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Sample records for arnason gardar arnason

  1. Semi-Markov Arnason-Schwarz models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Ruth; Langrock, Roland

    2016-06-01

    We consider multi-state capture-recapture-recovery data where observed individuals are recorded in a set of possible discrete states. Traditionally, the Arnason-Schwarz model has been fitted to such data where the state process is modeled as a first-order Markov chain, though second-order models have also been proposed and fitted to data. However, low-order Markov models may not accurately represent the underlying biology. For example, specifying a (time-independent) first-order Markov process involves the assumption that the dwell time in each state (i.e., the duration of a stay in a given state) has a geometric distribution, and hence that the modal dwell time is one. Specifying time-dependent or higher-order processes provides additional flexibility, but at the expense of a potentially significant number of additional model parameters. We extend the Arnason-Schwarz model by specifying a semi-Markov model for the state process, where the dwell-time distribution is specified more generally, using, for example, a shifted Poisson or negative binomial distribution. A state expansion technique is applied in order to represent the resulting semi-Markov Arnason-Schwarz model in terms of a simpler and computationally tractable hidden Markov model. Semi-Markov Arnason-Schwarz models come with only a very modest increase in the number of parameters, yet permit a significantly more flexible state process. Model selection can be performed using standard procedures, and in particular via the use of information criteria. The semi-Markov approach allows for important biological inference to be drawn on the underlying state process, for example, on the times spent in the different states. The feasibility of the approach is demonstrated in a simulation study, before being applied to real data corresponding to house finches where the states correspond to the presence or absence of conjunctivitis. © 2015, The International Biometric Society.

  2. Johann P. Arnason & Kurt A. Raaflaub, The Roman Empire in Context: Historical and Comparative Perspectives (Chichester: Wiley & Sons, 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Gibbons

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Arnason and Raaflaub’s edited volume, The Roman Empire in Context: Historical and Comparative Perspectives, is the fifth volume in a series entitled The Ancient World: Comparative Histories. The overarching aim of the series is to bring a comparative perspective to studies of ancient histories, and earlier titles focus either on content or geography. This is the only volume to date that focuses on a specific civilization, and Rome is of course significant enough to merit its own volume.

  3. Phytochemicals in nutrition and health

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    International Phytochemical Conference (3rd : 2000 : California State Polytechnic University); Meskin, Mark S

    2002-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JOHN T. ARNASON, SHANNON E. BINNS, and BERNARD R. BAUM 9 CHAPTER 3 Phytochemicals in the Vaccinium Family: Bilberries, Blueberries, and Cranberries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

  4. Toxity of Gedunin, Piperine and Crude Extracts of their Natural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toxity of Gedunin, Piperine and Crude Extracts of their Natural Products on Growth and Development of Ostrinia Nubilalis Hbner (Lepidoptera: Pyrarlidae). F K Ewete, J T Arnason, T Durst, S Mackinnon ...

  5. Crystallisation of mela-aillikites of the Narsaq region, Gardar alkaline province, south Greenland and relationships to other aillikitic carbonatitic associations in the province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, B. G. J.; Craven, J. A.; Kirstein, L. A.

    2006-11-01

    Aillikites (carbonated, melilite-free ultramafic lamprophyres grading to carbonatites) are minor components of the Gardar alkaline igneous province. They occur principally as minor intrusions and as clasts in diatremes, but more voluminous aillikitic intrusions crop out near the Ilímaussaq Complex, which they predate by a few million years. These larger intrusions were emplaced at 1160 ± 5 Ma. They are essentially carbonate-free and, consisting almost wholly of ferromagnesian silicate and oxide minerals, are mela-aillikites. Typically the mela-aillikites are fine-grained rocks composed largely of olivine, clinopyroxene, phlogopite and magnetite that crystallised in open systems, permitting loss of volatile-rich residues. The petrography is highly complex, involving at least 28 mineral species. Pyroxenitic veins were emplaced while the host-rocks were still at high temperatures and represent channels through which fluorinated silico-carbonatitic residual melts escaped, with exsolving CO 2 as propellant. Precipitation of Ca-rich minerals including monticellite, perovskite, vesuvianite, wollastonite and cuspidine was a result of dissociation of the calcium carbonate in the residual melts. Late-stage crystallisation was in a highly oxidising environment in which the 'common minerals' attain extreme compositions (almost pure forsterite, ferrian-diopside, highly magnesian ilmenite, Ba-Ti-rich phlogopite and Sr-rich kaersutite). Spatially associated diatremes may be vents through which CO 2-rich gases erupted. The whole-rock compositions are considered to be well removed from those of co-existing melts: compaction and expulsion of highly mobile residual melts is inferred to have left the mela-aillikites as aberrant cumulates. The mela-aillikites are a late-Gardar manifestation of the aillikitic magmatism that occurred intermittently in the province for over 120 Ma. Repetitive formation of metasomite vein systems in the deep lithospheric mantle is postulated. These

