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Sample records for armillaria pine rot

  1. From the investigations on Armillaria root rot occurrence in young Scots pine stands in Zielonka Forest District

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    Wojciech Szewczyk

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Armillaria root rot, one of the most dangerous diseases in our forests, is caused in Poland mainly by Armillaria ostoyae, especially severe in young Scots pine stands, established after broadleaved stands or with participation of broadleaved species. In Forest District Zielonka young stands are severly affected by Armillaria root rot. Only one species, A.ostoyae, was found in the young (8-14 yrs Scots pine stands, despite the presence of other Armillaria species in the district. The pathogen's frequent occurrence may be due, inter alia, to favouring environmental factors.

  2. Armillaria root rot

    Science.gov (United States)

    First described on grapevines in California in the 1880s, Armillaria root rot occurs in all major grape-growing regions of the state. The causal fungus, Armillaria mellea, infects woody grapevine roots and the base of the trunk (the root collar), resulting in a slow decline and eventual death of the...

  3. Genetic structure of an expanding Armillaria root rot fungus (Armillaria ostoyae) population in a managed pine forest in southwestern France.

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    Prospero, S; Lung-Escarmant, B; Dutech, C

    2008-07-01

    The Landes de Gascogne forest (southwestern France) is the largest maritime pine (Pinus pinaster) plantation in Europe. Armillaria root disease (Armillaria ostoyae) has been reported since the early 1920s in the coastal area (western sector), but its incidence over the last 20 years has increased in the eastern sector. We investigated the genetic structure of the A. ostoyae population in this forest, focusing particularly on geographical differentiation potentially indicative of disease expansion in this area. In total, 531 isolates obtained from mycelial fans on symptomatic trees or undecayed stumps in 31 different disease foci were genotyped at five microsatellite loci. In 20 of these disease foci, a single genotype dominated, reflecting a predominantly clonal local spread of A. ostoyae. By contrast, at the regional scale, A. ostoyae probably spreads mostly via basidiospores (sexual spores), as no genotype common to several disease foci was identified. The absence of a clear pattern of isolation by distance may indicate either substantial gene flow or stochastic colonisation independent of spatial distance. The gradient of genetic diversity from the coast inwards and the greater genetic divergence of the eastern disease foci are consistent with the expansion of the A. ostoyae population from the coast eastwards.

  4. Armillaria root rot of tea in Kenya : characterization of the pathogen and approaches to disease management

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    Otieno, W.

    2002-01-01

    The rare occurrence of basidiomata and rhizomorphs constrains diagnosis of Armillaria root rot and identification of Armillaria species in Africa. This has had a negative impact on taxonomic research on the genus Armillaria in the continent, where the

  5. Armillaria root rot -- rev. revised edition. Information leaflet No. LFC 14E

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    Lachance, D.

    1996-11-01

    Armillaria root rot is a disease of the roots of plants and is caused by a fungus belonging to the genus `Armillaria spp.`. Most tree species in both the temperate and tropical zones can be affected by this disease; however, the damage is most notable and probably greatest in plantations. Armillaria root rot can be controlled, albeit with difficulty. This document looks at armillaria root rot and looks at the following points: Hosts and extent of the disease; the pathogens; symptoms and signs; infection and development; control; prevention; compromise solution; and, bibliography.

  6. Armillaria root rot in the Canadian prairie provinces. Information report No. -X-329

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    Mallet, K.I.

    1992-01-01

    Armillaria root rot is one of the most important diseases of forest trees in the prairie provinces of Canada. Information on symptoms, detection, and damage caused by the disease is given. The Armillaria species in the prairie provinces, their geographic distribution and host range is discussed. Means of spread and control of the disease are described.

  7. Impact of armillaria root rot in intensively managed white spruce/aspen stands

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    Blenis, P.V.; Mallet, K.I.; Titus, S.J.

    1995-12-31

    The Western Boreal Growth and Yield (WESBOGY) experiment was initiated to determine the growth and yield of aspen and white spruce when the two species occur in mixtures at different densities. Armillaria root rot may play an important role in mixedwood management because the fungus can attack both spruce and aspen, and the spatial distribution of trees influences the spread of these pathogens. The ultimate objective of WESBOGY is to determine the effect of the different densities on the impact of Armillaria root rot. However, as Armillaria may be distributed irregularly across the landscape, it is necessary to know the initial pathogen population so that it can be used as a covariate to adjust estimated treatment effects to account for different starting levels of Armillaria. This paper reports on a project to determine the distribution of Armillaria in two replicates of the WESBOGY trial. Armillaria distribution was determined by inserting trap logs into the soil between the planted spruces in July 1993 and examining the logs a year later for the distinctive white mycelium typical of Armillaria.

  8. Identification of naphthalene metabolism by white rot fungus Armillaria sp. F022.

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    Hadibarata, Tony; Yusoff, Abdull Rahim Mohd; Aris, Azmi; Kristanti, Risky Ayu

    2012-01-01

    Armillaria sp. F022, a white rot fungus isolated from tropical rain forest (Samarinda, Indonesia) was used to biodegrade naphthalene in cultured medium. Transformation of naphthalene by Armillaria sp. F022 which is able to use naphthalene, a two ring-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) as a source of carbon and energy was investigated. The metabolic pathway was elucidated by identifying metabolites, biotransformation studies and monitoring enzyme activities in cell-free extracts. The identification of metabolites suggests that Armillaria sp. F022 initiates its attack on naphthalene by dioxygenation at its C-1 and C-4 positions to give 1,4-naphthoquinone. The intermediate 2-hydroxybenzaldehyde and salicylic acid, and the characteristic of the meta-cleavage of the resulting diol were identified in the long-term incubation. A part from typical metabolites of naphthalene degradation known from mesophiles, benzoic acid was identified as the next intermediate for the naphthalene pathway of this Armillaria sp. F022. Neither phthalic acid, catechol and cis,cis-muconic acid metabolites were detected in culture extracts. Several enzymes (manganese peroxidase, lignin peroxidase, laccase, 1,2-dioxygenase and 2,3-dioxygenase) produced by Armillaria sp. F022 were detected during the incubation.

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Methylobacterium sp. Strain ARG-1 Isolated from the White-Rot Fungus Armillaria gallica.

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    Collins, Caitlin; Kowalski, Caitlin; Zebrowski, Jessica; Tulchinskaya, Yevgeniya; Tai, Albert K; James-Pederson, Magdalena; Hirst, Rachel

    2016-06-02

    Methylobacterium sp. strain ARG-1 was isolated from a cell culture of hyphal tips of the white-rot fungus Armillaria gallica We describe here the sequencing, assembly, and annotation of its genome, confirming the presence of genes involved in methylotrophy. This is the first genome announcement of a strain of Methylobacterium associated with A. gallica. Copyright © 2016 Collins et al.

  10. Armillaria.

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    Sipos, György; Anderson, James B; Nagy, László G

    2018-04-02

    Lingering in forests around the world, some of the largest and oldest terrestrial organisms on earth hide in plain sight. In this Quick Guide, Sipos et al. shed light on the biology of the Armillaria fungi. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Susceptibility to Armillaria mellea root rot in grapevine rootstocks commonly grafted onto Teroldego Rotaliano

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    D. Prodorutti

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Armillaria root rot is an increasing problem in some grapevine-growing areas in north-eastern Italy (Trentino Province. The susceptibility of seven grapevine rootstocks (Schwarzmann, 3309 C, 101-14, Teleki 5C, SO4, Kober 5BB and 41 B; all grafted with Teroldego Rotaliano to Armillaria mellea was evaluated in a five-year investigation. Two inoculation methods were also compared: young grapevine plants were transplanted to a substrate that had been inoculated with A. mellea (Method A, or A. mellea rhizomorphs were inserted under the root bark after the root bark had been lifted up with a scalpel (Method B. Plants inoculated with Method A had higher infection and mortality rates than plants that were inoculated with Method B, demonstrating that root wounding does not lead to higher A. mellea infection. The significantly higher mortality and infection rates of 3309 C as compared with Teleki 5C in the final year of the study suggest that a Teroldego Rotaliano vineyard established on 3309 C will suffer greater losses than would a similar vineyard established on Teleki 5C. Rootstocks that were intermediate in their response to infection (Schwarzmann, Kober 5BB, and 41B may offer moderate levels of resistance since with these rootstocks the mortality and infection rates were not signifi cantly different from those of Teleki 5C. Since all rootstocks became infected, however, no rootstock is completely immune.

  12. First report of the root-rot pathogen, Armillaria nabsnona, from Hawaii

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    J. W. Hanna; N. B. Klopfenstein; M. -S. Kim

    2007-01-01

    The genus Armillaria (2) and Armillaria mellea sensu lato (3) have been reported previously from Hawaii. However, Armillaria species in Hawaii have not been previously identified by DNA sequences, compatibility tests, or other methods that distinguish currently recognized taxa. In August 2005, Armillaria rhizomorphs and mycelial bark fans were collected from two...

  13. Population genetics of the wood-rotting basidiomycete Armillaria cepistipes in a fragmented forest landscape.

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    Heinzelmann, Renate; Rigling, Daniel; Prospero, Simone

    2012-09-01

    Armillaria cepistipes is a common wood-rotting basidiomycete fungus found in most forests in Central Europe. In Switzerland, the habitat of A. cepistipes is fragmented because of the presence of major geographical barriers, in particular the Alps, and past deforestation. We analysed the impact of habitat fragmentation on the current spatial genetic structure of the Swiss A. cepistipes population. A total of 167 isolates were sampled across an area of 41 000 km(2) and genotyped at seven microsatellite and four single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) loci. All isolates belonged to different genotypes which, according to the Bayesian clustering algorithm implemented in Tess, originated from a single gene pool. Our analyses indicate that the overall A. cepistipes population shows little, but significant (F(ST)=0.02), genetic differentiation. Such a situation suggests gene flow is strong, possibly due to long-distance dispersal of airborne basidiospores. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that we could not detect a pattern of isolation by distance. Gene flow is partially restricted by the high mountain ranges of the Alps, as indicated by a signal of spatial autocorrelation detected among genotypes separated by less than about 80-130 km. In contrast, past deforestation seems to have no significant effect on the current spatial population structure of A. cepistipes. This might indicate the existence of a time lag between the current spatial genetic structure and the processes that have induced this specific structure. Copyright © 2012 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Fate and cometabolic degradation of benzo[a]pyrene by white-rot fungus Armillaria sp. F022.

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    Hadibarata, Tony; Kristanti, Risky Ayu

    2012-03-01

    Armillaria sp. F022, a white-rot fungus isolated from a tropical rain forest in Samarinda, Indonesia, was used to biodegrade benzo[a]pyrene (BaP). Transformation of BaP, a 5-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), by Armillaria sp. F022, which uses BaP as a source of carbon and energy, was investigated. However, biodegradation of BaP has been limited because of its bioavailability and toxicity. Five cosubstrates were selected as cometabolic carbon and energy sources. The results showed that Armillaria sp. F022 used BaP with and without cosubstrates. A 2.5-fold increase in degradation efficiency was achieved after addition of glucose. Meanwhile, the use of glucose as a cosubstrate could significantly stimulate laccase production compared with other cosubstrates and not using any cosubstrate. The metabolic pathway was elucidated by identifying metabolites, conducting biotransformation studies, and monitoring enzyme activities in cell-free extracts. The degradation mechanism was determined through the identification of several metabolites: benzo[a]pyrene-1,6-quinone, 1-hydroxy-2-benzoic acid, and benzoic acid. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Root rots

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    Kathryn Robbins; Philip M. Wargo

    1989-01-01

    Root rots of central hardwoods are diseases caused by fungi that infect and decay woody roots and sometimes also invade the butt portion of the tree. By killing and decaying roots, root rotting fungi reduce growth, decrease tree vigor, and cause windthrow and death. The most common root diseases of central hardwoods are Armillaria root rot, lnonotus root rot, and...

  16. Antagonistic effect of fungi from Scots pine stump roots against Heterobasidion annosum and Armillaria ostoyae

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    Hanna Kwaśny

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The study presents quantitative and qualitative aspects of fungal colonization of the 2-year-old stump roots of the 30- and 49-year-old Scots pines, and biotic relations between fungi inhabiting the stump roots and major agent s of butt and root rot in Poland, i.e.: H. annosum and A. ostoyae. Compared to the live roots, the increase in density of fungi communities as well as the frequency of the fungi antagonistic towards H. annosum and A. ostoyae, particularly of Trichoderma species. in pine stump roots resulted in the increase of the suppressive effect of these communities towards both pathogens, studied in vitro. This finding may suggest a stronger resistance of pine stump roots to H. annosum and A. ostoyae what under forest conditions may be the example of natural control of both pathogens.

  17. Degradation and transformation of anthracene by white-rot fungus Armillaria sp. F022.

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    Hadibarata, Tony; Zubir, Meor Mohd Fikri Ahmad; Rubiyatno; Chuang, Teh Zee; Yusoff, Abdull Rahim Mohd; Salim, Mohd Razman; Fulazzaky, Mohammad Ali; Seng, Bunrith; Nugroho, Agung Endro

    2013-09-01

    Characterization of anthracene metabolites produced by Armillaria sp. F022 was performed in the enzymatic system. The fungal culture was conducted in 100-mL Erlenmeyer flask containing mineral salt broth medium (20 mL) and incubated at 120 rpm for 5-30 days. The culture broth was then centrifuged at 10,000 rpm for 45 min to obtain the extract. Additionally, the effect of glucose consumption, laccase activity, and biomass production in degradation of anthracene were also investigated. Approximately, 92 % of the initial concentration of anthracene was degraded within 30 days of incubation. Dynamic pattern of the biomass production was affected the laccase activity during the experiment. The biomass of the fungus increased with the increasing of laccase activity. The isolation and characterization of four metabolites indicated that the structure of anthracene was transformed by Armillaria sp. F022 in two routes. First, anthracene was oxidized to form anthraquinone, benzoic acid, and second, converted into other products, 2-hydroxy-3-naphthoic acid and coumarin. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis also revealed that the molecular structure of anthracene was transformed by the action of the enzyme, generating a series of intermediate compounds such as anthraquinone by ring-cleavage reactions. The ligninolytic enzymes expecially free extracellular laccase played an important role in the transformation of anthracene during degradation period.

  18. Fluorene biodegradation and identification of transformation products by white-rot fungus Armillaria sp. F022.

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    Hadibarata, Tony; Kristanti, Risky Ayu

    2014-06-01

    A diverse surfactant, including the nonionic Tween 80 and Brij 30, the anionic sodium dodecyl sulphate, the cationic surfactant Tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide, and biosurfactant Rhamnolipid were investigated under fluorine-enriched medium by Armilaria sp. F022. The cultures were performed at 25 °C in malt extract medium containing 1 % of surfactant and 5 mg/L of fluorene. The results showed among the tested surfactants, Tween-80 harvested the highest cell density and obtained the maximum specific growth rate. This due Tween-80 provide a suitable carbon source for fungi. Fluorane was also successfully eliminated (>95 %) from the cultures within 30 days in all flasks. During the experiment, laccase production was the highest among other enzymes and Armillaria sp. F022-enriched culture containing Non-ionic Tween 80 showed a significant result for laccase activity (1,945 U/L). The increased enzyme activity was resulted by the increased biodegradation activity as results of the addition of suitable surfactants. The biotransformation of fluorene was accelerated by Tween 80 at the concentration level of 10 mg/L. Fluorene was initially oxidized at C-2,3 positions resulting 9-fluorenone. Through oxidative decarboxylation, 9-fluorenone subjected to meta-cleavage to form salicylic acid. One metabolite detected in the end of experiment, was identified as catechol. Armillaria sp. F022 evidently posses efficient, high effective degrader and potential for further application on the enhanced bioremediation technologies for treating fluorene-contaminated soil.

  19. Fungal communities in soil beneath Scots pine and their stumps. Effect of fungi on Heterobasidion annosum and Armillaria ostoyae growth

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    Hanna Kwaśna

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The soil beneath 30-year-old Scots pines, was inhabited by fungi communities which were at least iwicc as big as communities from ihe 49-year-old stand. The fungi communities in soil beneath the stumps were much smaller compared to those beneath the live trees and more abundant in the 30- than in the 49--year-old stand. The fungal communities in soil beneath the 30-year-old pines have bigger antagonistic effect on Heterobasidion annosum and Armillaria ostoyae than those beneath the 49-year-old stand. The decrease in density of fungi and in the frequency of species antagonistic to H. annosum and A. ostoyae resulted in the decrease of the antagonistic effect on both pathogens in soil beneath pine stumps.

  20. Inoculum reduction measures to manage Armillaria root disease in a severely infected stand of ponderosa pine in south-central Washington: 35-year results

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    Charles G. Shaw; D.W. Omdal; A. Ramsey-Kroll; L.F. Roth

    2012-01-01

    A stand of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) severely affected by Armillaria root disease was treated with five different levels of sanitation by root removal to reduce root disease losses in the regenerating stand. Treatments included the following: (1) all trees pushed over by machine, maximum removal of roots by machine ripping, and visible...

  1. Genetic population structure of three Armillaria species at the landscape scale: a case study from Swiss Pinus mugo forests.

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    Bendel, Muriel; Kienast, Felix; Rigling, Daniel

    2006-06-01

    Armillaria species are plant pathogens that cause Armillaria root rot and are known to cause mortality of mountain pines (Pinus mugo) in the Swiss National Park in the Central Alps. The identity of isolates and the spatially explicit population structure of the Armillaria species were investigated in a 3.3km(2) study area in the Swiss National Park. In total, 242 Armillaria isolates, 205 from wood samples and 37 from epiphytic rhizomorphs, were collected. Species were identified using haploid-diploid pairings and genets were determined using intraspecific somatic incompatibility tests. The population structure differed markedly among the Armillaria species. A. cepistipes and A. borealis mainly occurred as genets of small spatial extent (mean 0.2ha, and 0.6ha), whereas A. ostoyae formed significantly larger genets (mean 6.8ha). The largest A. ostoyae genet extended over approx. 37ha. Several disease centres associated with Heterobasidion annosum were found to be embedded within large Armillaria genets. The extension of large A. ostoyae genets suggests that forests that occupy the study area have developed in the presence of these Armillaria genets. The finding of large Armillaria genets supports the assumption that large genets occur in areas with cold climate and little precipitation.

  2. High-density genetic mapping identifies the genetic basis of a natural colony morphology mutant in the root rot pathogen Armillaria ostoyae.

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    Heinzelmann, Renate; Croll, Daniel; Zoller, Stefan; Sipos, György; Münsterkötter, Martin; Güldener, Ulrich; Rigling, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    Filamentous fungi exhibit a broad spectrum of heritable growth patterns and morphological variations reflecting the adaptation of the different species to distinct ecological niches. But also within species, isolates show considerable variation in growth rates and other morphological characteristics. The genetic basis of this intraspecific variation in mycelial growth and morphology is currently poorly understood. By chance, a growth mutant in the root rot pathogen Armillaria ostoyae was discovered. The mutant phenotype was characterized by extremely compact and slow growth, as well as shorter aerial hyphae and hyphal compartments in comparison to the wildtype phenotype. Genetic analysis revealed that the abnormal phenotype is caused by a recessive mutation, which segregates asa single locus in sexual crosses. In order to identify the genetic basis of the mutant phenotype, we performed a quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis. A mapping population of 198 haploid progeny was genotyped at 11,700 genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) making use of double digest restriction site associated DNA sequencing (ddRADseq). In accordance with the genetic analysis, a single significant QTL was identified for the abnormal growth phenotype. The QTL confidence interval spans a narrow, gene dense region of 87kb in the A. ostoyae genome which contains 37 genes. Overall, our study reports the first high-density genetic map for an Armillaria species and shows its successful application in forward genetics by resolving the genetic basis of a mutant phenotype with a severe defect in hyphal growth. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Genetic analysis reveals efficient sexual spore dispersal at a fine spatial scale in Armillaria ostoyae, the causal agent of root-rot disease in conifers.

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    Dutech, Cyril; Labbé, Frédéric; Capdevielle, Xavier; Lung-Escarmant, Brigitte

    Armillaria ostoyae (sometimes named Armillaria solidipes) is a fungal species causing root diseases in numerous coniferous forests of the northern hemisphere. The importance of sexual spores for the establishment of new disease centres remains unclear, particularly in the large maritime pine plantations of southwestern France. An analysis of the genetic diversity of a local fungal population distributed over 500 ha in this French forest showed genetic recombination between genotypes to be frequent, consistent with regular sexual reproduction within the population. The estimated spatial genetic structure displayed a significant pattern of isolation by distance, consistent with the dispersal of sexual spores mostly at the spatial scale studied. Using these genetic data, we inferred an effective density of reproductive individuals of 0.1-0.3 individuals/ha, and a second moment of parent-progeny dispersal distance of 130-800 m, compatible with the main models of fungal spore dispersal. These results contrast with those obtained for studies of A. ostoyae over larger spatial scales, suggesting that inferences about mean spore dispersal may be best performed at fine spatial scales (i.e. a few kilometres) for most fungal species. Copyright © 2017 British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Pretreatment of radiata pine using two white rot fungal strains Stereum hirsutum and Trametes versicolor

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    Shirkavand, Ehsan; Baroutian, Saeid; Gapes, Daniel J.; Young, Brent R.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Fungal pretreatment by two New Zealand native white rot fungi was proposed. • Trametes versicolor was more efficient in selective degradation of pine wood chips. • Both fungal strains significantly decreased crystallinity index of biomass only after week 7 of degradation. • Structural analysis showed that Trametes versicolor and Stereum hirsutum increased porous surface area of woody biomass. - Abstract: Stereum hirsutum and Trametes versicolor, were studied over a period of 3–7 weeks for pretreatment of radiata pine wood chips. Chemical analysis of pretreated biomass showed that the two studied strains were able to selectively degrade lignin. Selective lignin degradation was greater in week 3 of the pretreatment by Trametes versicolor compared to the other strain. Lengthening pretreatment time increased both lignin and cellulose losses which caused a reduction in selective lignin degradation for both strains. X-ray diffractometry showed that after seven weeks of pretreatment, the crystallinity of the woody biomass was decreased significantly. It decreased from 46% for untreated wood chips to 37% and 44% for Stereum hirsutum and Trametes versicolor treated biomass, respectively. The pretreatment with these two white rot fungi showed that 3-week pretreatment provided a cellulose rich biomass with the minimum cellulose loss compared to the other time of pretreatment.

  5. Determination of the Ecological and Geographic Distributions of Armillaria Species in Missouri Ozark Forest Ecosystems

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    Johann N. Bruhn; James J. Wetteroff; Jeanne D. Mihail; Susan. Burks

    1997-01-01

    Armillaria root rot contributes to oak decline in the Ozarks. Three Armillaria species were detected in Ecological Landtypes (ELT's) representing south- to west-facing side slopes (ELT 17), north- to east-facing side slopes (ELT 18), and ridge tops (ELT 11). Armillaria mellea was detected in 91 percent...

  6. Seedling mortality and development of root rot in white pine seedlings in two bare-root nurseries

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    J. Juzwik; D. J. Rugg

    1996-01-01

    Seedling mortality and development of root rot in white pine (Pinus strobus) were followed across locations and over time within three operational nursery fields with loamy sand soils at a provincial nursery in southwestern Ontario, Canada, and a state nursery in southern Wisconsin, USA. One Ontario field was fumigated with dazomet; the other was not...

  7. Armillaria species in coniferous stands

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    Anna Żółciak

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Identification of the Armillaria species in selected coniferous stands (Scots pine stands, Norway spruce stands and fir stands was the aim of the work carried out on the basis of mating tests and consideration of macroscopic traits of fruit-bodies. One species of Armillaria [A. ostoyae (Romagnesi Herink] was found in Scots pine stands, three species [A. ostoyae, A. cepistipes Velenovský and A. borealis Marxmüller et Korhonen] were found in Norway spruce stands and two species [A. ostoyae and A. cepistipes] were found in fir stands.

  8. Characterization of Armillaria isolates from tea (Camellia sinensis) in Kenya

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    Otieno, W.; Perez Sierra, A.; Termorshuizen, A.J.

    2003-01-01

    Armillaria is a primary root rot pathogen of tea (Camellia sinensis) in Kenya. The main species presently described in this country are A. mellea and A. heimii. A survey covering fourteen districts of Kenya was carried out and forty-seven isolates of Armillaria collected. Cultural morphology,

  9. Spatial patterns of Armillaria populations in the walker branch watershed throughfall displacement experiment, Tennessee,USA.

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    Johann N. Bruhn; James A. Brenneman; James J., Jr. Wetteroff; Jeanne D. Mihail; Theodor D. Leininger

    1997-01-01

    Species in the white-rot fungal genus Armillaria vary in parasitic aggressiveness as root and butt rot pathogens of trees. Armillaria genets (individuals) were mapped in the Throughfall Displacement Experiment (TDE) using mushrooms and rhizomorphs collected in 1994 and 1995. Initiated in July 1993, the TDE consists of three 80 x 80...

  10. Identification of Armillaria nabsnona in gastrodia tubers.

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    Sekizaki, Haruo; Kuninaga, Shiro; Yamamoto, Mizuho; Asazu, Sandra Naomi; Sawa, Satoko; Kojoma, Mareshige; Yokosawa, Ryozo; Yoshida, Naotoshi

    2008-07-01

    The symbiosis between Armillaria species and an achlorophylous orchid Gastrodia elata BLUME has been reported. The main species described as a symbiont is Armillaria mellea (VAHL: FR.) KUMMER, known widely as a primary root rot pathogen. Samples collected from the rhizomorphs attached to the tuber of G. elata were separated and analyzed. Molecular analysis based on sequencing of the intergenic spacer 1 (IGS-1) and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) was performed, coupled with restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the IGS-1 region. Cultural morphology and features of basidiomata were also used to characterize the isolates. Phylogenetic analysis and morphological data strongly suggested that the fungus present in the tubers of G. elata is Armillaria nabsnona. This is the first report of occurrence of this Armillaria species in association with G. elata.

  11. Transcriptome of an Armillaria root disease pathogen reveals candidate genes involved in host substrate utilization at the host­-pathogen interface

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    A. L. Ross-Davis; J. E. Stewart; J. W. Hanna; M.-S. Kim; B. J. Knaus; R. Cronn; H. Rai; B. A. Richardson; G. I. McDonald; N. B. Klopfenstein

    2013-01-01

    Armillaria species display diverse ecological roles ranging from beneficial saprobe to virulent pathogen. Armillaria solidipes (formerly A. ostoyae), a causal agent of Armillaria root disease, is a virulent primary pathogen with a broad host range of woody plants across the Northern Hemisphere. This white-rot pathogen grows between trees as rhizomorphs and attacks...

  12. Intraspecific Variation in Armillaria Species from Shrubs and Trees in Northwestern Spain

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    O. Aguín

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, the identification of Armillaria species relied upon morphological characteristics and mating tests, but now molecular techniques based on polymorphisms in the IGS region of the fungal rDNA are more commonly used, since these are more rapid and reliable. Differences found in RFLP patterns identifying Armillaria species have suggested the existence of intraspecific variation. In this work, 185 Armillaria isolates from different plant species (including fruit trees, broadleaf and coniferous trees, ornamental shrubs, kiwifruit and grapevine affected by white root rot were analyzed by RFLP-PCR, in order to study intraspecific variation in Armillaria and the relationship with the plant host. Armillaria mellea was found in the majority of samples (71%, and was the most frequent Armillaria species in symptomatic ornamental shrubs, kiwifruit, grapevine, fruit trees and broadleaf trees. In conifers however white root rot was generally caused by Armillaria ostoyae. Armillaria gallica was identified, although with low incidence, in ornamental, coniferous, broadleaf and fruit hosts. Intraspecies variation was recorded only in A. mellea, for which RFLP patterns mel 1 and mel 2 were found. Most plants infected with A. mellea showed the mel 2 pattern. Further research is needed to study whether Armillaria RFLP patterns are specific to certain plant hosts, and whether intraspecific variation is related to differences in pathogenicity.

  13. Crescimento in vitro de isolados de Armillaria sp. obtidos de Pinus elliottii var: elliottii sob várias temperaturas In vitro growth of Armillaria sp. isolates obtained from Pinus elliottii var: elliottii under several temperatures

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    Nei Sebastião Braga Gomes

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available A armilariose tem sido considerada a principal doença em Pinus no Brasil. Os sintomas e danos consistem no amarelecimento de acículas, declínio, podridão de raízes, exsudação de resina e morte. A temperatura é um dos fatores ambientais que influencia patógenos, doença de plantas ou ambos. Este trabalho avaliou o comportamento de três isolados de Armillaria sp. obtidos de P. elliottii var. elliottii, submetidos a uma faixa de temperatura de 16 a 26 ºC, utilizando a biomassa seca produzida em meio líquido como parâmetro de análise. Verificou-se que todos os isolados apresentaram máxima produção de biomassa a 22 ºC. Utilizando-se de regressão cúbica encontrou-se temperaturas de máximo crescimento entre 21,79 e 23,19 ºC. De acordo com os resultados, a melhor temperatura para crescimento dos isolados testados situou-se em 22 ºC.Armillaria root rot is the major pine disease in Brazil. Symptoms of this disease are yellowing of the needles, decline, root rot, resin exsudation and plant death. Temperature is an environmental factor that affects pathogens, the disease or both. This work evaluated the behaviour of three isolates of Armillaria sp. obtained from P. elliottii var. elliottii. The fungus isolates were submitted to temperature ranging from 16 to 26 ºC, by using dry biomass production in liquid medium as a measureable variable. All isolates produced higher amount of biomass at 22 ºC. A cubic regression showed a maximum point of temperatures between 21,8 e 23,2 ºC. The best temperature for fungus isolates growth was around 22 ºC.

  14. Effects of silvicultural techniques on the diversity of microorganisms in forest soil and their possible participation in biological control of Armillaria and Heterobasidion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwaśna Hanna

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Effects of different pre-planting soil preparations and post-harvest wood debris applications in a clear-cut Scots pine plantation, on the abundance, diversity, and activity of culturable microorganisms were investigated. The investigation was done 9 years after the re-plantings had been done. This formed part of an investigation of silvicultural practices for conservation and the biological control of Armillaria and Heterobasidion in northern temperate forests (Poland. The treatments being compared, were expected to have altered the soil’s physical and chemical properties, and consequently, its biological properties. Only soft-rot microfungi from the Ascomycota and Zygomycota were detected in the soil. Fungi, including those antagonistic to Armillaria and Heterobasidion, were more abundant after shallow ploughing than after deep ploughing or ridging, and where chipped rather than coarse wood debris was left on the soil surface or incorporated. Scots pine trees had the most biomass and the least mortality after ridging and leaving coarse wood debris on the surface (associated with only a relatively moderate abundance of fungi.

  15. First report of the root-rot pathogen, Armillaria gallica, on koa (Acacia koa) and 'Ohi'a lehua (Metrosideros polymorpha) on the island of Kaua'i, Hawai'i

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. -S. Kim; N. R. Fonseca; R. D. Hauff; P. G. Cannon; John Hanna; Ned Klopfenstein

    2017-01-01

    Koa (Acacia koa) and 'ohi'a lehua (Metrosideros polymorpha) are the two most dominant native tree species in Hawai‘i. Their populations are continuously decreasing, primarily because of forest disease (Dudley et al. 2007; Keith et al. 2015) and other biotic disturbances. In April 2015, Armillaria rhizomorphs were collected from woody hosts on the...

  16. Effects of ash leachates on growth and development of Armillaria mellea in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimmy L. Reaves; Charles G. III Shaw; Robert E. Martin; John E. Mayfield

    1984-01-01

    Ash leachates from recently burned litter in a ponderosa pine forest in central Oregon were tested for their effects on growth and development of Armillaria mellea in culture. Two isolates were used: one from an infected western hemlock and the other from an infected ponderosa pine tree. Colonies developing from agar discs containing mycelia of the...

  17. Occurrence and distribution of Armillaria gallica genets in a declining oak stand of southern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. de Gioia

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Outbreaks of Armillaria root rot in conifer plantations and declining oak stands are frequently due to the spread of the fungus in the soil over long periods. This paper examines the occurrence and distribution of Armillaria genets in a declining mixed oak stand of southern Italy. Samples of rhizomorphs, mycelial mats and fruit bodies of Armillaria were collected from the soil, stumps, and living and dead trees. A total of 111 Armillaria isolates were collected, all belonging to the species A. gallica. They were grouped in 28 genets by somatic incompatibility. The largest genet covered an area of about 2.6 ha with a linear extent of 300 m. On the basis of an estimated 0.5 m annual growth in the soil, its age was assumed to be about 3 centuries. The results confirm the ability of A. gallica to remain alive and stable in a large area over a long time.

  18. Genetic diversity of Armillaria spp. infecting highbush blueberry in northern Italy (Trentino region).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodorutti, D; Vanblaere, T; Gobbin, D; Pellegrini, A; Gessler, C; Pertot, I

    2009-06-01

    Armillaria spp. are the causal agents of root rots of several woody plants, including highbush blueberry. Since 2003, highbush blueberry plants infected by Armillaria spp. have been found in Valsugana Valley, Trentino region, northern Italy. Our aim was to identify the Armillaria spp. involved in these infections, as well as possible sources of inoculum in blueberry fields. Samples of Armillaria spp. were collected from diseased blueberry plants in 13 infected blueberry fields, from bark spread along the blueberry rows, from infected trees in the vicinity of the fields, and from four forest locations. The identification of Armillaria spp. was accomplished using a species-specific multiplex polymerase chain reaction method and by sequencing the rDNA at a specific locus. The differentiation between genotypes was performed by using simple-sequence repeat analysis. Armillaria mellea and A. gallica were the most frequently observed species infecting blueberry in the Valsugana Valley. Three to eight Armillaria genotypes were identified in each blueberry field. No individual genotypes were found in more than one blueberry field. Two-thirds of the genotypes found colonizing trees in the immediate vicinity of infected fields and two-thirds of the genotypes found colonizing the bark spread in blueberry rows were also isolated from blueberry plants in the field, indicating that bark used as mulch and infected trees surrounding the fields may be important sources of inoculum.

  19. RECONSTRUCTING THE EVOLUTIONARY HISTORY OF THE FOREST FUNGAL PATHOGEN, ARMILLARIA MELLEA, IN A TEMPERATE WORLDWIDE POPULATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The forest pathogen Armillaria mellea s.s. (Basidiomycota, Physalacriaceae) is among the most significant forest pathogens causing root rot in northern temperate forest trees worldwide. Phylogenetic reconstructions for A. mellea show distinct European, Asian and North American lineages. The North Am...

  20. The test of eight tree species resistance to the attack of Armillaria mellea and A. ostoyae by artificial infection

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    Keča Nenad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the forest ecosystems in Serbia five Armillaria species are present. Understanding differences in the pathogenicity of Armillaria species to the tree species is of a great importance for the foresters. The aim of study was to test susceptibility of eight forest tree species to attack of Armillaria mellea and A. ostoyae. The sticks of Hazel previously infected with mycelium of two Armillaria were placed next to the root collar of two years old seediling. In the period of eighteen months health status of tested seedlings was observed. Differences in susceptibility among tested tree species was observed, while there was no difference in the pathogenicity between Armillaria mellea and A. ostoyae. The most susceptible species were Serbian Spruce, Common Fir, Scots and Austrian Pine, following by Spruce and Douglas Fir, while more resistant were Pedunculate and Sessile oak.

  1. The most important parasitic and saprophytic fungi in Austrian pine and Scots pine plantations in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karadžić Dragan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In Austrian pine plantations in Serbia, the greatest damage is caused by the fungi Mycosphaerella pini, Sphaeropsis sapinea, Cenangium ferruginosum, Germmeniella abietina (in the mountain regions and occasionally Armillaria spp., Lophodermium spp. (seditiosum, conigenum, pinastri and Cyclaneusma niveum. In Scots pine plantations, the greatest damage is caused by the fungi Heterobasidion annosum (especially in plantations on sandy soils, Armillaria spp, Lophodermium seditiosum, L. pinastri, Cyclaneusma minus and Sphaeropsis sapinea. Damage caused by rust fungi (Coleosporium sennecionis, Melampsora pinitorqua and Cronartium flaccidum occurs less frequently. In mountainous regions in Scots pine plantations, great damage is caused by Phacidium infestans, Lophodermella sulcigena and Gremmeniella abietina.

  2. Armillaria Pathogenesis under Climate Changes

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    Katarzyna Kubiak

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Climate changes influencing forest ecosystems include increased air temperatures and CO2 concentrations as well as droughts and decreased water availability. These changes in turn effect changes in species composition of both host plants and pathogens. In the case of Armillaria, climate changes cause an increase in the activity of individual species and modify the growth of rhizomorphs, increasing the susceptibility of trees. The relationship between climate changes and the biotic elements of Armillaria disease are discussed in overview.

  3. Pines

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Plomion; D. Chagne; D. Pot; S. Kumar; P.L. Wilcox; R.D. Burdon; D. Prat; D.G. Peterson; J. Paiva; P. Chaumeil; G.G. Vendramin; F. Sebastiani; C.D. Nelson; C.S. Echt; O. Savolainen; T.L. Kubisiak; M.T. Cervera; N. de Maria; M.N. Islam-Faridi

    2007-01-01

    Pinus is the most important genus within the Family Pinaceae and also within the gymnosperms by the number of species (109 species recognized by Farjon 2001) and by its contribution to forest ecosystems. All pine species are evergreen trees or shrubs. They are widely distributed in the northern hemisphere, from tropical areas to northern areas in America and Eurasia....

  4. Armillaria root disease in the western USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Hanna; Sara Ashiglar; Anna Case; Mary Lou Fairweather; Chris Hoffman; Mee-Sook Kim; Helen Maffei; Robert Mathiasen; Geral McDonald; Erik Nelson; Amy Ross-Davis; John Shaw; Ned Klopfenstein

    2012-01-01

    Armillaria species display diverse ecological behaviors from beneficial saprobe to virulent pathogen. Armillaria solidipes, a causal agent of Armillaria root disease (ARD), is a virulent primary pathogen with a broad host range. ARD is responsible for reduced forest productivity as a result of direct tree mortality and non-lethal cryptic infections that impact growth....

  5. A faster infection assay for Armillaria using Herbaceous plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armillaria (honey fungus) is a virulent necrotrophic pathogen that causes Armillaria root disease. Conventional Armillaria inoculation assays use young saplings as hosts and consequently are cumbersome, frequently conducted outdoors and take many years from establishment to analysis of infection. We...

  6. Biomechanics of invasive growth by Armillaria rhizomorphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yafetto, Levi; Davis, Diana J; Money, Nicholas P

    2009-09-01

    Rhizomorphs of wood-decay basidiomycetes are root-like structures produced by the coordinated growth of thousands of hyphae. Very little is known about their development nor the way that they penetrate soils and rotting wood. In this study, we applied techniques used in previous studies on hyphae to explore the mechanics of the invasive growth process in Armillaria gallica. Growth rate measurements were made in media with different gel strengths. The osmolyte composition of rhizomorph sap was determined spectroscopically and the forces exerted by growing tips were measured using a force transducer. Cultured rhizomorphs extended at much faster rates than unbundled hyphae (3.5mmd(-1) versus 1.5mmd(-1)) and their growth accelerated in response to increased medium gel strength (to 7.4mmd(-1)). Measurements of rhizomorph osmolality provided a turgor pressure estimate of 760kPa (7.5atm.), and spectroscopic analysis showed that this pressure was generated by the accumulation of erythritol, mannitol, and KCl. Forces exerted by growing tips ranged from 1 to 6mN, corresponding to pressures of 40-300kPa (0.4-3.0atm.). Pressures exerted by extending rhizomorphs are comparable to those produced by individual vegetative hyphae. This suggests that the mechanical behavior of hyphae is similar whether they grow as unbundled cells or aggregate to form macroscopic rhizomorphs.

  7. Bioluminescence patterns among North American Armillaria species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihail, Jeanne D

    2015-06-01

    Bioluminescence is widely recognized among white-spored species of Basidiomycota. Most reports of fungal bioluminescence are based upon visual light perception. When instruments such as photomultipliers have been used to measure fungal luminescence, more taxa have been discovered to produce light, albeit at a range of magnitudes. The present studies were undertaken to determine the prevalence of bioluminescence among North American Armillaria species. Consistent, constitutive bioluminescence was detected for the first time for mycelia of Armillaria calvescens, Armillaria cepistipes, Armillaria gemina, Armillaria nabsnona, and Armillaria sinapina and confirmed for mycelia of Armillaria gallica, Armillaria mellea, Armillaria ostoyae, and Armillaria tabescens. Emission spectra of mycelia representing all species had maximum intensity in the range 515-525 nm confirming that emitted light was the result of bioluminescence rather than chemiluminescence. Time series analysis of 1000 consecutive luminescence measurements revealed a highly significant departure from random variation. Mycelial luminescence of eight species exhibited significant, stable shifts in magnitude in response to a series of mechanical disturbance treatments, providing one mechanism for generating observed luminescence variation. Copyright © 2015 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Armillaria mellea: an ozonophilic basidiomycete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berliner, M.D.

    1963-01-19

    Armillaria mellea, a luminescent basidiomycete grown in culture, had its light emission stimulated by high ozone concentrations and survived long ozone exposures without apparent lasting ill-effect. There is a strong possibility that a pigment acts as an ozone protecting substance by preventing the formation of free radicals and peroxides.

  9. Mitochondrial Genetics in a Natural Population of the Plant Pathogen Armillaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M. L.; Duchesne, L. C.; Bruhn, J. N.; Anderson, J. B.

    1990-01-01

    Transmission and propagation of mitochondrial genotypes in fungi have not been previously investigated in the field. This study examined the distribution of nuclear and mitochondrial genotypes in a natural, local population of the fungal (Basidiomycetes) root-rot pathogen, Armillaria. Six vegetative clones, ranging in size up to 635 m, were identified on the basis of mating-type alleles. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) restriction fragment patterns indicated that each vegetative clone has one, unique mtDNA type. However, as in other basidiomycetous fungi, biparental transmission of mitochondria following laboratory matings of sexually compatible haploid isolates of Armillaria resulted in a uniformly diploid mycelium that was a mosaic for both parental mitochondrial types. Therefore, either matings between monosporous, haploid isolates are uncommon in nature, or when mating does occur, cytoplasmic markers of one partner predominate during subsequent vegetative growth. PMID:2249757

  10. Biodegradation and metabolite transformation of pyrene by basidiomycetes fungal isolate Armillaria sp. F022.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadibarata, Tony; Kristanti, Risky Ayu

    2013-04-01

    Armillaria sp. F022 is a white-rot fungus isolated from a tropical rain forest in Indonesia that is capable of utilizing pyrene as a source of carbon and energy. Enzymes production during the degradation process by Armillaria sp. F022 was certainly related to the increase in biomass. In the first week after incubation, the growth rate rapidly increased, but enzyme production decreased. After 7 days of incubation, rapid growth was observed, whereas, the enzymes were produced only after a good amount of biomass was generated. About 63 % of pyrene underwent biodegradation when incubated with this fungus in a liquid medium on a rotary shaker (120 rpm, 25 °C) for 30 days; during this period, pyrene was transformed to five stable metabolic products. These metabolites were extracted in ethyl acetate, isolated by column chromatography, and then identified using thin layer chromatography (TLC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). 1-Hydroxypyrene was directly identified by GC-MS, while 4-phenanthroic acid, 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid, phthalic acid, and protocatechuic acid were identified to be present in their derivatized forms (methylated forms and silylated forms). Protocatechuic acid was the end product of pyrene degradation by Armillaria sp. F022. Dynamic profiles of two key enzymes, namely laccase and 1,2-dioxygenase, were revealed during the degradation process, and the results indicated the presence of a complicated mechanism in the regulation of pyrene-degrading enzymes. In conclusion, Armillaria sp. F022 is a white-rot fungus with potential for application in the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons such as pyrene in the environment.

  11. Secrets of the subterranean pathosystem of Armillaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Kendra; Coetzee, Martin P A; Hoffmeister, Dirk

    2011-08-01

    Armillaria root disease affects fruit and nut crops, timber trees and ornamentals in boreal, temperate and tropical regions of the world. The causal pathogens are members of the genus Armillaria (Basidiomycota, Physalacriaceae). This review summarizes the state of knowledge and highlights recent advances in Armillaria research. Armillaria includes more than 40 morphological species. However, the identification and delineation of species on the basis of morphological characters are problematic, resulting in many species being undetected. Implementation of the biological species' concept and DNA sequence comparisons in the contemporary taxonomy of Armillaria have led to the discovery of a number of new species that are not linked to described morphological species. Armillaria exhibits a range of symbioses with both plants and fungi. As plant pathogens, Armillaria species have broad host ranges, infecting mostly woody species. Armillaria can also colonize orchids Galeola and Gastrodia but, in this case, the fungus is the host and the plant is the parasite. Similar to its contrasting relationships with plants, Armillaria acts as either host or parasite in its interactions with other fungi. Disease control: Recent research on post-infection controls has revealed promising alternatives to the former pre-plant eradication attempts with soil fumigants, which are now being regulated more heavily or banned outright because of their negative effects on the environment. New study tools for genetic manipulation of the pathogen and characterization of the molecular basis of the host response will greatly advance the development of resistant rootstocks in a new stage of research. The depth of the research, regardless of whether traditional or genomic approaches are used, will depend on a clear understanding of where the different propagules of Armillaria attack a root system, which of the pathogen's diverse biolymer-degrading enzymes and secondary metabolites facilitate infection

  12. [Incidence and distribution of the genus Armillaria in vineyards of the five protected designation of origin wines in Galicia (Northwestern Spain)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguín, Olga; Abuín, María; Lozano, Francisco; Ferreiroa, Vanesa; Corral, Mercedes; Mansilla, J Pedro

    2015-01-01

    The genus Armillaria, specifically Armillaria mellea, is an important phytopathological problem in the wine sector in Galicia (NW Spain), having caused yield reductions in vineyards for the last 15 years. The fungus attacks the root system, resulting in a decrease in vigour, and eventually in the death of the plant. Up to now, there is no chemical or biological method really effective against the pathogen once it has infected the plant. The main objective of this work was to study the incidence and distribution of the genus Armillaria across the five Galician protected designation of origin (DO) wines (namely Rías Baixas, Ribeiro, Ribeira Sacra, Valdeorras and Monterrei) through the application of molecular techniques. A total of 624 samples (483 soils and 141 symptomatic vines) were analyzed by nested-PCR/RFLP, PCR-RFLP and phylogeny. Armillaria mellea is widely distributed in vineyards of the five DO wines, with the highest incidence in the Ribeiro DO. Preventive control measures against Armillaria mellea must be established in the five DO wines of Galicia, in order to reduce the advance of white root rot. Copyright © 2013 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Phylogenetic constrains on Polyporus umbellatus-Armillaria associations

    OpenAIRE

    Xing, Xiaoke; Men, Jinxin; Guo, Shunxing

    2017-01-01

    It has been well established that some Armillaria species are symbionts of Polyporus umbellatus, However, little is known about the evolutionary history of P. umbellatus-Armillaria associations. In this research, we used an analysis based on the strength of the phylogenetic signal to investigate P. umbellatus-Armillaria associations in 57 sclerotial samples across 11 provinces of China. We isolated Armillaria strains from the invasion cavity inside the sclerotia of P. umbellatus and then phyl...

  14. Survey for Armillaria by plant associations in northern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ W. Hoffman; Robert L. Mathiasen; Richard W. Hofstetter; Mary Lou Fairweather; John D. Shaw; John W. Hanna; Ned B. Klopfenstein

    2014-01-01

    Fungi in the genus Armillaria are associated with an important disease of deciduous and coniferous trees and shrubs in western North America. This study examined the distribution of Armillaria by forest habitat types on the Kaibab National Forest and northern Coconino National Forest, Arizona. Over 400 trees were examined for Armillaria in 76 Interior West Forest...

  15. Phylogenetic constrains on Polyporus umbellatus-Armillaria associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Xiaoke; Men, Jinxin; Guo, Shunxing

    2017-06-26

    It has been well established that some Armillaria species are symbionts of Polyporus umbellatus, However, little is known about the evolutionary history of P. umbellatus-Armillaria associations. In this research, we used an analysis based on the strength of the phylogenetic signal to investigate P. umbellatus-Armillaria associations in 57 sclerotial samples across 11 provinces of China. We isolated Armillaria strains from the invasion cavity inside the sclerotia of P. umbellatus and then phylogenetically analyzed these Armillaria isolates. We also tested the effect of P. umbellatus and Armillaria phylogenies on the P. umbellatus-Armillaria associations. We isolated forty-seven Armillaria strains from 26 P. umbellatus sclerotial samples. All Armillaria isolates were classified into the 5 phylogenetic lineages found in China except for one singleton. Among the 5 phylogenetic lineages, one lineage (lineage 8) was recognized by delimitation of an uncertain phylogenetic lineage in previous study. Results of simple Mantel test implied that phylogenetically related P. umbellatus populations tend to interact with phylogenetically related Armillaria species. Phylogenetic network analyses revealed that the interaction between P. umbellatus and Armillaria is significantly influenced by the phylogenetic relationships between the Armillaria species.

  16. Using the Resistograph®to distinguish different types of wood rot on living silver fir in Molise (Italy

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    Lasserre B

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available he study was performed in two silver-fir forests (Abies alba Mill. located in Alto Molise, Province of Isernia: Collemeluccio, near Pescolanciano and Abeti Soprani near Capracotta. The aim of this work was to distinguish different types of wood rot on living silver fir individuals by using the Resistograph® (IML-RESI E400, a device that allows to estimate the variation of wood density by measuring the resistance to micro-perforation. The occurrence of different types of wood rot (white rot and brown rot in living trees was pointed out and discriminated by the device. In the detected deteriorated zones, fungal pathogens and decomposers were isolated and identified, causing either white (Phellinus hartigii, Ganoderma adspersum, Heterobasidion abietinum and Armillaria ostoyae or brown rot (Fomitopsis pinicola.

  17. Armillaria mellea induces a set of defense genes in grapevine roots and one of them codifies a protein with antifungal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perazzolli, Michele; Bampi, Federica; Faccin, Silvia; Moser, Mirko; De Luca, Federica; Ciccotti, Anna Maria; Velasco, Riccardo; Gessler, Cesare; Pertot, Ilaria; Moser, Claudio

    2010-04-01

    Grapevine root rot, caused by Armillaria mellea, is a serious disease in some grape-growing regions. Young grapevines start to show symptoms of Armillaria root rot from the second year after inoculation, suggesting a certain degree of resistance in young roots. We used a suppression subtractive hybridization approach to study grapevine's reactions to the first stages of A. mellea infection. We identified 24 genes that were upregulated in the roots of the rootstock Kober 5BB 24 h after A. mellea challenge. Real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis confirmed the induction of genes encoding protease inhibitors, thaumatins, glutathione S-transferase, and aminocyclopropane carboxylate oxidase, as well as phase-change related, tumor-related, and proline-rich proteins, and gene markers of the ethylene and jasmonate signaling pathway. Gene modulation was generally stronger in Kober 5BB than in Pinot Noir plants, and in vitro inoculation induced higher modulation than in greenhouse Armillaria spp. treatments. The full-length coding sequences of seven of these genes were obtained and expressed as recombinant proteins. The grapevine homologue of the Quercus spp. phase-change-related protein inhibited the growth of A. mellea mycelia in vitro, suggesting that this protein may play an important role in the defense response against A. mellea.

