefronts of objects. We utilize liquid crystal materials to shape the microlens array with the electrically tunable focal length. Through switching the voltage signal on and off, the wavefronts and the intensity images can be acquired through the DMPAs, sequentially. We use white light to obtain the object's wavefronts for avoiding losing important wavefront information. We separate the white light wavefronts with a large number of spectral components and then experimentally compare them with single spectral wavefronts of typical red, green and blue lasers, respectively. Then we mix the red, green and blue wavefronts to a composite wavefront containing more optical information of the object. PMID:26906768

  13. Long implosion experiments and simulations on the Saturn and Z machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By increasing the implosion time for Z-pinches from the canonical 100 ns to 200--300 ns, the complexity and power flow risks can be reduced for future higher current generators, assuming that the implosions still produce high energies and powers. The recent success of high wire number arrays and nested configurations have permitted load designs to be considered that could provide the necessary performance at the longer implosion times, i.e., can the authors challenge the conventional wisdom? At Sandia National Laboratory, two experimental campaigns (on Saturn and Z) plus two-dimensional MHD modeling have been performed to investigate the scaling of tungsten wire arrays to 150 to 250 ns implosion times. For the Saturn experiments 25 mm diameter, 240 tungsten wire arrays of increasing mass were used. A comparison with short pulse data shows similar powers, risetimes, final pinch diameters, and instability mode structure. For the same final implosion velocity, measured risetimes were faster than the equivalent short pulse. Fall times were much longer and correlated to late time on-axis dynamics. Simulations using the Mach2 code incorporated a cell-to-cell random density to initiate a Raleigh-Taylor instability, believed to dominate the implosion dynamics. The results of these simulations show that the rise time of the x-ray power correlates to the FWHM of the sheath and has a strong dependence on perturbation level. The mode evolution is similar to the short pulse simulation and experimental results are reproduced. Both simulations and theory suggest that in the long pulse mode, the wires have time to merge and form a more uniform shell prior to acceleration. Modeling of the long pulse Z data is in progress

  14. Investigation of the Resistance and Inductance of Planar Wire Array Z-Pinch at the Qiangguang Accelerator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王亮平; 吴坚; 郭宁; 韩娟娟; 李沫; 李岩; 邱爱慈

    2012-01-01

    The resistance and inductance of a wire array during an implosion are very important parameters of interest to:researchers. A variety of inductances and resistances directly affect the kinetic energy and resistance heat energy coupled from a pulsed-power generator. In this paper, the inductance and resistance of a planar wire array during the Z-pinch process are analyzed. The inductance is calculated from the data obtained by a time-resolved soft X-ray framed camera, while the resistance is calculated through the voltage and the current of the wire array load combined with the variety of the inductance. The results show that the resistance of the load increases with the development of the implosion, and reaches its maximum at 0.29 ± 0.16Ω near the pinched time.

  15. Research progress on the numerical simulation of Z-pinch implosion using mared code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physical scheme of the MARED code, a two-dimensional three-temperature radiation magneto-hydrodynamics code for Z-pinch implosion simulation, is described. Results from the one- and two-dimensional calculation tests demonstrate the MARED code is able to simulate Z-pinch implosions of a wide range of accelerator and load parameters. It is able to present the primary dynamic characteristics of Z-pinch implosions, and the calculated images and rules qualitatively agree with the theoretical analyses and experimental observations. Compared with the experimental data, simulation results show that, under the same condition, the tungsten wire-array implosion has higher X-ray radiation power output than aluminum wire arrays. With same load parameters, the X-ray radiation power increases with the load current. Under the certain drive condition, the X-ray output decreases with the load mass. The MARED code is also used to simulate the radiation field formation of the wire-array filled with foam. The preliminary results on the Z machine are qualitative consistent with the simulation results from the Sandia laboratory. (authors)

  16. The high-foot implosion campaign on the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The “High-Foot” platform manipulates the laser pulse-shape coming from the National Ignition Facility laser to create an indirect drive 3-shock implosion that is significantly more robust against instability growth involving the ablator and also modestly reduces implosion convergence ratio. This strategy gives up on theoretical high-gain in an inertial confinement fusion implosion in order to obtain better control of the implosion and bring experimental performance in-line with calculated performance, yet keeps the absolute capsule performance relatively high. In this paper, we will cover the various experimental and theoretical motivations for the high-foot drive as well as cover the experimental results that have come out of the high-foot experimental campaign. At the time of this writing, the high-foot implosion has demonstrated record total deuterium-tritium yields (9.3×1015) with low levels of inferred mix, excellent agreement with implosion simulations, fuel energy gains exceeding unity, and evidence for the “bootstrapping” associated with alpha-particle self-heating

  17. Design of foil implosion system for Pioneer I experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A foil implosion system is described that integrates an explosive flux-compression generator, a flat plate feed section with power conditioning switches, and a vacuum electrode region containing a cylindrical foil/plasma load. Power conditioning, obtained with an explosive-driven plasma compression opening switch and explosive-actuated closing switches, provides a submicrosecond multimegampere pulse for the implosion of an aluminum plasma. The flat plate section is configured for bidirectional feed to the coaxial vacuum electrodes. Important considerations in the design of the vacuum power flow region include gap failure, feed symmetry, and radial diagnostic access. The system presently accommodates a foil radius of 3 cm. Innovative foil insertion and clamping techniques are also described

  18. Uniformity of fuel target implosion in Heavy Ion Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Kawata, S; Noguchi, K.; Suzuki, T; Karino, T.; Barada, D.; Ogoyski, A. I.; Ma, Y. Y.

    2014-01-01

    In inertial confinement fusion the target implosion non-uniformity is introduced by a driver beams' illumination non-uniformity, a fuel target alignment error in a fusion reactor, the target fabrication defect, et al. For a steady operation of a fusion power plant the target implosion should be robust against the implosion non-uniformities. In this paper the requirement for the implosion uniformity is first discussed. The implosion uniformity should be less than a few percent. A study on the ...

  19. Numerical analysis of non-spherical implosion for fast ignition using newly developed integrated implosion code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the key issues in numerical analysis for the fast ignition is the controlling the hydrodynamic of imploding target to form a high density core plasma in non-spherical implosion. In order to study the issue, we have upgraded the integrated implosion code. Using the code, implosion of a non-spherical shell target with a conical target is simulated. As the result, we can conclude that the implosion with the cone which in not clean spherical geometry can make the high density core region also. In this paper, we will describe the detail feature of the integrated implosion code and the performance of the non-spherical implosion that is estimated by the present code. (author)

  20. Diagnostics and equipment for ion temperatures and implosion neutron yields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel ion temperature is of great importance in the ICF research field. A set of ultra-fast quenched plastic scintillation detector system was fabricated for low yield neutron diagnostic. The detection efficiency and the sensitivity to DT neutrons were scaled using a K-400 accelerator and a pulse neutron tube from Russia with a width 5 - 10 ns, respectively. Its time response functions were calibrated by cosmic ray and implosion neutron separately. Under the conditions of low laser energy so low neutron yield and very limited space, fuel ion temperatures (including implosion neutron yields at the same time) were obtained. The measured ion temperatures for exploding pusher capsules were between 4 keV and 5 keV with errors +-(15 - 25)%. The neutron yields were 5 x 108 - 3 x 109 for exploding pusher capsules and 1.6 x 107 - 3.9 x 108 for ablation ones with errors +- (7 - 10)%. Of the six shots of neutron yields calculated, five are in good agreement with authors' experimental results in the range of +- 20%. Not only the heat-conducting mechanism and the effects on implosion of the energy balance of each path of incidence laser, target design, fuel mixture as well as hot electron behavior have been investigated, but also the upgrade level of the laser facility Shengguang II has been tested

  1. Dual-mode photosensitive arrays based on integration of liquid crystal microlenses and CMOS sensors for obtaining intensity images and wavefronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Qing; Lei, Yu; Zhang, Xinyu; Xie, Changsheng

    2015-09-01

    As we all know, because the index of refraction of the conventional microlens array (MLA) is not variable, the wavefront sensor based on the conventional MLA can only obtain the intensity image with low-resolution when it is used to measure the wavefront information simultaneously. In this paper, we use the dual-mode photosensitive arrays based on the liquid crystal (LC) MLA and CMOS sensors to obtain both intensity images with high-resolution and wavefronts. The dual-mode photosensitive arrays can work between an imaging mode and a wavefront sensor mode by switching the voltage off and on. In the experiment, we compare the composite wavefront of the object exposured in a white light with the wavefronts of the same object in tricolor laser. Because using the monochromatic light to measure the wavefront of an object may loss some information, it is a better method to use the white light for obtaining the wavefront information of the single object in the black background. We also discussed how to mix the wavefronts of the red green and blue laser to make the mixed wavefront which is closer to the composite wavefront.

  2. Integrated two-dimensional simulations of dynamic hohlraum driven inertial fusion capsule implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simulations have been useful for improving the design of dynamic hohlraums for the purpose of imploding inertial fusion capsules [S. A. Slutz, J. E. Bailey, G. A. Chandler et al., Phys. Plasmas 10, 1875 (2003)]. These design changes, which have resulted in capsule implosions with hot dense cores [J. E. Bailey, G. A. Chandler, S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 085002 (2004)] and the production of thermonuclear neutrons [C. L. Ruiz, G. Cooper, S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 015001 (2005)], were based primarily on a series of one-dimensional numerical simulations, which treated the dynamic hohlraum and the capsule implosion separately. In this paper we present simulations which are fully integrated to include the implosion of wire arrays onto foam convertors, the implosion of the capsule imbedded in the foam, and the absorption of radiation into the electrodes. These simulations yield predictions that are in remarkably good agreement with measured values considering the complexity of the problem, which spans more than 100 ns of wire implosion with the subsequent capsule implosion on a few ns timescale. For example, the predicted neutron yields are less than a factor of 2 higher than the measured values, while the predicted shock velocity is about 30% higher than the measured value. The spectroscopically inferred imploded capsule gas core temperatures are somewhat lower than predicted by the simulations, while the gas densities are about a factor of 2 higher. Simulations indicate that a more slowly rising radiation drive temperature yields higher core densities and lower temperatures and thus better agreement with experimental measurements. Possible reasons for a more slowly rising radiation drive are discussed

  3. Underwater implosions of large format photo-multiplier tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large, deep, well shielded liquid detectors have become an important technology for the detection of neutrinos over a wide dynamic range from few MeV to TeV. The critical component of this technology is the large format semi-hemispherical photo-multiplier tube with diameters in the range of 25–50 cm. The survival of an assembled array of these photo-multiplier tubes under high hydrostatic pressure is the subject of this study. These are the results from an R and D program which is intended to understand the modes of failure when a photo-multiplier tube implodes under hydrostatic pressure. Our tests include detailed measurements of the shock wave which results from the implosion of a photo-multiplier tube and a comparison of the test data to modern hydrodynamic simulation codes. Using these results we can extrapolate to other tube geometries and make recommendation on deployment of the photo-multiplier tubes in deep water detectors with a focus on risk mitigation from a tube implosion shock wave causing a chain reaction loss of multiple tubes.

  4. Buoyancy instability of homologous implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Bryan

    2015-11-01

    Hot spot turbulence is a potential contributor to yield degradation in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules, although its origin, if present, remains unclear. In this work, a perturbation analysis is performed of an analytical homologous solution that mimics the hot spot and surrounding cold fuel during the late stages of an ICF implosion. It is shown that the flow is governed by the Schwarzschild criterion for buoyant stability, and that during stagnation, short wavelength entropy and vorticity fluctuations amplify by a factor exp (π |N0 | ts) , where N0 is the buoyancy frequency at stagnation and ts is the stagnation time scale. This amplification factor is exponentially sensitive to mean flow gradients and varies from 103-107 for realistic gradients. Comparisons are made with a Lagrangian hydrodynamics code, and it is found that a numerical resolution of ~ 30 zones per wavelength is required to capture the evolution of vorticity accurately. This translates to an angular resolution of ~(12 / l) ∘ , or ~ 0 .1° to resolve the fastest growing modes (Legendre mode l > 100).

  5. Impact of the population implosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilpatrick, J.J.

    1978-03-01

    Mr. Kilpatrick evaluates Paul R. Ehrlich's thesis that mankind will breed itself into oblivion. Mr. Ehrlich in his book, ''The Population Bomb,'' sees population control as the only answer to mass starvation in such countries as India, Africa, Central America, and China. Mr. Kilpatrick says the U.S. has drifted toward the goal of zero population growth, where the total births per woman have dropped to 1.8. In Denmark, Finland, Sweden, Belgium, West Germany, Great Britain, and Austria, the births per woman have dropped even lower than in the U.S. The decline in births is attributed to women joining the workforce, advancement of birth control measures, and high costs of medical care, housing, and education. Women marrying later and fashion are also factors. Zero population growth will have gross implications on the financial markets in the U.S. Pension systems will be directly affected. The author cites the dilemma of the Social Security system when a smaller proportion of young people are contributing to it. Household savings trends will alter; new construction, new plant and equipment investment, and consumer loans will have to be reconsidered. If the trend toward implosion continues and social services demand an increasing share of the Federal budget, other interests will have to yield and the author cites the budget for national defense as declining. Some prophets feel the population decline is nothing of concern, the author concludes. (MCW)

  6. Investigation of ion kinetic effects in direct-drive exploding-pusher implosions at the NIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, M. J., E-mail: mrosenbe@mit.edu; Zylstra, A. B.; Séguin, F. H.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Sio, H.; Waugh, C. J.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); McKenty, P. W.; Hohenberger, M.; Radha, P. B.; Delettrez, J. A.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Betti, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Knauer, J. P.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); and others

    2014-12-15

    Measurements of yield, ion temperature, areal density (ρR), shell convergence, and bang time have been obtained in shock-driven, D{sub 2} and D{sup 3}He gas-filled “exploding-pusher” inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions at the National Ignition Facility to assess the impact of ion kinetic effects. These measurements probed the shock convergence phase of ICF implosions, a critical stage in hot-spot ignition experiments. The data complement previous studies of kinetic effects in shock-driven implosions. Ion temperature and fuel ρR inferred from fusion-product spectroscopy are used to estimate the ion-ion mean free path in the gas. A trend of decreasing yields relative to the predictions of 2D DRACO hydrodynamics simulations with increasing Knudsen number (the ratio of ion-ion mean free path to minimum shell radius) suggests that ion kinetic effects are increasingly impacting the hot fuel region, in general agreement with previous results. The long mean free path conditions giving rise to ion kinetic effects in the gas are often prevalent during the shock phase of both exploding pushers and ablatively driven implosions, including ignition-relevant implosions.

  7. Neutron spectrometry--an essential tool for diagnosing implosions at the National Ignition Facility (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatu Johnson, M; Frenje, J A; Casey, D T; Li, C K; Séguin, F H; Petrasso, R; Ashabranner, R; Bionta, R M; Bleuel, D L; Bond, E J; Caggiano, J A; Carpenter, A; Cerjan, C J; Clancy, T J; Doeppner, T; Eckart, M J; Edwards, M J; Friedrich, S; Glenzer, S H; Haan, S W; Hartouni, E P; Hatarik, R; Hatchett, S P; Jones, O S; Kyrala, G; Le Pape, S; Lerche, R A; Landen, O L; Ma, T; MacKinnon, A J; McKernan, M A; Moran, M J; Moses, E; Munro, D H; McNaney, J; Park, H S; Ralph, J; Remington, B; Rygg, J R; Sepke, S M; Smalyuk, V; Spears, B; Springer, P T; Yeamans, C B; Farrell, M; Jasion, D; Kilkenny, J D; Nikroo, A; Paguio, R; Knauer, J P; Glebov, V Yu; Sangster, T C; Betti, R; Stoeckl, C; Magoon, J; Shoup, M J; Grim, G P; Kline, J; Morgan, G L; Murphy, T J; Leeper, R J; Ruiz, C L; Cooper, G W; Nelson, A J

    2012-10-01

    DT neutron yield (Y(n)), ion temperature (T(i)), and down-scatter ratio (dsr) determined from measured neutron spectra are essential metrics for diagnosing the performance of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A suite of neutron-time-of-flight (nTOF) spectrometers and a magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) have been implemented in different locations around the NIF target chamber, providing good implosion coverage and the complementarity required for reliable measurements of Y(n), T(i), and dsr. From the measured dsr value, an areal density (ρR) is determined through the relationship ρR(tot) (g∕cm(2)) = (20.4 ± 0.6) × dsr(10-12 MeV). The proportionality constant is determined considering implosion geometry, neutron attenuation, and energy range used for the dsr measurement. To ensure high accuracy in the measurements, a series of commissioning experiments using exploding pushers have been used for in situ calibration of the as-built spectrometers, which are now performing to the required accuracy. Recent data obtained with the MRS and nTOFs indicate that the implosion performance of cryogenically layered DT implosions, characterized by the experimental ignition threshold factor (ITFx), which is a function of dsr (or fuel ρR) and Y(n), has improved almost two orders of magnitude since the first shot in September, 2010. PMID:23126835

  8. Neutron spectrometry - An essential tool for diagnosing implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DT neutron yield (Yn), ion temperature (Ti) and down-scatter ratio (dsr) determined from measured neutron spectra are essential metrics for diagnosing the performance of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A suite of neutron-Time-Of-Flight (nTOF) spectrometers and a Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) have been implemented in different locations around the NIF target chamber, providing good implosion coverage and the redundancy required for reliable measurements of Yn, Ti and dsr. From the measured dsr value, an areal density (ρR) is determined from the relationship ρRtot (g/cm2) = (20.4 ± 0.6) x dsr10-12 MeV. The proportionality constant is determined considering implosion geometry, neutron attenuation and energy range used for the dsr measurement. To ensure high accuracy in the measurements, a series of commissioning experiments using exploding pushers have been used for in situ calibration. The spectrometers are now performing to the required accuracy, as indicated by the good agreement between the different measurements over several commissioning shots. In addition, recent data obtained with the MRS and nTOFs indicate that the implosion performance of cryogenically layered DT implosions, characterized by the experimental Ignition Threshold Factor (ITFx) which is a function of dsr (or fuel ρR) and Yn, has improved almost two orders of magnitude since the first shot in September, 2010.

  9. Neutron spectrometry-An essential tool for diagnosing implosions at the National Ignition Facility (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, M. Gatu; Frenje, J. A.; Casey, D. T.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Ashabranner, R.; Bionta, R. M.; Bleuel, D. L.; Bond, E. J.; Caggiano, J. A.; Carpenter, A.; Cerjan, C. J.; Clancy, T. J.; Doeppner, T.; Eckart, M. J.; Edwards, M. J.; Friedrich, S.; Glenzer, S. H.; Haan, S. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2012-10-15

    DT neutron yield (Y{sub n}), ion temperature (T{sub i}), and down-scatter ratio (dsr) determined from measured neutron spectra are essential metrics for diagnosing the performance of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A suite of neutron-time-of-flight (nTOF) spectrometers and a magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) have been implemented in different locations around the NIF target chamber, providing good implosion coverage and the complementarity required for reliable measurements of Y{sub n}, T{sub i}, and dsr. From the measured dsr value, an areal density ({rho}R) is determined through the relationship {rho}R{sub tot} (g/cm{sup 2}) = (20.4 {+-} 0.6) Multiplication-Sign dsr{sub 10-12MeV}. The proportionality constant is determined considering implosion geometry, neutron attenuation, and energy range used for the dsr measurement. To ensure high accuracy in the measurements, a series of commissioning experiments using exploding pushers have been used for in situ calibration of the as-built spectrometers, which are now performing to the required accuracy. Recent data obtained with the MRS and nTOFs indicate that the implosion performance of cryogenically layered DT implosions, characterized by the experimental ignition threshold factor (ITFx), which is a function of dsr (or fuel {rho}R) and Y{sub n}, has improved almost two orders of magnitude since the first shot in September, 2010.

  10. Neutron spectrometry—An essential tool for diagnosing implosions at the National Ignition Facility (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DT neutron yield (Yn), ion temperature (Ti), and down-scatter ratio (dsr) determined from measured neutron spectra are essential metrics for diagnosing the performance of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A suite of neutron-time-of-flight (nTOF) spectrometers and a magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) have been implemented in different locations around the NIF target chamber, providing good implosion coverage and the complementarity required for reliable measurements of Yn, Ti, and dsr. From the measured dsr value, an areal density (ρR) is determined through the relationship ρRtot (g/cm2) = (20.4 ± 0.6) ×dsr10-12MeV. The proportionality constant is determined considering implosion geometry, neutron attenuation, and energy range used for the dsr measurement. To ensure high accuracy in the measurements, a series of commissioning experiments using exploding pushers have been used for in situ calibration of the as-built spectrometers, which are now performing to the required accuracy. Recent data obtained with the MRS and nTOFs indicate that the implosion performance of cryogenically layered DT implosions, characterized by the experimental ignition threshold factor (ITFx), which is a function of dsr (or fuel ρR) and Yn, has improved almost two orders of magnitude since the first shot in September, 2010.

  11. Neutron spectrometry - An essential tool for diagnosing implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackinnon, A J; Johnson, M G; Frenje, J A; Casey, D T; Li, C K; Seguin, F H; Petrasso, R; Ashabranner, R; Cerjan, C; Clancy, T J; Bionta, R; Bleuel, D; Bond, E J; Caggiano, J A; Capenter, A; Eckart, M J; Edwards, M J; Friedrich, S; Glenzer, S H; Haan, S W; Hartouni, E P; Hatarik, R; Hachett, S P; McKernan, M; Jones, O; Lepape, S; Lerche, R A; Landen, O L; Moran, M; Moses, E; Munro, D; McNaney, J; Rygg, J R; Sepke, S; Spears, B; Springer, P; Yeamans, C; Farrell, M; Kilkenny, J D; Nikroo, A; Paguio, R; Knauer, J; Glebov, V; Sangster, T; Betti, R; Stoeckl, C; Magoon, J; Shoup, M J; Grim, G P; Moran, G L; Murphy, T J; Leeper, R J; Ruiz, C

    2012-05-02

    DT neutron yield (Y{sub n}), ion temperature (T{sub i}) and down-scatter ratio (dsr) determined from measured neutron spectra are essential metrics for diagnosing the performance of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A suite of neutron-Time-Of-Flight (nTOF) spectrometers and a Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) have been implemented in different locations around the NIF target chamber, providing good implosion coverage and the redundancy required for reliable measurements of Yn, Ti and dsr. From the measured dsr value, an areal density ({rho}R) is determined from the relationship {rho}R{sub tot} (g/cm{sup 2}) = (20.4 {+-} 0.6) x dsr{sub 10-12 MeV}. The proportionality constant is determined considering implosion geometry, neutron attenuation and energy range used for the dsr measurement. To ensure high accuracy in the measurements, a series of commissioning experiments using exploding pushers have been used for in situ calibration. The spectrometers are now performing to the required accuracy, as indicated by the good agreement between the different measurements over several commissioning shots. In addition, recent data obtained with the MRS and nTOFs indicate that the implosion performance of cryogenically layered DT implosions, characterized by the experimental Ignition Threshold Factor (ITFx) which is a function of dsr (or fuel {rho}R) and Y{sub n}, has improved almost two orders of magnitude since the first shot in September, 2010.

  12. Studies of ablation pressure, ablative acceleration and ablative implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time and space resolved X-ray spectroscopy have been used to measure ablation rate and ablation pressure on plane targets irradiated by the first and second harmonics of Nd glass laser light. Streaked X-ray shadowgraphy has been applied to the study of ablatively imploded spherical shell targets uniformly irradiated by six 1.05 μm laser beams. The results give a direct measurement of shell acceleration and thus of ablation pressure and show evidence of fluid instability increasing as the shell ratio is varied from 10 to 100. A direct determination of implosion core density is also obtained. (author)

  13. Comment on 'Evidence for Stratification of Deuterium-Tritium Fuel in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions'

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Hua

    2013-01-01

    Recent implosion experiments performed at the OMEGA laser facility reported by Casey et al.[1], displayed an anomalously low dd proton yield and a high tt neutron yield as compared to dt fusion reactions, explained as a stratification of the fuel in the implosion core. We suggest that in the com- pression stage the fuel is out of equilibrium. Ions are inward accelerated to a velocity v0 independent on the particle type. Yield ratios are simply given by the ratios of fusion cross-sections obtained at the same velocity. A 'Hubble' type model gives also a reasonable description of the data. These considerations might be relevant for implosion experiments at the National Ignition Facility as well.

  14. Implosion chain reaction mitigation in underwater assemblies of photomultiplier tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the accident with a cascade failure of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) in the Super-Kamiokande experiment in 2001, the mechanical performance of large format semi-hemispherical PMTs has become a critical issue for large water Cherenkov detectors. The subject of this study is the survival of an assembled array of PMTs under significant hydrostatic pressure and subjected to shock waves caused by the failure of a single PMT. This paper details the results of the second stage of a R and D program focused on the design and testing of different PMT assemblies to mitigate the risk of a “chain-reaction” of PMT failures. The initial results show that our PMT assembly design can effectively reduce the magnitude of the shock wave. With the testing results in this paper and the hydrodynamic simulation calculation, we can further improve the design of PMT deployment to mitigate the risk of chain reactions caused by implosion induced shock waves

  15. The Los Alamos foil implosion project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of the Los Alamos foil implosion project is to produce an intense (>100 TW), multi-megajoule, laboratory soft x-ray source for material studies and fusion experiments. The concept involves the implosion of annular, current-carrying, cylindrical metallic plasmas via their self-magnetic forces. The project features inductive storage systems using both capacitor banks and high explosive-driven flux compression generators as prime energy sources. Fast opening switches are employed to shorten the electrical pulses. The program will be described and activities to date will be summarized

  16. Implosive therapy as a treatment for insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, R N; Elenewski, J J

    1980-07-01

    Previous research has suggested that insomnia is related positively to preoccupation with death. Introductory psychology students (N = 200) of both sexes who qualified as insomniacs were administered Implosive Therapy specifically targeted to fear of death, nonspecific Implosive Therapy, a relaxation procedure, or were assigned to a wait-control group. All three experimental treatments resulted in significant decreases in anxiety as measured by the Fear Survey Schedule II administered immediately after the experiment. The groups did not differ, however, before or after treatment on reported fear of death as measured by the Collett-Lester scale. On self-report measures collected 1 month after the experimental treatment, all groups, including the wait-control, showed a significant decrease in latency of sleep onset. Pairwise comparisons indicated that only the death implosion condition was significantly more effective than the wait-control. The finding was interpreted to mean that the death implosion produced a decrease in insomnia beyond the strong expectancy effects that resulted from all experimental treatments. The failure to observe changes in reported fear of death was attributed to Ss' anxiety-based reluctance to acknowledge openly such fear. PMID:7410572

  17. Spectroscopic modeling and analysis of plasma conditions in implosion cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovkin, Igor E.

    In this dissertation we discuss the effects of opacity and plasma gradients on the analysis and interpretation of Ar K-shell line emission from Ar-doped inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, and introduce a spectroscopic technique for the determination of core plasma gradients. In particular, the Ar Heβ composite spectral feature is used for core plasma temperature and density diagnostics. We present a versatile, spectroscopic-quality Non-Local-Thermodynamic- Equilibrium radiation transport model that takes into account the effects of collisional-radiative atomic kinetics, plasma gradients, Stark-broadened line shapes and radiation transport. The code computes the radiative properties of the plasma, and it can be easily adapted to treat different problems of spectra formation. We discuss the importance of high-order satellite emission in the formation of Heβ spectral feature, and the interpretation of core averaged electron temperatures and densities extracted from space integrated spectra of non- uniform plasmas. We also present an application of Genetic Algorithms to the analysis of experimental X-ray spectra. This algorithm drives the search for plasma parameters that yield the best fits to experimental spectra. We discuss the applicability of Case Injected Genetic Algorithms to accelerate analysis of spectra. Furthermore, we introduce a novel method for the determination of plasma temperature and density gradients in imploded cores. The gradients are extracted from the self-consistent analysis of time-resolved X-ray spectra and spatial emissivity distributions obtained from X-ray monochromatic images. In this case, the search in the complex parameter space of gradient functions is driven by a multi-objective Niched Pareto Genetic Algorithm. We discuss the analysis of time resolved spectra recorded during Ar-doped ICF implosions at the NOVA laser facility. Time histories of core averaged electron densities and temperatures during the collapse of the

  18. Effects of real viscosity on plasma liner formation and implosion from supersonic plasma jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillo, Kevin; Cassibry, Jason; Hsu, Scott; PLX-Alpha Team

    2015-11-01

    The PLX- α project endeavors to study plasma liner formation and implosion by merging of a spherical array of plasma jets as a candidate standoff driver for magneto-inertial fusion (MIF). Smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is being used to model the liner formation and implosion processes. SPH is a meshless Lagrangian method to simulate fluid flows by dividing a fluid into a set of particles and using a summation interpolant function to calculate the properties and gradients for each of these particles. The SPH code was used to simulate test cases in which the number of plasma guns and initial conditions for the plasma were varied. Linear stabilizations were observed, but the possibility exists that this stabilization was due to the implementation of artificial viscosity in the code. A real viscosity model was added to our SPHC model using the Braginskii ion viscosity. Preliminary results for test cases that incorporate real viscosity are presented.

  19. Expectations for the Laguna foil implosion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Building on the results achieved in the Pioneer shot series, the Los Alamos Trailmaster project is embarking on the Laguna foil implosion experiments. In this series a Mark-IX helical generator will be coupled to an explosively formed fuse opening switch, a surface-tracking closing switch, and a vacuum power flow and load chamber. In this paper the system design will be discussed and results from zero-, one-, and two-dimensional MHD simulations will be presented. It is anticipated that the generator will provide more than 10 MA of which ∼5.5 MA will be switched to the 5-cm-radius, 2-cm-high, 250-nm-thick aluminum foil load. This should give rise to a 1 μs implosion with more than 100 kJ of kinetic energy

  20. Implosion hydrodynamics of fast ignition targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fast ignition (FI) concept requires the generation of a compact, dense, pure fuel mass accessible to an external ignition source. The current base line FI target is a shell fitted with a reentrant cone extending to near its center. Conventional direct- or indirect-drive collapses the shell near the tip of the cone and then an ultraintense laser pulse focused to the inside cone tip generates high-energy electrons to ignite the dense fuel. A theoretical and experimental investigation was undertaken of the collapse of such targets, validating modeling, and exploring the trade-offs available, in such an asymmetric geometry, to optimize compaction of the fuel and maintain the integrity of the cone. The collapse is complex. Away from the cone, the shell collapses much as does a conventional implosion, generating a hot, low-density inner core. But because of the open side, hot plasma exhausts out toward the tip of the cone. This hot plasma is advantageous for implosion diagnostics; it can provide protons for angular dependent measurements of the shell wall, neutrons for temperature measurements, and self-emission for contamination measurements. But for FI it is a liability; the hot, low-density inner core impedes the compaction of the cold fuel, lowering the implosion/burn efficiency and the gain. Approaches to optimizing this shell design are discussed

  1. Contribution to the understanding of the high magnetic field compression produced by the implosion of a thin metal tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report we present the essential phenomena which occur during the magnetic flux compression obtained by the explosive-driven implosion of a thin conducting liner: acceleration time, dynamic evolution, heating and instability behaviour of the liner; field diffusion through the conducting wall and resulting flux losses which condition the increasing field in the cavity. Various implosion models are proposed and the one most elaborated leads to a numerical computation of the flux compression. Repeated experiments have permitted us to define and improve the flux injection techniques, the optical and electrical diagnostics and, consequently, the final compressed field. We now know how to obtain and record reproducible fields of 12 MOe in 0.8 cm diameter cavities. The final phase or the liner 'turnaround' has been specially observed. All the implosion shots are compared to the theoretical expectation. It may be concluded that the liner electrical conductivity and its variation essentially determine the final flux value. (author)

  2. Diagnosing implosion performance at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) by means of neutron spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron spectrum from a cryogenically layered deuterium–tritium (dt) implosion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) provides essential information about the implosion performance. From the measured primary-neutron spectrum (13–15 MeV), yield (Yn) and hot-spot ion temperature (Ti) are determined. From the scattered neutron yield (10–12 MeV) relative to Yn, the down-scatter ratio, and the fuel areal density (ρR) are determined. These implosion parameters have been diagnosed to an unprecedented accuracy with a suite of neutron-time-of-flight spectrometers and a magnetic recoil spectrometer implemented in various locations around the NIF target chamber. This provides good implosion coverage and excellent measurement complementarity required for reliable measurements of Yn, Ti and ρR, in addition to ρR asymmetries. The data indicate that the implosion performance, characterized by the experimental ignition threshold factor, has improved almost two orders of magnitude since the first shot taken in September 2010. ρR values greater than 1 g cm−2 are readily achieved. Three-dimensional semi-analytical modelling and numerical simulations of the neutron-spectrometry data, as well as other data for the hot spot and main fuel, indicate that a maximum hot-spot pressure of ∼150 Gbar has been obtained, which is almost a factor of two from the conditions required for ignition according to simulations. Observed Yn are also 3–10 times lower than predicted. The conjecture is that the observed pressure and Yn deficits are partly explained by substantial low-mode ρR asymmetries, which may cause inefficient conversion of shell kinetic energy to hot-spot thermal energy at stagnation. (paper)

  3. Targets fabrication in Limeil for laser interaction and implosion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various studies are conducted in order to obtain laser targets in agreement with theoretical design. The simple microballoon is a basic element prepared in the laboratory by using dried gel or liquid droplet. Selected microspheres containing a given pressure of D.T. gas are routinely prepared for implosion experiments. Several coating techniques are available to achieve with density layers in the range 20 - 5.10-2 g.cm-3. Sputtering in radiofrequency is well suited for high-Z materials like gold, nickel, silicon, aluminium whereas low pressure discharge is appropriate for plastics deposition. Finally freeze-drying techniques to produce low density foams give good results, between 5 - 3.10-2 g.cm-3 and coat microspheres. In addition micro-machining using laser beam or electrical discharge is operative for cutting and drilling microscopic elements. For special fabrication of plane targets, microcircuit thin film technology is under development

  4. Planar wire array performance scaling at multi-MA levels on the Saturn generator.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuvatin, Alexander S. (Laboratoire du Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, France); Jones, Michael; Vesey, Roger Alan; Waisman, Eduardo M.; Esaulov, Andrey A. (University of Nevada, Reno, NV); Ampleford, David J.; Kantsyrev, Victor Leonidovich (University of Nevada, Reno, NV); Cuneo, Michael Edward; Rudakov, L. I. (Icarus Research Inc., Bethesda, MD); Coverdale, Christine Anne; Jones, Brent Manley; Safronova, Alla S. (University of Nevada, Reno, NV)

    2007-10-01

    A series of twelve shots were performed on the Saturn generator in order to conduct an initial evaluation of the planar wire array z-pinch concept at multi-MA current levels. Planar wire arrays, in which all wires lie in a single plane, could offer advantages over standard cylindrical wire arrays for driving hohlraums for inertial confinement fusion studies as the surface area of the electrodes in the load region (which serve as hohlraum walls) may be substantially reduced. In these experiments, mass and array width scans were performed using tungsten wires. A maximum total radiated x-ray power of 10 {+-} 2 TW was observed with 20 mm wide arrays imploding in {approx}100 ns at a load current of {approx}3 MA, limited by the high inductance. Decreased power in the 4-6 TW range was observed at the smallest width studied (8 mm). 10 kJ of Al K-shell x-rays were obtained in one Al planar array fielded. This report will discuss the zero-dimensional calculations used to design the loads, the results of the experiments, and potential future research to determine if planar wire arrays will continue to scale favorably at current levels typical of the Z machine. Implosion dynamics will be discussed, including x-ray self-emission imaging used to infer the velocity of the implosion front and the potential role of trailing mass. Resistive heating has been previously cited as the cause for enhanced yields observed in excess of jxB-coupled energy. The analysis presented in this report suggests that jxB-coupled energy may explain as much as the energy in the first x-ray pulse but not the total yield, which is similar to our present understanding of cylindrical wire array behavior.

  5. Direct drive implosion experiments on SGIII prototype laser facility: Assessing energy coupling efficiency and implosion symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Direct drive implosion experiments were conducted on SGIII prototype laser facility. From the time resolved x-ray images, the bright ring and the central bright spot are observed. The radial velocity of the convergent bright ring indicates the shell velocity, and the times when the central bright spot is first seen and becomes most intensive indicate the times of shock convergence and later stagnation, respectively. Radiation hydrodynamic simulations were carried out by changing laser energy deposition factors. When the simulated results are brought close to the measured ones, it is found that the energy coupling efficiency is around 70%. The implosion symmetry is indicated by the core x-ray emission pattern which is pancake when viewing from the equator, and splits into several bright spots when viewing close to the pole. A simple model is developed to understand this asymmetry. It is speculated that the observed implosion asymmetry can be attributed to the laser arrangement which is originally designed for indirect drive experiments. Further improvements of energy coupling efficiency and implosion symmetry in future experiments can be achieved by optimizing target design and laser arrangement.

  6. Kinetic studies of ICF implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Grigory; Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y.-H.; Schmitt, M. J.; Hakel, P.; Hsu, S. C.; Hoffman, N. M.; Svyatsky, D.; Baalrud, S. D.; Daligault, J. O.; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Albright, B. J.; Taitano, W.; Kyrala, G. A.; Bradley, P. A.; Huang, C.-K.; McDevitt, C. J.; Chacon, L.; Srinivasan, B.; McEvoy, A. M.; Joshi, T. R.; Adams, C. S.

    2016-05-01

    Kinetic effects on inertial confinement fusion have been investigated. In particular, inter-ion-species diffusion and suprathermal ion distribution have been analyzed. The former drives separation of the fuel constituents in the hot reacting core and governs mix at the shell/fuel interface. The latter underlie measurements obtained with nuclear diagnostics, including the fusion yield and inferred ion burn temperatures. Basic mechanisms behind and practical consequences from these effects are discussed.

  7. Radiation Driven Implosion and Triggered Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Bisbas, T G; Wünsch, R; Hubber, D A; Walch, S

    2010-01-01

    We present simulations of initially stable isothermal clouds exposed to ionizing radiation from a discrete external source, and identify the conditions that lead to radiatively driven implosion and star formation. We use the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics code SEREN (Hubber et al. 2010) and the HEALPix-based photoionization algorithm described in Bisbas et al. (2009). We find that the incident ionizing flux is the critical parameter determining the evolution: high fluxes simply disperse the cloud, whereas low fluxes trigger star formation. We find a clear connection between the intensity of the incident flux and the parameters of star formation.

  8. Wave dynamics of theta pinch implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model based on two constraints is proposed for theta pinch implosions. The first constraint states that the external radial force per mass density is the same for both electron and ion fluids like in a newtonian system. The second constraint is the quasi-neutrality. In cylindrical geometry, this model claims different radial velocities for the two fluids, plasma rotation in the azimuthal direction, and a minimum two dimensional consistent description. The physics of electron beam current saturation is shown to be very relevant in reverse biased pinches. (author)

  9. Strong shock implosion, approximate solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Y.; Mishkin, E. A.; Alejaldre, C.

    1983-01-01

    The self-similar, center-bound motion of a strong spherical, or cylindrical, shock wave moving through an ideal gas with a constant, γ= cp/ cv, is considered and a linearized, approximate solution is derived. An X, Y phase plane of the self-similar solution is defined and the representative curved of the system behind the shock front is replaced by a straight line connecting the mappings of the shock front with that of its tail. The reduced pressure P(ξ), density R(ξ) and velocity U1(ξ) are found in closed, quite accurate, form. Comparison with numerically obtained results, for γ= {5}/{3} and γ= {7}/{5}, is shown.

  10. Evidence for stratification of deuterium-tritium fuel in inertial confinement fusion implosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Johnson, M Gatu; Manuel, M J-E; Rinderknecht, H G; Sinenian, N; Séguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Radha, P B; Delettrez, J A; Glebov, V Yu; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C; McNabb, D P; Amendt, P A; Boyd, R N; Rygg, J R; Herrmann, H W; Kim, Y H; Bacher, A D

    2012-02-17

    Measurements of the D(d,p)T (dd) and T(t,2n)(4)He (tt) reaction yields have been compared with those of the D(t,n)(4)He (dt) reaction yield, using deuterium-tritium gas-filled inertial confinement fusion capsule implosions. In these experiments, carried out on the OMEGA laser, absolute spectral measurements of dd protons and tt neutrons were obtained. From these measurements, it was concluded that the dd yield is anomalously low and the tt yield is anomalously high relative to the dt yield, an observation that we conjecture to be caused by a stratification of the fuel in the implosion core. This effect may be present in ignition experiments planned on the National Ignition Facility. PMID:22401216

  11. Computer simulations of cylindrical current discharge driven spherical implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors present one and two dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of cylindrical and quasi-spherical current discharge driven spherical implosions. Analytic results imply that by properly compressing a pre-heated (∼ 1--5 eV), high sound speed working fluid, a centered target may undergo spherical compression. The authors show this compression may be possible using properly shaped, i.e., quasi-spherical imploding liners. The authors contrast this implosion method with traditional cylindrical implosions and present arguments favoring one method over the other

  12. The effect of laser spot shapes on polar-direct-drive implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weilacher, F. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623, USA; Radha, P. B. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623, USA; Collins, T. J. B. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623, USA; Marozas, J. A. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623, USA

    2015-03-01

    Ongoing polar-direct-drive (PDD) implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. D. Lindl and E. I. Moses, Phys. Plasmas 18, 050901 (2011)] use existing NIF hardware, including indirect-drive phase plates. This limits the performance achievable in these implosions. Spot shapes are identified that significantly improve the uniformity of PDD NIF implosions; outer surface deviation is reduced by a factor of 7 at the end of the laser pulse and hot-spot distortion is reduced by a factor of 2 when the shell has converged by a factor of 10. As a result, the neutron yield increases by approximately a factor of 2. This set of laser spot shapes is a combination of circular and elliptical spots, along with elliptical spot shapes modulated by an additional higher-intensity ellipse offset from the center of the beam. This combination is motivated in this paper. It is also found that this improved implosion uniformity is obtained independent of the heat conduction model. This work indicates that significant improvement in performance can be obtained robustly with the proposed spot shapes.

  13. The effect of laser spot shapes on polar-direct-drive implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weilacher, F.; Radha, P. B., E-mail: rbah@lle.rochester.edu; Collins, T. J. B.; Marozas, J. A. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Ongoing polar-direct-drive (PDD) implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. D. Lindl and E. I. Moses, Phys. Plasmas 18, 050901 (2011)] use existing NIF hardware, including indirect-drive phase plates. This limits the performance achievable in these implosions. Spot shapes are identified that significantly improve the uniformity of PDD NIF implosions; outer surface deviation is reduced by a factor of 7 at the end of the laser pulse and hot-spot distortion is reduced by a factor of 2 when the shell has converged by a factor of ∼10. As a result, the neutron yield increases by approximately a factor of 2. This set of laser spot shapes is a combination of circular and elliptical spots, along with elliptical spot shapes modulated by an additional higher-intensity ellipse offset from the center of the beam. This combination is motivated in this paper. It is also found that this improved implosion uniformity is obtained independent of the heat conduction model. This work indicates that significant improvement in performance can be obtained robustly with the proposed spot shapes.

  14. Probing high areal-density cryogenic deuterium-tritium implosions using downscattered neutron spectra measured by the magnetic recoil spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the first time high areal-density (ρR) cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) implosions have been probed using downscattered neutron spectra measured with the magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) [J. A. Frenje et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 10E502 (2008)], recently installed and commissioned on OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. The ρR data obtained with the MRS have been essential for understanding how the fuel is assembled and for guiding the cryogenic program at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) to ρR values up to ∼300 mg/cm2. The ρR data obtained from well-established charged particle spectrometry techniques [C. K. Li et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 4902 (2001)] were used to authenticate the MRS data for low-ρR plastic capsule implosions, and the ρR values inferred from these techniques are in excellent agreement, indicating that the MRS technique provides high-fidelity data. Recent OMEGA-MRS data and Monte Carlo simulations have shown that the MRS on the NIF [G. H. Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, S228 (2004)] will meet most of the absolute and relative requirements for determining ρR, ion temperature (Ti) and neutron yield (Yn) in both low-yield, tritium-rich, deuterium-lean, hydrogen-doped implosions and high-yield DT implosions.

  15. Probing high areal-density cryogenic deuterium-tritium implosions using downscattered neutron spectra measured by the magnetic recoil spectrometera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenje, J. A.; Casey, D. T.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Radha, P. B.; Sangster, T. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Hatchett, S. P.; Haan, S. W.; Cerjan, C. J.; Landen, O. L.; Fletcher, K. A.; Leeper, R. J.

    2010-05-01

    For the first time high areal-density (ρR) cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) implosions have been probed using downscattered neutron spectra measured with the magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) [J. A. Frenje et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 10E502 (2008)], recently installed and commissioned on OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. The ρR data obtained with the MRS have been essential for understanding how the fuel is assembled and for guiding the cryogenic program at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) to ρR values up to ˜300 mg/cm2. The ρR data obtained from well-established charged particle spectrometry techniques [C. K. Li et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 4902 (2001)] were used to authenticate the MRS data for low-ρR plastic capsule implosions, and the ρR values inferred from these techniques are in excellent agreement, indicating that the MRS technique provides high-fidelity data. Recent OMEGA-MRS data and Monte Carlo simulations have shown that the MRS on the NIF [G. H. Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, S228 (2004)] will meet most of the absolute and relative requirements for determining ρR, ion temperature (Ti) and neutron yield (Yn) in both low-yield, tritium-rich, deuterium-lean, hydrogen-doped implosions and high-yield DT implosions.

  16. Shell stability and conditions analyzed using a new method of extracting shell areal density maps from spectrally resolved images of direct-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, H. M.; Mancini, R. C.; Nagayama, T.; Mayes, D. C.; Tommasini, R.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Regan, S. P.; Delettrez, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    In warm target direct-drive inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments performed at the OMEGA laser facility, plastic micro-balloons doped with a titanium tracer layer in the shell and filled with deuterium gas were imploded using a low-adiabat shaped laser pulse. Continuum radiation emitted in the core is transmitted through the tracer layer and the resulting spectrum recorded with a gated multi-monochromatic x-ray imager (MMI). Titanium K-shell line absorption spectra observed in the data are due to transitions in L-shell titanium ions driven by the backlighting continuum. The MMI data consist of an array of spectrally resolved images of the implosion. These 2-D space-resolved titanium spectral features constrain the plasma conditions and areal density of the titanium doped region of the shell. The MMI data were processed to obtain narrow-band images and space resolved spectra of titanium spectral features. Shell areal density maps, ρL(x,y), extracted using a new method using both narrow-band images and space resolved spectra are confirmed to be consistent within uncertainties. We report plasma conditions in the titanium-doped region of electron temperature (Te) = 400 ± 28 eV, electron number density (Ne) = 8.5 × 1024 ± 2.5 × 1024 cm-3, and average areal density = 86 ± 7 mg/cm2. Fourier analysis of areal density maps reveals shell modulations caused by hydrodynamic instability growth near the fuel-shell interface in the deceleration phase. We observe significant structure in modes l = 2-9, dominated by l = 2. We extract a target breakup fraction of 7.1 ± 1.5% from our Fourier analysis. A new method for estimating mix width is evaluated against existing literature and our target breakup fraction. We estimate a mix width of 10.5 ± 1 μm.

  17. On the analysis of shock implosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishkin, Eli A.; Alejaldre, Carlos

    1984-06-01

    An imploding shock wave, coming from infinity, moves through an ideal gas with the adiabatic constant γ. To define a single-valued self-similar coefficient λ(γ), over the whole classical interval 1 < γ < ∞, its boundary values λ(1), λ(∞) are deduced. The conservation equations, cast in form of quadratics, exhibit their singular points P,M,M‧. At P the pressure is maximum, at M the velocity of the gas U1, minus ξ, equals the speed of sound C, at M‧ there is a linear relationship between U1, U˙1 and C. The representative curve of the compressed gas passes analytically through all of them. The relative position of P, M, M‧ leads to three solutions of the quadratic conservation equations. Representative curves of the state of the imploded gas, at various values of γ, are shown. The errors associated with the idealized models of implosion and explosion are evaluated.

  18. Ion-induced quark-gluon implosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankfurt, L; Strikman, M

    2003-07-11

    We investigate nuclear fragmentation in the central proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at the energies of CERN LHC. Within the semiclassical approximation we argue that because of the fast increase with energy of the cross sections of soft and hard interactions each nucleon is stripped in the average process off "soft" partons and fragments into a collection of leading quarks and gluons with large p(t). Valence quarks and gluons are streaming in the opposite directions when viewed in the c.m. of the produced system. The resulting pattern of the fragmentation of the colliding nuclei leads to an implosion of the quark and gluon constituents of the nuclei. The nonequilibrium state produced at the initial stage in the nucleus fragmentation region is estimated to have densities >/=50 GeV/fm(3) at the LHC energies and probably >/=10 GeV/fm(3) at BNL RHIC. PMID:12906475

  19. Laser fusion implosion and plasma interaction experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlstrom, H.G.

    1977-08-01

    Results related to the propagation, absorption and scattering of laser light by both spherical and planar targets are described. The absorption measurements indicate that for intensities of interest, inverse bremsstrahlung is not the dominant absorption mechanism. The laser light scattered by the plasma is polarization dependent and provides evidence that Brillouin scattering and resonance absorption are operative. Special diagnostics have been designed and experiments have been performed to elucidate the nature of these two processes. Implosion results on glass microshell targets filled with DT gas are also summarized. These experiments are for targets intentionally operated in the portion of parameter space characteristic of exploding pusher events. Experiments have been performed over a yield range from 0 to 10/sup 9/ neutrons per event. It is shown how this data can be normalized with a simple scaling law.

  20. High-adiabat high-foot inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments on the national ignition facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H-S; Hurricane, O A; Callahan, D A; Casey, D T; Dewald, E L; Dittrich, T R; Döppner, T; Hinkel, D E; Berzak Hopkins, L F; Le Pape, S; Ma, T; Patel, P K; Remington, B A; Robey, H F; Salmonson, J D; Kline, J L

    2014-02-01

    This Letter reports on a series of high-adiabat implosions of cryogenic layered deuterium-tritium (DT) capsules indirectly driven by a "high-foot" laser drive pulse at the National Ignition Facility. High-foot implosions have high ablation velocities and large density gradient scale lengths and are more resistant to ablation-front Rayleigh-Taylor instability induced mixing of ablator material into the DT hot spot. Indeed, the observed hot spot mix in these implosions was low and the measured neutron yields were typically 50% (or higher) of the yields predicted by simulation. On one high performing shot (N130812), 1.7 MJ of laser energy at a peak power of 350 TW was used to obtain a peak hohlraum radiation temperature of ∼300  eV. The resulting experimental neutron yield was (2.4±0.05)×10(15) DT, the fuel ρR was (0.86±0.063)  g/cm2, and the measured Tion was (4.2±0.16)  keV, corresponding to 8 kJ of fusion yield, with ∼1/3 of the yield caused by self-heating of the fuel by α particles emitted in the initial reactions. The generalized Lawson criteria, an ignition metric, was 0.43 and the neutron yield was ∼70% of the value predicted by simulations that include α-particle self-heating. PMID:24580603

  1. Moderate-convergence inertial confinement fusion implosions in tetrahedral hohlraums at Omega

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A highly uniform thermal x-radiation field for indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions may be obtained by irradiating a four-hole, tetrahedral geometry, spherical hohlraum with all 60 Omega laser beams. Implosion studies and calculations [J. M. Wallace et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 3807 (1999)] indicate a drive uniformity comparable to that expected for the National Ignition Facility [J. A. Painser et al., Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)]. With 60 beams distributed over the cavity wall, tetrahedral hohlraums have a natural insensitivity to power balance and pointing errors. Standard, smooth Nova capsules imploded with this drive indicate that moderate convergence-ratio implosions, Cr∼18, have measured-neutron yield to calculated-clean-one-dimensional-neutronyield ratios similar to those previously investigated using the comparatively poor drive uniformity of Nova cylindrical hohlraums. This may indicate that a nonsymmetry-related neutron yield degradation mechanism, e.g., hydrodynamic mixing of cold, dense ablator material with the hot-spot region or some combination of nonsymmetry effects, is dominating in this Cr regime. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  2. First-principles equation of state of polystyrene and its effect on inertial confinement fusion implosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S X; Collins, L A; Goncharov, V N; Kress, J D; McCrory, R L; Skupsky, S

    2015-10-01

    Obtaining an accurate equation of state (EOS) of polystyrene (CH) is crucial to reliably design inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules using CH/CH-based ablators. With first-principles calculations, we have investigated the extended EOS of CH over a wide range of plasma conditions (ρ=0.1to100g/cm(3) and T=1000 to 4,000,000 K). When compared with the widely used SESAME-EOS table, the first-principles equation of state (FPEOS) of CH has shown significant differences in the low-temperature regime, in which strong coupling and electron degeneracy play an essential role in determining plasma properties. Hydrodynamic simulations of cryogenic target implosions on OMEGA using the FPEOS table of CH have predicted ∼30% decrease in neutron yield in comparison with the usual SESAME simulations. This is attributed to the ∼5% reduction in implosion velocity that is caused by the ∼10% lower mass ablation rate of CH predicted by FPEOS. Simulations using CH-FPEOS show better agreement with measurements of Hugoniot temperature and scattered light from ICF implosions. PMID:26565353

  3. First-principles equation of state of polystyrene and its effect on inertial confinement fusion implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S. X.; Collins, L. A.; Goncharov, V. N.; Kress, J. D.; McCrory, R. L.; Skupsky, S.

    2015-10-01

    Obtaining an accurate equation of state (EOS) of polystyrene (CH) is crucial to reliably design inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules using CH/CH-based ablators. With first-principles calculations, we have investigated the extended EOS of CH over a wide range of plasma conditions (ρ =0.1 to 100 g /cm3 and T =1000 to 4 000 000 K ). When compared with the widely used SESAME-EOS table, the first-principles equation of state (FPEOS) of CH has shown significant differences in the low-temperature regime, in which strong coupling and electron degeneracy play an essential role in determining plasma properties. Hydrodynamic simulations of cryogenic target implosions on OMEGA using the FPEOS table of CH have predicted ˜30% decrease in neutron yield in comparison with the usual SESAME simulations. This is attributed to the ˜5% reduction in implosion velocity that is caused by the ˜10% lower mass ablation rate of CH predicted by FPEOS. Simulations using CH-FPEOS show better agreement with measurements of Hugoniot temperature and scattered light from ICF implosions.