  6. genetic variability characterisation of tanzania sorghum landraces ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jen

    molecular markers, eleven clusters were observed. ... et 7 pour les marqueurs microsatellites ou SSRs (simple sequence repeats) ont été ...... Inc, USA. Teshome, A., Baum, B.R., Fahrig, L., Torrance,. J.K., Arnason, T.J. and Lambert, J.D. 1997.

  7. Botanical Extracts as Medical Countermeasures for Radiation Induced DNA Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    20 Figure 9: CYP3A4 inhibition HPLC assay for GSE4 and LT ..................................................... 21...the final stages of this project, Dr. John Arnason at the University of Ottawa for preliminary botanicals information and HPLC data, Aimee Jones for...flavanols, flavonols, stilbenes (resveratrol) and phenolic acids (31, 32). Previous studies have shown that proanthocyanidin (oligomer chain of flavonoid

  8. Den visuelle oplevelses økonomi – klassisk, neoklassisk, relationel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Anders Ib

    2009-01-01

    Det foreliggende kapitel søger kortfattet at skitsere en relation mellem visuel kultur og økonomi, som i videre forstand er et konkret input til en mulig teori om vi- suel kulturøkonomi. Med udgangspunkt i en sammenstilling af Johann P. Arnasons teori om en ”kulturel artikulation af verden” med P...... kulturøkonomi, der går ud over den traditionelle diskrepans mel- lem kulturbegreber, fx af antropologisk art, og økonomibegreber, fx af neoklassisk art....

  9. B cell receptor pathway in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: specific role of CC-292

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnason JE

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Jon E Arnason,1 Jennifer R Brown21Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, 2CLL Center, Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL is the most common adult leukemia. The current treatment paradigm involves the use of chemoimmunotherapy, when patients develop an indication for therapy. With this strategy, a majority of patients will obtain a remission, though cure remains elusive. While treatable, the majority of CLL patients will die of complications of their disease. Recent advances in the understanding of the importance of the B cell receptor (BCR pathway in CLL have led to the development of a number of agents targeting this pathway. In this review, we discuss recent developments in the targeting of the BCR pathway, with a focus on CC-292. CC-292 covalently binds to Bruton's tyrosine kinase, a key mediator of BCR signaling, and has demonstrated preclinical and clinical activity in CLL, with acceptable tolerability. Based on the success of CC-292 and other inhibitors of the BCR pathway, these agents are being investigated in combination with standard therapy, with the hope that they will increase the depth and length of response, without significant toxicity.Keywords: Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitor, ibrutinib

  10. Emigration and retention of Palinurus elephas (Fabricius, 1787 in a central western Mediterranean marine protected area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Follesa

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the results obtained by applying the Arnason Schwartz multistate mark-recapture model to eight years of data collected in and around a small no-fishing marine protected area (MPA; 4 km2 in the central western Mediterranean. From 1997 to 2004, a total of 4044 specimens of Palinurus elephas (Fabr., 1787 were tagged and 317 recaptured. The most parsimonious model which best explained the data variability was that of a temporally constant rate of apparent survival and movement in each of the two strata. The absence of any temporal influence in the apparent survival rate inside the no-take area suggested that spillover and mortality are constant for each period of the study. The lower apparent survival rate in surrounding zones than inside the MPA (0.26 ± 0.04 (SE vs 0.94 ± 0.03 (SE is presumed to be a function of fishing effort. A continuous movement of P. elephas across the boundary of the small MPA was also tested. This information on retention of lobsters in the MPA contributes to our understanding of the effect of introducing MPAs into a managed commercial fishery system.

  11. Approaches for the direct estimation of lambda, and demographic contributions to lambda, using capture-recapture data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, James D.; Hines, James E.

    2002-01-01

    We first consider the estimation of the finite rate of population increase or population growth rate, u i , using capture-recapture data from open populations. We review estimation and modelling of u i under three main approaches to modelling openpopulation data: the classic approach of Jolly (1965) and Seber (1965), the superpopulation approach of Crosbie & Manly (1985) and Schwarz & Arnason (1996), and the temporal symmetry approach of Pradel (1996). Next, we consider the contributions of different demographic components to u i using a probabilistic approach based on the composition of the population at time i + 1 (Nichols et al., 2000b). The parameters of interest are identical to the seniority parameters, n i , of Pradel (1996). We review estimation of n i under the classic, superpopulation, and temporal symmetry approaches. We then compare these direct estimation approaches for u i and n i with analogues computed using projection matrix asymptotics. We also discuss various extensions of the estimation approaches to multistate applications and to joint likelihoods involving multiple data types.