  18. Assessing the impact of wood decay fungi on the modulus of elasticity of slash pine (Pinus elliottii) by stress wave non-destructive testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong Yang; Zhehui Jiang; Chung Y. Hse; Ru Liu

    2017-01-01

    Small wood specimens selected from six slash pine (Pinus elliottii) trees were inoculated with brown-rot and white-rot fungi and then evaluated for static modulus of elasticity (MOE) and dynamic MOE (MOEsw). The experimental variables studied included a brown-rot fungus (Gloeophyllum trabeum) and a white-rot fungus (Trametes versicolor) for six exposure periods (2, 4,...

  19. In vitro fruiting of Armillaria species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimmy L. Reaves; Michael. McWilliams

    1991-01-01

    Thirty-three different isolates of various Armillaria species were grown on sterilized orange slices under a controlled temperature and light regime. Nine isolates of A. ostoyae (North American Biological Species I, NABS I), three of NABS VII, one of NABS IX, one of NABS X, and two unidentified isolates formed basidiomes. Most...

  20. Armillaria ectypa, a vulnerable indicator of mires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester Ohenoja

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A boreal-montane basidiomycete, Armillaria ectypa, occurs as occasional in northern Finland, mainly in the aapa mire area. According to the IUCN criteria it has been classified as a vulnerable fungus in Finland. Its ecology is in some way connected e.g. to the carices of wet mesotrophic mires.

  1. Armillaria Staude in the Cameroon Republic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Watling, Roy

    1992-01-01

    The intricacies of the nomenclature of the African Armillaria variously known as Clitocybe elegans, A. heimii, and A. fuscipes, and its relationship to A. mellea var. camerunensis are discussed. A full illustrated description of recently collected material from the Guinea-Congo rainforest is given,

  2. In vitro interactions between Armillaria species and potential biocontrol fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keča Nenad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Interaction between Armillaria species and seven other fungi were tested in vitro. Tree antagonistic (Trichoderma viride, Trichotecium roseum and Penicillium sp. and four decaying (Hypholoma fasciculare¸ Hypholoma capnoides, Phlebiopsis gigantea, and Pleurotus ostreatus fungi were chosen for this study. The best results were noted for Trichoderma viride, because fungus was able to kill both mycelia and rhizomorphs of Armillaria species, while Hypholoma spp. inhibited both growth of Armillaria colonies and rhizomorph production.

  3. Strength reduction in slash pine (Pinus elliotii) wood caused by decay fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong Yang; Zhehui Jiang; Chung Y. Hse; Todd F. Shupe

    2009-01-01

    Small wood specimens selected from slash pine (Pinus elliotii )trees at three growth rates (fast, medium, and slow) were inoculated with brown-rot and white-rot fungi and then evaluated for work to maximum load (WML), modulus of rupture (MOR), and modulus of elasticity (MOE). The experimental variables studied included a brown-rot fungus (Gloeophyllum trabeum...

  4. Fungal biodiversity in rhizosphere of healthy and needle cast-affected Scots pine transplants

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    Małgorzata Mańka

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Healthy Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. transplants had in rhizosphere a community of saprotrophic fungi which considerably suppressed the growth of severe root pathogens Heterobasidion annosum and Armillaria obscura. A community from transplants affected by needle cast (Lophodermium spp. suppressed both pathogens to a much smaller extent.

  5. Microsatellite markers for the diploid Basidiomycete fungus, Armillaria mellea

    Science.gov (United States)

    We isolated and characterized 13 microsatellite markers for two North American populations (California and Pennsylvania) of Armillaria mellea, a fungal root pathogen responsible for Armillaria root disease of numerous horticultural crops and forest trees. The frequency of alleles ranged from two to...

  6. Developing a prediction model for Armillaria solidipes in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    N. B. Klopfenstein; J. W Hanna; M. L. Fairweather; J. D. Shaw; R. Mathiasen; C. Hoffman; E. Nelson; M. -S. Kim; A. L. Ross-Davis

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, a collaborative project was started to determine the distribution of Armillaria solidipes (= A. ostoyae) in Arizona. The methods and preliminary accomplishments of the 2010 and 2011 (ongoing) field surveys/collections are summarized. During the next phase of this project, surveys will be completed and remaining Armillaria isolates will be identified using DNA-...

  7. Studies on black stain root disease in ponderosa pine. pp. 236-240. M. Garbelotto & P. Gonthier (Editors). Proceedings 12th International Conference on Root and Butt Rots of Forest Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. J. Otrosina; J. T. Kliejunas; S. S. Sung; S. Smith; D. R. Cluck

    2008-01-01

    Black stain root disease of ponderosa pine, caused by Lepfographium wageneri var. ponderosum (Harrington & Cobb) Harrington & Cobb, is increasing on many eastside pine stands in northeastern California. The disease is spread from tree to tree via root contacts and grafts but new infections are likely vectored by root...

  8. Foraging behaviour of Armillaria rhizomorph systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihail, Jeanne D; Bruhn, Johann N

    2005-11-01

    The foraging behaviour of Armillaria rhizomorph systems is poorly understood owing to their cryptic position within the soil. We investigated foraging in a homogeneous environment (i.e. agar), finding that rhizomorph systems of the more parasitic species, A. mellea, A. ostoyae, and A. tabescens, lacked melanin and the approximately cylindrical cord-like form observed in the field. In contrast, rhizomorph systems of the more saprotrophic species, A. calvescens, A. gallica, and A. sinapina, developed radially resembling those in the field. For the three saprotrophic Armillaria species, the number of rhizomorph tips, total rhizomorph length and total rhizomorph surface area were significantly positively correlated with increasing rhizomorph system diameter and elapsed time in two developmental tests. However, the fractal dimension (D), used as a measure of foraging intensity, was temporally invariable, suggesting that one component of foraging behaviour is innate. In a heterogeneous environment (i.e. sand) and in the absence of a potential nutrient source, we observed that rhizomorph systems of A. gallica most often developed asymmetrically. While rhizomorph foraging was unresponsive to the lateral placement of an uncolonised stem segment, we were able to demonstrate directional growth toward an uncolonised Quercus velutina stem segment placed above or below the colonised source stem segment. When neighboring rhizomorph systems were conspecific genets of A. gallica, we observed that the growth of one rhizomorph system was directed toward zones unoccupied by its neighbour. However, the foraging intensity of the neighbouring genets, as measured by fractal dimension (D), was unaffected by the proximity of a neighbour. When neighbouring rhizomorph systems represented different species (A. gallica and A. mellea), A. gallica rhizomorph systems produced more total length and more foraging tips but concentrated their rhizomorph production away from the neighbouring A. mellea

  9. First report of Armillaria root disease caused by Armillaria tabescens on Araucaria araucana in Veracruz, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.-S. Kim; N. B. Klopfenstein; J. W. Hanna; P. Cannon; R. Medel; A. Lopez

    2010-01-01

    In September 2007, bark samples were collected from the root collar of a single Araucaria araucana tree that had recently died and was suspected of being killed by Armillaria root disease. Disease symptoms and signs included a thinning crown and fruiting bodies at the tree base over a several-year period before tree death.

  10. Role of the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in tolerance response against Armillaria mellea in lavender

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvet, C.; Garcia-Figueres, F.; Lovato, P.; Camprubi, A.

    2015-07-01

    Lavender species form the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis and are at the same time highly susceptible to white root rot. In an attempt to evaluate the response of mycorrhizal Lavandula angustifolia L. to Armillaria mellea (Vahl:Fr) P. Kumm in a greenhouse experiment, plants were previously inoculated with an isolate of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis (former Glomus intraradices BEG 72) and the influence of the pH growing medium on the plant-symbiont-pathogen interaction was tested in gnotobiotic autotrophic growth systems in which mycorrhizal inoculum was obtained from root organ cultures. After ten months growth dual-inoculated lavender plants grown in containers with a pasteurized substrate mixture produced a similar number of spikes than healthy plants and achieved equivalent plant diameter coverage. When the growing medium in the autotrophic systems was supplemented with calcium carbonate, the inoculation of lavender plantlets with R. irregularis at higher pH (7.0 and 8.5) media caused a significant decrease of A. mellea presence in plant roots, as detected by qPCR. Moreover, the observation of internal root mycorrhizal infection showed that the extent of mycorrhizal colonization increasedin plant rootsgrown at higher pH, indicating that tolerance to white root rot in lavender plants inoculated with R. irregularis could be associated to mycorrhizal establishment. (Author)

  11. Role of the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in tolerance response against Armillaria mellea in lavender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinta Calvet

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Lavender species form the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis and are at the same time highly susceptible to white root rot. In an attempt to evaluate the response of mycorrhizal Lavandula angustifolia L. to Armillaria mellea (Vahl:Fr P. Kumm in a greenhouse experiment, plants were previously inoculated with an isolate of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis (former Glomus intraradices BEG 72 and the influence of the pH growing medium on the plant-symbiont-pathogen interaction was tested in gnotobiotic autotrophic growth systems in which mycorrhizal inoculum was obtained from root organ cultures. After ten months growth dual-inoculated lavender plants grown in containers with a pasteurized substrate mixture produced a similar number of spikes than healthy plants and achieved equivalent plant diameter coverage. When the growing medium in the autotrophic systems was supplemented with calcium carbonate, the inoculation of lavender plantlets with R. irregularis at higher pH (7.0 and 8.5 media caused a significant decrease of A. mellea presence in plant roots, as detected by qPCR. Moreover, the observation of internal root mycorrhizal infection showed that the extent of mycorrhizal colonization increasedin plant rootsgrown at higher pH, indicating that tolerance to white root rot in lavender plants inoculated with R. irregularis could be associated to mycorrhizal establishment.

  12. In vitro fruiting of `armillaria` species. Forest Service research note

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reaves, J.L.; McWilliams, M.

    1991-08-01

    Fruiting of Armillaria is sporadic in the interior forests of Western North America, where the most highly pathogenic species of Armillaria occur. If single spores are not available, the species must be determined by haploid/diploid pairings, which may lead to uncertainty over what Armallaria species is present in a particular area. Objectives of this study were to evaluate the feasibility of growing spore-bearing basidiocarps of various Armillaria species in vitro. Spores from these basidiocarps will be used to carry out haploid/diploid pairings.

  13. PHOTOSYNTHETIC RESPONSES OF Eucalyptus nitens Maiden AT INITIAL STAGES OF ROOT-ROT INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciasih Agustini

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Root-rots are known to be latent diseases that may be present in plants for an extended period without any noticeable expression of symptoms above ground. Photosynthetic responses of Eucalyptus nitens saplings artificially inoculated with the root-rot pathogen, Armillaria luteobubalina were examined to characterize the initial stages of root-rot infection. This paper studies three photosynthetic parameters, i.e. photosystem II yield (Fv/Fm, chlorophyll content and photosynthetic capacity (Amax for two strains of A. luteobubalina over a seven-month period. Root systems were either wounded or left intact before inoculation. A significant difference was observed in the Fv/Fm ratio between the uninoculated control and inoculated saplings. Photosystem II yield was considered the most sensitive parameter for the early detection of root-rot disease. Chlorophyll content and Amax decreased for all trees, including controls, during the period of the experiment, and most likely reflected host responses to seasonal change rather than treatment effects. Fungal re-isolations from symptomatic roots of inoculated trees confirmed the presence of A. luteobubalina. Findings from this preliminary trial indicated that there were detectable physiological changes associated with early infection of root-rot. However, to detect more widespread physiological changes an experiment of longer duration is needed.

  14. CHARACTERIZATION ADN BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF SECONDARY METABOLITES FROM ARMILLARIA TABESCENS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethyl acetate extracts from liquid cultures of Armillaria tabescens showed good antimicrobial activity against Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium intracellulare. Chemical analyses of extract constituents led to the isolation and identification of two new co...

  15. In vitro interactions between Armillaria species and potential biocontrol fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Keča Nenad

    2009-01-01

    Interaction between Armillaria species and seven other fungi were tested in vitro. Tree antagonistic (Trichoderma viride, Trichotecium roseum and Penicillium sp.) and four decaying (Hypholoma fasciculare¸ Hypholoma capnoides, Phlebiopsis gigantea, and Pleurotus ostreatus) fungi were chosen for this study. The best results were noted for Trichoderma viride, because fungus was able to kill both mycelia and rhizomorphs of Armillaria species, while Hypholoma spp. inhibited both growth of Armillar...

  16. Rapid identification of Armillaria species by PCR-DGGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longa, Claudia M O; La Porta, Nicola

    2014-12-01

    The molecular approach has been used to distinguish between Armillaria species because of the ambiguity when using morphological traits. PCR-DGGE using the fungal primers ITS3GC-ITS4 enables a selective separation of amplicons and results in a simple and rapid approach to discriminate in one-step the most common Armillaria species in Europe. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. [Chemical constituents from fungus Armillaria mellea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xing-Li; Yan, Li-Hua; Zhang, Qi-Wei; Wang, Zhi-Min

    2013-08-01

    Ten compounds were isolated from cultures of the fungus Armillaria mellea by silica gel and Sephadex LH-20 column chromatographies. Their structures were identified by spectroscopic data analysis and compared their spectroscopic data with those reported in the literature as 2-hydroxy-4-methoxy-6-methylbenzoic acid (1), orsellinic acid (2), melleolide (3), ergosterol (4), genistein (5), daidzein (6), daucosterol (7), genistin (8), uracil (9) and D-mannitol (10). Compounds 1-10 were isolated from cultures of A. mellea for the first time. Among them, 14, 6 and 10 had been obtained from mycelia or rhizomorphs of A. mellea. The structure of compound 3 was determined by detailed analysis of its 1D and 2D NMR data in the solvent of DMSO for the first time.

  18. Taxonomy of Armillaria in the Patagonian forests of Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pildain, María B; Coetzee, Martin P A; Wingfield, Brenda D; Wingfield, Michael J; Rajchenberg, Mario

    2010-01-01

    The taxonomy of Armillaria in southern South America has received little attention since the work of Singer and others. In this study we examine the morphological traits and cultural features for taxa representing the lineages revealed based on molecular phylogeny, and we link them to previously described taxa based on morphology. Lineages I-IV were identified as Armillaria novae-zelandiae, A. montagnei, A. umbrinobrunnea comb. nov. and A. sparrei respectively. They could be differentiated morphologically based on dimension, features of the epicutis, annulus, stipe, hymenophoral trama and flavor and characteristics in culture. Furthermore there was no evidence of host preference for the species recognized. This is the first study integrating the phylogeny and morphology of Armillaria species from Patagonia, and it provides a foundation for future research on these fungi in South America.

  19. Comparative bioluminescence dynamics among multiple Armillaria gallica, A. mellea, and A. tabescens genets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihail, Jeanne D

    2013-03-01

    Bioluminescence is well known among white-spored species of Basidiomycota including several species of the white-rot wood decay genus Armillaria. Previous work demonstrated consistent differences among A. gallica, A. mellea, and A. tabescens in luminescence magnitude and in luminescence expression relative to environmental stimuli. In the present studies, temporal fluctuations in mycelial luminescence were quantitatively characterized using genets matched for geographical location. All genets derived from rhizomorphs or basdiomata were constitutively luminescent while six of 13 genets originating from mycelial fans were inconsistently luminescent. Using time series of 1000 consecutive measurements over 800 ms intervals, fluctuation patterns had significantly quantifiable structure and were not simply 'white noise'. Fluctuation patterns were qualitatively similar with alternating periods of rapid fluctuation and relative stability, regardless of luminescence magnitude. Anomalous spikes or shifts in luminescence were recorded for several genets suggesting further work to identify the transient stimuli which elicited these altered luminescence patterns. Copyright © 2013 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Enzymatic hydrolysis of aspen biomass into fermentable sugars by using lignocellulases from Armillaria gemina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagtap, Sujit Sadashiv; Dhiman, Saurabh Sudha; Kim, Tae-Su; Li, Jinglin; Lee, Jung-Kul; Kang, Yun Chan

    2013-04-01

    A white rot fungus, identified as Armillaria gemina SKU2114 on the basis of morphological and phylogenetic analyses, was found to secrete efficient lignocellulose-degrading enzymes. The strain showed maximum endoglucanase, cellobiohydrolase, and β-glucosidase activities of 146, 34, and 15 U/mL, respectively, and also secreted xylanase, laccase, mannanase, and lignin peroxidase with activities of 1270, 0.16, 57, and 0.31 U/mL, respectively, when grown with rice straw as a carbon source. Among various plant biomasses tested for saccharification, aspen biomass produced the maximum amount of reducing sugar. Response surface methodology was used to optimize the hydrolysis of aspen biomass to achieve the highest level of sugar production. A maximum saccharification yield of 62% (429 mg/g-substrate) was obtained using Populus tomentiglandulosa biomass after 48 h of hydrolysis. A. gemina was shown to be a good option for use in the production of reducing sugars from lignocellulosic biomass. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Chemical compositions, infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffractometry study on brown-rotted woods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai-Yun Li; Luo-Hua Huang; Chung Hse; Te-Fu Qin

    2011-01-01

    The effect of brown-rot decay on the chemical composition and crystallinity of Masson pine was studied by exposing it to Wolfiporia cocos (Schwein.) Ryvarden and Gilbn. for durations of up to 15 weeks in the field. The holocellulose content, α-cellulose content, and wood crystallinity decreased slowly in the initial stage, followed by a significant reduction...

  2. Soft rot decay capabilities and interactions of fungi and bacteria from fumigated utility poles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C.J.K.; Worrall, J.J. (State Univ. of New York, Syracuse, NY (United States). Coll. of Environmental Science and Forestry)

    1992-11-01

    The objectives were to (1) identify microfungi and bacterial associates isolated from fumigated southern pine poles from EPRI project RP 1471-72, (2) study the soft-rot capabilities of predominant fungi, and (3) study interactions among microorganisms in relation to wood decay. Methods for identification followed standard techniques using morphological and physiological criteria. Soft-rot by microfungi alone and with bacteria was determined as weight loss and anatomical examination of wood blocks using light microscopy and limited electron microscopy. Acinetobacter calcoaceticus was the predominant bacterium. Twenty-one species of microfungi were identified including four new species. A book entitled IDENTIFICATION MANUAL FOR FUNGI FROM UTILITY POLES IN THE EASTERN UNITED STATES was published. An improved soft-rot test was devised. Fifty-one of 84 species (60%) of microfungi from poles tested were soft-rot positive; that is much greater than previously reported. Three types of anatomical damage of wood of pine or birch caused by soft-rot fungi were described. Interaction tests showed that, in some cases, there was a strong synergism between bacteria and fungi in causing weight loss, but results were inconsistent. Although soft rot is often most apparent under conditions of very high moisture, intermediate moisture levels appear to be optimal, as with basidiomycete decayers.

  3. Soft rot decay capabilities and interactions of fungi and bacteria from fumigated utility poles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.J.K.; Worrall, J.J.

    1992-11-01

    The objectives were to (1) identify microfungi and bacterial associates isolated from fumigated southern pine poles from EPRI project RP 1471-72, (2) study the soft-rot capabilities of predominant fungi, and (3) study interactions among microorganisms in relation to wood decay. Methods for identification followed standard techniques using morphological and physiological criteria. Soft-rot by microfungi alone and with bacteria was determined as weight loss and anatomical examination of wood blocks using light microscopy and limited electron microscopy. Acinetobacter calcoaceticus was the predominant bacterium. Twenty-one species of microfungi were identified including four new species. A book entitled IDENTIFICATION MANUAL FOR FUNGI FROM UTILITY POLES IN THE EASTERN UNITED STATES was published. An improved soft-rot test was devised. Fifty-one of 84 species (60%) of microfungi from poles tested were soft-rot positive; that is much greater than previously reported. Three types of anatomical damage of wood of pine or birch caused by soft-rot fungi were described. Interaction tests showed that, in some cases, there was a strong synergism between bacteria and fungi in causing weight loss, but results were inconsistent. Although soft rot is often most apparent under conditions of very high moisture, intermediate moisture levels appear to be optimal, as with basidiomycete decayers

  4. First report of the Armillaria root disease pathogen, Armillaria sinapina, on subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa) and quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) in Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. S. Burns; J. W. Hanna; Ned Klopfenstein; M.-S. Kim

    2016-01-01

    In July 2014, mycelial fans (isolates CO104F, CO106F, and CO108F) of Armillaria sp. were collected from forest trees in Colorado. These isolates were all identified as A. sinapina based on a somatic pairing test against 18 tester isolates representing six North American Armillaria spp. and nucleotide sequences of the translation elongation factor 1alpha (tef-...

  5. Evaluation of partial tef1, rpb2, and nLSU sequences for identification of isolates representing Armillaria calvescens and Armillaria gallica from northeastern North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazee, Nicholas J; Hulvey, Jon P; Wick, Robert L

    2011-08-01

    Armillaria calvescens and Armillaria gallica are two of the most closely-related species of Armillaria in North America and have been difficult to distinguish from one another using morphological and molecular techniques. In an attempt to better distinguish these two species, partial sequences of the elongation factor-1 alpha (tef1), RNA polymerase II (rpb2), and nuclear large subunit (nLSU) genes were generated for 32 total isolates; 12 isolates each for A. calvescens and A. gallica, along with two isolates each of Armillaria gemina, Armillaria mellea, Armillaria sinapina, and Armillaria solidipes. Within the tef1 amplicon, five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were present between A. calvescens and A. gallica. Phylogenetic reconstruction using the maximum likelihood (ML) and maximum parsimony (MP) methods showed that tef1 was the only gene capable of distinguishing A. calvescens from A. gallica, and additionally, all isolates representing the six northeastern North American species. Partial tef1 sequences grouped A. calvescens into a strongly-supported, monophyletic clade with bootstrap support (BS) values of 98/98% (ML/MP), while A. gallica was grouped into a monophyletic clade with lower BS support (76/59%). The results illustrate the utility of partial tef1 sequences for the identification of field isolates of Armillaria from northeastern North America. Copyright © 2011 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. First report of the Armillaria root-disease pathogen, Armillaria gallica, associated with several woody hosts in three states of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    N. B. Klopfenstein; J. W. Hanna; P. G. Cannon; R. Medel-Ortiz; D. Alvarado-Rosales; F. Lorea-Hernandez; R. D. Elias-Roman; M. -S. Kim

    2014-01-01

    In September 2007, rhizomorphs with morphological characteristics of Armillaria were collected from woody hosts in forests of Mexico State, Veracruz, and Oaxaca, Mexico. Based on pairing tests, isolates were assigned to five somatically compatible genets or clones (MEX7R, MEX11R, MEX23R, MEX28R, and MEX30R). These genets were all identified as Armillaria gallica based...

  7. Diversity and decay ability of basidiomycetes isolated from lodgepole pines killed by the mountain pine beetle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, E; Kim, J-J; Lim, Y W; Au-Yeung, T T; Yang, C Y H; Breuil, C

    2011-01-01

    When lodgepole pines (Pinus contorta Douglas ex Louden var. latifolia Engelm. ex S. Watson) that are killed by the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) and its fungal associates are not harvested, fungal decay can affect wood and fibre properties. Ophiostomatoids stain sapwood but do not affect the structural properties of wood. In contrast, white or brown decay basidiomycetes degrade wood. We isolated both staining and decay fungi from 300 lodgepole pine trees killed by mountain pine beetle at green, red, and grey stages at 10 sites across British Columbia. We retained 224 basidiomycete isolates that we classified into 34 species using morphological and physiological characteristics and rDNA large subunit sequences. The number of basidiomycete species varied from 4 to 14 species per site. We assessed the ability of these fungi to degrade both pine sapwood and heartwood using the soil jar decay test. The highest wood mass losses for both sapwood and heartwood were measured for the brown rot species Fomitopsis pinicola and the white rot Metulodontia and Ganoderma species. The sap rot species Trichaptum abietinum was more damaging for sapwood than for heartwood. A number of species caused more than 50% wood mass losses after 12 weeks at room temperature, suggesting that beetle-killed trees can rapidly lose market value due to degradation of wood structural components.

  8. Butt Rot of Southern Hardwoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    F. I. McCracken

    1977-01-01

    Butt rot is the most serious cause of cull throughout the South, and affects all hardwood species. Defined as any decay at the base of a living tree, butt rot accounts for the loss of millions of board feet of southern hardwood timber annually. In one study of loess and alluvial hardwood sites in the Midsouth, butt rot was found in 40 percent of the trees being...

  9. Evaluating paradox walnut rootstocks for resistance to Armillaria root disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    The most common Juglans regia (English walnut) rootstock in California is Paradox, a hybrid between J. hindsii (Northern California black walnut) and J. regia. Unfortuntely, Paradox rootstock is highly susceptible to Armillaria root disease. The relative resistance of new clonal, Paradox rootstock...

  10. In vitro antioxidant properties of polysaccharides from Armillaria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antioxidant properties of exopolysaccharides (EPS) and intracellular polysaccharides (IPS) obtained respectively from mycelia and filtrates of submerged culture by Armillaria mellea in a 20-L stirred tank bioreactor were investigated. Effective production of EPS and IPS is available by submerged culture of A. mellea with ...

  11. Phylogeographic patterns of Armillaria ostoyae in the western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. W. Hanna; N. B. Klopfenstein; M. -S. Kim; G. I. McDonald; J. A. Moore

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear ribosomal DNA regions (i.e. large subunit, internal transcribed spacer, 5.8S and intergenic spacer) were sequenced using a direct-polymerase chain reaction method from Armillaria ostoyae genets collected from the western USA. Many of the A. ostoyae genets contained heterogeneity among rDNA repeats, indicating intragenomic variation and likely intraspecific...

  12. Armillaria ectypa, a rare fungus of mire in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Stasińska

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Armillaria ectypa is a saprotroph that occurs on active raised bogs and alkaline fens, as well as Aapa mires and transitional bogs. It is a very rare and threatened Eurasian species and one of the 33 fungal species proposed for inclusion into the Bern Convention. Its distribution in Poland, ecological notes and morphology of basidiocarp based on Polish specimens are presented.

  13. Armillaria mexicana, a newly described species from Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elías-Román, Rubén Damián; Medel-Ortiz, Rosario; Alvarado-Rosales, Dionicio; Hanna, John W; Ross-Davis, Amy L; Kim, Mee-Sook; Klopfenstein, Ned B

    2018-01-19

    Armillaria mexicana (Agaricales, Physalacriaceae) is described as a new species based on morphology, DNA sequence data, and phylogenetic analyses. It clearly differs from previously reported Armillaria species in North, Central, and South America. It is characterized by the absence of fibulae in the basidioma, abundant cheilocystidia, and ellipsoidal, hyaline basidiospores that are apparently smooth under light microscope, but slightly to moderately rugulose under scanning electron microscope. It is differentiated from other Armillaria species by macromorphological characters, including annulus structure, pileus and stipe coloration, and other structures. DNA sequence data (nuc rDNA internal transcribed spacers [ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 = ITS], 28S D-domain, 3' end of 28S intergenic spacer 1, and translation elongation factor 1-α [TEF1]) show that A. mexicana sequences are quite distinct from sequences of analogous Armillaria species in GenBank. In addition, sequences of ITS of the A. mexicana ex-type culture reveal an ITS1 of 1299 bp and an ITS2 of 582 bp, the longest ITS regions reported thus far in fungi. Phylogenetic analysis based on TEF1 sequences place A. mexicana in a well-separated, monophyletic clade basal to the polyphyletic A. mellea complex.

  14. Discovery of cryptic Armillaria solidipes genotypes within the Colorado Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. W. Hanna; N. B. Klopfenstein; M. -S. Kim; S. M. Ashiglar; A. L. Ross-Davis; G. I. McDonald

    2012-01-01

    Armillaria solidipes (= A. ostoyae) is a root-disease pathogen that causes severe losses in growth and productivity of forest trees throughout the Northern Hemisphere. This species is genetically diverse with variable disease activities across different regions of the world. In North America, A. solidipes in the Colorado Plateau exists in drier habitats and causes more...

  15. Role of Armillaria species on tree dying in Turkey oak and Hungarian oak forest in Lipovica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keča Nenad

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The species and population structure of Armillaria species were studied in Turkey oak and Hungarian oak forest. Two species were observed, Armillaria gallica and A. mellea. Armillaria mellea was found on only one tree, and A. gallica was found on seven trees. Four gewets of A. gallica were observed of which two were represented only by one isolate each, while two covered the area of 5 and 9 areas respectively.

  16. Lignin-modifying enzymes of the white rot basidiomycete Ganoderma lucidum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D/Souza, T.M.; Merritt, C.S.; Reddy, C.A.

    1999-12-01

    Ganoderma lucidum, a white rot basidiomycete widely distributed worldwide, was studied for the production of the lignin-modifying enzymes laccase, manganese-dependent peroxidase (MnP), and lignin peroxidase (LiP). Laccase levels observed in high-nitrogen shaken cultures were much greater than those seen in low-nitrogen, malt extract, or wool-grown cultures and those reported for most other white rot fungi to date. Laccase production was readily seen in cultures grown with pine or poplar as the sole carbon and energy source. Cultures containing both pine and poplar showed 5- to 10-fold-higher levels of laccase than cultures containing pine or poplar alone. Since syringyl units are structural components important in poplar lignin and other hardwoods but much less so in pine lignin and other softwoods, pine cultures were supplemented with syringic acid, and this resulted in laccase levels comparable to those seen in pine-plus-poplar cultures. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of concentrated extracellular culture fluid from HM cultures showed two laccase activity bands, where as isoelectric focusing revealed five major laccase activity bands with estimated pIs of 3.0, 4.25, 4.5, and 5.1. Low levels of MnP activity were detected in poplar-grown cultures but not in cultures grown with pine, with pine plus syringic acid, or in HN medium. No LiP activity was seen in any of the media tested; however, probing the genomic DNA with the LiP cDNA (CLG4) from the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium showed distinct hybridization bands suggesting the presence of lip-like sequences in G. lucidum.

  17. Survey of Armillaria spp. in the Oregon East Cascades: Baseline data for predicting climatic influences on Armillaria root disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. W. Hanna; A. L. Smith; H. M. Maffei; M.-S. Kim; N. B. Klopfenstein

    2008-01-01

    Root disease pathogens, such as Armillaria solidipes Peck (recently recognized older name for A. ostoyae), will likely have increasing impacts to forest ecosystems as trees undergo stress due to climate change. Before we can predict future impacts of root disease pathogens, we must first develop an ability to predict current distributions of the pathogens (and their...

  18. An Armillaria survey in Mexico: A basis for determining evolutionary relationships, assessing potentially invasive pathogens, evaluating future impacts of climate change, and developing international collaborations in forest pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phil Cannon; Ned B. Klopfenstein; Mee-Sook Kim; John W. Hanna; Dionicio Alvarado. Rosales

    2008-01-01

    In September 2007, a collaborative effort was made to survey Armillaria species in three general areas of south-central Mexico. Collected Armillaria isolates will be subjected to DNA analyses to examine genetic relationships with other Armillaria species. These studies will provide baseline information for examining evolution of Armillaria...

  19. Carbon Dioxide and Methane Formation in Norway Spruce Stems Infected by White-Rot Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari M. Hietala

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Globally, billions of tons of carbon sequestered in trees are annually recycled back to the atmosphere through wood decomposition by microbes. In Norway, every fifth Norway spruce shows at final harvest infection by pathogenic white-rot fungi in the genera Heterobasidion and Armillaria. As these fungi can mineralize all components of wood, we predicted that they have a significant carbon footprint. Gas samples taken from infected stems were analyzed for CO2 and CH4 concentrations, and wood samples from different parts of the decay columns were incubated under hypoxic (4% O2 and anoxic laboratory conditions. In spring and summer the stem concentrations of CO2 were generally two times higher in trees with heartwood decay than in healthy trees. For most of the healthy trees and trees with heartwood decay, mean stem concentrations of CH4 were comparable to ambient air, and only some Armillaria infected trees showed moderately elevated CH4. Consistently, low CH4 production potentials were recorded in the laboratory experiment. Up-scaling of CO2 efflux due to wood decay in living trees suggests that the balance between carbon sequestration and emission may be substantially influenced in stands with high frequency of advanced root and stem heartwood decay.

  20. Initial characterization of unidentified Armillaria isolate from Serbia using LSU-IGS1 and TEF-1a genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    N. Keca; N. B. Klopfenstein; M.-S. Kim; H. Solheim; S. Woodward

    2014-01-01

    Armillaria species have a global distribution and play variable ecological roles, including causing root disease of diverse forest, ornamental and horticultural trees. Accurate identification of Armillaria species is critical to understand their distribution and ecological roles. This work focused on characterizing an unidentified Armillaria isolate from a Serbian...

  1. Disease notes - Bacterial root rot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial root rot initiated by lactic acid bacteria, particularly Leuconostoc, occurs every year in Idaho sugarbeet fields. Hot fall weather seems to make the problem worse. Although Leuconostoc initiates the rot, other bacteria and yeast frequently invade the tissue as well. The acetic acid bac...

  2. Seedling regeneration on decayed pine logs after the deforestation events caused by pine wilt disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Fukasawa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Coarse woody debris (CWD forms an important habitat suitable for tree seedling establishment, and the CWD decay process influences tree seedling community. In Japan, a severe dieback of Pinus densiflora Sieb. & Zucc. caused by pine wilt disease (PWD damaged huge areas of pine stands but creates huge mass of pine CWD. It is important to know the factors influencing seedling colonization on pine CWD and their variations among geographical gradient in Japan to expect forest regeneration in post-PWD stands. I conducted field surveys on the effects of latitude, climates, light condition, decay type of pine logs, and log diameter on tree seedling colonization at ten geographically distinct sites in Japan. In total, 59 tree taxa were recorded as seedlings on pine logs. Among them, 13 species were recorded from more than five sites as adult trees or seedlings and were used for the analyses. A generalized linear model showed that seedling colonization of Pinus densiflora was negatively associated with brown rot in sapwood, while that of Rhus trichocarpa was positively associated with brown rot in heartwood. Regeneration of Ilex macropoda had no relationships with wood decay type but negatively associated with latitude and MAT, while positively with log diameter. These results suggested that wood decay type is a strong determinant of seedling establishment for certain tree species, even at a wide geographical scale; however, the effect is tree species specific.

  3. Armillaria species: Primary drivers of forest ecosystem processes and potential impacts of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ned B. Klopfenstein; Mee-Sook Kim; John W. Hanna; Amy L. Ross-Davis; Sara M. Ashiglar; Geral I. McDonald

    2012-01-01

    Species of the fungal genus Armillaria are pervasive in forest soils and are associated with widely ranging tree species of diverse forests worldwide (Baumgartner et al., 2011). As primary decay drivers of ecosystem processes, Armillaria species exhibit diverse ecological behaviors, ranging from virulent root and/or butt pathogens of diverse woody hosts, such as timber...

  4. DNA-based identification and phylogeny of North American Armillaria species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amy L. Ross-Davis; John W. Hanna; Ned B. Klopfenstein

    2011-01-01

    Because Armillaria species display different ecological behaviors across diverse forest ecosystems, it is critical to identify Armillaria species accurately for any assessment of forest health. To further develop DNA-based identification methods, partial sequences of the translation elongation factor-1 alpha (EF-1α) gene were used to examine the phylogenetic...

  5. Bioclimatic models estimate areas with suitable climate for Armillaria spp. in Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    James T. Blodgett; John W. Hanna; Eric W. I. Pitman; Sara M. Ashiglar; John E. Lundquist; Mee-Sook Kim; Amy L. Ross-Davis; Ned B. Klopfenstein

    2015-01-01

    Armillaria species range from beneficial saprobes to damaging root pathogens, and their ecological roles and impacts vary with environment and host. Armillaria solidipes [pending vote to conserve A. ostoyae . (Redhead et al. 2011 )] is known as an aggressive pathogen of conifers and causes tree mortality and significant growth loss in Wyoming and throughout...

  6. Clonal and sexual dispersal of Armillaria mellea in an ornamental landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    High densities of planted hosts and frequent irrigation have contributed to severe Armillaria root disease in Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, CA. Our objective was to assess the relative contribution of vegetative growth and basidiospore dispersal to the colonization of the park by Armillaria melle...

  7. Identification of tree-crop rootstocks with resistance to Armillaria root disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armillaria root disease attacks a broad range of tree crops in California. Instead of re-tooling ineffective conventional controls, namely soil fumigation, we focused on identification of Armillaria-resistant Juglans rootstocks, as part of a collaborative project to identify rootstocks with resistan...

  8. Oak stump-sprout vigor and Armillaria infection after clearcutting in southeastern Missouri, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher A. Lee; Daniel C. Dey; Rose-Marie Muzika

    2016-01-01

    Armillaria spp. occur widely in Missouri mixed-oak ecosystems. In order to better understand the ecology and management of this pathogen and its effects on oak coppice, we observed a transect of 150 stumps after clearcutting in southeastern Missouri, noting Armillaria infection and oak sprout demography one year and seven years...

  9. Armillaria root disease affects oak coppice regeneration in upland Missouri Ozark forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. N. Bruhn; D. C. Dey; K. K. Kromroy; J. D. Mihail; J. M. Kabrick; J. J., Jr. Wetteroff

    2005-01-01

    Coppice regeneration is favored in North America for oak (Quercus spp.) regeneration. Although models of oak stump sprouting do not consider Armillaria root disease, many oak stumps in upland Ozark forest stands carry active Armillaria root crown infections. The spatial pattern of sprouting on oak stumps is...

  10. The role of somatic recombination in natural populations of the root pathogen Armillaria mellea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fungi have evolved various mechanisms of shuffling genetic material, which can occur in the absence of fruiting and meiosis. In the homobasidiomycete Armillaria (causal agent of Armillaria root disease), the predominant vegetative stage is diploid. Diploid and haploid mycelia can fuse and undergo ka...

  11. De novo assembly and transcriptome characterization of an Armillaria solidipes mycelial fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amy L. Ross-Davis; Jane E. Stewart; John W. Hanna; Mee-Sook Kim; Rich C. Cronn; Hardeep S. Rai; Bryce A. Richardson; Geral I. McDonald; Ned B. Klopfenstein

    2012-01-01

    Armillaria (Fr.) Staude is a widely distributed fungal genus comprising approximately 40 species (Volk and Burdsall 1995) that display diverse ecological behaviors ranging from beneficial saprobe to virulent pathogen. Armillaria solidipes (formerly A. ostoyae; Burdsall and Volk 2008; pending vote to conserve A. ostoyae; Redhead et al. 2011), one of the causal agents of...

  12. Effects of forest management practices and environment on occurrence of Armillaria species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mee-Sook Kim; Ned B. Klopfenstein; Geral I. McDonald

    2010-01-01

    Influences of environment (indicated by plant associations) and forest management practices on the distribution of Armillaria spp. and genets (vegetative clones) were investigated. A total of 142 isolates of Armillaria was collected from various host trees on pristine and managed sites (thinned and/or fertilized) growing in relatively wet and dry environments in...

  13. Abundance and distribution of rhizomorphs of Armillaria spp. in defoliated mixed oak stands in western Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark J. Twery; Garland N. Mason; Philip M. Wargo; Kurt W. Gottschalk

    1990-01-01

    The abundance and distribution of rhizomorphs of Armillaria spp. in the soil were quantified in undisturbed stands and in stands defoliated 1 and 5 years previously by insects. Although the species of Armillaria was not determined, similar mixed oak forests in south central Pennsylvania contain North American biological species VII...

  14. Screening almond rootstocks for sources of resistance to Armillaria root diesease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prunus is one of the most susceptible horticultural crops to Armillaria root disease. Resistance to the geographically isolated causal fungi Armillaria mellea and A. tabescens has been evaluated in separate field trials of almond and other Prunus rootstocks, but not in one comprehensive study. We ev...

  15. Effect of infesting soil with Trichoderma harzianum and amendment with coffee pulp on survival of Armillaria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otieno, W.; Jeger, M.J.; Termorshuizen, A.J.

    2003-01-01

    Six isolates of Trichoderma were screened for antagonism to Armillaria in tea stem sections buried in the soil. The inability of Armillaria to invade Trichoderma-colonized stem sections and the reduction of its viability in the plant materials following invasion of these by Trichoderma were used as

  16. Wood luminescence as marker of tree Armillaria infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Puzyr

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Diagnostics of infectious diseases of trees is based on anatomical and morphological characteristics of the tree damage and determining the participants of this process. In the study of tree diseases caused by fungal pathogens their presence and description of morphological characteristics is necessary. Thus, the studies of the causes of the trees diseases are only possible fora limited amount of time, the determined period of the formation of fruiting bodies of fungi. Keep in mind that not every year the natural conditions are favorable for the basidia formation. The diagnostics of pathogen is complicated in the absence of fruiting bodies. In this case, it is required to carry out additional measures on the cultivation of fruit bodies or obtaining a pure culture of the fungal mycelium to determine the cause of the disease. According to the literature, the genus Armillaria fungi are the most common wood destroyers in all forest areas. In addition, they are found in the botanical gardens, parks, urban areas and on private garden plots. Unlike other fungi that destroy wood trees the mycelium complex Armillaria mellea sensu lato has bioluminescence. This feature allows you to identify them among other basidiomycetes growing in Russia. In this article, based on the experimental results is discussed a method for determining the infestation of trees by root pathogens complex Armillaria mellea s. L. by recording luminescence wood samples. It has been shown that the registration of bioluminescent signal of wood samples can be performed at any time of the year, not just during the growing season. It is supposed the possibility of identifying trees that are infected by mycelium of pathogenic fungi genus Armillaria in the absence of fruiting bodies. It may allow probably early detection of infected trees.

  17. Armillaria mellea: phenolic content, in vitro antioxidant and antihyperglycemic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavastin, Daniela Elena; Mircea, Cornelia; Aprotosoaie, Ana Clara; Gherman, Simona; Hancianu, Monica; Miron, Anca

    2015-01-01

    Armillaria mellea, known as honey mushroom, has been used both as food and medicine. In this work, the ethanolic and hydromethanolic extracts from Armillaria mellea fruiting bodies were investigated for their phenolic content, antioxidant and antihyperglycemic effects (in vitro studies). The total phenolics were quantified using Folin-Ciocalteu assay. The antioxidant activity was evaluated by testing the free radical scavenging capacity, reducing power and ferrous ion chelating ability; in addition, the capacity to inhibit 15-lipoxygenase was also assessed. The antihyperglycemic activity was investigated by α-glucosidase assay. Total phenolic contents of 21.68 ± 0.06 and 5.70 ± 0.28 mg/g were determined in the hydromethanolic and ethanolic extracts, respectively. The hydromethanolic extract showed higher free radical scavenging and reducing abilities (EC50 = 452.6 ± 2.7, 140.57 ± 1.45 and 129.45 ± 0.98 μg/mL in DPPH, ABTS and reducing power assays, respectively). The ethanolic extract proved to be more efficient in the ferrous ion chelation, 15-lipoxygenase and α-glucosidase inhibition assays (EC55 = 67.93 ± 0.35, 290.93 ± 2.05 and 8.54 ± 0.06 μg/mL, respectively). Armillaria mellea extracts showed antioxidant and antihyperglycemic potential in in vitro models and therefore they are promising candidates for the development of dietary supplements and pharmaceutical products.

  18. Stimulation of Armillaria rhizomorph growth by oak root fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Kwaśna

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Thirty one different genera of fungi were isolated from the wood of roots of 5O·year·old oak (Quercus robur. The most frequently isolated fungi were: Mycelium radicis atrovirens alpha (MRAA, Clonostachys sp. and Penicillium daleae, Beauveria bassiana, Clonostachys sp., Cryplosporiopsis rodicicolo, Geotrichum candidum, Mortierella vinacea, MRAA, P. daleae, P. janczewskii P. spinulosum, Sporothrix schenckii and Tolypocladium niveum significantly enhanced Armillaria mellea rhizomorph initiation and growth from oak branch segments in vitro. The biggest stimulation effect was noticed when the dematiaceous hyphomycetes, e.g. MRAA, P. dimorphospora and S. schenckii were studied.

  19. Degradation of Bunker C Fuel Oil by White-Rot Fungi in Sawdust Cultures Suggests Potential Applications in Bioremediation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darcy Young

    Full Text Available Fungal lignocellulolytic enzymes are promising agents for oxidizing pollutants. This study investigated degradation of Number 6 "Bunker C" fuel oil compounds by the white-rot fungi Irpex lacteus, Trichaptum biforme, Phlebia radiata, Trametes versicolor, and Pleurotus ostreatus (Basidiomycota, Agaricomycetes. Averaging across all studied species, 98.1%, 48.6%, and 76.4% of the initial Bunker C C10 alkane, C14 alkane, and phenanthrene, respectively were degraded after 180 days of fungal growth on pine media. This study also investigated whether Bunker C oil induces changes in gene expression in the white-rot fungus Punctularia strigosozonata, for which a complete reference genome is available. After 20 days of growth, a monokaryon P. strigosozonata strain degraded 99% of the initial C10 alkane in both pine and aspen media but did not affect the amounts of the C14 alkane or phenanthrene. Differential gene expression analysis identified 119 genes with ≥ log2(2-fold greater expression in one or more treatment comparisons. Six genes were significantly upregulated in media containing oil; these genes included three enzymes with potential roles in xenobiotic biotransformation. Carbohydrate metabolism genes showing differential expression significantly accumulated transcripts on aspen vs. pine substrates, perhaps reflecting white-rot adaptations to growth on hardwood substrates. The mechanisms by which P. strigosozonata may degrade complex oil compounds remain obscure, but degradation results of the 180-day cultures suggest that diverse white-rot fungi have promise for bioremediation of petroleum fuels.

  20. Evidence of natural hybridization among homothallic members of the basidiomycete Armillaria mellea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Populations of Armillaria mellea (Basidiomycota, Agaricales, Physalacriaceae) across much of its geographic range are heterothallic; homothallic populations are reported only from Africa (A. mellea ssp. africana), China [China Biological Species (CBS) G], and Japan (A. mellea ssp. nipponica). Monos...

  1. Geographical distribution and ecology of the Armillaria species in western Europe.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guillaumin, J.J.; Mohammed, C.; Anselmi, N.; Courtecuisse, R.; Gregory, S.C.; Holdenrieder, O.; Intini, M.; Lung, B.; Marxmüller, H.; Morrison, D.; Rishbeth, J.; Termorshuizen, A.J.; Tirro, A.; Dam, van B.

    1993-01-01

    Over 4000 records of the six European Armillaria species were compiled to give distribution maps and host lists for each species. Differences in geographical and altitudinal distribution, pathogenicity, dissemination and ecological role are discussed.

  2. Characteristics of Armillaria species development and their growth at different temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keča Nenad

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous research shows that 5 Armillaria species are identified in forest ecosystems in Serbia. This paper presents the Pegler's key of species identification based on fruiting bodies - mushrooms. Previous reference data from Serbia refer only to the species A. mellea. Because of the insufficient information on the bioecology of individual species in the genus Armillaria we studied the effect of temperature, as one of the most important ecological factors for the development of mycelium and rhisomorphs.

  3. Écologie des espèces d'Armillaria du sapin blanc (Abies alba) dans les Pyrénées espagnoles

    OpenAIRE

    Oliva , Jonàs; Suz , Laura M.; Colinas , Carlos

    2009-01-01

    International audience; We describe the distribution and the ecology of three Armillaria species observed in silver fir (Abies alba) forests of the Pyrenees.* We surveyed the presence and abundance of Armillaria above and belowground in 29 stands. Isolates were identified by the PCR-RFLP pattern of the IGS-1 region of their ribosomal DNA. We measured several ecological and management parameters of each stand in order to describe Armillaria infected sites.* Armillaria cepistipes was the most a...

  4. Distribution and Characterization of Armillaria Complex in Atlantic Forest Ecosystems of Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nebai Mesanza

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Armillaria root disease is a significant forest health concern in the Atlantic forest ecosystems in Spain. The damage occurs in conifers and hardwoods, causing especially high mortality in young trees in both native forests and plantations. In the present study, the distribution of Armillaria root disease in the forests and plantations of the Basque Country is reported. Armillaria spp. were more frequently isolated from stands with slopes of 20–30% and west orientation, acid soils with high permeability, deciduous hosts, and a rainfall average above 1800 mm. In a large-scale survey, 35% of the stands presented Armillaria structures and showed disease symptoms. Of the isolated Armillaria samples, 60% were identified using molecular methods as A. ostoyae, 24% as A. mellea, 14% as A. gallica, 1% as A. tabescens, and 1% as A. cepistipes. In a small scale sampling, population diversity was defined by somatic compatibility tests and Universally Primed-PCR technique. Finally, the pathogenicity of A. mellea, the species with the broadest host range, was determined on different tree species present in the Atlantic area of Spain in order to determine their resistance levels to Armillaria disease. A significant difference in disease severity was observed among tree species (p < 0.001, with Pinus radiata being the most susceptible tree species and Cryptomeria japonica the most resistant to A. mellea.

  5. Toward a west-wide model of Armillaria root disease: New surveys needed in western Oregon, western Washington, and Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. W. Hanna; M. -S. Kim; N. B. Klopfenstein; A. C. Ramsey; D. W. Omdal; R. L. Mulvey; B. A. Goodrich; B. A. Ferguson; L. M. Winton; E. M. Goheen; J. J. Bronson; H. S. J. Kearns; K. L. Chadwick; M. Murray; D. C. Shaw; G. I. McDonald; E. W. I. Pitman; M. V. Warwell

    2017-01-01

    Currently, Armillaria root disease causes large growth/volume losses (e.g., 16-55%) in areas of western North America (Filip and Goheen 1984; Cruickshank 2011; Lockman and Kearns 2016). Armillaria root disease is typically more severe in trees that are maladapted to climate-induced stress (Ayres and Lombardero 2000; Kliejunas et al. 2009; Sturrock 2011). Thus, it is...

  6. Can metagenetic studies of soil microbial communities provide insights toward developing novel management approaches for Armillaria root disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mee-Sook Kim; Amy L. Ross-Davis; Jane E. Stewart; John W. Hanna; Marcus V. Warwell; Paul J. Zambino; Christy Cleaver; Geral I. McDonald; Deborah Page-Dumroese; Bruce Moltzan; Ned B. Klopfenstein

    2016-01-01

    Armillaria root diseases are among the most damaging and broadly distributed group of forest diseases in the world (Lockman et al. in press). Armillaria root disease is typically more severe in highly susceptible tree species and in trees that are maladapted due to rapidly changing climatic conditions (Ayres and Lombardero 2000, Kliejunas et al. 2009, Sturrock...

