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Sample records for aromatic molecules mini-review

  1. Biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by Trichoderma species: a mini review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafra, German; Cortés-Espinosa, Diana V

    2015-12-01

    Fungi belonging to Trichoderma genus are ascomycetes found in soils worldwide. Trichoderma has been studied in relation to diverse biotechnological applications and are known as successful colonizers of their common habitats. Members of this genus have been well described as effective biocontrol organisms through the production of secondary metabolites with potential applications as new antibiotics. Even though members of Trichoderma are commonly used for the commercial production of lytic enzymes, as a biological control agent, and also in the food industry, their use in xenobiotic biodegradation is limited. Trichoderma stands out as a genus with a great range of substrate utilization, a high production of antimicrobial compounds, and its ability for environmental opportunism. In this review, we focused on the recent advances in the research of Trichoderma species as potent and efficient aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading organisms, as well as aimed to provide insight into its potential role in the bioremediation of soils contaminated with heavy hydrocarbons. Several Trichoderma species are associated with the ability to metabolize a variety of both high and low molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) such as naphthalene, phenanthrene, chrysene, pyrene, and benzo[a]pyrene. PAH-degrading species include Trichoderma hamatum, Trichoderma harzianum, Trichoderma reesei, Trichoderma koningii, Trichoderma viride, Trichoderma virens, and Trichoderma asperellum using alternate enzyme systems commonly seen in other organisms, such as multicooper laccases, peroxidases, and ring-cleavage dioxygenases. Within these species, T. asperellum stands out as a versatile organism with remarkable degrading abilities, high tolerance, and a remarkable potential to be used as a remediation agent in polluted soils. PMID:26498812

  2. Aromatic molecules as spintronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we study the spin-dependent electron transport through aromatic molecular chains attached to two semi-infinite leads. We model this system taking into account different geometrical configurations which are all characterized by a tight binding Hamiltonian. Based on the Green's function approach with a Landauer formalism, we find spin-dependent transport in short aromatic molecules by applying external magnetic fields. Additionally, we find that the magnetoresistance of aromatic molecules can reach different values, which are dependent on the variations in the applied magnetic field, length of the molecules, and the interactions between the contacts and the aromatic molecule

  3. Quantum transport through aromatic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we study the electronic transport properties through aromatic molecules connected to two semi-infinite leads. The molecules are in different geometrical configurations including arrays. Using a nearest neighbor tight-binding approach, the transport properties are analyzed into a Green's function technique within a real-space renormalization scheme. We calculate the transmission probability and the Current-Voltage characteristics as a function of a molecule-leads coupling parameter. Our results show different transport regimes for these systems, exhibiting metal-semiconductor-insulator transitions and the possibility to employ them in molecular devices

  4. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic models of small molecules and therapeutic antibodies: a mini-review on fundamental concepts and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferl, Gregory Z; Theil, Frank-Peter; Wong, Harvey

    2016-03-01

    The mechanisms of absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination of small and large molecule therapeutics differ significantly from one another and can be explored within the framework of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. This paper briefly reviews fundamental approaches to PBPK modeling, in which drug kinetics within tissues and organs are explicitly represented using physiologically meaningful parameters. The differences in PBPK models applied to small/large molecule drugs are highlighted, thus elucidating differences in absorption, distribution and elimination properties between these two classes of drugs in a systematic manner. The absorption of small and large molecules differs with respect to their common extravascular routes of delivery (oral versus subcutaneous). The role of the lymphatic system in drug distribution, and the involvement of tissues as sites of elimination (through catabolism and target mediated drug disposition) are unique features of antibody distribution and elimination that differ from small molecules, which are commonly distributed into the tissues but are eliminated primarily by liver metabolism. Fundamental differences exist in the ability to predict human pharmacokinetics based upon preclinical data due to differing mechanisms governing small and large molecule disposition. These differences have influence on the evolving utilization of PBPK modeling in the discovery and development of small and large molecule therapeutics. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26461173

  5. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules in astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Shantanu; Pathak, Amit; Maurya, Anju

    2013-06-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules are responsible for the mid-infrared emission features. Their ubiquitous presence in almost all types of astrophysical environments and related variations in their spectral profilesmake them an important tool to understand the physics and chemistry of the interstellar medium. The observed spectrum is generally a composite superposition of all different types of PAHs possible in the region. In the era of space telescopes the spectral richness of the emission features has enhanced their importance as probe and also the need to understand the variations with respect to PAH size, type and ionic state. Quantum computational studies of PAHs have proved useful in elucidating the profile variations and put constraints on the possible types of PAHs in different environments. The study of PAHs has also significantly contributed to the problems of diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), UV extinction and understanding the chemistry of the formation of complex organics in space. The review highlights the results of various computational models for the understanding of infrared emission features, the PAH-DIB relation, formation of prebiotics and possible impact in the understanding of far-infrared features.

  6. Electron-Exchange Reactions of Aromatic Molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large body of information is available on the rates and mechanisms of inorganic electron-exchange processes. In contrast, purely organic systems have received only minor attention. The homogeneous electron-exchange rates (kexc) and the heterogeneous rate constants for the electrode reaction (kel) have been measured only for a few hydrocarbons. We have measured kexc for a variety of aromatic systems including hydrocarbons, quinones and nitro compounds. These measurements have been carried out via electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) line broadening measurements on mixtures of radical ions and their parent compounds. We have been able to measure kexc with a precision that allows detection of small differences presumably due to molecular structure and environment. Hydrocarbon systems like anthracene/anthracene anion are very rapid with kexc values of ca. 108-109 litres mole-1 sec-1. Some substituted aromatics like quinones and nitriles are also quite rapid. However, when a strong electron acceptor function is present like a nitro group in nitrobenzene, the value of kexc decreases by a factor of 10. It is possible to correlate changes in kexc in the nitrobenzene series with the unpaired electron density in terms of the 14N coupling constants of the EPR spectra. Further, the nitro aromatic series show very large variations in kexc with the solvent system. These changes can be correlated with recent studies of the solvation effect on hyperfine coupling constants. Marcus has reviewed recently chemical and electrochemical electron-transfer theory and suggested correlations between kexc and kel. We have measured kel especially for the nitrobenzene system under conditions which are as nearly identical experimentally to the EPR studies as possible. The electrochemical investigations were carried out by a steady-state d.c. method to eliminate some of the uncertainties inherent in electrochemical relaxation techniques. Rotated disc electrodes at low temperatures were used

  7. Levan And Levansucrase-A Mini Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Caroline Marques Goncalves

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Levansucrase is a fructosyltranferase that synthesizes levan and present great biotechnological interest. Its being widely used in therapeutic food cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. Levansucrase is produced by many microorganisms such as the Bacillus subtilis Natto using the sucrose fermentation. In this mini-review we described some properties and functions of this important group of enzymes and the recent technologies used in the production and purification of levansucrase and levan.

  8. Cosmic Background Radiation Mini-Review

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Douglas; Smoot, George

    2004-01-01

    This is a complete re-write of the mini-review for the Review of Particle Physics (a.k.a the Partcicle Data Book), which includes an assessment of the CMB anisotropy results and their interpretation up until the end of 2003. It forms a compact overview of the field at this time. Sections headings are: Introduction; Description of CMB Anisotropies; Cosmological Parameters; Physics of Anisotropies; Current Anisotropy Data; CMB Polarization; Complications; Constraints on Cosmologies; Particle Ph...

  9. Levan And Levansucrase-A Mini Review

    OpenAIRE

    Bruna Caroline Marques Goncalves; Cristiani Baldo; Maria Antonia Pedrine Colabone Celligoi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Levansucrase is a fructosyltranferase that synthesizes levan and present great biotechnological interest. Its being widely used in therapeutic food cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. Levansucrase is produced by many microorganisms such as the Bacillus subtilis Natto using the sucrose fermentation. In this mini-review we described some properties and functions of this important group of enzymes and the recent technologies used in the production and purification of levansucrase an...

  10. Coulomb explosion in aromatic molecules and their deuterated derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzallas, P.; Kosmidis, C.; Graham, P.; Ledingham, K. W. D.; McCanny, T.; Hankin, S. M.; Singhal, R. P.; Taday, P. F.; Langley, A. J.

    2000-12-01

    Coulomb explosion within some aromatic molecules (furan, pyrrole, pyridine and pyrazine) and their deuterated derivatives induced by strong fs laser fields (˜ 4×10 16 W/cm2) is studied at λ=790 nm by means of time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry. It is found that in hydrogenated molecules the Coulomb explosion process begins at internuclear distances about twice larger than the equilibrium distance ( Re), while the expansion of the molecular skeleton in the deuterated derivatives is smaller. Based on the estimated kinetic energy values of the fragment ions, the charge distribution in the transient molecular species is also discussed.

  11. Cosmic Background Radiation Mini-Review

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, D; Scott, Douglas; Smoot, George

    2004-01-01

    This is a complete re-write of the mini-review for the Review of Particle Physics (a.k.a the Partcicle Data Book), which includes an assessment of the CMB anisotropy results and their interpretation up until the end of 2003. It forms a compact overview of the field at this time. Sections headings are: Introduction; Description of CMB Anisotropies; Cosmological Parameters; Physics of Anisotropies; Current Anisotropy Data; CMB Polarization; Complications; Constraints on Cosmologies; Particle Physics Constraints; Fundamental Lessons; and Future Directions.

  12. Mini--Review of Dark Matter: 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Drees, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    This is the mini-review on Dark Matter in the 2012 edition of the Particle Data Group's Review of Particle Properties. After briefly summarizing the arguments in favor of the existence of Dark Matter, we list possible candidates, ranging in mass from a fraction of an eV (e.g., axions) to many solar masses (e.g., primordial black holes), and discuss ways to detect them. The main emphasis is on Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). A large international effort is being made to detect them directly, or else to detect their annihilation products. We explain why we consider all claims to have established a positive signal for WIMPs in either direct or indirect detection to be premature. We also introduce the concept of a {\\it WIMP safe} minimal mass; below this mass, the interpretation of a given direct search experiment depends strongly on the tail of the WIMP velocity distribution and/or on the experimental energy resolution.

  13. Cyclic distillation technology - A mini-review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bîldea, Costin Sorin; Pătruţ, Cătălin; Jørgensen, Sten Bay;

    2016-01-01

    Process intensification in distillation systems has received much attention during the past decades, with the aim of increasing both energy and separation efficiency. Various techniques, such as internal heat-integrated distillation, membrane distillation, rotating packed bed, dividing-wall columns...... and reactive distillation were studied and reported in literature. All these techniques employ the conventional continuous counter-current contact of vapor and liquid phases. Cyclic distillation technology is based on an alternative operating mode using separate phase movement which leads to key...... practical advantages in both chemical and biochemical processes. This article provides a mini-review of cyclic distillation technology. The topics covered include the working principle, design and control methods, main benefits and limitations as well as current industrial applications. Cyclic distillation...

  14. Coulomb pairing resonances in multiple-ring aromatic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Huber, D L

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of the Coulomb pairing resonances observed in photo-double-ionization studies of CnHm aromatic molecules with multiple benzene-like rings. It is applied to naphthalene, anthracene, phenanthrene, pyrene and coronene, all of which have six-member rings, and azulene which is comprised of a five-member and a seven-member ring. There is a high energy resonance at ~ 40 eV that is found in all of the molecules cited and is associated with paired electrons localized on carbon sites on the perimeter of the molecule, each of which having two carbon sites as nearest neighbors. The low energy resonance at 10 eV, which is found only in pyrene and coronene, is attributed to the formation of paired electrons localized on arrays of interior carbon atoms that have the point symmetry of the molecule with each carbon atom having three nearest neighbors. The origin of the anomalous increase in the doubly charged to singly charged parent-ion ratio that is found above the 40 eV resonance in all of the cited ...

  15. Pro-aromatic and anti-aromatic π-conjugated molecules: an irresistible wish to be diradicals

    KAUST Repository

    Zeng, Zebing

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 The Royal Society of Chemistry. Aromaticity is an important concept to understand the stability and physical properties of π-conjugated molecules. Recent studies on pro-aromatic and anti-aromatic molecules revealed their irresistible tendency to become diradicals in the ground state. Diradical character thus becomes another very important concept and it is fundamentally correlated to the physical (optical, electronic and magnetic) properties and chemical reactivity of most of the organic optoelectronic materials. Molecules with distinctive diradical character show unique properties which are very different from those of traditional closed-shell π-conjugated systems, and thus they have many potential applications in organic electronics, spintronics, non-linear optics and energy storage. This critical review first introduces the fundamental electronic structure of Kekulé diradicals within the concepts of anti-aromaticity and pro-aromaticity in the context of Hückel aromaticity and diradical character. Then recent research studies on various stable/persistent diradicaloids based on pro-aromatic and anti-aromatic compounds are summarized and discussed with regard to their synthetic chemistry, physical properties, structure-property relationships and potential material applications. A summary and personal perspective is given at the end.

  16. Essential Oils for Treatment for Onychomycosis: A Mini-Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Fernanda C; Beck, Ruy C R; da Silva, Cristiane de B

    2016-02-01

    Onychomycosis are fungal infections affecting finger and toenails mainly caused by dermatophyte fungi and some Candida species. Low cure rates and frequent recurrence, development of a fungal resistance front to various antimicrobial agents topical and systemic, and an ineffective topical treatment make onychomycosis difficult to treat. Essential oils are excellent candidates for the topical treatment for onychomycosis because the development of resistance by fungi is rare, and the presence of side effects is low. They are composed of a complex variety of compounds, mainly terpenes, with low molecular weight, which may easily penetrate into the nail plate, finding the fungi elements. The complex mixture confers a broad antifungal spectrum of action, through interaction with biological membranes, interference in radical and enzymatic reaction of fungi cells. Essential oils may become the source of new therapeutic molecules, and the use of an essential oil incorporated into a topical formulation is an interesting, safe, and effective alternative for the treatment for onychomycosis. However, studies are needed to evaluate the efficacy of essential oils in the treatment for onychomycosis in vivo. This mini-review aims to present the potential use of essential oils for the treatment for onychomycosis, focusing on the last decade. PMID:26481920

  17. π-Electron rotations in chiral aromatic molecules induced by ultashort laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    π Electron play an important role in formation of the molecular structures and reactivity of aromatic molecules. In recent years, research fields of electron dynamics in atoms and molecules have attracted considerable attention with rapid progress in laser science and technology in femtosecond to attosecond time regimes [1]. This is a new branch of femtosecond chemistry. In this talk, we present the results of our recent works on control of π-electron rotation in photo-induced chiral aromatic molecules [2-4]. Control of π-electron rotation has potential utility to next-generation ultrafast switching devices. After a short introduction, the principle of generation of unidirectional π-electron rotation in aromatic molecules induced by a linearly polarized UV laser pulse is described. Next, the results of control simulations of π-electron rotations and those of the π- electron ring currents are presented for two representative chiral aromatic molecules; one is 2,5-dichlor[n] (3,6) pyrazinophane with one aromatic pyrzine ring [2], and the other is (P)-2,2’-biphenol with two aromatic rings [3,4]. Finally, the summary of the π-electron rotations and perspectives of ultrashort quantum switching investigations are described. (author)

  18. Process engineering for bioflavour production with metabolically active yeasts - a mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlquist, Magnus; Gibson, Brian; Karagul Yuceer, Yonca; Paraskevopoulou, Adamantini; Sandell, Mari; Angelov, Angel I; Gotcheva, Velitchka; Angelov, Angel D; Etschmann, Marlene; de Billerbeck, Gustavo M; Lidén, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Flavours are biologically active molecules of large commercial interest in the food, cosmetics, detergent and pharmaceutical industries. The production of flavours can take place by either extraction from plant materials, chemical synthesis, biological conversion of precursor molecules or de novo biosynthesis. The latter alternatives are gaining importance through the rapidly growing fields of systems biology and metabolic engineering, giving efficient production hosts for the so-called 'bioflavours', which are natural flavour and/or fragrance compounds obtained with cell factories or enzymatic systems. Yeasts are potential production hosts for bioflavours. In this mini-review, we give an overview of bioflavour production in yeasts from the process-engineering perspective. Two specific examples, production of 2-phenylethanol and vanillin, are used to illustrate the process challenges and strategies used. PMID:25400136

  19. Aromaticity of rings-in-molecules (RIMs) from electron localization-delocalization matrices (LDMs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumar, Ismat; Cook, Ronald; Ayers, Paul W.; Matta, Chérif F.

    2016-01-01

    A new and powerful molecular descriptor termed the LDM (localization-delocalization matrix) has recently been proposed as a molecular fingerprinting tool and has been shown to yield robust quantitative-structure-to-activity/property-relationships (QSAR/QSPR). An LDM lists the average number of electrons localized within an atom in a molecule along its diagonal while the off-diagonal elements are the pair-wise average number of electrons shared between every pair of atoms in the molecule, bonded or not. Hence, the LDM is a representation of a fuzzy molecular graph that accounts for the whereabouts of all electron(s) in the molecule and can be expected to encode for several facets of its chemistry at once. We show that the LDM captures the aromatic character of a ring-in-a-molecule by comparing the aromaticity ranking based on the LDMs and their eigenvalues of 6-membered carbon rings within (polycyclic) benzenoid hydrocarbons with the ranking based on four well-established local aromaticity measures (harmonic oscillator model of aromaticity, acromatic fluctuation index, para delocalization index, and nucleus independent chemical shift(0)). This paper is dedicated to the memory of Professor Paul von Ragué Schleyer (1930-2014).

  20. Colour chemistry and mini-review on hadron dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper consists of two parts, colour chemistry and mini-review on hadron dynamics. Colour is now popularly believed to be the basis of strong interaction. Unfortunately, the empirical evidence for colour remains as yet limited. It is necessary to seek an entirely new class of phenomena qualitatively different from those in a colourless world. Diquoniums are the simplest example. There are two types of diquoniums such as T-diquoniums and M-diquoniums. The spectrum, the decay pattern and the production mechanism are discussed. The existence of M-diquoniums would be verification of colour. The experimental situation is not yet very clear. Generalization to other multiquark states is discussed. The mini-review on hadron dynamics covers what is now known as soft hadron collision or small transverse momentum physics. There are some new results on standard Regge phenomenology, and it can be said that the standard Regge model for quantum number exchanges continues to be useful. The recent interest on the spectroscopy of multiquark states is reflected in the search for Regge exchanges of multiquark trajectories, and extends to the study of duality. A fair amount of effort was devoted to reconciling duality with unitarity, based on the dual topological unitarisation (DTU). The main result in this scheme is the calculation of the crossed meson loop with the topology of a cylinder. Asymptotic problems can be studied in Regge field theory without reference to DTU. The progress made in this Tokyo Conference on soft hadron dynamics is not dramatic. (Kato, T.)

  1. Shape-selective adsorption of aromatic molecules from water by tetramethylammonium-smectite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.; Mortland, M.M.; Boyd, S.A.; Chiou, C.T.

    1989-01-01

    The adsorption of aromatic compounds by smectite exchanged with tetramethylammonium (TMA) has been studied. Aromatic compounds adsorbed by TMA-smectite are assumed to adopt a tilted orientation in a face-to-face arrangment with the TMA tetrahedra. The sorptive characteristics of TMA-smectite were influenced strongly by the presence of water. The dry TMA-smectite showed little selectivity in the uptake of benzen, toluene and xylene. In the presence of water, TMA-smectite showed a high degree of selectivity based on molecular size/shape, resulting in high uptake of benzene and progressively lower uptake of larger aromatic molecules. This selectivity appeared to result from the shrinkage of interlamellar cavities by water.

  2. Biological Properties of Plant-Derived Alkylresorcinols: Mini-Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luís, Ângelo; Domingues, Fernanda; Duarte, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    Alkylresorcinols are compounds which belong to the family of phenolic lipids, and are usually found in numerous biological species. In the particular case of higher plants, alkylresorcinols have been found in various counterparts with chains of thirteen to twenty-seven carbon atoms containing several saturations. Due to the demonstrated antimicrobial properties of many naturally occurring members of the alkylresorcinols family, it is possible to conclude that these compounds act as defensive agents in plants. Previous studies led to the isolation and identification of 5-alkylresorcinols that cleave DNA. Additionally, in the literature, there are several other biological effects attributed to some resorcinol derivatives, namely, cytotoxic, anticarcinogenic, antiproliferative, antileishmanial and antioxidant properties. This mini-review intends to outline the biological activities of the most relevant alkylresorcinols isolated from plants and to propose future directions for subsequent studies regarding the effective biological effects of this class of compounds. PMID:26864549

  3. R2PI Spectroscopy of Aromatic Molecules Produced in an Ethylene-Rich Flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentier, Yvain; Pino, Thomas; Bréchignac, Philippe

    2013-10-01

    Laser spectroscopy, combined with mass spectrometry, was applied to study the spectra of aromatic molecules produced in a premixed ethylene-rich flat flame. These studies produce new gas-phase electronic spectra of polyaromatic compounds, which ultimately will guide the understanding of the chemical processes that lead to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) growth or PAH formation locking. Resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) spectra of all species detectable in a specific fuel-rich flame were recorded simultaneously during a single scan of the laser wavelength, within the 220-330 nm range. Comparison with spectra available in the literature allowed us to identify 16 aromatic species. In the PAH forming region of this flame, we found that the main PAHs are accompanied by a great diversity of other species, including in particular various side-chains on aromatic networks. We also show that this technique allows, at least in some cases, to distinguish between different isomers associated with the same mass peak, although the extracted PAHs are only cooled down to room temperature.

  4. Chemistry of the fullerenes: The manifestation of strain in a class of continuous aromatic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddon. R.C. (AT T Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, NJ (United States))

    1993-09-17

    Within the [pi]-orbital axis vector theory, the total rehybridization required for closure of the fullerenes is approximately conserved. This result allows the development of a structure-based index of strain in the fullerenes, and it is estimated that about 80 percent of the heat of formation of the carbon atoms in C[sub 60] may be attributed to a combination of [sigma] strain and steric inhibition of resonance. Application of this analysis to the geometries of structurally characterized organometallic derivatives of C[sub 60] and C[sub 70] shows that the reactivity exhibited by the fullerenes may be attributed to the relief of a combination of local and global strain energy. C[sub 60] is of ambiguous aromatic character with anomalous magnetic properties but with the reactivity of a continuous aromatic molecule, moderated only by the tremendous strain inherent in the spheroidal structure.

  5. Structural and thermodynamic analysis of the hetero-association of theophylline with aromatic drug molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrejuk, D. D.; Hernandez Santiago, A. A.; Khomich, V. V.; Voronov, V. K.; Davies, D. B.; Evstigneev, M. P.

    2008-10-01

    The hetero-association of theophylline (THP) with other biologically-active aromatic molecules ( e.g. the anti-cancer drugs daunomycin and novantrone, the antibiotic norfloxacin, the vitamin flavin-mononucleotide and two mutagens ethidium bromide and proflavine) has been studied by NMR in aqueous-salt solution (0.1 M Na-phosphate buffer, p D 7.1). It was found that THP shows an essentially similar hetero-association ability as caffeine (CAF) towards aromatic drugs, except for novantrone (NOV), which has much less affinity to THP than CAF as a result of energetically unfavourable orthogonal orientation of the chromophores of THP and NOV in the hetero-complex.

  6. From small aromatic molecules to functional nanostructured carbon by pulsed laser-induced photochemical stitching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. Gokhale

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A novel route employing UV laser pulses (KrF Excimer, 248 nm to cleave small aromatic molecules and stitch the generated free radicals into functional nanostructured forms of carbon is introduced. The process differs distinctly from any strategies wherein the aromatic rings are broken in the primary process. It is demonstrated that this pulsed laser-induced photochemical stitching (PLPS process when applied to routine laboratory solvents (or toxic chemical wastes when discarded Chlorobenzene and o-Dichlorobenzene yields Carbon Nanospheres (CNSs comprising of graphene-like sheets assembled in onion-like configurations. This room temperature process implemented under normal laboratory conditions is versatile and clearly applicable to the whole family of haloaromatic compounds without and with additions of precursors or other nanomaterials. We further bring out its applicability for synthesis of metal-oxide based carbon nanocomposites.

  7. Inclusion of poly-aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules in a functionalized layered double hydroxide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L Mohanambe; S Vasudevan

    2006-01-01

    The internal surface of an Mg-Al layered double hydroxide has been functionalized by anchoring carboxy-methyl derivatized -cyclodextrin cavities to the gallery walls. Neutral polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules have been included within the functionalized solid by driving the hydrophobic aromatic molecules from a polar solvent into the less polar interior of the anchored cyclodextrin cavities by a partitioning process. The optical (absorption and emission) properties of the PAH molecules included within the functionalized Mg-Al layered double hydroxide solid are similar to that of dilute solutions of the PAH in non-polar solvents. The unique feature of these hybrid materials is that they are thermally stable over a wide temperature range with their emission properties practically unaltered.

  8. Retardation the dewetting dynamics of ultrathin polystyrene films using highly branched aromatic molecules as additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study introduces a new class of materials as a dewetting inhibitor for polystyrene (PS) ultrathin films. Two types of highly branched aromatic (HBA) molecules are added into PS films with thicknesses of 7 nm and 23 nm. Their concentrations range from 0.75 to 5 wt.%. The films are annealed in vacuum oven at elevated temperatures to accelerate dewetting process. Evolution of the film morphologies is followed by utilizing atomic force microscopy and optical microscopy. Contact angle measurements are used to evaluate interfacial interactions in each system. Dewetting area as a function of annealing time and HBA concentration are calculated. We have found that the presence of only 0.5 wt.% HBA can suppress the dewetting dynamics of PS films. Increasing the HBA concentration from 0.5 to 5 wt.% causes systematic decrease of the dewetting rate. In this system, the HBA molecules behave as physical cross-linking points for PS chains, which lead to the improvement of film stability. The efficiency of HBA as a dewetting inhibitor varies with molecular weight of PS while the change of HBA structure hardly affects the dewetting behaviors. - Highlights: • New method for improving stability of polystyrene (PS) thin films • Highly branched aromatic molecules (HBA) are used to suppress the dewetting. • Thermal stability of blended PS/HBA films greatly improves. • The effectiveness of HBA varies with molecular weight of PS. • Important results for designing materials in coating application

  9. Energetics and Electronic Structures of Carbon Nanotubes Encapsulating Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kigure, Shota; Iizumi, Yoko; Okazaki, Toshiya; Okada, Susumu

    2014-12-01

    We report total-energy electronic structure calculations that provide energetics of the encapsulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules coronene, sumanene, and corannulene into carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and electronic structures of the resulting carbon hybrid structures. Our calculations elucidate that the encapsulation of these PAHs into CNTs is an exothermic reaction for nanotubes with indexes of (16,0), (17,0), and (18,0) or thicker for coronene, sumanene, and corannulene molecules, respectively, and that the energy gain upon encapsulation is up to 1 eV per molecule. We also find that the stacking arrangement of encapsulated PAH molecules depends on the molecular species and inner spacing of the CNTs: coronene is tilted to the CNT axis in its stable conformation, sumanene is stacked normal to the CNT axis, and corannulene is randomly arranged along the CNT axis. The electron states of the PAH-CNT hybrids depend on both the space inside the CNTs and the tilting angle of the PAH molecules with respect to the CNTs, leading to substantial hybridization between π states of the PAH molecules and CNTs.

  10. Density-functional calculations of field-dependent ionization potentials and excitation energies of aromatic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A model for the calculation of field-dependent ionization potential is presented. • A limitation of the model for polyaromatic molecules is investigated and cured. • Excitation energies are also calculated for molecules used as insulating liquids. • The IP decreases in the field, while the excitation energies remain constant. • The excitations vanish at certain fields, different for different types of molecules. - Abstract: A recent method based on constrained density functional theory (CDFT) has been used to calculate the field-dependent ionization potential by determining the dissociation barrier for the interaction between a cation and an electron in an electric field. In the CDFT model, we rely on that the barrier is located somewhere outside the cation, which has limited the applicability for polyaromatic molecules where the barrier is located closer to the cation than for other molecules. Different density functionals, basis sets and choices of constraints in the CDFT calculations are tested for benzene as a case study. The field-dependent ionization potential calculated by constraining the charge with the B3LYP functional and the cc-pVDZ basis set shows a good agreement with our previous work and has a low computational cost for the larger aromatic molecules included here. In addition, field-dependent excitation energies are investigated using time-dependent DFT

  11. Permanent Encapsulation or Host–Guest Behavior of Aromatic Molecules in Hexanuclear Arene Ruthenium Prisms

    OpenAIRE

    Freudenreich, Julien; Barry, Nicolas P. E.; Süss-Fink, Georg; Therrien, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Cationic arene ruthenium metallaprisms of the general formula [Ru6(p-cymene)6(tpt)2(OO∩OO)3]6+ {tpt = 2,4,6-tris(4-pyridyl)-1,3,5-triazine; OO∩OO = 9,10-dioxo-9,10-dihydroanthracene-1,4-diolato [1]6+, 6,11-dioxo-6,11-dihydronaphthacene-5,12-diolato [2]6+} have been obtained from the corresponding dinuclear arene ruthenium complexes [Ru2(p-cymene)2(OO∩OO)Cl2] by reaction with tpt and silver trifluoromethanesulfonate. Aromatic molecules (phenanthrene, pyrene, triphenylene, coronene) present dur...

  12. Microbial diversity in Brazilian mangrove sediments – a mini review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghizelini, Angela Michelato; Mendonça-Hagler, Leda Cristina Santana; Macrae, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The importance and protection of mangrove ecosystems has been recognized in Brazilian Federal law since 1965. Being protected in law, however, has not always guaranteed their protection in practice. Mangroves are found in coastal and estuarine locations, which are prime real estate for the growth of cities, ports and other economic activities important for Brazilian development. In this mini-review we introduce what mangroves are and why they are so important. We give a brief overview of the microbial diversity found in mangrove sediments and then focus on diversity studies from Brazilian mangroves. We highlight the breadth and depth of knowledge about mangrove microbial communities gained from studying Brazilian mangroves. We report on the exciting findings of molecular microbial ecology methods that have been very successfully applied to study bacterial communities. We note that there have been fewer studies that focus on fungal communities and that fungal diversity studies deserve more attention. The review ends with a look at how a combination of new molecular biology methods and isolation studies are being developed to monitor and conserve mangrove ecosystems and their associated microbial communities. These recent studies are having a global impact and we hope they will help to protect and re-establish mangrove ecosystems. PMID:24031949

  13. Mini-review: Prediction errors, attention and associative learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Peter C; Schiffino, Felipe L

    2016-05-01

    Most modern theories of associative learning emphasize a critical role for prediction error (PE, the difference between received and expected events). One class of theories, exemplified by the Rescorla-Wagner (1972) model, asserts that PE determines the effectiveness of the reinforcer or unconditioned stimulus (US): surprising reinforcers are more effective than expected ones. A second class, represented by the Pearce-Hall (1980) model, argues that PE determines the associability of conditioned stimuli (CSs), the rate at which they may enter into new learning: the surprising delivery or omission of a reinforcer enhances subsequent processing of the CSs that were present when PE was induced. In this mini-review we describe evidence, mostly from our laboratory, for PE-induced changes in the associability of both CSs and USs, and the brain systems involved in the coding, storage and retrieval of these altered associability values. This evidence favors a number of modifications to behavioral models of how PE influences event processing, and suggests the involvement of widespread brain systems in animals' responses to PE. PMID:26948122

  14. A mini review on Affleck–Dine baryogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Affleck–Dine mechanism is an attractive scenario for generating the observed baryon asymmetry of the universe utilizing flat directions in the scalar potential of supersymmetric theories. In this mini review, we describe this mechanism in its original version, its explicit realization within the minimal supersymmetric standard model and its variants. We discuss the formation of a condensate along the flat directions in the inflationary era, its post-inflationary evolution leading to baryogenesis and its fate. In some cases the condensate may fragment into non-topological solitons, known as Q-balls, during its evolution. In models of gravity-mediated supersymmetry breaking, the Q-balls can be long-lived, in which case their decay will be the source of all baryons and dark matter in the form of the lightest supersymmetric particle. In models of gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking, the Q-balls can be absolutely stable and form dark matter that can be searched for directly. (paper)

  15. An easy approach for constructing vesicles by using aromatic molecules with β-cyclodextrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shangyang; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Bo; Ma, Mingfang; Xing, Pengyao; Chu, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Yimeng; Hao, Aiyou

    2015-03-01

    Vesicles were formed in aqueous solution using β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) complexes with a series of ultra-small aromatic molecules. The vesicles are easy to prepare without a complicated synthesis procedure and their structure was identified and characterized using various techniques, including transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and dynamic laser light scattering. Using the β-CD/l-phenylalanine system as a representative example, the structural factors that caused the self-assembly were revealed using proton nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. In addition, the vesicular architecture could be endowed with a diverse range of stimuli-responses, as a consequence of the selective addition of various guest molecules. It is anticipated that this novel assembly strategy could be further extended, and that it presents new opportunities for the development of nanocarriers and soft materials. PMID:25608115

  16. A molecular dynamics study on slow ion interactions with the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecule anthracene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic collisions with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules are astrophysically particularly relevant for collision energies of less than 1 keV. In this regime, the interaction dynamics are dominated by elastic interactions. We have employed a molecular dynamics simulation based on analytical interaction potentials to model the interaction of low energy hydrogen and helium projectiles with isolated anthracene (C14H10) molecules. This approach allows for a very detailed investigation of the elastic interaction dynamics on an event by event basis. From the simulation data the threshold projectile kinetic energies above which direct C atom knock out sets in were determined. Anthracene differential energy transfer cross sections and total (dissociation) cross sections were computed for a wide range of projectile kinetic energies. The obtained results are interpreted in the context of PAH destruction in astrophysical environments.

  17. Structure dependence of the rate coefficients of hydroxyl radical+aromatic molecule reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rate coefficients of hydroxyl radical addition to the rings of simple aromatic molecules (kOH) were evaluated based on the literature data. By analyzing the methods of kOH determination and the data obtained the most probable values were selected for the kOH's of individual compounds and thereby the most reliable dataset was created for monosubstituted aromatics and p-substituted phenols. For these compounds the rate coefficients fall in a narrow range between 2×109 mol−1 dm3 s−1 and 1×1010 mol−1 dm3 s−1. Although the values show some regular trend with the electron donating/withdrawing nature of the substituent, the log kOH−σp Hammett substituent constant plots do not give straight lines because these high kOH's are controlled by both, the chemical reactivity and the diffusion. However, the logarithms of the rate coefficients of the chemical reactivity controlled reactions (kchem), are calculated by the equation 1/kOH=1/kchem+1/kdiff, and accepting for the diffusion controlled rate coefficient kdiff=1.1×1010 mol−1 dm3 s−1, show good linear correlation with σp. - Highlights: ► OH·+aromatic molecule rate coefficients are in the range 2×109–1×1010 mol−1 dm3 s−1. ► The logarithms of rate coefficients as a function of Hammett constants do not give straight lines. ► Logarithms rate coefficients of chemically activated reaction linearly depend on Hammett constants. ► Liquid phase chemically activated reaction rate coefficients and gas phase values are correlated

  18. Metabolism and molecular systems for the biotransformation of aromatic molecules. Annual Project Meeting: Naples, 19 January 2010

    OpenAIRE

    Banfi, Stefano; Barbieri, Paola; Bernasconi, Silvana; Bertini, Laura; Bertoni, Giovanni; Bianchi, Luca; Cafaro, Valeria; Caporale, Carlo; Caruso, Carla; Caruso, Enrico; Di Donato, Alberto; Di Gennaro, Patrizia; Donadio, Giuliana; Fanali, Gabriella; Fasano, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    The collection of papers is the result of the first year's results of the Project: METABOLISM AND MOLECULAR SYSTEMS FOR THE BIOTRANSFORMATION OF AROMATIC MOLECULES. Aim of the research project is to gain knowledge in microorganisms endowed with the ability of transforming aromatic compounds, and in the genes and enzymes involved in this process. Particular attention is paid to the information acquired for its use in the development of biosynthetic systems for bioremediation and bioco...

  19. Adsorption of small aromatic molecules on gold: a DFT localized basis set study including van der Waals effects

    OpenAIRE

    Buimaga-Iarinca, Luiza; Morari, Cristian

    2014-01-01

    We compare the density functional theory (DFT) results on the adsorption of small aromatic molecules (benzene, pyridine and thiophene) on gold surfaces obtained by using three types of van der Waals exchange-correlation functionals and localized basis set calculations. We show that the value of the molecule surface binding energy depends on the interplay between the BSSE effect and the tendency of the exchange-correlation functionals to overestimate both the molecule-surface as well as the go...

  20. Chemical communication in cichlids: A mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller-Costa, Tina; Canário, Adelino V M; Hubbard, Peter C

    2015-09-15

    The family Cichlidae is well-known for pair-formation, parental care, territoriality, elaborate courtship and social organization. Do cichlids use chemical communication to mediate any of these behaviours? Early studies suggest that parent cichlids can discriminate between conspecific and heterospecific wrigglers (but not eggs) using olfactory cues. Some species are able to discriminate between their own brood and other conspecific broods based on olfaction. The young recognise conspecific adults (although not necessarily their parents) through the odorants they release. In both scenarios, protection of the young from predation is the likely selective force. Some male cichlids use urinary pheromones during courtship and spawning to attract females and induce ovulation. Females--in their turn--may base their mate-choice in part on assessment of those self-same pheromones. The same pheromonal system may be involved in establishing and maintaining the social hierarchies in lek-breeding cichlids. Individual recognition is also mediated by chemical communication. Finally, there is ample behavioural evidence that cichlids--like ostariophysan fish--release alarm cues that alert conspecifics to predation danger. Although the effects of these cues may be similar (e.g., increased shelter use, tighter schooling), they are different substances which remain to be identified. Cichlids, then, use chemical communication associated with many different behaviours. However, given the diversity of cichlids, little is known about the mechanisms of chemical communication or the chemical identity of the cues involved. The aim of this mini-review is to persuade those working with cichlids to consider the involvement of chemical communication, and those working in chemical communication to consider using cichlids. PMID:25622908

  1. Mini Review of Phytochemicals and Plant Taxa with Activity as Microbial Biofilm and Quorum Sensing Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chieu Anh Kim Ta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biofilms readily form on many surfaces in nature including plant surfaces. In order to coordinate the formation of these biofilms, microorganisms use a cell-to-cell communication system called quorum sensing (QS. As formation of biofilms on vascular plants may not be advantageous to the hosts, plants have developed inhibitors to interfere with these processes. In this mini review, research papers published on plant-derived molecules that have microbial biofilm or quorum sensing inhibition are reviewed with the objectives of determining the biosynthetic classes of active compounds, their biological activity in assays, and their families of occurrence and range. The main findings are the identification of plant phenolics, including benzoates, phenyl propanoids, stilbenes, flavonoids, gallotannins, proanthocyanidins and coumarins as important inhibitors with both activities. Some terpenes including monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, diterpenes and triterpenes also have anti-QS and anti-biofilm activities. Relatively few alkaloids were reported. Quinones and organosulfur compounds, especially from garlic, were also active. A common feature is the polar nature of these compounds. Phytochemicals with these activities are widespread in Angiosperms in temperate and tropical regions, but gymnosperms, bryophytes and pteridophytes were not represented.

  2. Prediction of druggable proteins using machine learning and systems biology: a mini-review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav eKandoi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of -omics technologies has allowed the collection of vast amounts of data on biological systems. Although the pace of such collection has been exponential, the impact of these data remains small on many critical biomedical applications such as drug development. Limited resources, high costs and low hit-to-lead ratio have led researchers to search for more cost effective methodologies. A possible alternative is to incorporate computational methods of potential drug target prediction early during drug discovery workflow. Computational methods based on systems approaches have the advantage of taking into account the global properties of a molecule not limited to its sequence, structure or function. Machine learning techniques are powerful tools that can extract relevant information from massive and noisy data sets. In recent years the scientific community has explored the combined power of these fields to propose increasingly accurate and low cost methods to propose interesting drug targets. In this mini-review, we describe promising approaches based on the simultaneous use of systems biology and machine learning to access gene and protein druggability. Moreover, we discuss the state-of-the-art of this emerging and interdisciplinary field, discussing data sources, algorithms and the performance of the different methodologies. Finally, we indicate interesting avenues of research and some remaining open challenges.

  3. An atomic force microcopy study of the mechanical and electricalproperties of monolayer films of molecules with aromatic end groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Liang; Park, J.Y.; Ma, H.; Jen, A.K.-Y.; Salmeron, M.

    2007-09-06

    The effect of intermolecular {pi}-{pi} stacking on the electrical and mechanical properties of monolayer films molecules containing aromatic groups was studied using atomic force microscopy. Two types of aromatic molecules, (4-mercaptophenyl) anthrylacetylene (MPAA) and (4-mercaptophenyl)-phenylacetylene (MPPA) were used as model systems with different {pi}-{pi} stacking strength. Monolayer films of these molecules on Au(111) surfaces exhibited conductivities differing by more than one order of magnitude, MPAA being the most conductive and MPPA the least conductive. The response to compressive loads by the AFM tip was also found to be very different for both molecules. In MPAA films distinct molecular conductivity changes are observed upon mechanical perturbation. This effect however was not observed on the MPPA film, where intermolecular {pi}-{pi} interactions are likely weaker.

  4. The generation of stationary π-electron rotations in chiral aromatic ring molecules possessing non-degenerate excited states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaki, Masahiro; Teranishi, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Hiroki; Lin, Sheng Hsien; Fujimura, Yuichi

    2016-01-21

    The electron angular momentum is a fundamental quantity of high-symmetry aromatic ring molecules and finds many applications in chemistry such as molecular spectroscopy. The stationary angular momentum or unidirectional rotation of π electrons is generated by the excitation of a degenerated electronic excited state by a circularly-polarized photon. For low-symmetry aromatic ring molecules having non-degenerate states, such as chiral aromatic ring molecules, on the other hand, whether stationary angular momentum can be generated or not is uncertain and has not been clarified so far. We have found by both theoretical treatments and quantum optimal control (QOC) simulations that a stationary angular momentum can be generated even from a low-symmetry aromatic ring molecule. The generation mechanism can be explained in terms of the creation of a dressed-state, and the maximum angular momentum is generated by the dressed state with an equal contribution from the relevant two excited states in a simple three-electronic state model. The dressed state is formed by inducing selective nonresonant transitions between the ground and each excited state by two lasers with the same frequency but having different polarization directions. The selective excitation can be carried out by arranging each photon-polarization vector orthogonal to the electronic transition moment of the other transition. We have successfully analyzed the results of the QOC simulations of (P)-2,2'-biphenol of axial chirality in terms of the analytically determined optimal laser fields. The present findings may open up new types of chemical dynamics and spectroscopy by utilizing strong stationary ring currents and current-induced magnetic fields, which are created at a local site of large compounds such as biomolecules. PMID:26670839

  5. Pulse gas chromatographic study of adsorption of substituted aromatics and heterocyclic molecules on MIL-47 at zero coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerinck, Tim; Couck, Sarah; Vermoortele, Frederik; De Vos, Dirk E; Baron, Gino V; Denayer, Joeri F M

    2012-10-01

    The low coverage adsorptive properties of the MIL-47 metal organic framework toward aromatic and heterocyclic molecules are reported in this paper. The effect of molecular functionality and size on Henry adsorption constants and adsorption enthalpies of alkyl and heteroatom functionalized benzene derivates and heterocyclic molecules was studied using pulse gas chromatography. By means of statistical analysis, experimental data was analyzed and modeled using principal component analysis and partial least-squares regression. Structure-property relationships were established, revealing and confirming several trends. Among the molecular properties governing the adsorption process, vapor pressure, mean polarizability, and dipole moment play a determining role. PMID:22958218

  6. DMPD: Translational mini-review series on Toll-like receptors: networks regulated byToll-like receptors mediate innate and adaptive immunity. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17223959 Translational mini-review series on Toll-like receptors: networks regulate...ol. 2007 Feb;147(2):199-207. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Translational mini-review series on Toll-like receptors: networks... immunity. PubmedID 17223959 Title Translational mini-review series on Toll-like receptors: networks regulat

  7. Adsorption of small aromatic molecules on gold: a DFT localized basis set study including van der Waals effects

    CERN Document Server

    Buimaga-Iarinca, Luiza

    2014-01-01

    We compare the density functional theory (DFT) results on the adsorption of small aromatic molecules (benzene, pyridine and thiophene) on gold surfaces obtained by using three types of van der Waals exchange-correlation functionals and localized basis set calculations. We show that the value of the molecule surface binding energy depends on the interplay between the BSSE effect and the tendency of the exchange-correlation functionals to overestimate both the molecule-surface as well as the gold-gold distances within the relaxed systems. Consequently, we find that by using different types of LCAO basis sets or geometric models for the adsorption of the molecules on the surface, the binding energy can vary up to 100 %. A critical analysis of the physical parameters resulting from the calculations is presented for each exchange-correlation functional.

  8. Absolute fragmentation cross sections in atom-molecule collisions: Scaling laws for non-statistical fragmentation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present scaling laws for absolute cross sections for non-statistical fragmentation in collisions between Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH/PAH+) and hydrogen or helium atoms with kinetic energies ranging from 50 eV to 10 keV. Further, we calculate the total fragmentation cross sections (including statistical fragmentation) for 110 eV PAH/PAH+ + He collisions, and show that they compare well with experimental results. We demonstrate that non-statistical fragmentation becomes dominant for large PAHs and that it yields highly reactive fragments forming strong covalent bonds with atoms (H and N) and molecules (C6H5). Thus nonstatistical fragmentation may be an effective initial step in the formation of, e.g., Polycyclic Aromatic Nitrogen Heterocycles (PANHs). This relates to recent discussions on the evolution of PAHNs in space and the reactivities of defect graphene structures

  9. Absolute fragmentation cross sections in atom-molecule collisions: Scaling laws for non-statistical fragmentation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, T.; Gatchell, M.; Stockett, M. H.; Alexander, J. D.; Schmidt, H. T.; Cederquist, H.; Zettergren, H., E-mail: henning@fysik.su.se [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Zhang, Y. [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Physics, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Rousseau, P.; Maclot, S.; Delaunay, R.; Adoui, L. [CIMAP, UMR 6252, CEA/CNRS/ENSICAEN/Université de Caen Basse-Normandie, bd Henri Becquerel, BP 5133, F-14070 Caen Cedex 05 (France); Université de Caen Basse-Normandie, Esplanade de la Paix, F-14032 Caen (France); Domaracka, A.; Huber, B. A. [CIMAP, UMR 6252, CEA/CNRS/ENSICAEN/Université de Caen Basse-Normandie, bd Henri Becquerel, BP 5133, F-14070 Caen Cedex 05 (France); Schlathölter, T. [Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747AG Groningen (Netherlands)

    2014-06-14

    We present scaling laws for absolute cross sections for non-statistical fragmentation in collisions between Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH/PAH{sup +}) and hydrogen or helium atoms with kinetic energies ranging from 50 eV to 10 keV. Further, we calculate the total fragmentation cross sections (including statistical fragmentation) for 110 eV PAH/PAH{sup +} + He collisions, and show that they compare well with experimental results. We demonstrate that non-statistical fragmentation becomes dominant for large PAHs and that it yields highly reactive fragments forming strong covalent bonds with atoms (H and N) and molecules (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}). Thus nonstatistical fragmentation may be an effective initial step in the formation of, e.g., Polycyclic Aromatic Nitrogen Heterocycles (PANHs). This relates to recent discussions on the evolution of PAHNs in space and the reactivities of defect graphene structures.

  10. Statistical analyses of hydrophobic interactions: A mini-review

    CERN Document Server

    Pratt, L R; Rempe, Susan B

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the striking recent progress in solving for hydrophobic interactions between small inert molecules. We discuss several new understandings. Firstly, the _inverse _temperature phenomenology of hydrophobic interactions, _i.e., strengthening of hydrophobic bonds with increasing temperature, is decisively exhibited by hydrophobic interactions between atomic-scale hard sphere solutes in water. Secondly, inclusion of attractive interactions associated with atomic-size hydrophobic reference cases leads to substantial, non-trivial corrections to reference results for purely repulsive solutes. Hydrophobic bonds are _weakened by adding solute dispersion forces to treatment of reference cases. The classic statistical mechanical theory for those corrections is not accurate in this application, but molecular quasi-chemical theory shows promise. Finally, because of the masking roles of excluded volume and attractive interactions, comparisons that do not discriminate the different possibilities face an...

  11. Trypanosoma rangeli interactions within the vector Rhodnius prolixus: a mini review

    OpenAIRE

    Patrícia Azambuja; Garcia, Eloi S.

    2005-01-01

    This article is an integrative mini review of the research on the interactions between Trypanosoma rangeli and the insect vector, Rhodnius prolixus. Special attention is given to the interactions of these parasites with the gut environment, gut walls, with hemolymph invasion, hemocytes, hemocyte microaggregations, prophenoloxidase-activating system, superoxide, and nitric acid generation and eicosanoid pathways. We described factors affecting vectorial capacity and suggested that T. rangeli m...

  12. Alternate Service Delivery Models in Cancer Genetic Counseling: A Mini-Review

    OpenAIRE

    Buchanan, Adam Hudson; Rahm, Alanna Kulchak; Williams, Janet L.

    2016-01-01

    Demand for cancer genetic counseling has grown rapidly in recent years as germline genomic information has become increasingly incorporated into cancer care, and the field has entered the public consciousness through high-profile celebrity publications. Increased demand and existing variability in the availability of trained cancer genetics clinicians place a priority on developing and evaluating alternate service delivery models for genetic counseling. This mini-review summarizes the state o...

  13. Sex differences in exercise and drug addiction: A mini review of animal studies

    OpenAIRE

    Yuehui Zhou; Chenglin Zhou; Rena Li

    2014-01-01

    Growing literature has demonstrated that exercise may be an effective prevention and treatment option for drug addiction. In the past few years, many studies have suggested that there were sex differences in all phases of drug addiction. However, very limited research has investigated sex differences in the effectiveness of exercise intervention in drug addiction and rehabilitation. In this mini review, we summarize the effect of sex on the results of using exercise to prevent and treat drug ...

  14. Zebrafish as potential model for developmental neurotoxicity testing: a mini review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Esch, Celine; Slieker, Roderick; Wolterbeek, André; Woutersen, Ruud; de Groot, Didima

    2012-01-01

    The zebrafish is a powerful toxicity model; biochemical assays can be combined with observations at a structural and functional level within one individual. This mini review summarises the potency of zebrafish as a model for developmental neurotoxicity screening, and its possibilities to investigate working mechanisms of toxicants. The use of zebrafish in toxicity research can ultimately lead to the refinement or reduction of animal use. PMID:22971930

  15. Interaction of the molecules and the clusters of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with low energy multicharged ions (MCIs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work presented in this thesis concerns the study of the interaction of low energy multiply charged ions (few tens of keV) with molecules of astrophysical relevance, either in molecular or in cluster form. It is the main aim to study the fundamental processes which occur when molecules and clusters of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are colliding with multi-charged ions (MCIs). During this interaction the potential energy transported by the ions provokes a charge transfer between the target and the projectile. Consequently, after the collision the molecules or the clusters are singly or multiply charged. We are interested in the stability of these size-finite systems in relation with the excess charge and the internal energy of the system. The different fragmentation channels which have been studied for molecules and clusters depend on their sizes, their structures, their charge states and their internal energies. The studies presented in this thesis, which are the first this kind, give new insight in the stability of the simply and multiply charged cationic clusters of PAH molecules. (author)

  16. Vibrational effects on UV/Vis laser-driven π-electron ring currents in aromatic ring molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Vibrational effects on coherent and non-coherent ring currents in aromatic ring molecules are studied. • The analytical expression for the coherent vibronic ring current is derived in the adiabatic approximation. • Vibrational effects on the non-coherent ring currents of benzene are negligibly small. • Low frequency torsional mode brings modulations of vibronic ring currents in (P)-2,2'-biphenol. • Temperature effects on the time-dependence of coherent vibronic currents are also investigated. - Abstract: We present the results of a theoretical study of vibrational effects on UV/Vis laser-driven π-electron ring currents in aromatic ring molecules. We consider vibrational effects on both coherent and non-coherent (single quantum state) ring currents. The coherent ring current originates from an excitation of a pair of quasi-degenerate electronic states by an ultrashort linearly polarized UV/Vis laser pulse, while the non-coherent ring current originates from by an excitation of a degenerated electronic state of an aromatic ring molecule with high symmetry by a circularly polarized electric field of a UV/Vis laser pulse. The magnitude of a generated ring current can be expressed as an average of those of the bond currents for both the coherent and non-coherent cases. We derive an analytical expression for the magnitude of the bond currents in the adiabatic approximation. Using the expression, we performed calculations of a non-coherent ring current generated in the optically allowed excited state (1E1U) of benzene and the time evolution of coherent ring current of (P)-2,2-biphenol. Vibrational effects on the non-coherent ring current of benzene were found to be negligibly small. We paid particular attention to the vibrational effects induced by the torsion mode on time evolution of the coherent ring current along the bond bridging between the two aromatic rings of (P)-2,2-biphenol. By comparing the time evolution of the coherent ring

  17. A mini-review on Biginelli adducts with notable pharmacological properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ângelo de Fátima

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the disclosure of Biginelli reaction by the chemist Pietro Biginelli, functionalized 3,4-dihydropyrimidin-2(1H-ones/thiones (DHPMs have emerged as prototypes for the design of compounds with a broad variety of biological activities. This mini-review describes over 100 Biginelli adducts demonstrated to be promising anticancer, inhibitors of calcium channel, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and antioxidant agents. Thus, this compilation presents the most notable in vitro and in vivo results for such fascinating class of organic compounds.

  18. Trypanosoma rangeli interactions within the vector Rhodnius prolixus: a mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Azambuja

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available This article is an integrative mini review of the research on the interactions between Trypanosoma rangeli and the insect vector, Rhodnius prolixus. Special attention is given to the interactions of these parasites with the gut environment, gut walls, with hemolymph invasion, hemocytes, hemocyte microaggregations, prophenoloxidase-activating system, superoxide, and nitric acid generation and eicosanoid pathways. We described factors affecting vectorial capacity and suggested that T. rangeli may modulate the hemocoelic invasion and the survival of the parasites by overcoming the cellular and humoral defense reactions of the insect vector at different physiological events. The mechanisms of these interactions and their significance for parasite transmission are discussed.

  19. Recent updates on incubation of drug craving: a mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuan; Caprioli, Daniele; Marchant, Nathan J

    2015-09-01

    Cue-induced drug craving progressively increases after prolonged withdrawal from drug self-administration in laboratory animals, a behavioral phenomenon termed 'incubation of drug craving.' Studies over the years have revealed several important neural mechanisms contributing to incubation of drug craving. In this mini-review, we first discuss three excellent Addiction Biology publications on incubation of drug craving in both human and laboratory animals. We then review several key publications from the past year on behavioral and mechanistic findings related to incubation of drug craving. PMID:25440081

  20. A mini review on aflatoxin exposure in Malaysia: past, present and future

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Redzwan eSabran; Rosita eJamaluddin; Mohd Sokhini eAbd. Mutalib; Zuraini eAhmad

    2013-01-01

    This mini review article described the exposure of aflatoxin in Malaysia, including its presence in the foodstuffs and the detection of aflatoxin biomarkers in human biological samples. Historically, the exposure of aflatoxin in Malaysia can be dated in 1960s where an outbreak of disease in pig farms caused severe liver damage to the animals. Later, an aflatoxicosis case in Perak in 1988 was reported and caused death to 13 children, as up to 3 mg of aflatoxin was present in a single serving o...

  1. Evaluating the progress of the UK’s material recycling facilities:a mini review

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Muhammad; Courtenay, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, the UK has made great strides in reducing the amount of waste being sent to landfill while also increasing the amount of waste being recycled. The key drivers for this change are the European Union Landfill Directive (1999/31/EC) and the UK Landfill Tax. However, also playing their part are the growing numbers of Material Recycling Facilities (MRFs), which process recyclables. This mini review evaluates the current state of MRFs in the UK, through extensive secondary r...

  2. Thin film growth of aromatic rod-like molecules on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratzer, M.; Teichert, C.

    2016-07-01

    Research on graphene (Gr) is a vastly expanding field due to its potential for technological applications. Its close structural and chemical relationship to conjugated organic molecules makes it a superior candidate as a transparent electrode material in organic electronics and optoelectronics. The growth of organic thin films—intensively investigated in the past few decades—has demonstrated the complexity in growth and nucleation processes arising from the anisotropy and spatial extension of the molecular building blocks. Choosing the small, conjugated rod-like molecules para-hexaphenyl and pentacene as model representatives for small organic molecules, we review recent findings in organic thin film growth on a variety of Gr substrates. Special attention is paid to the differences in the resulting growth arising from the various methods of Gr fabrication and support that affect both the Gr–molecule interfacing and the involved molecular diffusion processes.

  3. Design and synthesis of aromatic molecules for probing electric-fields at the nanoscale

    OpenAIRE

    Faez, Sanli; Verhart, Nico R.; Markoulides, Marios; Buda, Francesco; Gourdon, André; Orrit, Michel

    2015-01-01

    We propose using halogenated organic dyes as nanoprobes for electric field and show their greatly enhanced Stark coefficients using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We analyse halogenated variants of three molecules that have been of interest for cryogenic single molecule spectroscopy, perylene, terrylene, and dibenzoterrylene, with the zero-phonon optical transitions at blue, red, and near infrared. Out of all the combinations of halides and binding sites that are calculated, we...

  4. Design and synthesis of aromatic molecules for probing electric-fields at the nanoscale

    CERN Document Server

    Faez, Sanli; Markoulides, Marios; Buda, Francesco; Gourdon, André; Orrit, Michel

    2015-01-01

    We propose using halogenated organic dyes as nanoprobes for electric field and show their greatly enhanced Stark coefficients using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We analyse halogenated variants of three molecules that have been of interest for cryogenic single molecule spectroscopy, perylene, terrylene, and dibenzoterrylene, with the zero-phonon optical transitions at blue, red, and near infrared. Out of all the combinations of halides and binding sites that are calculated, we have found that fluorination of the optimum binding site induces a dipole difference between ground and excited states larger than 0.5 D for all three molecules with the highest value of 0.69 D for fluoroperylene. We also report on synthesis of 3-fluoroterrylene and bulk spectroscopy of this compound in liquid and solid organic environments.

  5. The status and developments of leather solid waste treatment: A mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Huiyan; Liu, Junsheng; Han, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Leather making is one of the most widespread industries in the world. The production of leather goods generates different types of solid wastes and wastewater. These wastes will pollute the environment and threat the health of human beings if they are not well treated. Consequently, the treatment of pollution caused by the wastes from leather tanning is really important. In comparison with the disposal of leather wastewater, the treatment of leather solid wastes is more intractable. Hence, the treatment of leather solid wastes needs more innovations. To keep up with the rapid development of the modern leather industry, various innovative techniques have been newly developed. In this mini-review article, the major achievements in the treatment of leather solid wastes are highlighted. Emphasis will be placed on the treatment of chromium-tanned solid wastes; some new approaches are also discussed. We hope that this mini-review can provide some valuable information to promote the broad understanding and effective treatment of leather solid wastes in the leather industry. PMID:26944068

  6. Recycling and management of waste lead-acid batteries: A mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Malan; Liu, Junsheng; Han, Wei

    2016-04-01

    As a result of the wide application of lead-acid batteries to be the power supplies for vehicles, their demand has rapidly increased owing to their low cost and high availability. Accordingly, the amount of waste lead-acid batteries has increased to new levels; therefore, the pollution caused by the waste lead-acid batteries has also significantly increased. Because lead is toxic to the environment and to humans, recycling and management of waste lead-acid batteries has become a significant challenge and is capturing much public attention. Various innovations have been recently proposed to recycle lead and lead-containing compounds from waste lead-acid batteries. In this mini-review article, different recycling techniques for waste lead-acid batteries are highlighted. The present state of such recycling and its future perspectives are also discussed. We hope that this mini-review can provide useful information on recovery and recycling of lead from waste lead-acid batteries in the field of solid waste treatment. PMID:26941209

  7. Correlation Between Energy Transfer Rate and Atomization Energy of Some Trinitro Aromatic Explosive Molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su-hong Ge; Xin-lu Cheng; Zheng-lai Liu; Xiang-dong Yang; Fang-fang Dong

    2008-01-01

    An assumptive theoretical relationship is suggested to describe the property of molecular atomization energy and energy transfer rate in the initiation of explosions. To investigate the relationship between atomization energy and energy transfer rate, the number of doorway modes of explosives is estimated by the theory of Dlott and Fayer in which the rate is proportional to the number of normal mode vibrations. It was evaluated frequencies of normal mode vibrations of eight molecules by means of density functional theory (DFT) at the b3p86/6-31G(d,p) level. It is found that the number of doorway modes shows a linear correlation to the atomization energies of the molecules, which were also calculated by means of the same method. A mechanism of this correlation is discussed. It is also noted that in those explosives with similar molecular structure and molecular weight, the correlation between the atomization energy and the number of doorway modes is higher.