  12. Interpretation in reproductive genetic counseling: a methodological framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Adél; Szeverényi, Péter

    2007-09-01

    In case of genetic risk, parents are often faced with reproductive decisions affecting their life essentially, so it is advisable to pursue careful deliberation. For this reason, the genetic counselor is expected to help the counselee make well-informed and well-considered decisions, which requires the understanding of the patient as an individual. To reach emphatic understanding, physicians can use the results of the Gadamerian theory of interpretation that contains the idea -- as it has been summarized by V. Arnason -- that four aspects of openness are necessary to fully understand the other, such as openness to oneself, to the other, to the subject matter and to tradition. In our paper, we are applying the four-openness model of interpretation to genetic consultation, and we argue that during counseling double interpretation takes place: the physician interprets the patient, and the patient interprets the physician. Double interpretation leads to the clarification of those factors which influence the patient's decision-making: the counselor's attitude and prejudices, the counselee's values and needs, the medical, social, and moral implications of the genetic disease, and the social expectations. By adopting the theory of interpretation, counselors can also advance the provision of emotional support patients need in hard situations.

  13. Deuterium and tritium profile through the Vatnajoekull icecap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnasson, B.

    1974-06-01

    During the years 1971-73 a research project was carried out at the Science Institute of the University of Iceland with the financial support of the IAEA. A rotary drill for deep coring in temperate ice has been developed, and a 415 m deep hole was drilled during the summer of 1972 into the temperate accumulation area of the Vatnajoekull glacier, Iceland, at an altitude of 1800 m a.s.l. The core recovery was 99%. The bottom, at 480-500 m depth, was not reached because of a fault in the cable. Detail on the drill is given in: Arnason, Bjoernsson and Theodorsson, J. of Glaciology, 13, 133 (1974). Several volcanic ash layers have been recognized in the ice core and associated with historically known eruptions. This provides the age-depth relationship. Isotopic analyses along the core show that precipitation in the period 1931-1960 is enriched by 5 per mil in deuterium with respect to that in the period 1891-1920, in agreement with the 1degC increase in the mean air temperature occurred from the beginning of the century. Tritium analyses show appreciable isotopic exchange due to water percolation (summer rains and ice melting). The Na + and Cl - content decreases with depth (from 1 μg/g ice to 0.1 μg/g ice). This decrease has been attributed to dissolution of ions in water percolating along the ice crystals. Other studies of the ice core, in progress or planned, include: size and orientation of ice crystals, size and pressure of air bubbles, measurement of F - , SO 4 -- and Hg

  14. AUDIT OF INJURIES IN A PREMIERSHIP FOOTBALL SQUAD OVER A FIVE-YEAR PERIOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslam Chougle

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Football is currently the most popular sport in the world. The competitive nature of the sport makes it prone to injuries with the estimated frequency being 10 to 35 per 1000 playing hours (Dvorak and Junge, 2000. The aim of this study was to identify the injury patterns and rehabilitation periods with specific injuries in a premiership football club. Player injuries were retrospectively analysed from a local database (Microsoft Access 2000 at the Blackburn Rovers Football Club, UK from December 1998 to March 2004. The club physiotherapist and physician recorded details of all injuries sustained during both training and matches during that period. Clear distinctions were made between acute and overuse injuries and rehabilitation times for each injury were noted (Arnason et al., 2004. Data was analysed using SPSS (Chicago, Illinois, USA. Differences between the groups were assessed using the independent samples t-test. P values of < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. There were 483 injuries in 91 players. Of these 133 injuries occurred as a result of overuse and 350 as a result of direct trauma. 440 injuries were treated conservatively while 43 were treated operatively. Table 1 shows the range and number of injuries, which occurred during this period along with the average rehabilitation time for each injury. Injuries grouped as "Other" in table 1 accounted for less than 1% of all injuries and could not always be directly attributed to football even though this appeared to be the precipitating factor in all cases. There was no statistical difference between rehabilitation times for acute injuries (18 days, standard deviation 30 as compared to overuse injuries (20 days, standard deviation 39 (p = 0.640. The mean rehabilitation time however for injuries treated conservatively (15 days , standard deviation 24 as compared to injuries treated surgically (61 days, standard deviation 67 was found to be statistically significant (p = 0