  7. Armillaria phylogeny based on tef-1α sequences suggests ongoing divergent speciation within the boreal floristic kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ned B. Klopfenstein; John W. Hanna; Amy L. Ross-Davis; Jane E. Stewart; Yuko Ota; Rosario Medel-Ortiz; Miguel Armando Lopez-Ramirez; Ruben Damian Elias-Roman; Dionicio Alvarado-Rosales; Mee-Sook Kim

    2013-01-01

    Armillaria plays diverse ecological roles in forests worldwide, which has inspired interest in understanding phylogenetic relationships within and among species of this genus. Previous rDNA sequence-based phylogenetic analyses of Armillaria have shown general relationships among widely divergent taxa, but rDNA sequences were not reliable for separating closely related...

  8. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; environmental consequences fact sheet 13: Root Disease Analyzer-Armillaria Response Tool (ART)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geral I. McDonald; Philip D. Tanimoto; Thomas M. Rice; David E. Hall; Jane E. Stewart; Paul J. Zambino; Jonalea R. Tonn; Ned B. Klopfenstein; Mee-Sook Kim

    2005-01-01

    The Root Disease Analyzer-Armillaria Response Tool (ART) is a Web-based tool that estimates Armillaria root disease risk in dry forests of the Western United States. This fact sheet identifies the intended users and uses, required inputs, what the model does and does not do, and tells the user how to obtain the model.

  9. Canker Rots in Southern Hardwoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    F.I. McCracken

    1978-01-01

    Canker-rot fungi cause serious degrade and cull in southern hardwoods, especially the red oaks. Heartwood decay is the most serious form of damage, but the fungi also kill the cambium and decay the sapwood for as much as 3 feet (.91 m) above and below the entrance point into the tree. The ability of these fungi to kill the cambium and cause cankers distinguishes them...

  10. Analysis of indole compounds in Armillaria mellea fruiting bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muszyńska, Bozena; Maślanka, Anna; Ekiert, Halina; Sułkowska-Ziaja, Katarzyna

    2011-01-01

    A TLC method with densitometric detection for identification and quantitation of indole compounds in methanolic extracts of fruiting bodies of Armillaria mellea (Vahl.) P. Kumm. (Basidiomycota)--Honey mushroom has been developed. The TLC method with densitometric detection was validated for determination of tryptamine and serotonin contents. The use of this chromatographic-densitometric method for analysis of extracts allowed for a precise, easy and quick determination of the compounds under study. We identified three physiologically active indole compounds: tryptamine. L- tryptophan and serotonin. This analysis demonstrated the highest contents of L-tryptophan (4.467 mg/100 g d.w.). The contents of tryptamine were comparable with the contents of serotonin and amounted to: 2.740 and 2.207 mg/100 g d. w.

  11. Resolved phylogeny and biogeography of the root pathogen Armillaria and its gasteroid relative, Guyanagaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Rachel A; Wilson, Andrew W; Séné, Olivier; Henkel, Terry W; Aime, M Catherine

    2017-01-25

    Armillaria is a globally distributed mushroom-forming genus composed primarily of plant pathogens. Species in this genus are prolific producers of rhizomorphs, or vegetative structures, which, when found, are often associated with infection. Because of their importance as plant pathogens, understanding the evolutionary origins of this genus and how it gained a worldwide distribution is of interest. The first gasteroid fungus with close affinities to Armillaria-Guyanagaster necrorhizus-was described from the Neotropical rainforests of Guyana. In this study, we conducted phylogenetic analyses to fully resolve the relationship of G. necrorhizus with Armillaria. Data sets containing Guyanagaster from two collecting localities, along with a global sampling of 21 Armillaria species-including newly collected specimens from Guyana and Africa-at six loci (28S, EF1α, RPB2, TUB, actin-1 and gpd) were used. Three loci-28S, EF1α and RPB2-were analyzed in a partitioned nucleotide data set to infer divergence dates and ancestral range estimations for well-supported, monophyletic lineages. The six-locus phylogenetic analysis resolves Guyanagaster as the earliest diverging lineage in the armillarioid clade. The next lineage to diverge is that composed of species in Armillaria subgenus Desarmillaria. This subgenus is elevated to genus level to accommodate the exannulate mushroom-forming armillarioid species. The final lineage to diverge is that composed of annulate mushroom-forming armillarioid species, in what is now Armillaria sensu stricto. The molecular clock analysis and ancestral range estimation suggest the most recent common ancestor to the armillarioid lineage arose 51 million years ago in Eurasia. A new species, Guyanagaster lucianii sp. nov. from Guyana, is described. The armillarioid lineage evolved in Eurasia during the height of tropical rainforest expansion about 51 million years ago, a time marked by a warm and wet global climate. Species of Guyanagaster and

  12. Incidence of butt rot in a tree species experiment in northern Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronnberg, J; Vollbrecht, G.; Thomsen, Iben Margrete

    1999-01-01

    procera Rehd.), Japanese larch (Larix kaempferi (Lamb.) Carr.), Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.), Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.), and Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) were planted after shelterwood felling of a mountain pine (Pinus uncinata Mill. ex Mirb.) stand...... that had been infected by H. annosum. Douglas fir and noble fir showed the greatest mortality due to H. annosum during the first 5 years after planting. At first thinning the highest incidences of butt rot were recorded in noble fir, Japanese larch and Sitka spruce, with 44%, 43% and 36% of the thinned...... trees infected, respectively. Silver fir and Caucasian fir were almost free from infections. Maximum extension of H. annosum rot columns were in Japanese larch (18 dm). Heterobasidion annosum was found to be the most important decay causing fungus. Mating tests assigned all isolated strains of H...

  13. Armillaria altimontana, a new species from the western interior of North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazee, Nicholas J; Ortiz-Santana, Beatriz; Banik, Mark T; Lindner, Daniel L

    2012-01-01

    Armillaria altimontana, previously considered North American biological species (NABS) X, is described as new. To date, it appears that A. altimontana prefers higher-elevation, mesic sites within the dry, conifer forest zone of western interior North America. This species has been found on hardwoods and conifers and is associated most commonly with Abies-dominated forest types in southern British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, Idaho and northern California. Partial elongation factor 1-alpha (tef1) sequences were generated from six isolates of A. altimontana originating from three locations in northern Idaho. Phylogenetic analyses of all 10 North American Armillaria species were carried out with maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood. Results indicate that isolates of A. altimontana formed a monophyletic group and clustered with A. calvescens, A. cepistipes, A. gallica and A. nabsnona, which is in agreement with recent phylogenetic studies of Armillaria.

  14. Microfungi in the soil beneath common oak and their effect on Armillaria occurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Kwaśna

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Microfungal assemblages in a soil beneath 30- and 50·year-old oaks and their 2-year-old stumps were studied using the soil dilution plate method. A total of 98 culturable microfungi were isolated. Compared to the living oaks before felling and the control living oaks, the density of Mortierella macrocystis, Penicillium jonczewskii, Pseudogymnoascus roseus Sporothrix schenckii, Tolypoccladiumum inflatum and Umbelopsis vinacea sigificantly inacased in the soil beneath slumps in the 32- and 52-year-old stands. Density of Aspergillus kanagawaensis, Monodictys lepraria, P. daleae and sterile dematiaceous hyphomycetes increased significantly in the 32-year-old stand and Chrysosporium merdarium in the 52·year-old stand. These fungi are known 'stimulants' of Armillaria rhizomorph formation. It is suggested that the increase in density of Armillaria rhizomorph 'stimulants' in a soil beneath oak stumps may increase the possibility of colonization of stumps by Armillaria.

  15. Fusarium basal rot in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, de C.L.M.; Broek, van den R.C.F.M.; Brink, van den L.

    2006-01-01

    Fusarium basal rot of onion, caused by Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cepae, is a steadily increasing problem in The Netherlands. Financial losses for Dutch farmers confronted with Fusarium basal rot is substantial, due to yield reduction and high storage costs. This paper describes the development and

  16. Short Rotations in Forest Plantations Accelerate Virulence Evolution in Root-Rot Pathogenic Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Paul Soularue

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available As disease outbreaks in forest plantations are causing concern worldwide, a clear understanding of the influence of silvicultural practices on the development of epidemics is still lacking. Importantly, silvicultural practices are likely to simultaneously affect epidemiological and evolutionary dynamics of pathogen populations. We propose a genetically explicit and individual-based model of virulence evolution in a root-rot pathogenic fungus spreading across forest landscapes, taking the Armillaria ostoyae–Pinus pinaster pathosystem as reference. We used the model to study the effects of rotation length on the evolution of virulence and the propagation of the fungus within a forest landscape composed of even-aged stands regularly altered by clear-cutting and thinning operations. The life cycle of the fungus modeled combines asexual and sexual reproduction modes, and also includes parasitic and saprotrophic phases. Moreover, the tree susceptibility to the pathogen is primarily determined by the age of the stand. Our simulations indicated that the shortest rotation length accelerated both the evolution of virulence and the development of the epidemics, whatever the genetic variability in the initial fungal population and the asexuality rate of the fungal species

  17. Specificity of monoclonal antibodies to strains of Dickeya sp. that cause bacterial heart rot of pineapple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckham, Gabriel D; Kaneshiro, Wendy S; Luu, Van; Berestecky, John M; Alvarez, Anne M

    2010-10-01

    During a severe outbreak of bacterial heart rot that occurred in pineapple plantations on Oahu, Hawaii, in 2003 and years following, 43 bacterial strains were isolated from diseased plants or irrigation water and identified as Erwinia chrysanthemi (now Dickeya sp.) by phenotypic, molecular, and pathogenicity assays. Rep-PCR fingerprint patterns grouped strains from pineapple plants and irrigation water into five genotypes (A-E) that differed from representatives of other Dickeya species, Pectobacterium carotovorum and other enteric saprophytes isolated from pineapple. Monoclonal antibodies produced following immunization of mice with virulent type C Dickeya sp. showed only two specificities. MAb Pine-1 (2D11G1, IgG1 with kappa light chain) reacted to all 43 pineapple/water strains and some reference strains (D. dianthicola, D. chrysanthemi, D. paradisiaca, some D. dadantii, and uncharacterized Dickeya sp.) but did not react to reference strains of D. dieffenbachiae, D. zeae, or one of the two Malaysian pineapple strains. MAb Pine-2 (2A7F2, IgG3 with kappa light chain) reacted to all type B, C, and D strains but not to any A or E strains or any reference strains except Dickeya sp. isolated from Malaysian pineapple. Pathogenicity tests showed that type C strains were more aggressive than type A strains when inoculated during cool months. Therefore, MAb Pine-2 distinguishes the more virulent type C strains from less virulent type A pineapple strains and type E water strains. MAbs with these two specificities enable development of rapid diagnostic tests that will distinguish the systemic heart rot pathogen from opportunistic bacteria associated with rotted tissues. Use of the two MAbs in field assays also permits the monitoring of a known subpopulation and provides additional decision tools for disease containment and management practices.

  18. Mountain Pine Beetle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gene D. Amman; Mark D. McGregor; Robert E. Jr. Dolph

    1989-01-01

    The mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, is a member of a group of beetles known as bark beetles: Except when adults emerge and attack new trees, the mountain pine beetle completes its life cycle under the bark. The beetle attacks and kills lodgepole, ponderosa, sugar, and western white pines. Outbreaks frequently develop in lodgepole pine stands that...

  19. Seeding and planting pines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralph E. Willard; L. Max Schmollinger

    1989-01-01

    Pines that occur naturally in parts of the region, as well as those that do not, have been introduced throughout. Pines usually produce greater volumes of wood faster than hardwoods, but in many parts of the region there is no market for pine stumpage or logs. Aside from wood production, pines are established for Christmas trees, windbreaks, landscaping, erosion...

  20. Water relations in untreated and modified wood under brown-rot and white-rot decay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thybring, Emil Engelund

    2017-01-01

    from several literature sources, the water relations of untreated and modified wood decayed by brown-rot and white-rot fungi are examined. The aim is to investigate to what extent observations and assumptions regarding brown-rot and white-rot decay can explain changes in water relations observed during...... and after decay. Although the available experimental data for modified wood is scarce, it indicates that brown-rot and white-rot decay of non-resistant modified wood occurs by similar degradation mechanisms with similar effects on water relations as for untreated wood. From simplistic, mathematical...... modelling, it is shown that changes in water relations during decay can be partly explained by accompanying changes in chemical composition and void volume....

  1. Inferring dispersal patterns of the generalist root fungus Armillaria mellea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travadon, Renaud; Smith, Matthew E; Fujiyoshi, Phillip; Douhan, Greg W; Rizzo, David M; Baumgartner, Kendra

    2012-03-01

    Investigating the dispersal of the root-pathogenic fungus Armillaria mellea is necessary to understand its population biology. Such an investigation is complicated by both its subterranean habit and the persistence of genotypes over successive host generations. As such, host colonization by resident mycelia is thought to outcompete spore infections. We evaluated the contributions of mycelium and spores to host colonization by examining a site in which hosts pre-date A. mellea. Golden Gate Park (San Francisco, CA, USA) was established in 1872 primarily on sand dunes that supported no resident mycelia. Genotypes were identified by microsatellite markers and somatic incompatibility pairings. Spatial autocorrelation analyses of kinship coefficients were used to infer spore dispersal distance. The largest genotypes measured 322 and 343 m in length, and 61 of the 90 total genotypes were recovered from only one tree. The absence of multilocus linkage disequilibrium and the high proportion of unique genotypes suggest that spore dispersal is an important part of the ecology and establishment of A. mellea in this ornamental landscape. Spatial autocorrelations indicated a significant spatial population structure consistent with limited spore dispersal. This isolation-by-distance pattern suggests that most spores disperse over a few meters, which is consistent with recent, direct estimates based on spore trapping data. No claim to original US government works. New Phytologist © 2011 New Phytologist Trust.

  2. Optimization of exopolysaccharide production from Armillaria mellea in submerged cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung, M-Y; Huang, P-C

    2010-02-01

    To study the optimization of submerged culture conditions for exopolysaccharide (EPS) production by Armillaria mellea in shake-flask cultures and also to evaluate the performance of an optimized culture medium in a 5-l stirred tank fermenter. Shake flask cultures for EPS optimal nutritional production contained having the following composition (in g l(-1)): glucose 40, yeast extract 3, KH(2)PO(4) 4 and MgSO(4) 2 at an optimal temperature of 22 degrees C and an initial of pH 4.0. The optimal culture medium was then cultivated in a 5-l stirred tank fermenter at 1 vvm (volume of aeration per volume of bioreactor per min) aeration rate, 150 rev min(-1) agitation speed, controlled pH 4.0 and 22 degrees C. In the optimal culture medium, the maximum EPS production in a 5-l stirred tank fermenter was 588 mg l(-1), c. twice as great as that in the basal medium. The maximum productivity for EPS (Q(p)) and product yield (Y(P/S)) were 42.02 mg l(-1) d(-1) and 26.89 mg g(-1), respectively. The optimal culture conditions we proposed in this study enhanced the EPS production of A. mellea from submerged cultures. The optimal culturing conditions we have found will be a suitable starting point for a scale-up of the fermentation process, helping to develop the production of related medicines and health foods from A. mellea.

  3. First report of Armillaria sinapina, a cause of armillaria root disease, associated with a variety of forest tree hosts on sites with diverse climates in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    N. B. Klopfenstein; J. E. Lundquist; J. W. Hanna; M.-S. Kim; G. I. McDonald

    2009-01-01

    In August of 2007, a preliminary survey was conducted in Alaska to evaluate potential impacts of climate change on forest trees. Armillaria sinapina, a root-disease pathogen, was isolated from conifer and hardwood hosts on climatically diverse sites spanning 675 km from the Kenai Peninsula to the Arctic Circle. Seven isolates (NKAK1, NKAK2, NKAK5, NKAK6, NKAK9F, NKAK13...

  4. DNA-based identification of Armillaria isolates from peach orchards in Mexico state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruben Damian Elias Roman; Ned B. Klopfenstein; Dionicio Alvarado Rosales; Mee-Sook Kim; Anna E. Case; Sara M. Ashiglar; John W. Hanna; Amy L. Ross-Davis; Remigio A. Guzman Plazola

    2012-01-01

    A collaborative project between the Programa de Fitopatología, Colegio de Postgraduados, Texcoco, Estado de Mexico and the USDA Forest Service - RMRS, Moscow Forest Pathology Laboratory has begun this year (2011) to assess which species of Armillaria are causing widespread and severe damage to the peach orchards from México state, Mexico. We are employing a DNA-based...

  5. A reliable in vitro fruiting system for armillaria mellea for evaluation of agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armillaria mellea is a serious pathogen of horticultural and agricultural systems in Europe and North America. The lack of a reliable in vitro fruiting system has hindered research, and necessitated dependence on intermittently available wild-collected basidiospores. Here we describe a reliable, rep...

  6. New secondary metabolites from bioactive extracts of the fungus Armillaria tabescens

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. M. T.Bandara Herath; Melissa Jacob; A. Alpus Wilson; Hamed K. Abbas; N.P. Dhammika Nanayakkara. Nanayakkara

    2012-01-01

    Ethyl acetate extracts of Armillaria tabescens (strain JNB-OZ344) showed significant fungistatic and bacteristatic activities against several major human pathogens including Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium intracellulare. Chemical analysis of these extracts led to the isolation and identification of four new compounds,...

  7. Efficacy of soil solarization, Trichoderma harzianum, and coffee pulp amendment against Armillaria sp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otieno, W.; Termorshuizen, A.J.; Jeger, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Soil solarization was evaluated singly or in combination with Trichoderma harzianum infestation or coffee pulp amendment for its effect on wood-borne inoculum of an Armillaria sp. pathogenic on tea. Solarization increased maximum soil temperatures at 10 cm depth by 9-12degreesC and reduced viability

  8. Three New Sesquiterpene Aryl Esters from the Mycelium of Armillaria mellea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Chih; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Cheng, Jing-Jy; Sung, Ping-Jyun; Ni, Ching-Li; Chen, Chin-Chu; Shen, Chien-Chang

    2015-05-29

    Three new sesquiterpene aryl esters and eight known compounds were isolated from the EtOH extract of the mycelium of Armillaria mellea. The structures of new compounds were established by analysis of their spectroscopic data. Some of the isolates showed cytotoxicity to a variety of cancer cell lines, including MCF-7, H460, HT-29, and CEM.

  9. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation for the investigation of somatic recombination in the fungal pathogen Armillaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    The honey fungus Armillaria mellea is a destructive soil-borne pathogen that affects over 300 plant species, and is of increasing interest due to its ability to decompose lignin. Here we report the transformation of this fungus. A range of techniques was evaluated, and Agrobacterium-mediated trans...

  10. [Isolation and characterization of 27 polymorphic microsatellite markers in Armillaria luteo-virens ( Physalacriaceae)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Rui; Gao, Qingbo; Zhang, Faqi; Li, Yinhu; Ful, Pengcheng; Zhang, Jinhua; Wang, Jiuli; Chen, Shilong

    2014-09-04

    [OBJECTIVE] The objectives of this study were to use Roche 454 GS FLX system to develop SSR markers for Armillaria luteo-virens. These datasets will be valuable for detecting genetic diversity and population structure of this species. [METHODS] We collected Armillaria luteo-virens samples from Yushu in Qinghai province, China. Total RNA was isolated by using the TRIzol reagent, after that we constructed cDNA library and performed one quarter plate of the whole run 454 pyrosequencing. We selected 98 primer pairs randomly from the 321 SSRs to evaluate their application and the polymorphism across 66 individuals (Armillaria luteo-virens) representing 3 wild populations. [RESULTS] Roche 454 sequencing yielded 197,121 reads with a total nucleotide size of 88,585,965bp. 27 of 98 SSRs loci were polymorphic. Numbers of alleles (Na) ranged from 2 to 8. Expected heterozygosity (HE) ranged from less than 0. 001 to 0. 810 at locus ALV65, while observed heterozygosity (Ho) from 0 at loci AIV64 and AIV92 to 0. 900 at loci ALV8. We found no evidence of linkage disequiliburium, however 10 of 27 SSR markers showed significant deviation from Hardy-weinberg equilibrium. [CONCLUSION] These remaining 17 pairs of Armillaria luteo-virens SSR markers will be valuable for future research on detecting population structure and conservation of this species.

  11. Armillaria mellea and mortality of beech affected by beech bark disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip M. Wargo

    1983-01-01

    The role of Armillaria mellea in the mortality of beech trees affected by beech bark disease was determined by excavating root systems of beech trees infested by beech scale, Cryptococcus fagisuga, or also infected by the bark fungus, Nectria coccinea var. faginata. Only trees infected by

  12. Genome expansion and lineage-specific genetic innovations in the forest pathogenic fungi Armillaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipos, György; Prasanna, Arun N; Walter, Mathias C; O'Connor, Eoin; Bálint, Balázs; Krizsán, Krisztina; Kiss, Brigitta; Hess, Jaqueline; Varga, Torda; Slot, Jason; Riley, Robert; Bóka, Bettina; Rigling, Daniel; Barry, Kerrie; Lee, Juna; Mihaltcheva, Sirma; LaButti, Kurt; Lipzen, Anna; Waldron, Rose; Moloney, Nicola M; Sperisen, Christoph; Kredics, László; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Patrignani, Andrea; Fitzpatrick, David; Nagy, István; Doyle, Sean; Anderson, James B; Grigoriev, Igor V; Güldener, Ulrich; Münsterkötter, Martin; Nagy, László G

    2017-12-01

    Armillaria species are both devastating forest pathogens and some of the largest terrestrial organisms on Earth. They forage for hosts and achieve immense colony sizes via rhizomorphs, root-like multicellular structures of clonal dispersal. Here, we sequenced and analysed the genomes of four Armillaria species and performed RNA sequencing and quantitative proteomic analysis on the invasive and reproductive developmental stages of A. ostoyae. Comparison with 22 related fungi revealed a significant genome expansion in Armillaria, affecting several pathogenicity-related genes, lignocellulose-degrading enzymes and lineage-specific genes expressed during rhizomorph development. Rhizomorphs express an evolutionarily young transcriptome that shares features with the transcriptomes of both fruiting bodies and vegetative mycelia. Several genes show concomitant upregulation in rhizomorphs and fruiting bodies and share cis-regulatory signatures in their promoters, providing genetic and regulatory insights into complex multicellularity in fungi. Our results suggest that the evolution of the unique dispersal and pathogenicity mechanisms of Armillaria might have drawn upon ancestral genetic toolkits for wood-decay, morphogenesis and complex multicellularity.

  13. Characterization of North American Armillaria species: Genetic relationships determined by ribosomal DNA sequences and AFLP markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. -S. Kim; N. B. Klopfenstein; J. W. Hanna; G. I. McDonald

    2006-01-01

    Phylogenetic and genetic relationships among 10 North American Armillaria species were analysed using sequence data from ribosomal DNA (rDNA), including intergenic spacer (IGS-1), internal transcribed spacers with associated 5.8S (ITS + 5.8S), and nuclear large subunit rDNA (nLSU), and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. Based on rDNA sequence data,...

  14. Author Correction: Genome expansion and lineage-specific genetic innovations in the forest pathogenic fungi Armillaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipos, György; Prasanna, Arun N; Walter, Mathias C; O'Connor, Eoin; Bálint, Balázs; Krizsán, Krisztina; Kiss, Brigitta; Hess, Jaqueline; Varga, Torda; Slot, Jason; Riley, Robert; Bóka, Bettina; Rigling, Daniel; Barry, Kerrie; Lee, Juna; Mihaltcheva, Sirma; LaButti, Kurt; Lipzen, Anna; Waldron, Rose; Moloney, Nicola M; Sperisen, Christoph; Kredics, László; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Patrignani, Andrea; Fitzpatrick, David; Nagy, István; Doyle, Sean; Anderson, James B; Grigoriev, Igor V; Güldener, Ulrich; Münsterkötter, Martin; Nagy, László G

    2018-03-01

    In the version of this Article originally published, it was incorrectly stated that "16,687 protein-coding genes were inferred for the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of Armillaria"; the value was incorrect and it should have read "15,787". This has now been corrected.

  15. LIMITED POPULATION STRUCTURE OF ARMILLARIA MELLEA THROUGHOUT COASTAL CALIFORNIA SUGGESTS GENE FLOW THROUGH BASIDIOSPORE DISPERSAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armillaria mellea is a fungal pathogen in the orchards, forests, and urban areas of California (CA). Diploid mycelia spread vegetatively belowground among host roots. Basidiospores are not thought to infect planted hosts and haploid mycelia are not collected in nature. We tested the hypothesis that ...

  16. Three New Sesquiterpene Aryl Esters from the Mycelium of Armillaria mellea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chih Chen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Three new sesquiterpene aryl esters and eight known compounds were isolated from the EtOH extract of the mycelium of Armillaria mellea. The structures of new compounds were established by analysis of their spectroscopic data. Some of the isolates showed cytotoxicity to a variety of cancer cell lines, including MCF-7, H460, HT-29, and CEM.

  17. Climate-based species distribution models for Armillaria solidipes in Wyoming: A preliminary assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    John W. Hanna; James T. Blodgett; Eric W. I. Pitman; Sarah M. Ashiglar; John E. Lundquist; Mee-Sook Kim; Amy L. Ross-Davis; Ned B. Klopfenstein

    2014-01-01

    As part of an ongoing project to predict Armillaria root disease in the Rocky Mountain zone, this project predicts suitable climate space (potential distribution) for A. solidipes in Wyoming and associated forest areas at risk to disease caused by this pathogen. Two bioclimatic models are being developed. One model is based solely on verified locations of A. solidipes...

  18. Compartmentalization of decayed wood associated with Armillaria mellea in several tree species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex L. Shigo; Joanna T. Tippett

    1981-01-01

    Decayed wood associated with Armillaria mellea was compartmentalized according to the CODIT (Compartmentalization Of Decay In Trees) model. Compartmentalization in the sapwood began after the tree walled off the area of dead cambium associated with the inflection of the fungus. The fungus spread into dying sapwood beneath and beyond the area of...

  19. Preliminary report on the ecology of Armillaria in the East Cascades of Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geral I. McDonald; John W. Hanna; Aaron L. Smith; Helen M. Maffei; Mee-Sook Kim; Amy L. Ross-Davis; Ned B. Klopfenstein

    2011-01-01

    As part of a larger effort to assess the distribution and ecology of Armillaria species throughout western North America, we present preliminary survey results for the East Cascades of Oregon. Surveys and sampling were conducted on 260 0.04-ha plots, which were randomly located across diverse environments and geographic locations. Using DNA-based techniques for the...

  20. Species of Armillaria in the Wielkopolsko-Pomorski Forest Region (NW Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Żółciak

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Fungi belonging to the genus Armillaria were identified in forests situated in the Wielkopolsko-Pomorski Forest Region. The occurrence of each species in various habitats, stands and hosts was determined. Mating tests as well as morphological studies of fruit-bodies were made for species identification.

  1. Nonspecific elicitation of defense reaction in suspension tobacco cells by elicitors from Armillaria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Víteček, J.; Kašparovský, T.; Mikešová, Milena; Mikeš, V.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 2 (2005), s. 128-132 ISSN 0015-5632 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : elicitation * Armillaria * SFE Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 0.918, year: 2005

  2. Molecular identification of Armillaria gallica from the Niobrara Valley Preserve in Nebraska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mee-Sook Kim; Ned B. Klopfenstein

    2011-01-01

    Armillaria isolates were collected from a unique forest ecosystem in the Niobrara Valley Preserve in Nebraska, USA, which comprises a glacial and early postglacial refugium in the central plains of North America. The isolates were collected from diverse forest trees representing a unique mixture of forest types. Combined methods of rDNA sequencing and flow cytometric...

  3. Evaluation of Compatibility between Beetle-Killed Lodgepole Pine (Pinus Contorta var. Latifolia Wood with Portland Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian D. Hartley

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The compatibility of wood from mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosa killed lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia with Portland cement was investigated based on time-since-death as a quantitative estimator, and the presence of blue-stained sapwood, brown rot, or white rot as qualitative indicators. The exothermic behavior of cement hydration, maximum heat rate, time to reach this maximum, and total heat released within a 3.5–24 h interval were used for defining a new wood-cement compatibility index (CX. CX was developed and accounted for large discrepancies in assessing wood-cement compatibility compared to the previous methods. Using CX, no significant differences were found between fresh or beetle-killed wood with respect to the suitability for cement; except for the white rot samples which reached or exceeded the levels of incompatibility. An outstanding physicochemical behavior was also found for blue-stained sapwood and cement, producing significantly higher compatibility indices.

  4. Evaluation of Compatibility between Beetle-Killed Lodgepole Pine (Pinus Contorta var. Latifolia) Wood with Portland Cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasca, Sorin A; Hartley, Ian D; Reid, Matthew E; Thring, Ronald W

    2010-12-17

    The compatibility of wood from mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosa) killed lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia) with Portland cement was investigated based on time-since-death as a quantitative estimator, and the presence of blue-stained sapwood, brown rot, or white rot as qualitative indicators. The exothermic behavior of cement hydration, maximum heat rate, time to reach this maximum, and total heat released within a 3.5-24 h interval were used for defining a new wood-cement compatibility index (CX). CX was developed and accounted for large discrepancies in assessing wood-cement compatibility compared to the previous methods. Using CX, no significant differences were found between fresh or beetle-killed wood with respect to the suitability for cement; except for the white rot samples which reached or exceeded the levels of incompatibility. An outstanding physicochemical behavior was also found for blue-stained sapwood and cement, producing significantly higher compatibility indices.

  5. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation for investigation of somatic recombination in the fungal pathogen Armillaria mellea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Kendra; Fujiyoshi, Phillip; Foster, Gary D; Bailey, Andy M

    2010-12-01

    Armillaria root disease is one of the most damaging timber and fruit tree diseases in the world. Despite its economic importance, many basic questions about the biology of the causal fungi, Armillaria spp., are unanswered. For example, Armillaria undergoes matings between diploid and haploid mycelia, which can result in a recombinant diploid without meiosis. Evidence of such somatic recombination in natural populations suggests that this reproductive mode may affect the pathogen's ecology. Investigations of the mechanisms and adaptive consequences of somatic recombination are, however, hampered by the lack of a method to reliably synthesize somatic recombinants. Here we report the first genetic transformation system for the genus Armillaria. We transformed A. mellea with selective markers for use in diploid-haploid matings to reliably synthesize somatic recombinants. This was accomplished with Agrobacterium tumefaciens carrying pBGgHg, which carries the hygromycin phosphotransferase gene (hph). hph was integrated into transformants, as evidenced by serial transfer to selective media, PCR, reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), and Southern hybridization. Nuclear and mitochondrial markers were developed to genotype synthesized mycelia. In matings between a wild-type diploid and hygromycin-resistant haploids (transgenic), we identified recombinant, hygromycin-resistant diploids and, additionally, hygromycin-resistant triploids, all with the mitochondrial haplotype of the haploid partner. Our approach created no mycelium in which the haploid nucleus was replaced by the diploid nucleus, the typical outcome of diploid-haploid matings in Armillaria. This genetic transformation system, in combination with new markers to track chromosomal and cytoplasmic inheritance in A. mellea, will advance research aimed at characterizing the significance of somatic recombination in the ecology of this important fungus.

  6. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-Mediated Transformation for Investigation of Somatic Recombination in the Fungal Pathogen Armillaria mellea▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Kendra; Fujiyoshi, Phillip; Foster, Gary D.; Bailey, Andy M.

    2010-01-01

    Armillaria root disease is one of the most damaging timber and fruit tree diseases in the world. Despite its economic importance, many basic questions about the biology of the causal fungi, Armillaria spp., are unanswered. For example, Armillaria undergoes matings between diploid and haploid mycelia, which can result in a recombinant diploid without meiosis. Evidence of such somatic recombination in natural populations suggests that this reproductive mode may affect the pathogen's ecology. Investigations of the mechanisms and adaptive consequences of somatic recombination are, however, hampered by the lack of a method to reliably synthesize somatic recombinants. Here we report the first genetic transformation system for the genus Armillaria. We transformed A. mellea with selective markers for use in diploid-haploid matings to reliably synthesize somatic recombinants. This was accomplished with Agrobacterium tumefaciens carrying pBGgHg, which carries the hygromycin phosphotransferase gene (hph). hph was integrated into transformants, as evidenced by serial transfer to selective media, PCR, reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), and Southern hybridization. Nuclear and mitochondrial markers were developed to genotype synthesized mycelia. In matings between a wild-type diploid and hygromycin-resistant haploids (transgenic), we identified recombinant, hygromycin-resistant diploids and, additionally, hygromycin-resistant triploids, all with the mitochondrial haplotype of the haploid partner. Our approach created no mycelium in which the haploid nucleus was replaced by the diploid nucleus, the typical outcome of diploid-haploid matings in Armillaria. This genetic transformation system, in combination with new markers to track chromosomal and cytoplasmic inheritance in A. mellea, will advance research aimed at characterizing the significance of somatic recombination in the ecology of this important fungus. PMID:20952653

  7. Pseudomonads associated with midrib rot and soft rot of butterhead lettuce and endive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottyn, B; Vanhouteghem, K; Heyrman, J; Bleyaert, P; Van Vaerenbergh, J; De Vos, P; Höfte, M; Maes, M

    2005-01-01

    During the past ten years, bacterial soft rot and midrib rot of glasshouse-grown butterhead lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. var. capitata) and field-grown endive (Cichorium endivia L.) has become increasingly common in the region of Flanders, Belgium. Severe losses and reduced market quality caused by bacterial rot represent an important economical threat for the production sector. Symptoms of midrib rot are a brownish rot along the midrib of one or more inner leaves, often accompanied by soft rot of the leaf blade. Twenty-five symptomatic lettuce and endive samples were collected from commercial growers at different locations in Flanders. Isolations of dominant bacterial colony types on dilution plates from macerated diseased tissue extracts yielded 282 isolates. All isolates were characterized by colony morphology and fluorescence on pseudomonas agar F medium, oxidase reaction, and soft rot ability on detached chicory leaves. Whole-cell fatty acid methyl esters profile analyses identified the majority of isolates (85%) as belonging to the Gammaproteobacteria, which included members of the family Enterobacteriaceae (14%) and of the genera Pseudomonas (73%), Stenotrophomonas (9%), and Acinetobacter (3%). Predominant bacteria were a diverse group of fluorescent Pseudomonas species. They were further differentiated based on the non-host hypersensitive reaction on tobacco and the ability to rot potato slices into 4 phenotypic groups: HR-/P- (57 isolates), HR-/P+ (54 isolates), HR+/P (16 isolates) and HR+/P+ (35 isolates). Artificial inoculation of suspensions of HR-, pectolytic fluorescent pseudomonads in the leaf midrib of lettuce plants produced various symptoms of soft rot, but they did not readily cause symptoms upon spray inoculation. Fluorescent pseudomonads with phenotype HR+ were consistently isolated from typical dark midrib rot symptoms, and selected isolates reproduced the typical midrib rot symptoms when spray-inoculated onto healthy lettuce plants.

  8. Changes in cation concentrations in red spruce wood decayed by brown rot and white rot fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Ostrofsky; J. Jellison; K.T. Smith; W.C. Shortle

    1997-01-01

    Red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) wood blocks were incubated in modified soil block jars and inoculated with one of nine white rot or brown rot basidiomycetes. Concentrations of calcium, magnesium, potassium, iron, and aluminum were determined using inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy in wood incubated 0, 1.5, 4, and 8 months after...

  9. Pine Tortoise Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey J. MacAloney

    1961-01-01

    The pine tortoise scale (Toumeyella numismaticum (P. & M.)) is a soft scale that periodically causes a noticeable amount of mortality of hard pines. Although it was not described until 1920, when it was found on Scotch pine, in northern Wisconsin, there is evidence that it had caused injury much earlier in a number of localities in this and other States. Scale...

  10. Jeffrey Pine Beetle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard H. Smith

    1971-01-01

    The Jeffrey pine beetle (Dendroctonus jeffreyi Hopk.), one of the bark beetles that kill trees by mining between the bark and the wood, is the principal insect enemy of Jeffrey pine. The beetle is of economic importance chiefly in California, where most of the Jeffrey pine grows, and is most destructive in old-growth stands in the timber-producing areas of northeastern...

  11. Lodgepole Pine Dwarf Mistletoe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank G. Hawksworth; Oscar J. Dooling

    1984-01-01

    Lodgepole pine dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium americanum Nutt. ex Engelm.) is a native, parasitic, seed plant that occurs essentially throughout the range of lodgepole pine in North America. It is the most damaging disease agent in lodgepole pine, causing severe growth loss and increased tree mortality. Surveys in the Rocky Mountains show that the parasite is found in...

  12. Foot Rot of Ulluco Caused by Pythium aphanidermatum

    OpenAIRE

    Keisuke, TOMIOKA; Toyozo, SATO; Tateo, NAKANISHI; National Agricultural Research Center for Western Region; National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences; National Agricultural Research Center for Western Region

    2002-01-01

    Severe rot of stem bases caused by Pythium aphanidermatum was found on ulluco (Ullucus tuberosus) grown in Kagawa Prefecture, Japan, in September 1999. The name "foot rot of ulluco" is proposed for this new disease.

  13. Efficacy of pinosylvins against white-rot and brown-rot fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catherine C. Celimene; Jessie A. Micales; Leslie Ferge; Raymond A. Young

    1999-01-01

    Three stilbenes, pinosylvin (PS), pinosylvin monomethyl ether (PSM) and pinosylvin dimethyl ether (PSD), were extracted from white spruce (Picea glauca), jack pine (Pinus banksiana), and red pine (Pinus resinosa) pine cones, and their structures were confirmed by spectroscopic and chromatographic (HPLC, GC/MS, NMR and FTIR) analysis. PS, PSM, PSD or a 1:1:1 mixture of...

  14. A native promoter and inclusion of an intron is necessary for efficient expression of GFP or mRFP in Armillaria mellea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armillaria mellea is a significant pathogen that causes Armillaria root disease on numerous hosts in forests, gardens and agricultural environments worldwide. Using a yeast-adapted pCAMBIA0380 Agrobacterium vector, we have constructed a series of vectors for transformation of A. mellea, assembled u...

  15. Coarse-scale population structure of pathogenic Armillaria species in a mixed-conifer forest in the Blue Mountains of northeast Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    B.A. Ferguson; T.A. Dreisbach; C.G. Parks; G.M. Filip; C.L. Schmitt

    2003-01-01

    The coarse-scale population structure of pathogenic Armillaria (Fr.) Staude species was determined on approximately 16 100 ha Of relatively dry, mixed-conifer forest in the Blue Mountains of northeast Oregon. Sampling of recently dead or live, symptomatic conifers produced 112 isolates of Armillaria from six tree species.

  16. Why does the bioluminescent fungus Armillaria mellea have luminous mycelium but nonluminous fruiting body?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purtov, K V; Petushkov, V N; Rodionova, N S; Gitelson, J I

    2017-05-01

    By determining the components involved in the bioluminescence process in luminous and nonluminous organs of the honey fungus Armillaria mellea, we have established causes of partial luminescence of this fungus. The complete set of enzymes and substrates required for bioluminescence is formed only in the mycelium and only under the conditions of free oxygen access. Since the synthesis of luciferin precursor (hispidin) and 3-hydroxyhispidin hydroxylase in the fruiting bodies is blocked, the formation of luciferin-the key component of fungal bioluminescent system-was not observed. That is why the fruiting body of Armillaria mellea is nonluminous despite the presence of luciferase, the enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of luciferin with a photon emission.

  17. Effects of SO2-fumigation on the infection of Norway spruce by Armillaria ostoyae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horak, M.; Tesche, M.

    1993-01-01

    SO 2 fumigation (0.86 mg/m 3 ) reduced drastically the survival expectancy of spruce seedlings already after 1 month. Under such conditions, the infection of spruce by Armillaria ostoyae is known to increase. The present investigation has shown that mortality increased strongly by combining A. ostoyae infection and fumigation. However, mycorrhization of spruce (Paxillus involutus) increased the survival rate of seedlings and reduced infection by A. ostoyae remarkably (20%). (orig.) [de

  18. Network formation by rhizomorphs of Armillaria lutea in natural soil: their description and ecological significance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamour, A.; Termorshuizen, A.J.; Volker, D.; Jeger, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    Armillaria lutea rhizomorphs in soil were mapped over areas of 25¿m2 at a Pinus nigra (site I) and a Picea abies (site II) plantation. Rhizomorph density was 4.3 and 6.1¿m¿m¿2 soil surface with 84% and 48% of the total rhizomorph length in the mapped area interconnected in a network at site I and

  19. Bioactive sesquiterpene aryl esters from the culture broth of Armillaria sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobori, Hajime; Sekiya, Atsushi; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Choi, Jae-Hoon; Hirai, Hirofumi; Kawagishi, Hirokazu

    2015-01-23

    Two new compounds, 10-dehydroxymelleolide D (1) and 13-hydroxymelleolide K (2), along with seven known compounds, 5'-O-methylmelledonal (3), melleolide D (4), 13-hydroxydihydromelleolide (5), melleolide (6), armillarinin (7), armillaridin (8), and armillarikin (9), were isolated from the culture broth of Armillaria sp. Their structures were determined by spectroscopic data analysis. All the compounds inhibited plant growth of lettuce. Melleolide (6) and armillarikin (9) inhibited mycelial growth of Coprinopsis cinerea and/or Flammulina velutipes.

  20. A new multilocus approach for a reliable DNA-based identification of Armillaria species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsykun, Tetyana; Rigling, Daniel; Prospero, Simone

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we highlight and critically discuss limitations to molecular methods for identification of fungi via the example of the basidiomycete genus Armillaria. We analyzed a total of 144 sequences of three DNA regions commonly used for identifying fungi (ribosomal IGS-1 and ITS regions, translation elongation factor-1 alpha gene) from 48 specimens of six Armillaria species occurring in Europe (A. cepistipes, A. ostoyae, A. gallica, A. borealis, A. mellea, A. tabescens). Species were identified by comparing newly obtained sequences with those from the NCBI database, phylogenetic analyses and PCR-RFLP analyses of the three regions considered. When analyzed separately, no single gene region could unambiguously identify all six Armillaria species because of low interspecific and high intrasequence variability. We therefore developed a multilocus approach, which involves the stepwise use of the three regions. Following this scheme, all six species could be clearly discriminated. Our study suggests that, to improve the reliability of DNA-based techniques for species identification, multiple genes or intergenic regions should be analyzed.

  1. Pathogenicity of Armillaria Isolates Inoculated on Five Quercus Species at Different Watering Regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Metaliaj

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available One of three fungal isolates of Armillaria mellea (Vahl: Fr. P. Kummer, A. gallica Marxm. et Romagn. and A. tabescens (Scop.: Fr. Emel. was inoculated on 1,440 three-year-old potted seedlings of five Quercus species (Q. cerris L., Q. ilex L., Q. pubescens Willd., Q. robur L. and Q. trojana Webb. grown at different watering regimes in a greenhouse. Inoculum was represented by a piece of an oak branch colonised with the fungus (or sterile, as a control, which was attached to the unwounded main root of each oak seedling. During the growing season, differences in water availability among seedlings were measured monthly using minimum water potential assessments on noninoculated seedlings receiving an equal amount of water. Although all three Armillaria isolates induced infection, the A. mellea isolate was most pathogenic in all cases, while the A. gallica isolate showed a statistically equal degree of pathogenicity only on the least watered seedlings. Of the Quercus species, Q. ilex showed the greatest number of infected seedlings, Q. robur the smallest. Reducing the water supply to potted oak seedlings could be a useful indicator for detecting differences in pathogenicity between Armillaria species.

  2. Transcriptome analysis of genes involved in defence response in Polyporus umbellatus with Armillaria mellea infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meng-Meng; Xing, Yong-Mei; Zhang, Da-Wei; Guo, Shun-Xing

    2015-11-03

    Polyporus umbellatus, a species symbiotic with Armillaria mellea and it also exhibits substantial defence response to Armillaria mellea infection. There are no genomics resources databases for understanding the molecular mechanism underlying the infection stress of P. umbellatus. Therefore, we performed a large-scale transcriptome sequencing of this fungus with A. mellea infection using Illumina sequencing technology. The assembly of the clean reads resulted in 120,576 transcripts, including 38,444 unigenes. Additionally, we performed a gene expression profiling analysis upon infection treatment. The results indicated significant differences in the gene expression profiles between the control and the infection group. In total, 10933 genes were identified between the two groups. Based on the differentially expressed genes, a Gene Ontology annotation analysis showed many defence-relevant categories. Meanwhile, the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis uncovered some important pathways. Furthermore, the expression patterns of 13 putative genes that are involved in defence response resulting from quantitative real-time PCR were consistent with their transcript abundance changes as identified by RNA-seq. The sequenced genes covered a considerable proportion of the P. umbellatus transcriptome, and the expression results may be useful to strengthen the knowledge on the defence response of this fungus defend against Armillaria mellea invasion.

  3. Sequence-based identification of Japanese Armillaria species using the elongation factor-1 alpha gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Eri; Ota, Yuko; Hattori, Tsutomu; Kikuchi, Taisei

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed the sequences of three DNA regions-the translation elongation factor-1 alpha (EF-1 alpha) gene and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and intergenic spacer (IGS) regions of ribosomal DNA-to compare their accuracy in identifying species of Japanese Armillaria. We studied 49 isolates of eight Armillaria species, A. mellea, A. ostoyae, A. nabsnona, A. cepistipes, A. gallica, A. sinapina, A. tabescens and the biological species Nagasawa E (Nag. E). Phylogenetic analyses of the ITS and IGS data helped in identifying A. mellea, A. ostoyae, A. nabsnona, A. tabescens and Nag. E but could not be used to identify A. gallica, A. cepistipes and A. sinapina. Nevertheless our analysis showed that the EF-1 alpha gene was clearly different in the eight examined species. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) of the IGS-1 region could be used to distinguish most species, but the RFLP profiles of some isolates of A. cepistipes and A. sinapina were the same even with four different restriction enzymes. In conclusion, among the techniques examined in this study, analyzing the EF-1 alpha sequence was found to be the most suitable method for identifying different species of Japanese Armillaria.

  4. Frequent diploidisation of haploid Armillaria ostoyae strains in an outdoor inoculation experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzelmann, Renate; Prospero, Simone; Rigling, Daniel

    Very little is known about the biology and ecology of haploid Armillaria strains in nature. In this outdoor inoculation experiment, we assessed the virulence of six haploid Armillariaostoyae strains along with their diploid parent towards 2-year-old seedlings and 4-year-old saplings of Norway spruce (Picea abies), and determined their ability to colonise freshly cut stumps. As inoculum source an Armillaria-colonised hazelnut (Corylus avellana) stem segment was inserted into the soil substrate. Re-isolations from mycelial fans at the root collar of infected trees or stumps were made. Surprisingly, not a single haploid re-isolate could be recovered. Microsatellite genotyping of 133 re-isolates suggests that the inoculated haploid strains were diploidised either by mating propagules (basidiospores or haploid mycelia) already present in the soil substrate or naturally disseminated in the course of the experiment from nearby forests. Consequently, no conclusion about the infectious ability of haploid Armillaria mycelia under natural conditions can be drawn. Nonetheless, the diploid half-sib families resulting from the diploidisation showed varying degrees of virulence, with a high correlation between the experiment with 2-year-old seedlings and 4-year-old saplings. Despite extensive genotyping of re-isolates, no evidence for somatic recombination between haploid mating propagules and diploidised mycelia was detected, suggesting that this is an uncommon phenomenon in A. ostoyae. Copyright © 2017 British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Extensive sampling of basidiomycete genomes demonstrates inadequacy of the white-rot/brown-rot paradigm for wood decay fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert Riley; Asaf A. Salamov; Daren W. Brown; Laszlo G. Nagy; Dimitrios Floudas; Benjamin W. Held; Anthony Levasseur; Vincent Lombard; Emmanuelle Morin; Robert Otillar; Erika A. Lindquist; Hui Sun; Kurt M. LaButti; Jeremy Schmutz; Dina Jabbour; Hong Luo; Scott E. Baker; Antonio G. Pisabarro; Jonathan D. Walton; Robert A. Blanchette; Bernard Henrissat; Francis Martin; Daniel Cullen; David S. Hibbett; Igor V. Grigoriev

    2014-01-01

    Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes) make up 32% of the described fungi and include most wood-decaying species, as well as pathogens and mutualistic symbionts. Wood-decaying basidiomycetes have typically been classified as either white rot or brown rot, based on the ability (in white rot only) to degrade lignin along with cellulose and hemicellulose. Prior genomic...

  6. Response of the Andean diversity panel to root rot in a root rot nursery in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Andean Diversity Panel (ADP) was evaluated under low-fertility and root rot conditions in two trials conducted in 2013 and 2015 in Isabela, Puerto Rico. About 246 ADP lines were evaluated in the root rot nursery with root rot and stem diseases caused predominantly by Fusarium solani, which cause...

  7. Extensive sampling of basidiomycete genomes demonstrates inadequacy of the white rot/brown rot paradigm for wood decay fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes) make up 32% of the described fungi and include most wood decaying species, as well as pathogens and mutualistic symbionts. Wood-decaying basidiomycetes have typically been classified as either white rot or brown rot, based on the ability (in white rot only) to degrade ...

  8. Changes in Molecular Size Distribution of Cellulose during Attack by White Rot and Brown Rot Fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Kleman-Leyer, Karen; Agosin, Eduardo; Conner, Anthony H.; Kirk, T. Kent

    1992-01-01

    The kinetics of cotton cellulose depolymerization by the brown rot fungus Postia placenta and the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium were investigated with solid-state cultures. The degree of polymerization (DP; the average number of glucosyl residues per cellulose molecule) of cellulose removed from soil-block cultures during degradation by P. placenta was first determined viscosimetrically. Changes in molecular size distribution of cellulose attacked by either fungus were then det...

  9. Incidence of root and butt rot in consecutive rotations, with emphasis on Heterobasidion annosum in Norway spruce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roennberg, J. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp (Sweden). Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre

    1999-06-01

    The incidence of root and butt rot in consecutive rotations was evaluated in five separate studies. The susceptibility to infections by Heterobasidion annosum was examined in a 28-year-old tree species experiment in northern Jutland, Denmark, established after a heavily infected mountain pine (Pinus uncinata) stand. Pseudotsuga menziesii and Abies nobilis showed greatest mortality due to H. annosum within five years of planting. The highest incidences of butt rot at first thinning, mainly caused by H. annosum of the P-group, were recorded in A. nobilis, Larix leptolepis and Picea sitchensis, with 44 %, 43 % and 36 % of the thinned trees infected respectively. Abies alba and A. nordmanniana were almost free from infections. The incidence of H. annosum was examined in three young hybrid larch (Larix x eurolepis) plantations in southern Sweden established after heavily infected Picea abies stands. The incidence of H. annosum was 7 %, 33 %, and 70 % respectively, in the 2-, 3-, and 5-year-old plantations. Transfer of H. annosum from infected old P. abies stumps to hybrid larch occurs early after planting. The incidence of butt rot in two consecutive rotations in 28 permanent sample plots of P. abies at four different sites in Denmark and at six plots in southwestern Sweden was evaluated. No correlation between the incidence of butt rot at final felling of the previous rotation of P. abies and the incidence of butt rot at first thinning of the subsequent rotation of P. abies was found. In two studies the effects of clear felling operations on stump root damage to P. abies were examined. Numerous cases of damage on stumps and roots were found. However, few cases of damage get infected by spores of H. annosum, and treatment of clear felled P. abies stumps may be a way of reducing the possible infection source transferring the infection of H. annosum to the subsequent rotation 173 refs, 1 fig

  10. Studies on storage rot of cocoyam

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    uc network

    Department of Botany, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria, were employed for this study. These were fungal organisms which had earlier been established as the major rot pathogens of cocoyam corms during storage. Pathogenicity assessment studies of fungal organisms: To assess the potency of the fungal organisms.