  4. Crossed-beam energy transfer in direct-drive implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seka, W; Edgell, D H; Michel, D T; Froula, D H; Goncharov, V N; Craxton, R S; Divol, L; Epstein, R; Follett, R; Kelly, J H; Kosc, T Z; Maximov, A V; McCrory, R L; Meyerhofer, D D; Michel, P; Myatt, J F; Sangster, T C; Shvydky, A; Skupsky, S

    2012-05-22

    Direct-drive-implosion experiments on the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] have showed discrepancies between simulations of the scattered (non-absorbed) light levels and measured ones that indicate the presence of a mechanism that reduces laser coupling efficiency by 10%-20%. This appears to be due to crossed-beam energy transfer (CBET) that involves electromagnetic-seeded, low-gain stimulated Brillouin scattering. CBET scatters energy from the central portion of the incoming light beam to outgoing light, reducing the laser absorption and hydrodynamic efficiency of implosions. One-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations including CBET show good agreement with all observables in implosion experiments on OMEGA. Three strategies to mitigate CBET and improve laser coupling are considered: the use of narrow beams, multicolor lasers, and higher-Z ablators. Experiments on OMEGA using narrow beams have demonstrated improvements in implosion performance.

  5. QUICK-FIRE: Plasma flow driven implosion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High speed plasma implosions involving megajoules of energy, and sub-microsecond implosion times are expected to require additional stages of power conditioning between realistic primary energy sources and the implosion system. Plasma flow switches and vacuum inductive stores represent attractive alternates to the high speed fuse and atmospheric store techniques which have been previously reported for powering such plasma experiments. In experiments being conducted at the Air Force Weapons Lab, a washer shaped plasma accelerated to 7-10 cm/microsecond in a coaxial plasma gun configuration, represents the moving element in a vacuum store/power conditioning system of 16.5 nH inductance which stores 1-1.5 MJ at 12-14 MA. At the end of the coaxial gun, the moving element transits the 2cm axial length of the cylindrical implosion gap in 200-400 nS, delivering the magnetic energy to the implosion foil, accelerating the imploding plasma to speeds of 30-40 cm/microsecond in 350-450 nS, and delivering a projected 400 KJ of kinetic energy to the implosion

  6. Multimegajoule electromagnetic implosion of shaped solid-density liners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electromagnetic implosions of shaped cylindrical aluminum liners that remain at solid density are discussed. The approximate liner parameters have an initial radius of 3 to 4 cm, are 4 cm in height, and are nearly 0.1 cm thick. The liners are driven by the Shiva Star 1300-μf capacitor bank at an 84-kV charging voltage and an nearly 30-nH total initial inductance (including implosion load). The discharge current travels along the length of the liner and rises to 14 MA in nearly 8 μs. The implosion time is nearly 12 μs. Diagnostics include inductive current and capacitive voltage probes, magnetic probes, and radiography. Both right-circular cylinder and conical liner implosion data are displayed and discussed. Radiography indicates implosion behavior substantially consistent with two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic calculations, which predict inner surface implosion velocities exceeding 20 km/s, and compressed density of two to three times solid density. Less growth of perturbations is evident for the conical liner (nearly 1% thickness tolerance) than for the right-circular cylindrical liner (nearly 3% thickness tolerance). 12 refs., 8 figs

  7. Preliminary experimental results of tungsten wire-array Z-pinches on primary test stand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Primary Test Stand (PTS) developed at the China Academy of Engineering Physics is a 20 TW pulsed power driver, which can deliver a ∼10 MA, 70 ns rise-time (10%–90%) current to a short-circuit load and has important applications in Z-pinch driven inertial confinement fusion and high energy density physics. Preliminary results of tungsten wire-array Z-pinch experiments on PTS are presented. The load geometries investigated include 15-mm-tall cylindrical single and nested arrays with diameter ranging from 13 mm to 30 mm, consisting of 132–300 tungsten wires with 5–10 μm in diameter. Multiple diagnostics were fielded to characterize the x-ray radiation from wire-array Z pinches. The x-ray peak power (∼50 TW) and total radiated energy (∼500 kJ) were obtained from a single 20-mm-diam array with 80-ns stagnation time. The highest x-ray peak power up to 80 TW with 2.4 ns FWHM was achieved by using a nested array with 20-mm outer diameter, and the total x-ray energy from the nested array is comparable to that of single array. Implosion velocity estimated from the time-resolved image measurement exceeds 30 cm/μs. The detailed experimental results and other findings are presented and discussed

  8. Preliminary experimental results of tungsten wire-array Z-pinches on primary test stand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xian-Bin; Zhou, Shao-Tong; Dan, Jia-Kun; Ren, Xiao-Dong, E-mail: amosrxd@163.com; Wang, Kun-Lun; Zhang, Si-Qun; Li, Jing; Xu, Qiang; Cai, Hong-Chun; Duan, Shu-Chao; Ouyang, Kai; Chen, Guang-Hua; Ji, Ce; Wei, Bing; Feng, Shu-Ping; Wang, Meng; Xie, Wei-Ping; Deng, Jian-Jun [Key Laboratory of Pulsed Power, Institute of Fluid Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-108, Mianyang, Sichuan 621999 (China); Zhou, Xiu-Wen; Yang, Yi [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-987, Mianyang, Sichuan 621999 (China)

    2015-07-15

    The Primary Test Stand (PTS) developed at the China Academy of Engineering Physics is a 20 TW pulsed power driver, which can deliver a ∼10 MA, 70 ns rise-time (10%–90%) current to a short-circuit load and has important applications in Z-pinch driven inertial confinement fusion and high energy density physics. Preliminary results of tungsten wire-array Z-pinch experiments on PTS are presented. The load geometries investigated include 15-mm-tall cylindrical single and nested arrays with diameter ranging from 13 mm to 30 mm, consisting of 132–300 tungsten wires with 5–10 μm in diameter. Multiple diagnostics were fielded to characterize the x-ray radiation from wire-array Z pinches. The x-ray peak power (∼50 TW) and total radiated energy (∼500 kJ) were obtained from a single 20-mm-diam array with 80-ns stagnation time. The highest x-ray peak power up to 80 TW with 2.4 ns FWHM was achieved by using a nested array with 20-mm outer diameter, and the total x-ray energy from the nested array is comparable to that of single array. Implosion velocity estimated from the time-resolved image measurement exceeds 30 cm/μs. The detailed experimental results and other findings are presented and discussed.

  9. Anisotropy of radiation emitted from planar wire arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kantsyrev, V. L.; Esaulov, A. A.; Safronova, A. S.; Williamson, K. M.; Osborne, G. C.; Shrestha, I. K.; Weller, M. E.; Shlyaptseva, V. V. [Department of Physics, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Chuvatin, A. S. [Laboratorie de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Rudakov, L. I. [Icarus Research, Inc., P. O. Box 30780, Bethesda, Maryland 20824-0780 (United States); Velikovich, A. [Naval Research Laboratory, Plasma Physics Division, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    The planar wire array (PWA) is a promising load for new multi-source inertial confinement fusion (ICF) hohlraums [B. Jones et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 125001 (2010)]. The hohlraum radiation symmetry is an important issue for ICF. It was found that extreme ultraviolet and sub-keV photon emission from PWAs may have considerable anisotropy in the load azimuthal plane. This experimental result is obtained on the UNR 1–1.7 MA Zebra generator. The time-dependent anisotropy effect is detected. This feature is studied in 2D numerical simulations and can be explained by initial anisotropy of implosion of those non-cylindrical loads radiating essentially as surface sources in sub-keV quanta and also by radiation absorption in cold magnetized plasma tails forming in the direction of magnetic compression.

  10. Quick-fire: Plasma flow driven implosion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High speed plasma implosions involving megajoules of energy, and sub-microsecond implosion times are expected to require additional stages of power conditioning between realistic primary energy sources and the implosion system. Plasma flow switches and vacuum inductive stores represent attractive alternates to the high speed fuse and atmospheric store techniques which have been previously reported for powering such plasma experiments. In experiments being conducted at the Air Force Weapons Lab, a washer shaped plasma accelerated to 7-10 cm/microsecond in a coaxial plasma gun configuration, represents the moving element in a vacuum store/power conditioning system of 16.5 nH inductance which stores 1-1.5 MJ at 12-14 MA. At the end of the coaxial gun, the moving element transits the 2cm axial length of the cylindrical implosion gap in 200-400 nS, delivering the magnetic energy to the implosion foil, accelerating the imploding plasma to speeds of 30-40 cm/microsecond in 350-450 nS, and delivering a projected 400 KJ of kinetic energy to the implosion. Experiments have been conducted using the SHIVA STAR capacitor bank operating at 6 MJ stored energy in which performance has been monitored by electrical diagnostics, magnetic probes, and axial and radial viewing high speed visible and X-Ray photographs to assess the performance of the coaxial run and coaxial to radial transition. Time and spectrally resolved X-Ray diagnostics are used to assess implosion quality and performance and results are compared to kinematic and MHD models

  11. Time-resolved characterization and energy balance analysis of implosion core in shock-ignition experiments at OMEGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-resolved temperature and density conditions in the core of shock-ignition implosions have been determined for the first time. The diagnostic method relies on the observation, with a streaked crystal spectrometer, of the signature of an Ar tracer added to the deuterium gas fill. The data analysis confirms the importance of the shell attenuation effect previously noted on time-integrated spectroscopic measurements of thick-wall targets [R. Florido et al., Phys. Rev. E 83, 066408 (2011)]. This effect must be taken into account in order to obtain reliable results. The extracted temperature and density time-histories are representative of the state of the core during the implosion deceleration and burning phases. As a consequence of the ignitor shock launched by the sharp intensity spike at the end of the laser pulse, observed average core electron temperature and mass density reach T ∼ 1100 eV and ρ ∼ 2 g/cm3; then temperature drops to T ∼ 920 eV while density rises to ρ ∼ 3.4 g/cm3 about the time of peak compression. Compared to 1D hydrodynamic simulations, the experiment shows similar maximum temperatures and smaller densities. Simulations do not reproduce all observations. Differences are noted in the heating dynamics driven by the ignitor shock and the optical depth time-history of the compressed shell. Time-histories of core conditions extracted from spectroscopy show that the implosion can be interpreted as a two-stage polytropic process. Furthermore, an energy balance analysis of implosion core suggests an increase in total energy greater than what 1D hydrodynamic simulations predict. This new methodology can be implemented in other ICF experiments to look into implosion dynamics and help to understand the underlying physics

  12. Two-frame flash x-radiography system for target implosion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A two-frame flash x-radiography system has been developed to study target implosion dynamics. It is capable of taking two time separated 3 ns exposure x-ray shadowgrams of a particle beam driven target implosion

  13. Progress of LMJ-relevant implosions experiments on OMEGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casner A.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In preparation of the first ignition attempts on the Laser Mégajoule (LMJ, an experimental program is being pursued on OMEGA to investigate LMJ-relevant hohlraums. First, radiation temperature levels close to 300 eV were recently achieved in reduced-scale hohlraums with modest backscatter losses. Regarding the baseline target design for fusion experiments on LMJ, an extensive experimental database has also been collected for scaled implosions experiments in both empty and gas-filled rugby-shaped hohlraums. We acquired a full picture of hohlraum energetics and implosion dynamics. Not only did the rugby hohlraums show significantly higher x-ray drive energy over the cylindrical hohlraums, but symmetry control by power balance was demonstrated, as well as high-performance D2 implosions enabling the use of a complete suite of neutrons diagnostics. Charged particle diagnostics provide complementary insights into the physics of these x-ray driven implosions. An overview of these results demonstrates our ability to control the key parameters driving the implosion, lending more confidence in extrapolations to ignition-scale targets.

  14. Explosion-Induced Implosions of Cylindrical Shell Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, C. M.; Duncan, J. H.

    2010-11-01

    An experimental study of the explosion-induced implosion of cylindrical shell structures in a high-pressure water environment was performed. The shell structures are filled with air at atmospheric pressure and are placed in a large water-filled pressure vessel. The vessel is then pressurized to various levels P∞=αPc, where Pc is the natural implosion pressure of the model and α is a factor that ranges from 0.1 to 0.9. An explosive is then set off at various standoff distances, d, from the model center line, where d varies from R to 10R and R is the maximum radius of the explosion bubble. High-speed photography (27,000 fps) was used to observe the explosion and resulting shell structure implosion. High-frequency underwater blast sensors recorded dynamic pressure waves at 6 positions. The cylindrical models were made from aluminum (diameter D = 39.1 mm, wall thickness t = 0.89 mm, length L = 240 mm) and brass (D = 16.7 mm, t = 0.36 mm, L=152 mm) tubes. The pressure records are interpreted in light of the high-speed movies. It is found that the implosion is induced by two mechanisms: the shockwave generated by the explosion and the jet formed during the explosion-bubble collapse. Whether an implosion is caused by the shockwave or the jet depends on the maximum bubble diameter and the standoff distance.

  15. A self-similar isochoric implosion for fast ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various gain models have shown the potentially great advantages of fast ignition (FI) inertial confinement fusion (ICF) over its conventional hot spot ignition counterpart (e.g. Atzeni S. 1999 Phys. Plasmas 6 3316; Tabak M. et al 2006 Fusion Sci. Technol. 49 254). These gain models, however, all assume nearly uniform density fuel assemblies. In contrast, conventional ICF implosions yield hollowed fuel assemblies with a high-density shell of fuel surrounding a low-density, high-pressure hot spot. Hence, to realize fully the advantages of FI, an alternative implosion design must be found which yields nearly isochoric fuel assemblies without substantial hot spots. Here, it is shown that a self-similar spherical implosion of the type originally studied by Guderley (1942 Luftfahrtforschung 19 302) may be employed to yield precisely such quasi-isochoric imploded states. The difficulty remains, however, of accessing these self-similarly imploding configurations from initial conditions representing an actual ICF target, namely a uniform, solid-density shell at rest. Furthermore, these specialized implosions must be realized for practicable drive parameters and at the scales and energies of interest in ICF. A direct-drive implosion scheme is presented which meets all of these requirements and reaches a nearly isochoric assembled density of 300 g cm-3 and areal density of 2.4 g cm-2 using 485 kJ of laser energy

  16. Indirectly driven, high-convergence implosions (HEP1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatchett, S.P.; Cable, M.D.; Caird, J.A. [and others

    1996-06-01

    High-gain inertial confinement fusion will most readily be achieved with hot-spot ignition, in which a relatively small mass of gaseous fuel at the center of the target is heated to 5-10 keV, igniting a larger surrounding mass of approximately isobaric fuel at higher density but lower temperature. Existing lasers are too low in energy to achieve thermonuclear gain, but hydrodynamically equivalent implosions using these lasers can demonstrate that the important, scalable parameters of ignition capsules are scientifically and technologically achievable. The experiments described in this article used gas-filled glass shells driven by x rays produced in a surrounding cavity, or hohlraum. These implosions achieved convergence ratios (initial capsule radius/ final fuel radius) high enough to fall in the range required for ignition-scale capsules, and they produced an imploded configuration (high-density glass with hot gas fill) that is equivalent to the hot-spot configuration of an ignition-scale capsule. Other recent laser-driven implosions have achieved high shell density but at lower convergences and without a well defined hot spot. Still other experiments have used very-low-density gas fill to reach high convergence with unshaped drive, but that approach results in a relatively low shell density. Moreover, even at the highest convergence ratios the implosions described here had neutron yields averaging 8% of that calculated for an idealized, clean, spherically symmetric implosion - much higher than previous high-convergence experiments.

  17. Uniformity of fuel target implosion in Heavy Ion Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Kawata, S; Suzuki, T; Karino, T; Barada, D; Ogoyski, A I; Ma, Y Y

    2015-01-01

    In inertial confinement fusion the target implosion non-uniformity is introduced by a driver beams' illumination non-uniformity, a fuel target alignment error in a fusion reactor, the target fabrication defect, et al. For a steady operation of a fusion power plant the target implosion should be robust against the implosion non-uniformities. In this paper the requirement for the implosion uniformity is first discussed. The implosion uniformity should be less than a few percent. A study on the fuel hotspot dynamics is also presented and shows that the stagnating plasma fluid provides a significant enhancement of vorticity at the final stage of the fuel stagnation. Then non-uniformity mitigation mechanisms of the heavy ion beam (HIB) illumination are also briefly discussed in heavy ion inertial fusion (HIF). A density valley appears in the energy absorber, and the large-scale density valley also works as a radiation energy confinement layer, which contributes to a radiation energy smoothing. In HIF a wobbling he...

  18. Overview of 12-cm-Diameter, Argon Gas-Puff Experiments and Analyses with >200-ns Implosion Times at 3- to 6-MA Peak Currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the motivation for, results from, and analyses of 12-cm-diameter argon gas-puff experiments carried out over the last four years on three generators at 3.2- to 6.5-MA peak currents, all with implosion times ≥200 ns. Using the argon K-shell yield as a metric of implosion quality, high-quality implosions are obtained for an appropriate initial radial mass distribution, i.e., a distribution that is peaked on axis. Higher compressed densities and smaller final radii are observed compared to shell-like initial mass distributions. Theory and data suggest that these distributions mitigate the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability. An energy analysis shows that (1) significant electrical energy is directly coupled to the pinch during the K-shell radiation pulse and (2) conversion of radially-directed kinetic energy into thermal energy is not the dominant mechanism responsible for the pinch K-shell radiation.

  19. First beryllium capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, J. L.; Yi, S. A.; Simakov, A. N.; Olson, R. E.; Wilson, D. C.; Kyrala, G. A.; Perry, T. S.; Batha, S. H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Dewald, E. L.; Tommasini, R.; Ralph, J. E.; Strozzi, D. J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Callahan, D. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Hurricane, O. A.; Milovich, J. L.; Rygg, J. R.; Khan, S. F.; Haan, S. W.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Hammel, B. A.; Kozioziemski, B.; Schneider, M. B.; Marinak, M. M.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Robey, H. F.; Salmonson, J. D.; Patel, P. K.; Ma, T.; Edwards, M. J.; Stadermann, M.; Baxamusa, S.; Alford, C.; Wang, M.; Nikroo, A.; Rice, N.; Hoover, D.; Youngblood, K. P.; Xu, H.; Huang, H.; Sio, H.

    2016-05-01

    The first indirect drive implosion experiments using Beryllium (Be) capsules at the National Ignition Facility confirm the superior ablation properties and elucidate possible Be-ablator issues such as hohlraum filling by ablator material. Since the 1990s, Be has been the preferred Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) ablator because of its higher mass ablation rate compared to that of carbon-based ablators. This enables ICF target designs with higher implosion velocities at lower radiation temperatures and improved hydrodynamic stability through greater ablative stabilization. Recent experiments to demonstrate the viability of Be ablator target designs measured the backscattered laser energy, capsule implosion velocity, core implosion shape from self-emission, and in-flight capsule shape from backlit imaging. The laser backscatter is similar to that from comparable plastic (CH) targets under the same hohlraum conditions. Implosion velocity measurements from backlit streaked radiography show that laser energy coupling to the hohlraum wall is comparable to plastic ablators. The measured implosion shape indicates no significant reduction of laser energy from the inner laser cone beams reaching the hohlraum wall as compared with plastic and high-density carbon ablators. These results indicate that the high mass ablation rate for beryllium capsules does not significantly alter hohlraum energetics. In addition, these data, together with data for low fill-density hohlraum performance, indicate that laser power multipliers, required to reconcile simulations with experimental observations, are likely due to our limited understanding of the hohlraum rather than the capsule physics since similar multipliers are needed for both Be and CH capsules as seen in experiments.

  20. X-ray source production in foil implosion machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of two-dimensional radiation-magneto-hydrodynamic foil implosion calculations are discussed which explore ways of producing warm x-ray sources (∼60 eV) in a reproducible manner and which would permit close-in access to the source. The discussions include the effects of contoured electrodes on the foil implosion and source output, and of tapering the average mass distribution along the length of the foil. Primarily, source evaluation by jet formation and stagnation against a dense stopping block is treated

  1. Implosion of the small cavity and large cavity cannonball targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent results of cannonball target implosion research are briefly reviewed with theoretical predictions for GEKKO XII experiments. The cannonball targets are classified into two types according to the cavity size ; small cavity and large cavity. The compression mechanisms of the two types are discussed. (author)

  2. Design of indirectly driven, high-compression Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions with improved hydrodynamic stability using a 4-shock adiabat-shaped drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovich, J. L.; Robey, H. F.; Clark, D. S.; Baker, K. L.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C.; Field, J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Pak, A.; Patel, P. K.; Peterson, J. L.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Weber, C. R.

    2015-12-01

    Experimental results from indirectly driven ignition implosions during the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) [M. J. Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 070501 (2013)] achieved a record compression of the central deuterium-tritium fuel layer with measured areal densities up to 1.2 g/cm2, but with significantly lower total neutron yields (between 1.5 × 1014 and 5.5 × 1014) than predicted, approximately 10% of the 2D simulated yield. An order of magnitude improvement in the neutron yield was subsequently obtained in the "high-foot" experiments [O. A. Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014)]. However, this yield was obtained at the expense of fuel compression due to deliberately higher fuel adiabat. In this paper, the design of an adiabat-shaped implosion is presented, in which the laser pulse is tailored to achieve similar resistance to ablation-front instability growth, but with a low fuel adiabat to achieve high compression. Comparison with measured performance shows a factor of 3-10× improvement in the neutron yield (>40% of predicted simulated yield) over similar NIC implosions, while maintaining a reasonable fuel compression of >1 g/cm2. Extension of these designs to higher laser power and energy is discussed to further explore the trade-off between increased implosion velocity and the deleterious effects of hydrodynamic instabilities.

  3. Design of indirectly driven, high-compression Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions with improved hydrodynamic stability using a 4-shock adiabat-shaped drive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milovich, J. L., E-mail: milovich1@llnl.gov; Robey, H. F.; Clark, D. S.; Baker, K. L.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C.; Field, J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Pak, A.; Patel, P. K.; Peterson, J. L.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Weber, C. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Experimental results from indirectly driven ignition implosions during the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) [M. J. Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 070501 (2013)] achieved a record compression of the central deuterium-tritium fuel layer with measured areal densities up to 1.2 g/cm{sup 2}, but with significantly lower total neutron yields (between 1.5 × 10{sup 14} and 5.5 × 10{sup 14}) than predicted, approximately 10% of the 2D simulated yield. An order of magnitude improvement in the neutron yield was subsequently obtained in the “high-foot” experiments [O. A. Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014)]. However, this yield was obtained at the expense of fuel compression due to deliberately higher fuel adiabat. In this paper, the design of an adiabat-shaped implosion is presented, in which the laser pulse is tailored to achieve similar resistance to ablation-front instability growth, but with a low fuel adiabat to achieve high compression. Comparison with measured performance shows a factor of 3–10× improvement in the neutron yield (>40% of predicted simulated yield) over similar NIC implosions, while maintaining a reasonable fuel compression of >1 g/cm{sup 2}. Extension of these designs to higher laser power and energy is discussed to further explore the trade-off between increased implosion velocity and the deleterious effects of hydrodynamic instabilities.

  4. Kinetic mix mechanisms in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinderknecht, H. G.; Sio, H.; Li, C. K.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Hoffman, N.; Kagan, G.; Molvig, K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Betti, R.; Yu Glebov, V.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Seka, W.; Stoeckl, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Bellei, C.; Amendt, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2014-05-15

    Shock-driven implosions of thin-shell capsules, or “exploding pushers,” generate low-density, high-temperature plasmas in which hydrodynamic instability growth is negligible and kinetic effects can play an important role. Data from implosions of thin deuterated-plastic shells with hydroequivalent D{sup 3}He gas fills ranging from pure deuterium to pure {sup 3}He [H. G. Rinderknecht et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 135001 (2014)] were obtained to evaluate non-hydrodynamic fuel-shell mix mechanisms. Simulations of the experiments including reduced ion kinetic models support ion diffusion as an explanation for these data. Several additional kinetic mechanisms are investigated and compared to the data to determine which are important in the experiments. Shock acceleration of shell deuterons is estimated to introduce mix less than or comparable to the amount required to explain the data. Beam-target mechanisms are found to produce yields at most an order of magnitude less than the observations.

  5. Plasma flow switch for foil-implosion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma-Flow-Switch (PFS) experiments have been conducted on the 1.5 MJ Pegasus capacitor bank as a part of the opening switch development for the Los Alamos Trailmaster program. The goal of this experiment is an inductive-store, opening switch (for use with an explosive-pulsed-power generator) to drive very high energy foil implosions and generate soft x-ray pulses of ≥ 1 MJ. A shot series is underway to: (1) optimize the PFS for use on Pegasus to study foil-implosion physics issues at drive currents as high as ∼ 10 MA; (2) provide scaling and benchmarking information for the simulations used to design the PFS for explosive generators at much higher energy levels

  6. Plasma Viscosity with Mass Transport in Spherical ICF Implosion Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Vold, Erik L; Ortega, Mario I; Moll, Ryan; Fenn, Daniel; Molvig, Kim

    2015-01-01

    The effects of viscosity and small-scale atomic-level mixing on plasmas in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) currently represent challenges in ICF research. Many current ICF hydrodynamic codes ignore the effects of viscosity though recent research indicates viscosity and mixing by classical transport processes may have a substantial impact on implosion dynamics. We have implemented a Lagrange hydrodynamic code in one-dimensional spherical geometry with plasma viscosity and mass transport and including a three temperature model for ions, electrons, and radiation treated in a gray radiation diffusion approximation. The code is used to study ICF implosion differences with and without plasma viscosity and to determine the impacts of viscosity on temperature histories and neutron yield. It was found that plasma viscosity has substantial impacts on ICF shock dynamics characterized by shock burn timing, maximum burn temperatures, convergence ratio, and time history of neutron production rates. Plasma viscosity reduc...

  7. Changes of implosion dynamics derived by difference of equation of state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komatsu Yu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate an implosion dynamics with different equation-of-state (EOS models in inertial confinement fusion (ICF, we compare two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulation with QEOS, ideal gas EOS, and SESAME. The maximum density achieved during the implosion for the ideal gas EOS is higher than that for the QEOS. The sound velocity for the SESAME is faster than that for the QEOS. These results indicated that the EOS models affect the implosion dynamics in ICF.

  8. Changes of implosion dynamics derived by difference of equation of state

    OpenAIRE

    Komatsu Yu; Sasaki Toru; Kikuchi Takashi; Harada Nob.; Nagatomo Hideo

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate an implosion dynamics with different equation-of-state (EOS) models in inertial confinement fusion (ICF), we compare two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulation with QEOS, ideal gas EOS, and SESAME. The maximum density achieved during the implosion for the ideal gas EOS is higher than that for the QEOS. The sound velocity for the SESAME is faster than that for the QEOS. These results indicated that the EOS models affect the implosion dynamics in ICF.

  9. Implosion and burn of fast ignition capsules—Calculations with HYDRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a methodology for conducting the design calculations for fast ignition indirect-drive implosions with an embedded cone for introducing a second laser beam to ignite the compressed fuel. These calculations are tuned to achieve several design goals. We demonstrate a major feature of the implosion simulations, the lagging of the implosions along the cone. Possible avenues for enhancing the coupling of the fast electrons to the dense compressed DT fuel are discussed.

  10. Implosion and burn of fast ignition capsules-Calculations with HYDRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shay, H. D.; Amendt, P.; Clark, D.; Ho, D.; Key, M.; Koning, J.; Marinak, M.; Strozzi, D.; Tabak, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2012-09-15

    We present a methodology for conducting the design calculations for fast ignition indirect-drive implosions with an embedded cone for introducing a second laser beam to ignite the compressed fuel. These calculations are tuned to achieve several design goals. We demonstrate a major feature of the implosion simulations, the lagging of the implosions along the cone. Possible avenues for enhancing the coupling of the fast electrons to the dense compressed DT fuel are discussed.

  11. Spiral wobbling beam illumination uniformity in HIF fuel target implosion

    OpenAIRE

    Kawata S.; Kurosaki T.; Koseki S.; Hisatomi Y.; Barada D.; Ma Y.Y.; Ogoyski A.I.

    2013-01-01

    A few % wobbling-beam illumination nonuniformity is realized in heavy ion inertial confinement fusion (HIF) throughout the heavy ion beam (HIB) driver pulse by a newly introduced spiraling beam axis motion in the first two rotations. The wobbling HIB illumination was proposed to realize a uniform implosion in HIF. However, the initial imprint of the wobbling HIBs was a serious problem and introduces a large unacceptable energy deposition nonuniformity. In the wobbling HIBs illumination, the i...

  12. Implosion (Flooding)—a New Treatment for Phobias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulougouris, J. C.; Marks, I. M.

    1969-01-01

    A new technique is described for the treatment of phobic patients which may be more effective than other available methods to date. Three out of four patients treated by implosion (flooding) became almost symptom-free after a mean of 14 sessions and remained so over six-and-a-half months' follow-up. The mechanism of action of the method is not yet clear. PMID:5812397

  13. An Experimental Investigation of the Implosion of Cylindrical Shell Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, C. M.; Wilkerling, J.; Duncan, J. H.

    2009-11-01

    An experimental study of the physics of the implosion of cylindrical shell structures in a high-pressure water environment was performed. The shell structures are filled with air at atmospheric pressure and the implosions occur when the water pressure is raised above the shell buckling stability limit. High-speed photography (27,000 fps) was used to observe and measure the motion of the structure during its implosion. High-frequency underwater blast sensors recorded dynamic pressure waves at 13 positions in the tank. The cylindrical models are made from various aluminum alloys (diameter D = 39.1 mm, wall thickness t = 0.89 mm) and brass (D = 16.7 to 25.4 mm, t = 0.33 to 0.36 mm). The ends of the tubes were sealed with Aluminum caps. The pressure records are interpreted in light of the high-speed movies. Cylinder length-to-diameter (L/D) ratios between 6 and 10 were examined; in this range the cylinders implode in a mode 2 cross-sectional shape at pressures between 6.9 and 28.7 bar. It is found that the pressure versus time records from sensors placed at the same dimensionless radial position (r/D) from the cylinder surface scale well with time and pressure scales from cavitation bubble collapse theory.

  14. Spiral wobbling beam illumination uniformity in HIF fuel target implosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawata S.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A few % wobbling-beam illumination nonuniformity is realized in heavy ion inertial confinement fusion (HIF throughout the heavy ion beam (HIB driver pulse by a newly introduced spiraling beam axis motion in the first two rotations. The wobbling HIB illumination was proposed to realize a uniform implosion in HIF. However, the initial imprint of the wobbling HIBs was a serious problem and introduces a large unacceptable energy deposition nonuniformity. In the wobbling HIBs illumination, the illumination nonuniformity oscillates in time and space. The oscillating-HIB energy deposition may produce a time-dependent implosion acceleration, which reduces the Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T growth [Laser Part. Beams 11, 757 (1993, Nuclear Inst. Methods in Phys. Res. A 606, 152 (2009, Phys. Plasmas 19, 024503 (2012] and the implosion nonuniformity. The wobbling HIBs can be generated in HIB accelerators and the oscillating frequency may be several 100 MHz ∼ 1 GHz [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 254801 (2010]. Three-dimensional HIBs illumination computations present that the few % wobbling HIBs illumination nonuniformity oscillates with the same wobbling HIBs frequency.

  15. Influence and measurement of mass ablation in ICF implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spears, B K; Hicks, D; Velsko, C; Stoyer, M; Robey, H; Munro, D; Haan, S; Landen, O; Nikroo, A; Huang, H

    2007-09-05

    Point design ignition capsules designed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) currently use an x-ray-driven Be(Cu) ablator to compress the DT fuel. Ignition specifications require that the mass of unablated Be(Cu), called residual mass, be known to within 1% of the initial ablator mass when the fuel reaches peak velocity. The specifications also require that the implosion bang time, a surrogate measurement for implosion velocity, be known to +/- 50 ps RMS. These specifications guard against several capsule failure modes associated with low implosion velocity or low residual mass. Experiments designed to measure and to tune experimentally the amount of residual mass are being developed as part of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). Tuning adjustments of the residual mass and peak velocity can be achieved using capsule and laser parameters. We currently plan to measure the residual mass using streaked radiographic imaging of surrogate tuning capsules. Alternative techniques to measure residual mass using activated Cu debris collection and proton spectrometry have also been developed. These developing techniques, together with bang time measurements, will allow us to tune ignition capsules to meet NIC specs.

  16. First results from cryogenic target implosions on OMEGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Initial results from direct-drive spherical cryogenic target implosions on the 60-beam OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly, D. L. Brown, R. S. Craxton et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] are presented. These experiments are part of the scientific base leading to direct-drive ignition implosions planned for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [W. J. Hogan, E. I. Moses, B. E. Warner et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 567 (2001)]. Polymer shells (1-mm diam with walls 2 to provide 100-μm-thick ice layers. The ice layers are smoothed by IR heating with 3.16-μm laser light and are characterized using shadowgraphy. The targets are imploded by a 1-ns square pulse with up to ∼24 kJ of 351-nm laser light at a beam-to-beam rms energy balance of rms=9 μm showed 30% of the 1-D predicted neutron yield. These initial results are encouraging for future cryogenic implosions on OMEGA and the NIF

  17. The effects of insulating coatings and current prepulse on tungsten planar wire array Z-pinches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, M., E-mail: limo@nint.ac.cn; Li, Y. [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China); State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulsed Radiation Simulation and Effect, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi' an 710024 (China); Sheng, L.; Wang, L. P.; Zhao, C.; Yuan, Y.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhang, M.; Peng, B. D.; Zhang, J. H.; Zhang, S. G.; Qiu, M. T. [State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulsed Radiation Simulation and Effect, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi' an 710024 (China); Li, X. W. [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China)

    2015-12-15

    This paper presents experimental results on the effects of insulating coatings and current prepulse on tungsten planar wire array Z-pinches on ∼100 ns main current facility. Optical framing images indicated that without a current prepulse the wire ablation process was asymmetrical and the implosion was zippered. The x-ray peak power was ∼320 GW. By using insulating coatings on the wire surface the asymmetry remained, and the processes of ablation and implosion were delayed by ∼30 ns. The x-ray burst was narrow and decreased to ∼200 GW. When current prepulses were used on both standard and insulated wire arrays, implosion symmetry was improved and the x-ray burst was improved (to ∼520 GW peak power). In addition, there was a strong emitting precursor column for insulated loads with the current prepulse.

  18. The effects of insulating coatings and current prepulse on tungsten planar wire array Z-pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents experimental results on the effects of insulating coatings and current prepulse on tungsten planar wire array Z-pinches on ∼100 ns main current facility. Optical framing images indicated that without a current prepulse the wire ablation process was asymmetrical and the implosion was zippered. The x-ray peak power was ∼320 GW. By using insulating coatings on the wire surface the asymmetry remained, and the processes of ablation and implosion were delayed by ∼30 ns. The x-ray burst was narrow and decreased to ∼200 GW. When current prepulses were used on both standard and insulated wire arrays, implosion symmetry was improved and the x-ray burst was improved (to ∼520 GW peak power). In addition, there was a strong emitting precursor column for insulated loads with the current prepulse

  19. Recent advances in theoretical and numerical studies of wire array Z-pinch in the IAPCM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast Z-pinch has produced the most powerful X-ray radiation source in laboratory and also shows the possibility to drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Recent advances in wire-array Z-pinch researches at the Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics are presented in this paper. A typical wire array Z-pinch process has three phases: wire plasma formation and ablation, implosion and the MRT instability development, stagnation and radiation. A mass injection model with azimuthal modulation coefficient is used to describe the wire initiation, and the dynamics of ablated plasmas of wire-array Z-pinches in (r, θ) geometry is numerically studied. In the implosion phase, a two-dimensional(r, z) three temperature radiation MHD code MARED has been developed to investigate the development of the Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor(MRT) instability. We also analyze the implosion modes of nested wire-array and find that the inner wire-array is hardly affected before the impaction of the outer wire-array. While the plasma accelerated to high speed in the implosion stage stagnates on the axis, abundant x-ray radiation is produced. The energy spectrum of the radiation and the production mechanism are investigated. The computational x-ray pulse shows a reasonable agreement with the experimental result. We also suggest that using alloyed wire-arrays can increase multi-keV K-shell yield by decreasing the opacity of K-shell lines. In addition, we use a detailed circuit model to study the energy coupling between the generator and the Z-pinch implosion. Recently, we are concentrating on the problems of Z-pinch driven ICF, such as dynamic hohlraum and capsule implosions. Our numerical investigations on the interaction of wire-array Z-pinches on foam convertors show qualitative agreements with experimental results on the “Qiangguang I” facility. An integrated two-dimensional simulation of dynamic hohlraum driven capsule implosion provides us the physical insights of wire-array

  20. Convergence of shock waves generated by underwater electrical explosion of cylindrical wire arrays between different boundary geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanuka, D.; Zinowits, H. E.; Krasik, Ya. E. [Physics Department, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Kozlov, M. [Center for Energy Research, National Laboratory Astana, Nazarbayev University, Astana 010000, Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan)

    2015-10-15

    The results of experiments and numerical simulations of a shock wave propagating between either conical or parabolic bounding walls are presented. The shock wave was generated by a microsecond timescale underwater electrical explosion of a cylindrical wire array supplied by a current pulse having an amplitude of ∼230 kA and a rise time of ∼1 μs. It is shown that with the same energy density deposition into the exploding wire array, the shock wave converges faster between parabolic walls, and as a result, the pressure in the vicinity of convergence is ∼2.3 times higher than in the case of conical walls. The results obtained are compared to those of earlier experiments [Antonov et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 102, 124104 (2013)] with explosions of spherical wire arrays. It is shown that at a distance of ∼400 μm from the implosion origin the pressure obtained in the current experiments is higher than for the case of spherical wire arrays.

  1. Convergence of shock waves generated by underwater electrical explosion of cylindrical wire arrays between different boundary geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of experiments and numerical simulations of a shock wave propagating between either conical or parabolic bounding walls are presented. The shock wave was generated by a microsecond timescale underwater electrical explosion of a cylindrical wire array supplied by a current pulse having an amplitude of ∼230 kA and a rise time of ∼1 μs. It is shown that with the same energy density deposition into the exploding wire array, the shock wave converges faster between parabolic walls, and as a result, the pressure in the vicinity of convergence is ∼2.3 times higher than in the case of conical walls. The results obtained are compared to those of earlier experiments [Antonov et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 102, 124104 (2013)] with explosions of spherical wire arrays. It is shown that at a distance of ∼400 μm from the implosion origin the pressure obtained in the current experiments is higher than for the case of spherical wire arrays

  2. Wavelength scaling of implosion symmetry, ablation pressure, and hydrodynamic efficiency in laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examine the scaling of implosion symmetry, ablation pressure, and hydrodynamic efficiency with the wavelength of the laser, using a recent theoretical analysis of ablative laser driven implosions as a tool. Symmetrization by a hot atmosphere is most effective for long wavelength lasers, whereas ablation pressure and hydrodynamic efficiency are best for shorter laser wavelengths

  3. In-flight observations of low-mode ρR asymmetries in NIF implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zylstra, A. B., E-mail: zylstra@mit.edu; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Petrasso, R. D.; Sinenian, N.; Sio, H. W. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Rygg, J. R.; Kritcher, A.; Hicks, D. G.; Friedrich, S.; Bionta, R.; Meezan, N. B.; Atherton, J.; Barrios, M.; Bell, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2015-05-15

    Charged-particle spectroscopy is used to assess implosion symmetry in ignition-scale indirect-drive implosions for the first time. Surrogate D{sup 3}He gas-filled implosions at the National Ignition Facility produce energetic protons via D+{sup 3}He fusion that are used to measure the implosion areal density (ρR) at the shock-bang time. By using protons produced several hundred ps before the main compression bang, the implosion is diagnosed in-flight at a convergence ratio of 3–5 just prior to peak velocity. This isolates acceleration-phase asymmetry growth. For many surrogate implosions, proton spectrometers placed at the north pole and equator reveal significant asymmetries with amplitudes routinely ≳10%, which are interpreted as ℓ=2 Legendre modes. With significant expected growth by stagnation, it is likely that these asymmetries would degrade the final implosion performance. X-ray self-emission images at stagnation show asymmetries that are positively correlated with the observed in-flight asymmetries and comparable in magnitude, contradicting growth models; this suggests that the hot-spot shape does not reflect the stagnated shell shape or that significant residual kinetic energy exists at stagnation. More prolate implosions are observed when the laser drive is sustained (“no-coast”), implying a significant time-dependent asymmetry in peak drive.

  4. Control of fuel target implosion non-uniformity in heavy ion inertial fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Iinuma, T; Kondo, S; Kubo, T; Kato, H; Suzuki, T; Kawata, S; Ogoyski, A I

    2016-01-01

    In inertial fusion, one of scientific issues is to reduce an implosion non-uniformity of a spherical fuel target. The implosion non-uniformity is caused by several factors, including the driver beam illumination non-uniformity, the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) growth, etc. In this paper we propose a new control method to reduce the implosion non-uniformity; the oscillating implosion acceleration dg(t) is created by pulsating and dephasing heavy ion beams (HIBs) in heavy ion inertial fusion (HIF). The dg(t) would reduce the RTI growth effectively. The original concept of the non- uniformity control in inertial fusion was proposed in (Kawata, et al., 1993). In this paper it was found that the pulsating and dephasing HIBs illumination provide successfully the controlled dg(t) and that dg(t) induced by the pulsating HIBs reduces well the implosion non-uniformity. Consequently the pulsating HIBs improve a pellet gain remarkably in HIF.

  5. EFFECT BY RADIATIVE ENERGY TRANSPORT IN PUSHER LAYER AND TRANSPORT PROPERTY OF FUEL ON NONUNIFORM IMPLOSION OF TARGET IRRADIATED BY ION BEAM

    OpenAIRE

    Niu, K.; Aoki, T.

    1988-01-01

    In order to obtain a high pressure to compress DT fuel in target for ICF, momenta of pusher and fuel itself are converted to impulse. Compressibility of fuel depends strongly on its equation of state. Target is usually not illuminated by energy driver in spherically symmetric way. Nonuniform implosion decreases severely the rate of fuel compression. Radiative energy transport in pusher layer homogenizes profile of nonuniform pressure which is originated by a nonuniform deposition of driver en...

  6. Fusion yield enhancement in magnetized laser-driven implosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, P Y; Fiksel, G; Hohenberger, M; Knauer, J P; Betti, R; Marshall, F J; Meyerhofer, D D; Séguin, F H; Petrasso, R D

    2011-07-15

    Enhancement of the ion temperature and fusion yield has been observed in magnetized laser-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions on the OMEGA Laser Facility. A spherical CH target with a 10 atm D2 gas fill was imploded in a polar-drive configuration. A magnetic field of 80 kG was embedded in the target and was subsequently trapped and compressed by the imploding conductive plasma. As a result of the hot-spot magnetization, the electron radial heat losses were suppressed and the observed ion temperature and neutron yield were enhanced by 15% and 30%, respectively. PMID:21838372

  7. ''QUICK-FIRE'' plasma flow driven implosion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The QUICK-FIRE experimental series presently being conducted on the SHIVA STAR fast capacitor bank (120 KV, 9.3 MJ) at the Air Force Weapons Laboratory is described. Diagnostics used to measure physical quantities are listed and preliminary results from the first eight shots are presented. Initial data indicates that the performance of the coaxial gun portion of the plasma flow switch is good. Radiation yields from the unoptimized implosions are 220 KJ of soft x-rays in the 80-280 eV range with a peak power of roughly 1.25 TW. Plans for future work are outlined

  8. Fuel Target Implosion in Ion beam Inertial Confinement Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Kawata, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    The numerical results for the fuel target implosion are presented in order to clarify the target physics in ion beam inertial fusion. The numerical analyses are performed for a direct-driven ion beam target. In the paper the following issues are studied: the beam obliquely incidence on the target surface, the plasma effect on the beam-stopping power, the beam particle energy, the beam time duration, the target radius, the beam input energy and the non-uniformity effect on the fuel target performance. In this paper the beam ions are protons.

  9. Fuel Target Implosion in Ion beam Inertial Confinement Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Kawata, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    The numerical results for the fuel target implosion are presented in order to clarify the target physics in ion beam inertial fusion. The numerical analyses are performed for a direct-driven ion beam target. In the paper the following issues are studied: the beam obliquely incidence on the target surface, the plasma effect on the beam-stopping power, the beam particle energy, the beam time duration, the target radius, the beam input energy and the non-uniformity effect on the fuel target perf...

  10. Proton and Alpha Core Imaging of OMEGA D^3He Implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrasso, R. D.; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Schwartz, B. E.; Stoeckl, C.; Radha, P. B.; Delettrez, J. A.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Roberts, S.; Sangster, T. C.; Soures, J. M.

    2002-11-01

    Measurements of the nuclear burn region are important for investigating the extent of the burn, the presence of burn asymmetries, the effects of mix and thermal conduction on the burn region, and the accuracy of code predictions. Charged-fusion-product core images have been obtained at OMEGA for implosions of D^3He-filled capsules with both thin and thick shells. Using multiple pinholes, images are reconstructed from 3.0-MeV and 14.7-MeV protons and 3.6-MeV alphas. For thin-shell, all three particles escape at bang time and their images reflect the different burn regions for DD and D^3He reactions. In contrast, for thick-shell implosions, only the 14.7-MeV proton can penetrate the capsule ρR at bang time, and the burn region reflects the effects of compression and mix. At first shock coalescence, when the ρR is far below its peak value, all three particles may also escape from the capsule. As mix has been experimentally shown to be inconsequential at this instant, meaningful comparisons of 1-D simulations with experiments can be made. This work was supported in part by the U.S. DOE Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion (Grant number DE-FG03-99DP00300 and Cooperative Agreement number DE-FC03-92SF19460), LLE (subcontract P0410025G), and LLNL (subcontract B313975. (Petrasso: Visiting Senior Scientist at LLE.)

  11. Development of an accelerating-piston implosion-driven launcher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huneault, Justin; Loiseau, Jason; Higgins, Andrew

    2013-06-01

    The ability to soft-launch projectiles at velocities exceeding 10 km/s is of interest to several scientific fields, including orbital debris impact testing and equation of state research. Current soft-launch technologies have reached a performance plateau below this operating range. The energy and power density of high explosives provides a possible avenue to reach this velocity if used to dynamically compress a light driver gas to significantly higher pressures and temperatures compared to light-gas guns. In the implosion-driven launcher (IDL), linear implosion of a pressurized tube drives a strong shock into the gas ahead of the tube pinch, thereby forming an increasingly long column of compressed gas which can be used to propel a projectile. The McGill IDL has demonstrated the ability to launch a 0.1-g projectile to 9.1 km/s. This study focuses on the implementation of a novel launch cycle wherein the explosively driven pinch is accelerated down the length of the tube in order to maintain a relatively constant projectile base pressure early in the launch cycle. The experimental development of an accelerating driver which utilizes an explosive lens to phase the detonation wave is presented. The design and experimental performance of an accelerating-piston IDL is also discussed.

  12. Moving finite element method for ICF target implosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One-dimensional hydrodynamic codes for the analysis of ICF target implosion which include various effects have been developed, but most of them utilize the artificial viscosity (e.g. Von Neumann's viscosity) which cannot reveal accurately the shock waves. A gain of ICF target implosion is much due to the dissipation at the shock fronts, so it is necessary to express correctly the shock waves which are affected by the viscosity. The width of the shock waves is usually a few times as large as the length of mean-free-path, and we have to set about 104 -- 105 meshes for the shock waves. It is a serious problem because of the computional memories or CPU time. In the moving finite element (MFE) method, both nodal amplitudes and nodal positions move continuously with time in such a way as to satisfy simultaneous ordinary differential equations (OPDs) which minimize partial differential equation (PDE) residuals. In this paper, it is proposed to extend the MFE method for various one-dimensional hydrodynamic equations. (author)

  13. Modeling and diagnosing interface mix in layered ICF implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, C. R.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Clark, D. S.; Haan, S. W.; Ho, D. D.; Meezan, N. B.; Milovich, J. L.; Robey, H. F.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Thomas, C. A.

    2015-11-01

    Mixing at the fuel-ablator interface of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion can arise from an unfavorable in-flight Atwood number between the cryogenic DT fuel and the ablator. High-Z dopant is typically added to the ablator to control the Atwood number, but recent high-density carbon (HDC) capsules have been shot at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) without this added dopant. Highly resolved post-shot modeling of these implosions shows that there was significant mixing of ablator material into the dense DT fuel. This mix lowers the fuel density and results in less overall compression, helping to explain the measured ratio of down scattered-to-primary neutrons. Future experimental designs will seek to improve this issue through adding dopant and changing the x-ray spectra with a different hohlraum wall material. To test these changes, we are designing an experimental platform to look at the growth of this mixing layer. This technique uses side-on radiography to measure the spatial extent of an embedded high-Z tracer layer near the interface. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. D.O.E. by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  14. Analysis of NIF experiments with the minimal energy implosion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, B.; Kwan, T. J. T.; Wang, Y. M.; Merrill, F. E.; Cerjan, C. J.; Batha, S. H.

    2015-08-01

    We apply a recently developed analytical model of implosion and thermonuclear burn to fusion capsule experiments performed at the National Ignition Facility that used low-foot and high-foot laser pulse formats. Our theoretical predictions are consistent with the experimental data. Our studies, together with neutron image analysis, reveal that the adiabats of the cold fuel in both low-foot and high-foot experiments are similar. That is, the cold deuterium-tritium shells in those experiments are all in a high adiabat state at the time of peak implosion velocity. The major difference between low-foot and high-foot capsule experiments is the growth of the shock-induced instabilities developed at the material interfaces which lead to fuel mixing with ablator material. Furthermore, we have compared the NIF capsules performance with the ignition criteria and analyzed the alpha particle heating in the NIF experiments. Our analysis shows that alpha heating was appreciable only in the high-foot experiments.

  15. Implosion Robustness, Time-Dependent Flux Asymmetries and Big Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, J. L.; Field, J. E.; Spears, B. K.; Brandon, S. T.; Gaffney, J. A.; Hammer, J.; Kritcher, A.; Nora, R. C.; Springer, P. T.

    2015-11-01

    Both direct and indirect drive inertial confinement fusion rely on the formation of spherical implosions, which can be a challenge under temporal and spatial drive variations (either from discrete laser beams, a complex hohlraum radiation environment, or both). To that end, we examine the use of large simulation databases of 2D capsule implosions to determine the sensitivity of indirectly driven NIF designs to time-varying low-mode radiation drive asymmetries at varying convergence ratios. In particular, we define and calculate a large number of extensive quantities for the simulations within the database and compare with the equivalent quantities extracted from fully 3D simulations and those used in 1D hydrodynamic models. Additionally, we discuss some of the practical challenges of searching for physical insight in multi-petabyte datasets. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC. LLNL-ABS-674884.

  16. Analysis of NIF experiments with the minimal energy implosion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We apply a recently developed analytical model of implosion and thermonuclear burn to fusion capsule experiments performed at the National Ignition Facility that used low-foot and high-foot laser pulse formats. Our theoretical predictions are consistent with the experimental data. Our studies, together with neutron image analysis, reveal that the adiabats of the cold fuel in both low-foot and high-foot experiments are similar. That is, the cold deuterium-tritium shells in those experiments are all in a high adiabat state at the time of peak implosion velocity. The major difference between low-foot and high-foot capsule experiments is the growth of the shock-induced instabilities developed at the material interfaces which lead to fuel mixing with ablator material. Furthermore, we have compared the NIF capsules performance with the ignition criteria and analyzed the alpha particle heating in the NIF experiments. Our analysis shows that alpha heating was appreciable only in the high-foot experiments

  17. Application of 2-D simulations to hollow Z-pinch implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of simulations of z-pinch implosions should have at least two goals: first, to properly model the most important physical processes occurring in the pinch allowing for a better understanding of the experiments and second, provide a design capability for future experiments. Beginning with experiments fielded at Los Alamos on the Pegasus I and Pegasus II capacitor banks, we have developed a methodology for simulating hollow z-pinches in two dimensions which has reproduced important features of the measured experimental current drive, spectrum, radiation pulse shape, peak power and total radiated energy (1,2,3). This methodology employs essentially one free parameter, the initial level of the random density perturbations imposed at the beginning of the 2-D simulation, but in general no adjustments to other parameters (such as the resistivity) are required (1). Limitations in the use of this approach include the use of the 3-T, gray diffusion treatment of radiation and the fact that the initial perturbation conditions are not known a priori. Nonetheless, the approach has been successful in reproducing important experimental features of such implosions over a wide variety of timescales (tens of nanoseconds to microseconds), current drives (3 to 16 MA), masses (submilligram to tens of milligrams), initial radii (<1cm to 5 cm), materials (Al and W) and initial configurations (thin foils and wire arrays with 40 to 240 wires). Currently we are applying this capability to the analysis of recent Saturn and PBFA-Z experiments (4,5). The code results provide insight into the nature of the pinch plasma prior to arrival on-axis, during thermalization and development after peak pinch time. Among other things, the simulation results provide an explanation for the production of larger amounts of radiated energy than would be expected from a simple slug-model kinetic energy analysis and the appearance of multiple peaks in the radiation power. The 2-D modeling has also

  18. A technique for extending by ∼103 the dynamic range of compact proton spectrometers for diagnosing ICF implosions on the National Ignition Facility and OMEGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedge Range Filter (WRF) proton spectrometers are routinely used on OMEGA and the NIF for diagnosing ρR and ρR asymmetries in direct- and indirect-drive implosions of D3He-, D2-, and DT-gas-filled capsules. By measuring the optical opacity distribution in CR-39 due to proton tracks in high-yield applications, as opposed to counting individual tracks, WRF dynamic range can be extended by 102 for obtaining the spectral shape, and by 103 for mean energy (ρR) measurement, corresponding to proton fluences of 108 and 109 cm−2, respectively. Using this new technique, ρR asymmetries can be measured during both shock and compression burn (proton yield ∼108 and ∼1012, respectively) in 2-shock National Ignition Facility implosions with the standard WRF accuracy of ±∼10 mg/cm2

  19. Probing off-Hugoniot states in Ta, Cu, and Al to 1000 GPa compression with magnetically driven liner implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a new technique for obtaining off-Hugoniot pressure vs. density data for solid metals compressed to extreme pressure by a magnetically driven liner implosion on the Z-machine (Z) at Sandia National Laboratories. In our experiments, the liner comprises inner and outer metal tubes. The inner tube is composed of a sample material (e.g., Ta and Cu) whose compressed state is to be inferred. The outer tube is composed of Al and serves as the current carrying cathode. Another aluminum liner at much larger radius serves as the anode. A shaped current pulse quasi-isentropically compresses the sample as it implodes. The iterative method used to infer pressure vs. density requires two velocity measurements. Photonic Doppler velocimetry probes measure the implosion velocity of the free (inner) surface of the sample material and the explosion velocity of the anode free (outer) surface. These two velocities are used in conjunction with magnetohydrodynamic simulation and mathematical optimization to obtain the current driving the liner implosion, and to infer pressure and density in the sample through maximum compression. This new equation of state calibration technique is illustrated using a simulated experiment with a Cu sample. Monte Carlo uncertainty quantification of synthetic data establishes convergence criteria for experiments. Results are presented from experiments with Al/Ta, Al/Cu, and Al liners. Symmetric liner implosion with quasi-isentropic compression to peak pressure ∼1000 GPa is achieved in all cases. These experiments exhibit unexpectedly softer behavior above 200 GPa, which we conjecture is related to differences in the actual and modeled properties of aluminum

  20. Probing off-Hugoniot states in Ta, Cu, and Al to 1000 GPa compression with magnetically driven liner implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemke, R. W., E-mail: rwlemke@sandia.gov; Dolan, D. H.; Dalton, D. G.; Brown, J. L.; Robertson, G. R.; Harding, E.; Mattsson, A. E.; Carpenter, J. H.; Drake, R. R.; Cochrane, K.; Robinson, A. C.; Mattsson, T. R. [Sandia National Laboratories, PO Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1189 (United States); Tomlinson, K.; Blue, B. E. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States); Knudson, M. D. [Sandia National Laboratories, PO Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1189 (United States); Institute for Shock Physics and Department of Physics, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164 (United States)

    2016-01-07

    We report on a new technique for obtaining off-Hugoniot pressure vs. density data for solid metals compressed to extreme pressure by a magnetically driven liner implosion on the Z-machine (Z) at Sandia National Laboratories. In our experiments, the liner comprises inner and outer metal tubes. The inner tube is composed of a sample material (e.g., Ta and Cu) whose compressed state is to be inferred. The outer tube is composed of Al and serves as the current carrying cathode. Another aluminum liner at much larger radius serves as the anode. A shaped current pulse quasi-isentropically compresses the sample as it implodes. The iterative method used to infer pressure vs. density requires two velocity measurements. Photonic Doppler velocimetry probes measure the implosion velocity of the free (inner) surface of the sample material and the explosion velocity of the anode free (outer) surface. These two velocities are used in conjunction with magnetohydrodynamic simulation and mathematical optimization to obtain the current driving the liner implosion, and to infer pressure and density in the sample through maximum compression. This new equation of state calibration technique is illustrated using a simulated experiment with a Cu sample. Monte Carlo uncertainty quantification of synthetic data establishes convergence criteria for experiments. Results are presented from experiments with Al/Ta, Al/Cu, and Al liners. Symmetric liner implosion with quasi-isentropic compression to peak pressure ∼1000 GPa is achieved in all cases. These experiments exhibit unexpectedly softer behavior above 200 GPa, which we conjecture is related to differences in the actual and modeled properties of aluminum.