  15. Abundance estimation and conservation biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, J.D.; MacKenzie, D.I.

    2004-01-01

    Abundance is the state variable of interest in most population–level ecological research and in most programs involving management and conservation of animal populations. Abundance is the single parameter of interest in capture–recapture models for closed populations (e.g., Darroch, 1958; Otis et al., 1978; Chao, 2001). The initial capture–recapture models developed for partially (Darroch, 1959) and completely (Jolly, 1965; Seber, 1965) open populations represented efforts to relax the restrictive assumption of population closure for the purpose of estimating abundance. Subsequent emphases in capture–recapture work were on survival rate estimation in the 1970’s and 1980’s (e.g., Burnham et al., 1987; Lebreton et al.,1992), and on movement estimation in the 1990’s (Brownie et al., 1993; Schwarz et al., 1993). However, from the mid–1990’s until the present time, capture–recapture investigators have expressed a renewed interest in abundance and related parameters (Pradel, 1996; Schwarz & Arnason, 1996; Schwarz, 2001). The focus of this session was abundance, and presentations covered topics ranging from estimation of abundance and rate of change in abundance, to inferences about the demographic processes underlying changes in abundance, to occupancy as a surrogate of abundance. The plenary paper by Link & Barker (2004) is provocative and very interesting, and it contains a number of important messages and suggestions. Link & Barker (2004) emphasize that the increasing complexity of capture–recapture models has resulted in large numbers of parameters and that a challenge to ecologists is to extract ecological signals from this complexity. They offer hierarchical models as a natural approach to inference in which traditional parameters are viewed as realizations of stochastic processes. These processes are governed by hyperparameters, and the inferential approach focuses on these hyperparameters. Link & Barker (2004) also suggest that our attention

  16. Abundance estimation and Conservation Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nichols, J. D.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abundance is the state variable of interest in most population–level ecological research and in most programs involving management and conservation of animal populations. Abundance is the single parameter of interest in capture–recapture models for closed populations (e.g., Darroch, 1958; Otis et al., 1978; Chao, 2001. The initial capture–recapture models developed for partially (Darroch, 1959 and completely (Jolly, 1965; Seber, 1965 open populations represented efforts to relax the restrictive assumption of population closure for the purpose of estimating abundance. Subsequent emphases in capture–recapture work were on survival rate estimation in the 1970’s and 1980’s (e.g., Burnham et al., 1987; Lebreton et al.,1992, and on movement estimation in the 1990’s (Brownie et al., 1993; Schwarz et al., 1993. However, from the mid–1990’s until the present time, capture–recapture investigators have expressed a renewed interest in abundance and related parameters (Pradel, 1996; Schwarz & Arnason, 1996; Schwarz, 2001. The focus of this session was abundance, and presentations covered topics ranging from estimation of abundance and rate of change in abundance, to inferences about the demographic processes underlying changes in abundance, to occupancy as a surrogate of abundance. The plenary paper by Link & Barker (2004 is provocative and very interesting, and it contains a number of important messages and suggestions. Link & Barker (2004 emphasize that the increasing complexity of capture–recapture models has resulted in large numbers of parameters and that a challenge to ecologists is to extract ecological signals from this complexity. They offer hierarchical models as a natural approach to inference in which traditional parameters are viewed as realizations of stochastic processes. These processes are governed by hyperparameters, and the inferential approach focuses on these hyperparameters. Link & Barker (2004 also suggest that

  17. Uranium districts defined by reconnaissance geochemistry in South Greenland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armour-Brown, A.; Steenfelt, A.; Kunzendorf, H.

    1983-01-01

    A reconnaissance exploration survey over 14 000 km 2 of Precambrian terrain in South Greenland using stream-sediment and stream-water samples delineated a central uranium district of 2000 km 2 with enhanced uranium levels and smaller anomalous zones in the south of the field area. Limited follow-up work located 8 pitchblende occurrences in this extensive district. The pitchblende is in veins which contain quartz, calcite, iron oxide, fluorite and minor sulphides. The isotopic (U-Pb) age of the pitchblende, which ranges from 1180-1090 Ma, corresponds to the late stages of Gardar alkaline igneous activity. It is concluded, therefore, that the reconnaissance geochemistry reflects a district-wide hydrothermal event related to the late volatile differentiates derived from the highly fractionated alkaline magma. A combination of primary and secondary features have complemented each other in enhancing the geochemical reconnaissance data and emphasized its importance but has not materially altered the interpretation. (Auth.)