  11. Etiology of phomopsis root rot in soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Cecília Ghissi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In a survey of damages caused by soybean root rot to crops in the south of Brazil for several years, a root rot caused by Phomopsis sp has been found with increasing frequency. The primary symptoms are seen when the main root is cut longitudinally, including the death of the wood which shows white coloration and well-defined black lines that do not have a defined format. Thus, based on similarity, it has been called geographic root rot due to its aspect resembling irregular lines that separate regions on a map. In isolations, colonies and alpha spores of Phomopsis have prevailed. Pathogenicity test was done by means of inoculation in the crown of plants cultivated in a growth chamber. The geographic symptoms were reproduced in plants and the fungus Phomopsis sp. was reisolated. In soybean stems naturally infected with pod and stem blight, geographic symptoms caused by Phomopsis phaseoli are found. To the known symptoms on stems, pods and grains, that of root rot caused by P. phaseoli is now added.

  12. Laminated Root Rot of Western Conifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    E.E. Nelson; N.E. Martin; R.E. Williams

    1981-01-01

    Laminated root rot is caused by the native fungus Phellinus weirii (Murr.) Gilb. It occurs throughout the Northwestern United States and in southern British Columbia, Canada. The disease has also been reported in Japan and Manchuria. In the United States, the pathogen is most destructive in pure Douglas-fir stands west of the crest of the Cascade Range in Washington...

  13. Postharvest Rhizopus rot on sugar beet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhizopus species have been reported as a minor post-harvest rot on sugar beet, particularly under temperatures above 5 deg C. In 2010, Rhizopus was isolated from beets collected from Michigan storage piles in February at a low frequency. However, recent evidence from Michigan has found a high incide...

  14. Influence of mineral salts upon activity of Trichoderma harzianum non-volatile metabolites on Armillaria spp. rhizomorphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Przybył

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of non-volatile metabolites of Trichoderma harzianum together with certain salts containing Mg++, Fe+++, Mn++, Cu++, Al+++, Ca++, K++, Na+, PO4--- and SO3--- on the production and length of rhizomorphs of Armillaria borealis, A. gallica and A. ostoyae was studied. In pure medium, T. harzianum exhibited stimulating effect on rhizomorphs of A. borealis (both number and length and A. ostoyae (only initiation. Cu++ salt totaly inhibited the initiation of rhizomorphs of Armillaria borealis, A. gallica and A. ostoyae. Effect of other compounds on the activity of T. harzianum depended on Armillaria species. The majority of chemical compounds tested supressed the activity of non-volatile metabolites of T. harzianum. Evident stimulating effect was observed under influence of sulphate salts consisting Al++ and Fe+++ on the rhizomorph number of A. borealis and A. gallica, respectively.

  15. Mountain Pine Beetle Fecundity and Offspring Size Differ Among Lodgepole Pine and Whitebark Pine Hosts

    OpenAIRE

    Gross, Donovan

    2008-01-01

    Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis Engelmann) is a treeline species in the central Rocky Mountains. Its occupation of high elevations previously protected whitebark pine from long-term mountain pine beetle outbreaks. The mountain pine beetle, however, is currently reaching outbreaks of record magnitude in high-elevation whitebark pine. We used a factorial laboratory experiment to compare mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) life history characteristics between a typical host, ...

  16. Soft rot erwiniae: from genes to genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Ian K; Bell, Kenneth S; Holeva, Maria C; Birch, Paul R J

    2003-01-01

    SUMMARY The soft rot erwiniae, Erwinia carotovora ssp. atroseptica (Eca), E. carotovora ssp. carotovora (Ecc) and E. chrysanthemi (Ech) are major bacterial pathogens of potato and other crops world-wide. We currently understand much about how these bacteria attack plants and protect themselves against plant defences. However, the processes underlying the establishment of infection, differences in host range and their ability to survive when not causing disease, largely remain a mystery. This review will focus on our current knowledge of pathogenesis in these organisms and discuss how modern genomic approaches, including complete genome sequencing of Eca and Ech, may open the door to a new understanding of the potential subtlety and complexity of soft rot erwiniae and their interactions with plants. The soft rot erwiniae are members of the Enterobacteriaceae, along with other plant pathogens such as Erwinia amylovora and human pathogens such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp. and Yersinia spp. Although the genus name Erwinia is most often used to describe the group, an alternative genus name Pectobacterium was recently proposed for the soft rot species. Ech mainly affects crops and other plants in tropical and subtropical regions and has a wide host range that includes potato and the important model host African violet (Saintpaulia ionantha). Ecc affects crops and other plants in subtropical and temperate regions and has probably the widest host range, which also includes potato. Eca, on the other hand, has a host range limited almost exclusively to potato in temperate regions only. Disease symptoms: Soft rot erwiniae cause general tissue maceration, termed soft rot disease, through the production of plant cell wall degrading enzymes. Environmental factors such as temperature, low oxygen concentration and free water play an essential role in disease development. On potato, and possibly other plants, disease symptoms may differ, e.g. blackleg disease is associated

  17. Hurricane Katrina winds damaged longleaf pine less than loblolly pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt H. Johnsen; John R. Butnor; John S. Kush; Ronald C. Schmidtling; C. Dana. Nelson

    2009-01-01

    Some evidence suggests that longleaf pine might be more tolerant of high winds than either slash pine (Pinus elliotii Englem.) or loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.). We studied wind damage to these three pine species in a common garden experiment in southeast Mississippi following Hurricane Katrina,...

  18. Pine weevil (Hylobius abietis) antifeedants from lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratt, K; Sunnerheim, K; Nordenhem, H; Nordlander, G; Langström, B

    2001-11-01

    Pine weevils (Hylobius abietis) fed less on bark of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) than on bark of Scots pine (P. sylvestris). Two pine weevil antifeedants, ethyl trans-cinnamate and ethyl 2,3-dibromo-3-phenyl-propanoate, were isolated from bark of lodgepole pine. These two compounds significantly reduced pine weevil feeding in a laboratory bioassay. In field assays, the second compound significantly decreased pine weevil damage on planted seedlings. Ethyl 2,3-dibromo-3-phenylpropanoate has not previously been reported as a natural product.

  19. Isolation of laccase gene-specific sequences from white rot and brown rot fungi by PCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D`Souza, T.M.; Boominathan, K.; Reddy, C.A. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Degenerate primers corresponding to the consensus sequences of the copper-binding regions in the N-terminal domains of known basidiomycete laccases were used to isolate laccase gene-specific sequences from strains representing nine genera of wood rot fungi. All except three gave the expected PCR product of about 200 bp. Computer searches of the databases identified the sequences of each of the PCR product of about 200 bp. Computer searches of the databases identified the sequence of each of the PCR products analyzed as a laccase gene sequence, suggesting the specificity of the primers. PCR products of the white rot fungi Ganoderma lucidum, Phlebia brevispora, and Trametes versicolor showed 65 to 74% nucleotide sequence similarity to each other; the similarity in deduced amino acid sequences was 83 to 91%. The PCR products of Lentinula edodes and Lentinus tigrinus, on the other hand, showed relatively low nucleotide and amino acid similarities (58 to 64 and 62 to 81%, respectively); however, these similarities were still much higher than when compared with the corresponding regions in the laccases of the ascomycete fungi Aspergillus nidulans and Neurospora crassa. A few of the white rot fungi, as well as Gloeophyllum trabeum, a brown rot fungus, gave a 144-bp PCR fragment which had a nucleotide sequence similarity of 60 to 71%. Demonstration of laccase activity in G. trabeum and several other brown rot fungi was of particular interest because these organisms were not previously shown to produce laccases. 36 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Longleaf pine seedling production

    Science.gov (United States)

    James P. Barnett

    2000-01-01

    Longleaf pine is a highly desirable species, resisting fire, insects and pathogens, and produces quality solid-wood products, but regeneration of the species has been difficult. Natural regeneration is feasible only on a small portion of the area considered to be longleaf pine type. Therefore, artificial regeneration must become a reliable means of regenerating the...

  1. Incidence of butt rot in a tree species experiment in northern Denmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roennberg, Jonas; Vollbrecht, Gudmund [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp (Sweden). Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre; Thomsen, I.M. [Danish Forest and Landscape Research Inst., Hoersholm (Denmark)

    1999-08-01

    The susceptibility to infections by Heterobasidion annosum (Fr.) Bref. was examined in a 28-year-old tree species experiment in northern Jutland, Denmark. Silver fir (Abies alba Mill.), Caucasian fir (Abies nordmanniana (Stev.) Spach), grand fir (Abies grandis (Dougl) Lindl.), noble fir (Abies procera Rehd.), Japanese larch (Larix kaempferi (Lamb.) Carr.), Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.), Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.), and Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) were planted after shelterwood felling of a mountain pine (Pinus uncinata Mill. ex Mirb.) stand that had been infected by H. annosum. Douglas fir and noble fir showed the greatest mortality due to H. annosum during the first 5 years after planting. At first thinning the highest incidences of butt rot were recorded in noble fir, Japanese larch and Sitka spruce, with 44%, 43% and 36% of the thinned trees infected, respectively. Silver fir and Caucasian fir were almost free from infections. Maximum extension of H. annosum rot columns were in Japanese larch (18 dm). Heterobasidion annosum was found to be the most important decay causing fungus. Mating tests assigned all isolated strains of H. annosum to the P-intersterility group 35 refs, 2 tabs

  2. MANAGEMENT OF ROOT ROT IN AVOCADO TREES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SIMONE RODRIGUES DA SILVA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Root rot (Phytophthora cinnamomi Rands is one of the most restrictive factors to avocado growing in main producing regions worldwide. In Brazil, scientific reports on the effectiveness of control methods are scarce. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of gypsum applications and dolomitic limestone to the soil and potassium phosphite sprays in controlling this disease in ‘Hass’ avocado, grown without irrigation. The application of dolomitic limestone or gypsum alone is not effective to recover plants affected by root rot. The application of potassium phosphite, combined or not with dolomitic lime or gypsum enables the partial recovery ‘Hass’ avocado plants affected by the disease.

  3. Sugar pine and its hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. B. Critchfield; B. B. Kinloch

    1986-01-01

    Unlike most white pines, sugar pine (Pinus lambertiana) is severely restricted in its ability to hybridize with other species. It has not been successfully crossed with any other North American white pine, nor with those Eurasian white pines it most closely resembles. Crosses with the dissimilar P. koraiensis and P....

  4. MANAGEMENT OF ROOT ROT IN AVOCADO TREES

    OpenAIRE

    SILVA, SIMONE RODRIGUES DA; CANTUARIAS-AVILÉS, TATIANA; BREMER NETO, HORST; MOURÃO FILHO, FRANCISCO DE ASSIS ALVES; MEDINA, RICARDO BORDIGNON

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Root rot (Phytophthora cinnamomi Rands) is one of the most restrictive factors to avocado growing in main producing regions worldwide. In Brazil, scientific reports on the effectiveness of control methods are scarce. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of gypsum applications and dolomitic limestone to the soil and potassium phosphite sprays in controlling this disease in ‘Hass’ avocado, grown without irrigation. The application of dolomitic limestone or gypsum...

  5. Sheath rot of rice in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeimi, S; Okhovvat, S M; Hedjaroude, G A; Khosravi, V

    2003-01-01

    Sheath rot of rice occurs in most rice-growing regions of the world. It usually causes yield losses from 20 to 85%. Sheath rot was reported from Iran in 1993. Year after year, the number of diseased plants increased in the Northern Iran. In summer of 2001, these symptoms were observed in most fields: lesions occur on the upper leaf sheaths, especially the flag leaf sheath. As the disease progresses, lesions enlarge and coalesce and may cover most of the leaf sheath. Panicle may fail to completely or at all. Brown or partially brown not filled or partially filled grain is also associated with infection of the panicle. A whitish powdery growth may be found inside affected sheaths. Infected plants were collected and trasferred to laboratory. Small pieces of diseased tissues were washed under tap water for one hour. Then tissues were placed on WA and incubated at 25 degrees C. These isolates were purified and identified as: Sarocladium oryzae, Fusarium udum, F. semitectum, F. avenaceum, F. flocciferum, F. graminearum, Bipolaris oryzae, Alternaria padwickii, Rhizoctonia solani, Paecilomyces sp., Nigrospora sp. and Trichoderma sp. This is the first report of F. udum in Iran. Also this is the first report that rice is the host for F. semitectum, F. avenaceum and F. flocciferum in Iran. Pathogenicity tests were conducted in glass house. Following species were found to be associated with sheath rot of rice: S. oryzae, F. graminearum, F. udum, F. avenaceum, B. oryzae, A. padwickii. This is the first report in the world that F. udum and A. padwickii are the causal agents of the sheath rot on rice plants.

  6. Stand tending and root rot in Norway spruce stands - economical effects caused by root rot at different thinning regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Mats

    1997-01-01

    This report is divided into three parts: 1) a literature study describing the most common fungi causing rot in wood and descriptions of various strategies to reduce economic loss from root rot, 2) a check of a model describing the development of butt rot in pure Norway spruce plantations in southern Sweden, and 3) simulated economic effects of root rot in stands with various stand tending. The rot model was used to estimate future rot frequencies in the economic calculations. In order to avoid overestimations of rot frequencies, the calculations were also executed when assuming slower growth of rot than shown in the model. When analysing the economical effects of rot, the following three thinning programmes were used: Program 1: thinning at the ages of 30- and 45 years. Final felling at the ages 50-, 55-, 60-, 65-, and 70 years. Program 2: thinning at the ages of 40- and 60- years. Final felling at the ages 65 and 75 years. Program 3: thinning at the ages of 30-, 40-, 55-, and 70 years. Final felling at the ages 80 and 90 years. With an interest rate of 3%, programme 2 (final felling at the age of 65 years) had the highest value at present. This result was valid when presuming butt rot in the stand as well as when presuming no butt rot in the stand. There was a small difference between the value at present in programme 1 (final felling at the age of 60 years) and in programme 3 (final felling at the age of 80 years). When presuming butt rot in the stand, the value at present in programme 3 decreased somewhat more in comparison to the value at present in programme 1. Compared to no butt rot in the stand, the optimal final felling time appeared five to ten years earlier when assuming butt rot in the stand. Stand tending programme 1 and an interest rate of 3% were used. Interest rates 2 and 4% did not indicate shorter rotation. The calculated optimal time of final felling appeared at the same stand age whether assuming rot preset or not. The results in this study

  7. Trypsin-specific Inhibitors from the Macrolepiota procera, Armillaria mellea and Amanita phalloides wild mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukanc, Tjaša; Brzin, Jože; Kos, Janko; Sabotič, Jerica

    2017-01-01

    Wild growing mushrooms are a rich source of novel proteins with unique features. We have isolated and characterized trypsin inhibitors from two edible mushrooms, the honey fungus (Armillaria mellea) and the parasol mushroom (Macrolepiota procera), and from the poisonous death cap (Amanita phalloides). The trypsin inhibitors isolated: armespin, macrospin and amphaspin, have similar molecular masses, acidic isoelectric points and are not N-glycosylated. They are very strong trypsin inhibitors and weak chymotrypsin inhibitors. They are resistant to exposure to high temperatures and withstand extreme pH values. These exceptional characteristics are advantageous for their potential use in biotechnology, agriculture and medicine.

  8. Fragmentation of human IgG by a new protease isolated from the basidiomycete Armillaria mellea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunneyball, I M; Stanworth, D R

    1975-01-01

    Digestion of human IgG by a new lysine-specific protease, isolated from the basidiomycete Armillaria mellea, produced Fc and Fab fragments similar to those produced by papain digestion of the same molecule. Digestion appeared to be restricted to a single cleavage point within the hinge region of the IgG molecule. Myeloma proteins of IgG1, IgG3 and IgG4 subclasses were found to be digested at an extremely rapid rate whereas IgG2 myeloma proteins appeared to be resistant to digestion by this enzyme. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 6 PMID:1201861

  9. Advances toward DNA-based identification and phylogeny of North American Armillaria species using elongation factor-1 alpha gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amy L. Ross-Davis; John W. Hanna; Mee-Sook Kim; Ned B. Klopfenstein

    2012-01-01

    The translation elongation factor-1 alpha gene was used to examine the phylogenetic relationships among 30 previously characterized isolates representing ten North American Armillaria species: A. solidipes (=A. ostoyae), A. gemina, A. calvescens, A. sinapina, A. mellea, A. gallica, A. nabsnona, North American biological species X, A. cepistipes, and A. tabescens. The...

  10. THE ORIGIN AND MAINTENANCE OF GENETIC DIVERSITY WITHIN POPULATIONS OF THE ROOT PATHOGEN ARMILLARIA MELLEA IN NORTH AMERICA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armillaria mellea (Basidiomycota, Physalacriaceae) sensu stricto is a common root pathogen of fruit crops, timber trees, and ornamentals worldwide. Phylogenetic analyses of nuclear rDNA and protein-coding loci support differentiation of four geographic groups: Asia, western N. America, eastern N. Am...

  11. Extensive sampling of basidiomycete genomes demonstrates inadequacy of the white rot/ brown rot paradigm for wood decay fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Brown, Daren W.; Nagy, Laszlo G.; Floudas, Dimitris; Held, Benjamin; Levasseur, Anthony; Lombard, Vincent; Morin, Emmanuelle; Otillar, Robert; Lindquist, Erika; Sun, Hui; LaButti, Kurt; Schmutz, Jeremy; Jabbour, Dina; Luo, Hong; Baker, Scott E.; Pisabarro, Antonio; Walton, Jonathan D.; Blanchette, Robert; Henrissat, Bernard; Martin, Francis; Cullen, Dan; Hibbett, David; Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2014-03-14

    Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes) make up 32percent of the described fungi and include most wood decaying species, as well as pathogens and mutualistic symbionts. Wood-decaying basidiomycetes have typically been classified as either white rot or brown rot, based on the ability (in white rot only) to degrade lignin along with cellulose and hemicellulose. Prior genomic comparisons suggested that the two decay modes can be distinguished based on the presence or absence of ligninolytic class II peroxidases (PODs), as well as the abundance of enzymes acting directly on crystalline cellulose (reduced in brown rot). To assess the generality of the white rot/brown rot classification paradigm we compared the genomes of 33 basidiomycetes, including four newly sequenced wood decayers, and performed phylogenetically-informed Principal Components Analysis (PCA) of a broad range of gene families encoding plant biomass-degrading enzymes. The newly sequenced Botryobasidium botryosum and Jaapia argillacea genomes lack PODs, but possess diverse enzymes acting on crystalline cellulose, and they group close to the model white rot species Phanerochaete chrysosporium in the PCA. Furthermore, laboratory assays showed that both B. botryosum and J. argillacea can degrade all polymeric components of woody plant cell walls, a characteristic of white rot. We also found expansions in reducing polyketide synthase genes specific to the brown rot fungi. Our results suggest a continuum rather than a dichotomy between the white rot and brown rot modes of wood decay. A more nuanced categorization of rot types is needed, based on an improved understanding of the genomics and biochemistry of wood decay.

  12. The phylogenetic position of an Armillaria species from Amami-Oshima, a subtropical island of Japan, based on elongation factor and ITS sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuko Ota; Mee-Sook Kim; Hitoshi Neda; Ned B. Klopfenstein; Eri Hasegawa

    2011-01-01

    An undetermined Armillaria species was collected on Amami-Oshima, a subtropical island of Japan. The phylogenetic position of the Armillaria sp. was determined using sequences of the elongation factor-1a (EF-1a) gene and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2) of ribosomal DNA (rDNA). The phylogenetic analyses based on EF-1a and ITS sequences...

  13. Resistance of particleboard panels made of agricultural residues and bonded with synthetic resins or PVC plastic to wood-rotting fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divino Eterno Teixeira

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to evaluate the resistance of three types of particleboard panel to biodeterioration, two of which bonded with synthetic resins and one bonded with PVC plastic. Composite panels were made using sugar cane straw particles as raw material which were bonded together with urea-formaldehyde (UF, tannin-formaldehyde (TANI and PVC plastic (PVC resins. Decay tests were performed following procedures outlined in the ASTM D2017-81/1994 standard, whereby sample specimens were subjected to attack by white rot fungus Trametes versicolor and brown rot fungus Gloeophyllum trabeum using pine (Pinus sp. and embaúba (Cecropia sp. as reference timber. Panels bonded with PVC resin were rated ‘resistant’ to attack by both fungi while those bonded with UF and TANI resins were rated ‘slightly resistant’ to their attack.

  14. Phylogenetic Analyses of Armillaria Reveal at Least 15 Phylogenetic Lineages in China, Seven of Which Are Associated with Cultivated Gastrodia elata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Guo

    Full Text Available Fungal species of Armillaria, which can act as plant pathogens and/or symbionts of the Chinese traditional medicinal herb Gastrodia elata ("Tianma", are ecologically and economically important and have consequently attracted the attention of mycologists. However, their taxonomy has been highly dependent on morphological characterization and mating tests. In this study, we phylogenetically analyzed Chinese Armillaria samples using the sequences of the internal transcribed spacer region, translation elongation factor-1 alpha gene and beta-tubulin gene. Our data revealed at least 15 phylogenetic lineages of Armillaria from China, of which seven were newly discovered and two were recorded from China for the first time. Fourteen Chinese biological species of Armillaria, which were previously defined based on mating tests, could be assigned to the 15 phylogenetic lineages identified herein. Seven of the 15 phylogenetic lineages were found to be disjunctively distributed in different continents of the Northern Hemisphere, while eight were revealed to be endemic to certain continents. In addition, we found that seven phylogenetic lineages of Armillaria were used for the cultivation of Tianma, only two of which had been recorded to be associated with Tianma previously. We also illustrated that G. elata f. glauca ("Brown Tianma" and G. elata f. elata ("Red Tianma", two cultivars of Tianma grown in different regions of China, form symbiotic relationships with different phylogenetic lineages of Armillaria. These findings should aid the development of Tianma cultivation in China.

  15. Phylogenetic Analyses of Armillaria Reveal at Least 15 Phylogenetic Lineages in China, Seven of Which Are Associated with Cultivated Gastrodia elata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ting; Wang, Han Chen; Xue, Wan Qiu; Zhao, Jun; Yang, Zhu L

    2016-01-01

    Fungal species of Armillaria, which can act as plant pathogens and/or symbionts of the Chinese traditional medicinal herb Gastrodia elata ("Tianma"), are ecologically and economically important and have consequently attracted the attention of mycologists. However, their taxonomy has been highly dependent on morphological characterization and mating tests. In this study, we phylogenetically analyzed Chinese Armillaria samples using the sequences of the internal transcribed spacer region, translation elongation factor-1 alpha gene and beta-tubulin gene. Our data revealed at least 15 phylogenetic lineages of Armillaria from China, of which seven were newly discovered and two were recorded from China for the first time. Fourteen Chinese biological species of Armillaria, which were previously defined based on mating tests, could be assigned to the 15 phylogenetic lineages identified herein. Seven of the 15 phylogenetic lineages were found to be disjunctively distributed in different continents of the Northern Hemisphere, while eight were revealed to be endemic to certain continents. In addition, we found that seven phylogenetic lineages of Armillaria were used for the cultivation of Tianma, only two of which had been recorded to be associated with Tianma previously. We also illustrated that G. elata f. glauca ("Brown Tianma") and G. elata f. elata ("Red Tianma"), two cultivars of Tianma grown in different regions of China, form symbiotic relationships with different phylogenetic lineages of Armillaria. These findings should aid the development of Tianma cultivation in China.

  16. Guyanagaster, a new wood-decaying sequestrate fungal genus related to Armillaria (Physalacriaceae, Agaricales, Basidiomycota).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, Terry W; Smith, Matthew E; Aime, M Catherine

    2010-09-01

    Sequestrate basidiomycete fungi (e.g. "gasteromycetes") have foregone ballistospory and evolved alternative, often elaborate mechanisms of basidiospore dispersal with highly altered basidioma morphology. Sequestrate fungi have independently evolved in numerous Agaricomycete lineages, confounding taxonomic arrangements of these fungi for decades. Understanding the multiple origins and taxonomic affinities of sequestrate fungi provides insight into the evolutionary forces that can drastically alter basidioma morphology. In the neotropical rainforests of the Guiana Shield, we encountered a remarkable sequestrate fungus fruiting directly on decaying hardwood roots. The fungus' singular combination of traits include a wood-decaying habit; black, verrucose peridium; reduced stipe; and gelatinized basidiospore mass. • Guyanagaster necrorhiza gen. et sp. nov. is described. Macro- and micromorphological characters were assessed and compared to most similar taxa. To determine the phylogenetic affinities of the fungus, DNA sequence data were obtained for the 18S, ITS, and 28S rDNA, RBP2, and EF1α regions and subjected to single- and multi-gene analyses. DNA sequences from fungal vegetative organs growing on decaying woody roots confirmed the wood-inhabiting lifestyle of Guyanagaster. • Guyanagaster is morphologically unique among sequestrate fungi worldwide. Phylogenetic evidence places Guyanagaster in close relation to the wood-decaying mushroom genus Armillaria in the Physalacriaceae (Agaricales, Agaricomycetes, Basidiomycota). • Guyanagaster represents an independently evolved sequestrate form within the Physalacriaceae. Although molecular data confirm that Guyanagaster is closely related to Armillaria, the unusual features of this fungus suggest a case of radically divergent morphological evolution.

  17. The study on the biological effect of armillaria mellea irradiated with 60Co γ-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chutao; Liu Dayong; Zhu Liquan

    2002-01-01

    The biological effects of 60 Co γ-ray irradiation on Armillaria mellea were studied. The results showed that the lower dose (10-80 Gy) irradiation stimulated the growth and increased the content of soluble protein. The irradiation effects were most significant in the treatment of 20 Gy with growth mass of 31.20% higher and MDA content of 27.4% lower than those of control. At higher dose (above 80 Gy) the growth was inhibited with the increasing of irradiation dose. The lower dose of irradiation increased the activities of POD with the increasing of dose and the activities of POD were proportional to the content of MAD with relative coefficient of 0.987. The content of DNA and RNA in the mycelia increased when treated with 60 Co γ-ray and became higher with the increasing of irradiation dose. At the dose of 20 Gy, the content of DNA and RNA increased, while the content of soluble protein decreased with relative coefficients of - 0.8389 and - 0.7340, respectively. The electrophoresis of DNA showed that lower dose (20 Gy) irradiation made little influence on the DNA of armillaria, while higher dose (200 Gy) irradiation resulted in a lot of breaks of DNA strands and these breaks mostly appeared in the 6 hours after irradiation and could be self-repaired gradually

  18. Improvement of resistance to Fusarium root rot through gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fusarium root rot (FRR), caused by Fusarium solani f.sp. , is one of the most serious root rot diseases of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) throughout the world. Yield losses of up to 84% have been attributed to the disease. Development and deployment of resistant materials is the most feasible approach to managing ...

  19. ( Azadirachta Indica ) Leaf Extracts on the Rot Fungus ( Fusarium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The storage lifespan of kola nuts is challenged by the problem of decay of nuts in storage as a result of the attack by the rot fungus (Fusarium spp). The effect of the neem leaf (Azadirachta indica) extracts on the rot fungus was investigated in order to aid extended kola nuts storage. The aqueous and ethanolic leaf extracts of ...

  20. Resistance to charcoal rot identified in ancestral soybean germplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charcoal rot, caused by the fungal pathogen Macrophomina phaseolina, is an economically important disease on soybean and other crops including maize, sorghum, and sunflowers. Without effective cultural or chemical options to control charcoal rot in soybean, finding sources of genetic resistance is o...

  1. RESISTANCE TO POST-HARVEST MICROBIAL ROT IN YAM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Rot from microbial infection of healthy yam tubers reduces their table quality and renders them unappealing to consumers. A study was carried out at Bimbilla in the Nanumba North District of Ghana to evaluate possible interactions of yam genotypes and storage methods for controlling internal rot in yam. Four local varieties.

  2. Impact of management strategies in the basal rot, charcoal rots epidemiology and Phaseolus vulgaris L. yield.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulacio Osorio Dilcia

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of chemical, physical, biologycal and cultural strategies individually or combinated were evaluated in the epidemiology of the basal rot (Sclerotium rolfsii, charcoal rot (Macrophomina phaseolina and the Phaseolus vulgaris cv Tacarigua yield at Barinas state from Venezuela. In the experiment, Tebuconazole (Teb was applicated at seed (1 L/Ton and at soil, a los 30 y 60 days after of the sow (1 L/ha; Trichoderma harzianum (Tri was applicated at seed (15 g for each 1.5 k and to 15, 30, 45 y 60 days after of the sow (30 g/10 L of water. On the other hand, soil was solarizated (Sol during 15 days and calcium nitrate (Ca (60 g/10 L of water was applicated each 15 days until 60 days of growth of cultivated plants. Basal rot was registered as far as 42 days after of the sow, showing less of 5.3% in Teb y the combination SolTeb. The hightest incidence of this disease was observed in the treatment Tri with 28.5%, being highter that control (14.5%. Last to 42 days predominated the charcoal rot in the rest of the plants for a total of 100% of incidente in everything the treatments. Nevertheless, Teb showed the hightest yield with 555 k/ha, being different estatistically at treatment TriCa, which showed the lowest yield with 31 k/ha, however, the roots not formed nodules nitrogen uptake in these replications with the fungicide and Ca. It is concluded that S. rolfsii was sensible at action of some of the treatments; but not M. phaseolina; nevertheless, the plants were capables to produce seeds health apparently in treatments in which observed less severity of charcoal rot.

  3. The longleaf pine resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    John F. Kelly; William A. Bechtold

    1989-01-01

    Area of longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) in the Southern United States has declined from 12.2 to 3.8 million acres over the past 30 years. Longleaf pine, which once dominated vast portions of the region, now accounts for only 3 percent of the total timberland acreage in the 8 States where the species is found.Longleaf growing-stock volume has decreased by 12...

  4. Diagnostic of dry rot in living trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaetzler, H.P.

    1978-01-01

    The γ-desorption method has been used in the early diagnosis of dry rot in trees. The attenuation of a 60 keV γ-beam ( 241 Am) has been measured on eleven healthy spruce disks. It is seen that early diagnostic of rotten trees is limited by natural density variation of the wood itself, but for a 95% confidence level that the wood is diseased, a tree must have an average of less than 0.59 g./cm 3 . (Auth/C.F.)

  5. Medical Council of India : the rot within.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Sunil K

    2009-01-01

    The Medical Council of India is a statutory national agency charged with several responsibilities. Sadly, it is plagued by inefficiency, arbitrariness and lack of transparency. It has been functioning for some years as the fiefdom of one person--Dr Ketan Desai. He has been re-elected president of the council despite strictures against him by the High Court of New Delhi. This essay provides data that may help the reader identify the rot within the Council. Permitted optimism, we may hope that this essay and similar observations by others will prompt a change for the better. At present such optimism is not justified.

  6. Should ponderosa pine be planted on lodgepole pine sites?

    Science.gov (United States)

    P.H. Cochran

    1984-01-01

    Repeated radiation frosts caused no apparent harm to the majority of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl.) seedlings planted on a pumice flat in south-central Oregon. For most but not all of the ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl.) seedlings planted with the lodgepole pine, however, damage from radiation frost resulted in...

  7. EXTRACELLULAR POLYSACCHARIDES OF POTATO RING ROT PATHOGEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafikova Т.N.

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Many bacteria, including phytopathogenic ones produce extracellular polysaccharides or exopolysaccharides which are universal molecules. Causal agent of potato ring rot, Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies sepedonicus, secretes exopolysaccharides which role in pathogenesis is poorly investigated. The aim of our research is to ascertain the composition and structure of Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies sepedonicus exopolysaccharides. Exopolysaccharides of Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies sepedonicus are determined to consist of 4-6 anionic and neutral components which have molecular weights from 700 kDa. Glucose is a major monomer of polysaccharides and arabinose, rhamnose and mannose are minor monomers. Glucose is present in α-Dglucopyranose and β-D-glucopyranose configurations. Calcium is determined to be a component of exopolysaccharides. Components of exopolysaccharides of potato ring rot pathogen are probably capableto associate via calcium ions and other ionic interactions that may result in a change of their physiological activity. Further studies of Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies sepedonicus exopolysaccharides composition and structure can serve a base for the synthesis of their chemical analogues with elicitor action.

  8. Effects of SO{sub 2}-fumigation on the infection of Norway spruce by Armillaria ostoyae; Einfluss von SO{sub 2} auf die Infektion von Fichtensaemlingen durch Armillaria ostoyae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horak, M. [Tuebingen Univ., Spezielle Botanik 1 (Germany); Tesche, M. [TU Dresden, Inst. fuer Forstbotanik und Forstzoologie, Tharandt (Germany)

    1993-04-01

    SO{sub 2} fumigation (0.86 mg/m{sup 3}) reduced drastically the survival expectancy of spruce seedlings already after 1 month. Under such conditions, the infection of spruce by Armillaria ostoyae is known to increase. The present investigation has shown that mortality increased strongly by combining A. ostoyae infection and fumigation. However, mycorrhization of spruce (Paxillus involutus) increased the survival rate of seedlings and reduced infection by A. ostoyae remarkably (20%). (orig.) [Deutsch] Eine SO{sub 2}-Behandlung von 0,86 mg/m{sup 3} fuehrte bereits nach 1 Monat zu einer verminderten Ueberlebensrate der untersuchten Fichtensaemlinge. Unter diesen Bedingungen lag eine erhoehte Infektionsbereitschaft der Fichten gegenueber dem Schwaecheparasiten Armillaria ostoyae vor. Durch eine Mykorrhizierung der Saemlinge konnte die Infektion mit A. ostoyae in starkem Masse (um 20%) eingeschraenkt werden. (orig.)

  9. Southern Pine Bark Beetle Guild

    Science.gov (United States)

    T. Evan Nebeker

    2011-01-01

    Dendroctonus frontalis (southern pine beetle), D. terebrans (black turpentine beetle), Ips avulsus (small southern pine engraver or four-spined engraver), I. grandicollis (five-spined engraver), and I. calligraphus (six-spined engraver) comprise the southern pine bark beetle guild. Often they are found sharing the same hosts in the Southeastern United States. They...

  10. Whitebark pine mortality related to white pine blister rust, mountain pine beetle outbreak, and water availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, Erin; Irvine, Kathryn M.; Thoma, David P.; Wilmoth, Siri K.; Ray, Andrew; Legg, Kristin; Shovic, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) forests in the western United States have been adversely affected by an exotic pathogen (Cronartium ribicola, causal agent of white pine blister rust), insect outbreaks (Dendroctonus ponderosae, mountain pine beetle), and drought. We monitored individual trees from 2004 to 2013 and characterized stand-level biophysical conditions through a mountain pine beetle epidemic in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Specifically, we investigated associations between tree-level variables (duration and location of white pine blister rust infection, presence of mountain pine beetle, tree size, and potential interactions) with observations of individual whitebark pine tree mortality. Climate summaries indicated that cumulative growing degree days in years 2006–2008 likely contributed to a regionwide outbreak of mountain pine beetle prior to the observed peak in whitebark mortality in 2009. We show that larger whitebark pine trees were preferentially attacked and killed by mountain pine beetle and resulted in a regionwide shift to smaller size class trees. In addition, we found evidence that smaller size class trees with white pine blister rust infection experienced higher mortality than larger trees. This latter finding suggests that in the coming decades white pine blister rust may become the most probable cause of whitebark pine mortality. Our findings offered no evidence of an interactive effect of mountain pine beetle and white pine blister rust infection on whitebark pine mortality in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Interestingly, the probability of mortality was lower for larger trees attacked by mountain pine beetle in stands with higher evapotranspiration. Because evapotranspiration varies with climate and topoedaphic conditions across the region, we discuss the potential to use this improved understanding of biophysical influences on mortality to identify microrefugia that might contribute to successful whitebark pine conservation

  11. Results of forest insect and disease surveys in the central region of Ontario, 1993. Information report No. O-X-438

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    Report summarizing forest damage by insects, diseases and abiotic conditions in the Central Region of Ontario. Textual descriptions of pests are accompanied by maps and statistical tables. Pest conditions covered include pine false webworm, budworms, shoot borers, leafcutters, armillaria root rot and other diseases and insects. Abiotic damage reported on covers forest decline, frost injury, salt and wind damage, and winter drying. Forest health reports and special surveys are also described.

  12. Results of forest insect and disease surveys in the central region of Ontario, 1994. Information report No. O-X-448. Annual publication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, H.J.

    1995-12-31

    Report summarizing forest damage by insects, diseases and abiotic conditions in the Central Region of Ontario. Textual descriptions of pests are accompanied by maps and statistical tables. Pest conditions covered include pine false webworm, budworms, shoot borers, leafcutters, armillaria root rot and other diseases and insects. Abiotic damage reported on covers forest decline, frost injury, salt and wind damage, and winter drying. Forest health reports and special surveys are also described.

  13. Results of forest insect and disease surveys in the central region of Ontario, 1992. Information report No. O-X-427. Annual publication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, C.G.

    1993-01-01

    Report for 1992 summarizing forest damage by insects, diseases and abiotic conditions in the Central Region of Ontario. Textual descriptions of pests are accompanied by maps and statistical tables. Pest conditions covered include pine false webworm, bronze birch borer, early aspen leafcutter, armillaria root rot and other diseases and insects. Abiotic damage reported on covers forest decline, frost injury, salt and wind damage, and winter drying. Forest health reports and special surveys are also described.

  14. Results of forest insect and disease surveys in the northeast region of Ontario, 1993. Information report No. O-X-436

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    Report summarizing forest damage by insects, diseases and abiotic conditions in the Northeast Region of Ontario. Textual descriptions of pests are accompanied by maps and statistical tables. Pest conditions covered include pine spittlebug, birch skeletonizer, eastern spruce budworm, armillaria root rot, spruce needle rusts, and other diseases and insects. Abiotic damage reported on covers frost damage, ice damage, and winter drying. Forest health reports and special surveys are also described.

  15. Results of forest insect and disease surveys in the northeast region of Ontario, 1994. Information report No. O-X-447. Annual publication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, C.G.

    1995-12-31

    Report summarizing forest damage by insects, diseases and abiotic conditions in the Northeast Region of Ontario. Textual descriptions of pests are accompanied by maps and statistical tables. Pest conditions covered include pine spittlebug, birch skeletonizer, eastern spruce budworm, armillaria root rot, spruce needle rusts, and other diseases and insects. Abiotic damage reported on covers frost damage, ice damage, and winter drying. Forest health reports and special surveys are also described.

  16. Results of forest insect and disease surveys in the northeast region of Ontario, 1992. Information report No. O-X-430. Annual publication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingram, W.A.

    1993-01-01

    Report for 1992 summarizing forest damage by insects, diseases and abiotic conditions in the Northeast Region of Ontario. Textual descriptions of pests are accompanied by maps and statistical tables. Pest conditions covered include pine spittlebug, birth skeletonizer, eastern spruce budworm, armillaria root rot, spruce needle rusts, and other diseases and insects. Abiotic damage reported on covers frost damage, ice damage, and winter drying. Forest health reports and special surveys are also described.

  17. The occurrence of, and economic losses caused by Armillaria in the Western Carpathian Mts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Kaliszewski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available An investigation carried out in the Western Carpathian Mountains (Ujsoły, Węgierska Górka, Ustroń and Wisła Forest Districts demonstrated a strong relationship between dieback in Norway spruce stands and the intensity of occurrence of Armillaria ostoyae. For the most endangered site types – mountain deciduous forest (LG and mountain mixed forest (LMG, analyses of losses of annual volume increment and of stand productivity were performed, and their financial dimensions determined. The greatest losses – of about 8 m3/ha/year for tree stands of the age of 100 years, and 400 m3/ha for the rotation period – were found for LG (Mountain broadleaved forest site type.

  18. New secondary metabolites from bioactive extracts of the fungus Armillaria tabescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herath, H M T Bandara; Jacob, Melissa; Wilson, A Dan; Abbas, Hamed K; Nanayakkara, N P Dhammika

    2013-01-01

    Ethyl acetate extracts of Armillaria tabescens (strain JNB-OZ344) showed significant fungistatic and bacteristatic activities against several major human pathogens including Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium intracellulare. Chemical analysis of these extracts led to the isolation and identification of four new compounds, emestrin-F (1), emestrin-G (2), 6-O-(4-O-methyl-β-D-glucopyranosyl)-8-hydroxy-2,7-dimethyl-4H-benzopyran-4-one (3) and cephalosporolide-J (4), along with five other previously known compounds, emestrin (5), cephalosporolide-E (6), decarestrictine-C2 (7), ergosterol and brassicasterol. Structural elucidation of all compounds was carried out by NMR and MS analyses. Antimicrobial assays revealed that compounds 1 and 5 were responsible for the observed growth inhibitory activities of the fungal extracts against the human pathogens tested.

  19. New compounds and secondary metabolites from bioactive extracts of the fungus Armillaria tabescens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandara Herath, H.M.T.; Jacob, Melissa; Wilson, A. Dan; Abbas, Hamed K.; Nanayakkara, N. P. Dhammika

    2012-01-01

    Ethyl acetate extracts of Armillaria tabescens (strain JNB-OZ344) showed significant fungistatic and bacteristatic activities against several major human pathogens including Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium intracellulare. Chemical analysis of these extracts led to the isolation and identification of four new compounds emestrin-F (1), emestrin-G (2), 6-O-(4-O-methyl-β-D-glucopyranosyl)-8-hydroxy-2,7-dimethyl-4H-benzopyran-4-one (3) and cephalosporolide-J (4) along with five other previously known compounds, emestrin (5), cephalosporolide-E (6), decarestrictine-C2 (7), ergosterol and brassicasterol. Structural elucidation of all compounds was carried out by NMR and MS analysis. Antimicrobial assays revealed that compounds 1 and 5 were responsible for the observed growth-inhibitory activities of the fungal extracts against the human pathogens tested. PMID:23140424

  20. Structure, cytotoxic activity and mechanism of protoilludane sesquiterpene aryl esters from the mycelium of Armillaria mellea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhijin; Wang, Yunchao; Jiang, Bin; Li, Wenliang; Zheng, Lihua; Yang, Xiaoguang; Bao, Yongli; Sun, Luguo; Huang, Yanxin; Li, Yuxin

    2016-05-26

    Armillaria mellea (Vahl. ex. Fr.) Karst is an important traditional Chinese medicine used in dispelling wind and removing obstruction in the meridians, and strengthening tendons and bones. Armillaria mellea has been recorded in the book Caobenshiyi which was written by ancestor for the function of suppressing hyderactive liver for calming endogenous wind medicine. The aim of this study is to investigate the cytotoxic activity for liver cell lines (normal and cancerous) of protoilludane sesquiterpene aryl esters from the mycelium of A. mellea. A systemic fractionation of the mycelium extracts of A. mellea and relative activity mechanisms were studied. Two new protoilludane sesquiterpene aryl esters named 5'-methoxy-armillasin (1) and 5-hydroxyl-armillarivin (2) were isolated. In addition, eight known protoilludane sesquiterpene aryl esters armillaridin (3), armillartin (4), armillarin (5), melleolide B (6), armillarilin (7), armillasin (8), armillarigin (9) and melleolide (10) were also isolated from the mycelium of A. mellea. The relative configurations of the two new compounds were confirmed by NOESY spectra. Among ten protoilludane sesquiterpene aryl esters, compounds 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, 9 and 10 were active constituents with highly cytotoxic activity against HepG2 cells (4.95-37.65μg/mL). We reported here for the time, that compound 10 (melleolide) showed anti-tumor ability on hepatoma cell. The relative mechanism was assessed on HepG2 cells. Among all the ten protoilludane sesquiterpene aryl esters, melleolide (10) showed the best cytotoxic activity for HepG2 cells (4.95μg/mL) and lower activity for L02 cells (16.05μg/mL). Mechanism study showed that melleolide decreased the viability of the cancer cells with varying levels of cleaved-caspase 3, caspase 8, caspase 9, Bax and Ki67 expression. On the other hand, melleolide induced HepG2 cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. In vitro interaction studies between Glomus intraradices and Armillaria mellea in vines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogales, A.; Camprubi, A.; Estaun, V.; Marfa, V.; Calvet, C.

    2010-07-01

    An interaction study was performed with mycorrhizal plants of the grapevine rootstock Richter 110 (Vitis berlandieri Planch x Vitis rupestris Scheele) and the root pathogenic fungus Armillaria mellea (Vahl:Fr.) P. Kumm using an autotrophic in vitro culture system. Micro propagated plant lets were transferred to Petri plates with MSR medium lacking sugar and vitamins. Inocula of Glomus intraradices (BEG 72) and of Armillaria mellea obtained from a root organ culture and from a mycelium colony grown in malt agar respectively, were added to the plates according to each treatment: non-inoculated, inoculated with G. intra radices, inoculated with A. mellea, and dual-inoculated plants. There were ten replicates per treatment. Fourteen weeks later, the pathogen's mycelium occupied most of the surface/volume of the plate and had produced rhizomorphs. In dual inoculated plates, A. mellea's growth was not affected by the presence of G. intraradices, but the latter produced a lower number of spores and its extra radical phase showed granulation, vacuolation and tip swelling. The pathogen induced necrosis and growth decrease in the root. Glomus intra radices alleviated these symptoms and there were no differences in root biomass between non-inoculated plants and plants inoculated with both fungi. There were no symptoms of the disease in shoots and G. intra radices stimulated shoot growth both, although mycorrhizal colonization was lower when A. mellea was present. No direct antagonism or antibiosis against the pathogen was observed, thus the protective effect exerted by the symbiotic fungus in grapevines must be indirect, mediated through the host plant physiology. (Author) 38 refs.

  2. Incidence and phylogenetic analyses of Armillaria spp. associated with root disease in peach orchards in the State of Mexico, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. D. Elias-Roman; R. A. Guzman-Plazola; N. B. Klopfenstein; D. Alvarado-Rosales; G. Calderon-Zavala; J. A. Mora-Aguilera; M.-S. Kim; R. Garcia-Espinosa

    2013-01-01

    Incidence of peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] tree mortality attributed to Armillaria root disease was assessed from 2009 to 2011 in 15 orchards in the State of Mexico, Mexico. Incidence increased gradually every year of assessment, reaching average values of 9.7, 15.3 and 20.3% tree mortality and 23.2, 24.7 and 28.3% disease-impacted area of the orchards during 2009...

  3. A new compound from liquid fermentation broth of Armillaria mellea and the determination of its absolute configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun-Chao; Zhang, Yu-Wei; Zheng, Li-Hua; Bao, Yong-Li; Wu, Yin; Yu, Chun-Lei; Sun, Lu-Guo; Zhang, Yu; Huang, Yan-Xin; Sun, Ying; Li, Yu-Xin

    2013-01-01

    A new 2,5-diketopiperazine, (R)-2-(2-(furan-2-yl)-oxoethyl)-octahydropyrrolo[1,2-a]pyrazine-1,4-dione, and seven known compounds were isolated from the ethyl acetate extract of liquid fermentation broth of Armillaria mellea. The structures of the isolated compounds were established from NMR and HR-MS data. The absolute configuration of the new compound was established by comparing the experimental electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectrum with the calculated ECD data.

  4. Root rot diseases of sugar beet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobsen Barry J.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Root rot diseases of sugar beet caused by Rhizoctonia solani (AG 2-2 IIIB and AG 2-2 IV, R. crocorum, Aphanomyces cochlioides, Phoma betae, Macrophomina phaeseolina, Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. radicis-betae, Pythium aphanidermatum Phytophthora drechsleri, Rhizopus stolonifer, R. arrhizus and Sclerotium rolfsii cause significant losses wherever sugar beets are grown. However, not all these soil-borne pathogens have been reported in all sugar beet production areas. Losses include reduced harvestable tonnage and reduced white sugar recovery. Many of these pathogens also cause post harvest losses in storage piles. Control for diseases caused by these pathogens include disease resistant cultivars, avoidance of stresses, cultural practices such as water management and the use of fungicides.

