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  1. Anthropometry of height, weight, arm, wrist, abdominal circumference and body mass index, for Bolivian adolescents 12 to 18 years: Bolivian adolescent percentile values from the MESA study Referencias antropométricas de los adolescentes bolivianos de 12 a 18 años: estatura, peso, circunferencia del brazo, muñeca y abdominal, índice de masa corporal: Percentiles de adolescentes bolivianos (PAB) del estudio MESA

    OpenAIRE

    A. Baya Botti; Pérez-Cueto, F.J.A.; P. A. Vasquez Monllor; P. W. Kolsteren

    2009-01-01

    Anthropometry is important as clinical tool for individual follow-up as well as for planning and health policymaking at population level. Recent references of Bolivian Adolescents are not available. The aim of this cross sectional study was to provide age and sex specific centile values and charts of Body Mass Index, height, weight, arm, wrist and abdominal circumference from Bolivian Adolescents. Data from the MEtabolic Syndrome in Adolescents (MESA) study was used. Thirty-two Bolivian clust...

  2. Anthropometry of height, weight, arm, wrist, abdominal circumference and body mass index, for Bolivian adolescents 12 to 18 years: Bolivian adolescent percentile values from the MESA study Referencias antropométricas de los adolescentes bolivianos de 12 a 18 años: estatura, peso, circunferencia del brazo, muñeca y abdominal, índice de masa corporal: Percentiles de adolescentes bolivianos (PAB del estudio MESA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Baya Botti

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Anthropometry is important as clinical tool for individual follow-up as well as for planning and health policymaking at population level. Recent references of Bolivian Adolescents are not available. The aim of this cross sectional study was to provide age and sex specific centile values and charts of Body Mass Index, height, weight, arm, wrist and abdominal circumference from Bolivian Adolescents. Data from the MEtabolic Syndrome in Adolescents (MESA study was used. Thirty-two Bolivian clusters from urban and rural areas were selected randomly considering population proportions, 3445 school going adolescents, 12 to 18 y, 45% males; 55% females underwent anthropometric evaluation by trained personnel using standardized protocols for all interviews and examinations. Weight, height, wrist, arm and abdominal circumference data were collected. Body Mass Index was calculated. Smoothed age- and gender specific 3rd, 5th, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 85th, 90th, 95th and 97th Bolivian adolescent percentiles(BAP and Charts(BAC where derived using LMS regression. Percentile-based reference data for the antropometrics of for Bolivian Adolescents are presented for the first time.La antropometría es una herramienta clínica importante para el seguimiento individual de los pacientes así como para la planificación de políticas públicas. En Bolivia no existen referencias antropométricas nacionales para adolescentes. El objetivo de este estudio transversal fue de desarrollar percentiles y diagramas de crecimiento para peso, talla, índice de masa corporal, presión arterial sistólica y diastólica, circunferencia de muñeca, brazo y abdominal de adolescentes bolivianos. Los datos antropométricos en el estudio MESA (Síndrome metabólico en adolescentes bolivianos fueron obtenidos a partir de 32 unidades muestrales, considerando proporcionalidad muestral con reposición. Fueron evaluados 3445 adolescentes de 12 a 18, 45% hombres; 55% mujeres, de colegios de

  3. Development of prosthetic arm with pneumatic prosthetic hand and tendon-driven wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Hiroyuki; Tsujiuchi, Nobutaka; Koizumi, Takayuki; Kan, Hiroto; Hirano, Masanori; Nakamura, Yoichiro

    2009-01-01

    Recently, various prosthetic arms have been developed, but few are both attractive and functional. Considering human coexistence, prosthetic arms must be both safe and flexible. In this research, we developed a novel prosthetic arm with a five-fingered prosthetic hand using our original pneumatic actuators and a slender tendon-driven wrist using a wire drive and two small motors. Because the prosthetic hand's driving source is comprised of small pneumatic actuators, the prosthetic hand is safe when it makes contact with people; it can also operate flexibly. In addition, the arm has a tendon-driven wrist to expand its motion space and to perform many operations. First, we explain the pneumatic hand's drive mechanism and its tendon-driven wrist. Next, we identify the characteristics of the hand and the wrist and construct a control system for this arm and verify its control performance. PMID:19964378

  4. Arm and wrist surface potential mapping for wearable ECG rhythm recording devices: a pilot clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study addresses an important question in the development of a ECG device that enables long term monitoring of cardiac rhythm. This device would utilise edge sensor technologies for dry, non-irritant skin contact suitable for distal limb application and would be supported by embedded ECG denoising processes. Contemporary ECG databases including those provided by MIT-BIH and Physionet are focused on interpretation of cardiac disease and rhythm tracking. The data is recorded using chest leads as in standard clinical practise. For the development of a peripherally located heart rhythm monitor, such data would be of limited use. To provide a useful database adequate for the development of the above mentioned cardiac monitoring device a unipolar body surface potential map from the left arm and wrist was gathered in 37 volunteer patients and characterized in this study. For this, the reference electrode was placed at the wrist. Bipolar far-field electrogram leads were derived and analysed. Factors such as skin variability, 50Hz noise interference, electrode contact noise, motion artifacts and electromyographic noise, presented a challenge. The objective was quantify the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at the far-field locations. Preliminary results reveal that an electrogram indicative of the QRS complex can be recorded on the distal portion of the left arm when denoised using signal averaging techniques.

  5. Wrist pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain - wrist; Pain - carpal tunnel; Injury - wrist; Arthritis - wrist; Gout - wrist; Pseudogout - wrist ... Carpal tunnel syndrome: A common cause of wrist pain is carpal tunnel syndrome . You may feel aching, ...

  6. Risk factors for arm-wrist-hand and neck-shoulder symptoms among office workers : a longitudinal perspective

    OpenAIRE

    IJmker, S

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis the association was examined between the duration of computer use at work and the onset of arm-wrist-hand and neck-shoulder symptoms. A prospective cohort study among 1951 office workers was performed with a follow-up period of 2 years. Outcome was assessed every three months by questionnaire. Cases were identified based on the transition within 3 months of no, irregular or "minor" symptoms to regular or prolonged symptoms accompanied with a pain intensity exceeding 6 on a Von ...

  7. Dexterous Humanoid Robotic Wrist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Reich, David M. (Inventor); Wampler, II, Charles W. (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Nguyen, Vienny (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A humanoid robot includes a torso, a pair of arms, a neck, a head, a wrist joint assembly, and a control system. The arms and the neck movably extend from the torso. Each of the arms includes a lower arm and a hand that is rotatable relative to the lower arm. The wrist joint assembly is operatively defined between the lower arm and the hand. The wrist joint assembly includes a yaw axis and a pitch axis. The pitch axis is disposed in a spaced relationship to the yaw axis such that the axes are generally perpendicular. The pitch axis extends between the yaw axis and the lower arm. The hand is rotatable relative to the lower arm about each of the yaw axis and the pitch axis. The control system is configured for determining a yaw angle and a pitch angle of the wrist joint assembly.

  8. Parkinsonism reduces coordination of fingers, wrist, and arm in fine motor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teulings, H L; Contreras-Vidal, J L; Stelmach, G E; Adler, C H

    1997-07-01

    This experiment investigates movement coordination in Parkinson's disease (PD) subjects. Seventeen PD patients and 12 elderly control subjects performed several handwriting-like tasks on a digitizing writing tablet resting on top of a table in front of the subject. The writing patterns, in increasing order of coordination complexity, were repetitive back-and-forth movements in various orientations, circles and loops in clockwise and counterclockwise directions, and a complex writing pattern. The patterns were analyzed in terms of jerk normalized for duration and size per stroke. In the PD subjects, back-and-forth strokes, involving coordination of fingers and wrist, showed larger normalized jerk than strokes performed using either the wrist or the fingers alone. In the PD patients, wrist flexion (plus radial deviation) showed greater normalized jerk in comparison to wrist extension (plus ulnar deviation). The elderly control subjects showed no such effects as a function of coordination complexity. For both PD and elderly control subjects, looping patterns consisting of circles with a left-to-right forearm movement, did not show a systematic increase of normalized jerk. The same handwriting patterns were then simulated using a biologically inspired neural network model of the basal ganglia thalamocortical relations for a control and a mild PD subject. The network simulation was consistent with the observed experimental results, providing additional support that a reduced capability to coordinate wrist and finger movements may be caused by suboptimal functioning of the basal ganglia in PD. The results suggest that in PD patients fine motor control problems may be caused by a reduced capability to coordinate the fingers and wrist and by reduced control of wrist flexion. PMID:9225749

  9. Recognition of elementary arm movements using orientation of a tri-axial accelerometer located near the wrist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we present a method for recognising three fundamental movements of the human arm (reach and retrieve, lift cup to mouth, rotation of the arm) by determining the orientation of a tri-axial accelerometer located near the wrist. Our objective is to detect the occurrence of such movements performed with the impaired arm of a stroke patient during normal daily activities as a means to assess their rehabilitation. The method relies on accurately mapping transitions of predefined, standard orientations of the accelerometer to corresponding elementary arm movements. To evaluate the technique, kinematic data was collected from four healthy subjects and four stroke patients as they performed a number of activities involved in a representative activity of daily living, ‘making-a-cup-of-tea’. Our experimental results show that the proposed method can independently recognise all three of the elementary upper limb movements investigated with accuracies in the range 91–99% for healthy subjects and 70–85% for stroke patients. (paper)

  10. Patterns of self-cutting: a preliminary study on differences in clinical implications between wrist- and arm-cutting using a Japanese juvenile detention center sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Yamaguchi, Akiko; Chiba, Yasuhiko; Asami, Takeshi; Iseki, Eizo; Hirayasu, Yoshio

    2004-08-01

    The present study was aimed to clarify the differences in clinical implications between wrist- and arm-cutting. Subjects were 201 delinquent adolescents (178 males and 23 females) who had been admitted to a detention center from February to March 2003. A self-reporting questionnaire and the Adolescent Dissociative Experience Scale (ADES) were given. Traumatic events and other self-injurious behavior were compared among four groups. In total, 33 (16.4%) subjects reported wrist- and/or arm-cutting. Of the females, 60.9% (n = 14) had experienced self cutting behaviors compared to 10.7% of males (n = 19). Subjects were divided into four groups; 'non-cutting' (NC: n = 168, 83.6%), 'wrist-cutting' (WC: n = 5, 2.5%), 'arm-cutting' (AC: n = 19, 9.5%), and 'wrist- and arm-cutting' (WAC: n = 9, 4.5%). WC, AC, and WAC groups reported early separation, bulling in school, and histories of sexual/physical abuse more frequently than NC group. WC and WAC groups reported suicidal ideation and suicide attempts more frequently than NC and AC groups. The ADES scores in AC and WAC groups were significantly higher than in those in NC group (P suicide idea more frequently than the AC group, while AC group self-cut due to anger expression more frequently than WC or WAC groups. Self-cutters experienced early separation, bullying in school, and sexual/physical abuse more frequently than-non-self-cutters. Arm-cutting behavior may predict dissociation, while wrist-cutting may involve with suicidality. PMID:15298650

  11. The impact of arm position and pulse pressure on the validation of a wrist-cuff blood pressure measurement device in a high risk population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Khoshdel

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Ali Reza Khoshdel1,2, Shane Carney2, Alastair Gillies21Faculty of Medicine, Aja University of Medical Science, Tehran, Iran; 2John Hunter Hospital, Faculty of Health, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NS W, AustraliaAbstract: Despite the increasing popularity of blood pressure (BP wrist monitors for self-BP measurement at home, device validation and the effect of arm position remains an issue. This study focused on the validation of the Omron HEM-609 wrist BP device, including an evaluation of the impact of arm position and pulse pressure on BP measurement validation. Fifty patients at high risk for cardiovascular disease were selected (age 65 ± 10 years. Each patient had two measurements with a mercury sphygmomanometer and three measurements with the wrist BP device (wrist at the heart level while the horizontal arm supported [HORIZONTAL], hand supported on the opposite shoulder [SHOULDER], and elbow placed on a desk [DESK], in random order. The achieved systolic BP (SBP and diastolic BP (DBP wrist-cuff readings were compared to the mercury device and the frequencies of the readings within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg of the gold standard were computed and compared with the British Hypertension Society (BHS and Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI protocols. The results showed while SBP readings with HORIZONTAL and SHOULDER positions were significantly different from the mercury device (mean difference = 7.1 and 13.3 mmHg, respectively; P < 0.05, the DESK position created the closest reading to mercury (mean difference = 3.8, P > 0.1. Approximately 71% of SBP readings with the DESK position were within ±10 mmHg, whereas it was 62.5% and 34% for HORIZONTAL and SHOULDER positions, respectively. Wrist DBP attained category D with BHS criteria with all three arm positions. Bland–Altman plots illustrated that the wrist monitor systematically underestimated SBP and DBP values. However a reading adjustment of 5 and 10 mm

  12. Animation of Phoenix's Wrist Unlatching

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This animation shows what happened underneath Phoenix's Robotic Arm wrist on Sol 3. The pin that goes through the loop is what holds the wrist in place. The rotation of the wrist pops the pin free. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  13. When the diameter of the abdominal aorta should be considered as abnormal? A new ultrasonographic index using the wrist circumference as a body build reference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To use US to evaluate the normal values of aortic diameter (AD), stratifying the population by age, gender and body build, as measured using wrist circumference (WC). Materials and methods: Between April 2010 and February 2012, consecutive patients ≥ 30 years of age, without history of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) were prospectively enrolled. They underwent an abdominal ultrasonography for reasons other than aorta evaluation. AD was measured at the infrarenal (AD1), intermediate (AD2), and iliac bifurcation (AD3) levels: a diameter ≥ 3 cm was considered as an aneurysm. The maximal aortic diameter (ADmax) was measured for AAA patients. WC was measured; AD/WC ratio was calculated and presented in percentage: the range of normal values was obtained excluding AAA cases and calculated as mean ± 1.96 × standard deviation. Pearson correlation coefficient was used. Results: We recruited 1200 patients, 15 (1.25%; age range = 64–86 years) had AAA. AD ranges of the other patients were: AD1 = 0.74–1.84 cm, AD2 = 0.78–1.85 cm, and AD3 = 0.68–1.76 cm for females; AD1 = 0.86–2.02 cm, AD2 = 0.91–2.08 cm, and AD3 = 0.84–1.95 cm for males. AD2/WC ratio of non-AAA patients range was 4–15%, with only one outlier at 18%, while ADmax/WC ratio of AAA patients range was 15–35% (p 1, r = 0.318, p 2 and r = 0.280, p 3). Conclusion: The definition of normal AD should consider body build. An AD2/WC ratio of 15% may be regarded as a threshold to differentiate AAA- from non-AAA patients. Patients with AD2/WC values comprised between 12% and 15% may be at risk for AAA

  14. Wrist pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the wrist that allows feeling and movement to parts of the hand. Swelling can occur if you: Do repetitive movements with your wrist, such as typing on a computer keyboard, using a computer mouse, playing racquetball or ...

  15. Brain-Computer Interface-based robotic end effector system for wrist and hand rehabilitation: results of a three-armed randomized controlled trial for chronic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Keng eAng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy of an Electroencephalography (EEG-based Motor Imagery (MI Brain-Computer Interface (BCI coupled with a Haptic Knob (HK robot for arm rehabilitation in stroke patients. In this three-arm, single-blind, randomized controlled trial; 21 chronic hemiplegic stroke patients (Fugl-Meyer Motor Assessment (FMMA score 10-50, recruited after pre-screening for MI BCI ability, were randomly allocated to BCI-HK, HK or Standard Arm Therapy (SAT groups. All groups received 18 sessions of intervention over 6 weeks, 3 sessions per week, 90 minutes per session. The BCI-HK group received 1 hour of BCI coupled with HK intervention, and the HK group received 1 hour of HK intervention per session. Both BCI-HK and HK groups received 120 trials of robot-assisted hand grasping and knob manipulation followed by 30 minutes of therapist-assisted arm mobilization. The SAT group received 1.5 hours of therapist-assisted arm mobilization and forearm pronation-supination movements incorporating wrist control and grasp-release functions. In all, 14 males, 7 females, mean age 54.2 years, mean stroke duration 385.1 days, with baseline FMMA score 27.0 were recruited. The primary outcome measure was upper-extremity FMMA scores measured mid-intervention at week 3, end-intervention at week 6, and follow-up at weeks 12 and 24. Seven, 8 and 7 subjects underwent BCI-HK, HK and SAT interventions respectively. FMMA score improved in all groups, but no intergroup differences were found at any time points. Significantly larger motor gains were observed in the BCI-HK group compared to the SAT group at weeks 3, 12 and 24, but motor gains in the HK group did not differ from the SAT group at any time point. In conclusion, BCI-HK is effective, safe, and may have the potential for enhancing motor recovery in chronic stroke when combined with therapist-assisted arm mobilization.

  16. Arm Care. Relief and Prevention for Shoulder Tendonitis, Tennis Elbow, Bursitis and Wrist Sprain in Athletics and Other Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirschl, Robert P.

    The book provides a practical and meaningful treatment program for athletes involved in sports which injure the arm or shoulder to a high degree, such as tennis, baseball, swimming, raquetball, pole vaulting, javelin throwing, and weight training. The book's chapters present information on: (1) symptoms of injury; (2) the anatomy of injury; (3)…

  17. Forward and inverse kinematics of double universal joint robot wrists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Robert L., II

    1991-01-01

    A robot wrist consisting of two universal joints can eliminate the wrist singularity problem found on many individual robots. Forward and inverse position and velocity kinematics are presented for such a wrist having three degrees of freedom. Denavit-Hartenberg parameters are derived to find the transforms required for the kinematic equations. The Omni-Wrist, a commercial double universal joint robot wrist, is studied in detail. There are four levels of kinematic parameters identified for this wrist; three forward and three inverse maps are presented for both position and velocity. These equations relate the hand coordinate frame to the wrist base frame. They are sufficient for control of the wrist standing alone. When the wrist is attached to a manipulator arm; the offset between the two universal joints complicates the solution of the overall kinematics problem. All wrist coordinate frame origins are not coincident, which prevents decoupling of position and orientation for manipulator inverse kinematics.

  18. Wrist Sprains

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Symptom Picker Hand and Arm Conditions Carpal Tunnel Ganglion Cysts Trigger Finger Arthritis Base of the Thumb See ... Symptom Picker Hand and Arm Conditions Carpal Tunnel Ganglion Cysts Trigger Finger Arthritis Base of the Thumb See ...

  19. Wrist Arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Symptom Picker Hand and Arm Conditions Carpal Tunnel Ganglion Cysts Trigger Finger Arthritis Base of the Thumb See ... Symptom Picker Hand and Arm Conditions Carpal Tunnel Ganglion Cysts Trigger Finger Arthritis Base of the Thumb See ...

  20. Wrist Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Symptom Picker Hand and Arm Conditions Carpal Tunnel Ganglion Cysts Trigger Finger Arthritis Base of the Thumb See ... Symptom Picker Hand and Arm Conditions Carpal Tunnel Ganglion Cysts Trigger Finger Arthritis Base of the Thumb See ...

  1. Analysis of the treatment of abdominal pedicle flap repair of wrist electric burn%腹部带蒂皮瓣修复腕部电烧伤的治疗效果观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张凤刚; 沈锐; 陈晓东; 刘婕婷; 阮树斌

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyze the research of wrist electric burn patients through the abdomen with pedicled skin flap for repairing of treatment method,in order to provide the basis for clinical practice. Methods A total of August 2013 to August 2015 of wrist electric burn patient data of 50 cases of the implementation of retrospective analysis and summary of wounds in 50 cases of patients with treatment and functional recovery of the relationship between the degree and amputation. Results 50 patients underwent surgical treatment of 58 cases,and non operative treatment in 5 cases. Eight debridement and skin graft,stage I healing 4(50. 0% );eight adjacent random flap and axial pattern flap to repair,stage I healing 5(62. 5% );forty abdominal random flap,axial pattern skin flap and free + axial pattern skin flap,stage I healing 32(80. 0% ). There were no deaths in 50 cases,49 cases were cured,one patient returned to the local hospital to continue treatment. Follow up showed that patients with wrist electric burn site shape and range of motion and strength good,fully functional or recovered,curative effect satisfaction. Conclusion Implementation early incision decompression,debridement and flap surgery for wrist electric burn,can guarantee the healing effect,reduce the amputation rate,it should be popularized in clinic.%目的:观察腕部电烧伤患者通过腹部带蒂皮瓣修复治疗效果。方法选取2013年8月-2015年8月收治的50例腕部电烧伤患者的临床资料进行回顾性分析,观察50例患者的创面处理方式和功能恢复程度以及截肢情况。结果50例患者行手术治疗58例次,非手术治疗5例次,其中采取扩创以及游离植皮8处,Ⅰ期愈合4处(50.0%);邻近随意皮瓣以及轴型皮瓣转移修复8处,Ⅰ期愈合5处(62.5%);腹部随意皮瓣、轴型皮瓣以及随意+轴型皮瓣40处,Ⅰ期愈合32处(80.0%)。本组50例患者无死亡病例,治愈49例,剩余1例回到当地医

  2. Whole-body CT in polytrauma patients: the effect of arm position on abdominal image quality when using a human phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a considerable number of emergency computed tomography (CT) scans, patients are unable to position their arms above their head due to traumatic injuries. The arms-down position has been shown to reduce image quality with beam-hardening artifacts in the dorsal regions of the liver, spleen, and kidneys, rendering these images non-diagnostic. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of arm position on the image quality in patients undergoing whole-body CT. We acquired CT scans with various acquisition parameters at voltages of 80, 120, and 140 kVp and an increasing tube current from 200 to 400 mAs in 50 mAs increments. The image noise and the contrast assessment were considered for quantitative analyses of the CT images. The image noise (IN), the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and the coefficient of variation (COV) were evaluated. Quantitative analyses of the experiments were performed with CT scans representative of five different arm positions. Results of the CT scans acquired at 120 kVp and 250 mAs showed high image quality in patients with both arms raised above the head (SNR: 12.4, CNR: 10.9, and COV: 8.1) and both arms flexed at the elbows on the chest (SNR: 11.5, CNR: 10.2, and COV: 8.8) while the image quality significantly decreased with both arms in the down position (SNR: 9.1, CNR: 7.6, and COV: 11). Both arms raised, one arm raised, and both arms flexed improved the image quality compared to arms in the down position by reducing beam-hardening and streak artifacts caused by the arms being at the side of body. This study provides optimal methods for achieving higher image quality and lower noise in abdominal CT for trauma patients.

  3. Whole-body CT in polytrauma patients: The effect of arm position on abdominal image quality when using a human phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Pil-Hyun; Kim, Hee-Joung; Lee, Chang-Lae; Kim, Dae-Hong; Lee, Won-Hyung; Jeon, Sung-Su

    2012-06-01

    For a considerable number of emergency computed tomography (CT) scans, patients are unable to position their arms above their head due to traumatic injuries. The arms-down position has been shown to reduce image quality with beam-hardening artifacts in the dorsal regions of the liver, spleen, and kidneys, rendering these images non-diagnostic. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of arm position on the image quality in patients undergoing whole-body CT. We acquired CT scans with various acquisition parameters at voltages of 80, 120, and 140 kVp and an increasing tube current from 200 to 400 mAs in 50 mAs increments. The image noise and the contrast assessment were considered for quantitative analyses of the CT images. The image noise (IN), the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and the coefficient of variation (COV) were evaluated. Quantitative analyses of the experiments were performed with CT scans representative of five different arm positions. Results of the CT scans acquired at 120 kVp and 250 mAs showed high image quality in patients with both arms raised above the head (SNR: 12.4, CNR: 10.9, and COV: 8.1) and both arms flexed at the elbows on the chest (SNR: 11.5, CNR: 10.2, and COV: 8.8) while the image quality significantly decreased with both arms in the down position (SNR: 9.1, CNR: 7.6, and COV: 11). Both arms raised, one arm raised, and both arms flexed improved the image quality compared to arms in the down position by reducing beam-hardening and streak artifacts caused by the arms being at the side of body. This study provides optimal methods for achieving higher image quality and lower noise in abdominal CT for trauma patients.

  4. Whole-body CT in polytrauma patients: the effect of arm position on abdominal image quality when using a human phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Pil-Hyun [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Wonju Christian Hospital, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee-Joung; Lee, Chang-Lae; Kim, Dae-Hong [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Won-Hyung; Jeon, Sung-Su [Wonju Christian Hospital, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    For a considerable number of emergency computed tomography (CT) scans, patients are unable to position their arms above their head due to traumatic injuries. The arms-down position has been shown to reduce image quality with beam-hardening artifacts in the dorsal regions of the liver, spleen, and kidneys, rendering these images non-diagnostic. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of arm position on the image quality in patients undergoing whole-body CT. We acquired CT scans with various acquisition parameters at voltages of 80, 120, and 140 kVp and an increasing tube current from 200 to 400 mAs in 50 mAs increments. The image noise and the contrast assessment were considered for quantitative analyses of the CT images. The image noise (IN), the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and the coefficient of variation (COV) were evaluated. Quantitative analyses of the experiments were performed with CT scans representative of five different arm positions. Results of the CT scans acquired at 120 kVp and 250 mAs showed high image quality in patients with both arms raised above the head (SNR: 12.4, CNR: 10.9, and COV: 8.1) and both arms flexed at the elbows on the chest (SNR: 11.5, CNR: 10.2, and COV: 8.8) while the image quality significantly decreased with both arms in the down position (SNR: 9.1, CNR: 7.6, and COV: 11). Both arms raised, one arm raised, and both arms flexed improved the image quality compared to arms in the down position by reducing beam-hardening and streak artifacts caused by the arms being at the side of body. This study provides optimal methods for achieving higher image quality and lower noise in abdominal CT for trauma patients.

  5. Trends in Wrist Arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obdeijn, Miryam C.; Tuijthof, Gabrielle J. M.; van der Horst, Chantal M. A. M.; Mathoulin, Christophe; Liverneaux, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Background Wrist arthroscopy plays a role in both the diagnosis and the treatment of wrist pathology. It has evolved in the last three decades. Questions The present status of wrist arthroscopy was investigated by answering the following questions: -What is its current position in the treatment wrist pathologies according to the literature? -What is its current position according to hand surgeons? Methods Analysis of the number of publications on wrist arthroscopy was performed and compared with the number of publications on other arthroscopy topics to assess the current position of wrist arthroscopy. The members of the EWAS (European Wrist Arthroscopy Society) and the members of eight national hand surgery societies were questioned on wrist arthroscopy in daily practice. Results From 1975 till now, 925 papers on wrist arthroscopy were found. The publications on wrist arthroscopy increased from an average of 8/year (1986) to 26/year (2012). More than half (56.9%) of the respondents of the EWAS perform fewer than 5 wrist arthroscopies per month, and only 7 (10.8%) indicate the performance of more than 10 wrist arthroscopies per month. Seventy-four percent of the orthopedic hand surgeons perform wrist arthroscopy (in 48.5% for therapeutic indications) against 36.8% of plastic surgery hand surgeons (in 23.1% for therapeutic indications). Conclusion Wrist arthroscopy has taken up a place in the armamentarium of the hand surgeon. The place of wrist arthroscopy in daily practice is related to the background of the hand surgeon. PMID:24436823

  6. Associations of work activities requiring pinch or hand grip or exposure to hand-arm vibration with finger and wrist osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Paula E C; Shiri, Rahman; Kryger, Ann I;

    2014-01-01

    the associations of radiographic diagnosed finger and/or wrist joint OA with work activities involving pinch or hand grip or exposure to HAV. We used specific criteria to evaluate completeness of reporting, potential confounding, and bias. Pooled odds ratios (OR) were computed using random......-effects meta-analyses. RESULTS: Of the 19 studies included, 17 were cross-sectional, 1 was a prospective cohort, and 1 a case-control study. The meta-analyses of studies that controlled their estimates for at least age and gender showed the associations of pinch grip work with proximal interphalangeal joint...

  7. Wrist pulse (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    To measure the pulse at the wrist, place the index and middle finger over the underside of the opposite wrist, below the base ... firmly with flat fingers until you feel the pulse in the radial artery.

  8. Arthritis of the Wrist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the hand and wrist. It is symmetrical, meaning that it usually affects the same joint on ... swelling, pain, limited motion, and weakness. However, in contrast to OA, wrist symptoms will usually be accompanied ...

  9. 腹部联合轴型皮瓣修复腕部环状高压电烧伤创面%Repair of circumferential wound in the wrist region due to high-voltage electrical burn using combined abdominal axial pattern flaps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈余明; 田彭; 宁方刚; 覃凤均; 张国安

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the method for repairing circumferential wound in the wrist region due to high-voltage electrical burn.Methods Six patients with circumferential wound in the wrist region after high-voltage electrical burn were admitted to our hospital from January 2009 to December 2011.After debridement,wounds in the wrist were repaired with combined abdominal axial pattern flaps.The wound of wrist on the flexor aspect was repaired with paraumbilical flap carrying a portion of rectus abdominis that filled the wound cavity of the wrist on the flexor aspect.The wound of wrist on the dorsal aspect was repaired with lower abdominal flap.Pedicle division was performed 4-5 weeks post surgery.Some donor sites were sutured directly,and the others were closed by skin grafting after the suture of anterior sheath.Results Three flaps survived.Liquefaction necrosis of tissue was observed under two flaps,and they were healed after debridement.Radial artery embolism of wrist occurred in one flap when pedicle division was performed 5 weeks post surgery,and it was healed by a transplantation of a segment of the great saphenous vein to reconstruct radial artery right after debridement.Patients were followed up for 6-12 months,and satisfactory appearance and function of the flaps were observed.Conclusions It is a feasible option to repair circumferential wound in the wrist region due to high-voltage electrical burn by using paraumbilical flap carrying a portion of rectus abdominis muscle combined with lower abdominal flap.%目的 探讨腕部环状高压电烧伤创面的修复方法. 方法 2009年1月-2011年12月,笔者单位收治6例腕部环状高压电烧伤患者,清创后采用腹部联合轴型皮瓣修复腕部创面,即用带部分腹直肌的脐旁皮瓣修复腕屈侧创面,其中腹直肌充填腕屈侧腔隙;下腹部皮瓣修复腕背侧创面,术后4~5周断蒂.供瓣区部分直接.拢缝合,部分在前鞘拉拢缝合后植皮修复. 结果 3

  10. 上臂式电子血压计和手腕式电子血压计的准确性比较%Comparison of Upper Arm Type Electronic Sphygmomanometer and Wrist Electronic Blood Pressure Monitor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马凤莲

    2015-01-01

    电子血压计被越来越多的家庭使用,但是其测量的准确性一直被使用者质疑。本文按YY 0670-2008《无创自动测量血压计》标准,对上臂式电子血压计和手腕式电子血压计的可重复性和压力传感器准确性进行检测、比较,为使用者提供科学依据。%Electronic sphygmomanometers have been used widely by many families, but their accuracy of measurement was doubt by the users. According to standard of YY 0670-2008 “Non-invasive Automated Sphygmomanometers”, this article was reported the testing and comparisons of repeatability of the upper arm electronic sphygmomanometers and the wrist electronic sphygmomanometers and the accuracy of pressure sensors. This article provided the scientiifc basis and data for the users.

  11. Two-degree-of-freedom powered prosthetic wrist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Kyberd, PhD

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Prosthetic wrists need to be compact. By minimizing space requirements, a wrist unit can be made for people with long residual limbs. This prosthetic wrist uses two motors arranged across the arm within the envelope of the hand. The drive is transmitted by a differential so that it produces wrist flexion and extension, pronation and supination, or a combination of both. As a case study, it was controlled by a single-prosthesis user with pattern recognition of the myoelectric signals from the forearm. The result is a compact, two-degree-of-freedom prosthetic wrist that has the potential to improve the functionality of any prosthetic hand by creating a hand orientation that more closely matches grasp requirements.

  12. Armes

    OpenAIRE

    Camps, G.; Chenorkian, R.; Lhote, H.

    2013-01-01

    Préhistoire (G. Camps) Les armes des Paléoberbères de la Préhistoire ne présentent guère d’originalité mais à la documentation archéologique provenant de fouilles s’ajoute, en Afrique du Nord et au Sahara, une documentation iconographique d’une grande richesse que ne possèdent pas les autres pays riverains du bassin occidental de la Méditerranée. Durant les temps paléolithiques, les hommes qui occupèrent le Maghreb et le Sahara utilisèrent, en plus des outils et armes connus ailleurs ; biface...

  13. Advances in wrist arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Jennifer Moriatis; Dukas, Alex; Pensak, Michael

    2012-11-01

    Since its introduction more than three decades ago, wrist arthroscopy has continually evolved. The procedure has a wide list of indications, including diagnostic and management applications. The scope of practice for the wrist arthroscopic surgeon includes management of triangulofibrocartilage complex pathology, evaluation and management of carpal instability, assistance in fracture reduction of the radius and scaphoid, treatment of trapeziometacarpal synovitis and arthritis, distal ulnar and carpal bone excisions, and salvage procedures. In addition, innovations such as new portals and smaller arthroscopes have expanded the applications of wrist arthroscopy. PMID:23118138

  14. MRI of the wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dick, Elizabeth A. [Department of MRI, St Mary' s Hospital, Praed St, London W2 1NY (United Kingdom)], E-mail: dickelizabeth@hotmail.com; Burnett, Carole; Gedroyc, Wladyslaw M.W. [Department of MRI, St Mary' s Hospital, Praed St, London W2 1NY (United Kingdom)

    2008-08-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist is increasingly recognised as the imaging modality of choice in wrist disorders as image resolution improves and clinicians realise its potential. Consequently the ability to confidently interpret such imaging will become more important to both general and musculoskeletal radiologists. This article reviews current optimal imaging protocols and describes common abnormalities with a particular emphasis on less well understood topics such as intercalated segment instability, the triangular fibrocartilage complex and carpal tunnel syndrome.

  15. Lightweight wrist photoplethysmography for heavy exercise: motion robust heart rate monitoring algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Po-Hsiang; Kim, Insoo

    2015-01-01

    The challenge of heart rate monitoring based on wrist photoplethysmography (PPG) during heavy exercise is addressed. PPG is susceptible to motion artefacts, which have to be mitigated for accurate heart rate estimation. Motion artefacts are particularly apparent for wrist devices, for example, a smart watch, because of the high mobility of the arms. Proposed is a low complexity highly accurate heart rate estimation method for continuous heart rate monitoring using wrist PPG. The proposed meth...

  16. Destructive wrist arthropathy of pseudogout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smathers, R.L.; Keats, T.E.; Stelling, C.B.

    1982-01-01

    The wrist is a frequent site of arthropathy in the pseudogout syndrome (calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease). Three cases of severe wrist arthropathy are presented to emphasize the destructive changes which may occur, including necrosis or collapse of the lunate and navicular bones. The roentgenographic findings characteristic of pseudogout in the wrist are discussed.

  17. X-Ray Exam: Wrist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth X-Ray Exam: Wrist KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Wrist Print A A A Text Size ... español Radiografía: muñeca What It Is A wrist X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  18. Hand and Wrist Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Symptom Picker Hand and Arm Conditions Carpal Tunnel Ganglion Cysts Trigger Finger Arthritis Base of the Thumb See ... Symptom Picker Hand and Arm Conditions Carpal Tunnel Ganglion Cysts Trigger Finger Arthritis Base of the Thumb See ...

  19. Qualifying CT for wrist arthroplasty: extending techniques for total hip arthroplasty to total wrist arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcala, Yvonne; Olivecrona, Henrik; Olivecrona, Lotta; Noz, Marilyn E.; Maguire, Gerald Q., Jr.; Zeleznik, Michael P.; Sollerman, Christer

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to extend previous work to detect migration of total wrist arthroplasty non-invasively, and with greater accuracy. Two human cadaverous arms, each with a cemented total wrist implant, were used in this study. In one of the arms, 1 mm tantalum balls were implanted, six in the carpal bones and five in the radius. Five CT scans of each arm were acquired, changing the position of the arm each time to mimic different positions patients might take on repeated examinations. Registration of CT volume data sets was performed using an extensively validated, 3D semi-automatic volume fusion tool in which co-homologous point pairs (landmarks) are chosen on each volume to be registered. Three sets of ten cases each were obtained by placing landmarks on 1) bone only (using only arm one), 2) tantalum implants only, and 3) bone and tantalum implants (both using only arm two). The accuracy of the match was assessed visually in 2D and 3D, and numerically by calculating the distance difference between the actual position of the transformed landmarks and their ideal position (i.e., the reference landmark positions). All cases were matched visually within one width of cortical bone and numerically within one half CT voxel (0.32 mm, p = 0.05). This method matched only the bone/arm and not the prosthetic component per se, thus making it possible to detect prosthetic movement and wear. This method was clinically used for one patient with pain. Loosening of the carpal prosthetic component was accurately detected and this was confirmed at surgery.

  20. Effects of Taping on Pain, Grip Strength and Wrist Extension Force in Patients with Tennis Elbow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsoddini, Alireza; Hollisaz, Mohammad Taghi

    2013-01-01

    Background Tennis elbow (TE) is a common musculotendinous degenerative disorder of the extensor origin at the lateral humeral epicondyle. Different modes of treatment are used for management of tennis elbow. Objectives This study investigated the effect of the taping technique (TT) on pain, grip strength and wrist extension force in treatment of tennis elbow. Patients and Methods Thirty patients (16 men /14 women with a mean age of 32.2 years) with tennis elbow of their dominant arm participated in this study. Outcome measures were assessment of pain at the lateral aspect of the elbow, grip strength and wrist extension force before and five to ten minutes after application of elbow tape on the affected and unaffected arms. A Visual Analog Scale was used to assess pain. A dynamometer and a hand-held dynamometer were used for evaluation of grip strength and wrist extension force, respectively. Results Among the variables, significant differences were found in wrist extension forces between effected and unaffected arms (P = 0.02). Changes in grip strength showed statically significant improvements in the affected arm compared to the unaffected arm (P = 0.03). Also, in assessment of pain at the lateral epicondyle, the mean change between affected and unaffected arms was significant, with P = 0.001. Conclusions The taping technique, as applied in this study demonstrates an impressive effect on wrist extension force and grip strength of patients with TE. Elbow taping also reduces pain at the lateral aspect of the elbow in these patients. PMID:24350156

  1. Epidemiology of acute wrist trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, C F; Lauritsen, Jens

    1993-01-01

    Epidemiological data on wrist injuries in a population can be used for planning by applying them to criteria for care and thus deriving estimates of provisions for care according to currently desirable standards. In a 1-year study all patients > or = 15 years with acute wrist trauma and treated...... in the emergency room were examined according to an algorithm until a diagnosis was established. The overall incidence of wrist trauma was 69 per 10,000 inhabitants per year. Incidence of wrist trauma requiring x-ray examination was 58 per 10,000 per year. The incidence of distal radius fractures was 27 per 10...... using data from a population-based study. A completeness rate of 0.56 (95% confidence interval: 0.31-0.78) was found. An x-ray had been taken for all patients reporting a fracture thus justifying the use of fractures as an incidence measure when comparing groups of patients with wrist trauma....

  2. The instability of wrist joint and total wrist replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jin-Xing; Xu, Yong-Qing

    2016-02-01

    Total wrist arthroplasty are not used as widely as total knee and hip replacement. The functional hands are requiring surgeons to design a durable and functional satisfying prosthesis. This article will list the main reasons that cause the failure of the prosthesis. Some remarkable and representative prostheses are listed to show the devolvement of total wrist prosthesis and their individual special innovations to fix the problems. And the second part we will discuss the part that biomechanical elements act in the total wrist replacement (TWA). Summarize and find out what the real problem is and how we can find a way to fix it. PMID:27033274

  3. Intervention randomized controlled trials involving wrist and shoulder arthroscopy: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Tadjerbashi, Kamelia; Rosales, Roberto S; Atroshi, Isam

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although arthroscopy of upper extremity joints was initially a diagnostic tool, it is increasingly used for therapeutic interventions. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are considered the gold standard for assessing treatment efficacy. We aimed to review the literature for intervention RCTs involving wrist and shoulder arthroscopy. Methods: We performed a systematic review for RCTs in which at least one arm was an intervention performed through wrist arthroscopy or shoulder arth...

  4. Evidence-based nursing care for patients from different cultures with a fractured wrist in a plaster cast

    OpenAIRE

    Kabuki Ocansey, Pearl

    2013-01-01

    A broken arm or wrist is usually caused by a fall onto an outstretched arm. It usually takes six to eight weeks to heal in adults, and less time in children. The aim of this study sought to describe how nurses can care for patients from different cultures with a fractured wrist in a plaster of paris cast. Qualitative content analysis was used to analysis the findings. The findings from the literature reviewed were grouped into three themes: nursing care for wrist fractures, providing cult...

  5. 21 CFR 888.3810 - Wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis. 888.3810 Section 888.3810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer...

  6. The double universal joint wrist on a manipulator: Solution of inverse position kinematics and singularity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Robert L., III

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents three methods to solve the inverse position kinematics position problem of the double universal joint attached to a manipulator: (1) an analytical solution for two specific cases; (2) an approximate closed form solution based on ignoring the wrist offset; and (3) an iterative method which repeats closed form position and orientation calculations until the solution is achieved. Several manipulators are used to demonstrate the solution methods: cartesian, cylindrical, spherical, and an anthropomorphic articulated arm, based on the Flight Telerobotic Servicer (FTS) arm. A singularity analysis is presented for the double universal joint wrist attached to the above manipulator arms. While the double universal joint wrist standing alone is singularity-free in orientation, the singularity analysis indicates the presence of coupled position/orientation singularities of the spherical and articulated manipulators with the wrist. The cartesian and cylindrical manipulators with the double universal joint wrist were found to be singularity-free. The methods of this paper can be implemented in a real-time controller for manipulators with the double universal joint wrist. Such mechanically dextrous systems could be used in telerobotic and industrial applications, but further work is required to avoid the singularities.

  7. Kinematics of Hooke universal joint robot wrists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckinney, William S., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The singularity problem associated with wrist mechanisms commonly found on industrial manipulators can be alleviated by redesigning the wrist so that it functions as a three-axis gimbal system. This paper discussess the kinematics of gimbal robot wrists made of one and two Hooke universal joints. Derivations of the resolved rate motion control equations for the single and double Hooke universal joint wrists are presented using the three-axis gimbal system as a theoretical wrist model.

  8. Ulnar Neuropathy at the Wrist

    OpenAIRE

    Pearce, Carisa; Feinberg, Joseph; Wolfe, Scott W.

    2009-01-01

    A case of ulnar nerve compression at the wrist within Guyon’s canal is reported. The clinical presentation initially appeared consistent with an ulnar nerve entrapment at the elbow. The true diagnosis of an ulnar sensorimotor nerve lesion occurring within the canal of Guyon was made electrophysiologically. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated compression of the nerve within the canal by a ganglionic cyst, which was confirmed by surgical intervention. Ulnar nerve entrapment at the wrist is ...

  9. Small Business Innovations (Robotic Wrist)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Under a Langley Research Center Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract, Ross-Hime Designs, Inc. Minneapolis, MN, developed the Omni-Wrist actuator, which has a 25-pound capacity, 180 degrees of pitch/yaw, and 360 degrees of roll. Company literature calls it "the first successful singularity-free high-precision (robotic) wrist." Applications include spray painting, sealing, ultrasonic testing, welding and a variety of nuclear industry, aerospace and military uses.

  10. Abdominal Adhesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... adhesions? Abdominal adhesions can cause intestinal obstruction and female infertility—the inability to become pregnant after a year of trying. Abdominal adhesions can lead to female infertility by preventing fertilized eggs from reaching the uterus, ...

  11. Abdominal Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It is used to help diagnose pain or distention and evaluate the kidneys, liver, gallbladder, pancreas, spleen ... variety of conditions, such as: abdominal pain or distention. abnormal liver function. enlarged abdominal organ. stones in ...

  12. [Comparison of invasive blood pressure measurement in the aorta with indirect oscillometric blood pressure measurement at the wrist and forearm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saul, F; Aristidou, Y; Klaus, D; Wiemeyer, A; Lösse, B

    1995-09-01

    Indirectly measured blood pressure at the wrist or upper arm was compared with directly measured values in the aortic arch during routinely performed diagnostic cardiac catheterization in 100 patients (31-80 years, mean 59.3 years, 60% males). The noninvasive measurements were carried out by oscillometric devices, NAiS Blood Pressure Watch for measurements at the wrist, and Hestia OZ80 at the upper arm. Systolic blood pressure measured at the wrist was 4.3 +/- 14.1 mm Hg, and the diastolic value 6.0 +/- 8.9 mm Hg higher than when measured at the aortic arch; the difference was significant in both cases. Correlation coefficients were 0.85 for systolic and 0.71 for diastolic blood pressure. In 16% of the patients the systolic blood pressure at the wrist differed more than +/- 20 mm Hg. The diastolic blood pressure at the wrist measured more than +/- 20 mm Hg higher than in the aorta in 5% of the patients. At the upper arm mean systolic values were not different to the aorta. The diastolic pressure was 9.3 +/- 9.8 mm Hg higher in the aorta than at the upper arm. To verify the accuracy of values measured with the NAiS Blood Pressure Watch compared with the standard technique at the upper arm, sequential measurements were made at wrist and ipsilateral upper arm in the same group of 100 patients. The systolic blood pressure at the left wrist was 3.4 +/- 13.3 mm Hg higher and the diastolic pressure 3.8 +/- 9.5 mm Hg lower than at the upper arm. Only 53% of systolic values lay within a range of +/- 10 mm Hg. The correspondence between wrist and upper arm values was better for diastolic blood pressure, the values differing by less than +/- 10 mm Hg in two-thirds of patients. Self-measurement of arterial blood pressure with an oscillometric device at the wrist can be recommended only in individual cases with a difference of simultaneously measured values at the upper arm of less than +/- 10 mm Hg for systolic and diastolic blood pressures. The standard method for indirectly

  13. Current concepts in wrist arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chloros, George D; Wiesler, Ethan R; Poehling, Gary G

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the recent literature on arthroscopic treatment of distal radius fractures (DRFs), triangular fibrocartilage complex injuries, intercarpal ligament injuries, and ganglion cysts, including the use of electrothermal devices. A major advantage of arthroscopy in the treatment of DRFs is the accurate assessment of the status of the articular surfaces and the detection of concomitant injuries. Nonrandomized studies of arthroscopically assisted reduction of DRFs show satisfactory results, but there is only 1 prospective randomized study showing the benefits of arthroscopy compared with open reduction-internal fixation. Wrist arthroscopy plays an important role as part of the treatment for DRFs; however, the treatment for each practitioner and each patient needs to be individualized. Wrist arthroscopy is the gold standard in the diagnosis and treatment of triangular fibrocartilage complex injuries. Type 1A injuries may be successfully treated with debridement, whereas the repair of type 1B, 1C, and 1D injuries gives satisfactory results. For type 2 injuries, the arthroscopic wafer procedure is equally effective as ulnar shortening osteotomy but is associated with fewer complications in the ulnar positive wrist. With interosseous ligament injuries, arthroscopic visualization provides critical diagnostic value. Debridement and pinning in the acute setting of complete ligament tears are promising and proven. In the chronic patient, arthroscopy can guide reconstructive options based on cartilage integrity. The preliminary results of wrist arthroscopy using electrothermal devices are encouraging; however, complications have been reported, and therefore, their use is controversial. In dorsal wrist ganglia, arthroscopy has shown excellent results, a lower rate of recurrence, and no incidence of scapholunate interosseous ligament instability compared with open ganglionectomy. Arthroscopy in the treatment of volar wrist ganglia has yielded

  14. Proximal Row Carpectomy Combined with Wrist Hemiarthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Culp, Randall W.; Bachoura, Abdo; Gelman, Scott E.; Jacoby, Sidney M.

    2012-01-01

    Proximal row carpectomy (PRC) combined with distal radius hemiarthroplasty is a relatively novel procedure that rivals total wrist arthrodesis and offers a new surgical treatment option for select patients with painful, end-stage wrist disease. We present our early experience with this procedure. A retrospective chart review was conducted for nonrheumatoid patients diagnosed with wrist arthritis and subsequently treated with wrist hemiarthroplasty combined with PRC. The minimum follow-up dura...

  15. Abdominal Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Deborah; Weilitz, Pamela Becker

    2016-03-01

    Abdominal pain is one of the most common complaints by patients, and assessment of abdominal pain and associated symptoms can be challenging for home healthcare providers. Reasons for abdominal pain are related to inflammation, organ distention, and ischemia. The history and physical examination are important to narrow the source of acute or chronic problems, identify immediate interventions, and when necessary, facilitate emergency department care. PMID:26925941

  16. The destructive wrist arthropathy of pseudogout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wrist is a frequent site of arthropathy in the pseudogout syndrome (calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease). Three cases of severe wrist arthropathy are presented to emphasize the destructive changes which may occur, including necrosis or collapse of the lunate and navicular bones. The roentgenographic findings characteristic of pseudogout in the wrist are discussed. (orig.)

  17. Computational Biomechanics of the Wrist Joint

    CERN Document Server

    Nazri Bajuri, Mohd

    2013-01-01

    This book presents an analysis of the stress distribution and contact stresses in severe rheumatoid wrist after total wrist arthroplasty. It assesses and compares the load transfer throughout the joint and contact pressure at the articulations. The data obtained from this study is of importance as this provide greater evidence to the benefits of total wrist arthroplasty in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

  18. New advances in wrist arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Gregory I; Munt, Justin; Turner, Perry C

    2008-03-01

    Wrist arthroscopy is a commonly used procedure that has undergone many modifications and improvements since it was first described. The advent of new portals (both dorsal and volar) means that the wrist joint can be viewed from virtually any perspective ("box concept"). Indications for wrist arthroscopy have continued to expand and include diagnostic and reparative procedures and, more recently, reconstructive, soft-tissue, and bony procedures. Arthroscopic grading of Kienböck's disease better describes articular damage compared with plain radiographs and can help guide surgical treatment options. Triangular fibrocartilage complex injury diagnosis, classification, and treatment can be performed arthroscopically, including distal ulna resection (wafer procedure). Assessment of fracture reduction of the distal radius and scaphoid is superior to that obtained with fluoroscopy, with the advantage of being able to look for associated soft-tissue and chondral injuries. Arthroscopic assessment of intercarpal ligament injuries and instability is now considered the gold standard by many authors. Arthroscopy can also aid us in the management of post-traumatic capsular contraction, resection of ganglia, and the relatively rare isolated ulna styloid impaction. Complications of wrist arthroscopy are relatively uncommon. With the ever-expanding list of indications and procedures that can be performed with this technique, it exists as an essential diagnostic and therapeutic tool for the orthopaedic surgeon. PMID:18308189

  19. Double representation of the wrist and elbow in human motor cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strother, L.; Medendorp, W.P.; Coros, A.M.; Vilis, T.

    2012-01-01

    Movements of the fingers, hand and arm involve overlapping neural representations in primary motor cortex (M1). Monkey M1 exhibits a coresurround organisation in which cortical representation of the hand and fingers is surrounded by representations of the wrist, elbow and shoulder. A potentially hom

  20. Abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential for multiple intraperitoneal and retroperitoneal organ injuries often makes accurate clinical evaluation of abdominal trauma patients difficult. Additionally, patients may be unresponsive, have unreliable abdominal physical examinations, or have concurrent serious head and cervical spine injuries which delay diagnosis of and attention to abdominal problems. In these situations radiologic abdominal imaging is often requested. To expedite patient evaluation, close cooperation between the emergency physician and the radiologist is essential. It is the clinical stability of the traumatized patient that dictates the extent of radiologic imaging. Life-threatening hypotension, positive peritoneal signs, or clear evidence of penetrating abdominal injury are indications for immediate surgery. Stable patients with signs suggesting intra-abdominal injury will benefit by further radiologic evaluation with appropriate imaging modalities. The selection of an appropriate modality in any one clinical situation depends upon many criteria including accessibility to diagnostic equipment, the sensitivity and specificity of each technique, and the expertise and preference of the attending radiologist. A suggested scheme for evaluating abdominal trauma patients is presented. Most aspects of this evaluation scheme will be discussed in depth

  1. Abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdominal injury is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in childhood. Ten percent of trauma-related deaths are due to abdominal injury. Thousands of children are involved in auto accidents annually; many suffer severe internal injury. Child abuse is a second less frequent but equally serious cause of internal abdominal injury. The descriptions of McCort and Eisenstein and their associates in the 1960s first brought to attention the frequency and severity of visceral injury as important manifestations of the child abuse syndrome. Blunt abdominal trauma often causes multiple injuries; in the past, many children have been subjected to exploratory surgery to evaluate the extent of possible hidden injury. Since the advent of noninvasive radiologic imaging techniques including radionuclide scans and ultrasound and, especially, computed tomography (CT), the radiologist has been better able to assess (accurately) the extent of abdominal injury and thus allow conservative therapy in many cases. Penetrating abdominal trauma occurs following gunshot wounds, stabbing, and other similar injury. This is fortunately, a relatively uncommon occurrence in most pediatric centers and will not be discussed specifically here, although many principles of blunt trauma diagnosis are valid for evaluation of penetrating abdominal trauma. If there is any question that a wound has extended intraperitonelly, a sinogram with water-soluble contrast material allows quick, accurate diagnosis. The presence of large amounts of free intraperitoneal gas suggests penetrating injury to the colon or other gas-containing viscus and is generally considered an indication for surgery

  2. Denervation of the wrist joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck-Gramcko, D

    1977-01-01

    A collective review was made of the results of denervation of the wrist joint for painful restrictiorn of motion done in 313 patients and follow-up studies on 195 (average 4.1 years, ranging from 9 months to 14 years). Complete denervation was done in only 30, partial denervation in the others being done after testing with local anesthetic blocks. Sixty-nine of the patients retained a moble wrist without pain or with slight pain with heavy work. No evidence of Charcot-like joints was seen. Poorest results followed when the operation was done for sequelae of intra-articular fracture of the radius, fracture dislocations, unstable ligamentous support, joint surface destruction, or for those required to do heavy manual labor. Arthrodesis was done secondarily in nine patients. PMID:839055

  3. Abdominal sounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... during sleep. They also occur normally for a short time after the use of certain medicines and after abdominal surgery. Decreased or absent bowel sounds often indicate constipation. Increased ( hyperactive ) bowel sounds ...

  4. Radiologic examination and measurement of the wrist and distal radio-ulnar joint. New aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toernvall, A.H.; Ekenstam, F. af; Hagert, C.G.; Irstam, L.

    Following fractures of the distal radius, a relatively high incidence of complications is caused by malalignment in the distal radio-ulnar (DRU) joint; recent anatomic and clinical investigations have shown a congruity of that joint to be of significant importance for restoring the function of the wrist. The radius forms a moderately arched bone, which moves around the ulna in pronation and supination. Biomechanically, the ulna may be regarded as the pillar around which the radius moves. In an anatomic investigation of 5 arm specimens, we have shown that the maximum cartilage contact in the DRU joint between the ulna head and the distal radius occurs in the neutral rotation position. A proposed routine examination method of the wrist and forearm includes a true antero-posterior and a lateral projection of the radius and the ulna, performed with the forearm and wrist in a neutral rotation, a neutral wrist deviation and with the elbow angled 90 degrees. Such an examination implies a standardized and reproducible method. In a radioanatomic investigation, a series of 50 healthy wrists and forearms were examined. A simple measuring technique is presented, applicable to the DRU joint and wrist favouring the ulna as the bone through which a reproducible long axis of the forearm/wrist may be drawn. It is suggested that the length of the radius should be judged relative to the ulna. Ulnar head inclination and radio-ulnar angle are new concepts, being major characteristics of the DRU joint. These angles of the right and left wrist were equal and no difference was found between the sexes. Minor alterations of the distal radius may be revealed when estimating these angles.

  5. Radiologic examination and measurement of the wrist and distal radio-ulnar joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following fractures of the distal radius, a relatively high incidence of complications is caused by malalignment in the distal radio-ulnar (DRU) joint; recent anatomic and clinical investigations have shown a congruity of that joint to be of significant importance for restoring the function of the wrist. The radius forms a moderately arched bone, which moves around the ulna in pronation and supination. Biomechanically, the ulna may be regarded as the pillar around which the radius moves. In an anatomic investigation of 5 arm specimens, we have shown that the maximum cartilage contact in the DRU joint between the ulna head and the distal radius occurs in the neutral rotation position. A proposed routine examination method of the wrist and forearm includes a true antero-posterior and a lateral projection of the radius and the ulna, performed with the forearm and wrist in a neutral rotation, a neutral wrist deviation and with the elbow angled 90 degrees. Such an examination implies a standardized and reproducible method. In a radioanatomic investigation, a series of 50 healthy wrists and forearms were examined. A simple measuring technique is presented, applicable to the DRU joint and wrist favouring the ulna as the bone through which a reproducible long axis of the forearm/wrist may be drawn. It is suggested that the length of the radius should be judged relative to the ulna. Ulnar head inclination and radio-ulnar angle are new concepts, being major characteristics of the DRU joint. These angles of the right and left wrist were equal and no difference was found between the sexes. Minor alterations of the distal radius may be revealed when estimating these angles. (orig.)