  18. Unravelling the sulphur isotope systematics of an alkaline magmatic province: implications for REE mineralization and exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, W.; Finch, A.; Boyce, A.; Friis, H.; Borst, A. M.; Horsburgh, N. J.

    2017-12-01

    Some of the world's best alkaline rare earth element (REE) deposits are formed in magmatic systems that are sealed (i.e., those that are autometasomatised and maintain reducing conditions). Conversely, in open systems where oxidizing fluids infiltrate, it is commonly assumed that REE are redistributed over a wider (less concentrated) zone. Sulphur isotope fractionation is sensitive to variations in temperature and redox, and, although sulphide minerals are relatively abundant in alkaline systems, there have been few attempts to test these hypotheses and develop a sulphur isotope proxy for alkaline metasomatism and formation of associated REE deposits. The Gardar Rift Province in southern Greenland was volcanically active in two periods between 1300 and 1100 Ma and is an ideal natural laboratory to explore sulphur isotope systematics because a near-complete alkaline magmatic lineage is exposed. We present new δ34S from across the province with a particular focus on three alkaline systems (Ilímaussaq, Motzfeldt and Ivigtût) that also host major REE deposits. Primitive mafic rocks from regional Gardar dykes and lavas have a restricted range of δ34S between 0 and 3 ‰ and fractional crystallization imparts no observable change in δ34S. In a few cases high-δ34S rocks (>15 ‰) occur when intrusive units have assimilated local sedimentary crust (δ34S = 25 ‰). Most δ34S variation takes place in the roof zones of alkaline intrusions during late-magmatic and hydrothermal stages, and we identify clear differences between the complexes. At Ilímaussaq, where the magmatic series is exceptionally reduced (below QFM buffer), roof zone δ34S remains narrow (0-3 ‰). At Motzfeldt, a more open oxidizing roof zone (MH buffer), δ34S ranges from -12 ‰ in late-stage fluorite veins to +12 ‰ where local crust has been assimilated. Ivigtût is intermediate between these end-members varying between -5 to +5 ‰. The δ34S variations primarily relate to temperature and

  19. Uranium occurrences in the Granite Zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyegaard, P.; Armour-Brown, A.

    1986-04-01

    This report describes the work and results of the South Greenland Exploration Programme (Sydex) during the 1984 field season in the Granite Zone, and discusses the results and conclusions that can be drawn from them. It also contains a structural analysis of the Ivigtut-Julianehaab region, which will help in future exploration by indicating the likely directions of uraniferous faults and fractures. It also includes suggestions for future work with both exploration and scientific aspects. The project was carried out by the Geological Survey Greenland (GGU) in co-operation with Risoe National Laboratory. It was financed by the Danish Ministry of Energy. The structural analysis was carried out using previous geological maps, our own field observations and an analysis of lineament frequencies taken from aerial photographs and satellite images. Major lineaments in the region are due to E-W sinistral wrench faults and NE-SW normal faults. Analysis of the minor lineaments showed that the region could be divided into three blocks which have each reacted differently to the same regional stress field which was active throughout the Gardar period. A northern block which has been influenced by an older system of faults in the Archaean gneiss, a central block dominated by a graben, and a southern block where there is a change to a less intensively faulted area. 2 maps, 27 refs. (EG)

  20. Large-scale deep-water seafloor mapping from the Rockall to the Hatton basins, NE Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteys, X.; Thébaudeau, B.; Murcia, C.; Duncan, N.

    2016-02-01

    Multibeam data acquired in 2000 and 2001 during the Irish National Seabed Survey (INSS) are used for the first detailed investigation of the seabed geomorphology and sediment type in the Hatton-Rockall basin area of the North East Atlantic Ocean, covering an area of approximately 80,000 km². The original multibeam survey produced bathymetric and backscatter datasets that allowed the creation of a Digital Terrain Models of approximately 50 m in resolution in water depths between 500 and 3500 m. Near-surface sediments for the entire region haven been classified using features derived from multibeam angular backscatter data (12kHz) and robust unsupervised clustering techniques. Additionally, sub bottom data imaging the shallow stratigraphy and geomagnetic measurements collected at the time of the MBES survey are combined to further characterise some of the features identified. The features presented in detail include parts of the Hatton and Gardar contourite drifts, volcanic mounds identified by their morphology and magnetic signature, deep-water coral mounds, iceberg scours as well as canyons, gullies and escarpments along and down the slopes of the banks and mounds. This study highlights for the first time the variety and complexity of the seafloor present at the seabed in the Irish Hatton-Rockall basin area

