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Sample records for aromatic substrates tethered

  1. Using tethered triblock copolymers to mediate the interaction between substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using scaling analysis and a self-consistent field (SCF) theory, we compress two copolymer-coated surfaces and isolate conditions that yield multiple, distinct minima in the interaction profile. We focus on planar surfaces that are coated with ABC triblock copolymers. Tethered to the surface by the last monomer in the C block, the copolymers are grafted at relatively low densities. The surrounding solution is a poor solvent for both the A and C blocks, and is a good solvent for the B blocks. Through scaling theory, we pinpoint the parameters that yield two minima in the interaction profile. The SCF calculations reveal the changes in the morphology of the polymers as the layers are compressed. Through both studies, we determine how the morphological changes give rise to the observed surface interactions. The results provide guidelines for creating polymer-coated colloidal systems that can form two stable crystal structures. Such systems could be used for bistable, optical switches. The findings also yield a prescription for creating systems that exhibit additional minima in the free energy of interaction. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  2. Controlled-surface-wettability-based fabrication of hydrogel substrates with matrix tethering density variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md. Mahmudur; Lee, Donghee; Bhagirath, Divya; Zhao, Xiangshan; Band, Vimla; Ryu, Sangjin

    2014-03-01

    It is widely accepted that cells behave differently responding to the stiffness of extracellular matrix (ECM). Such observations were made by culturing cells on hydrogel substrates of tunable stiffness. However, it was recently proposed that cells actually sense how strongly they are tethered to ECM, not the local stiffness of ECM. To investigate the hypothesis, we develop constant-stiffness hydrogel substrates with varying matrix tethering density (the number of anchoring sites between the gel and the ECM protein molecules). We fabricate polyacrylamide gel of static stiffness and conjugate ECM proteins to the gel using a cross-linker. When treating the gel with the cross-linker, we control positioning of cross-linker solutions with different concentrations using superhydrophobic barriers on glass, functionalize the gel by pressing it to the aligned cross-linker solutions, and conjugate an ECM protein of constant concentration to the gel. We expect that the gel will be functionalized to different degrees depending on the concentration distribution of the cross-linker and thus the gel will have variations of matrix tethering density even with constant ECM protein concentration. We acknowledge support from Bioengineering for Human Health grant of UNL-UNMC.

  3. Detection of specific DNA using a microfluidic device featuring tethered poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) on a silicon substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jem-Kun; Li, Jun-Yan

    2010-08-01

    In this study, we grafted thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) onto a Si substrate as the medium in a microfluidic device to detect specific DNA molecules [human genomic DNA (hgDNA528), 528 bp] at extremely low concentrations (down to 2 ng/μl). After using the polymerase chain reaction to amplify the released human gDNA signal from the tethered PNIPAAm on the substrate, the amplified human gDNA molecules were characterized through agarose gel electrophoresis. The tethered PNIPAAm in the fluid device allowed the precise detection of the human gDNA.

  4. Substrate specific hydrolysis of aromatic and aromatic-aliphatic esters in orchid tissue cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Agnieszka Mironowicz; Krystyna Kukułczanka; Antoni Siewiński

    2014-01-01

    We found that tissue cultures of higher plants were able, similarly as microorganisms, to transform low-molecular-weight chemical compounds. In tissue cultures of orchids (Cymbidium 'Saint Pierre' and Dendrobium phalaenopsis) acetates of phenols and aromatic-aliphatic alcohols were hydrolyzed, whereas methyl esters of aromatic and aromatic-aliphatic acids did not undergo this reaction. Acetates of racemic aromatic-aliphatic alcohols were hydrolyzed with distinct enantiospecificity.

  5. Characterization of the two-component, FAD-dependent monooxygenase SgcC that requires carrier protein-tethered substrates for the biosynthesis of the enediyne antitumor antibiotic C-1027.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shuangjun; Van Lanen, Steven G; Shen, Ben

    2008-05-21

    C-1027 is a potent antitumor antibiotic composed of an apoprotein (CagA) and a reactive enediyne chromophore. The chromophore has four distinct chemical moieties, including an ( S)-3-chloro-5-hydroxy-beta-tyrosine moiety, the biosynthesis of which from l-alpha-tyrosine requires five proteins: SgcC, SgcC1, SgcC2, SgcC3, and SgcC4; a sixth protein, SgcC5, catalyzes the incorporation of this beta-amino acid moiety into C-1027. Biochemical characterization of SgcC has now revealed that (i) SgcC is a two-component, flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent monooxygenase, (ii) SgcC is only active with SgcC2 (peptidyl carrier protein)-tethered substrates, (iii) SgcC-catalyzed hydroxylation requires O 2 and FADH 2, the latter supplied by the C-1027 pathway-specific flavin reductase SgcE6 or Escherichia coli flavin reductase Fre, and (iv) SgcC efficiently catalyzes regioselective hydroxylation of 3-substituted beta-tyrosyl-S-SgcC2 analogues, including the chloro-, bromo-, iodo-, fluoro-, and methyl-substituted analogues, but does not accept 3-hydroxy-beta-tyrosyl-S-SgcC2 as a substrate. Together with the in vitro data for SgcC4, SgcC1, and SgcC3, the results establish that SgcC catalyzes the hydroxylation of ( S)-3-chloro-beta-tyrosyl-S-SgcC2 as the final step in the biosynthesis of the ( S)-3-chloro-5-hydroxy-beta-tyrosine moiety prior to incorporation into C-1027. SgcC now represents the first biochemically characterized two-component, FAD-dependent monooxygenase that acts on a carrier-protein-tethered aromatic substrate. PMID:18426211

  6. An electrostatic mechanism for substrate guidance down the aromatic gorge of acetylcholinesterase.

    OpenAIRE

    Ripoll, D. R.; Faerman, C H; Axelsen, P H; Silman, I.; Sussman, J. L.

    1993-01-01

    Electrostatic calculations based on the recently solved crystal structure of acetylcholinesterase (acetylcholine acetylhydrolase, EC 3.1.1.7) indicate that this enzyme has a strong electrostatic dipole. The dipole is aligned with the gorge leading to its active site, so that a positively charged substrate will be drawn to the active site by its electrostatic field. Within the gorge, aromatic side chains appear to shield the substrate from direct interaction with most of the negatively charged...

  7. Synthesis and Evaluation of Novel Aromatic Substrates and Competitive Inhibitors of GABA Aminotransferase

    OpenAIRE

    Clift, Michael D.; Silverman, Richard B.

    2007-01-01

    The design, synthesis, and evaluation of novel γ-aminobutyric acid aminotransferase (GABA-AT) inhibitors and inactivators can lead to the discovery of new GABA-related therapeutics. To this end, a series of aromatic amino acid compounds was synthesized to aid in the design of new inhibitors and inactivators of GABA-AT. All compounds were tested as competitive inhibitors of GABA-AT. The amino acids with benzylic amines were also tested as substrates for GABA-AT. It was found that these compoun...

  8. Investigation of a substrate-specifying residue within Papaver somniferum and Catharanthus roseus aromatic amino acid decarboxylases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrens-Spence, Michael P; Lazear, Michael; von Guggenberg, Renee; Ding, Haizhen; Li, Jianyong

    2014-10-01

    Plant aromatic amino acid decarboxylases (AAADs) catalyze the decarboxylation of aromatic amino acids with either benzene or indole rings. Because the substrate selectivity of AAADs is intimately related to their physiological functions, primary sequence data and their differentiation could provide significant physiological insights. However, due to general high sequence identity, plant AAAD substrate specificities have been difficult to identify through primary sequence comparison. In this study, bioinformatic approaches were utilized to identify several active site residues within plant AAAD enzymes that may impact substrate specificity. Next a Papaver somniferum tyrosine decarboxylase (TyDC) was selected as a model to verify our putative substrate-dictating residues through mutation. Results indicated that mutagenesis of serine 372 to glycine enables the P. somniferum TyDC to use 5-hydroxytryptophan as a substrate, and reduces the enzyme activity toward 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (dopa). Additionally, the reverse mutation in a Catharanthus roseus tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC) enables the mutant enzyme to utilize tyrosine and dopa as substrates with a reduced affinity toward tryptophan. Molecular modeling and molecular docking of the P. somniferum TyDC and the C. roseus TDC enzymes provided a structural basis to explain alterations in substrate specificity. Identification of an active site residue that impacts substrate selectivity produces a primary sequence identifier that may help differentiate the indolic and phenolic substrate specificities of individual plant AAADs. PMID:25107664

  9. An Aromatic Cap Seals the Substrate Binding Site in an ECF-Type S Subunit for Riboflavin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpowich, Nathan K; Song, Jinmei; Wang, Da-Neng

    2016-07-31

    ECF transporters are a family of active membrane transporters for essential micronutrients, such as vitamins and trace metals. Found exclusively in archaea and bacteria, these transporters are composed of four subunits: an integral membrane substrate-binding subunit (EcfS), a transmembrane coupling subunit (EcfT), and two ATP-binding cassette ATPases (EcfA and EcfA'). We have characterized the structural basis of substrate binding by the EcfS subunit for riboflavin from Thermotoga maritima, TmRibU. TmRibU binds riboflavin with high affinity, and the protein-substrate complex is exceptionally stable in solution. The crystal structure of riboflavin-bound TmRibU reveals an electronegative binding pocket at the extracellular surface in which the substrate is completely buried. Analysis of the intermolecular contacts indicates that nearly every available substrate hydrogen bond is satisfied. A conserved aromatic residue at the extracellular end of TM5, Tyr130, caps the binding site to generate a substrate-bound, occluded state, and non-conservative mutation of Tyr130 reduces the stability of this conformation. Using a novel fluorescence binding assay, we find that an aromatic residue at this position is essential for high-affinity substrate binding. Comparison with other S subunit structures suggests that TM5 and Loop5-6 contain a dynamic, conserved motif that plays a key role in gating substrate entry and release by S subunits of ECF transporters. PMID:27312125

  10. The subtilisin-like protease AprV2 is required for virulence and uses a novel disulphide-tethered exosite to bind substrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth M Kennan

    Full Text Available Many bacterial pathogens produce extracellular proteases that degrade the extracellular matrix of the host and therefore are involved in disease pathogenesis. Dichelobacter nodosus is the causative agent of ovine footrot, a highly contagious disease that is characterized by the separation of the hoof from the underlying tissue. D. nodosus secretes three subtilisin-like proteases whose analysis forms the basis of diagnostic tests that differentiate between virulent and benign strains and have been postulated to play a role in virulence. We have constructed protease mutants of D. nodosus; their analysis in a sheep virulence model revealed that one of these enzymes, AprV2, was required for virulence. These studies challenge the previous hypothesis that the elastase activity of AprV2 is important for disease progression, since aprV2 mutants were virulent when complemented with aprB2, which encodes a variant that has impaired elastase activity. We have determined the crystal structures of both AprV2 and AprB2 and characterized the biological activity of these enzymes. These data reveal that an unusual extended disulphide-tethered loop functions as an exosite, mediating effective enzyme-substrate interactions. The disulphide bond and Tyr92, which was located at the exposed end of the loop, were functionally important. Bioinformatic analyses suggested that other pathogenic bacteria may have proteases that utilize a similar mechanism. In conclusion, we have used an integrated multidisciplinary combination of bacterial genetics, whole animal virulence trials in the original host, biochemical studies, and comprehensive analysis of crystal structures to provide the first definitive evidence that the extracellular secreted proteases produced by D. nodosus are required for virulence and to elucidate the molecular mechanism by which these proteases bind to their natural substrates. We postulate that this exosite mechanism may be used by proteases produced by

  11. Aromatic Amino Acid Mutagenesis at the Substrate Binding Pocket of Yarrowia lipolytica Lipase Lip2 Affects Its Activity and Thermostability

    OpenAIRE

    Guilong Wang; Zimin Liu; Li Xu; Yunjun Yan

    2014-01-01

    The lipase2 from Yarrowia lipolytica (YLLip2) is a yeast lipase exhibiting high homologous to filamentous fungal lipase family. Though its crystal structure has been resolved, its structure-function relationship has rarely been reported. By contrast, there are two amino acid residues (V94 and I100) with significant difference in the substrate binding pocket of YLLip2; they were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis (SDM) to introduce aromatic amino acid mutations. Two mutants (V94W and I100F...

  12. Studies of pectin substrates as the adsorbents of aromatic compounds of essential oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Наталія Василівна Чепель

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the perspective of gum arabic as an adsorbent of aromatic compounds of essential oils. Its adsorption properties were compared with apple pectin and beet pectin which were more selective. The stabilization of chemical content of essential oils has been proven in applying the gum arabic. 

  13. The role of active site aromatic residues in substrate degradation by the human chitotriosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, Kristine Bistrup; Stockinger, Linn Wilhelmsen; Lewin, Anna Sofia; Tøndervik, Anne; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Sørlie, Morten

    2016-02-01

    Human chitotriosidase (HCHT) is a glycoside hydrolase family 18 chitinase synthesized and secreted in human macrophages thought be an innate part of the human immune system. It consists of a catalytic domain with the (β/α)8 TIM barrel fold having a large area of solvent-exposed aromatic amino acids in the active site and an additional family 14 carbohydrate-binding module. To gain further insight into enzyme functionality, especially the effect of the active site aromatic residues, we expressed two variants with mutations in subsites on either side of the catalytic acid, subsite -3 (W31A) and +2 (W218A), and compared their catalytic properties on chitin and high molecular weight chitosans. Exchange of Trp to Ala in subsite -3 resulted in a 12-fold reduction in extent of degradation and a 20-fold reduction in kcat(app) on chitin, while the values are 5-fold and 10-fold for subsite +2. Moreover, aromatic residue mutation resulted in a decrease of the rate of chitosan degradation contrasting previous observations for bacterial family 18 chitinases. Interestingly, the presence of product polymers of 40 sugar moieties and higher starts to disappear already at 8% degradation for HCHT50-W31A. Such behavior contrast that of the wild type and HCHT-W218A and resembles the action of endo-nonprocessive chitinases. PMID:26621384

  14. Conductive Tether Coating for Electrodynamic Tethers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Jason A.; Schuler, Pete

    2000-01-01

    The Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS), which is an on-orbit demonstration of the propulsion capabilities of electrodynamic tethers in space, is a secondary payload on a Delta 11 unmanned expendable booster. The ProSEDS tether consists of a 5 km bare electrodynamic tether and a 1 0-km non-conductive leader tether. Near the Delta 11, 160 m of the conductive tether is insulated to prevent plasma electron collection from the plasma contactor and for other science requirements. The remainder of the 5-km conductive tether is coated with a new conductive coating to collect plasma electrons. A bare metal tether easily collects electrons from the plasma, but thermal concerns preclude this design. A highly emissive conductive polymer developed by Triton Systems, Inc. has been optimized for both conductivity and thermo-optical properties. The current design for the ProSEDS conductive tether is seven individually coated strands of 28 AWG aluminum wire, coated with an atomic oxygen-resistant conductive polymer composed of a mixture of COR (Colorless Oxygen Resistant) and polyanaline (PANI) known as C-COR (Conductive-Colorless Oxygen Resistant). The conductive-coated wire strands are cold-welded to individually coated strands of the insulated tether. The insulated tether is coated with 1 mil of polyimide and an atomic oxygen resistant polymer TOR-BP. The insulated tether must stand off the entire voltage of the tether (1 200 V) at various times during the mission. All seven wires are twisted around a Kevlar-29 core using the Hi-wire design. Extensive testing has been performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center to qualify both the conductive coating and insulating coating for use on the ProSEDS tether. The conductive coating has been exposed to a plasma to verify the coatings ability to collect electrons from the space plasma from 0 to 1500 V, and to verify the coatings ability to collect electrons after atomic oxygen exposure. The insulated coating has been

  15. Aromatic Amino Acid Mutagenesis at the Substrate Binding Pocket of Yarrowia lipolytica Lipase Lip2 Affects Its Activity and Thermostability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilong Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The lipase2 from Yarrowia lipolytica (YLLip2 is a yeast lipase exhibiting high homologous to filamentous fungal lipase family. Though its crystal structure has been resolved, its structure-function relationship has rarely been reported. By contrast, there are two amino acid residues (V94 and I100 with significant difference in the substrate binding pocket of YLLip2; they were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis (SDM to introduce aromatic amino acid mutations. Two mutants (V94W and I100F were created. The enzymatic properties of the mutant lipases were detected and compared with the wild-type. The activities of mutant enzymes dropped to some extent towards p-nitrophenyl palmitate (pNPC16 and their optimum temperature was 35°C, which was 5°C lower than that of the wild-type. However, the thermostability of I100F increased 22.44% after incubation for 1 h at 40°C and its optimum substrate shifted from p-nitrophenyl laurate (pNPC12 to p-nitrophenyl caprate (pNPC10. The above results demonstrated that the two substituted amino acid residuals have close relationship with such enzymatic properties as thermostability and substrate selectivity.

  16. Two Polyhydroxyalkanoate Synthases from Distinct Classes from the Aromatic Degrader Cupriavidus pinatubonensis JMP134 Exhibit the Same Substrate Preference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Jiang

    Full Text Available Cupriavidus pinatubonensis JMP134 utilizes a variety of aromatic substrates as sole carbon sources, including meta-nitrophenol (MNP. Two polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA synthase genes, phaC1 and phaC2, were annotated and categorized as class I and class II PHA synthase genes, respectively. In this study, both His-tagged purified PhaC1 and PhaC2 were shown to exhibit typical class I PHA synthase substrate specificity to make short-chain-length (SCL PHA from 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA and failed to make medium-chain-length (MCL PHA from 3-hydroxyoctanoyl-CoA. The phaC1 or phaC2 deletion strain could also produce SCL PHA when grown in fructose or octanoate, but the double mutant of phaC1 and phaC2 lost this ability. The PhaC2 also exhibited substrate preference towards SCL substrates when expressed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 phaC mutant strain. On the other hand, the transcriptional level of phaC1 was 70-fold higher than that of phaC2 in MNP-grown cells, but 240-fold lower in octanoate-grown cells. Further study demonstrated that only phaC1 was involved in PHA synthesis in MNP-grown cells. These findings suggested that phaC1 and phaC2 genes were differentially regulated under different growth conditions in this strain. Within the phaC2-containing gene cluster, a single copy of PHA synthase gene was present clustering with genes encoding enzymes in the biosynthesis of PHA precursors. This is markedly different from the genetic organization of all other previously reported class II PHA synthase gene clusters and this cluster likely comes from a distinct evolutionary path.

  17. Key aromatic residues at subsites +2 and +3 of glycoside hydrolase family 31 α-glucosidase contribute to recognition of long-chain substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tagami, Takayoshi; Okuyama, Masayuki; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Kim, Young-Min; Mori, Haruhide; Taguchi, Kazunori; Svensson, Birte; Kimura, Atsuo

    2013-01-01

    Glycoside hydrolase family 31 α-glucosidases (31AGs) show various specificities for maltooligosaccharides according to chain length. Aspergillus niger α-glucosidase (ANG) is specific for short-chain substrates with the highest kcat/Km for maltotriose, while sugar beet α-glucosidase (SBG) prefers...... +2 and +3 caused alterations of substrate specificity in the mutant enzymes. These results indicated that the aromatic residue in the N-loop contributes to determining the chain-length specificity of 31AGs....

  18. Addition of Aromatic Substrates Restores Trichloroethylene Degradation Activity in Pseudomonas putida F1

    OpenAIRE

    Morono, Yuki; Unno, Hajime; TANJI, Yasunori; Hori, Katsutoshi

    2004-01-01

    The rate of trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation by toluene dioxygenase (TDO) in resting cells of Pseudomonas putida F1 gradually decreased and eventually stopped within 1.5 h, as in previous reports. However, the subsequent addition of toluene, which is the principal substrate of TDO, resulted in its immediate degradation without a lag phase. After the consumption of toluene, degradation of TCE restarted at a rate similar to its initial degradation, suggesting that this degradation was mediat...

  19. Determination of single-bond association kinetics by tethered particle motion: concept and simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Merkus, Koen E.; Prins, Menno W. J.; Storm, Cornelis

    2016-01-01

    Tethered particle motion (TPM) --- the motion of a micro- or nanoparticle tethered to a substrate by a macromolecule --- is a system that has proven extremely useful for its ability to reveal physical features of the tether, because the thermal motion of the bound particle reports sensitively on parameters like the length, the rigidity, or the folding state of its tether. In this paper, we discuss a novel application of TPM, surveying its utility in probing the kinetics of single secondary bo...

  20. Determination of single-bond association kinetics by tethered particle motion: concept and simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Merkus, Koen E; Storm, Cornelis

    2016-01-01

    Tethered particle motion (TPM) --- the motion of a micro- or nanoparticle tethered to a substrate by a macromolecule --- is a system that has proven extremely useful for its ability to reveal physical features of the tether, because the thermal motion of the bound particle reports sensitively on parameters like the length, the rigidity, or the folding state of its tether. In this paper, we discuss a novel application of TPM, surveying its utility in probing the kinetics of single secondary bonds: bonds that form and break between the tethered particle and a substrate due, for instance, to receptor/ligand pairs on particle and substrate. Much like the tether itself affects the motion pattern, so do the presence and absence of such secondary connections. Keeping the tether properties constant, we demonstrate how raw positional TPM data may be parsed to generate detailed insights into the association and dissociation kinetics of single secondary bonds. We do this using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulatio...

  1. Tether Deployer And Brake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Joseph A.; Alexander, Charles M.

    1993-01-01

    Design concept promises speed, control, and reliability. Scheme for deploying tether provides for fast, free, and snagless payout and fast, dependable braking. Developed for small, expendable tethers in outer space, scheme also useful in laying transoceanic cables, deploying guidance wires to torpedoes and missiles, paying out rescue lines from ship to ship via rockets, deploying antenna wires, releasing communication and power cables to sonobuoys and expendable bathythermographs, and in reeling out lines from fishing rods.

  2. GRASP: A Multitasking Tether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabouille, Catherine; Linstedt, Adam D

    2016-01-01

    Originally identified as Golgi stacking factors in vitro, the Golgi reassembly stacking protein (GRASP) family has been shown to act as membrane tethers with multiple cellular roles. As an update to previous comprehensive reviews of the GRASP family (Giuliani et al., 2011; Vinke et al., 2011; Jarvela and Linstedt, 2012), we outline here the latest findings concerning their diverse roles. New insights into the mechanics of GRASP-mediated tethering come from recent crystal structures. The models of how GRASP65 and GRASP55 tether membranes relate directly to their role in Golgi ribbon formation in mammalian cells and the unlinking of the ribbon at the onset of mitosis. However, it is also clear that GRASPs act outside the Golgi with roles at the ER and ER exit sites (ERES). Furthermore, the proteins of this family display other roles upon cellular stress, especially in mediating unconventional secretion of both transmembrane proteins (Golgi bypass) and cytoplasmic proteins (through secretory autophagosomes). PMID:26858948

  3. Tethered Lubricants for Small Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynden A. Archer

    2006-01-09

    The objective of this research project is two-fold. First, to fundamentally understand friction and relaxation dynamics of polymer chains near surfaces; and second, to develop novel self-lubricated substrates suitable for MEMS devices. During the three-year performance period of this study the PI and his students have shown using theory and experiments that systematic introduction of disorder into tethered lubricant coatings (e.g. by using self-assembled monolayer (SAM) mixtures or SAMs with nonlinear, branched architectures) can be used to significantly reduce the friction coefficient of a surface. They have also developed a simple procedure based on dielectric spectroscopy for quantifying the effect of surface disorder on molecular relaxation in lubricant coatings. Details of research accomplishments in each area of the project are described in the body of the report.

  4. Construction of Pd(II)-poly(4-vinylpyridine) multilayers on quartz substrate surface as heterogeneous catalyst for selective hydrogenation of aromatic conjugated alkenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Pd-PVP multilayers were prepared by layer-by-layer method. → Immobilized Pd-PVP multilayers acted as heterogeneous catalyst. → Hydrogen used as a reductant for the connectors of Pd(II) ions as well as hydrogen source for the hydrogenation reactions of alkenes. → The heterogeneous catalyst had advantages of high stability, good recyclability and easy separation. - Abstract: Palladium-mediated layer-by-layer (LBL) multilayers with poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PVP) as linker have been constructed on quartz substrate surface and characterized by using UV-Vis absorption spectra, attenuated total reflection infrared spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectra as well as scanning electron microscopy. The as-prepared Pd-PVP multilayers modified substrate was used as heterogeneous catalyst for selectively catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic conjugated alkenes at room temperature. Hydrogen gas was used as a reductant for the connectors of Pd(II) ions as well as hydrogen source for the hydrogenation reactions of alkenes. X-ray photoelectron spectra revealed that the connectors of Pd(II) ions could be reduced to Pd(0) atoms by hydrogen saturated aqueous solution. Yields of the hydrogenation reaction were closely related to the nature of aromatic conjugated alkenes. Because the Pd(0) atoms were encapsulated in the matrix of Pd-PVP multilayers and immobilized on the quartz surface, the present Pd-PVP heterogeneous catalysts had the advantages of high stability, good recyclability as well as the advantage of monitoring the catalytic reaction process through immersing in or withdrawing the modified substrate from the reaction solutions.

  5. Tethered float liquid level sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daily, III, William Dean

    2016-09-06

    An apparatus for sensing the level of a liquid includes a float, a tether attached to the float, a pulley attached to the tether, a rotation sensor connected to the pulley that senses vertical movement of said float and senses the level of the liquid.

  6. Space Station tethered elevator system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddock, Michael H.; Anderson, Loren A.; Hosterman, K.; Decresie, E.; Miranda, P.; Hamilton, R.

    1989-01-01

    The optimized conceptual engineering design of a space station tethered elevator is presented. The tethered elevator is an unmanned, mobile structure which operates on a ten-kilometer tether spanning the distance between Space Station Freedom and a platform. Its capabilities include providing access to residual gravity levels, remote servicing, and transportation to any point along a tether. The report discusses the potential uses, parameters, and evolution of the spacecraft design. Emphasis is placed on the elevator's structural configuration and three major subsystem designs. First, the design of elevator robotics used to aid in elevator operations and tethered experimentation is presented. Second, the design of drive mechanisms used to propel the vehicle is discussed. Third, the design of an onboard self-sufficient power generation and transmission system is addressed.

  7. Microfluidics-based side view flow chamber reveals tether-to-sling transition in rolling neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marki, Alex; Gutierrez, Edgar; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Groisman, Alex; Ley, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils rolling at high shear stress (above 6 dyn/cm(2)) form tethers in the rear and slings in the front. Here, we developed a novel photo-lithographically fabricated, silicone(PDMS)-based side-view flow chamber to dynamically visualize tether and sling formation. Fluorescently membrane-labeled mouse neutrophils rolled on P-selectin substrate at 10 dyn/cm(2). Most rolling cells formed 5 tethers that were 2-30 μm long. Breaking of a single tether caused a reproducible forward microjump of the cell, showing that the tether was load-bearing. About 15% of all tether-breaking events resulted in slings. The tether-to-sling transition was fast (rolling cell, suggesting a very low bending modulus of the tether. The sling downstream of the rolling cell aligned according to the streamlines before landing on the flow chamber. These new observations explain how slings form from tethers and provide insight into their biomechanical properties. PMID:27357741

  8. Microfluidics-based side view flow chamber reveals tether-to-sling transition in rolling neutrophils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marki, Alex; Gutierrez, Edgar; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Groisman, Alex; Ley, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils rolling at high shear stress (above 6 dyn/cm2) form tethers in the rear and slings in the front. Here, we developed a novel photo-lithographically fabricated, silicone(PDMS)-based side-view flow chamber to dynamically visualize tether and sling formation. Fluorescently membrane-labeled mouse neutrophils rolled on P-selectin substrate at 10 dyn/cm2. Most rolling cells formed 5 tethers that were 2–30 μm long. Breaking of a single tether caused a reproducible forward microjump of the cell, showing that the tether was load-bearing. About 15% of all tether-breaking events resulted in slings. The tether-to-sling transition was fast (<100 ms) with no visible material extending above the rolling cell, suggesting a very low bending modulus of the tether. The sling downstream of the rolling cell aligned according to the streamlines before landing on the flow chamber. These new observations explain how slings form from tethers and provide insight into their biomechanical properties. PMID:27357741

  9. Tethered cord syndrome: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tethered cord syndrome is one of the filum terminale congenital defects. It can coexist with anomalies of the spinal canal and column, as well as with anorectal defects. The authors present a case of tethered cord syndrome diagnosed in a 45-year-old woman. She showed typical lumbo-sacral radicular syndrome with no neurological deficits and no bowel/bladder dysfunction. The anomaly coexisted with fibrolipoma, spina bifida and Tarlov cyst. Magnetic resonance imaging is the method of choice in diagnostics of tethered cord syndrome. It provides crucial information, which is necessary for planning surgical treatment of the anomaly. (author)

  10. Tether Elevator Crawler Systems (TECS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Frank R.

    1987-01-01

    One of the needs of the experimenters on the space station is access to steady and controlled-variation microgravity environments. A method of providing these environments is to place the experiment on a tether attached to the space station. This provides a high degree of isolation from structural oscillations and vibrations. Crawlers can move these experiments along the tethers to preferred locations, much like an elevator. This report describes the motion control laws developed for these crawlers and the testing of laboratory models of these tether elevator crawlers.

  11. Bioremediation of multi-polluted soil by spent mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) substrate: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons degradation and Pb availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Delgado, Carlos; Yunta, Felipe; Eymar, Enrique

    2015-12-30

    This study investigates the effect of three spent Agaricus bisporus substrate (SAS) application methods on bioremediation of soil multi-polluted with Pb and PAH from close to a shooting range with respect natural attenuation (SM). The remediation treatments involve (i) use of sterilized SAS to biostimulate the inherent soil microbiota (SSAS) and two bioaugmentation possibilities (ii) its use without previous treatment to inoculate A. bisporus and inherent microbiota (SAS) or (iii) SAS sterilization and further A. bisporus re-inoculation (Abisp). The efficiency of each bioremediation microcosm was evaluated by: fungal activity, heterotrophic and PAH-degrading bacterial population, PAH removal, Pb mobility and soil eco-toxicity. Biostimulation of the native soil microbiology (SSAS) achieved similar levels of PAH biodegradation as SM and poor soil detoxification. Bioaugmented microcosms produced higher PAH removal and eco-toxicity reduction via different routes. SAS increased the PAH-degrading bacterial population, but lowered fungal activity. Abisp was a good inoculum carrier for A. bisporus exhibiting high levels of ligninolytic activity, the total and PAH-degrading bacteria population increased with incubation time. The three SAS applications produced slight Pb mobilization (<0.3%). SAS sterilization and further A. bisporus re-inoculation (Abisp) proved the best application method to remove PAH, mainly BaP, and detoxify the multi-polluted soil. PMID:26188871

  12. Substrate-dependent aromatic ring fission of catechol and 2-aminophenol with O2 catalyzed by a nonheme iron complex of a tripodal N4 ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshman, Triloke Ranjan; Chatterjee, Sayanti; Chakraborty, Biswarup; Paine, Tapan Kanti

    2016-06-01

    The catalytic reactivity of an iron(ii) complex [(TPA)Fe(II)(CH3CN)2](2+) (1) (TPA = tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine) towards oxygenative aromatic C-C bond cleavage of catechol and 2-aminophenol is presented. Complex 1 exhibits catalytic and regioselective C-C bond cleavage of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol (H2DBC) to form intradiol products, whereas it catalyzes extradiol-type C-C bond cleavage of 2-amino-4,6-di-tert-butylphenol (H2AP). The catalytic reactions are found to be pH-dependent and the complex exhibits maximum turnovers at pH 5 in acetonitrile-phthalate buffer. An iron(iii)-catecholate complex [(TPA)Fe(III)(DBC)](+) (2) is formed in the ring cleavage of catechol. In the extradiol-type cleavage of H2AP, an iron(iii)-2-iminobenzosemiquinonate complex [(TPA)Fe(III)(ISQ)](2+) (3) (ISQ = 4,6-di-tert-butyl-2-iminobenzosemiquinonate radical anion) is observed in the reaction pathway. This work shows the importance of the nature of 'redox non-innocent' substrates in governing the mode of ring fission reactivity. PMID:27148606

  13. Tethered Nanoparticle–Polymer Composites: Phase Stability and Curvature

    KAUST Repository

    Srivastava, Samanvaya

    2012-04-17

    Phase behavior of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) tethered silica nanoparticles dispersed in PEG hosts is investigated using small-angle X-ray scattering. Phase separation in dispersions of densely grafted nanoparticles is found to display strikingly different small-angle X-ray scattering signatures in comparison to phase-separated composites comprised of bare or sparsely grafted nanoparticles. A general diagram for the dispersion state and phase stability of polymer tethered nanoparticle-polymer composites incorporating results from this as well as various other contemporary studies is presented. We show that in the range of moderate to high grafting densities the dispersion state of nanoparticles in composites is largely insensitive to the grafting density of the tethered chains and chemistry of the polymer host. Instead, the ratio of the particle diameter to the size of the tethered chain and the ratio of the molecular weights of the host and tethered polymer chains (P/N) are shown to play a dominant role. Additionally, we find that well-functionalized nanoparticles form stable dispersions in their polymer host beyond the P/N limit that demarcates the wetting/dewetting transition in polymer brushes on flat substrates interacting with polymer melts. A general strategy for achieving uniform nanoparticle dispersion in polymers is proposed. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  14. Enabling Tethered Exploration on Mars Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Strong science motivations exist for exploring hard to reach terrain on Mars and the leading systems proposed to do so require tethers. While tethers are used...

  15. The Tethered Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnle, Kevin; Lupu, Roxana Elena; Dubrovolskis, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    that the Moon's orbit evolves is limited by the modest radiative cooling rate of Earth's atmosphere, which in effect tethers the Moon to the Earth. Consequently the Moon's orbit evolves orders of magnitude more slowly than in conventional models. Slow orbital evolution promotes capture by orbital resonances that may have been important in the Earth-Moon system

  16. Polymeric Coatings for Electrodynamic Tethers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Jason A.; Kamenetzky, Rachel R.; Finckenor, Miria M.; Schuler, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Two polymeric coatings have been developed for the Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS) mission. ProSEDS is designed to provide an on-orbit demonstration of the electrodynamic propulsion capabilities of tethers in space. The ProSEDS experiment will be a secondary payload on a Delta II unmanned expendable booster scheduled for launch in August 2000. A 5-km conductive tether is attached to the Delta 11 second stage and collects current from the low Earth orbit (LEO) plasma to facilitate de-orbit of the spent stage. The conductive tether is attached to a 10-km non-conductive tether, the other end of which is attached to an endmass containing several scientific instruments. A bare metal tether would have the best conductivity but thermal concerns preclude this design. A conductive polymer developed by Triton Systems has been optimized for conductivity and thermo-optical properties. The current design for the ProSEDS conductive tether is seven strands of 28 AWG aluminum wire individually coated with 8.7 micrometers (0.35 mil) of an atomic oxygen-resistant conductive polymer composed of a mixture of 87% Clear Oxygen-Resistant polymer (COR) and 13% polyanaline (PANi), wrapped around a braided Kevlar (TM) 49 core. Extensive testing has been performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to qualify this material for flight on ProSEDS. Atomic oxygen exposure was performed, with solar absorptance and infrared emittance measured before and after exposure. Conductivity was measured before and after atomic oxygen exposure. High voltage tests, up to 1500 V, of the current collecting ability of the COR/PANi have been completed. Approximately 160 meters of the conductive tether closest to the Delta 11 second stage is insulated to prevent any electron reconnection to the tether from the plasma contactor. The insulation is composed of polyimide overcoated with TOR-BP, another polymeric coating developed by Triton for this mission. TOR-BP acts as both insulator

  17. Short, high current electrodynamic tether

    OpenAIRE

    Savich, N.A.; Sanmartín Losada, Juan Ramón

    1994-01-01

    An electrodynamic tether experiment, to be carried out in the Russian spacecraft Almaz, is proposed. A 10 km tether would be deployed downwards; the lower 8 km would be nonconductive, the upper 2 km would be conductive, bare, and 2.2 mm in diameter, and would act as a thruster, with power supply at the top. This hybrid arrangement allows for other, onelectrodynamic experiments,reducing costs; it also limits the induced electromotive force, reducing the power to be handled. The current-volt...

  18. Tethered Satellite System Contingency Investigation Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-11-01

    The Tethered Satellite System (TSS-1) was launched aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis (STS-46) on July 31, 1992. During the attempted on-orbit operations, the Tethered Satellite System failed to deploy successfully beyond 256 meters. The satellite was retrieved successfully and was returned on August 6, 1992. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Associate Administrator for Space Flight formed the Tethered Satellite System (TSS-1) Contingency Investigation Board on August 12, 1992. The TSS-1 Contingency Investigation Board was asked to review the anomalies which occurred, to determine the probable cause, and to recommend corrective measures to prevent recurrence. The board was supported by the TSS Systems Working group as identified in MSFC-TSS-11-90, 'Tethered Satellite System (TSS) Contingency Plan'. The board identified five anomalies for investigation: initial failure to retract the U2 umbilical; initial failure to flyaway; unplanned tether deployment stop at 179 meters; unplanned tether deployment stop at 256 meters; and failure to move tether in either direction at 224 meters. Initial observations of the returned flight hardware revealed evidence of mechanical interference by a bolt with the level wind mechanism travel as well as a helical shaped wrap of tether which indicated that the tether had been unwound from the reel beyond the travel by the level wind mechanism. Examination of the detailed mission events from flight data and mission logs related to the initial failure to flyaway and the failure to move in either direction at 224 meters, together with known preflight concerns regarding slack tether, focused the assessment of these anomalies on the upper tether control mechanism. After the second meeting, the board requested the working group to complete and validate a detailed integrated mission sequence to focus the fault tree analysis on a stuck U2 umbilical, level wind mechanical interference, and slack tether in upper tether

  19. Artificial Gravity: Tethers and Containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criswell, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    Tethers used in conjunction with containers offer a means of enhanced control of basic variables such as local acceleration, pointing and orientation, and protected or controlled environments against particle or electromagnetic radiation. Permanent occupancy of space will require the rapid exploration of the short and long term responses of many living organisms to the space environment or separated components of that environment. Tethers and ET facilities could provide the rapid establishment of laboratories in LEO within which to study living systems in a wide range of separate controlled environments for long periods of time, support large optical arrays; provide orbiting laboratories; and provide controlled environments within which the application of advanced manufacturing, assembly, control, and robotics could be developed to aid off-Earth industry and science and the conduct of more complex space operations.

  20. Two-Way Tether Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanger, George F.

    1994-01-01

    Safety-tether device enables crewmembers on spacecraft to retrieve crewmember drifting away from spacecraft. Alternatively, drifting crewmember who carries device uses it to grasp and return to spacecraft. Also used on Earth. For example, rescuer on vessel or pier uses it to retrieve and haul drowning or unconscious person to safety; drifting person or rescuer in water uses it to grasp and hold onto support.

  1. On the survivability of tethers in space

    OpenAIRE

    Anselmo, Luciano; Pardini, Carmen

    2000-01-01

    Tethers have been proposed for several space applications, like satellite de-orbiting or re-boost, electric energy generation, scientific research and so on. However, they may be vulnerable to orbital debris and meteoroid impacts. The problem was assessed, to assist tether systems design, by detailed numerical computations of the average impact rate of artificial debris, taking into account the specific geometric properties of tethers as debris targets, when compared to typical satellites. Th...

  2. Early Results of the Multi-Application Survivable Tether (MAST) Space Tether Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Hoyt, Robert; Voronka, Nestor; Newton, Tyrel; Barnes, Ian; Shepherd, Jack; Frank, S. Scott; Slostad, Jeff; Jaroux, Belgacem; Twiggs, Robert

    2007-01-01

    The Multi-Application Survivable Tether (MAST) Experiment utilizes three tethered picosatellites to study the survivability of space tether structures and materials in the low Earth orbit environment. The MAST picosatellites initially deployed as a single body from a CubeSat PPOD deployer were designed to subsequently deploy a 1,000 meter long multi-line "Hoytether" between two of the picosatellites. The third picosatellite will then slowly crawl up and down the tether photographing it and tr...

  3. Get-Away tether experiment - Experimental plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Michael; Walls, Justin; Carter, J. Theron; Rupp, Charles C.

    1988-01-01

    The experimental capabilities of the Get-Away Tether Experiment (GATE) are presented and a series of demonstration mission are proposed. The GATE is a free-flying tether system that will develop or demonstrate technology in the areas of tether dynamics (deployment and stabilization, retrieval, stationkeeping, and severance), tether electrodynamics, micrometeor hazards to tethers, and disturbance rejection. The system consists of two subsatellites connected by 1 km of tether. The free-flying system is ejected from the Orbiter via a Getaway Special (GAS) canister. Two dynamics missions are profiled along with a description of electrodynamic mission capabilities. The dynamic interactions of the end body and tether may be observed from the Orbiter or from an on-board video tracking system. Hence, GATE provides a unique, low cost capability to demonstrate various tether technologies, and address critical design and safety issues associated with future tether applications. An assessment of the significant measurable parameters and associated instrumentation is given. Future work and system development projection schedules are also outlined.

  4. Sliding tethered ligands add topological interactions to the toolbox of ligand-receptor design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Martin; Kékicheff, Patrick; Iss, Jean; Fajolles, Christophe; Charitat, Thierry; Daillant, Jean; Marques, Carlos M.

    2015-09-01

    Adhesion in the biological realm is mediated by specific lock-and-key interactions between ligand-receptor pairs. These complementary moieties are ubiquitously anchored to substrates by tethers that control the interaction range and the mobility of the ligands and receptors, thus tuning the kinetics and strength of the binding events. Here we add sliding anchoring to the toolbox of ligand-receptor design by developing a family of tethered ligands for which the spacer can slide at the anchoring point. Our results show that this additional sliding degree of freedom changes the nature of the adhesive contact by extending the spatial range over which binding may sustain a significant force. By introducing sliding tethered ligands with self-regulating length, this work paves the way for the development of versatile and reusable bio-adhesive substrates with potential applications for drug delivery and tissue engineering.

  5. Mobile tethering: Overview, perspectives and challengess

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Constantinescu, M.; Onur, E.; Durmus, Y.; Nikou, S.; Reuver, M. de; Bouwman, H.; Djurica, M.; Glatz, P.M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyze mobile tethering from technological and social perspectives. Mobile tethering allows us to share cellular data connection with others over WiFi, Bluetooth or USB. Although the technology is ready and has promising outcomes, service providers and the u

  6. Seismic Response of Submerged Floating Tunnel Tether

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Zhi-bin; SUN Sheng-nan

    2013-01-01

    A mathematical equation for vibration of submerged floating tunnel tether under the effects of earthquake and parametric excitation is presented.Multi-step Galerkin method is used to simplify this equation and the fourth-order Runge-Kuta integration method is used for numerical analysis.Finally,vibration response of submerged floating tunnel tether subjected to earthquake and parametric excitation is analyzed in a few numerical examples.The results show that the vibration response of tether varies with the seismic wave type; the steady maximum mid-span displacement of tether subjected to seismic wave keeps constant when parametric resonance takes place; the transient maximum mid-span displacement of tether is related to the peak value of input seismic wave acceleration.

  7. Electrodynamics of the Getaway Tether Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Michael; Baginski, Michael; Wheelock, Douglas

    1989-01-01

    An electrodynamic circuit model of the interaction of a pair of small tethered satellites and the ionosphere is developed and analyzed. The system under study, the Getaway Tether Experiment (GATE), is composed of two small satellites and 1 km of insulated conducting tether. The nonlinear model has elements representing the emission, collection, and resistive flow of charge through an electrically conductive tether, plasma contactors, and the ionosphere. The circuit model is incorporated into a dynamic orbital simulation to predict mission performance. Simulation results show the feasibility to bilaterally transfer energy between stored electrical energy and orbital momentum. A transient model is also developed using the circuit model and a string of N lumped-parameter modules, each consisting of resistance, capacitance, and induced potential for the tether. Transients are shown via simulation to occur over millisecond intervals.

  8. The space station tethered elevator system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Loren A.

    1989-01-01

    The optimized conceptual engineering design of a space station tethered elevator is presented. The elevator is an unmanned mobile structure which operates on a ten kilometer tether spanning the distance between the Space Station and a tethered platform. Elevator capabilities include providing access to residual gravity levels, remote servicing, and transportation to any point along a tether. The potential uses, parameters, and evolution of the spacecraft design are discussed. Engineering development of the tethered elevator is the result of work conducted in the following areas: structural configurations; robotics, drive mechanisms; and power generation and transmission systems. The structural configuration of the elevator is presented. The structure supports, houses, and protects all systems on board the elevator. The implementation of robotics on board the elevator is discussed. Elevator robotics allow for the deployment, retrieval, and manipulation of tethered objects. Robotic manipulators also aid in hooking the elevator on a tether. Critical to the operation of the tethered elevator is the design of its drive mechanisms, which are discussed. Two drivers, located internal to the elevator, propel the vehicle along a tether. These modular components consist of endless toothed belts, shunt-wound motors, regenerative power braking, and computer controlled linear actuators. The designs of self-sufficient power generation and transmission systems are reviewed. Thorough research indicates all components of the elevator will operate under power provided by fuel cells. The fuel cell systems will power the vehicle at seven kilowatts continuously and twelve kilowatts maximally. A set of secondary fuel cells provides redundancy in the unlikely event of a primary system failure. Power storage exists in the form of Nickel-Hydrogen batteries capable of powering the elevator under maximum loads.

  9. Golgi GRASPs: moonlighting membrane tethers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarvela T

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Timothy Jarvela, Adam D LinstedtDepartment of Biological Sciences, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, USAAbstract: The identification of mammalian Golgi reassembly stacking proteins (GRASPs 15 years ago was followed by experiments implicating them in diverse functions, including two differing structural roles in Golgi biogenesis and at least two distinct roles in the secretion of proteins. GRASP55 and GRASP65 are localized to cis and medial/trans Golgi cisternae, respectively. They are both required for stacking of Golgi membranes in a Golgi reassembly assay. Depletion of either GRASP from cultured cells prevents the linking of Golgi membranes into their normal ribbon-like network. While GRASPs are not required for transport of secretory cargo per se, they are required for ER-to-Golgi transport of certain specific cargo, such as those containing a C-terminal valine motif. Surprisingly, GRASPs also promote secretion of cargo by the so-called unconventional secretory pathway, which bypasses the Golgi apparatus where the GRASPs reside. Furthermore, regulation of GRASP activity is now recognized for its connections to cell cycle control, development, and disease. Underlying these diverse activities is the structurally conserved N-terminal GRASP domain whose crystal structure was recently determined. It consists of a tandem array of atypical PSD95–DlgA–Zo–1 (PDZ domains, which are well-known protein–protein interaction motifs. The GRASP PDZ domains are used to localize the proteins to the Golgi as well as GRASP-mediated membrane tethering and cargo interactions. These activities are regulated, in part, by phosphorylation of the large unstructured C-terminal domain.Keywords: GRASP, review, membrane, tether, PDZ domain, secretory chaperone, unconventional secretion

  10. Dynamic simulation of tethered satellite systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The idea of connecting several spacecrafts by tethers to create mechanical systems with interesting dynamic properties was first brought up by Tsiolkovskii at the end of the nineteenth century, long before the technical means for realization were available. Today, after about 30 years of worldwide research, Tethered Satellite Systems have evolved into a promising technology with a considerable number of possible applications. These systems can be used to build large structures in orbit and provide a fuel-saving way of returning payloads from a space station. Conducting tethers interacting with the Earth's magnetic field can serve as motors or generators, transforming kinetic and electric energy into each other very efficiently. To develop this new technology seventeen experiments have been carried out in orbit since 1966 with NASA's TSS missions being the most well known. The work introduced in this thesis is part of a project carried out by the Institute of Mechanics of the Vienna University of Technology as contractor of the European Space Agency. A software package for the dynamic simulation of Tethered Satellite Systems with variable tether length has been developed to serve as a tool for the development and testing of such systems. The focus is on the deployment and retrieval of the tether, which is an important but tricky process, and has to be controlled by proper control algorithms. This can elegantly be done by a force acting on the tether at the point where it leaves the satellite. In the simulation program a mechanical model consisting of two satellites and a massive, perfectly flexible, visco-elastic tether is considered. The actual length of the tether is not given as a prescribed function of time but is an additional unknown and has to be calculated from the dynamics of the entire system and the forces acting on the tether. Hence the deployment mechanism has an important influence on the deployment dynamics. In this work the tether is considered to

  11. FCAPD Protective Coating for Space Tethers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Alameda Applied Sciences Corporation (AASC) proposes to demonstrate extended service lifetime of space tethers in the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) environment by using...

  12. Tethers in space handbook, second edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penzo, Paul A. (Editor); Ammann, Paul W. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The Tethers in Space Handbook, Second Edition represents an update to the initial volume issued in September 1986. As originally intended, this handbook is designed to serve as a reference manual for policy makers, program managers, educators, engineers, and scientists alike. It contains information for the uninitiated, providing insight into the fundamental behavior of tethers in space. For those familiar with space tethers, it includes a summary of past and ongoing studies and programs, a complete bibliography of tether publications, and names, addresses, and phone numbers of workers in the field. Perhaps its most valuable asset is the brief description of nearly 50 tether applications which have been proposed and analyzed over the past 10 years. The great variety of these applications, from energy generation to boosting satellites to gravity wave detection is an indication that tethers will play a significant part in the future of space development. This edition of the handbook preserves the major characteristics of the original; however, some significant rearrangements and additions have been made. The first section on Tether Programs has been brought up to date, and now includes a description of TSS-2, the aerodynamic NASA/Italian Space Agency (ASI) mission. Tether Applications follows, and this section has been substantially rearranged. First, the index and cross-reference for the applications have been simplified. Also, the categories have changed slightly, with Technology and Test changed to Aerodynamics, and the Constellations category removed. In reality, tether constellations may be applicable to many of the other categories, since it is simply a different way of using tethers. Finally, to separate out those applications which are obviously in the future, a Concepts category has been added. A new section included here on Conference Summaries recognizes the fact that the tether community is growing internationally, and that meetings provide a means of

  13. Tethered satellite system dynamics and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musetti, B.; Cibrario, B.; Bussolino, L.; Bodley, C. S.; Flanders, H. A.; Mowery, D. K.; Tomlin, D. D.

    1990-01-01

    The first tethered satellite system, scheduled for launch in May 1991, is reviewed. The system dynamics, dynamics control, and dynamics simulations are discussed. Particular attention is given to in-plane and out-of-plane librations; tether oscillation modes; orbiter and sub-satellite dynamics; deployer control system; the sub-satellite attitude measurement and control system; the Aeritalia Dynamics Model; the Martin-Marietta and NASA-MSFC Dynamics Model; and simulation results.

  14. Numerical modelling of elastic space tethers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Kristian Uldall; Palmer, P. L.; Roberts, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    , the numerical experiments of an orbiting tether system show that bending may introduce significant forces in some regions of phase space. Finally, numerical evidence for the existence of an almost invariant slow manifold of the singularly perturbed, regularised, non-dissipative massive tether model is provided....... It is also shown that on the slow manifold the dynamics of the satellites are well-approximated by the finite dimensional slack-spring model....

  15. Controlled Activation of Protein Rotational Dynamics Using Smart Hydrogel Tethering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beech, Brenda M.; Xiong, Yijia; Boschek, Curt B.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Mcateer, Kathleen; Squier, Thomas C.

    2014-09-05

    Stimulus-responsive hydrogel materials that stabilize and control protein dynamics have the potential to enable a range of applications to take advantage of the inherent specificity and catalytic efficiencies of proteins. Here we describe the modular construction of a hydrogel using an engineered calmodulin (CaM) within a polyethylene glycol (PEG) matrix that involves the reversible tethering of proteins through an engineered CaM-binding sequence. For these measurements, maltose binding protein (MBP) was isotopically labeled with [13C] and [15N], permitting dynamic structural measurements using TROSY-HSQC NMR spectroscopy. Upon initial formation of hydrogels protein dynamics are suppressed, with concomitant increases in protein stability. Relaxation of the hydrogel matrix following transient heating results in the activation of protein dynamics and restoration of substrate-induced large-amplitude domain motions necessary for substrate binding.

  16. Chemotaxis of Azospirillum Species to Aromatic Compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez-de-Victoria, Geralyne; Lovell, Charles R.

    1993-01-01

    Chemotaxis of Azospirillum lipoferum Sp 59b and Azospirillum brasilense Sp 7 and Sp CD to malate and to the aromatic substrates benzoate, protocatechuate, 4-hydroxybenzoate, and catechol was assayed by the capillary method and direct cell counts. A. lipoferum required induction by growth on 4-hydroxybenzoate for positive chemotaxis to this compound. Chemotaxis of Azospirillum spp. to all other substrates did not require induction. Maximum chemotactic responses for most aromatic compounds occu...

  17. Aromatic graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, D. K.; Sahoo, S.

    2016-04-01

    In recent years graphene attracts the scientific and engineering communities due to its outstanding electronic, thermal, mechanical and optical properties and many potential applications. Recently, Popov et al. [1] have studied the properties of graphene and proved that it is aromatic but without fragrance. In this paper, we present a theory to prepare graphene with fragrance. This can be used as scented pencils, perfumes, room and car fresheners, cosmetics and many other useful household substances.

  18. Cellulose Microfibril Formation by Surface-Tethered Cellulose Synthase Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Snehasish; Omadjela, Okako; Gaddes, David; Tadigadapa, Srinivas; Zimmer, Jochen; Catchmark, Jeffrey M

    2016-02-23

    Cellulose microfibrils are pseudocrystalline arrays of cellulose chains that are synthesized by cellulose synthases. The enzymes are organized into large membrane-embedded complexes in which each enzyme likely synthesizes and secretes a β-(1→4) glucan. The relationship between the organization of the enzymes in these complexes and cellulose crystallization has not been explored. To better understand this relationship, we used atomic force microscopy to visualize cellulose microfibril formation from nickel-film-immobilized bacterial cellulose synthase enzymes (BcsA-Bs), which in standard solution only form amorphous cellulose from monomeric BcsA-B complexes. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques show that surface-tethered BcsA-Bs synthesize highly crystalline cellulose II in the presence of UDP-Glc, the allosteric activator cyclic-di-GMP, as well as magnesium. The cellulose II cross section/diameter and the crystal size and crystallinity depend on the surface density of tethered enzymes as well as the overall concentration of substrates. Our results provide the correlation between cellulose microfibril formation and the spatial organization of cellulose synthases. PMID:26799780

  19. The investigation of tethered satellite system dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzini, E. C.

    1986-01-01

    The analysis of the rotational dynamics of the satellite was focused on the rotational amplitude increase of the satellite, with respect to the tether, during retrieval. The dependence of the rotational amplitude upon the tether tension variation to the power 1/4 was thoroughly investigated. The damping of rotational oscillations achievable by reel control was also quantified while an alternative solution that makes use of a lever arm attached with a universal joint to the satellite was proposed. Comparison simulations between the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and the Martin Marietta (MMA) computer code of reteival maneuvers were also carried out. The agreement between the two, completely independent, codes was extremely close, demonstrating the reliability of the models. The slack tether dynamics during reel jams was analytically investigated in order to identify the limits of applicability of the SLACK3 computer code to this particular case. Test runs with SLACK3 were also carried out.

  20. Tethering Complexes in the Arabidopsis Endomembrane System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukašinović, Nemanja; Žárský, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Targeting of endomembrane transport containers is of the utmost importance for proper land plant growth and development. Given the immobility of plant cells, localized membrane vesicle secretion and recycling are amongst the main processes guiding proper cell, tissue and whole plant morphogenesis. Cell wall biogenesis and modification are dependent on vectorial membrane traffic, not only during normal development, but also in stress responses and in plant defense against pathogens and/or symbiosis. It is surprising how little we know about these processes in plants, from small GTPase regulation to the tethering complexes that act as their effectors. Tethering factors are single proteins or protein complexes mediating first contact between the target membrane and arriving membrane vesicles. In this review we focus on the tethering complexes of the best-studied plant model-Arabidopsis thaliana. Genome-based predictions indicate the presence of all major tethering complexes in plants that are known from a hypothetical last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA). The evolutionary multiplication of paralogs of plant tethering complex subunits has produced the massively expanded EXO70 family, indicating a subfunctionalization of the terminal exocytosis machinery in land plants. Interpretation of loss of function (LOF) mutant phenotypes has to consider that related, yet clearly functionally-specific complexes often share some common core subunits. It is therefore impossible to conclude with clarity which version of the complex is responsible for the phenotypic deviations observed. Experimental interest in the analysis of plant tethering complexes is growing and we hope to contribute with this review by attracting even more attention to this fascinating field of plant cell biology. PMID:27243010

  1. Passivity-Based Control of a Rigid Electrodynamic Tether

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Martin Birkelund; Blanke, Mogens

    2011-01-01

    Electrodynamic tethers provide actuation for performing orbit correction of spacecrafts. When an electrodynamic tether system is orbiting the Earth in an inclined orbit, periodic changes in the magnetic field result in a family of unstable periodic solutions in the attitude motion. This paper shows how these periodic solutions can be stabilized by controlling only the current through the tether. A port-controlled Hamiltonian formulation is employed to describe the tethered satellite system an...

  2. Dynamics of the Space Tug System with a Short Tether

    OpenAIRE

    Jiafu Liu; Naigang Cui; Fan Shen; Siyuan Rong

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of the space tug system with a short tether similar to the ROGER system during deorbiting is presented. The kinematical characteristic of this system is significantly different from the traditional tethered system as the tether is tensional and tensionless alternately during the deorbiting process. The dynamics obtained based on the methods for the traditional tethered system is not suitable for the space tug system. Therefore, a novel method for deriving dynamics for the deorbit...

  3. MR imaging evaluation of tethered spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seven cases of tethered cord underwent magnetic resonance imaging. The associated findings included the following: case 1: caudal regression, inperforated anus, cutaneovesical fistula, and diverticulum of the bladder; case 2: Arnold-Chiari malformation, hydromyelia, and urinary reflux; case 3; lipoma; case 4: postoperative syringomyelia and residual lipoma; case 5: diastematomyelia and spinal bifida; case 6: dysraphism, diastematomyelia, and myelomeningocele; and case 7: postoperative split cord T1-weighted axial and sagittal images are sufficient for evaluation of tethered cord and associated anomalies and are also useful for postoperative follow-up and the detection of possible complications

  4. Tethers in Space: A propellantless propulsion in-orbit demonstration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijff, M.

    2011-01-01

    Space tethers are cables that connect satellites or other endmasses in orbit. The emptiness of space and the near-weightlessness there make it possible to deploy very long and thin tethers. By exploiting basic principles of physics, tethers can provide propellantless propulsion and enable unique app

  5. Fluorescence method for enzyme analysis which couples aromatic amines with aromatic aldehydes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R.E.; Dolbeare, F.A.

    1980-10-21

    Analysis of proteinases is accomplished using conventional amino acid containing aromatic amine substrates. Aromatic amines such as 4-methoxy-2-naphthylamine (4M2NA), 2-naphthylamine, aminoisophthalic acid dimethyl ester, p-nitroaniline, 4-methoxy-1-aminofluorene and coumarin derivatives resulting from enzymatic hydrolysis of the substrate couples with aromatic aldehydes such as 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde (5-NSA), benzaldehyde and p-nitrobenzaldehyde to produce Schiff-base complexes which are water insoluble. Certain Schiff-base complexes produce a shift from blue to orange-red (visible) fluorescence. Such complexes are useful in the assay of enzymes. No Drawings

  6. Fluorescence method for enzyme analysis which couples aromatic amines with aromatic aldehydes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert E.; Dolbeare, Frank A.

