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Sample records for armillifer agkistrodontis pentastomida

  1. Heavy infection with Armillifer moniliformis: a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Cun-mei; TANG Hong-feng; QIU Ming-hua; XIONG Qi-xing

    2005-01-01

    @@ Pentastomid parasite Armillifer moniliformis, (A. moniliformis) is a pathogen causing human pentastomiasis. Pentastomiasis is a parasitic zoonosis, which has seldom been reported. When the number of armillifer parasites infecting a person is few or very few, the overwhelming majority of the cases are of asymptomatic or subclinical presentation and are generally discovered during autopsies or at surgical operation. A case of A. moniliformis, with heavy infection caused by nymphal pentastomids and possessing the clinical symptoms of chronic fever and abdominal pain, was admitted to the children's hospital in Hangzhou, China. As the first case in China, it is hereby reported.

  2. Finding of pentastomes of genus Reighardia (Pentastomida) in the Belcher's gull (Larus belcheri).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naupay, Asucena I; Cribillero, Nelly G; Lopez-Urbina, Maria T; Gonzalez, Armando E; Gomez-Puerta, Luis A

    2016-06-01

    This report describes the finding of Reighardia sp. (Pentastomida) infecting the air sac of two Belcher's gulls (Larus belcheri) found dead on the beaches of Pucusana, a district in southern Lima, Peru. Three pentastomes were collected from two Belcher's gulls. Then, they were morphologically and molecular analyzed. Molecular characterization of the parasite was achieved by amplifying a fragment of the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (SSU rRNA). Based on both morphological and molecular data the pentastomes were identified as pentastomes of the genus Reighardia. This is the first report showing that the Belcher's gull is a new natural definitive host for this pentastome. PMID:26892103

  3. The Zoonotic Implications of Pentastomiasis in the Royal Python (Python Regius)

    OpenAIRE

    Ayinmode, AB; Adedokun, AO; Aina, A; Taiwo, V

    2010-01-01

    Pentastomes are worm-like endoparasites of the phylum Pentastomida found principally in the respiratory tract of reptiles, birds, and mammals. They cause a zoonotic disease known as pentastomiasis in humans and other mammals. The autopsy of a Nigerian royal python (Python regius) revealed two yellowish-white parasites in the lungs, tissue necrosis and inflammatory lesions. The parasite was confirmed to be Armillifer spp (Pentastomid); this is the first recorded case of pentastomiasis in the r...

  4. Experimental studies on the life-cycle of Sebekia wedli (Pentastomida: Sebekidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junker, K; Boomker, J; Booyse, D G

    1998-12-01

    Four young Nile crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus) were infected with infective pentastome larvae obtained from naturally infected Mozambique bream, Oreochromis mossambicus, and red-breasted bream, Tilapia rendalli swierstrai in the Kruger National Park. At day 95 post infection one of the crocodiles died and three female and four male S. wedli were recovered from its lungs. One pair was found in copula but the uteri of the females were not yet developed. Males and females were of about equal size. After 226 d post infection the three remaining crocodiles were sacrificed. Two of these harboured no pentastomes but eight were taken from the lungs of the third. The sex ratio had shifted in favour of the females, seven females and one male being present. One of the females recovered from the crocodiles was placed in saline and produced 3,400 eggs. These were used to infect eight guppies, Poecilia reticulata. Within 31 d two infective stages of S. wedli had developed in one of the guppies thus completing the life-cycle of the pentastome. S. wedli recovered from experimentally infected final hosts were slightly smaller than those recovered from a wild-caught final host. PMID:10192834

  5. Porocephalus species (Pentastomida infecting Boa constrictor (Boidae and Lachesis muta (Viperidae in northeastern Brazil

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    Miriam Camargo Guarnieri

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Brazil has a great diversity of snakes, but there are few published works concerning parasitism in these animals. The present paper examined pulmonary infection by pentastomids in large snakes from northeastern Brazil, including six specimens of Boa constrictor and two examples of Lachesis muta from the Serpentarium of the Federal University of Pernambuco (UFPE, Brazil, all of which were collected in the Atlantic Coastal Forest. One specimen of B. constrictor was infected by Porocephalus sp. (intensity of infection 5.0 and one specimen of L. muta was infected by P. stilesi (intensity of infection 15.0.