  1. Quaternary magnetic excursions recorded in marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Channell, J. E. T.

    2017-12-01

    This year is the golden (50th) anniversary of the first documentation of a magnetic excursion, the Laschamp excursion in volcanics from the Chaine des Puys (Bonhommet and Babkine, 1967). The first recording of an excursion in sediments was from the Blake Outer Ridge (Smith and Foster, 1969). Magnetic excursions are directional aberrations of the geomagnetic field apparently involving short-lived reversal of the main dipole field. They have durations of a few kyrs, and are therefore rarely recorded in sediments with mean sedimentation rates Palma), and 670 ka (Osaka Bay), implying at least 11 excursions in the Brunhes Chron. For the Matuyama Chron, excursions have been recorded in marine sediments at 868 ka (Kamikatsura?), 932 ka (Santa Rosa), 1051 ka (Intra-Jaramillo), 1115 ka (Punaruu), 1255 ka (Bjorn), 1476 ka (Gardar), 1580 ka (Gilsa), and 2737 ka (Porcupine). Excursions coincide with minima in relative paleointensity (RPI) records. Ages are from correlation of excursion records to oxygen isotope records in the same cores, and ice-volume calibration of the oxygen isotope template. The marine sediment record of excursions, combined with independent documentation of excursions in lavas with Ar/Ar age control, is progressively strengthening our knowledge of the excursion inventory in the Quaternary, and enhancing the importance of excursions and RPI in Quaternary stratigraphy.

  2. The petrology and petrogenesis of the Swaldale region, Motzfeldt Center, South Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reekie, Callum; Finch, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    Motzfeldt is one of several high-level alkaline plutonic centers that collectively define the mid-Proterozoic Gardar Province of South Greenland. Despite pyrochlore-hosted Ta-enrichment (± Nb-Zr-REE), the petrology, geochemistry and petrogenesis across the center remain to be fully constrained. We present petrological and geochemical data for the Swaldale region, an arcuate band of nepheline syenite and associated intrusives on Motzfeldt's NW margin. Work for this present study was undertaken in collaboration with the license holder, Regency Mines plc. Swaldale comprises two geochemically distinct magmatic members. The largest, the Motzfeldt Sø Formation (MSF; EuN/Eu*N = 0.35), is a suite of diverse syenite variants that show significant petrological and geochemical heterogeneity. These rocks have a relatively restricted SiO2 range (57.4-62.9 wt.%) with concurrent variation in (Na+K)/Al (0.75-0.95), Mg/(Mg+Fe) (2.18-19.82) and ΣREE (595.0-3095.9 ppm), emphasizing their evolved but not peralkaline nature. Fractionation is mirrored by pyroxene geochemistry with evolution from aegirine-augite, aegirine-hedenbergite, to aegirine. Accessory pyrochlore, titanite, and zircon are rare; however, anomalous facies of zircon-rich (~2 wt.%) syenite are observed. Intercumulus fluorite is a common accessory within MSF rocks. Hydrothermal alteration, marked by hematized alkali-feldspar, is pervasive and ubiquitous. Further peraluminous syenite of the Geologfjeld Formation ((Na+K)/Al = 0.74; EuN/Eu*N = 1.60) marks the truncated remnant of an early syenite stock to the north of the MSF. These rocks contain salite, which, in addition to a lower ΣREE and higher Mg/(Mg+Fe) (18.01), demonstrates the less-fractionated nature of this stock in comparison with the MSF. Sheeted intrusions of peralkaline syenite ((Na+K)/Al = 1.1; Ta = 32.4 ppm) truncate the MSF across central Swaldale. On a mineralogical basis, it is hypothesized that such intrusions reflect outward sheeting of the

  3. The South Greenland uranium exploration programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armour-Brown, A.; Tukiainen, T.; Wallin, B.

    1982-11-01

    This is the final report of the reconnaissance phase of the SYDURAN Project which was initiated in 1st. December 1978 to outline areas of increased uranium potential where more detailed prospection would be warranted. Districts and smaller zones in South Greenland which have the potential for containing economically exploitable uranium occurrences were defined using airborne gamma-spectroscopic, reconnaissance geochemical and geological methods. Other districts and areas have been shown to have no uranium potential and can be eliminated. The three promising districts are: 1. a 2000 square kilometre sub-circular district surrounding Ilimaussaq complex in which there are small high grade pitchblende occurences in faults and fractures in the surrounding granite. 2. the eastern area of the Motzfeldt Centre where large parts of the centre is mineralised and may give rise to exploitable, large tonnage, low grade uranium ore with associated niobium and rare earth elements in extractable quantities. 3. uraniferous rich districts or zones associated with the migmatitic supracrustal units in the area between Kap Farvel and Lindenows Fjord. The areas which were eliminated from having any uranium potential include: the Ketilidian supracrustal unit. the Nunarssuit alkaline complex. The uranium mineralisation in South Greenland is confined to two Proterozoic episodes: a) a late phase of granitisation and migmatisation with the formation of disseminated uraninite in the Migmatite Complex in the south of the project area between 1700-1800 m.y. and, b) hydrothermal activity associated with Gardar magmatic events between 1090-1170 m.y. in the central Granite Zone. Future work should be directed towards the definition and location of drilling targets. (EG)