  8. Measuring binding kinetics of aromatic thiolated molecules with nanoparticles via surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    DeVetter, Brent M.; Mukherjee, Prabuddha; Murphy, Catherine J.; Bhargava, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Colloidal plasmonic nanomaterials, consisting of metals such as gold and silver, are excellent candidates for advanced optical probes and devices, but precise control over surface chemistry is essential for realizing their full potential. Coupling thiolated (R-SH) molecules to nanoprobe surfaces is a convenient and established route to tailor surface properties. The ability to dynamically probe and monitor the surface chemistry of nanoparticles in solution is essential for rapidly manufacturi...

  9. The ir emission features: Emission from PAH [Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons] molecules and amorphous carbon particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PAHs can have several forms in the interstellar medium. To assess the importance of each requires the availability of a collection of high quality, complete mid-ir interstellar emission spectra, a collection of laboratory spectra of PAH samples prepared under realistic conditions and a firm understanding of the microscopic emission mechanism. Given what we currently know about PAHs, the spectroscopic data suggests that there are at least two components which contribute to the interstellar emission spectrum: free molecule sized PAHs producing the narrow features and amorphous carbon particles (which are primarily made up of an irregular ''lattice'' of PAHs) contributing to the broad underlying components. An exact treatment of the ir fluorescence from highly vibrationally excited large molecules shows that species containing between 20 and 30 carbon atoms are responsible for the narrow features, although the spectra match more closely with the spectra of amorphous carbon particles. Since little is known about the spectroscopic properties of free PAHs and PAH clusters, much laboratory work is called for in conjunction with an observational program which focuses on the spatial characteristics of the spectra. In this way the distribution and evolution of carbon from molecule to particle can be traced. 38 refs., 9 figs

  10. Solvation of carbonaceous molecules by para-H2 and ortho-D2 clusters. I. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, F; Yurtsever, E

    2016-06-14

    This work theoretically examines the progressive coating of planar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules ranging from benzene to circumcoronene (C54H18) by para-hydrogen and ortho-deuterium. The coarse-grained Silvera-Goldman potential has been extended to model the interactions between hydrogen molecules and individual atoms of the PAH and parametrized against quantum chemical calculations for benzene-H2. Path-integral molecular dynamics simulations at 2 K were performed for increasingly large amounts of hydrogen coating the PAH up to the first solvation shell and beyond. From the simulations, various properties were determined such as the size of the first shell and its thickness as well as the solvation energy. The degree of delocalization was notably quantified from an energy landscape perspective, by monitoring the fluctuations among inherent structures sampled by the trajectories. Our results generally demonstrate a high degree of localization owing to relatively strong interactions between hydrogen and the PAH, and qualitatively minor isotopic effects. In the limit of large hydrogen amounts, the shell size and solvation energy both follow approximate linear relations with the numbers of carbon and hydrogen in the PAH. PMID:27306002

  11. Solvation of carbonaceous molecules by para-H2 and ortho-D2 clusters. I. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, F.; Yurtsever, E.

    2016-06-01

    This work theoretically examines the progressive coating of planar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules ranging from benzene to circumcoronene (C54H18) by para-hydrogen and ortho-deuterium. The coarse-grained Silvera-Goldman potential has been extended to model the interactions between hydrogen molecules and individual atoms of the PAH and parametrized against quantum chemical calculations for benzene-H2. Path-integral molecular dynamics simulations at 2 K were performed for increasingly large amounts of hydrogen coating the PAH up to the first solvation shell and beyond. From the simulations, various properties were determined such as the size of the first shell and its thickness as well as the solvation energy. The degree of delocalization was notably quantified from an energy landscape perspective, by monitoring the fluctuations among inherent structures sampled by the trajectories. Our results generally demonstrate a high degree of localization owing to relatively strong interactions between hydrogen and the PAH, and qualitatively minor isotopic effects. In the limit of large hydrogen amounts, the shell size and solvation energy both follow approximate linear relations with the numbers of carbon and hydrogen in the PAH.

  12. Electron acceptors for energy generation in microbial fuel cells fed with wastewaters: A mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chuan-Shu; Mu, Zhe-Xuan; Yang, Hou-Yun; Wang, Ya-Zhou; Mu, Yang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-12-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have gained tremendous global interest over the last decades as a device that uses bacteria to oxidize organic and inorganic matters in the anode with bioelectricity generation and even for purpose of bioremediation. However, this prospective technology has not yet been carried out in field in particular because of its low power yields and target compounds removal which can be largely influenced by electron acceptors contributing to overcome the potential losses existing on the cathode. This mini review summarizes various electron acceptors used in recent years in the categories of inorganic and organic compounds, identifies their merits and drawbacks, and compares their influences on performance of MFCs, as well as briefly discusses possible future research directions particularly from cathode aspect. PMID:25907762

  13. Electron correlations and two-photon states in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules: A peculiar role of geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present numerical studies of one- and two-photon excited states ordering in a number of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules: coronene, hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene, and circumcoronene, all possessing D6h point group symmetry versus ovalene with D2h symmetry, within the Pariser-Parr-Pople model of interacting π-electrons. The calculated energies of the two-photon states as well as their relative two-photon absorption cross-sections within the interacting model are qualitatively different from single-particle descriptions. More remarkably, a peculiar role of molecular geometry is found. The consequence of electron correlations is far stronger for ovalene, where the lowest spin-singlet two-photon state is a quantum superposition of pairs of lowest spin triplet states, as in the linear polyenes. The same is not true for D6h group hydrocarbons. Our work indicates significant covalent character, in valence bond language, of the ground state, the lowest spin triplet state and a few of the lowest two-photon states in D2h ovalene but not in those with D6h symmetry

  14. DMPD: Translational mini-review series on Toll-like receptors: recent advances inunderstanding the role of Toll-like receptors in anti-viral immunity. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17223961 Translational mini-review series on Toll-like receptors: recent advances i...147(2):217-26. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Translational mini-review series on Toll-like receptors: recent advances...nity. PubmedID 17223961 Title Translational mini-review series on Toll-like receptors: recent advances inund

  15. Supramolecular chemistry: from aromatic foldamers to solution-phase supramolecular organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhan-Ting

    2015-01-01

    This mini-review covers the growth, education, career, and research activities of the author. In particular, the developments of various folded, helical and extended secondary structures from aromatic backbones driven by different noncovalent forces (including hydrogen bonding, donor-acceptor, solvophobicity, and dimerization of conjugated radical cations) and solution-phase supramolecular organic frameworks driven by hydrophobically initiated aromatic stacking in the cavity of cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8]) are highlighted. PMID:26664626

  16. Role of mitochondrial DNA mutations in brain tumors: A mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed Yusoff, Abdul Aziz

    2015-01-01

    Brain tumor is molecularly a heterogeneous group of diseases, and genetic factors seem to play a crucial role in its genesis. Even though multiple alterations in the nuclear-encoded genes such as tumor suppressor and oncogenes are believed to play a key role in brain tumorigenesis, the involvement of the mitochondrial genome to this event remains controversial to date. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has been suspected to be associated with the carcinogenesis because of its high sensitivity to mutations and inefficient repair mechanisms in comparison to nuclear DNA. Thus, defects in mtDNA could also lead to the development of brain tumor. By virtue of their clonal nature and high copy number, mtDNA mutations may provide a new effective molecular biomarker for the cancer detection. It has been suggested that establishing mtDNA defective pattern might be useful in cancer diagnostics and detection, the prognosis of cancer outcome, and/or the response to certain treatments. This mini-review gives a brief overview on the several aspects of mtDNA, with a particular focus on its role in tumorigenesis and progression of brain tumor. Understanding the role of mitochondria and brain tumor development could potentially translate into therapeutic strategies for patients with these tumors. PMID:26458578

  17. Role of mitochondrial DNA mutations in brain tumors: A mini-review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Aziz Mohamed Yusoff

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain tumor is molecularly a heterogeneous group of diseases, and genetic factors seem to play a crucial role in its genesis. Even though multiple alterations in the nuclear-encoded genes such as tumor suppressor and oncogenes are believed to play a key role in brain tumorigenesis, the involvement of the mitochondrial genome to this event remains controversial to date. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA has been suspected to be associated with the carcinogenesis because of its high sensitivity to mutations and inefficient repair mechanisms in comparison to nuclear DNA. Thus, defects in mtDNA could also lead to the development of brain tumor. By virtue of their clonal nature and high copy number, mtDNA mutations may provide a new effective molecular biomarker for the cancer detection. It has been suggested that establishing mtDNA defective pattern might be useful in cancer diagnostics and detection, the prognosis of cancer outcome, and/or the response to certain treatments. This mini-review gives a brief overview on the several aspects of mtDNA, with a particular focus on its role in tumorigenesis and progression of brain tumor. Understanding the role of mitochondria and brain tumor development could potentially translate into therapeutic strategies for patients with these tumors.

  18. The effect of striatal dopamine depletion on striatal and cortical glutamate: A mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaggio, Fernando; Nakajima, Shinichiro; Plitman, Eric; Gerretsen, Philip; Chung, Jun Ku; Iwata, Yusuke; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the interplay between the neurotransmitters dopamine and glutamate in the striatum has become the highlight of several theories of neuropsychiatric illnesses, such as schizophrenia. Using in vivo brain imaging in humans, alterations in dopamine and glutamate concentrations have been observed in several neuropsychiatric disorders. However, it is unclear a priori how alterations in striatal dopamine should modulate glutamate concentrations in the basal ganglia. In this selective mini-review, we examine the consequence of reducing striatal dopamine functioning on glutamate concentrations in the striatum and cortex; regions of interest heavily examined in the human brain imaging studies. We examine the predictions of the classical model of the basal ganglia, and contrast it with findings in humans and animals. The review concludes that chronic dopamine depletion (>4months) produces decreases in striatal glutamate levels which are consistent with the classical model of the basal ganglia. However, acute alterations in striatal dopamine functioning, specifically at the D2 receptors, may produce opposite affects. This has important implications for models of the basal ganglia and theorizing about neurochemical alterations in neuropsychiatric diseases. Moreover, these findings may help guide a priori hypotheses for (1)H-MRS studies measuring glutamate changes given alterations in dopaminergic functioning in humans. PMID:26334687

  19. Ebulin from Dwarf Elder (Sambucus ebulus L.: A Mini-Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Jiménez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sambucus ebulus L. (dwarf elder is a medicinal plant, the usefulness of which also as food is restricted due to its toxicity. In the last few years, both the chemistry and pharmacology of Sambucus ebulus L. have been investigated. Among the structural and functional proteins present in the plant, sugar-binding proteins (lectins with or without anti-ribosomal activity and single chain ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs have been isolated. RIPs are enzymes (E.C. 3.2.2.22 that display N-glycosidase activity on the 28S rRNA subunit, leading to the inhibition of protein synthesis by arresting the step of polypeptide chain elongation. The biological role of all these proteins is as yet unknown. The evidence suggests that they could be involved in the defense of the plant against predators and viruses or/and a nitrogen store, with an impact on the nutritional characteristics and food safety. In this mini-review we describe all the isoforms of ebulin that have to date been isolated from dwarf elder, as well as their functional characteristics and potential uses, whilst highlighting concern regarding ebulin toxicity.

  20. Genomic and metagenomic challenges and opportunities for bioleaching: a mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, Juan Pablo; Quatrini, Raquel; Holmes, David S

    2016-09-01

    High-throughput genomic technologies are accelerating progress in understanding the diversity of microbial life in many environments. Here we highlight advances in genomics and metagenomics of microorganisms from bioleaching heaps and related acidic mining environments. Bioleaching heaps used for copper recovery provide significant opportunities to study the processes and mechanisms underlying microbial successions and the influence of community composition on ecosystem functioning. Obtaining quantitative and process-level knowledge of these dynamics is pivotal for understanding how microorganisms contribute to the solubilization of copper for industrial recovery. Advances in DNA sequencing technology provide unprecedented opportunities to obtain information about the genomes of bioleaching microorganisms, allowing predictive models of metabolic potential and ecosystem-level interactions to be constructed. These approaches are enabling predictive phenotyping of organisms many of which are recalcitrant to genetic approaches or are unculturable. This mini-review describes current bioleaching genomic and metagenomic projects and addresses the use of genome information to: (i) build metabolic models; (ii) predict microbial interactions; (iii) estimate genetic diversity; and (iv) study microbial evolution. Key challenges and perspectives of bioleaching genomics/metagenomics are addressed. PMID:27394987

  1. Alternate service delivery models in cancer genetic counseling: a mini-review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Hudson Buchanan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Demand for cancer genetic counseling has grown rapidly in recent years as germline genomic information has become increasingly incorporated into cancer care and the field has entered the public consciousness through high-profile celebrity publications. Increased demand and existing variability in the availability of trained cancer genetics clinicians place a priority on developing and evaluating alternate service delivery models for genetic counseling. This mini-review summarizes the state of science regarding service delivery models such as telephone counseling, telegenetics and group counseling. Research on comparative effectiveness of these models in traditional individual, in-person genetic counseling has been promising for improving access to care in a manner acceptable to patients. Yet, it has not fully evaluated the short- and long-term patient- and system-level outcomes that will help answer the question of whether these models achieve the same beneficial psychosocial and behavioral outcomes as traditional cancer genetic counseling. We propose a research agenda focused on comparative effectiveness of available service delivery models and how to match models to patients and practice settings. Only through this rigorous research can clinicians and systems find the optimal balance of clinical quality, ready and secure access to care, and financial sustainability. Such research will be integral to achieving the promise of genomic medicine in oncology.

  2. Alternate Service Delivery Models in Cancer Genetic Counseling: A Mini-Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Adam Hudson; Rahm, Alanna Kulchak; Williams, Janet L

    2016-01-01

    Demand for cancer genetic counseling has grown rapidly in recent years as germline genomic information has become increasingly incorporated into cancer care, and the field has entered the public consciousness through high-profile celebrity publications. Increased demand and existing variability in the availability of trained cancer genetics clinicians place a priority on developing and evaluating alternate service delivery models for genetic counseling. This mini-review summarizes the state of science regarding service delivery models, such as telephone counseling, telegenetics, and group counseling. Research on comparative effectiveness of these models in traditional individual, in-person genetic counseling has been promising for improving access to care in a manner acceptable to patients. Yet, it has not fully evaluated the short- and long-term patient- and system-level outcomes that will help answer the question of whether these models achieve the same beneficial psychosocial and behavioral outcomes as traditional cancer genetic counseling. We propose a research agenda focused on comparative effectiveness of available service delivery models and how to match models to patients and practice settings. Only through this rigorous research can clinicians and systems find the optimal balance of clinical quality, ready and secure access to care, and financial sustainability. Such research will be integral to achieving the promise of genomic medicine in oncology. PMID:27242960

  3. Protecting the radiation-damaged skin from friction: a mini review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herst, Patries M [Department of Radiation Therapy, University of Otago, Wellington (New Zealand)

    2014-06-15

    Radiation-induced skin reactions are an unavoidable side effect of external beam radiation therapy, particularly in areas prone to friction and excess moisture such as the axilla, head and neck region, perineum and skin folds. Clinical studies investigating interventions for preventing or managing these reactions have largely focussed on formulations with moisturising, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial and wound healing properties. However, none of these interventions has emerged as a consistent candidate for best practice. Much less emphasis has been placed on evaluating ways to protect the radiation-damaged skin from friction and excess moisture. This mini review analyses the clinical evidence for barrier products that form a protective layer by adhering very closely to the skin folds and do not cause further trauma to the radiation-damaged skin upon removal. A database search identified only two types of barrier products that fitted these criteria and these were tested in two case series and six controlled clinical trials. Friction protection was most effective when the interventions were used from the start of treatment and continued for several weeks after completion of treatment. Soft silicone dressings (Mepilex Lite and Mepitel Film) and Cavilon No Sting Barrier Film, but not Cavilon Moisturizing Barrier Cream, decreased skin reaction severity, most likely due to differences in formulation and skin build-up properties. It seems that prophylactic use of friction protection of areas at risk could be a worthwhile addition to routine care of radiation-damaged skin.

  4. Mini-Review:Green sustainable processes using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RAMSEY Edward; SUN Qiubai; ZHANG Zhiqiang; ZHANG Chongmin; GOU Wei

    2009-01-01

    Environmentally benign carbon dioxide offers significant potential in its supercritical fluid phase to replace current reliance on a range of hazardous,relatively expensive and environmentally damaging organic solvents that are used on an extensive global basis.The unique combination of the physical properties of supercritical fluids are being exploited and further researched to continue the development and establishment of high efficiency,compact plant to provide energy and water efficient manufacturing processes.This mini-review is focused on the use and potential applications of supercritical fluid carbon dioxide for a selected range of key and emerging industrial processes as a sustainable alternative to totally eliminate or greatly reduce the requirement of numerous conventional organic solvents.Examples of the industries include:chemical extraction and purification,synthetic chemical reactions including polymerization and inorganic catalytic processes.Biochemical reactions involving enzymes,particle size engineering,textile dyeing and advanced material manufacture provide further illustrations of vital industrial activities where supercritical fluid technology processes are being implemented or developed.Some aspects relating to the economics of sustainable supercritical fluid carbon dioxide processes are also considered.

  5. Mini-review: green sustainable processes using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Edward; Sun, Qiubai; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Chongmin; Gou, Wei

    2009-01-01

    Environmentally benign carbon dioxide offers significant potential in its supercritical fluid phase to replace current reliance on a range of hazardous, relatively expensive and environmentally damaging organic solvents that are used on an extensive global basis. The unique combination of the physical properties of supercritical fluids are being exploited and further researched to continue the development and establishment of high efficiency, compact plant to provide energy and water efficient manufacturing processes. This mini-review is focused on the use and potential applications of supercritical fluid carbon dioxide for a selected range of key and emerging industrial processes as a sustainable alternative to totally eliminate or greatly reduce the requirement of numerous conventional organic solvents. Examples of the industries include: chemical extraction and purification, synthetic chemical reactions including polymerization and inorganic catalytic processes. Biochemical reactions involving enzymes, particle size engineering, textile dyeing and advanced material manufacture provide further illustrations of vital industrial activities where supercritical fluid technology processes are being implemented or developed. Some aspects relating to the economics of sustainable supercritical fluid carbon dioxide processes are also considered. PMID:19803072

  6. Evaluating the progress of the UK's Material Recycling Facilities: a mini review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Muhammad; Courtenay, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Over the last 15 years, the UK has made great strides in reducing the amount of waste being sent to landfill while also increasing the amount of waste being recycled. The key drivers for this change are the European Union Landfill Directive (1999/31/EC) and the UK Landfill Tax. However, also playing their part are the growing numbers of Material Recycling Facilities (MRFs), which process recyclables. This mini review evaluates the current state of MRFs in the UK, through extensive secondary research, and detailed primary data analysis focussing on MRFs located in South-East England, UK. This study also explores technologies that aim to generate energy from waste, including Waste-to-Energy (WtE) and Refuse-derived Fuel (RDF) facilities. These facilities can have a huge appetite for waste, which can be detrimental to recycling efforts as some of the waste being sent there should be recycled. It was found that the waste sent to a typical UK MRF would recycle around 92% of materials while 6% was sent to energy recovery and the remaining 2% ended up in landfill. Therefore, the total estimated rejected or non-compliance materials from MRFs are around 8%. A key recommendation from this study is to adopt a strategy to combine MRFs with a form of energy generation, such as WtE or RDF. This integrated approach would ensure any residual waste arising from the recycling process can be used as a sustainable fuel, while also increasing the recycling rates. PMID:25391552

  7. Alternate Service Delivery Models in Cancer Genetic Counseling: A Mini-Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Adam Hudson; Rahm, Alanna Kulchak; Williams, Janet L.

    2016-01-01

    Demand for cancer genetic counseling has grown rapidly in recent years as germline genomic information has become increasingly incorporated into cancer care, and the field has entered the public consciousness through high-profile celebrity publications. Increased demand and existing variability in the availability of trained cancer genetics clinicians place a priority on developing and evaluating alternate service delivery models for genetic counseling. This mini-review summarizes the state of science regarding service delivery models, such as telephone counseling, telegenetics, and group counseling. Research on comparative effectiveness of these models in traditional individual, in-person genetic counseling has been promising for improving access to care in a manner acceptable to patients. Yet, it has not fully evaluated the short- and long-term patient- and system-level outcomes that will help answer the question of whether these models achieve the same beneficial psychosocial and behavioral outcomes as traditional cancer genetic counseling. We propose a research agenda focused on comparative effectiveness of available service delivery models and how to match models to patients and practice settings. Only through this rigorous research can clinicians and systems find the optimal balance of clinical quality, ready and secure access to care, and financial sustainability. Such research will be integral to achieving the promise of genomic medicine in oncology.

  8. PRODUCTION POTENTIALS AND THE PHYSICOCHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF SELECTED DUCK STRAINS: A MINI REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FREDERICK ADZITEY

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Physicochemical composition of meat is an important factor in human nutrition and contributes to the choice of food by mankind. In recent times humans are much conscious of the health benefits of what they consume. Emphasize on the consumption of balance diets have been given much attention. The consumption of organic foods, vegetables, fruits, foods high in fibre, foods of animal origin with less fat and cholesterol are among the food stuffs being upheld. Poultry meat, eggs and products are widely consumed worldwide without much religious restrictions. The high consumption of poultry meat is partly due to it ease for preparing different dishes and the development of a wide range of processed ready-to-eat meals incorporated with chicken as a major protein source. Poultry meat (white meat is known to be healthier than red meat probably due to its low calorie and lipid contents. Duck meat is comparable to that of chicken despite being red meat and it is a close alternative source of protein and other nutrients for humans. Duck meat is high in protein, iron, selenium and niacin; and lower in calories compared to many cuts of beef. This mini-review reports on the production potentials of ducks and the physicochemical composition of selected duck strains. It also reports on world duck population.

  9. Protecting the radiation-damaged skin from friction: a mini review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced skin reactions are an unavoidable side effect of external beam radiation therapy, particularly in areas prone to friction and excess moisture such as the axilla, head and neck region, perineum and skin folds. Clinical studies investigating interventions for preventing or managing these reactions have largely focussed on formulations with moisturising, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial and wound healing properties. However, none of these interventions has emerged as a consistent candidate for best practice. Much less emphasis has been placed on evaluating ways to protect the radiation-damaged skin from friction and excess moisture. This mini review analyses the clinical evidence for barrier products that form a protective layer by adhering very closely to the skin folds and do not cause further trauma to the radiation-damaged skin upon removal. A database search identified only two types of barrier products that fitted these criteria and these were tested in two case series and six controlled clinical trials. Friction protection was most effective when the interventions were used from the start of treatment and continued for several weeks after completion of treatment. Soft silicone dressings (Mepilex Lite and Mepitel Film) and Cavilon No Sting Barrier Film, but not Cavilon Moisturizing Barrier Cream, decreased skin reaction severity, most likely due to differences in formulation and skin build-up properties. It seems that prophylactic use of friction protection of areas at risk could be a worthwhile addition to routine care of radiation-damaged skin

  10. Role of complementary and alternative medicine in geriatric care: A mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Jamshed Siddiqui

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since time immemorial homo sapiens are subjected to both health and diseases states and seek treatment for succor and assuagement in compromised health states. Since last two decades the progressive rise in the alternative form of treatment cannot be ignored and population seems to be dissatisfied with the conventional treatment modalities and therefore, resort to other forms of treatment, mainly complementary and alternative medicine (CAM. The use of CAM is predominantly more popular in older adults and therefore, numerous research studies and clinical trials have been carried out to investigate the effectiveness of CAM in the management of both communicable and non-communicable disease. In this current mini review, we attempt to encompass the use of CAM in chronic non-communicable diseases that are most likely seen in geriatrics. The current review focuses not only on the reassurance of good health practices, emphasizing on the holistic development and strengthening the body′s defense mechanisms, but also attempts to construct a pattern of self-care and patient empowerment in geriatrics. The issues of safety with CAM use cannot be sidelined and consultation with a health care professional is always advocated to the patient. Likewise, responsibility of the health care professional is to inform the patient about the safety and efficacy issues. In order to substantiate the efficacy and safety of CAMs, evidence-based studies and practices with consolidated standards should be planned and executed.

  11. A mini review on aflatoxin exposure in Malaysia: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd-Redzwan, Sabran; Jamaluddin, Rosita; Abd-Mutalib, Mohd Sokhini; Ahmad, Zuraini

    2013-01-01

    This mini review article described the exposure of aflatoxin in Malaysia, including its presence in the foodstuffs and the detection of aflatoxin biomarkers in human biological samples. Historically, the exposure of aflatoxin in Malaysia can be dated in 1960s where an outbreak of disease in pig farms caused severe liver damage to the animals. Later, an aflatoxicosis case in Perak in 1988 was reported and caused death to 13 children, as up to 3 mg of aflatoxin was present in a single serving of contaminated noodles. Since then, extensive research on aflatoxin has been conducted in Malaysia. The food commodities such as peanuts, cereals, spices, and their products are the main commodities commonly found to be contaminated with aflatoxin. Surprisingly, some of the contaminated foods had levels greater than the permissible limit adopted by the Malaysian Food Regulation 1985. Besides, exposure assessment through the measurement of aflatoxin biomarkers in human biological samples is still in its infancy stage. Nevertheless, some studies had reported the presence of these biomarkers. In fact, it is postulated that Malaysians are moderately exposed to aflatoxin compared to those high risk populations, where aflatoxin contamination in the diets is prevalent. Since the ingestion of aflatoxin could be the integral to the development of liver cancer, the incidence of cancer attributable by dietary aflatoxin exposure in Malaysia has also been reported and published in the literatures. Regardless of these findings, the more important task is to monitor and control humans from being exposed to aflatoxin. The enforcement of law is insufficient to minimize human exposure to aflatoxin. Preventive strategies include agricultural, dietary, and clinical measures should be implemented. With the current research on aflatoxin in Malaysia, a global networking for research collaboration is needed to expand the knowledge and disseminate the information to the global scientific community

  12. Jellyfish and Ctenophores in Limfjorden (Denmark—Mini-Review, with Recent New Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Ulrik Riisgård

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Limfjorden is a major Danish water system that connects the North Sea via Thyborøn Kanal in the west and to the Kattegat in the east. Limfjorden is heavily eutrophicated and certain areas suffer from oxygen depletion each summer. Bottom-dwelling fish have disappeared as the number of jellyfish and ctenophores has increased. The abundance and predation impact of jellyfish and ctenophores in Limfjorden have been described in a number of studies conducted during the last decade, and a mini-review of this literature is given here in Section 2. The common jellyfish Aurelia aurita may, in a few years, be very abundant and exert a considerable predatory impact on zooplankton and fish larvae. Abundance, species composition, and population dynamics of A. aurita may, at irregular time intervals, be strongly influenced not only by the water brought into Limfjorden from the North Sea, but also by competition with the invasive ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi that occurred for the first time in extremely high numbers in 2007, brought into the fjord system with North Sea water. It has been suggested that Limfjorden may function as an incubator for M. leidyi with the potential to further seed M. leidyi into the Kattegat and adjacent Danish waters, and recent observations seem to support this hypothesis. In Section 3, we report on two bloom events of ctenophores, Pleurobrachia pileus and M. leidyi, along with their predators (Beroe spp. in Limfjorden in the autumns of 2012 and 2013, when the usually dominating A. aurita was absent. However, the present observation of B. ovata being M. leidyi’s native predator and a new species in Limfjorden may in the future reduce the abundance of M. leidyi.

  13. A mini review on aflatoxin exposure in Malaysia: past, present and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Redzwan eSabran

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This mini review article described the exposure of aflatoxin in Malaysia, including its presence in the foodstuffs and the detection of aflatoxin biomarkers in human biological samples. Historically, the exposure of aflatoxin in Malaysia can be dated in 1960s where an outbreak of disease in pig farms caused severe liver damage to the animals. Later, an aflatoxicosis case in Perak in 1988 was reported and caused death to 13 children, as up to 3 mg of aflatoxin was present in a single serving of contaminated noodles. Since then, extensive research on aflatoxin has been conducted in Malaysia. The food commodities such as peanuts, cereals, spices and their products are the main commodities commonly found to be contaminated with aflatoxin. Surprisingly, some of the contaminated foods had levels greater than the permissible limit adopted by the Malaysian Food Regulation 1985. Besides, exposure assessment through the measurement of aflatoxin biomarkers in human biological samples is still in its infancy stage. Nevertheless, some studies had reported the presence of these biomarkers. In fact, it is postulated that Malaysians are moderately exposed to aflatoxin compared to those high risk populations, where aflatoxin contamination in the diets is prevalent. Since the ingestion of aflatoxin could be the integral to the development of liver cancer, the incidence of cancer attributable by dietary aflatoxin exposure in Malaysia has also been reported and published in the literatures. Regardless of these findings, the more important task is to monitor and control humans from being exposed to aflatoxin. The enforcement of law is insufficient to minimize human exposure to aflatoxin. Preventive strategies include agricultural, dietary and clinical measures should be implemented. With the current research on aflatoxin in Malaysia, a global networking for research collaboration is needed to expand the knowledge and disseminate the information to the global

  14. GABA System in Schizophrenia and Mood Disorders: A Mini Review on Third-Generation Imaging Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiapponi, Chiara; Piras, Federica; Piras, Fabrizio; Caltagirone, Carlo; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    Third-generation neuroimaging research has been enriched by advances in magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) measuring the concentration of important neurotrasmitters, such as the inhibitory amino acid GABA. Here, we performed a systematic mini-review on brain MRS studies measuring GABA concentration in patients affected by schizophrenia (SZ), bipolar disorder (BD), and major depressive disorder (MDD). We wondered whether multimodal investigations could overcome intrinsic technical limits of MRS giving a broader view of mental disorders pathogenesis. In SZ, unimodal studies gave mixed results, as increased, decreased, or unaltered GABA levels were reported depending on region, disease phase, and treatment. Conversely, multimodal results showed reduced level of glutamate, but not of GABA, in patients mirrored by in vitro biochemical findings revealing hippocampal reduction in glutamate signaling in SZ, and no deficits in GABA synthesis. Moreover, a mouse model confirmed the unique pathological characteristic of glutamate function in SZ. Unimodal studies in BD revealed again, inconsistent results, while no multimodal investigations including MRS on GABA exist. In MDD, unimodal studies could not differentiate patients from controls nor characterize high-risk subjects and remitted patients. However, a multimodal study combining functional magnetic resonance imaging and MRS revealed that cingulate cortex activity is related to glutamate, N-acetylaspartate levels and anhedonia in patients, and to GABA concentration in healthy subjects, improving the distinction between MDD and physiology. Overall, our results show that unimodal studies do not indicate GABA as a biomarker for the psychiatric disorders considered. Conversely, multimodal studies can widen the understanding of the link between psychopathology, genetics, neuroanatomy, and functional-biochemical brain activity in mental disorders. Although scarce, multimodal approaches seem promising for moving from GABA MRS

  15. Mini-review: Assessing the drivers of ship biofouling management - aligning industry and biosecurity goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Ian; Scianni, Christopher; Hewitt, Chad; Everett, Richard; Holm, Eric; Tamburri, Mario; Ruiz, Gregory

    2016-04-01

    Biofouling exerts a frictional and cost penalty on ships and is a direct cause of invasion by marine species. These negative consequences provide a unifying purpose for the maritime industry and biosecurity managers to prevent biofouling accumulation and transfer, but important gaps exist between these sectors. This mini-review examines the approach to assessments of ship biofouling among sectors (industry, biosecurity and marine science) and the implications for existing and emerging management of biofouling. The primary distinctions between industry and biosecurity in assessment of vessels biofouling revolve around the resolution of biological information collected and the specific wetted surface areas of primary concern to each sector. The morphological characteristics of biofouling and their effects on propulsion dynamics are of primary concern to industry, with an almost exclusive focus on the vertical sides and flat bottom of hulls and an emphasis on antifouling and operational performance. In contrast, the identity, biogeography, and ecology of translocated organisms is of highest concern to invasion researchers and biosecurity managers and policymakers, especially as it relates to species with known histories of invasion elsewhere. Current management practices often provide adequate, although not complete, provision for hull surfaces, but niche areas are well known to enhance biosecurity risk. As regulations to prevent invasions emerge in this arena, there is a growing opportunity for industry, biosecurity and academic stakeholders to collaborate and harmonize efforts to assess and manage biofouling of ships that should lead to more comprehensive biofouling solutions that promote industry goals while reducing biosecurity risk and greenhouse gas emissions. PMID:26930397

  16. GABA System in Schizophrenia and Mood Disorders: A Mini Review on Third-Generation Imaging Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiapponi, Chiara; Piras, Federica; Piras, Fabrizio; Caltagirone, Carlo; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    Third-generation neuroimaging research has been enriched by advances in magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) measuring the concentration of important neurotrasmitters, such as the inhibitory amino acid GABA. Here, we performed a systematic mini-review on brain MRS studies measuring GABA concentration in patients affected by schizophrenia (SZ), bipolar disorder (BD), and major depressive disorder (MDD). We wondered whether multimodal investigations could overcome intrinsic technical limits of MRS giving a broader view of mental disorders pathogenesis. In SZ, unimodal studies gave mixed results, as increased, decreased, or unaltered GABA levels were reported depending on region, disease phase, and treatment. Conversely, multimodal results showed reduced level of glutamate, but not of GABA, in patients mirrored by in vitro biochemical findings revealing hippocampal reduction in glutamate signaling in SZ, and no deficits in GABA synthesis. Moreover, a mouse model confirmed the unique pathological characteristic of glutamate function in SZ. Unimodal studies in BD revealed again, inconsistent results, while no multimodal investigations including MRS on GABA exist. In MDD, unimodal studies could not differentiate patients from controls nor characterize high-risk subjects and remitted patients. However, a multimodal study combining functional magnetic resonance imaging and MRS revealed that cingulate cortex activity is related to glutamate, N-acetylaspartate levels and anhedonia in patients, and to GABA concentration in healthy subjects, improving the distinction between MDD and physiology. Overall, our results show that unimodal studies do not indicate GABA as a biomarker for the psychiatric disorders considered. Conversely, multimodal studies can widen the understanding of the link between psychopathology, genetics, neuroanatomy, and functional–biochemical brain activity in mental disorders. Although scarce, multimodal approaches seem promising for moving from GABA

  17. GABA system in schizophrenia and mood disorders. A mini review on third generation imaging studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara eChiapponi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Third-generation neuroimaging research has been enriched by advances in magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS measuring the concentration of important neurotrasmitters, such as the inhibitory amino acid GABA. Here, we performed a systematic mini-review on brain MRS studies measuring GABA concentration in patients affected by schizophrenia (SZ, bipolar disorder (BD and major depressive disorder (MDD. We wondered whether multimodal investigations could overcome intrinsic technical limits of MRS giving a broader view of mental disorders pathogenesis.In SZ unimodal studies gave mixed results, as increased, decreased or unaltered GABA levels were reported depending on region, disease phase and treatment. Conversely, multimodal results showed reduced level of glutamate, but not of GABA, in patients, mirrored by in vitro biochemical findings revealing hippocampal reduction in glutamate signalling in SZ, and no deficits in GABA synthesis. Moreover, a mouse model confirmed the unique pathological characteristic of glutamate function in SZ.Unimodal studies in BD revealed, again, inconsistent results, while no multimodal investigations including MRS on GABA exist. In MDD, unimodal studies could not differentiate patients from controls, nor characterize high-risk subjects and remitted patients. However, a multimodal study combining functional magnetic resonance imaging and MRS revealed that cingulate cortex activity is related to glutamate and N-acetylaspartate levels and anhedonia in patients, and to GABA concentration in healthy subjects, improving the distinction between MDD and physiology.Overall, our results show that unimodal studies do not indicate GABA as a biomarker for the psychiatric disorders considered. Conversely, multimodal studies can widen the understanding of the link between psychopathology, genetics, neuroanatomy and functional-biochemical brain activity in mental disorders. Although scarce, multimodal approaches seem promising for moving

  18. Management of waste electrical and electronic equipment in Romania: A mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciocoiu, Carmen Nadia; Colesca, Sofia Elena; Rudăreanu, Costin; Popescu, Maria-Loredana

    2016-02-01

    Around the world there are growing concerns for waste electrical and electronic equipment. This is motivated by the harmful effects of waste electrical and electronic equipment on the environment, but also by the perspectives of materials recovery. Differences between countries regarding waste electrical and electronic equipment management are notable in the European Union. Romania is among the countries that have made significant efforts to comply with European Union regulations, but failed reaching the collection target. The article presents a mini review of the waste electrical and electronic equipment management system in Romania, based on legislation and policy documents, statistical data, research studies and reports published by national and international organisations. The article debates subjects like legislative framework, the electrical and electronic equipment Romanian market, the waste electrical and electronic equipment collection system, waste electrical and electronic equipment processing and waste electrical and electronic equipment behaviour. The recast of the European directive brings new challenges to national authorities and to other stakeholders involved in the waste electrical and electronic equipment management. Considering the fact that Romania has managed a collection rate of roughly 1 kg capita(-1) in the last years, the new higher collection targets established by the waste electrical and electronic equipment Directive offer a serious challenge for the management system. Therefore, another aim of the article is to highlight the positive and negative aspects in the Romanian waste electrical and electronic equipment field, in order to identify the flows that should be corrected and the opportunities that could help improve this system to the point of meeting the European standards imposed by the European Directive. PMID:26558822

  19. Analyses at High Spatial Resolution of Organic Molecules in Extraterrestrial Samples: Two-Step Laser Mass Spectrometry: Search for Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Antarctic Meteorite and Micrometeorite Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare, Richard N.

    1998-01-01

    Perhaps the best way to summarize the past three-year grant period is to cite the publications and present a brief synopsis of each: 1. "Indigenous Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Molecules in Circumstellar Graphite Grains." Bulk C-12/C-13 isotope ratios observed in some graphite grains extracted from primitive meteorites point strongly to a circumstellar origin. By applying our technique of microprobe two-step laser desorption laser ionization mass spectrometry ((mu)L(sup 2)MS) to individual circumstellar graphite grains we have measured the C-12/C-13 isotope ratio of various polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) found in these grains. 2. "Deuterium Enrichments in Cluster IDPS," Large enrichments in the D/H isotope ratios in IDPs likely arise from the preservation of presolar molecules. 3. "Evidence for thermalization of surface-disorder molecules at heating rates of 10(exp 8) K/s". A careful study of the ((mu)L(sup 2)MS) of aniline-d(sub 7) from a single-crystal surface (0001) of sapphire (al2O3) shows that all measured properties are consistent with a thermal mechanism for desorption. 4. "Search for past life on Mars; possible relic biogenic activity in Martian meteorite ALH 84001. The authors examined the Martian meteorite ALH 84001 and found several lines of evidence compatible with existence of past primitive (single-cell) life on early Mars. 5. "Microprobe two-step laser mass spectrometry as an analytical tool for meteorite samples". THis paper presents a comprehensive review of (mu)L(sup 2)MS and how this technique can be applied to meteoritic samples. 6. "Indigenous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in circumstellar graphite grains from primitive meteorites". The C-12/C-13 isotope ratios were measured for PAHs in a total of 89 spherical graphite grains. 7. "Observation of indigenous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in "Giant" carbonaceous antarctic micrometeorites." The (mu)L(sup 2)MS method was used to establish the nature and distribution of PAHs in

  20. Turn-on fluorescence and unprecedented encapsulation of large aromatic molecules within a manganese(II)-triazole metal-organic confined space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Yuan, Bin; Xu, Yao-Yao; Wang, Xiu-Guang; Ding, Bin; Zhao, Xiao-Jun

    2015-01-26

    For the purpose of investigating the coordination behavior of sterically congested alkenes and exploring the possibility of cofacial complexation in the polycyclic aromatic system for the formation of extended polymeric networks, a new tetradentate ligand, 1,1,2,2-tetrakis[4-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)phenyl]ethylene (TTPE), has been designed and synthesized. By using TTPE as a building block with regard to the self-assembly with MnCl2 ⋅4 H2 O, a novel two-dimensional coordination framework {[Mn(TTPE)Cl2 ]⋅4 CHCl3 }n (1) can be isolated. Anion-exchange and organic-group-functionalized aromatic guest TTPE-loaded host-guest complex experimental results indicate that coordinated Cl(-) anions in the 2D framework of 1 can be completely replaced with dissociative ClO4 (-) groups in an irreversible single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation fashion, as evidenced by the anion-exchange products of {[Mn(TTPE)(H2 O)2 ](ClO4 )2 ⋅0.5 TTPE⋅5.25 H2 O}n (2). Interestingly, TTPE, acting as an organic template, was encapsulated in the confined space of the 2D grid of 2. To the best of our knowledge, such large organic molecules encapsulated in the reactive organic-group-functionalized aromatic-guest-loaded host-guest complex are unprecedented up to now. Luminescence measurements illustrate that 1 and 2 represent novel examples of sensing materials based on triazole derivatives. Further, 2 has been demonstrated by tuning the fluorescence response of porous metal-organic frameworks as a function of adsorbed small analytes. PMID:25449539

  1. Photo-assisted intersystem crossing: The predominant triplet formation mechanism in some isolated polycyclic aromatic molecules excited with pulsed lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naphthalene, anthracene, and phenanthrene are shown to have very long-lived triplet lifetimes when the isolated molecules are excited with nanosecond pulsed lasers resonant with the lowest singlet state. For naphthalene, triplet state populations are created only during the laser pulse, excluding the possibility of normal intersystem crossing at the one photon level, and all molecules have triplet lifetimes greater than hundreds of microseconds, similar to the behavior previously reported for phenylacetylene. Although containing 7-12 thousand cm-1 of vibrational energy, the triplet molecules have ionization thresholds appropriate to vibrationless T1 states. The laser power dependences (slopes of log-log power plots) of the excited singlet and triplet populations are about 0.7 for naphthalene and about 0.5 for anthracene. Kinetic modeling of the power dependences successfully reproduces the experimental results and suggests that the triplet formation mechanism involves an enhanced spin orbit coupling caused by sigma character in states at the 2-photon level. Symmetry Adapted Cluster-Configuration Interaction calculations produced excited state absorption spectra to provide guidance for estimating kinetic rates and the sigma character present in higher electronic states. It is concluded that higher excited state populations are significant when larger molecules are excited with pulsed lasers and need to be taken into account whenever discussing the molecular photodynamics

  2. Photo-assisted intersystem crossing: The predominant triplet formation mechanism in some isolated polycyclic aromatic molecules excited with pulsed lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Philip M., E-mail: Philip.johnson@stonybrook.edu [Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-3400 (United States); Sears, Trevor J. [Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-3400 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

    2015-07-28

    Naphthalene, anthracene, and phenanthrene are shown to have very long-lived triplet lifetimes when the isolated molecules are excited with nanosecond pulsed lasers resonant with the lowest singlet state. For naphthalene, triplet state populations are created only during the laser pulse, excluding the possibility of normal intersystem crossing at the one photon level, and all molecules have triplet lifetimes greater than hundreds of microseconds, similar to the behavior previously reported for phenylacetylene. Although containing 7–12 thousand cm{sup −1} of vibrational energy, the triplet molecules have ionization thresholds appropriate to vibrationless T{sub 1} states. The laser power dependences (slopes of log-log power plots) of the excited singlet and triplet populations are about 0.7 for naphthalene and about 0.5 for anthracene. Kinetic modeling of the power dependences successfully reproduces the experimental results and suggests that the triplet formation mechanism involves an enhanced spin orbit coupling caused by sigma character in states at the 2-photon level. Symmetry adapted cluster-configuration interaction calculations produced excited state absorption spectra to provide guidance for estimating kinetic rates and the sigma character present in higher electronic states. It is concluded that higher excited state populations are significant when larger molecules are excited with pulsed lasers and need to be taken into account whenever discussing the molecular photodynamics.

  3. Self-consistent meta-generalized gradient approximation study of adsorption of aromatic molecules on noble metal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrighi, Lara; Madsen, Georg Kent Hellerup; Hammer, Bjørk

    2011-01-01

    The adsorption of benzene, pyridine, and two nucleobases on the Au(111) surface has been investigated using a fully relaxed, self-consistent meta-generalized gradient approximation (meta-GGA) density functional theory setup with the M06-L functional. The meta-GGA based molecule-surface separations...

  4. Process engineering for bioflavour production with metabolically active yeasts - a mini-review

    OpenAIRE

    Carlquist, Magnus; Gibson, Brian; Yuceer, Yonca Karagul; Paraskevopoulou, Adamantini; Sandell, Mari; Angelov, Angel I.; Gotcheva, Velitchka; Angelov, Angel D.; Etschmann, Marlene; De Billerbeck, Gustavo; Liden, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Flavours are biologically active molecules of large commercial interest in the food, cosmetics, detergent and pharmaceutical industries. The production of flavours can take place by either extraction from plant materials, chemical synthesis, biological conversion of precursor molecules or de novo biosynthesis. The latter alternatives are gaining importance through the rapidly growing fields of systems biology and metabolic engineering, giving efficient production hosts for the so-called 'biof...

  5. Electrical properties of SAM-modified ITO surface using aromatic small molecules with double bond carboxylic acid groups for OLED applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Can, Mustafa [Izmir Katip Celebi University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Engineering Sciences, Çiğli, Izmir (Turkey); Havare, Ali Kemal [Toros University, Faculty of Engineering, Electric and Electronic Department, Mersin (Turkey); Aydın, Hasan; Yagmurcukardes, Nesli [Izmir Institute of Technology, Material Science and Engineering, Izmir (Turkey); Demic, Serafettin [Izmir Katip Celebi University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Material Science and Engineering, Çiğli, Izmir (Turkey); Icli, Sıddık [Ege University, Solar Energy Institute, Izmir (Turkey); Okur, Salih, E-mail: salih.okur@ikc.edu.tr [Izmir Katip Celebi University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Material Science and Engineering, Çiğli, Izmir (Turkey)

    2014-09-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We report that the performance of OLED consist of aromatic small molecules with double bond carboxylic acid groups on ITO surface. • The OLED devices were tested in terms of electrical and optical characteristics. • The I–V results show that OLEDs with SAM-modified ITO surface have lower turn on voltages than OLED configurations without SAMs. - Abstract: 5-[(3-Methylphenyl)(phenyl)amino]isophthalic acid (5-MePIFA) and 5-(diphenyl)amino]isophthalic acid (5-DPIFA) organic molecules were synthesized to form self-assembled monolayer on indium tin oxide (ITO) anode to enhance hole transport from ITO to organic hole transport layers such as TPD. The modified surface was characterized by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The change in the surface potential was measured by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). Our Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) measurements showed that the surface potentials increased more than 100 mV with reference to bare indium tin-oxide. The results show that the threshold voltage on OLEDs with modified ITO is lowered significantly compared to OLEDs with unmodified ITO. The hole mobility of TPD has been estimated using space–charge-limited current measurements (SCLC)

  6. Electrical properties of SAM-modified ITO surface using aromatic small molecules with double bond carboxylic acid groups for OLED applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We report that the performance of OLED consist of aromatic small molecules with double bond carboxylic acid groups on ITO surface. • The OLED devices were tested in terms of electrical and optical characteristics. • The I–V results show that OLEDs with SAM-modified ITO surface have lower turn on voltages than OLED configurations without SAMs. - Abstract: 5-[(3-Methylphenyl)(phenyl)amino]isophthalic acid (5-MePIFA) and 5-(diphenyl)amino]isophthalic acid (5-DPIFA) organic molecules were synthesized to form self-assembled monolayer on indium tin oxide (ITO) anode to enhance hole transport from ITO to organic hole transport layers such as TPD. The modified surface was characterized by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The change in the surface potential was measured by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). Our Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) measurements showed that the surface potentials increased more than 100 mV with reference to bare indium tin-oxide. The results show that the threshold voltage on OLEDs with modified ITO is lowered significantly compared to OLEDs with unmodified ITO. The hole mobility of TPD has been estimated using space–charge-limited current measurements (SCLC)

  7. THE SPITZER VIEW OF LOW-METALLICITY STAR FORMATION. III. FINE-STRUCTURE LINES, AROMATIC FEATURES, AND MOLECULES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present low- and high-resolution Spitzer/IRS spectra, supplemented by Infrared Array Camera and Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer measurements, of 22 blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies. The BCD sample spans a wide range in oxygen abundance (12+log(O/H) between 7.4 and 8.3), and hardness of the interstellar radiation field (ISRF). The Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) spectra provide us with a rich set of diagnostics to probe the physics of star and dust formation in very low metallicity environments. We find that metal-poor BCDs have harder ionizing radiation than metal-rich galaxies: [O IV] emission is ∼>4 times as common as [Fe II] emission. They also have a more intense ISRF, as indicated by the 71 to 160 μm luminosity ratio. Two-thirds of the sample (15 BCDs) show polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features, although the fraction of PAH emission normalized to the total infrared (IR) luminosity is considerably smaller in metal-poor BCDs (∼0.5%) than in metal-rich star-forming galaxies (∼10%). We find several lines of evidence for a deficit of small PAH carriers at low metallicity, and attribute this to destruction by a hard, intense ISRF, only indirectly linked to metal abundance. Our IRS spectra reveal a variety of H2 rotational lines, and more than a third of the objects in our sample (eight BCDs) have ∼>3σ detections in one or more of the four lowest-order transitions. The warm gas masses in the BCDs range from 103 Msun to 108 Msun, and can be comparable to the neutral hydrogen gas mass; relative to their total IR luminosities, some BCDs contain more H2 than Spitzer Nearby Galaxy Survey galaxies.

  8. Mini Review: Basic Physiology and Factors Influencing Exogenous Enzymes Activity in the Porcine Gastrointestinal Tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strube, Mikael Lenz; Meyer, Anne S.; Boye, Mette

    2013-01-01

    activity during intestinal transit are few, it is known that the enzymes, being protein molecules, can be negatively affected by the gastrointestinal proteolytic enzymes and the low pH in the stomach ventricle. In this review, the pH-values, endogenous proteases and other factors native to the digestive...

  9. Clinical Neuropathology mini-review 6-2015: PD-L1: emerging biomarker in glioblastoma?

    OpenAIRE

    Preusser, Matthias; Berghoff, Anna S.; Wick, Wolfgang; Weller, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Programmed death 1 (PD-1, CD279) and programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1, CD274) are involved in generating tumor-associated immunosuppression by suppression of T-cell proliferation and interleukin 2 (IL-2) production and immune checkpoint inhibitors targeting these molecules are showing compelling activity against a variety of human cancers. PD-L1 expression has shown a positive association with response to PD-1 inhibition in non-central nervous system (CNS) tumors, e.g., melanoma or non-small ...

  10. Titanium and Ruthenium Phthalocyanines for NO2 Sensors: A Mini-Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio Rossi Albertini

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This review presents studies devoted to the description and comprehension of phenomena connected with the sensing behaviour towards NO2 of films of two phthalocyanines, titanium bis-phthalocyanine and ruthenium phthalocyanine. Spectroscopic, conductometric, and morphological features recorded during exposure to the gas are explained and the mechanisms of gas-molecule interaction are also elucidated. The review also shows how X-ray reflectivity can be a useful tool for monitoring morphological parameters such as thickness and roughness that are demonstrated to be sensitive variables for monitoring the exposure of thin films of sensor materials to NO2 gas.

  11. Excitation spectra of aromatic molecules within a real-space G W -BSE formalism: Role of self-consistency and vertex corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Linda; da Jornada, Felipe H.; Souto-Casares, Jaime; Chelikowsky, James R.; Louie, Steven G.; Ã-ǧüt, Serdar

    2016-08-01

    We present first-principles calculations on the vertical ionization potentials (IPs), electron affinities (EAs), and singlet excitation energies on an aromatic-molecule test set (benzene, thiophene, 1,2,5-thiadiazole, naphthalene, benzothiazole, and tetrathiafulvalene) within the G W and Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE) formalisms. Our computational framework, which employs a real-space basis for ground-state and a transition-space basis for excited-state calculations, is well suited for high-accuracy calculations on molecules, as we show by comparing against G0W0 calculations within a plane-wave-basis formalism. We then generalize our framework to test variants of the G W approximation that include a local density approximation (LDA)-derived vertex function (ΓLDA) and quasiparticle-self-consistent (QS) iterations. We find that ΓLDA and quasiparticle self-consistency shift IPs and EAs by roughly the same magnitude, but with opposite sign for IPs and the same sign for EAs. G0W0 and QS G W ΓLDA are more accurate for IPs, while G0W0ΓLDA and QS G W are best for EAs. For optical excitations, we find that perturbative G W -BSE underestimates the singlet excitation energy, while self-consistent G W -BSE results in good agreement with previous best-estimate values for both valence and Rydberg excitations. Finally, our work suggests that a hybrid approach, in which G0W0 energies are used for occupied orbitals and G0W0ΓLDA for unoccupied orbitals, also yields optical excitation energies in good agreement with experiment but at a smaller computational cost.

  12. Porphyra Species: A Mini-Review of Its Pharmacological and Nutritional Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jin; Wang, Jianping; Wang, Shicheng; Xu, Ximing

    2016-02-01

    Porphyra sensu lato belongs to Bangiales, the most genetically diverse order of red algae. Porphyra or Pyropia is widely cultivated in East Asian countries, such as China, Japan, and Korea. Dried Porphyra contains numerous nutritional and biofunctional compounds, including proteins, minerals, dietary fiber, polyunsaturated fatty acids, carotenoids, saccharides, and mycosporine-like amino acids. In addition, the compound is most abundant in Porphyra, such as polysaccharides and phycobiliproteins, and demonstrates various immunomodulating, anticancer, antihyperlipidemic, and antioxidative activities. This review summarizes our current knowledge concerning the pharmacologically active substances found in Porphyra species. The biological activities and potential applications of certain carbohydrates, proteins, peptides, and other small molecules purified from Porphyra are also described, and possible areas for future studies are discussed. PMID:26653974

  13. Mini Review: Basic Physiology and Factors Influencing Exogenous Enzymes Activity in the Porcine Gastrointestinal Tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strube, Mikael Lenz; Meyer, Anne S.; Boye, Mette

    2013-01-01

    activity during intestinal transit are few, it is known that the enzymes, being protein molecules, can be negatively affected by the gastrointestinal proteolytic enzymes and the low pH in the stomach ventricle. In this review, the pH-values, endogenous proteases and other factors native to the digestive......The addition of exogenous enzymes to pig feed is used to enhance general nutrient availability and thus increase daily weight gain per feed unit. The enzymes used are mainly beta-glucanase (EC 3.2.1.4) and xylanase (EC 3.2.1.8) and phytase (EC 3.1.3.8). Although in vivo data assessing feed enzyme...... tract of the adult pig and the piglet are discussed in relation to the stability of exogenous feed enzymes. Development of more consistent assessment methods which acknowledge such factors is warranted both in vitro and in vivo for proper evaluation and prediction of the efficiency of exogenous enzymes...

  14. Composites of Graphene and LiFePO4 as Cathode Materials for Lithium-Ion Battery:A Mini-review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haixia Wu; Qinjiao Liu; Shouwu Guo

    2014-01-01

    This mini-review highlights selectively the recent research progress in the composites of LiFePO4 and graphene. In particularly, the different fabrication protocols, and the electrochemical performance of the composites are summarized in detail. The structural and morphology characters of graphene sheets that may affect the property of the composites are discussed briefly. The possible ongoing researches in area are speculated upon.

  15. Mini Review: Circular RNAs as Potential Clinical Biomarkers for Disorders in the Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dan; Xu, An-Ding

    2016-01-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are a type of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), produced in eukaryotic cells during post-transcriptional processes. They are more stable than linear RNAs, and possess spatio-temporal properties. CircRNAs do not distribute equally in the neuronal compartments in the brain, but largely enriched in the synapses. These ncRNA species can be used as potential clinical biomarkers in complex disorders of the central nervous system (CNS), which is supported by recent findings. For example, ciRS-7 was found to be a natural microRNAs sponge for miRNA-7 and regulate Parkinson's disease/Alzheimer's disease-related genes; circPAIP2 is an intron-retaining circRNA which upregulates memory-related parental genes PAIP2 to affect memory development through PABP reactivation. The quantity of circRNAs carry important messages, either when they are inside the cells, or in circulation, or in exosomes released from synaptoneurosomes and endothelial. In addition, small molecules such as microRNAs and microvesicles can pass through the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and get into blood. For clinical applications, the study population needs to be phenotypically well-defined. CircRNAs may be combined with other biomarkers and imaging tools to improve the diagnostic power. PMID:27092176

  16. A mini review on CP-violating minimal supersymmetric Standard Model Higgs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    AMIT CHAKRABORTY; DILIP KUMAR GHOSH

    2016-09-01

    We discuss the present status of the Higgs sector of the CP-violating minimal supersymmetric Standard Model (CPVMSSM). In the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics, the only source of CP violation is the complex phase in the Cabibbo–Kobayashi–Maskawa (CKM) matrix. By now we all know that this singlephase is not large enough to explain the observed baryon asymmetry of our Universe. Hence, one require additional sources of CP violation. The MSSM with several complex phases is one such scenario. The tree-level CP invariance of the MSSM Higgs potential is broken at one-loop level in the presence of complex phases in the MSSM Lagrangian. The presence of these additional phases modifies Higgs masses, mixings and couplings significantly. These additional phases have non-trivial impact on several low-energy observables; like the electric dipole moments (EDMs) of atoms and molecules, the CP asymmetry in rare b-decays etc. We first present a brief outline of the CPVMSSM Higgs sector, and then discuss the current limits/bounds obtained from the measurementsof several low-energy observables. We also comment on the current bounds coming from the high-energy collider experiments, specially the Large Electron Positron (LEP) Collider and the ongoing Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the CERN.