  6. Porocephalus species (Pentastomida) infecting Boa constrictor (Boidae) and Lachesis muta (Viperidae) in northeastern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Miriam Camargo Guarnieri; Felipe Silva Ferreira; Waltécio de Oliveira Almeida; Samuel Vieira Brito

    2008-01-01

    Brazil has a great diversity of snakes, but there are few published works concerning parasitism in these animals. The present paper examined pulmonary infection by pentastomids in large snakes from northeastern Brazil, including six specimens of Boa constrictor and two examples of Lachesis muta from the Serpentarium of the Federal University of Pernambuco (UFPE), Brazil, all of which were collected in the Atlantic Coastal Forest. One specimen of B. constrictor was infected by Porocephalus sp....

  7. Helminths and Pentastomida of two synanthropic gecko lizards, Hemidactylus mabouia and Phyllopezus pollicaris, in an urban area in Northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, J G G; Brito, S V; Ávila, R W; Teles, D A; Araujo-Filho, J A; Teixeira, A A M; Anjos, L A; Almeida, W O

    2014-11-01

    Helminths and pentastomids were examined in exotic Hemidactylus mabouia and native Phyllopezus pollicaris lizards, living synanthropically in an urban area in the municipality of Crato, Ceará state, northeastern Brazil. A total of 194 lizards were collected, being 76 specimens of H. mabouia e 118 specimens of P. pollicaris. Six parasite species were found infecting H. mabouia: the cestode Oochoristica sp., the nematodes Parapharyngodon sceleratus, Physaloptera retusa, Physalopteroides venancioi, and Spauligodon oxkutzcabiensis and the pentastomid Raillietiella mottae; while four parasite species were found associated with P. pollicaris: Oochoristica sp., P. sceleratus, P. retusa, and S. oxkutzcabiensis. Three new host records were reported: P. retusa infecting H. mabouia and P. retusa and Oochoristica sp. infecting P. pollicaris. About 75% of the parasites species found were shared by both lizards. Moreover, H. mabouia showed greater diversity than P. pollicaris (6 versus 4 species), while P. pollicaris had higher intensity of infection than H. mabouia (1536 versus 121 specimens). PMID:25627607

  8. Leiperia cincinnalis Sambon, 1922 (Pentastomida) from Nile crocodiles Crocodylus niloticus in the Kruger National Park, South Africa, with a description of the male.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junker, K; Boomker, J; Swanepoel, D; Taraschewski, H

    2000-09-01

    A single male and several adult females of the pentastomid Leiperia cincinnalis were recovered from the trachea of five of six Nile crocodiles examined in 1995 and 1998. Infective larvae, pre-adult males and females, as well as mature males, occurred in clusters in the pulmonary artery but infective larvae and pre-adult females were also occasionally taken from the lungs. Irrespective of the developmental stage, the intensity of infection was 3, 6, 48, 72 and 79. Sixty-four percent of eggs recovered from the posterior part of the uterus of a patent L. cincinnalis female contained fully-developed primary larvae and these were used to infect 24 Mozambique bream Oreochromis mossambicus. Within a week of infection all the fish died and hatched primary larvae were recovered from the stomach and anterior part of the intestine. Eggs that had not hatched were found to be unsegmented. The total primary larval count in seven fish was 18, 12, 1, 25, 16, >40 and >50. Descriptions with detailed measurements are given of the females, the males, the eggs, the primary larvae and the infective larvae of L. cincinnalis. PMID:10937664

  9. Rilleyella petauri gen. nov., sp. nov. (Pentastomida : Cephalobaenida from the lungs and nasal sinus of Petaurus breviceps (Marsupialia : Petauridae in Australia

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    Spratt D.M.

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available A new cephalobaenid pentastome, Rileyella petauri gen. nov., sp. nov. from the lungs and nasal sinus of the petaurid marsupial, Petaurus breviceps, is described. It is the smallest adult pentastome known to date, represents the first record of a mammal as the definitive host of a cephalobaenid and may respresent the only pentastome known to inhabit the lungs of a mammal through all its instars, with the exception of patent females. Adult males, non-gravid females and nymphs moulting to adults occur in the lungs; gravid females occur in the nasal sinus. R. petauri is minute and possesses morphological features primarily of the Cephalobaenida but the glands in the cephalothorax and the morphology of the copulatory spicules are similar to some members of the remaining pentastomid order, the Porocephalida. This unusual combination of features distinguish the new genus from other genera in the Cephalobaenida. The occurrence of only seven fully-formed larvae in eggs in the uterus, each representing about 10 % of the length of the patent female, and her presence in the nasal sinus of a dependent juvenile P. breviceps (36 gm implies a direct life cycle.