    1979-01-01

    Analysis of proteinases is accomplished using conventional amino acid containing aromatic amine substrates. Aromatic amines such as 4-methoxy-2-naphthylamine (4M2NA), 2-naphthylamine, aminoisophthalic acid dimethyl ester, p-nitroaniline, 5-methoxy-1-aminofluorene and coumarin derivatives resulting from enzymatic hydrolysis of the substrate couples with aromatic aldehydes such as 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde (5-NSA), benzaldehyde and p-nitrobenzaldehyde to produce Schiff-base complexes which are water insoluble. Certain Schiff-base complexes produce a shift from blue to orange-red (visible) fluorescence. Such complexes are useful in the assay of enzymes.

  7. Ionic-Liquid-Tethered Nanoparticles: Hybrid Electrolytes

    KAUST Repository

    Moganty, Surya S.

    2010-10-22

    A new class of solventless electrolytes was created by tethering ionic liquids to hard inorganic ZrO2 nanostructures (see picture; NIM=nanoscale ionic material). These hybrid fluids exhibit exceptional redox stability windows, excellent thermal stability, good lithium transference numbers, long-term interfacial stability in the presence of a lithium anode and, when doped with lithium salt, reasonable ionic conductivities.

  8. Electrodynamic Tethers for Novel LEO Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantner, Michael; Hoyt, Robert; Scardera, Michael; Johnson, Charles

    2011-01-01

    The exponential increase of launch system size - and cost - with deltaV makes missions requiring large total impulse cost prohibitive. Northrop Grumman and partners have matured a fundamentally different method for generating propulsion using electrodynamic tethers (EDTs) that escapes the limitations of the rocket equation. With essentially unlimited delta V, we can perform new classes of missions that are currently unaffordable or unfeasible.

  9. Activation and routing of membrane-tethered prohormone convertases 1 and 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzzaniti, A; Marx, R; Mains, R E

    1999-08-27

    Many peptide hormones and neuropeptides are processed by members of the subtilisin-like family of prohormone convertases (PCs), which are either soluble or integral membrane proteins. PC1 and PC2 are soluble PCs that are primarily localized to large dense core vesicles in neurons and endocrine cells. We examined whether PC1 and PC2 were active when expressed as membrane-tethered proteins, and how tethering to membranes alters the biosynthesis, enzymatic activity, and intracellular routing of these PCs. PC1 and PC2 chimeras were constructed using the transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic domain of the amidating enzyme, peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (PAM). The membrane-tethered PCs were rerouted from large dense core vesicles to the Golgi region. In addition, the chimeras were transiently expressed at the cell surface and rapidly internalized to the Golgi region in a fashion similar to PAM. Membrane-tethered PC1 and PC2 exhibited changes in pro-domain maturation rates, N-glycosylation, and in the pH and calcium optima required for maximal enzymatic activity against a fluorogenic substrate. In addition, the PC chimeras efficiently cleaved endogenous pro-opiomelanocortin to the correct bioactive peptides. The PAM transmembrane domain/cytoplasmic domain also prevented stimulated secretion of pro-opiomelanocortin products in AtT-20 cells. PMID:10455138

  10. Conjunctions and Collision Avoidance with Electrodynamic Tethers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, E.

    2013-09-01

    Electrodynamic propulsion technology is currently in development by NASA, ESA, and JAXA for the purpose of affordable removal of large debris objects from LEO. At the same time, the Naval Research Laboratory is preparing a 3U CubeSat with a 1-km electrodynamic tether for a flight demonstration of electrodynamic propulsion. This type of propulsion does not require fuel. The electrodynamic thrust is the Lorentz force acting on the electric current in a long conductor (tether) in the geomagnetic field. Electrons are collected from the ambient plasma on one end and emitted back into the plasma from the other end. The electric current loop is closed through the ionosphere, as demonstrated in two previous flights. The vehicle is solar powered. To support safe navigation of electrodynamic tethers, proper conjunction analysis and collision avoidance strategies are needed. The typical lengths of electrodynamic tethers for near-term applications are measured in kilometers, and the conjunction geometry is very different from the geometry of conjunctions between compact objects. It is commonly thought that the collision cross-section in a conjunction between a tether and a compact object is represented by the product of the tether length and the size of the object. However, rigorous analysis shows that this is not the case, and that the above assumption leads to grossly overestimated collision probabilities. The paper will present the results of a detailed mathematical analysis of the conjunction geometry and collision probabilities in close approaches between electrodynamic tethers and compact objects, such as satellites, rocket bodies, and debris fragments. Electrodynamic spacecraft will not require fuel, and therefore, can thrust constantly. Their orbit transfers can take many days, but can result in major orbit changes, including large rotations of the orbital plane, both in the inclination and the node. During these orbit transfers, the electrodynamic spacecraft will

  11. Coordinated coupling control of tethered space robot using releasing characteristics of space tether

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Panfeng; Zhang, Fan; Xu, Xiudong; Meng, Zhongjie; Liu, Zhengxiong; Hu, Yongxin

    2016-04-01

    Tethered space robot (TSR) is a new concept of space robot, which is released from the platform satellite, and retrieved via connected tether after space debris capture. In this paper, we propose a new coordinate control scheme for optimal trajectory and attitude tracking, and use releasing motor torque to instead the tension force, since it is difficult to track in practical. Firstly, the 6-DOF dynamics model of TSR is derived, in which the dynamics of tether releasing system is taken into account. Then, we propose and design the coordinated coupled controller, which is composed of a 6-DOF sliding mode controller and a PD controller tether's releasing. Thrust is treated as control input of the 6-DOF sliding mode controller to control the in-plane and out-of-plane angle of the tether and attitude angles of the TSR. The torque of releasing motor is used as input of PD controller, which controls the length rate of space tether. After the verification of the control scheme, finally, the simulation experiment is presented in order to validate the effectiveness of this control method. The results show that TSR can track the optimal approaching trajectory accurately. Simultaneously, the attitude angles can be changed to the desired attitude angles in control period, and the terminal accuracy is ±0.3°.

  12. Surfactant Behavior of Amphiphilic Polymer-Tethered Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Zhao, Hanying

    2016-04-19

    In recent years, an emerging research area has been the surfactant behavior of polymer-tethered nanoparticles. In this feature article, we have provided a general introduction to the synthesis, self-assembly, and interfacial activity of polymer-tethered inorganic nanoparticles, polymer-tethered organic nanoparticles, and polymer-tethered natural nanoparticles. In addition, applications of the polymer-tethered nanoparticles in colloidal and materials science are briefly reviewed. All research demonstrates that amphiphilic polymer-tethered nanoparticles exhibit surfactant behavior and can be used as elemental building blocks for the fabrication of advanced structures by the self-assembly approach. The polymer-tethered nanoparticles provide new opportunities to engineer materials and biomaterials possessing specific functionality and physical properties. PMID:27018567

  13. Aromatic stacking between nucleobase and enzyme promotes phosphate ester hydrolysis in dUTPase

    OpenAIRE

    Pecsi, Ildiko; Leveles, Ibolya; Harmat, Veronika; Vertessy, Beata G.; Toth, Judit

    2010-01-01

    Aromatic interactions are well-known players in molecular recognition but their catalytic role in biological systems is less documented. Here, we report that a conserved aromatic stacking interaction between dUTPase and its nucleotide substrate largely contributes to the stabilization of the associative type transition state of the nucleotide hydrolysis reaction. The effect of the aromatic stacking on catalysis is peculiar in that uracil, the aromatic moiety influenced by the aromatic interac...

  14. A Tethering Device for Mobile Robot Guidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangik Na

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available A new human and robot interface tool, so-called Navi-Guider, which makes it easy to handle mobile robots, is presented in this paper. The Navi-Guider is easily mounted on a mobile robot and is able to detect a length and a direction of the tether pulled out by a user. Those detected factors are utilized for the robot guidance and control. This paper addresses detailed hardware and software architecture of the Navi-Guider and demonstrates the practical usability of the system through actual experimental tests. The new device, NaviGuider, is an intuitive control tool for moving mobile robots from a place to another place just by pulling the tether.

  15. Magnetic Carbon Nanotubes Tethered with Maghemite Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Il Tae; Nunnery, Grady; Jacob, Karl; Schwartz, Justin; Liu, Xiaotao; Tannenbaum, Rina

    2011-03-01

    We describe a novel, facile method for the synthesis of magnetic carbon nanotubes (m-CNTs) decorated with monodisperse γ - Fe 2 O3 magnetic (maghemite) nanoparticles and their aligned feature in a magnetic field. The tethering of the nanoparticles was achieved by the initial activation of the surface of the CNTs with carboxylic acid groups, followed by the attachment of the γ - Fe 2 O3 nanoparticles via a modified sol-gel process. Sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (NaDDBS) was introduced into the suspension to prevent the formation of an iron oxide 3D network. Various characterization methods were used to confirm the formation of well-defined maghemite nanoparticles. The tethered nanoparticles imparted magnetic characteristics to the CNTs, which became superparamagnetic. The m-CNTs were oriented parallel to the direction of a magnetic field. This has the potential of enhancing various properties, e.g. mechanical and electrical properties, in composite materials.

  16. Tethered Forth system for FPGA applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goździkowski, Paweł; Zabołotny, Wojciech M.

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents the tethered Forth system dedicated for testing and debugging of FPGA based electronic systems. Use of the Forth language allows to interactively develop and run complex testing or debugging routines. The solution is based on a small, 16-bit soft core CPU, used to implement the Forth Virtual Machine. Thanks to the use of the tethered Forth model it is possible to minimize usage of the internal RAM memory in the FPGA. The function of the intelligent terminal, which is an essential part of the tethered Forth system, may be fulfilled by the standard PC computer or by the smartphone. System is implemented in Python (the software for intelligent terminal), and in VHDL (the IP core for FPGA), so it can be easily ported to different hardware platforms. The connection between the terminal and FPGA may be established and disconnected many times without disturbing the state of the FPGA based system. The presented system has been verified in the hardware, and may be used as a tool for debugging, testing and even implementing of control algorithms for FPGA based systems.

  17. Tethered nuclear power for the space station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear space power system the SP-100 is being developed for future missions where large amounts of electrical power will be required. Although it is primarily intended for unmanned spacecraft, it can be adapted to a manned space platform by tethering it above the station through an electrical transmission line which isolates the reactor far away from the inhabited platform and conveys its power back to where it is needed. The transmission line, used in conjunction with an instrument rate shield, attenuates reactor radiation in the vicinity of the space station to less than one-one hundredth of the natural background which is already there. This combination of shielding and distance attenuation is less than one-tenth the mass of boom-mounted or onboard man-rated shields that are required when the reactor is mounted nearby. This paper describes how connection is made to the platform (configuration, operational requirements) and introduces a new element the coaxial transmission tube which enables efficient transmission of electrical power through long tethers in space. Design methodology for transmission tubes and tube arrays is discussed. An example conceptual design is presented that shows SP-100 at three power levels 100 kWe, 300 kWe, and 1000 kWe connected to space station via a 2 km HVDC transmission line/tether. Power system performance, mass, and radiation hazard are estimated with impacts on space station architecture and operation. 23 references

  18. Evaluation of Aromatic Boronic Acids as Ligands for Measuring Diabetes Markers on Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors

    OpenAIRE

    Steingrimur Stefansson; Lára A. Stefansson; Suk-won Chung; Kevin Ko; Hena H. Kwon; Saeyoung Nate Ahn

    2012-01-01

    Biomolecular detections performed on carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNT-FETs) frequently use reactive pyrenes as an anchor to tether bioactive ligands to the hydrophobic nanotubes. In this paper, we explore the possibility of directly using bioactive aromatic compounds themselves as CNT-FET ligands. This would be an efficient way to functionalize CNT-FETs since many aromatic compounds bind avidly to nanotubes, and it would also ensure that ligand-binding molecules would be brought ...

  19. Coat/Tether Interactions—Exception or Rule?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeter, Saskia; Beckmann, Sabrina; Schmitt, Hans Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Coat complexes are important for cargo selection and vesicle formation. Recent evidence suggests that they may also be involved in vesicle targeting. Tethering factors, which form an initial bridge between vesicles and the target membrane, may bind to coat complexes. In this review, we ask whether these coat/tether interactions share some common mechanisms, or whether they are special adaptations to the needs of very specific transport steps. We compare recent findings in two multisubunit tethering complexes, the Dsl1 complex and the HOPS complex, and put them into context with the TRAPP I complex as a prominent example for coat/tether interactions. We explore where coat/tether interactions are found, compare their function and structure, and comment on a possible evolution from a common ancestor of coats and tethers. PMID:27243008

  20. Modeling of tethered satellite formations using graph theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin Birkelund; Smith, Roy S; Blanke, Mogens

    2011-01-01

    could form stable formations in space are cumbersome when done at a case to case basis, and a common framework providing a basic model of the dynamics of tethered satellite formations can therefore be advantageous. This paper suggests the use of graph theoretical quantities to describe a tethered...... stationary configurations and an upper limit of their number is determined. The method is shown to be valid for general tethered satellite formations that form a tree structure....

  1. Electrodynamics of long metallic tethers in the ionospheric plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowolny, M.

    1978-01-01

    A study is presented of the electrodynamic interactions of long metallic tethers (lengths up to 100 km) with the ionospheric plasma. The study, which is of interest in view of possible future experiments using long tethers in space, includes the derivation of current and potential distribution along the tether, taking also the effects of internal resistance into account. Electrostatic and electrodynamic drag forces are computed and compared with aerodynamic drag.

  2. Lyapunov Orbits in the Jupiter System Using Electrodynamic Tethers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokelmann, Kevin; Russell, Ryan P.; Lantoine, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Various researchers have proposed the use of electrodynamic tethers for power generation and capture from interplanetary transfers. The effect of tether forces on periodic orbits in Jupiter-satellite systems are investigated. A perturbation force is added to the restricted three-body problem model and a series of simplifications allows development of a conservative system that retains the Jacobi integral. Expressions are developed to find modified locations of equilibrium positions. Modified families of Lyapunov orbits are generated as functions of tether size and Jacobi integral. Zero velocity curves and stability analyses are used to evaluate the dynamical properties of tether-modified orbits.

  3. Dynamic analysis of tethered space system deployment process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Discusses in detail the deploying strategies and feature of themotion of the Tethered Space System and the effects of some parameters, such as the property and initial length of the tether, the perturbation of the atmosphere, the ellipse of the orbit and the mass distribution of the system and points out the deploying strategy is based on the controlling of tension and the length of tether. And concludes from the computer simulation results of a tethered atmosphere probing satellite deployment that the deploying strategy presented does work well.

  4. A proposed bare tether experiment on board a sounding rocket

    OpenAIRE

    Fujii, Hironori; OYAMA, Kohichiro; Sasaki, Susumu; Yamagiwa, Yoshiki; Cho, Mengu; Sanmartín Losada, Juan Ramón; Charro, Mario; Heide, Erik J. van der; Kruijff, Michiel; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Hilgers, Alain

    2005-01-01

    A sounding rocket experiment is proposed to carry out two experiments by the conductive bare-tether; 1) the test of the OML (Orbital-Motion-Limited) theory to collect electron, and II) the test of techniques to determine (neutral) density profile in critical E-layer. The main driver of the mission is provide a space tether technology experiment in low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) deploying a long tape tether in space and verify the performance of the bare electrodynamic tape tether. The sounding rocket ...

  5. The stochastic dynamics of tethered microcantilevers in a viscous fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, Brian A.; Paul, Mark R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Radiom, Milad; Ducker, William A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Walz, John Y. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506 (United States)

    2014-10-28

    We explore and quantify the coupled dynamics of a pair of micron scale cantilevers immersed in a viscous fluid that are also directly tethered to one another at their tips by a spring force. The spring force, for example, could represent the molecular stiffness or elasticity of a biomolecule or material tethered between the cantilevers. We use deterministic numerical simulations with the fluctuation-dissipation theorem to compute the stochastic dynamics of the cantilever pair for the conditions of experiment when driven only by Brownian motion. We validate our approach by comparing directly with experimental measurements in the absence of the tether which shows excellent agreement. Using numerical simulations, we quantify the correlated dynamics of the cantilever pair over a range of tether stiffness. Our results quantify the sensitivity of the auto- and cross-correlations of equilibrium fluctuations in cantilever displacement to the stiffness of the tether. We show that the tether affects the magnitude of the correlations which can be used in a measurement to probe the properties of an attached tethering substance. For the configurations of current interest using micron scale cantilevers in water, we show that the magnitude of the fluid coupling between the cantilevers is sufficiently small such that the influence of the tether can be significant. Our results show that the cross-correlation is more sensitive to tether stiffness than the auto-correlation indicating that a two-cantilever measurement has improved sensitivity when compared with a measurement using a single cantilever.

  6. The stochastic dynamics of tethered microcantilevers in a viscous fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We explore and quantify the coupled dynamics of a pair of micron scale cantilevers immersed in a viscous fluid that are also directly tethered to one another at their tips by a spring force. The spring force, for example, could represent the molecular stiffness or elasticity of a biomolecule or material tethered between the cantilevers. We use deterministic numerical simulations with the fluctuation-dissipation theorem to compute the stochastic dynamics of the cantilever pair for the conditions of experiment when driven only by Brownian motion. We validate our approach by comparing directly with experimental measurements in the absence of the tether which shows excellent agreement. Using numerical simulations, we quantify the correlated dynamics of the cantilever pair over a range of tether stiffness. Our results quantify the sensitivity of the auto- and cross-correlations of equilibrium fluctuations in cantilever displacement to the stiffness of the tether. We show that the tether affects the magnitude of the correlations which can be used in a measurement to probe the properties of an attached tethering substance. For the configurations of current interest using micron scale cantilevers in water, we show that the magnitude of the fluid coupling between the cantilevers is sufficiently small such that the influence of the tether can be significant. Our results show that the cross-correlation is more sensitive to tether stiffness than the auto-correlation indicating that a two-cantilever measurement has improved sensitivity when compared with a measurement using a single cantilever.

  7. Tether-directed synthesis of highly substituted oxasilacycles via an intramolecular allylation employing allylsilanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cox Liam R

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Using a silyl tether to unite an aldehyde electrophile and allylsilane nucleophile into a single molecule allows a subsequent Lewis-acid-mediated allylation to proceed in an intramolecular sense and therefore receive all the benefits associated with such processes. However, with the ability to cleave the tether post allylation, a product that is the result of a net intermolecular reaction can be obtained. In the present study, four diastereoisomeric β-silyloxy-α-methyl aldehydes, which contain an allylsilane tethered through the β-carbinol centre, have been prepared, in order to probe how the relative configuration of the two stereogenic centres affects the efficiency and selectivity of the intramolecular allylation. Results Syn-aldehydes, syn-4a and syn-4b, both react poorly, affording all four possible diastereoisomeric oxasilacycle products. In contrast, the anti aldehydes anti-4a and anti-4b react analogously to substrates that lack substitution at the α-site, affording only two of the four possible allylation products. Conclusion The outcome of the reaction with anti-aldehydes is in accord with reaction proceeding through a chair-like transition state (T.S.. In these systems, the sense of 1,3-stereoinduction can be rationalised by the aldehyde electrophile adopting a pseudoaxial orientation, which will minimise dipole-dipole interactions in the T.S. The 1,4-stereoinduction in these substrates is modest and seems to be modulated by the R substituent in the starting material. In the case of the syn-substrates, cyclisation through a chair T.S. is unlikely as this would require the methyl substituent α to the reacting carbonyl group to adopt an unfavourable pseudoaxial position. It is therefore proposed that these substrates react through poorly-defined T.S.s and consequently exhibit essentially no stereoselectivity.

  8. Electrodynamic-tether time-domain reflectometer for analyzing tether faults and degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilén, Sven G.; Gilchrist, Brian E.

    2001-02-01

    We propose using time-domain-reflectometry (TDR) systems to locate and track faults along electrodynamic tether (EDT) systems. Inclusion of a TDR on long-duration EDT missions would facilitate tracking of the expected performance degradation due to faults caused by hazards such as micrometeors. The TDR technique has long been an effective tool for determining the location of loads and faults along common transmission lines (TLs) such as coaxial cables. Also sometimes known as pulse reflectometry, TDR works by sending an impulse down a TL and recording the reflected energy as a function of time. Measurement of the reflected TDR waveform provides insight into the physical structure of the TL and any loads, i.e., faults, along its length. In addition, the delay between launched and reflected signals determines the location of the load or fault. Hence, the TDR technique requires knowledge of the propagation characteristics of the TL under test. To examine the feasibility of extending the technique to EDTs we use a previously developed model for the tether transmission line. This model has temporal, and hence spatial, limitations, which may be overcome with enhancements to the tether TL model. We present some general parameters governing the development of such a tether TDR system as well as computer simulations of the TDR system's response. .

  9. Tethered Contactless Mobile Nuclear Environment Monitoring Robot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In fact, the nuclear environment monitoring is significantly crucial for early detection of NPP accident, radiological emergency, the estimation of radiation exposure to nearby residents as well as the long term radioactivity. In the UAE, the nuclear environment monitoring is, however, quite challenging because sampling locations are far from NPPs and the outdoor temperature and humidity are very high for NPP workers to collect soil, air, and water samples. Therefore, nuclear environment monitoring robots (Nubos) are strongly needed for the NPPs in the UAE. The Nubos can be remotely controlled to collect samples in extreme environment instead of NPP workers. Moreover, the Nubos can be unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs), unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and unmanned marine vehicles (UMVs) to collect soil, air, and water samples, respectively. In this paper, the prototype development of UGV type Nubos using power cable for a long distance power delivery, called Tethered contactless mobile Nubo is introduced and validated by experiments. In this paper, the prototype development of Tethered Contactless Mobile (TeCoM) Nubo, which can be powered continuously within several km distance and avoid tangled cable, and the indoor test are finished. As further works, outdoor demonstration and a grand scale R and D proposal of practical Nubo will be proceeded

  10. Lipid Gymnastics: Tethers and Fingers in membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayebi, Lobat; Miller, Gregory; Parikh, Atul

    2009-03-01

    A significant body of evidence now links local mesoscopic structure (e.g., shape and composition) of the cell membrane with its function; the mechanisms by which cellular membranes adopt the specific shapes remain poorly understood. Among all the different structures adopted by cellular membranes, the tubular shape is one of the most surprising one. While their formation is typically attributed to the reorganization of membrane cytoskeleton, many exceptions exist. We report the instantaneous formation of tubular membrane mesophases following the hydration under specific thermal conditions. The shapes emerge in a bimodal way where we have two distinct diameter ranges for tubes, ˜20μm and ˜1μm, namely fat fingers and narrow tethers. We study the roughening of hydrated drops of 3 lipids in 3 different spontaneous curvatures at various temp. and ionic strength to figure out the dominant effect in selection of tethers and fingers. Dynamics of the tubes are of particular interest where we observe four distinct steps of birth, coiling, uncoiling and retraction with different lifetime on different thermal condition. These dynamics appear to reflect interplay between membrane elasticity, surface adhesion, and thermal or hydrodynamic gradient.

  11. Detergent interaction with tethered bilayer lipid membranes for protein reconstitution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broccio, Matteo; Zan Goh, Haw; Loesche, Mathias

    2009-03-01

    Tethered bilayer lipid membranes (tBLMs) are self-assembled biomimetic structures in which the membrane is separated from a solid substrate by a nm-thick hydrated submembrane space. These model systems are being used in binding studies of peripheral proteins and exotoxins. Here we aim at their application for the reconstitution of water-insoluble integral membrane proteins. As an alternative to fusion of preformed proteoliposomes we study the direct reconstitution of such proteins for applications in biosensing and pharmaceutical screening. For reconstitution, highly insulating tBLMs (R˜10^5-10^6 φ) were temporarily incubated with a detergent to screen for conditions that keep the detergent-saturated membranestable and ready to incorporate detergent-solubilized proteins. We assess the electrical characteristics, i.e. specific resistance and capacitance, by means of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) under timed incubation with decylmaltoside and dodecylmaltoside detergents in a regime around their critical micelle concentration, 1.8 mM and 0.17 mM respectively and demonstrate the restoration of the tBLM upon detergent removal. Thereby a range of concentration and incubation times was identified, that represents optimal conditions for the subsequent membrane protein reconstitution.

  12. Tethered actuator for vibration control of space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, H. A.; Sugimoto, Y.; Watanabe, T.; Kusagaya, T.

    2015-12-01

    Effectiveness of a micro-tension actuator for vibration control of such flexible space structures as the tethered space solar power satellites is experimentally studied on the ground. A flexible leverage is employed as the micro-tension actuator in order to control the microtension of tether. The flexible leverage is connected through a tether to the flexible beam as an experimental model of the flexible solar panel with the low first modal frequency of order 1 Hz. The nonlinearity of the flexible tether is taken into account for the vibration control since the tether becomes ineffective when it slacks, i.e., when it is tension-free. The feedback controller is designed by means of the Mission Function control algorithm. Flexural rigidity of the flexible leverage plays an important role in the vibration suppression and is studied experimentally to shed light on the effectiveness of the leverages with five different kinds of rigidity. The experimental results show not only the effect of the flexural rigidity of the flexible leverage on the control performance of the vibration suppression but also the importance of selection of the rigidity to control the vibration of tethered flexible space structures through the microtension of tethers in space.

  13. Project 'VOLCANO': Electronics of tethered satellite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savich, N. A.

    The main goal of the 'VOLCANO' project developed jointly by the Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics and space concern 'ENERGIA' is experimental investigation of the current-voltage characteristics of the 'Collector-Boom-Emitter' system simulating the long Tethered Satellite System (TSS) in the real space flight conditions on the transport ship 'PROGRESS'. These measurements will allow scientists to determine the attainable current values for different combinations of collectors and emitters (passive metallic sphere, thermocathode, hollow cathodes and show up some prospects of active TSS. The report is concerned with the concept, purpose and tasks of the project, the planned set up of the measurement equipment on the 'PROGRESS' ship and in the container extended on the deployable 100 m long boom end.

  14. Airborne Internet Providing Tethered Balloon System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvriti Dhawan1

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we shall introduce a new system for providing wireless network communication over a specified area using ’lighter than air’ balloons. This technology will replace the existing fiber optic network system. This will be done by using a tethered balloon along with the payload (containing a receiver, a transmitter and a radio communication device.This payload will be suspended from the ground at an altitude (depending on the area of coverage required. Users under this area will be able to access this system directly for internet connectivity. This system can be used over large areas like universities, companies and societies to provide internet facility to their users through Wi-Fi or over an area where the user is specified (commercial purposes. Currently Google is working on similar idea called the ’Google Loon’ in which they use high altitude balloons which float at an altitude twice as high as air planes and the weather. They recently tested this system over New-Zealand by providing internet to their pilot testers on ground. Their balloons not being stationary, move with directional winds and have to be replaced one after the other to maintain consistency. This can be a huge problem over the areas where upper atmospheric winds are not in favorable direction. We can resolve this problem by using our stationary tethered balloon system which can communicate with the loon balloons to provide internet facility over a desired area. Moreover when our balloon will communicate with the loon balloon it will increase the coverage area as the loon balloon has to communicate to a point which is above the ground. Our system will not only replace the existing fiber optic system but it will also be selfsustaining i.e. It will generate its own power using solar panels.

  15. Passivity-Based Control of a Rigid Electrodynamic Tether

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin Birkelund; Blanke, Mogens

    2011-01-01

    Electrodynamic tethers provide actuation for performing orbit correction of spacecrafts. When an electrodynamic tether system is orbiting the Earth in an inclined orbit, periodic changes in the magnetic field result in a family of unstable periodic solutions in the attitude motion. This paper shows...... parts, a feedback connection, which stabilizes the open-loop equilibrium, and a bias term, which is able to drive the system trajectory away from this equilibrium, a feature necessary to obtain orbit adjustment capabilities of the electrodynamic tether. It is then shown how the periodic solutions of the...

  16. Chemotaxis of Azospirillum species to aromatic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-de-Victoria, G.; Lovell, C.R. (Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States))

    1993-09-01

    Azospirillum sspeciesare free-living nitrogen fixing bacteria commonly found in soils and in association with plant roots, including important agricultural crops. Rhizosphere colonization my Azospirillum species has been shown to stimulate growth of a variety of plant species. Chemotaxis is one of the properties which may contribute to survival, rhizosphere colonization and the initiation of mutualistic interactions by Azospirillum species. This study evaluates the chemotactic responses of three Azospirillum stains to a variety of aromatic compounds:benzoate, catechol, 4-HB, and PCA. Results indicate that the same aromatic substance can elicit different chemotactic responses from different Azospirillum species, and that Azospirillum can detect aromatic substrates at concentrations similar to those they encounter naturally. 36 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  17. Laboratory experiments on the electrodynamic behavior of tethers in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenzel, Reiner L.; Urrutia, Manuel J.

    1991-01-01

    The transient current systems between tethered plasmas in a large magnetoplasma are investigated experimentally for extrapolation to electrodynamic tethers in space. The studies measure the perturbed magnetic fields and the current density associated with pulsed currents to electrodes in three-dimensional space and time. The electrodes excite electron whistlers because they produce fields that dominantly couple to electrons, allowing pulsed currents to propagate and disperse as whistler wave packets. The wave packets evolve into force-free, flux-ropelike field configurations, and a whistler 'wedge' is formed in the plasma due to 'eddy' currents caused by insulated tethers with dc currents. Substantial radiation into the whistler mode happens with moving VLF antennas as well as tethers, and the wave spread within the ray cone is the most significant characteristic event. The wave spread widens the current channel, incites current closure, and is also associated with a 'phantom loop' phenomenon.

  18. Stationary Tether Device for Buoy Apparatus and System for Using

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A rigid, neutrally buoyant hydrodynamicaly-faired tether and associated fastening hardware that loosely holds a bathymetric float at a predetermined distance from a...

  19. An updated review of nanotechnologies for the space elevator tether

    OpenAIRE

    Brambilla, G.

    2010-01-01

    The space elevator tether requires an extraordinary specific ultimate strength (ratio between ultimate strength and density) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been identified as the ideal candidate because of their astonishing strength. This paper reviews CNT manufacture and measured strengths.

  20. Fiber Optic Shape Sensing for Tethered Marsupial Rovers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Building upon the successful proof of concept work in Phase I, Luna Innovations Incorporated is proposing to design, build, and test a sensing tether for marsupial...

  1. Fiber Optic Shape Sensing for Tethered Marsupial Rovers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Luna Innovations Incorporated is proposing to design, build, and test a shape, length, and tension sensing tether for robotic exploration and sample-gathering...

  2. Development of a Tethered Formation Flight Testbed for ISS Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The development of a testbed for the development and demonstration of technologies needed by tethered formation flying satellites is proposed. Such a testbed would...

  3. Isothermal pumping analysis for high-altitude tethered balloons

    OpenAIRE

    Kuo, Kirsty A.; Hunt, Hugh E.M.

    2015-01-01

    High-altitude tethered balloons have potential applications in communications, surveillance, meteorological observations and climate engineering. To maintain balloon buoyancy, power fuel cells and perturb atmospheric conditions, fluids could be pumped from ground level to altitude using the tether as a hose. This paper examines the pumping requirements of such a delivery system. Cases considered include delivery of hydrogen, sulfur dioxide (SO2) and powders as fluid-based slurries. Isothermal...

  4. Role of the membrane for mechanosensing by tethered channels

    CERN Document Server

    Sabass, Benedikt

    2016-01-01

    Biologically important membrane channels are gated by force at attached tethers. Here, we generically characterize the non-trivial interplay of force, membrane tension, and channel deformations that can affect gating. A central finding is that minute conical channel deformation under force leads to significant energy release during opening. We also calculate channel-channel interactions and show that they can amplify force sensitivity of tethered channels.

  5. Single-particle tracking for DNA tether length monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Pouget, Noëlle; Dennis, Cynthia; Turlan, Catherine; Grigoriev, Mikhail; Chandler, Michaël; Salomé, Laurence

    2004-01-01

    We describe a simple single-particle tracking approach for monitoring the length of DNA molecules in tethered particle motion experiments. In this method, the trajectory of a submicroscopic bead tethered by a DNA molecule to a glass surface is determined by videomicroscopy coupled to image analysis. The amplitude of motion of the bead is measured by the standard deviation of the distribution of successive positions of the bead in a given time interval. We were able to describe theoretically t...

  6. Survival Probability of Round and Tape Tethers Against Debris Impact

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Shaker Bayajid; Sanmartin, Juan R.

    2013-01-01

    The current space environment, consisting of manmade debris and micrometeoroids, poses a risk to safe operations in space, and the situation is continuously deteriorating due to in-orbit debris collisions and to new satellite launches. Bare electrodynamic tethers can provide an efficient mechanism for rapid deorbiting of satellites from low Earth orbit at end of life. Because of its particular geometry (length very much larger than cross-sectional dimensions), a tether may have a relatively h...

  7. Analysis of tape tether survival in LEO against orbital debris

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Shaker Bayajid; Sanmartin, Juan R.

    2014-01-01

    The low earth orbit (LEO) environment contains a large number of artificial debris, of which a significant portion is due to dead satellites and fragments of satellites resulted from explosions and in-orbit collisions. Deorbiting defunct satellites at the end of their life can be achieved by a successful operation of an Electrodynamic Tether (EDT) system. The effectiveness of an EDT greatly depends on the survivability of the tether, which can become debris itself if cut by debris particle...

  8. Space Test of Bare-Wire Anode Tethers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L.; Fujii, H. A.; Sanmartin, J. R.

    2007-01-01

    An international team, lead by Tokyo Metropolitan University, is developing a mission concept for a suborbital test of orbital-motion-limited (OML) bare-wire anode current collection for application to electrodynamic tether propulsion. The tether is a tape with a 50-mm width, 0.05-mm thickness, and 1-km length. This will be the first space test of the OML theory. In addition, by being an engineering demonstration (of space tethers), the mission will demonstrate electric beam generation for "sounding" determination of the neutral density profile in the ionospheric "E-layer." If selected by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science/Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), the mission will launch in early 2009 using an $520 Sounding Rocket. During ascent, and above =100 km in attitude, the 1-km tape tether will be deployed at a rate of 8 m/s. Once deployed, the tape tether will serve as an anode, collecting ionospheric electrons. The electrons will be expelled into space by a hollow cathode device, thereby completing the circuit and allowing current to flow.This paper will describe the objectives of the proposed mission, the technologies to be employed, and the application of the results to future space missions using electrodynamic tethers for propulsion or power generation.

  9. Dynamics of single-stranded DNA tethered to a solid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiom, Milad; Paul, Mark R.; Ducker, William A.

    2016-06-01

    Tethering is used to deliver specific biological and industrial functions. For example, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) is tethered to polymerases and long sequences of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) during replication, and to solids in DNA microarrays. However, tethering ssDNA to a large object limits not only the available ssDNA conformations, but also the range of time-scales over which the mechanical responses of ssDNA are important. In this work we examine the effect of tethering by measurement of the mechanical response of ssDNA that is tethered at each end to two separate atomic force microscope cantilevers in aqueous solution. Thermal motion of the cantilevers drives the ends of the ssDNA chain at frequencies near 2 kHz. The presence of a tethered molecule makes a large difference to the asymmetric cross-correlation of two cantilevers, which enables resolution of the mechanical properties in our experiments. By analysis of the correlated motion of the cantilevers we extract the friction and stiffness of the ssDNA. We find that the measured friction is much larger than the friction that is usually associated with the unencumbered motion of ssDNA. We also find that the measured relaxation time, ∼30 μs, is much greater than prior measurements of the free-molecule relaxation time. We attribute the difference to the loss of conformational possibilities as a result of constraining the ends of the ssDNA.

  10. Dynamics of the Space Tug System with a Short Tether

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiafu Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of the space tug system with a short tether similar to the ROGER system during deorbiting is presented. The kinematical characteristic of this system is significantly different from the traditional tethered system as the tether is tensional and tensionless alternately during the deorbiting process. The dynamics obtained based on the methods for the traditional tethered system is not suitable for the space tug system. Therefore, a novel method for deriving dynamics for the deorbiting system similar to the ROGER system is proposed by adopting the orbital coordinates of the two spacecraft and the Euler angles of ROGER spacecraft as the generalized coordinates instead of in- and out-plane librations and the length of the tether and so forth. Then, the librations of the system are equivalently obtained using the orbital positions of the two spacecraft. At last, the geostationary orbit (GEO and the orbit whose apogee is 300 km above GEO are chosen as the initial and target orbits, respectively, to perform the numerical simulations. The simulation results indicate that the dynamics can describe the characteristic of the tether-net system conveniently and accurately, and the deorbiting results are deeply affected by the initial conditions and parameters.

  11. Elastic issues and vibration reduction in a tethered deorbiting mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatini, Marco; Gasbarri, Paolo; Palmerini, Giovanni B.

    2016-05-01

    Recently proposed mission concepts involving harpoons or nets to capture and de-orbit debris represent an interesting application of the tethered systems, where the orbiting bodies are connected by a flexible link. These systems present a complex behavior, as flexible characteristics combine with orbital dynamics. The focus of the paper is on the dynamic behavior of the tethered system in the final phase of the de-orbiting mission, when a powerful apogee motor is used to change the debris orbit. The thrust action introduces significant issues, as elastic waves propagate along the tether, and the relevant oscillations couple with the orbital dynamics. Input shaping techniques are proposed to limit or cancel these oscillations. However, the performance of these techniques drops when non-ideal scenarios are considered. In particular, an initially slack tether is a serious issue that must be solved if acceptably low oscillations of the tether are to be obtained. Three strategies are proposed and discussed in this paper to remove the slack condition: a natural drift of the chaser by means of a single impulse, a controlled maneuver for precisely adjusting the relative distance between chaser spacecraft and debris, and a retrieval mechanism for changing the tether length.

  12. Effect of tethering on the surface dynamics of a thin polymer melt layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uğur, Gökçe; Akgun, Bulent; Jiang, Zhang; Narayanan, Suresh; Satija, Sushil; Foster, Mark D

    2016-06-28

    The surface height fluctuations of a layer of low molecular weight (2.2k) untethered perdeuterated polystyrene (dPS) chains adjacent to a densely grafted polystyrene brush are slowed dramatically. Due to the interpenetration of the brush with the layer of "untethered chains" a hydrodynamic continuum theory can only describe the fluctuations when the effective thickness of the film is taken to be that which remains above the swollen brush. The portion of the film of initially untethered chains that interpenetrates with the brush becomes so viscous as to effectively play the role of a rigid substrate. Since these hybrid samples containing a covalently tethered layer at the bottom do not readily dewet, and are more robust than thin layers of untethered short chains on rigid substrates, they provide a route for tailoring polymer layer surface properties such as wetting, adhesion and friction. PMID:27222250

  13. Superconductivity in aromatic hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Aromatic superconductor is one of core research subjects in superconductivity. Superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons. Some serious problems to be solved exist for future advancement of the research. This article shows the present status of aromatic superconductors. - Abstract: ‘Aromatic hydrocarbon’ implies an organic molecule that satisfies the (4n + 2) π-electron rule and consists of benzene rings. Doping solid aromatic hydrocarbons with metals provides the superconductivity. The first discovery of such superconductivity was made for K-doped picene (Kxpicene, five benzene rings). Its superconducting transition temperatures (Tc’s) were 7 and 18 K. Recently, we found a new superconducting Kxpicene phase with a Tc as high as 14 K, so we now know that Kxpicene possesses multiple superconducting phases. Besides Kxpicene, we discovered new superconductors such as Rbxpicene and Caxpicene. A most serious problem is that the shielding fraction is ⩽15% for Kxpicene and Rbxpicene, and it is often ∼1% for other superconductors. Such low shielding fractions have made it difficult to determine the crystal structures of superconducting phases. Nevertheless, many research groups have expended a great deal of effort to make high quality hydrocarbon superconductors in the five years since the discovery of hydrocarbon superconductivity. At the present stage, superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons (picene, phenanthrene and dibenzopentacene), but the shielding fraction remains stubbornly low. The highest priority research area is to prepare aromatic superconductors with a high superconducting volume-fraction. Despite these difficulties, aromatic superconductivity is still a core research target and presents interesting and potentially breakthrough challenges, such as the positive pressure dependence of Tc that is clearly observed in some phases of aromatic hydrocarbon superconductors

  14. Analytical investigation of the dynamics of tethered constellations in Earth orbit, phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzini, Enrico C.; Gullahorn, Gordon E.; Cosmo, Mario L.; Estes, Robert D.; Grossi, Mario D.

    1994-01-01

    This final report covers nine years of research on future tether applications and on the actual flights of the Small Expendable Deployment System (SEDS). Topics covered include: (1) a description of numerical codes used to simulate the orbital and attitude dynamics of tethered systems during station keeping and deployment maneuvers; (2) a comparison of various tethered system simulators; (3) dynamics analysis, conceptual design, potential applications and propagation of disturbances and isolation from noise of a variable gravity/microgravity laboratory tethered to the Space Station; (4) stability of a tethered space centrifuge; (5) various proposed two-dimensional tethered structures for low Earth orbit for use as planar array antennas; (6) tethered high gain antennas; (7) numerical calculation of the electromagnetic wave field on the Earth's surface on an electrodynamically tethered satellite; (8) reentry of tethered capsules; (9) deployment dynamics of SEDS-1; (10) analysis of SEDS-1 flight data; and (11) dynamics and control of SEDS-2.

  15. Adult idiopathic scoliosis: the tethered spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte Ferguson, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on an observational and treatment study using three case histories to describe common patterns of muscle and fascial asymmetry in adults with idiopathic scoliosis (IS) who have significant scoliotic curvatures that were not surgically corrected and who have chronic pain. Rather than being located in the paraspinal muscles, the myofascial trigger points (TrPs) apparently responsible for the pain were located at some distance from the spine, yet referred pain to locations throughout the thoracolumbar spine. Asymmetries in these muscles appear to tether the spine in such a way that they contribute to scoliotic curvatures. Evaluation also showed that each of these individuals had major ligamentous laxity and this may also have contributed to development of scoliotic curvatures. Treatment focused on release of TrPs found to refer pain into the spine, release of related fascia, and correction of related joint dysfunction. Treatment resulted in substantial relief of longstanding chronic pain. Treatment thus validated the diagnostic hypothesis that myofascial and fascial asymmetries were to some extent responsible for pain in adults with significant scoliotic curvatures. Treatment of these patterns of TrPs and muscle and fascial asymmetries and related joint dysfunction was also effective in relieving pain in each of these individuals after they were injured in auto accidents. Treatment of myofascial TrPs and asymmetrical fascial tension along with treatment of accompanying joint dysfunction is proposed as an effective approach to treating both chronic and acute pain in adults with scoliosis that has not been surgically corrected. PMID:24411157

  16. Numerical Simulation of Tethered Underwater Kites for Power Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Amirmahdi; Olinger, David; Tryggvason, Gretar

    2015-11-01

    An emerging renewable energy technology, tethered undersea kites (TUSK), which is used to extract hydrokinetic energy from ocean and tidal currents, is studied. TUSK systems consist of a rigid-winged ``kite,'' or glider, moving in an ocean current which is connected by tethers to a floating buoy on the ocean surface. The TUSK kite is a current speed enhancement device since the kite can move in high-speed, cross-current motion at 4-6 times the current velocity, thus producing more power than conventional marine turbines. A computational simulation is developed to simulate the dynamic motion of an underwater kite and extendable tether. A two-step projection method within a finite volume formulation, along with an Open MP acceleration method, is employed to solve the Navier-Stokes equations. An immersed boundary method is incorporated to model the fluid-structure interaction of the rigid kite (with NACA 0012 airfoil shape in 2D and NACA 0021 airfoil shape in 3D simulations) and the fluid flow. PID control methods are used to adjust the kite angle of attack during power (tether reel-out) and retraction (reel-in) phases. Two baseline simulations (for kite motions in two and three dimensions) are studied, and system power output, flow field vorticity, tether tension, and hydrodynamic coefficients (lift and drag) for the kite are determined. The simulated power output shows good agreement with established theoretical results for a kite moving in two-dimensions.

  17. Tethered Pyrotechnic Apparatus for Acquiring a Ground Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack; Zimmerman, Wayne; Wu, Jiunn Jenq; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart

    2009-01-01

    A proposed alternative design for the balloon-borne ground-sampling system described in the immediately preceding article would not rely on free fall to drive a harpoonlike sample-collecting device into the ground. Instead, the harpoon-like sample-collecting device would be a pyrotechnically driven, tethered projectile. The apparatus would include a tripod that would be tethered to the gondola. A gun for shooting the projectile into the ground would be mounted at the apex of the tripod. The gun would include an electronic trigger circuit, a chamber at the breech end containing a pyrotechnic charge, and a barrel. A sabot would be placed in the barrel just below the pyrotechnic charge, and the tethered projectile would be placed in the barrel just below the sabot. The tripod feet would be equipped with contact sensors connected to the trigger circuit. In operation, the tripod would be lowered to the ground on its tether. Once contact with the ground was detected by the sensors on all three tripod feet, the trigger circuit would fire the pyrotechnic charge to drive the projectile into the ground. (Requiring contact among all three tripod feet and the ground would ensure that the projectile would be fired into the ground, rather than up toward the gondola or the balloon.) The tethered projectile would then be reeled back up to the gondola for analysis of the sample.

  18. Effect of chromosome tethering on nuclear organization in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barış Avşaroğlu

    Full Text Available Interphase chromosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are tethered to the nuclear envelope at their telomeres and to the spindle pole body (SPB at their centromeres. Using a polymer model of yeast chromosomes that includes these interactions, we show theoretically that telomere attachment to the nuclear envelope is a major determinant of gene positioning within the nucleus only for genes within 10 kb of the telomeres. We test this prediction by measuring the distance between the SPB and the silent mating locus (HML on chromosome III in wild-type and mutant yeast strains that contain altered chromosome-tethering interactions. In wild-type yeast cells we find that disruption of the telomere tether does not dramatically change the position of HML with respect to the SPB, in agreement with theoretical predictions. Alternatively, using a mutant strain with a synthetic tether that localizes an HML-proximal site to the nuclear envelope, we find a significant change in the SPB-HML distance, again as predicted by theory. Our study quantifies the importance of tethering at telomeres on the organization of interphase chromosomes in yeast, which has been shown to play a significant role in determining chromosome function such as gene expression and recombination.

  19. Tethered satellite system control using electromagnetic forces and reaction wheels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alandi Hallaj, Mohammad Amin; Assadian, Nima

    2015-12-01

    In this paper a novel non-rotating space tethered configuration is introduced which its relative positions controlled using electromagnetic forces. The attitude dynamics is controlled by three reaction wheels in the body axes. The nonlinear coupled orbital dynamics of a dumbbell tethered satellite formation flight are derived through a constrained Lagrangian approach. These equations are presented in the leader satellite orbital frame. The tether is assumed to be mass-less and straight, and the J2 perturbation is included to the analysis. The forces and the moments of the electromagnetic coils are modeled based on the far-filed model of the magnetic dipoles. A guidance scheme for generating the desired positions as a function of time in Cartesian form is presented. The satellite tethered formation with variable length is controlled utilizing a linear controller. This approach is applied to a specified scenario and it is shown that the nonlinear guidance method and the linear controller can control the nonlinear system of the tethered formation and the results are compared with optimal control approach.

  20. Numerical and Experimental Approaches on the Motion of a Tethered System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehara, Shoichiro; Terumichi, Yoshiaki; Nohmi, Masahiro; Sogabe, Kiyoshi

    In the present paper, the motion of a tethered system with large deformation and large displacement is discussed. In general, a tether is a cable or a wire rope, and a tethered system consists of a tether and the equipment attached to the tether. A tethered subsatellite in space is an example of a tethered system. In the present study, a tethered system consisting of a very flexible body (the tether) and a rigid body at one end is considered as the analytical model. A flexible body in planer motion is described using the Absolute Nodal Coordinate Formulation. Using this formulation, the motion of a flexible body with large deformation, rotation and translation can be expressed with the accuracy of rigid body motion. The combination of the flexible body motion and the rigid body motion is performed, and their interaction is discussed. Experiments are performed to investigate the fundamental motion of the tethered system and to evaluate the validity of the numerical formulation. Experiments were conducted using a steel tether and a rubber tether in gravity space. In addition, an experiment of the motion of the tethered system with a rigid body in microgravity space was conducted.

  1. Numerical simulation of tethered DNA in shear flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvinov, S; Hu, X Y; Adams, N A [Institute of Aerodynamics, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85747 Garching (Germany)

    2011-05-11

    The behavior of tethered DNA in shear flow is investigated numerically by the smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) method. Unlike numerical methods used in previous studies, SDPD models the solvent explicitly, takes into account the fully coupled hydrodynamic interactions and is free of the numerical artifact of wall sticking. Based on numerical simulations the static and dynamic properties of a tethered DNA is studied both qualitatively and quantitatively. The observed properties are in general agreement with previous experimental, numerical and theoretical work. Furthermore, the cyclic-motion phenomenon is studied by power spectrum density and cross-correlation function analysis, which suggest that there is only a very weak coherent motion of tethered DNA for a characteristic timescale larger than the relaxation time. Cyclic motion is more likely relevant as an isolated event than a typical mode of DNA motion.

  2. Orbit Maneuver of Spinning Tether via Tidal Force

    CERN Document Server

    Baoyin, Hexi; Li, Junfeng

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the spinning tethered system is regarded as a typical and fundamental space structure attracting great interest of the aerospace engineers, and has been discussed primarily for specific space missions in past decades, including on-orbit capture and propellantless orbit transfer etc. The present work studies the dynamical behaviours of a fast spinning tethered binary system under central gravitational field, and derives principles of the basic laws of orbital maneuver. Considering the characteristics of coupled librational and orbital motions, an averaging method is introduced to deal with the slow-fast system equation, thus a definite equivalent model is derived. The general orbit motion is completely determined analytically, including the orbit geometry, periodicity, conversations and moving region etc. Since the possibility of orbit control using tether reaction has been proved by previous studies, special attention is paid to the transportation mode of angular momentum and mechanical energy betwe...

  3. The Secret Life of Tethers: The Role of Tethering Factors in SNARE Complex Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubuke, Michelle L; Munson, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Trafficking in eukaryotic cells is a tightly regulated process to ensure correct cargo delivery to the proper destination organelle or plasma membrane. In this review, we focus on how the vesicle fusion machinery, the SNARE complex, is regulated by the interplay of the multisubunit tethering complexes (MTC) with the SNAREs and Sec1/Munc18 (SM) proteins. Although these factors are used in different stages of membrane trafficking, e.g., Golgi to plasma membrane transport vs. vacuolar fusion, and in a variety of diverse eukaryotic cell types, many commonalities between their functions are being revealed. We explore the various protein-protein interactions and findings from functional reconstitution studies in order to highlight both their common features and the differences in their modes of regulation. These studies serve as a starting point for mechanistic explorations in other systems. PMID:27243006

  4. Anchoring a Leviathan: How the Nuclear Membrane Tethers the Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafal eCzapiewski

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that the nuclear envelope has many distinct direct connections to chromatin that contribute to genome organization. The functional consequences of genome organization on gene regulation are less clear. Even less understood is how interactions of lamins and nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins (NETs with chromatin can produce anchoring tethers that can withstand the physical forces of and on the genome. Chromosomes are the largest molecules in the cell, making megadalton protein structures like the nuclear pore complexes and ribosomes seem small by comparison. Thus to withstand strong forces from chromosome dynamics an anchoring tether is likely to be much more complex than a single protein-protein or protein-DNA interaction. Here we will briefly review known NE-genome interactions that likely contribute to spatial genome organization, postulate in the context of experimental data how these anchoring tethers contribute to gene regulation, and posit several hypotheses for the physical nature of these tethers that need to be investigated experimentally. Significantly, disruption of these anchoring tethers and the subsequent consequences for gene regulation could explain how mutations in nuclear envelope proteins cause diseases ranging from muscular dystrophy to lipodystrophy to premature ageing progeroid syndromes. The two favored hypotheses for nuclear envelope protein involvement in disease are 1 weakening nuclear and cellular mechanical stability, and 2 disrupting genome organization and gene regulation. Considerable experimental support has been obtained for both. The integration of both mechanical and gene expression defects in the disruption of anchoring tethers could provide a unifying hypothesis consistent with both.

  5. The Momentum-eXchange/Electrodynamic Reboost (MXER) Tether Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorenson, K. F.

    2004-12-01

    Within NASA's In-Space Propulsion Technology Projects Office exists Emerging Propulsion Technologies (EPT) Investment Area that is advancing emerging propulsion concepts that have potential to lower the cost of space transportation, enable new missions, and/or increase the payload capability. The current, primary investment of EPT is the Momentum-eXchange/Electrodynamic Reboost (MXER) tether concept. The MXER tether is a long, rotating cable in an elliptical Earth orbit whose rapid rotation allows it to catch a payload in a low Earth orbit and throw it to a high-energy orbit. The orbital energy transferred by the MXER tether to the payload is restored to the tether via electrodynamic tether propulsion. This technique uses solar power to drive electrical current collected from the ionosphere through the tether, resulting in a magnetic interaction with the terrestrial field. Since the Earth itself serves as the reaction mass, the thrust force is generated without propellant, and allows the MXER facility to be repeatedly reused without resupply. Essentially, the MXER facility is a `propellantless' upper stage that could assist nearly every mission going beyond low Earth orbit. Payloads to interplanetary destinations would especially benefit from the boost provided by the MXER facility, resulting in launch vehicle cost reductions, increased payload fractions, and more frequent mission opportunities. Some of the benefits to space exploration include: (1) Multi-use, in-space, `propellantless' infrastructure, (2) Useable by essentially all missions beyond LEO, (3) Lowers overall mission costs and/or enables larger payloads, (4) ``Panama Canal" of space transportation, (5) A spiral development for future generations, (6) Readily scales up or down, (7) Future transportation to and from Lunar surface.

  6. Superconductivity in aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubozono, Yoshihiro, E-mail: kubozono@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Research Center of New Functional Materials for Energy Production, Storage and Transport, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, ACT-C, Kawaguchi 332-0012 (Japan); Goto, Hidenori; Jabuchi, Taihei [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Yokoya, Takayoshi [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Research Center of New Functional Materials for Energy Production, Storage and Transport, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Kambe, Takashi [Department of Physics, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Sakai, Yusuke; Izumi, Masanari; Zheng, Lu; Hamao, Shino; Nguyen, Huyen L.T. [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Sakata, Masafumi; Kagayama, Tomoko; Shimizu, Katsuya [Center of Science and Technology under Extreme Conditions, Osaka University, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Aromatic superconductor is one of core research subjects in superconductivity. Superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons. Some serious problems to be solved exist for future advancement of the research. This article shows the present status of aromatic superconductors. - Abstract: ‘Aromatic hydrocarbon’ implies an organic molecule that satisfies the (4n + 2) π-electron rule and consists of benzene rings. Doping solid aromatic hydrocarbons with metals provides the superconductivity. The first discovery of such superconductivity was made for K-doped picene (K{sub x}picene, five benzene rings). Its superconducting transition temperatures (T{sub c}’s) were 7 and 18 K. Recently, we found a new superconducting K{sub x}picene phase with a T{sub c} as high as 14 K, so we now know that K{sub x}picene possesses multiple superconducting phases. Besides K{sub x}picene, we discovered new superconductors such as Rb{sub x}picene and Ca{sub x}picene. A most serious problem is that the shielding fraction is ⩽15% for K{sub x}picene and Rb{sub x}picene, and it is often ∼1% for other superconductors. Such low shielding fractions have made it difficult to determine the crystal structures of superconducting phases. Nevertheless, many research groups have expended a great deal of effort to make high quality hydrocarbon superconductors in the five years since the discovery of hydrocarbon superconductivity. At the present stage, superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons (picene, phenanthrene and dibenzopentacene), but the shielding fraction remains stubbornly low. The highest priority research area is to prepare aromatic superconductors with a high superconducting volume-fraction. Despite these difficulties, aromatic superconductivity is still a core research target and presents interesting and potentially breakthrough challenges, such as the positive pressure dependence of T{sub c} that is clearly

  7. Dynamics of an Electrodynamic Tether System in a Varying Space-Plasma Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Janeski, John

    2013-01-01

    Electrodynamic tethers have a wide range of proposed applications in the fields of satellite propulsion and space plasma research. The fundamental purpose of this dissertation is to improve the understanding of the behavior of an electrodynamic tether (EDT) system in Earth's ionosphere. An electrodynamic tether system consists of two satellites connected by a long tether that generates current to produce either power or thrust via the system's electromagnetic interaction with the space envir...

  8. Dynamics of multi-tethered pyramidal satellite formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alary, D.; Andreev, K.; Boyko, P.; Ivanova, E.; Pritykin, D.; Sidorenko, V.; Tourneur, C.; Yarotsky, D.

    2015-12-01

    This paper is devoted to the dynamics of a multi-tethered pyramidal satellite formation rotating about its axis of symmetry in the nominal mode. Whereas the combination of rotation and gravity-gradient forces is insufficient to maintain the mutual positions of satellites, they are assumed to be equipped with low-thrust rocket engines. We propose a control strategy that allows the stabilization of the nominal spin state and demonstrate the system's proper operation by numerically simulating its controlled motion. The discussed multi-tethered formations could be employed, for example, to provide co-location of several satellites at a slot in geostationary orbit.

  9. Dihydrodiol dehydrogenase and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smithgall, T.E.

    1986-01-01

    Carcinogenic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by microsomal monoxygenases proceeds through trans-dihydrodiol metabolites to diol-epoxide ultimate carcinogens. This thesis directly investigated the role of dihydrodiol dehydrogenase, a cytosolic NAD(P)-linked oxidoreductase, in the detoxification of polycyclic aromatic trans-dihydrodiols. A wide variety of non-K-region trans-dihydrodiols were synthesized and shown to be substrates for the homogeneous rat liver dehydrogenase, including several potent proximate carcinogens derived from 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene, 5-methylchrysene, and benzo(a)pyrene. Since microsomal activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is highly stereospecific, the stereochemical course of enzymatic trans-dihydrodiol oxidation was monitored using circular dichroism spectropolarimetry. The major product formed from the dehydrogenase-catalyzed oxidation of the trans-1,2-dihydrodiol of naphthalene was characterized using UV, IR, NMR, and mass spectroscopy, and appears to be 4-hydroxy-1,2-naphthoquinone. Mass spectral analysis suggests that an analogous hydroxylated o-quinone is formed as the major product of benzo(a)pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol oxidation. Enzymatic oxidation of trans-dihydrodiols was shown to be potently inhibited by all of the major classes of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. Enhancement of trans-dihydrodiol proximate carcinogen oxidation may protect against possible adverse effects of the aspirin-like drugs, and help maintain the balance between activation and detoxification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  10. Optimal Trajectories for Tethered Kite Mounted on a Vertical Axis Generator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, P.; Lansdorp, B.; Ockels, W.

    2007-01-01

    Tethered kite technology promises the enable the efficient extraction of energy from high altitude winds. One possible concept for converting the wind energy into electricity is to generate useful work at the ground by using a tether. The tether is able to drive a generator in one of two ways: eithe

  11. Nonlinear Control of Electrodynamic Tether in Equatorial or Somewhat Inclined Orbits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin Birkelund; Blanke, Mogens

    2007-01-01

    This paper applies different control design methods to a tethered satellite system (TSS) to investigate essential control properties of this under-actuated and nonlinear system. When the tether position in the orbit plane is controlled by the tether current, out of orbit plane motions occur as an...