  17. Mitochondria in relation to cancer metastasis: introduction to a mini-review series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Peter L

    2012-12-01

    This introductory article and those that follow focus on the roles that mitochondria may have in cancer metastasis (spreading) that all too frequently leads to death of cancer patients. The history of cancer dates back in time to several thousand years BC and continues to this day. Although billions of dollars have been invested, numerous cancer researchers/scientists and oncologist located at universities, hospitals, cancer centers, commercial entities (companies), and government agencies have been unable to discover "magic bullets" to quickly silence most cancers. That is, agents that are effective not only in eradicating the primary tumor at its site of origin, but eradicating also distant tumors that have arisen therefrom via metastatic cells. Fortunately, in recent years some researchers have obtained evidence that the mitochondria of cancer cells are involved not only in providing in part the necessary energy (ATP) to fuel their growth, but hold the secrets to their immortality, and propensity to metastasize (spread) from their original site of origin to other body locations. This introductory article, as well as those that follow, focus on the possible roles of mitochondria in cancer metastasis as well as strategies to arrest cancer metastasis based on this knowledge. Ideally, for a patient to become "cancer free" the anticancer agent/agents used must 1) eradicate the primary tumor at its site of origin, 2) eradicate any tumors at other body locations that have arisen via metastasis, and 3) eradicate any tumor cells that remain in the blood, i.e., circulating tumor cells. One such agent that holds promise for doing all three is the small molecule 3-bromopyruvate (3BP) discovered in the author's laboratory by Dr. Young H. Ko near the turn of the century to be a potent anti-cancer agent [Ko et al.(2001) Can Lett 173:83-91]. PMID:22926290

  18. NF-kappaB signaling pathways in Neurological inflammation: A mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruey-Horng Shih

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The NF-κB (nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells transcription factor family is a pleiotropic regulator of many cellular signaling pathways, providing a mechanism for the cells in response to a wide variety of stimuli linking to inflammation. The stimulated cells will be regulated by not only the canonical but also non-canonical NF-κB pathways. To initiate both of these pathways, IκB-degradation triggers NF-κB release and the nuclear translocated-heterodimer (or homodimer can associate with the κB sites of promoter to regulate the gene transcriptions. NF-κB ubiquitously expresses in neurons and the constitutive NF-κB activation is associated with processing of neuronal information. NF-κB can regulate the transcription of genes such as chemokines, cytokines, proinflammatory enzymes, adhesion molecules, proinflammatory transcription factors, and other factors to modulate the neuronal survival. In neuronal insult, NF-κB constitutively active in neuron cell bodies can protect neurons against different injuries and regulate the neuronal inflammatory reactions. Besides neurons, NF-κB transcription factors are abundant in glial cells and cerebral blood vessels and the diverse functions of NF-κB also regulate the inflammatory reaction around the neuronal environment. NF-κB transcription factors are abundant in the brain and exhibit diverse functions. Several central nerve system (CNS diseases are linked to NF-κB activated by inflammatory mediators. The RelA and c-Rel expression produce opposite effects on neuronal survival. Importantly, c-Rel expression in CNS plays a critical role in anti-apoptosis and reduces the age-related behaviors. Moreover, the different subunits of NF-κB dimer formation can modulate the neuroninflammation, neuronal protection, or neurotoxicity. The diverse functions of NF-κB depend on the subunits of the NF-κB dimer-formation which enable us to develop a therapeutic approach to

  19. Nano-Sized Cyclodextrin-Based Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Adsorbents for Perfluorinated Compounds—A Mini-Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdalla H. Karoyo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent efforts have been directed towards the design of efficient and contaminant selective remediation technology for the removal of perfluorinated compounds (PFCs from soils, sediments, and aquatic environments. While there is a general consensus on adsorption-based processes as the most suitable methodology for the removal of PFCs from aquatic environments, challenges exist regarding the optimal materials design of sorbents for selective uptake of PFCs. This article reviews the sorptive uptake of PFCs using cyclodextrin (CD-based polymer adsorbents with nano- to micron-sized structural attributes. The relationship between synthesis of adsorbent materials and their structure relate to the overall sorption properties. Hence, the adsorptive uptake properties of CD-based molecularly imprinted polymers (CD-MIPs are reviewed and compared with conventional MIPs. Further comparison is made with non-imprinted polymers (NIPs that are based on cross-linking of pre-polymer units such as chitosan with epichlorohydrin in the absence of a molecular template. In general, MIPs offer the advantage of selectivity, chemical tunability, high stability and mechanical strength, ease of regeneration, and overall lower cost compared to NIPs. In particular, CD-MIPs offer the added advantage of possessing multiple binding sites with unique physicochemical properties such as tunable surface properties and morphology that may vary considerably. This mini-review provides a rationale for the design of unique polymer adsorbent materials that employ an intrinsic porogen via incorporation of a macrocyclic compound in the polymer framework to afford adsorbent materials with tunable physicochemical properties and unique nanostructure properties.

  20. Revisiting the health effects of psychological stress—its influence on susceptibility to ionizing radiation: a mini-review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Katsube, Takanori; Begum, Nasrin; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2016-01-01

    Both psychological stress (PS) and ionizing radiation (IR) cause varied detrimental effects on humans. There has been no direct evidence so far showing PS alone could cause cancer; however, long-lasting PS may affect our overall health and ability to cope with cancer. Due to their living conditions and occupations, some people may encounter concurrent exposure to both PS and IR to a high extent. In addition to possible health effects resulting directly from exposure to IR on these people, fear of IR exposure is also a cause of PS. The question of whether PS would influence susceptibility to IR, radiocarcinogenesis in particular, is of great concern by both the academic world and the public. Recently, investigations using animal PS models demonstrated that PS could modulate susceptibility to IR, causing increased susceptibility to radiocarcinogenesis in Trp53-heterozygous mice, hematological toxicity in peripheral blood and elevated chromosome aberration (dicentrics) frequency in splenocytes of Trp53–wild-type mice. To actively reduce health risk from exposure to IR, further studies are needed to cumulate more evidence and provide insights into the mechanisms underlying the alterations in susceptibility due to PS modulation. This mini-review gives a general overview of the significance of PS effects on humans and experimental animals, with a special focus on summarizing the latest weight-of-evidence approaches to radiobiological studies on PS-induced alterations in susceptibility in experimental animal models. The susceptibility being investigated is mainly in the context of the impact of the modulatory effect of PS on radiocarcinogenesis; we seek to improve understanding of the combined effects of exposure to both PS and IR in order to facilitate, via active intervention, strategies for radiation risk reduction. PMID:27242342

  1. Superconductivity in aromatic hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Aromatic superconductor is one of core research subjects in superconductivity. Superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons. Some serious problems to be solved exist for future advancement of the research. This article shows the present status of aromatic superconductors. - Abstract: ‘Aromatic hydrocarbon’ implies an organic molecule that satisfies the (4n + 2) π-electron rule and consists of benzene rings. Doping solid aromatic hydrocarbons with metals provides the superconductivity. The first discovery of such superconductivity was made for K-doped picene (Kxpicene, five benzene rings). Its superconducting transition temperatures (Tc’s) were 7 and 18 K. Recently, we found a new superconducting Kxpicene phase with a Tc as high as 14 K, so we now know that Kxpicene possesses multiple superconducting phases. Besides Kxpicene, we discovered new superconductors such as Rbxpicene and Caxpicene. A most serious problem is that the shielding fraction is ⩽15% for Kxpicene and Rbxpicene, and it is often ∼1% for other superconductors. Such low shielding fractions have made it difficult to determine the crystal structures of superconducting phases. Nevertheless, many research groups have expended a great deal of effort to make high quality hydrocarbon superconductors in the five years since the discovery of hydrocarbon superconductivity. At the present stage, superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons (picene, phenanthrene and dibenzopentacene), but the shielding fraction remains stubbornly low. The highest priority research area is to prepare aromatic superconductors with a high superconducting volume-fraction. Despite these difficulties, aromatic superconductivity is still a core research target and presents interesting and potentially breakthrough challenges, such as the positive pressure dependence of Tc that is clearly observed in some phases of aromatic hydrocarbon superconductors

  2. A mini review of designed mesoporous materials for energy-storage applications: from electric double-layer capacitors to hybrid supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Eunho; Jo, Changshin; Lee, Jinwoo

    2016-04-21

    In recent years, porous materials have attracted significant attention in various research fields because of their structural merits. In particular, well-designed mesoporous structures with two- or three-dimensionally interconnected pores have been recognized as electrode materials of particular interest for achieving high-performance electrochemical capacitors (ECs). In this mini review, recent progress in the design of mesoporous electrode materials for ECs, from electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) and pseudocapacitors (PCs) to hybrid supercapacitors (HSCs), and research challenges for the development of new mesoporous electrode materials has been discussed. PMID:27020465

  3. Graphite Oxide and Aromatic Amines : Size Matters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spyrou, Konstantinos; Calvaresi, Matteo; Diamanti, Evmorfi A. K.; Tsoufis, Theodoros; Gournis, Dimitrios; Rudolf, Petra; Zerbetto, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies are performed in order to illuminate, for first time, the intercalation mechanism of polycyclic aromatic molecules into graphite oxide. Two representative molecules of this family, aniline and naphthalene amine are investigated. After intercalation, aniline molec

  4. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons as Plausible Prebiotic Membrane Components

    OpenAIRE

    Groen, Joost; Deamer, David W.; Kros, Alexander; Ehrenfreund, Pascale

    2012-01-01

    Aromatic molecules delivered to the young Earth during the heavy bombardment phase in the early history of our solar system were likely to be among the most abundant and stable organic compounds available. The Aromatic World hypothesis suggests that aromatic molecules might function as container elements, energy transduction elements and templating genetic components for early life forms. To investigate the possible role of aromatic molecules as container elements, we incorporated different p...

  5. HIV Risk Among Men Who Have Sex With Men, Women Who Have Sex With Women, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Populations in South Africa: A Mini-Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Meredith G. B.; Cloete, Allanise; Zungu, Nompumelelo; Simbayi, Leickness C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The HIV epidemic in South Africa is characterized mainly by heterosexual transmission. Recently, the importance of targeting key populations and marginalized groups, including men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender people, has been added to the national agenda. Objectives: This mini-review explores the current state of empirical research on HIV risk and MSM, women who have sex with women (WSW), lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) populations in South Africa in order to assess the current state of research and identify gaps in the literature. Method: Peer-reviewed empirical social and behavioral articles on HIV prevalence and risk focusing on MSM, WSW, and LGBT populations published since 2006 were included in this mini-review. Results: In total 35 articles were included: 30 on MSM, gay, and/or bisexual male-identified populations, three on WSW, lesbian, and/or bisexual female-identified populations, two on LGB youth, and none on transgender populations. Conclusion: Despite South Africa being the country with the largest number of people living with HIV in the world, there is a limited amount of research in South Africa on HIV and non-normative gender identities and sexualities, especially WSW, lesbian, and/or bisexual female-identified populations, transgender populations, and LGB youth. Research with MSM, WSW, and LGBT populations should be prioritized in South Africa in order to appropriately inform HIV prevention strategies that meet the specific needs of these marginalized groups. PMID:27347271

  6. "Carbo-aromaticity" and novel carbo-aromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocq, Kévin; Lepetit, Christine; Maraval, Valérie; Chauvin, Remi

    2015-09-21

    While the concept of aromaticity is being more and more precisely delineated, the category of "aromatic compounds" is being more and more expanded. This is illustrated by an introductory highlight of the various types of "aromaticity" previously invoked, and by a focus on the recently proposed "aromatic character" of the "two-membered rings" of the acetylene and butatriene molecules. This serves as a general foundation for the definition of "carbo-aromaticity", the relevance of which is surveyed through recent results in the synthetic, physical, and theoretical chemistry of carbo-mers and in particular macrocyclic-polycyclic representatives constituting a natural family of "novel aromatic compounds". With respect to their parent molecules, carbo-mers are constitutionally defined as "carbon-enriched", and can also be functionally regarded as "π-electron-enriched". This is exemplified by recent experimental and theoretical results on functional, aromatic, rigid, σ,π-macrocyclic carbo-benzene archetypes of various substitution patterns, with emphasis on the quadrupolar pattern. For the purpose of comparison, several types of non-aromatic references of carbo-benzenes are then considered, i.e. freely rotating σ,π-acyclic carbo-n-butadienes and flexible σ-cyclic, π-acyclic carbo-cyclohexadienes, and to "pro-aromatic" congeners, i.e. rigid σ,π-macrocyclic carbo-quinoids. It is shown that functional carbo-mers are entering the field of "molecular materials" for properties such as linear or nonlinear optical properties (e.g. dichromism and two-photon absorption) and single molecule conductivity. Since total or partial carbo-mers of aromatic carbon-allotropes of infinite size such as graphene (graphynes and graphdiynes) and graphite ("graphitynes") have long been addressed at the theoretical or conceptual level, recent predictive advances on the electrical, optical and mechanical properties of such carbo-materials are surveyed. Very preliminary experimental results

  7. Fluorescent aromatic sensors and their methods of use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meador, Michael A. (Inventor); Tyson, Daniel S. (Inventor); Ilan, Ulvi F. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Aromatic molecules that can be used as sensors are described. The aromatic sensors include a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon core with a five-membered imide rings fused to the core and at least two pendant aryl groups. The aromatic sensor molecules can detect target analytes or molecular strain as a result of changes in their fluorescence, in many cases with on-off behavior. Aromatic molecules that fluoresce at various frequencies can be prepared by altering the structure of the aromatic core or the substituents attached to it. The aromatic molecules can be used as sensors for various applications such as, for example, the detection of dangerous chemicals, biomedical diagnosis, and the detection of damage or strain in composite materials. Methods of preparing aromatic sensor molecules are also described.

  8. Self-assembly of monolayers of aromatic carboxylic acid molecules on silver and copper modified gold surfaces at the liquid-solid interface

    OpenAIRE

    Aitchison, Hannah

    2015-01-01

    Exploiting coordination bonding of aromatic carboxylic acids at metal surfaces, this thesis explores new directions in the design and application of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). The SAMs are investigated using a multi-technique approach comprising of a complementary combination of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. In addition, the X-ray standing wave technique (XSW) was used to ...

  9. Small-Molecule Target Engagement in Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schürmann, Marc; Janning, Petra; Ziegler, Slava; Waldmann, Herbert

    2016-04-21

    Monitoring how, when, and where small molecules engage their targets inside living cells is a critical step in chemical biology and pharmacological research, because it enables compound efficacy and confirmation of mode of action to be assessed. In this mini-review we summarize the currently available methodologies to detect and prove direct target engagement in cells and offer a critical view of their key advantages and disadvantages. As the interest of the field shifts toward discovery and validation of high-quality agents, we expect that efforts to develop and refine these types of methodologies will also intensify in the near future. PMID:27049669

  10. What is the role of the D3 receptor in addiction? A mini review of PET studies with [(11)C]-(+)-PHNO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payer, Doris; Balasubramaniam, Gayathiri; Boileau, Isabelle

    2014-07-01

    The chronic use of drugs, including psychostimulants such as cocaine and amphetamine, has been associated with low D2/3 dopamine receptor availability, which in turn has been linked to poor clinical outcome. In contrast, recent studies focused on the D3 receptor (a member of the D2-like receptor family) suggest that chronic exposure to stimulant drugs can up-regulate this receptor subtype, which, in preclinical models, is linked to dopamine system sensitization - a process hypothesized to contribute to relapse in addiction. In this mini review we present recent human data suggesting that the D3 receptor may contribute to core features of addiction, and discuss the usefulness of the PET imaging probe [(11)C]-(+)-PHNO in investigating this question. PMID:23999545

  11. Superconductivity in aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubozono, Yoshihiro, E-mail: kubozono@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Research Center of New Functional Materials for Energy Production, Storage and Transport, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, ACT-C, Kawaguchi 332-0012 (Japan); Goto, Hidenori; Jabuchi, Taihei [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Yokoya, Takayoshi [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Research Center of New Functional Materials for Energy Production, Storage and Transport, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Kambe, Takashi [Department of Physics, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Sakai, Yusuke; Izumi, Masanari; Zheng, Lu; Hamao, Shino; Nguyen, Huyen L.T. [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Sakata, Masafumi; Kagayama, Tomoko; Shimizu, Katsuya [Center of Science and Technology under Extreme Conditions, Osaka University, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Aromatic superconductor is one of core research subjects in superconductivity. Superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons. Some serious problems to be solved exist for future advancement of the research. This article shows the present status of aromatic superconductors. - Abstract: ‘Aromatic hydrocarbon’ implies an organic molecule that satisfies the (4n + 2) π-electron rule and consists of benzene rings. Doping solid aromatic hydrocarbons with metals provides the superconductivity. The first discovery of such superconductivity was made for K-doped picene (K{sub x}picene, five benzene rings). Its superconducting transition temperatures (T{sub c}’s) were 7 and 18 K. Recently, we found a new superconducting K{sub x}picene phase with a T{sub c} as high as 14 K, so we now know that K{sub x}picene possesses multiple superconducting phases. Besides K{sub x}picene, we discovered new superconductors such as Rb{sub x}picene and Ca{sub x}picene. A most serious problem is that the shielding fraction is ⩽15% for K{sub x}picene and Rb{sub x}picene, and it is often ∼1% for other superconductors. Such low shielding fractions have made it difficult to determine the crystal structures of superconducting phases. Nevertheless, many research groups have expended a great deal of effort to make high quality hydrocarbon superconductors in the five years since the discovery of hydrocarbon superconductivity. At the present stage, superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons (picene, phenanthrene and dibenzopentacene), but the shielding fraction remains stubbornly low. The highest priority research area is to prepare aromatic superconductors with a high superconducting volume-fraction. Despite these difficulties, aromatic superconductivity is still a core research target and presents interesting and potentially breakthrough challenges, such as the positive pressure dependence of T{sub c} that is clearly

  12. Noncomparative scaling of aromaticity through electron itinerancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aromaticity is a multidimensional concept and not a directly observable. These facts have always stood in the way of developing an appropriate theoretical framework for scaling of aromaticity. In the present work, a quantitative account of aromaticity is developed on the basis of cyclic delocalization of π-electrons, which is the phenomenon leading to unique features of aromatic molecules. The stabilization in molecular energy, caused by delocalization of π-electrons is obtained as a second order perturbation energy for archetypal aromatic systems. The final expression parameterizes the aromatic stabilization energy in terms of atom to atom charge transfer integral, onsite repulsion energy and the population of spin orbitals at each site in the delocalized π-electrons. An appropriate computational platform is framed to compute each and individual parameter in the derived equation. The numerical values of aromatic stabilization energies obtained for various aromatic molecules are found to be in close agreement with available theoretical and experimental reports. Thus the reliable estimate of aromaticity through the proposed formalism renders it as a useful tool for the direct assessment of aromaticity, which has been a long standing problem in chemistry

  13. Influence of methoxy- and nitro-substitutions in the aromatic ring on proton donation ability in hydrogen bond and on the amino group parameters of free and H-bonded molecules of 2-aminopyrimidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisenko, V. E.; Krekov, S. A.; Fomenko, M. Yu.; Koll, A.; Lipkovski, P.

    2008-06-01

    Amino- and imino- forms of pyrimidine are widely presented as part of antibiotics, corrective medications for heart failures and metabolic stimulators. Hydrogen bonding is one of the fundamental interactions between biologically active molecules. This type of interactions provides flexibility, speed and variety of the biochemical processes. Proton donation properties of aminopyrimidines significantly depend on the position, number and kind of the substituent in its aromatic ring. In present work we studied the influence of the methoxy- and nitro-substitutions in the phenyl radical of pyridine and pyrimidine cycles on the proton donation ability of the amino group in hydrogen bonds as well as on its geometrical, force, electro-optical and thermodynamical characteristics in free and H-bonded (1:1 and 1:2, with various proton acceptors) molecules of primary aromatic amines. Acetonitrile, dioxane, tetrahydrofourane, dimethylformamide, dimethylsulfoxide and hexamethylphosphoramide (whose proton accepting properties vary within a wide range) were used as proton acceptors in our research. In the region of the amino group stretching and deformation vibrations the IR spectra of free and H-bonded (1:1) molecules of 2-amino-4,6-dimethoxy- and 2-amino-5-nitropyrimidine were studied in complexes with proton acceptors in CCl 4 within the temperature range 288-328 K. The spectra of 1:2 complexes were studied in undiluted aprotic solvents. The following spectral characteristics of absorption bands in amino group stretching vibrations were determined: M(0) (zero spectral moment, integrated intensity B); M(1) (first spectral moment, band "centre of gravity"); effective half width, related to the second central moment (Δ ν1/2) eff = 2( M(2)) 1/2, frequencies of the deformation vibrations δ(HNH) of free and H-bonded molecules. It was shown that changes of the absorption band spectral characteristics of the amino group stretching and deformation vibrations in the analyzed

  14. Botulinum neurotoxin: Progress in negating its neurotoxicity; and in extending its therapeutic utility via molecular engineering. MiniReview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostrzewa, Richard M; Kostrzewa, Rose Anna; Kostrzewa, John P

    2015-10-01

    While the poisonous effects of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) have been recognized since antiquity, the overall actions and mechanisms of effects of BoNT have been elucidated primarily over the past several decades. The general utility of BoNT is described in the paper, but the focus is mainly on the approaches towards negating the toxic effects of BoNT, and on the projection of an engineered BoNT molecule serving as a Trojan Horse to deliver a therapeutic load for treatment of a host of medical disorders. The BoNT molecule is configured with a binding domain, a zinc-dependent protease with specificity primarily for vesicular proteins, and a translocation domain for delivery of the metalloprotease into the cytoplasm. The anti-toxin approaches for BoNT include the use of vaccines, antibodies, block of BoNT binding or translocation, inhibition of metalloprotease activity, impeded translocation of the protease/catalytic domain, and inhibition of the downstream Src signaling pathway. Projections of BoNT as a therapeutic include its targeting to non-cholinergic nerves, also targeting to non-neuronal cells for treatment of hypersecretory disorders (e.g., cystic fibrosis), and treatment of hormonal disorders (e.g., acromegaly). Still in the exploratory phase, there is the expectation of major advances in BoNT neuroprotective strategies and burgeoning utility of engineered BoNTs as therapeutics. PMID:26192475

  15. Comments on Coulomb pairing in aromatic hydrocarbons

    CERN Document Server

    Huber, D L

    2013-01-01

    Recently reported anomalies in the double-photonionization spectra of aromatic molecules such as benzene, naphthalene, anthracene and coronene are attributed to Coulomb-pair resonances of pi electrons.

  16. Aromatic graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, D. K.; Sahoo, S.

    2016-04-01

    In recent years graphene attracts the scientific and engineering communities due to its outstanding electronic, thermal, mechanical and optical properties and many potential applications. Recently, Popov et al. [1] have studied the properties of graphene and proved that it is aromatic but without fragrance. In this paper, we present a theory to prepare graphene with fragrance. This can be used as scented pencils, perfumes, room and car fresheners, cosmetics and many other useful household substances.

  17. Therapeutic Application of Synbiotics, a Fusion of Probiotics and Prebiotics, and Biogenics as a New Concept for Oral Candida Infections: A Mini Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, Tomoko; Kojima, Yukako; Seneviratne, Chaminda J; Maeda, Nobuko

    2016-01-01

    Candida is a major human fungal pathogen causing infectious conditions predominantly in the elderly and immunocompromised hosts. Although Candida resides as a member of the oral indigenous microbiota in symbiosis, some circumstances may cause microbial imbalance leading to dysbiosis and resultant oral candidiasis. Therefore, oral microbial symbiosis that suppresses the overgrowth of Candida is important for a healthy oral ecosystem. In this regard, probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics can be considered a potential therapeutic and preventive strategy against oral candidiasis. Prebiotics have a direct effect on microbial growth as they stimulate the growth of beneficial bacteria and suppress the growth of pathogens. Probiotics render a local protective effect against pathogens and a systemic indirect effect on immunological amelioration. Synbiotics are fusion products of prebiotics and probiotics. This mini review discusses the potential use and associated limitations of probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics for the prevention and treatment of oral candidiasis. We will also introduce biogenics, a recent concept derived from the work on probiotics. Biogenics advocates the use of beneficial bioactive substances produced by probiotic bacteria, whose activities are independent from the viability of probiotic bacteria in human bodies. PMID:26834728

  18. Central administration of murine interferon-α induces depressive-like behavioral, brain cytokine and neurochemical alterations in mice: a mini-review and original experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayley, Shawn; Scharf, Jeff; Anisman, Hymie

    2013-07-01

    A role for pro-inflammatory cytokines and their neuroinflammatory signaling cascades in depressive pathology has increasingly gained acceptance. In this regard, several lines of evidence suggested that interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) can provoke neurochemical and hormonal changes akin to those associated with psychological stressors, and that these cytokines also induce sickness behaviors that resemble some of the neurovegetative features of depression. Similarly, human depressed patients often display marked changes of pro-inflammatory cytokine levels and immune cell activity. Perhaps more germane in the analysis of the cytokine-depression connection, reports of humans undergoing interferon-α (IFN-α) treatment for certain cancers or viral infections have indicated that the pro-inflammatory cytokine caused signs of major depression in a substantial subset of those treated. In the present investigation, we demonstrated that acute or repeated infusion of IFN-α into the lateral ventricles provoked depressive-like behavior and concomitant changes in serotonin (5-HT) and mRNA expression of particular 5-HT receptors and pro-inflammatory cytokines. These actions were less evident following administration directly into the prefrontal cortex and not apparent at all when administered to the dorsal raphe nucleus. The data are discussed in relation to the induction of depression elicited by IFN-α, and are presented in the context of a mini-review that highlights potential mechanisms through which the cytokine might act to promote psychomotor and affective disturbances and interact with stressors. PMID:22884959

  19. Mini-review of the geotechnical parameters of municipal solid waste: Mechanical and biological pre-treated versus raw untreated waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovic, Igor

    2016-09-01

    The most viable option for biostabilisation of old sanitary landfills, filled with raw municipal solid waste, is the so-called bioreactor landfill. Even today, bioreactor landfills are viable options in many economically developing countries. However, in order to reduce the biodegradable component of landfilled waste, mechanical and biological treatment has become a widely accepted waste treatment technology, especially in more prosperous countries. Given that mechanical and biological treatment alters the geotechnical properties of raw waste material, the design of sanitary landfills which accepts mechanically and biologically treated waste, should be carried out with a distinct set of geotechnical parameters. However, under the assumption that 'waste is waste', some design engineers might be tempted to use geotechnical parameters of untreated raw municipal solid waste and mechanical and biological pre-treated municipal solid waste interchangeably. Therefore, to provide guidelines for use and to provide an aggregated source of this information, this mini-review provides comparisons of geotechnical parameters of mechanical and biological pre-treated waste and raw untreated waste at various decomposition stages. This comparison reveals reasonable correlations between the hydraulic conductivity values of untreated and mechanical and biological pre-treated municipal solid waste. It is recognised that particle size might have a significant influence on the hydraulic conductivity of both municipal solid waste types. However, the compression ratios and shear strengths of untreated and pre-treated municipal solid waste do not show such strong correlations. Furthermore, another emerging topic that requires appropriate attention is the recovery of resources that are embedded in old landfills. Therefore, the presented results provide a valuable tool for engineers designing landfills for mechanical and biological pre-treated waste or bioreactor landfills for untreated raw

  20. Unparticle Phenomenology -- A Mini Review

    OpenAIRE

    Cheung, Kingman; Keung, Wai-Yee; Yuan, Tzu-Chiang

    2008-01-01

    We review some collider phenomenology of unparticle physics, including real emissions and virtual exchanges of unparticle. Existing experimental constraints from collider physics as well as astrophysics are briefly discussed.

  1. Unparticle Phenomenology - A Mini Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We review some collider phenomenology of unparticle physics, including real emissions and virtual exchanges of unparticle. Existing experimental constraints from collider physics as well as astrophysics are briefly discussed.

  2. Sorption of Hydrophobic Organic Compounds on Natural Sorbents and Organoclays from Aqueous and Non-Aqueous Solutions: A Mini-Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Moyo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Renewed focus on the sorption of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs onto mineral surfaces and soil components is required due to the increased and wider range of organic pollutants being released into the environment. This mini-review examines the possibility of the contribution and mechanism of HOC sorption onto clay mineral sorbents such as kaolinite, and soil organic matter and the possible role of both in the prevention of environmental contamination by HOCs. Literature data indicates that certain siloxane surfaces can be hydrophobic. Therefore soils can retain HOCs even at low soil organic levels and the extent will depend on the structure of the pollutant and the type and concentration of clay minerals in the sorbent. Clay minerals are wettable by nonpolar solvents and so sorption of HOCs onto them from aqueous and non-aqueous solutions is possible. This is important for two reasons: firstly, the movement and remediation of soil environments will be a function of the concentration and type of clay minerals in the soil. Secondly, low-cost sorbents such as kaolinite and expandable clays can be added to soils or contaminated environments as temporary retention barriers for HOCs. Inorganic cations sorbed onto the kaolinite have a strong influence on the rate and extent of sorption of hydrophobic organic pollutants onto kaolinite. Structural sorbate classes that can be retained by the kaolinite matrix are limited by hydrogen bonding between hydroxyl groups of the octahedral alumosilicate sheet and the tetrahedral sheet with silicon. Soil organic carbon plays a key role in the sorption of HOCs onto soils, but the extent will be strongly affected by the structure of the organic soil matter and the presence of soot. Structural characterisation of soil organic matter in a particular soil should be conducted during a particular contamination event. Contamination by mining extractants and antibiotics will require renewed focus on the use of the QSAR

  3. Hexacoordinate bonding and aromaticity in silicon phthalocyanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang

    2010-12-23

    Si-E bondings in hexacoordinate silicon phthalocyanine were analyzed using bond order (BO), energy partition, atoms in molecules (AIM), electron localization function (ELF), and localized orbital locator (LOL). Bond models were proposed to explain differences between hexacoordinate and tetracoordinate Si-E bondings. Aromaticity of silicon phthalocyanine was investigated using nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS), harmonic oscillator model of aromaticity (HOMA), conceptual density functional theory (DFT), ring critical point (RCP) descriptors, and delocalization index (DI). Structure, energy, bonding, and aromaticity of tetracoordinate silicon phthalocyanine were studied and compared with hexacoordinate one. PMID:21105726

  4. Radiation chemistry of aromatic dimer radical cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    π-π Interactions of aromatic molecules are paid attention much in many fields, especially biology, chemistry, and applied physics, represented as protein, DNA, electron donor-accepter complexes, charge transfers, and self assembly molecules. Aromatic molecules including benzene rings are the simplest case to study the π-π interactions. To interpret the charge resonance (CR) structure in the dimer radical cations, spectroscopic and ESR methods have been carried out. The spectroscopic study on the dimer radical ion of molecules with two chromophores would be profitable to identify the electronic and configurational properties. In this article, dynamics of the dimer radical cation of benzenes, polystyrenes, and resist polymers is described on the basis of direct observation of CR band by the nanosecond pulse radiolysis and low temperature γ-radiolysis methods. (author)

  5. Discovering Chemical Aromaticity Using Fragrant Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Tanya L.

    2010-01-01

    Introductory organic chemistry is often perceived as inaccessible by students. This article describes a method used to link organic chemistry to everyday experience, asking students to explore whether fragrant molecules are also aromatic in the chemical sense. Students were engaged in this activity, excited about their results, and performed well…

  6. Retention of polyphenyls and substituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the system hydroxylated silica - n-hexane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikitin, Y.S.; Lanin, S.N. [Dept. of Chemistry, M.V. Lomonosov State Univ. of Moscow (Russian Federation); Al-Ahmed, A. [University of Aleppo (Syrian Arab Republic)

    1997-12-31

    The regularity of retention of unsubstituted and methyl-substituted polyphenyls and condensed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in normal-phase (NP) HPLC with a non-polar mobile phase (n-hexane) on hydroxylated silica has been studied. It was shown that chromatographic retention of aromatic hydrocarbons depends not only on number of aromatic rings and methyl groups in a molecule, but also on a nature of the bond between the aromatic rings of polyphenyls and condensed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. A structure - retention relationship has been proposed for description of the retention regularity of the aromatic hydrocarbons studied. (orig.)

  7. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid

    2010-01-01

    Carbonaceous materials play an important role in space. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a ubiquitous component of the carbonaceous materials. PAHs are the best-known candidates to account for the IR emission bands. They are also thought to be among the carriers of the diffuse interstellar absorption bands (DIBs). PAH ionization states reflect the ionization balance of the medium while PAH size, composition, and structure reflect the energetic and chemical history of the medium. A major challenge is to reproduce in the laboratory the physical conditions that exist in the emission and absorption interstellar zones. The harsh physical conditions of the ISM -low temperature, collisionless, strong UV radiation fields- are simulated in the laboratory by associating a molecular beam with an ionizing discharge to generate a cold plasma expansion. PAH ions and radicals are formed from the neutral precursors in an isolated environment at low temperature and probed with high-sensitivity cavity ringdown spectroscopy in the NUV-NIR range. Carbon nanoparticles are also formed during the short residence time of the precursors in the plasma and are characterized with time-offlight mass spectrometry. These experiments provide unique information on the spectra of large carbonaceous molecules and ions in the gas phase that can now be directly compared to interstellar and circumstellar observations (IR emission bands, DIBs, extinction curve). These findings also hold great potential for understanding the formation process of interstellar carbonaceous grains. We will review recent progress in the experimental and theoretical studies of PAHs, compare the laboratory data with astronomical observations and discuss the global implications.

  8. Interatomic magnetizability: a QTAIM-based approach toward deciphering magnetic aromaticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroutan-Nejad, Cina

    2011-11-17

    Interatomic magnetizability provides insight into the extent of electronic current density between two adjacent atomic basins. By studying a number of well-known aromatic, nonaromatic, and antiaromatic molecules, it is demonstrated that interatomic magnetizability (bond magnetizability) not only is able to verify the exact nature of aromaticity/antiaromaticity among different molecules, but also can distinguish the correct aromaticity order among sets of aromatic/antiaromatic molecules. The interatomic magnetizability is a direct measure of the current flux between two adjacent atomic basins and is the first QTAIM-derived index that evaluates aromaticity based on a response property, that is, magnetizability. Bond magnetizability is easy to compute, straightforward to interpret, and can be employed to evaluate the pure π- or σ-orbital contributions to magnetic aromaticity. PMID:21739973

  9. Electronic Aromaticity Index for Large Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Matito, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new electronic aromaticity index, AV1245, consisting in the average of the 4-center MCI values along the ring that keep a positional relationship of 1,2,4,5. AV1245 measures the extent of transferability of the delocalized electrons between bonds 1-2 and 4-5, which is expected to be large in conjugated circuits and, therefore, in aromatic molecules. A new algorithm for the calculation of MCI for large rings is also introduced and used to produce the data for the calibration of the new aromaticity index. AV1245 does not rely on reference values, does not suffer from large numerical precision errors, and it does not present any limitation on the nature of atoms, the molecular geometry or the level of calculation. It is a size-extensive measure with a small computational cost that grows linearly with the number of ring members. Therefore, it is specially suitable to study the aromaticity of large molecular rings as those occurring in belt-shaped M\\"obius structures or porphyrins.

  10. An electronic aromaticity index for large rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matito, Eduard

    2016-04-28

    We introduce a new electronic aromaticity index, AV1245, consisting of an average of the 4-center multicenter indices (MCI) along the ring that keeps a positional relationship of 1, 2, 4, 5. AV1245 measures the extent of transferability of the delocalized electrons between bonds 1-2 and 4-5, which is expected to be large in conjugated circuits and, therefore, in aromatic molecules. A new algorithm for the calculation of MCI for large rings is also introduced and used to produce the data for the calibration of the new aromaticity index. AV1245 does not rely on reference values, does not suffer from large numerical precision errors, and it does not present any limitation on the nature of atoms, the molecular geometry or the level of calculation. It is a size-extensive measure with low computational cost that grows linearly with the number of ring members. Therefore, it is especially suitable to study the aromaticity of large molecular rings such as those occurring in belt-shaped Möbius structures or porphyrins. The analysis of AV1245 in free-base and bis-metalated Pd [32]octaphyrins(1,0,1,0,1,0,1,0) completes this study. PMID:26878146

  11. Lignin Peroxidase Oxidation of Aromatic Compounds in Systems Containing Organic Solvents

    OpenAIRE

    Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael; Westlake, Donald W. S.; Fedorak, Phillip M.

    1994-01-01

    Lignin peroxidase from Phanerochaete chrysosporium was used to study the oxidation of aromatic compounds, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocyclic compounds, that are models of moieties of asphaltene molecules. The oxidations were done in systems containing water-miscible organic solvents, including methanol, isopropanol, N, N-dimethylformamide, acetonitrile, and tetrahydrofuran. Of the 20 aromatic compounds tested, 9 were oxidized by lignin peroxidase in the presence of hy...

  12. Starlike aluminum-carbon aromatic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan-Bo; Jiang, Jin-Liang; Lu, Hai-Gang; Wang, Zhi-Xiang; Perez-Peralta, Nancy; Islas, Rafael; Contreras, Maryel; Merino, Gabriel; Wu, Judy I-Chia; Schleyer, Paul von Ragué

    2011-01-10

    Is it possible to achieve molecules with starlike structures by replacing the H atoms in (CH)(n)(q) aromatic hydrocarbons with aluminum atoms in bridging positions? Although D(4h) C(4)Al(4)(2-) and D(2) C(6)Al(6) are not good prospects for experimental realization, a very extensive computational survey of fifty C(5)Al(5)(-) isomers identified the starlike D(5h) global minimum with five planar tetracoordinate carbon atoms to be a promising candidate for detection by photoelectron detachment spectroscopy. BOMD (Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics) simulations and high-level theoretical computations verified this conclusion. The combination of favorable electronic and geometric structural features (including aromaticity and optimum C-Al-C bridge bonding) stabilizes the C(5)Al(5)(-) star preferentially. PMID:21207593

  13. Aromatic Structure in Simulates Titan Aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainer, Melissa G.; Loeffler, M. J.; Anderson, C. M.; Hudson, R. L.; Samuelson, R. E.; Moore, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    Observations of Titan by the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) between 560 and 20 per centimeter (approximately 18 to 500 micrometers) have been used to infer the vertical variations of Titan's ice abundances, as well as those of the aerosol from the surface to an altitude of 300 km [1]. The aerosol has a broad emission feature centered approximately at 140 per centimeter (71 micrometers). As seen in Figure 1, this feature cannot be reproduced using currently available optical constants from laboratory-generated Titan aerosol analogs [2]. The far-IR is uniquely qualified for investigating low-energy vibrational motions within the lattice structures of COITIDlex aerosol. The feature observed by CIRS is broad, and does not likely arise from individual molecules, but rather is representative of the skeletal movements of macromolecules. Since Cassini's arrival at Titan, benzene (C6H6) has been detected in the atmosphere at ppm levels as well as ions that may be polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) [3]. We speculate that the feature may be a blended composite that can be identified with low-energy vibrations of two-dimensional lattice structures of large molecules, such as PAHs or nitrogenated aromatics. Such structures do not dominate the composition of analog materials generated from CH4 and N2 irradiation. We are performing studies forming aerosol analog via UV irradiation of aromatic precursors - specifically C6H6 - to understand how the unique chemical architecture of the products will influence the observable aerosol characteristics. The optical and chemical properties of the aromatic analog will be compared to those formed from CH4/N2 mixtures, with a focus on the as-yet unidentified far-IR absorbance feature. Preliminary results indicate that the photochemically-formed aromatic aerosol has distinct chemical composition, and may incorporate nitrogen either into the ring structure or adjoined chemical groups. These compositional differences are

  14. Molecular dynamics studies of aromatic hydrocarbon liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project mainly involves a molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo study of the effect of molecular shape on thermophysical properties of bulk fluids with an emphasis on the aromatic hydrocarbon liquids. In this regard we have studied the modeling, simulation methodologies, and predictive and correlating methods for thermodynamic properties of fluids of nonspherical molecules. In connection with modeling we have studied the use of anisotropic site-site potentials, through a modification of the Gay-Berne Gaussian overlap potential, to successfully model the aromatic rings after adding the necessary electrostatic moments. We have also shown these interaction sites should be located at the geometric centers of the chemical groups. In connection with predictive methods, we have shown two perturbation type theories to work well for fluids modeled using one-center anisotropic potentials and the possibility exists for extending these to anisotropic site-site models. In connection with correlation methods, we have studied, through simulations, the effect of molecular shape on the attraction term in the generalized van der Waals equation of state for fluids of nonspherical molecules and proposed a possible form which is to be studied further. We have successfully studied the vector and parallel processing aspects of molecular simulations for fluids of nonspherical molecules

  15. Managing Prolactinomas During Pregnancy: Mini Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mussa eAlmalki

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Prolactinomas are the most prevalent functional benign pituitary tumors due to a pituitary micro- or macroadenoma. The majority of patients presents with infertility and gonadal dysfunction.A dopamine agonist (DAs (bromocriptine or cabergoline is the treatment of choice that can normalize prolactin levels, reduce tumor size and restore ovulation and fertility. Cabergoline generally preferred over bromocriptine because of its higher efficacy and tolerability. Managing prolactinomas during pregnancy may be challenging. During pregnancy, the pituitary gland undergoes global hyperplasia due to a progressive increase in serum estrogens level that may lead to increase of the tumor volume with potential mass effect and visual loss.The risk of tumor enlargement may occur in 3 % of those with microadenomas, 32 % in those with macroadenomas that were not previously operated on and 4.8% of those with macroadenomas with prior ablative treatment. Though both drugs appear to be safe during pregnancy, the data on fetal exposure to DAs during pregnancy have been reported with bromocriptine far exceeds that of cabergoline with no association of increased risk of pregnancy loss and premature delivery. It is advisable to stop the use of DAs immediately once pregnancy is confirmed, except in the case of women with invasive macroprolactinomas or pressure symptoms. This review outlines the therapeutic approach to, prolactinoma during pregnancy, with emphasis on the safety of available DA therapy.

  16. The childhood obesity epidemic: A mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubna Mahmood

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a medical condition resulting from the accumulation of excess fat in the human body to the extent that it might have great harm effects on the human health by increasing the diseases lowering the average life expectancy. A person who has a body mass index (BMI of more than 30 kg/m 2 is classified as obese; this is how obesity can be defined for adult, which is different than that in children. To account for variability by sex and age, BMI in children must be compared with sex- and age-specific reference values (Centers for Disease Control growth chart. The terminology that is used for high BMI-for-age in children in has been based on the recommendation of an expert committee convened by federal agencies. Parents can be a good example for their children by modeling healthful eating behaviors and being physically active. Parents can also be effective advocates by being involved in efforts in their schools, and community to expand the access and availability of opportunities for physical activity and healthful eating. In the case of being an obese child, that means suffering from many health problems and obesity-related diseases such as elevated blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes and heart diseases. Diabetes is considered as one of the obesity-related diseases; type 2 diabetes in children has linked with obesity; when the pancreas starts to produce the insulin hormone, excess body fat will not allow child's body to use the insulin as it should be which can lead to being a diabetic patient. Schools also play a vital role in teaching the students on how to eat properly and select the best meal with keeping their bodies flexible by doing physical activities. It is important in order to keep children away from being in disasters by having a lot of obesity-related diseases (e.g., heart attacks and diabetes, which can lead to premature death in obese children. Children must be healthy since those children growing up in today's world are tomorrow's future!

  17. Electrochemistry in Supercritical Fluids: A Mini Review

    OpenAIRE

    Toghill, Kathryn E.; Mendez, Manuel A.; Voyame, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    A brief overview of the literature relating to electrochemical studies and processes undertaken in supercritical fluids is presented. This review mostly concerns carbon dioxide and hydrofluorocarbons, given the accessibility of their supercritical states, and does not consider the emerging body of research in expanded phase electrochemistry.

  18. Cosmic Microwave Background Mini-review

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    A compact overview of the status of CMB anisotropy results and their cosmological interpretation up until the end of 2009. Section headings: Introduction; Description of CMB Anisotropies; Cosmological Parameters; Physics of Anisotropies; Current Anisotropy Data; CMB Polarization; Complications; Constraints on Cosmologies; Particle Physics Constraints; Fundamental Lessons; and Future Directions.

  19. Cosmic Microwave Background Mini-review

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Douglas; Smoot, George F.

    2010-01-01

    A compact overview of the status of CMB anisotropy results and their cosmological interpretation up until the end of 2005. Sections headings: Introduction; Description of CMB Anisotropies; Cosmological Parameters; Physics of Anisotropies; Current Anisotropy Data; CMB Polarization; Complications; Constraints on Cosmologies; Particle Physics Constraints; Fundamental Lessons; and Future Directions.

  20. Cosmic Microwave Background Mini-Review

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, D; Scott, Douglas; Smoot, George

    2006-01-01

    A compact overview of the status of CMB anisotropy results and their cosmological interpretation up until the end of 2005. Sections headings: Introduction; Description of CMB Anisotropies; Cosmological Parameters; Physics of Anisotropies; Current Anisotropy Data; CMB Polarization; Complications; Constraints on Cosmologies; Particle Physics Constraints; Fundamental Lessons; and Future Directions.

  1. Toxicology of iodine: A mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilin Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Iodine is necessary for all living organisms. Deficiency of iodine in the organism leads to various diseases (including mental and increased rates of cancer. It is well known that one third of the world’s population lived in iodine-deficient areas. At present time, the primary intervention for preventing iodine deficiency disorders worldwide is through the iodization of salt. The two most common types of fortificant used to iodize salt are potassium iodide and potassium iodate. Iodine-containing compounds are also widely used in clinical medicine as a highly effective topical antimicrobial agent that has been used clinically in the treatment of wounds. Hence, the genetic toxicology of iodine and iodine-containing compounds is very essential topic. In this literature review are analyzed the data concerning genetic toxicology and the influence of these compounds on tumor rates in epidemiological and experimental studies.

  2. Stereopsis and amblyopia: A mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Dennis M; Knill, David C; Bavelier, Daphne

    2015-09-01

    Amblyopia is a neuro-developmental disorder of the visual cortex that arises from abnormal visual experience early in life. Amblyopia is clinically important because it is a major cause of vision loss in infants and young children. Amblyopia is also of basic interest because it reflects the neural impairment that occurs when normal visual development is disrupted. Amblyopia provides an ideal model for understanding when and how brain plasticity may be harnessed for recovery of function. Over the past two decades there has been a rekindling of interest in developing more effective methods for treating amblyopia, and for extending the treatment beyond the critical period, as exemplified by new clinical trials and new basic research studies. The focus of this review is on stereopsis and its potential for recovery. Impaired stereoscopic depth perception is the most common deficit associated with amblyopia under ordinary (binocular) viewing conditions (Webber & Wood, 2005). Our review of the extant literature suggests that this impairment may have a substantial impact on visuomotor tasks, difficulties in playing sports in children and locomoting safely in older adults. Furthermore, impaired stereopsis may also limit career options for amblyopes. Finally, stereopsis is more impacted in strabismic than in anisometropic amblyopia. Our review of the various approaches to treating amblyopia (patching, perceptual learning, videogames) suggests that there are several promising new approaches to recovering stereopsis in both anisometropic and strabismic amblyopes. However, recovery of stereoacuity may require more active treatment in strabismic than in anisometropic amblyopia. Individuals with strabismic amblyopia have a very low probability of improvement with monocular training; however they fare better with dichoptic training than with monocular training, and even better with direct stereo training. PMID:25637854

  3. Osteoblasts in Bone Physiology—Mini Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orit Rosenberg

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Bone structural integrity and shape are maintained by removal of old matrix by osteoclasts and in-situ synthesis of new bone by osteoblasts. These cells comprise the basic multicellular unit (BMU. Bone mass maintenance is determined by the net anabolic activity of the BMU, when the matrix elaboration of the osteoblasts equals or exceeds the bone resorption by the osteoclasts. The normal function of the BMU causes a continuous remodeling process of the bone, with deposition of bony matrix (osteoid along the vectors of the generated force by gravity and attached muscle activity. The osteoblasts are derived from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. Circulating hormones and locally produced cytokines and growth factors modulate the replication and differentiation of osteoclast and osteoblast progenitors. The appropriate number of the osteoblasts in the BMU is determined by the differentiation of the precursor bone-marrow stem cells into mature osteoblasts, their proliferation with subsequent maturation into metabolically active osteocytes, and osteoblast degradation by apoptosis. Thus, the two crucial points to target when planning to control the osteoblast population are the processes of cell proliferation and apoptosis, which are regulated by cellular hedgehog and Wnt pathways that involve humoral and mechanical stimulations. Osteoblasts regulate both bone matrix synthesis and mineralization directly by their own synthetic activities, and bone resorption indirectly by its paracrinic effects on osteoclasts. The overall synthetic and regulatory activities of osteoblasts govern bone tissue integrity and shape.

  4. Schleyer hyperconjugative aromaticity and Diels-Alder reactivity of 5-substituted cyclopentadienes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levandowski, Brian J; Zou, Lufeng; Houk, K N

    2016-01-01

    Schleyer's discovery of hyperconjugative aromaticity and antiaromaticity in 5-substituted cyclopentadienes further expanded our understanding of the pervasive influence of aromaticity. Acceptors induce antiaromatic character by Schleyer's negative hyperconjugative aromaticity, and donors have the opposite effect. We computationally explored the Diels-Alder reactivity of 5-substituted cyclopentadienes with ethylene and maleic anhydride. The predicted billionfold difference in the computed gas phase rate constants at room temperature for the Diels-Alder reactions of 5-substituted cyclopentadienes with ethylene or maleic anhydride results from differences in the transition state distortion energies, which are directly related to the hyperconjugative aromaticity of these molecules. PMID:26444427

  5. Photoinduced dynamics in protonated aromatic amino acid

    CERN Document Server

    Grégoire, Gilles; Barat, Michel; Fayeton, Jacqueline; Dedonder-Lardeux, Claude; Jouvet, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    UV photoinduced fragmentation of protonated aromatics amino acids have emerged the last few years, coming from a situation where nothing was known to what we think a good understanding of the optical properties. We will mainly focus this review on the tryptophan case. Three groups have mostly done spectroscopic studies and one has mainly been involved in dynamics studies of the excited states in the femtosecond/picosecond range and also in the fragmentation kinetics from nanosecond to millisecond. All these data, along with high level ab initio calculations, have shed light on the role of the different electronic states of the protonated molecules upon the fragmentation mechanisms.

  6. A new aromatic probe - The ring stretching vibration Raman spectroscopy frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yan-bo; Liu, Zi-zhong; Liu, Hong-xia; Zhang, Feng-ying; Yin, Jun-qing

    2016-07-01

    A new aromatic criterion is presented to determine the aromatic degree of the high symmetric molecules. Group theory is used to explain the correlation between the aromatic degree and the value of Ring Stretching Vibration Raman Spectroscopic Frequency (RSVRSF). The calculations of the geometrical optimization, nucleus-independent chemical shifts (NICS) and values of the Raman Spectroscopy for the aromatic molecules-LnHn (L = C, Si, Ge, n = 3, 5-8) were performed using the Density Functional Theory (DFT) Method, as well as the correlations between the values of their RSVRSF and NICS values by Statistic Package for Social Science (SPSS17.0). There are high positive correlations between the theoretical calculated the NICS values and the value of the RSVRSF (A1g/A1‧) of the LnHn (L = C, Si, Ge, n = 3, 5-8). The bigger the aromatic degree, the bigger the RSVRSF is. The value of the RSVRSF is a new probe of aromaticity. Expectedly, it is predicted that the experimental determination of the aromatic degree can be achieved by the determination of the ring stretching vibration (A1g/A1‧) Raman spectrum frequencies for the aromatic target molecules.

  7. A new aromatic probe - The ring stretching vibration Raman spectroscopy frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yan-Bo; Liu, Zi-Zhong; Liu, Hong-Xia; Zhang, Feng-Ying; Yin, Jun-Qing

    2016-07-01

    A new aromatic criterion is presented to determine the aromatic degree of the high symmetric molecules. Group theory is used to explain the correlation between the aromatic degree and the value of Ring Stretching Vibration Raman Spectroscopic Frequency (RSVRSF). The calculations of the geometrical optimization, nucleus-independent chemical shifts (NICS) and values of the Raman Spectroscopy for the aromatic molecules-LnHn (L=C, Si, Ge, n=3, 5-8) were performed using the Density Functional Theory (DFT) Method, as well as the correlations between the values of their RSVRSF and NICS values by Statistic Package for Social Science (SPSS17.0). There are high positive correlations between the theoretical calculated the NICS values and the value of the RSVRSF (A1g/A1') of the LnHn (L=C, Si, Ge, n=3, 5-8). The bigger the aromatic degree, the bigger the RSVRSF is. The value of the RSVRSF is a new probe of aromaticity. Expectedly, it is predicted that the experimental determination of the aromatic degree can be achieved by the determination of the ring stretching vibration (A1g/A1') Raman spectrum frequencies for the aromatic target molecules. PMID:27085169

  8. Polyimidazoles via aromatic nucleophilic displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Polyimidazoles (PI) are prepared by the aromatic nucleophilic displacement reaction of di(hydroxyphenyl) imidazole monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or activated aromatic dinitro compounds. The reactions are carried out in polar aprotic solvents such as N,N-dimethyl acetamide, sulfolane, N-methylpyrrolidinone, dimethylsulfoxide, or diphenylsulfone using alkali metal bases such as potassium carbonate at elevated temperatures under nitrogen. The di(hydroxyphenyl) imidazole monomers are prepared by reacting an aromatic aldehyde with a dimethoxybenzil or by reacting an aromatic dialdehyde with a methoxybenzil in the presence of ammonium acetate. The di(methoxyphenyl) imidazole is subsequently treated with aqueous hydrobromic acid to give the di(hydroxphenyl) imidazole monomer. This synthetic route has provided high molecular weight PI of new chemical structure, is economically and synthetically more favorable than other routes, and allows for facile chemical structure variation due to the availability of a large variety of activated aromatic dihalides and dinitro compounds.

  9. Occurrence and transformation of tricyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in low rank coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazai, I.; Alexander, G. (Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary). Research Laboratory for Inorganic Chemistry)

    1991-08-01

    Aromatic components of extracts obtained from four low rank coal samples were investigated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A number of compounds were observed for the first time. The tricyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were investigated in detail. They show close similarities in structure to those reported to be formed in laboratory dehydrogenation experiments. The co-occurrence of molecules in the same samples containing additional unsaturation as well as the aromatic ring(s), offers strong support for the hypothesis of progressive aromatization of diterpenoids. A hypothetical diagenetic pathway is proposed to explain the generation of many of the compounds present. In the pathway the following reactions were considered: aromatization (i.e. dehydrogenation), elimination of substituents, methyl shift, isomerization and side chain shortening of fully aromatized species. 40 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Design of nanostructures based on aromatic peptide amphiphiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Scott; Ulijn, Rein V

    2014-12-01

    Aromatic peptide amphiphiles are gaining popularity as building blocks for the bottom-up fabrication of nanomaterials, including gels. These materials combine the simplicity of small molecules with the versatility of peptides, with a range of applications proposed in biomedicine, nanotechnology, food science, cosmetics, etc. Despite their simplicity, a wide range of self-assembly behaviours have been described. Due to varying conditions and protocols used, care should be taken when attempting to directly compare results from the literature. In this review, we rationalise the structural features which govern the self-assembly of aromatic peptide amphiphiles by focusing on four segments, (i) the N-terminal aromatic component, (ii) linker segment, (iii) peptide sequence, and (iv) C-terminus. It is clear that the molecular structure of these components significantly influences the self-assembly process and resultant supramolecular architectures. A number of modes of assembly have been proposed, including parallel, antiparallel, and interlocked antiparallel stacking conformations. In addition, the co-assembly arrangements of aromatic peptide amphiphiles are reviewed. Overall, this review elucidates the structural trends and design rules that underpin the field of aromatic peptide amphiphile assembly, paving the way to a more rational design of nanomaterials based on aromatic peptide amphiphiles. PMID:25199102

  11. Synthetic fuel aromaticity and staged combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longanbach, J. R.; Chan, L. K.; Levy, A.

    1982-11-15

    Samples of middle and heavy SRC-II distillates were distilled into 50 C boiling point range fractions. These were characterized by measurements of their molecular weight, elemental analysis and basic nitrogen content and calculation of average molecular structures. The structures typically consisted of 1 to 3 aromatic rings fused to alicyclic rings with short, 1 to 3 carbon aliphatic side chains. The lower boiling fractions contained significant amounts (1 atom/molecule) of oxygen while the heavier fractions contained so few heteroatoms that they were essentially hydrocarbons. Laboratory scale oxidative-pyrolysis experiments were carried out at pyrolysis temperatures of 500 to 1100 C and oxygen concentrations from 0 to 100 percent of stoichiometry. Analysis of liquid products, collected in condensers cooled with liquid nitrogen showed that aromatization is a major reaction in the absence of oxygen. The oxygen-containing materials (phenolics) seem to be more resistant to thermal pyrolysis than unsubstituted aromatics. Nitrogen converts from basic to nonbasic forms at about 500 C. The nonbasic nitrogen is more stable and survives up to 700 C after which it is slowly removed. A recently constructed 50,000 Btu/hr staged combustor was used to study the chemistry of the nitrogen and aromatics. SRC II combustion was studied under fuel-rich, first-stage conditions at air/fuel ratios from 0.6 to 1.0 times stoichiometric. The chemistry of the fuel during combustion calls for further investigation in order to examine the mechanism by which HCN is evolved as a common intermediate for the formation of the nitrogen-containing gaseous combustion products. 25 references, 45 figures, 25 tables.

  12. Nickel-Catalyzed Aromatic C-H Functionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Junichiro; Muto, Kei; Itami, Kenichiro

    2016-08-01

    Catalytic C-H functionalization using transition metals has received significant interest from organic chemists because it provides a new strategy to construct carbon-carbon bonds and carbon-heteroatom bonds in highly functionalized, complex molecules without pre-functionalization. Recently, inexpensive catalysts based on transition metals such as copper, iron, cobalt, and nickel have seen more use in the laboratory. This review describes recent progress in nickel-catalyzed aromatic C-H functionalization reactions classified by reaction types and reaction partners. Furthermore, some reaction mechanisms are described and cutting-edge syntheses of natural products and pharmaceuticals using nickel-catalyzed aromatic C-H functionalization are presented. PMID:27573407

  13. DAR Assisted Layer-by-Layer Assembly of Aromatic Compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜思光; 陈晓东; 张莉; 刘鸣华

    2003-01-01

    A facile DAR (diphenylamine-4-diazonium-formaldehyde resin)assisted layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of uitrathin organic film of aromatic compounds has been investigated. The muitilayer of pyrene or anthracene was fabricated through simple dipping of the glass slide into the mixed solution of DAR with the target compounds. In this method, DAR acted as an assistant compound to help the assembling of the aromatic compounds. Such a convenient deposition method not only reserves the advantages of the traditional LbL technique but also simplifies the technique and extends the effectiveness of LbL technique to small molecules without any charge.

  14. Non-covalent Interactions of Graphene with Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zygouri, Panagiota; Potsi, Georgia; Mouzourakis, Eleftherios; Spyrou, Konstantinos; Gournis, Dimitrios; Rudolf, Petra

    2015-01-01

    In this mini review we discuss the interactions of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with graphene and the experimental approaches developed so far to create novel graphene/PAH hybrids and composite systems. The utilization of these systems in electrical, biomedical and polymer-reinforcement applicat

  15. Photoisomerisable molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Peris Fajarnes, Eduardo Víctor; Mata Martínez, José Antonio; Márquez Linares, Francisco Manuel; Sabater Picot, María José

    2005-01-01

    [EN] The invention relates to a molecule comprising at least one carbon-carbon double bond which is substituted by at least one cyclopentadienyl-metal-cyclopentadienyl complex, having the cis/trans isomerisation property, in a reversible manner in response to the absorption of light. Preferably, the rest of the molecule comprises a dendrimer of any generation, advantageously of the polypropylenimine octaamine type. The inventive molecule can be used as a molecular switch and in various differ...

  16. Bacterial Degradation of Aromatic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing X. Li

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aromatic compounds are among the most prevalent and persistent pollutants in the environment. Petroleum-contaminated soil and sediment commonly contain a mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs and heterocyclic aromatics. Aromatics derived from industrial activities often have functional groups such as alkyls, halogens and nitro groups. Biodegradation is a major mechanism of removal of organic pollutants from a contaminated site. This review focuses on bacterial degradation pathways of selected aromatic compounds. Catabolic pathways of naphthalene, fluorene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, and benzo[a]pyrene are described in detail. Bacterial catabolism of the heterocycles dibenzofuran, carbazole, dibenzothiophene, and dibenzodioxin is discussed. Bacterial catabolism of alkylated PAHs is summarized, followed by a brief discussion of proteomics and metabolomics as powerful tools for elucidation of biodegradation mechanisms.