  5. Insights into the phylogeny of Northern Hemisphere Armillaria: Neighbor-net and Bayesian analyses of translation elongation factor 1-α gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopfenstein, Ned B; Stewart, Jane E; Ota, Yuko; Hanna, John W; Richardson, Bryce A; Ross-Davis, Amy L; Elías-Román, Rubén D; Korhonen, Kari; Keča, Nenad; Iturritxa, Eugenia; Alvarado-Rosales, Dionicio; Solheim, Halvor; Brazee, Nicholas J; Łakomy, Piotr; Cleary, Michelle R; Hasegawa, Eri; Kikuchi, Taisei; Garza-Ocañas, Fortunato; Tsopelas, Panaghiotis; Rigling, Daniel; Prospero, Simone; Tsykun, Tetyana; Bérubé, Jean A; Stefani, Franck O P; Jafarpour, Saeideh; Antonín, Vladimír; Tomšovský, Michal; McDonald, Geral I; Woodward, Stephen; Kim, Mee-Sook

    2017-01-01

    Armillaria possesses several intriguing characteristics that have inspired wide interest in understanding phylogenetic relationships within and among species of this genus. Nuclear ribosomal DNA sequence-based analyses of Armillaria provide only limited information for phylogenetic studies among widely divergent taxa. More recent studies have shown that translation elongation factor 1-α (tef1) sequences are highly informative for phylogenetic analysis of Armillaria species within diverse global regions. This study used Neighbor-net and coalescence-based Bayesian analyses to examine phylogenetic relationships of newly determined and existing tef1 sequences derived from diverse Armillaria species from across the Northern Hemisphere, with Southern Hemisphere Armillaria species included for reference. Based on the Bayesian analysis of tef1 sequences, Armillaria species from the Northern Hemisphere are generally contained within the following four superclades, which are named according to the specific epithet of the most frequently cited species within the superclade: (i) Socialis/Tabescens (exannulate) superclade including Eurasian A. ectypa, North American A. socialis (A. tabescens), and Eurasian A. socialis (A. tabescens) clades; (ii) Mellea superclade including undescribed annulate North American Armillaria sp. (Mexico) and four separate clades of A. mellea (Europe and Iran, eastern Asia, and two groups from North America); (iii) Gallica superclade including Armillaria Nag E (Japan), multiple clades of A. gallica (Asia and Europe), A. calvescens (eastern North America), A. cepistipes (North America), A. altimontana (western USA), A. nabsnona (North America and Japan), and at least two A. gallica clades (North America); and (iv) Solidipes/Ostoyae superclade including two A. solidipes/ostoyae clades (North America), A. gemina (eastern USA), A. solidipes/ostoyae (Eurasia), A. cepistipes (Europe and Japan), A. sinapina (North America and Japan), and A. borealis

  6. Energy balance associated with the degradation of lignocellulosic material by white-rot and brown-rot fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrien, Delphine; Bédu, Hélène; Buée, Marc; Kohler, Annegret; Goodell, Barry; Gelhaye, Eric

    2017-04-01

    Forest soils cover about 30% of terrestrial area and comprise between 50 and 80% of the global stock of soil organic carbon (SOC). The major precursor for this forest SOC is lignocellulosic material, which is made of polysaccharides and lignin. Lignin has traditionally been considered as a recalcitrant polymer that hinders access to the much more labile structural polysaccharides. This view appears to be partly incorrect from a microbiology perspective yet, as substrate alteration depends on the metabolic potential of decomposers. In forest ecosystems the wood-rotting Basidiomycota fungi have developed two different strategies to attack the structure of lignin and gain access to structural polysaccharides. White-rot fungi degrade all components of plant cell walls, including lignin, using enzymatic systems. Brown-rot fungi do not remove lignin. They generate oxygen-derived free radicals, such as the hydroxyl radical produced by the Fenton reaction, that disrupt the lignin polymer and depolymerize polysaccharides which then diffuse out to where the enzymes are located The objective of this study was to develop a model to investigate whether the lignin relative persistence could be related to the energetic advantage of brown-rot degradative pathway in comparison to white-rot degradative pathway. The model simulates the changes in substrate composition over time, and determines the energy gained from the conversion of the lost substrate into CO2. The energy cost for the production of enzymes involved in substrate alteration is assessed using information derived from genome and secretome analysis. For brown-rot fungus specifically, the energy cost related to the production of OH radicals is also included. The model was run, using data from the literature on populous wood degradation by Trametes versicolor, a white-rot fungus, and Gloeophyllum trabeum, a brown-rot fungus. It demonstrates that the brown-rot fungus (Gloeophyllum trabeum) was more efficient than the white-rot

  7. Effect of surfactants and identification of metabolites on the biodegradation of fluoranthene by basidiomycetes fungal isolate Armillaria sp. F022.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadibarata, Tony; Kristanti, Risky Ayu

    2014-04-01

    The effects of structure and concentration of surfactants on the biodegradation of fluoranthene, a three rings polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon in the aqueous phase, as well as their effects on the biodegradation and enzyme activity were investigated. The toxicity ranking of studied surfactants is: non-ionic Tween 80 Armillaria sp. F022 (>4,500 mg/L) was showed by Tween 80 (10 mg/L) culture, manifesting that the non-ionic surfactant present in the culture were beneficial to the fungal growth. Laccase showed the highest enzymes activity in all surfactants culture. Non-ionic Tween 80 showed a significant result for laccase activity (1,902 U/L) in the Armillaria sp. F022 culture. The increased enzymes cumulative activity may stem directly from the rising fluoranthene biodegradability as addition of appropriate surfactants. The biotransformation of fluoranthene was greatly improved by Tween 80, and totally fluoranthene degradation was obtained as Tween 80 was 10 mg/L. Two fluoranthene metabolites were isolated from the culture medium and analyzed by a thin layer chromatography, UV visible spectrometer and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The oxidation of fluoranthene is initiated by oxygenation at the C-2,3 positions resulting 9-fluorenone. At the end of experiment, one metabolite was detected in the culture extract and identified as phthalic acid. Evidently, Armillaria sp. F022 seems efficient, high effective and deserves further application on the enhanced bioremediation technologies for the treatment of fluoranthene-contaminated soil.

  8. Comparative Assessment of Pathogenicity of Storage Rot Causing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    L)Schott) corms were assessed for their potency in causing rot of the corms during storage. The isolates were Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc., Botryodiplodia theobromae Pat., Fusarium solanii (Mart) Sac., Fusarium SP. and Rhizopus stolonifer (Ehren ...

  9. Erwinia carotovora extracellular proteases : characterization and role in soft rot

    OpenAIRE

    Kyöstiö, Sirkka R. M.

    1990-01-01

    Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora (Ecc) strain EC14, a Gram-negative bacterium, causes soft rot on several crops, including potato. Maceration of potato tuber tissue is caused by secreted pectolytic enzymes. Other cell-degrading enzymes may also have roles in pathogenesis, including cellulases, phospholipases, and protease(s). The objectives of this research were to (1) characterize Ecc extracellular protease (Prt) and (2) elucidate its role in potato soft rot. A gene enc...

  10. Association of Pectolytic Fluorescent PSeudomonas with Postharvest Rots of Onion

    OpenAIRE

    H.H. El-Hendawy

    2004-01-01

    Five isolates of pectolytic fluorescent pseudomonads were obtained from a rotted onion bulb and identified as Pseudomonas marginalis. At both 4 and 25oC, all isolates caused soft rot to detached plant parts of onion and to carrot, celery, cucumber, pepper, spinach, tomato and turnip (but not garlic). They did not however cause any symptoms in living plants of these same species. These results suggest that the onion isolates are a postharvest pathogen which is not destructive in th...

  11. Conifer root and butt rot caused by Heterobasidion annosum (Fr.) Bref. s.l.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asiegbu, Fred O; Adomas, Aleksandra; Stenlid, Jan

    2005-07-01

    SUMMARY The root and butt rot caused by Heterobasidon annosum is one of the most destructive diseases of conifers in the northern temperate regions of the world, particularly in Europe. Economic losses attributable to Heterobasidion infection in Europe are estimated at 800 million euros annually. The fungus has been classified into three separate European intersterile species P (H. annosum), S (H. parviporum) and F (H. abietinum) based on their main host preferences: pine, spruce and fir, respectively. In North America, two intersterile groups are present, P and S/F, but these have not been given scientific names. The ecology of the disease spread has been intensively studied but the genetics, biochemistry and molecular aspects of pathogen virulence have been relatively little examined. Recent advances in transcript profiling, molecular characterization of pathogenicity factors and establishment of DNA-transformation systems have paved the way for future advances in our understanding of this pathosystem. Heterobasidion annosum (Fr.) Bref., H. parviporum Niemelä & Korhonen and H. abietinum Niemelä & Korhonen; kingdom Fungi; class Basidiomycotina; order Aphyllophorales; family Bondarzewiaceae; genus Heterobasidion. presence of the fungus fruit bodies, basidiocarps whitish in the margins, upper surface is tan to dark brown, usually irregular shaped, 3.5 (-7) cm thick and up to 40 cm in diameter; pores 5-19, 7-22 and 13-26 mm(2) for the P, F and S groups, respectively. Small brownish non-sporulating postules develop on the outside of infected roots. Asexual spores (conidiospores) are 3.8-6.6 x 2.8-5.0 microm in size. Mating tests are necessary for identification of intersterility groups. The fungus attacks many coniferous tree species. In Europe, particularly trees of the genera Pinus and Juniperus (P), Picea (S), Abies (F) and in North America Pinus (P) and Picea, Tsuga and Abies (S/F). To a lesser extent it causes root rot on some decidous trees (Betula and Quercus

  12. Sand Pine Symposium Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    USDA Forest Service Southern Forest Experiment Station

    1973-01-01

    Sand pine, a species well suited to the excessively drained soils common to several million acres in the Southeast, was the subject of this well-attended 3-day meeting. Papers presented included a review of the literature plus results of current research related to this species. Subjects covered ranged from seeds and seedlings to final harvest and conversion...

  13. Introduced Pine Sawfly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis F. Wilson

    1966-01-01

    The introduced pine, sawfly (Diprion similis (Hartig)) in North America was first discovered in 1914 in a nursery in New Haven, Conn. This insect might have been introduced in the cocoon stage on nursery stock or packing material from Holland. Since its arrival, it has advanced steadily westward, reaching Pennsylvania before 1920 and Ontario by 1931. The present range...

  14. Diseases of lodgepole pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank G. Hawksworth

    1964-01-01

    Diseases are a major concern to forest managers throughout the lodgepole pine type. In many areas, diseases constitute the primary management problem. As might be expected for a tree that has a distribution from Baja California, Mexico to the Yukon and from the Pacific to the Dakotas, the diseases of chief concern vary in different parts of the tree's range. For...

  15. Longleaf Pine Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald C. Schmidtling

    1999-01-01

    There has been a movement of late toward the use of natural regeneration for iongieaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) as well as for other forest tree species. If you have a good natural stand, and have plenty of time, natural regeneration will result in a suitable stand, and genetics is not relevant.

  16. Comparative studies on thermochemical characterization of corn stover pretreated by white-rot and brown-rot fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yelin; Yang, Xuewei; Yu, Hongbo; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Ma, Fuying

    2011-09-28

    The effects of white-rot and brown-rot fungal pretreatment on the chemical composition and thermochemical conversion of corn stover were investigated. Fungus-pretreated corn stover was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis to characterize the changes in chemical composition. Differences in thermochemical conversion of corn stover after fungal pretreatment were investigated using thermogravimetric and pyrolysis analysis. The results indicated that the white-rot fungus Irpex lacteus CD2 has great lignin-degrading ability, whereas the brown-rot fungus Fomitopsis sp. IMER2 preferentially degrades the amorphous regions of the cellulose. The biopretreatment favors thermal decomposition of corn stover. The weight loss of IMER2-treated acid detergent fiber became greater, and the oil yield increased from 32.7 to 50.8%. After CD2 biopretreatment, 58% weight loss of acid detergent lignin was achieved and the oil yield increased from 16.8 to 26.8%.

  17. QTLs for Resistance to Major Rice Diseases Exacerbated by Global Warming: Brown Spot, Bacterial Seedling Rot, and Bacterial Grain Rot

    OpenAIRE

    Mizobuchi, Ritsuko; Fukuoka, Shuichi; Tsushima, Seiya; Yano, Masahiro; Sato, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    In rice (Oryza sativa L.), damage from diseases such as brown spot, caused by Bipolaris oryzae, and bacterial seedling rot and bacterial grain rot, caused by Burkholderia glumae, has increased under global warming because the optimal temperature ranges for growth of these pathogens are relatively high (around 30??C). Therefore, the need for cultivars carrying genes for resistance to these diseases is increasing to ensure sustainable rice production. In contrast to the situation for other impo...

  18. QTLs for Resistance to Major Rice Diseases Exacerbated by Global Warming: Brown Spot, Bacterial Seedling Rot, and Bacterial Grain Rot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizobuchi, Ritsuko; Fukuoka, Shuichi; Tsushima, Seiya; Yano, Masahiro; Sato, Hiroyuki

    2016-12-01

    In rice (Oryza sativa L.), damage from diseases such as brown spot, caused by Bipolaris oryzae, and bacterial seedling rot and bacterial grain rot, caused by Burkholderia glumae, has increased under global warming because the optimal temperature ranges for growth of these pathogens are relatively high (around 30 °C). Therefore, the need for cultivars carrying genes for resistance to these diseases is increasing to ensure sustainable rice production. In contrast to the situation for other important rice diseases such as blast and bacterial blight, no genes for complete resistance to brown spot, bacterial seedling rot or bacterial grain rot have yet been discovered. Thus, rice breeders have to use partial resistance, which is largely influenced by environmental conditions. Recent progress in molecular genetics and improvement of evaluation methods for disease resistance have facilitated detection of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with resistance. In this review, we summarize the results of worldwide screening for cultivars with resistance to brown spot, bacterial seedling rot and bacterial grain rot and we discuss the identification of QTLs conferring resistance to these diseases in order to provide useful information for rice breeding programs.

  19. IMA Genome-F 6: Draft genome sequences of Armillaria fuscipes, Ceratocystiopsis minuta, Ceratocystis adiposa, Endoconidiophora laricicola, E. polonica and Penicillium freii DAOMC 242723.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingfield, Brenda D; Ambler, Jon M; Coetzee, Martin P A; de Beer, Z Wilhelm; Duong, Tuan A; Joubert, Fourie; Hammerbacher, Almuth; McTaggart, Alistair R; Naidoo, Kershney; Nguyen, Hai D T; Ponomareva, Ekaterina; Santana, Quentin S; Seifert, Keith A; Steenkamp, Emma T; Trollip, Conrad; van der Nest, Magriet A; Visagie, Cobus M; Wilken, P Markus; Wingfield, Michael J; Yilmaz, Neriman

    2016-06-01

    The genomes of Armillaria fuscipes, Ceratocystiopsis minuta, Ceratocystis adiposa, Endoconidiophora laricicola, E. polonica, and Penicillium freii DAOMC 242723 are presented in this genome announcement. These six genomes are from plant pathogens and otherwise economically important fungal species. The genome sizes range from 21 Mb in the case of Ceratocystiopsis minuta to 58 Mb for the basidiomycete Armillaria fuscipes. These genomes include the first reports of genomes for the genus Endoconidiophora. The availability of these genome data will provide opportunities to resolve longstanding questions regarding the taxonomy of species in these genera. In addition these genome sequences through comparative studies with closely related organisms will increase our understanding of how these pathogens cause disease.

  20. Cloning, expression, purification and characterization of an aflatoxin-converting enzyme from Armillaria tabescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Sixia; Guan, Min; Zhou, Tao; Cao, Hong; Xie, Chunfang; Liu, Daling; Yao, Dongsheng

    2011-09-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is extremely mutagenic, toxic and a potent carcinogen both to humans and livestock. Aflatoxin-oxidase (AFO) was an aflatoxin-converting enzyme previously purified by us from Armillaria tabescens. In order to know better about the molecular characterization of this distinct enzyme, we expressed, purified and characterized the His6 tag fused aflatoxin-oxidase. Based on sequences of peptides fragments of AFO previously obtained by Electrophoresis-Electrospray Ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS), we cloned the cDNA of AFO using Switching Mechanism At 5' end of the RNA Transcript (SMART) Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE) technology and expressed this gene as a fusion protein in Pichia pastoris by using pPIC9-afo as vector. We purified the fusion enzyme using nickel affinity chromatography. We identified the recombinant aflatoxin-oxidase (rAFO) by both western blot and peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF). Moreover, we characterized several enzymatic properties of the rAFO using AFB1 as the substrate including Km value, optimum temperature, optimum pH, thermal stability and pH stability. The AFO gene is 2321 bp long with a coding region of 2088 bp encoding 695 amino acids. Peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) identification showed a 63.2% coverage of the molecule compared to the theoretical tryptic cleavage of the rAFO. The recombinant aflatoxin oxidase was purified 5.99-folds using nickel affinity chromatography. It has a specific activity of 234 U/mg. Kinetics studies showed that the rAFO converted AFB1 with the Km value of 3.93 +/- 0.20 x 10(-6) mol/L under its optimal conditions of pH 6.0 and 30 degrees C. Thermostability investigation revealed that the rAFO had a half-life of 90 min at 30 degrees C, and pH stability results suggested that the rAFO was relatively stable when pH ranged from 5.5 to 7.5. It appears to be the first successful production of the recombinant aflatoxin oxidase (rAFO) with AFB1-converting ability from

  1. Induction of apoptosis by Armillaria mellea constituent armillarikin in human hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen YJ

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Yu-Jen Chen,1–4 Chien-Chih Chen,5 Huey-Lan Huang6 1Department of Medical Research, 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Mackay Memorial Hospital, 3Institute of Traditional Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, 4Institute of Pharmacology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 5Department of Biotechnology, HungKuang University, Taichung, 6Department of Bioscience Technology, College of Health Science, Chang Jung Christian University, Tainan, Taiwan Abstract: Armillaria mellea is a honey mushroom often used in the traditional Chinese medicine “Tianma”. Currently, this medicinal mushroom is also used as a dietary supplement in numerous Western and Eastern countries. Armillarikin was isolated from A. mellea, and we previously discovered that it induced cytotoxicity in human leukemia cells. In this study, we further investigated the cytotoxicity of armillarikin against liver and intrahepatic bile duct cancer cells. Armillarikin was cytotoxic against human hepatocellular carcinoma Huh7, HA22T, and HepG2 cells based on the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl-2-(4-sulfophenyl-2H-tetrazolium and alamarBlue® assays. Armillarikin treatment also induced the collapse of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential of these cells. Furthermore, armillarikin-induced apoptotic cell death was demonstrated by sub-G1 chromosomal DNA formation by using flow cytometry. In addition, the apoptosis was inhibited by the pan-caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-fmk. Immunoblotting also revealed the armillarikin-induced activation of procaspase-3, -8, and -9 and upregulation of the apoptosis- and cell cycle arrest-related phospho-histones 2 and 3, respectively. Moreover, reactive oxygen species scavengers also inhibited the armillarikin-induced apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma, suggesting that reactive oxygen species formation played an important role in the armillarikin-induced apoptosis of human hepatocellular carcinoma. In

  2. Pine Creek uranium province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bower, M.B.; Needham, R.S.; Page, R.W.; Stuart-Smith, P.G.; Wyborn, L.A.I.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this project is to help establish a sound geological framework of the Pine Creek region through regional geological, geochemical and geophysical studies. Uranium ore at the Coronation Hill U-Au mine is confined to a wedge of conglomerate in faulted contact with altered volcanics. The uranium, which is classified as epigenetic sandstone type, is derived from a uranium-enriched felsic volcanic source

  3. Ecophysiological comparison of 50-year-old longleaf pine, slash pine and loblolly pine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisa Samuelson; Tom Stokes; Kurt Johnsen

    2012-01-01

    Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.), a species that once dominated the southeastern USA, is considered to be more drought tolerant than the principle plantation species in the South, loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) and slash pine (Pinus elliottii Engelm.), and so is predicted to better cope with increases in drought frequency associated with climate change. To...

  4. Genetic variation between Phytophthora cactorum isolates differing in their ability to cause crown rot in strawberry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikemo, Håvard; Klemsdal, Sonja S; Riisberg, Ingvild; Bonants, Peter; Stensvand, Arne; Tronsmo, Anne M

    2004-03-01

    Analysis of 44 isolates of Phytophthora cactorum, isolated from strawberry and other hosts, by AFLP showed that the crown rot pathotype is different from leather rot isolates and from P. cactorum isolated from other hosts. 16 of 23 crown rot isolates, including isolates from Europe, Japan, Australia, and New Zealand, were identical in an analysis based on 96 polymorphic bands from seven primer combinations. Leather rot isolates of strawberry could not be distinguished from isolates from other hosts. The pathogenicity test of all 44 isolates on strawberry plants mostly gave unambiguous results, except for three American isolates, which seemed to have reduced aggressiveness compared to the crown rot isolates. These isolates also differed in the AFLP analysis. Comparing information on the origin of the isolates with results from the pathogenicity test, showed that isolates from strawberry fruits or petioles could be either leather rot or crown rot pathotypes. None of the isolates from hosts other than strawberry caused crown rot symptoms in strawberry.

  5. ROTS: An R package for reproducibility-optimized statistical testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suomi, Tomi; Seyednasrollah, Fatemeh; Jaakkola, Maria K; Faux, Thomas; Elo, Laura L

    2017-05-01

    Differential expression analysis is one of the most common types of analyses performed on various biological data (e.g. RNA-seq or mass spectrometry proteomics). It is the process that detects features, such as genes or proteins, showing statistically significant differences between the sample groups under comparison. A major challenge in the analysis is the choice of an appropriate test statistic, as different statistics have been shown to perform well in different datasets. To this end, the reproducibility-optimized test statistic (ROTS) adjusts a modified t-statistic according to the inherent properties of the data and provides a ranking of the features based on their statistical evidence for differential expression between two groups. ROTS has already been successfully applied in a range of different studies from transcriptomics to proteomics, showing competitive performance against other state-of-the-art methods. To promote its widespread use, we introduce here a Bioconductor R package for performing ROTS analysis conveniently on different types of omics data. To illustrate the benefits of ROTS in various applications, we present three case studies, involving proteomics and RNA-seq data from public repositories, including both bulk and single cell data. The package is freely available from Bioconductor (https://www.bioconductor.org/packages/ROTS).

  6. Mountain pine beetle infestations in relation to lodgepole pine diameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter E. Cole; Gene D. Amman

    1969-01-01

    Tree losses resulting from infestation by the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) were measured in two stands of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl.) where the beetle population had previously been epidemic. Measurement data showed that larger diameter trees were infested and killed first. Tree losses...

  7. Genetic variation between Phytophthora cactorum isolates differing in their ability to cause crown rot in strawberry

    OpenAIRE

    Eikemo, H.; Klemsdal, S.S.; Riisberg, I.; Bonants, P.J.M.; Stensvand, A.; Tronsmo, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    Analysis of 44 isolates of Phytophthora cactorum, isolated from strawberry and other hosts, by AFLP showed that the crown rot pathotype is different from leather rot isolates and from P. cactorum isolated from other hosts. 16 of 23 crown rot isolates, including isolates from Europe, Japan, Australia, and New Zealand, were identical in an analysis based on 96 polymorphic bands from seven primer combinations. Leather rot isolates of strawberry could not be distinguished from isolates from other...

  8. Mapping quantitative trait loci controlling early growth in a (longleaf pine × slash pine) × slash pine BC1 family

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Weng; Thomas L. Kubisiak; C. Dana. Nelson; M. Stine

    2002-01-01

    Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were employed to map the genome and quantitative trait loci controlling the early growth of a pine hybrid F1 tree (Pinus palustris Mill. × P. elliottii Engl.) and a recurrent slash pine tree (P. ellottii Engl.) in a (longleaf pine × slash pine...

  9. Mountain pine beetles use volatile cues to locate host limber pine and avoid non-host Great Basin bristlecone pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis A. Gray; Justin B. Runyon; Michael J. Jenkins; Andrew D. Giunta

    2015-01-01

    The tree-killing mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) is an important disturbance agent of western North American forests and recent outbreaks have affected tens of millions of hectares of trees. Most western North American pines (Pinus spp.) are hosts and are successfully attacked by mountain pine beetles whereas a handful of pine species are not...

  10. Climate influences on whitebark pine mortality from mountain pine beetle in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polly C. Buotte; Jeffrey A. Hicke; Haiganoush K. Preisler; John T. Abatzoglou; Kenneth F. Raffa; Jesse A. Logan

    2016-01-01

    Extensive mortality of whitebark pine, beginning in the early to mid-2000s, occurred in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) of the western USA, primarily from mountain pine beetle but also from other threats such as white pine blister rust. The climatic drivers of this recent mortality and the potential for future whitebark pine mortality from mountain pine beetle...

  11. Induction of apoptosis by Armillaria mellea constituent armillarikin in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Jen; Chen, Chien-Chih; Huang, Huey-Lan

    2016-01-01

    Armillaria mellea is a honey mushroom often used in the traditional Chinese medicine "Tianma". Currently, this medicinal mushroom is also used as a dietary supplement in numerous Western and Eastern countries. Armillarikin was isolated from A. mellea, and we previously discovered that it induced cytotoxicity in human leukemia cells. In this study, we further investigated the cytotoxicity of armillarikin against liver and intrahepatic bile duct cancer cells. Armillarikin was cytotoxic against human hepatocellular carcinoma Huh7, HA22T, and HepG2 cells based on the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium and alamarBlue(®) assays. Armillarikin treatment also induced the collapse of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential of these cells. Furthermore, armillarikin-induced apoptotic cell death was demonstrated by sub-G1 chromosomal DNA formation by using flow cytometry. In addition, the apoptosis was inhibited by the pan-caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-fmk. Immunoblotting also revealed the armillarikin-induced activation of procaspase-3, -8, and -9 and upregulation of the apoptosis- and cell cycle arrest-related phospho-histones 2 and 3, respectively. Moreover, reactive oxygen species scavengers also inhibited the armillarikin-induced apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma, suggesting that reactive oxygen species formation played an important role in the armillarikin-induced apoptosis of human hepatocellular carcinoma. In conclusion, our study indicates the potential of armillarikin as an effective agent for hepatoma or leukemia therapies.

  12. Proteomic Characterization of Armillaria mellea Reveals Oxidative Stress Response Mechanisms and Altered Secondary Metabolism Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassandra Collins

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Armillaria mellea is a major plant pathogen. Yet, the strategies the organism uses to infect susceptible species, degrade lignocellulose and other plant material and protect itself against plant defences and its own glycodegradative arsenal are largely unknown. Here, we use a combination of gel and MS-based proteomics to profile A. mellea under conditions of oxidative stress and changes in growth matrix. 2-DE and LC-MS/MS were used to investigate the response of A. mellea to H2O2 and menadione/FeCl3 exposure, respectively. Several proteins were detected with altered abundance in response to H2O2, but not menadione/FeCl3 (i.e., valosin-containing protein, indicating distinct responses to these different forms of oxidative stress. One protein, cobalamin-independent methionine synthase, demonstrated a common response in both conditions, which may be a marker for a more general stress response mechanism. Further changes to the A. mellea proteome were investigated using MS-based proteomics, which identified changes to putative secondary metabolism (SM enzymes upon growth in agar compared to liquid cultures. Metabolomic analyses revealed distinct profiles, highlighting the effect of growth matrix on SM production. This establishes robust methods by which to utilize comparative proteomics to characterize this important phytopathogen.

  13. Purification, structural elucidation, and anti-inflammatory activity of xylosyl galactofucan from Armillaria mellea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Chuan; Cheng, Jing-Jy; Lee, I-Jung; Lu, Mei-Kuang

    2018-02-13

    A xylosyl 1,3-galactofucan (AMPS-III) was isolated and identified as a novel anti-inflammatory agent from an edible fungus, Armillaria mellea. The characteristics chemical structure of AMPS-III including the linkages of compositional monosaccharides and structure of the repeat unit were depicted and elucidated by proton, carbon and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. AMPS-III was chemically proposed to have a partial 4-O-xylosylated 1,3-linked α-d-galactosyl-interlaced α-l-fucan composed of a pentadecasaccharide repeat unit with a molecular mass approximately 13 kDa. AMPS-III significantly suppressed the release of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and cytokine monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) in RAW264.7 macrophages and EAhy926 following LPS and TNF-α induction. The results provide helpful evidences for application of AMPS-III as anti-inflammatory food supplements. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. A polysaccharide from Armillaria mellea exhibits strong in vitro anticancer activity via apoptosis-involved mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun; Zhou, Jinxu; Lang, Yaoguo; Yao, Lei; Xu, Hai; Shi, Hubo; Xu, Shidong

    2012-11-01

    Armillaria mellea is a famous traditional Chinese medicinal and edible fungus. In this study, we purified a water-soluble polysaccharide (AMP) from the fruiting bodies of this fungus. AMP contained 94.8% carbohydrate, 2.3% uronic acid and 0.5% protein. Its molecular weight was determined as 4.6 × 10⁵ Da, as determined by high-performance gel-permeation chromatography (HPGPC). Gas chromatography (GC) analysis indicated that AMP was mainly composed of d-glucose. In vitro assay, AMP exhibited a potent tumor growth inhibitory effect on A549 cells, and induced cell cycle disruption in the G0/G1 phase, accompanied by an increment of apoptotic cells. Furthermore, AMP induced the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, thus leading to cytochrome c release from mitochondria and activation of caspase-3 and -9. Taken together, our results demonstrate that AMP possesses strong antitumor activities through the mitochondria dependent pathway and activation of caspase cascade through cytochrome c release. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Isolation and characterization of a novel lectin from the mushroom Armillaria luteo-virens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, K.; Liu, Q.H.; Ng, T.B.; Liu, H.Z.; Li, J.Q.; Chen, G.; Sheng, H.Y.; Xie, Z.L.; Wang, H.X.

    2006-01-01

    From the dried fruiting bodies of the mushroom Armillaria luteo-virens, a dimeric lectin with a molecular mass of 29.4 kDa has been isolated. The purification procedure involved (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 precipitation, ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, CM-cellulose, and Q-Sepharose, and gel filtration by fast protein liquid chromatography on Superdex 75. The hemagglutinating activity of the lectin could not be inhibited by simple sugars but was inhibited by the polysaccharide inulin. The activity was stable up to 70 o C but was acid- and alkali-labile. Salts including FeCl 3 , AlCl 3 , and ZnCl 2 inhibited the activity whereas MgCl 2 , MnCl 2 , and CaCl 2 did not. The lectin stimulated mitogenic response of mouse splenocytes with the maximal response achieved by 1 μM lectin. Proliferation of tumor cells including MBL2 cells, HeLa cells, and L1210 cells was inhibited by the lectin with an IC 5 of 2.5, 5, and 10 μM, respectively. However, proliferation of HepG2 cells was not affected. The novel aspects of the isolated lectin include a novel N-terminal sequence, fair thermostability, acid stability, and alkali stability, together with potent mitogenic activity toward spleen cells and antiproliferative activity toward tumor cells

  16. Saccharification of sunflower stalks using lignocellulases from a fungal consortium comprising Pholiota adiposa and Armillaria gemina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Priyadharshini; Kim, Tae-Su; Dhiman, Saurabh Sudha; Li, Jinglin; Park, Ji-Hyun; Choi, Joon-Ho; Kim, Jae Young; Kim, Dongwook; Lee, Jung-Kul

    2015-09-01

    Lignocellulases from Armillaria gemina and Pholiota adiposa are efficient in hydrolyzing aspen and poplar biomass, respectively. In the present study, lignocellulosic enzymes obtained from a fungal consortium comprising P. adiposa and A. gemina were used for the saccharification of sunflower stalks. Sunflower stalks were thermochemically pretreated using 2 % NaOH at 50 °C for 24 h. The saccharification process parameters including substrate concentration, enzyme loading, pH, and temperature were optimized using response surface methodology to improve the saccharification yield. The highest enzymatic hydrolysis (84.3 %) was obtained using the following conditions: enzyme loading 10 FPU/g-substrate, substrate 5.5 %, temperature 50 °C, and pH 4.5. The hydrolysis yield obtained using the enzymes from the fungal consortium was equivalent to that obtained using a mixture of commercial enzymes Celluclast and Novozyme β-glucosidase. Addition of up to 500 ppm of heavy metal ions (As, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn) during saccharification did not significantly affect the saccharification yield. Thus, the biomass grown for phytoremediation of heavy metals can be used for the production of reducing sugars followed by ethanol fermentation.

  17. Pharmacological Basis for Use of Armillaria mellea Polysaccharides in Alzheimer's Disease: Antiapoptosis and Antioxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Shengshu; Lu, Wenqian; Zhang, Yongfeng; Yuan, Qingxia; Wang, Di

    2017-01-01

    Armillaria mellea , an edible fungus, exhibits various pharmacological activities, including antioxidant and antiapoptotic properties. However, the effects of A. mellea on Alzheimer's disease (AD) have not been systemically reported. The present study aimed to explore the protective effects of mycelium polysaccharides (AMPS) obtained from A. mellea , especially AMPSc via 70% ethanol precipitation in a L-glutamic acid- (L-Glu-) induced HT22 cell apoptosis model and an AlCl 3 plus D-galactose- (D-gal-) induced AD mouse model. AMPSc significantly enhanced cell viability, suppressed nuclear apoptosis, inhibited intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation, prevented caspase-3 activation, and restored mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). In AD mice, AMPSc enhanced horizontal movements in an autonomic activity test, improved endurance times in a rotarod test, and decreased escape latency time in a water maze test. Furthermore, AMPSc reduced the apoptosis rate, amyloid beta (A β ) deposition, oxidative damage, and p-Tau aggregations in the AD mouse hippocampus. The central cholinergic system functions in AD mice improved after a 4-week course of AMPSc administration, as indicated by enhanced acetylcholine (Ach) and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) concentrations, and reduced acetylcholine esterase (AchE) levels in serum and hypothalamus. Our findings provide experimental evidence suggesting A. mellea as a neuroprotective candidate for treating or preventing neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. Structural elucidation and immunological activity of a polysaccharide from the fruiting body of Armillaria mellea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongxu; Liang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiantao; Tong, Haibin; Liu, Jicheng

    2009-03-01

    The water-soluble polysaccharide (AMP), with a molecular mass of 7.8x10(3)Da as determined by high-performance size-exclusion chromatography (HPSEC), was obtained from the fruiting body of Armillaria mellea. Methylation, Smith degradation, acetolysis, (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy and acid hydrolysis studies were conducted to elucidate its structure. The results indicated that AMP consisted of a backbone composed of (1-->6)-linked-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl, (1-->2,6)-linked-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl and (1-->6)-linked-alpha-D-galactopyranosyl residues in the ratio of 3:1:1, and terminated with one single terminal (1-->)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl at the O-2 position of (1-->2,6)-linked-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl, on average, along the main chain. Preliminary tests in vitro showed that AMP has stimulating effects on murine lymphocyte proliferation induced by concanavalin A or lipopolysaccharide in a dose-dependent manner. It is a possible potential immunopotentiating agent for use in health-care food or medicine.

  19. Molecular properties and antioxidant activities of polysaccharides isolated from alkaline extract of wild Armillaria ostoyae mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Ka-Chai; Xu, Lijian; Chen, Xia; Wu, Jian-Yong

    2016-02-10

    This study aims to discover novel and bioactive polysaccharides (PS) from wild Armillaria ostoyae, a honey mushroom species. Two PS designated AkPS1V-1 (66.6 kDa) and AkPS1V-2 (15.3 kDa) were isolated and fractionated by anion ion exchange (IEC) and size exclusion chromatography (SEC) from the alkaline extract of A. ostoyae mushrooms. AkPS1V-1 was a glucan composed of solely glucose residues and AkPS1V-2 a heteropolysaccharide composed of glucose and galactose at 6:1 molar ratio. AkPS1V-2 exhibited higher antioxidant activities than AkPS1V-1 based on reducing power, radical scavenging and metal chelating assays. The structure of AkPS1V-2 was further analyzed and elucidated as a branched galactoglucan with a backbone composed of (1→6)-β-D-glucopyranosyl, (1→3)-β-D-glucopyranosyl, (1→3)-α-D-galactopyranosyl and (1→3,6)-β-D-glucopyranosyl residues at 3:1:1:1 ratio, and side chain of (1→3)-β-D-glucopyranosyl residue. This is the first report on a pure PS structure and its antioxidant activities from this mushroom species. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Genomewide mutation dynamic within a long-lived individual of Armillaria gallica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James B; Catona, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Mutation is the ultimate source of all genetic variation in populations and yet they remain unobservable and buried in the past. Long-lived individuals of Armillaria gallica, a common opportunistic fungal pathogen of tree roots in temperate forests of the northern hemisphere, provide a spatial context for examining the mutational dynamic. Each individual of A. gallica arises in a single mating between two haploid gametes and the resulting diploid then grows vegetatively to occupy a discrete spatial territory often including many adjacent tree root systems. In effect, this leaves a spatial record of growth over time within which mutations can be localized. To identify mutations, the entire genomes of three spatially separated samples of one individual of A. gallica approximately 200 × 60 m were sequenced and compared. In this comparison, mutations and regions of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) were identified then assayed in another 20 isolates from the same individual by conventional PCR and Sanger sequencing. The genotype network of all mutations and LOH were without internal conflict. Further, the spatial pattern of genotypes was nonrandom and appeared to reflect the vegetative expansion leading to the present-day individual. The results reflect the spectrum of spontaneous mutation in nature and provide insight into cellular generation times. © 2014 by The Mycological Society of America.

  1. Chemical Compositions and Antioxidant Activities of Polysaccharides from the Sporophores and Cultured Products of Armillaria mellea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Zhang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Armillaria mellea is a traditional Chinese medicinal and edible mushroom. Many cultured products of A. mellea have been used to develop commercial medicines in recent years. The chemical composition and activities of the major bioactive chemical components—polysaccharides—may be different because of differences in the raw materials used. Four polysaccharides (SP, CMP, CFBP and CFMP were obtained from wild sporophores and cultured products (including mycelia, fermentation broth and fermentation mixture of A. mellea. Their yields, carbohydrate contents, monosaccharide compositions, FT-IR spectra, NMR spectroscopy and antioxidant activities were investigated. All of the polysaccharides were composed of xylose, glucose and galactose without protein. Glucose was the dominant monosaccharide in SP, CMP and CFMP, whereas galactose was the dominant monosaccharide in CFBP. SP and CMP showed higher scavenging DPPH• and ABTS•+ activities and reducing power among four polysaccharides. The carbohydrate content and corresponding glucose percentage were positive influences on the antioxidant activities, whereas the corresponding xylose and galactose percentage were negative influences. A. mellea polysaccharides are potential natural antioxidants. Polysaccharides from cultured products, especially mycelia, are good substitutes for SP and are also potential sources for both dietary supplements and food industries.

  2. Antioxidant Properties of the Edible Basidiomycete Armillaria mellea in Submerged Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Yeou Lung

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidant components, ascorbic acid, total flavonoids and total phenols are produced effectively by Armillaria mellea submerged cultures. Dried mycelia and mycelia-free broths obtained by A. mellea submerged cultures are extracted with methanol and hot water and investigated for antioxidant properties. Methanolic extracts from dried mycelia (MEM and mycelia-free broth (MEB and hot water extracts from dried mycelia (HWEM by A. mellea submerged cultures show good antioxidant properties as evidenced by low EC50 values (< 10 mg/mL. Total flavonoid is mainly found in hot water extracts; however, total phenol is rich in methanol and hot water extracts from mycelia. Ascorbic acid and total phenol contents are well correlated with the reducing power and the scavenging effect on superoxide anions. Total flavonoid content is dependent on the antioxidant activity and the chelating effect on ferrous ions. Total antioxidant component contents are closely related to the antioxidant activity and the scavenging superoxide anion ability. Results confirm that extracts with good antioxidant properties from fermenting products by A. mellea are potential good substitutes for synthetic antioxidants and can be applied to antioxidant-related functional food and pharmaceutical industries.

  3. A Fivefold Parallelized Biosynthetic Process Secures Chlorination of Armillaria mellea (Honey Mushroom) Toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wick, Jonas; Heine, Daniel; Lackner, Gerald; Misiek, Mathias; Tauber, James; Jagusch, Hans; Hertweck, Christian; Hoffmeister, Dirk

    2016-02-15

    The basidiomycetous tree pathogen Armillaria mellea (honey mushroom) produces a large variety of structurally related antibiotically active and phytotoxic natural products, referred to as the melleolides. During their biosynthesis, some members of the melleolide family of compounds undergo monochlorination of the aromatic moiety, whose biochemical and genetic basis was not known previously. This first study on basidiomycete halogenases presents the biochemical in vitro characterization of five flavin-dependent A. mellea enzymes (ArmH1 to ArmH5) that were heterologously produced in Escherichia coli. We demonstrate that all five enzymes transfer a single chlorine atom to the melleolide backbone. A 5-fold, secured biosynthetic step during natural product assembly is unprecedented. Typically, flavin-dependent halogenases are categorized into enzymes acting on free compounds as opposed to those requiring a carrier-protein-bound acceptor substrate. The enzymes characterized in this study clearly turned over free substrates. Phylogenetic clades of halogenases suggest that all fungal enzymes share an ancestor and reflect a clear divergence between ascomycetes and basidiomycetes. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Substrate Specificity Profiling of Peptidyl-Lys Metallopeptidase of Armillaria mellea by FRET Based Peptide Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ødum, Anders S R; Olesen, Kjeld; Østergaard, Søren; Thim, Lars; Nørby, Inga; Meldal, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Determining the substrate specificity of a protease is essential for developing assays, inhibitors and understanding the mechanisms of the enzyme. In this work, we have profiled the specificity of Peptidyl-Lys metallopeptidase, (LysN), of Armillaria mellea, by a synthetic fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) positional-scanning library. The library was based on a reference sequence K(Abz)-S-A-Q-K-M-V-S-K(Dnp), where the fluorescent donor is 2-aminobenzamide and the quencher is N-2,4-dinitrophenyl. Each position was varied between 19 different amino acids one by one, to reveal the specificity of the protease. LysN exhibits strict specificity for lysine in S1', and has less specificity moving further away from the scissile bond. Additivity between the subsites was observed and the best substrate identified was K(Abz)-M-R-F-K-R-R-R-K(Dnp) with a kcat/KM of 42.6 µM/s. Based on a homology structure model the reference substrate was fitted into the active site using molecular dynamics to propose peptide-enzyme interactions.

  5. Purification and characterization of a ribonuclease from the wild edible mushroom Armillaria luteo-virens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li-Jing; Chen, Qing-Jun; Wang, He-Xiang; Zhang, Guo-Qing

    2013-06-01

    A 15 kDa ribonuclease (RNase) was purified from dried fruiting bodies of the wild edible mushroom Armillaria luteo-virens. The simple 4-step purification protocol involved ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, ion-exchange chromatography on SP-Sepharose and a final gel filtration by FPLC on Superdex-75. The RNase was unadsorbed on Affi-gel blue gel, but adsorbed on DEAE-cellulose and SP-Sepharose. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of purified RNase was AGVQYKLTILLV, which showed low sequence homology to those of previously reported RNases. The optimal pH and temperature of the enzyme were very close to 4.0 and 70 degrees C, respectively. The enzyme showed considerably high ribonucleolytic activity and broad specificity towards polyhomoribonucleotides, with a specificity of poly(U) > poly(C) > poly (G) > poly(A). The ribonucleolytic activities towards poly(U), poly(C), poly(G) and poly(A) were 279.5, 184.1, 69.9 and 52.3 U/mg, respectively.

  6. Antioxidant properties of the edible Basidiomycete Armillaria mellea in submerged cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung, Ming-Yeou; Chang, Yu-Cheng

    2011-01-01

    Antioxidant components, ascorbic acid, total flavonoids and total phenols are produced effectively by Armillaria mellea submerged cultures. Dried mycelia and mycelia-free broths obtained by A. mellea submerged cultures are extracted with methanol and hot water and investigated for antioxidant properties. Methanolic extracts from dried mycelia (MEM) and mycelia-free broth (MEB) and hot water extracts from dried mycelia (HWEM) by A. mellea submerged cultures show good antioxidant properties as evidenced by low EC(50) values (<10 mg/mL). Total flavonoid is mainly found in hot water extracts; however, total phenol is rich in methanol and hot water extracts from mycelia. Ascorbic acid and total phenol contents are well correlated with the reducing power and the scavenging effect on superoxide anions. Total flavonoid content is dependent on the antioxidant activity and the chelating effect on ferrous ions. Total antioxidant component contents are closely related to the antioxidant activity and the scavenging superoxide anion ability. Results confirm that extracts with good antioxidant properties from fermenting products by A. mellea are potential good substitutes for synthetic antioxidants and can be applied to antioxidant-related functional food and pharmaceutical industries.

  7. Proteomic Characterization of Armillaria mellea Reveals Oxidative Stress Response Mechanisms and Altered Secondary Metabolism Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Cassandra; Hurley, Rachel; Almutlaqah, Nada; O'Keeffe, Grainne; Keane, Thomas M; Fitzpatrick, David A; Owens, Rebecca A

    2017-09-17

    Armillaria mellea is a major plant pathogen. Yet, the strategies the organism uses to infect susceptible species, degrade lignocellulose and other plant material and protect itself against plant defences and its own glycodegradative arsenal are largely unknown. Here, we use a combination of gel and MS-based proteomics to profile A. mellea under conditions of oxidative stress and changes in growth matrix. 2-DE and LC-MS/MS were used to investigate the response of A. mellea to H₂O₂ and menadione/FeCl₃ exposure, respectively. Several proteins were detected with altered abundance in response to H₂O₂, but not menadione/FeCl₃ (i.e., valosin-containing protein), indicating distinct responses to these different forms of oxidative stress. One protein, cobalamin-independent methionine synthase, demonstrated a common response in both conditions, which may be a marker for a more general stress response mechanism. Further changes to the A. mellea proteome were investigated using MS-based proteomics, which identified changes to putative secondary metabolism (SM) enzymes upon growth in agar compared to liquid cultures. Metabolomic analyses revealed distinct profiles, highlighting the effect of growth matrix on SM production. This establishes robust methods by which to utilize comparative proteomics to characterize this important phytopathogen.

  8. The Fruiting Body Formation of Armillaria mellea on Oak Sawdust Medium Covered with Ground Raw Carrots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Jae-Ouk; Chang, Kwang-Choon; Lee, Youn-Su; Park, Cheol-Ho; Kim, Hey-Young; Lee, U-Youn; Lee, Tae-Soo

    2006-01-01

    To produce an artificial fruiting body of Armillaria mellea on the oak sawdust medium, seven strains of A. mellea were used. The top surface of oak sawdust medium covered with ground raw carrot was inoculated with each of 7 strains and cultured for 30 days at 25℃ in the dark condition until the mycelia of A. mellea completely colonized the medium from top to bottom. Then, the mycelia which were fully covered on the top surface of the medium were scratched slightly with a spatula and filled with tap water for 3 hours. To induce the primordial formation, the 7 strains of A. mellea were transferred to the growth chamber under the illumination (350 lux) of 12 hours and relative humidity of 85 ± 5% in a day and then cultured at 16 ± 1℃. Only A. mellea IUM 949 could form primordia on the sawdust medium, but the other strains did not make primordia at the same condition. The primordia of A. mellea IUM 949 were formed 10 days after complete colonization of the medium and the fruiting bodies were produced 7 days after a primordial formation. The experimental results suggested that IUM 949 strain might be a good candidate for mass production of fruiting bodies of A. mellea. PMID:24039500

  9. Chemical compositions and antioxidant activities of polysaccharides from the sporophores and cultured products of Armillaria mellea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shanshan; Liu, Xiaoqian; Yan, Lihua; Zhang, Qiwei; Zhu, Jingjing; Huang, Na; Wang, Zhimin

    2015-03-31

    Armillaria mellea is a traditional Chinese medicinal and edible mushroom. Many cultured products of A. mellea have been used to develop commercial medicines in recent years. The chemical composition and activities of the major bioactive chemical components-polysaccharides-may be different because of differences in the raw materials used. Four polysaccharides (SP, CMP, CFBP and CFMP) were obtained from wild sporophores and cultured products (including mycelia, fermentation broth and fermentation mixture) of A. mellea. Their yields, carbohydrate contents, monosaccharide compositions, FT-IR spectra, NMR spectroscopy and antioxidant activities were investigated. All of the polysaccharides were composed of xylose, glucose and galactose without protein. Glucose was the dominant monosaccharide in SP, CMP and CFMP, whereas galactose was the dominant monosaccharide in CFBP. SP and CMP showed higher scavenging DPPH• and ABTS•+ activities and reducing power among four polysaccharides. The carbohydrate content and corresponding glucose percentage were positive influences on the antioxidant activities, whereas the corresponding xylose and galactose percentage were negative influences. A. mellea polysaccharides are potential natural antioxidants. Polysaccharides from cultured products, especially mycelia, are good substitutes for SP and are also potential sources for both dietary supplements and food industries.

  10. Pharmacological Basis for Use of Armillaria mellea Polysaccharides in Alzheimer’s Disease: Antiapoptosis and Antioxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengshu An

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Armillaria mellea, an edible fungus, exhibits various pharmacological activities, including antioxidant and antiapoptotic properties. However, the effects of A. mellea on Alzheimer’s disease (AD have not been systemically reported. The present study aimed to explore the protective effects of mycelium polysaccharides (AMPS obtained from A. mellea, especially AMPSc via 70% ethanol precipitation in a L-glutamic acid- (L-Glu- induced HT22 cell apoptosis model and an AlCl3 plus D-galactose- (D-gal- induced AD mouse model. AMPSc significantly enhanced cell viability, suppressed nuclear apoptosis, inhibited intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation, prevented caspase-3 activation, and restored mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP. In AD mice, AMPSc enhanced horizontal movements in an autonomic activity test, improved endurance times in a rotarod test, and decreased escape latency time in a water maze test. Furthermore, AMPSc reduced the apoptosis rate, amyloid beta (Aβ deposition, oxidative damage, and p-Tau aggregations in the AD mouse hippocampus. The central cholinergic system functions in AD mice improved after a 4-week course of AMPSc administration, as indicated by enhanced acetylcholine (Ach and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT concentrations, and reduced acetylcholine esterase (AchE levels in serum and hypothalamus. Our findings provide experimental evidence suggesting A. mellea as a neuroprotective candidate for treating or preventing neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Persistence of Gliocephalotrichum spp. causing fruit rot of rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum L.) in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worldwide, fruit rot of rambutan is an important problem that limits the storage, marketing and long-distance transportation of the fruit. A complex of pathogens has been reported to cause fruit rot of rambutan and significant post-harvest economic losses. During 2009 and 2011 rambutan fruit rot was...

  12. First report of Fusarium proliferatum causing dry rot in Michigan commercial potato (Solanum tuberosum) production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusarium dry rot of potato is a postharvest disease caused by several Fusarium spp. and is of worldwide importance. Thirteen Fusarium spp. have been implicated in fungal dry rots of potatoes worldwide. Among them, 11 species have been reported causing potato dry rot of seed tubers in the northern Un...

  13. Fusarium spp. causing dry rot of seed potato tubers in Michigan and their sensitivity to fungicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusarium dry rot of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) is a postharvest disease that can be caused by several Fusarium spp. A survey was conducted to establish the composition of Fusarium species causing dry rot of seed tubers in Michigan. A total of 370 dry rot symptomatic tubers were collected in 2009 ...

  14. Occurrence of wood-and root- rot basidiomycetes on trees in Bayero ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Several death and decays or rots of tropical trees are as result of infection caused by wood and root rot 'parasitic basidiomycetes. In the present study, survey of parasitic homobasidiomycetes causing wood and root rot on woody trees in Bayero University, Kano (two campuses) was carried out between April – September ...

  15. Genetic variation between Phytophthora cactorum isolates differing in their ability to cause crown rot in strawberry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eikemo, H.; Klemsdal, S.S.; Riisberg, I.; Bonants, P.J.M.; Stensvand, A.; Tronsmo, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    Analysis of 44 isolates of Phytophthora cactorum, isolated from strawberry and other hosts, by AFLP showed that the crown rot pathotype is different from leather rot isolates and from P. cactorum isolated from other hosts. 16 of 23 crown rot isolates, including isolates from Europe, Japan,

  16. Perry Pinyon Pines Protection Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel McCarthy

    2012-01-01

    Fuel reduction treatments around pinyon pine trees began as a simple project but ended in something more complex, enjoyable, and rewarding. The project eventually led to pinyon species (Pinus monophylla and P. quadrifolia) reforestation efforts, something that has been tried in the past with disappointing results. The Perry Pinyon Pines Protection Project and current...

  17. Natural Regeneration of Longleaf Pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    William D. Boyer

    1979-01-01

    Natural regeneration is now a reliable alternative for existing longleaf pine forests. The shelterwood system, or modifications of it, has been used experimentally to regenerate longleaf pine for over 20 years, and regional tests have confirmed its value for a wide range of site conditions. Natural regeneration, because of its low cost when compared to other...