  12. Efficient Access to Chiral Benzhydrols via Asymmetric Transfer Hydrogenation of Unsymmetrical Benzophenones with Bifunctional Oxo-Tethered Ruthenium Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touge, Taichiro; Nara, Hideki; Fujiwhara, Mitsuhiko; Kayaki, Yoshihito; Ikariya, Takao

    2016-08-17

    A concise asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of diaryl ketones, promoted by bifunctional Ru complexes with an etherial linkage between 1,2-diphenylethylenediamine (DPEN) and η(6)-arene ligands, was successfully developed. Because of the effective discrimination of substituents at the ortho position on the aryl group, unsymmetrical benzophenones were smoothly reduced in a 5:2 mixture of formic acid and triethylamine with an unprecedented level of excellent enantioselectivity. For the non-ortho-substituted benzophenones, the oxo-tethered catalyst electronically discerned biased substrates, resulting in attractive performance yielding chiral diarylmethanols with >99% ee. PMID:27463264

  13. Dynamics and control of the tether elevator/crawler system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzini, E. C.; Cosmo, M.; Vetrella, S.; Moccia, A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper investigates the dynamics and acceleration levels of a new tethered system for micro- and variable-gravity applications. The system consists of two platforms tethered on opposite sides to the Space Station. A fourth platform, the elevator, is placed in between the Space Station and the upper platform. Variable-g levels on board the elevator are obtained by moving this facility along the upper tether, while microgravity experiments are carried out on board the Space Station. By controlling the length of the lower tether the position of the system center of mass can be maintained on board the Space Station despite variations of the system's distribution of mass. The paper illustrates the mathematical model, the environmental perturbations and the control techniques which have been adopted for the simulation and control of the system dynamics. Two sets of results from two different simulation runs are shown. The first set shows the system dynamics and the acceleration spectra on board the Space Station and the elevator during station-keeping. The second set of results demonstrates the capability of the elevator to attain a preselected g-level.

  14. Sounding rocket experiment of bare electrodynamic tether system

    OpenAIRE

    Fujii, Hironori; Watanabe, Takeo; Kojima, Hirohisa; Kusagaya, Tairo; Oyama, Koh-ichiro; Yamagiwa, Yoshiki; Ohtsu, Hirotaka; Cho, Mengu; Sasaki, Susumu; Tanaka, Koji; Williams, John; Rubin, Binyamin; Les Jhonson, Charles; Khazanov, George; Sanmartín Losada, Juan Ramón

    2009-01-01

    An overview of asounding rocket S-520-25th, project on space tether technology experiment is presented.The project is prepared by an international research group consisting of Japanese,European,American,andAustralianresearchers.The sounding rocket will be assembled by the ISAS/JAXA and will be launched in the summer of 2009.

  15. Sliding mode control of electromagnetic tethered satellite formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallaj, Mohammad Amin Alandi; Assadian, Nima

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigates the control of tethered satellite formation actuated by electromagnetic dipoles and reaction wheels using the robust sliding mode control technique. Generating electromagnetic forces and moments by electric current coils provides an attractive control actuation alternative for tethered satellite system due to the advantages of no propellant consumption and no obligatory rotational motion. Based on a dumbbell model of tethered satellite in which the flexibility and mass of the tether is neglected, the equations of motion in Cartesian coordinate are derived. In this model, the J2 perturbation is taken into account. The far-field and mid-field models of electromagnetic forces and moments of two satellites on each other and the effect of the Earth's magnetic field are presented. A robust sliding mode controller is designed for precise trajectory tracking purposes and to deal with the electromagnetic force and moment uncertainties and external disturbances due to the Earth's gravitational and magnetic fields inaccuracy. Numerical simulation results are presented to validate the effectiveness of the developed controller and its superiority over the linear controller.

  16. Tether de-orbiting of satellites at end of mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanmartin, Juan R.; Sánchez-Torres, Antonio

    2012-07-01

    The accumulation of space debris around the Earth has become critical for Space security. The BETs project, financed by the European Commission through its FP7-Space program, is focusing on preventing generation of new debris by de-orbiting satellites at end of mission. The de-orbiting system considered, involving an electrodynamic bare tape-tether, uses no propellant and no power supply, while generating power for on-board use during de-orbiting. As an example, preliminary results are here presented on a specific orbit/satellite case: 1300 km altitude and 65 degrees inclination, and 500 kg mass. Design tether dimensions are 8 km length, 1.5 cm width, and 0.05 mm thickness; subsystem masses are limited to twice tether mass. Simple calculations, using orbit-averaging, solar mid-cycle phase, and ionospheric and geomagnetic field models, yield 2.6 months time for de-orbiting down to 200 km, with a probability of about 1 percent of debris cutting the tape. References: Sanmartin, J.R., Lorenzini, E.C., and Martinez-Sanchez, M., Electrodynamic Tether Applications and Constraints, J. Space. Rockets 47, 442-456, 2010. Sanmartin, J.R. et al., A universal system to de-orbit satellites at end of life, Journal of Space Technology and Science, to appear.

  17. Position Control of an X4-Flyer Using a Tether

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    , Keigo Watanabe

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In Japan, aging of infrastructures, such as roads, bridges, and water and sewer services, etc. poses a problem, and it is required to extend the life-span of such infrastructures by maintenance. Among infrastructures, especially bridges are periodically inspected by short range visual observations, which check the damage and deterioration of the surface. However, since there are some cases where the short range visual observation is difficult, an alternative method is required so as to replace the short range visual observation with it. So, "X4-Flyer" is very attractive because of realizing a movement at high altitude easily. The objective of this study is to develop a tethered X4- Flyer, so that the conventional short range visual observation of bridges is replaced by it. In this paper, a method for the measurement and control of the position is described by using a tether for controlling the position of the X4-Flyer. In addition, it is checked whether the tethered X4-Flyer can control the position using the proposed method or not, letting it fly in a state in which a tether is being attached.

  18. Balloon Launched on Multiwall Carbon Nanotube Tether in Antarctica

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kletetschka, Günther; McKinney, E.; Kawasumiova, D.

    Cambridge: University of Cambridge, 2011. s. 1-1. [NT international Conference on the Science and Application of Nanotubes /11./. 10.07.2011-16.07.2011, Cambridge] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : MWCNT * fibres * tether * strength * Antarctica Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  19. Hierarchical Structure in Semicrystalline Polymers Tethered to Nanospheres

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Sung A

    2014-01-28

    We report on structural and dynamic transitions of polymers tethered to nanoparticles. In particular, we use X-ray diffraction, vibrational spectroscopy, and thermal measurements to investigate multiscale structure and dynamic transitions of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chains densely grafted to SiO2 nanoparticles. The approach used for synthesizing these hybrid particles leads to homogeneous SiO2-PEG composites with polymer grafting densities as high as 1.5 chains/nm2, which allows the hybrid materials to exist as self-suspended suspensions with distinct hierarchical structure and thermal properties. On angstrom and nanometer length scales, the tethered PEG chains exhibit more dominant TTG conformations and helix unit cell structure, in comparison to the untethered polymer. The nanoparticle tethered PEG chains are also reported to form extended crystallites on tens of nanometers length scales and to exhibit more stable crystalline structure on small dimensions. On length scales comparable to the size of each hybrid SiO 2-PEG unit, the materials are amorphous presumably as a result of the difficulty fitting the nanoparticle anchors into the PEG crystal lattice. This structural change produces large effects on the thermal transitions of PEG molecules tethered to nanoparticles. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  20. Fortissimo: A Japanese Space Test Of Bare Wire Anode Tethers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Les; Fujii, H. A.; Sanmartin, J. R.

    2008-01-01

    A Japanese led international team is developing a suborbital test of orbital-motion-limited (OML) bare wire anode current collection for application to electrodynamic tether (EDT) propulsion. The tether is a tape with a width of 25 mm, thickness of 0.05 mm, and is 300 m in length. This will be the first space test of OML theory. The mission will launch in the summer of 2009 using an S520 Sounding Rocket. During ascent, and above approx. 100 km in attitude, the tape tether will be deployed at a rate of approx. 8 m/s. Once deployed, the tape tether will serve as an anode, collecting ionospheric electrons. The electrons will be expelled into space by a hollow cathode device, thereby completing the circuit and allowing current to flow. The total amount of current collected will be used to assess the validity of OML theory. This paper will describe the objectives of the proposed mission, the technologies to be employed, and the application of the results to future space missions using EDTs for propulsion or power generation.

  1. T-Rex: A Japanese Space Tether Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Les

    2009-01-01

    Electrodynamic tether (EDT) thrusters work by virtue of the force a magnetic field exerts on a wire carrying an electrical current. The force, which acts on any charged particle moving through a magnetic field (including the electrons moving in a current-carrying wire), were concisely expressed by Lorentz in 1895 in an equation that now bears his name. The force acts in a direction perpendicular to both the direction of current flow and the magnetic field vector. Electric motors make use of this force: a wire loop in a magnetic field is made to rotate by the torque the Lorentz Force exerts on it due to an alternating current in the loop times so as to keep the torque acting in the same sense. The motion of the loop is transmitted to a shaft, thus providing work. Although the working principle of EDT thrusters is not new, its application to space transportation may be significant. In essence, an EDT thruster is just a clever way of getting an electrical current to flow in a long orbiting wire (the tether) so that the Earth s magnetic field will accelerate the wire and, consequently the payload attached to the wire. The direction of current flow in the tether, either toward or away from the Earth along the local vertical, determines whether the magnetic force will raise or lower the orbit. The bias voltage of a vertically deployed metal tether, which results just from its orbital motion (assumed eastward) through Earth s magnetic field, is positive with respect to the ambient plasma at the top and negative at the bottom. This polarization is due to the action of the Lorentz force on the electrons in the tether. Thus, the natural current flow is the result of negative electrons being attracted to the upper end and then returned to the plasma at the lower end. The magnetic force in this case has a component opposite to the direction of motion, and thus leads to a lowering of the orbit and eventually to re-entry. In this generator mode of operation the Lorentz Force

  2. Modeling and Control of Electrodynamic Tethers - an Energy and Topology Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Martin Birkelund; Blanke, Mogens

    2010-01-01

    A space tether is a cable used to connect spacecrafts in an orbiting structure. If an electrical current is lead through the tether, it can be utilized to provide propulsion for the spacecraft. In this case the cable is referred to as an electrodynamic tether. The system utilizes the magnetic field of the Earth for creating a Lorentz force along the tether which occur when a current carrying wire operates in a magnetic field. The use of electrodynamic tethers are interesting since they operat...

  3. Efficient iodination of aromatic compounds using potassium ferrate supported on montmorillonite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hoda Keipour; Mohammad A. Khalilzadeh; Bita Mohtat; Abolfazl Hosseini; Daryoush Zareyee

    2011-01-01

    Potassium ferrate impregnated on montmorillonite is a mild, cheap, and non-toxic reagent for the iodination of phenols, including naphthol, aromatic amines, and heterocyclic substrates in fair to excellent yields by a simple isolation procedure.

  4. Modelling a tethered mammalian sperm cell undergoing hyperactivation

    KAUST Repository

    Curtis, M.P.

    2012-09-01

    The beat patterns of mammalian sperm flagella can be categorised into two different types. The first involves symmetric waves propagating down the flagellum with a net linear propulsion of the sperm cell. The second, hyperactive, waveform is classified by vigorous asymmetric waves of higher amplitude, lower wavenumber and frequency propagating down the flagellum resulting in highly curved trajectories. The latter beat pattern is part of the capacitation process whereby sperm prepare for the prospective penetration of the zona pellucida and fusion with the egg. Hyperactivation is often observed to initiate as sperm escape from epithelial and ciliary bindings formed within the isthmic regions of the female oviducts, leading to a conjecture in the literature that this waveform is mechanically important for sperm escape. Hence, we explore the mechanical effects of hyperactivation on a tethered sperm, focussing on a Newtonian fluid. Using a resistive force theory model we demonstrate that hyperactivation can indeed generate forces that pull the sperm away from a tethering point and consequently a hyperactivated sperm cell bound to an epithelial surface need not always be pushed by its flagellum. More generally, directions of the forces generated by tethered flagella are insensitive to reductions in beat frequency and the detailed flagellar responses depend on the nature of the binding at the tethering point. Furthermore, waveform asymmetry and amplitude increases enhance the tendency for a tethered flagellum to start tugging on its binding. The same is generally predicted to be true for reductions in the wavenumber of the flagellum beat, but not universally so, emphasising the dynamical complexity of flagellar force generation. Finally, qualitative observations drawn from experimental data of human sperm bound to excised female reproductive tract are also presented and are found to be consistent with the theoretical predictions. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Relaxation Dynamics of Nanoparticle-Tethered Polymer Chains

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Sung A

    2015-09-08

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Relaxation dynamics of nanoparticle-tethered cis-1,4-polyisoprene (PI) are investigated using dielectric spectroscopy and rheometry. A model system composed of polymer chains densely grafted to spherical SiO2 nanoparticles to form self-suspended suspensions facilitates detailed studies of slow global chain and fast segmental mode dynamics under surface and geometrical confinement-from experiments performed in bulk materials. We report that unentangled polymer molecules tethered to nanoparticles relax far more slowly than their tethered entangled counterparts. Specifically, at fixed grafting density we find, counterintuitively, that increasing the tethered polymer molecular weight up to values close to the entanglement molecular weight speeds up chain relaxation dynamics. Decreasing the polymer grafting density for a fixed molecular weight has the opposite effect: it dramatically slows down chain relaxation, increases interchain coupling, and leads to a transition in rheological response from simple fluid behavior to viscoelastic fluid behavior for tethered PI chains that are unentangled by conventional measures. Increasing the measurement temperature produces an even stronger elastic response and speeds up molecular relaxation at a rate that decreases with grafting density and molecular weight. These observations are discussed in terms of chain confinement driven by crowding between particles and by the existence of an entropic attractive force produced by the space-filling constraint on individual chains in a self-suspended material. Our results indicate that the entropic force between densely grafted polymer molecules couples motions of individual chains in an analogous manner to reversible cross-links in associating polymers.

  6. Autonomous Vision-Based Tethered-Assisted Rover Docking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Dorian; Nesnas, Issa A.D.; Zarzhitsky, Dimitri

    2013-01-01

    Many intriguing science discoveries on planetary surfaces, such as the seasonal flows on crater walls and skylight entrances to lava tubes, are at sites that are currently inaccessible to state-of-the-art rovers. The in situ exploration of such sites is likely to require a tethered platform both for mechanical support and for providing power and communication. Mother/daughter architectures have been investigated where a mother deploys a tethered daughter into extreme terrains. Deploying and retracting a tethered daughter requires undocking and re-docking of the daughter to the mother, with the latter being the challenging part. In this paper, we describe a vision-based tether-assisted algorithm for the autonomous re-docking of a daughter to its mother following an extreme terrain excursion. The algorithm uses fiducials mounted on the mother to improve the reliability and accuracy of estimating the pose of the mother relative to the daughter. The tether that is anchored by the mother helps the docking process and increases the system's tolerance to pose uncertainties by mechanically aligning the mating parts in the final docking phase. A preliminary version of the algorithm was developed and field-tested on the Axel rover in the JPL Mars Yard. The algorithm achieved an 80% success rate in 40 experiments in both firm and loose soils and starting from up to 6 m away at up to 40 deg radial angle and 20 deg relative heading. The algorithm does not rely on an initial estimate of the relative pose. The preliminary results are promising and help retire the risk associated with the autonomous docking process enabling consideration in future martian and lunar missions.

  7. SPHERES tethered formation flight testbed: advancements in enabling NASA's SPECS mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Soon-Jo; Adams, Danielle; Saenz-Otero, Alvar; Kong, Edmund; Miller, David W.; Leisawitz, David; Lorenzini, Enrico; Sell, Steve

    2006-06-01

    This paper reports on efforts to control a tethered formation flight spacecraft array for NASA's SPECS mission using the SPHERES test-bed developed by the MIT Space Systems Laboratory. Specifically, advances in methodology and experimental results realized since the 2005 SPIE paper are emphasized. These include a new test-bed setup with a reaction wheel assembly, a novel relative attitude measurement system using force torque sensors, and modeling of non-ideal tethers to account for tether vibration modes. The nonlinear equations of motion of multi-vehicle tethered spacecraft with elastic flexible tethers are derived from Lagrange's equations. The controllability analysis indicates that both array resizing and spin-up are fully controllable by the reaction wheels and the tether motor, thereby saving thruster fuel consumption. Based upon this analysis, linear and nonlinear controllers have been successfully implemented on the tethered SPHERES testbed, and tested at the NASA MSFC's flat floor facility using two and three SPHERES configurations.

  8. Tether-mission design for multiple flybys of moon Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanmartin, J. R. S.; Charro, M. C.; Sanchez-Arriaga, G. S. A.; Sanchez-Torres, A. S. T.

    2015-10-01

    A tether mission to carry out multiple flybys of Jovian moon Europa is here presented. There is general agreement on elliptic-orbit flybys of Europa resulting in cost to attain given scientific goals lower than if actually orbiting the moon, tethers being naturally fit to fly-by rather than orbit moons1. The present mission is similar in this respect to the Clipper mission considered by NASA, the basic difference lying in location of periapsis, due to different emphasis on mission-challenge metrics. Clipper minimizes damaging radiation-dose by avoiding the Jupiter neighborhood and its very harsh environment; periapsis would be at Europa, apoapsis as far as moon Callisto. As in all past outer-planet missions, Clipper faces, however, critical power and propulsion needs. On the other hand, tethers can provide both propulsion and power, but must reach near the planet to find high plasma density and magnetic field values, leading to high induced tether current, and Lorentz drag and power. The bottom line is a strong radiation dose under the very intense Radiation Belts of Jupiter. Mission design focuses on limiting dose. Perijove would be near Jupiter, at about 1.2-1.3 Jovian radius, apojove about moon Ganymede, corresponding to 1:1 resonance with Europa, so as to keep dose down: setting apojove at Europa, for convenient parallel flybys, would require two perijove passes per flyby (the Ganymede apojove, resulting in high eccentricity, about 0.86, is also less requiring on tether operations). Mission is designed to attain reductions in eccentricity per perijove pass as high as Δe ≈ - 0.04. Due the low gravity-gradient, tether spinning is necessary to keep it straight, plasma contactors placed at both ends taking active turns at being cathodic. Efficiency of capture of the incoming S/C by the tether is gauged by the ratio of S/C mass to tether mass; efficiency is higher for higher tape-tether length and lower thickness and perijove. Low tether bowing due to the Lorentz

  9. Substrate influence on the frying process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pokorny, J.

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available The substrate affects frying oil in different ways during the frying. Water is released from the substrate, which is converted into steam and participates in hydrolytical processes of frying fats. The transfer of fat into the substrate and from the substrate into frying fat depends on the fat content in the substrate and on the frying conditions. Other, more polar substances than triacylglycerols, including pigments and their precursors, pass in frying oil. Oxidation processes in frying oil are inhibited by the substrate, especially by proteins, starch or phenolic substances. Mutagenic polycyclic aromatic heterocycles are produced during the interaction of frying fat and protein. Oxidation products are bound to proteins and other components of the substrate. Flavour substances are produced by reactions of oxidized frying oil with proteins and other sulphur and nitrogen substances in the substrate.

  10. Preliminary Orbit Determination of a Tethered Satellite Using the p-Iteration Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicci, D. A.; Qualls, C.

    2016-04-01

    The possibility of the future deployment of tethered satellites has created a need for a preliminary orbit determination method capable of determining whether or not a satellite is tethered to another satellite. Classical preliminary orbit determination methods, which are used for untethered satellites, typically require two or more position vectors along with their respective observation times in order to determine a preliminary orbital element set. However, these conventional methods can't distinguish between an untethered satellite and a tethered one, whose motion is modified due to the presence of a tether force. The use of conventional methods on a satellite which is part of a tethered satellite system will result in the calculation of inaccurate orbital elements. Modifications have been made to the p-iteration preliminary orbit determination method in order to allow for the identification of these tethered satellites. The modifications allow for the calculation of a modified gravitational parameter, which can be used to distinguish between a tethered satellite and an untethered one. This paper applies this modified p-iteration method to the problem of the quick identification of a tethered satellite. The performance of this method is evaluated through scenarios of differing tether lengths, levels of observation error, and orbital eccentricities. Due to the need for the preliminary orbit determination to be achieved quickly, only short time intervals between observations were considered. The manner in which this preliminary orbit information can be used to obtain tether parameters for the subsequent differential correction process is also described.

  11. Advances in dynamics and control of tethered satellite systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Wen; Dongping P. Jin; Haiyan Y. Hu

    2008-01-01

    The concept of tethered satellite system (TSS) promises to revolutionize many aspects of space exploration and exploitation. It provides not only numerous possible and valuable applications, but also challenging and interesting problems related to their dynamics, control, and physical implementation. Over the past decades, this exciting topic has attracted significant attention from many researchers and gained a vast number of analytical, numerical and experimental achievements with a focus on the two essential aspects of both dynamics and control. This review article presents the historic background and recent hot topics for the space tethers, and introduces the dynamics and control of TSSs in a progressive manner, from basic operating principles to the state-of-the-art achievements.

  12. Tethered elevator: A unique opportunity for space processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, R.

    1986-01-01

    The latest fluid dynamic and material science experiments in the microgravity environment have emphasized the importance of the residual gravity level and of the g-jitter on fluid physics phenomena. The tethered elevator presents the possibility of providing variable g-levels (both steady and g-jitter) around a very low steady g-level (that can be realized when the elevator is near the center of mass of the space station-tether complex). When positioning a variable periodic oscillation to the payload a clean g-jitter disturbance can be obtained that would not be otherwise obtainable by other systems. These two possibilities make the elevator a facility to help resolve a number of still open questions that are preventing wider utilization of the space environment in the microgravity area.

  13. Electrodynamic tethers for exploration of jupiter and its icy moons

    OpenAIRE

    Sanmartín Losada, Juan Ramón

    2006-01-01

    Use of electrodynamic bare tethers in exploring the Jovian system by tapping its rotational energy for power and propulsion is studied. The position of perijove and apojove in elliptical orbits, relative to the synchronous orbit at 2.24 times Jupiter’s radius, is exploited to conveniently make the induced Lorentz force to be drag or thrust, while generating power, and navigating the system. Capture and evolution to a low elliptical orbit near Jupiter, and capture into low circular orbits at m...

  14. Chemical tethering of motile bacteria to silicon surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Bearinger, Jane P.; Dugan, Lawrence C.; Wu, Ligang; Hill, Haley; Christian, Allen T.; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.

    2009-01-01

    We chemically immobilized live, motile Escherichia coli on micrometer-scale, photocatalytically patterned silicon surfaces via amine- and carboxylic acid–based chemistries. Immobilization facilitated (i) controlled positioning; (ii) high resolution cell wall imaging via atomic force microscopy (AFM); and (iii) chemical analysis with time-of-flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Spinning motion of tethered bacteria, captured with fast-acquisition video, proved microbe viability. W...

  15. Effect of Chromosome Tethering on Nuclear Organization in Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Avşaroğlu, Barış; Bronk, Gabriel; Gordon-Messer, Susannah; Ham, Jungoh; Bressan, Debra A.; Haber, James E; Kondev, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Interphase chromosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are tethered to the nuclear envelope at their telomeres and to the spindle pole body (SPB) at their centromeres. Using a polymer model of yeast chromosomes that includes these interactions, we show theoretically that telomere attachment to the nuclear envelope is a major determinant of gene positioning within the nucleus only for genes within 10 kb of the telomeres. We test this prediction by measuring the distance between the SPB and the sil...

  16. Crowded, Confined, and Frustrated: Dynamics of Molecules Tethered to Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Agarwal, Praveen

    2012-12-01

    Above a critical chemistry-dependent molecular weight, all polymer molecules entangle and, as a result, exhibit slow dynamics, enhanced viscosity, and elasticity. Herein we report on the dynamics of low molecular weight polymers tethered to nanoparticles and find that even conventionally unentangled chains manifest dynamical features similar to entangled, long-chain molecules. Our findings are shown to imply that crowding and confinement of polymers on particles produce topological constraints analogous to those in entangled systems. © 2012 American Physical Society.

  17. Aromatic stacking between nucleobase and enzyme promotes phosphate ester hydrolysis in dUTPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecsi, Ildiko; Leveles, Ibolya; Harmat, Veronika; Vertessy, Beata G; Toth, Judit

    2010-11-01

    Aromatic interactions are well-known players in molecular recognition but their catalytic role in biological systems is less documented. Here, we report that a conserved aromatic stacking interaction between dUTPase and its nucleotide substrate largely contributes to the stabilization of the associative type transition state of the nucleotide hydrolysis reaction. The effect of the aromatic stacking on catalysis is peculiar in that uracil, the aromatic moiety influenced by the aromatic interaction is relatively distant from the site of hydrolysis at the alpha-phosphate group. Using crystallographic, kinetics, optical spectroscopy and thermodynamics calculation approaches we delineate a possible mechanism by which rate acceleration is achieved through the remote π-π interaction. The abundance of similarly positioned aromatic interactions in various nucleotide hydrolyzing enzymes (e.g. most families of ATPases) raises the possibility of the reported phenomenon being a general component of the enzymatic catalysis of phosphate ester hydrolysis. PMID:20601405

  18. Investigation of force approximations in tethered cells simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Zakrisson, Johan; Axner, Ove; Andersson, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Simulations of tethered cells in viscous sub-layers are frequently performed using the Stokes drag force, but without taking into account contributions from surface corrections, lift forces, buoyancy, the Basset force, the cells finite inertia, or added mass. In this work, we investigate to which extent such contributions influence, under a variety of hydrodynamic conditions, the force at the anchor point of a tethered cell and the survival probability of a bacterium that is attached to a host by either a slip or a catch bond via a tether with a few different biomechanical properties. We show that a consequence of not including some of these contributions is that the force to which a bond is exposed can be significantly underestimated; in general by ~32-46 %, where the influence of the surface corrections dominate (the parallel and normal correction coefficients contribute with ~5-8 or 23-26 %, respectively). The Basset force is a major contributor, up to 20 %, for larger cells and shear rates. The lift force...

  19. Surfactant mediated morphological tethering of Cu2O nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This communication describes a very simple and reproducible methodology to study the self-assembly of nanoparticles functionalized with a non-ionic tethering agent attached to the surface of the nanoparticle seeds. The synthesis starts with the [Cu(OH)4]2− species acting as a template, with varying concentration of the tethering agent Triton X-100 (TX100). The morphological alteration is systematically investigated. The effect of surfactant micelles, growth reaction time, and solution temperature has a tremendous impact on the morphology of the nanocrystals that govern the controlled synthesis of different shapes of nanostructures. The initial morphology of the nanocrystals is polyhedron in the absence of a tethering additive. The addition of TX100 suppresses the polymorph phase morphology and enhances the non-uniform spherical morphology of the nanocrystals. The surface modification effect enhances the morphological alteration, which potentially makes it applicable to various industrial uses such as water cleaning, hydrogen production, and third-generation solar cells. (paper)

  20. [Methanogenic destruction of (amino)aromatic compounds by anaerobic microbial communities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin'kova, Iu V; D'iakonova, A T; Gladchenko, M A; Kaliuzhnyĭ, S A; Kotova, I B; Stams, A; Netrusov, A I

    2011-01-01

    Destruction of a number of aromatic substrates by anaerobic microbial communities was studied. Active methanogenic microbial communities decomposing aminoaromatic acids and azo dyes into CH4 and CO2 were isolated. Products of primary conversion were found to be 2-hydroxybenzyl and benzyl alcohols gradually transforming into benzoate. It was shown that isolated microbial communities are capable of converting the initial substrates--benzyl alcohol, benzoate, salicylic acid, and golden yellow azo dye--into biogas without a lag-phase but with different velocities. Aromatic and linear intermediates of biodestruction of aromatic amines by obtained enrichment cultures were determined for the first time. Selective effect of aromatic substrates on a microbial community that was expressed in decrease in diversity and gradual change of dominant morphotypes was revealed. PMID:22232897

  1. Polyimidazoles via aromatic nucleophilic displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Polyimidazoles (PI) are prepared by the aromatic nucleophilic displacement reaction of di(hydroxyphenyl) imidazole monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or activated aromatic dinitro compounds. The reactions are carried out in polar aprotic solvents such as N,N-dimethyl acetamide, sulfolane, N-methylpyrrolidinone, dimethylsulfoxide, or diphenylsulfone using alkali metal bases such as potassium carbonate at elevated temperatures under nitrogen. The di(hydroxyphenyl) imidazole monomers are prepared by reacting an aromatic aldehyde with a dimethoxybenzil or by reacting an aromatic dialdehyde with a methoxybenzil in the presence of ammonium acetate. The di(methoxyphenyl) imidazole is subsequently treated with aqueous hydrobromic acid to give the di(hydroxphenyl) imidazole monomer. This synthetic route has provided high molecular weight PI of new chemical structure, is economically and synthetically more favorable than other routes, and allows for facile chemical structure variation due to the availability of a large variety of activated aromatic dihalides and dinitro compounds.

  2. Method of Deployment of a Space Tethered System Aligned to the Local Vertical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrzhevskii, A. E.

    2016-04-01

    The object of this research is a space tether of two bodies connected by a flexible massless string. The research objective is the development and theoretical justification of a novel approach to the solution of the problem of deployment of the space tether in a circular orbit with its alignment to the local vertical. The approach is based on use of the theorem on the angular momentum change. It allows developing the open-loop control of the tether length that provides desired change of the angular momentum of the tether under the effect of the gravitational torque to the value, which corresponds to the angular momentum of the deployed tether aligned to the local vertical. The given example of application of the approach to a case of deployment of a tether demonstrates the simplicity of use of the method in practice, and also the method of validation of the mathematical model.

  3. Modeling of induced currents from electrodynamic tethers in a laboratory plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia, J. M.; Stenzel, R. L.

    1990-01-01

    The presently accepted picture of the current path for electrodynamic tethers envisions a quasi-dc current flow in a 'phantom loop' consisting of the tether, two field-aligned current channels into the ionosphere and a cross-field closing current in the E-layer. Predictions are made on the establishment and maintenance of a current loop in space based on observations of time-dependent currents between tethered electrodes in a large laboratory magnetoplasma. In addition to radiation from the contactors ('whistler wings'), the insulated tether is observed to emit waves (a 'whistler wedge'). The 'wedge' provides closure during loop formation by carrying cross-field polarization currents. Whistler spread within the ray cone leads to overlapping of the current wings not far from the tether hence minimizing the role of the ionospheric closure. Maintenance of the loop requires the continuous emission of whistler waves by the entire tether thereby providing severe radiation losses.

  4. Membrane tether formation from voltage-clamped outer hair cells using optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Feng; Ermilov, Sergey A.; Murdock, David R.; Brownell, William E.; Anvari, Bahman

    2004-06-01

    Outer hair cells contribute an active mechanical feedback to the vibrations of the cochlear structures resulting in the high sensitivity and frequency selectivity of normal hearing. We have designed and implemented a novel experimental setup that combines optical tweezers with patch-clamp apparatus to investigate the electromechanical properties of cellular plasma membranes. A micron-size bead trapped by the optical tweezers is brought in contact with the membrane of a voltage-clamped cell, and subsequently moved away to form a plasma membrane tether. Bead displacement during tether elongation is monitored by a quadrant photodetector to obtain time-resolved measurements of the tethering force. Salient information associated with the mechanical properties of the membrane tether can thus be obtained. Tethers can be pulled from the cell membrane at different holding potentials, and the tether force response can be measured while changing transmembrane potential. Experimental results from outer hair cells and human embryonic kidney cells are presented.

  5. Dynamics of a Tether System Connected to an Irregularly Shaped Celestial Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalali Mashayekhi, Mohammad; K. Misra, Arun; Keshmiri, Mehdi

    2016-04-01

    The problem of pendular oscillations of a tether attached to an irregularly shaped celestial body is studied in this paper. The dynamic analysis of the system is performed by examining the phase plane trajectories. The effect of the tether length as well as the higher order terms in the gravitational potential of the celestial body on the tether dynamics is investigated. It is demonstrated that consideration of the finite size of the celestial body can have significant effects on the tether dynamics, while the effect of the asphericity of the celestial body on the tether dynamics is negligible. This study is of practical relevance for asteroid deflection using tethers, as well as for the development of space elevators on small planets/moons.

  6. Fibrin Hydrogel Based Bone Substitute Tethered with BMP-2 and BMP-2/7 Heterodimers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay S. Karfeld-Sulzer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Current clinically used delivery methods for bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs are collagen based and require large concentrations that can lead to dangerous side effects. Fibrin hydrogels can serve as osteoinductive bone substitute materials in non-load bearing bone defects in combination with BMPs. Two strategies to even further optimize such a fibrin based system include employing more potent BMP heterodimers and engineering growth factors that can be covalently tethered to and slowly released from a fibrin matrix. Here we present an engineered BMP-2/BMP-7 heterodimer where an N-terminal transglutaminase substrate domain in the BMP-2 portion provides covalent attachment to fibrin together with a central plasmin substrate domain, a cleavage site for local release of the attached BMP-2/BMP-7 heterodimer under the influence of cell-activated plasmin. In vitro and in vivo results revealed that the engineered BMP-2/BMP-7 heterodimer induces significantly more alkaline phosphatase activity in pluripotent cells and bone formation in a rat calvarial model than the engineered BMP-2 homodimer. Therefore, the engineered BMP-2/BMP-7 heterodimer could be used to reduce the amount of BMP needed for clinical effect.

  7. Aromatic molecules as spintronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we study the spin-dependent electron transport through aromatic molecular chains attached to two semi-infinite leads. We model this system taking into account different geometrical configurations which are all characterized by a tight binding Hamiltonian. Based on the Green's function approach with a Landauer formalism, we find spin-dependent transport in short aromatic molecules by applying external magnetic fields. Additionally, we find that the magnetoresistance of aromatic molecules can reach different values, which are dependent on the variations in the applied magnetic field, length of the molecules, and the interactions between the contacts and the aromatic molecule

  8. Biomimicry Enhances Sequential Reactions of Tethered Glycolytic Enzymes, TPI and GAPDHS

    OpenAIRE

    Mukai, Chinatsu; Gao, Lizeng; Bergkvist, Magnus; Nelson, Jacquelyn L.; Hinchman, Meleana M.; Travis, Alexander J.

    2013-01-01

    Maintaining activity of enzymes tethered to solid interfaces remains a major challenge in developing hybrid organic-inorganic devices. In nature, mammalian spermatozoa have overcome this design challenge by having glycolytic enzymes with specialized targeting domains that enable them to function while tethered to a cytoskeletal element. As a step toward designing a hybrid organic-inorganic ATP-generating system, we implemented a biomimetic site-specific immobilization strategy to tether two g...

  9. Interaction of the Betapapillomavirus E2 Tethering Protein with Mitotic Chromosomes▿

    OpenAIRE

    Sekhar, Vandana; Reed, Shawna C.; Alison A McBride

    2009-01-01

    During persistent papillomavirus infection, the viral E2 protein tethers the viral genome to the host cell chromosomes, ensuring maintenance and segregation of the viral genome during cell division. However, E2 proteins from different papillomaviruses interact with distinct chromosomal regions and targets. The tethering mechanism has been best characterized for bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV1), where the E2 protein tethers the viral genome to mitotic chromosomes in complex with the cellula...

  10. Nonlinear Control of Electrodynamic Tether in Equatorial or Somewhat Inclined Orbits

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Martin Birkelund; Blanke, Mogens

    2007-01-01

    This paper applies different control design methods to a tethered satellite system (TSS) to investigate essential control properties of this under-actuated and nonlinear system. When the tether position in the orbit plane is controlled by the tether current, out of orbit plane motions occur as an unwanted side effect, due to nonlinear interaction with the Earth’s magnetic field. This paper focus on the uncontrollable out-of-plane motions and the robustness against B-field uncertainty associat...

  11. The design conception of multipurpose underwater tethered systems with centralized data exchange

    OpenAIRE

    Блінцов, Олександр Володимирович

    2013-01-01

    The structure and design features of a typical tethered underwater system are given. The design complexity, limitations on the installation of additional equipment and the need for the creation of multi-purpose tethered underwater systems are shown.Logic modules, of which almost all tethered underwater systems consist: actuating mechanisms and sensors of the underwater robotic vehicle, control and display devices of the control station, documenting devices, are singled out.The concept of crea...

  12. Complex crystal structures formed by the self assembly of di-tethered nanospheres

    OpenAIRE

    Iacovella, Christopher R.; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2009-01-01

    We report the results from a computational study of the self-assembly of amphiphilic di-tethered nanospheres using molecular simulation. As a function of the interaction strength and directionality of the tether-tether interactions, we predict the formation of four highly ordered phases not previously reported for nanoparticle systems. We find a double diamond structure comprised of a zincblende (binary diamond) arrangement of spherical micelles with a complementary diamond network of nanopar...

  13. Tethered elevator and platforms as space station facilities: Systems studies and demonstrative experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    Several key concepts of the science and applications tethered platforms were studied. Some conclusions reached are herein listed. Tether elevator and platform could improve the space station scientific and applicative capabilities. The space elevator presents unique characteristics as microgravity facility and as a tethered platform servicing vehicle. Pointing platforms could represent a new kind of observation facility for large class of payloads. The dynamical, control and technological complexity of these concepts advised demonstrative experiments. The on-going tethered satellite system offers the opportunity to perform such experiments. And feasibility studies are in progress.

  14. A proposed bare-tether experiment on board a sounding rocket

    OpenAIRE

    Fujii, Hironori A.; OYAMA, Koichiro; Sasaki, Susumu; Yamagiwa, Yoshiki; 藤井 裕矩; 小山 孝一郎; 佐々木 進; 山極 芳樹; Cho, Mengu; Sanmartin, Juan R.; Charro, Mario; VanderHeide, Erick J.; Kruijff, Michiel; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre

    2005-01-01

    A sounding rocket experiment is proposed to carry out two experiments by the conductive bare-tether; (1) the test of the OML (Orbital-Motion-Limited) theory to collect electron, and (2) the test of techniques to determine (neutral) density profile in critical E-layer. The main driver of the mission is provide a space tether technology experiment in Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) deploying a long tape tether in space and verify the performance of the bare electrodynamic tape tether. The sounding rocket...

  15. Configuration maintaining control of three-body ring tethered system based on thrust compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Panfeng; Liu, Binbin; Zhang, Fan

    2016-06-01

    Space multi-tethered systems have shown broad prospects in remote observation missions. This paper mainly focuses on the dynamics and configuration maintaining control of space spinning three-body ring tethered system for such mission. Firstly, we establish the spinning dynamic model of the three-body ring tethered system considering the elasticity of the tether using Newton-Euler method, and then validate the suitability of this model by numerical simulation. Subsequently, LP (Likins-Pringle) initial equilibrium conditions for the tethered system are derived based on rigid body's equilibrium theory. Simulation results show that tether slack, snapping and interaction between the tethers exist in the three-body ring system, and its' configuration can not be maintained without control. Finally, a control strategy based on thrust compensation, namely thrust to simulate tether compression under LP initial equilibrium conditions is designed to solve the configuration maintaining control problem. Control effects are verified by numerical simulation compared with uncontrolled situation. Simulation results show that the configuration of the three-body ring tethered system could maintain under this active control strategy.

  16. Nonlinear dynamics and coupling effect of libration and vibration of tethered space robot in deorbiting process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王班; 郭吉丰; 冯吉根; 王剑

    2016-01-01

    In order to control the growth of space debris, a novel tethered space robot (TSR) was put forward. After capture,the platform, tether, and target constituted a tethered combination system. General nonlinear dynamics of the tethered combination system in the post-capture phase was established with the consideration of the attitudes of two spacecrafts and the quadratic nonlinear elasticity of the tether. The motion law of the tethered combination in the deorbiting process with different disturbances was simulated and discussed on the premise that the platform was only controlled by a constant thrust force. It is known that the four motion freedoms of the tethered combination are coupled with each other in the deorbiting process from the simulation results. A noticeable phenomenon is that the tether longitudinal vibration does not decay to vanish even under the large tether damping with initial attitude disturbances due to the coupling effect. The approximate analytical solutions of the dynamics for a simplified model are obtained through the perturbation method. The condition of the inter resonance phenomenon is the frequency ratioλ1=2. The case study shows good accordance between the analytical solutions and numerical results, indicating the effectiveness and correctness of approximate analytical solutions.

  17. "Carbo-aromaticity" and novel carbo-aromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocq, Kévin; Lepetit, Christine; Maraval, Valérie; Chauvin, Remi

    2015-09-21

    While the concept of aromaticity is being more and more precisely delineated, the category of "aromatic compounds" is being more and more expanded. This is illustrated by an introductory highlight of the various types of "aromaticity" previously invoked, and by a focus on the recently proposed "aromatic character" of the "two-membered rings" of the acetylene and butatriene molecules. This serves as a general foundation for the definition of "carbo-aromaticity", the relevance of which is surveyed through recent results in the synthetic, physical, and theoretical chemistry of carbo-mers and in particular macrocyclic-polycyclic representatives constituting a natural family of "novel aromatic compounds". With respect to their parent molecules, carbo-mers are constitutionally defined as "carbon-enriched", and can also be functionally regarded as "π-electron-enriched". This is exemplified by recent experimental and theoretical results on functional, aromatic, rigid, σ,π-macrocyclic carbo-benzene archetypes of various substitution patterns, with emphasis on the quadrupolar pattern. For the purpose of comparison, several types of non-aromatic references of carbo-benzenes are then considered, i.e. freely rotating σ,π-acyclic carbo-n-butadienes and flexible σ-cyclic, π-acyclic carbo-cyclohexadienes, and to "pro-aromatic" congeners, i.e. rigid σ,π-macrocyclic carbo-quinoids. It is shown that functional carbo-mers are entering the field of "molecular materials" for properties such as linear or nonlinear optical properties (e.g. dichromism and two-photon absorption) and single molecule conductivity. Since total or partial carbo-mers of aromatic carbon-allotropes of infinite size such as graphene (graphynes and graphdiynes) and graphite ("graphitynes") have long been addressed at the theoretical or conceptual level, recent predictive advances on the electrical, optical and mechanical properties of such carbo-materials are surveyed. Very preliminary experimental results

  18. Sulfide Catalysts Supported on Porous Aromatic Frameworks for Naphthalene Hydroprocessing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Karakhanov

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the first example of using porous aromatic frameworks as supports for sulfide catalysts for the hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons. The synthesis of bimetallic Ni-W and Ni-Mo sulfides was performed by in situ decomposition of [(n-Bu4N]2[Ni(MeS42] (Me = W, Mo complexes, supported on mesoporous aromatic framework with a diamond-like structure. It is shown that the highest naphthalene conversions were achieved in the case of additional sulfidation with sulfur. After the reaction, catalysts were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The activity of synthesized catalysts has been studied using naphthalene as a model substrate. The materials used in this study were substantially active in hydrogenation and slightly in hydrocracking of naphthalene.

  19. Regioselective nitration of aromatic substrates in zeolite cages

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Esakkidurai; M Kumarraja; K Pitchumani

    2003-04-01

    Phenol is nitrated regioselectively by fuming nitric acid inside the cages of faujasite zeolites (dependent on the loading level) and a remarkable orthoselectivity is observed in solid state nitration. Toluene and chlorobenzene also containing ortho-/para-orienting substituents, undergo faster nitration, though the regioselectivity is less significant in zeolite media. The results are explained on the basis of diffusion and binding of phenol inside zeolite, which facilitate regioselectivity (and which is absent in toluene and chlorobenzene). Other advantages of employing zeolites as media for mild and selective nitration are also highlighted.

  20. Bacterial Degradation of Aromatic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing X. Li

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aromatic compounds are among the most prevalent and persistent pollutants in the environment. Petroleum-contaminated soil and sediment commonly contain a mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs and heterocyclic aromatics. Aromatics derived from industrial activities often have functional groups such as alkyls, halogens and nitro groups. Biodegradation is a major mechanism of removal of organic pollutants from a contaminated site. This review focuses on bacterial degradation pathways of selected aromatic compounds. Catabolic pathways of naphthalene, fluorene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, and benzo[a]pyrene are described in detail. Bacterial catabolism of the heterocycles dibenzofuran, carbazole, dibenzothiophene, and dibenzodioxin is discussed. Bacterial catabolism of alkylated PAHs is summarized, followed by a brief discussion of proteomics and metabolomics as powerful tools for elucidation of biodegradation mechanisms.

  1. Biodegradation of Various Aromatic Compounds by Enriched Bacterial Cultures: Part A-Monocyclic and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberoi, Akashdeep Singh; Philip, Ligy; Bhallamudi, S Murty

    2015-08-01

    Present study focused on the screening of bacterial consortium for biodegradation of monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (MAH) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Target compounds in the present study were naphthalene, acenaphthene, phenanthrene (PAHs), and benzene (MAH). Microbial consortia enriched with the above target compounds were used in screening experiments. Naphthalene-enriched consortium was found to be the most efficient consortium, based on its substrate degradation rate and its ability to degrade other aromatic pollutants with significantly high efficiency. Substrate degradation rate with naphthalene-enriched culture followed the order benzene > naphthalene > acenaphthene > phenanthrene. Chryseobacterium and Rhodobacter were discerned as the predominant species in naphthalene-enriched culture. They are closely associated to the type strain Chryseobacterium arthrosphaerae and Rhodobacter maris, respectively. Single substrate biodegradation studies with naphthalene (PAH) and benzene (MAH) were carried out using naphthalene-enriched microbial consortium (NAPH). Phenol and 2-hydroxybenzaldehyde were identified as the predominant intermediates during benzene and naphthalene degradation, respectively. Biodegradation of toluene, ethyl benzene, xylene, phenol, and indole by NAPH was also investigated. Monod inhibition model was able to simulate biodegradation kinetics for benzene, whereas multiple substrate biodegradation model was able to simulate biodegradation kinetics for naphthalene. PMID:26054614

  2. Maneuver analysis for spinning thrusting spacecraft and spinning tethered spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Kaela M.

    During axial thrusting of a spin-stabilized spacecraft undergoing orbital injections or control maneuvers, misalignments and center-of-mass offset create undesired body-fixed torques. The effects of the body-fixed torques, which in turn cause velocity pointing errors, can be reduced by ramping up (and then ramping down) the thruster. The first topic discussed in this thesis derives closed-form solutions for the angular velocity, Euler angles, inertial velocity, and inertial displacement solutions with nonzero initial conditions. Using the closed-form solutions, the effect of variations in the spin-axis moment of inertia and spin-rate on the spacecraft velocity pointing error are shown. The analytical solutions closely match numerical simulations. The next topic considers various ramp-up profiles (including parabolic, cosine, logarithmic, exponential, and cubic) to heuristically find a suboptimal solution to reduce the velocity pointing error. Some of the considered cosine, logarithmic, exponential, parabolic, and cubic profiles drive the velocity pointing error to nearly zero and hence qualify as effective solutions. The third topic examines a large tethered spacecraft that produces artificial gravity with the propulsion system on one end of the tether. Instead of thrusting through the center of mass, the offset thrust occurs at an angle to the tether which is held in the desired direction by changing the spin rate to compensate for decreasing propellant mass. The dynamics and control laws of the system are derived for constant, time-varying, planar, and non-planar thrust as well as spin-up maneuvers. The final topic discusses how the Bodewadt solution of a self-excited rigid body is unable to accurately predict the motion compared to a numerical integration of the equations of motion.

  3. Lipid tethering of breast tumor cells enables real-time imaging of free-floating cell dynamics and drug response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Kristi R; Andorko, James I; Whipple, Rebecca A; Zhang, Peipei; Sooklal, Elisabeth L; Martin, Stuart S; Jewell, Christopher M

    2016-03-01

    Free-floating tumor cells located in the blood of cancer patients, known as circulating tumor cells (CTCs), have become key targets for studying metastasis. However, effective strategies to study the free-floating behavior of tumor cells in vitro have been a major barrier limiting the understanding of the functional properties of CTCs. Upon extracellular-matrix (ECM) detachment, breast tumor cells form tubulin-based protrusions known as microtentacles (McTNs) that play a role in the aggregation and re-attachment of tumor cells to increase their metastatic efficiency. In this study, we have designed a strategy to spatially immobilize ECM-detached tumor cells while maintaining their free-floating character. We use polyelectrolyte multilayers deposited on microfluidic substrates to prevent tumor cell adhesion and the addition of lipid moieties to tether tumor cells to these surfaces through interactions with the cell membranes. This coating remains optically clear, allowing capture of high-resolution images and videos of McTNs on viable free-floating cells. In addition, we show that tethering allows for the real-time analysis of McTN dynamics on individual tumor cells and in response to tubulin-targeting drugs. The ability to image detached tumor cells can vastly enhance our understanding of CTCs under conditions that better recapitulate the microenvironments they encounter during metastasis. PMID:26871289

  4. Lipid tethering of breast tumor cells enables real-time imaging of free-floating cell dynamics and drug response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whipple, Rebecca A.; Zhang, Peipei; Sooklal, Elisabeth L.; Martin, Stuart S.; Jewell, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Free-floating tumor cells located in the blood of cancer patients, known as circulating tumor cells (CTCs), have become key targets for studying metastasis. However, effective strategies to study the free-floating behavior of tumor cells in vitro have been a major barrier limiting the understanding of the functional properties of CTCs. Upon extracellular-matrix (ECM) detachment, breast tumor cells form tubulin-based protrusions known as microtentacles (McTNs) that play a role in the aggregation and re-attachment of tumor cells to increase their metastatic efficiency. In this study, we have designed a strategy to spatially immobilize ECM-detached tumor cells while maintaining their free-floating character. We use polyelectrolyte multilayers deposited on microfluidic substrates to prevent tumor cell adhesion and the addition of lipid moieties to tether tumor cells to these surfaces through interactions with the cell membranes. This coating remains optically clear, allowing capture of high-resolution images and videos of McTNs on viable free-floating cells. In addition, we show that tethering allows for the real-time analysis of McTN dynamics on individual tumor cells and in response to tubulin-targeting drugs. The ability to image detached tumor cells can vastly enhance our understanding of CTCs under conditions that better recapitulate the microenvironments they encounter during metastasis. PMID:26871289

  5. Tethered Transition Metals Promoted Photocatalytic System for Efficient Hydrogen Evolutions

    KAUST Repository

    Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2015-03-05

    The present invention is directed, at least in part, to a process for improving the efficiency of a photocatalyst (a semiconductor photocatalyst) by tethering (depositing) a metal (e.g., metal ions of a late transition metal, such as nickel) to the semiconductor (photocatalyst) surface through the use of an organic ligand. More specifically, 1,2-ethanedithiol (EDT) functions as an excellent molecular linker (organic ligand) to attach a transition metal complex (e.g., nickel (Ni.sup.2+ ions)) to the semiconductor surface, which can be in the form of a cadmium sulfide surface. The photocatalyst has particular utility in generating hydrogen from H.sub.2S.

  6. Formation and finite element analysis of tethered bilayer lipid structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Kwang Joo; Valincius, Gintaras; Liao, Wei-Ching; Hu, Xin; Wen, Xuejin; Lee, Andrew; Yu, Bo; Vanderah, David J; Lu, Wu; Lee, L James

    2010-12-01

    Rapid solvent exchange of an ethanolic solution of diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPhyPC) in the presence of a mixed self-assembled monolayer (SAM) [thiolipid/β-mercaptoethanol (βME) (3/7 mol/mol) on Au] shows a transition from densely packed tethered bilayer lipid membranes [(dp)tBLMs], to loosely packed tethered bilayer lipid membranes [(lp)tBLMs], and tethered bilayer liposome nanoparticles (tBLNs) with decreasing DPhyPC concentration. The tethered lipidic constructs in the aqueous medium were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Finite element analysis (FEA) was applied to interpret spectral EIS features without referring to equivalent circuit modeling. Using structural data obtained earlier from neutron reflectometry and dielectric constants of lipid bilayers, we reproduced experimentally observed features of the electrochemical impedance (EI) spectra of complex surface constructs involving small pinhole defects, large membrane-free patches, and bound liposomes. We demonstrated by FEA that highly insulating (dp)tBLMs with low-defect density exhibit EI spectra in the shape of a perfect semicircle with or without low-frequency upward "tails" in the Cole-Cole representation. Such EI spectra were observed at DPhyPC concentrations of >5 × 10(-3) mol L(-1). While AFM was not able to visualize very small lateral defects in such films, EI spectra unambiguously signaled their presence by increased low frequency "tails". Using FEA we demonstrate that films with large diameter visible defects (>25 nm by AFM) produce EI spectral features consisting of two semicircles of comparable size. Such films were typically obtained at DPhyPC concentrations of FEA revealed that, to account for these EI features for bound liposome systems (50-500 nm diameter), one needs to assume much lower tBLM conductivities of the submembrane space, which separates the electrode surface and the phospholipid bilayer. Alternatively, FEA

  7. Reconstitution of Cholesterol-Dependent Vaginolysin into Tethered Phospholipid Bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budvytyte, Rima; Pleckaityte, M.; Zvirbliene, A.;

    2013-01-01

    Functional reconstitution of the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin vaginolysin (VLY) from Gardnerella vaginalis into artificial tethered bilayer membranes (tBLMs) has been accomplished. The reconstitution of VLY was followed in real-time by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Changes of the...... EIS parameters of the tBLMs upon exposure to VLY solutions were consistent with the formation of water-filled pores in the membranes. It was found that reconstitution of VLY is a strictly cholesterol-dependent, irreversible process. At a constant cholesterol concentration reconstitution of VLY...... platform for the detection of the activity of VLY and possibly other cholesterol-dependent cytolysins....

  8. Solvation force between tethered polyelectrolyte layers. A density functional approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Pizio

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We use a version of the density functional theory to study the solvation force between two plates modified with a tethered layer of chains. The chains are built of tangentially jointed charged spherical segments. The plates are immersed in an electrolyte solution that involves cations, anions and solvent molecules. The latter molecules are modelled as hard spheres. We study the dependence of the solvation force and the structure of chains and of solute molecules on the grafting density, length of chains, architecture of the chains and on concentration of the solute.

  9. Fullerenic structures and such structures tethered to carbon materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Anish; Howard, Jack B.; Vander Sande, John B.

    2010-01-05

    The fullerenic structures include fullerenes having molecular weights less than that of C.sub.60 with the exception of C.sub.36 and fullerenes having molecular weights greater than C.sub.60. Examples include fullerenes C.sub.50, C.sub.58, C.sub.130, and C.sub.176. Fullerenic structure chemically bonded to a carbon surface is also disclosed along with a method for tethering fullerenes to a carbon material. The method includes adding functionalized fullerene to a liquid suspension containing carbon material, drying the suspension to produce a powder, and heat treating the powder.

  10. Tethered spinal cord syndrome with symptomatic onset in adulthood

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Shi-sheng; ZHAO Ying-chuan; SHI Zhi-cai; LI Ming; HOU Tie-sheng; ZHANG Ye; WU Yun-gang

    2009-01-01

    @@ Tethered spinal cord syndrome(TCS)is a condition of overstretching or compression of the caudal part of the spinal cord caused by various spinal lesions,such as a tight filum terminale or an intraspinal lipoma.~(1-9) Though it is a well-recognized cause of neurological deterioration in childhood,its symptomatic onset in adulthood is uncommon.~(10-23) Eleven cases of TCS are presented here.In addition,their related clinical features,surgical procedures and outcomes are investigated.

  11. Nanostructured materials based on the integration of ferrocenyl-tethered dendrimer and redox proteins on self-assembled monolayers: an efficient biosensor interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frasconi, Marco; Deriu, Daniela; Mazzei, Franco [Department of Chemistry and Drug Technologies, Sapienza University of Rome, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 500185 Rome (Italy); D' Annibale, Andrea, E-mail: franco.mazzei@uniroma1.it [Department of Chemistry, Sapienza University of Rome, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 500185 Rome (Italy)

    2009-12-16

    In this paper we report the use of ferrocenyl-tethered dendrimer (Fc-D) as an electrode modifier supported by a self-assembled monolayer coated gold surface. The pretreatment of electrodes with Fc-D allows the covalent immobilization of glucose oxidase. The resulting integrated hybrid system provides electrical contact between the redox center of the enzyme and the electrode, and improves the overall bioelectrocatalyzed oxidation of glucose. Cyclic voltammetry combined with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is used to investigate the redox-induced orientation changes of ferrocene-tethered dendrimers and the optimal electrical wiring of the enzyme, depending on the length of the alkyl chain of the ferrocene-tethered groups. The amount of substrate controls the steady-state concentration ratio of Fc/Fc{sup +} in the film composition. Therefore, the SPR spectrum of the film is controlled by the reversible change in the refractive index of the enzyme-integrated redox film. The proposed method demonstrates a new procedure for developing a stable amperometric redox enzyme-based sensor by designing a new nanostructured material that control the biosensing performance.

  12. Nanostructured materials based on the integration of ferrocenyl-tethered dendrimer and redox proteins on self-assembled monolayers: an efficient biosensor interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasconi, Marco; Deriu, Daniela; D'Annibale, Andrea; Mazzei, Franco

    2009-12-01

    In this paper we report the use of ferrocenyl-tethered dendrimer (Fc-D) as an electrode modifier supported by a self-assembled monolayer coated gold surface. The pretreatment of electrodes with Fc-D allows the covalent immobilization of glucose oxidase. The resulting integrated hybrid system provides electrical contact between the redox center of the enzyme and the electrode, and improves the overall bioelectrocatalyzed oxidation of glucose. Cyclic voltammetry combined with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is used to investigate the redox-induced orientation changes of ferrocene-tethered dendrimers and the optimal electrical wiring of the enzyme, depending on the length of the alkyl chain of the ferrocene-tethered groups. The amount of substrate controls the steady-state concentration ratio of Fc/Fc+ in the film composition. Therefore, the SPR spectrum of the film is controlled by the reversible change in the refractive index of the enzyme-integrated redox film. The proposed method demonstrates a new procedure for developing a stable amperometric redox enzyme-based sensor by designing a new nanostructured material that control the biosensing performance.

  13. Analytical investigation of the dynamics of tethered constellations in earth orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzini, Enrico C.; Gullahorn, Gordon E.; Estes, Robert D.

    1988-01-01

    This Quarterly Report on Tethering in Earth Orbit deals with three topics: (1) Investigation of the propagation of longitudinal and transverse waves along the upper tether. Specifically, the upper tether is modeled as three massive platforms connected by two perfectly elastic continua (tether segments). The tether attachment point to the station is assumed to vibrate both longitudinally and transversely at a given frequency. Longitudinal and transverse waves propagate along the tethers affecting the acceleration levels at the elevator and at the upper platform. The displacement and acceleration frequency-response functions at the elevator and at the upper platform are computed for both longitudinal and transverse waves. An analysis to optimize the damping time of the longitudinal dampers is also carried out in order to select optimal parameters. The analytical evaluation of the performance of tuned vs. detuned longitudinal dampers is also part of this analysis. (2) The use of the Shuttle primary Reaction Control System (RCS) thrusters for blowing away a recoiling broken tether is discussed. A microcomputer system was set up to support this operation. (3) Most of the effort in the tether plasma physics study was devoted to software development. A particle simulation code has been integrated into the Macintosh II computer system and will be utilized for studying the physics of hollow cathodes.

  14. Stabilization of periodic solutions in a tethered satellite system by damping injection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin Birkelund; Blanke, Mogens

    2009-01-01

    A spacecraft with electrodynamic tether orbiting the Earth will be subject to a periodic forcing term induced by the variation of the magnetic field along the orbit. The periodic forcing term leads to a family of unstable periodic solutions for a tether carrying a constant current. This paper...

  15. Control by damping Injection of Electrodynamic Tether System in an Inclined Orbit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin Birkelund; Blanke, Mogens

    2009-01-01

    Control of a satellite system with an electrodynamic tether as actuator is a time-periodic and underactuated control problem. This paper considers the tethered satellite in a Hamiltonian framework and determines a port-controlled Hamiltonian formulation that adequately describes the nonlinear...

  16. Flight mechanics applications for tethers in space: Cooperative Italian-US programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevilacqua, Franco; Merlina, Pietro; Anderson, John L.

