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Sample records for arid southwestern united

  1. Algae from the arid southwestern United States: an annotated bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, W.H.; Gaines, S.R.

    1983-06-01

    Desert algae are attractive biomass producers for capturing solar energy through photosynthesis of organic matter. They are probably capable of higher yields and efficiencies of light utilization than higher plants, and are already adapted to extremes of sunlight intensity, salinity and temperature such as are found in the desert. This report consists of an annotated bibliography of the literature on algae from the arid southwestern United States. It was prepared in anticipation of efforts to isolate desert algae and study their yields in the laboratory. These steps are necessary prior to setting up outdoor algal culture ponds. Desert areas are attractive for such applications because land, sunlight, and, to some extent, water resources are abundant there. References are sorted by state.

  2. Using remotely sensed indices of primary productivity to evaluate large mammal abundance and movement in the arid Southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoner, D.; Edwards, T.; Sexton, J. O.; Nagol, J.; Sims, A.; Ironside, K.; Choate, D.; Longshore, K.; Anand, A.; Mattson, D.

    2013-12-01

    Southwestern ecoregions are marked by topographic and climatic variability, which facilitates the coexistence of large herbivores exploiting different dietary niches. Mountain ungulates buffer this variability through physiological and behavioral adaptations such as fat accumulation and seasonal migrations. However, projected climatic shifts imply changes in vegetation biomass and phenology, and therefore mammalian distributions. Here we evaluate how the distribution of primary productivity and phenological rhythms influence abundance and seasonal movements of three widely distributed ungulate species and their principal predator. We used spatio-temporal patterns in the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) derived from MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) measurements at 250-m, daily resolution to explain spatial variability in the abundance of mule deer, elk, and bighorn sheep. Ungulate population response to NDVI was assessed using annual survey data collected by state wildlife agencies with jurisdiction on and around the Colorado Plateau ecoregion. We used NDVI-ungulate relationships to evaluate the spatial requirements and potential densities of cougars; a predator whose diet, density, and distribution is closely tied to these species. Cougar location data were combined from nine radio-telemetry studies conducted over a range of climatic conditions. Focal ungulates demonstrated differing responses to patterns in NDVI. Mule deer abundance corresponded to the timing of green-up (late spring), elk abundance correlated best with peak green biomass (July-Aug), and bighorn showed no relationship to NDVI. Seasonal movements also differed, with deer migrating between distinct summer and winter ranges; bighorn residing on annual ranges, and elk demonstrating a mixed pattern of residency and migration. Cougar movements did not correspond to phenology per se, but home range size and diet diversity varied inversely with NDVI. Projected shifts in the

  3. Point sources of emerging contaminants along the Colorado River Basin: source water for the arid Southwestern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones-Lepp, Tammy L; Sanchez, Charles; Alvarez, David A; Wilson, Doyle C; Taniguchi-Fu, Randi-Laurant

    2012-07-15

    Emerging contaminants (ECs) (e.g., pharmaceuticals, illicit drugs, personal care products) have been detected in waters across the United States. The objective of this study was to evaluate point sources of ECs along the Colorado River, from the headwaters in Colorado to the Gulf of California. At selected locations in the Colorado River Basin (sites in Colorado, Utah, Nevada, Arizona, and California), waste stream tributaries and receiving surface waters were sampled using either grab sampling or polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS). The grab samples were extracted using solid-phase cartridge extraction (SPE), and the POCIS sorbents were transferred into empty SPEs and eluted with methanol. All extracts were prepared for, and analyzed by, liquid chromatography-electrospray-ion trap mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-ITMS). Log D(OW) values were calculated for all ECs in the study and compared to the empirical data collected. POCIS extracts were screened for the presence of estrogenic chemicals using the yeast estrogen screen (YES) assay. Extracts from the 2008 POCIS deployment in the Las Vegas Wash showed the second highest estrogenicity response. In the grab samples, azithromycin (an antibiotic) was detected in all but one urban waste stream, with concentrations ranging from 30ng/L to 2800ng/L. Concentration levels of azithromycin, methamphetamine and pseudoephedrine showed temporal variation from the Tucson WWTP. Those ECs that were detected in the main surface water channels (those that are diverted for urban use and irrigation along the Colorado River) were in the region of the limit-of-detection (e.g., 10ng/L), but most were below detection limits. PMID:22684090

  4. Drought in Southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The southwestern United States pined for water in late March and early April 2007. This image is based on data collected by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite from March 22 through April 6, 2007, and it shows the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, or NDVI, for the period. In this NDVI color scale, green indicates areas of healthier-than-usual vegetation, and only small patches of green appear in this image, near the California-Nevada border and in Utah. Larger areas of below-normal vegetation are more common, especially throughout California. Pale yellow indicates areas with generally average vegetation. Gray areas appear where no data were available, likely due to persistent clouds or snow cover. According to the April 10, 2007, update from the U.S. Drought Monitor, most of the southwestern United Sates, including Utah, Nevada, California, and Arizona, experienced moderate to extreme drought. The hardest hit areas were southeastern California and southwestern Arizona. Writing for the Drought Monitor, David Miskus of the Joint Agricultural Weather Facility reported that March 2007 had been unusually dry for the southwestern United States. While California's and Utah's reservoir storage was only slightly below normal, reservoir storage was well below normal for New Mexico and Arizona. In early April, an international research team published an online paper in Science noting that droughts could become more common for the southwestern United States and northern Mexico, as these areas were already showing signs of drying. Relying on the same computer models used in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report released in early 2007, the researchers who published in Science concluded that global warming could make droughts more common, not just in the American Southwest, but also in semiarid regions of southern Europe, Mediterranean northern Africa, and the Middle East.

  5. A Reservoir of Natural Perchlorate in Unsaturated Zones of Arid and Semi-Arid Regions, Southwestern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, B. A.; Stonestrom, D. A.; Anderson, T. A.; Orris, G. J.; Rajagapolan, S.; Sandvig, R. M.; Scanlon, B. R.; Walvoord, M. A.; Jackson, W.

    2006-12-01

    Natural perchlorate (ClO4-) is generally present in unsaturated zones of steppe-to-desert regions of the arid and semi-arid southwestern United States. The perchlorate is associated with atmospherically deposited chloride that has accumulated throughout the Holocene. To assess this natural reservoir, we analyzed unsaturated-zone profiles from ten sites across Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, and Utah for perchlorate and other anions. The sampled sites represent a wide range of precipitation (0.1 0.5 m yr-1), dominant vegetation, soil type, underlying geology, and include five distinct ecological regions: Chihuahuan, Mojave, and southern Great Basin deserts; Arizona-New Mexico semi-desert; and Texas High Plains dry steppe. Concentrations of perchlorate correlated closely with chloride and bromide. The perchlorate reservoir (up to 1 kg ha-1) is sufficiently large to impact groundwater when natural recharge during pluvial periods or induced recharge after conversion to agriculture flushes accumulated salts from the unsaturated zone. This little explored source can explain perchlorate in milk and other agricultural products far from anthropogenic contamination, and should be considered when evaluating overall exposure risk.

  6. Spatial distribution and comparison of aridity indices in Extremadura, southwestern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moral, Francisco J.; Rebollo, Francisco J.; Paniagua, Luis L.; García-Martín, Abelardo; Honorio, Fulgencio

    2015-09-01

    In semi-arid lands with warm climates, aridity is a real hazard, with the threat of desertification because of greater precipitation variability and prolonged droughts. Aridity indices can be used to identify areas prone to desertification. The present study aimed to analyse the spatial distribution of aridity in Extremadura, southwestern Spain, using three indices: the De Martonne aridity index (I DM), the Pinna combinative index (I P), and the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) aridity index (I F). Temperature, precipitation, and evapotranspiration data from 90 weather stations located throughout Extremadura and 27 along boundaries with at least 30-year length (within the 1980-2011 period) were used to compute each index at each station. The statistical properties of each aridity index were assessed, and later, they were mapped by means of an integrated geographic information system (GIS) and a multivariate geostatistical (regression-kriging) algorithm in which exhaustive secondary information on elevation was incorporated. Annual and seasonal I DM and I F, and annual I P-kriged maps were generated. According to annual I DM, the semi-arid and Mediterranean conditions are predominant in the region, covering about 70 % of the territory, while about 94 % of the areas are classified as dry and semi-dry Mediterranean based on annual I P and about 86 % are classified as semi-arid and dry categories based on annual I F. The most vulnerable to aridity are the natural regions located to the west, the south, and the southeast of Extremadura, especially during summer, when arid conditions are found across the region. Although the three aridity indices were highly correlated, displaying similar spatial patterns, I DM was preferred because it can better discriminate different climate conditions in Extremadura.

  7. Documentation of Arid Land Soilscapes in Southwestern Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    José Ibáñez, Juan; Pérez-Gómez, Rufino; Oyonarte, Cecilio; Brevik, Eric C.

    2016-04-01

    There have been no studies to date that have proven the existence of soil assemblages typical of arid lands in Europe. This study was carried out in Almería province, a representative territory of the SE part of the Iberian Peninsula which is the driest part of Europe, to determine if soils characteristic of arid lands were present. The study made use of mathematical tools previously developed in biodiversity and pedodiversity analysis, such as richness, entropy indices, abundance distribution models, diversity-area relationships and nested subset analysis to analyse the spatial distribution of soils. The study demonstrated that the soil types or pedotaxa are typical of mountainous arid lands. Shallow and weakly developed soils (e.g. Leptosols, Regosols, Arenosols), Calcisols, Gypsisols and Solonchaks cover most of the study area, and pedodiversity analysis demonstrates that the pedotaxa spatial patterns follow the same regularities as in other areas, environments and scales. In view of the fact that the class of landscapes identified in this study are unique in Europe, the Tarbernas desert and other arid lands sites of the study area merit preservation as part of the European geological, geomorphological, and pedological heritage.

  8. Precipitation Intensity Effects on Groundwater Recharge in the Southwestern United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian F. Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Episodic recharge as a result of infrequent, high intensity precipitation events comprises the bulk of groundwater recharge in arid environments. Climate change and shifts in precipitation intensity will affect groundwater continuity, thus altering groundwater recharge. This study aims to identify changes in the ratio of groundwater recharge and precipitation, the R:P ratio, in the arid southwestern United States to characterize observed changes in groundwater recharge attributed to variations in precipitation intensity. Our precipitation metric, precipitation intensity magnification, was used to investigate the relationship between the R:P ratio and precipitation intensity. Our analysis identified significant changes in the R:P ratio concurrent with decreases in precipitation intensity. The results illustrate the importance of precipitation intensity in relation to groundwater recharge in arid regions and provide further insights for groundwater management in nonrenewable groundwater systems and in a changing climate.

  9. Basin-scale recharge in the Southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, J. F.; Duffy, C.; Eastoe, C.; Ferre, T. P. A.; Goodrich, D.; Hendrickx, J.; Hibbs, B.; Phillips, F.; Small, E.; Wilson, J.

    2003-04-01

    The major domestic water source in the arid southwestern United States is groundwater from alluvial basin aquifers. Accurate estimates of basin-scale groundwater recharge rates are a critical need for developing sustainable or "safe yield" groundwater pumping. Basin-scale recharge rates are typically estimated using inverse hydrologic modeling or geochemical tracers (e.g. chloride mass balance). These methods, while useful, have a high level of uncertainty and provide no information about the mechanisms of groundwater recharge. SAHRA - an NSF Science and Technology Center focused on the Sustainability of semi-Arid Hydrology and Riparian Areas - has developed an integrated research plan to address this problem. Our approach is two-fold. First we are investigating the "input" components that comprise basin-scale recharge: basin floor recharge, alluvial channel recharge, mountain front recharge, and mountain block recharge. Each component has unique spatial and temporal scales and thus requires distinct methods. Our research is aimed at understanding the factors (e.g. vegetation type, bedrock lithology, soil structure) that control recharge rates in each of these locations. With such an understanding one could then scale from point measurements to the basin-scale using remote sensing data. Our second approach is to employ isotopic tracers to determine water sources, groundwater ages and residence times of the groundwater and surface water "outputs"; these values can then be used to better calibrate recharge rates in groundwater models. By focusing our studies on two basins, the San Pedro River Basin in Arizona and the Rio Grande in New Mexico, we hope to develop a better understanding of the importance of different recharge pathways for basin-scale recharge and which methods are best suited for estimating basin-scale recharge.

  10. Increased aridity in southwestern Africa during the last-interglacial warmest periods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Urrego

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We use pollen analysis of marine sediments from core MD96-2098 to produce a paleoenvironmental record spanning from 190 to 24.7 ka (thousand years before present from southern Africa. Our interpretations of the pollen record are supported by an analysis of present day pollen spectra for the region. We apply canonical correspondence analysis (CCA and detrended correspondence analysis (DCA on pollen spectra from terrestrial surface samples to investigate pollen spectra-climate relationships. We identify pollen taxa that are suitable indicators for the different South African biomes, and assess in detail the distribution and potential interpretation of Poaceae pollen signals in marine sediments along the southwestern African coast. The pollen record from MD96-2098 documented major increases of Poaceae pollen percentages, that are interpreted as expansions of semi-arid southwestern African biomes (i.e. the Nama-Karoo and fine-leaved savannas during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS 5e, 5c and 5a substages. These expansions coincided with minima in precession and global ice volume. They likely resulted from a combination of reduced Benguela upwelling; expanded subtropical high pressure and reduced austral-summer precipitation due to a northward shift of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ; and a southern displacement of the westerlies and decreased austral-winter precipitation. During glacial isotopic stages MIS 6, 4 and 3, Fynbos expanded at the expense of semi-arid biomes. Stage and substage transitions were characterised by small but rapid increases in Podocarpus indicating a humidity increase. Increased millennial-scale variability in the vegetation and climate of southern Africa is also suggested for the last 100 ka.

  11. A Review of Applicability and Effectiveness of Low Impact Development/Green Infrastructure Practices in Arid/Semi-Arid United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Jiang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Urbanized areas of the southwestern/western United States are among the fastest growing in the nation and face multiple water resource challenges. Low impact development (LID/green infrastructure (GI practices are increasingly popular technologies for managing stormwater; however, LID is often not as common in the southwest/west due to the lack of regulatory and/or economic drivers. There is also a lack of performance evaluation of these practices, particularly at the field scale. This study focused on investigating the hydrologic and pollutant removal performance of field-scale LID/GI systems in arid/semi-arid climates. Nine typical practices were reviewed: rainwater harvest system, detention pond, retention pond, bioretention, media filter, porous pavement, vegetated swale/buffer/strip, green roof, and infiltration trench, as well as integrated LIDs. We evaluate these practices by a cost-effectiveness analysis and also recommend best practices for the arid/semi-arid area. The analysis provides data support and insights for future implementation of LID/GI in the southwest/west.

  12. Trichinella infection in wildlife of the southwestern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozio, E; Pence, D B; La Rosa, G; Casulli, A; Henke, S E

    2001-10-01

    Several potential mammalian reservoirs of sylvatic species of Trichinella were examined from Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona. During 1998-99, tongues were collected from a black bear (Ursus americanus) in Arizona; from 9 black bears, a coyote (Canis latrans), and a mountain lion (Felis concolor) in New Mexico; and from 154 coyotes, 32 raccoons (Procyon lotor), 13 opossums (Didelphis marsupialis), 4 ocelots (Leopardus pardalis), 3 bobcats (Lynx rufus), and 5 feral hogs (Sus scrofa) in southern Texas. Larvae of Trichinella murrelli were identified by a multiple-polymerase chain reaction analysis in 1 black bear (11.1%) from New Mexico and in 7 coyotes (4.5%) of Texas, whereas Trichinella spiralis larvae were detected in the black bear of Arizona. This is the first report of Trichinella infection in wildlife of New Mexico and Texas and extends the distribution of T. murrelli into the southwestern United States near the border of Mexico. PMID:11695403

  13. LAND SUITABILITY SCENARIOS FOR ARID COASTAL PLAINS USING GIS MODELING: SOUTHWESTERN SINAI COASTAL PLAIN, EGYPT

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed Mohamed Wahid; Marguerite Madden; Fikry Khalaf; Ibtehal Fathy

    2009-01-01

    Site selection analysis was carried out to find the best suitable lands for development activities in an example of promising coastal plains, southwestern Sinai, Egypt. Two GIS models were developed to represent two scenarios of land use suitability in the study area using GIS Multi Criteria Analysis Modeling. The factors contributed in the analysis are the Topography, Land cover, Existing Land use, Flash flood index, Drainage lines and Water points. The first scenario was to classify the are...

  14. Modeling the distributed effects of forest thinning on the long-term water balance and streamflow extremes for a semi-arid basin in the southwestern US

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno, Hernan A.; Gupta, Hoshin V.; Dave D. White; Sampson, David A.

    2016-01-01

    To achieve water resource sustainability in the water-limited southwestern US, it is critical to understand the potential effects of proposed forest thinning on the hydrology of semi-arid basins, where disturbances to headwater catchments can cause significant changes in the local water balance components and basinwise streamflows. In Arizona, the Four Forest Restoration Initiative (4FRI) is being developed with the goal of restoring 2.4 million acres of ponderosa pine along...

  15. LAND SUITABILITY SCENARIOS FOR ARID COASTAL PLAINS USING GIS MODELING: SOUTHWESTERN SINAI COASTAL PLAIN, EGYPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Mohamed Wahid

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Site selection analysis was carried out to find the best suitable lands for development activities in an example of promising coastal plains, southwestern Sinai, Egypt. Two GIS models were developed to represent two scenarios of land use suitability in the study area using GIS Multi Criteria Analysis Modeling. The factors contributed in the analysis are the Topography, Land cover, Existing Land use, Flash flood index, Drainage lines and Water points. The first scenario was to classify the area according to various gradual ranges of suitability. According to this scenario, the area is classified into five classes of suitability. The percentage of suitability values are 51.16, 6.13, 22.32, 18.49 and 1.89% for unsuitable, least suitable, low suitable, suitable and high suitable, respectively. The second scenario is developed for a particular kind of land use planning; tourism and recreation projects. The suitability map of this scenario was classified into five values. Unsuitable areas represent 51.18% of the study area, least suitable 16.67%, low suitable 22.85%, suitable 8.61%, and high suitable 0.68%. The best area for locating development projects is the area surrounding El-Tor City and close to the coast. This area could be an urban extension of El-Tor City with more economical and environmental management.

  16. Arid land irrigation in the United States Pacific Northwest for 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This spatial data set was created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to represent the extent of arid land irrigation in the Pacific Northwest region of the United...

  17. Estimating large-scale evapotranspiration in arid and semi-arid systems: A multi-site study linking MODIS and Ameriflux data

    Science.gov (United States)

    A common goal for water resource managers is to ensure long-term water sustainability for increasing human populations in the arid and semi-arid southwestern United States. In these areas, estimating evapotranspiration (ET) at watershed or river-reach scales is critical in determining an amount of w...

  18. 77 FR 30437 - Proposed Amendment of Air Traffic Service Routes; Southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    ...; Southwestern United States as published in the Federal Register of April 23, 2010 (77 FR 24156) FR Doc. 2012... (77 FR 24156). The description of V-16 in the NPRM did not reflect a previous amendment of the route that was published on September 19, 2011 (76 FR 57902). The incorrect part of the V-16 description...

  19. Feeding Behavior of a Potential Insect Pest, Lygus hesperus, on Four New Industrial Crops for the Arid Southwestern USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camelina (Camelina sativa), guayule (Parthenium argentatum), lesquerella (Physaria fendleri), and vernonia ( Centrapalus pauciflorus [formerly Vernonia galamensis]) are either under limited commercial production or being developed for production in the southwestern USA. Insect pests are a potential ...

  20. Field measurement and analysis of climatic factors affecting dune mobility near Grand Falls on the Navajo Nation, southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogle, Rian C.; Redsteer, Margaret Hiza; Vogel, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Aeolian sand covers extensive areas of the Navajo Nation in the southwestern United States. Much of this sand is currently stabilized by vegetation, although many drier parts of these Native lands also have active and partly active dunes. Current prolonged drought conditions that started in the mid-1990s are producing significant changes in dune mobility. Reactivation of regional aeolian deposits due to drought or increasing aridity from rising temperatures resulting from climate change could have serious consequences for human and animal populations, agriculture, grazing, and infrastructure. To understand and document the current and future potential for mobility, seasonally repeated surveys were used to track the location of multiple active barchan dunes. By utilizing Real-Time Kinematic GPS field surveys and simultaneously collecting in-situ meteorological data, it is possible to examine climatic parameters and seasonal variations that affect dune mobility and their relative influences. Through analysis of the recorded data, we examined the fit of various climate parameters, and demonstrate that under the current prolonged drought, wind power is the dominant factor controlling dune mobility.

  1. Models of Regional Habitat Quality and Connectivity for Pumas (Puma concolor) in the Southwestern United States

    OpenAIRE

    Dickson, Brett G.; Roemer, Gary W.; Mcrae, Brad H.; Jill M. Rundall

    2013-01-01

    The impact of landscape changes on the quality and connectivity of habitats for multiple wildlife species is of global conservation concern. In the southwestern United States, pumas (Puma concolor) are a well distributed and wide-ranging large carnivore that are sensitive to loss of habitat and to the disruption of pathways that connect their populations. We used an expert-based approach to define and derive variables hypothesized to influence the quality, location, and permeability of habita...

  2. Population Growth, Climate Change and Water Scarcity in the Southwestern United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy c. Fuller

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: In a simple economic model, water scarcity arises as a result of an imbalance between the supply of and demand for water sources. Distribution in this setting is the source of numerous conflicts globally. Approach: Already, the Southwestern United States (US suffers from annual drought and long-standing feud over natural water resources. Results: Population growth in the Southwestern United States along with the continued effects of climate change (natural and anthropogenic predicts a perpetual decline in natural water sources, such as smaller snowpacks, in the coming years. As the increasing number of communities across multiple US states that subsist off of natural water supplies face water shortages with increasing severity, further water conflict will emerge. Such conflicts become especially protracted when the diversion of water from a source of benefit to one community negatively impacts nearby communities of humans and economically vital ecosystems (e.g., marshlands or tributaries. Conclusion/Recommendations: The ensuing politics and health effects of these diversions can be complicated and future water policies both domestically and internationally are lacking. To draw attention to and stimulate discussion around the lacking policy discussion domestically, herein we document existing and emerging consequences of watery scarcity in the Southwestern United States and briefly outline past and potential future policy responses.

  3. Deserts of the southwestern United States, for the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system study, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set defines the boundaries of the deserts of the southwestern United States. Those deserts include the Great Basin, Mojave, Colorado, and Sonoran...

  4. Productivity and residual benefits of grain legumes to sorghum under semi-arid conditions in southwestern Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ncube, B.; Twomlow, S.J.; Wijk, van M.T.; Dimes, J.P.; Giller, K.E.

    2007-01-01

    The productivity and residual benefits of four grain legumes to sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) grown in rotation were measured under semi-arid conditions over three cropping seasons. Two varieties of each of the grain legumes; cowpea (Vigna unguiculata); groundnut (Arachis hypogaea); pigeon pea (Cajanus

  5. Productivity and residual benefits of grain legumes to sorghum under semi-arid conditions in southwestern Zimbabwe

    OpenAIRE

    Ncube, B.; Twomlow, S.J.; Wijk, van, M.J.; Dimes, J.P.; Giller, K.E.

    2007-01-01

    The productivity and residual benefits of four grain legumes to sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) grown in rotation were measured under semi-arid conditions over three cropping seasons. Two varieties of each of the grain legumes; cowpea (Vigna unguiculata); groundnut (Arachis hypogaea); pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan); Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea), and sorghum were grown during the first season. The same experiment was implemented three times in different, but adjacent fields that had similar soi...

  6. Modeling the distributed effects of forest thinning on the long-term water balance and stream flow extremes for a semi-arid basin in the southwestern US

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. Moreno

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available To achieve water resources sustainability in the water-limited Southwestern US, it is critical to understand the potential effects of proposed forest thinning on the hydrology of semi-arid basins, where disturbances to headwater catchments can cause significant changes in the local water balance components and basin-wise stream flows. In Arizona, the Four Forest Restoration Initiative (4FRI is being developed with the goal of restoring 2.4 million acres of ponderosa pine along the Mogollon Rim. Using the physically based, spatially distributed tRIBS model, we examine the potential impacts of the 4FRI on the hydrology of Tonto Creek, a basin in the Verde–Tonto–Salt (VTS system, which provides much of the water supply for the Phoenix Metropolitan Area. Long-term (20 year simulations indicate that forest removal can trigger significant shifts in the spatio-temporal patterns of various hydrological components, causing increases in net radiation, surface temperature, wind speed, soil evaporation, groundwater recharge, and runoff, at the expense of reductions in interception and shading, transpiration, vadose zone moisture and snow water equivalent, with south facing slopes being more susceptible to enhanced atmospheric losses. The net effect will likely be increases in mean and maximum stream flow, particularly during El Niño events and the winter months, and chiefly for those scenarios in which soil hydraulic conductivity has been significantly reduced due to thinning operations. In this particular climate, forest thinning can lead to net loss of surface water storage by vegetation and snow pack, increasing the vulnerability of ecosystems and populations to larger and more frequent hydrologic extreme conditions on these semi-arid systems.

  7. Modeling the distributed effects of forest thinning on the long-term water balance and streamflow extremes for a semi-arid basin in the southwestern US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Hernan A.; Gupta, Hoshin V.; White, Dave D.; Sampson, David A.

    2016-03-01

    To achieve water resource sustainability in the water-limited southwestern US, it is critical to understand the potential effects of proposed forest thinning on the hydrology of semi-arid basins, where disturbances to headwater catchments can cause significant changes in the local water balance components and basinwise streamflows. In Arizona, the Four Forest Restoration Initiative (4FRI) is being developed with the goal of restoring 2.4 million acres of ponderosa pine along the Mogollon Rim. Using the physically based, spatially distributed triangulated irregular network (TIN)-based Real-time Integrated Basin Simulator (tRIBS) model, we examine the potential impacts of the 4FRI on the hydrology of Tonto Creek, a basin in the Verde-Tonto-Salt (VTS) system, which provides much of the water supply for the Phoenix metropolitan area. Long-term (20-year) simulations indicate that forest removal can trigger significant shifts in the spatiotemporal patterns of various hydrological components, causing increases in net radiation, surface temperature, wind speed, soil evaporation, groundwater recharge and runoff, at the expense of reductions in interception and shading, transpiration, vadose zone moisture and snow water equivalent, with south-facing slopes being more susceptible to enhanced atmospheric losses. The net effect will likely be increases in mean and maximum streamflow, particularly during El Niño events and the winter months, and chiefly for those scenarios in which soil hydraulic conductivity has been significantly reduced due to thinning operations. In this particular climate, forest thinning can lead to net loss of surface water storage by vegetation and snowpack, increasing the vulnerability of ecosystems and populations to larger and more frequent hydrologic extreme conditions on these semi-arid systems.

  8. Arid land irrigation in the United States Pacific Northwest for 2001 summarized for NHDPlus v2 catchments

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This spatial data set was created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to represent the area of arid land irrigation in the Pacific Northwest region of the United...

  9. Contaminants from cretaceous black shale Part 2: Effect of geology, weathering, climate, and land use on salinity and selenium cycling, Mancos Shale landscapes, southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, Michele L.W.; Fahy, Juli W.; Elliott, John G.; Grauch, Richard I.; Stillings, Lisa L.

    2013-01-01

    The Cretaceous Mancos Shale (MS) is a known nonpoint source for a significant portion of the salinity and selenium (Se) loads in the Colorado River in the southwestern United States and northwestern corner of Mexico. These two contaminants pose a serious threat to rivers in these arid regions where water supplies are especially critical. Tuttle et al. (companion paper) investigates the cycling of contaminants in a Colorado River tributary watershed (Uncompahgre River, southwestern Colorado) where the MS weathers under natural conditions. This paper builds on those results and uses regional soil data in the same watershed to investigate the impact of MS geology, weathering intensity, land use, and climate on salt and Se storage in and flux from soils on the natural landscape, irrigated agriculture fields, areas undergoing urban development, and wetlands. The size of salinity and Se reservoirs in the MS soils is quantified. Flux calculations show that during modern weathering, natural landscapes cycle salt and Se; however, little of it is released for transport to the Uncompahgre River (10% of the annual salinity and 6% of the annual Se river loads). When irrigated, salinity and Se loads from the MS soil increase (26% and 57% of the river load, respectively), causing the river to be out of compliance with Federal and State Se standards. During 100 years of irrigation, seven times more Se has been removed from agricultural soil than what was lost from natural landscapes during the entire period of pedogenesis. Under more arid conditions, even less salt and Se are expected to be transported from the natural landscape. However, if wetter climates prevail, transport could increase dramatically due to storage of soluble phases in the non-irrigated soil. These results are critical input for water-resource and land-use managers who must decide whether or not the salinity and Se in a watershed can be managed, what sustainable mitigation strategies are possible, and what

  10. Site selection issues for radioactive waste disposal in arid regions of the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the United States, shallow land burial has been the principal method of low-level radioactive waste disposal for the past 24 years. Experience has included disposal sites in both arid and humid environments. This paper provides a general overview of the experience to date at the arid sites with contrasts to the humid site experience. Current practices are reviewed with respect to surface water management, trench construction and disposal operations, environmental monitoring of air, water, groundwater, soil and vegetation. As a result of recent federal legislation, new disposal sites are soon to be developed in various regions of the country. Site selection, licensing and development of these new facilities will be governed by federal regulations which have been developed on the basis of past experience and research. Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 61, 'Licensing Requirements for Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste', sets forth certain site suitability requirements and performance objectives with respect to acceptable levels of impact to man and the environment. Guidelines for the site selection process and site characterization are also provided. In this paper, these requirements and their conceptual bases are discussed, particularly in relation to implementation at an arid location. Another rule, 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 193 is being developed to establish 'Standards for Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal'. This rule is being supported by a risk assessment computer model developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency

  11. Tree Morphologic Plasticity Explains Deviation from Metabolic Scaling Theory in Semi-Arid Conifer Forests, Southwestern USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swetnam, Tyson L; O'Connor, Christopher D; Lynch, Ann M

    2016-01-01

    A significant concern about Metabolic Scaling Theory (MST) in real forests relates to consistent differences between the values of power law scaling exponents of tree primary size measures used to estimate mass and those predicted by MST. Here we consider why observed scaling exponents for diameter and height relationships deviate from MST predictions across three semi-arid conifer forests in relation to: (1) tree condition and physical form, (2) the level of inter-tree competition (e.g. open vs closed stand structure), (3) increasing tree age, and (4) differences in site productivity. Scaling exponent values derived from non-linear least-squares regression for trees in excellent condition (n = 381) were above the MST prediction at the 95% confidence level, while the exponent for trees in good condition were no different than MST (n = 926). Trees that were in fair or poor condition, characterized as diseased, leaning, or sparsely crowned had exponent values below MST predictions (n = 2,058), as did recently dead standing trees (n = 375). Exponent value of the mean-tree model that disregarded tree condition (n = 3,740) was consistent with other studies that reject MST scaling. Ostensibly, as stand density and competition increase trees exhibited greater morphological plasticity whereby the majority had characteristically fair or poor growth forms. Fitting by least-squares regression biases the mean-tree model scaling exponent toward values that are below MST idealized predictions. For 368 trees from Arizona with known establishment dates, increasing age had no significant impact on expected scaling. We further suggest height to diameter ratios below MST relate to vertical truncation caused by limitation in plant water availability. Even with environmentally imposed height limitation, proportionality between height and diameter scaling exponents were consistent with the predictions of MST. PMID:27391084

  12. Quantifying the vulnerability of carbon stocks and fluxes in six semi-arid biomes in the Southwestern US to the severe 2011-2013 drought (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvak, M. E.; Krofcheck, D.; Hilton, T. W.; Fox, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    The magnitude of carbon fluxes through arid and semi-arid ecosystems is considered modest, but integrated over the ~40% of the global land surface covered by these ecosystems, the total carbon stored is almost twice that in temperate forest ecosystems. Climatic extremes are typical in the Southwestern U.S, and the frequency of extreme temperature and precipitation events (both drought and large storms) in this region is predicted to increase in the next century. Understanding how resilient carbon pools and fluxes in these biomes are to climate extremes constitutes a large uncertainty in our ability to understand regional carbon balance. We use a 7 year record (2007-2013) of continuous measurements of net ecosystem exchange of carbon (NEE) and its components (gross primary productivity (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (Re) made over the New Mexico Elevation Gradient (NMEG) network of flux tower sites (desert grassland, creosote shrubland, juniper savanna, piñon-juniper woodland, ponderosa pine and subalpine mixed conifer) to test hypotheses about the biome-specific sensitivity of carbon cycling to both drought and temperature extremes. In particular, we focus on the functional responses in these biomes to the extended drought in this region from 2011-2013, which has triggered extensive mortality in many biomes. We used time series of climatic variables, radiation absorbed by vegetation, sap flux, soil moisture storage, and remotely sensed structural and functional data, including rates of mortality, to compare the biome-specific mechanisms behind these responses. We also produce biome-specific functional response surfaces of productivity and respiration to VPD, temperature and soil water availability. Decreases in annual NEP from the relatively wet year of 2010 to the severe drought year 2011 ranged from 60-165 g C m-2 y-1 across the gradient, due more to decreases in GPP than Re. We observed the greatest sensitivity to both temperature and precipitation extremes in

  13. Earlier onset of the spring fine dust season in the southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, J. L.; White, W. H.; Gebhart, K. A.; Hyslop, N. P.; Gill, T. E.; Schichtel, B. A.

    2016-04-01

    Particulate matter (PM)2.5 dust concentrations (mineral particles with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 µm) typically peak in spring and early summer at rural and remote sites across the southwestern United States. Trend analyses indicate that springtime regional mean PM2.5 dust concentrations have increased from 1995 to 2014, especially in March (5.4% yr-1, p < 0.01). This increase reflects an earlier onset of the spring dust season across the Southwest by 1 to 2 weeks over the 20 year time period. March dust concentrations were strongly correlated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation index (r = -0.65, p < 0.01), which was mostly in its negative phase from 2007 to 2014, during which the region was drier, windier, and less vegetated. The positive spring trend and its association with large-scale climate variability have several important implications for visibility, particulate matter, health effects, and the hydrologic cycle in the region.

  14. Models of regional habitat quality and connectivity for pumas (Puma concolor) in the southwestern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Brett G; Roemer, Gary W; McRae, Brad H; Rundall, Jill M

    2013-01-01

    The impact of landscape changes on the quality and connectivity of habitats for multiple wildlife species is of global conservation concern. In the southwestern United States, pumas (Puma concolor) are a well distributed and wide-ranging large carnivore that are sensitive to loss of habitat and to the disruption of pathways that connect their populations. We used an expert-based approach to define and derive variables hypothesized to influence the quality, location, and permeability of habitat for pumas within an area encompassing the entire states of Arizona and New Mexico. Survey results indicated that the presence of woodland and forest cover types, rugged terrain, and canyon bottom and ridgeline topography were expected to be important predictors of both high quality habitat and heightened permeability. As road density, distance to water, or human population density increased, the quality and permeability of habitats were predicted to decline. Using these results, we identified 67 high quality patches across the study area, and applied concepts from electronic circuit theory to estimate regional patterns of connectivity among these patches. Maps of current flow among individual pairs of patches highlighted possible pinch points along two major interstate highways. Current flow summed across all pairs of patches highlighted areas important for keeping the entire network connected, regardless of patch size. Cumulative current flow was highest in Arizona north of the Colorado River and around Grand Canyon National Park, and in the Sky Islands region owing to the many small habitat patches present. Our outputs present a first approximation of habitat quality and connectivity for dispersing pumas in the southwestern United States. Map results can be used to help target finer-scaled analyses in support of planning efforts concerned with the maintenance of puma metapopulation structure, as well as the protection of landscape features that facilitate the dispersal

  15. Models of regional habitat quality and connectivity for pumas (Puma concolor in the southwestern United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett G Dickson

    Full Text Available The impact of landscape changes on the quality and connectivity of habitats for multiple wildlife species is of global conservation concern. In the southwestern United States, pumas (Puma concolor are a well distributed and wide-ranging large carnivore that are sensitive to loss of habitat and to the disruption of pathways that connect their populations. We used an expert-based approach to define and derive variables hypothesized to influence the quality, location, and permeability of habitat for pumas within an area encompassing the entire states of Arizona and New Mexico. Survey results indicated that the presence of woodland and forest cover types, rugged terrain, and canyon bottom and ridgeline topography were expected to be important predictors of both high quality habitat and heightened permeability. As road density, distance to water, or human population density increased, the quality and permeability of habitats were predicted to decline. Using these results, we identified 67 high quality patches across the study area, and applied concepts from electronic circuit theory to estimate regional patterns of connectivity among these patches. Maps of current flow among individual pairs of patches highlighted possible pinch points along two major interstate highways. Current flow summed across all pairs of patches highlighted areas important for keeping the entire network connected, regardless of patch size. Cumulative current flow was highest in Arizona north of the Colorado River and around Grand Canyon National Park, and in the Sky Islands region owing to the many small habitat patches present. Our outputs present a first approximation of habitat quality and connectivity for dispersing pumas in the southwestern United States. Map results can be used to help target finer-scaled analyses in support of planning efforts concerned with the maintenance of puma metapopulation structure, as well as the protection of landscape features that facilitate

  16. Groundwater flow functioning in arid zones with thick volcanic aquifer units: North-Central Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Population increase in arid zones of Mexico has created the presence of 450% new cities with more that 50,000 inhabitants, as related to the 1950s. Due to the arid nature of the environment, the once sufficient spring and shallow water are becoming inadequate for the supply of those cities. An answer to this problem lies with the sustainable development of deep groundwater. The geological features of the country include fractured volcanic aquifer units that are more than 1,500 m thick, and are regionally continuous over of several hundred thousands of square kilometres. Groundwater development decisions need to consider, in the long span, inter-basin groundwater flow and the need to prevent environmental impacts in distant sites hydraulically connected with extraction centres. Radiocarbon is an excellent tool that initially has been applied to characterize groundwater in thick aquifer units in central Mexico to provide evidence on the hierarchy of flow (local/regional) and water age from where the distance of regional recharge was inferred. Radiocarbon also helps constrain flow path length which can then be used to characterize inter-basin groundwater communication. Radiocarbon has a large potential for future expansion of research and water management application. (author)

  17. Lagrangian particle modeling of air pollution transport in southwestern United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uliasz, M. [Warsaw Univ. of Technology (Poland); Stocker, R.A.; Pielke, R.A. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Several modeling techniques of various complexity and accuracy are applied in a numerical modeling study of regional air pollution transport being performed within the Measurement Of Haze And Visual Effect (MOHAVE) project. The goal of this study is to assess the impact of the Mohave Power Project (MPP) and other potential sources of air pollution to specific Class I areas located in the desert southwest United States including the Grand Canyon National Park. The Colorado State University team is performing the daily meteorological and dispersion simulations for a year long study using a nonhydrostatic mesoscale meteorological model; the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) coupled with a Lagrangian particle dispersion (LPD) model. The modeling domain covers the southwestern United States with its extremely complex terrain. Two complementary dispersion modeling techniques: a traditional source-oriented approach and receptor-oriented approach are used to calculate concentration and influence function fields, respectively. All computations are performed on two IBM RISC-6000 workstations dedicated to the project. The goal of this paper is to present our design for daily dispersion simulations with an emphasis on influence function calculations using examples from the winter and summer intensive periods of the MOHAVE project.

  18. Identifying Groundwater Recharge in Arid Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, B. F.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Recharge epodicity in arid regions provides a method to estimate annual groundwater recharge given a relationship expressed as the recharge to precipitation ratio. Traditionally, in-situ observations are required to identify aquifer recharge events, while more advanced approaches such as the water-table fluctuation method or the episodic master recession method are necessary to delineate the recharge event. Our study uses the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) observations to estimate monthly changes in groundwater storage which are attributed to the combination of groundwater abstraction and episodic recharge in the arid southwestern United States. Our results illustrate the ability of remote sensing technologies to identify episodic groundwater recharge in arid regions which can be used within sustainable groundwater management frameworks to effectively manage groundwater resources.

  19. Seismic discontinuities beneath the southwestern United States from S receiver functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akanbi, Olufemi; Li, Aibing

    2016-05-01

    S-receiver functions along the Colorado Plateau-Rio Grande Rift-Great Plains Transect known as LA RISTRA in the southwestern United States have been utilized to map seismic discontinuities beneath this tectonically active region. Individual receiver functions were stacked according to ray piercing points with moveout corrections in order to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the converted S-to-P phases. A mantle discontinuity, which is interpreted as the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB), is observed along the profile with depth ranging from 80 km beneath the Rio Grande Rift (RGR) to 100 km beneath the Great Plains (GP) and 120-180 km beneath the Colorado Plateau (CP). The shallow LAB beneath the Rio Grande Rift is indicative of lithosphere extension and asthenosphere upwarp. The LAB deepens sharply at the RGR-CP and RGR-GP boundaries, providing evidence for edge-driven, small-scale mantle convection beneath LA RISTRA. Two local discontinuities beneath the southeastern Colorado Plateau are imaged at ~ 250 km and ~ 300 km and could be the top and base of the eroded lithosphere, respectively. The S receiver function images suggest that edge-driven, small-scale convection is probably the mantle source for recent extension and uplift in the Rio Grande Rift and the Colorado Plateau.

  20. Geothermal development and production of electricity in the Southwestern United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowotny, K.R.; Rao, C.R.

    1978-10-01

    A computer simulation model (GIRORA-Electric) is developed to study the economics of power generation from high temperature geothermal resources. GIRORA-Electric is a discounted cash flow investment model which evaluates the rate of return on producers' capital investment. This model consists of two major submodels: the exploration and development of a geothermal anomaly by a producer; and the purchase of geothermal fluid by a utility developer. The primary output of the model is a calculated rate of return on the capital investment earned by the geothermal producer. The results of the sensitivity analysis of the model subject to changes in physical and economic parameters are given. Using the results of the economic analysis, the high temperature geothermal sites (temperatures greater than 150/sup 0/C) in the Southwestern United States are examined for economic viability for power generation. The total amount of power that can be brought on line in the Southwest Region is estimated under three different scenario assumptions. An econometric model is developed to estimate the total demand for electricity in the Southwest Region. From this demand and supply estimates, the amount of geothermal energy that can be utilized is also estimated.

  1. Seasonal variation of indoor Rn at a location in the southwestern United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon-222 concentrations have been measured in 12 homes typical of a small town in the southwestern United States. Nine of the houses, in which both summer and winter data are available, have an annual mean of 63 +/- 18 Bq m-3 (1.7 +/- 0.5 pCi L-1) and a range of 41 to 96 Bq m-3 (1.1 to 2.6 pCi L-1). These results were obtained with passive Rn dosimeters using polycarbonate nuclear track detector foils. The overall results fall slightly above the middle of the range of values obtained in other studies in the United States. Winter levels clearly exceed summer by a factor of from two to three. This result is attributed primarily to wide use of evaporative air conditioners for daytime cooling in the summer together with the fact that doors and windows are left open frequently during evening and nighttime hours. Both practices enhance the exchange of outdoor air with indoor air contributing to a decrease in the indoor Rn levels during the summer season. Room-to-room differences were evident during the winter season only. Bedrooms and bathrooms were generally higher in Rn than kitchens and living rooms but by only about 25%. The two adobe houses in the group showed higher Rn concentrations during the winter season than did those of frame-stucco, concrete, or cinder block construction. Dose equivalent calculations yielded a mean figure of 0.29 WLM y-1 for typical occupancy patterns in these New Mexico houses

  2. Seasonal variation of indoor Rn at a location in the southwestern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkening, M; Wicke, A

    1986-10-01

    Radon-222 concentrations have been measured in 12 homes typical of a small town in the southwestern United States. Nine of the houses, in which both summer and winter data are available, have an annual mean of 63 +/- 18 Bq m-3 (1.7 +/- 0.5 pCi L-1) and a range of 41 to 96 Bq m-3 (1.1 to 2.6 pCi L-1). These results were obtained with passive Rn dosimeters using polycarbonate nuclear track detector foils. The overall results fall slightly above the middle of the range of values obtained in other studies in the United States. Winter levels clearly exceed summer by a factor of from two to three. This result is attributed primarily to wide use of evaporative air conditioners for daytime cooling in the summer together with the fact that doors and windows are left open frequently during evening and nighttime hours. Both practices enhance the exchange of outdoor air with indoor air contributing to a decrease in the indoor Rn levels during the summer season. Room-to-room differences were evident during the winter season only. Bedrooms and bathrooms were generally higher in Rn than kitchens and living rooms but by only about 25%. The two adobe houses in the group showed higher Rn concentrations during the winter season than did those of frame-stucco, concrete, or cinder block construction. Dose equivalent calculations yielded a mean figure of 0.29 WLM y-1 for typical occupancy patterns in these New Mexico houses. PMID:3759456

  3. Management implications of the ecology of free-roaming horses in semi-arid ecosystems of the western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beever, Erik A.