  4. Millennial-scale interaction between ice sheets and ocean circulation during marine isotope stage 100

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masao eOhno

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Waxing/waning of the ice sheets and the associated change in thermohaline circulation have played an important role in global climate change since major continental ice sheets appeared in the northern hemisphere about 2.75 million years ago. In the earliest glacial stages, however, establishment of the linkage between ice sheet development and ocean circulation remain largely unclear. Here we show new high-resolution records of marine isotope stage 100 recovered from deep-sea sediments on the Gardar Drift, in the subpolar North Atlantic. Results of a wide range of analyses clearly reveal the influence of millennial-scale variability in iceberg discharge on ocean surface condition and bottom current variability in the subpolar North Atlantic during marine isotope stage 100. We identified eight events of ice-rafted debris, which occurred mostly with decreases in sea surface temperature and in current components indicating North Atlantic Deep Water. These decreases are interpreted by weakened deep water formation linked to iceberg discharge, similarly to observations from the last glacial period. Dolomite fraction of the ice-rafted events in early MIS 100 like the last glacial Heinrich events suggests massive collapse of the Laurentide ice sheet in North America. At the same time, our early glacial data suggest differences from the last glacial period: absence of 1470-year periodicity in the interactions between ice sheets and ocean, and northerly shift of the ice-rafted debris belt. Our high-resolution data largely improve the picture of ice-sheet/ocean interactions on millennial time scales in the early glacial period after major Northern Hemisphere glaciation.

  5. Morphology of the Iceland Basin Excursion from a spherical harmonics analysis and an iterative Bayesian inversion procedure of sedimentary records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanci, Luca; Kissel, Catherine; Leonhardt, Roman; Laj, Carlo

    2008-08-01

    Based on 5 published marine high-resolution sedimentary records of the Iceland Basin Excursion [IBE; Channell, J.E.T., Hodell, D.A., Lehman, B., 1997. Relative geomagnetic paleointensity and ∂ 18O at ODP Site 983/Gardar Drift, North Atlantic since 350 ka. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 153, 103-118; Laj, C., Kissel, C., Roberts, A., 2006. Geomagnetic field behavior during the Iceland Basin and Laschamp geomagnetic excursions: a simple transitional field geometry? Geochem. Geophys. Geosystems. 7, Q03004, doi:10.1029/2005GC001122] dated around 186-190 kyr, we present models of the excursional geomagnetic field at the Earth's surface using two different approaches. First a spherical harmonics analysis is performed after synchronization of the records using their paleointensity profiles. Second, we have used an iterative Bayesian inversion procedure, calibrated using the single volcanic data available so far. Both modeling approaches suffer from imperfections of the paleomagnetic signals and mostly from the still poor geographical distribution of detailed records, presently available only from the North Atlantic and the West Pacific. For these reasons, our modeling results should only be regarded as preliminary models of the geomagnetic field during the IBE, susceptible to improvements when including results from future paleomagnetic studies. Nevertheless, both approaches show distinct similarities and are stable against moderate variations of modeling parameters. The general picture is that of a dipole field undergoing a strong reduction, but remaining higher than the non-dipole field all through the excursional process, except for a very short interval of time corresponding to the dipole minimum at the center of the excursion. On the other hand, some differences exist between the results of the two models with each other and with the real data when the virtual geomagnetic pole (VGP) paths are considered. The non-dipole field does not appear to undergo very significant

  6. Cosmogenic 10Be signature of geomagnetic dipole moment variations over the last 2 Ma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Q.; Thouveny, N.; Bourlès, D. L.; Valet, J. P.; Bassinot, F. C.; Savranskaia, T.; Duvivier, A.; Choy, S.; Gacem, L.; Villedieu, A.

    2017-12-01

    strengthens the occurrence of several Matuyama's excursions (Kamikatsura, Santa Rosa, Punaruu, Bjorn, Gilsa, Gardar) that were reported only from sparse locations.