  6. The anatomy and pathophysiology of the wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Geoffrey

    2006-04-28

    A basic knowledge of the anatomy and the interrelationships of the structures that make up the joint is a prerequisite for understanding the pathomechanics of the wrist. In the paper, the anatomy (especially including carpal ligaments) and the mechanics of wrist movements, also under load, are described. The features of the common wrist disorders that occur as a result of injury are also explained. PMID:17603435

  7. Can total wrist arthroplasty be an option in the treatment of the severely destroyed posttraumatic wrist?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeckstyns, Michel E H; Herzberg, Guillaume; Sørensen, Allan Ibsen;

    2013-01-01

    Background Severely destroyed posttraumatic wrists are usually treated by partial or total wrist fusion or proximal row carpectomy. The indications for and longevity of total wrist arthroplasty (TWA) are still unclear. Case Description The aim of this study was to analyze a series in which one la...

  8. A cable-driven wrist robotic rehabilitator using a novel torque-field controller for human motion training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weihai; Cui, Xiang; Zhang, Jianbin; Wang, Jianhua

    2015-06-01

    Rehabilitation technologies have great potentials in assisted motion training for stroke patients. Considering that wrist motion plays an important role in arm dexterous manipulation of activities of daily living, this paper focuses on developing a cable-driven wrist robotic rehabilitator (CDWRR) for motion training or assistance to subjects with motor disabilities. The CDWRR utilizes the wrist skeletal joints and arm segments as the supporting structure and takes advantage of cable-driven parallel design to build the system, which brings the properties of flexibility, low-cost, and low-weight. The controller of the CDWRR is designed typically based on a virtual torque-field, which is to plan "assist-as-needed" torques for the spherical motion of wrist responding to the orientation deviation in wrist motion training. The torque-field controller can be customized to different levels of rehabilitation training requirements by tuning the field parameters. Additionally, a rapidly convergent parameter self-identification algorithm is developed to obtain the uncertain parameters automatically for the floating wearable structure of the CDWRR. Finally, experiments on a healthy subject are carried out to demonstrate the performance of the controller and the feasibility of the CDWRR on wrist motion training or assistance.

  9. Abdominal Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Waele, Jan J

    2016-08-01

    Abdominal infections are an important challenge for the intensive care physician. In an era of increasing antimicrobial resistance, selecting the appropriate regimen is important and, with new drugs coming to the market, correct use is important more than ever before and abdominal infections are an excellent target for antimicrobial stewardship programs. Biomarkers may be helpful, but their exact role in managing abdominal infections remains incompletely understood. Source control also remains an ongoing conundrum, and evidence is increasing that its importance supersedes the impact of antibiotic therapy. New strategies such as open abdomen management may offer added benefit in severely ill patients, but more data are needed to identify its exact role. The role of fungi and the need for antifungal coverage, on the other hand, have been investigated extensively in recent years, but at this point, it remains unclear who requires empirical as well as directed therapy. PMID:27363829

  10. Carpal instability of the wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caggiano, Nicholas; Matullo, Kristofer S

    2014-01-01

    The scaphoid is stabilized by the scapholunate ligament (directly) and lunotriquetral ligament (indirectly). Disruption of either of these ligaments leads to a pattern of instability that, left untreated, leads to altered mechanics of the wrist and ultimately debilitating arthritis and collapse. Although arthroscopy remains the gold standard for diagnosis of these injuries, plain films and advanced imaging are useful adjuncts. In the acute setting, conservative treatment may be attempted, but recalcitrant cases require surgical stabilization. Salvage procedures are also available for those patients who fail initial stabilization or present with late degeneration. PMID:24267214

  11. Abdominal Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... relaxation. Guided imagery for abdominal pain About self-hypnosis and kids See YourChild : Pain and Your Child or Teen for more detail ... how to help your baby cope with the pain of medical procedures, circumcision, and teething. ... Helping Kids YourChild : A Look at Biofeedback YourChild : ...

  12. Current innovations in wrist arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slutsky, David J

    2012-09-01

    It has become clear that the stability of the scapholunate joint does not depend wholly on the scapholunate interosseous ligament, but rather on both primary and secondary stabilizers, which form a scapholunate ligament complex. Each case of scapholunate instability is unique and should be treated with tissue-specific repairs, which may partly explain why one procedure cannot successfully restore joint stability in every case. Wrist arthroscopy has a pivotal role in both the assessment and treatment of the scapholunate ligament complex derangements. Tears of the foveal attachment of the triangular fibrocartilaginous complex can be an underdiagnosed cause of distal radioulnar joint instability, because the foveal fibers cannot be visualized using the standard radiocarpal arthroscopy portals. Distal radioulnar joint arthroscopy allows for direct visualization and assessment of these fibers, which in turn has spawned a number of open and arthroscopic repair methods. Wrist arthroscopy has gained wider acceptance as a method to fine-tune articular reduction during open and percutaneous fixation of distal radius fractures, and simplifies intra-articular osteotomies for malunion. It can facilitate percutaneous bone grafting of scaphoid nonunions and has a role in the diagnosis and treatment of associated soft tissue lesions. These and other recent developments will be discussed in the following article. PMID:22916867

  13. Supinator Extender (SUE): a pneumatically actuated robot for forearm/wrist rehabilitation after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allington, James; Spencer, Steven J; Klein, Julius; Buell, Meghan; Reinkensmeyer, David J; Bobrow, James

    2011-01-01

    The robot described in this paper, SUE (Supinator Extender), adds forearm/wrist rehabilitation functionality to the UCI BONES exoskeleton robot and to the ArmeoSpring rehabilitation device. SUE is a 2-DOF serial chain that can measure and assist forearm supination-pronation and wrist flexion-extension. The large power to weight ratio of pneumatic actuators allows SUE to achieve the forces needed for rehabilitation therapy while remaining lightweight enough to be carried by BONES and ArmeoSpring. Each degree of freedom has a range of 90 degrees, and a nominal torque of 2 ft-lbs. The cylinders are mounted away from the patient's body on the lateral aspect of the arm. This is to prevent the danger of a collision and maximize the workspace of the arm robot. The rotation axis used for supination-pronation is a small bearing just below the subject's wrist. The flexion-extension motion is actuated by a cantilevered pneumatic cylinder, which allows the palm of the hand to remain open. Data are presented that demonstrate the ability of SUE to measure and cancel forearm/wrist passive tone, thereby extending the active range of motion for people with stroke. PMID:22254624

  14. Hand/Wrist Disorders among Sign Language Communicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Susan M.; Kress, Tyler A.; Hart, William M.

    2000-01-01

    A study assessed the frequency of self-reported hand/wrist problems among 184 sign-language communicators. Fifty-nine percent reported experiencing hand/wrist problems, 26 percent reported experiencing hand/wrist problems severe enough to limit their ability to work, and 18 percent reported a medical diagnosis of wrist tendinitis, carpal tunnel…

  15. Prognosis of wrist ganglion operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündeş, H; Cirpici, Y; Sarlak, A; Müezzinoglu, S

    2000-10-01

    A retrospective study was conducted to evaluate the results of treatment of 40 wrist ganglia operated under local anesthesia over four years. The mean follow-up period was 27 months (range 6-48 months). There were 24 dorsal and 16 volar ganglia. The mean complication rate was 56% for volar ganglia, 12.5% for dorsal ganglia, and the difference was significant (p dorsal cyst) and to the palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve in two patients (volar cysts). The mean nerve injury rate was 7.5%. In two patients with volar ganglia, the palmar superficial branch of the radial artery was lace-rated and had to be ligated. The significantly higher complication rate after excision of volar ganglia in contrast to dorsal ones might indicate that the former should be approached more carefully in contrast to dorsal ones and preferably by a senior surgeon. PMID:11103488

  16. Recognizing upper limb movements with wrist worn inertial sensors using k-means clustering classification

    OpenAIRE

    Biswas, Dwaipayan; Cranny, Andy; Gupta, Nayaab; Maharatna, Koushik; Achner, Josy; Klemke, Jasmin; Jobges, Michael; Ortmann, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a methodology for recognizing three fundamental movements of the human forearm (extension, flexion and rotation) using pattern recognition applied to the data from a single wrist-worn, inertial sensor. We propose that this technique could be used as a clinical tool to assess rehabilitation progress in neurodegenerative pathologies such as stroke or cerebral palsy by tracking the number of times a patient performs specific arm movements (e.g. prescribed exercises) with...

  17. Arthroscopic findings in patients with painful wrist ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povlsen, B; Peckett, W R

    2001-09-01

    The aetiology of painful dorsal wrist ganglia remains obscure. In a prospective study we investigated the link between a painful dorsal wrist ganglion and wrist joint abnormality with wrist arthroscopy before excision of the ganglion. Of 16 wrists arthroscoped 12 were abnormal, 10 had an abnormal scapholunate joint, and two had abnormal lunatetriquetral joints. We think that painful dorsal wrist ganglia, like popliteal cysts in the knee, are markers of underlying joint abnormalities. Surgeons who treat painful ganglia should be aware of a possible underlying cause so that they can target treatment more accurately, particularly in recurrent cases and those patients with persistent wrist pain after excision of the ganglion. PMID:11680404

  18. Osteoarthritis of the Wrist STT Joint and Radiocarpal Joint

    OpenAIRE

    Ronit Wollstein; Julio Clavijo; Gilula, Louis A.

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of wrist osteoarthritis (OA) lags behind that of other joints, possibly due to the complexity of wrist biomechanics and the importance of ligamentous forces in the function of the wrist. Scaphotrapeziotrapezoidal (STT) OA is common, but its role in wrist clinical pathology and biomechanics is unclear. We identified the prevalence of radiographic STT joint OA in our hand clinic population and defined the relationship between STT and radiocarpal OA in wrist radiographs. One hu...

  19. Bilateral three-compartment wrist arthrography in patients with unilateral wrist pain: findings and implications for management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilateral three-compartment wrist arthrography was performed in 30 patients with unilateral post-traumatic wrist pain to assess the incidence of bilateral findings. The mean age of patients was 30 (range 18-55) years. Thirty-three percent of patients were normal bilaterally, 30% had unilateral communication in the symptomatic wrist, 30% had communications in both the symptomatic and asymptomatic wrists and 7% had communication in the asymptomatic wrist only. Unilateral three-compartment wrist arthrography is not recommended in the assessment of unilateral post-traumatic wrist pain; no advantage of three-compartment injection over radiocarpal injection alone was shown. (orig.)

  20. Ganglion Cyst of the Wrist and Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    .org Ganglion Cyst of the Wrist and Hand Page ( 1 ) Ganglion cysts are the most common mass or lump ... can quickly appear, disappear, and change size. Many ganglion cysts do not require treatment. However, if the ...

  1. Wrist arthroscopy: principles and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, R; Bozentka, D J; Osterman, A L

    2001-01-01

    With the development of better and smaller equipment, arthroscopy of the wrist offers the same benefits achievable with arthroscopy of the knee, shoulder, or elbow - not only diagnostic information but also a therapeutic option. Standardized techniques of performing wrist arthroscopy have been developed to evaluate the treat various wrist disorders, such as lesions of the triangular fibrocartilage complex, intra-articular distal radius fractures, and scaphoid fractures. Arthroscopy is now performed in the treatment of dorsal-wrist ganglion cysts and interosseous ligament disruptions, as well as for bone incisions, such as radial styloidectomy, distal ulnar excision (wafer procedure), and proximal-row carpectomy. Compared with other techniques, arthroscopic procedures, such as repair of the triangular fibrocartilage complex, demonstrate better results and improved localization of the injury with a low complication rate. In addition, arthroscopic procedures involve lesssurgical dissection, less postoperative pain, a shorter recovery time, and an earlier return to work for the patient. PMID:11421577

  2. Ganglions of the hand and wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, L; Bartell, T; Logan, S E

    1988-06-01

    The ganglion is the most common soft tissue tumor of the hand and wrist, originating from the joint capsule or tendon sheath. Accurate diagnosis and proper treatment of these entities require a thorough knowledge of the anatomy of the wrist and hand as well as of the ganglion itself. Definitive therapy is based on total surgical removal of the cyst and its connections to the joint or tendon sheath. PMID:3287641

  3. The Smart Home Controller on Your Wrist

    OpenAIRE

    De Russis, Luigi; Bonino, Dario; Corno, Fulvio

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses human-home interaction mediated by everyday objects, with a particular focus on wrist watches. Everyday wrist-worn devices are turned into flexible home access points by exploiting a modular architecture independent from the underlying home automation system, and from the specific watch device, provided that the necessary capabilities are available. A first working prototype based on a cost-effective consumer watch is presented, and experimental results confirm the viabil...

  4. MR and CT arthrography of the wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerezal, Luis; de Dios Berná-Mestre, Juan; Canga, Ana; Llopis, Eva; Rolon, Alejandro; Martín-Oliva, Xavier; del Piñal, Francisco

    2012-02-01

    The study of the wrist represents a major diagnostic challenge because of its complex anatomy and the small size of individual structures. Recent advances in imaging techniques have increased our diagnostic capabilities. However, 3T magnets, multichannel specific wrist coils, and new MRI sequences have not restricted the indications of arthrographic imaging techniques (CT arthrography and MR arthrography). Distension of the different wrist compartments at CT arthrography and MR arthrography significantly improves the diagnostic accuracy for triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) complex injuries and carpal instability. Dedicated multichannel wrist coils are essential for an adequate study of the wrist, but the placement of these coils and the positioning of the wrist are also important for proper diagnosis. The development of dynamic multislice CT studies allows a diagnostic approach that combines dynamic information and the accurate assessment of ligaments and the TFC complex. New advances in arthroscopy have changed the anatomical description of the TFC with a functional division in the proximal and distal TFC complex, and they have allowed a better characterization of lesions of the TFC complex with subclassification of Palmer 1B and 1D lesions and description of new lesions not included in the Palmer classification, such as capsular injuries. PMID:22447235

  5. Automatic Segmentation of Wrist Bones in CT Using a Statistical Wrist Shape + Pose Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anas, Emran Mohammad Abu; Rasoulian, Abtin; Seitel, Alexander; Darras, Kathryn; Wilson, David; John, Paul St; Pichora, David; Mousavi, Parvin; Rohling, Robert; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2016-08-01

    Segmentation of the wrist bones in CT images has been frequently used in different clinical applications including arthritis evaluation, bone age assessment and image-guided interventions. The major challenges include non-uniformity and spongy textures of the bone tissue as well as narrow inter-bone spaces. In this work, we propose an automatic wrist bone segmentation technique for CT images based on a statistical model that captures the shape and pose variations of the wrist joint across 60 example wrists at nine different wrist positions. To establish the correspondences across the training shapes at neutral positions, the wrist bone surfaces are jointly aligned using a group-wise registration framework based on a Gaussian Mixture Model. Principal component analysis is then used to determine the major modes of shape variations. The variations in poses not only across the population but also across different wrist positions are incorporated in two pose models. An intra-subject pose model is developed by utilizing the similarity transforms at all wrist positions across the population. Further, an inter-subject pose model is used to model the pose variations across different wrist positions. For segmentation of the wrist bones in CT images, the developed model is registered to the edge point cloud extracted from the CT volume through an expectation maximization based probabilistic approach. Residual registration errors are corrected by application of a non-rigid registration technique. We validate the proposed segmentation method by registering the wrist model to a total of 66 unseen CT volumes of average voxel size of 0.38 mm. We report a mean surface distance error of 0.33 mm and a mean Jaccard index of 0.86. PMID:26890640

  6. A Global Obstacle-avoidance Map for Anthropomorphic Arms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Fang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available More and more humanoid robots are used in human society, and they face a wide variety of complicated manipulation tasks, which are mainly to be achieved by their anthropomorphic arms. Obstacle avoidance for the anthropomorphic arm must be a fundamental consideration to guarantee the successful implementation of these tasks. Different from traditional methods searching for feasible or optimal collision-free solutions for the anthropomorphic arm, a global obstacle- avoidance map for the whole arm is proposed to indicate the complete set of feasible solutions. In this map, the motion of the arm can be appropriately planned to intuitively control the configuration of the arm in motion. First, the cubic spline function is adopted to interpolate some well-chosen path points to generate a smooth collision-free path for the wrist of the anthropomorphic arm. Second, based on the path function of the wrist, the time and the self-rotation angle of the arm about the “shoulder-wrist” axis are used to parameterize all possible configurations of the arm so that a global two- dimensional map considering the obstacle avoidance can be established. Subsequently, a collision-free self-rotation angle profile of the arm can be well planned. Finally, the joint trajectories of a specific anthropomorphic arm, which correspond to the planned path of the wrist and self-rotation angle profile of the arm, can be solved on the basis of the general kinematic analysis of the anthropomorphic arm, and the specific structure. Several simulations are conducted to verify that the proposed collision-free motion planning method for anthropomorphic arms has some advantages and can be regarded as a convenient and intuitive tool to control the configuration of the anthropomorphic arm in motion, without collision with obstacles in its surroundings.

  7. Evaluation of wrist arthroscopy outcomes in patients with chronic wrist pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Shahryar Kamrani

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: According to our results, wrist arthroscopy have acceptable outcome in TFCC injuries and Kienbock disease. With the ever-expanding list of indications and procedures that can be performed with wrist arthroscopy, it can be considered as an essential diagnostic and therapeutic tool for the orthopedic surgeon.

  8. In vivo length changes of wrist ligaments at full wrist extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, J; Chen, J; Tang, J B

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the length changes of carpal ligaments when loaded in full extension in vivo. We obtained computed tomography scans of the right wrists in three positions for six volunteers: neutral; 75° extension; and 75° extension with a further 10° of radial deviation. Nine ligaments were measured and analysed with computer modelling. The results showed that the radioscaphocapitate, long radiolunate, and ulnolunate ligaments lengthened the most at full wrist extension, suggesting that they were under greatest load. The radioscapholunate, ulnocapitate, and ulnotriquetral ligaments lengthened further with the addition of wrist radial deviation. At full extension, the dorsal intercarpal ligament inserting on the scaphoid was lengthened. The dorsal radiocarpal and dorsal intercarpal ligaments inserting on the trapezoid were shortened, suggesting reduced loading. In conclusion, a number of volar carpal ligaments lengthened significantly in full wrist extension and the ulnar carpal ligaments were further lengthened at wrist radial deviation. PMID:23571488

  9. Kinematic rate control of simulated robot hand at or near wrist singularity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, K.; Houck, J. A.; Carzoo, S. W.

    1985-01-01

    A robot hand should obey movement commands from an operator on a computer program as closely as possible. However, when two of the three rotational axes of the robot wrist are colinear, the wrist loses a degree of freedom, and the usual resolved rate equations (used to move the hand in response to an operator's inputs) are indeterminant. Furthermore, rate limiting occurs in close vicinity to this singularity. An analysis shows that rate limiting occurs not only in the vicinity of this singularity but also substantially away from it, even when the operator commands rotational rates of the robot hand that are only a small percentage of the operational joint rate limits. Therefore, joint angle rates are scaled when they exceed operational limits in a real time simulation of a robot arm. Simulation results show that a small dead band avoids the wrist singularity in the resolved rate equations but can introduce a high frequency oscillation close to the singularity. However, when a coordinated wrist movement is used in conjunction with the resolved rate equations, the high frequency oscillation disappears.

  10. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... access catheters Vertebroplasty Women and vascular disease Women's health Social Media Facebook Twitter ... Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Interventional Radiologists Treat Abdominal Aneurysms Nonsurgically Interventional radiologists are vascular ...

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist ligaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advent of small arthroscopes has enabled the hand surgeon to visualize the ligaments of the wrist directly with resultant increased accuracy in diagnosing and treating pathology. Orthopaedists are now demanding a preoperative assessment and this, in turn, has necessitated that radiologists have a comprehensive understanding of wrist anatomy. High resolution MR imaging can identify the wrist ligaments reliably and provide information concerning their integrity. Interpretation is not straightforward; there is considerable anatomic variation, and there are perforations, defects and degenerative tears that can be troublesome in diagnosing injury. However, with experience and attention to anatomic detail, the radiologist can provide useful information regarding structural abnormalities. When injured, the ligaments of the wrist behave as other joint ligaments do. Findings following injury include discontinuity of normal striated bands, incomplete disruption, irregularities and alteration in normal signal. Fluid pooling around a ligament and concomitant bone injury are other clues to injury. The identification of such structural abnormalities may help to explain altered biomechanics and improve the management of patients following wrist injury. Copyright (2001) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  12. Tuberculous Tenosynovitis Presenting as Ganglion of Wrist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahaji Chavan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is still endemic in many developed countries. Involvement of the hand and wrist at presentation is extremely rare, and the diagnosis is often missed. A 57 years old male presented with swelling over the left wrist since 3 years Three swellings over dorsal aspect of the left wrist Soft in consistency Non tender Non compressible Mobile at right angles to the plane of the wrist joint. ESR: 45 mm in 1 hr and rest blood investigations were normal. Ultrsonography showed giant cell tumor of Extensor Digitorum sheath. X-ray: soft tissue swelling and MRI was suggestive of extensor tendon sheath extraskeletal synovial Koch’s, or giant cell tumor of tendon sheath. Excision of swelling was planned and intraoperatively, rice bodies were seen inside it. Histopathological examination showed caseous necrosis with granuloma formation. Patient was put on DOT1 therapy. Tuberculous tenosynovitis was first described by Acrel in 1777. Rice bodies occurring in joints affected by tuberculosis were first described in 1895 by Reise. Rice bodies will be diagnosed on plain radiographs when mineralization occurs. More than 50% of cases recur within 1 year of treatment. The currently recommended 6-month course is often adequate with extensive curettage lavage and synovectomy should be performed. Surgery is essential, but the extent of surgical debridement is still debatable. The surgeon has to be aware of the significance of loose bodies when performing routine excision of innocuous looking wrist ganglia.

  13. Abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiologic evaluation of abdominal trauma must provide a quick and accurate assessment of the lesions in order to improve the management of the patient. The technique used varies depending on the mechanism of the trauma (blunt trauma or stab wounds) and the hemodynamic status. Radiologic evaluation is usually performed in blunt trauma whereas stab wound trauma is usually explored surgically. The various techniques available are standard radiographs, ultrasonography, computed tomography and arteriography. The role of magnetic resonance imaging in the immediate evaluation is still not well defined. It appears to be useful method in the delayed evaluation of diaphragmatic trauma. Computed tomography is the method most commonly performed in trauma patients. This technique is accurate and allows correct assessment of the lesions. The disadvantages are the radiation induced and the need for a hemo-dynamically stable patient. The aim of the radiologic evaluation is to provide the clinicians with an accurate description of the lesions. It can help in the management of the patient usually in association with clinical and laboratory data. It can also guide interventional procedures (drainage, embolization...). Finally, it allows radiographic follow-up when conservative treatment is performed. (authors). 26 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab

  14. [Arthroscopic resection of dorsal wrist ganglia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisch, N

    2014-10-01

    In arthroscopic wrist surgery, the resection of dorsal wrist ganglia has become a well accepted practice. As advantages for the minimally invasive procedure the low complication rate and low postoperative morbidity, less postoperative pain and faster recovery over open techniques are discussed. The possibility to assess accompanying joint pathology is considered as another advantage. The importance of identifying a so-called ganglion cyst stalk seems to have been overstated. Regarding the technique, the main discussion points are the size and localisation of the capsular window and the necessity of additional midcarpal arthroscopy. The possibility and results of treatment of recurrent ganglion cysts are still controversial. Our own experience and that of some authors are positive. Hardly mentioned in the literature is the treatment of occult dorsal wrist ganglia and its results, which is considered as very successful by the authors. PMID:25290273

  15. Ultrasonography of the hand, wrist, and elbow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodor, Marko; Fullerton, Brad

    2010-08-01

    High-frequency diagnostic ultrasonography of the hand, wrist and elbow has significant potential to improve the quality of diagnosis and care provided by neuromuscular and musculoskeletal specialists. In patients referred for weakness, pain and numbness of the hand, wrist or elbow, diagnostic ultrasonography can be an adjunct to electrodiagnosis and help in identifying ruptured tendons and treating conditions such as carpal tunnel syndrome or trigger finger. Use of a small high-frequency (>10-15 MHz) transducer, an instrument with a blunt pointed tip to enhance sonopalpation and a model of the hand, wrist and elbow is advised to enhance visualization of small anatomical structures and complex bony contours. A range of conditions, including tendon and ligament ruptures, trigger finger, de Quervain tenosynovitis, intersection syndrome, lateral epicondylitis, and osteoarthritis, is described along with detailed ultrasonography-guided injection techniques for carpal tunnel syndrome and trigger finger. PMID:20797547

  16. Multicentric extra-abdominal desmoid tumors arising in bilateral lower limbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuhiro Fukushima

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Extra-abdominal desmoid tumors preferentially affect the shoulders, arms, backs, buttocks, and thighs of young adults. Multicentric occurrence is rather rare but seems to be another distinctive feature of extra-abdominal desmoid tumors. In this article we report a rare case of multicentric extra-abdominal desmoid tumors arising in bilateral lower limbs.

  17. Two Case Report on Wrist Ganglion Treated with Scolopendrid Pharmacopuncture

    OpenAIRE

    Min-Seop Shin; Jin-Bok Lee; Beom-yong Song

    2010-01-01

    Object : This study was to investigate the clinical effect of Scolopendrid Pharmacopuncture on two patients suffering from Wrist Ganglion. Methods : We treated two patients suffering from Wrist Ganglion with both acupuncture and injection of Scolopendrid Pharmacopuncture. Then we measured the sizes of Wrist Ganglion and Visual Analogue Scale(VAS). Results and Conclusions : We found that the sizes of Wrist Ganglion of the two patients were significantly reduced. Moreover, the pain and di...

  18. 3D Dynamic Analysis of the Wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandow, Michael J

    2015-10-01

    With advances in imaging and computing technology the greater capacity to diagnose, plan and deliver care to patients with hand and wrist disorder is being realised. Work in our laboratory, has been able to identify certain specific rules that control wrist motion, and is a step on the pathway to creating a unified theory of carpal mechanics which will incorporate a kinetic biomechanical model. This will allow more precise anatomically based as well as quantitative diagnoses, but also an ability to test a proposed intervention in a "what if" scenario. PMID:26387995

  19. Dorsal wrist mass: the carpal boss

    OpenAIRE

    Boggess, Blake; Berkoff, David

    2011-01-01

    The carpal boss is an osseous overgrowth that is occasionally mistaken for a ganglion cyst. This report highlights the case a 36-year-old patient who was originally diagnosed by his primary care physician with a ganglion cyst and was sent to an orthopaedist for aspiration. Upon further evaluation with a plain radiograph, the dorsal wrist mass was found to be a carpal boss. The patient was treated with rest and a wrist brace, and was informed that a corticosteroid injection or surgical excisio...

  20. Dorsal wrist ganglion: Current review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Sanjay; Gupta, Ajay

    2014-06-01

    Ganglion cyst is the most common soft tissue tumour of hand. Sixty to seventy percent of ganglion cysts are found in the dorsal aspect of the wrist. They may affect any age group; however they are more common in the twenties to forties. Its origin and pathogenesis remains enigmatic. Non-surgical treatment is unreliable with a high recurrence rates. Open surgical excision leads to unsightly scar and poor outcome. Arthroscopy excision has shown very promising result with very low recurrence rate. We reviewed the current literature available on dorsal wrist ganglion. PMID:25983472

  1. Dorsal wrist mass: the carpal boss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggess, Blake; Berkoff, David

    2011-01-01

    The carpal boss is an osseous overgrowth that is occasionally mistaken for a ganglion cyst. This report highlights the case a 36-year-old patient who was originally diagnosed by his primary care physician with a ganglion cyst and was sent to an orthopaedist for aspiration. Upon further evaluation with a plain radiograph, the dorsal wrist mass was found to be a carpal boss. The patient was treated with rest and a wrist brace, and was informed that a corticosteroid injection or surgical excision would be necessary if conservative treatment failed. The patient was asymptomatic on follow-up and invasive procedures were not necessary. PMID:22707539

  2. [Ganglion cysts of the hand and wrist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarig, Oren; Hass, Avraham; Oron, Amir

    2013-10-01

    Ganglion cysts are considered the most common tumor of the wrist and hand. They are most common between the second and fourth decades of life. The most common anatomical location is the dorsal wrist. This article includes a general review of these cysts including symptoms, pathology and methods of diagnosis, as well as a review of these cysts in specific anatomic locations. The article also includes an updated review of the literature comparing open surgery vs. arthroscopic treatment. The authors believe that arthroscopic surgery of ganglion cysts will gain an important role in the treatment of these cysts. PMID:24450035

  3. A random forest classifier for the prediction of energy expenditure and type of physical activity from wrist and hip accelerometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrist accelerometers are being used in population level surveillance of physical activity (PA) but more research is needed to evaluate their validity for correctly classifying types of PA behavior and predicting energy expenditure (EE). In this study we compare accelerometers worn on the wrist and hip, and the added value of heart rate (HR) data, for predicting PA type and EE using machine learning. Forty adults performed locomotion and household activities in a lab setting while wearing three ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometers (left hip, right hip, non-dominant wrist) and a HR monitor (Polar RS400). Participants also wore a portable indirect calorimeter (COSMED K4b2), from which EE and metabolic equivalents (METs) were computed for each minute. We developed two predictive models: a random forest classifier to predict activity type and a random forest of regression trees to estimate METs. Predictions were evaluated using leave-one-user-out cross-validation. The hip accelerometer obtained an average accuracy of 92.3% in predicting four activity types (household, stairs, walking, running), while the wrist accelerometer obtained an average accuracy of 87.5%. Across all 8 activities combined (laundry, window washing, dusting, dishes, sweeping, stairs, walking, running), the hip and wrist accelerometers obtained average accuracies of 70.2% and 80.2% respectively. Predicting METs using the hip or wrist devices alone obtained root mean square errors (rMSE) of 1.09 and 1.00 METs per 6 min bout, respectively. Including HR data improved MET estimation, but did not significantly improve activity type classification. These results demonstrate the validity of random forest classification and regression forests for PA type and MET prediction using accelerometers. The wrist accelerometer proved more useful in predicting activities with significant arm movement, while the hip accelerometer was superior for predicting locomotion and estimating EE. (paper)

  4. Evaluation of wrist arthroscopy outcomes in patients with chronic wrist pain

    OpenAIRE

    Reza Shahryar Kamrani; Mohammad Hossein Nabian; Leila Oryadi Zanjani

    2015-01-01

    Background: Wrist arthroscopy is an evolving diagnostic and therapeutic modality which is progressively used by Iranian surgeons. Little data is published about the procedure’s indications, outcomes, complications and prognostic factors. In following study we evaluate the outcome and complications of diagnostic and therapeutic arthroscopy in our patients. Methods: In a prospective study from September 2009 to March 2013, 100 patients entered in the study. All the patients had chronic wrist...

  5. Positioning of the wrist for scaphoid radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toth, Ferenc [Department of Traumatology and Hand Surgery, Medical School of Pecs University, PF.: 99, Akac utca 1, H-7601 Pecs (Hungary)], E-mail: tothf2@yahoo.com; Sebestyen, Andor [Baranya County Health Insurance Fund, Nagy Lajos kiraly utja 3, 7623 Pecs (Hungary); Balint, Lehel [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Medical School of Pecs University, Ifjusag u. 13, 7643 Pecs (Hungary); Mester, Sandor [Szent Gyorgy County Hospital, Seregelyesi u. 3, 8000 Szekesfehervar (Hungary); Szabo, Gyorgy [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Medical School of Pecs University, Ifjusag u. 13, 7643 Pecs (Hungary); Nyarady, Jozsef [Department of Traumatology and Hand Surgery, Medical School of Pecs University, PF.: 99, Akac utca 1, H-7601 Pecs (Hungary); Weninger, Csaba [Department of Radiology, Medical School of Pecs University, Ifjusag u. 13, 7643 Pecs (Hungary); Angyal, Miklos [Department of Forensic Medicine, Medical School of Pecs University, Ifjusag u. 13, 7643 Pecs (Hungary); Lovasz, Gyorgy [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Medical School of Pecs University, Ifjusag u. 13, 7643 Pecs (Hungary)

    2007-10-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this cadaver study was to determine the ideal position of the wrist for scaphoid radiography. Materials and methods: Four cadaver wrists were rotated around their longitudinal axis in 15 deg. increments and exposures were taken. Seven postero-anterior images were taken as well. Thus, 18 images of each wrist were available for assessment. Views were determined in which the main anatomic regions of the scaphoid were visualized undistorted. The size and localization of the overlap of other carpal bones were also evaluated. Finally, views with the best visualization of anatomic landmarks were selected. The results of these three investigations were compared to literature data. Results: We consider the following four images the most valuable in the diagnostic imaging of scaphoid bone: (1) Postero-anterior view in ulnar deviation of wrist and fist position of the hand; (2) oblique view in 60 deg. of pronation; (3) oblique view in 60 deg. of supination; (4) lateral view. Conclusion: We concluded that our four views are sufficient for proper radiographic evaluation of the scaphoid.

  6. Periprosthetic osteolysis after total wrist arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeckstyns, Michel E H; Herzberg, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Background and Literature Review Periprosthetic osteolysis (PPO) after second- or third-generation total wrist arthroplasty (TWA), with or without evident loosening of the implant components, has previously been reported in the literature, but rarely in a systematic way. Purpose The purpose of th...

  7. Restoring ADL function after wrist surgery in children with cerebral palsy: a novel Bilateral robot system design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley, D; Theriault, A; Kamara, S; Anewenter, V; Hughes, D; Johnson, M J

    2013-06-01

    Cerebral palsy is a leading cause of disability in children and reducing its effects on arm function will improve quality of life. Our goal is to train children with CP after wrist tendon transfer surgery using a robotic therapy system consisting of two robot arms and wrist robots. The therapeutic goal is to determine if the robot training combined with surgery intervention improved functional outcomes significantly more than surgery alone. To accomplish this long-term goal we have developed a Bilateral ADL Exercise Robot, BiADLER aimed at training children with CP in reach to grasp coordination on ADLs. Specifically, the robot will provide active training using an assist-as-needed. This paper presents the design concepts. PMID:24187280

  8. Scapholunate kinematics of asymptomatic wrists in comparison with symptomatic contralateral wrists using four-dimensional CT examinations: initial clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using four-dimensional CT scan (4DCT), we aimed at showing the kinematics of scapholunate (SL) interval in asymptomatic wrists in comparison with symptomatic contralateral wrists with inconclusive radiographic findings. This is an IRB approved, HIPPA compliant, retrospective study. Patients suspected of SL interosseous ligament (SLIL) injuries were referred for further evaluation of chronic wrist pain (>3 months). Twelve wrists (11 subjects) with chronic symptoms and inconclusive plain radiographs and 10 asymptomatic wrists (in 10 different subjects) were scanned using 4DCT. The minimum SL interval was measured during three wrist motions: relaxed-to-clenched fist, flexion-to-extension, and radial-to-ulnar-deviation. Changes were recorded using double-oblique multiplanar reformation technique. We extracted the normal limits of the SL interval as measured by dynamic CT scanning during active motion in asymptomatic wrists. In asymptomatic wrists, the average SL interval was observed to be smaller than 1 mm during all motions. In symptomatic wrists, during exams performed with clenched fist (SL interval (mean ± SD) = 2.53 ± 1.19 mm), extension (2.54 ± 1.48 mm) or ulnar deviation (2.06 ± 1.12 mm), the average SL interval was more than 2 mm. In contrast to symptomatic wrists, no significant change in SL interval measurements was detected during wrist motions in asymptomatic wrists. There was a mild to moderate correlation between SL interval change and presence/absence of symptoms (point-biserial correlation coefficients: 0.29-0.55). In patients with wrist pain suspicious for SLIL injury and inconclusive radiographs, SL interval increase can be detected with 4DCT in the symptomatic wrist compared to the asymptomatic wrist. (orig.)

  9. Scapholunate kinematics of asymptomatic wrists in comparison with symptomatic contralateral wrists using four-dimensional CT examinations: initial clinical experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demehri, Shadpour; Hafezi-Nejad, Nima; Morelli, John N.; Thakur, Uma; Eng, John [Johns Hopkins University, Musculoskeletal Radiology, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Lifchez, Scott D.; Shores, Jaimie T. [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Baltimore, MD (United States); Means, Kenneth R. [MedStar Union Memorial Hospital, The Curtis National Hand Center, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Using four-dimensional CT scan (4DCT), we aimed at showing the kinematics of scapholunate (SL) interval in asymptomatic wrists in comparison with symptomatic contralateral wrists with inconclusive radiographic findings. This is an IRB approved, HIPPA compliant, retrospective study. Patients suspected of SL interosseous ligament (SLIL) injuries were referred for further evaluation of chronic wrist pain (>3 months). Twelve wrists (11 subjects) with chronic symptoms and inconclusive plain radiographs and 10 asymptomatic wrists (in 10 different subjects) were scanned using 4DCT. The minimum SL interval was measured during three wrist motions: relaxed-to-clenched fist, flexion-to-extension, and radial-to-ulnar-deviation. Changes were recorded using double-oblique multiplanar reformation technique. We extracted the normal limits of the SL interval as measured by dynamic CT scanning during active motion in asymptomatic wrists. In asymptomatic wrists, the average SL interval was observed to be smaller than 1 mm during all motions. In symptomatic wrists, during exams performed with clenched fist (SL interval (mean ± SD) = 2.53 ± 1.19 mm), extension (2.54 ± 1.48 mm) or ulnar deviation (2.06 ± 1.12 mm), the average SL interval was more than 2 mm. In contrast to symptomatic wrists, no significant change in SL interval measurements was detected during wrist motions in asymptomatic wrists. There was a mild to moderate correlation between SL interval change and presence/absence of symptoms (point-biserial correlation coefficients: 0.29-0.55). In patients with wrist pain suspicious for SLIL injury and inconclusive radiographs, SL interval increase can be detected with 4DCT in the symptomatic wrist compared to the asymptomatic wrist. (orig.)

  10. Application of the Blobo bluetooth ball in wrist rehabilitation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Wei-Min; Hwang, Yuh-Shyan; Chen, Shih-Ching; Tan, Sun-Yen; Chen, Chih-Chen; Chen, Yu-Luen

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The introduction of emerging technologies such as the wireless Blobo bluetooth ball with multimedia features can enhance wrist physical therapy training, making it more fun and enhancing its effects. [Methods] Wrist injuries caused by fatigue at work, improper exercise, and other conditions are very common. Therefore, the reconstruction of wrist joint function is an important issue. The efficacy of a newly developed integrated wrist joint rehabilitation game using a Blobo bluetooth ball with C# software installed was tested in wrist rehabilitation (Flexion, Extension, Ulnar Deviation, Radial Deviation). [Results] Eight subjects with normal wrist function participated in a test of the system's stability and repeatability. After performing the Blobo bluetooth ball wrist physical therapy training, eight patients with wrist dysfunction experienced approximately 10° improvements in range of motion (ROM) of flexion extension, and ulnar deviation and about 6° ROM improvement in radial deviation. The subjects showed progress in important indicators of wrist function. [Conclusion] This study used the Blobo bluetooth ball in wrist physical therapy training and the preliminary results were encouraging. In the future, more diverse wrist or limb rehabilitation games should be developed to meet the needs of physical therapy training. PMID:26957723

  11. Joint Replacement (Finger and Wrist Joints)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Symptom Picker Hand and Arm Conditions Carpal Tunnel Ganglion Cysts Trigger Finger Arthritis Base of the Thumb See ... Symptom Picker Hand and Arm Conditions Carpal Tunnel Ganglion Cysts Trigger Finger Arthritis Base of the Thumb See ...

  12. Amsterdam wrist rules: A clinical decision aid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bentohami Abdelali

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute trauma of the wrist is one of the most frequent reasons for visiting the Emergency Department. These patients are routinely referred for radiological examination. Most X-rays however, do not reveal any fractures. A clinical decision rule determining the need for X-rays in patients with acute wrist trauma may help to percolate and select patients with fractures. Methods/Design This study will be a multi-center observational diagnostic study in which the data will be collected cross-sectionally. The study population will consist of all consecutive adult patients (≥18 years presenting with acute wrist trauma at the Emergency Department in the participating hospitals. This research comprises two components: one study will be conducted to determine which clinical parameters are predictive for the presence of a distal radius fracture in adult patients presenting to the Emergency Department following acute wrist trauma. These clinical parameters are defined by trauma-mechanism, physical examination, and functional testing. This data will be collected in two of the three participating hospitals and will be assessed by using logistic regression modelling to estimate the regression coefficients after which a reduced model will be created by means of a log likelihood ratio test. The accuracy of the model will be estimated by a goodness of fit test and an ROC curve. The final model will be validated internally through bootstrapping and by shrinking it, an adjusted model will be generated. In the second component of this study, the developed prediction model will be validated in a new dataset consisting of a population of patients from the third hospital. If necessary, the model will be calibrated using the data from the validation study. Discussion Wrist trauma is frequently encountered at the Emergency Department. However, to this date, no decision rule regarding this type of trauma has been created. Ideally, radiographs are

  13. Abdominal Pain or Cramping

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Body & lifestyle changes > Abdominal pain or cramping Abdominal pain or cramping E-mail to a friend Please ... signs of severe pain. What causes mild belly pain in pregnancy? There are different causes for mild ...

  14. Whole-body predictors of wrist shot accuracy in ice hockey: a kinematic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud-Paquette, Yannick; Magee, Patrick; Pearsall, David; Turcotte, René

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify joint angular kinematics that corresponds to shooting accuracy in the stationary ice hockey wrist shot. Twenty-four subjects participated in this study, each performing 10 successful shots on four shooting targets. An eight-camera infra-red motion capture system (240 Hz), along with passive reflective markers, was used to record motion of the joints, hockey stick, and puck throughout the performance of the wrist shot. A multiple regression analysis was carried out to examine whole-body kinematic variables with accuracy scores as the dependent variable. Significant accuracy predictors were identified in the lower limbs, torso and upper limbs. Interpretation of the kinematics suggests that characteristics such as a better stability of the base of support, momentum cancellation, proper trunk orientation and a more dynamic control of the lead arm throughout the wrist shot movement are presented as predictors for the accuracy outcome. These findings are substantial as they not only provide a framework for further analysis of motor control strategies using tools for accurate projection of objects, but more tangibly they may provide a comprehensive evidence-based guide to coaches and athletes for planned training to improve performance. PMID:21560748

  15. Mechanical Design, Control Choices and first Return of Use of a Prosthetic Arm

    OpenAIRE

    THOMANN, Guillaume; Artigue, Vincent

    2007-01-01

    In the world of upper limb prostheses, few companies dominate the majority of the market. They propose different kinds of hand, wrist and elbow prostheses but their control is often difficult to understand by the patients. We have decided to develop new myoelectric prosthetic arm (elbow, wrist and hand) by axing our development on the use of new technologies and facility of use for the patient. In this paper, we are explaining in details the different kinds of prostheses currently proposed to...

  16. Dorsal wrist ganglion: Current review of literature

    OpenAIRE

    Meena, Sanjay; Gupta, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    Ganglion cyst is the most common soft tissue tumour of hand. Sixty to seventy percent of ganglion cysts are found in the dorsal aspect of the wrist. They may affect any age group; however they are more common in the twenties to forties. Its origin and pathogenesis remains enigmatic. Non-surgical treatment is unreliable with a high recurrence rates. Open surgical excision leads to unsightly scar and poor outcome. Arthroscopy excision has shown very promising result with very low recurrence rat...

  17. High-energy injuries of the wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obert, L; Loisel, F; Jardin, E; Gasse, N; Lepage, D

    2016-02-01

    High-energy injuries to the wrist gather complex fractures of the distal radius, radiocarpal dislocations, perilunate dislocations, and other intracarpal dislocations. Depending on the energy of the injury and the position of the wrist at the time of impact, the patient, often a young male with a high functional demand, presents one of these injuries associating fracture(s) and ligament injury. The trauma is often bilateral, with proximal lesions (elbow) very often associated with contusion or compression of the median nerve. Diagnosis is confirmed by wrist X-rays, which are sufficient to determine treatment for radiocarpal and perilunate dislocations. In cases of distal radius fractures or other intracarpal dislocations, a preoperative CT is necessary. Reduction of the dislocation and relief of neurovascular compression are performed immediately. The final treatment of each lesion (bone fixation, ligament repair) can be undertaken simultaneously or delayed, depending on the patient and the lesions. Cartilage lesions, resulting from the high-energy injury, can be estimated using arthroscopy but cannot be repaired and determine the prognosis. The surgeon's objective is to restore joint congruence, which does not prevent stiffness, the main complication of these rare injuries, which the surgeon must know how to recognize and treat. PMID:26782706

  18. Adaptive motion artifact reducing algorithm for wrist photoplethysmography application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jingwei; Wang, Guijin; Shi, Chenbo

    2016-04-01

    Photoplethysmography (PPG) technology is widely used in wearable heart pulse rate monitoring. It might reveal the potential risks of heart condition and cardiopulmonary function by detecting the cardiac rhythms in physical exercise. However the quality of wrist photoelectric signal is very sensitive to motion artifact since the thicker tissues and the fewer amount of capillaries. Therefore, motion artifact is the major factor that impede the heart rate measurement in the high intensity exercising. One accelerometer and three channels of light with different wavelengths are used in this research to analyze the coupled form of motion artifact. A novel approach is proposed to separate the pulse signal from motion artifact by exploiting their mixing ratio in different optical paths. There are four major steps of our method: preprocessing, motion artifact estimation, adaptive filtering and heart rate calculation. Five healthy young men are participated in the experiment. The speeder in the treadmill is configured as 12km/h, and all subjects would run for 3-10 minutes by swinging the arms naturally. The final result is compared with chest strap. The average of mean square error (MSE) is less than 3 beats per minute (BPM/min). Proposed method performed well in intense physical exercise and shows the great robustness to individuals with different running style and posture.

  19. Stiffness, not inertial coupling, determines path curvature of wrist motions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Steven K; Hogan, Neville

    2012-02-01

    When humans rotate their wrist in flexion-extension, radial-ulnar deviation, and combinations, the resulting paths (like the path of a laser pointer on a screen) exhibit a distinctive pattern of curvature. In this report we show that the passive stiffness of the wrist is sufficient to account for this pattern. Simulating the dynamics of wrist rotations using a demonstrably realistic model under a variety of conditions, we show that wrist stiffness can explain all characteristics of the observed pattern of curvature. We also provide evidence against other possible causes. We further demonstrate that the phenomenon is robust against variations in human wrist parameters (inertia, damping, and stiffness) and choice of model inputs. Our findings explain two previously observed phenomena: why faster wrist rotations exhibit more curvature and why path curvature rotates with pronation-supination of the forearm. Our results imply that, as in reaching, path straightness is a goal in the planning and control of wrist rotations. This requires humans to predict and compensate for wrist dynamics, but, unlike reaching, nonlinear inertial coupling (e.g., Coriolis acceleration) is insignificant. The dominant term to be compensated is wrist stiffness. PMID:22131378

  20. Maximal dynamic grip force and wrist torque: the effects of gender, exertion direction, angular velocity, and wrist angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Jonathan L; Jung, Myung-Chul; Bashford, Gregory R; Hallbeck, M Susan

    2006-11-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of gender, exertion direction, angular velocity and wrist angle on simultaneous grip force and wrist torque under the isokinetic condition. The study used 20 participants (10 males and 10 females) and included 6 angular velocities (15, 30, 45, 60, 75, and 90 degrees /s) and 2 wrist exertion directions (flexion and extension) over the wrist range of motion of 70 degrees flexion to 60 degrees extension in 5 degrees increments. Similar to other studies, males and flexion exertion produced larger forces than females and extension exertion, respectively. However, the largest forces were generated at near extreme flexion of the wrist and the dependent variable of angular velocity was not practically significant. These results can contribute to the evaluation of cumulative trauma syndromes, but there is a need for more research on the dynamic measures of the hand and wrist complex and for standard development for dynamic force measurement. PMID:16442072

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging for the wrist joint of the coal miners in vibration department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, X.Z.; Liu, R.L.; Hu, S.D.; Zhang, W.; Xu, W.X.; Ge, L.X. [Central Hospital of Zaozhuang Mine Corporation, Zaozhuang (China)

    2006-04-15

    To study the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the wrist joint of coal miners who work in excavation and vibration department. Forty-three coal miners with the hand-arm vibration disease served as the observation group while 20 workers who were not working in the vibration department acted as the control group. The patients in the observation group were divided into five subgroups according to the time when they received vibration. The regularity of the development of signs and symptoms of MRI was observed and analyzed. The hydroarthrosis was most found in MRI. There were significant difference in hydroarthrosis osteoporosis and osteomyelitis between the observation group and the control group. The edema of bone marrow and the avascular necrosis of ossa carpi were found only in the observation group and not found in the control group. The hydroarthrosis and the edema of bone marrow occurred most in the early stage of vibration. The signal in the edema of the bone marrow of the distal end of the radius was decreased in the GE sequence with the specificity. Changes in the wrist joint occur in the early stage of the vibration work, and can be found in the MRI. The edema of the bone marrow of the distal end of the radius is of great value in the diagnosis of the hand-arm vibration disease.

  2. Mirror therapy in a patient with a fractured wrist and no active wrist extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altschuler, Eric L; Hu, Jeong

    2008-01-01

    We report a patient in whom mirror therapy, training moving both hands while watching the reflection of the present or good hand in a parasaggital mirror - a method used for phantom limb and stroke patients - was extremely useful after a fractured wrist with good passive, but no active, extension. PMID:18335358

  3. Avoiding unplanned resections of wrist sarcomas: an algorithm for evaluating dorsal wrist masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Samuel N; Alamanda, Vignesh K; Weikert, Douglas R; Holt, Ginger E

    2013-09-01

    Ganglion cysts, soft-tissue masses that commonly occur about the wrist, are often excised without imaging or biopsy. In this article, we report a series of incompletely excised soft-tissue sarcomas about the wrist and offer an algorithm for their evaluation. We describe a series of 4 consecutive patients who each presented after incomplete resection of a soft-tissue sarcoma mistakenly diagnosed as a ganglion cyst. We also retrospectively review the cases of 7 patients with incompletely excised sarcomas of the wrist. Three of the 4 patients with sarcomas mistaken for ganglion cysts did not have prior magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), 3 of the 4 did not have an attempted aspiration, and all 4 did not have transillumination. Common atypical characteristics included ulna-based lesions (3/4), symptoms for less than 6 months (3/4), and no appreciable fluctuation in size (3/4). Functional outcomes for all patients were poor because of multiple surgical procedures, re-excisions requiring flaps, and need for additional adjuvant therapies. Dorsal wrist masses with atypical characteristics should be approached with caution. Transillumination and aspiration are 2 accessible, cost-efficient methods for evaluating these masses. If either test is abnormal, an MRI should be performed. PMID:24078963

  4. Transluminar catheter angioplasty of abdominal aorta in Takayasu's arteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nine patients with Takayasu's arteritis and a long stenotic segment of the abdominal aorta were treated by percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA). Intermittent claudication dissappeared in six of seven cases, the femoral pulse reappeared in all five; ankle/arm indices increased in seven cases; elevated blood pressure normalized in seven of eight cases. Seven patients were followed for 3 to 28 months. They were all free of symptoms from the lower extremities. In three patients with or without renal artery stenosis and with hypertension, the blood pressure decreased after PTA of the abdominal aorta only. PTA may be a valuable treatment in Takayasu's arteritis and stenosis of the abdominal aorta. (orig.)

  5. Abdominal MRI in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MRI provides diagnostic information in multiple abdominal diseases in childhood. Additional information to sonographic findings can be achieved in the diagnosis of abdominal malformation as well as in several inflammatory processes. In childhood cancer imaging MRI is essential at the beginning as well as during therapy to assess response to therapy. Because of radiation protection MRI has to replace CT in abdominal imaging in children. Some technical details have to be considered when children are examined. (orig.)

  6. Volar Central Portal in Wrist Arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corella, F; Ocampos, M; Cerro, M Del; Larrainzar-Garijo, R; Vázquez, T

    2016-03-01

    Background Nowadays, the wrist is not limited to a dorsal visualization; the joint can be thought of as a "box," which can be visualized from almost every perspective. The purpose of this study was to describe a new volar central portal for the wrist, following three principles: a single incision that allows access to both the radiocarpal and midcarpal joints, centered on the lunate, with the volar structures at risk protected not only by retractors, but also by tendons. Description of Technique The incision begins in the distal wrist crease and extended 1.5 cm proximally up to the proximal wrist crease, following the axis of the third intermetacarpal space. The flexor superficialis tendons are identified and retracted toward the radial side. Next, the fourth and fifth flexor digitorum profundus tendons are retracted toward the ulnar side, while the third and second tendons are retracted toward the radial side. The volar central midcarpal portal is performed under direct vision just over the anterior horn of the lunate through the Poirier space. The volar central radiocarpal portal is created under the lunate through the interval between the ulnocarpal ligaments and the short radioulnar ligament. Methods An anatomical study was performed on 14 cadaver specimens. Two data were recorded: iatrogenic injuries of the structures at risk and the distances to the structures at risk. Results The median (interquartile range [IQR]) distances from the volar central radiocarpal portal to the median nerve, palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve, and ulnar neurovascular bundle were 10.5 (7.8-15.0), 18.5 (15.8-20.3), and 7.0 (5.0-10.5) mm, respectively. The median (IQR) distances from the volar central midcarpal portal to the median nerve, palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve, and ulnar neurovascular bundle were 7.0 (4.8-10.3), 16.0 (14.8-19.0), and 4.5 (3.8-9.0) mm, respectively. No iatrogenic injuries were observed. Conclusion The volar central portal is

  7. Prosthesis of the wrist-joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldmeier, C.

    1983-02-25

    Function of the hand-joint and the well-being of patients can be severely affected by arthrosis of the wrist-joint. Therapeutically, arthrodesis usually results in a painfree status of stiffness. A painless and well functioning joint can be achieved by alloplastic joint replacement or resurfacing. The possibilities and clinical results in cases of arthrosis of the carpo-metacarpal joint of the thumb, pseudarthrosis of the scaphoid, aseptic necrosis of the Lunate and severe arthrosis of the radio-carpal joint are demonstrated.

  8. Prosthesis of the wrist-joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Function of the hand-joint and the well-being of patients can be severely affected by arthrosis of the wrist-joint. Therapeutically, arthrodesis usually results in a painfree status of stiffness. A painless and well functioning joint can be achieved by alloplastic joint replacement or resurfacing. The possibilities and clinical results in cases of arthrosis of the carpo-metacarpal joint of the thumb, pseudarthrosis of the scaphoid, aseptic necrosis of the Lunate and severe arthrosis of the radio-carpal joint are demonstrated. (orig.)

  9. Wrist-worn pervasive gaze interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, John Paulin; Lund, Haakon; Biermann, Florian; Møllenbach, Emilie; Sztuk, Sebastian; San Augustin, javier

    This paper addresses gaze interaction for smart home control, conducted from a wrist-worn unit. First we asked ten people to enact the gaze movements they would propose for e.g. opening a door or adjusting the room temperature. On basis of their suggestions we built and tested different versions of...... correct selection. Their subjective evaluations were positive with regard to the speed of the interaction. We conclude that gaze gesture input seems feasible for fast and brief remote control of smart home technology provided that robustness of tracking is improved....

  10. Estimation of Thermal Sensation Based on Wrist Skin Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Soo Young; Koh, Myung Jun; Joo, Kwang Min; Noh, Seungwoo; Park, Sangyun; Kim, Youn Ho; Park, Kwang Suk

    2016-01-01

    Thermal comfort is an essential environmental factor related to quality of life and work effectiveness. We assessed the feasibility of wrist skin temperature monitoring for estimating subjective thermal sensation. We invented a wrist band that simultaneously monitors skin temperatures from the wrist (i.e., the radial artery and ulnar artery regions, and upper wrist) and the fingertip. Skin temperatures from eight healthy subjects were acquired while thermal sensation varied. To develop a thermal sensation estimation model, the mean skin temperature, temperature gradient, time differential of the temperatures, and average power of frequency band were calculated. A thermal sensation estimation model using temperatures of the fingertip and wrist showed the highest accuracy (mean root mean square error [RMSE]: 1.26 ± 0.31). An estimation model based on the three wrist skin temperatures showed a slightly better result to the model that used a single fingertip skin temperature (mean RMSE: 1.39 ± 0.18). When a personalized thermal sensation estimation model based on three wrist skin temperatures was used, the mean RMSE was 1.06 ± 0.29, and the correlation coefficient was 0.89. Thermal sensation estimation technology based on wrist skin temperatures, and combined with wearable devices may facilitate intelligent control of one’s thermal environment. PMID:27023538

  11. [A woman with acute pain and swelling of her wrist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridder, J.A. de; Koning, G.G.

    2015-01-01

    After hyperextension of both her wrists, a 39-year-old woman, who used coumarin derivatives for a known antiphospholipid syndrome, had acute pain and swelling of the left wrist. She had symptoms of an acute carpal tunnel syndrome. MRI revealed a hematoma compressing the median nerve in the carpal tu

  12. 21 CFR 888.3780 - Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888.3780 Section 888.3780 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device made...

  13. Radiological diagnosis in lesions of the wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kob, A.; Thelen, R.; Schild, H.; Lang, A.