    2003-01-01

    Compared to other ungulates of North America, free-roaming horses (Equus caballus) possess a unique evolutionary history that has given rise to a distinct suite of behavioral, morphological, and physiological traits. Because of their unique combination of cecal digestion, an elongate head with flexible lips, and non-uniform use of the landscape, horses represent a unique disturbance agent in semi-arid ecosystems of the western United States. Consequently, it is inappropriate to assume that influences of horses on the structure, composition, function, and pattern of arid and semi-arid ecosystems will mirror influences of cattle or other artiodactyls. Although management areas for free-roaming horses occupy 18.6 million ha of land across western North America, we know relatively little about how western ecosystems and their components have responded to this uniquely managed ungulate. I draw on my research of horse habitats in the western Great Basin (U.S.A.) to examine predictions of horses' unique influence, and advocate for continued research to refine our understanding of synecological relationships among horses and diverse ecosystem components in arid and semi-arid regions.

  4. Projecting climate effects on birds and reptiles of the Southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Riper, Charles, III; Hatten, James R.; Giermakowski, J. Tomasz; Mattson, David; Holmes, Jennifer A.; Johnson, Matthew J.; Nowak, Erika M.; Ironside, Kirsten; Peters, Michael; Heinrich, Paul; Cole, K.L.; Truettner, C.; Schwalbe, Cecil R.

    2014-01-01

    We modeled the current and future breeding ranges of seven bird and five reptile species in the Southwestern United States with sets of landscape, biotic (plant), and climatic global circulation model (GCM) variables. For modeling purposes, we used PRISM data to characterize the climate of the Western United States between 1980 and 2009 (baseline for birds) and between 1940 and 2009 (baseline for reptiles). In contrast, we used a pre-selected set of GCMs that are known to be good predictors of southwestern climate (five individual and one ensemble GCM), for the A1B emission scenario, to characterize future climatic conditions in three time periods (2010–39; 2040–69; and, 2070–99). Our modeling approach relied on conceptual models for each target species to inform selection of candidate explanatory variables and to interpret the ecological meaning of developed probabilistic distribution models. We employed logistic regression and maximum entropy modeling techniques to create a set of probabilistic models for each target species. We considered climatic, landscape, and plant variables when developing and testing our probabilistic models. Climatic variables included the maximum and minimum mean monthly and seasonal temperature and precipitation for three time periods. Landscape features included terrain ruggedness and insolation. We also considered plant species distributions as candidate explanatory variables where prior ecological knowledge implicated a strong association between a plant and animal species. Projected changes in range varied widely among species, from major losses to major gains. Breeding bird ranges exhibited greater expansions and contractions than did reptile species. We project range losses for Williamson’s sapsucker and pygmy nuthatch of a magnitude that could move these two species close to extinction within the next century. Although both species currently have a relatively limited distribution, they can be locally common, and neither

  5. Water uptake in woody riparian phreatophytes of the southwestern United States: a stable isotope study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alluvial forest associations are often dominated by woody phreatophytes, plants that are tightly linked to aquifers for water uptake. Anthropogenic hydrological alterations (e.g., water impoundment or diversion) are of clear importance to riparian ecosystem function. Because decreased frequency of flooding and depression of water tables may, in effect, sever riparian plants from their natural water sources, research was undertaken to determine water uptake patterns for the dominant native and introduced woody taxa of riparian plant communities of the southwestern United States. At floodplain study sites along the Bill Williams and lower Colorado Rivers (Arizona, USA), naturally occurring D and 18O were used to distinguish among potential water sources. Isotopic ratios from potential uptake locations were compared to water extracted from the dominant woody taxa of the study area (Populus fremontii, Salix gooddingii, and Tamarix ramosissima) to elucidate patterns of water absorption. Isotopic composition of water obtained from sapwood cores did not differ significantly from heartwood or branch water, suggesting that heartwood water exchange, stem capacitance, and phloem sap mixing may be inconsequential in actively transpiring Salix and Populus. There was evidence for close hydrologic linkage of river, ground, and soil water during the early part of the growing season. Surface soils exhibited D enrichment due to cumulative exposure to evaporation as the growing season progressed. Isotopic ratios of water extracted from Populus and Salix did not exhibit isotopic enrichment and were not significantly different from groundwater or saturated soil water sources, indicating a phreatophytic uptake pattern. Associations of isotopic ratios with water relations parameters indicated high levels of canopy evaporation and possible use of moisture from unsaturated alluvial soils in addition to groundwater in Tamarix. (author)

  6. A Projection of Maize-Yield Potential in the Southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S. H.; Kim, J.; Walko, R. L.; Myoung, B.; Stack, D.; Kafatos, M.

    2014-12-01

    As human population is projected to increase by 35% by 2050, agricultural production requires substantial growth compared to the current yield levels. In the coming decades, evaluating yield potential (Yp), the yield of a crop cultivar when grown without limitation of water and nutrients with effectively controlled pest and diseases change and solely determined by climate variables, is crucial to assess food security under climate change scenarios as it is directly connected to amount of exploitable yield. In this study, Yp is estimated and projected using regional climate models (RCM) and a process-based crop model over the Southwestern United States. High-resolution (8km grid spacing at the inner domain) climate variables are obtained using dynamical downscaling with two RCMs (WRF and OLAM) driven by boundary conditions from a GCM (GFDL-ESM2M) in the 5th phase of Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) archives. 20 years of the high-resolution and bias-corrected climate data from the two RCM runs (historical (1981-2000) and future (2031-2050)) are employed on the process-based crop model, Agricultural Production Systems sIMulator (ASPIM) to assess the climate change impact on maize Yp. The potential maize yield in the future period under the RCP8.5 greenhouse gas concentrations pathways shows that the yields are significantly changed when compared to the historical period. In the generally rising temperature regime, the projected Yp shows strong geospatial variations according to the regional climate characteristics in the high-resolution RCM projections.

  7. Desert grassland responses to climate and soil moisture suggest divergent vulnerabilities across the southwestern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gremer, Jennifer R; Bradford, John B; Munson, Seth M; Duniway, Michael C

    2015-11-01

    Climate change predictions include warming and drying trends, which are expected to be particularly pronounced in the southwestern United States. In this region, grassland dynamics are tightly linked to available moisture, yet it has proven difficult to resolve what aspects of climate drive vegetation change. In part, this is because it is unclear how heterogeneity in soils affects plant responses to climate. Here, we combine climate and soil properties with a mechanistic soil water model to explain temporal fluctuations in perennial grass cover, quantify where and the degree to which incorporating soil water dynamics enhances our ability to understand temporal patterns, and explore the potential consequences of climate change by assessing future trajectories of important climate and soil water variables. Our analyses focused on long-term (20-56 years) perennial grass dynamics across the Colorado Plateau, Sonoran, and Chihuahuan Desert regions. Our results suggest that climate variability has negative effects on grass cover, and that precipitation subsidies that extend growing seasons are beneficial. Soil water metrics, including the number of dry days and availability of water from deeper (>30 cm) soil layers, explained additional grass cover variability. While individual climate variables were ranked as more important in explaining grass cover, collectively soil water accounted for 40-60% of the total explained variance. Soil water conditions were more useful for understanding the responses of C3 than C4 grass species. Projections of water balance variables under climate change indicate that conditions that currently support perennial grasses will be less common in the future, and these altered conditions will be more pronounced in the Chihuahuan Desert and Colorado Plateau. We conclude that incorporating multiple aspects of climate and accounting for soil variability can improve our ability to understand patterns, identify areas of vulnerability, and predict

  8. MACROINVERTEBRATE SAMPLING TECHNIQUES FOR STREAMS IN SEMI-ARID REGIONS. COMPARISON OF THE SURBER METHOD AND A UNIT-EFFORT TRAVELING KICK METHOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streams of the arid and semi-arid regions of the western United States are characterized by irregular flow patterns resulting in highly unstable macroinvertebrate habitats and a sparse macrobenthic fauna. The use of a standard square-foot Surber stream-bottom sampler is of limite...

  9. Identifying bird and reptile vulnerabilities to climate change in the southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatten, James R.; Giermakowski, J. Tomasz; Holmes, Jennifer A.; Nowak, Erika M.; Johnson, Matthew J.; Ironside, Kirsten E.; Van Riper, Charles, III; Peters, Michael; Truettner, Charles; Cole, Kenneth L.

    2016-01-01

    Current and future breeding ranges of 15 bird and 16 reptile species were modeled in the Southwestern United States. Rather than taking a broad-scale, vulnerability-assessment approach, we created a species distribution model (SDM) for each focal species incorporating climatic, landscape, and plant variables. Baseline climate (1940–2009) was characterized with Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) data and future climate with global-circulation-model data under an A1B emission scenario. Climatic variables included monthly and seasonal temperature and precipitation; landscape variables included terrain ruggedness, soil type, and insolation; and plant variables included trees and shrubs commonly associated with a focal species. Not all species-distribution models contained a plant, but if they did, we included a built-in annual migration rate for more accurate plant-range projections in 2039 or 2099. We conducted a group meta-analysis to (1) determine how influential each variable class was when averaged across all species distribution models (birds or reptiles), and (2) identify the correlation among contemporary (2009) habitat fragmentation and biological attributes and future range projections (2039 or 2099). Projected changes in bird and reptile ranges varied widely among species, with one-third of the ranges predicted to expand and two-thirds predicted to contract. A group meta-analysis indicated that climatic variables were the most influential variable class when averaged across all models for both groups, followed by landscape and plant variables (birds), or plant and landscape variables (reptiles), respectively. The second part of the meta-analysis indicated that numerous contemporary habitat-fragmentation (for example, patch isolation) and biological-attribute (for example, clutch size, longevity) variables were significantly correlated with the magnitude of projected range changes for birds and reptiles. Patch isolation was

  10. Geochemistry of magnetite from porphyry Cu and skarn deposits in the southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadoll, Patrick; Mauk, Jeffrey L.; LeVeille, Richard A.; Koenig, Alan E.

    2015-01-01

    A combination of petrographic observations, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), and statistical data exploration was used in this study to determine compositional variations in hydrothermal and igneous magnetite from five porphyry Cu–Mo and skarn deposits in the southwestern United States, and igneous magnetite from the unmineralized, granodioritic Inner Zone Batholith, Japan. The most important overall discriminators for the minor and trace element chemistry of magnetite from the investigated porphyry and skarn deposits are Mg, Al, Ti, V, Mn, Co, Zn, and Ga—of these the elements with the highest variance for (I) igneous magnetite are Mg, Al, Ti, V, Mn, Zn, for (II) hydrothermal porphyry magnetite are Mg, Ti, V, Mn, Co, Zn, and for (III) hydrothermal skarn magnetite are Mg, Ti, Mn, Zn, and Ga. Nickel could only be detected at levels above the limit of reporting (LOR) in two igneous magnetites. Equally, Cr could only be detected in one igneous occurrence. Copper, As, Mo, Ag, Au, and Pb have been reported in magnetite by other authors but could not be detected at levels greater than their respective LORs in our samples. Comparison with the chemical signature of igneous magnetite from the barren Inner Zone Batholith, Japan, suggests that V, Mn, Co, and Ga concentrations are relatively depleted in magnetite from the porphyry and skarn deposits. Higher formation conditions in combination with distinct differences between melt and hydrothermal fluid compositions are reflected in Al, Ti, V, and Ga concentrations that are, on average, higher in igneous magnetite than in hydrothermal magnetite (including porphyry and skarn magnetite). Low Ti and V concentrations in combination with high Mn concentrations are characteristic features of magnetite from skarn deposits. High Mg concentrations (magnetite from magnesian skarn and likely reflect extensive fluid/rock interaction. In porphyry deposits, hydrothermal magnetite from different

  11. District space heating potential of low temperature hydrothermal geothermal resources in the southwestern United States. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDevitt, P.K.; Rao, C.R.

    1978-10-01

    A computer simulation model (GIRORA-Nonelectric) is developed to study the economics of district space heating using geothermal energy. GIRORA-Nonelectric is a discounted cashflow investment model which evaluates the financial return on investment for space heating. This model consists of two major submodels: the exploration for and development of a geothermal anomaly by a geothermal producer, and the purchase of geothermal fluid by a district heating unit. The primary output of the model is a calculated rate of return on investment earned by the geothermal producer. The results of the sensitivity analysis of the model subject to changes in physical and economic parameters are given in this report. Using the results of the economic analysis and technological screening criteria, all the low temperature geothermal sites in Southwestern United States are examined for economic viability for space heating application. The methodology adopted and the results are given.

  12. Reported Historic Asbestos Mines, Historic Asbestos Prospects, and Natural Asbestos Occurrences in the Southwestern United States (Arizona, Nevada, and Utah)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gosen, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    This map and its accompanying dataset provide information for 113 natural asbestos occurrences in the Southwestern United States (U.S.), using descriptions found in the geologic literature. Data on location, mineralogy, geology, and relevant literature for each asbestos site are provided. Using the map and digital data in this report, the user can examine the distribution of previously reported asbestos occurrences and their geological characteristics in the Southwestern U.S., which includes sites in Arizona, Nevada, and Utah. This report is part of an ongoing study by the U.S. Geological Survey to identify and map reported natural asbestos occurrences in the U.S., which thus far includes similar maps and datasets of natural asbestos occurrences within the Eastern U.S. (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2005/1189/), the Central U.S. (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2006/1211/), and the Rocky Mountain States (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1182/. These reports are intended to provide State and local government agencies and other stakeholders with geologic information on natural occurrences of asbestos in the U.S.

  13. Water use and supply concerns for utility-scale solar projects in the Southwestern United States.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klise, Geoffrey Taylor; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Reno, Marissa Devan; Moreland, Barbara D.; Zemlick, Katie M.; Macknick, Jordan [National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, CO

    2013-07-01

    As large utility-scale solar photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) facilities are currently being built and planned for locations in the U.S. with the greatest solar resource potential, an understanding of water use for construction and operations is needed as siting tends to target locations with low natural rainfall and where most existing freshwater is already appropriated. Using methods outlined by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to determine water used in designated solar energy zones (SEZs) for construction and operations & maintenance, an estimate of water used over the lifetime at the solar power plant is determined and applied to each watershed in six Southwestern states. Results indicate that that PV systems overall use little water, though construction usage is high compared to O&M water use over the lifetime of the facility. Also noted is a transition being made from wet cooled to dry cooled CSP facilities that will significantly reduce operational water use at these facilities. Using these water use factors, estimates of future water demand for current and planned solar development was made. In efforts to determine where water could be a limiting factor in solar energy development, water availability, cost, and projected future competing demands were mapped for the six Southwestern states. Ten watersheds, 9 in California, and one in New Mexico were identified as being of particular concern because of limited water availability.

  14. Increased Extreme Hydrological Events and Decreased Water Supply Availability for the Southwestern United States Projected by Mid-Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagan, B. R.; Ashfaq, M.; Rastogi, D.; Naz, B. S.; Kao, S. C.; Mei, R.; Kendall, D. R.; Pal, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Semi-arid Southern California relies primarily on imported water originating mostly from snowpack in basins outside of the region including the San-Joaquin River, Tulare Lake, Sacramento River, Owens Valley, Mono Lake, and Colorado River basins. This study provides an integrated ensemble approach to assessing climate change impacts on the hydrologic cycle and hydrologic extremes for all water supplies to Southern California. Output from 10 global climate models is used to force a regional climate model and hydrological model resulting in high-resolution 4.17-km output for the region. Greenhouse gas concentrations are prescribed according to historical values for the present-day (1965-2005) and the IPCC Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5 for the near to mid term future (2010-2050). On the annual timescale, temperature, precipitation and evaporation increase throughout the majority of the study area. With increased temperatures, precipitation is less likely to fall as snow, decreasing snowpack and natural storage and shifting peak flows to earlier in the year. Daily annual maximum runoff and precipitation events are projected to significantly increase in intensity and frequency by mid-century. The 50-year event, for example, becomes approximately five times more likely in the Colorado River basin and twice as likely in the other basins. In densely populated coastal Southern Californian cities, extreme flood events become three to five times as likely substantially increasing the risk of overburdening flood control systems and potential widespread flooding. The escalating likelihood of the combined effects of runoff occurring earlier in the year and in significantly higher amounts poses a substantial flood control risk requiring adaptation measures such as water release from reservoirs. Significant snowpack reductions and increased flood risk will likely necessitate additional multiyear storage solutions for urban and agricultural regions in the Southwestern US.

  15. National Assessment of Oil and Gas Project - Southwestern Wyoming Province (037) Assessment Units

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Assessment Unit is the fundamental unit used in the National Assessment Project for the assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources. The Assessment Unit is...

  16. DISCRIMINATION OF ALTERED BASALTIC ROCKS IN THE SOUTHWESTERN UNITED STATES BY ANALYSIS OF LANDSAT THEMATIC MAPPER DATA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Philip A.; Berlin, Graydon L.; Chavez, Pat S.

    1987-01-01

    Landsat Thematic Mapper image data were analyzed to determine their ability to discriminate red cone basalts from gray flow basalts and sedimentary country rocks for three volcanic fields in the southwestern United States. Analyses of all of the possible three-band combinations of the six nonthermal bands indicate that the combination of bands 1, 4, and 5 best discriminates among these materials. The color-composite image of these three bands unambiguously discriminates 89 percent of the mapped red volcanic cones in the three volcanic fields. Mineralogic and chemical analyses of collected samples indicate that discrimination is facilitated by the presence of hematite as a major mineral phase in the red cone basalts (hematite is only a minor mineral phase in the gray flow basalts and red sedimentary rocks).

  17. Contaminants from Cretaceous Black Shale Part 1: Natural weathering processes controlling contaminant cycling in Mancos Shale, southwestern United States, with emphasis on salinity and selenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, Michele L.W.; Fahy, Juli W.; Elliott, John G.; Grauch, Richard I.; Stillings, Lisa L.

    2013-01-01

    Soils derived from black shale can accumulate high concentrations of elements of environmental concern, especially in regions with semiarid to arid climates. One such region is the Colorado River basin in the southwestern United States where contaminants pose a threat to agriculture, municipal water supplies, endangered aquatic species, and water-quality commitments to Mexico. Exposures of Cretaceous Mancos Shale (MS) in the upper basin are a major contributor of salinity and selenium in the Colorado River. Here, we examine the roles of geology, climate, and alluviation on contaminant cycling (emphasis on salinity and Se) during weathering of MS in a Colorado River tributary watershed. Stage I (incipient weathering) began perhaps as long ago as 20 ka when lowering of groundwater resulted in oxidation of pyrite and organic matter. This process formed gypsum and soluble organic matter that persist in the unsaturated, weathered shale today. Enrichment of Se observed in laterally persistent ferric oxide layers likely is due to selenite adsorption onto the oxides that formed during fluctuating redox conditions at the water table. Stage II weathering (pedogenesis) is marked by a significant decrease in bulk density and increase in porosity as shale disaggregates to soil. Rainfall dissolves calcite and thenardite (Na2SO4) at the surface, infiltrates to about 1 m, and precipitates gypsum during evaporation. Gypsum formation (estimated 390 kg m−2) enriches soil moisture in Na and residual SO4. Transpiration of this moisture to the surface or exposure of subsurface soil (slumping) produces more thenardite. Most Se remains in the soil as selenite adsorbed to ferric oxides, however, some oxidizes to selenate and, during wetter conditions is transported with soil moisture to depths below 3 m. Coupled with little rainfall, relatively insoluble gypsum, and the translocation of soluble Se downward, MS landscapes will be a significant nonpoint source of salinity and Se to the

  18. Increasing Vulnerability to Drought and Climate Change on the Navajo Nation, southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiza, M. M.; Kelley, K. B.; Francis, H.

    2011-12-01

    The Navajo Nation of Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah, is an ecologically sensitive semi-arid to arid area where rapid growth of one of the largest population of Native Americans is outstripping the capacity of the land to sustain them. Recent drought conditions, combined with increasing temperatures, are significantly altering the habitability of a region already characterized by harsh living conditions. In addition to altered landscape conditions due to climatic change, drought, and varying land use practices over the last 200 years, the Navajo people have been affected by land use policies and harsh economic conditions that weaken their cultural fabric. Increasing aridity combined with drought threaten the very existence of Navajo culture and the survival of traditional Navajo communities. People presently living on these Native lands are unique in American society as their traditional lifestyle requires intimate knowledge of the ecosystem, knowledge that has been passed on for generations through oral traditions. We present data from the lifelong observations of 73 Native American elders that provide a record of the changes in plants and animals, water availability, weather, and sand or dust storms. This information is used to complement the scant long-term meteorological records and historical documentation for the region to further refine our understanding of the historical trends and local impacts of climate change and drought. Among the most cited changes is a long-term decrease in the amount of annual snowfall over the past century, a transition from wet conditions to dry conditions in the 1940s, and a decline in surface water features. The lack of available water, in addition to changing socioeconomic conditions, was mentioned as a leading cause for the decline in the ability to grow corn and other crops. Other noted changes include the disappearance of springs, and of plant and animal populations (particularly medicinal plants, cottonwood trees, beavers

  19. Prospects for phenological monitoring in an arid southwestern U.S. rangeland using field observations with hyperspatial and moderate resolution imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, D. M.; Laliberte, A. S.; Rango, A.; Herrick, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    Relating field observations of plant phenological events to remotely sensed depictions of land surface phenology remains a challenge to the vertical integration of data from disparate sources. This research conducted at the Jornada Basin Long-Term Ecological Research site in southern New Mexico capitalizes on legacy datasets pertaining to reproductive phenology and biomass and hyperspatial imagery. Large amounts of exposed bare soil and modest cover from shrubs and grasses in these arid and semi-arid ecosystems challenge the integration of field observations of phenology and remotely sensed data to monitor changes in land surface phenology. Drawing on established field protocols for reproductive phenology, hyperspatial imagery (4 cm), and object-based image analysis, we explore the utility of two approaches to scale detailed observations (i.e., field and 4 cm imagery) to the extent of long-term field plots (50 x 50m) and moderate resolution Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) imagery (30 x 30m). Very high resolution color-infrared imagery was collected June 2007 across 15 LTER study sites that transect five distinct vegetation communities along a continuum of grass to shrub dominance. We examined two methods for scaling spectral vegetation indices (SVI) at 4 cm resolution: pixel averaging and object-based integration. Pixel averaging yields the mean SVI value for all pixels within the plot or TM pixel. Alternatively, the object-based method is based on a weighted average of SVI values that correspond to discrete image objects (e.g., individual shrubs or grass patches). Object-based image analysis of 4 cm imagery provides a detailed depiction of ground cover and allows us to extract species-specific contributions to upscaled SVI values. The ability to discern species- or functional-group contributions to remotely sensed signals of vegetation greenness can greatly enhance the design of field sampling protocols for phenological research. Furthermore, imagery from unmanned

  20. Simple equation for estimating actual evapotranspiration using heat units for wheat in arid regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Salama

    2015-07-01

    Application of treatment (B resulted in highly significant increase in yield production of Gemmeza10 and Misr2 as compared to treatment (A. Grain yield of different wheat varieties grown under treatment (B could be ranked in the following descending order: Misr2 > Gemmeza10 > Sids12. While under treatment (A it could be arranged in the following descending order: Misr2 > Sids12 > Gemmeza10. On the other hand, the overall means indicated non-significant difference between all wheat verities. The highest values of water and irrigation use efficiency as well as heat use efficiency were obtained with treatment (B. The equation used in the present study is available to estimate ETa under arid climate with drip irrigation system.

  1. Late Pleistocene C4 plant dominance and summer rainfall in the southwestern United States from isotopic study of herbivore teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connin, S.L.; Betancourt, J.; Quade, Jay

    1998-01-01

    Patterns of climate and C4 plant abundance in the southwestern United States during the last glaciation were evaluated from isotopic study of herbivore tooth enamel. Enamel ??13C values revealed a substantial eastward increase in C4 plant consumption for Mammuthus spp., Bison spp., Equus spp., and Camelops spp. The ??13C values were greatest in Bison spp. (-6.9 to + 1.7???) and Mammuthus spp. (-9.0 to +0.3???), and in some locales indicated C4-dominated grazing. The ??13C values of Antilocaprids were lowest among taxa (-12.5 to -7.9???) and indicated C3 feeding at all sites. On the basis of modern correlations between climate and C4 grass abundance, the enamel data imply significant summer rain in parts of southern Arizona and New Mexico throughout the last glaciation. Enamel ??18O values range from +19.0 to +31.0??? and generally increase to the east. This pattern could point to a tropical or subtropical source of summer rainfall. At a synoptic scale, the isotope data indicate that interactions of seasonal moisture, temperature, and lowered atmospheric pCO2 determined glacial-age C4 abundance patterns.

  2. Urban vegetation and income segregation in drylands: a synthesis of seven metropolitan regions in the southwestern United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To better understand how urbanization affects the amount and timing of urban vegetation in drylands we investigated remotely sensed vegetation patterns across seven large metropolitan regions in the southwestern United States. We asked (1) how low density urban land cover differed from adjacent wildland grass, herb, and shrub land covers in both the amount of vegetation and the length of the growing season, (2) how neighborhood income affected patterns of vegetation within low density urban cover, and (3) how cities differed from one another in their vegetation patterns. We found that urbanization generally has a strong influence on vegetation compared to adjacent wildlands. In four of the metropolitan regions the cumulative enhanced vegetation index (EVI) and growing season length in low density developments were higher than grass, herb, and shrub land covers. Within all metropolitan regions, there was a significant socioeconomic effect where higher income areas had a higher cumulative EVI than lower income areas. The large differences in urban vegetation among cities were related to precipitation and total domestic water use. These findings help to identify how urbanization influences vegetation, with implications for the availability of ecosystem services and requirements for irrigation in hot dryland cities. (letter)

  3. Diabetes among Latinos in the Southwestern United States: border health and binational cooperation

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan P. Casey; Mark A. Rouff; Lorena Jauregui-Covarrubias

    2014-01-01

    This analysis reviews cooperation between the four border states of the United States of America (Arizona, California, New Mexico, and Texas) and international partners in Mexico with regard to type 2 diabetes among Latinos. Binational cooperation, academic collaboration, preventative health initiatives, and efforts to improve health care access for the border population are highlighted. This meta-analysis of the literature points out causative factors of the increased type 2 diabetes prevale...

  4. Multiple oxygen and sulfur isotopic analyses on water-soluble sulfate in bulk atmospheric deposition from the southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, H.; Reheis, M.C.

    2003-01-01

    Sulfate is a major component of bulk atmospheric deposition (including dust, aerosol, fog, and rain). We analyzed sulfur and oxygen isotopic compositions of water-soluble sulfate from 40 sites where year-round dust traps collect bulk atmospheric deposition in the southwestern United States. Average sulfur and oxygen isotopic compositions (??34S and ??18O) are 5.8 ?? 1.4 (CDT) and 11.2 ?? 1.9 (SMOW) (n = 47), respectively. Samples have an oxygen 17 anomaly (?? 17O), with an average value of 1.0 ?? 0.6???. Except for a weak positive correlation between ??18O and ??17O values (r2 ??? 0.4), no correlation exists for ??18O versus ??34S, ?? 17O versus ??34S, or any of the three isotopic compositions versus elevation of the sample site. Exceptional positive ?? 17O values (up to 4.23???) are found in samples from sites in the vicinity of large cities or major highways, and near-zero ?? 17O values are found in samples close to dry lakes. Comparison of isotopic values of dust trap sulfate and desert varnish sulfate from the region reveals that varnish sulfate has average isotopic values that are ???4.8??? lower for ??18O, ???2.1??? higher for ??34S , and ???0.3??? lower for ?? 17O than those of the present-day bulk deposition sulfate. Although other factors could cause the disparity, this observation suggests a possibility that varnish sulfate may have recorded a long-term atmospheric sulfate deposition during the Holocene or Pleistocene, as well as the differences between sulfur and oxygen isotopic compositions of the preindustrial bulk deposition sulfate and those of the industrial era.

  5. Association of Bactericera cockerelli (Homoptera: Psyllidae) with "zebra chip," a new potato disease in southwestern United States and Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munyaneza, J E; Crosslin, J M; Upton, J E

    2007-06-01

    A new defect of potato, Solanum tuberosum L., "zebra chip," so named for the characteristic symptoms that develop in fried chips from infected potato tubers, has recently been documented in several southwestern states of the United States, in Mexico, and in Central America. This defect is causing millions of dollars in losses to both potato producers and processors. Zebra chip plant symptoms resemble those caused by potato purple top and psyllid yellows diseases. Experiments were conducted to elucidate the association between the psyllid Bactericera cockerelli (Sulc) (Homoptera: Psyllidae) and zebra chip by exposing clean potato plants to this insect under greenhouse and field conditions. Potato plants and tubers exhibiting zebra chip symptoms were tested for phytoplasmas by polymerase chain reaction. Potato psyllids collected from infected potato fields also were tested. Results indicated that there was an association between the potato psyllid and zebra chip. Plants exposed to psyllids in the greenhouse and field developed zebra chip. In the greenhouse, 25.8 and 59.2% of tubers exhibited zebra chip symptoms in the raw tubers and fried chips, respectively. In the field, 15 and 57% of tubers showed symptoms in raw tubers and chips, respectively. No zebra chip was observed in tubers from plants that had not been exposed to psyllids, either in the greenhouse or field. No phytoplasmas were detected from potato plants or tubers with zebra chip symptoms, suggesting that these pathogens are not involved in zebra chip. Of the 47 samples of potato psyllids tested, only two tested positive for the Columbia Basin potato purple top phytoplasma. PMID:17598522

  6. Aerosol and precipitation chemistry in the southwestern United States: spatiotemporal trends and interrelationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sorooshian

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study characterizes the spatial and temporal patterns of aerosol and precipitation composition at six sites across the United States Southwest between 1995 and 2010. Precipitation accumulation occurs mostly during the wintertime (December–February and during the monsoon season (July–September. Rain and snow pH levels are usually between 5–6, with crustal-derived species playing a major role in acid neutralization. These species (Ca2+, Mg2+, K+,Na+ exhibit their highest concentrations between March and June in both PM2.5 and precipitation due mostly to dust. Crustal-derived species concentrations in precipitation exhibit positive relationships with SO42−, NO3−, and Cl−, suggesting that acidic gases likely react with and partition to either crustal particles or hydrometeors enriched with crustal constituents. Concentrations of particulate SO42− show a statistically significant correlation with rain SO42− unlike snow SO42−, which may be related to some combination of the vertical distribution of SO42− (and precursors and the varying degree to which SO42−-enriched particles act as cloud condensation nuclei versus ice nuclei in the region. The coarse : fine aerosol mass ratio was correlated with crustal species concentrations in snow unlike rain, suggestive of a preferential role of coarse particles (mainly dust as ice nuclei in the region. Precipitation NO3− : SO42− ratios exhibit the following features with potential explanations discussed: (i they are higher in precipitation as compared to PM2.5; (ii they exhibit the opposite annual cycle compared to particulate NO3− : SO42− ratios; and (iii they are higher in snow relative to rain during the wintertime. Long-term trend analysis for the monsoon season shows that the NO3− : SO42− ratio in rain decreased at the majority of sites due mostly to air pollution regulations of SO42− precursors.

  7. Aerosol and precipitation chemistry in the southwestern United States: spatiotemporal trends and interrelationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sorooshian

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This study characterizes the spatial and temporal patterns of aerosol and precipitation composition at six sites across the United States Southwest between 1995 and 2010. Precipitation accumulation occurs mostly during the wintertime (December–February and during the monsoon season (July–September. Rain and snow pH levels are usually between 5–6, with crustal-derived species playing a major role in acid neutralization. These species (Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, Na+ exhibit their highest concentrations between March and June in both PM2.5 and precipitation due mostly to dust. Crustal-derived species concentrations in precipitation exhibit positive relationships with SO42−, NO3−, and Cl−, suggesting that acidic gases likely react with and partition to either crustal particles or hydrometeors enriched with crustal constituents. Concentrations of particulate SO42− show a statistically significant correlation with rain SO42− unlike snow SO42−, which may be related to some combination of the vertical distribution of SO42− (and precursors and the varying degree to which SO42−-enriched particles act as cloud condensation nuclei versus ice nuclei in the region. The coarse : fine aerosol mass ratio was correlated with crustal species concentrations in snow unlike rain, suggestive of a preferential role of coarse particles (mainly dust as ice nuclei in the region. Precipitation NO3− : SO42− ratios exhibit the following features with potential explanations discussed: (i they are higher in precipitation as compared to PM2.5; (ii they exhibit the opposite annual cycle compared to particulate NO3− : SO42− ratios; and (iii they are higher in snow relative to rain during the wintertime. Long-term trend analysis for the monsoon season shows that the NO3− : SO42− ratio in rain increased at the majority of sites due mostly to air pollution regulations of SO42− precursors.

  8. Roadmap for sustainable water resources in southwestern North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleick, Peter H

    2010-12-14

    The management of water resources in arid and semiarid areas has long been a challenge, from ancient Mesopotamia to the modern southwestern United States. As our understanding of the hydrological and climatological cycles has improved, and our ability to manipulate the hydrologic cycle has increased, so too have the challenges associated with managing a limited natural resource for a growing population. Modern civilization has made remarkable progress in water management in the past few centuries. Burgeoning cities now survive in desert regions, relying on a mix of simple and complex technologies and management systems to bring adequate water and remove wastewater. These systems have permitted agricultural production and urban concentrations to expand in regions previously thought to have inadequate moisture. However, evidence is also mounting that our current management and use of water is unsustainable. Physical, economic, and ecological limits constrain the development of new supplies and additional water withdrawals, even in regions not previously thought vulnerable to water constraints. New kinds of limits are forcing water managers and policy makers to rethink previous assumptions about population, technology, regional planning, and forms of development. In addition, new threats, especially the challenges posed by climatic changes, are now apparent. Sustainably managing and using water in arid and semiarid regions such as the southwestern United States will require new thinking about water in an interdisciplinary and integrated way. The good news is that a wide range of options suggest a roadmap for sustainable water management and use in the coming decades. PMID:21149725

  9. Estimation of water requirement per unit carbon fixed by Eucalyptus camaldulensis in semi-arid land of Western Australia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T.; Kojima; Y.; Tanaka; S.; Katoh; K.; Tahara; N.; Takahashi; K,; Yamada

    2002-01-01

    Afforestation in arid land is a promising method for carbon fixation, but the effective utili-zation of water is highly important and required. Thus, the evaluation of the amount of water perunit carbon fixed with the tree growth is required to minimize the amount of water supplied to theplants. In this research, a tree is regarded as a carbon fixation reactor with inflows of water andnutrients from roots, and CO2 as the carbon source from leaves with outflow of water vapor fromleaves and accumulation in the tree itself. In the process of photosynthesis and respiration nutri-tional elements are dissolved in water flow in trees. They do not flow out by these reactions, butare accumulated in trees. Thus, we have treated the behaviour of nutrients as a marker to evaluatethe water/carbon ratio. Assuming that nutrient concentration is constant in sap, and the differences in the ratios ofnutrient to carbon in living trees and dead (i.e. litter fall, etc.) are negiected, the ratio of the usedwater to fixed carbon is given as the ratio of nutrient to carbon in the tree body divided by the ratioof nutrient to water in sap. However, some nutrients are translocated and concentrated within thetree and some may be discarded through litter fall. Thus it is important to examine which nutrientelement is the most suitable as the tracer. In this paper, the results of the above method applied to Eucalyptus camaldulensis in semi-arid land of Western Australia are shown. The value of water requirement per unit carbon fixationdetermined from potassium balance is between 421 kg-H2O/kg-C for mature trees and 285kg-H2O/k9-C for young trees, while the values from calcium balance are much larger than these.The cause of the discrepancy between these values is discussed based on the measured elementconcentrations in sap and trees and the plant physiology. Finally, the actual average value throughthe life of a tree is suggested to fall between the two values.

  10. Diagnosis of GLDAS LSM based aridity index and dryland identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazanfari, Sadegh; Pande, Saket; Hashemy, Mehdy; Sonneveld, Ben

    2013-04-15

    The identification of dryland areas is crucial for guiding policy aimed at intervening in water-stressed areas and addressing the perennial livelihood or food insecurity of these areas. However, the prevailing aridity indices (such as UNEP aridity index) have methodological limitations that restrict their use in delineating drylands and may be insufficient for decision-making frameworks. In this study, we propose a new aridity index based on based on 3 decades of soil moisture time series by accounting for site-specific soil and vegetation that partitions precipitation into the competing demands of evaporation and runoff. Our proposed aridity index is the frequency at which the dominant soil moisture value at a location is not exceeded by the dominant soil moisture values in all of the other locations. To represent the dominant spatial template of the soil moisture conditions, we extract the first eigenfunction from the empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis from 3 GLDAS land surface models (LSMs): VIC, MOSAIC and NOAH at 1 × 1 degree spatial resolution. The EOF analysis reveals that the first eigenfunction explains 33%, 43% and 47% of the VIC, NOAH and MOSAIC models, respectively. We compare each LSM aridity indices with the UNEP aridity index, which is created based on LSM data forcings. The VIC aridity index displays a pattern most closely resembling that of UNEP, although all of the LSM-based indices accurately isolate the dominant dryland areas. The UNEP classification identifies portions of south-central Africa, southeastern United States and eastern India as drier than predicted by all of the LSMs. The NOAH and MOSAIC LSMs categorize portions of southwestern Africa as drier than the other two classifications, while all of the LSMs classify portions of central India as wetter than the UNEP classification. We compare all aridity maps with the long-term average NDVI values. Results show that vegetation cover in areas that the UNEP index classifies as

  11. Soil Moisture Mapping in an Arid Area Using a Land Unit Area (LUA Sampling Approach and Geostatistical Interpolation Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Gharechelou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Soil moisture (SM plays a key role in many environmental processes and has a high spatial and temporal variability. Collecting sample SM data through field surveys (e.g., for validation of remote sensing-derived products can be very expensive and time consuming if a study area is large, and producing accurate SM maps from the sample point data is a difficult task as well. In this study, geospatial processing techniques are used to combine several geo-environmental layers relevant to SM (soil, geology, rainfall, land cover, etc. into a land unit area (LUA map, which delineates regions with relatively homogeneous geological/geomorphological, land use/land cover, and climate characteristics. This LUA map is used to guide the collection of sample SM data in the field, and the field data is finally spatially interpolated to create a wall-to-wall map of SM in the study area (Garmsar, Iran. The main goal of this research is to create a SM map in an arid area, using a land unit area (LUA approach to obtain the most appropriate sample locations for collecting SM field data. Several environmental GIS layers, which have an impact on SM, were combined to generate a LUA map, and then field surveying was done in each class of the LUA map. A SM map was produced based on LUA, remote sensing data indexes, and spatial interpolation of the field survey sample data. The several interpolation methods (inverse distance weighting, kriging, and co-kriging were evaluated for generating SM maps from the sample data. The produced maps were compared to each other and validated using ground truth data. The results show that the LUA approach is a reasonable method to create the homogenous field to introduce a representative sample for field soil surveying. The geostatistical SM map achieved adequate accuracy; however, trend analysis and distribution of the soil sample point locations within the LUA types should be further investigated to achieve even better results. Co

  12. Post-Closure Challenges of U.S. Department of Energy Sites in Desert Environments of the Southwestern United States - 12095

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites located in harsh desert environments of the Four Corners region of the southwestern United States require diligence and continual maintenance to ensure the remediation systems function as designed to protect human health and the environment. The geology and climate of this area create issues that are unique to these sites. Geologic formations contain naturally occurring constituents that are often the same as the residual contaminants remaining from historical milling activities at the sites. Although annual precipitation is low, when precipitation events occur they can be of extreme intensity, resulting in erosion and flooding that can quickly destroy infrastructure and rapidly change site conditions. Winds can cause sand storms and sand mounding that effect site features. These challenging environmental conditions, along with the remote locations of the sites, require active management beyond what was originally envisioned for uranium disposal sites to address concerns in a safe and cost-effective manner. The unique environment of the Four Corners region creates many challenges to the LTSM of LM sites in southwestern United States. The remediation efforts and approaches to infrastructure have to be specifically structured to work in this environment. Often, the systems and structures have to be modified based on lessons learned on how to best adapt to these difficult conditions and remote locations. These sites require continual maintenance and additional efforts compared to many other LM sites. (authors)

  13. Climate change and the water cycle: A new southwest regional climate hub curriculum unit for 6th-12th grade students

    Science.gov (United States)

    As climate change intensifies, increased temperatures and altered precipitation will make water, a limited resource in the arid southwestern United States, even scarcer in many locations. The USDA Southwest Regional Climate Hub (SWRCH) developed Climate Change and the Water Cycle, an engaging and sc...

  14. Productivity and residual benefits of grain legumes to sorghum under semi-arid conditions in south-western Zimbabwe: Unravelling the effects of water and nitrogen using a simulation model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ncube, B.; Dimes, J.P.; Wijk, van M.T.; Twomlow, S.J.; Giller, K.E.

    2009-01-01

    The APSIM model was used to assess the impact of legumes on sorghum grown in rotation in a nutrient-limited system under dry conditions in south-western Zimbabwe. An experiment was conducted at Lucydale, Matopos Research Station, between 2002 and 2005. The model was used to simulate soil and plant r

  15. Inventories and mobilization of unsaturated zone sulfate, fluoride, and chloride related to land use change in semiarid regions, southwestern United States and Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, B.R.; Stonestrom, D.A.; Reedy, R.C.; Leaney, F.W.; Gates, J.; Cresswell, R.G.

    2009-01-01

    Unsaturated zone salt reservoirs are potentially mobilized by increased groundwater recharge as semiarid lands are cultivated. This study explores the amounts of pore water sulfate and fluoride relative to chloride in unsaturated zone profiles, evaluates their sources, estimates mobilization due to past land use change, and assesses the impacts on groundwater quality. Inventories of water-extractable chloride, sulfate, and fluoride were determined from borehole samples of soils and sediments collected beneath natural ecosystems (N = 4), nonirrigated ("rain-fed") croplands (N = 18), and irrigated croplands (N = 6) in the southwestern United States and in the Murray Basin, Australia. Natural ecosystems contain generally large sulfate inventories (7800-120,000 kg/ha) and lower fluoride inventories (630-3900 kg/ha) relative to chloride inventories (6600-41,000 kg/ha). Order-of-magnitude higher chloride concentrations in precipitation and generally longer accumulation times result in much larger chloride inventories in the Murray Basin than in the southwestern United States. Atmospheric deposition during the current dry interglacial climatic regime accounts for most of the measured sulfate in both U.S. and Australian regions. Fluoride inventories are greater than can be accounted for by atmospheric deposition in most cases, suggesting that fluoride may accumulate across glacial/ interglacial climatic cycles. Chemical modeling indicates that fluorite controls fluoride mobility and suggests that water-extractable fluoride may include some fluoride from mineral dissolution. Increased groundwater drainage/recharge following land use change readily mobilized chloride. Sulfate displacement fronts matched or lagged chloride fronts by up to 4 m. In contrast, fluoride mobilization was minimal in all regions. Understanding linkages between salt inventories, increased recharge, and groundwater quality is important for quantifying impacts of anthropogenic activities on groundwater

  16. An Assessment of Water Demand and Availability to meet Construction and Operational Needs for Large Utility-Scale Solar Projects in the Southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klise, G. T.; Tidwell, V. C.; Macknick, J.; Reno, M. D.; Moreland, B. D.; Zemlick, K. M.

