WorldWideScience

Sample records for arkansas

  1. Slamming Arkansas Schools!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, W. Clayton

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author, a poet and teaching artist, shares how he successfully brought slam poetry to College Hill Middle School in Texarkana, Arkansas. In 2001 he discovered slam poetry--a poetry-reading format in which poets compete in dramatic readings of their works--and went to Slam Nationals in Seattle on the Arkansas slam team. He…

  2. Census Snapshot: Arkansas

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, Adam P; Baumle, Amanda K; Badgett, M. V. Lee; Gates, Gary J.

    2007-01-01

    Using data from the U.S. Census Bureau, this report provides demographic and economic information about same-sex couples and same-sex couples raising children in Arkansas. We compare same-sex “unmarried partners,” which the Census Bureau defines as an unmarried couple who “shares living quarters and has a close personal relationship,” to different-sex married couples in Arkansas. In many ways, the almost 5,900 same-sex couples living in Arkansas are similar to married couples. Accord...

  3. Arkansas' Disappearing Tax Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoppmeyer, Martin; Venters, Tommy

    State legislation that has contributed to the reduction of Arkansas' tax base is described in this paper. Amendment 59, adopted in 1980, has reduced the state tax base by millions of dollars. At the end of 1992, the majority of school districts have equalized their real, personal, and carrier and utility property. Act 34, the current foundation…

  4. 27 CFR 9.112 - Arkansas Mountain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Arkansas Mountain. 9.112... Arkansas Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Arkansas Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Arkansas...

  5. Arkansas River Water Needs Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is on the legal elements, hydrologic analysis, objectives, and water levels related to the Arkansas River and the management of it.

  6. Marshallese COFA Migrants in Arkansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElfish, Pearl Anna

    2016-05-01

    Arkansas is home to one of the largest populations of Marshallese in the world. Marshallese communities suffer from a disproportionate incidence of chronic diseases, including obesity, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and infectious diseases, such as Hansen's disease (leprosy), tuberculosis, and types of hepatitis. There are a number of structural, legal, economic, and social issues that must be addressed in order to reduce health disparities and increase access to health care for Marshallese living in Arkansas. PMID:27263176

  7. 33 CFR 117.121 - Arkansas River

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Arkansas River 117.121 Section 117.121 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Arkansas § 117.121 Arkansas River The draw of...

  8. Arkansas Groundwater-Quality Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Aaron L.; Jackson, Barry T.; Miller, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Arkansas is the fourth largest user of groundwater in the United States, where groundwater accounts for two-thirds of the total water use. Groundwater use in the State increased by 510 percent between 1965 and 2005 (Holland, 2007). The Arkansas Groundwater-Quality Network is a Web map interface (http://ar.water.usgs.gov/wqx) that provides rapid access to the U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) National Water Information System (NWIS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (USEPA) STOrage and RETrieval (STORET) databases of ambient water information. The interface enables users to perform simple graphical analysis and download selected water-quality data.

  9. Arkansas Tech University reactor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the nuclear reactor project at Arkansas Tech University (ATU). The reactor will be a part of the Center for Energy Studies (CES) located on the ATU campus in Russellville, Arkansas. It will be used for education, training, and research. The Arkansas Tech University TRIGA Reactor (ATUTR) is a TRIGA Mark I that will be operated in two basic modes: steady state and pulsing. The maximum power level for steady-state operation is 250 kW(thermal), and the maximum step reactivity insertion will be 2.0$. The inherent safety of this reactor comes from the large negative temperature coefficient of the uranium-zirconium-hydride fuel-moderator elements. Principal design parameters for the reactor are summarized. The application for reactor construction and operating license was submitted to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in November 1989. The review process is continuing. ATU plans to continue to work with local industry and the public to provide a wide variety of services related to nuclear science and engineering

  10. Arkansas: Its Land and People, Vol. 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foti, Tom

    This bicentennial volume offers a blend of Arkansas history, ecology, and literature. Its purpose is to show the relationship between Arkansas' people and their land. It contains a discussion of the Natural Divisions concept, the geological development of the state, and descriptions by early pioneers. The volume is not intended to be a complete…

  11. Goose survey, Arkansas, December 15 - 19, 1980

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A table presents data gathered during the goose survey in Arkansas. Numbers of Canada Geese, Whitefronted Geese, and BlueSnow Geese are included.

  12. Arkansas' Children: How Well Are They Doing? Arkansas Kids Count Data Book 1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlstrom, Sherryl M.; High, Rhonda L.

    This Kids Count data book is the fourth to examine the well-being of Arkansas' children and notes trends from 1990 to 1995. The report's introductory sections include discussions of the potential impact of welfare reform on Arkansas' children, and present figures detailing the number of children affected by particular risk factors each week. The…

  13. Arkansas' Junior Executive Training Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Dean; And Others

    This curriculum guide is designed to help teachers conduct courses on small business management and entrepreneurship to high school seniors in Arkansas. The program focuses upon the managerial process, examining the functions of planning, organization, staffing, directing, and controlling as related to the activities and responsibilities of the…

  14. Rickettsiae in Gulf Coast Ticks, Arkansas, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Trout, Rebecca; Steelman, C Dayton; Szalanski, Allen L.; Williamson, Phillip C

    2010-01-01

    To determine the cause of spotted fever cases in the southern United States, we screened Gulf Coast ticks (Amblyomma maculatum) collected in Arkansas for rickettsiae. Of the screened ticks, 30% had PCR amplicons consistent with Rickettsia parkeri or Candidatus Rickettsia amblyommii.

  15. Arkansas Physical Education Curriculum Framework, 1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock.

    This K-12 physical education curriculum presents six areas in which Arkansas students should show competence. The six strands are: health related fitness (students will be knowledgeable of and derive immediate health benefits from participation in vigorous musculoskeletal and cardiorespiratory enhancing activities); movement/motor skills (students…

  16. 78 FR 5202 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Arkansas State University Museum, Jonesboro, AR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-24

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Arkansas State University Museum, Jonesboro, AR AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Arkansas State University Museum... culturally affiliated with the human remains may contact the Arkansas State University Museum....

  17. 78 FR 5199 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Arkansas State University Museum, Jonesboro, AR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-24

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Arkansas State University Museum, Jonesboro, AR AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Arkansas State University Museum... associated funerary objects may contact the Arkansas State University Museum. Repatriation of the...

  18. Time of travel of selected Arkansas streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, T.E.

    1982-01-01

    Between 1971 and 1981, time-of-travel and dispersion measurements were made in 15 streams in Arkansas. Most of the streams studied were at or near base flow. Graphs are presented for predicting traveltime of solutes in segments of the streams studied. The relationship of time of passage and peak unit concentration to traveltime is presented for two of the streams. Examples of use and application of the data are given. (USGS)

  19. Annual yield and selected hydrologic data for the Arkansas River basin compact Arkansas-Oklahoma, 1995 water year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    The computed annual yield and deficiency of the subbasins as defined in the Arkansas River Basin Compact, Arkansas-Oklahoma, are given in tables for the 1995 water year. Actual runoff from the subbasins and depletion caused by major reservoirs in the compact area also are given in tabular form. Monthly mean discharges are shown for the 17 streamflow stations used in computing annual yield. Water-quality data are shown for 20 water-quality stations sampled in the Arkansas River Basin.

  20. Annual yield and selected hydrologic data for the Arkansas River Basin Compact, Arkansas-Oklahoma, 1996 water year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, J. Elton

    1997-01-01

    The computed annual yield and deficiency of the subbasins as defined in the Arkansas River Basin Compact, Arkansas-Oklahoma, are given in tables for the 1996 water year. Actual runoff from the subbasins and depletion caused by major reservoirs in the compact area also are given in tabular form. Computed monthly mean discharges are shown for the 21 streamflow stations in the Arkansas River Basin. Water-quality data are shown for 16 water-quality stations sampled in the Arkansas River Basin.

  1. Success For Arkansas: Success for All Schools In Arkansas Continue Gains On Benchmark Exams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Success for All Foundation, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Success for All is the most extensively researched of all comprehensive reform models for Title I elementary schools. It incorporates scientifically based principles of reading, cooperative learning, professional development, tutoring, and family support. Arkansas elementary schools using the Success for All reading program continued to make …

  2. A Look at Arkansas' Children: Arkansas Kids Count Data Book 1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlstrom, Sherryl M.; High, Rhonda L.

    This Kids Count data book provides information on indicators of the well-being of Arkansas' children. The report's introduction discusses factors contributing to increased attention to children and families, the need for broad-based community collaborations to address children and family needs, and cultural changes influencing families. Data…

  3. Arkansas' Anemometer Loan Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernando Vego

    2012-10-11

    The measurement campaign had one year duration from 04/01/2011 to 03/31/2012 and was taken at 20m and 34m with NRG instrumentation. The data was analyzed weekly to check inconsistencies and validity and processed using Excel, Flexpro and Windographer standard Edition Version 2.04. The site analyzed is located in the Waldron, Arkansas in Scott County. It is an open site for most of the direction sectors with immediate roughness class of 1.5. It has seasonally directional winds, of which the most energetic come from the southern direction. The vertical wind profile shows moderate wind shear that varies by season as well.

  4. Small Works in Arkansas: How Poverty and the Size of Schools and School Districts Affect School Performance in Arkansas. Summary of Recent Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rural School and Community Trust, Washington, DC.

    A study examined how Arkansas students' achievement is related to poverty, school and district size, and the interaction between these factors. Achievement test scores from grades 4, 5, 7, 8, and 9 in all Arkansas schools were supplied by the Arkansas Department of Education. Poverty levels were determined by percentage of students receiving…

  5. Annual yield and selected hydrologic data for the Arkansas River Basin Compact, Arkansas-Oklahoma, 1994 water year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, J.E.

    1995-01-01

    The computed annual yield and deficiency of the subbasins as defined in the Arkansas River Basin Compact, Arkansas-Oklahoma, are given in tables for the 1994 water year. Actual runoff from the subbasins and depletion caused by major reservoirs in the compact area also are given in tabular form. Monthly maximum, minimum, and mean discharges are shown for the 14 streamflow stations used in computing annual yield. Water-quality data are shown for 11 water-quality stations sampled in the Arkansas River Basin.

  6. Annual yield and selected hydrologic data for the Arkansas River Basin Compact Arkansas-Oklahoma 1993 water year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, J.E.; Barks, C. Shane

    1994-01-01

    The computed annual yield and deficiency of the subbasins as defined in the Arkansas River Basin Compact, Arkansas-Oklahoma, are given in tables for the 1993 water year. Actual runoff from the subbasins and depletion caused by major reservoirs in the compact area also are given in tabular form. Monthly maximum, minimum, and mean discharges are shown for the 14 streamflow stations used in computing annual yield. Water-quality data are shown for 12 water-quality stations sampled in the Arkansas River Basin.

  7. Final Critical Habitat for the Arkansas River Shiner (Notropis girardi)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To provide the user with a general idea of areas where final critical habitat for Arkansas River Shiner (Notropis girardi) occur. The geographic extent includes New...

  8. Arkansas: 1986 all goose survey: December 14 - 18, 1987

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A table presents data gathered during the goose survey in Arkansas. Numbers of Canada Geese, Whitefronted Geese, and Snow Geese are included.

  9. Central Arkansas National Wildlife Refuge Complex: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Central Arkansas NWR Complex for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Complex...

  10. 76 FR 44031 - Arkansas; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-22

    ....046, Fire Management Assistance Grant; 97.048, Disaster Housing Assistance to Individuals and...--Disaster Housing Operations for Individuals and Households; 97.050, Presidentially Declared Disaster... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Arkansas; Major Disaster and Related Determinations...

  11. [Arkansas annual winter goose survey: December 10 & 11, 1979

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A table presents data gathered during the goose survey in Arkansas. Numbers of Canada Geese, Whitefronted Geese, resident geese, and BlueSnow Geese are included.

  12. [Arkansas annual winter goose survey: December 11 - 15, 1978

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A table presents data gathered during the goose survey in Arkansas. Numbers of Canada Geese, Whitefronted Geese, resident geese, and BlueSnow Geese are included.

  13. 1985 goose survey: December 9 - 13, 1985: Arkansas

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A table presents data gathered during the goose survey in Arkansas. Numbers of Canada Geese, Whitefronted Geese, and Snow Geese are included.

  14. 1982 goose survey: December 13 - 17, 1982: Arkansas

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A table presents data gathered during the goose survey in Arkansas. Numbers of Canada Geese, Whitefronted Geese, and Snow Geese are included.

  15. 1983 goose survey: December 12 - 16, 1983: Arkansas

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A table presents data gathered during the goose survey in Arkansas. Numbers of Canada Geese, Whitefronted Geese, and Snow Geese are included.

  16. Arkansas: 1986 all goose survey: December 8 - 12, 1986

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A table presents data gathered during the goose survey in Arkansas. Numbers of Canada Geese, Whitefronted Geese, and Snow Geese are included.

  17. Fitness-for-duty program at Arkansas nuclear one

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The key events at Arkansas Power and Light Co. (AP and L) the fitness for duty (FFD) program since January 1981 are outlined. The sequential interface and impact of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) ruling, of the Edison Electric Institute (EEI)-published guidelines, and of the NUMARC commitment have played a key role in the continuing evolution of the FFD program at Arkansas Nuclear One (ANO). The major elements of the FFD program, difficulties encountered, and successful results are described

  18. 78 FR 48716 - Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Arkansas Valley...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-09

    ... Arkansas River Basin, groundwater, climate change, recreation biological resources, human environment... Valley Conduit and Long-Term Excess Capacity Master Contract, Fryingpan-Arkansas Project; Bent, Chaffee... statement (EIS) for the Arkansas Valley Conduit (AVC) and Long-Term Excess Capacity Contract,...

  19. Arkansas Superintendents Predict Curriculum for the Year 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaupel, Carl F., Jr.; Sweat, Joseph P.

    1985-01-01

    Superintendents of 164 Arkansas small school districts predicted the importance of 20 selected academic courses/physical activities by the year 2000. Courses/activities ranked highest for 2000 were computer science, physics, soccer, economics, and composition. Study assumes collective wisdom or bias of superintendents will alter future secondary…

  20. Arkansas Department of Education Technology Plan, 2008-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkansas Department of Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The Arkansas Department of Education Technology Plan provides policy makers, school districts, education service cooperatives and institutes of higher education with a blueprint that guides and facilitates future state and local technology planning, funding, implementation, and evaluation. The 2008 Plan builds on the progress of the last five-year…

  1. Arkansas and the Southern Regional Education Board, December 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2014

    2014-01-01

    This report details Arkansas's participation in SREB programs and services from December 2013 through November 2014. Appropriations from member states support SREB's core operations and general services. SREB leverages the long-standing commitment of member states to attract external funding for an array of targeted projects for educational…

  2. Recidivism among Arkansas Boot Camp Graduates after 12 Months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toombs, Nancy J.; Benda, Brent B.; Corwyn, Robert Flynn

    1997-01-01

    Examines recidivism among 792 graduates of Arkansas' only boot camp. Results indicate that the primary predictors of recidivism were the type of offenses (drugs vs. others), race, and infractions while in boot camp. However, none of the predictors accounted for more than minor proportions of the variance in recidivism. (RJM)

  3. State Minimum Core Curricula: Arkansas Institutions of Higher Education, 2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkansas State Dept. of Higher Education, Little Rock.

    In 1990 the Arkansas State Board of Higher Education adopted guidelines for the development of state minimum core curriculum response to state legislation. This legislation provides that courses within the core shall apply to the general education core curriculum requirements for baccalaureate degrees at state-supported institutions and shall be…

  4. The Arkansas Autism Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (AR ADDM) project: statewide autism surveillance in a rural state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Maya; Schulz, Eldon G; Baroud, Thaer; Hudson, Allison; Wilson, Mark

    2012-03-01

    In 2002, the Arkansas Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (AR ADDM) project collected data on the number and characteristics of resident children aged 8 years using a retrospective record review standardized methodology. This paper provides a first-look epidemiology of ASDs among 8 year old Arkansas children using data from the 2002 study year. Overall prevalence estimates, demographic distribution and a temporal lag from concerns identified to diagnosis of ASDs among 8 year olds in Arkansas were similar to that in other sites. Dissemination of information that promotes timely resolution of developmental concerns and improving educational services will benefit children with autism in Arkansas. PMID:22479981

  5. Middle Claiborne Aquifer: Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, Mississippi, Tennessee 2006-2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Outcrop and subcrop extent of the Middle Claiborne Aquifer in Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, Mississippi, Tennessee.

  6. Middle Claiborne Aquifer: Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, Mississippi, Tennessee 2006-2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital hydrogeologic surface of the Middle Claiborne Aquifer in Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, Mississippi, Tennessee. The...

  7. UPPER BUFFALO WILDERNESS AND BUFFALO ADDITION ROADLESS AREA, ARKANSAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Mary H.; Armstrong, Michelle K.

    1984-01-01

    The Upper Buffalo Wilderness and Buffalo Addition Roadless Area covers about 19 sq mi in the Ozark National Forest, Newton County, Arkansas. No metal-bearing minerals were observed during geologic mapping, and analyses for zinc and lead contents in surface rock and sediment samples from the study area are not anomalous. Exploratory drilling into the Boone Formation and (or) the Everton Formation will be necessary to evaluate the mineral-resource potential of zinc and lead in the study area.

  8. Submarine-fan sedimentation, Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas and Oklahoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moiola, R.J.; Shanmugam, G.

    1984-09-01

    More than 10,000 m (32,808 ft) of interbedded sandstones and shales comprise the Upper Mississippian and Lower Pennsylvanian flysch succession (Stanley, Jackfork, Johns Valley, Atoka) in the Ouachita Mountains of Arkansas and Oklahoma. Deposited primarily by turbidity current and hemipelagic processes in bathyal and abyssal water depths, these strata formed major submarine-fan complexes that prograded in a westward direction along the axis of an elongate remnant ocean basin that was associated with the collision and suturing of the North American and African-South American plates. A longitudinal fan system is visualized as the depositional framework for these strata, which were deposited in a setting analogous to the modern Bengal fan of the Indian Ocean. Facies analysis of the Jackfork formation indicates that inner fan deposits are present in the vicinity of Little Rock, Arkansas; middle fan channel and interchannel deposits occur at DeGray Dam and Friendship, Arkansas; and outer fan depositional-lobe deposits are present in southeastern Oklahoma. Boulder-bearing units (olistostromes), many with exotic clasts, were shed laterally into the Ouachita basin. They occur throughout the flysch succession and in all fan environments (i.e., inner, middle, and outer). This relationship may serve as a useful criterion for recognizing analogous longitudinal fan systems in the rock record.

  9. WORK SKILL NEEDS FOR THE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OF ARKANSAS, A REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DAVIS, J. CLARK; AND OTHERS

    A GROWING POPULATION, MIGRATION FROM RURAL TO URBAN AREAS, AND AN EXPANDING MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY IS FORCING ARKANSAS TO REAPPRAISE ITS BASIC SKILLS OFFERINGS IN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION. SINCE ARKANSAS IS NOT IN A POSITION TO PROVIDE MASSIVE INCREASES IN SPENDING FOR VOCATIONAL EDUCATION, THE STATE MUST DECIDE IF IT IS DIRECTING ITS EXPENDITURES TO…

  10. "McLean v. Arkansas" (1982) and Beyond: Implications for Biology Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, Mark W.; Moore, Randy

    2011-01-01

    To assess current trends of evolution instruction in high schools of the mid-South, we invited Arkansas high school biology teachers from across the state to respond to a survey designed to address this issue. We also asked students enrolled in a freshman-level, nonmajors biology course at a midsize public Arkansas university to recall their…

  11. Access to and Use of Eye Care Services in Rural Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilmer, Greta; Bynum, LaTonya; Balamurugan, Appathurai

    2010-01-01

    Context: Rural residents are more likely to be uninsured and have low income. Purpose: To determine if rural residents in Arkansas have decreased access to eye care services and use them less frequently than urban residents. Methods: Data from the 2006 Visual Impairment and Access to Eye Care Module from the Arkansas Behavioral Risk Factor…

  12. Association of School-Based Influenza Vaccination Clinics and School Absenteeism--Arkansas, 2012-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gicquelais, Rachel E.; Safi, Haytham; Butler, Sandra; Smith, Nathaniel; Haselow, Dirk T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Influenza is a major cause of seasonal viral respiratory illness among school-aged children. Accordingly, the Arkansas Department of Health (ADH) coordinates >800 school-based influenza immunization clinics before each influenza season. We quantified the relationship between student influenza vaccination in Arkansas public schools…

  13. Children in Poverty: A Citizen's Guide. A Special Report by Arkansas Kids Count.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddleston, Rich

    Noting that child poverty has been a persistent problem for Arkansas children despite improvements in the economy, this Kids Count special report focuses on child poverty in Arkansas. The report examines how child poverty is measured and notes the limitation of existing poverty data; it also discusses the causes and consequences of poverty and…

  14. 77 FR 47779 - Arkansas: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-10

    ... FR 31756-31769 Arkansas Code of 1987 Annotated (A.C.A.) Treatment Sludges from Auto Sections 8-7-201... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Arkansas: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision... to the EPA for Final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under the...

  15. 77 FR 55430 - Arkansas Regulatory Program and Abandoned Mine Land Reclamation Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-10

    ... Access Discharges; Hydrologic Balance: Protection of Groundwater Recharge Capacity; Hydrologic Balance... Environmental Quality, 5301 Northshore Drive, North Little Rock, Arkansas 72118-5317, Telephone: (501) 682-0744... November 21, 1980, Federal Register (45 FR 77003). You can find later actions on the Arkansas program at...

  16. 76 FR 76104 - Arkansas Regulatory Program and Abandoned Mine Land Reclamation Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-06

    ...; Hydrologic Balance: Protection of Groundwater Recharge Capacity; Hydrologic Balance: Surface And Groundwater... Department of Environmental Quality, 5301 Northshore Drive, North Little Rock, Arkansas 72118-5317. Telephone... November 21, 1980, Federal Register (45 FR 77003). You can find later actions on the Arkansas program at...

  17. Status of Water Levels in Aquifers in the Nacatoch Sand of Southwestern and Northeastern Arkansas and the Tokio Formation of Southwestern Arkansas, February 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, T.P.

    2007-01-01

    The Nacatoch Sand and Tokio Formation aquifers in southwestern Arkansas and the Nacatoch Sand aquifer in northeastern Arkansas are sources of water for industrial, public supply, domestic, and agricultural uses. Potentiometric-surface maps were constructed from water-level measurements made in 60 wells completed in the Nacatoch Sand and 50 wells completed in the Tokio Formation during February 2005. Aquifers in the Nacatoch Sand and Tokio Formation are hereafter referred to as the Nacatoch aquifer and Tokio aquifer, respectively. The direction of ground-water flow in the Nacatoch aquifer in northeastern Arkansas generally is towards the southeast. The potentiometric high is located along the north and northwestern boundaries of the area. The direction of ground-water flow in the Nacatoch aquifer in southwestern Arkansas is towards the south-southeast in Little River, Miller, and Hempstead Counties and to the east-southeast in Nevada and Clark Counties. The potentiometric high is located within the outcrop area in north-central Hempstead County. A cone of depression exists in the Nacatoch aquifer at Hope in southeastern Hempstead County. The direction of ground-water flow in the Tokio aquifer in southwestern Arkansas generally is towards the south or southeast. The potentiometric high is within the outcrop area. An area of artesian flow exists in southeastern Pike, northeastern Hempstead, and northwestern Nevada Counties. One apparent cone of depression might exist northwest of Hope in Hempstead County. In northeastern Arkansas, withdrawals from the Nacatoch aquifer increased by 516 percent from 1965 to 2000. In southwestern Arkansas, withdrawals from Nacatoch aquifer and Tokio aquifer increased by 125 percent and 201 percent, respectively, from 1965 to 1980 and decreased by 93 percent and 80 percent, respectively, from 1980 to 2000. Long-term hydrographs were prepared for 10 wells in the study areas. Changes in water levels in some wells may be associated with

  18. Status of Water Levels in Aquifers in the Nacatoch Sand of Southwestern and Northeastern Arkansas and the Tokio Formation of Southwestern Arkansas, 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Tony P.

    1999-01-01

    Nacatoch Sand and Tokio Formation aquifers in southwestern Arkansas and the Nacatoch Sand aquifer in northeastern Arkansas are a source of water for industrial, public supply, domestic, and agricultural uses. Potentiometric-surface maps were constructed from water-level measurements made in 59 wells completed in the Nacatoch Sand and 45 wells completed in the Tokio Formation from April through May 1999. The direction of ground-water flow in the aquifer in the Nacatoch Sand in northeastern Arkansas generally is towards the southeast. The potentiometric high is located along the north and northwestern boundaries. The direction of ground-water flow in the aquifer in the Nacatoch Sand in southwestern Arkansas is towards the south-southeast in Little River, Miller, and Hempstead Counties and to the east-southeast in Nevada and Clark Counties. The potentiometric high is located within the outcrop area in north-central Hempstead County. A cone of depression exists in the aquifer in the Nacatoch Sand at Hope in southeastern Hempstead County. The direction of ground-water flow in the aquifer in the Yokio Formation in southwestern Arkansas generally is towards the southeast. The potentiometric high is within the outcrop area. An area of artesian flow exists in southeastern Pike, northeastern Hempstead, and northwestern Nevada Counties. One apparent cone of depression might exist northwest of Hope in Hempstead County. In northeastern Arkansas, withdrawals from the Nacatoch Sand increased by 736 percent from 1965 to 1995. In southwestern Arkansas withdrawals from aquifers in the Nacatoch Sand and Yokio Formation increased by 125 percent and 201 percent, respectively, from 1965 to 1980 and decreased by 78 percent and 63 percent, respectively, from 1980 to 1995. Long-term hydrographs were prepared for 13 wells in the study area. Changes in water levels in some wells may be associated with changes in withdrawals from the respective aquifers.

  19. Arkansas State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Arkansas State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. This report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Arkansas. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Arkansas. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Arkansas

  20. Mississippi River Valley Alluvial Aquifer, Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee; 2006-2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Outcrop and subcrop extent of the Mississippi River Valley Alluvial Aquifer in Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Tennessee.

  1. Upper Claiborne Aquifer: Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana, Missouri, Mississippi, Tennessee 2006-2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital hydrogeologic surface of the Upper Claiborne Aquifer in Arkansas, Alabama, Louisiana, Missouri, Mississippi, and Tennessee. The hydrogeologic unit dataset...

  2. Middle Claiborne Confining Unit: Alabama, Arkansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, Mississippi, Tennessee 2006-2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital hydrogeologic surface of the Middle Claiborne Confining Unit in Alabama, Arkansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, Mississippi, Tennessee. The hydrogeologic...

  3. An Evaluation of Ecosystem Restoration Options for Grand Prairie Region of Arkansas

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Evaluation of Ecosystem Restoration and Management Options covers the hydrogeomorphic analysis HGM for Grand Prairie Region of Arkansas. This three step...

  4. Middle Wilcox Aquifer: Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, Mississippi, Tennessee 2006-2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital hydrogeologic surface of the Middle Wolcox Aquifer in Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, Mississippi, Tennessee. The hydrogeologic...

  5. Arkansas State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive-waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Arkansas State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Arkansas. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Arkansas. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Arkansas

  6. Lower Wilcox Aquifer: Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, Mississippi 2006-2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital hydrogeologic surface of the in Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, Mississippi. The hydrogeologic unit dataset contains 414 rows and 394...

  7. Annual mid-December goose survey - December 14 - 18, 1981: Arkansas

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A table presents data gathered during the goose survey in Arkansas. Numbers of Canada Geese, Whitefronted Geese, and Snow Geese are included.

  8. Employment Discrimination Based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity in Arkansas

    OpenAIRE

    Mallory, Christy; Sears, Brad

    2015-01-01

    None of the approximately 47,000 LGBT workers in Arkansas are explicitly protected from discrimination under local, state or federal laws. If sexual orientation and gender identity were added to existing statewide non-discrimination laws, 22 more complaints would be filed in Arkansas each year. The cost of enforcing those complaints would be negligible, and would not require additional court or administrative staff.

  9. Ooid mineralogy and diagenesis of upper Mississippian Pitkin Formation, Arkansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heydari, E.; Snelling, R.D.; Dawson, W.C.; Machain, M.L. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge (USA))

    1989-08-01

    The Pitkin formation is a marine oolitic-bioclastic limestone exhibiting shoal, lagoonal, beach, and tidal-channel facies. Ooids formed on the Pitkin carbonate shelf show lateral and vertical variations in original mineralogy. In a section south of Mountain View, Arkansas, the lower marine shoal and shoreface facies are composed of originally aragonitic ooids. These ooids are replaced by neomorphic calcite and exhibit elevated strontium and low magnesium concentrations. The overlying lagoonal facies are composed of originally calcite ooids that have retained their original radial fabrics. These ooids exhibit low strontium and high magnesium concentration. Ooids in sections to the west of Mountain View are all calcitic. Early diagenesis of the formation is dominated by marine cementation. Postdepositional diagenesis encompasses extensive dissolution of originally aragonite and magnesian calcite components, precipitation of a late unzoned ferroan calcite, and minor amounts of saddle dolomite. Grainstone units lack any intergranular porosity. Pressure solution contacts among grains in grainstones are generally uncommon. Cementation alone is responsible for destruction of all of the original porosity in these rocks. Intensive pressure solution is observed only in packstone units not affected by early marine cementation.

  10. Rural Industralization and Population Growth: The Case of Arkansas. ORNL-HUD-4, Civil Defense Research Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Alfred W.

    Utilizing available 1966 statistical data and U.S. Census figures, the State of Arkansas was examined for purposes of analyzing: (1) the extent to which recent population gains in states such as Arkansas and Oklahoma is occurring in rural areas rather than as an extension of urbanization; (2) the extent to which U.S. manufacturing is beginning to…

  11. Sadness, suicide, and bullying in Arkansas: results from the Youth Risk Behavior Survey -- 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindrick, Kristi; Castro, Juan; Messias, Erick

    2013-10-01

    Bullying is a common exposure in high school and more recently cyberbullying has become prevalent among teens. We used the 2011 Arkansas Youth Risk Behavior Survey to estimate the prevalence of school bullying and cyberbullying and to measure its association with teen suicidality. In Arkansas, 11.6% of students reported only school bullying, 6.2% only cyberbullying, and 10.2% both forms of bullying. We determined "feeling unsafe at school" was a significant risk factor for depression and all suicide questions. We also found that being a victim of school bullying, cyberbullying, or both, increased the risk for depression, suicidal ideation, and plan. PMID:24383197

  12. Teacher Pension Incentives, Retirement Behavior, and Potential for Reform in Arkansas. Conference Paper 2009-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costrell, Robert M.; McGee, Josh B.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present an analysis of the Arkansas Teacher Retirement System (ATRS) pension plan and an empirical investigation of the behavioral response to that plan, as well as to a possible reform plan. We begin by describing the plan parameters and discussing the incentives these parameters create. We then estimate the effect of pension…

  13. Teacher Pension Incentives, Retirement Behavior, and Potential for Reform in Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costrell, Robert M.; McGee, Josh B.

    2010-01-01

    The authors analyze the Arkansas teacher pension plan and empirically gauge the behavioral response to incentives embedded in that plan and to possible reforms. The pattern of pension wealth accrual creates sharp incentives to work until eligible for early or normal retirement, often in one's early fifties, and to separate shortly thereafter. We…

  14. Drought and deluge: Effects of recent climate variability on groundwater levels in eastern Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecki, John B.; Schrader, T.P.

    2013-01-01

    Arkansas experienced wide extremes in climate variability during the period of 2005 to 2010, recording the largest annual precipitation ever recorded in the State (100.05 inches) in 2009. Many weather stations across the State reported between 80 to 90 inches of rainfall in 2009. For comparison, the average annual precipitation in Little Rock, Arkansas, for the period 1878 to 2010 was 47.1 inches. In contrast, 2005 and 2010 were the 7th and 14th driest years on record in Little Rock with 34.55 and 36.52 inches, respectively; both tied as the hottest years ever recorded in Arkansas. The wettest year on record in Little Rock (2009) was interspersed within these dry years, with a total of 81.79 inches. Fifteen weather stations within the State ranked 2009 as the wettest year on record. Extremes in annual precipitation rates may lead to greater variability in groundwater recharge rates and water use, particularly in the agricultural areas in eastern Arkansas that rely heavily on groundwater produced from the Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer (hereafter referred to as the alluvial aquifer). How does this variability affect the groundwater system and water use therein? Are the effects of this variability discernable in measured water levels in wells? Czarnecki and Schrader examined these questions and provided some insights, the results of which are presented here.

  15. Impact of Spina Bifida on Parental Caregivers: Findings from a Survey of Arkansas Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Scott D.; Flores, Alina L.; Ouyang, Lijing; Robbins, James M.; Tilford, John M.

    2009-01-01

    The well-being of caregivers of children with spina bifida and other conditions is an important topic. We interviewed the primary caregivers of 98 children aged 0-17 years with spina bifida sampled from a population-based birth defects registry in Arkansas and the caregivers of 49 unaffected children. Measures of caregiver well-being were compared…

  16. 77 FR 52365 - Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Arkansas Valley...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-29

    ... are analyzed in the Draft EIS: (1) Construct and operate the Arkansas Valley Conduit (AVC) and enter... and delivery purposes, the proposed actions are independent of each other. The AVC was authorized by... annual federal funding as necessary for constructing AVC, and included a cost sharing plan with...

  17. Field evaluation of four spatial repellent devices against Arkansas rice-land mosquitoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Four commercially available spatial repellent devices were tested in a rice land habitat near Stuttgart, Arkansas after semi-field level assessments had been made at the Center for Medical, Agricultural, and Veterinary Entomology, ARS, USDA in Gainesville, FL. OFF! Clip-On® (a.i. metofluthrin, S.C....

  18. Pharmaceuticals and other organic chemicals in selected north-central and northwestern Arkansas streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggard, B.E.; Galloway, J.M.; Green, W.R.; Meyer, M.T.

    2006-01-01

    Recently, our attention has focused on the low level detection of many antibiotics, pharmaceuticals, and other organic chemicals in water resources. The limited studies available suggest that urban or rural streams receiving wastewater effluent are more susceptible to contamination. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of antibiotics, pharmaceuticals, and other organic chemicals at 18 sites on seven selected streams in Arkansas, USA, during March, April, and August 2004. Water samples were collected upstream and downstream from the influence of effluent discharges in northwestern Arkansas and at one site on a relatively undeveloped stream in north-central Arkansas. At least one antibiotic, pharmaceutical, or other organic chemical was detected at all sites, except at Spavinaw Creek near Mayesville, Arkansas. The greatest number of detections was observed at Mud Creek downstream from an effluent discharge, including 31 pharmaceuticals and other organic chemicals. The detection of these chemicals occurred in higher frequency at sites downstream from effluent discharges compared to those sites upstream from effluent discharges; total chemical concentration was also greater downstream. Wastewater effluent discharge increased the concentrations of detergent metabolites, fire retardants, fragrances and flavors, and steroids in these streams. Antibiotics and associated degradation products were only found at two streams downstream from effluent discharges. Overall, 42 of the 108 chemicals targeted in this study were found in water samples from at least one site, and the most frequently detected organic chemicals included caffeine, phenol, para-cresol, and acetyl hexamethyl tetrahydro naphthalene (AHTN). ?? ASA, CSSA, SSSA.

  19. 76 FR 36142 - Arkansas; Amendment No. 6 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-21

    ... Unemployment Assistance (DUA); 97.046, Fire Management Assistance Grant; 97.048, Disaster Housing Assistance to... Assistance--Disaster Housing Operations for Individuals and Households; 97.050, Presidentially Declared... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Arkansas; Amendment No. 6 to Notice of a Major...

  20. 76 FR 37360 - Arkansas; Amendment No. 7 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-27

    ..., Disaster Unemployment Assistance (DUA); 97.046, Fire Management Assistance Grant; 97.048, Disaster Housing... Declared Disaster Assistance--Disaster Housing Operations for Individuals and Households; 97.050... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Arkansas; Amendment No. 7 to Notice of a Major...

  1. Child Care Needs of Mothers in Arkansas' Labor Force: A Statistical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families, Little Rock.

    The major purpose of this paper is to increase employers' awareness of the impact that the rising number of working mothers has had on the need for day care in Arkansas as a whole and in their specific business locales. It is hoped that employers will be motivated to investigate and evaluate the advantages of providing some form of day care…

  2. 77 FR 14603 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Arkansas; Regional Haze State Implementation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-12

    ... determinations for the American Electric Power (AEP) Flint Creek Plant Boiler No. 1; the NO X BART determination... and 2; the BART determination for the Entergy White Bluff Plant Auxiliary Boiler; the SO 2 and NO X... from Arkansas's RH SIP: The PM BART determination for the AEP Flint Creek Plant Boiler No. 1. The SO...

  3. Creating a Caring Community: The University of Arkansas Nursery School Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Vernoice G.; DaRos-Voseles, Denise A.; Swick, Kevin J.

    2003-01-01

    This article describes seven dimensions of establishing a caring community at the University of Arkansas Nursery School in Fayetteville. Key components relate to the director setting the tone for the school, the instructor-student relationship, empathetic teacher-child interactions, empathetic teacher-parent interactions, celebration of…

  4. Risks, Assets, and Negative Health Behaviors among Arkansas' Hispanic Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Kevin M.; Choudary, Wendie; Kearney, Anne; Piko, Bettina F.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between risk, assets, and negative health behaviors among a large sample of Hispanic adolescents. Data were collected from over 1,000 Hispanic youth in grades 6, 8, 10, and 12 attending school in a moderate size school district in Northwest Arkansas. Logistic regression models examined the variation in the odds…

  5. Unpublished Interim Digital Geologic Map of Hot Springs National Park and Vicinity, Arkansas (NPS, GRD, GRI, HOSP, HOSP digital map) adapted from the interim Arkansas Geological Survey DGM-HSR-003 by Johnson and Hanson (2011)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The Unpublished Interim Digital Geologic Map of Hot Springs National Park and Vicinity, Arkansas is composed of GIS data layers complete with ArcMap 9.3 layer...