  17. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons as Plausible Prebiotic Membrane Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groen, Joost; Deamer, David W.; Kros, Alexander; Ehrenfreund, Pascale

    2012-08-01

    Aromatic molecules delivered to the young Earth during the heavy bombardment phase in the early history of our solar system were likely to be among the most abundant and stable organic compounds available. The Aromatic World hypothesis suggests that aromatic molecules might function as container elements, energy transduction elements and templating genetic components for early life forms. To investigate the possible role of aromatic molecules as container elements, we incorporated different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the membranes of fatty acid vesicles. The goal was to determine whether PAH could function as a stabilizing agent, similar to the role that cholesterol plays in membranes today. We studied vesicle size distribution, critical vesicle concentration and permeability of the bilayers using C6-C10 fatty acids mixed with amphiphilic PAH derivatives such as 1-hydroxypyrene, 9-anthracene carboxylic acid and 1,4 chrysene quinone. Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) spectroscopy was used to measure the size distribution of vesicles and incorporation of PAH species was established by phase-contrast and epifluorescence microscopy. We employed conductimetric titration to determine the minimal concentration at which fatty acids could form stable vesicles in the presence of PAHs. We found that oxidized PAH derivatives can be incorporated into decanoic acid (DA) vesicle bilayers in mole ratios up to 1:10 (PAH:DA). Vesicle size distribution and critical vesicle concentration were largely unaffected by PAH incorporation, but 1-hydroxypyrene and 9-anthracene carboxylic acid lowered the permeability of fatty acid bilayers to small solutes up to 4-fold. These data represent the first indication of a cholesterol-like stabilizing effect of oxidized PAH derivatives in a simulated prebiotic membrane.

  18. Enumerating molecules.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visco, Donald Patrick, Jr. (, . Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, TN); Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Roe, Diana C.

    2004-04-01

    This report is a comprehensive review of the field of molecular enumeration from early isomer counting theories to evolutionary algorithms that design molecules in silico. The core of the review is a detail account on how molecules are counted, enumerated, and sampled. The practical applications of molecular enumeration are also reviewed for chemical information, structure elucidation, molecular design, and combinatorial library design purposes. This review is to appear as a chapter in Reviews in Computational Chemistry volume 21 edited by Kenny B. Lipkowitz.

  19. Formation of Prebiotic Molecules in Interstellar and Cometary Ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Max P.; Sandford, Scott A.; Allamandola, Louis J.; Dworkin, Jason; Gilette, J. Seb; Zare, Richard N.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We report here on our lab studies of ice photochemistry of large organic molecules under cometary conditions. We focus on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), their photoproducts, and their similarities to molecules seen in living systems today. We note that these kinds of compounds are seen in meteorites and we propose an explanation for both their formation and their observed deuterium enrichments.

  20. Polybenzimidazoles Via Aromatic Nucleophilic Displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Hergerrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Novel molecular weight controlled and endcapped polybenzimidazoles (PBI) are prepared by the aromatic nucleophilic displacement reaction of di(hydroxyphenylbenzimidazole) monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or activated aromatic dinitro compounds. The PBI are endcapped with mono(hydroxyphenyl)benzimidazoles. The polymerizations are carried out in polar aprotic solvents such as N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone or N,N-dimethylacetamide using alkali metal bases such as potassium carbonate at elevated temperatures under nitrogen. Mono(hydroxyphenyl)benzimidazoles are synthesized by reacting phenyl-4-hydroxybenzoate with aromatic (o-diamine)s in diphenylsulfone. Molecular weight controlled and endcapped PBI of new chemical structures are prepared that exhibit a favorable combination of physical and mechanical properties.

  1. Bioassay of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Kirk, E.A.

    1980-08-01

    A positive relationship was found between the photodynamic activity of 24 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons versus published results on the mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, and initiation of unscheduled DNA synthesis. Metabolic activation of benzo(a)pyrene resulted in detection of increased mutagenesis in Paramecium tetraurelia as found also in the Ames Salmonella assay. The utility of P. tetraurelia as a biological detector of hazardous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is discussed.

  2. Micropropagation of different aromatic plants

    OpenAIRE

    Koleva Gudeva, Liljana; Iljovska Tusev, Jasmina; Trajkova, Fidanka

    2014-01-01

    Aromatic plants have been used for centuries as species, natural flavor, raw material for essential-oil industry and other purposes. Micropropagation has advantage over conventional propagation because of high multiplication rate, but it depends on the performance of the starting material, media composition, phytohormones and environmental factors. In this study, aromatic plants as peppermint (Menta piperita L.) and Menta sp., rosemary (Rosmarinus sp.), rocket (Eruca sativa Mill.), coriand...

  3. Sensory and aromatic characteristics of tongue sole by-products hydrolysates (Cynoglossus senegalensis)

    OpenAIRE

    Sylla, K. S. B.; Berge, Jean-pascal; PROST Carole; Musabyemariya, B.; Seydi, Mg

    2009-01-01

    Tongue sole by-products coming from fish-filleting plant were hydrolyzed by Protamex® protease. To identify the future application of hydrolysates, a sensory analysis was carried out.The sensory profile was performed with a jury of 14 specialized judges.11 profiles were found by this panel of tasting. In addition, the aromatic characterization revealed that 57 molecules are responsible for these odours described in sensory analysis.The description of these aromatic compounds opens potentia...

  4. Neutron Scattering of Aromatic and Aliphatic Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkowska, Marta; Bowron, Daniel T.; Manyar, Haresh G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Organic solvents, such as cyclohexane, cyclohexene, methylcyclohexane, benzene and toluene, are widely used as both reagents and solvents in industrial processes. Despite the ubiquity of these liquids, the local structures that govern the chemical properties have not been studied extensively. Herein, we report neutron diffraction measurements on liquid cyclohexane, cyclohexene, methylcyclohexane, benzene and toluene at 298 K to obtain a detailed description of the local structure in these compounds. The radial distribution functions of the centres of the molecules, as well as the partial distribution functions for the double bond for cyclohexene and methyl group for methylcyclohexane and toluene have been calculated. Additionally, probability density functions and angular radial distribution functions were extracted to provide a full description of the local structure within the chosen liquids. Structural motifs are discussed and compared for all liquids, referring specifically to the functional group and aromaticity present in the different liquids. PMID:26990367

  5. Neutron Scattering of Aromatic and Aliphatic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkowska, Marta; Bowron, Daniel T; Manyar, Haresh G; Hardacre, Christopher; Youngs, Tristan G A

    2016-07-01

    Organic solvents, such as cyclohexane, cyclohexene, methylcyclohexane, benzene and toluene, are widely used as both reagents and solvents in industrial processes. Despite the ubiquity of these liquids, the local structures that govern the chemical properties have not been studied extensively. Herein, we report neutron diffraction measurements on liquid cyclohexane, cyclohexene, methylcyclohexane, benzene and toluene at 298 K to obtain a detailed description of the local structure in these compounds. The radial distribution functions of the centres of the molecules, as well as the partial distribution functions for the double bond for cyclohexene and methyl group for methylcyclohexane and toluene have been calculated. Additionally, probability density functions and angular radial distribution functions were extracted to provide a full description of the local structure within the chosen liquids. Structural motifs are discussed and compared for all liquids, referring specifically to the functional group and aromaticity present in the different liquids. PMID:26990367

  6. Failure of hydrogenation in protecting polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Gatchell, Michael; de Ruette, Nathalie; Chen, Tao; Giacomozzi, Linda; Nascimento, Rodrigo F; Wolf, Michael; Anderson, Emma K; Delaunay, Rudy; Viziano, Violaine; Rousseau, Patrick; Adoui, Lamri; Huber, Bernd A; Schmidt, Henning T; Zettergren, Henning; Cederquist, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    A recent study of soft X-ray absorption in native and hydrogenated coronene cations, C$_{24}$H$_{12+m}^+$ $m=0-7$, led to the conclusion that additional hydrogen atoms protect (interstellar) Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules from fragmentation [Reitsma et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 053002 (2014)]. The present experiment with collisions between fast (30-200 eV) He atoms and pyrene (C$_{16}$H$_{10+m}^+$, $m=0$, 6, and 16) and simulations without reference to the excitation method suggests the opposite. We find that the absolute carbon-backbone fragmentation cross section does not decrease but increases with the degree of hydrogenation for pyrene molecules.

  7. Bacterial degradation of monocyclic aromatic amines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Kumar Arora

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aromatic amines are an important group of industrial chemicals, which are widely used for manufacturing of dyes, pesticides, drugs, pigments, and other industrial products. These compounds have been considered highly toxic to human beings due to their carcinogenic nature. Three groups of aromatic amines have been recognized: monocyclic, polycyclic and heterocyclic aromatic amines. Bacterial degradation of several monocyclic aromatic compounds has been studied in a variety of bacteria, which utilizes monocyclic aromatic amines as their sole source of carbon and energy. Several degradation pathways have been proposed and the related enzymes and genes have also been characterized. Many reviews have been reviewed toxicity of monocyclic aromatic amines; however, there is lack of review on biodegradation of monocyclic aromatic amines. The aim of this review is to summarize bacterial degradation of monocyclic aromatic amines. This review will increase our current understanding of biochemical and molecular basis of bacterial degradation of monocyclic aromatic amines.

  8. Aromatic-Aromatic Interactions in Biological System: Structure Activity Relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajagopal, Appavu; Deepa, Mohan [Molecular Biophysics Unit, Indian Institute of Sciences-Bangalore, Karnataka (India); Govindaraju, Munisamy [Bio-Spatial Technology Research Unit, Department of Environmental Biotechnology, School of Environmental Sciences, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2016-02-26

    While, intramolecular hydrogen bonds have attracted the greatest attention in studies of peptide conformations, the recognition that several other weakly polar interactions may be important determinants of folded structure has been growing. Burley and Petsko provided a comprehensive overview of the importance of weakly polar interactions, in shaping protein structures. The interactions between aromatic rings, which are spatially approximate, have attracted special attention. A survey of the proximal aromatic residue pairs in proteins, allowed Burley and Petsko to suggest that, “phenyl ring centroids are separated by a preferential distance of between 4.5 and 7 Å, and dihedral angles approximately 90° are most common”.

  9. Aromatic-Aromatic Interactions in Biological System: Structure Activity Relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While, intramolecular hydrogen bonds have attracted the greatest attention in studies of peptide conformations, the recognition that several other weakly polar interactions may be important determinants of folded structure has been growing. Burley and Petsko provided a comprehensive overview of the importance of weakly polar interactions, in shaping protein structures. The interactions between aromatic rings, which are spatially approximate, have attracted special attention. A survey of the proximal aromatic residue pairs in proteins, allowed Burley and Petsko to suggest that, “phenyl ring centroids are separated by a preferential distance of between 4.5 and 7 Å, and dihedral angles approximately 90° are most common”

  10. Aromatic-Aromatic Interactions in Biological System: Structure Activity Relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajagopal Appavu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available While, intramolecular hydrogen bonds have attracted the greatest attention in studies of peptide conformations, the recognition that several other weakly polar interactions may be important determinants of folded structure has been growing. Burley and Petsko provided a comprehensive overview of the importance of weakly polar interactions, in shaping protein structures. The interactions between aromatic rings, which are spatially approximate, have attracted special attention. A survey of the proximal aromatic residue pairs in proteins, allowed Burley and Petsko to suggest that, “phenyl ring centroids are separated by a preferential distance of between 4.5 and 7 Å, and dihedral angles approximately 90° are most common”.

  11. Advances towards aromatic oligoamide foldamers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelmgaard, Thomas; Plesner, Malene; Dissing, Mette Marie; Andersen, Jeanette Marker; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Nielsen, John

    2014-01-01

    We have efficiently synthesized 36 arylopeptoid dimers with ortho-, meta-, and para-substituted aromatic backbones and tert-butyl or phenyl side chains. The dimers were synthesized by using a "submonomer method" on solid phase, by applying a simplified common set of reaction conditions. X......-ray crystallographic analysis of two of these dimers disclosed that the tert-butyl side chain invokes a cis amide conformation with a comparatively more closely packed structure of the surrounding aromatic backbone while the phenyl side chain results in a trans amide conformation with a more open, extended structure...... conformation with a more open, extended structure of the surrounding aromatic backbone. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim....

  12. Concept of chemical bond and aromaticity based on quantum information theory

    CERN Document Server

    Szilvási, T; Legeza, Ö

    2015-01-01

    Quantum information theory (QIT) emerged in physics as standard technique to extract relevant information from quantum systems. It has already contributed to the development of novel fields like quantum computing, quantum cryptography, and quantum complexity. This arises the question what information is stored according to QIT in molecules which are inherently quantum systems as well. Rigorous analysis of the central quantities of QIT on systematic series of molecules offered the introduction of the concept of chemical bond and aromaticity directly from physical principles and notions. We identify covalent bond, donor-acceptor dative bond, multiple bond, charge-shift bond, and aromaticity indicating unified picture of fundamental chemical models from ab initio.

  13. Survey of Recent Innovations in Aromatic Rice

    OpenAIRE

    Napasintuwong, Orachos

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides situations of aromatic rice demand, and international standards. The history and recent developments of traditional and evolved aromatic rice varieties, namely Basmati rice and Jasmine rice, are reviewed. The emerging aromatic rice innovations from developed countries such as the U.S. and other Asian countries generate a threat to these traditional aromatic rice producers such as India, Pakistan, and Thailand. Under WTO Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights...

  14. From Möbius aromaticity to gapped spin liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheng-Chien; Muechler, Lukas; Neupert, Titus; Maciejko, Joseph; Car, Roberto

    Motivated by the concept of Möbius aromatics in organic chemistry, the Hubbard model on ring-shaped molecules has been shown previously to support a fragile Mott insulator (FMI) ground state, which is distinct from a conventional insulator through its nontrivial transformation properties under point-group symmetry operations. In this talk, we discuss two-dimensional lattices of weakly-coupled FMI molecules belonging to multi-dimensional irreducible representations of the molecular point group. The low-energy effective Hamiltonians map onto quantum compass models with broken spin SU(2) symmetry. On the triangular lattice, the ground state develops long-range magnetism, which corresponds to a charge-ordered state of the molecules. On the honeycomb lattice, interestingly, we find a non-degenerate gapped spin-liquid ground state that preserves all spatial symmetries but transforms nontrivially under point-group operations. Our microscopic model therefore realizes an intrinsically interacting fermionic symmetry protected topological (SPT) phase.

  15. On the Aliphatic versus Aromatic Content of the Carriers of the "Unidentified" Infrared Emission Features

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Xuejuan; Li, Aigen; Zhong, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Although it is generally accepted that the so-called "unidentified" infrared emission (UIE) features at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.3 micrometer are characteristic of the stretching and bending vibrations of aromatic hydrocarbon materials, the exact nature of their carriers remains unknown: whether they are free-flying, predominantly aromatic gas-phase molecules, or amorphous solids with a mixed aromatic/aliphatic composition are being debated. Recently, the 3.3 and 3.4 micrometer features which are commonly respectively attributed to aromatic and aliphatic C-H stretches have been used to place an upper limit of ~2\\% on the aliphatic fraction of the UIE carriers (i.e. the number of C atoms in aliphatic chains to that in aromatic rings). Here we further explore the aliphatic versus aromatic content of the UIE carriers by examining the ratio of the observed intensity of the 6.2 micrometer aromatic C-C feature (I6.2) to that of the 6.85 micrometer aliphatic C-H deformation feature (I6.85). To derive the intrinsic...

  16. EXPERIMENTAL EVIDENCE FOR THE FORMATION OF HIGHLY SUPERHYDROGENATED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS THROUGH H ATOM ADDITION AND THEIR CATALYTIC ROLE IN H2 FORMATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrower, John; Jørgensen, Bjarke; Friis, Emil Enderup; Baouche, Saoud; Luntz, Alan C.; Andersen, Mie; Hammer, Bjørk; Hornekær, Liv

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry measurements show the formation of highly superhydrogenated derivatives of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecule coronene through H atom addition reactions. The observed product mass distribution provides evidence also for abstraction reactions resulting in H2 formation, ...

  17. Nucleophilic fluorination of aromatic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Barrio, Jorge R

    2014-03-18

    Iodylbenzene derivatives substituted with electron donating as well as electron withdrawing groups on the aromatic ring are used as precursors in aromatic nucleophilic substitution reactions. The iodyl group (IO.sub.2) is regiospecifically substituted by nucleophilic fluoride to provide the corresponding fluoroaryl derivatives. No-carrier-added [F-18]fluoride ion derived from anhydrous [F-18](F/Kryptofix, [F-18]CsF or a quaternary ammonium fluoride (e.g., Me.sub.4NF, Et.sub.4NF, n-Bu.sub.4NF, (PhCH.sub.2).sub.4NF) exclusively substitutes the iodyl moiety in these derivatives and provides high specific activity F-18 labeled fluoroaryl analogs. Iodyl derivatives of a benzothiazole analog and 6-iodyl-L-dopa derivatives have been synthesized as precursors and have been used in the preparation of no-carrier-added [F-18]fluorobenzothiazole as well as 6-[F-18]fluoro-L-dopa.

  18. Characterization of aromaticity in analogues of titan's atmospheric aerosols with two-step laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Mahjoub, Ahmed; Carrasco, Nathalie; Benilan, Yves; Cernogora, Guy; Szopa, Cyril; Gazeau, Marie-Claire

    2016-01-01

    The role of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and Nitrogen containing PAH (PANH) as intermediates of aerosol production in the atmosphere of Titan has been a subject of controversy for a long time. An analysis of the atmospheric emission band observed by the Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) at 3.28 micrometer suggests the presence of neutral polycyclic aromatic species in the upper atmosphere of Titan. These molecules are seen as the counter part of negative and positive aromatics ions suspected by the Plasma Spectrometer onboard the Cassini spacecraft, but the low resolution of the instrument hinders any molecular speciation. In this work we investigate the specific aromatic content of Titan's atmospheric aerosols through laboratory simulations. We report here the selective detection of aromatic compounds in tholins, Titan's aerosol analogues, produced with a capacitively coupled plasma in a N2:CH4 95:5 gas mixture. For this purpose, Two-Step Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight Ma...

  19. Synthesis of a Fluorescent Acridone Using a Grignard Addition, Oxidation, and Nucleophilic Aromatic Substitution Reaction Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, Samuel; Patel, Miloni; Woydziak, Zachary R.

    2015-01-01

    A three-pot synthesis oriented for an undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory was developed to construct a fluorescent acridone molecule. This laboratory experiment utilizes Grignard addition to an aldehyde, alcohol oxidation, and iterative nucleophilic aromatic substitution steps to produce the final product. Each of the intermediates and the…

  20. Biodegradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    OpenAIRE

    DEMİR, İsmail; DEMİRBAĞ, Zihni

    1999-01-01

    Polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), such as petroleum and petroleum derivatives, are widespread organic pollutants entering the environment, chiefly, through oil spills and incomplete combustion of fossil fuels. Since most PAHs are persist in the environment for a long period of time and bioaccumulate, they cause environmental pollution and effect biological equilibrium dramatically. Biodegradation of some PAHs by microorganisms has been biochemically and genetically investigated. Ge...

  1. Analysis of heterocyclic aromatic amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murkovic, M

    2007-09-01

    Heterocyclic aromatic amines are formed in protein and amino acid-rich foods at temperatures above 150 degrees C. Of more than twenty heterocyclic aromatic amines identified ten have been shown to have carcinogenic potential. As nutritional hazards, their reliable determination in prepared food, their uptake and elimination in living organisms, including humans, and assessment of associated risks are important food-safety issues. The concentration in foods is normally in the low ng g(-1) range, which poses a challenge to the analytical chemist. Because of the complex nature of food matrixes, clean-up and enrichment of the extracts are also complex, usually involving both cation-exchange (propylsulfonic acid silica gel, PRS) and reversed-phase purification. The application of novel solid-phase extraction cartridges with a wettable apolar phase combined with cation-exchange characteristics simplified this process--both the polar and apolar heterocyclic aromatic amines were recovered in one fraction. Copper phthalocyanine trisulfonate bonded to cotton ("blue cotton") or rayon, and molecular imprinted polymers have also been successfully used for one-step sample clean-up. For analysis of the heterocyclic aromatic amines, liquid chromatography with base-deactivated reversed-phase columns has been used, and, recently, semi-micro and capillary columns have been introduced. The photometric, fluorimetric, or electrochemical detectors used previously have been replaced by mass spectrometers. Increased specificity and sub-ppb sensitivities have been achieved by the use of the selected-reaction-monitoring mode of detection of advanced MS instrumentation, for example the triple quadrupole and Q-TOF instrument combination. Gas chromatography, also with mass-selective detection, has been used for specific applications; the extra derivatization step needed for volatilization has been balanced by the higher chromatographic resolution. PMID:17546447

  2. Deuterated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Doney, Kirstin D; Mori, Tamami; Onaka, Takashi; Tielens, A G G M

    2016-01-01

    The amount of deuterium locked up in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has to date been an uncertain value. We present a near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic survey of HII regions in the Milky Way, Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), and Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) obtained with AKARI, which aims to search for features indicative of deuterated PAHs (PAD or Dn-PAH) to better constrain the D/H ratio of PAHs. Fifty-three HII regions were observed in the NIR (2.5-5 {\\mu}m), using the Infrared Camera (IRC) on board the AKARI satellite. Through comparison of the observed spectra with a theoretical model of deuterated PAH vibrational modes, the aromatic and (a)symmetric aliphatic C-D stretch modes were identified. We see emission features between 4.4-4.8 {\\mu}m, which could be unambiguously attributed to deuterated PAHs in only six of the observed sources, all of which are located in the Milky Way. In all cases, the aromatic C-D stretching feature is weaker than the aliphatic C-D stretching feature, and, in the case o...

  3. The direct aromatization of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcelin, G.; Oukaci, R.; Migone, R.A.; Kazi, A.M. [Altamira Instruments, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The thermal decomposition of methane shows significant potential as a process for the production of higher unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons when the extent of the reaction is limited. Thermodynamic calculations have shown that when the reaction is limited to the formation of C{sub 2} to C{sub 10} products, yields of aromatics can exceed 40% at temperatures of 1200{degrees}C. Preliminary experiments have shown that when the reaction is limited to the formation of C{sub 2} to C{sub 10} products, yields of aromatics can exceed 40% at temperatures of 1200{degrees}C. Preliminary experiments have shown that cooling the product and reacting gases as the reaction proceeds can significantly reduce or eliminate the formation of solid carbon and heavier (C{sub 10+}) materials. Much work remains to be done in optimizing the quenching process and this is one of the goals of this program. Means to lower the temperature of the reaction are being studied as this result in a more feasible commercial process due to savings realized in energy and material of construction costs. The use of free-radical generators and catalysts will be investigated as a means of lowering the reaction temperature thus allowing faster quenching. It is highly likely that such studies will lead to a successful direct methane to higher hydrocarbon process.

  4. Spin-lattice relaxation in phosphorescent triplet state molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present thesis contains the results of a study of spin-lattice relaxation (SLR) in the photo-excited triplet state of aromatic molecules, dissolved in a molecular host crystal. It appears that SLR in phosphorescent triplet state molecules often is related to the presence of so-called (pseudo) localized phonons in the molecular mixed crystals. These local phonons can be thought to correspond with vibrations (librations) of the guest molecule in the force field of the surrounding host molecules. Since the intermolecular forces are relatively weak, the frequencies corresponding with these vibrations are relatively low and usually are of the order of 10-30 cm-1. (Auth.)

  5. Characterization of aromaticity in analogues of titan's atmospheric aerosols with two-step laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Mahjoub, Ahmed; Schwell, Martin; Carrasco, Nathalie; Benilan, Yves; Cernogora, Guy; Szopa, Cyril; Gazeau, Marie-Claire

    2016-01-01

    The role of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and Nitrogen containing PAH (PANH) as intermediates of aerosol production in the atmosphere of Titan has been a subject of controversy for a long time. An analysis of the atmospheric emission band observed by the Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) at 3.28 micrometer suggests the presence of neutral polycyclic aromatic species in the upper atmosphere of Titan. These molecules are seen as the counter part of negative and positive ...

  6. Evaluation of Aromatic Boronic Acids as Ligands for Measuring Diabetes Markers on Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors

    OpenAIRE

    Steingrimur Stefansson; Lára A. Stefansson; Suk-won Chung; Kevin Ko; Hena H. Kwon; Saeyoung Nate Ahn

    2012-01-01

    Biomolecular detections performed on carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNT-FETs) frequently use reactive pyrenes as an anchor to tether bioactive ligands to the hydrophobic nanotubes. In this paper, we explore the possibility of directly using bioactive aromatic compounds themselves as CNT-FET ligands. This would be an efficient way to functionalize CNT-FETs since many aromatic compounds bind avidly to nanotubes, and it would also ensure that ligand-binding molecules would be brought ...

  7. A Theoretical Study on the Vibrational Spectra of PAH Molecules with Aliphatic Sidegroups

    CERN Document Server

    Sadjadi, SeyedAbdolreza; Kwok, Sun

    2015-01-01

    The role of aliphatic side groups on the formation of astronomical unidentified infrared emission (UIE) features is investigated by applying the density functional theory (DFT) to a series of molecules with mixed aliphatic-aromatic structures. The effects of introducing various aliphatic groups to a fixed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) core (ovalene) are studied. Simulated spectra for each molecule are produced by applying a Drude profile at $T$=500 K while the molecule is kept at its electronic ground state. The vibrational normal modes are classified using a semi-quantitative method. This allows us to separate the aromatic and aliphatic vibrations and therefore provide clues to what types of vibrations are responsible for the emissions bands at different wavelengths. We find that many of the UIE bands are not pure aromatic vibrational bands but may represent coupled vibrational modes. The effects of aliphatic groups on the formation of the 8 $\\mu$m plateau are qua ntitatively determined. The vibratio...

  8. Concerted nucleophilic aromatic substitution with 19F‑ and 18F‑

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Constanze N.; Hooker, Jacob M.; Ritter, Tobias

    2016-06-01

    Nucleophilic aromatic substitution (SNAr) is widely used by organic chemists to functionalize aromatic molecules, and it is the most commonly used method to generate arenes that contain 18F for use in positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging. A wide range of nucleophiles exhibit SNAr reactivity, and the operational simplicity of the reaction means that the transformation can be conducted reliably and on large scales. During SNAr, attack of a nucleophile at a carbon atom bearing a ‘leaving group’ leads to a negatively charged intermediate called a Meisenheimer complex. Only arenes with electron-withdrawing substituents can sufficiently stabilize the resulting build-up of negative charge during Meisenheimer complex formation, limiting the scope of SNAr reactions: the most common SNAr substrates contain strong π-acceptors in the ortho and/or para position(s). Here we present an unusual concerted nucleophilic aromatic substitution reaction (CSNAr) that is not limited to electron-poor arenes, because it does not proceed via a Meisenheimer intermediate. We show a phenol deoxyfluorination reaction for which CSNAr is favoured over a stepwise displacement. Mechanistic insights enabled us to develop a functional-group-tolerant 18F-deoxyfluorination reaction of phenols, which can be used to synthesize 18F-PET probes. Selective 18F introduction, without the need for the common, but cumbersome, azeotropic drying of 18F, can now be accomplished from phenols as starting materials, and provides access to 18F-labelled compounds not accessible through conventional chemistry.

  9. Current-voltage characteristics of a homologous series of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhme, Thilo; Simpson, Christopher D; Müllen, Klaus; Rabe, Jürgen P

    2007-01-01

    A novel alkyl-substituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) with D(2h) symmetry and 78 carbon atoms in the aromatic core (C78) was synthesized, thereby completing a homologous series of soluble PAH compounds with increasing size of the aromatic pi system (42, 60, and 78 carbon atoms). The optical band gaps were determined by UV/Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy in solution. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS) revealed diode-like current versus voltage (I-V) characteristics through individual aromatic cores in monolayers at the interface between the solution and the basal plane of graphite. The asymmetry of the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics increases with the increasing size of the aromatic core, and the concomitantly decreasing HOMO-LUMO gap. This is attributed to resonant tunneling through the HOMO of the adsorbed molecule, and an asymmetric position of the molecular species in the tunnel junction. Consistently, submolecularly resolved STM images at negative substrate bias are in good agreement with the calculated pattern for the electron densities of the HOMOs. The analysis provides the basis for tailoring rectification with a single molecule in an STM junction. PMID:17579898

  10. Benzo-thia-fused [n]Thienoacenequinodimethanes with Small to Moderate Diradical Characters: The Role of Pro-aromaticity versus Anti-aromaticity

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Xueliang

    2016-01-19

    Open-shell singlet diradicaloids recently have received much attention due to their unique optical, electronic and magnetic properties and promising applications in materials science. Among various diradicaloids, quinoidal π-conjugated molecules have become the prevailing designs. However, there still lacks fundamental understanding on how the fusion mode and pro-aromaticity/anti-aromaticity affect their diradical character and physical properties. In this work, a series of pro-aromatic benzo-thia-fused [n]thienoacenequinodimethanes (Thn-TIPS (n=1-3) and BDTh-TIPS) were synthesized and compared with the previously reported anti-aromatic bisindeno-[n]thienoacenes (Sn-TIPS, n=1-4). The ground-state geometric and electronic structures of these new quinoidal molecules were systematically investigated by X-ray crystallographic analysis, variable temperature NMR, ESR, SQUID, Raman, and electronic absorption spectroscopy, assisted by DFT calculations. It was found that the diradical character index (y0) increased from nearly zero for Th1-TIPS to 2.4% for Th2-TIPS, 18.2% for Th3-TIPS, and 38.2% for BDTh-TIPS, due to the enhanced aromatic stabilization. Consequently, with the extension of molecular size, the one-photon absorption spectra are gradually red-shifted, the two-photon absorption (TPA) cross section values increase, and the singlet excited state lifetimes decrease. By comparison with the corresponding anti-aromatic analogues Sn-TIPS (n=1-3), the pro-aromatic Thn-TIPS (n=1-3) exhibit larger diradical character, longer singlet excited state lifetime and larger TPA cross section value. At the same time, they display distinctively different electronic absorption spectra and improved electrochemical amphotericity. Spectroelectrochemical studies revealed a good linear relationship between the optical energy gaps and the molecular length in the neutral, radical cationic and dicationic forms. Our research work disclosed the significant difference between the pro-aromatic

  11. C-H and N-H bond dissociation energies of small aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barckholtz, C.; Barckholtz, T.A.; Hadad, C.M.

    1999-01-27

    A survey of computational methods was undertaken to calculate the homolytic bond dissociation energies (BDEs) of the C-H and N-H bonds in monocyclic aromatic molecules that are representative of the functionalities present in coal. These include six-membered rings (benzene, pyridine, pyridazine, pyrimidine, pyrazine) and five-membered rings (furan, thiophene, pyrrole, oxazole). By comparison of the calculated C-H BDEs with the available experimental values for these aromatic molecules, the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level of theory was selected to calculate the BDEs of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), including carbonaceous PAHs (naphthalene, anthracene, pyrene, coronene) and heteroatomic PAHs (benzofuran, benzothiophene, indole, benzoxazole, quinoline, isoquinoline, dibenzofuran, carbazole). The cleavage of a C-H or a N-H bond generates a {sigma} radical that is, in general, localized at the site from which the hydrogen atom was removed. However, delocalization of the unpaired electron results in {approximately} 7 kcal {center{underscore}dot} mol{sup {minus}1} stabilization of the radical with respect to the formation of phenyl when the C-H bond is adjacent to a nitrogen atom in the azabenzenes. Radicals from five-membered rings are {approximately} 6 kcal {center{underscore}dot} mol{sup {minus}1} less stable than those formed from six-membered rings due to both localization of the spin density and geometric factors. The location of the heteroatoms in the aromatic ring affects the C-H bond strengths more significantly than does the size of the aromatic network. Therefore, in general, the monocyclic aromatic molecules can be used to predict the C-H BDE of the large PAHs within 1 kcal {center{underscore}dot} mol{sup {minus}1}.

  12. Substrate specific hydrolysis of aromatic and aromatic-aliphatic esters in orchid tissue cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Agnieszka Mironowicz; Krystyna Kukułczanka; Antoni Siewiński

    2014-01-01

    We found that tissue cultures of higher plants were able, similarly as microorganisms, to transform low-molecular-weight chemical compounds. In tissue cultures of orchids (Cymbidium 'Saint Pierre' and Dendrobium phalaenopsis) acetates of phenols and aromatic-aliphatic alcohols were hydrolyzed, whereas methyl esters of aromatic and aromatic-aliphatic acids did not undergo this reaction. Acetates of racemic aromatic-aliphatic alcohols were hydrolyzed with distinct enantiospecificity.

  13. Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds as Anticancer Agents: Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Methoxy Dibenzofluorene Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BimalKrishnaBanik

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis of a new methoxy dibenzofluorene through alkylation, cyclodehydration and aromatization in a one-pot operation is achieved for the first time. Using this hydrocarbon, a few derivatives are prepared through aromatic nitration, catalytic hydrogenation, coupling reaction with a side chain and reduction. The benzylic position of this hydrocarbon with the side chain is oxidized and reduced. Some of these derivatives have demonstrated excellent antitumor activities in vitro. This study confirms antitumor activity depends on the structures of the molecules.

  14. Nucleobases in Space: Laboratory Studies of Polycyclic Aromatic Nitrogen Heterocycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsila, Jamie; Mattioda, Andy; Bernstein, Max; Sandford, Scott; Hudgins, Doug

    2005-01-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Nitrogen Heterocycles (PANHs) are heterocyclic aromatics Le., PAHs with carbon atoms replaced by a nitrogen atom. These molecules have been detected in meteorite extracts, and in general these nitrogen heterocycles are of astrobiological interest since this class of molecules include nucleobases, basic components of our nucleic acids. These compounds are predicted to be present in the interstellar medium and in Titan tholin, but have received relatively little attention. We will present spectra and reactions of PANHs, frozen in solid H2O at 12 K, conditions germane to astronomical observations. In contrast to simple PAHs, that do not interact strongly with solid H2O, the nitrogen atoms in PANHs are potentially capable of hydrogen bonding with H20 changing their spectra, complicating their remote detection on the surfaces of icy bodies. Moreover, we have studied the photo-chemistry of these interesting compounds under astrophysical conditions and will use our lab studies to assess a potential interstellar heritage of these compounds in carbonaceous chondrites.

  15. Infrared Spectroscopy of Matrix-Isolated Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds and their Ions. 6; Polycyclic Aromatic Nitrogen Heterocycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioda, A. L.; Hudgins, Douglas M.; Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Rosi, M.; Allamandola, L. J.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The matrix-isolation technique has been employed to measure the mid-infrared spectra of several polycyclic aromatic nitrogen heterocycles in both neutral and cationic forms. The species studied include: 7,8 benzoquinoline (C13H9N); 2-azapyrene (C15H9N); 1- and 2-azabenz(a)anthracene (C17H11N); and 1-, 2-, and 4-azachrysene (also C17H11N). The experimentally measured band frequencies and intensities for each molecule are tabulated and compared with their theoretically calculated values computed using density functional theory at the B3LYP/4-31G level. The overall agreement between experiment and theory is quite good, in keeping with previous investigations involving the parent aromatic hydrocarbons. Several interesting spectroscopic trends are found to accompany nitrogen substitution into the aromatic framework of these compounds. First, for the neutral species, the nitrogen atom produces a significant increase in the total integrated infrared intensity across the 1600 - 1100/cm region and plays an essential role in the molecular vibration that underlies an uncharacteristically intense, discrete feature that is observed near 1400/cm in the spectra of 7,8 benzoquinoline, 1-azabenz(a)anthracene, and 4-azachrysene. The origin of this enhanced infrared activity and the nature of the new 1400/cm vibrational mode are explored. Finally, in contrast to the parent hydrocarbon species, these aromatic nitrogen heterocycles possess a significant permanent dipole moment. Consequently, these dipole moments and the rotational constants are reported for these species in their neutral and ionized forms.

  16. Beyond organic chemistry: aromaticity in atomic clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldyrev, Alexander I; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2016-04-28

    We describe joint experimental and theoretical studies carried out collaboratively in the authors' labs for understanding the structures and chemical bonding of novel atomic clusters, which exhibit aromaticity. The concept of aromaticity was first discovered to be useful in understanding the square-planar unit of Al4 in a series of MAl4(-) bimetallic clusters that led to discoveries of aromaticity in many metal cluster systems, including transition metals and similar cluster motifs in solid compounds. The concept of aromaticity has been found to be particularly powerful in understanding the stability and bonding in planar boron clusters, many of which have been shown to be analogous to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in their π bonding. Stimulated by the multiple aromaticity in planar boron clusters, a design principle has been proposed for stable metal-cerntered aromatic molecular wheels of the general formula, M@Bn(k-). A series of such borometallic aromatic wheel complexes have been produced in supersonic cluster beams and characterized experimentally and theoretically, including Ta@B10(-) and Nb@B10(-), which exhibit the highest coordination number in two dimensions. PMID:26864511

  17. Lignin peroxidase oxidation of aromatic compounds in systems containing organic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Duhalt, R; Westlake, D W; Fedorak, P M

    1994-02-01

    Lignin peroxidase from Phanerochaete chrysosporium was used to study the oxidation of aromatic compounds, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocyclic compounds, that are models of moieties of asphaltene molecules. The oxidations were done in systems containing water-miscible organic solvents, including methanol, isopropanol, N, N-dimethylformamide, acetonitrile, and tetrahydrofuran. Of the 20 aromatic compounds tested, 9 were oxidized by lignin peroxidase in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. These included anthracene, 1-, 2-, and 9-methylanthracenes, acenaphthene, fluoranthene, pyrene, carbazole, and dibenzothiophene. Of the compounds studied, lignin peroxidase was able to oxidize those with ionization potentials of stability characteristics of lignin peroxidase were determined by using pyrene as the substrate in systems containing different amounts of organic solvent. Benzyl alkylation of lignin peroxidase improved its activity in a system containing water-miscible organic solvent but did not increase its resistance to inactivation at high solvent concentrations. PMID:16349176

  18. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with SPICA

    CERN Document Server

    Berne, O; Mulas, G; Tielens, A G G M; Goicoechea, J R

    2009-01-01

    Thanks to high sensitivity and angular resolution and broad spectral coverage, SPICA will offer a unique opportunity to better characterize the nature of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and very small grains (VSGs), to better use them as probes of astrophysical environments. The angular resolution will enable to probe the chemical frontiers in the evolution process from VSGs to neutral PAHs, to ionized PAHs and to "Grand-PAHs" in photodissotiation regions and HII regions, as a function of G$_0$/n (UV radiation field / density). High sensitivity will favor the detection of the far-IR skeletal emission bands of PAHs, which provide specific fingerprints and could lead to the identification of individual PAHs. This overall characterization will allow to use PAH and VSG populations as tracers of physical conditions in spatially resolved protoplanetary disks and nearby galaxies (using mid-IR instruments), and in high redshift galaxies (using the far-IR instrument), thanks to the broad spectral coverage SPIC...

  19. Translation of an aromatic field image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yastrebov, Anatoliy S.; Makarov, Leonid M.; Protasenya, Sergey V.; Vereshak, Evgeniy V.

    2005-04-01

    As is known, for a person there are possibilities of perception of audio, video, and aromatic information messages by means of touch systems available to him. Such packages of the messages are accepted remotely without direct contact to a message source. Now the direction bound with creation of devices capable to playback aromatic information images is actively developed. Such systems switched on in special transmission channels of information provide adequate perception of information highways describing actual event which happen in the enclosing world. One can present the aromatic-field image through a series of control codes for an aromatic field synthesizer, thereupon it is possible to transmit the image on telecommunication networks. For odor oscillators installation problems in compartments of automobiles, buses as well as of airplanes are widely discussed. In this work we deal with a device for synthesis of an image of an aromatic field which works under the control of a personal computer with an express program. In the given operation, the possibility of remote handle of an image of an aromatic field and, as a corollary, organization of a new tansmission channel for the information on the aromatic-field image through an existing synthesizer is considered.

  20. Formation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Nitrogen Containing Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds in Titan's Atmosphere, the Interstellar Medium and Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landera, Alexander

    2013-12-01

    Several different mechanisms leading to the formation of (substituted) naphthalene and azanaphthalenes were examined using theoretical quantum chemical calculations. As a result, a series of novel synthetic routes to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) and Nitrogen Containing Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds (N-PACs) have been proposed. On Earth, these aromatic compounds originate from incomplete combustion and are released into our environment, where they are known to be major pollutants, often with carcinogenic properties. In the atmosphere of a Saturn's moon Titan, these PAH and N-PACs are believed to play a critical role in organic haze formation, as well as acting as chemical precursors to biologically relevant molecules. The theoretical calculations were performed by employing the ab initio G3(MP2,CC)/B3LYP/6-311G** method to effectively probe the Potential Energy Surfaces (PES) relevant to the PAH and N-PAC formation. Following the construction of the PES, Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Markus (RRKM) theory was used to evaluate all unimolecular rate constants as a function of collision energy under single-collision conditions. Branching ratios were then evaluated by solving phenomenological rate expressions for the various product concentrations. The most viable pathways to PAH and N-PAC formation were found to be those where the initial attack by the ethynyl (C2H) or cyano (CN) radical toward a unsaturated hydrocarbon molecule led to the formation of an intermediate which could not effectively lose a hydrogen atom. It is not until ring cyclization has occurred, that hydrogen elimination leads to a closed shell product. By quenching the possibility of the initial hydrogen atom elimination, one of the most competitive processes preventing the PAH or N-PAC formation was avoided, and the PAH or N-PAC formation was allowed to proceed. It is concluded that these considerations should be taken into account when attempting to explore any other potential routes towards

  1. Conservation of medicinal and aromatic plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šveistytė, Laima

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The conservation of medicinal and aromatic plants includes ex situ and in situ methods. The genetic recourses of medicinal and aromatic plants are stored, studied and constantly maintained in the field collections of the Institute of Botany of Nature Research Centre, Kaunas Botanical Garden of Vytautas Magnus University and Aleksandras Stulginskis University of Agriculture. Presently seeds of 214 accessions representing 38 species of medicinal and aromatic plants are stored in a long-term storage in the Plant Gene Bank. The data about national genetic resources are collected and stored in the Central Database of the Plant Gene Bank.

  2. Aromaticity influencing the thermostability of micellar dispersions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, J.A.; Kunzman, W.J.

    1970-02-17

    The thermostability of a micellar dispersion is shifted to higher temperature ranges by increasing the aromaticity of the hydrocarbon within the dispersion. The micellar solution is composed of kerosene and light catalytic cycle oil (hydrocarbons), water, sodium or ammonium alkyl aryl naphthenic sulfonates (petroleum sulfonate surfactant), isopropanol (cosurfactant), and sodium sulfate (electrolyte). The aromatic content of the light catalytic cycle oil is higher than the aromatic content of the kerosene. By increasing the concentration of cycle oil to kerosene, stable micellar solutions at temperatures from ambient to 200/sup 0/F can be obtained. The aqueous medium can be soft, brackish, or a brine.

  3. POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS WITH ARMCHAIR EDGES AND THE 12.7 μm BAND

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this Letter, we report the results of density functional theory calculations on medium-sized neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules with armchair edges. These PAH molecules possess strong C-H stretching and bending modes around 3 μm and in the fingerprint region (10-15 μm), and also strong ring deformation modes around 12.7 μm. Perusal of the entries in the NASA Ames PAHs Database shows that ring deformation modes of PAHs are common, although generally weak. Therefore, we propose that armchair PAHs with NC > 65 are responsible for the 12.7 μm aromatic infrared band in H II regions and discuss the astrophysical implications in the context of the PAH life cycle

  4. Pulse shape discrimination in non-aromatic plastics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently it has been demonstrated that plastic scintillators have the ability to distinguish neutrons from gamma rays by way of pulse shape discrimination (PSD). This discovery has lead to new materials and new capabilities. Here we report our work with the effects of aromatic, non-aromatic, and mixed aromatic/non-aromatic matrices have on the performance of PSD plastic scintillators

  5. Volatilisation of aromatic hydrocarbons from soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt, B.; Christensen, T.H.

    1996-01-01

    The non-steady-state fluxes of aromatic hydrocarbons were measured in the laboratory from the surface of soils contaminated with coal tar Four soil samples from a former gasworks site were used for the experiments. The fluxes were quantified for 11 selected compounds, 4 mono- and 7 polycyclic...... aromatic hydrocarbons, for a period of up to 8 or 16 days. The concentrations of the selected compounds in the soils were between 0.2 and 3,100 mu g/g. The study included the experimental determination of the distribution coefficient of the aromatic hydrocarbons between the sorbed phase and the water under...... saturated conditions. The determined distribution coefficients showed that the aromatic hydrocarbons were more strongly sorbed to the total organic carbon including the coal tar pitch - by a factor of 8 to 25 - than expected for natural organic matter. The fluxes were also estimated using an analytical...

  6. International congress on aromatic and medicinal plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full Text : In Morocco, medicinal and aromatic plants occupy an important place in the traditional care system of a large number of local people. They are also economically strong potential, but unfortunately they are not valued enough. Indeed, Morocco by its privileged geographical position in the Mediterranean basin and its floristic diversity (with a total of over 4,200 species and subspecies of which over 500 are recognized as medicinal and aromatic plants), is a leading provider of traditional global market. In this context and given the back label of the natural global, group research and studies on Aromatic and Medicinal Plants (GREPAM), the Faculty of Semlalia and University Cadi Ayyad, organize: the International Congress on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants CIPAM 2009. The organization of this conference is part of scientific research developed by the GREPAM.

  7. Activity relationships for aromatic crown ethers

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, M J

    1998-01-01

    This thesis involves an investigation of aromatic crown ethers and a study of their binding constants for alkali metals. The study was motivated by the current needs of the semiconductor industry to improve the scavenging of mobile ions from fabricated circuits. A number of aromatic crown ethers have been sulphonated in an attempt to improve their water solubility and cation binding activity. These materials have been extensively studied and their binding activity determined. In collaboration with a molecular modelling study, the effect of ionisable sulphonate groups on the macrocycles' behaviour has been investigated. The broader issue of the effect of substituents in aromatic crown ethers has also been studied with the preparation of a wide range of substituted crown ethers. The cation binding activity of these materials has been found to bear a simple relationship to the electron withdrawing nature of the aromatic substituents. This relationship can be accurately monitored using electronic charge densities...

  8. PROTONATED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS REVISITED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We reconsider the contribution that singly protonated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs; HPAH+s) might make to the Class A component of the 6.2 μm interstellar emission feature in light of the recent experimental measurements of protonated naphthalene and coronene. Our calculations on the small HPAH+s have a band near 6.2 μm, as found in experiment. While the larger HPAH+s still have emission near 6.2 μm, the much larger intensity of the band near 6.3 μm overwhelms the weaker band at 6.2 μm, so that the 6.2 μm band is barely visible. Since the large PAHs are more representative of those in the interstellar medium, our work suggests that large HPAH+s cannot be major contributors to the observed emission at 6.2 μm (i.e., Class A species). Saturating large PAH cations with hydrogen atoms retains the 6.2 μm Class A band position, but the rest of the spectrum is inconsistent with observed spectra.

  9. Dehydrogenative Aromatization of Saturated Aromatic Compounds by Graphite Oxide and Molecular Sieves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张轩; 徐亮; 王希涛; 马宁; 孙菲菲

    2012-01-01

    Graphite oxide (GO) has attracted much attention of material and catalysis chemists recently. Here we describe a combination of GO and molecular sieves for the dehydrogenative aromatization. GO prepared through improved Hummers method showed high oxidative activity in this reaction. Partially or fully saturated aromatic compounds were converted to their corresponding dehydrogenated aromatic products with fair to excellent conversions and selectivities. As both GO and molecular sieves are easily available, cheap, lowly toxic and have good tolerance to various functional groups, this reaction provides a facile approach toward aromatic compounds from their saturated precursors

  10. Aromatic amines sources, environmental impact and remediation

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Luciana; Mondal, P. K.; Alves, M. M.

    2015-01-01

    Aromatic amines are widely used industrial chemicals as their major sources in the environment include several chemical industry sectors such as oil refining, synthetic polymers, dyes, adhesives, rubbers, perfume, pharmaceuticals, pesticides and explosives. They result also from diesel exhaust, combustion of wood chips and rubber and tobacco smoke. Some types of aromatic amines are generated during cooking, special grilled meat and fish, as well. The intensive use and production of these comp...

  11. Aromaticity influencing the thermostability of micellar dispersions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, J.A.; Kunzman, W.J.

    1971-05-11

    A hydrocarbon, having sufficient aromaticity to obtain a stable micellar dispersion at the temperature of the formation, is mixed with a surfactant and aqueous medium for injection into the formation to recover crude oil. Higher reservoir temperatures require a greater degree of aromaticity in the hydrocarbon component of the micellar dispersion. This patent is a continuation of U.S. Patent Number 3,495,660 (item No. 118).

  12. Nonchemical weeding of medicinal and aromatic plants

    OpenAIRE

    Carrubba, Alessandra; Militello, Marcello

    2013-01-01

    Medicinal and aromatic plants are major crops of domestic and industrial interest. Medicinal and aromatic plants are increasingly organically grown to enhance profitability. However, the presence of weeds may lead to a decrease in both yield and quality. Therefore, nonchemical methods of weed control are needed. In this study, mechanical weeding, flaming, stale seedbed, and biodegradable mulch were tested from 2003/2004 to 2006/2007 on coriander, fennel, and psyllium. Biomass and seed yield w...

  13. Chemotaxis of Azospirillum Species to Aromatic Compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez-de-Victoria, Geralyne; Lovell, Charles R.

    1993-01-01

    Chemotaxis of Azospirillum lipoferum Sp 59b and Azospirillum brasilense Sp 7 and Sp CD to malate and to the aromatic substrates benzoate, protocatechuate, 4-hydroxybenzoate, and catechol was assayed by the capillary method and direct cell counts. A. lipoferum required induction by growth on 4-hydroxybenzoate for positive chemotaxis to this compound. Chemotaxis of Azospirillum spp. to all other substrates did not require induction. Maximum chemotactic responses for most aromatic compounds occu...

  14. Interstellar molecules - Formation in solar nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, E.

    1973-01-01

    Herbig's (1970) hypothesis that solar nebulae might be the principal source of interstellar grains and molecules is investigated. The investigation includes the determination of physical and chemical conditions in the early solar system. The production of organic compounds in the solar nebula is studied, and the compounds in meteorites are compared with those obtained in Miller-Urey and Fischer-Tropsch-type (FTT) reactions, taking into consideration aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, purines, pyrimidines, amino acids, porphyrins, and aspects of carbon-isotope fractionation. It is found that FTT reactions account reasonably well for all well-established features of organic matter in meteorites investigated. The distribution of compounds produced by FTT reactions is compared with the distribution of interstellar molecules. Biological implications of the results are considered.

  15. A Perylene-Based Microporous Coordination Polymer Interacts Selectively with Electron-Poor Aromatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Ly D; Ma, Jialiu; Wong-Foy, Antek G; Matzger, Adam J

    2016-04-11

    The design, synthesis, and properties of the new microporous coordination polymer UMCM-310 are described. The unique electronic character of the perylene-based linker enables selective interaction with electron-poor aromatics leading to efficient separation of nitroaromatics. UMCM-310 possesses high surface area and large pore size and thus permits the separation of large organic molecules based on adsorption rather than size exclusion. PMID:26868729

  16. Extracellular matrix formation in self-assembled minimalistic bioactive hydrogels based on aromatic peptide amphiphiles

    OpenAIRE

    ZHOU, MI; Ulijn, Rein V.; Gough, Julie E

    2014-01-01

    The hitherto inconsistency in clinical performance for engineered skin drives the current development of novel cell-scaffolding materials; one challenge is to only extract essential characteristics from the complex native ECM (extracellular matrix) and incorporate them into a scaffold with minimal complexity to support normal cell functions. This study involved small-molecule-based bioactive hydrogels produced by the co-assembly of two aromatic peptide amphiphiles: Fmoc-FF (Fluorenylmethoxyca...

  17. A database for medicinal and aromatic plants of JK (Jammu and Kashmir) in India

    OpenAIRE

    Masood, Akbar; Shafi, Mujtaba

    2005-01-01

    High throughput screening of small molecules for a given drug target is achieved using plant materials of medicinal value. Therefore, it is important to document the availability and location of such medicinal plants in the form of a database. Here, we describe a web database containing information (botanical name, common name, local name, botany, chemistry, folklore medicinal use and medicinal uses) about the medicinal and aromatic plants available in JK (Jammu and Kashmir). The database is ...

  18. Mini-review of the chicken gastrointestinal microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    We are in the midst of what may, in retrospect, come to be referred to as the golden age of microbial ecology. The microorganisms and their genes associated with higher organisms (the microbiome) that were once viewed primarily as sources of human pathogens are now recognized as complex communities...

  19. Enzymatic processes in alternative reaction media: a mini review

    OpenAIRE

    Mansour Ghaffari-Moghaddam; Hassan Eslahi; Yasar A. Aydin; Didem Saloglu

    2015-01-01

    Biocatalysis is a growing field in the production of fine chemicals and will most probably increase its share in the future. Enzymatic reactions are carried out under mild conditions, i.e., non-toxic solvents, low temperature and pressure, which eliminates most environmental drawbacks associated with conventional production methods. The superiority of chemo-, regio- and enantioselectivity of enzymes exhibit significant advantages over conventional catalysts for production of fine chemicals, f...

  20. A Mini-Review on Greenness of Ionic Liquids

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, S.; Chen, R.; Wu, Y; Chen, Q; Zhang, X.; Z. Yu

    2009-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) have been considered as “green solvents” in many published works. However, recent research on their eco-toxicity and degradability has proven that some ILs are not as “green” as expected. In this review, the greenness of ILs was discussed in terms of their synthesis, eco-toxicity and degradability and their applications. Greenness of ILs depends not only on themselves but also on their synthesis and specific applications. For a chemical process where the IL is employed,...

  1. Lithium reduces pathological aggression and suicidality: a mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Oerlinghausen, Bruno; Lewitzka, Ute

    2010-01-01

    From a practical point of view, the well-proven antisuicidal and anti-aggressive effects of lithium are of utmost importance for a rational, safe and economical treatment of patients with affective disorders. Regular lithium long-term treatment reduces the otherwise 2- to 3-fold increased mortality of untreated patients with severe affective disorders down to the level of the general population. This is mainly due to the reduced suicide risk. Many international studies have confirmed this fascinating property of lithium which so far has not been demonstrated with comparable evidence for any other psychotropic compound. The antisuicidal effects of lithium might possibly be related to its anti-aggressive effects which have been shown in various species, populations and settings, such as animals, inhabitants of nursing homes for the elderly, mentally handicapped subjects, children and adolescents with hyperactive, hostile and aggressive behavior, and particularly in hyperaggressive inmates of correction units and prisons. PMID:20453534

  2. Trophoblast cells of ruminant placentas - A mini review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding of ruminant placental structure and function is essential for veterinarians and researchers. The ruminant placenta is classified as cotyledonary and synepitheliochorial on the bases of its gross anatomical features and histological characteristics respectively. The richly vascularized embryonic chorioallantois is lined on its outer surface by cells of the trophectodermal epithelium. These cells which assume specialized functions are referred to as trophoblast cells. Two morphologically and functionally distinct cell types have been recognized in the trophectoderm of the placenta of ruminant animals. These are the mononucleate trophoblast cells and the binucleate trophoblast cells. The occurrence, morphological characteristics, and specialized functions of these trophoblast cells, in relation to conceptus nutrition and survival in utero are discussed in this review. (author)

  3. Biotechnological production of hyaluronic acid: a mini review

    OpenAIRE

    Sze, Jun Hui; Brownlie, Jeremy C.; Love, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a polysaccharide found in the extracellular matrix of vertebrate epithelial, neural and connective tissues. Due to the high moisture retention, biocompatibility and viscoelasticity properties of this polymer, HA has become an important component of major pharmaceutical, biomedical and cosmetic products with high commercial value worldwide. Currently, large scale production of HA involves extraction from animal tissues as well as the use of bacterial expression systems ...

  4. Persistence for stochastic difference equations: A mini-review

    CERN Document Server

    Schreiber, Sebastian J

    2011-01-01

    Understanding under what conditions populations, whether they be plants, animals, or viral particles, persist is an issue of theoretical and practical importance in population biology. Both biotic interactions and environmental fluctuations are key factors that can facilitate or disrupt persistence. One approach to examining the interplay between these deterministic and stochastic forces is the construction and analysis of stochastic difference equations $X_{t+1}=F(X_t,\\xi_{t+1})$ where $X_t \\in \\R^k$ represents the state of the populations and $\\xi_1,\\xi_2,...$ is a sequence of random variables representing environmental stochasticity. In the analysis of these stochastic models, many theoretical population biologists are interested in whether the models are bounded and persistent. Here, boundedness asserts that asymptotically $X_t$ tends to remain in compact sets. In contrast, persistence requires that $X_t$ tends to be "repelled" by some "extinction set" $S_0\\subset \\R^k$. Here, results on both of these pro...

  5. Nanofiltration for water and wastewater treatment – a mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. K. Shon

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The application of membrane technology in water and wastewater treatment is increasing due to stringent water quality standards. Nanofiltration (NF is one of the widely used membrane processes for water and wastewater treatment in addition to other applications such as desalination. NF has replaced reverse osmosis (RO membranes in many applications due to lower energy consumption and higher flux rates. This paper briefly reviews the application of NF for water and wastewater treatment including fundamentals, mechanisms, fouling challenges and their controls.

  6. Nanofiltration for water and wastewater treatment – a mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. K. Shon

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The application of membrane technology in water and wastewater treatment is increasing due to stringent water quality standards. Nanofiltration (NF is one of the widely used membrane processes for water and wastewater treatment in addition to other applications such as desalination. NF has replaced reverse osmosis (RO membranes in many applications due to lower energy consumption and higher flux rates. This paper briefly reviews the application of NF for water and wastewater treatment including fundamentals of membrane process in general, mechanisms of NF process including few basic models. fouling challenges and their control mechanisms adopted.

  7. Nanotechnology and its applications in lignocellulosic composites, a mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology has applications across most economic sectors and allows the development of new enabling science. The ability to see materials down to nanoscale dimensions and to control how materials are constructed at the nanoscale is providing the opportunity to develop new materials and products in previously unimagined ways. This review covers the academic and industrial aspects of the preparation, characterization, material properties, crystallization behavior; melt rheology, and processing of polymer/cellulose or cellulose/cellulose nanocomposites. Cellulosic materials have a great potential as nanomaterials because they are abundant, renewable, have a nanofibrillar structure, can be made multifunctional, and self-assemble into well-defined architectures. The fibrillation of pulp fiber to obtain nano-orderunit web-like network structure, called microfibrillated cellulose, is obtained through a mechanical treatment of pulp fibers, consisting of refining and high pressure homogenizing processes. Also, nano-whisker can be used as novel reinforcement in nanocomposites; it can be obtained by acid hydrolysis from various sources such as wood, tunicin, ramie, cotton, wheat straw, bacterial cellulose, and sugar beet. The properties of nanocomposite materials depend not only on the properties of their individual parents, but also on their morphology and interfacial characteristics. Compared with plant cellulose, bacterial cellulose has found many applications in the biomedical field as tissue engineering materials due to their good biocompatibility, mechanical properties similar to those of hard and soft tissue and easy fabrication into a variety of shapes with adjustable interconnected porosity. One of the drawbacks of cellulose whiskers with polar surfaces is poor dispersibility/ compatibility with nonpolar solvents or resins. Thus, their incorporation as reinforcing materials for nanocomposites has so far been largely limited to aqueous or polar systems. To overcome this problem and broaden the type of possible polymer matrices, efforts of surface modification have been made. These attempts include surfactant coating or graft copolymerization.