    2013-12-01

    In the Southwestern United States, there are many large utility-scale solar photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) facilities currently in operation, with even more under construction and planned for future development. These are locations with high solar insolation and access to large metropolitan areas and existing grid infrastructure. The Bureau of Land Management, under a reasonably foreseeable development scenario, projects a total of almost 32 GW of installed utility-scale solar project capacity in the Southwest by 2030. To determine the potential impacts to water resources and the potential limitations water resources may have on development, we utilized methods outlined by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to determine potential water use in designated solar energy zones (SEZs) for construction and operations & maintenance (O&M), which is then evaluated according to water availability in six Southwestern states. Our results indicate that PV facilities overall use less water, however water for construction is high compared to lifetime operational water needs. There is a transition underway from wet cooled to dry cooled CSP facilities and larger PV facilities due to water use concerns, though some water is still necessary for construction, operations, and maintenance. Overall, ten watersheds, 9 in California, and one in New Mexico were identified as being of particular concern because of limited water availability. Understanding the location of potentially available water sources can help the solar industry determine locations that minimize impacts to existing water resources, and help understand potential costs when utilizing non-potable water sources or purchasing existing appropriated water. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract

  17. Contaminant migration at two low-level radioactive waste sites in arid western United States - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contamination of the unsaturated zone and ground water at the Beatty, Nevada and Richland, Washington low-level radioactive waste sites shows that pathways exist for rapid lateral and vertical migration of contaminants through unconsolidated clastic sediments that comprise the 100 m-thick unsaturated zones of those arid disposal sites. Disposal of liquid wastes at the Beatty site until 1975 may have contributed to rapid migration of contaminants, but negligible amounts of liquid wastes reportedly were disposed at the Richland LLRW site and similar problems of contaminant migration exist. Pathways for vertical migration in the unsaturated zone include fractures and, at Richland, clastic dikes; lateral migration pathways likely are facies-controlled. Disturbance of the disposal sites contributed to increased infiltration of the unlined waste trenches after closure; simulations that used Beatty sample data show dramatic increases in recharge with disturbances necessary to develop the site. Because neither and arid climate nor presence of a thick unsaturated zone offer effective barriers to ground-water contamination, reliance on those factors at proposed sites such as Ward Valley, California and elsewhere is unwarranted. (orig.)

  18. Global patterns and environmental controls of perchlorate and nitrate co-occurrence in arid and semi-arid environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, W. Andrew; Böhlke, J. K.; Andraski, Brian J.; Fahlquist, Lynne; Bexfield, Laura; Eckardt, Frank D.; Gates, John B.; Davila, Alfonso F.; McKay, Christopher P.; Rao, Balaji; Sevanthi, Ritesh; Rajagopalan, Srinath; Estrada, Nubia; Sturchio, Neil; Hatzinger, Paul B.; Anderson, Todd A.; Orris, Greta; Betancourt, Julio; Stonestrom, David; Latorre, Claudio; Li, Yanhe; Harvey, Gregory J.

    2015-09-01

    Natural perchlorate (ClO4-) is of increasing interest due to its wide-spread occurrence on Earth and Mars, yet little information exists on the relative abundance of ClO4- compared to other major anions, its stability, or long-term variations in production that may impact the observed distributions. Our objectives were to evaluate the occurrence and fate of ClO4- in groundwater and soils/caliche in arid and semi-arid environments (southwestern United States, southern Africa, United Arab Emirates, China, Antarctica, and Chile) and the relationship of ClO4- to the more well-studied atmospherically deposited anions NO3- and Cl- as a means to understand the prevalent processes that affect the accumulation of these species over various time scales. ClO4- is globally distributed in soil and groundwater in arid and semi-arid regions on Earth at concentrations ranging from 10-1 to 106 μg/kg. Generally, the ClO4- concentration in these regions increases with aridity index, but also depends on the duration of arid conditions. In many arid and semi-arid areas, NO3- and ClO4- co-occur at molar ratios (NO3-/ClO4-) that vary between ∼104 and 105. We hypothesize that atmospheric deposition ratios are largely preserved in hyper-arid areas that support little or no biological activity (e.g. plants or bacteria), but can be altered in areas with more active biological processes including N2 fixation, N mineralization, nitrification, denitrification, and microbial ClO4- reduction, as indicated in part by NO3- isotope data. In contrast, much larger ranges of Cl-/ClO4- and Cl-/NO3- ratios indicate Cl- varies independently from both ClO4- and NO3-. The general lack of correlation between Cl- and ClO4- or NO3- implies that Cl- is not a good indicator of co-deposition and should be used with care when interpreting oxyanion cycling in arid systems. The Atacama Desert appears to be unique compared to all other terrestrial locations having a NO3-/ClO4- molar ratio ∼103. The relative

  19. Natural history, ecology, and conservation of the genus Polyphylla Harris, 1841. 1. New species from the southwestern United States and Baja California, Mexico, with notes on distribution and synonymy (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae)

    OpenAIRE

    La Rue, Delbert A.

    2016-01-01

    Four new species of the genus Polyphylla Harris (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae) from the southwestern United States and Baja California, Mexico, are described and illustrated: Polyphylla anivallis, P. koso, P. morroensis, and P. socorriana. Two nomenclatural changes are proposed: Polyphylla ratcliffei Young is placed into synonymy with P. avittata Hardy and Andrews, new synonymy; P. uteana Tanner is removed from synonymy and reinstated as a valid species, reinstated status. The fema...

  20. Traces of the crustal units and the upper mantle structure in the southwestern part of the East European Craton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Janutyte

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The presented study is a part of the passive seismic experiment PASSEQ 2006–2008 which took place around the Trans-European Suture Zone (TESZ from May 2006 to June 2008. The dataset of 4195 manually picked arrivals of teleseismic P waves of 101 earthquakes (EQs recorded in the PASSEQ seismic stations deployed to the east of the TESZ was inverted using the non-linear teleseismic tomography algorithm TELINV. Two 3-D crustal models were used to estimate the crustal travel time (TT corrections. As a result, we obtained a model of P wave velocity variations in the upper mantle beneath the TESZ and the EEC. In the study area beneath the craton we observed 5 to 6.5% higher and beneath the TESZ about 4% lower seismic velocities compared to the IASP91 velocity model. We found the seismic lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB beneath the TESZ at a depth of about 180 km, while we observed no seismic LAB beneath the EEC. The inversion results obtained with the real and the synthetic datasets indicated a ramp shape of the LAB in the northern TESZ where we observed values of seismic velocities close to those of the craton down to about 150 km. The lithosphere thickness in the EEC increases going from the TESZ to the NE from about 180 km beneath Poland to 300 km or more beneath Lithuania. Moreover, in western Lithuania we possibly found an upper mantle dome. In our results the crustal units are not well resolved. There are no clear indications of the features in the upper mantle which could be related with the crustal units in the study area. On the other hand, at a depth of 120–150 km we possibly found a trace of a boundary of proposed palaeosubduction zone between the East Lithuanian Domain (EL and the West Lithuanian Granulite Domain (WLG. Also, in our results we may have identified two anorogenic granitoid plutons.

  1. Parasitismo natural em moscas-das-frutas (Diptera: Tephritidae no semiárido do sudoeste da Bahia, Brasil Natural parasitism in fruit-flies in the fruticulture area of anagé, semi-arid of southwestern Bahia, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Falcão de Sá

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Parasitoides são importantes agentes de controle natural de tefritídeos, e os conhecimentos sobre as relações tritróficas podem subsidiar o manejo destas pragas. Este trabalho objetivou estimar índices de parasitismo em moscas-das-frutas, em 21 espécies vegetais, e identificar as espécies de parasitoides associados, nas condições do semiárido do sudoeste da Bahia. Oito hospedeiros apresentaram infestação por Anastrepha spp. e, destes, em quatro, ocorreu parasitismo superior a 20,0%, sendo: 20,8% (Ziziphus joazeiro L.; 21,3% (Spondias tuberosa L.; 32,4% (Spondias purpurea L. e 57,1% (Malpighia emarginata L.. Os parasitoides coletados pertencem à família Braconidae, sendo 89% de Doryctobracon areolatus e 11% de Asobara anastrephae.Parasitoids are important natural control agents of tephritids and knowledge about the tritrophic relationships can support the management of these pests. This study aimed to estimate of parasitism indexes in fruit flies in 21 plant species and identify the species of parasitoids associated, in semiarid conditions of Southwestern Bahia. Eight hosts showed infestation by Anastrepha spp. and, of these, four occurred parasitism above 20.0%, of which: 20.8% (Ziziphus joazeiro L.; 21.3% (Spondias tuberosa L.; 32.4% (Spondias purpurea L. and 57.1% (Malpighia emarginata L.. The collected parasitoids belong to the Braconidae family, 89% of Doryctobracon areolatus and 11% of Asobara anastrephae.

  2. Studies of geology and hydrology in the Basin and Range province, southwestern United States, for isolation of high-level radioactive waste: characterization of the Sonoran region, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Sonoran region of California lies west of the Colorado River and adjoins the Mojave Desert on the west, Death Valley on the northwest, and the Salton trough on the south. The region is arid with annual precipitation ranging from less than 80 millimeters to as great as 250 millimeters in one mountain range; annual free-surface evaporation is as great as 2,500 millimeters. The characteristic basin and range topography of the region was caused by a mid-Tertiary period of intense crustal extension, accompanied by volcanic eruptions, clastic sedimentation, faulting, and tilting. Potential host media for isolation of high-level radioactive waste include granite and other coarsegrained plutonic rocks, ash-flow tuff, and basalt and basaltic andesite lava flows. Thick sections of the unsaturated zone in basin fill, intrusive, and volcanic rocks appear to have potential as host media. The region is bordered on the west by areas of relatively greater Quaternary faulting, vertical crustal uplift, and seismicity. The region has a few areas of Quaternary volcanic activity. Geothermal heat flows of 2.5 heat-flow units or greater and one earthquake of magnitude 6-7 have been recorded. The region includes topographically closed basins as well as basins that drain to the Colorado River. Dry lakes and playas occupy the closed basins. Ground-water recharge and surface runoff are small because of the small amount of precipitation and great potential evaporation. Natural ground-water discharge is by evaporation in the basin playas and by underflow to the Colorado River. Dissolved-solids concentration of ground water generally is less than 500 milligrams per liter, and much of it is of the sodium bicarbonate type. Ground water is saline in many of the playas, and chloride or sulfate is the predominant anion. Small tonnages of ore have been produced from numerous precious and fewer base-metal deposits. (author)

  3. Application of a hydrological model in a data-poor arid region catchment: a case study of Wadi Ham, United Arab Emirates

    OpenAIRE

    Al Mulla , Mohamed Mustafa

    2005-01-01

    Many arid region Wadi catchments are facing increasing water scarcity due to the unsustainable human practises such as the over expansion of irrigated agriculture and over exploitation of their groundwater aquifers. The “Soil and Water Assessment Tool” (SWAT) model, which is a comprehensive conceptual, semi-distributed watershed scale model, was selected after a review of the hydrological processes occurring in arid region catchments to simulate the hydrological processes of...

  4. Keeping Sediment and Nutrients out of Streams in Arid/Semi-Arid Regions: Application of Low Impact Development/Green Infrastructure Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongping, Yuan

    2015-04-01

    Climatic and hydrological characteristics in the arid/semi-arid areas create unique challenges to soil, water and biodiversity conservation. These areas are environmentally sensitive, but very valuable for the ecosystems services they provide to society. Some of these areas are experiencing the fastest urbanization and now face multiple water resource challenges. Low Impact Development (LID)/Green Infrastructure (GI) practices are increasingly popular for reducing stormwater and nonpoint source pollution in many regions around the world. However, streamflow in the arid/semi-arid regions is largely dependent on seasonal, short term, and high intensity rainfall events. LID has not been very common in the arid/semi-arid regions due to a lack of performance evaluation, as well as the perception that LID may not be very useful for regions with little annual precipitation. This study focused on investigating the hydrologic and pollutant removal performance of LID/GI systems in arid/semi-arid climates. Ten types of practices were found in use in the Western/Southwestern U.S.: rainwater harvest systems, detention ponds, retention ponds, bioretention, media filters, porous pavements, vegetated swales/buffer/strips, green roofs, infiltration trenches, and integrated LIDs. This study compared the performance of these practices in terms of their effectiveness at pollutant removal and cost-effectiveness. This analysis provides insight into the future implementation of LID/GI in the arid/semi-arid areas. Key words: LID/GI, arid/semi-arid, effectiveness of pollutant removal, cost-effectiveness analysis

  5. A Climatology of Tropospheric CO over the Central and Southeastern United States and the Southwestern Pacific Ocean Derived from Space, Air, and Ground-based Infrared Interferometer Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillian, W. Wallace; Strow, L. Larrabee; Revercomb, H.; Knuteson, R.; Thompson, A.

    2003-01-01

    This final report summarizes all research activities and publications undertaken as part of NASA Atmospheric Chemistry and Modeling Analysis Program (ACMAP) Grant NAG-1-2022, 'A Climatology of Tropospheric CO over the Central and Southeastern United States and the Southwestern Pacific Ocean Derived from Space, Air, and Ground-based Infrared Interferometer Spectra'. Major project accomplishments include: (1) analysis of more than 300,000 AERI spectra from the ARM SGP site yielding a 5-year (1998-2002) timeseries of CO retrievals from the Lamont, OK AERI; (2) development of a prototype CO profile retrieval algorithm for AERI spectra; (3) validation and publication of the first CO retrievals from the Scanning High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (SHIS); and (4) development of a prototype AERI tropospheric O3 retrieval algorithm. Compilation and publication of the 5-year Lamont, OK timeseries is underway including a new collaboration with scientists at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Public access to this data will be provided upon article submission. A comprehensive CO analysis of the archive of HIS spectra of remains as the only originally proposed activity with little progress. The greatest challenge faced in this project was motivating the University of Wisconsin Co-Investigators to deliver their archived HIS and AERIOO data along with the requisite temperature and water vapor profiles in a timely manner. Part of the supplied HIS dataset from ASHOE may be analyzed as part of a Master s Thesis under a separate project. Our success with the SAFARI 2000 SHIS CO analysis demonstrates the utility of such aircraft remote sensing data given the proper support from the instrument investigators. In addition to the PI and Co-I s, personnel involved in this CO climatology project include one Post Doctoral Fellow, one Research Scientist, two graduate students, and two undergraduate students. A total of fifteen presentations regarding research related to this

  6. Plant distributions in the southwestern United States; a scenario assessment of the modern-day and future distribution ranges of 166 Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kathryn A.; Guertin, Patricia P.; Gass, Leila

    2012-01-01

    The authors developed spatial models of the predicted modern-day suitable habitat (SH) of 166 dominant and indicator plant species of the southwestern United States (herein referred to as the Southwest) and then conducted a coarse assessment of potential future changes in the distribution of their suitable habitat under three climate-change scenarios for two time periods. We used Maxent-based spatial modeling to predict the modern-day and future scenarios of SH for each species in an over 342-million-acre area encompassing all or parts of six states in the Southwest--Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah. Modern-day SH models were predicted by our using 26 annual and monthly average temperature and precipitation variables, averaged for the years 1971-2000. Future SH models were predicted for each species by our using six climate models based on application of the average of 16 General Circulation Models to Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change emission scenarios B1, A1B, and A2 for two time periods, 2040 to 2069 and 2070 and 2100, referred to respectively as the 2050 and 2100 time periods. The assessment examined each species' vulnerability to loss of modern-day SH under future climate scenarios, potential to gain SH under future climate scenarios, and each species' estimated risk as a function of both vulnerability and potential gains. All 166 species were predicted to lose modern-day SH in the future climate change scenarios. In the 2050 time period, nearly 30 percent of the species lost 75 percent or more of their modern-day suitable habitat, 21 species gained more new SH than their modern-day SH, and 30 species gained less new SH than 25 percent of their modern-day SH. In the 2100 time period, nearly half of the species lost 75 percent or more of their modern-day SH, 28 species gained more new SH than their modern-day SH, and 34 gained less new SH than 25 percent of their modern-day SH. Using nine risk categories we found only two

  7. Global and continental changes of arid areas using the FAO Aridity Index over the periods 1951-1980 and 1981-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinoni, Jonathan; Micale, Fabio; Carrao, Hugo; Naumann, Gustavo; Barbosa, Paulo; Vogt, Jürgen

    2013-04-01

    An increase in arid areas and progressing land degradation are two of the main consequences of global climate change. In the 2nd edition of the World Atlas of Desertification (WAD), published by the United Nation Environment Program (UNEP) in 1997, a global aridity map was presented. This map was based on the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) Aridity Index (AI) that takes into account the annual ratio between precipitation (RR) and Potential Evapo-Transpiration (PET). According to the long-term mean value of this ratio, climate is therefore classified in hyper-arid (0.65); a special case are cold climates, which occur if the mean annual PET is below 400 mm. In the framework of the 3rd edition of the WAD, we computed new global aridity maps to improve and update the old version that was based on a single dataset (CRU dataset, Climate Research Unit of University of East Anglia) related to the 1951-80 period only. We computed the AI on two different time intervals (1951-80 and 1981-2010) in order to account for shifts in classes between the two periods and we used two different datasets: PET from CRU (version 3.2), and precipitation from the global 0.5˚x0.5˚ gridded monthly precipitation of the Global Precipitation Climatology Center (GPCC) of the Deutscher Wetterdienst (DWD). We used the GPCC Full Data Reanalysis Version 6.0, which showed a high reliability during many quality checks and is based on more stations than the CRU's precipitation counterpart. The results show that the "arid areas" (i.e. AI Spain, the Southern Sahara and North-Eastern Kalahari deserts, Rajasthan and Madhya Pradesh (India), Mongolia, the Yang-Tze Basin (China), and the North-Eastern and South-Western Australian coasts. On the other hand, Central U.S., Paraguay and Northern Argentina, Scandinavia, Northern Australia, and Western China moved to a wetter climate in the last period. Due to the low data availability, we assumed that no changes took place in Antarctica, which is meant to

  8. Rapid warming and drought negatively impact population size and reproductive dynamics of an avian predator in the arid southwest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-McDonnell, Kirsten K; Wolf, Blair O

    2016-01-01

    Avian communities of arid ecosystems may be particularly vulnerable to global climate change due to the magnitude of projected change for desert regions and the inherent challenges for species residing in resource limited ecosystems. How arid-zone birds will be affected by rapid increases in air temperature and increased drought frequency and severity is poorly understood because avian responses to climate change have primarily been studied in the relatively mesic northern temperate regions. We studied the effects of increasing air temperature and aridity on a Burrowing Owl (Athene cunicularia) population in the southwestern United States from 1998 to 2013. Over 16 years, the breeding population declined 98.1%, from 52 pairs to 1 pair, and nest success and fledgling output also declined significantly. These trends were strongly associated with the combined effects of decreased precipitation and increased air temperature. Arrival on the breeding grounds, pair formation, nest initiation, and hatch dates all showed significant delays ranging from 9.4 to 25.1 days over 9 years, which have negative effects on reproduction. Adult and juvenile body mass decreased significantly over time, with a loss of 7.9% mass in adult males and 10.9% mass in adult females over 16 years, and a loss of 20.0% mass in nestlings over 8 years. Taken together, these population and reproductive trends have serious implications for local population persistence. The southwestern United States has been identified as a climate change hotspot, with projections of warmer temperatures, less winter precipitation, and an increase in frequency and severity of extreme events including drought and heat waves. An increasingly warm and dry climate may contribute to this species' decline and may already be a driving force of their apparent decline in the desert southwest. PMID:26367541

  9. Environmental tolerance of an invasive riparian tree and its potential for continued spread in the southwestern US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, L.V.; Cooper, D.J.

    2010-01-01

    Questions: Exotic plant invasion may be aided by facilitation and broad tolerance of environmental conditions, yet these processes are poorly understood in species-rich ecosystems such as riparian zones. In the southwestern United States (US) two plant species have invaded riparian zones: tamarisk (Tamarix ramosissima, T. chinensis, and their hybrids) and Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia). We addressed the following questions: (1) is Russian olive able to tolerate drier and shadier conditions than cottonwood and tamarisk? (2) Can tamarisk and cottonwood facilitate Russian olive invasion? Location: Arid riparian zones, southwestern US. Methods: We analyzed riparian tree seedling requirements in a controlled experiment, performed empirical field studies, and analyzed stable oxygen isotopes to determine the water sources used by Russian olive. Results: Russian olive survival was significantly higher in dense shade and low moisture conditions than tamarisk and cottonwood. Field observations indicated Russian olive established where flooding cannot occur, and under dense canopies of tamarisk, cottonwood, and Russian olive. Tamarisk and native riparian plant species seedlings cannot establish in these dry, shaded habitats. Russian olive can rely on upper soil water until 15 years of age, before utilizing groundwater. Conclusions: We demonstrate that even though there is little evidence of facilitation by cottonwood and tamarisk, Russian olive is able to tolerate dense shade and low moisture conditions better than tamarisk and cottonwood. There is great potential for continued spread of Russian olive throughout the southwestern US because large areas of suitable habitat exist that are not yet inhabited by this species. ?? 2010 International Association for Vegetation Science.

  10. Evidence of Urban-Induced Precipitation Variability in Arid Climate Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, J. Marshall

    2005-01-01

    Water is essential to life in the Earth system. The water cycle components that sustain life are becoming more scarce and polluted. The most recent (1999-2004) drought experienced in the southwestern United States is the seventh worst in the approximately 500-year proxy tree-ring record. As a result, many regions contemplated drought emergencies in which severe water restrictions are implemented. Though larger weather and climate processes likely control drought processes, there is increasing evidence that anthropogenic or human-related activities can significantly alter precipitation processes. Urbanization is an example of anthropogenic forcing. Recent studies continue to provide evidence that urban environments can modify or induce precipitation under a specific set of conditions. Arid and semi-arid regions of the southwestern United States and other parts of the world are rapidly developing and placing greater demands on the environmental system. In the past fifty years, Phoenix has expanded from a predominantly agricultural center to an urbanized region with extent 700 percent larger than its size in the middle of the twentieth century. Riyadh's population grew from about a half million people in 1972 to almost two million by 2000. Saudi Arabia experienced urbanization later than many other countries; in the early 1970s its urban-rural ratio was still about 1:3. By 1990 the ratio had reversed to about 3:l. In the mid-1970s Riyadh's population was increasing by about 10 percent a year. Irrigation also significantly increased between 1972 and 1990 southeast of Riyadh. The study employs a 108-year precipitation historical data record, global climate observing network observations and satellite data to identify possible anomalies in rainfall in and around two major arid urban areas, Phoenix, Arizona and Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. It provides statistically sound evidence that rainfall distribution and magnitude is statistically different in post-urban than in pre

  11. Mining the Agave Microbiome for adaptions to arid environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman-Derr, Devin; Wojke, Tanja; North, Gretchen; Partida-Martinez, Laila; DeAngeli, Kristen; Clingenpeel, Scott; Gross, Stephen; Tringe, Susannah; Visel, Axel

    2013-03-25

    A major challenge facing the biofuels industry is the identification of high-yield plant feedstocks that can be cultivated with minimal resource inputs without competing for land and water supplies with existing food crops. Recent research has demonstrated that the Agave plant, cultivated in Mexico and Southwestern United States for the production of fiber and alcohol, meets these criteria1. Agaves grow on non-arable rocky soils in regions characterized by prolonged drought and extreme temperatures, due in part to physiological adaptions that prevent excess water-loss in arid environments2. Plant-microbial symbioses can play a role in helping plants adapt to heat and drought stress, increasing the accessibility of soil nutrients, or compete with plant pathogens3. Whether agaves have similar beneficial microbe interactions in their native environment is unknown. We aim to provide a comprehensive characterization of the Agave microbiome, with the goal of identifying specific community members that may contribute to Agave biotic and abiotic stress tolerance

  12. Environmental Management Audit: Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Management Audit completed for the Southwestern Power Administration. During this Audit, activities and records were reviewed and personnel interviewed. The onsite portion of the Southwestern Audit was conducted from November 30 through December 11, 1992, by the US Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24). EH-24 carries out independent assessments of Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and activities as part of the Assistant Secretary's Environmental Audit Program. This program is designed to evaluate the status of DOE facilities/activities regarding compliance with laws, regulations, DOE Orders, formal written procedures, compliance agreements, and Best Management Practices (BMPs). This internal oversight function plays an important role in improving the compliance status of DOE operations. The Environmental Management Audit stresses DOE's policy that it is the responsibility of line management to conduct operations in an environmentally sound and safe manner. The Environmental Management Audit focuses on management systems and programs, whereas the Environmental Baseline Audit conducted in March 1991 focused on specific compliance issues. The scope of the Southwestern Environmental Management Audit included a review of all systems and functions necessary for effective environmental management. Specific areas of review included: Organizational Structure; Environmental Commitment; Environmental Protection Programs; Formality of Environmental Programs; Internal and External Communication; Staff Resources, Training, and Development; and Program Evaluation, Reporting, and Corrective Action

  13. Physical and chemical parameters affecting transport of 137Cs in arid watersheds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The occurrence and amount of fallout 137Cs were determined in 12 watersheds in the arid southwestern United States. The factors believed to influence the distribution of 137Cs in the watershed soils and in the reservoir sediments were investigated by using stepwise regression techniques. Seventeen parameters, in the case of soils, and 21 parameters, in the case of sediments, were used in the study. Ninety percent of the variation in the 137Cs content of soils, per unit weight, could be predicted in terms of the percentage of soil nitrogen, the R factor (rainfall intensity) of the universal soil loss equation, the percentage of sand in the soils, and the soil cation exchange capacity. Also, 90% of the variation in the content of 137Cs in the watershed soils, per unit area, could be predicted in terms of the fallout intensity, the percentages of silt and clay, and the cation exchange capacity. For reservoir sediments the equivalent predictors of 137Cs accumulation in the sediment profile, per unit weight, were the soil cation exchange capacity, the January-March average precipitation, and the soil contents of total P and N. The distribution of 137Cs in sediments per unit area was similarly predicted by watershed area, percentage of total soil C, reservoir surface area, areal concentration of 137Cs in the watershed soils, and soil organic matter

  14. Camelina water use and seed yield response to irrigation scheduling in an arid environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camelina sativa (L.) Crantz is a promising, biodiesel-producing oilseed that could potentially be implemented as a low-input alternative crop for production in the arid southwestern USA. However, little is known about camelina’s water use, irrigation management, and agronomic characteristics in this...

  15. Ecotonal Control on Vadose-Zone Fluxes in Arid Regions Over Very Long Time Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, F. M.; Walvoord, M. A.; Sandvig, R.

    2003-12-01

    Recent studies indicate that vegetation plays an important role in regulating recharge in semiarid and arid basins over very long time scales. Several lines of evidence from desert floor environments in the southwestern United States suggest that vegetation has established essentially permanent upward hydraulic gradients, effectively precluding diffuse recharge since the transition from woodland to xeric scrub in the early Holocene. However, less xeric vegetation (such as the pygmy piñon and juniper forest) may support significant diffuse recharge. We show comparative water potential and porewater chemistry profiles collected from various vegetation communities in the Chihuahuan Desert of west Texas. The modeled soil water (vapor and liquid) flux regimes illustrate a conversion from substantial downward fluxes under the mixed woodland to upward fluxes under grassland and xeric scrub. Model results also indicated a trend in increasing drying front propagation depth from the grassland to recently-encroached xeric scrub to well-established xeric scrub. Drying fronts are the result of upward soil water fluxes initiated up to 16 thousand years ago in the xeric scrub community. In contrast, the nearby woodland community supports active, and likely episodic, recharge on the order of 5 to 15 mm yr-1. The mechanism by which some vegetation takes up essentially all seasonally available moisture within the root zone, preventing downward soil water fluxes for periods of thousands of years, but adjacent vegetation communities regularly permit downward fluxes, remains to be determined. Nevertheless, these results suggest that understanding the relation between vegetation community and vadose-zone hydrological processes may be the most profitable avenue toward quantifying diffuse groundwater recharge. We hypothesize that vegetation type may be a reasonable proxy for estimating recharge in semiarid and arid basins. Ongoing research is intended to test the hypothesis of ecotonal

  16. Diagnosis of GLDAS LSM based aridity index and dryland identification for socioeconomic aspect of water resources management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazanfari, S.; Pande, S.; Hashemy, M.; Naseri M., M.

    2012-04-01

    for NOAH and MOSAIC. The VIC aridity index displays a pattern most closely resembling that of UNEP though all LSM based indices isolate dominant dryland areas, correctly. The UNEP classification identifies some parts of south central Africa, southeast United States and eastern India as drier than all LSMs. NOAH and MOSAIC categorize parts of SouthWestern Africa drier than the other two classifications, while all LSMs classify parts of central India wetter than the UNEP classification. We find long term average NDVI values showing vegetation cover in areas that UNEP classifies drier than other three LSMs. Finally, based on unsupervised clustering of global land surface based on long term mean temperature and precipitation, soil texture and land slope, areas classified as dry by UNEP but wet by LSMs have relatively wet characteristics while areas classified as wet by UNEP but dry by LSMs have dry characteristics. We conclude that LSM based aridity index identifies dryland areas other than UNEP aridity index since the former also incorporates the role of vegetation and soil in partitioning of precipitation into evaporation, runoff and infiltration.

  17. Waste biorefinery in arid/semi-arid regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastidas-Oyanedel, Juan-Rodrigo; Fang, Chuanji; Almardeai, Saleha; Javid, Usama; Yousuf, Ahasa; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2016-09-01

    The utilization of waste biorefineries in arid/semi-arid regions is advisable due to the reduced sustainable resources in arid/semi-arid regions, e.g. fresh water and biomass. This review focuses on biomass residues available in arid/semi-arid regions, palm trees residues, seawater biomass based residues (coastal arid/semi-arid regions), and the organic fraction of municipal solid waste. The present review aims to describe and discuss the availability of these waste biomasses, their conversion to value chemicals by waste biorefinery processes. For the case of seawater biomass based residues it was reviewed and advise the use of seawater in the biorefinery processes, in order to decrease the use of fresh water. PMID:27072789

  18. Evaluation of an extreme-condition-inverse calibration remote sensing model for mapping energy balance fluxes in arid riparian areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.-H. Hong

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Accurate information on the distribution of the surface energy balance components in arid riparian areas is needed for sustainable management of water resources as well as for a better understanding of water and heat exchange processes between the land surface and the atmosphere. Since the spatial and temporal distributions of these fluxes over large areas are difficult to determine from ground measurements alone, their prediction from remote sensing data is very attractive as it enables large area coverage and a high repetition rate. In this study the Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL was used to estimate all the energy balance components in the arid riparian areas of the Middle Rio Grande Basin (New Mexico, San Pedro Basin (Arizona, and Owens Valley (California. We compare instantaneous and daily SEBAL fluxes derived from Landsat TM images to surface-based measurements with eddy covariance flux towers. This study presents evidence that SEBAL yields reliable estimates for actual evapotranspiration rates in riparian areas of the southwestern United States. The great strength of the SEBAL method is its internal calibration procedure that eliminates most of the bias in latent heat flux at the expense of increased bias in sensible heat flux.

  19. The "Land Unit and Soil Capability Map of Sardinia" at a 1:50,000 scale, a new tool for land use planning in Sardinia (Italy) - The pilot area of Pula-Capoterra (southwestern Sardinia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacca, Andrea; Marrone, Vittorio Alessandro; Loddo, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    The Regional Landscape Plan (RLP) of Sardinia (Italy), approved in 2006, establishes the directions for any land use planning in Sardinia and requires that pre-existing plans have to be changed to comply with these directives. In the RLP, the soil is specifically considered one of the main landscape components and in the RLP guidelines a soil survey of the whole communal territory is required. Moreover, Land Unit and Land Capability maps are explicitly required, and the adoption of a single regional reference legend for these maps is strongly recommended. The Planning Department of the Regional Administration of Sardinia (RAS) has recently realized the need for specific knowledge and tools to support land use planning according to the RLP rules. Consequently, a new project for the creation of a "Land Unit and Soil Capability Map of Sardinia", at a scale of 1:50,000, was recently initiated in four pilot areas. Two Universities (Cagliari and Sassari) and two regional Agencies (AGRIS and LAORE) are involved in the project, each of them being responsible for one pilot area. In this work we present the map of the pilot area Pula-Capoterra (southwestern Sardinia, 46,040 ha). A GIS approach was used. We used the soil-landscape paradigm for the prediction of soil classes and their spatial distribution based on landscape features. The work was divided into two main phases. In the first phase, the available digital data on topography, geology and land cover were processed and classified according to their influence on weathering processes and soil properties. Digital thematic maps of soil-forming factors (landform, parent material, land cover) were produced to build the first draft of the Land Unit Map. The dataset was developed in a GIS environment, exploiting its potential to produce derived maps by intersections, reclassifications and summarizing themes using GIS functions. The existing soil data (areal and point data) were collected, reviewed, validated and standardized

  20. Reconciling Environmental and Flood Control Goals on an Arid-Zone River: Case Study of the Limitrophe Region of the Lower Colorado River in the United States and Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Edward P.; Hucklebridge, Kate; Hinojosa-Huerta, Osvel; Nagler, Pamela L.; Pitt, Jennifer

    2008-03-01

    Arid zone rivers have highly variable flow rates, and flood control projects are needed to protect adjacent property from flood damage. On the other hand, riparian corridors provide important wildlife habitat, especially for birds, and riparian vegetation is adapted to the natural variability in flows on these rivers. While environmental and flood control goals might appear to be at odds, we show that both goals can be accommodated in the Limitrophe Region (the shared border between the United States and Mexico) on the Lower Colorado River. In 1999, the International Boundary and Water Commission proposed a routine maintenance project to clear vegetation and create a pilot channel within the Limitrophe Region to improve flow capacity and delineate the border. In 2000, however, Minute 306 to the international water treaty was adopted, which calls for consideration of environmental effects of IBWC actions. We conducted vegetation and bird surveys within the Limitrophe and found that this river segment is unusually rich in native cottonwood and willow trees, marsh habitat, and resident and migratory birds compared to flow-regulated segments of river. A flood-frequency analysis showed that the existing levee system can easily contain a 100 year flood even if vegetation is not removed, and the existing braided channel system has greater carrying capacity than the proposed pilot channel.

  1. Study on climate change in Southwestern China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zongxing

    2015-03-01

    Nominated by Chinese Academy of Sciences as an outstanding Ph.D. thesis. Offers a needed exploration of the temporal and spatial pattern of climate change in southwestern China. Explores the action mechanism among the large-scale atmospheric circulation system, the complicated topography, human activities and regional climate changes. Analyzes the response of glaciers to climate change from the aspects of morphology of the glacier, glacial mass balance and the process of hydrology. This thesis confirms many changes, including sharp temperature rise, interannual variability of precipitation, extreme climate events and significant decreases of sunshine duration and wind speed in southwestern China, and systemically explores the action mechanism between large-scale atmospheric circulation systems, the complicated topography, human activities and regional climate changes. This study also analyzes the response of glaciers to climate change so that on the one hand it clearly reflects the relationship between glacier morphologic changes and climate change; on the other, it reveals the mechanism of action of climate warming as a balance between energy and matter. The achievements of this study reflect a significant contribution to the body of research on the response of climate in cold regions, glaciers and human activities to a global change against the background of the typical monsoon climate, and have provided scientific basis for predictions, countermeasures against disasters from extreme weather, utilization of water and the establishment of counterplans to slow and adapt to climate change. Zongxing Li works at the Cold and Arid Region Environmental and Engineering Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China.

  2. Study on climate change in Southwestern China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nominated by Chinese Academy of Sciences as an outstanding Ph.D. thesis. Offers a needed exploration of the temporal and spatial pattern of climate change in southwestern China. Explores the action mechanism among the large-scale atmospheric circulation system, the complicated topography, human activities and regional climate changes. Analyzes the response of glaciers to climate change from the aspects of morphology of the glacier, glacial mass balance and the process of hydrology. This thesis confirms many changes, including sharp temperature rise, interannual variability of precipitation, extreme climate events and significant decreases of sunshine duration and wind speed in southwestern China, and systemically explores the action mechanism between large-scale atmospheric circulation systems, the complicated topography, human activities and regional climate changes. This study also analyzes the response of glaciers to climate change so that on the one hand it clearly reflects the relationship between glacier morphologic changes and climate change; on the other, it reveals the mechanism of action of climate warming as a balance between energy and matter. The achievements of this study reflect a significant contribution to the body of research on the response of climate in cold regions, glaciers and human activities to a global change against the background of the typical monsoon climate, and have provided scientific basis for predictions, countermeasures against disasters from extreme weather, utilization of water and the establishment of counterplans to slow and adapt to climate change. Zongxing Li works at the Cold and Arid Region Environmental and Engineering Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China.

  3. Three Millennia of Southwestern North American Dustiness and Future Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routson, Cody C; Overpeck, Jonathan T; Woodhouse, Connie A; Kenney, William F

    2016-01-01

    Two sediment records of dust deposition from Fish Lake, in southern Colorado, offer a new perspective on southwest United States (Southwest) aridity and dustiness over the last ~3000 years. Micro scanning X-ray fluorescence and grain size analysis provide separate measures of wind-deposited dust in the lake sediment. Together these new records confirm anomalous dustiness in the 19th and 20th centuries, associated with recent land disturbance, drought, and livestock grazing. Before significant anthropogenic influences, changes in drought frequency and aridity also generated atmospheric dust loading. Medieval times were associated with high levels of dustiness, coincident with widespread aridity. These records indicate the Southwest is naturally prone to dustiness. As global and regional temperatures rise and the Southwest shifts toward a more arid landscape, the Southwest will likely become dustier, driving negative impacts on snowpack and water availability, as well as human health. PMID:26886350

  4. Three Millennia of Southwestern North American Dustiness and Future Implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cody C Routson

    Full Text Available Two sediment records of dust deposition from Fish Lake, in southern Colorado, offer a new perspective on southwest United States (Southwest aridity and dustiness over the last ~3000 years. Micro scanning X-ray fluorescence and grain size analysis provide separate measures of wind-deposited dust in the lake sediment. Together these new records confirm anomalous dustiness in the 19th and 20th centuries, associated with recent land disturbance, drought, and livestock grazing. Before significant anthropogenic influences, changes in drought frequency and aridity also generated atmospheric dust loading. Medieval times were associated with high levels of dustiness, coincident with widespread aridity. These records indicate the Southwest is naturally prone to dustiness. As global and regional temperatures rise and the Southwest shifts toward a more arid landscape, the Southwest will likely become dustier, driving negative impacts on snowpack and water availability, as well as human health.

  5. Effects of Agriculture and Urbanization on Quality of Shallow Ground Water in the Arid to Semiarid Western United States, 1993-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Angela P.; Seiler, Ralph L.; Rowe, Timothy G.; Rosen, Michael R.

    2007-01-01

    Within the Western United States, agricultural and rural lands are being developed into commercial and residential areas. With changes in land use and increasing population, greater demands are placed on water resources for agricultural, industrial, and domestic supplies. Many areas in the Western United States rely exclusively on ground water as their source of drinking water. Areas that use surface-water resources often need to supplement this supply with ground water. Generally, shallow ground water is susceptible to fluctuating water quality within relatively short time scales and therefore can be used as an indicator of land-use stresses that may, in time, affect deep aquifer systems. This regional study examines data on shallow ground-water quality collected from 1993 to 2004 from 273 agricultural and 181 urban wells from 7 U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment study units in Arizona, California, Nevada, New Mexico, south-central Colorado, and Utah. This report determines important influences that land-use practices may have on the quality of recently recharged ground water, which may ultimately affect deep water supplies within the region. The results of this investigation show that nitrate, the principal species of nitrogen present in ground water, exceeds the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 milligrams per liter in water from more than 25 percent of agricultural wells and 10 percent of urban wells. In agricultural areas, the probability of exceeding the USEPA MCL for nitrate is influenced primarily by three factors: fertilizer use, irrigation, and aquifer oxidation-reduction (redox) conditions. At the study-unit level, differences in nutrient concentrations between agricultural and urban land use likely are influenced by ground-water redox conditions within respective aquifer systems. The most commonly detected pesticides belonged to the triazine, urea, amide, and carbamate classes. The

  6. CHARACTERISTICS OF ARIDITY CONDITIONS IN SOUTH DOBRUDJA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. TISCOVSCHI

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of Aridity Conditions in South Dobrudja. For most people, the arid and semi-arid lands are those where precipitation is low (less than 200 mm per year, and yet enough for supplying streams capable of temporarily carrying the debris resulted from weathering, but insufficient for encouraging the development of a vegetal cover meant to protect the soil blanket against eroding agents. The drought is a major and permanent climatic risk for the Dobrudja territory as a whole and for South Dobrudja in particular, a territory where hydrographic network is underdeveloped, streams are ephemeral, and semi-endorheic areas are well developed. When the period of moisture deficiency lasts longer, it can bring about a significant water imbalance, which results in crop losses or restrictions in water consumption, thus leading to a number of economic problems. Under the circumstances, the risk of aridity expansion is significant, this being the reason why a better water management system in Romania is urgently needed. In the last decades, the numerous specialty studies undertaken in the area have emphasized an intensification of the process of dryness, because atmospheric and pedological droughts have become more and more serious. Romania is a member of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO. It actively participates within the drought management network and the Drought Management Center for Southeastern Europe, which comprises 11 countries. The scope is to work together and exchange experience with the neighboring countries that have recorded positive results and acquired a rich experience in terms of drought management. The employment of appropriate pluvial indices in identifying the areas prone to aridity may prove to be convenient tool for finding practical solutions meant to mitigate the impact of this phenomenon on the local communities living in South Dobrudja.

  7. Native American Student Resiliency within Southwestern Tribal Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralez, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the degree to which Native American culture impacts the resiliency of Native American students earning degrees at three tribal colleges in the southwestern part of the United States. This study was a qualitative case study that was based on the following research question: "How does Native American…

  8. GLDAS Land Surface Models based Aridity Indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, S.; Ghazanfari, S.

    2011-12-01

    Identification of dryland areas is crucial to guide policy aimed at intervening in water stressed areas and addressing its perennial livelihood or food insecurity. Aridity indices based on spatially relative soil moisture conditions such as NCEP aridity index allow cross comparison of dry conditions between sites. NCEP aridity index is based on the ratio of annual precipitation (supply) to annual potential evaporation (demand). Such an index ignores subannual scale competition between evaporation and drainage functions well as rainfall and temperature regimes. This determines partitioning of annual supply of precipitation into two competing (but met) evaporation and runoff demands. We here introduce aridity indices based on these additional considerations by using soil moisture time series for the past 3 decades from three Land Surface Models (LSM) models and compare it with NCEP index. We analyze global monthly soil moisture time series (385 months) at 1 x 1 degree spatial resolution as modeled by three GLDAS LSMs - VIC, MOSAIC and NOAH. The first eigen vector from Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis, as it is the most dominant spatial template of global soil moisture conditions, is extracted. Frequency of nonexceedences of this dominant soil moisture mode for a location by other locations is calculated and is used as our proposed aridity index. An area is indexed drier (relative to other areas in the world) if its frequency of nonexceedence is lower. The EOF analysis reveals that their first eigen vector explains approximately 32%, 43% and 47% of variance explained by first 385 eigen vectors for VIC, MOSAIC and NOAH respectively. The temporal coefficients associated with it for all three LSMS show seasonality with a jump in trend around the year 1999 for NOAH and MOSAIC. The VIC aridity index displays a pattern most closely resembling that of NCEP though all LSM based indices isolate dominant dryland areas. However, all three LSMs identify some parts of

  9. Assessment of future agricultural conditions in southwestern Africa using fuzzy logic and high-resolution climate model scenarios

    OpenAIRE

    Weinzierl, Thomas; Heider, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is expected to have a major impact on the arid savanna regions of southwestern Africa, such as the Okavango Basin. Precipitation is a major constraint for agriculture in countries like Namibia and Botswana and assessments of future crop growth conditions are in high demand. This GIS-based approach uses reanalysis data and climate model output for two scenarios and compares them to the precipitation requirements of the five most important crops grown in the region: maize, pearl ...