    1988-05-01

    To visualise the rupture of the scaphoid bone it will be sufficient - as has been proven - to perform two additional projections from the navicular series besides the standard X-rays of the wrist joint, namely, with the hand in writing-pen position and in hyperpronation. With this procedure, almost all (99%) of fractures detected during first examination can be diagnosed. To prove the occurrence of fractures of the wrist besides those of the os naviculare, specific X-rays are employed in accordance with the results of an on-target clinical examination. Such X-rays are, in particular, lateral radioulnar X-ray rotated by 10/sup 0/ in volar direction to assess the os triquetrum, lateral radioulnar X-ray in 10-30/sup 0/ supination to visualise the os pisiforme, carpal tunnel X-ray to assess the entire hollow of the hand, in particular the volar parts of os pisiforme, os hamatum (hamulus) and os trapezium. Although such fractures can partly also be diagnosed by means of a navicular series, as already stated, it is not permissible to exclude the presence of a fracture if there are no abnormal findings in the navicular quartet whereas clinical findings are positive.

  14. Radiological diagnosis in lesions of the wrist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To visualise the rupture of the scaphoid bone it will be sufficient - as has been proven - to perform two additional projections from the navicular series besides the standard X-rays of the wrist joint, namely, with the hand in writing-pen position and in hyperpronation. With this procedure, almost all (99%) of fractures detected during first examination can be diagnosed. To prove the occurrence of fractures of the wrist besides those of the os naviculare, specific X-rays are employed in accordance with the results of an on-target clinical examination. Such X-rays are, in particular, lateral radioulnar X-ray rotated by 100 in volar direction to assess the os triquetrum, lateral radioulnar X-ray in 10-300 supination to visualise the os pisiforme, carpal tunnel X-ray to assess the entire hollow of the hand, in particular the volar parts of os pisiforme, os hamatum (hamulus) and os trapezium. Although such fractures can partly also be diagnosed by means of a navicular series, as already stated, it is not permissible to exclude the presence of a fracture if there are no abnormal findings in the navicular quartet whereas clinical findings are positive. (orig.)

  15. Basic pathologic conditions of the wrist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathologic conditions of the wrist involve both musculoskeletal structure (bones and joints) and soft tissues, of which fat pads are an important diagnostic aid to recognize various disorders. The authors report their 5-year experience with Xeroradiography in the diagnosis of various pathologic conditions (e.g., inflammatory, degenerative, and tumoral conditions) of the wrist. The importance of Xeroradiography was emphatized, in the past, because of its characteristic technical properties, especially in demonstrating lower-density tissues tumors. The main advantage of Xeroradiography is the physical phenomenon known as edge effect, which increases image contrast at the borders. Other differences between xeroradiography and conventional radiography are: broader recording latitude of the former, together with its higher resolution power (100 lines/mm), and high exposition power (which makes repeats useless). Thus, Xeroradiography allows the contemporary depiction of various and different structures and densities- e.g., bones and soft tissues. Unfortunately, radiation dose to the patient is higher during Xeroradiography than during conventional radiography. That is why digital radiography has nowadays replaced Xeroradiography. In fact, the former provides images that are comparable with those obtained by means of conventional radiography and -sometimes- even with xeroradiographic images allows radiation dose to the patient to be markedly reduced, whereas recording latitude remains the same

  16. Ganglions of the hand and wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornburg, L E

    1999-01-01

    Ganglions of the hand and wrist are common benign lesions. They most frequently arise adjacent to joints and tendons, but may also be intratendinous or intraosseous. Treatment options include observation, aspiration, and surgical excision. Observation is acceptable in most instances. Indications for more aggressive treatment include pain, interference with activity, nerve compression, and imminent ulceration (in the case of some mucous cysts). The recurrence rate after puncture and aspiration is greater than 50% for cysts in most locations, but is less than 30% for cysts in the flexor tendon sheath. Surgical excision is effective, with a recurrence rate of only 5% if care is taken to completely excise the stalk of the cyst along with a small portion of joint capsule. Surgical treatment of occult ganglions is successful with accurate assessment of the source of the pain. Arthroscopic treatment of dorsal wrist ganglions is still experimental, but early results are encouraging. Ganglion surgery requires a formal operative environment and careful technique in order to minimize injury to adjacent structures and minimize the likelihood of recurrence. PMID:10434077

  17. Radiological evaluation of the skeleton: traumatology of the distal forearm, wrist, and hand; Radiologische Skelettdiagnostik: Traumatologie des distalen Unterarmes, der Handgelenke und der Hand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, K. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Zentralinstitut fuer Roentgendiagnostik; Langer, R. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Zentralinstitut fuer Roentgendiagnostik

    1996-07-01

    Plain X-ray films including some special radiographic views are still the basis of the radiological evaluation of injuries of the distal forearm, the wrist, and the hand. Especially, in the diagnosis of fractures of the distal radius the exact positioning of the arm and hand is essential. For the description of fractures of the distal forearm the AO classification of fractures should be used, which is comprehensive and universally applicable. Conventional tomography and computed tomography (CT) of the radio-ulnar joint and the wrist are used in patients with persisting complaints or equivocal findings on plain radiographs, and difficult anatomical situations. Suspected ligamentous injuries of the wrist including tears of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) are evaluated by wrist arthrography or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the latter requiring a highly skilled imaging and interpretation technique. MRI is the method of choice for the detection of osteonecrosis. Ultrasound examinations are of minor importance in the work up of wrist and hand injuries. (orig.) [Deutsch] Fuer die radiologische Beurteilung von Verletzungen des distalen Unterarmes, des Handgelenkes und der Hand steht die konventionelle Roentgenuntersuchung einschliesslich einiger Spezialeinstellungen nach wie vor im Vordergrund. Bei der Beschreibung insbesondere der distalen Radiusfrakturen sollten die historische Benennung oder aeltere Einteilungen zugunsten der allgemeingueltigen und umfassenderen AO-Klassifikation verlassen werden. Die Computertomographie und Magnetresonanztomographie kommen in der Frakturdiagnostik bei unklaren anatomischen Verhaeltnissen oder konventionell nicht zufriedenstellend erklaerbaren Beschwerden zur Anwendung. Vermutete ligamentaere Verletzungen der Handwurzel lassen sich arthrographisch oder magnetresonanztomographisch abklaeren. (orig.)

  18. [Abdominal pregnancy, institutional experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfante Ramírez, E; Bolaños Ancona, R; Simón Pereyra, L; Juárez García, L; García-Benitez, C Q

    1998-07-01

    Abdominal pregnancy is a rare entity, which has been classified as primary or secondary by Studiford criteria. A retrospective study, between January 1989 and December 1994, realized at Instituto Nacional de Perinatología, found 35,080 pregnancies, from which 149 happened to be ectopic, and 6 of them were abdominal. All patients belonged to a low income society class, age between 24 and 35 years, and average of gestations in 2.6. Gestational age varied from 15 weeks to 32.2 weeks having only one delivery at term with satisfactory postnatal evolution. One patient had a recurrent abdominal pregnancy, with genital Tb as a conditional factor. Time of hospitalization varied from 4 to 5 days, and no further patient complications were reported. Fetal loss was estimated in 83.4%. Abdominal pregnancy is often the sequence of a tubarian ectopic pregnancy an when present, it has a very high maternal mortality reported in world literature, not found in this study. The stated frequency of abdominal pregnancy is from 1 of each 3372, up to 1 in every 10,200 deliveries, reporting in the study 1 abdominal pregnancy in 5846 deliveries. The study had two characteristic entities one, the recurrence and two, the delivery at term of one newborn. Abdominal pregnancy accounts for 4% of all ectopic pregnancies. Clinical findings in abdominal pregnancies are pain, transvaginal bleeding and amenorrea, being the cardinal signs of ectopic pregnancy. PMID:9737070

  19. Imaging in abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging in abdominal trauma with special regard to the value of abdominal X-ray, ultrasound and computed tomography is described. The introduction to each organ focusses on the clinical situation, special mechanism of trauma, symptoms and the pathological staging of trauma. (orig.)

  20. Robotic arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwech, Horst

    1989-04-18

    A robotic arm positionable within a nuclear vessel by access through a small diameter opening and having a mounting tube supported within the vessel and mounting a plurality of arm sections for movement lengthwise of the mounting tube as well as for movement out of a window provided in the wall of the mounting tube. An end effector, such as a grinding head or welding element, at an operating end of the robotic arm, can be located and operated within the nuclear vessel through movement derived from six different axes of motion provided by mounting and drive connections between arm sections of the robotic arm. The movements are achieved by operation of remotely-controllable servo motors, all of which are mounted at a control end of the robotic arm to be outside the nuclear vessel.

  1. Robotic arm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A robotic arm positionable within a nuclear vessel by access through a small diameter opening and having a mounting tube supported within the vessel and mounting a plurality of arm sections for movement lengthwise of the mounting tube as well as for movement out of a window provided in the wall of the mounting tube is disclosed. An end effector, such as a grinding head or welding element, at an operating end of the robotic arm, can be located and operated within the nuclear vessel through movement derived from six different axes of motion provided by mounting and drive connections between arm sections of the robotic arm. The movements are achieved by operation of remotely-controllable servo motors, all of which are mounted at a control end of the robotic arm to be outside the nuclear vessel. 23 figs

  2. Management of the spastic wrist and hand in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leafblad, Nels D; Van Heest, Ann E

    2015-05-01

    Research from the last 5 years on the pathophysiology and treatment of upper extremity sequelae of cerebral palsy (CP) is presented. The development of new treatments of CP-affected limbs, utilizing the brain's inherent neuroplasticity, remains an area of promising and active research. Functional magnetic resonance imaging scans have evaluated the role of neuroplasticity in adapting to the initial central nervous system insult. Children with CP appear to have greater recruitment of the ipsilateral brain for motor and sensory functions of the affected upper limb. Studies have also shown that constraint-induced movement therapy results in localized increase in gray matter volume of the sensorimotor cortex contralateral to the affected arm targeted during rehabilitation. Recent therapy interventions have emphasized the role of home therapy programs, the transient effects of splinting, and the promise of constraint-induced movement therapy and bimanual hand training. The use of motion laboratory analysis to characterize the movement pattern disturbances in children with CP continues to expand. Classification systems for CP upper limb continue to expand and improve their reliability, including use of the House Classification, the Manual Ability Classification System, and the Shriner's Hospital Upper Extremity Evaluation. Surgical outcomes have greater patients' satisfaction when they address functional limitations, also in addition to aesthetics, which may improve patients' self-esteem. Surgical techniques for elbow, wrist, fingers, and thumb continue to be refined. Research into each of these areas continues to expand our understanding of the nervous system insults that cause CP, how they may be modified, and how hand surgeons can continue to serve patients by improving their upper limb function and aesthetics. PMID:25841769

  3. [Radiometric assessment of wrist angle values, linear parameters of the forearm and wrist ratios].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baczkowski, Bogusław; Mechlińska-Baczkowska, Janina; Lorczyński, Adam

    2006-01-01

    With the device of our own invention suitable for static X-ray examination of the wrist 12 radiographic parameters were evaluated. 100 radiograms regarded normal were analyzed, obtained as a comparative in unilateral wrist trauma patients group. Age of the patients ranged from 18 to 60 years. No comparative studies in regard to sex were performed. Obtained data were statistically analyzed. Subsequent values of the radiometric parameters were obtained: scaphoid-lunate angle (SL) 48.61 degrees, radio-lunate angle (RL): -0.83 degrees, palmar inclination of the distal radius metaphysis (RI): 25.96. The most significant linear parameters measured: ulnar length 0.18 mm, ulnar transposition (UT): 0.339 mm. PMID:17131729

  4. Ganglion cysts in the paediatric wrist: magnetic resonance imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The majority of published literature on ganglion cysts in children has been from a surgical perspective, with no dedicated radiologic study yet performed. Our aim was to assess the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging appearance of ganglion cysts in a series of paediatric MR wrist examinations. Ninety-seven consecutive paediatric MR wrist examinations were retrospectively reviewed for the presence of ganglion cysts. Only those studies with wrist ganglia were included. Cysts were assessed for location, size, internal characteristics and secondary effect(s). Forty-one ganglion cysts (2-32 mm in size) were seen in 35/97 (36%) patients (24 female, 11 male), mean age: 13 years 11 months (range: 6 years 3 months-18 years). The majority were palmar (63.4%) with the remainder dorsal. Of the cysts, 43.9% were related to a wrist ligament(s), 36.6% to a joint and 17.1% to the triangular fibrocartilage complex. Of the patients, 91.4% had wrist symptoms: pain (n=29, 82.9%), swelling (n=7, 20%) and/or palpable mass (n=4, 11.4%); 71.4% patients had significant additional wrist abnormalities. Ganglion cysts were frequently found in children referred for wrist MRI. (orig.)

  5. Ganglion cysts in the paediatric wrist: magnetic resonance imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracken, Jennifer; Bartlett, Murray [Royal Children' s Hospital, Medical Imaging Department, Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    2013-12-15

    The majority of published literature on ganglion cysts in children has been from a surgical perspective, with no dedicated radiologic study yet performed. Our aim was to assess the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging appearance of ganglion cysts in a series of paediatric MR wrist examinations. Ninety-seven consecutive paediatric MR wrist examinations were retrospectively reviewed for the presence of ganglion cysts. Only those studies with wrist ganglia were included. Cysts were assessed for location, size, internal characteristics and secondary effect(s). Forty-one ganglion cysts (2-32 mm in size) were seen in 35/97 (36%) patients (24 female, 11 male), mean age: 13 years 11 months (range: 6 years 3 months-18 years). The majority were palmar (63.4%) with the remainder dorsal. Of the cysts, 43.9% were related to a wrist ligament(s), 36.6% to a joint and 17.1% to the triangular fibrocartilage complex. Of the patients, 91.4% had wrist symptoms: pain (n=29, 82.9%), swelling (n=7, 20%) and/or palpable mass (n=4, 11.4%); 71.4% patients had significant additional wrist abnormalities. Ganglion cysts were frequently found in children referred for wrist MRI. (orig.)

  6. Clinical impact of MRI in acute wrist fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical impact of MRI in the early diagnosis of wrist trauma. High-resolution MR imaging was performed on a 1.5-T unit (Symphony Quantum, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) using coronal and axial T1- and T2-weighted fat-saturated turbo-spin-echo sequence via a dedicated wrist coil within a mean of 6.6 days after initial radiographs in 54 patients (56 wrists) with clinical suspicion of wrist fractures and normal plain or indistinct radiographs. Initial radiographs were evaluated independently by two senior radiologists and the hand surgeon without knowledge of the MRI findings. The initial treatment protocol was based on evaluation of plain films and clinical findings by the hand surgeon. Treatment protocol was changed after MRI examination if necessary. In 31 of 56 wrists MRI findings resulted in a change of diagnosis. There were false-positive diagnoses on plain radiographs in nearly one half (n=25) of the patients. False-negative diagnoses on plain radiographs resulted in 6 cases. Magnetic resonance imaging detected additional injuries of soft tissue in more than one third (n=20). In 22 of 56 wrists the period of immobilization could be shortened or ended, in 12 of 56 it was prolonged, and in 3 of 56 a surgical intervention was necessary. In 19 wrists MRI had no therapeutic consequences. Our data demonstrate the high clinical impact of MRI in the detection of acute wrist fractures. We recommend MRI of the wrist immediately on the day of trauma if there is clinical suspicion and normal plain radiographs. Accurate diagnosis by MRI examination within the first days following trauma may reduce economic costs due to shortened immobilization time in cases with a suspected fracture but plain radiographs. (orig.)

  7. Clinical impact of MRI in acute wrist fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mack, Martin G.; Keim, Sabine; Balzer, Joern O.; Schwarz, Wolfram; Hochmuth, Kathrin; Vogl, Thomas J. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Universitaetsklinikum Frankfurt/Main, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Windolf, Joachim [Department of Traumatology and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Hamburg, Martinistrasse 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany)

    2003-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical impact of MRI in the early diagnosis of wrist trauma. High-resolution MR imaging was performed on a 1.5-T unit (Symphony Quantum, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) using coronal and axial T1- and T2-weighted fat-saturated turbo-spin-echo sequence via a dedicated wrist coil within a mean of 6.6 days after initial radiographs in 54 patients (56 wrists) with clinical suspicion of wrist fractures and normal plain or indistinct radiographs. Initial radiographs were evaluated independently by two senior radiologists and the hand surgeon without knowledge of the MRI findings. The initial treatment protocol was based on evaluation of plain films and clinical findings by the hand surgeon. Treatment protocol was changed after MRI examination if necessary. In 31 of 56 wrists MRI findings resulted in a change of diagnosis. There were false-positive diagnoses on plain radiographs in nearly one half (n=25) of the patients. False-negative diagnoses on plain radiographs resulted in 6 cases. Magnetic resonance imaging detected additional injuries of soft tissue in more than one third (n=20). In 22 of 56 wrists the period of immobilization could be shortened or ended, in 12 of 56 it was prolonged, and in 3 of 56 a surgical intervention was necessary. In 19 wrists MRI had no therapeutic consequences. Our data demonstrate the high clinical impact of MRI in the detection of acute wrist fractures. We recommend MRI of the wrist immediately on the day of trauma if there is clinical suspicion and normal plain radiographs. Accurate diagnosis by MRI examination within the first days following trauma may reduce economic costs due to shortened immobilization time in cases with a suspected fracture but plain radiographs. (orig.)

  8. Favorable results after total wrist arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeckstyns, Michel E. H.; Herzberg, G.; Merser, Søren

    2013-01-01

    -rheumatoid cases) and short follow-up times. Here we report a multicenter series using a third-generation implant with a minimum follow-up time of 5 years. Methods In 2012, data were retrieved from a registry of consecutive wrist operations at 7 centers with units specialized in hand surgery, between 2003 and 2007...... for the whole group were statistically significantly better at follow-up. There were no statistically significant differences between the rheumatoid and the non-rheumatoid patients except for motion, which was better in the non-rheumatoid group. The motion obtained depended on the preoperative motion. Implant...... survival was 0.9 at 5–9 years. Interpretation The clinical results in terms of pain, motion, strength, and function were similar to those in previous reports. The implant survival was 0.9 at 9 years, both in rheumatoid and non-rheumatoid cases, which is an important improvement compared to the earlier...

  9. [Arthroscopy-assisted management of wrist fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deiler, S; Häberle, S; Quentmeier, P; Biberthaler, P; Ahrens, P

    2013-04-01

    Distal radius fractures are the most common fractures in humans and early surgical intervention with modern plating systems is becoming increasingly more established to avoid secondary dislocation. Even fractures with slight dislocations are adequately stabilized and the affinity for surgical intervention and plating procedures is applied to secure these simple fractures. In this aspect the surgical indications are significantly dependent on X-ray examination results. Further diagnostics with respect to ligamentous and soft tissue injury are the exception although the impact energy which creates osseus fractures is sufficient by far to destroy functional soft tissue, cartilage and ligaments. The ongoing development of wrist arthroscopy enables new possibilities especially concerning concomitant articular involvement of distal radius fractures. Arthroscopy-assisted reduction and stabilization as well as minimally invasive soft tissue repair and loose body removal seem to be adequate methods to improve the surgical treatment of distal radius fractures. PMID:23515646

  10. Musculoskeletal integration at the wrist underlies the modular development of limb tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Alice H; Riordan, Timothy J; Pryce, Brian; Weibel, Jennifer L; Watson, Spencer S; Long, Fanxin; Lefebvre, Veronique; Harfe, Brian D; Stadler, H Scott; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Tufa, Sara F; Keene, Douglas R; Schweitzer, Ronen

    2015-07-15

    The long tendons of the limb extend from muscles that reside in the zeugopod (arm/leg) to their skeletal insertions in the autopod (paw). How these connections are established along the length of the limb remains unknown. Here, we show that mouse limb tendons are formed in modular units that combine to form a functional contiguous structure; in muscle-less limbs, tendons develop in the autopod but do not extend into the zeugopod, and in the absence of limb cartilage the zeugopod segments of tendons develop despite the absence of tendons in the autopod. Analyses of cell lineage and proliferation indicate that distinct mechanisms govern the growth of autopod and zeugopod tendon segments. To elucidate the integration of these autopod and zeugopod developmental programs, we re-examined early tendon development. At E12.5, muscles extend across the full length of a very short zeugopod and connect through short anlagen of tendon progenitors at the presumptive wrist to their respective autopod tendon segment, thereby initiating musculoskeletal integration. Zeugopod tendon segments are subsequently generated by proximal elongation of the wrist tendon anlagen, in parallel with skeletal growth, underscoring the dependence of zeugopod tendon development on muscles for tendon anchoring. Moreover, a subset of extensor tendons initially form as fused structures due to initial attachment of their respective wrist tendon anlage to multiple muscles. Subsequent individuation of these tendons depends on muscle activity. These results establish an integrated model for limb tendon development that provides a framework for future analyses of tendon and musculoskeletal phenotypes. PMID:26062940

  11. Abdominal ultrasound (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdominal ultrasound is a scanning technique used to image the interior of the abdomen. Like the X- ... use high frequency sound waves to produce an image and do not expose the individual to radiation. ...

  12. Abdominal CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Computed tomography scan - abdomen; CT scan - abdomen; CAT scan - abdomen; CT abdomen and pelvis ... An abdominal CT scan makes detailed pictures of the structures inside your belly (abdomen) very quickly. This test may be used to ...

  13. Abdominal Pain Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... inspection of a drop of urine), and urine culture for bacterial infection. Stools can be analyzed for ... Hepatitis C Inflammatory Bowel Disease Irritable Bowel Syndrome Obesity Digestive Health Topics Abdominal Pain Syndrome Belching, Bloating, ...

  14. Abdominal tuberculosis: Imaging features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiological findings of abdominal tuberculosis can mimic those of many different diseases. A high level of suspicion is required, especially in high-risk population. In this article, we will describe barium studies, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) findings of abdominal tuberculosis (TB), with emphasis in the latest. We will illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis and describe imaging features that differentiate it from other inflammatory and neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma and Crohn's disease. As tuberculosis can affect any organ in the abdomen, emphasis is placed to ileocecal involvement, lymphadenopathy, peritonitis and solid organ disease (liver, spleen and pancreas). A positive culture or hystologic analysis of biopsy is still required in many patients for definitive diagnosis. Learning objectives:1.To review the relevant pathophysiology of abdominal tuberculosis. 2.Illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis

  15. White Paper: functionality and efficacy of wrist protectors in snowboarding—towards a harmonized international standard

    OpenAIRE

    Michel, Frank I; Schmitt, Kai-Uwe; Greenwald, Richard M.; Russell, Kelly; Simpson, Frank I; Schulz, David; Langran, Mike

    2013-01-01

    The wrist is the most frequently injured body region among snowboarders. Studies have shown that the risk of sustaining a wrist injury can be reduced by wearing wrist protection. Currently, there are a wide variety of wrist protection products for snowboarding on the market that offer a range of protective features. However, there are no minimum performance standards for snowboarding wrist protectors worldwide. The International Society for Skiing Safety convened a task force to develop a Whi...

  16. Imaging in Tuberculosis abdominal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article we illustrate and discuss imaging features resulting from Tuberculosis abdominal affectation. We present patients evaluated with several imaging modalities who had abdominal symptoms and findings suggestive of granulomatous disease. Diagnosis was confirm including hystopatology and clinical outgoing. Cases involved presented many affected organs such as lymphatic system, peritoneum, liver, spleen, pancreas, kidneys, ureters, adrenal glands and pelvic organs Tuberculosis, Tuberculosis renal, Tuberculosis hepatic, Tuberculosis splenic Tomography, x-ray, computed

  17. Recognizing upper limb movements with wrist worn inertial sensors using k-means clustering classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Dwaipayan; Cranny, Andy; Gupta, Nayaab; Maharatna, Koushik; Achner, Josy; Klemke, Jasmin; Jöbges, Michael; Ortmann, Steffen

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we present a methodology for recognizing three fundamental movements of the human forearm (extension, flexion and rotation) using pattern recognition applied to the data from a single wrist-worn, inertial sensor. We propose that this technique could be used as a clinical tool to assess rehabilitation progress in neurodegenerative pathologies such as stroke or cerebral palsy by tracking the number of times a patient performs specific arm movements (e.g. prescribed exercises) with their paretic arm throughout the day. We demonstrate this with healthy subjects and stroke patients in a simple proof of concept study in which these arm movements are detected during an archetypal activity of daily-living (ADL) - 'making-a-cup-of-tea'. Data is collected from a tri-axial accelerometer and a tri-axial gyroscope located proximal to the wrist. In a training phase, movements are initially performed in a controlled environment which are represented by a ranked set of 30 time-domain features. Using a sequential forward selection technique, for each set of feature combinations three clusters are formed using k-means clustering followed by 10 runs of 10-fold cross validation on the training data to determine the best feature combinations. For the testing phase, movements performed during the ADL are associated with each cluster label using a minimum distance classifier in a multi-dimensional feature space, comprised of the best ranked features, using Euclidean or Mahalanobis distance as the metric. Experiments were performed with four healthy subjects and four stroke survivors and our results show that the proposed methodology can detect the three movements performed during the ADL with an overall average accuracy of 88% using the accelerometer data and 83% using the gyroscope data across all healthy subjects and arm movement types. The average accuracy across all stroke survivors was 70% using accelerometer data and 66% using gyroscope data. We also use a Linear

  18. Phantom hand and wrist movements in upper limb amputees are slow but naturally controlled movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Graaf, J B; Jarrassé, N; Nicol, C; Touillet, A; Coyle, T; Maynard, L; Martinet, N; Paysant, J

    2016-01-15

    After limb amputation, patients often wake up with a vivid perception of the presence of the missing limb, called "phantom limb". Phantom limbs have mostly been studied with respect to pain sensation. But patients can experience many other phantom sensations, including voluntary movements. The goal of the present study was to quantify phantom movement kinematics and relate these to intact limb kinematics and to the time elapsed since amputation. Six upper arm and two forearm amputees with various delays since amputation (6months to 32years) performed phantom finger, hand and wrist movements at self-chosen comfortable velocities. The kinematics of the phantom movements was indirectly obtained via the intact limb that synchronously mimicked the phantom limb movements, using a Cyberglove® for measuring finger movements and an inertial measurement unit for wrist movements. Results show that the execution of phantom movements is perceived as "natural" but effortful. The types of phantom movements that can be performed are variable between the patients but they could all perform thumb flexion/extension and global hand opening/closure. Finger extension movements appeared to be 24% faster than finger flexion movements. Neither the number of types of phantom movements that can be executed nor the kinematic characteristics were related to the elapsed time since amputation, highlighting the persistence of post-amputation neural adaptation. We hypothesize that the perceived slowness of phantom movements is related to altered proprioceptive feedback that cannot be recalibrated by lack of visual feedback during phantom movement execution. PMID:26556065

  19. The post-arthro-CT of the wrist clinical evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    Scheurecker, G

    2001-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic effectiveness of post-arthro-CT (PACT) and 3-compartment wrist arthrography (AG) both separate and combined versus wrist arthroscopy for scapho-lunate ligament (SLL), luno-triquetral ligament (LTL) and triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) defects and chondromalacia of the carpal bones. Material and methods: in 58 patients (16-69 years) the affected wrist was examined initially by conventional 3-compartment wrist arthrography with digital subtraction technique during injection followed by digital stress images. Afterwards spiral arthro-CT was performed in the semi-coronal and axial plane with 1 mm slice thickness and secondary true-coronal and sagittal reconstructions. Within 1 month arthroscopy was performed in general anesthesia utilizing standard joint entry points combined with routine digital picture archiving. All examinations were evaluated for SLL, LTL and TFC defects, PACT and AS for ChM too. Results: AG versus AS: the following detection rates were observed (AG and AS positive/AG...

  20. Wrist Energy Fuzzy Assist Cancer Engine – WE-FACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharmila Begum M

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Promotion and propagation of Ancient Indian Medical System has been our aim, as we foresee the usefulness and cost effectiveness of traditional medical system. Even though there has been a tremendousadvancement in medical technology, the prediction or diagnosis of diseases are costlier than the treatment.Intelligence can be spotted out in each and every cell in an human body and this intelligence gets communicated throughout the body in the form of vibration which can be examined through Wrist Pulse Examination. Since this wrist pulse signals contains vital information which explicitly points out the pathologic changes in a human body. Here, we propose a new methodology named “Wrist Energy Fuzzy Assist Cancer Engine – WE-FACE”for prediction and diagnosis of diseases using fuzzy logic. We mainly focus on the prediction and diagnosis of cancer through wrist pulse signals with the use of appropriate sensors.

  1. Hand and wrist arthritis of Behcet disease: Imaging features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Reports on arthritis in Behcet disease are relatively scarce, and imaging features vary. Purpose: To document the various imaging features of articular disorders of the hand and wrist in Behcet disease. Material and Methods: Four patients, four women aged 26 to 65 years, fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of Behcet disease, with imaging findings of hand and wrist arthritis, were seen in two institutions. Radiography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging were studied to elucidate the pattern and distribution. Results: Both non-erosive arthritis and erosive arthritis of different features were noted: one with non-erosive synovitis of the wrist, one with wrist synovitis with minimal erosion, and two with erosive arthritis of the distal interphalangeal joint. Conclusion: Imaging manifestations of arthritis of Behcet disease vary, and may be similar to other seronegative arthritides

  2. Risk factors for hand-wrist disorders in repetitive work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, J. F.; Mikkelsen, S.; Andersen, JH;

    2007-01-01

    (wrist pain and palpation tenderness) were determined in 3123 employees in 19 industrial settings. With the use of questionnaires and video recordings of homogenous work tasks number of wrist movements, hand force requirements and wrist position were analysed as risk factors for hand-wrist disorders......-response pattern. Odds ratios for the risk of hand pain was 1.7 (95% CI 1.3 to 2.2) and for possible tendonitis 1.9 (95% CI 1.1 to 3.3). There was no significant interaction between the ergonomic factors. In the follow-up analyses force remained a risk factor for hand pain (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.1 to 1.8) and for...

  3. Pseudotumoral form of soft-tissue tuberculosis of the wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbai, Mohamed Ali; Benzarti, Sofien; Msek, Hichem; Boussen, Monia; Khorbi, Adel

    2016-03-01

    Tuberculosis is a major public health problem in developing countries. Hand and wrist is a rare localization for extra-pulmonary tuberculosis, a pseudotumoral form of soft tissue tuberculosis of the wrist is exceptional. We report the case of a 45-year-old male presenting with a painful swelling of the dorsal aspect of the right wrist evolving for six months. Clinical study was evoking a ganglion cyst of the wrist. Intraoperatively a pseudotumoral mass with rice bodies was found, suggesting tuberculous tenosynovitis. The histopathological study revealed caseating giant cell granulomas with epithelioid cells. Cultures on Löwenstein-Jensen medium detected Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Synovectomy with removal of all the rice bodies followed by anti-tuberculous chemotherapy provided uneventful recovery. PMID:26927998

  4. Longitudinal observation of pediatric hand and wrist ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, A A; Hutchinson, D T

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the behavior of ganglia of the hand and wrist in young children treated without surgery. Fourteen consecutive children, less than 10 years of age, who presented with cysts of the hand and wrist were followed up by a single surgeon. The average age of the patient at the time of diagnosis was 38 months (range, 2 months to 9 years 3 months). The masses included 7 retinacular cysts, 5 volar wrist ganglia, and 2 dorsal wrist ganglia. These cysts had been present for an average of 3.3 months (range, 1-12 months) before medical advice was sought. None of the cysts were painful. Follow-up averaged 33 months (range, 9-112 months), with 79% of all cysts spontaneously resolving, the majority within a year. We believe that a child presenting with a benign hand lesion characteristic of a ganglion cyst should initially be treated by observation. PMID:11466631

  5. Kinematics and Dynamics of an Asymmetrical Parallel Robotic Wrist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Guanglei

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces an asymmetrical parallel robotic wrist, which can generate a decoupled unlimited-torsion motion and achieve high positioning accuracy. The kinematics, dexterity, and singularities of the manipulator are investigated to visualize the performance contours of the manipulator...

  6. Wrist display concept demonstration based on 2-in. color AMOLED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Frederick M.; Longo, Sam J.; Hopper, Darrel G.

    2004-09-01

    The wrist watch needs an upgrade. Recent advances in optoelectronics, microelectronics, and communication theory have established a technology base that now make the multimedia Dick Tracy watch attainable during the next decade. As a first step towards stuffing the functionality of an entire personnel computer (PC) and television receiver under a watch face, we have set a goal of providing wrist video capability to warfighters. Commercial sector work on the wrist form factor already includes all the functionality of a personal digital assistant (PDA) and full PC operating system. Our strategy is to leverage these commercial developments. In this paper we describe our use of a 2.2 in. diagonal color active matrix light emitting diode (AMOLED) device as a wrist-mounted display (WMD) to present either full motion video or computer generated graphical image formats.

  7. MRI-identified abnormalities and wrist range of motion in asymptomatic versus symptomatic computer users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlosky William F

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous work has shown an association between restricted wrist range of motion (ROM and upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders in computer users. We compared the prevalence of MRI-identified wrist abnormalities and wrist ROM between asymptomatic and symptomatic computer users. Methods MR images at 1.5 T of both wrists were obtained from 10 asymptomatic controls (8 F, 2 M and 14 computer users (10 F, 4 M with chronic wrist pain (10 bilateral; 4 right-side. Maximum wrist range of motion in flexion and radioulnar deviation was measured with an electrogoniometer. Results Extraosseous ganglia were identified in 66.6% of asymptomatic wrists and in 75% of symptomatic wrists. Intraosseous ganglia were identified in 45.8% of asymptomatic wrists and in 75% of symptomatic wrists, and were significantly (p p Conclusions This appears to be the first MRI study of wrist abnormalities in computer users. This study demonstrates that a variety of wrist abnormalities are common in computer users and that only intraosseous ganglia prevalence and size differed between asymptomatic and symptomatic wrists. Flexion was restricted in the dominant wrist of the symptomatic group, but the correlation between wrist flexion and intraosseous ganglion burden did not reach significance. Flexion restriction may be an indicator of increased joint loading, and identifying the cause may help to guide preventive and therapeutic interventions.

  8. Potential wrist ligament injury in rescuers performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Curran; Sasha Sorr; Eva Aquino

    2013-01-01

    Wrist pain in rescuers performing chest compressions as part of cardiopulmonary resuscitation has been reported anecdotally and recently in the literature. Studies have indicated that rescuers apply as much as 644 N of force to the victim′s chest with each compression, while standards require one hundred compressions per minute. Recent research suggests that forces transmitted through the rescuers′ wrists of less than 10% of those seen during the performance of chest compressions significantl...

  9. Diagnostic and therapeutic arthroscopy of the wrist: clinical experience

    OpenAIRE

    Tuzuner, Serdar; Ozdemir, Hakan; Gur, Semih

    2004-01-01

    Wrist arthroscopy can facilitate early definitive diagnosis of soft tissue, carpal bone cartilage, the triangular fibrocartilage complex and carpal ligaments injuries. Many such injuries can be treated successfully with minimally invasive arthroscopic techniques, reducing the morbidity associated with surgical exposure and permitting earlier return to work. Between November 1991 and May 1996 19 wrist arthroscopies were performed in the Department of Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, University ...

  10. Therapeutic Approach of Wrist Ganglion Using Electroacupuncture: Two Case Reports

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Kyoung Min; Kang, Eun Young; Lee, Sung Hoon; Jung, A Young; Nam, Doo Hyoun; Cheon, Ji Hwan

    2014-01-01

    A ganglion cyst is a relatively common benign tumor on the wrist. Conservative and surgical approaches have been used for its treatment. Various conservative treatment methods have been suggested such as reassurance, aspiration, sclerosant injection, and direct compression. But, there is no acceptable treatment of choice yet because each suggested method has a relatively high recurrence rate. We want to report two cases in which the size of the wrist ganglion was decreased by using electroacu...

  11. Midcarpal Hemiarthroplasty for Wrist Arthritis: Rationale and Early Results

    OpenAIRE

    Vance, Michael C.; Packer, Greg; Tan, David; Crisco, J.J. Trey; Wolfe, Scott W.

    2012-01-01

    Midcarpal hemiarthroplasty is a novel motion-preserving treatment for radiocarpal arthritis and is an alternative to current procedures that provide pain relief at the expense of wrist biomechanics and natural motion. It is indicated primarily in active patients with a well-preserved distal row and debilitating arthritic symptoms. By resurfacing the proximal carpal row, midcarpal arthroplasty relieves pain while preserving the midcarpal articulation and the anatomic center of wrist rotation. ...

  12. Ultrasonographic Diagnosis of the Hand and Wrist Joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ik; Choi, Sang Hee [Kangnnam Sacredheart Hospital, Hallym University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-12-15

    Ultrasonographic examination of the hand and wrist is simple and easy due to their superficial anatomy, and easy accessibility. Ultrasound is indicated to evaluate persistent pain and swelling when the radiographic examination is normal. Although their anatomy is simple, the pathologic conditions of the hand and wrist are quite diverse. Although plain radiographs, CT, arthrography, and MRI have traditionally been used to evaluate the hand and wrist, nowadays, ultrasound is now being ordered with increasing frequency to scan the hand and wrist as it is a cost-effective and accurate modality for the diagnosis of focal pathology in those areas. A high-frequency linear array transducer should be used to scan the upper extremity. Available transducers up to 12 MHz provide excellent resolution. Color and power Doppler images are useful in hyperemic changes and tumor vascularity. Sonographic panorama imaging also has the advantage of demonstrating the whole extension of the lesion and of enabling a dynamic study of the hand and wrist. This action during sonographic examination not only help to diagnosis to examiner to the anatomic structures, but also localize the pathologic process to a target organ. This chapter will describe the sonographic findings associated with the most common hand and wrist pathologic conditions

  13. Isolated ulnar shaft fractures. Comparison of treatment by a functional brace and long-arm cast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebuhr, Peter Henrik; Hölmich, P; Orsnes, T; Soelberg, M; Krasheninnikoff, Michael; Kjersgaard, A G

    1992-01-01

    In a prospective study, we randomly allocated 39 patients with isolated fractures of the lower two-thirds of the ulnar shaft to treatment either by a prefabricated functional brace or a long-arm cast. Significantly better wrist function and a higher percentage of satisfied patients were found in...

  14. Wrist ultrasound analysis of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Mendonça

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we evaluated 42 wrists using the semi-quantitative scales power Doppler ultrasound (PDUS and gray scale ultrasound (GSUS with scores ranging from 0 to 3 and correlated the results with clinical, laboratory and radiographic data. Twenty-one patients (17 women and 4 men with rheumatoid arthritis according to criteria of the American College of Rheumatology were enrolled in the study from September 2008 to July 2009 at Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP. The average disease duration was 14 months. The patients were 66.6% Caucasians and 33.3% non-Caucasians, with a mean age of 42 and 41 years, respectively. A dorsal longitudinal scan was performed by ultrasound on the radiocarpal and midcarpal joints using GE LOGIQ XP-linear ultrasound and a high frequency (8-10 MHz transducer. All patients were X-rayed, and the Larsen score was determined for the joints, with grades ranging from 0 to V. This study showed significant correlations between clinical, sonographic and laboratory data: GSUS and swollen right wrist (r = 0.546, GSUS of right wrist and swelling of left wrist (r = 0.511, PDUS of right wrist and pain in left wrist (r = 0.436, PDUS of right wrist and C-reactive protein (r = 0.466. Ultrasound can be considered a useful tool in the diagnosis of synovitis in early rheumatoid arthritis mainly when the anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide and rheumatoid factor are negative, and can lead to an early change in the therapeutic decision.

  15. Machine learning for activity recognition: hip versus wrist data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Problem addressed: Wrist-worn accelerometers are associated with greater compliance. However, validated algorithms for predicting activity type from wrist-worn accelerometer data are lacking. This study compared the activity recognition rates of an activity classifier trained on acceleration signal collected on the wrist and hip. Methodology: 52 children and adolescents (mean age 13.7  ±  3.1 year) completed 12 activity trials that were categorized into 7 activity classes: lying down, sitting, standing, walking, running, basketball, and dancing. During each trial, participants wore an ActiGraph GT3X+ tri-axial accelerometer on the right hip and the non-dominant wrist. Features were extracted from 10-s windows and inputted into a regularized logistic regression model using R (Glmnet + L1). Results: Classification accuracy for the hip and wrist was 91.0% ± 3.1% and 88.4% ± 3.0%, respectively. The hip model exhibited excellent classification accuracy for sitting (91.3%), standing (95.8%), walking (95.8%), and running (96.8%); acceptable classification accuracy for lying down (88.3%) and basketball (81.9%); and modest accuracy for dance (64.1%). The wrist model exhibited excellent classification accuracy for sitting (93.0%), standing (91.7%), and walking (95.8%); acceptable classification accuracy for basketball (86.0%); and modest accuracy for running (78.8%), lying down (74.6%) and dance (69.4%). Potential Impact: Both the hip and wrist algorithms achieved acceptable classification accuracy, allowing researchers to use either placement for activity recognition. (paper)

  16. Abdominal Dual Energy Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, F. Graham; Brody, William R.; Cassel, Douglas M.; Macovski, Albert

    1981-11-01

    Dual energy scanned projection radiography of the abdomen has been performed using an experimental line-scanned radiographic system. Digital images simultaneously obtained at 85 and 135 kVp are combined, using photoelectric/Compton decomposition algorithms to create images from which selected materials are cancelled. Soft tissue cancellation images have proved most useful in various abdominal imaging applications, largely due to the elimination of obscuring high-contrast bowel gas shadows. These techniques have been successfully applied to intravenous pyelography, oral cholecystography, intravenous abdominal arteriog-raphy and the imaging of renal calculi.

  17. Childhood abdominal cystic lymphangioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konen, Osnat; Rathaus, Valeria; Shapiro, Myra [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Meir General Hospital, Sapir Medical Centre, Kfar Saba (Israel); Dlugy, Elena [Department of Paediatric Surgery, Schneider Medical Centre, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University (Israel); Freud, Enrique [Department of Paediatric Surgery, Sapir Medical Centre, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University (Israel); Kessler, Ada [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Sourasky Medical Centre, Tel-Aviv (Israel); Horev, Gadi [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Schneider Medical Centre, Tel-Aviv (Israel)

    2002-02-01

    Background: Abdominal lymphangioma is a rare benign congenital malformation of the mesenteric and/or retroperitoneal lymphatics. Clinical presentation is variable and may be misleading; therefore, complex imaging studies are necessary in the evaluation of this condition. US and CT have a major role in the correct preoperative diagnosis and provide important information regarding location, size, adjacent organ involvement, and expected complications. Objective: To evaluate the clinical and imaging findings of seven children with proven abdominal cystic lymphangioma. Materials and methods: Clinical and imaging files of seven children with pathologically proven abdominal lymphangioma, from three university hospitals, were retrospectively evaluated. Patient's ages ranged from 1 day to 6 years (mean, 2.2 years). Symptoms and signs included evidence of inflammation, abnormal prenatal US findings, chronic abdominal pain, haemorrhage following trauma, clinical signs of intestinal obstruction, and abdominal distension with lower extremities lymphoedema. Plain films of five patients, US of six patients and CT of five patients were reviewed. Sequential imaging examinations were available in two cases. Results: Abdominal plain films showed displacement of bowel loops by a soft tissue mass in five of six patients, two of them with dilatation of small bowel loops. US revealed an abdominal multiloculated septated cystic mass in five of six cases and a single pelvic cyst in one which changed in appearance over 2 months. Ascites was present in three cases. CT demonstrated a septated cystic mass of variable sizes in all available five cases. Sequential US and CT examinations in two patients showed progressive enlargement of the masses, increase of fluid echogenicity, and thickening of walls or septa in both cases, with multiplication of septa in one case. At surgery, mesenteric lymphangioma was found in five patients and retroperitoneal lymphangioma in the other two

  18. Childhood abdominal cystic lymphangioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Abdominal lymphangioma is a rare benign congenital malformation of the mesenteric and/or retroperitoneal lymphatics. Clinical presentation is variable and may be misleading; therefore, complex imaging studies are necessary in the evaluation of this condition. US and CT have a major role in the correct preoperative diagnosis and provide important information regarding location, size, adjacent organ involvement, and expected complications. Objective: To evaluate the clinical and imaging findings of seven children with proven abdominal cystic lymphangioma. Materials and methods: Clinical and imaging files of seven children with pathologically proven abdominal lymphangioma, from three university hospitals, were retrospectively evaluated. Patient's ages ranged from 1 day to 6 years (mean, 2.2 years). Symptoms and signs included evidence of inflammation, abnormal prenatal US findings, chronic abdominal pain, haemorrhage following trauma, clinical signs of intestinal obstruction, and abdominal distension with lower extremities lymphoedema. Plain films of five patients, US of six patients and CT of five patients were reviewed. Sequential imaging examinations were available in two cases. Results: Abdominal plain films showed displacement of bowel loops by a soft tissue mass in five of six patients, two of them with dilatation of small bowel loops. US revealed an abdominal multiloculated septated cystic mass in five of six cases and a single pelvic cyst in one which changed in appearance over 2 months. Ascites was present in three cases. CT demonstrated a septated cystic mass of variable sizes in all available five cases. Sequential US and CT examinations in two patients showed progressive enlargement of the masses, increase of fluid echogenicity, and thickening of walls or septa in both cases, with multiplication of septa in one case. At surgery, mesenteric lymphangioma was found in five patients and retroperitoneal lymphangioma in the other two. Conclusions: US

  19. Abdominal Vascular Catastrophes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manpreet; Koyfman, Alex; Martinez, Joseph P

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal vascular catastrophes are among the most challenging and time sensitive for emergency practitioners to recognize. Mesenteric ischemia remains a highly lethal entity for which the history and physical examination can be misleading. Laboratory tests are often unhelpful, and appropriate imaging must be quickly obtained. A multidisciplinary approach is required to have a positive impact on mortality rates. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm likewise may present in a cryptic fashion. A specific type of ruptured aneurysm, the aortoenteric fistula, often masquerades as the more common routine gastrointestinal bleed. The astute clinician recognizes that this is a more lethal variant of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. PMID:27133247

  20. Influence of the long term use of a computer on median, ulnar and radial sensory nerves in the wrist region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belgin Bamac

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Repetitive microtrauma or overuse injuries may often affect upper extremities of the long term computer users. The aim of this study was to compare sensory nerve conduction velocities (SNCV for median, radial and ulnar nerves in the wrist of computer users with the same parameters in controls who do not use computers regularly. Material and Methods: Twenty one male computer users (age: mean (M = 28.3 years ± standard deviation (SD = 7.5 years and 21 male control subjects (age: M±SD = 24.1±4.6 years were recruited for the study. Limb length and the perimeters of the dominant arm and forearm were measured for each subject. The neurophysiological study consisted of measuring sensory nerve conduction of the median, ulnar and radial nerves. Results: The sensory conduction velocities of both median and ulnar nerves were significantly delayed in the dominant arm of the computer users compared to the controls. In addition, sensory conduction velocity of the median nerve was significantly delayed in the dominant extremity of the computer users compared to their non-dominant extremity. Conclusions: This study shows that computer users have a tendency toward developing median and ulnar sensory nerve damage in the wrist region. Mechanism of delayed SNCV in the median and ulnar nerves may be due to sustained extension and ulnar deviation of the wrist during computer mouse use and typing. Reduced SNCV changes were more apparent on the dominant side of the median nerve. This may indicate the increased neural deficits related to an increased use of the dominant side. Further investigation is needed to determine how to reduce potential risk factors at this stage in order to prevent development of median or ulnar neuropathy in the long term computer users.

  1. MDCT arthrography of the wrist: Diagnostic accuracy and indications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Filippo, Massimo [Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Radiological Sciences, University of Parma, Parma Hospital, Via Gramsci, 14, 43100 Parma (Italy)], E-mail: massimo.defilippo@unipr.it; Pogliacomi, Francesco [Orthopaedics, Traumatology and Functional Rehabilitation Unit, Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Parma, Parma Hospital, Via Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Bertellini, Annalisa [Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Radiological Sciences, University of Parma, Parma Hospital, Via Gramsci, 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Araoz, Philip A. [Department of Radiology, Division of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, 200 First St SW, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Averna, Raffaele; Sverzellati, Nicola; Ingegnoli, Anna [Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Radiological Sciences, University of Parma, Parma Hospital, Via Gramsci, 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Corradi, Maurizio; Costantino, Cosimo [Orthopaedics, Traumatology and Functional Rehabilitation Unit, Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Parma, Parma Hospital, Via Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Zompatori, Maurizio [Department of Radiological and Histopathological Sciences, Policlinic S.Orsola-Malpighi, University of Bologna, Via Massarenti 9, 40138 Bologna (Italy)

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and indications of arthrography with Multidetector Computed Tomography (arthro-MDCT) of the wrist in patients with absolute or relative contraindications to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies and in patients with periarticular metal implants using diagnostic arthroscopy as the gold standard. Materials and methods: After intra-articular injection of iodixanol and volumetric acquisition, 43 wrists in patients of both genders (18 females, 25 males, age range 32-60 years) were examined with a 16-detector-row CT scanner. Fifteen patients had prior wrist surgery. The patients had arthralgia, degenerative and traumatic arthropathies as well as limited range of motion, but no radiologically detected fractures. All examinations were interpreted by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. The findings were compared with arthroscopic findings carried out within 28 days of the CT study. Results: In non-operated and operated wrists the comparison between arthro-MDCT and arthroscopy showed sensitivity, specificity and accuracy ranging between 92% and 94% for triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC), between 80% and 100% for intrinsic ligaments located within the proximal carpal compartment, and between 94% and 100% for articular cartilage. Inter-observer agreement between two radiologists, in the evaluation of all types of lesions, was almost perfect (k = 0.96) and statistically significant (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Arthro-MDCT of the wrist provides an accurate diagnosis to identify chondral, fibrocartilaginous and intra-articular ligament lesions in patients who cannot be evaluated by MRI, and in post-surgical patients.

  2. MDCT arthrography of the wrist: Diagnostic accuracy and indications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and indications of arthrography with Multidetector Computed Tomography (arthro-MDCT) of the wrist in patients with absolute or relative contraindications to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies and in patients with periarticular metal implants using diagnostic arthroscopy as the gold standard. Materials and methods: After intra-articular injection of iodixanol and volumetric acquisition, 43 wrists in patients of both genders (18 females, 25 males, age range 32-60 years) were examined with a 16-detector-row CT scanner. Fifteen patients had prior wrist surgery. The patients had arthralgia, degenerative and traumatic arthropathies as well as limited range of motion, but no radiologically detected fractures. All examinations were interpreted by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. The findings were compared with arthroscopic findings carried out within 28 days of the CT study. Results: In non-operated and operated wrists the comparison between arthro-MDCT and arthroscopy showed sensitivity, specificity and accuracy ranging between 92% and 94% for triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC), between 80% and 100% for intrinsic ligaments located within the proximal carpal compartment, and between 94% and 100% for articular cartilage. Inter-observer agreement between two radiologists, in the evaluation of all types of lesions, was almost perfect (k = 0.96) and statistically significant (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Arthro-MDCT of the wrist provides an accurate diagnosis to identify chondral, fibrocartilaginous and intra-articular ligament lesions in patients who cannot be evaluated by MRI, and in post-surgical patients.

  3. Feasibility study into self-administered training at home using an arm and hand device with motivational gaming environment in chronic stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Nijenhuis, Sharon M; Prange, Gerdienke B; Amirabdollahian, Farshid; Sale, Patrizio; Infarinato, Francesco; Nasr, Nasrin; Mountain, Gail; Hermens, Hermie J.; Stienen, Arno H.A.; Buurke, Jaap H.; Rietman, Johan S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Assistive and robotic training devices are increasingly used for rehabilitation of the hemiparetic arm after stroke, although applications for the wrist and hand are trailing behind. Furthermore, applying a training device in domestic settings may enable an increased training dose of functional arm and hand training. The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility and potential clinical changes associated with a technology-supported arm and hand training system at home fo...

  4. Endometriosis Abdominal wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endometriosis of abdominal wall is a rare entity wi ch frequently appears after gynecological surgery. Case history includes three cases of parietal endometriosis wi ch were treated in Maciel Hospital of Montevideo. The report refers to etiological diagnostic aspects and highlights the importance of total resection in order to achieve definitive healing

  5. Adult abdominal hernias.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Kevin P

    2014-06-01

    Educational Objectives and Key Points. 1. Given that abdominal hernias are a frequent imaging finding, radiologists not only are required to interpret the appearances of abdominal hernias but also should be comfortable with identifying associated complications and postrepair findings. 2. CT is the imaging modality of choice for the assessment of a known adult abdominal hernia in both elective and acute circumstances because of rapid acquisition, capability of multiplanar reconstruction, good spatial resolution, and anatomic depiction with excellent sensitivity for most complications. 3. Ultrasound is useful for adult groin assessment and is the imaging modality of choice for pediatric abdominal wall hernia assessment, whereas MRI is beneficial when there is reasonable concern that a patient\\'s symptoms could be attributable to a hernia or a musculoskeletal source. 4. Fluoroscopic herniography is a sensitive radiologic investigation for patients with groin pain in whom a hernia is suspected but in whom a hernia cannot be identified at physical examination. 5. The diagnosis of an internal hernia not only is a challenging clinical diagnosis but also can be difficult to diagnose with imaging: Closed-loop small-bowel obstruction and abnormally located bowel loops relative to normally located small bowel or colon should prompt assessment for an internal hernia.

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Children’s (pediatric) ultrasound imaging of the abdomen ... limitations of Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging? What is Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and produces ...

  7. Soft-tissue approach to hand and wrist trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides information that will help minimize nondiagnosis of significant injuries to the hand and wrist, currently the most common cause of litigation in radiology. Soft-tissue swelling accompanies all significant injuries. The soft-tissue anatomy determines the patterns of swelling seen in acute injuries to the hand and wrist. Knowledge of the detectable patterns of swelling logically directs attention to the region of greatest trauma, minimizing the possibility that subtle sprains, fractures, and dislocations will be overlooked. Principles of joint space evaluation, alignment assessment, and additional evaluation techniques are other tools that will minimize nondiagnosis. Common examples of trauma to the hand and wrist in all age groups have been selected to illustrate the usefulness of this technique. Subtleties are stressed and unusual injuries illustrated

  8. 78 FR 68905 - Agency Information Collection (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Under OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Under OMB... Questionnaire)'' in any correspondence. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Crystal Rennie, Enterprise Records... Disability Benefits Questionnaire)''. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Wrist Conditions Disability...

  9. Redundancy resolution of a human arm for controlling a seven DOF wearable robotic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunchul; Miller, Levi Makaio; Al-Refai, Aimen; Brand, Moshe; Rosen, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    The human arm including the shoulder, elbow, wrist joints and exclusion scapular motion has 7 Degrees of Freedom (DOF) while positioning of the wrist in space and orientating the palm is a task that requires 6 DOF. As such it includes one more DOF than is needed to complete the task. Given the redundant nature of the arm, multiple arm configurations can be used to complete a task, which is expressed mathematically by none unique solution for the inverse kinematics. Despite this mathematical difficulty, the motor control provides a unique solution for the arm redundancy as the arm is moved in space. Resolving this redundancy is becoming critical as the human interacts with a wearable robotic system(exoskeleton) which includes the same redundancy as the human arm. Therefore, the inverse kinematics solution resolving the redundancy of these two coupled systems must be identical in order to guarantee a seamless integration. The redundancy of the arm can be formulated kinematically by defining the swivel angle - the rotation angle of the plane including the upper and lower arm around a virtual axis connecting the shoulder and wrist joints which are fixed in space. Analyzing reaching tasks recorded with a motion capture lab indicates that the swivel angle is selected such that when the elbow joint is flexed, the palm points the head. Based on these experimental results, selecting the point around the center of the head as a stationary target allows to calculate the swivel angle and in that way to resolve the human arm redundancy. Experimental results indicated that by using the proposed redundancy resolution criteria the error between the predicted swivel angle and the actual swivel angle adopted by the motor control system is less then 5 Deg. This criterion or a synthesis of several additional criteria may improve the synergistic relationships between an operator and a wearable robotic system. PMID:22255087

  10. Wheelchair ergonomic hand drive mechanism use improves wrist mechanics associated with carpal tunnel syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Lisa A. Zukowski, MA; Jaimie A. Roper, MS; Orit Shechtman, PhD, OTR/L; Dana M. Otzel, PhD; Patty W. Hovis, MSESS; Mark D. Tillman, PhD

    2014-01-01

    Among conventional manual wheelchair (CMW) users, 49% to 63% experience carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) that is likely induced by large forces transmitted through the wrist and extreme wrist orientations. The ergonomic hand drive mechanism (EHDM) tested in this study has been shown to utilize a more neutral wrist orientation. This study evaluates the use of an EHDM in terms of wrist orientations that may predispose individuals to CTS. Eleven adult full-time CMW users with spinal cord injury part...

  11. Quantifying forearm and wrist joint power during unconstrained movements in healthy individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Flores, Diana Castillo; Laurendeau, Simon; Teasdale, Normand; Simoneau, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background Wrist movement-related injuries account for a large number of repetitive motion injuries. Remarkably little, if any, empirical data exist to quantify the impact of neuromuscular disorders affecting the wrist or to validate the effectiveness of rehabilitation training programs on wrist functions. The aim of this project was to develop a biomechanical model for quantifying wrist and forearm kinetics during unconstrained movements, to assess its reliability and to determine its sensit...