  6. Burnup verification at Arkansas Nuclear One-unit 1 using the Fork measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fork measurement system, designed at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards program, has been used for several years to examine spent fuel assemblies at nuclear reactors around the world. The objective of the test program described here is to demonstrate the ability of the Fork system to verify the records for assembly burnup at U.S. nuclear utilities. The measurements described here were performed at Arkansas Nuclear One, operated by Energy Operations, Inc. The Fork system was used to examine 34 assemblies in the storage pool of Arkansas Nuclear One-Unit 1. The correlation between the neutron measurements and the reactor records produced an average random deviation in burnup of 3.0% from the calibration, which translates into an average variation of 2.2% in the reactor records for burnup. The system proved to be compatible with utility operations

  7. Reactor building temperature reduction project data acquisition, evaluations and proposed actions. Arkansas nuclear one, Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On August 1, 1987 Arkansas Power and Light maintenance personnel made a power entry at Arkansas Nuclear One, Unit 1. They discovered that the steam generator cavity temperature was too high for personnel comfort. AP and L management requested that the available temperature data be recorded throughout the reactor building (RB). Hand held thermometers, infrared thermography, and existing RTD's were utilized. Temperatures were found to range from 100F near the basement to 165F in the dome area. A temperature of 183F was found above the A steam generator cavity. As a result of this finding, AP and L and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission decided that an in depth evaluation of the RB temperatures and their effect on the safe operation of the plant was needed. The original design temperature was 110F. This section discusses the monitoring systems installed, the results of the evaluation and the corrective actions taken

  8. Building Partnerships With Rural Arkansas Faith Communities to Promote Veterans’ Mental Health: Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Greer; Hunt, Justin; Haynes, Tiffany F.; Bryant, Keneshia; Cheney, Ann M.; Pyne, Jeffrey M.; Reaves, Christina; Sullivan, Steve; Lewis, Caleb; Barnes, Bonita; Barnes, Michael; Hudson, Cliff; Jegley, Susan; Larkin, Bridgette; Russell, Shane; White, Penny; Gilmore, LaNissa; Claypoole, Sterling; Smith, Rev. Johnny; Richison, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Background The Mental Health–Clergy Partnership Program established partnerships between institutional (Department of Veterans’ Affairs [VA] chaplains, mental health providers) and community (local clergy, parishioners) groups to develop programs to assist rural veterans with mental health needs. Objectives Describe the development, challenges, and lessons learned from the Mental Health–Clergy Partnership Program in three Arkansas towns between 2009 and 2012. Methods Researchers identified three rural Arkansas sites, established local advisory boards, and obtained quantitative ratings of the extent to which partnerships were participatory. Results Partnerships seemed to become more participatory over time. Each site developed distinctive programs with variation in fidelity to original program goals. Challenges included developing trust and maintaining racial diversity in local program leadership. Conclusions Academics can partner with local faith communities to create unique programs that benefit the mental health of returning veterans. Research is needed to determine the effectiveness of community based programs, especially relative to typical “top-down” outreach approaches. PMID:24859098

  9. Cost-effectiveness of the US Geological Survey stream-gaging program in Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, M.E.; Lamb, T.E.

    1984-01-01

    This report documents the results of the cost-effectiveness of the stream-gaging program in Arkansas. Data uses and funding sources were identified for the daily-discharge stations. All daily-discharge stations were found to be in one or more data use categories, and none were candidates for alternate methods which would result in discontinuation or conversion to a partial record station. The cost for operation of daily-discharge stations and routing costs to partial record stations, crest gages, pollution control stations as well as seven recording ground-water stations was evaluated in the Kalman-Filtering Cost-Effective Resource allocation (K-CERA) analysis. This operation under current practices requires a budget of $292,150. The average standard error of estimate of streamflow record for the Arkansas District was analyzed at 33 percent.

  10. A new species of Sellaphora (Sellaphoraceae) from Hannaberry Lake, Arkansas, U.S.A.

    OpenAIRE

    Enache, Mihaela D.; Potapova, Marina

    2009-01-01

    A new small-size species of Sellaphora was found in sediments from Hannaberry Lake, Arkansas, during the National Lakes Assessment project conducted by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. The species was studied with light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. It differs from previously reported Sellaphora species by its small and delicate frustule with striation irresolvable in light microscopy. Here we present details on its morphology and size variation and report the...

  11. Fruit and Vegetable Consumption among College Students in Arkansas and Florida: Food Culture vs. Health Knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Schroeter, Christiane; House, Lisa; Lorence, Argelia

    2007-01-01

    This study determines the impact of demographics, dietary and health knowledge, and food culture on fruit and vegetable consumption of college students in Arkansas and Florida. Our empirical analysis demonstrates that food culture significantly impacts consumption of fruits and vegetables; a finding which emphasizes the need to target cultural aspects when developing effective and efficient management of agribusiness firms. Understanding the antecedents to consumption for products like fruits...

  12. Arkansas and Louisiana Aeromagnetic and Gravity Maps and Data - A Website for Distribution of Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankey, Viki; Daniels, David L.

    2008-01-01

    This report contains digital data, image files, and text files describing data formats for aeromagnetic and gravity data used to compile the State aeromagnetic and gravity maps of Arkansas and Louisiana. The digital files include grids, images, ArcInfo, and Geosoft compatible files. In some of the data folders, ASCII files with the extension 'txt' describe the format and contents of the data files. Read the 'txt' files before using the data files.

  13. Atmospheric Contributors to Heavy Rainfall Events in the Arkansas-Red River Basin

    OpenAIRE

    McCorkle, Taylor A.; Skylar S. Williams; Pfeiffer, Timothy A.; Basara, Jeffrey B.

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzed the top 1% 24-hour rainfall events from 1994 to 2013 at eight climatological sites that represent the east to west precipitation gradient across the Arkansas-Red River Basin in North America. A total of 131 cases were identified and subsequently classified on the synoptic-scale, mesoscale, and local-scale to compile a climatological analysis of these extreme, heavy rainfall events based on atmospheric forcings. For each location, the prominent midtropospheric pattern, meso...

  14. Molecular Subtype Analyses of Campylobacter spp. from Arkansas and California Poultry Operations

    OpenAIRE

    Hiett, K. L; Stern, N. J.; Fedorka-Cray, P.; Cox, N. A.; Musgrove, M. T.; Ladely, S.

    2002-01-01

    Campylobacter isolates from diverse samples within broiler production and processing environments were typed by using flaA short variable region DNA sequence analysis. Sixteen flocks from four different farms representing two broiler producers in Arkansas and California were analyzed. Fourteen of the flocks (87.5%) were Campylobacter-positive; two remained negative throughout the 6-week rearing period. In general, multiple clones were present within a flock. Additionally, clones found within ...

  15. Factor that Affect Arkansas Farm Operators’ and Landowners’ Decision to Participate in Agritourism

    OpenAIRE

    Rainey, Daniel V.; Djunaidi, Harjanto; McCullough, Stacey W.; Das, Biswa R.

    2010-01-01

    This study utilizes survey data analyzed at the regional level to obtain additional insights which may be left unnoticed if the analysis only considers data at the state level. The current analysis reveals that farm operators’ and/or landowners’ decision to participate in the agritourism industry in Arkansas is affected by state government infrastructure. But these infrastructures are varied among regions. The infrastructures are state government support in training the farm operators; in pro...

  16. Arthropods of Steel Creek, Buffalo National River, Arkansas. III. Heteroptera (Insecta: Hemiptera)

    OpenAIRE

    Skvarla, Michael Joseph; Fisher, Danielle M.; Dowling, Ashley P.G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background This is the third in a series of papers detailing the terrestrial arthropods collected during an intensive survey of a site near Steel Creek campground along the Buffalo National River in Arkansas. The survey was conducted over a period of eight and a half months using twelve trap types – Malaise traps, canopy traps (upper and lower collector), Lindgren multifunnel traps (black, green, and purple), pan traps (blue, purple, red, white, and yellow), and pitfall traps – and B...

  17. Terrestrial arthropods of Steel Creek, Buffalo National River, Arkansas. II. Sawflies (Insecta: Hymenoptera: " Symphyta ")

    OpenAIRE

    Skvarla, Michael Joseph; Smith, David R.; Fisher, Danielle M.; Dowling, Ashley P.G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background This is the second in a series of papers detailing the terrestrial arthropods collected during an intensive survey of a site near Steel Creek campground along the Buffalo National River in Arkansas. The survey was conducted over a period of eight and a half months using twelve trap types – Malaise traps, canopy traps (upper and lower collector), Lindgren multifunnel traps (black, green, and purple), pan traps (blue, purple, red, white, and yellow), and pitfall traps – and ...

  18. Terrestrial arthropods of Steel Creek, Buffalo National River, Arkansas. II. Sawflies (Insecta: Hymenoptera : " Symphyta ")

    OpenAIRE

    Skvarla, Michael Joseph; Smith, David R.; Fisher, Danielle M.; Dowling, Ashley P.G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background This is the second in a series of papers detailing the terrestrial arthropods collected during an intensive survey of a site near Steel Creek campground along the Buffalo National River in Arkansas. The survey was conducted over a period of eight and a half months using twelve trap types – Malaise traps, canopy traps (upper and lower collector), Lindgren multifunnel traps (black, green, and purple), pan traps (blue, purple, red, white, and yellow), and pitfall traps – and ...

  19. Notes from the Field: Cluster of Tuberculosis Cases Among Marshallese Persons Residing in Arkansas - 2014-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothfeldt, Laura Lester; Patil, Naveen; Haselow, Dirk T; Williams, Sandy Hainline; Wheeler, J Gary; Mukasa, Leonard N

    2016-01-01

    During early September 2014, the Arkansas Department of Health identified an increased number of tuberculosis (TB) cases among a unique population in a well-circumscribed geographical area in northwest Arkansas. The Compact of Free Association Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-239, amended in 2003 by Public Law 108-188) established the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) as an independent nation, and persons from the RMI can travel freely (with valid RMI passport) to and from the United States as nonimmigrants without visas (1). Marshallese started settling in northwest Arkansas during the early 1990s because of employment and educational opportunities (2). According to the 2010 Census, an estimated 4,300 Marshallese resided in Arkansas (2), mostly within one county which ranked 6th in the United States for counties with the highest percentage of Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders (3). It is estimated that this number has been growing steadily each year since the 2010 Census; however, obtaining an accurate count is difficult. The RMI is a TB high-incidence country, with a case-rate of 212.7 per 100,000 persons for 2014, whereas the case-rate was 3.1 per 100,000 persons in Arkansas and 2.9 per 100,000 persons in the United States (4,5). Screening for either active TB or latent TB infection (LTBI) is not required for Marshallese entry to the United States (1). PMID:27560201

  20. The Natural Divisions of Arkansas: A Three Week Unit. Classroom Guide. Recommended for High School Level Social Studies, Earth Science and Biological Science Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foti, Thomas L.

    This unit is designed to (1) acquaint the student with Arkansas, (2) provide information on what an environment (natural system) is, and (3) provide information on how people relate to the environment as a whole. Natural systems and natural divisions (geographical areas) of Arkansas are described. Included in several sections are questions to…

  1. Land use change detection with LANDSAT-2 data for monitoring and predicting regional water quality degradation. [Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, H.; Steele, K. (Principal Investigator); Waite, W.; Rice, R.; Shinn, M.; Dillard, T.; Petersen, C.

    1977-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Comparison between LANDSAT 1 and 2 imagery of Arkansas provided evidence of significant land use changes during the 1972-75 time period. Analysis of Arkansas historical water quality information has shown conclusively that whereas point source pollution generally can be detected by use of water quality data collected by state and federal agencies, sampling methodologies for nonpoint source contamination attributable to surface runoff are totally inadequate. The expensive undertaking of monitoring all nonpoint sources for numerous watersheds can be lessened by implementing LANDSAT change detection analyses.

  2. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Mississippi and Florida airborne survey, Russellville quadrangle, Arkansas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Russellville quadrangle in north central Arkansas overlies thick Paleozoic sediments of the Arkoma Basin. These Paleozoics dominate surface exposure except where covered by Quaternary alluvial materials. Examination of available literature shows no known uranium deposits (or occurrences) within the quadrangle. Eighty-eight groups of uranium samples were defined as anomalies and are discussed briefly. None were considered significant, and most appeared to be of cultural origin. Magnetic data show character that suggest structural and/or lithologic complexity, but imply relatively deep-seated sources

  3. NSSS design and cycle 1 operating history data for Arkansas Nuclear One, Unit-2. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains design and cycle 1 operating data for the Arkansas Nuclear One, Unit-2 nuclear steam supply system. The design data include descriptions of the reactor core, reactor coolant system, and control systems which are a part of the nuclear steam supply system. Operating history data are provided for the period of December 1978 through January 1980. The most important operating history data provided include reactor power, cumulative fuel burnup, control rod position, primary coolant temperature, and a series of power distribution state points

  4. Analytical data for geologic units in Missouri and parts of Kansas, Oklahoma and Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerngen, Josephine G.; VanTrump, George; Ebens, Richard J.

    1975-01-01

    This report lists the geochemical data collected during the course of a reconnaissance study of compositional variation in the bedrock and surficial gelogic untis exposed in Missouri and adjoining parts of Kansas, Oklahoma, and Arkansas.  The primar object of the study was to assess scale-related components of geochemical variance with a view of determining the importance of regional geochemical variation in these units (cf. Connor and other, 1972).  Geologic evaluation, geochemical interpretation and summaries, and sampling designs employed in the collection of most of these data may be found in U.S. Geological Survey (1972a-1972f, 1973) and Connor and Shacklette (1975).

  5. Terrestrial arthropods of Steel Creek, Buffalo National River, Arkansas. II. Sawflies (Insecta: Hymenoptera: "Symphyta")

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David R.; Fisher, Danielle M.; Dowling, Ashley P.G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background This is the second in a series of papers detailing the terrestrial arthropods collected during an intensive survey of a site near Steel Creek campground along the Buffalo National River in Arkansas. The survey was conducted over a period of eight and a half months using twelve trap types – Malaise traps, canopy traps (upper and lower collector), Lindgren multifunnel traps (black, green, and purple), pan traps (blue, purple, red, white, and yellow), and pitfall traps – and Berlese-Tullgren extraction of leaf litter. New information We provide collection records for 47 species of "Symphyta" (Insecta: Hymenoptera), 30 of which are new state records for Arkansas: (Argidae) Sterictiphora serotina; (Cimbicidae) Abia americana; (Diprionidae) Monoctenus fulvus; (Orussidae) Orussus terminalis; (Pamphiliidae) Onycholyda luteicornis, Pamphilius ocreatus, P. persicum, P. rileyi; (Pergidae) Acordulecera dorsalis, A. mellina, A. pellucida; (Tenthredinidae) Caliroa quercuscoccineae, Empria coryli, Hoplocampa marlatti, Macrophya cassandra, Monophadnoides conspiculatus, Monophadnus bakeri, Nematus abbotii, Neopareophora litura, Pachynematus corniger, Paracharactus rudis, Periclista marginicollis, Pristiphora banski, P. chlorea, Strongylogaster impressata, S. remota, Taxonus epicera, Thrinax albidopictus, T. multicinctus, Zaschizonyx montana; (Xiphydriidae) Xiphydria tibialis. PMID:27222635

  6. 5th Bionanotox and Applications International Research Conference, Peabody, Little Rock, Arkansas, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabb, Taneicie; Chowdhury, Parimal

    2011-06-01

    "BioNanoTox and Toxicity: using Technology to Advance Discovery" was this year's theme at the 5th BioNanoTox and Applications International Research Conference held at the Peabody Hotel, Little Rock, Arkansas on November 4-5th, 2010. This year, the international participation in this conference increased to 25 countries spanning the globe. The conference began with opening remarks by Paul Howard, Associate Director of the National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, Arkansas, United States. Two keynote speakers, Dr. Ananth V. Annapragada and Dr. Merle G. Paule presented lectures on "Toxicity of Novel Nanoparticles for CT imaging" and "The Biology of Neurotoxicity: using Technology to Advance Discovery", respectively. Teachers, students, faculty, and scientists presented oral and poster presentations on fundamental and translational research related to BioNanoTox and related fields of science. Six presentation sessions were held over the two-day conference. There were 31 presentations and 39 posters from disciplines ranging from biology to chemistry, toxicology, nanotechnology, computational sciences, mathematics, engineering, plant science, and biotechnology. Poster presentation awards were presented to three high school students, three high school teachers, and three college students. In addition to poster awards a memorial, travel, and BioNanoTox award were presented. This year's meeting paved the way for a more outstanding meeting for the future.

  7. Water quality of least-impaired lakes in eastern and southern Arkansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justus, Billy

    2010-09-01

    A three-phased study identified one least-impaired (reference) lake for each of four Arkansas lake classifications: three classifications in the Mississippi Alluvial Plain (MAP) ecoregion and a fourth classification in the South Central Plains (SCP) ecoregion. Water quality at three of the least-impaired lakes generally was comparable and also was comparable to water quality from Kansas and Missouri reference lakes and Texas least-impaired lakes. Water quality of one least-impaired lake in the MAP ecoregion was not as good as water quality in other least-impaired lakes in Arkansas or in the three other states: a probable consequence of all lakes in that classification having a designated use as a source of irrigation water. Chemical and physical conditions for all four lake classifications were at times naturally harsh as limnological characteristics changed temporally. As a consequence of allochthonous organic material, oxbow lakes isolated within watersheds comprised of swamps were susceptible to low dissolved oxygen concentrations to the extent that conditions would be limiting to some aquatic biota. Also, pH in lakes in the SCP ecoregion was black water systems. Water quality of the deepest lakes exceeded that of shallow lakes. N/P ratios and trophic state indices may be less effective for assessing water quality for shallow lakes (<2 m) than for deep lakes because there is an increased exposure of sediment (and associated phosphorus) to disturbance and light in the former. PMID:19705289

  8. Survey of pathogens and parasitoids of Popillia japonica (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) in northwest Arkansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, B M; Johnson, D T; Steinkraus, D C

    2012-09-15

    The impact of pathogens and parasitoids on the recently established population of Popillia japonica Newman in northwest Arkansas has been unknown. In this study, we quantified the prevalence of natural enemies: Stictospora villani Hays, Ovavesicula popilliae Andreadis and Hanula, Paenibacillus spp. (Dingman), nematodes and parasitic Diptera and Hymenoptera in third instar and adult populations in 2010 and 2011. S. villani was found in 38.4% and 35.5% of larvae in 2010 and 2011, respectively. S. villani was not found in adult beetles. Paenibacillus bacteria were not found in either larvae or adults in either year. In 2010, the microsporidian O. popilliae was not found in larvae but was present in 0.2% of adults. In 2011, 2.6% of larvae were infected with O. popilliae, but the microsporidian was not found in adults. A previously unknown Adelina sp. was found infecting 0.4% of adult beetles in 2010 and 1.3% of larvae in 2011. Nematode infections were found in 1.8% of larvae and 0.1% of adults in 2010 and not found in either life stage in 2011. No parasitic Hymenoptera or Diptera were found in either year. Apparently, pathogens and parasitoids currently provide little control of the Japanese beetle population within northwest Arkansas. PMID:22721914

  9. Curriculum alignment and higher order thinking in introductory biology in Arkansas public two-year colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, Elizabeth Diane

    This dissertation identified the cognitive levels of lecture objectives, lab objectives, and test questions in introductory majors' biology. The study group included courses offered by 27 faculty members at 18 of the 22 community colleges in Arkansas. Using Bloom's Taxonomy to identify cognitive levels, the median lecture learning outcomes were at level 2 (Comprehension) and test assessments at Level 1 (Knowledge). Lab learning outcomes were determined to have a median of level 3 (Analysis). A correlation analysis was performed using SPSS software to determine if there was an association between the Bloom's level of lecture objectives and test assessments. The only significant difference found was at the Analysis level, or Bloom's level 4 (p=.043). Correlation analyses were run for two other data sets. Years of college teaching experience and hours of training in writing objectives and assessments were compared to the Bloom's Taxonomy level of lecture objectives and test items. No significant difference was found for either of these independent variables. This dissertation provides Arkansas two-year college biology faculty with baseline information about the levels of cognitive skills that are required in freshman biology for majors courses. It can serve to initiate conversations about where we are compared to a national study, where we need to be, and how we get there.

  10. User's manual for FORAR: a stand model for composition and growth of upland forests of southern Arkansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mielke, D. L.; Shugart, H. H.; West, D. C.

    1977-04-01

    This report is a user's manual for FORAR, a computer model simulating stand growth and composition of upland forests of south central Arkansas. The model computes: the number and biomass of each tree species, and the dbh, age, and species of each individual tree on a 1/12-ha circular plot.

  11. Uranium Resource Evaluation Project. Hydrochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance basic data for Ardmore, McAlester, Little Rock, and Helena Quadrangles, Oklahoma; Arkansas; Mississippi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data are compiled for hydrochemical and stream sediment reconnaisance of the following quadrangles: Ardmore, McAlester, Little Rock and Helena. These quadrangles are in Oklahoma, Arkansas and Mississippi

  12. Geodatabase of the available top and bottom surface datasets that represent the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system, Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Texas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This geodatabase contains the spatial datasets that represent the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system in the States of Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Texas. Included are: (1)...

  13. Demographics of Same-sex Couples in Arkansas, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota: Analyses of the 2013 American Community Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Gates, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    Analyzing data from the 2013 US American Community Survey, this report considers the demographic, economic, and geographic characteristics of same-sex couples (married and unmarried), especially those raising children, in Arkansas, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota. Comparisons are made with their different-sex counterparts. In Arkansas, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota, as of 2013, there are an estimated 19652 same-sex couples. An estimated 12% of these cou...

  14. A COLLABORATIVE LEARNING MATRIX FOR COMBINING SCIENCE WITH STAKEHOLDER INVOLVEMENT TO PRIORITIZE WATERSHED IMPLEMENTATION IN ARKANSAS' NONPOINT SOURCE STATE MANAGEMENT PLAN

    OpenAIRE

    ROBERT MORGAN; MARTY MATLOCK

    2008-01-01

    In 2004, the Ecological Engineering Group at the University of Arkansas received a grant to update Arkansas' nonpoint source pollution (NPS) management program. A stakeholder involvement process was developed that used collaborative learning (CL) and comparative risk assessment (CRA) to prioritise watersheds for NPS implementation. The relative ecological risk posed by nonpoint pollution to each watershed was assessed and values assigned using available water quality, GIS, and demographic dat...

  15. Size distribution of planktonic autotrophy and microheterotrophy in DeGray Reservoir, Arkansas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naturally occurring assemblages of phytoplankton and bacterioplankton were radiolabelled with sodium 14C-bicarbonate and sodium 3H-acetate and size fractionated to determine the size structure of planktonic autotrophy and microheterotrophy in DeGray Reservoir, an oligotrophic impoundment of the Caddo River in south-central Arkansas. Size distributions of autotrophy and microheterotrophy were remarkably uniform seasonally, vertically within the water column, and along the longitudinal axis of the reservoir despite significant changes in environmental conditions. Planktonic autotrophy was dominated by small algal cells with usually >50% of the photosynthetic carbon uptake accounted for by organisms 75% of the planktonic microheterotrophy. Longitudinal patterns in autotrophic and microheterotrophic activities associated with >3-μm and >1-μm size fractions, respectively, suggest an uplake to downlake shift from riverine to lacustrine environmental influences within the reservoir. 83 references, 7 figures

  16. Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units within the Ozark Plateaus aquifer system, northwestern Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecki, John B.; Bolyard, Susan E.; Hart, Rheannon M.; Clark, Jimmy M.

    2014-01-01

    Digital surfaces and thicknesses of nine hydrogeologic units of the Ozark Plateaus aquifer system from land surface to the top of the Gunter Sandstone in northwestern Arkansas were created using geophysical logs, drillers’ logs, geologist-interpreted formation tops, and previously published maps. The 6,040 square mile study area in the Ozark Plateaus Province includes Benton, Washington, Carroll, Madison, Boone, Newton, Marion, and Searcy Counties. The top of each hydrogeologic unit delineated on geophysical logs was based partly on previously published reports and maps and also from drillers’ logs. These logs were then used as a basis to contour digital surfaces showing the top and thickness of the Fayetteville Shale, the Boone Formation, the Chattanooga Shale, the Everton Formation, the Powell Dolomite, the Cotter Dolomite, the Roubidoux Formation, the Gasconade Dolomite, and the Gunter Sandstone.

  17. Quality aspects in nuclear engineering courses at the University of Arkansas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although quality assurance and total quality management are well-established programs in industry, almost all university academic programs lack formally organized programs for development, demonstration, and maintenance of high quality. Many academic programs do have many facets of a quality assurance program, it is simply handled as a part of the usual management of the academic program. These quality assurance programs inevitably are aimed at management of the instructor, with little or no emphasis on the ongoing quality of student work. This paper describes how the concept of quality is directed toward the entire aspect of nuclear engineering classes at the University of Arkansas, from overall university management of the instructor to details concerning instructor contact with students to improve the quality of the student's own work. One particular new concept is introduced: the use of quality points by the author in grading all students work

  18. Geologic map of the west-central Buffalo National River region, northern Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Mark R.; Turner, Kenzie J.

    2014-01-01

    This map summarizes the geology of the west-central Buffalo National River region in the Ozark Plateaus region of northern Arkansas. Geologically, the region lies on the southern flank of the Ozark dome, an uplift that exposes oldest rocks at its center in Missouri. Physiographically, the map area spans the Springfield Plateau, a topographic surface generally held up by Mississippian cherty limestone and the higher Boston Mountains to the south, held up by Pennsylvanian rocks. The Buffalo River flows eastward through the map area, enhancing bedrock erosion of an approximately 1,600-ft- (490-m-) thick sequence of Ordovician, Mississippian, and Pennsylvanian carbonate and clastic sedimentary rocks that have been mildly deformed by a series of faults and folds. Quaternary surficial units are present as alluvial deposits along major streams, including a series of terrace deposits from the Buffalo River, as well as colluvium and landslide deposits mantling bedrock on hillslopes.

  19. Middle school transition and body weight outcomes: Evidence from Arkansas Public Schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Di; Thomsen, Michael R; Nayga, Rodolfo M; Rouse, Heather L

    2016-05-01

    There is evidence that middle school transition adversely affects educational and psychological outcomes of pre-teen children, but little is known about the impacts of middle school transition on other aspects of health. In this article, we estimate the impact of middle school transition on the body mass index (BMI) of public schoolchildren in Arkansas, United States. Using an instrumental variable approach, we find that middle school transition in grade 6 led to a moderate decrease of 0.04 standard deviations in BMI z-scores for all students. Analysis by subsample indicated that this result was driven by boys (0.06-0.07 standard deviations) and especially by non-minority boys (0.09 standard deviations). We speculate that the changing levels of physical activities associated with middle school transition provide the most reasonable explanation for this result. PMID:26794273

  20. The road to tuberculosis (Mycobacterium tuberculosis elimination in Arkansas; a re-examination of risk groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Berzkalns

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study was conducted to generate knowledge useful for developing public health interventions for more effective tuberculosis control in Arkansas. METHODS: The study population included 429 culture-confirmed reported cases (January 1, 2004-December 31, 2010. Mycobacterium tuberculosis genotyping data were used to identify cases likely due to recent transmission (clustered versus reactivation (non-clustered. Poisson regression models estimated average decline rate in incidence over time and assessed the significance of differences between subpopulations. A multinomial logistic model examined differences between clustered and non-clustered incidence. RESULTS: A significant average annual percent decline was found for the overall incidence of culture-confirmed (9%; 95% CI: 5.5%, 16.9%, clustered (6%; 95% CI: 0.5%, 11.6%, and non-clustered tuberculosis cases (12%; 95% CI: 7.6%, 15.9%. However, declines varied among demographic groups. Significant declines in clustered incidence were only observed in males, non-Hispanic blacks, 65 years and older, and the rural population. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that the Arkansas tuberculosis control program must target both traditional and non-traditional risk groups for successful tuberculosis elimination. The present study also demonstrates that a thorough analysis of TB trends in different population subgroups of a given geographic region or state can lead to the identification of non-traditional risk factors for TB transmission. Similar studies in other low incidence populations would provide beneficial data for how to control and eventually eliminate TB in the U.S.

  1. Arkansas' experience: statewide surveillance and parental information on the child obesity epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Joseph W; Card-Higginson, Paula

    2009-09-01

    Parents, clinicians, public health officials, and policy makers need readily available information on the extent of the childhood obesity epidemic. As in any epidemic, the strategies and tools used to combat the imminent threat are frequently based on scientific rationale and experience but applied in areas in which we lack complete understanding. The urgent need for information requires execution of decisions that are not risk-free--such is the case of BMI screening obesity. Use of BMI percentiles to classify weight status among youth and quantify the epidemic can inform and engage parents and other key stakeholders. Arkansas has completed its sixth year of BMI screenings for public school students. Through a groundbreaking legislative mandate that requires BMI assessments in public schools, the state has achieved both enhanced awareness among parents and their children and increased engagement by school, clinical, public health, and community leaders in response to the epidemic. External evaluations conducted since institution of BMI assessments have revealed none of the initially feared negative consequences of BMI measurements such as teasing, use of diet pills, or excessive concerns about weight. In the face of this epidemic, the risks of using BMI assessments in clinical or school-based settings must be recognized but can be managed. Arkansas' Act 1220 and BMI-reporting efforts have not only afforded parents detailed information about their children's health but also provided longitudinal data needed to fully understand the scope of childhood and adolescent obesity in the state and to track progress made in combating this epidemic. PMID:19720670

  2. Effects of recent climate variability on groundwater levels in eastern Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecki, John B.; Schrader, T.P.

    2013-01-01

    Water-level fluctuations in wells completed in the Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer in eastern Arkansas were compared to variability in annual precipitation, an indicator of climate variability. The wettest year on record in Little Rock, Arkansas, occurred in 2009 with 81.79 inches of precipitation compared to an average of 47.1 inches per year. In contrast, 2005 and 2010 were the 7th and 14th driest years on record with 34.55 and 36.52 inches per year, respectively. This variability in precipitation was reflected in water-level altitude changes between 2004 and 2008 and 2006 and 2010. Generally, drier conditions between 2004 and 2008 led to an average decline in water levels of 1.62 feet, whereas wetter conditions between 2006 and 2010 led to an average rise in water levels of 1.36 feet. Drier periods likely resulted in less recharge compared to wetter periods. Groundwater use from the alluvial aquifer peaked in 2000 and has since declined, in part, because of conservation measures and substantial reduction in aquifer saturated thickness. Groundwater-flow model results showed some areas of the alluvial aquifer simulated as dry in 2010, indicating a reduced capacity of the alluvial aquifer to produce water in those areas. Additional factors affecting groundwater use include the types of crops grown in an area and the availabitiliy of crop subsidies. Real-time continuous water-level measurements in wells allow for a more accurate assessment of the effect of variability in precipitation and water use than periodic water-level measurements.

  3. Superfund at work: Hazardous waste cleanup efforts nationwide, spring 1993 (Old Midland Products Site Profile, Yell County, Arkansas). Fact sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Old Midland Products site in Yell County, Arkansas was contaminated by hazardous chemicals from operations of a wood preserving plant. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) worked closely with the Arkansas Department of Pollution Control and Ecology (ADPCE) to select a cleanup plan to remediate the site, allowing unrestricted use by 1998. EPA and ADPCE actions consisted of: treating over 11 million gallons of contaminated surface water and lagoon liquids; employing a highly efficient, transportable incinerator to destroy more than 85,000 tons of contaminated soil and lagoon sludges over a short period of time; installing recovery wells to treat an estimated 450,000 gallons of contaminated ground water; and maintaining effective community relations with local residents to address their concerns and involve them in the cleanup process. The site serves as an example of how EPA, state agencies, and local residents can work together to restore the environment polluted by hazardous waste

  4. BEACON/MOD2A analysis of the Arkansas-1 reactor cavity during a hypothetical hot leg break

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the evaluation of the new MOD2A version of the BEACON code, the Arkansas-1 reactor cavity was modeled during a hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident. Results of the BEACON analysis were compared with results obtained previously with the COMPARE containment code. Studies were also made investigating some of the BEACON interphasic, timestep control, and wall heat transfer options to assure that these models were working properly and to observe their effects on the results. Descriptions of the Arkansas-1 reactor cavity, initial assumptions during the hypothetical LOCA, and methods of modeling with BEACON are presented. Some of the problems encountered in accurately modeling the penetrations surrounding the hot and cold leg pipes are also discussed

  5. Additions to the aquatic diptera (Chaoboridae, Chironomidae, Culicidae, Tabanidae, Tipulidae) fauna of the White River National Wildlife Refuge, Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chordas, Stephen W., III; Hudson, Patrick L.; Chapman, Eric G.

    2004-01-01

    The dipteran fauna of Arkansas is generally poorly known. A previous study of the Aquatic macroinvertebrates of the White River National Wildlife Refuge, the largest refuge in Arkansas, reported only 12 diptera taxa out of 219 taxa collected (Chordas et al., 1996). Most of the dipterans from this study were identified only to the family level. The family Chironomidae is a large, diverse group and was predicted to be much more diverse in the refuge than indicated by previous studies. In this study, Chironomidae were targeted, with other aquatic or semiaquatic dipterans also retained, in collections designed to better define the dipteran fauna of the White River National Wildlife Refuge. Adult dipterans were collected from 22 sites within the refuge using sweep-nets, two types of blacklight traps, and lighted fan traps in June of 2001. Specimens from previous studies were retrieved and identified to the lowest possible taxonomic level. A total of 4,917 specimens representing 122 taxa was collected. The 122 taxa were comprised of the following: two chaoborids, 83 chironomids, 15 culicids, nine tabanids, and 13 tipulids. Of these, 46 species are new state records for Arkansas. Nine undescribed species of chironomids were collected, and eight species records represent significant range extensions.

  6. Survey of Borreliae in ticks, canines, and white-tailed deer from Arkansas, U.S.A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fryxell Rebecca T

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the Eastern and Upper Midwestern regions of North America, Ixodes scapularis (L. is the most abundant tick species encountered by humans and the primary vector of B. burgdorferi, whereas in the southeastern region Amblyomma americanum (Say is the most abundant tick species encountered by humans but cannot transmit B. burgdorferi. Surveys of Borreliae in ticks have been conducted in the southeastern United States and often these surveys identify B. lonestari as the primary Borrelia species, surveys have not included Arkansas ticks, canines, or white-tailed deer and B. lonestari is not considered pathogenic. The objective of this study was to identify Borrelia species within Arkansas by screening ticks (n = 2123, canines (n = 173, and white-tailed deer (n = 228 to determine the identity and locations of Borreliae endemic to Arkansas using PCR amplification of the flagellin (flaB gene. Methods Field collected ticks from canines and from hunter-killed white-tailed were identified to species and life stage. After which, ticks and their hosts were screened for the presence of Borrelia using PCR to amplify the flaB gene. A subset of the positive samples was confirmed with bidirectional sequencing. Results In total 53 (21.2% white-tailed deer, ten (6% canines, and 583 (27.5% Ixodid ticks (252 Ixodes scapularis, 161 A. americanum, 88 Rhipicephalus sanguineus, 50 Amblyomma maculatum, 19 Dermacentor variabilis, and 13 unidentified Amblyomma species produced a Borrelia flaB amplicon. Of the positive ticks, 324 (22.7% were collected from canines (151 A. americanum, 78 R. sanguineus, 43 I. scapularis, 26 A. maculatum, 18 D. variabilis, and 8 Amblyomma species and 259 (37.2% were collected from white-tailed deer (209 I. scapularis, 24 A. maculatum, 10 A. americanum, 10 R. sanguineus, 1 D. variabilis, and 5 Amblyomma species. None of the larvae were PCR positive. A majority of the flaB amplicons were homologous with B

  7. Factors related to achievement in sophomore organic chemistry at the University of Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Harriet Arlene

    The purpose of this study was to identify the significant cognitive and non-cognitive variables that related to achievement in the first semester of organic chemistry at the University of Arkansas. Cognitive variables included second semester general chemistry grade, ACT composite score, ACT English, mathematics, reading, and science reasoning subscores, and spatial ability. Non-cognitive variables included anxiety, confidence, effectance motivation, and usefulness. Using a correlation research design, the individual relationships between organic chemistry achievement and each of the cognitive variables and non-cognitive variables were assessed. In addition, the relationships between organic chemistry achievement and combinations of these independent variables were explored. Finally, gender- and instructor-related differences in the relationships between organic chemistry achievement and the independent variables were investigated. The samples consisted of volunteers from the Fall 1999 and Fall 2000 sections of Organic Chemistry I at the University of Arkansas. All students in each section were asked to participate. Data for spatial ability and non-cognitive independent variables were collected using the Purdue Visualization of Rotations test and the modified Fennema-Sherman Attitude Scales. Data for other independent variables, including ACT scores and second semester general chemistry grades, were obtained from the Office of Institutional Research. The dependent variable, organic chemistry achievement, was measured by each student's accumulated points in the course and consisted of scores on quizzes and exams in the lecture section only. These totals were obtained from the lecture instructor at the end of each semester. Pearson correlation and stepwise multiple regression analyses were used to measure the relationships between organic chemistry achievement and the independent variables. Prior performance in chemistry as measured by second semester general

  8. Using Paid Radio Advertisements to Promote Physical Activity Among Arkansas Tweens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Appathurai Balamurugan, MD, MPH

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The level of physical activity among children is a growing concern. Evidence shows that many children aged 9 to 13 years (tweens do not participate in any organized physical activity during their nonschool hours, and some do not engage in any free-time physical activity. Physical inactivity is associated with a host of chronic diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Paid media advertisements have been an effective method of promoting physical activity. Methods From March 10, 2003, through June 29, 2003, we aired paid radio advertisements in six major Arkansas metropolitan areas to promote physical activity among tweens. In September 2003, we surveyed 295 Arkansas tweens by telephone to assess their exposure to the advertisements and the impact of the advertisements on their intent to participate in physical activity. In the same telephone survey, we also asked questions about the respondents’ physical activity level. The data were weighted so that the results would be representative of the areas surveyed. The statistical analysis was performed using SPSS, version 11.5 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, Ill. Results Of the tweens surveyed, 56.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 50.7%–62.1% reported hearing the radio advertisements. Of the tweens who heard the advertisement messages, 76.1% (95% CI, 69.4%–82.8% said the messages made them more likely to get involved in physical activity. Younger tweens (aged 9 and 10 years were less likely to have heard the advertisements than older tweens (aged 11 to 13 years. However, the advertisements were more likely to cause younger tweens to want to get involved in physical activity (odds ratio [OR] = 6.89, P = .003 than older tweens. Of the tweens surveyed, 74.9% (95% CI, 70.0%–79.8% reported that they were involved in nonschool-sponsored sports, and 45.3% (95% CI, 39.6%–51.0% were involved in school-sponsored sports. Conclusion Paid media advertisements may be an effective way to

  9. Cadmium Accumulation in Periphyton from an Abandoned Mining District in the Buffalo National River, Arkansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Jacob R; Bouldin, Jennifer L

    2016-06-01

    The Rush Mining District along the Buffalo River in Arkansas has a significant history of zinc and lead mining operations. The tails and spoils of these operations deposit heavy amounts of raw ore into streams. One element commonly found in the earth's crust that becomes a minor constituent of the deposition is cadmium. Periphyton samples from Rush Creek and Clabber Creek, two creeks within the Rush Mining District were measured for cadmium as well as two creeks with no history of mining, Spring Creek and Water Creek. Periphyton samples from Rush and Clabber Creek contained mean cadmium concentrations of 436.6 ± 67.3 and 93.38 ± 8.67 µg/kg, respectively. Spring Creek and Water Creek had a mean cadmium concentration of 40.49 ± 3.40 and 41.78 ± 3.99 µg/kg within periphyton. The results indicate increased metal concentrations in algal communities from mined areas. As periphyton is the base of the aquatic food chain, it acts as a conduit for movement of cadmium in the food web. PMID:27130541

  10. Digital model of the Bayou Bartholomew alluvial aquifer stream system, Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, J.E.; Broom, Matthew E.