  10. The role of climate change in the widespread mortality of Holm oak in open woodlands of Southwestern Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Natalini, Fabio; Alejano Monge, Reyes; Vázquez Piqué, Javier; Cañellas, Isabel; Gea Izquierdo, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Forest decline and increasing tree mortality are of global concern and the identification of the causes is necessary to develop preventive measures. Global warming is an emerging factor responsible for the increasing tree mortality in drought-prone ecosystems. In the southwestern Iberian Peninsula, Mediterranean holm oak open woodlands currently undergo large-scale population-level tree die-off. In this region, temperature and aridity have increased during recent decades, but the ...

  11. Microbial ecology of arid environments

    OpenAIRE

    夏江瀛; Ha, Kong-ying

    2013-01-01

    Deserts comprise the largest terrestrial biome, making up approximately one third of the Earth’s land mass. They are defined in terms of moisture deficit using the Aridity Index with values 18°C), cold (

  12. Integrated Water Resources Planning and Management in Arid/Semi-arid Regions: Data, Modeling, and Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, H.; Liu, Y.; Wagener, T.; Durcik, M.; Duffy, C.; Springer, E.

    2005-12-01

    Water resources in arid and semi-arid regions are highly sensitive to climate variability and change. As the demand for water continues to increase due to economic and population growth, planning and management of available water resources under climate uncertainties becomes increasingly critical in order to achieve basin-scale water sustainability (i.e., to ensure a long-term balance between supply and demand of water).The tremendous complexity of the interactions between the natural hydrologic system and the human environment means that modeling is the only available mechanism for properly integrating new knowledge into the decision-making process. Basin-scale integrated models have the potential to allow us to study the feedback processes between the physical and human systems (including institutional, engineering, and behavioral components); and an integrated assessment of the potential second- and higher-order effects of political and management decisions can aid in the selection of a rational water-resources policy. Data and information, especially hydrological and water-use data, are critical to the integrated modeling and assessment for water resources management of any region. To this end we are in the process of developing a multi-resolution integrated modeling and assessment framework for the south-western USA, which can be used to generate simulations of the probable effects of human actions while taking into account the uncertainties brought about by future climatic variability and change. Data are being collected (including the development of a hydro-geospatial database) and used in support of the modeling and assessment activities. This paper will present a blueprint of the modeling framework, describe achievements so far and discuss the science questions which still require answers with a particular emphasis on issues related to dry regions.

  13. Dust aerosol effect on semi-arid climate over Northwest China detected from A-Train satellite measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, J; Minnis, P.; Yan, H; Yi, Y.; Chen, B; Zhang, L.; J. K. Ayers

    2010-01-01

    The impact of dust aerosols on the semi-arid climate of Northwest China is analyzed by comparing aerosol and cloud properties derived over the China semi-arid region (hereafter, CSR) and the United States semi-arid region (hereafter, USR) using several years of surface and A-Train satellite observations during active dust event seasons. These regions have similar climatic conditions, but aerosol concentrations are greater over the CSR. Because the CSR is close to two major dust source regions...

  14. Southwestern Power Administration Update, October- December 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2004-12-01

    On October 29, 2004, Southwestern and Southwest Power Pool, Inc. (SPP) reached agreement on interim arrangements to be implemented after the October 31, 2004, expiration of the membership agreement between the two parties. According to Jim McDonald, Director of Southwestern’s Division of Customer Service, the interim agreement forged between Southwestern and SPP seeks to minimize impacts to SPP as well as to Southwestern and its customers while Southwestern and SPP work on a seams/coordination agreement to succeed the expired membership agreement.

  15. Mining the Agave Microbiome for adaptions to arid environments

    OpenAIRE

    Coleman-Derr, Devin

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge facing the biofuels industry is the identification of high-yield plant feedstocks that can be cultivated with minimal resource inputs without competing for land and water supplies with existing food crops. Recent research has demonstrated that the Agave plant, cultivated in Mexico and Southwestern United States for the production of fiber and alcohol, meets these criteria1. Agaves grow on non-arable rocky soils in regions characterized by prolonged drought and extreme tempe...

  16. Three Millennia of Southwestern North American Dustiness and Future Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Cody C Routson; Overpeck, Jonathan T.; Woodhouse, Connie A.; Kenney, William F.

    2016-01-01

    Two sediment records of dust deposition from Fish Lake, in southern Colorado, offer a new perspective on southwest United States (Southwest) aridity and dustiness over the last ~3000 years. Micro scanning X-ray fluorescence and grain size analysis provide separate measures of wind-deposited dust in the lake sediment. Together these new records confirm anomalous dustiness in the 19th and 20th centuries, associated with recent land disturbance, drought, and livestock grazing. Before significant...

  17. Southwestern Power Administration Combined Financial Statements, 2006-2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-09-01

    We have audited the accompanying combined balance sheets of the Southwestern Federal Power System (SWFPS), as of September 30, 2009, 2008, 2007, and 2006, and the related combined statements of revenues and expenses, changes in capitalization, and cash flows for the years then ended. As described in note 1(a), the combined financial statement presentation includes the hydroelectric generation functions of another Federal agency (hereinafter referred to as the generating agency), for which Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern) markets and transmits power. These combined financial statements are the responsibility of the management of Southwestern and the generating agency. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these combined financial statements based on our audits. We conducted our audits in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audits to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the combined financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes consideration of internal control over financial reporting as a basis for designing audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of Southwestern and the generating agency’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit also includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the combined financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall combined financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion. In our opinion, the combined financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the respective financial position of the Southwestern Federal Power

  18. Soil carbon in the arid and semi-arid tropics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soils in the arid and semi-arid tropics are often poor in soil organic matter (SOM) contents. On the other hand, calcretes and soils with calcic or petrocalcic horizons have a world-wide distribution and are regarded as important carbon reservoirs. For this reason, knowledge on their formation processes and the carbon source-sink relationship is necessary. An evaluation is made of the major models of calcrete formation using stable isotope techniques, especially on Tunisian soils. Normally, calcretes do not act as carbon sinks unless at least part of the calcium originates from weathering. However, in some cases they can change to carbon sources under anthropogenically altered environmental conditions when acids are precipitated. Desert losses are quite rich in carbonates and can form fertile soils, but good management practices and conservation efforts are required. These soils are usually poor in SOM contents and their carbon source-sink relationship depends on the way in which the soil is managed. Vertisols play an important role in soils of the semi-arid tropics. Despite their dark colour, they generally contain little organic carbon. Using stable isotope and radiocarbon methods it has been shown that carbon fixation takes place even over a few decades. Research experiments carried out on Vertisols in India have shown that the SOM decomposition rates can be influenced by the soil management practices. (author). 3 figs

  19. Adaptive wetland management in an uncertain and changing arid environment

    OpenAIRE

    Rebekah Downard; Joanna Endter-Wada; Kettenring, Karin M.

    2014-01-01

    Wetlands in the arid western United States provide rare and critical migratory bird habitat and constitute a critical nexus within larger social-ecological systems (SES) where multiple changing land-use and water-use patterns meet. The Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge in Utah, USA, presents a case study of the ways that wetland managers have created adaptive management strategies that are responsive to the social and hydrological conditions of the agriculture-dominated SES within which they a...

  20. The case of arid and semi-arid zones; Le cas des zones arides et semi-arides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agoumi, A. [Ecole Hassania, Casablanca (Morocco); Stour, L. [Hassan Univ., Mohammedia (Morocco). Faculty of Sciences

    2009-07-15

    This article addressed issues regarding the conservation and sustainable use of biomass resources in arid and semi-arid zone ecosystems. Conservation strategies for climatic zones threatened by increased pressure from intensified land use, drought, and land degradation were discussed along with sustainable land use management practices. The strategies range from strict regulations for environmental protection to various forms of conservation easements, such as carbon credits. The article also supported the initiative to reduce emissions caused by deforestation and degradation (REDD). The REDD initiative proposes that future global climate agreements should first aim to reduce the total forested area lost in the tropics and then to eventually cease global deforestation. It was concluded that sustainable forestry at a global level is needed in order to achieve mitigation targets and to avoid the risk that forests may becomes a net carbon source rather than carbon sinks. 3 figs.

  1. DS926 Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina -- Raster surface depicting the thickness of residuum in southwestern Georgia and southeastern Alabama

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital surfaces and thicknesses of selected hydrogeologic units of the Floridan aquifer system were developed to define an updated hydrogeologic framework as part...

  2. Southwestern Power Administration annual site environmental report CY 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-01

    This report provides a synopsis of Southwestern Power Administration`s (Southwestern`s) effectiveness in managing its operations in an environmentally responsible manner. In CY 1997, the Office of Environmental, Safety, and Health was reorganized and incorporated into the Division of Acquisition and Property. The Division of Acquisition, Property, and Environmental Management maintains responsibility for development, oversight, and implementation of environmental programs. Senior Management at Southwestern has taken actions to increase environmental awareness throughout the organization. During CY 1997, (Southwestern) was not involved in any known programs or activities that had adverse impacts on the environment. The 1997 Environmental Appraisal, a portion of Southwestern`s Self-Assessment and Appraisal Program, indicated approximately 90% compliance with Southwestern`s written environmental programs. Southwestern continued to function throughout CY 1997 in an operations and maintenance posture with minor substation projects.

  3. Arid Lands Biofuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neupane, B. P.

    2013-05-01

    Dependence on imported petroleum, as well as consequences from burning fossil fuels, has increased the demand for biofuel sources in the United States. Competition between food crops and biofuel crops has been an increasing concern, however, since it has the potential to raise prices for US beef and grain products due to land and resource competition. Biofuel crops that can be grown on land not suitable for food crops are thus attractive, but also need to produce biofuels in a financially sustainable manner. In the intermountain west of Nevada, biofuel crops need to survive on low-organic soils with limited precipitation when grown in areas that are not competing with food and feed. The plants must also yield an oil content sufficiently high to allow economically viable fuel production, including growing and harvesting the crop as well as converting the hydrocarbons into a liquid fuel. Gumweed (Grindelia squarrosa) currently appears to satisfy all of these requirements and is commonly observed throughout the west. The plant favors dry, sandy soils and is most commonly found on roadsides and other freshly disturbed land. A warm season biennial, the gumweed plant is part of the sunflower family and normally grows 2-4 feet high with numerous yellow flowers and curly leaves. The gumweed plant contains a large store of diterpene resins—most abundantly grindelic acid— similar to the saps found on pine trees that are used to make inks and adhesives. The dry weight harvest on the experimental field is 5130 lbs/acre. Whole plant biomass yields between 11-15% (average 13%) biocrude when subjected to acetone extraction whereas the buds alone contains up to a maximum of 35% biocrude when harvested in 'white milky' stage. The extract is then converted to basic form (sodium grindelate) followed by extraction of nonpolar constituents (mostly terpenes) with hexane and extracted back to ethyl acetate in acidified condition. Ethyl acetate is removed under vacuum to leave a dark

  4. CHARACTERISTICS OF ARIDITY CONDITIONS IN SOUTH DOBRUDJA

    OpenAIRE

    A. TISCOVSCHI; GABRIELA MANEA; O. COCOS; IULIANA VIJULIE; ROXANA CUCULICI

    2013-01-01

    Characteristics of Aridity Conditions in South Dobrudja. For most people, the arid and semi-arid lands are those where precipitation is low (less than 200 mm per year), and yet enough for supplying streams capable of temporarily carrying the debris resulted from weathering, but insufficient for encouraging the development of a vegetal cover meant to protect the soil blanket against eroding agents. The drought is a major and permanent climatic risk for the Dobrudja territory as a whole and for...

  5. South-western Africa vegetation responses to atmospheric and oceanic changes during the last climatic cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Urrego

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial and marine climatic tracers from marine core MD96-2098 collected in the southwestern African margin and spanning from 194 to 24 (thousand years before present documented three pronounced expansions of Nama-Karoo and fine-leaved savanna during the last interglacial (Marine Isotopic Stage 5 – MIS 5. Nama-Karoo and fine-leaved savanna expansions were linked to increased aridity during the three warmest substadials of MIS 5. Enhanced aridity potentially resulted from a combination of reduced Benguela Upwelling System (BUS, expanded subtropical high-pressure cells, and reduced austral-summer precipitation due to a northward shift of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ. Decreased austral-winter precipitation was likely linked to a southern displacement of the westerlies. In contrast, during glacial isotopic stages MIS 6, 4 and 3, Fynbos expanded at the expense of Nama-Karoo and fine-leaved savanna indicating a relative increase in precipitation probably concentrated during the austral winter months. Our record also suggested that warm-cold or cold-warm transitions between isotopic stages and substages were punctuated by short increases in humidity. Increased aridity during MIS 5e, 5c and 5a warm substages coincided with minima in both precessional index and global ice volume. On the other hand, austral-winter precipitation increases were associated with precession maxima at the time of well-developed northern-hemisphere ice caps.

  6. Diallel Analysis of Southwestern Corn Borer Leaf Feeding Damage in Maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southwestern corn borer [Diatraea grandiosella (Dyar)] is an important pest of maize in the southern United States. It feeds extensively within the leaf whorls of plants in the vegetative stages of growth. This reduces both the quantity and quality of harvestable grain. Germplasm lines with resistan...

  7. SIZE AND COMPOSITION OF VISIBILITY-REDUCING AEROSOLS IN SOUTHWESTERN PLUMES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The southwestern United States desert and mountain areas are generally characterized by very good visibility. Until recent years, scenic vistas of natural landmarks and mountains with a visual range of over 100 miles were common. These vistas have been considered a major resource...

  8. Southwestern Power Administration Annual Report 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-04-01

    Dear Secretary Chu: I am pleased to present the financial statements and operating data for Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern) for Fiscal Year (FY) 2011. In FY 2011, Southwestern delivered over 4.1 billion kilowatt-hours of energy to its wholesale customers in Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas, generating $167 million in revenue. In fulfilling its mission to market and reliably deliver renewable Federal hydroelectric power, Southwestern maintains 1,380 miles of high-voltage transmission lines, substations, and communications sites, contributing to the reliability of the regional and National electric grid. Southwestern also actively partners with the Department of Energy, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Southwestern’s customers, and other Federal power stakeholders to most effectively balance their diverse interests with Southwestern’s mission while continuing to maximize Federal assets to repay the Federal investment in the 24 hydropower facilities within Southwestern’s marketing region. Southwestern is proud of its past successes, and we look forward to continuing to serve the Nation’s energy needs in the future. Sincerely, Christopher M. Turner Administrator

  9. Southwestern Power Administration Annual Report 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2012-09-01

    Dear Secretary Chu: I am pleased to present the financial statements and operating data for Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern) for Fiscal Year (FY) 2010. In FY 2010, Southwestern delivered nearly 7.6 billion kilowatt-hours of energy to its wholesale customers in Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, Texas, and Oklahoma, generating $189 million in revenue. In fulfilling its mission to market and reliably deliver renewable Federal hydroelectric power, Southwestern maintains 1,380 miles of high-voltage transmission lines, substations, and communications sites, contributing to the reliability of the regional and National electric grid. Southwestern also actively partners with the Department of Energy, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Southwestern’s customers, and other Federal power stakeholders to most effectively balance their diverse interests with Southwestern’s mission while continuing to maximize Federal assets to repay the Federal investment in the 24 hydropower facilities within Southwestern’s marketing region. Southwestern is proud of its past successes, and we look forward to continuing to serve the Nation’s energy needs in the future. Sincerely, Christopher M. Turner Administrator

  10. Southwestern Power Administration Annual Report 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-09-01

    Dear Secretary Moniz: I am pleased to present the financial statements and operating data for Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern) for Fiscal Year (FY) 2012. In FY 2012, Southwestern delivered over 4.1 billion kilowatt-hours of energy to its wholesale customers in Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas, generating $195 million in revenue. In fulfilling its mission to market and reliably deliver renewable Federal hydroelectric power, Southwestern maintains 1,380 miles of high-voltage transmission lines, substations, and communications sites, contributing to the reliability of the regional and National electric grid. Southwestern also actively partners with the Department of Energy, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Southwestern’s customers, and other Federal power stakeholders to most effectively balance their diverse interests with Southwestern’s mission while continuing to maximize Federal assets to repay the Federal investment in the 24 hydropower facilities within Southwestern’s marketing region. Southwestern is proud of its past successes, and we look forward to continuing to serve the Nation’s energy needs in the future. Sincerely, Christopher M. Turner Administrator

  11. On plate tectonics and the geologic evolution of southwestern North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, P.L.

    1991-01-01

    Very rapid subduction of the Farallon plate under southwestern North America between 60 and 40 Ma was accompanied by a relatively low volume of magmatism throughout the southwestern United States and northern Mexico. Between 40 and 20 Ma, when subduction slowed significantly and in one area may have even stopped, magmatism became widespread and voluminous from Nevada and Utah to central Mexico. This correlation of rapid subduction with a relatively low volume of magmatism can be explained by the observation that subduction-related andesitic arc volcanism, often formed in a Laramide-style compressional regime, is relatively low volume compared to continental volcanism. -from Author

  12. Precipitation and nitrogen interactions in arid ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arid and semi-arid ecosystems are among the most impoverished terrestrial systems in terms of water and nitrogen (N) availability. Productivity (NPP) is generally low, soil N pools are small and N loss through percolation is assumed to be negligible. Increased water availability can stimulate both N...

  13. Screening Prosopis (mesquite) species for biofuel production on semi-arid lands. Final report, April 1, 1978-March 30, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felker, P; Cannell, G H; Clark, P R; Osborn, J F; Nash, P

    1985-01-01

    Arid adapted nitrogen fixing trees and shrubs of the genus Prosopis (mesquite) have been examined for woody biomass production on semi-arid lands of southwestern United States. A germ-plasm collection of 900 accessions from North and South America and Africa was assembled. Field studies screening for biomass production, frost tolerance, response to irrigation, pod production and heat/drought tolerance involved a total of 80 accessions. Selections made from survivors of coal/frost screening trial had more frost tolerance and biomass productivity than prostrate selections from the ranges of Arizona, New Mexico and west Texas. Thirteen Prosopis species were found to nodulate, reduce acetylene to ethylene, and grow on a nitrogen free media in greenhouse experiments. The salinity tolerance of six Prosopis species was examined on a nitrogen free media in greenhouse experiments. No reduction in growth occurred for any species tested at a salinity of 6000 mg NaC1/L which is considered too saline for normal agricultural crops. Individual trees have grown 5 to 7 cm in basal diameter, and 2.0 to 3.7 meters in height per year and have achieved 50 kg oven dry weight per tree in 2 years with 600 mm water application per year. Vegetative propagation techniques have been developed and clones of these highly productive trees have been made. Small pilots on 1.5 x 1.5 m spacing in the California Imperial Valley had a first and second season dry matter production of 11.7 and 16.9 T/ha for P. chilensis (0009), 7.1 and 6.9 T/ha for P. glandulosa var. torreyana (0001), 9.8 and 19.2 T/ha for P. alba (0039) and 7.9 and 14.5 T/ha for progency of a California ornamental (0163). The projected harvested costs of $25.00 per oven dry ton or $1.50 per million Btu's compare favorable with coal and other alternative fuel sources in South Texas.

  14. Studies of geology and hydrology in the Basin and Range province, southwestern United States, for isolation of high-level radioactive waste: characterization of the Rio Grande Region, New Mexico, and Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Rio Grande region, New Mexico and Texas, includes most of the area east of the Rio Grande to the Sacramento Mountains. The region encompasses two large basins, the Jornada del Muerto and Tularosa basins, and the intervening San Andres Mountains. The valley surfaces generally have altitudes from 600 to 1,500 meters, and the mountain ranges generally have altitudes from 1,500 to 2,400 meters. About one-half the area is underlain by basin fill. Sedimentary rocks that crop out in the Rio Grande region range in age from Precambrian to Holocene. The oldest Precambrian rocks are metamorphosed and intruded by plutons. Paleozoic rocks are primarily carbonates, with argillaceous beds in the older Paleozoic units. Clastic and gypsum are in greater abundance in younger Paleozoic units of Pennsylvanian and Permian age. The Mesozoic rocks primarily are clastic rocks with some limestone. Cenozoic rocks consist of sequences of conglomerate, sandstone, mudstone, and siltstone, derived from adjacent mountain masses, interbedded with basalt and andesite flows and silicic tuffs. Early to middle Tertiary volcanic and tectonic processes resulted in the implacement of plutonic bodies; volcanic activity continued into the Quaternary. Media considered to have potential for isolation of high-level radioactive waste include intrusive rocks, ash-flow tuff, and basaltic lava flows. Laharic and mudflow breccia and argillaceous beds also may be potential host rocks. These and other rocks may be potential media in areas where the unsaturated zone is thick. Quaternary faults are more common in the southern one-half of the region than in the northern one-half. Range-bounding faults with evidence of Quaternary movement extend northward into the central part of the region. Volcanic activity in the northern part of the region includes basalt flows of Quaternary age. Historical crustal uplift and seismicity have occurred in the vicinity of Socorro, New Mexico. The region is bordered on the west by

  15. Enrollment Management in Academic Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBiaso, Nick

    2012-01-01

    This study provides an understanding of how administrative leaders make decisions regarding enrollment management within academic units at a major research university in the southwestern United States. Key enrollment management functions of recruiting, admissions, marketing, orientation, financial aid/scholarships, academic advising, student…

  16. Casuses of deforestation in southwestern Madagascar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casse, Thorkil; Milhøj, Anders; Ranaivoson, Socrate;

    2004-01-01

    Causes of deforestation are discussed in the case of southwestern Madagascar. Distinction is made between direct and indirect causes. The article ends up with an estimation of the value of agricultural land vs. an estimation of benefits from utilisation of non-timber forest products......Causes of deforestation are discussed in the case of southwestern Madagascar. Distinction is made between direct and indirect causes. The article ends up with an estimation of the value of agricultural land vs. an estimation of benefits from utilisation of non-timber forest products...

  17. Energy Requirements by the Water Sector in the Southwestern US: Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averyt, K.; Yates, D. N.; Meldrum, J.

    2014-12-01

    Climate, energy, and water are fundamentally linked such that shifts in one sector have cascading impacts on the others. Consideration of the integrated system is necessary to fully understand the individual risk profile of each sector. In defining vulnerabilities and potential adaptations, the policy and regulatory environment must be considered alongside the biological and physical systems. Take, for example, the Southwestern U.S., a naturally arid system, where water availability is declining as a consequence of climate change and population growth. Adaptations by the water sector to convey, store, and develop new water sources (e.g. desalination, groundwater pumping, water-reuse) are strategies designed to enhance sustainability of the sector. But, the energy requirements embedded in these management techniques pose challenges to electric utilities. West wide, approximately 20% of total electricity generation goes toward supplying and heating water. If future investments made by the water sector to deal with changing supply and demand regimes continue to follow current trends, the dependence of water on energy availability will grow, meaning that the water supply will be increasingly reliant on the electricity system. Here, we use the example of long-term aridity and the recent drought in the Western US to illustrate the tradeoffs and challenges inherent at the nexus between energy and water. We present long-term trends in the energy intensity of water supplies in the Southwestern US, with a specific focus on groundwater systems. Projected energy requirements for proposed and future conveyance systems are discussed. The potential impacts of reduced flows on the Colorado River on the energy demands for groundwater pumping in the Lower Colorado River Basin are highlighted.

  18. Desertification of arid Rangelands in Morocco

    OpenAIRE

    Mahyou, Hamid; Tychon, Bernard; Paul, Roger; Balaghi, Riad; Mimouni, Jamal

    2011-01-01

    Rangeland or natural arid pastures of Morocco are ecosystems where there is a natural or seminatural vegetation composed of steppes, shrubs and grassland. They cover about 82% of the Moroccan arid lands. These areas represent livelihoods for thousands of people and protect the country from desertification. Despite the importance of the rangelands and the threat of desertification, it is surprising that up to date there is no comprehensive assessment of their condition ...

  19. Rainfall-runoff modeling in arid areas

    OpenAIRE

    Abushandi, Eyad

    2011-01-01

    The Wadi Dhuliel catchment/ North east Jordan, as any other arid area has distinctive hydrological features with limited water resources. The hydrological regime is characterized by high variability of temporal and spatial rainfall distributions, flash floods, absence of base flow, and high rates of evapotranspiration. The aim of this Ph.D. thesis was to apply lumped and distributed models to simulate stream flow in the Wadi Dhuliel arid catchment. Intensive research was done to estimate the ...

  20. SCIENCES IN COLD AND ARID REGIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Aims and Scope Sciences in Cold and Arid Regions, an international Engiish-language journal, is devoted to publishing the latest research achievements on the process and the pattern of Earth surface system in cold and arid regions. Researches in cold regions 1) emphasize particularly on the cold-region-characterized physical, chemical and biological processes and their interactions, and on the response of Cryosphere to Global change and Human activities as well as its effect to environment and the acclimatizable

  1. Southwestern Institute of Physics annual report (2000)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research results and engineering progress of SWIP (Southwestern Institute of Physics) during the year of 2000 was summarized in this annual report. The contents divided into five parts: 1. tokamak experimental diagnoses and tokamak engineering; 2. fusion reactor and fusion reactor materials; 3. plasma theory and calculation; 4. technique development and application; 5. appendix 31 theses and presented in this report

  2. Southwestern Power Administration site environmental report for calendar year 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During CY 93, Southwestern was not involved in any programs that had a direct effect on the environment, involving endangered species, protection of wetlands, or increased electromagnetic radiation. Southwestern continued to function throughout the year in an operations and maintenance posture with minor substation projects. Southwestern received an environmental management audit by the Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), during CY 1992. The purpose of the audit was to give Southwestern, DOE headquarters, and the Secretary an indication of the status of Southwestern management's effectiveness in discharging its duties in an environmentally responsible manner. The audit identified 17 findings. An action plan was developed and remediation of the findings has been accomplished. Several strengths were identified during the audit with regard to the environmental programs at Southwestern. Most importantly, senior management at Southwestern has taken actions to increase environmental awareness throughout the organization which is evidenced by the creation of the Environmental, Safety, Health, and Security Office

  3. Rainwater harvesting in arid and semi-arid zones (repr. 1997)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boers, Th.M.

    1994-01-01

    In arid and semi-arid regions, the scarcity of water can be alleviated by rainwater harvesting, which is defined as a method of inducing, collecting, storing, and conserving local surface runoff for agriculture. Rainwater harvesting can be applied with different systems, and this dissertation deals

  4. Chemical composition, stratigraphy, and depositional environments of the Black River Group (Middle Ordovician), southwestern Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stith, David A.

    1981-01-01

    The chemical composition and stratigraphy of the Black River Group in southwestern Ohio were studied. Chemical analyses were done on two cores of the Black River from Adams and Brown Counties, Ohio. These studies show that substantial reserves of high-carbonate rock are present in the Black River at depths of less than 800 ft, in proximity to Cincinnati and the Ohio River. Stratigraphic studies show that the Black River Group has eight marker beds in its middle and upper portions and three distinct lithologic units in its lower portion; these marker beds and units are present throughout southwestern Ohio. The Black River Group correlates well with the High Bridge Group of Kentucky. Depositional environments of the Black River are similar to those of the High Bridge and to present-day tidal flats in the Bahamas.-Author

  5. Extensive regional atmospheric hydrocarbon pollution in the southwestern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzenstein, Aaron S; Doezema, Lambert A; Simpson, Isobel J; Blake, Donald R; Rowland, F Sherwood

    2003-10-14

    Light alkane hydrocarbons are present in major quantities in the near-surface atmosphere of Texas, Oklahoma, and Kansas during both autumn and spring seasons. In spring 2002, maximum mixing ratios of ethane [34 parts per 109 by volume (ppbv)], propane (20 ppbv), and n-butane (13 ppbv) were observed in north-central Texas. The elevated alkane mixing ratios are attributed to emissions from the oil and natural gas industry. Measured alkyl nitrate mixing ratios were comparable to urban smog values, indicating active photochemistry in the presence of nitrogen oxides, and therefore with abundant formation of tropospheric ozone. We estimate that 4-6 teragrams of methane are released annually within the region and represents a significant fraction of the estimated total U.S. emissions. This result suggests that total U.S. natural gas emissions may have been underestimated. Annual ethane emissions from the study region are estimated to be 0.3-0.5 teragrams. PMID:14530403

  6. Population Structure of Peronospora effusa in the Southwestern United States

    OpenAIRE

    Lyon, Rebecca; Correll, James; Feng, Chunda; Bluhm, Burt; Shrestha, Sandesh; Shi, Ainong; Lamour, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Peronospora effusa is an obligate pathogen that causes downy mildew on spinach and is considered the most economically important disease of spinach. The objective of the current research was to assess genetic diversity of known historical races and isolates collected in 2014 from production fields in Yuma, Arizona and Salinas Valley, California. Candidate neutral single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified by comparing sequence data from reference isolates of known races of the pat...

  7. Population Structure of Peronospora effusa in the Southwestern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Rebecca; Correll, James; Feng, Chunda; Bluhm, Burt; Shrestha, Sandesh; Shi, Ainong; Lamour, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Peronospora effusa is an obligate pathogen that causes downy mildew on spinach and is considered the most economically important disease of spinach. The objective of the current research was to assess genetic diversity of known historical races and isolates collected in 2014 from production fields in Yuma, Arizona and Salinas Valley, California. Candidate neutral single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified by comparing sequence data from reference isolates of known races of the pathogen collected in 2009 and 2010. Genotypes were assessed using targeted sequencing on genomic DNA extracted directly from infected plant tissue. Genotyping 26 historical and 167 contemporary samples at 46 SNP loci revealed 82 unique multi-locus genotypes. The unique genotypes clustered into five groups and the majority of isolates collected in 2014 were genetically closely related, regardless of source location. The historical samples, representing several races, showed greater genetic differentiation. Overall, the SNP data indicate much of the genotypic variation found within fields was produced during asexual development, whereas overall genetic diversity may be influenced by sexual recombination on broader geographical and temporal scales. PMID:26828428

  8. The Source Hydrology of Severe Sustained Drought in th Southwestern U.S.

    OpenAIRE

    Tarboton, David G.

    1994-01-01

    This paper considers the risk of drought and develops drough scenarios for use in the study of severe sustained drought in the Southwestern United States. The focus is on the Colorado River gbasin and regions to which Colorado River water is exported, especially southern California, which depends on water from the Colorado River as well as the four major rivers in northern California. Drought scenarios are develop...

  9. Southwestern Institute of Physics annual report 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the year 2001, significant progresses in the engineering construction of the HL-2A tokamak were made at the Southwestern Institute of Physics (SWIP). At the same time, the research projects from Nuclear Energy Development Foundation, the National Defense Basic Research Foundation and the National Science Foundation of China were completely fulfilled. In addition 283 papers and reports were contributed, among them, 67 are included in the Annual Report

  10. Southwestern Power Administration Annual Report 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-12-01

    Dear Secretary Chu, I am pleased to present the financial statements and operating data for Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern) for Fiscal Year (FY) 2008. In FY 2008, Southwestern delivered over 7.3 billion kilowatt-hours of energy to its wholesale customers – nearly 31% more than average due to numerous record rainfall amounts in the southwest region. These record amounts produced revenues which exceeded the average annual revenue requirement by nearly $20 million and resulted in over $200 million in economic benefits to the region. Yet even as Southwestern exceeded its goals of marketing and delivering Federal hydroelectric power to our customers, we stayed focused on safety, security, and reliability. For example, we maintained our nearly 1,400 miles of high-voltage transmission lines, substations, and communications sites while achieving a Recordable Accident Frequency Rate of 0.0, a record that reflects Southwestern’s safety achievement of no recordable injuries for every 200,000 hours worked. We kept our rights-of-way secure from vegetation and other obstacles, work that not only supports our mission but also promotes reliability of the regional and National grid. We exceeded all North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) Control Performance Standards (CPS- 1 and CPS-2), and maintained regulation and reserve obligations and reactive reserve margins to ensure the reliability of the bulk electric system, even during extended periods of restricted hydro operations due to unusually high project inflows. Finally, we continued our partnerships with the Department of Energy, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, our customers, and other Federal power stakeholders, partnerships that are vital to our continued success in marketing and delivering carbon-free, renewable, and domestically produced energy to our customers and to the Nation. Sincerely, Jon Worthington Administrator

  11. Atmospheric Impacts of Marcellus Shale Gas Activities in Southwestern Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presto, A. A.; Lipsky, E. M.; Saleh, R.; Donahue, N. M.; Robinson, A. L.

    2012-12-01

    Pittsburgh and the surrounding regions of southwestern Pennsylvania are subject to intensive natural gas exploration, drilling, and extraction associated with the Marcellus Shale formation. Gas extraction from the shale formation uses techniques of horizontal drilling followed by hydraulic fracturing. There are significant concerns about air pollutant emissions from the development and production of shale gas, especially methane emissions. We have deployed a mobile monitoring unit to investigate the atmospheric impacts of Marcellus Shale gas activities. The mobile sampling platform is a van with an on-board generator, a high-resolution GPS unit, cameras, and instrumentation for measuring methane, criteria gases (SO2, NOx, CO, O3), PM size distributions (scanning mobility particle sizer), black carbon mass (multi-angle absorption photometer), particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, volatile organic compounds (gas chromatograph with flame ionization detection), and meteorological data. A major advantage of the mobile sampling unit over traditional, stationary monitors is that it allows us to rapidly visit a variety of sites. Sampling at multiple sites allows us to characterize the spatial variability of pollutant concentrations related to Marcellus activity, particularly methane. Data collected from the mobile sampling unit are combined with GIS techniques and dispersion models to map pollutants related to Marcellus Shale operations. The Marcellus Shale gas activities are a major and variable source of methane. The background methane concentration in Pittsburgh is 2.1 +/- 0.2 ppm. However, two southwestern Pennsylvania counties with the highest density of Marcellus Shale wells, Washington and Greene Counties, have many areas of elevated methane concentration. Approximately 11% of the sampled sites in Washington County and nearly 50% of the sampled sites in Greene County have elevated (>2.3 ppm) methane concentrations, compared to 1.5% of sites with elevated

  12. Southwestern Power Administration Annual Report 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2008-01-01

    “Renewable energy” isn’t just a catchphrase at Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern). It describes the hydroelectric energy we market, and the energy that Southwestern’s employees bring to work every day, constantly challenging themselves to become more eff ective and effi cient in providing aff ordable, environmentally clean power to the American people. As Southwestern’s new Administrator, I have had the opportunity to view our operations from a fresh perspective, and I’m proud to share with you how a focus on continual improvement has been evident in accomplishments throughout the agency during fi scal year (FY) 2007. When the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) implemented new reliability standards, we met applicable implementation dates and exceeded NERC’s control performance standards throughout the year. When tasked with reducing the agency’s carbon footprint, we found ways to achieve an 8.7% reduction in energy intensity from last year without impacting our operational capabilities. And when faced with record-breaking infl ows into the reservoir projects from which we market power, we capitalized on the opportunity to provide customers with signifi cant quantities of supplemental energy. Our supplemental sales this year not only saved customers over $122 million, but increased Southwestern’s revenues -- a huge win-win for Southwestern’s ratepayers and the Nation’s taxpayers alike. Southwestern is proud of its role in protecting National and economic security by contributing to the diverse supply of domestically produced energy, operating and maintaining a safe and reliable transmission system, and ensuring good stewardship of our Nation’s water resources and environment. In FY 2007, Southwestern continued to repay all power costs to the American taxpayers by marketing and delivering approximately 5.6 billion kilowatthours of hydropower at cost-based rates to customers in our six-state region. This energy

  13. Development of a regression model to predict copper toxicity to Daphnia magna and site-specific copper criteria across multiple surface-water drainages in an arid landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Barry A; Meyer, Joseph S

    2014-08-01

    The water effect ratio (WER) procedure developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency is commonly used to derive site-specific criteria for point-source metal discharges into perennial waters. However, experience is limited with this method in the ephemeral and intermittent systems typical of arid climates. The present study presents a regression model to develop WER-based site-specific criteria for a network of ephemeral and intermittent streams influenced by nonpoint sources of Cu in the southwestern United States. Acute (48-h) Cu toxicity tests were performed concurrently with Daphnia magna in site water samples and hardness-matched laboratory waters. Median effect concentrations (EC50s) for Cu in site water samples (n=17) varied by more than 12-fold, and the range of calculated WER values was similar. Statistically significant (α=0.05) univariate predictors of site-specific Cu toxicity included (in sequence of decreasing significance) dissolved organic carbon (DOC), hardness/alkalinity ratio, alkalinity, K, and total dissolved solids. A multiple-regression model developed from a combination of DOC and alkalinity explained 85% of the toxicity variability in site water samples, providing a strong predictive tool that can be used in the WER framework when site-specific criteria values are derived. The biotic ligand model (BLM) underpredicted toxicity in site waters by more than 2-fold. Adjustments to the default BLM parameters improved the model's performance but did not provide a better predictive tool compared with the regression model developed from DOC and alkalinity. PMID:24796294

  14. From leaf to basin: evaluating the impacts of introduced plant species on evapotranspiration fluxes from riparian ecosystems in the southwestern U.S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultine, K. R.; Bush, S.; Nagler, P. L.; Morino, K.; Burtch, K.; Dennison, P. E.; Glenn, E. P.; Ehleringer, J.

    2010-12-01

    Global change processes such as climate change and intensive land use pose significant threats to water resources, particularly in arid regions where potential evapotranspiration far exceeds annual rainfall. Potentially compounding these shortages is the progressive expansion of introduced plant species in riparian areas along streams, canals and rivers in geographically arid regions. The question of whether these invasive species have had or will have impacts on water resources is currently under intense debate. We identify a framework for assessing when and where introduced riparian plant species are likely to have the highest potential impact on hydrologic fluxes of arid and semi-arid river systems. We focus on three introduced plant systems that currently dominate southwestern U.S. riparian forests: tamarisk (Tamarix spp.), Russian olive (Eleagnus angustifolia), and Russian knapweed (Acroptilon repens). Our framework focuses on two main criteria: 1) the ecophysiological traits that promote establishment of invasive species across environmental gradients, and 2) an assessment of how hydrologic fluxes are altered by the establishment of introduced species at varying scales. The framework identifies when and where introduced species should have the highest potential impact on the water cycle. This framework will assist land managers and policy makers with restoration and conservation priorities to preserve water resources and valued riparian habitat given limited economic resources.

  15. Uranium isotopes in carbonate aquifers of arid region setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groundwater in arid and semiarid regions is vital resource for many uses and therefore information about concentrations of uranium isotopes among other chemical parameters are necessary. In the study presented here, distribution of 238U and 235U in groundwater of four selected locations in the southern Arabian peninsula, namely at two locations within the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and two locations in Oman are discussed. The analyses of the uranium isotopes were performed using ICP-MS and the results indicated a range of concentrations for 235U and 238U at 3-39 ng L-1 (average: 18 ng L-1) and 429-5,293 ng L-1 (average: 2,508 ng L-1) respectively. These uranium concentrations are below the higher permissible WHO limit for drinking water and also comparable to averages found in groundwater from similar aquifers in Florida and Tunisia. Negative correlation between rainfall and uranium concentrations suggests that in lithologically comparable aquifers, climate may influence the concentration of uranium in subtropical to arid regions. (author)

  16. Study on RS- and GIS-based ecological capital assessment in arid areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Kefa; CHEN Xi; ZHOU Huarong; ZHANG Qing; ZUO Qiting; ZHANG Haibo; YAN Jinfeng; CHEN Chuan

    2006-01-01

    Ecological capital assessment is currently one of the important research contents in the interdisciplinary field of ecology, resources economics, environmental economics and ecological economics. To scientifically assess ecological capital redounds to decision-makers to consider the ecological cost in economic development, and is also necessary for sustainable economic development in arid areas. Based on the theory of landscape ecology,in this paper the per unit area ecological capital values in arid areas are researched by using the Landsat TM data, CBERS satellite data, meteorological data, MODIS satellite data and other ecological data,and the RS- and GIS-based models of assessing ecological capital values in arid areas are developed.Moreover, based on the field-measured data, a case study on ecological capital assessment in the Manas River basin, Xinjiang in 2003 is carried out. The basin is divided into 4 ecological capital areas so as to quantitatively calculate the ecological capital values of the ecosystems, analyze the spatial distribution of ecological capital, and chart the maps of spatial distribution of ecological capital. The results show that the total ecological capital value of the ecosystems in the Manas River basin in 2003 was 1.49454×1011yuan RMB. In spatial distribution, the ecological capital decreases from the alpine zones to the plains and from the oases to the deserts, which accords with the distribution of vegetation zonality in this arid area.The assessed results can objectively reflect the ecological capital and its spatial distribution in the arid basin, and can also provide reference for roundly carrying out the assessment of ecological capital in arid areas.

  17. Isotope techniques in water resource investigations in arid and semi-arid regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Use of Isotope Techniques in Water Resources Investigations in Arid and Semi-arid Regions was initiated with the aim od contributing to the assessment of groundwater resources in arid areas through the use of environmental isotope techniques, and thereby to help in better management of these valuable fresh groundwater resources. The main emphases identified were in three key areas: (i) the evaluation of water balance components such as recharge rate estimation and recharge and discharge cycles at different spatial scales, (ii) paleohydrology and hydroclimatic change and, (iii) anthropogenic impacts and the assessment of the vulnerability of arid zone ground waters to salinisation and pollution impacts. This publication presents individual projects carried out within the frameworks of the CRP. Each paper has been indexed separately

  18. Conservation and restoration of degraded ecosystems in arid and semi-arid areas of northwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In "West Development" of China, one of the most important activities is the Natural Forest Protection Program, designed to swiftly convert the focus of management and utilization of the natural forests from a timber orientation towards forest conservation, sustainable management and environmental protection. The project covered almost all the arid and semi-arid regions in Northwest region. Accompanying this great campaign this paper studied the conservation and restoration model of degraded ecosystems in arid and semi-arid lands in Northwest China. The past practices have resulted in considerably natural forest degradation and loss through land conversion (primarily for agriculture), over-harvesting, inadequate reforestation and lack of protection. The consequences have been the loss of soil and water resources, diminished timber production capacity on a sustainable basis, and environmental losses. This paper applied Aronson's restoration model and proposed the conservation, restoration, re-allocation and preservation program for the implementation of environmental improvement and natural forest conservation.

  19. Spatial interactions and resilience in arid ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppel, van de J.; Rietkerk, M.