  12. Imaging of radial wrist pain. I. Imaging modalities and anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ryan Ka Lok; Griffith, James F.; Ng, Alex Wing Hung [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong, Shatin (China); Wong, Clara Wing Yee [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Shatin (China)

    2014-06-15

    Radial wrist pain is a common clinical complaint. The relatively complex anatomy in this region, combined with the small size of the anatomical structures and occasionally subtle imaging findings, can pose problems when trying to localize the exact cause of pain. To fully comprehend the underlying pathology, one needs a good understanding of both radial-sided wrist anatomy and the relative merits of the different imaging techniques used to assess these structures. In part I of this review, these aspects will be discussed. (orig.)

  13. Ulnar-sided wrist pain. II. Clinical imaging and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pain at the ulnar aspect of the wrist is a diagnostic challenge for hand surgeons and radiologists due to the small and complex anatomical structures involved. In this article, imaging modalities including radiography, arthrography, ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), CT arthrography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and MR arthrography are compared with regard to differential diagnosis. Clinical imaging findings are reviewed for a more comprehensive understanding of this disorder. Treatments for the common diseases that cause the ulnar-sided wrist pain including extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) tendonitis, flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) tendonitis, pisotriquetral arthritis, triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) lesions, ulnar impaction, lunotriquetral (LT) instability, and distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability are reviewed. (orig.)

  14. Ulnar-sided wrist pain. II. Clinical imaging and treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Atsuya; Souza, Felipe [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Vezeridis, Peter S.; Blazar, Philip [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Boston, MA (United States); Yoshioka, Hiroshi [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); University of California-Irvine, Department of Radiological Sciences, Irvine, CA (United States); UC Irvine Medical Center, Department of Radiological Sciences, Orange, CA (United States)

    2010-09-15

    Pain at the ulnar aspect of the wrist is a diagnostic challenge for hand surgeons and radiologists due to the small and complex anatomical structures involved. In this article, imaging modalities including radiography, arthrography, ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), CT arthrography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and MR arthrography are compared with regard to differential diagnosis. Clinical imaging findings are reviewed for a more comprehensive understanding of this disorder. Treatments for the common diseases that cause the ulnar-sided wrist pain including extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) tendonitis, flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) tendonitis, pisotriquetral arthritis, triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) lesions, ulnar impaction, lunotriquetral (LT) instability, and distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability are reviewed. (orig.)

  15. Anthropometric characteristics of wrists joint surfaces depending on lunate types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyankova, S

    2007-10-01

    It is well known that the lunate presents with two main types: lunate type I has one facet of its distal surface only for capitates, whereas lunate type II has two facets of the same surface for capitate and for hamate. Our previous anthropometric studies showed that the lunate type II wrists are of greater size than the lunate type I wrists. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the lunate types and the presence or absence of hamato-lunate joint correlate with anthropometric characteristics of the joint surfaces of other wrists. Sixteen sets of macerated wrists with the lunate type I and 21 with the lunate type II were studied. Two-thousand-four-hundred-and-forty-eight anthropometric measurements were done (for 68 anthropometric indicators) and 864 anthropometric indices were calculated (for 24 anthropometric indices) separately for the wrist joint surfaces. The absolute value of the anthropometric indicators of the joint surfaces of the separated wrists were greater in the wrists with the lunate type II, except for the indicators "Greatest length of the dorsal joint surface of pisiform", "Width of the proximal joint surface, measured in the middle" and "Greatest width of the proximal joint surface" for the trapezoid and "Greatest height of the ulnar joint surface" for the capitate. The enlargement of the joint surfaces for the scaphoid was mainly in proximo-distal direction. The enlargement for the triquetrum and pisiform was mainly in radio-ulnar direction. The enlargement for trapezium, trapezoid and capitate was mainly in dorso-volar direction (except for the ulnar joint surface of capitate). The enlargement for hamate was mainly in radio-ulnar and dorso-volar directions (except for the joint surfaces for capitate and triquetrum). The calculated indices illustrate the quantitative proportions of the variations mentioned above. The anthropometric differences are a good reason to make a clear distinction between both types of wrist joint

  16. Potential wrist ligament injury in rescuers performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Curran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Wrist pain in rescuers performing chest compressions as part of cardiopulmonary resuscitation has been reported anecdotally and recently in the literature. Studies have indicated that rescuers apply as much as 644 N of force to the victim′s chest with each compression, while standards require one hundred compressions per minute. Recent research suggests that forces transmitted through the rescuers′ wrists of less than 10% of those seen during the performance of chest compressions significantly strain the scapholunate ligament. Biomechanical research should be performed to further evaluate this possible correlation. Compensation for worker injury maybe involved.

  17. Imaging of radial wrist pain. I. Imaging modalities and anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radial wrist pain is a common clinical complaint. The relatively complex anatomy in this region, combined with the small size of the anatomical structures and occasionally subtle imaging findings, can pose problems when trying to localize the exact cause of pain. To fully comprehend the underlying pathology, one needs a good understanding of both radial-sided wrist anatomy and the relative merits of the different imaging techniques used to assess these structures. In part I of this review, these aspects will be discussed. (orig.)

  18. Radiographic findings in wrists and hands of patients with leprosy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leprosy, like other neuropathic disorders, can involve the skeleton, affecting both bone and joints, especially those segments that have to withstand weight. To asses the osteoarticular involvement of the wrist and hand in 58 patients with leprosy. The radiographic images of wrist and hand of 58 patients with Hansen's disease were reviewed. The entire spectrum of specific and nonspecific bone lesions described in the literature is presented. Despite the fact that the upper limbs do not have to withstand the weight that the feet and ankles do, radiographic images show that gripping and other common motions can also produce lesions compatible with those of neuropathic arthropathy. (Author) 20 refs

  19. Component separation in abdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawstorne, Edward; Smart, Christopher J; Fallis, Simon A; Suggett, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    Component separation is established for complex hernia repairs. This case presents early component separation and release of the anterior and posterior sheath to facilitate closure of the abdominal wall following emergency laparotomy, reinforcing the repair with a biological mesh. On Day 11 following an emergency laparotomy for penetrating trauma, this patient underwent component separation and release of the anterior and posterior sheath. An intra-abdominal biological mesh was secured, and the fascia and skin closed successfully. Primary abdominal closure can be achieved in patients with penetrating abdominal trauma with the use of component separation and insertion of intra-abdominal biological mesh, where standard closure is not possible. PMID:24876334

  20. 21 CFR 888.3800 - Wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... cemented prosthesis. 888.3800 Section 888.3800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace a wrist...

  1. CT of abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soon after it became available for clinical use, cranial CT became the method of choice for evaluating head trauma. Only relatively recently have newer generation full-body scanners been installed at major trauma centers, but experience is rapidly being gained in the utilization of CT for abdominal trauma. CT has proved highly accurate in diagnosing a wide variety of injuries to both intra- and retroperitoneal organs in pediatric and adult patient populations. The impact has been evident not only in decreasing utilization of other diagnostic tests, such as angiography, but also in practical management decisions, such as whether to perform exploratory laparotomy. This chapter details the authors' approach to evaluation of abdominal trauma by CT

  2. The blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Up to 1970 the number of patients suffering from blunt abdominal trauma showed a substantial increase. In more than 50% of all cases there are additional injuries. The most important factor influencing the prognosis of these patients is the early and correct indication for operation and the avoidance of unnecessary laparotomies. As a primary aim in diagnosis one should consider the recognition of an intraperitoneal bleeding without risk for the patient. Peritoneal lavage as an invasive method with low complication rates has proved good. First reports also show good results using the sonography of the abdomen. The recognition of the injured organ allows a carefully directed operation. Concerning the prognosis it is of minor importance. The diagnosis in patients with blunt abdominal trauma at the university clinic of Freiburg consists of: sonography, followed in positive cases by laparotomy or angiography and laparotomy. In cases with questionable results a lavage is done. (orig.)

  3. Abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gefke, K; Schroeder, T V; Thisted, B; Olsen, P S; Perko, M J; Agerskov, Kim; Røder, O; Lorentzen, Jørgen Ewald

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify patients who need longer care in the ICU (more than 48 hours) following abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery and to evaluate the influence of perioperative complications on short- and long-term survival and quality of life. AAA surgery was performed in 55......, 78% stated that their quality of life had improved or was unchanged after surgery and had resumed working. These data justify a therapeutically aggressive approach, including ICU therapy following AAA surgery, despite failure of one or more organ systems.......The goal of this study was to identify patients who need longer care in the ICU (more than 48 hours) following abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery and to evaluate the influence of perioperative complications on short- and long-term survival and quality of life. AAA surgery was performed in 553...

  4. Surgical Simulations Based on Limited Quantitative Data: Understanding How Musculoskeletal Models Can Be Used to Predict Moment Arms and Guide Experimental Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Jennifer A; Bednar, Michael S; Murray, Wendy M

    2016-01-01

    The utility of biomechanical models and simulations to examine clinical problems is currently limited by the need for extensive amounts of experimental data describing how a given procedure or disease affects the musculoskeletal system. Methods capable of predicting how individual biomechanical parameters are altered by surgery are necessary for the efficient development of surgical simulations. In this study, we evaluate to what extent models based on limited amounts of quantitative data can be used to predict how surgery influences muscle moment arms, a critical parameter that defines how muscle force is transformed into joint torque. We specifically examine proximal row carpectomy and scaphoid-excision four-corner fusion, two common surgeries to treat wrist osteoarthritis. Using models of these surgeries, which are based on limited data and many assumptions, we perform simulations to formulate a hypothesis regarding how these wrist surgeries influence muscle moment arms. Importantly, the hypothesis is based on analysis of only the primary wrist muscles. We then test the simulation-based hypothesis using a cadaveric experiment that measures moment arms of both the primary wrist and extrinsic thumb muscles. The measured moment arms of the primary wrist muscles are used to verify the hypothesis, while those of the extrinsic thumb muscles are used as cross-validation to test whether the hypothesis is generalizable. The moment arms estimated by the models and measured in the cadaveric experiment both indicate that a critical difference between the surgeries is how they alter radial-ulnar deviation versus flexion-extension moment arms at the wrist. Thus, our results demonstrate that models based on limited quantitative data can provide novel insights. This work also highlights that synergistically utilizing simulation and experimental methods can aid the design of experiments and make it possible to test the predictive limits of current computer simulation techniques

  5. The abdominal circulatory pump.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Aliverti

    Full Text Available Blood in the splanchnic vasculature can be transferred to the extremities. We quantified such blood shifts in normal subjects by measuring trunk volume by optoelectronic plethysmography, simultaneously with changes in body volume by whole body plethysmography during contractions of the diaphragm and abdominal muscles. Trunk volume changes with blood shifts, but body volume does not so that the blood volume shifted between trunk and extremities (Vbs is the difference between changes in trunk and body volume. This is so because both trunk and body volume change identically with breathing and gas expansion or compression. During tidal breathing Vbs was 50-75 ml with an ejection fraction of 4-6% and an output of 750-1500 ml/min. Step increases in abdominal pressure resulted in rapid emptying presumably from the liver with a time constant of 0.61+/-0.1SE sec. followed by slower flow from non-hepatic viscera. The filling time constant was 0.57+/-0.09SE sec. Splanchnic emptying shifted up to 650 ml blood. With emptying, the increased hepatic vein flow increases the blood pressure at its entry into the inferior vena cava (IVC and abolishes the pressure gradient producing flow between the femoral vein and the IVC inducing blood pooling in the legs. The findings are important for exercise because the larger the Vbs the greater the perfusion of locomotor muscles. During asystolic cardiac arrest we calculate that appropriate timing of abdominal compression could produce an output of 6 L/min. so that the abdominal circulatory pump might act as an auxiliary heart.

  6. The Abdominal Circulatory Pump

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea Aliverti; Dario Bovio; Irene Fullin; Dellacà, Raffaele L.; Antonella Lo Mauro; Antonio Pedotti; Macklem, Peter T.

    2009-01-01

    Blood in the splanchnic vasculature can be transferred to the extremities. We quantified such blood shifts in normal subjects by measuring trunk volume by optoelectronic plethysmography, simultaneously with changes in body volume by whole body plethysmography during contractions of the diaphragm and abdominal muscles. Trunk volume changes with blood shifts, but body volume does not so that the blood volume shifted between trunk and extremities (Vbs) is the difference between changes in trunk ...

  7. Obesity-Associated Abdominal Elephantiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritesh Kohli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal elephantiasis is a rare entity. Abdominal elephantiasis is an uncommon, but deformative and progressive cutaneous disease caused by chronic lymphedema and recurrent streptococcal or Staphylococcus infections of the abdominal wall. We present 3 cases of patients with morbid obesity who presented to our hospital with abdominal wall swelling, thickening, erythema, and pain. The abdominal wall and legs were edematous, with cobblestone-like, thickened, hyperpigmented, and fissured plaques on the abdomen. Two patients had localised areas of skin erythema, tenderness, and increased warmth. There was purulent drainage from the abdominal wall in one patient. They were managed with antibiotics with some initial improvement. Meticulous skin care and local keratolytic treatment for the lesions were initiated with limited success due to their late presentation. All three patients refused surgical therapy. Conclusion. Early diagnosis is important for the treatment of abdominal elephantiasis and prevention of complications.

  8. Abdominal aspergillosis: CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeom, Suk Keu, E-mail: pagoda20@hanmail.net [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hye Jin, E-mail: kimhyejin@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Jae Ho, E-mail: jhbyun@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ah Young, E-mail: aykim@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Moon-Gyu, E-mail: mglee@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Hyun Kwon, E-mail: hkha@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    Objective: In order to retrospectively evaluate the CT findings of abdominal aspergillosis in immunocompromised patients. Materials and methods: CT scans were reviewed with regard to the sites, number, morphologic appearance, attenuation, and the contrast enhancement patterns of the lesions in six patients (5 women, 1 man; mean age, 43.4 years; range, 23-59 years) with pathologically proved abdominal aspergillosis by two gastrointestinal radiologists in consensus. Medical records were also reviewed to determine each patient's clinical status and outcome. Results: All patients were immunocompromised state: 4 patients received immunosuppressive therapy for solid organ transplantation and 2 patients received chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia. Aspergillosis involved blood vessels (n = 3), liver (n = 2), spleen (n = 2), gastrointestinal tract (n = 2), native kidney (n = 1), transplanted kidney (n = 1), peritoneum (n = 1), and retroperitoneum (n = 1). CT demonstrated solid organ or bowel infarction or perforation secondary to vascular thrombosis or pseudoaneurysm, multiple low-attenuating lesions of solid organs presenting as abscesses, concentric bowel wall thickening mimicking typhlitis, or diffuse or nodular infiltration of the peritoneum and retroperitoneum. Conclusion: Familiarity with findings commonly presenting as angioinvasive features or abscesses on CT, may facilitate the diagnosis of rare and fatal abdominal aspergillosis.

  9. Abdominal aspergillosis: CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: In order to retrospectively evaluate the CT findings of abdominal aspergillosis in immunocompromised patients. Materials and methods: CT scans were reviewed with regard to the sites, number, morphologic appearance, attenuation, and the contrast enhancement patterns of the lesions in six patients (5 women, 1 man; mean age, 43.4 years; range, 23-59 years) with pathologically proved abdominal aspergillosis by two gastrointestinal radiologists in consensus. Medical records were also reviewed to determine each patient's clinical status and outcome. Results: All patients were immunocompromised state: 4 patients received immunosuppressive therapy for solid organ transplantation and 2 patients received chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia. Aspergillosis involved blood vessels (n = 3), liver (n = 2), spleen (n = 2), gastrointestinal tract (n = 2), native kidney (n = 1), transplanted kidney (n = 1), peritoneum (n = 1), and retroperitoneum (n = 1). CT demonstrated solid organ or bowel infarction or perforation secondary to vascular thrombosis or pseudoaneurysm, multiple low-attenuating lesions of solid organs presenting as abscesses, concentric bowel wall thickening mimicking typhlitis, or diffuse or nodular infiltration of the peritoneum and retroperitoneum. Conclusion: Familiarity with findings commonly presenting as angioinvasive features or abscesses on CT, may facilitate the diagnosis of rare and fatal abdominal aspergillosis.

  10. Comparison of regression models for estimation of isometric wrist joint torques using surface electromyography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menon Carlo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several regression models have been proposed for estimation of isometric joint torque using surface electromyography (SEMG signals. Common issues related to torque estimation models are degradation of model accuracy with passage of time, electrode displacement, and alteration of limb posture. This work compares the performance of the most commonly used regression models under these circumstances, in order to assist researchers with identifying the most appropriate model for a specific biomedical application. Methods Eleven healthy volunteers participated in this study. A custom-built rig, equipped with a torque sensor, was used to measure isometric torque as each volunteer flexed and extended his wrist. SEMG signals from eight forearm muscles, in addition to wrist joint torque data were gathered during the experiment. Additional data were gathered one hour and twenty-four hours following the completion of the first data gathering session, for the purpose of evaluating the effects of passage of time and electrode displacement on accuracy of models. Acquired SEMG signals were filtered, rectified, normalized and then fed to models for training. Results It was shown that mean adjusted coefficient of determination (Ra2 values decrease between 20%-35% for different models after one hour while altering arm posture decreased mean Ra2 values between 64% to 74% for different models. Conclusions Model estimation accuracy drops significantly with passage of time, electrode displacement, and alteration of limb posture. Therefore model retraining is crucial for preserving estimation accuracy. Data resampling can significantly reduce model training time without losing estimation accuracy. Among the models compared, ordinary least squares linear regression model (OLS was shown to have high isometric torque estimation accuracy combined with very short training times.

  11. Relationship Between Wrist Motion and Capitolunate Reduction in Four-Corner Arthrodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamas Gomez, Claudia; Proubasta Renart, Ignacio; Llusa Perez, Manuel

    2015-11-01

    The authors retrospectively studied 36 patients with degenerative changes associated with scaphoid nonunion and scapholunate advanced collapse treated with circular plate fixation and bone graft. The goals of the study were to review the incidence of dorsal impingement, nonunion of arthrodesis, loose hardware, broken screws, and limitation in wrist motion associated with correct or incorrect surgical capitolunate reduction. Surgical indications were scapholunate advanced collapse (3 patients), scaphoid nonunion advanced collapse (32 patients), and sequelae of irreducible perilunate dislocation (1 patient). All of the patients were men, with a mean age of 48 years (range, 35-68 years). Average follow-up was 56 months (range, 12-108 months). Functional outcomes evaluated were pain with the visual analog scale, range of motion, grip strength, Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) score, satisfaction, and time to union. Mean visual analog scale score was 7 (range, 5-9) preoperatively and 1 (range, 0-2) postoperatively. Average wrist range of motion was 42° in extension, 36° in flexion, 15° in ulnar deviation, and 12° in radial deviation. Mean grip strength was 34 kg preoperatively, 50 kg postoperatively, and 56 kg contralaterally. Thirty-five of the 36 patients achieved union at 6 months. Degenerative changes at the radiolunate articulation were present in 1 patient 62 months after surgery, but he was asymptomatic. Mean capitolunate angle was 38º preoperatively and 9º postoperatively. Poor correlation was found between the measured capitate-lunate angle and subsequent flexion and extension (r=0.32 and r=0.17, respectively) using the Pearson correlation coefficient. The authors noted 1 or 2 broken screws in 3 cases (8.3%) and hardware dorsal impingement in the plate in 6 cases (16.6%). Mean DASH score was 24 of 100. Overall patient satisfaction was 70%. PMID:26558669

  12. T2-signal of ulnar nerve branches at the wrist in guyon's canal syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Kollmer

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate T2-signal of high-resolution MRI in distal ulnar nerve branches at the wrist as diagnostic sign of guyon's-canal-syndrome (GCS. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 11 GCS patients confirmed by clinical/electrophysiological findings, and 20 wrists from 11 asymptomatic volunteers were prospectively included to undergo the following protocol: axial T2-weighted-fat-suppressed and T1-weighted-turbo-spin-echo-sequences (3T-MR-scanner, Magnetom/Verio/Siemens. Patients were examined in prone position with the arm extended and wrist placed in an 8-channel surface-array-coil. Nerve T2-signal was evaluated as contrast-to-noise-ratios (CNR from proximal-to-distal in ulnar nerve trunk, its superficial/sensory and deep/motor branch. Distal motor-nerve-conduction (distal-motor-latency (dml to first dorsal-interosseus (IOD I and abductor digiti minimi muscles was correlated with T2-signal. Approval by the institutional review-board and written informed consent was given by all participants. RESULTS: In GCS, mean nerve T2-signal was strongly increased within the deep/motor branch (11.7±4.8 vs.controls:-5.3±2.4;p = 0.001 but clearly less and not significantly increased in ulnar nerve trunk (6.8±6.4vs.-7.4±2.5;p = 0.07 and superficial/sensory branch (-2.1±4.9vs.-9.7±2.9;p = 0.08. Median nerve T2-signal did not differ between patients and controls (-9.8±2.5vs.-6.7±4.2;p = 0.45. T2-signal of deep/motor branch correlated strongly with motor-conduction-velocity to IOD I in non-linear fashion (R(2 = -0.8;p<0.001. ROC-analysis revealed increased nerve T2-signal of the deep/motor branch to be a sign of excellent diagnostic performance (area-under-the-curve 0.94, 95% CI: 0.85-1.00; specificity 90%, sensitivity 89.5%. CONCLUSIONS: Nerve T2-signal increase of distal ulnar nerve branches and in particular of the deep/motor branch is highly accurate for the diagnostic determination of GCS. Furthermore, for the first time it was found in nerve entrapment

  13. Extracellular and intracellular volume variations during postural change measured by segmental and wrist-ankle bioimpedance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenech, Marianne; Jaffrin, Michel Y

    2004-01-01

    Extracellular (ECW) and intracellular (ICW) volumes were measured using both segmental and wrist-ankle (W-A) bioimpedance spectroscopy (5-1000 kHz) in 15 healthy subjects (7 men, 8 women). In the 1st protocol, the subject, after sitting for 30 min, laid supine for at least 30 min. In the second protocol, the subject, who had been supine for 1 hr, sat up in bed for 10 min and returned to supine position for another hour. Segmental ECW and ICW resistances of legs, arms and trunk were measured by placing four voltage electrodes on wrist, shoulder, top of thigh and ankle and using Hanai's conductivity theory. W-A resistances were found to be very close to the sum of segmental resistances. When switching from sitting to supine (protocol 1), the mean ECW leg resistance increased by 18.2%, that of arm and W-A by 12.4%. Trunk resistance also increased but not significantly by 4.8%. Corresponding increases in ICW resistance were smaller for legs (3.7%) and arm (-0.7%) but larger for the trunk (21.4%). Total body ECW volumes from segmental measurements were in good agreement with W-A and Watson anthropomorphic correlation. The decrease in total ECW volume (when supine) calculated from segmental resistances was at 0.79 l less than the W-A one (1.12 l). Total ICW volume reductions were 3.4% (segmental) and 3.8% (W-A). Tests of protocol 2 confirmed that resistance and fluid volume values were not affected by a temporary position change. PMID:14723506

  14. Statistical Modeling of Shape and Motion of the Wrist Bones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Giessen, M.

    2011-01-01

    Carpal instability occurs when the wrist bones assume a pathological posture, e.g. due to ligament rupture as a result of trauma. Ligament rupture cannot be diagnosed reliably directly, as current medical imaging modalities do not provide sufficient soft-tissue contrast (X-ray, CT) or lack a suffici

  15. Tendon involvement in rheumatoid arthritis of the wrist: MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valeri, G.; Ferrara, C.; Ercolani, P.; De Nigris, E. [Ancona Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Radiology; Giovagnoni, A. [Modena Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Radiology

    2001-03-01

    Objective. To evaluate the distribution and extent of wrist tendon alterations in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Design and patients. Forty-three clinically active RA patients with an illness duration of less than 4 years and no clinical evidence of tendons tears were enrolled in the study. There were 10 men and 33 women, with an average age of 52 years (range 33-63 years). MRI of both wrists, with one exception, was performed at 1.0 T using T1- and T2-weighted sequences (slice thickness 3 mm). Twelve healthy subjects (8 women, 4 men; mean age 31 years) were also evaluated as a control group. Two radiologists reviewed each of four schematic anatomical regions (volar, dorsal, ulnar, radial) for the degree of tendon and tendon sheath alterations using two progressive scales. Results. In the control group all tendons had homogeneous low signal intensity on all sequences. A small amount of fluid was found in six subjects but the diameter was always less than 1 mm. In the patient group minimal fluid (<2 mm) was found in 35 (41%) wrists, grade 2 fluid (<2>5mm) in 26 (31%) and grade 3 fluid (>5 mm) in 24 (28%). Fiftynine (69%) of the grade 1 changes were in the volar compartment but grade 2 involvement was evenly distributed. Grade 3 changes were most common in the dorsal compartment and combined grade 2 and 3 in the dorsal and ulnar compartments were 32 (38%) and 25 (30%) compared with 16 (18%) and 17 (20%) respectively in the volar and radial compartments. The tendons were normal (grade 0) in 47 (46%) wrists. A maximum tendon signal change (grade 1) was demonstrated in 28 wrists (32%). When associated with other individual tendons grades this grade was demonstrated in the dorsal compartment in 30 (35%) wrists, in the volar compartment in 12 (14%), in the radial compartment in 17 (20%) and in the ulnar compartment in 26 (30%). A partial tear (grade 2) was detected in 7 (8%) wrists, all involving the dorsal and ulnar

  16. The Use of Routine Wrist Radiography is Not Useful in the Evaluation of Patients with a Ganglion Cyst of the Wrist

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew S. Wong; Jebson, Peter J.L.; Murray, Peter M.; Trigg, Stephen D.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of routine wrist radiography in the evaluation of patients with a wrist ganglion. In the setting of a University-based hand surgery practice, 103 consecutive patients with a dorsal or volar wrist ganglion underwent posteroanterior, lateral, and oblique radiographs of the involved wrist. There were 24 men and 79 women with an average age of 34 years (range 4–67 years). A retrospective review of the medical records was performed. ...

  17. Wheelchair ergonomic hand drive mechanism use improves wrist mechanics associated with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukowski, Lisa A; Roper, Jaimie A; Shechtman, Orit; Otzel, Dana M; Hovis, Patty W; Tillman, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Among conventional manual wheelchair (CMW) users, 49% to 63% experience carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) that is likely induced by large forces transmitted through the wrist and extreme wrist orientations. The ergonomic hand drive mechanism (EHDM) tested in this study has been shown to utilize a more neutral wrist orientation. This study evaluates the use of an EHDM in terms of wrist orientations that may predispose individuals to CTS. Eleven adult full-time CMW users with spinal cord injury participated. Motion data were captured as participants propelled across a flat surface, completing five trials in a CMW and five trials in the same CMW fitted with the EHDM. Average angular wrist orientations were compared between the two propulsion styles. Use of the EHDM resulted in reduced wrist extension and ulnar deviation. The shift to more neutral wrist orientations observed with EHDM use may reduce median nerve compression. PMID:25856042

  18. Wheelchair ergonomic hand drive mechanism use improves wrist mechanics associated with carpal tunnel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa A. Zukowski, MA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Among conventional manual wheelchair (CMW users, 49% to 63% experience carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS that is likely induced by large forces transmitted through the wrist and extreme wrist orientations. The ergonomic hand drive mechanism (EHDM tested in this study has been shown to utilize a more neutral wrist orientation. This study evaluates the use of an EHDM in terms of wrist orientations that may predispose individuals to CTS. Eleven adult full-time CMW users with spinal cord injury participated. Motion data were captured as participants propelled across a flat surface, completing five trials in a CMW and five trials in the same CMW fitted with the EHDM. Average angular wrist orientations were compared between the two propulsion styles. Use of the EHDM resulted in reduced wrist extension and ulnar deviation. The shift to more neutral wrist orientations observed with EHDM use may reduce median nerve compression.

  19. [Differential diagnosis of abdominal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Pascal

    2015-09-01

    Despite the frequency of functional abdominal pain, potentially dangerous causes of abdominal pain need to be excluded. Medical history and clinical examination must focus on red flags and signs for imflammatory or malignant diseases. See the patient twice in the case of severe and acute abdominal pain if lab parameters or radiological examinations are normal. Avoid repeated and useless X-ray exposure whenever possible. In the case of subacute or chronic abdominal pain, lab tests such as fecal calprotectin, helicobacter stool antigen and serological tests for celiac disease are very useful. Elderly patients may show atypical or missing clinical signs. Take care of red herrings and be skeptical whether your initial diagnosis is really correct. Abdominal pain can frequently be an abdominal wall pain. PMID:26331201

  20. Dolor abdominal recurrente .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo De Vivero

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available El dolor abdominal recurrente (DAR es un problema frecuente en la consulta médica y en la subespecialidad médica y quirúrgica. El DAR es frecuentemente funcional, es decir, sin una causa orgánica aparente. El diagnóstico diferencial debe incluir pérdida de peso, sangrado gastrointestinal, fiebre persistente, diarrea crónica y vómito importante. En este artículo se revisa el diagnóstico y tratamiento, pruebas diagnósticas y manejo farmacológico y ambiental.

  1. Practical human abdominal fat imaging utilizing electrical impedance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fundamental cause of metabolic syndrome is thought to be abdominal obesity. Accurate diagnosis of abdominal obesity can be done by an x-ray computed tomography (CT) scan. But CT is expensive, bulky and entails the risks involved with radiation. To overcome such disadvantages, we attempted to develop a measuring device that could apply electrical impedance tomography to abdominal fat imaging. The device has 32 electrodes that can be attached to a subject's abdomen by a pneumatic mechanism. That way, electrode position data can be acquired simultaneously. An applied alternating current of 1.0 mArms was used at a frequency of 500 kHz. Sensed voltage data were carefully filtered to remove noise and processed to satisfy the reciprocal theorem. The image reconstruction software was developed concurrently, applying standard finite element methods and the Marquardt method to solve the mathematical inverse problem. The results of preliminary experiments showed that abdominal subcutaneous fat and the muscle surrounding the viscera could be imaged in humans. While our imaging of visceral fat was not of sufficient quality, it was suggested that we will be able to develop a safe and practical abdominal fat scanner through future improvements

  2. Hypnosis for functional abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottsegen, David

    2011-07-01

    Chronic abdominal pain is a common pediatric condition affecting 20% of the pediatric population worldwide. Most children with this disorder are found to have no specific organic etiology and are given the diagnosis of functional abdominal pain. Well-designed clinical trials have found hypnotherapy and guided imagery to be the most efficacious treatments for this condition. Hypnotic techniques used for other somatic symptoms are easily adaptable for use with functional abdominal pain. The author discusses 2 contrasting hypnotic approaches to functional abdominal pain and provides implications for further research. These approaches may provide new insights into this common and complex disorder. PMID:21922712

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Children's (pediatric) abdominal ultrasound imaging produces pictures ...

  4. Practical pediatric abdominal CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This course is designed to help the radiologist in a hospital setting successfully approach abdominal CT in the infant and child. Emphasis is placed on techniques necessary for a high-quality examination of the upper abdomen, as applied to common pediatric problems such as trauma, tumor, and infection. Material is presented on technical considerations, including patient sedation, preparation, and potential pitfalls and helpful hints for imaging. An emphasis is placed on dynamic scanning with table incrementation. The section on trauma focuses on an approach to imaging the abdomen in the injured child, typical injuries, patterns of injury in the upper abdomen, and why CT is the best imaging modality for blunt upper abdominal trauma. The discussion of tumor imaging reviews the appearance of typical childhood neoplasia including Wilms tumor, neuroblastoma, non-Hodgkin and Burkitt lymphoma, and disseminated solid tumors such as rhabdomyosarcoma. The authors emphasize what to look for and where, both on initial and on later (for recurrences) examinations. The discussion of infection addresses detection of abscesses and occult infections in children, as well as imaging of abscesses prior to intervention

  5. Nontraumatic abdominal emergencies: acute abdominal pain: diagnostic strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marincek, B. [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2002-09-01

    Common causes of acute abdominal pain include appendicitis, cholecystitis, bowel obstruction, urinary colic, perforated peptic ulcer, pancreatitis, diverticulitis, and nonspecific, nonsurgical abdominal pain. The topographic classification of acute abdominal pain (pain in one of the four abdominal quadrants, diffuse abdominal pain, flank or epigastric pain) facilitates the choice of the imaging technique. The initial radiological evaluation often consists of plain abdominal radiography, despite significant diagnostic limitations. The traditional indications for plain films - bowel obstruction, pneumoperitoneum, and the search of ureteral calculi - are questioned by helical computed tomography (CT). Although ultrasonography (US) is in many centers the modality of choice for imaging the gallbladder and the pelvis in children and women of reproductive age, CT is considered to be one of the most valued tools for triaging patients with acute abdominal pain. CT is particularly beneficial in patients with marked obesity, unclear US findings, bowel obstruction, and multiple lesions. The introduction of multidetector row CT (MDCT) has further enhanced the utility of CT in imaging patients with acute abdominal pain. (orig.)

  6. Psychometric Properties and Administration of the Wrist/Hand Subscales of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment in Minimally-Impaired Upper Extremity Hemiparesis in Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Page, Stephen J.; Levine, Peter; Hade, Erinn

    2012-01-01

    There is a need for time-efficient, valid measures of distal paretic upper extremity (UE) movement. The purposes of this study were to: (a) determine the psychometric properties of the wrist stability and mobility and hand items of the upper extremity scale of the Fugl-Meyer (w/h UE FM) as a “stand alone” measure of distal UE movement; and (b) provide detailed instructions on w/h UE FM administration and scoring. The UE FM and Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) were administered on 2 separate oc...

  7. Tendon involvement in rheumatoid arthritis of the wrist: MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective. To evaluate the distribution and extent of wrist tendon alterations in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Design and patients. Forty-three clinically active RA patients with an illness duration of less than 4 years and no clinical evidence of tendons tears were enrolled in the study. There were 10 men and 33 women, with an average age of 52 years (range 33-63 years). MRI of both wrists, with one exception, was performed at 1.0 T using T1- and T2-weighted sequences (slice thickness 3 mm). Twelve healthy subjects (8 women, 4 men; mean age 31 years) were also evaluated as a control group. Two radiologists reviewed each of four schematic anatomical regions (volar, dorsal, ulnar, radial) for the degree of tendon and tendon sheath alterations using two progressive scales. Results. In the control group all tendons had homogeneous low signal intensity on all sequences. A small amount of fluid was found in six subjects but the diameter was always less than 1 mm. In the patient group minimal fluid (5mm) in 26 (31%) and grade 3 fluid (>5 mm) in 24 (28%). Fiftynine (69%) of the grade 1 changes were in the volar compartment but grade 2 involvement was evenly distributed. Grade 3 changes were most common in the dorsal compartment and combined grade 2 and 3 in the dorsal and ulnar compartments were 32 (38%) and 25 (30%) compared with 16 (18%) and 17 (20%) respectively in the volar and radial compartments. The tendons were normal (grade 0) in 47 (46%) wrists. A maximum tendon signal change (grade 1) was demonstrated in 28 wrists (32%). When associated with other individual tendons grades this grade was demonstrated in the dorsal compartment in 30 (35%) wrists, in the volar compartment in 12 (14%), in the radial compartment in 17 (20%) and in the ulnar compartment in 26 (30%). A partial tear (grade 2) was detected in 7 (8%) wrists, all involving the dorsal and ulnar compartments; five underwent surgical repair and one

  8. Detailed analysis of contrast-enhanced MRI of hands and wrists in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tehranzadeh, Jamshid [University of California, Department of Radiological Sciences, Irvine (United States); University of California Medical Center, Department of Radiological Sciences R-140, Orange, CA (United States); Ashikyan, Oganes; Anavim, Arash; Shin, John [University of California, Department of Radiological Sciences, Irvine (United States)

    2008-05-15

    The objective was to perform detailed analysis of the involved soft tissues, tendons, joints, and bones in the hands and wrists of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). We reviewed 23 contrast-enhanced MR imaging studies (13 hands and 10 wrists) in 10 patients with the clinical diagnosis of PsA. We obtained clinical information from medical records and evaluated images for the presence of erosions, bone marrow edema, joint synovitis, tenosynovitis, carpal tunnel, and soft tissue involvement. Two board-certified musculoskeletal radiologists reviewed all images independently. Differences were resolved during a subsequent joint session. The average duration of disease was 71.3 months, ranging from 1 month to 25 years. Eight of the 10 wrists (80%) and 6 of the 13 hands demonstrated bone erosions. Bone marrow abnormalities were shown in 5 of the 10 wrists (50%) and 4 of the 14 hands (31%). Triangular fibrocartilage tears were seen in 6 of the 10 wrists (60%). Wrist and hand joint synovitis were present in all studies (67 wrist joints and 101 hand joints). Wrist soft tissue involvement was detected in 9 of the 10 wrists (90%) and hand soft tissue involvement was present in 12 of the 13 wrists (92%). Findings adjacent to the region of soft tissue involvement included synovitis (4 wrists) and tenosynovitis (3 wrists). Bone marrow edema adjacent to the region of soft tissue involvement was seen in one wrist. Bulge of the flexor retinaculum was seen in 4 of the 10 wrists (40%) and median nerve enhancement was seen in 8 of the 10 wrists (80%). Tenosynovitis was seen in all studies (all 10 of the hands and all 13 of the wrists). The 'rheumatoid' type of distribution of bony lesions was common in our study. Interobserver agreement for various findings ranged from 83% to 100%. Contrast-enhanced MRI unequivocally demonstrated bone marrow edema, erosions, tendon and soft-tissue disease, and median nerve involvement, with good interobserver reliability in patients with

  9. Rheumatoid wrist deformity and risk of extensor tendon rupture evaluated by 3DCT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Hajime; Abe, Asami; Murasawa, Akira; Nakazono, Kiyoshi; Horizono, Hidehiro; Ishii, Katsushi; Seki, Eiko [Niigata Rheumatic Center, Department of Rheumatology, Shibata city, Niigata (Japan)

    2010-05-15

    Extensor tendon rupture on the dorsum of the wrist is commonly seen in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It causes immediate dysfunction of the hand and surgical reconstruction is usually required. The purpose of this study was to clarify the risk of extensor tendon rupture by quantifying wrist deformity on three-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT) images. Three-dimensional CT images of 108 wrists in 102 patients with RA and 38 wrists in 38 healthy volunteers were analyzed retrospectively. All of the rheumatoid wrists had caused persistent pain for more than 6 months despite ongoing medical treatment. Extensor tendon rupture was noted in 49 wrists in 47 patients, and no rupture was noted in 59 wrists in 56 patients. The dorsal subluxation ratio (DSR) of the ulnar head and the carpal supination angle (CSA) were measured utilizing a new technique. The average DSR and CSA in the rupture group (n = 49), the non-rupture group (n = 59), and the normal wrist group (n = 38) were 37%, 19%, and 26%, and 15 , 11 , and 6 respectively. The cut-off values for extensor tendon rupture in the wrists of patients with RA were 32% (sensitivity; 70%, specificity; 75%) in the DSR, and 14 (71%, 68%) in the CSA. By utilizing 3DCT imaging of the rheumatoid wrist, these parameters can help improve our ability to predict extensor tendon rupture. (orig.)

  10. A clinical decision rule for the use of plain radiography in children after acute wrist injury: development and external validation of the Amsterdam Pediatric Wrist Rules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Slaar (Annelie); M.M.J. Walenkamp (Monique); A. Bentohami (Abdelali); M. Maas (Mario); R.R. van Rijn (Rick); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); L.C. Jager (L. Cara); N.L. Sosef (Nico L.); R. van Velde (Romuald); J.M. Ultee (Jan); J.C. Goslings (Carel); N.W.L. Schep (Niels)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In most hospitals, children with acute wrist trauma are routinely referred for radiography. Objective: To develop and validate a clinical decision rule to decide whether radiography in children with wrist trauma is required. Materials and methods: We prospectively developed a

  11. MR imaging in suspected acute trauma of wrist bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the findings of MR imaging compared to plain radiography in acute wrist trauma. Radiography and MR imaging (obtained at 1.5 T) of 67 patients (38 female, 29 male, aged 15-80 years) were analysed by three senior radiologists in a blinded random fashion. One-third (n= 13) of the 37 fractures observed on MR images were missed on the radiographs. The McNemar test indicated significant differences in diagnoses between radiography and MR. We recommend that MR imaging should be considered in the diagnosis of acute wrist trauma when: 1) There is a clear discrepancy between the clinical status and a negative radiography and when splint treatment would increase cost by causing occupational restrictions; and 2) Healing of trauma diagnosed as contusion or distension does not occur within the expected time

  12. Pose Tracking Algorithm of an Endoscopic Surgery Robot Wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, L [Chinese-German Institute of Automatic Control Engineering, Tongji University (China); Yin, H L [Chinese-German Institute of Automatic Control Engineering, Tongji University (China); Meng, Q [Shanghai University of Electric Power (China)

    2006-10-15

    In recent two decades, more and more research on the endoscopic surgery has been carried out [2]. Most of the work focuses on the development of the robot in the field of robotics and the navigation of the surgery tools based on computer graphics. But the tracking and locating of the EndoWrist is also a very important aspect. This paper deals with the the tracking algorithm of the EndoWrist's pose (position and orientation). The linear tracking of the position is handled by the Kalman Filter. The quaternion-based nonlinear orientation tracking is implemented with the Extended Kalman Filter. The most innovative point of this paper is the parameterization of the motion model of the Extended Kalman Filter.

  13. Abdominal Burkitt lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: As scarce information is available, in this research we have tried to describe the imaging findings of the Burkitt's lymphoma. Retrospective analysis of the clinical and imaging presentation of a 4 years old boy, is given. Biopsy confirmed the BL. Different imaging techniques were combined. The X-rays were negative. The US revealed a moderate hepatomegaly with multiple hypoechoic nodules and free fluid in the abdominal cavity. The CT showed the hepatomegaly as well as solid nodules in great number and different sizes(due to the densitometric behaviour and to post contrast enhancement), a scarce amount of ascites and a density increase of the mesentery fat. The MRI characterized and revealed in detail the US and the CT findings. The Burkitt's lymphoma is a rare entity; several methods are needed to approach the diagnosis. It represents a great clinical and imaging challenge. (author)

  14. Effect of training on contractile and metabolic properties of wrist extensors in spinal cord-injured individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartkopp, Andreas; Harridge, Stephen D R; Mizuno, Masao; Ratkevicius, Aivaras; Quistorff, Björn; Kjaer, Michael; Biering-Sörensen, Fin

    2003-01-01

    (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((31)P-NMRS) during and following a continuous 40-s 10-HZ contraction. In the Hr group the cost of contraction decreased by 38% (P < 0.05) and the half-time of phosphocreatine (PCr) recovery was shortened by 52% (P < 0.05). Thus, long-term electrically...... induced stimulation of the wrist extensor muscles in spinal cord injury (SCI) increases fatigue resistance independent of training pattern. However, only the Hr protocol increased muscle strength and was shown to improve muscle aerobic metabolism after training. Muscle Nerve 27: 72-80, 2003...... extensor muscles were stimulated for 30 min/day, 5 days/week, for 12 weeks, using either a high-resistance (Hr) or a low-resistance (Lr) protocol. Total work output was similar in both protocols. The nontrained arm was used as a control. Maximum voluntary torque increased in the Hr (P < 0.05) but not the...

  15. WRIST ARTHRODESIS WITH MINIMAL FIXATION PRESERVING THE CARPOMETACARPAL JOINTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardini, Arlindo Gomes; Pádua Gonçalves, Rodolfo Fonseca; Freitas, Afrânio Donato; Chaves, Antonio Barbosa

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Wrist arthrodesis is a surgical procedure that should always be considered in cases of pathological conditions in which anatomical and functional structures are altered. In general, the results are very satisfactory, particularly for pain relief, and in the majority of cases, there is considerable functional improvement. Various techniques have been described, with different methods of internal fixation, most of which include the carpometacarpal joints in the fusion. The objective of this study was to evaluate the results from wrist arthrodesis using a technique that is simpler, more biological, less expensive, and does not involve the carpometacarpal joints. Methods: Fifteen patients with wrist arthrodesis were evaluated (six with sequelae from trauma, four with rheumatoid arthritis, three with Kienbock grade IV, one with Preiser and one with panarthrosis). The technique consisted of using an iliac bone plate and internal fixation with Kirschner wires, avoiding the carpometacarpal joints. Results: The evaluation was based on consolidation time (93% in seven weeks); movements of the fingers and pronosupination; pinch and grasp strength; functional evaluation through the DASH, pain and patient satisfaction questionnaires. In general, the results were similar to those of other, more aggressive techniques, and the non-inclusion of the carpometacarpal joints did not affect the final result. Conclusion: Wrist arthrodesis with fixation using Kirschner wires and an iliac bone plate, preserving the carpometacarpal joints, gives good or excellent results that are not inferior to those of other techniques that have been described. However, it presents major advantages over other methods: it is less aggressive and cheaper, and does not have the inconvenience and complications associated with the use of plates and screws. PMID:27022522

  16. Association between wrist angle and carpal tunnel syndrome among workers

    OpenAIRE

    You, Doohee

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Association between wrist angle and carpal tunnel syndrome among workersbyDoohee YouDoctor of Philosophy in Environmental Health Science University of California, Berkeley Professor David Rempel, Chair IntroductionCarpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) is the most common work-related peripheral neuropathy among workers who perform hand-intensive tasks. It has a greater impact on time away from work and disability than almost all other workplace injuries. For prevention, the National Institute ...

  17. Role of MR imaging in chronic wrist pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for chronic wrist pain is challenging. Correct assessment of the triangular fibrocartilage, hyaline cartilage, ligaments, and tendons has become mandatory for comprehensive decision making in wrist surgery. The MR technique, potential and limits of MR imaging in patients with chronic wrist pain will be discussed. MR arthrography with injection of gadolinium-containing contrast material into the distal radioulnar joint is suggested for evaluation of the triangular fibrocartilage. The clinically meaningful ulnar-sided peripheral tears are otherwise hard to diagnose. The diagnostic performance of MR imaging for interosseous ligament tears varies considerably. The sensitivity for scapholunate ligament tears is consistently better than for lunotriquetral ligament tears. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging is considered to be the best technique for detecting established avascularity of bone, but the assessment of the MR results remains challenging. Most cases of ulnar impaction syndrome have characteristic focal signal intensity changes in the ulnar aspect of the lunate. Avascular necrosis of the lunate (Kienboeck's disease) is characterized by signal changes starting in the proximal radial aspect of the lunate. MR imaging is extremely sensitive for occult fractures. Questions arise if occult posttraumatic bone lesions seen on MR images only necessarily require the same treatment as fractures evident on plain films or computed tomography (CT) images. MR imaging and ultrasound are equally effective for detecting occult carpal ganglia. Carpe bossu (carpal boss) is a bony protuberance of a carpometacarpal joint II and III which may be associated with pain. (orig.)

  18. Role of MR imaging in chronic wrist pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanetti, Marco; Saupe, Nadja [University Hospital Balgrist, Department of Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Nagy, Ladislav [University Hospital Balgrist, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2007-04-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for chronic wrist pain is challenging. Correct assessment of the triangular fibrocartilage, hyaline cartilage, ligaments, and tendons has become mandatory for comprehensive decision making in wrist surgery. The MR technique, potential and limits of MR imaging in patients with chronic wrist pain will be discussed. MR arthrography with injection of gadolinium-containing contrast material into the distal radioulnar joint is suggested for evaluation of the triangular fibrocartilage. The clinically meaningful ulnar-sided peripheral tears are otherwise hard to diagnose. The diagnostic performance of MR imaging for interosseous ligament tears varies considerably. The sensitivity for scapholunate ligament tears is consistently better than for lunotriquetral ligament tears. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging is considered to be the best technique for detecting established avascularity of bone, but the assessment of the MR results remains challenging. Most cases of ulnar impaction syndrome have characteristic focal signal intensity changes in the ulnar aspect of the lunate. Avascular necrosis of the lunate (Kienboeck's disease) is characterized by signal changes starting in the proximal radial aspect of the lunate. MR imaging is extremely sensitive for occult fractures. Questions arise if occult posttraumatic bone lesions seen on MR images only necessarily require the same treatment as fractures evident on plain films or computed tomography (CT) images. MR imaging and ultrasound are equally effective for detecting occult carpal ganglia. Carpe bossu (carpal boss) is a bony protuberance of a carpometacarpal joint II and III which may be associated with pain. (orig.)

  19. The management of wrist injuries: an international perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Elias, Marc; Folgar, Miguel Angel Vidal

    2006-11-01

    Wrist injury is common and may significantly impair the overall function of the upper extremity unless properly managed. Fractures of the distal radius are particularly common among the aging population, accounting for nearly 1/6 of all fractures, often as a result of increased longevity with the subsequent underlying osteoporosis. New diagnostic tools, including wrist arthroscopy, magnetic resonance imaging, or computed tomography, are increasingly available in developed countries allowing accurate recognition and more effective resolution of lesions which would be otherwise missed using conventional methods. First world treatment standards, however, can scarcely be introduced in developing countries owing to, among other factors, different prevalence of problems, and the lack of resource to implement most modern technologies. If any program needs to be introduced that meets the demands of wrist injury management in the third world, aside from a better regionalisation of trauma care, it should emphasise adequate training of professionals in the use of more cost effective techniques of fracture reduction and stabilisation, applicable everywhere, with the minimum possible morbidity. PMID:17049527

  20. Methylene blue-enhanced arthroscopic resection of dorsal wrist ganglions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung Joo; Sawyer, Gregory A; Dasilva, Manuel F

    2011-12-01

    The ganglion is the most common soft tissue mass of the hand and wrist. Over the past 10 to 15 years, there has been a growing interest in arthroscopic treatment of dorsal wrist ganglions. Proposed advantages of arthroscopy include greater motion (particularly wrist flexion), improved cosmesis, and potential to identify/treat other intra-articular pathology. Despite the documented clinical success of arthroscopic ganglion excision, limitations include inconsistent identification of the ganglion stalk. Our described technique offers a means by which to improve visualization of the ganglion stalk intra-articularly to produce a more effective and efficient arthroscopic ganglion excision. During the procedure, a small volume of methylene blue solution is injected into the cyst. Its communication with the joint is apparent arthroscopically, thus identifying the location of the stalk. With the ability to precisely identify the ganglion stalk using an injection of methylene blue, the surgeon can direct the arthroscopic debridement toward the appropriate pathologic tissue. Unnecessary debridement of uninvolved tissue can be avoided with the technique. This also allows for optimal portal placement and, in particular, indicates whether a midcarpal portal should be employed. This should result in fewer recurrences, decreased operative time, and less iatrogenic injury. PMID:22105637

  1. Prospective outcomes of arthroscopic treatment of dorsal wrist ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslani, Hamidreza; Najafi, Arvin; Zaaferani, Zohre

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the results of arthroscopic resection of dorsal wrist ganglia. Between November 2002 and September 2007, all patients with dorsal wrist ganglia underwent arthroscopic resection in our institution. Average follow-up was 39.2 months (range, 24-71 months). Fifty-two patients (40 women and 12 men; mean age, 29.8 years) were treated with our operative technique. Symptoms at presentation were unpleasant appearance in 15 patients (28.8 %), pain in 30 (57.6%), and unpleasant appearance and pain in 7 (13.5%). The ganglion cyst site was in front of the midcarpal joint in 41 patients (78.8%), in front of the radiocarpal joint in 6 patients (11.5%), and in front of the radiocarpal and midcarpal joints in 5 patients (9.6%). Our surgical technique resulted in a significant improvement in flexion, extension, and grip strength (P≤.005). In patients with painful ganglia, treatment also had a significant effect. Nine (17.3%) recurrences were observed. Mean time off work was 14 days, but 19 patients returned to work immediately. According to the results of this study, we recommend the use of arthroscopy as the primary treatment method for dorsal wrist ganglion excision. PMID:22385448

  2. Occult scapholunate ganglion: a cause of dorsal radial wrist pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, B D; Kleinman, W B

    1999-03-01

    There are multiple causes for chronic dorsal wrist pain over the scapholunate ligament, including occult dorsal carpal ganglion cyst, scaphoid impaction syndrome, dorsal carpal capsulitis, distal posterior interosseous nerve syndrome, and dynamic scapholunate ligament instability. Patients with such pain often have normal x-rays. A retrospective study of 21 patients undergoing surgical exploration for chronic dorsal radial wrist pain who had no palpable cyst and normal x-rays revealed that 18 of the patients had occult scapholunate ganglion cysts or myxomatous degeneration within the scapholunate ligament. All had failed long-term conservative management. Surgery involved an approach through Langer's lines, resection of a large triangular portion of the capsule between the dorsal intercarpal and radiotriquetral ligaments, and tangential debridement of the area of myxoid degeneration proximal to the distal 2 to 3 mm of dorsal scapholunate interosseous ligament. None of the patients had scapholunate instability or scaphoid impacting syndrome. Of the 18 patients with histologically confirmed myxomatous changes in the scapholunate ligament, 16 had an excellent outcome as defined by rigorous criteria; 1 had a good outcome. There was 1 patient with a poor result. A compelling argument is made for surgical exploration of the scapholunate joint in patients with persistent dorsal radial wrist pain and scapholunate point tenderness. PMID:10194003

  3. Maximum acceptable forces for repetitive ulnar deviation of the wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snook, S H; Vaillancourt, D R; Ciriello, V M; Webster, B S

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to quantify maximum acceptable forces for ulnar deviation motions of the wrist at various repetition rates. Subjects grasped a handle with a power grip and moved it through a 1.40 rad (80 degrees) ulnar deviation wrist motion (similar to a knife cutting task). A psychophysical methodology was used in which the subject adjusted the resistance on the handle and the experiment manipulated or controlled all other variables. Two series of experiments were conducted. Thirteen subjects completed the first series, which investigated repetition rates of 15 and 20 motions per minute. Eleven subjects completed the second series, which investigated 15, 20, and 25 motions per minute. Subjects performed for 7 hours per day, 5 days per week, for 4 weeks in the first series and 5 weeks in the second series. The subjects were instructed to work as if they were on an incentive basis, getting paid for the amount of work they performed. Symptoms were recorded by the subjects during the last 5 minutes of each hour. The results are presented and compared with maximum acceptable forces for wrist flexion and extension. PMID:9208467

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist: Diagnostic performance statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AIM: To review the published diagnostic performance statistics for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the wrist for tears of the triangular fibrocartilage complex, the intrinsic carpal ligaments, and for osteonecrosis of the carpal bones. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We used Medline and Embase to search the English language literature. Studies evaluating the diagnostic performance of MRI of the wrist in living patients with surgical confirmation of MR findings were identified. RESULTS: We identified 11 studies reporting the diagnostic performance of MRI for tears of the triangular fibrocartilage complex for a total of 410 patients, six studies for the scapho-lunate ligament (159 patients), six studies for the luno-triquetral ligament (142 patients) and four studies (56 patients) for osteonecrosis of the carpal bones. CONCLUSIONS: Magnetic resonance imaging is an accurate means of diagnosing tears of the triangular fibrocartilage and carpal osteonecrosis. Although MRI is highly specific for tears of the intrinsic carpal ligaments, its sensitivity is low. The diagnostic performance of MRI in the wrist is improved by using high-resolution T2* weighted 3D gradient echo sequences. Using current imaging techniques without intra-articular contrast medium, magnetic resonance imaging cannot reliably exclude tears of the intrinsic carpal ligaments. Hobby, J.L. (2001)

  5. Robotic Mirror Therapy System for Functional Recovery of Hemiplegic Arms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beom, Jaewon; Koh, Sukgyu; Nam, Hyung Seok; Kim, Wonshik; Kim, Yoonjae; Seo, Han Gil; Oh, Byung-Mo; Chung, Sun Gun; Kim, Sungwan

    2016-01-01

    Mirror therapy has been performed as effective occupational therapy in a clinical setting for functional recovery of a hemiplegic arm after stroke. It is conducted by eliciting an illusion through use of a mirror as if the hemiplegic arm is moving in real-time while moving the healthy arm. It can facilitate brain neuroplasticity through activation of the sensorimotor cortex. However, conventional mirror therapy has a critical limitation in that the hemiplegic arm is not actually moving. Thus, we developed a real-time 2-axis mirror robot system as a simple add-on module for conventional mirror therapy using a closed feedback mechanism, which enables real-time movement of the hemiplegic arm. We used 3 Attitude and Heading Reference System sensors, 2 brushless DC motors for elbow and wrist joints, and exoskeletal frames. In a feasibility study on 6 healthy subjects, robotic mirror therapy was safe and feasible. We further selected tasks useful for activities of daily living training through feedback from rehabilitation doctors. A chronic stroke patient showed improvement in the Fugl-Meyer assessment scale and elbow flexor spasticity after a 2-week application of the mirror robot system. Robotic mirror therapy may enhance proprioceptive input to the sensory cortex, which is considered to be important in neuroplasticity and functional recovery of hemiplegic arms. The mirror robot system presented herein can be easily developed and utilized effectively to advance occupational therapy. PMID:27583794

  6. Abdominal aortic aneurysm demonstrated on renal scintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phisitkul, Sorot; Brian, Susan; Rakvit, Ariwan; Jenkins, Leigh A; Bohannon, W Todd; Harris, Jennifer; Tsikouris, James; Silva, Michael B; Meyerrose, Gary E

    2003-08-01

    A 74-year-old hypertensive woman presented with abdominal discomfort and a pulsatile abdominal mass. Anterior abdominal angiography during cardiac blood pool, and renal scintigraphic imaging demonstrated a large abdominal aortic aneurysm. 1, 2 Before endovascular repair with an aortoiliac endograft, the abdominal aneurysm measured 7.5 x 7.0 cm on abdominal computed tomography. This study demonstrates that a suspected abdominal aortic aneurysm can be confirmed using the addition of anterior abdominal imaging with normal posterior imaging at the time of renal scintigraphy. PMID:12897671

  7. Validation of the IOF quality of life questionnaire for patients with wrist fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Lips, P.T.A.M.; Jameson, K; Bianchi, M. L.; Goemaere, S.; Boonen, S; Reeve, J.; Stepan, J.; Johnell, O.; Schoor, van der, R.; Dennison, E.; Kanis, J A; Cooper, C.