    1990-01-01

    Since the 1974 proposal by Giuseppe Colombo to fly a tethered subsatellite from the Shuttle Orbiter, the creative thinking of many scientists and engineers from Italy and U.S. has generated a broad range of potential tether applications in space. Many of these applications have promise for enabling innovative research and operational activities relating to flight mechanics in earth orbit and at suborbital altitudes. From a flight mechanics standpoint the most interesting of the currently proposed flight demonstrations are: the second Tethered Satellite System experiment which offers both the potential for aerothermodynamics and hypersonics research and for atmospheric science research; the Tethered Initiated Space Recovery System which would enable orbital deboost and recovery of a re-entry vehicle and waste removal from a space station; and the Tether Elevator/Crawler System which would provide a variable microgravity environment and space station center of mass management. The outer atmospheric and orbital flight mechanics characteristics of these proposed tether flight demonstrations are described. The second Tethered Satellite System mission will deploy the tethered satellite earthward and will bring it as low as 130 km from ground and thus into the transition region between the atmosphere (non-ionized) and the partially ionized ionosphere. The atmospheric flight mechanics of the tethered satellite is discussed and simulation results are presented. The Tether Initiated Space Recovery System experiment will demonstrate the ability of a simple tether system to deboost and recover a reentry vehicle. The main feature of this demonstration is the utilization of a Small Expendable Deployment System (SEDS) and the low-tension deployment assumed to separate the reentry vehicle from the Shuttle. This low-tension deployment maneuver is discussed and its criticalities are outlined. The Tether Elevator/Crawler System is a new space element able to move in a controlled way

  17. Modeling and Control of Electrodynamic Tethers - an Energy and Topology Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin Birkelund

    only be generated perpendicular to the instantaneous magnetic field. Furthermore, the control problem is complicated by the time variations in the magnetic field. This thesis solves these problems by utilizing an energy-based system description and a passivity-based control design. An advantage of the...... of the Earth for creating a Lorentz force along the tether which occur when a current carrying wire operates in a magnetic field. The use of electrodynamic tethers are interesting since they operate solely on electrical energy, which can be provided by solar panels of the spacecrafts. In this way the...... amount of propellant a spacecraft need to bring from Earth can be reduced. In this thesis the modeling and control of electrodynamic tethers are investigated, both when a single tether is used to connect two spacecrafts, and when the tethers are used i more general formations of spacecrafts. One of the...

  18. Shortest Path Planning for a Tethered Robot or an Anchored Cable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xavier, P.G.

    1999-02-22

    We consider the problem of planning shortest paths for a tethered robot with a finite length tether in a 2D environment with polygonal obstacles. We present an algorithm that runs in time O((k{sub 1} + 1){sup 2}n{sup 4}) and finds the shortest path or correctly determines that none exists that obeys the constraints; here n is the number obstacle vertices, and k{sub 1} is the number loops in the initial configuration of the tether. The robot may cross its tether but nothing can cross obstacles, which cause the tether to bend. The algorithm applies as well for planning a shortest path for the free end of an anchored cable.

  19. Cholesterol tethered bioresponsive polycation as a candidate for gene delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The efficient unpacking of viral protein shell gave the inspiration for the synthesized vectors. In this research, novel cholesterol tethered bioresponsive polyethylenimine (PEI) was specially designed via disulfide-containing cross-linker. The cholesterol lipid had proved to increase the permeability of gene vector through cell membrane. The acid-base titration indicated that the synthesized polycation possessed efficient proton sponge effect, which was suggested to increase endosomal release of pDNA complexes into the cytoplasm. The cholesterol tethered polycation could effectively induce DNA condensation and form spherical particles with diameter about 200 nm at N/P ratio of 10. At glutathione concentration of 3 mM, the polyplexes were unpacked due to the bioresponsive cleavage of the disulfide bonds. The in-vitro experiment indicated that the polyplexes showed efficient transfection efficiency to HEK293T cells. All the results indicated that the bioresponsive polycation could be served as an effective trigger to control the release of DNA at the intracellular environment. The novel bioresponsive polycation might have great potential in non-viral gene delivery research and application.

  20. Cholesterol tethered bioresponsive polycation as a candidate for gene delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu Ying [Second Affiliated Hospital, Medical College, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310009 (China); Wang Youxiang, E-mail: yx_wang@zju.edu.cn [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Key Laboratory of Macromolecular Synthesis and Functionalization, Ministry of Education, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Hu Qiaoling; Shen Jiacong [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Key Laboratory of Macromolecular Synthesis and Functionalization, Ministry of Education, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2009-04-30

    The efficient unpacking of viral protein shell gave the inspiration for the synthesized vectors. In this research, novel cholesterol tethered bioresponsive polyethylenimine (PEI) was specially designed via disulfide-containing cross-linker. The cholesterol lipid had proved to increase the permeability of gene vector through cell membrane. The acid-base titration indicated that the synthesized polycation possessed efficient proton sponge effect, which was suggested to increase endosomal release of pDNA complexes into the cytoplasm. The cholesterol tethered polycation could effectively induce DNA condensation and form spherical particles with diameter about 200 nm at N/P ratio of 10. At glutathione concentration of 3 mM, the polyplexes were unpacked due to the bioresponsive cleavage of the disulfide bonds. The in-vitro experiment indicated that the polyplexes showed efficient transfection efficiency to HEK293T cells. All the results indicated that the bioresponsive polycation could be served as an effective trigger to control the release of DNA at the intracellular environment. The novel bioresponsive polycation might have great potential in non-viral gene delivery research and application.

  1. Forcing adsorption of a tethered polymer by pulling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an analysis of a partially directed walk model of a polymer which at one end is tethered to a sticky surface and at the other end is subjected to a pulling force at fixed angle away from the point of tethering. Using the kernel method, we derive the full generating function for this model in two and three dimensions and obtain the respective phase diagrams. We observe adsorbed and desorbed phases with a thermodynamic phase transition in between. In the absence of a pulling force this model has a second-order thermal desorption transition which merely gets shifted by the presence of a lateral pulling force. On the other hand, if the pulling force contains a non-zero vertical component this transition becomes first order. Strikingly, we find that, if the angle between the pulling force and the surface is below a critical value, a sufficiently strong force will induce polymer adsorption, no matter how large the temperature of the system. Our findings are similar in two and three dimensions, an additional feature in three dimensions being the occurrence of a re-entrance transition at constant pulling force for low temperature, which has been observed previously for this model in the presence of pure vertical pulling. Interestingly, the re-entrance phenomenon vanishes under certain pulling angles, with details depending on how the three-dimensional polymer is modeled

  2. Piperidinium tethered nanoparticle-hybrid electrolyte for lithium metal batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Korf, Kevin S.

    2014-06-23

    We report on the synthesis of novel piperidinium-based ionic liquid tethered nanoparticle hybrid electrolytes and investigate their physical and electrochemical properties. Hybrid electrolytes based on the ionic liquid 1-methyl-1-propylpiperidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfone) imide covalently tethered to silica nanoparticles (SiO2-PP-TFSI) were blended with propylene carbonate-1 M lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfone) imide (LiTFSI). We employed NMR analysis to confirm the successful creation of the hybrid material. Dielectric and rheological measurements show that these electrolytes exhibit exceptional room-temperature DC ionic conductivity (10-2 to 10 -3 S cm-1) as well as high shear mechanical moduli (105 to 106 Pa). Lithium transference numbers were found to increase with particle loading and to reach values as high as 0.22 at high particle loadings where the particle jam to form a soft glassy elastic medium. Analysis of lithium electrodeposits obtained in the hybrid electrolytes using SEM and EDX spectra show that the SiO2-PP-TFSI nanoparticles are able to smooth lithium deposition and inhibit lithium dendrite proliferation in Li metal batteries. LTOSiO2-PP-TFSI/PC in 1 M LiTFSILi half-cells based on the SiO2-PP-TFSI hybrid electrolytes exhibit attractive voltage profiles and trouble-free extended cycling behavior over more than 1000 cycles of charge and discharge. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  3. Power Generation for a JUNO-type Mission using Electrodynamic Tethers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombardelli, C.; Lorenzini, E. C.; Sanmartin, J. R.

    2008-09-01

    Electrodynamic tethers are known to exhibit high performance in the Jupiter environment , both as propellantless propulsion devices and as power generating systems. In spite of the considerable amount of research work of electrodynamic tethers in the Jupiter environment the case involving high inclination orbit has never been addressed so far. We present a power generation scheme for rotating electrodynamic tethers which can be applied to a generic Jupiter science missions employing polar orbits. We show that when the orbit inclination reaches 90 degrees and the tether rotates in the orbital plane the effect of the tether electrodynamic force does not impact orbital energy but orbit inclination. Thanks to favorable environmental conditions at Jupiter (i.e. strong magnetic field and fast rotating plasmasphere) relatively high power levels can be obtained with tethers of modest length when the tether transits the low altitude regions around the planet. In addition the impact on orbit inclination is minimal thanks to the high specific angular momentum of jovian orbits. As a numerical example we consider an electrodynamic tether subsystem consisting of two 3- km-long 5-cm wide and 0.05-mm-thick tape tether arms deployed radially from a main central spacecraft whose orbit has the characteristic of the current baseline JUNO orbit. The tether subsystem, whose total mass is less than 50 kg, can provide kW level average power along a 120 degrees orbital arc around the equatorial plane crossing. The inclination variation induced by the Lorentz force in this case is below 1/1000 of a degree per orbit. Applications of the concept to future Jupiter exploration missions are discussed.

  4. Biological production of hydroxylated aromatics: Optimization strategies for Pseudomonas putida S12

    OpenAIRE

    A. Verhoef

    2010-01-01

    To replace environmentally unfriendly petrochemical production processes, the demand for bio-based production of organic chemicals is increasing. This thesis focuses on the biological production of hydroxylated aromatics from renewable substrates by engineered P. putida S12 including several cases of strain improvement. Chapter 2 describes the construction of a P. putida S12 strain that produces p-hydroxybenzoate via the aromatic amino acid tyrosine. Previous research on biosynthesis of aroma...

  5. Abilities of some higher plants to hydrolyze the acetates of phenols and aromatic-aliphatic alcohols

    OpenAIRE

    Agnieszka Mironowicz; Krystyna Kromer; Paweł Pawłowicz; Antoni Siewiński

    2014-01-01

    In the biotransformations carried out under the same conditions, the whole intact plants of Spirodela punctata, Nephrolepis exaltata, Cyrtomium falcatum, Nephrolepis cordifolia and the suspension cultures of Helianthus tuberosus, Daucus carota and Petunia hybrida hydrolyze (partially or totally) the ester bonds of the acetates of phenols and aromatic-aliphatic alcohols and also the menthyl acetate. Nevertheless, the methyl esters of aromatic acids, structurally similar to the former substrate...

  6. Polybenzimidazoles Via Aromatic Nucleophilic Displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Hergerrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Novel molecular weight controlled and endcapped polybenzimidazoles (PBI) are prepared by the aromatic nucleophilic displacement reaction of di(hydroxyphenylbenzimidazole) monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or activated aromatic dinitro compounds. The PBI are endcapped with mono(hydroxyphenyl)benzimidazoles. The polymerizations are carried out in polar aprotic solvents such as N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone or N,N-dimethylacetamide using alkali metal bases such as potassium carbonate at elevated temperatures under nitrogen. Mono(hydroxyphenyl)benzimidazoles are synthesized by reacting phenyl-4-hydroxybenzoate with aromatic (o-diamine)s in diphenylsulfone. Molecular weight controlled and endcapped PBI of new chemical structures are prepared that exhibit a favorable combination of physical and mechanical properties.

  7. [1,2]-Wittig Rearrangement of THP Acetal Compounds: Facile Synthesis of Aromatic Tertiary Alcohols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Lei Gu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Several sec-aromatic THP acetal compounds have been found to be suitable substrates for the [1,2]-Wittig rearrangement in the absence of an external electrophile, which resulted in the generation of new carbon-carbon bond and the facile synthesis of aromatic tertiary alcohols. More interestingly, an unexpected effect of chlorotrimethylsilane on this [1,2]-Wittig rearrangement of sec-aromatic THP acetal compounds was found, in which two different products involving oxidative procedure were obtained due to the competitive [1,4]-Sigmatropic rearrangement versus [1,2]-Wittig rearrangement

  8. Bioassay of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Kirk, E.A.

    1980-08-01

    A positive relationship was found between the photodynamic activity of 24 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons versus published results on the mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, and initiation of unscheduled DNA synthesis. Metabolic activation of benzo(a)pyrene resulted in detection of increased mutagenesis in Paramecium tetraurelia as found also in the Ames Salmonella assay. The utility of P. tetraurelia as a biological detector of hazardous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is discussed.

  9. Micropropagation of different aromatic plants

    OpenAIRE

    Koleva Gudeva, Liljana; Iljovska Tusev, Jasmina; Trajkova, Fidanka

    2014-01-01

    Aromatic plants have been used for centuries as species, natural flavor, raw material for essential-oil industry and other purposes. Micropropagation has advantage over conventional propagation because of high multiplication rate, but it depends on the performance of the starting material, media composition, phytohormones and environmental factors. In this study, aromatic plants as peppermint (Menta piperita L.) and Menta sp., rosemary (Rosmarinus sp.), rocket (Eruca sativa Mill.), coriand...

  10. Design Concept for a Reusable/Propellantless MXER Tether Space Transportation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCandless, B., II; Kustas, F. m.; Marshall, L. S.; Lytle, W. B.; Hansen, N. P.

    2005-01-01

    The Momentum Exchange/Electrodynamic Reboost (MXER) tether facility is a transformational concept that significantly reduces the fuel requirements (and associated costs) in transferring payloads above low earth orbit (LEO). Facility reboost is accomplished without propellant by driving current against a voltage created by a conducting tether's interaction with the Earth's magnetic field (electrodynamic reboost). This system can be used for transferring a variety of payloads (scientific, cargo, and human space vehicles) to multiple destinations including geosynchronous transfer orbit, the Moon or Mars. MXER technology advancement requires development in two key areas: survivable, high tensile strength non-conducting tethers and reliable, lightweight payload catch/release mechanisms. Fundamental requirements associated with the MXER non-conducting strength tether and catch mechanism designs will be presented. Key requirements for the tether design include high specific-strength (tensile strength/material density), material survivability to the space environment (atomic oxygen and ultraviolet radiation), and structural survivability to micrometeoroid/orbital debris (MM/OD) impacts. The driving mechanism key,gequirements include low mass-to-capture-volume ratio, positional and velocity error tolerance, and operational reliability. Preliminary tether and catch mechanism design criteria are presented, which have been used as guidelines to "screen" and down-select initial concepts. Candidate tether materials and protective coatings are summarized along with their performance in simulated space environments (e.g., oxygen plasma, thermal cycling). A candidate catch mechanism design concept is presented along with examples of demonstration hardware.

  11. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid

    2010-01-01

    Carbonaceous materials play an important role in space. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a ubiquitous component of the carbonaceous materials. PAHs are the best-known candidates to account for the IR emission bands. They are also thought to be among the carriers of the diffuse interstellar absorption bands (DIBs). PAH ionization states reflect the ionization balance of the medium while PAH size, composition, and structure reflect the energetic and chemical history of the medium. A major challenge is to reproduce in the laboratory the physical conditions that exist in the emission and absorption interstellar zones. The harsh physical conditions of the ISM -low temperature, collisionless, strong UV radiation fields- are simulated in the laboratory by associating a molecular beam with an ionizing discharge to generate a cold plasma expansion. PAH ions and radicals are formed from the neutral precursors in an isolated environment at low temperature and probed with high-sensitivity cavity ringdown spectroscopy in the NUV-NIR range. Carbon nanoparticles are also formed during the short residence time of the precursors in the plasma and are characterized with time-offlight mass spectrometry. These experiments provide unique information on the spectra of large carbonaceous molecules and ions in the gas phase that can now be directly compared to interstellar and circumstellar observations (IR emission bands, DIBs, extinction curve). These findings also hold great potential for understanding the formation process of interstellar carbonaceous grains. We will review recent progress in the experimental and theoretical studies of PAHs, compare the laboratory data with astronomical observations and discuss the global implications.

  12. DOE Geothermal Data Repository - Tethering Data to Information: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weers, J.; Anderson, A.

    2014-02-01

    Data are not inherently information. Without context, data are just numbers, figures, names, or points on a line. By assigning context to data, we can validate ideas, form opinions, and generate knowledge. This is an important distinction to information scientists, as we recognize that the context in which we keep our data plays a big part in generating its value. The mechanisms used to assign this context often include their own data, supplemental to the data being described and defining semantic relationships, commonly referred to as metadata. This paper provides the status of the DOE Geothermal Data Repository (DOE GDR), including recent efforts to tether data submissions to information, discusses the important distinction between data and information, outlines a path to generate useful knowledge from raw data, and details the steps taken in order to become a node on the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS).

  13. Tethered and Polymer Supported Bilayer Lipid Membranes: Structure and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Andersson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Solid supported bilayer lipid membranes are model systems to mimic natural cell membranes in order to understand structural and functional properties of such systems. The use of a model system allows for the use of a wide variety of analytical tools including atomic force microscopy, impedance spectroscopy, neutron reflectometry, and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Among the large number of different types of model membranes polymer-supported and tethered lipid bilayers have been shown to be versatile and useful systems. Both systems consist of a lipid bilayer, which is de-coupled from an underlying support by a spacer cushion. Both systems will be reviewed, with an emphasis on the effect that the spacer moiety has on the bilayer properties.

  14. Physisorbed Polymer-Tethered Lipid Bilayer with Lipopolymer Gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph A. Naumann

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Physisorbed polymer-tethered lipid bilayers consisting of phospholipids and lipopolymers represent an attractive planar model membrane platform, in which bilayer fluidity and membrane elastic properties can be regulated through lipopolymer molar concentration. Herein we report a method for the fabrication of such a planar model membrane system with a lateral gradient of lipopolymer density. In addition, a procedure is described, which leads to a sharp boundary between regions of low and high lipopolymer molar concentrations. Resulting gradients and sharp boundaries are visualized on the basis of membrane buckling structures at elevated lipopolymer concentrations using epifluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Furthermore, results from spot photobleaching experiments are presented, which provide insight into the lipid lateral fluidity in these model membrane architectures. The presented experimental data highlight a planar, solid-supported membrane characterized by fascinating length scale-dependent dynamics and elastic properties with remarkable parallels to those observed in cellular membranes.

  15. The HOPS/class C Vps complex tethers membranes by binding to one Rab GTPase in each apposed membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ruoya; Stroupe, Christopher

    2015-07-15

    Many Rab GTPase effectors are membrane-tethering factors, that is, they physically link two apposed membranes before intracellular membrane fusion. In this study, we investigate the distinct binding factors needed on apposed membranes for Rab effector-dependent tethering. We show that the homotypic fusion and protein-sorting/class C vacuole protein-sorting (HOPS/class C Vps) complex can tether low-curvature membranes, that is, liposomes with a diameter of ∼100 nm, only when the yeast vacuolar Rab GTPase Ypt7p is present in both tethered membranes. When HOPS is phosphorylated by the vacuolar casein kinase I, Yck3p, tethering only takes place when GTP-bound Ypt7p is present in both tethered membranes. When HOPS is not phosphorylated, however, its tethering activity shows little specificity for the nucleotide-binding state of Ypt7p. These results suggest a model for HOPS-mediated tethering in which HOPS tethers membranes by binding to Ypt7p in each of the two tethered membranes. Moreover, because vacuole-associated HOPS is presumably phosphorylated by Yck3p, our results suggest that nucleotide exchange of Ypt7p on multivesicular bodies (MVBs)/late endosomes must take place before HOPS can mediate tethering at vacuoles. PMID:25995379

  16. Minimally invasive tethered cord release in children: A technical note

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kağan Başarslan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Tethered cord release is commonly performed in pediatric neurosurgery. Nowadays, minimally invasive procedures are created growing interest due to its highly tolerable nature for surgery. It has been main purpose a minimal damaging on access route and maximum protection of normal structures in surgery. We present a surgical treatment of tethered cord syndrome, by which is provided the cord releasing unlike the many methods being applied with tissue removal. The main advantage of performing this surgery through 2 cm hole is to avoid removing ligamentum flavum and bony structure like lamina in addition to reduce the length of the incision and the related scar tissue. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (1: 115-117 Technical note: the patient was taken on the operating table in the sitting-prone position, and L5-S1 distance was determined by fluoroscopy. The skin and subcutaneous tissues was passed via a 2 cm vertical incision settled in 0.5 cm laterally from midline. L5-S1 distance and its covering ligamentum flavum are displayed by the guidance of L5 lamina. Williams’s retractor was placed in the distance after fetching microscope. The foregoing procedures are the same with microdiscectomic surgery. By a vertical incision made on the flavum, its both layer was lifted up and hanged with simple suture on the back tissue for a comfortable exposure of the Dura. Thecal sac was opened by 0.5 cm long vertical incision on the Dura after obtaining secure CSF drainage with the help of yellow-tipped syringe needle. With finding by a nerve hook, the phylum was burned and released securely. Then the Dura was sutured primarily for the closure by means of microsurgery instruments, and flavum was laid on it again.

  17. Cluster filtering/control of bending/torsional vibrations of a tape tether using smart-film sensors/actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Hirohisa; Kunugi, Kouta; Trivailo, Pavel M.

    2016-06-01

    Tape tethers show great promise for application in space debris removal because they possess a large collecting area, which is crucial for the collection of electrons from a plasma environment in space. Tape tethers are therefore preferred over string tethers in electrodynamic tethered systems (EDTS), which operate based on the Lorentz force derived from the interaction between the electric current on the tether and the Earth's magnetic field. Vibrations of the tether may disturb the attitude of the mother satellite and the subsatellite, and are difficult to damp in space because the damping would be minimal owing to the almost zero drag force in space. Due to their relatively large width, tape tethers experience torsional deformation and therefore cannot be treated as a string tether. If torsional deformation of tape tethers is not avoided, the advantage of tape tethers as the materials for EDT systems will be deteriorated. Point-type sensors and actuators are usually used to sense and control vibrations. However, it is difficult to apply such sensors and actuators to tape tethers because of the substantial length of the tether as well as the need for a deployment mechanism, such as a reel. In order to overcome the difficulties related to vibrations, the use of smart-film sensors and actuators for sensing and controlling vibrations of tape tethers is considered in this study. In a previous study, we presented an application of smart film for sensing vibrations of tape tethers, but the actuation of tape tethers using smart-film actuators has not yet been reported. In the present paper, we mathematically derive suitable configurations of smart-film attachment to a tape tether for cluster filtering and actuation of bending and torsional vibrations of the tape tether, and carried out cluster actuation experiments. The experimental results reveal that the bending and torsional vibrations of a tape tether can be reduced by cluster actuation control based on direct

  18. Bacterial degradation of monocyclic aromatic amines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Kumar Arora

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aromatic amines are an important group of industrial chemicals, which are widely used for manufacturing of dyes, pesticides, drugs, pigments, and other industrial products. These compounds have been considered highly toxic to human beings due to their carcinogenic nature. Three groups of aromatic amines have been recognized: monocyclic, polycyclic and heterocyclic aromatic amines. Bacterial degradation of several monocyclic aromatic compounds has been studied in a variety of bacteria, which utilizes monocyclic aromatic amines as their sole source of carbon and energy. Several degradation pathways have been proposed and the related enzymes and genes have also been characterized. Many reviews have been reviewed toxicity of monocyclic aromatic amines; however, there is lack of review on biodegradation of monocyclic aromatic amines. The aim of this review is to summarize bacterial degradation of monocyclic aromatic amines. This review will increase our current understanding of biochemical and molecular basis of bacterial degradation of monocyclic aromatic amines.

  19. Aromatic-Aromatic Interactions in Biological System: Structure Activity Relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajagopal, Appavu; Deepa, Mohan [Molecular Biophysics Unit, Indian Institute of Sciences-Bangalore, Karnataka (India); Govindaraju, Munisamy [Bio-Spatial Technology Research Unit, Department of Environmental Biotechnology, School of Environmental Sciences, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2016-02-26

    While, intramolecular hydrogen bonds have attracted the greatest attention in studies of peptide conformations, the recognition that several other weakly polar interactions may be important determinants of folded structure has been growing. Burley and Petsko provided a comprehensive overview of the importance of weakly polar interactions, in shaping protein structures. The interactions between aromatic rings, which are spatially approximate, have attracted special attention. A survey of the proximal aromatic residue pairs in proteins, allowed Burley and Petsko to suggest that, “phenyl ring centroids are separated by a preferential distance of between 4.5 and 7 Å, and dihedral angles approximately 90° are most common”.

  20. Aromatic-Aromatic Interactions in Biological System: Structure Activity Relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While, intramolecular hydrogen bonds have attracted the greatest attention in studies of peptide conformations, the recognition that several other weakly polar interactions may be important determinants of folded structure has been growing. Burley and Petsko provided a comprehensive overview of the importance of weakly polar interactions, in shaping protein structures. The interactions between aromatic rings, which are spatially approximate, have attracted special attention. A survey of the proximal aromatic residue pairs in proteins, allowed Burley and Petsko to suggest that, “phenyl ring centroids are separated by a preferential distance of between 4.5 and 7 Å, and dihedral angles approximately 90° are most common”

  1. Aromatic-Aromatic Interactions in Biological System: Structure Activity Relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajagopal Appavu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available While, intramolecular hydrogen bonds have attracted the greatest attention in studies of peptide conformations, the recognition that several other weakly polar interactions may be important determinants of folded structure has been growing. Burley and Petsko provided a comprehensive overview of the importance of weakly polar interactions, in shaping protein structures. The interactions between aromatic rings, which are spatially approximate, have attracted special attention. A survey of the proximal aromatic residue pairs in proteins, allowed Burley and Petsko to suggest that, “phenyl ring centroids are separated by a preferential distance of between 4.5 and 7 Å, and dihedral angles approximately 90° are most common”.

  2. Genomic and molecular mechanisms for efficient biodegradation of aromatic dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Su; Xie, Shangxian; Chen, Hu; Cheng, Yanbing; Shi, Yan; Qin, Xing; Dai, Susie Y; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Yuan, Joshua S

    2016-01-25

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms for aromatic compound degradation is crucial for the development of effective bioremediation strategies. We report the discovery of a novel phenomenon for improved degradation of Direct Red 5B azo dye by Irpex lacteus CD2 with lignin as a co-substrate. Transcriptomics analysis was performed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of aromatic degradation in white rot fungus by comparing dye, lignin, and dye/lignin combined treatments. A full spectrum of lignin degradation peroxidases, oxidases, radical producing enzymes, and other relevant components were up-regulated under DR5B and lignin treatments. Lignin induced genes complemented the DR5B induced genes to provide essential enzymes and redox conditions for aromatic compound degradation. The transcriptomics analysis was further verified by manganese peroxidase (MnP) protein over-expression, as revealed by proteomics, dye decolorization assay by purified MnP and increased hydroxyl radical levels, as indicated by an iron reducing activity assay. Overall, the molecular and genomic mechanisms indicated that effective aromatic polymer degradation requires synergistic enzymes and radical-mediated oxidative reactions to form an effective network of chemical processes. This study will help to guide the development of effective bioremediation and biomass degradation strategies. PMID:26476316

  3. Advances towards aromatic oligoamide foldamers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelmgaard, Thomas; Plesner, Malene; Dissing, Mette Marie; Andersen, Jeanette Marker; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Nielsen, John

    2014-01-01

    We have efficiently synthesized 36 arylopeptoid dimers with ortho-, meta-, and para-substituted aromatic backbones and tert-butyl or phenyl side chains. The dimers were synthesized by using a "submonomer method" on solid phase, by applying a simplified common set of reaction conditions. X......-ray crystallographic analysis of two of these dimers disclosed that the tert-butyl side chain invokes a cis amide conformation with a comparatively more closely packed structure of the surrounding aromatic backbone while the phenyl side chain results in a trans amide conformation with a more open, extended structure...... conformation with a more open, extended structure of the surrounding aromatic backbone. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim....

  4. Computational study of small molecule binding for both tethered and free conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Ytreberg, F Marty

    2009-01-01

    Using a calix[4]arene-benzene complex as a test system we compare the potential of mean force for when the calix[4]arene is tethered versus free. When the complex is in vacuum our results show that the difference between tethered and free is primarily due to the entropic contribution to the potential of mean force resulting in a binding free energy difference of 6.5 kJ/mol. By contrast, when the complex is in water our results suggest that the difference between tethered and free is due to the enthalpic contribution resulting in a binding free energy difference of 1.6 kJ/mol. This study elucidates the roles of entropy and enthalpy for this small molecule system and emphasizes the point that tethering the receptor has the potential to dramatically impact the binding properties. These findings should be taken into consideration when using calixarene molecules in nanosensor design.

  5. Advanced Particle-in-Cell (PIC) Tools for Simulation of Electrodynamic Tether Plasma Interactions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Electrodynamic tethers are optimally suited for use in Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) to generate thrust or drag maneuver satellites. LEO region is polluted with space...

  6. Significance of relative velocity in drag force or drag power estimation for a tethered float

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vethamony, P.; Sastry, J.S.

    There is difference in opinion regarding the use of relative velocity instead of particle velocity alone in the estimation of drag force or power. In the present study, a tethered spherical float which undergoes oscillatory motion in regular waves...

  7. UV-Curable Hybrid Nanocomposite Coating to Protect Tether Polymer Materials Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address the NASA need for coatings to protect and strengthen tether materials for Momentum-exchange Electrodynamic Reboost (MXER) technology, Luminit, LLC,...

  8. Enzymatic activity of soluble and membrane tethered peptide pro-hormone convertase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzzaniti, Angela; Mains, Richard E

    2002-05-01

    Pro-hormone convertases PC1 and PC2 perform endoproteolytic cleavages of precursors in peptide-containing secretory granules. PC1 and PC2 are soluble, secreted with bioactive peptides. Evolutionarily related PCs have membrane tethers, not secreted. We tethered PC1 to the transmembrane-cytoplasmic domains (CD) of a granule enzyme (peptidylglycine-alpha-amidating monooxygenase; PAM) and Golgi-localized PC8. The tethered PC1 is far more stable to elevated temperature and denaturants than soluble PC1, and more active. Both tethers allow PC1 to visit the cell surface transiently, cleaving soluble molecules outside the cell. Both membrane-bound PC1 chimeras cleave membrane PAM into soluble active fragments when PAM is expressed on adjacent cells. PMID:12084516

  9. Materials for advancement of MXER tether design (1000-371) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There exist a need to develop, identify, and classify various materials that can be used in the fabrication of electrodynamic tethers for various applications....

  10. Materials for Advancement of MXER Tether Design (1000-549) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There exist a need to develop, identify, and classify various materials that can be used in the fabrication of electrodynamic tethers for various applications....

  11. Construction and Structural Analysis of Tethered Lipid Bilayer Containing Photosynthetic Antenna Proteins for Functional Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumino, Ayumi; Dewa, Takehisa; Takeuchi, Toshikazu; Sugiura, Ryuta; Sasaki, Nobuaki; Misawa, Nobuo; Tero, Ryugo; Urisu, Tsuneo; Gardiner, Alastair T; Cogdell, Richard J; Hashimoto, Hideki; Nango, Mamoru

    2011-07-11

    The construction and structural analysis of a tethered planar lipid bilayer containing bacterial photosynthetic membrane proteins, light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2), and light-harvesting core complex (LH1-RC) is described and establishes this system as an experimental platform for their functional analysis. The planar lipid bilayer containing LH2 and/or LH1-RC complexes was successfully formed on an avidin-immobilized coverglass via an avidin-biotin linkage. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) showed that a smooth continuous membrane was formed there. Lateral diffusion of these membrane proteins, observed by a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAY), is discussed in terms of the membrane architecture. Energy transfer from LH2 to LH1-RC within the tethered membrane architecture. Energy transfer from LH2 to LH1-RC within the tethered membrane was observed by steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy, indicating that the tethered membrane can mimic the natural situation.

  12. Attitude stabilization of electrodynamic tethers in elliptic orbits by time-delay feedback control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iñarrea, Manuel; Lanchares, Víctor; Pascual, Ana Isabel; Salas, José Pablo

    2014-03-01

    It is well known that libration motion of electrodynamic tethers operating in inclined orbits is affected by dynamic instability due to the electromagnetic interaction between the tether and the geomagnetic field. We study the application of two feedback control methods in order to stabilize the periodic attitude motions of electrodynamic tethers in elliptic inclined orbits. Both control schemes are based on the time-delayed autosynchronization of the system. Numerical simulations of the controlled libration motion show that both control techniques are able to transform the uncontrolled unstable periodic motions into asymptotically stable ones. Such stabilized periodic attitude motions can be taken as starting points for the operation of the tether. The control domains of both methods have been computed for different values of the system parameters, as functions of the two control parameters shared by both control schemes. The relative effectiveness of the two techniques in the stabilization of the periodic attitude motion has also been studied.

  13. Polydopamine tethered enzyme/metal-organic framework composites with high stability and reusability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoling; Yang, Cheng; Ge, Jun; Liu, Zheng

    2015-11-01

    An enzyme/metal-organic framework (MOF) composite with both highly stable and easily reusable features was prepared via tethering enzyme/MOF nanocrystals with polydopamine (PDA). The micrometer-sized PDA tethered enzyme/MOF composite can be easily repeatedly used without obvious activity loss, promising for efficient enzymatic catalysis at low cost with long-term operational stability under harsh conditions.An enzyme/metal-organic framework (MOF) composite with both highly stable and easily reusable features was prepared via tethering enzyme/MOF nanocrystals with polydopamine (PDA). The micrometer-sized PDA tethered enzyme/MOF composite can be easily repeatedly used without obvious activity loss, promising for efficient enzymatic catalysis at low cost with long-term operational stability under harsh conditions. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Synthesis of enzyme-MOF nanocrystals, SEM, TEM, CLSM characterization and measurements of enzymatic performances. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05190h

  14. Electron Emitter for small-size Electrodynamic Space Tether using MEMS Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleron, René A. W.; Blanke, Mogens

    2004-01-01

    Adjustment of the orbit of a spacecraft using the forces created by an electro-dynamic space-tether has been shown as a theoretic possibility in recent literature. Practical implementation is being pursued for larger scale missions where a hot filament device controls electron emission and the...... current flowing in the electrodynamic space tether. Applications to small spacecraft, or space debris in the 1–10 kg range, possess difficulties with electron emission technology, as low power emitting devices are needed. This paper addresses the system concepts of a small spacecraft electrodynamic tether...... system with focus on electron emitter design and manufacture using micro-electro-mechanical- system (MEMS) technology. The paper addresses the system concepts of a small size electrodynamic tether mission and shows a novel electron emitter for the 1-2 mA range where altitude can be effectively affected...

  15. Validation, reliability, and complications of a tethering scoliosis model in the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallemeier, Patricia M; Buttermann, Glenn R; Beaubien, Brian P; Chen, Xinqian; Polga, David J; Lew, William D; Wood, Kirkham B

    2006-04-01

    This study was conducted to refine a small animal model of scoliosis, and to quantify the deformities throughout its growth period. Subcutaneous scapula-to-contralateral pelvis tethering surgery was selected due to its minimally invasive nature and potential applicability for a large animal model. The procedure was performed in 7-week-old New Zealand white rabbits. Group A animals (n=9) underwent the tethering procedure with a suture that spontaneously released. Group B animals (n=17) had the identical procedure with a robust tether and pelvic fixation, which was maintained for 2 months during growth. All animals developed immediate post-operative scoliosis with a Cobb angle of 23 degrees (range, 6-39 degrees) in group A and 59 degrees (range, 24-90 degrees) in group B animals. During the 2 month post-tethering, group A animals lost their tether and scoliosis resolved, whereas all animals in group B maintained their tether until scheduled release at which time the mean scoliosis was 62 degrees. Immediately after tether release, group B scoliosis decreased to a mean 53 degrees. Over the following 4 months of adolescent growth, the scoliosis decreased to a mean of 43 degrees at skeletal maturity; the decrease usually occurred in animals with less than 45 degrees curves at tether release. Radiographs revealed apical vertebral wedging (mean 19 degrees ) in all group B animals. Sagittal spinal alignment was also assessed, and for group B animals, the scoliotic segment developed mild to moderate kyphosis (mean 28 degrees) and torsional deformity, but the kyphosis resolved by 4 months after tether-release. Complications specific to this technique included a high rate of transient scapulothoracic dissociation and cases of cor pulmonale. In conclusion, this tethering technique in immature rabbits consistently produced scoliosis with vertebral wedging when the tether was intact through the first 2 months of the protocol. The transient exaggeration of kyphosis suggests that

  16. Effect of Temperature on Tether Extraction, Surface Protrusion, and Cortical Tension of Human Neutrophils

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Baoyu; Goergen, Craig J.; Shao, Jin-Yu

    2007-01-01

    Neutrophil rolling on endothelial cells, the initial stage of its migrational journey to a site of inflammation, is facilitated by tether extraction and surface protrusion. Both phenomena have been studied extensively at room temperature, which is considerably lower than human body temperature. It is known that temperature greatly affects cellular mechanical properties such as viscosity. Therefore, we carried out tether extraction, surface protrusion, and cortical tension experiments at 37°C ...

  17. Low work-function coating for an entirely propellantless bare electrodynamic tether

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, John D.; Sanmartin, Juan R.; Rand, Lauren P.

    2012-01-01

    We present the possibility of a low work-function material, calcium aluminate electride, being used for a coating on a bare electrodynamic tether system. Analyses suggest that the coating would eliminate the need for an active cathodic device like a hollow cathode and, consequently, eliminate the need for an expellant to the hollow cathode, thus resulting in an electrodynamic tether system that requires no consumables. Applications include on-orbit power generation and deorbiting debris fr...

  18. Tether Extrusion from Red Blood Cells: Integral Proteins Unbinding from Cytoskeleton

    OpenAIRE

    Borghi, N.; Brochard-Wyart, F.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the mechanical strength of adhesion and the dynamics of detachment of the membrane from the cytoskeleton of red blood cells (RBCs). Using hydrodynamical flows, we extract membrane tethers from RBCs locally attached to the tip of a microneedle. We monitor their extrusion and retraction dynamics versus flow velocity (i.e., extrusion force) over successive extrusion-retraction cycles. Membrane tether extrusion is carried out on healthy RBCs and ATP-depleted or -inhibited RBCs. For...

  19. Validation, reliability, and complications of a tethering scoliosis model in the rabbit

    OpenAIRE

    Kallemeier, Patricia M.; Buttermann, Glenn R.; Beaubien, Brian P.; Chen, Xinqian; Polga, David J.; Lew, William D; Wood, Kirkham B.

    2005-01-01

    This study was conducted to refine a small animal model of scoliosis, and to quantify the deformities throughout its growth period. Subcutaneous scapula-to-contralateral pelvis tethering surgery was selected due to its minimally invasive nature and potential applicability for a large animal model. The procedure was performed in 7-week-old New Zealand white rabbits. Group A animals (n=9) underwent the tethering procedure with a suture that spontaneously released. Group B animals (n=17) had the...

  20. Biomimicry enhances sequential reactions of tethered glycolytic enzymes, TPI and GAPDHS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinatsu Mukai

    Full Text Available Maintaining activity of enzymes tethered to solid interfaces remains a major challenge in developing hybrid organic-inorganic devices. In nature, mammalian spermatozoa have overcome this design challenge by having glycolytic enzymes with specialized targeting domains that enable them to function while tethered to a cytoskeletal element. As a step toward designing a hybrid organic-inorganic ATP-generating system, we implemented a biomimetic site-specific immobilization strategy to tether two glycolytic enzymes representing different functional enzyme families: triose phosphoisomerase (TPI; an isomerase and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDHS; an oxidoreductase. We then evaluated the activities of these enzymes in comparison to when they were tethered via classical carboxyl-amine crosslinking. Both enzymes show similar surface binding regardless of immobilization method. Remarkably, specific activities for both enzymes were significantly higher when tethered using the biomimetic, site-specific immobilization approach. Using this biomimetic approach, we tethered both enzymes to a single surface and demonstrated their function in series in both forward and reverse directions. Again, the activities in series were significantly higher in both directions when the enzymes were coupled using this biomimetic approach versus carboxyl-amine binding. Our results suggest that biomimetic, site-specific immobilization can provide important functional advantages over chemically specific, but non-oriented attachment, an important strategic insight given the growing interest in recapitulating entire biological pathways on hybrid organic-inorganic devices.

  1. Off-set control of the tethered systems using a graph theoretic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, V. J.; Pradhan, S.; Misra, A. K.

    1995-03-01

    A mathematical model is developed to study the dynamics and control of the tethered satellite systems undergoing planar motion in a Keplerian orbit. The system consists of a rigid platform from which a point mass subsatellite can be deployed or retrieved by a flexible tether. The model incorporates off-set of the tether attachment point from the platform centre of mass and its time-dependent variation. The governing equations of motion are obtained using the Lagrangian formulation. The effect of system parameters is analysed numerically. The off-set control strategy, which involves movement of the attachment point, is used to regulate the tether swing and the platform dynamics is controlled by a momentum gyro. The off-set control strategy can be implemented using a manipulator which moves the tether attachment point as required. It is shown that the control of only the rigid degrees of freedom is not sufficient as the flexible dynamics of the tether becomes unstable, particularly during retrieval. In the present study, passive dampers are proposed to control the flexible dynamics. The simulation results show that the control procedure regulates the system dynamics quite successfully. The state feedback controller for the system is designed using graph theoretic approach which has computational advantage particularly for higher order systems.

  2. Biomimicry enhances sequential reactions of tethered glycolytic enzymes, TPI and GAPDHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Chinatsu; Gao, Lizeng; Bergkvist, Magnus; Nelson, Jacquelyn L; Hinchman, Meleana M; Travis, Alexander J

    2013-01-01

    Maintaining activity of enzymes tethered to solid interfaces remains a major challenge in developing hybrid organic-inorganic devices. In nature, mammalian spermatozoa have overcome this design challenge by having glycolytic enzymes with specialized targeting domains that enable them to function while tethered to a cytoskeletal element. As a step toward designing a hybrid organic-inorganic ATP-generating system, we implemented a biomimetic site-specific immobilization strategy to tether two glycolytic enzymes representing different functional enzyme families: triose phosphoisomerase (TPI; an isomerase) and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDHS; an oxidoreductase). We then evaluated the activities of these enzymes in comparison to when they were tethered via classical carboxyl-amine crosslinking. Both enzymes show similar surface binding regardless of immobilization method. Remarkably, specific activities for both enzymes were significantly higher when tethered using the biomimetic, site-specific immobilization approach. Using this biomimetic approach, we tethered both enzymes to a single surface and demonstrated their function in series in both forward and reverse directions. Again, the activities in series were significantly higher in both directions when the enzymes were coupled using this biomimetic approach versus carboxyl-amine binding. Our results suggest that biomimetic, site-specific immobilization can provide important functional advantages over chemically specific, but non-oriented attachment, an important strategic insight given the growing interest in recapitulating entire biological pathways on hybrid organic-inorganic devices. PMID:23626684

  3. The mechanics of motorised momentum exchange tethers when applied to active debris removal from LEO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of momentum exchange when applied to space tethers for propulsion is well established, and a considerable body of literature now exists on the on-orbit modelling, the dynamics, and also the control of a large range of tether system applications. The authors consider here a new application for the Motorised Momentum Exchange Tether by highlighting three key stages of development leading to a conceptualisation that can subsequently be developed into a technology for Active Debris Removal. The paper starts with a study of the on-orbit mechanics of a full sized motorised tether in which it is shown that a laden and therefore highly massasymmetrical tether can still be forced to spin, and certainly to librate, thereby confirming its possible usefulness for active debris removal (ADR). The second part of the paper concentrates on the modelling of the centripetal deployment of a symmetrical MMET in order to get it initialized for debris removal operations, and the third and final part of the paper provides an entry into scale modelling for low cost mission design and testing. It is shown that the motorised momentum exchange tether offers a potential solution to the removal of large pieces of orbital debris, and that dynamic methodologies can be implemented to in order to optimise the emergent design

  4. Enhanced Aromatic Sequons Increase Oligosaccharyltransferase Glycosylation Efficiency and Glycan Homogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Amber N; Chen, Wentao; Antonopoulos, Aristotelis; Hanson, Sarah R; Wiseman, R Luke; Dell, Anne; Haslam, Stuart M; Powers, David L; Powers, Evan T; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2015-08-20

    N-Glycosylation plays an important role in protein folding and function. Previous studies demonstrate that a phenylalanine residue introduced at the n-2 position relative to an Asn-Xxx-Thr/Ser N-glycosylation sequon increases the glycan occupancy of the sequon in insect cells. Here, we show that any aromatic residue at n-2 increases glycan occupancy in human cells and that this effect is dependent upon oligosaccharyltransferase substrate preferences rather than differences in other cellular processing events such as degradation or trafficking. Moreover, aromatic residues at n-2 alter glycan processing in the Golgi, producing proteins with less complex N-glycan structures. These results demonstrate that manipulating the sequence space surrounding N-glycosylation sequons is useful both for controlling glycosylation efficiency, thus enhancing glycan occupancy, and for influencing the N-glycan structures produced. PMID:26190824

  5. Substrate-bound tyrosinase electrode using gold nanoparticles anchored to pyrroloquinoline quinone for a pesticide biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, G.Y.; Kang, M.S.; Shim, J.; Moon, S.H. [Gwangju Inst. of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Environmental Science and Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Enzyme electrodes are now being considered for use in the detection of pesticides. However, the electrodes do not have the sensitivity to detect low concentration pesticides, and external substrates are needed to measure changes in enzyme activity. This study discussed a chemical species designed to mimic a substrate in the preparation of a tyrosinase (TYR) electrode for use without substrate standard solutions. Pyrroloquinolone quinone (PQQ) was integrated within the tyrosinase electrode and used as an assimilated substrate for measuring the pesticide. Gold (Au) nanoparticles were also used to detect low concentration pesticides. The TYR was immobilized on the PQQ-anchored Au nanoparticles by a covalent bond. The tethered PQQ was then reduced by obtaining 2-electrons from the electrode. The study showed that the substrate-bound enzyme electrode can be used to detect pesticide without a substrate standard solution through the immobilization of the enzyme and the substrate on the Au nanoparticles.

  6. Environmental Remediation: Removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nkansah, Marian Asantewah

    2012-11-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous persistent semi-volatile organic compounds. They are contaminants that are resistant to degradation and can remain in the environment for long periods due to their high degree of conjugation, and aromaticity. PAHs are present in industrial effluents as products of incomplete combustion processes of organic compounds. Petroleum, coal and shale oil contain extremely complex mixtures of these PAHs, and their transport and refining process can also result in the release of PAHs. It is therefore prudent that such effluents are treated before discharge into the environment. In this project, different approaches to the treatment of PAHs have been investigated. Hydrous pyrolysis has been explored as a potential technique for degrading PAHs in water using anthracene as a model compound. The experiments were performed under different conditions of temperature, substrate, redox systems and durations. The conditions include oxidising systems comprising pure water, hydrogen peroxide and Nafion-SiO2 solid catalyst in water; and reducing systems of formic acid and formic acid / Nafion-SiO2 / Pd-C catalysts to assess a range of reactivities. Products observed in GCMS analysis of the extract from the water phase include anthrone, anthraquinone, xanthone and multiple hydro-anthracene derivatives (Paper I). In addition a modified version of the Nafion-SiO2 solid catalyst in water oxidising system was tested; and reducing systems of formic acid and formic acid / Nafion-SiO2 / Pd-C catalysts were adopted for the conversion of a mixture of anthracene, fluorene and fluoranthene. The rate of conversion in the mixture was high as compared to that of only anthracene (Paper II). Also the use of LECA (Lightweight expanded clay aggregates) as an adsorbent (Paper III) for PAHs (phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene) removal from water has been.(Author)

  7. Survey of Recent Innovations in Aromatic Rice

    OpenAIRE

    Napasintuwong, Orachos

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides situations of aromatic rice demand, and international standards. The history and recent developments of traditional and evolved aromatic rice varieties, namely Basmati rice and Jasmine rice, are reviewed. The emerging aromatic rice innovations from developed countries such as the U.S. and other Asian countries generate a threat to these traditional aromatic rice producers such as India, Pakistan, and Thailand. Under WTO Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights...

  8. Lipoproteins tethered dendrimeric nanoconstructs for effective targeting to cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Anupriya; Jain, Keerti, E-mail: keertijain02@gmail.com; Mehra, Neelesh Kumar, E-mail: neelesh81mph@gmail.com; Jain, N. K., E-mail: dr.jnarendr@gmail.com [Dr. H. S. Gour University, Pharmaceutics Research Laboratory, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (India)

    2013-10-15

    In the present investigation, poly (propylene imine) dendrimers up to fifth generation (PPI G5.0) were synthesized using ethylene diamine and acrylonitrile. Lipoproteins (high-density lipoprotein; HDL and low-density lipoprotein; LDL) were isolated from human plasma by discontinuous density gradient ultracentrifugation, characterized and tethered to G5.0 PPI dendrimers to construct LDL- and HDL-conjugated dendrimeric nanoconstructs for tumor-specific delivery of docetaxel. Developed formulations showed sustained release characteristics in in vitro drug release and in vivo pharmacokinetic studies. The cancer targeting potential of lipoprotein coupled dendrimers was investigated by ex vivo cytotoxicity and cell uptake studies using human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines (HepG2 cells) and biodistribution studies in albino rats of Sprague-Dawley strain. Lipoprotein anchored dendrimeric nanoconstructs showed significant uptake by cancer cells as well as higher biodistribution of docetaxel to liver and spleen. It is concluded that these precisely synthesized engineered dendrimeric nanoconstructs could serve as promising drug carrier for fighting with the fatal disease, i.e., cancer, attributed to their defined targeting and therapeutic potential.

  9. Critical adsorption of copolymer tethered on selective surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Qian, Chang-Ji; Luo, Meng-Bo

    2016-04-01

    Critical adsorption behaviors of flexible copolymer chains tethered to a flat homogeneous surface are studied by using Monte Carlo simulations. We have compared the critical adsorption temperature Tc, estimated by a finite-size scaling method, for different AB copolymer sequences with A the attractive monomer and B the inert monomer. We find that Tc increases with an increase in the fraction of monomers A, fA, in copolymers, and it increases with an increase in the length of block A for the same fA. In particular, Tc of copolymer (AnBn)r can be expressed as a function of the block length, n, and Tc of copolymer (AnB)r and (ABm)r can be expressed as a linear function of fA. Tc of random copolymer chains also can be expressed as a linear function of fA and it can be estimated by using weight-average of Tc of different diblocks in the random copolymer. However, the crossover exponent is roughly independent of AB sequence distributions either for block copolymers or for random copolymers.

  10. SURFACE MODIFICATION OF POLYPROPYLENE MICROPOROUS MEMBRANE BY TETHERING POLYPEPTIDES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-mei Liu; Zhi-kang Xu; Mathias Ulbricht

    2006-01-01

    Two kinds of polypeptides were tethered onto the surface of polypropylene microporous membrane (PPMM)through a ring opening polymerization of L-glutamate N-carboxyanhydride initiated by amino groups which were introduced by ammonia plasma and γ-aminopropyl triethanoxysilane treatments. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR/ATR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), together with water contact angle measurements were used to characterize the modified membranes. XPS analyses and FT-IR/ATR spectra demonstrated that polypeptides are actually grafted onto the membrane surface. The wettability of the membrane surface increases at first and then decreases with the increase in grafting degrees of polypeptide. Platelet adhesion and murine macrophage attachment experiments reveal an enhanced hemocompatibility for the polypeptide modified PPMMs. All these results give evidence that polypeptide grafting can simultaneously improve the hemocompatibility as well as reserve the hydrophobicity for the membrane, which will provide a potential approach to improve the performance of polypropylene hollow fiber microporous membrane used in artificial oxygenator.

  11. Space demostration of bare electrodynamic tape-tether technology on the sounding rocket S520-25

    OpenAIRE

    Fujii, Hironori; Watanabe, Takeo; Sahara, Hironori; Kojima, Hirohisa; Takehara, Shoichiro; Yamagiwa, Yoshiki; Sasaki, Susumu; Abe, Takumi; Tanaka, Koji; Oyama, Khoichiro; Jhonson, Les; Khazanov, V.; Sanmartín Losada, Juan Ramón; Charro, Mario; Kruijff, Michiel

    2011-01-01

    A spaceflight validation of bare electro dynamic tape tether technology was conducted. A S520-25 sounding rocket was launched successfully at 05:00am on 31 August 2010 and successfully deployed 132.6m of tape tether over 120 seconds in a ballistic flight. The electrodynamic performance of the bare tape tether employed as an atmospheric probe was measured. Flight results are introduced through the present progressive report of the demonstration and the results of flight experiment are ex...

  12. T-REX: Bare electro-dynamic tape-tether technology experimetn on sounding rocket S520

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Takeo; Fujii, Hironori; Kusagaya, Tairo; Sahara, Hironori; Kojima, Hirohisa; Takehara, Shoichiro; Yamagiwa, Yoshiki; Sasaki, Susumu; Abe, Takumi; Tanaka, Koji; Oyama, Khoichiro; Ebinuma, Takuji; Johson, Les; Khazanov, George; Sanmartín Losada, Juan Ramón

    2012-01-01

    The project to verify the performance of space tether technology was successfully demonstrated by the launch of the sounding rocket S520 the 25tu. The project is the space demonstration of science and engineering technologies of a bare tape electrodynamic tether (EDT) in the international campaign between Japan, USA, Europe and Australia. Method of "Inverse ORIGAMI (Tape tether folding)" was employed in order to deploy the bare tape EDT in a short period time of the suborbital flight. The ...

  13. Tethered swimming and dry land force parameters: useful tools to characterize front crawl performance in both genders

    OpenAIRE

    Morouço, Pedro Gil Frade

    2012-01-01

    The major purpose of this work was to examine possible relationships between tethered forces and dry-land exercises with swimming performance, for both males and female swimmers. Additionally, it was intended to verify if tethered swimming could be an easy, operative and accurate methodology for the biophysical evaluation of swimmers. For the accomplishment of these purposes the following sequence was used: (i) reviewing available literature; (ii) comparison of tethered swimming w...

  14. Aromatic A-ring analogues of orobanchol, new germination stimulants for seeds of parasitic weeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malik, H.; Kohlen, W.; Jamil, M.; Rutjes, F.P.J.T.; Zwanenburg, B.

    2011-01-01

    Strigolactones are signaling compounds in plants of increasing importance. In this paper the focus is on their activity as germinating agents for seeds of parasitic weeds. The syntheses of aromatic A-ring analogues of the germination stimulant orobanchol have been described. Starting substrate is th

  15. Prediction of activation energies for aromatic oxidation by cytochrome P450

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydberg, Patrik; Ryde, Ulf; Olsen, Lars

    2008-01-01

    We have estimated the activation energy for aromatic oxidation by compound I in cytochrome P450 for a diverse set of 17 substrates using state-of-the-art density functional theory (B3LYP) with large basis sets. The activation energies vary from 60 to 87 kJ/mol. We then test if these results can be...

  16. Lithium BINOL Phosphate Catalyzed Desymmetrization of meso-Epoxides with Aromatic Thiols

    OpenAIRE

    Ingle, Gajendrasingh; Mormino, Michael G.; Antilla, Jon C.

    2014-01-01

    A highly enantioselective method for desymmetrization of meso-epoxides using thiols is reported. This is the first example of epoxide activation achieved using metal BINOL phosphates. The reaction has a broad scope in terms of epoxide substrates and aromatic thiol nucleophiles. The resulting β-hydroxyl sulfides are obtained in excellent yield and enantioselectivity.

  17. Application of the NASCAP Spacecraft Simulation Tool to Investigate Electrodynamic Tether Current Collection in LEO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Mitzi; HabashKrause, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Recent interest in using electrodynamic tethers (EDTs) for orbital maneuvering in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) has prompted the development of the Marshall ElectroDynamic Tether Orbit Propagator (MEDTOP) model. The model is comprised of several modules which address various aspects of EDT propulsion, including calculation of state vectors using a standard orbit propagator (e.g., J2), an atmospheric drag model, realistic ionospheric and magnetic field models, space weather effects, and tether librations. The natural electromotive force (EMF) attained during a radially-aligned conductive tether results in electrons flowing down the tether and accumulating on the lower-altitude spacecraft. The energy that drives this EMF is sourced from the orbital energy of the system; thus, EDTs are often proposed as de-orbiting systems. However, when the current is reversed using satellite charged particle sources, then propulsion is possible. One of the most difficult challenges of the modeling effort is to ascertain the equivalent circuit between the spacecraft and the ionospheric plasma. The present study investigates the use of the NASA Charging Analyzer Program (NASCAP) to calculate currents to and from the tethered satellites and the ionospheric plasma. NASCAP is a sophisticated set of computational tools to model the surface charging of three-dimensional (3D) spacecraft surfaces in a time-varying space environment. The model's surface is tessellated into a collection of facets, and NASCAP calculates currents and potentials for each one. Additionally, NASCAP provides for the construction of one or more nested grids to calculate space potential and time-varying electric fields. This provides for the capability to track individual particles orbits, to model charged particle wakes, and to incorporate external charged particle sources. With this study, we have developed a model of calculating currents incident onto an electrodynamic tethered satellite system, and first results are shown

  18. Aromatic-Mediated Carbohydrate Recognition in Processive Serratia marcescens Chitinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Suvamay; Hamre, Anne Grethe; Wildberger, Patricia; Holen, Matilde Mengkrog; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Beckham, Gregg T; Sørlie, Morten; Payne, Christina M

    2016-02-25

    Microorganisms use a host of enzymes, including processive glycoside hydrolases, to deconstruct recalcitrant polysaccharides to sugars. Processive glycoside hydrolases closely associate with polymer chains and repeatedly cleave glycosidic linkages without dissociating from the crystalline surface after each hydrolytic step; they are typically the most abundant enzymes in both natural secretomes and industrial cocktails by virtue of their significant hydrolytic potential. The ubiquity of aromatic residues lining the enzyme catalytic tunnels and clefts is a notable feature of processive glycoside hydrolases. We hypothesized that these aromatic residues have uniquely defined roles, such as substrate chain acquisition and binding in the catalytic tunnel, that are defined by their local environment and position relative to the substrate and the catalytic center. Here, we investigated this hypothesis with variants of Serratia marcescens family 18 processive chitinases ChiA and ChiB. We applied molecular simulation and free energy calculations to assess active site dynamics and ligand binding free energies. Isothermal titration calorimetry provided further insight into enthalpic and entropic contributions to ligand binding free energy. Thus, the roles of six aromatic residues, Trp-167, Trp-275, and Phe-396 in ChiA, and Trp-97, Trp-220, and Phe-190 in ChiB, have been examined. We observed that point mutation of the tryptophan residues to alanine results in unfavorable changes in the free energy of binding relative to wild-type. The most drastic effects were observed for residues positioned at the "entrances" of the deep substrate-binding clefts and known to be important for processivity. Interestingly, phenylalanine mutations in ChiA and ChiB had little to no effect on chito-oligomer binding, in accordance with the limited effects of their removal on chitinase functionality. PMID:26824449

  19. Computer Simulations Reveal Multiple Functions for Aromatic Residues in Cellulase Enzymes (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-07-01

    NREL researchers use high-performance computing to demonstrate fundamental roles of aromatic residues in cellulase enzyme tunnels. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) computer simulations of a key industrial enzyme, the Trichoderma reesei Family 6 cellulase (Cel6A), predict that aromatic residues near the enzyme's active site and at the entrance and exit tunnel perform different functions in substrate binding and catalysis, depending on their location in the enzyme. These results suggest that nature employs aromatic-carbohydrate interactions with a wide variety of binding affinities for diverse functions. Outcomes also suggest that protein engineering strategies in which mutations are made around the binding sites may require tailoring specific to the enzyme family. Cellulase enzymes ubiquitously exhibit tunnels or clefts lined with aromatic residues for processing carbohydrate polymers to monomers, but the molecular-level role of these aromatic residues remains unknown. In silico mutation of the aromatic residues near the catalytic site of Cel6A has little impact on the binding affinity, but simulation suggests that these residues play a major role in the glucopyranose ring distortion necessary for cleaving glycosidic bonds to produce fermentable sugars. Removal of aromatic residues at the entrance and exit of the cellulase tunnel, however, dramatically impacts the binding affinity. This suggests that these residues play a role in acquiring cellulose chains from the cellulose crystal and stabilizing the reaction product, respectively. These results illustrate that the role of aromatic-carbohydrate interactions varies dramatically depending on the position in the enzyme tunnel. As aromatic-carbohydrate interactions are present in all carbohydrate-active enzymes, the results have implications for understanding protein structure-function relationships in carbohydrate metabolism and recognition, carbon turnover in nature, and protein engineering

  20. Metabolic pathways of biotransformation and biosynthesis of aromatic compounds for the flavour industry by the basidiomycete Pycnoporus cinnabarinus

    OpenAIRE

    Asther, Marcel; Lomascolo, A.; Asther, M.; Moukha, S.; Lesage-Meessen, L.