  10. Lesões pulmonares associadas ao parasitismo por Sebekia oxycephala (Pentastomida em jacarés-açu (Melanosuchus niger Spix, 1825 oriundos de vida livre na Amazônia brasileira

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    Adriana Maciel de C. Cardoso

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo objetivou descrever as lesões pulmonares macro e microscópicas associadas ao parasitismo por Sebekia oxycephala em 100 espécimes de jacarés-açu (Melanosuchusniger, abatidos na Reserva de Desenvolvimento Sustentável Mamirauá, situada no Estado do Amazonas, Brasil. Durante a avaliação macroscópica, exemplares dos parasitos encontrados no tecido pulmonar foram coletados individualmente em AFA (Álcool etílico - Formalina - Ácido acético glacial e formol a 5% para avaliação parasitológica e classificação taxonômica. Amostras de tecido pulmonar de todos os animais, independentemente da ocorrência de lesões macroscópicas, foram fixadas em formol 10% e incluídas em parafina. Secções histológicas coradas por Hematoxilina-Eosina destas amostras foram avaliadas por meio de microscopia óptica. Macroscopicamente, 4 dos 100 animais (4% apresentaram espécimes de pentastomídeos no parênquima pulmonar. Os parasitos foram classificados taxonomicamente como pertencentes à espécie Sebekia oxycephala. Nenhuma alteração macroscópicas foi observada, porém, microscopicamente, lesões pulmonares foram encontradas em 37% dos casos, sendo que, lesões inflamatórias associadas ao parasitismo corresponderam a 75,6% dos mesmos (28/37. Nestes, segmentos degenerados e ovos de S. oxycephala encontravam-se envolvidos por cápsula de tecido conjuntivo fibroso e infiltrado inflamatório predominantemente composto por células gigantes do tipo corpo estranho. Três espécimes apresentaram espessamento de septos alveolares e sete exemplares continham infiltrado inflamatório granulocítico multifocal no parênquima pulmonar. As lesões associadas ao parasitismo, de modo geral, apresentaram intensidade discreta e parecem não representar uma causa importante de doença pulmonar entre a população estudada. Esta é a primeira descrição de lesões pulmonares em M. niger associadas ao parasitismo por S. oxycephala na Amazônia brasileira.

  11. Diagnosis of Human Visceral Pentastomiasis

    OpenAIRE

    Tappe, Dennis; Büttner, Dietrich W.

    2009-01-01

    Visceral pentastomiasis in humans is caused by the larval stages (nymphs) of the arthropod-related tongue worms Linguatula serrata, Armillifer armillatus, A. moniliformis, A. grandis, and Porocephalus crotali. The majority of cases has been reported from Africa, Malaysia, and the Middle East, where visceral pentastomiasis may be an incidental finding in autopsies, and less often from China and Latin America. In Europe and North America, the disease is only rarely encountered in immigrants and...

  12. The prevalence of Linguatula serrata nymphs in mesenteric and mediastinal lymph nodes in one-humped camels (Camelus dromedarius) slaughtered in Rafsanjan slaughterhouse, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Bamorovat, Mehdi; Zarandi, Mehdi Borhani; Mostafavi, Mahshid; Kheirandish, Reza; Sharifi, Iraj; Radfar, Mohammad Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Linguatula serrata is a well-known zoonotic parasite belonging to the order of Pentastomida which infects both human and animals. Human can be infected by both the nymph stage, causing a disease condition called nasopharyngeal linguatulosis or halzoun syndrome and the egg, a condition called visceral linguatulosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of nymphal stages of L. serrata in mesenteric and mediastinal lymph nodes of one-humped camels slaughtered in Rafsanjan slaught...