  8. Social media use of older adults: a mini-review

    OpenAIRE

    Leist, Anja

    2013-01-01

    Background. Maintaining social relationships has been defined as a core element of aging well. With a considerable amount of older adults living alone, social media provides the possibility to engage in meaningful social contact, e. g., by joining online social networks and online discussion forums. Objective. The review encompasses current knowledge of prerequisites in social media use of older adults such as functional capacity, ICT-related knowledge, and favorable attitudes towards social ...

  9. Enzymatic processes in alternative reaction media: a mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Ghaffari-Moghaddam

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Biocatalysis is a growing field in the production of fine chemicals and will most probably increase its share in the future. Enzymatic reactions are carried out under mild conditions, i.e., non-toxic solvents, low temperature and pressure, which eliminates most environmental drawbacks associated with conventional production methods. The superiority of chemo-, regio- and enantioselectivity of enzymes exhibit significant advantages over conventional catalysts for production of fine chemicals, flavors, fragrances, agrochemicals and pharmaceuticals. Enzymes can function both in aqueous and non-aqueous solvents. As a result of the growing scientific and industrial interest towards green chemistry, green solvent systems, which are mainly water, supercritical fluids, ionic liquids, fluorinated solvents, and solvent-free systems have become more popular in biocatalysis. However, the activity and selectivity of an enzyme is heavily dependent on solvent properties. In this review, various green solvents were classified and some of their influential features on enzyme activity were discussed.

  10. Mini-review: Molecular mechanisms of antifouling compounds

    KAUST Repository

    Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2013-04-01

    Various antifouling (AF) coatings have been developed to protect submerged surfaces by deterring the settlement of the colonizing stages of fouling organisms. A review of the literature shows that effective AF compounds with specific targets are ones often considered non-toxic. Such compounds act variously on ion channels, quorum sensing systems, neurotransmitters, production/release of adhesive, and specific enzymes that regulate energy production or primary metabolism. In contrast, AF compounds with general targets may or may not act through toxic mechanisms. These compounds affect a variety of biological activities including algal photosynthesis, energy production, stress responses, genotoxic damage, immunosuppressed protein expression, oxidation, neurotransmission, surface chemistry, the formation of biofilms, and adhesive production/release. Among all the targets, adhesive production/release is the most common, possibly due to a more extensive research effort in this area. Overall, the specific molecular targets and the molecular mechanisms of most AF compounds have not been identified. Thus, the information available is insufficient to draw firm conclusions about the types of molecular targets to be used as sensitive biomarkers for future design and screening of compounds with AF potential. In this review, the relevant advantages and disadvantages of the molecular tools available for studying the molecular targets of AF compounds are highlighted briefly and the molecular mechanisms of the AF compounds, which are largely a source of speculation in the literature, are discussed. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  11. Chemicals, Nutrition, and Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Mini-Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Takeo; Morisaki, Naho; Honda, Yukiko; Sampei, Makiko; Tani, Yukako

    2016-01-01

    The rapid increase of the prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) suggests that exposure to chemicals may impact the development of ASD. Therefore, we reviewed literature on the following chemicals, nutrient to investigate their association with ASD: (1) smoke/tobacco, (2) alcohol, (3) air pollution, (4) pesticides, (5) endocrine-disrupting chemicals, (6) heavy metals, (7) micronutrients, (8) fatty acid, and (9) parental obesity as a proxy of accumulation of specific chemicals or nutritional status. Several chemical exposures such as air pollution (e.g., particular matter 2.5), pesticides, bisphenol A, phthalates, mercury, and nutrition deficiency such as folic acid, vitamin D, or fatty acid may possibly be associated with an increased risk of ASD, whereas other traditional risk factors such as smoking/tobacco, alcohol, or polychlorinated biphenyls are less likely to be associated with ASD. Further research is needed to accumulate evidence on the association between chemical exposure and nutrient deficiencies and ASD in various doses and populations. PMID:27147957

  12. Chemicals, nutrition, and autism spectrum disorder: a mini-review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeo eFujiwara

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The rapid increase of the prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD suggests that exposure to chemicals may impact the development of ASD. Therefore, we reviewed literature on the following chemicals, nutrient to investigate their association with ASD: 1 smoke/tobacco, 2 alcohol, 3 air pollution, 4 pesticides, 5 endocrine-disrupting chemicals, 6 heavy metals, 7 micronutrients, 8 fatty acid, and 9 parental obesity as a proxy of accumulation of specific chemicals or nutritional status. Several chemical exposures such as air pollution (e.g., particular matter 2.5, pesticides, bisphenol A, phthalates, mercury, and nutrition deficiency such as folic acid, vitamin D, or fatty acid may possibly be associated with an increased risk of ASD, whereas other traditional risk factors such as smoking/tobacco, alcohol, or polychlorinated biphenyls are less likely to be associated with ASD. Further research is needed to accumulate evidence on the association between chemical exposure and nutrient deficiencies and ASD in various doses and populations.

  13. Methylene blue treatment in experimental ischemic stroke: a mini review

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Zhao; Duong, Timothy Q.

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death and long-term disability. Methylene blue, a drug grandfathered by the Food and Drug Administration with a long history of safe usage in humans for treating methemoglobinemia and cyanide poisoning, has recently been shown to be neuroprotective in neurodegenerative diseases and brain injuries. The goal of this paper is to review studies on methylene blue in experimental stroke models.

  14. [Mini review] metagenomic studies of the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Behzad, Hayedeh

    2015-10-23

    Metagenomics has significantly advanced the field of marine microbial ecology, revealing the vast diversity of previously unknown microbial life forms in different marine niches. The tremendous amount of data generated has enabled identification of a large number of microbial genes (metagenomes), their community interactions, adaptation mechanisms, and their potential applications in pharmaceutical and biotechnology-based industries. Comparative metagenomics reveals that microbial diversity is a function of the local environment, meaning that unique or unusual environments typically harbor novel microbial species with unique genes and metabolic pathways. The Red Sea has an abundance of unique characteristics; however, its microbiota is one of the least studied amongst marine environments. The Red Sea harbors approximately 25 hot anoxic brine pools, plus a vibrant coral reef ecosystem. Physiochemical studies describe the Red Sea as an oligotrophic environment that contains one of the warmest and saltiest waters in the world with year-round high UV radiations. These characteristics are believed to have shaped the evolution of microbial communities in the Red Sea. Over-representation of genes involved in DNA repair, high-intensity light responses, and osmolyte C1 oxidation were found in the Red Sea metagenomic databases suggesting acquisition of specific environmental adaptation by the Red Sea microbiota. The Red Sea brine pools harbor a diverse range of halophilic and thermophilic bacterial and archaeal communities, which are potential sources of enzymes for pharmaceutical and biotechnology-based application. Understanding the mechanisms of these adaptations and their function within the larger ecosystem could also prove useful in light of predicted global warming scenarios where global ocean temperatures are expected to rise by 1–3 °C in the next few decades. In this review, we provide an overview of the published metagenomic studies that were conducted in the Red Sea, and the bio-prospecting potential of the Red Sea microbiota. Furthermore, we discuss the limitations of the previous studies and the need for generating a large and representative metagenomic database of the Red Sea to help establish a dynamic model of the Red Sea microbiota.

  15. Laser pointer induced macular damage: case report and mini review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turaka, Kiran; Bryan, J Shepard; Gordon, Alan J; Reddy, Rahul; Kwong, Henry M; Sell, Clive H

    2012-06-01

    To report laser pointer induced damage to retina and choroid and briefly review literature. A case report of a 13-year old Caucasian boy developed blurry central vision and central scotoma in right eye (OD). He was exposed for one minute to class IIIA green laser pointer of 650 nm wavelength and 5 mW power. Clinical examination showed a grayish lesion in foveal region. Ancillary testing revealed disruption of the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) layer in foveal region and indocyanine green angiography demonstrated evidence of choroidal hypofluorescence suggestive of choroidal infarction in OD. Visual acuity improved from 20/100 to 20/60 in one day and he was treated with tapering doses of oral prednisolone (40 mg) for 3 weeks. Laser pointer with a power of >5 mW caused damage to RPE in the macula. Children should not be given laser pointers as toys especially those with label of danger instructions. PMID:22466425

  16. Renal injury, nephrolithiasis and Nigella sativa: A mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parichehr Hayatdavoudi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The incidence and prevalence of kidney stone is increasing worldwide. After the first recurrence the risk of subsequent relapses is higher and the time period between relapses is shortened. Urinary stones can be severely painful and make a huge economic burden. The stone disease may increase the vulnerability of patients to other diseases such as renal failure. Medicinal herbs are rich sources of antioxidants which are increasingly consumed globally for their safety, efficacy and low price. Nigella sativa is a spice plant that is widely used for prevention and treatment of many ailments in Muslim countries and worldwide. This review aims at investigation of the effects of Nigella sativa on renal injury and stone formation. Materials and Method: The scientific resources including PubMed, Scopus, and Google scholar were searched using key words such as: nephrolithiasis, urolithiasis, kidney/renal stone, renal injury, renal failure, urinary retention and black seed, black cumin, Nigella sativa and thymoquinone.    Results: N. sativa and its main component, thymoquinone showed positive effects in prevention or curing kidney stones and renal failure through various mechanism such as antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, anti-eicosanoid and immunomodulatory effects. The putative candidate in many cases has been claimed to be thymoquinone but it seems that at least in part, particularly in kidney stones, the herbal melanin plays a role which requires further investigation to prove. Conclusion: N. sativa and its components are beneficial in prevention and curing of renal diseases including nephrolithiasis and renal damages.

  17. Sacroiliac screw fixation: A mini review of surgical technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernando Raphael Alvis-Miranda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The sacral percutaneous fixation has many advantages but can be associated with a significant exposure to X-ray radiation. Currently, sacroiliac screw fixation represents the only minimally invasive technique to stabilize the posterior pelvic ring. It is a technique that should be used by experienced surgeons. We present a practical review of important aspects of this technique.

  18. Chemicals, Nutrition, and Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Mini-Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Takeo; Morisaki, Naho; Honda, Yukiko; Sampei, Makiko; Tani, Yukako

    2016-01-01

    The rapid increase of the prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) suggests that exposure to chemicals may impact the development of ASD. Therefore, we reviewed literature on the following chemicals, nutrient to investigate their association with ASD: (1) smoke/tobacco, (2) alcohol, (3) air pollution, (4) pesticides, (5) endocrine-disrupting chemicals, (6) heavy metals, (7) micronutrients, (8) fatty acid, and (9) parental obesity as a proxy of accumulation of specific chemicals or nutritional status. Several chemical exposures such as air pollution (e.g., particular matter 2.5), pesticides, bisphenol A, phthalates, mercury, and nutrition deficiency such as folic acid, vitamin D, or fatty acid may possibly be associated with an increased risk of ASD, whereas other traditional risk factors such as smoking/tobacco, alcohol, or polychlorinated biphenyls are less likely to be associated with ASD. Further research is needed to accumulate evidence on the association between chemical exposure and nutrient deficiencies and ASD in various doses and populations. PMID:27147957

  19. Paleoethnobotany and Ancient Alcohol Production: A Mini-Review

    OpenAIRE

    Matthew E Biwer; Amber M VanDerwarker

    2015-01-01

    The production and consumption of alcoholic beverages in the past is an important consideration when addressing issues involving ancient food. However, successfully demonstrating that alcoholic beverages were produced in prehistoric contexts is problematic.  As a result, archaeobotanists have developed a multi-scalar approach, incorporating multiple lines of evidence, to argue for the production of fermented beverages in the past.

  20. Mini Review: Dental Pulp as a Source for Paleomicrobiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tung Nguyen-Hieu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Paleomicrobiology is a recent science. Paleomicrobiology describes the history of infectious diseases through research of ancient microbes. The dentistry with the tooth in particular has contributed to the progress of this science. The dental pulp is very well protected in the centre of the tooth. Molecular techniques such as “suicide PCR” and Multiple Spacer Typing have identified and characterized micro-organisms in the ancient samples. The detection of bacterial DNA from ancient dental pulp provided the scientific evidences for diagnosis of the infectious diseases of the past. The cooperation of paleomicrobiology and paleodontology also contributed the new knowledge to human pathology.

  1. Crocus sativus L. (saffron) for cancer chemoprevention: A mini review

    OpenAIRE

    Prasan R Bhandari

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is one of the most feared diseases globally and there has been a sustained rise in its incidence in both developing and developed countries. Despite the growing therapeutic options for patients with cancer, their efficacy is time-limited and non-curative. Hence to overcome these drawbacks, an incessant screening for superior and safer drugs has been ongoing for numerous decades, resulting in the detection of anti-cancer properties of several phytochemicals. Chemoprevention using readil...

  2. Emtricitabine in Chronic Hepatitis B: A Mini Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Palumbo

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Emtricitabine is a cytosine nucleoside analog with antiviral activity against both hepatitis B virus (HBV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. It is structurally similar to lamivudine; it differs only by a fluorine at the 5-position of the nucleic acid. This review focuses on the efficacy and tolerability of FTC in the treatment of chronic hepatitis B, both HBeAg and anti-HBe-positive. Relevant literature was identified through searches of MEDLINE (2001-January 2008. The review of literature suggests that the role of emtricitabine as monotherapy may be limited by its structural similarity to lamivudine and the corresponding risk of development of drug resistance; however, some studies seem to evidence an efficacy for emtricitabine in association with other antiviral drugs, as adefovir dipivoxil and clevudine. Other studies are needed to evaluate the efficacy of this new drug in particular in association with other antiviral drugs.

  3. Bioinformatics in microbial biotechnology – a mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bansal Arvind K

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The revolutionary growth in the computation speed and memory storage capability has fueled a new era in the analysis of biological data. Hundreds of microbial genomes and many eukaryotic genomes including a cleaner draft of human genome have been sequenced raising the expectation of better control of microorganisms. The goals are as lofty as the development of rational drugs and antimicrobial agents, development of new enhanced bacterial strains for bioremediation and pollution control, development of better and easy to administer vaccines, the development of protein biomarkers for various bacterial diseases, and better understanding of host-bacteria interaction to prevent bacterial infections. In the last decade the development of many new bioinformatics techniques and integrated databases has facilitated the realization of these goals. Current research in bioinformatics can be classified into: (i genomics – sequencing and comparative study of genomes to identify gene and genome functionality, (ii proteomics – identification and characterization of protein related properties and reconstruction of metabolic and regulatory pathways, (iii cell visualization and simulation to study and model cell behavior, and (iv application to the development of drugs and anti-microbial agents. In this article, we will focus on the techniques and their limitations in genomics and proteomics. Bioinformatics research can be classified under three major approaches: (1 analysis based upon the available experimental wet-lab data, (2 the use of mathematical modeling to derive new information, and (3 an integrated approach that integrates search techniques with mathematical modeling. The major impact of bioinformatics research has been to automate the genome sequencing, automated development of integrated genomics and proteomics databases, automated genome comparisons to identify the genome function, automated derivation of metabolic pathways, gene expression analysis to derive regulatory pathways, the development of statistical techniques, clustering techniques and data mining techniques to derive protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions, and modeling of 3D structure of proteins and 3D docking between proteins and biochemicals for rational drug design, difference analysis between pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains to identify candidate genes for vaccines and anti-microbial agents, and the whole genome comparison to understand the microbial evolution. The development of bioinformatics techniques has enhanced the pace of biological discovery by automated analysis of large number of microbial genomes. We are on the verge of using all this knowledge to understand cellular mechanisms at the systemic level. The developed bioinformatics techniques have potential to facilitate (i the discovery of causes of diseases, (ii vaccine and rational drug design, and (iii improved cost effective agents for bioremediation by pruning out the dead ends. Despite the fast paced global effort, the current analysis is limited by the lack of available gene-functionality from the wet-lab data, the lack of computer algorithms to explore vast amount of data with unknown functionality, limited availability of protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions, and the lack of knowledge of temporal and transient behavior of genes and pathways.

  4. ROLE OF BACTERIA IN THE TOOTH ABSCESS: A MINI REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Biswajit Batabyal; Gautam kr. Kundu

    2013-01-01

    A tooth abscess or root abscess is pus enclosed in the tissues of the jaw bone at the apex of an infected tooth's root(s). Usually the abscess originates from a bacterial infection that has accumulated in the soft, often dead, pulp of the tooth. This can be caused by untreated tooth decay, cracked teeth or extensive periodontal disease. A failed root canal treatment may also create a similar abscess. Recently developed molecular methods have made it possible to characterise mixed micro flora ...

  5. Amylin in the Periphery II: An Updated Mini-Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Wookey

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Amylin is a polypeptide that is cosecreted with insulin from the β cells of the pancreas. Therefore, in states of diabetes in which the β-cell mass is largely depleted or dysfunctional, insulin and amylin secretion are also lost or dysregulated.While the soluble monomeric form of amylin acts as a hormone that alters physiological responses related to feeding and acts as a specific growth factor, there has been renewed interest in the less-soluble oligomeric and insoluble polymeric forms of human (also monkey and cat amylin that may contribute to the establishment of a pathophysiological pathway to overt diabetes. With this discovery has grown the hope of minimizing, with appropriate therapy, these toxic forms to preserve the functional β-cell mass. Human β cells may also be more vulnerable to these forms and one risk factor, a higher fat diet, may promote toxic forms. The generation and utilities of transgenic rodent models, which express enhanced levels of human amylin, have been accompanied by strategies that may lead to the reduction of toxic forms and associated risk factors.The successful definition and faithful expression of the physiological receptors (and complexes for amylin that may differ for each target organ is an important development in the field of amylin research generally. Besides the heuristic value for the understanding of the molecular biology of receptors, the opportunity to screen and identify nonpeptide analogues that bind the physiological receptors has important implications for biomedicine and clinical practice in relation to treatments for diabetic complications, bone diseases, and eating disorders. In particular, in their capacities to mimic the effects of amylin as a growth factor, amylin analogues may prove useful in the stimulation of β-cell mass (in conjunction with other factors, reduce the activity of the osteoclast population, and stimulate the regeneration of proximal tubules following toxic insult (and thus avoid the development of renal insufficiency.

  6. Nanofiltration for water and wastewater treatment – a mini review

    OpenAIRE

    Shon, H. K.; S. Phuntsho; D. S. Chaudhary; Vigneswaran, S.; Cho, J.

    2013-01-01

    The application of membrane technology in water and wastewater treatment is increasing due to stringent water quality standards. Nanofiltration (NF) is one of the widely used membrane processes for water and wastewater treatment in addition to other applications such as desalination. NF has replaced reverse osmosis (RO) membranes in many applications due to lower energy consumption and higher flux rates. This paper briefly reviews the application of NF for water and wastewat...

  7. Nanofiltration for water and wastewater treatment – a mini review

    OpenAIRE

    Shon, H. K.; S. Phuntsho; D. S. Chaudhary; Vigneswaran, S.; Cho, J.

    2013-01-01

    The application of membrane technology in water and wastewater treatment is increasing due to stringent water quality standards. Nanofiltration (NF) is one of the widely used membrane processes for water and wastewater treatment in addition to other applications such as desalination. NF has replaced reverse osmosis (RO) membranes in many applications due to lower energy consumption and higher flux rates. This paper briefly reviews the application of NF for water and wastewater treatment inclu...

  8. The Endocrinology of Ageing: A Mini-Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher M; Boelaert, Kristien

    2015-01-01

    Significant advances in health and social wellbeing have led to linear gains in life expectancy and an accompanying increase in the burden imposed by age-related morbidities. Complex alterations in hormonal networks which regulate homeostasis and survival may underlie this poor adaptation to later life, as exemplified by an increased fracture risk amongst post-menopausal women. Beyond overt under- or overactivity of hormonal axes, changes in the concentrations of regulatory hormones may also impact on health and disease. Subclinical hyperthyroidism, a disorder characterised by normal thyroxine levels in the presence of decreased thyroid-stimulating hormone, is, for instance, independently associated with an increased risk of atrial fibrillation amongst elderly populations. Both the menopause and subclinical thyroid disease demonstrate the difficulty in reversing endocrine changes in later life, with minimal impact from thyroxine therapy in subclinical hypothyroidism and multiple reports of harm resulting from hormone replacement therapy in peri- and post-menopausal women. Given these findings, strategies to locally regulate hormone bioavailability by altering pre-receptor metabolism may offer greater therapeutic potential in the fight against age-related disease. This review aims to provide an overview of the ageing endocrine system and its potential impact on health and disease in the elderly. It will postulate that strategies to coordinate pre-receptor hormone metabolism and a greater understanding of putative hormonal longevity pathways may offer key new drug targets in the fight against ageing, and will argue against applying the conventional endocrine maxim of 'block and replace' to hormonal changes seen during ageing. PMID:25471682

  9. Remediation of copper in vineyards – A mini review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viticulturists use copper fungicide to combat Downy Mildew. Copper, a non-degradable heavy metal, can accumulate in soil or leach into water sources. Its accumulation in topsoil has impacted micro and macro organisms, spurring scientists to research in situ copper removal methods. Recent publications suggest that microorganism assisted phytoextraction, using plants and bacteria to actively extract copper, is most promising. As vineyards represent moderately polluted sites this technique has great potential. Active plant extraction and chelate assisted remediation extract too little copper or risk leaching, respectively. However, despite interesting pot experiment results using microorganism assisted phytoextraction, it remains a challenge to find plants that primarily accumulate copper in their shoots, a necessity in vineyards where whole plant removal would be time consuming and financially cumbersome. Vineyard remediation requires a holistic approach including sustainable soil management, proper plant selection, increasing biodiversity and microorganisms. - Highlights: ► We describe copper distribution and availability in vineyards. ► We explain the environmental impact of copper on organisms, plants and processes. ► We detail possible remediation methods within vineyards. ► Microbially assisted phytoremediation is the most promising remediation method. ► A solution requires an interdisciplinary approach between plants, soil and vines. - This review is significant because it highlights prospective remediation methods usable in copper contaminated vineyards.

  10. Essential Oil Compositions of Malaysian Lauraceae: A Mini Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Mohd Nuzul Hakimi Salleh, Farediah Ahmad * , Khong Heng Yen, Razauden Mohamed Zulkifli

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils have been largely employed for human need due to their antibacterial, antifungal and insecticidal activities. At present, approximately 3000 essential oils are known, 300 of which are commercially important. Essential oils or some of their components are used in perfumes and make-up products, sanitary products, dentistry, agriculture, as food preservers and additives, and as natural remedies. The essential oil compositions of Malaysian Lauraceae family have been investigated for many years. In the recent years, studies on the essential oils of the species have been progressing and many of them have reported interesting pharmacological activities. In this article, we summarized and updated the chemical compositions and biological activities of Malaysian Lauraceae. Throughout our literature review, only four genera which are Lindera, Beilschmiedia, Litsea, and Cinnamomum have been studied for their essential oil compositions in Malaysia. They were found to contain mainly safrole, eugenol, linalool, camphor, benzyl benzoate or cinnamaldehyde as major components. There were significant priorities to find out the details of the chemical compositions of the essential oils from Malaysian Lauraceae. Therefore, more clinical studies on the toxicity of the essential oil of the species are also crucial to ensure their safety and to assess their eligibility to be used as the sources of modern medicines.

  11. SiRNA Mediated Gene Silencing: A Mini Review

    OpenAIRE

    M.V Jeevitha; S.U Ajisha; Baby Joseph

    2012-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) technology has become a novel tool for silencing gene expression in cells or organisms. RNA interference is the process that double-stranded RNA induces the homology-dependent degradation of cognate mRNA mediated by 21-23 nucleotide short interfering RNA (siRNA). RNA interference is a powerful mechanism of gene silencing that underlies many aspects of eukaryotic biology. On the molecular level, RNAi is mediated by a family of ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes called R...

  12. HER-2 Positive Breast Cancer - a Mini-Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asif, Hafiz Muhammad; Sultana, Sabira; Ahmed, Saeed; Akhtar, Naheed; Tariq, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of among all cancers with increased incidence, high mortality rate, and high economic and social costs. The the most common type of cancer among females worldwide, breast cancer is actually the uncontrolled proliferation of cells which attain malignancy. Recently it has shown that breast cancer contributes 11% among all types of cancer diagnosed globally on an annual basis and it is one of the leading causes of death among women. The human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) is a receptor tyrosine-protein kinase erbB-2 normally involved in the proliferation and division of breast cells. In some abnormal cases the HER2 gene does not work correctly and makes too many copies of itself. HER2-positive (HER2+) breast cancers constitute an aggressive type of breast cancer and tend to grow faster and are more likely to spread. However, therapies that specifically target HER2, such as Herceptin® (traztuzumab), are very effective. HER2 targeted therapies, has significantly improved the therapeutic outcome for patients with HER2 positive breast cancer. PMID:27221828

  13. The versatile strategies of Escherichia coli pathotypes: a mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. P. Sousa

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The widespread species Escherichia coli includes a broad variety of different types, ranging from highly pathogenic strains to avirulent isolates. Few microorganisms are as versatile as E. coli. Pathogenic strains remain a leading cause of severe and persistent infant diarrhea in developing countries. They may be limited to colonization of a mucosal surface or can disseminate throughout the body and have been implicated in urinary tract infection, sepsis/meningitis and gastrointestinal infection. The human gastrointestinal tract is susceptible to diarrheagenic E. coli infections. Escherichia coli have effectively managed to subvert the host cytoskeleton for their own purposes causing substantial diarrheal disease, a major public health problem worldwide. This review deals with the different strategies regarding E. coli as a pathogen and the virulence traits of its pathotypes highlighting the species as a commensal, opportunistic and specialized pathogen.

  14. Bioinformatics in microbial biotechnology – a mini review

    OpenAIRE

    Bansal Arvind K

    2005-01-01

    Abstract The revolutionary growth in the computation speed and memory storage capability has fueled a new era in the analysis of biological data. Hundreds of microbial genomes and many eukaryotic genomes including a cleaner draft of human genome have been sequenced raising the expectation of better control of microorganisms. The goals are as lofty as the development of rational drugs and antimicrobial agents, development of new enhanced bacterial strains for bioremediation and pollution contr...

  15. SiRNA Mediated Gene Silencing: A Mini Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V. Jeevitha

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi technology has become a novel tool for silencing gene expression in cells or organisms. RNA interference is the process that double-stranded RNA induces the homology-dependent degradation of cognate mRNA mediated by 21-23 nucleotide short interfering RNA (siRNA. RNA interference is a powerful mechanism of gene silencing that underlies many aspects of eukaryotic biology. On the molecular level, RNAi is mediated by a family of ribonucleoprotein (RNP complexes called RNA-Induced Silencing Complexes (RISCs, which can be programmed to target virtually any nucleic acid sequence for silencing. The ability of RISC to locate target RNAs been co-opted by evolution many times to generate a broad spectrum of gene silencing pathways. The study about the Silencing of gene expression by siRNA is rapidly becoming a powerful tool for genetic analysis and represents a potential strategy for therapeutic product development. In this study, the applications of siRNA expressing recombinant adenovirus system in plants, animals and in cancer gene therapy are given importance with its modifications

  16. Theories relating baryon asymmetry and dark matter: a Mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano eMorisi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The nature of dark matter and the origin of the baryon asymmetry are two of the deepest mysteries of modern particle physics. In the absence of hints regarding a possible solution to these mysteries, many approaches have been developed to tackle them simultaneously { leading to very diverse and rich models}. We give a short review where we describe the general features of some of these models and an overview on the general problem. We also propose a diagrammatic notation to label the different models.

  17. Anticancer biology of Azadirachta indica L (neem): a mini review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Rajkumar; Prasad, Murari; Sah, Nand K

    2011-09-15

    Neem (Azadirachta indica), a member of the Meliaceae family, is a fast growing tropical evergreen tree with a highly branched and stout, solid stem. Because of its tremendous therapeutic, domestic, agricultural and ethnomedicinal significance, and its proximity with human culture and civilization, neem has been called "the wonder tree" and "nature's drug store." All parts of this tree, particularly the leaves, bark, seed-oil and their purified products are widely used for treatment of cancer. Over 60 different types of biochemicals including terpenoids and steroids have been purified from this plant. Pre-clinical research work done during the last decade has fine-tuned our understanding of the anticancer properties of the crude and purified products from this plant. The anticancer properties of the plant have been studied largely in terms of its preventive, protective, tumor-suppressive, immunomodulatory and apoptotic effects against various types of cancer and their molecular mechanisms. This review aims at scanning scattered literature on "the anticancer biology of A. indica," related toxicity problems and future perspectives. The cogent data on the anticancer biology of products from A. indica deserve multi-institutional clinical trials as early as possible. The prospects of relatively cheaper cancer drugs could then be brighter, particularly for the under-privileged cancer patients of the world. PMID:21743298

  18. ROLE OF BACTERIA IN THE TOOTH ABSCESS: A MINI REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswajit Batabyal

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A tooth abscess or root abscess is pus enclosed in the tissues of the jaw bone at the apex of an infected tooth's root(s. Usually the abscess originates from a bacterial infection that has accumulated in the soft, often dead, pulp of the tooth. This can be caused by untreated tooth decay, cracked teeth or extensive periodontal disease. A failed root canal treatment may also create a similar abscess. Recently developed molecular methods have made it possible to characterise mixed micro flora in their entirety, including the substantial numbers of uncultivable bacteria. This paper will review the current literature regarding the molecular techniques used to identify uncultivable bacteria from dental abscess.

  19. Mini review of Central Exclusive Production at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Brona, Grzegorz

    2009-01-01

    The LHC experiments provide an unprecedented coverage in pseudo-rapidity. This advantage and the high LHC luminosity allow for broad studies of central exclusive production (CEP) \\mbox{processes} such as exclusive production of $\\Upsilon$, di-leptons, di-photons and di-jets. With the proposed near beam detectors (FP420 and FP220) exclusive Higgs and SUSY states will be also \\mbox{accesible}. The \\mbox{discussion} is focused on the CMS programme, but both CMS and ATLAS have similar \\mbox{kinematical} coverage and may perform similar studies.

  20. Mini review of Central Exclusive Production at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Brona, Grzegorz

    2009-01-01

    The LHC experiments provide an unprecedented coverage in pseudo-rapidity. This advantage and high LHC luminosity allow for broad studies of central exclusive production (CEP) processes such as exclusive production of ¡, di-leptons, di-photons and di-jets. Finally, with the proposed near beam detectors (FP420 and FP220) the exclusive Higgs and SUSY states will be also accesible. The discussion is focused on the CMS programme, as both CMS and ATLAS have similar kinematical coverage and may perform similar studies.

  1. A mini review of preoxidation to improve coagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Pengchao; Chen, Yiqun; Ma, Jun; Zhang, Xiang; Zou, Jing; Wang, Zongping

    2016-07-01

    Preoxidation has attracted people's attention due to its effectiveness in enhancing coagulation. The mechanisms, drawbacks and applications in the improvement of coagulation were summarized in this work. Preoxidation can destroy the organic coating on the surface of particles to change the zeta potential, which is the vital reason for improving coagulation. Co-existing metallic ions, such as calcium, iron and manganese, play important roles in the improvement of coagulation due to the formation of metal-humate complexes or the in situ formed coagulant. However, preoxidation could degrade organic matter from high molecular weight to low molecular weight and damage cell membrane of algae, causing intracellular algal organic matter to release outside and producing hydrophilic functional groups to some extent, which has the potential to deteriorate the water quality. Additionally, disinfection byproduct formation is also affected significantly through changing the characteristics of the organic and inorganic precursors. Based on the recent publications, some future developments of preoxidation process were suggested in this study. PMID:27153238

  2. Mini-review on Monte Carlo programs for Bhabha scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We review the status of Monte Carlo generators presently used for simulations of the large-angle Bhabha process at electron-positron colliders of moderately high energy (flavour factories), operating at centre-of-mass energies between about 1 GeV and 10 GeV. It is shown how the theoretical accuracy reached by present Bhabha programs for physics at flavour factories is at the level of 0.1% and, therefore, comparable with that reached about a decade ago for luminosity monitoring through small-angle Bhabha scattering at LEP

  3. Small incision cataract surgery: Complications and mini-review

    OpenAIRE

    Gogate Parikshit

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the literature on manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS) and its complications. Various articles on MSICS published in indexed journals were reviewed, as well as the sections on complications of MSICS. The Pubmed search engine on the Internet was used to find out articles published since 1985 on MSICS in any language in indexed journals. Books published by Indian authors and the website of Indian Journal of Ophthalmology were also referred to. MSICS has become ver...

  4. Small incision cataract surgery: Complications and mini-review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gogate Parikshit

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the literature on manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS and its complications. Various articles on MSICS published in indexed journals were reviewed, as well as the sections on complications of MSICS. The Pubmed search engine on the Internet was used to find out articles published since 1985 on MSICS in any language in indexed journals. Books published by Indian authors and the website of Indian Journal of Ophthalmology were also referred to. MSICS has become very popular technique of cataract surgery in India, and it is often used as an alternative to phacoemulsification. Studies on its efficacy and safety for cataract surgery show that, being a variant of extracapsular cataract surgery, MSICS also has similar intraoperative and postoperative complications. The considerable handling inside the anterior chamber during nucleus delivery increase the chances of iris injury, striate keratitis, and posterior capsular rupture. The surgeon has to be extra careful in the construction of the scleral tunnel and to achieve a good capsulorrhexis. Postoperative inflammation and corneal edema are rare if surgeons have the expertise and patience. The final astigmatism is less than that in the extracapsular cataract surgery and almost comparable to that in phacoemulsification. There is, however, a concern of posterior capsular opacification in the long term, which needs to be addressed. Although MSICS demands skill and patience from the cataract surgeon, it is a safe, effective, and economical alternative to competing techniques and can be the answer to tackle the large backlog of blindness due to cataract.

  5. Mini-review: bmx kinase inhibitors for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarboe, John S; Dutta, Shilpa; Velu, Sadanandan E; Willey, Christopher D

    2013-09-01

    Kinase inhibitors are among the fastest growing class of anti-cancer therapies. One family of kinases that has recently gained attention as a target for treating malignant disorders is the Tec kinase family. Evidence has been published that one member of this family; the Bmx kinase, may play a role in the pathogenesis of glioblastoma, prostate, breast and lung cancer. Bmx has also shown potential as an anti-vascular therapy in combination with radiation or as a sensitizer to chemotherapeutic agents. Therefore, several companies such as Pharmacyclics, Avila Therapeutics, Merck and Co., Metaproteomics, IRM, and Moerae Matrix have developed compounds or peptides that function as Bmx kinase inhibitors. These companies have subsequently been issued patents for these inhibitors. Additionally, it has been shown that current clinical stage EGFR inhibitors can irreversibly inhibit Bmx, suggesting these compounds might be rapidly moved to clinical trials for other malignancies. This review will discuss current patents issued since 2009 that contain data specifically on inhibition of the Bmx kinase, and will also discuss the scientific literature that suggests their potential application as therapeutics in the treatment of the aforementioned malignancies. PMID:23198769

  6. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons for fullerene synthesis in flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, J. Michael; Diener, Michael D.

    2006-12-19

    This invention provides improved methods for combustion synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, including fullerenes, employing multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels selected for high carbon conversion to extractable fullerenes. The multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels include those that contain polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. More specifically, multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels contain a substantial amount of indene, methylnapthalenes or mixtures thereof. Coal tar and petroleum distillate fractions provide low cost hydrocarbon fuels containing polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, including without limitation, indene, methylnapthalenes or mixtures thereof.

  7. Biosurfactant-enhanced bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameotra, S.S.; Bollag, J.M. [Penn State University, University Park, PA (USA). Soil Biochemical Lab.

    2003-07-01

    Biosurfactants are surface-active compounds synthesized by it wide variety of micro-organisms. They are molecules that have both hydrophobic and hydrophilic domains and are capable of lowering the surface tension and the interfacial tension of the growth medium. Biosurfactants possess different chemical structures - lipopeptides, glycolipids, neutral lipids, and fatty acids. They are nontoxic biomolecules that are biodegradable. Biosurfactants also exhibit strong emulsification of hydrophobic compounds and form stable emulsions. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) can be toxic, mutagenic, and carcinogenic compounds that pollute the environment. They are released to the environment its a result of spillage of oil and byproducts of coal treatment processes. The low water solubility of PAHs limits their availability to microorganisms, which is a potential problem for bioremediation of PAH-contaminated sites. Microbially produced surfactants enhance the bioavailability of these hydrophobic compounds for bioremediation. Therefore, biosurfactant-enhanced solubility of PAHs has potential applications in bioremediation.

  8. A Shape-Persistent Cryptand for Capturing Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui-Feng; Hu, Wen-Jing; Liu, Yahu A; Zhao, Xiao-Li; Li, Jiu-Sheng; Jiang, Biao; Wen, Ke

    2016-07-01

    A shape-persistent cryptand 1, containing two face-to-face oriented electron-deficient 2,4,6-triphenyl-1,3,5-triazine units separated by approximately 7 Å, and bridged by two rigid 1,8-naphthyridine linkers and a pentaethylene oxide loop, is created for capturing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Cryptand 1 formed 1:1 complexes with PAH guest molecules, such as phenanthrene (6), anthracene (7), pyrene (8), triphenylene (9), and tetraphene (10). The single-crystal structure of complex 6⊂1 revealed that 6 was included in the cavity of 1 via face-to-face π···π stacking interactions. Soaking crystalline 1 in a toluene solution of anthracene resulted in anthracene from the toluene solution being picked up by the crystalline solid of 1. PMID:27258531

  9. Charge-transfer complexes of pyrimidine Schiff bases with aromatic nitro compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Yousry M.; El Ansary, A. L.; Sherif, O. E.; Hassib, H. B.

    2011-08-01

    Charge-transfer (CT) complexes of pyrimidine Schiff bases, derived from condensation of 2-aminopyrimidine and substituted benzaldehydes, with some aromatic polynitro compounds were prepared and investigated using IR, UV, visible and 1H NMR spectroscopy. For all solid complexes, the main interaction between the donor and acceptor molecules takes place through the π-π* interaction. Strong and some weak acidic acceptors, in addition interact through proton transfer from the acceptor molecule to the basic centre of the electron donor. Also, an n-π* transition was detected in some complexes.

  10. Theoretical observation of hexaatomic molecules containing pentacoordinate planar carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Qiong

    2008-01-01

    The smallest molecules up to date containing a D5h pentacoordinate planar carbon (PPC) atom, CBe5 and CBe54-, are presented by means of ab initio calculations. To gain a better understanding about which electronic factors contribute to their stabilization, natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis and the nucleus independent chemical shifts (NlCS) were calculated. The data reported here suggest that D5h CBe5 is a aromaticity in nature, while in D5h CBe54- Tr aromaticity is dominating. The classical octet rule is well satisfied in both molecules, and is one of the fundamental reasons to understand the stability of the pentagon structures. The Be5 ring serves as σ donor in D5h CBe5, and Tr-acceptor in D5h CBe54-. The D5h CBe54- possessing 18 valence electrons with a closed-shell electron configuration is the most plau-sible candidate for experimental detection.

  11. Theoretical observation of hexaatomic molecules containing pentacoordinate planar carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The smallest molecules up to date containing a D5h pentacoordinate planar carbon (PPC) atom, CBe5 and CBe54-, are presented by means of ab initio calculations. To gain a better understanding about which electronic factors contribute to their stabilization, natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis and the nucleus independent chemical shifts (NICS) were calculated. The data reported here suggest that D5h CBe5 is σ aromaticity in nature, while in D5h CBe54- π aromaticity is dominating. The classical octet rule is well satisfied in both molecules, and is one of the fundamental reasons to understand the stability of the pentagon structures. The Be5 ring serves as σ donor in D5h CBe5, and π-acceptor in D5h CBe54-. The D5h CBe54- possessing 18 valence electrons with a closed-shell electron configuration is the most plau-sible candidate for experimental detection.

  12. POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON FAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The far-IR characteristics of astrophysically relevant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) averaging in size around 100 carbon atoms have been studied using the theoretical spectra in the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database. These spectra were calculated using density functional theory. Selections of PAH species are made, grouped together by common characteristics or trends, such as size, shape, charge, and composition, and their far-IR spectra compared. The out-of-plane modes involving the entire molecule are explored in detail, astronomical relevance is assessed, and an observing strategy is discussed. It is shown that PAHs produce richer far-IR spectra with increasing size. PAHs also produce richer far-IR spectra with increasing number of irregularities. However, series of irregular-shaped PAHs with the same compact core have common 'Jumping-Jack' modes that 'pile up' at specific frequencies in their average spectrum. For the PAHs studied here, around 100 carbon atoms in size, this band falls near 50 μm. PAH charge and nitrogen inclusion affect band intensities but have little effect on far-IR band positions. Detailed analysis of the two-dimensional, out-of-plane bending 'drumhead' modes in the coronene and pyrene 'families' and the one-dimensional, out-of-plane bending 'bar' modes in the acene 'family' show that these molecular vibrations can be treated as classical vibrating sheets and bars of graphene, respectively. The analysis also shows that the peak position of these modes is very sensitive to the area of the emitting PAH and does not depend on the particular geometry. Thus, these longest wavelength PAH bands could provide a unique handle on the size of the largest species in the interstellar PAH family. However, these bands are weak. Observing highly excited regions showing the mid-IR bands in which the emission from classical dust peaks at short wavelengths offers the best chance of detecting PAH emission in the far-IR. For these regions

  13. An overview of the AROMAT campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlaud, Alexis; Dekemper, Emmanuel; Van Roozendael, Michel; Constantin, Daniel; Georgescu, Lucian; Meier, Andreas; Richter, Andreas; Den Hoed, Mirjam; Allaart, Marc; Boscornea, Andreea; Vajaiac, Sorin; Bellegante, Livio; Nemuc, Anca; Nicolae, Doina; Shaifangar, Reza; Dörner, Steffen; Wagner, Thomas; Stebel, Kerstin; Schuettemeyer, Dirk

    2016-04-01

    The Airborne ROmanian Measurements of Aerosols and Trace gases (AROMAT) campaign and its follow-up AROMAT-2 were held in September 2014 and August 2015, respectively. Both campaigns focused on two geophysical targets: the city of Bucharest and the large power plants of the Jiu Valley, which are located in a rural area 170 km West of Bucharest. These two areas are complementary in terms of emitted chemical species and their spatial distributions. The objectives of the AROMAT campaigns were (i) to test recently developed airborne observation systems dedicated to air quality satellite validation studies such as the AirMAP imaging DOAS system (University of Bremen), the NO2 sonde (KNMI), and the compact SWING whiskbroom imager (BIRA), and (ii) to prepare the validation programme of the future Atmospheric Sentinels, starting with Sentinel-5 Precursor (S5P) to be launched in early summer 2016. We present results from the different airborne instrumentations and from coincident ground-based measurements (lidar, in-situ, and mobile DOAS systems) performed during both campaigns. The AROMAT dataset addresses several of the mandatory products of TROPOMI/S5P, in particular NO2 and SO2 (horizontal distribution and profile from aircraft, plume image with ground-based SO2 and NO2 cameras, transects with mobile DOAS, in-situ), H2CO (mobile MAX-DOAS), and aerosols (lidar, airborne FUBISS-ASA2 sun-photometer, and aircraft in-situ). We investigate the information content of the AROMAT dataset for satellite validation studies based on co-located OMI and GOME-2 data, and simulations of TROPOMI measurements. The experience gained during AROMAT and AROMAT-2 will be used in support of a large-scale TROPOMI/S5P validation campaign in Romania scheduled for summer 2017.

  14. Polarizable Atomic Multipole-based Molecular Mechanics for Organic Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Pengyu; Wu, Chuanjie; Ponder, Jay W.

    2011-01-01

    An empirical potential based on permanent atomic multipoles and atomic induced dipoles is reported for alkanes, alcohols, amines, sulfides, aldehydes, carboxylic acids, amides, aromatics and other small organic molecules. Permanent atomic multipole moments through quadrupole moments have been derived from gas phase ab initio molecular orbital calculations. The van der Waals parameters are obtained by fitting to gas phase homodimer QM energies and structures, as well as experimental densities ...

  15. The C--H Stretching Features at 3.2--3.5 Micrometer of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons with Aliphatic Sidegroups

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Xuejuan; Glaser, Rainer; Zhong, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    The so-called unidentified infrared emission (UIE) features at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.3 micrometer are ubiquitously seen in a wide variety of astrophysical regions. The UIE features are characteristic of the stretching and bending vibrations of aromatic hydrocarbon materials, e.g., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules. The 3.3 micrometer aromatic C--H stretching feature is often accompanied by a weaker feature at 3.4 micrometer. The latter is often thought to result from the C--H stretch of aliphatic groups attached to the aromatic systems. The ratio of the observed intensity of the 3.3 micrometer aromatic C--H feature to that of the 3.4 micrometer aliphatic C--H feature allows one to estimate the aliphatic fraction of the UIE carriers, provided that the intrinsic oscillator strengths of the 3.3 micrometer aromatic C--H stretch (A3.3) and the 3.4 micrometer aliphatic C--H stretch (A3.4) are known. While previous studies on the aliphatic fraction of the UIE carriers were mostly based on the A3.4...

  16. Dibenzoheptazethrene isomers with different biradical characters: An exercise of clar's aromatic sextet rule in singlet biradicaloids

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Zhe

    2013-12-04

    Clar\\'s aromatic sextet rule has been widely used for the prediction of the reactivity and stability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with a closed-shell electronic configuration. Recent advances in open-shell biradicaloids have shown that the number of aromatic sextet rings plays an important role in determination of their ground states. In order to test the validity of this rule in singlet biradicaloids, the two soluble and stable dibenzoheptazethrene isomers DBHZ1 and DBHZ2 were prepared by different synthetic approaches and isolated in crystalline form. These two molecules have different numbers of aromatic sextet rings in their respective biradical resonance forms and thus are expected to exhibit varied singlet biradical character. This assumption was verified by different experimental methods, including nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), electron spin resonance (ESR), superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), steady-state and transient absorption spectroscopy (TA), and X-ray crystallographic analysis, assisted by unrestricted symmetry-broken density functional theory (DFT) calculations. DBHZ2, with more aromatic sextet rings in the biradical form, was demonstrated to possess greater biradical character than DBHZ1; as a result, DBHZ2 exhibited an intense one-photon absorption (OPA) in the near-infrared region (λabs max = 804 nm) and a large two-photon absorption (TPA) cross-section (σ(2)max = 2800 GM at 1600 nm). This investigation together with previous studies indicates that Clar\\'s aromatic sextet rule can be further extended to the singlet biradicaloids to predict their ground states and singlet biradical characters. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  17. CD molecules 2005: human cell differentiation molecules

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zola, H.; Swart, B.; Nicholson, I.; Aasted, B.; Bensussan, A.; Boumsell, L.; Buckley, C.; Clark, G.; Drbal, Karel; Engel, P.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Isacke, C.; Macardle, P.; Malavasi, F.; Mason, D.; Olive, D.; Saalmüller, A.; Schlossman, S.F.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Simmons, P.; Tedder, T.F.; Uguccioni, M.; Warren, H.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 106, č. 9 (2005), s. 3123-3126. ISSN 0006-4971 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD molecules * leukocyte antigen Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 10.131, year: 2005

  18. Enhancing Muconic Acid Production from Glucose and Lignin-Derived Aromatic Compounds via Increased Protocatechuate Decarboxylase Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Christopher W.; Salvachua, Davinia; Khanna, Payal; Smith, Holly; Peterson, Darren J.; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2016-12-01

    The conversion of biomass-derived sugars and aromatic molecules to cis,cis-muconic acid (referred to hereafter as muconic acid or muconate) has been of recent interest owing to its facile conversion to adipic acid, an important commodity chemical. Metabolic routes to produce muconate from both sugars and many lignin-derived aromatic compounds require the use of a decarboxylase to convert protocatechuate (PCA, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate) to catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene), two central aromatic intermediates in this pathway. Several studies have identified the PCA decarboxylase as a metabolic bottleneck, causing an accumulation of PCA that subsequently reduces muconate production. A recent study showed that activity of the PCA decarboxylase is enhanced by co-expression of two genetically associated proteins, one of which likely produces a flavin-derived cofactor utilized by the decarboxylase. Using entirely genome-integrated gene expression, we have engineered Pseudomonas putida KT2440-derived strains to produce muconate from either aromatic molecules or sugars and demonstrate in both cases that co-expression of these decarboxylase associated proteins reduces PCA accumulation and enhances muconate production relative to strains expressing the PCA decarboxylase alone. In bioreactor experiments, co-expression increased the specific productivity (mg/g cells/h) of muconate from the aromatic lignin monomer p-coumarate by 50% and resulted in a titer of >15 g/L. In strains engineered to produce muconate from glucose, co-expression more than tripled the titer, yield, productivity, and specific productivity, with the best strain producing 4.92+/-0.48 g/L muconate. This study demonstrates that overcoming the PCA decarboxylase bottleneck can increase muconate yields from biomass-derived sugars and aromatic molecules in industrially relevant strains and cultivation conditions.

  19. Electron transport in single molecules: from benzene to graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, F; Tao, N J

    2009-03-17

    Electron movement within and between molecules--that is, electron transfer--is important in many chemical, electrochemical, and biological processes. Recent advances, particularly in scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM), scanning-tunneling microscopy (STM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM), permit the study of electron movement within single molecules. In this Account, we describe electron transport at the single-molecule level. We begin by examining the distinction between electron transport (from semiconductor physics) and electron transfer (a more general term referring to electron movement between donor and acceptor). The relation between these phenomena allows us to apply our understanding of single-molecule electron transport between electrodes to a broad range of other electron transfer processes. Electron transport is most efficient when the electron transmission probability via a molecule reaches 100%; the corresponding conductance is then 2e(2)/h (e is the charge of the electron and h is the Planck constant). This ideal conduction has been observed in a single metal atom and a string of metal atoms connected between two electrodes. However, the conductance of a molecule connected to two electrodes is often orders of magnitude less than the ideal and strongly depends on both the intrinsic properties of the molecule and its local environment. Molecular length, means of coupling to the electrodes, the presence of conjugated double bonds, and the inclusion of possible redox centers (for example, ferrocene) within the molecular wire have a pronounced effect on the conductance. This complex behavior is responsible for diverse chemical and biological phenomena and is potentially useful for device applications. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) afford unique insight into electron transport in single molecules. The simplest one, benzene, has a conductance much less than 2e(2)/h due to its large LUMO-HOMO gap. At the other end of the spectrum, graphene

  20. Asymmetric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon as a capable source of astronomically observed interstellar infrared spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Ota, Norio

    2015-01-01

    In order to find out capable molecular source of astronomically well observed infrared (IR) spectrum, asymmetric molecular configuration polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) was analyzed by the density functional theory (DFT) analysis. Starting molecules were benzene C6H6, naphthalene C10H8 and 1H-phenalene C13H9. In interstellar space, those molecules will be attacked by high energy photon and proton, which may bring cationic molecules as like C6H6n+ (n=0~3 in calculation), C10H8n+, and C13H9n+, also CH lacked molecules C5H5n+, C9H7n+, and C12H8n+. IR spectra of those molecules were analyzed based on DFT based Gaussian program. Results suggested that symmetrical configuration molecules as like benzene, naphthalene , 1H-phenalene and those cation ( +, 2+, and 3+) show little resemblance with observed IR. Contrast to such symmetrical molecules, several cases among cationic and asymmetric configuration molecules show fairly good IR tendency. One typical example was C12H83+, of which calculated harmonic IR wave...

  1. Visualizing Improved Spin Coupling in Large Magnetic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, Judith; Broschinski, Jan-Philipp; Feldscher, Bastian; Glaser, Thorsten; Khajetoorians, Alexander Ako; Wegner, Daniel

    In an attempt to combine a high spin ground state and a large magnetic anisotropy in one molecule, triplesalen-based complexes are promising building blocks for a new generation of single molecule magnets (SMMs). The spin coupling in these molecules is based on the spin polarization effect, which requires a delocalized aromatic π-system in the central carbon ring of the complex. Unfortunately, chemical analysis indicates that this ring can change its configuration to [6]radialene, therefore causing a loss of aromaticity and weakening the magnetic coupling. We have employed a combination of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS) to investigate single Cu3-triplesalen and Cu3-triplesalalen molecules, the latter being designed to show an enhanced intramolecular spin coupling. The large molecules were deposited in situ using the unconventional techniques pulse injection and rapid heating. A thorough structural and spectroscopic analysis allows us to discuss the electronic properties of the two complexes, with a special focus on the state of the central carbon ring. We find that even small changes in the ligand structure have a drastic influence on the intramolecular spin coupling, which opens the way for an improved rational design of future SMMs.

  2. Silicone elastomers with aromatic voltage stabilizers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A Razak, Aliff Hisyam; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    insulation cables.3–5 As an alternative to utilise additives as voltage stabilizers, grafting aromatic compounds to silicone backbones may overcome the common problem of insolubility of the aromatic voltage stabilizer in the silicone elastomers due to phase separation. Preventing phase separation during...... via hydrosilylation by a vinyl-functional crosslinker. The mechanism of electron-trapping by aromatic compounds grafted to silicone backbones in a crosslinked PDMS is illustrated in Fig. 1. The electrical breakdown strength, the storage modulus and the loss modulus of the elastomer were investigated...... attached to the silicone backbone. The dielectric relative permittivity of PDMS-PPMS copolymers remained between 2 to 3 with low conductivity and low dielectric loss as well as high storage moduli with low viscous loss, thereby maintaining the electro-mechanical integrity of the elastomer....

  3. Chemotaxis of Azospirillum species to aromatic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-de-Victoria, G.; Lovell, C.R. (Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States))

    1993-09-01

    Azospirillum sspeciesare free-living nitrogen fixing bacteria commonly found in soils and in association with plant roots, including important agricultural crops. Rhizosphere colonization my Azospirillum species has been shown to stimulate growth of a variety of plant species. Chemotaxis is one of the properties which may contribute to survival, rhizosphere colonization and the initiation of mutualistic interactions by Azospirillum species. This study evaluates the chemotactic responses of three Azospirillum stains to a variety of aromatic compounds:benzoate, catechol, 4-HB, and PCA. Results indicate that the same aromatic substance can elicit different chemotactic responses from different Azospirillum species, and that Azospirillum can detect aromatic substrates at concentrations similar to those they encounter naturally. 36 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  4. Low-energy ions interacting with anthracene molecules and clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of slow ions (v∼0.4a.u.) with a small polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, namely anthracene (C14H10), is studied in the gas-phase either with the isolated molecule or with a pure cluster target. We discuss the ionization and fragmentation of the molecule with respect to the projectile charge state, i.e. for singly charged He+ ions and for multiply charged Xe20+ ions. For the isolated C14H10, single or multiple ionization of the molecule occurs under ion impact. The (multi) cation relative yields are compared with those obtained by other ionization methods (electron and fs-laser). The molecular dissociation occurs by loss of hydrogen and small hydrocarbon molecules, leading to the formation of CnHx cations. The interaction of Xe20+ with C14H10 clusters gives surprising results, i.e. the emission of hotter monomer compared to the interaction with He+.

  5. Production of aromatics from di- and polyoxygenates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, Taylor; Blank, Brian; Jones, Casey; Woods, Elizabeth; Cortright, Randy

    2016-08-02

    Methods, catalysts, and reactor systems for producing in high yield aromatic chemicals and liquid fuels from a mixture of oxygenates comprising di- and polyoxygenates are disclosed. Also disclosed are methods, catalysts, and reactor systems for producing aromatic chemicals and liquid fuels from oxygenated hydrocarbons such as carbohydrates, sugars, sugar alcohols, sugar degradation products, and the like; and methods, catalysts, and reactor systems for producing the mixture of oxygenates from oxygenated hydrocarbons such as carbohydrates, sugars, sugar alcohols, sugar degradation products, and the like. The disclosed catalysts for preparing the mixture of oxygenates comprise a Ni.sub.nSn.sub.m alloy and a crystalline alumina support.

  6. Global aromatics supply. Today and tomorrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, M. [BASF SE, Ludwigshafen (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    Aromatics are the essential building blocks for some of the largest petrochemical products in today's use. To the vast majority they are consumed to produce intermediates for polymer products and, hence, contribute to our modern lifestyle. Their growth rates are expected to be in line with GDP growth in future. This contrasts the significantly lower growth rates of the primary sources for aromatics - fuel processing and steam cracking of naphtha fractions. A supply gap can be expected to open up in future for which creative solutions will be required. (orig.)

  7. Electron beam irradiation effects on aromatic polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron irradiation effects on aromatic polymers having various molecular structures were studied to elucidate the following subjects; (1) relation between radiation stability and molecular structure of repeating units, (2) mechanism of deterioration and (3) adaptability to matrix resin for radiation resistant FRP. Results are summarized as follows: (1) An order of radiation stability of units is; imide ring > diphenyl ether, diphenyl ketone > aromatic amide >> bis-phenol A > diphenyl sulphone. (2) Poly (ether-ether-ketone) and most polyimide are crosslinkable but polysulphones and polyarylate are chain degradation type polymers. (3) Newly developed thermoplastic polyimides have possibilities for use as matrix materials in radiation resistant FRP. (author)

  8. Threshold Energies for Single Carbon Knockout from Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    CERN Document Server

    Stockett, M H; Chen, T; de Ruette, N; Giacomozzi, L; Wolf, M; Schmidt, H T; Zettergren, H; Cederquist, H

    2015-01-01

    We have measured absolute cross sections for ultrafast (fs) single-carbon knockout from Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) cations as functions of He-PAH center-of-mass collision energy in the range 10-200 eV. Classical Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations cover this range and extend up to 10$^5$ eV. The shapes of the knockout cross sections are well described by a simple analytical expression yielding experimental and MD threshold energies of $E_{th}^{Exp}=32.5\\pm 0.4$ eV and $E_{th}^{MD}=41.0\\pm 0.3$ eV, respectively. These are the first measurements of knockout threshold energies for molecules isolated \\emph{in vacuo}. We further deduce semi-empirical (SE) and MD displacement energies --- \\emph{i.e.} the energy transfers to the PAH molecules at the threshold energies for knockout --- of $T_{disp}^{SE}=23.3\\pm 0.3$ eV and $T_{disp}^{MD}=27.0\\pm 0.3$ eV. The semi-empirical results compare favorably with measured displacement energies for graphene $T_{disp}=23.6$ eV [Meyer \\emph{et al.} Phys. Rev Lett. \\tex...

  9. Fullerenes, fulleranes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the Allende meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, L.; Bunch, T. E.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, we confirm our earlier observations of fullerenes (C60 and C70) in the Allende meteorite (Becker et al., 1994a, 1995). Fullerene C60 was also detected in two separate C-rich (approximately 0.5-1.0%) dark inclusions (Heymann et al., 1987) that were hand picked from the Allende sample. The amounts of C60 detected were approximately 5 and approximately 10 ppb, respectively, which is considerably less than what was detected in the Allende 15/21 sample (approximately 100 ppb; Becker et al., 1994a, 1995). This suggests that fullerenes are heterogeneously distributed in the meteorite. In addition, we present evidence for fulleranes, (C60Hx), detected in separate samples by laser desorption (reflectron) time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (LDMS). The LDMS spectra for the Allende extracts were remarkably similar to the spectra generated for the synthetic fullerane mixtures. Several fullerane products were synthesized using a Rh catalyst (Becker et al., 1993a) and separated using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were also observed ppm levels) that included benzofluoranthene and corannulene, a cup-shaped molecule that has been proposed as a precursor molecule to the formation of fullerenes in the gas phase (Pope et al., 1993).

  10. Fluorescence method for enzyme analysis which couples aromatic amines with aromatic aldehydes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R.E.; Dolbeare, F.A.