    1979-01-01

    A digital model of the Bayou Bartholomew aquifer-stream system in Arkansas was calibrated for the purpose of predicting hydrologic responses to stresses of water development. The simulated-time span for model calibration was from 1953 to 1970, during which time the system was stressed largely by ground- and surface-water diversions for rice irrigation. The model was calibrated by comparing groundwater-level and streamflow data with model-derived groundwater levels and streamflow. In the calibrated model, the ratio of model-derived to observed streamflows for 17 subbasins averaged 1.1; the ratios among the subbasins ranged from 0.8 to 1.6. The average deviation of the differences between model-derived and observed groundwater levels at 47 nodes was 0.2; the average among the nodes ranged from -2.3 to 10.4. The average standard deviation of the differences between the model-derived and observed groundwater levels was 3.5; the average among the nodes ranged from 0.4 to 10.5. The model will provide projections of changes in the potentiometric surface resulting from (1) changes in the rate or distribution of groundwater pumpage or (2) changes in the stage of streams and reservoirs. The model will provide only approximate projections of the streamflow. (USGS)

  11. Atmospheric Contributors to Heavy Rainfall Events in the Arkansas-Red River Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor A. McCorkle

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the top 1% 24-hour rainfall events from 1994 to 2013 at eight climatological sites that represent the east to west precipitation gradient across the Arkansas-Red River Basin in North America. A total of 131 cases were identified and subsequently classified on the synoptic-scale, mesoscale, and local-scale to compile a climatological analysis of these extreme, heavy rainfall events based on atmospheric forcings. For each location, the prominent midtropospheric pattern, mesoscale feature, and predetermined thermodynamic variables were used to classify each 1% rainfall event. Individual events were then compared with other cases throughout the basin. The most profound results were that the magnitudes of the thermodynamic variables such as convective available potential energy and precipitable water values were poor predictors of the amount of rainfall produced in these extreme events. Further, the mesoscale forcings had more of an impact during the warm season and for the westernmost locations, whereas synoptic forcings were extremely prevalent during the cold season at the easternmost locations in the basin. The implications of this research are aimed at improving the forecasting of heavy precipitation at individual weather forecasts offices within the basin through the identified patterns at various scales.

  12. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Pine Bluff Arsenal, Pine Bluff, Arkansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ensminger, J.T.; Hillsman, E.L.; Johnson, R.D.; Morrisey, J.A.; Staub, W.P.; Boston, C.R.; Hunsaker, D.B.; Leibsch, E.; Rickert, L.W.; Tolbert, V.R.; Zimmerman, G.P.

    1991-09-01

    The Pine Bluff Arsenal (PBA) near Pine Bluff, Arkansas, is one of eight continental United States (CONUS) Army installations where lethal unitary chemical agents and munitions are stored and where destruction of agents and munitions is proposed under the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP). The chemical agent inventory at PBA consists of approximately 12%, by weight, of the total US stockpile. The destruction of the stockpile is necessary to eliminate the risk to the public from continued storage and to dispose of obsolete and leaking munitions. In 1988 the US Army issued a Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (FPEIS) for the CSDP that identified on-site disposal of agents and munitions as the environmentally preferred alternative (i.e., the alternative with the least potential to cause significant adverse impacts). The purpose of this report is to examine the proposed implementation of on-site disposal at PBA in light of more recent and more detailed data than those on which the FPEIS is based. New population data were used to compute fatalities using the same computation methods and values for all other parameters as in the FPEIS. Results indicate that all alternatives are indistinguishable when the potential health impacts to the PBA community are considered. However, risks from on-site disposal are in all cases equal to or less than risks from other alternatives. Furthermore, no unique resources with the potential to prevent or delay implementation of on-site disposal at PBA have been identified.

  13. Size distribution of planktonic autotrophy and microheterotrophy in DeGray Reservoir, Arkansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimmel, B.L.; Groeger, A.W.

    1983-01-01

    Naturally occurring assemblages of phytoplankton and bacterioplankton were radiolabelled with sodium /sup 14/C-bicarbonate and sodium /sup 3/H-acetate and size fractionated to determine the size structure of planktonic autotrophy and microheterotrophy in DeGray Reservoir, an oligotrophic impoundment of the Caddo River in south-central Arkansas. Size distributions of autotrophy and microheterotrophy were remarkably uniform seasonally, vertically within the water column, and along the longitudinal axis of the reservoir despite significant changes in environmental conditions. Planktonic autotrophy was dominated by small algal cells with usually >50% of the photosynthetic carbon uptake accounted for by organisms <8.0 ..mu..m. Microheterotrophic activity in the 0.2- to 1.0-..mu..m size fraction, presumably associated with free-living bacterioplankton not attached to suspended particles, usually accounted for >75% of the planktonic microheterotrophy. Longitudinal patterns in autotrophic and microheterotrophic activities associated with >3-..mu..m and >1-..mu..m size fractions, respectively, suggest an uplake to downlake shift from riverine to lacustrine environmental influences within the reservoir. 83 references, 7 figures.

  14. Predictors of Substance Abuse Treatment Entry Among Rural Illicit Stimulant Users in Ohio, Arkansas, and Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Robert G.; Sexton, Rocky; Wang, Jichuan; Falck, Russel; Leukefeld, Carl G.; Booth, Brenda M.

    2010-01-01

    Illicit drug use in the rural United States is increasingly common, yet little is known about drug users’ treatment-seeking behaviors. This study identifies predictors of substance abuse treatment entry over 24 months among 710 illicit stimulant users in rural areas of Ohio, Arkansas, and Kentucky. Active users of powdered cocaine, crack cocaine, and/or methamphetamine (MA) were recruited using respondent-driven sampling. Participants completed structured interviews at baseline and follow-up questionnaires every 6 months for 24 months. Data were analyzed using the Cox proportional hazards model. The paper is informed by the Anderson-Newman Model. Overall, 18.7% of the sample entered treatment. Ohio or Kentucky residence, perceived need for substance abuse treatment, higher ASI legal problem composite scores, prior substance abuse treatment, and tranquilizer use were positively associated with treatment entry. Non-daily crack cocaine users and marijuana users were less likely to enter treatment. The findings can help inform rural substance abuse treatment program development and outreach. PMID:20391264

  15. Description of Survey Data Regarding the Chemical Repackaging Plant Accident West Helena, Arkansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorensen, J.H.; Vogt, B.M.

    1999-03-01

    Shortly after 1:00 p.m. on Thursday, May 8, 1997, clouds of foul-smelling smoke began pouring from an herbicide and pesticide packaging plant in West Helena, Arkansas. An alert was sounded, employees evacuated, and the West Helena fire department was called. As three firefighters prepared to enter the plant, the chemical compounds exploded, collapsing a solid concrete block wall, and killing all three firefighters. As the odorous smoky cloud drifted away from the plant, authorities ordered residents in a 2-mile area downwind of the plant to evacuate and those in the 2- to 3-mile zone to shelter in place. This study examines and compares the responses to a mail survey of those ordered to evacuate and those told to shelter in place. Among the variables examined are compliance with official orders and perceived warnings, threat perception, time and source of first warning, response times, and behavior characteristics for both populations. The findings indicate that 90% of those that were told to evacuate did so but only 27% of those told to shelter-in-place did so, with 68% opting to evacuate instead. The implications of these findings for emergency managers is that people will likely choose to evacuate when both warnings to evacuate and warnings to shelter are issued to residents in close proximity to each other. The findings on warning times closely resemble other findings from evacuations when chemical accidents occur and route notification is used for warning residents.

  16. Duplex-like structures in submarine fan channels, Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanmugam, G.; Moiola, R.J.; Sales, J.K.

    1988-03-01

    Submarine fan channel sequences of the Jackfork Formation (Lower Pennsylvanian) at DeGray Dam section in the Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas, contain discrete units (10-75 cm thick) with moderately dipping (25/sup 0/-40/sup 0/), sigmoidal imbricate slices. Adjacent units with opposing imbricate slices are common. The sigmoidal structures are similar in geometry to a tectonic feature known as a duplex. A tectonic origin of sigmoidal structures, however, seems unlikely because opposing directions of imbrication in adjacent units would require an unrealistic tectonic movement history for the area. The authors propose that the Jackfork sigmoidal structures were formed by a process kinematically similar to that responsible for generating duplex structures. Unlike tectonic duplexes, however, the sigmoidal structures were formed by soft-sediment deformation of sand and mud layers as high-energy sediment gravity flows glided over these layers. Sediment gravity flows, responsible for forming the sigmoidal deformation, were probably generated by slumping of adjacent channel walls. Dip direction of sigmoidal slices is perpendicular to channel axes. Thus, recognition of sigmoidal deformation structures may be useful in inferring the trend of channels in ancient submarine fan complexes.

  17. Burnup verification measurements on spent fuel assemblies at Arkansas Nuclear One

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnup verification measurements have been performed using the Fork system at Arkansas Nuclear One, Units 1 and 2, operated by Energy Operations, Inc. Passive neutron and gamma-ray measurements on individual spent fuel assemblies were correlated with the reactor records for burnup, cooling time, and initial enrichment. The correlation generates an internal calibration for the system in the form of a power law determined by a least squares fit to the neutron data. The values of the exponent in the power laws were 3.83 and 4.35 for Units 1 and 2, respectively. The average deviation of the reactor burnup records from the calibration determined from the measurements is a measure of the random error in the burnup records. The observed average deviations were 2.7% and 3.5% for assemblies at Units 1 and 2, respectively, indicating a high degree of consistency in the reactor records. Two non-standard assemblies containing neutron sources were studied at Unit 2. No anomalous measurements were observed among the standard assemblies at either Unit. The effectiveness of the Fork system for verification of reactor records is due to the sensitivity of the neutron yield to burnup, the self-calibration generated by a series of measurements, the redundancy provided by three independent detection systems, and the operational simplicity and flexibility of the design

  18. The UP modelling system for large scale hydrology: simulation of the Arkansas-Red River basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. G. Kilsby

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The UP (Upscaled Physically-based hydrological modelling system to the Arkansas-Red River basin (USA is designed for macro-scale simulations of land surface processes, and aims for a physical basis and, avoids the use of discharge records in the direct calibration of parameters. This is achieved in a two stage process: in the first stage parametrizations are derived from detailed modelling of selected representative small and then used in a second stage in which a simple distributed model is used to simulate the dynamic behaviour of the whole basin. The first stage of the process is described in a companion paper (Ewen et al., this issue, and the second stage of this process is described here. The model operated at an hourly time-step on 17-km grid squares for a two year simulation period, and represents all the important hydrological processes including regional aquifer recharge, groundwater discharge, infiltration- and saturation-excess runoff, evapotranspiration, snowmelt, overland and channel flow. Outputs from the model are discussed, and include river discharge at gauging stations and space-time fields of evaporation and soil moisture. Whilst the model efficiency assessed by comparison of simulated and observed discharge records is not as good as could be achieved with a model calibrated against discharge, there are considerable advantages in retaining a physical basis in applications to ungauged river basins and assessments of impacts of land use or climate change.

  19. Modeling regional variation in riverine fish biodiversity in the Arkansas-White-Red River basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL; Jager, Yetta [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The patterns of biodiversity in freshwater systems are shaped by biogeography, environmental gradients, and human-induced factors. In this study, we developed empirical models to explain fish species richness in subbasins of the Arkansas White Red River basin as a function of discharge, elevation, climate, land cover, water quality, dams, and longitudinal position. We used information-theoretic criteria to compare generalized linear mixed models and identified well-supported models. Subbasin attributes that were retained as predictors included discharge, elevation, number of downstream dams, percent forest, percent shrubland, nitrate, total phosphorus, and sediment. The random component of our models, which assumed a negative binomial distribution, included spatial correlation within larger river basins and overdispersed residual variance. This study differs from previous biodiversity modeling efforts in several ways. First, obtaining likelihoods for negative binomial mixed models, and thereby avoiding reliance on quasi-likelihoods, has only recently become practical. We found the ranking of models based on these likelihood estimates to be more believable than that produced using quasi-likelihoods. Second, because we had access to a regional-scale watershed model for this river basin, we were able to include model-estimated water quality attributes as predictors. Thus, the resulting models have potential value as tools with which to evaluate the benefits of water quality improvements to fish.

  20. Bacteria and Turbidity Survey for Blue Mountain Lake, Arkansas, Spring and Summer, 1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasker, A. Dwight

    1995-01-01

    Introduction Blue Mountain Lake darn is located at river mile 74.4 on the Petit Jean River in Logan and Yell Counties in west-central Arkansas (fig. 1). Drainage area above the darn is 488 square miles. Blue Mountain Lake is located between two national forests-the Ozark National Forest and the Ouachita National Forest. The primary purpose for Blue Mountain Lake is flood control, but the lake is used for a variety of recreational purposes. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the U.s. Army Corps of Engineers, Little Rock District, conducted a bacterial and turbidity study of the Blue Mountain Lake Basin during the spring and suri1mer 1994. Samples were collected weekly at 11 locations within the lake basin from May through September 1994. Eight sampling sites were located on tributaries to the lake and three sampling sites were located on the lake with one of the sites located at a swim beach (fig. 2; table 1).

  1. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Mississippi and Florida airborne survey, Fort Smith quadrangle, Oklahoma, and Arkansas. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fort Smith quadrangle in western Arkansas and eastern Oklahoma overlies thick Paleozoic sediments of the Arkoma Basin. These Paleozoics dominate surface exposure except where covered by Quaternary Alluvial materials. Examination of available literature shows no known uranium deposits (or occurrences) within the quadrangle. Seventy-five groups of uranium samples were defined as anomalies and are discussed briefly. None were considered significant, and most appeared to be of cultural origin. Magnetic data show character that suggest structural and/or lithologic complexity, but imply relatively deep-seated sources

  2. Geologic Map of the Boxley Quadrangle, Newton and Madison Counties, Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Mark R.; Turner, Kenzie J.

    2007-01-01

    This map summarizes the geology of the Boxley 7.5-minute quadrangle in the Ozark Plateaus region of northern Arkansas. Geologically, the area lies on the southern flank of the Ozark dome, an uplift that exposes oldest rocks at its center in Missouri. Physiographically, the Boxley quadrangle lies within the Boston Mountains, a high plateau region underlain by Pennsylvanian sandstones and shales. Valleys of the Buffalo River and its tributaries expose an approximately 1,600-ft-(490-m-)thick sequence of Ordovician, Mississippian, and Pennsylvanian carbonate and clastic sedimentary rocks that have been mildly deformed by a series of faults and folds. Part of Buffalo National River, a park encompassing the Buffalo River and adjacent land that is administered by the National Park Service, extends through the eastern part of the quadrangle. Mapping for this study was conducted by field inspection of numerous sites and was compiled as a 1:24,000-scale geographic information system (GIS) database. Locations and elevation sites were determined with the aid of a global positioning satellite receiver and a hand-held barometric altimeter. Hill-shade-relief and slope maps derived from a U.S. Geological Survey 10-m digital elevation model as well as orthophotos were used to help trace ledge-forming units between field traverses within the Upper Mississippian and Pennsylvanian part of the stratigraphic sequence. Strike and dip of beds were typically measured along stream drainages or at well-exposed ledges. Structure contours were constructed on the top of the Boone Formation and the base of a prominent sandstone unit within the Bloyd Formation based on elevations of control points as well as other limiting information on their maximum or minimum elevations.

  3. Geomorphic Characterization of the Middle Fork Saline River: Garland, Perry, and Saline Counties, Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Aaron L.; Garday, Thomas J.; Redman, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    This report was prepared to help address concerns raised by local residents, State, and Federal agencies about the current geomorphic conditions of the Middle Fork Saline River. Over the past 30 years the Middle Fork Saline River Basin has experienced a marked increase in urbanization. The report summarizes the Middle Fork?s current (2003) channel characteristics at nine stream reaches in the upper 91 square miles of the basin. Assessments at each study reach included comparing measured stream geometry dimensions (cross-sectional area, top width, and mean depth) at bankfull stage to regional hydraulic geometry curves for the Ouachita Mountains Physiographic Province of Arkansas and Oklahoma, evaluations of streambed materials and sinuosity, and classification of individual stream reach types. When compared to the Ouachita Mountains? regional hydraulic geometry curves for natural, stable, stream reaches, five of the nine study reaches had slightly smaller crosssectional areas, longer top widths, and shallower depths. Streambed material analysis indicates that the Middle Fork is a bedrock influenced, gravel dominated stream with lesser amounts of sand and cobbles. Slight increases in sinuosity from 1992 to 2002 at seven of the nine study reaches indicate a slight decrease in stream channel slope. Analyses of the Middle Fork?s hydraulic geometry and sinuosity indicate that the Middle Fork is currently overly wide and shallow, but is slowly adjusting towards a deeper, narrower hydraulic geometry. Using the Rosgen system of channel classification, the two upstream study reaches classified as B4c/1 stream types; which were moderately entrenched, riffle dominated channels, with infrequently spaced pools. The downstream seven study reaches classified as C4/1 stream types; which were slightly entrenched, meandering, gravel-dominated, riffle/ pool channels with well developed flood plains. Analyses of stream reach types suggest that the downstream reaches of the Middle Fork

  4. A Model For Syntectonic Fibrous Vein Growth Inferred From Microtextures. Ouachitas Orogen, Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, P.; Wiltschko, D. V.

    2005-12-01

    Veins from the Lower Ordovician Mazarn Formation in the Arkansas' Ouachitas show two processes of vein growth, 1) continuous localized fracturing and filling and 2) recrystallization, tied to the deformation history of the area under study. Evidence for continuous localized fracturing includes the presence of veinlets near or at the vein-host interface. Veinlets are long and narrow features parallel to the main body of the vein, filled mainly with quartz, between 5 and 25 μm wide. Veinlets cut and displaced host grains. Displacement of host grains is evident because the material precipitated on veinlets show different luminescence than host grains. Remnants of these veinlets are observed in completely recrystallized fibers. Evidence for recrystallization includes, 1) wide fibers (more than 100 μm) with fluid inclusion trails parallel to fiber length that span the entire fiber length, 2) luminescence in the central part of the vein is different than luminescence in the external part of the vein (close to host-vein interface), 3) remnants of original luminescence in the central part of the vein suggesting that recrystallization is a later process. We hypothesize that in this region folding followed by flattening gave rise to boudinage of resistant layers accompanying abundant pressure solution providing the vein forming material. Precipitation of material took place along necks of boudins, which fractured repeatedly allowing veins to grow in width and length. Late thrust faults led to open system conditions which gave rise to new vein growth and recrystallization. Recrystallization altered the shape of previously formed veins.

  5. National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program. Data report: Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of ground water, stream water, and stream sediment reconnaissance in Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas. The following samples were collected: Arkansas-3292 stream sediments, 5121 ground waters, 1711 stream waters; Louisiana-1017 stream sediments, 0 ground waters, 0 stream waters; Misissippi-0 stream sediments, 814 ground waters, 0 stream waters; Missouri-2162 stream sediments, 3423 ground waters 1340 stream waters; Oklahoma-2493 stream sediments, 2751 ground waters, 375 stream waters; and Texas-279 stream sediments, 0 ground waters, 0 stream waters. Neutron activation analyses are given for U, Br, Cl, F, Mn, Na, Al, V, and Dy in ground water and stream water, and for U, Th, Hf, Ce, Fe, Mn, Na, Sc, Ti, V, Al, Dy, Eu, La, Sm, Yb, and Lu in sediments. The results of mass spectroscopic analysis for He are given for 563 ground water sites in Mississippi. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Oak Ridge National Laboratory analyzed sediment samples which were not analyzed by Savannah River Laboratory neutron activation

  6. Stream habitat and water-quality information for sites in the Buffalo River Basin and nearby basins of Arkansas, 2001-2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, James C.

    2004-01-01

    The Buffalo River lies in north-central Arkansas and is a tributary of the White River. Stream-habitat and water-quality information are presented for 52 sites in the Buffalo River Basin and adjacent areas of the White River Basin. The information was collected during the summers of 2001 and 2002 to supplement fish community sampling during the same time period.

  7. The Role of State Government in Agriculture. Proceedings of the Conference on the Role of State Government in Agriculture (Morrilton, Arkansas, December 3-4, 1987).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ospina, Enrique, Ed.; Sims, Cami S., Ed.

    Conference participants examined how other states are preparing their farmers and rural communities to survive in the present "new world order," and considered whether Arkansas, one of only three states without a central agricultural agency, has the tools to forge strategies for the 1990's. "The Role of State Government in Agriculture" by R. O.…

  8. The Occurrence of Knickpoints in Soluble Strata in the Buffalo River Basin, Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, E.; Covington, M. D.; Myre, J. M.; Perne, M.; Holcomb, G.

    2014-12-01

    Prior field and theoretical work has suggested that bedrock channels adjust to lower stream power when encountering highly soluble strata, exhibiting an increase in channel width and/or a decrease in channel slope. However, in apparent contradiction to this expectation, many channels within the Buffalo River Basin, Arkansas, contain knickpoints, in the form of waterfalls and slot canyons, that are developed at the contact between the Mississippian Batesville Sandstone and the underlying Boone Limestone. To improve understanding of bedrock channel response to contrasts in rock solubility, longitudinal surveys were conducted in three channels that cross the Boone Limestone. Additionally, channel widths and a profile were obtained for the main stem of the Buffalo River using aerial photography and a digital elevation model. Schmidt scores for the Boone and Batesville suggest that the two strata have similar compressive strengths, which is a measure of relative resistance to mechanical erosion. Two of the four studied reaches show significant knickpoint development, and in both cases the basin area above the knickpoint is less than 3 km2. One possible explanation is that these knickpoints have been arrested at a critical threshold basin area. However, at least four other such knickpoints are known from the area, and in all cases the knickpoint is highly correlated to the contact rather than a specific basin area, suggesting that the properties of the strata are an important factor. We identify three potential mechanisms that may often act in concert to develop knickpoints at contacts with underlying soluble rocks. (1) If chemical erosion in the soluble reach outpaces uplift, and knickpoint retreat through the overlying layer is sufficiently slow, then a knickpoint will develop. (2) Karstification can divert geomorphic work to the subsurface, resulting in a steep surface channel and possible stalling of upstream knickpoint migration within the soluble strata. (3) The

  9. Geodatabase of the datasets used to represent the six subunits of the Texas Coastal Uplands and Mississippi Embayment aquifer system, Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Tennessee, and Texas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This geodatabase includes spatial datasets that represent the Texas Coastal Uplands and Mississippi Embayment aquifer system in the States of Alabama, Arkansas,...

  10. Hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance, orientation study, Ouachita Mountain area, Arkansas. National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steele, K. F.

    1982-08-01

    A hydrogeochemical ground water orientation study was conducted in the multi-mineralized area of the Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas in order to evaluate the usefulness of ground water as a sampling medium for uranium exploration in similar areas. Ninety-three springs and nine wells were sampled in Clark, Garland, Hot Springs, Howard, Montgomery, Pike, Polk, and Sevier Counties. Manganese, barite, celestite, cinnabar, stibnite, copper, lead, and zinc are present. The following parameters were determined: pH, conductivity, alkalinity, U, Br, Cl, F, He, Mn, Na, V, Al, Dy, NO/sub 3/, NH/sub 3/, SO/sub 4/, and PO/sub 4/. The minerals appear to significantly affect the chemistry of the ground water. This report is issued in draft form, without detailed technical and copy editing. This was done to make the report available to the public before the end of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation.

  11. Metals, Parasites, and Environmental Conditions Affecting Breeding Populations of Spotted Salamanders (Ambystoma maculatum) in Northern Arkansas, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMali, Heather M; Trauth, Stanley E; Bouldin, Jennifer L

    2016-06-01

    The spotted salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) is indigenous to northern Arkansas, and several breeding sites are known to exist in the region. Spotted salamanders (n = 17) were collected and examined for parasites and only three females harbored nematodes (Physaloptera spp.). Chronic aquatic bioassays were conducted using water collected from eight breeding ponds during different hydroperiod events. No lethal or sublethal effects were measured in Ceriodaphnia dubia; however, decreased growth and survival were seen in Pimephales promelas. Aqueous, sediment, and salamander hepatic samples were analyzed for As, Cd, Cu, Pb, and Ni. Metal analysis revealed possible increased metal exposure following precipitation, with greatest metal concentrations measured in sediment samples. Hepatic metal concentrations were similar in parasitized and non-parasitized individuals, and greatest Pb concentrations were measured following normal precipitation events. Determining environmental stressors of amphibians, especially during their breeding and subsequent larval life stage, is imperative to improve species conservation. PMID:26886425

  12. Hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance, orientation study, Ouachita Mountain area, Arkansas. National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hydrogeochemical ground water orientation study was conducted in the multi-mineralized area of the Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas in order to evaluate the usefulness of ground water as a sampling medium for uranium exploration in similar areas. Ninety-three springs and nine wells were sampled in Clark, Garland, Hot Springs, Howard, Montgomery, Pike, Polk, and Sevier Counties. Manganese, barite, celestite, cinnabar, stibnite, copper, lead, and zinc are present. The following parameters were determined: pH, conductivity, alkalinity, U, Br, Cl, F, He, Mn, Na, V, Al, Dy, NO3, NH3, SO4, and PO4. The minerals appear to significantly affect the chemistry of the ground water. This report is issued in draft form, without detailed technical and copy editing. This was done to make the report available to the public before the end of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation

  13. Analysis and inundation mapping of the April-May 2011 flood at selected locations in northern and eastern Arkansas and southern Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerman, Drew A.; Merriman, Katherine R.; De Lanois, Jeanne L.; Berenbrock, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Precipitation that fell from April 19 through May 3, 2011, resulted in widespread flooding across northern and eastern Arkansas and southern Missouri. The first storm produced a total of approximately 16 inches of precipitation over an 8-day period, and the following storms produced as much as 12 inches of precipitation over a 2-day period. Moderate to major flooding occurred quickly along many streams within Arkansas and Missouri (including the Black, Cache, Illinois, St. Francis, and White Rivers) at levels that had not been seen since the historic 1927 floods. The 2011 flood claimed an estimated 21 lives in Arkansas and Missouri, and damage caused by the flooding resulted in a Federal Disaster Declaration for 59 Arkansas counties that received Federal or State assistance. To further the goal of documenting and understanding floods, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers–Little Rock and Memphis Districts, and Arkansas Natural Resources Commission, conducted a study to summarize meteorological and hydrological conditions before the flood; computed flood-peak magnitudes for 39 streamgages; estimated annual exceedance probabilities for 37 of those streamgages; determined the joint probabilities for 11 streamgages paired to the Mississippi River at Helena, Arkansas, which refers to the probability that locations on two paired streams simultaneously experience floods of a magnitude greater than or equal to a given annual exceedance probability; collected high-water marks; constructed flood-peak inundation maps showing maximum flood extent and water depths; and summarized flood damages and effects. For the period of record used in this report, peak-of-record stage occurred at 24 of the 39 streamgages, and peak-of-record streamflow occurred at 13 of the 30 streamgages where streamflow was determined. Annual exceedance probabilities were estimated to be less than 0.5 percent at three

  14. The project for intercomparison of land-surface parameterization schemes (PILPS) phase 2(c) Red-Arkansas River basin experiment: 1. Experiment description and summary intercomparisons

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, EF; Lettenmaier, DP; Liang, X.; D. Lohmann; Boone, A.; Chang, S; Chen, F.; Dai, Y.; Dickinson, RE; Duan, Q; M. Ek; Gusev, YM; Habets, F.; Irannejad, P.; Koster, R

    1998-01-01

    Sixteen land-surface schemes participating in the project for the Intercomparison of Land-surface Schemes (PILPS) Phase 2(c) were run using 10 years (1979-1988) of forcing data for the Red-Arkansas River basins in the Southern Great Plains region of the United States. Forcing data (precipitation, incoming radiation and surface meteorology) and land-surface characteristics (soil and vegetation parameters) were provided to each of the participating schemes. Two groups of runs are presented. (1)...

  15. The project for intercomparison of land-surface parameterization schemes (PILPS) phase 2(c) Red-Arkansas River basin experiment: 3. Spatial and temporal analysis of water fluxes

    OpenAIRE

    Lohmann, D; Lettenmaier, DP; Liang, X.; Wood, EF; A. Boone; Chang, S.; Chen, F.; Dai, Y; Desborough, C; Dickinson, RE; Duan, Q; Ek, M.; Gusev, YM; F. Habets; P. Irannejad

    1998-01-01

    The water-balance components of 16 Soil-Vegetation Atmospheric Transfer (SVAT) schemes were evaluated by comparing predicted and observed streamflow, predicted evapotranspiration and evapotranspiration inferred from an atmospheric moisture budget analysis, and soil moisture storage changes for a seven-year period (1980-1986) using data from the Red-Arkansas River basins of the Southern Great Plains of the USA. The evaluations support the following suggestions: (a) The mean annual runoff of al...

  16. Spatio-Temporal Trends of Oak Decline and Mortality under Periodic Regional Drought in the Ozark Highlands of Arkansas and Missouri

    OpenAIRE

    Shifley, Stephen R.; Hong He; W. Keith Moser; Spetich, Martin A.; Michael K. Crosby; Zhaofei Fan; Xiuli Fan

    2012-01-01

    At the forest landscape/region level, based on annual Forest Inventory and Analysis plot data from 1999 to 2010, oak decline and mortality trends for major oak species (groups) were examined in the Ozark Highlands of Arkansas and Missouri. Oak decline has elevated cumulative mortality of red oak species to between 11 and 15 percent in terms of relative density and basal area of standing dead oak trees, respectively. These values are three to five times higher than...

  17. Status of Water Levels and Selected Water-Quality Conditions in the Sparta-Memphis Aquifer in Arkansas and the Status of Water Levels in the Sparta Aquifer in Louisiana, Spring 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, T.P.; Jones, J.S.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Arkansas Natural Resources Commission, the Arkansas Geological Commission, and the Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development has monitored water levels in the Sparta Sand of Claiborne Group and Memphis Sand of Claiborne Group since the 1920's. Ground-water withdrawals have increased while water levels have declined since monitoring was initiated. This report has been produced to describe ground-water levels in the aquifers in the Sparta Sand and Memphis Sand and provide information for the management of this valuable resource. The 2005 potentiometric-surface map of the aquifers in the Sparta Sand and Memphis Sand was constructed using water-level data collected in 333 wells in Arkansas and 120 wells in Louisiana during the spring of 2005. The highest water-level altitude measured in Arkansas was 327 feet above National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929 located in Grant County in the outcrop at the western boundary of the study area; the lowest water-level altitude was 189 feet below National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929 in Union County. The highest water-level altitude measured in Louisiana was 246 feet above National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929 located in Bossier Parish in the outcrop area near the western boundary of the study area; the lowest water-level altitude was 226 feet below National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929 in central Ouachita Parish. Three large depressions centered in Columbia, Jefferson, and Union Counties in Arkansas are the result of large withdrawals for industrial and public supplies. In Louisiana, three major pumping centers are in Ouachita, Jackson, and Lincoln Parishes. Water withdrawals from these major pumping centers primarily is used for industrial and public-supply purposes. Withdrawals from Ouachita and Lincoln Parishes and Union County, Arkansas, primarily for industrial purposes, have caused the resulting cones of depression to coalesce so that the -40 foot

  18. Potential for Optical Sensor-Based Nitrogen Fertilization in Grain Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) in Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales Rodriguez, Kamil

    Ground-based active-optical (GBAO) crop sensors have become an effective tool to improve nitrogen (N) use efficiency and to predict yield early in the growing season, particularly for grass crops. Commercially available canopy sensors calculate the normalized difference vegetative index (NDVI) by emitting light in the red and near infrared range of the electromagnetic spectrum. The NDVI is used to evaluate vigor status and to estimate yield potential. However, few studies have been conducted to compare the performance of commercially available sensors. Therefore, a study was conducted using the most common crop canopy sensors: i) N-Tech's GreenSeeker(TM) (GS), ii) Holland Scientific's Crop Circle(TM) (CC), and iii) Minolta's SPAD-502 chlorophyll content meter (CCM). The objective of this study was to find the optimum time for sensing and compare the relative performance of the sensors in estimating the yield potential of grain sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench). Treatments included six levels of N fertilization (0, 37, 74, 111, 148, and 185 kg N/ ha), applied in a single split 20 days after planting (DAP). Treatments were arranged in a randomized complete block design with five replications, in four locations in Arkansas, during 2012 and 2013. Sensors readings at vegetative growth stages V3, 4, 5 and 6. Results from simple regression analysis showed that the V3-V4 growth stage correlated better with grain yield than readings collected and any other time. In season estimated yield (INSEY) obtained at V3 captured 41, 57, 78, and 61% of the variation in grain sorghum yield when red NDVI of GS, red NDVI of CC, red edge for CC and CCM, respectively, were used. Results from these studies suggest that the CC sensor has a better potential for in-season site-specific N application in Arkansas than the GS sensor. The GS reflectance values appear to saturate after the V3 stage, in contrast with CC values that allow for discrimination past the V3 Stage. Therefore, the red

  19. Comparing the 2000 and 2005 factors affecting the selling price of feeder cattle sold at Arkansas livestock auctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troxel, T R; Barham, B L

    2007-12-01

    The objectives of the study were to determine how factors affecting the selling price of feeder calves changed from 2000 to 2005 and to examine the perception that discounts narrow or even disappear as calf supplies decrease and selling prices increase. Data from weekly Arkansas livestock auctions were collected from January 1 to December 31 in 2000 and 2005. Data included calf sex, breed type, color, muscle score, horn status, frame score, fill, condition, health, and BW. Mean selling prices for 2000 and 2005 were $92.91 +/- 15.05 and $118.32 +/- 15.13 (mean +/- SD; $/45.45 kg), respectively. Individual price observations were subtracted from the respective annual means and became the dependent variable. The selling prices for feeder calves sold in groups of 2 to 5 calves and in groups of >/= 6 calves were greater in 2005 than 2000 (P Angus x Hereford, Angus, Angus x Charolais, and Brahman (P Brahman Cross, Charolais, Charolais x Limousin, Hereford x Limousin, Limousin, Limousin x one-fourth Brahman, Longhorn, Saler and Simmental. Yellow-white face, black-white face, black, and gray feeder calves received an increase in selling price from 2000 to 2005 (P < 0.001). Although fewer horned feeder calves were sold in 2005 (P < 0.01), they received greater discounts in 2005 than 2000 (-$2.86 +/- 0.16 and -$0.51 +/- 0.09; P < 0.001). In 2005, large-framed feeder calves did not receive the premium detected in 2000, but medium-framed feeder calves in 2005 received a greater selling price compared with 2000. Feeder calves with a muscle score of 1 received a greater premium in 2005 compared with 2000 ($2.58 +/- 0.06 and $0.02 +/- 0.09, respectively; P < 0.001). Feeder calves with a muscle score of 2 were discounted in both years, but the discount in 2005 was not as great as in 2000 (P < 0.001). Full and tanked feeder calves received greater discounts in 2005 than in 2000 (P < 0.001). Discounts for fleshy and fat feeder calves were greater in 2005 than in 2000. Most factors

  20. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Pine Bluff Arsenal, Pine Bluff, Arkansas. Final phase 1, Environmental report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ensminger, J.T.; Hillsman, E.L.; Johnson, R.D.; Morrisey, J.A.; Staub, W.P.; Boston, C.R.; Hunsaker, D.B.; Leibsch, E.; Rickert, L.W.; Tolbert, V.R.; Zimmerman, G.P.

    1991-09-01

    The Pine Bluff Arsenal (PBA) near Pine Bluff, Arkansas, is one of eight continental United States (CONUS) Army installations where lethal unitary chemical agents and munitions are stored and where destruction of agents and munitions is proposed under the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP). The chemical agent inventory at PBA consists of approximately 12%, by weight, of the total US stockpile. The destruction of the stockpile is necessary to eliminate the risk to the public from continued storage and to dispose of obsolete and leaking munitions. In 1988 the US Army issued a Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (FPEIS) for the CSDP that identified on-site disposal of agents and munitions as the environmentally preferred alternative (i.e., the alternative with the least potential to cause significant adverse impacts). The purpose of this report is to examine the proposed implementation of on-site disposal at PBA in light of more recent and more detailed data than those on which the FPEIS is based. New population data were used to compute fatalities using the same computation methods and values for all other parameters as in the FPEIS. Results indicate that all alternatives are indistinguishable when the potential health impacts to the PBA community are considered. However, risks from on-site disposal are in all cases equal to or less than risks from other alternatives. Furthermore, no unique resources with the potential to prevent or delay implementation of on-site disposal at PBA have been identified.