    2004-01-01

    We present a mathematical analysis of the consequences of spatial interactions between vegetation patches by means of water flow for the functioning of arid systems. Our model results suggest that spatial exchange of water improved the resilience to disturbances and increased the resistance to human

  20. Aridity and decomposition processes in complex landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossola, Alessandro; Nyman, Petter

    2015-04-01

    Decomposition of organic matter is a key biogeochemical process contributing to nutrient cycles, carbon fluxes and soil development. The activity of decomposers depends on microclimate, with temperature and rainfall being major drivers. In complex terrain the fine-scale variation in microclimate (and hence water availability) as a result of slope orientation is caused by differences in incoming radiation and surface temperature. Aridity, measured as the long-term balance between net radiation and rainfall, is a metric that can be used to represent variations in water availability within the landscape. Since aridity metrics can be obtained at fine spatial scales, they could theoretically be used to investigate how decomposition processes vary across complex landscapes. In this study, four research sites were selected in tall open sclerophyll forest along a aridity gradient (Budyko dryness index ranging from 1.56 -2.22) where microclimate, litter moisture and soil moisture were monitored continuously for one year. Litter bags were packed to estimate decomposition rates (k) using leaves of a tree species not present in the study area (Eucalyptus globulus) in order to avoid home-field advantage effects. Litter mass loss was measured to assess the activity of macro-decomposers (6mm litter bag mesh size), meso-decomposers (1 mm mesh), microbes above-ground (0.2 mm mesh) and microbes below-ground (2 cm depth, 0.2 mm mesh). Four replicates for each set of bags were installed at each site and bags were collected at 1, 2, 4, 7 and 12 months since installation. We first tested whether differences in microclimate due to slope orientation have significant effects on decomposition processes. Then the dryness index was related to decomposition rates to evaluate if small-scale variation in decomposition can be predicted using readily available information on rainfall and radiation. Decomposition rates (k), calculated fitting single pool negative exponential models, generally

  1. Contribution of Afforestation Practices to Changing Hydrology in Arid and Semi-arid Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, X.; Meng, S.; Li, J.

    2014-12-01

    Arid and semi-arid regions are generally susceptible to land degeneration due to limited precipitation and high potential evapotranspiration (ET). Afforestation has been assumed to be a feasible strategy to conserve water and to improve ecological environment. For example, the Northern China, as a typical arid and semi-arid region has experienced large-scale and long-term afforestation practices since the early 1980s. The land cover has been altered to some degree as tree planting with increasing greenness. However, the effectiveness of afforestation might not be as expected due to the interference of climate change. In this study, we attempted to quantify the contribution of afforestation practices to the hydrological system in the Northern China. A macro-scale hydrological model, i.e., the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC), was employed to simulate ET, soil moisture and runoff for the period 1959 - 2009. Fractional simulation scenarios were designed regarding different conditions of land cover and climate changes. The results indicate that the land cover has minor impact on the variability of hydrological variables at regional scale, comparing with the climate change. Particularly, the decreasing precipitation plays a dominant role in shaping the trends of ET, soil moisture and runoff. The findings have significant implications for the implementation of the afforestation practices and for the management of water resources in arid and semi-arid regions.

  2. Aridity under conditions of increased CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greve, Peter; Roderick, Micheal L.; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2016-04-01

    A string of recent of studies led to the wide-held assumption that aridity will increase under conditions of increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations and associated global warming. Such results generally build upon analyses of changes in the 'aridity index' (the ratio of potential evaporation to precipitation) and can be described as a direct thermodynamic effect on atmospheric water demand due to increasing temperatures. However, there is widespread evidence that contradicts the 'warmer is more arid' interpretation, leading to the 'global aridity paradox' (Roderick et al. 2015, WRR). Here we provide a comprehensive assessment of modeled changes in a broad set of dryness metrics (primarily based on a range of measures of water availability) over a large range of realistic atmospheric CO2 concentrations. We use an ensemble of simulations from of state-of-the-art climate models to analyse both equilibrium climate experiments and transient historical simulations and future projections. Our results show that dryness is, under conditions of increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations and related global warming, generally decreasing at global scales. At regional scales we do, however, identify areas that undergo changes towards drier conditions, located primarily in subtropical climate regions and the Amazon Basin. Nonetheless, the majority of regions, especially in tropical and mid- to northern high latitudes areas, display wetting conditions in a warming world. Our results contradict previous findings and highlight the need to comprehensively assess all aspects of changes in hydroclimatological conditions at the land surface. Roderick, M. L., P. Greve, and G. D. Farquhar (2015), On the assessment of aridity with changes in atmospheric CO2, Water Resour. Res., 51, 5450-5463

  3. 沉思性·议论化·隐喻化——论“西南联大诗人群”的诗语言探索与诗美追求%Meditativeness, Disputativeness and Metaphorization -- Exploration of Poetic Language and Pursuit of Poetic Aesthetics of the "Poet Group in Southwestern China United University"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程国君; 朱卫国

    2012-01-01

    "The Poet Group in Southwestern China United University" actively explored poetic aesthetics and practiced new poetic constructs mainly in innovation and invention of modern poetic language. First of all, They re- duced narrative and descriptive language but massively increased meditative language in poetry writing; cut down straightforward and scientific statement but added largely to rhetorical and sensitive language then, they , including paradox, metaphor, synaesthesia, irony, etc. ; finally, they deliberately invented novel expressions and strange collocations to experiment with sentence structure of modem poetry and new rules of constructing poetic lines, great- ly projecting the aesthetic effects of poetic language tension. With expressive, ironical and metaphorical language of "new experience" and symbolic "art", these poets were correcting those malpractices of new poetry in its initial days, inventing a poetic language system which was capable of expressing complex and delicate implications and ex- perience. Moreover, an obscure and "modernistic" poetic style took shape, which greatly enriched and raised the artistic quality and aesthetic taste of modern poetry.%"西南联大诗人群"的诗美探索与建构实践,主要集中在对于现代诗歌语言的革新与创造上。这种革新与实践主要体现在以下3个方面:一是诗歌中的叙述、描写性语言减少,沉思性语言大量增加;二是诗歌中的直白、科学性语言减少,矛盾修辞格、隐喻、通感、反讽等修辞性、感受性语言大量增加;三是蓄意制造文字的新奇与陌生化组合,探索现代诗句构、诗行构成的新法则,诗歌语言张力美效果凸显。当该派诗人以直观感性的、隐喻反讽的"新的感性"和象征性"艺术"语言改变着初期新诗语言直白化的弊端时,便创造了一套能够表现现代人复杂幽微意蕴与感受的诗歌语言体系。由于诗歌中象征性、隐喻性语言变

  4. The instrumental climate history of southwestern Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doesken, N.J.; McKee, T.B. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Instrumental observations of the climate of southwestern Colorado date back to about 1880. Climatic conditions since the late 19th century will be described with emphasis on temperatures, temperature ranges and observed precipitation. Typical seasonal patterns of temperature and precipitation will be shown, and variations and apparent trends over time will be discussed. Drought characteristics will be described based on a standardized precipitation index developed for Colorado. Finally, brief comments on the challenge of collecting accurate and consistent long-term data will be given.

  5. Transformational Leadership and Teacher Motivation in Southwestern Arizona High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Catherine L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between transformational leadership and teacher motivation in Southwestern Arizona high schools. Teachers in a school district in Southwestern Arizona comprised of high schools were surveyed using two instruments, Leithwood and Jantzi's (1998) The Leadership and Management of Schools in…

  6. New Technologies to Reclaim Arid Lands User's Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. K. Ostler

    2002-10-01

    establishing project objectives, scheduling, budgeting, and selecting cost-effective techniques. Reclamation techniques include sections describing: (1) erosion control (physical, chemical, and biological), (2) site preparation, (3) soil amendments, (4) seeding, (5) planting, (6) grazing and weed control, (7) mulching, (8) irrigation, and (9) site protection. Each section states the objectives of the technique, the principles, an in-depth look at the techniques, and any special considerations as it relates to DoD or DOE lands. The need for monitoring and remediation is described to guide users in monitoring reclamation efforts to evaluate their cost-effectiveness. Costs are provided for the proposed techniques for the major deserts of the southwestern U.S. showing the average and range of costs. A set of decision tools are provided in the form of a flow diagram and table to guide users in selecting effective reclamation techniques to achieve mitigation objectives. Recommendations are provided to help summarize key reclamation principles and to assist users in developing a successful program that contributes to sustainable uses of DoD and DOE lands. The users manual is helpful to managers in communicating to installation management the needs and consequences of training decisions and the costs required to achieve successful levels of sustainable use. This users manual focuses on the development of new reclamation techniques that have been implemented at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, California, and are applicable to most arid land reclamation efforts.

  7. INVESTIGATION OF THE GROUNDWATER SUITABILITY FOR IRRIGATION PRACTICES IN AN ARID REGION: CASE STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed Murad

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater is an important source of acceptable water for irrigation in the arid regions and in particular in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Demand for groundwater is increasing in the UAE due to population growth and significant economic advancement associated with political stability. As agricultural practices are the main land use in Al Hayer area, southeast UAE, majority of extracted groundwater from major aquifer is used to meet the increasing demands of irrigation. This study is aimed...

  8. Rainfall Characterization In An Arid Area

    OpenAIRE

    Bazaraa, A. S.; Ahmed, Shamim

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this work is to characterize the rainfall in Doha which lies in an arid region. The rainfall data included daily rainfall depth since 1962 and the hyetographs of the individual storms since 1976. The rainfall is characterized by high variability and severe thunderstorms which are of limited geographical extent. Four probability distributions were used to fit the maximum rainfall in 24 hours and the annual rainfall depth. The extreme value distribution was found to have the be...

  9. VOCs in Arid soils: Technology summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Volatile Organic Compounds In Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID) focuses on technologies to clean up volatile organic compounds and associated contaminants in soil and groundwater at arid sites. The initial host site is the 200 West Area at DOE's Hanford site in southeastern Washington state. The primary VOC contaminant is carbon tetrachloride, in association with heavy metals and radionuclides. An estimated 580--920 metric tons of carbon tetrachloride were disposed of between 1955 and 1973, resulting in extensive soil and groundwater contamination. The VOC-Arid ID schedule has been divided into three phases of implementation. The phased approach provides for: rapid transfer of technologies to the Environmental Restoration (EM-40) programs once demonstrated; logical progression in the complexity of demonstrations based on improved understanding of the VOC problem; and leveraging of the host site EM-40 activities to reduce the overall cost of the demonstrations. During FY92 and FY93, the primary technology demonstrations within the ID were leveraged with an ongoing expedited response action at the Hanford 200 West Area, which is directed at vapor extraction of VOCs from the vadose (unsaturated) zone. Demonstration efforts are underway in the areas of subsurface characterization including: drilling and access improvements, off-gas and borehole monitoring of vadose zone VOC concentrations to aid in soil vapor extraction performance evaluation, and treatment of VOC-contaminated off-gas. These current demonstration efforts constitute Phase 1 of the ID and, because of the ongoing vadose zone ERA, can result in immediate transfer of successful technologies to EM-40

  10. Cereals for the semi-arid tropics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The region of semi-arid tropics is the most famine prone area of the world. This region with nearly one billion people extends across some 20 million square kilometres. Major domesticated cereals adapted to semi-arid regions are sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench), foxtail millet (Setaria italica (L.) P. Beauv.) and pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum (L.) R. Br.). Several minor cereals are grown as speciality crops, or harvested in the wild in times of severe drought and scarcity. Important in the African Sahel are the fonios Digitaria iburua Stapf, D. exilis (Kapist) Stapf and Brachiaria deflexa (Schumach). C.E. Hubbard. These species are aggressive colonizers and are commonly encouraged as weeds in cultivated fields. Sown genotypes differ from their close wild relatives primarily in the lack of efficient natural seed dispersal. The fonios lend themselves to rapid domestication. Several wild cereals extend well beyond the limits of agriculture into the Sahara. Commonly harvested are the perennial Stipagrostis pungens and Panicum turgidum, and the annual Cenchrus biflorus (kram-kram). Kram-kram yields well under extreme heat and drought stress, and holds promise as a domesticated cereal. Sauwi millet (Panicum sonorum) is promising cereal in arid northwestern Mexico. (author). 31 refs

  11. Machine learning for predicting soil classes in three semi-arid landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brungard, Colby W.; Boettinger, Janis L.; Duniway, Michael C.; Wills, Skye A.; Edwards, Thomas C., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Mapping the spatial distribution of soil taxonomic classes is important for informing soil use and management decisions. Digital soil mapping (DSM) can quantitatively predict the spatial distribution of soil taxonomic classes. Key components of DSM are the method and the set of environmental covariates used to predict soil classes. Machine learning is a general term for a broad set of statistical modeling techniques. Many different machine learning models have been applied in the literature and there are different approaches for selecting covariates for DSM. However, there is little guidance as to which, if any, machine learning model and covariate set might be optimal for predicting soil classes across different landscapes. Our objective was to compare multiple machine learning models and covariate sets for predicting soil taxonomic classes at three geographically distinct areas in the semi-arid western United States of America (southern New Mexico, southwestern Utah, and northeastern Wyoming). All three areas were the focus of digital soil mapping studies. Sampling sites at each study area were selected using conditioned Latin hypercube sampling (cLHS). We compared models that had been used in other DSM studies, including clustering algorithms, discriminant analysis, multinomial logistic regression, neural networks, tree based methods, and support vector machine classifiers. Tested machine learning models were divided into three groups based on model complexity: simple, moderate, and complex. We also compared environmental covariates derived from digital elevation models and Landsat imagery that were divided into three different sets: 1) covariates selected a priori by soil scientists familiar with each area and used as input into cLHS, 2) the covariates in set 1 plus 113 additional covariates, and 3) covariates selected using recursive feature elimination. Overall, complex models were consistently more accurate than simple or moderately complex models. Random

  12. Cancer mortality and radioactive fallout in southwestern Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer mortality was compared between a three-county region in southwestern Utah and the remainder of Utah in an investigation of reported excess cancer risks associated with residence in southwestern Utah during the period of above-ground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site. Because most of the fallout in southwestern Utah was deposited during 1953-1957, comparisons were limited to persons born before 1958, and deaths from leukemia and bone cancer during 1955-1980 and from other cancers during 1964-1980. There was no excess risk of cancer mortality in southwestern Utah, for single or grouped sites, with the single exception of leukemia which showed statistically significant odds ratios of 1.45 based on 62 deaths at all ages, and 2.84 based on nine deaths at ages 0-14. The finding for childhood leukemia was based on different time periods and geographic comparisons from those of two earlier studies in which no such excess was found. Mortality from all cancer sites combined was significantly lower in southwestern Utah than in the remainder of the state, even after adjustment for the higher proportion of (lower risk) Mormons in southwestern Utah. The present results, including the positive association for leukemia, are inconsistent with the high excess risks reported by Johnson (JAMA 1984;251:230-6) based on an interview survey of cancer incidence among long-term Mormon residents of southwestern Utah

  13. Cancer mortality and radioactive fallout in southwestern Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, S.G.; Land, C.E.; McKay, F.W.

    1987-01-01

    Cancer mortality was compared between a three-county region in southwestern Utah and the remainder of Utah in an investigation of reported excess cancer risks associated with residence in southwestern Utah during the period of above-ground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site. Because most of the fallout in southwestern Utah was deposited during 1953-1957, comparisons were limited to persons born before 1958, and deaths from leukemia and bone cancer during 1955-1980 and from other cancers during 1964-1980. There was no excess risk of cancer mortality in southwestern Utah, for single or grouped sites, with the single exception of leukemia which showed statistically significant odds ratios of 1.45 based on 62 deaths at all ages, and 2.84 based on nine deaths at ages 0-14. The finding for childhood leukemia was based on different time periods and geographic comparisons from those of two earlier studies in which no such excess was found. Mortality from all cancer sites combined was significantly lower in southwestern Utah than in the remainder of the state, even after adjustment for the higher proportion of (lower risk) Mormons in southwestern Utah. The present results, including the positive association for leukemia, are inconsistent with the high excess risks reported by Johnson (JAMA 1984;251:230-6) based on an interview survey of cancer incidence among long-term Mormon residents of southwestern Utah.

  14. Millennial-scale records of North American Monsoon in time and space during the last glacial period: reconstructions from arid northern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, P.; Quiroz-Jiménez, D.; Charles-Polo, M.; Lozano-Santacruz, R.

    2013-05-01

    The arid northern Mexico is part of the Sonora and Chihuahua Deserts and both the deserts belong to the North American Desert system. The North American Monsoon (NAM) or Mexican Monsoon refers to the system that brings summer precipitation to arid northern Mexico and southwestern USA. It contributes ca. 70-80% of total annual precipitation along the western slopes of the Sierra Madre Occidental (northern Mexico) and ca. 40-50% of total precipitation in Arizona and New Mexico (southwest USA). High-resolution geochemical data from lacustrine deposits located between 23°N and 31°N (paleolakes La Salada, Babicora and San Felipe) provide spatio-temporal and millennial-scale paleohydrological records related to the dynamics of summer precipitation as well as westerly winter storms over the last glacial period. The inverse relationship between proxy records of runoff into lacustrine basins of northern Mexico and winter precipitation over the southwestern USA indicate that the westerly winter storms had minimal influence south of 30°N and the paleohydrological changes are mainly summer precipitation controlled. The variation in summer season precipitation between 20 and 60 cal. kyr BP was driven by long term changes in summer insolation. During an interval of lower summer insolation (i.e. >60 cal. kyr BP), the higher summer precipitation could be related to the NAM expansion as a result of reduced north hemisphere ice sheets. On a millennial-scale, the region received more than average precipitation during the warm interstadials and vice versa.

  15. Rainwater harvesting in arid and semi-arid zones (repr. 1997)

    OpenAIRE

    Boers, Th.M.

    1994-01-01

    In arid and semi-arid regions, the scarcity of water can be alleviated by rainwater harvesting, which is defined as a method of inducing, collecting, storing, and conserving local surface runoff for agriculture. Rainwater harvesting can be applied with different systems, and this dissertation deals with the system of micro-catchments. A microcatchment consists of a runoff area and a basin area in which a tree is planted. The purpose of this study was to develop a design procedure for micro-ca...

  16. Paleomagnetism of subsurface Trenton Group carbonates, southwestern Ontario : preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garner, N.; Cioppa, M.T. [Windsor Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Earth Sciences

    2004-07-01

    The oil and gas industry in Canada and the United States has expressed renewed exploration interest in the Ordovician Trenton and Black River Group carbonates of southwestern Ontario. The hydrocarbon reservoirs in the area are associated with non-porous limestones and isolated areas of dolomitization. Paleomagnetic studies have been conducted on unoriented core from the dolomite-rich Hillman Field to determine if previously characterized dolomitic phases can be distinguished magnetically. More than 200 specimens were collected from a single well, providing a nearly complete section through the Sherman Falls Formation. Preliminary measurements were made using a multi-step alternating field or thermal demagnetization sequence. There were at least two magnetization components in the specimens measured. These included a normal polarity low temperature/low coercivity remanent magnetization, and a reversed polarity characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM). Results suggest that pyrrhotite and magnetite is present. Although the origin of the high temperature magnetization has not been determined, the generally low temperature magnetization of the ChRM suggests that the magnetization is the Permian Kiaman overprint that is observed in the Appalachian Basin.

  17. Energy map of southwestern Wyoming, Part A - Coal and wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biewick, Laura R.H.; Jones, Nicholas R.

    2012-01-01

    To further advance the objectives of the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI) the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Wyoming State Geological Survey (WSGS) have compiled Part A of the Energy Map of Southwestern Wyoming. Focusing primarily on electrical power sources, Part A of the energy map is a compilation of both published and previously unpublished coal (including coalbed gas) and wind energy resources data, presented in a Geographic Information System (GIS) data package. Energy maps, data, documentation and spatial data processing capabilities are available in a geodatabase, published map file (pmf), ArcMap document (mxd), Adobe Acrobat PDF map (plate 1) and other digital formats that can be downloaded at the USGS website. Accompanying the map (plate 1) and the geospatial data are four additional plates that describe the geology, energy resources, and related infrastructure. These tabular plates include coal mine (plate 2), coal field (plate 3), coalbed gas assessment unit (plate 4), and wind farm (plate 5) information with hyperlinks to source publications and data on the internet. The plates can be printed and examined in hardcopy, or accessed digitally. The data represent decades of research by the USGS, WSGS, BLM and others, and can facilitate landscape-level science assessments, and resource management decisionmaking.

  18. Southwestern Institute of Physics: Annual Report 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main achievements of controlled nuclear fusion research are presented for Southwestern Institute of Physics in 1998 year. With the establishment and operation of two auxiliary heating systems (NBI, ICRH), the HL-1M Tokamak is equipped with main auxiliary heating and current driving systems such as NBI, ECRH, ICRH and LHCD etc. . In addition, a variety of advanced fueling system, i.e. , multi-shot pellet and supersonic molecular beam injection, the first wall processing technologies of boronization, siliconization and lithiumization as well as more than 20 diagnostic facilities with partial space-time resolution capability have been established on the device. The construction of a larger Tokamak with divertors, the HL-2A, and its complementary systems are being carried out

  19. Environmental Assessment for power marketing policy for Southwestern Power Administration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern) needs to renew expiring power sales contracts with new term (10 year) sales contracts. The existing contracts have been in place for several years and many will expire over the next ten years. Southwestern completed an Environmental Assessment on the existing power allocation in June, 1979 (a copy of the EA is attached), and there are no proposed additions of any major new generation resources, service to discrete major new loads, or major changes in operating parameters, beyond those included in the existing power allocation. Impacts from a no action plan, proposed alternative, and market power for less than 10 years are described.

  20. Environmental Assessment for power marketing policy for Southwestern Power Administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern) needs to renew expiring power sales contracts with new term (10 year) sales contracts. The existing contracts have been in place for several years and many will expire over the next ten years. Southwestern completed an Environmental Assessment on the existing power allocation in June, 1979 (a copy of the EA is attached), and there are no proposed additions of any major new generation resources, service to discrete major new loads, or major changes in operating parameters, beyond those included in the existing power allocation. Impacts from a no action plan, proposed alternative, and market power for less than 10 years are described

  1. Untangling a species complex of arid zone grasses (Triodia) reveals patterns congruent with co-occurring animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Benjamin M; Barrett, Matthew D; Krauss, Siegfried L; Thiele, Kevin

    2016-08-01

    The vast Australian arid zone formed over the last 15million years, and gradual aridification as well as more extreme Pliocene and Pleistocene climate shifts have impacted the evolution of its biota. Understanding the evolutionary history of groups of organisms or regional biotas such as the Australian arid biota requires clear delimitation of the units of biodiversity (taxa). Here we integrate evidence from nuclear (ETS and ITS) and chloroplast (rps16-trnK spacer) regions and morphology to clarify taxonomic boundaries in a species complex of Australian hummock grasses (Triodia) to better understand the evolution of Australian arid zone plants and to evaluate congruence in distribution patterns with co-occurring organisms. We find evidence for multiple new taxa in the T. basedowii species complex, but also incongruence between data sets and indications of hybridization that complicate delimitation. We find that the T. basedowii complex has high lineage diversity and endemism in the biologically important Pilbara region of Western Australia, consistent with the region acting as a refugium. Taxa show strong geographic structure in the Pilbara, congruent with recent work on co-occurring animals and suggesting common evolutionary drivers across the biota. Our findings confirm recognition of the Pilbara as an important centre of biodiversity in the Australian arid zone, and provide a basis for future taxonomic revision of the T. basedowii complex and more detailed study of its evolutionary history and that of arid Australia. PMID:27179699

  2. Warm-dry collocation of recent drought in southwestern China tied to moisture transport and climate warming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴新刚; 柳晔; 汪萍

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the recent drought in southwestern China and its association with environmental changes in moisture transport (MT) and atmospheric circulation. Climatic Research Unit grid data, in situ observations in China, and ERA-interim reanalysis are used to study the characteristics of the drought and the associated mechanism. Recent precipitation trends show a pattern of “Northern wetting and Southern drying”, similar to the anti-phase of the climate pattern prevailing during 1980–2000 in mainland China;southwestern China incurred a severe drought during 2009–2013. Wavelet analysis reveals that the drought coincides with a warm–dry phase of temperature and precipitation on a period of about 20 years and beyond 100 years, where contributions account for 43%and 57%of the deficiency of the precipitation, averaged for 2003–2012, respectively. A further investigation reveals that the drought results chiefly from the decline of the southwestern monsoon MT toward southwestern China, in addition to mid-latitude circulation changes, which leads to more blockings near the Ural Mountains and the Sea of Okhotsk in the rainy season and negative anomalies around Lake Baikal and northeast China in the dry season. These anomalies are likely to be correlated with global sea surface temperature changes and need to be studied further.

  3. Analysis list: ARID1A [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ARID1A Liver + hg19 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/ARID1A.1.tsv http://dbar...chive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/ARID1A.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/AR...ID1A.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/ARID1A.Liver.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/Liver.gml ...

  4. Analysis list: ARID1B [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ARID1B Liver + hg19 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/ARID1B.1.tsv http://dbar...chive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/ARID1B.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/AR...ID1B.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/ARID1B.Liver.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/Liver.gml ...

  5. Analysis list: ARID3B [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ARID3B Others + hg19 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/ARID3B.1.tsv http://dbar...chive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/ARID3B.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/AR...ID3B.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/ARID3B.Others.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/Others.gml ...

  6. Analysis list: ARID2 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ARID2 Liver + hg19 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/ARID2.1.tsv http://dbar...chive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/ARID2.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/AR...ID2.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/ARID2.Liver.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/Liver.gml ...

  7. Incidence of retinopathy of prematurity and risk factors in the South-Western Region of Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Mostafa Feghhi; Seyed Mohammad Hassan Altayeb; Foad Haghi; Ali Kasiri; Fereydoun Farahi; Mosoud Dehdashtyan; Mahzyar Movasaghi; Fakher Rahim

    2012-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to report the incidence of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) and the contribution of various risk factors to ROP in the south-western region of Iran. Material and Methods: This cross-sectional case-control series reviewed all low birth weight (LBW, ≤2000 g) neonates and/or neonates less than 32 weeks gestational age who had been hospitalized in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit from 2006 to 2010. The cohort was divided into infants without ROP (nonROP group)...

  8. Holocene freshwater carbonate structures in the hyper-arid Gebel Uweinat region of the Sahara Desert (Southwestern Egypt)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinova, Margarita M.; Meckler, A. Nele; McKay, Christopher P.

    2014-01-01

    The eastern part of the Sahara is at present the driest region of the desert. Yet the extensive animal rock art in the area, presumed to depict real activities in the lives of the painters, suggests that environmental conditions were significantly different when the rock art was produced. Here we report on exploration of the area, which led to the discovery of morphologically-distinct carbonate structures that line the walls of two valleys in Gebel Uweinat, and were likely formed in standing water. The carbonate structures comprise what appear to be shoreline carbonate formations, and date back to 8100 and 9400 years BP. The chemical and morphological similarity of these formations to carbonate structures from modern lakes suggests that these lakes contained fresh, standing water suitable for human and animal use. However, the significant quartz content suggests that windblown sand was pervasive, and thus the vegetation cover may have been sparse. This discovery supports the possibility of grasslands in the area, which may have been able to support human habitation, and adds to the evidence for a wetter climate in the area in the early Holocene.

  9. Preparing a Schematic Soils Map of an Arid Area Using Landsat Imagery

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, R. H.

    1980-01-01

    Between June 1977 and October 1979, a schematic soils map was made of an arid area 2,149,700 square kilometers in size using photo-interpretive techniques on 120 Landsat scenes. The smallest mapping unit was about 5000 hectares. The mapping units were named for the soil subgroups that were present classification of the soils was based on Soil Taxonomy. Visual interpretations were made on the images (black and white band 7) after determining the general landscape forms that were present in ...

  10. Conservation genomics reveals multiple evolutionary units within Bell’s Vireo (Vireo bellii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klicka, Luke B.; Kus, Barbara E.; Title, Pascal O.; Burns, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    The Bell’s Vireo (Vireo bellii) is a widespread North American species of bird that has declined since the mid-1960s primarily due to habitat modification. Throughout its range, Bell’s Vireo populations are regulated under varying degrees of protection; however, the species has never been characterized genetically. Therefore, the current taxonomy used to guide management decisions may misrepresent the true evolutionary history for the species. We sequenced 86 individuals for ND2 and genotyped 48 individuals for genome-wide SNPs to identify distinct lineages within Bell’s Vireo. Phylogenetic analyses uncovered two distinct clades that are separated in the arid southwestern United States, near the border of the Chihuahuan and Sonoran Deserts. These clades diverged from each other approximately 1.11–2.04 mya. The timing of diversification, geographic location, and niche modeling of the east/west divergence suggest vicariance as a mode of diversification for these two lineages. Analyses of the SNP dataset provided additional resolution and indicated the Least Bell’s Vireo populations are a distinct evolutionary lineage. Our genetic evidence, together with information from morphology and behavior, suggests that the Bell’s Vireo complex involves two species, each containing two separate subspecies. This new information has implications for the federal, state and other listing status of Bell’s Vireo throughout its range.

  11. Isotope and radiation techniques for efficient water and fertilizer use in semi-arid regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Joint FAO/IAEA Division carried out a coordinated research programme, which was concerned with the efficiency of water and fertilizer uses in semi-arid farming systems. The present publication is a summary of the individual contributions from Belgium, Chile, Ivory Coast, Cyprus, France, India, Israel, Romania, Senegal, Sri Lanka and the United States of America, over the period 1978-1984. Water and fertilizer uptake by crops are dynamic processes affected by several factors of the soil-plant-atmosphere system. The neutron moisture meters were used not only to measure soil water contents but also to understand water dynamics under field conditions. Nitrogen is the most limiting nutrient in many semi-arid regions, and as its absorption is very much related to water dynamics in the soil, experiments using N-15 labelled fertilizer were carried out, which are presented in this report

  12. Plutonium in surface soil near the southwestern boundary of the Hanford project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples of airborne particles collected near the Prosser Barricade in another study showed low 240Pu/239Pu ratios that are indicative of Hanford-produced plutonium. In an effort to locate evidence of a trail or the remains of a large short-term release of plutonium that may have occurred during past Hanford operations, surface soil samples were collected along the southweastern boundary of the Hanford Site in December 1979. Results indicated the possibility of slightly elevated levels of 239240Pu (0.016 pCi/g) occurring in the general vicinity of the Arid Land Ecology Field lab extending to the junction of Highway 240 and Horn Rapids Road as compared to lower levels (0.006 pCi/g) in a northwesterly direction along the base of Rattlesnake Mountain and the eastern slope of Yakima Ridge. Assuming the worldwide average 240Pu/239Pu ratio of 0.18 for soil of the Pacific Northwest, the plutonium in these soil samples may be slightly less enriched with 240Pu (240Pu/239Pu = 0.16). No evidence was discovered of an acute release remaining intact and crossing the southwestern boundary during the operating history of plutonium facilities in the 200 Areas

  13. Late Holocene climate variability in the southwestern Mediterranean region: an integrated marine and terrestrial geochemical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Martín-Puertas

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A combination of marine (Alboran Sea cores, ODP 976 and TTR 300 G and terrestrial (Zoñar Lake, Andalucia, Spain geochemical proxies provides a high-resolution reconstruction of climate variability and human influence in the southwestern Mediterranean region for the last 4000 years at inter-centennial resolution. Proxies respond to changes in precipitation rather than temperature alone. Our combined terrestrial and marine archive documents a succession of dry and wet periods coherent with the North Atlantic climate signal. A dry period occurred prior to 2.7 cal ka BP – synchronously to the global aridity crisis of the third-millennium BC – and during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (1.4–0.7 cal ka BP. Wetter conditions prevailed from 2.7 to 1.4 cal ka BP. Hydrological signatures during the Little Ice Age are highly variable but consistent with more humidity than the Medieval Climate Anomaly. Additionally, Pb anomalies in sediments at the end of the Bronze Age suggest anthropogenic pollution earlier than the Roman Empire development in the Iberian Peninsula. The Late Holocene climate evolution of the in the study area confirms the see-saw pattern between the eastern and western Mediterranean regions and the higher influence of the North Atlantic dynamics in the western Mediterranean.

  14. Hydrology of Salt Wells Creek : a plains stream in southwestern Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowham, H.W.; DeLong, L.L.; Collier, K.R.; Zimmerman, E.A.

    1982-01-01

    Development of energy minerals in plains areas of Wyoming is expanding rapidly. Such development may affect water resources and hydrologic relations of the plains; however, little information exists concerning hydrologic processes for these areas. This report summarizes results of a hydrologic study made during 1975-78 of Salt Wells creek, a drainage area of about 500 square miles located southeast of Rock Springs, Wyoming. The area is typical of arid and semiarid plains areas in southwestern Wyoming where mineral development is occurring. Salt Wells Creek is predominately an intermittent stream. Numerous springs in the headwaters cause small perennial flows in some upstream tributaries, but evaporation, freezeup, and seepage deplete these flows so that the middle and lower reaches of the main channel have only intermittent flows. The intermittent nature of streamflow affects water quality. It was observed that a flushing of dissolved solids and suspended sediment occurs during the first flows of a runoff event. A striking feature of the stream is its deeply incised channel. The downcutting is attributed to the cummulative effects of: (1) a change in the relative climate, amounts of annual precipitation occurring as rain and snow, (2) change in base level due to downstream channelization, and (3) changes in land use. Because of the incision, erosion is now expanding to include intervening tributaries. (USGS)

  15. Prevalence of Dental Caries and Periodontal Disease in Mexican American Children Aged 5 to 17 Years: Results from Southwestern HHANES, 1982-83.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Amid L.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Dental caries and periodontal disease in Mexican American children of the southwestern United States occur mainly in molars, lending strong support for the use of fissure sealants as a preventive procedure. This study also reports on the prevalence of fillings decay and gingivitis in this population. (VM)

  16. College-Bound Seniors, 1979. [College Board ATP Summary Reports for: National, New England, Middle States, Southern, Midwestern, Southwestern, Rocky Mountain, and Western Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    College Entrance Examination Board, Princeton, NJ.

    The Admissions Testing Program (ATP) is a service of the College Board. The 1979 ATP summary reports on college-bound seniors were produced for each region of the United States, including New England, the Middle, Southern, Midwestern, Southwestern, Rocky Mountain, and Western States. The national and each regional report are in separate booklets.…

  17. A PROPOSED NEW VEGETATION INDEX, THE TOTAL RATIO VEGETATION INDEX (TRVI), FOR ARID AND SEMI-ARID REGIONS

    OpenAIRE

    H. Fadaei; Suzuki, R.; Sakai, T; Torii, K.

    2012-01-01

    Vegetation indices that provide important key to predict amount vegetation in forest such as percentage vegetation cover, aboveground biomass, and leaf-area index. Arid and semi-arid areas are not exempt of this rule. Arid and semi-arid areas of northeast Iran cover about 3.4 million ha and are populated by two main tree species, the broadleaf Pistacia vera (pistachio) and the conifer Juniperus excelsa ssp. polycarpos (Persian juniper). Natural stands of pistachio in Iran are not only environ...

  18. Drowning in children: Aseer Central Hospital experience, Southwestern Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suliman H Al-Fifi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To study the reasons, magnitude and outcome of drowning following submersion in water of children admitted to the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit in Aseer Province, Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: A retrospective cohort study of all pediatric patients (0-13 years old who drowned and were admitted to the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Aseer Central Hospital, Southwestern Saudi Arabia, between January 1st 1999 and December 31st 2009. Results: A total of 19 cases were admitted following submersion in water. The mean age was 5.2 years ±3.8. Majority of victims (94.1% were from the highland areas. Events most frequently occurred in the summer (46.7%, followed by spring and winter, 33.3% and 20%, respectively. Home events constituted 44.4% of submersion cases. Of these, 55.6% drowned in a washing container, While 53.4% submersed in swimming pools. Twenty-two percent of these accidents occurred in the sea and in wells while 11.1% occurred in a lake. The mean duration of submersion was 4.04 minutes ± 5.35. Cardiac arrest was reported upon arrival at hospital in 42.1% of the victims. There were seven deaths (36.8 % and in one patient (5.2 % there was severe brain injury. In all deceased cases, no adults were watching the children when the accidents occurred. Conclusion: Drowning is a significant risk factor facing our children and can claim lives. The media as well as the authority should play a major role in increasing the public awareness to minimize or prevent such a problem.

  19. Thermal and water management in irrigating lands in the arid and semi-arid regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Excess heat and scarcity of water are the two major problems, which are usually encountered in irrigating lands especially in the arid and semi-arid regions. This paper introduces a technical approach of managing agricultural lands in the arid and semi arid regions through determination of daily water requirement and amount of heat the land is being exposed at various meteorological conditions. Through setting up a mathematical model consisting of basic heat and mass transfer equations and fluid properties, daily rate of water evaporation, different modes of heat transfer such as radiation, convection and heat transfer by evaporation at a wide range relative humidities are determined. Furthermore, the analyses are performed at two different scenarios at average air velocities of 1 and 5 m/s. Our findings showed that the volume of water evaporation at relative humidity and air temperature of phi=50% and T∞=20 deg. C is 22% higher than at phi=100% and T∞=20 deg. C. Moreover, at a specified phi and T∞, the total rate of heat transfer at air velocity of 5 m/s is at least 25% higher than the total rate of heat transfer at air velocity of 1 m/s

  20. Environmental scanning strategy of manufacturing companies in Southwestern Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Olamade, O. O.; Oyebisi, T. O.; Egbetokun, A. A.; Adebowale, B. O.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the environmental scanning strategy of manufacturing companies in Southwestern Nigeria against the background that manufacturing companies in Nigeria exist in a challenging environment characterised by high import dependency, inappropriate policies, lack of transparent governance and weak industrial capabilities. Empirical data was collected with a questionnaire from a sample of 84 manufacturing firms in Southwestern Nigeria. We found that generally, companies in the...

  1. [Depth of edge influence on agriculture-forestry boundary in arid valley of upper reaches of Minjiang River, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liguang; He, Xingyuan; Li, Xiuzhen; Wen, Qingchun; Zhao, Yonghua; Hu, Zhibin; Chang, Yu; Zhu, Yaping

    2004-10-01

    By using moving split-window techniques (MSWT), this study estimated how far the edge effects penetrated the forest and agricultural fields in the arid valley of upper reaches of Minjiang River, southwestern China. Its aim was to provide general information on vegetation along edge to interior gradients in order to assist in interpretation and prediction of biological phenomena associated with agriculture-forestry boundary, and to improve current management practices in such areas. Three types of boundaries (10 transects) were investigated and sampled. The results showed that when the window width reached 6-10, the change of the SED curve on the graph tended to become stable, and one or two peaks occurred. The depth of edge influence was clearly different for different types of boundaries, and could be estimated within 50 m from the edge to interior. The depth of edge influence (DEI) on vegetation diversity almost varied between 12-30 m, mainly depending on the patch type, topography and microclimate, but seldom on slope orientation. Of the 6 forest transects in the three types of boundaries, the DEI was detected only in the forest part transects M2 and M6, but almost detectable in the agricultural part of all transects. MSWT was considered to be a useful tool for characterizing edge dynamics if enough data was available, and became a simple and powerful technique for analyzing the boundary. The results will provide further knowledge for understanding the interaction between forestry and agriculture in the arid valley. PMID:15624812

  2. Runoff generation processes during the wet-up phase in a semi-arid basin in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Zarei

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the hydrological processes in catchments is important for water resources management, particularly in semi-arid regions of the world. To contribute to this field, dominant runoff generation processes in a semi-arid basin (283 km2 in Southwestern Iran were investigated using analysis of hydrometric data in combination with natural isotopic tracers through the wet-up phase of a rainy season. The analysis of seven rainfall–runoff events during the rainfall dominated period illustrated the role of antecedent base flow and cumulative rainfall for explaining the hydrological response. Three distinct storm events and the corresponding discharge were collected and analyzed for oxygen-18 and deuterium isotope composition. The results show that during the wetting-up cycle, the runoff ratio during storm events increased progressively from 1 to 10%. Higher event runoff ratios following catchment wet-up were shown to be directly linked to changes in soil moisture, which in turn controlled the runoff generation processes. In line with the hydrometric results, the two-component hydrograph separation using δ18O and δ2H demonstrated a clear connection to the antecedent wetness conditions. The results suggest that the runoff ratios during storms and the partitioning of event and pre-event water fractions are sensitive to the amount of catchment wet-up and could hence be strongly impacted by changes in the timing, duration and amount of precipitation in the future.

  3. Runoff generation processes during the wet-up phase in a semi-arid basin in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, H.; Akhondali, A. M.; Mohammadzadeh, H.; Radmanesh, F.; Laudon, H.

    2014-04-01

    Understanding the hydrological processes in catchments is important for water resources management, particularly in semi-arid regions of the world. To contribute to this field, dominant runoff generation processes in a semi-arid basin (283 km2) in Southwestern Iran were investigated using analysis of hydrometric data in combination with natural isotopic tracers through the wet-up phase of a rainy season. The analysis of seven rainfall-runoff events during the rainfall dominated period illustrated the role of antecedent base flow and cumulative rainfall for explaining the hydrological response. Three distinct storm events and the corresponding discharge were collected and analyzed for oxygen-18 and deuterium isotope composition. The results show that during the wetting-up cycle, the runoff ratio during storm events increased progressively from 1 to 10%. Higher event runoff ratios following catchment wet-up were shown to be directly linked to changes in soil moisture, which in turn controlled the runoff generation processes. In line with the hydrometric results, the two-component hydrograph separation using δ18O and δ2H demonstrated a clear connection to the antecedent wetness conditions. The results suggest that the runoff ratios during storms and the partitioning of event and pre-event water fractions are sensitive to the amount of catchment wet-up and could hence be strongly impacted by changes in the timing, duration and amount of precipitation in the future.

  4. Demographic processes limiting seedling recruitment in arid grassland restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeding is commonly used in plant community restoration to overcome recruitment limitations. In arid systems, seeding is a particularly important management tool because plant community recovery following disturbance is slow and often inhibited by invasive species. While important in arid systems,...

  5. Uses of tree legumes in semi-arid regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felker, P.

    1980-01-01

    Uses of tree legumes in semi-arid and arid regions are reviewed. This review is divided into sections according to the following general use categories: fuels; human food; livestock food; to increase yields of crops grown beneath their canopies;and control of desertification. (MHR)

  6. Herbivore-plant interactions and desertification in arid lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arid lands around the world have experienced or are currently experiencing degradation that is known as desertification. Animal-plant interactions that have an effect on desertification are among the most important function of animals in arid ecosystems. Desertification has been defined as land de...

  7. Analysis list: ARID3A [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ARID3A Blood,Liver + hg19 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/AR...ID3A.1.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/ARID3A.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedb...c.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/ARID3A.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/ARID3A.Blood.tsv,http://dbarchive.biosci...encedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/ARID3A.Liver.tsv http://dbarchive.bioscience...dbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/Blood.gml,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/Liver.gml ...

  8. CHARACTERISTICS AND CONSTRUCTION OF LANDSCAPE???ECOLOGY IN ARID REGIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper analyzes the characteristics of the landscape structures and landacape ecological processes in arid regions of China. Landscape structure is simplicity and homogeneity with the pattern of desert-oasis-river and canal corridor. The spatial distribution of landscape heterogeneity mosaics is relatively dependent on water resources. In arid regions,the landscape changes rapidly and extensively because of the sensitive landscape ecosystems and fragile regional ecosystems.For the sustainable development of arid regions, the theories and methods for the eco-environmental construction and the strategies of ecological construction in the arid regions were proposed in the view of landscape ecology. Keynote subjects of landscape ecology were also discussed. The paper points out that protecting and increasing landscape diversity and heterogeneity are critical to control ecological safety in arid regions.