    1980-10-21

    Analysis of proteinases is accomplished using conventional amino acid containing aromatic amine substrates. Aromatic amines such as 4-methoxy-2-naphthylamine (4M2NA), 2-naphthylamine, aminoisophthalic acid dimethyl ester, p-nitroaniline, 4-methoxy-1-aminofluorene and coumarin derivatives resulting from enzymatic hydrolysis of the substrate couples with aromatic aldehydes such as 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde (5-NSA), benzaldehyde and p-nitrobenzaldehyde to produce Schiff-base complexes which are water insoluble. Certain Schiff-base complexes produce a shift from blue to orange-red (visible) fluorescence. Such complexes are useful in the assay of enzymes. No Drawings

  11. Fluorescence method for enzyme analysis which couples aromatic amines with aromatic aldehydes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert E.; Dolbeare, Frank A.

    1979-01-01

    Analysis of proteinases is accomplished using conventional amino acid containing aromatic amine substrates. Aromatic amines such as 4-methoxy-2-naphthylamine (4M2NA), 2-naphthylamine, aminoisophthalic acid dimethyl ester, p-nitroaniline, 5-methoxy-1-aminofluorene and coumarin derivatives resulting from enzymatic hydrolysis of the substrate couples with aromatic aldehydes such as 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde (5-NSA), benzaldehyde and p-nitrobenzaldehyde to produce Schiff-base complexes which are water insoluble. Certain Schiff-base complexes produce a shift from blue to orange-red (visible) fluorescence. Such complexes are useful in the assay of enzymes.

  12. Formation of Ultracold Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cote, Robin [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2016-01-28

    Advances in our ability to slow down and cool atoms and molecules to ultracold temperatures have paved the way to a revolution in basic research on molecules. Ultracold molecules are sensitive of very weak interactions, even when separated by large distances, which allow studies of the effect of those interactions on the behavior of molecules. In this program, we have explored ways to form ultracold molecules starting from pairs of atoms that have already reached the ultracold regime. We devised methods that enhance the efficiency of ultracold molecule production, for example by tuning external magnetic fields and using appropriate laser excitations. We also investigates the properties of those ultracold molecules, especially their de-excitation into stable molecules. We studied the possibility of creating new classes of ultra-long range molecules, named macrodimers, thousand times more extended than regular molecules. Again, such objects are possible because ultra low temperatures prevent their breakup by collision. Finally, we carried out calculations on how chemical reactions are affected and modified at ultracold temperatures. Normally, reactions become less effective as the temperature decreases, but at ultracold temperatures, they can become very effective. We studied this counter-intuitive behavior for benchmark chemical reactions involving molecular hydrogen.

  13. Assessment of atmospheric distribution of polychlorinated biphenyls and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using polyparameter model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turk-Sekulić Maja M.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of partial or total destruction of industrial plants, military targets, infrastructure, uncontrolled fires and explosions during the conflict period from 1991 to 1999, at the area of Western Balkans, were large amounts of hazardous organic matter that have been generated and emitted in the environment. In order to assess gas/particle partition of seven EPA polychlorinated biphenyls and sixteen EPA polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, twenty air samples have been collected at six urban, industrial and highly contaminated localities in Vojvodina. Hi-Vol methodology has been used for collecting ambiental air samples, that simultaneously collects gaseous and particulate phase with polyurethane foam filters (PUF and glass fiber filters (GFF. PUF and GFF filters have been analyzed, and concentration levels of gaseous PCBs and PAHs molecules in gaseous and particulate phase were obtained, converted and expressed through fraction of individual compounds sorbed onto particulate phase of the sample, in total detected quantity. Experimentally gained gas/particle partitioning values of PCBs and PAHs molecules have been compared with PP-LFER model estimated values. Significant deviation has been noticed during comparative analysis of estimated polyparameter model values for complete set of seven PCBs congeners. Much better agreement of experimental and estimated values is for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, especially for molecules with four rings. These results are in a good correlation with literature data where polyparameter model has been used for predicting gas/particle partition of studied group of organic molecules.

  14. σ-Aromaticity in polyhydride complexes of Ru, Ir, Os, and Pt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Izal, Elisa; Alexandrova, Anastassia N

    2016-04-28

    Transition-metal hydrides represent a unique class of compounds, which are essential for catalysis, organic synthesis, and hydrogen storage. In this work we study IrH5(PPh3)2, (RuH5(P(i)Pr3)2)(-), (OsH5(P(i)Pr3)2)(-), and OsH4(PPhMe2)3 polyhydride complexes, inspired by the recent discovery of the σ-aromatic PtZnH5(-) cluster anion. The distinctive feature of these molecules is that, like in the PtZnH5(-) cluster, the metal is five-fold coordinated in-plane, and holds additional ligands at the axial positions. This work shows that the unusual coordination in these compounds indeed can be explained by σ-aromaticity in the pentagonal arrangement, stabilized by the atomic orbitals on the metal. Based on this newly elucidated bonding principle, we additionally propose a new family of polyhydrides that display a uniquely high coordination. We also report the first indications of how aromaticity may impact the reactivity of these molecules. PMID:26414992

  15. Extremely long aromatics: Diastereomerically pure [19]helicene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nejedlý, Jindřich; Rybáček, Jiří; Stará, Irena G.; Starý, Ivo

    Praha: Czech Chemical Society, 2015. s. 119. [Liblice 2015. Advances in Organic , Bioorganic and Pharmaceutical Chemistry /50./. 06.11.2015-08.11.2015, Olomouc] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-29667S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : helically chiral aromatics * helicenes * [2+2+2] cycloisomerisation Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  16. Aromatic cytokinins in micropropagated potato plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Baroja, F. E.; Aguirreolea, J.; Martínková, Hana; Hanuš, Jan; Strnad, Miroslav

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 3 (2002), s. 217-224. ISSN 0981-9428 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC 844.10; GA ČR GA301/02/0475 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Keywords : Acclimatization * Aromatic cytokinins * Micropropagation Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.582, year: 2002

  17. Thermoset/Thermoplastic Aromatic Polyamides for Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Clair, T. L.; St. Clair, A. K.; Barrick, J. D.; Wolfe, J. F.; Greenwood, T. D.

    1983-01-01

    Aromatic polyamides are processed at relatively low temperature, then heat-treated to attain high softening temperature required when polyamides are used as matrix resins in structural composites. New polyamides are compatable with organic fibers often used as reinforcing agents in such composites Pendent propargyl groups serve as latent cross-linking agents in new series of polyamide resins.

  18. Fused aromatic thienopyrazines: structure, properties and function

    KAUST Repository

    Mondal, Rajib

    2010-01-01

    Recent development of a fused aromatic thieno[3.4-b]pyrazine system and their application in optoelectronic devices are reviewed. Introduction of a fused aromatic unit followed by side chain engineering, dramatically enhanced the charge carrier mobility in thin film transistor devices and mobilities up to 0.2 cm2/Vs were achieved. The optoelectronic properties of these fused aromatic thienopyrazine polymers (Eg = 1.3 to 1.6 eV, HOMO = -4.9 to -5.2 V) were tuned by introduction of various fused aromatic rings within thienopyrazine. By balancing the fundamental properties of these polymers, both high charge carrier mobilities and moderate PCEs in solar cells were achieved. Further, effects of copolymerizing units are discussed. Low band gap semiconducting polymer (Eg ∼ 1 eV) with high field effect mobility (0.044 cm2/Vs) was obtained using cyclopentadithiophene as copolymerizing unit. Finally, a molecular design approach to enhance the absorption coefficients is discussed, which resulted in improved power conversion efficiency in bulk heterojunction solar cells. © 2010 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  19. Silicone elastomers with aromatic voltage stabilizers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A Razak, Aliff Hisyam; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    enhanced electrical breakdown strength due to delocalized pi-electrons of aromatic rings attached to the silicone backbone. The dielectric relative permittivity of PDMS-PPMS copolymers remained between 2 to3 with low conductivity and low dielectric loss as well as high storage moduli with low viscousloss...

  20. Dihydrodiol dehydrogenase and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smithgall, T.E.

    1986-01-01

    Carcinogenic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by microsomal monoxygenases proceeds through trans-dihydrodiol metabolites to diol-epoxide ultimate carcinogens. This thesis directly investigated the role of dihydrodiol dehydrogenase, a cytosolic NAD(P)-linked oxidoreductase, in the detoxification of polycyclic aromatic trans-dihydrodiols. A wide variety of non-K-region trans-dihydrodiols were synthesized and shown to be substrates for the homogeneous rat liver dehydrogenase, including several potent proximate carcinogens derived from 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene, 5-methylchrysene, and benzo(a)pyrene. Since microsomal activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is highly stereospecific, the stereochemical course of enzymatic trans-dihydrodiol oxidation was monitored using circular dichroism spectropolarimetry. The major product formed from the dehydrogenase-catalyzed oxidation of the trans-1,2-dihydrodiol of naphthalene was characterized using UV, IR, NMR, and mass spectroscopy, and appears to be 4-hydroxy-1,2-naphthoquinone. Mass spectral analysis suggests that an analogous hydroxylated o-quinone is formed as the major product of benzo(a)pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol oxidation. Enzymatic oxidation of trans-dihydrodiols was shown to be potently inhibited by all of the major classes of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. Enhancement of trans-dihydrodiol proximate carcinogen oxidation may protect against possible adverse effects of the aspirin-like drugs, and help maintain the balance between activation and detoxification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  1. Trapping molecules on chips

    CERN Document Server

    Santambrogio, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    In the last years, it was demonstrated that neutral molecules can be loaded on a microchip directly from a supersonic beam. The molecules are confined in microscopic traps that can be moved smoothly over the surface of the chip. Once the molecules are trapped, they can be decelerated to a standstill, for instance, or pumped into selected quantum states by laser light or microwaves. Molecules are detected on the chip by time-resolved spatial imaging, which allows for the study of the distribution in the phase space of the molecular ensemble.

  2. Aromatic oligoamides with a rare ortho-connectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelmgaard, T.; Nielsen, John

    2013-01-01

    Even though aromatic oligoamides composed of aromatic amino acids in a "one-way sequence" attract ever increasing research interest, backbones connected through ortho-linked aromatics remain rare. Herein, we present the first synthesis and study of N-alkylated ortho-aminomethyl- benzamides termed...

  3. 40 CFR 721.5762 - Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5762 Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (PMN P-01-573) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  4. 40 CFR 721.2673 - Aromatic epoxide resin (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aromatic epoxide resin (generic). 721... Substances § 721.2673 Aromatic epoxide resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as aromatic epoxide resin (PMN...

  5. Plasmids and aromatic degradation in Sphingomonas for bioremediation : Aromatic ring cleavage genes in soil and rhizosphere

    OpenAIRE

    SipilÀ, Timo

    2009-01-01

    Microbial degradation pathways play a key role in the detoxification and the mineralization of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are widespread pollutants in soil and constituents of petroleum hydrocarbons. In microbiology the aromatic degradation pathways are traditionally studied from single bacterial strains with capacity to degrade certain pollutant. In soil the degradation of aromatics is performed by a diverse community of micro-organisms. The aim of this thesis was to study biode...

  6. Laboratory studies of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: the search for interstellar candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Joblin, C; Simon, A; Mulas, G

    2009-01-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are considered as a major constituent of interstellar dust. They have been proposed as the carriers of the Aromatic Infrared Bands (AIBs) observed in emission in the mid-IR. They likely have a significant contribution to various features of the extinction curve such as the 220 nm bump,the far-UV rise and the diffuse interstellar bands. Emission bands are also expected in the far-IR, which are better fingerprints of molecular identity than the AIBs. They will be searched for with the Herschel Space Observatory. Rotational emission is also expected in the mm range for those molecules which carry significant dipole moments. Despite spectroscopic studies in the laboratory, no individual PAH species could be identified. This emphasises the need for an investigation on where interstellar PAHs come from and how they evolve due to environmental conditions: ionisation and dissociation upon UV irradiation, interactions with electrons, gas and dust. There is also evidence for PAH ...

  7. Small Organic Molecules for Direct Aldol Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Zhuo; GONG Liu-Zhu; MI Ai-Qiao; JIANG Yao-Zhong

    2004-01-01

    Since the pioneering finding by List and Barbas Ⅲ and their coworkers that L-proline could work as a catalyst in the intermolecular direct aldol reaction, the concept of small organic molecules as catalysts has received great attention. However, new organic molecule which have better catalysis ability are reported scarcely.Our groups1 found L-Prolinamides 1 to be active catalysts for the direct aldol reaction of 4-nitrobenaldehyde with neat acetone at room temperature. The enantioselectivity increases as the amide N-H becomes more acidic and thus a better hydrogen bond donor. Introducing another proton donor, hydroxyl, in the catalyst lead to a further improvement in the catalytic enantioselectivity.The calculations reveal that the amide N-H and the terminal hydroxyl groups form hydrogen bonds with the benzaldehyde substrate. These hydrogen bonds reduce the activation energy and cause high enantioselectivity.Catalyst 2, prepared from L-proline and (1S, 2S)-diphenyl-2-aminoethanol, exhibits high enantioselectivities of up to 93% ee for aromatic aldehydes and up to >99% ee for aliphatic aldehydes. It is noteworthy that our results refuted the conventional wisdom that the carboxylic acid group of proline is a reqirement for high enatioselectivity and provide a powerful strategy in the molecular design of new organic catalyst because plentiful chiral resource containing multi-hydrogen bonding donor, for example, peptides.Very recently, we found that L-proline-based peptides 3-7 can catalyze the aldol reactions of hydroxyacetone with aldehydes 8 in aqueous media, to give 1,4-diols 9, the disfavored products with either aldolase or L-proline. Both peptides 5 and 6 give good results.The abilities of peptides 5 and 6 to catalyze the direct aldol reactions of hydroxyacetone with avariety of aldehydes were examined under optimal conditions. The results are shown in table. Highyields and entioselectivities of up to 96% ee were observed for aromatic aldehydes

  8. Interaction of aromatic compounds with xenon: spectroscopic and computational characterization for the cases of p-cresol and toluene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qian; Andrijchenko, Natalya; Ermilov, Alexander; Räsänen, Markku; Nemukhin, Alexander; Khriachtchev, Leonid

    2015-03-19

    We have investigated noncovalent interactions of two aromatic compounds (toluene and p-cresol) with Xe atoms by using infrared spectroscopy in a Ne matrix and quantum chemical calculations. The present results show that the methyl group of these molecules is a sensitive probe of the interaction with Xe. We have used the molecules with the deuterated methyl group, possessing a relatively simple spectrum, which allows us to detect characteristic vibrational shifts in the complexes, in which a Xe atom interacts with the aromatic π electron system (π structure). For the p-cresol···Xe complex, we also observed evidence of the 1:1 H-bonded structure. The amount of the H-bonded structure of the cresol···Xe complex is relatively small, which agrees with the calculated interaction energies (stronger interaction for the π structure). The bands of the 1:1 complexes of p-cresol and toluene with Xe appear at low Xe concentration and their intensities relative to the monomer bands are nearly proportional to the Xe/Ne concentration ratio. For the p-cresol-Xe system, additional OH stretching bands appear at higher Xe concentrations, which are suitable for the complexes with several Xe atoms. The π structures studied in this work can probably be formed in the case of aromatic amino acids, for which these simple aromatic compounds are useful models. PMID:25360812

  9. Structural description of aromatic core in residue fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, H.C.; Sun, W.F.; Fang, X.C.; Guan, M.H. [Fushun Research Inst. of Petroleum and Petrochemicals, Fushun, Liaoning (China)

    2008-07-01

    The chemical structures of a polycyclic aromatic core in Oman residue fractions was examined using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-NMR), synchronous fluorescence spectrometry (SFS) and ruthenium ions catalyzed oxidation (RICO). It was important to understand the aromatic core structure in heavy oil fractions, including aromatic rings system size and condensed type. The types and content of benzenepolycarboxylic acids disclosed the condensed types of aromatic rings in core. Biphenyl fraction (BIPH), cata-condensed fraction (CATA), peri-condensed fraction (PERI) and condensed index (BCI) were calculated by benzenepolycarboxylic acids. The results from 1H-NMR showed that about 3.2 aromatic rings were in the aromatics core, 5.6 rings were in the resins unit, and 8.2 rings were in the asphaltenes unit. This paper also described the aromatic rings distribution of residue fractions as determined by SFS. The type and content of benzenepolycarboxylic acids from RICO of residue fractions suggested the condensed mode of rings in the aromatic core. The most cata-condensed type aromatic structures were in aromatics, the whole peri-condensed type were in asphaltenes, while the dominant peri-condensed type, as well as some quantity of cata-condensed type structures existed together in resins. Aromatics, resins and asphaltenes were given likely structural models based on results from this study. 8 refs., 3 tabs., 7 figs.

  10. Synthesis of aromatic cytokinins for plant biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plíhalová, Lucie; Vylíčilová, Hana; Doležal, Karel; Zahajská, Lenka; Zatloukal, Marek; Strnad, Miroslav

    2016-09-25

    Cytokinins represent an important group of plant growth regulators that can modulate several biotechnological processes owing to their ability to influence almost all stages of plant development and growth. In addition, the use of purine based cytokinins with aromatic substituent in C6 position of the purine moiety in tissue culture techniques is currently experiencing a surge in interest, made possible by the ongoing systematic synthesis and study of these compounds. This review article outlines progress in the synthesis of aromatic cytokinins, the in vitro and in vivo effects of these substances and insights gleaned from their synthesis. As the purine moiety in these compounds can be substituted at several positions, we examine each of the substitution possibilities in relation to the derivatives prepared so far. The discussion highlights the gradual simplification of their preparation in relation to their application in practice and summarizes the relevant organic chemistry literature and published patents. PMID:26703810

  11. Electron correlation in molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, S

    2007-01-01

    Electron correlation effects are of vital significance to the calculation of potential energy curves and surfaces, the study of molecular excitation processes, and in the theory of electron-molecule scattering. This text describes methods for addressing one of theoretical chemistry's central problems, the study of electron correlation effects in molecules.Although the energy associated with electron correlation is a small fraction of the total energy of an atom or molecule, it is of the same order of magnitude as most energies of chemical interest. If the solution of quantum mechanical equatio

  12. Carcinogenic potential of hydrotreated petroleum aromatic extracts.

    OpenAIRE

    Doak, S. M.; Hend, R W; van der Wiel, A; Hunt, P F

    1985-01-01

    Five experimental petroleum extracts were produced from luboil distillates derived from Middle East paraffinic crude by solvent extraction and severe hydrotreatment. The polycyclic aromatic content (PCA) of the extracts was determined by dimethyl sulphoxide extraction and ranged from 3.7-9.2% w/w. The five extracts were evaluated for their potential to induce cutaneous and systemic neoplasia in female mice derived from Carworth Farm No 1 strain (CF1). The test substances were applied undilute...

  13. Aromatic compounds from three Brazilian Lauraceae species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batista, Andrea Nastri de Luca; Batista Junior, Joao Marcos; Lopez, Silvia Noeli; Furlan, Maysa; Cavalheiro, Alberto Jose; Silva, Dulce Helena Siqueira; Bolzani, Vanderlan da Silva [UNESP, Araraquara, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Quimica Organica; Nunomura, Sergio Massayoshi [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisa da Amazonia (INPA), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Dept. de Produtos Naturais; Yoshida, Massayoshi [Centro de Biotecnologia da Amazonia, Manaus, AM (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Phytochemical investigations on three Brazilian Lauraceae species from the Cerrado region of Sao Paulo State, Ocotea corymbosa (Meins) Mez., O. elegans Mez. and Persea pyrifolia Nees and Mart. ex Nees resulted in the isolation of flavonoids, an ester of the 4-O-E-caffeoylquinic acid, an aromatic sesquiterpene besides furofuran lignans. This is the first chemical study on the leaves of Ocotea elegans and O. corymbosa as well as the first report of non-volatile compounds from Persea pyrifolia. (author)

  14. Aromatic compounds from three Brazilian Lauraceae species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phytochemical investigations on three Brazilian Lauraceae species from the Cerrado region of Sao Paulo State, Ocotea corymbosa (Meins) Mez., O. elegans Mez. and Persea pyrifolia Nees and Mart. ex Nees resulted in the isolation of flavonoids, an ester of the 4-O-E-caffeoylquinic acid, an aromatic sesquiterpene besides furofuran lignans. This is the first chemical study on the leaves of Ocotea elegans and O. corymbosa as well as the first report of non-volatile compounds from Persea pyrifolia. (author)

  15. Decarboxylative and direct functionalisations of aromatic compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Seo, Sangwon

    2014-01-01

    Aromatic rings are privileged structures found in a diverse range of natural and synthetic compounds, thus synthetic methods for their functionalisations are important in organic synthesis. Despite significant advancements made, especially in the field of transition metal catalysis, work still continues for the development of milder, more efficient, and more atom economical reactions. We describe here our efforts towards the development of decarboxylative/direct C(aryl)–N and C(aryl)–C bond f...

  16. AN AROMATIC COMPOUND from CENTAUREA PTOSIMOPAPPOIDES

    OpenAIRE

    A. ULUBELEN, S. ÖKSÜZ

    2015-01-01

    Centaurea ptosimopappoides was previously investigated by our groupand the presence of two new triterpenes were reported. The rare occurrence ofthis type compounds in the plants prompted us to further investigation of Centaureaptosimopappoides. In this work we report the isolation and structure determinationof an aromatic glycoside which was found in the genus Centaureafor the first time. The structure of the compound was determined by spectralmethods.Key words: Centaurea ptosimopappoides; Co...

  17. Transformations of aromatic hydrocarbons over zeolites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Voláková, Martina; Žilková, Naděžda; Čejka, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 34, 5-7 (2008), s. 439-454. ISSN 0922-6168 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/05/0197; GA AV ČR 1QS400400560; GA AV ČR KJB4040402 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : aromatic hydrocarbons * zeolites * alkylation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.514, year: 2008

  18. ANTIEMETIC ACTIVITY OF SOME AROMATIC PLANTS

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan MuhammadMohtasheemul; Ahmed Salman; Ahmed Ziauddin; Azhar Iqbal

    2012-01-01

    Current study was conducted to explore the antiemetic activity of ten aromatic medicinal plants viz., Carissa carandus L. (fruits), Chichorium intybus L (flowers), Cinnamum tamala L (leaves), Curcuma caesia Roxb (rhizomes), Lallemantia royleana Benth (leaves), Matricaria chamomila L (flowers), Piper longum L (fruits), Piper methysticum G. Forst (fruits), Piper nigrum Linn. (fruits) and Syzygium aromaticum (Linn.) Merr. & Perry (flowering buds) was studied using chick emetic model. The ethan...

  19. Spectroscopic Characterisation of Novel Polycyclic Aromatic Polymers

    OpenAIRE

    O'Neill, Luke; Lynch, Patrick; McNamara, Mary; Byrne, Hugh

    2007-01-01

    A series of novel polyphenylenevinylene (PPV) derivative polymers were studied by absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopies. The effect of the sequential introduction of polycyclic aromatic ring substituents into the delocalized backbone was examined with relation to hypsochromatic and bathochromatic shifting. While the replacement of the phenyl units by naphthyl units results in a substantial hypsochromic shift of both the absorption and emission spectra, their subsequent substitution ...

  20. Aromatics Oxidation and Soot Formation in Flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, J. B.; Richter, H.

    2005-03-29

    This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and the growth process to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) of increasing size, soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The overall objective of the experimental aromatics oxidation work is to extend the set of available data by measuring concentration profiles for decomposition intermediates such as phenyl, cyclopentadienyl, phenoxy or indenyl radicals which could not be measured with molecular-beam mass spectrometry to permit further refinement and testing of benzene oxidation mechanisms. The focus includes PAH radicals which are thought to play a major role in the soot formation process while their concentrations are in many cases too low to permit measurement with conventional mass spectrometry. The radical species measurements are used in critical testing and improvement of a kinetic model describing benzene oxidation and PAH growth. Thermodynamic property data of selected species are determined computationally, for instance using density functional theory (DFT). Potential energy surfaces are explored in order to identify additional reaction pathways. The ultimate goal is to understand the conversion of high molecular weight compounds to nascent soot particles, to assess the roles of planar and curved PAH and relationships between soot and fullerenes formation. The specific aims are to characterize both the high molecular weight compounds involved in the nucleation of soot particles and the structure of soot including internal nanoscale features indicative of contributions of planar and/or curved PAH to particle inception.

  1. Supra-molecular assembly of aromatic proton sponges to direct the crystallization of extra-large-pore zeotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez Franco, Raquel; Sun, Junliang; SASTRE NAVARRO, GERMAN IGNACIO; Yun, Yifeng; Zou, Xiaodong; Moliner Marin, Manuel; Corma Canós, Avelino

    2014-01-01

    The combination of different experimental techniques, such as solid C-13 and H-1 magic-angle spinning NMR spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and powder X-ray diffraction, together with theoretical calculations allows the determination of the unique structure directing the role of the bulky aromatic proton sponge 1,8-bis(dimethylamino)naphthalene (DMAN) towards the extra-large-pore ITQ-51 zeolite through supra-molecular assemblies of those organic molecules. Spanish Government SEV 20...

  2. Charge-transfer complex formation in gelation: the role of solvent molecules with different electron-donating capacities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Shibaji; Bhattacharya, Sumantra; Datta, Ayan; Banerjee, Arindam

    2014-05-01

    A naphthalenediimide (NDI)-based synthetic peptide molecule forms gels in a particular solvent mixture (chloroform/aromatic hydrocarbon, 4:1) through charge-transfer (CT) complex formation; this is evident from the corresponding absorbance and fluorescence spectra at room temperature. Various aromatic hydrocarbon based solvents, including benzene, toluene, xylene (ortho, meta and para) and mesitylene, have been used for the formation of the CT complex. The role of different solvent molecules with varying electron-donation capacities in the formation of CT complexes has been established through spectroscopic and computational studies. PMID:24677404

  3. Electron-molecule collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Takayanagi, Kazuo

    1984-01-01

    Scattering phenomena play an important role in modern physics. Many significant discoveries have been made through collision experiments. Amongst diverse kinds of collision systems, this book sheds light on the collision of an electron with a molecule. The electron-molecule collision provides a basic scattering problem. It is scattering by a nonspherical, multicentered composite particle with its centers having degrees of freedom of motion. The molecule can even disintegrate, Le., dissociate or ionize into fragments, some or all of which may also be molecules. Although it is a difficult problem, the recent theoretical, experimental, and computational progress has been so significant as to warrant publication of a book that specializes in this field. The progress owes partly to technical develop­ ments in measurements and computations. No less important has been the great and continuing stimulus from such fields of application as astrophysics, the physics of the earth's upper atmosphere, laser physics, radiat...

  4. Single molecules and nanotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, Horst

    2007-01-01

    This book focuses on recent advances in the rapidly evolving field of single molecule research. These advances are of importance for the investigation of biopolymers and cellular biochemical reactions, and are essential to the development of quantitative biology. Written by leading experts in the field, the articles cover a broad range of topics, including: quantum photonics of organic dyes and inorganic nanoparticles their use in detecting properties of single molecules the monitoring of single molecule (enzymatic) reactions single protein (un)folding in nanometer-sized confined volumes the dynamics of molecular interactions in biological cells The book is written for advanced students and scientists who wish to survey the concepts, techniques and results of single molecule research and assess them for their own scientific activities.

  5. Optothermal Molecule Trap

    OpenAIRE

    Duhr, Stefan; Braun, Dieter

    2006-01-01

    Thermophoresis moves molecules along temperature gradients, typically from hot to cold. We superpose fluid flow with thermophoretic molecule flow under well defined microfluidic conditions, imaged by fluorescence microscopy. DNA is trapped and accumulated 16-fold in regions where both flows move in opposite directions. Strong 800-fold accumulation is expected, however with slow trapping kinetics. The experiment is equally described by a three-dimensional and one-dimensional analytical model. ...

  6. THE FAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF VERY LARGE NEUTRAL POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here we report the computed far-infrared (FIR) spectra of neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules containing at least 82 carbons up to 130 carbons and with shapes going from compact round and oval-type structures to rectangular and to trapezoidal. The effects of size and shape on the FIR band positions and intensities are discussed. Using FIR data from the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database Version 1.1, we generate synthetic spectra that support the suggestion that the 16.4, 17.4, and 17.8 μm bands arise from PAHs.

  7. Biosynthesis of Aromatic Polyketides in Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Abhirup; Khosla, Chaitan

    2009-01-01

    Natural products, produced chiefly by microorganisms and plants, can be large and structurally complex molecules. These molecules are manufactured by cellular assembly lines, in which enzymes construct the molecules in a stepwise fashion. The means by which enzymes interact and work together in a modular fashion to create diverse structural features has been an active area of research; the work has provided insight into the fine details of biosynthesis.

  8. Formation of nanowires via single particle-triggered linear polymerization of solid-state aromatic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horio, Akifumi; Sakurai, Tsuneaki; Lakshmi, G B V S; Kumar Avasthi, Devesh; Sugimoto, Masaki; Yamaki, Tetsuya; Seki, Shu

    2016-08-11

    Nanowires occupy a prestigious place in nanoelectronics, nanomechanics, and biomimetics. Although there are notable methods to grow nanowires via self-assembly, there is a key drawback in the need to find out the specific conditions appropriate for each system. In this sense, universal techniques to fabricate such nanowires from various organic materials have been sought for the continued progress of the related research field. Here we report one of the promising and facile methodologies to quantitatively produce nanowires with controlled geometrical parameters. In this method, referred to as "Single Particle-Triggered Linear Polymerization (STLiP)", organic thin films on a supporting substrate were irradiated with high-energy charged particles, accelerated by particle accelerators. Each particle penetrates from the top of the films to the substrate while gradually releasing kinetic energy along its trajectory (ion track), generating reactive intermediates such as radical species that eventually induce propagation reactions. The resulting polymerized products were integrated into nanowires with uniform diameter and length that can be isolated via development with appropriate organic solvents. Considering the widely applicable nature of STLiP to organic materials, the present technique opens a new door for access to a number of functional nanowires and their assembly. PMID:27355341

  9. Ultrafast Internal Conversion of Aromatic Molecules Studied by Photoelectron Spectroscopy using Sub-20 fs Laser Pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshinori Suzuki

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This article describes our recent experimental studies on internal conversion via a conical intersection using photoelectron spectroscopy. Ultrafast S2(ππ*–S1(nπ* internal conversion in pyrazine is observed in real time using sub-20 fs deep ultraviolet pulses (264 and 198 nm. While the photoelectron kinetic energy distribution does not exhibit a clear signature of internal conversion, the photoelectron angular anisotropy unambiguously reveals the sudden change of electron configuration upon internal conversion. An explanation is presented as to why these two observables have different sensitivities to internal conversion. The 198 nm probe photon energy is insufficient for covering the entire Franck-Condon envelopes upon photoionization from S2/S1 to D1/D0. A vacuum ultraviolet free electron laser (SCSS producing 161 nm radiation is employed to solve this problem, while its pulse-to-pulse timing jitter limits the time resolution to about 1 ps. The S2–S1 internal conversion is revisited using the sub-20 fs 159 nm pulse created by filamentation four-wave mixing. Conical intersections between D1(π−1 and D0(n−1 and also between the Rydberg state with a D1 ion core and that with a D0 ion core of pyrazine are studied by He(I photoelectron spectroscopy, pulsed field ionization photoelectron spectroscopy and one-color resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy. Finally, ultrafast S2(ππ*–S1(ππ* internal conversion in benzene and toluene are compared with pyrazine.

  10. Chemisorption of aromatic molecules on Si(100)-2x1. An HREELS study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkunshalie, T

    1998-07-01

    HREELS has been used to investigate the growth of ultra-thin organic film on Si(100)-2x1 by reactive coupling of polyimide precursors. 1,4- phenylenediamine and pyromelltic dianhydride were sequentially dosed on clean Si(100)-2x1 under ultra high vacuum conditions. The interfacial imidisation was initiated by thermal curing at 200 deg C. To simplify the analysis of the vibrational data, model compounds benzoic acid, aniline and phthalic anhydride were characterised first. HREEL spectra show that the model compounds absorb through dissociation of the functional group. The spectra also show that an oligimide chain has been formed which stands upright on the surface. The oligomer chain bonds to the silicon surface via a Si-(NH)-C linkage. (author)

  11. POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND THE DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR BANDS: A SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the proposal of relating the origin of some of the diffuse interstellar absorption bands (DIBs) to neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present in translucent interstellar clouds. An assessment of ionized PAHs will be examined in a future report. The spectra of several cold, isolated gas-phase PAHs have been measured in the laboratory under experimental conditions that mimic the interstellar conditions and are compared with an extensive set of astronomical spectra of reddened, early-type stars. This comparison provides-for the first time-accurate upper limits for the abundances of specific PAH molecules along specific lines of sight, something not attainable from IR observations alone. The comparison of these unique laboratory data with high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio spectra leads to two major findings: (1) a finding specific to the individual molecules that were probed in this study and, which leads to the clear and unambiguous conclusion that the abundance of these specific neutral PAHs must be very low in the individual translucent interstellar clouds that were probed in this survey (PAH features remain below the level of detection) and, (2) a general finding that neutral PAHs exhibit intrinsic band profiles that are similar to the profile of the narrow DIBs indicating that the carriers of the narrow DIBs must have close molecular structure and characteristics. This study is the first quantitative survey of neutral PAHs in the optical range and it opens the way for unambiguous quantitative searches of PAHs in a variety of interstellar and circumstellar environments.

  12. Very High Pressure Single Pulse Shock Tube Studies of Aromatic Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brezinsky, K.

    2006-11-28

    The principal focus of this research program is aimed at understanding the oxidation and pyrolysis chemistry of primary aromatic molecules and radicals with the goal of developing a comprehensive kinetic model at conditions that are relevant to practical combustion devices. A very high pressure single pulse shock tube is used to obtain experimental data over a wide pressure range in the high pressure regime, 5-1000 bars, at pre-flame temperatures for fuel pyrolysis and oxidation over a broad spectrum of equivalence ratios. Stable species sampled from the shock tube are analyzed using standard chromatographic techniques using GC/MS-PDD and GC/TCD-FID. Experimental data from the HPST (stable species profiles) and data from other laboratories (if available) are simulated using kinetic models (if available) to develop a comprehensive model that can describe aromatics oxidation and pyrolysis over a wide range of experimental conditions. The shock tube has been heated (1000C) recently to minimize effects due to condensation of aromatic, polycyclic and other heavy species. Work during this grant period has focused on 7 main areas summarized in the final technical report.

  13. Electron-flux infrared response to varying π-bond topology in charged aromatic monomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvaro Galué, Héctor; Oomens, Jos; Buma, Wybren Jan; Redlich, Britta

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of delocalized π-electrons with molecular vibrations is key to charge transport processes in π-conjugated organic materials based on aromatic monomers. Yet the role that specific aromatic motifs play on charge transfer is poorly understood. Here we show that the molecular edge topology in charged catacondensed aromatic hydrocarbons influences the Herzberg-Teller coupling of π-electrons with molecular vibrations. To this end, we probe the radical cations of picene and pentacene with benchmark armchair- and zigzag-edges using infrared multiple-photon dissociation action spectroscopy and interpret the recorded spectra via quantum-chemical calculations. We demonstrate that infrared bands preserve information on the dipolar π-electron-flux mode enhancement, which is governed by the dynamical evolution of vibronically mixed and correlated one-electron configuration states. Our results reveal that in picene a stronger charge π-flux is generated than in pentacene, which could justify the differences of electronic properties of armchair- versus zigzag-type families of technologically relevant organic molecules. PMID:27577323

  14. Adsorption behaviour of aromatic in different activated carbon: (Frendlich and Langmuir models)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adsorption behavior of p-Cresol, Benzoic acid and nitrobenzene on the two different activated carbons was carried out at 301 K and at controlled ph conditions. In acidic conditions, well below the pKa of all solutes, it was observed that the adsorbate solubility and the electron density of its aromatic ring were the influencing factors on the extent of the adsorption by affecting the extent of London dispersion forces. In higher solution ph conditions, on the other hand, it was found that the electrostatic forces played a significant role on the extent on adsorption. The Effect of ph must be considered from its combined effects on the carbon surface and on the solute molecules. It was found that the uptake of the molecular form of the aromatic solute was dependent on the substituents of the aromatic ring. Adsorption of the solutes in higher ph values was found to be dependent on the concentration of anionic form of the solutes. All isotherms on the F 100 and S E I were fitted into Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm Equations, respectively to find the relative factors

  15. Searching the Hearts of Graphene-like Molecules for Simplicity, Sensitivity, and Logic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangtarash, Sara; Huang, Cancan; Sadeghi, Hatef; Sorohhov, Gleb; Hauser, Jürg; Wandlowski, Thomas; Hong, Wenjing; Decurtins, Silvio; Liu, Shi-Xia; Lambert, Colin J

    2015-09-01

    If quantum interference patterns in the hearts of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons could be isolated and manipulated, then a significant step toward realizing the potential of single-molecule electronics would be achieved. Here we demonstrate experimentally and theoretically that a simple, parameter-free, analytic theory of interference patterns evaluated at the mid-point of the HOMO-LUMO gap (referred to as M-functions) correctly predicts conductance ratios of molecules with pyrene, naphthalene, anthracene, anthanthrene, or azulene hearts. M-functions provide new design strategies for identifying molecules with phase-coherent logic functions and enhancing the sensitivity of molecular-scale interferometers. PMID:26288219

  16. Rate coefficients of hydroxyl radical reactions with pesticide molecules and related compounds: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rate coefficients published in the literature on hydroxyl radical reactions with pesticides and related compounds are discussed together with the experimental methods and the basic reaction mechanisms. Recommendations are made for the most probable values. Most of the molecules whose rate coefficients are discussed have aromatic ring: their rate coefficients are in the range of 2×109–1×1010 mol–1 dm3 s–1. The rate coefficients show some variation with the electron withdrawing–donating nature of the substituent on the ring. The rate coefficients for triazine pesticides (simazine, atrazine, prometon) are all around 2.5×109 mol–1 dm3 s–1. The values do not show variation with the substituent on the s-triazine ring. The rate coefficients for the non-aromatic molecules which have C=C double bonds or several C–H bonds may also be above 1×109 mol–1 dm3 s–1. However, the values for molecules without C=C double bonds or several C–H bonds are in the 1×107–1×109 mol–1 dm3 s–1 range. - Highlights: • The ∙OH rate coefficients with aromatic pesticides are (2–10)×109 mol−1 dm3 s−1. • For triazine type pesticides the values are around 2.5×109 mol−1 dm3 s−1. • For non-aromatics with double bond or several C–H they are ∼1×109 mol−1 dm3 s−1. • For aromatics kOH’s are determined by diffusion; for triazines by chemical activation. • They are activation controlled when molecule does not have double or C–H bonds

  17. Aromatic plant production on metal contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheljazkov, Valtcho D. [Mississippi State, Department of Plant and Soil Sciences and North Mississippi Research and Extension Center, 5421 Highway 145 South, Verona, MS 38879 (United States)], E-mail: vj40@pss.msstate.edu; Craker, Lyle E.; Xing Baoshan [Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, 12 Stockbridge Hall, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Nielsen, Niels E. [Plant Nutrition and Soil Fertility Lab, Department of Agricultural Sciences, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Thorvaldsensvej 40, DK1871, Copenhagen (Denmark); Wilcox, Andrew [Harper Adams University College, Newport, Shropshire, TF10 8NB (United Kingdom)

    2008-06-01

    Field and container experiments were conducted to assess the feasibility of growing aromatic crops in metal contaminated areas and the effect of metals on herbage and oil productivity. The field experiments were conducted in the vicinities of the Non-Ferrous Metals Combine (Zn-Cu smelter) near Plovdiv, Bulgaria using coriander, sage, dill, basil, hyssop, lemon balm, and chamomile grown at various distances from the smelter. Herbage essential oil yields of basil, chamomile, dill, and sage were reduced when they were grown closer to the smelter. Metal removal from the site with the harvestable plant parts was as high as 180 g ha{sup -1} for Cd, 660 g ha{sup -1} for Pb, 180 g ha{sup -1} for Cu, 350 g ha{sup -1} for Mn, and 205 g ha{sup -1} for Zn. Sequential extraction of soil demonstrated that metal fractionation was affected by the distance to the smelter. With decreasing distance to the smelter, the transfer factor (TF) for Cu and Zn decreased but increased for Cd, while the bioavailability factor (BF) for Cd, Pb, Cu, Mn, and Zn decreased. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microanalyses of contaminated soil verified that most of the Pb, Cd, Mn, Cu, and Zn were in the form of small (< 1 {mu}m) particles, although there were larger particles (1-5 {mu}m) with high concentrations of individual metals. This study demonstrated that high concentrations of heavy metals in soil or growth medium did not result in metal transfer into the essential oil. Of the tested metals, only Cu at high concentrations may reduce oil content. Our results demonstrated that aromatic crops may not have significant phytoremediation potential, but growth of these crops in metal contaminated agricultural soils is a feasible alternative. Aromatic crops can provide economic return and metal-free final product, the essential oil.

  18. Aromatic plant production on metal contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field and container experiments were conducted to assess the feasibility of growing aromatic crops in metal contaminated areas and the effect of metals on herbage and oil productivity. The field experiments were conducted in the vicinities of the Non-Ferrous Metals Combine (Zn-Cu smelter) near Plovdiv, Bulgaria using coriander, sage, dill, basil, hyssop, lemon balm, and chamomile grown at various distances from the smelter. Herbage essential oil yields of basil, chamomile, dill, and sage were reduced when they were grown closer to the smelter. Metal removal from the site with the harvestable plant parts was as high as 180 g ha-1 for Cd, 660 g ha-1 for Pb, 180 g ha-1 for Cu, 350 g ha-1 for Mn, and 205 g ha-1 for Zn. Sequential extraction of soil demonstrated that metal fractionation was affected by the distance to the smelter. With decreasing distance to the smelter, the transfer factor (TF) for Cu and Zn decreased but increased for Cd, while the bioavailability factor (BF) for Cd, Pb, Cu, Mn, and Zn decreased. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microanalyses of contaminated soil verified that most of the Pb, Cd, Mn, Cu, and Zn were in the form of small (< 1 μm) particles, although there were larger particles (1-5 μm) with high concentrations of individual metals. This study demonstrated that high concentrations of heavy metals in soil or growth medium did not result in metal transfer into the essential oil. Of the tested metals, only Cu at high concentrations may reduce oil content. Our results demonstrated that aromatic crops may not have significant phytoremediation potential, but growth of these crops in metal contaminated agricultural soils is a feasible alternative. Aromatic crops can provide economic return and metal-free final product, the essential oil

  19. Biosynthesis of the Aromatic Amino Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittard, James; Yang, Ji

    2008-09-01

    This chapter describes in detail the genes and proteins of Escherichia coli involved in the biosynthesis and transport of the three aromatic amino acids tyrosine, phenylalanine, and tryptophan. It provides a historical perspective on the elaboration of the various reactions of the common pathway converting erythrose-4-phosphate and phosphoenolpyruvate to chorismate and those of the three terminal pathways converting chorismate to phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan. The regulation of key reactions by feedback inhibition, attenuation, repression, and activation are also discussed. Two regulatory proteins, TrpR (108 amino acids) and TyrR (513 amino acids), play a major role in transcriptional regulation. The TrpR protein functions only as a dimer which, in the presence of tryptophan, represses the expression of trp operon plus four other genes (the TrpR regulon). The TyrR protein, which can function both as a dimer and as a hexamer, regulates the expression of nine genes constituting the TyrR regulon. TyrR can bind each of the three aromatic amino acids and ATP and under their influence can act as a repressor or activator of gene expression. The various domains of this protein involved in binding the aromatic amino acids and ATP, recognizing DNA binding sites, interacting with the alpha subunit of RNA polymerase, and changing from a monomer to a dimer or a hexamer are all described. There is also an analysis of the various strategies which allow TyrR in conjunction with particular amino acids to differentially affect the expression of individual genes of the TyrR regulon. PMID:26443741

  20. Towards single molecule switches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia Lin; Zhong, Jian Qiang; Lin, Jia Dan; Hu, Wen Ping; Wu, Kai; Xu, Guo Qin; Wee, Andrew T S; Chen, Wei

    2015-05-21

    The concept of using single molecules as key building blocks for logic gates, diodes and transistors to perform basic functions of digital electronic devices at the molecular scale has been explored over the past decades. However, in addition to mimicking the basic functions of current silicon devices, molecules often possess unique properties that have no parallel in conventional materials and promise new hybrid devices with novel functions that cannot be achieved with equivalent solid-state devices. The most appealing example is the molecular switch. Over the past decade, molecular switches on surfaces have been intensely investigated. A variety of external stimuli such as light, electric field, temperature, tunneling electrons and even chemical stimulus have been used to activate these molecular switches between bistable or even multiple states by manipulating molecular conformations, dipole orientations, spin states, charge states and even chemical bond formation. The switching event can occur either on surfaces or in break junctions. The aim of this review is to highlight recent advances in molecular switches triggered by various external stimuli, as investigated by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (LT-STM) and the break junction technique. We begin by presenting the molecular switches triggered by various external stimuli that do not provide single molecule selectivity, referred to as non-selective switching. Special focus is then given to selective single molecule switching realized using the LT-STM tip on surfaces. Single molecule switches operated by different mechanisms are reviewed and discussed. Finally, molecular switches embedded in self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and single molecule junctions are addressed. PMID:25757483

  1. Biodegradation Rates of Aromatic Contaminants in Biofilm Reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arcangeli, Jean-Pierre; Arvin, Erik

    1995-01-01

    This study has shown that microorganisms can adapt to degrade mixtures of aromatic pollutants at relatively high rates in the μg/l concentration range. The biodegradation rates of the following compounds were investigated in biofilm systems: aromatic hydrocarbons, phenol, methylphenols......, chlorophenols, nitrophenol, chlorobenzenes and aromatic nitrogen-, sulphur- or oxygen-containing heterocyclic compounds (NSO-compounds). Furthermore, a comparison with degradation rates observed for easily degradable organics is also presented. At concentrations below 20-100 μg/l the degradation of the aromatic...

  2. Critical analysis of the local aromaticity concept in polyaromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bultinck, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    A large number of local aromaticity indices for the benzenoid rings in polyaromatic hydrocarbons is computed. The results are interpreted, supporting Clar's hypothesis, and mutual correlations are investigated. It is shown that there are good correlations between all indices that strictly allow comparing benzenoid character. Poor correlations are found with NICS. A rationale is offered, yielding the conclusion that NICS and ring current maps follow a fundamentally different path to local aromaticity. In this sense the lack of correlation is not due to a real multidimensional character of aromaticity but rather to confusion and vagueness of the aromaticity concept. PMID:17328438

  3. Aromatic compounds from three Brazilian Lauraceae species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Nastri de Luca Batista

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytochemical investigations on three Brazilian Lauraceae species from the Cerrado region of São Paulo State, Ocotea corymbosa (Meins Mez., O. elegans Mez. and Persea pyrifolia Nees & Mart. ex Nees resulted in the isolation of flavonoids, an ester of the 4-O-E-caffeoylquinic acid, an aromatic sesquiterpene besides furofuran lignans. This is the first chemical study on the leaves of Ocotea elegans and O. corymbosa as well as the first report of non-volatile compounds from Persea pyrifolia.

  4. Carcinogenic potential of hydrotreated petroleum aromatic extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doak, S M; Hend, R W; van der Wiel, A; Hunt, P F

    1985-06-01

    Five experimental petroleum extracts were produced from luboil distillates derived from Middle East paraffinic crude by solvent extraction and severe hydrotreatment. The polycyclic aromatic content (PCA) of the extracts was determined by dimethyl sulphoxide extraction and ranged from 3.7-9.2% w/w. The five extracts were evaluated for their potential to induce cutaneous and systemic neoplasia in female mice derived from Carworth Farm No 1 strain (CF1). The test substances were applied undiluted (0.2 ml per application) to the shorn dorsal skin twice weekly for up to 78 weeks, with 48 mice in each treatment group and 96 in the untreated control group; two further groups, each of 48 mice, were similarly treated either with a non-hydrotreated commercial aromatic extract (PCA content, 19.7% w/v) or with a low dose of benzo(a)pyrene (12.5 micrograms/ml acetone). The mice were housed individually in polypropylene cages in specified pathogen free conditions. The incidence of cutaneous and systemic tumours was determined from histological analysis of haematoxylin and eosin stained tissue sections. The results were correlated with the PCA content of the extracts and compared with those from female mice exposed to a non-hydrotreated commercial aromatic extract. Four of the hydrotreated extracts were carcinogenic for murine skin; the two products with the lower PCA contents were less carcinogenic than the products with the higher PCA contents and all were less carcinogenic than the commercial extract. One extract with the lowest PCA content was non-carcinogenic. Thus refining by severe hydrotreatment was an effective method of reducing the carcinogenic potential of petroleum aromatic extracts. Although other physicochemical properties may influence the biological activity of oil products, the PCA content determined by dimethyl sulphoxide extraction may be a useful indicator of the potential of oil products to induce cutaneous tumours in experimental animals. There was no

  5. Aromatics oxidation and soot formation in flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, J.B.; Pope, C.J.; Shandross, R.A.; Yadav, T. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The scope includes detailed measurements of profiles of stable and radical species concentrations in low-pressure one-dimensional premixed flames. Intermediate species identifications and mole fractions, fluxes, and net reaction rates calculated from the measured profiles are used to test postulated reaction mechanisms. Particular objectives are to identify and to determine or confirm rate constants for the main benzene oxidation reactions in flames, and to characterize fullerenes and their formation mechanisms and kinetics.

  6. Physical activation of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief review of processes of physical activation of molecules on the basis of phenomena of electronic and vibrational excitation, electron polarization is presented. Consideration is given to activation by electron impact, photo-, magneto- and mechanoactivation, as well as to radiation activation, proceeding under the effect of high-power radiations (102-107 eV). The character of disturbance of molecules, participating in chemical reactions, under the effect of different types of ionizing radiation (α-particles, electrons, γ-quanta etc.) is discussed

  7. High-resolution IR absorption spectroscopy of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: the realm of anharmonicity

    CERN Document Server

    Maltseva, Elena; Candian, Alessandra; Mackie, Cameron J; Huang, Xinchuan; Lee, Timothy J; Tielens, Alexander G G M; Oomens, Jos; Buma, Wybren Jan

    2015-01-01

    We report on an experimental and theoretical investigation of the importance of anharmonicity in the 3 micron CH stretching region of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules. We present mass-resolved, high-resolution spectra of the gas-phase cold (~4K) linear PAH molecules naphthalene, anthracene, and tetracene. The measured IR spectra show a surprisingly high number of strong vibrational bands. For naphthalene, the observed bands are well separated and limited by the rotational contour, revealing the band symmetries. Comparisons are made to the harmonic and anharmonic approaches of the widely used Gaussian software. We also present calculated spectra of these acenes using the computational program SPECTRO, providing anharmonic predictions enhanced with a Fermi-resonance treatment that utilises intensity redistribution. We demonstrate that the anharmonicity of the investigated acenes is strong, dominated by Fermi resonances between the fundamental and double combination modes, with triple combination ...

  8. On-line database of the spectral properties of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    CERN Document Server

    Malloci, G; Mulas, G; 10.1016/j.chemphys.2007.01.001

    2009-01-01

    We present an on-line database of computed molecular properties for a large sample of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in four charge states: -1, 0, +1, and +2. At present our database includes 40 molecules ranging in size from naphthalene and azulene (C10H8) up to circumovalene (C66H20). We performed our calculations in the framework of the density functional theory (DFT) and the time-dependent DFT to obtain the most relevant molecular parameters needed for astrophysical applications. For each molecule in the sample, our database presents in a uniform way the energetic, rotational, vibrational, and electronic properties. It is freely accessible on the web at http://astrochemistry.ca.astro.it/database/ and http://www.cesr.fr/~joblin/database/.

  9. Determining inhibition effects of some aromatic compounds on peroxidase enzyme purified from white and red cabbage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztekin, Aykut; Almaz, Züleyha; Özdemir, Hasan

    2016-04-01

    Peroxidases (E.C.1.11.1.7) catalyze the one electron oxidation of wide range of substrates. They are used in synthesis reaction, removal of peroxide from industrial wastes, clinical biochemistry and immunoassays. In this study, the white cabbage (Brassica Oleracea var. capitata f. alba) and red cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata f. rubra) peroxidase enzymes were purified for investigation of inhibitory effect of some aromatic compounds on these enzymes. IC50 values and Ki constants were calculated for the molecules of 6-Amino nicotinic hydrazide, 6-Amino-5-bromo nicotinic hydrazide, 2-Amino-5-hydroxy benzohydrazide, 4-Amino-3-hydroxy benzohydrazide on purified enzymes and inhibition type of these molecules were determined. (This research was supported by Ataturk University. Project Number: BAP-2015/98).

  10. Determination of Quantum Chemistry Based Force Fields for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Aromatic Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Richard; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Ab initio quantum chemistry calculations for model molecules can be used to parameterize force fields for molecular dynamics simulations of polymers. Emphasis in our research group is on using quantum chemistry-based force fields for molecular dynamics simulations of organic polymers in the melt and glassy states, but the methodology is applicable to simulations of small molecules, multicomponent systems and solutions. Special attention is paid to deriving reliable descriptions of the non-bonded and electrostatic interactions. Several procedures have been developed for deriving and calibrating these parameters. Our force fields for aromatic polyimide simulations will be described. In this application, the intermolecular interactions are the critical factor in determining many properties of the polymer (including its color).

  11. Prebiologically Important Interstellar Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Y.-J.; Huang, H.-C.; Charnley, S. B.; Tseng, W.-L.; Snyder, L. E.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Kisiel, Z.; Thorwirth, S.; Bohn, R. K.; Wilson, T. L.

    2004-06-01

    Understanding the organic chemistry of molecular clouds, particularly the formation of biologically important molecules, is fundamental to the study of the processes which lead to the origin, evolution and distribution of life in the Galaxy. Determining the level of molecular complexity attainable in the clouds, and the nature of the complex organic material available to protostellar disks and the planetary systems that form from them, requires an understanding of the possible chemical pathways and is therefore a central question in astrochemistry. We have thus searched for prebiologically important molecules in the hot molecular cloud cores: Sgr B2(N-LMH), W51 e1/e2 and Orion-KL. Among the molecules searched: Pyrimidine is the unsubstituted ring analogue for three of the DNA and RNA bases. 2H-Azirine and Aziridine are azaheterocyclic compounds. And Glycine is the simplest amino acid. Detections of these interstellar organic molecular species will thus have important implications for Astrobiology. Our preliminary results indicate a tentative detection of interstellar glycine. If confirmed, this will be the first detection of an amino acid in interstellar space and will greatly strengthen the thesis that interstellar organic molecules could have played a pivotal role in the prebiotic chemistry of the early Earth.

  12. Atoms, Molecules, and Compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, Phillip

    2007-01-01

    Explores the atoms that govern chemical processes. This book shows how the interactions between simple substances such as salt and water are crucial to life on Earth and how those interactions are predestined by the atoms that make up the molecules.

  13. High-Resolution IR Absorption Spectroscopy of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: The Realm of Anharmonicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltseva, Elena; Petrignani, Annemieke; Candian, Alessandra; Mackie, Cameron J.; Huang, Xinchuan; Lee, Timothy J.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Oomens, Jos; Buma, Wybren Jan

    2016-01-01

    We report on an experimental and theoretical investigation of the importance of anharmonicity in the 3 micrometers CH stretching region of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules. We present mass-resolved, high-resolution spectra of the gas-phase cold ((is) approximately 4K) linear PAH molecules naphthalene, anthracene, and tetracene. The measured IR spectra show a surprisingly high number of strong vibrational bands. For naphthalene, the observed bands are well separated and limited by the rotational contour, revealing the band symmetries. Comparisons are made to the harmonic and anharmonic approaches of the widely used Gaussian software. We also present calculated spectra of these acenes using the computational program SPECTRO, providing anharmonic predictions enhanced with a Fermi-resonance treatment that utilizes intensity redistribution. We demonstrate that the anharmonicity of the investigated acenes is strong, dominated by Fermi resonances between the fundamental and double combination modes, with triple combination bands as possible candidates to resolve remaining discrepancies. The anharmonic spectra as calculated with SPECTRO lead to predictions of the main modes that fall within 0.5% of the experimental frequencies. The implications for the Aromatic Infrared Bands, specifically the 3-m band are discussed.

  14. An Aromatic Inventory of the Local Volume

    CERN Document Server

    Marble, A R; van Zee, L; Dale, D A; Smith, J D T; Gordon, K D; Wu, Y; Lee, J C; Kennicutt, R C; Skillman, E D; Johnson, L C; Block, M; Calzetti, D; Cohen, S A; Lee, H; Schuster, M D

    2010-01-01

    Using infrared photometry from the Spitzer Space Telescope, we perform the first inventory of aromatic feature emission (AFE, but also commonly referred to as PAH emission) for a statistically complete sample of star-forming galaxies in the local volume. The photometric methodology involved is calibrated and demonstrated to recover the aromatic fraction of the IRAC 8 micron flux with a standard deviation of 6% for a training set of 40 SINGS galaxies (ranging from stellar to dust dominated) with both suitable mid-infrared Spitzer IRS spectra and equivalent photometry. A potential factor of two improvement could be realized with suitable 5.5 and 10 micron photometry, such as what may be provided in the future by JWST. The resulting technique is then applied to mid-infrared photometry for the 258 galaxies from the Local Volume Legacy (LVL) survey, a large sample dominated in number by low-luminosity dwarf galaxies for which obtaining comparable mid-infrared spectroscopy is not feasible. We find the total LVL lum...

  15. Exotic helium molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the photo-association of an ultracold cloud of magnetically trapped helium atoms: pairs of colliding atoms interact with one or two laser fields to produce a purely long range 4He2(23S1-23P0) molecule, or a 4He2(23S1-23S1) long range molecule. Light shifts in one photon photo-association spectra are measured and studied as a function of the laser polarization and intensity, and the vibrational state of the excited molecule. They result from the light-induced coupling between the excited molecule, and bound and scattering states of the interaction between two metastable atoms. Their analysis leads to the determination of the scattering length a = (7.2 ± 0.6) ruling collisions between spin polarized atoms. The two photon photo-association spectra show evidence of the production of polarized, long-range 4He2(23S1-23S1) molecules. They are said to be exotic as they are made of two metastable atoms, each one carrying a enough energy to ionize the other. The corresponding lineshapes are calculated and decomposed in sums and products of Breit-Wigner and Fano profiles associated to one and two photon processes. The experimental spectra are fit, and an intrinsic lifetime τ = (1.4 ± 0.3) μs is deduced. It is checked whether this lifetime could be limited by spin-dipole induced Penning autoionization. This interpretation requires that there is a quasi-bound state close to the dissociation threshold in the singlet interaction potential between metastable helium atoms for the theory to match the experiment. (author)

  16. OMG: Open Molecule Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peironcely Julio E

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG, which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck.

  17. Low Temperature Formation of Nitrogen-substituted Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PANHs)- Barrierless Routes to Dihydro(iso)quinolines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Dorian S. N.; Yang, Tao; Dangi, Beni B.; Kaiser, Ralf. I.; Bera, Partha P.; Lee, Timothy J.

    2015-12-01

    Meteorites contain bio-relevant molecules such as vitamins and nucleobases, which consist of aromatic structures with embedded nitrogen atoms. Questions remain over the chemical mechanisms responsible for the formation of nitrogen-substituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PANHs) in extraterrestrial environments. By exploiting single collision conditions, we show that a radical mediated bimolecular collision between pyridyl radicals and 1,3-butadiene in the gas phase forms nitrogen-substituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PANHs) 1,4-dihydroquinoline and to a minor amount 1,4-dihydroisoquinoline. The reaction proceeds through the formation of a van der Waals complex, which circumnavigates the entrance barrier implying it can operate at very low kinetic energy and therefore at low temperatures of 10 K as present in cold molecular clouds such as TMC-1. The discovery of facile de facto barrierless exoergic reaction mechanisms leading to PANH formation could play an important role in providing a population of aromatic structures upon which further photo-processing of ice condensates could occur to form nucleobases.