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Wrist fracture causes pain and decreased physical, social and emotional function. The International Osteoporosis Foundation has developed a specific questionnaire to assess quality of life in patients with wrist fracture. This questionnaire, including 12 questions, was validated in a multicentre study and compared with an osteoporosis-specific questionnaire (Qualeffo-41) and a generic questionnaire (EQ-5D). METHODS: The study included 105 patients with a recent wrist fracture an...

  8. Joint Preservation of the Wrist Using Articulated Distraction Arthroplasty: A Case Report of a Novel Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Fletcher, Matt D.A.

    2015-01-01

    Distraction arthroplasty of the ankle, elbow, and hip has become widely accepted and used within the orthopaedic community with excellent initial results which appear sustained. To date it has not been applied to the wrist in the same manner. A novel technique, drawn upon past success of articulated ankle distraction and static wrist distraction, was devised and evaluated by application of articulated wrist distraction performed over a 12-week period in a patient with poor functional outcome ...

  9. Penetrating abdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneman, P L

    1989-08-01

    The management of patients with penetrating abdominal trauma is outlined in Figure 1. Patients with hemodynamic instability, evisceration, significant gastrointestinal bleeding, peritoneal signs, gunshot wounds with peritoneal violation, and type 2 and 3 shotgun wounds should undergo emergency laparotomy. The initial ED management of these patients includes airway management, monitoring of cardiac rhythm and vital signs, history, physical examination, and placement of intravenous lines. Blood should be obtained for initial hematocrit, type and cross-matching, electrolytes, and an alcohol level or drug screen as needed. Initial resuscitation should utilize crystalloid fluid replacement. If more than 2 liters of crystalloid are needed to stabilize an adult (less in a child), blood should be given. Group O Rh-negative packed red blood cells should be immediately available for a patient in impending arrest or massive hemorrhage. Type-specific blood should be available within 15 minutes. A patient with penetrating thoracic and high abdominal trauma should receive a portable chest x-ray, and a hemo- or pneumothorax should be treated with tube thoracostomy. An unstable patient with clinical signs consistent with a pneumothorax, however, should receive a tube thoracostomy prior to obtaining roentgenographic confirmation. If time permits, a nasogastric tube and Foley catheter should be placed, and the urine evaluated for blood (these procedures can be performed in the operating room). If kidney involvement is suspected because of hematuria or penetrating trauma in the area of a kidney or ureter in a patient requiring surgery, a single-shot IVP should be performed either in the ED or the operating room. An ECG is important in patients with possible cardiac involvement and in patients over the age of 40 going to the operating room. Tetanus status should be updated, and appropriate antibiotics covering bowel flora should be given. Operative management should rarely be delayed

  10. Economics of abdominal wall reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Curtis; Roth, J Scott

    2013-10-01

    The economic aspects of abdominal wall reconstruction are frequently overlooked, although understandings of the financial implications are essential in providing cost-efficient health care. Ventral hernia repairs are frequently performed surgical procedures with significant economic ramifications for employers, insurers, providers, and patients because of the volume of procedures, complication rates, the significant rate of recurrence, and escalating costs. Because biological mesh materials add significant expense to the costs of treating complex abdominal wall hernias, the role of such costly materials needs to be better defined to ensure the most cost-efficient and effective treatments for ventral abdominal wall hernias. PMID:24035086

  11. Ulnar-sided wrist pain. Part I: anatomy and physical examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulnar-sided wrist pain is a common complaint, and it presents a diagnostic challenge for hand surgeons and radiologists. The complex anatomy of this region, combined with the small size of structures and subtle imaging findings, compound this problem. A thorough understanding of ulnar-sided wrist anatomy and a systematic clinical examination of this region are essential in arriving at an accurate diagnosis. In part I of this review, ulnar-sided wrist anatomy and clinical examination are discussed for a more comprehensive understanding of ulnar-sided wrist pain. (orig.)

  12. Ulnar-sided wrist pain. Part I: anatomy and physical examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vezeridis, Peter S.; Blazar, Philip [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Boston, MA (United States); Yoshioka, Hiroshi [University of California, Irvine, Department of Radiological Sciences, Orange, CA (United States); Han, Roger [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2010-08-15

    Ulnar-sided wrist pain is a common complaint, and it presents a diagnostic challenge for hand surgeons and radiologists. The complex anatomy of this region, combined with the small size of structures and subtle imaging findings, compound this problem. A thorough understanding of ulnar-sided wrist anatomy and a systematic clinical examination of this region are essential in arriving at an accurate diagnosis. In part I of this review, ulnar-sided wrist anatomy and clinical examination are discussed for a more comprehensive understanding of ulnar-sided wrist pain. (orig.)

  13. A study comparing MRI with clinical examinations on wrists with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the appearances of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on MRI, and compare MRI with clinical examinations on wrists with RA. Methods: Fifty patients, fulfilled 1987 American Rheumatism Association (ARA) revised criteria, and 10 age-matched healthy controls entered the study. T1-weighted spin echo, short time inversion recovery (STIR) of both wrists, gadolinium contrast material-enhanced sequences of dominant wrists were performed in the coronal planes. MRl, plain wrist radiographs, clinical date, including swollen joint, patient global assessment (AIMS), and laboratory examinations including ESR, RF, APF, and AKA were obtained at the same time. Functional disability was assessed using the Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Score. Results: In 50 patients, all had pannus on MRI of wrists, 38 patients had enhanced signal intensity for pannus, 21 patients had bone marrow edema, 37 patients had joint effusion, and 37 patients had bone erosions. There were significant difference in the ESR, HAQ, AIMS as well as swollen joint count between patients with bone marrow edema and patients without bone marrow edema (P2=5.06, P=0.025; χ2=5.59, P=0.018). Number of patients with MRI erosion of wrists was associated with the number of patients without MRI bone marrow edema of wrists (χ2=5.11, P=0.024). Conclusion: MRI can find the appearances of wrists with RA. Comparing MRI with clinical examinations on wrists with RA, authors can assess and evaluate the role of MRI on RA

  14. The use of routine wrist radiography is not useful in the evaluation of patients with a ganglion cyst of the wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Andrew S; Jebson, Peter J L; Murray, Peter M; Trigg, Stephen D

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of routine wrist radiography in the evaluation of patients with a wrist ganglion. In the setting of a University-based hand surgery practice, 103 consecutive patients with a dorsal or volar wrist ganglion underwent posteroanterior, lateral, and oblique radiographs of the involved wrist. There were 24 men and 79 women with an average age of 34 years (range 4-67 years). A retrospective review of the medical records was performed. Abnormalities on plain radiographs were noted in only 13 patients (13%). Findings included six cases of thumb carpometacarpal joint arthritis and one case each of an enchondroma, congenital distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) anomaly, DRUJ degenerative changes, intraosseous ganglion, carpal boss, radiocarpal arthritis, and thumb metacarpophalangeal joint osteoarthritis. In only one case (1%) did the findings alter the management. At our institution, the professional and technical charge for three views of the wrist is $172. This confers a cost of $17,716 per therapeutically significant finding in our series. We conclude that routinely performing wrist radiography is not cost-effective in the evaluation and treatment decision-making process in patients with a wrist ganglion. PMID:18780070

  15. CT-based three-dimensional kinematic comparison of dart-throwing motion between wrists with malunited distal radius and contralateral normal wrists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To compare motion of the capitate, scaphoid, and lunate in wrists with a malunited distal radius and contralateral normal wrists during dart-throwing motion (DTM) by three-dimensional kinematic studies using computed tomography (CT) images. Materials and methods: CT was performed simultaneously on both wrists in six patients with a unilateral distal radius malunion at three stepwise positions simulating DTM. Using volume registration technique, the kinematic variables of helical axis motion of the capitate, scaphoid, and lunate were calculated and compared between both wrists. The helical motion of the capitate was also evaluated in a scaphoid- and lunate-based coordinate system. Results: Among the average rotation and translation of the scaphoid, lunate, and capitate during DTM, only the average rotation of the capitate was significantly different between the uninjured (88.9°) and the injured (70°) wrist (p = 0.0075). Rotation of the capitate relative to the scaphoid (26.3° versus 37.8°, p = 0.029) or lunate (39.2° versus 59.3°, p = 0.028) was smaller in the malunited wrist. The centres of helical axis motion of the three carpal bones were located more dorsally and radially in the injured wrist. Conclusions: The present study showed that decreased DTM in wrists with a distal radius malunion resulted from decreased midcarpal motion. The present study of the capitate, scaphoid, and lunate in wrists with distal radius malunion might be the first to present a 3D kinematic analysis of the effect of distal radius malunion on the carpal bones

  16. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) of the infrarenal abdominal aorta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) (n=13) of the lower abdominal aorta are reported in 12 patients. The mean patient age was relatively low (46 years). In 7 cases there were isolated aortic obstructions (6 stenoses, 1 occlusion). In the remaining 6 aortic stenoses, there were also major atherosclerotic lesions distally. The mean diameter of the aortic section in which PTA was performed, measured 8.2 mm. The total diameter of the PTA balloon(s) averaged 19.1 mm. The arterial gradient dropped significantly from 41.4 mm Hg (mean) to 2 mm Hg after PTA. The arm-ankle index increases significantly from 0.64 to 0.97. The follow-up included 9 patients; 1 showed restenosis 38 month after PTA. There were no clinically relevant complications. The data published on abdominal PTA in atherosclerotic lesions are summarized. (orig.)

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... located within a child's abdomen. A Doppler ultrasound study may be part of a child's abdominal ultrasound ... pain from the procedure. If a Doppler ultrasound study is performed, your child may actually hear pulse- ...

  18. JAMA Patient Page: Abdominal Hernia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an operation. Umbilical hernia Abdominal wall Intestinal loop Peritoneum Skin Peritoneum Umbilical annulus SYMPTOMS The first symptom of a ... vomiting, or constipation. Inguinal hernia Indirect inguinal hernia Peritoneum Deep inguinal ring Inguinal canal Superficial inguinal ring ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... technique that allows the physician to see and evaluate blood flow through arteries and veins in the ... the procedure? Abdominal ultrasound imaging is performed to evaluate the: appendix stomach/ pylorus liver gallbladder spleen pancreas ...

  20. Anatomical peculiarities of sensory tracts of the wrist median nerve pedicled with nutrient vessels transferring to bridge wrist ulnar nerve defect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sixin Ouyang; Zhenshan Peng; Jianguo Tan; Tianhong Peng; Jianzhong Xiao

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Translocation or transplantation of nerve stem has good effect;however, nervous function of donator is completely lost. If some nerve stem is damaged, sensory tracts are intercepted from the near nerve stem by nutrient vessels to regard as neural graft for transferring and bridging which may repair injured nerve and decrease neural functional loss of donator.OBJECTIVE: To observe anatomical peculiarities on sensory tracts of wrist median nerve pedicled with nutrient vessels transferring to bridge wrist ulnar nerve defect, and to investigate its feasibility.DESIGN: Duplicated and measured design.SETTING: Anatomy Department of Medical College affiliated to Nanhua University.MATERIALS: A total of 14 samples of upper limbs were selected from adult unnamed corpse and volunteers.METHODS: The experiment was completed at the Clinical Application Anatomy Laboratory of Medical College affiliated to Nanhua University from September to November 2005. Samples were perfused with red emulsion through artery to observe length, fibrous bands and blood supply of median nerve and ulnar nerve at wrist. Boundary of median nerve at wrist ranged from superficial site between flexor carpi radialis and palmaris longus to branch of common palmar digital nerves. Ulnar nerve at wrist ranged from branch of back of the hand to site of common palmar digital nerves. Proximal boundary of the two nerves was crossed from 1/8 to 2/8 region of forearm. Samples of upper limbs from 1 case were selected to simulate operation on sensory tracts of wrist median nerve pedicled with nutrient vessels transferring to bridge wrist ulnar nerve.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Anatomical peculiarities on sensory tracts of wrist median nerve pedicled with nutrient vessels transferring to bridge wrist ulnar nerve defect.RESULTS: ① The length of wrist median nerves was 7.8 (7.5-8.1) cm. There were 19 to 27 nerve tracts in it and the majority belonged to sensory tracts on the ulnar side, in which non

  1. Component separation in abdominal trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Rawstorne, Edward; Smart, Christopher J.; Fallis, Simon A.; Suggett, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    Component separation is established for complex hernia repairs. This case presents early component separation and release of the anterior and posterior sheath to facilitate closure of the abdominal wall following emergency laparotomy, reinforcing the repair with a biological mesh. On Day 11 following an emergency laparotomy for penetrating trauma, this patient underwent component separation and release of the anterior and posterior sheath. An intra-abdominal biological mesh was secured, and t...

  2. Updates on abdominal desmoid tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Desmoid tumor is a monoclonal, fibroblastic proliferation arising in musculoaponeurotic structures. This connective tissue hyperplasia infiltrates locally, recurs frequentiy after resection but does not metastasize. Abdominal desmoid occurs sporadically, in association with some familial syndromes and often represents a clinical dilemma for surgeons. The enigmatic biology and anatomical location of abdominal desmoids make treatment recommendations difficult. This distinct pathological entity is reviewed with a specific focus on aetiology and management.

  3. Abdominal muscle training in sport.

    OpenAIRE

    Norris, C M

    1993-01-01

    This paper evaluates several abdominal exercises, and highlights factors which are important for their safe prescription and effective use. The function of the abdominal muscles and hip flexors is considered, and the importance of the infra-umbilical portion of the rectus abdominis is emphasized. The effects of flexion on the lumbar spine are outlined. The trunk curl, sit-up, and straight leg raise are analysed, together with modifications of these exercises. The effect of foot fixation and h...

  4. Real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI during active wrist motion--initial observations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D Boutin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Non-invasive imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI provide the ability to evaluate the complex anatomy of bone and soft tissues of the wrist without the use of ionizing radiation. Dynamic instability of wrist--occurring during joint motion--is a complex condition that has assumed increased importance in musculoskeletal medicine. The objective of this study was to develop an MRI protocol for evaluating the wrist during continuous active motion, to show that dynamic imaging of the wrist is realizable, and to demonstrate that the resulting anatomical images enable the measurement of metrics commonly evaluated for dynamic wrist instability. METHODS: A 3-Tesla "active-MRI" protocol was developed using a bSSFP sequence with 475 ms temporal resolution for continuous imaging of the moving wrist. Fifteen wrists of 10 asymptomatic volunteers were scanned during active supination/pronation, radial/ulnar deviation, "clenched-fist", and volarflexion/dorsiflexion maneuvers. Two physicians evaluated distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ congruity, extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU tendon translation, the scapholunate (SL interval, and the SL, radiolunate (RL and capitolunate (CL angles from the resulting images. RESULTS: The mean DRUJ subluxation ratio was 0.04 in supination, 0.10 in neutral, and 0.14 in pronation. The ECU tendon was subluxated or translated out of its groove in 3 wrists in pronation, 9 wrists in neutral, and 11 wrists in supination. The mean SL interval was 1.43 mm for neutral, ulnar deviation, radial deviation positions, and increased to 1.64 mm during the clenched-fist maneuver. Measurement of SL, RL and CL angles in neutral and dorsiflexion was also accomplished. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates the initial performance of active-MRI, which may be useful in the investigation of dynamic wrist instability in vivo.

  5. Extensor tendon rupture and three-dimensional computed tomography imaging of the rheumatoid wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Asami; Ishikawa, Hajime; Murasawa, Akira; Nakazono, Kiyoshi [Niigata Rheumatic Center, Department of Rheumatology, Shibata, Niigata (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    Extensor tendon rupture on the dorsum of the wrist is commonly seen in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The diagnosis of tendon rupture is usually straightforward, but it is sometimes difficult in the hand with complex deformity. The purposes of this study were to investigate the reliability of three-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT) imaging of extensor tendons in the rheumatoid wrist and in the normal wrist and to clarify the validity of its clinical application to the diagnosis of tendon rupture in the rheumatoid wrist. Preoperative 3DCT images of 48 wrists of 45 patients with RA and 3DCT images of 38 wrists of 38 healthy volunteers were reviewed retrospectively by six orthopaedic surgeons who were unaware of all other study data. Extensor tendon rupture was verified by operation on 20 rheumatoid wrists. Regarding interobserver and intra-observer reliabilities of 3DCT imaging of the extensor tendons, agreement with respect to tendon rupture in this study group was high, and Cohen's kappa ({kappa}) coefficient was variable, depending on the individual tendon. Positive predictive value (PPV) of tendon rupture in the extensor digiti minimi (EDM), extensor digitorum communis (EDC) V and IV and extensor pollicis longs (EPL) tendons was more than 60%, but those for the other extensor tendons were less than 50%. Negative predictive value (NPV) was more than 96% in all extensor tendons, in both rheumatoid and normal wrists. Extensor tendons in normal and rheumatoid wrists were well depicted by 3DCT imaging. In the rheumatoid wrists, extensors of the ring and little fingers and the thumb were depicted more accurately than those to the other fingers. 3DCT imaging was clinically applicable to wrists for which it was difficult to diagnose by physical examination a definite cause for the loss of extension of the fingers. (orig.)

  6. Computer tomography following blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computer tomographic appearances of lesions of parenchymatous organs following blunt abdominal trauma are described in 13 patients (five liver, four renal, two splenic and two pancreatic injuries). The value of abdominal computer tomography is discussed in relation to the interval between injury and time of abdominal examination and compared with the diagnostic value of abdominal angiography. (orig.)

  7. Imaging of gastrointestinal and abdominal tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanhoenacker, FM; De Backer, AI; Op de Beeck, B; Maes, M; Van Altena, R; Van Beckevoort, D; Kersemans, P; De Schepper, AM

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses the range of manifestations of tuberculosis (TB) of the abdomen, including involvement of the gastrointestinal tract, the peritoneum, mesentery, omentum, abdominal lymph nodes, solid abdominal organs, the genital system and the abdominal aorta. Abdominal TB is a diagnostic cha

  8. Arm morbidity after breast cancer treatments and analysis of related factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Mi Son; Chung, Yong Sik; Kang, Seung Hee [College of Medicine, Ajou University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Seong Mi [Ajou University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Eun Hyun [Ajou University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hye Jin; Song, Yeoung Suk [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hee Bung [Hee Bung Park Breast Clinic, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-03-15

    To evaluate the incidence of arm morbidity following breast cancer surgery including axillary dissection and to identify related factors. One hundred and fifty nine patients were studied using a self-report questionnaire and a clinical examination. Lymphedema, reduction of range of motion in shoulder joint and subjective symptoms (pain, impaired arm movement, numbness, stiffness) were evaluated. As related factors, demographic, oncologic characteristics and types of treatment were analysed. The incidence of lymphedema ({>=} 2 cm difference comparing to unaffected arm) was 6.3%, 10.7%, 22.6% and 23.3% at each 10 cm, 20 cm, 30 cm, and 40 cm from wrist. Reduction of range of motion in shoulder joint ({>=} 20 degree difference comparing to unaffected arm) was noted in more than 1/3 patients for flexion, abduction and internal rotation. Especially the reduction of range of motion in internal rotation was severe (> 50% reduction) in 1/3 patients. Approximately 50 to 60% of patients complained impaired arm movement, numbness, stiffness and pain. Body mass index (BMI) was the significant risk factor for lymphedema. Lymphedema was present in 1/3 of patients and the common sites of edema were 30 cm 40 cm proximal from the wrist. Also most severe reduction of range of motion in shoulder joint was with internal rotation. There needs weight control for lymphedema because BMI was the significant risk factor for lymphedema. Also rehabilitation program for range of motion especially internal rotation in shoulder joint should be developed.

  9. Arm morbidity after breast cancer treatments and analysis of related factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the incidence of arm morbidity following breast cancer surgery including axillary dissection and to identify related factors. One hundred and fifty nine patients were studied using a self-report questionnaire and a clinical examination. Lymphedema, reduction of range of motion in shoulder joint and subjective symptoms (pain, impaired arm movement, numbness, stiffness) were evaluated. As related factors, demographic, oncologic characteristics and types of treatment were analysed. The incidence of lymphedema (≥ 2 cm difference comparing to unaffected arm) was 6.3%, 10.7%, 22.6% and 23.3% at each 10 cm, 20 cm, 30 cm, and 40 cm from wrist. Reduction of range of motion in shoulder joint (≥ 20 degree difference comparing to unaffected arm) was noted in more than 1/3 patients for flexion, abduction and internal rotation. Especially the reduction of range of motion in internal rotation was severe (> 50% reduction) in 1/3 patients. Approximately 50 to 60% of patients complained impaired arm movement, numbness, stiffness and pain. Body mass index (BMI) was the significant risk factor for lymphedema. Lymphedema was present in 1/3 of patients and the common sites of edema were 30 cm 40 cm proximal from the wrist. Also most severe reduction of range of motion in shoulder joint was with internal rotation. There needs weight control for lymphedema because BMI was the significant risk factor for lymphedema. Also rehabilitation program for range of motion especially internal rotation in shoulder joint should be developed

  10. Kinematics and Dynamics of an Asymmetrical Parallel Robotic Wrist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanglei Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces an asymmetrical parallel robotic wrist, which can generate a decoupled unlimited-torsion motion and achieve high positioning accuracy. The kinematics, dexterity, and singularities of the manipulator are investigated to visualize the performance contours of the manipulator. Using the method of Lagrange multipliers and considering all the mobile components, the equations of motion of the manipulator are derived to investigate the dynamic characteristics efficiently. The developed dynamic model is numerically illustrated and compared with its simplified formulation to show its computation accuracy.

  11. Wear particles and osteolysis in patients with total wrist arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeckstyns, Michel E H; Toxværd, Anders; Bansal, Manjula; Vadstrup, Lars Soelberg

    2014-01-01

    tissue, the level of chrome and cobalt ions in the blood, and the possible role of infectious or rheumatoid activity in the development of PPO. METHODS: Biopsies were taken from the implant-bone interphase in 13 consecutive patients with total wrist arthroplasty and with at least 3 years' follow...... of the radiolucent zone. The blood levels of chrome and cobalt ions were normal. There was no evidence of infectious or rheumatoid activity. CONCLUSIONS: Polyethylene wear has been accepted as a major cause of osteolysis in total hip arthroplasty, and metallic debris has also been cited to be an...

  12. Arm posture score and arm movement during walking: a comprehensive assessment in spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riad, Jacques; Coleman, Scott; Lundh, Dan; Broström, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Patients with hemiplegic cerebral palsy often have noticeably deviant arm posture and decreased arm movement. Here we develop a comprehensive assessment method for the upper extremity during walking. Arm posture score (APS), deviation of shoulder flexion/extension, shoulder abduction/adduction, elbow flexion/extension and wrist flexion/extension were calculated from three-dimensional gait analysis. The APS is the root mean square deviation from normal, similar to Baker's Gait Profile Score (GPS) [1]. The total range of motion (ROM) was defined as the difference between the maximum and minimum position in the gait cycle for each variable. The arm symmetry, arm posture index (API) was calculated by dividing the APS on the hemiplegic side by that on the non-involved side, and the range of motion index (ROMI) by dividing the ROM on the hemiplegic side by that on the non-involved side. Using the APS, two groups were defined. Group 1 had minor deviations, with an APS under 9.0 and a mean of 6.0 (95% CI 5.0-7.0). Group 2 had more pronounced deviations, with an APS over 9.0 and a mean of 13.1 (CI 10.8-15.5) (p=0.000). Total ROM was 60.6 in group 1 and 46.2 in group 2 (p=0.031). API was 0.89 in group 1 and 1.70 in group 2 (pdynamic measurements of upper extremity abnormality can be useful in following natural progression, evaluating treatment and making prognoses in several categories of patients. PMID:20971011

  13. Prediction of Energy Expenditure from Wrist Accelerometry in People with and without Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agiovlasitis, Stamatis; Motl, Robert W.; Foley, John T.; Fernhall, Bo

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between energy expenditure and wrist accelerometer output during walking in persons with and without Down syndrome (DS). Energy expenditure in metabolic equivalent units (METs) and activity-count rate were respectively measured with portable spirometry and a uniaxial wrist accelerometer in 17 persons with DS…

  14. The investigation of the functions of the wrists after the resection of radial head

    OpenAIRE

    Domanic, Unsal; Cakmak, Mehmet; Taser, Omer; Hamzaoglu, Azmi

    2004-01-01

    The functions of the wrists of 8 cases in which the resection of radial head were applied, have been studied in later period. After resection, it was retermined that the radius slids usualiy towards the proximale, but there was no definite relation between this slip and complaints which exist at the wrist.

  15. Marker placement to describe the wrist movements during activities of daily living in cyclical tasks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murgia, A; Kyberd, PJ; Chappell, PH; Light, CM

    2004-01-01

    Objective. To describe the wrist kinematics during movement through free range of motion and activities of daily living using a cyclical task. Design. The wrist angles were initially calculated in a calibration trial and then in two selected activities of daily living (jar opening and carton pouring

  16. 78 FR 36307 - Proposed Information Collection (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity... . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-NEW (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any... Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA Form 21-0960M-16. OMB Control Number: 2900-NEW...

  17. 78 FR 36643 - Proposed Information Collection (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-18

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity... . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900--NEW (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any... Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA Form 21-0960M-16. OMB Control Number: 2900-NEW...

  18. MRI for the initial evaluation of acute wrist, knee, and ankle trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Nikken (Jeroen)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractIn this thesis we study the application of MRI in acute trauma of wrist, knee, and ankle, evaluating its potentials, its effects, and its costs. Our aim was to use MRI in all patients with acute trauma of wrist, knee, and ankle, without increasing the overall costs to society, potentiall

  19. 21 CFR 888.3760 - Wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis. 888.3760 Section 888.3760 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... scaphoid polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis is a...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3770 - Wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis. 888.3770 Section 888.3770 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... trapezium polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis is a...

  1. 21 CFR 888.3750 - Wrist joint carpal lunate polymer prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal lunate polymer prosthesis. 888.3750 Section 888.3750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... lunate polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal lunate prosthesis is a...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3790 - Wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis... constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis is a... as cobalt-chromium-molybdenum, and is limited to those prostheses intended for use with bone...

  3. Detection of abdominal bleeding in blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arterial hemorrhage is the most serious immediate complication of blunt abdominal trauma. This paper discusses the detection and localization of active hemorrhage in nonpenetrating injury, as a modification of the technique using technetium-99m sulfur colloid to localize the site of active bleeding in the gastrointestinal tract. Any imaging protocol for suspected hepatosplenic injury can be easily modified to search for active intra-abdominal hemorrhage. The timely detection of unsuspected bleeding improves patient management by allowing the surgeon to reorder his or her treatment priorities. The early detection of clinically unsuspected intra-abdominal, retroperitoneal, or pelvic hemorrhage will identify those patients who may need more definitive diagnostic procedures, interventional angiography for control of bleeding, or surgical intervention. The 500,000-count view of the abdomen and pelvis can be easily incorporated into any existing trauma protocol using technetium-99m sulfur colloid, is of proven value, and adds little additional time to the study

  4. Skill Analysis of the Wrist Release in the Golf Swings Utilizing Shaft Elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Soichiro; Hoshino, Yohei; Kobayashi, Yukinori

    This study analyzes the skill component of the wrist release in the golf swing by employing a three-dimensional dynamic model considering vibration of the club shaft. It is observed that professional and expert golfers relax their wrists in the swing motion as a "natural" or "late" release. Thus, the relationship between the timing of the wrist release and the shaft vibration is examined in this study. First, it is demonstrated that "natural release" at the zero-crossing point of the bending vibration of the shaft efficiently increases the head speed at impact. In the next step, the "late hitting" condition is imposed upon the model. It is demonstrated that "late hitting" could further improve the efficiency of the swing motion. Finally, the skill component in the wrist release for the long drive is experimentally verified by measuring the movement of the wrist and the dynamic deformation of the shaft during the downswing.

  5. Complete palmer lunate enucleation——is proximal row carpectomy or wrist arthrodesis the only choice?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Atin Jaiswal; Naiman Deepak Kachchhap; Yashwant S Tanwar; Masood Habib; Birendra Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Perilunate dislocations are rare injuries of the wrist and complete dislocation of the lunate is also rare.There is controversy in literature regarding the optimal management of such injuries.Complete lunate enucleation is associated with high rate of osteonecrosis of lunate thus wrist arthrodesis or proximal row carpectomy has been advocated as primary treatment for such injuries.We report a case of transradial styloid complete palmar lunate enucleation in a 25-year-old male patient who sustained injury to the left wrist due to fall on outstretched hand.Carpal row salvage surgery initially by closed reduction and wrist distractor application followed by open reduction and internal fixation with K-wires along with ligamentous repair resulted in restoration of normal wrist anatomy and good functional outcome.As many of these injuries are missed on initial presentation and outcome is poor for missed injuries,prompt diagnosis and early surgical management to restore vascularity of lunate is recommended.

  6. Wrist ligament injuries: value of post-arthrography computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the use of post-arthrography high-resolution computed tomography in wrist ligament injuries.Design and patients: Thirty-six consecutive patients who had a history and clinical findings suggestive of ligamentous injuries of the wrist were prospectively studied. The findings of three-compartment arthrography and post-arthrography computed tomography (arthro-CT) were compared with those of arthroscopy. The evaluation concentrates on the detection and precise localization of ligament lesions in the triangular fibrocartilage (TFC), the scapholunate ligament (SLL) and the lunotriquetral ligament (LTL).Results: For TFC, SLL and LTL lesions, standard arthrography responded with a sensitivity and specificity of 85% and 100%, 85% and 100%, 80% and 100% respectively, while arthro-CT showed a sensitivity and specificity of 85% and 100%, 100% and 100%, 80% and 100% respectively. The precise localization of the lesions was possible only with arthro-CT.Conclusion: The sensitivity and specificity of standard arthrography and arthro-CT are similar, although the latter shows the site of tears or perforation with greater precision, while conventional arthrography demonstrates them indirectly. This precision is essential and may have clinical implications for the success of treatment procedures. (orig.)

  7. Wrist ultrasonography of ossification centers during the adolescent growth spurt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-resolution ultrasound (US) of the hand and wrist was compared with radiography in 26 patients (mean age: 11.4 years) to be submitted to orthodontic therapy. US scans were targeted on the ossification centers critical for the growth spurt, namely the pisiform and abductor sesamoid bones of the metacarpophalaneal joint of the thumb and the cartilage of the distal phalanx of the third finger. All images were retrospectively reviewed on a double-blind basis by two independent observers who gave a conspicuity score to each structure of interest. All the scores were submitted to statistical analysis with the Wilcoxon test. US images clearly demonstrated the initial appearance of the ossification centers of the pisiform and sesamoid bones. These structures appeared as hyperechoic spots causing marked acoustic shadowing. The persistence of the phalangeal cartilage was depicted as a thin rim interrupting the hyperechoic cortical profile of the bone. Us results were statistically equivalent to radiographic findings in the pisiform. A statistically significant difference between the two techniques was found in the third finger cartilage because its profile was poorly depicted on some US images. To conclude, wrist US is proposed as a simple and valuable radiation-free support examination for the follow-up of skeletal maturation in adolescents to be submitted to orthodontic therapy

  8. An Exoskeleton Robot for Human Forearm and Wrist Motion Assist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranathunga Arachchilage Ruwan Chandra Gopura; Kiguchi, Kazuo

    The exoskeleton robot is worn by the human operator as an orthotic device. Its joints and links correspond to those of the human body. The same system operated in different modes can be used for different fundamental applications; a human-amplifier, haptic interface, rehabilitation device and assistive device sharing a portion of the external load with the operator. We have been developing exoskeleton robots for assisting the motion of physically weak individuals such as elderly or slightly disabled in daily life. In this paper, we propose a three degree of freedom (3DOF) exoskeleton robot (W-EXOS) for the forearm pronation/ supination motion, wrist flexion/extension motion and ulnar/radial deviation. The paper describes the wrist anatomy toward the development of the exoskeleton robot, the hardware design of the exoskeleton robot and EMG-based control method. The skin surface electromyographic (EMG) signals of muscles in forearm of the exoskeletons' user and the hand force/forearm torque are used as input information for the controller. By applying the skin surface EMG signals as main input signals to the controller, automatic control of the robot can be realized without manipulating any other equipment. Fuzzy control method has been applied to realize the natural and flexible motion assist. Experiments have been performed to evaluate the proposed exoskeleton robot and its control method.

  9. Videolaparoscopia no trauma abdominal Videolaparoscopy in the abdominal trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Átila Varela Velho

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available A videolaparoscopia (VL vem contribuindo de forma crescente, para diagnóstico e terapêutica de várias afecções cirúrgicas abdominais, introduzindo profundas mudanças na cirurgia contemporânea. Esse avanço incorporou-se também às urgências traumáticas, fazendo parte da avaliação diagnóstica e, às vezes, da terapêutica do trauma abdominal. Os autores apresentam uma revisão concisa da literatura sobre a VL no trauma, atualizando o tema e discutindo os aspectos mais relevantes das indicações, limitações e complicações do método.Videolaparoscopy has been contributing for the diagnostic and therapeutic approach in the abdominal surgical diseases in the last years. Representing real modification in the conventional elective and traumatic abdominal surgery. Its has been recognized as a safe procedure for the diagnosis and treatment of abdominal trauma. Diagnostic predictive values, sensibility and specificity are greater than when obtained by the other diagnostic methods such as peritoneal lavage, ultrasonography and computed tomography. Despite their limitations, when indicated for selected patients seems to reduce non terapeutic laparotomies, postoperative morbidity, hospital stay and costs. The authors present a review of the literature regarding videolaparoscopy in the abdominal trauma, its limitations and complications. Based an a complex protocol for the indications of videolaparoscopy for abdominal trauma, the authors sugested their exclusive use by level trauma centers.

  10. A clinical dilemma: abdominal tuberculosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oya Uygur-Bayramicli; G(u)l Dabak; Resat Dabak

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the clinical, radiological and microbiological properties of abdominal tuberculosis (TB) and to discuss methods needed to get the diagnosis.METHODS: Thirty-one patients diagnosed as abdominal TB between March 1998 and December 2001 at the Gastroenterology Department of Kartal State Hospital,Istanbul, Turkey were evaluated prospectively. Complete physical examination, medical and family history, blood count erythrocyte sedimentation rate, routine biochemical tests,Mantoux skin test, chest X-ray and abdominal ultrasonography (USG) were performed in all cases, whereas microbiological examination of ascites, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, colonoscopy or barium enema, abdominal tomography, mediastinoscopy, laparoscopy or laparotomy were done when needed.RESULTS: The median age of patients (14 females, 17males) was 34.2 years (range 15-65 years). The most frequent symptoms were abdominal pain and weight loss.Eleven patients had active pulmonary TB. The most common abdominal USG findings were ascites and hepatomegaly. Ascitic fluid analysis performed in 13 patients was found to be exudative and acid resistant bacilli were present in smear and cultured only in one patient with BacTec (3.2 %). Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy yielded nonspecific findings in 16 patients. Colonoscopy performed in 20 patients showed ulcers in 9 (45 %), nodules in 2 (10 %)and, stricture, polypoid lesions, granulomatous findings in terminal ileum and rectal fistula each in one patient (5 %).Laparoscopy on 4 patients showed dilated bowel loops,thickening in the mesentery, multiple ulcers and tubercles on the peritoneum. Patients with abdominal TB were divided into three groups according to the type of involvement.Fifteen patients (48 %) had intestinal TB, L1 patients (35.2 %) had tuberculous peritonitis and 5 (16.8 %)tuberculous lymphadenitis. The diagnosis of abdominal TB was confirmed microbiologically in 5 (16 %) and histopathologically in 19 patients (60.8 %). The

  11. Abdominal tuberculosis and amoebic abscess. Abdominal tuberkulose og amoebeabscess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myklebust, G.; Bardstad, J.; Brabrand, K. (Aust-Agder Central Hospital, Arendal (Norway))

    1993-03-01

    A 26-years-old Indian male was admitted to hospital with loss of weight and vague abdominal pain of several weeks duration. Ultrasonography and computed tomography showed several expansive lesions near the pancreatic head, probably representing enlarged lymph nodes. A few milliliters of yellowish pus were aspirated by ultrasound guided aspiration. Microscopic examination of the pus showed trophozoits, and mycobacterium tuberculosis subsequently grew from the pus culture. Abdominal tuberculosis is a rare condition, particularly in the pancreas and the peripancreatic region. The report stresses the importance of considering the possible coexistance of more than one infectious disease in patients from endemic areas. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Uso da peritoneostomia na sepse abdominal Laparostomy in abdominal sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    Juvenal da Rocha Torres Neto; Adonai Pinheiro Barreto; Ana Carolina Lisboa Prudente; Allisson Mário dos Santos; Rodrigo Rocha Santiago

    2007-01-01

    Dentre as modalidades terapêuticas da sepse abdominal, a peritoneostomia tem papel decisivo permitindo explorações e lavagens da cavidade de forma facilitada. Observamos pacientes com diagnóstico clínico de sepse abdominal internados no Serviço de Coloproctologia do Hospital Universitário da Universidade Federal de Sergipe, e que foram submetidos a peritoneostomia de janeiro de 2004 a janeiro de 2006. Foram avaliados quanto ao diagnóstico primário e secundário, tipo de peritonite secundária, ...

  13. Most Correlated Arms Identification

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Che-Yu; Bubeck, Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    We study the problem of finding the most mutually correlated arms among many arms. We show that adaptive arms sampling strategies can have significant advantages over the non-adaptive uniform sampling strategy. Our proposed algorithms rely on a novel correlation estimator. The use of this accurate estimator allows us to get improved results for a wide range of problem instances.

  14. Contemporary imaging in abdominal emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging is often a fundamental part in the evaluation of an injured or ill child. A variety of imaging modalities (radiography, angiography/fluoroscopy, sonography, CT, magnetic resonance imaging and scintigraphy) are among the options. CT is worth focused attention because of its usefulness in a variety of emergency department settings, its increasing use, and its potential radiation risks. CT plays an important role in the evaluation of traumatic and nontraumatic abdominal emergencies in children. Therefore, the goal of this paper is to review current imaging approaches and controversies in the evaluation of common acute abdominal emergencies. Through discussion of various modalities, especially CT in evaluation of abdominal pain and trauma, the relative advantages and disadvantages including radiation risk will be reviewed. (orig.)

  15. CT evaluation of abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: An evaluation of CT diagnosis of abdominal trauma. Methods: CT appearance of abdominal trauma was analyzed retrospectively in 95 cases. thirty-three patients were cured by operation, and the other 59 patients received conservative treatment. Fifty-one patients out of 59 were seen healed or improved by a follow up CT scan after the conservative treatment. Results: The study included: 31 cases of splenic contusion, accompanying with hemoperitoneum in 25 cases; 3 cases of hepatic laceration; 33 cases of liver and spleen compound trauma accompanying with hemoperitoneum; 18 cases of renal contusion, with subcapsular hemorrhage in 12 cases; 4 cases of midriff colic; 3 cases of mesentery breach; 3 cases of digestive tract perforation. Conclusion: CT is sensitive and precise in evaluating abdominal trauma, providing important information for treatment. (author)

  16. Contemporary imaging in abdominal emergencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivit, Carlos J. [Rainbow Babies and Children' s Hospital, Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2008-11-15

    Imaging is often a fundamental part in the evaluation of an injured or ill child. A variety of imaging modalities (radiography, angiography/fluoroscopy, sonography, CT, magnetic resonance imaging and scintigraphy) are among the options. CT is worth focused attention because of its usefulness in a variety of emergency department settings, its increasing use, and its potential radiation risks. CT plays an important role in the evaluation of traumatic and nontraumatic abdominal emergencies in children. Therefore, the goal of this paper is to review current imaging approaches and controversies in the evaluation of common acute abdominal emergencies. Through discussion of various modalities, especially CT in evaluation of abdominal pain and trauma, the relative advantages and disadvantages including radiation risk will be reviewed. (orig.)

  17. Abdominal wall hernia and pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K K; Henriksen, N A; Jorgensen, L N

    2015-01-01

    Med and Embase in combination with a cross-reference search of eligible papers. RESULTS: We included 31 papers of which 23 were case reports. In fertile women undergoing sutured or mesh repair, pain was described in a few patients during the last trimester of a subsequent pregnancy. Emergency surgery of......PURPOSE: There is no consensus as to the treatment strategy for abdominal wall hernias in fertile women. This study was undertaken to review the current literature on treatment of abdominal wall hernias in fertile women before or during pregnancy. METHODS: A literature search was undertaken in Pub...... incarcerated hernias in pregnant women, as well as combined hernia repair and cesarean section appears as safe procedures. No major complications were reported following hernia repair before or during pregnancy. The combined procedure of elective cesarean section and abdominal wall hernia repair was reported...

  18. Abdominal radiation causes bacterial translocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a single dose of radiation to the rat abdomen leads to bacterial translocation into the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). A second issue addressed was whether translocation correlates with anatomic damage to the mucosa. The radiated group (1100 cGy) which received anesthesia also was compared with a control group and a third group which received anesthesia alone but no abdominal radiation. Abdominal radiation lead to 100% positive cultures of MLN between 12 hr and 4 days postradiation. Bacterial translocation was almost nonexistent in the control and anesthesia group. Signs of inflammation and ulceration of the intestinal mucosa were not seen until Day 3 postradiation. Mucosal damage was maximal by Day 4. Bacterial translocation onto the MLN after a single dose of abdominal radiation was not apparently dependent on anatomical, histologic damage of the mucosa

  19. Radiological evaluation of abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simple abdomen film has played an important role in decision of emergency operations in patients with the abdominal trauma. Nowadays, it still acts as a primary and inevitable processes in emergency condition. At the Department of Radiology, Hanil Hospital, 70 patients, who were laparotomied due to penetrating or nonpernetraing abdominal trauma, were observed and analyzed with simple abdomen film after comparison with the operative findings. The results are as follows: 1. Most frequent age distribution was 10 to 39 years and marked 70%. Male was in 90% incidence. 2. Penetrating injury largely involved the small bowel and abdominal wall. Non-penetrating injury usually involved the spleen, small bowel, liver, kidney, pancreas, duodenum. 3. Single organ injury occurred in higher incidence at the small bowel and abdominal wall. Multiple organ injury occurred in higher incidence at the spleen, liver, kidney and pancreas. 4. Organ distribution was 26% in spleen, 22% in small bowel, 14% in liver, 11% in abdominal wall. 7% in pancreas, 7% in kidney. 5% in duodenum, 4% in GB and CBD, 2% in diaphragm, 2% in colon, and 1% in stomach. 5. The specific roentgen findings and their frequency which useful in differential diagnosis at abdominal trauma, were as follows: a) flank fluid; Detectable possibility was 71% in liver laceration, 69% in spleen laceration and 57% in pancreas laceration. b) ipsilateral psoas shadow obliteration; Detectable possibility was 57% in liver laceration, 57% in kidney laceration and 46% in spleen laceration. c) free air; Detactable possibility was 60% in duodenal perforation, and 36% in peroration of upper part of small bowel. d) Reflex ileus; Detectable possibility was 64% in small bowel, 50% in liver laceration and 35% in spleen laceration. e) rib fracture; Detactable possibility was 36% in liver laceration and 23% in spleen laceration. f) pleural effusion; Detectable possibility was 29% in liver laceration and 27% in spleen laceration

  20. Secondary abdominal appendicular ectopic pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nama, Vivek; Gyampoh, Bright; Karoshi, Mahantesh; McRae, Reynold; Opemuyi, Isaac

    2007-01-01

    Although the case fatality rate for ectopic pregnancies has decreased to 0.08% in industrialized countries, it still represents 3.8% of maternal mortality in the United States alone. In developing countries, the case fatality rate varies from 3% to 27%. Laparoscopic management of tubal pregnancies is now the standard form of treatment where this technology is available. Abdominal pregnancies are rare, and secondary implantation of tubal ectopic pregnancies is the most common cause of abdominal gestations. We present an interesting case of secondary implantation of a tubal ectopic pregnancy to highlight the appendix as a possible secondary implantation site after a tubal ectopic pregnancy. PMID:17630175

  1. CT appearances of abdominal tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, W.-K., E-mail: leewk33@hotmail.com [Department of Medical Imaging, St Vincent' s Hospital, University of Melbourne, Fitzroy, Victoria (Australia); Van Tonder, F.; Tartaglia, C.J.; Dagia, C. [Department of Medical Imaging, St Vincent' s Hospital, University of Melbourne, Fitzroy, Victoria (Australia); Cazzato, R.L. [Department of Radiology, Universita Campus Bio-Medico di Roma, Rome (Italy); Duddalwar, V.A. [Department of Radiology, Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Chang, S.D. [Department of Medical Imaging, Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, British Columbia (Canada)

    2012-06-15

    The purpose of this article is to review and illustrate the spectrum of computed tomography (CT) appearances of abdominal tuberculosis. Tuberculosis can affect any organ or tissue in the abdomen, and can be mistaken for other inflammatory or neoplastic conditions. The most common sites of tuberculosis in the abdomen include lymph nodes, genitourinary tract, peritoneal cavity and gastrointestinal tract. The liver, spleen, biliary tract, pancreas and adrenals are rarely affected, but are more likely in HIV-seropositive patients and in miliary tuberculosis. This article should alert the radiologist to consider abdominal tuberculosis in the correct clinical setting to ensure timely diagnosis and enable appropriate treatment.

  2. CT appearances of abdominal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this article is to review and illustrate the spectrum of computed tomography (CT) appearances of abdominal tuberculosis. Tuberculosis can affect any organ or tissue in the abdomen, and can be mistaken for other inflammatory or neoplastic conditions. The most common sites of tuberculosis in the abdomen include lymph nodes, genitourinary tract, peritoneal cavity and gastrointestinal tract. The liver, spleen, biliary tract, pancreas and adrenals are rarely affected, but are more likely in HIV-seropositive patients and in miliary tuberculosis. This article should alert the radiologist to consider abdominal tuberculosis in the correct clinical setting to ensure timely diagnosis and enable appropriate treatment.

  3. Recurrent abdominal pain in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, Niyaz A; Ahmad, Sheikh Mushtaq; Ahmed, S Zubair; Ali, Syed Wazid; Charoo, B A; Hassan, Masood Ul

    2002-09-01

    Eighty five children with recurrent abdominal pain(RAP) were studied. Organic cause was noticed in 70 cases and non-organic in 15 cases. Giardiasis was the commonest organic cause in 57 (67.0 percent), either alone or with other parasitic infestations. Other organic causes include gallstones (4.7 percent), urinary infections (4.7 percent), esophagitis/gastritis (3.5 percent) and abdominal tuberculosis (2.3 percent). Single parent, school phobia, sibling rivalry, RAP in other family members and nocturnal enuresis are significant factors associated with nonorganic causes PMID:12368527

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the abdomen, arms, legs, neck and/or brain (in infants and children) or within various body ... children. It is also valuable for evaluating the brain, spinal cord and hip joints in newborns and ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... allows the physician to see and evaluate blood flow through arteries and veins in the abdomen, arms, ... physician to see and evaluate: blockages to blood flow (such as clots) narrowing of vessels tumors and ...

  6. A Novel, Open Access Method to Assess Sleep Duration Using a Wrist-Worn Accelerometer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent T van Hees

    Full Text Available Wrist-worn accelerometers are increasingly being used for the assessment of physical activity in population studies, but little is known about their value for sleep assessment. We developed a novel method of assessing sleep duration using data from 4,094 Whitehall II Study (United Kingdom, 2012-2013 participants aged 60-83 who wore the accelerometer for 9 consecutive days, filled in a sleep log and reported sleep duration via questionnaire. Our sleep detection algorithm defined (nocturnal sleep as a period of sustained inactivity, itself detected as the absence of change in arm angle greater than 5 degrees for 5 minutes or more, during a period recorded as sleep by the participant in their sleep log. The resulting estimate of sleep duration had a moderate (but similar to previous findings agreement with questionnaire based measures for time in bed, defined as the difference between sleep onset and waking time (kappa = 0.32, 95%CI:0.29,0.34 and total sleep duration (kappa = 0.39, 0.36,0.42. This estimate was lower for time in bed for women, depressed participants, those reporting more insomnia symptoms, and on weekend days. No such group differences were found for total sleep duration. Our algorithm was validated against data from a polysomnography study on 28 persons which found a longer time window and lower angle threshold to have better sensitivity to wakefulness, while the reverse was true for sensitivity to sleep. The novelty of our method is the use of a generic algorithm that will allow comparison between studies rather than a "count" based, device specific method.

  7. The arms race control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Written in 1961, this paper presents the content of a book entitled 'The arms race control' where the author outlined the difference between disarmament and arms control, described the economic and moral role of arms race, the importance of force balance for international security. He wandered whether arms control could ensure this balance and whether nuclear balance meant force balance. Force balance then appears to be a precarious and unsteady component of international security. He commented the challenges of disarmament, recalled some arguments for a nuclear disarmament. Then he discussed what would be an arms control with or without disarmament (either nuclear or conventional)

  8. Plain abdominal film and abdominal ultrasound in intestine occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plain film of the abdomen is widely used in the diagnostic evaluation of intestinal occlusion. Even though this technique can yield a panoramic and high-resolution view of gas-filled intestinal loops, several factors, such as type and duration of occlusion, neurovascular status of the intestine and general patient condition, may reduce the diagnostic specificy of the plain film relative to the organic or functional nature of the occlusion. From 1987 to 1989, fifty-four patients with intestinal occlusion were studied combining plain abdominal film with abdominal ultrasound (US). This was done in order to evaluate whether the additional information obtained from US could be of value in better determining the nature of the ileus. US evaluation was guided by the information already obtained from plain film which better demonstrates gas-filled loops. The results show that in all 27 cases of dynamic ileus (intestinal ischemia, acute appendicitis, acute cholecistis, acute pancreatitis or blunt abdominal trauma) US demonstrates: intestinal loops slightly increased in caliber, with liquid content, or loops containing rare hyperechoic particles, intestinal wall thickening and no peristalsis. In 27 cases of acute, chronic or complicated mechanical ileus (adhesions, internal hernia, intestinal neoplasm, peritoneal seedings) US shows: 1) in acute occlusion: hyperperistaltic intestinal loops containing inhomogeneous liquid; 2) in chronic occlusion: liquid content with a solid echigenic component; 3) in complicated occlusion: liquid stasis, frequent increase in wall thickness, moderate peritoneal effusion and inefficient peristalsis. In conclusion, based on the obtained data, the authors feel that the combination of plain abdominal film and abdominal US can be useful in the work-up of patient with intestinal occlusion. The information provided by US allows a better definition of the nature of the ileus

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... gallbladder spleen pancreas intestines kidneys bladder testicles ovaries uterus Abdominal ultrasound images can be used to help ... that is being examined to the transducer (the device used to examine the patient), as well ... is not a medical facility. Please contact your physician with specific medical ...

  10. Sequential PTA of abdominal aorta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case of sequential dilatation of a subtotal stenosis of the abdominal aorta in a young subject is reported. Initial and long-term success of the procedure is recorded using haemodynamic evaluation and intravenous digital subtraction angiography (IV-DSA) follow-up on an outpatient basis. In addition, the significance of biplane aortography with IV-DSA is illustrated. (orig.)

  11. Dehydration related abdominal pain (drap)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To describe the frequency of dehydration as a medical cause of acute abdomen. Subjects and Methods: All the patients reporting with abdominal pain to the surgical outpatient department or the emergency department were reviewed in the study. The clinical findings in all these cases were studied along with the mode of their management and outcome. Results: Of all the patients presenting with abdominal pain, 3.3% (n=68) were suffering from dehydration related abdominal pain. They were predominantly males in a ratio of 8.7: 1, mostly in the 2nd and 3rd decades of their lives. All these cases were suffering from acute or chronic dehydration were provisionally diagnosed by general practitioners as 'acute abdomen' and referred for surgical consultation. Associated symptoms included vomiting in 42.6%, backache in 91.2%, headache in 95.6%, and pain in lower limbs in 97.1 % of the cases. 83.8% required indoor management with intravenous fluids. All the patients became asymptomatic with rehydration therapy. Conclusion: Dehydration is a possible cause of severe abdominal pain. There is a need to educate the general public about the benefits of adequate fluid intake. (author)

  12. Computed tomography of abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdominal lesions following an accident or surgical interventions are becoming more frequently indications for investigations by computed tomography. Changes of spleen, liver, kidneys, pancreas, and of the retroperitoneal space are discussed. Advantages of computed tomography compared to other investigative methods are shown. (orig.)

  13. CT diagnosis of abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography (CT) findings from 95 patients with blunt abdominal trauma were evaluated. Among them, there was no false negative case. It can thus be said that if CT is negative the patient can be treated conservatively. The efficacy of CT in diagnosing injuries of various organs was also evaluated. (author)

  14. Tuberculous tenosynovitis of the wrist: MRI findings in three patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sueyoshi, E. [Department of Radiology, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, 1-7-1 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852 (Japan); Uetani, M. [Department of Radiology, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, 1-7-1 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852 (Japan); Hayashi, K. [Department of Radiology, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, 1-7-1 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852 (Japan); Kohzaki, S. [Nagasaki Municipal Hospital, Nagasaki (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    We report recent MRI findings in patients with tuberculous tenosynovitis of the wrist. Marked synovial thickening around the flexor tendons and fluid in the tendon sheath were clearly shown on MRI. Post-contrast study was useful in distinguishing the thick tenosynovium from the surrounding structures and fluid in the tendon sheath. The well-enhanced tenosynovium was also seen in the carpal tunnel in all cases. On the basis of these findings, we could easily distinguish tenosynovitis from other soft-tissue-mass lesions, such as tumors or infected ganglia. Tuberculous tenosynovitis is often not diagnosed early, and its differentiation from soft tissue tumors may be clinically difficult. MRI, particularly post-contrast study, is useful for early diagnosis of, and planning treatment for, tuberculous tenosynovitis. (orig.). With 3 figs.

  15. The image appearances of intraosseous ganglion of the wrist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To observe the imaging features of intraosseous ganglion of the wrist. Methods: The radiographs (6 cases), CT (4 cases), and MR (1 case) in 6 cases (7 lesions) of surgically confirmed intraosseous ganglion were retrospectively reviewed. Results: Typical intraosseous ganglion was seen as sharp margined and cystic lesion with the size of approximately 0.5 cm in diameter. All but one lesion showed no communication with joint. No degenerative changes were seen in the joints nearby. CT was able to depict the lesions better than radiographs in 4 cases. Intraosseous ganglion was seen as slight low signal on T1WI and slight high signal on T2WI MR images. Conclusion: Intraosseous ganglion was typically seen as sharp-margined and cystic lesion on radiographs, and it could be better demonstrated with CT and MR. With typical imaging appearance, a suggestion to the diagnosis of intraosseous ganglion could be made

  16. The post-arthro-CT of the wrist: clinical evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the diagnostic effectiveness of post-arthro-CT (PACT) and 3-compartment wrist arthrography (AG) both separate and combined versus wrist arthroscopy for scapho-lunate ligament (SLL), luno-triquetral ligament (LTL) and triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) defects and chondromalacia of the carpal bones. Material and methods: in 58 patients (16-69 years) the affected wrist was examined initially by conventional 3-compartment wrist arthrography with digital subtraction technique during injection followed by digital stress images. Afterwards spiral arthro-CT was performed in the semi-coronal and axial plane with 1 mm slice thickness and secondary true-coronal and sagittal reconstructions. Within 1 month arthroscopy was performed in general anesthesia utilizing standard joint entry points combined with routine digital picture archiving. All examinations were evaluated for SLL, LTL and TFC defects, PACT and AS for ChM too. Results: AG versus AS: the following detection rates were observed (AG and AS positive/AG negative - AS positive/AG positive - AS negative/ AG and AS negative): SLL: 16/8/0/34, LTL: 13/4/8/33, TFC: 28/5/1/24. Using AS as the 'gold standard' this translates into following sensitivity (%) and specificity (%) values: SLL 67/100, LTL 76/80, TFC 85/96. PACT versus AS: the following detection rates were observed (PACT and AS positive/PACT negative - AS positive/PACT positive - AS negative/ PACT and AS negative): SLL: 18/6/0/34, LTL: 15/2/8/33, TFC: 31/2/2/23, ChM: 20/15/3/20. Using AS as the 'gold standard' this translates into following sensitivity (%) and specificity (%) values: SLL 75/100, LTL 88/80, TFC 94/92, ChM 57/87. AG+PACT versus AS: the following detection rates were observed (AG+PACT and AS positive/AG+PACT negative - AS positive/AG+PACT positive - AS negative/ AG+PACT and AS negative): SLL: 19/5/0/34, LTL: 15/2/8/33, TFC: 31/2/2/23, ChM 20/15/3/20. Using AS as the 'gold standard' this translates into following sensitivity (%) and specificity

  17. Interstitial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 3. Fetal pathology and exclusion of the gene for beta-galactosidase-1 (GLB-1) from 3(p11----p14.2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Jens Michael; Coerdt, W; Hahnemann, N;

    1988-01-01

    A de novo interstitial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 3 was prenatally diagnosed in a male fetus, karyotype 46,XY,del(3)(pter----p14.2::p11----qter). The fetus had craniofacial dysmorphisms, a single transverse palmar crease, ulnar deviation in the wrists, cardiovascular anomalies, a...