  9. Assessment of the desertification vulnerability of the Cappadocian district (Central Anatolia, Turkey based on aridity and climate-process system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Türkeş

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study discusses climate of the Cappadocian district in Turkey on the basis of Thornthwaite’s climate classification and water budget, Erinç’s aridity index and United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD aridity index, along with the spatial and inter-seasonal variations of precipitation and air temperatures. Vulnerability of the Cappadocia to desertification processes was also investigated with respect to the aridity, lithology dominated by tuffs and climate-process system and present land-use features of the district. The data analysis revealed that coefficients of variation (CV of the mean and maximum temperatures are the greatest in summer and the smallest in winter. Nevşehir and Kayseri environs are the most continental parts of the Cappadocia with a high inter-annual variability and low temperatures. Cappadocia is characterized with a continental rainfall regime having a maximum precipitation in spring. Variability of summer precipitation totals is greater than that of other seasons, varying from 65.7% to 78%. The CVs of the annual precipitation totals are about 18% at north and about 20% at south. Semi-arid and dry sub-humid or semi-humid climate types prevail over Cappadocia according to Thornthwaite’s moisture and Erinç’s aridity indices. Steppe is the dominant vegetation formation with sparse dry trees. The Cappadocia is vulnerable to the desertification processes due to both natural factors (e.g. degree of aridity, climate-process system, weathering of tuffs, erosion, climate change, etc. and human-involvement (e.g. land degradation and intensive tourism, etc.. In order to mitigate desertification and to preserve the historical and cultural heritages in Cappadocia, sustainable land-use management and tourism planning applications are urgently needed.

  10. Assessment of the desertification vulnerability of the Cappadocian district (Central Anatolia, Turkey based on aridity and climate-process system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Türkeş

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study discusses climate of the Cappadocian district in Turkey on the basis of Thornthwaite’s climate classification and water budget, Erinç’s aridity index and United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD aridity index, along with the spatial and inter-seasonal variations of precipitation and air temperatures. Vulnerability of the Cappadocia to desertification processes was also investigated with respect to the aridity, lithology dominated by tuffs and climate-process system and present land-use features of the district. The data analysis revealed that coefficients of variation (CV of the mean and maximum temperatures are the greatest in summer and the smallest in winter. Nevşehir and Kayseri environs are the most continental parts of the Cappadocia with a high inter-annual variability and low temperatures. Cappadocia is characterized with a continental rainfall regime having a maximum precipitation in spring. Variability of summer precipitation totals is greater than that of other seasons, varying from 65.7% to 78%. The CVs of the annual precipitation totals are about 18% at north and about 20% at south. Semi-arid and dry sub-humid or semi-humid climate types prevail over Cappadocia according to Thornthwaite’s moisture and Erinç’s aridity indices. Steppe is the dominant vegetation formation with sparse dry forests. The Cappadocia is vulnerable to the desertification processes due to both natural factors (e.g. degree of aridity, climate-process system, weathering of tuffs, erosion, climate change, etc. and human-involvement (e.g. land degradation and intensive tourism, etc.. In order to mitigate desertification and to preserve the historical and cultural heritages in Cappadocia, sustainable land-use management and tourism planning applications are urgently needed.

  11. Determine the optimum spectral reflectance of juniper and pistachio in arid and semi-arid region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadaei, Hadi; Suzuki, Rikie

    2012-11-01

    Arid and semi-arid areas of northeast Iran cover about 3.4 million ha are populated by two main tree species, the broadleaf Pistacia vera. L (pistachio) and the conifer Juniperus excelsa ssp. polycarpos (Persian juniper). Natural stands of pistachio in Iran are not only environmentally important but genetically essential as seed sources for pistachio production in orchards. In this study, we estimated the optimum spectral reflectance of juniper forests and natural pistachio stands using remote sensing to help in the sustainable management and production of pistachio in Iran. In this research spectral reflectance are able to specify of multispectral from Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) that provided by JAXA. These data included PRISM is a panchromatic radiometer with a 2.5 m spatial resolution at nadir, has one band with a wavelength of 0.52-0.77 μm and AVNIR-2 is a visible and near infrared radiometer for observing land and coastal zones with a 10 m spatial resolution at nadir, has four multispectral bands: blue (0.42-0.50 μm), green (0.52-0.60 μm), red (0.61-0.69 μm), and near infrared (0.76-0.89 μm). Total ratio vegetation index (TRVI) of optimum spectral reflectance of juniper and pistachio have been evaluated. The result of TRVI for Pistachio and juniper were (R2= 0.71 and 0.55). I hope this research can provide decision of managers to helping sustainable management for arid and semi-arid regions in Iran.

  12. Acupunctural Afforestation for Desertification Mitigation over Semi-Arid Regions in East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myoung, B.; Choi, Y.; Park, S. K.

    2011-12-01

    Desertification over the arid/semi-arid regions in East Asia and dust transports from the regions have been serious concerns for the societies not only in adjacent Asian countries but also in the western US. One of the strategies for desertification mitigation is tree planting over the semi-arid areas. However, unless the newly planted vegetation changes the feedback characteristics between land-surface and the atmosphere, the impact is not profound and effective for a long time. Here we show afforestation effects on the coupling strength between the land-surface and atmosphere, measured by the monthly anomalies of precipitation and evapotranspiration. The coupling strength is an important parameter to diagnose the aridity of a region since the stronger coupling strength is indicative of the higher vulnerability of the local climate to droughts. Simulations of a regional vegetation-climate coupled model reveal that afforestation substantially modulates local coupling strength mainly through controlling variability of evapotranspiration. The coupling strength decreases most significantly with an increase of unit vegetation fraction over the northern and central China including Manchurian Plains and highly populated areas of Beijing and Tianjin. The coupling characteristics of these regions are expected to reduce the occurrence of extreme weather events such as droughts by alleviating positive responses of the surface to precipitation deficit. Therefore, afforestation concentrated on these regions, which is called "acupunctural afforestation", may most effectively contribute to desertification mitigation than other regions by attenuating mechanisms maintaining warm season droughts. This study suggests that our attention should be paid to understanding the coupling strength between land and the atmosphere for desertification mitigation.

  13. Development of an arid site closure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes the development of a prototype plan for the effective closure and stabilization of an arid low-level waste disposal site. This plan will provide demonstrated closure techniques for a trench in a disposal site at Los Alamos. The accuracy of modeling soil water storage by two hydrologic models, CREAMS and HELP, was tested by comparing simulation results with field measurements of soil moisture in eight experimental landfill cover systems having a range of well-defined soil profiles and vegetative covers. Regression analysis showed that CREAMS generally represented soil moisture more accurately than HELP simulations. Precautions for determining parameter values for model input and for interpreting simulation results are discussed. A specific example is presented showing how the field-validated hydrologic models can be used to develop a final prototype closure plan. 15 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs

  14. Synthetic socioeconomic based domestic wastewater hydrographs for small arid communities

    KAUST Repository

    Elnakar, H.

    2012-06-04

    A model was developed to predict synthetic socioeconomic based domestic wastewater hydrographs for the small arid communities. The model predicts the flow hydrograph for random weekdays and weekends based on the specific socioeconomic characteristics of the community. The main socioeconomic characteristics are the composition of the community, the different user behaviours in using water appliances, and the unit discharges of such appliances. Use patterns of water appliances are assumed to vary for the various members of the community and the type of day. Each community is composed of several social categories such as the employee, working woman, stay home woman, stay home child, students etc. The use patterns account for the stochastic nature of use in terms of number of uses, duration of the use and times of use in the day. Randomly generated hydrographs are generated for weekdays and weekends along with synthetic hydrographs of non-exceedance. The model was verified for a small residential compound in Sharm El Shiekh - Egypt using 11 days of flow measurements performed in summer. The synthetic hydrographs based on assumed water use patterns of the various members of the community compared reasonably with the measured hydrographs. Synthetic hydrographs can be derived for a community under consideration to reflect its socioeconomic conditions and thus can be used to generate probability based peaking factors to be used in the design of sewerage systems pumping facilities, and treatment plants. © 201 WIT Press.

  15. Sensitivity of Southwestern US Mountain Ecosystems to Climate Variability: Interactions Among Forest Dieback, Fire, and Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, C. D.

    2004-12-01

    Millions of hectares in the upland landscapes of the Southwestern United States have been affected by forest dieback and severe fire activity since the late 1990s, a period of ongoing severe drought and unusual warmth. Climate regulates physiological plant stress that can directly cause vegetation mortality, and also influences associated insect outbreak dynamics. Climate also interacts with fuel conditions to drive regional fire activity. Current and historic patterns of forest dieback, fire activity, and erosion are described across landscape gradients in Southwestern mountains, particularly the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico. Methods used include inventory and dating of live and dead woody plants to assess demographic changes through time, long-term (since 1991) measurements of ponderosa pine tree-growth at three sites with dendrometer bands, monitoring of herbaceous vegetation along 3 km of permanent transects since 1991, aerial photograph analyses of insect outbreaks and forest dieback and fire activity, and hydrological measurements of runoff and erosion. Similarities and differences in vegetation dieback and regional fire activity patterns between the current drought and the 1950s (when regional drought last affected the Southwest) are explained by changes in climatic and vegetation conditions. The current climate-induced vegetation dieback and pulse of regional fire activity have strong feedbacks with various key ecosystem processes, including water budgets and soil erosion. For example, severe drought and fire both markedly reduce the surface cover of live plants and dead plant materials ("litter"), triggering nonlinear increases in erosion rates once the connectivity of bare soil patches exceeds critical threshold values, particularly during high-intensity summer rainfall events that characterize the Southwestern summer "monsoon". These observations highlight the magnitude, rapidity, and complexity of climate-induced disturbance processes, and provide an

  16. Geothermal technoecosystems and water cycles in arid lands. Information paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffield, C.

    1976-01-01

    Arid lands resource information paper No. 2, 'Exploration and Exploitation of Geothermal Resources in Arid and Semiarid Lands,' first issued in 1973, is now out-of-print. The intent of the present paper was to revise that earlier literature review with its annotated bibliography, by recognizing the unusual developments in this field in the interim, with new geothermal fields discovered, new demands for geothermal energy as an alternative source to more conventional sources, and a number of new publications reflecting accelerated research. The extensive bibliography accompanying this paper was produced by ALIS, and includes over one hundred references prepared by the Office of Arid Lands Studies.

  17. Integrated Indicators-based Gradation of Cultivated Land Quality in Mountainous Region of Southwestern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO Jing'an; WEI Chaofu; XIE Deti; ZHOU Yan

    2006-01-01

    The gradation of cultivated land is to assess the suitability of cultivated land for agricultural production in terms of natural and economic properties of land. It can be used to evaluate sustainability of land use and soil management practices. Formal and informal surveys, Delphi and comprehensive index method are adopted to identify appropriate integrated indicators, and measure the gradation of cultivated land quality. The determination of integrated indicators presents three basic features of cultivated land quality: stable plant productivity, social acceptability and maintenance of environmental quality.Pronounced concentration-dissipation law of total function score value occurs in paddy field units, with three ranges, I.e., 79-68.5, 68.5~59 and 59-51. Total function score value in dryland units mainly ranges from 40 to 70, but slight concentration-dissipation law of each unit is still observed, with four ranges, I.e., 79~68, 68~51, 51~37 and 37~15. Paddy field quality is divided into three gradations, and the scales are 18 220.9 ha, 5410.6 ha and 2890.9 ha. Dryland quality is classified into four gradations, and the scales are 1548.6 ha, 8153.8 ha, 3316.3 ha and 685.2 ha. The total function score value of every gradation unit is conformed to the results of farmers' assessment. Research results meet with the needs of accurate degree of the gradation of cultivated land quality. Integrated indicators-based gradation of cultivated land assessment accords with the characteristics of land resources and human preference in the mountains of southwestern China. This study will be useful to promote the monitoring of cultivated land quality, and to supply fine ground and knowledge for establishing appropriate cultivated land management practices in Southwestern China.

  18. Status of corrective measures technology for shallow land burial at arid sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeele, W. V.; Nyhan, J. W.; Drennon, B. J.; Lopez, E. A.; Herrera, W. J.; Langhorst, G. J.

    The field research program involving corrective measure technologies for arid shallow land burial sites is described. Soil erosion and infiltration of water into a simulated trench cap with various surface treatments was measured and compared with similar data from agricultural systems across the United States. Report of field testing of biointrusion barriers continues at a closed-out waste disposal site at Los Alamos. Final results of an experiment designed to determine the effects of subsidence on the performance of a cobble-gravel biobarrier system are reported, as well as the results of hydrologic modeling activities involving biobarrier systems.

  19. Status of corrective measures technology for shallow land burial at arid sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The field research program involving corrective measure technologies for arid shallow land burial sites is described. Soil erosion and infiltration of water into a simulated trench cap with various surface treatments was measured and compared with similar data from agricultural systems across the United States. Report of field testing of biointrusion barriers continues at a closed-out waste disposal site at Los Alamos. Final results of an experiment designed to determine the effects of subsidence on the performance of a cobble-gravel biobarrier system are reported, as well as the results of hydrologic modeling activities involving biobarrier systems. 11 refs., 10 figs

  20. Snails, stable iostopes, and southwestern desert paleoclimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharpe, S.E. [Univ. and Community College System of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Whelan, J.F.; Forester, R.M.; Burdett, J.

    1995-09-01

    Modern and fossil molluscs (snails) occur in many localities in and semi-arid regions throughout the desert southwest. Live terrestrial snails are found under rocks and in forest litter and aquatic taxa inhabit springs, seeps, and/or wetlands. Molluscs uptake local water during their growing season (spring and summer) and incorporate its delta 180 signature into their shells. Preliminary 180 analysis of modem shells from the southern Great Basin indicates that the shells probably reflect meteoric water 180 values during the growing season. This provides a way to estimate the delta 180 value of precipitation and, thereby, the source of the moisture-bearing air masses. Significant 180 variability in shells analyzed include geographic location, elevation, taxonomy, and habitat (terrestrial, spring, or wetland). We found a rough inverse correlation with elevation in modem shells from the Spring Range in southern Nevada. The delta 180 values of modem and fossil shells are also very different; modem values in this location are much higher than those from nearby late Pleistocene-age molluscs suggesting that the Pleistocene summers were variously colder and wetter than today or less evaporative (more humid). Assuming shell material directly reflects the 180 of the growing-season environment, comparison of modem and fossil shell delta 180 values can potentially identify changes in air-mass moisture sources and can help to define seasonal precipitation change through time. Comprehension and quantification of community and isotopic variability in modem gastropods is required to create probabilistic valid transfer functions with fossil materials. Valid inferences about past environmental conditions can then be established with known confidence limits.

  1. Adaptive wetland management in an uncertain and changing arid environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekah Downard

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Wetlands in the arid western United States provide rare and critical migratory bird habitat and constitute a critical nexus within larger social-ecological systems (SES where multiple changing land-use and water-use patterns meet. The Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge in Utah, USA, presents a case study of the ways that wetland managers have created adaptive management strategies that are responsive to the social and hydrological conditions of the agriculture-dominated SES within which they are located. Managers have acquired water rights and constructed infrastructure while cultivating collaborative relationships with other water users to increase the adaptive capacity of the region and decrease conflict. Historically, water management involved diversion and impoundment of water within wetland units timed around patterns of agricultural water needs. In the last 20 years, managers have learned from flood and drought events and developed a long-term adaptive management plan that specifies alternative management actions managers can choose each year based on habitat needs and projected water supply. Each alternative includes habitat goals and target wetland water depth. However, wetland management adapted to agricultural return-flow availability may prove insufficient as population growth and climate change alter patterns of land and water use. Future management will likely depend more on negotiation, collaboration, and learning from social developments within the SES than strictly focusing on water management within refuge boundaries. To face this problem, managers have worked to be included in negotiations with regional water users, a strategy that may prove instructive for other wetland managers in agriculture-dominated watersheds.

  2. Population dynamics of small mammals in semi-arid regions: a comparative study of demographic variability in two rodent species.

    OpenAIRE

    Lima, Mauricio; Stenseth, Nils Chr.; Leirs, Herwig; Jaksic, Fabián M

    2003-01-01

    The seasonally determined demographic structure of two semi-arid rodents, both agricultural pest species (the leaf-eared mouse (Phyllotis darwini) in Chile and the multimammate mouse (Mastomys natalensis) in Tanzania), is analysed using capture-mark-recapture (CMR) statistical models and measures for elasticity (the relative change in the growth rate due to a relative unit change in the parameter of concern) derived from projection linear matrix models. We demonstrate that reproduction and su...

  3. Seven Global Goals. 2013 annual report, Southwestern Power Administration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-09-01

    For over 70 years, Southwestern has marketed and delivered reliable, renewable, and affordable hydropower, partnering with Federal power stakeholders and others in the industry to make sure the lights stay on. This kind of effective, efficient, and cost conscious operation is made possible only by hard work and dedication. Southwestern employees work individually and as a team to meet seven comprehensive agency goals that touch on all aspects of the agency’s operations. Dubbed the “Seven Global Goals” by Administrator Chris Turner, these objectives identify specific, measurable targets that support Southwestern’s mission and reinforce its responsibilities toward its customers and the Nation.

  4. The energy behind the power. Southwestern Power Administration 1994 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This is the Southwestern Power Administration 1994 annual report. The topics of the report include a letter to the secretary; an overview including the mission statement, a description of the Southwestern Federal Power System, financial statement, performance measurements, national performance review; year in review, summary of results, financial and statistical data and the Southwestern Power Administration Organization.

  5. Ebeling: Handbook of Indian Foods and Fibers of Arid America

    OpenAIRE

    Sutton, Mark Q

    1987-01-01

    Handbook of Indian Foods and Fibers of Arid America Walter Ebeling. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1986, 971 pp., 73 figures, 50 plates, 12 tables. Appendix, Glossary, Index, References, $65.00 (hardcover).

  6. Arid Lands--A Study in Ecological Disaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckholm, Erik

    1977-01-01

    Reports that over-grazing and unsound agricultural practices are increasing the world-wide amount of uninhabitable land. Cites some practices which have been used to successfully reclaim arid land areas. (CP)

  7. Aridity changes in the Tibetan Plateau in a warming climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yanhong; Li, Xia; Leung, L. Ruby; Chen, Deliang; Xu, Jianwei

    2015-03-01

    Desertification in the Tibetan Plateau (TP) has drawn increasing attention in the recent decades. It has been postulated as a consequence of increasing climate aridity due to the observed warming. This study quantifies the aridity changes in the TP and attributes the changes to different climatic factors. Using the ratio of precipitation to potential evapotranspiration (P/PET) as an aridity index, we used observed meteorological records at 83 stations in the TP to calculate PET using the Penman-Monteith algorithm and the ratio. Spatial and temporal changes of P/PET in 1979-2011 were analyzed. Results show that stations located in the arid and semi-arid northwestern TP are becoming significantly wetter, and half of the stations in the semi-humid eastern TP are becoming drier, though not significantly, in the recent three decades. The aridity change patterns are significantly correlated with the change patterns of precipitation, sunshine duration and diurnal temperature range. Temporal correlations between the annual P/PET ratio and other meteorological variables confirm the significant correlation between aridity and the three variables, with precipitation being the dominant driver of P/PET changes at the interannual time scale. Annual PET are insignificantly but negatively correlated with P/PET in the cold season. In the warm season, however, the correlation between PET and P/PET is significant at the confidence level of 99.9% when the cryosphere near the surface melts. Significant correlation between annual wind speed and aridity occurs in limited locations and months. Consistency in the climatology pattern and linear trends in surface air temperature and precipitation calculated using station data, gridded data, and nearest grid-to-stations for the TP average and across sub-basins indicate the robustness of the trends despite the large spatial heterogeneity in the TP that challenge climate monitoring.

  8. Aridity changes in the Tibetan Plateau in a warming climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desertification in the Tibetan Plateau (TP) has drawn increasing attention in the recent decades. It has been postulated as a consequence of increasing climate aridity due to the observed warming. This study quantifies the aridity changes in the TP and attributes the changes to different climatic factors. Using the ratio of precipitation to potential evapotranspiration (P/PET) as an aridity index, we used observed meteorological records at 83 stations in the TP to calculate PET using the Penman–Monteith algorithm and the ratio. Spatial and temporal changes of P/PET in 1979–2011 were analyzed. Results show that stations located in the arid and semi-arid northwestern TP are becoming significantly wetter, and half of the stations in the semi-humid eastern TP are becoming drier, though not significantly, in the recent three decades. The aridity change patterns are significantly correlated with the change patterns of precipitation, sunshine duration and diurnal temperature range. Temporal correlations between the annual P/PET ratio and other meteorological variables confirm the significant correlation between aridity and the three variables, with precipitation being the dominant driver of P/PET changes at the interannual time scale. Annual PET are insignificantly but negatively correlated with P/PET in the cold season. In the warm season, however, the correlation between PET and P/PET is significant at the confidence level of 99.9% when the cryosphere near the surface melts. Significant correlation between annual wind speed and aridity occurs in limited locations and months. Consistency in the climatology pattern and linear trends in surface air temperature and precipitation calculated using station data, gridded data, and nearest grid-to-stations for the TP average and across sub-basins indicate the robustness of the trends despite the large spatial heterogeneity in the TP that challenge climate monitoring. (letter)

  9. Analysis of aridity indicators in the Deliblato Sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadović Ratko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Deliblato Sands are located in the southern part of Banat region in Vojvodina province. According to the estimated changes of basic climate parameters in this part of the Republic of Serbia during past decades very strong rise in annual air temperatures (T was registered, an average of 0.52°C per decade. This rise in temperature increased the potential evapotranspiration (PET, which together with precipitation can increase the degree of aridity of climate in the study area. However, in the same period an increase in annual precipitation sum (P was observed, an average of about 35 mm per decade, which may somewhat slow the aridisation of desert sands. Considering the nature, origin and significance of Deliblato Sands ecosystem, the main goal of this paper is to analyse the drought and aridity index (AI = P / PET, analyse the trend of aridisation process and its possible impact on ecosystems of this special nature reserve. Aridity index analyses were performed in meteorological stations Banatski Karlovac, Vrsac and Bela Crkva for the period 1981 - 2010 at the annual values and for the growing season. Results showed that Deliblato desert sands (Banatski Karlovac stand at a higher frequency of arid years (AI < 0.65 compared to locations of Vrsac and Bela Crkva. On the other hand, the level of aridity has considerably increased during the vegetation period in desert sands as well in its surroundings. This intensified aridity is the result of considerable increase of potential evapotranspiration (PET connected to season precipitation.

  10. Preliminary assessment of aridity conditions in the Iberian Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, C.; Corte-Real, J. A.

    2016-06-01

    Aridity is one of the key elements characterizing the climate of a region, having a severe impact on human activities. Aiming at assessing aridity conditions in the Iberian Peninsula, the spatial distribution of the UNEP aridity index is analyzed during the period 1901-2012. Gridded precipitation and potential evapotranspiration datasets are used on a monthly basis. Results show that the southern half of Iberia is particularly vulnerable to water stress and hence to desertification processes. In particular, the UNEP aridity index reveals an increase and northward extension of the semi-arid regime in the Iberian Peninsula between 1901 and 2012. More than 50% of the north and western territory have experienced humid/sub-humid conditions, while the other regions underwent semi-arid settings. Results also reveal that climate was subjected to spatial and temporal variabilities with an overall statistically significant (at a 95% confidence level) trend to aridification in the south-easternmost and central regions. The remaining territory of the Iberian Peninsula does not reveal statistically significant trends.

  11. Long-term benefits to the growth of ponderosa pines from controlling southwestern pine tip moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) and weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Michael R; Chen, Zhong

    2004-12-01

    The southwestern pine tip moth, Rhyacionia neomexicana (Dyar) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), is a native forest pest that attacks seedlings and saplings of ponderosa pine, Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws, in the southwestern United States. Repeated attacks can cause severe deformation of host trees and significant long-term growth loss. Alternatively, effective control of R. neomexicana, vegetative competition, or both in young pine plantations may increase survival and growth of trees for many years after treatments are applied. We test the null hypothesis that 4 yr of R. neomexicana and weed control with insecticide, weeding, and insecticide plus weeding would not have any residual effect on survival and growth of trees in ponderosa pine plantation in northern Arizona 14 yr post-treatment, when the trees were 18 yr old. Both insecticide and weeding treatment increased tree growth and reduced the incidence of southwestern pine tip moth damage compared with the control. However, weeding alone also significantly increased tree survival, whereas insecticide alone did not. The insecticide plus weeding treatment had the greatest tree growth and survival, and the lowest rate of tip moth damage. Based on these results, we rejected our null hypothesis and concluded that there were detectable increases in the survival and growth of ponderosa pines 14 yr after treatments applied to control R. neomexicana and weeds. PMID:15666752

  12. Late glacial aridity in southern Rocky Mountains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, O.K.; Pitblado, B.L. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1995-09-01

    While the slopes of the present-day Colorado Rocky Mountains are characterized by large stands of subalpine and montane conifers, the Rockies of the late glacial looked dramatically different. Specifically, pollen records suggest that during the late glacial, Artemisia and Gramineae predominated throughout the mountains of Colorado. At some point between 11,000 and 10,000 B.P., however, both Artemisia and grasses underwent a dramatic decline, which can be identified in virtually every pollen diagram produced for Colorado mountain sites, including Como Lake (Sangre de Cristo Mountains), Copley Lake and Splains; Gulch (near Crested Butte), Molas Lake (San Juan Mountains), and Redrock Lake (Boulder County). Moreover, the same pattern seems to hold for pollen spectra derived for areas adjacent to Colorado, including at sites in the Chuska Mountains of New Mexico and in eastern Wyoming. The implications of this consistent finding are compelling. The closest modem analogues to the Artemisia- and Gramineae-dominated late-glacial Colorado Rockies are found in the relatively arid northern Great Basin, which suggests that annual precipitation was much lower in the late-glacial southern Rocky Mountains than it was throughout the Holocene.

  13. Salinization mechanisms in semi-arid regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During a period of three years the basins of the Pereira de Miranda and Caxitore dams, located in the crystalline rock area of Ceara, Brazil, were studied in order to determine the mechanisms of salinization of their waters. Isotope methods (18O/16O) and hidrochemistry (determination of the of the maior ions) were applied to surface, underground and rain water in this study. An isotope model was designed and applied to the determination of evaporation and percolation of dams in semi-arid zones during the dry season. The results are compared to those from a conventional chemical model. As causes of salinization of the water in the dams, the contributions of the rain itself and the lixiviation of the soil are quantified. An interaction between the dams and the underground water is imperceptible. The salinization of the underground water is attributed to recharge of the aquifer with rain water from the surface runoff followed by evaporation of the water rising, due to capilarity, in a one-directional flow to the surface. (Author)

  14. Entomological studies for surveillance and prevention of dengue in arid and semi-arid districts of Rajasthan, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Purohit

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Rajasthan is one of the dengue endemic states of India. Very few studies have been published on entomological aspects of dengue in this state. Owing to water scarcity, inhabitants in desert areas overstore domestic water which leads to the persistence of dengue vectors within the domestic premises. Area specific knowledge on breeding, key containers and seasonal rhythms of vector population is essential for preparing an effective prevention plan against dengue. Present paper reports results of entomological investigations on dengue vectors in arid and semi-arid districts of Rajasthan. Methods: Longitudinal studies were undertaken during 2004–06 in one arid and two semi-arid dengue endemic districts of Rajasthan. Adult and larval Aedes were collected from the randomly selected houses in representative towns and villages with associated details of container types and water storage practices of inhabitants. Results: In urban areas during all the seasons adult house index (AHI of Aedes aegypti was maximum in desert zone (25 and least in semi-arid area with saline river III (1. The difference of AHI during three seasons was statistically significant (c2 = 16.1, p <0.01 for urban; and c2 = 50.71, p < 0.001 for rural. Breeding of Ae. aegypti among urban settings was maximum in desert zone. During all the seasons cement tanks were the key breeding habitats for Ae. aegypti in desert as well as semi-arid areas. Interpretation & conclusion: Water storage habits during summer season emerged to be the risk factor of vector abundance in urban areas of arid and semi-arid settings. A carefully designed study of key containers targeting cement tanks as the primary habitats of mosquito control may lead to commendable results for dengue prevention.

  15. A Study of Racism and Sexism at Georgia Southwestern College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisbie, Lynn H.

    1980-01-01

    Provides the results of a study among undergraduate and graduate teacher education students at Georgia Southwestern College to determine: (1) student opinions on racist or sexist attitudes and behavior among faculty or administrators; and (2) whether the students themselves are racist or sexist in their attitudes. (Author/MJL)

  16. Holocene insect remains from south-western Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøcher, Jens Jensenius; Bennike, Ole; Wagner, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Remains of plants and invertebrates from Holocene deposits in south-western Greenland include a number of insect fragments from Heteroptera and Coleoptera. Some of the finds extend the known temporal range of the species considerably back in time, and one of the taxa has not previously been found...... remains of terrestrial insects complement the scarce fossil Greenland record of the species concerned....

  17. 25 CFR 38.15 - Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... This manual system may be found in Bureau of Indian Affairs Regional and Agency Offices, Education Line... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute. 38.15 Section 38.15 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION EDUCATION PERSONNEL §...

  18. Monochroa bronzella sp. n. from the southwestern Alps (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karsholt, Ole; Nel, Jacques; Fournier, François;

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Monochroa bronzella sp. n. is described from the southwestern Alps (France, Italy). It is closely related to M. nomadella (Zeller, 1868), with which it was hitherto confused. Literature records of M. nomadella from France and northwestern Italy refer to M. bronzella sp. n. The two speci...

  19. Fragmentation patterns of evergreen oak woodlands in Southwestern Iberia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costa, A.; Madeira, M.; Lima Santos, J.;

    2014-01-01

    Mediterranean evergreen oak woodlands (composed of Quercus suber L. and Quercus rotundifolia Lam.) are becoming increasingly fragmented in the human-modified landscapes of Southwestern Portugal and Spain. Previous studies have largely neglected to assess the spatial changes of oak woodlands in...... patterns of oak recruitment and therefore, its study may be helpful in highlighting future baselines for the sustainable management of oak woodlands....

  20. Genetic diversity of Ascaris in southwestern Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betson, Martha; Nejsum, Peter; Llewellyn-Hughes, Julia;

    2012-01-01

    Despite the common occurrence of ascariasis in southwestern Uganda, helminth control in the region has been limited. To gain further insights into the genetic diversity of Ascaris in this area, a parasitological survey in mothers (n=41) and children (n=74) living in two villages, Habutobere and M...

  1. 2014 annual site environmental report, Southwestern Power Administration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-12-31

    Southwestern Power Administration’s Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) serves as the chief reporting mechanism for site environmental performance information within the Department of Energy and as a valuable resource for shared and collaborative environmental protection and performance information to Agency stakeholders and members of the public living near Southwestern Power Administration’s (Southwestern) facilities and transmission line rights-of-ways. This ASER meets the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.B. Southwestern’s key environmental involvement includes an emphasis on the protection of ecological resources which is effectively accomplished through environmental program elements such as protecting water resources, generation of clean hydropower energy, oil spill prevention practices, elimination of green-house gas emissions, and comprehensive project reviews to ensure the protection of living organisms, migratory birds, Federally threatened or endangered species, and historic or cultural resources. Southwestern continues to actively minimize effects to natural resources and strive for continual improvement in the area of environmental compliance and sustainability while achieving the agency mission to market and deliver Federal hydroelectric power.

  2. Understanding the erosion of semi-arid landscapes subject to vegetation change: a combined approach using monitoring, isotope and 14c analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The degradation of grasslands is a common problem across semi-arid areas worldwide.over the last 150 years much of the south-Western USA has experienced significant land degradation, with desert grasslands becoming dominated by shrubs and concurrent changes in runoff and erosion which are thought to propagate further the process of degradation. Field-based experiments were carried out to determine how runoff and erosion vary at stages over a transition from a black grama (Bouteloua eriopoda) grassland to creosote bush (Larrea tridentata) shrub land at the Sevilleta NWR LTER site in New Mexico. δ13 C and δ15 N analyses were carried out to investigate the age and potential provenance of eroded sediment. (Author) 4 refs.

  3. Landscape eco-environment risk assessment of highway in arid area of Xinjiang,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    With the aid of analyses to landscape ecology in the highway region of the arid area in Xinjiang of China, vegetation type, soil type and land-use type were ascertained as environmental factors of highway landscape ecosystem fragility, and seasonal flood, blown-wind sand and alkali-salinization as disaster factors of highway engineering. All items of these factors constitute an objective hierarchy of evaluating landscape ecosystem risk of the highway region in the arid area. The weighted values of the items were determined according to the number of occupied area or length by them against each unit. The area or length was interpreted with the aids of GIS technology and gained by measuring in the highway reconnaissance. The results of the eco-environmental risk assessment of G315 Yitunbulake-Qiemo section in Xinjiang shows that eight units of landscape ecology can be sorted into four categories according to the differences of the fragility indices (Σxiwi) and the disaster indices (Σyiwj).

  4. Southwestern Power Administration Annual Report 2004-2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2006-01-01

    Confidence Commitment Cooperation These are words that spring to mind regarding Southwestern Power Administration’s performance during fiscal years (FY) 2004-2006 By offering innovative, customer-oriented service, working to improve system reliability and efficiency, and partnering with customers and other Federal power stakeholders, Southwestern has certainly exhibited all three of these qualities during these challenging yet productive years In fact, our cooperative working relationships were critical to our success during the severe and widespread drought conditions which prevailed throughout Southwestern’s marketing area for much of 2005-2006 When we proposed a temporary energy deferral program, our customers came on board by voluntarily taking less Federal hydropower than they were entitled to, enabling us to preserve system storage and fulfill our contract obligations during the crucial summer months of 2006 The U S Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) also helped improve our drought situation by allowing Southwestern more operational flexibility on a regional level Despite the challenges this critical drought period presented, Southwestern remained committed to fulfilling our mission and strategic goals From FY 2004 through FY 2006, we marketed and delivered all available Federal hydropower while meeting and even exceeding the reliability standards of the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) Our Power Operations Training Center in Springfield, Missouri, was cited as an “Example of Excellence” during a NERC readiness audit in October 2006; and as we have every year since NERC began measuring, Southwestern far exceeded the accepted NERC compliance ratings for power system operations reliability Our commitment to excellence and accountability has kept our repayment goals on target as well Revenues were sufficient to repay all annual expenses and the required principal investment in the Federal hydropower facilities Furthermore, the original

  5. Aquaculture and mangrove ecosys of temproductivity in arid and semi-arid Balochistan coastal environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey of coastal shrimp-pond operations, and the structure and functioning of coastal mangrove forest ecosystems with particular reference to Ecuador, indicates that certain physical parameters may be good predictors of key biological processes. The most important factors are those associated with the regional water balance, tidal and surface water circulation patterns, and the physicochemical properties of the underlying soils. One important conclusion to emerge from the analyses is that at both regional and local levels, well-developed and productive mangrove forest areas often represent the least desirable sites for the construction and operation of commercial shrimp ponds. In certain regards semi-arid and arid coastal environments where mangroves are poorly developed, shrimp ponds that are constructed on barren mud flats and inland salt pans appear to have the potential to produce higher yields of shrimp with fewer management problems and at a relatively lower production cost. The data and research results from coast of Baluchistan and elsewhere are briefly summarized to suggest why productive mangrove ecosystems to not make the best areas in which to obtain maximum shrimp-pond yields. (author)

  6. Predicted performance of clay-barrier landfill covers in arid and semi-arid environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadek, S; Ghanimeh, S; El-Fadel, M

    2007-01-01

    Conventional landfill cover systems for municipal solid waste include low-permeability compacted clay barriers to minimize infiltration into the landfilled waste. Such layers are vulnerable in climates where arid to semi-arid conditions prevail, whereby the clay cover tends to desiccate and crack, resulting in drastically higher infiltration, i.e., lower cover efficiency. To date, this phenomenon, which has been reported in field observations, has not been adequately assessed. In this paper, the performance of a cover system solely relying on a clay barrier was simulated using a numerical finite element formulation to capture changes in the clay layer and the corresponding modified hydraulic characteristics. The cover system was guided by USEPA Subtitle-D minimum requirements and consisted of a clay layer underlying a protective vegetated soil. The intrinsic characteristics of the clay barrier and vegetative soil cover, including their saturated hydraulic conductivities and their soil-water characteristic curves, were varied as warranted to simulate intact or "cracked" conditions as determined through the numerical analyses within the proposed methodology. The results indicate that the levels of percolation through the compromised or cracked cover were up to two times greater than those obtained for intact covers, starting with an intact clay hydraulic conductivity of 10(-5)cm/s. PMID:16987648

  7. Adaptation to drought in arid and semi-arid environments: Case of the Zambezi Valley, Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Mavhura

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Small-scale rain-fed agriculture is the main livelihood in arid to semi-arid regions of subSaharan Africa. The area is characterised by erratic rainfall and frequent droughts, making the capacity for coping with temporal water shortages essential for smallholder farmers. Focusing on the Zambezi Valley, Zimbabwe, this study investigates the impact of drought on food security and the strategies used by smallholder farmers to cope with drought. We used meteorological data and interviews to examine the rainfall variability in the study area and the drought-coping mechanisms employed by smallholder famers respectively. The results show that there are various strategies used by smallholder farmers to cope with the impact of drought. These strategies include drought-tolerant crop production, crop variety diversification, purchasing cereals through asset sales, non-governmental organisations’ food aid and gathering wild fruit. However, consecutive droughts have resulted in high food insecurity and depletion of household assets during droughts. Smallholder farmers in the valley have also resorted to a number of measures taken before, during and after the drought. Still, these strategies are not robust enough to cope with this uncertainty

  8. Non-isothermal water flow in the vadose zone of arid and semi-arid environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallants, Dirk; Gerke, Kirill; Cook, Peter

    2013-04-01

    In desert environments thermally-driven vapour flow can be an important component of the total water flux in soils. As such, vapour flow can have considerable impact on recharge estimation, with small errors in soil water flow rates resulting in relatively larger errors in the recharge estimates since recharge is a very small fraction of rainfall. The additional effects of vegetation and temperature contributions may also impact soil water movement and thus calculated recharge rates in arid and semi-arid vadose zones. Currently most methods for estimating large-scale recharge rates do not consider these various processes, which adds an unknown degree of uncertainty to recharge estimation. The HYDRUS-1D numerical simulator was used to simulate coupled isothermal liquid, isothermal vapour, non-isothermal liquid and vapour flow, and heat flow in deep variably saturated vadose zones. The considered climatic conditions are characteristic of central Australia with approximate mean annual precipitation and potential evapotranspiration rates of 300 and 3000 mm, respectively. A time series of 130 years of daily climate data provides the upper boundary conditions. Groundwater recharge under highly erratic rainfall conditions is hypothesized to be primarily episodic and linked to flood events which may be significant only once every few years. The combined effect of vegetation and temperature on water flow and soil water redistribution is discussed for both vegetated and bare soils.

  9. Effects of impervious pavements on reducing runoff in an arid urban catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epshtein, O.; Turnbull, L.; Earl, S.

    2011-12-01

    The progressive urbanization of US arid and semi-arid southwestern territories has transformed undeveloped aridlands into dynamic, radially expanding metropolitan centers. As these mature, infill development further reduces undeveloped area, inversely coupling surface imperviousness to infiltration rates, with a subsequent increase in runoff generation. Intensified runoff carries undesirable environmental consequences, magnifying urban flooding events and concentrations, transport, and propagation of contaminants. Pervious pavements offer one potential solution for decreased urban infiltration. At present, the application potential of pervious pavements as an effective urban infiltration management tool exceeds its exploitation. While entirely eliminating urban Total Impervious Area is not a feasible solution, pervious pavements significantly reduce Effective Impervious Area at costs competitive with traditional Best Management Practices. Previous research into pervious pavements has largely consisted of laboratory prototypes or small-scale field experiments, with a heavy bias towards parking lots. In this study we explore the effectiveness of pervious pavements in increasing infiltration, thus decreasing runoff volume during summer monsoonal and winter convective rainfall events in an 8 ha residential catchment in Scottsdale, Arizona. Analysis focuses on the interaction dynamics between surface area of pervious pavement application and its net effect on runoff response at the catchment level. Hydrological response was modeled using MAHLERAN (Model for Assessing Hillslope-Landscape Erosion, Runoff and Nutrients), a spatially explicit, event-based model, parameterized at a spatial resolution of 0.25 sq m. Data for model parameterization was obtained from analysis of aerial imagery and field-based monitoring of surface properties. The model was tested against measurements of flow at the catchment outlet for multiple rainfall events with total event rainfall ranging

  10. Characterization of magnetically enhanced buried soil layer in arid environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovsky, E.; Grison, H.; Kapicka, A.; Silva, P. F.; Font, E.

    2011-12-01

    Magnetic susceptibility (MS) of soils, reflecting the presence of magnetite/maghemite, can be used in several environmental applications. Magnetic topsoil mapping is often used to outline areas polluted by atmospherically deposited dust. However, in these studies, the magnetically enhanced layer is usually shallow, some 5-6 cm under the surface. In our contribution, we present the case when the magnetic susceptibility is enhanced in deeper soil layers. Investigated soils are mostly sandy soils, from several localities in Portugal, in a zone with arid climate. Sample profiles were collected always in forests or forest stands with pines, cork oaks or eucalyptus trees in two areas: around the city of Sines (on the coast south of Lisbon) and around the city of Abrantes (inland, north-east of Lisbon). Both areas are presumably affected by one major source of pollution - power plant. Surface magnetic susceptibility measurements were performed by Bartington MS2D loop; values vary from 10 to 300 x 10-5 SI units. Vertical distribution of magnetic susceptibility was measured already in situ using the SM400 (ZHInstruments) on profiles about 40cm in length. Mass-specific MS was determined using Bartington MS2B dual frequency meter and Agico MFK1. Nine vertical profiles were selected for detailed analyses including the ARM, IRM and hysteresis measurements. Distinctly enhanced magnetic layers were detected in deeper horizons. This enhancement can be ascribed to several mechanisms. Migration of magnetic particles seems to be probable, as observed in our model experiments with sand columns. In coastal areas, the enhanced layer could be due to tsunami deposits, as described in other areas. Finally, in particular at sites close to power plants, the construction works followed by surface remediation have to be also considered as one of the possible mechanisms.

  11. Shallow Horizontal GCHP Effectiveness in Arid Climate Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Timothy James

    Ground coupled heat pumps (GCHPs) have been used successfully in many environments to improve the heating and cooling efficiency of both small and large scale buildings. In arid climate regions, such as the Phoenix, Arizona metropolitan area, where the air condi-tioning load is dominated by cooling in the summer, GCHPs are difficult to install and operate. This is because the nature of soils in arid climate regions, in that they are both dry and hot, renders them particularly ineffective at dissipating heat. The first part of this thesis addresses applying the SVHeat finite element modeling soft-ware to create a model of a GCHP system. Using real-world data from a prototype solar-water heating system coupled with a ground-source heat exchanger installed in Menlo Park, California, a relatively accurate model was created to represent a novel GCHP panel system installed in a shallow vertical trench. A sensitivity analysis was performed to evaluate the accuracy of the calibrated model. The second part of the thesis involved adapting the calibrated model to represent an ap-proximation of soil conditions in arid climate regions, using a range of thermal properties for dry soils. The effectiveness of the GCHP in the arid climate region model was then evaluated by comparing the thermal flux from the panel into the subsurface profile to that of the prototype GCHP. It was shown that soils in arid climate regions are particularly inefficient at heat dissipation, but that it is highly dependent on the thermal conductivity inputted into the model. This demonstrates the importance of proper site characterization in arid climate regions. Finally, several soil improvement methods were researched to evaluate their potential for use in improving the effectiveness of shallow horizontal GCHP systems in arid climate regions.