  1. Perceived Need for Substance Abuse Treatment among Illicit Stimulant Drug Users in Rural Areas of Ohio, Arkansas, and Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falck, Russel S.; Wang, Jichuan; Carlson, Robert G.; Krishnan, Laura L.; Leukefeld, Carl; Booth, Brenda M.

    2007-01-01

    Non-medical drug use in rural communities in the United States is a significant and growing public health threat. Understanding what motivates drug users in rural areas to seek substance abuse treatment may help in addressing the problem. Perceived need for treatment, a construct indicative of problem recognition and belief in problem solution, has been identified as an important predictor of help-seeking behavior. This cross-sectional study used data collected through face-to-face interviews to examine factors associated with perceived need for drug abuse treatment among not-in-treatment, adult, illicit stimulant drug users (n=710) in rural areas of Ohio, Kentucky, and Arkansas. More than one-quarter of the sample perceived a need for treatment. Results from a stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that white users, users with better physical and mental health status, and occasional users of methamphetamine were significantly less likely to see a need for treatment. Users with higher Addiction Severity Index composite scores for family/social problems or legal problems, and users with prior drug abuse treatment experience were significantly more likely to perceive a need for treatment. These findings have practical implications for efforts addressing substance abuse in rural areas. PMID:17604917

  2. Arkansas Nuclear One IPE: An implementation of the EPRI generic framework for IPE back end (Level 2) analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Generic Letter 88-20, the NRC asked US nuclear power plant licensees to prepare individual plant probabilistic risk studies. These studies are commonly referred to as Individual Plant Examinations (IPEs). In response to the IPE Generic Letter, Energy Operations implemented an EPRI-developed generic framework for the Level 2 analysis portion of the Arkansas Nuclear One (ANO Units 1 and 2) IPEs. It begins with grouping the Level 1 core damage accident sequences having similar characteristics into a more manageable set of plant damage states (PDSs). This serves as the interface with the Level 1 PRA, and it provides the starting point for investigating the various severe accident progression scenarios and containment response. These investigations are aided by the use of the generic containment event trees (CETs). This paper presents the implementation of the generic framework for the ANO-2 IPE and describes the integrated Level 1/2 insights on the risk-dominant sequences, potential containment vulnerabilities, and identification of likely accident management strategies. The present understanding of some severe accident phenomena is still limited. Therefore, a parametric analysis of the ANO IPE Level 2 model, as intended in the generic framework, was conducted reflecting different viewpoints in the severe accident phenomena. In particular, this allowed NRC viewpoints on various phenomenological issues, as discussed in Appendix 1 of GL 88-20, to be evaluated in a straight forward manner

  3. Status of Water Levels and Selected Water-Quality Conditions in the Mississippi River Valley Alluvial Aquifer in Eastern Arkansas, 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, T.P.

    2006-01-01

    During the spring of 2004, water levels were measured in 684 wells completed in the Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer in eastern Arkansas. Ground-water levels are affected by intense ground-water withdrawals resulting in extensive potentiometric depressions. In 2004, the highest water-level altitude measured was 293 feet above National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929 in northeastern Clay County. The lowest water-level altitude measured was 76 feet above National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929 in the center of Arkansas County. A large depression in the potentiometric surface was located in Arkansas, Lonoke, and Prairie Counties during 1998 and persisted to 2002. The area enclosed in the 100-foot contour in Arkansas County in 2004 is about the same as in 2002, however, the area enclosed in the 100-foot contour in Lonoke and Prairie Counties in 2004 has receded. Two shallower cones of depressions were located in Craighead, Cross, and Poinsett Counties and St. Francis, Woodruff, Lee, and Monroe Counties west of Crowleys Ridge during 1998. The 2004 potentiometricsurface map shows that the areas enclosed by the 140-foot contour have continued to expand. A map of changes in water-level measurements between 2000 and 2004 was constructed using the difference between water-level measurements from 625 wells reported in this report and the 2000 Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer report. Water-level changes between 2000 and 2004 ranged from -31.1 feet to 16.3 feet, with a mean of -0.7 feet (negative changes indicating water-level declines, positive changes indicating water-level rises). The largest rise of 16.3 feet is in Arkansas County and the largest decline of -31.1 feet is in Prairie County. Long-term water-level changes were calculated for 134 wells in the alluvial aquifer for the period from 1980 to 2004. The mean annual decline in water level for the entire study area was -0.31 feet per year with a range of -1.35 feet per year to 0.84 feet per year. The

  4. Ambient conditions and fate and transport simulations of dissolved solids, chloride, and sulfate in Beaver Lake, Arkansas, 2006--10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, W. Reed

    2013-01-01

    Beaver Lake is a large, deep-storage reservoir located in the upper White River Basin in northwestern Arkansas, and was completed in 1963 for the purposes of flood control, hydroelectric power, and water supply. Beaver Lake is affected by point and nonpoint sources of minerals, nutrients, and sediments. The City of Fayetteville discharges about half of its sewage effluent into the White River immediately upstream from the backwater of the reservoir. The City of West Fork discharges its sewage effluent into the West Fork of the White River, and the City of Huntsville discharges its sewage effluent into a tributary of War Eagle Creek. A study was conducted to describe the ambient conditions and fate and transport of dissolved solids, chloride, and sulfate concentrations in Beaver Lake. Dissolved solids, chloride, and sulfate are components of wastewater discharged into Beaver Lake and a major concern of the drinking water utilities that use Beaver Lake as their source. A two-dimensional model of hydrodynamics and water quality was calibrated to include simulations of dissolved solids, chloride, and sulfate for the period January 2006 through December 2010. Estimated daily dissolved solids, chloride, and sulfate loads were increased in the White River and War Eagle Creek tributaries, individually and the two tributaries together, by 1.2, 1.5, 2.0, 5.0, and 10.0 times the baseline conditions to examine fate and transport of these constituents through time at seven locations (segments) in the reservoir, from upstream to downstream in Beaver Lake. Fifteen dissolved solids, chloride, and sulfate fate and transport scenarios were compared to the baseline simulation at each of the seven downstream locations in the reservoir, both 2 meters (m) below the surface and 2 m above the bottom. Concentrations were greater in the reservoir at model segments closer to where the tributaries entered the reservoir. Concentrations resulting from the increase in loading became more diluted

  5. Geochemical and isotopic variations in shallow groundwater in areas of the Fayetteville Shale development, north-central Arkansas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • No evidence for shallow groundwater contamination in Fayetteville Shale, Arkansas. • Methane in groundwater is low and likely associated with shallow aquifer processes. • No relationship between methane and salinity in groundwater and shale-gas wells. • δ13CCH4 and δ13CDIC suggest biogenic origin for dissolved methane. • Water-aquifer rock interaction controls majority of water chemistry. - Abstract: Exploration of unconventional natural gas reservoirs such as impermeable shale basins through the use of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing has changed the energy landscape in the USA providing a vast new energy source. The accelerated production of natural gas has triggered a debate concerning the safety and possible environmental impacts of these operations. This study investigates one of the critical aspects of the environmental effects; the possible degradation of water quality in shallow aquifers overlying producing shale formations. The geochemistry of domestic groundwater wells was investigated in aquifers overlying the Fayetteville Shale in north-central Arkansas, where approximately 4000 wells have been drilled since 2004 to extract unconventional natural gas. Monitoring was performed on 127 drinking water wells and the geochemistry of major ions, trace metals, CH4 gas content and its C isotopes (δ13CCH4), and select isotope tracers (δ11B, 87Sr/86Sr, δ2H, δ18O, δ13CDIC) compared to the composition of flowback-water samples directly from Fayetteville Shale gas wells. Dissolved CH4 was detected in 63% of the drinking-water wells (32 of 51 samples), but only six wells exceeded concentrations of 0.5 mg CH4/L. The δ13CCH4 of dissolved CH4 ranged from −42.3‰ to −74.7‰, with the most negative values characteristic of a biogenic source also associated with the highest observed CH4 concentrations, with a possible minor contribution of trace amounts of thermogenic CH4. The majority of these values are distinct from the

  6. Detailed lithologic log of the Dow Chemical #1 B.L. Garrigan Drill Hole, Mississippi County, Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Donley S.; Skipp, Gary L.

    1995-01-01

    The geology and tectonic setting of the New Madrid region in southeastern Missouri has received considerable attention because of the area's high seismic activity. The largest recorded earthquakes in this area occurred in the winter of 1811-1812. These earthquakes has estimated magnitudes as large as 8.0 on the Richter scale (Johnsonton and Kanter, 1990) and affected an area of about 1 million square miles (Fuller, 1912). Today, an area of continuously high seismic activity defines the New Madrid seismic zone, which extends from northeastern Arkansas into southeastern Missouri and northwestern Tennessee. Seismicity is locally concentrated along two subsurface archers--the Blytheville and Pascola (Hildenbrand and others, 1977; Crone and others, 1985; Hildenbrand, 1985; McKeown, 1988). The Padcola arch is not pertinent to this study and, therefore will not be discusses further. The Blytheville arch is located in and is subparallel to the axis of the northeast-southwest-trending Reelfoot structural basin, which formed during early Paleozoic rifting (Ervin and McGinnis, 1975; fig. 1). The Reelfoot basin is filled with Cambrian and Ordovician sedimentary rocks (Grohskopf, 1955; Howe, 1984; Houseknevht, 1989; Collins and others, 1992) that are uncomfortably overlain by Cretacaous and Tertiary sedimentary rocks and underlain by crystalline rocks of the eastern granite-rhyolite province (see Bickford and others, 1986). The presence of some Late Proterozoic sedimentary rocks in the Reelfoot basin currently cannot be ruled out. The Dow Chemical #1 B.L. Garrigan drill hole (hereafter, Garrigan) penetrated Paleozoic rocks on the Blytheville arch. The Garrigan is locted in the Reelfoot basin in the NW1/4, NW1/4 sec. 28, T. 15 N., R. 10 E., Mississippi County, Arkansas (fig. 1) and was completed to a total depth of 12,038 ft from a ground elevation of 239 ft on April 11, 1982 (Swolfs, 1991). The Garrigan is the only reported drill hole that penetrates the subsurface Blytheville

  7. Public-health assessment for Monroe Auto Equipment Company (Paragould Pit), Paragould, Greene County, Arkansas, Region 6. CERCLIS No. ARD980864110. Preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-06-22

    The Monroe Auto Equipment Company site (aliases Paragould Pit and Finch Road Landfill) is an industrial landfill located near Paragould, Arkansas. The landfill received wastewater treatment sludge, which contained trichlorethylene and various heavy metals, from the Monroe Auto Equipment Company's Paragould manufacturing facility. Groundwater on-site is contaminated with volatile organic compounds and metals with concentrations of trans-1,2-dichloroethene, chromium and lead exceeding U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) drinking water standards. One off-site monitoring well has been shown to be contaminated with cadmium, chromium, and lead. Approximately 3 dozen households are within a 1-mile radius of the site. The entire area depends on groundwater for drinking water and domestic use. Subsurface soil is contaminated with chromium and lead. Exposure pathways of potential concern include ingestion and inhalation of and dermal contact with disturbed contaminated soil and volatilized organic compounds.

  8. Hydrologic and Water-Quality Characteristics for Calf Creek Near Silber Hill, Arkansas and Selected Buffalo River Sites, 2001-2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Joel M.; Green, W. Reed

    2004-01-01

    The Buffalo River and its tributary, Calf Creek, are in the White River Basin in the Ozark Plateaus physiographic province in north-central Arkansas. A better understanding of the hydrology and water quality of Calf Creek is of interest to many, including the National Park Service, which administers the Buffalo National River, to evaluate its effect on the hydrology and water quality of the Buffalo River. The streamflow and water-quality characteristics of Calf Creek near Silver Hill, Arkansas, were compared to two sites on the Buffalo River upstream (near Boxley, Arkansas) and downstream (near St. Joe, Arkansas) from the confluence of Calf Creek for calendar years 2001 and 2002. Annual and seasonal loads were estimated for Calf Creek for nutrients, dissolved organic carbon, and suspended sediment and compared with loads at sites on the Buffalo River. Flow-weighted concentrations and yields were computed from estimated annual loads for comparison with other developed and undeveloped basins. Streamflow varied annually and seasonally at the three sites. The Buffalo River near St. Joe had the largest annual mean streamflow (805 to 1,360 cubic feet per second for 2001 and 2002) compared to the Buffalo River near Boxley (106 and 152 cubic feet per second for 2001 and 2002) and Calf Creek (39 and 80 cubic feet per second for 2001 and 2002). Concentrations of nutrients, suspended sediment, and fecal indicator bacteria generally were greater in samples from Calf Creek than in samples collected from both Buffalo River sites. Bacteria and suspended-sediment concentrations were greater in samples collected during high-flow events at all three sites. The Buffalo River near Boxley had the lowest concentrations for nutrients, suspended sediment, and fecal indicator bacteria. Estimated annual loads of the nutrients, suspended sediment, and organic carbon for 2001 and 2002 demonstrated substantial variability between the three sites and through time. Estimated loads for nutrients

  9. Use of finite-difference arrays of observation wells to estimate evapotranspiration from ground water in the Arkansas River Valley, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Edwin P.; Sorey, M.L.

    1973-01-01

    A method to determine evapotranspiration from ground water was tested at four sites in the flood plain of the Arkansas River in Colorado. Approximate ground-water budgets were obtained by analyzing water-level data from observation wells installed in five-point arrays. The analyses were based on finite difference approximations of the differential equation describing ground-water flow. Data from the sites were divided into two groups by season. It was assumed that water levels during the dormant season were unaffected by evapotranspiration of ground water or by recharge, collectively termed 'accretion.' Regression analyses of these data were made to provide an equation for separating the effects of changes in aquifer storage and of aquifer heterogeneity from those due to accretion during the growing season. The data collected during the growing season were thus analyzed to determine accretion.

  10. Evaluation of Selected Model Constraints and Variables on Simulated Sustainable Yield from the Mississippi River Valley Alluvial Aquifer System in Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecki, John B.

    2008-01-01

    An existing conjunctive use optimization model of the Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer was used to evaluate the effect of selected constraints and model variables on ground-water sustainable yield. Modifications to the optimization model were made to evaluate the effects of varying (1) the upper limit of ground-water withdrawal rates, (2) the streamflow constraint associated with the White River, and (3) the specified stage of the White River. Upper limits of ground-water withdrawal rates were reduced to 75, 50, and 25 percent of the 1997 ground-water withdrawal rates. As the upper limit is reduced, the spatial distribution of sustainable pumping increases, although the total sustainable pumping from the entire model area decreases. In addition, the number of binding constraint points decreases. In a separate analysis, the streamflow constraint associated with the White River was optimized, resulting in an estimate of the maximum sustainable streamflow at DeValls Bluff, Arkansas, the site of potential surface-water withdrawals from the White River for the Grand Prairie Area Demonstration Project. The maximum sustainable streamflow, however, is less than the amount of streamflow allocated in the spring during the paddlefish spawning period. Finally, decreasing the specified stage of the White River was done to evaluate a hypothetical river stage that might result if the White River were to breach the Melinda Head Cut Structure, one of several manmade diversions that prevents the White River from permanently joining the Arkansas River. A reduction in the stage of the White River causes reductions in the sustainable yield of ground water.

  11. The Power Behind the Controversy: Understanding Local Policy Elites' Perceptions on the Benefits and Risks Associated with High Voltage Power Line Installation in the State of Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, Rachael M.

    Following a proposal for the installation of high voltage power lines in northwest Arkansas, a controversial policy debate emerged. Proponents of the transmission line argue that such an installation is inevitable and necessary to efficiently and reliably support the identified electric load in the region. Opponents claim that the lines will degrade the natural environment and hamper the tourism-based local economy in affected regions, notably in Ozark Mountain areas. This study seeks to understand how local policy elites perceive the benefits and risks associated with proposed transmission lines, which is a critical step in comprehending the formation and changes of related government policies. First, based upon the dual process theory of judgment, this study systematically investigates the triadic relationships between (a) more profound personal value predispositions, (b) affects and feelings, and (c) perceived benefits and risks related to the proposed installation of high voltage power lines among local policy elites in the state of Arkansas. Next, this study focuses more specifically on the role of value predispositions, specific emotional dimensions of affect heuristics, and perceptions pertaining to high voltage power line risks and benefits. Using original data collected from a statewide Internet survey of 420 local leaders and key policymakers about their opinions on the related issues, other factors claimed by previous literature, including trust, knowledge level, and demographic characteristics are considered. Analytical results suggest that grid-group cultural predispositions, as deeply held core values within local policy elites' individual belief systems, both directly and indirectly -- through affective feelings -- shape perceived utility associated with the installation of high voltage power lines. Recognizing that risk perceptions factor into policy decisions, some practical considerations for better designing policy addressing controversial issues

  12. Hydrologic and landscape database for the Cache and White River National Wildlife Refuges and contributing watersheds in Arkansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buell, Gary R.; Wehmeyer, Loren L.; Calhoun, Daniel L.

    2012-01-01

    A hydrologic and landscape database was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, for the Cache River and White River National Wildlife Refuges and their contributing watersheds in Arkansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma. The database is composed of a set of ASCII files, Microsoft Access® files, Microsoft Excel® files, an Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI) ArcGIS® geodatabase, ESRI ArcGRID® raster datasets, and an ESRI ArcReader® published map. The database was developed as an assessment and evaluation tool to use in examining refuge-specific hydrologic patterns and trends as related to water availability for refuge ecosystems, habitats, and target species; and includes hydrologic time-series data, statistics, and hydroecological metrics that can be used to assess refuge hydrologic conditions and the availability of aquatic and riparian habitat. Landscape data that describe the refuge physiographic setting and the locations of hydrologic-data collection stations are also included in the database. Categories of landscape data include land cover, soil hydrologic characteristics, physiographic features, geographic and hydrographic boundaries, hydrographic features, regional runoff estimates, and gaging-station locations. The database geographic extent covers three hydrologic subregions—the Lower Mississippi–St Francis (0802), the Upper White (1101), and the Lower Arkansas (1111)—within which human activities, climatic variation, and hydrologic processes can potentially affect the hydrologic regime of the refuges and adjacent areas. Database construction has been automated to facilitate periodic updates with new data. The database report (1) serves as a user guide for the database, (2) describes the data-collection, data-reduction, and data-analysis methods used to construct the database, (3) provides a statistical and graphical description of the database, and (4) provides detailed information on

  13. Spatio-Temporal Trends of Oak Decline and Mortality under Periodic Regional Drought in the Ozark Highlands of Arkansas and Missouri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen R. Shifley

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available At the forest landscape/region level, based on annual Forest Inventory and Analysis plot data from 1999 to 2010, oak decline and mortality trends for major oak species (groups were examined in the Ozark Highlands of Arkansas and Missouri. Oak decline has elevated cumulative mortality of red oak species to between 11 and 15 percent in terms of relative density and basal area of standing dead oak trees, respectively. These values are three to five times higher than for white oak group and non-oak species. Oak decline and associated escalating mortality have occurred primarily in red oak species while the white oak group has maintained a relatively stable mortality rate that is comparable to non-oak species. Cross-correlation analyses indicate that mortality in the red oak group was significantly correlated with the growing season Palmer drought severity index (PDSI and usually lagged two to three years following single drought events. Moreover, based on the past 17 years PDSI data, it appears that the cumulative impacts of drought may last up to 10 years. The Ozark Highlands experienced a severe drought extending from 1998 to 2000 and another milder drought from 2005 to 2006. These drought events triggered the escalation of mortality starting around year 2000. Spatially, high red oak mortality sites (hot spots with proportional basal area mortality > 0.12 initially occurred in the central Ozarks and spread gradually over most of the Ozark Highlands as regional droughts continued. In contrast, sites with elevated white oak and non-oak mortality occurred sporadically, mainly in the southern portion (Arkansas of the Ozark Highlands. During the most recent inventory period (2006–2010, over 60%, 7% and 5% of red oak, white oak and non-oak groups, respectively, had relative mortality rates of > 12%.

  14. TERRAIN, LAWRENCE COUNTY, ARKANSAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  15. HYDRAULICS, GREENE COUNTY, ARKANSAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  16. HYDRAULICS, LAWRENCE COUNTY, ARKANSAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  17. HYDROLOGY, Lawrence County, ARKANSAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Hydrology data include spatial datasets and data tables necessary for documenting the hydrologic procedures for estimating flood discharges for a Flood Insurance...

  18. Hydrologic and water-quality characteristics for Bear Creek near Silver Hill, Arkansas, and selected Buffalo River sites, 1999-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Joel M.; Green, W. Reed

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe and compare the hydrologic and water-quality characteristics of Bear Creek near Silver Hill, Arkansas, to two sites on the Buffalo River upstream from the confluence of Bear Creek, to a site on Calf Creek, a smaller tributary to the Buffalo River, to selected undeveloped sites across the Nation, and to a developed site in Arkansas. A better understanding of the hydrology and water quality of Bear Creek is of interest to many, including the National Park Service, which administers the Buffalo National River, to evaluate its effects on the hydrology and water quality of the Buffalo River. The streamflow at Bear Creek near Silver Hill varied seasonally and annually from January 1999 to March 2004. The mean annual streamflow at Bear Creek for calendar years 1999 to 2003 was 86.0 cubic feet per second. The highest annual mean streamflow occurred in 2002 (158 cubic feet per second) and the lowest annual mean streamflow occurred in 1999 (56.4 cubic feet per second). The mean annual streamflow for calendar years 1999 to 2003 at the Buffalo River near Boxley and Buffalo River near St. Joe was 102 and 881 cubic feet per second, respectively. Concentrations of nitrogen measured for Bear Creek generally were greater than concentrations measured at the two Buffalo River sites and were similar to concentrations measured at Calf Creek. Concentrations of phosphorus measured at Bear Creek generally were greater than concentrations measured at the two Buffalo River sites and were similar to concentrations measured at Calf Creek. Fecal indicator bacteria concentrations generally were greater at Bear Creek than concentrations measured at the Buffalo River and similar to concentrations at Calf Creek. Bear Creek had significantly greater suspended-sediment concentrations than the Buffalo River near Boxley and the Buffalo River near St. Joe and similar concentrations to Calf Creek. Nutrients, dissolved organic carbon, and suspended-sediment loads

  19. An Assessment of Regional Water Resources and Agricultural Sustainability in the Mississippi River Alluvial Aquifer System of Mississippi and Arkansas Under Current and Future Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, J.; Reba, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Lower Mississippi River Alluvial Plain is a highly productive agricultural region for rice, soy beans, and cotton that depends heavily on irrigation. Development of the Mississippi River Alluvial Aquifer (MRAA), one of the more prolific agricultural aquifers in the country, has traditionally been the primary source for irrigation in the region yielding over 1,100 Mgal/day to irrigation wells. Increasingly, the realities of changing climate and rapidly declining water tables have highlighted the necessity for new water management practices. Tail-water recovery and reuse is a rapidly expanding practice due in part to the efforts and cost-sharing of the NRCS, but regional studies of the potential for such practices to alleviate groundwater mining under current and future climate are lacking. While regional studies of aquifer geology have long been available, including assessments of regional groundwater flow, much about the aquifer is still not well understood including controls on recharge rates, a crucial component of water management design. We review the trends in regional availability of surface and groundwater resources, their current status, and the effects of recent changes in management practices on groundwater decline in Mississippi and Arkansas. Global and regional climate projections are used to assess scenarios of sustainable aquifer use under current land use and management along with the potential for more widely practiced surface water capture and reuse to alleviate groundwater decline. Finally, we highlight crucial knowledge gaps and challenges associated with the development of water management practices for sustainable agricultural use in the region.

  20. Thermal neutron activation analysis of the water Zamzam at Mecca, Saudi Arabia and the water of the fourty five hot springs at Hot Springs, Arkansas, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples from the Islamic holy water Zamzam in Mecca, Saudi Arabia and the famous mineral water of Hot Springs, in Hot Springs, Arkansas were analyzed for trace elements content by thermal neutron activation analysis. For Zamzam the concentration of 37S, 49Ca, 38Cl, 31Si, 42K, 24Na and 82Br were found, respectively, to be 3, 107, 11, 12, 4, 14, and 9 ppm; and that for Hot Springs Sample, replacing 82Br with 27Mg, are 2, 44, 2, 10, 1, 4, and 5 ppm. The experimental limit of detection for pure standards of the nuclides 27Mg, 128I, 64Cu, and 56Mn were found to be 8, 8x10-3, 6x10-2, and 2x10-4 μg, respectively. These nuclides were not detected in Zamzam, therefore, it was concluded that in Zamzam the concentration levels of the nuclides 27Mg, 128I, 64Cu, and 56Mn were below that of the limit of detection of pure standards. (orig./HP)

  1. MENTOR-BASED EFFORT TO ADVANCE IMPLEMENTATION OF PREFERRED MANAGEMENT PRACTICES (PMPS) FOR OIL PRODUCERS IN SOUTH MIDCONTINENT (OKLAHOMA/ARKANSAS) AND WEST COAST (CALIFORNIA) REGIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donald F. Duttlinger; E. Lance Cole

    2004-12-01

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) and cooperating Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) in its South Midcontinent (Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, Oklahoma) and West Coast (University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California) regions conducted a ''Mentor-Based Effort to Advance Implementation of Preferred Management Practices (PMPs) For Oil Producers'' (DE-FC26-01BC15272) under an award in Phase I of Department of Energy's (DOE's) PUMP (Preferred Upstream Management Practices) program. The project's objective was to enable producers in California, Oklahoma and Arkansas to increase oil production, moderating or potentially reversing production declines and extending the life of marginal wells in the near term. PTTC identified the primary constraints inhibiting oil production through surveys and PUMPer direct contacts in both regions. The leading common constraint was excess produced water and associated factors. Approaches for addressing this common constraint were tailored for each region. For Oklahoma and Arkansas, the South Midcontinent Region developed a concise manual titled ''Produced Water And Associated Issues'' that led to multiple workshops across the region, plus workshops in several other regions. In California, the West Coast Region leveraged PUMP funding to receive an award from the California Energy Commission for $300,000 to systematically evaluate water control solutions for the California geological environment. Products include still-developing remedial action templates to help producers identify underlying causes of excess water production and screen appropriate solutions. Limited field demonstrations are being implemented to build producer confidence in water control technologies. Minor leverage was also gained by providing technology transfer support to a Global Energy Partners project that demonstrated affordable approaches for reducing power consumption. PTTC

  2. Base flow, water quality, and streamflow gain and loss of the Buffalo River, Arkansas, and selected tributaries, July and August 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moix, Matthew W.; Galloway, Joel M.

    2005-01-01

    A study of the Buffalo National River in north-central Arkansas was conducted between July 28-30 and August 13-15, 2003, to characterize the base-flow and water-quality characteristics and streamflow gain and loss in the Buffalo River. The study was separated into two time periods because of a precipitation event that occurred on the afternoon of July 30 causing appreciable storm runoff. Streamflow was separated to identify base-flow and surface-runoff components using the Base Flow Index hydrograph separation computer program. Base-flow separation analyses indicated annual variability in streamflow throughout the Buffalo River Basin. Based upon these analyses, total and base flow were below average for the mainstem of the river and Richland Creek during the 2003 water year. Waterquality samples were collected from 25 surface-water sites on the Buffalo River and selected tributaries. Most nutrient concentrations for the mainstem of the Buffalo River were near or below the minimum reporting level and were less than the median flow-weighted concentration for relatively undeveloped stream basins in the United States. Streamflow measurement data were collected at 44 locations along the mainstem of the Buffalo River and at points of inflow (prior to confluence with the mainstem) to identify gaining and losing reaches. Seven gaining and five losing reaches were identified for the Buffalo River. Additionally, surface flow on the mainstem of the Buffalo River was diverted to subsurface flow on the mainstem at two locations (river miles 73.6 and 131.6) where the mainstem was found to be dry. Reaches throughout the length of the river had calculated gains or losses that were less than the sum of measurement errors for the respective reaches of river.

  3. Methods for Monitoring Fish Communities of Buffalo National River and Ozark National Scenic Riverways in the Ozark Plateaus of Arkansas and Missouri: Version 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, James C.; Justus, B.G.; Dodd, H.R.; Bowles, D.E.; Morrison, L.W.; Williams, M.H.; Rowell, G.A.

    2008-01-01

    Buffalo National River located in north-central Arkansas, and Ozark National Scenic Riverways, located in southeastern Missouri, are the two largest units of the National Park Service in the Ozark Plateaus physiographic province. The purpose of this report is to provide a protocol that will be used by the National Park Service to sample fish communities and collect related water-quality, habitat, and stream discharge data of Buffalo National River and Ozark National Scenic Riverways to meet inventory and long-term monitoring objectives. The protocol includes (1) a protocol narrative, (2) several standard operating procedures, and (3) supplemental information helpful for implementation of the protocol. The protocol narrative provides background information about the protocol such as the rationale of why a particular resource or resource issue was selected for monitoring, information concerning the resource or resource issue of interest, a description of how monitoring results will inform management decisions, and a discussion of the linkages between this and other monitoring projects. The standard operating procedures cover preparation, training, reach selection, water-quality sampling, fish community sampling, physical habitat collection, measuring stream discharge, equipment maintenance and storage, data management and analysis, reporting, and protocol revision procedures. Much of the information in the standard operating procedures was gathered from existing protocols of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment program or other sources. Supplemental information that would be helpful for implementing the protocol is included. This information includes information on fish species known or suspected to occur in the parks, sample sites, sample design, fish species traits, index of biotic integrity metrics, sampling equipment, and field forms.

  4. Recalibration of a ground-water flow model of the Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer in Southeastern Arkansas, 1918, with simulations of hydraulic heads caused by projected ground-water withdrawals through 2049

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Gregory P.; Clark, Brian R.

    2003-01-01

    The Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer, encompassing parts of Arkansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, and Tennessee supplies an average of 5 billion gallons of water per day. However, withdrawals from the aquifer in recent years have caused considerable drawdown in the hydraulic heads in southeastern Arkansas and other areas. The effects of current ground-water withdrawals and potential future withdrawals on water availability are major concerns of water managers and users as well as the general public. A full understanding of the behavior of the aquifer under various water-use scenarios is critical for the development of viable water-management and alternative source plans. To address these concerns, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Vicksburg District, and the Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation Commission developed and calibrated a ground-water flow model for the Mississippi River valley alluvial aquifer in southeastern Arkansas to simulate hydraulic heads caused by projected ground-water withdrawals. A previously published ground-water flow model for the alluvial aquifer in southeastern Arkansas was updated and recalibrated to reflect more current pumping stresses with additional stress periods added to bring the model forward from 1982 to 1998. The updated model was developed and calibrated with MODFLOW-2000 finite difference numerical modeling and parameter estimation software. The model was calibrated using hydraulic-head data collected during 1972 and 1982 and hydraulic-head measurements made during spring (February to April) of 1992 and 1998. The residuals for 1992 and 1998 have a mean absolute value of 4.74 and 5.45 feet, respectively, and a root mean square error of 5.9 and 6.72 feet, respectively. The effects of projected ground-water withdrawals were simulated through 2049 in three predictive scenarios by adding five additional stress periods of 10 years each. In the three scenarios

  5. Nitrogen and Phosphorus Loads in an Agricultural Watershed Affected by Poultry Litter Application and Wastewater Effluent, Northeastern Oklahoma and Northwestern Arkansas, 2002-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esralew, R.; Tortorelli, R. L.

    2010-12-01

    The Eucha-Spavinaw Basin in Northeastern Oklahoma and Northwestern Arkansas is the source of water for Lake Eucha and Spavinaw Lake, which are part of the water supply for the city of Tulsa, Oklahoma. Lake Eucha and Spavinaw Lakes have experienced deteriorating water quality largely due to growth of algae, notably cyanobacteria, from the excess input of nutrients. As a result, the city of Tulsa has spent millions of dollars to eliminate taste and odor problems resulting from production of algal and bacterial byproducts. To evaluate changes in nutrient loading resulting from a reduction in land application of poultry litter, installation of best management practices, and reductions in the phosphorus concentrations in wastewater effluent, the U.S. Geological Survey investigated nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations from samples collected during baseflow and runoff and used regression models to estimate nitrogen and phosphorus loads, yields, and flow-weighted concentrations in two major tributaries to Lake Eucha, Spavinaw and Beaty Creeks, for the period 2002-2009. Estimated mean flow-weighted total unfiltered nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations in the basin were about 5 to 10 times greater than the 75th percentile of flow-weighted nutrient concentrations in other mostly undeveloped basins of the United States. Spavinaw and Beaty Creeks contributed an estimated mean annual total load of about 762,500 kilograms of nitrogen and 49,200 kilograms of phosphorus per year, 76 to 91 percent of which was transported to Lake Eucha by runoff. Thirty-four percent of the nitrogen load and 48 percent of the phosphorus load to Lake Eucha occurred during the year 2008 which was the wettest year on record for the Eucha-Spavinaw Basin. The results of this analysis indicate that although efforts were made to control nutrient loading, nutrient concentrations, especially phosphorus, were substantially augmented by non-point sources and that most loading occurs during runoff events

  6. An Initial Analysis of LANDSAT-4 Thematic Mapper Data for the Discrimination of Agricultural, Forested Wetlands, and Urban Land Cover. [Poinsett County, Arkansas; and Reelfoot Lake and Union City, Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    The capabilities of TM data for discriminating land covers within three particular cultural and ecological realms was assessed. The agricultural investigation in Poinsett County, Arkansas illustrates that TM data can successfully be used to discriminate a variety of crop cover types within the study area. The single-date TM classification produced results that were significantly better than those developed from multitemporal MSS data. For the Reelfoot Lake area of Tennessee TM data, processed using unsupervised signature development techniques, produced a detailed classification of forested wetlands with excellent accuracy. Even in a small city of approximately 15,000 people (Union City, Tennessee). TM data can successfully be used to spectrally distinguish specific urban classes. Furthermore, the principal components analysis evaluation of the data shows that through photointerpretation, it is possible to distinguish individual buildings and roof responses with the TM.

  7. Level III Ecoregions of Arkansas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  8. FLOODPLAIN MAPPING, Lawrence County, Arkansas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  9. Level IV Ecoregions of Arkansas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  10. 2015 State Geodatabase for Arkansas

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Census Bureau, Department of Commerce — The 2015 TIGER Geodatabases are extracts of selected nation based and state based geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census Bureau's Master...

  11. Regression analysis and real-time water-quality monitoring to estimate constituent concentrations, loads, and yields in the Little Arkansas River, south-central Kansas, 1995-99

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Victoria G.; Jian, Xiaodong; Ziegler, Andrew C.

    2000-01-01

    Water from the Little Arkansas River is used as source water for artificial recharge to the Equus Beds aquifer, which provides water for the city of Wichita in south-central Kansas. To assess the quality of the source water, continuous in-stream water-quality monitors were installed at two U.S. Geological Survey stream-gaging stations to provide real-time measurement of specific conductance, pH, water temperature, dissolved oxygen, and turbidity in the Little Arkansas River. In addition, periodic water samples were collected manually and analyzed for selected constituents, including alkalinity, dissolved solids, total suspended solids, chloride, sulfate, atrazine, and fecal coliform bacteria. However, these periodic samples do not provide real-time data on which to base aquifer-recharge operational decisions to prevent degradation of the Equus Beds aquifer. Continuous and periodic monitoring enabled identification of seasonal trends in selected physical properties and chemical constituents and estimation of chemical mass transported in the Little Arkansas River. Identification of seasonal trends was especially important because high streamflows have a substantial effect on chemical loads and because concentration data from manually collected samples often were not available. Therefore, real-time water-quality monitoring of surrogates for the estimation of selected chemical constituents in streamflow can increase the accuracy of load and yield estimates and can decrease some manual data-collection activities. Regression equations, which were based on physical properties and analysis of water samples collected from 1995 through 1998 throughout 95 percent of the stream's flow duration, were developed to estimate alkalinity, dissolved solids, total suspended solids, chloride, sulfate, atrazine, and fecal coliform bacteria concentrations. Error was evaluated for the first year of data collection and each subsequent year, and a decrease in error was observed as the

  12. Aerial radiometric and magnetic reconnaissance survey of portions of Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Missouri, and Tennessee: Dyersburg, Paducah, Poplar Bluff, and Rolla quadrangles, final report. Volume 1 and Volume 2C. Poplar Bluff quadrangle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Instrumentation and methods described were used for a Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored, high-sensitivity, aerial gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey of Dyersburg (Kentucky, Missouri, Tennessee); Paducah (Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri); Poplar Bluff (Arkansas, Missouri); and Rolla (Missouri) NTMS, 1:250,000-scale quadrangle. The survey was carried out by Texas Instruments Incorporated under Bendix Field Engineering Corporation Subcontract No. 78-285-L. The objective of the work was to define areas showing surface indications of a generally higher uranium content where detailed exploration for uranium would most likely be successful. A DC-3 aircraft equipped with a high-sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and ancillary geophysical and electronic equipment was employed for each quadrangle. The system was calibratd using the DOE calibration facilities at Grand Junction, Colorado, and Lake Mead, Arizona. Gamma-ray spectrometric data were processed to correct for variations in atmospheric, flight, and instrument conditions and were statistically evaluated to remove the effects of surface geologic variations. The resulting first-priority uranium anomalies (showing simultaneously valid eU, eU/eTh, and eU/K anomalies) were interpreted to evaluate their origin and significance. Results of the interpretation in the form of a preferred-anomaly map, along with significance-factor profile maps, stacked profiles, histograms, and descriptions of the geology and known uranium occurrences are presented in Volume 2 of this final report

  13. BASEMAP DATABASE, HOT SPRING COUNTY, ARKANSAS, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — FEMA Framework Basemap datasets comprise six of the seven FGDC themes of geospatial data that are used by most GIS applications (Note: the seventh framework theme,...

  14. Insecticide Recommendations for Arkansas. MP 144.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Bill F.; Barnes, Gordon

    This publication gives, in chart form, insecticides for use on animals, field crops, fruits, flowers, trees and shrubs, household pests, recreation areas, lawn and turf grass, pecans, stored grain, and vegetables. Included in the charts are the insecticides recommended for each insect, formulation to be used, amount, time to apply, and other…

  15. 40 CFR 81.304 - Arkansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... County Conway County Dallas County Desha County Drew County Faulkner County Garland County Grant County... Dallas County Desha County Drew County Faulkner County Garland County Grant County Hot Spring County... Dallas County Desha County Drew County Faulkner County Garland County Grant County Hot Spring...