  1. Charged-Particle Probing of X-ray-Driven Inertial-Fusion Implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of x-ray-driven implosions with charged particles have resulted in the quantitative characterization of critical aspects of indirect-drive inertial fusion. Three types of spontaneous electric fields differing in strength by two orders of magnitude, the largest being nearly one-tenth of the Bohr field, were discovered with time-gated proton radiographic imaging and spectrally resolved proton self-emission. The views of the spatial structure and temporal evolution of both the laser drive in a hohlraum and implosion properties provide essential insight into, and modeling validation of, x-ray-driven implosions. (authors)

  2. Non-spherical implosion of a dense thermonuclear plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In contrast to the electronic heat conduction losses which for a tamped thermonuclear micro-explosion are minimized by a spherical target shape, the adiabatic temperature rise can be larger for a non-spherical implosion geometry, whereas for a given plasma volume and density the Bremsstrahlung losses are independent of the particular geometry. For the special case of an imploding oblate ellipsoid the optimal eccentricity is derived from an exact analytical solution. The predicted effect leads to a reduction in required beam power density, permitting less beam focusing than is necessary for spherical targets, which is of special importance for electron- and ion-beam induced micro-explosions, and may even make possible the attainment of thermonuclear temperatures by chemical explosives. (author)

  3. Implosion dynamics measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements have been made of the in-flight dynamics of imploding capsules indirectly driven by laser energies of 1–1.7 MJ at the National Ignition Facility [Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)]. These experiments were part of the National Ignition Campaign [Landen et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 051002 (2011)] to iteratively optimize the inputs required to achieve thermonuclear ignition in the laboratory. Using gated or streaked hard x-ray radiography, a suite of ablator performance parameters, including the time-resolved radius, velocity, mass, and thickness, have been determined throughout the acceleration history of surrogate gas-filled implosions. These measurements have been used to establish a dynamically consistent model of the ablative drive history and shell compressibility throughout the implosion trajectory. First results showed that the peak velocity of the original 1.3-MJ Ge-doped polymer (CH) point design using Au hohlraums reached only 75% of the required ignition velocity. Several capsule, hohlraum, and laser pulse changes were then implemented to improve this and other aspects of implosion performance and a dedicated effort was undertaken to test the sensitivity of the ablative drive to the rise time and length of the main laser pulse. Changing to Si rather than Ge-doped inner ablator layers and increasing the pulse length together raised peak velocity to 93% ± 5% of the ignition goal using a 1.5 MJ, 420 TW pulse. Further lengthening the pulse so that the laser remained on until the capsule reached 30% (rather than 60%–70%) of its initial radius, reduced the shell thickness and improved the final fuel ρR on companion shots with a cryogenic hydrogen fuel layer. Improved drive efficiency was observed using U rather than Au hohlraums, which was expected, and by slowing the rise time of laser pulse, which was not. The effect of changing the Si-dopant concentration and distribution, as well as the effect of using a larger initial shell

  4. Implosion dynamics measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hicks, D. G.; Meezan, N. B.; Dewald, E. L.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Callahan, D. A.; Doeppner, T.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Di Nicola, P.; Dixit, S. N.; Dzenitis, E. G.; Eggert, J. E.; Farley, D. R.; Glenn, S. M.; Glenzer, S. H.; Hamza, A. V.; Heeter, R. F.; Holder, J. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2012-12-15

    Measurements have been made of the in-flight dynamics of imploding capsules indirectly driven by laser energies of 1-1.7 MJ at the National Ignition Facility [Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)]. These experiments were part of the National Ignition Campaign [Landen et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 051002 (2011)] to iteratively optimize the inputs required to achieve thermonuclear ignition in the laboratory. Using gated or streaked hard x-ray radiography, a suite of ablator performance parameters, including the time-resolved radius, velocity, mass, and thickness, have been determined throughout the acceleration history of surrogate gas-filled implosions. These measurements have been used to establish a dynamically consistent model of the ablative drive history and shell compressibility throughout the implosion trajectory. First results showed that the peak velocity of the original 1.3-MJ Ge-doped polymer (CH) point design using Au hohlraums reached only 75% of the required ignition velocity. Several capsule, hohlraum, and laser pulse changes were then implemented to improve this and other aspects of implosion performance and a dedicated effort was undertaken to test the sensitivity of the ablative drive to the rise time and length of the main laser pulse. Changing to Si rather than Ge-doped inner ablator layers and increasing the pulse length together raised peak velocity to 93% {+-} 5% of the ignition goal using a 1.5 MJ, 420 TW pulse. Further lengthening the pulse so that the laser remained on until the capsule reached 30% (rather than 60%-70%) of its initial radius, reduced the shell thickness and improved the final fuel {rho}R on companion shots with a cryogenic hydrogen fuel layer. Improved drive efficiency was observed using U rather than Au hohlraums, which was expected, and by slowing the rise time of laser pulse, which was not. The effect of changing the Si-dopant concentration and distribution, as well as the effect of using a larger initial shell

  5. Implosion dynamics measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, D. G.; Meezan, N. B.; Dewald, E. L.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Olson, R. E.; Callahan, D. A.; Döppner, T.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Di Nicola, P.; Dixit, S. N.; Dzenitis, E. G.; Eggert, J. E.; Farley, D. R.; Frenje, J. A.; Glenn, S. M.; Glenzer, S. H.; Hamza, A. V.; Heeter, R. F.; Holder, J. P.; Izumi, N.; Kalantar, D. H.; Khan, S. F.; Kline, J. L.; Kroll, J. J.; Kyrala, G. A.; Ma, T.; MacPhee, A. G.; McNaney, J. M.; Moody, J. D.; Moran, M. J.; Nathan, B. R.; Nikroo, A.; Opachich, Y. P.; Petrasso, R. D.; Prasad, R. R.; Ralph, J. E.; Robey, H. F.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rygg, J. R.; Salmonson, J. D.; Schneider, M. B.; Simanovskaia, N.; Spears, B. K.; Tommasini, R.; Widmann, K.; Zylstra, A. B.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Hsing, W. W.; MacGowan, B. J.; Atherton, L. J.; Edwards, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    Measurements have been made of the in-flight dynamics of imploding capsules indirectly driven by laser energies of 1-1.7 MJ at the National Ignition Facility [Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)]. These experiments were part of the National Ignition Campaign [Landen et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 051002 (2011)] to iteratively optimize the inputs required to achieve thermonuclear ignition in the laboratory. Using gated or streaked hard x-ray radiography, a suite of ablator performance parameters, including the time-resolved radius, velocity, mass, and thickness, have been determined throughout the acceleration history of surrogate gas-filled implosions. These measurements have been used to establish a dynamically consistent model of the ablative drive history and shell compressibility throughout the implosion trajectory. First results showed that the peak velocity of the original 1.3-MJ Ge-doped polymer (CH) point design using Au hohlraums reached only 75% of the required ignition velocity. Several capsule, hohlraum, and laser pulse changes were then implemented to improve this and other aspects of implosion performance and a dedicated effort was undertaken to test the sensitivity of the ablative drive to the rise time and length of the main laser pulse. Changing to Si rather than Ge-doped inner ablator layers and increasing the pulse length together raised peak velocity to 93% ± 5% of the ignition goal using a 1.5 MJ, 420 TW pulse. Further lengthening the pulse so that the laser remained on until the capsule reached 30% (rather than 60%-70%) of its initial radius, reduced the shell thickness and improved the final fuel ρR on companion shots with a cryogenic hydrogen fuel layer. Improved drive efficiency was observed using U rather than Au hohlraums, which was expected, and by slowing the rise time of laser pulse, which was not. The effect of changing the Si-dopant concentration and distribution, as well as the effect of using a larger initial shell thickness

  6. Hohlraum Drive and Asymmetry in High Foot Implosions on NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, D.; Hurricane, O.; Casey, D.; Dewald, E.; Dittrich, T.; Doeppner, T.; Haan, S.; Hinkel, D.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Jones, O.; Kritcher, A.; Lepape, S.; Ma, T.; Macphee, A.; Milovich, J.; Pak, A.; Park, H.-S.; Patel, P.; Ralph, J.; Robey, H.; Ross, S.; Salmonson, J.; Spears, B.; Springer, P.; Tommasini, R.

    2015-11-01

    The strategy in the high foot campaign on NIF has been to take reasonably small steps away from a working design, which means that we have a very rich database to understand both capsule and hohlraum performance. Over the course of the campaign, we have changed the laser power and energy, used both gold and depleted uranium hohlraums, and varied the thickness of the ablator. Each of these changes has an impact on the hohlraum drive and drive asymmetry, as measured by the implosion shape. In this talk, we will discuss what we have learned about hohlraum performance and residual kinetic energy resulting from drive asymmetry in the high foot database. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA273.

  7. Modeling Z-Pinch implosions in two dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ideally, simulations of Z-Pinch implosions should provide useful information about important physics processes underlying observed experimental results and provide design capabilities for future experiments. With this goal the authors have developed a methodology for simulating hollow Z-Pinches in two dimensions and applied it to experiments conducted on the Pegasus I and Pegasus II capacitor banks, the Procyon explosion generator system, and the Saturn and PBFA-Z accelerators. In comparisons with experimental results the simulations have reproduced important features of the current drive, spectrum, radiation pulse shape, peak power and total radiated energy. Comparison of the instability development in the simulations with visible light framing camera photos has shown a close correlation with the observed instability wavelengths and amplitudes. Using this methodology the authors are analyzing recent Saturn and PBFA-Z experiments and applying the 2-D modeling in developing applications such as the dynamic hohlraum

  8. Plasma flow switch and foil implosion experiments on Pegasus II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pegasus II is the upgraded version of Pegasus, a pulsed power machine used in the Los Alamos AGEX (Above Ground EXperiments) program. A goal of the program is to produce an intense (> 100 TW) source of soft x-rays from the thermalization of the kinetic energy of a 1 to 10 MJ plasma implosion. The radiation pulse should have a maximum duration of several 10's of nanoseconds and will be used in the study of fusion conditions and material properties. The radiating plasma source will be generated by the thermalization of the kinetic energy of an imploding cylindrical, thin, metallic foil. This paper addresses experiments done on a capacitor bank to develop a switch (plasma flow switch) to switch the bank current into the load at peak current. This allows efficient coupling of bank energy into foil kinetic energy

  9. Proton radiography of cylindrical laser-driven implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volpe, L; Jafer, R [Universita di Milano-Bicocca (Italy); Vauzour, B; Nicolai, Ph; Santos, J J; Dorchies, F; Fourment, C; Hulin, S; Regan, C [CELIA, Universite de Bordeaux, CNRS, CEA, F33405 (France); Perez, F; Baton, S [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique-CNRS-UPMC, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Lancaster, K; Galimberti, M; Heathcote, R; Tolley, M; Spindloe, Ch [RAL, STFC (United Kingdom); Nazarov, W [St. Andrews University (United Kingdom); Koester, P; Labate, L; Gizzi, L A [INO-CNR, Pisa (Italy)

    2011-03-15

    We report on the results of a recent experiment at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory investigating fast electron propagation in cylindrically compressed targets; a subject of interest for fast ignition. This experiment was performed within the framework of the road map of HiPER (the European High Power laser Energy Research facility Project). Protons accelerated by a ps-laser pulse are used to radiograph a 220 {mu}m diameter, imploded with {approx}200 J of laser light (1 ns {lambda} = 0.53 {mu}m) in four symmetrically incident beams. Results are also compared with those from hard x-ray radiography. Detailed comparison with 2D radiation hydrodyamics simulations is performed with the aid of a Monte Carlo code adapted to describe plasma effects. Finally, a simple analytical model is developed to estimate the performance of proton radiography for given implosion conditions. (brief communication)

  10. Integrated implosion/heating studies for advanced fast ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Integrated experiments to investigate the ultrafast heating of implosions using cone/shell geometries have been performed at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. The experiments used the 1054 nm, nanosecond, 0.9 kJ output of the VULCAN Nd:glass laser to drive 486 μm diameter, 6 μm wall thickness Cu-doped deuterated plastic (CD) shells in 6-beam cubic symmetry. Measurements of the opacity of the compressed plasma using two-dimensional spatially resolved Ti-Kα x-ray radiography suggest that densities of 4 g cm-3 and areal densities of 40 mg cm-2 were achieved at stagnation. Upper limits on the heating with both 1 ps and 10 ps pulses were deduced from the fluorescent yield from the Cu dopant. The data suggest that control of the preformed plasma scale-length inside the cone is necessary for efficient coupling to the compressed plasma

  11. Direct-drive DT implosions with Knudsen number variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hoffman, N. M.; Schmitt, M. J.; Bradley, P. A.; Gales, S.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M.; Leatherland, A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Glebov, V. Yu

    2016-05-01

    Direct-drive implosions of DT-filled plastic-shells have been conducted at the Omega laser facility, measuring nuclear yields while varying Knudsen numbers (i.e., the ratio of mean free path of fusing ions to the length of fuel region) by adjusting both shell thickness (e.g., 7.5, 15, 20, 30 μm) and fill pressure (e.g., 2, 5, 15 atm). The fusion reactivity reduction model showed a stronger effect on yield as the Knudsen number increases (or the shell thickness decreases). The Reduced-Ion-Kinetic (RIK) simulation which includes both fusion reactivity reduction and mix model was necessary to provide a better match between the observed neutron yields and those simulated.

  12. Resolving a central ICF issue for ignition: Implosion symmertry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program focuses on resolving key target-physics issues and developing technology needed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This work is being performed in collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). A major requirement for the indirect-drive NIF ignition target is to achieve the irradiation uniformity on the capsule surface needed for a symmetrical high-convergence implosion. Los Alamos employed an integrated modeling technique using the Lasnex radiation-hydrodynamics code to design two different targets that achieve ignition and moderate gain. Los Alamos is performing experiments on the Nova Laser at LLNL in order to validate our NIF ignition calculations

  13. Direct-driven target implosion in heavy ion fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, K.; Suzuki, T.; Kurosaki, T.; Barada, D.; Kawata, S.; Ma, Y. Y.; Ogoyski, A. I.

    2016-03-01

    In inertial confinement fusion, the driver beam illumination non-uniformity leads a degradation of fusion energy output. A fuel target alignment error would happen in a fusion reactor; the target alignment error induces heavy ion beam illumination non-uniformity on a target. On the other hand, heavy ion beam accelerator provides a capability to oscillate a beam axis with a high frequency. The wobbling beams may provide a new method to reduce or smooth the beam illumination non-uniformity. First we study the effect of driver irradiation non-uniformity induced by the target alignment error (dz) on the target implosion. We found that dz should be less than about 130 μm for a sufficient fusion energy output. We also optimize the wobbling scheme. The spiral wobbling heavy ion beams would provide a promissing scheme to the uniform beam illumination.

  14. Thermonuclear fusion plasma produced by laser coupling and implosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A very important problem of present laser fusion research is to achieve fundamental understanding of (i) laser-plasma coupling due to various interactions, and of (ii) the implosion process taking place in pellet targets. High-power laser systems of various wave-lengths have been constructed for this purpose. A glass laser system consisting of four beams, ''Gekko IV'', using a new phosphate glass (LHG-5), has been constructed. The output energy is 1 kJ in one nanosecond and 300 J in 100 picoseconds. The focusable size of each beam is 50 μm in diameter. An E-beam-controlled CO2 laser system, ''Lekko I'', can deliver 500 J in one nanosecond. A multiband multiline oscillator is tested to increase energy extraction. The saturation energy of the laser increases by about 60%. The PFN capacitor bank is sucessfully employed in the main pumping discharge with perfect loading. As far as laser-plasma coupling is concerned, the importanced of resonance absorption, its relation to self-generated magnetic fields and the high-energy ion jet stream, the self-modulation of the density profile, and the influence of density scale length on the parametric instability related to Brillouin backscattering are investigated. With the help of 1-μm and 10-μm lasers a scaling law can be established for the interaction processes. A model for the generation of fast-ion jet streams is examined. The neutron yield in the plasma focus is enhanced by about a factor of two by strong absorption of the CO2 laser beam. As to the implosion experiment, various targets with multi-layers have been studied and the radiation energy flow was measured. Enhanced light transmission is found (Ausaka effect). The compression of the deuterium-filled micro-balloon is estimated as up to 1:100. The neutron yield is about 105. (author)

  15. Indications of flow near maximum compression in layered deuterium-tritium implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Knauer, J. P.; Cerjan, C. J.; Eckart, M. J.; Grim, G. P.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Munro, D. H.; Sayre, D. B.; Spears, B. K.; Bionta, R. M.; Bond, E. J.; Caggiano, J. A.; Callahan, D.; Casey, D. T.; Döppner, T.; Frenje, J. A.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Hurricane, O.; Kritcher, A.; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; Mackinnon, A.; Meezan, N.; Patel, P.; Petrasso, R. D.; Ralph, J. E.; Springer, P. T.; Yeamans, C. B.

    2016-08-01

    An accurate understanding of burn dynamics in implosions of cryogenically layered deuterium (D) and tritium (T) filled capsules, obtained partly through precision diagnosis of these experiments, is essential for assessing the impediments to achieving ignition at the National Ignition Facility. We present measurements of neutrons from such implosions. The apparent ion temperatures Tion are inferred from the variance of the primary neutron spectrum. Consistently higher DT than DD Tion are observed and the difference is seen to increase with increasing apparent DT Tion. The line-of-sight rms variations of both DD and DT Tion are small, ˜150 eV , indicating an isotropic source. The DD neutron yields are consistently high relative to the DT neutron yields given the observed Tion. Spatial and temporal variations of the DT temperature and density, DD-DT differential attenuation in the surrounding DT fuel, and fluid motion variations contribute to a DT Tion greater than the DD Tion, but are in a one-dimensional model insufficient to explain the data. We hypothesize that in a three-dimensional interpretation, these effects combined could explain the results.

  16. Probing off-Hugoniot states in Ta, Cu, and Al to 10 Mbar compression with magnetically driven liner implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, T. R.; Lemke, R. W.; Dolan, D. H.; Dalton, D. G.; Brown, J. L.; Robertson, G. R.; Knudson, M. D.; Harding, E.; Mattsson, A. E.; Carpenter, J. H.; Drake, R. R.; Cochrane, K.; Robinson, A. C.; Tomlinson, K.; Blue, B. E.

    We report on a technique for obtaining off-Hugoniot equation of state data on solid metals by a magnetically driven cylindrical liner implosion on Sandia's Z-machine (Z). The sample material is in an inner tube with an outer tube composed of Al that serves as the current carrying cathode. A shaped current pulse quasi-isentropically compresses the sample as it implodes. Photonic Doppler velocimetry measures the implosion velocity of the free inner surface of the sample material, and the explosion velocity of the return current anode free outer surface. The velocimetry measurements are used in conjunction with magnetohydrodynamic simulations and optimization to infer pressure and density in the sample. Results are presented for experiments on the Z-machine in which Ta, Cu, and Al samples were compressed to peak pressure 10 Mbar. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. Effects of seed magnetic fields on magnetohydrodynamic implosion structure and dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Mostert, W.

    2014-12-01

    The effects of various seed magnetic fields on the dynamics of cylindrical and spherical implosions in ideal magnetohydrodynamics are investigated. Here, we present a fundamental investigation of this problem utilizing cylindrical and spherical Riemann problems under three seed field configurations to initialize the implosions. The resulting flows are simulated numerically, revealing rich flow structures, including multiple families of magnetohydrodynamic shocks and rarefactions that interact non-linearly. We fully characterize these flow structures, examine their axi- and spherisymmetry-breaking behaviour, and provide data on asymmetry evolution for different field strengths and driving pressures for each seed field configuration. We find that out of the configurations investigated, a seed field for which the implosion centre is a saddle point in at least one plane exhibits the least degree of asymmetry during implosion.

  18. Sensitivity of Inferred Electron Temperature from X-ray Emission of NIF Cryogenic DT Implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klem, Michael [Univ. of Dallas, Irving, TX (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory seeks to achieve thermonuclear ignition through inertial confinement fusion. The accurate assessment of the performance of each implosion experiment is a crucial step. Here we report on work to derive a reliable electron temperature for the cryogenic deuteriumtritium implosions completed on the NIF using the xray signal from the Ross filter diagnostic. These Xrays are dominated by bremsstrahlung emission. By fitting the xray signal measured through each of the individual Ross filters, the source bremsstrahlung spectrum can be inferred, and an electron temperature of the implosion hot spot inferred. Currently, each filter is weighted equally in this analysis. We present work quantifying the errors with such a technique and the results from investigating the contribution of each filter to the overall accuracy of the temperature inference. Using this research, we also compare the inferred electron temperature against other measured implosion quantities to develop a more complete understanding of the hotspot physics.

  19. Measurements of the depth-dependent characteristics of light bulb implosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sungho; Kang, Donhyug

    2015-11-01

    Impulsive signals generated by the implosion of an incandescent light bulb were measured in shallow water with implosion depths in the range of 10 - 80 m. The received waveform was characterized by successive negative and positive pressure pulses originating from the bubble oscillation process. The time intervals between successive bubble pulses decreased with increasing implosion depth and the peaks of subsequent bubble oscillations dissipated relatively quickly. In this paper, semi-empirical formulas are derived to model the depth-dependent characteristics of the bulb implosion signal, including the time interval between bubble pulses and peak source level. The model predictions are compared with the measured signals and with the results in the literature. Possible causes of the differences in the comparison with previous results are discussed.

  20. Control of Be capsule low mode implosions symmetry at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrala, G. A.; Kline, J. L.; Yi, S.; Simakov, A. N.; Olson, R. E.; Wilson, D. C.; Batha, S.; Dewald, E. L.; Tommasini, R.; Ralph, J. E.; MacPhee, A. G.; Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Izumi, N.; Nagel, S.; Rygg, J. R.

    2016-05-01

    We present results of the beryllium experimental campaign on the implosion symmetry properties of beryllium capsules at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [1]. These indirect drive experiments measure both the inflight and core self-emission implosion symmetry. The inflight symmetry of the ablator before stagnation is measured using a backlight imaging technique. A copper backlighter was used to measure the transmissions (or backlit absorption) of the copper doped beryllium shells. Images of the x-ray emission from the core around bang time provide a measure of the symmetry near peak compression. Both pieces of information about the 2D symmetry are used to infer the drive and velocity uniformity enabling us to predictably adjust the properties of the incident laser, mainly the time dependent ratio of the inner beam cone power to the outer laser beam powers, to achieve proper symmetry of the implosion. Results from these experiments show inner beam propagation is not degraded compared to similar implosions with CH ablators. Variations in the shape compared with implosions using CH ablators also provides information about the cross beam energy transfer used to adjust the equatorial shape and thus infer information about the differences in plasma conditions near the laser entrance holes. Experimental results of the implosion shape for beryllium capsules will be presented along with comparisons relative to CH ablators.

  1. Maximizing 1D “like” implosion performance for inertial confinement fusion science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kline, John L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-15

    While the march towards achieving indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion at the NIF has made great progress, the experiments show that multi-dimensional effects still dominate the implosion performance. Low mode implosion symmetry and hydrodynamic instabilities seed by capsule mounting features appear to be two key limiting factors for implosion performance. One reason these factors have a large impact on the performance of ICF implosions is the high convergence required to achieve high fusion gains. To tackle these problems, a predictable implosion platform is needed meaning experiments must trade-off high gain for performance. To this end, LANL has adopted three main approaches to develop a 1D implosion platform where 1D means high yield over 1D clean calculations. Taking advantage of the properties of beryllium capsules, a high adiabat, low convergence platform is being developed. The higher drive efficiency for beryllium enables larger case-to-capsule ratios to improve symmetry at the expense of drive. Smaller capsules with a high adiabat drive are expected to reduce the convergence and thus increase predictability. The second approach is liquid fuel layers using wetted foam targets. With liquid fuel layers, the initial mass in the hot spot can be controlled via the target fielding temperature which changes the liquid vapor pressure. Varying the initial hot spot mass via the vapor pressure controls the implosion convergence and minimizes the need to vaporize the dense fuel layer during the implosion to achieve ignition relevant hot spot densities. The last method is double shell targets. Unlike hot spot ignition, double shells ignite volumetrically. The inner shell houses the DT fuel and the convergence of this cavity is relatively small compared to hot spot ignition. Radiation trapping and the longer confinement times relax the conditions required to ignite the fuel. Key challenges for double shell targets are coupling the momentum of the outer shell to

  2. Radiative cooling of two-component wire-array Z-pinch plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wire-array two-component Z-pinch plasmas containing Al and other elements were studied experimentally and the observations interpreted with the help of theoretical modeling. Special attention was given to achieving reproducible implosions. Cascading implosions in star wire arrays mix components during the implosion phase and implosion dynamics were not affected by changes in concentration. A reduction in Al K-shell radiation and an increase in soft x-ray radiation emission were observed in Al-W plasma with 84% concentration of Al ions compared to only-Al plasma. Plasma with 84% of Al ions has radiative properties like those of W Z-pinches. The analysis of Al K-shell x-ray spectra with a collisional-radiative atomic kinetics model shows a drop of the electron temperature from 400 eV in pure Al plasma to below 300 eV in the Al-W mix. Al-Au Z-pinches present radiation features similar to Al-W plasma. This is indicative of a similar plasma cooling effect due to the presence of a high-Z element

  3. The effect of shock dynamics on compressibility of ignition-scale National Ignition Facility implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zylstra, A. B., E-mail: zylstra@mit.edu; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Petrasso, R. D.; Sinenian, N.; Sio, H. W. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Hicks, D. G.; Dewald, E. L.; Robey, H. F.; Rygg, J. R.; Meezan, N. B.; Friedrich, S.; Bionta, R.; Atherton, J.; Barrios, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2014-11-15

    The effects of shock dynamics on compressibility of indirect-drive ignition-scale surrogate implosions, CH shells filled with D{sup 3}He gas, have been studied using charged-particle spectroscopy. Spectral measurements of D{sup 3}He protons produced at the shock-bang time probe the shock dynamics and in-flight characteristics of an implosion. The proton shock yield is found to vary by over an order of magnitude. A simple model relates the observed yield to incipient hot-spot adiabat, suggesting that implosions with rapid radiation-power increase during the main drive pulse may have a 2× higher hot-spot adiabat, potentially reducing compressibility. A self-consistent 1-D implosion model was used to infer the areal density (ρR) and the shell center-of-mass radius (R{sub cm}) from the downshift of the shock-produced D{sup 3}He protons. The observed ρR at shock-bang time is substantially higher for implosions, where the laser drive is on until near the compression bang time (“short-coast”), while longer-coasting implosions have lower ρR. This corresponds to a much larger temporal difference between the shock- and compression-bang time in the long-coast implosions (∼800 ps) than in the short-coast (∼400 ps); this will be verified with a future direct bang-time diagnostic. This model-inferred differential bang time contradicts radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, which predict constant 700–800 ps differential independent of coasting time; this result is potentially explained by uncertainties in modeling late-time ablation drive on the capsule. In an ignition experiment, an earlier shock-bang time resulting in an earlier onset of shell deceleration, potentially reducing compression and, thus, fuel ρR.

  4. Simulations in One Dimension of Unstable Mix in Laser-Driven Implosion Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, R.; Delettrez, J. A.; Bradley, D. K.; Verdon, C. P.

    1997-11-01

    The effects of Rayleigh-Taylor flow in recent laser-driven implosion experiments are simulated in one dimension by the hydrocode LILAC*. The adequacy of this mix model to account for the experimental results is examined. Mix is modeled as a diffusive transport process affecting material constituents, thermal energy, and turbulent mix-motion energy within a growing mix region whose boundaries are derived from a saturable, linear multimode model of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The linear growth rates and the feedthrough coupling between perturbations of different unstable interfaces are obtained analytically in terms of the one-dimensional fluid profiles. Two-dimensional simulations and experimental data are used to reduce the uncertainties in the adjustable parameters of the model. Mode evolution proceeds according to equations applicable to all phases of acceleration, and the effects of geometrically converging, compressible flow are taken into account. Simulated mix diagnostics include time-resolved spectra of x-ray emission from additives in the shell and in the fuel and time-resolved neutron production from CD layers in the shell. Spectra are simulated using a non-LTE radiation-transport post-processor that makes full use of the multi-material mix information. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460.

  5. Direct-drive, hollow-shell implosion studies on the 60-beam, UV OMEGA laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Direct-drive implosion experiments have been performed on the University of Rochester's 60-beam, 30 kJ, UV (351 nm) OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] laser system to investigate the conditions at maximum compression of polymer-shell targets with zero- or low-pressure (≤3 atm) gas fills. By using deuterium-bearing shells (CD), the imploded-core conditions have been diagnosed with both x-ray and neutron spectral measurements. The core electron temperature (kTe) and shell areal density (ρRshell) are determined from the emergent x-ray spectrum, while independent inferences of ρRshell are obtained from the measured primary (DD) and secondary (DT) neutron yields. Target performance was investigated for a range of beam-smoothing conditions [none to 0.25 THz-bandwidth smoothing by spectral dispersion along two dimensions (2-D SSD)] and a set of pulse shapes (1 ns square pulse to a 2.5 ns pulse with a 1:40 foot-to-main-pulse power ratio). The results have conclusively demonstrated the ability to compress targets to shell areal densities in the range of ∼60 to 130 mg/cm2. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  6. Diagnosing Implosion Performance at the National Ignition Facility by Means of Advanced Neutron-Spectrometry and Neutron-Imaging Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Proper assembly of capsule mass, as manifested through the evolution of fuel areal density, is essential for achieving hot-spot ignition planned at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Experimental information about areal density and areal-density asymmetries, hot-spot ion temperature (Ti) and yield (Yn) are therefore critical for understanding the assembly of the fuel. To obtain this information, a suite of neutron Time-of-Flight (nTOF) spectrometers and a Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been commissioned and extensively used on the NIF for measurements of the neutron spectrum in the energy range from 1.5 to 20 MeV. This range covers all essential details of the neutron spectrum, allowing for the determination of areal density, Yn, and Ti. The spectrometers are fielded at different locations around the implosion for directional measurements of the neutron spectrum, also allowing for determination of areal-density asymmetries and possible kinetic effects. The data obtained from these diagnostics have been essential to the progress of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), indicating that the implosion performance, characterized by the Experimental Ignition Threshold Factor (ITFx), has improved about two orders of magnitude since the first cryogenic shot taken in September 2010. Areal-density values greater than 1 g/cm2 are now readily achieved. By combining the areal-density data with information about the spatial extent of the high-density region obtained from Neutron Imaging System (NIS), it has been demonstrated that densities above 500 g/cc and pressure-time (Pτ) products in excess of 10 atm s have been achieved, which are according to HYDRA simulations about a factor of three from ignition conditions. (author)

  7. Comparing neutron and X-ray images from NIF implosions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson D.C.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Directly laser driven and X-radiation driven DT filled capsules differ in the relationship between neutron and X-ray images. Shot N110217, a directly driven DT-filled glass micro-balloon provided the first neutron images at the National Ignition Facility. As seen in implosions on the Omega laser, the neutron image can be enclosed inside time integrated X-ray images. HYDRA simulations show the X-ray image is dominated by emission from the hot glass shell while the neutron image arises from the DT fuel it encloses. In the absence of mix or jetting, X-ray images of a cryogenically layered THD fuel capsule should be dominated by emission from the hydrogen rather than the cooler plastic shell that is separated from the hot core by cold DT fuel. This cool, dense DT, invisible in X-ray emission, shows itself by scattering hot core neutrons. Germanium X-ray emission spectra and Ross pair filtered X-ray energy resolved images suggest that germanium doped plastic emits in the torus shaped hot spot, probably reducing the neutron yield.

  8. T-T Neutron Spectrum from Inertial Confinement Implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caggiano, Joseph; Gatu Johnson, Maria; Bacher, Andrew; McNabb, Denns

    2013-04-01

    Measurements of the T(2n,)^4He reaction (TT) have been conducted using high-purity tritium, gas-filled capsules in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. At the OMEGA laser facility, TT neutron spectra were measured using two instruments: the neutron-time-of-flight (nTOF) facility and the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) facility. The resolutions of these systems were improved for nTOF by using a crystal with much faster decay time and for MRS by using a thinner, more uniform CD2 recoil foil. Measurements at c.m. energies of 10-30 keV can be used to study the TT three-body reaction mechanism near astrophysical energies. With both nTOF and MRS, we observe a small, narrow peak starting at the 9.44 MeV endpoint, corresponding to the n + ^5He (g.s.) reaction channel. Most of the TT reaction proceeds through other reaction channels which produce broad, continuous neutron spectra in the range 0 - 9.5 MeV. Implications for ICF experiments at the National Ignition Facility will be discussed. Work in collaboration with J. A. Frenje, D. T. Casey, M. J.-E. Manuel, N. Sinenian, A. B. Zylstra, F. H. Seguin, C. K. Li, R. D. Petrasso, V. Yu Glebov, P. B. Radha, D. D. Meyerhofer, T. C. Sangster, P. A. Amendt, R. Hatarik, D. B. Sayre, J. R. Rygg, H. W. Herrmann and Y. H. Kim.

  9. Wire-array z-pinch: a powerful x-ray source for ICF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wire-array z-pinch has in a very short time achieved remarkable performance as a powerful (>200 TW), pulsed soft x-ray source of high efficiency (∼15%) and of great relevance to inertial confinement fusion. The underlying physics involves the transformation of wire cores to a plasma corona, the occurrence of uncorrelated axial instabilities, inward flowing low magnetic Reynolds number jets, sometimes an accumulated stable and dynamically confined precursor column, an almost constant velocity implosion when gaps occur in the wire cores and finally at stagnation a fast-rising soft x-ray pulse of typically 5 ns FWHM. Nested arrays improve the performance and can operate in several modes. Three hohlraum designs have been tested; one of these, the dynamic hohlraum, has achieved a radiation temperature of ∼230 eV and has compressed a capsule from 2 to ∼0.8 mm diameter with a neutron yield of > 1010 thermal DD neutrons. Lower mass stainless steel wire arrays are used for Kα radiation sources. Generally implosions lead to more energy radiated than the implosive kinetic energy, and this is hypothesized as being due to ion viscous heating, as fast-growing short wavelength nonlinear MHD instabilities are dissipated; record ion temperatures of 200-300 keV are predicted and have been measured for the stainless steel array on Z at Sandia

  10. Effects of electron-ion temperature equilibration on inertial confinement fusion implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electron-ion temperature relaxation essentially affects both the laser absorption in coronal plasmas and the hot-spot formation in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). It has recently been reexamined for plasma conditions closely relevant to ICF implosions using either classical molecular-dynamics simulations or analytical methods. To explore the electron-ion temperature equilibration effects on ICF implosion performance, we have examined two Coulomb logarithm models by implementing them into our hydrocodes, and we have carried out hydrosimulations for ICF implosions. Compared to the Lee-More model that is currently used in our standard hydrocodes, the two models predict substantial differences in laser absorption, coronal temperatures, and neutron yields for ICF implosions at the OMEGA Laser Facility [Boehly et al. Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Such effects on the triple-picket direct-drive design at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have also been explored. Based on the validity of the two models, we have proposed a combined model of the electron-ion temperature-relaxation rate for the overall ICF plasma conditions. The hydrosimulations using the combined model for OMEGA implosions have shown ∼6% more laser absorption, ∼6%-15% higher coronal temperatures, and ∼10% more neutron yield, when compared to the Lee-More model prediction. It is also noticed that the gain for the NIF direct-drive design can be varied by ∼10% among the different electron-ion temperature-relaxation models.

  11. Effects of electron-ion temperature equilibration on inertial confinement fusion implosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Barry; Hu, S X

    2011-07-01

    The electron-ion temperature relaxation essentially affects both the laser absorption in coronal plasmas and the hot-spot formation in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). It has recently been reexamined for plasma conditions closely relevant to ICF implosions using either classical molecular-dynamics simulations or analytical methods. To explore the electron-ion temperature equilibration effects on ICF implosion performance, we have examined two Coulomb logarithm models by implementing them into our hydrocodes, and we have carried out hydrosimulations for ICF implosions. Compared to the Lee-More model that is currently used in our standard hydrocodes, the two models predict substantial differences in laser absorption, coronal temperatures, and neutron yields for ICF implosions at the OMEGA Laser Facility [Boehly et al. Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Such effects on the triple-picket direct-drive design at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have also been explored. Based on the validity of the two models, we have proposed a combined model of the electron-ion temperature-relaxation rate for the overall ICF plasma conditions. The hydrosimulations using the combined model for OMEGA implosions have shown ∼6% more laser absorption, ∼6%-15% higher coronal temperatures, and ∼10% more neutron yield, when compared to the Lee-More model prediction. It is also noticed that the gain for the NIF direct-drive design can be varied by ∼10% among the different electron-ion temperature-relaxation models. PMID:21867323

  12. Engineering design of the LINUS-O prototype liner implosion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of imploding liner flux compression techniques for application to compact, pulsed fusion reactors has led to the concept of rotating liquid metal implosions driven by free-pistons. In hydrodynamic model tests, such implosions have been demonstrated to be stable and reversible, allowing serious consideration of a new class of pulsed fusion reactor. The next step is to demonstrate repetitive, controlled operation at high energy densities with liquid metal liners, for which peak magnetic field levels approaching a megagauss are possible. A prototype controlled liner implosion system, LINUS-O, has been designed and is under construction. During operation, the annular driving-piston surrounding the implosion chamber is displaced axially by the action of pulsed high pressure gas at several hundred atmospheres. The piston and chamber rotate at 2100 RPM, allowing the free inside surface of the liner to implode stably from 30 cm diameter to 1.0 cm at turnaround. The experimental facility is described and engineering problems associated with design and operation of controlled high energy implosion systems are discussed

  13. Higher velocity, high-foot implosions on the National Ignition Facility laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Döppner, T.; Ma, T.; Park, H.-S.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C. J.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Edwards, M. J.; Haan, S. W.; Hamza, A. V.; Kritcher, A. L.; Landen, O. L.; LePape, S.; MacPhee, A. G.; Milovich, J. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); and others

    2015-05-15

    By increasing the velocity in “high foot” implosions [Dittrich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055002 (2014); Park et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055001 (2014); Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014); Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056314 (2014)] on the National Ignition Facility laser, we have nearly doubled the neutron yield and the hotspot pressure as compared to the implosions reported upon last year. The implosion velocity has been increased using a combination of the laser (higher power and energy), the hohlraum (depleted uranium wall material with higher opacity and lower specific heat than gold hohlraums), and the capsule (thinner capsules with less mass). We find that the neutron yield from these experiments scales systematically with a velocity-like parameter of the square root of the laser energy divided by the ablator mass. By connecting this parameter with the inferred implosion velocity (v), we find that for shots with primary yield >1 × 10{sup 15} neutrons, the total yield ∼ v{sup 9.4}. This increase is considerably faster than the expected dependence for implosions without alpha heating (∼v{sup 5.9}) and is additional evidence that these experiments have significant alpha heating.

  14. Higher velocity, high-foot implosions on the National Ignition Facility laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By increasing the velocity in “high foot” implosions [Dittrich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055002 (2014); Park et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055001 (2014); Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014); Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056314 (2014)] on the National Ignition Facility laser, we have nearly doubled the neutron yield and the hotspot pressure as compared to the implosions reported upon last year. The implosion velocity has been increased using a combination of the laser (higher power and energy), the hohlraum (depleted uranium wall material with higher opacity and lower specific heat than gold hohlraums), and the capsule (thinner capsules with less mass). We find that the neutron yield from these experiments scales systematically with a velocity-like parameter of the square root of the laser energy divided by the ablator mass. By connecting this parameter with the inferred implosion velocity (v), we find that for shots with primary yield >1 × 1015 neutrons, the total yield ∼ v9.4. This increase is considerably faster than the expected dependence for implosions without alpha heating (∼v5.9) and is additional evidence that these experiments have significant alpha heating

  15. X-ray emission from a high-atomic-number z-pinch plasma created from compact wire arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal and nonthermal x-ray emission from the implosion of compact tungsten wire arrays in 5-MA Saturn discharges is reported. The timing of multiple implosions and the thermal x-ray spectra (1 to 10 keV) agree with 2D radiation-hydrocode simulations. Nonthermal x-ray emission (10 to 100 keV) correlates with pinch spots distributed along the z-axis. The similarities of the measured nonthermal spectrum, yield, and pinch-spot emission with those of 0.8-MA, single-exploded-wire discharges on Gamble-II suggest a common nonthermal-production mechanism. Nonthermal x-ray yields are lower than expected from current scaling of Gamble II results, suggesting that implosion geometries are not as efficient as single-wire geometries for nonthermal x-ray production. The instabilities, azimuthal asymmetries, and inferred multiple implosions that accompany the implosion geometry lead to larger, more irregular pinch spots, a likely reason for reduced nonthermal efficiency. A model for nonthermal-electron acceleration across magnetic fields in highly-collisional, high-atomic-number plasmas combined with 1D hydrocode simulations of Saturn compact loads predicts weak nonthermal x-ray emission. (author). 3 figs., 10 refs

  16. X-ray emission from a high-atomic-number z-pinch plasma created from compact wire arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal and nonthermal x-ray emission from the implosion of compact tungsten wire arrays in 5-MA Saturn discharges is reported. The timing of multiple implosions and the thermal x-ray spectra (1 to 10 keV) agree with 2D radiation-hydrocode simulations. Nonthermal x-ray emission (10 to 100 keV) correlates with pinch spots distributed along the z-axis. The similarities of the measured nonthermal spectrum, yield, and pinch-spot emission with those of 0.8-MA, single- exploded-wire discharges on Gamble-II suggest a common nonthermal- production mechanism. Nonthermal x-ray yields are lower than expected from current scaling of Gamble II results, suggesting that implosion geometries are not as efficient as single-wire geometries for nonthermal x-ray production. The instabilities, azimuthal asymmetries, and inferred multiple implosions that accompany the implosion geometry lead to larger, more irregular pinch spots, a likely reason for reduced nonthermal efficiency. A model for nonthermal-electron acceleration across magnetic fields in highly- collisional, high-atomic-number plasmas combined with 1D hydrocode simulations of Saturn compact loads predicts weak nonthermal x-ray emission

  17. Implosion dynamics measurements by monochromatic x-ray radiography in inertial confinement fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bolun; Yang, Zhenghua; Wei, Minxi; Pu, Yudong; Hu, Xin; Chen, Tao; Liu, Shenye; Yan, Ji; Huang, Tianxuan; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun

    2014-12-01

    The implosion dynamics is the most important metrics for assessing the progress toward ignition of an inertially confined fusion experiment. A high spatial resolution monochromatic x-ray imaging system based on the spherically bent crystal is developed to measure the implosion trajectory. The density distribution of the imploding capsules can be inferred with more accurately from monochromatic trajectories. The self emission of the imploded core will be restrained by spectral resolution and the setup of the imaging system. Also the variations of the backlighters' intensity will not be seen in the images. It has been demonstrated on SGII laser facility at the first time. The ablator remaining mass and the implosion velocity, which are the important ablator parameters, are calculated from the monochromatic trajectories. And the results are contrasted to the 1D hydrodynamics simulations.

  18. High-Performance Layered DT Capsule Implosions in Depleted Uranium Hohlraums on the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doeppner, Tilo; Hurricane, O. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D.; Ma, T.; Park, H.-S.; Benedetti, L.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Fittinghoff, D.; Haan, S.; Hinkel, D.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Izumi, N.; Kritcher, A.; Le Pape, S.; Pak, A.; Patel, P.; Robey, H.; Remington, B.; Salmonson, J.; Springer, P.; Widmann, K.; Merrill, F.; Wilde, C.

    2014-10-01

    We report on the first layered DT capsule implosions in depleted uranium (DU) hohlraums driven with a high-foot pulse shape. High-foot implosions have demonstrated improved resistance to hydrodynamic instabilities. [Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014)]. DU hohlraums provide a higher albedo and thus an increased drive equivalent to 25 TW extra laser power at the peak of the drive compared to Au hohlraums. Additionally, we observe an improved implosion shape closer to round which indicates enhanced drive from the waist. As a result, these first high-foot DU experiments achieved total neutron yields approaching 1016 neutrons where more than 50% of the yield was due to additional heating of alpha particles stopping in the DT fuel. This work performed under the auspices of U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Mitigation Effect of Finite Larmor Radius on Rayleigh-Taylor Instability in Z-Pinch Implosions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱孝明; 黄林; 简广德

    2002-01-01

    Based on the framework of magnetohydrodynamic theory, a simple model is proposed to study the mitigation effect of finite Larmor radius on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in Z-pinch implosions. In this model, taking account of Ti ≥ Te in Z-pinch implosions we believe that the magnetohydrodynamic plasma responds to a perturbation (~ exp [i (k. x - ωt)]) at frequency (ω + ik2⊥ρ2iΩi) instead of frequency ω, where k2⊥ρ2i is due to the finite Larmor radius effects expressed from the generalkinetic theory of magnetized plasma. Therefore the linearized continuity and momentum equations for the perturbed mass-density and velocity include the finite Larmor radius effects. The calculations indicate that, in the wavenumber region of interest, the finite Larmor radius effects can mitigate the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in Z-pinch implosions.

  20. Reconstruction and analysis of temperature and density spatial profiles inertial confinement fusion implosion cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss several methods for the extraction of temperature and density spatial profiles in inertial confinement fusion implosion cores based on the analysis of the x-ray emission from spectroscopic tracers added to the deuterium fuel. The ideas rely on (1) detailed spectral models that take into account collisional-radiative atomic kinetics, Stark broadened line shapes, and radiation transport calculations, (2) the availability of narrow-band, gated pinhole and slit x-ray images, and space-resolved line spectra of the core, and (3) several data analysis and reconstruction methods that include a multi-objective search and optimization technique based on a novel application of Pareto genetic algorithms to plasma spectroscopy. The spectroscopic analysis yields the spatial profiles of temperature and density in the core at the collapse of the implosion, and also the extent of shell material mixing into the core. Results are illustrated with data recorded in implosion experiments driven by the OMEGA and Z facilities

  1. Three-dimensional modeling of capsule implosions in OMEGA tetrahedral hohlraums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tetrahedral hohlraums have been proposed as a means for achieving the highly uniform implosions needed for ignition with inertial confinement fusion (ICF) [J. D. Schnittman and R. S. Craxton, Phys. Plasmas 3, 3786 (1996)]. Recent experiments on the OMEGA laser system have achieved good drive uniformity consistent with theoretical predictions [J. M. Wallace et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 3807 (1999)]. To better understand these experiments and future investigations of high-convergence ICF implosions, the three-dimensional (3-D) view-factor code BUTTERCUP has been expanded to model the time-dependent radiation transport in the hohlraum and the hydrodynamic implosion of the capsule. Additionally, a 3-D postprocessor has been written to simulate x-ray images of the imploded core. Despite BUTTERCUP's relative simplicity, its predictions for radiation drive temperatures, fusion yields, and core deformation show close agreement with experiment. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  2. Direct-Drive, Cryogenic Target Implosions on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, F. J.

    2004-11-01

    Direct-drive spherical implosions of cryogenic, D_2-filled capsules are being performed on the 60-beam OMEGA laser system. The targets are energy scaled from the baseline ignition design developed for the National Ignition Facility. Thin-walled (3- to 4-μm) CD polymer shells, ˜860 μm in diameter, are permeation-filled with ˜1000 atm of D2 gas. Once cooled to the D2 triple point ( ˜18.7 K), cryogenic layers are formed, characterized, and maintained to a uniformity of ˜2 μm rms. Low-adiabat ( ˜4), pulse shapes are used to study the effects on target performance of acceleration-phase Rayleigh--Taylor (RT) growth due to single-beam, short-wavelength nonuniformities (imprint) and deceleration-phase RT growth of the combined feedthrough and inner-surface perturbations. Full single-beam smoothing (1-THz bandwidth, 2-D SSD with polarization smoothing) is used on all of the drive pulses. Time-resolved and static x-ray images are used to measure the progress of the imploding shell and the shape of the stagnating core. Particle-based instruments are used to measure the fusion yield and rate, the ion temperature in the core, and the total fuel areal density. These experiments have produced fuel areal densities up to ˜100 mg/cm^2, primary neutron yields of ˜10^11, and secondary neutron yields ˜1% to 2% of the primary yield. Two-dimensional hydrocode simulations show good agreement with the experimental observations, and the scaled target performance is compared with the hydrocode predictions for the direct-drive ignition point design. Such comparisons give increasing confidence in the direct-drive approach to ICF ignition.

  3. Hohlraum Designs for High Velocity Implosions on NIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we compare experimental shock and capsule trajectories to design calculations using the radiation-hydrodynamics code HYDRA. The measured trajectories from surrogate ignition targets are consistent with reducing the x-ray flux on the capsule by about 85%. A new method of extracting the radiation temperature as seen by the capsule from x-ray intensity and image data shows that about half of the apparent 15% flux deficit in the data with respect to the simulations can be explained by HYDRA overestimating the x-ray flux on the capsule. The National Ignition Campaign (NIC) point-design target is designed to reach a peak fuel-layer velocity of 370 km/s by ablating 90% of its plastic (CH) ablator. The 192-beam National Ignition Facility laser drives a gold hohlraum to a radiation temperature (TRAD) of 300 eV with a 20 ns-long, 420 TW, 1.3 MJ laser pulse. The hohlraum x-rays couple to the CH ablator in order to apply the required pressure to the outside of the capsule. In this paper, we compare experimental measurements of the hohlraum TRAD and the implosion trajectory with design calculations using the code hydra. The measured radial positions of the leading shock wave and the unablated shell are consistent with simulations in which the x-ray flux on the capsule is artificially reduced by 85%. We describe a new method of inferring the TRAD seen by the capsule from time-dependent x-ray intensity data and static x-ray images. This analysis shows that hydra overestimates the x-ray flux incident on the capsule by ∼8%.

  4. Ti Kα radiography of Cu-doped plastic microshell implosions via spherically bent crystal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that short pulse laser generated Ti Kα radiation can be used effectively as a backlighter for radiographic imaging. This method of x-ray radiography features high temporal and spatial resolution, high signal to noise ratio, and monochromatic imaging. We present here the Ti Kα backlit images of six-beam driven spherical implosions of thin-walled 500-μm Cu-doped deuterated plastic (CD) shells and of similar implosions with an included hollow gold cone. These radiographic results were used to define conditions for the diagnosis of fast ignition relevant electron transport within imploded Cu-doped coned CD shells

  5. Multiresolution Analysis Techniques to Isolate, Detect and Characterize Morphologically Diverse Features of Structured ICF Capsule Implosions

    CERN Document Server

    Afeyan, Bedros; Jones, Peter; Starck, Jean Luc; Herrmann, Mark

    2012-01-01

    In order to capture just how nonuniform and degraded the symmetry may become of an imploding inertial confinement fusion capsule one may resort to the analysis of high energy X ray point projection backlighting generated radiographs. Here we show new results for such images by using methods of modern harmonic analysis which involve different families of wavelets, curvelets and WaSP (wavelet square partition) functions from geometric measure theory. Three different methods of isolating morphologically diverse features are suggested together with statistical means of quantifying their content for the purposes of comparing the same implosion at different times, to simulations and to different implosion images.

  6. Principles of inertial confinement fusion - physics of implosion and the concept of inertial fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principles of laser fusion are the implosion of fuel pellets and the inertial confinement of fusion plasma produced by implosion. The process contains a lot of interesting physics, some of which is related to other newly developing fields such as astrophysics, hydrodynamics with radiation and turbulence, nonequilibrium atomic physics, and material science of extreme conditions. This, therefore, opens up new research fields and methods in basic science. On the other hand, fusion research aims at energy development for the future. The state of the art of inertial confinement fusion has reached a level where a goal-oriented program could be arranged for physics investigations and also technological developments. (author)

  7. Comment on 'Evidence for Stratification of Deuterium-Tritium Fuel in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions'

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Hua; Bonasera, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    Recent implosion experiments performed at the OMEGA laser facility reported by Casey et al.[1], displayed an anomalously low dd proton yield and a high tt neutron yield as compared to dt fusion reactions, explained as a stratification of the fuel in the implosion core. We suggest that in the com- pression stage the fuel is out of equilibrium. Ions are inward accelerated to a velocity v0 independent on the particle type. Yield ratios are simply given by the ratios of fusion cross-sections obta...