  12. Deuterium and 18O as indicators of evaporation losses from rice crops in semi-arid climate zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice requires the highest water application rate of any of the major grain crops, with total water demand per unit area of crop at least twice that of maize or wheat. Most of the water used for rice production in semi-arid climates is lost to the atmosphere through the combined effects of evaporation and transpiration. Evaporation leads to substantial enrichment of residual liquid phase water molecules containing heavier isotopes (deuterium and 18O) because of preferential loss to the atmosphere of lighter isotope molecules. In contrast, transpiration leads to little net enrichment of the heavier isotopes in residual waters. This difference between the effects on the stable isotopic composition of surface water of the two loss modes to the atmosphere offers the potential to estimate arid zone evaporation losses independent of transpiration, both in natural waters, such as swamps, and in regional scale irrigation networks. 3 refs, 2 figs

  13. Assessment of future agricultural conditions in southwestern Africa using fuzzy logic and high-resolution climate model scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weinzierl, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Climate change is expected to have a major impact on the arid savanna regions of southwestern Africa, such as the Okavango Basin. Precipitation is a major constraint for agriculture in countries like Namibia and Botswana and assessments of future crop growth conditions are in high demand. This GIS-based approach uses reanalysis data and climate model output for two scenarios and compares them to the precipitation requirements of the five most important crops grown in the region: maize, pearl millet, sorghum, cassava and cow pea. It also takes into account the dominant soil types, as plant growth is also limited by nutrient-poor soils with unfavorable physical and chemical properties. The two factors are then combined using a fuzzy logic algorithm. The assessment visualizes the expected shifts in suitable zones and identifies areas where farming without irrigation may experience a decline in yields or may even no longer be possible at the end of the 21st century. The results show that pearl millet is the most suitable crop in all scenarios while especially the cultivation of maize, sorghum and cow pea may be affected by a possible reduction of precipitation under the high-emission scenario.

  14. Phytostabilization of Mine Tailings in Arid and Semiarid Environments—An Emerging Remediation Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Monica O.; Maier, Raina M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Unreclaimed mine tailings sites are a worldwide problem, with thousands of unvegetated, exposed tailings piles presenting a source of contamination for nearby communities. Tailings disposal sites in arid and semiarid environments are especially subject to eolian dispersion and water erosion. Phytostabilization, the use of plants for in situ stabilization of tailings and metal contaminants, is a feasible alternative to costly remediation practices. In this review we emphasize considerations for phytostabilization of mine tailings in arid and semiarid environments, as well as issues impeding its long-term success. Data sources We reviewed literature addressing mine closures and revegetation of mine tailings, along with publications evaluating plant ecology, microbial ecology, and soil properties of mine tailings. Data extraction Data were extracted from peer-reviewed articles and books identified in Web of Science and Agricola databases, and publications available through the U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the United Nations Environment Programme. Data synthesis Harsh climatic conditions in arid and semiarid environments along with the innate properties of mine tailings require specific considerations. Plants suitable for phytostabilization must be native, be drought-, salt-, and metal-tolerant, and should limit shoot metal accumulation. Factors for evaluating metal accumulation and toxicity issues are presented. Also reviewed are aspects of implementing phytostabilization, including plant growth stage, amendments, irrigation, and evaluation. Conclusions Phytostabilization of mine tailings is a promising remedial technology but requires further research to identify factors affecting its long-term success by expanding knowledge of suitable plant species and mine tailings chemistry in ongoing field trials. PMID:18335091

  15. Workshop on environmental changes of arid regions convenes in Inner Mongolia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Hosted by the CAS Institute of Geology and Geophysics and the local government, the International Workshop on Environmental Changes and Sustainable Development in Arid and Semi-arid Regions was held recently in Alashan Left Banner, Inner Mongolia.

  16. Soil Ecosystem Degradation of Karst Regions in Southwestern China

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Shi-you; Wang, Ju

    2012-01-01

    Deeply influenced by karst geological environment, the structure of the soil ecosystem in the southwest karst area of China is characterized by strong vertical variation and space variation, structural feature of nonrenewable soil, and functional feature of poor circulation of nutrient elements and limited vegetation growth. On the basis of analyzing vulnerability in structure and function of soil ecosystem in China’s southwestern karst regions, we discussed the degradation process and mech...

  17. COST OF FRESH MARKET CELERY PRODUCTION IN SOUTHWESTERN MICHIGAN

    OpenAIRE

    Dartt, Barbara; Black, J. Roy; Breinling, Jim; Morrone, Vicki

    2002-01-01

    This bulletin represents a tool that can help producers, consultants, educators, and agribusinesses working with producers estimate costs of production and expected profit based on "typical" celery management strategies found in southwestern Michigan. The budget included in this bulletin will allow users to revise inputs based on their management strategies and calculate their expected cost and profit. This flexibility provides a decision aid to search for systems that generate higher net ret...

  18. Mining disturbances in Virginia's southwestern coalfield, 1984-2011

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jing; Donovan, Patricia F.; Zipper, Carl E., 1948-; Wynne, Randolph H.; Oliphant, Adam J.

    2015-01-01

    Coal mining has been taking place in southwestern Virginia's Appalachian coalfield for more than a century, and surface mining has been a common method of coal extraction since the 1960s. Coal surface mining creates a significant landscape disturbance that is visible from space during the period of active mining. Researcher's have constructed a surface-mining disturbance history for Virginia's Appalachian coalfield that extends from the early 1980s through 2011. A series ...

  19. Descriptive Analyses of Two Late Prehistoric Burials From Southwestern Idaho

    OpenAIRE

    Yohe, Robert M II; St. Clair, Jessica

    1998-01-01

    Data relating to prehistoric human skeletal material from the northern cultural Great Basin are scant, especially for the period dating within the last 2,000 years. Recent discoveries of two separate prehistoric inhumations in southwestern Idaho resulted in professional data recovery efforts by the Idaho State Historical Society. The radiometric assessments of the remains place the date of the interments at approximately 900 and 1,300 years ago. Descriptions of each burial and associated arti...

  20. Evidence for fullerene in a coal of Yunnan, Southwestern China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In two types of coal from a coal mine in Yunnan Province, Southwestern China, the presence of fullerene is confirmed. The fullerene had been suggested earlier by its characteristic infrared absorption spectrum. The present work reports verification by a high performance liquid chromatograph. A critical step leading to the confirmation is in the process of preparation of the liquid solution from the coal for chromatography and this is described. Possible conditions for the search of natural fullerenes are suggested. (orig.)

  1. Correct nomenclature for the Angadimogar pluton, Kerala, southwestern India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H M Rajesh

    2006-04-01

    The proper usage of modal composition and geochemical classification of granitoids is discussed for assigning a proper nomenclature for the Angadimogar pluton,Kerala,southwestern India.This discussion is mainly aimed at addressing questions concerning the nomenclature of Angadimogar pluton (syenite vs. granite).Modal composition and whole-rock XRD data clearly show that the pluton exposed near Angadimogar is a quartz-syenite and its geochemistry is typical of a ferroan, metaluminous,alkali (A-type)granitoid.

  2. Ecological restoration of southwestern ponderosa pine ecosystems: A broad perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, C. D.; Savage, M.; Falk, D. A.; Suckling, K. F.; Swetnam, T.W.; Schulke, T.; Stacey, P. B.; Morgan, P.; Hoffman, M; Klingel, J. T.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to promote a broad and flexible perspective on ecological restoration of Southwestern (U.S.) ponderosa pine forests. Ponderosa pine forests in the region have been radically altered by Euro-American land uses, including livestock grazing, fire suppression, and logging. Dense thickets of young trees now abound, old-growth and biodiversity have declined, and human and ecological communities are increasingly vulnerable to destructive crown fires. A consensus has emer...

  3. Environmental gamma radiation indoors at Akure, Southwestern Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposures to environmental gamma radiation were assessed by using LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) placed inside family dwellings made out of stone, gravel concrete, brick etc., at Akure, the capital of Ondo State. Southwestern Nigeria for about two and a half months. The results show that houses made out of soil bricks give the least exposures to dwellers. The dosimetric implications are discussed in the text

  4. Innovation Generation in the Furniture Industry in Southwestern Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    obembe jide joseph; Owoputi Emmanuel Adetose; Ilori Mathew Olugbenga

    2014-01-01

    The paper examines the innovations carried out in the furniture making industry in Southwestern Nigeria. This was with a view to recommending policy measures to enhance the innovative performance of the furniture makers. The research covered Lagos, Oyo, Ondo and Ekiti States, because a large numbers of the industry are located in the states. The sample population consisted of 319 furniture makers. The research instruments used were questionnaire, personal observation and focus group discussi...

  5. Environmental gamma radiation indoors at Akure, Southwestern Nigeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajayi, O.S

    2000-09-01

    Exposures to environmental gamma radiation were assessed by using LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) placed inside family dwellings made out of stone, gravel concrete, brick etc., at Akure, the capital of Ondo State. Southwestern Nigeria for about two and a half months. The results show that houses made out of soil bricks give the least exposures to dwellers. The dosimetric implications are discussed in the text.

  6. Potential of arid zone vegetation as a source of substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassham, J.A.

    1977-11-01

    Three aspects of the potential of vegetation in arid zones as a source of substrates are discussed. The first includes the limitations on efficiency of conversion of solar energy to the stored chemical energy of biomass in green plants, and the subsequent biochemical pathways of carbon dioxide fixation and biosynthesis. Second is the potential of plants endogenous to arid zones. Finally, the use of covered agriculture or controlled environmental agriculture (CEA) is considered both in its present form and in terms of possible extenion to the large scale production of stable crops. (JGB)

  7. New crops for arid lands. [Jojoba; Buffalo gourd; Bladderpod; Gumweed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinman, C.W.

    1984-09-28

    Five plants are described that could be grown commercially under arid conditions. Once the most valuable component has been obtained from each plant (rubber from guayule; seed oil from jojoba, buffalo gourd, and bladderpod; and resin from gumweed), the remaining material holds potential for useful products as well as fuel. It is difficult to realize the full potential of arid land plants, however, because of the complexities of developing the necessary agricultural and industrial infrastructure simultaneously. To do so, multicompany efforts or cooperative efforts between government and the private sector will be required.

  8. Mediterranean semi-arid systems-sensitivity and adaptation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The semi-arid areas of the Mediterranean are sensitive to climate change as they are located. In many cases, between two different systems, the arid system and the Mediterranean sub-humid system. A number of quick response ecogeomorphological variables were monitored along a climatic transect in Israel, running from west to east, covering an annual rainfall range of 700-100mm. The relationships of climatic conditions-available water soil properties overland flow erosion, were investigates. Soil samples were taken from open areas between shrubs and overland flow was monitored in posts of 7, 14 and 21 m in length (3m width). (Author)

  9. a Proposed New Vegetation Index, the Total Ratio Vegetation Index (trvi), for Arid and Semi-Arid Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadaei, H.; Suzuki, R.; Sakai, T.; Torii, K.

    2012-07-01

    Vegetation indices that provide important key to predict amount vegetation in forest such as percentage vegetation cover, aboveground biomass, and leaf-area index. Arid and semi-arid areas are not exempt of this rule. Arid and semi-arid areas of northeast Iran cover about 3.4 million ha and are populated by two main tree species, the broadleaf Pistacia vera (pistachio) and the conifer Juniperus excelsa ssp. polycarpos (Persian juniper). Natural stands of pistachio in Iran are not only environmentally important but also genetically essential as seed sources for pistachio production in orchards. We investigated the relationships between tree density and vegetation indices in the arid and semi-arid regions in the northeast of Iran by analysing Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) data PRISM is a panchromatic radiometer with a 2.5 m spatial resolution at nadir, and has one band with a wavelength of 0.52-0.77 μm (JAXA EORC). AVNIR-2 is a visible and near infrared radiometer for observing land and coastal zones with a 10 m spatial resolution at nadir, and has four multispectral bands: blue (0.42-0.50 μm), green (0.52-0.60 μm), red (0.61-0.69 μm), and near infrared (0.76-0.89 μm) (JAXA EORC). In this study, we estimated various vegetation indices using maximum filtering algorithm (5×5) and examined. This study carried out of juniper forests and natural pistachio stand using Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) and field inventories. Have been compared linear regression model of vegetation indices and proposed new vegetation index for arid and semi-arid regions. Also, we estimated the densities of juniper forests and natural pistachio stands using remote sensing to help in the sustainable management and production of pistachio in Iran. We present a new vegetation index for arid and semi-arid regions with sparse forest cover, the Total Ratio Vegetation Index (TRVI), and we investigate the relationship of the new index to tree density by analysing data from the

  10. A PROPOSED NEW VEGETATION INDEX, THE TOTAL RATIO VEGETATION INDEX (TRVI, FOR ARID AND SEMI-ARID REGIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Fadaei

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Vegetation indices that provide important key to predict amount vegetation in forest such as percentage vegetation cover, aboveground biomass, and leaf-area index. Arid and semi-arid areas are not exempt of this rule. Arid and semi-arid areas of northeast Iran cover about 3.4 million ha and are populated by two main tree species, the broadleaf Pistacia vera (pistachio and the conifer Juniperus excelsa ssp. polycarpos (Persian juniper. Natural stands of pistachio in Iran are not only environmentally important but also genetically essential as seed sources for pistachio production in orchards. We investigated the relationships between tree density and vegetation indices in the arid and semi-arid regions in the northeast of Iran by analysing Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS data PRISM is a panchromatic radiometer with a 2.5 m spatial resolution at nadir, and has one band with a wavelength of 0.52–0.77 μm (JAXA EORC. AVNIR-2 is a visible and near infrared radiometer for observing land and coastal zones with a 10 m spatial resolution at nadir, and has four multispectral bands: blue (0.42–0.50 μm, green (0.52–0.60 μm, red (0.61–0.69 μm, and near infrared (0.76–0.89 μm (JAXA EORC. In this study, we estimated various vegetation indices using maximum filtering algorithm (5×5 and examined. This study carried out of juniper forests and natural pistachio stand using Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS and field inventories. Have been compared linear regression model of vegetation indices and proposed new vegetation index for arid and semi-arid regions. Also, we estimated the densities of juniper forests and natural pistachio stands using remote sensing to help in the sustainable management and production of pistachio in Iran. We present a new vegetation index for arid and semi-arid regions with sparse forest cover, the Total Ratio Vegetation Index (TRVI, and we investigate the relationship of the new index to tree density by

  11. Efficiency of a Horizontal Sub-Surface Flow Constructed Wetland Treatment System in an Arid Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeer Albalawneh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to evaluate the performance and treatment efficiency of the Horizontal Sub-Surface Flow Constructed Wetland treatment system (HSF-CW in an arid climate. Seventeen sub-surface, horizontal-flow HSF-CW units have been operated for approximately three years to improve the quality of partially-treated municipal wastewater. The studied design parameters included two sizes of volcanic tuff media (i.e., fine or coarse, two different bed dimensions (i.e., long and short, and three plantation types (i.e., reed, kenaf, or no vegetation as a control. The effluent Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD5, Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD, Total Suspended Solid (TSS, and phosphorus from all of the treatments were significantly lower as compared to the influent and demonstrated a removal efficiency of 55%, 51%, 67%, and 55%, respectively. There were significant increases in Electrical Conductivity (EC, sulfate, and calcium in the effluent of most HSF-CWs due to evaporative concentration and mineral dissolution from the media. The study suggests that unplanted beds with either fine or coarse media are the most suitable combinations among all of the studied designs based on their treatment efficiency and less water loss in arid conditions.

  12. Ensemble projections of wildfire activity and carbonaceous aerosol concentrations over the western United States in the mid-21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xu; Mickley, Loretta J.; Logan, Jennifer A.; Kaplan, Jed O.

    2013-10-01

    We estimate future wildfire activity over the western United States during the mid-21st century (2046-2065), based on results from 15 climate models following the A1B scenario. We develop fire prediction models by regressing meteorological variables from the current and previous years together with fire indexes onto observed regional area burned. The regressions explain 0.25-0.60 of the variance in observed annual area burned during 1980-2004, depending on the ecoregion. We also parameterize daily area burned with temperature, precipitation, and relative humidity. This approach explains ˜0.5 of the variance in observed area burned over forest ecoregions but shows no predictive capability in the semi-arid regions of Nevada and California. By applying the meteorological fields from 15 climate models to our fire prediction models, we quantify the robustness of our wildfire projections at midcentury. We calculate increases of 24-124% in area burned using regressions and 63-169% with the parameterization. Our projections are most robust in the southwestern desert, where all GCMs predict significant (p ecoregions, more GCMs predict significant increases in future area burned with the parameterization than with the regressions, because the latter approach is sensitive to hydrological variables that show large inter-model variability in the climate projections. The parameterization predicts that the fire season lengthens by 23 days in the warmer and drier climate at midcentury. Using a chemical transport model, we find that wildfire emissions will increase summertime surface organic carbon aerosol over the western United States by 46-70% and black carbon by 20-27% at midcentury, relative to the present day. The pollution is most enhanced during extreme episodes: above the 84th percentile of concentrations, OC increases by ˜90% and BC by ˜50%, while visibility decreases from 130 km to 100 km in 32 Federal Class 1 areas in Rocky Mountains Forest.

  13. Watershed Boundaries - WATERSHEDS_HUC11__USGS_IN: Watersheds, 11-digit Hydrologic Units, in Indiana, (Derived from US Geological Survey, Polygon Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — WATERSHEDS_HUC11_USGS_IN is a polygon shapefile showing the boundaries of watersheds in Southwestern Indiana. Watersheds are noted by a 11-digit hydrologic unit....

  14. Effects of environmental conditions on soil salinity and arid region in Tunisia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Ahmed, C.; Ben Rouina, B.; Boukhris, M.

    2009-07-01

    The shortage of water resources of good water quality is becoming an issue in the arid and semi arid regions. for this reason, the use of water resources of marginal quality such as treated wastewater and saline groundwater has become and important consideration, particularly in arid region in Tunisia, where large quantities of saline water are used for irrigation. (Author)

  15. Utilisation Of Micro-Finance Institutions’ Funds By Borrowers In Arid And Semi-Arid Lands In Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Nzioki, Paul M.; Taragon, Geoffrey; Kalio, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Despite a lot of efforts in terms of resource mobilisation in Arid and Semi-Arid Lands (ASAL) , the poverty levels are still very high and the defaulted loans from the four Micro-Finance Institutions (MFIs) in Maralal town amounts KES 15 million. The study sought to establish whether economic characteristics of entrepreneurs and whether literacy levels affect application and usage of borrowed funds in the ASAL regions of Africa. The study was limited to Maralal Town, one of the main towns in ...

  16. Research on Structure Innovation of Agricultural Organization in China's Southwestern Mountainous Regions

    OpenAIRE

    Du, Qiang; Luo, Min; Ping WANG

    2012-01-01

    Taking agricultural organization in China's southwestern mountainous regions as research object, on the basis of analysis of the status quo of agricultural organization development in China's southwestern mountainous regions, we use related theoretical knowledge on economics and organization science, we probe into the process of innovation and mechanism of action concerning the structure of agricultural organization in China's southwestern mountainous regions over the past 30 years. Finally w...

  17. Transport of elemental mercury in the unsaturated zone from a waste disposal site in an arid region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercury contained in buried landfill waste may be released via upward emission to the atmosphere or downward leaching to groundwater. Data from the US Geological Survey's Amargosa Desert Research Site (ADRS) in arid southwestern Nevada reveal another potential pathway of Hg release: long-distance (102 m) lateral migration of elemental Hg (Hg0) through the unsaturated zone. Gas collected from multiple depths from two instrumented boreholes that sample the entire 110-m unsaturated zone thickness and are located 100 and 160 m away from the closest waste burial trench exhibit gaseous Hg concentrations of up to 33 and 11 ng m-3, respectively. The vertical distribution of gaseous Hg in the borehole closest to the disposal site shows distinct subsurface peaks in concentration at depths of 1.5 and 24 m that cannot be explained by radial diffusive transport through a heterogeneous layered unsaturated zone. The inability of current models to explain gaseous Hg distribution at the ADRS highlights the need to advance the understanding of gas-phase contaminant transport in unsaturated zones to attain a comprehensive model of landfill Hg release

  18. Growing season soil moisture following restoration treatments of varying intensity in semi-arid ponderosa pine forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, F. C.; Springer, A. E.; Sankey, T.; Masek Lopez, S.

    2014-12-01

    Forest restoration projects are being planned for large areas of overgrown semi-arid ponderosa pine forests of the Southwestern US. Restoration involves the thinning of smaller trees and prescribed or managed fire to reduce tree density, restore a more natural fire regime, and decrease the risk of catastrophic wildfire. The stated goals of these projects generally reduced plant water stress and improvements in hydrologic function. However, little is known about how to design restoration treatments to best meet these goals. As part of a larger project on snow cover, soil moisture, and groundwater recharge, we measured soil moisture, an indicator of plant water status, in four pairs of control and restored sites near Flagstaff, Arizona. The restoration strategies used at the sites range in both amount of open space created and degree of clustering of the remaining trees. We measured soil moisture using 30 cm vertical time domain reflectometry probes installed on 100 m transects at 5 m intervals so it would be possible to analyze the spatial pattern of soil moisture. Soil moisture was higher and more spatially variable in the restored sites than the control sites with differences in spatial pattern among the restoration types. Soil moisture monitoring will continue until the first snow fall, at which point measurements of snow depth and snow water equivalent will be made at the same locations.

  19. Trends and responses to global change of China's arid regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weixi YANG

    2009-01-01

    Ⅰ analyzed and elaborated the trends in and responses to global change in arid regions of China, from the perspective of nine variables, i.e., temperature, precipitation, river runoff, melting glaciers, water level of lakes, wind power and evaporation, vegetation, oases, and desertification. The climate and hydrology data Ⅰ citedrepresent many years of observations. Ⅰ conclude that, since the 1980s, the climate in arid regions of China has clearly changed with rising temperatures and precipitation in most areas. Wind power and the number of galestorm days have continuously decreased, which resulted in an improvement of humid conditions and increases in river discharge and water levels of lakes. Simultaneously, vegetation also has improved and the process of deserti-fication has essentially been arrested. Although there are some unfavorable developments, such as decreased river flows or flow interruptions and downstream oases have suffered from degradation, these incidental cases should not distract our attention from the generally favorable trends during the middle and late 20th century. These discordant phenomena are not consequences of climate change but rather of unsuitable human activities. Despitea substantial increase in precipitation, the level of the original precipitation was so small that any increase in precipitation was still small. As a result, none of the fundamental conditions such as a scarcity of water resources and precipitation nor the landscape of drought-ridden deserts in the arid regions will change. The vulnerability of the eco-environmental system in the arid regions will not change fundamentally either in the near future.

  20. Agave Lechuguilla as a Potential Biomass Source in Arid Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Houri

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Biomass productivity presents a challenging problem in arid and semi-arid areas.  Despite a large need for energy in the form of solid biomass, liquid fuel or needs for animal feed, these regions remain largely unproductive.  A convenient way to overcome this challenge is to utilize plants with high water-use efficiency.  Agave lechuguilla is an example of a highly productive (3.8 tons ha-1 yr-1 desert plant that holds the potential for producing biomass with minimal water resources.  For this purpose, a global suitability map has been developed showing areas where this plant can be planted, and its productivity was assessed.  A Maxent model was used and was further refined by excluding protected areas and used lands (urban, agriculture, etc...  Productivity assessment provides a good way forward for prioritizing the regional utilization of this plant.   This study provides an initial analysis for the use of arid and semi-arid regions for biomass production.  Results indicate the potential generation of 93.8 million tons per year of dry biomass if the suitable areas were fully utilized.  The analytical method can be readily applied to other potential plant species to optimize the use of certain areas.

  1. Evaporation as the transport mechanism of metals in arid regions

    KAUST Repository

    Lima, Ana T.

    2014-09-01

    Soils of arid regions are exposed to drought and drastic temperature oscillations throughout the year. Transport mechanisms in these soils are therefore very different from the ones in temperate regions, where rain dictates the fate of most elements in soils. Due to the low rainfall and high evaporation rates in arid regions, groundwater quality is not threatened and all soil contamination issues tend to be overlooked. But if soil contamination happens, where do contaminants go? This study tests the hypothesis of upward metal movement in soils when evaporation is the main transport mechanism. Laboratory evaporation tests were carried out with heavy metal spiked Saudi soil, using circulation of air as the driving force (Fig. 1). Main results show that loamy soil retains heavy metals quite well while evaporation drives heavy metals to the surface of a sandy soil. Evaporation transports heavy metals upward in sandy soils of arid regions, making them accumulate at the soil surface. Sand being the dominating type of soil in arid regions, soils can then be a potential source of contaminated aerosols and atmospheric pollution - a transboundary problem. Some other repercussions for this problem are foreseen, such as the public ingestion or inhalation of dust. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Local facilitation, bistability and transitions in arid ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kefi, S.; Rietkerk, M.; Baalen, van M.; Loreau, M.

    2007-01-01

    Arid ecosystems are liable to undergo sudden discontinuous transitions from a vegetated to a desert state as a result of human pressure and climate change. A predictive framework about the conditions under which such transitions occur is lacking. Here, we derive and analyze a general model describin

  3. Extreme climatic events shape arid and semiarid ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holmgren, M.; Stapp, P.; Dickman, C.; Gracia, C.; Graham, S.

    2006-01-01

    Climatic changes associated with the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) can have a dramatic impact on terrestrial ecosystems worldwide, but especially on arid and semiarid systems, where productivity is strongly limited by precipitation. Nearly two decades of research, including both short-term exp

  4. Simulation of water use and herbage growth in arid regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulen, van H.

    1975-01-01

    The and and semi-arid regions of the world, totalling about 30% of the land surface of the earth, are predominantly used for extensive grazing, as low and erratic rainfall presents too high a risk for arable farming. The population that can be sustained by the animal products -meat, milk or wool- is

  5. Evaporation as the transport mechanism of metals in arid regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lima, A.T.; Safar, Z.; Loch, J.P.G.

    2014-01-01

    Soils of arid regions are exposed to drought and drastic temperature oscillations throughout the year. Transport mechanisms in these soils are therefore very different from the ones in temperate regions, where rain dictates the fate of most elements in soils. Due to the low rainfall and high evapora

  6. Spatial and temporal variability in Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer-derived surface albedo over global arid regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsvetsinskaya, Elena A.; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Gao, Feng; Strahler, Alan H.; Dickinson, Robert E.

    2006-10-01

    We derive spectral and broadband surface albedo for global arid regions from data collected by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard the Terra spacecraft, at 1 km spatial resolution for 2001. MODIS data show considerable spatial variability both across various arid regions of the globe (from the bright deserts of northern Africa and the Arabian peninsula to substantially less reflective American and Asian deserts) and within regions (variability related to soil and rock types). For example, over arid northern Africa and the Arabian peninsula, albedo in the visible broadband varies by a factor of over 2, from the brightest sand sheets to the darkest luvisols. Few, if any, global and regional land-atmosphere models capture this observed spatial variability in surface albedo over arid regions. We suggest a scheme that relates soil groups (based on the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) soil classification) to MODIS-derived surface albedo statistics. This approach allows for an efficient representation in climate and weather forecasting models of the observed spatial and temporal variability in surface albedo over global deserts. Observed variability in albedo was reduced to a small (1-13, depending on the region) number of soil-related classes (end-members) that could be used in climate models. We also addressed the temporal evolution of albedo during 2001 over global deserts. Regions/soils of stable albedo with very low temporal variability were identified. For other regions/soils, temporal signals in albedo were related to ephemeral inundation with water or variations in sample size.

  7. Causes of early Holocene desertification in arid central Asia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Liya [Lanzhou University, Key Laboratory of Western China' s Environmental System, Lanzhou, Gansu (China); University of Kiel, Institute of Geosciences, Kiel (Germany); Chen, Fahu [Lanzhou University, Key Laboratory of Western China' s Environmental System, Lanzhou, Gansu (China); Morrill, Carrie [University of Colorado, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, Boulder, CO (United States); NOAA' s National Climatic Data Center, Paleoclimatology Branch, Boulder, CO (United States); Otto-Bliesner, Bette L.; Rosenbloom, Nan [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Climate and Global Dynamics Division, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Paleoclimate records of effective moisture (precipitation minus evaporation, or P-E) show a dry (low effective moisture) period in mid-latitude arid/semi-arid central Asia during the early Holocene (11,000-8,000 years ago) relative to the middle and late Holocene, in contrast to evidence for greater-than-present precipitation at the same time in the south and east Asian monsoonal areas. To investigate the spatial differences in climate response over mid-latitude central Asia and monsoonal Asia we conducted a series of simulations with the Community Climate System Model version 3 coupled climate model for the early, middle and late Holocene. The simulations test the climatic impact of all important forcings for the early Holocene, including changes in orbital parameters, the presence of the remnant Laurentide ice sheet and deglacial freshening of the North Atlantic. Model results clearly show the early Holocene patterns indicated by proxy records, including both the decreased effective moisture in arid central Asia, which occurs in the model primarily during the winter months, and the increase in summer monsoon precipitation in south and east Asia. The model results suggest that dry conditions in the early Holocene in central Asia are closely related to decreased water vapor advection due to reduced westerly wind speed and less evaporation upstream from the Mediterranean, Black, and Caspian Seas in boreal winter. As an extra forcing to the early Holocene climate system, the Laurentide ice sheet and meltwater fluxes have a substantial cooling effect over high latitudes, especially just over and downstream of the ice sheets, but contribute only to a small degree to the early Holocene aridity in central Asia. Instead, most of the effective moisture signal can be explained by orbital forcing decreasing the early Holocene latitudinal temperature gradient and wintertime surface temperature. We find little evidence for regional subsidence related to a stronger summer Asian

  8. Arid land plants: promising new tools for economic development and basic research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felker, P.

    1980-01-01

    An overview is presented of arid land plant development stressing products and plant physiological and ecological concepts unique to arid land plants. Integration of new arid land crops into polyculture management systems is suggested utilizing specialized plant functions, e.g., drought resistance, resistance to salinity, ability to fix nitrogen, frost tolerance and capability to produce a cash crop. Impacts on arid land plant productivity on political systems of developing countries are discussed and recommendations are presented for overcoming institutional constraints facing arid land plant development. (MHR)

  9. Management of nutrients and water in rainfed arid and semi-arid areas. Proceedings of a consultants meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sustainable food security is needed for the arid and semi-arid regions of the tropical, subtropical and warm-temperate climatic zones. In these regions the supply of locally grown food is unreliable because much of it is produced in conditions of highly variable rainfall. Even in favourable seasons, these regions re becoming increasingly dependent on imported food. The IAEA's involvement in field studies on soil-water use dates back several years. A five year Co-ordinated Research Project on ''The Use of Nuclear and Related Techniques in Assessment of Irrigation Schedules of Field Crops to Increase Effective Use of Water in Irrigation Projects''. That project, completed in 1995, laid a solid foundation for future research. Because of a scarcity of water in many developing countries and increasing needs for sustainable food security in the face of increasing populations and lack of funds for irrigation schemes of significant dimension, research must focus on improved management of (i) the modest quantities of fertilizers that are available to farmers, (ii) the natural resources that are available to farmers for increasing soil organic matter content, and (iii) rain water. The Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture held a Consultants Meeting on Management of Nutrients and Water in Rainfed Arid and Semi-Arid Areas for Increasing Crop Production, 26-29 May 1997

  10. Impacts of climate change on nutrient cycling in semi-arid and arid ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belnap, J. [National Biological Survey, Moab, UT (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Effective precipitation is a major factor in determining nutrient pathways in different ecosystems. Soil flora and fauna play a critical role in nutrient cycles of all ecosystems. Temperature, timing, and amounts of precipitation affect population composition, activity levels, biomass, and recovery rates from disturbance. Changes in these variables can result in very different inputs and outputs for different nutrients. As a result, areas with less effective precipitation have very different nutrient cycles than more mesic zones. Climate change, therefore, can profoundly affect the nutrient cycles of ecosystems. Nitrogen cycles may be especially sensitive to changes in temperature and to timing and amounts of precipitation. Rainfall contains varying amounts of nitrogen compounds. Changes in amounts of rainfall will change amounts of nitrogen available to these systems. Because rainfall is limited in semi-arid and regions, these systems tend to be more dependent on microbial populations for nitrogen input. Consequently, understanding the effects of climate change on these organisms is critical in understanding the overall effect on ecosystems.

  11. Agave: a biofuel feedstock for arid and semi-arid environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, Stephen; Martin, Jeffrey; Simpson, June; Wang, Zhong; Visel, Axel

    2011-05-31

    Efficient production of plant-based, lignocellulosic biofuels relies upon continued improvement of existing biofuel feedstock species, as well as the introduction of newfeedstocks capable of growing on marginal lands to avoid conflicts with existing food production and minimize use of water and nitrogen resources. To this end, specieswithin the plant genus Agave have recently been proposed as new biofuel feedstocks. Many Agave species are adapted to hot and arid environments generally unsuitable forfood production, yet have biomass productivity rates comparable to other second-generation biofuel feedstocks such as switchgrass and Miscanthus. Agavesachieve remarkable heat tolerance and water use efficiency in part through a Crassulacean Acid Metabolism (CAM) mode of photosynthesis, but the genes andregulatory pathways enabling CAM and thermotolerance in agaves remain poorly understood. We seek to accelerate the development of agave as a new biofuelfeedstock through genomic approaches using massively-parallel sequencing technologies. First, we plan to sequence the transcriptome of A. tequilana to provide adatabase of protein-coding genes to the agave research community. Second, we will compare transcriptome-wide gene expression of agaves under different environmentalconditions in order to understand genetic pathways controlling CAM, water use efficiency, and thermotolerance. Finally, we aim to compare the transcriptome of A.tequilana with that of other Agave species to gain further insight into molecular mechanisms underlying traits desirable for biofuel feedstocks. These genomicapproaches will provide sequence and gene expression information critical to the breeding and domestication of Agave species suitable for biofuel production.

  12. Development of corrective measures technology for shallow land burial facilities at arid sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The field research program involving corrective measure technologies for arid shallow land burial sites is described. Soil erosion and infiltration of water into a simulated trench cap with various surface treatments was measured and compared with similar data from agricultural systems across the United States. Field testing of biointrusion barriers at closed-out waste disposal sites at Los Alamos and in the experimental clusters are reported. The final results of an experiment designed to measure the extent of contaminant transport to the surface of a SLB facility, and the influence of plants on this relationship, are presented. An experiment designed to determine the effects of subsidence on the performance of a cobble-gravel biobarrier system is described and current field data are presented. 11 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs

  13. Modeling the Surface Water-Groundwater Interaction in Arid and Semi-Arid Regions Impacted by Agricultural Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Y.; Wu, B.; Zheng, Y.

    2013-12-01

    In many semi-arid and arid regions, interaction between surface water and groundwater plays an important role in the eco-hydrological system. The interaction is often complicated by agricultural activities such as surface water diversion, groundwater pumping, and irrigation. In existing surface water-groundwater integrated models, simulation of the interaction is often simplified, which could introduce significant simulation uncertainty under certain circumstance. In this study, GSFLOW, a USGS model coupling PRMS and MODFLOW, was improved to better characterize the surface water-groundwater interaction. The practices of water diversion from rivers, groundwater pumping and irrigation are explicitly simulated. In addition, the original kinematic wave routing method was replaced by a dynamic wave routing method. The improved model was then applied in Zhangye Basin (the midstream part of Heihe River Baisn), China, where the famous 'Silk Road' came through. It is a typical semi-arid region of the western China, with extensive agriculture in its oasis. The model was established and calibrated using the data in 2000-2008. A series of numerical experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of those improvements. It has been demonstrated that with the improvements, the observed streamflow and groundwater level were better reproduced by the model. The improvements have a significant impact on the simulation of multiple fluxes associated with the interaction, such as groundwater discharge, riverbed seepage, infiltration, etc. Human activities were proved to be key elements of the water cycle in the study area. The study results have important implications to the water resources modeling and management in semi-arid and arid basins.

  14. Quantifying the thermal heat requirement of Brassica in assessing biophysical parameters under semi-arid microenvironments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adak, Tarun; Chakravarty, N. V. K.

    2010-07-01

    Evaluation of the thermal heat requirement of Brassica spp. across agro-ecological regions is required in order to understand the further effects of climate change. Spatio-temporal changes in hydrothermal regimes are likely to affect the physiological growth pattern of the crop, which in turn will affect economic yields and crop quality. Such information is helpful in developing crop simulation models to describe the differential thermal regimes that prevail at different phenophases of the crop. Thus, the current lack of quantitative information on the thermal heat requirement of Brassica crops under debranched microenvironments prompted the present study, which set out to examine the response of biophysical parameters [leaf area index (LAI), dry biomass production, seed yield and oil content] to modified microenvironments. Following 2 years of field experiments on Typic Ustocrepts soils under semi-arid climatic conditions, it was concluded that the Brassica crop is significantly responsive to microenvironment modification. A highly significant and curvilinear relationship was observed between LAI and dry biomass production with accumulated heat units, with thermal accumulation explaining ≥80% of the variation in LAI and dry biomass production. It was further observed that the economic seed yield and oil content, which are a function of the prevailing weather conditions, were significantly responsive to the heat units accumulated from sowing to 50% physiological maturity. Linear regression analysis showed that growing degree days (GDD) could indicate 60-70% variation in seed yield and oil content, probably because of the significant response to differential thermal microenvironments. The present study illustrates the statistically strong and significant response of biophysical parameters of Brassica spp. to microenvironment modification in semi-arid regions of northern India.

  15. Not All Roads Lead to Resilience: a Complex Systems Approach to the Comparative Analysis of Tortoises in Arid Ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas E. J. Leuteritz; Ekbia, Hamid R.

    2008-01-01

    The concept of resilience has been widely used in the study of social-ecological systems, with its key components identified as resistance, latitude, and precariousness. We use this concept to examine the differences among three semi-arid regions in terms of these three components. We do this by examining the status of tortoises that occur in the dry spiny forest Madagascar, the Karoo of South Africa, and the Mojave Desert of the United States as an indicator of the health and resilience of t...

  16. Depth to the top of the Mesaverde Group -- National Assessment of Oil and Gas Project - Southwestern Wyoming Province (037)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset shows depth contours to the top of the Mesaverde Group within the Southwestern Wyoming Province, southwestern Wyoming, northeastern Utah, and...

  17. Structural controls of Holocene reactivation of the Meers fault, southwestern Oklahoma, from magnetic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones-Cecil, M.

    1995-01-01

    Holocene reactivation of the aseismic Meers fault in southwestern Oklahoma illustrates the limitation of using the historical seismic record for identifying hazardous faults in the central United States. The 26- to 37-km-long fault sarp is one of the few known scarps recording Holocene movement in the central and eastern United States. Two documented late Holocene slip events, each with about 2.5 m of net slip and estimated Ms ranging from 6 3/4 to 7 1/4 , identify the Meers fault as a potentially hazardous fault. In the present-day strike-slip regional stress field, the observed up-to-the-north Holocene displacement suggests that either the fault continues to dip steeply at depth or the regional stress field is approaching a normal-faulting stress regime. If the former is true, the scarcity of near-vertical faults with similar orientation within the areas of the southern Oklahoma aulacogen implies that few are likely candidates for reactivation. from Author

  18. Structures and sequence stratigraphy of the Miocene successions, southwestern Gulf of Suez, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El Naby, Ahmed; Abdel-Rahman, Ahmed; Abd El-Aal, Mohamed; Alhamshry, Asmaa

    2016-05-01

    The subsurface structural evolution, facies changes and sequence stratigraphic interpretations of the Miocene successions of the southwestern part of the Gulf of Suez, Egypt, were studied by seismic reflection data of Twenty seven 3D seismic sections supported by the composite, velocity and vertical seismic profiles (VSP) logs of eight wells. Among them five sections and two geoseismic cross sections were selected to reveal the structural framework and depositional history of the study area. The analysis of depth-structure contour maps revealed that the Miocene strata are dissected by two major faults trends: The NW-SE trending faults (Clysmic trend) and the NE-SW trending cross faults running nearly perpendicular to the Clysmic faults. The facies changes of the syn-depositional Miocene units are controlled by the structural framework of the southern part of the Gulf of Suez being evolving diapiric structure of South Gharib Formation. The Miocene units are subdivided into two major 3rd order depositional sequences: S1 and S2.

  19. Soil Ecosystem Degradation of Karst Regions in Southwestern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Shi-you; WANG Ju

    2012-01-01

    Deeply influenced by karst geological environment, the structure of the soil ecosystem in the southwest karst area of China is characterized by strong vertical variation and space variation, structural feature of nonrenewable soil, and functional feature of poor circulation of nutrient elements and limited vegetation growth. On the basis of analyzing vulnerability in structure and function of soil ecosystem in China’s southwestern karst regions, we discussed the degradation process and mechanism of soil structure, nutrient, water and microorganism in the course of soil erosion from the perspective of material and energy cycle. Finally, we put forward some recommendations for recovery of degraded soil, transformation and rational utilization of soil.

  20. Nestling sex ratio in the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, E.H.; Sogge, M.K.; McCarthey, T.D.; Keim, P.

    2002-01-01

    Using molecular-genetic techniques, we determined the gender of 202 Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) nestlings from 95 nests sampled over a five-year period. Overall nestling sex ratio did not vary significantly from 50:50 among years, by clutch order, or by mating strategy (monogamous vs. polygamous pairings). However, we did observe significant differences among the four sites sampled, with sex ratios biased either toward males or females at the different sites. Given the small population sizes and geographic isolation of many of the endangered subspecies' breeding populations, sex-ratio differences may have localized negative impacts. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2002.

  1. Nestling sex ratios in the southwestern willow flycatcher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, E.H.; Sogge, M.K.; McCarthey, Tracy; Keim, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Using molecular-genetic techniques, we determined the gender of 202 Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) nestlings from 95 nests sampled over a five-year period. Overall nestling sex ratio did not vary significantly from 50:50 among years, by clutch order, or by mating strategy (monogamous vs. polygamous pairings). However, we did observe significant differences among the four sites sampled, with sex ratios biased either toward males or females at the different sites. Given the small population sizes and geographic isolation of many of the endangered subspecies' breeding populations, sex-ratio differences may have localized negative impacts.

  2. Effects of acid mine drainage on southwestern Pennsylvania stream

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, T.C.; Lucostic, C.M.

    1979-01-01

    Physicochemical parameters and benthic macroinvertebrate community structure were studied in a small valley stream in southwestern Pennsylvania, where the pH value below a coal mine effluent discharge was 5.8-7.0. The major factor affecting the benthic community seemed to be ferric hydroxide. Certain taxa were abundant at station sites above the mine discharge, while only those taxa tolerant of polluted conditions, such as Chironomidae and Tubifex, were prevalent at the downstream station sites. An analysis of benthic populations demonstrated environmental stress within the aquatic ecosystem.

  3. Mitigating Climate Change in the Arid Lands of Namibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Martin B.; Sorensen, Marten

    2014-05-01

    Mitigating Climate Change in the Arid Lands of Namibia Namibia is the most arid country south of the Sahara, with scarce rainfall and perennial rivers only at its borders, > 80% of the area relies solely on groundwater. This has had devastating economic effects limiting opportunities for sustainable rural livelihoods that keep the population majority living below the World Bank poverty line (IFAD, 2013). A primary example of climatic variability which affects agrarian productivity is increased bush encroachment of Namibia's arid grazing land. The result has been a severe biodiversity loss, increased desertification and diminished water-use efficiency and underground water tables. Given these factors, Namibia's arid lands provide a unique opportunity to assess and test innovative / appropriate adaptation and mitigation strategies. Working toward sustainable management, restoration, and maintenance of balanced, resilient arid ecosystems in Namibia will also be a means to support and expand economic sectors incl. opportunities for job creation and potentially provide a model for similar arid regions. Main vegetation zones are: desert (46%), savannah (37%), and dry woodlands and forests (17%), i.e. dimensions of management strategies within stakeholder groups using participatory approaches. 3. Determine science-based alternatives for adaptive land management strategies and test their acceptability to local communities and within the current policy framework. 4. Integrate identified indigenous knowledge with appropriate science and new emerging technologies to develop a training toolkit of effective strategies relevant to all stakeholders. 5. Utilize training sessions, education workshops, curriculum revisions, and appropriate information and communication technologies (ICTs) including social media outlets to disseminate the toolkit strategies. 6. Apply a modified logic model approach within a value chain analysis process to evaluate program effectiveness and impacts at

  4. Climate Warming Threatens Semi-arid Forests in Inner Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    WU, X.; Liu, H.; Qi, Z.; Li, X.