  16. 50 CFR 32.23 - Arkansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... official check station records. 7. Hunters must check out (check harvested deer) at the Hunter Information... with the exception of those refuge lands included in the combined Black Swamp Wildlife Management Area... turkey. 8. Immediately record the zone 002 on your hunting license and later at an official check...

  17. Contaminant survey of the White River National Wildlife Refuge, Arkansas, Monroe, Phillips, and Desha Counties, Arkansas

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Several contaminant surveys have been conducted on the refuge from 1985 to 1987 (Fish and Wildlife Service 1986; Fish and Wildlife Service unpublished data 1987,...

  18. Rapid gas development in the Fayetteville shale basin, Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advances in drilling and extraction of natural gas have resulted in rapid expansion of wells in shale basins. The rate of gas well installation in the Fayetteville shale is 774 wells a year since 2005 with thousands more planned. The Fayetteville shale covers 23,000 km2 although ...

  19. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, LINCOLN COUNTY, ARKANSAS, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  20. Usibelli tames low-rank coal dust. [USA - Arkansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillingim, J.; Wajer, M. (Usibelli Coal Mine Inc., Healy, AK (USA))

    1991-11-01

    The article describes coal dust control at the Usibelli Coal Mine, Inc. (UCM), located near Healy in the Alaska Range, USA. The mine produces approximately 1.5 million tons per year of an ultra-low sulphur, subbituminous C coal for domestic and export markets. Dust is generated at the crusher operations, transfer points and load-out. While dust levels were well within safety requirements, UCM wished to continue improving the work areas, reduce maintenance cleaning costs, and generally provide the best overall dust control available without a large capital investment. One proven alternative for dust control is the use of chemical dust suppressants that are either water or hydrocarbon based. The use and action of these suppressants, which are applied to the coal, are discussed. The product recommended to UCM, Dust-Buster{reg sign} RDC-8051, contains a combination of wetting, foaming and residual agents to provide effective dust suppression at the treatment points and throughout UCM. Trials indicated the elimination of visible dust emission and a reduction in airborne particulates. The system has now been in operation for 4 years and was a contributing factor in maintaining repirable dust levels at UCM below 1.10 milligrams per cubic metre, the Mine Safety and Health Administration limit for last year. 1 fig., 2 photos.

  1. Stand model for upland forests of Southern Arkansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mielke, D.L.; Shugart, H.H.; West, D.C.

    1978-06-01

    A forest stand growth and composition simulator (FORAR) was developed by modifying a stand growth model by Shugart and West (1977). FORAR is a functional stand model which used ecological parameters to relate individual tree growth to environment rather than using Markov probability matrices or differential equations to determine single tree or species replacement rates. FORAR simulated tree growth and species composition of upland forests of Union County, Ark., by considering 33 tree species on a /sup 1///sub 12/ ha circular plot.

  2. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, CLEVELAND COUNTY, ARKANSAS, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  3. Arkansas Post National Memorial Tract and Boundary Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — These ESRI shape files are of National Park Service tract and boundary data that was created by the Land Resources Division. Tracts are numbered and created by the...

  4. 76 FR 32984 - Arkansas; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-07

    ... counties of Benton, Clay, Faulkner, Garland, Lincoln, Pulaski, Randolph, and Saline for Individual Assistance. The counties of Benton, Clay, Faulkner, Garland, Lincoln, Pulaski, Randolph, and Saline...

  5. Pancreatic Cancer Screening of High-Risk Individuals in Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-20

    Pancreatic Neoplasms; Peutz-Jegher's Syndrome; BRCA1 Gene Mutation; BRCA2 Gene Mutation; Ataxia Telangiectasia; Familial Atypical Mole-Malignant Melanoma Syndrome; Colorectal Neoplasms, Hereditary Nonpolyposis; Hereditary Pancreatitis

  6. 75 FR 44982 - Arkansas Valley Conduit (AVC) and Long-Term Excess Capacity Master Contract, Fryingpan-Arkansas...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-30

    ... aquifer and groundwater levels and soil saturation as a result of altered well use and pumping Water-based.... Towns in the service area need to construct new or improved water treatment systems, supplement their... treatment costs because of poor groundwater quality and changes to the Safe Drinking Water Act. The...

  7. 78 FR 28003 - In the Matter of Entergy Arkansas and Entergy Operations, Arkansas Nuclear One, Units 1 and 2...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-13

    ...,'' was published in the Federal Register on January 3, 2013 (78 FR 328). No comments or hearing requests... the Director of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation satisfactory documentary evidence that EAL... (Agencywide Documents Access and Management System (ADAMS) Accession No. ML13077A237), to reflect the...

  8. Lock and Dam No. 9 : Arkansas River, Arkansas : Supplement No. 2 to Design Memorandum No. 1, General Fish and Wildlife Facilities at Holla Bend National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This supplement is prepared in compliance with instructions included in 2d endorsement ENGCW-EZ dated 9 June 1965 to the transmittal letter for Design Memorandum...

  9. Level II contaminant investigation of Overflow National Wildlife Refuge, Wilmot, Arkansas

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Conductivity and turbidity exhibited the greatest variation of the water quality parameters measured at Overflow NWR and the proposed acquisition land (Table 2)....

  10. Contaminant survey of Cache River National Wildlife Refuge including Radcliffe Farms, Arkansas

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) has identified the bottomland hardwoods of the Lower Mississippi River Delta as one of the highest Service priorities for...

  11. Agronomic and water quality impacts of incorporating polyacrylamide in furrow irrigation water in Arkansas cotton -- 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    The combined erosion-halting and infiltration-increasing effects of PAM appeared to be an ideal practice for Midsouth cotton producers interested in improving irrigation efficiency and nutrient management; however, there has been limited research to evaluate PAM in the Midsouth. The objective of thi...

  12. Environmental Literacy of Sixth Grade Students in Arkansas: Implications for Environmental Education Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Lisa S.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental education must be better integrated into K-12 curriculum to advance environmental literacy. Producing a citizenry that can understand and address the complex environmental issues facing the world today and in the future is essential to sustainable life on this planet. Using the Middle School Environmental Literacy Survey, 6th grade…

  13. TIGER/Line Shapefile, 2010, 2010 state, Arkansas, 2010 Census Block State-based

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Census Bureau, Department of Commerce — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  14. Lake Morphometry for NHD Lakes in Arkansas White Red Region 11 HUC

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Lake morphometry metrics are known to influence productivity in lakes and are important for building various types of ecological and environmental models of lentic...

  15. Combination ground and aerial adulticide applications against mosquitoes in an Arkansas riceland community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weathersbee, A A; Meisch, M V; Sandoski, C A; Finch, M F; Dame, D A; Olson, J K; Inman, A

    1986-12-01

    Simultaneous ground and aerial adulticide applications were evaluated against riceland mosquitoes in Stuttgart, AR, during July 1985. Naled was aerially applied at 52.6 ml/ha over 10.4 km2 surrounding the city. Ground ULV applications of a mixture of malathion, HAN and resmethrin/PBO (1:1:0.0625) were applied within the city at a rate of 221.8 ml/min at 24 kph. Adult populations of Anopheles quadrimaculatus and Psorophora columbiae were reduced at 24 hr but resurgence of Ps. columbiae was evident at 48 hr posttreatment. Posttreatment data indicated that movement of both mosquitoes occurred along the path of prevailing wind. PMID:2906984

  16. Bioethanol production from dedicated energy crops and residues in Arkansas, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globally, one of the major technological goals is cost-effective lignocellulosic ethanol production from biomass feedstocks. Lignocellulosic biomass of five dedicated energy crops and two crops residues were tested for bioethanol production using cellulose solvent-based lignocellulose fractionation...

  17. Alkaline igneous rocks of Magnet Cove, Arkansas: Mineralogy and geochemistry of syenites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flohr, M.J.K.; Ross, M.

    1990-01-01

    Syenites from the Magnet Cove alkaline igneous complex form a diverse mineralogical and geochemical suite. Compositional zoning in primary and late-stage minerals indicates complex, multi-stage crystallization and replacement histories. Residual magmatic fluids, rich in F, Cl, CO2 and H2O, reacted with primary minerals to form complex intergrowths of minerals such as rinkite, fluorite, V-bearing magnetite, F-bearing garnet and aegirine. Abundant sodalite and natrolite formed in pegmatitic segregations within nepheline syenite where Cl- and Na-rich fluids were trapped. During autometasomatism compatible elements such as Mn, Ti, V and Zr were redistributed on a local scale and concentrated in late-stage minerals. Early crystallization of apatite and perovskite controlled the compatible behavior of P and Ti, respectively. The formation of melanite garnet also affected the behaviour of Ti, as well as Zr, Hf and the heavy rare-earth elements. Pseudoleucite syenite and garnet-nepheline syenite differentiated along separate trends, but the two groups are related to the same parental magma by early fractionation of leucite, the presumed precursor of intergrowths of K-feldspar and nepheline. The Diamond Jo nepheline syenite group defines a different differentiation trend. Sphene-nepheline syenite, alkali syenite and several miscellaneous nepheline syenites do not consistently plot with the other syenite groups or each other on element and oxide variation diagrams, indicating that they were derived from still other parental syenite magmas. Mineral assemblages indicate that relatively high f{hook};O2, at or above the fayalite-magnetite-quartz buffer, prevailed throughout the crystallization history of the syenites. ?? 1990.

  18. How Cash and Counseling Affects Informal Caregivers Findings from Arkansas Florida and New Jersey

    OpenAIRE

    Leslie Foster; Randall Brown; Barbara Phillips; Barbara Lepidus Carlson

    2005-01-01

    This report estimates the effects of Cash and Counseling on caregivers who were providing the most unpaid assistance to adult beneficiaries at the time beneficiaries volunteered for the demonstration. Despite variations in design and implementation across states, all three demonstration programs positively affected the well-being of caregivers. On average, caregivers of treatment group members were less likely than their control group counterparts to report high levels of physical and financi...

  19. 78 FR 2354 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Arkansas; Prevention of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-11

    ... accordingly. For stationary sources co-firing fossil fuel and biologically-based fuel, and/or combusting mixed fuels (e.g., tire derived fuels, municipal solid waste (MSW)), the biogenic CO 2 emissions from that... federal PSD permitting requirements promulgated in EPA's Phase 2 8-hour Ozone Implementation Rule (70...

  20. Lower Arkansas River basin high priority issue : Rattlesnake creek subbasin : January 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a section from Volume III: Kansas River Basins, of the Kansas Water Plan, January 2009. This section is pertaining to Rattlesnake Creek subbasin,...

  1. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, ASHLEY COUNTY, ARKANSAS (AND INCORPORATED AREAS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  2. Drift of aquatic microfauna in Logan Cave Stream, Benton County, Arkansas

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Periodic drift of vertebrates and invertebrates is a known phenomenon in surface streams. Change in light intensity has generally been targeted as the trigger for...

  3. 30 CFR 904.25 - Approval of Arkansas abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... eligible lands and water; Ranking and selection procedures; Coordination of reclamation work; Acquisition management and disposition of land and water; Reclamation on private land; Rights of entry; Public...; Management accounting; and Abandoned mine land problem description. September 22, 1999 January 14,...

  4. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, POINSETT COUNTY, ARKANSAS (AND INCORPORATED AREAS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  5. Using Paid Radio Advertisements to Promote Physical Activity Among Arkansas Tweens

    OpenAIRE

    Appathurai Balamurugan, MD, MPH; Ernest J. Oakleaf, PhD; David Rath, MA, RD, LD

    2005-01-01

    Introduction The level of physical activity among children is a growing concern. Evidence shows that many children aged 9 to 13 years (tweens) do not participate in any organized physical activity during their nonschool hours, and some do not engage in any free-time physical activity. Physical inactivity is associated with a host of chronic diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Paid media advertisements have been an effective method of promoting physical activity. Methods Fro...

  6. The Nitrogen Fertilizer Value of Baled Broiler Litter for Cotton Production in the Arkansas Delta

    OpenAIRE

    Kemper, Nathan; Goodwin, Harold L., Jr.; Mozaffari, Morteza

    2008-01-01

    The export of poultry litter by baling efficiently packages litter for long-term storage and transportation. Use of baled poultry litter to supply the recommended rates of P and K and a portion of the N rate appears to be a feasible nutrient management strategy for cotton.

  7. Single-Sex Classes in Two Arkansas Elementary Schools: 2008-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotsky, Sandra; Denny, George; Tschepikow, Nick

    2010-01-01

    Interest in single-sex classes continues to grow in the United States, but there has been little research at the elementary level in this country or elsewhere to help guide educators' decision-making about the overall value of single-sex classes in public schools and the specific value of single-sex classes in public schools for increasing boy's…

  8. Education and the Economy: Boosting Arkansas' Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  9. 77 FR 16585 - Arkansas Midland Railroad Company, Inc.-Abandonment Exemption-in Phillips County, AK

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-21

    ... Analysis (OEA) in its independent investigation) cannot be made before the exemption's effective date. See... environment and historic resources. OEA will issue an environmental assessment (EA) by March 26, 2012. Interested persons may obtain a copy of the EA by writing to OEA (Room 1100, Surface Transportation...

  10. Development of lightweight concrete mixes for construction industry at the state of Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almansouri, Mohammed Abdulwahab

    As the construction industry evolved, the need for more durable, long lasting infrastructure increased. Therefore, more efforts have been put to find new methods to improve the properties of the concrete to prolong the service life of the structural elements. One of these methods is the use of lightweight aggregate as an internal curing agent to help reducing self-desiccation and shrinkage. This research studied the effects of using locally available lightweight aggregate (expanded clay), as a partial replacement of normal weight aggregate in the concrete matrix. The concrete mixtures contained lightweight aggregate with a replacement percentage of 12.5, 25, 37.5, and 50 percent by volume. Fresh properties as well as compressive strength, modulus of rupture, and drying shrinkage were measured. While was effective in reducing drying shrinkage, the use of lightweight aggregate resulted in slightly reducing both the compressive strength and modulus of rupture.

  11. Conserving Groundwater Supply in the Arkansas Delta using On-Farm Reservoirs

    OpenAIRE

    Kovacs, Kent F.; Popp, Michael P.; Brye, Kristofor R.

    2013-01-01

    We model water use, aquifer recharge and producer returns over 30 years in three watersheds to determine impact of modified water cost and construction of reservoirs. To maintain groundwater resources, raising cost of pumped water by a buffer value to the aquifer resource and using surface storage looked most promising.

  12. Contaminant survey of Felsenthal National Wildlife Refuge, Ashley, Union and Bradley Counties, Arkansas

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — PAHs and AHs were not detected in any of the water samples collected. However, the compounds were detected in the sediment samples (Table l and Appendix A)....

  13. Contemplative Education in Unexpected Places: Teaching Mindfulness in Arkansas and Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Mindfulness meditation is increasingly recognized as a health promotion practice across many different kinds of settings. Concomitantly, contemplative education is being integrated into colleges and universities in order to enhance learning through reflection and personal insight. The confluence of these trends provides an opportunity to develop…

  14. Arkansas Nuclear One, Unit 1. Annual operating report: January--December 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information is presented concerning operating experience, outages, exposures, and indication of failed fuel elements. In addition FSAR Amendment 53 and a listing of effective pages for the FSAR through Amendment 53 are given

  15. 76 FR 64185 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Arkansas; Regional Haze State Implementation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ... range that would exist without anthropogenic air pollution. 64 FR 35714, 35715 (July 1, 1999). In most... oil firing scenario for Unit 4 of the Entergy Lake Catherine plant; the SO 2 and NO X BART... soil dust) and their precursors (e.g., SO 2, nitrogen oxides (NO X ), and in some cases, ammonia (NH...

  16. Tip to midpoint observations on syntectonic veins, Ouachita orogen, Arkansas: Trading space for time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, Pablo; Wiltschko, David V.

    2010-08-01

    By examining a vein from its tip to center, we have established the transition from a single filled fracture at the vein tip to typical 'crack-seal' textures observed in fibered, laminated veins. The vein is contained in the boudin neck of a sandstone layer within the Lower Ordovician Mazarn Formation, Benton Uplift, Ouachita orogen. The tip of the vein is composed of one or more isolated veinlets, defined as quartz-filled narrow (5-25 μm) fractures parallel to the larger vein's long dimension. Scanned SEM-based cathodoluminescence shows that quartz laminae of the same orientation and thickness are found throughout the vein. Wall-normal fibers first appear in the vein where detrital grains are cut by multiple veinlets, each veinlet mimicking the crystallographic orientation of the detrital grain, whereas later veinlets reflect the established crystallographic orientation of the fiber. Fibers throughout the vein retain evidence of having been formed by repeated fracturing and filling of a pre-existing grain (at the vein walls) or fiber. However, recrystallization later modified the fibers by obliterating some evidence of the veinlets and moving fiber walls. Boudin formation provided the extension site that localized fracturing and vein filling. The vein grows by the repeated addition of veinlets in the neck region. Recrystallization altered the shape of previously formed fibers.

  17. Multidisciplinary Approach to Rehabilitation. Report from the Study Group. Institute on Rehabilitation Issues (13th, Little Rock, Arkansas, October 1986).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Robert; And Others

    This manual is the response of a National Institute on Rehabilitation Issues (IRI) Prime Study Group to charges given to the group by the National IRI Planning Committee to develop a meaningful training and resource document on the multidisciplinary approach to vocational rehabilitation. The guide is organized in seven chapters that cover the…

  18. Pyroxene zonation trends in mafic nepheline syenite and ijolite, Diamond Jo quarry, Magnet Cove igneous alkalic complex, Arkansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flohr, M.J.K.; Ross, M.

    1985-01-01

    Compositions of pyroxenes from mafic nepheline syenite and ijolite from Magnet Cove (NS and IJ) define zoning trends that reflect changing conditions in the crystallizing magmas and are used to contrast Magnet Cove with other alkalic complexes. The Na-Mg-Fe/sup 2 +/+Mn plot is used to compare NS and IJ pyroxenes with pyroxenes from nepheline syenites from S. Qoroq Centre, Greenland, and the Coldwell Complex intrusions, Ontario. Trends from the three areas are similar, but differences exists. Zoning in individual NS grains is greater than ranges for individual intrusions from S. Qoroq. Also, NS pyroxenes with compositions more magnesisan than Mg/sub 50/Nag are more Al-rich than S. Qoroq and Coldwell pyroxenes, indicating crystallization from a more undersaturated magma. These NS pyroxenes also contain 2-3 times more Ti and Fe/sup 3 +/. Despite different concentrations of Al, Ti, and Fe/sup 3 +/, the general crystallization trends shown by all elements considered are similar in NS and S. Qoroq pyroxenes. Sparse biotite and the absence of amphibole in NS indicate an H/sub 2/O-poor parent magma compared with those of the Coldwell and S. Qoroq nepheline syenites, which contain these phases. Mg-rich biotites and pyroxenes in IJ indicate that it formed from a less evolved liquid than NS.

  19. Perceived Need for Substance Abuse Treatment among Illicit Stimulant Drug Users in Rural Areas of Ohio, Arkansas, and Kentucky

    OpenAIRE

    Falck, Russel S.; Wang, Jichuan; Carlson, Robert G.; Krishnan, Laura L.; Leukefeld, Carl; Brenda M. Booth

    2007-01-01

    Non-medical drug use in rural communities in the United States is a significant and growing public health threat. Understanding what motivates drug users in rural areas to seek substance abuse treatment may help in addressing the problem. Perceived need for treatment, a construct indicative of problem recognition and belief in problem solution, has been identified as an important predictor of help-seeking behavior. This cross-sectional study used data collected through face-to-face interviews...

  20. Governors' Proposals in Arkansas, Delaware, Georgia, Kentucky, Maryland, Mississippi, South Carolina, Texas and Virginia. Legislative Report No. 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) follows education budgets and legislation during regular and special legislative sessions, from governors' proposals through final legislative actions in the 16 SREB states. This report includes legislative Web site addresses and descriptions, by state, of gubernatorial budgetary requests and proposals…

  1. Everything Rises and Falls on Leadership: An Assessment of Undergraduate Leadership Development Programs at the University of Arkansas--Fayetteville

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Louis Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Today's students are the leaders of tomorrow, and their ability to lead in the 21st century will be critical to the sustainability of life, and the nation's ability to prosper will depend on the quality of leadership demonstrated at all levels of society. Student leadership development in institutions of higher education has never been…

  2. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Mississippi and Florida airborne survey, Helena quadrangle of Arkansas, Mississippi and Tennessee. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Helena quadrangle covers a region largely within the Mississippi River flood plain in the extreme northern Gulf Coastal Province. Tertiary sediments in this area are relatively thick, and overlie a Paleozoic basin gradually shoaling to the northeast. The Oachita Tectonic Zone strikes southeasterly through the center of the quadrangle. The exposed sequence is almost entirely Quaternary sediments of the flood plain area. Older Cenozoic deposits crop out in upland areas on the west side of the river valley. A search of available literature revealed no known uranium deposits. Sixty uranium anomalies were detected and are discussed briefly. None were considered significant, and all appeared to occur as the result of cultural and/or weather effects. Magnetic data appear to be in agreement with existing structural interpretations of the region

  3. Solar heating and hot water system installed at Shoney's Restaurant, North Little Rock, Arkansas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-08-01

    The solar heating system is designed to supply a major portion of the space and water heating requirements for a newly built Shoney's Big Boy Restaurant which was installed with completion occurring in December 1979. The restaurant has a floor space of approximately 4,650 square feet and requires approximately 1500 gallons of hot water daily. The solar energy system consists of 1,428 square feet of Chamberlain flat plate liquid collector subsystem, and a 1500 gallon storage subsystem circulating hot water producing 321 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/yr (specified) building heating and hot water heating. Designer - Energy Solutions, Incorporated. Contractor - Stephens Brothers, Incorporated. This report includes extracts from site files, specification references for solar modifications to existing building heating and hot water systems, drawings installation, operation and maintenance instructions.

  4. Reinterpretation of depositional processes in a classic flysch sequence (Pennsylvania Jackfork Group), Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas and Oklahoma: Reply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanmugam, G.; Moiola, R.J. [Mobil Exploration and Producing Technical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    1997-03-01

    Progress in science is often made when we make new observations, question old paradigms that do not work, and introduce new concepts. We attempted to do all this in our paper on the Jackfork Group (Shanmugam and Moiola, 1995). To allow Bulletin readers to appreciate the sequence of events leading to our controversial paper that provoked the preceding critiques, we need to place our contributions in a historical perspective. Our involvement with the Ouachitas began in the late 1960s when Moiola initiated a study of the Upper Carboniferous deep-water succession. Throughout the 1970s and 1980s, we perpetuated the {open_quotes}turbidite{close_quotes} paradigm by continuing to interpret the Jackfork Group and associated strata according to conventional wisdom. However, we were always troubled by the virtual absence of normal grading in these classic turbidite deposits.

  5. Weathering the Great Recession with Human Capital? Evidence on Labor Market Returns to Education from Arkansas. A CAPSEE Working Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfield, Clive

    2015-01-01

    The Great Recession was one of the sharpest economic downturns of the past century, with significant impacts across the U.S. labor market. Over past decades, one key feature of the U.S. labor market has been the high and stable returns to education. In this paper I estimate the returns to education for large samples of young workers in Arkansas…

  6. A preliminary survey of contaminants in fish and sediment from the Arkansas River in the vicinity of Tulsa, Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Small fish, representative of prey taken by interior least terns, did not appear to be contaminated by organochlorine pesticides or PCBs. Likewise, concentrations...

  7. 75 FR 9868 - University of Arkansas; Notice of Decision on Applications for Duty-Free Entry of Scientific...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    ..., Germany. Intended Use: See notice at 75 FR 3895, January 25, 2010. Reasons: The instrument must be able to perform using lasers with both continuous wave (CW) and pulsed mode. The use of picoseconds pulsed lasers... Entry of Scientific Instruments This is a decision pursuant to Section 6(c) of the...

  8. Population dynamics and movement of Ozark cavefish in Logan Cave NWR, Benton County, Arkansas, with additional baseline water quality information

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The population dynamics, general biology, and movements of the threatened Ozark cavefish (Amblyopsis rosae) were studied in Logan Cave National Wildlife Refuge,...

  9. 33 CFR 207.275 - McClellan-Kerr Arkansas River navigation system: use, administration, and navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... If a towboat is not equipped with a radio or its radio is out of service, pilots shall furnish this... when navigation is passing over the dam. During daylight hours a yellow and black disc will be... deckhands shall maintain their stations while tows are moving adjacent to any part of a lock. They...

  10. Contamination of the Sulfur River Wildlife Management Area and watershed in and near Texarkana, Arkansas and Texas

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducted this study in response to the concern of local citizens that contaminants from four industrial facilities (two of which...

  11. Little Rock and El Dorado 10 x 20 NTMS quadrangles and adjacent areas, Arkansas: data report (abbreviated)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This abbreviated data report presents results of ground water and stream sediment reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series Little Rock 10 x 20 quadrangle (Cleveland, Dallas, and Howard Counties do not have stream sediment analyses); the El Dorado 10 x 20 quadrangle (only Clark County has stream sediment analyses); the western part (Lonoke and Jefferson Counties) of Helena 10 x 20 quadrangle; the southern part (Franklin, Logan, Yell, Perry, Faulkner, and Lonoke Counties) of Russellville 10 x 20 quadrangle; and the southwestern corner (Ashley County) of the Greenwood 10 x 20 quadrangle. Stream samples were collected at 943 sites in the Little Rock quadrangle, 806 sites in the El Dorado quadrangle, 121 sites in the Helena area, 292 sites in the Russellville area, and 77 in the Greenwood area. Ground water samples were collected at 1211 sites in the Little Rock quadrangle, 1369 sites in the El Dorado quadrangle, 186 sites in the Helena area, 470 sites in the Russellville area, and 138 sites in the Greenwood area. Stream sediment and stream water samples were collected from small streams at nominal density of one site per 21 square kilometers in rural areas. Ground water samples were collected at a nominal density of one site per 13 square kilometers. Neutron activation analysis results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 8 other elements in ground water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Uranium concentrations in the sediments ranged from less than 0.1 ppM to 23.5 ppM with a mean of 1.7 ppM. The ground water uranium mean concentration is 0.113 ppB, and the uranium concentrations range from less than 0.002 ppB to 15.875 ppB. High ground water uranium values in the Ouachita Mountain region of the Little Rock quadrangle appear to be associated with Ordovician black shale units

  12. 76 FR 67175 - Riverbank Hydro No. 2 LLC, Lock Hydro Friends Fund XXXVI, Arkansas Electric Cooperative Corp...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-31

    ... the Corps. Applicant Contact: Mr. Kuo-Bao Tong, Riverbank Power Corporation, Royal Bank Plaza, South Tower, P.O. Box 166, 200 Bay Street, Suite 3230, Toronto, ON, Canada M5J2J4. (416) 861-0092 x 154....

  13. 76 FR 67174 - Arkansas Electric Cooperative Corp., Riverbank Hydro No. 9 LLC, Solia 3 Hydroelectric LLC, Lock...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-31

    .... Kuo-Bao Tong, Riverbank Power Corporation, Royal Bank Plaza, South Tower, P.O. Box 166, 200 Bay Street, Suite 3230, Toronto, ON, Canada M5J2J4. (416) 861-0092 x 154. Solia's Project No. 14166-000...

  14. Schools K-12 - Public School District Boundary (polygon)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — The Arkansas Secretary of State contracted the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, GIS Applications Laboratory (UALRGIS) to use modern geographic information...

  15. Low-Power Radiation Hardened Delay-Insensitive Asynchronous Microcontroller Technology Capable of Operating on Extreme Temperature Environments Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this SBIR effort, Arkansas Power Electronics International, Inc. (APEI, Inc.) and the University of Arkansas are partnering to develop a versatile,...

  16. The Journalism Research Fellows Report: What Makes an Effective School? Studies of Schools That Work in: Arkansas, Florida, Maine, Maryland, Nebraska, Virginia, Urban Districts Nationwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brundage, Diane, Ed.

    The news series contained in this book describe educational practices that have worked well in six states. The schools studied include elementary and secondary programs in the rural North and Midwest, the urban East, and suburban and rural South. Each educational journalist selected a group of schools that were judged outstanding by scholastic or…

  17. EnVesting in an Agricultural Legacy: Design and Implementation of a Targeted Young and Beginning Farmer Loan Program in Arkansas

    OpenAIRE

    Goeringer, L. Paul; Goodwin, Harold L., Jr.; Dixon, Bruce L.; Popp, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    U.S. agriculture has seen a decrease in of producers under the age of 35 entering agriculture for the past thirty years. This paper will explore the design and possible implementation of an innovative loan program designed give qualifying new young and beginning producers concessionary interest rates and loan fees for implementing of practices designed to improve on-farm profitability.

  18. A history of the Fish Farming Experimental Laboratory in Stuttgart, Arkansas and the transfer to the USDA/ARS Harry K. Dupree - Stuttgart National Aquaculture Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 1958, Congress enacted the Fish Rice Rotation Act that directed the Secretary of the Interior (in cooperation with USDA) to develop a program to solve problems related to production and harvest of warmwater fish. The idea was to establish a program to grow fish on flooded rice acreage in rotatio...

  19. Baseline Contaminant Assessment of water, sediment, invertebrates, and fish from twenty tributaries to the Lower Arkansas, Kansas/Lower Republican and Neosho Rivers

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Water quality impairments, dewatering and habitat alteration, have been identified as leading causes of the decline of numerous fish species in the Great Plains...

  20. Comparison of Measured to Predicted Estimations of Nonpoint Source Contaminants Using Conservation Practices in an Agriculturally-Dominated Watershed in Northeast Arkansas, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasher, Sarah K; Woodruff, Tracy M; Bouldin, Jennifer L

    2016-06-01

    In efforts to reduce nonpoint source runoff and improve water quality, Best Management Practices (BMPs) were implemented in the Outlet Larkin Creek Watershed. Farmers need to make scientifically informed decisions concerning BMPs addressing contaminants from agricultural fields. The BMP Tool was developed from previous studies to estimate BMP effectiveness at reducing nonpoint source contaminants. The purpose of this study was to compare the measured percent reduction of dissolved phosphorus (DP) and total suspended solids to the reported percent reductions from the BMP Tool for validation. Similarities were measured between the BMP Tool and the measured water quality parameters. Construction of a sedimentation pond resulted in 74 %-76 % reduction in DP as compared to 80 % as predicted with the BMP Tool. However, further research is needed to validate the tool for additional water quality parameters. The BMP Tool is recommended for future BMP implementation as a useful predictor for farmers. PMID:27194420

  1. Impact of National Board Certification, Advanced Degree, and Socio-Economic Status on the Literacy Achievement Rate of 11th Grade Students in Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Merlina Tamara

    2011-01-01

    The researcher explored whether there was a significant difference between the literacy achievement rates among eleventh grade students taught by National Board Certified Teachers versus students taught by non-National Board Certified Teachers with or without advanced degrees and of varied socio-economic levels. The researcher also explored the…

  2. Effects of field plot size on variation in white flower anther injury by tarnished plant bug for host plant resistance evaluations in Arkansas cotton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field trials conducted in 2008 and 2009 investigated whether field plot size affects incidence of white flower anther injury by tarnished plant bug (TPB) ((Lygus lineolaris (Palisot de Beauvois)) in host plant resistance (HPR) evaluations. The three cotton lines evaluated in the trial included a su...

  3. Ruminal in situ disappearance kinetics of dry matter and fiber in growing steers for common crabgrass forages sampled on seven dates in northern Arkansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, R K; Coblentz, W K; Coffey, K P; Turner, J E; Scarbrough, D A; Jennings, J A; Richardson, M D

    2005-05-01

    Southern crabgrass (Digitaria ciliaris [Retz.] Koel.) is often viewed as an undesirable weed, largely because it encroaches upon field and forage crops, gardens, and lawns. However, visual observations of livestock grazing mixed-species pastures suggest that cattle seem to prefer crabgrass to many other summer forages. The objectives of this study were to assess the nutritive value of crabgrass sampled weekly between July 11, and August 22, 2001, and then to determine ruminal in situ disappearance kinetics of DM and NDF for these crabgrass forages. A secondary objective was to compare these kinetic estimates with those of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon [L.] Pers.), and orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.) control hays. All forages were evaluated in situ using five (383 +/- 22.7 kg) ruminally cannulated crossbred (Gelbvieh x Angus x Brangus) steers. Whole-plant crabgrass exhibited more rapid (P < or = 0.002) ruminal disappearance rates of DM (overall range = 0.069 to 0.084 h(-1)) than did bermudagrass (0.054 h(-1)) and orchardgrass (0.060 h(-1)) hays, but disappearance rates were slower (P < 0.001) for crabgrass than for alfalfa hay (0.143 h(-1)). Effective ruminal disappearance of DM was greater (P < 0.001) for crabgrass (overall range = 69.3 to 75.4%) than for all the control hays. Similarly, disappearance rates of NDF for crabgrass (overall range = 0.069 to 0.086 h(-1)) were more rapid (P < 0.001) than observed for bermudagrass and orchardgrass hays; however, NDF in alfalfa disappeared at a faster (P < 0.001) rate (0.107 h(-1)) than crabgrass. These results indicate that crabgrass offers greater effective ruminal degradability of DM and NDF than orchardgrass or alfalfa of moderate quality. More importantly, it potentially offers faster and more extensive ruminal disappearance than perennial warm-season grasses typically found throughout the southeastern United States, and it should likely support improved performance by ruminant livestock in this region. PMID:15827259

  4. Ruminal in situ disappearance kinetics of nitrogen and neutral detergent insoluble nitrogen from common crabgrass forages sampled on seven dates in northern Arkansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, R K; Coblentz, W K; Coffey, K P; Turner, J E; Scarbrough, D A; Jennings, J A; Richardson, M D

    2006-03-01

    Southern crabgrass (Digitaria ciliaris [Retz.] Koel.) is often an undesirable species in field and forage crops, but visual observations suggest that livestock prefer it to many other summer forages. The objectives of this study were to assess the nutritive value of crabgrass sampled weekly between July 11 and August 22, 2001 and then to determine ruminal in situ disappearance kinetics of N and neutral detergent insoluble N (NDIN) for these forages. A secondary objective was to compare these kinetic estimates for crabgrass with those of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon [L.] Pers.), and or-chardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.) as control hays. All kinetic evaluations were conducted with 5 ruminally cannulated Gelbvieh x Angus x Brangus steers (383 +/- 22.7 kg). Concentrations of N for crabgrass decreased linearly (P < or = 0.002) across sampling dates for leaf, stem, and whole-plant tissues. Conversely, percentages of the total N pool within NDIN and ADIN fractions generally increased over sampling dates in mostly linear patterns. For crabgrass, the immediately soluble portion of the total N pool (fraction A; overall mean = 54.6% of N) was greater (P < 0.001) than for all control hays. Crabgrass exhibited a more rapid N disappearance rate (overall mean = 0.093/h; expressed as a proportion disappearing/h) than that of bermudagrass (0.046/h; P < 0.001), but the disappearance rate for alfalfa N (0.223/h) was considerably faster (P < 0.001) than for crabgrass. The effective ruminal disappearance of N was greater (P < 0.001) for crabgrass (overall mean = 85.4%) than for the alfalfa (83.3%), bermudagrass (72.3%), or orchardgrass (76.0%) control hays. For alfalfa, the ruminal disappearance rate of NDIN (0.150/h) was more rapid (P < 0.001) than for crabgrass (overall mean = 0.110/h); however, the disappearance rate for crabgrass was faster than that for bermudagrass (0.072/h; P < 0.001) or for orchardgrass (0.098/h; P = 0.010). Effective ruminal disappearance of NDIN was greater (P < 0.001) for crabgrass (overall mean = 72.0%) than for the bermudagrass (69.0%) or alfalfa hays (50.5%), but there was no difference (P = 0.865) between crabgrass and orchardgrass (72.1%). Although crabgrass forages exhibited concentrations of total N that were comparable with those of alfalfa and rates of ruminal N disappearance that were < 50% of those for the alfalfa hay control, improvements in N use efficiency relative to alfalfa are questionable because of the excessively large Fraction A for crabgrass. PMID:16478959

  5. Water Resources Data, Texas Water Year 1998, Volume 1. Arkansas River Basin, Red River Basin, Sabine River Basin, Neches River Basin, Trinity River Basin, and Intervening Coastal Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandara, S.C.; Gibbons, W.J.; Andrews, F.L.; Barbie, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 1998 water year for Texas are presented in four volumes, and consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and canals; stage, contents, and water-quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 1 contains records for water discharge at 112 gaging stations; stage only at 5 gaging stations; stage and contents at 33 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 65 gaging stations; and data for 12 partial-record stations comprised of 7 flood-hydrograph, 2 low-flow, and 3 creststage stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas. Records for a few pertinent stations in the bordering States also are included.

  6. Water Resources Data - Texas Water Year 1999, Volume 1. Arkansas River Basin, Red River Basin, Sabine River Basin, Neches River Basin, and Intervening Coastal Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandara, S.C.; Gibbons, W.J.; Barbie, D.L.; Jones, R.E.

    2000-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 1999 water year for Texas are presented in six volumes, and consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and canals; stage, contents, and water-quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 1 contains records for water discharge at 71 gaging stations; stage only at 3 gaging stations; stage and contents at 23 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 47 gaging stations; and data for 9 partial-record stations comprised of 6 flood-hydrograph and 3 low-flow stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas. Records for a few pertinent stations in the bordering States also are included.

  7. Water Resources Data - Texas Water Year 2000, Volume 1. Arkansas River Basin, Red River Basin, Sabine River Basin, Neches River Basin, and Intervening Coastal Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandara, S.C.; Gibbons, W.J.; Barbie, D.L.

    2001-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2000 water year for Texas are presented in six volumes, and consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and canals; stage, contents, and water-quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 1 contains records for water discharge at 68 gaging stations; stage only at 3 gaging stations; stage and contents at 37 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 39 gaging stations; and data for 9 partial-record stations comprised of 6 flood-hydrograph and 3 low-flow stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas. Records for a few pertinent stations in the bordering States also are included.