  18. Abdominal pain - children under age 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stomach pain in children; Pain - abdomen - children; Abdominal cramps in children; Belly ache in children ... When your child complains of abdominal pain, see if they can describe ... kinds of pain: Generalized pain or pain over more than half ...

  19. Preoperative steroid in abdominal wall reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian Kiim; Brøndum, Tina Lee; Belhage, Bo;

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Preoperative administration of high-dose glucocorticoid leads to improved recovery and decreased length of stay after abdominal surgery. Even so, studies on administration of glucocorticoids for patients undergoing abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR) for giant ventral hernia repair ...

  20. Post-traumatic Median Nerve Neuroma in Wrist. A Case Report and brief review of Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmet Aslan; Mehmet Nuri Konya; Serdar Sargın

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Distal median nerve masses may be developed post-traumatic or non-traumatic. In this paper, we aim to present a 52 year old female case with a postraumatic neuroma of the median nerve in the left wrist. Case Report: A 52-year-old female patient had accidental incised wound over her left wrist which was primarily sutured. She presented 6 months later with unrelieved pain and growing swelling at the wrist. USG showed solid mass of size 2×3 cms. Intraoperatively the mass was see...

  1. MRI Evaluation of Soft Tissue Masses in the Hand and Wrist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Radmehr

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available MRI has a significant role in the diagnosis and as-sessment of soft tissue masses in the hand and wrist. Radiograph and CT scan remain useful in some cases. However, the potential detection rate and high soft tissue contrast resolution permit a valuable and more significant role for MRI in the evaluation and in certain cases tissue characterization of soft tissue masses in the hand and wrist. "nIn this session we would like to discuss MRI features and findings of the common soft tissue tumors in the hand and wrist.

  2. The state of art of MRI research on the wrist in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early diagnosis and treatment are essential for improving the outcome of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). New MRI and new scoring system, making precise and quantitative diagnosis and evaluation of RA, can be complementary to laboratory test. Wrist, metacarpophalangeal joint, carpometacarpal joint and interphalangeal joint are most often affected in RA. Early MRI features of RA include synovitis, bone marrow edema. erosions and cartilage loss. MRI can detect early signs of RA in wrist with high sensitivity and accuracy, and can easily and quantitatively monitor lesion response to the treatments. In this review, we summarized values of the wrist MRI in early diagnosis, quantitative analysis and prognosis of RA. (authors)

  3. Wrist flexion as an adjunct to the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunnan, J B; Waylonis, G W

    1991-03-01

    The effects of five minutes of wrist flexion on median motor and sensory evoked potential latencies in 87 individuals were studied. Nineteen subjects had carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) as diagnosed by increased median nerve latencies across the wrist, and 68 had values in the normal range and were assigned to the control group. A slight prolongation of up to 0.5m sec of evoked potential latencies was observed in both groups after flexion, but the differences between the two groups were not significant to establish the value of adding wrist flexion to conventional screening methods. PMID:1998456

  4. ADULT ABDOMINAL WALL HERNIA IN IBADAN

    OpenAIRE

    Ayandipo, O.O; Afuwape, O.O.; Irabor, D. O.; Abdurrazzaaq, A.I.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Abdominal wall hernias are very common diseases encountered in surgical practice. Groin hernia is the commonest type of abdominal wall hernias. There are several methods of hernia repair but tension-free repair (usually with mesh) offers the least recurrent rate. Aim: To describe the clinical profile of anterior abdominal wall hernias and our experience in the surgical management of identified hernias Method: The project was a retrospective study of all patients with abdominal wal...

  5. A clinical decision rule for the use of plain radiography in children after acute wrist injury: development and external validation of the Amsterdam Pediatric Wrist Rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In most hospitals, children with acute wrist trauma are routinely referred for radiography. To develop and validate a clinical decision rule to decide whether radiography in children with wrist trauma is required. We prospectively developed and validated a clinical decision rule in two study populations. All children who presented in the emergency department of four hospitals with pain following wrist trauma were included and evaluated for 18 clinical variables. The outcome was a wrist fracture diagnosed by plain radiography. Included in the study were 787 children. The prediction model consisted of six variables: age, swelling of the distal radius, visible deformation, distal radius tender to palpation, anatomical snuffbox tender to palpation, and painful or abnormal supination. The model showed an area under the receiver operator characteristics curve of 0.79 (95% CI: 0.76-0.83). The sensitivity and specificity were 95.9% and 37.3%, respectively. The use of this model would have resulted in a 22% absolute reduction of radiographic examinations. In a validation study, 7/170 fractures (4.1%, 95% CI: 1.7-8.3%) would have been missed using the decision model. The decision model may be a valuable tool to decide whether radiography in children after wrist trauma is required. (orig.)

  6. A clinical decision rule for the use of plain radiography in children after acute wrist injury: development and external validation of the Amsterdam Pediatric Wrist Rules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaar, Annelie; Maas, Mario; Rijn, Rick R. van [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Centre, Meibergdreef 9, 1105, AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Walenkamp, Monique M.J.; Bentohami, Abdelali; Goslings, J.C. [University of Amsterdam, Trauma Unit, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Steyerberg, Ewout W. [Erasmus MC - University Medical Centre, Department of Public Health, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Jager, L.C. [University of Amsterdam, Emergency Department, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sosef, Nico L. [Spaarne Hospital, Department of Surgery, Hoofddorp (Netherlands); Velde, Romuald van [Tergooi Hospitals, Department of Surgery, Hilversum (Netherlands); Ultee, Jan M. [Sint Lucas Andreas Hospital, Department of Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schep, Niels W.L. [University of Amsterdam, Trauma Unit, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Maasstadziekenhuis Rotterdam, Department of Surgery, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-01-15

    In most hospitals, children with acute wrist trauma are routinely referred for radiography. To develop and validate a clinical decision rule to decide whether radiography in children with wrist trauma is required. We prospectively developed and validated a clinical decision rule in two study populations. All children who presented in the emergency department of four hospitals with pain following wrist trauma were included and evaluated for 18 clinical variables. The outcome was a wrist fracture diagnosed by plain radiography. Included in the study were 787 children. The prediction model consisted of six variables: age, swelling of the distal radius, visible deformation, distal radius tender to palpation, anatomical snuffbox tender to palpation, and painful or abnormal supination. The model showed an area under the receiver operator characteristics curve of 0.79 (95% CI: 0.76-0.83). The sensitivity and specificity were 95.9% and 37.3%, respectively. The use of this model would have resulted in a 22% absolute reduction of radiographic examinations. In a validation study, 7/170 fractures (4.1%, 95% CI: 1.7-8.3%) would have been missed using the decision model. The decision model may be a valuable tool to decide whether radiography in children after wrist trauma is required. (orig.)

  7. Abdominal shotgun trauma: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Toutouzas, Konstantinos G; Larentzakis, Andreas; Drimousis, Panagiotis; Riga, Maria; Theodorou, Dimitrios; Katsaragakis, Stylianos

    2008-01-01

    Introduction One of the most lethal mechanisms of injury is shotgun wound and particularly the abdominal one. Case presentation We report a case of a 45 years old male suffering abdominal shotgun trauma, who survived his injuries. Conclusion The management of the abdominal shotgun wounds is mainly dependent on clinical examination and clinical judgment, while requires advanced surgical skills.

  8. Mechanical Design, Control Choices and first Return of Use of a Prosthetic Arm

    CERN Document Server

    Thomann, Guillaume

    2007-01-01

    In the world of upper limb prostheses, few companies dominate the majority of the market. They propose different kinds of hand, wrist and elbow prostheses but their control is often difficult to understand by the patients. We have decided to develop new myoelectric prosthetic arm (elbow, wrist and hand) by axing our development on the use of new technologies and facility of use for the patient. In this paper, we are explaining in details the different kinds of prostheses currently proposed to the amputees, their advantages and their drawbacks, the descriptions of the patients' needs and the possible improvements of the product. We will develop the designing choices of our prosthesis and the movements it can realize. Then we will explain the simplified control of the product by the patient and its first reactions. Finally, we will conclude by the news ideas and the next researches to concretize.

  9. Radiation Exposure of Abdominal Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PurposeTo evaluate patients radiation exposure of abdominal C-arm cone beam computed tomography (CBCT).MethodsThis prospective study was approved by the institutional review board; written, informed consent was waived. Radiation exposure of abdominal CBCT was evaluated in 40 patients who underwent CBCT during endovascular interventions. Dose area product (DAP) of CBCT was documented and effective dose (ED) was estimated based on organ doses using dedicated Monte Carlo simulation software with consideration of X-ray field location and patients’ individual body weight and height. Weight-dependent ED per DAP conversion factors were calculated. CBCT radiation dose was compared to radiation dose of procedural fluoroscopy. CBCT dose-related risk for cancer was assessed.ResultsMean ED of abdominal CBCT was 4.3 mSv (95 % confidence interval [CI] 3.9; 4.8 mSv, range 1.1–7.4 mSv). ED was significantly higher in the upper than in the lower abdomen (p = 0.003) and increased with patients’ weight (r = 0.55, slope = 0.045 mSv/kg, p < 0.001). Radiation exposure of CBCT corresponded to the radiation exposure of on average 7.2 fluoroscopy minutes (95 % CI 5.5; 8.8 min) in the same region of interest. Lifetime risk of exposure related cancer death was 0.033 % or less depending on age and weight.ConclusionsMean ED of abdominal CBCT was 4.3 mSv depending on X-ray field location and body weight

  10. Radiation Exposure of Abdominal Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sailer, Anna M., E-mail: anni.sailer@mumc.nl [Maastricht University Medical Centre (MUMC), Department of Radiology (Netherlands); Schurink, Geert Willem H., E-mail: gwh.schurink@mumc.nl [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Surgery (Netherlands); Wildberger, Joachim E., E-mail: j.wildberger@mumc.nl; Graaf, Rick de, E-mail: r.de.graaf@mumc.nl; Zwam, Willem H. van, E-mail: w.van.zwam@mumc.nl; Haan, Michiel W. de, E-mail: m.de.haan@mumc.nl; Kemerink, Gerrit J., E-mail: gerrit.kemerink@mumc.nl; Jeukens, Cécile R. L. P. N., E-mail: cecile.jeukens@mumc.nl [Maastricht University Medical Centre (MUMC), Department of Radiology (Netherlands)

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo evaluate patients radiation exposure of abdominal C-arm cone beam computed tomography (CBCT).MethodsThis prospective study was approved by the institutional review board; written, informed consent was waived. Radiation exposure of abdominal CBCT was evaluated in 40 patients who underwent CBCT during endovascular interventions. Dose area product (DAP) of CBCT was documented and effective dose (ED) was estimated based on organ doses using dedicated Monte Carlo simulation software with consideration of X-ray field location and patients’ individual body weight and height. Weight-dependent ED per DAP conversion factors were calculated. CBCT radiation dose was compared to radiation dose of procedural fluoroscopy. CBCT dose-related risk for cancer was assessed.ResultsMean ED of abdominal CBCT was 4.3 mSv (95 % confidence interval [CI] 3.9; 4.8 mSv, range 1.1–7.4 mSv). ED was significantly higher in the upper than in the lower abdomen (p = 0.003) and increased with patients’ weight (r = 0.55, slope = 0.045 mSv/kg, p < 0.001). Radiation exposure of CBCT corresponded to the radiation exposure of on average 7.2 fluoroscopy minutes (95 % CI 5.5; 8.8 min) in the same region of interest. Lifetime risk of exposure related cancer death was 0.033 % or less depending on age and weight.ConclusionsMean ED of abdominal CBCT was 4.3 mSv depending on X-ray field location and body weight.

  11. Macrobend optical sensing for pose measurement in soft robot arms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sareh, Sina; Noh, Yohan; Li, Min; Ranzani, Tommaso; Liu, Hongbin; Althoefer, Kaspar

    2015-12-01

    This paper introduces a pose-sensing system for soft robot arms integrating a set of macrobend stretch sensors. The macrobend sensory design in this study consists of optical fibres and is based on the notion that bending an optical fibre modulates the intensity of the light transmitted through the fibre. This sensing method is capable of measuring bending, elongation and compression in soft continuum robots and is also applicable to wearable sensing technologies, e.g. pose sensing in the wrist joint of a human hand. In our arrangement, applied to a cylindrical soft robot arm, the optical fibres for macrobend sensing originate from the base, extend to the tip of the arm, and then loop back to the base. The connectors that link the fibres to the necessary opto-electronics are all placed at the base of the arm, resulting in a simplified overall design. The ability of this custom macrobend stretch sensor to flexibly adapt its configuration allows preserving the inherent softness and compliance of the robot which it is installed on. The macrobend sensing system is immune to electrical noise and magnetic fields, is safe (because no electricity is needed at the sensing site), and is suitable for modular implementation in multi-link soft continuum robotic arms. The measurable light outputs of the proposed stretch sensor vary due to bend-induced light attenuation (macrobend loss), which is a function of the fibre bend radius as well as the number of repeated turns. The experimental study conducted as part of this research revealed that the chosen bend radius has a far greater impact on the measured light intensity values than the number of turns (if greater than five). Taking into account that the bend radius is the only significantly influencing design parameter, the macrobend stretch sensors were developed to create a practical solution to the pose sensing in soft continuum robot arms. Henceforward, the proposed sensing design was benchmarked against an electromagnetic

  12. Detecting Illegal Arms Trade

    OpenAIRE

    DellaVigna, Stefano; Ferrara, Eliana La

    2010-01-01

    Illegal arms are responsible for thousands of deaths in civil wars every year. Yet, their trade is very hard to detect. We propose a method to statistically detect illegal arms trade based on the investor knowledge embedded in financial markets. We focus on eight countries under UN arms embargo in the period 1990-2005, and analyze eighteen events during the embargo that suddenly increase or decrease conflict intensity. If the weapon-making companies are not trading or are trading legally, an ...

  13. Biomechanical evaluation of wrist-driven flexor hinge orthosis in persons with spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeoun-Seung Kang, MD, PhD, CPO

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The wrist-driven flexor hinge orthosis (WDFHO is a device used to restore hand function in persons with tetraplegic spinal cord injury by furnishing three-point prehension. We assessed the effectiveness and biomechanical properties of the WDFHO in 24 persons with cervical 6 or 7 tetraplegia who have severely impaired hand function. This study introduces a mechanical operating model to assess the efficiency of the WDFHO. Experimental results showed that pinch force increased significantly (p < 0.001 after using the WDFHO and was found to positively correlate with the strength of wrist extensor muscles (r = 0.41, p < 0.001. However, when the strength of the wrist extensors acting on the WDFHO was greater, the reciprocal wrist and finger motion that generates three-point prehension was less effective (r = 0.79, p < 0.001. Reliable and valid biomechanical evaluation of the WDFHO could improve our understanding of its biomechanics.

  14. EMPress: Practical Hand Gesture Classification with Wrist-Mounted EMG and Pressure Sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIntosh, Jess; McNeill, Charlie; Fraser, Mike;

    2016-01-01

    Practical wearable gesture tracking requires that sensors align with existing ergonomic device forms. We show that combining EMG and pressure data sensed only at the wrist can support accurate classification of hand gestures. A pilot study with unintended EMG electrode pressure variability led to...... exploration of the approach in greater depth. The EMPress technique senses both finger movements and rotations around the wrist and forearm, covering a wide range of gestures, with an overall 10-fold cross validation classification accuracy of 96%. We show that EMG is especially suited to sensing finger...... movements, that pressure is suited to sensing wrist and forearm rotations, and their combination is significantly more accurate for a range of gestures than either technique alone. The technique is well suited to existing wearable device forms such as smart watches that are already mounted on the wrist....

  15. Constant angular velocity of the wrist during the lifting of a sphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, P H; Metcalf, C D; Burridge, J H; Yule, V T; Pickering, R M

    2010-05-01

    The primary objective of the experiments was to investigate the wrist motion of a person while they were carrying out a prehensile task from a clinical hand function test. A six-camera movement system was used to observe the wrist motion of 10 participants. A very light sphere and a heavy sphere were used in the experiments to study any mass effects. While seated at a table, a participant moved a sphere over a small obstacle using their dominant hand. The participants were observed to move their wrist at a constant angular velocity. This phenomenon has not been reported previously. Theoretically, the muscles of the wrist provide an impulse of force at the start of the rotation while the forearm maintains a constant vertical force on a sphere. Light-heavy mean differences for the velocities, absolute velocities, angles and times taken showed no significant differences (p = 0.05). PMID:20233128

  16. Clinical Study on the Wrist-Ankle Acupuncture Treatment for 30 Cases of Diabetic Peripheral Neuritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the mechanisms of wrist-ankle acupuncture for prevention and treatment of diabetic peripheral neuritis. Methods: Ninety cases of diabetic peripheral neuritis were randomly divided into 3groups, and treated respectively with wrist-ankle acupuncture, body-acupuncture, and the western routine medical treatment, with 30 cases in each of the groups; and therapeutic effects and laboratory results compared. Results: It is proved that the therapeutic effects of the wrist-ankle acupuncture group and body acupuncture group were significantly superior to those of the control group, with no significant differences between the former two groups. Conclusion: Wrist-ankle acupuncture has the actions of improving the metabolisms of blood sugar and blood-lipid, lowering down blood viscosity, and restoring the functions of peripheral nerve cells, thus giving definite therapeutic effects for diabetic peripheral neuritis.

  17. Application of a three-dimensional computational wrist model to proximal row carpectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne, Jennifer S; Mir, Afsarul Q

    2015-06-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) computational model of the wrist examined the biomechanical effects of the proximal row carpectomy (PRC), a surgical treatment of certain wrist degenerative conditions but with functional consequences. Model simulations, replicating the 3D bony anatomy, soft tissue restraints, muscle loading, and applied perturbations, demonstrated quantitatively accurate responses for the decreased motions subsequent to the surgical procedure. It also yielded some knowledge of alterations in radiocarpal contact force which likely increase contact pressure as well as additional insight into the importance of the triangular fibrocartilage complex and retinacular/capsular structures for stabilizing the deficient wrist. As better understanding of the wrist joint is achieved, this model could serve as a useful clinical tool. PMID:25710135

  18. Wrist Injuries in Elderly Women is Overlooked when Using X-ray in Comparison to MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckmann, Johan Høising; Brix, Lau; Nielsen, Randi

    strength, lower mobility andincreased risk of degenerative joint disease. The standard approach fordiagnosing fractures or injuries of the ligaments is by conventional X-ray. Ifno pathology can be established and there is a suspected scaphoid bone fracturea supplemental MRI of the wrist is performed. The...... MRI often show pathology inthe wrist which is not visible on X-ray. The purposeof this project was to evaluate how often the supplemental MRI of the wrist wasable to demonstrate pathology which was invisible using standard X-ray.   Subjects& Methods: Forty women were included in the study (mean age......Introduction:Women aged 50 and above have a reduced bone density which increases the risk ofwrist injuries when exposed to traumas. Diagnosing wrist fractures and strainsof the ligaments is important as a delay may lead to a prolonged healingprocess, permanent pain problems, reduced gripping...

  19. Imaging of Sports-related Hand and Wrist Injuries: Sports Imaging Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockenpot, Eric; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Demondion, Xavier; Chantelot, Christophe; Cotten, Anne

    2016-06-01

    Hand and wrist injuries are common occurrences in amateur and professional sports and many of them are sport-specific. These can be divided into two categories: traumatic injuries and overuse injuries. The aim of this article is to review the most common hand and wrist sports-related lesions. Acute wrist injuries are predominantly bone fractures, such as those of the scaphoid, hamate hook, and ulnar styloid. Ligament lesions are more challenging for radiologists and may lead to carpal instability if undiagnosed. Overuse wrist injuries are mainly represented by tendinous disorders, with De Quervain syndrome and extensor carpi ulnaris tendon disorders being the most common among them; however, there are other possible disorders such as impaction syndromes, stress fractures, and neurovascular lesions. Finally, finger lesions, including closed-tendon injuries (mallet and boutonniere injuries, jersey finger, and boxer's knuckle), flexor pulley injuries, and skier's thumb, should also be detected. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:27183404

  20. The effects of ball impact location and grip tightness on the arm, racquet and ball for one-handed tennis backhand groundstrokes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Mark A; Kentel, Behzat B; Mitchell, Sean R

    2012-04-01

    A torque-driven, 3D computer simulation model of an arm-racquet system was used to investigate the effects of ball impact location and grip tightness on the arm, racquet and ball during one-handed tennis backhand groundstrokes. The stringbed was represented by nine point masses connected to each other and the racquet frame with elastic springs and three torsional spring-dampers between the hand and the racquet were used to represent grip tightness. For each perturbation of nine impact locations and grip tightness, simulations were run for a 50 ms period starting with ball-racquet impact. Simulations showed that during off-centre impacts below the longitudinal axis of the racquet, the wrist was forced to flex up to 16° more with up to six times more wrist extension torque when compared to a centre impact simulation. Perturbing grip tightness had no substantial effect on centre impact simulations. However, for off-centre impacts (below the longitudinal axis of the racquet) a tight grip condition resulted in a substantial decrease in racquet rotation within the hand (less than 2°) and an increase of 6° in wrist flexion angle when compared to the equivalent simulation with a normal grip. In addition there was approximately 20% more wrist extension torque when compared with equivalent off-centre impact simulation with a normal grip. Consequently off-centre impacts below the longitudinal axis of the racquet may be a substantial contributing factor for tennis elbow injuries with a tight grip aggravating the effect due to high eccentric wrist extension torques and forced wrist flexion. PMID:22325977

  1. Wrist Ultrasonography vs. Electrophysiological Studies in the Diagnosis of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirhossein Hashemi Attar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available   "nIntroduction: The carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is the most common entrapment neuropathy and is caused by compression of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel. It is characterized by pain or paresthesia in areas innervated by the median nerve. Electrophysiological studies are gold standard diagnostic tests for CTS. The objective of this study was to compare ultrasonography and electrophysiological studies in the diagnosis of CTS. "nMaterials and Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted on 100 wrists of 50 consecutive patients referred to 22-Bahman hospital (Mashhad with the clinical diagnosis of CTS from spring 2007 to summer 2008. These patients suspicious for CTS in at least one of their wrists (based on their complaints and neurological examination including Tinel’s test and Phallen test, were referred for electrophysiological studies including nerve conduction velocity and electromyography. All the patients underwent ultrasonography of both wrists within a week after electrophysiological studies. Ultrasonographies were performed by a radiologist using a high frequency (12 MHz linear probe (PHILIPS Envisor C. The cross sectional area of the median nerve was measured at the carpal tunnel. Measurements equal or more than 10 mm2 were considered as the CTS. Ultrasonographic findings and also clinical examination (Tinel’s test and Phalen’s test were compared with electrophysiological studies (as the gold standard diagnostic test for each wrist separately. "nResults: Of the 100 wrists (50 patients, 53 wrists were diagnosed as CTS based on the electrophysiological studies. Ninety one percent of the wrists with CTS were in female patients. The mean age was 52.1 years (23-75 years. There was no predisposing factor for most cases; however, 6% were affected by diabetes, 6% by hypertriglyceridemia, and 2% by hypothyroidism. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of clinical examination (Tinel’s test and Phalen’s test were 59%, 88

  2. How does arm positioning of polytraumatized patients in the initial computed tomography (CT) affect image quality and diagnostic accuracy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of different arm positions on abdominal image quality during initial whole-body CT (WBCT) in polytraumatized patients and to assess the risk of missing potentially life-threatening injuries due to arm artifacts. Materials and methods: Between July 2011 and February 2013, WBCT scans of 203 patients with arms in the abdominal area during initial WBCT were analyzed. Six different arms-down positions were defined: patients with both (group A)/one arm(s) (group B) down alongside the torso, patients with both (group C)/one arm(s) (group D) crossed in front of the upper abdomen, patients with both (group E)/one arm(s) (group F) crossed in front of the pelvic area. A group of 203 patients with elevated arms beside the head served as a control group. Two observers jointly evaluated image quality of different organ regions using a 4-point scale system. Follow-up examinations (CT scans and/or ultrasound) were analyzed to identify findings missed during initial WBCT due to reduced image quality. Results: Image quality for most of the organ regions analyzed was found to be significantly different among all groups (p < 0.05). Image quality was most severely degraded in group A, followed by groups E and C. Positioning with one arm up resulted in significantly better image quality than both arms down (p < 0.05). Overall, arms-up positioning showed significantly better image quality than arms-down positions (p < 0.05). In one case, liver hemorrhage missed in the initial WBCT because of arm artifacts, was revealed by follow-up CT. Conclusion: In WBCT arms-down positioning significantly degrades abdominal image quality and artifacts might even conceal potentially life-threatening injuries. If the patient's status does not allow elevation of both arms, image quality can benefit from raising at least one arm. Otherwise, arms should be placed in front of the upper abdomen instead of alongside the torso

  3. Intestinal contrasting in abdominal CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 56 patients undergoing abdominal CT the gastro-intestinal tract was defined by negative contrast instead of the conventional positive contrast from an iodine containing contrast medium. The contrast material was a 2 1/2% mannitol solution and was used for filling the rectum. Filling of the gastro-intestinal tract was of similar quality to that obtained with positve contrast media. The number of artifacts due to high contrast boundaries was slightly greater with the negative contrast than if would have been with positive contrast. Differentiation of the gastro-intestinal tract from other abdominal organs was equally good for both methods. The negative contrast method was poor in diagnosing cystic tumours but proved much better than positive contrast for evaluating the wall of the gastro-intestinal tract. (orig.)

  4. Sonography of blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonographic examination of the abdomen after blunt abdominal trauma represents a rapid and effective diagnostic method without bothering the patient. It has proved its value not only in the confirmation or exclusion of free fluid in the abdomen caused by liver of spleen rupture, but also in such cases actually it replaces peritoneal lavage or exploratory laparotomy. It is also qualified for diagnosis of intraparenchymal or subcapsular hemorrhages, intraperitoneal as well as retroperitoneal and for follow up. In particualr delayed bleedings including the risk of a retarded organ rupture can be detected early. A failure rate of 1.4% in 282 sonographically examined cases of blunt abdominal trauma further confirms the reliability of this method. (orig.)

  5. Acupuncture Treatment of Abdominal Pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡金生

    2002-01-01

    @@ Case History Mr. Li, a university student aged 23 years, paid his first visit on July 16, 2001, with the chief complaint of abdominal pain for one day. The patient stated that one day before when it happened to be the weekend, he got abdominal pain after supper, which went worse gradually and caused him to roll all over in bed. The pain was slightly alleviated half an hour later after he had taken some pain killers. Upon inquiry, the patient said that because of their newly graduation from the university, he and his classmates were so excited that they went to have a sumptuous lunch with alcoholic drinks. And in the evening he ate again a delicious supper cooked for him by his mother, after which he continued to have some fruit and dessert.

  6. Different evolutionary pathways underlie the morphology of wrist bones in hominoids

    OpenAIRE

    Kivell, Tracy L.; Barros, Anna P; JEROEN B. SMAERS

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND The hominoid wrist has been a focus of numerous morphological analyses that aim to better understand long-standing questions about the evolution of human and hominoid hand use. However, these same analyses also suggest various scenarios of complex and mosaic patterns of morphological evolution within the wrist and potentially multiple instances of homoplasy that would benefit from require formal analysis within a phylogenetic context.We identify morphological features that prin...

  7. Does wrist immobilization following open carpal tunnel release improve functional outcome? A literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Isaac, S. M.; Okoro, T.; Danial, I.; Wildin, C.

    2010-01-01

    Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) is a compressive neuropathy of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel. It is the most common peripheral entrapment neuropathy. The surgical management includes dividing the flexor retinaculum to decompress the median nerve. Post-operative mobilization of the wrist is controversial. Some surgeons splint the wrist for 2–4 weeks whilst others encourage early mobilization. The literature has been inconclusive as to which method is most beneficial. The purpose of this s...

  8. The Effect of Supination and Pronation on Wrist Range of Motion

    OpenAIRE

    Kane, Patrick M.; Vopat, Bryan G.; Got, Christopher; Mansuripur, Kaveh; Akelman, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Wrist range of motion (ROM) is a combination of complex osseous articulations and intricate soft tissue constraints. It has been proposed that forearm rotation contributes significantly to carpal kinematics. However, no studies have investigated whether supination or pronation influence this course of motion. The purpose of this study is to examine whether supination and pronation affect the mechanical axis of the wrist. After being screened for gross anatomic abnormalities, six upper extremi...

  9. A cadaveric study comparing the three approaches for ulnar nerve block at wrist

    OpenAIRE

    Rohit Varshney; Nidhi Sharma; Shraddha Malik; Sunny Malik

    2014-01-01

    Background: Ulnar nerve blockade as a component of wrist block is a promising technique for adequate anesthesia and analgesia for different surgeries of the hand. Due to anatomical variations in the location of ulnar nerve under the flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) a technique with good results and minimal complications are required. Aim: The aim of the following study is to compare the three techniques (volar, transtendinous volar [TTV] and ulnar) for ulnar nerve block at the wrist in human cadave...

  10. Biased wrist and finger coordination in Parkinsonian patients during performance of graphical tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dounskaia, Natalia; Van Gemmert, Arend W A; Leis, Berta C; Stelmach, George E

    2009-10-01

    Handwriting impairments in Parkinson's disease (PD) have been associated with micrographia, i.e. diminished letter size. However, dyscoordination of the wrist and fingers may also contribute to handwriting deterioration in PD. To investigate this hypothesis, right-handed PD patients and controls were tested in performance of three types of cyclic wrist and finger movements: drawing of two lines and a circle. The line drawing was performed with either simultaneous flexion and extension of the wrist and fingers (equivalent pattern resulting in a right-tilted line) or with wrist flexion/extension accompanied with finger extension/flexion (nonequivalent pattern resulting in a left-tilted line). Circle drawing required a specific phase difference between wrist and finger motions. Movements were performed with an inkless pen on a digitizer-tablet at two frequency levels. Consistent deformations of the circle into right-tilted ovals and lower variability in equivalent compared with nonequivalent lines revealed preference to produce right-tilted shapes. This preference became more apparent with increased movement speed and it was amplified in PD patients. Analysis revealed that the circle deformation emerged mainly due to reduction in relative phase, while wrist and finger amplitudes remained unchanged. The results suggest that PD causes deficit characterized by strong tendency to produce certain coordination patterns between wrist and finger motions. This deficit may significantly contribute to handwriting impairments in PD by reducing the dexterity in the production of the variety of shapes of the cursive letters. Furthermore, the deficiency revealed in wrist and finger coordination may represent a more general deficit affecting control of various multi-joint movements in PD. PMID:19410590

  11. Biased Wrist and Finger Coordination in Parkinsonian Patients during Performance of Graphical Tasks

    OpenAIRE

    Dounskaia, Natalia; Van Gemmert, Arend W.A.; Leis, Berta C; Stelmach, George E.

    2009-01-01

    Handwriting impairments in Parkinson’s disease (PD) have been associated with micrographia, i.e. diminished letter size. However, dyscoordination of the wrist and fingers may also contribute to handwriting deterioration in PD. To investigate this hypothesis, right-handed PD patients and controls were tested in performance of three types of cyclic wrist and finger movements: drawing of two lines and a circle. The line drawing was performed with either simultaneous flexion and extension of the ...

  12. Double Dart Technique of Instillation of Triamcinolone in Ganglion Over the Wrist

    OpenAIRE

    Dharmdas Paramhans; Dilip Nayak; Mathur, Raj K; Kushwah, K

    2010-01-01

    Background : Ganglia are the most common benign cystic swellings found over both the dorsal and volar aspects of the wrist. In spite of technical advancement, both operative and non-operative interventions achieve more or less similar results. Complete evacuation of gelatinous fluid followed with intra cystic instillation of triamcinolone has given encouraging results. Aims : To assess the efficacy and safety of drainage of cyst and instillation of triamcinolone in wrist ganglion. Ma...

  13. The importancy of finger extension test in the diagnosis of occult wrist ganglion

    OpenAIRE

    Kayalar, Murat; Vatansever, Aziz; Bal, Emin; Toros, Tulgar; Ozaksar, Kemal; Ada, Sait

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of diagnostic tools in comparison with surgical results of occult ganglion cyst of the wrist, which is one of the causes of chronic wrist pain. Methods: Twenty-five patients (4 males, 21 females; mean age 29 years; range 16 to 46 years) underwent surgery with an initial diagnosis of occult ganglion following unsuccessful conservative treatment. The mean symptom duration was 29 months (range 3 months to 10 years). Diagnosis was ...

  14. Functional Abdominal Bloating with Distention

    OpenAIRE

    Sullivan, Stephen Norman

    2012-01-01

    Ten to 25% of healthy persons experience bloating. It is particularly common in persons with the irritable bowel syndrome and constipation. While the cause of bloating remains unknown old explanations such as a excessive intestinal gas, exaggerated lumbar lordosis and psychiatric problems have been disproved. New suggestions include recent weight gain, weak or inappropriately relaxed abdominal muscles, an inappropriately contracted diaphragm and retained fluid in loops of distal small bowel. ...

  15. CT of abdominal blunt trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied CT findings and interventional radiology including therapeutic procedures in 43 cases with abdominal blunt trauma, retrospectively. All of parenchymal organ's injuries, and injuries of duodenum and retroperitoneum were correctly diagnosed by CT. In 14 cases with only hemoperitoneum or no positive findings on CT, 4 cases were jejunal perforations, and remaining 10 cases were conservatively treated and relieved. We have to take care that the similar CT findings include the opposite results to need surgery and not. (author)

  16. [A case of abdominal wall actinomycosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Jin Soo; Cho, Hyeong Jun; Choi, Seung Bong; Cheung, Dae Young; Kim, Jin Il; Lee, In Kyu

    2015-04-01

    Actinomycosis is a chronic suppurative granulomatous infectious disease caused by actinomyces species that is characterized by formation of characteristic clumps called as sulfur granules. Abdominal actinomycosis is a rare disease and is often difficult to diagnose before operation. Abdominal actinomycosis infiltrating into the abdominal wall and adhering to the colon is even rarer. Most abdominal actinomycosis develops after operation, trauma or inflammatory bowel disease, and is also considered as an opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patient with underlying malignancy, diabetes mellitus, human immunodeficiency virus infection, etc. Actinomycosis is diagnosed based on histologic demonstration of sulfur granules in surgically resected specimen or pus, and treatment consists of long-term penicillin based antibiotics therapy with or without surgical resection. Herein, we report an unusual case of abdominal wall actinomycosis which developed in a patient after acupuncture and presented as abdominal wall mass that was first mistaken for abdominal wall invasion of diverticulum perforation. PMID:25896158

  17. Abdominal wound closure: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams ZF

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Zachary F Williams, William W Hope Department of Surgery, South East Area Health Education Center, New Hanover Regional Medical Center, Wilmington, NC, USA Abstract: This review examines both early and late wound complications following laparotomy closure, with particular emphasis on technical aspects that reduce hernia formation. Abdominal fascial closure is an area of considerable variation within the field of general surgery. The formation of hernias following abdominal wall incisions continues to be a challenging problem. Ventral hernia repairs are among the most common surgeries performed by general surgeons, and despite many technical advances in the field, incisional hernia rates remain high. Much attention and research has been directed to the surgical management of hernias. Less focus has been placed on prevention of hernia formation despite its obvious importance. This review examines the effects of factors such as the type of incision, suture type and size, closure method, patient risk factors, and the use of prophylactic mesh. Keywords: incisional, abdominal, hernia, prevention, wound closure techniques 

  18. Acute Abdominal Pain in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reust, Carin E; Williams, Amy

    2016-05-15

    Acute abdominal pain accounts for approximately 9% of childhood primary care office visits. Symptoms and signs that increase the likelihood of a surgical cause for pain include fever, bilious vomiting, bloody diarrhea, absent bowel sounds, voluntary guarding, rigidity, and rebound tenderness. The age of the child can help focus the differential diagnosis. In infants and toddlers, clinicians should consider congenital anomalies and other causes, including malrotation, hernias, Meckel diverticulum, or intussusception. In school-aged children, constipation and infectious causes of pain, such as gastroenteritis, colitis, respiratory infections, and urinary tract infections, are more common. In female adolescents, clinicians should consider pelvic inflammatory disease, pregnancy, ruptured ovarian cysts, or ovarian torsion. Initial laboratory tests include complete blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate or C-reactive protein, urinalysis, and a pregnancy test. Abdominal radiography can be used to diagnose constipation or obstruction. Ultrasonography is the initial choice in children for the diagnosis of cholecystitis, pancreatitis, ovarian cyst, ovarian or testicular torsion, pelvic inflammatory disease, pregnancy-related pathology, and appendicitis. Appendicitis is the most common cause of acute abdominal pain requiring surgery, with a peak incidence during adolescence. When the appendix is not clearly visible on ultrasonography, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging can be used to confirm the diagnosis. PMID:27175718

  19. Wrist joint moments of walker-assisted gait:a study of biomechanics and instrumentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    While walkers are commonly prescribed to improve patient stability and ambulatory ability,quantitativestudy of the biomechanical and functional requirements for effective walker use is limited.To investigate the changesin wrist joint moments that occur with the use of a standard walker,a strain gauge-based walker instrumentation system was developed for the measurement of wrist joint moments.This walker dynamometer was integrated with an upper extremity biomechanical model.Preliminary system data were collected for twelve healthy,right-handed young adultsfollowing informed consent.Bilateral upper extremity kinematic data were acquired with a six-camera motion analysis system.Internal joint moments at the wrist were determined in the three clinical planes using the inverse dynamics method.Results showed that during a walker-assisted gait there were several typical demands of wrist abductor,adductor,flexor and external rotator.An interesting " bare phase " of wrist joint moments was also found in phaseangle[-30°,30°] of gait cycle.Complete description of wrist joint moments during walker-assisted gait may provide insight into walker use parameters and rehabilitative strategies.

  20. Ulnar sided wrist pain and distal radioulnar joint osteoarthritis; is surgical arthroplasty enough?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronit Wollstein

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ arthritis is a common cause of ulnar wrist pain in rheumatoid and osteoarthritis. Modified arthroplasty for the DRUJ is a minimally invasive procedure for the treatment of isolated DRUJ osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the procedure and the incidence of related ulnar wrist pathology as well as the incidence of subsequent ulnar wrist surgeries. All patients having modified arthroplasty for the DRUJ between 1994-2008 were retrospectively reviewed. Measurements included range of motion, grip strength, and subjective status. Data regarding other wrist surgeries was recorded. There were 29 patients, 23 of which had a follow-up of over 8 weeks (average 16 months (SD=24. Fourteen patients had no to minimal pain, 6 had pain with heavier activities (2 severe, and 2 reported constant pain at the surgical site. Of the 4 more painful patients, three had additional surgery after the DRUJ arthroplasty. In all 96% of the patients had another procedure involving the ulnar- wrist complex either prior to surgery, at the time of surgery or following surgery for modified arthroplasty. We suggest that pathology involving the ulnar-wrist complex is often a syndrome consisting of multiple related diagnoses including but not limited to arthritis of the DRUJ. Multiple procedures may be needed, or a more aggressive approach such as ulnar head replacement may be indicated so that pathology at both the distal radioulnar and ulnocarpal joints is addressed concomitantly.

  1. WRIST FORCE SENSOR'S DYNAMIC PERFORMANCE CALIBRATION BASED ON NEGATIVE STEP RESPONSE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Hongmei

    2008-01-01

    Negative step response experimental method is used in wrist force sensor's dynamic performance calibration. The exciting manner of negative step response method is the same as wrist force sensor's load in working. This experimental method needn't special experiment equipments. Experiment's dynamic repeatability is good. So wrist force sensor's dynamic performance is suitable to be calibrated by negative step response method. A new correlation wavelet transfer method is studied. By wavelet transfer method, the signal is decomposed into two dimensional spaces of time-frequency. So the problem of negative step exciting energy concentrating in the low frequency band is solved. Correlation wavelet transfer doesn't require that wavelet primary function be orthogonal and needn't wavelet reconstruction. So analyzing efficiency is high. An experimental bench is designed and manufactured to load the wrist force sensor orthogonal excitation force/moment. A piezoelectric force sensor is used to setup soft trigger and calculate the value of negative step excitation. A wrist force sensor is calibrated. The pulse response function is calculated after negative step excitation and step response have been transformed to positive step excitation and step response. The pulse response function is transferred to frequency response function. The wrist force sensor's dynamic characteristics are identified by the frequency response function.

  2. A structurally decoupled mechanism for measuring wrist torque in three degrees of freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Lizhi; Yang, Zhen; Zhang, Dingguo

    2015-10-01

    The wrist joint is a critical part of the human body for movement. Measuring the torque of the wrist with three degrees of freedom (DOFs) is important in some fields, including rehabilitation, biomechanics, ergonomics, and human-machine interfacing. However, the particular structure of the wrist joint makes it difficult to measure the torque in all three directions simultaneously. This work develops a structurally decoupled instrument for measuring and improving the measurement accuracy of 3-DOF wrist torque during isometric contraction. Three single-axis torque sensors were embedded in a customized mechanical structure. The dimensions and components of the instrument were designed based on requirement of manufacturability. A prototype of the instrument was machined, assembled, integrated, and tested. The results show that the structurally decoupled mechanism is feasible for acquiring wrist torque data in three directions either independently or simultaneously. As a case study, we use the device to measure wrist torques concurrently with electromyography signal acquisition in preparation for simultaneous and proportional myoelectric control of prostheses.

  3. Urgent Abdominal Re-Explorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peskersoy Mustafa

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment of a number of complications that occur after abdominal surgeries may require that Urgent Abdominal Re-explorations (UARs, the life-saving and obligatory operations, are performed. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the reasons for performing UARs, outcomes of relaparotomies (RLs and factors that affect mortality. Methods Demographic characteristics; initial diagnoses; information from and complications of the first surgery received; durations and outcomes of UAR(s performed in patients who received early RLs because of complicated abdominal surgeries in our clinic between 01.01.2000 and 31.12.2004 were investigated retrospectively. Statistical analyses were done using the chi-square and Fisher exact tests. Results Early UAR was performed in 81 out of 4410 cases (1.8%. Average patient age was 50.46 (13–81 years with a male-to-female ratio of 60/21. Fifty one (62.96% patients had infection, 41 (50.61% of them had an accompanying serious disease, 24 (29.62% of them had various tumors and 57 (70.37% patients were operated under emergency conditions during first operation. Causes of urgent abdominal re-explorations were as follows: leakage from intestinal repair site or from anostomosis (n:34; 41.97%; hemorrhage (n:15; 18.51%; intestinal perforation (n:8; 9.87%; intraabdominal infection or abscess (n:8; 9.87%; progressive intestinal necrosis (n:7; 8.64%; stomal complications (n:5; 6.17%; and postoperative ileus (n:4; 4.93%. Two or more UARs were performed in 18 (22.22% cases, and overall mortality was 34.97% (n:30. Interval between the first laparotomy and UAR averaged as 6.95 (1–20 days, and average hospitalization period was 27.1 (3–78 days. Mortality rate was found to be higher among the patients who received multiple UARs. The most common (55.5% cause of mortality was sepsis/multiple organ failure (MOF. The rates for common mortality and sepsis/MOF-dependent mortality that occured following UAR were

  4. ARM Mentor Selection Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sisterson, D. L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program was created in 1989 with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop several highly instrumented ground stations to study cloud formation processes and their influence on radiative transfer. In 2003, the ARM Program became a national scientific user facility, known as the ARM Climate Research Facility. This scientific infrastructure provides for fixed sites, mobile facilities, an aerial facility, and a data archive available for use by scientists worldwide through the ARM Climate Research Facility—a scientific user facility. The ARM Climate Research Facility currently operates more than 300 instrument systems that provide ground-based observations of the atmospheric column. To keep ARM at the forefront of climate observations, the ARM infrastructure depends heavily on instrument scientists and engineers, also known as lead mentors. Lead mentors must have an excellent understanding of in situ and remote-sensing instrumentation theory and operation and have comprehensive knowledge of critical scale-dependent atmospheric processes. They must also possess the technical and analytical skills to develop new data retrievals that provide innovative approaches for creating research-quality data sets. The ARM Climate Research Facility is seeking the best overall qualified candidate who can fulfill lead mentor requirements in a timely manner.

  5. Managing new arms races

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The management of new arms races in the region of Asia-Pacific includes considerations of weapons trade and transfer in the region, with an emphasis on nuclear weapons proliferation. It deals with the problem of controlling the arms trade and the efforts to control conventional weapons and underlines the possible role and influence of Conference on Cooperation and Security in Europe (CSCE)

  6. Solar powered wrist worn acquisition system for continuous photoplethysmogram monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieffenderfer, James P; Beppler, Eric; Novak, Tristan; Whitmire, Eric; Jayakumar, Rochana; Randall, Clive; Qu, Weiguo; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Bozkurt, Alper

    2014-01-01

    We present a solar-powered, wireless, wrist-worn platform for continuous monitoring of physiological and environmental parameters during the activities of daily life. In this study, we demonstrate the capability to produce photoplethysmogram (PPG) signals using this platform. To adhere to a low power budget for solar-powering, a 574 nm green light source is used where the PPG from the radial artery would be obtained with minimal signal conditioning. The system incorporates two monocrystalline solar cells to charge the onboard 20 mAh lithium polymer battery. Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) is used to tether the device to a smartphone that makes the phone an access point to a dedicated server for long term continuous storage of data. Two power management schemes have been proposed depending on the availability of solar energy. In low light situations, if the battery is low, the device obtains a 5-second PPG waveform every minute to consume an average power of 0.57 mW. In scenarios where the battery is at a sustainable voltage, the device is set to enter its normal 30 Hz acquisition mode, consuming around 13.7 mW. We also present our efforts towards improving the charge storage capacity of our on-board super-capacitor. PMID:25570657

  7. Autologous Blood Injection and Wrist Immobilisation for Chronic Lateral Epicondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Massy-Westropp

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study explored the effect of autologous blood injection (with ultrasound guidance to the elbows of patients who had radiologically assessed degeneration of the origin of extensor carpi radialis brevis and failed cortisone injection/s to the lateral epicondylitis. Methods. This prospective longitudinal series involved preinjection assessment of pain, grip strength, and function, using the patient-rated tennis elbow evaluation. Patients were injected with blood from the contralateral limb and then wore a customised wrist support for five days, after which they commenced a stretching, strengthening, and massage programme with an occupational therapist. These patients were assessed after six months and then finally between 18 months and five years after injection, using the patient-rated tennis elbow evaluation. Results. Thirty-eight of 40 patients completed the study, showing significant improvement in pain; the worst pain decreased by two to five points out of a 10-point visual analogue for pain. Self-perceived function improved by 11–25 points out of 100. Women showed significant increase in grip, but men did not. Conclusions. Autologous blood injection improved pain and function in a worker’s compensation cohort of patients with chronic lateral epicondylitis, who had not had relief with cortisone injection.

  8. Mechanical counter pressure on the arm counteracts adverse effects of hypobaric exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kunihiko; Limberg, Ryan; Webb, Paul; Reddig, Mike; Jarvis, Christine W.; Hargens, Alan R.

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Current space suits have limited movement due to gas pressurization during exposure to the vacuum of space. Alternatively, if pressure is applied by an elastic garment vs. pneumatic garment to produce mechanical counter pressure (MCP), several advantages are possible. In this study, we investigate local microcirculatory and other effects produced with and without a prototype MCP glove and sleeve during exposure to varying levels of vacuum. METHODS: The entire arms of eight male volunteers were studied at normal ambient pressure and during 5 min exposures to -50, -100, and -150 mm Hg with and without the MCP glove and sleeve. Pressure distribution, skin microvascular flow, and temperature were measured. RESULTS: The MCP glove and sleeve generated over 200 mm Hg on the middle finger, dorsum of the hand, and the wrist. However, pressure was significantly lower on the forearm and the upper arm. Without the glove and sleeve, only two of eight subjects tolerated -100 mm Hg. Also, no subject tolerated -150 mm Hg. However, subjects tolerated all vacuum pressures wearing the glove and sleeve. Skin microvascular flow and temperature remained within control values with the glove and sleeve at a chamber pressure of -150 mm Hg. DISCUSSION: The MCP glove and sleeve counteracts adverse effects of vacuum exposures due to lower pressure differentials. Pressure levels over the hand and wrist are similar to those of the current U.S. space suit glove and sleeve, but additional development is required to increase MCP over the forearm and upper arm.

  9. Arm trajectories and writing strategy in healthy children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiappedi Matteo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evaluation of elementary writing skills in children is usually obtained with high resolution (and high cost techniques or with low resolution pen-and-paper tests. In this observational study we tested a quantitative method to obtain normative data to describe arm movement during a writing precursor gesture. Methods We recruited 226 healthy children (mean age 9,1 years [range: 6.3 – 11.4 years], attending primary schools belonging to the “Istituto Comprensivo” of Rivanazzano Terme (Pavia. We asked to drive a cursor through a polygonal path (labyrinth projected in front of them using a wireless mouse. Dartfish™ video analysis software was used to elaborate images and Excel™, MedCalc™ and Statistica 7™ to analyze values of shoulder, elbow and wrist ranges of motion, arm trajectories, execution times and gesture accuracy. Results Differences seen in motor strategies, when divided according to attended class, suggest a proximal-distal maturation of motor control. Obtained values were not significantly correlated with variables such as gender, ethnicity or cognitive functioning. Conclusions This type of approach to a study of arm movement during childhood represents a valid alternative to other tests, considering that it can differentiate children who perform similarly in the VMI test and is non-invasive, low-cost and easily reproducible.

  10. A Bioinspired 10 DOF Wearable Powered Arm Exoskeleton for Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Kanti Manna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The developed exoskeleton device (Exorn has ten degrees of freedom to control joints starting from shoulder griddle to wrist to provide better redundancy, portability, and flexibility to the human arm motion. A 3D conceptual model is being designed to make the system wearable by human arm. All the joints are simple revolute joints with desired motion limit. A Simulink model of the human arm is being developed with proper mass and length to determine proper torque required for actuating those joints. Forward kinematics of the whole system has been formulated for getting desired dexterous workspace. A proper and simple Graphical User Interface (GUI and the required embedded system have been designed for providing physiotherapy lessons to the patients. In the literature review it has been found that researchers have generally ignored the motion of shoulder griddle. Here we have implemented those motions in our design. It has also been found that people have taken elbow pronation and supination motion as a part of shoulder internal and external rotation though both motions are quite different. A predefined resolved motion rate control structure with independent joint control is used so that all movements can be controlled in a predefined way.

  11. FULL TERM EXTRAUTERINE ABDOMINAL PREGNANCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neetu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Extrauterine abdominal pregnancy is extremely rare and is frequently missed during antenatal care, despite the routine use of obstetrics ultrasound. A 23 year old primigravida at 39 weeks of gestation was admitted to the department on December 2 , 2012, in routine hour with transverse lie with oligohydramnios. On examination her vitals and laboratory investigation were within normal limits . One of the ultrasonographic scanning done by radiologist at 35 wk. 3 days gestation demonstrated a single live intrauterine fetus of CGA 33 wk. 1 day with transverse lie , fundal gr II placenta and AFI - 10 cm. Ultrasonography done at the department on the day of admission demonstrated single live intrauterine fetus with transverse lie and AFI - 3.8 cm and EFW 2.4 Kg and placenta was right anterior.. She was planned for elective caesarean section on account of transverse lie and oligohydramnios at term. At laparotomy the following findings were made: Secondary abdominal pregnancy arising from right tubal ectopic rupture and making pseudogesta tional sac with meconium stained liquor. Omentum , right tube and ovary were adhered to sac. The uterus and left tube and ovary were healthy and normal . Other abdominal organs were normal. A 1.5 Kg live male baby with good Apgar score and incompletely formed mandible extracted from pseudo gestational sac. There was significant bleeding from pseudogestational sac and patient went in shock during intraoperative period. One unit whole blood transfused during intraoperative period. Placenta was adherent to the pseudogestational sac so Psudogestational sac was removed with placenta in situ and right sided salpingo - o ophrectomy was also done due to their adherence. Hemostasis was secured. The patient and baby progressed well and were discharged on the seventh postoperative day

  12. MRI findings of the wrist in patients with multiple osteonecrosis in large joints of the extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated MRI findings of the wrist in patients who had multiple osteonecrosis in the large joints of their extremities (hips, knees, shoulders, and ankles) and compared these with the clinical symptoms and radiographical findings. Sixty wrists of 30 patients (3 males and 27 females) with multiple osteonecrosis were studied. Subjects ranged in age from 16 to 59 years. Their primary diseases were SLE in 24 patients, alcoholic osteonecrosis in two, Sjoegren's syndrome in one, dermatomyositis in one, leukemia in one, and MCTD in one patient. Using MRI, we found osteonecrosis in seven wrists of four patients. Lesions were seen in six scaphoids of three patients, in two lunates of two patients, and in one capitate. We noted a reduced range of motion in three of the seven wrists with osteonecrosis. Two of the seven complained at wrist pain at motion, although three wrists were symptom free. Radiographically, an abnormality was recognized in two of the seven wrists. Generally, osteonecrosis of the lunate (Kienboeck's disease) is more frequent than that of the scaphoid (Preiser's disease). However in the present series, we found a higher osteonecrosis rate of the scaphoid than the lunate, using MRI. The discrepancy can be explained by the vascularity. In 1986, Gelberman reported that the scaphoid, the capitate, and 8% of the lunate had either vessels entering only one surface or large areas of bone that were dependent on a single vessel. The present study is consistent with these anatomical features. In other words, the present results demonstrated that Kienboeck's disease can be induced not only by a deficient blood supply but also by some additional factors. (author)

  13. MRI findings of the wrist in patients with multiple osteonecrosis in large joints of the extremities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitoh, Shinobu; Ebata, Tatsuki; Abe, Kazuhiro [Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Imai, Katsumi; Rokkaku, Tomoyuki

    1998-02-01

    We evaluated MRI findings of the wrist in patients who had multiple osteonecrosis in the large joints of their extremities (hips, knees, shoulders, and ankles) and compared these with the clinical symptoms and radiographical findings. Sixty wrists of 30 patients (3 males and 27 females) with multiple osteonecrosis were studied. Subjects ranged in age from 16 to 59 years. Their primary diseases were SLE in 24 patients, alcoholic osteonecrosis in two, Sjoegren`s syndrome in one, dermatomyositis in one, leukemia in one, and MCTD in one patient. Using MRI, we found osteonecrosis in seven wrists of four patients. Lesions were seen in six scaphoids of three patients, in two lunates of two patients, and in one capitate. We noted a reduced range of motion in three of the seven wrists with osteonecrosis. Two of the seven complained at wrist pain at motion, although three wrists were symptom free. Radiographically, an abnormality was recognized in two of the seven wrists. Generally, osteonecrosis of the lunate (Kienboeck`s disease) is more frequent than that of the scaphoid (Preiser`s disease). However in the present series, we found a higher osteonecrosis rate of the scaphoid than the lunate, using MRI. The discrepancy can be explained by the vascularity. In 1986, Gelberman reported that the scaphoid, the capitate, and 8% of the lunate had either vessels entering only one surface or large areas of bone that were dependent on a single vessel. The present study is consistent with these anatomical features. In other words, the present results demonstrated that Kienboeck`s disease can be induced not only by a deficient blood supply but also by some additional factors. (author)

  14. Enhanced MR imaging of tenosynovitis of hand and wrist in inflammatory arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tehranzadeh, J.; Ashilyan, O.; Anavim, A.; Tramma, S. [Univ. of California, Orange (United States). Dept. of Radiological Sciences

    2006-11-15

    The purpose of this study is to describe the appearance of tenosynovitis in various tendon groups in the wrist and hand and to compare MR enhanced and non-enhanced imaging evaluation of tenosynovitis of hand and wrist in inflammatory arthritis. We reviewed 72 MRI studies of hands and wrists, including coronal, axial and sagittal images in 30 consecutive patients with inflammatory arthritis and tenosynovitis. We compared the degree of synovitis on T2-weighted vs contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images, using a predetermined scale. We also measured the extent of tenosynovitis in three dimensions. The tendons were assigned to volar, dorsal, ulnar and radial groups in the wrist and to extensor, flexor and thumb groups in the hand. Degree of tenosynovitis (graded 0-3), cross-sectional area and volume of the inflamed synovium in various tendon groups were then compared by statistical analysis. Review of the medical records revealed the following diagnoses in our patient population: rheumatoid arthritis (n=16), unspecified inflammatory polyarthritis (n=9), psoriatic arthritis (n=2), CREST syndrome (n=1), systemic lupus erythematosus (n=1), paraneoplastic syndrome with arthritis (n=1). The average T2 brightness scores and post-gadolinium enhancement scores were 1.0 and 1.7 respectively (P<0.001) in the wrist studies. The average T2 brightness scores and post-gadolinium enhancement scores were 0.7 and 1.4, respectively (P<0.001) in the hand studies. The average sensitivity of T2-weighted imaging for detection of tenosynovitis was 40% in the hand and 67% in the wrist tendons, when contrast-enhanced images were used as a reference. Carpal tunnel flexor tendons were the most frequently affected tendons of the wrist. The most frequently affected tendons of the hand were second and third flexor tendons. The hand flexors demonstrated higher degrees of enhancement and larger volumes of the inflamed tenosynovium than did the hand extensors and tendons of the thumb.