  13. Parasites in pet reptiles

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    Mavri Urška

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Exotic reptiles originating from the wild can be carriers of many different pathogens and some of them can infect humans. Reptiles imported into Slovenia from 2000 to 2005, specimens of native species taken from the wild and captive bred species were investigated. A total of 949 reptiles (55 snakes, 331 lizards and 563 turtles, belonging to 68 different species, were examined for the presence of endoparasites and ectoparasites. Twelve different groups (Nematoda (5, Trematoda (1, Acanthocephala (1, Pentastomida (1 and Protozoa (4 of endoparasites were determined in 26 (47.3% of 55 examined snakes. In snakes two different species of ectoparasites were also found. Among the tested lizards eighteen different groups (Nematoda (8, Cestoda (1, Trematoda (1, Acanthocephala (1, Pentastomida (1 and Protozoa (6 of endoparasites in 252 (76.1% of 331 examined animals were found. One Trombiculid ectoparasite was determined. In 563 of examined turtles eight different groups (Nematoda (4, Cestoda (1, Trematoda (1 and Protozoa (2 of endoparasites were determined in 498 (88.5% animals. In examined turtles three different species of ectoparasites were seen. The established prevalence of various parasites in reptiles used as pet animals indicates the need for examination on specific pathogens prior to introduction to owners.

  14. Diagnosis of human visceral pentastomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappe, Dennis; Büttner, Dietrich W

    2009-01-01

    Visceral pentastomiasis in humans is caused by the larval stages (nymphs) of the arthropod-related tongue worms Linguatula serrata, Armillifer armillatus, A. moniliformis, A. grandis, and Porocephalus crotali. The majority of cases has been reported from Africa, Malaysia, and the Middle East, where visceral pentastomiasis may be an incidental finding in autopsies, and less often from China and Latin America. In Europe and North America, the disease is only rarely encountered in immigrants and long-term travelers, and the parasitic lesions may be confused with malignancies, leading to a delay in the correct diagnosis. Since clinical symptoms are variable and serological tests are not readily available, the diagnosis often relies on histopathological examinations. This laboratory symposium focuses on the diagnosis of this unusual parasitic disease and presents its risk factors and epidemiology. PMID:19238218

  15. Diagnosis of human visceral pentastomiasis.

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    Dennis Tappe

    Full Text Available Visceral pentastomiasis in humans is caused by the larval stages (nymphs of the arthropod-related tongue worms Linguatula serrata, Armillifer armillatus, A. moniliformis, A. grandis, and Porocephalus crotali. The majority of cases has been reported from Africa, Malaysia, and the Middle East, where visceral pentastomiasis may be an incidental finding in autopsies, and less often from China and Latin America. In Europe and North America, the disease is only rarely encountered in immigrants and long-term travelers, and the parasitic lesions may be confused with malignancies, leading to a delay in the correct diagnosis. Since clinical symptoms are variable and serological tests are not readily available, the diagnosis often relies on histopathological examinations. This laboratory symposium focuses on the diagnosis of this unusual parasitic disease and presents its risk factors and epidemiology.

  16. Rates of pulmonary infection by pentastomids in lizards species from a restinga habitat in northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, W O; Santana, G G; Vieira, W L S; Wanderley, I C; Ribeiro, S C

    2009-02-01

    Pulmonary parasitism by pentastomids was examined in two lizard species inhabiting an area of restinga vegetation (coastal sand dunes) situated in the municipality of Mataraca (6 degrees 29' S and 34 degrees 56' W), on the extreme northern coast of Paraíba State, Brazil. A total of 123 lizards were collected, being 75 specimens of Micrablepharus maximiliani (Gymnophtalmidae) and 48 specimens of Cnemidophorus ocellifer (Teiidae). Only a single species of Pentastomida (Raillietiella mottae) was found parasitizing three females M. maximiliani, with a prevalence of 4% and an average infection intensity of 2.3 +/- 1.3 (range 1-5). The infection rate by pentastomids encountered in the present study was similar to that seen with other species of restinga lizards. Raillietiella mottae is a generalist parasite species that is probably transmitted by common and widely distributed insects making up part of the diet of many insectivorous lizard species from northeastern Brazil. PMID:19347165

  17. An annotated catalogue of the ascaridoid nematode parasites of Chinese vertebrates.

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    Li, Liang; Gibson, David I; Zhang, Lu-Ping