  8. Twelve Years of Acoustical Research. American School Band Directors' Association, Research Committee Reports for the 17th Annual Convention, Hot Springs, Arkansas, 1969.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American School Band Directors Association, Newark, OH.

    The guide, one in a series of committee reports relating to school band performance, organization, and equipment needs, discusses acoustical problems inherent to the clarinet. The report is presented in five sections. Section I summarizes findings of an American School Band Directors' Association (ASBDA) clarinet testing committee. A major finding…

  9. The impact of anthropogenic discharges on Arkansas river shiner (Notropis girardi) habitat within the South Canadian River watershed in the Texas Panhandle, 2001-2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In 2001, the USFWS Arlington, Texas Field Office initiated a one-year study on the mainstem of the South Canadian River in the Texas Panhandle to determine the...

  10. Causes of Congenital Malformations

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-01-01

    The genetic epidemiology of congenital malformations (CMs) and interaction with environmental causes are reviewed from the Arkansas Center for Birth Defects, Arkansas Children’s Hospital, Little Rock, AS.

  11. Legislative Districts - Senate Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This layer represents the Arkansas State Senate district boundaries adopted by the Arkansas Board of Apportionment on July 29, 2011. The Board of Apportionment,...

  12. Legislative Districts - House Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This layer represents the Arkansas State House of Representatives district boundaries adopted by the Arkansas Board of Apportionment on July 29, 2011. The Board of...

  13. Cities, Towns and Villages - City Limit (polygon)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — Data available online through GeoStor at http://www.geostor.arkansas.gov. Arkansas Cities: This data set contains all of the city limit boundaries within the state...

  14. 76 FR 796 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-06

    ...) 1245 E Ocotillo Rd, Phoenix, 10001166 ARKANSAS Arkansas County Maxwell Street Bridge, (Historic Bridges of Arkansas MPS) Maxwell St, E of Jefferson St, DeWitt, 10001148 North Jackson Street Bridge..., 1860-1960 MPS) 1351 Box Elder Rd, Glenrock, 10001172 Other Actions: Request for Removal has been...

  15. 75 FR 25281 - Food Protection Workshop; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-07

    ... with the University of Arkansas (UA) Institute of Food Science and Engineering, is announcing a public.... Seideman, 2650 North Young Ave., Institute of Food Science & Engineering, University of Arkansas... of Food Science & Engineering, University of Arkansas, 2650 North Young Ave., Fayetteville, AR...

  16. Heterosis and direct effects for Charolais-sired calf weight and growth, cow weight and weight change, and ratios of cow and calf weights and weight changes across warm season lactation in Romosinuano, Angus, and F cows in Arkansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, D G; Burke, J M; Chase, C C; Coleman, S W

    2016-01-01

    The use of Brahman in cow-calf production offers some adaptation to the harsh characteristics of endophyte-infected tall fescue. Criollo breeds, such as the Romosinuano, may have similar adaptation. The objectives were to estimate genetic effects in Romosinuano, Angus, and crossbred cows for their weights, weights of their calves, and ratios (calf weight:cow weight and cow weight change:calf weight gain) across lactation and to assess the influence of forage on traits and estimates. Cows ( = 91) were bred to Charolais bulls after their second parity. Calves ( = 214) were born from 2006 to 2009. Cows and calves were weighed in early (April and June), mid- (July), and late lactation (August and October). Animal was a random effect in analyses of calf data; sire was random in analyses of cow records and ratios. Fixed effects investigated included calf age, calf sex, cow age-year combinations, sire breed of cow, dam breed of cow, and interactions. Subsequent analyses evaluated the effect of forage grazed: endophyte-free or endophyte-infected tall fescue. Estimates of maternal heterosis for calf weight ranged from 9.3 ± 4.3 to 15.4 ± 5.7 kg from mid-lactation through weaning ( < 0.05). Romosinuano direct effects (of the cow) were -6.8 ± 3.0 and -8.9 ± 4.2 kg for weights recorded in April and June. Calf weights and weight gains from birth were greater ( < 0.05) for calves of cows grazing endophyte-free tall fescue except in mid-summer. Cow weight change from April to each time was negative for Angus cows and lower ( < 0.05) than other groups. Cows grazing endophyte-free tall fescue were heavier ( < 0.05) at all times but had more weight loss in late lactation. Angus cows had the lowest ( < 0.05) ratios (negative) of cow weight change:calf weight gain, indicating an energy-deficit condition. Cows grazing endophyte-free tall fescue had more negative ( < 0.05) values for this trait but not in early lactation ( < 0.05). Estimates of heterosis ranged from 12.8 ± 9.5 to 28.6 ± 9.4 kg for cow weight, 7.9 ± 3.0 to 15.8 ± 5.0 kg for cow weight change, and 0.07 ± 0.03 to 0.27 ± 0.1 for cow weight change:calf weight gain. Direct Romosinuano effects ranged from 14.8 ± 4.2 to 49.8 ± 7.7 kg for cow weight change and 0.2 ± 0.04 to 0.51 ± 0.14 for cow weight change:calf weight gain. The adaptive ability of Romosinuano in temperate fescue regions may be favorable with respect to relative cow and calf weight but may be a consequence of lower milk-producing ability. PMID:26812306

  17. De la promesa de la Reconstrucción a la crisis de Little Rock, Arkansas en el proceso de la integración racial en Estados Unidos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARÍA ESTELA BÁEZ-VILLASEÑOR

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available El artículo tiene como propósito dar seguimiento al proceso enfrentado por la comunidad afroaméricana desde el momento en que terminó la Guerra Civil hasta uno de los sucesos más significativos en su integración a la sociedad de Estados Unidos. De esta manera, se busca analizar cuáles fueron los logros concretos de las enmiendas constitucionales aprobadas durante la Reconstrucción, así como la reacción de los estados sureños. Éstos, durante las décadas posteriores a la derrota del Sur fueron incrementando las medidas segregacionistas. Los afroamericanos buscaron diversas opciones ante esta situación. Algunos migraron, mientras otros crearon organismos que exigíeran la aplicación de las enmiendas constitucionales.

  18. BENEFITS OF CONTROLLING SALINE WATER IN COLORADO

    OpenAIRE

    Ellingson, Lindsey; Houk, Eric E.; Schuck, Eric C.; Frasier, W. Marshall

    2004-01-01

    The Arkansas River in Colorado is confronted with a salinity issue; the majority of this salinity problem is due to agricultural runoff caused by irrigation. Reducing applications of irrigation water through adoption of more technically efficient irrigation systems is one means of improving water quality in the Arkansas River basin. This research uses positive mathematical programming to model the cropping practices of the farms along the Arkansas River. It examines the affect of acreage and ...

  19. 77 FR 13349 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-06

    ... renewal of an existing permit to take (capture, survey, and electrofish) Arkansas River shiner (Notropis girardi), Neosho madtom (Noturus placidus), pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus), and Topeka...

  20. 76 FR 4724 - Emerson Transportation Division, a Division of Emerson Electric, Including Workers Located...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-26

    ... Transportation Division, a division of Emerson Electric, Bridgeton, Missouri. The notice was published in the Federal Register on December 16, 2010 (75 FR 75701). At the request of a State of Arkansas agent, the... Division lived throughout the United States, including Arkansas, but report to the Bridgeton,...

  1. University Intervention into Community Issues as Dialogic Public Relations: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Jamie M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines a study of the wastewater collection and treatment issues of Little Rock and North Little Rock, Arkansas by University of Arkansas at Little Rock personnel and how it constitutes dialogic public relations. The paper defines dialogic public relations using Kent and Taylor's work and then uses their criteria to describe how this…

  2. 78 FR 7445 - Notice of Intent To Prepare a Draft Environmental Impact Statement for a General Conservation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    ..., and Washington counties in Oklahoma and Lamar and Red River counties in Texas. The species covered... (Etheostoma cragini)--Candidate Arkansas River shiner (Notropis girardi)--Threatened, Arkansas R. Basin...)--Threatened with Critical Habitat Neosho madtom (Noturus placidus)--Threatened Neosho Mucket...

  3. 78 FR 27171 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Proposed Endangered Status for the Neosho Mucket...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-09

    ... Verdigris Rivers in Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma. The proposed critical habitat for the Neosho... critical habitat for the rabbitsfoot in the Neosho, Spring (Arkansas River system), Verdigris, Black... proposed rule of October 16, 2012 (77 FR 63440) to revise the total number of river kilometers (km) for...

  4. 76 FR 53844 - National Dairy Promotion and Research Program; Invitation To Submit Comments on Proposed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-30

    ..., research and nutrition education. Congress found that it is in the public interest to authorize the.... Arkansas, Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas 20,321 10.4 4 5. Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota 11,370.... Arizona, Colorado, Montana, Nevada, Utah, Wyoming....... 9,813.4 5.0 2 4. Arkansas, Kansas, New...

  5. 75 FR 17766 - National Register of Historic Places; Weekly Listing of Historic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-07

    ... (Arkansas Highway History and Architecture MPS) Crittenden County Riverside Speedway, 151 Legion Rd., West..., 09001259, LISTED, 1/21/10 (Cotton and Rice Farm History and Architecture in the Arkansas Delta MPS) Van... District, Co. Rt. 9, New Concord, 09001268, LISTED, 1/19/10 Orange County Balmville Cemetery, Albany...

  6. Estimating a Demand Function for Poultry Litter

    OpenAIRE

    Carreira, Rita I.; Goodwin, Harold L., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Excess poultry litter could be a sustainable source of crop nutrients outside of nutrient-saturated regions if crop farmers are willing to utilize it. Using nearly 150 observations of actual poultry litter purchases in Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Missouri we estimate a demand function for poultry litter produced in northwest Arkansas.

  7. 77 FR 63603 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Designation of Critical Habitat for the Cumberland...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-16

    ... private landowners in Arkansas through increased government regulation, and ] will add unnecessary... government regulation of private land in Arkansas. The effects of private activities are not subject to the... Federal Register on August 9, 2011 (76 FR 48722). For information on the five fishes' critical...

  8. High-Tech School Bus Teaches Students on the Road

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katims, Lauren

    2011-01-01

    Last year, kindergarten through high school students in the rural Hector, Arkansas, School District barely had the technology resources that keep kids interested in math and science. This year, they potentially have the most advanced resources in the country--before they even step into the classroom. One school bus in Arkansas' Pope County has…

  9. THE FEASIBILITY OF POULTRY LITTER TRANSPORTATION FROM ENVIRONMENTALLY SENSITIVE AREAS TO DELTA ROW CROP PRODUCTION

    OpenAIRE

    Govindasamy, Ramu; Cochran, Mark J.

    1995-01-01

    Arkansas ranks first in broiler production in the USA with more than a billion broiler and 1.5 million tons of litter produced in 1993. Transporting litter from western to eastern Arkansas can accomplish two goals: 1) avoid potential threat to clean water in western Arkansas and 2) can increase productivity of graded lands in the Delta. This paper examines the feasibility of litter transport from areas of high poultry concentrations to the Delta for use as a soil amendment. We establish the c...

  10. Think Before You Ink: Are Tattoos Safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumers Consumer Updates Think Before You Ink: Are Tattoos Safe? Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... and does not last long. back to top Tattoo Ink Research In a laboratory within FDA's Arkansas- ...

  11. 76 FR 54796 - Notice of Determinations Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-02

    ... articles is a party to a free trade agreement with the United States; 2. The country to which the workers... Casualty Company, Chicago, Illinois. TA-W-80,279; Paris Accessories, Inc., Yellville, Arkansas....

  12. 77 FR 8900 - Certain Vaginal Ring Birth Control Devices; Termination of the Investigation Based on Withdrawal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-15

    .... 76 FR 17444. The complaint alleges violations of section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended..., Rhode Island; Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. of Bentonville, Arkansas; Walgreens Co. of Deerfield,...

  13. 76 FR 38208

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ...., (North Central Phoenix Farmhouses and Rural Estate Homes, 1895-1959) 7620 N. 7th St., Phoenix, 11000463 ARKANSAS Clark County Arkadelphia Commercial Historic District, Roughly Main St. between 5th & 7th...

  14. Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set represents the extent of the Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer in the states of Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas, Mississippi, and...

  15. State Aquifer Recharge Atlas Plates, Geographic NAD83, LDEQ (1999) [aquifer_recharge_potential_LDEQ_1988

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This is a polygon dataset depicting the boundaries of aquifer systems in the state of Louisiana and adjacent areas of Texas, Arkansas and a portion of Mississippi....

  16. Schools K-12 - School Board Zones

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This dataset contains polygons and attributes which represent the School District Board Zones for the Public School Districts in the State of Arkansas. It includes...

  17. Health Insurance Coverage: Early Release of Estimates from the National Health Interview Survey, January -- June 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Arkansas, and Texas Washington, Oregon, California, Nevada, New Mexico, Arizona, Idaho, Utah, Colorado, Montana, Wyoming, Alaska, and ... status, personal care needs, serious psychological distress, diagnosed diabetes, and asthma episodes and current asthma. Wireless Substitution: ...

  18. Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Total Knee System (University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, 11/05/2009) Rotating Platform ... of Sealants and Collagen Duraplasty (Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, 4/20/2011) Back Pain ...

  19. 77 FR 14465 - Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program; Tribal Transit Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    ...: Alabama, Florida, States served: American Samoa, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, Arizona, California, Guam... area: Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky... Technical Assistance Program Richard A. Rolland, Eastern Washington University, Department of Urban...

  20. Turnover Rates of Fall Migrating Pectoral Sandpipers Through the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Mississippi Alluvial Valley (MA V) is the historic alluvial floodplain of the Lower Mississippi River. Most of the MAV is located in Arkansas, Louisiana, and...

  1. 78 FR 58517 - Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision (ROD) and Finding of No Significant Impact...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    ..., Arkansas 72201-3225. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Charlotte Bowie, State Irrigation Engineer, Natural... Improvement Project Area. The project provides a water supply and on-farm infrastructure for...

  2. Emergency Management Offices - Emergency Management Region (polygon)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — Data available online through GeoStor at http://www.geostor.arkansas.gov. This file contains location information for Emergency Management Regions in the State of...

  3. Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in a Faster Return to Patient Quality-of-Life (Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, ... of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, 11/05/2009) Rotating Platform ...

  4. 75 FR 11936 - Unit Structures LLC, Magnolia, AR; Notice of Termination of Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Unit Structures LLC, Magnolia, AR; Notice of Termination of... of workers of Unit Structures LLC, Magnolia, Arkansas. The petitioner has requested that the...

  5. Creating a Place in History [and] Tech Prep for Business and Marketing Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Anita K.; Butler, Tommie L.

    1993-01-01

    "Creating a Place in History" (Decker) discusses the evolution of tech prep and the challenges it offers to secondary and postsecondary schools. "Tech Prep for Business and Marketing Technology" (Butler) describes tech prep in Arkansas. (JOW)

  6. History, Status and National Distribution of the Red-cockaded Woodpecker in 1969

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This presents a summary of the distribution and life history of the red-cockaded woodpecker in Texas, Mississippi, Arkansas, Oklahoma, Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama,...

  7. DC-Motor Drive Encompassing SiGe Asynchronous Control Electronics for Ultra-Wide (-230 0C to +130 0C) Environments Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Phase I, the research team formed by APEI, Inc. and University of Arkansas proved the feasibility of developing ultra-wide temperature (-230

  8. How Far Can Poultry Litter Go? A New Technology for Litter Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Carreira, Rita I.; Young, Kenneth B.; Goodwin, Harold L., Jr.; Wailes, Eric J.

    2007-01-01

    Exporting northwest Arkansas excess turkey and broiler litter to partially fertilize nutrient-deficient cropland in eastern Arkansas can be more cost effective than to supply all crop nutrients with chemical fertilizer only, given current high fertilizer prices. Cost savings are greater if litter is baled in ultraviolet resistant plastic and transported via truck, since backhaul opportunities reduce truck rates, or alternatively, if raw litter is shipped via a truck-barge combination. Rice is...

  9. Emerging options in growth hormone therapy: an update

    OpenAIRE

    Kemp SF; Frindik JP

    2011-01-01

    Stephen F Kemp, J Paul FrindikUniversity of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Arkansas Children's Hospital, Little Rock, AR, USAAbstract: Growth hormone (GH) was first used to treat a patient in 1958. For the next 25 years it was available only from cadaver sources, which was of concern because of safety considerations and short supply. In 1985, GH produced by recombinant DNA techniques became available, expanding its possible uses. Since that time there have been three indications appro...

  10. Randomized clinical trial evaluating the frequency of membrane sweeping with an unfavorable cervix at 39 weeks

    OpenAIRE

    Chauhan SP; Warner WB; Magann MI; Poole AT; Doherty DA; Magann EF; Putnam K

    2011-01-01

    Kathleen Putnam1, Everett F Magann2, Dorota A Doherty3, Aaron T Poole1, Marcia I Magann2, William B Warner1, Suneet P Chauhan41Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Naval Medical Center – Portsmouth, Portsmouth, Virginia, USA; 2University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas, USA; 3School of Women's and Infants' Health, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia; 4Aurora Healthcare, West Allis, Wisconsin, USABackground: Despite the widely...

  11. How A Cap-and-Trade Policy of Green House Gases Could Alter the Face of Agriculture in the South: A Spatial and Production Level Analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Nalley, Lawton Lanier; Popp, Michael P.; Fortin, Corey

    2010-01-01

    With the Waxman-Markey Bill passing the House and the Obama administration’s push to reduce carbon emissions, the likelihood of the implementation of some form of a carbon policy is increasing. This study estimates the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of the six largest crops produced in Arkansas using 63 different production practices as documented by University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service. From these GHG estimates a baseline state “carbon footprint” was estimated and a hypotheti...

  12. Water resources data for Texas, water year 1996. Volume 1. Arkansas River basin, Red River basin, Sabine River basin, Neches River basin, Trinity River basin, and intervening coastal basins. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1995-30 September 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandara, S.C.; Gibbons, W.J.; Andrews, F.L.; Jones, R.E.; Barbie, D.L.

    1997-02-01

    Volume 1 contains records for water discharge at 112 gaging stations; stage only at 4 gaging stations; stage and contents at 34 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 76 gaging stations; and data for 15 partial-record stations comprised of 9 flood-hydrograph, 3 low-flow, and 3 crest-stage stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements.

  13. Evaluation and demonstration of methods for improved nuclear-fuel utilization. First semi-annual progress report, inception to June 30, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this program is to improve fuel utilization through more efficient fuel management and an increase in fuel burnup. A demonstration of these improvements in uranium utilization is planned for the Arkansas Nuclear One Unit 2 (ANO-2) reactor located near Russellville, Arkansas. This reactor is a 2815 MWT Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) owned and operated by Arkansas Power and Light. It is the first Combustion Engineering unit to utilize 16 x 16 fuel. More efficient fuel management will be achieved through implementation of a low leakage concept called SAVFUEL (Shimmed and Very Flexible Uranium Element Loading). Burnup will be increased as much as possible for the current fuel design. It should be possible to increase batch-average discharge exposure to about 43 GWD/T. In parallel, advanced fuel will be designed and tested which eventually may allow the batch-average discharge exposure to be increased to 53 GWD/T

  14. Wireless nanosensors and systems (WiNS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Gail; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2009-03-01

    Wireless Nanosensors and Systems research project has been investigating a systems approach to designing sensors systems. The effort is multifaceted and ranges from the design of low-cost sensors for various applications, such as biomedical or structural health monitoring, to the design of wireless interfaces and protocols with suitable networking and design of protocols to transmit sensor data from one place to another securely and to the design of appropriate applications themselves. The research team has been developing a system-engineering framework that forms the basis for collaborative activities across three campuses, University of Arkansas at Fayetteville, University of Arkansas at Little Rock and Arkansas State University, that captures the relationship between sensors, wireless interfaces, the network, the testbed that facilitates applications-level communications.

  15. Distribution of Races of Heterodera glycines in the Central United States

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, D. G.; Riggs, R. D.; Robbins, R. T.; Rakes, L.

    1997-01-01

    A total of 62 populations of Heterodera glycines were collected in 10 states along the Mississippi and Missouri rivers, and 206 populations were collected in Arkansas. Among the 62 populations, races 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, and 14 were found south of 37°N latitude, and races 1 and 3 were found north of 37°N latitude. In Arkansas samples, races 2, 4, 5, 6, 9, and 14 comprised 87% of the populations. In both groups of samples, H. glycines populations with genes that enabled the population to parasiti...

  16. The Mountain Meadows Massacre and “poisoned springs”: scientific testing of the more recent, anthrax theory

    OpenAIRE

    Perego, Ugo A.; Achilli, Alessandro; Ekins, Jayne E.; Milani, Lucio; Lari, Martina; Pilli, Elena; Brown, Alexis; Price, Erin P.; Wolken, Spenser R.; Matthews, Molly; Allen, Christina A; Pearson, Talima R.; Angerhofer, Norman; Caramelli, David; Kupferschmid, Tim

    2012-01-01

    It has been recorded that one of the possible causes that eventually escalated into the 1857 manslaughter at Mountain Meadows in Southern Utah was the poisoning of an open spring by the Fancher–Baker party as they crossed the Utah territory on their way from Arkansas to California. Historical accounts report that a number of cattle died, followed by human casualties from those that came in contact with the dead animals. Even after the Arkansas party departed, animals continued to perish and p...

  17. Managing for performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The training manager's role in the nuclear industry has changed considerably during the past five years. Training managers have become managers of complex projects, large staffs and multimillion dollar budgets. Along with the growth have come greater management responsibilities and problems. At Arkansas Nuclear One, a relatively quick and orderly transition to a larger, more professional training organization has occurred over the past four years. A major contribution to the successful transition was the application of fundamental management principles through managing for performance. The purpose of this paper is to share principles that have been utilized at Arkansas Nuclear One

  18. The "Pretty Redhead" Who Changed Science Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Randy

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the historical marginalization of women with claims that they are neither fit for nor interested in careers in science. Describes two cases of the media depiction of a successful female scientist and a high school biology teacher who was involved in the challenge to Arkansas' antievolution laws. (MM)

  19. The Accountability Litmus Test: Long-Term Performance Improvement with Contained Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, Brenda Norman

    1995-01-01

    Budget reforms adopted at the University of Montana and by the Arkansas state higher education system illustrate a variety of strategies for long-range planning. These efforts include reform of faculty collective bargaining, funding based on productivity enhancement, and a multiyear fiscal plan encompassing both operating and capital budgets. (MSE)

  20. Rotational Analysis of FTIR Spectra from Cigarette Smoke: An Application of Chem Spec II Software in the Undergraduate Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Alan R.; Burns, William A.; Reeve, Scott W.

    2004-01-01

    A version of the classic gas phase infrared experiment was developed for students at Arkansas State University based on the shortcomings of the rotationally resolved infrared experiment. Chem Spec II is a noncommercial Windows-based software package developed to aid in the potentially complicated problem of assigning quantum numbers to observed…

  1. Multi-batch catfish production and economic analysis using alternative low-cost diets with corn gluten feed and traditional diets with meat-and-bone meal

    Science.gov (United States)

    We conducted concurrent feeding trials for one growing season with channel catfish in ponds in Mississippi and Arkansas to evaluate the production and economic effects of alternative (low-cost) feeds containing 28 or 32% protein and alternative (corn gluten feed) or traditional (porcine meat, bone a...

  2. In-pond raceway systems and catfish disease related cases in west Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Production systems such as in-pond raceway systems (IPRS) and split-pond production systems are providing an alternative to traditional pond culture for raising catfish. Currently, there are over 1,300 water acres of production in Mississippi, Arkansas, and Alabama utilizing split-pond production sy...

  3. Commercial catfish pond water color and fish-eating birds: What is the connection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was designed to test and predict fish-eating bird use and avoidance at catfish production ponds during 2 winters in Arkansas. We measured (1) physical (size, length, width, depth, surface condition, secchi depth), (2) biological (fish size and stocking density, algal species composition ...

  4. Weed suppressive rice for drill-seeded systems of the Southern USA: Research strategies and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effective, affordable weed control is a challenge to sustainable rice production in the U.S. Research efforts in Arkansas have identified several rice lines that can suppress economically important C4 grass weeds such as Echinochloa crus-galli and Leptochloa fusca ssp. fascicularis. Earlier findin...

  5. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... In the ‘80s, I worked in a dialysis unit in Arkansas. I was a dialysis tech, and I got to know the people that came in. They would come in three times a week, so basically you become their family. They become a part of your family and ...

  6. GAIN and School Behaviors: A Family-Focused Drug-Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosti-Vasey, Joanne L.; Barton, Francine

    Getting Alternative Information Now (GAIN) is a family-based program designed to prevent/reduce drug and alcohol use/abuse among teenagers and families. The program includes: (1) referrals by school systems to the Family Services Agency of Central Arkansas; (2) clinical needs assessments to determine which program (Early Intervention Program,…

  7. Fallout of thorium and uranium isotopes from the 1982 eruption of the El Chichon volcano

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marked increases in the concentration of thorium and uranium isotopes observed in rain samples collected at Fayetteville (36 deg N, 94 deg W), Arkansas, during 1983 are attributed to the fallout from the 1982 eruption of El chichon volcano in Mexico. (author)

  8. Layers of metal nanoparticles on semiconductors deposited by electrophoresis from solutions with reverse micelles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žďánský, Karel; Kacerovský, Pavel; Zavadil, Jiří; Lorinčík, Jan; Fojtík, A.

    Fayetteville : University of Arkansas, 2007. s. t0110063--. [Semiconducting & Insulating Materials Conference - SIMC /14./. 15.05.2007-20.05.2007, Fayetteville] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN400670651 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : semiconductor junctions * nanostructured materials * semicpnductor devices Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  9. A Bibliography on American Indians. Bibliographic Series No. 36.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Larry S.

    The information sources on Indians of North and South America which are listed were selected from the holdings of the Arkansas University library. Materials are grouped by type, including bibliographies, biographies, catalogs and directories, documentary histories, laws and treaties, encyclopedias and guides, handbooks and sourcebooks, microfilm,…

  10. Agronomic and soil management lessons learned planting 13,000 acres of Miscanthus in the U.S. Midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2011 USDA approved millions of dollars to stimulate bioenergy production through the USDA Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP). Three BCAP projects for the southern edge of the U.S. Corn Belt were awarded to MFA Oil Biomass to assist farmers in northeast Arkansas and central and southwest Misso...

  11. 77 FR 16796 - Lead Requirements for Lead-Based Paint Activities in Target Housing and Child-Occupied Facilities...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    ... listings at http://www.gpoaccess.gov/fr/ . 2. In person: The State submittal is also available for public... of submission, which was March 29, 1999. (See, 64 FR 27266, May 19, 1999). In 2011, the Arkansas... activities program. On August 29, 1996 (61 FR 45777) (FRL-5389-9), EPA promulgated final TSCA section...

  12. Competitive edge of western coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper expresses views on the competitive advantages of one of the nation's most remarkable energy resources--Western coal. It covers utilization of Western coal, and its advantages. The Arkansas Power and Light Company and its demand for coal are also covered

  13. Why Educators Have Problems with Some Students: Understanding Frames of Preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Michael B.

    1999-01-01

    Students generally find themselves in listening situations, but they may not prefer this mode. A study of Arkansas educators' personality traits and communication abilities found that educators were either reactors, workaholics, or persisters. They interacted well with others like themselves but demonstrated limited potential to interact with…

  14. A Look at the Law, Public Safety, Corrections & Security Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffee, Joseph N.

    2008-01-01

    A month after the 9/11 terrorist attack in 2001, an advisory group met in Little Rock, Arkansas, to begin the development of the Law, Public Safety, Corrections and Security (LPSCS) career cluster. At that time there were five pathways of what was then called the Law and Public Safety cluster--fire and emergency services, law enforcement,…

  15. Arranged Marriage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Alan

    2004-01-01

    People in the rolling, scenic valley, between the Ozarks and Ouchita mountains have a lot in common. As of this school year, they share something else in common: a school district. The four districts that make up the newly christened Two Rivers are among 57 rural Arkansas systems that state lawmakers forced to consolidate with their neighbors.…

  16. 75 FR 69070 - Notice of Receipt of Requests To Voluntarily Cancel Certain Pesticide Registrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    .... AR980003 Arkansas Bait and Ornamental Fish Growers Assn., P.O. Box 509, Lonoke, AR 72086. OR050018 Loveland.... Ornamental Miticide/ Insecticide. 084456-00004 Abamectin 2% Abamectin. Miticide/ Insecticide. AR980003 Dylox 80 Turf and Trichlorfon. Ornamental Insecticide. OR050018 Prometryne 4L Prometryn....

  17. 76 FR 34979 - Product Cancellation Order for Certain Pesticide Registrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-15

    .... Box 640, Hockessin, DE 19707-0640. AR980003 Arkansas Bait and Ornamental Fish Growers Assn, P.O. Box... no comments in response to the November 10, 2010 Federal Register notice (75 FR 69070) (FRL-8851-9...-00003 Abamectin 2% Ornamental Abamectin Miticide/Insecticide. 084456-00004 Abamectin 2%...

  18. Atrazine in Source Water Intended for Artificial Ground-Water Recharge, South-Central Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Victoria G.; Ziegler, Andrew C.

    1998-01-01

    Atrazine, an herbicide commonly applied to row crops, is of concern because of potential effects on water quality. This fact sheet describes atrazine in water from the Little Arkansas River in south-central Kansas. The river is being evaluated as a source of artificial recharge into the Equus Beds aquifer, which provides water for the city of Wichita.

  19. Develop and Demonstrate the Cellulose to Ethanol Process: Executive Summary of the Final Technical Report, 17 September 1980 - 17 March 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emert, George H.; Becker, Dana K.; Bevernitz, Kurt J.; Gracheck, Stephen J.; Kienholz, Eldon W.; Rivers, Dougals B.; Zoldak, Bernadette R.; Woodford, Lindley C.

    1982-01-01

    The Biomass Research Center at the University of Arkansas was contracted by the Solar Energy Research Institute to 'Develop and Demonstrate the Cellulose to Ethanol Process.' The purpose of the contract was to accelerate site selection, site specific engineering, and research and development leading to the determination of the feasibility of economically operating a cellulose to ethanol commercial scale plant.

  20. Hendrix College Local Food Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valen, Gary L.

    1992-01-01

    By purchasing locally grown foods, Hendrix College (Arkansas) has found it can offer better nutrition, cut environmental damage, and spur economic development. The Local Food Project has reduced the amount of food purchased out of state from 90-70 percent, and is aiming for 50 percent in three years. Student participation is integral. (Author/MSE)

  1. Too Few Visits to the Dentist? The Impact on Children's Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shobo, Yetunde A.

    Noting that although dental disease is preventable, dental decay is still the most common and costly oral health problem among children, this special Kids Count report presents information on oral health and the role of prevention and the problem of poor oral health in Arkansas. Included in the report is information on the obstacles in accessing…

  2. 76 FR 40720 - CenterPoint Energy Gas Transmission Company, LLC; Notice of Availability of the Environmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-11

    ... Counties, Arkansas; and the installation of a pig \\1\\ launcher at the beginning of the new pipeline (MP 0.0) and a pig receiver at its terminus (MP 16.7). \\1\\ A ``pig'' is a tool that is inserted into and...

  3. Using Cluster Analysis to Identify Patterns in Students' Responses to Contextually Different Conceptual Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, John; Miller, Mayo; Audo, Christine; Stewart, Gay

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the evolution of student responses to seven contextually different versions of two Force Concept Inventory questions in an introductory physics course at the University of Arkansas. The consistency in answering the closely related questions evolved little over the seven-question exam. A model for the state of student knowledge…

  4. Context Sensitivity in the Force Concept Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, John; Griffin, Heather; Stewart, Gay

    2007-01-01

    The force concept inventory and a 10-question context-modified test were given to 647 students enrolled in introductory physics classes at the University of Arkansas. Context changes had an effect ranging from -3% to 10% on the individual questions. The average student score on the ten transformed questions was 3% higher than the average student…

  5. Urban School Choice and Integration: The Effect of Charter Schools in Little Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Gary W.; Jensen, Nathan C.; Kisida, Brian; Bowen, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    We examine the impact of charter schools on school integration in the Little Rock, Arkansas metropolitan area. We find that charters are less likely to be hyper-segregated than traditional public schools (TPS), but TPS have compositions more closely reflecting the region. However, differences in each case are slight. Using student-level data to…

  6. Conducting a Technology Audit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, William

    2011-01-01

    Technology is a critical component in the success of any high-functioning school district, thus it is important that education leaders should examine it closely. Simply put, the purpose of a technology audit is to assess the effectiveness of the technology for administrative or instructional use. Rogers Public Schools in Rogers, Arkansas, recently…

  7. Third Grade Level Science Sample Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock.

    This document presents a sample of the Arkansas science curriculum and identifies the content standards for physical science systems, life science systems, and Earth science/space science systems for third grade students. Each content standard is explained and includes student learning expectations, third grade benchmarks, assessments, and…

  8. 29 CFR Appendix A to Part 70 - Disclosure Officers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Region X 1111 Third Avenue Seattle, Washington 98101 (For Wage and Hour only: Contact Region IX) 1..., California 94105 8. 1111 Third Avenue, Suite 610, Seattle, Washington 98101 Office of Workers' Compensation..., Texas 76180 70. TCBY Building, 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 450, Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 71. 700...

  9. A Study to Determine the Perception of Business Persons on Changing from a Traditional Office to the Electronic Office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Geraldine A.; Ford, Jerry D.

    A study examined the attitudes of employers from 10 firms in northwest Arkansas toward changing from a traditional office to an electronic one. Even though the 10 employers represented 7 different categories of industry (construction, manufacturing, transportation and public utilities, wholesale and retail trade, finance and real estate, services,…

  10. Sistema de Transferencia de Archivos para Estudiantes Migrantes: Un Mejor Entendimiento para Padres. (Migrant Student Record Transfer System: A Better Understanding for Parents).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Senaida I.

    When migrant children are enrolled in the Migrant Education Program, they are also enrolled in the Migrant Student Record Transfer System (MSRTS), a national system which accumulates educational and health information for each child on a computer located in Little Rock, Arkansas. The system affords teachers the opportunity to review the records,…

  11. Biocontrol-based sheath blight management to reduce fungicide use on rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheath blight (ShB) caused by Rhizoctonia solani is one of the most important rice diseases in Texas, Arkansas, Mississippi, and other southern states. The lack of complete ShB resistance in the most commonly planted varieties and the severity of this disease results in southern U.S. rice farmers ap...

  12. 77 FR 71636 - Huntington Foam LLC, Fort Smith, AR; Notice of Revised Determination on Reconsideration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-03

    ... Employment and Training Administration Huntington Foam LLC, Fort Smith, AR; Notice of Revised Determination... Determination Regarding Application for Reconsideration applicable to workers and former workers of Huntington... workers of Huntington Foam LLC, Fort Smith, Arkansas, who were engaged in employment related to...

  13. The Role of Agriculture in the Social and Economic Development of the Lower Mississippi River Delta Region. Proceedings of a Regional Conference (Memphis, Tennessee, February 26-28, 1990).

    Science.gov (United States)

    North Central Regional Center for Rural Development, Ames, IA.

    The lower Mississippi River delta region comprises 214 counties in Louisiana, Mississippi, Arkansas, Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Illinois. The region is heavily dependent on agriculture and contains unusually high proportions of small farms, poor farmers, and black farmers. A conference planned by the region's 13 land-grant institutions and…

  14. 78 FR 39280 - Integrated System Power Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    ... projects are located in the states of Arkansas, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas. Southwestern's marketing... Schedule P-13 (System Peaking) Capacity Grid or 138-161kV $4.29/kW/Mo $4.50/kW/Mo. Regulation & Freq... held. ADDRESSES: If requested, the Forum will be held in Southwestern's offices, Room 1460,...

  15. Teachers Say the Most Interesting Things--An Alternative View of Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Stuart; Ritter, Gary W.; Jensen, Nathan C.; Rose, Caleb P.

    2010-01-01

    The professional literature is filled with criticism of standardized testing, and the belief is that most teachers oppose standardized testing because it forces them to abandon creative lesson plans in exchange for test prep. However, a study of Arkansas teachers found that teachers also have positive views of testing. The teachers reported that…

  16. 40 CFR 52.183 - Small business assistance program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Small business assistance program. 52... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Arkansas § 52.183 Small business assistance... a Small Business Stationary Source Technical and Environmental Compliance Assistance...

  17. Criminality among Rural Stimulant Users in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oser, Carrie; Leukefeld, Carl; Staton-Tindall, Michele; Duvall, Jamieson; Garrity, Thomas; Stoops, William; Falck, Russel; Wang, Jichuan; Carlson, Robert; Sexton, Rocky; Wright, Patricia; Booth, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    Despite the increase in media attention on "meth cooking" in rural areas of the United States, little is known about rural stimulant use--particularly, the criminality associated with stimulant use. Data were collected from community stimulant users in rural Ohio, Arkansas, and Kentucky (N = 709). Findings from three logistic regression models…

  18. InP based semioconductor stuctures for radiation detection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Procházková, Olga; Grym, Jan; Pekárek, Ladislav; Zavadil, Jiří; Žďánský, Karel

    Fayetteville : University of Arkansas, 2007. s. a213088--. [Semiconducting & Insulating Materials Conference - SIMC /14./. 15.05.2007-20.05.2007, Fayetteville] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA102/06/0153 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : semiconductor technology * rare earth compounds * radiation detectors Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  19. Factors Influencing the Improved Academic Success in Literacy at the Knowledge Is Power Program (KIPP) Schools in the Delta Region According to Adult Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kimberly J.; Holt, Carleton R.

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative case study explored factors that have influenced literacy success of Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP) students in the low-income, poverty stricken Delta Region of Arkansas. The study examined progress made since implementation of the KIPP Program and the influence the program had made upon student achievement in literacy at the…

  20. Scholastic Journalism Teacher Use of Digital Devices and Social Networking Tools in a Poor, Largely Rural State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plopper, Bruce L.; Conaway, Anne Fleming

    2013-01-01

    Research showing adolescents' ever-increasing use of digital devices, combined with calls from governmental officials to incorporate more technology into classroom activities, prompted this survey of Arkansas scholastic journalism advisers. The goal was to determine how they used digital communication devices in their teaching. Results showed lack…

  1. Southern Entrepreneurship Program. Rural Research Report. Volume 20, Issue 2, Winter 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Brent D.