  18. Solvent-free functionalization of fullerene C60 and pristine multi-walled carbon nanotubes with aromatic amines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Calera, Itzel J.; Meza-Laguna, Victor; Gromovoy, Taras Yu.; Chávez-Uribe, Ma. Isabel; Basiuk, Vladimir A.; Basiuk, Elena V.

    2015-02-01

    We employed a direct one-step solvent-free covalent functionalization of solid fullerene C60 and pristine multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with aromatic amines 1-aminopyrene (AP), 2-aminofluorene (AF) and 1,5-diaminonaphthalene (DAN). The reactions were carried out under moderate vacuum, in a wide temperature range of 180-250 °C, during relatively short time of about 2 h. To confirm successful amine attachment, a large number of analytical techniques were used (depending on the nanomaterial functionalized) such as Fourier transform infrared, Raman, X-ray photoelectron, 13C cross-polarization magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, laser-desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, temperature-programmed desorption with mass spectrometric detection, as well as scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The nucleophilic addition of the aromatic amines to C60 molecule was studied theoretically by using density functional theory (PBE GGA functional with Grimme dispersion correction in conjunction with the DNP basis set). In the case of crystalline C60, the solvent-free technique has a limited applicability due to poor diffusion of vaporous aromatic amines into the bulk. Nevertheless, the approach proposed allows for a facile preparation of aromatic amine-functionalized pristine MWCNTs without contamination with other chemical reagents, detergents and solvents, which is especially important for a vast variety of nanotube applications spanning from nanoelectronics to nanomedicine.

  19. Bacterial invasion reconstructed molecule by molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, James H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We propose to visualize the initial stages of bacterial infection of a human host cell with unmatched spatial and temporal resolution. This work will develop a new capability for the laboratory (super-resolution optical imaging), will test unresolved scientific hypotheses regarding host-pathogen interaction dynamics, and leverages state of the art 3D molecular tracking instrumentation developed recently by our group. There is much to be gained by applying new single molecule tools to the important and familiar problem of pathogen entry into a host cell. For example, conventional fluorescence microscopy has identified key host receptors, such as CD44 and {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin, that aggregate near the site of Salmonella typhimurium infection of human cells. However, due to the small size of the bacteria ({approx} 2 {micro}m) and the diffraction of the emitted light, one just sees a fluorescent 'blob' of host receptors that aggregate at the site of attachment, making it difficult to determine the exact number of receptors present or whether there is any particular spatial arrangement of the receptors that facilitates bacterial adhesion/entry. Using newly developed single molecule based super-resolution imaging methods, we will visualize how host receptors are directed to the site of pathogen adhesion and whether host receptors adopt a specific spatial arrangement for successful infection. Furthermore, we will employ our 3D molecular tracking methods to follow the injection of virulence proteins, or effectors, into the host cell by the pathogen Type III secretion system (TTSS). We expect these studies to provide mechanistic insights into the early events of pathogen infection that have here-to-fore been technically beyond our reach. Our Research Goals are: Goal 1--Construct a super-resolution fluorescence microscope and use this new capability to image the spatial distribution of different host receptors (e.g. CD44, as {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin) at the

  20. Nanoscale Structural and Electronic Properties of Ultrathin Blends of Two Polyaromatic Molecules: A Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy Investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Palermo, Vincenzo; Morelli, Susanna; Palma, Matteo; Simpson, Christopher; Nolde, Fabian; Herrmann, Andreas; Müllen, Klaus; Samorì, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    We describe a Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy (KPFM) study on the morphological and electronic properties of complex mono and bi-molecular ultrathin films self-assembled on mica. These architectures are made up from an electron-donor (D), a synthetic all-benzenoid polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, and an electron-acceptor (A), perylene-bis-dicarboximide. The former molecule self-assembles into fibers in single component films, while the latter molecule forms discontinuous layers. Taking advantag...

  1. Möbius molecules and fragile Mott insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muechler, Lukas; Maciejko, Joseph; Neupert, Titus; Car, Roberto

    2015-03-01

    Motivated by the concept of Möbius aromatics in organic chemistry, we extend the recently introduced concept of fragile Mott insulators (FMI) to ring-shaped molecules with repulsive Hubbard interactions threaded by a half-quantum of magnetic flux (hc / 2 e). In this context, a FMI is the insulating ground state of a finite-size molecule that cannot be adiabatically connected to a single Slater determinant, i.e., to a band insulator, provided that time-reversal and lattice translation symmetries are preserved. Based on exact numerical diagonalization for finite Hubbard interaction strength U and existing Bethe-ansatz studies of the one-dimensional Hubbard model in the large- U limit, we establish a duality between Hubbard molecules with 4 n and 4 n + 2 sites, with n integer. A molecule with 4 n sites is an FMI in the absence of flux but becomes a band insulator in the presence of a half-quantum of flux, while a molecule with 4 n + 2 sites is a band insulator in the absence of flux but becomes an FMI in the presence of a half-quantum of flux. Including next-nearest-neighbor-hoppings gives rise to new FMI states that belong to multidimensional irreducible representations of the molecular point group, giving rise to a rich phase diagram. Reference: arXiv:1409.6732

  2. Zeolite H-BEA catalysed multicomponent reaction: One-pot synthesis of amidoalkyl naphthols - Biologically active drug-like molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sunil R Mistry; Rikesh S Joshi; Kalpana C Maheria

    2011-07-01

    Zeolite has been used as an efficient and a novel heterogeneous catalyst for one-pot synthesis of biologically active drug-like molecules, amidoalkyl naphthols. This green route involves multicomponent reaction of 2-naphthol, aromatic aldehydes and amide in the presence of a catalytic amount of zeolite H-Beta (H-BEA) under solvent reflux as well as solvent-free conditions.

  3. Reversed binding of a small molecule ligand in homologous chemokine receptors - differential role of extracellular loop 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P C; Thiele, S; Steen, A; Elder, A; Kolbeck, R; Ghosh, Sudip; Frimurer, T M; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie

    2012-01-01

    The majority of small molecule compounds targeting chemokine receptors share a similar pharmacophore with a centrally located aliphatic positive charge and flanking aromatic moieties. Here we describe a novel piperidine-based compound with structural similarity to previously described CCR8-specif...

  4. Biodegradation Rates of Aromatic Contaminants in Biofilm Reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arcangeli, Jean-Pierre; Arvin, Erik

    1995-01-01

    , chlorophenols, nitrophenol, chlorobenzenes and aromatic nitrogen-, sulphur- or oxygen-containing heterocyclic compounds (NSO-compounds). Furthermore, a comparison with degradation rates observed for easily degradable organics is also presented. At concentrations below 20-100 μg/l the degradation of the aromatic...

  5. Products Distribution of Meta-Oriented Aromatic Polyamide Needs Improvement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Maojian

    2007-01-01

    @@ Capacity holding the second place in the world Metaoriented aromatic polya-mide fiber was first developed by DuPont of the United States. Commercial production began in the late 1960s.Today the world's capacity to produce meta-oriented aromatic polyamide fiber is 28 150t/a, and DuPont holds a 78% market share.

  6. High atmosphere-ocean exchange of semivolatile aromatic hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Gaya, Belén; Fernández-Pinos, María-Carmen; Morales, Laura; Méjanelle, Laurence; Abad, Esteban; Piña, Benjamin; Duarte, Carlos M.; Jiménez, Begoña; Dachs, Jordi

    2016-06-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and other semivolatile aromatic-like compounds, are an important and ubiquitous fraction of organic matter in the environment. The occurrence of semivolatile aromatic hydrocarbons is due to anthropogenic sources such as incomplete combustion of fossil fuels or oil spills, and other biogenic sources. However, their global transport, fate and relevance for the carbon cycle have been poorly assessed, especially in terms of fluxes. Here we report a global assessment of the occurrence and atmosphere-ocean fluxes of 64 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons analysed in paired atmospheric and seawater samples from the tropical and subtropical Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans. The global atmospheric input of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to the global ocean is estimated at 0.09 Tg per month, four times greater than the input from the Deepwater Horizon spill. Moreover, the environmental concentrations of total semivolatile aromatic-like compounds were 102-103 times higher than those of the targeted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, with a relevant contribution of an aromatic unresolved complex mixture. These concentrations drive a large global deposition of carbon, estimated at 400 Tg C yr-1, around 15% of the oceanic CO2 uptake.

  7. Laboratory Investigation of Organic Aerosol Formation from Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Luisa T.; Molina, Mario J.; Zhang, Renyi

    2006-08-23

    Our work for this DOE funded project includes: (1) measurements of the kinetics and mechanism of the gas-phase oxidation reactions of the aromatic hydrocarbons initiated by OH; (2) measurements of aerosol formation from the aromatic hydrocarbons; and (3) theoretical studies to elucidate the OH-toluene reaction mechanism using quantum-chemical and rate theories.

  8. Bis-perfluoroalkylation of aromatic compounds with sodium perfluoroalkanesulfinates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU, Jin-Tao(刘金涛); LU, He-Jun(吕贺军)

    2000-01-01

    Bis-perfluoroalkylation of aromatic compounds such as dimethoxybenzenes (2,4,6), anisole (8), pyridine (10) and quinoline (13) was accomplished by reaction with excess sodium perfluoroalkanesulfinates, RFSO2Na (1), in the presence of Mn(OAc)3·2H2O under mild conditions. The reaction provides a facile method for the synthesis of bis-perfluoroalkylated aromatic compounds.

  9. 40 CFR 721.757 - Polyoxyalkylene substituted aromatic azo colorant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... azo colorant. 721.757 Section 721.757 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.757 Polyoxyalkylene substituted aromatic azo colorant. (a) Chemical... as polyoxyalkylene substituted aromatic azo colorant (PMN P-92-1131) is subject to reporting...

  10. Conformational switching of ethano-bridged Cu,H2-bis-porphyrin induced by aromatic amines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Bettini

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cu,H2-bis-porphyrin (Cu,H2-Por2, in which copper porphyrin and free-base porphyrin are linked together by an ethano-bridge, was dissolved in chloroform and spread at the air/liquid subphase interface of a Langmuir trough. The bis-porphyrin derivative, floating film was characterized by reflection spectroscopy and the surface pressure of the floating film was studied as a function of the mean area per molecule. When aromatic amines are dissolved in the subphase, an evident interaction between the bis-porphyrin host and the aromatic amine guest is observed. A clear-cut variation of the profile of surface pressure vs area per molecule curve is observed. Reflection spectroscopy highlights that the aromatic amines dissolved in the subphase are able to induce the syn-to-anti conformational switching in the bis-porphyrin derivative. The Langmuir–Schaefer technique has been used to transfer the floating bis-porphyrin film (when using pure water as a subphase to a surface plasmon resonance (SPR substrate and the resulting device was able to detect the presence of aniline at concentrations as low as 1 nM in aqueous solution. The high selectivity of the SPR sensing device has been verified by checking the spectral response of the active layer towards other analytes dissolved in the aqueous solutions.

  11. Polyynyl-substituted PAH molecules and DIB carriers

    CERN Document Server

    Rouillé, Gaël; Huisken, Friedrich; Henning, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules have been long considered promising candidates for the carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). The PAH-DIB hypothesis, however, raises two major issues. First, the number of interstellar PAH species is potentially orders of magnitude larger than the number of DIBs. Second, the absorption spectrum of a PAH is in general dominated by bands found at UV wavelengths while, conversely, DIBs are absent from the UV wavelength domain and arise at visible and near IR wavelengths. These issues do not necessarily weaken the PAH-DIB hypothesis and can actually allow us to refine it. In that context, we analyze the UV/vis absorption spectra of PAH molecules isolated in Ne matrices and propose that polyynyl-substituted PAHs, or similar species, are valid candidates for the carriers of the DIBs. Finally, a possible lifecycle for DIB-carrying PAHs is presented.

  12. Molecules without electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrons are the glue that holds the atoms in molecules together. Without them the positive charges of nuclei would repel each other, and the world would be a much simpler place. But in the quest to gain control over matter at a fundamental level, physicists in Russia and Canada have come up with a way of binding charged nuclei without any electrons. Instead the researchers use intense laser light. (U.K.)

  13. Atoms, molecules & elements

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Young scientists will be thrilled to explore the invisible world of atoms, molecules and elements. Our resource provides ready-to-use information and activities for remedial students using simplified language and vocabulary. Students will label each part of the atom, learn what compounds are, and explore the patterns in the periodic table of elements to find calcium (Ca), chlorine (Cl), and helium (He) through hands-on activities.

  14. Single Molecule Mechanochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shaowei; Zhang, Yanxing; Ho, Wilson; Wu, Ruqian; Ruqian Wu, Yanxing Zhang Team; Wilson Ho, Shaowei Li Team

    Mechanical forces can be used to trigger chemical reactions through bending and stretching of chemical bonds. Using the reciprocating movement of the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), mechanical energy can be provided to a single molecule sandwiched between the tip and substrate. When the mechanical pulse center was moved to the outer ring feature of a CO molecule, the reaction rate was significantly increased compared with bare Cu surface and over Au atoms. First, DFT calculations show that the presence of CO makes the Cu cavity more attractive toward H2 Second, H2 prefers the horizontal adsorption geometry in the Cu-Cu and Au-Cu cavities and no hybridization occurs between the antibonding states of H2 and states of Cu atoms. While H2 loses electrons from its bonding state in all three cavities, the filling of its anti-bonding state only occurs in the CO-Cu cavity. Both make the CO-Cu cavity much more effectively to chop the H2 molecule. Work was supported by the National Science Foundation Center for Chemical Innovation on Chemistry at the Space-Time Limit (CaSTL) under Grant No. CHE-1414466.

  15. Photonic Molecule Lasers Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Denis; Dumont, Joey; Déziel, Jean-Luc; Dubé, Louis J.

    2014-05-01

    Photonic molecules (PMs) formed by coupling two or more optical resonators are ideal candidates for the fabrication of integrated microlasers, photonic molecule lasers. Whereas most calculations on PM lasers have been based on cold-cavity (passive) modes, i.e. quasi-bound states, a recently formulated steady-state ab initio laser theory (SALT) offers the possibility to take into account the spectral properties of the underlying gain transition, its position and linewidth, as well as incorporating an arbitrary pump profile. We will combine two theoretical approaches to characterize the lasing properties of PM lasers: for two-dimensional systems, the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory will obtain the resonant modes of the coupled molecules in an active medium described by SALT. Not only is then the theoretical description more complete, the use of an active medium provides additional parameters to control, engineer and harness the lasing properties of PM lasers for ultra-low threshold and directional single-mode emission. We will extend our recent study and present new results for a number of promising geometries. The authors acknowledge financial support from NSERC (Canada) and the CERC in Photonic Innovations of Y. Messaddeq.

  16. Photochemically induced oscillations of aromatic pentazadienes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunz, T.; Hahn, C.; Wokaun, A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    Aromatic pentazadienes are used to enhance the laser induced ablation of standard polymers with low absorption in the UV. Therefore the photochemistry of substituted 1,5-diaryl-3-alkyl-1,4-pentazadiene monomers was studied with a pulsed excimer laser as irradiation source. The net photochemical reaction proceeds in an overall one-step pathway A{yields}B. Quantum yields for the laser decomposition were determined to be up to 10%. An oscillating behaviour of the absorption was found during the dark period following the irradiation. The temperature dependence of this dark reaction has been studied. An attempt to model this behaviour in terms of a non-linear coupling between heat released, heat transfer, and reaction kinetics will be described. (author) 4 figs., 4 refs.

  17. Muonium addition reactions to aromatic solutes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reaction rate constants of 0.3 to 1.1 x 10sup(10) Msup(-1) ssup(-1) were determined for the reaction of muonium (μsup(+)esup(-),Mu) with seven aromatic solutes in dilute aqueous solution at approximately 295K. The reaction was deduced to be that of addition to the benzene ring to form cyclohexadienyl radicals. On comparison with the analogous H-atom reactions, the kinetic isotope effects were generally about three, equal to the mean thermal velocity ratio of Mu/H. When analyzed through the Hammett equation there were serious discontinuities but a rho value of +0.6 was deduced, not inconsistent with attack by a mildly electron-donating neutral atom forming only free radical intermediates

  18. Naturally occurring antifungal aromatic esters and amides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the search of antifungal natural products from terrestrial plants, a new long chained aromatic ester named grandiflorate along with spatazoate from Portulaca grandiflora and N-[2-methoxy-2-(4-methoxyphenyl) ethyl]-trans-cinnamide and aegeline from Solanum erianthum of Nigeria were isolated and tested against six fungal species. The known constituents have not been reported so far from mentioned investigated plants. Structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated with the aid of spectroscopic techniques including two dimensional NMR experiments. Among the compounds, the esters found more potent than amides against Candida albicans and Aspergillus flavus. The new compound grandiflorate gave response against all tested fungal species while aegeline was found to give lowest inhibition during this study. (author)

  19. ANTIEMETIC ACTIVITY OF SOME AROMATIC PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan MuhammadMohtasheemul

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Current study was conducted to explore the antiemetic activity of ten aromatic medicinal plants viz., Carissa carandus L. (fruits, Chichorium intybus L (flowers, Cinnamum tamala L (leaves, Curcuma caesia Roxb (rhizomes, Lallemantia royleana Benth (leaves, Matricaria chamomila L (flowers, Piper longum L (fruits, Piper methysticum G. Forst (fruits, Piper nigrum Linn. (fruits and Syzygium aromaticum (Linn. Merr. & Perry (flowering buds was studied using chick emetic model. The ethanol extracts of these plants were administered at 150 mg/kg body weight orally. Domperidone was given at 100 mg/kg as a reference drug. All the extracts decrease in retches induced by copper sulphate pentahydrate given orally at 50 mg/kg body weight and showed comparable antiemetic activity with domperidone. Compound targeted antiemetic activity is further suggested.

  20. Aromatic fluorine compounds. VII. Replacement of aromatic -Cl and -NO2 groups by -F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, G.C.; Kruse, C.W.

    1956-01-01

    Replacement of -Cl by -F in aryl chlorides with potassium fluoride has been extended from 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene to less activated halides by the use of non-aqueous solvents, especially dimethylformamide (DMF) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Also replacement of -NO2 by -F in substituted nitrobenzenes was studied in DMF. As a direct result of this study, many aromatic fluorine compounds can now be obtained by a relatively simple synthetic route.

  1. Environmental Remediation: Removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nkansah, Marian Asantewah

    2012-11-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous persistent semi-volatile organic compounds. They are contaminants that are resistant to degradation and can remain in the environment for long periods due to their high degree of conjugation, and aromaticity. PAHs are present in industrial effluents as products of incomplete combustion processes of organic compounds. Petroleum, coal and shale oil contain extremely complex mixtures of these PAHs, and their transport and refining process can also result in the release of PAHs. It is therefore prudent that such effluents are treated before discharge into the environment. In this project, different approaches to the treatment of PAHs have been investigated. Hydrous pyrolysis has been explored as a potential technique for degrading PAHs in water using anthracene as a model compound. The experiments were performed under different conditions of temperature, substrate, redox systems and durations. The conditions include oxidising systems comprising pure water, hydrogen peroxide and Nafion-SiO2 solid catalyst in water; and reducing systems of formic acid and formic acid / Nafion-SiO2 / Pd-C catalysts to assess a range of reactivities. Products observed in GCMS analysis of the extract from the water phase include anthrone, anthraquinone, xanthone and multiple hydro-anthracene derivatives (Paper I). In addition a modified version of the Nafion-SiO2 solid catalyst in water oxidising system was tested; and reducing systems of formic acid and formic acid / Nafion-SiO2 / Pd-C catalysts were adopted for the conversion of a mixture of anthracene, fluorene and fluoranthene. The rate of conversion in the mixture was high as compared to that of only anthracene (Paper II). Also the use of LECA (Lightweight expanded clay aggregates) as an adsorbent (Paper III) for PAHs (phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene) removal from water has been.(Author)

  2. Kinetics and mechanisms of reactions involving small aromatic reactive intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, M.C. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Small aromatic radicals such as C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O and C{sub 6}H{sub 4} are key prototype species of their homologs. C{sub 6}H{sub 5} and its oxidation product, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O are believed to be important intermediates which play a pivotal role in hydrocarbon combustion, particularly with regard to soot formation. Despite their fundamental importance, experimental data on the reaction mechanisms and reactivities of these species are very limited. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, most kinetic data except its reactions with NO and NO{sub 2}, were obtained by relative rate measurements. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O, the authors have earlier measured its fragmentation reaction producing C{sub 5}H{sub 5} + CO in shock waves. For C{sub 6}H{sub 4}, the only rate constant measured in the gas phase is its recombination rate at room temperature. The authors have proposed to investigate systematically the kinetics and mechanisms of this important class of molecules using two parallel laser diagnostic techniques--laser resonance absorption (LRA) and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry (REMPI/MS). In the past two years, study has been focused on the development of a new multipass adsorption technique--the {open_quotes}cavity-ring-down{close_quotes} technique for kinetic applications. The preliminary results of this study appear to be quite good and the sensitivity of the technique is at least comparable to that of the laser-induced fluorescence method.

  3. Using spin labels to study molecular processes in soils: Covalent binding of aromatic amines to humic acids of soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrova, O. N.; Kholodov, V. A.; Perminova, I. V.

    2015-08-01

    Interactions of aliphatic and aromatic amines with soil and humic acids isolated from it are studied by means of spin labels and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Nitroxyl radicals containing amino groups are used as spin labels. It is found experimentally that aromatic amines are instantaneously converted to the bound state. It is shown that the microareas of their incorporation are characterized by a significant delay in the reduction of the nitroxyl fragment of spin-label molecules, indicating the formation of condensed structures typical of an oxidative binding mechanism. It is concluded that aliphatic amines do not bind to humic acids. It is noted that the studied process allows elucidating the formation of bound xenobiotic residues in soils.

  4. Two-dimensional character of internal rotation of furfural and other five-member heterocyclic aromatic aldehydes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataev, Vadim A.; Pupyshev, Vladimir I.; Godunov, Igor A.

    2016-05-01

    The features of nuclear motion corresponding to the rotation of the formyl group (CHO) are studied for the molecules of furfural and some other five-member heterocyclic aromatic aldehydes by the use of MP2/6-311G** quantum chemical approximation. It is demonstrated that the traditional one-dimensional models of internal rotation for the molecules studied have only limited applicability. The reason is the strong kinematic interaction of the rotation of the CHO group and out-of-plane CHO deformation that is realized for the molecules under consideration. The computational procedure based on the two-dimensional approximation is considered for low lying vibrational states as more adequate to the problem.

  5. The future role of aromatics in refining and petrochemistry. Proceedings of the DGMK-Conference (Authors' manuscripts)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emig, G.; Rupp, M.; Weitkamp, J. [eds.

    1999-07-01

    Topic of this conference has been the furure role of aromatics in the refinign industry. The articles deal with the following topics: Refining; legal aspects in the aromatics market; transportation fuels; dearomatization; catalytic reforming and aromatics; separation processes for aromatics; oxidation and ammoxidation of aromatics; electrophilic substitution of aromatics; hydrogenation of benzene; zeolites. (orig./sr)

  6. Solvent-free functionalization of fullerene C60 and pristine multi-walled carbon nanotubes with aromatic amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Pristine multi-walled carbon nanotubes were functionalized with aromatic amines. • The amines add onto nanotube defects, likewise they add onto fullerene C60. • The addition takes place at elevated temperature and without organic solvents. • Functionalized nanotubes were characterized by a number of instrumental techniques. - Abstract: We employed a direct one-step solvent-free covalent functionalization of solid fullerene C60 and pristine multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with aromatic amines 1-aminopyrene (AP), 2-aminofluorene (AF) and 1,5-diaminonaphthalene (DAN). The reactions were carried out under moderate vacuum, in a wide temperature range of 180–250 °C, during relatively short time of about 2 h. To confirm successful amine attachment, a large number of analytical techniques were used (depending on the nanomaterial functionalized) such as Fourier transform infrared, Raman, X-ray photoelectron, 13C cross-polarization magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, laser-desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, temperature-programmed desorption with mass spectrometric detection, as well as scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The nucleophilic addition of the aromatic amines to C60 molecule was studied theoretically by using density functional theory (PBE GGA functional with Grimme dispersion correction in conjunction with the DNP basis set). In the case of crystalline C60, the solvent-free technique has a limited applicability due to poor diffusion of vaporous aromatic amines into the bulk. Nevertheless, the approach proposed allows for a facile preparation of aromatic amine-functionalized pristine MWCNTs without contamination with other chemical reagents, detergents and solvents, which is especially important for a vast variety of nanotube applications spanning from nanoelectronics to nanomedicine

  7. Solvent-free functionalization of fullerene C{sub 60} and pristine multi-walled carbon nanotubes with aromatic amines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramírez-Calera, Itzel J. [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior C. U., 04510, México, D.F. (Mexico); Meza-Laguna, Victor [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior C. U., 04510 México, D.F. (Mexico); Gromovoy, Taras Yu. [O.O. Chuiko Institute of Surface Chemistry, National Academy of Sciences of the Ukraine, Gen. Naumova 17, 03164 Kiev (Ukraine); Chávez-Uribe, Ma. Isabel [Instituto de Química, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior C. U., 04510 México, D.F. (Mexico); Basiuk, Vladimir A., E-mail: basiuk@nucleares.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior C. U., 04510 México, D.F. (Mexico); Basiuk, Elena V., E-mail: elbg1111@gmail.com [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior C. U., 04510, México, D.F. (Mexico)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Pristine multi-walled carbon nanotubes were functionalized with aromatic amines. • The amines add onto nanotube defects, likewise they add onto fullerene C{sub 60}. • The addition takes place at elevated temperature and without organic solvents. • Functionalized nanotubes were characterized by a number of instrumental techniques. - Abstract: We employed a direct one-step solvent-free covalent functionalization of solid fullerene C{sub 60} and pristine multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with aromatic amines 1-aminopyrene (AP), 2-aminofluorene (AF) and 1,5-diaminonaphthalene (DAN). The reactions were carried out under moderate vacuum, in a wide temperature range of 180–250 °C, during relatively short time of about 2 h. To confirm successful amine attachment, a large number of analytical techniques were used (depending on the nanomaterial functionalized) such as Fourier transform infrared, Raman, X-ray photoelectron, {sup 13}C cross-polarization magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, laser-desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, temperature-programmed desorption with mass spectrometric detection, as well as scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The nucleophilic addition of the aromatic amines to C{sub 60} molecule was studied theoretically by using density functional theory (PBE GGA functional with Grimme dispersion correction in conjunction with the DNP basis set). In the case of crystalline C{sub 60}, the solvent-free technique has a limited applicability due to poor diffusion of vaporous aromatic amines into the bulk. Nevertheless, the approach proposed allows for a facile preparation of aromatic amine-functionalized pristine MWCNTs without contamination with other chemical reagents, detergents and solvents, which is especially important for a vast variety of nanotube applications spanning from nanoelectronics to nanomedicine.

  8. Watching single molecules dance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Amit Dinesh

    Molecular motors convert chemical energy, from ATP hydrolysis or ion flow, into mechanical motion. A variety of increasingly precise mechanical probes have been developed to monitor and perturb these motors at the single molecule level. Several outstanding questions can be best approached at the single molecule level. These include: how far does a motor progress per energy quanta consumed? how does its reaction cycle respond to load? how many productive catalytic cycles can it undergo per diffusional encounter with its track? and what is the mechanical stiffness of a single molecule connection? A dual beam optical trap, in conjunction with in vitro ensemble motility assays, has been used to characterize two members of the myosin superfamily: muscle myosin II and chick brain myosin V. Both move the helical polymer actin, but myosin II acts in large ensembles to drive muscle contraction or cytokinesis, while myosin V acts in small numbers to transport vesicles. An optical trapping apparatus was rendered sufficiently precise to identify a myosin working stroke with 1nm or so, barring systematic errors such as those perhaps due to random protein orientations. This and other light microscopic motility assays were used to characterize myosin V: unlike myosin II this vesicle transport protein moves through many increments of travel while remaining strongly bound to a single actin filament. The step size, stall force, and travel distance of myosin V reveal a remarkably efficient motor capable of moving along a helical track for over a micrometer without significantly spiraling around it. Such properties are fully consistent with the putative role of an organelle transport motor, present in small numbers to maintain movement over long ranges relative to cellular size scales. The contrast between myosin II and myosin V resembles that between a human running on the moon and one walking on earth, where the former allows for faster motion when in larger ensembles but for less

  9. Aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in sediments of Placentia Bay, Newfoundland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was conducted to examine the potential for contamination of recent sediments with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons due to tanker and refinery activity in Placentia Bay, Newfoundland, an area without large local anthropogenic sources of aromatics. Sediment samples were taken from the vicinity of the Come By Chance refinery, Woody Island, Wild Cove, and Port Royal Arm, all in the north end of the bay. The samples were extracted by two methods, dichloromethane extraction of dried sediment for determination of total aromatic hydrocarbon content and hexane extraction of wet sediment for estimation of the bioavailability of hydrocarbons and determination of more volatile compounds. Class analysis of aromatic hydrocarbons was conducted on a NH2 column with detection at 255 nm. Total concentrations of di-tricyclic aromatics were highest at the Woody Island site (0.6 μg/g). The sediments from the Come By Chance site, Wild Cove, and Port Royal Arm sediments contained 0.3, 0.1, and 0.2 μg/g respectively. The hexane extracts from Come By Chance were lowest in di-tricyclic aromatics (0.007 μg/g), with the other sites being equal in concentration (0.01 μg/g). It is evident from the study that aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in Placentia Bay are elevated in some parts of the bay in the absence of local combustion sources, and that the most likely source is petroleum. 12 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  10. How non-conventional feedstocks will affect aromatics technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, E. [Clariant Produkte (Deutschland) GmbH, Muenchen (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    The abundance of non-conventional feedstocks such as coal and shale gas has begun to affect the availability of traditional base chemicals such as propylene and BTX aromatics. Although this trend is primarily fueled by the fast growing shale gas economy in the US and the abundance of coal in China, it will cause the global supply and demand situation to equilibrate across the regions. Lower demand for gasoline and consequently less aromatics rich reformate from refineries will further tighten the aromatics markets that are expected to grow at healthy rates, however. Refiners can benefit from this trend by abandoning their traditional fuel-oriented business model and becoming producers of petrochemical intermediates, with special focus on paraxylene (PX). Cheap gas from coal (via gasification) or shale reserves is an advantaged feedstock that offers a great platform to make aromatics in a cost-competitive manner, especially in regions where naphtha is in short supply. Gas condensates (LPG and naphtha) are good feedstocks for paraffin aromatization, and methanol from coal or (shale) gas can be directly converted to BTX aromatics (MTA) or alkylated with benzene or toluene to make paraxylene. Most of today's technologies for the production and upgrading of BTX aromatics and their derivatives make use of the unique properties of zeolites. (orig.)

  11. Solution, surface, and single molecule platforms for the study of DNA-mediated charge transport

    OpenAIRE

    Muren, Natalie B.; Olmon, Eric D.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2012-01-01

    The structural core of DNA, a continuous stack of aromatic heterocycles, the base pairs, which extends down the helical axis, gives rise to the fascinating electronic properties of this molecule that is so critical for life. Our laboratory and others have developed diverse experimental platforms to investigate the capacity of DNA to conduct charge, termed DNA-mediated charge transport (DNA CT). Here, we present an overview of DNA CT experiments in solution, on surfaces, and with single molecu...

  12. Ultra-cold molecule production.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jamie; Chandler, David W.; Strecker, Kevin; Rahn, Larry A.

    2005-12-01

    The production of Ultra-cold molecules is a goal of many laboratories through out the world. Here we are pursuing a unique technique that utilizes the kinematics of atomic and molecular collisions to achieve the goal of producing substantial numbers of sub Kelvin molecules confined in a trap. Here a trap is defined as an apparatus that spatially localizes, in a known location in the laboratory, a sample of molecules whose temperature is below one degree absolute Kelvin. Further, the storage time for the molecules must be sufficient to measure and possibly further cool the molecules. We utilize a technique unique to Sandia to form cold molecules from near mass degenerate collisions between atoms and molecules. This report describes the progress we have made using this novel technique and the further progress towards trapping molecules we have cooled.

  13. Magnetic field modification of ultracold molecule-molecule collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Tscherbul, T. V.; Suleimanov, Yu. V.; Aquilanti, V.; Krems, R.V.

    2008-01-01

    We present an accurate quantum mechanical study of molecule-molecule collisions in the presence of a magnetic field. The work focusses on the analysis of elastic scattering and spin relaxation in collisions of O2(3Sigma_g) molecules at cold (~0.1 K) and ultracold (~10^{-6} K) temperatures. Our calculations show that magnetic spin relaxation in molecule-molecule collisions is extremely efficient except at magnetic fields below 1 mT. The rate constant for spin relaxation at T=0.1 K and a magnet...

  14. Theoretical study of aromaticity in inorganic tetramer clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sandeep Nigam; Chiranjib Majumder; S K Kulshreshtha

    2006-11-01

    Ground state geometry and electronic structure of M$^{2-}_{4}$ cluster (M = B, Al, Ga) have been investigated to evaluate their aromatic properties. The calculations are performed by employing the Density Functional Theory (DFT) method. It is found that all these three clusters adopt square planar configuration. Results reveal that square planar M$^{2-}_{4}$ dianion exhibits characteristics of multifold aromaticity with two delocalised -electrons. In spite of the unstable nature of these dianionic clusters in the gas phase, their interaction with the sodium atoms forms very stable dipyramidal M4Na2 complexes while maintaining their square planar structure and aromaticity.

  15. Passing Current through Touching Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schull, G.; Frederiksen, Thomas; Brandbyge, Mads;

    2009-01-01

    The charge flow from a single C-60 molecule to another one has been probed. The conformation and electronic states of both molecules on the contacting electrodes have been characterized using a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope. While the contact conductance of a single molecule between two...

  16. Synthesis and characterization of aromatic self-assembled monolayers containing methylene and ethyleneglycol entities by means of sum-frequency generation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We use infrared-visible sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy in order to investigate the adsorption properties on Pt(111) of molecules having CH3-C6H4-(O-CH2-CH2) n-O-(CH2) m-SH as general chemical formula. We synthesized three molecules defined by the values m = 5 n = 4, m = 11 n = 4, m = 11 n = 8 and characterized them by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy. Thanks to spectroscopic measurements, we show that these molecules build self-assembled monolayers on Pt(111). First, the weak SFG signals arising from the ad-layer indicate low order and surface coverage of the substrate by these molecules. Next, the vibrational fingerprints of the aforementioned molecules are determined between 2825 and 3125 cm-1 and the observed SFG spectral features are ascribed on the basis of the analysis of shorter and simpler molecules (1-dodecanethiol, 4-methylbenzenethiol and CH3-C6H4-O-(CH2)11-SH) also adsorbed on Pt(111). The occurrence of methylene vibration modes indicates a significant amount of chain defects whatever the n and m numbers are. Finally, the identification of a particular vibration mode, characteristic of the aromatic ring, enables us to qualitatively discuss the effect of the number of methylene and ethylene glycol entities on its orientation. More precisely, higher these numbers, more tilted (with respect to the substrate normal) the aromatic ring plane is

  17. Efficient single molecule detection and single molecule photochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Affleck, R.L.; Ambrose, W.P.; Goodwin, P.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Single molecule detection efficiencies greater than 90% in flowing sample streams can be attained by confining the sample to the center of the excitation laser beam and photobleaching the reagent stream immediately before it enters the detection flow cell. Photolysis of single molecules of B-Phycoerythrin dissolved in aqueous solution is observed as an abrupt cessation of the fluorescence from these molecules as they flow through {approximately}40 pl probe volume. An analysis of the survival times of individual molecules in the laser beams yields the photodestruction quantum yield of the molecule. Photon pair correlation measurements of the fluorescence detected from single B-PE molecules demonstrate that the molecule fluoresces from only one bilin chromophore at a time.

  18. Ionization and fragmentation of cold clusters of PAH molecules: collisions with keV ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on collisions between atomic ions and pure, loosely bound, clusters of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules. We find that charge and excitation energy is distributed on the cluster constituents before break-up which mostly leads to emissions of intact, excited, singly charged monomers. Surprisingly, collisions with highly charged ions lead to hotter monomers than collisions with ions in low charge states. Small PAH clusters fragment promptly when singly ionized while clusters of more than 13 or 5 molecules may remain intact for anthracene or coronene clusters, respectively.

  19. Malaria parasite carbonic anhydrase:inhibition of aromatic/heterocyclic sulfonamides and its therapeutic potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sudaratana R Krungkrai; Jerapan Krungkrai

    2011-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) is responsible for the majority of life-threatening cases of human malaria, causing 1.5-2.7 million annual deaths. The global emergence of drug-resistant malaria parasites necessitates identification and characterization of novel drug targets and their potential inhibitors. We identified the carbonic anhydrase (CA) genes in P. falciparum. The pfCA gene encodes an α-carbonic anhydrase, a Zn 2+-metalloenzme, possessing catalytic properties distinct from that of the human host CA enzyme. The amino acid sequence of the pfCA enzyme is different from the analogous protozoan and human enzymes. A library of aromatic/heterocyclic sulfonamides possessing a large diversity of scaffolds were found to be very good inhibitors for the malarial enzyme at moderate-low micromolar and submicromolar inhibitions. The structure of the groups substituting the aromatic-ureido- or aromatic-azomethine fragment of the molecule and the length of the parent sulfonamide were critical parameters for the inhibitory properties of the sulfonamides. One derivative, that is, 4- (3, 4-dichlorophenylureido)thioureido-benzenesulfonamide (compound 10) was the most effective in vitro Plasmodium falciparum CA inhibitor, and was also the most effective antimalarial compound on the in vitro P. falciparum growth inhibition. The compound 10 was also effective in vivo antimalarial agent in mice infected with Plasmodium berghei, an animal model of drug testing for human malaria infection. It is therefore concluded that the sulphonamide inhibitors targeting the parasite CA may have potential for the development of novel therapies against human malaria.

  20. Photochemistry of biological molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earlier studies of the photodamage induced by 254nm irradiation of linear alanine peptides in the solid state have been supplemented by an investigation into the gaseous photoproducts from the cyclic dipeptide, 3,6-dimethyl-2,5-diketopiperazine. The trans and cis isomers have been prepared and the photoproducts compared with those from the DL-mixture. The conformation of the molecule did influence the yield of gaseous products. CO was produced by peptide bond rupture with concomitant release of hydrogen. C02 was also produced. The use of N- and C-deuterated analogues together with relevant crystallographic and EPR data has enabled a detailed study of the mechanism of photodegradation to be made, from which it was concluded that the methyl protons are not inert but rather are the major source of the hydrogen observed on photolysis. (author)

  1. Forces in molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Trujillo, Jesús; Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando; Fang, De-Chai; Bader, Richard F W

    2007-01-01

    Chemistry is determined by the electrostatic forces acting within a collection of nuclei and electrons. The attraction of the nuclei for the electrons is the only attractive force in a molecule and is the force responsible for the bonding between atoms. This is the attractive force acting on the electrons in the Ehrenfest force and on the nuclei in the Feynman force, one that is countered by the repulsion between the electrons in the former and by the repulsion between the nuclei in the latter. The virial theorem relates these forces to the energy changes resulting from interactions between atoms. All bonding, as signified by the presence of a bond path, has a common origin in terms of the mechanics determined by the Ehrenfest, Feynman and virial theorems. This paper is concerned in particular with the mechanics of interaction encountered in what are classically described as 'nonbonded interactions'--are atoms that 'touch' bonded or repelling one another? PMID:17328425

  2. Lanthanide single molecule magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Jinkui

    2015-01-01

    This book begins by providing basic information on single-molecule magnets (SMMs), covering the magnetism of lanthanide, the characterization and relaxation dynamics of SMMs, and advanced means of studying lanthanide SMMs. It then systematically introduces lanthanide SMMs ranging from mononuclear and dinuclear to polynuclear complexes, classifying them and highlighting those SMMs with high barrier and blocking temperatures – an approach that provides some very valuable indicators for the structural features needed to optimize the contribution of an Ising type spin to a molecular magnet. The final chapter presents some of the newest developments in the lanthanide SMM field, such as the design of multifunctional and stimuli-responsive magnetic materials as well as the anchoring and organization of the SMMs on surfaces. In addition, the crystal structure and magnetic data are clearly presented with a wealth of illustrations in each chapter, helping newcomers and experts alike to better grasp ongoing trends and...

  3. Lanthanide single molecule magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jinkui; Zhang, Peng [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun (China). Changchun Inst. of Applied Chemistry

    2015-10-01

    This book begins by providing basic information on single-molecule magnets (SMMs), covering the magnetism of lanthanide, the characterization and relaxation dynamics of SMMs and advanced means of studying lanthanide SMMs. It then systematically introduces lanthanide SMMs ranging from mononuclear and dinuclear to polynuclear complexes, classifying them and highlighting those SMMs with high barrier and blocking temperatures - an approach that provides some very valuable indicators for the structural features needed to optimize the contribution of an Ising type spin to a molecular magnet. The final chapter presents some of the newest developments in the lanthanide SMM field, such as the design of multifunctional and stimuli-responsive magnetic materials as well as the anchoring and organization of the SMMs on surfaces. In addition, the crystal structure and magnetic data are clearly presented with a wealth of illustrations in each chapter, helping newcomers and experts alike to better grasp ongoing trends and explore new directions.

  4. Application of aromatization catalyst in synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Song Rongjun; Yang Yunpeng; Ji Qing; Li Bin

    2012-02-01

    In a typical chemical vapour deposition (CVD) process for synthesizing carbon nanotubes (CNTs), it was found that the aromatization catalysts could promote effectively the formation of CNT. The essence of this phenomenon was attributed to the fact that the aromatization catalyst can accelerate the dehydrogenation–cyclization and condensation reaction of carbon source, which belongs to a necessary step in the formation of CNTs. In this work, aromatization catalysts, H-beta zeolite, HZSM-5 zeolite and organically modified montmorillonite (OMMT) were chosen to investigate their effects on the formation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) via pyrolysis method when polypropylene and 1-hexene as carbon source and Ni2O3 as the charring catalyst. The results demonstrated that the combination of those aromatization catalysts with nickel catalyst can effectively improve the formation of MWCNTs.

  5. Affinity labelling enzymes with esters of aromatic sulfonic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Show-Chu; Shaw, Elliott

    1977-01-01

    Novel esters of aromatic sulfonic acids are disclosed. The specific esters are nitrophenyl p- and m-amidinophenylmethanesulfonate. Also disclosed is a method for specific inactivation of the enzyme, thrombin, employing nitrophenyl p-amidinophenylmethanesulfonate.

  6. Six-Membered Aromatic Polyazides: Synthesis and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei V. Chapyshev

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aromatic polyazides are widely used as starting materials in organic synthesis and photochemical studies, as well as photoresists in microelectronics and as cross-linking agents in polymer chemistry. Some aromatic polyazides possess high antitumor activity, while many others are of considerable interest as high-energy materials and precursors of high-spin nitrenes and C3N4 carbon nitride nanomaterials. The use of aromatic polyazides in click-reactions may be a new promising direction in the design of various supramolecular systems possessing interesting chemical, physical and biological properties. This review is devoted to the synthesis, properties and applications of six-membered aromatic compounds containing three and more azido groups in the ring.

  7. THE UPTAKE OF AROMATIC AND BRANCHED CHAIN HYDROCARBONS BY YEAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies of the hydrocarbon utilizing yeasts, Candida maltosa and C. lipolytica, have shown that both were capable of reducing recoverable amounts of branched chain and aromatic hydrocarbons in a mixture of naphthalene, tetradecane, hexadecane, pristane (tetra-methylpentadecane). ...

  8. Aromatic Plants as a Source of Bioactive Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiota Florou-Paneri

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Aromatic plants, also known as herbs and spices, have been used since antiquity as folk medicine and as preservatives in foods. The best known aromatic plants, such as oregano, rosemary, sage, anise, basil, etc., originate from the Mediterranean area. They contain many biologically active compounds, mainly polyphenolics, which have been found to possess antimicrobial, antioxidant, antiparasitic, antiprotozoal, antifungal, and anti-inflammatory properties. Currently, the demand for these plants and their derivatives has increased because they are natural, eco-friendly and generally recognized as safe products. Therefore, aromatic plants and their extracts have the potential to become new generation substances for human and animal nutrition and health. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the literature surrounding the in vivo and in vitro use of aromatic plants.

  9. Provisional Guidance for Quantitative Risk Assessment of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are products of incomplete combustion of organic materials; sources are, thus, widespread,including cigarette smoke, municipal waste incineration, wood stove emissions, coal conversion, energy production form fossil fuels, and automobile an...

  10. A numerical ab initio study of harmonic generation from a ring-shaped model molecule in laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, D

    2001-01-01

    When a laser pulse impinges on a molecule which is invariant under certain symmetry operations selection rules for harmonic generation (HG) arise. In other words: symmetry controls which channels are open for the deposition and emission of laser energy---with the possible application of filtering or amplification. We review the derivation of HG selection rules and study numerically the interaction of laser pulses with an effectively one-dimensional ring-shaped model molecule. The harmonic yields obtained from that model and their dependence on laser frequency and intensity are discussed. In a real experiment obvious candidates for such molecules are benzene, other aromatic compounds, or even nanotubes.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of organosoluble aromatic copolyimids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jintian; HUANG Wei; ZHOU Yongfeng; YAN Deyue

    2007-01-01

    A series of aromatic copolyimides was success fully synthesized from the commercial pyromellitic dianhy dride (PMDA) with a commercial diamine p-phenyldiamine (PDA) and a diamine 4,4'-methylenebis-(2-tert-butylaniline)(MBTBA) specially designed by the authors.The copoly imides were characterized by Infra-red (IR),Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR),Gel Permeation Chromato graphy (GPC),Ultraviolet Visual (UV-Vis),Thermogra vimetic Analysis (TGA) and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA).The copolyimide was precipitated in m-cresol in the polymerization process when the molar ratio of MBTBA and PDA was lower than 6/4.The number-average molecular weight of the soluble copolyimides measured by GPC was larger than 4.0 x 104,and the polydispersity index was higher than 1.5.Only one glass transition temperature of these copolyimdies was detected around 360℃ by DMA.The copolyimides did not show appreciable decomposition up to 500℃ under N2,and the thermal stability of the copolyimide increased a little with the introduction of PDA into the polyimide main chain.

  12. Porphyrins Fused with Unactivated Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    KAUST Repository

    Diev, Vyacheslav V.

    2012-01-06

    A systematic study of the preparation of porphyrins with extended conjugation by meso,β-fusion with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is reported. The meso-positions of 5,15-unsubstituted porphyrins were readily functionalized with PAHs. Ring fusion using standard Scholl reaction conditions (FeCl 3, dichloromethane) occurs for perylene-substituted porphyrins to give a porphyrin β,meso annulated with perylene rings (0.7:1 ratio of syn and anti isomers). The naphthalene, pyrene, and coronene derivatives do not react under Scholl conditions but are fused using thermal cyclodehydrogenation at high temperatures, giving mixtures of syn and anti isomers of the meso,β-fused porphyrins. For pyrenyl-substituted porphyrins, a thermal method gives synthetically acceptable yields (>30%). Absorption spectra of the fused porphyrins undergo a progressive bathochromic shift in a series of naphthyl (λ max = 730 nm), coronenyl (λ max = 780 nm), pyrenyl (λ max = 815 nm), and perylenyl (λ max = 900 nm) annulated porphyrins. Despite being conjugated with unsubstituted fused PAHs, the β,meso-fused porphyrins are more soluble and processable than the parent nonfused precursors. Pyrenyl-fused porphyrins exhibit strong fluorescence in the near-infrared (NIR) spectral region, with a progressive improvement in luminescent efficiency (up to 13% with λ max = 829 nm) with increasing degree of fusion. Fused pyrenyl-porphyrins have been used as broadband absorption donor materials in photovoltaic cells, leading to devices that show comparatively high photovoltaic efficiencies. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  13. [Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons exposure and birth defects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, S S; Huang, Y; Wang, C Y; Ren, A G

    2016-06-01

    Birth defects are one of the most common adverse birth outcomes, which create a heavy economic burden to the country, society and family. And they are also one of the biggest problems facing public health today. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a group of toxic pollutants existing in the environment widely, resulting from incomplete organic matter combustion, and can be taken into the body through various ways including the digestive tract, respiratory tract and so on. Recent researches suggest that the exposure of PAHs may be associated with various birth defects, while the special mechanism isn't very clear. This paper is a review of the relationship between PAHs and birth defects from the aspects of epidemiological data, experimental evidence on animals, which indicates that exposure of PAHs during pregnancy may be associated with birth defects including congenital heart defects, neural tube defects and cleft lip/plate. Furthermore, we explored the possible mechanism, including oxidative stress, oxidative damage and the changes of signal transduction pathway in order to provide some recommendations and suggestions on the future work. PMID:27256742

  14. Optimization of low ring polycylic aromatic biodegradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, N.; Abdul-Talib, S.; Tay, C. C.

    2016-07-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are recalcitrance and persistence that finally turn into problematic environmental contaminants. Microbial degradation is considered to be the primary mechanism of PAHs removal from the environment due to its organic criteria. This study is carried out to optimize degradation process of low ring PAHs. Bacteria used in this study was isolated from sludge collected from Kolej Mawar, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam, Selangor. Working condition namely, substrate concentration, bacteria concentration, pH and temperature were optimized. PAHs in the liquid sample was extracted by using solid phase microextractio equipped with a 7 µm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) SPME fibr. Removal of PAHs were assessed by measuring PAHs concentration using GC-FID. Results from the optimization study of biodegradation indicated that maximum rate of PAHs removal occurred at 100 mgL-1 of PAHs, 10% bacteria concentration, pH 7.0 and 30°C. These working condition had proved the effectiveness of using bacteria in biodegradation process of PAHs.

  15. Saudi decree encourages MTBE, Chevron aromatics plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevron Chemical (Houston), encouraged by a new Saudi royal decree that establishes extremely low feedstock prices, is in final negotiations to build a novel aromatics plant in Saudi Arabia. Chevron says it plans to close the deal and announce details the first week of March. The unit will be based on Chevron's Aromax reforming process, which uses a zeolite catalyst to convert light naphtha into benzene and toluene. No existing plant is using the technology, but Chevron is building a $250-million, 150-million gal/year Aromax unit at its refinery site in Pascagoula, MS, and Idemitsu has licensed the process for a plant in Chiba, Japan. The Saudi decree, issued late last year, pegs domestic feedstocks - propane, butane, and naphthas - at 30% below the lowest price of the prior quarter in major non-domestic markets. That clarifies and guarantees the Saudi feedstock price, which has always been nebulous, and thus allows project feasibility to be more clearly assessed. The decree is designed to encourage further private petrochemical investment in the country. In particular, the Saudi government hopes guaranteed low prices for butane will encourage more methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) projects. Arabian American Chemical, a 50/50 joint venture between Mobile and Arabian Chemical Investments, said in October of last year that its 830,000-m.t./year MTBE project at Yanbu, Saudi Arabia, would go ahead if feedstock questions could be resolved. The decree apparently resolves those questions

  16. Aromatizing unzipping polyester for EUV photoresist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzawa, Kensuke; Mesch, Ryan; Olah, Mike; Wang, Wade; Phillips, Scott T.; Willson, C. Grant

    2015-03-01

    New "self-immolating" or "unzipping" polymers, materials that depolymerize in response to irradiation, were designed and prepared successfully. We studied several candidate polymers and ultimately chose two of them for further development. One is a polyester that aromatizes upon depolymerization. The unzipping reaction initiated by UV exposure in solution was confirmed. The polymer was then studied in thin films to assess its potential for use in formulating photoresists. The neat polymer was tested as a blend with novolac resin. The effect of unzipping polyester loading in novolac on the rate of dissolution of films in TMAH was studied. Inhibition occurs at 20-30% loading. The films were exposed with DUV light and patterning was observed. The sensitivity of the unzipping polyester formulation is low in part due to the low absorption of the polymer for UV light. However, the polymer showed higher sensitivity with EUV exposure and first contrast curves show sensitivity in the range of 20-25mJ/cm2.

  17. Coassembly of aromatic dipeptides into biomolecular necklaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuran, Sivan; Razvag, Yair; Reches, Meital

    2012-11-27

    This paper describes the formation of complex peptide-based structures by the coassembly of two simple peptides, the diphenylalanine peptide and its tert-butyl dicarbonate (Boc) protected analogue. Each of these peptides can self-assemble into a distinct architecture: the diphenylalanine peptide into tubular structures and its analogue into spheres. Integrated together, these peptides coassemble into a construction of beaded strings, where spherical assemblies are connected by elongated elements. Electron and scanning force microscopy demonstrated the morphology of these structures, which we termed "biomolecular necklaces". Additional experiments indicated the reversibility of the coassembly process and the stability of the structures. Furthermore, we suggest a possible mechanism of formation for the biomolecular necklaces. Our suggestion is based on the necklace model for polyelectrolyte chains, which proposes that a necklace structure appears as a result of counterion condensation on the backbone of a polyelectrolyte. Overall, the approach of coassembly, demonstrated using aromatic peptides, can be adapted to any peptides and may lead to the development and discovery of new self-assembled architectures formed by peptides and other biomolecules. PMID:23061818

  18. Solubilities of solid polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polycyclic aromatic heterocycles in pressurized hot water

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Karásek, Pavel; Planeta, Josef; Roth, Michal

    Boulder, CO: National Institute of Standards and Technology, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, USA, 2006 - (Friend, D.; Frenkel, M.; Muzny, C.; Hardin, G.). s. 641-642 [International Conference on Chemical Thermodynamics /19./. THERMO International 2006. 30.07.2006-04.08.2006, Boulder, CO] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4031301; GA AV ČR KJB400310504; GA ČR GA203/05/2106 Keywords : aqueous solubility * pressurized hot water * polycyclic aromatic compounds Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  19. Measurement of Aromatic-hydrocarbons With the DOAS Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Axelsson, H; Eilard, A.; Emanuelsson, A.; Galle, B.; Edner, Hans; Ragnarson, P; Kloo, H

    1995-01-01

    Long-path DOAS (differential optical absorption spectroscopy) in the ultraviolet spectral region has been shown to be applicable for low-concentration measurements of light aromatic hydrocarbons. However, because of spectral interferences among different aromatics as well as with oxygen, ozone, and sulfur dioxide, the application of the DOAS technique for this group of components is not without problems. This project includes a study of the differential absorption characteristics, between 250...

  20. DNA-Catalyzed Hydrolysis of Esters and Aromatic Amides

    OpenAIRE

    Brandsen, Benjamin M.; Hesser, Anthony R.; Castner, Marissa A.; Chandra, Madhavaiah; Silverman, Scott K.

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported that DNA catalysts (deoxyribozymes) can hydrolyze DNA phosphodiester linkages, but DNA-catalyzed amide bond hydrolysis has been elusive. Here we used in vitro selection to identify DNA catalysts that hydrolyze ester linkages as well as DNA catalysts that hydrolyze aromatic amides, for which the leaving group is an aniline moiety. The aromatic amide-hydrolyzing deoxyribozymes were examined using linear free energy relationship analysis. The hydrolysis reaction is unaffec...

  1. Terahertz Spectroscopy of Biochars and Related Aromatic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepodise, L. M.; Horvat, J.; Lewis, R. A.

    2016-07-01

    A recent application of terahertz spectroscopy is to biochar, the agricultural charcoal produced by pyrolysis of various organic materials. Biochars simultaneously improve soil fertility and assist in carbon sequestration. Terahertz spectroscopy allows different biochars to be distinguished. However, the origin of the absorption features observed has not been clear. Given that biochar-based fertilizers are rich in aromatic compounds, we have investigated simple aromatic compounds as an approach to unravelling the complex biochar spectrum.

  2. Does toxicity of aromatic pollutants increase under remote atmospheric conditions?

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Kroflič; Miha Grilc; Irena Grgić

    2015-01-01

    Aromatic compounds contribute significantly to the budget of atmospheric pollutants and represent considerable hazard to living organisms. However, they are only rarely included into atmospheric models which deviate substantially from field measurements. A powerful experimental-simulation tool for the assessment of the impact of low- and semi-volatile aromatic pollutants on the environment due to their atmospheric aqueous phase aging has been developed and introduced for the first time. The c...

  3. Shifting from Agriculture to Agribusiness: The Case of Aromatic Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Mittal, Rashi; Singh, S. P.

    2007-01-01

    This study has examined the agribusiness opportunities in medicinal and aromatic plants (MAPs), based on the field level information from the state of Uttarakhand. The financial feasibility of important aromatic plants has been studied. It has been found that the returns are substantially higher from these crops than the most profitable commercial crops like sugarcane. The study has identified the constraints that affect the spread of cultivation of MAPs; these include inadequate processing c...

  4. Aromatic Plants as a Source of Bioactive Compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Panagiota Florou-Paneri; Ilias Giannenas; Eleftherios Bonos; Efterpi Christaki

    2012-01-01

    Aromatic plants, also known as herbs and spices, have been used since antiquity as folk medicine and as preservatives in foods. The best known aromatic plants, such as oregano, rosemary, sage, anise, basil, etc., originate from the Mediterranean area. They contain many biologically active compounds, mainly polyphenolics, which have been found to possess antimicrobial, antioxidant, antiparasitic, antiprotozoal, antifungal, and anti-inflammatory properties. Currently, the demand for these plant...

  5. Collection and conservation of medicinal and aromatic plants resources

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Abraham

    2011-01-01

    (Abstract selected from presentation in National Conference on Biodiversity of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants: Collection, Characterization and Utilization, held at Anand, India during November 24-25, 2010)Plant genetic resources have made substantial contributions to the domestication, utilization and improvement of all kinds of crops including medicinal and aromatic plants. Collection, characterization and  their efficient utilization are keys to efficient management of any kind of genetic r...

  6. Aromatic amine dehydrogenase, a second tryptophan tryptophylquinone enzyme.

    OpenAIRE

    Govindaraj, S; Eisenstein, E.; Jones, L. H.; Sanders-Loehr, J; Chistoserdov, A Y; Davidson, V L; Edwards, S. L.

    1994-01-01

    Aromatic amine dehydrogenase (AADH) catalyzes the oxidative deamination of aromatic amines including tyramine and dopamine. AADH is structurally similar to methylamine dehydrogenase (MADH) and possesses the same tryptophan tryptophylquinone (TTQ) prosthetic group. AADH exhibits an alpha 2 beta 2 structure with subunit molecular weights of 39,000 and 18,000 and with a quinone covalently attached to each beta subunit. Neither subunit cross-reacted immunologically with antibodies to the correspo...

  7. Aromatic VOCs global influence in the ozone production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Perez, David; Pozzer, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Aromatic hydrocarbons are a subgroup of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) of special interest in the atmosphere of urban and semi-urban areas. Aromatics form a high fraction of VOCs, are highly reactive and upon oxidation they are an important source of ozone. These group of VOCs are released to the atmosphere by processes related to biomass burning and fossil fuel consumption, while they are removed from the atmosphere primarily by OH reaction and by dry deposition. In addition, a branch of aromatics (ortho-nitrophenols) produce HONO upon photolysis, which is responsible of certain amount of the OH recycling. Despite their importance in the atmosphere in anthropogenic polluted areas, the influence of aromatics in the ozone production remains largely unknown. This is of particular relevance, being ozone a pollutant with severe side effects on air quality, health and climate. In this work the atmospheric impacts at global scale of the most emitted aromatic VOCs in the gas phase (benzene, toluene, xylenes, ethylbenzene, styrene, phenol, benzaldehyde and trimethylbenzenes) are analysed and assessed. Specifically, the impact on ozone due to aromatic oxidation is estimated, as this is of great interest in large urban areas and can be helpful for developing air pollution control strategies. Further targets are the quantification of the NOx loss and the OH recycling due to aromatic oxidation. In order to investigate these processes, two simulations were performed with the numerical chemistry and climate simulation ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) model. The simulations compare two cases, one with ozone concentrations when aromatics are present or the second one when they are missing. Finally, model simulated ozone is compared against a global set of observations in order to better constrain the model accuracy.