  15. Grip-force modulation in multi-finger prehension during wrist flexion and extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambike, Satyajit S.; Paclet, Florent; Latash, Mark L.; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2013-01-01

    Extrinsic digit muscles contribute to both fingertip forces and wrist movements (FDP and FPL – flexion, EDC - extension). Hence it is expected that finger forces depend on the wrist movement and position. We investigated the relation between grip force and wrist kinematics to examine whether and how the force: (1) scales with wrist flexion-extension (FE) angle; (2) can be predicted from accelerations induced during FE movement. In one experiment subjects naturally held an instrumented handle using a prismatic grasp and performed very slow FE movements. In another experiment, the same movement was performed cyclically at three prescribed frequencies. In quasistatic conditions, the grip force remained constant over the majority of the wrist range of motion. During the cyclic movements, the grip force changed. The changes were described with a linear regression model that represents the thumb and virtual finger (VF = four fingers combined) normal forces as the sum of the effects of the object’s tangential and radial accelerations and an object-weight-dependent constant term. The model explained 99% of the variability in the data. The independence of the grip force from wrist position agrees with the theory that that the thumb and VF forces are controlled with two neural variables that encode referent coordinates for each digit while accounting for changes in the position dependence of muscle forces, rather than a single neural variable like referent aperture. The results of the cyclical movement study extend the principle of superposition (some complex actions can be decomposed into independently controlled elemental actions) for a motor task involving simultaneous grip force exertion and wrist motion with significant length changes of the grip-force producing muscles. PMID:23625077

  16. Radiography of the abdominal cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiography is a very important part of the diagnostic procedure in many small animal diseases. Technically perfect X-rays are essential for the exact diagnosis. The general appearance of the abdominal cavity should be evaluated at first, e.g. the overall contrast and the definition of the visualized organs. Then particular attention should be paid, if there is any peritoneal effusion or free air in the peritoneal cavity. Subsequently each radiographically visible organ has to be evaluated for its position, size, shape and radiographic density

  17. Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    OpenAIRE

    Linné, Anneli

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) is a common disease with a prevalence of 1.5-2.0% in 65-year old men in Sweden. The risk of having AAA is increased with smoking, high age, family history of AAA and cardiovascular disease. Women have a lower prevalence (0.5%) and develop AAA later in life. An AAA seldom gives any symptom prior to rupture. Untreated rupture is associated with 100% mortality, while surgically treated rupture is associated with 25-70% mortality. Prophylactic sur...

  18. Abdominal manifestations of autoimmune disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Immunoglobulin G4-related disease was recognized as a systemic disease since various extrapancreatic lesions were observed in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). The real etiology and pathogenesis of IgG4-RD is still not clearly understood. Moreover the exact role of IgG4 or IgG4-positive plasma cells in this disease has not yet been elucidated. only some inconsistent biological features such as hypergammaglobulinemia or hypocomplementemia support the autoimmune nature of the disease process. various names have been ascribed to this clinicopathological entity including IgG4-related sclerosing disease, IgG4-related systemic sclerosing disease, IgG4-related disease, IgG4-related autoimmune disease, hyper-IgG4 disease and IgG4-related systemic disease. The extrapancreatic lesions of IgG4-RD also exhibit the same characteristic histologic features including dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, massive storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis as seen in IgG4-related pancreatitis. Abdominal manifestations include the following organs/systems: Bile ducts: Sclerosing cholangitis; Gallbladder and liver: Acalculous sclerosis cholecytitis with diffuse wall thickening; hepatic inflammatory pseudotumorts; Kidneys: round or wedge-shaped renal cortical nodules, peripheral cortical; lesions, mass like lesions or renal pelvic involvement; Prostate, urethra, seminal vesicle, vas deferens, uterine cervix; Autoimmune prostatitis; Retroperitoneum: Retroperitoneal fibrosis. thin or mildly thick homogeneous soft tissue lesion surrounding the abdominal aorta and its branches but also bulky masses causing hydronephroureterosis; Mesentery: Sclerosing mesenteritis usually involving the root of the mesentery; Bowel: Inflammatory bowel diseases mimicking Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis. various types of sclerosing nodular lesions of the bowel wall; Stomach: Gastritis, gastric ulcers and focal masses mimicking submucosal tumor; omentum: Infiltration mimicking

  19. On the abdominal pressure volume relationship

    OpenAIRE

    Mulier, Jan Paul; Dillemans, Bruno; Crombach, Mark; Missant, Carlo; Sels, Annabel

    2009-01-01

    Abstract: During insufflation of the abdomen to create a pneumoperitoneum for laparoscopy, both intra abdominal pressure and insufflated volume can be measured and are used to calculate the abdominal pressure-volume relationship. First, an accurate, linear relationship was identified using a mathematical model with an elastance, E, or its reciprocal the compliance C and with a pressure at zero volume, PV0. This function was stable and could be used to describe the abdominal characteristics of...

  20. TODDLER WITH RECURRENT ABDOMINAL PAIN: MIGRAINE?

    OpenAIRE

    Amit; Vaishali

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal migraine is a migraine variant, causing chronic idiopathic recurrent abdominal pain in 4-15% of children. It is usually seen between the ages of seven to twelve years and is more common in girls, with peak prevalence at the age of ten years. We report a 3 year old girl suffering from recurrent abdominal pain since 1½ years of age, who underwent extensive investigations as well as diagnostic laparotomy with appendectomy, and was ultimately diagnosed to have abdomi...

  1. Nonspecific Arm Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Moradi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Nonspecific activity-related arm pain is characterized by an absence of objective physical findings and symptoms that do not correspond with objective pathophysiology. Arm pain without strict diagnosis is often related to activity, work-related activity in particular, and is often seen in patients with physically demanding work. Psychological factors such as catastrophic thinking, symptoms of depression, and heightened illness concern determine a substantial percentage of the disability associated with puzzling hand and arm pains. Ergonomic modifications can help to control symptoms, but optimal health may require collaborative management incorporating psychosocial and psychological elements of illness.

  2. Nonspecific Arm Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Moradi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available   Nonspecific activity-related arm pain is characterized by an absence of objective physical findings and symptoms that do not correspond with objective pathophysiology. Arm pain without strict diagnosis is often related to activity, work-related activity in particular, and is often seen in patients with physically demanding work. Psychological factors such as catastrophic thinking, symptoms of depression, and heightened illness concern determine a substantial percentage of the disability associated with puzzling hand and arm pains. Ergonomic modifications can help to control symptoms, but optimal health may require collaborative management incorporating psychosocial and psychological elements of illness.

  3. Contrast-Enhanced Abdominal Angiographic CT for Intra-abdominal Tumor Embolization: A New Tool for Vessel and Soft Tissue Visualization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C-Arm cone-beam computed tomography (CACT), is a relatively new technique that uses data acquired with a flat-panel detector C-arm angiography system during an interventional procedure to reconstruct CT-like images. The purpose of this Technical Note is to present the technique, feasibility, and added value of CACT in five patients who underwent abdominal transarterial chemoembolization procedures. Target organs for the chemoembolizations were kidney, liver, and pancreas and a liposarcoma infiltrating the duodenum. The time for patient positioning, C-arm and system preparation, CACT raw data acquisition, and data reconstruction for a single CACT study ranged from 6 to 12 min. The volume data set produced by the workstation was interactively reformatted using maximum intensity projections and multiplanar reconstructions. As part of an angiography system CACT provided essential information on vascular anatomy, therapy endpoints, and immediate follow-up during and immediately after the abdominal interventions without patient transfer. The quality of CACT images was sufficient to influence the course of treatment. This technology has the potential to expedite any interventional procedure that requires three-dimensional information and navigation

  4. Abdominal migraine in childhood: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scicchitano B

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Beatrice Scicchitano,1 Gareth Humphreys,1 Sally G Mitton,2 Thiagarajan Jaiganesh1 1Children's Emergency Department, 2Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, St Georges Hospital, St Georges Healthcare NHS Trust, Tooting, London, United Kingdom Abstract: The childhood condition of abdominal migraine has been described under many different synonyms, including "abdominal epilepsy", "recurrent abdominal pain", "cyclical vomiting syndrome", and "functional gastrointestinal disorder". In the early literature, abdominal migraine is included in the "childhood periodic syndrome", first described by Wyllie and Schlesinger in 1933. Abdominal migraine has emerged over the last century as a diagnostic entity in its own right thanks to the development of well defined diagnostic criteria and its recent inclusion in the International Headache Society's Classification of Headache disorders. Despite this progress, little is known about the pathophysiology of the condition, and the treatment options are poorly defined. Here we summarize the recent literature, with particular focus on establishing the diagnosis of abdominal migraine and its pathophysiology, and suggest an approach to management. Keywords: abdominal migraine, recurrent abdominal pain, abdominal epilepsy, cyclical vomiting

  5. TODDLER WITH RECURRENT ABDOMINAL PAIN: MIGRAINE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal migraine is a migraine variant, causing chronic idiopathic recurrent abdominal pain in 4-15% of children. It is usually seen between the ages of seven to twelve years and is more common in girls, with peak prevalence at the age of ten years. We report a 3 year old girl suffering from recurrent abdominal pain since 1½ years of age, who underwent extensive investigations as well as diagnostic laparotomy with appendectomy, and was ultimately diagnosed to have abdominal migraine. She responded well to the prophylactic drug Flunarizine.

  6. Abdominal ultrasound in AIDS patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To analyze the ultrasonography findings in abdomen in the AIDS patients in our hospital, as well as the indications for this exploration, assessing the role of abdominal ultrasound (AU). The ultrasonographic and clinical findings in 527 patients who underwent a total of 715 explorations between 1992 and 1996 were studied. Hepatomegaly and/or splenomegaly, usually homogeneous, were observed in nearly half of the studies (45%); one third of the patients with marked splenomegaly presented visceral leishmaniasis. Focal lesions in liver and/or spleen, corresponding to angiomas, abscesses, lymphomatous lesions and metastasis, were detected in 5.7% of the explorations. Thirty-five percent of the AU revealed the presence of lymphadenopathy; nodes measuring over 2.5 cm were usually related to potential treatable infection or neoplasm. Thickening of the gallbladder wall did not usually indicate the presence of acute cholecystitis unless Murphy''s sign was also detected. Bile duct dilation and wall thickening was related to opportunistic cholangitis, and the increase in the echogenicity of the renal parenchyma was linked to AIDS-related nephropathy. Despite the fact that many of findings with AU are nonspecific, we consider that this approach should be the principal diagnostic technique in AIDS patients with suspected abdominal pathology or fever of unknown origin. (Author) 43 refs,

  7. The Neonate with Abdominal Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bajoghli

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal abdominal masses have broad spectrum of pathology, ranging from small lesions found incidentally to large masses occupying the entire of peritoneal cavity. These tumors are benign to malignant, and from unilocular cysts to complex solid lesions. Many of these lesions identified and will treat before delivery. Others are discovered during routine examination. These lesions may be life threatening, or cause persistent morbidity. Some of these have no sequel."nDiagnosis began with history. Characteristic of the mass which must be note include location, size, shape, texture, mobility and tenderness. Other findings should be in mind to find out nature of mass, for example hypoplasia of chest wall with oligohydramnios due to GU tract obstruction (potter sequwnce, a bulging hymen due to hydrometrocolpus, skin metastasis due to neuroblastoma. Radiography is the next step that shows organomegaly and calcification. Next step is US which is an excellent screening tool. CT and MRI are occasionally indicated."nThe purpose of this presentation is to review the diagnosis of abdominal masses in neonates.

  8. Percutaneous drainage of abdominal abcess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Men, Sueleyman E-mail: suleyman.men@deu.edu.tr; Akhan, Okan; Koeroglu, Mert

    2002-09-01

    The mortality in undrained abdominal abscesses is high with a mortality rate ranging between 45 and 100%. The outcome in abdominal abscesses, however, has improved due to advances in image guided percutaneous interventional techniques. The main indications for the catheter drainage include treatment or palliation of sepsis associated with an infected fluid collection, and alleviation of the symptoms that may be caused by fluid collections by virtue of their size, like pancreatic pseudocele or lymphocele. The single liver abscesses may be drained with ultrasound guidance only, whereas the multiple abscesses usually require computed tomography (CT) guidance and placement of multiple catheters. The pancreatic abscesses are generally drained routinely and urgently. Non-infected pancreatic pseudocysts may be simply observed unless they are symptomatic or cause problems such as pain or obstruction of the biliary or the gastrointestinal tract. Percutaneous routes that have been described to drain pelvic abscesses include transrectal or transvaginal approach with sonographic guidance, a transgluteal, paracoccygeal-infragluteal, or perineal approach through the greater sciatic foramen with CT guidance. Both the renal and the perirenal abscesses are amenable to percutaneous drainage. Percutaneous drainage provides an effective and safe alternative to more invasive surgical drainage in most patients with psoas abscesses as well.

  9. Manual matching of perceived surface orientation is affected by arm posture–Evidence of calibration between proprioception and visual experience in near space

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Zhi; Durgin, Frank H.

    2011-01-01

    Proprioception of hand orientation (orientation production using the hand) is compared with manual matching of visual orientation (visual surface matching using the hand) in two experiments. In Experiment 1, using self-selected arm postures, the proportions of wrist and elbow flexion spontaneously used to orient the pitch of the hand (20% and 80% respectively) are relatively similar across both manual matching tasks and manual orientation production tasks for most participants. Proprioceptive...

  10. Orthogonal views improves localisation in bone scans of wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, A.L.

    1997-09-01

    Full text: Of all nuclear medicine studies, bone scans are the most fundamental. However, straightforward these may seem, there are always mechanisms that can be implemented which assist in a more precise diagnosis, particularly in areas with an intricate bone structure. An 18-year-old right-handed student presented to her doctor with a one month history of pain over the right distal radio-ulna joint area. Clinically, she had prominence of the right ulna, which suggested that there may have been a previous injury to the wrist. Also, pronation/supination were painful where there was swelling of the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon, as well as some discomfort with clicking in ulna deviation/rotation. The X-rays demonstrated some premature radial epiphysial closure. A bone scan was requested to attempt to localise the main inflammatory focus. The dynamic study was performed in the planar projection with an immediate blood pool for 300k being taken. These demonstrated a vascular blush medially. A medial blood pool image was acquired and it localised the abnormal vascularity as being dorsal. A separate focal area of less intense blood pooling was also noted in the line of the distal ulna. Delayed images showed increased uptake localised to the ulna styloid. Anatomically, the superficial vascular blush correlated with tenosynovitis. Hence, the orthogonal initial and delayed images were definitive in the diagnoses of tenosynovitis of the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon. This clearly complements the information provided by the palmar view. However, it is important to remember that an increased radiation dose to the technologist is incurred as a result of the extra orthogonal view, hence attention to technique is imperative.

  11. Orthogonal views improves localisation in bone scans of wrist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Of all nuclear medicine studies, bone scans are the most fundamental. However, straightforward these may seem, there are always mechanisms that can be implemented which assist in a more precise diagnosis, particularly in areas with an intricate bone structure. An 18-year-old right-handed student presented to her doctor with a one month history of pain over the right distal radio-ulna joint area. Clinically, she had prominence of the right ulna, which suggested that there may have been a previous injury to the wrist. Also, pronation/supination were painful where there was swelling of the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon, as well as some discomfort with clicking in ulna deviation/rotation. The X-rays demonstrated some premature radial epiphysial closure. A bone scan was requested to attempt to localise the main inflammatory focus. The dynamic study was performed in the planar projection with an immediate blood pool for 300k being taken. These demonstrated a vascular blush medially. A medial blood pool image was acquired and it localised the abnormal vascularity as being dorsal. A separate focal area of less intense blood pooling was also noted in the line of the distal ulna. Delayed images showed increased uptake localised to the ulna styloid. Anatomically, the superficial vascular blush correlated with tenosynovitis. Hence, the orthogonal initial and delayed images were definitive in the diagnoses of tenosynovitis of the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon. This clearly complements the information provided by the palmar view. However, it is important to remember that an increased radiation dose to the technologist is incurred as a result of the extra orthogonal view, hence attention to technique is imperative

  12. Arthrographic effect induced by therapeutic ultrasound in magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist: a preliminary investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the potential arthrographic effect of therapeutic ultrasound applied before magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the wrist. Subjects and methods: MRI of the wrist was performed in 6 asymptomatic volunteers before and after ultrasound therapy of the carpus. For each patient, ultrasound therapy was performed by a trained physiotherapist for 10 minutes, with doses titrated to the maximum tolerated without pain. The amount of fluid within the wrist joints before and after therapy was assessed subjectively by 2 reviewers, as well as objectively by digital analysis. Results: Subjective appraisal of the images indicated that after ultrasound therapy there was an increase in joint fluid within the distal radioulnar joint in 4 volunteers, the midcarpal joint in 4 and the radiocarpal joint in 2. Computerized digital analysis of joint fluid confirmed an average volumetric increase in wrist joint fluid of 52.8% in 3 of the volunteers. The discomfort of the therapy was graded as 1/10 by 5 of the subjects and 4/10 by a single subject. Conclusions: Therapeutic ultrasound may be a useful adjuvant tool in the noninvasive induction of joint fluid before MRI of the wrist. (author)

  13. Tennis Racket Vibrations and Shock Transmission to the Wrist during Forehand Drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogowski, Isabelle; Creveaux, Thomas; Triquigneaux, Sylvain; Macé, Pierre; Gauthier, Fabien; Sevrez, Violaine

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of two different racket models and two different forehand drive velocities on the three-dimensional vibration behavior of the racket and shock transmission to the player’s wrist under real playing conditions. Nine tennis players performed a series of crosscourt flat forehand drives at two velocities, using a lightly and a highly vibrant racket. Two accelerometers were fixed on the racket frame and the player’s wrist. The analysis of vibration signals in both time and frequency domains showed no interaction effect of velocity and racket conditions either on the racket vibration behavior or on shock transmission. An increase in playing velocity enlarged the amount of vibrations at the racket and wrist, but weakly altered their frequency content. As compared to a racket perceived as highly vibrating, a racket perceived as lightly vibrating damped longer in the out-of-plane axis of the racket and shorter on the other axis of the racket and on the wrist, and displayed a lower amount of energy in the high frequency of the vibration signal at the racket and wrist. These findings indicated that the playing velocity must be controlled when investigating the vibration loads due to the racket under real playing conditions. Similarly, a reduced perception of vibration by the tennis player would be linked to decreased amplitude of the racket vibration signal, which may concentrate the signal energy in the low frequencies. PMID:26177373

  14. NMR findings in patients after wrist trauma with a negative plain radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose was to assess the prevalence and location of the injuries of the carpal bones and soft tissue of the wrist on NMR in patients with negative radiographs. A total of 89 patients (9–81years) were consecutively examined after wrist trauma. Radiograms were performed in four projections: AP, PA, oblique and lateral. In 63 cases of negative radiographs and persistent clinical problem, simplified NMR (T1,T2, STIR; in coronal plane) was conducted with a 1.5 Tesla magnet. Results were evaluated by two independent observers. A positive X-ray result was stated when at least one observer suggested bone fracture. The MR images were viewed for detection of possible bone fracture, bone edema and soft tissue injuries. Cohen’s kappa coefficient was calculated to assess the quality of chosen criteria by means of agreement between both observers and both methods. As many as 26 X-ray studies were classified as positive. Substantial agreement between independent observers was found (kappa=0.63). In 17 cases out of 63 with two negative wrist radiogram, the NMR result was positive (19%). The most frequently fractured or injured bone was scaphoid (10 cases) and distal radius (5 cases). Fair agreement was found between X-ray and NMR studies (kappa=0.37) due to different diagnostic information received in both methods. Simplified NMR imaging of the wrist proved to be strongly efficient in the detection of pathological changes in injured wrists

  15. Diagnostic values of bone scintigram for painful disorders of the hand and the wrist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From April 1993 to April 1997, 43 patients underwent bone scintigraphic examination for various painful conditions in the hand and the wrist joint. Three hours after an intravenous injection of 740 MBq of TC-99m HMDP, wrist scintigram was obtained. Of 18 patients with ulnar wrist pain, 12 patients had positive scan. The accumulation pattern in the five cases of ulnocarpal abutment syndrome showed different patterns. Slight difference of the accumulation between the ulnar head and the ulnar styloid process was well differentiated. Each carpal bone could be well identified, but when two bones were overlapping as in the triquetrum and the pisiform, additional physical findings were helpful. Six patients showed negative scan. The two patients with positive triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) tear but with negative bone scan showed no bony involvement, whereas those with TFC tear and positive scan were the ones having some bony disorders such as ulnocarpal abutment syndrome. Of 25 patients with wrist pain other than ulnar pain, 14 patients had positive scan. The remaining 11 patients who had negative scan included three patients with occult ganglion, two with wrist sprain and six with various disorders. (K.H.)

  16. Inflammatory arthritis-like and other MR findings in wrists of asymptomatic subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To describe magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings in the wrists of asymptomatic subjects that might be confused with pathologic findings. MR examination of the dominant wrist was performed in 30 asymptomatic volunteers aged 22-49 years using pre-contrast and post-contrast sequences in the coronal and axial planes. The bases of the metacarpals, the carpus and the distal radius and ulna were evaluated by two musculoskeletal radiologists for lesions, notches, blood vessels and synovial enhancement. There were 24 bright osseous lesions (erosions, intraosseous ganglia, oedema or cysts) in 14 subjects. Intraosseous blood vessels were seen in all but one wrist examined, most commonly in the capitate and lunate bones. Enhancement was present in 26 of 27 notches identified at the base of the second metacarpal and less commonly in the capitate, hamate and triquetral notches. A small joint effusion was present in 14 subjects. Joint or soft-tissue enhancement was identified in 16 wrists. Many MR abnormalities and variants may be detected in the wrists of asymptomatic subjects. Many of these could be confused with pathologic findings usually associated with inflammatory arthritis. (orig.)

  17. Robot-Aided Mapping of Wrist Proprioceptive Acuity across a 3D Workspace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Francesca; Squeri, Valentina; Morasso, Pietro; Konczak, Jürgen; Masia, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Proprioceptive signals from peripheral mechanoreceptors form the basis for bodily perception and are known to be essential for motor control. However we still have an incomplete understanding of how proprioception differs between joints, whether it differs among the various degrees-of-freedom (DoFs) within a particular joint, and how such differences affect motor control and learning. We here introduce a robot-aided method to objectively measure proprioceptive function: specifically, we systematically mapped wrist proprioceptive acuity across the three DoFs of the wrist/hand complex with the aim to characterize the wrist position sense. Thirty healthy young adults performed an ipsilateral active joint position matching task with their dominant wrist using a haptic robotic exoskeleton. Our results indicate that the active wrist position sense acuity is anisotropic across the joint, with the abduction/adduction DoF having the highest acuity (the error of acuity for flexion/extension is 4.64 ± 0.24°; abduction/adduction: 3.68 ± 0.32°; supination/pronation: 5.15 ± 0.37°) and they also revealed that proprioceptive acuity decreases for smaller joint displacements. We believe this knowledge is imperative in a clinical scenario when assessing proprioceptive deficits and for understanding how such sensory deficits relate to observable motor impairments. PMID:27536882

  18. Uso da peritoneostomia na sepse abdominal Laparostomy in abdominal sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juvenal da Rocha Torres Neto

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Dentre as modalidades terapêuticas da sepse abdominal, a peritoneostomia tem papel decisivo permitindo explorações e lavagens da cavidade de forma facilitada. Observamos pacientes com diagnóstico clínico de sepse abdominal internados no Serviço de Coloproctologia do Hospital Universitário da Universidade Federal de Sergipe, e que foram submetidos a peritoneostomia de janeiro de 2004 a janeiro de 2006. Foram avaliados quanto ao diagnóstico primário e secundário, tipo de peritonite secundária, antibioticoterapia, esquema de lavagens, tempo de peritoneostomia, complicações e desfecho. Estudamos 12 pacientes, com idade de 15 a 57, média de 39,3 anos. Diagnóstico primário: abdome agudo inflamatório em 6(50%, abdome agudo obstrutivo em 2(16,7%, abdome agudo perfurativo em 2(16,7%, fístula enterocutânea em 1(8,3% e abscesso intra-cavitário em 1(8,3%. Diagnóstico secundário: perfuração de cólon em 4(33,3%, abscessos intra-cavitários em 3(25%, deiscências de anastomoses em 3(25%, 1(8,3% com tumor perfurado de sigmóide e 1(8,3% com necrose de cólon abaixado. Peritonite fecal em 10(83,3% e purulenta em 2(16,7%. A antibioticoterapia teve duração média de 19 dias. Lavagens de demanda em 6(50%, programadas em 4(33,3% e regime misto em 2(16,7%. O tempo médio de peritoneostomia foi de 10,9 dias (1-36. Como complicações: evisceração em 2(16,7% e fistulização em 1(8,3%. Quatro pacientes evoluíram com óbito.Among the therapeutics approach form of abdominal sepsis, the laparostomy has a decisive role allowing cavity explorations and lavages in an easier way. We study patients with abdominal sepsis diagnoses admitted to our surgical service of Coloproctology form Sergipe´s Federal University Hospital who underwent a Bogotá Bag laparostomy associated or not with polypropylene mesh from January 2004 to January 2006. These patients were assessed as: first and second diagnosis; secondary peritonitis type; antibiotic

  19. An Elastica Arm Scale

    CERN Document Server

    Bosi, F; Corso, F Dal; Bigoni, D

    2015-01-01

    The concept of 'deformable arm scale' (completely different from a traditional rigid arm balance) is theoretically introduced and experimentally validated. The idea is not intuitive, but is the result of nonlinear equilibrium kinematics of rods inducing configurational forces, so that deflection of the arms becomes necessary for the equilibrium, which would be impossible for a rigid system. In particular, the rigid arms of usual scales are replaced by a flexible elastic lamina, free of sliding in a frictionless and inclined sliding sleeve, which can reach a unique equilibrium configuration when two vertical dead loads are applied. Prototypes realized to demonstrate the feasibility of the system show a high accuracy in the measure of load within a certain range of use. It is finally shown that the presented results are strongly related to snaking of confined beams, with implications on locomotion of serpents, plumbing, and smart oil drilling.

  20. ARM7-kehityskortti

    OpenAIRE

    Kukkonen, Henri

    2006-01-01

    Tämän opinnäytetyön tarkoituksena oli suunnitella ja toteuttaa ARM-mikro-ohjain pohjainen kehityskortti. Kortin tuli olla soveltuva ARM-ohjelmoinnin opettamiseen. Työssä myös selvitettiin ARM-mikro-ohjaimen ohjelmointiympäristön käyttöönotto. Teoriaosassa käsitellään ARM-arkkitehtuuria, työssä käytettyjen Atmelin AT91R40008-mikro-ohjaimen sekä Philipsin LPC2105-mikro-ohjaimen ominaisuuksia. Erityisesti työssä keskitytään kehityskorttien suunnitteluun. Kehityskortin vaatimuksina oli, että se ...

  1. The effect of forearm posture on wrist flexion in computer workers with chronic upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson R Terry

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Occupational computer use has been associated with upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders (UEMSDs, but the etiology and pathophysiology of some of these disorders are poorly understood. Various theories attribute the symptoms to biomechanical and/or psychosocial stressors. The results of several clinical studies suggest that elevated antagonist muscle tension may be a biomechanical stress factor. Affected computer users often exhibit limited wrist range of motion, particularly wrist flexion, which has been attributed to increased extensor muscle tension, rather than to pain symptoms. Recreational or domestic activities requiring extremes of wrist flexion may produce injurious stress on the wrist joint and muscles, the symptoms of which are then exacerbated by computer use. As these activities may involve a variety of forearm postures, we examined whether changes in forearm posture have an effect on pain reports during wrist flexion, or whether pain would have a limiting effect on flexion angle. Methods We measured maximum active wrist flexion using a goniometer with the forearm supported in the prone, neutral, and supine postures. Data was obtained from 5 subjects with UEMSDs attributed to computer use and from 13 control subjects. Results The UEMSD group exhibited significantly restricted wrist flexion compared to the control group in both wrists at all forearm postures with the exception of the non-dominant wrist with the forearm prone. In both groups, maximum active wrist flexion decreased at the supine forearm posture compared to the prone posture. No UEMSD subjects reported an increase in pain symptoms during testing. Conclusion The UEMSD group exhibited reduced wrist flexion compared to controls that did not appear to be pain related. A supine forearm posture reduced wrist flexion in both groups, but the reduction was approximately 100% greater in the UEMSD group. The effect of a supine forearm posture on wrist

  2. ARM for Platform Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patte, Mathieu; Poupat, Jean-Luc; Le Meur, Patrick

    2015-09-01

    The activities described in this paper are part of the CNES R&T “Study of a Cortex-R ARM based architecture” performed by Airbus DS Space System & Electronics in 2014. With the support of CNES, Airbus DS has performed the porting of a representative space application software on an ARM based demonstration platform. This paper presents the platform itself, the activities performed at software level and the first results on this evaluation study.

  3. 腕部电烧伤创面修复的临床分析%Clinical analysis to repairs of electrical burn of wrist

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张功宝; 崔素英; 张成书

    2009-01-01

    Objective To choose a better metherds to repair electrical burns of Wrist.Methods We had treated 72 limbs of 64 patients between 1994 to 2008 which were divivided into two groups by differents choice of opperations.The abdominal pedicle flap were used in one group,local axial flap and free skin flap were used in another group.Results There was no differences between two groups in the injury,age and operation time,but was significant differences in the wound healing rate,preservation of the important deep fissure and complications(P<0.01).Conclusion It's more worthy recommendating to use local axial flap and free flap to repair electrical burns of wrist.%目的 腕部电烧伤创面修复的最佳皮瓣选择.方法 将1994~2008年间应用皮瓣修复腕部电烧伤创面64例72个肢体分成两个组进行比较分析,一组为腹部带蒂皮瓣修复,另一组为局部轴型皮瓣及游离皮瓣修复.结果 两组患者在伤情严重性、年龄和手术时间等方面均基本相同,但两组患者创而愈合率及深部重要组织保存,以及严重并发症发生有很大差异(P<0.01).结论 用局部轴型皮瓣和游离皮瓣修复腕部电烧伤较用腹部带蒂皮瓣修复有明显优越性.

  4. Hello to Arms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This image highlights the hidden spiral arms (blue) that were discovered around the nearby galaxy NGC 4625 by the ultraviolet eyes of NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer. The image is composed of ultraviolet and visible-light data, from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer and the California Institute of Technology's Digitized Sky Survey, respectively. Near-ultraviolet light is colored green; far-ultraviolet light is colored blue; and optical light is colored red. As the image demonstrates, the lengthy spiral arms are nearly invisible when viewed in optical light while bright in ultraviolet. This is because they are bustling with hot, newborn stars that radiate primarily ultraviolet light. The youthful arms are also very long, stretching out to a distance four times the size of the galaxy's core. They are part of the largest ultraviolet galactic disk discovered so far. Located 31 million light-years away in the constellation Canes Venatici, NGC 4625 is the closest galaxy ever seen with such a young halo of arms. It is slightly smaller than our Milky Way, both in size and mass. However, the fact that this galaxy's disk is forming stars very actively suggests that it might evolve into a more massive and mature galaxy resembling our own. The armless companion galaxy seen below NGC 4625 is called NGC 4618. Astronomers do not know why it lacks arms but speculate that it may have triggered the development of arms in NGC 4625.

  5. Synovial sarcoma of the abdominal wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case report of synovial sarcoma arising in the abdominal wall is presented. A brief review of the clinical and radiological features of synovial sarcoma is made. Pre-operative diagnosis of an abdominal wall synovial sarcoma is virtually impossible, but should be considered when a soft tissue swelling is found to show amorphous stippled calcification X-ray. (author)

  6. Abdominal Wall Modification for the Difficult Ostomy

    OpenAIRE

    Beck, David E.

    2008-01-01

    A select group of patients with major stomal problems may benefit from operative modification of the abdominal wall. Options may include a modified abdominoplasty (abdominal wall contouring), localized flaps, or liposuction. Although frequently successful, these techniques have the potential for significant morbidity.

  7. Hypoxia inhibits abdominal expiratory nerve activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fregosi, R F; Knuth, S L; Ward, D K; Bartlett, D

    1987-07-01

    Our purpose was to examine the influence of steady-state changes in chemical stimuli, as well as discrete peripheral chemoreceptor stimulation, on abdominal expiratory motor activity. In decerebrate, paralyzed, vagotomized, and ventilated cats that had bilateral pneumothoraces, we recorded efferent activity from a phrenic nerve and from an abdominal nerve (cranial iliohypogastric nerve, L1). All cats showed phasic expiratory abdominal nerve discharge at normocapnia [end-tidal PCO2 38 +/- 2 Torr], but small doses (2-6 mg/kg) of pentobarbital sodium markedly depressed this activity. Hyperoxic hypercapnia consistently enhanced abdominal expiratory activity and shortened the burst duration. Isocapnic hypoxia caused inhibition of abdominal nerve discharge in 11 of 13 cats. Carotid sinus nerve denervation (3 cats) exacerbated the hypoxic depression of abdominal nerve activity and depressed phrenic motor output. Stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors with NaCN increased abdominal nerve discharge in 7 of 10 cats, although 2 cats exhibited marked inhibition. Four cats with intact neuraxis, but anesthetized with ketamine, yielded qualitatively similar results. We conclude that when cats are subjected to steady-state chemical stimuli in isolation (no interference from proprioceptive inputs), hypercapnia potentiates, but hypoxia attenuates, abdominal expiratory nerve activity. Mechanisms to explain the selective inhibition of expiratory motor activity by hypoxia are proposed, and physiological implications are discussed. PMID:3624126

  8. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available COMPONENT SEPARATION FOR COMPLEX ABDOMINAL WALL RECONSTRUCTION ALBANY MEDICAL CENTER ALBANY, NY April 30, 2008 00:00:07 ANNOUNCER: This event is being ... the premiere webcast of a component separation for complex abdominal-wall reconstruction, performed by Dr. Jerome D. ...

  9. Actinomycosis mimicking abdominal neoplasm. Case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waaddegaard, P; Dziegiel, M

    1988-01-01

    In a patient with a 6-month history of nonspecific abdominal complaints, preoperative examination indicated malignant disease involving the right ovary, rectum and sigmoid, but laparotomy revealed abdominal actinomycosis. Removal of the ovary and low anterior colonic resection followed by penicil...

  10. Live secondary abdominal pregnancy- by chance!!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akanksha Sood

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal pregnancy though rare but is a life threatening situation, if not recognized and managed properly. We are hereby presenting a rare successful outcome in a case of ruptured live Secondary Abdominal pregnancy with placental implants over intestines. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2013; 2(2.000: 251-253

  11. The EULAR-OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis MRI reference image atlas: the wrist joint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejbjerg, B; McQueen, F; Lassere, M;

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the wrist joint MR images of the EULAR-OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis MRI reference image atlas. Reference images for scoring synovitis, bone oedema, and bone erosions according to the OMERACT RA MRI scoring (RAMRIS) system are provided. All grades (0-3) of synovitis are......, capitate, and a metacarpal base. In these bones, grades 0-3 of bone oedema are illustrated, and for bone erosion, grades 0-3 and examples of higher grades are presented. The presented reference images can be used to guide scoring of wrist joints according to the OMERACT RA MRI scoring system...... illustrated in each of the three wrist joint areas defined in the scoring system-that is, the distal radioulnar joint, the radiocarpal joint, and the intercarpal-carpometacarpal joints. For reasons of feasibility, examples of bone abnormalities are limited to five selected bones: the radius, scaphoid, lunate...

  12. [Ganglia of the hand and wrist--a retrospective study on the origination of recurrences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schicke, S; Hoigne, D; Zwipp, H; Grünert, J

    2011-10-01

    This study examines retrospectively the impact of operative and perioperative factors on the recurrence rate of finger and wrist cysts.Out of a total of 237 recorded cyst operations in 201 patients, 46% were carried out for dorsal wrist ganglia, 38% for finger ganglia, and 16% for palmar wrist cysts. 133 (56%) patients answered on a mailed questionnaire. At an average of 2 years 79 of these 133 patients could be re-examined. Data concerning history, size of the cyst, location of the cyst, the hand surgical experience of the performing surgeon were taken from the charts. Statistical analysis were performed.There were 48 (36.1%; n=133) recurrences. Most (79.2%) occurred within the first year. A higher recurrence rate was observed in patients with a longer history, larger ganglia, and when patients were operated by less experienced surgeons. Recurrence rates did neither correlate with the ganglion location, the patient's age, and gender. PMID:21935849

  13. Relationship between dorsal ganglion cysts of the wrist and intraosseous ganglion cysts of the carpal bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Dungen, Sophie; Marchesi, Simona; Ezzedine, Rabih; Bindou, David; Lorea, Patrick

    2005-10-01

    Soft tissue ganglion cysts are the most common benign tumours of the wrist; their pathogenesis remains controversial. We prospectively screened the radiographic appearance of the wrists of 51 patients presenting to a single surgeon with dorsal wrist ganglions during a one-year period. Postero-anterior and lateral radiographs were systematically performed looking for possible associated intraosseous ganglion cysts. There were 51 dorsal soft tissue ganglion cysts in 51 patients. We detected 29 associated intraosseous ganglia in 24 patients (47%): 16 ganglia in the lunate bone (55%), 5 in the capitate bone, 7 in the scaphoid and 1 in the trapezoid. Mean size of the intraosseous ganglia was 3 mm (range, 2 to 5 mm). This high prevalence of intraosseous ganglia in association with soft tissue ganglia has to our knowledge never been reported previously. A common aetiology for these two types of ganglion cysts may explain this high association rate. PMID:16305077

  14. Validation of a wrist monitor for accurate estimation of RR intervals during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renevey, Ph; Sola, J; Theurillat, P; Bertschi, M; Krauss, J; Andries, D; Sartori, C

    2013-01-01

    While the incidence of sleep disorders is continuously increasing in western societies, there is a clear demand for technologies to asses sleep-related parameters in ambulatory scenarios. The present study introduces a novel concept of accurate sensor to measure RR intervals via the analysis of photo-plethysmographic signals recorded at the wrist. In a cohort of 26 subjects undergoing full night polysomnography, the wrist device provided RR interval estimates in agreement with RR intervals as measured from standard electrocardiographic time series. The study showed an overall agreement between both approaches of 0.05 ± 18 ms. The novel wrist sensor opens the door towards a new generation of comfortable and easy-to-use sleep monitors. PMID:24110980

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist in early rheumatoid arthritis: a pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This pictorial essay describes the changes seen in the wrist in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on MRI. Magnetic resonance imaging can demonstrate bone erosions, bone marrow signal changes, synovitis and tenosynovitis in early rheumatoid arthritis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist can identify erosions in RA earlier than plain radiographs and can detect more erosions. Common sites include the capitate, lunate and scaphoid. Bone marrow signal changes occur frequently and are most common in the capitate, lunate and triquetrum. Synovial thickening and enhancement are clearly demonstrated with MRI and are most commonly seen in the radiocarpal joint (RCJ). Tenosynovitis can be seen in the wrist in more than half of patients presenting with RA. This most commonly involves the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon and is seen as sheath fluid, thickening and enhancement. Copyright (2001) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  16. Scoring of synovial membrane hypertrophy and bone erosions by MR imaging in clinically active and inactive rheumatoid arthritis of the wrist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Gideon, P; Sørensen, K;

    1995-01-01

    MRI-scores of synovial membrane hypertrophy and bone erosions of the RA-wrist are introduced. Gadolinium-DTPA enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and conventional radiography (CR) of the wrist were performed in 16 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 3 healthy controls. A MRI-score of...... MRI and CR with respect to bone erosions. Bone erosions were detected by MRI in 14 wrists in contrast to only 6 wrists by CR. In all patients the erosions were more numerous on MRI. The introduced methods may be useful quantitative measures of synovitis and early joint destruction in RA....... synovial membrane hypertrophy was obtained by summation of gradings of synovial hypertrophy in 6 regions of the wrist. The score was significantly higher in wrists with than in wrists without clinical signs of active arthritis. The score was 0 in all healthy controls. Each bone of the wrist was assessed by...

  17. Fetal abdominal magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review deals with the in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of the human fetal abdomen. Imaging findings are correlated with current knowledge of human fetal anatomy and physiology, which are crucial to understand and interpret fetal abdominal MRI scans. As fetal MRI covers a period of more than 20 weeks, which is characterized not only by organ growth, but also by changes and maturation of organ function, a different MR appearance of the fetal abdomen results. This not only applies to the fetal intestines, but also to the fetal liver, spleen, and adrenal glands. Choosing the appropriate sequences, various aspects of age-related and organ-specific function can be visualized with fetal MRI, as these are mirrored by changes in signal intensities. Knowledge of normal development is essential to delineate normal from pathological findings in the respective developmental stages

  18. Fetal abdominal magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brugger, Peter C. [Center of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Integrative Morphology Group, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringerstrasse 13, 1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: peter.brugger@meduniwien.ac.at; Prayer, Daniela [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2006-02-15

    This review deals with the in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of the human fetal abdomen. Imaging findings are correlated with current knowledge of human fetal anatomy and physiology, which are crucial to understand and interpret fetal abdominal MRI scans. As fetal MRI covers a period of more than 20 weeks, which is characterized not only by organ growth, but also by changes and maturation of organ function, a different MR appearance of the fetal abdomen results. This not only applies to the fetal intestines, but also to the fetal liver, spleen, and adrenal glands. Choosing the appropriate sequences, various aspects of age-related and organ-specific function can be visualized with fetal MRI, as these are mirrored by changes in signal intensities. Knowledge of normal development is essential to delineate normal from pathological findings in the respective developmental stages.

  19. The Use of Navigation Forces for Assessment of Wrist Arthroscopy Skills Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obdeijn, Miryam C.; van Baalen, Sophie J.; Horeman, Tim; Liverneaux, Philippe; Tuijthof, Gabrielle J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To provide an efficient learning process, feedback on performance is crucial. In skills laboratories, it is possible to measure the skills and progression of skills of the trainees objectively. This requires metrics that represent the learning curve of the trainee, which were investigated for wrist arthroscopy. The research questions were: What are the forces used by novices during wrist arthroscopy? What aspects of these navigation forces are discriminative for the wrist arthroscopy skills level? Methods A cadaver wrist was mounted in a custom-made distraction device mounted in front of a force platform (ForceTrap). Eleven novices were invited to perform two tasks on the wrist: Insertion of the scope through the 3–4 portal and the hook through the 6R portal, and visualization of the hook in the center of the image Navigation through the wrist from radial to ulnar with probing and visualization of five predefined landmarks The second task was repeated 10 times. The absolute force (F abs) and the direction of force were measured. The angle α is defined in the vertical plane, and the angle β in the horizontal plane. Results The median F abs used by novices remained below the force threshold as defined from the expert data (7.3 N). However, the direction of the applied forces by novices in both planes was not consistent with expert data and showed a wider range. Also, there was no improvement after more trials. Conclusion Our study suggests by the absence of a learning curve for the novices and a significant difference between novices and experts that novices can benefit from feedback on the magnitude and direction of forces to improve their performance. PMID:25077049

  20. Cuff width alters the amplitude envelope of wrist cuff pressure pulse waveforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accuracy of noninvasive blood pressure (BP) measurement with any method is affected by cuff width. Measurement with a too narrow cuff overestimates BP and measurement with a too wide cuff underestimates BP. Automatic wrist cuff BP monitors use permanently attached narrow cuffs with bladders about 6 cm wide. Such narrow cuffs should result in under-cuffing for wrist circumferences larger than 15 cm. The objective of this qualitative study was to show that a narrow wrist cuff results in increased BP values when a cuff pulse amplitude ratio algorithm is used. According to the algorithm used in this study, systolic pressure (SBP) corresponds to the point of 50% of maximal amplitude; for diastolic pressure (DBP) the ratio is 70%. Data were acquired from 12 volunteers in the sitting position. The mean wrist circumference was 18 cm. The acquired cuff pulse data were used to compute SBP, mean pressure (MAP) and DBP. The mean values for a 6 cm cuff were SBP = 144 mmHg, MAP = 104 mmHg and DBP = 88 mmHg. The values for a 10 cm cuff were SBP = 128 mmHg, MAP = 93 mmHg and DBP = 78 mmHg. The reference BP values were SBP = 132 mmHg, MAP = 96 mmHg and DBP = 80 mmHg. All narrow (6 cm) cuff BP values were higher than wide (10 cm) cuff or reference BP values. The results indicate that wider wrist cuffs may be desirable for more accurate and reliable BP measurement with wrist monitors. (note)

  1. The use of navigation forces for assessment of wrist arthroscopy skills level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obdeijn, Miryam C; van Baalen, Sophie J; Horeman, Tim; Liverneaux, Philippe; Tuijthof, Gabrielle J M

    2014-05-01

    Purpose To provide an efficient learning process, feedback on performance is crucial. In skills laboratories, it is possible to measure the skills and progression of skills of the trainees objectively. This requires metrics that represent the learning curve of the trainee, which were investigated for wrist arthroscopy. The research questions were: What are the forces used by novices during wrist arthroscopy?What aspects of these navigation forces are discriminative for the wrist arthroscopy skills level?Methods A cadaver wrist was mounted in a custom-made distraction device mounted in front of a force platform (ForceTrap). Eleven novices were invited to perform two tasks on the wrist: Insertion of the scope through the 3-4 portal and the hook through the 6R portal, and visualization of the hook in the center of the imageNavigation through the wrist from radial to ulnar with probing and visualization of five predefined landmarksThe second task was repeated 10 times. The absolute force (F abs) and the direction of force were measured. The angle α is defined in the vertical plane, and the angle β in the horizontal plane. Results The median F abs used by novices remained below the force threshold as defined from the expert data (7.3 N). However, the direction of the applied forces by novices in both planes was not consistent with expert data and showed a wider range. Also, there was no improvement after more trials. Conclusion Our study suggests by the absence of a learning curve for the novices and a significant difference between novices and experts that novices can benefit from feedback on the magnitude and direction of forces to improve their performance. PMID:25077049

  2. Flexible and static wrist units in upper limb prosthesis users : functionality scores, user satisfaction and compensatory movements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deijs, Marieke; Bongers, R. M.; Ringeling-van Leusen, N. D. M.; van der Sluis, C. K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The current study examines the relevance of prosthetic wrist movement to facilitate activities of daily living or to prevent overuse complaints. Prosthesis hands with wrist flexion/extension capabilities are commercially available, but research on the users' experiences with flexible wri

  3. Combined pre-injection wrist and ankle MRI protocol and steroid joint injections in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kan, J.H. [Texas Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Houston, TX (United States); Graham, T.B. [Monroe Carell Jr. Children' s Hospital at Vanderbilt, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Precise localization of affected compartments of the wrist and ankle in children with an established diagnosis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is clinically challenging. The purpose of this paper is to describe our experience utilizing a pre-injection MRI protocol of the wrist and ankle for localizing disease activity followed by fluoroscopically guided joint injections in children with JIA. (orig.)

  4. Effects of Neoprene Wrist/Hand Splints on Handwriting for Students with Joint Hypermobility Syndrome: A Single System Design Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohlich, Lauren; Wesley, Alison; Wallen, Margaret; Bundy, Anita

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Pain associated with hypermobility of wrist and hand joints can contribute to decreased handwriting output. This study examined the effectiveness of a neoprene wrist/hand splint in reducing pain and increasing handwriting speed and endurance for students with joint hypermobility syndrome. Methods: Multiple baseline, single system design…

  5. Constant angular velocity of the wrist during the lifting of a sphere.

    OpenAIRE

    Chappell, Paul; Metcalf, Cheryl; Burridge, Jane; Yule, Victoria; Pickering, R.M.

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of the experiments was to investigate the wrist motion of a person while they were carrying out a prehensile task from a clinical hand function test. A sixcamera movement system was used to observe the wrist motion of 10 participants. A very light sphere and a heavy sphere were used in the experiments to study any mass effects. While seated at a table, a participant moved a sphere over a small obstacle using their dominant hand. The participants were observed to move the...

  6. Variant course of extensor pollicis longus tendon in the second wrist extensor compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Jun; Lee, Jae Hoon; Baek, Jong Hun

    2016-05-01

    Among the muscles involved in thumb movement, the extensor pollicis longus (EPL) tendon of the hand is considered the most consistent structure with the least variation among individuals. There have been a few reports regarding different types of supernumerary tendons; however, an abnormal course of the EPL tendon is extremely rare. We describe a case of a variant course of a single EPL tendon appearing in the second extensor compartment of the wrist. This case was observed incidentally during wrist surgery, and demonstrates a unique variation of tendon course, which has not been reported previously. The knowledge of this anatomic variation is helpful in surgical planning and for making accurate diagnoses. PMID:26253859

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of extraskeletal mesenchymal chondrosarcoma of wrist: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysin Pourbagher

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Extraskeletal mesenchymal chondrosarcomas (EMC are high grade malignant tumors that rarely involves wrist. Published reports about them are mostly based on conventional radiography, tomography and conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings. We did not recognize any report of dynamic-contrast enhanced MRI so far. Herein, we present dynamic contrast enhanced and Diffusion Weighted MRI findings of a case with extraskeletal mesenchymal chondrosarcoma of the wrist. In conclusion, EMC might show peripheral enhancement at early arterial phase and restricted diffusion on MRI. The knowledge of the imaging spectrum of the EMC might help us suggesting the diagnosis. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(2.000: 374-378

  8. Validity and reliability of the Turkish “Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation” questionnaire

    OpenAIRE

    Ozturk, Ozgul; Sari, Zubeyir; Ozgul, Bahar; Tasyikan, Levent

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation (PRWE) scale is a self-administered outcome questionnaire used to determine level of pain and disability in wrist problems. The scale includes pain (PRWE-P) and function (PRWE-F) subscales, the latter consisting of specific function (PRWESF)and usual (PRWE-UF) function. This study aimed to evaluate the validity and reliability of the Turkish versionof the PRWE scale.Methods: Permission was sought and received from the original author of the PRWE f...

  9. Carpal arch and median nerve changes during radioulnar wrist compression in carpal tunnel syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquardt, Tamara L; Evans, Peter J; Seitz, William H; Li, Zong-Ming

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the morphological changes of the carpal arch and median nerve during the application of radiounlarly directed compressive force across the wrist in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Radioulnar compressive forces of 10 N and 20 N were applied at the distal level of the carpal tunnel in 10 female patients diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome. Immediately prior to force application and after 3 min of application, ultrasound images of the distal carpal tunnel were obtained. It was found that applying force across the wrist decreased the carpal arch width (p 1234-1240, 2016. PMID:26662276

  10. Quantitative assessment of the synovial membrane in the rheumatoid wrist: an easily obtained MRI score reflects the synovial volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Hansen, M; Stoltenberg, M;

    1996-01-01

    Determination of the synovial membrane volume in the rheumatoid arthritis (RA) wrist by gadolinium-DTPA-enhanced MRI is introduced. Moreover, dynamic imaging and an MRI score of synovial hypertrophy, based on gradings in six regions, are evaluated as substitutes of the time-consuming volume...... swelling and/or joint tenderness than in wrists without these signs (Mann-Whitney, both P < 0.05). Suboptimal slice selection made dynamic imaging uninformative. MRI allows quantification of the synovial volume in the rheumatoid wrist. The volume is related to clinical signs of inflammation, but may also...... calculations. Twenty-six RA wrists were examined. Synovial membrane volumes ranged from 1 to 20 ml (median 9 ml). Synovial hypertrophy scores were highly correlated to synovial volumes (Spearman r = 0.88; P < 10(-8) for uncorrelated values). The volumes and scores were significantly higher in wrists with joint...

  11. Severe psychogenic tremor of both wrists in a 13-year-old girl treated successfully with a customized wrist brace: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Schafflhuber Caroline; Sauerhoefer Elisabeth; Kratz Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Psychogenic movement disorders in childhood have been little researched. As there are few courses of treatment which have been evaluated, further examination and case studies about the treatment and clinical course of this rare occurrence of severe psychogenic tremor in childhood and adolescence are much needed. Case presentation A 13-year-old Caucasian girl with tremor in both wrists, severe enough to prevent her from attending school, was sent to our hospital. After a ...

  12. An airjet actuator system for identification of the human arm joint mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu YMj; Hunter, I W; Hollerbach, J M; Bennett, D J

    1991-11-01

    A system is described for determining the mechanical properties of the human arm during unconstrained posture and movement. An airjet perturbation device is attached to the wrist with a special cuff, and provides high-frequency stochastic perturbations in potentially three orthogonal directions. The airjet operates as a fluidic flip-flop utilizing the Coanda effect, and generates binary force sequences with a steady-state thrust of 4 N, a flat frequency response to 75 Hz, usable thrust to 150 Hz, and a rise time of 1 ms, when the static pressure at the nozzle inlet is 5.5 x 10(5) Pa (80 psi). These operating characteristics are adequate to identify the arm's mechanical properties efficiently and robustly. PMID:1748446

  13. Abdominal Burkitt lymphoma in children : CT finding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the CT findings of Burkitt's lymphoma involving the abdomen in children We retrospectively analyzed the abdominal CT of ten children who presented with abdominal symptom. They were confirmed by operation in two cases and by fine needle aspiration biopsy in eight to be suffering from Burkitt's lymphoma. We also abdominal ultrasonography(USG)(n=10) and carried out small bowel follow-through examination(SBS)(n=5). Analyses focused on features of the abdominal mass : bowel wall thickening, ascites, lymphadenopathy, and the involvement of intra-abdominal solid organ. Abdominal CT at the time of presentation showed a huge conglomerated mass encasing segments of small bowel and also peripherally displacing bowel loops(n=9), bowel wall thickening(n=10), and ascites(n=10). In three of these cases, we were able to see tumor necrosis and cavity formation. Extensive infiltration into mesenteric fat and obliteration of tissue plane made it impossible to identify on CT the margin of the tumor and the presence of mesenteric lymphadenopathy. In four patients, sonography showed enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes(15-20mm), and in three, retroperitoneal lymph nodes(5mm, 10mm, 12mm in long dimension) were detected on CT and USG. Abdominal CT can reveal the characteristic imaging features of Burkitt's lymphoma in children. These are a huge conglomerate mass with or without cavity formation, that encases the small bowel and infiltrates the mesentery, ascites, and the relatively spared retroperitoneal lymph nodes

  14. Abdominal Burkitt lymphoma in children : CT finding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Jae Uoo; Kim, Woo Sun; Kim, In One; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Ahn, Hyo Seop; Shin, Hee Young [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Chi Sung [Seoul City Boramae Hospital Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-10-01

    To evaluate the CT findings of Burkitt's lymphoma involving the abdomen in children We retrospectively analyzed the abdominal CT of ten children who presented with abdominal symptom. They were confirmed by operation in two cases and by fine needle aspiration biopsy in eight to be suffering from Burkitt's lymphoma. We also abdominal ultrasonography(USG)(n=10) and carried out small bowel follow-through examination(SBS)(n=5). Analyses focused on features of the abdominal mass : bowel wall thickening, ascites, lymphadenopathy, and the involvement of intra-abdominal solid organ. Abdominal CT at the time of presentation showed a huge conglomerated mass encasing segments of small bowel and also peripherally displacing bowel loops(n=9), bowel wall thickening(n=10), and ascites(n=10). In three of these cases, we were able to see tumor necrosis and cavity formation. Extensive infiltration into mesenteric fat and obliteration of tissue plane made it impossible to identify on CT the margin of the tumor and the presence of mesenteric lymphadenopathy. In four patients, sonography showed enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes(15-20mm), and in three, retroperitoneal lymph nodes(5mm, 10mm, 12mm in long dimension) were detected on CT and USG. Abdominal CT can reveal the characteristic imaging features of Burkitt's lymphoma in children. These are a huge conglomerate mass with or without cavity formation, that encases the small bowel and infiltrates the mesentery, ascites, and the relatively spared retroperitoneal lymph nodes.