  8. Implosion lessons from national security, high reliability spacecraft, electronics, and the forces which changed them

    CERN Document Server

    Temple, L Parker

    2012-01-01

    Implosion is a focused study of the history and uses of high-reliability, solid-state electronics, military standards, and space systems that support our national security and defense. This book is unique in combining the interdependent evolution of and interrelationships among military standards, solid-state electronics, and very high-reliability space systems. Starting with a brief description of the physics that enabled the development of the first transistor, Implosion covers the need for standardizing military electronics, which began during World War II and continu

  9. Hot dense capsule-implosion cores produced by Z-pinch dynamic hohlraum radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hot dense capsule implosions driven by Z-pinch x rays have been measured using a ∼220 eV dynamic hohlraum to implode 1.7-2.1 mm diameter gas-filled CH capsules. The capsules absorbed up to ∼20 kJ of x rays. Argon tracer atom spectra were used to measure the Te∼1 keV electron temperature and the ne∼1-4x1023 cm-3 electron density. Spectra from multiple directions provide core symmetry estimates. Computer simulations agree well with the peak emission values of Te, ne, and symmetry, indicating reasonable understanding of the hohlraum and implosion physics

  10. Seeded perturbations in wire array Z-Pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Controlled seeding of perturbations is employed to study the evolution of wire array z-pinch implosion instabilities which strongly impact x-ray production when the 3D plasma stagnates on axis. Wires modulated in radius exhibit locally enhanced magnetic field and imploding bubble formation at discontinuities in wire radius due to the perturbed current path. Wires coated with localized spectroscopic dopants are used to track turbulent material flow. Experiments and MHD modeling offer insight into the behavior of z-pinch instabilities.

  11. Progress in detailed modelling of low foot and high foot implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D. S.; Weber, C. R.; Eder, D. C.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Jones, O. S.; Kritcher, A. L.; Marinak, M. M.; Milovich, J. L.; Patel, P. K.; Robey, H. F.; Salmonson, J. D.; Sepke, S. M.

    2016-05-01

    Several dozen high convergence inertial confinement fusion ignition experiments have now been completed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These include both “low foot” experiments from the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) and more recent “high foot” experiments. At the time of the NIC, there were large discrepancies between simulated implosion performance and experimental data. In particular, simulations over predicted neutron yields by up to an order of magnitude, and some experiments showed clear evidence of mixing of ablator material deep into the hot spot that could not be explained at the time. While the agreement between data and simulation improved for high foot implosion experiments, discrepancies nevertheless remain. This paper describes the state of detailed modelling of both low foot and high foot implosions using 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D radiation hydrodynamics simulations with HYDRA. The simulations include a range of effects, in particular, the impact of the plastic membrane used to support the capsule in the hohlraum, as well as low-mode radiation asymmetries tuned to match radiography measurements. The same simulation methodology is applied to low foot NIC implosion experiments and high foot implosions, and shows a qualitatively similar level of agreement for both types of implosions. While comparison with the experimental data remains imperfect, a reasonable level of agreement is emerging and shows a growing understanding of the high-convergence implosions being performed on NIF.

  12. Assessment of transient effects on the x-ray spectroscopy of implosion cores at OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florido, R.; Mancini, R. C.

    2015-11-01

    An assessment of transient effects on the atomic kinetics of argon tracers in inertial confinement fusion implosion cores is carried out. The focus is on typical electron temperature and density conditions achieved in high- and low-adiabat, and shock-ignition implosion experiments performed at the OMEGA laser facility (Laboratory for Laser Energetics, USA). The results show that no significant time-dependent effects are present through the deceleration and burning phases of the implosion, and thus justify the use of steady-state atomic kinetics models in the spectroscopic analysis of sets of time-resolved x-ray spectra recorded with streaked or gated spectrometers. Modeling calculations suggest an onset for time-dependent effects to become important at electron densities ≲1022 cm-3. A physical interpretation of these results is given based on the atomic kinetics timescales extracted from the eigenvalue spectrum of the collisional-radiative rate matrix. This study is also relevant for past implosion experiments performed at the GEKKO XII laser (Institute of Laser Engineering, Japan), as well as those currently being performed at the National Ignition Facility (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA).

  13. Growth Implosions, Debt Explosions, and My Aunt Marilyn : Do Growth Slowdowns Cause Public Debt Crises?

    OpenAIRE

    Easterly, William

    2001-01-01

    The worldwide slowdown in growth after 1975 was a major negative fiscal shock. Slower growth lowers the present value of tax revenues and primary surpluses and thus makes a given level of debt more burdensome. Most countries failed to adjust to the negative fiscal consequences of the growth implosion, so public-debt-to-GDP ratios exploded. The growth slowdown therefore played an important ...

  14. Effects of plasma physics on capsule implosions in gas-filled hohlraums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindman, E.L.; Delamater, N.D.; Magelssen, G.R.; Hauer, A.

    1994-10-01

    Initial experiments on capsule implosions in gas-filled hohlraums have been carried out on the NOVA Laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Observed capsule shapes from preliminary experiments are more oblate than predicted. Improvements in modeling required to calculate these experiments and additional experiments are being pursued.

  15. Laser/x-ray coupling in the first NIF beryllium implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, D. C.; Kline, J. L.; Yi, S. A.; Simakov, A. N.; Olson, R. E.; Kyrala, G. A.; Perry, T. S.; Batha, S.; Callahan, D. A.; Dewald, E. L.; Jones, O.; Hinkel, D. E.; Hurricane, O. A.; Izumi, N.; Macphee, A. G.; Milovich, J. L.; Ralph, J. E.; Rygg, J. R.; Schneider, M. B.; Strozzi, D. J.; Thomas, C. A.; Tommasini, R.

    2015-11-01

    The x-ray flux driving a capsule is currently overestimated in standard Hydra high-flux model (Rosen et al., HEDP 7,180 (2011)) calculations of gas-filled hohlraums. Jones et al. (Phys. Plasmas,19,056315 (2012)) introduced time dependent multipliers to reduce the laser drive and achieve an appropriate radiation drive on NIF capsules. Using shock velocities from VISAR capsule experiments, symmetry capsule implosion times with truncated laser pulses, and time dependent DANTE X-ray flux measurements from 1D and 2D convergent ablator implosions, we derived a set of time dependent flux multipliers for the first NIF cryogenically layered beryllium capsule implosion. The similarity between these multipliers for both plastic and beryllium capsules suggests that they are primarily correcting for improper modeling of the hohlraum physics, with possibly some residual contribution from capsule modeling deficiencies. Using Lasnex we have adjusted hohlraum physics and resolution in an attempt to model these implosions without drive multipliers. This work was funded by the US Department of Energy.

  16. Three-dimensional simulations of low foot and high foot implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D. S.; Weber, C. R.; Milovich, J. L.; Salmonson, J. D.; Kritcher, A. L.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Hurricane, O. A.; Jones, O. S.; Marinak, M. M.; Patel, P. K.; Robey, H. F.; Sepke, S. M.; Edwards, M. J.

    2016-05-01

    In order to achieve the several hundred Gbar stagnation pressures necessary for inertial confinement fusion ignition, implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] require the compression of deuterium-tritium fuel layers by a convergence ratio as high as forty. Such high convergence implosions are subject to degradation by a range of perturbations, including the growth of small-scale defects due to hydrodynamic instabilities, as well as longer scale modulations due to radiation flux asymmetries in the enclosing hohlraum. Due to the broad range of scales involved, and also the genuinely three-dimensional (3D) character of the flow, accurately modeling NIF implosions remains at the edge of current simulation capabilities. This paper describes the current state of progress of 3D capsule-only simulations of NIF implosions aimed at accurately describing the performance of specific NIF experiments. Current simulations include the effects of hohlraum radiation asymmetries, capsule surface defects, the capsule support tent and fill tube, and use a grid resolution shown to be converged in companion two-dimensional simulations. The results of detailed simulations of low foot implosions from the National Ignition Campaign are contrasted against results for more recent high foot implosions. While the simulations suggest that low foot performance was dominated by ablation front instability growth, especially the defect seeded by the capsule support tent, high foot implosions appear to be dominated by hohlraum flux asymmetries, although the support tent still plays a significant role. For both implosion types, the simulations show reasonable, though not perfect, agreement with the data and suggest that a reliable predictive capability is developing to guide future implosions toward ignition.

  17. Measurements of Spontaneous Electromagnetic Fields, Plasma Flows, and Implosion Dynamics in Indirect-Drive Inertial-Confinement Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Measurements of x-ray-driven implosions with charged particles have resulted in the quantitative characterization of critical aspects of indirect-drive inertial fusion. Three types of spontaneous electric fields differing in strength by two orders of magnitude, the largest being nearly one-tenth of the Bohr field, were discovered with time-gated proton radiographic imaging and spectrally-resolved proton self-emission. The views of the spatial structure and temporal evolution of both the laser drive in a hohlraum and implosion properties provide essential insight into, and modeling validation of, x-ray-driven implosions. (author)

  18. Three-dimensional modeling of direct-drive cryogenic implosions on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igumenshchev, I. V.; Goncharov, V. N.; Marshall, F. J.; Knauer, J. P.; Campbell, E. M.; Forrest, C. J.; Froula, D. H.; Glebov, V. Yu.; McCrory, R. L.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Skupsky, S.; Stoeckl, C.

    2016-05-01

    The effects of large-scale (with Legendre modes ≲ 10 ) laser-imposed nonuniformities in direct-drive cryogenic implosions on the OMEGA Laser System are investigated using three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations performed using the newly developed code ASTER. Sources of these nonuniformities include an illumination pattern produced by 60 OMEGA laser beams, capsule offsets (˜10-20 μm), and imperfect pointing, power balance, and timing of the beams (with typical σ rms ˜ 10 μm, 10%, and 5 ps, respectively). Two implosion designs using 26-kJ triple-picket laser pulses were studied: a nominal design, in which an 874-μm-diameter capsule is illuminated by about the same-diameter beams, and a more hydrodynamically efficient "R75" design using a 900-μm-diameter capsule and beams of 75% of this diameter. Simulations show that nonuniformities caused by capsule offsets and beam imbalance have the largest effect on implosion performance. These nonuniformities lead to significant distortions of implosion cores, resulting in an increased residual kinetic energy and incomplete stagnation. The shape of distorted cores can be well characterized using neutron images but is less represented by 4-8 keV x-ray images. Simulated neutron spectra from perturbed implosions show large directional variations because of bulk motion effects and up to an ˜2 keV variation of the hot-spot temperature inferred from these spectra. The R75 design suffers more from illumination nonuniformities. Simulations show an advantage of this design over the nominal design when the target offset and beam power imbalance σ rms are reduced to less than 5 μm and 5%, respectively.

  19. An Investigation Into Bayesian Networks for Modeling National Ignition Facility Capsule Implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitrani, J

    2008-08-18

    Bayesian networks (BN) are an excellent tool for modeling uncertainties in systems with several interdependent variables. A BN is a directed acyclic graph, and consists of a structure, or the set of directional links between variables that depend on other variables, and conditional probabilities (CP) for each variable. In this project, we apply BN's to understand uncertainties in NIF ignition experiments. One can represent various physical properties of National Ignition Facility (NIF) capsule implosions as variables in a BN. A dataset containing simulations of NIF capsule implosions was provided. The dataset was generated from a radiation hydrodynamics code, and it contained 120 simulations of 16 variables. Relevant knowledge about the physics of NIF capsule implosions and greedy search algorithms were used to search for hypothetical structures for a BN. Our preliminary results found 6 links between variables in the dataset. However, we thought there should have been more links between the dataset variables based on the physics of NIF capsule implosions. Important reasons for the paucity of links are the relatively small size of the dataset, and the sampling of the values for dataset variables. Another factor that might have caused the paucity of links is the fact that in the dataset, 20% of the simulations represented successful fusion, and 80% didn't, (simulations of unsuccessful fusion are useful for measuring certain diagnostics) which skewed the distributions of several variables, and possibly reduced the number of links. Nevertheless, by illustrating the interdependencies and conditional probabilities of several parameters and diagnostics, an accurate and complete BN built from an appropriate simulation set would provide uncertainty quantification for NIF capsule implosions.

  20. Array tomography: imaging stained arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheva, Kristina D; O'Rourke, Nancy; Busse, Brad; Smith, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Array tomography is a volumetric microscopy method based on physical serial sectioning. Ultrathin sections of a plastic-embedded tissue are cut using an ultramicrotome, bonded in an ordered array to a glass coverslip, stained as desired, and imaged. The resulting two-dimensional image tiles can then be reconstructed computationally into three-dimensional volume images for visualization and quantitative analysis. The minimal thickness of individual sections permits high-quality rapid staining and imaging, whereas the array format allows reliable and convenient section handling, staining, and automated imaging. Also, the physical stability of the arrays permits images to be acquired and registered from repeated cycles of staining, imaging, and stain elution, as well as from imaging using multiple modalities (e.g., fluorescence and electron microscopy). Array tomography makes it possible to visualize and quantify previously inaccessible features of tissue structure and molecular architecture. However, careful preparation of the tissue is essential for successful array tomography; these steps can be time-consuming and require some practice to perfect. In this protocol, tissue arrays are imaged using conventional wide-field fluorescence microscopy. Images can be captured manually or, with the appropriate software and hardware, the process can be automated. PMID:21041399

  1. Array tomography: production of arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheva, Kristina D; O'Rourke, Nancy; Busse, Brad; Smith, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Array tomography is a volumetric microscopy method based on physical serial sectioning. Ultrathin sections of a plastic-embedded tissue are cut using an ultramicrotome, bonded in an ordered array to a glass coverslip, stained as desired, and imaged. The resulting two-dimensional image tiles can then be reconstructed computationally into three-dimensional volume images for visualization and quantitative analysis. The minimal thickness of individual sections permits high-quality rapid staining and imaging, whereas the array format allows reliable and convenient section handling, staining, and automated imaging. Also, the physical stability of the arrays permits images to be acquired and registered from repeated cycles of staining, imaging, and stain elution, as well as from imaging using multiple modalities (e.g., fluorescence and electron microscopy). Array tomography makes it possible to visualize and quantify previously inaccessible features of tissue structure and molecular architecture. However, careful preparation of the tissue is essential for successful array tomography; these steps can be time consuming and require some practice to perfect. This protocol describes the sectioning of embedded tissues and the mounting of the serial arrays. The procedures require some familiarity with the techniques used for ultramicrotome sectioning for electron microscopy. PMID:21041397

  2. A technique for extending by ∼10{sup 3} the dynamic range of compact proton spectrometers for diagnosing ICF implosions on the National Ignition Facility and OMEGA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sio, H., E-mail: hsio@mit.edu; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Wedge Range Filter (WRF) proton spectrometers are routinely used on OMEGA and the NIF for diagnosing ρR and ρR asymmetries in direct- and indirect-drive implosions of D{sup 3}He-, D{sub 2}-, and DT-gas-filled capsules. By measuring the optical opacity distribution in CR-39 due to proton tracks in high-yield applications, as opposed to counting individual tracks, WRF dynamic range can be extended by 10{sup 2} for obtaining the spectral shape, and by 10{sup 3} for mean energy (ρR) measurement, corresponding to proton fluences of 10{sup 8} and 10{sup 9} cm{sup −2}, respectively. Using this new technique, ρR asymmetries can be measured during both shock and compression burn (proton yield ∼10{sup 8} and ∼10{sup 12}, respectively) in 2-shock National Ignition Facility implosions with the standard WRF accuracy of ±∼10 mg/cm{sup 2}.

  3. Response Of A CVD Diamond Detector To ''Typical'' Deuterium-Tritium NIF Implosions For Areal Density Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dauffy, L S; Lerche, R A; Phillips, T W

    2005-04-11

    CVD diamond detector signals from Deuterium-Tritium implosions have been simulated in order to study the feasibility of measuring areal density using the ratio of downscattered to primary neutrons during the ignition campaign at the NIF. Simulated neutron spectra for three ''typical'' DT implosions were weighted with the CVD diamond sensitivity to obtain an estimated signal at several distances from the target chamber center. The 14 MeV peak was found to have an amplitude about three orders of magnitude larger than the down-scattered signal for the three spectra. At a target to detector distance of 17 m (just outside the target bay wall) and for a 1 cm{sup 2} wafer, signals are large enough to be recorded, well above any background and electronic noise. The uncertainty in the areal density measurement comes mainly from the uncertainty in the CVD diamond energy dependent sensitivity, the accuracy of the background simulation, and the effect of the saturation of both detector and electronics after the large 14 MeV peak. Nevertheless, the results found in this study are encouraging, and the remaining sources of uncertainty should now be addressed.

  4. Determination of pressure and density of shocklessly compressed beryllium through x-ray radiography of a magnetically driven cylindrical liner implosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, R. W.; Martin, M. R.; McBride, R. D.; Davis, J.-P.; Knudson, M. D.

    2011-06-01

    High current, pulsed-power driven liner implosions can be used to produce extreme pressure states in condensed matter for equation of state (EOS) studies. The Z accelerator can deliver a current pulse to a cylindrical liner (tubular shell) that rises to a peak current of ~20 MA in ~100 ns; at peak current the magnetic pressure is ~28 Mbar on the surface of a liner with radius 0.15 cm. We discuss a semi-empirical technique for obtaining EOS data for a metallic solid, quasi-isentropically (shocklessly) compressed to multi-megabar pressure, through x-ray radiography of a high current, magnetically driven, cylindrical liner implosion. Results are presented from experiments on Z in which a solid beryllium (Be) liner is quasi-isentropically compressed by magnetic pressure. Radiographs of the liner are used in conjunction with hydrodynamic equations to determine density and pressure on the principal quasi-isentrope of solid Be to a peak pressure of 2.4 Mbar. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract No. DE-ACO4-94AL85000.

  5. Reconstruction of quasimonochromatic images for multispectral x-ray imaging with a pinhole array and a flat Bragg mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a software package for reconstruction of quasimonochromatic images from a multiple monochromatic x-ray imager for inertial confinement fusion implosions. The instrument consists of a pinhole array, a multilayer Bragg mirror, and an image detector. The pinhole array projects hundreds of images onto the detector after reflection off the multilayer Bragg mirror, which introduces spectral dispersion along the reflection axis. The quasimonochromatic images of line emissions and continuum emissions can be used for measurement of temperature and density maps of implosion plasmas. In this article, we describe a computer-aided processing technique for systematic reconstruction of quasimonochromatic images from raw data. This technique provides flexible spectral bandwidth selection and allows systematic subtraction of continuum emission from line emission images

  6. Imaging of high-energy x-ray emission from cryogenic thermonuclear fuel implosions on the NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, T; Izumi, N; Tommasini, R; Bradley, D K; Bell, P; Cerjan, C J; Dixit, S; Döppner, T; Jones, O; Kline, J L; Kyrala, G; Landen, O L; LePape, S; Mackinnon, A J; Park, H-S; Patel, P K; Prasad, R R; Ralph, J; Regan, S P; Smalyuk, V A; Springer, P T; Suter, L; Town, R P J; Weber, S V; Glenzer, S H

    2012-10-01

    Accurately assessing and optimizing the implosion performance of inertial confinement fusion capsules is a crucial step to achieving ignition on the NIF. We have applied differential filtering (matched Ross filter pairs) to provide broadband time-integrated absolute x-ray self-emission images of the imploded core of cryogenic layered implosions. This diagnostic measures the temperature- and density-sensitive bremsstrahlung emission and provides estimates of hot spot mass, mix mass, and pressure. PMID:23126937

  7. A compact neutron spectrometer for characterizing inertial confinement fusion implosions at OMEGA and the NIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zylstra, A. B., E-mail: zylstra@mit.edu; Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sio, H. W.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); McCluskey, M.; Mastrosimone, D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Forrest, C.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    A compact spectrometer for measurements of the primary deuterium-tritium neutron spectrum has been designed and implemented on the OMEGA laser facility [T. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. This instrument uses the recoil spectrometry technique, where neutrons produced in an implosion elastically scatter protons in a plastic foil, which are subsequently detected by a proton spectrometer. This diagnostic is currently capable of measuring the yield to ∼±10% accuracy, and mean neutron energy to ∼±50 keV precision. As these compact spectrometers can be readily placed at several locations around an implosion, effects of residual fuel bulk flows during burn can be measured. Future improvements to reduce the neutron energy uncertainty to ±15−20 keV are discussed, which will enable measurements of fuel velocities to an accuracy of ∼±25−40 km/s.

  8. A strategy for reducing stagnation phase hydrodynamic instability growth in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, D. S.; Robey, H. F.; Smalyuk, V. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Encouraging progress is being made in demonstrating control of ablation front hydrodynamic instability growth in inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses, R. N. Boyd, B. A. Remington, C. J. Keane, and R. Al-Ayat, Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)]. Even once ablation front stabilities are controlled, however, instability during the stagnation phase of the implosion can still quench ignition. A scheme is proposed to reduce the growth of stagnation phase instabilities through the reverse of the “adiabat shaping” mechanism proposed to control ablation front growth. Two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations confirm that improved stagnation phase stability should be possible without compromising fuel compression.

  9. Multidimensional Analysis of Direct-Drive Plastic-Shell Implosions on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radha, P. B.

    2004-11-01

    Direct-drive implosions of plastic shells with the OMEGA laser are used as energy-scaled warm surrogates for ignition cryogenic targets designed for use on the National Ignition Facility. Plastic targets involve varying shell thickness (15 to 33 μm), fill pressures (3 to 15 atm), and shell adiabats. The multidimensional hydrodynamics code DRACO is used to evaluate the effects of capsule-surface roughness and illumination nonuniformities on target performance. These simulations indicate that shell stability during the acceleration phase plays a critical role in determining fusion yields. For shells that are thick enough to survive the Rayleigh--Taylor growth, target yields are significantly reduced by growth of the long (ℓ surrogacy between these plastic-shell implosions and the cryogenic ignition designs.

  10. A compact neutron spectrometer for characterizing inertial confinement fusion implosions at OMEGA and the NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zylstra, A B; Gatu Johnson, M; Frenje, J A; Séguin, F H; Rinderknecht, H G; Rosenberg, M J; Sio, H W; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; McCluskey, M; Mastrosimone, D; Glebov, V Yu; Forrest, C; Stoeckl, C; Sangster, T C

    2014-06-01

    A compact spectrometer for measurements of the primary deuterium-tritium neutron spectrum has been designed and implemented on the OMEGA laser facility [T. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. This instrument uses the recoil spectrometry technique, where neutrons produced in an implosion elastically scatter protons in a plastic foil, which are subsequently detected by a proton spectrometer. This diagnostic is currently capable of measuring the yield to ~±10% accuracy, and mean neutron energy to ~±50 keV precision. As these compact spectrometers can be readily placed at several locations around an implosion, effects of residual fuel bulk flows during burn can be measured. Future improvements to reduce the neutron energy uncertainty to ±15-20 keV are discussed, which will enable measurements of fuel velocities to an accuracy of ~±25-40 km/s. PMID:24985814

  11. Onset of hydrodynamic mix in high-velocity, highly compressed inertial confinement fusion implosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, T; Patel, P K; Izumi, N; Springer, P T; Key, M H; Atherton, L J; Benedetti, L R; Bradley, D K; Callahan, D A; Celliers, P M; Cerjan, C J; Clark, D S; Dewald, E L; Dixit, S N; Döppner, T; Edgell, D H; Epstein, R; Glenn, S; Grim, G; Haan, S W; Hammel, B A; Hicks, D; Hsing, W W; Jones, O S; Khan, S F; Kilkenny, J D; Kline, J L; Kyrala, G A; Landen, O L; Le Pape, S; MacGowan, B J; Mackinnon, A J; MacPhee, A G; Meezan, N B; Moody, J D; Pak, A; Parham, T; Park, H-S; Ralph, J E; Regan, S P; Remington, B A; Robey, H F; Ross, J S; Spears, B K; Smalyuk, V; Suter, L J; Tommasini, R; Town, R P; Weber, S V; Lindl, J D; Edwards, M J; Glenzer, S H; Moses, E I

    2013-08-23

    Deuterium-tritium inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility have demonstrated yields ranging from 0.8 to 7×10(14), and record fuel areal densities of 0.7 to 1.3 g/cm2. These implosions use hohlraums irradiated with shaped laser pulses of 1.5-1.9 MJ energy. The laser peak power and duration at peak power were varied, as were the capsule ablator dopant concentrations and shell thicknesses. We quantify the level of hydrodynamic instability mix of the ablator into the hot spot from the measured elevated absolute x-ray emission of the hot spot. We observe that DT neutron yield and ion temperature decrease abruptly as the hot spot mix mass increases above several hundred ng. The comparison with radiation-hydrodynamic modeling indicates that low mode asymmetries and increased ablator surface perturbations may be responsible for the current performance. PMID:24010449

  12. A strategy for reducing stagnation phase hydrodynamic instability growth in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Encouraging progress is being made in demonstrating control of ablation front hydrodynamic instability growth in inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses, R. N. Boyd, B. A. Remington, C. J. Keane, and R. Al-Ayat, Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)]. Even once ablation front stabilities are controlled, however, instability during the stagnation phase of the implosion can still quench ignition. A scheme is proposed to reduce the growth of stagnation phase instabilities through the reverse of the “adiabat shaping” mechanism proposed to control ablation front growth. Two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations confirm that improved stagnation phase stability should be possible without compromising fuel compression

  13. Drive Asymmetry and the Origin of Turbulence in an ICF Implosion

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, V A; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.075004

    2012-01-01

    2D and 3D numerical simulations with the adaptive mesh refinement Eulerian radiation-hydrocode RAGE at unprecedented spatial resolution are used to investigate the connection between drive asymmetry and the generation of turbulence in the DT fuel in a simplified inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) implosion. Long-wavelength deviations from spherical symmetry in the pressure drive lead to the generation of coherent vortical structures in the DT gas and it is the three-dimensional instability of these structures that in turn leads to turbulence and mix. The simulations sug-gest that this mechanism may be an additional important source of mix in ICF implosions. Applications to target ignition at the National Ignition Facility are briefly discussed.

  14. Fusion neutrons from the gas endash pusher interface in deuterated-shell inertial confinement fusion implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first measurements and numerical simulations of fusion neutrons from the gas endash pusher interface of indirectly-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions have been performed using hydrogen-filled capsules made with a deuterated inner layer. Nonlinear saturation of the growth of hydrodynamic perturbations in high linear growth factor (≅325) implosions was varied by adjusting the initial surface roughness of the capsule. The neutron yields are in quantitative agreement with the direct simulations of perturbation growth, and also with a linear mode superposition and saturation model including enhanced thermal loss in the mixed region. Neutron spectra from these capsules are broader than expected for the calculated ion temperatures, suggesting the presence of nonthermal broadening from mass motion during the fusion burn. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  15. Electromagnetically driven linear implosion and magnetic flux compression towards magnetized target fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the schemes in the inertial confinement fusion is to prove that substantial heating and increased nt will result from liner implosion of well-formed target plasma. The experiments conducted on different imploding solid liners with available sources and the numerical analysis of the implosion systems help us to have a preliminary insight into the physics issues associated with the accelerating liners. This work is basically aimed at gaining the experimental knowledge base and developing well-benchmarked computer models of liner physics. Experiments have been conducted on cylindrical liners accelerated by 280 kJ/ 40 kV capacitor bank synchronized with another feeder bank providing the initial field, with an aim to demonstrate the magnetic flux compression. Experimental results are compared with numerical simulation of these configurations and are presented in this paper. (author)

  16. Study of the stability of Z-pinch implosions with different initial density profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousskikh, A. G.; Zhigalin, A. S.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Yushkov, G. Yu. [Institute of High Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Oreshkin, V. I.; Batrakov, A. V. [Institute of High Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Baksht, R. B. [Institute of High Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Tel-Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2014-05-15

    Stability of metal-puff Z pinches was studied experimentally. Experiments were carried out on a facility producing a load current up to 450 kA with a rise time of 450 ns. In a metal-puff Z pinch, the plasma shell is produced due to evaporation of the electrode material during the operation of a vacuum arc. In the experiment to be reported, a single-shell and a shell-on-jet pinch load with magnesium electrodes were used. Two-dimensional, 3 ns gated, visible-light images were taken at different times during the implosion. When the shell was formed from a collimated plasma flow with small radial divergence, Rayleigh–Taylor (RT) instability typical of gas-puff implosions was recorded. The RT instability was completely suppressed in a mode where the initial density distribution of the shell approached a tailored density profile [A. L. Velikovich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 853 (1996)].

  17. Lasers and laser applications. Imaging implosion dynamics: The x-ray pinhole/streak camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Livermore-developed x-ray-sensitive streak camera was combined with a unique x-ray pinhole camera to make dynamic photographs of laser-irradiated fusion target implosions. These photographs show x radiation emitted from the imploding shell during its 100-ps implosion; they are the first continuous observations of an imploding laser-driven fusion capsule. The diagnostic system has a time resolution of 15 ps and a spatial resolution of about 6 μm. Results agree very well with those predicted by our LASNEX calculations, confirming that the essential physics are correctly described in the code and providing further confidence in the soundness of this approach to inertial confinement fusion

  18. X-ray absorption lines - Signature for preheat level in non-explosive laser implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaakobi, B.; McCrory, R. L.; Skupsky, S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Bourke, P.; Soures, J. M.; Hooper, C. F.; Deckman, H.

    1980-08-01

    The measured X-ray spectrum from thick glass shells imploded with two TW six-beam laser pulses displayed absorption by transitions of Si ions. This indicates the existence around the time of peak compression of a cooler (less than approximately 200 eV) layer surrounding the hot innermost glass layer, of density times thickness approximately 0.0006 g/sq cm. This temperature is indicative of the preheat level ealier in the implosion.

  19. High-density implosion via suppression of Rayleigh–Taylor instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiroto, Takashi; Ohnishi, Naofumi; Sunahara, Atsushi; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Sasaki, Akira

    2016-05-01

    Radiation hydrodynamic simulations of ICF capsules assuming a kJ-class laser facility were conducted to evaluate the hydrodynamic stability of a brominated plastic shell. An opacity table based on a detailed atomic model was employed so that more quantitative forecast of the implosion dynamics could be performed. A lightly doped shell could form a high-density core at the maximum compression by suppressing the hydrodynamic instability.

  20. Study of the current-sheath formation during the implosion of multishell gas puffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labetsky, A. Yu.; Kokshenev, V. A.; Kurmaev, N. E.; Oreshkin, V. I.; Rousskikh, A. G.; Fedyunin, A. V.; Fursov, F. I.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Shishlov, A. V.; Zhidkova, N. A.

    2008-03-01

    Results are presented from experimental studies of the dynamics of large-diameter multishell gas puffs imploded by microsecond megampere current pulses. The experiments were conducted on the GIT-12 generator in the regime of microsecond implosion ( t imp = 1.1-1.2 μs, I 0 = 3.4-3.7 MA). The influence of the load configuration on the dynamics of current losses and gas-puff radiative characteristics was studied. The correlation between the radial compression ratio (the ratio between the initial and final Z-pinch radii) and the magnitude of the current flowing at the plasma periphery was investigated. The experiments show that, in a multishell gas puff, large-scale instabilities insignificantly affect the gas-puff implosion even over microsecond time intervals and that a compact dense pinch with a relatively high average electron temperature (400-600 eV) forms at the Z-pinch axis. The diameter of the plasma column radiating in the K-shell lines of neon is about 3-4 mm, the K-shell radiation yield being 5-11 kJ/cm. In the final stage of implosion, only a small portion of the current flows through the high-temperature central region of the pinch plasma, whereas the major part of the generator current flows through the residual peripheral plasma.

  1. Magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability mitigation in large-diameter gas puff Z-pinch implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, a new approach for efficiently generating K-shell x-rays in large-diameter, long-implosion time, structured argon gas Z-pinches has been demonstrated based on a 'pusher-stabilizer-radiator' model. In this paper, direct observations of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability mitigation of a 12-cm diameter, 200-ns implosion time argon Z-pinch using a laser shearing interferometer (LSI) and a laser wavefront analyzer (LWA) are presented. Using a zero-dimensional snowplow model, the imploding plasma trajectories are calculated with the driver current waveforms and the initial mass distributions measured using the planar laser induced fluorescence method. From the LSI and LWA images, the plasma density and trajectory during the implosion are measured. The measured trajectory agrees with the snowplow calculations. The suppression of hydromagnetic instabilities in the ''pusher-stabilizer-radiator'' structured loads, leading to a high-compression ratio, high-yield Z-pinch, is discussed. For comparison, the LSI and LWA images of an alternative load (without stabilizer) show the evolution of a highly unstable Z-pinch

  2. Mitigating the impact of hohlraum asymmetries in National Ignition Facility implosions using capsule shims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D. S.; Weber, C. R.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Robey, H. F.; Kritcher, A. L.; Milovich, J. L.; Salmonson, J. D.

    2016-07-01

    Current indirect drive implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] are believed to be strongly impacted by long wavelength perturbations driven by asymmetries in the hohlraum x-ray flux. To address this perturbation source, active efforts are underway to develop modified hohlraum designs with reduced asymmetry imprint. An alternative strategy, however, is to modify the capsule design to be more resilient to a given amount of hohlraum asymmetry. In particular, the capsule may be deliberately misshaped, or "shimmed," so as to counteract the expected asymmetries from the hohlraum. Here, the efficacy of capsule shimming to correct the asymmetries in two recent NIF implosion experiments is assessed using two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations. Despite the highly time-dependent character of the asymmetries and the high convergence ratios of these implosions, simulations suggest that shims could be highly effective at counteracting current asymmetries and result in factors of a few enhancements in neutron yields. For higher compression designs, the yield improvement could be even greater.

  3. Time history prediction of direct-drive implosions on the Omega facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present in this article direct-drive experiments that were carried out on the Omega facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Two different pulse shapes were tested in order to vary the implosion stability of the same target whose parameters, dimensions and composition, remained the same. The direct-drive configuration on the Omega facility allows the accurate time-resolved measurement of the scattered light. We show that, provided the laser coupling is well controlled, the implosion time history, assessed by the “bang-time” and the shell trajectory measurements, can be predicted. This conclusion is independent on the pulse shape. In contrast, we show that the pulse shape affects the implosion stability, assessed by comparing the target performances between prediction and measurement. For the 1-ns square pulse, the measured neutron number is about 80% of the prediction. For the 2-step 2-ns pulse, we test here that this ratio falls to about 20%

  4. Time history prediction of direct-drive implosions on the Omega facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laffite, S.; Bourgade, J. L.; Caillaud, T.; Girard, F.; Landoas, O.; Lemaire, S.; Masse, L.; Masson-Laborde, P. E.; Philippe, F.; Reverdin, C.; Tassin, V. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Delettrez, J. A.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Marshall, F. J.; Michel, D. T.; Seka, W. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Frenje, J. A. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Joshi, T.; Mancini, R. C. [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Legay, G. [CEA, CVA, 21120 Is-sur-Tille (France)

    2016-01-15

    We present in this article direct-drive experiments that were carried out on the Omega facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Two different pulse shapes were tested in order to vary the implosion stability of the same target whose parameters, dimensions and composition, remained the same. The direct-drive configuration on the Omega facility allows the accurate time-resolved measurement of the scattered light. We show that, provided the laser coupling is well controlled, the implosion time history, assessed by the “bang-time” and the shell trajectory measurements, can be predicted. This conclusion is independent on the pulse shape. In contrast, we show that the pulse shape affects the implosion stability, assessed by comparing the target performances between prediction and measurement. For the 1-ns square pulse, the measured neutron number is about 80% of the prediction. For the 2-step 2-ns pulse, we test here that this ratio falls to about 20%.

  5. Implosion of coronal loops during the impulsive phase of a solar flare

    CERN Document Server

    Simões, P J A; Hudson, H S; Russell, A J B

    2013-01-01

    We study the relationship between implosive motions in a solar flare, and the energy redistribution in the form of oscillatory structures and particle acceleration. The flare SOL2012-03-09T03:53 (M6.4) shows clear evidence for an irreversible (stepwise) coronal implosion. Extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) images show at least four groups of coronal loops at different heights overlying the flaring core undergoing fast contraction during the impulsive phase of the flare. These contractions start around a minute after the flare onset, and the rate of contraction is closely associated with the intensity of the hard X-ray (HXR) and microwave emissions. They also seem to have a close relationship with the dimming associated with the formation of the Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) and a global EUV wave. Several studies now have detected contracting motions in the corona during solar flares that can be interpreted as the implosion necessary to release energy. Our results confirm this, and tighten the association with the flare ...

  6. Shock timing measurements and analysis in deuterium-tritium-ice layered capsule implosions on NIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances in shock timing experiments and analysis techniques now enable shock measurements to be performed in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion implosions [Boehly et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195005 (2011); Robey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215004 (2012)] were performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. These previous experiments pose two surrogacy issues: a material surrogacy due to the difference of species (D2 vs. DT) and densities of the materials used and a geometric surrogacy due to presence of an additional interface (ice/gas) previously absent in the liquid-filled targets. This report presents experimental data and a new analysis method for validating the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique. Comparison of the data with simulation shows good agreement for the timing of the first three shocks, but reveals a considerable discrepancy in the timing of the 4th shock in DT ice layered implosions. Electron preheat is examined as a potential cause of the observed discrepancy in the 4th shock timing

  7. Shock timing measurements and analysis in deuterium-tritium-ice layered capsule implosions on NIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Sater, J.; Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Ross, J. S.; LePape, S.; Ralph, J. E.; Dewald, E. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Kroll, J. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Hohenberger, M.; Boehly, T. R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92196 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Recent advances in shock timing experiments and analysis techniques now enable shock measurements to be performed in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion implosions [Boehly et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195005 (2011); Robey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215004 (2012)] were performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. These previous experiments pose two surrogacy issues: a material surrogacy due to the difference of species (D2 vs. DT) and densities of the materials used and a geometric surrogacy due to presence of an additional interface (ice/gas) previously absent in the liquid-filled targets. This report presents experimental data and a new analysis method for validating the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique. Comparison of the data with simulation shows good agreement for the timing of the first three shocks, but reveals a considerable discrepancy in the timing of the 4th shock in DT ice layered implosions. Electron preheat is examined as a potential cause of the observed discrepancy in the 4th shock timing.

  8. Shock timing measurements and analysis in deuterium-tritium-ice layered capsule implosions on NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Sater, J.; Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Ross, J. S.; LePape, S.; Ralph, J. E.; Hohenberger, M.; Dewald, E. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Kroll, J. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Boehly, T. R.; Nikroo, A.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.

    2014-02-01

    Recent advances in shock timing experiments and analysis techniques now enable shock measurements to be performed in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion implosions [Boehly et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195005 (2011); Robey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215004 (2012)] were performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. These previous experiments pose two surrogacy issues: a material surrogacy due to the difference of species (D2 vs. DT) and densities of the materials used and a geometric surrogacy due to presence of an additional interface (ice/gas) previously absent in the liquid-filled targets. This report presents experimental data and a new analysis method for validating the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique. Comparison of the data with simulation shows good agreement for the timing of the first three shocks, but reveals a considerable discrepancy in the timing of the 4th shock in DT ice layered implosions. Electron preheat is examined as a potential cause of the observed discrepancy in the 4th shock timing.

  9. Inertial confinement fusion implosions with imposed magnetic field compression using the OMEGA Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments applying laser-driven magnetic-flux compression to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets to enhance the implosion performance are described. Spherical plastic (CH) targets filled with 10 atm of deuterium gas were imploded by the OMEGA Laser, compare Phys. Plasmas 18, 056703 or Phys. Plasmas 18, 056309. Before being imploded, the targets were immersed in an 80-kG magnetic seed field. Upon laser irradiation, the high implosion velocities and ionization of the target fill trapped the magnetic field inside the capsule, and it was amplified to tens of megagauss through flux compression. At such strong magnetic fields, the hot spot inside the spherical target was strongly magnetized, reducing the heat losses through electron confinement. The experimentally observed ion temperature was enhanced by 15%, and the neutron yield was increased by 30%, compared to nonmagnetized implosions [P. Y. Chang et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 035006 (2011)]. This represents the first experimental verification of performance enhancement resulting from embedding a strong magnetic field into an ICF capsule. Experimental data for the fuel-assembly performance and magnetic field are compared to numerical results from combining the 1-D hydrodynamics code LILAC with a 2-D magnetohydrodynamics postprocessor.

  10. Collection of solid and gaseous samples to diagnose inertial confinement fusion implosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoyer, M A; Velsko, C A; Spears, B K; Hicks, D G; Hudson, G B; Sangster, T C; Freeman, C G

    2012-02-01

    Collection of representative samples of debris following inertial confinement fusion implosions in order to diagnose implosion conditions and efficacy is a challenging endeavor because of the unique conditions within the target chamber such as unconverted laser light, intense pulse of x-rays, physical chunks of debris, and other ablative effects. We present collection of gas samples following an implosion for the first time. High collection fractions for noble gases were achieved. We also present collection of solid debris samples on flat plate collectors. Geometrical collection efficiencies for Au hohlraum material were achieved and collection of capsule debris (Be and Cu) was also observed. Asymmetric debris distributions were observed for Au and Be samples. Collection of Be capsule debris was higher for solid collectors viewing the capsule through the laser entrance hole in the hohlraum than for solid collectors viewing the capsule around the waist of the hohlraum. Collection of Au hohlraum material showed the opposite pattern: more Au debris was collected around the waist than through the laser entrance hole. The solid debris collectors were not optimized for minimal Cu backgrounds, which limited the conclusions about the symmetry of the Cu debris. The quality of the data limited conclusions on chemical fractionation effects within the burning, expanding, and then cooling plasma. PMID:22380089

  11. Soft x-ray backlighting of cryogenic implosions using a narrowband crystal imaging system (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeckl, C; Bedzyk, M; Brent, G; Epstein, R; Fiksel, G; Guy, D; Goncharov, V N; Hu, S X; Ingraham, S; Jacobs-Perkins, D W; Jungquist, R K; Marshall, F J; Mileham, C; Nilson, P M; Sangster, T C; Shoup, M J; Theobald, W

    2014-11-01

    A high-performance cryogenic DT inertial confinement fusion implosion experiment is an especially challenging backlighting configuration because of the high self-emission of the core at stagnation and the low opacity of the DT shell. High-energy petawatt lasers such as OMEGA EP promise significantly improved backlighting capabilities by generating high x-ray intensities and short emission times. A narrowband x-ray imager with an astigmatism-corrected bent quartz crystal for the Si Heα line at ∼1.86 keV was developed to record backlit images of cryogenic direct-drive implosions. A time-gated recording system minimized the self-emission of the imploding target. A fast target-insertion system capable of moving the backlighter target ∼7 cm in ∼100 ms was developed to avoid interference with the cryogenic shroud system. With backlighter laser energies of ∼1.25 kJ at a 10-ps pulse duration, the radiographic images show a high signal-to-background ratio of >100:1 and a spatial resolution of the order of 10 μm. The backlit images can be used to assess the symmetry of the implosions close to stagnation and the mix of ablator material into the dense shell. PMID:25430343

  12. Collection of solid and gaseous samples to diagnose inertial confinement fusion implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collection of representative samples of debris following inertial confinement fusion implosions in order to diagnose implosion conditions and efficacy is a challenging endeavor because of the unique conditions within the target chamber such as unconverted laser light, intense pulse of x-rays, physical chunks of debris, and other ablative effects. We present collection of gas samples following an implosion for the first time. High collection fractions for noble gases were achieved. We also present collection of solid debris samples on flat plate collectors. Geometrical collection efficiencies for Au hohlraum material were achieved and collection of capsule debris (Be and Cu) was also observed. Asymmetric debris distributions were observed for Au and Be samples. Collection of Be capsule debris was higher for solid collectors viewing the capsule through the laser entrance hole in the hohlraum than for solid collectors viewing the capsule around the waist of the hohlraum. Collection of Au hohlraum material showed the opposite pattern: more Au debris was collected around the waist than through the laser entrance hole. The solid debris collectors were not optimized for minimal Cu backgrounds, which limited the conclusions about the symmetry of the Cu debris. The quality of the data limited conclusions on chemical fractionation effects within the burning, expanding, and then cooling plasma.

  13. Data driven models of the performance and repeatability of NIF high foot implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffney, Jim; Casey, Dan; Callahan, Debbie; Hartouni, Ed; Ma, Tammy; Spears, Brian

    2015-11-01

    Recent high foot (HF) inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments performed at the national ignition facility (NIF) have consisted of enough laser shots that a data-driven analysis of capsule performance is feasible. In this work we use 20-30 individual implosions of similar design, spanning laser drive energies from 1.2 to 1.8 MJ, to quantify our current understanding of the behavior of HF ICF implosions. We develop a probabilistic model for the projected performance of a given implosion and use it to quantify uncertainties in predicted performance including shot-shot variations and observation uncertainties. We investigate the statistical significance of the observed performance differences between different laser pulse shapes, ablator materials, and capsule designs. Finally, using a cross-validation technique, we demonstrate that 5-10 repeated shots of a similar design are required before real trends in the data can be distinguished from shot-shot variations. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-674957.

  14. Three-dimensional simulations of National Ignition Facility implosions: Insight into experimental observables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We simulate in 3D both the hydrodynamics and, simultaneously, the X-ray and neutron diagnostic signatures of National Ignition Facility (NIF) implosions. We apply asymmetric radiation drive to study the impact of low mode asymmetry on diagnostic observables. We examine X-ray and neutron images as well as neutron spectra for these perturbed implosions. The X-ray images show hot spot evolution on small length scales and short time scales, reflecting the incomplete stagnation seen in the simulation. The neutron images show surprising differences from the X-ray images. The neutron spectra provide additional measures of implosion asymmetry. Flow in the hot spot alters the neutron spectral peak, namely, the peak location and width. The changes in the width lead to a variation in the apparent temperature with viewing angle that signals underlying hot spot asymmetry. We compare our new expectations based on the simulated data with NIF data. We find that some recent cryogenic layered experiments show appreciable temperature anisotropy indicating residual flow in the hot spot. We also find some trends in the data that do not reflect our simulation and theoretical understanding

  15. Direct-drive cryogenic target implosion experiments on SGIII prototype laser facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Yudong

    2014-10-01

    We present the cryogenic target implosion experiments conducted on SGIII prototype laser facility. The cryogenic target assembly consists of a copper cylinder, filling tubes and cooling arms. The capsule supported by the filling tube is cooled by the surrounding helium gas. Frozen condensation on the sealing film is inferred by examining the x-ray pinhole images. The influence of condensation on delivering laser energy to the capsule is quantified by experiments. The cryogenic layered target as well as cryogenic gas-filled target is imploded using 6.5 kJ laser energy. The implosion performance has been characterized with neutron yield, 2D inflight self-emission images, and primary proton spectrum. The neutron yield is measured by scintillator detector, and is 2 × 107 for the gas-filled capsule, and 2.8 × 107 for the layered capsule. The 2D inflight self-emission images are recorded by framed x-ray camera, and show significant implosion asymmetry. The primary proton tracks are recorded by CR39 which is then analyzed to give the proton energy spectrum. Energy downshift of the proton spectrum is used to infer the areal density. For the gas-filled capsule, the spectrum is downshifted 0.1 MeV giving an areal density of 1-3 mg/cm2, while for the layered capsule the spectrum is downshifted 0.5 MeV giving an areal density of 4-6 mg/cm2.

  16. Soft x-ray backlighting of cryogenic implosions using a narrowband crystal imaging system (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoeckl, C., E-mail: csto@lle.rochester.edu; Bedzyk, M.; Brent, G.; Epstein, R.; Fiksel, G.; Guy, D.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hu, S. X.; Ingraham, S.; Jacobs-Perkins, D. W.; Jungquist, R. K.; Marshall, F. J.; Mileham, C.; Nilson, P. M.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M. J.; Theobald, W. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    A high-performance cryogenic DT inertial confinement fusion implosion experiment is an especially challenging backlighting configuration because of the high self-emission of the core at stagnation and the low opacity of the DT shell. High-energy petawatt lasers such as OMEGA EP promise significantly improved backlighting capabilities by generating high x-ray intensities and short emission times. A narrowband x-ray imager with an astigmatism-corrected bent quartz crystal for the Si He{sub α} line at ∼1.86 keV was developed to record backlit images of cryogenic direct-drive implosions. A time-gated recording system minimized the self-emission of the imploding target. A fast target-insertion system capable of moving the backlighter target ∼7 cm in ∼100 ms was developed to avoid interference with the cryogenic shroud system. With backlighter laser energies of ∼1.25 kJ at a 10-ps pulse duration, the radiographic images show a high signal-to-background ratio of >100:1 and a spatial resolution of the order of 10 μm. The backlit images can be used to assess the symmetry of the implosions close to stagnation and the mix of ablator material into the dense shell.

  17. Implosion simulation by hydro code coupled with laser absorption using new raytrace algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The calculation of the laser absorption is very important for implosion simulations to capture precisely its dynamics. In many implosion simulations, the laser absorption is computed by the use of ray tracing. However, the conventional ray tracing method has the problem that it generates a non-physical absorption distribution because it represents a laser beam by a finite number of rays. Such a non-physical distribution on the target surface could be numerical perturbations that grow drastically due to Rayleigh-Taylor instability. An enormous number of rays are required to avoid such a non-physical distribution. This results in high computational costs. Thus, we have developed a new method of ray tracing that essentially generates no non-physical absorption distribution. In the new algorithm, rays are inversely traced from grid points unlike the conventional method. This paper presents the new algorithm and a preliminary implosion simulation where the pressure perturbation due to the non-uniformity of the irradiation is computed by the use of this new ray tracing. (author)

  18. Diagnosis of pusher-fuel mix in indirectly driven Nova implosions (HEP3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dittrich, T.R.; Hammel, B.A.; Keane, C.J. [and others

    1996-06-01

    A key issue for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is the hydrodynamic stability of the imploding capsule. Imperfections on the capsule surface can grow into large perturbations that degrade capsule performance. Understanding this process is crucial if the authors are to successfully predict requirements for future high-gain ICF capsules. Experiments on the Nova laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have directly measured perturbation growth on planar foils, and three experimental groups have investigated backlit perturbation growth using imploding spheres. In addition to these efforts, which concentrate on indirectly driven implosions, is work investigating the hydrodynamic stability of directly driven ICF capsules. In these direct-drive experiments the laser light shines directly on the capsules, causing the implosion and providing the seed for perturbation growth. This article reports measurement, via emission from spectroscopic tracers, of the full process of perturbation growth leading to pusher-fuel mix in spherical implosions, and shows perturbation growth dependence on initial perturbation amplitude and wavelength. In contrast to the cited direct-drive work, the authors have in this experiment separated the drive from the perturbation seed.

  19. Neutron temporal diagnostic for high-yield deuterium-tritium cryogenic implosions on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeckl, C.; Boni, R.; Ehrne, F.; Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Lonobile, D. J.; Magoon, J.; Regan, S. P.; Shoup, M. J.; Sorce, A.; Sorce, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Weiner, D.

    2016-05-01

    A next-generation neutron temporal diagnostic (NTD) capable of recording high-quality data for the highest anticipated yield cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) implosion experiments was recently installed at the Omega Laser Facility. A high-quality measurement of the neutron production width is required to determine the hot-spot pressure achieved in inertial confinement fusion experiments—a key metric in assessing the quality of these implosions. The design of this NTD is based on a fast-rise-time plastic scintillator, which converts the neutron kinetic energy to 350- to 450-nm-wavelength light. The light from the scintillator inside the nose-cone assembly is relayed ˜16 m to a streak camera in a well-shielded location. An ˜200× reduction in neutron background was observed during the first high-yield DT cryogenic implosions compared to the current NTD installation on OMEGA. An impulse response of ˜40 ± 10 ps was measured in a dedicated experiment using hard x-rays from a planar target irradiated with a 10-ps short pulse from the OMEGA EP laser. The measured instrument response includes contributions from the scintillator rise time, optical relay, and streak camera.

  20. Phased array antennas with optimized element patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Skobelev, Sergei P

    2011-01-01

    This authoritative resource provides you with a detailed description of ideal array element characteristics that help you estimate the quality of development of real-world phased array antennas. You find several approaches to optimum phased array design, allowing you to provide specified array gain in a specific region of scan, using a minimum number of expensive, controlled devices. Moreover, this practical book presents important numerical methods that you can use to model and optimize phased array structure to obtain the best array characteristics that the chosen structure can provide.From

  1. Mass-ablation-rate measurements in direct-drive cryogenic implosions using x-ray self-emission images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, A K; Michel, D T; Hu, S X; Craxton, R S; Epstein, R; Goncharov, V N; Igumenshchev, I V; Sangster, T C; Froula, D H

    2014-11-01

    A technique to measure the mass ablation rate in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions using a pinhole x-ray framing camera is presented. In target designs consisting of two layers of different materials, two x-ray self-emission peaks from the coronal plasma were measured once the laser burned through the higher-Z outer layer. The location of the inner peak is related to the position of the ablation front and the location of the outer peak corresponds to the position of the interface of the two layers in the plasma. The emergence of the second peak was used to measure the burnthrough time of the outer layer, giving the average mass ablation rate of the material and instantaneous mass remaining. By varying the thickness of the outer layer, the mass ablation rate can be obtained as a function of time. Simulations were used to validate the methods and verify that the measurement techniques are not sensitive to perturbation growth at the ablation surface. PMID:25430192

  2. Use of Faraday probing to estimate current distribution in wire array z pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to understand the formation and dynamics of plasma in wire array z-pinch experiments, measurements of the distribution of current throughout the array are required. We present details of two Faraday probing diagnostics aimed at exploring the magnetic fields and hence distribution of current in an array. An imaging Faraday system utilizes a short laser pulse to make estimates of the current distribution in the precursor column formed on axis before implosion. In a second system, a rod of high Verdet constant glass is placed close to the wires of an array and the polarization of a cw laser passing through the rod is monitored to examine the variance of current with time

  3. Exergetic Optimization of a Solar Photovoltaic Array

    OpenAIRE

    Amin Behzadmehr; Hossein Ajam; Said Farahat; Faramarz Sarhaddi

    2009-01-01

    An exergetic optimization is developed to determine the optimal performance and design parameters of a solar photovoltaic (PV) array. A detailed energy and exergy analysis is carried out to evaluate the electrical performance, exergy destruction components, and exergy efficiency of a typical PV array. The exergy efficiency of a PV array obtained in this paper is a function of climatic, operating, and design parameters such as ambient temperature, solar radiation intensity, PV array temperatur...

  4. X-ray pulse shaping in experiments with planar wire arrays at the 1.6 MA Zebra generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The shaping of the x-ray radiation pulse is very important in both radiation physics research and Inertial Confinement Fusion studies. The novel planar wire array (PWA) was found to be the effective radiator tested at the university-scale 1.6 MA, 100 ns Zebra generator. The single PWA consists of a single row of wires that are parallel to each other, while the double planar wire array (DPWA) and triple planar wire array (TPWA) include two or three parallel plane wire rows, respectively. All multi-planar geometries resulted in a cascade-type array implosion with a complicated multi-step precursor formation before plasma stagnation. The PWAs (without additional core foam target) feature a dynamic precursor evolution that is a powerful tool for x-ray pulse shaping. The shape and timing of the x-ray pulse from different PWAs were theoretically predicted and experimentally analyzed for a variety of planar wire arrays.