  18. Cleavage by trypsin and by the proteinase from Armillaria mellea at epsilon-N-formyl-lysine residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, F P; Doonan, S; Ross, C A

    1981-01-01

    Kinetic studies were made of the hydrolysis by trypsin of alpha-N-acetylglycyl-L-lysine methyl ester and of its neutral analogue alpha-N-acetylglycyl-epsilon-N-formyl-L-lysine methyl ester. The latter substance is a moderately good substrate for trypsin, and this observation is discussed in terms of the substrate specifically of the enzyme. The actions of trypsin and of the lysine-specific proteinase from Armillaria mellea on both a native and a formylated polypeptide substrate were compared. Both enzymes were found to hydrolyse specifically bonds to epsilon-N-formyl-lysine in the formylated substrate. PMID:6796050

  19. Southern Pine Beetle Information System (SPBIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valli Peacher

    2011-01-01

    The southern pine beetle (SPB) is the most destructive forest insect in the South. The SPB attacks all species of southern pine, but loblolly and shortleaf are most susceptible. The Southern Pine Beetle Information System (SPBIS) is the computerized database used by the national forests in the Southern Region for tracking individual southern pine beetle infestations....

  20. The Austrian x red pine hybrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. B. Critchfield

    1963-01-01

    The genetic improvement of red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.) presents tree breeders with one of their most difficult problems. Not only is this valuable species remarkably uniform, but until 1955 it resisted all attempts to cross it with other pines. In that year red pine and Austrian pine (P. nigra var. austriaca [...

  1. Carbon sequestration and natural longleaf pine ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralph S. Meldahl; John S. Kush

    2006-01-01

    A fire-maintained longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) ecosystem may offer the best option for carbon (C) sequestration among the southern pines. Longleaf is the longest living of the southern pines, and products from longleaf pine will sequester C longer than most since they are likely to be solid wood products such as structural lumber and poles....

  2. Assessment of compatibility among Armillaria cepistipes, A. sinapina, and North American biological species X and XI, using culture morphology and molecular biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark T. Banik; Harold H. Burdsall

    1998-01-01

    Ten single-spore isolates each of Armillaria sinapina, A. cepistipes, and North American biological species (NABS)X and XI were paired in all combinations. A second set of ten single-spore isolates of each species was likewise paired. Each pairing was duplicated for a total of 3280 pairs. Using the standard morphological criteria (e.g., fluffy, crustose) to assess the...

  3. Bioclimatic modeling predicts potential distribution of Armillaria solidipes and Pseudotsuga menziesii (Douglas-fir) under contemporary and changing climates in the interior western U.S.A

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Hanna; M. V. Warwell; H. Maffei; M. L. Fairweather; J. T. Blodgett; P. J. Zambino; J. Worrall; K. S. Burns; J. J. Jacobs; S. M. Ashiglar; J. E. Lundquist; M. -S. Kim; Amy Ross-Davis; C. Hoffman; R. Mathiasen; R. Hofstetter; John Shaw; E. W. I. Pitman; E. V. Nelson; Geral I. McDonald; M. R. Cleary; S. Brar; B. Richardson; Ned Klopfenstein

    2016-01-01

    Pseudotsuga menziesii (Douglas-fir) is a dominant component of forest stands in much of western North America. It is an important tree to the timber industry, yielding more timber than any other species in North America. It is also extremely important for wildlife as habitat and food. Many small birds and mammals feed on its seeds . Armillaria solidipes [...

  4. Precommercial thinning in mixed-species conifer plantations affected by armillaria and heterobasidion root diseases in West-Central Oregon and Washington: 30-year results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory M. Filip; Joshua J. Bronson; Kristen L. Chadwick; Jeremy B. Filip; Susan J. Frankel; Donald J. Goheen; Ellen M. Goheen; Sylvia R. Mori; Angel L. Saavedra

    2015-01-01

    Four 10- to 20-year-old plantations were precommercially thinned to determine the effects on tree growth and mortality caused by armillaria and heterobasidion root diseases. The plantations represented different species compositions with one each of (1) coastal Douglas-fir and noble fir, (2) Douglas-fir and western hemlock, (3) pure Douglas-fir, and (4) Shasta red fir...

  5. Southern Pine Beetle Handbook: Southern Pine Beetles Can Kill Your Ornamental Pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert C. Thatcher; Jack E. Coster; Thomas L. Payne

    1974-01-01

    Southern pine beetles are compulsive eaters. Each year in the South from Texas to Virginia the voracious insects conduct a movable feast across thousands of acres of pine forests. Most trees die soon after the beetles sink their teeth into them.

  6. in vitro technique for selecting onion for white rot disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    and Simmonds, D.H. 2003. Partial resistance to white mold in a transgenic soybean line. Crop Science 43: 92-95. Coventry, E., Noble, R., Mead, A. and Whipps,. J.M. 2005. Suppression of Allium white rot. (Sclerotium cepivorum) in different soils using vegetable wastes. European Journal of Plant Pathology 111: 101-112.

  7. Evaluation of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) response to charcoal rot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charcoal rot in common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), caused by Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Gold. (Mph), is an endemic disease in the prevailing hot and dry conditions in southern Puerto Rico. This study evaluated the 120 bean genotypes that compose the BASE 120 panel under screenhouse conditio...

  8. improvement of resistance to fusarium root rot through gene

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    PhD. Thesis. University of KwaZulu-Natal, Pietmeritzburg,. South Africa. Navarro, F., Sass, M.E. and Nienhuis, J. 2003. Identification and mapping bean root rot resistance in an 'Eagle x Puebla 152' population. Annual Report of the Bean. Improvement Cooperative 47:83–84. Park, S.J. and Tu, J.C. 1994. Genetic segregation.

  9. Biodegrading effects of some rot fungi on Pinus caribaea wood

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-05-16

    May 16, 2008 ... degradation was peculiar with each fungus. Wood decay varied along the tree bole but was not related to height above the ground. The results indicated that biodegradation by rot fungi differs in intensity according to the fungus species and this suggested that preservative impregnation and retention may.

  10. Physiological studies of Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc. causing collar rot of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In vitro studies were conducted on the effect of temperature, pH levels, carbon, nitrogen and amino acids on the mycelial growth and biomass production of Sclerotium rofsii Sacc. causing collar rot of mint. The results reveal that the growth of S. rolfsii was maximum at 30°C which was reduced significantly below 20°C and ...

  11. Botanicals to Control Soft Rot Bacteria of Potato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Rahman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracts from eleven different plant species such as jute (Corchorus capsularis L., cheerota (Swertia chiraita Ham., chatim (Alstonia scholaris L., mander (Erythrina variegata, bael (Aegle marmelos L., marigold (Tagetes erecta, onion (Allium cepa, garlic (Allium sativum L., neem (Azadiracta indica, lime (Citrus aurantifolia, and turmeric (Curcuma longa L. were tested for antibacterial activity against potato soft rot bacteria, E. carotovora subsp. carotovora (Ecc P-138, under in vitro and storage conditions. Previously, Ecc P-138 was identified as the most aggressive soft rot bacterium in Bangladeshi potatoes. Of the 11 different plant extracts, only extracts from dried jute leaves and cheerota significantly inhibited growth of Ecc P-138 in vitro. Finally, both plant extracts were tested to control the soft rot disease of potato tuber under storage conditions. In a 22-week storage condition, the treated potatoes were significantly more protected against the soft rot infection than those of untreated samples in terms of infection rate and weight loss. The jute leaf extracts showed more pronounced inhibitory effects on Ecc-138 growth both in in vitro and storage experiments.

  12. Huanglongbing increases Diplodia Stem End Rot in Citrus sinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huanglongbing (HLB), one of the most devastating diseases of citrus is caused by the a-Proteobacteria Candidatus Liberibacter. Diplodia natalensis Pole-Evans is a fungal pathogen which has been known to cause a postharvest stem-end rot of citrus, the pathogen infects citrus fruit under the calyx, an...

  13. Fungi associated with base rot disease of aloe vera (Aloe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-17

    Dec 17, 2008 ... Fungi associated with base rot disease of Aloe vera (syn. Aloe barbadensis) were investigated in Niger. Delta Area of Nigeria. Fungi and their percentage frequency were Aspergillus verocosa 28.03%,. Fusarium oxysporium 24.24%, Plectosphaerella cucumerina 16.67%, Mammeria ehinobotryoides 15.91 ...

  14. Inflorescence rot disease of date palm is caused by Fusarium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zulfiqar-Ali

    2012-05-01

    May 1, 2012 ... inflorescence rot disease in southern part of Iraq is Fusarium proliferatum. Pathogenecity test confirmed the ... Key words: Fusarium proliferatum, ITS1, ITS4, pathogenecity, PCR, isolates, phylogeny. INTRODUCTION ..... ITS rRNA Region for Identification of Fusarium spp. from Ocular. Sources. Investigative ...

  15. Advancing our understanding of charcoal rot in soybeans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charcoal rot (Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid ) of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], is an important but commonly misidentified disease, and very few summary articles exist on this pathosystem. Research conducted over the last 10 years has improved our understanding of the environment conducive...

  16. Production and optimization of ligninolytic enzymes by white rot ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study deals with production of ligninolytic enzymes from an indigenous white rot fungus Schizophyllum commune IBL-06 by using banana stalk as substrate through the process of solid state fermentation. The production process was further improved by optimizing a number of physical parameters such as ...

  17. Fungi associated with base rot disease of aloe vera ( Aloe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fungi associated with base rot disease of Aloe vera (syn. Aloe barbadensis) were investigated in Niger Delta Area of Nigeria. Fungi and their percentage frequency were Aspergillus verocosa 28.03%, Fusarium oxysporium 24.24%, Plectosphaerella cucumerina 16.67%, Mammeria ehinobotryoides 15.91% and Torula ...

  18. Inflorescence rot disease of date palm caused by Fusarium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Date palm is one of the important income sources for many farmers in different parts of several countries, including Iraq, Iran, Saudi Arabia, North Africa etc. Inflorescence rot is a serious disease of date palm which limits its yield. The identification of the causal organism is a key step to tackling this disease, and such studies ...

  19. Root rots of common and tepary beans in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root rots are a disease complex affecting common bean and can be severe in bean growing areas in the tropics and subtropics. The presence of several pathogens makes it difficult to breed for resistance because of the synergistic effect of the pathogens in the host and the interaction of soil factors...

  20. Evaluating host resistance to Macrophomina crown rot in strawberry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrophomina crown rot, caused by the soilborne fungus Macrophomina phaseolina, is an emerging pathogen in California strawberry production. When established, the pathogen can cause extensive plant decline and mortality. Host resistance will be a critical tool for managing this disease and guiding ...

  1. Detecting cotton boll rot with an electronic nose

    Science.gov (United States)

    South Carolina Boll Rot is an emerging disease of cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., caused by the opportunistic bacteria, Pantoea agglomerans (Ewing and Fife). Unlike typical fungal diseases, bolls infected with P. agglomerans continue to appear normal externally, complicating early and rapid detectio...

  2. Factors contributing to bacterial bulb rots of onion

    Science.gov (United States)

    The incidence of bacterial rots of onion bulbs is increasing and has become a serious problem for growers. This increase is likely due to a combination of factors, such as high bacterial populations in soils and irrigation water, heavy rains flooding production fields, higher temperatures, etc. It m...

  3. Evaluation of antagonistic fungi against charcoal rot of sunflower ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Results showed reduction in disease incidence of charcoal rot on sunflower cultivar G-66 with antagonist, A. flavus (100%) followed by A. niger (64.86%) P. capsulatum (63.79%) and T. viride (31.89%) over control. Decrease in disease incidence over control was 100% where seed was treated with combination of A. niger ...

  4. OXIDATION OF PERSISTANT ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS BY A WHITE ROT FUNGUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium degraded DDT [1,1,-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-2,2,2-trichloroethane], 3,4,3',4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl, 2,4,5,2',-4',5'-hexachlorobiphenyl, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, lindane (1,2,3,4,5,6-hexachlorocylohexane), and benzo[a]pyrene t...

  5. Corm Rot and Yellows of Gladiolus and Its Biomanagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Khan

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available A corm dressing containing Trichoderma harzianum (T014 and Pseudomonas fluorescens (PS07 cultured on a bagasse-soil-molasses mixture was tested for its efficacy against corm rot and yellows caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. gladioli on the gladiolus (Gladiolus psittacinus L. cv. White Prosperity (WP, King Lear (KL, Friendship (FR, Her Majesty (HM and American Beauty (AB in a pot culture experiment. The effectiveness of the biocontrol agents was compared with that of the fungicide carbendazim (200 ppm. All cultivars were susceptible to the pathogenic fungus and developed the characteristic symptoms of corm rot and yellows. Cultivars HM and AB were highly susceptible, scoring 2.9–3.2 on a corm rot and yellows scale (0–5 scale; compared with 1.5–2.9 for the other cultivars. Fungal infection reduced plant growth and flowering significantly, with a 15–28% decrease in the number of florets/spike. Application of carbendazim, T. harzianum (P=0.001 and P. fluorescens (P=0.05 decreased the corm rot and yellows scores and the soil population of the pathogen, and increased plant growth and flowering. The greatest improvement in the flower variables of infected plants was recorded with P. fluorescens (+18–31% over control. The soil population of the bioagents increased significantly over time, both in the presence and in the absence of the pathogenic fungus, but more in its absence.

  6. Calonectria species associated with cutting rot of Eucalyptus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lombard, L.; Zhou, X.D.; Crous, P.W.; Wingfield, B.D.; Wingfield, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Decline in the productivity of Eucalyptus hybrid cutting production in the Guangdong Province of China is linked to cutting rot associated with several Calonectria spp. The aim of this study was to identify these fungi using morphological and DNA sequence comparisons. Two previously undescribed

  7. Management of Potato Soft Rot by Gamma Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El-Ghany, H.; Moussa, Z.; Abd El-Rahman, A.F.; Salem, E.A.

    2017-01-01

    This investigation aims to apply a safe practice to minimize potato losses due to soft rot disease of tubers kept under ambient temperature. In this regard, gamma irradiation was used to extend keeping quality through its effect on soft rot bacteria. Eight bacterial isolates were recovered on Logan’s medium from kitchen kept tubers with symptoms of soft rot disease. Five isolates were found pathogenic and tentatively identified as Pectobacterium atrosepticum and Pectobacterium carotovorum sub sp. brasiliense on the basis of the usual bacteriological methods. A molecular method using 16SrDNA sequence analysis for verification of the identity of two isolates was made. The two bacterial isolates, Pectobacterium atrosepticum and Pectobacterium carotovorum sub sp. brasiliense, were irradiated by different doses of gamma rays. Complete inhibition occurred at doses 2.5 and 2.0 KGy for high densities (Approximately 4.0x10 9 CFU/ml) of P. atrosepticum and P. carotovorum sub sp. brasiliense, respectively. The D10 value of gamma irradiation was 0.24 KGy for P. atrosepticum and 0.20 KGy for P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliense. Irradiation of artificially infected tubers with soft rot bacteria using the two mentioned D10 doses for the two bacterial species increased the shelf life of tubers kept under ambient temperature. The internal chemical quality of tubers was shown to be improved by keeping the tubers under ambient temperature after irradiation by the two D10 doses 0.24 and 0.20 KGy

  8. Antagonistic Effect of Native Bacillus Isolates against Black Root Rot ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Faba bean (Vicia faba L.) is one of the most important pulse crops grown in eastern Africa. Black root rot (Fusarium solani) is known to cause great yield losses in faba bean, especially in the highlands of Ethiopia. The objective of this study was to evaluate the biological control ability of native Bacillus species on the basis of ...

  9. Autochthonous white rot fungi from the tropical forest: Potential of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Autochthonous white rot fungi from the tropical forest: Potential of Cuban strains for dyes and textile industrial effluents decolourisation. MI Sánchez-López, SF Vanhulle, V Mertens, G Guerra, SH Figueroa, C Decock, A Corbisier, MJ Penninckx ...

  10. The influence of root rot incidence on cassava genotype on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    28 panelists were asked to indicate their degree of preference for the colour, odour and taste of each gari sample by choosing the appropriate category in the hedonic scale. The results were compared with the tuberous root rot incidence and severity of genotypes in the field. All experiments were repeated and the data ...

  11. Mycobionta of birch and birch stump roots and its possible effect on the infection by Armillaria spp. II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Kwaśna

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the differences in size and structure of mycobionta communities occurring in soil and on/i n roots of a 30 year-old birch and its stumps 2 years after cutting of the trees. Special attention was paid to the occurrence of Zygorhynchus moelleri and Trichoderma viride. The first species due to the metabolites produced may presumably stimulate the infection by Armlllaria. The second species is a well-known antagonist of Armillaria, Z. moelleri accounted only for 2.6, l.3 and 9.l % of the total number of isolates in rhizoplane as well as in the fine and thick roots of stumps, respectively. Trlchodcrma viride and T. virens were present in roots of Hve birch and its stumps only occasionally. The relatively big population of Mycelium radicis atrovirens- particularly in the fine roots of stumps is attributed to their high vitality and relatively lower level of root decomposition. It seems that the rate of stump root decomposilion does not favour their colonization by Z. moelleri and its supposed contribution in enhancing the infection by Armillaria might not be so distinct as on stumps of 49-year-old birches.

  12. Characterisation of the ArmA adenylation domain implies a more diverse secondary metabolism in the genus Armillaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiek, Mathias; Braesel, Jana; Hoffmeister, Dirk

    2011-08-01

    The armA-gene, encoding a tridomain enzyme reminiscent of nonribosomal peptide synthetases, was identified in the genome of the basidiomycete Armillaria mellea. Heterologously expressed enzyme and the ATP-pyrophosphate exchange assay were used for the in vitro biochemical characterisation of the ArmA adenylation domain. l-leucine was the preferred substrate, while l-threonine, l-valine, l-alanine, and l-isoleucine were turned over at lower rates (83 %, 62 %, 56 %, and 44 %, respectively). Other proteinogenic amino acids, 2-oxo acids, and benzoic acid derivatives were not accepted. As the substrate range of ArmA is incompatible with the secondary metabolites known from the genus Armillaria, our results imply greater natural product diversity in this genus. This is the first biochemical characterisation of a basidiomycete amino acid-adenylating domain, and our results may help refine computer algorithms to predict substrate specificities for basidiomycete nonribosomal peptide synthetases whose genes are discovered through genome sequencing. Copyright © 2011 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Root rot of sugarbeet in the Vojvodina Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojšin Vera B.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Large changes introduced in the sugar beet production technology in the Vojvodina Province over last 40 years resulted in changes in the etiology and harmfulness of different agents of sugar beet root diseases. Improvements in cultivation practices reduced the harmfulness of some diseases while increased the harmfulness of others. Some disease agents became obsolete, but others gained importance. New agents of root diseases were found. The most frequent damages, persisting over long periods of time were caused by seedling damping-off, Fusarium root rot, charcoal root rot, parasitic (Rhizomania and non-parasitic root bearding. The parasitic damping-off caused by several fungal species but most frequently by Phoma betae occurred at the time when multigerm seeds were used in combination with extensive cultural practices. The agents of seedling diseases completely lost their significance as the consequence of switching to fungicide - treated monogerm seeds, earlier planting and improved soil tillage. In the period of intensive use of agricultural chemicals, seedling damping-off occurred frequently due to the phytotoxic action of chemicals (insecticides, herbicides and mineral fertilizers. In some years, frosts caused damping- off of sugar beet seedlings on a large scale in the Vojvodina Province. Poor sugar beet germination and emergence were frequently due to spring droughts. Sometimes they were due to strong winds. The occurrence of Fusarium root rot and charcoal root rot intensified on poor soils. Fusariosis symptoms were exhibited as plant wilting and different forms of root rot. In recent years root tip rot has occurred frequently in the first part of the growing season causing necrosis and dying of plants. Lateral roots tended to proliferate from the healthy tissue, giving the root a bearded appearance similar to Rhizomania. Fusarium oxysporum was the most frequent agent of this fusariosis. F. graminearum, F. equiseti, F. solani have also been

  14. Identifying ponderosa pines infested with mountain pine beetles

    Science.gov (United States)

    William F. McCambridge

    1974-01-01

    Trees successfully and unsuccessfully attacked by mountain pine beetles have several symptoms in common, so that proper diagnosis is not always easy. Guidelines presented here enable the observer to correctly distinguish nearly all attacked trees.

  15. Genotypic diversity of Armillaria gallica from mixed oak forests in Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazee, Nicholas J; Marra, Robert E; Wick, Robert L

    2012-01-01

    The population structure of Armillaria gallica, an important pathogen of Quercus spp., was investigated from mixed oak forests in central Massachusetts, encompassing a sampling area over 500 km(2). From 16 plots at four sites a total of 153 isolates (34-40 isolates per site) was analyzed with amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs). Analyses of 204 polymorphic loci detected 38 AFLP genotypes from a sample area of 4.51 hectares (ha). Genets ranged in distribution from five to 33 genets per hectare (GPH), with a mean of eight GPH and the average A. gallica genet occupying 0.13 ha. Allele frequencies produced an unbiased expected heterozygosity (H(E)) value of 0.112 (SE = 0.006) and a Nei's expected heterozygosity (H(J)) value of 0.190 (SE = 0.009), indicating low genetic diversity within the population. Analysis of molecular variation (Φ(PT) = 0.301; P < 0.001) indicates high genetic differentiation, with 70% of the molecular variation explained at the site-level within A. gallica subpopulations. However, results of the Mantel test, used to assess the isolation-by-distance hypothesis, were inconclusive in determining whether the subpopulations were truly isolated by distance. A neighbor-joining tree constructed from a genetic distance matrix grouped genotypes from the same site (subpopulation) together, but from three of four sites genotypes were randomly clustered at the plot level. The results suggest that basidiospore dispersal is an important means of new genet formation at linear distances up to 2000 m.

  16. Hypouricemic Effects of Armillaria mellea on Hyperuricemic Mice Regulated through OAT1 and CNT2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Tianqiao; Chen, Shaodan; Xie, Yizhen; Chen, Diling; Su, Jiyan; Shuai, Ou; Hu, Huiping; Zuo, Dan; Liang, Danling

    2018-03-29

    Ethanol and water extracts of Armillaria mellea were prepared by directly soaking A. mellea in ethanol (AME) at 65[Formula: see text]C, followed by decocting the remains in water (AMW) at 85[Formula: see text]C. Significantly, AME and AMW at 30, 60 and 120[Formula: see text]mg/kg exhibited excellent hypouricemic actions, causing remarkable declines from hyperuricemic control (351[Formula: see text][Formula: see text]mol/L, [Formula: see text]) to 136, 130 and 115[Formula: see text][Formula: see text]mol/L and 250, 188 and 152[Formula: see text][Formula: see text]mol/L in serum uric acid, correspondingly. In contrast to the evident renal toxicity of allopurinol, these preparations showed little impacts. Moreover, they showed some inhibitory effect on XOD (xanthine oxidase) activity. Compared with hyperuricemic control, protein expressions of OAT1 (organic anion transporter 1) were significantly elevated in AME- and AMW-treated mice. The levels of GLUT9 (glucose transporter 9) expression were significantly decreased by AMW. CNT2 (concentrative nucleoside transporter 2), a key target for purine absorption in gastrointestinal tract was involved in this study, and was verified for its innovative role. Both AME and AMW down-regulated CNT2 proteins in the gastrointestinal tract in hyperuricemic mice. As they exhibited considerable inhibitory effects on XOD, we selected XOD as the target for virtual screening by using molecular docking, and four compounds were hit with high ranks. From the analysis, we concluded that hydrogen bond, Pi-Pi and Pi-sigma interactions might play important roles for their orientations and locations in XOD inhibition.

  17. Evidence of natural hybridization among homothallic members of the basidiomycete Armillaria mellea sensu stricto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Kendra; Baker, Bethany R; Korhonen, Kari; Zhao, Jun; Hughes, Karen W; Bruhn, Johann; Bowman, Tiffany S; Bergemann, Sarah E

    2012-06-01

    Populations of Armillaria mellea (Basidiomycota, Agaricales) across much of its range are heterothallic; homothallic populations occur only in Africa (A. mellea ssp. africana), China (China Biological Species CBS G), and Japan (A. mellea ssp. nipponica). Monosporous isolates of heterothallic A. mellea are haploid and their mating behaviour is consistent with the requirement of two different alleles at two mating-type loci (tetrapolar mating system) to create a diploid individual. In contrast, monosporous isolates of homothallic A. mellea are putatively diploid; they bypass the haploid phase by undergoing karyogamy in the basidium (a unique type of secondary homothallism/pseudohomothallism). In order to determine the genetic origin of this homothallism, we analyzed genetic variation of 47 heterothallic isolates from China, Europe, and North America, and 14 homothallic isolates from Africa, China, and Japan. Gene trees and mutational networks were constructed for partial mitochondrial gene ATP synthase subunit 6 (ATP6) and for the following nuclear genes: actin (ACTIN), elongation factor subunit 1-alpha (EFA), glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD), and the RNA polymerase subunit II (RPB2). Homothallic isolates from Africa and Japan shared a common mitochondrial ATP6 haplotype with homothallic isolates from China, and are likely introductions. Homothallic isolates from China that shared a common mitochondrial haplotype with all European isolates did not share European nuclear haplotypes, as revealed by median-joining networks, but instead clustered with haplotypes from China or were intermediate between those of China and Europe. Such mitochondrial-nuclear discordance in homothallic isolates from China is indicative of hybridization between lineages originating from China and Europe. Copyright © 2012 British Mycological Society. All rights reserved.

  18. [Correlative analysis advance of chemical constituents of Polyporus umbellatus and Armillaria mellea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing-Wen; Lai, Chang-Jiang-Sheng; Yuan, Yuan; Zhang, Min; Zhou, Jun-Hui; Huang, Lu-Qi

    2017-08-01

    Medicinal Polyporus umbellatus is the dry sclerotia of P. umbellatus, with the effect of diuresis; Armillaria mellea is a parasitic fungus which can infect plants up to 300 genera, with sedative, anticonvulsant and some other biological activities. As the medicinal value of P. umbellatus and A. mellea is increasingly wide concerned, the market quantity demanded of them is gradually increased and the demand outstrips the supply. The symbiotic A. mellea and P. umbellatus are both the medicinal and edible fungi with diverse activities, including hypoglycemic action, improve immunity and antitumor and so on. The growth of the sclerotia forming from the mycelium of P. umbellatus is related to the infection of the symbiotic A. mellea and their secondary products. In this study, by comparing the chemical constituents of the mycelium and sclerotia of P. umbellatus and A. mellea, we found that they all produced steroids and nitrogen-containing heterocycles. The sclerotia of P. umbellatus and A. mellea also produced triterpenes secondary metabolites. In addition, the mycelium and infected sclerotia of P. umbellatus mainly produced different steroids, and the sclerotia produced some other special secondary metabolites, such as long-chain fatty acids, ceramides, phenol and so on. By analyzing above all kinds of differences, speculated that these may be caused by the infection of the symbiotic A. mellea which mainly produced sesquiterpenes, diterpenes and other secondary metabolites. The contents and types of compounds of P. umbellatus and A. mellea are closely related to their symbiosis and reproduction, therefore, many symbiosis mechanisms should be found by utilizing more molecular biology technology to elucidate this complex symbiotic infection and provide scientific basis for improving the yield and quality of P. umbellatus and A. mellea. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  19. Control of lettuce bottom rot by isolates of Trichoderma spp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zayame Vegette Pinto

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Bottom rot, caused by Rhizoctonia solani AG 1-IB, is an important disease affecting lettuce in Brazil, where its biological control with Trichoderma was not developed yet. The present study was carried out with the aim of selecting Trichoderma isolates to be used in the control of lettuce bottom rot. Forty-six Trichoderma isolates, obtained with baits containing mycelia of the pathogen, were evaluated in experiments carried out in vitro and in vivo in a greenhouse in two steps. In the laboratory, the isolates were evaluated for their capabilities of parasitizing and producing toxic metabolic substances that could inhibit the pathogen mycelial growth. In the first step of the in vivo experiments, the number and the dry weight of lettuce seedlings of the cultivar White Boston were evaluated. In the second step, 12 isolates that were efficient in the first step and showed rapid growth and abundant sporulation in the laboratory were tested for their capability of controlling bottom rot in two repeated experiments, and had their species identified. The majority of the isolates of Trichoderma spp. (76% showed high capacity for parasitism and 50% of them produced toxic metabolites capable of inhibiting 60-100% of R. solani AG1-IB mycelial growth. Twenty-four isolates increased the number and 23 isolates increased the dry weight of lettuce seedlings inoculated with the pathogen in the first step of the in vivo experiments.In both experiments of the second step, two isolates of T. virens, IBLF 04 and IBLF 50, reduced the severity of bottom rot and increased the number and the dry weight of lettuce seedlings inoculated with R. solani AG1-IB. These isolates had shown a high capacity for parasitism and production of toxic metabolic substances, indicating that the in vitro and in vivo steps employed in the present study were efficient in selecting antagonists to be used for the control of lettuce bottom rot.

  20. Assessing longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) restoration after southern pine beetle kill using a compact experimental design

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.-P. Berrill; C.M. Dagley

    2010-01-01

    A compact experimental design and analysis is presented of longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) survival and growth in a restoration project in the Piedmont region of Georgia, USA. Longleaf pine seedlings were planted after salvage logging and broadcast burning in areas of catastrophic southern pine beetle (Dendroctonus frontalis) attacks on even-aged mixed pine-hardwood...

  1. A ponderosa pine-lodgepole pine spacing study in central Oregon: results after 20 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    K.W. Seidel

    1989-01-01

    The growth response after 20 years from an initial spacing study established in a ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) and lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud.) plantation was measured in central Oregon. The study was designed to compare the growth rates of pure ponderosa pine, pure lodgepole pine, and a...

  2. Influence of pine straw harvesting, prescribed fire, and fertilization on a Louisiana longleaf pine site

    Science.gov (United States)

    James D. Haywood

    2009-01-01

    This research was initiated in a 34-year-old, direct-seeded stand of longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) to study how pine straw management practices (harvesting, fire, and fertilization) affected the longleaf pine overstory and pine straw yields. A randomized complete block split-plot design was installed with two main plot treatments...

  3. Species determination of pine nuts in commercial samples causing pine nut syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Aase Æ.; Jessen, Flemming; Ballin, Nicolai Z.

    2014-01-01

    Consumption of pine nuts from the species of Pinus armandii has been reported to cause dysgeusia, commonly known as pine mouth, or pine nut syndrome (PNS). However, the number of reports on pine nut consumptions of the different species and PNS is limited. This leaves open the possibility...

  4. Mountain Pine Beetles Use Volatile Cues to Locate Host Limber Pine and Avoid Non-Host Great Basin Bristlecone Pine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Curtis A; Runyon, Justin B; Jenkins, Michael J; Giunta, Andrew D

    2015-01-01

    The tree-killing mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) is an important disturbance agent of western North American forests and recent outbreaks have affected tens of millions of hectares of trees. Most western North American pines (Pinus spp.) are hosts and are successfully attacked by mountain pine beetles whereas a handful of pine species are not suitable hosts and are rarely attacked. How pioneering females locate host trees is not well understood, with prevailing theory involving random landings and/or visual cues. Here we show that female mountain pine beetles orient toward volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from host limber pine (Pinus flexilis James) and away from VOCs of non-host Great Basin bristlecone pine (Pinus longaeva Bailey) in a Y-tube olfactometer. When presented with VOCs of both trees, females overwhelmingly choose limber pine over Great Basin bristlecone pine. Analysis of VOCs collected from co-occurring limber and Great Basin bristlecone pine trees revealed only a few quantitative differences. Noticeable differences included the monoterpenes 3-carene and D-limonene which were produced in greater amounts by host limber pine. We found no evidence that 3-carene is important for beetles when selecting trees, it was not attractive alone and its addition to Great Basin bristlecone pine VOCs did not alter female selection. However, addition of D-limonene to Great Basin bristlecone pine VOCs disrupted the ability of beetles to distinguish between tree species. When presented alone, D-limonene did not affect behavior, suggesting that the response is mediated by multiple compounds. A better understanding of host selection by mountain pine beetles could improve strategies for managing this important forest insect. Moreover, elucidating how Great Basin bristlecone pine escapes attack by mountain pine beetles could provide insight into mechanisms underlying the incredible longevity of this tree species.

  5. A rapid infection assay for Armillaria and real-time PCR quantitation of the fungal biomass in planta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Kendra; Bhat, Ravi; Fujiyoshi, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    Slow and unreliable infection in the greenhouse has been a barrier to research on Armillaria root disease. The existing infection assay takes 7-18 months for detectable infection, during which time the inoculum often dies, resulting in unequal challenge among plants. Because symptom expression and mortality are rare, presence or absence of infection, determined by culturing, is the only datum derived from the existing infection assay. This limits both routine comparisons of strain virulence and complex investigations of pathogenesis, neither of which have been done for Armillaria mellea. We tested a new infection assay, in which grape rootstocks growing in tissue culture medium are inoculated, and compared to rootstocks previously characterized from the existing infection assay as tolerant (Freedom) or susceptible (3309C). Culture media of 25 plants per rootstock was inoculated and five plants per rootstock were harvested 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks postinoculation; the experiment was completed twice. Confocal microscopy and quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) were used to quantify infection. Roots were treated with WGA-AlexaFluor488, hyphae and roots were scanned on green and red channels on a confocal microscope, and percent root colonization was quantified. A fungal gene (EF1?) was determined to have a single copy in A. mellea, and both EF1? and a single-copy grape gene (UFGT) were amplified by Q-PCR; fungal DNA: plant DNA served as a measure of fungal biomass. Armillaria was detected by culture, microscopy, and Q-PCR starting 2 weeks postinoculation from all inoculated plants, demonstrating that the new infection assay is rapid and plants do not escape infection. Our findings of higher percent root colonization (as measured by microscopy) of 3309C than Freedom at all harvests (P<0.0001), consistently higher fungal biomass (as measured by Q-PCR) of 3309 than Freedom, and a significant positive correlation between percent root colonization and fungal biomass (P=0.01) suggests

  6. Identification by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of the volatile organic compounds emitted from the wood-rotting fungi Serpula lacrymans and Coniophora puteana, and from Pinus sylvestris timber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewen, Richard J; Jones, Peter R H; Ratcliffe, Norman M; Spencer-Phillips, Peter T N

    2004-07-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by two wood-rotting basidiomycete fungi, Serpula lacrymans (dry rot fungus) and Coniophora puteana (cellar fungus), and the timber of Pinus sylvestris (Scots pine), were identified. Several volatile collection techniques were employed including dichloromethane solvent extraction, solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and thermal desorption of VOCs entrained on Tenax GR. In addition, a new method of solid sample injection (SSI) is described which utilises a low injector temperature and an all-glass deactivated injector liner designed to minimise both the formation of pyrolysis products and analyte degradation. All the volatile compounds collected were analysed using electron impact capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) on HP-5, HP-Innowax and beta-cyclodextrin columns. SSI and Tenax thermal desorption were found to be the most effective extraction methods. A total of 19 VOCs were observed from S. lacrymans grown on glass slides and pine, 15 from C. puteana grown on glass slides and 12 from P. sylvestris timber. S. lacrymans was found to emit, in low abundance, six unique VOCs, of which 2-methylbutanal was the greatest. The major volatile compound emitted by S. lacrymans was 1-octen-3-ol, which was also found in lower abundance from C. puteana. Six VOCs, including diethylene glycol and 4-methyl methylbenzoate, were found to be unique to C. puteana, all in medium abundance: From P. sylvestris, the major volatiles identified were S-alpha-pinene and 3-carene.

  7. Forest litter stocks in Korean pine-broad-leaved forests of the southern Sikhote Alin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Ivanov

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the data on the forest litter of the Korean pine-broad-leaved forests of the South of Primorsky krai. The focus of the research is plantations dominated by Korean pine; areas of the main tree species with ages of 50, 80, 130 and 200 years were selected. The dynamics of the forest litter stock in the pine and broadleaved forests of different ages according to the measurement results for the season in 2014 is stated. In the studied plantation, the forest litter stock varies between 9.7–20.3 t ha-1. The greatest value of the forest litter stock is recorded in old-growth cedar forest (200 years. Relatively high power and the stock of litter are typical for young Korean pine forest that can explain the lower speed of the litter properties change against the dynamics of taxation indicators of the forest stand. The difference between the amount of the litter in the 200-year-old and remaining pine trees are statistically significant at p = 0.05. The dependence of the litter power on the age is not revealed. The coefficient of the forest litter decomposition ranges from 2.55–10.60 that characterizes the high speed of its rotting. The highest coefficient of the litter decomposition has an old-growing pine forest. The schedule of seasonal humidity fluctuations of the forest litter on the chosen plot is made; with increasing cedar forest age, the volumetric moisture content of the forest litter increases; volumetric moisture content on the plots remain relatively unchanged during the season. The area of the Korean pine forests of Primorsky State Academy of Agriculture is 6835 ha. The amount of carbon stock in the forest litter is 38.7 thousand tons C. in this area, while the system of regional assessment of the forest carbon balance estimates this index as 24.3 tons С. The data obtained can be used to adjust the coefficients of regional assessment of the forest carbon balance for cedar forests of Primorsky krai.

  8. Fusarium rot of onion and possible use of bioproduct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klokočar-Šmit Zlata

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Several species of Fusarium are causal agents of onion rot in field and storage. Most prevalent are F. oxysporum f. sp. cepae and F. solani, and recently F. proliferatum, a toxigenic species. Most frequently isolated fungi in our field experiments were F. solani and F. proliferatum with different pathogenicity. Certain differences in antagonistic activity of Trichoderma asperellum on different isolates of F. proliferatum and F. solani have been found in in vitro study in dual culture, expressed as a slower inhibition of growth of the former, and faster of the latter pathogen. Antagonistic abilities of species from genus Trichoderma (T. asperellum are important, and have already been exploited in formulated biocontrol products in organic and conventional production, in order to prevent soil borne pathogens inducing fusarium wilt and rot. The importance of preventing onion infection by Fusarium spp., possible mycotoxin producers, has been underlined.

  9. Association of Pectolytic Fluorescent PSeudomonas with Postharvest Rots of Onion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.H. El-Hendawy

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Five isolates of pectolytic fluorescent pseudomonads were obtained from a rotted onion bulb and identified as Pseudomonas marginalis. At both 4 and 25oC, all isolates caused soft rot to detached plant parts of onion and to carrot, celery, cucumber, pepper, spinach, tomato and turnip (but not garlic. They did not however cause any symptoms in living plants of these same species. These results suggest that the onion isolates are a postharvest pathogen which is not destructive in the field but becomes a threat to fresh vegetables stored at low-temperature. Analysis of cellulosolytic and pectic enzymes revealed that pectic lyases, but not polygalacturonases, pectin methyl esterases and cellulases were produced in culture by each isolate.

  10. Increased delignification by white rot fungi after pressure refining Miscanthus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Paul W; Charlton, Adam; Hale, Mike D C

    2015-01-01

    Pressure refining, a pulp making process to separate fibres of lignocellulosic materials, deposits lignin granules on the surface of the fibres that could enable increased access to lignin degrading enzymes. Three different white rot fungi were grown on pressure refined (at 6 bar and 8 bar) and milled Miscanthus. Growth after 28 days showed highest biomass losses on milled Miscanthus compared to pressure refined Miscanthus. Ceriporiopsis subvermispora caused a significantly higher proportion of lignin removal when grown on 6 bar pressure refined Miscanthus compared to growth on 8 bar pressure refined Miscanthus and milled Miscanthus. RM22b followed a similar trend but Phlebiopsis gigantea SPLog6 did not. Conversely, C. subvermispora growing on pressure refined Miscanthus revealed that the proportion of cellulose increased. These results show that two of the three white rot fungi used in this study showed higher delignification on pressure refined Miscanthus than milled Miscanthus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The post-harvest fruit rots of tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum) in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajola, A O

    1979-01-01

    A survey of the post-harvest fruit rot diseases of tomato was conducted in five states of Nigeria. During severe infections, the diseases could cause 25% loss at harvest and 34% loss of the remaining product in transit, storage and market stalls; thus giving an overall loss of about 50% of the product. Two types of rots, soft and dry were recognised. The soft rot was found to account for about 85% and the dry rot about 15% of the overall loss. Erwinia carotovora, Rhizopus oryzae, R. stolonifer, Fusarium equiseti, F. nivale and F. oxysporum were established as the soft rot pathogens; while Aspergillus aculeatus, A. flavus, Cladosporium tenuissimum, Corynespora cassiicola, Curvularia lunata, Penicillium expansum P. multicolor and Rhizoctonia solani were established as the dry rot pathogens of tomato fruits in Nigeria.

  12. Biological Control of White Rot in Garlic Using Burkholderia pyrrocinia CAB08106-4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang Seop Han

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available White rot caused by Sclerotium cepivorum was reported to be severe soil-born disease on garlic. Disease progress of white rot of garlic (Allium sativum L. was investigated during the growing season of 2009 to 2011 at Taean and Seosan areas. The white rot disease on bulb began to occur from late April and peaked in late May. The antifungal bacteria, Burkholderia pyrrocinia CAB08106-4 was tested in field bioassay for suppression of white rot disease. As a result of the nucleotide sequence of the gene 16S rRNA, CAB008106-4 strain used in this study has been identified as B. pyrrocinia. B. pyrrocinia CAB080106-4 isolate suppressed the white rot with 69.6% control efficacy in field test. These results suggested that B. pyrrocinia CAB08106-4 isolate could be an effective biological control agent against white rot of garlic.

  13. Removal of phenanthrene in contaminated soil by combination of alfalfa, white-rot fungus, and earthworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shuguang; Zeng, Defang

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the removal of phenanthrene by combination of alfalfa, white-rot fungus, and earthworms in soil. A 60-day experiment was conducted. Inoculation with earthworms and/or white-rot fungus increased alfalfa biomass and phenanthrene accumulation in alfalfa. However, inoculations of alfalfa and white-rot fungus can significantly decrease the accumulation of phenanthrene in earthworms. The removal rates for phenanthrene in soil were 33, 48, 66, 74, 85, and 93% under treatments control, only earthworms, only alfalfa, earthworms + alfalfa, alfalfa + white-rot fungus, and alfalfa + earthworms + white-rot fungus, respectively. The present study demonstrated that the combination of alfalfa, earthworms, and white-rot fungus is an effective way to remove phenanthrene in the soil. The removal is mainly via stimulating both microbial development and soil enzyme activity.

  14. Southern Pine Based on Biorefinery Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragauskas, Arthur J. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Singh, Preet [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2013-12-20

    This program seeks to develop an integrated southern pine wood to biofuels/biomaterials processing facility on the Recipient’s campus, that will test advanced integrated wood processing technologies at the laboratory scale, including: The generation of the bioethanol from pines residues and hemicelluloses extracted from pine woodchips; The conversion of extracted woodchips to linerboard and bleach grade pulps; and the efficient conversion of pine residues, bark and kraft cooking liquor into a useful pyrolysis oil.

  15. Fungal hydroquinones contribute to brown rot of wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melissa R. Suzuki; Christopher G. Hunt; Carl J. Houtman; Zachary D. Dalebroux; Kenneth E. Hammel

    2006-01-01

    The fungi that cause brown rot of wood initiate lignocellulose breakdown with an extracellular Fenton system in which Fe2+ and H2O2 react to produce hydroxyl radicals (•OH), which then oxidize and cleave the wood holocellulose. One such fungus, Gloeophyllum trabeum, drives Fenton chemistry on defined media by reducing Fe3+ and O2 with two extracellular hydroquinones,...

  16. Trichoderma spp. decrease Fusarium root rot in common bean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hudson Teixeira

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of six Trichoderma-based commercial products (TCP in controlling Fusarium root rot (FRR in common bean was assessed under field conditions. Three TCP, used for seed treatment or applied in the furrow, increased seedling emergence as much as the fungicide fludioxonil. FRR incidence was not affected, but all TCP and fludioxonil reduced the disease severity, compared to control. Application of Trichoderma-based products was as effective as that of fludioxonil in FRR management.

  17. The presence and survival of soft rot (Erwinia) in flower bulb production systems

    OpenAIRE

    Doorn, van, J.; Vreeburg, P.J.M.; Leeuwen, van, P.J.; Dees, R.H.L.

    2011-01-01

    Soft rot is causing increasing damage in the flower bulb industry. Bulbous ornamentals such as Hyacinthus, Dahlia, Iris, Muscari, Freesia and Zantedeschia can be infected. Soft rot in flower bulbs is mainly caused by Dickeya spp. (Dickeya spp.) and Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora (Pectobacterium carotovorum spp. carotovorum).To identify and detect these soft rot bacterial species in several bulbous ornamentals, standard PCR methods were used. During the last four years, research was dire...

  18. Cellulose Degradation by Cellulose-Clearing and Non-Cellulose-Clearing Brown-Rot Fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Highley, Terry L.

    1980-01-01

    Cellulose degradation by four cellulose-clearing brown-rot fungi in the Coniophoraceae—Coniophora prasinoides, C. puteana, Leucogyrophana arizonica, and L. olivascens—is compared with that of a non-cellulose-clearing brown-rot fungus, Poria placenta. The cellulose- and the non-cellulose-clearing brown-rot fungi apparently employ similar mechanisms to depolymerize cellulose; most likely a nonenzymatic mechanism is involved.

  19. A Hydraulically Operated Pine Cone Cutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl W. Fatzinger; M.T. Proveaux

    1971-01-01

    Mature cones of slash pine (Pinus elliottii Engelm. var. elliottii) and longleaf pine (P. palustris Mill.) can be easily bisected along their longitudinal axes with the hydraulic pine cone cutter described. This cutter eliminates the two major problems of earlier models--undue operator fatigue and the...

  20. Silvical characteristics of Virginia pine (Pinus virginiana)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert G., Jr. Snow

    1960-01-01

    Virginia pine has finally attained its rightful place among trees of commercial importance. It has done so in spite of being called "scrub pine" and "poverty pine" - and in spite of the term "forest weed", which has lingered long in the speech of oldtimers who remember the days of timber-plenty.

  1. Ecology of southwestern ponderosa pine forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    William H. Moir; Brian W. Geils; Mary Ann Benoit; Dan Scurlock

    1997-01-01

    Ponderosa pine forests are important because of their wide distribution, commercial value, and because they provide habitat for many plants and animals. Ponderosa pine forests are noted for their variety of passerine birds resulting from variation in forest composition and structure modified by past and present human use. Subsequent chapters discuss how ponderosa pine...

  2. Mycobionta of birch and birch stump roots and its possible effect on the infection by Armillaria spp. I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Kwaśna

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Zygorhynchus moelleri was the dominating species on/in roots of 2 year-old stumps of the 49 year-old birches. Trichoderma viride was more frequently found in the fine roots of living birches than in the fine roots of stumps though its population increased in thick roots of stumps. Occasionally the fungus also occurred on the surface of fine roots of stumps. Z. moelleri is known to produce indole 3-ethanol and indole-3 acetic acid which stimulate the growth of A. ostoyae rhizomorphs and phenoloxidizing enzymes which play an important role in the degradation of the wood. It seems that the accumulation of Z. moelleri and absence of bigger populations of T. viride on/in roots of 2-year-old stumps of the 49 year-old birches may result in an increase of their susceptibility to Armillaria infection.

  3. Chemical, pharmacological, and biological characterization of the culinary-medicinal honey mushroom, Armillaria mellea (Vahl) P. Kumm. (Agaricomycetideae): a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muszyńska, Bozena; Sułkowska-Ziaja, Katarzyna; Wołkowska, Małgorzata; Ekiert, Halina

    2011-01-01

    Recently, studies have been conducted on the chemical composition of fruiting bodies of the culinary-medicinal Honey mushroom, Armillaria mellea (Vahl.) P. Kumm. (higher Basidiomycetes). It is considered in Europe and Asia as edible and medicinal, when appropriately prepared, and has demonstrated the presence of different groups of organic compounds, including carbohydrates, sterols, sphingolipids, fatty acids, sesquiterpenes, non-hallucinogenic indole compounds, peptides, enzymes, adenosine derivatives, and many other components. Most of these metabolite groups possess potential therapeutic and dietary values. The results of quantitative analyses of indole compounds and heavy metals signal potential health hazards for humans. Some of the studies reviewed herein describe in detail the mechanism of symbiosis between A. mellea and the orchid species Gastrodia elata. This orchid is native to Asia, Australia, and New Zealand, and is used in therapeutics in official Chinese medicine.

  4. Fungi associated with storage rots of cocoyams (Colocasia spp.) in Nsukka, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugwuanyi, J O; Obeta, J A

    1996-04-01

    Cocoyam (Colocasia spp.) corms and cormels showing spoilage symptoms were collected from many stores in Nsukka locality and examined for rot and associated fungal pathogens. Aspergillus niger, Botryodiplodia theobromae, Corticium rolfsii, Geotrichum candidum, Fusarium oxysporum, and F. solani were recovered from rotten cocoyams. The representative isolates of these species caused cocoyam rot in pathogenicity tests. The rot due to A. niger, B. theobromae and C. rolfsii was extensive resulting in complete maceration of cocoyam tissue. Potassium sorbate (0.1 mg/ml) protected cocoyams from fungal rot with the exception of C. rolfsii.

  5. DNA-based identification of Armillaria isolates from peach [Prunus persica (l.) batsch] orchards in méxico state, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruben D. Elias-Roman; Ned B. Klopfenstein; Mee-Sook Kim; Dionicio Alvarado-Rosales; John W. Hanna; Amy L. Ross-Davis; Remigio Anastacio Guzman-Plazola; Guillermo Calderon-Zavala; Antonio Mora-Aguilera

    2013-01-01

    A collaborative project between the Programa de Fitopatología, Colegio de Postgraduados, Texcoco, Edo. de México and the USDA Forest Service-RMRS, Moscow Forest Pathology Laboratory began in 2011 to identify which species of Armillaria are causing widespread and severe damage to the peach orchards from México State, México. We are employing a DNA-based approach in...

  6. Diseases of the shoots and bark of oaks in the FRG. [Phomopsis quercella; Phomopsis quercina; Fusicoccum quercus; Colpoma quercinum; Pezicula cinnamomea; Stereum rugosum; Armillaria mellea; Ceratocystis piceae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butin, H.

    1987-03-01

    Several fungi known to cause diseases in oak trees and which have been found in recent years in the Federal Republic of Germany are discussed with regard to their pathogenicity. These include: Phomopsis quercella, Ph. quercina, Fusicoccum quercus, Colpoma quercinum. The proportion of red oaks afflicted with Pezicula cinnamomea, Stereum rugosum, and Armillaria mellea was considerable. The importance of Ceratocystis piceae in the development of oak disease is discussed.

  7. Detection, recognition and management of Armillaria and Phellinus root diseases in the southern interior of British Columbia. FRDA report No. 179

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, D.; Merler, H.; Norris, D.

    1992-01-01

    The root diseases caused by Armillaria ostoyae and Phellinus weirii reduce timber productivity and affect other resource values over a substantial area of the southern interior of B.C. This guide describes how to recognize and detect the diseases, the biology of the fungi, and management options for diseased sites. Information on the fungi comes from published work and the authors' observations and unpublished research. The management options presented are based on results from control trials, especially the Skimikin.

  8. Study on Korean Pine Nut Processors

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Hag Mo; Choi, Soo Im; Sato, Noriko; Kim, Hyun; 佐藤, 宣子

    2012-01-01

    In the results of survey on operating state of pine nut processors located in Gapyeong–gun, Gyeonggi–do and Hongcheon–gun, Gangwon–do, representative pine nut producing area, the total purchasing amount of pine nuts with a cone of Gapyeong–gun, Gyeonggi–do was 500~4,000 bags (1 bag is 80 kg), of which average amount per processor was 2000 bags. The price range per bag of pine nuts was 470~620 thousand won and the average price was 550 thousand won. Total purchase price of pine nuts with a con...