    1998-01-01

    Among filamentous fungi, white-rot Basidiomycetes have become a strategic group to generate industrial aromatic flavours. In the course of a basidiomycete screening, the biotechnological potential of #Pycnoporus cinnabarinus$ strains was studied in order to produce, by transformation or de novo, natural aromatic flavours in liquid cultures. Ferulic acid and L-phenylalanine were found to be suitable substrates for vanillin and benzaldehyde (bitter almond aroma) production, respectively. These ...

  1. Nucleophilic fluorination of aromatic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Barrio, Jorge R

    2014-03-18

    Iodylbenzene derivatives substituted with electron donating as well as electron withdrawing groups on the aromatic ring are used as precursors in aromatic nucleophilic substitution reactions. The iodyl group (IO.sub.2) is regiospecifically substituted by nucleophilic fluoride to provide the corresponding fluoroaryl derivatives. No-carrier-added [F-18]fluoride ion derived from anhydrous [F-18](F/Kryptofix, [F-18]CsF or a quaternary ammonium fluoride (e.g., Me.sub.4NF, Et.sub.4NF, n-Bu.sub.4NF, (PhCH.sub.2).sub.4NF) exclusively substitutes the iodyl moiety in these derivatives and provides high specific activity F-18 labeled fluoroaryl analogs. Iodyl derivatives of a benzothiazole analog and 6-iodyl-L-dopa derivatives have been synthesized as precursors and have been used in the preparation of no-carrier-added [F-18]fluorobenzothiazole as well as 6-[F-18]fluoro-L-dopa.

  2. Biodegradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    OpenAIRE

    DEMİR, İsmail; DEMİRBAĞ, Zihni

    1999-01-01

    Polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), such as petroleum and petroleum derivatives, are widespread organic pollutants entering the environment, chiefly, through oil spills and incomplete combustion of fossil fuels. Since most PAHs are persist in the environment for a long period of time and bioaccumulate, they cause environmental pollution and effect biological equilibrium dramatically. Biodegradation of some PAHs by microorganisms has been biochemically and genetically investigated. Ge...

  3. Analysis of heterocyclic aromatic amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murkovic, M

    2007-09-01

    Heterocyclic aromatic amines are formed in protein and amino acid-rich foods at temperatures above 150 degrees C. Of more than twenty heterocyclic aromatic amines identified ten have been shown to have carcinogenic potential. As nutritional hazards, their reliable determination in prepared food, their uptake and elimination in living organisms, including humans, and assessment of associated risks are important food-safety issues. The concentration in foods is normally in the low ng g(-1) range, which poses a challenge to the analytical chemist. Because of the complex nature of food matrixes, clean-up and enrichment of the extracts are also complex, usually involving both cation-exchange (propylsulfonic acid silica gel, PRS) and reversed-phase purification. The application of novel solid-phase extraction cartridges with a wettable apolar phase combined with cation-exchange characteristics simplified this process--both the polar and apolar heterocyclic aromatic amines were recovered in one fraction. Copper phthalocyanine trisulfonate bonded to cotton ("blue cotton") or rayon, and molecular imprinted polymers have also been successfully used for one-step sample clean-up. For analysis of the heterocyclic aromatic amines, liquid chromatography with base-deactivated reversed-phase columns has been used, and, recently, semi-micro and capillary columns have been introduced. The photometric, fluorimetric, or electrochemical detectors used previously have been replaced by mass spectrometers. Increased specificity and sub-ppb sensitivities have been achieved by the use of the selected-reaction-monitoring mode of detection of advanced MS instrumentation, for example the triple quadrupole and Q-TOF instrument combination. Gas chromatography, also with mass-selective detection, has been used for specific applications; the extra derivatization step needed for volatilization has been balanced by the higher chromatographic resolution. PMID:17546447

  4. Deuterated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Doney, Kirstin D; Mori, Tamami; Onaka, Takashi; Tielens, A G G M

    2016-01-01

    The amount of deuterium locked up in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has to date been an uncertain value. We present a near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic survey of HII regions in the Milky Way, Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), and Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) obtained with AKARI, which aims to search for features indicative of deuterated PAHs (PAD or Dn-PAH) to better constrain the D/H ratio of PAHs. Fifty-three HII regions were observed in the NIR (2.5-5 {\\mu}m), using the Infrared Camera (IRC) on board the AKARI satellite. Through comparison of the observed spectra with a theoretical model of deuterated PAH vibrational modes, the aromatic and (a)symmetric aliphatic C-D stretch modes were identified. We see emission features between 4.4-4.8 {\\mu}m, which could be unambiguously attributed to deuterated PAHs in only six of the observed sources, all of which are located in the Milky Way. In all cases, the aromatic C-D stretching feature is weaker than the aliphatic C-D stretching feature, and, in the case o...

  5. The direct aromatization of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcelin, G.; Oukaci, R.; Migone, R.A.; Kazi, A.M. [Altamira Instruments, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The thermal decomposition of methane shows significant potential as a process for the production of higher unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons when the extent of the reaction is limited. Thermodynamic calculations have shown that when the reaction is limited to the formation of C{sub 2} to C{sub 10} products, yields of aromatics can exceed 40% at temperatures of 1200{degrees}C. Preliminary experiments have shown that when the reaction is limited to the formation of C{sub 2} to C{sub 10} products, yields of aromatics can exceed 40% at temperatures of 1200{degrees}C. Preliminary experiments have shown that cooling the product and reacting gases as the reaction proceeds can significantly reduce or eliminate the formation of solid carbon and heavier (C{sub 10+}) materials. Much work remains to be done in optimizing the quenching process and this is one of the goals of this program. Means to lower the temperature of the reaction are being studied as this result in a more feasible commercial process due to savings realized in energy and material of construction costs. The use of free-radical generators and catalysts will be investigated as a means of lowering the reaction temperature thus allowing faster quenching. It is highly likely that such studies will lead to a successful direct methane to higher hydrocarbon process.

  6. A model of surfactant-induced surface tension effects on the parenchymal tethering of pulmonary airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Hideki; Halpern, David; Gaver, Donald P

    2013-01-18

    We developed a computational model of lung parenchyma, which is comprised of individual alveolar chamber models. Each alveolus is modeled by a truncated octahedron. Considering the force balance between the elastin and collagen fibers laying on the alveolar membrane and the pressures acting on the membrane, we computed the deformations of the parenchyma with a finite element method. We focused on the effect of surfactant on the force of parenchymal tethering an airway. As the lung inflates, the parenchyma becomes stiffer and the tethering force becomes stronger. As the alveolar surfactant concentration is reduced, the lung volume at a fixed alveolar pressure decreases, and thus, the tethering force becomes weaker. The distortion of parenchyma caused by the deformation of an airway extends widely around the airway. The displacement of parenchyma decays with distance from the airway wall, but deviates from the prediction based on a theory for a continuum material. Using results obtained from the present lung parenchyma model, we also developed a simple 1-dimensional model for parenchyma tethering force on an airway, which could be utilized for the analysis of liquid/gas transports in an axis-symmetric elastic airway. The effective shear modulus was calculated from the pressure-volume relation of parenchyma. By manipulating the pressure-volume curve, this simple model may be used to predict the parenchyma tethering force in diseased lungs. PMID:23235110

  7. Optimization of low ring polycylic aromatic biodegradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, N.; Abdul-Talib, S.; Tay, C. C.

    2016-07-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are recalcitrance and persistence that finally turn into problematic environmental contaminants. Microbial degradation is considered to be the primary mechanism of PAHs removal from the environment due to its organic criteria. This study is carried out to optimize degradation process of low ring PAHs. Bacteria used in this study was isolated from sludge collected from Kolej Mawar, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam, Selangor. Working condition namely, substrate concentration, bacteria concentration, pH and temperature were optimized. PAHs in the liquid sample was extracted by using solid phase microextractio equipped with a 7 µm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) SPME fibr. Removal of PAHs were assessed by measuring PAHs concentration using GC-FID. Results from the optimization study of biodegradation indicated that maximum rate of PAHs removal occurred at 100 mgL-1 of PAHs, 10% bacteria concentration, pH 7.0 and 30°C. These working condition had proved the effectiveness of using bacteria in biodegradation process of PAHs.

  8. Noncomparative scaling of aromaticity through electron itinerancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aromaticity is a multidimensional concept and not a directly observable. These facts have always stood in the way of developing an appropriate theoretical framework for scaling of aromaticity. In the present work, a quantitative account of aromaticity is developed on the basis of cyclic delocalization of π-electrons, which is the phenomenon leading to unique features of aromatic molecules. The stabilization in molecular energy, caused by delocalization of π-electrons is obtained as a second order perturbation energy for archetypal aromatic systems. The final expression parameterizes the aromatic stabilization energy in terms of atom to atom charge transfer integral, onsite repulsion energy and the population of spin orbitals at each site in the delocalized π-electrons. An appropriate computational platform is framed to compute each and individual parameter in the derived equation. The numerical values of aromatic stabilization energies obtained for various aromatic molecules are found to be in close agreement with available theoretical and experimental reports. Thus the reliable estimate of aromaticity through the proposed formalism renders it as a useful tool for the direct assessment of aromaticity, which has been a long standing problem in chemistry

  9. GHz spurious mode free AlN lamb wave resonator with high figure of merit using one dimensional phononic crystal tethers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guoqiang; Zhu, Yao; Merugu, Srinivas; Wang, Nan; Sun, Chengliang; Gu, Yuandong

    2016-07-01

    This letter reports a spurious mode free GHz aluminum nitride (AlN) lamb wave resonator (LWR) towards high figure of merit (FOM). One dimensional gourd-shape phononic crystal (PnC) tether with large phononic bandgaps is employed to reduce the acoustic energy dissipation into the substrate. The periodic PnC tethers are based on a 1 μm-thick AlN layer with 0.26 μm-thick Mo layer on top. A clean spectrum over a wide frequency range is obtained from the measurement, which indicates a wide-band suppression of spurious modes. Experimental results demonstrate that the fabricated AlN LWR has an insertion loss of 5.2 dB and a loaded quality factor (Q) of 1893 at 1.02 GHz measured in air. An impressive ratio of the resistance at parallel resonance (Rp) to the resistance at series resonance (Rs) of 49.8 dB is obtained, which is an indication of high FOM for LWR. The high Rp to Rs ratio is one of the most important parameters to design a radio frequency filter with steep roll-off.

  10. Concerted nucleophilic aromatic substitution with 19F‑ and 18F‑

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Constanze N.; Hooker, Jacob M.; Ritter, Tobias

    2016-06-01

    Nucleophilic aromatic substitution (SNAr) is widely used by organic chemists to functionalize aromatic molecules, and it is the most commonly used method to generate arenes that contain 18F for use in positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging. A wide range of nucleophiles exhibit SNAr reactivity, and the operational simplicity of the reaction means that the transformation can be conducted reliably and on large scales. During SNAr, attack of a nucleophile at a carbon atom bearing a ‘leaving group’ leads to a negatively charged intermediate called a Meisenheimer complex. Only arenes with electron-withdrawing substituents can sufficiently stabilize the resulting build-up of negative charge during Meisenheimer complex formation, limiting the scope of SNAr reactions: the most common SNAr substrates contain strong π-acceptors in the ortho and/or para position(s). Here we present an unusual concerted nucleophilic aromatic substitution reaction (CSNAr) that is not limited to electron-poor arenes, because it does not proceed via a Meisenheimer intermediate. We show a phenol deoxyfluorination reaction for which CSNAr is favoured over a stepwise displacement. Mechanistic insights enabled us to develop a functional-group-tolerant 18F-deoxyfluorination reaction of phenols, which can be used to synthesize 18F-PET probes. Selective 18F introduction, without the need for the common, but cumbersome, azeotropic drying of 18F, can now be accomplished from phenols as starting materials, and provides access to 18F-labelled compounds not accessible through conventional chemistry.

  11. Diamond surface functionalization with biomimicry – Amine surface tether and thiol moiety for electrochemical sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sund, James B., E-mail: jim@jamessund.com [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Causey, Corey P. [Departments of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Wolter, Scott D. [Department of Physics, Elon University, Elon, NC 27244 (United States); Parker, Charles B., E-mail: charles.parker@duke.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Stoner, Brian R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Research Triangle Institute (RTI) International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Toone, Eric J. [Departments of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Glass, Jeffrey T. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Diamond surfaces were functionalized with organic molecules using a novel approach. • Used biomimicry to select a molecule to bind NO, similar to the human body. • Molecular orbital theory predicted the molecule-analyte oxidation behavior. • A thiol moiety was attached to an amine surface tether on the diamond surface. • XPS analysis verified each surface functionalization step. - Abstract: The surface of conducting diamond was functionalized with a terminal thiol group that is capable of binding and detecting nitrogen–oxygen species. The functionalization process employed multiple steps starting with doped diamond films grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition followed by hydrogen termination and photochemical attachment of a chemically protected amine alkene. The surface tether was deprotected to reveal the amine functionality, which enabled the tether to be extended with surface chemistry to add a terminal thiol moiety for electrochemical sensing applications. Each step of the process was validated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis.

  12. Exploration of the Galilean Moons using Electrodynamic Tethers for Propellantless Maneuvers and Self-Powering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzini, E. C.; Curreli, D.; Zanutto, D.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the benefits of using electrodynamic tethers (EDT) for the exploration of the inner region of the Jovian system. Intense planetary magnetic field and reasonable environmental plasma density make the electrodynamic interaction of the conductive tether with the plasmasphere strong. The interaction is responsible for a Lorentz force that can be conveniently used for propellantless maneuvers and extraction of electrical power for on board use. Jupiter and the four Galilean Moons represent an exceptional gravitational environment for the study of the orbital dynamics of an EDT. The dynamics of such a system was analyzed using a 3-body model, consisting of the planet plus one of its moons (Io in this work) and the EDT itself. New and interesting features appear, like for example the possibility to place the tether in equilibrium with respect to a frame co-rotating with the moon at points that do not coincide with the classical Lagrangian points for non-null electrodynamic forces.

  13. Diamond surface functionalization with biomimicry – Amine surface tether and thiol moiety for electrochemical sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Diamond surfaces were functionalized with organic molecules using a novel approach. • Used biomimicry to select a molecule to bind NO, similar to the human body. • Molecular orbital theory predicted the molecule-analyte oxidation behavior. • A thiol moiety was attached to an amine surface tether on the diamond surface. • XPS analysis verified each surface functionalization step. - Abstract: The surface of conducting diamond was functionalized with a terminal thiol group that is capable of binding and detecting nitrogen–oxygen species. The functionalization process employed multiple steps starting with doped diamond films grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition followed by hydrogen termination and photochemical attachment of a chemically protected amine alkene. The surface tether was deprotected to reveal the amine functionality, which enabled the tether to be extended with surface chemistry to add a terminal thiol moiety for electrochemical sensing applications. Each step of the process was validated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis

  14. Low density aerothermodynamics studies performed by means of the tethered satellite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlomagno, Giovanni M.; De Luca, Luigi; Siemers, Paul M.; Wood, George M., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Low density gas flow modeling and current ground wind-tunnel technologies are not presently able to produce fully reliable data concerning low density flow regimes. In order to answer some of these issues, the Shuttle Continuous Open Wind Tunnel (SCOWT) program has been proposed, which makes use of the tethered satellite system (TSS). SCOWT's objective is to investigate the energy and momentum transfer between the tethered satellite and its environmental medium within the range of the thermofluid-dynamic conditions experienced by TSS during its atmospheric flights. The feasibility and capability of SCOWT to perform low density aerothermodynamics studies are investigated. Some of the results, obtained by means of a tether simulation program, and the instrumentation and TSS design main requirements to meet SCOWT objectives are described.

  15. Numerical study of rocket upper stage deorbiting using passive electrodynamic tether drag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru IONEL

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is a numerical study of the possibility of deorbiting a rocket upper stage from low Earth orbit at EOM (end of mission by means of passive electrodynamic tether drag. The article is structured as follows: the introduction presents the space debris problem in low Earth orbit and the possible methods of deorbiting spacecraft. The next part of the article describes summarily some space tether applications. The third part of the article presents the principle of operation behind passive electrodynamic tether drag. In the fourth part, this principle is detailed so as to represent the input for a numerical study for the deorbit time when using the passive electrodynamic drag concept as deorbiting application. Lastly, the results are presented and conclusions are drawn.

  16. Modeling and simulations of orbital capture with space tether-net system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAI Guang; QIU Yue; LIANG Bin; LI Cheng

    2009-01-01

    A new flexible tether-net space robotic system used to capture, space debris is presented in this paper. With a mass point assumption, a dynamic model of the tether-net system was established in orbital frame by applying Lagrange Equations. In order to investigate the net in-plane trajectories after being cast, the noncontrolled R-bar and V-bar captures were simulated with ignoring the out-of-plane libration, and the effect of inplane libration on the trajectories of the capture net was demonstrated by simulation results. With an effort to damp the in-plane libration, the control scheme based on tether tension was investigated, then an integrated control scheme was proposed by introducing thrusters into the system, and the nonlinear close-loop dynamics was linearised by feedforward strategy. Simulation results show that the feedforward controller is effective for inplane libration damping and enables the capture net to track an expected trajectory.

  17. Environmental diagnostic analysis of ground water bacteria and their involvement in utilization of aromatic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wear, J.E. Jr.

    1993-05-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the hypothesis that select functional groups of bacteria from pristine sites have an innate ability to degrade synthetic aromatics that often contaminate groundwater environments,due to exposure to naturally occurring recalcitrant aromatics in their environment. This study demonstrates that subsurface microbial communities are capable of utilizing lignin and humic acid breakdown products. Utilizers of these compounds were found to be present in most all the wells tested. Even the deepest aquifer tested had utilizers present for all six of the aromatics tested. Highest counts for the aromatics tested were observed with the naturally occurring breakdown products of either lignin or humic acid. Carboxylic acids were found to be an important sole carbon source for groundwater bacteria possibly explained by the fact that they are produced by the oxidative cleavage of aromatic ring structures. The carbohydrate sole carbon sources that demonstrated the greatest densities were ones commonly associated with humics. This study indicates that utilization of naturally occurring aromatic compounds in the subsurface is an important nutritional source for groundwater bacteria. In addition, it suggests that adaptation to naturally occurring recalcitrant substrates is the origin of degradative pathways for xenobiotic compounds with analogous structure. This work has important implications for in situ bioremediation as a method of environmental cleanup.

  18. Differential regulation of synaptic vesicle tethering and docking by UNC-18 and TOM-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena O Gracheva

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The assembly of SNARE complexes between syntaxin, SNAP-25 and synaptobrevin is required to prime synaptic vesicles for fusion. Since Munc18 and tomosyn compete for syntaxin interactions, the interplay between these proteins is predicted to be important in regulating synaptic transmission. We explored this possibility, by examining genetic interactions between C. elegans unc-18(Munc18, unc-64(syntaxin and tom-1(tomosyn. We have previously demonstrated that unc-18 mutants have reduced synaptic transmission, whereas tom-1 mutants exhibit enhanced release. Here we show that the unc-18 mutant release defect is associated with loss of two morphologically distinct vesicle pools; those tethered within 25nm of the plasma membrane and those docked with the plasma membrane. In contrast, priming defective unc-13 mutants accumulate tethered vesicles, while docked vesicles are greatly reduced, indicating tethering is UNC-18-dependent and occurs in the absence of priming. C. elegans unc-64 mutants phenocopy unc-18 mutants, losing both tethered and docked vesicles, whereas overexpression of open syntaxin preferentially increases vesicle docking, suggesting UNC-18/closed syntaxin interactions are responsible for vesicle tethering. Given the competition between vertebrate tomosyn and Munc18, for syntaxin binding, we hypothesized that C. elegans TOM-1 may inhibit both UNC-18-dependent vesicle targeting steps. Consistent with this hypothesis, tom-1 mutants exhibit enhanced UNC-18 plasma membrane localization and a concomitant increase in both tethered and docked synaptic vesicles. Furthermore, in tom-1;unc-18 double mutants the docked, primed vesicle pool is preferentially rescued relative to unc-18 single mutants. Together these data provide evidence for the differential regulation of two vesicle targeting steps by UNC-18 and TOM-1 through competitive interactions with syntaxin

  19. The Disulfide Bonds within BST-2 Enhance Tensile Strength during Viral Tethering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Pont, Kelly E; McKenzie, Aidan M; Kokhan, Oleksandr; Sumner, Isaiah; Berndsen, Christopher E

    2016-02-16

    Human BST-2/tetherin is a host factor that inhibits the release of enveloped viruses, including HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIV, from the cell surface by tethering viruses to the host cell membrane. BST-2 has an α-helical ectodomain that forms disulfide-linked dimers between two monomers forming a coiled coil. The ectodomain contains three cysteine residues that can participate in disulfide bond formation and are critical for viral tethering. The role of the disulfides in viral tethering is unknown but proposed to be for maintaining the dimer. We explored the role of the disulfides in the structure of BST-2 using experimental, biophysical methods. To understand the role of the disulfides in viral tethering, we used a new approach in viral tethering, steered molecular dynamics. We find that the disulfides coordinate the unfolding of the BST-2 monomers, which adds tensile strength to the coiled coil. Structural differences between oxidized and reduced BST-2 are apparent during unfolding, showing the monomers slide past each other in the absence of the disulfides. We found no evidence to support dissociation of the dimer upon reduction of the disulfide bonds. Moreover, the structure of BST-2 in the absence of the disulfides is similar to that of the oxidized form of BST-2, supporting previous X-ray crystallography and cellular work that showed the disulfides are not required for expression of BST-2. These data provide new insights into viral tethering by using novel techniques in the analysis of BST-2 to give amino acid level insight into functions of BST-2. PMID:26789136

  20. Determination of Force Coresponding to Maximal Lactate Steady State in Tethered Swimming

    OpenAIRE

    PAPOTI, MARCELO; VITÓRIO, RICARDO; de Araújo, Gustavo G.; Adelino S R da Silva; SANTHIAGO, VANESSA; MARTINS, LUIZ E. B.; CUNHA, SÉRGIO A.; Gobatto, Claudio A.

    2009-01-01

    The main aim of the present investigation was to verify if the aerobic capacity (AC) measured in tethered swimming corresponds to the maximal lactate steady state (MLSS) and its correlation with 30 min and 400m free style swimming. Twenty-five swimmers were submitted to an incremental tethered swimming test (ITS) with an initial load of 20N and increments of 10N each 3min. After each stage of 3min, the athletes had 30s of interval to blood sample collections that were used to measure blood la...

  1. Drop Tower tests in preparation of a Tethered Electromagnetic Docking space demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivieri, Lorenzo; Francesconi, Alessandro; Antonello, Andrea; Bettiol, Laura; Branz, Francesco; Duzzi, Matteo; Mantellato, Riccardo; Sansone, Francesco; Savioli, Livia

    2016-07-01

    A group of students of the University of Padova is recently developing some technologies to implement a Tethered Electromagnetic Docking (TED) experiment, a novel system for close rendezvous and mating manoeuvres between two spacecraft, consisting in a small tethered probe ejected by the chaser and magnetically guided by a receiving electromagnet mounted on the target. Because of the generated magnetic field, automatic self-alignment and mating are possible; then, as the tether is rewinded, the chaser is able to dock with the target. This concept allows to simplify standard docking procedures, thanks to the reduction of proximity navigation and guidance requirements, as well as consequent fuel reduction. Other interesting applications are expected, from active debris removal to space tugging; in particular, the utilization of the tethered connection for detumbling operations is considered. The realization of a space demonstrator requires a preliminary verification of the critical technologies employed in TED, in particular the magnetic guidance and the probe deploy and retrieve; in the framework of ESA "Drop your Thesis!" 2014 and 2016 campaigns the experiments FELDs (Flexible Electromagnetic Leash Docking system) and STAR (System for Tether Automatic Retrieval) have been focused on the test of such critical elements in the relevant microgravity environment of ZARM Drop Tower in Bremen. In particular, FELDs consisted in a simplified model of TED with a magnetic target interface, a passive tethered probe and its launch system: the experiment allowed to assess the passive self-alignment of the probe with respect to the target and to study the effect of friction between the tether and the release system. Similarly, STAR is investigating the tether actively controlled deployment and retrieval, with the experiment campaign planned on November 2016. In addition, another microgravity experiment is in preparation for the investigation of active magnetic navigation: PACMAN

  2. Tethered satellite system dynamics and control review panel and related activities, phase 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Two major tests of the Tethered Satellite System (TSS) engineering and flight units were conducted to demonstrate the functionality of the hardware and software. Deficiencies in the hardware/software integration tests (HSIT) led to a recommendation for more testing to be performed. Selected problem areas of tether dynamics were analyzed, including verification of the severity of skip rope oscillations, verification or comparison runs to explore dynamic phenomena observed in other simulations, and data generation runs to explore the performance of the time domain and frequency domain skip rope observers.

  3. Diamond surface functionalization with biomimicry - Amine surface tether and thiol moiety for electrochemical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sund, James B.; Causey, Corey P.; Wolter, Scott D.; Parker, Charles B.; Stoner, Brian R.; Toone, Eric J.; Glass, Jeffrey T.

    2014-05-01

    The surface of conducting diamond was functionalized with a terminal thiol group that is capable of binding and detecting nitrogen-oxygen species. The functionalization process employed multiple steps starting with doped diamond films grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition followed by hydrogen termination and photochemical attachment of a chemically protected amine alkene. The surface tether was deprotected to reveal the amine functionality, which enabled the tether to be extended with surface chemistry to add a terminal thiol moiety for electrochemical sensing applications. Each step of the process was validated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis.

  4. Calculating the electromagnetic field on the earth due to an electrodynamic tethered system in the ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Robert D.

    1989-01-01

    A method is presented for calculating the electromagnetic wave field on the earth's surface associated with the operation of an electrodynamic tethered satellite system of constant or slowly varying current in the upper ionosphere. The wave field at the ionospheric boundary and on the earth's surface is obtained by numerical integration. The results suggest that the ionospheric waves do not propagate into the atmosphere and that the image of the Alfven wings from a steady-current tether should be greatly broadened on the earth's surface.

  5. Integrated test rig for tether hardware, real-time simulator and control algorithms: Robust momentum transfer validated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruijff, Michiel; van der Heide, Erik Jan

    2001-02-01

    In preparation of the ESA demonstration mission for a tethered sample return capability from ISS, a breadboard test has been performed to validate the robust StarTrack tether dynamics control algorithms in conjunction with the constructed hardware. The proposed mission will use hardware inherited from the YES mission (Kruijff, 1999). A tether spool is holding a 7 kg, 35 km Dyneema tether. A 45 kg re-entry capsule will be ejected by springs and then deployed by gravity gradient. The dynamics are solely controlled by a barberpole type friction brake, similar to the SEDS hardware. This hardware is integrated in a test rig, based on the TMM&M stand, that has been upgraded to accommodate both a Space Part (abruptly applied initial tether deployment speed, fine tensiometer, real-time space tether simulator using the tensiometer measurements as input, take-up roller deploying the tether at a simulator-controlled speed) and a Satellite Part (infra-red beams inside the tether canister, control computer estimating deployed length and required extra braking from the IRED interrupts, `barberpole' friction brake). So the set-up allows for a tether deployment with closed loop control, all governed by a real-time comprehensive tether dynamics simulation. The tether deployment is based on the two-stage StarTrack deployment. This scheme stabilizes the tether at an intermediate vertical stage (with 3 km deployed). When the orbit and landing site have synchronized, a high-speed deployment follows to a large angle. When the fully deployed 35-km tether swings to the vertical at approximately 40 m/s, it is cut at a prefixed time optimized for landing site accuracy. The paper discusses the tests performed to characterize the designed hardware, maturing of the developed algorithms with respect to the hardware noise levels and the difficulties and limitations of the test rig. It is found that the set-up can be applied to a variety of tether pre-mission tests. It is shown that the performed

  6. Abilities of some higher plants to hydrolyze the acetates of phenols and aromatic-aliphatic alcohols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Mironowicz

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In the biotransformations carried out under the same conditions, the whole intact plants of Spirodela punctata, Nephrolepis exaltata, Cyrtomium falcatum, Nephrolepis cordifolia and the suspension cultures of Helianthus tuberosus, Daucus carota and Petunia hybrida hydrolyze (partially or totally the ester bonds of the acetates of phenols and aromatic-aliphatic alcohols and also the menthyl acetate. Nevertheless, the methyl esters of aromatic acids, structurally similar to the former substrates, do not undergo hydrolysis. At the same time, the viability of first four plants was observed for different levels of acetate concentration. The method of continuous preparative hydrolysis of the same acetates was worked out in Cyrtomium falcatum culture.

  7. Stereoselective Arene-Forming Aldol Condensation: Synthesis of Axially Chiral Aromatic Amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fäseke, Vincent C; Sparr, Christof

    2016-06-13

    The increasing awareness of the importance of amide atropisomers prompts the development of novel strategies for their selective preparation. Described herein is a method for the enantioselective synthesis of atropisomeric aromatic amides by an amine-catalyzed arene-forming aldol condensation. The high reactivity of the glyoxylic amide substrates enables a remarkably efficient construction of a new aromatic ring, which proceeds within minutes at ambient temperature to afford products with excellent stereoselectivity. The high rotational barriers of the reduced products highlight the utility of this stable, spatially organized chiral scaffold. PMID:27166995

  8. Quantum transport through aromatic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we study the electronic transport properties through aromatic molecules connected to two semi-infinite leads. The molecules are in different geometrical configurations including arrays. Using a nearest neighbor tight-binding approach, the transport properties are analyzed into a Green's function technique within a real-space renormalization scheme. We calculate the transmission probability and the Current-Voltage characteristics as a function of a molecule-leads coupling parameter. Our results show different transport regimes for these systems, exhibiting metal-semiconductor-insulator transitions and the possibility to employ them in molecular devices

  9. Vascular gene transfer from metallic stent surfaces using adenoviral vectors tethered through hydrolysable cross-linkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishbein, Ilia; Forbes, Scott P; Adamo, Richard F; Chorny, Michael; Levy, Robert J; Alferiev, Ivan S

    2014-01-01

    In-stent restenosis presents a major complication of stent-based revascularization procedures widely used to re-establish blood flow through critically narrowed segments of coronary and peripheral arteries. Endovascular stents capable of tunable release of genes with anti-restenotic activity may present an alternative strategy to presently used drug-eluting stents. In order to attain clinical translation, gene-eluting stents must exhibit predictable kinetics of stent-immobilized gene vector release and site-specific transduction of vasculature, while avoiding an excessive inflammatory response typically associated with the polymer coatings used for physical entrapment of the vector. This paper describes a detailed methodology for coatless tethering of adenoviral gene vectors to stents based on a reversible binding of the adenoviral particles to polyallylamine bisphosphonate (PABT)-modified stainless steel surface via hydrolysable cross-linkers (HC). A family of bifunctional (amine- and thiol-reactive) HC with an average t1/2 of the in-chain ester hydrolysis ranging between 5 and 50 days were used to link the vector with the stent. The vector immobilization procedure is typically carried out within 9 hr and consists of several steps: 1) incubation of the metal samples in an aqueous solution of PABT (4 hr); 2) deprotection of thiol groups installed in PABT with tris(2-carboxyethyl) phosphine (20 min); 3) expansion of thiol reactive capacity of the metal surface by reacting the samples with polyethyleneimine derivatized with pyridyldithio (PDT) groups (2 hr); 4) conversion of PDT groups to thiols with dithiothreitol (10 min); 5) modification of adenoviruses with HC (1 hr); 6) purification of modified adenoviral particles by size-exclusion column chromatography (15 min) and 7) immobilization of thiol-reactive adenoviral particles on the thiolated steel surface (1 hr). This technique has wide potential applicability beyond stents, by facilitating surface engineering of

  10. Power electronics substrate for direct substrate cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Khiet; Ward, Terence G.; Mann, Brooks S.; Yankoski, Edward P.; Smith, Gregory S.

    2012-05-01

    Systems and apparatus are provided for power electronics substrates adapted for direct substrate cooling. A power electronics substrate comprises a first surface configured to have electrical circuitry disposed thereon, a second surface, and a plurality of physical features on the second surface. The physical features are configured to promote a turbulent boundary layer in a coolant impinged upon the second surface.

  11. Rupture force of cell adhesion ligand tethers modulates biological activities of a cell-laden hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Kyung; Park, Jooyeon; Wang, Xuefeng; Roein-Peikar, Mehdi; Ko, Eunkyung; Qin, Ellen; Lee, Jonghwi; Ha, Taekjip; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2016-04-01

    Recent efforts to design a synthetic extracellular matrix for cell culture, engineering, and therapies greatly contributed to addressing biological roles of types and spatial organization of cell adhesion ligands. It is often suggested that ligand-matrix bond strength is another path to regulate cell adhesion and activities; however tools are lacking. To this end, this study demonstrates that a hydrogel coupled with integrin-binding deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) tethers with pre-defined rupture forces can modulate cell adhesion, differentiation, and secretion activities due to the changes in the number and, likely, force of cells adhered to a gel. The rupture force of DNA tethers was tuned by altering the spatial arrangement of matrix-binding biotin groups. The DNA tethers were immobilized on a hydrogel of alginate grafted with biotin using avidin. Mesenchymal stem cells showed enhanced adhesion, neural differentiation, and paracrine secretion when cultured on the gel coupled with DNA tethers with higher rupture forces. Such innovative cell-matrix interface engineering would be broadly useful for a series of materials used for fundamental and applied studies on biological cells. PMID:26912186

  12. Tethered particle analysis of supercoiled circular DNA using peptide nucleic acid handles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norregaard, Kamilla; Andersson, Magnus; Nielsen, Peter Eigil;

    2014-01-01

    -digoxigenin-coated glass cover slide, and one conjugated with biotin for attachment to a submicron-sized streptavidin-coated polystyrene bead. Plasmids are constructed, purified and incubated with the PNA handles. The dynamics of the construct is analyzed by tracking the tethered bead using video microscopy: less...

  13. Titanium-tethered vancomycin prevents resistance to rifampicin in Staphylococcus aureus in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Rottman

    Full Text Available Rifampicin is currently recognized as the most potent drug against Gram positive implant related infections. The use of rifampicin is limited by the emergence of bacterial resistance, which is often managed by coadministration of a second antibiotic. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of soluble rifampicin in combination with vancomycin tethered to titanium metal as a means to control bacterial growth and resistance in vitro. Bacterial growth was inhibited when the vancomycin-tethered titanium discs were treated with Staphylococcus aureus inocula of ≤2×10⁶ CFU, however inocula greater than 2×10⁶ CFU/disc adhered and survived. The combination of surface-tethered vancomycin with soluble rifampicin enhanced the inhibitory effect of rifampicin for an inoculum of 10⁶ CFU/cm² by one dilution (combination MIC of 0.008 mg/L versus 0.015 mg/L for rifampicin alone. Moreover, surface tethered vancomycin prevented the emergence of a rifampicin resistant population in an inoculum of 2×10⁸ CFU.

  14. Interplay between native topology and non-native interactions in the folding of tethered proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We assessed the interplay of native topology and non-native interactions on surface-tethered protein folding via extensive Monte Carlo simulations of a simple lattice model. In particular, we investigated the thermodynamics and kinetics of protein-like sequences enclosing different amounts of non-native interactions to protein energetics, and which were designed to fold to distinct native topologies. Our results show that the high-contact order (CO) structure renders a folding transition that is robust to (external) steric constraints and non-native interactions. On the other hand, the folding process of the simple low-CO topology can be easily hampered by the presence of a nearby chemically inert plane. In this case, if non-native interactions are highly conspicuous during folding they can actually drive chain collapse into a very native-like trapped state, which impedes the formation of the native structure. The analysis of folding kinetics reveals that the empirical correlation between folding rate and CO may not apply to surface-tethered protein folding. Indeed, results reported here show that depending on the native environment of the tethered chain terminus the folding rate of a low-CO topology can become so drastically small that the high-CO topology actually folds faster under the same conditions. We predict that complex topologies are more likely to conserve their bulk folding mechanism upon surface tethering. (paper)

  15. Curvature sorting of proteins on a cylindrical lipid membrane tether connected to a reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pankaj; Mahata, Paritosh; Baumgart, Tobias; Das, Sovan Lal

    2012-05-01

    Membrane curvature of a biological cell is actively involved in various fundamental cell biological functions. It has been discovered that membrane curvature and binding of peripheral membrane proteins follow a symbiotic relationship. The exact mechanism behind this interplay of protein binding and membrane curvature has not yet been properly understood. To improve understanding of the mechanism, we study curvature sorting of proteins in a model system consisting of a tether pulled from a giant unilamellar vesicle using mechanical-thermodynamic models. The concentration of proteins bound to the membrane changes significantly due to curvature. This has also been observed in experiments by other researchers. We also find that there is a phase transition based on protein concentration and we discuss the coexistence of phases and stability of solutions. Furthermore, when sorting is favorable, the increase in protein concentration stabilizes the tether in the sense that less pulling force is required to maintain the tether. A similar mechanism may be in place, when motor proteins pull tethers from donor membranes.

  16. New amidines from intramolecular cyclization in triflic acid of nitroketene aminals with a tethered phenyl ring

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Soro Yaya; Bamba Fanté; Siaka Sorho; Coustard Jean-Marie; Adima A Augustin

    2007-05-01

    Nitroketene aminals with a tethered phenyl group underwent an intramolecular cyclization in trifluoromethanesulfonic acid to afford the corresponding N-(3-ethyl-hydrohydroxyiminobenzocycloalkenylidene) methylamine trifluoromethanesulfonate. The yields were fair to good excepted for the starting compound 1-[N-ethyl-N-(2-phenylethyl)amino]-1-methylamino-2-nitroethene.

  17. Mono- and bis(pyrrolo)tetrathiafulvalene derivatives tethered to C60

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vico Solano, Marta; Della Pia, Eduardo Antonio; Jevric, Martyn; Schubert, Christina; Wang, Xintai; van der Pol, Cornelia; Kadziola, Anders; Nørgaard, Kasper; Guldi, Dirk M.; Nielsen, Mogens Brøndsted; Jeppesen, Jan Oskar

    2014-01-01

    A series of mono- (MPTTF) and bis(pyrrolo) tetrathiafulvalene (BPTTF) derivatives tethered to one or two C-60 moieties was synthesized and characterized. The synthetic strategy for these dumbbell-shaped compounds was based on a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction between aldehyde-functionalized MP...

  18. High-Voltage Tethers For Enhanced Particle Scattering In Van Allen Belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirnov, Vladimir; Ü, Defne; Danilov, Valentin

    1996-11-01

    New applications of space tethers (HVTSS) are discussed in relation with the ideafootnote Yu.V.Vasilyev, V.V.Danilov, Physics-Doklady, (1995) 342, 5. of an active experiment at the Earth's radiation belts. Two conducting strings are supposed to be tethered between the main satellite and two small subsatellites flying through the ERB. A large potential difference ~1MV is applied between the tethers by means of a generator carried on the main satellite. The tethers effectively scatter the high energy particles into loss cone, providing a control of particle life time in ERB. The rigorous theory of the sheath layer formed by relatively cold plasma is developed for both DC and AC regimes yielding an electric field profile, which is then used for the treatment of the scattering problem. With the help of the Fokker-Planck equation, the average rate of particle losses, normalized per 1 km of the theter's length is found to be: (2.5 div 14)× 10^16 sec-1km-1 for electron belts and 1.8× 10^14div 2.5× 10^20 sec-1km-1 for proton belts. New active experiments in ERB become possible under the joint realization of HVTSS and HAARPfootnote D.Papadopoulos, P.Bernhardt et al. A Joint Program of Phillips Lab and the Office of Naval Research, June, 1995 projects.

  19. Synthetic Studies to Lyngbouilloside: A Phosphate Tether-Mediated Synthesis of the Macrolactone Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chegondi, Rambabu

    2015-01-01

    A concise synthetic pathway to the originally assigned structure of lyngbouilloside macrolactone (3) is reported. The core macrocycle 3 was synthesized via a phosphate tether-mediated, one-pot, sequential RCM/CM/chemoselective hydrogenation reaction, Roskamp homologation, and a high yielding Boeckman acylketene cyclization. PMID:26388654

  20. Beyond organic chemistry: aromaticity in atomic clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldyrev, Alexander I; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2016-04-28

    We describe joint experimental and theoretical studies carried out collaboratively in the authors' labs for understanding the structures and chemical bonding of novel atomic clusters, which exhibit aromaticity. The concept of aromaticity was first discovered to be useful in understanding the square-planar unit of Al4 in a series of MAl4(-) bimetallic clusters that led to discoveries of aromaticity in many metal cluster systems, including transition metals and similar cluster motifs in solid compounds. The concept of aromaticity has been found to be particularly powerful in understanding the stability and bonding in planar boron clusters, many of which have been shown to be analogous to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in their π bonding. Stimulated by the multiple aromaticity in planar boron clusters, a design principle has been proposed for stable metal-cerntered aromatic molecular wheels of the general formula, M@Bn(k-). A series of such borometallic aromatic wheel complexes have been produced in supersonic cluster beams and characterized experimentally and theoretically, including Ta@B10(-) and Nb@B10(-), which exhibit the highest coordination number in two dimensions. PMID:26864511

  1. Lignin peroxidase oxidation of aromatic compounds in systems containing organic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Duhalt, R; Westlake, D W; Fedorak, P M

    1994-02-01

    Lignin peroxidase from Phanerochaete chrysosporium was used to study the oxidation of aromatic compounds, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocyclic compounds, that are models of moieties of asphaltene molecules. The oxidations were done in systems containing water-miscible organic solvents, including methanol, isopropanol, N, N-dimethylformamide, acetonitrile, and tetrahydrofuran. Of the 20 aromatic compounds tested, 9 were oxidized by lignin peroxidase in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. These included anthracene, 1-, 2-, and 9-methylanthracenes, acenaphthene, fluoranthene, pyrene, carbazole, and dibenzothiophene. Of the compounds studied, lignin peroxidase was able to oxidize those with ionization potentials of stability characteristics of lignin peroxidase were determined by using pyrene as the substrate in systems containing different amounts of organic solvent. Benzyl alkylation of lignin peroxidase improved its activity in a system containing water-miscible organic solvent but did not increase its resistance to inactivation at high solvent concentrations. PMID:16349176

  2. Dynamics and Power Generation Potential from a Tethered Kite Moving in a Horizontal Flightpath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavi, Glenn Romo

    Tethered-wing power systems are a viable possibility for collecting energy from stronger, more consistent winds found in the upper regions of the atmosphere where conventional wind turbines are incapable of reaching. To date, all of the tethered-wing systems fly with the tether oriented down-wind of the ground attachment point. Examined here are the dynamics and performance of a novel system where the tether is oriented both upwind and downwind of the ground attachment point during normal operation of the device. Certain prototypes built by Makani and Ampyx Power are considered to have motions analogous to the motions of the blade tips on conventional horizontal-axis wind turbines. If true, this system has motions that are analogous to conventional vertical-axis wind turbines. The system has a ground-based generator which is mechanical coupled to the aircraft and energy is generated on the reel-out phase of each cycle while a smaller amount of energy is consumed during the reel-in phase of each cycle. A simple model was developed which captures the dominant dynamics of this system and shows, via simulation, that the proposed system is viable and capable of stable and unstable periodic motions with a simulated closed-loop tether tension controller or a simple open loop reel-rate controller. In addition, it is capable of motions which produce net positive power. The small system examined, where parameter optimization was not performed, predicts an average cycle power of more than 500 watts in a 10 m/s wind.

  3. Dynamics of a flexible tethered satellite system utilising various materials for coplanar and non-coplanar models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Aaron Aw Teik; Varatharajoo, Renuganth

    2015-08-01

    This paper discusses the development of mathematical models for a flexible tethered satellite system (TSS) in both planar and co-planar states. The flexible tethered satellite system consists of three rigid bodies with two flexible tethers, each connecting two rigid bodies with one located in the centre and serving as the mothership. The TSS motion includes tether deformations, rotational dynamics, and orbital mechanics. The three materials that are possible to be used for a space tether are tungsten wire, Spectra-2000, and diamond; it should be noted that the diamond used here is in a form of a nanotube thread. The tether will undergo a spinning motion as well in the motorised option. In addition, the air drag perturbation is also considered since the entire TSS is flown around the Low Earth Orbit (LEO), where the air-drag perturbation is dominant. A survival analysis was then performed for planar and non-coplanar models in order to establish a dynamic performance envelope with respect to the tether's tension at different altitudes under the air-drag perturbation. The proposed models were treated numerically and analysed accordingly. Then a comparison study between the coplanar and non-coplanar models were conducted and the difference in their performances was observed and discussed. Although all materials have their own safe operation boundaries, the flexible TSS using tungsten shows a better dynamic performance than the other TSS options in a non-coplanar model.

  4. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with SPICA

    CERN Document Server

    Berne, O; Mulas, G; Tielens, A G G M; Goicoechea, J R

    2009-01-01

    Thanks to high sensitivity and angular resolution and broad spectral coverage, SPICA will offer a unique opportunity to better characterize the nature of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and very small grains (VSGs), to better use them as probes of astrophysical environments. The angular resolution will enable to probe the chemical frontiers in the evolution process from VSGs to neutral PAHs, to ionized PAHs and to "Grand-PAHs" in photodissotiation regions and HII regions, as a function of G$_0$/n (UV radiation field / density). High sensitivity will favor the detection of the far-IR skeletal emission bands of PAHs, which provide specific fingerprints and could lead to the identification of individual PAHs. This overall characterization will allow to use PAH and VSG populations as tracers of physical conditions in spatially resolved protoplanetary disks and nearby galaxies (using mid-IR instruments), and in high redshift galaxies (using the far-IR instrument), thanks to the broad spectral coverage SPIC...

  5. Nitration of naphthalene and remarks on the mechanism of electrophilic aromatic nitration*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olah, George A.; Narang, Subhash C.; Olah, Judith A.

    1981-01-01

    Naphthalene was nitrated with a variety of nitrating agents. Comparison of data with Perrin's electrochemical nitration [Perrin, C. L. (1977) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 99, 5516-5518] shows that nitration of naphthalene gives an α-nitronaphthalene to β-nitronaphthalene ratio that varies between 9 and 29 and is thus not constant. Perrin's data, therefore, are considered to be inconclusive evidence for the proposed one-electron transfer mechanism for the nitration of naphthalene and other reactive aromatics. Moodie and Schoefield [Hoggett, J. G., Moodie, R. B., Penton, J. R. & Schoefield, K. (1971) Nitration and Aromatic Reactivity (Cambridge Univ. Press, London)], as well as Perrin, independently concluded that, in the general scheme of nitration of reactive aromatics, there is the necessity to introduce into the classical Ingold mechanism an additional step involving a distinct intermediate preceding the formation of the Wheland intermediate (σ complexes). This view coincides with our two-step mechanistic picture [Kuhn, S. J. & Olah, G. A. (1961) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 83, 4564-4571] of the nitronium salt nitration of aromatic hydrocarbons (including benzene and toluene), in which low substrate selectivity but high positional selectivity was found, indicating the independence of substrate from positional selectivity. PMID:16593026

  6. Nitration of naphthalene and remarks on the mechanism of electrophilic aromatic nitration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olah, G A; Narang, S C; Olah, J A

    1981-06-01

    Naphthalene was nitrated with a variety of nitrating agents. Comparison of data with Perrin's electrochemical nitration [Perrin, C. L. (1977) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 99, 5516-5518] shows that nitration of naphthalene gives an alpha-nitronaphthalene to beta-nitronaphthalene ratio that varies between 9 and 29 and is thus not constant. Perrin's data, therefore, are considered to be inconclusive evidence for the proposed one-electron transfer mechanism for the nitration of naphthalene and other reactive aromatics. Moodie and Schoefield [Hoggett, J. G., Moodie, R. B., Penton, J. R. & Schoefield, K. (1971) Nitration and Aromatic Reactivity (Cambridge Univ. Press, London)], as well as Perrin, independently concluded that, in the general scheme of nitration of reactive aromatics, there is the necessity to introduce into the classical Ingold mechanism an additional step involving a distinct intermediate preceding the formation of the Wheland intermediate (sigma complexes). This view coincides with our two-step mechanistic picture [Kuhn, S. J. & Olah, G. A. (1961) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 83, 4564-4571] of the nitronium salt nitration of aromatic hydrocarbons (including benzene and toluene), in which low substrate selectivity but high positional selectivity was found, indicating the independence of substrate from positional selectivity. PMID:16593026

  7. Utilizing the σ-complex stability for quantifying reactivity in nucleophilic substitution of aromatic fluorides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Liljenberg

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A computational approach using density functional theory to compute the energies of the possible σ-complex reaction intermediates, the “σ-complex approach”, has been shown to be very useful in predicting regioselectivity, in electrophilic as well as nucleophilic aromatic substitution. In this article we give a short overview of the background for these investigations and the general requirements for predictive reactivity models for the pharmaceutical industry. We also present new results regarding the reaction rates and regioselectivities in nucleophilic substitution of fluorinated aromatics. They were rationalized by investigating linear correlations between experimental rate constants (k from the literature with a theoretical quantity, which we call the sigma stability (SS. The SS is the energy change associated with formation of the intermediate σ-complex by attachment of the nucleophile to the aromatic ring. The correlations, which include both neutral (NH3 and anionic (MeO− nucleophiles are quite satisfactory (r = 0.93 to r = 0.99, and SS is thus useful for quantifying both global (substrate and local (positional reactivity in SNAr reactions of fluorinated aromatic substrates. A mechanistic analysis shows that the geometric structure of the σ-complex resembles the rate-limiting transition state and that this provides a rationale for the observed correlations between the SS and the reaction rate.

  8. Current-voltage characteristics of a homologous series of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhme, Thilo; Simpson, Christopher D; Müllen, Klaus; Rabe, Jürgen P

    2007-01-01

    A novel alkyl-substituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) with D(2h) symmetry and 78 carbon atoms in the aromatic core (C78) was synthesized, thereby completing a homologous series of soluble PAH compounds with increasing size of the aromatic pi system (42, 60, and 78 carbon atoms). The optical band gaps were determined by UV/Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy in solution. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS) revealed diode-like current versus voltage (I-V) characteristics through individual aromatic cores in monolayers at the interface between the solution and the basal plane of graphite. The asymmetry of the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics increases with the increasing size of the aromatic core, and the concomitantly decreasing HOMO-LUMO gap. This is attributed to resonant tunneling through the HOMO of the adsorbed molecule, and an asymmetric position of the molecular species in the tunnel junction. Consistently, submolecularly resolved STM images at negative substrate bias are in good agreement with the calculated pattern for the electron densities of the HOMOs. The analysis provides the basis for tailoring rectification with a single molecule in an STM junction. PMID:17579898

  9. Ratcheting of the substrate from the zymogen to proteinase conformations directs the sequential cleavage of prothrombin by prothrombinase

    OpenAIRE

    Bianchini, Elsa P.; Orcutt, Steven J.; Panizzi, Peter; Bock, Paul E.; Krishnaswamy, Sriram

    2005-01-01

    Prothrombinase catalyzes thrombin formation by the ordered cleavage of two peptide bonds in prothrombin. Although these bonds are likely ≈36 Å apart, sequential cleavage of prothrombin at Arg-320 to produce meizothrombin, followed by its cleavage at Arg-271, are both accomplished by equivalent exosite interactions that tether each substrate to the enzyme and facilitate presentation of the scissile bond to the active site of the catalyst. We show that impairing the conformational transition fr...

  10. A potential base substrate for deformable scintillation materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Hidehito; Sato, Nobuhiro; Kitamura, Hisashi; Shirakawa, Yoshiyuki; Takahashi, Sentaro

    2016-05-01

    Deformable scintillation materials for radiation detection are an original concept that will impact many applications. Here we reveal the optical characteristics of readily available, transparent grease that consists of adhesive aromatic ring polymers. The aromatic ring polymer is methyl phenyl polysiloxane, commonly used in cosmetics, lubrication, heat conduction, and mechanical damping. It has a 285-nm excitation maximum and emits short wavelength light that peaks at 315 nm. The stopping power for 1 MeV electrons is 1.78 MeV cm2/g. The light-yield distribution has distinct peaks at 976 keV from internal conversion electrons and at 5486 keV from alpha particles. In addition, this particular methyl phenyl polysiloxane is safe for use and disposal, which is an excellent advantage. These aromatic ring polymers are potential base substrates for deformable scintillation materials and make an important addition to the categories of scintillation materials.

  11. Dynamics of an Electrodynamic Tether System in a Varying Space-Plasma Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janeski, John A.

    Electrodynamic tethers have a wide range of proposed applications in the fields of satellite propulsion and space plasma research. The fundamental purpose of this dissertation is to improve the understanding of the behavior of an electrodynamic tether (EDT) system in Earth's ionosphere. An electrodynamic tether system consists of two satellites connected by a long tether that generates current to produce either power or thrust via the system's electromagnetic interaction with the space environment. Previous electrodynamic tether investigations decouple the interaction between the tether and the constantly changing plasma environment. The limiting factor inhibiting the development of a full system model that has an accurate characterization of the tether/plasma interaction is that the understanding of that interaction is not well developed over a wide range of system parameters. The EDT system model developed in this study uses a high fidelity dynamics model that includes a tether current described by an analytical current collection model whose plasma parameters are determine by the International Reference Ionosphere. It is first shown that new instabilities are induced in the system dynamics under a basic analytical current model versus a constant current model. A 2-D3v Particle-in-Cell (PIC) code has been developed to study the plasma dynamics near a positively charged EDT system end-body and their impact on the current collected. Simulations are run over a range of system parameters that occur throughout a LEO orbit. The azimuthal current structures observed during the TSS-1R mission are found to enhance the current collected by the satellite when the magnetic field is slightly off of perpendicular to the orbital velocity. When the in-plane component of the magnetic field becomes large, the electrons are not able to easily cross the field lines causing plasma lobes form above and below the satellite. The lobes limit the current arriving to the satellite and also

  12. Translation of an aromatic field image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yastrebov, Anatoliy S.; Makarov, Leonid M.; Protasenya, Sergey V.; Vereshak, Evgeniy V.

    2005-04-01

    As is known, for a person there are possibilities of perception of audio, video, and aromatic information messages by means of touch systems available to him. Such packages of the messages are accepted remotely without direct contact to a message source. Now the direction bound with creation of devices capable to playback aromatic information images is actively developed. Such systems switched on in special transmission channels of information provide adequate perception of information highways describing actual event which happen in the enclosing world. One can present the aromatic-field image through a series of control codes for an aromatic field synthesizer, thereupon it is possible to transmit the image on telecommunication networks. For odor oscillators installation problems in compartments of automobiles, buses as well as of airplanes are widely discussed. In this work we deal with a device for synthesis of an image of an aromatic field which works under the control of a personal computer with an express program. In the given operation, the possibility of remote handle of an image of an aromatic field and, as a corollary, organization of a new tansmission channel for the information on the aromatic-field image through an existing synthesizer is considered.

  13. Bacterial Conversion of Hydroxylamino Aromatic Compounds by both Lyase and Mutase Enzymes Involves Intramolecular Transfer of Hydroxyl Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Nadeau, Lloyd J.; He, Zhongqi; Spain, Jim C.

    2003-01-01

    Hydroxylamino aromatic compounds are converted to either the corresponding aminophenols or protocatechuate during the bacterial degradation of nitroaromatic compounds. The origin of the hydroxyl group of the products could be the substrate itself (intramolecular transfer mechanism) or the solvent water (intermolecular transfer mechanism). The conversion of hydroxylaminobenzene to 2-aminophenol catalyzed by a mutase from Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes JS45 proceeds by an intramolecular hydroxyl...

  14. Hovering and Twirling of Tethered Molecules by Confinement between Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Laura; Lee, Joonhee; Tallarida, Nicholas; Apkarian, V Ara

    2016-07-01

    Through STM images, we show that azobenzene-terminated alkanethiols hover and twirl when confined between the Ag tip and Au(111) substrate of an STM junction. In contrast with mechanisms of activation used to drive molecular rotors, twirling is induced by the effective elimination of lateral corrugation in the energy landscape when molecules hover by their van der Waals attraction to the approaching tip. While in the stationary state the benzenes of the head group lie flat with an inter-ring separation of 7.5 Å, they stand on-edge as the molecule twirls and their separation contracts to 5.2 Å, close to the value of the free molecule. The captured images of motion allow the characterization of physisorption potentials. PMID:27300256

  15. Conservation of medicinal and aromatic plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šveistytė, Laima

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The conservation of medicinal and aromatic plants includes ex situ and in situ methods. The genetic recourses of medicinal and aromatic plants are stored, studied and constantly maintained in the field collections of the Institute of Botany of Nature Research Centre, Kaunas Botanical Garden of Vytautas Magnus University and Aleksandras Stulginskis University of Agriculture. Presently seeds of 214 accessions representing 38 species of medicinal and aromatic plants are stored in a long-term storage in the Plant Gene Bank. The data about national genetic resources are collected and stored in the Central Database of the Plant Gene Bank.

  16. Aromaticity influencing the thermostability of micellar dispersions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, J.A.; Kunzman, W.J.

    1970-02-17

    The thermostability of a micellar dispersion is shifted to higher temperature ranges by increasing the aromaticity of the hydrocarbon within the dispersion. The micellar solution is composed of kerosene and light catalytic cycle oil (hydrocarbons), water, sodium or ammonium alkyl aryl naphthenic sulfonates (petroleum sulfonate surfactant), isopropanol (cosurfactant), and sodium sulfate (electrolyte). The aromatic content of the light catalytic cycle oil is higher than the aromatic content of the kerosene. By increasing the concentration of cycle oil to kerosene, stable micellar solutions at temperatures from ambient to 200/sup 0/F can be obtained. The aqueous medium can be soft, brackish, or a brine.