  5. Comparison of genetic-algorithm and emissivity-ratio analyses of image data from OMEGA implosion cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, T; Mancini, R C; Florido, R; Tommasini, R; Koch, J A; Delettrez, J A; Regan, S P; Smalyuk, V A; Welser-Sherrill, L A; Golovkin, I E

    2008-10-01

    Detailed analysis of x-ray narrow-band images from argon-doped deuterium-filled inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments yields information about the temperature spatial structure in the core at the collapse of the implosion. We discuss the analysis of direct-drive implosion experiments at OMEGA, in which multiple narrow-band images were recorded with a multimonochromatic x-ray imaging instrument. The temperature spatial structure is investigated by using the sensitivity of the Ly beta/He beta line emissivity ratio to the temperature. Three analysis methods that consider the argon He beta and Ly beta image data are discussed and the results compared. The methods are based on a ratio of image intensities, ratio of Abel-inverted emissivities, and a search and reconstruction technique driven by a Pareto genetic algorithm. PMID:19044576

  6. Technique for fabrication of ultrathin foils in cylindrical geometry for liner-plasma implosion experiments with sub-megaampere currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager-Elorriaga, D A; Steiner, A M; Patel, S G; Jordan, N M; Lau, Y Y; Gilgenbach, R M

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we describe a technique for fabricating ultrathin foils in cylindrical geometry for liner-plasma implosion experiments using sub-MA currents. Liners are formed by wrapping a 400 nm, rectangular strip of aluminum foil around a dumbbell-shaped support structure with a non-conducting center rod, so that the liner dimensions are 1 cm in height, 6.55 mm in diameter, and 400 nm in thickness. The liner-plasmas are imploded by discharging ∼600 kA with ∼200 ns rise time using a 1 MA linear transformer driver, and the resulting implosions are imaged four times per shot using laser-shadowgraphy at 532 nm. This technique enables the study of plasma implosion physics, including the magneto Rayleigh-Taylor, sausage, and kink instabilities on initially solid, imploding metallic liners with university-scale pulsed power machines. PMID:26628134

  7. IMPLOSION OF CORONAL LOOPS DURING THE IMPULSIVE PHASE OF A SOLAR FLARE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simões, P. J. A.; Fletcher, L.; Hudson, H. S.; Russell, A. J. B., E-mail: paulo.simoes@glasgow.ac.uk, E-mail: lyndsay.fletcher@glasgow.ac.uk, E-mail: arussell@maths.dundee.ac.uk, E-mail: hhudson@ssl.berkeley.edu [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2013-11-10

    We study the relationship between implosive motions in a solar flare, and the energy redistribution in the form of oscillatory structures and particle acceleration. The flare SOL2012-03-09T03:53 (M6.4) shows clear evidence for an irreversible (stepwise) coronal implosion. Extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) images show at least four groups of coronal loops at different heights overlying the flaring core undergoing fast contraction during the impulsive phase of the flare. These contractions start around a minute after the flare onset, and the rate of contraction is closely associated with the intensity of the hard X-ray and microwave emissions. They also seem to have a close relationship with the dimming associated with the formation of the coronal mass ejection and a global EUV wave. Several studies now have detected contracting motions in the corona during solar flares that can be interpreted as the implosion necessary to release energy. Our results confirm this, and tighten the association with the flare impulsive phase. We add to the phenomenology by noting the presence of oscillatory variations revealed by Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite soft X-rays (SXR) and spatially integrated EUV emission at 94 and 335 Å. We identify pulsations of ≈60 s in SXR and EUV data, which we interpret as persistent, semi-regular compressions of the flaring core region which modulate the plasma temperature and emission measure. The loop oscillations, observed over a large region, also allow us to provide rough estimates of the energy temporarily stored in the eigenmodes of the active-region structure as it approaches its new equilibrium.

  8. IMPLOSION OF CORONAL LOOPS DURING THE IMPULSIVE PHASE OF A SOLAR FLARE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the relationship between implosive motions in a solar flare, and the energy redistribution in the form of oscillatory structures and particle acceleration. The flare SOL2012-03-09T03:53 (M6.4) shows clear evidence for an irreversible (stepwise) coronal implosion. Extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) images show at least four groups of coronal loops at different heights overlying the flaring core undergoing fast contraction during the impulsive phase of the flare. These contractions start around a minute after the flare onset, and the rate of contraction is closely associated with the intensity of the hard X-ray and microwave emissions. They also seem to have a close relationship with the dimming associated with the formation of the coronal mass ejection and a global EUV wave. Several studies now have detected contracting motions in the corona during solar flares that can be interpreted as the implosion necessary to release energy. Our results confirm this, and tighten the association with the flare impulsive phase. We add to the phenomenology by noting the presence of oscillatory variations revealed by Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite soft X-rays (SXR) and spatially integrated EUV emission at 94 and 335 Å. We identify pulsations of ≈60 s in SXR and EUV data, which we interpret as persistent, semi-regular compressions of the flaring core region which modulate the plasma temperature and emission measure. The loop oscillations, observed over a large region, also allow us to provide rough estimates of the energy temporarily stored in the eigenmodes of the active-region structure as it approaches its new equilibrium

  9. The art of implosions has impacted the success of three decontamination and decommissioning projects at Fernald

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), near Cincinnati, Ohio, has successfully impacted the safety, cost and schedule goals of the Decontamination and Dismantling (D ampersand D) Program by using the art of implosions. An implosion is the act of bringing a structure down in a well planned and directed manner using explosive materials. Three major structures in three separate projects were imploded using this well known commercial technology. Safety is, and will always be, the major consideration with each of the projects. As each project succeeded another, the work process used new and improved methods to lower the risk to the environment, provide a safer workplace by reducing the exposure of high risk work and reducing the spread of lead, asbestos and radioactive materials. The time frame for dismantlement of the steel structures was greatly improved, thus reducing the total project cost. The lessons learned were incorporated from one project to another, to continually improve the work process. A number of alternatives were considered for the removal of the structures, seven, four and three stories in height. The subcontractor and its demolition sub-tier contractor worked in a fixed price lump sum contract environment. While skeptical at first, the subcontractor realized the benefits of the technology, a win-win situation for all participants. The overall planning of each of the events was tied to the needs of the client (DOE), the stakeholders and the community surrounding the site, and the continuing progress at the Fernald site. The recording and application of several key lessons learned in the sequence of implosions, will be the key issues of interest in this paper. Each project offered interesting opportunities for contingency planning, coordination, safety culture adjustments, and high regard for the protection of surrounding structures

  10. Copper Wire Arrays at the 1 MA Zebra Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coverdale, C. A.; Jones, B.; Ampleford, D. J.; Deeney, C.; Lepell, P. D.; Safronova, A. S.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Ouart, N.; Ivanov, V. V.

    2006-10-01

    Experiments to study the implosion dynamics and radiation characteristics of copper z-pinches have been fielded at the 1 MA Zebra facility. At Zebra, load diameters ranged from 8mm to 16mm, with 6 to 14 wires, and load masses of 80 to 200 μg. All arrays utilized 10 micron diameter wire. The impact of initial load mass and initial load diameter on the precursor and the stagnated plasma has been evaluated through spectroscopy, shadowgraphy, and fluence measurements. Plasma parameters have been extracted from modeling of the time-integrated L-shell spectra to study temperature and density variations as a function of spatial position and initial load configuration. Comparisons will be made with harder x-ray spectra and pinhole images to identify regions of highest temperature and density. Shadowgraphy has been fielded to study the formation of the precursor and the main implosion; significant structure is observed. Substantial radiation is observed from the precursor, with variations in the precursor associated with initial load configuration. *Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. Implosion Experiments using Glass Ablators for Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion.

    OpenAIRE

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Betti, R.; Delettrez, J. A.; Glebov, V.Y.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Radha, P. B.; S. P. Regan; Sangster, T. C.; Sanz, Javier; Seka, W.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.; Frenje, J.A.; C. K. Li; Petrasso, R.D.

    2010-01-01

    Direct-drive implosions with 20-μm-thick glass shells were conducted on the Omega Laser Facility to test the performance of high-Z glass ablators for direct-drive, inertial confinement fusion. The x-ray signal caused by hot electrons generated by two-plasmon-decay instability was reduced by more than ∼40× and hot-electron temperature by ∼2× in the glass compared to plastic ablators at ignition-relevant drive intensities of ∼1×1015  W/cm2, suggesting reduced target preheat. The measured absorp...

  12. Non-LTE considerations in spectral diagnostics of thermal transport and implosion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent thermal-transport and target-implosion experiments have used the emission of radiation from highly-ionized ions to signal the advance of laser-driven heat fronts and to mark the trajectories and stagnation points of imploding shells. We examine the results of such experiments with particular attention given to non-LTE effects of non-Maxwellian electrons and of finite ionization times on the populations of signature-emitting atomic species and on the formation of signature spectra and x-ray images in these experiments

  13. Explicit Dynamic Finite Element Method for Predicting Implosion/Explosion Induced Failure of Shell Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Hoon Song

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A simplified implementation of the conventional extended finite element method (XFEM for dynamic fracture in thin shells is presented. Though this implementation uses the same linear combination of the conventional XFEM, it allows for considerable simplifications of the discontinuous displacement and velocity fields in shell finite elements. The proposed method is implemented for the discrete Kirchhoff triangular (DKT shell element, which is one of the most popular shell elements in engineering analysis. Numerical examples for dynamic failure of shells under impulsive loads including implosion and explosion are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the method.

  14. X-ray imaging measurements of capsule implosions driven by a Z-pinch dynamic hohlraum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation and shock generated by impact of an annular tungsten Z-pinch plasma on a 10-mm diam 5-mg/cc CH2 foam are diagnosed with x-ray imaging and power measurements. The radiative shock was virtually unaffected by Z-pinch plasma instabilities. The 5-ns-duration ∼135-eV radiation field imploded a 2.1-mm-diam CH capsule. The measured radiation temperature, shock radius, and capsule radius agreed well with computer simulations, indicating understanding of the main features of a Z-pinch dynamic-hohlraum-driven capsule implosion

  15. Beam illumination and implosion simulation in inertial confinement heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three-dimensional computer simulations are performed for a heavy ion beam (HIB) irradiation onto a direct-driven spherical fuel pellet in heavy ion fusion (HIF). In addition, the non-uniformity growth due to a little pellet displacement from a reactor chamber center is investigated. The calculation results demonstrate that we can realize a rather low non-uniform energy deposition: for example, less than 2.0% even for a 32-beam irradiation system. Moreover we develop hydrodynamic simulation code to calculate a target implosion. (author)

  16. Scalings of implosion experiment for high neutron yield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of experiments focused on high neutron yield has been done with Gekko-XII green laser system. DT neutron yield of 1013, pellet gain 0.2 %, and coupling efficiency 5.5 % have been achieved. Based on the experimental data for more than 70 shots, the scaling laws of the neutron yield and the related physical quantities have been studied. The comparison of the experimental neutron yield with that obtained by one-dimensional fluid code has led us to a conclusion that most of the neutron yield produced in the stagnation phase is not observed in the experiment because of fuel-pusher mixing possibly induced by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. A DT core gain of 5 % has also been obtained. The experimental data plotted in the ρR-Ti diagram indicate that for igniting the fuel, the ion temperature is sufficiently high, while the ρR is less by two orders of magnitude than the required value. (author)

  17. Effects of the P2 M-band flux asymmetry of laser-driven gold Hohlraums on the implosion of ICF ignition capsule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongsheng; Gu, Jianfa; Wu, Changshu; Song, Peng; Dai, Zhensheng; Li, Shuanggui; Li, Xin; Kang, Dongguo; Gu, Peijun; Zheng, Wudi; Zou, Shiyang; Ding, Yongkun; Lan, Ke; Ye, Wenhua; Zhang, Weiyan

    2016-07-01

    Low-mode asymmetries in the laser-indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments conducted on the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, S228 (2004)] are deemed the main obstacles hindering further improvement of the nuclear performance of deuterium-tritium-layered capsules. The dominant seeds of these asymmetries include the P2 and P4 asymmetries of x-ray drives and P2 asymmetry introduced by the supporting "tent." Here, we explore the effects of another possible seed that can lead to low-mode asymmetric implosions, i.e., the M-band flux asymmetry (MFA) in laser-driven cylindrical gold Hohlraums. It is shown that the M-band flux facilitates the ablation and acceleration of the shell, and that positive P2 MFAs can result in negative P2 asymmetries of hot spots and positive P2 asymmetries of shell's ρR. An oblate or toroidal hot spot, depending on the P2 amplitude of MFA, forms at stagnation. The energy loss of such a hot spot via electron thermal conduction is seriously aggravated not only due to the enlarged hot spot surface but also due to the vortices that develop and help transferring thermal energy from the hotter center to the colder margin of such a hot spot. The cliffs of nuclear performance for the two methodologies of applying MFA (i.e., symmetric flux in the presence of MFA and MFA added for symmetric soft x-ray flux) are obtained locating at 9.5% and 5.0% of P2/P0 amplitudes, respectively.

  18. Generation of extreme state of water by spherical wire array underwater electrical explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of the first experiments on the underwater electrical explosion of a spherical wire array generating a converging strong shock wave are reported. Using a moderate pulse power generator with a stored energy of ≤6 kJ and discharge current of ≤500 kA with a rise-time of ∼300 ns, explosions of Cu and Al wire arrays of different diameters and with a different number and diameter of wires were tested. Electrical, optical, and destruction diagnostics were used to determine the energy deposited into the array, the time-of-flight of the shock wave to the origin of the implosion, and the parameters of water at that location. The experimental and numerical simulation results indicate that the convergence of the shock wave leads to the formation of an extreme state of water in the vicinity of the implosion origin that is characterized by pressure, temperature, and compression factors of (2 ± 0.2) × 1012 Pa, 8 ± 0.5 eV, and 7 ± 0.5, respectively.

  19. Measurements of the Fuel Distribution in Cryogenic D-T Direct-Drive Implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Chad J.

    In direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, a capsule filled with a mixture of deuterium and tritium ice at cryogenic temperature is irradiated by a symmetric arrangements of laser beams to compress and heat the fuel to conditions required for thermonuclear reactions. The areal density (rhoR) of the compressed fuel assembly in a cryogenic implosion is one of the fundamental parameters required to assess the target performance. The rhoR measurements presented here are achieved by measuring the complex neutron energy spectrum resulting from primary and secondary nuclear reactions within the compressed fuel assembly. Advances in neutron time-of-flight diagnostics have made it possible to infer the neutron fraction that elastically scatters off the tritons in the compressed fuel in the energy range from 3.5 -5.5 MeV which is directly proportional to the areal density. In these OMEGA cryogenic campaigns from January 2013 to August 2014, measured low-mode modulations show good agreement with Monte Carlo simulations. Deviations up to 40% in the cold-fuel distribution from spherical symmetry have been inferred from the scattered neutron spectrum. Understanding the mechanism for anisotropic areal density measurements is crucial to improve hydrodynamically equivalent ignition-relevant direct-drive cryogenic implosions on OMEGA.

  20. Capsule implosion optimization during the indirect-drive National Ignition Campaign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capsule performance optimization campaigns will be conducted at the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)] to substantially increase the probability of ignition. The campaigns will experimentally correct for residual uncertainties in the implosion and hohlraum physics used in our radiation-hydrodynamic computational models using a variety of ignition capsule surrogates before proceeding to cryogenic-layered implosions and ignition experiments. The quantitative goals and technique options and down selections for the tuning campaigns are first explained. The computationally derived sensitivities to key laser and target parameters are compared to simple analytic models to gain further insight into the physics of the tuning techniques. The results of the validation of the tuning techniques at the OMEGA facility [J. M. Soures et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2108 (1996)] under scaled hohlraum and capsule conditions relevant to the ignition design are shown to meet the required sensitivity and accuracy. A roll-up of all expected random and systematic uncertainties in setting the key ignition laser and target parameters due to residual measurement, calibration, cross-coupling, surrogacy, and scale-up errors has been derived that meets the required budget. Finally, we show how the tuning precision will be improved after a number of shots and iterations to meet an acceptable level of residual uncertainty.

  1. Impact of Inner Surface Perturbations on the Stability of Cylindrical Liner Implosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Matthew; Peterson, Kyle; Hess, Mark; Lau, Y. Y.; Zhang, Peng; Gilgenbach, Ronald

    2015-11-01

    This paper studies the effects of initial perturbations on the inner liner surface (ILS) of an imploding cylindrical liner. In MagLIF, nonuniform preheat of the fuel could provide an additional source of spatial nonuniformity on the ILS. A blast wave generated by the laser preheat might trigger the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RM) on the ILS which then serves as another seed to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RT) during the stagnation (deceleration) phase of the implosion. Another scenario is that the shock initiated from the outer liner surface, during current rise, propagates inward and is reflected at the ILS. This reflected shock would carry the initial ILS perturbations which then serve as an additional seed for the magneto-RT (MRT) during the acceleration phase of the implosion. These potentially dangerous interactions are analyzed using the 2D HYDRA code. The effects of axial magnetic fields, of the initial surface roughness spectrum, and of gas fill or water fill (to examine deceleration phase RT) are studied. M. R. Weis was supported by the Sandia National Laboratories. This work was also supported by DoE Grant DE-SC0012328.

  2. Capsule implosion optimization during the indirect-drive National Ignition Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landen, O. L.; Edwards, J.; Haan, S. W.; Robey, H. F.; Milovich, J.; Spears, B. K.; Weber, S. V.; Clark, D. S.; Lindl, J. D.; MacGowan, B. J.; Moses, E. I.; Atherton, J.; Amendt, P. A.; Boehly, T. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Braun, D. G.; Callahan, D. A.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Dewald, E. L.; Divol, L.; Frenje, J. A.; Glenzer, S. H.; Hamza, A.; Hammel, B. A.; Hicks, D. G.; Hoffman, N.; Izumi, N.; Jones, O. S.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G. A.; Marinak, M. M.; Meezan, N.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Michel, P.; Munro, D. H.; Olson, R. E.; Nikroo, A.; Regan, S. P.; Suter, L. J.; Thomas, C. A.; Wilson, D. C.

    2011-05-01

    Capsule performance optimization campaigns will be conducted at the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)] to substantially increase the probability of ignition. The campaigns will experimentally correct for residual uncertainties in the implosion and hohlraum physics used in our radiation-hydrodynamic computational models using a variety of ignition capsule surrogates before proceeding to cryogenic-layered implosions and ignition experiments. The quantitative goals and technique options and down selections for the tuning campaigns are first explained. The computationally derived sensitivities to key laser and target parameters are compared to simple analytic models to gain further insight into the physics of the tuning techniques. The results of the validation of the tuning techniques at the OMEGA facility [J. M. Soures et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2108 (1996)] under scaled hohlraum and capsule conditions relevant to the ignition design are shown to meet the required sensitivity and accuracy. A roll-up of all expected random and systematic uncertainties in setting the key ignition laser and target parameters due to residual measurement, calibration, cross-coupling, surrogacy, and scale-up errors has been derived that meets the required budget. Finally, we show how the tuning precision will be improved after a number of shots and iterations to meet an acceptable level of residual uncertainty.

  3. New tuning method of the low-mode asymmetry for ignition capsule implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jianfa; Dai, Zhensheng; Zou, Shiyang; Song, Peng; Ye, Wenhua; Zheng, Wudi; Gu, Peijun

    2015-12-01

    In the deuterium-tritium inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility, the hot spot and the surrounding main fuel layer show obvious P2 asymmetries. This may be caused by the large positive P2 radiation flux asymmetry during the peak pulse resulting form the poor propagation of the inner laser beam in the gas-filled hohlraum. The symmetry evolution of ignition capsule implosions is investigated by applying P2 radiation flux asymmetries during different time intervals. A series of two-dimensional simulation results show that a positive P2 flux asymmetry during the peak pulse results in a positive P2 shell ρR asymmetry; while an early time positive P2 flux asymmetry causes a negative P2 in the fuel ρR shape. The opposite evolution behavior of shell ρR asymmetry is used to develop a new tuning method to correct the radiation flux asymmetry during the peak pulse by adding a compensating same-phased P2 drive asymmetry during the early time. The significant improvements of the shell ρR symmetry, hot spot shape, hot spot internal energy, and neutron yield indicate that the tuning method is quite effective. The similar tuning method can also be used to control the early time drive asymmetries.

  4. Plasma viscosity with mass transport in spherical inertial confinement fusion implosion simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vold, E. L.; Joglekar, A. S.; Ortega, M. I.; Moll, R.; Fenn, D.; Molvig, K.

    2015-11-01

    The effects of viscosity and small-scale atomic-level mixing on plasmas in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) currently represent challenges in ICF research. Many current ICF hydrodynamic codes ignore the effects of viscosity though recent research indicates viscosity and mixing by classical transport processes may have a substantial impact on implosion dynamics. We have implemented a Lagrangian hydrodynamic code in one-dimensional spherical geometry with plasma viscosity and mass transport and including a three temperature model for ions, electrons, and radiation treated in a gray radiation diffusion approximation. The code is used to study ICF implosion differences with and without plasma viscosity and to determine the impacts of viscosity on temperature histories and neutron yield. It was found that plasma viscosity has substantial impacts on ICF shock dynamics characterized by shock burn timing, maximum burn temperatures, convergence ratio, and time history of neutron production rates. Plasma viscosity reduces the need for artificial viscosity to maintain numerical stability in the Lagrangian formulation and also modifies the flux-limiting needed for electron thermal conduction.

  5. Plasma viscosity with mass transport in spherical inertial confinement fusion implosion simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vold, E. L.; Molvig, K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Joglekar, A. S. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Ortega, M. I. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Moll, R. [University of California, Santa Cruz, California 95064 (United States); Fenn, D. [Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    The effects of viscosity and small-scale atomic-level mixing on plasmas in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) currently represent challenges in ICF research. Many current ICF hydrodynamic codes ignore the effects of viscosity though recent research indicates viscosity and mixing by classical transport processes may have a substantial impact on implosion dynamics. We have implemented a Lagrangian hydrodynamic code in one-dimensional spherical geometry with plasma viscosity and mass transport and including a three temperature model for ions, electrons, and radiation treated in a gray radiation diffusion approximation. The code is used to study ICF implosion differences with and without plasma viscosity and to determine the impacts of viscosity on temperature histories and neutron yield. It was found that plasma viscosity has substantial impacts on ICF shock dynamics characterized by shock burn timing, maximum burn temperatures, convergence ratio, and time history of neutron production rates. Plasma viscosity reduces the need for artificial viscosity to maintain numerical stability in the Lagrangian formulation and also modifies the flux-limiting needed for electron thermal conduction.

  6. New tuning method of the low-mode asymmetry for ignition capsule implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Jianfa, E-mail: gu-jianfa@iapcm.ac.cn; Dai, Zhensheng; Zou, Shiyang; Song, Peng; Ye, Wenhua; Zheng, Wudi; Gu, Peijun [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China)

    2015-12-15

    In the deuterium-tritium inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility, the hot spot and the surrounding main fuel layer show obvious P2 asymmetries. This may be caused by the large positive P2 radiation flux asymmetry during the peak pulse resulting form the poor propagation of the inner laser beam in the gas-filled hohlraum. The symmetry evolution of ignition capsule implosions is investigated by applying P2 radiation flux asymmetries during different time intervals. A series of two-dimensional simulation results show that a positive P2 flux asymmetry during the peak pulse results in a positive P2 shell ρR asymmetry; while an early time positive P2 flux asymmetry causes a negative P2 in the fuel ρR shape. The opposite evolution behavior of shell ρR asymmetry is used to develop a new tuning method to correct the radiation flux asymmetry during the peak pulse by adding a compensating same-phased P2 drive asymmetry during the early time. The significant improvements of the shell ρR symmetry, hot spot shape, hot spot internal energy, and neutron yield indicate that the tuning method is quite effective. The similar tuning method can also be used to control the early time drive asymmetries.

  7. New tuning method of the low-mode asymmetry for ignition capsule implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the deuterium-tritium inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility, the hot spot and the surrounding main fuel layer show obvious P2 asymmetries. This may be caused by the large positive P2 radiation flux asymmetry during the peak pulse resulting form the poor propagation of the inner laser beam in the gas-filled hohlraum. The symmetry evolution of ignition capsule implosions is investigated by applying P2 radiation flux asymmetries during different time intervals. A series of two-dimensional simulation results show that a positive P2 flux asymmetry during the peak pulse results in a positive P2 shell ρR asymmetry; while an early time positive P2 flux asymmetry causes a negative P2 in the fuel ρR shape. The opposite evolution behavior of shell ρR asymmetry is used to develop a new tuning method to correct the radiation flux asymmetry during the peak pulse by adding a compensating same-phased P2 drive asymmetry during the early time. The significant improvements of the shell ρR symmetry, hot spot shape, hot spot internal energy, and neutron yield indicate that the tuning method is quite effective. The similar tuning method can also be used to control the early time drive asymmetries

  8. Plasma viscosity with mass transport in spherical inertial confinement fusion implosion simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of viscosity and small-scale atomic-level mixing on plasmas in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) currently represent challenges in ICF research. Many current ICF hydrodynamic codes ignore the effects of viscosity though recent research indicates viscosity and mixing by classical transport processes may have a substantial impact on implosion dynamics. We have implemented a Lagrangian hydrodynamic code in one-dimensional spherical geometry with plasma viscosity and mass transport and including a three temperature model for ions, electrons, and radiation treated in a gray radiation diffusion approximation. The code is used to study ICF implosion differences with and without plasma viscosity and to determine the impacts of viscosity on temperature histories and neutron yield. It was found that plasma viscosity has substantial impacts on ICF shock dynamics characterized by shock burn timing, maximum burn temperatures, convergence ratio, and time history of neutron production rates. Plasma viscosity reduces the need for artificial viscosity to maintain numerical stability in the Lagrangian formulation and also modifies the flux-limiting needed for electron thermal conduction

  9. X-ray drive of beryllium capsule implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, D. C.; Yi, S. A.; Simakov, A. N.; Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G. A.; Dewald, E. L.; Tommasini, R.; Ralph, J. E.; Olson, R. E.; Strozzi, D. J.; Celliers, P. M.; Schneider, M. B.; MacPhee, A. G.; Zylstra, A. B.; Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Milovich, J. L.; Hinkel, D. E.; Rygg, J. R.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Sio, H.; Perry, T. S.; Batha, S.

    2016-05-01

    National Ignition Facility experiments with beryllium capsules have followed a path begun with “high-foot” plastic capsule implosions. Three shock timing keyhole targets, one symmetry capsule, a streaked backlit capsule, and a 2D backlit capsule were fielded before the DT layered shot. After backscatter subtraction, laser drive degradation is needed to match observed X-ray drives. VISAR measurements determined drive degradation for the picket, trough, and second pulse. Time dependence of the total Dante flux reflects degradation of the of the third laser pulse. The same drive degradation that matches Dante data for three beryllium shots matches Dante and bangtimes for plastic shots N130501 and N130812. In the picket of both Be and CH hohlraums, calculations over-estimate the x-ray flux > 1.8 keV by ∼100X, while calculating the total flux correctly. In beryllium calculations these X-rays cause an early expansion of the beryllium/fuel interface at ∼3 km/s. VISAR measurements gave only ∼0.3 km/s. The X-ray drive on the Be DT capsule was further degraded by an unplanned decrease of 9% in the total picket flux. This small change caused the fuel adiabat to rise from 1.8 to 2.3. The first NIF beryllium DT implosion achieved 29% of calculated yield, compared to CH capsules with 68% and 21%.

  10. Hohlraum-Driven Ignition-Like Double-Shell Implosion Experiments on Omega: Analysis and Interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amendt, P; Robey, H F; Park, H-S; Tipton, R E; Turner, R E; Milovich, J; Rowley, D; Hibbard, R; Louis, H; Wallace, R; Garbett, W; Dunne, A M; Varnum, W S; Watt, R G; Wilson, D C

    2003-08-22

    An experimental campaign to study hohlraum-driven ignition-like double-shell target performance using the Omega laser facility has begun. These targets are intended to incorporate as many ignition-like properties of the proposed National Ignition Facility (NIF) double-shell ignition design [1,2] as possible, given the energy constraints of the Omega laser. In particular, this latest generation of Omega double-shells is nominally predicted to produce over 99% of the (clean) DD neutron yield from the compressional or stagnation phase of the implosion as required in the NIF ignition design. By contrast, previous double-shell experience on Omega [3] was restricted to cases where a significant fraction of the observed neutron yield was produced during the earlier shock convergence phase where the effects of mix are deemed negligibly small. These new targets are specifically designed to have optimized fall-line behavior for mitigating the effects of pusher-fuel mix after deceleration onset and, thereby, providing maximum neutron yield from the stagnation phase. Experimental results from this recent Omega ignition-like double-shell implosion campaign show favorable agreement with two-dimensional integrated hohlraum simulation studies when enhanced (gold) hohlraum M-band (2-5 keV) radiation is included at a level consistent with observations.

  11. Using multiple secondary fusion products to evaluate fuel ρR, electron temperature, and mix in deuterium-filled implosions at the NIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In deuterium-filled inertial confinement fusion implosions, the secondary fusion processes D(3He,p)4He and D(T,n)4He occur, as the primary fusion products 3He and T react in flight with thermal deuterons. In implosions with moderate fuel areal density (∼5–100 mg/cm2), the secondary D-3He reaction saturates, while the D-T reaction does not, and the combined information from these secondary products is used to constrain both the areal density and either the plasma electron temperature or changes in the composition due to mix of shell material into the fuel. The underlying theory of this technique is developed and applied to three classes of implosions on the National Ignition Facility: direct-drive exploding pushers, indirect-drive 1-shock and 2-shock implosions, and polar direct-drive implosions. In the 1- and 2-shock implosions, the electron temperature is inferred to be 0.65 times and 0.33 times the burn-averaged ion temperature, respectively. The inferred mixed mass in the polar direct-drive implosions is in agreement with measurements using alternative techniques

  12. Using multiple secondary fusion products to evaluate fuel ρR, electron temperature, and mix in deuterium-filled implosions at the NIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinderknecht, H. G., E-mail: hgr@mit.edu; Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Lahmann, B.; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Caggiano, J. A.; Divol, L.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hatchett, S. P.; Le Pape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; McNaney, J. M.; Meezan, N. B.; Moran, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2015-08-15

    In deuterium-filled inertial confinement fusion implosions, the secondary fusion processes D({sup 3}He,p){sup 4}He and D(T,n){sup 4}He occur, as the primary fusion products {sup 3}He and T react in flight with thermal deuterons. In implosions with moderate fuel areal density (∼5–100 mg/cm{sup 2}), the secondary D-{sup 3}He reaction saturates, while the D-T reaction does not, and the combined information from these secondary products is used to constrain both the areal density and either the plasma electron temperature or changes in the composition due to mix of shell material into the fuel. The underlying theory of this technique is developed and applied to three classes of implosions on the National Ignition Facility: direct-drive exploding pushers, indirect-drive 1-shock and 2-shock implosions, and polar direct-drive implosions. In the 1- and 2-shock implosions, the electron temperature is inferred to be 0.65 times and 0.33 times the burn-averaged ion temperature, respectively. The inferred mixed mass in the polar direct-drive implosions is in agreement with measurements using alternative techniques.

  13. Recent experimental results on ICF target implosions by Z-pinch radiation sources and their relevance to ICF ignition studies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, James E.; Chandler, Gordon Andrew; Vesey, Roger Alan; Hanson, David Lester; Olson, Craig Lee; Nash, Thomas J.; Matzen, Maurice Keith; Ruiz, Carlos L.; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Varnum, William S.; Bennett, Guy R. (K-tech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Cooper, Gary Wayne; Schroen, Diana Grace (Schafer Gorp., Livermore, CA); Slutz, Stephen A.; MacFarlane, Joseph John (Prism Computational Sciences, Madison, WI); Leeper, Ramon Joe; Golovkin, I. E. (Prism Computational Sciences, Madison, WI); Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Mancini, Roberto Claudio (University of Nevada, Reno, NV)

    2003-07-01

    Inertial confinement fusion capsule implosions absorbing up to 35 kJ of x-rays from a {approx}220 eV dynamic hohlraum on the Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories have produced thermonuclear D-D neutron yields of (2.6 {+-} 1.3) x 10{sup 10}. Argon spectra confirm a hot fuel with Te {approx} 1 keV and n{sub e} {approx} (1-2) x 10{sup 23} cm{sup -3}. Higher performance implosions will require radiation symmetry control improvements. Capsule implosions in a {approx}70 eV double-Z-pinch-driven secondary hohlraum have been radiographed by 6.7 keV x-rays produced by the Z-beamlet laser (ZBL), demonstrating a drive symmetry of about 3% and control of P{sub 2} radiation asymmetries to {+-}2%. Hemispherical capsule implosions have also been radiographed in Z in preparation for future experiments in fast ignition physics. Z-pinch-driven inertial fusion energy concepts are being developed. The refurbished Z machine (ZR) will begin providing scaling information on capsule and Z-pinch in 2006. The addition of a short pulse capability to ZBL will enable research into fast ignition physics in the combination of ZR and ZBL-petawatt. ZR could provide a test bed to study NIF-relevant double-shell ignition concepts using dynamic hohlraums and advanced symmetry control techniques in the double-pinch hohlraum backlit by ZBL.

  14. Recent experimental results on ICF target implosions by Z-pinch radiation sources and their relevance to ICF ignition studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inertial confinement fusion capsule implosions absorbing up to 35 kJ of x-rays from a ∼220 eV dynamic hohlraum on the Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories have produced thermonuclear D-D neutron yields of (2.6 ± 1.3) x 1010. Argon spectra confirm a hot fuel with Te ∼ 1 keV and ne ∼ (1-2) x 1023 cm-3. Higher performance implosions will require radiation symmetry control improvements. Capsule implosions in a ∼70 eV double-Z-pinch-driven secondary hohlraum have been radiographed by 6.7 keV x-rays produced by the Z-beamlet laser (ZBL), demonstrating a drive symmetry of about 3% and control of P2 radiation asymmetries to ±2%. Hemispherical capsule implosions have also been radiographed in Z in preparation for future experiments in fast ignition physics. Z-pinch-driven inertial fusion energy concepts are being developed. The refurbished Z machine (ZR) will begin providing scaling information on capsule and Z-pinch in 2006. The addition of a short pulse capability to ZBL will enable research into fast ignition physics in the combination of ZR and ZBL-petawatt. ZR could provide a test bed to study NIF-relevant double-shell ignition concepts using dynamic hohlraums and advanced symmetry control techniques in the double-pinch hohlraum backlit by ZBL.

  15. Seismometer array station processors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A description is given of the design, construction and initial testing of two types of Seismometer Array Station Processor (SASP), one to work with data stored on magnetic tape in analogue form, the other with data in digital form. The purpose of a SASP is to detect the short period P waves recorded by a UK-type array of 20 seismometers and to edit these on to a a digital library tape or disc. The edited data are then processed to obtain a rough location for the source and to produce seismograms (after optimum processing) for analysis by a seismologist. SASPs are an important component in the scheme for monitoring underground explosions advocated by the UK in the Conference of the Committee on Disarmament. With digital input a SASP can operate at 30 times real time using a linear detection process and at 20 times real time using the log detector of Weichert. Although the log detector is slower, it has the advantage over the linear detector that signals with lower signal-to-noise ratio can be detected and spurious large amplitudes are less likely to produce a detection. It is recommended, therefore, that where possible array data should be recorded in digital form for input to a SASP and that the log detector of Weichert be used. Trial runs show that a SASP is capable of detecting signals down to signal-to-noise ratios of about two with very few false detections, and at mid-continental array sites it should be capable of detecting most, if not all, the signals with magnitude above msub(b) 4.5; the UK argues that, given a suitable network, it is realistic to hope that sources of this magnitude and above can be detected and identified by seismological means alone. (author)

  16. Rotor noise measurement using a directional microphone array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcolini, Michael A.; Brooks, Thomas F.

    1987-01-01

    A directional array of microphones was used to measure the noise from a 40 percent scale model rotor in a large aeroacoustic wind tunnel. The development and design of this directional array is described. A design goal was that the array focus on a constant sensing area over a broad frequency range. The implementation of the array design is presented, followed by sample results for several different rotor test conditions. The directional array spectral results are compared with predictions of broadband self noise, and with total rotor noise measurements obtained from individual microphones of the array. The directional array is demonstrated to be a useful tool in examining noise source distributions.

  17. Array antenna diagnostics with the 3D reconstruction algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappellin, Cecilia; Meincke, Peter; Pivnenko, Sergey; Jørgensen, Erik

    The 3D reconstruction algorithm is applied to a slotted waveguide array measured at the DTU-ESA Spherical Near-Field Antenna Test Facility. One slot of the array is covered by conductive tape and an error is present in the array excitation. Results show the accuracy obtainable by the 3D reconstru......The 3D reconstruction algorithm is applied to a slotted waveguide array measured at the DTU-ESA Spherical Near-Field Antenna Test Facility. One slot of the array is covered by conductive tape and an error is present in the array excitation. Results show the accuracy obtainable by the 3D...

  18. Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Tiziana C; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James; Liu, Gang Logan

    2015-11-03

    Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

  19. Celui qui implose dans le vacuum de la difficulté de survivre dans le vacuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaston Tremblay

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Le vacuum dont nous parlons découle directement de l’implosion du Canada français, c’est-à-dire du mouvement de repli qui, à la fin des années soixante, amène les Canadiens-Français à délimiter pour la première fois leurs frontières nationales. C’est en quelque sorte une conversion au réel, aussi bien pour les Québécois qui tentent alors de prendre possession de leur territoire, que pour les Franco-Ontariens qui doivent faire le deuil de leurs institutions nationales.

  20. Hot spot formation and stagnation properties in simulations of direct-drive NIF implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Andrew J.; Obenschain, Stephen P.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate different proposed methods of increasing the hot spot energy and radius in inertial confinement fusion implosions. In particular, shock mistiming (preferentially heating the inner edge of the target's fuel) and increasing the initial vapor gas density are investigated as possible control mechanisms. We find that only the latter is effective in substantially increasing the hot spot energy and dimensions while achieving ignition. In all cases an increase in the hot spot energy is accompanied by a decrease in the hot spot energy density (pressure) and both the yield and the gain of the target drop substantially. 2D simulations of increased vapor density targets predict an increase in the robustness of the target with respect to surface perturbations but are accompanied by significant yield degradation.

  1. Symmetric inertial confinement fusion implosions at ultra-high laser energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first indirect-drive hohlraum experiments at the National Ignition Facility have demonstrated symmetric capsule implosions at unprecedented laser drive energies of 0.7 MJ. 192 simultaneously fired laser beams heat ignition hohlraums to radiation temperatures of 3.3 million Kelvin compressing 1.8-millimeter capsules by the soft x rays produced by the hohlraum. Self-generated plasma-optics gratings on either end of the hohlraum tune the laser power distribution in the hohlraum producing symmetric x-ray drive as inferred from capsule self-emission measurements. These experiments indicate conditions suitable for compressing deuterium-tritium filled capsules with the goal to achieve burning fusion plasmas and energy gain in the laboratory.

  2. A hybrid model for coupling kinetic corrections of fusion reactivity to hydrodynamic implosion simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xian-Zhu; McDevitt, C. J.; Guo, Zehua; Berk, H. L.

    2014-03-01

    Inertial confinement fusion requires an imploded target in which a central hot spot is surrounded by a cold and dense pusher. The hot spot/pusher interface can take complicated shape in three dimensions due to hydrodynamic mix. It is also a transition region where the Knudsen and inverse Knudsen layer effect can significantly modify the fusion reactivity in comparison with the commonly used value evaluated with background Maxwellians. Here, we describe a hybrid model that couples the kinetic correction of fusion reactivity to global hydrodynamic implosion simulations. The key ingredient is a non-perturbative treatment of the tail ions in the interface region where the Gamow ion Knudsen number approaches or surpasses order unity. The accuracy of the coupling scheme is controlled by the precise criteria for matching the non-perturbative kinetic model to perturbative solutions in both configuration space and velocity space.

  3. Performance and Mix Measurements of Indirect Drive Cu-Doped Be Implosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, D T; Woods, D T; Smalyuk, V A; Hurricane, O A; Glebov, V Y; Stoeckl, C; Theobald, W; Wallace, R; Nikroo, A; Schoff, M; Shuldberg, C; Wu, K J; Frenje, J A; Landen, O L; Remington, B A; Glendinning, G

    2015-05-22

    The ablator couples energy between the driver and fusion fuel in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Because of its low opacity, high solid density, and material properties, beryllium has long been considered an ideal ablator for ICF ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility. We report here the first indirect drive Be implosions driven with shaped laser pulses and diagnosed with fusion yield at the OMEGA laser. The results show good performance with an average DD neutron yield of ∼2×10^{9} at a convergence ratio of R_{0}/R∼10 and little impact due to the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities and mix. In addition, the effect of adding an inner liner of W between the Be and DD is demonstrated. PMID:26047234

  4. Performance and Mix Measurements of Indirect Drive Cu-Doped Be Implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, D.  T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Woods, D. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Smalyuk, V. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hurricane, O.  A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Glebov, V.  Y. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Stoeckl, C. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Theobald, W. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Wallace, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Schoff, M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Shuldberg, C. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Wu, K. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Frenje, J.  A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Landen, O.  L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Remington, B.  A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Glendinning, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-05-19

    The ablator couples energy between the driver and fusion fuel in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Because of its low opacity, high solid density, and material properties, beryllium has long been considered an ideal ablator for ICF ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility. We report here the first indirect drive Be implosions driven with shaped laser pulses and diagnosed with fusion yield at the OMEGA laser. The results show good performance with an average DD neutron yield of ~2 × 10⁹ at a convergence ratio of R₀/R ~ 10 and little impact due to the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities and mix. In addition, the effect of adding an inner liner of W between the Be and DD is demonstrated.

  5. Thin shell, high velocity inertial confinement fusion implosions on the national ignition facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, T; Hurricane, O A; Callahan, D A; Barrios, M A; Casey, D T; Dewald, E L; Dittrich, T R; Döppner, T; Haan, S W; Hinkel, D E; Berzak Hopkins, L F; Le Pape, S; MacPhee, A G; Pak, A; Park, H-S; Patel, P K; Remington, B A; Robey, H F; Salmonson, J D; Springer, P T; Tommasini, R; Benedetti, L R; Bionta, R; Bond, E; Bradley, D K; Caggiano, J; Celliers, P; Cerjan, C J; Church, J A; Dixit, S; Dylla-Spears, R; Edgell, D; Edwards, M J; Field, J; Fittinghoff, D N; Frenje, J A; Gatu Johnson, M; Grim, G; Guler, N; Hatarik, R; Herrmann, H W; Hsing, W W; Izumi, N; Jones, O S; Khan, S F; Kilkenny, J D; Knauer, J; Kohut, T; Kozioziemski, B; Kritcher, A; Kyrala, G; Landen, O L; MacGowan, B J; Mackinnon, A J; Meezan, N B; Merrill, F E; Moody, J D; Nagel, S R; Nikroo, A; Parham, T; Ralph, J E; Rosen, M D; Rygg, J R; Sater, J; Sayre, D; Schneider, M B; Shaughnessy, D; Spears, B K; Town, R P J; Volegov, P L; Wan, A; Widmann, K; Wilde, C H; Yeamans, C

    2015-04-10

    Experiments have recently been conducted at the National Ignition Facility utilizing inertial confinement fusion capsule ablators that are 175 and 165  μm in thickness, 10% and 15% thinner, respectively, than the nominal thickness capsule used throughout the high foot and most of the National Ignition Campaign. These three-shock, high-adiabat, high-foot implosions have demonstrated good performance, with higher velocity and better symmetry control at lower laser powers and energies than their nominal thickness ablator counterparts. Little to no hydrodynamic mix into the DT hot spot has been observed despite the higher velocities and reduced depth for possible instability feedthrough. Early results have shown good repeatability, with up to 1/2 the neutron yield coming from α-particle self-heating. PMID:25910132

  6. Characterizing Hot-Spot Dynamics of Direct-Drive Cryogenic Implosions on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, K. S.; McKenty, P. W.; Shvydky, A.; Knauer, J. P.; Collins, T. J. B.; Delettrez, J. A.; Keller, D.; Marinak, M. M.

    2015-11-01

    In direct-drive inertial confinement fusion, nonuniformities in laser drive, capsule manufacture, and target positioning lead to non-radial hydrodynamic flow in the hot spot at stagnation. Characterizing such flow in the hot spot requires simulating the entire capsule in three dimensions to remove symmetry boundary conditions, which artificially constrain hot-spot flow. This paper will present results from 3-D simulations of cryogenic implosions on OMEGA using HYDRA. Low-mode asymmetries and their contributions to residual hot-spot kinetic energy will be discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944 and performed under the auspices of LLNL under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  7. Theory of Ignition, Burn and Hydro-equivalency for Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Recent advances in the theory of ignition and burn for inertial confinement fusion are presented and related to the experimental observables of the current indirect-drive ignition campaign on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the direct-drive implosion campaign on the OMEGA laser. The performance parameter currently used for the ignition campaign (the Experimental Ignition Threshold Factor or ITFX) is related to the well-known Lawson criterion. Hydro-equivalent curves are derived and used to extrapolate current results from OMEGA to future direct-drive ignition experiments on the NIF. The impact of laser-plasma instabilities, hot electron and radiation preheat on the hydrodynamic scaling is discussed. Remedies to mitigate the detrimental effects of laser-plasma and hydrodynamic instabilities are presented. It is also shown that ignition through a late shock launched at the end of the laser pulse (shock ignition) may be possible on the NIF at sub-megajoule energies. (author)

  8. Change in inertial confinement fusion implosions upon using an ab initio multiphase DT equation of state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillabet, L; Canaud, B; Salin, G; Mazevet, S; Loubeyre, P

    2011-09-01

    Improving the description of the equation of state (EOS) of deuterium-tritium (DT) has recently been shown to change significantly the gain of an inertial confinement fusion target [S. X. Hu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 235003 (2010)]. Here we use an advanced multiphase EOS, based on ab initio calculations, to perform a full optimization of the laser pulse shape with hydrodynamic simulations starting from 19 K in DT ice. The thermonuclear gain is shown to be a robust estimate over possible uncertainties of the EOS. Two different target designs are discussed, for shock ignition and self-ignition. In the first case, the areal density and thermonuclear energy can be recovered by slightly increasing the laser energy. In the second case, a lower in-flight adiabat is needed, leading to a significant delay (3 ns) in the shock timing of the implosion. PMID:22026681

  9. Interactive tools designed to study mix in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welser-sherrill, Leslie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cooley, James H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilson, Doug C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Graphical user interface tools have been built in IDL to study mix in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion cores. FLAME (Fall-Line Analysis Mix Evaluator), a code which investigates yield degradation due to mix , was designed to post-process 1D hydrodynamic simulation output by implementing a variety of mix models. Three of these mix models are based on the physics of the fall-line. In addition, mixing data from other sources can be incorporated into the yield degradation analysis. Two independent tools called HAME (Haan Analysis Mix Evaluator) and YAME (Youngs Analysis Mix Evaluator) were developed to calculate the spatial extent of the mix region according to the Haan saturation model and Youngs' phenomenological model, respectively. FLAME facilitates a direct comparison to experimental data. The FLAME, HAME, and YAME interfaces are user-friendly, flexible, and platform-independent.

  10. Preionization effect on the implosion dynamics of one- and double argon gas puffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments to compress both single- and double-cascade Ar puff were carried out. Three different systems of preliminary ionization, that is: 1 - spark illumination by UV-radiation; 2- cylindrical magnetron charge in crossed ExB fields; 3- planar magnetron charge in crossed ExB fields, are used to treat gas medium of a puffin preliminary. Conditions under which current layer stratificates as puffin is being compressed are determined for preliminary ionization three systems. The experimental data show direct dependence of compression dynamics of a gas puffin on the type of the used system of preliminary ionization. Essential stabilization both of instabilities occurring during compression of a gas puffin and of the output parameters of the implosion was reached when using magnetron system of preliminary ionization

  11. Wobblers and Rayleigh–Taylor instability mitigation in HIF target implosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawata, S., E-mail: kwt@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp [Utsunomiya University, 7-1-2 Yohtoh, Utsunomiya 321-8585 (Japan); Kurosaki, T.; Noguchi, K.; Suzuki, T.; Koseki, S.; Barada, D.; Ma, Y.Y. [Utsunomiya University, 7-1-2 Yohtoh, Utsunomiya 321-8585 (Japan); Ogoyski, A.I. [Varna Technical University, Varna 9010 (Bulgaria); Barnard, J.J.; Logan, B.G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory for Heavy Ion Fusion, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Virtual National Laboratory for Heavy Ion Fusion, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    A few percent wobbling-beam illumination nonuniformity is realized in heavy ion inertial confinement fusion (HIF) by a spiraling beam axis motion in the paper. The wobbling heavy ion beam (HIB) illumination was proposed to realize a uniform implosion in HIF. However, the initial imprint of the wobbling HIBs was a serious problem and introduces a large unacceptable energy deposition nonuniformity. In wobbling the HIBs illumination, the illumination nonuniformity oscillates in time and space. The oscillating-HIB energy deposition may contribute to the reduction of the HIBs' illumination nonuniformity and also the mitigation of the Rayleigh–Taylor instability. The wobbling HIBs can be generated in HIB accelerators and the oscillating frequency may be from several 100 MHz to 1 GHz. Three-dimensional HIBs illumination computations presented here show that the few percent wobbling HIBs illumination nonuniformity oscillates successfully with the same wobbling HIBs frequency.

  12. Thin Shell, High Velocity Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hurricane, O. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Callahan, D. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Barrios, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Casey, D. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dewald, E. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dittrich, T. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Doppner, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Haan, S. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hinkel, D. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Berzak Hopkins, L. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Le Pape, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); MacPhee, A. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pak, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Park, H. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Patel, P. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Remington, B. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Robey, H. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Salmonson, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Springer, P. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tommasini, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Benedetti, L. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bionta, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bond, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bradley, D. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Caggiano, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Celliers, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cerjan, C. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Church, J. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dixit, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dylla-Spears, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Edgell, D. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Edwards, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Field, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fittinghoff, D. N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Frenje, J. A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Gatu Johnson, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Grim, G. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Guler, N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hatarik, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Herrmann, H. W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hsing, W. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Izumi, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jones, O. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Khan, S. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kilkenny, J. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Knauer, J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Kohut, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kozioziemski, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kritcher, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kyrala, G. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); MacGowan, B. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mackinnon, A. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meezan, N. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Merrill, F. E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Moody, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nagel, S. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Parham, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ralph, J. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rosen, M. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rygg, J. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sater, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sayre, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Schneider, M. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Shaughnessy, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Spears, B. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Town, R.P. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Volegov, P. L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wan, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Widmann, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wilde, C. H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Yeamans, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-04-06

    Experiments have recently been conducted at the National Ignition Facility utilizing inertial confinement fusion capsule ablators that are 175 and 165 μm in thickness, 10% and 15% thinner, respectively, than the nominal thickness capsule used throughout the high foot and most of the National Ignition Campaign. These three-shock, high-adiabat, high-foot implosions have demonstrated good performance, with higher velocity and better symmetry control at lower laser powers and energies than their nominal thickness ablator counterparts. Little to no hydrodynamic mix into the DT hot spot has been observed despite the higher velocities and reduced depth for possible instability feedthrough. Earlier results have shown good repeatability, with up to 1/2 the neutron yield coming from α-particle self-heating.

  13. Diagnostic of DT fuel plasma state in direct-driven implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on systematical theoretical and experimental studies of ICF neutron energy spectrum and charged particle measurement techniques, the diagnostic systems, numerical simulation codes and data processing methods have been developed and, in 2000, successfully applied for the first time to direct-driven implosion experiments at SG-II laser facility utilizing 8 beams of high power laser with a wavelength of 1053 nm. The first domestic success of both ions temperature and areal density diagnostics through neutron time-of-flight measurement and knock-on fuel nuclei measurement are achieved. The neutron scattering induced knock-on D and T nuclei are measured by using CR39 solid state track detector. Energy spectrum of protons released from DD reactions accompanied simultaneously by DT reactions is measured by nuclear emulsion. The results indicate that the energy spectrum distortion of energetic knock-on nuclei escaped out from the target can be neglected

  14. Directivity of basic linear arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Henning

    1970-01-01

    For a linear uniform array ofnelements, an expression is derived for the directivity as a function of the spacing and the phase constants. The cases of isotropic elements, collinear short dipoles, and parallel short dipoles are included. The formula obtained is discussed in some detail and contour...

  15. Spherical Horn Array for Wideband Propagation Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franek, Ondrej; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2011-01-01

    A spherical array of horn antennas designed to obtain directional channel information and characteristics is introduced. A dual-polarized quad-ridged horn antenna with open flared boundaries and coaxial feeding for the frequency band 600 MHz–6 GHz is used as the element of the array. Matching...

  16. Difference packing arrays and systematic authentication codes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a type of combinatorial design (called difference packing array)is proposed and used to give a construction of systematic authentication codes. Taking advantage of this construction, some new series of systematic authentication codes are obtainable in terms of existing difference packing arrays.

  17. First results of radiation-driven, layered deuterium-tritium implosions with a 3-shock adiabat-shaped drive at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Robey, H. F.; Döppner, T.; Jones, O. S.; Milovich, J. L.; Bachmann, B.; Baker, K. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Bond, E.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; Celliers, P. M.; Cerjan, C.; Clark, D. S.; Dixit, S. N.; Edwards, M. J.; Haan, S. W.; Hamza, A. V.; Hurricane, O. A.; Jancaitis, K. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2015-08-15

    Radiation-driven, layered deuterium-tritium plastic capsule implosions were carried out using a new, 3-shock “adiabat-shaped” drive on the National Ignition Facility. The purpose of adiabat shaping is to use a stronger first shock, reducing hydrodynamic instability growth in the ablator. The shock can decay before reaching the deuterium-tritium fuel leaving it on a low adiabat and allowing higher fuel compression. The fuel areal density was improved by ∼25% with this new drive compared to similar “high-foot” implosions, while neutron yield was improved by more than 4 times, compared to “low-foot” implosions driven at the same compression and implosion velocity.