  9. The optimization of propagation medium for the increase of laccase production by the white-rot fungus Pleurotus ostreatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazuchová Miroslava

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The lignocellulolytic enzymes are routinely produced by submerged fermentation using lignocellulosic material, but for more effective production, it would be suitable to precede the production phase on the lignocellulose by propagation phase in the nutrition medium suitable for growth of the fungi. Therefore, the aim of this study was to increase the laccase production by the white-rot fungus Pleurotus ostreatus by two-step cultivation strategy. In the first step, propagation medium was optimized for the maximal biomass growth, the second step included the laccase production by produced fungal biomass in media with the selected lignocellulosic material (pine sawdust, alfalfa steam and corn straw. From our experiments, parameters such as glucose concentration, yeast extract concentration and pH of propagation medium were selected as key factors affecting growth of P. ostreatus. The optimal conditions of propagation medium for maximal fungal growth determined by response surface methodology were: glucose concentration 102.68 g/L, yeast extract concentration 43.65 g/L and pH of propagation medium 7.24. These values were experimentally verified and used statistical model of biomass production prediction was appropriate adjusted. Thus prepared fungal biomass produced in the media with lignocellulose approximately 9-16 times higher concentrations of the laccase in 3 times shorter time than the fungal biomass without propagation phase in optimized propagation medium.

  10. A Loblolly Pine Management Guide: Natural Regeneration of Loblolly Pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Boyd Edwards

    1987-01-01

    For many landowners, low cost makes natural regeneration an attractive alternative to planting when loblolly pine stands are harvested. Clearcutting, seed-tree, shelterwood, and selection methods can be used. Keys to success are a suitable seedbed.an adequate seed supply, sufficient moisture. and freedom from excessive competition.

  11. Pine needle abortion biomarker detected in bovine fetal fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine needle abortion is a naturally occurring condition in free-range cattle caused by the consumption of pine needles from select species of cypress, juniper, pine, and spruce trees. Confirmatory diagnosis of pine needle abortion has previously relied on a combined case history of pine needle cons...

  12. Successional trends of six mature shortleaf pine forests in Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael C. Stambaugh; Rose-Marie Muzika

    2007-01-01

    Many of Missouri's mature oak-shortleaf pine (Quercus-Pinus echinata) forests are in a mid-transition stage characterized by partial pine overstory, limited pine recruitment, and minimal pine regeneration. Restoration of shortleaf pine communities at a large scale necessitates the understanding and management of natural regeneration. To...

  13. Characterizing butt-rot fungi on USA-affiliated islands in the western Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phil Cannon; Ned B. Klopfenstein; Robert L. Schlub; Mee-Sook Kim; Yuko Ota; Norio Sahashi; Roland J. Quitugua; John W. Hanna; Amy L. Ross-Davis; J. D. Sweeney

    2014-01-01

    Ganoderma and Phellinus are genera that commonly cause tree butt-rot on USA-affiliated islands of the western Pacific. These fungal genera can be quite prevalent, especially in older mangrove stands. Although the majority of infections caused by these fungi lead to severe rotting of the heartwood, they typically do not directly kill the living tissues of the sapwood,...

  14. The persistence of Gliocephalotrichum bulbilium and G. simplex causing fruit rot of rambutan in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruit rot of rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum L.) is a pre and post-harvest disease problem that affects fruit quality. Significant post-harvest losses have occurred worldwide and several pathogens have been identified in Malaysia, Costa Rica, Hawaii, Thailand, and Puerto Rico. In 2011, fruit rot was o...

  15. First report of Calonectria hongkongensis causing fruit rot of rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruit rot is a major pre- and post-harvest disease problem in rambutan orchards. In 2011, fruit rot was observed at the USDA-TARS orchards in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico. Infected fruit were collected and tissue sections (1 mm2) were superficially sterilized with 70% ethanol and 0.5% sodium hypochlorite. ...

  16. First report of Colletotrichum fructicola and C. queenslandicum causing fruit rot of rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In rambutan production, fruit rot is the main pre- and post-harvest disease of concern. In a 2008-2013 fruit disease survey, fruit rot was observed in eight orchards in Puerto Rico. Infected fruit were collected and 1 mm2 tissue sections were surface disinfested with 70% ethanol followed by 0.5% sod...

  17. Preparation and Characterization of Novolak Phenol Formaldehyde Resin from Liquefied Brown-Rotted Wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai-Yun Li; Chung-Yun Hse; Te-Fu Qin

    2012-01-01

    The brown-rotted wood was liquefied in phenol with phosphoric acid as catalyst and the resulting liquefied products were condensed with formaldehyde to yield novolak liquefied wood-based phenol formaldehyde resin (LWPF). The results showed that brown-rotted wood could be more easily liquefied than sound wood in phenol. The residue content of liquefied wood decreased...

  18. Enzymatic oxalic acid regulation correlated with wood degradation in four brown-rot fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anne Christine Steenkjær Hastrup; Frederick Green III; Patricia K. Lebow; Bo Jensen

    2012-01-01

    Oxalic acid is a key component in the initiation of brown-rot decay and it has been suggested that it plays multiple roles during the degradation process. Oxalic acid is accumulated to varying degrees among brown-rot fungi; however, details on active regulation are scarce. The accumulation of oxalic acid was measured in this study from wood degraded by the four brown-...

  19. Effect of irradiation and insect pest control on rots and sensory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The coffee bean weevil, Araecerus fasciculatus Degeer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is associated with rots in stored yam tubers. The current study was designed to assess the effect of irradiation and other insect pest control strategies on rots and sensory quality of stored yams. 450 tubers each of two varieties of white yam ...

  20. Antifungal Effects Of Botanical Leaf Extracts On Tuber Rots Of Yam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fungicidal effects of dry and fresh leaf extracts of Axardirachta indica (L) and Ocimum grattissimum on the rot of yam tubers were investigated. Fusaruim oxysporium, Rhjzopus stolonifer, Botryodiplodia theobromae and Aspergillus Niger (root pathogens) were isolated from the rotted yam. Both dry and fresh leaf extracts ...

  1. Biocontrol of charcoal-rot of sorghum by actinomycetes isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-12

    Dec 12, 2011 ... Streptomyces but with different species in BLAST analysis. This study indicates that the selected actinomycetes have the potential for PGP and control of charcoal-rot disease in sorghum. Key words: Antagonistic actinomycetes, biocontrol, charcoal-rot, Macrophomina phaseolina. INTRODUCTION.

  2. First report of Fusarium redolens causing crown rot of wheat (Triticum spp.) in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusarium crown rot, caused by a complex of Fusarium spp., is a yield-limiting disease of wheat world-wide, especially in dry Mediterranean climates. In order to identify Fusarium species associated with crown rot of wheat, a survey was conducted in summer 2013 in the major wheat growing regions of T...

  3. Potassium and Phosphorus effects on disease severity of charcoal rot of soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of potassium (K) and phosphorus (P) fertilizers on charcoal rot of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] are unknown. Therefore, the severity of charcoal rot was studied at five levels of K (0, 37, 75, 111 and 149 kg K ha-1) and a level that was equal to the recommended fertilizer applicatio...

  4. Potassium and phosphorus have no effects on severity of charcoal rot of soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of potassium (K) and phosphorus (P) fertilizers on charcoal rot of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] are unknown. Therefore, the severity of charcoal rot was studied at five levels of K (0, 37, 75, 111 and 149 kg K ha-1) and a level that was equal to the recommended fertilizer applicatio...

  5. Studies on the epidemiology of spear rot in oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) in Suriname

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lande, van de H.L.

    1993-01-01

    The epidemiology of spear rot, an infectious disease of unknown etiology, was studied over 10 years at three government-owned oil palm plantations in Suriname. As with other and similar diseases, amarelecimento fatal in Brazil and pudrición del cogollo in Latin America, which too show rot

  6. First Report of Calonectria hongkongensis Causing Fruit Rot of Rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serrato-Diaz, L.M.; Latoni-Brailowsky, E.I.; Rivera-Vargas, L.I.; Goenaga, R.J.; Crous, P.W.; French-Monar, R.D.

    2013-01-01

    Fruit rot of rambutan is a pre- and post-harvest disease problem of rambutan orchards. In 2011, fruit rot was observed at USDA-ARS orchards in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico. Infected fruit were collected and 1 mm2 tissue sections were surface disinfested with 70% ethanol followed by 0.5% sodium

  7. Potential of bulb-associated bacteria for biocontrol of hyacinth soft rot caused by Dickeya zeae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jafra, S.; Przysowa, J.; Gwizdek-Wisniewska, A.; Wolf, van der J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Dickeya zeae is a pectinolytic bacterium responsible for soft rot disease in flower bulb crops. In this study, the possibility of controlling soft rot disease in hyacinth by using antagonistic bacteria isolated from hyacinth bulbs was explored. Bacterial isolates with potential for biocontrol were

  8. The presence and survival of soft rot (Erwinia) in flower bulb production systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van J.; Vreeburg, P.J.M.; Leeuwen, van P.J.; Dees, R.H.L.

    2011-01-01

    Soft rot is causing increasing damage in the flower bulb industry. Bulbous ornamentals such as Hyacinthus, Dahlia, Iris, Muscari, Freesia and Zantedeschia can be infected. Soft rot in flower bulbs is mainly caused by Dickeya spp. (Dickeya spp.) and Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora

  9. Fungicide rotation schemes for managing Phytophthora fruit rot of watermelon across southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southeastern states produce about 50% of the watermelons in the United States (U.S.) where conditions are optimal for development of Phytophthora fruit rot prevail. Phytophthora fruit rot significantly limits watermelon production by causing serious yield losses to growers before and after harvest. ...

  10. Conversion of sorghum stover into animal feed with white-rot fungi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Treatment of crop residues with some species of white-rot fungi can enhance the nutritive value. After the fungal treatment of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) stover with two white-rot fungi in a solid state fermentation, the chemical composition and in vitro digestibility of the resultant substrate was determined. The results show a ...

  11. Interaction of Rhizoctonia solani and Rhizopus stolonifer Causing Root Rot of Sugar Beet

    Science.gov (United States)

    In recent years, growers in Michigan and other sugar beet production areas of the United States have reported increasing incidence of root rot with little or no crown or foliar symptoms in sugar beet with Rhizoctonia crown and root rot. In addition, Rhizoctonia-resistant beets have been reported wit...

  12. Conversion of sorghum stover into animal feed with white-rot fungi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-03-15

    Mar 15, 2010 ... white-rot fungi: Pleurotus ostreatus and Pleurotus ... the fungal treatment of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) stover with two white-rot fungi in a solid state ..... Rumen degradation and In vitro gas production parameters in some browse forages, grasses and maize stover from Kenya. J. Food Agric. Environ.

  13. The effect of long term storage on bacterial soft rot resistance in potato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial soft rot is a serious disease in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), causing rapid tuber tissue maceration and, consequently, marketable yield loss. Soft rot bacteria, especially Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum (Pbc), are favored by moist conditions, which are prevalent in large p...

  14. Copper tolerance of brown-rot fungi : time course of oxalic acid production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick Green; Carol A. Clausen

    2003-01-01

    The increase in the use of non-arsenical copper-based wood preservatives in response to environmental concerns has been accompanied by interest in copper-tolerant decay fungi. Oxalic acid production by brown-rot fungi has been proposed as one mechanism of copper tolerance. Fifteen brown-rot fungi representing the genera Postia, Wolfiporia, Meruliporia, Gloeophyllum,...

  15. Fungicides reduce Rhododendron root rot and mortality caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi, but not by P. plurivora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhododendron root rot, caused by several Phytophthora species, can cause devastating losses in nursery-grown plants. Most research on chemical control of root rot has focused on Phytophthora cinnamomi. However, it is unknown whether treatments recommended for P. cinnamomi are also effective for othe...

  16. Nonchemical, cultural management strategies to suppress phytophthora root rot in northern highbush blueberry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytophthora cinnamomi causes root rot of highbush blueberry and decreases plant growth, yield, and profitability for growers. Fungicides can suppress root rot, but cannot be used in certified organic production systems and fungicide resistance may develop. Alternative, non-chemical, cultural manag...

  17. Resistance to post-harvest microbial rot in yam: Integration of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Post-harvest microbial rot is an important disease that causes severe losses in yam (Dioscorea spp.) storage. Rot from microbial infection of healthy yam tubers reduces their table quality and renders them unappealing to consumers. A study was carried out at Bimbilla in the Nanumba North District of Ghana to evaluate ...

  18. Genetic diversity within and among populations of shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata Mill.) and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiqin Xu; C.G. Tauer; C. Dana Nelson

    2008-01-01

    Shortleaf pine (n=93) and loblolly pine (n=112) trees representing 22 seed sources or 16 physiographic populations were sampled from Southwide Southern Pine Seed Source Study plantings located in Oklahoma, Arkansas and Mississippi. The sampled trees were grown from shortleaf pine and loblolly pine seeds formed in 1951 and 1952, prior to the start of intensive forest...

  19. First report of in-vitro fludioxonil-resistant isolates of Fusarium spp. causing potato dry rot in Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusarium dry rot of potato (Solanum tuberosum) is a postharvest disease caused by several Fusarium species and is of worldwide importance. Measures for controlling dry rot in storage are limited. Dry rot has been managed primarily by reducing tuber bruising, providing conditions for rapid wound heal...

  20. Multiaged silviculture of ponderosa pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin L. O' Hara

    2005-01-01

    Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa P. & C. Lawson) is highly suitable for management using multiaged systems. This suitability is primarily the result of a frequent, low severity disturbance regime, but also because it naturally occurs at low densities and has a long history of management to promote multiple age classes. Several different stocking...

  1. Fusiform Rust of Southern Pines

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. R. Phelps; F. L. Czabator

    1978-01-01

    Fusiform rust, caused by the fungus Cronartium fusiforme Hedg. & Hunt ex Cumm., is distributed in the Southern United States from Maryland to Florida and west to Texas and southern Arkansas. Infections by the fungus, which develops at or near the point of infection, result in tapered, spindle-shaped swells, called galls, on branches and stems of pines. (see photo...

  2. Nutrient Management in Pine Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan E. Tiarks

    1999-01-01

    Coastal plain soils are naturally low in fertility and many pine stands will give an economic response to fertilization, especially phosphorus. Maintaining the nutrients that are on the site by limiting displacement of logging slash during and after the harvest can be important in maintaining the productivity of the site and reducing the amount of fertilizer required...

  3. National regeneration of shortleaf pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwin R. Lawson

    1986-01-01

    Natural regeneration with clearcutting, shelterwood, seed tree, and selection systems is a viable method for establishing and managing shortleaf pine stands. An adequate seed source, a suitable seedbed, control of competing vegetation, follow-up cultural treatments, and protection of reproduction are the primary prerequisites for establishing and maintaining natural...

  4. Moniliophthora roreri, causal agent of cacao frosty pod rot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Bryan A; Evans, Harry C; Phillips-Mora, Wilbert; Ali, Shahin S; Meinhardt, Lyndel W

    2017-12-01

    Taxonomy: Moniliophthora roreri (Cif.) H.C. Evans et al. ; Phylum Basidiomycota; Class Agaricomycetes; Order Agaricales; Family Marasmiaceae; Genus Moniliophthora. Biology: Moniliophthora roreri attacks Theobroma and Herrania species causing frosty pod rot. Theobroma cacao (cacao) is the host of major economic concern. Moniliophthora roreri is a hemibiotroph with a long biotrophic phase (45-90 days). Spore masses, of apparent asexual origin, are produced on the pod surface after initiation of the necrotrophic phase. Spores are spread by wind, rain and human activity. Symptoms of the biotrophic phase can include necrotic flecks and, in some cases, pod malformation, but pods otherwise remain asymptomatic. Relationship to Moniliophthora perniciosa: Moniliophthora roreri and Moniliophthora perniciosa, causal agent of witches' broom disease of cacao, are closely related. Their genomes are similar, including many of the genes they carry which are considered to be important in the disease process. Moniliophthora perniciosa, also a hemibiotroph, has a typical basidiomycete lifestyle and morphology, forming clamp connections and producing mushrooms. Basidiospores infect meristematic tissues including flower cushions, stem tips and pods. Moniliophthora roreri does not form clamp connections or mushrooms and infects pods only. Both pathogens are limited to the Western Hemisphere and are a threat to cacao production around the world. Agronomic importance: Disease losses caused by frosty pod rot can reach 90% and result in field abandonment. Moniliophthora roreri remains in the invasive phase in the Western Hemisphere, not having reached Brazil, some islands within the Caribbean and a few specific regions within otherwise invaded countries. The disease can be managed by a combination of cultural (for example, maintenance of tree height and removal of infected pods) and chemical methods. These methods benefit from regional application, but can be cost prohibitive. Breeding for

  5. Perfect Undetectable Acoustic Device from Fabry-Pérot Resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huanyang; Zhou, Yangyang; Zhou, Mengying; Xu, Lin; Liu, Qing Huo

    2018-02-01

    Transformation acoustics is a method to design novel acoustic devices, while the complexity of the material parameters hinders its progress. In this paper, we analytically present a three-dimensional perfect undetectable acoustic device from Fabry-Pérot resonances and confirm its functionality from Mie theory. Such a mechanism goes beyond the traditional transformation acoustics. In addition, such a reduced version can be realized by holey-structured metamaterials. Our theory paves a way to the implementation of three-dimensional transformation acoustic devices.

  6. Bacteriophages of Soft Rot Enterobacteriaceae-a minireview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czajkowski, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Soft rot Enterobacteriaceae (Pectobacterium spp. and Dickeya spp., formerly pectinolytic Erwinia spp.) are ubiquitous necrotrophic bacterial pathogens that infect a large number of different plant species worldwide, including economically important crops. Despite the fact that these bacteria have been studied for more than 50 years, little is known of their corresponding predators: bacteriophages, both lytic and lysogenic. The aim of this minireview is to critically summarize recent ecological, biological and molecular research on bacteriophages infecting Pectobacterium spp. and Dickeya spp. with the main focus on current and future perspectives in that field. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Serpula lacrymans, The Dry Rot Fungus and Tolerance Towards Copper-Based Wood Preservatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hastrup, Anne Christine Steenkjær; Jensen, Bo; Clausen, Carol

    2005-01-01

    -rot fungi is thought to be due in part to oxalic acid production and accumulation. Oxalic acid has been implicated in copper tolerance by the formation of copper oxalate crystals. Twelve isolates of the dry rot fungus, S. lacrymans and four other brown rot species were evaluated for weight loss on wood......Serpula lacrymans (Wulfen : Fries) Schröter, the dry rot fungus, is considered the most (Wulfen : Fries) Schröterthe dry rot fungus, is considered the most economically important wood decay fungus in temperate regions of the world i.e. northern Europe, Japan and Australia. Previously copper based...... wood preservatives were the most commonly used preservatives for pressure treatment of wood for building constructions. Because of a suspicion about tolerance toward copper components, a soil block test was undertaken to clarify the effect of two copper based preservatives, copper citrate and ACQ...

  8. Role of Rot in bacterial autolysis regulation of Staphylococcus aureus NCTC8325.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Xinmin; Xia, Rui; He, Nianan; Fang, Yuting

    2013-09-01

    Autolysis is an important process in cell wall turnover in Staphylococcus aureus, performed by several peptidoglycan hydrolases or so-called autolysins and controlled by many regulators. Rot is a global regulator that regulates numerous virulence genes, including genes encoding lipase, hemolysins, proteases and genes related to cell surface adhesion. The aim of our study was to determine whether Rot has the ability to regulate autolysis. We compared Triton-X-100-induced autolysis of S. aureus NCTC8325 and its rot knock-out mutant. We found that the rot mutant showed increased autolysis rates. By examining the transcript level of several autolysins and some known regulators responsible for regulating autolysis using real-time RT-PCR assays, we found that transcription of two autolysins (lytM, lytN) and one regulatory operon (lrgAB) was changed in the rot mutant. An in vitro approach was undertaken to determine which of these genes are directly controlled by Rot. Rot proteins were overproduced in Escherichia coli and purified. Gel mobility shift DNA binding assays were used and showed that in-vitro-purified Rot can directly bind to the promoter region of lytM, lytN, lrgA and lytS. We also tested biofilm formation of the rot mutant, and it showed enhancement in biofilm formation. Taken together, our results reveal that Rot affects autolysis by directly regulating autolysins LytM and LytN, and, via a regulatory system, LrgAB. Copyright © 2013 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Establishing Longleaf Pine Seedlings Under a Loblolly Pine Canopy (User’s Guide)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    longleaf seedlings under loblolly pine rather than longleaf pine presents distinct challenges. Loblolly trees produce abundant seeds that germinate and...Walker, J.L., and Tennant, C. 2011. Restoring longleaf pine ( Pinus palustris Mill.) in loblolly pine ( Pinus taeda L.) stands: Effects of restoration...Effects of canopy structure and cultural treatments on the survival and growth of Pinus palustris Mill. seedlings underplanted in Pinus taeda L

  10. Efficient xylose fermentation by the brown rot fungus Neolentinus lepideus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Kenji; Kanawaku, Ryuichi; Masumoto, Masaru; Yanase, Hideshi

    2012-02-10

    The efficient production of bioethanol on an industrial scale requires the use of renewable lignocellulosic biomass as a starting material. A limiting factor in developing efficient processes is identifying microorganisms that are able to effectively ferment xylose, the major pentose sugar found in hemicellulose, and break down carbohydrate polymers without pre-treatment steps. Here, a basidiomycete brown rot fungus was isolated as a new biocatalyst with unprecedented fermentability, as it was capable of converting not only the 6-carbon sugars constituting cellulose, but also the major 5-carbon sugar xylose in hemicelluloses, to ethanol. The fungus was identified as Neolentinus lepideus and was capable of assimilating and fermenting xylose to ethanol in yields of 0.30, 0.33, and 0.34 g of ethanol per g of xylose consumed under aerobic, oxygen-limited, and anaerobic conditions, respectively. A small amount of xylitol was detected as the major by-product of xylose metabolism. N. lepideus produced ethanol from glucose, mannose, galactose, cellobiose, maltose, and lactose with yields ranging from 0.34 to 0.38 g ethanol per g sugar consumed, and also exhibited relatively favorable conversion of non-pretreated starch, xylan, and wheat bran. These results suggest that N. lepideus is a promising candidate for cost-effective and environmentally friendly ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass. To our knowledge, this is the first report on efficient ethanol fermentation from various carbohydrates, including xylose, by a naturally occurring brown rot fungus. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Sclerotinia Rot on Basil Caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Sang Hahm

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available During growing season of 2011 to 2013, Sclerotinia rot symptoms consistently have been observed on basil in Yesan-gun, Chungcheongnam-do in Korea. The typical symptom formed initially brownish spot on leaf and stem, and then advancing margins, wilting the whole plant and blighting, eventually died. On the surface of diseased lesions was observed cottony, white, dense mat of mycelial growth, and sclerotia (30–100 µm diameter formed on stem and leaf. Morphological and cultural characteristic on potato dextrose agar, color of colony was white and colorless chocolate, sclerotium of irregular shape of the oval was black and 5–50 µm diameter in size. In pathogenicity test, necrosis and wilt of the inoculated stem were observed in all plants and the pathogen was reisolated from stems. On the basis of mycological characteristics, pathogenicity, and internal transcribed spacer rDNA sequence analysis, this fungus was identified as Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. This is the first report of Sclerotinia rot on basil caused by S. sclerotiorum in Korea.

  12. Shortleaf pine reproduction abundance and growth in pine-oak stands in the Missouri Ozarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizabeth M. Blizzard; Doyle Henken; John M. Kabrick; Daniel C. Dey; David R. Larsen; David Gwaze

    2007-01-01

    We conducted an operational study to evaluate effect of site preparation treatments on pine reproduction density and the impact of overstory basal area and understory density on pine reproduction height and basal diameter in pine-oak stands in the Missouri Ozarks. Stands were harvested to or below B-level stocking, but patchiness of the oak decline lead to some plots...

  13. Timber management guide for shortleaf pine and oak-pine types in Missouri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    K.A. Brinkman; N.F. Rogers

    1967-01-01

    Summarizes recommended management practices for the shortleaf pine and oak-pine types in Missouri. Describes sites and soils, and silvical characteristics of pine; discusses rotations, cutting cycles, stocking levels, growing space requirements, and regeneration techniques; and prescribes treatments for stands with specified characteristics to maximize returns from...

  14. Occurrence of shortleaf x loblolly pine hybrids in shortleaf pine orchards: Implications for ecosystem restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    John F. Stewart; Rodney Will; Barbara S. Crane; C. Dana Nelson

    2016-01-01

    Shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata Mill.) is an important conifer in much of the southeastern United States. However, the species and its associated ecosystems are in decline, and recent evidence about hybridization with loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) raises concerns that the species may be at risk of further losses due to introgression. Although shortleaf pine is not...

  15. Loblolly pine: the ecology and culture of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert P. Schultz

    1997-01-01

    Loblolly pine ranks as a highly valuable tree for its pulp, paper, and lumber products. In the South, loblolly is planted more than any other conifer. Loblolly Pine: The Ecology and Culture of Loblolly Pine (Pinus taeda L.) adds to the technical foundations laid by Ashe (1915) and Wahlenberg (1960). Agriculture Handbook 713 encompasses genetics, tree...

  16. Selection for resistance to white pine blister rust affects the abiotic stress tolerances of limber pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick J. Vogan; Anna W. Schoettle

    2015-01-01

    Limber pine (Pinus flexilis) mortality is increasing across the West as a result of the combined stresses of white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola; WPBR), mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae), and dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium cyanocarpum) in a changing climate. With the continued spread of WPBR, extensive mortality will continue with strong selection...

  17. Potential for long-term seed storage for ex situ genetic conservation of high elevation white pine species – whitebark pine and foxtail pine case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.A. Sniezko; A.J. Kegley

    2017-01-01

    Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) and foxtail pine (P. balfouriana) are conifers native to western North America. Due to several threats, including a non-native pathogen (Cronartium ribicola) and a changing climate, whitebark pine and foxtail pine are classified on the IUCN Red List as ‘endangered’ and ‘...

  18. Restoration planting options for limber pines impacted by mountain pine beetles and/or white pine blister rust in the Southern Rocky Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anne Marie Casper; William R. Jacobi; Anna W. Schoettle; Kelly S. Burns

    2010-01-01

    Limber Pine (Pinus flexilis) populations in the southern Rock Mountains are severely threatened by the combined impacts of mountain pine beetles and white pine blister rust. Limber pine’s critical role these high elevation ecosystems heightens the importance of mitigating impacts. To develop forest-scale planting methods six seedling planting trial sites were installed...

  19. Foliar fungi of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris)

    OpenAIRE

    Millberg, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) is an ecologically and economically important tree species in Fennoscandia. Scots pine needles host a variety of fungi, some with the potential to profoundly influence their host. These fungi can have beneficial or detrimental effects with important implications for both forest health and primary production. In this thesis, the foliar fungi of Scots pine needles were investigated with the aim of exploring spatial and temporal patterns, and development with needle...

  20. Bio-composites made from pine straw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng Piao; Todd F. Shupe; Chung Y. Hse; Jamie Tang

    2004-01-01

    Pine straw is renewable natural resource that is under-utilized. The objective of this study was to evaluate the physical and mechanical performances of pine straw composites. Three panel density levels (0.8, 0.9, 1.0 g/cm2) and two resin content levels (1% pMDI + 4% UF, 2% pMDI + 4% UF) were selected as treatments. For the pine-straw-bamboo-...

  1. Defoliation effects on enzyme activities of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Suillus granulatus in a Pinus contorta (lodgepole pine) stand in Yellowstone National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullings, Ken; Ishkhanova, Galina; Henson, Joan

    2008-11-01

    Ectomycorrhizal (EM) basidiomycete fungi are obligate mutualists of pines and hardwoods that receive fixed C from the host tree. Though they often share most recent common ancestors with wood-rotting fungi, it is unclear to what extent EM fungi retain the ability to express enzymes that break down woody substrates. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the dominant EM fungus in a pure pine system retains the ability to produce enzymes that break down woody substrates in a natural setting, and that this ability is inducible by reduction of host photosynthetic potential via partial defoliation. To achieve this, pines in replicate blocks were defoliated 50% by needle removal, and enzyme activities were measured in individual EM root tips that had been treated with antibiotics to prevent possible bacterial activity. Results indicate that the dominant EM fungal species (Suillus granulatus) expressed all enzymes tested (endocellulase D: -glucosidase, laccase, manganese peroxidase, lignin peroxidase, phosphatase and protease), and that activities of these enzymes increased significantly (P pine) has the potential to play a significant role in C, N and P cycling in this forested ecosystem. Therefore, many above-ground factors that reduce photosynthetic potential or divert fixed C from roots may have wide-reaching ecosystem effects.

  2. Effect of Environment and Sugar Beet Genotype on Root Rot Development and Pathogen Profile During Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebe, Sebastian; Varrelmann, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Storage rots represent an economically important factor impairing the storability of sugar beet by increasing sucrose losses and invert sugar content. Understanding the development of disease management strategies, knowledge about major storage pathogens, and factors influencing their occurrence is crucial. In comprehensive storage trials conducted under controlled conditions, the effects of environment and genotype on rot development and associated quality changes were investigated. Prevalent species involved in rot development were identified by a newly developed microarray. The strongest effect on rot development was assigned to environment factors followed by genotypic effects. Despite large variation in rot severity (sample range 0 to 84%), the spectrum of microorganisms colonizing sugar beet remained fairly constant across all treatments with dominant species belonging to the fungal genera Botrytis, Fusarium, and Penicillium. The intensity of microbial tissue necrotization was strongly correlated with sucrose losses (R² = 0.79 to 0.91) and invert sugar accumulation (R² = 0.91 to 0.95). A storage rot resistance bioassay was developed that could successfully reproduce the genotype ranking observed in storage trials. Quantification of fungal biomass indicates that genetic resistance is based on a quantitative mechanism. Further work is required to understand the large environmental influence on rot development in sugar beet.

  3. Simultaneous Detection of Brown Rot- and Soft Rot-Causing Bacterial Pathogens from Potato Tubers Through Multiplex PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, R K; Singh, Dinesh; Baranwal, V K

    2016-11-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum (Smith) Yabuuchi et al. and Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora (Jones) Bergey et al. (Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum) are the two major bacterial pathogens of potato causing brown rot (wilt) and soft rot diseases, respectively, in the field and during storage. Reliable and early detection of these pathogens are keys to avoid occurrence of these diseases in potato crops and reduce yield loss. In the present study, multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocol was developed for simultaneous detection of R. solanacearum and E. carotovora subsp. carotovora from potato tubers. A set of oligos targeting the pectatelyase (pel) gene of E. carotovora subsp. carotovora and the universal primers based on 16S r RNA gene of R. solanacearum were used. The standardized multiplex PCR protocol could detect R. solanacearum and E. carotovora subsp. carotovora up to 0.01 and 1.0 ng of genomic DNA, respectively. The protocol was further validated on 96 stored potato tuber samples, collected from different potato-growing states of India, viz. Uttarakhand, Odisha, Meghalaya and Delhi. 53.1 % tuber samples were positive for R. solanacearum, and 15.1 % of samples were positive for E. carotovora subsp. carotovora, and both the pathogens were positive in 26.0 % samples when BIO-PCR was used. This method offers sensitive, specific, reliable and fast detection of two major bacterial pathogens from potato tubers simultaneously, particularly pathogen-free seed certification in large scale.

  4. Distribution and prevalence of crown rot pathogens affecting wheat crops in southern Chile

    OpenAIRE

    Ernesto Moya-Elizondo; Nolberto Arismendi; María Paz Castro; Herman Doussoulin

    2015-01-01

    Crown rot pathogens are associated with higher losses for wheat crop farmers, but information about the distribution and prevalence of these pathogens in Chile is inadequate. Distribution and prevalence of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) crown rot pathogens were examined in a survey of 48 commercial fields from December 2011 to February 2012 in southern Chile. These fields were located between Collipulli (37°56'00" S; 72°26'39" W) and Purranque (40°50'30" S; 73°22'03" W). Severity of crown rot d...

  5. Neofusicoccum luteum associated with leaf necrosis and fruit rot of olives in New South Wales, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Sergeeva

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Neofusicoccum luteum is reported for the first time from olives (Olea europaea, causing fruit rot and leaf necrosis. Affected fruits initially became brown with pycnidia developing on the surface, later drying out and becoming mummified. The fungus was shown to be pathogenic on both fruits and leaves. The association of Botryosphaeriaceae with rotting olive fruits in Mediterranean regions and in New South Wales, Australia indicates that these fungi play a significant role in fruit rots of olives and deserve greater attention.

  6. Control of Ralstonia Solanacearum The Causal Agent of Brown Rot in Potato Using Essential Oils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salem, E.A.

    2011-01-01

    Five essential oils, namely peppermint (Mentha piperita L.), caraway (Carium carvum L.), fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill.), lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus Staph.) and thyme (Thymus vulgaris), were used separately against Ralstonia solanacearum; the causal agent of brown rot in potato. The most two effective oils (peppermint and thyme) were used in vitro and in vivo after testing their effects on potato tubers buds germination. Peppermint inhibited buds germination but thyme have no effects on buds germination. In vivo, the control of brown rot using thyme oil in glass house experiment reduced the percentage of brown rot infection to 30.6% and reduced the severity of disease from 5 to 3.

  7. Contrasting patterns of genetic diversity and population structure of Armillaria mellea sensu stricto in the eastern and western United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Kendra; Travadon, Renaud; Bruhn, Johann; Bergemann, Sarah E

    2010-07-01

    ABSTRACT Armillaria mellea infects hundreds of plant species in natural and managed ecosystems throughout the Northern hemisphere. Previously reported nuclear genetic divergence between eastern and western U.S. isolates is consistent with the disjunct range of A. mellea in North America, which is restricted mainly to both coasts of the United States. We investigated patterns of population structure and genetic diversity of the eastern (northern and southern Appalachians, Ozarks, and western Great Lakes) and western (Berkeley, Los Angeles, St. Helena, and San Jose, CA) regions of the United States. In total, 156 diploid isolates were genotyped using 12 microsatellite loci. Absence of genetic differentiation within either eastern subpopulations (theta(ST) = -0.002, P = 0.5 ) or western subpopulations (theta(ST) = 0.004, P = 0.3 ) suggests that spore dispersal within each region is sufficient to prevent geographic differentiation. In contrast to the western United States, our finding of more than one genetic cluster of isolates within the eastern United States (K = 3), revealed by Bayesian assignment of multilocus genotypes in STRUCTURE and confirmed by genetic multivariate analyses, suggests that eastern subpopulations are derived from multiple founder sources. The existence of amplifiable and nonamplifiable loci and contrasting patterns of genetic diversity between the two regions demonstrate that there are two geographically isolated, divergent genetic pools of A. mellea in the United States.

  8. Characterization of a novel xylanase from Armillaria gemina and its immobilization onto SiO2 nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhiman, Saurabh Sudha; Kalyani, Dayanand; Jagtap, Sujit Sadashiv; Haw, Jung-Rim; Kang, Yun Chan; Lee, Jung-Kul

    2013-02-01

    Enhanced catalytic activities of different lignocellulases were obtained from Armillaria gemina under statistically optimized parameters using a jar fermenter. This strain showed maximum xylanase, endoglucanase, cellobiohydrolase, and β-glucosidase activities of 1,270, 146, 34, and 15 U mL(-1), respectively. Purified A. gemina xylanase (AgXyl) has the highest catalytic efficiency (k (cat)/K (m) = 1,440 mg mL(-1) s(-1)) ever reported for any fungal xylanase, highlighting the significance of the current study. We covalently immobilized the crude xylanase preparation onto functionalized silicon oxide nanoparticles, achieving 117 % immobilization efficiency. Further immobilization caused a shift in the optimal pH and temperature, along with a fourfold improvement in the half-life of crude AgXyl. Immobilized AgXyl gave 37.8 % higher production of xylooligosaccharides compared to free enzyme. After 17 cycles, the immobilized enzyme retained 92 % of the original activity, demonstrating its potential for the synthesis of xylooligosaccharides in industrial applications.

  9. Influence of elevated CO2 concentrations on the growth of Armillaria ostoyae (Romagn. Herink rhizomorphs in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lech Paweł

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A comparative experiment was carried out in growth chambers to determine the effects of elevated CO2 concentrations (either 760 ppm or 1,140 ppm versus ambient CO2 conditions on the growth of Armillaria ostoyae (Romagn. Herink rhizomorphs, which is the infectious organ of a fungal pathogen affecting many forest trees. We found that one out of three isolates in the experiment differed significantly in rhizomorph production, which was measured as rhizomorph dry mass/100 days of growth. Rhizomorph production was also affected by the tree species used as a food source in the inoculum preparation, with beech wood being significantly different from oak and hazel. Under higher CO2 regimes the production of rhizomorphs was consistently lower for all three isolates compared to ambient CO2 concentrations. For one isolate (no. 11 the growth differences were significant between 380 ppm and both elevated CO2 concentrations (760 ppm and 1,140 ppm, while for the other two (no. 30 and 32 significance was observed only between 380 ppm and 760 ppm. No statistically significant differences have been noted between 760 ppm and 1,140 ppm CO2 for these two isolates. it was concluded that elevated concentrations of CO2 inhibited A. ostoyae rhizomorph growth and therefore have the potential to lessen the pathogenicity of the fungus.

  10. A reliable in vitro fruiting system for Armillaria mellea for evaluation of Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Kathryn L; Baumgartner, Kendra; Henricot, Béatrice; Bailey, Andy M; Foster, Gary D

    2015-10-01

    Armillaria mellea is a serious pathogen of horticultural and agricultural systems in Europe and North America. The lack of a reliable in vitro fruiting system for heterothallic A. mellea has hindered research and required dependence on intermittently available wild-collected basidiospores of endemic genotypes, necessitating the use of variable genetic material in transformation studies. Here we describe a reliable, reproducible in vitro fruiting method for heterothallic A. mellea from the western US. Isolates and growth conditions were evaluated to determine effective fruiting conditions. Following medium colonisation for 4 weeks, cultures were incubated under warm/bright conditions for 4-6 weeks before incubation in dim/cool conditions. Primordia emerged within 3-4 weeks following a temperature decrease and this was most efficient when coupled with a light reduction. Basidiocarps matured within 3-4 weeks and produced viable basidiospores. Agrobacterium tumefaciens and vectors were evaluated by transformation of in vitro-produced basidiospores and a versatile transformation vector was constructed to simplify promoter and marker gene exchange using homologous recombination in yeast. Fruiting bodies and viable basidiospores of A. mellea have been reliably produced in vitro which, coupled with the enhanced knowledge of suitable A. tumefaciens strains and vectors for transformation, will assist future genetic research into this important pathogen. Copyright © 2015 The British Mycological Society. All rights reserved.

  11. Armillaridin, a Honey Medicinal Mushroom, Armillaria mellea (Higher Basidiomycetes) Component, Inhibits Differentiation and Activation of Human Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tsang-Pai; Chen, Chien-Chih; Shiao, Pei-Yu; Shieh, Hui-Ru; Chen, Yu-Yawn; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Armillaridin (AM) is an aromatic ester compound isolated from honey medicinal mushroom, Armillaria mellea, which has anti-cancer potential. This study was designed to examine the effects of AM on differentiation and activation macrophages, the major ontogeny of innate immunity. Macrophages were derived from CD14+ monocytes which were sorted from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Cell viability was assessed by trypan blue exclusion test. Cells were stained with Liu's dye for observation of morphology. Expression of surface antigens was examined by flow cytometric analysis. Phagocytosis and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), as functional assays, were evaluated by counting engulfed yeasts and DCFH-DA reaction. The viability of macrophages was not significantly reduced by AM. AM at nontoxic concentrations markedly increased cytoplasmic vacuoles. The expression of surface CD14, CD16, CD36, and HLA-DR was suppressed. The phagocytosis function, but not ROS production, of macrophages was inhibited by AM. Armillaridin could inhibit the differentiation and activation of human macrophages. It may have potential to be developed as a biological response modifier for inflammatory diseases.

  12. Effect of submerged culture conditions on exopolysaccharides production by Armillaria luteo-virens Sacc QH and kinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, De Qin; Fu, Ming Liang; Chen, Qi He; Liu, Jing

    2011-01-01

    This work aimed to develop the submerged cultivation conditions for improved exopolysaccharides (EPS) production by Armillaria luteo-virens Sacc. The effects of culture temperature, aeration rate, inoculum level, initial pH, and additives on EPS formation and mycelial growth are investigated. The aeration rate, initial pH, and inoculum level significantly affected EPS production under the submerged cultivation. The developed conditions were as follows: cultivation temperature 23 °C, initial pH 5.0, aeration rate 0.5 vvm, 0.5% Tween 80, inoculum level 5% (v/v), and shaking speed 120 r/min. Under the developed conditions, the highest EPS production was 13.01 g/L at 5 days culture time. EPS production was examined in a 5 L bioreactor, and an unstructured kinetic model for EPS formation was well developed. The verified investigations in the large-scale cultivation system showed that the developed models are able to predict the submerged cultivation process of EPS formation. Current results revealed that the submerged cultivation conditions can be utilized to control EPS production, and the unstructured models developed are suitable for explaining EPS production by A. luteo-virens Sacc QH in a large-scale cultivation bioreactor.

  13. Mercury in fruiting bodies of dark honey fungus (Armillaria solidipes) and beneath substratum soils collected from spatially distant areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falandysz, Jerzy; Mazur, Aneta; Kojta, Anna K; Jarzyńska, Grażyna; Drewnowska, Małgorzata; Dryżałowska, Anna; Nnorom, Innocent C

    2013-03-15

    This paper reports data on bioconcentration potential and baseline mercury concentrations of fruiting bodies of dark honey fungus (Armillaria solidipes) Peck and soil substrate layer (0-10 cm) from 12 spatially distant sites across Poland. Mercury content of caps, stipes and soil samples were determined using validated analytical procedure including cold-vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy after thermal decomposition of the sample matrix and further amalgamation and desorption of mercury from gold wool. Mean mercury concentrations ranged from 20 ± 8 to 300 ± 70 ng g(-1) dry weight (dw) in caps, from 20 ± 6 to 160 ± 40 ng g(-1) dw in stipes, and in underlying soil were from 20 ± 2 to 100 ± 130 ng g(-1) dw. The results showed that stipes mercury concentrations were 1.1- to 1.7-fold lower than those of caps. All caps and the majority of stipes were characterized by bioconcentration factor values > 1, indicating that dark honey fungus can be characterized as a moderate mercury accumulator. Occasional or relatively frequent eating of meals including caps of dark honey fungus is considered safe in view of the low total mercury content, and the mercury intake rates are below the current reference dose and provisionally tolerable weekly intake limits for this hazardous metal. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Genomic and proteomic dissection of the ubiquitous plant pathogen, Armillaria mellea: toward a new infection model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Cassandra; Keane, Thomas M; Turner, Daniel J; O'Keeffe, Grainne; Fitzpatrick, David A; Doyle, Sean

    2013-06-07

    Armillaria mellea is a major plant pathogen. Yet, no large-scale "-omics" data are available to enable new studies, and limited experimental models are available to investigate basidiomycete pathogenicity. Here we reveal that the A. mellea genome comprises 58.35 Mb, contains 14473 gene models, of average length 1575 bp (4.72 introns/gene). Tandem mass spectrometry identified 921 mycelial (n = 629 unique) and secreted (n = 183 unique) proteins. Almost 100 mycelial proteins were either species-specific or previously unidentified at the protein level. A number of proteins (n = 111) was detected in both mycelia and culture supernatant extracts. Signal sequence occurrence was 4-fold greater for secreted (50.2%) compared to mycelial (12%) proteins. Analyses revealed a rich reservoir of carbohydrate degrading enzymes, laccases, and lignin peroxidases in the A. mellea proteome, reminiscent of both basidiomycete and ascomycete glycodegradative arsenals. We discovered that A. mellea exhibits a specific killing effect against Candida albicans during coculture. Proteomic investigation of this interaction revealed the unique expression of defensive and potentially offensive A. mellea proteins (n = 30). Overall, our data reveal new insights into the origin of basidiomycete virulence and we present a new model system for further studies aimed at deciphering fungal pathogenic mechanisms.

  15. Heterologous expression of peptidyl-Lys metallopeptidase of Armillaria mellea and mutagenic analysis of the recombinant peptidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ødum, Anders S R; Østergaard, Søren; Nørby, Inga; Meldal, Morten; Olesen, Kjeld

    2016-04-01

    A method to express, purify and modify the Peptidyl-Lys metallopeptidase (LysN) ofArmillaria melleainPichia pastoriswas developed to enable functional studies of the protease. Based on prior work, we propose a mechanism of action of LysN. Catalytic residues were investigated by site-directed mutagenesis. As anticipated, these mutations resulted in significantly reduced catalytic rates. Additionally, based on molecular modelling eleven mutants were designed to have altered substrate specificity. The S1' binding pocket of LysN is quite narrow and lined with negative charge to specifically accommodate lysine. To allow for arginine specificity in S1', it was proposed to extend the S1' binding pocket by mutagenesis, however the resulting mutant did not show any activity with arginine in P1'. Two mutants, A101D and T105D, showed increased specificity towards arginine in subsites S2'-S4' compared to the wild type protease. We speculate that the increased specificity to result from the additional negative charge which attract and interact with positively charged residues better than the wild type. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterization of a novel endo-β-1,4-glucanase from Armillaria gemina and its application in biomass hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagtap, Sujit Sadashiv; Dhiman, Saurabh Sudha; Kim, Tae-Su; Kim, In-Won; Lee, Jung-Kul

    2014-01-01

    A novel endo-β-1,4-glucanase (EG)-producing strain was isolated and identified as Armillaria gemina KJS114 based on its morphology and internal transcribed spacer rDNA gene sequence. A. gemina EG (AgEG) was purified using a single-step purification by gel filtration. The relative molecular mass of AgEG by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was 65 kDa and by size exclusion chromatography was 66 kDa, indicating that the enzyme is a monomer in solution. The pH and temperature optima for hydrolysis were 5.0 and 60 °C, respectively. Purified AgEG had the highest catalytic efficiency with carboxymethylcellulose (k(cat)/K(m) = 3,590 mg mL⁻¹ s⁻¹) unlike that reported for any fungal EG, highlighting the significance of the current study. The amino acid sequence of AgEG showed homology with hydrolases from the glycoside hydrolase family 61. The addition of AgEG to a Populus nigra hydrolysate reaction containing a commercial cellulase mixture (Celluclast 1.5L and Novozyme 188) showed a stimulatory effect on reducing sugar production. AgEG is a good candidate for applications that convert lignocellulosic biomass to biofuels and chemicals.

  17. Plasmonic coaxial Fabry-Pérot nanocavity color filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, G. Y.; Leong, E. S. P.; Danner, A. J.; Teng, J. H.

    2010-08-01

    Plamonic coaxial structures have drawn considerable attetion recently because of their unique properties. They exhibit different mechanisms of extraordinary optical transmission observed from subwavelength holes and they can support localized Fabry-Pérot plasmon modes. In this work, we experimentally demonstrate color filters based on coaxial structures fabricated in optically thick metallic films. Using nanogaps with different apertures from 160 nm down to only 40 nm, we show varying color outputs when the annular aperture arrays are illuminated with a broadband light source. Effective color-filter function is demonstrated in the optical regime. Different color outputs are observed and optical spectra are measured. In such structures, it is the propagating mode playing an important role rather than the evanescent. Resonances depend strongly on ring apertures, enabling devices with tunability of output colors using simple geometry control.

  18. Dynamics of whlte pine in New England

    Science.gov (United States)

    William B. Leak; J.B. Cullen; Thomas S. Frieswyk

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of growth, regeneration, and quality changes for white pine between the 1970's and 1980's in the six-state New England region. Growth rates seemed comparable among ail states except Rhode Island, where the percentage of growth (1.71%) seemed low. Over all states, the proportion of acreage in seedling/sapling white pine stands averaged too low (8%) to...

  19. Risk Assessment for the Southern Pine Beetle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew Birt

    2011-01-01

    The southern pine beetle (SPB) causes significant damage (tree mortality) to pine forests. Although this tree mortality has characteristic temporal and spatial patterns, the precise location and timing of damage is to some extent unpredictable. Consequently, although forest managers are able to identify stands that are predisposed to SPB damage, they are unable to...

  20. Diprionidae sawflies on lodgepole and ponderosa pines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eight species of Diprionidae feed on lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) and ponderosa pine (P. ponderosa) in western United States: Neodiprion burkei Middleton, N. annulus contortae Ross, N. autumnalis Smith, N. fulviceps (Cresson), N. gillettei (Rohwer), N. mundus Rohwer, N. ventralis Ross, and Zadi...

  1. Insects in IBL-4 pine weevil traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    I. Skrzecz

    2003-01-01

    Pipe traps (IBL-4) are used in Polish coniferous plantations to monitor and control the pine weevil (Hylobius abietis L.). This study was conducted in a one-year old pine plantation established on a reforested clear-cut area in order to evaluate the impact of these traps on non-target insects. Evaluation of the catches indicated that species of

  2. Sequence of the Sugar Pine Megagenome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristian A. Stevens; Jill L. Wegrzyn; Aleksey Zimin; Daniela Puiu; Marc Crepeau; Charis Cardeno; Robin Paul; Daniel Gonzalez-Ibeas; Maxim Koriabine; Ann E. Holtz-Morris; Pedro J. Martínez-García; Uzay U. Sezen; Guillaume Marçais; Kathie Jermstad; Patrick E. McGuire; Carol A. Loopstra; John M. Davis; Andrew Eckert; Pieter de Jong; James A. Yorke; Steven L. Salzberg; David B. Neale; Charles H. Langley

    2016-01-01

    Until very recently, complete characterization of the megagenomes of conifers has remained elusive. The diploid genome of sugar pine (Pinus lambertiana Dougl.) has a highly repetitive, 31 billion bp genome. It is the largest genome sequenced and assembled to date, and the first from the subgenus Strobus, or white pines, a group...

  3. High elevation white pines educational website

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anna W. Schoettle; Michele Laskowski

    2011-01-01

    The high elevation five-needle white pines are facing numerous challenges ranging from climate change to invasion by a non-native pathogen to escalation of pest outbreaks. This website (http://www.fs.fed.us/rm/highelevationwhitepines/) serves as a primer for managers and the public on the high elevation North American five-needle pines. It presents information on each...

  4. Longleaf Pine: Natural Regeneration and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    William D. Boyer

    1999-01-01

    Longleaf pine has long been recognized as a high-quality timber tree providing a number of valuable products. It is a versatile species with characteristics allowing the use of several silvicultural options. Both natural and artificial regeneration of longleaf pine are now practical management options. Natural regeneration is a lowcost alternative whenever sufficient...