  17. Hexacoordinate bonding and aromaticity in silicon phthalocyanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang

    2010-12-23

    Si-E bondings in hexacoordinate silicon phthalocyanine were analyzed using bond order (BO), energy partition, atoms in molecules (AIM), electron localization function (ELF), and localized orbital locator (LOL). Bond models were proposed to explain differences between hexacoordinate and tetracoordinate Si-E bondings. Aromaticity of silicon phthalocyanine was investigated using nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS), harmonic oscillator model of aromaticity (HOMA), conceptual density functional theory (DFT), ring critical point (RCP) descriptors, and delocalization index (DI). Structure, energy, bonding, and aromaticity of tetracoordinate silicon phthalocyanine were studied and compared with hexacoordinate one. PMID:21105726

  18. Multibody dynamics driving GNC and system design in tethered nets for active debris removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benvenuto, Riccardo; Lavagna, Michèle; Salvi, Samuele

    2016-07-01

    Debris removal in Earth orbits is an urgent issue to be faced for space exploitation durability. Among different techniques, tethered-nets present appealing benefits and some open points to fix. Former and latter are discussed in the paper, supported by the exploitation of a multibody dynamics tool. With respect to other proposed capture mechanisms, tethered-net solutions are characterised by a safer capturing distance, a passive angular momentum damping effect and the highest flexibility to unknown shape, material and attitude of the target to interface with. They also allow not considering the centre of gravity alignment with thrust axis as a constraint, as it is for any rigid link solution. Furthermore, the introduction of a closing thread around the net perimeter ensures safer and more reliable grasping and holding. In the paper, a six degrees of freedom multibody dynamics simulator is presented: it was developed at Politecnico di Milano - Department of Aerospace Science and Technologies - and it is able to describe the orbital and attitude dynamics of tethered-nets systems and end-bodies during different phases, with great flexibility in dealing with different topologies and configurations. Critical phases as impact and wrapping are analysed by simulation to address the tethered-stack controllability. It is shown how the role of contact modelling is fundamental to describe the coupled dynamics: it is demonstrated, as a major novel contribution, how friction between the net and a tumbling target allows reducing its angular motion, stabilizing the system and allowing safer towing operations. Moreover, the so-called tethered space tug is analysed: after capture, the two objects, one passive and one active, are connected by the tethered-net flexible link, the motion of the system being excited by the active spacecraft thrusters. The critical modes prevention during this phase, by means of a closed-loop control synthesis is shown. Finally, the connection between

  19. Boron-Catalyzed Aromatic C-H Bond Silylation with Hydrosilanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuanhong; Wang, Baoli; Zhang, Liang; Hou, Zhaomin

    2016-03-23

    Metal-free catalytic C-H silylation of a series of aromatic compounds such as N,N-disubstituted anilines with various hydrosilanes has been achieved for the first time using commercially available B(C6F5)3 as a catalyst. This protocol features simple and neutral reaction conditions, high regioselectivity, wide substrate scope (up to 40 examples), Si-Cl bond compatibility, and no requirement for a hydrogen acceptor. PMID:26959863

  20. Estimation of added-mass and damping coefficients of a tethered spherical float using potential flow theory

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vethamony, P.; Chandramohan, P.; Sastry, J.S.; Narasimhan, S.

    Added-mass (alpha) and damping coefficients (beta) of a tethered spherical float, undergoing oscillatory motion in sinusoidal waves, have been derived from the motion generated velocity potential for one degree-of-freedom (surge) using potential...

  1. Expression of an aromatic-dependent decarboxylase which provides growth-essential CO2 equivalents for the acetogenic (Wood) pathway of Clostridium thermoaceticum.

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, T D; Lux, M F; Drake, H L

    1990-01-01

    The acetogen Clostridium thermoaceticum generates growth-essential CO2 equivalents from carboxylated aromatic compounds (e.g., 4-hydroxybenzoate), and these CO2 equivalents are likely integrated into the acetogenic pathway (T. Hsu, S. L. Daniel, M. F. Lux, and H. L. Drake, J. Bacteriol. 172:212-217, 1990). By using 4-hydroxybenzoate as a model substrate, an assay was developed to study the expression and activity of the decarboxylase involved in the activation of aromatic carboxyl groups. The...

  2. Photocycloaddition of aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes to isoxazoles: Cycloaddition reactivity and stability studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidehiro Kotaka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The first photocycloadditions of aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes to methylated isoxazoles are reported. The reactions lead solely to the exo-adducts with high regio- and diastereoselectivities. Ring methylation of the isoxazole substrates is crucial for high conversions and product stability. The 6-arylated bicyclic oxetanes 9a–9c were characterized by X-ray structure analyses and showed the highest thermal stabilities. All oxetanes formed from isoxazoles were highly acid-sensitive and also thermally unstable. Cleavage to the original substrates is dominant and the isoxazole derived oxetanes show type T photochromism.

  3. Hydrogenation of diesel aromatic compounds in supercritical solvent environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.P. Martins

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Reactions under supercritical conditions have been employed in many processes. Furthermore, an increasing number of commercial reactions have been conducted under supercritical or near critical conditions. These reaction conditions offer several advantages when compared to conditions in conventional catalytic processes in liquid-phase, gas-liquid interface, or even some gas-phase reactions. Basically, a supercritical solvent can diminish the reactant’s transport resistance from the bulk region to the catalyst surface due to enhancement of liquid diffusivity values and better solubility than those in different phases. Another advantage is that supercritical solvents permit prompt and easy changes in intermolecular properties in order to modify reaction parameters, such as conversion or selectivity, or even proceed with the separation of reaction products. Diesel fractions from petroleum frequently have larger than desirable quantities of aromatic compounds. Diesel hydrogenation is intended to decrease these quantities, i.e., to increase the quantity of paraffin present in this petroleum fraction. In this work, the hydrogenation of tetralin was studied as a model reaction for the aromatic hydrogenation process. A conventional gas-liquid-solid catalytic process was compared with that of supercritical carbon dioxide substrate under similar conditions. Additionally, an equilibrium conversion diagram was calculated for this reaction in a wide range of temperature and reactant ratios, so as to optimize the operational conditions and improve the results of subsequent experiments. An increase in the rate of reaction at 493 K in supercritical fluid, as compared to that in the conventional process, was observed.

  4. BIODEGRADATION OF AROMATIC AMINE COMPOUNDS USING MOVING BED BIOFILM REACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Delnavaz ، B. Ayati ، H. Ganjidoust

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Three moving bed biofilm reactors were used to treat synthesized wastewater of aromatic amine compounds including aniline, para-diaminobenzene and para-aminophenol that are found in many industrial wastewaters. The reactors with cylindrical shape had an internal diameter and an effective depth of 10 and 60 cm, respectively. The reactors were filled with light expanded clay aggregate as carriers and operated in an aerobic batch and continuous conditions. Evaluation of the reactors' efficiency was done at different retention time of 8, 24, 48 and 72 h with an influent COD from 100 to 3500 mg/L (filling ratio of 50%. The maximum obtained removal efficiencies were 90% (influent COD=2000 mg/L, 87% (influent COD=1000 mg/L and 75% (influent COD=750 mg/L for aniline, para-diaminobenzene and para-aminophenol, respectively. In the study of decrease in filling ratio from 50 to 30 percent, 6% decrease for both para-diaminobenzene and para-aminophenol and 7% increase for aniline degradation were obtained. The removal efficiency was decreased to about 10% after 15 days of continuous loading for each of the above three substrates. In the shock loading test, initially the COD removal rate was decreased in all reactors, but after about 10 days, it has been approached to the previous values. Finally, biodegradability of aromatic amines has been proved by nuclear magnetic resonance system.

  5. Structure of the Membrane-tethering GRASP Domain Reveals a Unique PDZ Ligand Interaction That Mediates Golgi Biogenesis*

    OpenAIRE

    Truschel, Steven T.; Sengupta, Debrup; Foote, Adam; Heroux, Annie; Macbeth, Mark R.; Linstedt, Adam D.

    2011-01-01

    Biogenesis of the ribbon-like membrane network of the mammalian Golgi requires membrane tethering by the conserved GRASP domain in GRASP65 and GRASP55, yet the tethering mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of the GRASP55 GRASP domain, which revealed an unusual arrangement of two tandem PDZ folds that more closely resemble prokaryotic PDZ domains. Biochemical and functional data indicated that the interaction between the ligand-binding pocket of PDZ1 and an...

  6. Pulse shape discrimination in non-aromatic plastics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently it has been demonstrated that plastic scintillators have the ability to distinguish neutrons from gamma rays by way of pulse shape discrimination (PSD). This discovery has lead to new materials and new capabilities. Here we report our work with the effects of aromatic, non-aromatic, and mixed aromatic/non-aromatic matrices have on the performance of PSD plastic scintillators

  7. Volatilisation of aromatic hydrocarbons from soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt, B.; Christensen, T.H.

    1996-01-01

    The non-steady-state fluxes of aromatic hydrocarbons were measured in the laboratory from the surface of soils contaminated with coal tar Four soil samples from a former gasworks site were used for the experiments. The fluxes were quantified for 11 selected compounds, 4 mono- and 7 polycyclic...... aromatic hydrocarbons, for a period of up to 8 or 16 days. The concentrations of the selected compounds in the soils were between 0.2 and 3,100 mu g/g. The study included the experimental determination of the distribution coefficient of the aromatic hydrocarbons between the sorbed phase and the water under...... saturated conditions. The determined distribution coefficients showed that the aromatic hydrocarbons were more strongly sorbed to the total organic carbon including the coal tar pitch - by a factor of 8 to 25 - than expected for natural organic matter. The fluxes were also estimated using an analytical...

  8. Graphite Oxide and Aromatic Amines : Size Matters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spyrou, Konstantinos; Calvaresi, Matteo; Diamanti, Evmorfi A. K.; Tsoufis, Theodoros; Gournis, Dimitrios; Rudolf, Petra; Zerbetto, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies are performed in order to illuminate, for first time, the intercalation mechanism of polycyclic aromatic molecules into graphite oxide. Two representative molecules of this family, aniline and naphthalene amine are investigated. After intercalation, aniline molec

  9. International congress on aromatic and medicinal plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full Text : In Morocco, medicinal and aromatic plants occupy an important place in the traditional care system of a large number of local people. They are also economically strong potential, but unfortunately they are not valued enough. Indeed, Morocco by its privileged geographical position in the Mediterranean basin and its floristic diversity (with a total of over 4,200 species and subspecies of which over 500 are recognized as medicinal and aromatic plants), is a leading provider of traditional global market. In this context and given the back label of the natural global, group research and studies on Aromatic and Medicinal Plants (GREPAM), the Faculty of Semlalia and University Cadi Ayyad, organize: the International Congress on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants CIPAM 2009. The organization of this conference is part of scientific research developed by the GREPAM.

  10. Activity relationships for aromatic crown ethers

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, M J

    1998-01-01

    This thesis involves an investigation of aromatic crown ethers and a study of their binding constants for alkali metals. The study was motivated by the current needs of the semiconductor industry to improve the scavenging of mobile ions from fabricated circuits. A number of aromatic crown ethers have been sulphonated in an attempt to improve their water solubility and cation binding activity. These materials have been extensively studied and their binding activity determined. In collaboration with a molecular modelling study, the effect of ionisable sulphonate groups on the macrocycles' behaviour has been investigated. The broader issue of the effect of substituents in aromatic crown ethers has also been studied with the preparation of a wide range of substituted crown ethers. The cation binding activity of these materials has been found to bear a simple relationship to the electron withdrawing nature of the aromatic substituents. This relationship can be accurately monitored using electronic charge densities...

  11. Comments on Coulomb pairing in aromatic hydrocarbons

    CERN Document Server

    Huber, D L

    2013-01-01

    Recently reported anomalies in the double-photonionization spectra of aromatic molecules such as benzene, naphthalene, anthracene and coronene are attributed to Coulomb-pair resonances of pi electrons.

  12. PROTONATED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS REVISITED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We reconsider the contribution that singly protonated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs; HPAH+s) might make to the Class A component of the 6.2 μm interstellar emission feature in light of the recent experimental measurements of protonated naphthalene and coronene. Our calculations on the small HPAH+s have a band near 6.2 μm, as found in experiment. While the larger HPAH+s still have emission near 6.2 μm, the much larger intensity of the band near 6.3 μm overwhelms the weaker band at 6.2 μm, so that the 6.2 μm band is barely visible. Since the large PAHs are more representative of those in the interstellar medium, our work suggests that large HPAH+s cannot be major contributors to the observed emission at 6.2 μm (i.e., Class A species). Saturating large PAH cations with hydrogen atoms retains the 6.2 μm Class A band position, but the rest of the spectrum is inconsistent with observed spectra.

  13. Dehydrogenative Aromatization of Saturated Aromatic Compounds by Graphite Oxide and Molecular Sieves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张轩; 徐亮; 王希涛; 马宁; 孙菲菲

    2012-01-01

    Graphite oxide (GO) has attracted much attention of material and catalysis chemists recently. Here we describe a combination of GO and molecular sieves for the dehydrogenative aromatization. GO prepared through improved Hummers method showed high oxidative activity in this reaction. Partially or fully saturated aromatic compounds were converted to their corresponding dehydrogenated aromatic products with fair to excellent conversions and selectivities. As both GO and molecular sieves are easily available, cheap, lowly toxic and have good tolerance to various functional groups, this reaction provides a facile approach toward aromatic compounds from their saturated precursors

  14. An electronic interface for a fiber optic tethered unmanned underwater vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheakoski, J. R.

    1994-04-01

    As the sophistication of acoustic sensor and communication systems related to unmanned underwater vehicles (UUV) has increased, the requirement for greater volume and higher speed data transfers has emerged. Fiber optic technology provides an effective means for high bandwidth communications with a UUV while minimizing weight and space criteria aboard the UUV. Increase in data transmission speed has permitted real time processing of data on the launch platform when using large high powered computing systems. Maximum system reliability at advanced performance levels can also be realized. By designing and developing a full scale system comprised of the UUV, remote control and command platform, and data handling and routing electronics, fiber optic tethered UUV technology was demonstrated in lab field tests. This three year venture culminated in a series of successful in-water tests that proved the feasibility of fiber optic tethered UUV's and warranted the continuation of research on remotely operated UUV's.

  15. Experimental verification of chaotic control of an underactuated tethered satellite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Zhaojun; Jin, Dongping

    2016-03-01

    This paper studies chaotic control of a tethered satellite system (TSS) driven only by a momentum-exchange device during its attitude adjustment. In dealing with such the underactuated system, an extended time-delay autosynchronization (ETDAS) is employed to stabilize the chaotic motion to a periodic motion. To obtain the control domains of the ETDAS method, a stability analysis of the controlled tethered satellite system in elliptical orbit is implemented. According to the principle of dynamic similarity, then, ground-based experiment setups are proposed and designed to emulate the in-plane motions of the TSS. Representative experiments are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the ETDAS scheme in controlling the chaotic motion of the underactuated TSS.

  16. In Vivo Quantification of Peroxisome Tethering to Chloroplasts in Tobacco Epidermal Cells Using Optical Tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hongbo; Metz, Jeremy; Teanby, Nick A; Ward, Andy D; Botchway, Stanley W; Coles, Benjamin; Pollard, Mark R; Sparkes, Imogen

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisomes are highly motile organelles that display a range of motions within a short time frame. In static snapshots, they can be juxtaposed to chloroplasts, which has led to the hypothesis that they are physically interacting. Here, using optical tweezers, we tested the dynamic physical interaction in vivo. Using near-infrared optical tweezers combined with TIRF microscopy, we were able to trap peroxisomes and approximate the forces involved in chloroplast association in vivo in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and observed weaker tethering to additional unknown structures within the cell. We show that chloroplasts and peroxisomes are physically tethered through peroxules, a poorly described structure in plant cells. We suggest that peroxules have a novel role in maintaining peroxisome-organelle interactions in the dynamic environment. This could be important for fatty acid mobilization and photorespiration through the interaction with oil bodies and chloroplasts, highlighting a fundamentally important role for organelle interactions for essential biochemistry and physiological processes. PMID:26518344

  17. The motion of tethered tug-debris system with fuel residuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslanov, Vladimir S.; Yudintsev, Vadim V.

    2015-10-01

    Active debris removal using a space tug with a tether is one of the promising techniques to decrease the population of large non-functional satellites and orbital stages in near Earth orbits. Properties of debris should be taken into account in the development of the space tugs. In this paper we consider the motion of a debris objects with fuel residuals that can affect the safety of the debris transportation process. The equations of the attitude motion of the tug-debris system in a central gravitational field are derived. Stationary solutions of the equations are found. The system of linearized equations are introduced that can be used for short term analysis. The numerical simulation results are provided that show good accuracy of the linearized equations. Proposed equations can be used to analyze the attitude motion of the tug-debris system and to determine the conventional parameters for safe tethered transportation of space debris.

  18. From aromaticity to self-organized criticality in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubarev, Dmitry Yu; Frenklach, Michael; Lester, William A

    2012-09-21

    The unique properties of graphene are rooted in its peculiar electronic structure where effects of electron delocalization are pivotal. We show that the traditional view of delocalization as formation of a local or global aromatic bonding framework has to be expanded in this case. A modification of the π-electron system of a finite-size graphene substrate results in a scale-invariant response in the relaxation of interatomic distances and reveals self-organized criticality as a mode of delocalized bonding. Graphene is shown to belong to a diverse class of finite-size extended systems with simple local interactions where complexity emerges spontaneously under very general conditions that can be a critical factor controlling observable properties such as chemical activity, electron transport, and spin-polarization. PMID:22872129

  19. Aromatic amines sources, environmental impact and remediation

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Luciana; Mondal, P. K.; Alves, M. M.

    2015-01-01

    Aromatic amines are widely used industrial chemicals as their major sources in the environment include several chemical industry sectors such as oil refining, synthetic polymers, dyes, adhesives, rubbers, perfume, pharmaceuticals, pesticides and explosives. They result also from diesel exhaust, combustion of wood chips and rubber and tobacco smoke. Some types of aromatic amines are generated during cooking, special grilled meat and fish, as well. The intensive use and production of these comp...

  20. Aromaticity influencing the thermostability of micellar dispersions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, J.A.; Kunzman, W.J.

    1971-05-11

    A hydrocarbon, having sufficient aromaticity to obtain a stable micellar dispersion at the temperature of the formation, is mixed with a surfactant and aqueous medium for injection into the formation to recover crude oil. Higher reservoir temperatures require a greater degree of aromaticity in the hydrocarbon component of the micellar dispersion. This patent is a continuation of U.S. Patent Number 3,495,660 (item No. 118).

  1. Nonchemical weeding of medicinal and aromatic plants

    OpenAIRE

    Carrubba, Alessandra; Militello, Marcello

    2013-01-01

    Medicinal and aromatic plants are major crops of domestic and industrial interest. Medicinal and aromatic plants are increasingly organically grown to enhance profitability. However, the presence of weeds may lead to a decrease in both yield and quality. Therefore, nonchemical methods of weed control are needed. In this study, mechanical weeding, flaming, stale seedbed, and biodegradable mulch were tested from 2003/2004 to 2006/2007 on coriander, fennel, and psyllium. Biomass and seed yield w...

  2. Multi-mass dynamic model of a variable-length tether used in a high altitude wind energy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A multi-mass dynamics model of a variable length tether has been developed. • The modelling approach enables straightforward description of the aerodynamic drag. • The model is used in high altitude wind energy system control-oriented simulations. • The model accurately describes the shape, forces and vibrations of the tether. - Abstract: This paper presents a multibody approach to dynamics modelling of a variable-length tether moving through air, in a system where an airborne module generates aerodynamic lift and uses the tether to cyclically drive the winch-generator unit fixed on the ground. The rope is modelled as a series of straight, massless, elastic segments with the rope mass fragments lumped to the segment joints. Individual segment length is constant, with the exception of segment being wound out from the winch, while the number of segments is variable. For the segment being wound out, a special modelling approach is derived. The forces acting on the rope are also concentrated at the joints, thus simplifying computations and facilitating rope aerodynamic drag modelling. The proposed tether dynamics model is integrated into the overall model of controlled power production system and verified by computer simulation. The model is compared with two simpler tether dynamics models also proposed in the paper

  3. Tethered Aminohydroxylation: Synthesis of the β-Amino Acid of Microsclerodermins A and B

    OpenAIRE

    Pullin, Robert D. C.; Rathi, Akshat H.; Melikhova, Ekaterina Y.; Winter, Christian; Thompson, Amber L.; Donohoe, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    The utility of the tethered aminohydroxylation (TA) has been demonstrated by synthesis of the complex β-amino acid residue of microsclerodermins A and B. The TA provided a regio- and stereoselective functionalization of a complex homoallylic alcohol. The route includes late-stage introduction of the aliphatic side chain via a cuprate addition and cross metathesis, a tactic designed to render the synthesis applicable to other microsclerodermins.

  4. Quantifying interspecific variation in dispersal ability of noctuid moths using an advanced tethered flight technique

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Hayley B. C.; Lim, Ka S.; Bell, James R.; Hill, Jane K.; Chapman, Jason W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Dispersal plays a crucial role in many aspects of species' life histories, yet is often difficult to measure directly. This is particularly true for many insects, especially nocturnal species (e.g. moths) that cannot be easily observed under natural field conditions. Consequently, over the past five decades, laboratory tethered flight techniques have been developed as a means of measuring insect flight duration and speed. However, these previous designs have tended to focus on single...

  5. Tethered capsule endomicroscopy enables less-invasive imaging of gastrointestinal tract microstructure

    OpenAIRE

    Gora, Michalina J.; Sauk, Jenny S.; Carruth, Robert W.; Gallagher, Kevin A.; Suter, Melissa J.; Nishioka, Norman S.; Kava, Lauren E.; Rosenberg, Mireille; Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we introduce “tethered capsule endomicroscopy,” that involves swallowing an optomechanically-engineered pill that captures cross-sectional, 30 μm (lateral) × 7 μm (axial) resolution, microscopic images of the gut wall as it travels through the digestive tract. Results in human subjects show that this technique rapidly provides three-dimensional, microstructural images of the upper gastrointestinal tract in a simple and painless procedure, opening up new opportunities for screening for i...

  6. Simulation of tethered oligomers in nanochannels using multi-particle collision dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Raghu, Riyad; Schofield, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    The effect of a high Reynold's number, pressure-driven flow of a compressible gas on the conformation of an oligomer tethered to the wall of a square-channel is studied under both ideal solvent and poor solvent conditions using a hybrid multiparticle collision dynamics and molecular dynamics algorithm. Unlike previous studies, the flow field contains an elongational component in addition to a shear component as well as fluid slip near the walls and results in a Schmidt number for the polymer ...

  7. Template-Tethered Collagen Mimetic Peptides for Studying Heterotrimeric Triple-Helical Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yang; Mo, Xiao; Kim, Daniel; Yu, S. Michael

    2010-01-01

    Collagen mimetic peptides (CMPs) have been used to elucidate the structure and stability of the triple helical conformation of collagen molecules. Although CMP homotrimers have been widely studied, very little work has been reported regarding CMP heterotrimers because of synthetic difficulties. Here we present the synthesis and characterization of homotrimers and ABB type heterotrimers comprising natural and synthetic CMP sequences that are covalently tethered to a template, a tris(2-aminoeth...

  8. TIN2-tethered TPP1 recruits human telomerase to telomeres in vivo.

    OpenAIRE

    Abreu, E.; Aritonovska, E.; Reichenbach, P.; Cristofari, G.; Culp, B.; Terns, R. M.; Lingner, J; Terns, M P

    2010-01-01

    Recruitment to telomeres is a pivotal step in the function and regulation of human telomerase; however, the molecular basis for recruitment is not known. Here, we have directly investigated the process of telomerase recruitment via fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). We find that depletion of two components of the shelterin complex that is found at telomeres--TPP1 and the protein that tethers TPP1 to the complex, TIN2--results in a loss of telom...

  9. Analysis of a tethered stabilized Schmidt telescope asserved to the Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertola, F.; Rafanelli, P.; Angrilli, F.; Bianchini, G.; da Forno, R.

    The concept of a Schmidt telescope connected to the Space Station by a 2-10 km long tether is discussed. A mission scenario and the optical characteristics of the telescope are described. A linearized mathematical model is used to study the dynamic behavior of the telescope platform in space. Simulations are conducted to account for environmental perturbations, thermal effects, atmospheric drag, micrometeor impact, and the dynamical response to slewing motion.

  10. Tether radiation in Juno-type and circular-equatorial Jovian orbits

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez-Torres, Antonio; Sanmartín Losada, Juan Ramón

    2011-01-01

    Wave radiation by a conductor carrying a steady current in both a polar, highly eccentric, low perijove orbit, as in NASA's planned Juno mission, and an equatorial low Jovian orbit (LJO) mission below the intense radiation belts, is considered. Both missions will need electric power generation for scientific instruments and communication systems. Tethers generate power more efficiently than solar panels or radioisotope power systems (RPS). The radiation impedance is required to determin...

  11. Virtual migration in tethered flying monarch butterflies reveals their orientation mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Mouritsen, Henrik; Frost, Barrie J.

    2002-01-01

    A newly developed flight simulator allows monarch butterflies to fly actively for up to several hours in any horizontal direction while their fall migratory flight direction can be continuously recorded. From these data, long segments of virtual flight paths of tethered, flying, migratory monarch butterflies were reconstructed, and by advancing or retarding the butterflies' circadian clocks, we have shown that they possess a time-compensated sun compass. Control monarchs on local time fly app...

  12. Bacterial Tethering Analysis Reveals a “Run-Reverse-Turn” Mechanism for Pseudomonas Species Motility

    OpenAIRE

    Qian, Chen; Wong, Chui Ching; SWARUP, SANJAY; Chiam, Keng-Hwee

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a program that can accurately analyze the dynamic properties of tethered bacterial cells. The program works especially well with cells that tend to give rise to unstable rotations, such as polar-flagellated bacteria. The program has two novel components. The first dynamically adjusts the center of the cell's rotational trajectories. The second applies piecewise linear approximation to the accumulated rotation curve to reduce noise and separate the motion of bacteria into pha...

  13. Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin translocation across a tethered lipid bilayer

    OpenAIRE

    Veneziano, Rémi; Rossi, Claire; Chenal, Alexandre; Devoisselle, Jean-Marie; Ladant, Daniel; Chopineau, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Many bacterial toxins can cross biological membranes to reach the cytosol of mammalian cells, although how they pass through a lipid bilayer remains largely unknown. Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase (CyaA) toxin delivers its catalytic domain directly across the cell membrane. To characterize this unique translocation process, we designed an in vitro assay based on a tethered lipid bilayer assembled over a biosensor surface derivatized with calmodulin, a natural activator of the toxin. C...

  14. Space-Based Tethered Array Radar (STAR) - A Distributed Small Satellite Network

    OpenAIRE

    Tomlinson, Philip; Brown, Thomas; Chakraborty, Dayamoy

    1988-01-01

    The Space-Based Tethered Array Radar (STAR) concept evolved from the DoD need for an affordable, launchable, survivable, and expandable Space-Based Radar for wide-area surveillance of airborne targets and for ballistic missile defense applications. Because low-observable threats can undermine conventional large monolithic Space-Based Radar satellite designs by forcing power-aperture products (inversely proportional to target radar cross-section) so high that the resulting heavy and expensive ...

  15. Optimum sizing of bare-tape tethers for de-orbiting satellites at end of mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanmartín, J. R.; Sánchez-Torres, A.; Khan, S. B.; Sánchez-Arriaga, G.; Charro, M.

    2015-10-01

    De-orbiting satellites at end of mission would prevent generation of new space debris. A proposed de-orbit technology involves a bare conductive tape-tether, which uses neither propellant nor power supply while generating power for on-board use during de-orbiting. The present work shows how to select tape dimensions for a generic mission so as to satisfy requirements of very small tether-to-satellite mass ratio mt/MS and probability Nf of tether cut by small debris, while keeping de-orbit time tf short and product tf × tether length low to reduce maneuvers in avoiding collisions with large debris. Design is here discussed for particular missions (initial orbit of 720 km altitude and 63° and 92° inclinations, and 3 disparate MS values, 37.5, 375, and 3750 kg), proving it scalable. At mid-inclination and a mass-ratio of a few percent, de-orbit time takes about 2 weeks and Nf is a small fraction of 1%, with tape dimensions ranging from 1 to 6 cm, 10 to 54 μ m, and 2.8 to 8.6 km. Performance drop from middle to high inclination proved moderate: if allowing for twice as large mt/MS, increases are reduced to a factor of 4 in tf and a slight one in Nf, except for multi-ton satellites, somewhat more requiring because efficient orbital-motion-limited electron collection restricts tape-width values, resulting in tape length (slightly) increasing too.

  16. Dynamics, Control, and Estimation for Aerial Robots Tethered by Cables or Bars

    OpenAIRE

    Tognon, Marco; Franchi, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The problem of controlling an aerial robot connected by a passive tether or a passive rigid link to the ground is considered here. We provide a thorough characterization of this nonlinear dynamical robotic system in terms of fundamental properties such as differential flatness, controllability, and observability. We prove that the robotic system is differentially flat with respect to two possible output pairs: elevation of the link and attitude of the vehicle; elevation of the link and longit...

  17. Biodegradable, Tethered Lipid Bilayer-Microsphere Systems with Membrane-Integrated α-Helical Peptide Anchors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Eric S; Luchan, Joshua; Gilchrist, M Lane

    2016-04-12

    Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) are ideally suited for the study of biomembrane-biomembrane interactions and for the biomimicry of cell-to-cell communication, allowing for surface ligand displays that contain laterally mobile elements. However, the SLB paradigm does not include three-dimensionality and biocompatibility. As a way to bypass these limitations, we have developed a biodegradable form of microsphere SLBs, also known as proteolipobeads (PLBs), using PLGA microspheres. Microspheres were synthesized using solvent evaporation and size selected with fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). Biomembranes were covalently tethered upon fusion to microsphere supports via short-chain PEG spacers connecting membrane-integrated α-helical peptides and the microsphere surface, affecting membrane diffusivity and mobility as indicated by confocal FRAP analysis. Membrane heterogeneities, which are attributed to PLGA hydrophobicity and rough surface topography, are curtailed by the addition of PEG tethers. This method allows for the presentation of tethered, laterally mobile biomembranes in three dimensions with functionally embedded attachment peptides for mobile ligand displays. PMID:26972467

  18. History of the current understanding and management of tethered spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safavi-Abbasi, Sam; Mapstone, Timothy B; Archer, Jacob B; Wilson, Christopher; Theodore, Nicholas; Spetzler, Robert F; Preul, Mark C

    2016-07-01

    An understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of tethered cord syndrome (TCS) and modern management strategies have only developed within the past few decades. Current understanding of this entity first began with the understanding and management of spina bifida; this later led to the gradual recognition of spina bifida occulta and the symptoms associated with tethering of the filum terminale. In the 17th century, Dutch anatomists provided the first descriptions and initiated surgical management efforts for spina bifida. In the 19th century, the term "spina bifida occulta" was coined and various presentations of spinal dysraphism were appreciated. The association of urinary, cutaneous, and skeletal abnormalities with spinal dysraphism was recognized in the 20th century. Early in the 20th century, some physicians began to suspect that traction on the conus medullaris caused myelodysplasia-related symptoms and that prophylactic surgical management could prevent the occurrence of clinical manifestations. It was not, however, until later in the 20th century that the term "tethered spinal cord" and the modern management of TCS were introduced. This gradual advancement in understanding at a time before the development of modern imaging modalities illustrates how, over the centuries, anatomists, pathologists, neurologists, and surgeons used clinical examination, a high level of suspicion, and interest in the subtle and overt clinical appearances of spinal dysraphism and TCS to advance understanding of pathophysiology, clinical appearance, and treatment of this entity. With the availability of modern imaging, spinal dysraphism can now be diagnosed and treated as early as the intrauterine stage. PMID:26967990

  19. The Atg1-kinase complex tethers Atg9-vesicles to initiate autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Yijian; Perna, Marco G.; Hofmann, Benjamin; Beier, Viola; Wollert, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Autophagosomes are double-membrane vesicles that sequester cytoplasmic material for lysosomal degradation. Their biogenesis is initiated by recruitment of Atg9-vesicles to the phagophore assembly site. This process depends on the regulated activation of the Atg1-kinase complex. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. Here we reconstitute this early step in autophagy from purified components in vitro. We find that on assembly from its cytoplasmic subcomplexes, the Atg1-kinase complex becomes activated, enabling it to recruit and tether Atg9-vesicles. The scaffolding protein Atg17 targets the Atg1-kinase complex to autophagic membranes by specifically recognizing the membrane protein Atg9. This interaction is inhibited by the two regulatory subunits Atg31 and Atg29. Engagement of the Atg1-Atg13 subcomplex restores the Atg9-binding and membrane-tethering activity of Atg17. Our data help to unravel the mechanism that controls Atg17-mediated tethering of Atg9-vesicles, providing the molecular basis to understand initiation of autophagosome-biogenesis.

  20. Clustering of tethered satellite system simulation data by an adaptive neuro-fuzzy algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Sunanda; Pemmaraju, Surya

    1992-01-01

    Recent developments in neuro-fuzzy systems indicate that the concepts of adaptive pattern recognition, when used to identify appropriate control actions corresponding to clusters of patterns representing system states in dynamic nonlinear control systems, may result in innovative designs. A modular, unsupervised neural network architecture, in which fuzzy learning rules have been embedded is used for on-line identification of similar states. The architecture and control rules involved in Adaptive Fuzzy Leader Clustering (AFLC) allow this system to be incorporated in control systems for identification of system states corresponding to specific control actions. We have used this algorithm to cluster the simulation data of Tethered Satellite System (TSS) to estimate the range of delta voltages necessary to maintain the desired length rate of the tether. The AFLC algorithm is capable of on-line estimation of the appropriate control voltages from the corresponding length error and length rate error without a priori knowledge of their membership functions and familarity with the behavior of the Tethered Satellite System.

  1. From the Rocket Equation to Maxwell's Equations: Electrodynamic Tether Propulsion Nears Space Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Les; Estes, Robert

    1999-01-01

    The US space program is facing a growing challenge to its decades-long, global leadership position, as current launch costs consume valuable resources and limit achievements in science, exploration, and commercial development. More than 40% of projected launches over the next 10 years have payloads with intended destinations beyond low-Earth orbit. Therefore, more cost-effective upper stages and on-board propulsion systems are critical elements in reducing total space transportation costs. A new type of space propulsion, using electrodynamic tethers, may be capable of performing multiple sequential missions without resupply and have a potential usable lifetime of several years. They may provide an in-space infrastructure that has a very low life cycle cost and greatly enhanced mission flexibility, thus supporting the goal of reducing the cost of access to space. Electrodynamic tether thrusters work by virtue of the force the Earth's magnetic field exerts on a wire carrying an electrical current. The effect is the basis for electric motors and generators. The Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS) experiment, planned for launch in the summer of 2000, will demonstrate the use electrodynamic tether thrust by lowering the altitude of a Delta-H rocket's upper stage on which it will be flying. Applications of the technology include a passive deorbit system for spacecraft at their end-of-life, reusable Orbit Transfer Vehicles, propellantless reboost of the International Space Station, and propulsion and power generation for future missions to Jupiter.

  2. Postoperative epidural hematoma contributes to delayed upper cord tethering after decompression of Chiari malformation type I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Lopez-Gonzalez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Symptomatic arachnoiditis after posterior fossa surgical procedures such as decompression of Chiari malformation is a possible complication. Clinical presentation is generally insidious and delayed by months or years. It causes disturbances in the normal flow of cerebrospinal fluid and enlargement of a syrinx cavity in the upper spinal cord. Surgical de-tethering has favorable results with progressive collapse of the syrinx and relief of the associated symptoms. Case Description: A 30-year-old male with Chiari malformation type I was treated by performing posterior fossa bone decompression, dura opening and closure with a suturable bovine pericardium dural graft. Postoperative period was uneventful until the fifth day in which the patient suffered intense headache and progressive loose of consciousness caused by an acute posterior fossa epidural hematoma. It was quickly removed with complete clinical recovering. One year later, the patient experienced progressive worsened of his symptoms. Upper spinal cord tethering was diagnosed and a new surgery for debridement was required. Conclusions: The epidural hematoma compressing the dural graft against the neural structures contributes to the upper spinal cord tethering and represents a nondescribed cause of postoperative fibrosis, adhesion formation, and subsequent recurrent hindbrain compression.

  3. Shuttle-tethered satellite system definition study. Volume 1: Executive study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    The Tethered Satellite System has great prospects for extending orbital operations capability of the Space Transportation System to science, applications, and technology projects not otherwise attainable. The system will installed in the Shuttle Orbiter and will have the capability to deploy a captive satellite up to 100 km away from the Orbiter. Control and retrieval of the satellite are accomplished by means of a tether line connecting the satellite and the cargo bay mounted equipment in the Orbiter. At low satellite altitudes, the system will permit investigations of a duration that could not be pursued with sounding rockets of free-flying spacecraft. The propose of the Shuttle/Tethered Satellite System Definition Study was to produce the preliminary design, preliminary specifications, gross program plans, and program cost estimate for a 1982 operational verification flight. This was accomplished during a fifteen month effort under by the NASA George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The MSFC Phase 1 and related studies demonstrated the feasibility of the system and served as a starting point for the Phase 2 definition study.

  4. A Structure-Based Mechanism for Vesicle Capture by the Multisubunit Tethering Complex Dsl1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Y.; Yip, C; Tripathi, A; Huie, D; Jeffrey, P; Walz, T; Hughson, F

    2009-01-01

    Vesicle trafficking requires membrane fusion, mediated by SNARE proteins, and upstream events that probably include tethering, an initial long-range attachment between a vesicle and its target organelle. Among the factors proposed to mediate tethering are a set of multisubunit tethering complexes (MTCs). The Dsl1 complex, with only three subunits, is the simplest known MTC and is essential for the retrograde traffic of COPI-coated vesicles from the Golgi to the ER. To elucidate structural principles underlying MTC function, we have determined the structure of the Dsl1 complex, revealing a tower containing at its base the binding sites for two ER SNAREs and at its tip a flexible lasso for capturing vesicles. The Dsl1 complex binds to individual SNAREs via their N-terminal regulatory domains and also to assembled SNARE complexes; moreover, it is capable of accelerating SNARE complex assembly. Our results suggest that even the simplest MTC may be capable of orchestrating vesicle capture, uncoating, and fusion.

  5. TI tether rig for solving secular spinrate change problem of electric sail

    CERN Document Server

    Janhunen, Pekka

    2016-01-01

    The electric solar wind sail (E-sail) is a way to propel a spacecraft by using the natural solar wind as a thrust source. The problem of secular spinrate change was identified earlier which is due to the orbital Coriolis effect and tends to slowly increase or decrease the sail's spinrate, depending on which way the sail is inclined with respect to the solar wind. Here we present an E-sail design and its associated control algorithm which enable spinrate control during propulsive flight by the E-sail effect itself. In the design, every other maintether ("T-tether") is galvanically connected through the remote unit with the two adjacent auxtethers, while the other maintethers ("I-tethers") are insulated from the tethers. This enables one to effectively control the maintether and auxtether voltages separately, which in turn enables spinrate control. We use a detailed numerical simulation to show that the algorithm can fully control the E-sail's spin state in real solar wind. The simulation includes a simple and ...

  6. System Dynamics and Feedforward Control for Tether-Net Space Robot System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Liang

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available A new concept using flexible tether-net system to capture space debris is presented in this paper. With a mass point assumption the tether-net system dynamic model is established in orbital frame by applying Lagrange Equations. In order to investigate the net in-plane trajectories during after cast, the non-control R-bar and V-bar captures are simulated with ignoring the out-of-plane libration, the effect of in-plane libration on the trajectories of the capture net is demonstrated by simulation results. With an effort to damp the in-plane libration, the control scheme based on tether tension is investigated firstly, after that an integrated control scheme is proposed by introduced the thrusters into the system, the nonlinear close-loop dynamics is linearised by feedforward strategy, the simulation results show that feedforward controllor is effective for in-plane libration damping and enable the capture net to track an expected trajectory.

  7. Out-of-Plane Translational PZT Bimorph Actuator with Archimedes’ Spiral Actuating Tethers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chenye; Liu, Sanwei; Livermore, Carol

    2015-12-01

    The design, finite element analysis (FEA), and experimental characterization of a MEMS out-of-plane (vertical) translational lead-zirconate-titanate (PZT) bimorph actuator supported on Archimedes’ spiral tethers are presented. Two types of bimorph actuators with different electrode patterns (with spiral tethers half actuated or fully actuated) are designed and fabricated. Both designs are fabricated by commercial processes and are compatible with integration into more complex MEMS systems. Finite element analysis (FEA) was used to analyze and predict the displacements of both types of actuators. The deflections of both fully- actuated and half-actuated devices were measured experimentally to validate the design. At an applied voltage of 110V, the out-of-plane deflections of the actuators with half-actuated and fully-actuated tethers were measured at about 17 μm and 29 μm respectively, in good agreement with FEA predictions of 17.1 μm and 25.8 μm. The corresponding blocking forces are predicted as 10 mN and 17 mN by FEA.

  8. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons for fullerene synthesis in flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, J. Michael; Diener, Michael D.

    2006-12-19

    This invention provides improved methods for combustion synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, including fullerenes, employing multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels selected for high carbon conversion to extractable fullerenes. The multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels include those that contain polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. More specifically, multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels contain a substantial amount of indene, methylnapthalenes or mixtures thereof. Coal tar and petroleum distillate fractions provide low cost hydrocarbon fuels containing polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, including without limitation, indene, methylnapthalenes or mixtures thereof.

  9. MIXED SUBSTRATES IN ENVIRONMENT AND BIOTECHNOLOGICAL PROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. P. Pirog

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The modern literature and own experimental data on the use of substrates’ mixtures for intensification of microbial synthesis technologies of practically valuable fermentation products (ethanol, lactic acid, butanediol, primary (amino acids, n-hydroxybenzoate, triglycerides and secondary (lovastatin, surfactants metabolites as well as for intensification of biodegradation of aromatic xenobiotics (benzene, cresols, phenols, toluene and pesticides (dimethoate are presented. Special attention is paid on the molecular mechanisms that were established in recent years and underlying the phenomenon catabolic repression in Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative (Pseudomonas, Escherichia coli bacteria and yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and on the use of these data to develop technologies for utilization of plant biomass to produce industrially important metabolites. The survival strategies of heterotrophic microorganisms in natural oligotrophic environments are considered, including the simultaneous use of multiple substrates, allowing improved kinetic characteristics that give them a competitive advantage, also provided significant metabolic/physiological flexibility. The own experimental data on the use of mixtures of growth substrates for the intensification of surfactants’ synthesis of Rhodococcus erythropolis IMV Ac-5017 and Acinetobacter calcoaceticus IMV B-7241 are summarized. The dependence of the synthesis of surfactants in a mixture of energy excess (hexadecane and energy deficient (glycerol, ethanol substrates on the way of inoculum preparation, concentration of mono-substrates in the mixture, and their molar ratio were determined.

  10. An overview of the AROMAT campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlaud, Alexis; Dekemper, Emmanuel; Van Roozendael, Michel; Constantin, Daniel; Georgescu, Lucian; Meier, Andreas; Richter, Andreas; Den Hoed, Mirjam; Allaart, Marc; Boscornea, Andreea; Vajaiac, Sorin; Bellegante, Livio; Nemuc, Anca; Nicolae, Doina; Shaifangar, Reza; Dörner, Steffen; Wagner, Thomas; Stebel, Kerstin; Schuettemeyer, Dirk

    2016-04-01

    The Airborne ROmanian Measurements of Aerosols and Trace gases (AROMAT) campaign and its follow-up AROMAT-2 were held in September 2014 and August 2015, respectively. Both campaigns focused on two geophysical targets: the city of Bucharest and the large power plants of the Jiu Valley, which are located in a rural area 170 km West of Bucharest. These two areas are complementary in terms of emitted chemical species and their spatial distributions. The objectives of the AROMAT campaigns were (i) to test recently developed airborne observation systems dedicated to air quality satellite validation studies such as the AirMAP imaging DOAS system (University of Bremen), the NO2 sonde (KNMI), and the compact SWING whiskbroom imager (BIRA), and (ii) to prepare the validation programme of the future Atmospheric Sentinels, starting with Sentinel-5 Precursor (S5P) to be launched in early summer 2016. We present results from the different airborne instrumentations and from coincident ground-based measurements (lidar, in-situ, and mobile DOAS systems) performed during both campaigns. The AROMAT dataset addresses several of the mandatory products of TROPOMI/S5P, in particular NO2 and SO2 (horizontal distribution and profile from aircraft, plume image with ground-based SO2 and NO2 cameras, transects with mobile DOAS, in-situ), H2CO (mobile MAX-DOAS), and aerosols (lidar, airborne FUBISS-ASA2 sun-photometer, and aircraft in-situ). We investigate the information content of the AROMAT dataset for satellite validation studies based on co-located OMI and GOME-2 data, and simulations of TROPOMI measurements. The experience gained during AROMAT and AROMAT-2 will be used in support of a large-scale TROPOMI/S5P validation campaign in Romania scheduled for summer 2017.

  11. Experimental and numerical studies of tethered DNA dynamics in shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueth, Christopher A.

    Polymer physics has a rich tradition spanning nearly two centuries. In the 1830s, Henri Braconnot and coworkers were perhaps the first to work on what is today known as polymer science when they derived semi-synthetic materials from naturally occurring cellulose. However, the true nature of polymers, as long chain molecules, had not been proposed until 1910 by Pickles. It was not until the 1950's when polymer models were developed using statistical mechanics. Recently, the field has been revitalized by the ability to study individual polymer molecules for the first time. The development of DNA single molecule fluorescence microscopy coupled with ever increasing computational power has opened the door to molecular level understanding of polymer physics, resolving old disputes and uncovering new interesting phenomena. In this work, we use a combination of theoretical predictions and lambda-phage DNA single molecule fluorescence microscopy to study the behavior of polymers tethered to surfaces. Brownian dynamics simulations of a number of coarse-grained polymer models---dynamic and equilibrium Kratky-Porod chains as well as bead-spring chains---were completed and compared with analytical and experimental results. First, an expression is developed for the entropic exclusion force experienced by a tethered polymer chain. We propose that, for a freely jointed chain, a modification to the free entropic force of kBT/y is needed in the direction normal to the surface. Analogously, we propose that for a wormlike chain, a modification of 2kBT/y is needed, due to the finite curvature of the model. Then, the reliability of discretized bead spring simulations containing this modified entropic force are analyzed using Kratky-Porod simulations and are found to reproduce most statistics, except for those very near the surface, such as end-wall contact. Next, experiments of tethered lambda-phage DNA in shear flow are presented for the first time in the flow-gradient plane. The

  12. An Automated System for Measuring Microphysical and Radiative Cloud Characteristics from a Tethered Balloon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Paul Lawson

    2004-03-15

    OAK-B135 The rate of climate change in polar regions is now felt to be a harbinger of possible global warming. Long-lived, relatively thin stratus clouds play a predominant role in transmitting solar radiation and trapping long wave radiation emitted from open water and melt ponds. In situ measurements of microphysical and radiative properties of Arctic and Antarctic stratus clouds are needed to validate retrievals from remote measurements and simulations using numerical models. While research aircraft can collect comprehensive microphysical and radiative data in clouds, the duration of these aircraft is relatively short (up to about 12 hours). During the course of the Phase II research, a tethered balloon system was developed that supports miniaturized meteorological, microphysical and radiation sensors that can collect data in stratus clouds for days at a time. The tethered balloon system uses a 43 cubic meter balloon to loft a 17 kg sensor package to altitudes u p to 2 km. Power is supplied to the instrument package via two copper conductors in the custom tether. Meteorological, microphysical and radiation data are recorded by the sensor package. Meteorological measurements include pressure, temperature, humidity, wind speed and wind direction. Radiation measurements are made using a 4-pi radiometer that measures actinic flux at 500 and 800 nm. Position is recorded using a GPS receiver. Microphysical data are obtained using a miniaturized version of an airborne cloud particle imager (CPI). The miniaturized CPI measures the size distribution of water drops and ice crystals from 9 microns to 1.4 mm. Data are recorded onboard the sensor package and also telemetered via a 802.11b wireless communications link. Command signals can also be sent to the computer in the sensor package via the wireless link. In the event of a broken tether, a GMRS radio link to the balloon package is used to heat a wire that burns 15 cm opening in the top of the balloon. The balloon and

  13. Efficient and Selective Reduction of Aromatic Nitro Compounds to Aromatic Amines by NbCl{sub 5}/Indium System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Byung Woo; Kim, Duckil; Kim, Hyung Min; Kang, Sung Ho [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    -selective reduction of aromatic nitro compounds in the presence of the above-mentioned functional groups. After screening the reaction conditions, THF has been found to be the most suitable solvent for the reaction in terms of reaction time and yield. We investigated that the use of NbCl{sub 5}/Zn in place of NbCl{sub 5}/In is also equally effective but require slight longer reaction time and lower yield as compared to NbCl{sub 5}/In (Table 1). Thus, we have been able to demonstrate the utility of easily accessible NbCl{sub 5}/In system as a convenient reagent for effecting chemo-selective reduction of aromatic nitro compounds. Although the role of niobium(V) chloride is still not clarified, it is assumed that reduction of niobium(V) chloride with indium provides low-valent niobium species, which are involved in complexation with the substrates. The reduction probably proceeds by a reductive cleavage of polarized N.O bonds through a single electron transfer from indium metal to the niobium-substrate complex due to the high oxophilic nature of the niobium species. The reducing property exhibited by metal-metal salt combinations proceeds through transfer of one electron from the metal surface to the substrate. We believe that the present procedure using NbCl{sub 5}/In system proceeds through a SET (single electron transfer) process. The notable advantages of this methodology are mild reaction condition, simple manipulation, high yield, and tolerance of various functional groups. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that the NbCl{sub 5}/In system mediates an efficient and mild reduction of aromatic nitro compounds to the corresponding amines. Although the scope and limitations were not fully established, the present method could be a practical alternative to the conventional method. Further work on the application of the NbCl{sub 5}/In system is currently in progress.

  14. Silicone elastomers with aromatic voltage stabilizers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A Razak, Aliff Hisyam; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    insulation cables.3–5 As an alternative to utilise additives as voltage stabilizers, grafting aromatic compounds to silicone backbones may overcome the common problem of insolubility of the aromatic voltage stabilizer in the silicone elastomers due to phase separation. Preventing phase separation during...... via hydrosilylation by a vinyl-functional crosslinker. The mechanism of electron-trapping by aromatic compounds grafted to silicone backbones in a crosslinked PDMS is illustrated in Fig. 1. The electrical breakdown strength, the storage modulus and the loss modulus of the elastomer were investigated...... attached to the silicone backbone. The dielectric relative permittivity of PDMS-PPMS copolymers remained between 2 to 3 with low conductivity and low dielectric loss as well as high storage moduli with low viscous loss, thereby maintaining the electro-mechanical integrity of the elastomer....

  15. Gas-separation membranes loaded with porous aromatic frameworks that improve with age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Cher Hon; Konstas, Kristina; Thornton, Aaron W; Liu, Amelia C Y; Mudie, Stephen; Kennedy, Danielle F; Howard, Shaun C; Hill, Anita J; Hill, Matthew R

    2015-02-23

    Porosity loss, also known as physical aging, in glassy polymers hampers their long term use in gas separations. Unprecedented interactions of porous aromatic frameworks (PAFs) with these polymers offer the potential to control and exploit physical aging for drastically enhanced separation efficiency. PAF-1 is used in the archetypal polymer of intrinsic microporosity (PIM), PIM-1, to achieve three significant outcomes. 1) hydrogen permeability is drastically enhanced by 375% to 5500 Barrer. 2) Physical aging is controlled causing the selectivity for H2 over N2 to increase from 4.5 to 13 over 400 days of aging. 3) The improvement with age of the membrane is exploited to recover up to 98% of H2 from gas mixtures with N2 . This process is critical for the use of ammonia as a H2 storage medium. The tethering of polymer side chains within PAF-1 pores is responsible for maintaining H2 transport pathways, whilst the larger N2 pathways gradually collapse. PMID:25586722

  16. Long-term dynamic modeling of tethered spacecraft using nodal position finite element method and symplectic integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G. Q.; Zhu, Z. H.

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic modeling of tethered spacecraft with the consideration of elasticity of tether is prone to the numerical instability and error accumulation over long-term numerical integration. This paper addresses the challenges by proposing a globally stable numerical approach with the nodal position finite element method (NPFEM) and the implicit, symplectic, 2-stage and 4th order Gaussian-Legendre Runge-Kutta time integration. The NPFEM eliminates the numerical error accumulation by using the position instead of displacement of tether as the state variable, while the symplectic integration enforces the energy and momentum conservation of the discretized finite element model to ensure the global stability of numerical solution. The effectiveness and robustness of the proposed approach is assessed by an elastic pendulum problem, whose dynamic response resembles that of tethered spacecraft, in comparison with the commonly used time integrators such as the classical 4th order Runge-Kutta schemes and other families of non-symplectic Runge-Kutta schemes. Numerical results show that the proposed approach is accurate and the energy of the corresponding numerical model is conservative over the long-term numerical integration. Finally, the proposed approach is applied to the dynamic modeling of deorbiting process of tethered spacecraft over a long period.

  17. Effect of the finite size of an asteroid on its deflection using a tether-ballast system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashayekhi, Mohammad J.; Misra, Arun K.

    2016-07-01

    Potentially hazardous near-Earth objects which can impose a significant threat on life on the planet have generated a lot of interest in the study of various asteroid deflection strategies. There are numerous asteroid deflection techniques suggested and discussed in the literature. This paper is focused on one of the non-destructive asteroid deflection strategies by attaching a long tether-ballast system to the asteroid. In the existing literature on this technique, very simplified models of the asteroid-tether-ballast system including a point mass model of the asteroid have been used. In this paper, the dynamical effect of using a finite size asteroid model on the asteroid deflection achieved is analyzed in detail. It has been shown that considering the finite size of the asteroid, instead of the point mass approximation, can have significant influence on the deflection predicted. Furthermore the effect of the tether-deployment stage, which is an essential part of any realistic asteroid deflection mission, on the predicted deflection is studied in this paper. Finally the effect of cutting the tether on the deflection achieved is analyzed and it has been shown that depending on the orbital properties of the asteroid as well as its size and rotational rate, cutting the tether at an appropriate time can increase the deflection achieved. Several numerical examples have been used in this paper to elaborate on the proposed technique and to quantitatively analyze the effect of different parameters on the asteroid deflection.

  18. Effect of the finite size of an asteroid on its deflection using a tether-ballast system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashayekhi, Mohammad J.; Misra, Arun K.

    2016-04-01

    Potentially hazardous near-Earth objects which can impose a significant threat on life on the planet have generated a lot of interest in the study of various asteroid deflection strategies. There are numerous asteroid deflection techniques suggested and discussed in the literature. This paper is focused on one of the non-destructive asteroid deflection strategies by attaching a long tether-ballast system to the asteroid. In the existing literature on this technique, very simplified models of the asteroid-tether-ballast system including a point mass model of the asteroid have been used. In this paper, the dynamical effect of using a finite size asteroid model on the asteroid deflection achieved is analyzed in detail. It has been shown that considering the finite size of the asteroid, instead of the point mass approximation, can have significant influence on the deflection predicted. Furthermore the effect of the tether-deployment stage, which is an essential part of any realistic asteroid deflection mission, on the predicted deflection is studied in this paper. Finally the effect of cutting the tether on the deflection achieved is analyzed and it has been shown that depending on the orbital properties of the asteroid as well as its size and rotational rate, cutting the tether at an appropriate time can increase the deflection achieved. Several numerical examples have been used in this paper to elaborate on the proposed technique and to quantitatively analyze the effect of different parameters on the asteroid deflection.

  19. Production of aromatics from di- and polyoxygenates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, Taylor; Blank, Brian; Jones, Casey; Woods, Elizabeth; Cortright, Randy

    2016-08-02

    Methods, catalysts, and reactor systems for producing in high yield aromatic chemicals and liquid fuels from a mixture of oxygenates comprising di- and polyoxygenates are disclosed. Also disclosed are methods, catalysts, and reactor systems for producing aromatic chemicals and liquid fuels from oxygenated hydrocarbons such as carbohydrates, sugars, sugar alcohols, sugar degradation products, and the like; and methods, catalysts, and reactor systems for producing the mixture of oxygenates from oxygenated hydrocarbons such as carbohydrates, sugars, sugar alcohols, sugar degradation products, and the like. The disclosed catalysts for preparing the mixture of oxygenates comprise a Ni.sub.nSn.sub.m alloy and a crystalline alumina support.

  20. Global aromatics supply. Today and tomorrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, M. [BASF SE, Ludwigshafen (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    Aromatics are the essential building blocks for some of the largest petrochemical products in today's use. To the vast majority they are consumed to produce intermediates for polymer products and, hence, contribute to our modern lifestyle. Their growth rates are expected to be in line with GDP growth in future. This contrasts the significantly lower growth rates of the primary sources for aromatics - fuel processing and steam cracking of naphtha fractions. A supply gap can be expected to open up in future for which creative solutions will be required. (orig.)

  1. Electron beam irradiation effects on aromatic polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron irradiation effects on aromatic polymers having various molecular structures were studied to elucidate the following subjects; (1) relation between radiation stability and molecular structure of repeating units, (2) mechanism of deterioration and (3) adaptability to matrix resin for radiation resistant FRP. Results are summarized as follows: (1) An order of radiation stability of units is; imide ring > diphenyl ether, diphenyl ketone > aromatic amide >> bis-phenol A > diphenyl sulphone. (2) Poly (ether-ether-ketone) and most polyimide are crosslinkable but polysulphones and polyarylate are chain degradation type polymers. (3) Newly developed thermoplastic polyimides have possibilities for use as matrix materials in radiation resistant FRP. (author)

  2. Outcome of hospital discharge on postoperative Day 1 following uncomplicated tethered spinal cord release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poonia, Seerat; Graber, Sarah; Corbett Wilkinson, C; O'neill, Brent R; Handler, Michael H; Hankinson, Todd C

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Postoperative management following the release of simple spinal cord-tethering lesions is highly variable. As a quality improvement initiative, the authors aimed to determine whether an institutional protocol of discharging patients on postoperative day (POD) 1 was associated with a higher rate of postoperative CSF leaks than the prior protocol of discharge on POD 2. METHODS This was a single-center retrospective review of all children who underwent release of a spinal cord-tethering lesion that was not associated with a substantial fascial or dural defect (i.e., simple spinal cord detethering) during 2 epochs: prior to and following the institution of a protocol for discharge on POD 1. Outcomes included the need for and timing of nonroutine care of the surgical site, including return to the operating room, wound suturing, and nonsurgical evaluation and management. RESULTS Of 169 patients identified, none presented with CSF-related complications prior to discharge. In the preintervention group (n = 113), the postoperative CSF leak rate was 4.4% (5/113). The mean length of stay was 2.3 days. In the postintervention group, the postoperative CSF leak rate was 1.9% (1/53) in the patients with postdischarge follow-up. The mean length of stay in that group was 1.3 days. CONCLUSIONS At a single academic children's hospital, a protocol of discharging patients on POD 1 following uncomplicated release of a simple spinal cord-tethering lesion was not associated with an increased rate of postoperative CSF leaks, relative to the previous protocol. The rates identified are consistent with the existing literature. The authors' practice has changed to discharge on POD 1 in most cases. PMID:26849810

  3. Tethered Balloon Operations at ARM AMF3 Site at Oliktok Point, AK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexheimer, D.; Lucero, D. A.; Helsel, F.; Hardesty, J.; Ivey, M.

    2015-12-01

    Oliktok Point has been the home of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program's (ARM) third ARM Mobile Facility, or AMF3, since October 2013. The AMF3 is operated through Sandia National Laboratories and hosts instrumentation collecting continuous measurements of clouds, aerosols, precipitation, energy, and other meteorological variables. The Arctic region is warming more quickly than any other region due to climate change and Arctic sea ice is declining to record lows. Sparsity of atmospheric data from the Arctic leads to uncertainty in process comprehension, and atmospheric general circulation models (AGCM) are understood to underestimate low cloud presence in the Arctic. Increased vertical resolution of meteorological properties and cloud measurements will improve process understanding and help AGCMs better characterize Arctic clouds. SNL is developing a tethered balloon system capable of regular operation at AMF3 in order to provide increased vertical resolution atmospheric data. The tethered balloon can be operated within clouds at altitudes up to 7,000' AGL within DOE's R-2204 restricted area. Pressure, relative humidity, temperature, wind speed, and wind direction are recorded at multiple altitudes along the tether. These data were validated against stationary met tower data in Albuquerque, NM. The altitudes of the sensors were determined by GPS and calculated using a line counter and clinometer and compared. Wireless wetness sensors and supercooled liquid water content sensors have also been deployed and their data has been compared with other sensors. This presentation will provide an overview of the balloons, sensors, and test flights flown, and will provide a preliminary look at data from sensor validation campaigns and test flights.