  8. Removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from organic solvents by ashes wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) can be formed during the refinery processes of crude petroleum. Their removal is of great importance. The same happens with other organic solvents used for the extraction of PAHs (hexane, acetonitrile...), which can be polluted with PAHs. Kinetic and equilibrium batch sorption tests were used to investigate the effect of wood ashes wastes as compared to activated carbon on the sorption of three representative PAHs from n-hexane and acetonitrile. Mussel shell ashes were discarded for batch sorption experiments because they were the only ashes containing PAHs. The equilibrium time was reached at 16 h. Physical sorption caused by the aromatic nature of the compounds was the main mechanism that governed the PAHs removal process. Our investigation revealed that wood ashes obtained at lower temperature (300 deg. C) did not show any PAHs sorption, while ashes obtained at higher temperature (>500 deg. C) have adsorbent sites readily available for the PAH molecules. An increase in the molecular weight of PAHs has a strong effect on sorption wood ashes wastes. As low the wood ashes particle size as high the sorption of PAHs, as a result of differences in adsorbent sites. The performance of wood ash wastes vs. activated carbon to remove 10 PAHs from organic solvents is competitive in price, and a good way for waste disposal.

  9. Random mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon spectra match interstellar infrared emission

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenberg, Marissa J F; Boersma, Christiaan

    2014-01-01

    The mid-infrared (IR; 5-15~$\\mu$m) spectrum of a wide variety of astronomical objects exhibits a set of broad emission features at 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, 11.3 and 12.7 $\\mu$m. About 30 years ago it was proposed that these signatures are due to emission from a family of UV heated nanometer-sized carbonaceous molecules known as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), causing them to be referred to as aromatic IR bands (AIBs). Today, the acceptance of the PAH model is far from settled, as the identification of a single PAH in space has not yet been successful and physically relevant theoretical models involving ``true'' PAH cross sections do not reproduce the AIBs in detail. In this paper, we use the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database, which contains over 500 quantum-computed spectra, in conjunction with a simple emission model, to show that the spectrum produced by any random mixture of at least 30 PAHs converges to the same 'kernel'-spectrum. This kernel-spectrum captures the essence of the PAH emission spectrum...

  10. Polymorphism versus thermochromism: interrelation of color and conformation in overcrowded bistricyclic aromatic enes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedermann, P Ulrich; Stezowski, John J; Agranat, Israel

    2006-04-12

    The nature of the thermochromic form of overcrowded bistricyclic aromatic enes (BAEs) has been controversial for a century. We report the single-crystal X-ray structure analysis of the deep-purple and yellow polymorphs of 9-(2,7-dimethyl-9H-fluoren-9-ylidene)-9H-xanthene (11), which revealed the molecules in a twisted and a folded conformation, respectively. Therefore, the deeply colored thermochromic form B of BAEs is identified as having a twisted conformation and the ambient-temperature form A as having a folded conformation. This relationship between the color and the conformation is further supported by the X-ray structures of the deep-purple crystals of the twisted 9-(9H-fluoren-9-ylidene)-9H-xanthene (10), and of the yellow crystals of the folded 9-(11H-benzo[b]fluoren-11-ylidene)-9H-xanthene (12). Based on this conclusive crystallographic evidence, eleven previously proposed rationales of thermochromism in BAEs are refuted. In the twisted structures, the tricyclic moieties are nearly planar and the central double bond is elongated to 1.40 A and twisted by 42 degrees . In the folded structures, the xanthylidene moieties are folded by 45 degrees and the fluorenylidene moieties by 18-20 degrees . Factors stabilizing the twisted and folded conformations are discussed, including twisting of formal single or double bonds, intramolecular overcrowding, and the significance of a dipolar aromatic "xanthenylium-fluorenide" push-pull structure. PMID:16440387

  11. General design strategy for aromatic ketone-based single-component dual-emissive materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuepeng; Xie, Tongqing; Cui, Minxin; Yang, Li; Sun, Xingxing; Jiang, Jun; Zhang, Guoqing

    2014-02-26

    Materials with both fluorescence and room-temperature phosphorescence (RTP) can be useful in the field of optoelectronics. Here we present a general strategy, taking advantage of carbonyl compounds, which have been known to possess efficient intersystem crossing with high triplet state yield, as well as a strongly fluorescent intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) state, to produce materials with both fluorescence and RTP at the same time, or dual-emission. In the presented model systems, in order to generate a suitable ICT state, Lewis acid binding to aromatic ketone derivatives has been proved to be a viable method. We have selected AlCl3, BCl3, BF3, and GdCl3 as binding Lewis acids, in that they exhibit sufficiently strong binding affinity toward the aromatic ketone derivatives to afford stable complexes and yet do not possess low-lying electronic transitions vs the ligands. We have successfully observed dual-emission from these designed complexes in polymers, which act to suppress competitive thermal decay at room temperature. One of the complexes is particularly interesting as it is dual-emissive in the crystalline state. Single-crystal XRD reveals that the molecule forms multiple hydrogen bonds with its neighbors in crystals, which may significantly enhance the rigidity of the environment. PMID:24484404

  12. Removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from organic solvents by ashes wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Gregorio, M R; García-Falcón, M S; Martínez-Carballo, E; Simal-Gándara, J

    2010-06-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) can be formed during the refinery processes of crude petroleum. Their removal is of great importance. The same happens with other organic solvents used for the extraction of PAHs (hexane, acetonitrile...), which can be polluted with PAHs. Kinetic and equilibrium batch sorption tests were used to investigate the effect of wood ashes wastes as compared to activated carbon on the sorption of three representative PAHs from n-hexane and acetonitrile. Mussel shell ashes were discarded for batch sorption experiments because they were the only ashes containing PAHs. The equilibrium time was reached at 16 h. Physical sorption caused by the aromatic nature of the compounds was the main mechanism that governed the PAHs removal process. Our investigation revealed that wood ashes obtained at lower temperature (300 degrees C) did not show any PAHs sorption, while ashes obtained at higher temperature (>500 degrees C) have adsorbent sites readily available for the PAH molecules. An increase in the molecular weight of PAHs has a strong effect on sorption wood ashes wastes. As low the wood ashes particle size as high the sorption of PAHs, as a result of differences in adsorbent sites. The performance of wood ash wastes vs. activated carbon to remove 10 PAHs from organic solvents is competitive in price, and a good way for waste disposal. PMID:20117882

  13. Phototoxicity of individual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and petroleum to marine invertebrate larvae and juveniles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phototoxicity resulting from photoactivated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has been reported in the literature for a variety of freshwater organisms. The magnitude of increase in PAH toxicity often exceeds a factor of 100. In the marine environment phototoxicity to marine organisms has not been reported for individual or complex mixtures of PAHs. In this study, larvae and juveniles of the bivalve, Mulinia lateralis, and juveniles of the mysid shrimp, Mysidopsis bahia, were exposed to individual known phototoxic PAHs (anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene), as well as the water-accommodated fractions of several petroleum products (Fuel Oil number-sign 2, Arabian Light Crude, Prudhoe Bay Crude, Fuel Oil number-sign 6) containing PAHs. Phototoxicity of individual PAHs was 12 to >50,000 times that of conventional toxicity. Three of the petroleum products demonstrated phototoxicity while the lightest product, Fuel Oil number-sign 2, was not phototoxic at the concentrations tested. The phototoxicity of petroleum products appears to be dependent on the composition and concentrations of phototoxic PAHs present: lighter oils have fewer multiple aromatic ring, phototoxic compounds while heavier oils have higher levels of these types of molecules. This study shows that phototoxicity can occur in marine waters to marine species. Further, the occurrence of oil in marine waters presents the additional risk of phototoxicity not routinely assessed for during oil spills

  14. Aromatization of n-octane over Pd/C catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Yin, Mengchen

    2013-01-01

    Gas-phase aromatization of n-octane was investigated using Pd/C catalyst. The objectives were to: (1) determine the effects of temperature (400-600 °C), weight hourly space velocity (WHSV) (0.8-∞), and hydrogen to hydrocarbon molar ratio (MR) (0-6) on conversion, selectivity, and yield (2) compare the activity of Pd/C with Pt/C and Pt/KL catalysts and (3) test the suitability of Pd/C for aromatization of different alkanes including n-hexane, n-heptane, and n-octane. Pd/C exhibited the best aromatization performance, including 54.4% conversion and 31.5% aromatics yield at 500 °C, WHSV = 2 h-1, and a MR of 2. The Pd/C catalyst had higher selectivity towards the preferred aromatics including ethylbenzene and xylenes, whereas Pt/KL had higher selectivity towards benzene and toluene. The results were somewhat consistent with adsorbed n-octane cyclization proceeding mainly through the six-membered ring closure mechanism. In addition, Pd/C was also capable of catalyzing aromatization of n-hexane and n-heptane. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Detection of azo dyes and aromatic amines in women undergarment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thao; Saleh, Mahmoud A

    2016-07-28

    Women are exposed to several chemical additives including azo dyes that exist in textile materials, which are a potential health hazard for consumers. Our objective was to analyze suspected carcinogenic azo dyes and their degradation aromatic amines in women underwear panties using a fast and simple method for quantification. Here, we evaluated 120 different samples of women underwear for their potential release of aromatic amines to the skin. Seventy-four samples yielded low level mixtures of aromatic amines; however eighteen samples were found to produce greater than 200 mg/kg (ppm) of aromatic amines. Azo dyes in these 18 samples were extracted from the fabrics and analyzed by reverse phase thin layer chromatography in tandem with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry. Eleven azo dyes were identified based on their mass spectral data and the chemical structure of the aromatic amine produced from these samples. We demonstrate that planar chromatography and mass spectrometry can be really helpful in confirming the identity of the azo dyes, offering highly relevant molecular information of the responsible compounds in the fabrics. With the growing concern about the consumer goods, analysis of aromatic amines in garments has become a highly important issue. PMID:27149414

  16. Post-source decay of alkylated and functionalized polycyclic aromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frache, Gilles; Krier, Gabriel; Vernex-Loset, Lionel; Muller, Jean-François; Manuelli, Pascal

    2007-01-01

    Post-source decay (PSD) is a valuable tool for providing structural information from large molecules by time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS). We used PSD to obtain this type of data from small molecules in the laser desorption/ionization (LDI) study of diesel engine exhaust particles. As the original nitrogen laser (lambda = 337 nm, E = 3.5 eV/photon) of our TOF mass spectrometer does not yield sufficient energy to ionize polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), a second laser with a shorter wavelength has been coupled to the instrument. The fourth harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser (lambda = 266 nm, 4.6 eV/photon) has been chosen to achieve two-photon single-step desorption/ionization of PAHs. The PSD fragmentation of functionalized, alkylated and sulfur PAHs is discussed. Diesel engine exhaust particles are also studied as an example of a real complex sample. This technique is presented herein as a way to identify small molecules in environmental samples. Information provided by LDI-PSD-TOFMS can be a way to distinguish pollutants with very close molecular weights even if the resolving power of a TOF mass spectrometer is not sufficient. PMID:17639565

  17. POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON PROCESSING IN THE BLAST WAVE OF THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT N132D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph 14-36 μm mapping observations of the supernova remnant N132D in the Large Magellanic Cloud. This study focuses on the processing of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that we previously identified in the southern blast wave. The mid-infrared spectra show strong continuum emission from shock-heated dust and a unique, nearly featureless plateau in the 15-20 μm region, which we attribute to PAH molecules. The typical PAH emission bands observed in the surrounding interstellar medium ahead of the blast wave disappear, which indicates shock processing of PAH molecules. The PAH plateau appears most strongly at the outer edge of the blast wave and coincides with diffuse X-ray emission that precedes the brightest X-ray and optical filaments. This suggests that PAH molecules in the surrounding medium are swept up and processed in the hot gas of the blast wave shock, where they survive the harsh conditions long enough to be detected. We also observe a broad emission feature at 20 μm appearing with the PAH plateau. We speculate that this feature is either due to FeO dust grains or connected to the processing of PAHs in the supernova blast wave shock.

  18. Calculation of average molecular parameters, functional groups, and a surrogate molecule for heavy fuel oils using 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Abdul Jameel, Abdul Gani

    2016-04-22

    Heavy fuel oil (HFO) is primarily used as fuel in marine engines and in boilers to generate electricity. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a powerful analytical tool for structure elucidation and in this study, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy were used for the structural characterization of 2 HFO samples. The NMR data was combined with elemental analysis and average molecular weight to quantify average molecular parameters (AMPs), such as the number of paraffinic carbons, naphthenic carbons, aromatic hydrogens, olefinic hydrogens, etc. in the HFO samples. Recent formulae published in the literature were used for calculating various derived AMPs like aromaticity factor 〖(f〗_a), C/H ratio, average paraffinic chain length (¯n), naphthenic ring number 〖(R〗_N), aromatic ring number〖 (R〗_A), total ring number〖 (R〗_T), aromatic condensation index (φ) and aromatic condensation degree (Ω). These derived AMPs help in understanding the overall structure of the fuel. A total of 19 functional groups were defined to represent the HFO samples, and their respective concentrations were calculated by formulating balance equations that equate the concentration of the functional groups with the concentration of the AMPs. Heteroatoms like sulfur, nitrogen, and oxygen were also included in the functional groups. Surrogate molecules were finally constructed to represent the average structure of the molecules present in the HFO samples. This surrogate molecule can be used for property estimation of the HFO samples and also serve as a surrogate to represent the molecular structure for use in kinetic studies.

  19. Aromatic stacking between nucleobase and enzyme promotes phosphate ester hydrolysis in dUTPase

    OpenAIRE

    Pecsi, Ildiko; Leveles, Ibolya; Harmat, Veronika; Vertessy, Beata G.; Toth, Judit

    2010-01-01

    Aromatic interactions are well-known players in molecular recognition but their catalytic role in biological systems is less documented. Here, we report that a conserved aromatic stacking interaction between dUTPase and its nucleotide substrate largely contributes to the stabilization of the associative type transition state of the nucleotide hydrolysis reaction. The effect of the aromatic stacking on catalysis is peculiar in that uracil, the aromatic moiety influenced by the aromatic interac...

  20. Hydrophobic contribution to the free energy of complexation of aromatic ligands with DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evstigneev M. P.

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The hydrophobic component of complexation energy of double-stranded DNA with biologically active aromatic compounds was calculated using two semi-empirical methods – correlations of hydrophobic energy with changes of a heat capacity (DCp and solvent-accessible surface area (SASA. These surface areas were calculated for free ligands and DNA oligomers, unwound DNA duplexes and DNA-ligand complexes. The changes of polar and non-polar SASAs of molecules upon binding ligands to DNA were found. The hydrophobic contribution at both complexation stages were calculated. It was shown that the calculation of hydrophobic energy by SASA method is more correct than (DCp method for DNA-binding ligands.

  1. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitropolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in particulates emitted by motorcycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We determined eleven PAHs and four NPAHs in particulates and regulated pollutants (CO, CO2, HC, NOx, PM) exhausted from motorcycles to figure out the characteristics of motorcycle exhausts. Fluoranthene and pyrene accounted for more than 50% of the total detected PAHs. Among four detected NPAHs, 6-nitrochrysene and 7-nitrobenz[a]anthracene were the predominant NPAHs and were highly correlated relationship with their parent PAHs (R = 0.93 and 0.97, respectively). The PM and HC emissions tended to be close to the PAH emissions. NOx and NPAHs were negatively correlated. Despite their small engine size, motorcycles emitted much more PM and PAHs, showed stronger PAH-related carcinogenicity and indirect-acting mutagenicity, but weaker NPAH-related direct-acting mutagenic potency than automobiles. This is the first study to analyze both PAHs and NPAHs emitted by motorcycles, which could provide useful information to design the emission regulations and standards for motorcycles such as PM. -- Highlights: ► We characterized PAHs and NPAHs distribution in motorcycle exhausts. ► NPAHs concentrations were about three orders of magnitude lower than those of PAHs. ► We found larger amounts of PM and PAHs in exhaust of motorcycles than of automobiles. ► Motorcycles showed stronger PAH-related toxicity than automobiles. ► Motorcycles showed weaker NPAH-related direct-acting mutagenicity than automobiles. -- Control polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitropolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon in particulates emitted by motorcycles due to their toxic potency

  2. Aromatic and hetero-aromatic compositional changes during catalytic treatment of shale oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chishti, H.M.; Williams, P.T. [University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom). Dept. of Fuel and Energy

    1999-12-01

    Oil shale from the Kimmeridge Clay, of Jurassic age from the UK was pyrolysed in a 5 kg fixed bed reactor at 525{degree}C in a nitrogen atmosphere. The derived shale oil was then hydrotreated at 15.0 MPa pressure and 400{degree}C in a stirred reactor with a nickel-molybdenum (Ni-Mo) catalyst and residence times from 8 to 56 h. The shale oils were analysed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and for nitrogen PAH (PANH) and sulphur-PAH (PASH), before and after hydrotreatment. The results showed that generally the higher molecular weight three and four ring PAH decreased with increasing hydrotreatment time, however, single ring aromatic compounds and two ring PAH were increased. Nitrogen and sulphur containing PAH were significantly reduced in concentration in the oils with increasing hydrotreatment time to reach negligible concentrations after 56 h. The reduction in PANH and PASH coincided with a reduction in the overall nitrogen and sulphur contents of the oils. 37 refs.

  3. Arginine-aromatic interactions and their effects on arginine-induced solubilization of aromatic solutes and suppression of protein aggregation

    KAUST Repository

    Shah, Dhawal

    2011-09-21

    We examine the interaction of aromatic residues of proteins with arginine, an additive commonly used to suppress protein aggregation, using experiments and molecular dynamics simulations. An aromatic-rich peptide, FFYTP (a segment of insulin), and lysozyme and insulin are used as model systems. Mass spectrometry shows that arginine increases the solubility of FFYTP by binding to the peptide, with the simulations revealing the predominant association of arginine to be with the aromatic residues. The calculations further show a positive preferential interaction coefficient, Γ XP, contrary to conventional thinking that positive Γ XP\\'s indicate aggregation rather than suppression of aggregation. Simulations with lysozyme and insulin also show arginine\\'s preference for aromatic residues, in addition to acidic residues. We use these observations and earlier results reported by us and others to discuss the possible implications of arginine\\'s interactions with aromatic residues on the solubilization of aromatic moieties and proteins. Our results also highlight the fact that explanations based purely on Γ XP, which measures average affinity of an additive to a protein, could obscure or misinterpret the underlying molecular mechanisms behind additive-induced suppression of protein aggregation. © 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  4. Partition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on organobentonites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A series of organobentonites synthesized by exchanging organiccation such as dodecyltri-methylammonium (DTMA),benzyldimethyltetradecylammonium (BDTDA), cetyltrimethyl-ammonium (CTMA), octodeyltrimethylammonium (OTMA) on bentonite. The optimal condition, properties and mechanisms for the organobentonites to sorb phenanthrene, anthracene, naphthalene, acenaphthene in water were investigated in detail. The partition behavior was determined for four polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), such as naphthalene, phenanthrene, anthracene and acenaphthene, from water to a series of organobentonites. The interlayer spacings and organic carbon contents of organobentonites, removal rate and sorption capacities for organobentonites to treat phenanthrene,anthracene, naphthalene, acenaphthene were correlated to the length of alkyl chains and the amounts of cation surfactant exchanged on Foundation item: the bentonite. Phenanthrene, anthracene, naphthalene, and acenaphthene sorption to organobentonites were characterized by linear isotherms, indicating solute partition between water and the organic phase composed of the large alkyl functional groups of quaternary ammonium cations. PAHs distribution coefficients (Kd)between organobentonites and water were proportional to the organic carbon contents of organobentonites. However, the partition coefficients (Koc) were nearly constants for PAHs in the system of organobentonite-water. The Koc of phenanthrene, anthracene,naphthalene, acenaphthene were 2.621x105, 2.106x105, 2.247x104,5.085x104, respectively. The means Koc values on the organobentonites are about ten to twenty times larger than the values on the soils/sediments, what is significant prerequisite for organobentonite to apply to remediation of pollution soil and groundwater. The sorption mechanism was also evaluated from octanol-water partition coefficients and aqueous solubility of PAHs. The correlations between lgKoc and 1gkow, 1gKoc and 1gS for PAHs in the system of water

  5. Fate of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was performed on the persistence of selected polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's) in soil. Two incubation studies were performed. In the first, a mixture of eight PAH's were added to unacclimated soil at levels of 5 and 50 mg/kg and the concentrations were monitored with time. In the second, C14-labelled benzo(a)pyrene or anthracene was added to soil incubated in biometer flasks. Microbial degradation, physical and chemical degradation, volatilization and binding were assessed as mechanisms affecting benzo(a)pyrene and anthracene in soil. The disappearance of PAH's appeared to be related to molecular weight, water solubility, volatility and adsorptivity to soil. The loss during this initial period approximated first order kinetics, in some cases following a lag period. The remaining 2-6% of the added PAH's, however, was lost at a much reduced rate. With the 50 mg/kg level of application, reduced rates of disappearance in later stages resulted in levels five to ten times the background concentration which persisted throughout the 400 days. Degradation of phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene and pyrene at the 5 mg/kg application rate, however, resulted in concentrations close to background levels within 400 days. Either a model other than first order or a combination of two models was required to adequately describe the loss of 99% of the added PAH's. The mechanisms leading to a decrease in PAH concentration, identified through the use of C14 labelling, were predominantly volatilization and adsorption to soil solids for anthracene and adsorption to soil solids for benzo(a)pyrene. Microbial transformation of benzo(a)pyrene was minimal. 17 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs

  6. Reactions of oriented molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, P R

    1976-07-01

    Beams of oriented molecules have been used to directly study geometrical requirements in chemical reactions. These studies have shown that reactivity is much greater in some orientations than others and demonstrated the existence of steric effects. For some reactions portions of the orientation results are in good accord with traditional views of steric hindrance, but for others it is clear that our chemical intuition needs recalibrating. Indeed, the information gained from simultaneously orienting the reactants and observing the scattering angle of the products may lead to new insights about the detailed mechanism of certain reactions. Further work must be done to extend the scope and detail of the studies described here. More detailed information is needed on the CH(3)I reaction and the CF(3)I reaction. The effects of alkyl groups of various sizes and alkali metals of various sizes are of interest. In addition, reactions where a long-lived complex is formed should be studied to see if orientation is important. Finally, it would be of interest to apply the technique to the sort of reactions that led to our interest in the first place: the S(N)2 displacements in alkyl halides where the fascinating Walden inversion occurs. PMID:17793988

  7. Molecule-based magnets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J V Yakhmi

    2009-06-01

    The conventional magnetic materials used in current technology, such as, Fe, Fe2O3, Cr2O3, SmCo5, Nd2Fe14B etc are all atom-based, and their preparation/processing require high temperature routes. Employing self-assembly methods, it is possible to engineer a bulk molecular material with long-range magnetic order, mainly because one can play with the weak intermolecular interactions. Since the first successful synthesis of molecular magnets in 1986, a large variety of them have been synthesized, which can be categorized on the basis of the chemical nature of the magnetic units involved: organic-, metal-based systems, heterobimetallic assemblies, or mixed organic–inorganic systems. The design of molecule-based magnets has also been extended to the design of poly-functional molecular magnets, such as those exhibiting second-order optical nonlinearity, liquid crystallinity, or chirality simultaneously with long-range magnetic order. Solubility, low density and biocompatibility are attractive features of molecular magnets. Being weakly coloured, unlike their opaque classical magnet ‘cousins’ listed above, possibilities of photomagnetic switching exist. Persistent efforts also continue to design the ever-elusive polymer magnets towards applications in industry. While providing a brief overview of the field of molecular magnetism, this article highlights some recent developments in it, with emphasis on a few studies from the author’s own lab.

  8. Tunnelling of a molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A quantum-mechanical description of tunnelling is presented for a one-dimensional system with internal oscillator degrees of freedom. The 'charged diatomic molecule' is frustrated on encountering a barrier potential by its centre of charge not being coincident with its centre of mass, resulting in transitions amongst internal states. In an adiabatic limit, the tunnelling of semiclassical coherent-like oscillator states is shown to exhibit the Hartman and Bueuttiker-Landauer times tH and tBL, with the time dependence of the coherent state parameter for the tunnelled state given by α(t) = α e-iω(t+Δt) , Δt = tH - itBL. A perturbation formalism is developed, whereby the exact transfer matrix can be expanded to any desired accuracy in a suitable limit. An 'intrinsic' time, based on the oscillator transition rate during tunnelling, transmission or reflection, is introduced. In simple situations the resulting intrinsic tunnelling time is shown to vanish to lowest order. In the general case a particular (nonzero) parametrisation is inferred, and its properties discussed in comparison with the literature on tunnelling times for both wavepackets and internal clocks. Copyright (1998) CSIRO Australia

  9. Organic Molecules in Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Zita

    2015-08-01

    Carbonaceous meteorites are primitive samples from the asteroid belt, containing 3-5wt% organic carbon. The exogenous delivery of organic matter by carbonaceous meteorites may have contributed to the organic inventory of the early Earth. The majority (>70%) of the meteoritic organic material consist of insoluble organic matter (IOM) [1]. The remaining meteoritic organic material (Haber-Bosch type gas-grain reactions after the meteorite parent body cooled to lower temperatures [13, 14].The analysis of the abundances and distribution of the organic molecules present in meteorites helps to determine the physical and chemical conditions of the early solar system, and the prebiotic organic compounds available on the early Earth.[1] Cody and Alexander (2005) GCA 69, 1085. [2] Cronin and Chang (1993) in: The Chemistry of Life’s Origin. pp. 209-258. [3] Martins and Sephton (2009) in: Amino acids, peptides and proteins in organic chemistry. pp. 1-42. [4] Martins (2011) Elements 7, 35. [5] Botta et al. (2007) MAPS 42, 81. [6] Martins et al. (2015) MAPS, in press. [7] Cooper and Cronin (1995) GCA 59, 1003. [8] Glavin et al. (2006) MAPS. 41, 889. [9] Glavin et al. (2011) MAPS 45, 1948. [10] Elsila et al. (2005) GCA 5, 1349. [11] Glavin and Dworkin (2009) PNAS 106, 5487. [12] Pizzarello et al. (2003) GCA 67, 1589. [13] Chan et al. (2012) MAPS. 47, 1502. [14] Burton et al. (2011) MAPS 46, 1703.

  10. Thread bonds in molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Ivlev, B

    2015-01-01

    Unusual chemical bonds are proposed. Each bond is almost covalent but is characterized by the thread of a small radius $\\sim 0.6\\times 10^{-11}$cm, between two nuclei in a molecule. The main electron density is concentrated outside the thread as in a covalent bond. The thread is formed by the electron wave function which has a tendency to be singular on it. The singularity along the thread is cut off by electron "vibrations" due to the interaction with zero point electromagnetic oscillations. The electron energy has its typical value of (1-10)eV. Due to the small tread radius the uncertainty of the electron momentum inside the thread is large resulting in a large electron kinetic energy $\\sim 1 MeV$. This energy is compensated by formation of a potential well due to the reduction of the energy of electromagnetic zero point oscillations. This is similar to formation of a negative van der Waals potential. Thread bonds are stable and cannot be created or destructed in chemical or optical processes.

  11. Strongly interacting ultracold polar molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadway, Bryce; Yan, Bo

    2016-08-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in the study of strongly interacting systems of dipolar molecules. Heteronuclear molecules feature large and tunable electric dipole moments, which give rise to long-range and anisotropic dipole–dipole interactions. Ultracold samples of dipolar molecules with long-range interactions offer a unique platform for quantum simulations and the study of correlated many-body physics. We provide an introduction to the physics of dipolar quantum gases, both electric and magnetic, and summarize the multipronged efforts to bring dipolar molecules into the quantum regime. We discuss in detail the recent experimental progress in realizing and studying strongly interacting systems of polar molecules trapped in optical lattices, with particular emphasis on the study of interacting spin systems and non-equilibrium quantum magnetism. Finally, we conclude with a brief discussion of the future prospects for studies of strongly interacting dipolar molecules.

  12. Strongly interacting ultracold polar molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Gadway, Bryce

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in the study of strongly interacting systems of dipolar molecules. Heteronuclear molecules feature large and tunable electric dipole moments, which give rise to long-range and anisotropic dipole-dipole interactions. Ultracold samples of dipolar molecules with long-range interactions offer a unique platform for quantum simulations and the study of correlated many-body physics. We provide an introduction to the physics of dipolar quantum gases, both electric and magnetic, and summarize the multipronged efforts to bring dipolar molecules into the quantum regime. We discuss in detail the recent experimental progress in realizing and studying strongly interacting systems of polar molecules trapped in optical lattices, with particular emphasis on the study of interacting spin systems and non-equilibrium quantum magnetism. Finally, we conclude with a brief discussion of the future prospects for studies of strongly interacting dipolar molecules.

  13. Effects of solution P H on the adsorption of aromatic compounds from aqueous solutions by activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absorption of p-Cresol, Benzoic acid and Nitro Benzene by activated carbon from dilute aqueous solutions was carried out under controlled ph conditions at 310 k. In acidic conditions, well below the pKa of all solutes, it was observed that the adsorbate solubility and the electron density of its aromatic ring were the influencing factors on the extent of the adsorption by affecting the extent of London dispersion forces. In higher solution ph conditions, on the other hand, it was found that the electrostatic forces played a significant role on the extent of adsorption. The Effect of ph must be considered from its combined effects on the carbon surface and on the solute molecules. It was found that the uptake of the molecular forms of the aromatic solutes was dependent on the substituents of the aromatic ring. Adsorption of the solutes in higher P H values was found to be dependent on the concentration of anionic form of the solutes. All isotherms were fitted into Freundlich Isotherm Equations

  14. Laboratory Infrared Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Nitrogen Heterocycles: Quinoline, and Phenanthridine in Solid Argon and H2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, M. P.; Mattioda, A. L.; Sandford, S. A.; Hudgins, D. M.

    2004-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are common throughout the universe. Their detection and identification are based on telescopic infrared (IR) spectra compared with laboratory data. Polycyclic Aromatic Nitrogen Heterocycles (PANHs) are heterocyclic aromatics i.e., PAHs with carbon atoms replaced by a nitrogen atom. These molecules should be present in the interstellar medium, but have received relatively little attention. We present mid-IR spectra of two PANHs, quinoline (C9H7N), and phenanthridine (C13H9N) isolated in solid argon and frozen in solid H2O at 12 K, conditions yielding data directly comparable to astronomical observations. In contrast to simple PAHs, that do not interact strongly with solid H2O, the nitrogen atoms in PANHs are potentially capable of hydrogen bonding with H2O. Whereas the IR spectrum of phenanthridine in H2O is similar to that of the same compound isolated in an argon matrix, quinoline absorptions shift up to 16 cm(sup -1) (0.072 mm) between argon and H2O. Thus, astronomers will not always be able to rely on IR band positions of matrix isolated PANHs to correctly interpret the absorptions of PANHs frozen in H2O ice grains. Furthermore, our data suggest that relative band areas also vary, so determining column densities to better than a factor of 3 will require knowledge of the matrix in which the PANH is embedded and laboratory studies of relevant samples.

  15. Molecules Best Paper Award 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek J. McPhee

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Molecules starts to institute the “Best Paper” award to recognize these outstanding papers in the area of natural products, medicinal chemistry and molecular diversity published in Molecules. We are pleased to announce the first “Molecules Best Paper Award” for 2012. Nominations were selected by the editor-in-chief and selected editorial board members from all the papers published in 2008. [...

  16. Molecules Best Paper Award 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek J. McPhee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecules instituted some years ago a “Best Paper” award to recognize the most outstanding papers in the area of natural products, medicinal chemistry and molecular diversity published each year in Molecules. We are pleased to announce the third “Molecules Best Paper Award” for 2014. The winners were chosen by the Editor-in-Chief and selected editorial board members from among all the papers published in 2010. Reviews and research papers were evaluated separately.

  17. Molecules Best Paper Award 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek J. McPhee

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Molecules has started to institute a "Best Paper" award to recognize the most outstanding papers in the area of natural products, medicinal chemistry and molecular diversity published in Molecules. We are pleased to announce the second "Molecules Best Paper Award" for 2013. Candidates were chosen by the Editor-in-Chief and selected editorial board members from among all the papers published in 2009.

  18. Recoiling DNA Molecule: Simulation & Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Neto, Jose Coelho; Dickman, Ronald; Mesquita, O. N.

    2002-01-01

    Single molecule DNA experiments often generate data from force versus extension measurements involving the tethering of a microsphere to one end of a single DNA molecule while the other is attached to a substrate. We show that the persistence length of single DNA molecules can also be measured based on the recoil dynamics of these DNA-microsphere complexes if appropriate corrections are made to the friction coefficient of the microsphere in the vicinity of the substrate. Comparison between co...

  19. The Origins of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: Are They Everywhere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    During the past 15 years considerable progress in observational techniques has been achieved in the middle-infrared region (5000-500 per centimeter, 2-20 micron), the region where most diagnostic molecular vibrations occur. Spectra of many different astronomical infrared sources, some deeply embedded in dark molecular clouds and others at their edges, are now available. These spectra provide a powerful probe, not only for the identification of interstellar molecules in both the gas and solid phases, but also of the physical and chemical conditions which prevail in these two very different domains. The two lectures will focus on the evidence that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are an important, ubiquitous and abundant interstellar species. PAHs are. extremely stable species which can range in size from a few angstroms across to several hundred angstroms (PAHs are also the building blocks of amorphous carbon particles). This identification rests on the suggestive agreement between the laboratory spectra of PAHs with a set of IR emission bands which emanate from many different sources where ultraviolet starlight impinges on a "dusty" region. The picture is that individual PAHs are first pumped into highly vibrationally excited states and relax by fluorescence at their fundamental vibrational frequencies. That PAHs are a ubiquitous interstellar component has serious ramifications in other spectral regions as well, including the strong extinction in the ultraviolet, and the classic visible diffuse interstellar bands discovered more than 50 years ago (but unexplained to this day) The first part of the course will focus on the interpretation of astronomical spectra. The second lecture will start by showing how recent laboratory data on PAHs taken under realistic interstellar conditions has con borated the PAH hypothesis and led to great insight into the conditions in the PAH containing regions. This lecture will end by reviewing the ever-increasing evidence for

  20. Biodegradation aspects of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs): A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PAHs are aromatic hydrocarbons with two or more fused benzene rings with natural as well as anthropogenic sources. They are widely distributed environmental contaminants that have detrimental biological effects, toxicity, mutagenecity and carcinogenicity. Due to their ubiquitous occurrence, recalcitrance, bioaccumulation potential and carcinogenic activity, the PAHs have gathered significant environmental concern. Although PAH may undergo adsorption, volatilization, photolysis, and chemical degradation, microbial degradation is the major degradation process. PAH degradation depends on the environmental conditions, number and type of the microorganisms, nature and chemical structure of the chemical compound being degraded. They are biodegraded/biotransformed into less complex metabolites, and through mineralization into inorganic minerals, H2O, CO2 (aerobic) or CH4 (anaerobic) and rate of biodegradation depends on pH, temperature, oxygen, microbial population, degree of acclimation, accessibility of nutrients, chemical structure of the compound, cellular transport properties, and chemical partitioning in growth medium. A number of bacterial species are known to degrade PAHs and most of them are isolated from contaminated soil or sediments. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomons fluoresens, Mycobacterium spp., Haemophilus spp., Rhodococcus spp., Paenibacillus spp. are some of the commonly studied PAH-degrading bacteria. Lignolytic fungi too have the property of PAH degradation. Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Bjerkandera adusta, and Pleurotus ostreatus are the common PAH-degrading fungi. Enzymes involved in the degradation of PAHs are oxygenase, dehydrogenase and lignolytic enzymes. Fungal lignolytic enzymes are lignin peroxidase, laccase, and manganese peroxidase. They are extracellular and catalyze radical formation by oxidation to destabilize bonds in a molecule. The biodegradation of PAHs has been observed under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions and the rate can be

  1. Biodegradation aspects of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs): A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haritash, A.K., E-mail: akharitash@gmail.com [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science and Technology, Hisar, Haryana (India); Kaushik, C.P. [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science and Technology, Hisar, Haryana (India)

    2009-09-30

    PAHs are aromatic hydrocarbons with two or more fused benzene rings with natural as well as anthropogenic sources. They are widely distributed environmental contaminants that have detrimental biological effects, toxicity, mutagenecity and carcinogenicity. Due to their ubiquitous occurrence, recalcitrance, bioaccumulation potential and carcinogenic activity, the PAHs have gathered significant environmental concern. Although PAH may undergo adsorption, volatilization, photolysis, and chemical degradation, microbial degradation is the major degradation process. PAH degradation depends on the environmental conditions, number and type of the microorganisms, nature and chemical structure of the chemical compound being degraded. They are biodegraded/biotransformed into less complex metabolites, and through mineralization into inorganic minerals, H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2} (aerobic) or CH{sub 4} (anaerobic) and rate of biodegradation depends on pH, temperature, oxygen, microbial population, degree of acclimation, accessibility of nutrients, chemical structure of the compound, cellular transport properties, and chemical partitioning in growth medium. A number of bacterial species are known to degrade PAHs and most of them are isolated from contaminated soil or sediments. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomons fluoresens, Mycobacterium spp., Haemophilus spp., Rhodococcus spp., Paenibacillus spp. are some of the commonly studied PAH-degrading bacteria. Lignolytic fungi too have the property of PAH degradation. Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Bjerkandera adusta, and Pleurotus ostreatus are the common PAH-degrading fungi. Enzymes involved in the degradation of PAHs are oxygenase, dehydrogenase and lignolytic enzymes. Fungal lignolytic enzymes are lignin peroxidase, laccase, and manganese peroxidase. They are extracellular and catalyze radical formation by oxidation to destabilize bonds in a molecule. The biodegradation of PAHs has been observed under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions

  2. Labelled molecules, modern research implements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Details of the synthesis of carbon 14- and tritium-labelled molecules are examined. Although the methods used are those of classical organic chemistry the preparation of carbon 14-labelled molecules differs in some respects, most noticeably in the use of 14CO2 which requires very special handling techniques. For the tritium labelling of organic molecules the methods are somewhat different, very often involving exchange reactions. The following are described in turn: the so-called Wilzbach exchange method; exchange by catalysis in solution; catalytic hydrogenation with tritium; reductions with borotritides. Some applications of labelled molecules in organic chemistry, biochemistry and pharmacology are listed

  3. STM investigation of surfactant molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Adsorption and self-organization of sodium alkyl sulfonates (STS and SHS) have been studied on HOPG by using the in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Both SHS and STS molecules adsorb on the HOPG surface and form long-range well-ordered monolayers. The neighboring molecules in different rows form a "head to head" configuration. In the high-resolution images of STS and SHS molecules, one end of the molecules shows bright spots which are attributed to the SO3- groups.

  4. Molecules Best Paper Award 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek J. McPhee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecules instituted some years ago a “Best Paper” award to recognize the most outstanding papers in the area of organic synthesis, natural products, medicinal chemistry and molecular diversity published each year in Molecules. We are pleased to announce the third “Molecules Best Paper Award” for 2015. The winners were chosen by the Editor-in-Chief and selected editorial board members from among all the papers published in 2011. Reviews and research papers were evaluated separately. We are pleased to announce that the following eight papers have won the Molecules Best Paper Award for 2015:[...

  5. Probing the Sophisticated Synergistic Allosteric Regulation of Aromatic Amino Acid Biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Using ᴅ-Amino Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichau, Sebastian; Blackmore, Nicola J.; Jiao, Wanting; Parker, Emily J.

    2016-01-01

    Chirality plays a major role in recognition and interaction of biologically important molecules. The enzyme 3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase (DAH7PS) is the first enzyme of the shikimate pathway, which is responsible for the synthesis of aromatic amino acids in bacteria and plants, and a potential target for the development of antibiotics and herbicides. DAH7PS from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtuDAH7PS) displays an unprecedented complexity of allosteric regulation, with three interdependent allosteric binding sites and a ternary allosteric response to combinations of the aromatic amino acids l-Trp, l-Phe and l-Tyr. In order to further investigate the intricacies of this system and identify key residues in the allosteric network of MtuDAH7PS, we studied the interaction of MtuDAH7PS with aromatic amino acids that bear the non-natural d-configuration, and showed that the d-amino acids do not elicit an allosteric response. We investigated the binding mode of d-amino acids using X-ray crystallography, site directed mutagenesis and isothermal titration calorimetry. Key differences in the binding mode were identified: in the Phe site, a hydrogen bond between the amino group of the allosteric ligands to the side chain of Asn175 is not established due to the inverted configuration of the ligands. In the Trp site, d-Trp forms no interaction with the main chain carbonyl group of Thr240 and less favourable interactions with Asn237 when compared to the l-Trp binding mode. Investigation of the MtuDAH7PSN175A variant further supports the hypothesis that the lack of key interactions in the binding mode of the aromatic d-amino acids are responsible for the absence of an allosteric response, which gives further insight into which residues of MtuDAH7PS play a key role in the transduction of the allosteric signal. PMID:27128682

  6. Theoretical study of aromatic-antiaromatic pairs as material in organic solar cells of double light harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Iván; Schott, Eduardo; Chávez, Ivonne; Manríquez, Juan Manuel; Zarate, Ximena

    2016-08-01

    Molecular light harvesting components of organic solar cells containing antiaromatic and aromatic molecules as organic semiconductors were studied. We found that antiaromatic molecules with indacene core can act as acceptors looking for new options to assemble donor/acceptor interfaces. This is supported by their properties such as molecular orbitals energies, rigid fused core that could promote π-π intermolecular interactions imparting ordered nanostructures, that let high charge mobility thanks to their properly low reorganization energy and the optimum energy offsets of the donor/acceptor interfaces. It was found that pentacene might be an excellent donor and the benzo[g]benz[6,7]indeno[1,2-b]fluorene could act as an acceptor.

  7. Electronic spectroscopy of medium-sized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Implications for the carriers of the 2175 {\\AA} UV bump

    CERN Document Server

    Steglich, M; Rouillé, G; Huisken, F; Mutschke, H; Henning, Th

    2010-01-01

    Mixtures of polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been produced by means of laser pyrolysis. The main fraction of the extracted PAHs were primarily medium-sized, up to a maximum size of 38 carbon atoms per molecule. The use of different extraction solvents and subsequent chromatographic fractionation provided mixtures of different size distributions. UV-VIS absorption spectra have been measured at low temperature by matrix isolation spectroscopy and at room temperature with PAHs as film-like deposits on transparent substrates. In accordance with semi-empirical calculations, our findings suggest that large PAHs with sizes around 50 to 60 carbon atoms per molecule could be responsible for the interstellar UV bump at 217.5 nm.

  8. (Hetero)aromatics from dienynes, enediynes and enyne-allenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raviola, Carlotta; Protti, Stefano; Ravelli, Davide; Fagnoni, Maurizio

    2016-08-01

    The construction of aromatic rings has become a key objective for organic chemists. While several strategies have been developed for the functionalization of pre-formed aromatic rings, the direct construction of an aromatic core starting from polyunsaturated systems is yet a less explored field. The potential of such reactions in the formation of aromatics increased at a regular pace in the last few years. Nowadays, there are reliable and well-established procedures to prepare polyenic derivatives, such as dienynes, enediynes, enyne-allenes and hetero-analogues. This has stimulated their use in the development of innovative cycloaromatizations. Different examples have recently emerged, suggesting large potential of this strategy in the preparation of (hetero)aromatics. Accordingly, this review highlights the recent advancements in this field and describes the different conditions exploited to trigger the process, including thermal and photochemical activation, as well as the use of transition metal catalysis and the addition of electrophiles/nucleophiles or radical species. PMID:27263976

  9. Degradation of aromatic compounds in plants grown under aseptic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mithaishvili, T.; Ugrekhelidze, D.; Tsereteli, B.; Sadunishvili, T.; Kvesitadze, G. [Durmishidze Inst. of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Academy of Sciences of Georgia, Tbilisi (Georgia); Scalla, R. [Lab. des Xenobiotiques, INRA, Toulouse (France)

    2005-02-01

    The aim of the work is to investigate the ability of higher plants to absorb and detoxify environmental pollutants - aromatic compounds via aromatic ring cleavage. Transformation of {sup 14}C specifically labelled benzene derivatives, [1-6-{sup 14}C]-nitrobenzene, [1-6-{sup 14}C]-aniline, [1-{sup 14}C]- and [7-{sup 14}C]-benzoic acid, in axenic seedlings of maize (Zea mays L.), kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), pea (Pisum sativum L.) and pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo L.) were studied. After penetration in plants, the above xenobiotics are transformed by oxidative or reductive reactions, conjugation with cell endogenous compounds, and binding to biopolymers. The initial stage of oxidative degradation consists in hydroxylation reactions. The aromatic ring can then be cleaved and degraded into organic acids of the Krebs cycle. Ring cleavage is accompanied by {sup 14}CO{sub 2} evolution. Aromatic ring cleavage in plants has thus been demonstrated for different xenobiotics carrying different substitutions on their benzene ring. Conjugation with low molecular peptides is the main pathway of aromatic xenobiotics detoxification. Peptide conjugates are formed both by the initial xenobiotics (except nitrobenzene) and by intermediate transformation products. The chemical nature of the radioactive fragment and the amino acid composition of peptides participating in conjugation were identified. (orig.)

  10. A photochemical approach to aromatic extension of the corannulene nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeshkumar, Venkatachalam; Stuparu, Mihaiela C

    2016-08-01

    A high yielding, general, and mild synthetic strategy is established for aromatic annulation of the corannulene scaffold. In this approach, a corannulene-based aldehyde, ylide, or ketone compound is conjugated with an aromatic unit of choice through a Wittig reaction. The resulting stilbene-like precursor can be subjected to a photochemically induced oxidative-cyclization process to yield a corannulene structure with an extended π-framework. The generality of synthesis allows for preparation of a wide range of polycyclic aromatic arene as well as heteroarene structures. Meanwhile, the mild nature of the developed protocol permits for incorporation of reactive and functional substituents onto the fused aromatic scaffold. Furthermore, efficient and simple synthesis ensures access to significant amounts of the material in a facile manner. In essence, this work demonstrates, for the first time, that photochemical synthesis is a highly practical alternative to the known flash vacuum pyrolysis and metal catalyzed processes for the aromatic extension of the bucky-bowl structure. PMID:27440449

  11. Genetic Variability in Bangladeshi Aromatic Rice through RAPD Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehfuz Hasan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Genetic polymorphism and relationships among 30 commercial varieties of Bangladeshi aromatic rice (Oryza sativa L. were established using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD primers. Out of fifty 10-mer RAPD primers screened initially, four were chosen and used in a comparative analysis of different varieties of indigenous Bangladeshi aromatic rice. Of the 33 total RAPD fragments amplified, 7 (21.21% were found to be shared by individuals of all eight varieties. The remaining 26 fragments were found to be polymorphic (78.79%. Pair-wise estimates of similarity ranged from 0.101 to 0.911. Highest genetic diversity was determined between Radhunipagol and Dubsail varieties (0.911. The amount of genetic diversity within aromatic rice germplasm was quite high as determined by the genetic similarity coefficients between varieties. Genetic similarities obtained from RAPD data were also used to create a cluster diagram. Cluster analysis using an un-weighted pair-group method with arithmetic averages (UPGMA was used to group the varieties and the 30 aromatic rice varieties were grouped into 6 clusters where cluster I includes the maximum number of varieties (9. Cluster VI includes minimum number of varieties (2. This Study offered a rapid and reliable method for the estimation of variability between different varieties which could be utilized by the breeders for further improvement of the local aromatic rice varieties.

  12. Raman characterization of monolayers formed from mixtures of sodium 2-mercaptoethanesulfonate and various aromatic mercapto-derivative bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudelski, Andrzej

    2010-04-22

    Metal electrodes covered with organic (mono)layers containing pi-delocalized structures have many potential applications, for example, in construction of bioelectronic elements with high efficiency of electron transfer. In this contribution, a silver surface was modified with mixed monolayers formed from sodium 2-mercaptoethanesulfonate (MES) and four model (stable and easily available) aromatic thiols with strong basic properties: 4,6-diamino-2-mercaptopyrimidine (APY), 1H-1,2,4-triazole-3-thiol (HTR), 4-methyl-1,2,4-triazole-3-thiol (MTR), and 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole-5-thiol (ATR). The structure of the formed monolayers was determined from surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) measurements. These studies showed that, despite significant differences in the molecular structures, MES is a very promising candidate for making mixed monolayers with mercapto-derivative aromatic bases that are relatively homogeneous (without large one-component domains) in broad pH range. At high pH, in a one-component ATR monolayer, a significant amount of molecules are in the anionic form and adopt a flat orientation versus the metal surface. At the same pH, in mixed ATR+MES monolayers, a significantly larger part of ATR molecules than for the respective one-component monolayer is adsorbed in the neutral form with the aromatic ring(s) oriented perpendicularly to the metal surface. Also in the mixed APY+MES and HTR+MES monolayers, a significantly smaller part of HTR or APY molecules than for the respective one-component HTR and APY monolayers is deprotonated. The structure of the MTR monolayer practically does not depend on the pH of the surrounding solution. Increase of the ratio of acidic dissociation and reorientation of ATR molecules from the perpendicular to the parallel orientation is also observed during storage of the respective one-component and mixed monolayers in water, phosphorus buffers, and in the solutions of model peptides (bovine serum albumin or laccase). In some

  13. Single-molecule magnet engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kasper Steen; Bendix, Jesper; Clérac, Rodolphe

    2014-01-01

    to delicately tune, for instance, the properties of molecules that behave as "magnets", the so-called single-molecule magnets (SMMs). Although many interesting SMMs have been prepared by a more or less serendipitous approach, the assembly of predesigned, isolatable molecular entities into higher nuclearity...

  14. Higher Molecular Mass Organic Matter Molecules Compete with Orthophosphate for Adsorption to Iron (Oxy)hydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassé, Alexander W; Ohno, Tsutomu

    2016-07-19

    The competition between orthophosphate and water-extractable organic matter (WEOM) for adsorption to iron (oxy)hydroxide mineral surfaces is an important factor in determining the plant bioavailability of P in soils. Chemical force spectroscopy was used to determine the binding force between orthophosphate and iron (oxy)hydroxide that was coated onto atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips and adsorbed with WEOM. The force measurements were conducted at pH 4.65 and 0.02 M ionic strength which are representative of typical acid soil solutions. The chemical composition of the WEOM was determined by ultrahigh resolution electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometry. The results indicate a correlation between aromatic WEOM molecules that are greater than 600 Da and the reduced binding force of orthophosphate to WEOM-adsorbed iron (oxy)hydroxide AFM tips suggesting that the molecular mass of aromatic WEOM molecules plays a critical role in regulating the WEOM-P interactions with surface functional groups of minerals. Based on the results of this study, we show the importance of obtaining a detailed, molecular-scale understanding of soil processes that can help develop better management strategies to reduce waste of limited P resources and adverse environmental impacts. Specifically, soil amendments with greater content of high molecular mass aromatic components may positively affect dissolved P use efficiency in soils by maintaining P in soil solution. PMID:27362894

  15. Nanofibers for drug delivery – incorporation and release of model molecules, influence of molecular weight and polymer structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Hrib

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nanofibers were prepared from polycaprolactone, polylactide and polyvinyl alcohol using NanospiderTM technology. Polyethylene glycols with molecular weights of 2 000, 6 000, 10 000 and 20 000 g/mol, which can be used to moderate the release profile of incorporated pharmacologically active compounds, served as model molecules. They were terminated by aromatic isocyanate and incorporated into the nanofibers. The release of these molecules into an aqueous environment was investigated. The influences of the molecular length and chemical composition of the nanofibers on the release rate and the amount of released polyethylene glycols were evaluated. Longer molecules released faster, as evidenced by a significantly higher amount of released molecules after 72 hours. However, the influence of the chemical composition of nanofibers was even more distinct – the highest amount of polyethylene glycol molecules released from polyvinyl alcohol nanofibers, the lowest amount from polylactide nanofibers.

  16. Environmental Behaviors and Toxicities of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Nitropolycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Kazuichi

    2016-01-01

    Airborne particulate matter (PM) has been collected at four cities in Japan starting in the late 1990s, at five or more major cities in China, Korea and Russia starting in 2001 and at the Noto Peninsula starting in 2004. Nine polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and eleven nitropolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAHs) were determined by HPLC with fluorescence and chemiluminescence detections, respectively. Annual concentrations of PAHs and NPAHs were in the order, China>Russia≫Korea=Japan, with seasonal change (winter>summer). During the observation period, concentrations of PAHs and NPAHs in Japanese cities significantly decreased but the increases in the PAH concentration were observed in Chinese and Russian cities. Concentrations of PAHs and NPAHs were higher in the Northern China than those in the Southern China. At the Noto peninsula, which is in the main path of winter northwest winds and a year-round jet stream that blow from the Asian continent to Japan, the concentrations were high in winter and low in summer every year. A cluster analysis and back trajectory analysis indicated that PAHs and NPAHs were long-range transported from Northeastern China, where coal burning systems such as coal-heating boilers are considered to be the major contributors of PAHs and NPAHs. A dramatic change in atmospheric concentrations of PAHs and NPAHs in East Asia suggests the rapid and large change of PM2.5 pollution in East Asia. Considering the adverse health effects of PM2.5, continuous monitoring of atmospheric PAHs and NPAHs is necessary in this area. PMID:26833435

  17. Synthesis and anti-inflammatory properties of some aromatic and heterocyclic aromatic curcuminoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M Akram; El-Khatib, Riyad; Rainsford, K D; Whitehouse, M W

    2012-02-01

    A variety of novel aromatic and heterocyclic aromatic curcuminoids were synthesised, characterised and their anti-inflammatory activities (AIA) determined in vivo. Some of these compounds also were tested for inflammatory mediator production. The AIA of the main representatives of these compounds were assessed by oral administration to female Wistar rats using (a) acute carrageenan-induced paw oedema, (b) chronic adjuvant arthritis (therapeutic mode), and (c) anti-pyretic activity assessed in the yeast pyrexia. Gastric ulceration was determined in pre-inflamed rats. Natural curcumin showed modest aspirin-like anti-inflammatory activity which was enhanced when co-administered with the PGE(1) analogue misoprostol as a synergist. In contrast, four novel curcuminoids (RK-97, RK-103, RK-104 and RK-106) in which the bis-methoxy-phenyl group of curcumin was replaced with bis-dimethoxybutenolidyl-(ascorbate), bis-naphthyl, and bis-furanyl derivatives, respectively, had potent activity in the anti-arthritic assay with little gastric or systemic toxicity, compared with the vehicle-treated controls. Of the curcuminoids the furan RK-106 was the only compound to inhibit production of TNFα and IL-1β in a monocytic cell-line THP-1 in vitro. The inactivity of RK-106 on the production of PGE(2) may be related to its absence of gastrotoxicity. None of the curcuminoids exhibited anti-pyretic activity and this may also be related to its insensitivity to PGE(2). Thus, these novel curcuminoids, such as RK-106, may warrant the development of new low gastro-toxic anti-inflammatory agents with selective inhibitory activity of cytokine inflammatory mediators. PMID:22172598

  18. An in silico method for predicting Ames activities of primary aromatic amines by calculating the stabilities of nitrenium ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentzien, Jörg; Hickey, Eugene R; Kemper, Raymond A; Brewer, Mark L; Dyekjaer, Jane D; East, Stephen P; Whittaker, Mark

    2010-02-22

    In this paper, we describe an in silico first principal approach to predict the mutagenic potential of primary aromatic amines. This approach is based on the so-called "nitrenium hypothesis", which was developed by Ford et al. in the early 1990s. This hypothesis asserts that the mutagenic effect for this class of molecules is mediated through the transient formation of a nitrenium ion and that the stability of this cation is correlated with the mutagenic potential. Here we use quantum mechanical calculations at different levels of theory (semiempirical AM1, ab initio HF/3-21G, HF/6-311G(d,p), and DFT/B3LYP/6-311G(d,p)) to compute the stability of nitrenium ions. When applied to a test set of 257 primary aromatic amines, we show that this method can correctly differentiate between Ames active and inactive compounds, and furthermore that it is able to rationalize and predict SAR trends within structurally related chemical series. For this test set, the AM1 nitrenium stability calculations are found to provide a good balance between speed and accuracy, resulting in an overall accuracy of 85%, and sensitivity and specificity of 91% and 72%, respectively. The nitrenium-based predictions are also compared to the commercial software packages DEREK, MULTICASE, and the MOE-Toxicophore descriptor. One advantage of the approach presented here is that the calculation of relative stabilities results in a continuous spectrum of activities and not a simple yes/no answer. This allows us to observe and rationalize subtle trends due to the different electrostatic properties of the organic molecules. Our results strongly indicate that nitrenium ion stability calculations should be used as a complementary approach to assist the medicinal chemist in prioritizing and selecting nonmutagenic primary aromatic amines during preclinical drug discovery programs. PMID:20078034

  19. Suitability of the in vitro Caco-2 assay to predict the oral absorption of aromatic amine hair dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obringer, Cindy; Manwaring, John; Goebel, Carsten; Hewitt, Nicola J; Rothe, Helga

    2016-04-01

    Oral absorption is a key element for safety assessments of cosmetic ingredients, including hair dye molecules. Reliable in vitro methods are needed since the European Union has banned the use of animals for the testing of cosmetic ingredients. Caco-2 cells were used to measure the intestinal permeability characteristics (Papp) of 14 aromatic amine hair dye molecules with varying chemical structures, and the data were compared with historical in vivo oral absorption rat data. The majority of the hair dyes exhibited Papp values that indicated good in vivo absorption. The moderate to high oral absorption findings, i.e. ≥60%, were confirmed in in vivo rat studies. Moreover, the compound with a very low Papp value (APB: 3-((9,10-dihydro-9,10-dioxo-4-(methylamino)-1-anthracenyl)amino)-N,N-dimethyl-N-propyl-1-propanaminium) was poorly absorbed in vivo as well (5% of the dose). This data set suggests that the Caco-2 cell model is a reliable in vitro tool for the determination of the intestinal absorption of aromatic amines with diverse chemical structures. When used in combination with other in vitro assays for metabolism and skin penetration, the Caco-2 model can contribute to the prediction and mechanistic interpretation of the absorption, metabolism and elimination properties of cosmetic ingredients without the use of animals. PMID:26578466

  20. Sulfide Catalysts Supported on Porous Aromatic Frameworks for Naphthalene Hydroprocessing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Karakhanov

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the first example of using porous aromatic frameworks as supports for sulfide catalysts for the hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons. The synthesis of bimetallic Ni-W and Ni-Mo sulfides was performed by in situ decomposition of [(n-Bu4N]2[Ni(MeS42] (Me = W, Mo complexes, supported on mesoporous aromatic framework with a diamond-like structure. It is shown that the highest naphthalene conversions were achieved in the case of additional sulfidation with sulfur. After the reaction, catalysts were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The activity of synthesized catalysts has been studied using naphthalene as a model substrate. The materials used in this study were substantially active in hydrogenation and slightly in hydrocracking of naphthalene.