  5. Regional Longleaf Pine (Pinus palustris) Natural Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    William D. Boyer

    1998-01-01

    Duration: 1968-present Objective: Test the shelterwood system of longleaf pine natural regeneration. Methods: Longleaf pine natural regeneration tests were established from 1966 through 1970 at ten locations in seven states from North Carolina to Louisiana. One of these was established on a 50-acre flatwoods site on Eglin AFB in 1968. Regeneration was initially...

  6. Shortleaf Pine Seed Production in the Piedmont

    Science.gov (United States)

    David L. Bramlett

    1965-01-01

    Shortleaf pine occupies millions of acres of commercial forest land in the Southeastern United States and is one of the preferred pine species throughout much of its range. Natural regeneration of this species after harvest, however, is a major problem for forest managers. Adequate seed production is the first requirement of successful natural regeneration, and annual...

  7. Regenerating the Natural Longleaf Pine Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    William D. Boyer

    1979-01-01

    Natural regeneration by the shldterwood system is a reliable, low-cost alternative for existing longleaf pine (Pine palustris Mill.) forests. The system is well suited to the nautral attributes and requirements of the species. It may be attractive to landownders wishing to retain a natural forest and aboid high costs of site preparation and...

  8. State of pine decline in the southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lori Eckhardt; Mary Anne Sword Sayer; Don Imm

    2010-01-01

    Pine decline is an emerging forest health issue in the southeastern United States. Observations suggest pine decline is caused by environmental stress arising from competition, weather, insects and fungi, anthropogenic disturbances, and previous management. The problem is most severe for loblolly pine on sites that historically supported longleaf pine, are highly...

  9. Biogeography and diversity of pines in the Madrean Archipelago

    Science.gov (United States)

    George M. Ferguson; Aaron D. Flesch; Thomas R. Van Devender

    2013-01-01

    Pines are important dominants in pine-oak, pine and mixed-conifer forests across the Colorado Plateau, southern Rocky Mountains, Sierra Madre Occidental, and in the intervening Sky Islands of the United States-Mexico borderlands. All 17 native species of pines in the Sky Islands region or their adjacent mountain mainlands reach the northern or southern margins of their...

  10. Length Research Paper The effects of the pine processionary moth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The pine processionary moth (PPM), causing significant damage on pine stands in Turkey, affects mainly crimean pine stands within the Ulus vicinity. To determine the damage, 20 sample plots of second site class crimean pine stands were measured; 10 of which were taken as the control sample and 10 of which were ...

  11. Evolutionary relationships of Slash Pine ( Pinus elliottii ) with its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    llozymes in bud tissue and monoterpene contents in xylem oleoresin of slash pine (Pinus elliottii) were analyzed from populations across the natural distribution, as well as those from other species in the AUSTRALES pines. Allozyme diversity measures of slash pine were similar to those found in other southern pines.

  12. Western yellow pine in Arizona and New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore S. Woolsey

    1911-01-01

    Western yellow pine is to the Southwest what white pine is to the Northeast, or longleaf pine to the Southeast. The commercial forests of Arizona and New Mexico are three-fourths western yellow pine, which furnishes by far the greater part of the lumber used locally as well as that shipped to outside markets. To describe the characteristics of the species and to...

  13. White pine blister rust resistance research in Minnesota and Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew David; Paul Berrang; Carrie Pike

    2012-01-01

    The exotic fungus Cronartium ribicola causes the disease white pine blister rust on five-needled pines throughout North America. Although the effects of this disease are perhaps better known on pines in the western portion of the continent, the disease has also impacted regeneration and growth of eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L. ...

  14. White pine blister rust in the interior Mountain West

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly Burns; Jim Blodgett; Dave Conklin; Brian Geils; Jim Hoffman; Marcus Jackson; William Jacobi; Holly Kearns; Anna Schoettle

    2010-01-01

    White pine blister rust is an exotic, invasive disease of white, stone, and foxtail pines (also referred to as white pines or five-needle pines) in the genus Pinus and subgenus Strobus (Price and others 1998). Cronartium ribicola, the fungus that causes WPBR, requires an alternate host - currants and gooseberries in the genus Ribes and species of Pedicularis...

  15. Stem base rot of winter wheat by Fusarium spp. - causes and effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Narkiewicz-Jodko

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was to determine the influence of weather conditions and a degree of weed infestation on the incidence of stem bases rot (Fusarium spp. of winter wheat cultivars as well as their yield. The winter wheat cultivars (Kobra, Korweta, Mikon, Zyta were investigated (2000-2002 in the field where the following herbicides: Apyros 75 WG + Atpolan, Affinity 50,75 WG, Attribut 70 WG were applied. It has been shown the occurrence of stem base rot (Fusarium spp. depended mainly on weather conditions. The application of the herbicides improved the plant health. The stem base rot on winter wheat was caused by Fusarium spp., specially F. culmorum. The decrease in winter wheat yield depended on weather conditions, weed infestation and the occurrence of stem base rot (Fusarium spp..

  16. CHARACTERIZATION OF WOOD DECAY BY ROT FUNGI USING COLORIMETRY AND INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mírian de Almeida Costa

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Wood samples of marupá (Simarouba amara and andiroba (Carapa guianenis were submitted to Trametes versicolor (white rot and Gloeophylum trabeum (brown rot fungi attack. Colorimetry was used to determine the color of the wood before and after wood decaying fungi. To evaluate the changes in chemical compounds levels in the wood samples, the diffuse reflectance medium infrared spectroscopy was used. Both wood were non resistant against white rot fungus, while with brown rot attack andiroba was resistant and marupá was not. After Gloeophyllum trabeum attack both woods changed to a darken color, and after Trametes versicolor attack andiroba changed to a lighter color and marupá darkened slightly, The analysis showed a reduction in the peak intensity of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin, for both species, after Trametes versicolor attack and a reduction in the peak intensity of cellulose after Gloeophyllum trabeum attack.

  17. Efficacy of four plant extracts in the control of root rot disease of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Garcinia cola) and neem (Azadirachta indica) extracts in the control of root rot of cowpea caused by Pythium aphanidermatum was carried out in vitro and in the field (in vivo). They were evaluated for their antifungal activity over P.

  18. Biodegradation of hazardous waste using white rot fungus: Project planning and concept development document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luey, J.; Brouns, T.M.; Elliott, M.L.

    1990-11-01

    The white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium has been shown to effectively degrade pollutants such as trichlorophenol, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dioxins and other halogenated aromatic compounds. These refractory organic compounds and many others have been identified in the tank waste, groundwater and soil of various US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The treatment of these refractory organic compounds has been identified as a high priority for DOE's Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation (RDDT ampersand E) waste treatment programs. Unlike many bacteria, the white rot fungus P. chrysosporium is capable of degrading these types of refractory organics and may be valuable for the treatment of wastes containing multiple pollutants. The objectives of this project are to identify DOE waste problems amenable to white rot fungus treatment and to develop and demonstrate white rot fungus treatment process for these hazardous organic compounds. 32 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs

  19. First Report of Postharvest Gray Mold Rot on Carrot Caused by Botrytis cinerea in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Aktaruzzaman

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In February 2014, gray mold rotting symptoms were observed in carrots in cold storage at Gangneung, Gangwon province, Korea. The typical symptom of gray mold rot showed abundant blackish gray mycelia and conidia was observed on the infected root. The pathogen was isolated from infected root and cultured on PDA for further fungal morphological observation and confirming its pathogenicity according to Koch’s postulates. Results of morphological data, pathogenicity test and rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS 1 and 4 sequence showed that the postharvest gray mold rot of carrot was caused by Botyrtis cinerea. This is the first report of postharvest gray mold rot on carrot in Korea.

  20. Zwalczanie zgnilizny powodowanej przez grzyby z rodzaju Penicillium [Control of Penicillium apple rot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Borecka

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Control of Pezicula spp. fungi reduced Penicillium apple rot. The Penicillium apple rot process began slowly under the modified atmosphere of 5% CO2 and 3% O2. The lower concentration of Benlate – 0.05% did not influence this fungicide's effectiveness, The lower concentration– 0.05% of Topsin M decreased the effectiveness of this fungicide. The resistant strains of Penicillium spp. to benzimidazole fungicides under laboratory conditions were obtained.

  1. Molecular diagnosis of Phytophthora cinnamomi associated with root rot in avocado producing areas of Ecuador

    OpenAIRE

    Diana Elizabeth Toapanta-Gallegos; Luis Eduardo Morillo-Velastegui; William Fernando Viera-Arroyo

    2017-01-01

    One of the most damaging diseases in cultivation of avocado (Persea americana Mill.) is root rot associated with Phytophthora cinnamomi Rands. This disease causes progressive wilt and even death of the tree. The objective of this study was to identify the presence of P. cinnamomi in two productive areas of avocado in Ecuador using the molecular technique PCR-RFLP. Tree root samples were obtained with root rot symptoms in the production areas,...

  2. Distribution and prevalence of crown rot pathogens affecting wheat crops in southern Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Moya-Elizondo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Crown rot pathogens are associated with higher losses for wheat crop farmers, but information about the distribution and prevalence of these pathogens in Chile is inadequate. Distribution and prevalence of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. crown rot pathogens were examined in a survey of 48 commercial fields from December 2011 to February 2012 in southern Chile. These fields were located between Collipulli (37°56'00" S; 72°26'39" W and Purranque (40°50'30" S; 73°22'03" W. Severity of crown rot disease was determined through visual assessment of the first internode of 20 tillers obtained from each field. Incidence of crown rot pathogens per field was determined by plating the 20 tillers on Petri plates with 20% potato dextrose agar amended with lactic acid (aPDA medium. Resulting fungal colonies from monoxenic culture were identified by morphological or molecular-assisted identification. Severity of crown rot varied between 11.3% and 80% for individual fields. Culture plate analysis showed 72.2% of stems were infected with some fungus. Fusarium avenaceum, F. graminearum, and F. culmorum, pathogens associated with Fusarium crown rot disease were isolated from 13.5% of tillers. Gaeumannomyces graminis, causal agent of take-all disease in cereals, was isolated from 11.1% of culms. Phaeosphaeria sp., an endophyte and possibly a non-pathogenic fungus, was isolated from 13.9% of tillers. Pathogenic fungi such as Rhizoctonia spp. and Microdochium nivale, other saprophyte, and several unidentified non-sporulating fungi were isolated at frequencies lower than 3% of the total. Fusarium crown rot and take-all were the most prevalent and distributed crown rot diseases present in wheat crops in southern Chile.

  3. Thermal control of some post-harvest rot pathogens of Irish potato (solanum tuberosum l.)

    OpenAIRE

    Salami Olusola Abiodun; Popoola Omololu Olumide

    2007-01-01

    Thermal control effect on the incidence of some post-harvest rot pathogens of Solanum tuberosum (potato) was investigated in this study. Three cultivars of potato tuber whose local names are, Patiska, Mai Bawondoya and Nicola were used for the study. Five pathogenic fungi viz: Botryodiplodia theobromae, Fusarium redolens, Fusarium oxysporum, Penicillium sp. and Rhizopus oryzae associated with post harvest storage rot of root-tubers, were isolated from diseased potatoes. Among the three specie...

  4. First Report of Sclerotium Rot on Cymbidium Orchids Caused by Sclerotium rolfsii in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong-Chan; Lee, Jung-Sup; Soh, Jae-Woo; Kim, Su

    2012-01-01

    Sclerotium rot was found on Cymbidium orchids at Seosan-si, Chungcheongnam-do, Korea, in July, 2010. Symptoms occurred on low leaves, which turned yellowish, after which the entire plant wilted. Severely infected plants were blighted and eventually died. White mycelial mats and sclerotia appeared on pseudobulbs. Based on the mycological characteristics and pathogenicity, the causal fungus was identified as Sclerotium rolfsii. This is the first report of new Sclerotium rot on Cymbidium spp. caused by S. rolfsii in Korea. PMID:23323053

  5. Identification of Quorum Quenching Bacteria and Its Biocontrol Potential Against Soft Rot Disease Bacteria, Dickeya Dadantii

    OpenAIRE

    Khoiri, Syaiful; Damayanti, Tri Asmira; Giyanto, Giyanto

    2017-01-01

    Dickeya dadantii is one of newly found bacteria causing soft rot on orchids in Indonesia. Infected plants showed severe rot rapidly only in few days. An effort to control the bacteria was conducted by utilizing selected quorum quenching (QQ) inducer bacteria which produce AHL-lactonase by aiiA gene. The aims of this research were to screen and identify of quorum quenching bacteria, and also assayed their biocontrol potential ability against D. dadantii in laboratory. The screening of QQ bacte...

  6. No Reported Species, Botrytis aclada Causing Gray Mold Neck Rot Disease on Onion Bulbs in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Sun–Kyoung; Lee, Seung–Yeol; Back, Chang–Gi; Kang, In–Kyu; Lee, Hyang–Burm; Jung, Hee-Young; Ohga, Shoji; Oga, Shoji

    2016-01-01

    Gray mold neck rot was observed on onion bulbs (Allium cepa L.) in low–temperature warehouses in Changnyeong–gun, Korea. The causative pathogen was isolated from rotted onion bulb lesions and identified as Botrytis aclada based on morphological and culture characteristics, the sequences of three nuclear genes (G3PDH, HSP60, and RPB2), and polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR–RFLP) for Botrytis spp. identification. Although onion gray mold disease caused by B...

  7. First Report of Postharvest Gray Mold Rot on Carrot Caused by Botrytis cinerea in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Md. Aktaruzzaman; Joon-Young Kim; Sheng-Jun Xu; Byung-Sup Kim

    2014-01-01

    In February 2014, gray mold rotting symptoms were observed in carrots in cold storage at Gangneung, Gangwon province, Korea. The typical symptom of gray mold rot showed abundant blackish gray mycelia and conidia was observed on the infected root. The pathogen was isolated from infected root and cultured on PDA for further fungal morphological observation and confirming its pathogenicity according to Koch’s postulates. Results of morphological data, pathogenicity test and rDNA internal transcr...

  8. Effectiveness of Neutral Electrolyzed Water on Incidence of Fungal Rot on Tomato Fruits ( Solanum lycopersicum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vásquez-López, Alfonso; Villarreal-Barajas, Tania; Rodríguez-Ortiz, Gerardo

    2016-10-01

    We assessed the effect of neutral electrolyzed water (NEW) on the incidence of rot on tomato ( Solanum lycopersicum L.) fruits inoculated with Fusarium oxysporum , Galactomyces geotrichum , and Alternaria sp. at sites with lesions. The inoculated fruits were treated with NEW at 10, 30, and 60 mg liter -1 active chlorine, with copper oxychloride fungicide, and with sterile distilled water (control) for 3, 5, and 10 min. In the experiment with F. oxysporum , 50 to 80% of the control fruits and 50 to 60% of the fruits treated with the fungicide exhibited symptoms of rot at the inoculated sites. The lowest incidence recorded was 30% for fruits treated with NEW at 60 mg liter -1 active chlorine with an immersion time of 5 min. In the experiment with G. geotrichum , incidence of rot on control fruits was 70 to 90%, and for treatment with fungicide rot incidence was 50 to 90%. NEW at 60 mg liter -1 active chlorine significantly reduced incidence of symptomatic fruit: only 30% of the inoculated fruits washed for 5 min had damage from rot. In the experiment with Alternaria sp., 60 to 90% of the fruits in the control group and 60 to 70% of the fruits in the fungicide group were symptomatic. The lowest incidence was recorded for the treatment in which the fruits were submerged in NEW with 60 mg liter -1 active chlorine for 3 min. In this group, 40 to 50% of the fruits exhibited symptoms of rot. These results were obtained 8 days after inoculation. NEW, with 60 mg liter -1 active chlorine, significantly reduced incidence of rot symptoms on fruits inoculated with one of the experimental fungi relative to the control (P ≤ 0.05). NEW at 60 mg liter -1 is effective in the control of fungal rot in tomatoes.

  9. Zwalczanie zgnilizny powodowanej przez grzyby z rodzaju Penicillium [Control of Penicillium apple rot

    OpenAIRE

    H. Borecka

    2015-01-01

    Control of Pezicula spp. fungi reduced Penicillium apple rot. The Penicillium apple rot process began slowly under the modified atmosphere of 5% CO2 and 3% O2. The lower concentration of Benlate – 0.05% did not influence this fungicide's effectiveness, The lower concentration– 0.05% of Topsin M decreased the effectiveness of this fungicide. The resistant strains of Penicillium spp. to benzimidazole fungicides under laboratory conditions were obtained.

  10. Histological observations on needle colonization by Cronartium ribicola in susceptible and resistant seedlings of whitebark pine and limber pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey Stone; Anna Schoettle; Richard Sniezko; Angelia Kegley

    2011-01-01

    Resistance to white pine blister rust based on a hypersensitive response (HR) that is conferred by a dominant gene has been identified as functioning in needles of blister rust-resistant families of sugar pine, western white pine and southwestern white pine. The typical HR response displays a characteristic local necrosis at the site of infection in the needles during...

  11. Hybridization in naturally regenerated shortleaf pine as affected by the distance to nearby artificially regenerated stands of loblolly pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    John F. Stewart; Charles G. Tauer; James M. Guldin; C. Dana Nelson

    2013-01-01

    The natural range of shortleaf pine encompasses 22 states from New York to Texas, second only to eastern white pine in the eastern United States. It is a species of minor and varying occurrence in most of these states usually found in association with other pines, but it is the only naturally occurring pine in the northwestern part of its range in Oklahoma, Arkansas,...

  12. Natural hybridization within seed sources of shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata Mill.) and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiqin Xu; C.G. Tauer; C. Dana Nelson

    2008-01-01

    Shortleaf and loblolly pine trees (n=93 and 102, respectively) from 22 seed sources of the Southwide Southern Pine Seed Source Study plantings or equivalent origin were evaluated for amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) variation. These sampled trees represent shortleaf pine and loblolly pine, as they existed across their native geographic ranges before...

  13. Hybridization Leads to Loss of Genetic Integrity in Shortleaf Pine: Unexpected Consequences of Pine Management and Fire Suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles G. Tauer; John F. Stewart; Rodney E. Will; Curtis J. Lilly; James M. Guldin; C. Dana Nelson

    2012-01-01

    Hybridization between shortleaf pine and loblolly pine is causing loss of genetic integrity (the tendency of a population to maintain its genotypes over generations) in shortleaf pine, a species already exhibiting dramatic declines due to land-use changes. Recent findings indicate hybridization has increased in shortleaf pine stands from 3% during the 1950s to 45% for...

  14. Root rot diseases of sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L as affected by defloliation intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karadimos Dimitros A.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the effect of sugar beet re-growth after water stress defoliation on root rots of three cultivars (Europa, Rival Corsica, which were spring sown in Thessaly, central Greece, for two growing seasons (2003-04. At the beginning of July, sugar beets were subjected to water deficit with irrigation withholding. A month later, three defoliation levels (control - C, moderate - MD, severe - SD and irrigation were applied. Thus, sugar beets were forced to re-grow and three harvests (15, 30 and 40 days after defoliation - DAD were conducted. Rotted roots per hectare were counted and pathogens were identified. Data were analyzed as a four-factor randomized complete block design with years, defoliation levels, sampling times and cultivars as main factors. The number of rotted roots was increased with the defoliation level and was significantly higher for SD sugar beets (3748 roots ha–1. No significant differences were found between C and MD treatments (1543 and 2116 roots ha–1, respectively. Rival was the most susceptible cultivar to root rots. Sugar beets were more susceptible to rotting 15 and 40 DAD (2778 and 2998 roots ha–1. The causal agents of root rots were the fungi, Fusarium spp., Rhizopus stolonifer, Macrophomina phaseolina and Rhizoctonia solani.

  15. Phylogenetics of Lophodermium from pine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-García, Sol; Gernandt, David S; Stone, Jeffrey K; Johnston, Peter R; Chapela, Ignacio H; Salas-Lizana, Rodolfo; Alvarez-Buylla, Elena R

    2003-01-01

    Lophodermium comprises ascomycetous fungi that are both needle-cast pathogens and asymptomatic endophytes on a diversity of plant hosts. It is distinguished from other genera in the family Rhytismataceae by its filiform ascospores and ascocarps that open by a longitudinal slit. Nucleotide sequences of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of nuclear ribosomal DNA were used to infer phylogenetic relationships within Lophodermium. Twenty-nine sequences from approximately 11 species of Lophodermium were analyzed together with eight sequences from isolates thought to represent six other genera of Rhytismataceae: Elytroderma, Lirula, Meloderma, Terriera, Tryblidiopsis and Colpoma. Two putative Meloderma desmazieresii isolates occurred within the Lophodermium clade but separate from one another, one grouped with L. indianum and the other with L. nitens. An isolate of Elytroderma deformans also occurred within the Lophodermium clade but on a solitary branch. The occurrence of these genera within the Lophodermium clade might be due to problems in generic concepts in Rhytismataceae, such as emphasis on spore morphology to delimit genera, to difficulty of isolating Rhytismataceae needle pathogens from material that also is colonized by Lophodermium or to a combination of both factors. We also evaluated the congruence of host distribution and several morphological characters on the ITS phylogeny. Lophodermium species from pine hosts formed a monophyletic sister group to Lophodermium species from more distant hosts from the southern hemisphere, but not to L. piceae from Picea. The ITS topology indicated that Lophodermium does not show strict cospeciation with pines at deeper branches, although several closely related isolates have closely related hosts. Pathogenic species occupy derived positions in the pine clade, suggesting that pathogenicity has evolved from endophytism. A new combination is proposed, Terriera minor (Tehon) P.R. Johnst.

  16. The effect of CaCl2 on growth rate, wood decay and oxalic acid accumulation in Serpula lacrymans and related brown-rot fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hastrup, Anne Christine Steenkjær; Jensen, Bo; Clausen, Carol. A.

    2006-01-01

    to be significantly inhibited by treatment with CaCl2 in the presence of copper. In addition, calcium showed no effect on two strains of S. lacrymans and one Serpula himantioides strain in non-copper-treated SYP wood blocks. The growth rate of S. lacrymans was not affected on malt extract agar containing CaCl2......The dry rot fungus, Serpula lacrymans, is one of the most destructive copper-tolerant fungi causing timber decay in buildings in temperate regions. Calcium and oxalic acid have been shown to play important roles in the mechanism of wood decay. The effect of calcium on growth and decay was evaluated...... for 12 strains of S. lacrymans and compared to five brown-rot fungi. This was done by treating copper citrate (CC)-treated Southern yellow pine (SYP) wood with a CaCl2 solution and estimating the decay rate and amount of soluble oxalic acid in an ASTM soil block test. Decay by S. lacrymans was found...

  17. Cloning and characterization of an Armillaria gallica cDNA encoding protoilludene synthase, which catalyzes the first committed step in the synthesis of antimicrobial melleolides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Benedikt; Heinig, Uwe; Grothe, Torsten; Stadler, Marc; Jennewein, Stefan

    2011-03-04

    Melleolides and related fungal sesquiterpenoid aryl esters are antimicrobial and cytotoxic natural products derived from cultures of the Homobasidiomycetes genus Armillaria. The initial step in the biosynthesis of all melleolides involves cyclization of the universal sesquiterpene precursor farnesyl diphosphate to produce protoilludene, a reaction catalyzed by protoilludene synthase. We achieved the partial purification of protoilludene synthase from a mycelial culture of Armillaria gallica and found that 6-protoilludene was its exclusive reaction product. Therefore, a further isomerization reaction is necessary to convert the 6-7 double bond into the 7-8 double bond found in melleolides. We expressed an A. gallica protoilludene synthase cDNA in Escherichia coli, and this also led to the exclusive production of 6-protoilludene. Sequence comparison of the isolated sesquiterpene synthase revealed a distant relationship to other fungal terpene synthases. The isolation of the genomic sequence identified the 6-protoilludene synthase to be present as a single copy gene in the genome of A. gallica, possessing an open reading frame interrupted with eight introns.

  18. A native promoter and inclusion of an intron is necessary for efficient expression of GFP or mRFP in Armillaria mellea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Kathryn L; Baumgartner, Kendra; Henricot, Béatrice; Bailey, Andy M; Foster, Gary D

    2016-07-07

    Armillaria mellea is a significant pathogen that causes Armillaria root disease on numerous hosts in forests, gardens and agricultural environments worldwide. Using a yeast-adapted pCAMBIA0380 Agrobacterium vector, we have constructed a series of vectors for transformation of A. mellea, assembled using yeast-based recombination methods. These have been designed to allow easy exchange of promoters and inclusion of introns. The vectors were first tested by transformation into basidiomycete Clitopilus passeckerianus to ascertain vector functionality then used to transform A. mellea. We show that heterologous promoters from the basidiomycetes Agaricus bisporus and Phanerochaete chrysosporium that were used successfully to control the hygromycin resistance cassette were not able to support expression of mRFP or GFP in A. mellea. The endogenous A. mellea gpd promoter delivered efficient expression, and we show that inclusion of an intron was also required for transgene expression. GFP and mRFP expression was stable in mycelia and fluorescence was visible in transgenic fruiting bodies and GFP was detectable in planta. Use of these vectors has been successful in giving expression of the fluorescent proteins GFP and mRFP in A. mellea, providing an additional molecular tool for this pathogen.

  19. Cloning and Characterization of an Armillaria gallica cDNA Encoding Protoilludene Synthase, Which Catalyzes the First Committed Step in the Synthesis of Antimicrobial Melleolides*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Benedikt; Heinig, Uwe; Grothe, Torsten; Stadler, Marc; Jennewein, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Melleolides and related fungal sesquiterpenoid aryl esters are antimicrobial and cytotoxic natural products derived from cultures of the Homobasidiomycetes genus Armillaria. The initial step in the biosynthesis of all melleolides involves cyclization of the universal sesquiterpene precursor farnesyl diphosphate to produce protoilludene, a reaction catalyzed by protoilludene synthase. We achieved the partial purification of protoilludene synthase from a mycelial culture of Armillaria gallica and found that 6-protoilludene was its exclusive reaction product. Therefore, a further isomerization reaction is necessary to convert the 6–7 double bond into the 7–8 double bond found in melleolides. We expressed an A. gallica protoilludene synthase cDNA in Escherichia coli, and this also led to the exclusive production of 6-protoilludene. Sequence comparison of the isolated sesquiterpene synthase revealed a distant relationship to other fungal terpene synthases. The isolation of the genomic sequence identified the 6-protoilludene synthase to be present as a single copy gene in the genome of A. gallica, possessing an open reading frame interrupted with eight introns. PMID:21148562

  20. Damage by pathogens and insects to Scots pine and lodgepole pine 25 years after reciprocal plantings in Canada and Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Fries, Anders

    2017-01-01

    A combined species - provenance - family experiment with Scots pine and lodgepole pine was planted in Canada and Sweden. One aim of the experiment was to evaluate the two species' sensitivities to pathogens and insects 25 years after establishment in their non-native continents. In Canada, Scots pine had better average survival than lodgepole pine, but survival rates among trees from the best seed-lots were equal. In Canada only western gall rust infected Scots pine to some extent, and mounta...

  1. Transcriptome resources and functional characterization of monoterpene synthases for two host species of the mountain pine beetle, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) and jack pine (Pinus banksiana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Dawn E; Yuen, Macaire M S; Jancsik, Sharon; Quesada, Alfonso Lara; Dullat, Harpreet K; Li, Maria; Henderson, Hannah; Arango-Velez, Adriana; Liao, Nancy Y; Docking, Roderick T; Chan, Simon K; Cooke, Janice Ek; Breuil, Colette; Jones, Steven Jm; Keeling, Christopher I; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2013-05-16

    The mountain pine beetle (MPB, Dendroctonus ponderosae) epidemic has affected lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) across an area of more than 18 million hectares of pine forests in western Canada, and is a threat to the boreal jack pine (Pinus banksiana) forest. Defence of pines against MPB and associated fungal pathogens, as well as other pests, involves oleoresin monoterpenes, which are biosynthesized by families of terpene synthases (TPSs). Volatile monoterpenes also serve as host recognition cues for MPB and as precursors for MPB pheromones. The genes responsible for terpene biosynthesis in jack pine and lodgepole pine were previously unknown. We report the generation and quality assessment of assembled transcriptome resources for lodgepole pine and jack pine using Sanger, Roche 454, and Illumina sequencing technologies. Assemblies revealed transcripts for approximately 20,000 - 30,000 genes from each species and assembly analyses led to the identification of candidate full-length prenyl transferase, TPS, and P450 genes of oleoresin biosynthesis. We cloned and functionally characterized, via expression of recombinant proteins in E. coli, nine different jack pine and eight different lodgepole pine mono-TPSs. The newly identified lodgepole pine and jack pine mono-TPSs include (+)-α-pinene synthases, (-)-α-pinene synthases, (-)-β-pinene synthases, (+)-3-carene synthases, and (-)-β-phellandrene synthases from each of the two species. In the absence of genome sequences, transcriptome assemblies are important for defence gene discovery in lodgepole pine and jack pine, as demonstrated here for the terpenoid pathway genes. The product profiles of the functionally annotated mono-TPSs described here can account for the major monoterpene metabolites identified in lodgepole pine and jack pine.

  2. Purification, characterization and cDNA cloning of an endo-exonuclease from the basidiomycete fungus Armillaria mellea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, V; Doonan, S; McCarthy, T V

    1999-01-01

    We have purified an endo-exonuclease from the fruiting body of the basidiomycete fungus Armillaria mellea by using an ethanol fractionation step, followed by two rounds of column chromatography. The enzyme had an apparent molecular mass of 17500 Da and was shown to exist as a monomer by gel-filtration analysis. The nuclease was active on both double-stranded and single-stranded DNA but not on RNA. It was optimally active at pH8.5 and also exhibited a significant degree of thermostability. Three bivalent metal ions, Mg2+, Co2+ and Mn2+, acted as cofactors in the catalysis. It was also inhibited by high salt concentrations: activity was completely abolished at 150 mM NaCl. The nuclease possessed both endonuclease activity on supercoiled DNA and a 3'-5' (but not a 5'-3') exonuclease activity. It generated 5'-phosphomonoesters on its products that, after a prolonged incubation, were hydrolysed to a mixture of free mononucleotides and small oligonucleotides ranging in size from two to eight bases. Elucidation of its N-terminal amino acid sequence permitted the cDNA cloning of the A. mellea nuclease via a PCR-based approach. Peptide mapping of the purified enzyme generated patterns consistent with the amino acid sequence coded for by the cloned cDNA. A BLAST search of the SwissProt database revealed that A. mellea nuclease shared significant amino acid similarity with two nucleases from Bacillus subtilis, suggesting that the three might constitute a distinct class of nucleolytic enzymes. PMID:10215611

  3. Comparative assessment of SSR and SNP markers for inferring the population genetic structure of the common fungus Armillaria cepistipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsykun, T; Rellstab, C; Dutech, C; Sipos, G; Prospero, S

    2017-11-01

    During the last years, simple sequence repeats (SSRs, also known as microsatellites) and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have become the most popular molecular markers for describing neutral genetic variation in populations of a wide range of organisms. However, only a limited number of studies has focused on comparing the performance of these two types of markers for describing the underlying genetic structure of wild populations. Moreover, none of these studies targeted fungi, the group of organisms with one of the most complex reproductive strategies. We evaluated the utility of SSRs and SNPs for inferring the neutral genetic structure of Armillaria cepistipes (basidiomycetes) at different spatial scales. For that, 407 samples were collected across a small (150 km 2 ) area in the Ukrainian Carpathians and a large (41 000 km 2 ) area in the Swiss Alps. All isolates were analyzed at 17 SSR loci distributed throughout the whole genome and at 24 SNP loci located in different single-copy conserved genes. The two markers showed different patterns of structure within the two spatial scales studied. The multi-allelic SSR markers seemed to be best suited for detecting genetic structure in indigenous fungal populations at a rather small spatial scale (radius of ~50-100 km). The pattern observed at SNP markers rather reflected ancient divergence of distant (~1000 km) populations that in addition are separated by mountain ranges. Despite these differences, both marker types were suitable for detecting the weak genetic structure of the two A. cepistipes populations investigated.

  4. Enzymatic formation of compound-K from ginsenoside Rb1 by enzyme preparation from cultured mycelia of Armillaria mellea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyaya, Jitendra; Kim, Min-Ji; Kim, Young-Hoi; Ko, Sung-Ryong; Park, Hee-Won; Kim, Myung-Kon

    2016-04-01

    Minor saponins or human intestinal bacterial metabolites, such as ginsenosides Rg3, F2, Rh2, and compound K, are more pharmacologically active than major saponins, such as ginsenosides Rb1, Rb2, and Rc. In this work, enzymatic hydrolysis of ginsenoside Rb1 was studied using enzyme preparations from cultured mycelia of mushrooms. Mycelia of Armillaria mellea, Ganoderma lucidum, Phellinus linteus, Elfvingia applanata, and Pleurotus ostreatus were cultivated in liquid media at 25°C for 2 wk. Enzyme preparations from cultured mycelia of five mushrooms were obtained by mycelia separation from cultured broth, enzyme extraction, ammonium sulfate (30-80%) precipitation, dialysis, and freeze drying, respectively. The enzyme preparations were used for enzymatic hydrolysis of ginsenoside Rb1. Among the mushrooms used in this study, the enzyme preparation from cultured mycelia of A. mellea (AMMEP) was found to convert ginsenoside Rb1 into compound K with a high yield, while those from G. lucidum, P. linteus, E. applanata, and P. ostreatus produced remarkable amounts of ginsenoside Rd from ginsenoside Rb1. The enzymatic hydrolysis pathway of ginsenoside Rb1 by AMMEP was Rb1 → Rd → F2 → compound K. The optimum reaction conditions for compound K formation from ginsenoside Rb1 were as follows: reaction time 72-96 h, pH 4.0-4.5, and temperature 45-55°C. AMMEP can be used to produce the human intestinal bacterial metabolite, compound K, from ginsenoside Rb1 with a high yield and without food safety issues.

  5. Morphoanatomy and histochemistry analyses of cassava roots do not discriminate resistant from susceptible genotypes to soft root rot

    OpenAIRE

    SILVA, Jonny Lucio Sousa; MOURA, Elisa Ferreira; ILKIU-BORGES, Fernanda; GALVÃO, Jessivaldo Rodrigues; FARIAS-NETO, João Tomé de; SILVA, Gisele Barata da; RÊGO, Marcela Cristiane Ferreira; CUNHA, Roberto Lisboa

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cassava is an important culture in Brazil and in the North of the country, and soft root rot has affected root production. The aim of this work was to identify root morphoanatomic and histochemical characters associated with root rot resistance. In areas with no occurrence of the disease, nine cassava genotypes were tested, four of which were resistant, and five were susceptible to root rot. Root harvest was carried out twelve months after sowing, and thickness of suber, suber and co...

  6. Hybrid pine for tough sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, W.H.

    1994-01-01

    A test planting of 30 first- and second-generation pitch x loblolly pine (pinus rigida x P. taeda) hybrids was established on a West Virginia minesoil in 1985. The site was considered orphaned because earlier attempts at revegetation were unsuccessful. The soil was acid (pH 4.6), lacking in nutrients, and compacted. Vegetation present at the time of planting consisted of a sparse cover of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) and poverty grass (Danthonia spicata) and a few sourwood (Oxydendrum arboreum) and mountain laurel (Kalmia latifolia) seedlings. In the planting trial, 30 different hybrids were set out in 4 tree linear plots replicated 5 times. The seedlings had been grown in containers for 1 yr before outplanting. Evaluations made after 6 growing seasons showed overall plantation survival was 93%; six hybrids and one open-pollinated cross survived 100%. Individual tree heights ranged from 50 to 425 cm with a plantation average of 235 cm (7.7 ft). Eleven of the hybrids had average heights that exceeded the plantation average. Another test planting of tree and shrub species on this site has very poor survival. Therefore, pitch x loblolly hybrid pine can be recommended for reclaiming this and similar sites

  7. The chaperone ClpX stimulates expression of Staphylococcus aureus protein A by rot dependent and independent pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsbak, Lotte; Ingmer, Hanne; Valihrach, Lukás

    2010-01-01

    at pinpointing the role of ClpX in Rot synthesis revealed that ClpX is required for translation of Rot. Interestingly, translation of the spa mRNA was, like the rot mRNA, enhanced by ClpX. These data demonstrate that ClpX performs dual roles in regulating Protein A expression, as ClpX stimulates transcription...... of spa by enhancing translation of Rot, and that ClpX additionally is required for full translation of the spa mRNA. The current findings emphasize that ClpX has a central role in fine-tuning virulence regulation in S. aureus....

  8. Mountain pine beetle infestation of lodgepole pine in areas of water diversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolinski, Sharon L; Anthamatten, Peter J; Bruederle, Leo P; Barbour, Jon M; Chambers, Frederick B

    2014-06-15

    The Rocky Mountains have experienced extensive infestations from the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins), affecting numerous pine tree species including lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. var. latifolia). Water diversions throughout the Rocky Mountains transport large volumes of water out of the basins of origin, resulting in hydrologic modifications to downstream areas. This study examines the hypothesis that lodgepole pine located below water diversions exhibit an increased incidence of mountain pine beetle infestation and mortality. A ground survey verified diversion structures in a portion of Grand County, Colorado, and sampling plots were established around two types of diversion structures, canals and dams. Field studies assessed mountain pine beetle infestation. Lodgepole pines below diversions show 45.1% higher attack and 38.5% higher mortality than lodgepole pines above diversions. These findings suggest that water diversions are associated with increased infestation and mortality of lodgepole pines in the basins of extraction, with implications for forest and water allocation management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Lodgepole Pine Wood Chips Affected by the Mountain Pine Beetle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartwig Peemoeller

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, wood-water interactions of mountain pine beetle affected lodgepole pine were found to vary with time since death. Based on an analysis of magnetization components and spin-spin relaxation times from 1H NMR, it was determined that the mountain pine beetle attack does not affect the crystalline structure of the wood. Both the amorphous structure and the water components vary with time since death, which could be due to the fungi present after a mountain pine beetle attack, as well as the fact that wood from the grey-stage of attack cycles seasonally through adsorption and desorption in the stand.

  10. 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Lodgepole Pine Wood Chips Affected by the Mountain Pine Beetle

    OpenAIRE

    Todoruk, Tara M.; Hartley, Ian D.; Teymoori, Roshanak; Liang, Jianzhen; Peemoeller, Hartwig

    2010-01-01

    In this study, wood-water interactions of mountain pine beetle affected lodgepole pine were found to vary with time since death. Based on an analysis of magnetization components and spin-spin relaxation times from 1H NMR, it was determined that the mountain pine beetle attack does not affect the crystalline structure of the wood. Both the amorphous structure and the water components vary with time since death, which could be due to the fungi present after a mountain pine beetle attack, as wel...

  11. Enhanced bioprocessing of lignocellulose: Wood-rot fungal saccharification and fermentation of corn fiber to ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Prachand

    This research aims at developing a biorefinery platform to convert corn-ethanol coproduct, corn fiber, into fermentable sugars at a lower temperature with minimal use of chemicals. White-rot (Phanerochaete chrysosporium), brown-rot (Gloeophyllum trabeum) and soft-rot (Trichoderma reesei) fungi were used in this research to biologically break down cellulosic and hemicellulosic components of corn fiber into fermentable sugars. Laboratory-scale simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) process proceeded by in-situ cellulolytic enzyme induction enhanced overall enzymatic hydrolysis of hemi/cellulose from corn fiber into simple sugars (mono-, di-, tri-saccharides). The yeast fermentation of hydrolyzate yielded 7.1, 8.6 and 4.1 g ethanol per 100 g corn fiber when saccharified with the white-, brown-, and soft-rot fungi, respectively. The highest corn-to-ethanol yield (8.6 g ethanol/100 g corn fiber) was equivalent to 42 % of the theoretical ethanol yield from starch and cellulose in corn fiber. Cellulase, xylanase and amylase activities of these fungi were also investigated over a week long solid-substrate fermentation of corn fiber. G. trabeum had the highest activities for starch (160 mg glucose/mg protein.min) and on day three of solid-substrate fermentation. P. chrysosporium had the highest activity for xylan (119 mg xylose/mg protein.min) on day five and carboxymethyl cellulose (35 mg glucose/mg protein.min) on day three of solid-substrate fermentation. T. reesei showed the highest activity for Sigma cell 20 (54.8 mg glucose/mg protein.min) on day 5 of solid-substrate fermentation. The effect of different pretreatments on SSF of corn fiber by fungal processes was examined. Corn fiber was treated at 30 °C for 2 h with alkali [2% NaOH (w/w)], alkaline peroxide [2% NaOH (w/w) and 1% H2O 2 (w/w)], and by steaming at 100 °C for 2 h. Mild pretreatment resulted in improved ethanol yields for brown- and soft-rot SSF, while white-rot and Spezyme CP SSFs showed

  12. Differences in crystalline cellulose modification due to degradation by brown and white rot fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastrup, Anne Christine Steenkjær; Howell, Caitlin; Larsen, Flemming Hofmann; Sathitsuksanoh, Noppadon; Goodell, Barry; Jellison, Jody

    2012-10-01

    Wood-decaying basidiomycetes are some of the most effective bioconverters of lignocellulose in nature, however the way they alter wood crystalline cellulose on a molecular level is still not well understood. To address this, we examined and compared changes in wood undergoing decay by two species of brown rot fungi, Gloeophyllum trabeum and Meruliporia incrassata, and two species of white rot fungi, Irpex lacteus and Pycnoporus sanguineus, using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and (13)C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The overall percent crystallinity in wood undergoing decay by M. incrassata, G. trabeum, and I. lacteus appeared to decrease according to the stage of decay, while in wood decayed by P. sanguineus the crystallinity was found to increase during some stages of degradation. This result is suggested to be potentially due to the different decay strategies employed by these fungi. The average spacing between the 200 cellulose crystal planes was significantly decreased in wood degraded by brown rot, whereas changes observed in wood degraded by the two white rot fungi examined varied according to the selectivity for lignin. The conclusions were supported by a quantitative analysis of the structural components in the wood before and during decay confirming the distinct differences observed for brown and white rot fungi. The results from this study were consistent with differences in degradation methods previously reported among fungal species, specifically more non-enzymatic degradation in brown rot versus more enzymatic degradation in white rot. Copyright © 2012 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Interactions of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium and Pectobacterium carotovorum within a Tomato Soft Rot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Andrée S; Cox, Clayton E; Desai, Prerak; Porwolik, Steffen; Chu, Weiping; de Moraes, Marcos H; McClelland, Michael; Brandl, Maria T; Teplitski, Max

    2018-03-01

    Salmonella spp. are remarkably adaptable pathogens, and this adaptability allows these bacteria to thrive in a variety of environments and hosts. The mechanisms with which these pathogens establish within a niche amid the native microbiota remain poorly understood. Here, we aimed to uncover the mechanisms that enable Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain ATCC 14028 to benefit from the degradation of plant tissue by a soft rot plant pathogen, Pectobacterium carotovorum The hypothesis that in the soft rot, the liberation of starch (not utilized by P. carotovorum ) makes this polymer available to Salmonella spp., thus allowing it to colonize soft rots, was tested first and proven null. To identify the functions involved in Salmonella soft rot colonization, we carried out transposon insertion sequencing coupled with the phenotypic characterization of the mutants. The data indicate that Salmonella spp. experience a metabolic shift in response to the changes in the environment brought on by Pectobacterium spp. and likely coordinated by the csrBC small regulatory RNA. While csrBC and flhD appear to be of importance in the soft rot, the global two-component system encoded by barA sirA (which controls csrBC and flhDC under laboratory conditions) does not appear to be necessary for the observed phenotype. Motility and the synthesis of nucleotides and amino acids play critical roles in the growth of Salmonella spp. in the soft rot. IMPORTANCE Outbreaks of produce-associated illness continue to be a food safety concern. Earlier studies demonstrated that the presence of phytopathogens on produce was a significant risk factor associated with increased Salmonella carriage on fruits and vegetables. Here, we genetically characterize some of the requirements for interactions between Salmonella and phytobacteria that allow Salmonella spp. to establish a niche within an alternate host (tomato). Pathways necessary for nucleotide synthesis, amino acid synthesis, and motility

  14. Resistance mechanisms to toxin-mediated charcoal rot infection in maturity group III soybean: role of seed phenol lignin soflavones sugars and seed minerals in charcoal rot resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charcoal rot is a disease caused by the fungus Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid, and thought to infect the plants through roots by a toxin-mediated mechanism, resulting in yield loss and poor seed quality, especially under drought conditions. The mechanism by which this infection occurs is not y...

  15. Microsomal transformation of organophosphorus pesticides by white rot fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauregui, Juan; Valderrama, Brenda; Albores, Arnulfo; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael

    2003-12-01

    The enzymatic mechanism for the transformation of organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) by different white-rot fungi strains was studied. With the exception of Ganoderma applanatum 8168, all strains from a collection of 17 different fungi cultures were able to deplete parathion. Three strains showing the highest activities were selected for further studies: Bjerkandera adusta 8258, Pleurotus ostreatus 7989 and Phanerochaete chrysosporium 3641. These strains depleted 50 to 96% of terbufos, azinphos-methyl, phosmet and tribufos after four-days exposure to the pesticides. In order to identify the cellular localization of the transformation activity, the extracellular and microsomal fractions of Pleuronts ostreatus 7989 were evaluated in vitro. While the activities of ligninolytic enzymes (lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase and laccase) were detected in the extracellular fraction, no enzymatic modification of any of the five pesticides tested could be found, suggesting the intracellular origin of the transformation activity. In accordance with this observation the microsomal fraction was found able to transform three OPPs with the following rates: 10 micromol mg prot(-1) h(-1) for phosmet, 5.7 micromol mg prot(-1) h(-1) for terbufos, and 2.2 micromol mg prot(-1) h(-1) for azinphos-methyl. The products from these reactions and from the transformation of trichlorfon and malathion, were identified by mass-spectrometry. These results, supported by specific inhibition experiments and the stringent requirement for NADPH during the in vitro assays suggest the involvement of a cytochrome P450.

  16. Solubilization and Mineralization of Lignin by White Rot Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, C. David; Kropp, Bradley R.; Reid, Ian D.

    1992-01-01

    The white rot fungi Lentinula edodes, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Pleurotus sajor-caju, Flammulina velutipes, and Schizophyllum commune were grown in liquid media containing 14C-lignin-labelled wood, and the formation of water-soluble 14C-labelled products and 14CO2, the growth of the fungi, and the activities of extracellular lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase, and laccase were measured. Conditions that affect the rate of lignin degradation were imposed, and both long-term (0- to 16-day) and short-term (0- to 72-h) effects on the production of the two types of product and on the activities of the enzymes were monitored. The production of 14CO2-labelled products from the aqueous ones was also investigated. The short-term studies showed that the different conditions had different effects on the production of the two products and on the activities of the enzymes. Nitrogen sources inhibited the production of both products by all species when differences in growth could be discounted. Medium pH and manganese affected lignin degradation by the different species differently. With P. chrysosporium, the results were consistent, with lignin peroxidase playing a role in lignin solubilization and manganese peroxidase being important in subsequent CO2 production. PMID:16348781

  17. Association mapping in sunflower for sclerotinia head rot resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fusari Corina M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sclerotinia Head Rot (SHR is one of the most damaging diseases of sunflower in Europe, Argentina, and USA, causing average yield reductions of 10 to 20 %, but leading to total production loss under favorable environmental conditions for the pathogen. Association Mapping (AM is a promising choice for Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL mapping, as it detects relationships between phenotypic variation and gene polymorphisms in existing germplasm without development of mapping populations. This article reports the identification of QTL for resistance to SHR based on candidate gene AM. Results A collection of 94 sunflower inbred lines were tested for SHR under field conditions using assisted inoculation with the fungal pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Given that no biological mechanisms or biochemical pathways have been clearly identified for SHR, 43 candidate genes were selected based on previous transcript profiling studies in sunflower and Brassica napus infected with S. sclerotiorum. Associations among SHR incidence and haplotype polymorphisms in 16 candidate genes were tested using Mixed Linear Models (MLM that account for population structure and kinship relationships. This approach allowed detection of a significant association between the candidate gene HaRIC_B and SHR incidence (P  Conclusions These results suggest that AM will be useful in dissecting other complex traits in sunflower, thus providing a valuable tool to assist in crop breeding.

  18. Biodegradation of pentachlorophenol by the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mileski, G.J.; Bumpus, J.A.; Jurek, M.A.; Aust, S.D.

    1988-01-01

    Extensive biodegradation of pentachlorophenol (PCP) by the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium was demonstrated by the disappearance and mineralization of [ 14 C]PCP in nutrient nitrogen-limited culture. Mass balance analyses demonstrated the formation of water-soluble metabolites of [ 14 C]PCP during degradation. Involvement of the lignin-degrading system of this fungus was suggested by the fact that the time of onset, time course, and eventual decline in the rate of PCP mineralization were similar to those observed for [ 14 C]lignin degradation. Also, a purified ligninase was shown to be able to catalyze the initial oxidation of PCP. Although biodegradation of PCP was decreased in nutrient nitrogen-sufficient (i.e., nonligninolytic) cultures of P. chrysosporium, substantial biodegradation of PCP did occur, suggesting that in addition to the lignin-degrading system, another degradation system may also be responsible for some of the PCP degradation observed. Toxicity studies showed that PCP concentrations above 4 mg/liter (15 μM) prevented growth when fungal cultures were identified by inoculation with spores. The lethal effects of PCP could, however, be the circumvented by allowing the fungus to establish a mycelial mat before adding PCP. With this procedure, the fungus was able to grow and mineralize [ 14 C]PCP at concentrations as high as 500 mg/liter (1.9 mM)

  19. Identification of some saffron corm rot fungi and their control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayatollah Saeedizadeh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to isolation and identification of causal agents of corm rot and their control, the sampling was done from corms in farms of Bushroueye, southern Khorasan province. After culturing of sections of infected corms, the fungi, Penicillium digitatum, Aspergillus niger, and Rhizopus stolonifer were isolated and identified. For their control test, four concentrations of Pseudomonas fluorescens CHAO, Trichoderma harzianum Bi, and four concentrations of fungicides, cupper oxichlorore and benomil,were used with four replications. The control effect of antagonists and fungicides were determined by measurement of diameter of pathogens colony on medium. The results showed that the maximum of control of antagonistic fungus were obtained in concentrations of 1×107 and 1×108, and in the case of antagonistic bacterium wereshown in concentrations of 1×109 and 1×1010. The fungicides had maximum control in concentrations of 3×10-3 and 4×10-3. In general, among of the treatments, T. harzianumwas most effective to reducing the growth of pathogenic fungi.

  20. Restoring longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) stands: Effects of restoration treatments on natural loblolly pine regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Knapp; Wang Geoff; Huifeng Hu; Joan Walker; Carsyn Tennant

    2011-01-01

    Historical land use and management practices in the southeastern United States have resulted in the dominance of loblolly pine on many upland sites that historically were occupied by longleaf pine. There is currently much interest in restoring high quality longleaf pine habitats to such areas, but managers may also desire the retention of some existing canopy trees to...