  4. Numerical modeling of a spar platform tethered by a mooring cable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiangqian; Yoo, Wan-Suk

    2015-07-01

    Virtual simulation is an economical and efficient method in mechanical system design. Numerical modeling of a spar platform, tethered by a mooring cable with a spherical joint is developed for the dynamic simulation of the floating structure in ocean. The geometry modeling of the spar is created using finite element methods. The submerged part of the spar bears the buoyancy, hydrodynamic drag force, and effect of the added mass and Froude-Krylov force. Strip theory is used to sum up the forces acting on the elements. The geometry modeling of the cable is established based on the lumped-mass-and-spring modeling through which the cable is divided into 10 elements. A new element-fixed local frame is used, which is created by the element orientation vector and relative velocity of the fluid, to express the loads acting on the cable. The bottom of the cable is fixed on the seabed by spring forces, while the top of the cable is connected to the bottom of the spar platform by a modified spherical joint. This system suffers the propagating wave and current in the X-direction and the linear wave theory is applied for setting of the propagating wave. Based on the numerical modeling, the displacement-load relationships are analyzed, and the simulation results of the numerical modeling are compared with those by the commercial simulation code, ProteusDS. The comparison indicates that the numerical modeling of the spar platform tethered by a mooring cable is well developed, which provides an instruction for the optimization of a floating structure tethered by a mooring cable system.

  5. Role of Double-Strand Break End-Tethering during Gene Conversion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvi Jain

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Correct repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs is critical for maintaining genome stability. Whereas gene conversion (GC-mediated repair is mostly error-free, repair by break-induced replication (BIR is associated with non-reciprocal translocations and loss of heterozygosity. We have previously shown that a Recombination Execution Checkpoint (REC mediates this competition by preventing the BIR pathway from acting on DSBs that can be repaired by GC. Here, we asked if the REC can also determine whether the ends that are engaged in a GC-compatible configuration belong to the same break, since repair involving ends from different breaks will produce potentially deleterious translocations. We report that the kinetics of repair are markedly delayed when the two DSB ends that participate in GC belong to different DSBs (termed Trans compared to the case when both DSB ends come from the same break (Cis. However, repair in Trans still occurs by GC rather than BIR, and the overall efficiency of repair is comparable. Hence, the REC is not sensitive to the "origin" of the DSB ends. When the homologous ends for GC are in Trans, the delay in repair appears to reflect their tethering to sequences on the other side of the DSB that themselves recombine with other genomic locations with which they share sequence homology. These data support previous observations that the two ends of a DSB are usually tethered to each other and that this tethering facilitates both ends encountering the same donor sequence. We also found that the presence of homeologous/repetitive sequences in the vicinity of a DSB can distract the DSB end from finding its bona fide homologous donor, and that inhibition of GC by such homeologous sequences is markedly increased upon deleting Sgs1 but not Msh6.

  6. Feasibility Study of Space Based Solar Power to Tethered Aerostat Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Stephen J.; Leete, Stephen J.; Jaffe, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility of two-stage Space-Based Solar Power to Tethered Aerostat to Earth (SSP-TA) system architectures that offer significant advantages over conventional single stage space-to-earth architectures is being studied. There have been many proposals for the transmission of solar power collected in space to the surface of the earth so that solar energy could provide a major part of the electric power requirements on earth. There are, however, serious difficulties in implementing the single stage space-based solar power systems that have been previously studied. These difficulties arise due to: i) the cost of transporting the components needed for the extremely large microwave transmit beaming aperture into space orbit, ii) the even larger collection apertures required on earth, iii) the potential radiation hazard to personnel and equipment on earth, and iv) a lack of flexibility in location of the collection station on the earth. Two candidate system architectures are described here to overcome these difficulties. In both cases a two-stage space to tethered aerostat to earth transmission system (SSP-TA) is proposed. The use of high altitude tethered aerostats (or powered airships) avoids the effects of attenuation of EM energy propagating through the earth s lower atmosphere. This allows the use of beaming frequencies to be chosen from the range of high millimeter (THz) to near-infra-red (NIR) to the visible. This has the potential for: i) greatly reduced transportation costs to space, ii) much smaller receiver collection apertures and ground stations, iii) elimination of the potential radiation hazard to personnel and equipment on earth, and iv) ease in transportation and flexibility in location of the collection station on the earth. A preliminary comparison of system performance and efficiencies is presented.

  7. Direct observations of tether-cutting reconnection during a major solar event in AR 11990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huadong

    2015-08-01

    Using multi-wavelength data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we investigated two successive solar flares, a C5.1 confined flare and an X4.9 ejective flare with a halo coronal mass ejection, in NOAA active region 11990 from 2014 February 24 to 25. Before the confined flare onset, EUV brightening beneath the filament was detected. As the flare began, a twisted helical flux rope (FR) wrapping around the filament moved upward and then stopped, and in the meantime an obvious X-ray source below it was observed. Prior to the ejective X4.9 flare, some pre-existing loop structures in the active region interacted with each other, which produced a brightening region beneath the filament. Meanwhile, a small flaring loop appeared below the interaction region and some new helical lines connecting the far ends of the loop structures were gradually formed and continually added into the former twisted FR. Then, due to the resulting imbalance between the magnetic pressure and tension, the new FR, together with the filament, erupted outward. Our observations coincide well with a tether-cutting model, suggesting that the two flares probably have the same triggering mechanism, i.e., tether- cutting reconnection. To our knowledge, this is the first direct observation of tether-cutting reconnection occurring between pre-existing loops in an active region. In the ejective flare case, the erupting filament exhibited an Ω-like kinked structure and underwent an exponential rise after a slow-rise phase, indicating that the kink instability might be also responsible for the eruption initiation.

  8. Tethered capsule OCT endomicroscopy: from bench to bedside at the primary care office (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gora, Michalina J.; Simmons, Leigh H.; Tiernan, Aubrey R.; Grant, Catriona N.; Soomro, Amna R.; Walker Corkery, Elizabeth S.; Rosenberg, Mireille; Metlay, Joshua P.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a swallowable tethered capsule OCT endomicroscopy (TCE) device that acquires microscopic images of the entire esophagus in unsedated subjects in a quick and comfortable procedure. To test its capabilities of TCE to become a population-based screening device, we conducted a clinical feasibility study in the primary care office. The swept-source OCT imaging system (1310nm central wavelength, 40kHz A-line rate, 10um axial resolution) together with the tethered capsule catheter (11x25mm capsule attached to a flexible tether) were transferred to the PCP office where unsedated patients scheduled for non-urgent PCP visits swallowed the capsule and microscopic OCT images of the entire esophagus were collected. After the whole length of the esophagus was imaged, the catheter was disinfected for reuse. Twenty subjects were enrolled in the study, including nine female and eleven male. All TCE procedures were performed by a nurse and lasted in average 5:42 ± 1:54 min. High-resolution images of the esophagus were obtained in all seventeen subjects that swallowed the capsule. Our clinical experience in this cohort, subject feedback, image quality, and technological adaptations for efficient utilization in this setting will be presented. The ease and simplicity of the procedure combined with high quality of the images demonstrate the potential for this technology to become a population-based screening device. Technology limitations and future development guided by findings from this initial experience will be discussed with the goal of effectively translating TCE to the outpatient primary care setting.

  9. Use of Tethered Enzymes as a Platform Technology for Rapid Analyte Detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Cohen

    Full Text Available Rapid diagnosis for time-sensitive illnesses such as stroke, cardiac arrest, and septic shock is essential for successful treatment. Much attention has therefore focused on new strategies for rapid and objective diagnosis, such as Point-of-Care Tests (PoCT for blood biomarkers. Here we use a biomimicry-based approach to demonstrate a new diagnostic platform, based on enzymes tethered to nanoparticles (NPs. As proof of principle, we use oriented immobilization of pyruvate kinase (PK and luciferase (Luc on silica NPs to achieve rapid and sensitive detection of neuron-specific enolase (NSE, a clinically relevant biomarker for multiple diseases ranging from acute brain injuries to lung cancer. We hypothesize that an approach capitalizing on the speed and catalytic nature of enzymatic reactions would enable fast and sensitive biomarker detection, suitable for PoCT devices.We performed in-vitro, animal model, and human subject studies. First, the efficiency of coupled enzyme activities when tethered to NPs versus when in solution was tested, demonstrating a highly sensitive and rapid detection of physiological and pathological concentrations of NSE. Next, in rat stroke models the enzyme-based assay was able in minutes to show a statistically significant increase in NSE levels in samples taken 1 hour before and 0, 1, 3 and 6 hours after occlusion of the distal middle cerebral artery. Finally, using the tethered enzyme assay for detection of NSE in samples from 20 geriatric human patients, we show that our data match well (r = 0.815 with the current gold standard for biomarker detection, ELISA-with a major difference being that we achieve detection in 10 minutes as opposed to the several hours required for traditional ELISA.Oriented enzyme immobilization conferred more efficient coupled activity, and thus higher assay sensitivity, than non-tethered enzymes. Together, our findings provide proof of concept for using oriented immobilization of active

  10. Electric-Field-Assisted Assembly of Polymer-Tethered Gold Nanorods in Cylindrical Nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke; Jin, Seon-Mi; Xu, Jiangping; Liang, Ruijing; Shezad, Khurram; Xue, Zhigang; Xie, Xiaolin; Lee, Eunji; Zhu, Jintao

    2016-05-24

    In this report, we demonstrate the confined assembly of polymer-tethered gold nanorods in anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) channels with the assistance of electric field (EF). Various interesting hybrid assemblies, such as single-, double-, triple-, or quadruple-helix, linear, and hexagonally packed structures are obtained by adjusting pore size in AAO channels, ligand length, and EF orientation. Correspondingly, surface plasmonic property of the assemblies can thus be tuned. This strategy, by coupling of external-field and cylindrically confined assembly, is believed to be a promising approach for generating ordered hybrid assemblies with hierarchical structures, which may find potential applications in photoelectric devices, biosensors, and data storage devices. PMID:27054687

  11. Iatrogenic intradural arachnoid cyst following tethered cord release in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Chad A; Bonney, Phillip; Cheema, Ahmed A; Conner, Andrew K; Gross, Naina L; Yaun, Amanda L

    2016-02-01

    Iatrogenic arachnoid cysts represent uncommon complications of intradural spinal procedures. Here we present the case of a 7-year-old girl who was found to have a symptomatic, pathologically proven, intradural arachnoid cyst 3 years following tethered cord release. The patient originally presented with abnormal urodynamics testing and was found to have fatty infiltration in her filum terminale. She underwent sectioning of the filum terminale without complications. The patient presented 3 years later with pain and neurogenic claudication. The patient was successfully treated with subarachnoid cyst fenestration with resolution of her bilateral lower extremity pain. Spinal intradural arachnoid cysts represent an important, though rare, postoperative complication of dural opening. PMID:26602801

  12. A Tethered Cord with Hemivertebra: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asil, Kiyasettin; Yaldiz, Mahizer; Ozkal, Birol

    2015-01-01

    Spinal dysraphisms are defined as open and closed dysraphisms. A hemivertebra is a congenital condition seen in 61% of patients with congenital anomalies. The first report of the excision of a hemivertebra was by Royle in 1928. A sixteen-year-old girl was admitted to our clinic with a congenital stain on the waist and a normal neurological examination. No new cases have been reported in recent literature. Our case, which is also rare, is associated with a tethered cord only and no other congenital abnormalities. PMID:26512281

  13. Experimental and analytical determination of stability parameters for a balloon tethered in a wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redd, L. T.; Bennett, R. M.; Bland, S. R.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental and analytical techniques for determining stability parameters for a balloon tethered in a steady wind are described. These techniques are applied to a particular 7.64-meter-long balloon, and the results are presented. The stability parameters of interest appear as coefficients in linearized stability equations and are derived from the various forces and moments acting on the balloon. In several cases the results from the experimental and analytical techniques are compared and suggestions are given as to which techniques are the most practical means of determining values for the stability parameters.

  14. A complementary electrochromic device based on polyaniline-tethered polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane and tungsten oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Liying; Xiong, Shanxin; Ma, Jan; Lu, Xuehong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2009-05-15

    In this paper we report a high-contrast complementary electrochromic device based on polyaniline-tethered polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS-PANI) and tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}). The electrochromic properties, cyclic voltammetry behavior and coloration efficiency of the device are studied. Due to the loosely packed structure of POSS-PANI, it possesses more accessible doping sites and hence gives rise to a significantly higher electrochromic contrast than polyaniline (PANI). Furthermore, the replacement of PANI with POSS-PANI as the complementary layer for WO{sub 3} leads to an enhanced complementary effect, for which the underneath mechanism is also discussed. (author)

  15. Synaptic Vesicle Tethering and the CaV2.2 Distal C-terminal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona K Wong

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available . Evidence that synaptic vesicles (SVs can be gated by a single voltage sensitive calcium channel (CaV2.2 predict a molecular linking mechanism or ‘tether’[Stanley 1993]. Recent studies have proposed that the SV binds to the distal C-terminal on the CaV2.2 calcium channel [Kaeser et al. 2011;Wong, Li, and Stanley 2013] while genetic analysis proposed a double tether mechanism via RIM: directly to the C terminus PDZ ligand domain or indirectly via a more proximal proline rich site [Kaeser et al. 2011]. Using a novel in vitro SV-PD binding assay, we reported that SVs bind to a fusion protein comprising the C-terminal distal third (C3, aa 2137-2357 [Wong, Li, and Stanley 2013]. Here we limit the binding site further to the last 58 aa, beyond the proline rich site, by the absence of SV capture by a truncated C3 fusion protein (aa 2137-2299. To test PDZ-dependent binding we generated two C terminus-mutant C3 fusion proteins and a mimetic blocking peptide (H-WC, aa 2349-2357 and validated these by elimination of MINT-1 or RIM binding. Persistence of SV capture with all three fusion proteins or with the full length C3 protein but in the presence of the blocking peptide, demonstrated that SVs can bind to the distal C-terminal via a PDZ-independent mechanism. These results were supported in situ by normal SV turnover in H-WC-loaded synaptosomes, as assayed by a novel peptide cryoloading method. Thus, SVs tether to the CaV2.2 C-terminal within a 49 aa region immediately prior to the terminus PDZ ligand domain. Long tethers that could reflect extended C termini were imaged by electron microscopy of synaptosome ghosts. To fully account for SV tethering we propose a model where SVs are initially captured, or ‘grabbed’, from the cytoplasm by a binding site on the distal region of the channel C-terminal and are then retracted to be ‘locked’ close to the channel by a second attachment mechanism in preparation for single channel domain gating.

  16. A modular phosphate tether-mediated divergent strategy to complex polyols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul R. Hanson

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available An efficient and divergent synthesis of polyol subunits utilizing a phosphate tether-mediated, one-pot, sequential RCM/CM/reduction process is reported. A modular, 3-component coupling strategy has been developed, in which, simple “order of addition” of a pair of olefinic-alcohol components to a pseudo-C2-symmetric phosphoryl chloride, coupled with the RCM/CM/reduction protocol, yields five polyol fragments. Each of the product polyols bears a central 1,3-anti-diol subunit with differential olefinic geometries at the periphery.

  17. Development of a Tether Based Space Walking Robot to Be Tested on ISS/KIBO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Mitsushige; Yoshii, Masahiro; Kato, Hiroki; Suzuki, Satoshi; Hagiwara, Yusuke; Ueno, Taihei

    A unique space robot is proposed to support astronauts in space. The robot moves around the surface of a space facility, e.g. a space station using its handrails and tethers that the robot has. This unique mechanism of the proposed robot makes it possible to realize the robot in a small volume while the robot can move around the wide area. In order to demonstrate usefulness of this unique robot, an onboard experiment on the exposed facility of the International Space Station Japanese Experiment Module, “KIBO” will be conducted in the year 2012. Development of the experiment system is progressing now.

  18. Preparation of isospecific metallocene catalysts for olefin polymerization that are covalently tethered on solid surface

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Noriyuki; Yu, Jian; Shioda, Nobuyuki; Asami, Hayato; Nakamura, Takashi; Huhn, Thomas; Fukuoka, Atsushi; Ichikawa, Masaru; Saburi, Masahiko; Wakatsuki, Yasuo

    2002-01-01

    A novel methodology was developed for the preparation of isospecific metallocene catalysts for olefin polymerization that are tethered on silica surfaces with covalent bonds. A racemic ansa-zirconocene complex that has a Si Cl moiety on its bridge was immobilized on SiO2 by the reaction of the Si Cl anchor with Si OH on the solid surface. The prepared solid catalyst was found to be effective for isospecific propene polymerization (catalyst A). Pretreatment of silica surfaces with Me3SiCl impr...

  19. Nonlinear femtosecond laser processing of alkylsiloxane monolayers on surface-oxidized silicon substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Femtosecond laser patterning of octadecylsiloxane monolayers on surface-oxidized silicon substrates via single-pulse processing at λ=800 nm, τ2. A significantly larger parameter range for selective processing is anticipated in the case of functional monolayers that incorporate aromatic groups. Promising perspectives in femtosecond laser processing of organic monolayers are discussed.

  20. Fluorescent aromatic sensors and their methods of use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meador, Michael A. (Inventor); Tyson, Daniel S. (Inventor); Ilan, Ulvi F. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Aromatic molecules that can be used as sensors are described. The aromatic sensors include a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon core with a five-membered imide rings fused to the core and at least two pendant aryl groups. The aromatic sensor molecules can detect target analytes or molecular strain as a result of changes in their fluorescence, in many cases with on-off behavior. Aromatic molecules that fluoresce at various frequencies can be prepared by altering the structure of the aromatic core or the substituents attached to it. The aromatic molecules can be used as sensors for various applications such as, for example, the detection of dangerous chemicals, biomedical diagnosis, and the detection of damage or strain in composite materials. Methods of preparing aromatic sensor molecules are also described.

  1. Mineral dust aerosols promote the formation of toxic nitropolycyclic aromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameda, Takayuki; Azumi, Eri; Fukushima, Aki; Tang, Ning; Matsuki, Atsushi; Kamiya, Yuta; Toriba, Akira; Hayakawa, Kazuichi

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAHs), which have been shown to have adverse health effects such as carcinogenicity, are formed in part through nitration reactions of their parent polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the atmosphere. However, little is known about heterogeneous nitration rates of PAHs by gaseous NO2 on natural mineral substrates, such as desert dust aerosols. Herein by employing kinetic experiments using a flow reactor and surface analysis by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy with pyridine adsorption, we demonstrate that the reaction is accelerated on acidic surfaces of mineral dust, particularly on those of clay minerals. In support of this finding, we show that levels of ambient particle-associated NPAHs in Beijing, China, significantly increased during heavy dust storms. These results suggest that mineral dust surface reactions are an unrecognized source of toxic organic chemicals in the atmosphere and that they enhance the toxicity of mineral dust aerosols in urban environments. PMID:27075250

  2. Capacity of Aromatic Compound Degradation by Bacteria from Amazon Dark Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Mancini Nakamura

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Amazon dark earth (ADE is known for its high organic matter content, biochar concentration and microbial diversity. The biochar amount suggests the existence of microorganisms capable of degrading aromatic hydrocarbons (AHs. In an effort to investigate the influence of bacteria on the resilience and fertility of these soils, we enriched five ADE soils with naphthalene and phenanthrene, and biodegradation assays with phenanthrene and diesel oil were carried out, as well. After DNA extraction, amplification and sequencing of the 16S rRNA bacterial gene, we identified 148 isolates as the Proteobacteria, Firmicutes and Actinobacteria phyla comprising genera closely related to AHs biodegradation. We obtained 128 isolates that degrade diesel oil and 115 isolates that degrade phenanthrene. Some isolates were successful in degrading both substrates within 2 h. In conclusion, the obtained isolates from ADE have degrading aromatic compound activity, and perhaps, the biochar content has a high influence on this.

  3. Mineral dust aerosols promote the formation of toxic nitropolycyclic aromatic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameda, Takayuki; Azumi, Eri; Fukushima, Aki; Tang, Ning; Matsuki, Atsushi; Kamiya, Yuta; Toriba, Akira; Hayakawa, Kazuichi

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAHs), which have been shown to have adverse health effects such as carcinogenicity, are formed in part through nitration reactions of their parent polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the atmosphere. However, little is known about heterogeneous nitration rates of PAHs by gaseous NO2 on natural mineral substrates, such as desert dust aerosols. Herein by employing kinetic experiments using a flow reactor and surface analysis by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy with pyridine adsorption, we demonstrate that the reaction is accelerated on acidic surfaces of mineral dust, particularly on those of clay minerals. In support of this finding, we show that levels of ambient particle-associated NPAHs in Beijing, China, significantly increased during heavy dust storms. These results suggest that mineral dust surface reactions are an unrecognized source of toxic organic chemicals in the atmosphere and that they enhance the toxicity of mineral dust aerosols in urban environments. PMID:27075250

  4. Structure of the Membrane-tethering GRASP Domain Reveals a Unique PDZ Ligand Interaction That Mediates Golgi Biogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S Truschel; D Sengupta; A Foote; A Heroux; M Macbeth; A Linstedt

    2011-12-31

    Biogenesis of the ribbon-like membrane network of the mammalian Golgi requires membrane tethering by the conserved GRASP domain in GRASP65 and GRASP55, yet the tethering mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of the GRASP55 GRASP domain, which revealed an unusual arrangement of two tandem PDZ folds that more closely resemble prokaryotic PDZ domains. Biochemical and functional data indicated that the interaction between the ligand-binding pocket of PDZ1 and an internal ligand on PDZ2 mediates the GRASP self-interaction, and structural analyses suggest that this occurs via a unique mode of internal PDZ ligand recognition. Our data uncover the structural basis for ligand specificity and provide insight into the mechanism of GRASP-dependent membrane tethering of analogous Golgi cisternae.

  5. Structure of the Membrane-tethering GRASP Domain Reveals a Unique PDZ Ligand Interaction That Mediates Golgi Biogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truschel, S.T.; Heroux, A.; Sengupta, D.; Foote, A.; Macbeth, M. R.; Linstedt, A. D.

    2011-06-10

    Biogenesis of the ribbon-like membrane network of the mammalian Golgi requires membrane tethering by the conserved GRASP domain in GRASP65 and GRASP55, yet the tethering mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of the GRASP55 GRASP domain, which revealed an unusual arrangement of two tandem PDZ folds that more closely resemble prokaryotic PDZ domains. Biochemical and functional data indicated that the interaction between the ligand-binding pocket of PDZ1 and an internal ligand on PDZ2 mediates the GRASP self-interaction, and structural analyses suggest that this occurs via a unique mode of internal PDZ ligand recognition. Our data uncover the structural basis for ligand specificity and provide insight into the mechanism of GRASP-dependent membrane tethering of analogous Golgi cisternae.

  6. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons as Plausible Prebiotic Membrane Components

    OpenAIRE

    Groen, Joost; Deamer, David W.; Kros, Alexander; Ehrenfreund, Pascale

    2012-01-01

    Aromatic molecules delivered to the young Earth during the heavy bombardment phase in the early history of our solar system were likely to be among the most abundant and stable organic compounds available. The Aromatic World hypothesis suggests that aromatic molecules might function as container elements, energy transduction elements and templating genetic components for early life forms. To investigate the possible role of aromatic molecules as container elements, we incorporated different p...

  7. Electronic Aromaticity Index for Large Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Matito, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new electronic aromaticity index, AV1245, consisting in the average of the 4-center MCI values along the ring that keep a positional relationship of 1,2,4,5. AV1245 measures the extent of transferability of the delocalized electrons between bonds 1-2 and 4-5, which is expected to be large in conjugated circuits and, therefore, in aromatic molecules. A new algorithm for the calculation of MCI for large rings is also introduced and used to produce the data for the calibration of the new aromaticity index. AV1245 does not rely on reference values, does not suffer from large numerical precision errors, and it does not present any limitation on the nature of atoms, the molecular geometry or the level of calculation. It is a size-extensive measure with a small computational cost that grows linearly with the number of ring members. Therefore, it is specially suitable to study the aromaticity of large molecular rings as those occurring in belt-shaped M\\"obius structures or porphyrins.

  8. Extremely long aromatics: Diastereomerically pure [19]helicene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nejedlý, Jindřich; Rybáček, Jiří; Stará, Irena G.; Starý, Ivo

    Praha: Czech Chemical Society, 2015. s. 119. [Liblice 2015. Advances in Organic , Bioorganic and Pharmaceutical Chemistry /50./. 06.11.2015-08.11.2015, Olomouc] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-29667S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : helically chiral aromatics * helicenes * [2+2+2] cycloisomerisation Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  9. Aromatic cytokinins in micropropagated potato plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Baroja, F. E.; Aguirreolea, J.; Martínková, Hana; Hanuš, Jan; Strnad, Miroslav

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 3 (2002), s. 217-224. ISSN 0981-9428 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC 844.10; GA ČR GA301/02/0475 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Keywords : Acclimatization * Aromatic cytokinins * Micropropagation Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.582, year: 2002

  10. Discovering Chemical Aromaticity Using Fragrant Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Tanya L.

    2010-01-01

    Introductory organic chemistry is often perceived as inaccessible by students. This article describes a method used to link organic chemistry to everyday experience, asking students to explore whether fragrant molecules are also aromatic in the chemical sense. Students were engaged in this activity, excited about their results, and performed well…

  11. Thermoset/Thermoplastic Aromatic Polyamides for Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Clair, T. L.; St. Clair, A. K.; Barrick, J. D.; Wolfe, J. F.; Greenwood, T. D.

    1983-01-01

    Aromatic polyamides are processed at relatively low temperature, then heat-treated to attain high softening temperature required when polyamides are used as matrix resins in structural composites. New polyamides are compatable with organic fibers often used as reinforcing agents in such composites Pendent propargyl groups serve as latent cross-linking agents in new series of polyamide resins.

  12. An electronic aromaticity index for large rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matito, Eduard

    2016-04-28

    We introduce a new electronic aromaticity index, AV1245, consisting of an average of the 4-center multicenter indices (MCI) along the ring that keeps a positional relationship of 1, 2, 4, 5. AV1245 measures the extent of transferability of the delocalized electrons between bonds 1-2 and 4-5, which is expected to be large in conjugated circuits and, therefore, in aromatic molecules. A new algorithm for the calculation of MCI for large rings is also introduced and used to produce the data for the calibration of the new aromaticity index. AV1245 does not rely on reference values, does not suffer from large numerical precision errors, and it does not present any limitation on the nature of atoms, the molecular geometry or the level of calculation. It is a size-extensive measure with low computational cost that grows linearly with the number of ring members. Therefore, it is especially suitable to study the aromaticity of large molecular rings such as those occurring in belt-shaped Möbius structures or porphyrins. The analysis of AV1245 in free-base and bis-metalated Pd [32]octaphyrins(1,0,1,0,1,0,1,0) completes this study. PMID:26878146

  13. Fused aromatic thienopyrazines: structure, properties and function

    KAUST Repository

    Mondal, Rajib

    2010-01-01

    Recent development of a fused aromatic thieno[3.4-b]pyrazine system and their application in optoelectronic devices are reviewed. Introduction of a fused aromatic unit followed by side chain engineering, dramatically enhanced the charge carrier mobility in thin film transistor devices and mobilities up to 0.2 cm2/Vs were achieved. The optoelectronic properties of these fused aromatic thienopyrazine polymers (Eg = 1.3 to 1.6 eV, HOMO = -4.9 to -5.2 V) were tuned by introduction of various fused aromatic rings within thienopyrazine. By balancing the fundamental properties of these polymers, both high charge carrier mobilities and moderate PCEs in solar cells were achieved. Further, effects of copolymerizing units are discussed. Low band gap semiconducting polymer (Eg ∼ 1 eV) with high field effect mobility (0.044 cm2/Vs) was obtained using cyclopentadithiophene as copolymerizing unit. Finally, a molecular design approach to enhance the absorption coefficients is discussed, which resulted in improved power conversion efficiency in bulk heterojunction solar cells. © 2010 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  14. Silicone elastomers with aromatic voltage stabilizers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A Razak, Aliff Hisyam; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    enhanced electrical breakdown strength due to delocalized pi-electrons of aromatic rings attached to the silicone backbone. The dielectric relative permittivity of PDMS-PPMS copolymers remained between 2 to3 with low conductivity and low dielectric loss as well as high storage moduli with low viscousloss...

  15. Robust plasmonic substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kostiučenko, Oksana; Fiutowski, Jacek; Tamulevicius, Tomas; Tamulevicius, Sigitas; Silbernagl, Dorothee; Sturm, Heinz; Rubahn, Horst-Günter

    2014-01-01

    Robustness is a key issue for the applications of plasmonic substrates such as tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, surface-enhanced spectroscopies, enhanced optical biosensing, optical and optoelectronic plasmonic nanosensors and others. A novel approach for the fabrication of robust plasmonic...... considered robust plasmonic substrates, nanoindentation and wear resistance experiments as well as ablation experiment were performed. The mechanical properties of the layered substrates are tested via atomic force microscopy, evaluating spatially resolved threshold loads both for plastic deformation and...... breaking. DLC coating with thicknesses between 25 and 105 nm is found to considerably increase the mechanical strength of the substrates while at the same time ensuring conservation of sufficient field enhancements of the gold plasmonic substrates....

  16. Catalytic oxidation of 2-aminophenols and ortho hydroxylation of aromatic amines by tyrosinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The usual substrates of tyrosinase, a copper-containing monooxygenase (EC 1.14.18.1), are monophenols and o-diphenols which are both converted to o-quinones. In this paper, the authors studied the reaction of this enzyme with two new classes of substrates: aromatic amines and o-aminophenols, structural analogues of monophenols and o-diphenols, respectively. They undergo the same catalytic reactions (ortho hydroxylation and oxidation), as documented by product analysis and kinetic studies. In the presence of tyrosinase, arylamines and o-aminophenols are converted to o-quinone imines, which are isolated as quinone anils or phenoxazones. As an example, in the presence of tyrosinase, 2-amino-3-hydroxybenzoic acid (an o-aminophenol) is converted to cinnabarinic acid, a well-known phenoxazone, while p-aminotoluene (an aromatic amine) gives rise to the formation of 5-amino-2-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone 1-(4-methylanil). Kinetic studies using an oxygen electrode show that arylamines and the corresponding monophenols exhibit similar Michaelis constants. In contrast, the reaction rates observed for aromatic amines are relatively slow as compared to monophenols. The enzymatic conversion of arylamines by tryosinase is different from the typical ones: N-oxidation and ring hydroxylation without further oxidation. This difference originates from the regiospecific hydroxylation (ortho position) and subsequent oxidation of the intermediate o-aminophenol to the corresponding o-quinone imine. Finally, the well-know monooxygenase activity of tyrosinase was also confirmed for the aromatic amine p-aminotoluene, with 18O2

  17. Aromatic oligoamides with a rare ortho-connectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelmgaard, T.; Nielsen, John

    2013-01-01

    Even though aromatic oligoamides composed of aromatic amino acids in a "one-way sequence" attract ever increasing research interest, backbones connected through ortho-linked aromatics remain rare. Herein, we present the first synthesis and study of N-alkylated ortho-aminomethyl- benzamides termed...

  18. 40 CFR 721.5762 - Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5762 Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (PMN P-01-573) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  19. 40 CFR 721.2673 - Aromatic epoxide resin (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aromatic epoxide resin (generic). 721... Substances § 721.2673 Aromatic epoxide resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as aromatic epoxide resin (PMN...

  20. Plasmids and aromatic degradation in Sphingomonas for bioremediation : Aromatic ring cleavage genes in soil and rhizosphere

    OpenAIRE

    SipilÀ, Timo

    2009-01-01

    Microbial degradation pathways play a key role in the detoxification and the mineralization of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are widespread pollutants in soil and constituents of petroleum hydrocarbons. In microbiology the aromatic degradation pathways are traditionally studied from single bacterial strains with capacity to degrade certain pollutant. In soil the degradation of aromatics is performed by a diverse community of micro-organisms. The aim of this thesis was to study biode...

  1. Calculating the mean time to capture for tethered ligands and its effect on the chemical equilibrium of bound ligand pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lu; Decker, Caitlin G; Maynard, Heather D; Levine, Alex J

    2016-09-01

    We present here the calculation of the mean time to capture of a tethered ligand to the receptor. This calculation is then used to determine the shift in the partitioning between (1) free, (2) singly bound, and (3) doubly bound ligands in chemical equilibrium as a function of the length of the tether. These calculations are used in the research article Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 Dimer with Superagonist in vitro Activity Improves Granulation Tissue Formation During Wound Healing (Decker et al., in press [1]) to explain quantitatively how changes in polymeric linker length in the ligand dimers modifies the efficacy of these molecules relative to that of free ligands. PMID:27408925

  2. Vehicle tethered aerostat optoelectronic monitoring platform system for Shanghai World EXPO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Weihu; Wang, Yawei; Han, Xiaoquan; Yuan, Jiang

    2010-08-01

    To monitor the whole Shanghai Expo Park, a vehicle tethered aerostat optoelectronic monitoring platform with the characteristic of time-sensitive and all-weather monitoring is described in detail in this paper, which is hung beneath the tethered balloon and equipped with a variety of payloads, including visible light monitoring system, infrared monitoring system, hyperspectral monitoring system, GPS/INS system, monitoring and control system and so on. These equipments can be used for real-time monitoring, environmental monitoring, and ground target location of Shanghai Expo Park. The output High Definition (HD) image of Shanghai Expo Park from visible light monitoring system is clear and stable, and the stabilization accuracy of visual axis is 0.07°(3δ). The optoelectronic monitoring platform system uses the target location technology based on Global Position System/Inertial Navigation System (GPS/INS) system to output real-time location data compatible with Geographic Information System (GIS). Test results show that the maximum errors between the location results (latitude and longitude) solved by the target location program and the reference target are 0.2 0/00(latitude) and 2 0/00(longitude). Now the whole system has been used for surveillance the Shanghai Expo Park since April 2010.

  3. Probing DNA conformational changes with high temporal resolution by tethered particle motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tethered particle motion (TPM) technique informs about conformational changes of DNA molecules, e.g. upon looping or interaction with proteins, by tracking the Brownian motion of a particle probe tethered to a surface by a single DNA molecule and detecting changes of its amplitude of movement. We discuss in this context the time resolution of TPM, which strongly depends on the particle–DNA complex relaxation time, i.e. the characteristic time it takes to explore its configuration space by diffusion. By comparing theory, simulations and experiments, we propose a calibration of TPM at the dynamical level: we analyze how the relaxation time grows with both DNA contour length (from 401 to 2080 base pairs) and particle radius (from 20 to 150 nm). Notably we demonstrate that, for a particle of radius 20 nm or less, the hydrodynamic friction induced by the particle and the surface does not significantly slow down the DNA. This enables us to determine the optimal time resolution of TPM in distinct experimental contexts which can be as short as 20 ms

  4. Self-assembly of inorganic nanoparticle vesicles and tubules driven by tethered linear block copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jie; Liu, Yijing; Babu, Taarika; Wei, Zengjiang; Nie, Zhihong

    2012-07-18

    Controllable self-assembly of nanoscale building blocks into larger specific structures provides an effective route for the fabrication of new materials with unique optical, electronic, and magnetic properties. The ability of nanoparticles (NPs) to self-assemble like molecules is opening new research frontiers in nanoscience and nanotechnology. We present a new class of amphiphilic "colloidal molecules" (ACMs) composed of inorganic NPs tethered with amphiphilic linear block copolymers (BCPs). Driven by the conformational changes of tethered BCP chains, such ACMs can self-assemble into well-defined vesicular and tubular nanostructures comprising a monolayer shell of hexagonally packed NPs in selective solvents. The morphologies and geometries of these assemblies can be controlled by the size of NPs and molecular weight of BCPs. Our approach also allows us to control the interparticle distance, thus fine-tuning the plasmonic properties of the assemblies of metal NPs. This strategy provides a general means to design new building blocks for assembling novel functional materials and devices. PMID:22746265

  5. Evaluation of Power Conversion on Heavy Payload Tethered Hexarotors: A Strategic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasantha Samarathunga

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This research article addresses the evaluation of power conversion on heavy payload tethered hexarotors where the payloads are high and hovering times are long. Modifications were added to the power conversion unit based on operation reliability perspective. Since the objective power conversion is large comparing to existing tethered UAVs today, a strategic engineering approach was proposed and tested based on partial observations on current spikes and power thresholds of DCDC switching regulators. Research problem is such that, when UAV motors are consuming low currents, the current spikes are not the plausible cause of direct power failure. But at higher currents even small current spikes could cause power failures. Risk increase with time and situations worsen when UAVs operate under high precision flight controls. When the number of parallel converters are small this becomes a mission critical problem. As a solution, fast switching high current diodes are used at the low voltage high current output to block reverse currents, and then apply low voltage bus bar to prevent dependency issues on particular DCDC module. At the cost of a small power dissipations over diodes, the total current thresholds of UAV become higher. Experiment results shows that with the use of proposed method large number of paralleling switching regulators become possible and heavy payload flights become reliable.

  6. Identification of Novel ROS Inducers: Quinone Derivatives Tethered to Long Hydrocarbon Chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yeonsun; Sengupta, Sandip; Hur, Wooyoung; Sim, Taebo

    2015-05-14

    We performed the first synthesis of the 17-carbon chain-tethered quinone moiety 22 (SAN5201) of irisferin A, a natural product exhibiting anticancer activity, and its derivatives. We found that 22 is a potent ROS inducer and cytotoxic agent. Compound 25 (SAN7401), the hydroquinone form of 22, induced a significant release of intracellular ROS and apoptosis (EC50 = 1.3-2.6 μM) in cancer cell lines, including A549 and HCT-116. Compared with the activity of a well-known ROS inducer, piperlongumine, 22 and 25 showed stronger cytotoxicity and higher selectivity over noncancerous cells. Another hydroquinone tethering 12-carbon chain, 26 (SAN4601), generated reduced levels of ROS but showed more potent cytotoxicity (EC50 = 0.8-1.6 μM) in cancer cells, although it lacked selectivity over noncancerous cells, implying that the naturally occurring 17-carbon chain is also crucial for ROS production and a selective anticancer effect. Both 25 and 26 displayed strong, equipotent activities against vemurafenib-resistant SK-Mel2 melanoma cells and p53-deficient H1299 lung cancer cells as well, demonstrating their broad therapeutic potential as anticancer agents. PMID:25826398

  7. Fluorosilicone multi-block copolymers tethering quaternary ammonium salt groups for antimicrobial purpose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fang; Qin, Xiaoshuai; Li, Yancai; Ren, Lixia; Zhao, Yunhui; Yuan, Xiaoyan

    2015-08-01

    Symmetrically structured fluorosilicone multi-block copolymers containing poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) and poly(hexafluorobutyl methacrylate) (PHFBMA) were sequentially synthesized via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization, using a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) chain transfer agent with dithiocarbonate groups at both ends. Then, the CBABC-type block copolymers were quaternized with n-octyliodide to tether quaternary ammonium salt (QAS) groups in the PDMAEMA blocks for the antimicrobial use. The obtained fluorosilicone copolymers showed clear variations in the C-N+ composition and surface morphology on their films depending on the content of the PHFBMA blocks, which were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy, respectively. The results indicated that the symmetrical CBABC structure favored PDMS and QAS tethered blocks migrating to the film surface. With the mass percentage of the PHFBMA increased from 0 to 32.5%, the surface roughness of the copolymer film decreased gradually with a tendency to form a smooth surface. Owing to the surface properties, fluorosilicone multi-block copolymers containing a certain amount of PHFBMA with higher C-N+ content and relatively smooth morphology demonstrated obvious antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria, Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative bacteria, Escherichia coli. The functionalized multi-block copolymers based on fluorosilicone and QAS groups would have potential applications in antimicrobial coatings.

  8. Partner preference behavior of estrous female rats affected by castration of tethered male incentives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekman, M; de Bruin, M; Smeenk, J; Slob, A K; van der Schoot, P

    1988-09-01

    Estrous female rats were allowed to interact with either of two tethered intact male rats or to stay in an empty middle part of a three-compartment observation cage during a 60-min test. Sexual interactions occurred with both males (resulting in one to five ejaculations) but most time was spent in the empty compartment. After castration of one of the males, females spent more time with this male than with the intact male, although sexual interactions continued with both incentive animals. This "preference" for the castrated male persisted through the second hour of observation in a second experiment (total test time 115 min) although sexual interactions had virtually ceased during this period. Females' preference for castrated males seemed largely the consequence of aversion to genital stimulation received during intromissions by intact animals: (a) when intromissions were prevented through vaginal occlusion, intact males became by far the preferred partners for the whole 2-hr period of testing while sexual behavior continued to occur throughout the test; (b) when choice was allowed between a testosterone-treated ovariectomized female and an intact male, sexual interaction occurred with both tethered incentive rats but the female became the preferred animal. The results suggest that two opposite tendencies play a role in sexual motivation of estrous female rats: attraction resulting from the action of ovarian hormones on the central nervous system and rejection resulting from genital sensory stimulation through the male's genitalia. PMID:3169698

  9. Turbulence observations over a desert basin using a kite/tethered-blimp platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Frank D.; Balsley, Ben B.; Frehlich, Rod G.; Hugo, Ronald J.; Jensen, Michael L.; McCrae, Kimberley A.

    2000-09-01

    Results of the (temperature) refractive index structure parameter (C2T), C2n, and the eddy dissipation rate (epsilon) derived from the velocity structure parameter C2v are presented from fast response sensor observations using a kite/tethered-blimp platform in the Tularosa Basin at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, during the spring of 1998. Comparisons of different sensors (fine-wire probes and pilot tubes) measuring the same parameter are displayed and discussed while salient features of all sensors (standard and fast response) and the kite and tethered-blimp platforms are outlined. The nature and statistics of turbulence, including intermittency, under different stability conditions is discussed, including those found in the residual layer above the nocturnal boundary layer and the entrainment zone at the top of the daytime planetary boundary layer. In addition to displaying time series of temperature C2n and (epsilon) results obtained at specific altitudes and times, histograms of all daytime and nighttime C2n and (epsilon) values are compared to log-normal distributions. Examples of profiles of C2n and (epsilon) for daytime, near sunset, and nighttime conditions are shown and discussed. The relationship of C2n with (epsilon) is displayed for all data as well as sorted by daytime and nighttime. These results are explained in terms of potential and kinetic energy considerations under different atmospheric stability conditions.

  10. Cholesterol-Induced Buckling in Physisorbed Polymer-Tethered Lipid Monolayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph A. Naumann

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The influence of cholesterol concentration on the formation of buckling structures is studied in a physisorbed polymer-tethered lipid monolayer system using epifluorescence microscopy (EPI and atomic force microscopy (AFM. The monolayer system, built using the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB technique, consists of 3 mol % poly(ethylene glycol (PEG lipopolymers and various concentrations of the phospholipid, 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (SOPC, and cholesterol (CHOL. In the absence of CHOL, AFM micrographs show only occasional buckling structures, which is caused by the presence of the lipopolymers in the monolayer. In contrast, a gradual increase of CHOL concentration in the range of 0–40 mol % leads to fascinating film stress relaxation phenomena in the form of enhanced membrane buckling. Buckling structures are moderately deficient in CHOL, but do not cause any notable phospholipid-lipopolymer phase separation. Our experiments demonstrate that membrane buckling in physisorbed polymer-tethered membranes can be controlled through CHOL-mediated adjustment of membrane elastic properties. They further show that CHOL may have a notable impact on molecular confinement in the presence of crowding agents, such as lipopolymers. Our results are significant, because they offer an intriguing prospective on the role of CHOL on the material properties in complex membrane architecture.

  11. Relative Contribution of Arms and Legs in 30 s Fully Tethered Front Crawl Swimming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro G. Morouço

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The relative contribution of arm stroke and leg kicking to maximal fully tethered front crawl swimming performance remains to be solved. Twenty-three national level young swimmers (12 male and 11 female randomly performed 3 bouts of 30 s fully tethered swimming (using the whole body, only the arm stroke, and only the leg kicking. A load-cell system permitted the continuous measurement of the exerted forces, and swimming velocity was calculated from the time taken to complete a 50 m front crawl swim. As expected, with no restrictions swimmers were able to exert higher forces than that using only their arm stroke or leg kicking. Estimated relative contributions of arm stroke and leg kicking were 70.3% versus 29.7% for males and 66.6% versus 33.4% for females, with 15.6% and 13.1% force deficits, respectively. To obtain higher velocities, male swimmers are highly dependent on the maximum forces they can exert with the arm stroke (r=0.77, P<0.01, whereas female swimmers swimming velocity is more related to whole-body mean forces (r=0.81, P<0.01. The obtained results point that leg kicking plays an important role over short duration high intensity bouts and that the used methodology may be useful to identify strength and/or coordination flaws.

  12. Substrate-dependent cell elasticity measured by optical tweezers indentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousafzai, Muhammad S.; Ndoye, Fatou; Coceano, Giovanna; Niemela, Joseph; Bonin, Serena; Scoles, Giacinto; Cojoc, Dan

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, cell elasticity has been widely investigated as a potential label free indicator for cellular alteration in different diseases, cancer included. Cell elasticity can be locally measured by pulling membrane tethers, stretching or indenting the cell using optical tweezers. In this paper, we propose a simple approach to perform cell indentation at pN forces by axially moving the cell against a trapped microbead. The elastic modulus is calculated using the Hertz-model. Besides the axial component, the setup also allows us to examine the lateral cell-bead interaction. This technique has been applied to measure the local elasticity of HBL-100 cells, an immortalized human cell line, originally derived from the milk of a woman with no evidence of breast cancer lesions. In addition, we have studied the influence of substrate stiffness on cell elasticity by performing experiments on cells cultured on two substrates, bare and collagen-coated, having different stiffness. The mean value of the cell elastic modulus measured during indentation was 26±9 Pa for the bare substrate, while for the collagen-coated substrate it diminished to 19±7 Pa. The same trend was obtained for the elastic modulus measured during the retraction of the cell: 23±10 Pa and 13±7 Pa, respectively. These results show the cells adapt their stiffness to that of the substrate and demonstrate the potential of this setup for low-force probing of modifications to cell mechanics induced by the surrounding environment (e.g. extracellular matrix or other cells).

  13. Enzymatic degradation of aromatic hydrocarbon intermediates using a recombinant dioxygenase immobilized onto surfactant-activated carbon nanotube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suma, Yanasinee; Lim, Heejun; Kwean, Oh Sung; Cho, Suyeon; Yang, Junwon; Kim, Yohan; Kang, Christina S; Kim, Han S

    2016-06-01

    This study examined the enzymatic decomposition of aromatic hydrocarbon intermediates (catechol, 4-chlorocatechol, and 3-methylcatechol) using a dioxygenase immobilized onto single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT). The surfaces of SWCNTs were activated with surfactants. The dioxygenase was obtained by recombinant technique: the corresponding gene was cloned from Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus A6, and the enzyme was overexpressed and purified subsequently. The enzyme immobilization yield was 62%, and the high level of enzyme activity was preserved (60-79%) after enzyme immobilization. Kinetic analyses showed that the substrate utilization rates and the catalytic efficiencies of the immobilized enzyme for all substrates (target aromatic hydrocarbon intermediates) tested were similar to those of the free enzyme, indicating that the loss of enzyme activity was minimal during enzyme immobilization. The immobilized enzyme was more stable than the free enzyme against abrupt changes in pH, temperature, and ionic strength. Moreover, it retained high enzyme activity even after repetitive use. PMID:26810145

  14. An aromatic sensor with aversion to damaged strands confers versatility to DNA repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Maillard

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available It was not known how xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC protein, the primary initiator of global nucleotide excision repair, achieves its outstanding substrate versatility. Here, we analyzed the molecular pathology of a unique Trp690Ser substitution, which is the only reported missense mutation in xeroderma patients mapping to the evolutionary conserved region of XPC protein. The function of this critical residue and neighboring conserved aromatics was tested by site-directed mutagenesis followed by screening for excision activity and DNA binding. This comparison demonstrated that Trp690 and Phe733 drive the preferential recruitment of XPC protein to repair substrates by mediating an exquisite affinity for single-stranded sites. Such a dual deployment of aromatic side chains is the distinctive feature of functional oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding folds and, indeed, sequence homologies with replication protein A and breast cancer susceptibility 2 protein indicate that XPC displays a monomeric variant of this recurrent interaction motif. An aversion to associate with damaged oligonucleotides implies that XPC protein avoids direct contacts with base adducts. These results reveal for the first time, to our knowledge, an entirely inverted mechanism of substrate recognition that relies on the detection of single-stranded configurations in the undamaged complementary sequence of the double helix.

  15. Rhodium(III)-Catalyzed Directed ortho-C-H Bond Functionalization of Aromatic Ketazines via C-S and C-C Coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jing; Wu, An; Wang, Mingyang; Zhu, Jin

    2015-11-01

    Described herein is a convenient and efficient method for sulfuration and olefination of aromatic ketazines via rhodium-catalyzed oxidative C-H bond activation. A range of substituted substrates are supported, and a possible mechanism is proposed according to experimental results of kinetic isotopic effect, reversibility studies, and catalysis of rhodacycle intermediate c1. PMID:26417874

  16. The tissue-specific Rep8/UBXD6 tethers p97 to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane for degradation of misfolded proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Madsen

    Full Text Available The protein known as p97 or VCP in mammals and Cdc48 in yeast is a versatile ATPase complex involved in several biological functions including membrane fusion, protein folding, and activation of membrane-bound transcription factors. In addition, p97 plays a central role in degradation of misfolded secretory proteins via the ER-associated degradation pathway. This functional diversity of p97 depends on its association with various cofactors, and to further our understanding of p97 function it is important that these cofactors are identified and analyzed. Here, we isolate and characterize the human protein named Rep8 or Ubxd6 as a new cofactor of p97. Mouse Rep8 is highly tissue-specific and abundant in gonads. In testes, Rep8 is expressed in post-meiotic round spermatids, whereas in ovaries Rep8 is expressed in granulosa cells. Rep8 associates directly with p97 via its UBX domain. We show that Rep8 is a transmembrane protein that localizes to the ER membrane with its UBX domain facing the cytoplasm. Knock-down of Rep8 expression in human cells leads to a decreased association of p97 with the ER membrane and concomitantly a retarded degradation of misfolded ER-derived proteasome substrates. Thus, Rep8 tethers p97 to the ER membrane for efficient ER-associated degradation.

  17. Aromatic Structure in Simulates Titan Aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainer, Melissa G.; Loeffler, M. J.; Anderson, C. M.; Hudson, R. L.; Samuelson, R. E.; Moore, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    Observations of Titan by the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) between 560 and 20 per centimeter (approximately 18 to 500 micrometers) have been used to infer the vertical variations of Titan's ice abundances, as well as those of the aerosol from the surface to an altitude of 300 km [1]. The aerosol has a broad emission feature centered approximately at 140 per centimeter (71 micrometers). As seen in Figure 1, this feature cannot be reproduced using currently available optical constants from laboratory-generated Titan aerosol analogs [2]. The far-IR is uniquely qualified for investigating low-energy vibrational motions within the lattice structures of COITIDlex aerosol. The feature observed by CIRS is broad, and does not likely arise from individual molecules, but rather is representative of the skeletal movements of macromolecules. Since Cassini's arrival at Titan, benzene (C6H6) has been detected in the atmosphere at ppm levels as well as ions that may be polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) [3]. We speculate that the feature may be a blended composite that can be identified with low-energy vibrations of two-dimensional lattice structures of large molecules, such as PAHs or nitrogenated aromatics. Such structures do not dominate the composition of analog materials generated from CH4 and N2 irradiation. We are performing studies forming aerosol analog via UV irradiation of aromatic precursors - specifically C6H6 - to understand how the unique chemical architecture of the products will influence the observable aerosol characteristics. The optical and chemical properties of the aromatic analog will be compared to those formed from CH4/N2 mixtures, with a focus on the as-yet unidentified far-IR absorbance feature. Preliminary results indicate that the photochemically-formed aromatic aerosol has distinct chemical composition, and may incorporate nitrogen either into the ring structure or adjoined chemical groups. These compositional differences are

  18. Structural description of aromatic core in residue fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, H.C.; Sun, W.F.; Fang, X.C.; Guan, M.H. [Fushun Research Inst. of Petroleum and Petrochemicals, Fushun, Liaoning (China)

    2008-07-01

    The chemical structures of a polycyclic aromatic core in Oman residue fractions was examined using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-NMR), synchronous fluorescence spectrometry (SFS) and ruthenium ions catalyzed oxidation (RICO). It was important to understand the aromatic core structure in heavy oil fractions, including aromatic rings system size and condensed type. The types and content of benzenepolycarboxylic acids disclosed the condensed types of aromatic rings in core. Biphenyl fraction (BIPH), cata-condensed fraction (CATA), peri-condensed fraction (PERI) and condensed index (BCI) were calculated by benzenepolycarboxylic acids. The results from 1H-NMR showed that about 3.2 aromatic rings were in the aromatics core, 5.6 rings were in the resins unit, and 8.2 rings were in the asphaltenes unit. This paper also described the aromatic rings distribution of residue fractions as determined by SFS. The type and content of benzenepolycarboxylic acids from RICO of residue fractions suggested the condensed mode of rings in the aromatic core. The most cata-condensed type aromatic structures were in aromatics, the whole peri-condensed type were in asphaltenes, while the dominant peri-condensed type, as well as some quantity of cata-condensed type structures existed together in resins. Aromatics, resins and asphaltenes were given likely structural models based on results from this study. 8 refs., 3 tabs., 7 figs.

  19. Does glucose enhance the formation of nitrogen containing polycyclic aromatic compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the pyrolysis of proline?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillip F. Britt; A.C. Buchanan; Clyde V. Owens, Jr.; J. Todd Skeen [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Chemical and Analytical Sciences Division

    2004-08-01

    The gas-phase pyrolysis of proline, glucose, 1-((2{prime}-carboxy)pyrrolidinyl)-1-deoxy-D-fructose (the proline Amadori compound), and a 1:1 mixture by weight of proline and glucose was investigated at high temperatures (600-840{sup o}C) and short residence time (i.e. 1.0 s) in an inert atmosphere to determine if glucose or Maillard reaction products enhance the formation of nitrogen containing polycyclic aromatic compounds (N-PACs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the pyrolysis of proline. To study the gas-phase formation of N-PACs and PAHs, the substrates were sublimed into the pyrolysis furnace at 460{sup o}C. Thermogravimetric analysis showed that glucose, the proline/glucose mixture, and the proline Amadori compound undergo solid-state decomposition reactions before subliming. Thus, the substrates were pyrolyzed in two stages: at 460{sup o}C during the sublimation and at 600-840{sup o}C. At 800{sup o}C with a residence time of 1.0 s, proline produced low yields of N-PACs, such as quinoline, isoquinoline, indole, acridine, and carbazole, and PAHs, such as phenanthrene, pyrene, benz(a)anthracene, benzofluoranthene isomers, and benzo(a)pyrene. Increasing the temperature and residence time increased the yield of these products. Under similar pyrolysis conditions, the proline Amadori compound produced 2-8 fold more N-PACs and PAHs than proline. A 1:1 mixture of proline and glucose produced a similar slate of pyrolysis products as the proline Amadori compound, but it is unclear whether the proline Amadori compound was an intermediate in the reaction. In general, the proline Amadori compound produced a higher yield of N-PACs and PAHs than the proline/glucose mixture, but glucose clearly enhances the low temperature gas-phase formation of N-PACs and PAHs from the pyrolysis of proline. 56 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Lightweight Substrates For Mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, D. Kyle

    1991-01-01

    New substrate uses conventional quasi-isotropic fabric laminate with surfacing layer of carbon-fiber paper consisting of randomly oriented chopped carbon fibers. Layered structure of fabric and paper relatively easy to manufacture. When impregnated with carbon, structure rigid and stable. Substrates of this type made quite thin, thus keeping areal weights to minimum. Mirrors of this type made faster, and cost less, than predecessors.

  1. Candida tropicalis CE017: a new Brazilian enzymatic source for the bioreduction of aromatic prochiral ketones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Gizelle A.B.; Araujo, Daniel M. de Freitas; Lemos, Telma L.G.; Mattos, Marcos Carlos de; Oliveira, Maria da Conceicao F. de; Melo, Vania M.M., E-mail: mcdmatto@ufc.b [Universidade Federal do Ceara (DQOI/UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Organica e Inorganica; Gonzalo, Gonzalo de; Gotor-Fernandez, Vicente; Gotor, Vicente [Universidad de Oviedo, Oviedo (Spain). Inst. Univ. de Biotecnologia de Asturias. Dept. de Quimica Organica e Inorganica

    2010-07-01

    The reactivity and stereoselectivity showed by a new strain of Candida tropicalis in the reduction of prochiral ketones have been compared with the ones previously attained in our laboratory using microorganisms from the Brazilian biodiversity. In this manner, Candida tropicalis has demonstrated its versatility as stereoselective agent in the bioreduction of a series of aromatic ketones. These prochiral compounds were converted into their corresponding optically alcohols with moderate to excellent stereopreference depending on the substrate structure. Among ketones tested, nitroacetophenones were enzymatically reduced to enantiopure (S)-alcohol with complete conversion. (author)

  2. Candida tropicalis CE017: a new Brazilian enzymatic source for the bioreduction of aromatic prochiral ketones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reactivity and stereoselectivity showed by a new strain of Candida tropicalis in the reduction of prochiral ketones have been compared with the ones previously attained in our laboratory using microorganisms from the Brazilian biodiversity. In this manner, Candida tropicalis has demonstrated its versatility as stereoselective agent in the bioreduction of a series of aromatic ketones. These prochiral compounds were converted into their corresponding optically alcohols with moderate to excellent stereopreference depending on the substrate structure. Among ketones tested, nitroacetophenones were enzymatically reduced to enantiopure (S)-alcohol with complete conversion. (author)

  3. Radiation chemistry of aromatic dimer radical cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    π-π Interactions of aromatic molecules are paid attention much in many fields, especially biology, chemistry, and applied physics, represented as protein, DNA, electron donor-accepter complexes, charge transfers, and self assembly molecules. Aromatic molecules including benzene rings are the simplest case to study the π-π interactions. To interpret the charge resonance (CR) structure in the dimer radical cations, spectroscopic and ESR methods have been carried out. The spectroscopic study on the dimer radical ion of molecules with two chromophores would be profitable to identify the electronic and configurational properties. In this article, dynamics of the dimer radical cation of benzenes, polystyrenes, and resist polymers is described on the basis of direct observation of CR band by the nanosecond pulse radiolysis and low temperature γ-radiolysis methods. (author)

  4. Starlike aluminum-carbon aromatic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan-Bo; Jiang, Jin-Liang; Lu, Hai-Gang; Wang, Zhi-Xiang; Perez-Peralta, Nancy; Islas, Rafael; Contreras, Maryel; Merino, Gabriel; Wu, Judy I-Chia; Schleyer, Paul von Ragué

    2011-01-10

    Is it possible to achieve molecules with starlike structures by replacing the H atoms in (CH)(n)(q) aromatic hydrocarbons with aluminum atoms in bridging positions? Although D(4h) C(4)Al(4)(2-) and D(2) C(6)Al(6) are not good prospects for experimental realization, a very extensive computational survey of fifty C(5)Al(5)(-) isomers identified the starlike D(5h) global minimum with five planar tetracoordinate carbon atoms to be a promising candidate for detection by photoelectron detachment spectroscopy. BOMD (Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics) simulations and high-level theoretical computations verified this conclusion. The combination of favorable electronic and geometric structural features (including aromaticity and optimum C-Al-C bridge bonding) stabilizes the C(5)Al(5)(-) star preferentially. PMID:21207593

  5. Synthesis of aromatic cytokinins for plant biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plíhalová, Lucie; Vylíčilová, Hana; Doležal, Karel; Zahajská, Lenka; Zatloukal, Marek; Strnad, Miroslav

    2016-09-25

    Cytokinins represent an important group of plant growth regulators that can modulate several biotechnological processes owing to their ability to influence almost all stages of plant development and growth. In addition, the use of purine based cytokinins with aromatic substituent in C6 position of the purine moiety in tissue culture techniques is currently experiencing a surge in interest, made possible by the ongoing systematic synthesis and study of these compounds. This review article outlines progress in the synthesis of aromatic cytokinins, the in vitro and in vivo effects of these substances and insights gleaned from their synthesis. As the purine moiety in these compounds can be substituted at several positions, we examine each of the substitution possibilities in relation to the derivatives prepared so far. The discussion highlights the gradual simplification of their preparation in relation to their application in practice and summarizes the relevant organic chemistry literature and published patents. PMID:26703810

  6. Tethering of Ficolin-1 to cell surfaces through recognition of sialic acid by the fibrinogen-like domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, Christian; Rørvig, Sara; Hummelshøj, Tina; Skjoedt, Mikkel-Ole; Borregaard, Niels; Garred, Peter

    2010-01-01

    the cell surface is restricted to monocytes and granulocytes. Ficolin-1 is tethered to the cell surface of these cells through its fibrinogen-like domain, and the ligand involved in the binding of Ficolin-1 is shown to be sialic acid. Moreover, rFicolin-1 bound activated but not resting T lymphocytes...