  18. Self characterization of a coded aperture array for neutron source imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron imaging system at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is an important diagnostic tool for measuring the two-dimensional size and shape of the neutrons produced in the burning deuterium-tritium plasma during the stagnation stage of inertial confinement fusion implosions. Since the neutron source is small (∼100 μm) and neutrons are deeply penetrating (>3 cm) in all materials, the apertures used to achieve the desired 10-μm resolution are 20-cm long, triangular tapers machined in gold foils. These gold foils are stacked to form an array of 20 apertures for pinhole imaging and three apertures for penumbral imaging. These apertures must be precisely aligned to accurately place the field of view of each aperture at the design location, or the location of the field of view for each aperture must be measured. In this paper we present a new technique that has been developed for the measurement and characterization of the precise location of each aperture in the array. We present the detailed algorithms used for this characterization and the results of reconstructed sources from inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments at NIF

  19. X-ray emission from a high-atomic-number z-pinch plasma created from compact wire arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal and nonthermal x-ray emission from the implosion of compact tungsten wire arrays, driven by 5 MA from the Saturn accelerator, are measured and compared with LLNL Radiation-Hydro-Code (RHC) and SNL Hydro-Code (HC) numerical models. Multiple implosions, due to sequential compressions and expansions of the plasma, are inferred from the measured multiple x-radiation bursts. Timing of the multiple implosions and the thermal x-ray spectra measured between 1 and 10 keV are consistent with the RHC simulations. The magnitude of the nonthermal x-ray emission measured from 10 to 100 keV ranges from 0.02 to 0.08% of the total energy radiated and is correlated with bright-spot emission along the z-axis, as observed in earlier Gamble-11 single exploding-wire experiments. The similarities of the measured nonthermal spectrum and bright-spot emission with those measured at 0.8 MA on Gamble-II suggest a common production mechanism for this process. A model of electron acceleration across magnetic fields in highly-collisional, high-atomic-number plasmas is developed, which shows the existence of a critical electric field, Ec, below which strong nonthermal electron creation (and the associated nonthermal x rays) do not occur. HC simulations show that significant nonthermal electrons are not expected in this experiment (as observed) because the calculated electric fields are at least one to two orders-of-magnitude below Ec. These negative nonthermal results are confirmed by RHC simulations using a nonthermal model based on a Fokker-Plank analysis. Lastly, the lower production efficiency and the larger, more irregular pinch spots formed in this experiment relative to those measured on Gamble II suggest that implosion geometries are not as efficient as single exploding-wire geometries for warm x-ray production

  20. Small satellite solar array substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, John N.; Rosanova, Giulio

    1994-01-01

    The SMall EXplorer (SMEX) Fast Auroral SnapshoT (FAST) spacecraft was developed to investigate plasma physics of auroral phenomena at high orbital altitude. The FAST satellite comprises a variety of deployable booms with sensors on the ends, and instruments that protrude from the main body of the spacecraft to obtain the plasma and electromagnetic fields data. This required the plasma disturbance around the satellite to be kept to a minimum. A non deployable, body mounted solar array was implemented. This led to the design of a light weight solar array substrate with a high degree of structural integrity.

  1. First Measurements of Fuel-Ablator Interface Instability Growth in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, C. R.; Döppner, T.; Casey, D. T.; Bunn, T. L.; Carlson, L. C.; Dylla-Spears, R. J.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Nikroo, A.; Robey, H. F.; Sater, J. D.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    2016-08-01

    Direct measurements of hydrodynamic instability growth at the fuel-ablator interface in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions are reported for the first time. These experiments investigate one of the degradation mechanisms behind the lower-than-expected performance of early ICF implosions on the National Ignition Facility. Face-on x-ray radiography is used to measure instability growth occurring between the deuterium-tritium fuel and the plastic ablator from well-characterized perturbations. This growth starts in two ways through separate experiments—either from a preimposed interface modulation or from ablation front feedthrough. These experiments are consistent with analytic modeling and radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, which say that a moderately unstable Atwood number and convergence effects are causing in-flight perturbation growth at the interface. The analysis suggests that feedthrough from outersurface perturbations dominates the interface perturbation growth at mode 60.

  2. Effects of the irradiation of a finite number of laser beams on the implosion of a cone-guided target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, T.; Sakagami, H.; Nagatomo, H.; Sunahara, A.

    2016-03-01

    In direct drive laser fusion, the non-uniformity of the laser absorption on the target surface caused by the irradiation of a finite number of laser beams is a sever problem. GekkoXII laser at Osaka University has twelve laser beams and is irradiated to the target with a dodecahedron orientation, in which the distribution of the laser absorption on the target surface becomes non-uniform. Furthermore, in the case of a cone-guided target, the laser irradiation orientation is more limited. In this paper, we conducted implosion simulations of the cone- guided target based on GekkoXII irradiation orientation and compared the case of using the twelve beams and nine beams where the three beams irradiating the cone region are cut. The implosion simulations were conducted by a three-dimensional pure hydro code.

  3. High-resolution spectroscopy for Doppler-broadening ion temperature measurements of implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, J. A.; Stewart, R. E.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Shepherd, R.; Schneider, M. B.; Miles, A. R.; Scott, H. A.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Hsing, W. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-493, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Future implosion experiments at the national ignition facility (NIF) will endeavor to simultaneously measure electron and ion temperatures with temporal and spatial resolution in order to explore non-equilibrium temperature distributions and their relaxation toward equilibrium. In anticipation of these experiments, and with understanding of the constraints of the NIF facility environment, we have explored the use of Doppler broadening of mid-Z dopant emission lines, such as krypton He-{alpha} at 13 keV, as a diagnostic of time- and potentially space-resolved ion temperature. We have investigated a number of options analytically and with numerical raytracing, and we have identified several promising candidate spectrometer designs that meet the expected requirements of spectral and temporal resolution and data signal-to-noise ratio for gas-filled exploding pusher implosions, while providing maximum flexibility for use on a variety of experiments that potentially include burning plasma.

  4. High-resolution spectroscopy for Doppler-broadening ion temperature measurements of implosions at the National Ignition Facilitya)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, J. A.; Stewart, R. E.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Shepherd, R.; Schneider, M. B.; Miles, A. R.; Scott, H. A.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Hsing, W. W.

    2012-10-01

    Future implosion experiments at the national ignition facility (NIF) will endeavor to simultaneously measure electron and ion temperatures with temporal and spatial resolution in order to explore non-equilibrium temperature distributions and their relaxation toward equilibrium. In anticipation of these experiments, and with understanding of the constraints of the NIF facility environment, we have explored the use of Doppler broadening of mid-Z dopant emission lines, such as krypton He-α at 13 keV, as a diagnostic of time- and potentially space-resolved ion temperature. We have investigated a number of options analytically and with numerical raytracing, and we have identified several promising candidate spectrometer designs that meet the expected requirements of spectral and temporal resolution and data signal-to-noise ratio for gas-filled exploding pusher implosions, while providing maximum flexibility for use on a variety of experiments that potentially include burning plasma.

  5. High-resolution spectroscopy for Doppler-broadening ion temperature measurements of implosions at the National Ignition Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, J A; Stewart, R E; Beiersdorfer, P; Shepherd, R; Schneider, M B; Miles, A R; Scott, H A; Smalyuk, V A; Hsing, W W

    2012-10-01

    Future implosion experiments at the national ignition facility (NIF) will endeavor to simultaneously measure electron and ion temperatures with temporal and spatial resolution in order to explore non-equilibrium temperature distributions and their relaxation toward equilibrium. In anticipation of these experiments, and with understanding of the constraints of the NIF facility environment, we have explored the use of Doppler broadening of mid-Z dopant emission lines, such as krypton He-α at 13 keV, as a diagnostic of time- and potentially space-resolved ion temperature. We have investigated a number of options analytically and with numerical raytracing, and we have identified several promising candidate spectrometer designs that meet the expected requirements of spectral and temporal resolution and data signal-to-noise ratio for gas-filled exploding pusher implosions, while providing maximum flexibility for use on a variety of experiments that potentially include burning plasma. PMID:23126948

  6. Coherent magnetic semiconductor nanodot arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu Faxian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In searching appropriate candidates of magnetic semiconductors compatible with mainstream Si technology for future spintronic devices, extensive attention has been focused on Mn-doped Ge magnetic semiconductors. Up to now, lack of reliable methods to obtain high-quality MnGe nanostructures with a desired shape and a good controllability has been a barrier to make these materials practically applicable for spintronic devices. Here, we report, for the first time, an innovative growth approach to produce self-assembled and coherent magnetic MnGe nanodot arrays with an excellent reproducibility. Magnetotransport experiments reveal that the nanodot arrays possess giant magneto-resistance associated with geometrical effects. The discovery of the MnGe nanodot arrays paves the way towards next-generation high-density magnetic memories and spintronic devices with low-power dissipation.

  7. Selecting Sums in Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Jørgensen, Allan Grønlund

    2008-01-01

    In an array of n numbers each of the \\binomn2+nUnknown control sequence '\\binom' contiguous subarrays define a sum. In this paper we focus on algorithms for selecting and reporting maximal sums from an array of numbers. First, we consider the problem of reporting k subarrays inducing the k largest...... sums among all subarrays of length at least l and at most u. For this problem we design an optimal O(n + k) time algorithm. Secondly, we consider the problem of selecting a subarray storing the k’th largest sum. For this problem we prove a time bound of Θ(n · max {1,log(k/n)}) by describing an...... algorithm with this running time and by proving a matching lower bound. Finally, we combine the ideas and obtain an O(n· max {1,log(k/n)}) time algorithm that selects a subarray storing the k’th largest sum among all subarrays of length at least l and at most u....

  8. Effects of Low-Order Irradiation Nonuniformity on X-Ray Images of ICF Implosion Experiments on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, R.; Marshall, F. J.; Delettrez, J. A.; McKenty, P. W.; Radha, P. B.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    2003-10-01

    Time-resolved and time-integrated x-ray images of implosion experiments on OMEGA reveal asymmetric hydrodynamic histories of the imploding cores, including the asymmetric arrival and reverberation of the compression shock wave and the asymmetric convergence and expansion of the imploding shell. Implosions driven with irradiation nonuniformity of low harmonic order have been simulated to verify that recent improvements in beam-to-beam power balance, refinements in beam pointing and target positioning, and optimization of beam profiles would produce observed improvements in the image symmetry. Simulations of time-dependent x-ray images clarify how irradiation nonuniformity affects image symmetry and implosion performance. Adding helium to the fill increases the emissivity of the core, allowing the convergence of the compression shock to be visible as well as the impact of the reflected shock on the shell. Simulations have been performed with the hydrodynamic simulation code DRACO, and x-ray images have been simulated with the atomic-physics/radiation-transport postprocessor SPECT3D. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460.

  9. Development of Lower Energy Neutron Spectroscopy for Areal Density Measurement in Implosion Experiment at NIF and Omega

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isumi, N; Lerche, R A; Phillips, T W; Schmid, G J; Moran, M J; Sangster, T C

    2001-08-02

    Areal density ({rho}R) is a fundamental parameter that characterizes the performance of an ICF implosion. For high areal densities ({rho}R> 0.1 g/cm{sup 2}), which will be realized in implosion experiments at NIF and LMJ, the target areal density exceeds the stopping range of charged particles and measurements with charged particle spectroscopy will be difficult. In this region, an areal density measurement method using down shifted neutron counting is a promising alternative. The probability of neutron scattering in the imploded plasma is proportional to the areal density of the plasma. The spectrum of neutrons scattered by the specific target nucleus has a characteristic low energy cut off. This enables separate, simultaneous measurements of fuel and pusher {rho}Rs. To apply this concept in implosion experiments, the detector should have extremely large dynamic range. Sufficient signal output for low energy neutrons is also required. A lithium-glass scintillation-fiber plate (LG-SCIFI) is a promising candidate for this application. In this paper we propose a novel technique based on downshifted neutron measurements with a lithium-glass scintillation-fiber plate. The details of instrumentation and background estimation with Monte Carlo calculation are reported.

  10. Measuring symmetry of implosions in cryogenic Hohlraums at the NIF using gated x-ray detectors (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignition of imploding inertial confinement capsules requires, among other things, controlling the symmetry with high accuracy and fidelity. We have used gated x-ray imaging, with 10 μm and 70 ps resolution, to detect the x-ray emission from the imploded core of symmetry capsules at the National Ignition Facility. The measurements are used to characterize the time dependent symmetry and the x-ray bang time of the implosion from two orthogonal directions. These measurements were one of the primary diagnostics used to tune the parameters of the laser and Hohlraum to vary the symmetry and x-ray bang time of the implosion of cryogenically cooled ignition scale deuterium/helium filled plastic capsules. Here, we will report on the successful measurements performed with up to 1.2 MJ of laser energy in a fully integrated cryogenics gas-filled ignition-scale Hohlraum and capsule illuminated with 192 smoothed laser beams. We will describe the technique, the accuracy of the technique, and the results of the variation in symmetry with tuning parameters, and explain how that set was used to predictably tune the implosion symmetry as the laser energy, the laser cone wavelength separation, and the Hohlraum size were increased to ignition scales. We will also describe how to apply that technique to cryogenically layered tritium-hydrogen-deuterium capsules.

  11. Development of a polar direct-drive platform for studying inertial confinement fusion implosion mix on the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments were performed to develop a platform for the simultaneous measurement of mix and its effects on fusion burn. Two polar direct drive implosions of all-plastic capsules were conducted for the first time on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). To measure implosion trajectory and symmetry, area image backlighting of these capsules was also employed for the first time on NIF, an advance over previous 1-D slit imaging experiments, providing detailed symmetry data of the capsules as they imploded. The implosion trajectory and low-mode asymmetry seen in the resultant radiographs agreed with pre-shot predictions even though the 700 kJ drive energy produced laser beam intensities exceeding laser-plasma instability thresholds. Post-shot simulations indicate that the capsule yield was reduced by a factor of two compared to pre-shot predictions owing to as-shot laser drive asymmetries. The pre-shot predictions of bang time agreed within 200 ps with the experimental results. The second shot incorporated a narrow groove encircling the equator of the capsule. A predicted yield reduction factor of three was not observed

  12. Performance metrics for Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions: aspects of the technical framework for measuring progress in the National Ignition Campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spears, B K; Glenzer, S; Edwards, M J; Brandon, S; Clark, D; Town, R; Cerjan, C; Dylla-Spears, R; Mapoles, E; Munro, D; Salmonson, J; Sepke, S; Weber, S; Hatchett, S; Haan, S; Springer, P; Moses, E; Mapoles, E; Munro, D; Salmonson, J; Sepke, S

    2011-12-16

    The National Ignition Campaign (NIC) uses non-igniting 'THD' capsules to study and optimize the hydrodynamic assembly of the fuel without burn. These capsules are designed to simultaneously reduce DT neutron yield and to maintain hydrodynamic similarity with the DT ignition capsule. We will discuss nominal THD performance and the associated experimental observables. We will show the results of large ensembles of numerical simulations of THD and DT implosions and their simulated diagnostic outputs. These simulations cover a broad range of both nominal and off nominal implosions. We will focus on the development of an experimental implosion performance metric called the experimental ignition threshold factor (ITFX). We will discuss the relationship between ITFX and other integrated performance metrics, including the ignition threshold factor (ITF), the generalized Lawson criterion (GLC), and the hot spot pressure (HSP). We will then consider the experimental results of the recent NIC THD campaign. We will show that we can observe the key quantities for producing a measured ITFX and for inferring the other performance metrics. We will discuss trends in the experimental data, improvement in ITFX, and briefly the upcoming tuning campaign aimed at taking the next steps in performance improvement on the path to ignition on NIF.

  13. Time Domain Analysis of Transmit/Receive Dipole Pair Array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Li-zhi; Xiao Bo-xur; Zhu Guo-qiang; Yang Zi-jie

    2003-01-01

    We introduce a new transmit/receive dipole pair array to obtain a compact quasi-monostatic antenna structure for ground penetrating radar systems. And we analyze this transmit/receive dipole pair array in time domain. The numerical results show that if the distance between the transmit antenna and receive antenna is appropriate the array configuration is adoptable.

  14. High-foot Implosion Workshop (March 22-24, 2016) Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurricane, O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-05-06

    From March 22-24, 2016 at Workshop was held at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory bringing together international experts in inertial confinement fusion research for the purpose of discussing the results from the ‘high-foot implosion campaign.’ The Workshop topics covered a retrospective of the first two years of experiments, a discussion of our best present understanding of what the data and our models imply, a discussion about remaining mysteries that are not understood at this time, and a discussion of our strategy moving forward. The material herein contains information from published and unpublished sources and is distributed solely for the purposes of this Workshop. Key assessments and conclusions resulting from the Workshop are: “The high foot campaign is extremely well documented and the interested reader is urged to go directly to the peer-reviewed journal literature for details.” – D. Haynes (LANL) “Overall progress in understanding of fuel and hot-spot properties near peak burn is excellent.” – V. Goncharov (LLE) “I would say that given the constraints of using the same hohlraum and similar capsule designs to the National Ignition Campaign, the High Foot Campaign achieved as much as could be expected. Indeed the demonstration of significant alpha particle heating remains a landmark achievement.” – J. Chittenden (Imperial College) “One of the principal points of discussion at the meeting was the importance of the roll over in inferred pressure that occurs with reducing coast time for different ablator thicknesses and the idea of repeating shot N140819 to confirm this. I would be very interested to see a return to the High Foot platform as a way to exercise the improved radiographic capabilities such as the curved crystal imaging system and as a way to examine the hypothesis of ‘burn truncation by aneurism.’ ” – J. Chittenden (Imperial College) “It is clear from the quality of the data presented during this workshop

  15. Solitons in optomechanical arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Jing-Hui; Xiong, Hao; Si, Liu-Gang; Lü, Xin-You; Wu, Ying

    2016-06-15

    We show that optical solitons can be obtained with a one-dimensional optomechanical array that consists of a chain of periodically spaced identical optomechanical systems. Unlike conventional optical solitons, which originate from nonlinear polarization, the optical soliton here stems from a new mechanism, namely, phonon-photon interaction. Under proper conditions, the phonon-photon induced nonlinearity that refers to the optomechanical nonlinearity will exactly compensate the dispersion caused by photon hopping of adjacent optomechanical systems. Moreover, the solitons are capable of exhibiting very low group velocity, depending on the photon hopping rate, which may lead to many important applications, including all-optical switches and on-chip optical architecture. This work may extend the range of optomechanics and nonlinear optics and provide a new field to study soliton theory and develop corresponding applications. PMID:27304261

  16. BOLOMETRIC ARRAYS FOR MILLIMETER WAVELENGTHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Castillo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available During last years, semiconductor bolometers using thin lms have been developed at INAOE, speci cally boron-doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon lms. The characteristics shown by these devices made them attractive to be used in astronomical instrumentation, mainly in two-dimentional arrays. These detector arrays used at the Large Millimeter Telescope will make possible to obtain astronomical images in millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths. With this in mind, we are developing a method to produce, with enough reliability, bolometer arrays at INAOE. Until now, silicon nitride diaphragm arrays, useful as radiation absorbers, have succesfully been obtained. Sizes going from one to four millimeter by element in a consistent way; however we have not tested thermometers and metallic contact deposition yet. At the same time, we are working on two possible con gurations for the readout electronics; one of them using commercial components while the other will be an integrated circuit speci cally designed for this application. Both versions will work below 77K.

  17. One-Dimensional Simulation of the Effects of Unstable Mix on Neutron and Charged Particle Spectra from Laser-Driven Implosion Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, R.; Delettrez, J. A.; Goncharov, V. N.; McKenty, P. W.; Radha, P. B.; Skupsky, S.

    1999-11-01

    The effects of Rayleigh--Taylor flow in recent laser-driven implosion experiments are simulated in one dimension by the hydrocode LILAC. Mix is modeled as a diffusive transport process affecting material constituents, thermal energy, and turbulent mix-motion energy within a growing mix region whose boundaries are derived from a saturable, linear multimode model of the Rayleigh--Taylor instability. The linear growth rates and the feedthrough coupling between perturbations of different unstable interfaces are obtained analytically in terms of the one- dimensional fluid profiles. Mode evolution proceeds according to equations applicable to all phases of acceleration, and the effects of geometrically converging, compressible flow are taken into account. Simulated mix-diagnostic signals include time-resolved energy spectra of neutrons from core fuel and/or embedded deuterium shell layers and the energy spectra of charged primary and secondary products of nuclear reactions. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460, the University of Rochester, and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority.

  18. Radiometric stability of Phase 3 WISP arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, David S.; Marlow, Steven A.; Bergin, Thomas P.; Murrer, Robert Lee

    2000-07-01

    Phase 3 WISP arrays and BRITE arrays are currently being used extensively in many projection systems in many different facilities. These arrays have not been annealed at the factory, and previous tests with the arrays have revealed instabilities in the radiometric output when the arrays are driven at higher voltages. In some applications, the instabilities can be avoided by operating the arrays at lower voltages. In many KHILS applications, it is desirable to drive the arrays with the highest possible voltages to simulate hot missile targets. In one KHILS application (the KHILS VAcuum Cold Chamber, KVACC), the arrays are cooled to near cryogenic temperatures and then driven to high voltages. At lower substrate temperatures, the characteristic responses of the emitters change. Thus, it is important that the response and the stability of the radiometric output of the arrays be well understood for various substrate temperatures, and that the arrays either be annealed or operated below the voltage where the emitters begin to anneal. KHILS has investigated annealing procedures in the past, but there was concern that the annealing procedures themselves -- driving the arrays at high voltages for long times -- would damage the arrays. In order to understand the performance of the arrays better, and to reduce risks associated with driving the arrays at high voltages and operating the arrays at low substrate temperatures, a systematic measurement program was initiated. The radiometric output of new Phase 3 WISP arrays was accurately measured as a function of voltage and time. Arrays designated for testing were driven to the higher voltages and the radiometric output was measured for as long as two hours. Curves indicative of the annealing were observed, and it was determined that the maximum stable output without annealing was about 500 K (MWIR apparent temperature). Blocks of emitters were annealed and tested again. It was determined that stable output of as much as 680 K

  19. Plasma flow switch characterization for the Los Alamos Foil Implosion Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The next system design under consideration for the Los Alamos Foil Implosion Project is projected to deliver tens of mega-amperes of electrical current produced by high-explosive driven flux compression generators on a time scale of about one microsecond to a load foil. The use of such generators, with time scales of order several tenths of a millisecond, leads to considerable pulse shaping problems. Previously it was noted that a commutating switch might serve as an efficient alternative to a closing switch in transferring current from a coaxial transmission line to a cylindrically imploding load. Research at the Air Force Weapons Laboratory (AFWL) has met with considerable success in efficiently transferring currents of order 10 MA to an imploding liner using the plasma flow switch concept (PFS). Besides efficiently transferring current, the plasma flow switch protects the load region from high voltages generated by an opening switch until the current is present to provide magnetic insulation. For these reasons, a PFS is being investigated as the final pulse shaping step in the design. A series of capacitor bank experiments is also being fielded to help investigate physics issues and to benchmark the codes

  20. The Maximal Kinematical Invariance Group of Fluid Dynamics and Explosion-Implosion Duality

    CERN Document Server

    O'Raifeartaigh, Lochlainn

    2001-01-01

    It has recently been found that supernova explosions can be simulated in the laboratory by implosions induced in a plasma by intense lasers. A theoretical explanation is that the inversion transformation ($\\Sigma: t \\to -1/t, {\\bf x}\\to {\\bf x}/t$), leaves the Euler equations of fluid dynamics, with standard polytropic exponent, invariant. This implies that the kinematical invariance group of the Euler equations is larger than the Galilei group. In this paper we determine, in a systematic manner, the maximal invariance group ${\\cal G}$ of general fluid dynamics and show that it is a semi-direct product ${\\cal G} = SL(2,R) \\wedge G$, where the $SL(2,R)$ group contains the time-translations, dilations and the inversion $\\Sigma$, and $G$ is the static (nine-parameter) Galilei group. A subtle aspect of the inclusion of viscosity fields is discussed and it is shown that the Navier-Stokes assumption of constant viscosity breaks the $SL(2, R)$ group to a two-parameter group of time translations and dilations in a te...

  1. Experiments and Simulations on Magnetically Driven Implosions in High Repetition Rate Dense Plasma Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero Bendixsen, Luis; Bott-Suzuki, Simon; Cordaro, Samuel; Krishnan, Mahadevan; Chapman, Stephen; Coleman, Phil; Chittenden, Jeremy

    2015-11-01

    Results will be shown on coordinated experiments and MHD simulations on magnetically driven implosions, with an emphasis on current diffusion and heat transport. Experiments are run at a Mather-type dense plasma focus (DPF-3, Vc: 20 kV, Ip: 480 kA, E: 5.8 kJ). Typical experiments are run at 300 kA and 0.33 Hz repetition rate with different gas loads (Ar, Ne, and He) at pressures of ~ 1-3 Torr, usually gathering 1000 shots per day. Simulations are run at a 96-core HP blade server cluster using 3GHz processors with 4GB RAM per node.Preliminary results show axial and radial phase plasma sheath velocity of ~ 1x105 m/s. These are in agreement with the snow-plough model of DPFs. Peak magnetic field of ~ 1 Tesla in the radial compression phase are measured. Electron densities on the order of 1018 cm-3 anticipated. Comparison between 2D and 3D models with empirical results show a good agreement in the axial and radial phase.

  2. Hydrodynamic Instability Growth in Polar-Direct-Drive Implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenberger, M.; Shvydky, A.; Radha, P. B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Goncharov, V. N.; Marshall, F. J.; Knauer, J. P.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Nikroo, A.; Wallace, R. J.

    2015-11-01

    Polar direct drive (PDD) is an alternative, direct-drive inertial confinement fusion platform being developed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Shell stability of the target is of key importance for an optimized performance. We have begun an experimental campaign to characterize Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) growth and laser imprint in spherical PDD implosions on the NIF. Plastic, cone-in-shell targets with an outer diameter of ~ 2 . 2 mm were imploded, and the RT-amplified shell mass modulations were tracked via measurements of the 2-D optical depth variations using soft x-ray radiography. The RT growth of discrete modes was investigated by machining single-mode, sinusoidal corrugations onto the target surface, which acted as well-characterized seeds. We will present platform characterization and backlighter optimization data as well as experimental results of instability growth in spherical PDD experiments on the NIF. The experimental data will be compared to 2-D DRACO simulations and strategies for measuring high l-mode perturbations > 300 and for mitigating imprint in future PDD experiments will be discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  3. Computer simulations of laser hot spots and implosion symmetry kiniform phase plate experiments on Nova

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LASNEX computer code simulations have been performed for radiation symmetry experiments on the Nova laser with vacuum and gas-filled hohlraum targets [R. L. Kauffman et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 1927 (1998)]. In previous experiments with unsmoothed laser beams, the symmetry was substantially shifted by deflection of the laser beams. In these experiments, laser beams have been smoothed with Kiniform Phase Plates in an attempt to remove deflection of the beams. The experiments have shown that this smoothing significantly improves the agreement with LASNEX calculations of implosion symmetry. The images of laser produced hot spots on the inside of the hohlraum case have been found to differ from LASNEX calculations, suggesting that some beam deflection or self-focusing may still be present or that emission from interpenetrating plasmas is an important component of the images. The measured neutron yields are in good agreement with simulations for vacuum hohlraums but are far different for gas-filled hohlraums. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  4. Mitigating laser imprint in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions with high-Z dopants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S X; Fiksel, G; Goncharov, V N; Skupsky, S; Meyerhofer, D D; Smalyuk, V A

    2012-05-11

    Nonuniformities seeded by both long- and short-wavelength laser perturbations can grow via Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion, leading to performance reduction in low-adiabat implosions. To mitigate the effect of laser imprinting on target performance, spherical RT experiments have been performed on OMEGA using Si- or Ge-doped plastic targets in a cone-in-shell configuration. Compared to a pure plastic target, radiation preheating from these high-Z dopants (Si/Ge) increases the ablation velocity and the standoff distance between the ablation front and laser-deposition region, thereby reducing both the imprinting efficiency and the RT growth rate. Experiments showed a factor of 2-3 reduction in the laser-imprinting efficiency and a reduced RT growth rate, leading to significant (3-5 times) reduction in the σ(rms) of shell ρR modulation for Si- or Ge-doped targets. These features are reproduced by radiation-hydrodynamics simulations using the two-dimensional hydrocode DRACO. PMID:23003051

  5. Application of 2-D simulation to hollow z-pinch implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of simulations of z-pinch implosions should have at least two goals: first, to properly model the most important physical processes occurring in the pinch allowing for a better understanding of the experiments and second, provide a design capability for future experiments. Beginning with experiments fielded at Los Alamos on the Pegasus 1 and Pegasus 2 capacitor banks, the authors have developed a methodology for simulating hollow z-pinches in two dimensions which has reproduced important features of the measured experimental current drive, spectrum, radiation pulse shape, peak power and total radiated energy. This methodology employs essentially one free parameter, the initial level of the random density perturbations imposed at the beginning of the 2-D simulation, but in general no adjustments to other parameters are required. Currently the authors are applying this capability to the analysis of recent Saturn and PBFA-Z experiments. The code results provide insight into the nature of the pinch plasma prior to arrival on-axis, during thermalization and development after peak pinch time. Among other things, the simulation results provide an explanation for the production of larger amounts of radiated energy than would be expected from a simple slug-model kinetic energy analysis and the appearance of multiple peaks in the radiation power. The 2-D modeling has also been applied to the analysis of Saturn dynamic hohlraum experiments and is being used in the design of this and other Z-Pinch applications on PBFA-Z

  6. Modeling of the merging, liner formation, implosion of hypervelocity plasma jets for the PLX- α project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassibry, Jason; Hsu, Scott; Schillo, Kevin; Samulyak, Roman; Stoltz, Peter; Beckwith, Kris

    2015-11-01

    A suite of numerical tools will support the conical and 4 π plasma-liner-formation experiments for the PLX- α project. A new Lagrangian particles (LP) method will provide detailed studies of the merging of plasma jets and plasma-liner formation/convergence. A 3d smooth particle hydrodynamic (SPH) code will simulate conical (up to 9 jets) and 4 π spherical (up to 60 jets) liner formation and implosion. Both LP and SPH will use the same tabular EOS generated by Propaceos, thermal conductivity, optically thin radiation and physical viscosity models. With LP and SPH,the major objectives are to study Mach-number degradation during jet merging, provide RMS amplitude and wave number of the liner nonuniformity at the leading edge, and develop scaling laws for ram pressure and liner uniformity as a function of jet parameters. USIM, a 3D multi-fluid plasma code, will be used to perform 1D and 2D simulations of plasma-jet-driven magneto-inertial fusion (PJMIF) to identify initial conditions in which the ``liner gain'' exceeds unity. A brief overview of the modeling program will be provided. Results from SPH modeling to support the PLX- α experimental design will also be presented, including preliminary ram-pressure scaling and non-uniformity characterization.

  7. Inference of ICF implosion core mix using experimental data and theoretical mix modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherrill, Leslie Welser [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Haynes, Donald A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cooley, James H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sherrill, Manolo E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mancini, Roberto C [UNR; Tommasini, Riccardo [LLNL; Golovkin, Igor E [PRISM COMP. SCIENCES; Haan, Steven W [LLNL

    2009-01-01

    The mixing between fuel and shell materials in Inertial Confinement Fusion (lCF) implosion cores is a current topic of interest. The goal of this work was to design direct-drive ICF experiments which have varying levels of mix, and subsequently to extract information on mixing directly from the experimental data using spectroscopic techniques. The experimental design was accomplished using hydrodynamic simulations in conjunction with Haan's saturation model, which was used to predict the mix levels of candidate experimental configurations. These theoretical predictions were then compared to the mixing information which was extracted from the experimental data, and it was found that Haan's mix model predicted trends in the width of the mix layer as a function of initial shell thickness. These results contribute to an assessment of the range of validity and predictive capability of the Haan saturation model, as well as increasing confidence in the methods used to extract mixing information from experimental data.

  8. Implosion and heating experiments of fast ignition targets by Gekko-XII and LFEX lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiraga H.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The FIREX-1 project, the goal of which is to demonstrate fuel heating up to 5 keV by fast ignition scheme, has been carried out since 2003 including construction and tuning of LFEX laser and integrated experiments. Implosion and heating experiment of Fast Ignition targets have been performed since 2009 with Gekko-XII and LFEX lasers. A deuterated polystyrene shell target was imploded with the 0.53- μm Gekko-XII, and the 1.053- μm beam of the LFEX laser was injected through a gold cone attached to the shell to generate hot electrons to heat the imploded fuel plasma. Pulse contrast ratio of the LFEX beam was significantly improved. Also a variety of plasma diagnostic instruments were developed to be compatible with harsh environment of intense hard x-rays (γ rays and electromagnetic pulses due to the intense LFEX beam on the target. Large background signals around the DD neutron signal in time-of-flight record of neutron detector were found to consist of neutrons via (γ,n reactions and scattered gamma rays. Enhanced neutron yield was confirmed by carefully eliminating such backgrounds. Neutron enhancement up to 3.5 × 107 was observed. Heating efficiency was estimated to be 10–20% assuming a uniform temperature rise model.

  9. Two Dimensional Simulations of Plastic-Shell, Direct-Drive Implosions on OMEGA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radha, P B; Goncharov, V N; Collins, T B; Delettrez, J A; Elbaz, Y; Glebov, V Y; Keck, R L; Keller, D E; Knauer, J P; Marozas, J A; Marshall, F J; McKenty, P W; Meyerhofer, D D; Regan, S P; Sangster, T C; Shvarts, D; Skupsky, S; Srebro, Y; Town, R J; Stoeckl, C

    2004-09-27

    Multidimensional hydrodynamic properties of high-adiabat direct-drive plastic-shell implosions on the OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] are investigated using the multidimensional hydrodynamic code, DRACO. Multimode simulations including the effects of nonuniform illumination and target roughness indicate that shell stability during the acceleration phase plays a critical role in determining target performance. For thick shells that remain integral during the acceleration phase, target yields are significantly reduced by the combination of the long-wavelength ({ell} < 10) modes due to surface roughness and beam imbalance and the intermediate modes (20 {le} {ell} {le} 50) due to single-beam nonuniformities. The neutron-production rate for these thick shells truncates relative to one-dimensional (1-D) predictions. The yield degradation in the thin shells is mainly due to shell breakup at short wavelengths ({lambda} {approx} {Delta}, where {Delta} is the in-flight shell thickness). The neutron-rate curves for the thinner shells have significantly lower amplitudes and a fall-off that is less steep than 1-D rates. DRACO simulation results are consistent with experimental observations.

  10. Super phase array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wee, W H; Pendry, J B [Condensed Matter Theory Group Department of Physics Imperial College London London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: w.wee07@imperial.ac.uk

    2010-03-15

    For a long time phase arrays have been used in a variety of wave transmission applications because of their simplicity and versatility. Conventionally there is a trade-off between the compactness of a phase array and its directivity. In this paper we demonstrate how by embedding a normal phase array within a superlens (made of negative refractive index material) we can overcome this constraint and create compact phase arrays with a virtual extent much larger than the physical size of the array. In this paper we also briefly discuss the apparent unphysical field divergences in superlenses and how to resolve this issue.

  11. Super phase array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a long time phase arrays have been used in a variety of wave transmission applications because of their simplicity and versatility. Conventionally there is a trade-off between the compactness of a phase array and its directivity. In this paper we demonstrate how by embedding a normal phase array within a superlens (made of negative refractive index material) we can overcome this constraint and create compact phase arrays with a virtual extent much larger than the physical size of the array. In this paper we also briefly discuss the apparent unphysical field divergences in superlenses and how to resolve this issue.

  12. Measurements of collective fuel velocities in deuterium-tritium exploding pusher and cryogenically layered deuterium-tritium implosions on the NIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C.-K.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Ashabranner, R.; Bionta, R.; LePape, S.; McKernan, M.; Mackinnon, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Kilkenny, J. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States); Knauer, J.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    For the first time, quantitative measurements of collective fuel velocities in Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions at the National Ignition Facility are reported. Velocities along the line-of-sight (LOS) of the Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS), positioned close to the equator (73 Degree-Sign -324 Degree-Sign ), were inferred from the measured mean energy of the deuterium-tritium (DT)-primary neutron peak. Substantial mean energy shifts up to 113 {+-} 16 keV were observed in DT gas-filled exploding-pusher implosions, driven in a polar-direct drive configuration, which corresponds to bulk fuel velocities up to 210 {+-} 30 km/s. In contrast, only marginal bulk fuel velocities along the MRS LOS were observed in cryogenically layered DT implosions. Integrated analysis of data from a large number of cryogenically layered implosions has recently identified a deficit in achieved hot-spot energy of {approx}3 kJ for these implosions [C. Cerjan et al., Phys. Plasmas (2013)]. One hypothesis that could explain this missing energy is a collective, directional fuel velocity of {approx}190 km/s. As only marginal bulk fuel velocities are observed in the MRS data, this might indicate that turbulent or radial flows would be a likely explanation for the missing energy. However, a directional velocity close to perpendicular to the MRS LOS cannot be ruled out.

  13. Measurements of collective fuel velocities in deuterium-tritium exploding pusher and cryogenically layered deuterium-tritium implosions on the NIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the first time, quantitative measurements of collective fuel velocities in Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions at the National Ignition Facility are reported. Velocities along the line-of-sight (LOS) of the Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS), positioned close to the equator (73°–324°), were inferred from the measured mean energy of the deuterium-tritium (DT)-primary neutron peak. Substantial mean energy shifts up to 113 ± 16 keV were observed in DT gas-filled exploding-pusher implosions, driven in a polar-direct drive configuration, which corresponds to bulk fuel velocities up to 210 ± 30 km/s. In contrast, only marginal bulk fuel velocities along the MRS LOS were observed in cryogenically layered DT implosions. Integrated analysis of data from a large number of cryogenically layered implosions has recently identified a deficit in achieved hot-spot energy of ∼3 kJ for these implosions [C. Cerjan et al., Phys. Plasmas (2013)]. One hypothesis that could explain this missing energy is a collective, directional fuel velocity of ∼190 km/s. As only marginal bulk fuel velocities are observed in the MRS data, this might indicate that turbulent or radial flows would be a likely explanation for the missing energy. However, a directional velocity close to perpendicular to the MRS LOS cannot be ruled out.

  14. Preparation and characterization of haematite nanowire arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Xue, D S; Liu, Q F; Zhang, L Y

    2003-01-01

    Arrays of alpha-Fe sub 2 O sub 3 nanowires embedded in anodic alumina membranes were obtained after heat-treating beta-FeOOH nanowire arrays fabricated by electrochemical deposition. Haematite polycrystalline nanowires with maximum length of about 7 mu m and average diameter of about 120 nm were characterized by means of x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The Morin temperature below 80 K and Neel temperature of about 350 K for the alpha-Fe sub 2 O sub 3 nanowire arrays, far lower than those of bulk material, were measured by Moessbauer spectroscopy and using a Magnetic Property Measurement System.

  15. Spatiotemporal Gradient Analysis of Differential Microphone Arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Kolundzija, Mihailo; Faller, Christof; Vetterli, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The literature on gradient and differential microphone arrays makes a distinction between the two types, and nevertheless shows how both types can be used to obtain the same directional responses. A more theoretically sound rationale for using delays in differential microphone arrays has not yet been given. This paper presents a gradient analysis of the sound field viewed as a spatio-temporal phenomenon, and gives a theoretical interpretation of the working principles of gradient and differen...

  16. A novel particle time of flight diagnostic for measurements of shock- and compression-bang times in D3He and DT implosions at the NIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The particle-time-of-flight (pTOF) diagnostic, fielded alongside a wedge range-filter (WRF) proton spectrometer, will provide an absolute timing for the shock-burn weighted ρR measurements that will validate the modeling of implosion dynamics at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In the first phase of the project, pTOF has recorded accurate bang times in cryogenic DT, DT exploding pusher, and D3He implosions using DD or DT neutrons with an accuracy better than ±70 ps. In the second phase of the project, a deflecting magnet will be incorporated into the pTOF design for simultaneous measurements of shock- and compression-bang times in D3He-filled surrogate implosions using D3He protons and DD-neutrons, respectively.

  17. Demonstration of Fuel Hot-Spot Pressure in Excess of 50 Gbar for Direct-Drive, Layered Deuterium-Tritium Implosions on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, S. P.; Goncharov, V. N.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Bose, A.; Boehly, T. R.; Bonino, M. J.; Campbell, E. M.; Cao, D.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Davis, A. K.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Forrest, C. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Froula, D. H.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Harding, D. R.; Hohenberger, M.; Hu, S. X.; Jacobs-Perkins, D.; Janezic, R.; Karasik, M.; Keck, R. L.; Kelly, J. H.; Kessler, T. J.; Knauer, J. P.; Kosc, T. Z.; Loucks, S. J.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Obenschain, S. P.; Petrasso, R. D.; Radha, P. B.; Rice, B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Schmitt, A. J.; Schmitt, M. J.; Seka, W.; Shmayda, W. T.; Shoup, M. J.; Shvydky, A.; Skupsky, S.; Solodov, A. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Ulreich, J.; Wittman, M. D.; Woo, K. M.; Yaakobi, B.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2016-07-01

    A record fuel hot-spot pressure Phs=56 ±7 Gbar was inferred from x-ray and nuclear diagnostics for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion cryogenic, layered deuterium-tritium implosions on the 60-beam, 30-kJ, 351-nm OMEGA Laser System. When hydrodynamically scaled to the energy of the National Ignition Facility, these implosions achieved a Lawson parameter ˜60 % of the value required for ignition [A. Bose et al., Phys. Rev. E 93, LM15119ER (2016)], similar to indirect-drive implosions [R. Betti et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 255003 (2015)], and nearly half of the direct-drive ignition-threshold pressure. Relative to symmetric, one-dimensional simulations, the inferred hot-spot pressure is approximately 40% lower. Three-dimensional simulations suggest that low-mode distortion of the hot spot seeded by laser-drive nonuniformity and target-positioning error reduces target performance.

  18. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  19. Power enhancement by increasing the initial array radius and wire number of tungsten Z pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tungsten wire array implosions on the 7- to 8-MA Saturn generator have been optimized using wire number and array diameter variations to produce 75±10TW of x rays with total energy outputs of 450±50kJ. By increasing the number of wires in a 12.5-mm-diam array from 24 to 70 and simultaneously decreasing the individual wire diameter from 13 to 7.5 μm, the total radiated power increased from 20±3 to 40±6TW and the x-ray pulse width decreased from 18 to 8.5 ns. In addition, a diameter scan at an implosion time of 50±5ns showed that the pulse width has a strong dependence on collapse velocity and wire thickness. For the largest diameter load of 17.5 mm with 120 5-μm-diam wires, a 4-ns pulse width with a peak power of 75±10TW was achieved: four times power gain over the 20-TW electrical power generated by the pulsed power system. Time-resolved pinhole photography confirms that the power enhancement with increased wire number is associated with the plasma achieving a tighter compression and better axial uniformity. For the higher-velocity implosions, we infer from two-dimensional radiation-magnetohydrodynamic calculations that the plasma becomes hotter and hence radiates at a higher brightness temperature. Zero- and two-dimensional load models coupled with a detailed circuit model have shown expected radial kinetic energies in the range of 100 endash 200 kJ. The total radiated energy of >400kJ in a 4 endash 20-ns FWHM pulse exceeds the total kinetic energy by more than a factor of 2. Two-dimensional, three-temperature simulations reproduce the observed trends in powers and pulse widths by using a variable initial random density perturbation. These calculations also indicate that the radiated energy is accounted for by the total work done on the plasma by the magnetic field. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  20. Array of planar waveguide lasers with 50 GHz frequency spacing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldberg-Kjær, Søren Andreas; Laurent-Lund, Christian; Sckerl, Mads W.

    1999-01-01

    Waveguide laser arrays are demonstrated using planar silica-on-silicon technology. Excellent control over frequency separation is obtained with a single phase mask.......Waveguide laser arrays are demonstrated using planar silica-on-silicon technology. Excellent control over frequency separation is obtained with a single phase mask....

  1. Exponential yield sensitivity to long-wavelength asymmetries in three-dimensional simulations of inertial confinement fusion capsule implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haines, Brian M., E-mail: bmhaines@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS T087, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    In this paper, we perform a series of high-resolution 3D simulations of an OMEGA-type inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsule implosion with varying levels of initial long-wavelength asymmetries in order to establish the physical energy loss mechanism for observed yield degradation due to long-wavelength asymmetries in symcap (gas-filled capsule) implosions. These simulations demonstrate that, as the magnitude of the initial asymmetries is increased, shell kinetic energy is increasingly retained in the shell instead of being converted to fuel internal energy. This is caused by the displacement of fuel mass away from and shell material into the center of the implosion due to complex vortical flows seeded by the long-wavelength asymmetries. These flows are not fully turbulent, but demonstrate mode coupling through non-linear instability development during shell stagnation and late-time shock interactions with the shell interface. We quantify this effect by defining a separation lengthscale between the fuel mass and internal energy and show that this is correlated with yield degradation. The yield degradation shows an exponential sensitivity to the RMS magnitude of the long-wavelength asymmetries. This strong dependence may explain the lack of repeatability frequently observed in OMEGA ICF experiments. In contrast to previously reported mechanisms for yield degradation due to turbulent instability growth, yield degradation is not correlated with mixing between shell and fuel material. Indeed, an integrated measure of mixing decreases with increasing initial asymmetry magnitude due to delayed shock interactions caused by growth of the long-wavelength asymmetries without a corresponding delay in disassembly.

  2. HEL-1: A DEMG Based Demonstration of Solid Liner Implosions at 100 MA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinovsky, R.E.; Anderson, B.G.; Clark, D.A. [and others

    1997-12-31

    In August 1997, the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) conducted a joint experiment in Sarov, Russia to demonstrate the feasibility of applying explosive pulsed power technology to implode large scale, high velocity cylindrical liners. Kilogram mass metal liners imploding at velocities of 5-25 km/sec are useful scientific tools for producing high energy density environments, ultra high pressure shocks, and for the rapid compression of plasmas. To explore the issues associated with the design, operation and diagnosis of such implosions, VNIIEF and LANL designed and executed an practical demonstration in which a liner of approximately 1 kilogram mass was accelerated to 510 km/sec while undergoing a convergence of about 4:1. The scientific objectives of the experiment were threefold. First to explore the limits of very large, explosive, pulse power system delivering about 100 MA as drivers for accelerating solid density imploding liners to kinetic energies of 25 MJ or greater. Second to evaluate the behavior of single material (aluminum) liners imploding at 510 km/sec velocities by comparing experimental data with 1-D and 2-D numerical simulations. Third, to evaluate the condition of the selected liner at radial convergence of 4 and a final radius of 6 cm. A liner of such parameters could be used as a driver for equation of state measurements at megabar pressures or as a driver for a future experiment in which a magnetized fusion plasma would be compressed to approach ignition conditions.

  3. HEL-1: A DEMG Based Demonstration of Solid Liner Implosions at 100 MA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In August 1997, the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) conducted a joint experiment in Sarov, Russia to demonstrate the feasibility of applying explosive pulsed power technology to implode large scale, high velocity cylindrical liners. Kilogram mass metal liners imploding at velocities of 5-25 km/sec are useful scientific tools for producing high energy density environments, ultra high pressure shocks, and for the rapid compression of plasmas. To explore the issues associated with the design, operation and diagnosis of such implosions, VNIIEF and LANL designed and executed an practical demonstration in which a liner of approximately 1 kilogram mass was accelerated to 510 km/sec while undergoing a convergence of about 4:1. The scientific objectives of the experiment were threefold. First to explore the limits of very large, explosive, pulse power system delivering about 100 MA as drivers for accelerating solid density imploding liners to kinetic energies of 25 MJ or greater. Second to evaluate the behavior of single material (aluminum) liners imploding at 510 km/sec velocities by comparing experimental data with 1-D and 2-D numerical simulations. Third, to evaluate the condition of the selected liner at radial convergence of 4 and a final radius of 6 cm. A liner of such parameters could be used as a driver for equation of state measurements at megabar pressures or as a driver for a future experiment in which a magnetized fusion plasma would be compressed to approach ignition conditions

  4. Comparison and analysis of 2-D simulation results with two implosion radiation experiments on the Los Alamos Pegasus I and Pegasus II capacitor banks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two experiments, PegI-41, conducted on the Los Alamos Pegasus I capacitor bank, and PegII-25, on the Pegasus II bank, consisted of the implosions of 13 mg (nominal), 5 cm radius, 2 cm high thin cylindrical aluminum foils resulting in soft x-ray radiation pulses from the plasma thermalization on axis. The implosions were conducted in direct-drive (no intermediate switching) mode with peak currents of about 4 MA and 5 MA respectively, and implosion times of about 2.5 micros and 2.0 micros. A radiation yield of about 250 kJ was measured for PegII-25. The purpose of these experiments was to examine the physics of the implosion and relate this physics to the production of the radiation pulse and to provide detailed experimental data which could be compared with 2-D radiation-magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) simulations. Included in the experimental diagnostic suites were faraday rotation and dB/dt current measurements, a visible framing camera, an x-ray stripline camera, time-dependent spectroscopy, bolometers and XRD'S. A comparison of the results from these experiments shows agreement with 2-D simulation results in the instability development, current, and radiation pulse data, including the pulsewidth, shape, peak power and total radiation yield as measured by bolometry. Instabilities dominate the behavior of the implosion and largely determine the properties of the resulting radiation pulse. The 2-D simulations can be seen to be an important tool in understanding the implosion physics

  5. Measurements of the T(t,2n)4He neutron spectrum at low reactant energies from inertial confinement implosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Gatu Johnson, M; Manuel, M J-E; Sinenian, N; Zylstra, A B; Séguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Radha, P B; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C; McNabb, D P; Amendt, P A; Boyd, R N; Hatchett, S P; Quaglioni, S; Rygg, J R; Thompson, I J; Bacher, A D; Herrmann, H W; Kim, Y H

    2012-07-13

    Measurements of the neutron spectrum from the T(t,2n)4He (tt) reaction have been conducted using inertial confinement fusion implosions at the OMEGA laser facility. In these experiments, deuterium-tritium (DT) gas-filled capsules were imploded to study the tt reaction in thermonuclear plasmas at low reactant center-of-mass (c.m.) energies. In contrast to accelerator experiments at higher c.m. energies (above 100 keV), these results indicate a negligible n + 5He reaction channel at a c.m. energy of 23 keV. PMID:23030170

  6. High aspect ratio hard x-ray (> 100 keV) imager to measure hot electron preheat for indirectly driven capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doppner, T; Dewald, E; Divol, L; Burns, S; Izumi, N; Kline, J; LaCaille, G; McNaney, J; Prasad, R; Thomas, C A; Glenzer, S H; Landen, O; Author, A; Author, S G; Author, T

    2012-05-01

    We have fielded a multi-pinhole, hard x-ray (> 100 keV) imager to measure the spatially-resolved bremsstrahlung emission from energetic electrons slowing in a plastic ablator shell during indirectly driven implosions at the National Ignition Facility. These electrons are generated in laser plasma interactions, and are a source of preheat to the deuterium-tritium fuel that could limit the compressibility required for ignition and burn. Our hard x-ray imaging measurements allow to set an upper limit to the DT fuel preheat, which we find is acceptable in current capsule implosions on the NIF.

  7. Recent Results from Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    Fukushima, M

    2015-01-01

    The Telescope Array (TA) is an experiment to observe Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs). TA's recent results, the energy spectrum and anisotropy based on the 6-year surface array data, and the primary composition obtained from the shower maximum Xmax are reported. The spectrum demonstrates a clear dip and cutoff. The shape of the spectrum is well described by the energy loss of extra-galactic protons interacting with the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Above the cutoff, a medium-scale (20 degrees radius) flux enhancement was observed near the Ursa-Major. A chance probability of creating this hotspot from the isotropic flux is 4.0 sigma. The measured Xmax is consistent with the primary being proton or light nuclei for energies 10^18.2 eV - 10^19.2 eV.

  8. A derivation of bulk-motion insensitive implosion metrics inferred from neutron and high-energy x-ray emission in a series of high yield implosions on the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, P. T.; Macphee, A. G.; Hurricane, O. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C. J.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Doeppner, T.; Edgell, D. H.; Edwards, M. J.; Gaffney, J.; Grim, G. P.; Haan, S.; Hammer, J. H.; Hinkel, D. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Jones, O.; Kritcher, A. L.; Le Pape, S.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J.; Munro, D. H.; Pak, A.; Park, H. S.

    2015-11-01

    A suite of nuclear and x-ray data is used to deduce key implosion performance metrics at stagnation including the hotspot pressure, energy, and the role of alpha heating on producing the observed yield. Key to this analysis is a determination of the burn-averaged temperature of the hot plasma so that the nuclear reactivity and yield can then be used to deduce the plasma density and pressure. In this presentation we examine the systematics of both neutron and high-energy x-ray emission (22 keV x-ray monochromator) from a series of high yield implosions on the NIF. The advantage of incorporating high energy x-rays into the analysis is their insignificant attenuation and insensitivity to bulk flows, thus providing insight as to whether these effects complicate the interpretation of the nuclear data, and that a precipitous drop in their production is expected as the thermal temperature is reduced. A dynamic model for hotspot assembly is developed that incorporates thermal conduction, radiative losses, and alpha heating, which simultaneously matches both neutron and x-ray data with nearly identical nuclear and x-ray derived thermal temperatures. Work performed under the auspices of the USDoE by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA273.

  9. ISS Solar Array Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, James P.; Martin, Keith D.; Thomas, Justin R.; Caro, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Solar Array Management (SAM) software toolset provides the capabilities necessary to operate a spacecraft with complex solar array constraints. It monitors spacecraft telemetry and provides interpretations of solar array constraint data in an intuitive manner. The toolset provides extensive situational awareness to ensure mission success by analyzing power generation needs, array motion constraints, and structural loading situations. The software suite consists of several components including samCS (constraint set selector), samShadyTimers (array shadowing timers), samWin (visualization GUI), samLock (array motion constraint computation), and samJet (attitude control system configuration selector). It provides high availability and uptime for extended and continuous mission support. It is able to support two-degrees-of-freedom (DOF) array positioning and supports up to ten simultaneous constraints with intuitive 1D and 2D decision support visualizations of constraint data. Display synchronization is enabled across a networked control center and multiple methods for constraint data interpolation are supported. Use of this software toolset increases flight safety, reduces mission support effort, optimizes solar array operation for achieving mission goals, and has run for weeks at a time without issues. The SAM toolset is currently used in ISS real-time mission operations.

  10. Array for detecting microbes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, Gary L.; DeSantis, Todd D.

    2014-07-08

    The present embodiments relate to an array system for detecting and identifying biomolecules and organisms. More specifically, the present embodiments relate to an array system comprising a microarray configured to simultaneously detect a plurality of organisms in a sample at a high confidence level.

  11. Micromachined electrode array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okandan, Murat (Edgewood, NM); Wessendorf, Kurt O. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-12-11

    An electrode array is disclosed which has applications for neural stimulation and sensing. The electrode array, in certain embodiments, can include a plurality of electrodes each of which is flexibly attached to a common substrate using a plurality of springs to allow the electrodes to move independently. In other embodiments of the electrode array, the electrodes can be fixed to the substrate. The electrode array can be formed from a combination of bulk and surface micromachining, and can include electrode tips having an electroplated metal (e.g. platinum, iridium, gold or titanium) or a metal oxide (e.g. iridium oxide) for biocompatibility. The electrode array can be used to form a part of a neural prosthesis, and is particularly well adapted for use in an implantable retinal prosthesis.

  12. Diode Laser Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botez, Dan; Scifres, Don R.

    1994-08-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of the fundamental principles and applications of semiconductor diode laser arrays. All of the major types of arrays are discussed in detail, including coherent, incoherent, edge- and surface-emitting, horizontal- and vertical-cavity, individually addressed, lattice- matched and strained-layer systems. The initial chapters cover such topics as lasers, amplifiers, external-cavity control, theoretical modeling, and operational dynamics. Spatially incoherent arrays are then described in detail, and the uses of vertical-cavity surface emitter and edge-emitting arrays in parallel optical-signal processing and multi-channel optical recording are discussed. Researchers and graduate students in solid state physics and electrical engineering studying the properties and applications of such arrays will find this book invaluable.