  7. Cosmogenic signature of geomagnetic reversals and excursions from the Réunion event to the Matuyama-Brunhes transition (0.7-2.14 Ma interval)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Quentin; Bourlès, Didier L.; Thouveny, Nicolas; Horng, Chorng-Shern; Valet, Jean-Pierre; Bassinot, Franck; Choy, Sandrine

    2018-01-01

    Rosa, Punaruu, Bjorn, Gilsa, Gardar) that were until now reported from only sparse locations.

  8. From Carbonatite to Ikaite: How high-T carbonates are transformed into low-T carbonate minerals in SW Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockmann, G. J.; Tollefsen, E.; Ranta, E.; Skelton, A.; Sturkell, E.; Lundqvist, L.

    2015-12-01

    The 1300 Ma Grønnedal-Íka igneous complex in southwest Greenland comprises nepheline syenites and carbonatites. It belongs to a suite of intrusions formed 1300-1100 Ma ago referred to as the Gardar period. In modern time (the last ca. 8000 years), fluid-rock interactions involving the nepheline syenites and carbonatites gives rise to about one thousand submarine columns made of the rare low-T mineral ikaite (CaCO3x6H2O). The columns are found in a shallow, narrow fjord named Ikka Fjord and their distribution clearly follows the outcrop of the Grønnedal-Íka complex. When meteoric water percolates through the highly fractured complex, a sodium carbonate solution of pH 10 is formed through hitherto unknown fluid-rock reactions. This basic solution seeps up through fractures at the bottom of Ikka Fjord and when mixed with seawater, the mineral ikaite is formed. As the seepage water has a lower density than seawater, there is an upwards flow that creates columns. What is peculiar about ikaite is its limited stability making it unstable above +6 °C. Isotopic studies of ikaite reveal a seawater origin for the Ca2+ ions, and the carbonatite being the most likely source for the CO32- ions. The carbonatite is mainly of søvite composition (CaCO3) with high contents of siderite and ankerite in certain areas. The nepheline syenites contain Na,K-rich minerals like nepheline, alkali-feldspar, aegirine-augite, katophorite and biotite. Nepheline is mainly replaced by muscovite, and aegirine-augite partly by chlorite, which could release sodium into solution. A dolerite dyke of unknown age prompted extensive mineralization of magnetite by activating hydrothermal fluid convection. The fluid interacted with the carbonatite, replacing siderite and ankerite by magnetite and later hematite. In a newly launched project at Stockholm University, we are trying to unravel the chemical reactions taking place inside the Grønnedal-Íka igneous complex leading to the formation of the

  9. Variations in the Strength of the North Atlantic Bottom water during Holocene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissel, C.; Van Toer, A.; Michel, E.; Cortijo, E.

    2012-04-01

    centered at about 8.4 kyr (cal. ages) is marked by a pronounced minima in magnetic content and the smaller mean sortable silt sizes, typical for an abrupt reduction in deep flow speed. At the same time, the benthic delta13C values which could be obtained from Cib. wuellerstorfi reach significantly negative values (-0.5‰) providing evidence of a significant change to a major downwelling limb of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. This event is in phase with the meltwater outbursts from the final drainage of the proglacial lakes associated with the decaying Laurentide Ice Sheet margin. In addition, all through the Holocene, a series of short-term events of lower bottom flow speed and weaker ISOW always illustrated by minima mean size of the sortable silt and in magnetic concentration respectively are observed with a periodicity of 300-600 years between 6 and 2 kyr. These results are compared to those we obtained from other cores located along the Gardar Drift (P.I.C.A.S.S.O cruise in 2003) and the Eirik drift and with recently published results.

  10. Variations in the Holocene North Atlantic Bottom Current Strength in the Charlie Gibbs Fracture Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissel, C.; Van Toer, A.; Cortijo, E.; Turon, J.

    2011-12-01

    speed. Although not exactly at the same age, we note that the pattern in the same as the one observed by Ellison et al. (2006) further north along the Gardar drift with a gradual decrease in the mean sortable silt size followed by a two steps rather fast increase. At the same time, the benthic delta13C values which could be obtained from the few Cib. wuellerstorfi present in the sediment reach significantly negative values (-0.5%) providing evidence of a significant change to a major downwelling limb of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. This event is in phase with the meltwater outbursts from the final drainage of the proglacial lakes associated with the decaying Laurentide Ice Sheet margin. In addition, all through the Holocene, a series of short-term events of lower bottom flow speed always illustrated by minima in magnetic concentration and mean size of the sortable silt are observed with a periodicity of 900 years between 6 and 2 kyr.