    2016-01-01

    A catalogue, based on both examined specimens and the published literature, of all the ascaridoid nematodes recorded in China is presented. A total of 95 recognised species, representing 26 genera in five families, are reported. Detailed information on the type-host, type-locality, original reference, synonyms, annotated subsequent references of taxonomic importance, other host records, site of infection, location of type-specimens and distribution are listed for each recognised species. Additional comments on the taxonomic status of some species are also given. Moreover, some nomenclatural changes are proposed: (i) Toxascaris selenarctis Wang, 1965 and T. ailuri Wu, He & Hu, 1987 are placed in synonymy with Baylisascaris transfuga (Rudolphi, 1819); (ii) Raphidascaris lophii Wang & Wu, 1991 is a secondary homonym of R. lophii (Wu, 1949) and a replacement name, R. wangi nom. nov., is proposed for the former species; (iii) Aliascaris aetoplatea Luo, 2001 is transferred to Terranova Leiper & Atkinson, 1914, as T. aetoplatea (Luo, 2001) n. comb., and should be considered a species inquirenda; (iv) Ophidascaris orientalis (Wang, 1965) is resurrected as a valid species; (v) Phocascaris longispiculum Wang & Wu, 1991 and Ophidascaris agkistrodontis Wang, 1979 are treated as incertae sedis; and (vi) Hysterothylacium sauridae Li, Xu & Zhang, 2008 is listed as a nomen nudum. PMID:26739284

  18. Prevalence of Linguatula serrata Nymph in Goat in Tabriz, North-West of Iran

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    Yacob Garedaghi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Linguatula serrata is one of well-known members of Pentastomida which infects both humans and animals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of L. serrata in mesenteric lymph nodes, livers and lungs of goats slaughtered in Tabriz area, Iran. Mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs, livers and lungs of 280 goats slaughtered in Tabriz, North-west of Iran were investigated for nymphs of L. serrata from September 2009 to September 2010. The organs were examined macroscopically and then a tissue digestion method was also done for investigation of liver and lung of the goats that were infected MLN. The liver and lung samples were mostly taken from the condemned and rejected part of organs. The infection rate of L. serrata nymphs in MLNs, livers and lungs was 27.1 %, 2.8 % and 2.8 % respectively. The number of isolated nymph in infected lymph nodes varied from 1 to 22 with a mean of 7. Only one nymph was isolated from each infected livers and lungs. The infection rate increased with age (P 0.05. Linguatula infection occurs as an endemic zoonosis in the study area and has an active transmission life cycle.

  19. Parasitic infections of the African dwarf crocodile (Osteolaemus tetraspis) and the ornate Nile monitor (Varanus ornatus) from Nigeria.

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    Enabulele, Elisha E; Ozemoka, Habibat J; Awharitoma, Agnes O; Aisien, Martins S O

    2013-06-01

    The parasitic infections of market derived Osteolaemus tetraspis from the rainforest and Varanus ornatus from locations in the savanna-mosaic and the rainforest of southern Nigeria were investigated. Parasites recovered from O. tetraspis included members of the Pentastomida, Trematoda and Nematoda. An undescribed pentastomid belonging to the family Sebekidae was recovered from O. tetraspis. The same parasite was also found to parasitize V. ornatus from the rainforest. Other parasites found in O. tetraspis were Pseudoneodiplostomum thomasi, Dujardinascaris sp. and larva of a Camallanus sp. Varanus ornatus from the rainforest and the derived savanna had some parasites including Duthiersia fimbriata, an unidentified pseudophyllidean cestode and Tanqua tiara in common. Cosmocerca ornata and Oswaldocruzia hoepplii were restricted to hosts from the derived savanna while the unidentified trematode occurred only in lizards from the rainforest. The unidentified pseudophyllidean cestode bears a close resemblance to Probothriocephalus, a cestode previously reported only from deep water teleosts. Pseudoneodiplostomum thomasi and Duthiersia fimbriata are new locality records for Nigeria. PMID:23666655

  20. Endoparásitos de micromamíferos del noroeste de Perú. 1: helmintos de marsupiales

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    Manuel Tantaleán

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo, informamos los resultados del análisis parasitológico realizado a 40 individuos marsupiales de las especies Caluromys lanatus, Didelphis marsupialis, Marmosops noctivagus, Metachirus nudicaudatus, Marmosa (Micoureus regina, Monodelphis adusta, Philander andersoni y Philander opossum procedentes del departamento de Loreto, Perú. Se determinaron en total 11 especies de helmintos parásitos: Nematoda: Aspidodera sp., Cruzia tentaculata, Physaloptera mirandai, Physaloptera sp., Pterygodermatites sp., Trichuris sp., Turgida turgida, y Viannaia sp.; Trematoda: Podospathalium pedatum; Acanthocephala: Giganthorhynchus ortizi; y Pentastomida: ninfa. Los parásitos Trichuris sp., Pterygodematities sp., Turgida turgida, Viannaia sp. y Podospathalium pedatum son nuevos registros para el Perú. De igual manera, se registran por primera vez las siguientes asociaciones parásitos-huéspedes: Pterygodermatites sp.-Marmosa regina, Viannaia sp.- Marmosops noctivagus, Trichuris sp.-Marmosops cf. noctivagus, Podospathalium pedatum-Monodelphis adusta, Giganthorhynchus ortizi-Marmosops cf. noctivagus, y ninfas de pentastómidos-Marmosa regina y Metachirus nudicaudatus.