    2009-01-01

    The Mid-South Region of Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi as a long history of pervasive poverty and educational underachievement. According to the U.S. Census Bureau (2008), the poverty level of residents in the Mid-South Region is higher than the national average. Consequently, many of the region's best and brightest students of all…

  2. Human Resource Development in Newspaper Recruitment Advertisements: A Resource for Curriculum Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Kit; Nafukho, Fredrick Muyia; Herrington, Mary

    2004-01-01

    This paper explored HRD-related job advertisements in the state of Arkansas over a five-year period. This analysis was part of the curriculum revision process for a graduate Workforce Development Program at the state's "flagship" university. Classified advertisements from newspapers of major cities across the state were examined to determine if…

  3. 76 FR 33276 - Sulfoxaflor; Receipt of Application for Emergency Exemption, Solicitation of Public Comment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ... (TPB), (Lygus lineolaris) (Palisot de Beauvois), on up to 387,000 acres in Arkansas, 230,000 acres in... to control the TPB, (Lygus lineolaris) (Palisot de Beauvois). Information in accordance with 40 CFR... non-chemical tactics only suppress populations of TPB and there are not effective...

  4. Telling Their Stories: Women Construct/Instruct through Survival Rhetoric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meagher, Eileen M.

    Malika Oufkir of Morocco recounts her story in "Stolen Lives." Loung Ung of Cambodia relates her story in "First, They Killed My Father." Susan McDougal of Arkansas, USA, tells her story in the aptly named, "The Woman Who Wouldn't Talk." This paper looks at the struggles of these three very different women from very different cultures, struggles…

  5. 78 FR 71508 - Availability of Federally-Enforceable State Implementation Plans for All States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-29

    ... state. The State SIP compilations are available for public inspection during normal business hours at...: http://www.epa.gov/region5/air/sips/index.html . Region 6: Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma... FR 55459. Subsequent notices of availability were published in the Federal Register on November...

  6. DDT LEVELS IN MILK OF RURAL INDIGENT BLACKS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human milk samples from low-income blacks residing in rural Mississippi and Arkansas and middle-class whites residing in metropolitan Nashville, Tennessee, were analyzed for DDT and its metabolites. The mean total DDT (DDE + DDT) whole milk concentration of 38 samples from indige...

  7. Ehrlichia chaffeensis Infection of Sika Deer, Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Kawahara, Makoto; Tajima, Tomoko; Torii, Harumi; Yabutani, Mitsutaka; Ishii, Joji; Harasawa, Makiko; Isogai, Emiko; Rikihisa, Yasuko

    2009-01-01

    To determine whether Ehrlichia chaffeensis exists in Japan, we used PCR to examine blood from sika deer in Nara, Japan. Of 117 deer, 36 (31%) were infected with E. chaffeensis. The E. chaffeensis 16S rRNA base and GroEL amino acid sequences from Japan were most closely related to those of E. chaffeensis Arkansas.

  8. Venomous Animals and Their Victims: A Program for Sophomore Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, James J.

    1977-01-01

    In the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences program, lectures are given on the recognition and general biology of dangerous reptiles and anthropods, the nature of animal venoms, immunological aspects of envenomation, and treatment of bites and stings. Both first-aid and clinical management are included. (Author/LBH)

  9. 78 FR 52894 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Designating Critical Habitat for the Neosho Mucket...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-27

    ... Register (77 FR 63440) to list the Neosho mucket (Lampsilis rafinesqueana) as an endangered species and the... river miles (rmi)) of critical habitat for the Neosho mucket in the Cottonwood, Elk, Fall, Illinois, Neosho, Shoal, Spring, North Fork Spring, and Verdigris Rivers in Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri,...

  10. Pond water color and fish-eating birds: Improving the model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormorant and other fish-eating bird numbers and activity were quantified from observation towers at each 3 spatially isolated catfish farms throughout the over-wintering months in Arkansas. During the first phase of the study, treatment ponds received AquashadeTM, a U.S. Environmental Protection A...

  11. School-Based Clinics to the Rescue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elders, M. Joycelyn

    1992-01-01

    Although Lakeview (Arkansas) School District's health services originally targeted teenage pregnancies, its school-based clinic now offers varied health improvement services and contributes to decreased substance abuse, sexually transmitted diseases, dropping out, injuries, homicides, and suicides. Tips for forming clinics are provided, along with…

  12. Friendship and the Public Stage: Revisiting Hannah Arendt's Resistance to "Political Education"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutz, Aaron; Sandy, Marie G.

    2015-01-01

    Hannah Arendt's essays about the 1957 crisis over efforts of a group of youth, the "Little Rock Nine," to desegregate a high school in Little Rock, Arkansas, reveal a tension in her vision of the "public." In this article Aaron Schutz and Marie Sandy look closely at the experiences of the youth desegregating the school,…

  13. 76 FR 80214 - National Dairy Promotion and Research Program; Amendments to the Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-23

    ... promotion, research and nutrition education. Congress found that it is in the public interest to authorize... Dairy Order was amended by a final rule (importer final rule) [76 FR 14777, March 18, 2011] to implement..., Montana, Nevada, Utah, Wyoming 9,813.4 5.0 2 4. Arkansas, Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas 20,321...

  14. Academic Librarians: Status, Privileges, and Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vix, Heidi M.; Buckman, Kathie M.

    2012-01-01

    Three surveys from the College and University Library Division (CULD) of the Arkansas Library Association (ArLA) from the past six years representing forty-four academic institutions were studied to determine the number of students per librarian on campus, salary, faculty status, contract-length, and maternity/paternity leave for librarians.…

  15. Motivations of Volunteer Leaders in an Extension Exercise Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Lisa T.; Cornell, Carol E.; Traywick, LaVona; Felix, Holly C.; Phillips, Martha

    2015-01-01

    This article describes findings from a qualitative study of volunteer leaders in the StrongWomen strength training program in Arkansas. The study explored reasons volunteers initially agreed to serve, perceptions of volunteer role, and motivations for continuing to lead strength training groups long-term. Findings suggest a combination of factors…

  16. Students at the Edge of Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennon, Tillman; Roberts, Ed; Fuller, Teresa

    2008-01-01

    Space travel, even low Earth orbit, is probably several years away for most of us; however, students and teachers can research the edge of space by participating in the BalloonSat program. BalloonSat is an offshoot of the Space Grant Consortium's very successful RocketSat program. The Arkansas BalloonSat program consists of teacher-initiated…

  17. Sjogren's Syndrome: A Place to Begin

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Media Get Connected Donate Become a Member Support Groups > US Support Groups >> Alabama >> Arizona >> Arkansas >> California >> Colorado >> Connecticut >> Florida >> Georgia >> ... Tennessee >> Texas >> Utah >> Virginia >> Washington >> Wisconsin > Canadian Support Groups > International Sjögren’s Network Faces of Sjögren's International Sjögren’s ...

  18. Administrator Leadership and Content Knowledge: Effects on Literacy Achievement on Male Students Grades Four through Eight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Maria Kay Holleman

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship of principal characteristics and school socio-economic factors and their relationship to student achievement as measured by the literacy portion of the Arkansas state standardized test, with a particular interest in male students. The study was undertaken to contribute to the existing…

  19. Pioneering with Solar Power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, George; Pollack, Mary

    1982-01-01

    Describes the development of Mississippi County Community College's (MCCC's) solar energy system. Explains the functioning of the campus's computer-controlled photovoltaic concentrator system, MCCC's cooperative agreement with the Arkansas-Missouri Power Company, program funding, the integration of the solar system with other building components,…

  20. New Expectations Make State Chiefs Hot Commodities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Alan

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses Arkansas' new compensation package for its new education chief. One recent candidate for the state education director's job is said to have had discussions that included a salary of about $240,000, a substantial bonus for staying a certain number of years, and possibly even a professor's chair at a state university upon…

  1. Predicting Field Control of Tarnished Plant Bug (Heteroptera: Miridae) Populations with Pyrethroid Insecticides by Use of Two Glass-Vial Bioassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnished plant bug, Lygus lineolaris (Palisot de beauvois), populations from 21 locations in the Mississippi River Delta of Arkansas and Mississippi were tested for resistance to permethrin in 2004 and 2005. Each population was tested using permethrin in a discriminating-dose bioassay to determine...

  2. 75 FR 2860 - Clean Water Act Section 303(d): Call for Data for the Illinois River Watershed in Oklahoma and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-19

    ... AGENCY Clean Water Act Section 303(d): Call for Data for the Illinois River Watershed in Oklahoma and... developing a watershed model for the Illinois River watershed in Oklahoma and Arkansas to address nutrient water quality impairments. The results of this watershed model may be used to develop one or more...

  3. Evaluating Social Cognitive Theory in Action: An Assessment of the Youth Development Program's Impact on Secondary Student Retention in Selected Mississippi Delta Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, T. Price; Schreckhise, William D.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates the Youth Development Program (YDP), a component of the federal Workforce Investment Act (WIA). We examine whether the YDP reduced dropout rates among youth in secondary schools in seven school districts in the impoverished Mississippi River Delta in southeast Arkansas. Initially, the program seems to have an impact. Students…

  4. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Sentara. In the ‘80s, I worked in a dialysis unit in Arkansas. I was a dialysis tech, and I got to know the people ... But do patients who receive a transplant need dialysis after the operation?” One of the advantages of ...

  5. Geological Survey research 1962; Short papers in geology, hydrology, and topography; Articles 180-239

    Science.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1963-01-01

    An investigation of the source of salt contributing to mineralization of the Arkansas and Red Rivers indicated that shallow deposits of halite in the Flowerpot Shale of Permian age were associated with salt springs (Ward, 1960, 1961). This paper summarizes the result of the Red River in Beckham and Harmon Counties, Okla. (Available as Photostat Copy Only)

  6. Distribution of Employment Growth in 10 Ozark Communities. A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Victor J.; Kuehn, John A.

    Service industries, some manufacturing, and a concentration of retirees can provide a strong economic base in a rural area. Rapid growth of service businesses, especially wholesale and retail firms and other businesses related to tourism and recreation, attracted job-seekers to a 10-county area in the Ozark Mountains of Arkansas and Missouri…

  7. Spatial Variability of Tourism Demand and Differences in Economic Impact in a Rural Economic Development Context

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Biswa R.; Rainey, Daniel V.

    2008-01-01

    Statistically predicted future tourism demand is used to conduct an economic impact analysis in twelve tourism zones in the state of Arkansas. The analysis reveals spatial variability in employment, and output growth that will continue into the future. Tourism has the potential as an economic growth engine for the state, especially in economically disadvantaged regions with long-term benefits.

  8. The Effects of Phonemic Awareness Instruction in First Grade on the Reading Scores of Rural Primary Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Linda H.; Vinzant, Rebecca S.

    A study investigated the effect of phonemic awareness instruction on the reading ability of first and second grade students. Participants were 100 second graders who had been in 5 first grades at Westside Elementary in Searcy, Arkansas. Using a posttest only control group design and a t test for independent samples, it was found that second grade…

  9. 78 FR 56687 - Texas Gas Transmission, LLC; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-13

    ... Virginia, and Ohio; one new pump station in Highland County, Ohio; and about 394 miles of 24-inch-diameter... pipeline consisting of: 246.5 miles of the MLS 26-2 Pipeline from the Hardinsburg Compressor Station at... County, Arkansas to the discharge end of the Bastrop Compressor Station at MP 55.7 in Morehouse...

  10. State and Community Policy Roundup: Progress on Infant-Toddler Issues across the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiLauro, Elizabeth; Jones, Lynn; Nelson, Florence

    2007-01-01

    This article summarizes state and community policy activities during the first six months of 2007 and provides updates of the progress to serve infants, toddlers, and their families. The following states are included in the report: (1) Arkansas; (2) California; (3) Indiana; (4) Iowa; (5) Michigan; (6) Minnesota; (7) New York; (8) Ohio; (9)…

  11. Teaching Assistants and Academic Dishonesty: Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, John Michael

    2011-01-01

    This study surveyed the preparation for, attitudes towards, and experiences with academic dishonesty among Teaching Assistants (TAs) at the University of Arkansas. Of the population of 470 TAs, this study included 184 responses for a response rate of 39.1%. The survey included two instruments created by the researcher. The first assessed TAs'…

  12. An adaptive ensemble Kalman filter for soil moisture data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a 19-year twin experiment for the Red-Arkansas river basin we assimilate synthetic surface soil moisture retrievals into the NASA Catchment land surface model. We demonstrate how poorly specified model and observation error parameters affect the quality of the assimilation products. In particul...

  13. 33 CFR 117.135 - Red River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Red River. 117.135 Section 117.135 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Arkansas § 117.135 Red River. The draws of the bridges...

  14. 33 CFR 117.131 - Little River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Little River. 117.131 Section 117.131 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Arkansas § 117.131 Little River. The draws of the...

  15. 33 CFR 117.139 - White River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false White River. 117.139 Section 117.139 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Arkansas § 117.139 White River. (a) The draws of the St....

  16. 33 CFR 117.127 - Current River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Current River. 117.127 Section 117.127 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Arkansas § 117.127 Current River. The draws of...

  17. 33 CFR 117.125 - Black River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Black River. 117.125 Section 117.125 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Arkansas § 117.125 Black River. The following draws need not...

  18. 33 CFR 117.133 - Ouachita River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ouachita River. 117.133 Section 117.133 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Arkansas § 117.133 Ouachita River. The draw of the...

  19. 78 FR 78989 - Changes in Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ... Effective date of modification no. Arkansas: Garland, (FEMA Docket City of Hot Springs, The Honorable Ruth.... Dallas, (FEMA Docket No.: B- City of Garland, (13- The Honorable Douglas 800 Main Street, October 7, 2013 485471 1341). 06-0314P). Athas, Mayor, City of Garland, TX 75040. Garland, 200 North 5th Street,...

  20. Garland County Community College Non-Returning Student Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathey, Susan Aldridge; Moody, Brad

    A study was conducted at Garland County Community College (GCCC) in Arkansas to determine the characteristics and reasons why students who enrolled in fall 1992, did not re-enroll in fall 1993. A total of 220 full-time and 290 part-time former students were selected randomly from the 1,371 non-returning students. Telephone interviews were…

  1. Perceptions of community-based participatory research in the delta nutrition intervention research initiative:an academic perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lower Mississippi Delta Nutrition Intervention Research Initiative (Delta NIRI) is an academic-community partnership between seven academic institutions and three communities in Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana. A range of community-based participatory methods have been employed to develop susta...

  2. Food Shopping Perceptions, Behaviors And Ability To Purchase Healthy Food Items In The Lower Mississippi Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpose: To examine the agreement between perceptions, behaviors and ability to purchase healthy foods in the Lower Mississippi Delta (LMD). Methods: FOODS 2000, a nutritional survey conducted in 18 counties in Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi, provided information about dietary intake. A food ...

  3. Food shopping perceptions, behaviors, and ability to purchase healthful food items in the Lower Mississippi Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    FOODS 2000, a nutritional survey conducted in 18 counties in Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi, provided information about dietary intake. A food store survey investigated the availability and price of foods. One focus group on shopping perceptions was conducted in each of nine counties. Foods p...

  4. 77 FR 9230 - Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund XLV; FFP Project 2, LLC; Notice Announcing Preliminary Permit Drawing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund XLV; FFP Project 2, LLC; Notice Announcing... County, Arkansas. The applications were filed by Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund XLV for Project No....

  5. 77 FR 9915 - Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund XLIV; FFP Project 51, LLC; Notice Announcing Preliminary Permit Drawing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund XLIV; FFP Project 51, LLC; Notice Announcing... County, Arkansas. The applications were filed by Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund XLIV for Project No....

  6. 77 FR 9232 - Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund XXXVIII; FFP Project 1, LLC; Notice Announcing Preliminary Permit Drawing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund XXXVIII; FFP Project 1, LLC; Notice Announcing... County, Arkansas. The applications were filed by Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund XXXVIII for Project No....

  7. 77 FR 9230 - Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund XLVII; FFP Project 52, LLC; Notice Announcing Preliminary Permit Drawing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund XLVII; FFP Project 52, LLC; Notice Announcing... and Faulkner County, Arkansas. The applications were filed by Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund XLVII...

  8. 77 FR 51546 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-24

    ... Building Arkansas Sulphur Rock Radio Station N. Main Street Sulphur Rock AR 72579 Landholding Agency: GSA... Comments: Off-site removal only; 1,750 sf.; steam plant; deteriorating conditions; major renovations needed... extensive repairs; severe leaks around drains, asbestos identified District of Columbia West Heating...

  9. 77 FR 52715 - Request for Comment on Letters Seeking a Waiver of the Renewable Fuel Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-30

    ... severely harm the economy or environment of a State, a region, or the United States, or that there is an... time period at issue (September 1, 2008 through August 31, 2009) would have severely harmed the economy... would severely harm the economy of Arkansas, North Carolina, other States, a region, or the...

  10. Concussions in Collision Youth Sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen A. Linzmeier

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from the University of Pittsburg, University of Arkansas, Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine, and Boston Children’s Hospital/Harvard Medical College researched the incidence of concussions in youth hockey in relation to age and activity setting.

  11. Medicaid: A Primer - Key Information on the Nation's Health Coverage Program for Low-Income People

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 350,000 New Yorkers following the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Further, states have harnessed Medicaid’s leverage as a major source ... 1 Medicaid Enrollment by Group, FY 2009 State United States Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware ...

  12. Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program for Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilan, Barbara A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences is described, along with student reactions to the program. The summer elective program involves cancer lectures (one week) and clinical exposure (nine weeks) in medical, surgical, and pediatric oncology services, as well as self-directed learning…

  13. Developments in rice allelopathy: Searching for the balance between allelopathic activity, agronomic viability and commercial acceptability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sustainable weed control is an ongoing challenge in rice production. Indica rice lines that suppress troublesome C4 grass weeds such as Echinochloa crus-galli and Leptochloa fusca ssp. fascicularis have been evaluated extensively in Arkansas. Earlier findings suggested that suppression likely incl...

  14. Sequence variation of the rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region among isolates of Rhizoctonia solani

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhizoctonia solani is a common and highly heterogeneous fungal species. Sub-specific groups have been created based on hyphal anastomosis (AGs). One of the newer AGs described is AG-11 from soybean and rice seedlings or soil in Arkansas and lupine in Australia (Carling et al. Phytopathology 84:1378-...

  15. Steam generator channel head dose rates at Babcock ampersand Wilcox reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the results of a program to collect historical OTSG dose rate data from the five (5) B ampersand W operating plants. Data is presented for Arkansas Nuclear One, Crystal River, Davis-Besse, Oconee, and Three Mile Island. Also included are dose reduction measures employed at each site

  16. 78 FR 61386 - Hewlett Packard Company, AMS Call Center-Conway, CSS-Americas Support (AMSS) Division, Personal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Hewlett Packard Company, AMS Call Center-Conway, CSS-Americas Support (AMSS) Division, Personal Systems Business Unit, Conway, Arkansas; Hewlett Packard Company, TS AMS GD FS Central on Site, Enterprise...

  17. Rapid quantitative detection of Aeromonas hydrophila strains associated with disease outbreaks in catfish aquaculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the summer of 2009, a new strain of Aeromonas hydrophila was implicated in severe disease outbreaks in farm-raised catfish in Alabama, Arkansas and Mississippi. These outbreaks mostly afflicted large fish and resulted in considerable losses in short periods. Given the rapid onset and biosecurity ...

  18. Research advances and management of soybean sudden death syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusarium virguliforme causes soybean sudden death syndrome (SDS) in the United States. The disease was first observed in Arkansas in 1971, and since has been reported in most soybean-producing states, with a general movement from the southern to the northern states. In addition to F. virguliforme, ...

  19. Carex opaca (Hermann) P.E. Pothrock & Reznicek (CYPERACEAE) new to North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carex opaca (F. J. Hermann) P.E. Rothrock & Reznicek (CYPERACEAE) is reported from two sites in North Carolina. These are the first records of C. opaca from North Carolina and represent easternmost stations for this species in the United States. Previously C. opaca was known from Arkansas, Illino...

  20. 50 CFR 32.8 - Areas closed to hunting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., 1939 Arkansas Big Lake National Wildlife Refuge 3 CFR Cum. Supp. 4 FR 1309. Oct. 24, 1958 .......do... 10030. 2758 Dec. 2, 1947 .......do “Ding” Darling National Wildlife Refuge 3 CFR 1947 Supp.; 12 FR 8039. 2239 Apr. 10, 1939 Georgia Savannah National Wildlife Refuge 3 CFR Cum. Supp.; 4 FR 1595. Nov. 3,...

  1. Nuclear Energy. Instructional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Kenneth; Thessing, Dan

    This document is one of five learning packets on alternative energy (see note) developed as part of a descriptive curriculum research project in Arkansas. The overall objectives of the learning packets are to improve the level of instruction in the alternative energies by vocational exploration teachers, and to facilitate the integration of new…

  2. Two Views: Do College Therapists Underdiagnose Bipolar II Disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Jonathan; Keyes, Lee

    2014-01-01

    On February 17, 2014, Dr. Jonathan Perry, former director of counseling at the University of Arkansas, sparked a lively debate on the listserv of the Association of University and College Counseling Center Directors (AUCCCD) by warning about the likelihood and dangers of underdiagnosing borderline II disorder. Standing out among the many…

  3. AVTC Hosts TechnoCamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, Brenda

    2006-01-01

    The Area Vo-Tech Center (AVTC) in Russellville, Arkansas, recently hosted its first TechnoCamp to encourage enrollment based on the aptitude and interest level of the students enrolling in the various programs. The center currently offers student enrollment in auto technology, computer engineering, cosmetology, construction technology, drafting…

  4. [Book review] Fish immunology, edited by M. J. Manning and M. F. Tatner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, B.R.

    1986-01-01

    Review of: Fish Immunology. Edited by M. J. Manning and M. F. Tatner. Academic Press, London. 1985. 374 pages. $32.50. Reviewed by B. R. Griffin, Fish Farming Experimental Station, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Stuttgart, Arkansas 72160, USA.

  5. 40 CFR 62.854 - Identification of plan-negative declaration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Identification of plan-negative...—negative declaration. On September 24, 1992, the Arkansas Department of Pollution Control and Ecology submitted a negative declaration, signed by the Chief of the Air Division on September 2, 1992,...

  6. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 194 - High Volume Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false High Volume Areas B Appendix B to Part 194... Pt. 194, App. B Appendix B to Part 194—High Volume Areas As of January 5, 1993 the following areas are high volume areas: Major rivers Nearest town and state Arkansas River N. Little Rock, AR....

  7. The Home Instruction Program for Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, A J; Piotrkowski, C S; Brooks-Gunn, J

    1999-01-01

    The Home Instruction Program for Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY) is a two-year home-based early education intervention program designed to help parents with limited formal education prepare their four- and five-year-old children for school. This article begins with a brief overview of the HIPPY program and then presents the findings from a series of interconnected research studies, including a two-site, two-cohort evaluation in New York and Arkansas, a one-site case study, and a three-site qualitative study. With respect to program effectiveness, results varied across the New York and Arkansas sites and across participating cohorts at each site. For Cohort I, children who had been enrolled in HIPPY scored higher than children in the control/comparison groups on measures of cognitive skills (New York), classroom adaptation (New York and Arkansas), and standardized reading (New York); and more children were promoted to first grade (Arkansas). For Cohort II, comparison group children outperformed HIPPY children on school readiness and standardized achievement at posttest (Arkansas). Analyses to account for the differing results between cohorts were inconclusive. Qualitative analyses revealed considerable variation in parent involvement in HIPPY. Program staff identified four patterns of attrition from HIPPY: (1) early attrition within the first month after enrollment, (2) attrition between the program's first and second years, (3) attrition due to changes in the life circumstances of participating families, and (4) attrition due to turnover among the home visitors. Families were more likely to participate in in-home than out-of-home aspects of the program (for example, group meetings), but different family characteristics were associated with participation in the in- and out-of-home aspects of the program. The authors conclude with recommendations for future practice and research. PMID:10414013

  8. Differences in home food availability of high- and low-fat foods after a behavioral weight control program are regional not racial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    West Delia

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies, if any, have examined the impact of a weight control program on the home food environment in a diverse sample of adults. Understanding and changing the availability of certain foods in the home and food storage practices may be important for creating healthier home food environments and supporting effective weight management. Methods Overweight adults (n = 90; 27% African American enrolled in a 6-month behavioral weight loss program in Vermont and Arkansas. Participants were weighed and completed measures of household food availability and food storage practices at baseline and post-treatment. We examined baseline differences and changes in high-fat food availability, low-fat food availability and the storage of foods in easily visible locations, overall and by race (African American or white participants and region (Arkansas or Vermont. Results At post-treatment, the sample as a whole reported storing significantly fewer foods in visible locations around the house (-0.5 ± 2.3 foods, with no significant group differences. Both Arkansas African Americans (-1.8 ± 2.4 foods and Arkansas white participants (-1.8 ± 2.6 foods reported significantly greater reductions in the mean number of high-fat food items available in their homes post-treatment compared to Vermont white participants (-0.5 ± 1.3 foods, likely reflecting fewer high-fat foods reported in Vermont households at baseline. Arkansas African Americans lost significantly less weight (-3.6 ± 4.1 kg than Vermont white participants (-8.3 ± 6.8 kg, while Arkansas white participants did not differ significantly from either group in weight loss (-6.2 ± 6.0 kg. However, home food environment changes were not associated with weight changes in this study. Conclusions Understanding the home food environment and how best to measure it may be useful for both obesity treatment and understanding patterns of obesity prevalence and health disparity.

  9. A novel recruiting and surveying method: Participatory research during a Pacific Islander community’s traditional cultural event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Donoho

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the health status of Marshallese, a Pacific Islander subpopulation living in the United States. The Marshallese have established a growing community in Northwest Arkansas, providing a unique opportunity for increasing knowledge regarding the health of this minority group. This article describes how a community-based participatory research process was used by a community and university coalition to identify and refine questionnaires and recruit study participants. Questionnaires were self-administered on computers during a one-week traditional cultural event. A total of 874 Marshallese from Arkansas completed the questionnaire, exceeding the goal of 600 respondents. Lessons learned, including the level and timing of involvement of both the leadership and the community at large, are discussed in detail. This approach enhanced communication and collaboration between the Marshallese community, service providers and researchers, resulting in higher participation and interest among the Marshallese community. Keywords: participatory research, minority populations, community health assessment, community coalition, Marshallese

  10. Integrating BalloonSAT and Atmospheric Dynamic Concepts into the Secondary Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, B. N.; Kennon, J. T.; Roberts, E.

    2016-05-01

    Arkansas BalloonSAT is an educational outreach and scientific research program that is part of Arkansas State University in Jonesboro, AR. The following is a unit of instruction to incorporate BalloonSAT measurements into secondary science classes. Students interpret graphs and identify several atmospheric trends and properties of a typical balloon flight. Students engage critical thinking skills in developing and answering their own questions relevant to the BalloonSAT program. Prerequisite concepts students should know are how to interpret graphs and unit conversions. Students should have a basic understanding of gravity, units of temperature and distance, and error in measurements. The unit is designed for one week after end-of-course exams and before the end of school. The unit may take two to five 50-minute periods, depending on how many activities are completed.

  11. Testing a Mahalanobis distance model of black bear habitat use in the Ouachita Mountains of Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellgren, E.C.; Bales, S.L.; Gregory, M.S.; Leslie, David M., Jr.; Clark, J.D.

    2007-01-01

    Regional wildlife–habitat models are commonly developed but rarely tested with truly independent data. We tested a published habitat model for black bears (Ursus americanus) with new data collected in a different site in the same ecological region (i.e., Ouachita Mountains of Arkansas and Oklahoma, USA). We used a Mahalanobis distance model developed from relocations of black bears in Arkansas to produce a map layer of Mahalanobis distances on a study area in neighboring Oklahoma. We tested this modeled map layer with relocations of black bears on the Oklahoma area. The distributions of relocations of female black bears were consistent with model predictions. We conclude that this modeling approach can be used to predict regional suitability for a species of interest.

  12. Wind Turbine Manufacturers in the United States: Locations and Local Impacts (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegen, S.

    2010-05-26

    Suzanne Tegen's presentation about U.S. wind energy manufacturing (presented at WINDPOWER 2010 in Dallas) provides information about challenges to modeling renewables; wind energy's economic "ripple effect"; case studies about wind-related manufacturing in Colorado, Iowa, Ohio, and Indiana; manufacturing maps for the Great Lakes region, Arkansas, and the United States; sample job announcements; and U.S. Treasury Grant 1603 funding.

  13. A REGIONAL COMPARISON OF RISK-EFFICIENT SOYBEAN MARKETING STRATEGIES

    OpenAIRE

    McKinnell, Cathy S.; Kahl, Kandice H.; Curtis, Charles E., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Risk-efficient portfolios from a subset of marketing strategies were identified using Target-MOTAD. Portfolios were generated for Illinois, Arkansas, and South Carolina to determine whether regional price and yield characteristics affected the optimal marketing strategy selection during 1972-1985. The results support previous conclusions that the risk borne when following a combination of marketing strategies was less than the risk of any single marketing strategy examined. The results also s...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-1014 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TTRU-01-1014 ref|ZP_00545084.1| ComEC/Rec2-related protein [Ehrlichia chaffeensis str. Sapulpa...543.1| ComEC/Rec2-related protein [Ehrlichia chaffeensis str. Sapulpa] gb|ABD44501.1| ComEC/Rec2-related protein [Ehrlichia chaffeensis str. Arkansas] ZP_00545084.1 0.019 27% ...

  15. Developing a Weighted Collection Development Allocation Formula

    OpenAIRE

    Bailey, Jeff; Creibaum, Linda

    2015-01-01

    In this session the presenters demonstrated and discussed how to create a spreadsheet‐based library collection development allocation formula to help acquisitions personnel better manage their library’s limited collection development resources. The presenters demonstrated and led participants through Arkansas State University’s process of creating an Excel‐based formula that utilizes criteria relevant to their specific library and institution. Key to the success of this formula is the use of ...

  16. Progress and challenges in primocane-fruiting blackberry breeding and cultural management

    Science.gov (United States)

    The University of Arkansas blackberry breeding program began to focus on primocane-fruiting (PF) breeding in the mid 1990s, and has expanded this effort since then. Cultivars released since then include ‘Prime-Jan’® (‘APF-8’), ‘Prime-Jim’® (‘APF-12’) in 2004 and ‘APF-45’ in 2009. Immediate challenge...

  17. Sexual sensation seeking, transactional sex, and rural African American cocaine users

    OpenAIRE

    Gullette, Donna; Brenda M. Booth; Wright, Patricia B.; Montgomery, Brooke E. E.; Stewart, Katharine E.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore correlates of sexual sensation seeking (SSS) in a sample of rural African American cocaine users. Respondent-driven sampling was used to recruit 251 participants from two impoverished rural counties in eastern Arkansas. Consistent with previous investigations, SSS scores were associated with being younger, being male, having more sexual partners, and having more unprotected sexual encounters in the previous 30 days. Multiple regression revealed SSS was...

  18. Suppression of Rotylenchulus reniformis on Cotton by the Nematophagous Fungus ARF

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Kening; Riggs, R. D.; Crippen, Devany

    2004-01-01

    The reniform nematode, Rotylenchulus reniformis Linford &Oliveira, has become a serious threat to cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) production in the United States during the past decade. The objective of this study is to isolate fungi from eggs of R. reniformis and select potential biological control agents for R. reniformis on cotton. Soil samples were collected from cotton fields located in Jefferson County, Arkansas. Eight genera of fungi were included in the 128 fungal isolates obtained, an...

  19. Kaolin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, R.L.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, 22 companies mined kaolin in nine US states. Production in Georgia declined to 6.19 Mt down from 6.78 Mt in 2004. Despite the decline, Georgia remained the leading producer state followed by Alabama, South Carolina, Arkansas, Texas, Nevada, California, North Carolina and Florida. In the next year or two, domestic and export sales of kaolin for paper application are not expected to change significantly.

  20. In-depth review of atmospheric mercury: sources, transformations, and potential sinks

    OpenAIRE

    Gaffney, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Jeffrey S Gaffney, Nancy A Marley Department of Chemistry, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AK, USA Abstract: Mercury is a toxic heavy metal that is found naturally throughout the global environment. During the last 100 years, there has been a 70% rise in atmospheric mercury levels over the natural background measured prior to industrialization due to anthropogenic emissions. This increase in mercury levels represents a global threat to the health of ecosystems and humans ...

  1. The United Kingdom SATMaP program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towshend, J. R.; Cushnie, J.; Atkinson, P.; Hardy, J. R.; Wilson, A.; Harrison, A.; Baker, J. R.; Jackson, M.

    1983-01-01

    Data from test tapes from the United States (specifically the August Arkansas scene) and the first tape of the UK test site which came from ESRIN are analyzed. Methods for estimating spatial resolution are discussed and some preliminary results are included. The characteristics of the ESRIN data are examined and the utility of the various spectral bands of the thematic mapper for land cover mapping are outlined.

  2. The effect of fast-food restaurants on childhood obesity: a school level analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alviola, Pedro A; Nayga, Rodolfo M; Thomsen, Michael R; Danforth, Diana; Smartt, James

    2014-01-01

    We analyze, using an instrumental variable approach, the effect of the number of fast-food restaurants on school level obesity rates in Arkansas. Using distance to the nearest major highway as an instrument, our results suggest that exposure to fast-food restaurants can impact weight outcomes. Specifically, we find that the number of fast-food restaurants within a mile from the school can significantly affect school level obesity rates. PMID:23827821

  3. Autumn migration of of Mississippi Flyway mallards as determined by satellite telemetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krementz, David G.; Asante, Kwasi; Naylor, Luke W.

    2012-01-01

    We used satellite telemetry to study autumn migration timing, routes, stopover duration, and final destinations of mallardsAnas platyrhynchos captured the previous spring in Arkansas from 2004 to 2007. Of those mallards that still had functioning transmitters on September 15 (n  =  55), the average date when autumn migration began was October 23 (SE  =  2.62 d; range  =  September 17–December 7). For those mallards that stopped for >1 d during migration, the average stopover length was 15.4 d (SE  =  1.47 d). Ten mallards migrated nonstop to wintering sites. The eastern Dakotas were a heavily utilized stopover area. The total distance migrated per mallard averaged 1,407 km (SE  =  89.55 km; range  =  142–2,947 km). The average time spent on migration per individual between September 15 and December 15 was 27 d (SE  =  2.88 d; range  =  2–84 d). The state where most mallards were located on December 15 was Missouri (11) followed by Arkansas (8), while 5 mallards were still in Canada, and only 8 of 43 females and 0 of 10 males were present in Arkansas. The eastern Dakotas are a heavily utilized migration stopover for midcontinent mallards that may require more attention for migration habitat management. The reasons for so few mallards, especially male mallards, returning to Arkansas the following year deserves further research..

  4. Religious Authority in African American Churches: A Study of Six Churches

    OpenAIRE

    Karen Hye-cheon Kim Yeary

    2011-01-01

    A sociological study of religious authority and gender in the context of a rural, impoverished community was conducted in African American churches in one county of the Arkansas Lower Mississippi Delta region to understand relationships between religious leadership, gender, race, and social justice. Three female and three male African American pastors were interviewed as key-informants of their churches to investigate views of female religious authority, and to compare and contrast the congre...

  5. So-called Religious Freedom Restoration Acts (RFRAs) protect gender and sexual orientation discrimination, not religious freedom

    OpenAIRE

    Griffin, Leslie C.

    2015-01-01

    More than two decades after the Clinton administration passed the federal Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA), religious freedom bills are once again in the news. Leslie C. Griffin writes that the new RFRA legislation coming from Arkansas and Indiana has originated from fears over same-sex marriage rather than any real desire to protect religious freedoms. She argues that through RFRAs, those against LGBT rights are seeking a legal method of discrimination and that these l...

  6. The Role of Gender in Moderating Treatment Outcome in Collaborative Care for Anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    Grubbs, KM; Cheney, AM; Fortney, JC; Edlund, C; Han, X.; Dubbert, P; Sherbourne, CD; Craske, MG; Stein, MB; Roy-Byrne, PP; Sullivan, JG

    2014-01-01

    © 2015, American Psychiatric Association. All rights reserved. Objective: The aim of this study was to test whether gender moderates intervention effects in the Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management (CALM) intervention, a 12-month, randomized controlled trial of a collaborative care intervention for anxiety disorders (panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, and social anxiety disorder) in 17 primary care clinics in California, Washington, and Arkansa...

  7. Context sensitivity in the force concept inventory

    OpenAIRE

    Gay Stewart; Heather Griffin; John Stewart

    2007-01-01

    The force concept inventory and a 10-question context-modified test were given to 647 students enrolled in introductory physics classes at the University of Arkansas. Context changes had an effect ranging from −3% to 10% on the individual questions. The average student score on the ten transformed questions was 3% higher than the average student score on the corresponding 10 force concept inventory questions. Therefore, the effect of contextual changes on the total of the 10 questions is not ...

  8. Why Don't Farmers Adopt Precision Farming Technologies in Cotton Production?

    OpenAIRE

    Paudel, Krishna P.; Pandit, Mahesh; Mishra, Ashok K.; Segarra, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    We used the 2009 Southern Cotton Precision Farming Survey data collected from farmers in twelve U.S. states (Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Missouri, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia) to understand why farmers do not adopt seemingly profitable precision farming technology. Farmers provided cost, time constraint, satisfaction with the current practice and other as reasons for not adopting precision farming technology. Results from a m...

  9. Engagement in mental health treatment among veterans returning from Iraq

    OpenAIRE

    Tracy Stecker; John Fortney; Francis Hamilton; et al

    2010-01-01

    Tracy Stecker1,2, John Fortney3,4, Francis Hamilton1,2, Cathy D Sherbourne5, Icek Ajzen61Psychiatric Research Center, Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon, NH, USA; 2VA Health Services Research and Development, White River Junction Veterans Administration, White River Junction, VT, USA; 3VA Health Services Research and Development (HR S&D), Center for Mental Health and Outcomes Research, Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System, North Little Rock, AR, USA; 4Division of Health Services...