  7. Tethered N-heterocyclic carbene-carboranes: unique ligands that exhibit unprecedented and versatile coordination modes at rhodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Jordan; Pask, Christopher M; Fox, Mark A; Willans, Charlotte E

    2016-05-11

    Four brand new hybrid ligands combining an N-heterocyclic carbene tethered with two isomeric nido-dicarbaundecaborane dianions, a neutral closo-dicarbadodecaborane or a closo-dicarbadodecaborane anion are described. Versatile coordination of the ligands to Rh(I) is demonstrated, in which both NHC and carborane moieties covalently coordinate a metal centre. PMID:27098432

  8. Carcinogenic potential of hydrotreated petroleum aromatic extracts.

    OpenAIRE

    Doak, S. M.; Hend, R W; van der Wiel, A; Hunt, P F

    1985-01-01

    Five experimental petroleum extracts were produced from luboil distillates derived from Middle East paraffinic crude by solvent extraction and severe hydrotreatment. The polycyclic aromatic content (PCA) of the extracts was determined by dimethyl sulphoxide extraction and ranged from 3.7-9.2% w/w. The five extracts were evaluated for their potential to induce cutaneous and systemic neoplasia in female mice derived from Carworth Farm No 1 strain (CF1). The test substances were applied undilute...

  9. Aromatic compounds from three Brazilian Lauraceae species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batista, Andrea Nastri de Luca; Batista Junior, Joao Marcos; Lopez, Silvia Noeli; Furlan, Maysa; Cavalheiro, Alberto Jose; Silva, Dulce Helena Siqueira; Bolzani, Vanderlan da Silva [UNESP, Araraquara, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Quimica Organica; Nunomura, Sergio Massayoshi [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisa da Amazonia (INPA), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Dept. de Produtos Naturais; Yoshida, Massayoshi [Centro de Biotecnologia da Amazonia, Manaus, AM (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Phytochemical investigations on three Brazilian Lauraceae species from the Cerrado region of Sao Paulo State, Ocotea corymbosa (Meins) Mez., O. elegans Mez. and Persea pyrifolia Nees and Mart. ex Nees resulted in the isolation of flavonoids, an ester of the 4-O-E-caffeoylquinic acid, an aromatic sesquiterpene besides furofuran lignans. This is the first chemical study on the leaves of Ocotea elegans and O. corymbosa as well as the first report of non-volatile compounds from Persea pyrifolia. (author)

  10. Aromatic compounds from three Brazilian Lauraceae species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phytochemical investigations on three Brazilian Lauraceae species from the Cerrado region of Sao Paulo State, Ocotea corymbosa (Meins) Mez., O. elegans Mez. and Persea pyrifolia Nees and Mart. ex Nees resulted in the isolation of flavonoids, an ester of the 4-O-E-caffeoylquinic acid, an aromatic sesquiterpene besides furofuran lignans. This is the first chemical study on the leaves of Ocotea elegans and O. corymbosa as well as the first report of non-volatile compounds from Persea pyrifolia. (author)

  11. Decarboxylative and direct functionalisations of aromatic compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Seo, Sangwon

    2014-01-01

    Aromatic rings are privileged structures found in a diverse range of natural and synthetic compounds, thus synthetic methods for their functionalisations are important in organic synthesis. Despite significant advancements made, especially in the field of transition metal catalysis, work still continues for the development of milder, more efficient, and more atom economical reactions. We describe here our efforts towards the development of decarboxylative/direct C(aryl)–N and C(aryl)–C bond f...

  12. AN AROMATIC COMPOUND from CENTAUREA PTOSIMOPAPPOIDES

    OpenAIRE

    A. ULUBELEN, S. ÖKSÜZ

    2015-01-01

    Centaurea ptosimopappoides was previously investigated by our groupand the presence of two new triterpenes were reported. The rare occurrence ofthis type compounds in the plants prompted us to further investigation of Centaureaptosimopappoides. In this work we report the isolation and structure determinationof an aromatic glycoside which was found in the genus Centaureafor the first time. The structure of the compound was determined by spectralmethods.Key words: Centaurea ptosimopappoides; Co...

  13. Synthetic fuel aromaticity and staged combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longanbach, J. R.; Chan, L. K.; Levy, A.

    1982-11-15

    Samples of middle and heavy SRC-II distillates were distilled into 50 C boiling point range fractions. These were characterized by measurements of their molecular weight, elemental analysis and basic nitrogen content and calculation of average molecular structures. The structures typically consisted of 1 to 3 aromatic rings fused to alicyclic rings with short, 1 to 3 carbon aliphatic side chains. The lower boiling fractions contained significant amounts (1 atom/molecule) of oxygen while the heavier fractions contained so few heteroatoms that they were essentially hydrocarbons. Laboratory scale oxidative-pyrolysis experiments were carried out at pyrolysis temperatures of 500 to 1100 C and oxygen concentrations from 0 to 100 percent of stoichiometry. Analysis of liquid products, collected in condensers cooled with liquid nitrogen showed that aromatization is a major reaction in the absence of oxygen. The oxygen-containing materials (phenolics) seem to be more resistant to thermal pyrolysis than unsubstituted aromatics. Nitrogen converts from basic to nonbasic forms at about 500 C. The nonbasic nitrogen is more stable and survives up to 700 C after which it is slowly removed. A recently constructed 50,000 Btu/hr staged combustor was used to study the chemistry of the nitrogen and aromatics. SRC II combustion was studied under fuel-rich, first-stage conditions at air/fuel ratios from 0.6 to 1.0 times stoichiometric. The chemistry of the fuel during combustion calls for further investigation in order to examine the mechanism by which HCN is evolved as a common intermediate for the formation of the nitrogen-containing gaseous combustion products. 25 references, 45 figures, 25 tables.

  14. Transformations of aromatic hydrocarbons over zeolites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Voláková, Martina; Žilková, Naděžda; Čejka, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 34, 5-7 (2008), s. 439-454. ISSN 0922-6168 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/05/0197; GA AV ČR 1QS400400560; GA AV ČR KJB4040402 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : aromatic hydrocarbons * zeolites * alkylation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.514, year: 2008

  15. ANTIEMETIC ACTIVITY OF SOME AROMATIC PLANTS

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan MuhammadMohtasheemul; Ahmed Salman; Ahmed Ziauddin; Azhar Iqbal

    2012-01-01

    Current study was conducted to explore the antiemetic activity of ten aromatic medicinal plants viz., Carissa carandus L. (fruits), Chichorium intybus L (flowers), Cinnamum tamala L (leaves), Curcuma caesia Roxb (rhizomes), Lallemantia royleana Benth (leaves), Matricaria chamomila L (flowers), Piper longum L (fruits), Piper methysticum G. Forst (fruits), Piper nigrum Linn. (fruits) and Syzygium aromaticum (Linn.) Merr. & Perry (flowering buds) was studied using chick emetic model. The ethan...

  16. Spectroscopic Characterisation of Novel Polycyclic Aromatic Polymers

    OpenAIRE

    O'Neill, Luke; Lynch, Patrick; McNamara, Mary; Byrne, Hugh

    2007-01-01

    A series of novel polyphenylenevinylene (PPV) derivative polymers were studied by absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopies. The effect of the sequential introduction of polycyclic aromatic ring substituents into the delocalized backbone was examined with relation to hypsochromatic and bathochromatic shifting. While the replacement of the phenyl units by naphthyl units results in a substantial hypsochromic shift of both the absorption and emission spectra, their subsequent substitution ...

  17. The Design of Reactions, Catalysts and Materials with Aromatic Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandar, Jeffrey Scott

    This thesis details the use of aromatic ions, especially aminocyclopropenium ions, as empowering design elements in the development of new chemical reactions, organic catalysts and polymeric materials. A particular focus is placed throughout on understanding the relationship between the structure of aromatic ions and their performance in these novel applications. Additionally, the benefits that aromatic ions provide in these contexts are highlighted. The first chapter briefly summarizes the Lambert Group's prior efforts toward exploiting the unique reactivity profiles of aromatic ions in the context of new reaction design. Also provided in the first chapter is a comprehensive literature review of aminocyclopropenium ions, upon which the majority of advances described in this thesis are based. To set the stage for the first application of aminocyclopropenium ions, Chapter 2 provides an account of existing highly Bronsted basic functional groups, including guanidines, proazaphosphatranes and iminophosphoranes. The provided review on the synthesis and use in asymmetric catalysis of these bases indicates that there is a high need for conceptually new Bronsted basic functional groups. To address this need, the development of chiral 2,3-bis(dialkylamino)cyclopropenimines as a new platform for asymmetric Bronsted base catalysis is described in Chapter 3. This new class of Bronsted base is readily synthesized on scale, operates efficiently under practical conditions, and greatly outperforms closely related guanidine-based catalysts. Structure-activity relationship studies, mechanistic experiments and computational transition state modeling are all discussed in the context of asymmetric glycinate imine Michael reactions in order to arrive at a working model for cyclopropenimine chemistry. Cumulatively, this chapter provides a "user's guide" to understanding and developing further applications of 2,3-bis(dialkylamino)cyclopropenimines. The use of our optimal chiral 2,3-bis

  18. Biodegradation of Various Aromatic Compounds by Enriched Bacterial Cultures: Part B--Nitrogen-, Sulfur-, and Oxygen-Containing Heterocyclic Aromatic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberoi, Akashdeep Singh; Philip, Ligy; Bhallamudi, S Murty

    2015-07-01

    Present study focused on the biodegradation of various heterocyclic nitrogen, sulfur, and oxygen (NSO) compounds using naphthalene-enriched culture. Target compounds in the study were pyridine, quinoline, benzothiophene, and benzofuran. Screening studies were carried out using different microbial consortia enriched with specific polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and NSO compounds. Among different microbial consortia, naphthalene-enriched culture was the most efficient consortium based on high substrate degradation rate. Substrate degradation rate with naphthalene-enriched culture followed the order pyridine > quinoline > benzofuran > benzothiophene. Benzothiophene and benzofuran were found to be highly recalcitrant pollutants. Benzothiophene could not be biodegraded when concentration was above 50 mg/l. It was observed that 2-(1H)-quinolinone, benzothiophene-2-one, and benzofuran-2,3-dione were formed as metabolic intermediates during biodegradation of quinoline, benzothiophene, and benzofuran, respectively. Quinoline-N and pyridine-N were transformed into free ammonium ions during the biodegradation process. Biodegradation pathways for various NSO compounds are proposed. Monod inhibition model was able to simulate single substrate biodegradation kinetics satisfactorily. Benzothiophene and benzofuran biodegradation kinetics, in presence of acetone, was simulated using a generalized multi-substrate model. PMID:26054616

  19. Aromatics Oxidation and Soot Formation in Flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, J. B.; Richter, H.

    2005-03-29

    This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and the growth process to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) of increasing size, soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The overall objective of the experimental aromatics oxidation work is to extend the set of available data by measuring concentration profiles for decomposition intermediates such as phenyl, cyclopentadienyl, phenoxy or indenyl radicals which could not be measured with molecular-beam mass spectrometry to permit further refinement and testing of benzene oxidation mechanisms. The focus includes PAH radicals which are thought to play a major role in the soot formation process while their concentrations are in many cases too low to permit measurement with conventional mass spectrometry. The radical species measurements are used in critical testing and improvement of a kinetic model describing benzene oxidation and PAH growth. Thermodynamic property data of selected species are determined computationally, for instance using density functional theory (DFT). Potential energy surfaces are explored in order to identify additional reaction pathways. The ultimate goal is to understand the conversion of high molecular weight compounds to nascent soot particles, to assess the roles of planar and curved PAH and relationships between soot and fullerenes formation. The specific aims are to characterize both the high molecular weight compounds involved in the nucleation of soot particles and the structure of soot including internal nanoscale features indicative of contributions of planar and/or curved PAH to particle inception.

  20. A new class of tunable hypersonic phononic crystals based on polymer-tethered colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Redondo, E.; Schmitt, M.; Urbach, Z.; Hui, C. M.; Sainidou, R.; Rembert, P.; Matyjaszewski, K.; Bockstaller, M. R.; Fytas, G.

    2015-09-01

    The design and engineering of hybrid materials exhibiting tailored phononic band gaps are fundamentally relevant to innovative material technologies in areas ranging from acoustics to thermo-optic devices. Phononic hybridization gaps, originating from the anti-crossing between local resonant and propagating modes, have attracted particular interest because of their relative robustness to structural disorder and the associated benefit to `manufacturability'. Although hybridization gap materials are well known, their economic fabrication and efficient control of the gap frequency have remained elusive because of the limited property variability and expensive fabrication methodologies. Here we report a new strategy to realize hybridization gap materials by harnessing the `anisotropic elasticity' across the particle-polymer interface in densely polymer-tethered colloidal particles. Theoretical and Brillouin scattering analysis confirm both the robustness to disorder and the tunability of the resulting hybridization gap and provide guidelines for the economic synthesis of new materials with deliberately controlled gap position and width frequencies.

  1. Tether Transport System Study Summary Performed under Contract to Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonderwell, Dan; Bangham, Mike; Dionne, Heather; Fleming, Beth; Klus, Bill; Herring, Karmel; Suggs, Elton; Walker, Larry; Lorenzini, Enrico; Cosmo, Mario L.; Kaiser, Markus; Vestal, Linda; Johnson, Les; Carrington, Connie

    1998-01-01

    The main rationale for this study is to reduce the mission cost of transporting payloads to GEO. A two stage tether transport system was proposed for boosting payloads from LEO to GTO/GEO. The feasibility of the concept is addressed from the point of view of orbital mechanics and other principles of physics. The report presents the results of an engineering analysis that defines the system, major elements and subsystems, and assesses the feasibility (i.e., the technology readiness level) of designing and developing the system. Results indicate that significant cost savings can be realized over traditional upper stages within a few launches. Certain key technical issues, such as payload rendezvous and capture, need to be addressed in future studies. Advancements in certain technology areas, such as power generation and highly efficient propulsion systems, will have significant effects on the overall system design.

  2. Direct mechanical stimulation of tip links in hair cells through DNA tethers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Aakash; Lagier, Samuel; Vologodskaia, Maria; Fabella, Brian A; Hudspeth, AJ

    2016-01-01

    Mechanoelectrical transduction by hair cells commences with hair-bundle deflection, which is postulated to tense filamentous tip links connected to transduction channels. Because direct mechanical stimulation of tip links has not been experimentally possible, this hypothesis has not been tested. We have engineered DNA tethers that link superparamagnetic beads to tip links and exert mechanical forces on the links when exposed to a magnetic-field gradient. By pulling directly on tip links of the bullfrog's sacculus we have evoked transduction currents from hair cells, confirming the hypothesis that tension in the tip links opens transduction channels. This demonstration of direct mechanical access to tip links additionally lays a foundation for experiments probing the mechanics of individual channels. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16041.001 PMID:27331611

  3. Single molecular switch based on thiol tethered iron(II)clathrochelate on gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular electronics has been associated with high density nano-electronic devices. Developments of molecular electronic devices were based on reversible switching of molecules between the two conductive states. In this paper, self-assembled monolayers of dodecanethiol (DDT) and thiol tethered iron(II)clathrochelate (IC) have been prepared on gold film. The electrochemical and electronic properties of IC molecules inserted into the dodecanethiol monolayer (IC-DDT SAM) were investigated using voltammetric, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and cross-wire tunneling measurements. The voltage triggered switching behaviour of IC molecules on mixed SAM was demonstrated. Deposition of polyaniline on the redox sites of IC-DDT SAM using electrochemical polymerization of aniline was performed in order to confirm that this monolayer acts as nano-patterned semiconducting electrode surface.

  4. Optimization of motion control laws for tether crawler or elevator systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Frank R.; Von Tiesenhausen, Georg

    1988-01-01

    Based on the proposal of a motion control law by Lorenzini (1987), a method is developed for optimizing motion control laws for tether crawler or elevator systems in terms of the performance measures of travel time, the smoothness of acceleration and deceleration, and the maximum values of velocity and acceleration. The Lorenzini motion control law, based on powers of the hyperbolic tangent function, is modified by the addition of a constant-velocity section, and this modified function is then optimized by parameter selections to minimize the peak acceleration value for a selected travel time or to minimize travel time for the selected peak values of velocity and acceleration. It is shown that the addition of a constant-velocity segment permits further optimization of the motion control law performance.

  5. Virtual migration in tethered flying monarch butterflies reveals their orientation mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouritsen, Henrik; Frost, Barrie J

    2002-07-23

    A newly developed flight simulator allows monarch butterflies to fly actively for up to several hours in any horizontal direction while their fall migratory flight direction can be continuously recorded. From these data, long segments of virtual flight paths of tethered, flying, migratory monarch butterflies were reconstructed, and by advancing or retarding the butterflies' circadian clocks, we have shown that they possess a time-compensated sun compass. Control monarchs on local time fly approximately southwest, those 6-h time-advanced fly southeast, and 6-h time-delayed butterflies fly in northwesterly directions. Moreover, butterflies flown in the same apparatus under simulated overcast in natural magnetic fields were randomly oriented and did not change direction when magnetic fields were rotated. Therefore, these experiments do not provide any evidence that monarch butterflies use a magnetic compass during migration. PMID:12107283

  6. Fabrication and characterization of a tethered rotational planar variable capacitance micro drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we present the design, fabrication and characterization of a planar variable capacitance micro drive. The rotational micro drive is developed for high-speed applications with contactless active electrostatic micro bearings. The associated low-temperature process allows the fabrication of devices with narrow stator–rotor gaps. The drive performance is characterized by means of tethered functional prototype devices. The multicompliant devices have silicon rotors and a soft polymer suspension, which allows the validated modeling of the drive capacitance and accurate measurement of the static drive torques. The devices achieve up to 2.6 nNm static drive torque per phase at an actuation voltage of 12 V. These results demonstrate the highest torque generation of a planar variable capacitance drive at low actuation voltages. (paper)

  7. Linear Viscoelasticity of Spherical SiO 2 Nanoparticle-Tethered Poly(butyl acrylate) Hybrids

    KAUST Repository

    Goel, Vivek

    2010-12-01

    The melt state linear viscoelastic properties of spherical silica nanoparticles with grafted poly(n-butyl acrylate) chains of varying molecular weight were probed using linear small amplitude dynamic oscillatory measurements and complementary linear stress relaxation measurements. While the pure silica-tethered-polymer hybrids with no added homopolymer exhibit solid-like response, addition of matched molecular weight free matrix homopolymer chains to this hybrid, at low concentrations of added homopolymer, maintains the solid-like response with a lowered modulus that can be factored into a silica concentration dependence and a molecular weight dependence. While the silica concentration dependence of the modulus is strong, the dependence on molecular weight is weak. On the other hand, increasing the amount of added homopolymer changes the viscoelastic response to that of a liquid with a relaxation time that scales exponentially with hybrid concentration. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  8. Tethering of ferredoxin:NADP+ oxidoreductase to thylakoid membranes is mediated by novel chloroplast protein TROL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurić, Snjezana; Hazler-Pilepić, Kroata; Tomasić, Ana; Lepedus, Hrvoje; Jelicić, Branka; Puthiyaveetil, Sujith; Bionda, Tihana; Vojta, Lea; Allen, John F; Schleiff, Enrico; Fulgosi, Hrvoje

    2009-12-01

    Working in tandem, two photosystems in the chloroplast thylakoid membranes produce a linear electron flow from H(2)O to NADP(+). Final electron transfer from ferredoxin to NADP(+) is accomplished by a flavoenzyme ferredoxin:NADP(+) oxidoreductase (FNR). Here we describe TROL (thylakoid rhodanese-like protein), a nuclear-encoded component of thylakoid membranes that is required for tethering of FNR and sustaining efficient linear electron flow (LEF) in vascular plants. TROL consists of two distinct modules; a centrally positioned rhodanese-like domain and a C-terminal hydrophobic FNR binding region. Analysis of Arabidopsis mutant lines indicates that, in the absence of TROL, relative electron transport rates at high-light intensities are severely lowered accompanied with significant increase in non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). Thus, TROL might represent a missing thylakoid membrane docking site for a complex between FNR, ferredoxin and NADP(+). Such association might be necessary for maintaining photosynthetic redox poise and enhancement of the NPQ. PMID:19682289

  9. Method to maintain artificial gravity during transfer maneuvers for tethered spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Kaela M.; Landau, Damon F.; Longuski, James M.

    2016-03-01

    Artificial gravity has long been proposed to limit the harmful effects of the micro-gravity environment on human crews during mission to Mars. A tethered spacecraft spinning at 4 rpm (to avoid motion sickness) provides an attractive configuration. However, if the spacecraft is required to spin down for impulsive maneuvers and then spin up for interplanetary travel, the propellant cost may be unacceptably high. This paper proposes a maneuver that is performed while the spacecraft is spinning thus avoiding additional spin-down and spin-up maneuvers. A control law is provided to achieve the required ΔV while maintaining spin rate. A hypothetical human mission from Earth to Mars is analyzed using the new maneuver which, in this example, may save over 700 kg of propellant.

  10. Sponges with covalently tethered amines for high-efficiency carbon capture

    KAUST Repository

    Qi, Genggeng

    2014-12-12

    © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved. Adsorption using solid amine sorbents is an attractive emerging technology for energy-efficient carbon capture. Current syntheses for solid amine sorbents mainly based on physical impregnation or grafting-to methods (for example, aminosilane-grafting) lead to limited sorbent performance in terms of stability and working capacity, respectively. Here we report a family of solid amine sorbents using a grafting-from synthesis approach and synthesized by cationic polymerization of oxazolines on mesoporous silica. The sorbent with high amount of covalently tethered amines shows fast adsorption rate, high amine efficiency and sorbent capacity well exceeding the highest value reported to date for lowerature carbon dioxide sorbents under simulated flue gas conditions. The demonstrated efficiency of the new amine-immobilization chemistry may open up new avenues in the development of advanced carbon dioxide sorbents, as well as other nitrogen-functionalized systems.

  11. Role of Munc13-4 as a Ca2+-dependent tether during platelet secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicka, Michael C; Ren, Qiansheng; Richards, David; Hellman, Lance M; Zhang, Jinchao; Fried, Michael G; Whiteheart, Sidney W

    2016-03-01

    The Munc13 family of exocytosis regulators has multiple Ca(2+)-binding, C2 domains. Here, we probed the mechanism by which Munc13-4 regulates in vitro membrane fusion and platelet exocytosis. We show that Munc13-4 enhances in vitro soluble NSF attachment protein receptor (SNARE)-dependent, proteoliposome fusion in a Ca(2+)- and phosphatidylserine (PS)-dependent manner that was independent of SNARE concentrations. Munc13-4-SNARE interactions, under the conditions used, were minimal in the absence or presence of Ca(2+). However, Munc13-4 was able to bind and cluster liposomes harbouring PS in response to Ca(2+). Interestingly, Ca(2+)-dependent liposome binding/clustering and enhancement of proteoliposome fusion required both Munc13-4 C2 domains, but only the Ca(2+)-liganding aspartate residues of the C2B domain. Analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) measurements indicated that, in solution, Munc13-4 was a monomeric prolate ellipsoid with dimensions consistent with a molecule that could bridge two fusing membranes. To address the potential role of Munc13-4 as a tethering protein in platelets, we examined mepacrine-stained, dense granule mobility and secretion in platelets from wild-type and Munc13-4 null (Unc13d(Jinx)) mice. In the absence of Munc13-4, dense granules were highly mobile in both resting and stimulated platelets, and stimulation-dependent granule release was absent. These observations suggest that dense granules are stably docked in resting platelets awaiting stimulation and that Munc13-4 plays a vesicle-stabilizing or tethering role in resting platelets and also in activated platelets in response to Ca(2+). In summary, we show that Munc13-4 conveys Ca(2+) sensitivity to platelet SNARE-mediated membrane fusion and reveal a potential mechanism by which Munc13-4 bridges and stabilizes apposing membranes destined for fusion. PMID:26637270

  12. Determination of VO2-Intensity Relationship and MAOD in Tethered Swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalva-Filho, C A; Araújo, M Y C; Silva, A; Gobatto, C A; Zagatto, A M; Gobbi, R B; Papoti, M

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to test the reproducibility of the maximal accumulated oxygen deficit (MAOD) values and VO2-intensity relationship parameters as measured during tethered swimming. 9 swimmers performed an incremental test to determine the maximal aerobic force (MAF), 6 submaximal efforts to develop VO2-intensity relationship, and an exhaustive effort to determine MAOD. The tests were performed twice. The reproducibility of the measurements was tested using intraclass correlation (ICC), typical error (TE) and coefficient of variation (CV). High levels of reproducibility were observed for MAF (TE=2.6 N; CV=4.3%; ICC=0.98) and VO2-intensity relationship parameters, as intercept (TE=0.01 L.min(-1); CV=11.4%; ICC=0.97), slope (TE=0.002 L.min(-1).N(-1); CV=3.1%; ICC=0.97) and coefficient of determination (TE=0.02; CV=1.8%; ICC=0.47). The MAOD values measured during the test (2.9±1.1 L and 45.3±14.0 mL.Kg(-1)) and retests (2.9±1.1 L and 45.2±12.6 mL.Kg(-1)) were highly correlated (absolute values: ICC=0.93; relative to body mass values: ICC=0.89) and presented low values of TE (0.3 L and 4.3 mL.Kg(-1)) and CV (9.5% for absolute and 9.6% for relative to body mass values). Thus, we demonstrated the potential use of tethered swimming to assess anaerobic capacity in an aquatic environment. PMID:27176891

  13. Fluorosilicone multi-block copolymers tethering quaternary ammonium salt groups for antimicrobial purpose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • QAS-containing fluorosilicone multi-block copolymers were synthesized. • The block length of PHFBMA in the copolymers was tailored via RAFT polymerization. • Surface roughness of the copolymers decreased with the increased PHFBMA content. • A certain length of PHFBMA block enhanced C−N+ percentage on the surface. - Abstract: Symmetrically structured fluorosilicone multi-block copolymers containing poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) and poly(hexafluorobutyl methacrylate) (PHFBMA) were sequentially synthesized via reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer polymerization, using a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) chain transfer agent with dithiocarbonate groups at both ends. Then, the CBABC-type block copolymers were quaternized with n-octyliodide to tether quaternary ammonium salt (QAS) groups in the PDMAEMA blocks for the antimicrobial use. The obtained fluorosilicone copolymers showed clear variations in the C-N+ composition and surface morphology on their films depending on the content of the PHFBMA blocks, which were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy, respectively. The results indicated that the symmetrical CBABC structure favored PDMS and QAS tethered blocks migrating to the film surface. With the mass percentage of the PHFBMA increased from 0 to 32.5%, the surface roughness of the copolymer film decreased gradually with a tendency to form a smooth surface. Owing to the surface properties, fluorosilicone multi-block copolymers containing a certain amount of PHFBMA with higher C-N+ content and relatively smooth morphology demonstrated obvious antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria, Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative bacteria, Escherichia coli. The functionalized multi-block copolymers based on fluorosilicone and QAS groups would have potential applications in antimicrobial coatings

  14. Tethered chains in poor solvent conditions: An experimental study involving Langmuir diblock copolymer monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have employed Langmuir monolayers of highly asymmetric polydimethylsiloxane-polystyrene (PDMS-PS) diblock copolymers on dioctyl phthalate (DOP) at temperatures ranging from 22 to -35thinsp degree C as a model system for tethered chains in poor solvent conditions. The thicknesses of the tethered PS layers extending into the DOP subphase, measured by neutron reflection, decrease with decreasing temperature (T) over this entire range. However, the variation with T becomes weak below -20thinsp degree C. At the lowest T, the layer thicknesses are 55%endash 75% of the values at the theta condition (Tθ=22thinsp degree C). The contraction of the layer with decreasing T is determined as a function of surface density and molecular weight, and these data are compared to universal scaling forms. The PS segments are depleted from the near surface region over the entire T range, with the thickness of the depletion layer increasing slightly with decreasing T. The free energy of the surface layer is probed by surface tension measurements. With decreasing T, negative surface pressures are observed at low coverages for both PDMS-PS and PDMS monolayers, indicating metastability toward lateral phase separation. Evidence for a transition from a dispersed phase to a condensed phase with decreasing T was observed in the reflectivity for very low PDMS-PS coverage. At high coverage where the submerged blocks are strongly interacting at 22thinsp degree C, only a modest decrease in surface pressure is observed over the experimental range of T despite the strong contraction. This latter result is discussed in terms of the relative contributions of enthalpic and entropic effects to the surface pressure. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  15. Bacterial tethering analysis reveals a "run-reverse-turn" mechanism for Pseudomonas species motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Chen; Wong, Chui Ching; Swarup, Sanjay; Chiam, Keng-Hwee

    2013-08-01

    We have developed a program that can accurately analyze the dynamic properties of tethered bacterial cells. The program works especially well with cells that tend to give rise to unstable rotations, such as polar-flagellated bacteria. The program has two novel components. The first dynamically adjusts the center of the cell's rotational trajectories. The second applies piecewise linear approximation to the accumulated rotation curve to reduce noise and separate the motion of bacteria into phases. Thus, it can separate counterclockwise (CCW) and clockwise (CW) rotations distinctly and measure rotational speed accurately. Using this program, we analyzed the properties of tethered Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida cells for the first time. We found that the Pseudomonas flagellar motor spends equal time in both CCW and CW phases and that it rotates with the same speed in both phases. In addition, we discovered that the cell body can remain stationary for short periods of time, leading to the existence of a third phase of the flagellar motor which we call "pause." In addition, P. aeruginosa cells adopt longer run lengths, fewer pause frequencies, and shorter pause durations as part of their chemotactic response. We propose that one purpose of the pause phase is to allow the cells to turn at a large angle, where we show that pause durations in free-swimming cells positively correlate with turn angle sizes. Taken together, our results suggest a new "run-reverse-turn" paradigm for polar-flagellated Pseudomonas motility that is different from the "run-and-tumble" paradigm established for peritrichous Escherichia coli. PMID:23728820

  16. Comprehensive analysis of LANA interacting proteins essential for viral genome tethering and persistence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhash C Verma

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus is tightly linked to multiple human malignancies including Kaposi's sarcoma (KS, Primary Effusion Lymphoma (PEL and Multicentric Castleman's Disease (MCD. KSHV like other herpesviruses establishes life-long latency in the infected host by persisting as chromatin and tethering to host chromatin through the virally encoded protein Latency Associated Nuclear Antigen (LANA. LANA, a multifunctional protein, is capable of binding to a large number of cellular proteins responsible for transcriptional regulation of various cellular and viral pathways involved in blocking cell death and promoting cell proliferation. This leads to enhanced cell division and replication of the viral genome, which segregates faithfully in the dividing tumor cells. The mechanism of genome segregation is well known and the binding of LANA to nucleosomal proteins, throughout the cell cycle, suggests that these interactions play an important role in efficient segregation. Various biochemical methods have identified a large number of LANA binding proteins, including histone H2A/H2B, histone H1, MeCP2, DEK, CENP-F, NuMA, Bub1, HP-1, and Brd4. These nucleosomal proteins may have various functions in tethering of the viral genome during specific phases of the viral life cycle. Therefore, we performed a comprehensive analysis of their interaction with LANA using a number of different assays. We show that LANA binds to core nucleosomal histones and also associates with other host chromatin proteins including histone H1 and high mobility group proteins (HMGs. We used various biochemical assays including co-immunoprecipitation and in-vivo localization by split GFP and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET to demonstrate their association.

  17. Fluorosilicone multi-block copolymers tethering quaternary ammonium salt groups for antimicrobial purpose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Fang; Qin, Xiaoshuai; Li, Yancai; Ren, Lixia; Zhao, Yunhui, E-mail: zhaoyunhui@tju.edu.cn; Yuan, Xiaoyan

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • QAS-containing fluorosilicone multi-block copolymers were synthesized. • The block length of PHFBMA in the copolymers was tailored via RAFT polymerization. • Surface roughness of the copolymers decreased with the increased PHFBMA content. • A certain length of PHFBMA block enhanced C−N{sup +} percentage on the surface. - Abstract: Symmetrically structured fluorosilicone multi-block copolymers containing poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) and poly(hexafluorobutyl methacrylate) (PHFBMA) were sequentially synthesized via reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer polymerization, using a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) chain transfer agent with dithiocarbonate groups at both ends. Then, the CBABC-type block copolymers were quaternized with n-octyliodide to tether quaternary ammonium salt (QAS) groups in the PDMAEMA blocks for the antimicrobial use. The obtained fluorosilicone copolymers showed clear variations in the C-N{sup +} composition and surface morphology on their films depending on the content of the PHFBMA blocks, which were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy, respectively. The results indicated that the symmetrical CBABC structure favored PDMS and QAS tethered blocks migrating to the film surface. With the mass percentage of the PHFBMA increased from 0 to 32.5%, the surface roughness of the copolymer film decreased gradually with a tendency to form a smooth surface. Owing to the surface properties, fluorosilicone multi-block copolymers containing a certain amount of PHFBMA with higher C-N{sup +} content and relatively smooth morphology demonstrated obvious antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria, Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative bacteria, Escherichia coli. The functionalized multi-block copolymers based on fluorosilicone and QAS groups would have potential applications in antimicrobial coatings.

  18. Selective side-chain oxidation of alkyl aromatic compounds catalyzed by cerium modified silver catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Matthias Josef; Schimmoeller, Bjoern; Hansen, Thomas Willum; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Pratsinis, Sotiris E.; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk

    2010-01-01

    Silver supported on silica effectively catalyzes the aerobic side-chain oxidation of alkyl aromatic compounds under solvent-free conditions. Toluene, p-xylene, ethylbenzene and cumene were investigated as model substrates. Typically, the reaction was performed at ambient pressure; only for toluene...... an elevated pressure was required. Carboxylic acids, such as benzoic acid or p-toluic acid, additionally increased the reaction rate while CeO2 could act both as a promoter and an inhibitor depending on the substrate and the reaction conditions. Silver catalysts were prepared both by standard...... catalysis. In addition, flame-made catalysts were more stable against silver leaching compared to the impregnated catalysts. The structure of the silver catalysts was studied in detail both by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy suggesting metallic silver to be required for...

  19. Biaxially textured composite substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groves, James R.; Foltyn, Stephen R.; Arendt, Paul N.

    2005-04-26

    An article including a substrate, a layer of a metal phosphate material such as an aluminum phosphate material upon the surface of the substrate, and a layer of an oriented cubic oxide material having a rock-salt-like structure upon the metal phosphate material layer is provided together with additional layers such as a HTS top-layer of YBCO directly upon a layer of a buffer material such as a SrTi.sub.x Ru.sub.1-x O.sub.3 layer.

  20. Synthesis and accumulation of aromatic aldehydes in an engineered strain of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunjapur, Aditya M; Tarasova, Yekaterina; Prather, Kristala L J

    2014-08-20

    Aromatic aldehydes are useful in numerous applications, especially as flavors, fragrances, and pharmaceutical precursors. However, microbial synthesis of aldehydes is hindered by rapid, endogenous, and redundant conversion of aldehydes to their corresponding alcohols. We report the construction of an Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 strain with reduced aromatic aldehyde reduction (RARE) that serves as a platform for aromatic aldehyde biosynthesis. Six genes with reported activity on the model substrate benzaldehyde were rationally targeted for deletion: three genes that encode aldo-keto reductases and three genes that encode alcohol dehydrogenases. Upon expression of a recombinant carboxylic acid reductase in the RARE strain and addition of benzoate during growth, benzaldehyde remained in the culture after 24 h, with less than 12% conversion of benzaldehyde to benzyl alcohol. Although individual overexpression results demonstrated that all six genes could contribute to benzaldehyde reduction in vivo, additional experiments featuring subset deletion strains revealed that two of the gene deletions were dispensable under the conditions tested. The engineered strain was next investigated for the production of vanillin from vanillate and succeeded in preventing formation of the byproduct vanillyl alcohol. A pathway for the biosynthesis of vanillin directly from glucose was introduced and resulted in a 55-fold improvement in vanillin titer when using the RARE strain versus the wild-type strain. Finally, synthesis of the chiral pharmaceutical intermediate L-phenylacetylcarbinol (L-PAC) was demonstrated from benzaldehyde and glucose upon expression of a recombinant mutant pyruvate decarboxylase in the RARE strain. Beyond allowing accumulation of aromatic aldehydes as end products in E. coli, the RARE strain expands the classes of chemicals that can be produced microbially via aldehyde intermediates. PMID:25076127

  1. AromaDeg, a novel database for phylogenomics of aerobic bacterial degradation of aromatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Márcia; Jauregui, Ruy; Vilchez-Vargas, Ramiro; Junca, Howard; Pieper, Dietmar H.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding prokaryotic transformation of recalcitrant pollutants and the in-situ metabolic nets require the integration of massive amounts of biological data. Decades of biochemical studies together with novel next-generation sequencing data have exponentially increased information on aerobic aromatic degradation pathways. However, the majority of protein sequences in public databases have not been experimentally characterized and homology-based methods are still the most routinely used approach to assign protein function, allowing the propagation of misannotations. AromaDeg is a web-based resource targeting aerobic degradation of aromatics that comprises recently updated (September 2013) and manually curated databases constructed based on a phylogenomic approach. Grounded in phylogenetic analyses of protein sequences of key catabolic protein families and of proteins of documented function, AromaDeg allows query and data mining of novel genomic, metagenomic or metatranscriptomic data sets. Essentially, each query sequence that match a given protein family of AromaDeg is associated to a specific cluster of a given phylogenetic tree and further function annotation and/or substrate specificity may be inferred from the neighboring cluster members with experimentally validated function. This allows a detailed characterization of individual protein superfamilies as well as high-throughput functional classifications. Thus, AromaDeg addresses the deficiencies of homology-based protein function prediction, combining phylogenetic tree construction and integration of experimental data to obtain more accurate annotations of new biological data related to aerobic aromatic biodegradation pathways. We pursue in future the expansion of AromaDeg to other enzyme families involved in aromatic degradation and its regular update. Database URL: http://aromadeg.siona.helmholtz-hzi.de PMID:25468931

  2. Aromatic plant production on metal contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheljazkov, Valtcho D. [Mississippi State, Department of Plant and Soil Sciences and North Mississippi Research and Extension Center, 5421 Highway 145 South, Verona, MS 38879 (United States)], E-mail: vj40@pss.msstate.edu; Craker, Lyle E.; Xing Baoshan [Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, 12 Stockbridge Hall, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Nielsen, Niels E. [Plant Nutrition and Soil Fertility Lab, Department of Agricultural Sciences, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Thorvaldsensvej 40, DK1871, Copenhagen (Denmark); Wilcox, Andrew [Harper Adams University College, Newport, Shropshire, TF10 8NB (United Kingdom)

    2008-06-01

    Field and container experiments were conducted to assess the feasibility of growing aromatic crops in metal contaminated areas and the effect of metals on herbage and oil productivity. The field experiments were conducted in the vicinities of the Non-Ferrous Metals Combine (Zn-Cu smelter) near Plovdiv, Bulgaria using coriander, sage, dill, basil, hyssop, lemon balm, and chamomile grown at various distances from the smelter. Herbage essential oil yields of basil, chamomile, dill, and sage were reduced when they were grown closer to the smelter. Metal removal from the site with the harvestable plant parts was as high as 180 g ha{sup -1} for Cd, 660 g ha{sup -1} for Pb, 180 g ha{sup -1} for Cu, 350 g ha{sup -1} for Mn, and 205 g ha{sup -1} for Zn. Sequential extraction of soil demonstrated that metal fractionation was affected by the distance to the smelter. With decreasing distance to the smelter, the transfer factor (TF) for Cu and Zn decreased but increased for Cd, while the bioavailability factor (BF) for Cd, Pb, Cu, Mn, and Zn decreased. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microanalyses of contaminated soil verified that most of the Pb, Cd, Mn, Cu, and Zn were in the form of small (< 1 {mu}m) particles, although there were larger particles (1-5 {mu}m) with high concentrations of individual metals. This study demonstrated that high concentrations of heavy metals in soil or growth medium did not result in metal transfer into the essential oil. Of the tested metals, only Cu at high concentrations may reduce oil content. Our results demonstrated that aromatic crops may not have significant phytoremediation potential, but growth of these crops in metal contaminated agricultural soils is a feasible alternative. Aromatic crops can provide economic return and metal-free final product, the essential oil.

  3. Aromatic plant production on metal contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field and container experiments were conducted to assess the feasibility of growing aromatic crops in metal contaminated areas and the effect of metals on herbage and oil productivity. The field experiments were conducted in the vicinities of the Non-Ferrous Metals Combine (Zn-Cu smelter) near Plovdiv, Bulgaria using coriander, sage, dill, basil, hyssop, lemon balm, and chamomile grown at various distances from the smelter. Herbage essential oil yields of basil, chamomile, dill, and sage were reduced when they were grown closer to the smelter. Metal removal from the site with the harvestable plant parts was as high as 180 g ha-1 for Cd, 660 g ha-1 for Pb, 180 g ha-1 for Cu, 350 g ha-1 for Mn, and 205 g ha-1 for Zn. Sequential extraction of soil demonstrated that metal fractionation was affected by the distance to the smelter. With decreasing distance to the smelter, the transfer factor (TF) for Cu and Zn decreased but increased for Cd, while the bioavailability factor (BF) for Cd, Pb, Cu, Mn, and Zn decreased. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microanalyses of contaminated soil verified that most of the Pb, Cd, Mn, Cu, and Zn were in the form of small (< 1 μm) particles, although there were larger particles (1-5 μm) with high concentrations of individual metals. This study demonstrated that high concentrations of heavy metals in soil or growth medium did not result in metal transfer into the essential oil. Of the tested metals, only Cu at high concentrations may reduce oil content. Our results demonstrated that aromatic crops may not have significant phytoremediation potential, but growth of these crops in metal contaminated agricultural soils is a feasible alternative. Aromatic crops can provide economic return and metal-free final product, the essential oil

  4. Biosynthesis of the Aromatic Amino Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittard, James; Yang, Ji

    2008-09-01

    This chapter describes in detail the genes and proteins of Escherichia coli involved in the biosynthesis and transport of the three aromatic amino acids tyrosine, phenylalanine, and tryptophan. It provides a historical perspective on the elaboration of the various reactions of the common pathway converting erythrose-4-phosphate and phosphoenolpyruvate to chorismate and those of the three terminal pathways converting chorismate to phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan. The regulation of key reactions by feedback inhibition, attenuation, repression, and activation are also discussed. Two regulatory proteins, TrpR (108 amino acids) and TyrR (513 amino acids), play a major role in transcriptional regulation. The TrpR protein functions only as a dimer which, in the presence of tryptophan, represses the expression of trp operon plus four other genes (the TrpR regulon). The TyrR protein, which can function both as a dimer and as a hexamer, regulates the expression of nine genes constituting the TyrR regulon. TyrR can bind each of the three aromatic amino acids and ATP and under their influence can act as a repressor or activator of gene expression. The various domains of this protein involved in binding the aromatic amino acids and ATP, recognizing DNA binding sites, interacting with the alpha subunit of RNA polymerase, and changing from a monomer to a dimer or a hexamer are all described. There is also an analysis of the various strategies which allow TyrR in conjunction with particular amino acids to differentially affect the expression of individual genes of the TyrR regulon. PMID:26443741

  5. Regular pattern formation on surface of aromatic polymers and its cytocompatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaljaničová, I.; Slepička, P.; Rimpelová, S.; Slepičková Kasálková, N.; Švorčík, V.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we describe ripple and dot nanopatterning of three different aromatic polymer substrates by KrF excimer laser treatment. The conditions for regular structures were established by laser fluence and number of pulses. Subsequently, the influence of the angle of incidence of a laser beam was investigated. We have chosen polyethersulfone (PES), polyetherimide (PEI) and polyetheretherketone (PEEK) as substrates for modification since they are thermally, chemically and mechanically resistant aromatic polymers with high absorption coefficients at excimer laser wavelength. As a tool of wettability investigation, we used contact angle measurement and for determination of the absorption edge, UV-vis spectroscopy was used. Material surface chemistry was analyzed using FTIR and the changes caused by modification were gained as differential spectra by subtraction of the spectra of non-modified material. Surface morphology was investigated by atomic force microscopy, also the roughness and surface area of modified samples were studied. The scans showed the formation of regular periodic structures, ripples and dots, after treatment by 8 and 16 mJ cm-2 and 6000 pulses. Further, initial in vitro cytocompatibility tests were performed using U-2 OS cell line growing on PES samples subjected to scanning electron microscopy analysis. The structure formation mapping contributes strongly to development of new applications using nanostructured polymers, e.g. in tissue engineering or in combination with metallization in selected electronics and metamaterials construction.

  6. Highly Conductive Aromatic Functionalized Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube for Inkjet Printable High Performance Supercapacitor Electrodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev K Ujjain

    Full Text Available We report the functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT via the 1,3-dipolar [3+2] cycloaddition of aromatic azides, which resulted in a detangled CNT as shown by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Carboxylic moieties (-COOH on aromatic azide result in highly stable aqueous dispersion (max. conc. ~ 10 mg/mL H2O, making the suitable for inkjet printing. Printed patterns on polyethylene terephthalate (PET flexible substrate exhibit low sheet resistivity ~65 Ω. cm, which is attributed to enhanced conductivity. Fabricated Supercapacitors (SC assembled using these printed substrates exhibit good electrochemical performance in organic as well as aqueous electrolytes. High energy and power density (57.8 Wh/kg and 0.85 kW/kg in 1M H2SO4 aqueous electrolyte demonstrate the excellent performance of the proposed supercapacitor. Capacitive retention varies from ~85-94% with columbic efficiency ~95% after 1000 charge/discharge cycles in different electrolytes, demonstrating the excellent potential of the device for futuristic power applications.

  7. Biodegradation Rates of Aromatic Contaminants in Biofilm Reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arcangeli, Jean-Pierre; Arvin, Erik

    1995-01-01

    This study has shown that microorganisms can adapt to degrade mixtures of aromatic pollutants at relatively high rates in the μg/l concentration range. The biodegradation rates of the following compounds were investigated in biofilm systems: aromatic hydrocarbons, phenol, methylphenols......, chlorophenols, nitrophenol, chlorobenzenes and aromatic nitrogen-, sulphur- or oxygen-containing heterocyclic compounds (NSO-compounds). Furthermore, a comparison with degradation rates observed for easily degradable organics is also presented. At concentrations below 20-100 μg/l the degradation of the aromatic...

  8. Critical analysis of the local aromaticity concept in polyaromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bultinck, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    A large number of local aromaticity indices for the benzenoid rings in polyaromatic hydrocarbons is computed. The results are interpreted, supporting Clar's hypothesis, and mutual correlations are investigated. It is shown that there are good correlations between all indices that strictly allow comparing benzenoid character. Poor correlations are found with NICS. A rationale is offered, yielding the conclusion that NICS and ring current maps follow a fundamentally different path to local aromaticity. In this sense the lack of correlation is not due to a real multidimensional character of aromaticity but rather to confusion and vagueness of the aromaticity concept. PMID:17328438

  9. Aromatic compounds from three Brazilian Lauraceae species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Nastri de Luca Batista

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytochemical investigations on three Brazilian Lauraceae species from the Cerrado region of São Paulo State, Ocotea corymbosa (Meins Mez., O. elegans Mez. and Persea pyrifolia Nees & Mart. ex Nees resulted in the isolation of flavonoids, an ester of the 4-O-E-caffeoylquinic acid, an aromatic sesquiterpene besides furofuran lignans. This is the first chemical study on the leaves of Ocotea elegans and O. corymbosa as well as the first report of non-volatile compounds from Persea pyrifolia.

  10. Carcinogenic potential of hydrotreated petroleum aromatic extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doak, S M; Hend, R W; van der Wiel, A; Hunt, P F

    1985-06-01

    Five experimental petroleum extracts were produced from luboil distillates derived from Middle East paraffinic crude by solvent extraction and severe hydrotreatment. The polycyclic aromatic content (PCA) of the extracts was determined by dimethyl sulphoxide extraction and ranged from 3.7-9.2% w/w. The five extracts were evaluated for their potential to induce cutaneous and systemic neoplasia in female mice derived from Carworth Farm No 1 strain (CF1). The test substances were applied undiluted (0.2 ml per application) to the shorn dorsal skin twice weekly for up to 78 weeks, with 48 mice in each treatment group and 96 in the untreated control group; two further groups, each of 48 mice, were similarly treated either with a non-hydrotreated commercial aromatic extract (PCA content, 19.7% w/v) or with a low dose of benzo(a)pyrene (12.5 micrograms/ml acetone). The mice were housed individually in polypropylene cages in specified pathogen free conditions. The incidence of cutaneous and systemic tumours was determined from histological analysis of haematoxylin and eosin stained tissue sections. The results were correlated with the PCA content of the extracts and compared with those from female mice exposed to a non-hydrotreated commercial aromatic extract. Four of the hydrotreated extracts were carcinogenic for murine skin; the two products with the lower PCA contents were less carcinogenic than the products with the higher PCA contents and all were less carcinogenic than the commercial extract. One extract with the lowest PCA content was non-carcinogenic. Thus refining by severe hydrotreatment was an effective method of reducing the carcinogenic potential of petroleum aromatic extracts. Although other physicochemical properties may influence the biological activity of oil products, the PCA content determined by dimethyl sulphoxide extraction may be a useful indicator of the potential of oil products to induce cutaneous tumours in experimental animals. There was no

  11. Aromatics oxidation and soot formation in flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, J.B.; Pope, C.J.; Shandross, R.A.; Yadav, T. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The scope includes detailed measurements of profiles of stable and radical species concentrations in low-pressure one-dimensional premixed flames. Intermediate species identifications and mole fractions, fluxes, and net reaction rates calculated from the measured profiles are used to test postulated reaction mechanisms. Particular objectives are to identify and to determine or confirm rate constants for the main benzene oxidation reactions in flames, and to characterize fullerenes and their formation mechanisms and kinetics.

  12. Photoinduced dynamics in protonated aromatic amino acid

    CERN Document Server

    Grégoire, Gilles; Barat, Michel; Fayeton, Jacqueline; Dedonder-Lardeux, Claude; Jouvet, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    UV photoinduced fragmentation of protonated aromatics amino acids have emerged the last few years, coming from a situation where nothing was known to what we think a good understanding of the optical properties. We will mainly focus this review on the tryptophan case. Three groups have mostly done spectroscopic studies and one has mainly been involved in dynamics studies of the excited states in the femtosecond/picosecond range and also in the fragmentation kinetics from nanosecond to millisecond. All these data, along with high level ab initio calculations, have shed light on the role of the different electronic states of the protonated molecules upon the fragmentation mechanisms.

  13. Substrate specificity of copper-containing plant amine oxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrangeli, P; Federico, R; Mondovì, B; Morpurgo, L

    2007-07-01

    The steady-state kinetic parameters of the amine oxidases purified from Lathyrus cicera (LCAO) and Pisum sativum (PSAO) seedling were measured on a series of common substrates, previously tested on bovine serum amine oxidase (BSAO). LCAO, as PSAO, was substantially more reactive than BSAO with aliphatic diamines and histamine. The k(cat) and k(cat)/Km for putrescine were four and six order of magnitude higher, respectively. Differences were smaller with some aromatic monoamines. The plot of k(cat) versus hydrogen ions concentration produced bell-shaped curves, the maximum of which was substrate dependent, shifting from neutral pH with putrescine to alkaline pH with phenylethylamine and benzylamine. The latter substrates made the site more hydrophobic and increased the pK(a) of both enzyme-substrate and enzyme-product adducts. The plot of k(cat)/Km versus hydrogen ion concentration produced approximately parallel bell-shaped curves. Similar pK(a) couples were obtained from the latter curves, in agreement with the assignment as free enzyme and free substrate pK(a). The limited pH dependence of kinetic parameters suggests a predominance of hydrophobic interactions. PMID:17521737

  14. An Aromatic Inventory of the Local Volume

    CERN Document Server

    Marble, A R; van Zee, L; Dale, D A; Smith, J D T; Gordon, K D; Wu, Y; Lee, J C; Kennicutt, R C; Skillman, E D; Johnson, L C; Block, M; Calzetti, D; Cohen, S A; Lee, H; Schuster, M D

    2010-01-01

    Using infrared photometry from the Spitzer Space Telescope, we perform the first inventory of aromatic feature emission (AFE, but also commonly referred to as PAH emission) for a statistically complete sample of star-forming galaxies in the local volume. The photometric methodology involved is calibrated and demonstrated to recover the aromatic fraction of the IRAC 8 micron flux with a standard deviation of 6% for a training set of 40 SINGS galaxies (ranging from stellar to dust dominated) with both suitable mid-infrared Spitzer IRS spectra and equivalent photometry. A potential factor of two improvement could be realized with suitable 5.5 and 10 micron photometry, such as what may be provided in the future by JWST. The resulting technique is then applied to mid-infrared photometry for the 258 galaxies from the Local Volume Legacy (LVL) survey, a large sample dominated in number by low-luminosity dwarf galaxies for which obtaining comparable mid-infrared spectroscopy is not feasible. We find the total LVL lum...

  15. Molecular dynamics studies of aromatic hydrocarbon liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project mainly involves a molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo study of the effect of molecular shape on thermophysical properties of bulk fluids with an emphasis on the aromatic hydrocarbon liquids. In this regard we have studied the modeling, simulation methodologies, and predictive and correlating methods for thermodynamic properties of fluids of nonspherical molecules. In connection with modeling we have studied the use of anisotropic site-site potentials, through a modification of the Gay-Berne Gaussian overlap potential, to successfully model the aromatic rings after adding the necessary electrostatic moments. We have also shown these interaction sites should be located at the geometric centers of the chemical groups. In connection with predictive methods, we have shown two perturbation type theories to work well for fluids modeled using one-center anisotropic potentials and the possibility exists for extending these to anisotropic site-site models. In connection with correlation methods, we have studied, through simulations, the effect of molecular shape on the attraction term in the generalized van der Waals equation of state for fluids of nonspherical molecules and proposed a possible form which is to be studied further. We have successfully studied the vector and parallel processing aspects of molecular simulations for fluids of nonspherical molecules

  16. Split cord malformation as a cause of tethered cord syndrome in a 78-Year-old female.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallatroni, Henry F; Ball, Perry A; Duhaime, Ann-Christine

    2004-01-01

    A 78-year-old woman presented for evaluation of back pain, urinary dysfunction, leg weakness and progressive equinovarus foot deformity. She reported that shortly after her birth in 1924, she underwent resection of a subcutaneous 'cyst' in the lower lumbar area. Seven years prior to evaluation at our institution, she had undergone bilateral total knee arthroplasty for osteoarthritis. After the procedure, she began to experience severe low back pain that radiated into her legs. Weakness of the foot inverters, urinary dysfunction and worsening bilateral equinovarus foot deformity developed in the years following the surgery. MRI revealed a split cord malformation with a tethered spinal cord. Because of the patient's age and poor medical condition, her symptoms were managed conservatively. This case demonstrates symptomatic deterioration in an elderly patient with a tethered spinal cord after many years of clinical stability. PMID:15292638

  17. Analysis of the fluctuations of a single-tethered, quantum-dot labeled DNA molecule in shear flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laube, K; Guenther, K; Mertig, M, E-mail: michael.mertig@tu-dresden.de [Professur fuer Physikalische Chemie, Mess- und Sensortechnik, Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-05-11

    A novel technique for analyzing the conformational fluctuations of a single, surface-tethered DNA molecule by fluorescence microscopy is reported. Attaching a nanometer-sized fluorescent quantum dot to the free end of a {lambda}-phage DNA molecule allows us to study the fluctuations of a native DNA molecule without the mechanical properties being altered by fluorescent dye staining. We report on the investigation of single-tethered DNA in both the unperturbed and the shear flow induced stretched state. The dependence of the observed fractional extension and the magnitude of fluctuations on the shear rate can be qualitatively interpreted by Brochard's stem-and-flower model. The cyclic dynamics of a DNA molecule is directly observed in the shear flow experiment.

  18. An In-tether Chiral Center Modulates the Helicity, Cell Permeability, and Target Binding Affinity of a Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Kuan; Geng, Hao; Zhang, Qingzhou; Liu, Qisong; Xie, Mingsheng; Sun, Chengjie; Li, Wenjun; Lin, Huacan; Jiang, Fan; Wang, Tao; Wu, Yun-Dong; Li, Zigang

    2016-07-01

    The addition of a precisely positioned chiral center in the tether of a constrained peptide is reported, yielding two separable peptide diastereomers with significantly different helicity, as supported by circular dichroism (CD) and NMR spectroscopy. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis suggests that the absolute configuration of the in-tether chiral center in helical form is R, which is in agreement with theoretical simulations. The relationship between the secondary structure of the short peptides and their biochemical/biophysical properties remains elusive, largely because of the lack of proper controls. The present strategy provides the only method for investigating the influence of solely conformational differences upon the biochemical/biophysical properties of peptides. The significant differences in permeability and target binding affinity between the peptide diastereomers demonstrate the importance of helical conformation. PMID:27167181

  19. Iridium Cyclometalates with Tethered o-Carboranes: Impact of Restricted Rotation of o-Carborane on Phosphorescence Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Hoon; Park, Jihyun; Lee, Junseong; Lee, Sang Uck; Lee, Min Hyung

    2015-07-01

    Iridium(III) cyclometalates (1c and 2c) in which the two carborane units on the 4- or 5-positions of 2-phenylpyridine (ppy) ligands were tethered by an alkylene linker were prepared to investigate the effect of free rotation of o-carborane on phosphorescence efficiency. In comparison with the unlinked complex, tethering the o-carboranes to the 5-positions of ppy ligands (2c) enhanced phosphorescence efficiency by over 30-fold in polar medium (Φ(PL) = 0.37 vs 0.011 in THF), while restricting the rotation of o-carborane at the 4-positions (1c) negatively affected the phosphorescence efficiency. The different effects of restricted rotation of o-carborane on phosphorescence efficiency were likely a result of the different variations of the carboranyl C-C bond distances in the excited state. PMID:26075816

  20. Photogrammetric reconstruction of high-resolution surface topographies and deformable wing kinematics of tethered locusts and free-flying hoverflies

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Simon M.; Thomas, Adrian L. R.; Taylor, Graham K.

    2008-01-01

    Here, we present a suite of photogrammetric methods for reconstructing insect wing kinematics, to provide instantaneous topographic maps of the wing surface. We filmed tethered locusts (Schistocerca gregaria) and free-flying hoverflies (Eristalis tenax) using four high-speed digital video cameras. We digitized multiple natural features and marked points on the wings using manual and automated tracking. Epipolar geometry was used to identify additional points on the hoverfly wing outline which...