  15. Abdominal ultrasonographic findings of Yersiniosis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To review abdominal ultrasonography in Yersinia Pseudotuberculosis(YP) infection. From June 1993 through June 1994, abdominal ultrasonograms were reviewed in 36 patients with YP infection. The age of patients was from 4 to 14 years. A diagnosis of YP infection was made on the basis of isolation of YP from stool (n=15/36, 41.7%) and by documenting at least a minimum agglutination antibody titer of 1;160 or greater (n=34/36, 94.4%). Abdominal US findings were identified in 33/36 (91.7%) of patients with YP infection. US abnormalities included right lower quadrant abdominal lymphadenopathy in 28/36 (77.8%) of cases: increased bilateral renal cortical echogenecity with renal enlargement, 11/36 (30.6%) of cases:hepatosplenomegaly, 6/36 (16.7%) of cases: bowel wall thickening in termnal ileum and cecum, 4/36 (11.1%) of cases:and ascites, 2/36 (5.5%) of cases. Three patients revealed no abdominal sonographic finding. We conclude that abdominal US can help in the diagnosis of YP infection when US demonstrates multiple right lower quadrant abdominal lymphadenopathy, increased renal cortical echogenecity with renal enlargement, hepatosplenomegaly, intestinal wall thickening or ascites

  16. Radiologic findings of abdominal wall endometriosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the imaging findings of abdominal wall endometriosis. In seven of 17 patients with surgically proven endometriosis of the abdominal wall, we retrospectively reviewed the findings of radiologic studies such as abdominal US (n=3), CT (n=4), and MRI (n=1). One patient under went more than one type of imaging, apparently. The surgical history of the seven, and their symptoms and preoperative diagnosis were reviewed, and the size, location, margin and nature of the mass, and the contrast enhancement patterns observed at radiologic studies, were assessed. The chief symptoms were palpable abdominal wall mass (n=5) and lower abdominal pain (n=2) around a surgical scar. Previous surgery included cesarean section (n=5), cesarean section with oophorectomy (n=1) and appendectomy (n=1). Masses were located in the subcutaneous fat layer (n=5) or rectus abdominis muscle (n=2), and their maximum diameter was 2.6 cm. Imaging findings, which correlated closely with the pathologic findings, included a well (n=5) or poorly marginated (n=2) solid mass, with a focal cystic area apparent in two cases. Although imaging findings of abdominal wall endometriosis may not be specific for diagnosis, the presence of a solid abdominal mass in female patients of reproductive age with a history of surgery is a diagnostic pointer

  17. Radiologic findings of abdominal wall endometriosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jung Wook [Inje Univ. Ilsan Paik Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-01

    To evaluate the imaging findings of abdominal wall endometriosis. In seven of 17 patients with surgically proven endometriosis of the abdominal wall, we retrospectively reviewed the findings of radiologic studies such as abdominal US (n=3), CT (n=4), and MRI (n=1). One patient under went more than one type of imaging, apparently. The surgical history of the seven, and their symptoms and preoperative diagnosis were reviewed, and the size, location, margin and nature of the mass, and the contrast enhancement patterns observed at radiologic studies, were assessed. The chief symptoms were palpable abdominal wall mass (n=5) and lower abdominal pain (n=2) around a surgical scar. Previous surgery included cesarean section (n=5), cesarean section with oophorectomy (n=1) and appendectomy (n=1). Masses were located in the subcutaneous fat layer (n=5) or rectus abdominis muscle (n=2), and their maximum diameter was 2.6 cm. Imaging findings, which correlated closely with the pathologic findings, included a well (n=5) or poorly marginated (n=2) solid mass, with a focal cystic area apparent in two cases. Although imaging findings of abdominal wall endometriosis may not be specific for diagnosis, the presence of a solid abdominal mass in female patients of reproductive age with a history of surgery is a diagnostic pointer.

  18. Arm To Arm Interface Using Embedded C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohanraj.C

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Embedded systems are the most emerging field in these recent years. In this paper a different number of ARM processors (LPC2148 and LPC2378 are interconnected using C for distributed services. N numbers of processors are connected as the network and each processing devices are interlinked with each other, so that the each data that is processed by the devices and it can be used by the other device to activate their entire process. All the processed data’s are communicated to other device through Xbee interface card. LPC2148 and LPC2378 ARM processors are used in this prototype and winXtalk is used as a software terminal window. In this paper, the ultimate benefits of multiple processor interactions related to the embedded applications and design issues of processor interconnection are discussed. The features of multiple processor interaction in inter process communication and executions of embedded multitasking are also discussed. In modern embedded computing platform, embedded processor used in various applications like home automation, industrial control, medical system, access control, etc. In this paper, using embedded processor interactions, the several data communication is established.

  19. Accurate walking and running speed estimation using wrist inertial data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertschi, M; Celka, P; Delgado-Gonzalo, R; Lemay, M; Calvo, E M; Grossenbacher, O; Renevey, Ph

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we present an accelerometry-based device for robust running speed estimation integrated into a watch-like device. The estimation is based on inertial data processing, which consists in applying a leg-and-arm dynamic motion model to 3D accelerometer signals. This motion model requires a calibration procedure that can be done either on a known distance or on a constant speed period. The protocol includes walking and running speeds between 1.8km/h and 19.8km/h. Preliminary results based on eleven subjects are characterized by unbiased estimations with 2(nd) and 3(rd) quartiles of the relative error dispersion in the interval ±5%. These results are comparable to accuracies obtained with classical foot pod devices. PMID:26738169

  20. Children In Armed Conflicts

    OpenAIRE

    Ranjan, Tejaswini

    2013-01-01

    This is a descriptive study. A child soldier is a child under the age of 18 that is recruited into the armed forces and engages in political violence. Child Soldiers are recruited by a state or non-state armed group and used as fighters, cooks, suicide bombers, human shields, messengers, spies, or for sexual purposes. This work of research describes the plight of child soldiers taking in context the scenario of different nations. The International mechanisms to combat this problem have also b...

  1. PHENIX Muon Arms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PHENIX Muon Arms detect muons at rapidities of |y|=(1.2-2.4) with full azimuthal acceptance. Each muon arm must track and identify muons and provide good rejection of pions and kaons (∼10-3). In order to accomplish this we employ a radial field magnetic spectrometer with precision tracking (Muon Tracker) followed by a stack of absorber/low resolution tracking layers (Muon Identifier). The design, construction, testing and expected run parameters of both the muon tracker and the muon identifier are described

  2. PHENIX Muon Arms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akikawa, H.; Al-Jamel, A.; Archuleta, J.B.; Archuleta, J.R.; Armendariz, R.; Armijo, V.; Awes, T.C.; Baldisseri, A.; Barker, A.B.; Barnes, P.D.; Bassalleck, B.; Batsouli, S.; Behrendt, J.; Bellaiche, F.G.; Bland, A.W.; Bobrek, M.; Boissevain, J.G.; Borel, H.; Brooks, M.L.; Brown, A.W.; Brown, D.S.; Bruner, N.; Cafferty, M.M.; Carey, T.A.; Chai, J.-S.; Chavez, L.L.; Chollet, S.; Choudhury, R.K.; Chung, M.S.; Cianciolo, V.; Clark, D.J.; Cobigo, Y.; Dabrowski, C.M.; Debraine, A.; DeMoss, J.; Dinesh, B.V.; Drachenberg, J.L.; Drapier, O.; Echave, M.A.; Efremenko, Y.V.; En' yo, H.; Fields, D.E.; Fleuret, F.; Fried, J.; Fujisawa, E.; Funahashi, H.; Gadrat, S.; Gastaldi, F.; Gee, T.F.; Glenn, A.; Gogiberidze, G.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Hance, R.H.; Hart, G.W.; Hayashi, N.; Held, S.; Hicks, J.S.; Hill, J.C.; Hoade, R.; Hong, B.; Hoover, A.; Horaguchi, T.; Hunter, C.T.; Hurst, D.E.; Ichihara, T.; Imai, K.; Isenhower, L.D.L. Davis; Isenhower, L.D.L. Donald; Ishihara, M.; Jang, W.Y.; Johnson, J.; Jouan, D.; Kamihara, N.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Kang, J.H.; Kapoor, S.S.; Kim, D.J.; Kim, D.-W.; Kim, G.-B.; Kinnison, W.W.; Klinksiek, S.; Kluberg, L.; Kobayashi, H.; Koehler, D.; Kotchenda, L.; Kuberg, C.H.; Kurita, K.; Kweon, M.J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G.S.; LaBounty, J.J.; Lajoie, J.G.; Lee, D.M.; Lee, S.; Leitch, M.J.; Li, Z.; Liu, M.X.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y.; Lockner, E.; Lopez, J.D.; Mao, Y.; Martinez, X.B.; McCain, M.C.; McGaughey, P.L.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, R.E.; Mohanty, A.K.; Montoya, B.C.; Moss, J.M.; Murata, J.; Murray, M.M.; Nagle, J.L.; Nakada, Y.; Newby, J.; Obenshain, F.; Palounek, A.P.T.; Papavassiliou, V.; Pate, S.F.; Plasil, F.; Pope, K.; Qualls, J.M.; Rao, G.; Read, K.F. E-mail: readkf@ornl.gov; Robinson, S.H.; Roche, G.; Romana, A.; Rosnet, P.; Roth, R.; Saito, N.; Sakuma, T.; Sandhoff, W.F.; Sanfratello, L.; Sato, H.D.; Savino, R.; Sekimoto, M.; Shaw, M.R.; Shibata, T.-A.; Sim, K.S.; Skank, H.D.; Smith, D.E.; Smith, G.D. [and others

    2003-03-01

    The PHENIX Muon Arms detect muons at rapidities of |y|=(1.2-2.4) with full azimuthal acceptance. Each muon arm must track and identify muons and provide good rejection of pions and kaons ({approx}10{sup -3}). In order to accomplish this we employ a radial field magnetic spectrometer with precision tracking (Muon Tracker) followed by a stack of absorber/low resolution tracking layers (Muon Identifier). The design, construction, testing and expected run parameters of both the muon tracker and the muon identifier are described.

  3. Combined subcutaneous, intrathoracic and abdominal splenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadrashid, Reza; Paak, Neda; Salehi, Ahad

    2010-09-01

    We report a case of combined subcutaneous, intrathoracic, and abdominal splenosis who presented with attacks of flushing, tachycardia and vague abdominal pain. The patient's past medical history included a splenectomy due to abdominal trauma and years later, a lung lobectomy due to recurrent pneumonia. An enhancing solid mass adjacent to the upper pole of the left kidney and nodular pleural based lesions in the left hemi-thorax along with nodular lesions in subcutaneous tissue of the left chest wall suggested possible adrenal malignancy with multiple metastases. Histopathologic examination demonstrated benign lesions of ectopic splenic tissue. PMID:20804314

  4. Roentgenologic evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study comprises 25 cases of blunt abdominal trauma proved by surgery. It is concluded that visceral damage by blunt abdominal trauma may be suspected, but can not be satisfactorily diagnosed upon a single plane abdominal roentgenologic examination with clinical support. Contrary to some reports in the literature, rupture of the hallow, viscus is more susceptible than solid organ and ileum is more than jejunum. It is a useful roentgenologic sign denoting distension and small cresent air shadow in the duodenal sweep of the damaged pancreas

  5. Chylous Ascites after Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohki, Shinichi; Kurumisawa, Soki; Misawa, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    A 73-year-old man was transferred for treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm. He had no history of abdominal surgeries. Grafting between the infra-renal abdominal aorta and the bilateral common iliac arteries was performed. Proximal and distal cross clamps were applied for grafting. He developed chylous ascites on the 5th post-operative day, 2 days after initiation of oral intake. Fortunately, he responded to treatment with total parenteral hyper-alimentation for 10 days, followed by a low-fat diet. There was no recurrence of ascites. PMID:27087873

  6. The distally-based island ulnar artery perforator flap for wrist defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karki Durga

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reconstruction of soft tissue defects around the wrist with exposed tendons, joints, nerves and bone represents a challenge to plastic surgeons, and such defects necessitate flap coverage to preserve hand functions and to protect its vital structures. We evaluated the use of a distally-based island ulnar artery perforator flap in patients with volar soft tissue defects around the wrist. Materials and Methods: Between June 2004 and June 2006, seven patients of soft tissue defects on the volar aspect of the wrist underwent distally-based island ulnar artery perforator flap. Out of seven patients, five were male and two patients were female. This flap was used in the reconstruction of the post road traffic accident defects in four patients and post electric burn defects in three patients. Flap was raised on one or two perforators and was rotated to 180°. Results: All flaps survived completely. Donor sites were closed primarily without donor site morbidity. Conclusion: The distally-based island Ulnar artery perforator flap is convenient, reliable, easy to manage and is a single-stage technique for reconstructing soft tissue defects of the volar aspect of the wrist. Early use of this flap allows preservation of vital structures, decreases morbidity and allows for early rehabilitation.

  7. Effects of circumferential rigid wrist orthoses in rehabilitation of patients with radius fracture at typical site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurović Aleksandar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The use of orthoses is a questionable rehabilitation method for patients with the distal radius fracture at typical site. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of the rehabilitation on patients with radius fracture at the typical site, who wore circumferential static wrist orthoses, with those who did not wear them. Methods. Thirty patients were divided into 3 equal groups, 2 experimental groups, and 1 control group. The patients in the experimental groups were given the rehabilitation program of wearing serially manufactured (off-the-shelf, as well as custom-fit orthoses. Those in the control group did not wear wrist orthoses. Evaluation parameters were pain, edema, the range of the wrist motion, the quality of cylindrical, spherical, and pinch-spherical grasp, the strength of pinch and hand grasp, and patient's assessment of the effects of rehabilitation. Results. No significant difference in the effects of rehabilitation on the patients in experimental groups as opposed to control group was found. Patients in the first experimental group, and in control group were more satisfied with the effects of rehabilitation, as opposed to the patients in the second experimental group (p<0,05. Conclusion. The effects of circumferential static wrist orthoses in the rehabilitation of patients with distal radius fracture at the typical site were not clinically significant. There was no significant difference between the custom and off-the-shelf orthoses.

  8. MRI of the hand and wrist joint of climbers. Imaging of lesions and overstrain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hands and wrists of 20 top-level rock climbers with sports injuries and overstress abnormalities were compared with the hands and wrists of 10 normal volunteers. They were all studied with MR imaging at 1.5 T. The imaging protocol included spin-echo and gradient-echo sequences with 1- to 5-mm-thick contiguous slices in the axial, coronal and/or sagittal planes, depending on the location and nature of the suspected injury. Typical hand and wrist lesions depicted with MRI in climbers consisted of annular ligament tears, lesions of the flexor tendons, tenosynovitis, ganglion cysts, joint effusion and functional carpal tunnel syndrome. The MRI findings on these abnormalities were compared to normal findings and those with ultrasound and plain films. In addition, hypertrophic changes in the muscles, tendons, ligaments, and bones of top-level rock climbers were assessed morphometrically. MRI proved to be the superior imaging modality in the diagnosis of sports injuries and overstress abnormalities of the hand the wrist in rock-climbing athletes. (orig.)

  9. Role of Scaphoid in the Abduction and Adduction Movements of Wrist Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadik I Shaikh

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Being a carpal bone scaphoid has an important role in wrist movements. Wrist joint is a synovial modified ellipsoid joint where movements like flexion, extension and adduction, abduction take place around two axes (transverse and antero-posterior. These movements at the wrist joint are associated with considerable range of movements at the mid carpal joint, as same group of muscles act on both of these joints. Methodology: A study has been done amongst 120 persons at the tertiary care hospital during the period from 2006-07 to detect the important movements of scaphoid bone specially during the abduction and adduction of wrist joint (which occur in association with the intercarpal joints and also to detect whether such movements have any speciality in the population. Results: In fully abducted position, it was 45o among 53.3% subjects and the average among all the subjects was 60o. So, the degree of abduction was 30o. The extent of movement was more in adduction (ie, 1.90 cm - 1.03 cm = 0.87 cm than in abduction (ie, 1.03 cm - 0.72 cm = 0.31cm. Conclusion: It was found in this study that the scaphoid acts as a link bone between the two rows of carpal bones and prevents the buckling of midcarpal joint especially of the capitato- lunate joint interface. [Natl J Med Res 2013; 3(3.000: 253-256

  10. Psychometric properties of two questionnaires in the context of total wrist arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeckstyns, Michel E H; Merser, Søren

    2014-01-01

    evaluated the Patient-rated Wrist Evaluation. RESULTS: Internal consistency and reproducibility were very high (Cronbach's alpha 0.96/0.97; Spearman's rho 0.90/ 0.91; intraclass coefficient 0.91/0.92), and there were no floor or ceiling effects. The responsiveness of the QuickDASH was high (standardised...

  11. Pisotriquetral joint disorders: an under-recognized cause of ulnar side wrist pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraux, A. [Hopital Roger Salengro, Service d' Imagerie Musculo-Squelettique, Centre de Consultation de l' Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU Lille (France); Imagerie Medicale Jacquemars Gielee, Lille (France); Lefebvre, G.; Pansini, V.; Aucourt, J.; Vandenbussche, L.; Cotten, A. [Hopital Roger Salengro, Service d' Imagerie Musculo-Squelettique, Centre de Consultation de l' Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU Lille (France); Demondion, X. [Hopital Roger Salengro, Service d' Imagerie Musculo-Squelettique, Centre de Consultation de l' Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU Lille (France); Pole Recherche Faculte de Medecine de Lille, Laboratoire d' Anatomie, Lille (France)

    2014-06-15

    Pisotriquetral joint disorders are often under-recognized in routine clinical practice. They nevertheless represent a significant cause of ulnar side wrist pain. The aim of this article is to present the main disorders of this joint and discuss the different imaging modalities that can be useful for its assessment. (orig.)

  12. Four-dimensional computed tomographic imaging in the wrist: proof of feasibility in a cadaveric model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tay, Shian-Chao; Berger, Richard A. [Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Orthopedics Biomechanics Laboratory, Rochester, MN (United States); Primak, Andrew N.; Amrami, Kimberly K. [Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Fletcher, Joel G.; McCollough, Cynthia H. [Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, CT Innovation Center, Rochester, MN (United States); Schmidt, Bernhard [Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    High-resolution real-time three-dimensional (3D) imaging of the moving wrist may provide novel insights into the pathophysiology of joint instability. The purpose of this work was to assess the feasibility of using retrospectively gated spiral computed tomography (CT) to perform four-dimensional (4D) imaging of the moving wrist joint. A cadaver forearm from below the elbow was mounted on a motion simulator which performed radioulnar deviation of the wrist at 30 cycles per minute. An electronic trigger from the simulator provided the ''electrocardiogram'' (ECG) signal required for gated reconstructions. Four-dimensional and 3D images were compared by a blinded observer for image quality and presence of artifacts. Image quality of 4D images was found to be excellent at the extremes of radial and ulnar deviation (end-motion phases). Some artifacts were seen in mid-motion phases. 4D CT musculoskeletal imaging is feasible. Four-dimensional CT may allow clinicians to assess functional (dynamic) instabilities of the wrist joint. (orig.)

  13. Low Level Laser Therapy (Lllt) for Chronic Joint Pain of the Elbow, Wrist and Fingers

    OpenAIRE

    Okuni, Ikuko; Ushigome, Nobuyuki; Harada, Takashi; Ohshiro, Toshio; Musya, Yoshiro; Sekiguchi, Masayuki

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims: In previous studies, we successfully applied Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) in patients with non-specific chronic pain of the shoulder joint and lower back. The purpose of the present study was to assess the effectiveness of LLLT for chronic joint pain of the elbow, wrist, and fingers.

  14. A preliminary investigation of trunk and wrist kinematics when using drivers with different shaft properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Christopher; Burnett, Angus; Cochrane, Jodie; Reyes, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    It is unknown whether skilled golfers will modify their kinematics when using drivers of different shaft properties. This study aimed to firstly determine if golf swing kinematics and swing parameters and related launch conditions differed when using modified drivers, then secondly, determine which kinematics were associated with clubhead speed. Twenty high level amateur male golfers (M ± SD: handicap = 1.9 ± 1.9 score) had their three-dimensional (3D) trunk and wrist kinematics collected for two driver trials. Swing parameters and related launch conditions were collected using a launch monitor. A one-way repeated measures ANOVA revealed significant (p ≤ 0.003) between driver differences; specifically, faster trunk axial rotation velocity and an early wrist release for the low kick point driver. Launch angle was shown to be 2° lower for the high kick point driver. Regression models for both drivers explained a significant amount of variance (60-67%) in clubhead speed. Wrist kinematics were most associated with clubhead speed, indicating the importance of the wrists in producing clubhead speed regardless of driver shaft properties. PMID:27075379

  15. Incidentaloma at Radial Artery Forearm Free Flap Harvest: An Occult Volar Wrist Ganglion

    OpenAIRE

    Nambi, G.I.; M Dhiwakar

    2012-01-01

    Occult volar wrist ganglion originating from radioscaphoid interval and having adherence to flexor carpi radialis tendon [Fcr] and radial artery is an uncommon occurrence. We report such a case which was occult and asymptomatic during pre-operative assessment and presented as an incidentaloma during radial artery forearm free flap harvest for oral cancer reconstruction.

  16. 78 FR 44625 - Proposed Information Collection (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-24

    ... 17, 2013 (78 FR 36307), inviting the public to comment on a proposed information collection titled ``Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA Form 21-0960M-16.'' On June 18, 2013 (78 FR 36643... corrects that error by withdrawing the FR notice that published on June 18, 2013 (FR Doc 2013-14412)....

  17. Post-traumatic Median Nerve Neuroma in Wrist. A Case Report and brief review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Aslan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Distal median nerve masses may be developed post-traumatic or non-traumatic. In this paper, we aim to present a 52 year old female case with a postraumatic neuroma of the median nerve in the left wrist. Case Report: A 52-year-old female patient had accidental incised wound over her left wrist which was primarily sutured. She presented 6 months later with unrelieved pain and growing swelling at the wrist. USG showed solid mass of size 2×3 cms. Intraoperatively the mass was seen to arise from medial nerve and careful excision was done protecting the nerve. At one year follow up the patient is relived of her symptoms with no sensorimotor deficit. Conclusion: Post traumatic neuroma present as unrelieved pain and progressive swelling. A high index of suspicion should be kept in cases of wound that are primarily sutured over an area with superficial nerves. Careful excision of the lesion is very effective in relieving patients symptoms Keywords: Neuroma, wrist, median nerve, nerve ınjury.

  18. Four-dimensional computed tomographic imaging in the wrist: proof of feasibility in a cadaveric model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-resolution real-time three-dimensional (3D) imaging of the moving wrist may provide novel insights into the pathophysiology of joint instability. The purpose of this work was to assess the feasibility of using retrospectively gated spiral computed tomography (CT) to perform four-dimensional (4D) imaging of the moving wrist joint. A cadaver forearm from below the elbow was mounted on a motion simulator which performed radioulnar deviation of the wrist at 30 cycles per minute. An electronic trigger from the simulator provided the ''electrocardiogram'' (ECG) signal required for gated reconstructions. Four-dimensional and 3D images were compared by a blinded observer for image quality and presence of artifacts. Image quality of 4D images was found to be excellent at the extremes of radial and ulnar deviation (end-motion phases). Some artifacts were seen in mid-motion phases. 4D CT musculoskeletal imaging is feasible. Four-dimensional CT may allow clinicians to assess functional (dynamic) instabilities of the wrist joint. (orig.)

  19. Pisotriquetral joint disorders: an under-recognized cause of ulnar side wrist pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisotriquetral joint disorders are often under-recognized in routine clinical practice. They nevertheless represent a significant cause of ulnar side wrist pain. The aim of this article is to present the main disorders of this joint and discuss the different imaging modalities that can be useful for its assessment. (orig.)

  20. The paediatric wrist revisited - findings of bony depressions in healthy children on radiographs compared to MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avenarius, Derk M.F.; Eldevik, Petter [University Hospital North Norway, Department of Radiology, Tromsoe (Norway); Ording Mueller, Lil-Sofie [University Hospital North Norway, Department of Radiology, Tromsoe (Norway); Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Owens, Catherine M. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); University College London, Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom); Rosendahl, Karen [Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bergen (Norway); University of Bergen, Department of Surgical Sciences, Bergen (Norway); Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-15

    The presence of erosions is used for diagnosis and monitoring of disease activity in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Assessment of carpal bone erosions in children is challenging due to lack of normal references. To define normal appearances of bony depressions in the wrist on radiographs and MRI. MRI and radiography of the wrist were performed in 88 healthy children, 5-15 years of age. We assessed the number of bony depressions within the carpals/proximal metacarpals on both modalities, separately and combined. A total of 75 carpal depressions were identified on radiography compared to 715 on MRI. The number of bony depressions identified radiographically showed no statistically significant difference across age-groups. Within the metacarpals, there was no significant difference between bony depressions identified by MRI or radiography, except at the bases of the second metacarpal. Bony depressions that resemble erosions are normal findings in the wrist in children. MRI identifies more depressions than radiographs in the carpus. Some bony depressions occur at typical locations and should be accounted for when assessing the wrist in JIA to avoid overstaging. (orig.)

  1. Detection of In Vivo Dynamic 3-D Motion Patterns in the Wrist Joint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Carelsen; R. Jonges; S.D. Strackee; M. Maas; P. van Kemenade; C.A. Grimbergen; M. van Herk; G.J. Streekstra

    2009-01-01

    We present a method for measurement dynamic in vivo carpal motion patterns. The method consists of a 4-D rotational X-ray (RX) with improved image quality and image processing for accurate detection in vivo wrist motion measurements. Dynamic 3-D imaging yields a number of volume reconstructions of t

  2. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist in early arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Cimmino

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: MRI has been proposed as the imaging method of choice to evaluate the long-term outcome in patients with early arthritis. The role of dynamic MRI, performed at presentation, in predicting the outcome of patients with early arthritis has been addressed in the present study. Methods: 39 patients with early arthritis, involving at least one wrist, were studied with clinical visits and laboratory investigations, every 3 months. Dynamic MRI was performed with a low-field (0.2T, extremity-dedicated machine (Artoscan, Esaote, Genova, Italy equipped with a permanent magnet and with a dedicated hand and wrist coil. During the intravenous injection of Gd-DTPA, twenty consecutive fast images of 3 slices of the wrist were acquired. The synovial contrast enhancement ratio was calculated both as rate of early enhancement (REE per second during the first 55” and as relative enhancement (RE at t seconds. Results: In our cohort of patients, REE and RE were significantly lower than those observed in a historical cohort of 36 patients with active rheumatoid arthritis. In univariate analysis, low RE predicted complete remission of arthritis. In multivariate analysis, fulfillment of RA criteria during follow-up was predicted by high RE. The need for immunosuppressive treatment at the end of follow-up was predicted by both low RE and high REE. Conclusions: Dynamic MRI may be used to predict several outcomes of early arthritis involving the wrist

  3. Sonographic Wrist Measurements and Detection of Anatomical Features in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Vögelin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This study compares anatomical findings at wrist level in patients with known carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS and controls by ultrasonography (US. Material and Methods. Wrist-US investigations of 28 consecutive patients with 38 diagnosed, idiopathic CTS were compared to 49 healthy volunteers without history of CTS. Internal wrists dimensions, the presence of flexor muscle bellies in the carpal tunnel, and cross-sectional area of the median nerve were analyzed. The findings were correlated to gender, age, and BMI. Results. US demonstrated a square internal carpal tunnel configuration in CTS patients compared to controls (P<0.001. Patients with CTS showed a trend towards the presence of flexor muscles bellies in the carpal tunnel (odds ratio 1.77, 95% CI 0.337–8.33. CTS was present in women with higher BMI (P=0.015. Conclusion. US allowed detection of specific anatomical features at wrist level in CTS patients. This observation may enable—following confirmation in larger prospective studies—risk evaluation for CTS development.

  4. Elimination of hand-wrist radiographs for maturity assessment in children needing orthodontic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our aim was to evaluate the validity of the cervical vertebra maturation (CVM) method as an indicator of skeletal age during the circumpubertal period by correlating the CVM method with the hand-wrist maturation (HWM) method in an attempt to eliminate the need for hand-wrist radiographs for maturity assessment. Hand-wrist and lateral cephalometric radiographs of 400 Chinese were randomly selected. The age for girls was between 10 years and 15 years and for boys it was between 12 years and 17 years, so that they were within the circumpubertal period. The CVM was assessed by a method developed by Baccetti and co-workers, whereas hand-wrist maturation was assessed by Fishman's method. The CVM was significantly correlated with HWM skeletal age. (Spearman's r boys 0.9206, girls = 0.9363). All the patients in cervical vertebra stage 3 (CVS3) of CVM corresponded to skeletal maturation indicator 2 (SMI2) or SMI3 stages of HWM (around the peak of the growth spurt). The method error was insignificant. CVM is a valid indicator of skeletal growth during the circumpubertal period. This work will provide dental practitioners with information on jaw growth modification therapy. (orig.)

  5. Elimination of hand-wrist radiographs for maturity assessment in children needing orthodontic therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Khal, Hessa A.; Wong, Ricky W.K.; Rabie, A.B.M. [University of Hong Kong, Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Prince Philip Dental Hospital, Hong Kong (China)

    2008-03-15

    Our aim was to evaluate the validity of the cervical vertebra maturation (CVM) method as an indicator of skeletal age during the circumpubertal period by correlating the CVM method with the hand-wrist maturation (HWM) method in an attempt to eliminate the need for hand-wrist radiographs for maturity assessment. Hand-wrist and lateral cephalometric radiographs of 400 Chinese were randomly selected. The age for girls was between 10 years and 15 years and for boys it was between 12 years and 17 years, so that they were within the circumpubertal period. The CVM was assessed by a method developed by Baccetti and co-workers, whereas hand-wrist maturation was assessed by Fishman's method. The CVM was significantly correlated with HWM skeletal age. (Spearman's r boys = 0.9206, girls = 0.9363). All the patients in cervical vertebra stage 3 (CVS3) of CVM corresponded to skeletal maturation indicator 2 (SMI2) or SMI3 stages of HWM (around the peak of the growth spurt). The method error was insignificant. CVM is a valid indicator of skeletal growth during the circumpubertal period. This work will provide dental practitioners with information on jaw growth modification therapy. (orig.)

  6. Prophylactic corticosteroid injection in ulnar wrist pain in distal radius fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Saied

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Based on the findings of the present study it seems that prophylactic corticosteroid injection will be associated with a decrease in the severity of wrist pain in patients with acute distal radius fractures. With regard to the decrease in the number of painless individuals, it seems that the decrease is not persistent. Overall the need for a study with longer followup is obvious.

  7. The paediatric wrist revisited - findings of bony depressions in healthy children on radiographs compared to MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of erosions is used for diagnosis and monitoring of disease activity in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Assessment of carpal bone erosions in children is challenging due to lack of normal references. To define normal appearances of bony depressions in the wrist on radiographs and MRI. MRI and radiography of the wrist were performed in 88 healthy children, 5-15 years of age. We assessed the number of bony depressions within the carpals/proximal metacarpals on both modalities, separately and combined. A total of 75 carpal depressions were identified on radiography compared to 715 on MRI. The number of bony depressions identified radiographically showed no statistically significant difference across age-groups. Within the metacarpals, there was no significant difference between bony depressions identified by MRI or radiography, except at the bases of the second metacarpal. Bony depressions that resemble erosions are normal findings in the wrist in children. MRI identifies more depressions than radiographs in the carpus. Some bony depressions occur at typical locations and should be accounted for when assessing the wrist in JIA to avoid overstaging. (orig.)

  8. Some mechanical design aspects of the European Robotic Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambooy, Peter J.; Mandersloot, Wart M.; Bentall, Richard H.

    1995-01-01

    The European Robotic Arm (ERA) is a contribution to the Russian Segment of the International Space Station Alpha. It will start operating on the Russian Segment during the assembly phase. ERA is designed and produced by a large industrial consortium spread over Europe with Fokker Space & Systems as prime contractor. In this paper, we will describe some of the overall design aspects and focus on the development of several mechanisms within ERA. The operation of ERA during the approach of its end effector towards the grapple interface and the grapple operation is discussed, with a focus on mechanisms. This includes the geometry of the end effector leading edge, which is carefully designed to provide the correct and complete tactile information to a torque-force sensor (TFS). The data from this TFS are used to steer the arm such that forces and moments are kept below 20 N and 20 N.m respectively during the grappling operation. Two hardware models of the end effector are built. The problems encountered are described as well as their solutions. The joints in the wrists and the elbow initially used a harmonic drive lubricated by MoS2. During development testing, this combination showed an insufficient lifetime in air to survive the acceptance test program. The switch-over to a system comprising planetary gearboxes with grease lubrication is described. From these development efforts, conclusions are drawn and recommendations are given for the design of complex space mechanisms.

  9. Staging of pediatric abdominal malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scope of this review is the role of CT in the staging of childhood solid abdominal malignancies. Owing to the limitations of space, only the commonest lesions will be discussed in detail: Wilms' tumor, neuroblastoma, and liver tumors. The TNM staging system has been utilized throughout this monograph. It will not be used in this chapter, however, since in this country different staging systems individualized to each pediatric tumor have been developed. These staging systems take into account the different biology of each tumor and have clear correlations with prognosis and therapeutic programs. The discussion centers almost exclusively on the role of CT in the staging and management of neoplastic processes in children. The information required for staging can sometimes be obtained by other imaging modalities (i.e., ultrasound, excretory urography, etc.) The choice of modality will be strongly influenced by techniques and expertise available as well as by the bias of the institution. An additional factor to be taken into consideration will be the economic factor. Prospective reimbursement will strongly encourage the use of tests that are cost-effective and clinically efficacious

  10. Replantation (Finger, Hand, or Arm)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Symptom Picker Hand and Arm Conditions Carpal Tunnel Ganglion Cysts Trigger Finger Arthritis Base of the Thumb See ... Symptom Picker Hand and Arm Conditions Carpal Tunnel Ganglion Cysts Trigger Finger Arthritis Base of the Thumb See ...

  11. Modernization of African Armed Forces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Concept paper framing the debate at the Dakar Forum Workshop on Modernization of Armed forces in Africa.......Concept paper framing the debate at the Dakar Forum Workshop on Modernization of Armed forces in Africa....

  12. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... was yes, it did -- right here -- it did cause seromas as well. Another thing was that the ... is two things: one is it's going to cause more adherence of the Veritas to the abdominal ...

  13. An Unusual Case of Abdominal Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobby Desai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal calyceal rupture is a usual etiology of abdominal pain in the emergency department. We present a case of unexpected renal calyx rupture in a patient with symptomatology of renal colic. A discussion and review are provided.

  14. Asthma May Raise Risk for Abdominal Aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157202.html Asthma May Raise Risk for Abdominal Aneurysm Airway disease ... People 50 and older who have had recent asthma activity appear to be at an increased risk ...

  15. Adhesive intestinal obstruction following blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advances in diagnosis and management of multiple trauma patients have lead to adopting a conservative approach for most patients with blunt abdominal trauma. Intestinal obstruction is a rare complication for this approach. Herein, we report a 37-year-old male, who did not have an abdominal operation, and who developed adhesive intestinal obstruction 7 weeks following blunt abdominal trauma. We detected no signs of peritonitis or intra-abdominal bleeding clinically or radiologically on admission. We initially treated the intestinal obstruction conservatively, but the obstruction did not resolve. Finally, we performed laparotomy, which showed that the small bowel was matted together by thick fibrous layers of adhesions. We performed adhesiolysis, and the patient was discharged home 3 weeks later. Histopathological findings of the fibrous layer were consistent with repair due to previous trauma and hemorrhage. We review the literature of this rare condition. (author)

  16. Rotura e Hematoma do Recto Abdominal

    OpenAIRE

    Moura, D.; Lindo, T

    2013-01-01

    A miologia ântero-lateral do abdómen é constituída por dois músculos longos, o recto abdominal e o piramidal e três músculos largos, o oblíquo externo, oblíquo interno e transverso abdominal. A bainha do recto abdominal é formada pelas aponevroses de inserção anteriores dos músculos largos do abdómen em volta do recto abdominal, tendo camada anterior e camada posterior. Estes músculos abdominais são responsáveis por flexão e rotação do tronco, compressão e suporte/estabilidade de vísceras abd...

  17. Component Separation for Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available COMPONENT SEPARATION FOR COMPLEX ABDOMINAL WALL RECONSTRUCTION ALBANY MEDICAL CENTER ALBANY, NY April 30, 2008 00:00: ... Koumanis. The surgery comes to you from Albany Medical Center in Albany, New York. In just moments, ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: abdominal wall defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... size and can usually be diagnosed early in fetal development, typically between the tenth and fourteenth weeks of ... organs at the abdominal wall opening late in fetal development may also contribute to organ injury. Intestinal damage ...

  19. Surveillance intervals for small abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bown, Matthew J; Sweeting, Michael J; Brown, Louise C;

    2013-01-01

    Small abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs [3.0 cm-5.4 cm in diameter]) are monitored by ultrasound surveillance. The intervals between surveillance scans should be chosen to detect an expanding aneurysm prior to rupture....

  20. Audit of abdominal pain in general practice

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, M.W.; Forman, W.M.; Walton, J.

    1985-01-01

    An audit of 150 consecutive cases of abdominal pain presenting to an urban teaching practice between October 1983 and May 1984 was performed. The median duration of pain prior to presentation was two days. Females predominated in all age groups.

  1. Imaging of the elbow in children with wrist fracture: an unnecessary source of radiation and use of resources?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golding, Lauren P. [Wake Forest University Baptist Health, Department of Radiology, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Triad Radiology Associates, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Yasin, Yousef; Singh, Jasmeet; Anthony, Evelyn [Wake Forest University Baptist Health, Department of Radiology, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Gyr, Bettina M. [Wake Forest University Baptist Health, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Gardner, Alison [Wake Forest University Baptist Health, Department of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Anecdotally accepted practice for evaluation of children with clinically suspected or radiographically proven wrist fracture in many urgent care and primary care settings is concurrent imaging of the forearm and elbow, despite the lack of evidence to support additional images. These additional radiographs may be an unnecessary source of radiation and use of health care resources. Our study assesses the necessity of additional radiographs of the forearm and elbow in children with wrist injury. We reviewed electronic medical records of children 17 and younger in whom wrist fracture was diagnosed in the emergency department. We identified the frequency with which additional radiographs of the proximal forearm and distal humerus demonstrated another site of acute injury. We identified 214 children with wrist fracture. Of those, 129 received additional radiographs of the elbow. Physical examination findings proximal to the wrist were documented in only 16 (12%) of these 129 children. A second injury proximal to the wrist fracture was present in 4 (3%) of these 129 children, all of whom exhibited physical examination findings at the elbow. No fractures were documented in children with a negative physical examination of the elbow. Although elbow fractures occasionally complicate distal forearm fractures in children, our findings indicate that a careful physical evaluation of the elbow is sufficient to guide further radiographic investigation. Routine radiographs of both the wrist and elbow in children with distal forearm fracture appear to be unnecessary when an appropriate physical examination is performed. (orig.)

  2. A biomechanical model of the wrist joint for patient-specific model guided surgical therapy: Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschweiler, Jörg; Stromps, Jan-Philipp; Fischer, Maximilian; Schick, Fabian; Rath, Björn; Pallua, Norbert; Radermacher, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    An enhanced musculoskeletal biomechanical model of the wrist joint is presented in this article. The computational model is based on the multi-body simulation software AnyBody. Multi body dynamic musculoskeletal models capable of predicting muscle forces and joint contact pressures simultaneously would be valuable for studying clinical issues related to wrist joint degeneration and restoration. In this study, the simulation model of the wrist joint was used for investigating deeper the biomechanical function of the wrist joint. In representative physiological scenarios, the joint behavior and muscle forces were computed. Furthermore, the load transmission of the proximal wrist joint was investigated. The model was able to calculate the parameters of interest that are not easily obtainable experimentally, such as muscle forces and proximal wrist joint forces. In the case of muscle force investigation, the computational model was able to accurately predict the computational outcome for flexion and extension motion. In the case of force distribution of the proximal wrist joint, the model was able to predict accurately the computational outcome for an axial load of 140 N. The presented model and approach of using a multi-body simulation model are anticipated to have value as a predictive clinical tool including effect of injuries or anatomical variations and initial outcome of surgical procedures for patient-specific planning and custom implant design. Therefore, patient-specific multi-body simulation models are potentially valuable tools for surgeons in pre- and intraoperative planning of implant placement and orientation. PMID:26994118

  3. Imaging of the elbow in children with wrist fracture: an unnecessary source of radiation and use of resources?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anecdotally accepted practice for evaluation of children with clinically suspected or radiographically proven wrist fracture in many urgent care and primary care settings is concurrent imaging of the forearm and elbow, despite the lack of evidence to support additional images. These additional radiographs may be an unnecessary source of radiation and use of health care resources. Our study assesses the necessity of additional radiographs of the forearm and elbow in children with wrist injury. We reviewed electronic medical records of children 17 and younger in whom wrist fracture was diagnosed in the emergency department. We identified the frequency with which additional radiographs of the proximal forearm and distal humerus demonstrated another site of acute injury. We identified 214 children with wrist fracture. Of those, 129 received additional radiographs of the elbow. Physical examination findings proximal to the wrist were documented in only 16 (12%) of these 129 children. A second injury proximal to the wrist fracture was present in 4 (3%) of these 129 children, all of whom exhibited physical examination findings at the elbow. No fractures were documented in children with a negative physical examination of the elbow. Although elbow fractures occasionally complicate distal forearm fractures in children, our findings indicate that a careful physical evaluation of the elbow is sufficient to guide further radiographic investigation. Routine radiographs of both the wrist and elbow in children with distal forearm fracture appear to be unnecessary when an appropriate physical examination is performed. (orig.)

  4. Anatomical variation of radial wrist extensor muscles: a study in cadavers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soubhagya Ranjan Nayak

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The tendons of the extensor carpi radialis longus and brevis muscles are quite useful in tendon transfer, such as in correction of finger clawing and restoration of thumb opposition. Knowledge of additional radial wrist extensor muscle bellies with independent tendons is useful in the above-mentioned surgical procedures. METHODS: The skin, subcutaneous tissue, and antebrachial fascia of 48 (24 on the right side and 24 on left side male upper limb forearms were dissected. The following aspects were then analyzed: (a the presence of additional muscle bellies of radial wrist extensors, (b the origin and insertion of the additional muscle, and (c measurements of the muscle bellies and their tendons. RESULTS: Five out of 48 upper limbs (10.41% had additional radial wrist extensors; this occurred in 3 out of 24 left upper limbs (12.5% and 2 out of 24 right upper limbs (8.3%. In one of the right upper limbs, two additional muscles were found. The length and width of each additional muscle belly and its tendon ranged between 2 - 15cm by 0.35 - 6.4cm and 2.8 - 20.8cm by 0.2 0.5cm, respectively. The additional radial wrist extensor tendons in our study basically originated either from the extensor carpi radialis longus or brevis muscles and were inserted at the base of the 2nd or 3rd metacarpal bone. CONCLUSION: The present study will inform surgeons about the different varieties of additional radial wrist extensors and the frequency of their occurrence.

  5. An extremity (wrist) dosemeter based on the Landauer InLight whole body dosemeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of Landauer's clients use wrist badges to monitor extremity doses surrounding the hand. In the past, in France, we have supplied clients with standard issue InLight (registered) whole body dosemeters, enclosed within a soft plastic pouch. A strap was used to secure the dosemeter around the wrist. The standard algorithm for whole body dosimetry was used to determine the dose-equivalent (Hp(0.07)). Clients requested a smaller and more comfortable design. Therefore, a new design was proposed in which only the InLight case and slide are contained within a smaller plastic pouch. This design is substantially smaller than the previous wrist badge and gives the client greater comfort while allowing the badges themselves to be read out using the same readers and procedures as our standard whole body dosemeters. A neutron dosemeter can also be included in this badge. This paper gives an overview of the new design and reports on type testing of the proposed wrist badge on an ICRU pillar (wrist) phantom, in terms of the energy and angular response. It was found that, while the standard algorithm for the InLight dosemeters performed well for photons and was correctly identifying the quality of the radiation exposure (low or high energy photons, low or high energy beta particles), there was a significant under response for beta particle exposures. Minor modifications to the algorithm were adopted. Finally, the recalculated results using the modified algorithm are compared to the requirements of the international standard for extremity dosemeters (ISO 12794:2000). (author)

  6. Distinct thalamo-cortical controls for shoulder, elbow, and wrist during locomotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina N. Beloozerova

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent data from this laboratory on differential controls for the shoulder, elbow, and wrist exerted by the thalamo-cortical network during locomotion is presented, based on experiments involving chronically instrumented cats walking on a flat surface and along a horizontal ladder. The activity of the following three groups of neurons is characterized: 1 neurons of the motor cortex that project to the pyramidal tract (PTNs, 2 neurons of the ventrolateral thalamus (VL, many identified as projecting to the motor cortex (thalamo-cortical neurons, TCs, and 3 neurons of the reticular nucleus of thalamus (RE, which inhibit TCs. Neurons were grouped according to their receptive field into shoulder-, elbow-, and wrist/paw-related categories. During simple locomotion, shoulder-related PTNs were most active in the late stance and early swing, and on the ladder, often increased activity and step-related modulation while reducing discharge duration. Elbow-related PTNs were most active during late swing/early stance and typically remained similar on the ladder. Wrist-related PTNs were most active during swing, and on the ladder often decreased activity and increased modulation while reducing discharge duration.In the VL, shoulder-related neurons were more active during transition from swing to stance. Elbow-related cells tended to be more active during transition from stance to swing and on the ladder often decreased their activity and increased modulation. Wrist-related neurons were more active throughout the stance phase. In the RE, shoulder-related cells had low discharge rates and depths of modulation and long periods of activity distributed evenly across the cycle. In contrast, wrist/paw-related cells discharged synchronously during end of stance and swing with short periods of high activity, high modulation, and frequent sleep-type bursting. We conclude that thalamo-cortical network processes information related to different segments of the forelimb

  7. [Intestinal occlusion and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagnitti, Franco

    2009-01-01

    Intestinal occlusion is defined as an independent predictive factor of intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) which represents an independent predictor of mortality. Baggot in 1951 classified patients operated with intestinal occlusion as being at risk for IAH ("abdominal blow-out"), recommending them for open abdomen surgery proposed by Ogilvie. Abdominal surgery provokes IAH in 44.7% of cases with mortality which, in emergency, triples with respect to elective surgery (21.9% vs 6.8%). In particular, IAH is present in 61.2% of ileus and bowel distension and is responsible for 52% of mortality (54.8% in cases with intra-abdominal infection). These patients present with an increasing intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) which, over 20-25 mmHg, triggers an Abdominal Compartment Syndrome (ACS) with altered functions in some organs arriving at Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome (MODS). The intestine normally covers 58% of abdominal volume but when there is ileus distension, intestinal pneumatosis develops (third space) which can occupy up to 90% of the entire cavity. At this moment, Gastro Intestinal Failure (GIF) can appear, which is a specific independent risk factor of mortality, motor of "Organ Failure". The pathophysiological evolution has many factors in 45% of cases: intestinal pneumatosis is associated with mucosal and serous edema, capillary leakage with an increase in extra-cellular volume and peritoneal fluid collections (fourth space). The successive loss of the mucous barrier permits a bacterial translocation which includes bacteria, toxins, pro-inflammatory factors and oxygen free radicals facilitating the passage from an intra-abdominal to inter-systemic vicious cyrcle. IAH provokes the raising of the diaphragm, and vascular and visceral compressions which induce hypertension in the various spaces with compartmental characteristics. These trigger hypertension in the renal, hepatic, pelvic, thoracic, cardiac, intracranial, orbital and lower extremity areas, giving

  8. A biologically inspired neural network controller for ballistic arm movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmid Maurizio

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In humans, the implementation of multijoint tasks of the arm implies a highly complex integration of sensory information, sensorimotor transformations and motor planning. Computational models can be profitably used to better understand the mechanisms sub-serving motor control, thus providing useful perspectives and investigating different control hypotheses. To this purpose, the use of Artificial Neural Networks has been proposed to represent and interpret the movement of upper limb. In this paper, a neural network approach to the modelling of the motor control of a human arm during planar ballistic movements is presented. Methods The developed system is composed of three main computational blocks: 1 a parallel distributed learning scheme that aims at simulating the internal inverse model in the trajectory formation process; 2 a pulse generator, which is responsible for the creation of muscular synergies; and 3 a limb model based on two joints (two degrees of freedom and six muscle-like actuators, that can accommodate for the biomechanical parameters of the arm. The learning paradigm of the neural controller is based on a pure exploration of the working space with no feedback signal. Kinematics provided by the system have been compared with those obtained in literature from experimental data of humans. Results The model reproduces kinematics of arm movements, with bell-shaped wrist velocity profiles and approximately straight trajectories, and gives rise to the generation of synergies for the execution of movements. The model allows achieving amplitude and direction errors of respectively 0.52 cm and 0.2 radians. Curvature values are similar to those encountered in experimental measures with humans. The neural controller also manages environmental modifications such as the insertion of different force fields acting on the end-effector. Conclusion The proposed system has been shown to properly simulate the development of

  9. Using abdominal massage in bowel management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Michelle; Hunt, Catherine; Lindley, Alison; Adams, John

    2014-07-15

    This article describes the introduction of abdominal massage techniques by a community team as part of a total bowel management programme for people with learning disabilities. A trust-wide audit of prescribed laxative use by this client group raised concerns, and led to a more systematic approach to managing constipation in people with learning disabilities. An education programme for carers proved to be successful. Some reported that adopting abdominal massage provided further opportunity to develop the therapeutic relationship. PMID:25005415

  10. Factors associated with abdominal obesity in children

    OpenAIRE

    Matheus Ribeiro Theodósio Fernandes Melzer; Isabella Mastrangi Magrini; Semíramis Martins Álvares Domene; Paula Andrea Martins

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify the association of dietary, socioeconomic factors, sedentary behaviors and maternal nutritional status with abdominal obesity in children. Methods: A cross-sectional study with household-based survey, in 36 randomly selected census tracts in the city of Santos, SP. 357 families were interviewed and questionnaires and anthropometric measurements were applied in mothers and their 3-10 years-old children. Assessment of abdominal obesity was made by maternal and child's wa...

  11. Traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the abdominal aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchiche, R; Bové, T; Demanet, H; Goldstein, J P; Deuvaert, F E

    1999-08-01

    A traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the abdominal aorta is a rare entity, occurring as the result of a missed aortic lesion at the time of the initial injury. Therefore, clinical suspicion and careful abdominal exploration at first laparotomy is mandatory to prevent aortic pseudoaneurysm formation and its risk of delayed rupture. We present a case of successful surgical treatment of a suprarenal aortic false aneurysm, presenting 4 weeks after a life-threatening gunshot wound in a 13-year-old child. PMID:10499389

  12. A rare nonincisional lateral abdominal wall hernia

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Dong-Ju; Park, Jin-Woo

    2015-01-01

    A 68-year-old woman presented a rare lateral abdominal wall hernia. Three month before admission to Chungbuk National University Hospital, she found a large protruding mass measuring 8 cm in diameter in the midaxillary line just below the costal margin upon heavy coughing. She had no history of abdominal trauma, infection, or operation previously. The mass was easily reduced manually or by position change to left lateral decubitus. CT scan showed a defect of the right transversus abdominis mu...

  13. Abdominal integument atrophy after operative procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Smereczyński, Andrzej; Kołaczyk, Katarzyna; Lubiński, Jan; Bojko, Stefania; Gałdyńska, Maria; Bernatowicz, Elżbieta

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze clinical material concerning postoperative atrophy of abdominal integument. Material and methods The evaluated group consisted of 29 patients with sonographically revealed atrophy of the abdominal wall. Those changes were observed after various surgical procedures: mainly after long, anterolateral laparotomies or several classical operations. Ultrasound examinations up to the year 2000 were performed with analog apparatus, in the latter years only with digi...

  14. Anesthetic Considerations for Abdominal Wall Reconstructive Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Slabach, Rachel; Suyderhoud, Johan P.

    2012-01-01

    Anesthesia considerations for abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR) are numerous and depend upon the medical status of the patient and the projected procedure. Obesity, sleep apnea, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease are not uncommon in patients with abdominal wall defects; pulmonary functions and cardiac output can be affected by the surgical procedure. Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are also at a higher risk of coughing during the postoperative awakening process, wh...

  15. Asymptomatic torsion of intra-abdominal testis

    OpenAIRE

    M. Amin El-Gohary

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of intra-abdominal testicular torsion, of eight years old boy who presented with asymptomatic left impalpable testis. Diagnostic laparoscopy revealed a twisted small intra-abdominal testis in which the spermatic cord twisted 3 times over a band attached to the internal ring. The cord was long enough to bring the small testis into the scrotal sac. This case highlights the pole of laparoscopy in the management of impalpable testes.

  16. Diagnosis and treatment of expanding haematoma of the lateral abdominal wall after blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a rare case of an expanding post-traumatic lateral abdominal wall haematoma. A superselective arteriogram of the deep circumflex iliac artery showed extravasation from the ascending branch, urging emergency therapy. Microcoil and Gelfoam embolisation was successfully performed. Haematomas of the abdominal wall can be divided in the common rectus sheath haematomas and the rare haematomas of the lateral abdominal wall. Differentiating both entities is essential, since there is a strong difference in their vascular supply. The typical vascular supply of the lateral abdominal wall is discussed, with emphasis on the ascending branch of the deep circumflex iliac artery. (orig.)

  17. Load transfer through the radiocarpal joint and the effects of partial wrist arthrodesis on carpal bone behaviour: a finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gíslason, M K; Stansfield, B; Bransby-Zachary, M; Hems, T; Nash, D H

    2012-11-01

    A finite element model of the wrist was developed to simulate mechanical changes that occur after surgery of the wrist. After partial arthrodesis, the wrist will experience altered force transmission during loading. Three different types of partial arthrodesis were investigated - radiolunate, radioscaphoid, and radioscapholunate - and compared with the healthy untreated wrist. The results showed that the compressive forces on the radiocarpal joint decreased compared with the untreated wrist with both radiolunate and radioscaphoid fusions. The load transmission through the midcarpal joints varied depending on arthrodesis type. The forces in the extrinsic ligaments decreased with the fusion, most noticeably in the dorsal radiotriquetral ligament, but increased in the dorsal scaphotriquetral ligament. From the results of the study it can be concluded that the radioscapholunate fusion shows the most biomechanically similar behaviour out of the three fusion types compared with the healthy wrist. The modelling described in this paper may be a useful approach to pre-operative planning in wrist surgery. PMID:22457257

  18. Abdominal tuberculosis: clinical presentation and outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the clinical presentation and outcome of cases of Abdominal Tuberculosis. Fifty four patients of Abdominal Tuberculosis were seen during the study period. Four patients were lost to follow-up, which were excluded. Detailed information of all the patients including age, sex, symptoms, signs, investigations and management was recorded, analyzed and compared with local and international data. Out of the 50 patients with Abdominal Tuberculosis, 31 were females and 19 males. Their ages ranged from 17 to 63 years, with a mean age of 25.1 years. Thirty five cases were admitted through Emergency and 15 through Outpatients departments. Abdominal pain was the most common symptom found in 44 (88%) patients followed by vomiting in 33 (66%). Abdominal tenderness was seen in 22 (44%) patients, while 16 (32%) patients had rigidity and other features of peritonitis. Surgery was performed in all these patients, limited right hemicolectomy in 17 (34%), segmental resection and anastomosis in 12 (24%), ileostomy and strictureplasty in six (12%) each, repair of perforation in five (10%) and adhesiolysis in four (8%) patients. Overall mortality was 8% due to septicaemia and multiorgan failure. Abdominal Tuberculosis is a significant clinical entity with lethal complications in neglected cases. It affects a younger age group and is more common in females. Clinical features are rather non-specific but vague ill health, low grade fever, weight loss and anorexia may help to diagnose the case. (author)

  19. Effect of rectal distension on abdominal girth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, B; Ogliari, C; Basilisco, G

    2004-08-01

    It has been postulated that a viscerosomatic reflex activated by gut distension and inhibiting abdominal wall muscle tone may be one of the mechanisms underlying functional abdominal distension. Any demonstration of such a reflex has to take into account the fact that gut distension may increase abdominal girth as a result of volume displacement. As biomechanical and sensory rectal responses vary at different rates of rectal distension, we hypothesized that different rates of rectal distension might reveal different changes in abdominal girth. Abdominal girth was continuously recorded in 14 healthy subjects using a previously validated extensometer. The rectal distensions were made in a randomized order at rates of 100 mL min(-1) or 10 mL min(-1) up to 150 mL, and sham distensions were used as controls. An increase in abdominal girth was observed at the end of both distensions (P

  20. Factors associated with abdominal obesity in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Ribeiro Theodósio Fernandes Melzer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the association of dietary, socioeconomic factors, sedentary behaviors and maternal nutritional status with abdominal obesity in children. Methods: A cross-sectional study with household-based survey, in 36 randomly selected census tracts in the city of Santos, SP. 357 families were interviewed and questionnaires and anthropometric measurements were applied in mothers and their 3-10 years-old children. Assessment of abdominal obesity was made by maternal and child's waist circumference measurement; for classification used cut-off points proposed by World Health Organization (1998 and Taylor et al. (2000 were applied. The association between variables was performed by multiple logistic regression analysis. Results: 30.5% of children had abdominal obesity. Associations with children's and maternal nutritional status and high socioeconomic status were shown in the univariate analysis. In the regression model, children's body mass index for age (OR=93.7; 95%CI 39.3-223.3, female gender (OR=4.1; 95%CI 1.8-9.3 and maternal abdominal obesity (OR=2.7; 95%CI 1.2-6.0 were significantly associated with children's abdominal obesity, regardless of the socioeconomic status. Conclusions: Abdominal obesity in children seems to be associated with maternal nutritional status, other indicators of their own nutritional status and female gender. Intervention programs for control of childhood obesity and prevention of metabolic syndrome should consider the interaction of the nutritional status of mothers and their children.