  13. Microfabricated ion trap array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blain, Matthew G.; Fleming, James G.

    2006-12-26

    A microfabricated ion trap array, comprising a plurality of ion traps having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale ion traps to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microfabricated ion trap array with on-chip circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of the microfabricated ion trap array can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  14. Design and Use of Microphone Directional Arrays for Aeroacoustic Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Hunter, William W., Jr.; Meadows, Kristine R.

    1998-01-01

    An overview of the development of two microphone directional arrays for aeroacoustic testing is presented. These arrays were specifically developed to measure airframe noise in the NASA Langley Quiet Flow Facility. A large aperture directional array using 35 flush-mounted microphones was constructed to obtain high resolution noise localization maps around airframe models. This array possesses a maximum diagonal aperture size of 34 inches. A unique logarithmic spiral layout design was chosen for the targeted frequency range of 2-30 kHz. Complementing the large array is a small aperture directional array, constructed to obtain spectra and directivity information from regions on the model. This array, possessing 33 microphones with a maximum diagonal aperture size of 7.76 inches, is easily moved about the model in elevation and azimuth. Custom microphone shading algorithms have been developed to provide a frequency- and position-invariant sensing area from 10-40 kHz with an overall targeted frequency range for the array of 5-60 kHz. Both arrays are employed in acoustic measurements of a 6 percent of full scale airframe model consisting of a main element NACA 632-215 wing section with a 30 percent chord half-span flap. Representative data obtained from these measurements is presented, along with details of the array calibration and data post-processing procedures.

  15. Experimental investigation of the pre-implosion stages of an annular puff-gas Z-pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stages of an argon annular puff-gas z-pinch prior to implosion were experimentally investigated. A fast responding conical pressure probe was developed as an accurate supersonic gas flow diagnostic for evaluating the transient gas jet formed by the puff valve and nozzle. Neutral gas density profiles for two different nozzles show radial expansion of the annular gas jets. Radial and axial profiles at two different azimuthal positions of the azimuthal magnetic field at 20 ns into the main current pulse show that the current flows in the outer 1 cm of the shell, and is returned by posts supporting the wire mesh anode at initially low axial positions, which increase with time. Image converter and streak photographs show luminosity peaked azimuthally at the post positions, radially outside the positions of the neutral gas peaks, and axially near the cathode. The photography shows that the plasma is initially tapered but that it is swept into more of a right cylinder as the implosion begins, although strong axial and azimuthal dependencies are retained. Streak interferometry yields electron line density and average volume densities in particular regions of the plasma as functions of time. These results show that the early plasma is fully ionized only at high radial positions, and that it is strongly dependent on both axial and azimuthal position

  16. Numerical Modeling of the Sensitivity of X-Ray Driven Implosions to Low-Mode Flux Asymmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, R H H; Bradley, D K; Callahan, D A; Edwards, M J; Haan, S W; Jones, O S; Spears, B K; Marinak, M M; Town, R P J; Norreys, P A; Suter, L J

    2012-01-01

    The sensitivity of inertial confinement fusion implosions of the type performed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to low-mode flux asymmetries has been investigated numerically. It is shown that large-amplitude, low-order mode shapes (Legendre polynomial P4), resulting from associated low order flux asymmetries, cause spatial variations in capsule and fuel momentum that prevent the DT ice layer from being decelerated uniformly by the hot spot pressure. This reduces the transfer of kinetic to internal energy of the central hot spot, thus reducing neutron yield. Furthermore, synthetic gated x-ray images of the hot spot self-emission indicate that P4 shapes may be unquantifiable for DT layered capsules. Instead the positive P4 asymmetry aliases itself as an oblate P4 in the x-ray self emission images. Correction of this apparent P2 distortion can further distort the implosion while creating a round x-ray image. Long wavelength asymmetries may be playing a significant role in the observed yield reduction of...

  17. A Numerical Model for Two-Plasmon-Decay Hot-Electron Production and Mitigation in Direct-Drive Implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myatt, J. F.; Shaw, J. G.; Solodov, A. A.; Maximov, A. V.; Short, R. W.; Seka, W.; Follett, R. K.; Edgell, D. H.; Froula, D. H.; Goncharov, V. N.

    2015-11-01

    Hot-electron preheat, caused by laser-plasma instabilities, can impair the performance of inertial confinement fusion implosions. It is therefore imperative to understand processes that can generate hot electrons and to design mitigation strategies should preheat be found to be excessive at the ignition scale (laser-plasma interactions do not follow hydrodynamic scaling). For this purpose, a new 3-D model [laser-plasma simulation environment (LPSE)] has been constructed that computes hot-electron generation in direct-drive plasmas based on the assumption that two-plasmon decay is the dominant, hot-electron-producing instability. It uses an established model of TPD-driven turbulence together with a new GPU based hybrid particle method of hot-electron production. The time-dependent hot-electron power, total energy, and energy spectrum are computed and compared with data from recent OMEGA implosion experiments that have sought to mitigate TPD by the use of multilayered (mid- Z) ablators. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  18. Studies of implosion dynamics of D{sup 3}He gas-filled plastic targets using nuclear diagnostics at OMEGA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falk, Magnus

    2004-09-01

    Information about target-implosion dynamics is essential for understanding how assembly occurs. Without carefully tailored assembly of the fuel, hot-spot ignition on National Ignition Facility (NIF) will fail. Hot spot ignition relies on shock convergence to 'ignite' the hot spot (shock burn), followed by propagation of the burn into the compressed shell material (compressive burn). The relationship between these events must be understood to ensure the success of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) ignition. To further improve our knowledge about the timing of these events, temporal evolution of areal density (density times radius, normally referred to as {rho}R) and burn of direct-drive, D{sup 3}He gas-filled plastic target implosions have been studied using dd neutrons and d{sup 3}He protons. The proton temporal diagnostic (PTD) code was developed for this purpose. {rho}R asymmetries were observed at shock-bang time (time of peak burn during shock phase) and grew approximately twice as fast as the average {rho}R, without any phase changes. Furthermore, it was observed that the shock-bang and compression-bang time occur earlier, and that the time difference between these events decreases for higher laser energy on target, which indicates that the compression-bang time is more sensitive to the variation of laser energy on target. It was also observed that the duration of shock and compression phase might decrease for higher laser energy on target.

  19. Slipping Magnetic Reconnection, Chromospheric Evaporation, Implosion, and Precursors in the 2014 September 10 X1.6-Class Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Dudik, Jaroslav; Janvier, Miho; Mulay, Sargam M; Karlicky, Marian; Aulanier, Guillaume; Del Zanna, Giulio; Dzifcakova, Elena; Mason, Helen E; Schmieder, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the occurrence of slipping magnetic reconnection, chromospheric evaporation, and coronal loop dynamics in the 2014 September 10 X-class flare. The slipping reconnection is found to be present throughout the flare from its early phase. Flare loops are seen to slip in opposite directions towards both ends of the ribbons. Velocities of 20--40 km\\,s$^{-1}$ are found within time windows where the slipping is well resolved. The warm coronal loops exhibit expanding and contracting motions that are interpreted as displacements due to the growing flux rope that subsequently erupts. This flux rope existed and erupted before the onset of apparent coronal implosion. This indicates that the energy release proceeds by slipping reconnection and not via coronal implosion. The slipping reconnection leads to changes in the geometry of the observed structures at the \\textit{IRIS} slit position, from flare loop top to the footpoints in the ribbons. This results in variations of the observed velocities of chromosph...

  20. Slipping Magnetic Reconnection, Chromospheric Evaporation, Implosion, and Precursors in the 2014 September 10 X1.6-Class Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudík, Jaroslav; Polito, Vanessa; Janvier, Miho; Mulay, Sargam M.; Karlický, Marian; Aulanier, Guillaume; Del Zanna, Giulio; Dzifčáková, Elena; Mason, Helen E.; Schmieder, Brigitte

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the occurrence of slipping magnetic reconnection, chromospheric evaporation, and coronal loop dynamics in the 2014 September 10 X-class flare. Slipping reconnection is found to be present throughout the flare from its early phase. Flare loops are seen to slip in opposite directions toward both ends of the ribbons. Velocities of 20–40 km s‑1 are found within time windows where the slipping is well resolved. The warm coronal loops exhibit expanding and contracting motions that are interpreted as displacements due to the growing flux rope that subsequently erupts. This flux rope existed and erupted before the onset of apparent coronal implosion. This indicates that the energy release proceeds by slipping reconnection and not via coronal implosion. The slipping reconnection leads to changes in the geometry of the observed structures at the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph slit position, from flare loop top to the footpoints in the ribbons. This results in variations of the observed velocities of chromospheric evaporation in the early flare phase. Finally, it is found that the precursor signatures, including localized EUV brightenings as well as nonthermal X-ray emission, are signatures of the flare itself, progressing from the early phase toward the impulsive phase, with the tether-cutting being provided by the slipping reconnection. The dynamics of both the flare and outlying coronal loops is found to be consistent with the predictions of the standard solar flare model in three dimensions.

  1. Kinetic simulation of direct-drive capsule implosions and its comparison with experiments and radiation hydrodynamic simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Thomas; Le, Ari; Schmitt, Mark; Herrmann, Hans; Batha, Steve

    2015-11-01

    We have carried out simulations of direct-drive capsule implosion experiments conducted on Omega laser facility at the Laboratory of Laser energetics of the University of Rochester. The capsules had a glass shell (SiO2) with D, T, He-3 fills at various proportions. One-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic calculations and kinetic particle/hybrid simulations with LSP were carried out for the post-shot analysis to compare neutron yield, yield ratio, and shell convergence in assessing the effects of plasma kinetic effects. The LSP simulations were initiated with the output from the rad-hydro simulations at the end of the laser-drive. The electrons are treated as a fluid while all the ion species by the kinetic PIC technique. Our LSP simulations clearly showed species separation between the deuterons, tritons and He-3 during the implosion but significantly less after the compression. The neutron yield, gamma bang-time and -width from the LSP simulations compared favorably with experiments. Detail comparison among the kinetic simulations, rad-hydro simulations, and experimental results will be presented. Work performed under the auspices of the US Department of Energy by Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36.

  2. Studies of implosion dynamics of D3He gas-filled plastic targets using nuclear diagnostics at OMEGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information about target-implosion dynamics is essential for understanding how assembly occurs. Without carefully tailored assembly of the fuel, hot-spot ignition on National Ignition Facility (NIF) will fail. Hot spot ignition relies on shock convergence to 'ignite' the hot spot (shock burn), followed by propagation of the burn into the compressed shell material (compressive burn). The relationship between these events must be understood to ensure the success of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) ignition. To further improve our knowledge about the timing of these events, temporal evolution of areal density (density times radius, normally referred to as ρR) and burn of direct-drive, D3He gas-filled plastic target implosions have been studied using dd neutrons and d3He protons. The proton temporal diagnostic (PTD) code was developed for this purpose. ρR asymmetries were observed at shock-bang time (time of peak burn during shock phase) and grew approximately twice as fast as the average ρR, without any phase changes. Furthermore, it was observed that the shock-bang and compression-bang time occur earlier, and that the time difference between these events decreases for higher laser energy on target, which indicates that the compression-bang time is more sensitive to the variation of laser energy on target. It was also observed that the duration of shock and compression phase might decrease for higher laser energy on target

  3. Density controlled carbon nanotube array electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng F.; Tu, Yi

    2008-12-16

    CNT materials comprising aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with pre-determined site densities, catalyst substrate materials for obtaining them and methods for forming aligned CNTs with controllable densities on such catalyst substrate materials are described. The fabrication of films comprising site-density controlled vertically aligned CNT arrays of the invention with variable field emission characteristics, whereby the field emission properties of the films are controlled by independently varying the length of CNTs in the aligned array within the film or by independently varying inter-tubule spacing of the CNTs within the array (site density) are disclosed. The fabrication of microelectrode arrays (MEAs) formed utilizing the carbon nanotube material of the invention is also described.

  4. Dynamics of cylindrical converging shock waves interacting with aerodynamic obstacle arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vignati, F.; Guardone, A., E-mail: alberto.guardone@polimi.it [Department of Aerospace Science and Technology, Politecnico di Milano, via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy)

    2015-06-15

    Cylindrical converging shock waves interacting with an array of aerodynamic obstacles are investigated numerically for diverse shock strengths and for different obstacle configurations in air in standard conditions. The considered number of obstacles N is 4, 6, 8, 16, and 24. Obstacles are lenticular airfoils with thickness-to-chord ratios t/c of 0.07, 0.14, and 0.21. The distances of the airfoil leading edge from the shock focus point (r{sub LE})/(r{sub LE}{sup ref}) are 1, 2, and 2.5, where r{sub LE}{sup ref}=7 is the dimensionless reference distance from the origin. Considered impinging shock Mach numbers M{sub s} are 2.2, 2.7, and 3.2 at the reference distance from the origin. The reference experimental configuration (N=8,t/c =0.14,r{sub LE}=7,M{sub s}=2.7) was proposed by Kjellander et al. [“Thermal radiation from a converging shock implosion,” Phys. Fluids 22, 046102 (2010)]. Numerical results compare fairly well to available one-dimensional models for shock propagation and to available experimental results in the reference configuration. Local reflection types are in good agreement with the classical criteria for planar shock waves. The main shock reshaping patterns are identified and their dependence on the shock strength and obstacle configuration is exposed. In particular, different shock patterns are observed after the leading edge reflection, which results in polygonal shock wave with N, 2N, 3N, and 4N sides. The largest temperature peak at the origin is obtained for the 8- and the 16-obstacle configurations and for the smallest thickness to length ratio, 0.07, located at distance from the origin of 2r{sub LE}{sup ref}. In terms of compression efficiency at the origin, the 16-obstacle configuration is found to perform slightly better than the reference 8-obstacle configuration—with an efficiency increase of about 2%-3%, which is well within the model accuracy—thus confirming the goodness of the obstacle arrangement proposed by Kjellander and

  5. Solar array experiments on the Sphinx satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, N. J.

    1973-01-01

    The Space Plasma, High Voltage Interaction Experiment (SPHINX) is the name given to an auxiliary payload satellite scheduled to be launched in January 1974. The principal experiments carried on this satellite are specifically designed to obtain the engineering data on the interaction of high voltage systems with the space plasma. The classes of experiments are solar array segments, insulators, insulators with pin holes and conductors. The satellite is also carrying experiments to obtain flight data on three new solar array configurations; the edge illuminated-multijunction cells, the Teflon encased cells and the violet cells.

  6. External cavity coherent quantum cascade laser array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallon, Raphael; Parvitte, Bertrand; Bizet, Laurent; De Naurois, Guy Mael; Simozrag, Bouzid; Maisons, Grégory; Carras, Mathieu; Zeninari, Virginie

    2016-05-01

    We report on the development of a coherent quantum cascade laser array that consists in the fabrication of multi-stripes array. The main characteristic of this kind of source is that an anti-symmetrical signature with two lobes is obtained in the far field. Taking advantage of this drawback, a grating is aligned with one lobe of the source. Thus a Littrow configuration is designed that permit to obtain a wide tunability of the source. First results are presented and a preliminary test of the source is realized by measurements on acetone.

  7. Transient phenomena in the final implosion stage at the PF-1000 facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    is equal to 1 MJ so it makes this device one of the few where one can investigate an effect of the 'neutron saturation' phenomenon. It was found about 20 years ago and is still under discussion up to now. During these experiments we concentrated our efforts in an investigation of very fast non-equilibrium phenomena taking place in the final stage of plasma implosion, i.e. namely in the period of time, when neutron pulse is generated

  8. Multicolor photonic crystal laser array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Jeremy B; Brener, Igal; Subramania, Ganapathi S; Wang, George T; Li, Qiming

    2015-04-28

    A multicolor photonic crystal laser array comprises pixels of monolithically grown gain sections each with a different emission center wavelength. As an example, two-dimensional surface-emitting photonic crystal lasers comprising broad gain-bandwidth III-nitride multiple quantum well axial heterostructures were fabricated using a novel top-down nanowire fabrication method. Single-mode lasing was obtained in the blue-violet spectral region with 60 nm of tuning (or 16% of the nominal center wavelength) that was determined purely by the photonic crystal geometry. This approach can be extended to cover the entire visible spectrum.

  9. Introduction to adaptive arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Monzingo, Bob; Haupt, Randy

    2011-01-01

    This second edition is an extensive modernization of the bestselling introduction to the subject of adaptive array sensor systems. With the number of applications of adaptive array sensor systems growing each year, this look at the principles and fundamental techniques that are critical to these systems is more important than ever before. Introduction to Adaptive Arrays, 2nd Edition is organized as a tutorial, taking the reader by the hand and leading them through the maze of jargon that often surrounds this highly technical subject. It is easy to read and easy to follow as fundamental concept

  10. Protein Functionalized Nanodiamond Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu YL

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Various nanoscale elements are currently being explored for bio-applications, such as in bio-images, bio-detection, and bio-sensors. Among them, nanodiamonds possess remarkable features such as low bio-cytotoxicity, good optical property in fluorescent and Raman spectra, and good photostability for bio-applications. In this work, we devise techniques to position functionalized nanodiamonds on self-assembled monolayer (SAMs arrays adsorbed on silicon and ITO substrates surface using electron beam lithography techniques. The nanodiamond arrays were functionalized with lysozyme to target a certain biomolecule or protein specifically. The optical properties of the nanodiamond-protein complex arrays were characterized by a high throughput confocal microscope. The synthesized nanodiamond-lysozyme complex arrays were found to still retain their functionality in interacting with E. coli.

  11. Permutations of cubical arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure constants of an algebra determine a cube called the cubical array associated with the algebra. The permuted indices of the cubical array associated with a finite semifield generate new division algebras. We do not not require that the algebra be finite and ask 'Is it possible to choose a basis for the algebra such any permutation of the indices of the structure constants leaves the algebra unchanged?' What are the associated algebras? Author shows that the property 'weakly quadratic' is invariant under all permutations of the indices of the corresponding cubical array and presents two algebras for which the cubical array is invariant under all permutations of the indices.

  12. Flexible retinal electrode array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okandan, Murat (Albuquerque, NM); Wessendorf, Kurt O. (Albuquerque, NM); Christenson, Todd R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-10-24

    An electrode array which has applications for neural stimulation and sensing. The electrode array can include a large number of electrodes each of which is flexibly attached to a common substrate using a plurality of springs to allow the electrodes to move independently. The electrode array can be formed from a combination of bulk and surface micromachining, with electrode tips that can include an electroplated metal (e.g. platinum, iridium, gold or titanium) or a metal oxide (e.g. iridium oxide) for biocompatibility. The electrode array can be used to form a part of a neural prosthesis, and is particularly well adapted for use in an implantable retinal prosthesis where the electrodes can be tailored to provide a uniform gentle contact pressure with optional sensing of this contact pressure at one or more of the electrodes.

  13. Expandable LED array interconnect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Thomas Cheng-Hsin; Keller, Bernd

    2011-03-01

    A light emitting device that can function as an array element in an expandable array of such devices. The light emitting device comprises a substrate that has a top surface and a plurality of edges. Input and output terminals are mounted to the top surface of the substrate. Both terminals comprise a plurality of contact pads disposed proximate to the edges of the substrate, allowing for easy access to both terminals from multiple edges of the substrate. A lighting element is mounted to the top surface of the substrate. The lighting element is connected between the input and output terminals. The contact pads provide multiple access points to the terminals which allow for greater flexibility in design when the devices are used as array elements in an expandable array.

  14. Design and Experiment of Multi-resolution Composite Digital Array Antenna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Yue

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Because a sparse array has the advantages of a simplified structure and reduced cost in a radar system, radar technology based on the sparse array has gained widespread attention. To take advantage of the sparse array, in this paper, we designed a Multi-Resolution Composite digital Array antenna (MRCA, and then used it in single-target and multi-target detection experiments. Using the same number of array elements, our experimental results demonstrate that the MRCA can obtain a narrower main lobe and a lower side lobe, enhances the direction of the array antenna, and improves the angular resolution compared with the uniform linear array.

  15. Aligators for arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Henzinger, Thomas A.; Hottelier, Thibaud; Kovács, Laura; Rybalchenko, Andrey

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents Aligators, a tool for the generation of universally quantified array invariants. Aligators leverages recurrence solving and algebraic techniques to carry out inductive reasoning over array content. The Aligators’ loop extraction module allows treatment of multi-path loops by exploiting their commutativity and serializability properties. Our experience in applying Aligators on a collection of loops from open source software projects indicates the applicability of recurren...

  16. RFID array sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Capdevila Cascante, Santiago; Jofre Roca, Lluís; Romeu Robert, Jordi; Bolomey, J.Ch

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the use of RFID tags for the measurement of physical parameters in a distributed set of points is presented. Experimental results for two different scenarios are presented; the first uses a 2D RFID array to measure the field distribution of a radiating aperture, while the second detects the change in the close environment of an array of RFID tags to determine the water level of a container.

  17. Microphone arrays fundamentals

    OpenAIRE

    Embrechts, Jean-Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Microphone arrays are essentially directional sensors. They are therefore mainly used for locating, identifying, isolating, measuring and recording individual sound sources. The main principles governing the directivity of microphone arrays are reviewed: phase differences between signals create constructive and destructive interferences, depending on the direction of the sound source. Moreover, signal processing is applied to provide “beamforming”, i.e. beam shaping and steering. Contrary to ...

  18. Multi-Channel Detector Arrays for Heavy Ion Beam Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceto, Steven; Beckstead, Jeffrey; Castracane, James; Iguchi, H.; Fujisawa, A.; Demers, Diane; Schatz, John

    1997-11-01

    InterScience, Inc. has developed a multiple slit detector array for use with heavy ion beam probes. The first array was a twenty element array installed on the TEXT tokamak. An initial set of data was obtained with this array prior to the shutdown on the TEXT tokamak in December of 1995. More recently, a smaller detector array has been developed for use in the CHS torsatron in Nagoya. This array is smaller than the TEXT array, with ten elements, but contains two prototype sets of detector plates to determine the beam position. The operating conditions in CHS are expected to be much harsher than in TEXT, with ECH and NBI plasmas. Trajectory simulations allowed for the design of a tilted detector array in the CHS vacuum vessel. First tests of the CHS array will begin in the late summer of 1997. Other candidate machines for detector arrays are the MST reversed field pinch, in which a beam probe is expected to be installed in late 1997 or early 1998 and the Large Helical Device (LHD) which is expected to be operational in 1998. Design issues, trajectory simulations and array test results will be presented. Supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy under Grant #DE-FG02-94ER81788

  19. CNPC makes major breakthrough in array lateral logging technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    On October 12, 2011, the array lateral logging tool independently developed by CNPC Well Logging Company was successfully put to use at two production wells at Changqing Oilfield, obtaining high quality logging information. CNPC becomes the second company after Schlumberger in the world to master the array lateral logging technology, which can effectively identify layers as thin as 0.3 meter.

  20. Arrays of magnetic nanoparticles capped with alkylamines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P John Thomas; P Saravanan; G U Kulkarni; C N R Rao

    2002-02-01

    Magnetic metal and metal oxide nanoparticles capped with alkylamines have been synthesized and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and magnetization measurements. Core-shell Pd–Ni particles with composition, Pd561Ni3000, (diameter ∼ 3.3 nm) are superparamagnetic at 5 K and organize themselves into two-dimensional crystalline arrays. Similar arrays are obtained with Pd561Ni3000Pd1500 nanoparticles containing an additional Pd shell. Magnetic spinel particles of -Fe2O3, Fe3O4 and CoFe2O4 of average diameters in the 4–6 nm range coated with octylamine are all supermagnetic at room temperature and yield close-packed disordered arrays. Relatively regular arrays are formed by dodecylamine-capped Fe3O4 nanoparticles (∼ 8.6 nm diameter) while well-ordered hexagonal arrays were obtained with octylamine-covered Co3O4 nanoparticles (∼ 4.2 nm diameter).

  1. Methods of obtaining thermodynamic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The types of thermodynamic data needed to predict behavior of high temperature systems such as an overheated nuclear reactor in which the fuel has been exposed to water and oxygen are discussed. Procedures for obtaining the needed data are reviewed. 14 refs

  2. Uniformity of spherical shock wave dynamically stabilized by two successive laser profiles in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temporal, M., E-mail: mauro.temporal@hotmail.com [Centre de Mathématiques et de Leurs Applications, ENS Cachan and CNRS, 61 Av. du President Wilson, F-94235 Cachan Cedex (France); Canaud, B. [CEA, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon Cedex (France); Garbett, W. J. [AWE plc, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Ramis, R. [ETSI Aeronáutica y del Espacio, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    The implosion uniformity of a directly driven spherical inertial confinement fusion capsule is considered within the context of the Laser Mégajoule configuration. Two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic simulations have been performed assuming irradiation with two laser beam cones located at 49° and 131° with respect to the axis of symmetry. The laser energy deposition causes an inward shock wave whose surface is tracked in time, providing the time evolution of its non-uniformity. The illumination model has been used to optimize the laser intensity profiles used as input in the 2D hydro-calculations. It is found that a single stationary laser profile does not maintain a uniform shock front over time. To overcome this drawback, it is proposed to use two laser profiles acting successively in time, in order to dynamically stabilize the non-uniformity of the shock front.

  3. Analysis of the symmetry of the direct-drive target implosion under laser pulse of a megajoule scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demchenko, N. N.; Gus'kov, S. Yu; Kuchugov, P. A.; Rozanov, V. B.; Stepanov, R. V.; Vergunova, G. A.; Yakhin, R. A.; Zmitrenko, N. V.

    2016-05-01

    The class of direct-drive targets for the laser pulse of a megajoule scale is considered in the work. A distinctive feature of the design of these targets is a relatively low aspect ratio (outer DT-shell radius/shell thickness, A ∼ 10) to provide greater compression stability. The irradiation of the target surface is carried out by the shaped laser pulse on 2ω of Nd-laser. The influence of laser energy absorption inhomogeneity on the parameters of compression and burning of thermonuclear fuel on the final stage of implosion is studied in the work based on 1D and 2D numerical calculations. The results of 2D modeling show that in the case of target's offset from the point of beams crossing significantly greater reduction in the neutron yield is observed than in the case when only irregularities caused by the geometry of irradiation by the finite number of beams are taken into account.

  4. Numerical Simulations of Hydrodynamic Instability Growth in Polar-Direct-Drive Implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvydky, A.; Hohenberger, M.; Radha, P. B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Craxton, R. S.; Goncharov, V. N.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; McKenty, P. W.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.

    2015-11-01

    Control of shell nonuniformities imprinted by the laser and amplified by hydrodynamic instabilities in the imploding target is critical to the success of polar-direct-drive ignition at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). To develop a platform for laser-imprint studies, hydrodynamic instability growth experiments in laser-driven implosions were performed on the NIF. The experiments used cone-in-shell targets with sinusoidal modulations of various wavelengths and amplitudes machined on the surface. Throughshell x-ray radiography was used to measure optical depth variations, from which the amplitudes of the shell areal-density modulations were extracted. Results of DRACO simulations of the growth of preimposed modulations and imprint-seeded perturbations will be presented and compared with the experimental data. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  5. Note: Radiochemical measurement of fuel and ablator areal densities in cryogenic implosions at the National Ignition Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagmann, C; Shaughnessy, D A; Moody, K J; Grant, P M; Gharibyan, N; Gostic, J M; Wooddy, P T; Torretto, P C; Bandong, B B; Bionta, R; Cerjan, C J; Bernstein, L A; Caggiano, J A; Herrmann, H W; Knauer, J P; Sayre, D B; Schneider, D H; Henry, E A; Fortner, R J

    2015-07-01

    A new radiochemical method for determining deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel and plastic ablator (CH) areal densities (ρR) in high-convergence, cryogenic inertial confinement fusion implosions at the National Ignition Facility is described. It is based on measuring the (198)Au/(196)Au activation ratio using the collected post-shot debris of the Au hohlraum. The Au ratio combined with the independently measured neutron down scatter ratio uniquely determines the areal densities ρR(DT) and ρR(CH) during burn in the context of a simple 1-dimensional capsule model. The results show larger than expected ρR(CH) values, hinting at the presence of cold fuel-ablator mix. PMID:26233419

  6. Note: Radiochemical measurement of fuel and ablator areal densities in cryogenic implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagmann, C., E-mail: hagmann1@llnl.gov; Shaughnessy, D. A.; Moody, K. J.; Grant, P. M.; Gharibyan, N.; Gostic, J. M.; Wooddy, P. T.; Torretto, P. C.; Bandong, B. B.; Bionta, R.; Cerjan, C. J.; Bernstein, L. A.; Caggiano, J. A.; Sayre, D. B.; Schneider, D. H.; Henry, E. A.; Fortner, R. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Herrmann, H. W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Knauer, J. P. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    A new radiochemical method for determining deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel and plastic ablator (CH) areal densities (ρR) in high-convergence, cryogenic inertial confinement fusion implosions at the National Ignition Facility is described. It is based on measuring the {sup 198}Au/{sup 196}Au activation ratio using the collected post-shot debris of the Au hohlraum. The Au ratio combined with the independently measured neutron down scatter ratio uniquely determines the areal densities ρR(DT) and ρR(CH) during burn in the context of a simple 1-dimensional capsule model. The results show larger than expected ρR(CH) values, hinting at the presence of cold fuel-ablator mix.

  7. Uniformity of spherical shock wave dynamically stabilized by two successive laser profiles in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The implosion uniformity of a directly driven spherical inertial confinement fusion capsule is considered within the context of the Laser Mégajoule configuration. Two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic simulations have been performed assuming irradiation with two laser beam cones located at 49° and 131° with respect to the axis of symmetry. The laser energy deposition causes an inward shock wave whose surface is tracked in time, providing the time evolution of its non-uniformity. The illumination model has been used to optimize the laser intensity profiles used as input in the 2D hydro-calculations. It is found that a single stationary laser profile does not maintain a uniform shock front over time. To overcome this drawback, it is proposed to use two laser profiles acting successively in time, in order to dynamically stabilize the non-uniformity of the shock front

  8. Uniformity of spherical shock wave dynamically stabilized by two successive laser profiles in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temporal, M.; Canaud, B.; Garbett, W. J.; Ramis, R.

    2015-10-01

    The implosion uniformity of a directly driven spherical inertial confinement fusion capsule is considered within the context of the Laser Mégajoule configuration. Two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic simulations have been performed assuming irradiation with two laser beam cones located at 49° and 131° with respect to the axis of symmetry. The laser energy deposition causes an inward shock wave whose surface is tracked in time, providing the time evolution of its non-uniformity. The illumination model has been used to optimize the laser intensity profiles used as input in the 2D hydro-calculations. It is found that a single stationary laser profile does not maintain a uniform shock front over time. To overcome this drawback, it is proposed to use two laser profiles acting successively in time, in order to dynamically stabilize the non-uniformity of the shock front.

  9. On the change in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions upon using an ab initio multiphase DT equation of state

    CERN Document Server

    Caillabet, Laurent; Salin, Gwenaël; Mazevet, Stéphane; Loubeyre, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Improving the description of the equation of state (EoS) of deuterium-tritium (DT) has recently been shown to change significantly the gain of an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) target (Hu et al., PRL 104, 235003 (2010)). We use here an advanced multi-phase equation of state (EoS), based on ab initio calculations, to perform a full optimization of the laser pulse shape with hydrodynamic simulations starting from 19 K in DT ice. The thermonuclear gain is shown to be a robust estimate over possible uncertainties of the EoS. Two different target designs are discussed, for shock ignition and self-ignition. In the first case, the areal density and thermonuclear energy can be recovered by slightly increasing the laser energy. In the second case, a lower in-flight adiabat is needed, leading to a significant delay (3ns) in the shock timing of the implosion.

  10. X-ray Astronomy in the Laboratory with a Miniature Compact Object Produced by Laser-Driven Implosion

    CERN Document Server

    Fujioka, Shinsuke; Yamamoto, Norimasa; Salzmann, David; Wang, Feilu; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Li, Yutong; Dong, Quanli; Wang, Shoujun; Zhang, Yi; Rhee, Yong-Joo; Lee, Yong-Woo; Han, Jae-Min; Tanabe, Minoru; Fujiwara, Takashi; Nakabayashi, Yuto; Zhao, Gang; Zhang, Jie; Mima, Kunioki

    2009-01-01

    Laboratory spectroscopy of non-thermal equilibrium plasmas photoionized by intense radiation is a key to understanding compact objects, such as black holes, based on astronomical observations. This paper describes an experiment to study photoionizing plasmas in laboratory under well-defined and genuine conditions. Photoionized plasma is here generated using a 0.5-keV Planckian x-ray source created by means of a laser-driven implosion. The measured x-ray spectrum from the photoionized silicon plasma resembles those observed from the binary stars Cygnus X-3 and Vela X-1 with the Chandra x-ray satellite. This demonstrates that an extreme radiation field was produced in the laboratory, however, the theoretical interpretation of the laboratory spectrum significantly contradicts the generally accepted explanations in x-ray astronomy. This model experiment offers a novel test bed for validation and verification of computational codes used in x-ray astronomy.

  11. Assessment of the Effects of Azimuthal Mode Number Perturbations upon the Implosion Processes of Fluids in Cylinders

    CERN Document Server

    Lindstrom, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Fluid instabilities arise in a variety of contexts and are often unwanted results of engineering imperfections. In one particular model for a magnetized target fusion reactor, a pressure wave is propagated in a cylindrical annulus comprised of a dense fluid before impinging upon a plasma and imploding it. Part of the success of the apparatus is a function of how axially-symmetric the final pressure pulse is upon impacting the plasma. We study a simple model for the implosion of the system to study how imperfections in the pressure imparted on the outer circumference grow due to geometric focusing. Our methodology entails linearizing the compressible Euler equations for mass and momentum conservation about a cylindrically symmetric problem and analyzing the perturbed profiles at different mode numbers. The linearized system gives rise to singular shocks and through analyzing the perturbation profiles at various times, we infer that high mode numbers are dampened through the propagation. We also study the Linea...

  12. Note: Radiochemical measurement of fuel and ablator areal densities in cryogenic implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagmann, C.; Shaughnessy, D. A.; Moody, K. J.; Grant, P. M.; Gharibyan, N.; Gostic, J. M.; Wooddy, P. T.; Torretto, P. C.; Bandong, B. B.; Bionta, R.; Cerjan, C. J.; Bernstein, L. A.; Caggiano, J. A.; Herrmann, H. W.; Knauer, J. P.; Sayre, D. B.; Schneider, D. H.; Henry, E. A.; Fortner, R. J.

    2015-07-01

    A new radiochemical method for determining deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel and plastic ablator (CH) areal densities (ρR) in high-convergence, cryogenic inertial confinement fusion implosions at the National Ignition Facility is described. It is based on measuring the 198Au/196Au activation ratio using the collected post-shot debris of the Au hohlraum. The Au ratio combined with the independently measured neutron down scatter ratio uniquely determines the areal densities ρR(DT) and ρR(CH) during burn in the context of a simple 1-dimensional capsule model. The results show larger than expected ρR(CH) values, hinting at the presence of cold fuel-ablator mix.

  13. Implosion scaling and hydro dynamically equivalent target design - Strategy for proof of principle of high gain inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaling laws for hydro dynamically similar implosions are derived by applying Lie group analysis to the set of partial differential equations for the hydrodynamic system. Physically this implies that any fluid system belonging to a common similarity group evolves quite in the same manner including hydrodynamic instabilities. The scalings strongly depend on the description of the energy transport, i.e., whether the fluid system is heat conductive or adiabatic. Under a fully specified group transformation including prescriptions on the laser wavelength and the ionization state, the hydrodynamic similarity can still be preserved even when the system is cooperated with such other energy sources as classical laser absorption, hot electrons, local alpha heating, and bremsstrahlung loss. The results are expected to give the basis of target design and diagnostics for scaled high gain experiments in future. (author)

  14. Design of an electronic charged particle spectrometer to measure (ρR), yield, and implosion symmetry on the OMEGA Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preliminary design for a state-of-the-art diagnostic that will measure a broad energy spectrum of charged particles generated in the OMEGA Upgrade facility is investigated. Using a set of photodiodes (∼10) and a 0.8 Tesla permanent magnet, the diagnostic will uniquely determine particle energies and identities from 0.2 MeV up to the maximum charged particle energies (10.6 MeV tritons, 12.5 MeV deuterons and 17.4 MeV protons). With its high density picture elements, each photodiode has 106 single-hit detectors, giving the spectrometer a dynamic range of 1 - 105 particles/shot. For example, in the case of a DT yield of 109 neutrons, about 100 knock-on charged particles will be detected when the spectrometer aperture is 60 cm from the implosion. Furthermore, the measurement of knock-on D and T spectra will allow ρR's up to 0.15 g/cm2 to be measured (for a 1 keV plasma), or 0.3 g/cm22 if hydrogen doping is used. In addition, the yield and slowing down of secondary protons may be used to determine ρR up to 0.3 g/cm2. Significantly, this diagnostic will also directly measure the DD fusion yield and energy degradation of nascent 3 MeV protons. By using two such compact spectrometers to measure the yield and spectra on widely separated ports around the OMEGA Upgrade target chamber, the implosion and bum symmetry can be determined. Furthermore, the ion temperature, and, in principle, even the electron temperature can be measured. The diagnostic and its development will be fully tested at several critical steps, utilizing 0.2-16 MeV protons (and several other charged particles and neutrons) from our absolutely calibrated Cockcroft-Walton facility

  15. Assessment of ion kinetic effects in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions using fusion burn imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, M. J., E-mail: mros@lle.rochester.edu; Séguin, F. H.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Zylstra, A. B.; Li, C. K.; Sio, H.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Amendt, P. A.; Wilks, S. C.; Pino, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Atzeni, S. [Dipartimento SBAI, Università di Roma “La Sapienza” and CNISM, Via A. Scarpa 14-16, I-00161 Roma (Italy); Hoffman, N. M.; Kagan, G.; Molvig, K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Seka, W.; Marshall, F. J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); and others

    2015-06-15

    The significance and nature of ion kinetic effects in D{sup 3}He-filled, shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions are assessed through measurements of fusion burn profiles. Over this series of experiments, the ratio of ion-ion mean free path to minimum shell radius (the Knudsen number, N{sub K}) was varied from 0.3 to 9 in order to probe hydrodynamic-like to strongly kinetic plasma conditions; as the Knudsen number increased, hydrodynamic models increasingly failed to match measured yields, while an empirically-tuned, first-step model of ion kinetic effects better captured the observed yield trends [Rosenberg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 185001 (2014)]. Here, spatially resolved measurements of the fusion burn are used to examine kinetic ion transport effects in greater detail, adding an additional dimension of understanding that goes beyond zero-dimensional integrated quantities to one-dimensional profiles. In agreement with the previous findings, a comparison of measured and simulated burn profiles shows that models including ion transport effects are able to better match the experimental results. In implosions characterized by large Knudsen numbers (N{sub K} ∼ 3), the fusion burn profiles predicted by hydrodynamics simulations that exclude ion mean free path effects are peaked far from the origin, in stark disagreement with the experimentally observed profiles, which are centrally peaked. In contrast, a hydrodynamics simulation that includes a model of ion diffusion is able to qualitatively match the measured profile shapes. Therefore, ion diffusion or diffusion-like processes are identified as a plausible explanation of the observed trends, though further refinement of the models is needed for a more complete and quantitative understanding of ion kinetic effects.

  16. Assessment of ion kinetic effects in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions using fusion burn imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The significance and nature of ion kinetic effects in D3He-filled, shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions are assessed through measurements of fusion burn profiles. Over this series of experiments, the ratio of ion-ion mean free path to minimum shell radius (the Knudsen number, NK) was varied from 0.3 to 9 in order to probe hydrodynamic-like to strongly kinetic plasma conditions; as the Knudsen number increased, hydrodynamic models increasingly failed to match measured yields, while an empirically-tuned, first-step model of ion kinetic effects better captured the observed yield trends [Rosenberg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 185001 (2014)]. Here, spatially resolved measurements of the fusion burn are used to examine kinetic ion transport effects in greater detail, adding an additional dimension of understanding that goes beyond zero-dimensional integrated quantities to one-dimensional profiles. In agreement with the previous findings, a comparison of measured and simulated burn profiles shows that models including ion transport effects are able to better match the experimental results. In implosions characterized by large Knudsen numbers (NK ∼ 3), the fusion burn profiles predicted by hydrodynamics simulations that exclude ion mean free path effects are peaked far from the origin, in stark disagreement with the experimentally observed profiles, which are centrally peaked. In contrast, a hydrodynamics simulation that includes a model of ion diffusion is able to qualitatively match the measured profile shapes. Therefore, ion diffusion or diffusion-like processes are identified as a plausible explanation of the observed trends, though further refinement of the models is needed for a more complete and quantitative understanding of ion kinetic effects

  17. Assessment of ion kinetic effects in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions using fusion burn imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Séguin, F. H.; Amendt, P. A.; Atzeni, S.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Hoffman, N. M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Li, C. K.; Sio, H.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Seka, W.; Marshall, F. J.; Delettrez, J. A.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Wilks, S. C.; Pino, J.; Kagan, G.; Molvig, K.; Nikroo, A.

    2015-06-01

    The significance and nature of ion kinetic effects in D3He-filled, shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions are assessed through measurements of fusion burn profiles. Over this series of experiments, the ratio of ion-ion mean free path to minimum shell radius (the Knudsen number, NK) was varied from 0.3 to 9 in order to probe hydrodynamic-like to strongly kinetic plasma conditions; as the Knudsen number increased, hydrodynamic models increasingly failed to match measured yields, while an empirically-tuned, first-step model of ion kinetic effects better captured the observed yield trends [Rosenberg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 185001 (2014)]. Here, spatially resolved measurements of the fusion burn are used to examine kinetic ion transport effects in greater detail, adding an additional dimension of understanding that goes beyond zero-dimensional integrated quantities to one-dimensional profiles. In agreement with the previous findings, a comparison of measured and simulated burn profiles shows that models including ion transport effects are able to better match the experimental results. In implosions characterized by large Knudsen numbers (NK ˜ 3), the fusion burn profiles predicted by hydrodynamics simulations that exclude ion mean free path effects are peaked far from the origin, in stark disagreement with the experimentally observed profiles, which are centrally peaked. In contrast, a hydrodynamics simulation that includes a model of ion diffusion is able to qualitatively match the measured profile shapes. Therefore, ion diffusion or diffusion-like processes are identified as a plausible explanation of the observed trends, though further refinement of the models is needed for a more complete and quantitative understanding of ion kinetic effects.

  18. Optimizing Chemical Sensor Array Sizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optimal selection of array sensors for a chemical sensing application is a nontrivial task. It is commonly believed that ''more is better'' when choosing the number of sensors required to achieve good chemical selectivity. However, cost and system complexity issues point towards the choice of small arrays. A quantitative array optimization is carried out to explore the selectivity of arrays of partially-selective chemical sensors as a function of array size. It is shown that modest numbers (dozens) of target analytes are completely distinguished with a range of arrays sizes. However, the array selectivity and the robustness against sensor sensitivity variability are significantly degraded if the array size is increased above a certain number of sensors, so that relatively small arrays provide the best performance. The results also suggest that data analyses for very large arrays of partially-selective sensors will be optimized by separately anal yzing small sensor subsets

  19. Radiative signatures of Z-pinch plasmas at UNR: from X-pinches to wire arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    University-scale Z-pinch generators are able to produce High Energy Density (HED) plasmas in a broad range of plasma parameters under well-controlled and monitored experimental conditions suitable for radiation studies. The implosion of X-pinch and wire array loads at a 1 MA generator yields short (1-20 nsec) x-ray bursts from one or several bright plasma spots near the wire cross point (for X-pinches) or along and near Z-pinch axis (for wire arrays). Such X- and Z-pinch HED plasma with scales from a few µm to several mm in size emits radiation in a broad range of energies from 10 eV to 0.5 MeV and is subject of our studies during the last ten years. In particular, the substantial number of experiments with very different wire loads was performed on the 1 MA Zebra generator and analyzed: X-pinch, cylindrical, nested, and various types of the novel load, Planar Wire Arrays (PWA). Also, the experiments at an enhanced current of 1.5-1.7 MA on Zebra using Load Current Multiplier (LCM) were performed. This paper highlights radiative signatures of X-pinches and Single and Double PWAs which are illustrated using the new results with combined wire loads from two different materials. (author)

  20. A passive synthetic aperture phase correction algorithm for the asymmetric twin-line array sonar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A passive synthetic aperture based on phase correction algorithm for solving the port-starboard discrimination problem in the non-aligned towed twin-line array sonar, is described. This method creates a virtual array through applying the estimated phase correction into one array of twin-line arrays. Because the synthetic virtual array is aligned with the other array in twin-line arrays, the right port-starboard discriminated results can be obtained by array processing based on the new synthetic twin-line array. The effect of proposed method has been shown by simulated and sea-trials results in towed twin-line array sonar. With low extra computational loads, the proposed method is easy to apply to the practice.

  1. Coupled-oscillator based active-array antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Pogorzelski, Ronald J

    2012-01-01

    Describing an innovative approach to phased-array control in antenna design This book explores in detail phased-array antennas that use coupled-oscillator arrays, an arrangement featuring a remarkably simple beam steering control system and a major reduction in complexity compared with traditional methods of phased-array control. It brings together in one convenient, self-contained volume the many salient research results obtained over the past ten to fifteen years in laboratories around the world, including the California Institute of Technology's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  2. Optimized Optomechanical Micro-Cantilever Array for Uncooled Infrared Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Feng-Liang; ZHANG Qing-Chuan; CHEN Da-Peng; MIAO Zheng-Yu; XIONG Zhi-Ming; GUO Zhe-Ying; LI Chao-Bo; JIAO Bin-Bin; WU Xiao-Ping

    2007-01-01

    We present a new substrate-free bimaterial cantilever array made of SiNx and Au for an uncooled microoptomechanical infrared imaging device.Each cantilever element has an optimized deformation magnification structure.A 160×160 array with a 120μm×120μm pitch is fabricared and an optical readout is used to collectively measure deflections of all microcantilevers in the array.Tharmal images of room-temperature objects with higher spatial resolution have been obtained and the noise-equivalent temperature difference of the fabricated focal plane arrays is giyen statistically and is measured to be about 270mK.

  3. Imaging antenna arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, D. B.; Muha, M. S.

    1982-01-01

    Many millimeter and far-infrared imaging systems are limited in sensitivity and speed because they depend on a single scanned element. Because of recent advances in planar detectors such as Schottky diodes, superconducting tunnel junctions, and microbolometers, an attractive approach to this problem is a planar antenna array with integrated detectors. A planar line antenna array and optical system for imaging has been developed. The significant advances are a 'reverse-microscope' optical configuration and a modified bow-tie antenna design. In the 'reverse-microscope' configuration, a lens is attached to the bottom of the substrate containing the antennas. Imaging is done through the substrate. This configuration eliminates the troublesome effects of substrate surface waves. The substrate lens has only a single refracting surface, making possible a virtually aplanatic system, with little spherical aberration or coma. The array is characterized by an optical transfer function that is easily measured. An array with 19 dB crosstalk levels between adjacent antennas has been tested and it was found that the array captured 50 percent of the available power. This imaging system was diffraction limited.

  4. Drugs obtained by biotechnology processing

    OpenAIRE

    Hugo Almeida; Maria Helena Amaral; Paulo Lobão

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, the number of drugs of biotechnological origin available for many different diseases has increased exponentially, including different types of cancer, diabetes mellitus, infectious diseases (e.g. AIDS Virus / HIV) as well as cardiovascular, neurological, respiratory, and autoimmune diseases, among others. The pharmaceutical industry has used different technologies to obtain new and promising active ingredients, as exemplified by the fermentation technique, recombinant DNA tec...

  5. FEL phased array configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellan, Jeffrey B.

    1986-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of various phased array and shared aperture concepts for FEL configurations are discussed. Consideration is given to the characteristics of intra- and inter-micropulse phasing; intra-macropulse phasing; an internal coupled resonator configuration; and an injection locked oscillator array. The use of a master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) configuration with multiple or single master oscillators for FELs is examined. The venetian blind, rotating plate, single grating, and grating rhomb shared aperture concepts are analyzed. It is noted that the shared aperture approach using a grating rhomb and the MOPA concept with a single master oscillator and a coupled resonator are useful for FEL phased array configurations; and the MOPA concept is most applicable.

  6. Atacama Compact Array Antennas

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, Masao; Inatani, Junji; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Naoi, Takahiro; Yamada, Masumi; Saito, Hiro; Ikenoue, Bungo; Kato, Yoshihiro; Morita, Kou-ichiro; Mizuno, Norikazu; Iguchi, Satoru

    2011-01-01

    We report major performance test results of the Atacama Compact Array (ACA) 7-m and 12-m antennas of ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array). The four major performances of the ACA antennas are all-sky pointing (to be not more than 2.0 arcsec), offset pointing (to be < 0.6 arcsec) surface accuracy (< 25(20) micrometer for 12(7)m-antenna), stability of path-length (15 micrometer over 3 min), and high servo capability (6 degrees/s for Azimuth and 3 degrees/s for Elevation). The high...

  7. Wire Array Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner-Evans, Dan

    Over the past five years, the cost of solar panels has dropped drastically and, in concert, the number of installed modules has risen exponentially. However, solar electricity is still more than twice as expensive as electricity from a natural gas plant. Fortunately, wire array solar cells have emerged as a promising technology for further lowering the cost of solar. Si wire array solar cells are formed with a unique, low cost growth method and use 100 times less material than conventional Si cells. The wires can be embedded in a transparent, flexible polymer to create a free-standing array that can be rolled up for easy installation in a variety of form factors. Furthermore, by incorporating multijunctions into the wire morphology, higher efficiencies can be achieved while taking advantage of the unique defect relaxation pathways afforded by the 3D wire geometry. The work in this thesis shepherded Si wires from undoped arrays to flexible, functional large area devices and laid the groundwork for multijunction wire array cells. Fabrication techniques were developed to turn intrinsic Si wires into full p-n junctions and the wires were passivated with a-Si:H and a-SiNx:H. Single wire devices yielded open circuit voltages of 600 mV and efficiencies of 9%. The arrays were then embedded in a polymer and contacted with a transparent, flexible, Ni nanoparticle and Ag nanowire top contact. The contact connected >99% of the wires in parallel and yielded flexible, substrate free solar cells featuring hundreds of thousands of wires. Building on the success of the Si wire arrays, GaP was epitaxially grown on the material to create heterostructures for photoelectrochemistry. These cells were limited by low absorption in the GaP due to its indirect bandgap, and poor current collection due to a diffusion length of only 80 nm. However, GaAsP on SiGe offers a superior combination of materials, and wire architectures based on these semiconductors were investigated for multijunction

  8. Dynamic response of towed line array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Bing-ka; ZHU Ke-qiang; ZHU Yan-jie; QIN Dao-wu

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional motion equations with consideration of the bending and torsional effects of a marine towed cable system under large elastic deformation conditions are formulated using the lumped parameter model.The lumped mass model is used to simulate a circular maneuver of a towed horizontal array that was first presented by Ablow.The results of this paper are in a good agreement with those obtained by finite difference schemes,and the minimum depth is closer to the experimental result.Although the calculations take more computation time,the lumped mass model is a good method,which can also be used to solve problems of towed line array,especially multi-branched towed line array,because of its flexibility.

  9. A millisecond pulsar timing array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, George; Manchester, Dick; Sarkissian, John; Bailes, Matthew; Bhat, Ramesh; Keith, Michael; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; Coles, William; van Straten, Willem; Ravi, Vikram; Oslowski, Stefan; Khoo, Jonathan; Shannon, Ryan; Wang, Jingbo; Levin, Yuri

    2013-10-01

    The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) project has three primary goals: (a) detection of gravitational waves from astronomical sources, (b) establishment of a pulsar timescale, and (c) improvement of our understanding of Solar-system dynamics. There are many secondary goals, some astrophysical and some instrumental/technique oriented. Achievement of these ambitious primary goals requires frequent observations of at least 20 MSPs at two or preferably three widely spaced frequencies over several years. We wish to continue observing the PPTA sample at intervals of 2-3 weeks using both the 10/50cm and Multibeam receivers. The digital filterbanks (PDFB3, PDFB4) and the baseband systems (CPSR2; APSR) are used for data recording. With the new instruments and development of an efficient pipeline processing system, we have achieved the world's best pulsar timing precision. We are collaborating with the European and North American pulsar timing array groups (EPTA and NANOGrav, respectively) to obtain more frequent observations and a larger pulsar sample. Because of the high sensitivity and wide bandwidths required, RFI mitigation is an important part of the project. We request continuing status for this project.

  10. Array processors in chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostlund, N.S.

    1980-01-01

    The field of attached scientific processors (''array processors'') is surveyed, and an attempt is made to indicate their present and possible future use in computational chemistry. The current commercial products from Floating Point Systems, Inc., Datawest Corporation, and CSP, Inc. are discussed.

  11. Array Theory and Nial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falster, Peter; Jenkins, Michael

    1999-01-01

    This report is the result of collaboration between the authors during the first 8 months of 1999 when M. Jenkins was visiting professor at DTU. The report documents the development of a tool for the investigation of array theory concepts and in particular presents various approaches to choose...

  12. Detector array and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detector array and method are described in which sets of electrode elements are provided. Each set consists of a number of linear extending parallel electrodes. The sets of electrode elements are disposed at an angle (preferably orthogonal) with respect to one another so that the individual elements intersect and overlap individual elements of the other sets. Electrical insulation is provided between the overlapping elements. The detector array is exposed to a source of charged particles which in accordance with one embodiment comprise electrons derived from a microchannel array plate exposed to photons. Amplifier and discriminator means are provided for each individual electrode element. Detection means are provided to sense pulses on individual electrode elements in the sets, with coincidence of pulses on individual intersecting electrode elements being indicative of charged particle impact at the intersection of the elements. Electronic readout means provide an indication of coincident events and the location where the charged particle or particles impacted. Display means are provided for generating appropriate displays representative of the intensity and locaton of charged particles impacting on the detector array

  13. The Murchison Widefield Array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mitchell, Daniel A.; Greenhill, Lincoln J.; Ord, Stephen M.; Bernardi, Gianni

    2010-01-01

    It is shown that the excellent Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory site allows the Murchison Widefield Array to employ a simple RFI blanking scheme and still calibrate visibilities and form images in the FM radio band. The techniques described are running autonomously in our calibration and imagin

  14. Cantilever array sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Peter Lang

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Miniaturized microfabricated sensors have enormous potential in gas detection, biochemical analysis, medical applications, quality and process control, and product authenticity issues. Here, we highlight an ultrasensitive mechanical way of converting (bio-chemical or physical processes into a recordable signal using microfabricated cantilever arrays.