  10. LLRW panel presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) Panel of the Arkansas Department of Health discussed three general issues relative to the operational aspects of a newly developed LLRW disposal facility. The questions addressed and responses comprise this paper. Issue number 1 concerned the financial and regulatory aspects of an operational facility. The second general issue concerned the closure of the site after the end of its operational life. Issue number 2 addressed questions regarding the site operations manual

  11. Management of HIV/AIDS in older patients–drug/drug interactions and adherence to antiretroviral therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Burgess, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Mary J Burgess,1 John D Zeuli,2 Mary J Kasten31Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA; 2Department of Pharmacy, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 3Divisions of General Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAAbstract: Patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are living longer with their disease, as HIV has become a chronic illness managed with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). This ha...

  12. Bent's Old Fort: Amphibians and Reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muths, E.

    2008-01-01

    Bent's Old Fort National Historic Site sits along the Arkansas River in the semi-desert prairie of southeastern Colorado. The USGS provided assistance in designing surveys to assess the variety of herpetofauna (amphibians and reptiles) resident at this site. This brochure is the results of those efforts and provides visitors with information on what frogs, toads, snakes and salamanders might be seen and heard at Bent's Old Fort.

  13. Bauxite and alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, E.L.

    2009-01-01

    The article provides information on bauxite and alumina mining. U.S. states like Alabama, Arkansas and Georgia produced small amounts of bauxite and bauxitic clays for nonmetallurgical uses. Total metallurgical-grade bauxite imports in 2008 is cited. The leading suppliers of bauxite to the U.S. are Jamaica, Guinea and Brazil. The estimated domestic production of alumina in 2008 is mentioned. It also discusses consumption and prices of both bauxite and alumina.

  14. Letter of the Law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling-Sendor, Benjamin

    2003-01-01

    A recent decision by the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in a case from Arkansas centered on a vicious letter written by an 8th-grade boy about his former girlfriend and turned over to school officials. The court ruled for the school district in expelling the student for the year, without allowing him to attend an alternative school. Argues that…

  15. Effect of soil moisture deficit in the upper root zone on growth and yield of soybeans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anwar-ul-Haq; Brown, D.A.

    Soybean producers in Arkansas frequently are confronted with drought conditions which limit yields. These moisture deficit periods result in decreased water and nutrient absorption which adversely affects root growth and distribution within the soil profile, bloom set, and seed-pod retention. Producers have attempted to eliminate this problem by irrigation, by the use of drought tolerant cultivars, and by chiseling to provide for greater root penetration into the subsoil.

  16. Optical bleaching studies of quartz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bleaching properties of a hydrothermal, Arkansas quartz are studied in detail. The thermoluminescence (TL) and phototransferred TL (PTTL) signals are examined as a function of wavelength, illumination time and temperature at which the sample is illuminated. We have also briefly studied the effects of pre-irradiation annealing on the sample. The results of these experiments are described and their relevance to the models for TL is discussed. (Author)

  17. Factors Influencing Acceptance of Electronic Health Records in Hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkins, Melinda A

    2009-01-01

    The study's aim was to examine factors that may influence health information managers in the adoption of electronic health records. The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) served as theoretical foundation for this quantitative study. Hospital health information managers in Arkansas were queried as to the constructs of perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, and behavior intention. The study population comprised 94 health information managers with a return rate of 74.5 percent. One manager ...

  18. LEAST-COST WATERSHED MANAGEMENT SOLUTIONS: USING GIS DATA IN ECONOMIC MODELING OF A WATERSHED

    OpenAIRE

    Ancev, Tihomir; Stoecker, Arthur L.

    2003-01-01

    Phosphorus pollution from excessive litter application causes eutorphication of lakes in the Eucha-Spavinaw watershed in eastern Oklahoma and western Arkansas. Consequent algal blooms impair the taste of municipal water supply drawn from the watershed. The paper shows how GIS data based biophysical modeling can be used to derive spatially optimal, least-cost allocation of management practices to reduce phosphorus runoff in the watershed. Transportation activities were added to the model so th...

  19. A novel recruiting and surveying method: Participatory research during a Pacific Islander community’s traditional cultural event

    OpenAIRE

    Grace Donoho; Pearl McElfish; Rachel Avants; Emily Hallgren

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the health status of Marshallese, a Pacific Islander subpopulation living in the United States. The Marshallese have established a growing community in Northwest Arkansas, providing a unique opportunity for increasing knowledge regarding the health of this minority group. This article describes how a community-based participatory research process was used by a community and university coalition to identify and refine questionnaires and recruit study participants. Questio...

  20. Racial and ethnic differences in parents' assessments of pediatric care in Medicaid managed care.

    OpenAIRE

    Weech-Maldonado, R; Morales, L. S.; Spritzer, K; Elliott, M.; Hays, R D

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study examines whether parents' reports and ratings of pediatric health care vary by race/ethnicity and language in Medicaid managed care. DATA SOURCES: The data analyzed are from the National Consumer Assessment of Health Plans (CAHPS) Benchmarking Database 1.0 and consist of 9,540 children enrolled in Medicaid managed care plans in Arkansas, Kansas, Minnesota, Oklahoma, Vermont, and Washington state from 1997 to 1998. DATA COLLECTION: The data were collected by telephone and...

  1. Genetic polymorphisms of EPHX1, Gsk3β, TNFSF8 and myeloma cell DKK-1 expression linked to bone disease in myeloma

    OpenAIRE

    Durie, BGM; Van Ness, B; Ramos, C.; Stephens, O; Haznadar, M; Hoering, A; Haessler, J; Katz, MS; Mundy, GR; Kyle, RA; Morgan, Gj; Crowley, J.; Barlogie, B.; Shaughnessy, J

    2009-01-01

    Bone disease in myeloma occurs as a result of complex interactions between myeloma cells and the bone marrow microenvironment. A custom-built DNA single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chip containing 3404 SNPs was used to test genomic DNA from myeloma patients classified by the extent of bone disease. Correlations identified with a Total Therapy 2 (TT2) (Arkansas) data set were validated with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) and Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG) data sets. Univariate co...

  2. 米国各州における音楽スタンダードの構成の特徴 : 全米芸術教育標準に準じる6州を中心に <論文>

    OpenAIRE

    Nagai, Megumi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to find the point of the music standards in Arizona, Arkansas, Georgia, Indiana, Missouri, and Tennessee. Hiraiwa (2010) showed that these standards conform to National Standards for Arts Education worked out in 1994. It acknowledges arts as important subject to education as English, mathematics, history and others. In this study, analyzed these standards in 6 states, and explained its contexture and distinction. As results, show the following things. Arizona has...

  3. IMPLICATIONS OF POLICY REGULATIONS ON LAND APPLICATIONS OF POULTRY LITTER

    OpenAIRE

    Govindasamy, Ramu; Cochran, Mark J.

    1998-01-01

    The growth of the poultry industry in Arkansas has exploded in the past decade. As a result, approximately 1.5 million tons of litter are produced every year. Concerns about possible contamination of ground and surface water from land applications of poultry litter have been raised. This paper compares four policy scenarios in terms of their efficiency and practicality to manage land applications of poultry litter. The results indicate that a litter tax per ton of litter applied could achieve...

  4. ECONOMICS OF TRADE-OFF BETWEEN UREA NITROGEN AND POULTRY LITTER FOR RICE PRODUCTION

    OpenAIRE

    Govindasamy, Ramu; Cochran, Mark J.; Miller, David M.; Norman, Richard J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper identifies optimal combinations of nitrogen in the form of urea, fresh litter and composted litter for rice production. Traditional cost minimization techniques using data from experimental results conducted at three sites in Arkansas during 1991 have been employed. Comparisons between different scenarios indicate that the trade-off between the use of poultry litter and urea nitrogen depends on such factors as soil fertility, the yield response to litter application and the relativ...

  5. An Ethnographic Exploration of Self-Reported Violence Among Rural Methamphetamine Users

    OpenAIRE

    Sexton, Rocky L.; Carlson, Robert G.; Leukefeld, Carl G.; Brenda M. Booth

    2009-01-01

    Baseline and follow-up qualitative interviews with methamphetamine (MA) users in rural Kentucky and Arkansas examined their involvement in drug-related violence. Twelve baseline participants reported MA-related violence, while 20 reported violence linked to other substances. In follow-up interviews conducted 12 to 24 months later, four participants reported MA-related violence and 3 reported violence associated with other substances. Violence was rarely connected to MA’s psychoactive effects....

  6. Adoption and Nonadoption of Precision Farming Technologies by Cotton Farmers

    OpenAIRE

    Pandit, Mahesh; Paudel, Krishna P.; Mishra, Ashok K.; Segarra, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed data obtained from the 2009 Southern Cotton Precision Farming Survey of farmers in twelve states (Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Missouri, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia) to identify reasons for adoption/nonadoption of precision farming technologies. Farmers provided cost, time constraint, satisfaction with the current practice and other as reasons for not adopting precision farming technology. Profit, environmental ben...

  7. OPTIMAL SPATIAL ALLOCATION OF WASTE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES TO REDUCE PHOSPHORUS POLLUTION IN A WATERSHED

    OpenAIRE

    Ancev, Tihomir; Stoecker, Arthur L.; Daniel E. Storm

    2003-01-01

    Phosphorus pollution from excessive litter application and municipal discharges causes eutorphication of lakes in the Eucha-Spavinaw watershed in eastern Oklahoma and western Arkansas. Consequent algae blooms impair the taste of drinking water supply drawn from the watershed and reduce the recreational values of the lakes. The paper shows how GIS data based biophysical modeling can be used to derive spatially optimal, least-cost allocation of agricultural management practices to be combined w...

  8. Firm Entry and Wages: Impact of Wal-Mart Growth on Earnings Throughout the Retail Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Dube, Arindrajit; Lester, T. William; Eidlin, Barry

    2007-01-01

    This paper estimates the effect of Wal-Mart expansion on wages, benefits, and skill-composition of retail workers during the 1990s. We exploit the spatial pattern of Wal-Mart diffusion, radiating outward from the original store in Benton county, Arkansas, to control for potential endogeneity in store openings using both instrumental variable and control function approaches. Estimates from state and county level data suggest that store openings reduced both the average earnings and health bene...

  9. E-Learning using Cyberinfrastructure

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Jessie J.; S. Swaid; M. Mortazvi

    2012-01-01

    Cyberinfrastructure has become a major defining force for America, because of its economic, social, and national importance. Over the last two decades, scientists within all sectors of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) have witnessed an explosive rise of cyberinfrastructure as a research tool; universities are utilizing this infrastructure and its applications as an integral part of scientific education. The Arkansas Minority Cyberinfrastructure Training, Education Conso...

  10. Predicting probability of occurrence and factors affecting distribution and abundance of three Ozark endemic crayfish species at multiple spatial scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolen, Matthew S.; Magoulick, Daniel D.; DiStefano, Robert J.; Imhoff, Emily M.; Wagner, Brian K.

    2014-01-01

    Crayfishes and other freshwater aquatic fauna are particularly at risk globally due to anthropogenic demand, manipulation and exploitation of freshwater resources and yet are often understudied. The Ozark faunal region of Missouri and Arkansas harbours a high level of aquatic biological diversity, especially in regard to endemic crayfishes. Three such endemics, Orconectes eupunctus,Orconectes marchandi and Cambarus hubbsi, are threatened by limited natural distribution and the invasions of Orconectes neglectus.

  11. A report of the Sixth Annual Meeting of the International Society for the Prevention of Tobacco Induced Diseases (ISPTID)

    OpenAIRE

    Dobretsov Maxim; Chowdhury Parimal

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The Sixth meeting of the International Society for the Prevention of Tobacco Induced Diseases (ISPTiD) was held in Little Rock, Arkansas on November 2–4, 2007 and has brought together 140 participants, scientists and experts in this specialized field from 30 countries across the World. The central theme of the conference was the "Translational Approaches to the Prevention of Tobacco Induced Diseases". Discussions held during the three days meeting's sessions (including poster session...

  12. Measuring the Relative Profitability of Mid-South Cotton Production from an Alternative Gin Seed Rebate Model

    OpenAIRE

    Fannin, James Matthew; Paxton, Kenneth W

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to assess the opportunity returns forgone to cotton producers in the lower Mid-South region of the United States for growing cotton, compared to alternative commodities. We calculate the actual net returns per acre for selected cotton-producing counties in Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi. In addition, we calculate the opportunity returns per acre if the acres planted in cotton were planted in the highest net return commodity per acre between corn and soybeans...

  13. The Depths of Hydraulic Fracturing and Accompanying Water Use Across the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Robert B; Lowry, Ella R; Pickle, Amy; Kang, Mary; DiGiulio, Dominic; Zhao, Kaiguang

    2015-08-01

    Reports highlight the safety of hydraulic fracturing for drinking water if it occurs "many hundreds of meters to kilometers underground". To our knowledge, however, no comprehensive analysis of hydraulic fracturing depths exists. Based on fracturing depths and water use for ∼44,000 wells reported between 2010 and 2013, the average fracturing depth across the United States was 8300 ft (∼2500 m). Many wells (6900; 16%) were fractured less than a mile from the surface, and 2600 wells (6%) were fractured above 3000 ft (900 m), particularly in Texas (850 wells), California (720), Arkansas (310), and Wyoming (300). Average water use per well nationally was 2,400,000 gallons (9,200,000 L), led by Arkansas (5,200,000 gallons), Louisiana (5,100,000 gallons), West Virginia (5,000,000 gallons), and Pennsylvania (4,500,000 gallons). Two thousand wells (∼5%) shallower than one mile and 350 wells (∼1%) shallower than 3000 ft were hydraulically fractured with >1 million gallons of water, particularly in Arkansas, New Mexico, Texas, Pennsylvania, and California. Because hydraulic fractures can propagate 2000 ft upward, shallow wells may warrant special safeguards, including a mandatory registry of locations, full chemical disclosure, and, where horizontal drilling is used, predrilling water testing to a radius 1000 ft beyond the greatest lateral extent. PMID:26196164

  14. Tritium hydrology of the Mississippi River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, R.L.

    2004-01-01

    In the early 1960s, the US Geological Survey began routinely analysing river water samples for tritium concentrations at locations within the Mississippi River basin. The sites included the main stem of the Mississippi River (at Luling Ferry, Louisiana), and three of its major tributaries, the Ohio River (at Markland Dam, Kentucky), the upper Missouri River (at Nebraska City, Nebraska) and the Arkansas River (near Van Buren, Arkansas). The measurements cover the period during the peak of the bomb-produced tritium transient when tritium concentrations in precipitation rose above natural levels by two to three orders of magnitude. Using measurements of tritium concentrations in precipitation, a tritium input function was established for the river basins above the Ohio River, Missouri River and Arkansas River sampling locations. Owing to the extent of the basin above the Luling Ferry site, no input function was developed for that location. The input functions for the Ohio and Missouri Rivers were then used in a two-component mixing model to estimate residence times of water within these two basins. (The Arkansas River was not modelled because of extremely large yearly variations in flow during the peak of the tritium transient.) The two components used were: (i) recent precipitation (prompt outflow) and (ii) waters derived from the long-term groundwater reservoir of the basin. The tritium concentration of the second component is a function of the atmospheric input and the residence times of the groundwaters within the basin. Using yearly time periods, the parameters of the model were varied until a best fit was obtained between modelled and measured tritium data. The results from the model indicate that about 40% of the flow in the Ohio River was from prompt outflow, as compared with 10% for the Missouri River. Mean residence times of 10 years were calculated for the groundwater component of the Ohio River versus 4 years for the Missouri River. The mass flux of

  15. Geochemical Effects of Induced Stream-Water and Artificial Recharge on the Equus Beds Aquifer, South-Central Kansas, 1995-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Heather C. Ross; Ziegler, Andrew C.; Parkhurst, David L.

    2007-01-01

    Artificial recharge of the Equus Beds aquifer is part of a strategy implemented by the city of Wichita, Kansas, to preserve future water supply and address declining water levels in the aquifer of as much as 30 feet caused by withdrawals for water supply and irrigation since the 1940s. Water-level declines represent a diminished water supply and also may accelerate migration of saltwater from the Burrton oil field to the northwest and the Arkansas River to the southwest into the freshwater of the Equus Beds aquifer. Artificial recharge, as a part of the Equus Beds Ground-Water Recharge Project, involves capturing flows larger than base flow from the Little Arkansas River and recharging the water to the Equus Beds aquifer by means of infiltration or injection. The geochemical effects on the Equus Beds aquifer of induced stream-water and artificial recharge at the Halstead and Sedgwick sites were determined through collection and analysis of hydrologic and water-quality data and the application of statistical, mixing, flow and solute-transport, and geochemical model simulations. Chloride and atrazine concentrations in the Little Arkansas River and arsenic concentrations in ground water at the Halstead recharge site frequently exceeded regulatory criteria. During 30 percent of the time from 1999 through 2004, continuous estimated chloride concentrations in the Little Arkansas River at Highway 50 near Halstead exceeded the Secondary Drinking-Water Regulation of 250 milligrams per liter established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Chloride concentrations in shallow monitoring wells located adjacent to the stream exceeded the drinking-water criterion five times from 1995 through 2004. Atrazine concentrations in water sampled from the Little Arkansas River had large variability and were at or near the drinking-water Maximum Contaminant Level of 3.0 micrograms per liter as an annual average established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Atrazine

  16. Fallout of uranium and plutonium from recent volcanic eruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentrations of 234U, 235U, 238U in rain water were measured in a total of 102 individual samples which were collected at Fayetteville, Arkansas, from July 1980 through April 1983. A spectacular increase in the heavy isotope of uranium (238U) was observed in the months of July, August (1980); January through April, November and December 1981. This large increase in 238U in rain appeared to have had its origin in the May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. An increase in the concentration of 238U in rain, smaller than 1981, was observed, which seems to have originated from the El Chichon volcano eruption in March 1982, and the spring peak or so-called cycling effect. A striking increase in the average bimonthly concentration of /sup 239,240/Pu occurred during the months of September-October 1980 (15.6 fCi/l) and March-April 1981 (29.4 fCi/l). The excess deposition of /sup 239,240/Pu brought down by the rain at Fayetteville, Arkansas, from March 1980 through December 1982 was found to be 1.01 fCi/cm2. The total amount of /sub 239,240/Pu deposited at Fayetteville, Arkansas, from March through December 1982, was found to be about 30 times higher than the total amount calculated from reported literature values. The excess /sup 239,240/Pu has been attributed to stratospheric /sub 239,240/Pu from nuclear weapons testing prior to the 25th Chinese nuclear test

  17. Establishing Winter Origins of Migrating Lesser Snow Geese Using Stable Isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Hénaux

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Increases in Snow Goose (Chen caerulescens populations and large-scale habitat changes in North America have contributed to the concentration of migratory waterfowl on fewer wetlands, reducing resource availability, and enhancing risks of disease transmission. Predicting wintering locations of migratory individuals is critical to guide wildlife population management and habitat restoration. We used stable carbon (δ13C, nitrogen (δ15N, and hydrogen (δ2H isotope ratios in muscle tissue of wintering Snow Geese to discriminate four major wintering areas, the Playa Lake Region, Texas Gulf Coast, Louisiana Gulf Coast, and Arkansas, and infer the wintering locations of individuals collected later during the 2007 and 2008 spring migrations in the Rainwater Basin (RWB of Nebraska. We predicted the wintering ground derivation of migrating Snow Geese using a likelihood-based approach. Our three-isotope analysis provided an efficient discrimination of the four wintering areas. The assignment model predicted that 53% [95% CI: 37-69] of our sample of Snow Geese from the RWB in 2007 had most likely originated in Louisiana, 38% [23-54] had wintered on Texas Gulf Coast, and 9% [0-20] in Arkansas; the assessment suggested that 89% [73-100] of our 2008 sample had most likely come from Texas Gulf Coast, 9% [0-27] from Louisiana Gulf Coast, and 2% [0-9] from Arkansas. Further segregation of wintering grounds and additional sampling of spring migrating Snow Geese would refine overall assignment and help explain interannual variations in migratory connectivity. The ability to distinguish origins of northbound geese can support the development of spatially-adaptive management strategies for the midcontinent Snow Goose population. Establishing migratory connectivity using isotope assignment techniques can be extended to other waterfowl species to determine critical habitat, evaluate population energy requirements, and inform waterfowl conservation and management

  18. Agricultural Burning in the Southeastern United States Detected by MODIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, J. L.; Justice, C. O.; Korontzi, S.

    2005-12-01

    The southeastern United States, including the states of Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia, has a high occurrence of fire activity as detected by MODIS. The spatio-temporal analysis of the 1 km MODIS TERRA Active Fire Product (MOD 14) from 2001 to 2004 shows that agricultural burning in the southeastern United States accounts for an average of 16 percent of annual fire activity. In addition, the southeastern region contributes an average of 33 percent of all agricultural burning in the contiguous United States. Crop types that most likely burn in the southeast include rice, winter wheat, sugarcane, soybean and cotton. Much of the agricultural burning occurs in June and from October to January and is related to the harvest of winter wheat and rice in the spring and the harvest of sugarcane, soybean and cotton in the fall and winter. The results show that cropland burning is spatially dependent on crop type and temporally dependent on management practices (planting/harvesting). Three states represent more than 75 percent of all agricultural burning in the southeast: Arkansas, Florida, and Louisiana. A 250 m MODIS land cover map cover was created for these three states using a decision tree classification. Compared to the MODIS 1 km Land Cover Dataset (MOD 12) (Friedl et al., 2002), the 250m classified images contain on average 50 percent more cropland area and improve the estimation of cropland area based on validation from ground control sites of croplands. Results from the decision tree classification for each state suggest that in 2004 agricultural burning contributed 73 percent, 54 percent, and 33 percent of total fires for Arkansas, Florida, and Louisiana, respectively.

  19. Pathologic examination of the placenta: recommended versus observed practice in a university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sills A

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Amber Sills,1 Carmen Steigman,2 Songthip T Ounpraseuth,3 Imelda Odibo,1 Adam T Sandlin,1 Everett F Magann11Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Arkansas for the Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA; 2Department of Pathology, University of Arkansas for the Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA; 3Department of Biostatistics, University of Arkansas for the Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USAIntroduction: The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of appropriate placental examinations in a university hospital.Methods: A retrospective review of all deliveries and all placentas submitted for pathologic examination from live births. Placentas were reviewed by a perinatal pathologist to determine whether they met the College of American Pathologists (CAP-recommended guidelines for examination.Results: We used 1346 deliveries between July 1, 2010 and December 31, 2010 as the basis of this review. According to CAP guidelines, 703 placentas (52.2% should have been sent for pathologic examination; 575/703 (81.8%; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 78.9–84.7 were actually sent for examination. Of the 643 placentas that did not need to be examined per CAP guidelines, 568 (88.3%; 95% CI = 85.9–90.8 were appropriately not sent. In comparing the three categories of indications for examination (maternal, fetal/neonatal, placental, the only significant association was that women with fetal/neonatal indications were more likely to have their placenta sent than women with maternal indications (odds ratio, 2.63; 95% CI = 1.81–3.80.Conclusion: In this university hospital, more than 80% of the time, placentas were appropriately sent to pathology, and more than 85% of the time, placentas that should not have been sent for evaluation were not sent.Keywords: placenta, pathologic examination, clinical guidelines, birth

  20. Backcasting the decline of a vulnerable Great Plains reproductive ecotype: identifying threats and conservation priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, Thomas A; Brewer, Shannon K; Grabowski, Timothy B; Mueller, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Conservation efforts for threatened or endangered species are challenging because the multi-scale factors that relate to their decline or inhibit their recovery are often unknown. To further exacerbate matters, the perceptions associated with the mechanisms of species decline are often viewed myopically rather than across the entire species range. We used over 80 years of fish presence data collected from the Great Plains and associated ecoregions of the United States, to investigate the relative influence of changing environmental factors on the historic and current truncated distributions of the Arkansas River shiner Notropis girardi. Arkansas River shiner represent a threatened reproductive ecotype considered especially well adapted to the harsh environmental extremes of the Great Plains. Historic (n = 163 records) and current (n = 47 records) species distribution models were constructed using a vector-based approach in MaxEnt by splitting the available data at a time when Arkansas River shiner dramatically declined. Discharge and stream order were significant predictors in both models; however, the shape of the relationship between the predictors and species presence varied between time periods. Drift distance (river fragment length available for ichthyoplankton downstream drift before meeting a barrier) was a more important predictor in the current model and indicated river segments 375-780 km had the highest probability of species presence. Performance for the historic and current models was high (area under the curve; AUC > 0.95); however, forecasting and backcasting to alternative time periods suggested less predictive power. Our results identify fragments that could be considered refuges for endemic plains fish species and we highlight significant environmental factors (e.g., discharge) that could be manipulated to aid recovery. PMID:23873736

  1. Spatio-temporal variations in age structures of a partially re-established population of northern river otters (Lontra canadensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Dominic A.; Leslie, David M., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Examination of age structures and sex ratios is useful in the management of northern river otters (Lontra canadensis) and other furbearers. Reintroductions and subsequent recolonizations of river otters have been well documented, but changes in demographics between expanding and established populations have not been observed. As a result of reintroduction efforts, immigration from Arkansas and northeastern Texas, and other efforts, river otters have become partially reestablished throughout eastern and central Oklahoma. Our objective was to examine age structures of river otters in Oklahoma and identify trends that relate to space (watersheds, county) and time (USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service county trapping records). We predicted that river otters in western areas of the state were younger than river otters occurring farther east. From 2005–2007, we obtained salvaged river otter carcasses from federal and state agencies, and we live-captured other river otters using leg hold traps. Seventy-two river otters were sampled. Overall, sex ratios were skewed toward females (1F∶0.8M), but they did not differ among spatiotemporal scales examined. Teeth were removed from salvaged and live-captured river otters (n  =  63) for aging. One-year old river otters represented the largest age class (30.2%). Proportion of juveniles (age of river otters decreased from east-to-west in the Arkansas River and its tributaries. Mean age of river otters differed between the Canadian River Watershed (0.8 y) and the Arkansas River Watershed (2.9 y) and the Canadian River Watershed and the Red River Watershed (2.4 y). Proportion of juveniles did not differ among spatiotemporal scales examined. Similar to age structure variations in other mammalian carnivores, colonizing or growing western populations of river otters in Oklahoma contained younger ages than more established eastern populations.

  2. Trip report for field visit to Fayetteville Shale gas wells.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-09-30

    This report describes a visit to several gas well sites in the Fayetteville Shale on August 9, 2007. I met with George Sheffer, Desoto Field Manager for SEECO, Inc. (a large gas producer in Arkansas). We talked in his Conway, Arkansas, office for an hour and a half about the processes and technologies that SEECO uses. We then drove into the field to some of SEECO's properties to see first-hand what the well sites looked like. In 2006, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) made several funding awards under a program called Low Impact Natural Gas and Oil (LINGO). One of the projects that received an award is 'Probabilistic Risk-Based Decision Support for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Facilities in Sensitive Ecosystems'. The University of Arkansas at Fayetteville has the lead on the project, and Argonne National Laboratory is a partner. The goal of the project is to develop a Web-based decision support tool that will be used by mid- and small-sized oil and gas companies as well as environmental regulators and other stakeholders to proactively minimize adverse ecosystem impacts associated with the recovery of gas reserves in sensitive areas. The project focuses on a large new natural gas field called the Fayetteville Shale. Part of the project involves learning how the natural gas operators do business in the area and the technologies they employ. The field trip on August 9 provided an opportunity to do that.

  3. Late cretaceous extensional tectonics and associated igneous activity on the northern margin of the Gulf of Mexico Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, R. L.; Sundeen, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Major, dominantly compressional, orogenic episodes (Taconic, Acadian, Alleghenian) affected eastern North America during the Paleozoic. During the Mesozoic, in contrast, this same region was principally affected by epeirogenic and extensional tectonism; one episode of comparatively more intense tectonic activity involving extensive faulting, uplift, sedimentation, intrusion and effusion produced the Newark Series of eposits and fault block phenomena. This event, termed the Palisades Disturbance, took place during the Late Triassic - Earliest Jurassic. The authors document a comparable extensional tectonic-igneous event occurring during the Late Cretaceous (Early Gulfian; Cenomanian-Santonian) along the southern margin of the cratonic platform from Arkansas to Georgia.

  4. Variation of the thorium to uranium ratio in rain: thorium-230 chronology of the eruptions of Mt. St. Helens and El Chichon volcanoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Principles of the thorium-230 dating method were applied to the study of thorium and uranium isotopes in a seris of rain samples collected at Fayetteville (36 degN, 94 degW), Arkansas, since 1980. The results indicate that the rainwater contains volcanic ash materials with a wide variety of ages, which were blown up onto the upper stratosphere from the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens and the 28 March 1982 eruption of El Chichon. These volcanic materials seem to have stayed airborne for a number of years and profoundly affected the global atmospheric inventories of thorium and uranium isotopes. (author) 11 refs.; 7 figs

  5. Uranium fallout from the nuclear-powered satellites and volcanic eruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increasing trends of the concentrations of sup(234)U, sup(235)U and sup(238)U in rain observed during the period between April 1984 and June 1985 at Fayetteville (36 deg N, 94 deg W), Arkansas, and peak concentrations of sup(234)U and sup(235)U observed in a number of rain samples collected in May and June 1985 appear to be the effects of delayed fallout from the eruption of El Chichon volcano and the 1983 fall of the nuclear-powered satellite Kosmos-1402, respectively. (author)

  6. Using Cost-Effectiveness Tests to Design CHP Incentive Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tidball, Rick [ICF International, Fairfax, VA (United States)

    2014-11-01

    This paper examines the structure of cost-effectiveness tests to illustrate how they can accurately reflect the costs and benefits of CHP systems. This paper begins with a general background discussion on cost-effectiveness analysis of DER and then describes how cost-effectiveness tests can be applied to CHP. Cost-effectiveness results are then calculated and analyzed for CHP projects in five states: Arkansas, Colorado, Iowa, Maryland, and North Carolina. Based on the results obtained for these five states, this paper offers four considerations to inform regulators in the application of cost-effectiveness tests in developing CHP programs.

  7. Deep oxygenated ground water: Anomaly or common occurrence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winograd, I.J.; Robertson, F.N.

    1982-01-01

    Contrary to the prevailing notion that oxygen-depleting reactions in the soil zone and in the aquifer rapidly reduce the dissolved oxygen content of recharge water to detection limits, 2 to 8 milligrams per liter of dissolved oxygen is present in water from a variety of deep (100 to 1000 meters) aquifers in Nevada, Arizona, and the hot springs of the folded Appalachians and Arkansas. Most of the waters sampled are several thousand to more than 10,000 years old, and some are 80 kilometers from their point of recharge. Copyright ?? 1982 AAAS.

  8. Dicty_cDB: AFF514 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available arhtkasneaaeyaklvaqrqqakakrfrqsfkqkscxpsk Frame B: *verwyivyyylkks**tllkqfnkrkfieveh*mvqpkvii*tsntinklttrqtmsak...*kscssh*sqq*srrir*trcpktts*sqeipskfqakkllxk* Homology vs CSM-cDNA Score E Sequences producing significant...own update 2004.12.25 Homology vs DNA Score E Sequences producing significant alignment...80 4e-26 9 U03732 |U03732.1 Acanthamoeba castellanii Neff mitochondrion rRNA larg...9, full insert sequence. 58 5e-22 5 AF416765 |AF416765.1 Ehrlichia chaffeensis strain Arkansas 23S ribosomal RNA an

  9. Georgia Pacific: Crossett Mill Identifies Heat Recovery Projects and Operational Improvements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2003-10-01

    An assessment team conducted a mill-wide energy survey at Georgia-Pacific's Crossett, Arkansas mill to update a previous pinch analysis. Three heat recovery projects were identified that could reduce annual costs by $4.8 million and reduce natural gas use by 1,845,000 x 106 Btu. The overall payback period for the heat recovery projects would be less than 1 year. Furthermore, by implementing operational improvements, the mill could save $4.8 million more annually and 1,500,000 x 106 Btu in natural gas.

  10. Whiners%发牢骚的人

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maya Angelou; 斯骏

    2003-01-01

    @@ When my grandmother was raising me in Stamps,Arkansas(阿肯色州), she had a particular routine when people who were known to be whiners entered her store. My grandmother would ask the customer,"How are you doing today, Brother Thomas? "And the person would reply, "Not so good today, Sister Henderson. You see,it's this summer heat. I just hate it. It just frazzles (使疲惫,使精疲力竭) me up and frazzles me down. It's almost killing me."

  11. Analog-digital models of stream-aquifer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulder, E.A.; Jenkins, C.T.

    1969-01-01

    The best features of analog and digital computers were combined to make a management model of a stream-aquifer system. The analog model provides a means for synthesizing, verifying, and summarizing aquifer properties; the digital model permits rapid calculation of the effects of water management practices. Given specific management alternatives, a digital program can be written that will optimize operation plans of stream-aquifer systems. The techniques are demonstrated by application to a study of the Arkansas River valley in southeastern Colorado.

  12. Context sensitivity in the force concept inventory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gay Stewart

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The force concept inventory and a 10-question context-modified test were given to 647 students enrolled in introductory physics classes at the University of Arkansas. Context changes had an effect ranging from −3% to 10% on the individual questions. The average student score on the ten transformed questions was 3% higher than the average student score on the corresponding 10 force concept inventory questions. Therefore, the effect of contextual changes on the total of the 10 questions is not sufficient to affect normal use of the force concept inventory as a diagnostic instrument.

  13. Business analysis for Wal-Mart, a grocery retail chain, and improvement proposals

    OpenAIRE

    BARBERÁ MARCILLA, LAURA

    2014-01-01

    This study consists on the analysis of a very big grocery retail chain and the proposal of a serial of improvements I consider that can help the company to grow in the future. Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. is a multinational retail corporation that runs large discount superstores and warehouses. It was founded less than fifty years ago by Sam Walton and his brother Bud in Bentonville, Arkansas (USA). With sales over $300 billion a year, Wal-Mart is considered one of world´s most valuable companies...

  14. Granting the consent of the Congress to the Central Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact. A report submitted to the House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session, December 5, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The House Energy and Commerce Commission is favorable to H.R. 1046, which establishes the Central Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact for the states of Arkansas, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and Oklahoma. The committee report summarizes the bill and its intent, reports on committee hearings and findings concerning the need for regional cooperation in siting waste facilities and incentives to encourage that cooperation, and estimates the cost to the federal government to be minor. There is a section-by-section analysis of the bill, followed by the changes in the 1980 Act the bill entails

  15. Effect of three cross-section libraries on the calculated neutron flux in the cavity of a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to compare calculations of pressure vessel surveillance dosimetry foil reaction rates computed using the ENDF/B-VI cross-section libraries for all reactor core and in-vessel materials except the reactor pressure vessel for which the ENDF/B-V, ENDF/B-VI, and LANL T-2 iron cross sections were substituted. Reaction rates for dosimetry foils in the cavity surrounding the pressure vessel of a pressurized water reactor were determined using the MCNP4A code. These calculations were compared to measured reaction rates from dosimetry foil experiments conducted during cycle 10 of Arkansas Nuclear One unit 1 (ANO-1)

  16. Comparison of ENDF/B-V and VI cross sections for dosimetry foil reaction rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to compare calculations of pressure vessel surveillance dosimetry foil reaction rates computed using the ENDF/B-V and ENDF/B-VI cross-section libraries. Reaction rates for dosimetry foils irradiated in the cavity surrounding the pressure vessel of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) were determined using the MCNP4A code with ENDF/B-V and -VI cross sections. The computed reaction rates were compared to measured ones obtained during three fuel cycles of the Arkansas Nuclear One Unit 1 (ANO-1)

  17. Energy and water development appropriations for 1984. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session, Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development. Part 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Part 8 of the appropriations hearing record covers the testimony given by members of Congress and other interested individuals in support of projects included in the 1984 budget. It begins on page 1003 with the April 5th, 1983 testimony on Kentucky projects by representatives of that state. Their testimony is followed by that of witnesses speaking for the Upper Colorado River Commission, the Arkansas basin, and numerous projects around the country. This portion of the record concludes with testimony relating to the nuclear fuels industry and nuclear plant construction. An alphabetical list of over 500 witnesses whose testimony appears in this volume follows

  18. Stimulant Use by Young Adult African Americans in a Rural Community: A Pipeline to Prison?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Teresa L.; Bell-Tolliver, LaVerne; Tripathi, Shanti P.; Booth, Brenda M.

    2012-01-01

    The association between stimulant use and legal outcomes was examined in rural adults 18–21 years (n=98) in the Mississippi River Delta of Arkansas from 2003 through 2008. Participants were interviewed at baseline and every six months for two years using the Substance Abuse Outcomes Module, Addiction Severity Index, Short-Form 8 Health Survey, Brief Symptom Inventory, Patient Health Questionnaire Depression Screen, and an abbreviated Antisocial Personality Disorder measure. More than three-quarters were arrested before baseline; 47 were arrested over the next two years. Early arrest but not substance use was related to subsequent arrest. Limitations and implications for interventions are discussed. PMID:21047150

  19. Young Adult, Rural, African American Stimulant Users: Antecedents and Vulnerabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Teresa L.; Han, Xiaotong; Booth, Brenda M.

    2009-01-01

    Early initiation of substance use appears to be an alarming trend among rural minorities. This study focuses on 18–21 year old African American stimulant users in the Arkansas Mississippi Delta. Most participants had no high school diploma and were unemployed; 74.5% had already been arrested. Substance use was initiated early, and nearly all of the men and three quarters of the women already met criteria for lifetime abuse or dependence. Only 18% reported they had ever received substance abuse treatment. The results suggest that substance use interventions in rural communities will require multi-faceted strategies addressing economic, educational and healthcare disparities. PMID:20098663

  20. Functional characterization of the water-soluble organic carbon of size-fractionated aerosol in the southern Mississippi Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalbot, M.-C. G.; Brown, J.; Chitranshi, P.; da Costa, G. Gamboa; Pollock, E. D.; Kavouras, I. G.

    2016-01-01

    The chemical content of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) as a function of particle size was characterized in Little Rock, Arkansas in winter and spring 2013. The objectives of this study were to (i) compare the functional characteristics of coarse, fine and ultrafine WSOC and (ii) reconcile the sources of WSOC for periods when carbonaceous aerosol was the most abundant particulate component. The WSOC accounted for 5 % of particle mass for particles with δp > 0.96 μm and 10 % of particle mass for particles with δp 3.0 μm and δp < 0.96 μm.