  1. One-Humped Camel (Camelus dromedarius Infestation withLinguatula serrata in Tabriz, Iran

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    HR Haddadzadeh

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available "n "nBackground: Linguatula serrata is one of well known members of Pentastomida which infects both human and animals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of L. serrata in mesenteric lymph nodes, livers and lungs of camels slaughtered in Tabriz area, Iran. "n "nMethods: Mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs, livers and lungs of 140 one-humped camels slaughtered in Tabriz, north-west of Iran were investigated for nymphs of L. serrata from July 2007 to June 2008. The organs were examined macroscopically and then a tissue digestion method was also done for investigation of liver and lung of the camels that had infected MLN. The liver and lung samples were mostly taken from condemned and rejected part of organs. "n "nResults: The infection rate of L. serrata nymphs in MLNs, livers and lungs was 13.5%, 1.4% and 1.4% respectively. The number of isolated nymph in infected lymph nodes varied from 2 to 18 with a mean of 4.78. Only one nymph was isolated from each infected livers and lungs. The infection rate increased with age (p<0.05. No significant difference in different sex groups and seasons was observed (p>0.05. "n "nConclusion: Considering this fact that consumption of undercooked camel liver was not common in the studied area, the zoonotic importance of this infection should be concluded.

  2. A SEM study of the reindeer sinus worm (Linguatula arctica

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    Sven Nikander

    2009-01-01

    remain obscure. Transmission electron microscopy should be employed to gain more information about this fascinating creature and its origin.Abstract in Finnish / Yhteenveto:Elektronimikroskooppinen tutkimus poron kielimadosta (Linguatula arctica Pentastomida (matoäyriäiset ovat ryhmä erikoisia parasiitteihin kuuluvia niveljalkaisia. Niitä kutsutaan usein kielimadoiksi, sillä monet ryhmään kuuluvista lajeista ovat muodoltaan kielimäisiä. Linguatula arctica, poron kielimato, on poron nenäonteloon liittyvissä sivuonteloissa elävä loinen. Se on ainoa tunnettu matoäyriäinen, jolla on sorkkaeläin pääisäntänä ja suora (ilman väli-isäntää tapahtuva elämänkierto. Tässä tutkimuksessa tarkasteltiin L. arctica -loisen pinta- ja sisärakenteita pyyhkäisyelektronimikroskoopin avulla. Loiset kerättiin Suomen lapista talvella 1991–92. Nenän sivuontelot tutkittiin loisten varalta noin 80 porosta, ja niistä löydettiin yhteensä 30 kielimatoa. Kielimatojen ulkonäkö oli tyypillinen Linguatula-suvun loisille. Ne olivat melanmuotoisia, läpikuultavia, vaalean kellertäviä, litteitä, ne vaikuttivat jaokkeisilta ja niillä oli pitkä loppua kohden kapeneva häntä. Suu sijaitsi vatsapuolella lähellä etupäätä, ja suuhun liittyneenä oli selvästi erottuva päämäinen uloke. Suuaukon tuntumassa, suuaukon molemmilla puolilla oli pari voimakkaasti kehittyneitä kynsimäisiä koukkurakenteita. Kielimadon ulkopinta koostui annulaarisista rakenteista, mistä johtuen se vaikutti jaokkeiselta. Loisen sivuissa, kunkin jaokkeen reunassa, oli tuntoelin, joka näkyi pyyhkäisyelektronimikroskoopilla kuppimaisena syvennyksenä. Jaokerenkaiden takareuna oli pienten, taaksepäin suuntautuneiden kitiinipiikkien karhentama. Koko ulkopinnan alueella nähtiin pieniä, pyöreitä painautumia, joiden todettiin olevan loisen pintaan avautuva kärkiosa niin kutsutuista kloridisoluista. Koiraskielimadon sukuaukko sijaitsi vatsapuolella takimmaisen koukkuparin k