  15. Determination of critical velocity and fractions of suprathermal electrons in the implosion of deuterium-tritium pellets by the inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper physical processes related to the production of suprathermal electrons by the Inertial Confinement Fusion have been analyzed. The critical velocity suprathermal electrons emerge with, in the implosion of the Deuterium-Tritium pellets, by means of the application of laser, have been calculated. To determinate this critical velocity the authors consider electric fields generated by laser and magnetic fields self-generated by implosion of pellet. Starting on this velocity the authors consider a gegenerate electron's model and having in mind values of the temperature, they have applied statistics of Fermi, Maxwell-Boltzmann and relativistic Maxwell-Boltzmann. Fractions of suprathermal electrons and its concentration to each value of electrons concentration ne, as function of energy, have been calculated. Conditions of applicability have been applied to aforementioned statistics to utilize them in hydrodynamic codes related to inertial Confinement Fusion

  16. Measurements of fuel and ablator ρR in Symmetry-Capsule implosions with the Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Bionta, R. M.; Casey, D. T.; Caggiano, J. A.; Hatarik, R.; Khater, H. Y.; Sayre, D. B.; Knauer, J. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kilkenny, J. D.

    2014-11-01

    The Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) measures the neutron spectrum in the energy range of 4-20 MeV. This paper describes MRS measurements of DT-fuel and CH-ablator ρR in DT gas-filled symmetry-capsule implosions at the NIF. DT-fuel ρR's of 80-140 mg/cm2 and CH-ablator ρR's of 400-680 mg/cm2 are inferred from MRS data. The measurements were facilitated by an improved correction of neutron-induced background in the low-energy part of the MRS spectrum. This work demonstrates the accurate utilization of the complete MRS-measured neutron spectrum for diagnosing NIF DT implosions.

  17. Measurements of fuel and ablator ρR in Symmetry-Capsule implosions with the Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) measures the neutron spectrum in the energy range of 4–20 MeV. This paper describes MRS measurements of DT-fuel and CH-ablator ρR in DT gas-filled symmetry-capsule implosions at the NIF. DT-fuel ρR's of 80–140 mg/cm2 and CH-ablator ρR's of 400–680 mg/cm2 are inferred from MRS data. The measurements were facilitated by an improved correction of neutron-induced background in the low-energy part of the MRS spectrum. This work demonstrates the accurate utilization of the complete MRS-measured neutron spectrum for diagnosing NIF DT implosions

  18. Measurements of fuel and ablator ρR in Symmetry-Capsule implosions with the Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatu Johnson, M; Frenje, J A; Li, C K; Séguin, F H; Petrasso, R D; Bionta, R M; Casey, D T; Caggiano, J A; Hatarik, R; Khater, H Y; Sayre, D B; Knauer, J P; Sangster, T C; Herrmann, H W; Kilkenny, J D

    2014-11-01

    The Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) measures the neutron spectrum in the energy range of 4-20 MeV. This paper describes MRS measurements of DT-fuel and CH-ablator ρR in DT gas-filled symmetry-capsule implosions at the NIF. DT-fuel ρR's of 80-140 mg/cm(2) and CH-ablator ρR's of 400-680 mg/cm(2) are inferred from MRS data. The measurements were facilitated by an improved correction of neutron-induced background in the low-energy part of the MRS spectrum. This work demonstrates the accurate utilization of the complete MRS-measured neutron spectrum for diagnosing NIF DT implosions. PMID:25430283

  19. Measurements of fuel and ablator ρR in Symmetry-Capsule implosions with the Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatu Johnson, M., E-mail: gatu@psfc.mit.edu; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Bionta, R. M.; Casey, D. T.; Caggiano, J. A.; Hatarik, R.; Khater, H. Y.; Sayre, D. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Knauer, J. P.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Herrmann, H. W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Kilkenny, J. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    The Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) measures the neutron spectrum in the energy range of 4–20 MeV. This paper describes MRS measurements of DT-fuel and CH-ablator ρR in DT gas-filled symmetry-capsule implosions at the NIF. DT-fuel ρR's of 80–140 mg/cm{sup 2} and CH-ablator ρR's of 400–680 mg/cm{sup 2} are inferred from MRS data. The measurements were facilitated by an improved correction of neutron-induced background in the low-energy part of the MRS spectrum. This work demonstrates the accurate utilization of the complete MRS-measured neutron spectrum for diagnosing NIF DT implosions.

  20. Cryogenic tritium-hydrogen-deuterium and deuterium-tritium layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meezan, N. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Döppner, T.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J. L.; Pak, A. E.; Ross, J. S.; Thomas, C. A.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Izumi, N.; Kyrala, G. A.; Moody, J. D.; Patel, P. K.; Ralph, J. E.; Rygg, J. R.; Sepke, S. M.; Spears, B. K.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R. P. J.; Biener, J.; Bionta, R. M.; Bond, E. J.; Caggiano, J. A.; Eckart, M. J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G. P.; Hamza, A. V.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hoover, D. E.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; Kroll, J. J.; McNaney, J. M.; Nikroo, A.; Sayre, D. B.; Stadermann, M.; Wild, C.; Yoxall, B. E.; Landen, O. L.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2015-06-01

    High Density Carbon (or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of radiography of a tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightly oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 × 1015 neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.

  1. Enhanced photovoltaic performance of an inclined nanowire array solar cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yao; Yan, Xin; Zhang, Xia; Ren, Xiaomin

    2015-11-30

    An innovative solar cell based on inclined p-i-n nanowire array is designed and analyzed. The results show that the inclined geometry can sufficiently increase the conversion efficiency of solar cells by enhancing the absorption of light in the active region. By tuning the nanowire array density, nanowire diameter, nanowire length, as well as the proportion of intrinsic region of the inclined nanowire solar cell, a remarkable efficiency in excess of 16% can be obtained in GaAs. Similar results have been obtained in InP and Si nanowire solar cells, demonstrating the universality of the performance enhancement of inclined nanowire arrays. PMID:26698807

  2. Inhomogeneous parallel arrays of Josephson junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → New long wave model of an inhomogeneous parallel array of Josephson junctions. → Adapted spectral problem giving resonances in the current-voltage characteristic. → At resonances solution is described by two ordinary differential equations. → Good agreement with the characteristic curve of a real five junction array. - Abstract: We model new inhomogeneous parallel arrays of small Josephson junctions by taking into account the time and space variations of the field in the cavity and the capacity miss-match at the junctions. The model consists in a wave equation with Dirac delta function sine nonlinearities. We introduce an adapted spectral problem whose spectrum gives the resonances in the current-voltage characteristic curve of any array. It is shown that at the resonances the solution is described by two simple ordinary differential equations. The resonances obtained by this approach are in good agreement with the characteristic curve of a real five junction array. This flexible approach is a first step towards building a device tailored for given purposes.

  3. Correlation based method for reconstructing two-dimensional arrays of apertures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A procedure is shown that allows the reconstruction of two-dimensional arrays of amplitude-only apertures. It is based on the analysis of the autocorrelation of the array transmittance, which can be obtained by Fourier transforming the intensity distribution of the far field interference pattern produced by the array. (author)

  4. The ring vortex metamorphosis as a basis for cavitation bubble implosion, the Schwenk method for drop formation and the water jet cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is possible, even to understand better the implosion of cavitation bubles by means of the progress of the recent years with reference to the transition of the laminar into the turbulent state of flow, especially for the case of ring vortices. The present report proves that the implosion of the cavitation bubbles takes place within implosion of the cavitation bubbles takes place within a gaseous/liquid ring vortex that transits from laminar flow state into the turbulent. The material erosion by a cavitation bubble takes place, when the metamorphosis of the ring vortex takes place immediately at a wall resp. in the vicinity of a wall, when the ring vortices of the cavitation move towards the wall and hereby erode it. Furthermore it is presented that this beam phenomenon, observed in cavitation also takes place during other events e.g. the drop transformation at the impact of a drop on a liquid layer or a solid material. This way it is possible to make a contribution to the explantations of phenomena, that take place during cuttering of solid materials by high pressure drop jets cutters. (orig.)

  5. Cryogenic tritium-hydrogen-deuterium and deuterium-tritium layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meezan, N. B., E-mail: meezan1@llnl.gov; Hopkins, L. F. Berzak; Pape, S. Le; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Döppner, T.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J. L.; Pak, A. E.; Ross, J. S.; Thomas, C. A.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States); and others

    2015-06-15

    High Density Carbon (or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of <10 ns. A series of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a deuterium-tritium (DT) layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightly oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 × 10{sup 15} neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.

  6. Cryogenic tritium-hydrogen-deuterium and deuterium-tritium layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High Density Carbon (or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of <10 ns. A series of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a deuterium-tritium (DT) layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightly oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 × 1015 neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield

  7. Demonstration of Fuel Hot-Spot Pressure in Excess of 50 Gbar for Direct-Drive, Layered Deuterium-Tritium Implosions on OMEGA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, S P; Goncharov, V N; Igumenshchev, I V; Sangster, T C; Betti, R; Bose, A; Boehly, T R; Bonino, M J; Campbell, E M; Cao, D; Collins, T J B; Craxton, R S; Davis, A K; Delettrez, J A; Edgell, D H; Epstein, R; Forrest, C J; Frenje, J A; Froula, D H; Gatu Johnson, M; Glebov, V Yu; Harding, D R; Hohenberger, M; Hu, S X; Jacobs-Perkins, D; Janezic, R; Karasik, M; Keck, R L; Kelly, J H; Kessler, T J; Knauer, J P; Kosc, T Z; Loucks, S J; Marozas, J A; Marshall, F J; McCrory, R L; McKenty, P W; Meyerhofer, D D; Michel, D T; Myatt, J F; Obenschain, S P; Petrasso, R D; Radha, P B; Rice, B; Rosenberg, M J; Schmitt, A J; Schmitt, M J; Seka, W; Shmayda, W T; Shoup, M J; Shvydky, A; Skupsky, S; Solodov, A A; Stoeckl, C; Theobald, W; Ulreich, J; Wittman, M D; Woo, K M; Yaakobi, B; Zuegel, J D

    2016-07-01

    A record fuel hot-spot pressure P_{hs}=56±7  Gbar was inferred from x-ray and nuclear diagnostics for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion cryogenic, layered deuterium-tritium implosions on the 60-beam, 30-kJ, 351-nm OMEGA Laser System. When hydrodynamically scaled to the energy of the National Ignition Facility, these implosions achieved a Lawson parameter ∼60% of the value required for ignition [A. Bose et al., Phys. Rev. E 93, 011201(R) (2016)], similar to indirect-drive implosions [R. Betti et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 255003 (2015)], and nearly half of the direct-drive ignition-threshold pressure. Relative to symmetric, one-dimensional simulations, the inferred hot-spot pressure is approximately 40% lower. Three-dimensional simulations suggest that low-mode distortion of the hot spot seeded by laser-drive nonuniformity and target-positioning error reduces target performance. PMID:27447511

  8. Concurrent array-based queue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidelberger, Philip; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard

    2015-01-06

    According to one embodiment, a method for implementing an array-based queue in memory of a memory system that includes a controller includes configuring, in the memory, metadata of the array-based queue. The configuring comprises defining, in metadata, an array start location in the memory for the array-based queue, defining, in the metadata, an array size for the array-based queue, defining, in the metadata, a queue top for the array-based queue and defining, in the metadata, a queue bottom for the array-based queue. The method also includes the controller serving a request for an operation on the queue, the request providing the location in the memory of the metadata of the queue.

  9. Drugs obtained by biotechnology processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Almeida

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the number of drugs of biotechnological origin available for many different diseases has increased exponentially, including different types of cancer, diabetes mellitus, infectious diseases (e.g. AIDS Virus / HIV as well as cardiovascular, neurological, respiratory, and autoimmune diseases, among others. The pharmaceutical industry has used different technologies to obtain new and promising active ingredients, as exemplified by the fermentation technique, recombinant DNA technique and the hybridoma technique. The expiry of the patents of the first drugs of biotechnological origin and the consequent emergence of biosimilar products, have posed various questions to health authorities worldwide regarding the definition, framework, and requirements for authorization to market such products.Nos últimos anos, tem aumentado exponencialmente o número de fármacos de origem biotecnológica ao dispor das mais diversas patologias, entre elas destacam-se, os diferentes tipos de cancêr, as doenças infecciosas (ex. vírus AIDS/HIV, as doenças autoimunes, as doenças cardiovasculares, a Diabetes Mellitus, as doenças neurológicas, as doenças respiratórias, entre outras. A indústria farmacêutica tem recorrido a diferentes tecnologias para a obtenção de novos e promissores princípios ativos, como são exemplo a fermentação, a técnica de DNA Recombinante, a técnica de hidridoma, entre outras. A queda das patentes dos primeiros fármacos de origem biotecnológica e o consequente aparecimento dos produtos biossimilares têm colocado diferentes questões às autoridades de saúde mundiais, sobre a definição, enquadramento e exigências para a autorização de entrada no mercado deste tipo de produtos.

  10. Radar techniques using array antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Wirth, Wulf-Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Radar Techniques Using Array Antennas is a thorough introduction to the possibilities of radar technology based on electronic steerable and active array antennas. Topics covered include array signal processing, array calibration, adaptive digital beamforming, adaptive monopulse, superresolution, pulse compression, sequential detection, target detection with long pulse series, space-time adaptive processing (STAP), moving target detection using synthetic aperture radar (SAR), target imaging, energy management and system parameter relations. The discussed methods are confirmed by simulation stud

  11. Guided wave phased array beamforming and imaging in composite plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lingyu; Tian, Zhenhua

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes phased array beamforming using guided waves in anisotropic composite plates. A generic phased array algorithm is presented, in which direction dependent guided wave parameters and the energy skew effect are considered. This beamforming at an angular direction is achieved based on the classic delay-and-sum principle by applying phase delays to signals received at array elements and adding up the delayed signals. The phase delays are determined with the goal to maximize the array output at the desired direction and minimize it otherwise. For array characterization, the beam pattern of rectangular grid arrays in composite plates is derived. In addition to the beam pattern, the beamforming factor in terms of wavenumber distribution is defined to provide intrinsic explanations for phased array beamforming. The beamforming and damage detection in a composite plate are demonstrated using rectangular grid arrays made by a non-contact scanning laser Doppler vibrometer. Detection images of the composite plate with multiple surface defects at various directions are obtained. The results show that the guided wave phased array method is a potential effective method for rapid inspection of large composite structures. PMID:26907891

  12. Timed arrays wideband and time varying antenna arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Haupt, Randy L

    2015-01-01

    Introduces timed arrays and design approaches to meet the new high performance standards The author concentrates on any aspect of an antenna array that must be viewed from a time perspective. The first chapters briefly introduce antenna arrays and explain the difference between phased and timed arrays. Since timed arrays are designed for realistic time-varying signals and scenarios, the book also reviews wideband signals, baseband and passband RF signals, polarization and signal bandwidth. Other topics covered include time domain, mutual coupling, wideband elements, and dispersion. The auth

  13. Microreactor Array Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiktor, Peter; Brunner, Al; Kahn, Peter; Qiu, Ji; Magee, Mitch; Bian, Xiaofang; Karthikeyan, Kailash; Labaer, Joshua

    2015-03-01

    We report a device to fill an array of small chemical reaction chambers (microreactors) with reagent and then seal them using pressurized viscous liquid acting through a flexible membrane. The device enables multiple, independent chemical reactions involving free floating intermediate molecules without interference from neighboring reactions or external environments. The device is validated by protein expressed in situ directly from DNA in a microarray of ~10,000 spots with no diffusion during three hours incubation. Using the device to probe for an autoantibody cancer biomarker in blood serum sample gave five times higher signal to background ratio compared to standard protein microarray expressed on a flat microscope slide. Physical design principles to effectively fill the array of microreactors with reagent and experimental results of alternate methods for sealing the microreactors are presented.

  14. Optically interconnected phased arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhasin, Kul B.; Kunath, Richard R.

    1988-01-01

    Phased-array antennas are required for many future NASA missions. They will provide agile electronic beam forming for communications and tracking in the range of 1 to 100 GHz. Such phased arrays are expected to use several hundred GaAs monolithic integrated circuits (MMICs) as transmitting and receiving elements. However, the interconnections of these elements by conventional coaxial cables and waveguides add weight, reduce flexibility, and increase electrical interference. Alternative interconnections based on optical fibers, optical processing, and holography are under evaluation as possible solutions. In this paper, the current status of these techniques is described. Since high-frequency optical components such as photodetectors, lasers, and modulators are key elements in these interconnections, their performance and limitations are discussed.

  15. Atacama Compact Array Antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Saito, Masao; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Naoi, Takahiro; Yamada, Masumi; Saito, Hiro; Ikenoue, Bungo; Kato, Yoshihiro; Morita, Kou-ichiro; Mizuno, Norikazu; Iguchi, Satoru

    2011-01-01

    We report major performance test results of the Atacama Compact Array (ACA) 7-m and 12-m antennas of ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array). The four major performances of the ACA antennas are all-sky pointing (to be not more than 2.0 arcsec), offset pointing (to be < 0.6 arcsec) surface accuracy (< 25(20) micrometer for 12(7)m-antenna), stability of path-length (15 micrometer over 3 min), and high servo capability (6 degrees/s for Azimuth and 3 degrees/s for Elevation). The high performance of the ACA antenna has been extensively evaluated at the Site Erection Facility area at an altitude of about 2900 meters. Test results of pointing performance, surface performance, and fast motion capability are demonstrated.

  16. Off-Grid Direction of Arrival Estimation Based on Joint Spatial Sparsity for Distributed Sparse Linear Arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Yujie Liang; Rendong Ying; Zhenqi Lu; Peilin Liu

    2014-01-01

    In the design phase of sensor arrays during array signal processing, the estimation performance and system cost are largely determined by array aperture size. In this article, we address the problem of joint direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation with distributed sparse linear arrays (SLAs) and propose an off-grid synchronous approach based on distributed compressed sensing to obtain larger array aperture. We focus on the complex source distribution in the practical applications and classify t...

  17. The Murchison Widefield Array

    CERN Document Server

    Mitchell, Daniel A; Ord, Stephen M; Bernardi, Gianni; Wayth, Randall B; Edgar, Richard G; Clark, Michael A; Dal, Kevin; Pfister, Hanspeter; Gleadow, Stewart J; Arcus, W; Briggs, F H; Benkevitch, L; Bowman, J D; Bunton, J D; Burns, S; Cappallo, R J; Corey, B E; de Oliveira-Costa, A; Desouza, L; Doeleman, S S; Derome, M F; Emrich, D; Glossop, M; Goeke, R; Krishna, M R Gopala; Hazelton, B; Herne, D E; Hewitt, J N; Kamini, P A; Kaplan, D L; Kasper, J C; Kincaid, B B; Kocz, J; Kowald, E; Kratzenberg, E; Kumar, D; Lonsdale, C J; Lynch, M J; Madhavi, S; Matejek, M; McWhirter, S R; Morales, M F; Morgan, E; Oberoi, D; Pathikulangara, J; Prabu, T; Rogers, A; Salah, J E; Sault, R J; Shankar, N Udaya; Srivani, K S; Stevens, J; Tingay, S J; Vaccarella, A; Waterson, M; Webster, R L; Whitney, A R; Williams, A; Williams, C

    2010-01-01

    It is shown that the excellent Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory site allows the Murchison Widefield Array to employ a simple RFI blanking scheme and still calibrate visibilities and form images in the FM radio band. The techniques described are running autonomously in our calibration and imaging software, which is currently being used to process an FM-band survey of the entire southern sky.

  18. The Square Kilometre Array

    OpenAIRE

    Lazio, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is intended as the next-generation radio telescope and will address fundamental questions in astrophysics, physics, and astrobiology. The international science community has developed a set of Key Science Programs: (1) Emerging from the Dark Ages and the Epoch of Reionization, (2) Galaxy Evolution, Cosmology, and Dark Energy, (3) The Origin and Evolution of Cosmic Magnetism, (4) Strong Field Tests of Gravity Using Pulsars and Black Holes, and (5) The Cradle of...

  19. The Cherenkov Telescope Array

    OpenAIRE

    Bigongiari, Ciro

    2016-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is planned to be the next generation ground based observatory for very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray astronomy. Gamma-rays provide a powerful insight into the non-thermal universe and hopefully a unique probe for new physics. Imaging Cherenkov telescopes have already discovered more than 170 VHE gamma-ray emitters providing plentiful of valuable data and clearly demonstrating the power of this technique. In spite of the impressive results there are indication...

  20. The Submillimeter Array Polarimeter

    OpenAIRE

    Marrone, Daniel P.; Rao, Ramprasad

    2008-01-01

    We describe the Submillimeter Array (SMA) Polarimeter, a polarization converter and feed multiplexer installed on the SMA. The polarimeter uses narrow-band quarter-wave plates to generate circular polarization sensitivity from the linearly-polarized SMA feeds. The wave plates are mounted in rotation stages under computer control so that the polarization handedness of each antenna is rapidly selectable. Positioning of the wave plates is found to be highly repeatable, better than 0.2 degrees. A...

  1. Solar collector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, John Champlin; Martins, Guy Lawrence

    2015-09-06

    A method and apparatus for efficient manufacture, assembly and production of solar energy. In one aspect, the apparatus may include a number of modular solar receiver assemblies that may be separately manufactured, assembled and individually inserted into a solar collector array housing shaped to receive a plurality of solar receivers. The housing may include optical elements for focusing light onto the individual receivers, and a circuit for electrically connecting the solar receivers.

  2. Supersymetric laser arrays

    OpenAIRE

    El-Ganainy, Ramy; Ge, Li; Khajavikhan, Mercedeh; Christodoulides, Demetrios

    2015-01-01

    We introduce the concept of supersymmetric laser arrays that consists of a main optical lattice and its superpartner structure, and we investigate the onset of their lasing oscillations. Due to the coupling of the two constituent lattices, their degenerate optical modes form doublets, while the extra mode associated with unbroken supersymmetry forms a singlet state. Singlet lasing can be achieved for a wide range of design parameters either by introducing stronger loss in the partner lattice ...

  3. Microphone array proccesing

    OpenAIRE

    Navarro Contreras, Héctor Ángel

    2010-01-01

    Microphone arrays consist of multiple microphones functioning as a single directional input device: essentially, an acoustic antenna. Using sound propagation principles, the principal sound sources in an environment can be spatially located. Distinguishing sounds based on the spatial location of their source is achieved by filtering and combining the individual microphone signals. The location of the principal sounds sources may be determined dynamically by analyzing peaks i...

  4. Spaceborne Processor Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Edward T.; Schatzel, Donald V.; Whitaker, William D.; Sterling, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    A Spaceborne Processor Array in Multifunctional Structure (SPAMS) can lower the total mass of the electronic and structural overhead of spacecraft, resulting in reduced launch costs, while increasing the science return through dynamic onboard computing. SPAMS integrates the multifunctional structure (MFS) and the Gilgamesh Memory, Intelligence, and Network Device (MIND) multi-core in-memory computer architecture into a single-system super-architecture. This transforms every inch of a spacecraft into a sharable, interconnected, smart computing element to increase computing performance while simultaneously reducing mass. The MIND in-memory architecture provides a foundation for high-performance, low-power, and fault-tolerant computing. The MIND chip has an internal structure that includes memory, processing, and communication functionality. The Gilgamesh is a scalable system comprising multiple MIND chips interconnected to operate as a single, tightly coupled, parallel computer. The array of MIND components shares a global, virtual name space for program variables and tasks that are allocated at run time to the distributed physical memory and processing resources. Individual processor- memory nodes can be activated or powered down at run time to provide active power management and to configure around faults. A SPAMS system is comprised of a distributed Gilgamesh array built into MFS, interfaces into instrument and communication subsystems, a mass storage interface, and a radiation-hardened flight computer.

  5. Array processor architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, George H. (Inventor); Lundstrom, Stephen F. (Inventor); Shafer, Philip E. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A high speed parallel array data processing architecture fashioned under a computational envelope approach includes a data base memory for secondary storage of programs and data, and a plurality of memory modules interconnected to a plurality of processing modules by a connection network of the Omega gender. Programs and data are fed from the data base memory to the plurality of memory modules and from hence the programs are fed through the connection network to the array of processors (one copy of each program for each processor). Execution of the programs occur with the processors operating normally quite independently of each other in a multiprocessing fashion. For data dependent operations and other suitable operations, all processors are instructed to finish one given task or program branch before all are instructed to proceed in parallel processing fashion on the next instruction. Even when functioning in the parallel processing mode however, the processors are not locked-step but execute their own copy of the program individually unless or until another overall processor array synchronization instruction is issued.

  6. Synthetic Genetic Array Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmin, Elena; Costanzo, Michael; Andrews, Brenda; Boone, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Genetic interaction studies have been used to characterize unknown genes, assign membership in pathway and complex, and build a comprehensive functional map of a eukaryotic cell. Synthetic genetic array (SGA) methodology automates yeast genetic analysis and enables systematic mapping of genetic interactions. In its simplest form, SGA consists of a series of replica pinning steps that enable construction of haploid double mutants through automated mating and meiotic recombination. Using this method, a strain carrying a query mutation, such as a deletion allele of a nonessential gene or a conditional temperature-sensitive allele of an essential gene, can be crossed to an input array of yeast mutants, such as the complete set of approximately 5000 viable deletion mutants. The resulting output array of double mutants can be scored for genetic interactions based on estimates of cellular fitness derived from colony-size measurements. The SGA score method can be used to analyze large-scale data sets, whereas small-scale data sets can be analyzed using SGAtools, a simple web-based interface that includes all the necessary analysis steps for quantifying genetic interactions. PMID:27037072

  7. A phased-array coil for MR imaging of the upper extremities. Preliminary evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to construct a phased-array coil for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the upper extremities, and to compare MR images obtained with it to those with a commercially available GP flex coil. A phased-array coil was constructed so that two rectangular shaped loop coils were connected to a dual array adapter. In a phantom study, signal to noise ratio (SNR) and spatial resolution obtained with the phased-array coil were compared to those obtained with a GP flex coil. Four types of MR images of the elbow joint were obtained with the phased-array coil and a GP flex coil in three healthy volunteers, and these images were evaluated by five blinded reviewers. The phased-array coil provided better SNR than a GP flex coil in the phantom study. The mean value of SNR of the phased-array coil was approximately 1.3 times higher. Spatial resolution of the phased-array coil was equivalent to that of a GP flex coil. In most instances, MR images obtained with the phased-array coil were judged to be superior in image quality to those obtained with a GP flex coil by the reviewers. The phased-array coil was useful for MR imaging of the upper extremities. (author)

  8. Biologically-inspired, electrically small antenna arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoumi, Amir Reza

    First, the motivation behind adding a passive external coupling network after antenna arrays is discussed, the concept of biomimetic antenna arrays (BMAAs) introduced and some of the previous work done in this area have been reviewed. Next, a BMAA which achieves an angular resolution of roughly 15 times its regular counterpart is introduced and fully characterized. The introduced BMAA employs transformers which considerably degrade its performance, namely its output power. To cicumvent this shortcoming a new architecture of a BMAA that does not employ transformers and therefore yields a higher output power for the same angular resolution has been subsequently presented. Moreover, a detailed noise analysis of this BMAA is carried out and the output noise of the new architecture is compared with the output noise of the original design. The modified twoelement BMAA architecture is then extended to multiple elements. A novel nonlinear optimization process is introduced that maximizes the total power captured by the BMAA for a given angular resolution and the concept illustrated for a three-element antenna array. Next an optimum two-element BMAA which achieves the maximum possible angular resolution while obtaining the same output power level of a regular antenna array with the same elements and spacing is introduced. A novel two-element superdirective array based on this optimum BMAA has been also discussed. The passive BMAAs discussed in this thesis have a relatively narrow bandwidth. To extend the bandwidth of BMAAs, non- Foster networks have been employed in their external coupling networks and it has been demonstrated that they can increase their bandwidth by a factor of roughly 33. Finally, the BMAA concept has been extended to nano-antenna arrays and a concept for designing sub-wavelength angle-sensing detectors at optical wavelengths has been introduced.

  9. Nuclear structure and Indian Clover array

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H C Jain

    2001-07-01

    A brief description of the nuclear structure studies performed with the 14-UD pelletron at TIFR has been presented. The experimental facilities developed for these studies are described. Some of the interesting results obtained for mass 70 to 80 nuclei are presented. The development of a recoil mass spectrometer and an Indian clover array for the study of high spin states in nuclei near drip lines is discussed.

  10. Experimental study on imploding characteristics of wire-array Z pinches on Qiangguang-1 facility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Zhen; Xu Rong-Kun; Yang Jian-Lun; Hua Xin-Sheng; Li Lin-Bo; Xu Ze-Ping; Ning Jia-Min; Song Feng-Jun

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the imploding characteristics of cylindrical wire array,experiments with load current varying from 1.5MA to 1.7MA were carried out on the Qiangguang-1 facility.The complicated temporal-spatial distribution of x-ray radiation was measured by the one-dimensional (1D) x-ray imaging system.Other diagnostic equipments including the x-ray power meter(XRPM) and the time-integrated pinhole camera were used to record time-resolved x-ray power pulse and pinhole x-ray images.Analysis shows that the fast leading edge of the local x-ray radiation pulse is of primary importance in sharpening x-ray power pulse rather than the temporal synchrony and the spatial uniformity of implosion.Experimental results indicated that the better axial imploding synchrony,the faster the increase of X-ray power for an array consisting of 32 tungsten wires of 5μm diameter than for the others,and the higher the x-ray radiation power with maximal convergence ratio (r0/r1) of 10.5.A 'zipper-like' effect of x-ray radiation extending from the cathode Was also observed.

  11. Discrete Dipole Approximation Aided Design Method for Nanostructure Arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Shao-Li; LUO Xian-Gang; DU Chun-Lei

    2007-01-01

    A discrete dipole approximation (DDA) aided design method is proposed to determine the parameters of nanostructure arrays. The relationship between the thickness, period and extinction efficiency of nanostructure arrays for the given shape can be calculated using the DDA. Based on the calculated curves, the main parameters of the nanostructure arrays such as thickness and period can be determined. Using this aided method, a rhombic sliver nanostructure array is designed with the determinant parameters of thickness (40 nm) and period (440 nm).We further fabricate the rhombic sliver nanostructure arrays and testify the character of the extinction spectra.The obtained extinction spectra is within the visible range and the full width at half maximum is 99nm, as is expected.

  12. Preliminary analysis of core capsule x-ray spectroscopy and image results for medium-to-high growth factor implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent capsule implosions using indirect drive on NOVA have probed core and near-core capsule Te, ρ and mix structure using non-trivial pulse shapes (i.e. with a foot). These experiments have been performed using smooth as well as artificially roughened capsules. They have been performed using basically 3 non-trivial pulse-shapes with 3 different types of capsules with correspondingly different growth regimes for Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. These experiments have employed time-dependent spectroscopy, gated imaging and absolutely calibrated time-integrated imaging as x-ray diagnostics. We compare nominal and open-quote open-quote modified close-quote close-quote 1D calculations with the spectroscopic and time-integrated image results. We find that the core Te is less than calculated (not surprising), but also that the Te of the inner pusher is substantially higher (at least 20%) than predicted, with perhaps some enhanced mix of the PVA layer towards the core. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  13. The impact of laser plasma interactions on three-dimensional drive symmetry in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achieving symmetric hohlraum radiation drive is an important aspect of indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion experiments. However, when experimentally delivered laser powers deviate from ideal conditions, the resultant radiation field can become asymmetric. Two situations in which this may arise are random uncorrelated fluctuations, in as-delivered laser power and laser beams that do not participate in the implosion (either intentionally or unintentionally). Furthermore, laser plasma interactions in the hohlraum obfuscate the connection between laser powers and radiation drive. To study the effect of these situations on drive symmetry, we develop a simplified model for crossed-beam energy transfer, laser backscatter, and plasma absorption that can be used in conjunction with view factor calculations to expediently translate laser powers into three-dimensional capsule flux symmetries. We find that crossed-beam energy transfer can alter both the statistical properties of uncorrelated laser fluctuations and the impact of missing laser beams on radiation symmetry. A method is proposed to mitigate the effects of missing laser beams

  14. Radiation symmetry control for inertial confinement fusion capsule implosions in double Z-pinch hohlraums on Z

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The double Z-pinch hohlraum high-yield concept [Hammer et al., Phys. Plasmas 6, 2129 (1999)] utilizes two 63-MA Z pinches to heat separate primary hohlraums at either end of a secondary hohlraum containing the cryogenic fusion capsule. Recent experiments on the Z accelerator [Spielman et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 2105 (1998)] at Sandia National Laboratories have developed an advanced single-sided power feed, double Z-pinch load to study radiation symmetry and pinch power balance using implosion capsules [Cuneo et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 215004 (2002)]. Point-projection x-ray imaging with the Z-Beamlet Laser mapped the trajectory and distortion of 2-mm diameter plastic ablator capsules. Using the backlit capsule distortion as a symmetry diagnostic, the ability to predictably tune symmetry at the 2 Legendre mode asymmetry coefficient over a range of ±6% (±2% considering points nearest the optimum) was achieved by varying the length of the cylindrical secondary hohlraum containing the capsule, in agreement with viewfactor and radiation-hydrodynamics simulations

  15. High performance capsule implosions driven by the Z-pinch dynamic hohlraum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Z-pinch dynamic hohlraum (ZPDH) is a high-power x-ray source that has been used in a variety of high energy-density experiments including inertial confinement fusion (ICF) studies. The system consists of a tungsten wire-array Z pinch that implodes onto a low-density CH2 foam converter launching a radiating shock that heats the hohlraum to radiation temperatures >200 eV. Through time-gated pinhole camera measurements, the mean shock speed is measured from 28 experiments to be 326 ± 4 μm ns-1 with a shot-to-shot standard deviation of 7%. Broad-band x-ray measurements indicate that the shot-to-shot reproducibility in the power emission and pulse-shape of the source shock is 40 kJ of x-ray energy, within a factor of 4 of the energy believed sufficient for ICF ignition. The capsule types imploded by the ZPDH have evolved over four years culminating in a design that produces record indirect-drive DD thermonuclear neutron yields of up to 3.5E11

  16. Wire Array Z-Pinch Insights for Enhanced X-Ray Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparisons of measured total radiated x-ray power from annular wire-array z-pinches with a variety of models as a function of wire number, array mass, and load radius are reviewed. The data, which are comprehensive, have provided important insights into the features of wire-array dynamics that are critical for high x-ray power generation. Collectively, the comparisons of the data with the model calculations suggest that a number of underlying dynamical mechanisms involving cylindrical asymmetries and plasma instabilities contribute to the measured characteristics. For example, under the general assumption that the measured risetime of the total-radiated-power pulse is related to the thickness of the plasma shell formed on axis, the Heuristic Model [IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci., 26, 1275 (1998)] agrees with the measured risetime under a number of specific assumptions about the way the breakdown of the wires, the wire-plasma expansion, and the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the r-z plane, interact. Likewise, in the high wire-number regime (where the wires are calculated to form a plasma shell prior to significant radial motion of the shell) the comparisons show that the variation in the power of the radiation generated as a function of load mass and array radius can be simulated by the 2-D Eulerian-radiation-magnetohydrodynamics code (E-RMHC) [Phys. Plasmas 3, 368 (1996)], using a single random-density perturbation that seeds the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the r-z plane. For a given pulse-power generator, the comparisons suggest that (1) the smallest interwire gaps compatible with practical load construction and (2) the minimum implosion time consistent with the optimum required energy coupling of the generator to the load should produce the highest total-radiated-power levels

  17. Primary energy spectrum of cosmic rays obtained by arrival time spread of particles in EAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okita, M.; Wada, T.; Yamashita, Y.; Okei, K.; Morita, T.; Liang, S.; Takahashi, N.; Iyono, A.; Matsumoto, H.; Noda, C.; Masuda, M.; Yamamoto, I.; Kohata, M.; Ochi, N.; Nakatsuka, T.; Tsuji, S.

    2008-01-01

    The Large Area Air Shower (LAAS) group has been performing a network observation of extensive air showers (EAS) by using compact arrays. According to J. Linsley, the primary energy of EAS can be estimated from the spread of the arrival times of EAS particles, even with a small array. A shift register system for clocking the arrival times was installed in an array (OUS1) which is located in Okayama University of Science. Analyzing the OUS1 data, we obtained the primary energies of large air showers.

  18. Primary energy spectrum of cosmic rays obtained by arrival time spread of particles in EAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Large Area Air Shower (LAAS) group has been performing a network observation of extensive air showers (EAS) by using compact arrays. According to J. Linsley, the primary energy of EAS can be estimated from the spread of the arrival times of EAS particles, even with a small array. A shift register system for clocking the arrival times was installed in an array (OUS1) which is located in Okayama University of Science. Analyzing the OUS1 data, we obtained the primary energies of large air showers

  19. UAVSAR Phased Array Aperture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Neil; Zawadzki, Mark; Sadowy, Greg; Oakes, Eric; Brown, Kyle; Hodges, Richard

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a patch antenna array for an L-band repeat-pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) instrument that is to be flown on an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The antenna operates at a center frequency of 1.2575 GHz and with a bandwidth of 80 MHz, consistent with a number of radar instruments that JPL has previously flown. The antenna is designed to radiate orthogonal linear polarizations in order to facilitate fully-polarimetric measurements. Beam-pointing requirements for repeat-pass SAR interferometry necessitate electronic scanning in azimuth over a range of -20degrees in order to compensate for aircraft yaw. Beam-steering is accomplished by transmit/receive (T/R) modules and a beamforming network implemented in a stripline circuit board. This paper, while providing an overview of phased array architecture, focuses on the electromagnetic design of the antenna tiles and associated interconnects. An important aspect of the design of this antenna is that it has an amplitude taper of 10dB in the elevation direction. This is to reduce multipath reflections from the wing that would otherwise be detrimental to interferometric radar measurements. This taper is provided by coupling networks in the interconnect circuits as opposed to attenuating the output of the T/R modules. Details are given of material choices and fabrication techniques that meet the demanding environmental conditions that the antenna must operate in. Predicted array performance is reported in terms of co-polarized and crosspolarized far-field antenna patterns, and also in terms of active reflection coefficient.

  20. Weak Algebraic Monge Arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Rudolf, Rüdiger; Fortin, Dominique

    1995-01-01

    An $n\\times n$ matrix $C$ is called a {\\em weak Monge\\/} matrix iff $c_{ii}+c_{rs}\\le c_{is}+c_{ri}$ for all $1\\le i\\le r,s\\le n$. It is well known that the classical linear assignment problem is optimally solved by the identity permutation if the underlying cost-matrix fulfills the weak Monge property. In this paper we introduce higher dimensional weak Monge arrays and prove that higher dimensional axial assignment problems can be solved efficiently if the cost-structure is a higher dimensio...

  1. The Square Kilometre Array

    CERN Document Server

    Rawlings, Steve

    2011-01-01

    We review the current status of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) by outlining the science drivers for its Phase-1 (SKA1) and setting out the timeline for the key decisions and milestones on the way to the planned start of its construction in 2016. We explain how Phase-2 SKA (SKA2) will transform the research scope of the SKA infrastructure, placing it amongst the great astronomical observatories and survey instruments of the future, and opening up new areas of discovery, many beyond the confines of conventional astronomy.

  2. Adaptive and mobile ground sensor array.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzrichter, Michael Warren; O' Rourke, William T.; Zenner, Jennifer; Maish, Alexander B.

    2003-12-01

    The goal of this LDRD was to demonstrate the use of robotic vehicles for deploying and autonomously reconfiguring seismic and acoustic sensor arrays with high (centimeter) accuracy to obtain enhancement of our capability to locate and characterize remote targets. The capability to accurately place sensors and then retrieve and reconfigure them allows sensors to be placed in phased arrays in an initial monitoring configuration and then to be reconfigured in an array tuned to the specific frequencies and directions of the selected target. This report reviews the findings and accomplishments achieved during this three-year project. This project successfully demonstrated autonomous deployment and retrieval of a payload package with an accuracy of a few centimeters using differential global positioning system (GPS) signals. It developed an autonomous, multisensor, temporally aligned, radio-frequency communication and signal processing capability, and an array optimization algorithm, which was implemented on a digital signal processor (DSP). Additionally, the project converted the existing single-threaded, monolithic robotic vehicle control code into a multi-threaded, modular control architecture that enhances the reuse of control code in future projects.

  3. Performance Analysis of ICA in Sensor Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Cai

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available As the best-known scheme in the field of Blind Source Separation (BSS, Independent Component Analysis (ICA has been intensively used in various domains, including biomedical and acoustics applications, cooperative or non-cooperative communication, etc. While sensor arrays are involved in most of the applications, the influence on the performance of ICA of practical factors therein has not been sufficiently investigated yet. In this manuscript, the issue is researched by taking the typical antenna array as an illustrative example. Factors taken into consideration include the environment noise level, the properties of the array and that of the radiators. We analyze the analytic relationship between the noise variance, the source variance, the condition number of the mixing matrix and the optimal signal to interference-plus-noise ratio, as well as the relationship between the singularity of the mixing matrix and practical factors concerned. The situations where the mixing process turns (nearly singular have been paid special attention to, since such circumstances are critical in applications. Results and conclusions obtained should be instructive when applying ICA algorithms on mixtures from sensor arrays. Moreover, an effective countermeasure against the cases of singular mixtures has been proposed, on the basis of previous analysis. Experiments validating the theoretical conclusions as well as the effectiveness of the proposed scheme have been included.

  4. Recent results from the Telescope Array Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Rasha; Telescope Array Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Telescope Array (TA) is the largest ultrahigh energy cosmic rays detector in the northern hemisphere. TA is a hybrid detector comprised of three air fluorescence stations and a large surface array consisting of 507 scintillator counters. Each of the three fluorescence stations, located at the periphery of the ground array, views 108 degrees in azimuth and up to 30 degrees in elevation. The surface detectors are arranged in a square grid of 1.2 km spacing, covering over 700 square kilometers. TA has collected more than seven years of data. In this talk, we will present some of the main results on the cosmic rays composition and energy spectrum obtained by TA and its low energy extension (TALE). Finally, we will present our results from the search for arrival direction anisotropy, including the observed large excess of events at the highest energies, seen in the region of the northern sky centered on Ursa Major. Based on the current results, the ``hot spot'' in particular, TA is pursuing the expansion of the surface array to four times its current size.

  5. Performance Analysis of ICA in Sensor Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xin; Wang, Xiang; Huang, Zhitao; Wang, Fenghua

    2016-01-01

    As the best-known scheme in the field of Blind Source Separation (BSS), Independent Component Analysis (ICA) has been intensively used in various domains, including biomedical and acoustics applications, cooperative or non-cooperative communication, etc. While sensor arrays are involved in most of the applications, the influence on the performance of ICA of practical factors therein has not been sufficiently investigated yet. In this manuscript, the issue is researched by taking the typical antenna array as an illustrative example. Factors taken into consideration include the environment noise level, the properties of the array and that of the radiators. We analyze the analytic relationship between the noise variance, the source variance, the condition number of the mixing matrix and the optimal signal to interference-plus-noise ratio, as well as the relationship between the singularity of the mixing matrix and practical factors concerned. The situations where the mixing process turns (nearly) singular have been paid special attention to, since such circumstances are critical in applications. Results and conclusions obtained should be instructive when applying ICA algorithms on mixtures from sensor arrays. Moreover, an effective countermeasure against the cases of singular mixtures has been proposed, on the basis of previous analysis. Experiments validating the theoretical conclusions as well as the effectiveness of the proposed scheme have been included. PMID:27164100

  6. Linear antenna array optimization using flower pollination algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Prerna; Kothari, Ashwin

    2016-01-01

    Flower pollination algorithm (FPA) is a new nature-inspired evolutionary algorithm used to solve multi-objective optimization problems. The aim of this paper is to introduce FPA to the electromagnetics and antenna community for the optimization of linear antenna arrays. FPA is applied for the first time to linear array so as to obtain optimized antenna positions in order to achieve an array pattern with minimum side lobe level along with placement of deep nulls in desired directions. Various design examples are presented that illustrate the use of FPA for linear antenna array optimization, and subsequently the results are validated by benchmarking along with results obtained using other state-of-the-art, nature-inspired evolutionary algorithms such as particle swarm optimization, ant colony optimization and cat swarm optimization. The results suggest that in most cases, FPA outperforms the other evolutionary algorithms and at times it yields a similar performance. PMID:27066339

  7. High Power Fiber Bundle Array Coupled LDA Module

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QU Zhou; LIU Yang; ZHAO Chong-guang; WANG Ji; YIN Hong-he; WANG Li-jun

    2006-01-01

    An optical fiber bundle array coupling module with high output power is presented in this paper. The device integrated the coupling technique of the high power laser diode array (LDA) and the micro-ball lenses fiber array. This module can efficiently couple the output laser of the LDA into 19 fibers array with micro-ball lens endsurface. The difference of the couple efficiency between the flat-end fiber and micro-ball-end fiber is discussed.The micro-ball lenses fiber array made of 19 fibers have the same fiber core diameter of 200 μm, and then the endsurfaces of 19 fibers are fused to 19 micro-ball lenses. The micro-ball lenses fiber array are fixed precisely in the neighborhood on the V-grooves, and the fiber array has the same arrange period with the semiconductor laser units of LDA. This configuration of micro-ball lens fiber array can greatly reduce the divergence of the laser beam from all directions, and a very efficient laser beam homogenizer and shaper are obtained. Finally, high output power of 30.1 W of the fiber coupled LDA is achieved, and the maximal coupling efficiency is >83% with the numeral aperture (NA) of 0.16.

  8. Magnetic forces between arrays of cylindrical permanent magnets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vokoun, D.; Tomassetti, G.; Beleggia, Marco;

    2011-01-01

    Permanent magnet arrays are often employed in a broad range of applications: actuators, sensors, drug targeting and delivery systems, fabrication of self-assembled particles, just to name a few. An estimate of the magnetic forces in play between arrays is required to control devices and fabrication...... procedures. Here, we introduce analytical expressions for calculating the attraction force between two arrays of cylindrical permanent magnets and compare the predictions with experimental data obtained from force measurements with NdFeB magnets. We show that the difference between predicted and measured...

  9. Angular Resolution of Pachmarhi Array of Cerenkov Telescopes

    OpenAIRE

    Majumdar, P.; Acharya, B. S.; Bhat, P.N.; Chitnis, V. R.; Rahman, M. A.; Singh, B.B.; Vishwanath, P. R.

    2001-01-01

    Pachmarhi Array of \\v{C}erenkov Telescopes(PACT), consisting of a distributed array of 25 telescopes is used to sample the atmospheric \\v{C}erenkov Photon showers. The shower front is fitted to a plane and the direction of arrival of primary particle is obtained. The accuracy in the estimation of the arrival direction of showers has been estimated to be $\\sim 0^{\\circ}.1~$ using `split' array method. The angular resolution is expected to be even better when a spherical front is used for direc...

  10. Characterization of novel Hamamatsu Multi Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC) arrays for the GlueX experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The novel Hamamatsu Multi Pixel Photon Counter Array S12045(X) is an array of 16 individual MPPCs (3×3 mm2) (further in the paper MPPC array channel) each with 3600 G-APD (Geiger-mode Avalanche Photodiodes) pixels (50×50 [μm2]). Each MPPC in the array works with its individual reverse bias voltage mode (around 70 V). The paper summarizes the characterization process of MPPC arrays used in GlueX experiment (Hall D, Jefferson Lab). We studied the main features of each MPPC array channel for 2800 MPPC arrays at different temperatures. Two measurement stations were built to extract gain, breakdown voltage, photo detection efficiency (PDE), optical crosstalk and dark rate for each MPPC array channel. The hardware and the data analysis are described, which includes new analytical expressions to obtain the mean number of photo-electrons and optical crosstalk. The dynamical behavior of characterization parameters is presented as well

  11. ELECTROCHEMICALLY SYNTHESIZED COPPER NANOTUBES AND NANOROD ARRAYS IN POLYCARBONATE MEMBRANES

    OpenAIRE

    SHOUHONG XUE; ZHENGDE WANG

    2006-01-01

    The large area, highly uniform copper nanorod arrays with cylindrical morphology in polycarbonate membranes (PC) have been successfully prepared by electrochemical deposition. The copper nanorod arrays have the length of 3 μm, the diameter of 400 nm, approximately, which correspond closely to the pore diameter and thickness of membranes. The copper nanotubes were also obtained by controlling initial voltage and polycarbonate membranes treatment process. The possible growing mechanisms of copp...

  12. CT Burst Error Weight Enumerator of Array Codes

    OpenAIRE

    Irfan Siap

    2008-01-01

    Recently, CT burst errors originally dened for block codes havebeen generalized to CT burst errors for array codes [6]. In order to establish aRieger's type bound for array codes with respect to CT burst errors. Here, weintroduce a CT burst error weight enumerator whose coecients represent thenumber of CT burst errors of a particular weight. The method of obtainingthe CT burst error weight enumerator is obtained by generating function likeapproach and it does not involve solving equations as ...

  13. Long-range magnetostatic interactions in arrays of nanowires

    CERN Document Server

    Raposo, V; González, J M; Vázquez, M

    2000-01-01

    Experimental measurements and micromagnetic simulations of the hysteresis loops of arrays of cobalt nanowires are compared here. Arrays of cobalt nanowires (200 nm in diameter) were electrodeposited into the pores of alumina membranes (thickness 60 mu m). Their hysteresis loops along the axial direction of nanowires were measured using vibrating sample magnetometry. Micromagnetic simulations were performed considering dipolar interaction between nanowires leading to similar hysteresis loops as those obtained experimentally.

  14. Spatio-Temporal Gradient Analysis of Differential Microphone Arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Kolundzija, Mihailo; Faller, Christof; Vetterli, Martin

    2009-01-01

    The literature on gradient and differential microphone arrays makes a distinction between the two types, and nevertheless shows how both types can be used to obtain the same directional responses. A more theoretically sound rationale for using delays in differential microphone arrays has not yet been given. This paper presents a gradient analysis of the sound field viewed as a spatio-temporal phenomenon, and gives a theoretical interpretation of the working principles of gradient ...

  15. Electromagnetically Clean Solar Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem, Theodore G.; Kenniston, Anthony E.

    2008-01-01

    The term 'electromagnetically clean solar array' ('EMCSA') refers to a panel that contains a planar array of solar photovoltaic cells and that, in comparison with a functionally equivalent solar-array panel of a type heretofore used on spacecraft, (1) exhibits less electromagnetic interferences to and from other nearby electrical and electronic equipment and (2) can be manufactured at lower cost. The reduction of electromagnetic interferences is effected through a combination of (1) electrically conductive, electrically grounded shielding and (2) reduction of areas of current loops (in order to reduce magnetic moments). The reduction of cost is effected by designing the array to be fabricated as a more nearly unitary structure, using fewer components and fewer process steps. Although EMCSAs were conceived primarily for use on spacecraft they are also potentially advantageous for terrestrial applications in which there are requirements to limit electromagnetic interference. In a conventional solar panel of the type meant to be supplanted by an EMCSA panel, the wiring is normally located on the back side, separated from the cells, thereby giving rise to current loops having significant areas and, consequently, significant magnetic moments. Current-loop geometries are chosen in an effort to balance opposing magnetic moments to limit far-0field magnetic interactions, but the relatively large distances separating current loops makes full cancellation of magnetic fields problematic. The panel is assembled from bare photovoltaic cells by means of multiple sensitive process steps that contribute significantly to cost, especially if electomagnetic cleanliness is desired. The steps include applying a cover glass and electrical-interconnect-cell (CIC) sub-assemble, connecting the CIC subassemblies into strings of series-connected cells, laying down and adhesively bonding the strings onto a panel structure that has been made in a separate multi-step process, and mounting the

  16. Electrode array for neural stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wessendorf, Kurt O. (Albuquerque, NM); Okandan, Murat (Edgewood, NM); Stein, David J. (Albuquerque, NM); Yang, Pin (Albuquerque, NM); Cesarano, III, Joseph (Albuquerque, NM); Dellinger, Jennifer (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-08-16

    An electrode array for neural stimulation is disclosed which has particular applications for use in a retinal prosthesis. The electrode array can be formed as a hermetically-sealed two-part ceramic package which includes an electronic circuit such as a demultiplexer circuit encapsulated therein. A relatively large number (up to 1000 or more) of individually-addressable electrodes are provided on a curved surface of a ceramic base portion the electrode array, while a much smaller number of electrical connections are provided on a ceramic lid of the electrode array. The base and lid can be attached using a metal-to-metal seal formed by laser brazing. Electrical connections to the electrode array can be provided by a flexible ribbon cable which can also be used to secure the electrode array in place.

  17. The Murchison Widefield Array Correlator

    OpenAIRE

    Ord, S. M.; Crosse, B.; Emrich, D.; Pallot, D.; Wayth, R. B.; Clark, M. A.; Tremblay, S. E.; Arcus, W.; Barnes, D; Bell, M.; Bernardi, G.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Bowman, J.D.; Briggs, F.; Bunton, J. D.

    2014-01-01

    The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) is a Square Kilometre Array (SKA) Precursor. The telescope is located at the Murchison Radio--astronomy Observatory (MRO) in Western Australia (WA). The MWA consists of 4096 dipoles arranged into 128 dual polarisation aperture arrays forming a connected element interferometer that cross-correlates signals from all 256 inputs. A hybrid approach to the correlation task is employed, with some processing stages being performed by bespoke hardware, based on Fiel...

  18. Aligators for Arrays (Tool Paper)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henzinger, Thomas A.; Hottelier, Thibaud; Kovács, Laura; Rybalchenko, Andrey

    This paper presents Aligators, a tool for the generation of universally quantified array invariants. Aligators leverages recurrence solving and algebraic techniques to carry out inductive reasoning over array content. The Aligators' loop extraction module allows treatment of multi-path loops by exploiting their commutativity and serializability properties. Our experience in applying Aligators on a collection of loops from open source software projects indicates the applicability of recurrence and algebraic solving techniques for reasoning about arrays.

  19. Combinatorial aspects of covering arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles J. Colbourn

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Covering arrays generalize orthogonal arrays by requiring that t -tuples be covered, but not requiring that the appearance of t -tuples be balanced.Their uses in screening experiments has found application in software testing, hardware testing, and a variety of fields in which interactions among factors are to be identified. Here a combinatorial view of covering arrays is adopted, encompassing basic bounds, direct constructions, recursive constructions, algorithmic methods, and applications.

  20. Electrodynamic Arrays Having Nanomaterial Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigwell, Steven (Inventor); Biris, Alexandru S. (Inventor); Calle, Carlos I. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An electrodynamic array of conductive nanomaterial electrodes and a method of making such an electrodynamic array. In one embodiment, a liquid solution containing nanomaterials is deposited as an array of conductive electrodes on a substrate, including rigid or flexible substrates such as fabrics, and opaque or transparent substrates. The nanomaterial electrodes may also be grown in situ. The nanomaterials may include carbon nanomaterials, other organic or inorganic nanomaterials or mixtures.