    2014-12-01

    A line of evidences reveal an increasing tree growth decline and tree mortality mainly attributable to climate warming and the warming-mediated changes in drought and other processes (such as fire and insect dynamics) in many parts of world tropical, temperate and boreal forests. However, the growth responses to climate change of the widely distributed semi-arid forests are unclear. Here, we synthetically investigate the tree growth patterns during past decades and its interannual response to climate variations in Inner Asia combining the ground truth field survey and samplings, remote sensing observations and climate data. We identified a pervasive tree growth decline since mid-1990s in semi-arid forests in Inner Asia. The widely observed tree growth decline is dominantly attributable to warming-induced water stress during pre- and early growing season. Tree growth of semi-arid forests in Inner Asia is particularly susceptible to spring warming and has been suffering a prolonged growth limitation in recent decades due to spring warming-mediated water conditions. Additionally, we identified a much slower growth rate in younger trees and a lack of tree regeneration in these semi-arid forests. The widely observed forest growth reduction and lack of tree regeneration over semi-arid forests in Inner Asia could predictably exert great effects on forest structure, regionally/globally biophysical and biochemical processes and the feedbacks between biosphere and atmosphere. Notably, further increases in forest stress and tree mortality could be reasonably expected, especially in context of the increase frequency and severity of high temperature and heat waves and changes in forest disturbances, potentially driving the eventual regional loss of current semi-arid forests. Given the potential risks of climate induced forest dieback, increased management attention to adaptation options for enhancing forest resistance and resilience to projected climate stress can be expected

  5. 76 FR 75866 - Newspapers Used for Publication of Legal Notices in the Southwestern Region, Which Includes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-05

    ... purpose of publishing legal notice for a plan amendment decision that is subject to appeal under... Forest Service Newspapers Used for Publication of Legal Notices in the Southwestern Region, Which..., and the Regional Office of the Southwestern Region to give legal notice for the availability...

  6. 75 FR 19609 - Newspapers Used for Publication of Legal Notices in the Southwestern Region, Which Includes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-15

    ... legal notice for a plan amendment decision that is subject to appeal under ``Optional Appeal Procedures... Forest Service Newspapers Used for Publication of Legal Notices in the Southwestern Region, Which..., and the Regional Office of the Southwestern Region to give legal notice for the availability...

  7. Hydrogeologic subdivision of the Wolfcamp series and Pennsylvanian system of eastern Texas Panhandle, north-central Texas, and southwestern Oklahoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pennsylvanian-Wolfcamp section in the Palo Duro Basin includes brine aquifers that are considered to be the most important ground-water flow paths in the deep-basin system. This report is the fifth in a series providing summary documentation of studies that subdivide the section into hydrogeologic units based on their judged relative capacities for transmitting water. This report extends the hydrogeologic study area to the eastern Texas Panhandle, north-central Texas, and southwestern Oklahoma. It includes 37 counties in Texas and Oklahoma. Underground patterns of rock distribution are delineated from a hydrologic perspective and at a level of detail appropriate for numerical modeling of regional ground-water flow. Hydrogeologic units are defined and characterized so that appropriate porosity and permeability values can be assigned to each unit during construction of the numerical models (not part of this study), and so that modelers can combine units where necessary. In this study, hydrogeologic units have been defined as mappable, physically continuous rock bodies that function in bulk as water-transmitting or water-retarding units relative to adjacent rocks. Interpretations are made primarily from geophysical logs. Hydrologic characteristics are assessed on the basis of properties typically associated with certain lithologies (e.g., sandstones are more pervious than shales) and on the basis of gross variations in effective porosity (particularly in carbonate sequences). 44 refs., 32 figs., 1 tab

  8. Development and use of bioenergy feedstocks for semi-arid and arid lands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushman, John C; Davis, Sarah C; Yang, Xiaohan; Borland, Anne M

    2015-07-01

    Global climate change is predicted to increase heat, drought, and soil-drying conditions, and thereby increase crop sensitivity to water vapour pressure deficit, resulting in productivity losses. Increasing competition between agricultural freshwater use and municipal or industrial uses suggest that crops with greater heat and drought durability and greater water-use efficiency will be crucial for sustainable biomass production systems in the future. Agave (Agavaceae) and Opuntia (Cactaceae) represent highly water-use efficient bioenergy crops that could diversify bioenergy feedstock supply yet preserve or expand feedstock production into semi-arid, abandoned, or degraded agricultural lands, and reclaim drylands. Agave and Opuntia are crassulacean acid metabolism species that can achieve high water-use efficiencies and grow in water-limited areas with insufficient precipitation to support traditional C3 or C4 bioenergy crops. Both Agave and Opuntia have the potential to produce above-ground biomass rivalling that of C3 and C4 crops under optimal growing conditions. The low lignin and high amorphous cellulose contents of Agave and Opuntia lignocellulosic biomass will be less recalcitrant to deconstruction than traditional feedstocks, as confirmed by pretreatments that improve saccharification of Agave. Refined environmental productivity indices and geographical information systems modelling have provided estimates of Agave and Opuntia biomass productivity and terrestrial sequestration of atmospheric CO2; however, the accuracy of such modelling efforts can be improved through the expansion of field trials in diverse geographical settings. Lastly, life cycle analysis indicates that Agave would have productivity, life cycle energy, and greenhouse gas balances comparable or superior to those of traditional bioenergy feedstocks, but would be far more water-use efficient. PMID:25873672

  9. Arid lands plants as feedstocks for fuels and chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, J.J.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the recent research on arid-adapted plants that have potential as producers of fuels or chemicals. The major focus will be on plant species that appear to have commercial value. Research on guayule (Parthenium argentatum) and jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) will be mentioned only briefly, since these plants have been discussed extensively in the literature, and excellent reviews are already in existence. In this review the literature on arid-adapted plants that have potential uses for solid fuels, liquid fuels, and chemical feedstocks is summarized, followed by an overview of the research directions and types of development that are needed in order for bio-energy production systems to reach the commercial stage. 127 references.

  10. Désertification des parcours arides au Maroc

    OpenAIRE

    Mahyou, H.; B. Tychon; Balaghi, R.; Mimouni, J.; Paul, R.

    2010-01-01

    Les terres de parcours naturels arides du Maroc sont des écosystèmes avec une végétation naturelle ou semi naturelle composée de steppes, d’arbustes et de prairies. Elles représentent 82% de la superficie des terres arides marocaines. Ces terres offrent des moyens de subsistance à des milliers de personnes et protègent le pays d’une désertification rapide. Malgré l’importance de ces zones fragiles, il est étonnant qu’il n’y ait, à ce jour, aucune évaluation globale de leur état et de leur ...

  11. How Sustainable are Engineered Rivers in Arid Lands?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurgen Schmandt

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Engineered rivers in arid lands play an important role in feeding the world’s growing population. Each continent has rivers that carry water from distant mountain sources to fertile soil downstream where rainfall is scarce. Over the course of the last century most rivers in arid lands have been equipped with large engineering structures that generate electric power and store water for agriculture and cities. This has changed the hydrology of the rivers. In this paper we discuss how climate variation, climate change, reservoir siltation, changes in land use and population growth will challenge the sustainability of engineered river systems over the course of the next few decades. We use the Rio Grande in North America, where we have worked with Mexican and American colleagues, to describe our methodology and results. Similar work is needed to study future water supply and demand in engineered rivers around the world.

  12. On coordinated development of oasis and environment in arid area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Based upon the formation and evolution of oasis and the factors restricting the coordinated development of oasis economy and environment, this paper presents a goal of the development in coordination. It suggests that the sustainable survival and development of oasis could be ensured only if the oasis-desert and water source ecology are managed in a combined way to form a macro system. In light with the above mentioned, the approach to the development of economy and environment of oasis in arid area should depend upon the establishment of an oasis ecological and economic system, which suits the arid environment and promotes the efficiency of resource configuration, stabilizes economic increment and benefits ecological development.

  13. Preliminary Risk Assessment of the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The southwestern willow flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) is the fourth threatened or endangered species to undergo a preliminary assessment for estimating potential risk from environmental contaminants at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The assessments are being conducted as part of a three-year project to develop a habitat management plan for threatened and endangered species and species of concern at the Laboratory. For the preliminary assessment, estimated doses were compared against toxicity reference values to generate hazard indices (HIs). This assessment included a measure of cumulative effects from multiple contaminants (radionuclides, metals, and organic chemicals) to 100 simulated nest sites located within flycatcher potential habitat. Sources of contaminant values were 10,000-ft2 grid cells within an Ecological Exposure Unit (EEU). This EEU was estimated around the potential habitat and was based on the maximum home range for the fly catcher identified in the scientific literature. The tools used included a custom FORTRAN program, ECORSK5, and a geographic information system. Food consumption and soil ingestion contaminant pathways were addressed in the assessment. Using a four-category risk evaluation, HI results indicate no appreciable impact is expected to the southwestern willow flycatcher. Information on risk by specific geographical location was generated, which can be used to manage contaminated areas, flycatcher habitat, facility siting, and/or facility operations in order to maintain low levels of risk from contaminants

  14. Preliminary Risk Assessment of the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallegos, A.F.; Gonzales, G.J.; Bennett, K.D.; Mullen, M.A.; Foxx, T.S.

    1998-10-01

    The southwestern willow flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) is the fourth threatened or endangered species to undergo a preliminary assessment for estimating potential risk from environmental contaminants at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The assessments are being conducted as part of a three-year project to develop a habitat management plan for threatened and endangered species and species of concern at the Laboratory. For the preliminary assessment, estimated doses were compared against toxicity reference values to generate hazard indices (HIs). This assessment included a measure of cumulative effects from multiple contaminants (radionuclides, metals, and organic chemicals) to 100 simulated nest sites located within flycatcher potential habitat. Sources of contaminant values were 10,000-ft{sup 2} grid cells within an Ecological Exposure Unit (EEU). This EEU was estimated around the potential habitat and was based on the maximum home range for the fly catcher identified in the scientific literature. The tools used included a custom FORTRAN program, ECORSK5, and a geographic information system. Food consumption and soil ingestion contaminant pathways were addressed in the assessment. Using a four-category risk evaluation, HI results indicate no appreciable impact is expected to the southwestern willow flycatcher. Information on risk by specific geographical location was generated, which can be used to manage contaminated areas, flycatcher habitat, facility siting, and/or facility operations in order to maintain low levels of risk from contaminants.

  15. Climate risk management for water in semi–arid regions

    OpenAIRE

    Robertson, Andrew W.; Baethgen, Walter; Block, Paul; Lall, Upmanu; Sankarasubramanian, Arumugam; de Assis de Souza Filho, Francisco; Verbist, Koen

    2014-01-01

    Background: New sources of hydroclimate information based on forecast models and observational data have the potential to greatly improve the management of water resources in semi-arid regions prone to drought. Better management of climate-related risks and opportunities requires both new methods to develop forecasts of drought indicators and river flow, as well as better strategies to incorporate these forecasts into drought, river or reservoir management systems. In each case the existing i...

  16. Wind power variations under humid and arid meteorological conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • It indicates the role of weather parameters’ roles in the wind energy calculation. • Meteorological variables are more significant in arid regions for wind power. • It provides opportunity to take into consideration air density variability. • Wind power is presented in terms of the wind speed, temperature and pressure. - Abstract: The classical wind power per rotor area per time is given as the half product of the air density by third power of the wind velocity. This approach adopts the standard air density as constant (1.23 g/cm3), which ignores the density dependence on air temperature and pressure. Weather conditions are not taken into consideration except the variations in wind velocity. In general, increase in pressure and decrease in temperature cause increase in the wind power generation. The rate of increase in the pressure has less effect on the wind power as compared with the temperature rate. This paper provides the wind power formulation based on three meteorological variables as the wind velocity, air temperature and air pressure. Furthermore, from the meteorology point of view any change in the wind power is expressed as a function of partial changes in these meteorological variables. Additionally, weather conditions in humid and arid regions differ from each other, and it is interesting to see possible differences between the two regions. The application of the methodology is presented for two meteorology stations in Istanbul, Turkey, as representative of the humid regions and Al-Madinah Al-Monawwarah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, for arid region, both on daily record bases for 2010. It is found that consideration of air temperature and pressure in the average wind power calculation gives about 1.3% decrease in Istanbul, whereas it is about 13.7% in Al-Madinah Al-Monawwarah. Hence, consideration of meteorological variables in wind power calculations becomes more significant in arid regions

  17. Semi-arid development: competitiveness factors in biodiesel productive chain

    OpenAIRE

    Breno Barros Telles do Carmo; Dmontier Pinheiro Aragão; Heráclito Lopes Jaguaribe Pontes; Bruno Magalhães Ribeiro; Marcos Ronaldo Albertin

    2009-01-01

    The new global market competitiveness considerer the competition between productive chains (PC) or supply chains, not just between enterprises. In this case, it can be observed collaboration and cooperation enterprises that dispute with others productives chain. The PC competitiveness can be impaired if is subject by inhibitors factors, that can impairer the performance. This paper analyses these competitiveness factors inhibitors in biodiesel productive chain (CPB) in semi-arid area: exporte...

  18. Bridging structure and function in semi-arid ecosystems by integrating remote sensing and ground based measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krofcheck, Dan J.

    The Southwestern US is projected to continue to experience a significant warming trend, with increased variability in the timing and magnitude of rainfall events. The effects of theses changes in climate are already manifesting in the form of expansive, prolonged 'megadroughts', which have resulted in the widespread mortality of woody vegetation across the region.Therefore the need to monitor and model forest mortality and carbon dynamics at the landscape and regional scale is an essential component of regional and global climate mitigation strategies, and critical if we are to understand how the imminent state transitions taking place in forests globally will affect climate forcing and feedbacks. Remote sensing offers the only solution to multitemporal regional observation, yet many challenges exist with employing modern remote sensing solutions in highly stressed vegetation characteristic of semi-arid biomes, making one of the most expansive biomes on the globe also one of the most difficult to accurately monitor and model. The goal of this research was to investigate how changes in the structure of semi-arid woodlands following forest mortality impacts ecosystem function, and address this question in the context of remote sensing data sets, thereby contributing to the remote sensing community's ability to interact with these challenging ecosystems. We first focused on pinus edulis and juniperous monosperma (pinon-juniper) woodlands, as they comprise a model semi-arid biome. We tested the ability of high resolution remote sensing data to mechanistically describe the patterns in overstory mortality and understory green-up, and were able to observe the heterogeneous response of the understory as a function of cover type. We also investigated the relationship between changes in soil water content and the greenness of the canopy, noting that in these stress ecosystems there is often a decoupling of the canopy as measured remotely (e.g., via vegetation indices, VI

  19. Protocol for VOC-Arid ID remediation performance characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Volatile Organic Compound-Arid Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID) is a technology development program sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Office of Technology Development that is targeted to acquire, develop, demonstrate, and deploy new technologies for the remediation of VOC contaminants in the soils and groundwaters of arid DOE sites. Technologies cannot be adequately evaluated unless sufficient site characterization and technology performance data have been collection and analyzed. The responsibility for identifying these data needs has been placed largely on the Principal Investigators (PIs) developing the remediation technology, who usually are not experts in site characterization or in identification of appropriate sampling, analysis, and monitoring techniques to support the field testing. This document provides a protocol for planning the collection of data before, during, and after a test of a new technology. This generic protocol provides the PIs and project managers with a set of steps to follow. The protocol is based on a data collection planning process called the Data Quality Objectives (DQO) process, which was originally developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency and has been expanded by DOE to support site cleanup decisions. The DQO process focuses on the quality and quantity of data required to make decision. Stakeholders to the decisions must negotiate such key inputs to the process as the decision rules that will be used and the acceptable probabilities of making decision errors

  20. Désertification des parcours arides au Maroc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahyou, H.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Desertification of Arid Rangelands in Morocco. Rangeland or natural arid pastures of Morocco are ecosystems where there is a natural or seminatural vegetation composed of steppes, shrubs and grassland. They cover about 82% of the Moroccan arid lands. These areas represent livelihoods for thousands of people and protect the country from desertification. Despite the importance of the rangelands and the threat of desertification, it is surprising that up to date there is no comprehensive assessment of their condition and their evolution, hindering any plan for desertification alleviation. However, the available information on selected pilot areas shows that these rangelands are threatened by desertification. It's associated with biodiversity loss and contributes to climate change. The leading causes of land degradation are the human actions combined with climate. The establishment of a comprehensive surveillance system based on remote sensing, biophysics and socio-economic data must be envisaged to provide policymakers with an operational tool adapted to the spatio-temporal monitoring of desertification.

  1. Characteristics of the volatile organic compounds -- Arid Integrated Demonstration Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Last, G.V.; Lenhard, R.J.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Evans, J.C.; Roberson, K.R.; Spane, F.A.; Amonette, J.E.; Rockhold, M.L.

    1991-10-01

    The Volatile Organic Compounds -- Arid Integrated Demonstration Program (VOC-Arid ID) is targeted at demonstration and testing of technologies for the evaluation and cleanup of volatile organic compounds and associated contaminants at arid DOE sites. The initial demonstration site is an area of carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) contamination located near the center of the Hanford Site. The movement of CCl{sub 4} and other volatile organic contaminants in the subsurface is very complex. The problem at the Hanford Site is further complicated by the concurrent discharge of other waste constituents including acids, lard oil, organic phosphates, and transuranic radionuclides. In addition, the subsurface environment is very complex, with large spatial variabilities in hydraulic properties. A thorough understanding of the problem is essential to the selection of appropriate containment, retrieval, and/or in situ remedial technologies. The effectiveness of remedial technologies depends on knowing where the contaminants are, how they are held up in a given physical and chemical subsurface environment; and knowing the physical, chemical, and microbiological changes that are induced by the various remedial technologies.

  2. Saline dust storms and their ecological impacts in arid regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jilili; Abuduwaili

    2010-01-01

    In many arid and semiarid regions,saline playas represent a significant source of unconsoli-dated sediments available for aeolian transport,and severe saline dust storms occur frequently due to human disturbance.In this study,saline dust storms are reviewed systematically from the aspects of con-cept,general characteristics,conditions of occurrence,distribution and ecological impact.Our researches showed that saline dust storms are a kind of chemical dust storm originating in dry lake beds in arid and semiarid regions;large areas of unconsolidated saline playa sediments and frequent strong winds are the basic factors to saline dust storm occurrence;there are differentiation characteristics in deposition flux and chemical composition with wind-blown distance during saline dust storm diffusion;and saline dust storm diffusion to some extent increases glacier melt and results in soil salinization in arid regions.An under-standing of saline dust storms is important to guide disaster prevention and ecological rehabilitation.

  3. Mutations in ARID2 are associated with intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Linshan; Cho, Megan T; Retterer, Kyle; Folk, Leandra; Humberson, Jennifer; Rohena, Luis; Sidhu, Alpa; Saliganan, Sheila; Iglesias, Alejandro; Vitazka, Patrik; Juusola, Jane; O'Donnell-Luria, Anne H; Shen, Yufeng; Chung, Wendy K

    2015-10-01

    The etiology of intellectual disabilities (ID) remains unknown for the majority of patients. Due to reduced reproductive fitness in many individuals with ID, de novo mutations account for a significant portion of severe ID. The ATP-dependent SWI/SNF chromatin modifier has been linked with neurodevelopmental disorders including ID and autism. ARID2 is an intrinsic component of polybromo-associated BAF (PBAF), the SWI/SNF subcomplex. In this study, we used clinical whole exome sequencing (WES) in proband-parent-trios to identify the etiology of ID. We identified four independent, novel, loss of function variants in ARID2 gene in four patients, three of which were confirmed to be de novo. The patients all have ID and share other clinical characteristics including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, short stature, dysmorphic facial features, and Wormian bones. All four novel variants are predicted to lead to a premature termination with the loss of the two conservative zinc finger motifs. This is the first report of mutations in ARID2 associated with developmental delay and ID. PMID:26238514

  4. Characteristics of the volatile organic compounds -- Arid Integrated Demonstration Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Volatile Organic Compounds -- Arid Integrated Demonstration Program (VOC-Arid ID) is targeted at demonstration and testing of technologies for the evaluation and cleanup of volatile organic compounds and associated contaminants at arid DOE sites. The initial demonstration site is an area of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) contamination located near the center of the Hanford Site. The movement of CCl4 and other volatile organic contaminants in the subsurface is very complex. The problem at the Hanford Site is further complicated by the concurrent discharge of other waste constituents including acids, lard oil, organic phosphates, and transuranic radionuclides. In addition, the subsurface environment is very complex, with large spatial variabilities in hydraulic properties. A thorough understanding of the problem is essential to the selection of appropriate containment, retrieval, and/or in situ remedial technologies. The effectiveness of remedial technologies depends on knowing where the contaminants are, how they are held up in a given physical and chemical subsurface environment; and knowing the physical, chemical, and microbiological changes that are induced by the various remedial technologies

  5. Macro-scale water scarcity requires micro-scale approaches. Aspects of vulnerability in semi-arid development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkenmark, M; Lundqvist, J; Widstrand, C

    1989-11-01

    4 types of water scarcity exist. Aridity and intermittent droughts consist of the natural types while land desiccation and water stress are man-made types. Climatic aridity, intermittent droughts, land degradation, and population growth link to create growing critical water scarcity conditions. Specifically, in arid lands where only a limited growing season exists anyhow, increased and nonsustaining activities spurred on by population growth degrade soils resulting in interference with water recharge of the root zone. This combination precipitates intermittent droughts upsetting the water supply for plants and people. This occurs now in Africa to the degree that by 2025, 66% of people will experience severe water shortages. Policymakers in developing countries and bilateral and multilateral development agencies providing technical assistance need to understand these relationships. They must develop a new strategy which includes water resource assessments followed by upgraded water plans for optimal use of available water resources and by the creation of best land use criteria. Their challenge is to balance the acute needs of people with conserving the productivity of the resource base. Experience shows that maximizing agricultural production per unit of water instead of per unit of land can increase income and employment. For example, in India, a semiarid area produced, with a given amount of water, as much as 30 times the amount of crops if the crops had a low water demand (e.g., grapes and potatoes) rather than those with a high water demand (e.g., sugarcane). This microscale approach and other such approaches could help semiarid Africa. Yet decision makers must seriously consider the transferability of these approaches to the African cultural and geographical environment. More essential than that, however, is the very high levels of water stress caused by the rapid population growth in famine-prone African countries. PMID:12317608

  6. Inorganic nitrogen cycling in ephemeral urban waterways of the semi-arid Southwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, E. L.; Lohse, K. A.; Brooks, P. D.; Meixner, T.; Pavao-zuckerman, M.

    2012-12-01

    Non-point source inorganic nitrogen (N) pollution in urban runoff is a major water quality concern in water and N limited regions such as the semi-arid Southwestern US. Although ephemeral streams in drylands have long been recognized as biogeochemical hotspots, it is unclear how inorganic N cycling varies across ephemeral urban streams of distinct substrates in response to episodic wetting. We performed wetting experiments using an isotopic label (15N as K15NO3) to identify N-processing pathway differences in 3 ephemeral urban streams of distinct substrates in Tucson, AZ: 1) sand, 2) sandy loam and 3) loam. We applied the 15N label at a rate of 1.3 kg ha-1, and wetted the experimental plots to 25% volumetric water content. We monitored soil moisture, CO2 and N2O gas fluxes for 6 hours and soil inorganic and microbial N pools before and after the experiment. Fluxes of CO2 were significantly (α = 0.05) lower in the sand (1.05 ± 0.21 SD g CO2-C m-2 hr-1) than in the sandy loam and loam streams (1.77 ± 0.75 and 1.86 ± 0.87 g CO2-C m-2 hr-1, respectively); and varied with soil temperature, % soil C, % soil N and soil moisture at the loam site. Surprisingly, N2O fluxes in the sand and sandy loam sites (6.91 ± 5.06 and 8.42 ± 7.17 mg N2O-N m-2 hr-1, respectively) were significantly higher than N2O fluxes in the loam site (3.03 ± 2.49 mg N2O-N m-2 hr-1). Similarly, δ15N of N2O was significantly higher in the sand and sandy loam (4652 ± 4685 ‰ and 7280 ± 7191 ‰, respectively) than in the loam stream (794 ± 2577 ‰); indicating that a greater fraction of NO3-N is lost to denitrification in the sand and sandy loam sites. Surprisingly, post-experimental exchangeable inorganic δ15N was significantly higher in the sand and sandy loam sites (1014 ± 740 ‰ and 2840 ± 2686 ‰, respectively) than in the loam site (315 ± 238 ‰). Microbial biomass N did not significantly increase at the sand and sandy loam sites. However, it significantly increased in the deep

  7. Land use change and carbon cycle in arid and semi-arid lands of East and Central Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Togtohyn; Chuluun; Dennis; Ojima

    2002-01-01

    Dramatic changes in land use have occurred in arid and semi-arid landsof Asia during the 20th century. Grassland conversion into croplands and ecosystem degradation is widespread due to the high growth rate of human population and political reforms of pastoral systems. Rangeland degradation made many parts of this region vulnerable to environmental and political changes. The collapse of the livestock sector in some states of central Asia, expansion of livestock inChina and intensive degradation of grasslands in China are examples of the responses of pastoral systems to these changes over the past decades. Carbon dynamics in this region is highly variable in space and time. Land use/cover changes with widespread reduction of forest and grasslands increased carbon emission from the region.

  8. Quantitative Prediction Study of Climate-sensitive Potassium with Hyperspectrum in Arid and Semi-arid Region of Northwestern China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soil potassium content in arid and semi-arid region can reflect the conditions of the paleoclimate and it can be inverted by soil spectra. The relationship between soil spectra and soil potassium content was discussed in this research. Based on four reflectance transformations, single-variance analysis and multi-variances inversion model were built to invert potassium content. The results of single-wavelength inversions were very significant except for the reflectance model. The multi-variances models were good and accurately (R2 (determination coefficient) >0.674 and RMSE (root-mean-square error) <0.09). Then, the sensitive wavelengths of the potassium were chosen by using the higher correlation coefficients. The results of this study showed that both methods have a great potential for predicting soil potassium content. The sensitive wavelengths of the potassium content were at 2200–2300 nm which could be illustrated by the potassium-bearing minerals spectral absorption features

  9. Spatiotemporal analysis and trends of aridity of Iberian Peninsula (1960-2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paniagua, Luis L.; García, Abelardo; Moral, Francisco J.; Rebollo, Francisco J.

    2016-04-01

    In this study the aridity of the Iberian Peninsula was analysed, taking into account 45 stations in Spain and Portugal from 1960 to 2010. The De Martonne Index was considered. The goal of this study was to explore the spatial distribution and to determine monotonic trends and shift changes in annual aridity by using the Mann-Kendall test and the Seńs estimator. The spatially interpolated maps of the aridity indice were generated using the ordinary kriging algorithm in a geographic information system (GIS) environment. A great variability for Martonne Index was found, gathering from semiarid climates to extremely humid, although the former being the dominant type. 41 temporal series showed decreasing tendencies, 15 of them significant, belonging to all climate types, which indicates a increase in aridity during the research period. A shift in the aridity tendency has been observed around 1979, and a period of greater aridity started since.

  10. VOC-Arid Integrated Demonstration guide to preparation of demonstration documents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This guide has been prepared by Demonstration Operations of the Volatile Organic Compound-Arid Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID). Its purpose is to describe demonstration documents, designate responsibilities for these documents, and guide the Principal Investigator (PI) and others in their preparation. The main emphasis of this guide is to describe the documentation required of the PI. However, it does cover some of the responsibilities of other members of the VOC-Arid ID team. The VOC-Arid ID is one of several US Department of Energy (DOE) integrated demonstrations designed to support the demonstration of emerging environmental management and restoration technologies. The principal objective of the VOC-Arid ID is to identify, develop, and demonstrate new and innovative technologies for environmental restoration at arid or semiarid sites containing volatile organic compounds with or without associated contamination (e.g., radionuclides and metals)

  11. Hourly Wind Speed Interval Prediction in Arid Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaouch, M.; Ouarda, T.

    2013-12-01

    The long and extended warm and dry summers, the low rate of rain and humidity are the main factors that explain the increase of electricity consumption in hot arid regions. In such regions, the ventilating and air-conditioning installations, that are typically the most energy-intensive among energy consumption activities, are essential for securing healthy, safe and suitable indoor thermal conditions for building occupants and stored materials. The use of renewable energy resources such as solar and wind represents one of the most relevant solutions to overcome the increase of the electricity demand challenge. In the recent years, wind energy is gaining more importance among the researchers worldwide. Wind energy is intermittent in nature and hence the power system scheduling and dynamic control of wind turbine requires an estimate of wind energy. Accurate forecast of wind speed is a challenging task for the wind energy research field. In fact, due to the large variability of wind speed caused by the unpredictable and dynamic nature of the earth's atmosphere, there are many fluctuations in wind power production. This inherent variability of wind speed is the main cause of the uncertainty observed in wind power generation. Furthermore, producing wind power forecasts might be obtained indirectly by modeling the wind speed series and then transforming the forecasts through a power curve. Wind speed forecasting techniques have received substantial attention recently and several models have been developed. Basically two main approaches have been proposed in the literature: (1) physical models such as Numerical Weather Forecast and (2) statistical models such as Autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models, Neural Networks. While the initial focus in the literature has been on point forecasts, the need to quantify forecast uncertainty and communicate the risk of extreme ramp events has led to an interest in producing probabilistic forecasts. In short term

  12. Clay Mineralogy Investigation In The Soils Of Arid Almanaqil Ridge Gezira State Sudan Using Xrd Diffractograms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elhag A.M.H

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Clay mineralogy was studied in the soils of Arid Almanaqil Ridge. The soils are classified according to the American System Keys to Soil Taxonomy 2010 in the fallowing families Fine loamy mixed isohyperthermic TypicHaplustepts unit1 sample A1 and A2 Fine mont superactive Isohyperthermic VerticHaplocambids unit2 sample A3 and Fine mont superactive isohyperthermic TypicHaploustert unit3 sample A4. Representative soil samples were collected from these units. These samples were samples A1 and A2 for unit1 sample A3 for unit 2 and sample A4 for uint3 respectively. Those samples were compared with samples from outside the study area from north of the study area sample A5 and A6 and from the alluvium of the Blue Nile sample A7 according to their lithology topographic position soil types and soil mapping units. Clay mineralogy of the samples was studied using X-ray diffractograms XRD techniques. The XRD diffractograms indicated the presence of smectite chlorite illite and kaolinite as the major clay minerals in the soil of the study area and outside of the study area. The major clay minerals in these soils Chlorite illite and kaolinite could have originated from parent material. Smectite showed an increasing trend in samples A7 outside of study area and sample A4 unit 3. The CEC of clay minerals in unit 1 and 2 were less than 50 Cmolkg which indicated that minerals with low CEC were dominant this result conformed with the XRD results that showed dominance of Chlorite illite and Kaolinite. Higher CEC values more than 50 Cmolkg of the clay were encountered in soils samples from unit3 A4 and those from outside study area Sample A7 XRD results showed that the samples were dominated by smectite. Moreover the CEC values of clay minerals were consistent with results of XRD. The X-ray mineralogy indicated that the Vertisols and Aridisols of the study area had the same origin as that of the Gezira soils.

  13. Quantitative assessment and analysis on the dynamic change of ecological capital in arid areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xi; ZHANG Qing; ZHOU Kefa; SUN Li

    2006-01-01

    Ecological capital is the summation of the direct value of biological resources and the ecological service function value of ecosystems. Under the support of RS, GPS and GIS, in this paper the RS-based quantitative measurement model of assessing ecological capital is developed based on the traditional ecology theory and the research on the value of ecological capital per unit area by using the ecological parameters including Landsat TM data,CBERS satellite data, meteorological data, MODIS satellite data, land cover data and field-measured data. A case study on the spatiotemporal distribution of ecological capital in Changji Hui Autonomous Prefecture in 1990, 1995 and 2003 is carried out, and the dynamic change of ecological capital in the prefecture is measured and compared with GDP. The maps of the spatial distribution of ecological capital in the study area are charted, and the characteristics of spatial distribution of ecological capital are analyzed.The results show that the values of ecological capital in the prefecture in 1990, 1995 and 2003 were 1.47368×1011, 1.661 60×1011 and 1.77895×1011yuan RMB (hereafter referred to as yuan) respectively, and that in spatial distribution, the ecological capital decreases from the alpine zones to the plains and from the oases to the deserts, which accords with the zonal distribution of vegetation in arid areas.The measured results can more objectively reflect the ecological capital and its spatial distribution in arid areas, provide an ideal foundation for further study in the future, and can also be combined with the study on service functions of ecosystems and the regional planning as an important basis of regional planning.

  14. Regional Cost Estimates for Reclamation Practices on Arid and Semiarid Lands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. K. Ostler

    2002-02-01

    The U.S. Army uses the Integrated Training Area Management program for managing training land. One of the major objectives of the Integrated Training Area Management program has been to develop a method for estimating training land carrying capacity in a sustainable manner. The Army Training and Testing Area Carrying Capacity methodology measures training load in terms of Maneuver Impact Miles. One Maneuver Impact Mile is the equivalent impact of an M1A2 tank traveling one mile while participating in an armor battalion field training exercise. The Army Training and Testing Area Carrying Capacity methodology is also designed to predict land maintenance costs in terms of dollars per Maneuver Impact Mile. The overall cost factor is calculated using the historical cost of land maintenance practices and the effectiveness of controlling erosion. Because land maintenance costs and effectiveness are influenced by the characteristics of the land, Army Training and Testing Area Carrying Capacity cost factors must be developed for each ecological region of the country. Costs for land maintenance activities are presented here for the semiarid and arid regions of the United States. Five ecoregions are recognized, and average values for reclamation activities are presented. Because there are many variables that can influence costs, ranges for reclamation activities are also presented. Costs are broken down into six major categories: seedbed preparation, fertilization, seeding, planting, mulching, and supplemental erosion control. Costs for most land reclamation practices and materials varied widely within and between ecological provinces. Although regional cost patterns were evident for some practices, the patterns were not consistent between practices. For the purpose of estimating land reclamation costs for the Army Training and Testing Area Carrying Capacity methodology, it may be desirable to use the ''Combined Average'' of all provinces found in the last

  15. Regional Cost Estimates for Reclamation Practices on Arid and Semiarid Lands; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Army uses the Integrated Training Area Management program for managing training land. One of the major objectives of the Integrated Training Area Management program has been to develop a method for estimating training land carrying capacity in a sustainable manner. The Army Training and Testing Area Carrying Capacity methodology measures training load in terms of Maneuver Impact Miles. One Maneuver Impact Mile is the equivalent impact of an M1A2 tank traveling one mile while participating in an armor battalion field training exercise. The Army Training and Testing Area Carrying Capacity methodology is also designed to predict land maintenance costs in terms of dollars per Maneuver Impact Mile. The overall cost factor is calculated using the historical cost of land maintenance practices and the effectiveness of controlling erosion. Because land maintenance costs and effectiveness are influenced by the characteristics of the land, Army Training and Testing Area Carrying Capacity cost factors must be developed for each ecological region of the country. Costs for land maintenance activities are presented here for the semiarid and arid regions of the United States. Five ecoregions are recognized, and average values for reclamation activities are presented. Because there are many variables that can influence costs, ranges for reclamation activities are also presented. Costs are broken down into six major categories: seedbed preparation, fertilization, seeding, planting, mulching, and supplemental erosion control. Costs for most land reclamation practices and materials varied widely within and between ecological provinces. Although regional cost patterns were evident for some practices, the patterns were not consistent between practices. For the purpose of estimating land reclamation costs for the Army Training and Testing Area Carrying Capacity methodology, it may be desirable to use the ''Combined Average'' of all provinces found in the last row of each table

  16. Non-stationarity of "Nature's Limit" - Implications for Agriculture in Semi-arid Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozer, C.; Kiem, A.; Verdon-Kidd, D.

    2014-12-01

    "Rain follows the plow" was a theory that encouraged agricultural settlement in dryland areas in both the United States of America and Australia during the mid-1800s. Supporters of the theory believed that humans could master nature and alter the climate through cultivation of the soil. An opponent of this theory was George W. Goyder, who used vegetation in South Australia as an indicator to mark out the extent of the area's severe 1865 drought, effectively establishing "nature's limit" to reliable agriculture in South Australia. This limit became known as Goyder's Line and demarked the boundary between land suitable for agricultural pursuits (i.e. cropping) to the south and land only suitable for grazing in the State's arid north. Current cropping areas however extend north beyond this line, suggesting that either a) the line is not well defined, b) cropping is occurring on land considered 'non-viable' according to Goyder's Line or c) the line distinguishing where cropping is and is not viable varies on interannual to multidecadal timescales. In this study, the 220 mm growing season (April to October) rainfall isohyet is used as a proxy for Goyder's Line in order to assess its temporal and spatial variability. Using indices of the El Niño/Southern Oscillation, Indian Ocean variability, Southern Annular Mode and the Subtropical Ridge, it is shown that climate state significantly influences the location of the 220 mm growing season rainfall isohyet. This implies that the boundary between viable and non-viable cropping areas (i.e. Goyder's Line or "nature's limit") is non-stationary. These results also indicate the key influences on South Australia's climate and have important implications globally for agricultural practices operating in or bordering semi-arid environments.

  17. Outcrop Groundwater Prospecting, Drilling, and Well Construction in Hard Rocks in Semi-arid Regions

    OpenAIRE

    Chambel, António

    2014-01-01

    This chapter presents some recommendations for prospecting, drilling and well construction in hard rocks in semi-arid regions. Considering that these conditions are present in many countries where technology is not always available, the chapter concentrates on the most basic and simple methods to plan where best to drill and maximize success through the direct observation of rock types, weathering and fracturing. The advantage for the geologist and hydrogeologist in an arid or semi-arid envir...

  18. Analysis and evaluation of tillage on an alfisol ina semi-arid tropical region of India

    OpenAIRE

    Klaij, M C

    1983-01-01

    Tillage field experiments were conducted on Alfisols in a semi-arid tropical environment in India. The research was conducted within the framework of the Farming Systems Research Program of the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT).To put the experiments into perspective, a general review is given in chapter 2 on the environment of the semi-arid tropics, its problems and the research related to agricultural production. Rainfed agriculture has failed to pro...

  19. ARID1A immunohistochemistry improves outcome prediction in invasive urothelial carcinoma of urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraj, Sheila F; Chaux, Alcides; Gonzalez-Roibon, Nilda; Munari, Enrico; Ellis, Carla; Driscoll, Tina; Schoenberg, Mark P; Bivalacqua, Trinity J; Shih, Ie-Ming; Netto, George J

    2014-11-01

    AT-rich interactive domain 1A (ARID1A) is tumor suppressor gene that interacts with BRG1 adenosine triphosphatase to form a SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling protein complex. Inactivation of ARID1A has been described in several neoplasms, including epithelial ovarian and endometrial carcinomas, and has been correlated with prognosis. In the current study, ARID1A expression in urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the bladder and its association with clinicopathological parameters and outcome are addressed. Five tissue microarrays were constructed from 136 cystectomy specimens performed for UC at our institution. Nuclear ARID1A staining was evaluated using immunohistochemistry. An H-score was calculated as the sum of the products of intensity (0-3) multiplied by extent of expression (0%-100%). Average H-score per case was used for statistical analysis. ARID1A expression was categorized in low and high using Youden index to define the cut point. ARID1A expression significantly increased from normal to noninvasive UC to invasive UC. For both tumor progression and cancer death, Youden index yielded an H-score of 288 as the optimal cut point for ARID1A expression. Low ARID1A expression showed a tendency for lower risk of tumor progression and cancer mortality. Adding ARID1A expression to pathologic features offers a better model for predicting outcome than pathologic features alone. Low ARID1A expression was more frequently seen in earlier stage disease. There was a tendency for low ARID1A expression to predict better outcome. More importantly, the findings indicate that adding ARID1A expression to pathologic features increases the goodness of fit of the predictive model. PMID:25175170

  20. Organic Matter and Water Addition Enhance Soil Respiration in an Arid Region

    OpenAIRE

    Liming Lai; Jianjian Wang; Yuan Tian; Xuechun Zhao; Lianhe Jiang; Xi Chen; Yong Gao; Shaoming Wang; Yuanrun Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Climate change is generally predicted to increase net primary production, which could lead to additional C input to soil. In arid central Asia, precipitation has increased and is predicted to increase further. To assess the combined effects of these changes on soil CO2 efflux in arid land, a two factorial manipulation experiment in the shrubland of an arid region in northwest China was conducted. The experiment used a nested design with fresh organic matter and water as the two controlled par...

  1. Estimation of soil moisture-thermal infrared emissivity relation in arid and semi-arid environments using satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazia Blasi, Maria; Masiello, Guido; Serio, Carmine; Venafra, Sara; Liuzzi, Giuliano; Dini, Luigi

    2016-04-01

    The retrieval of surface parameters is very important for various aspects concerning the climatological and meteorological context. At this purpose surface emissivity represents one of the most important parameters useful for di fferent applications such as the estimation of climate changes and land cover features. It is known that thermal infrared (TIR) emissivity is aff ected by soil moisture, but there are very few works in literature on this issue. This study is aimed to analyze and fi nd a relation between satellite soil moisture data and TIR emissivity focusing on arid and semi-arid environments. These two parameters, together with the land surface temperature, are fundamental for a better understanding of the physical phenomena implied in the soil-atmosphere interactions and the surface energy balance. They are also important in several fi elds of study, such as climatology, meteorology, hydrology and agriculture. In particular, there are several studies stating a correlation between soil moisture and the emissivity at 8-9 μ m in desertic soils, which corresponds to the quartz Reststrahlen, a feature which is typical of sandy soils. We investigated several areas characterized by arid or semi-arid environments, focusing our attention on the Dahra desert (Senegal), and on the Negev desert (Israel). For the Dahra desert we considered both in situ, provided by the International Soil Moisture Network, and satellite soil moisture data, from ASCAT and AMSR-E sensors, for the whole year 2011. In the case of the Negev desert soil moisture data are derived from ASCAT observations and we computed a soil moisture index from a temporal series of SAR data acquired by the Cosmo-SkyMed constellation covering a period of six months, from June 2015 to November 2015. For both cases soil moisture data were related to the retrieved TIR emissivity from the geostationary satellite SEVIRI in three di erent spectral channels, at 8.7 μm, 10.8 μ m and 12 μ m. A Kalman lter

  2. Targeting EZH2 methyltransferase activity in ARID1A mutated cancer cells is synthetic lethal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biter, Benjamin G.; Aird, Katherine M.; Garipov, Azat; Li, Hua; Amatangelo, Michael; Kossenkov, Andrew V.; Schultz, David C.; Liu, Qin; Shih, Ie-Ming; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R.; Speicher, David W.; Zhang, Rugang

    2015-01-01

    ARID1A, a chromatin remodeler, shows one of the highest mutation rates across many cancer types. Notably, ARID1A is mutated in over 50% of ovarian clear cell carcinomas, which currently has no effective therapy. To date, clinically applicable targeted cancer therapy based on ARID1A mutational status has not been described. Here we show that inhibition of the EZH2 methyltransferase acts in a synthetic lethal manner in ARID1A mutated ovarian cancer cells. ARID1A mutational status correlates with response to the EZH2 inhibitor. We identified PIK3IP1 as a direct ARID1A/EZH2 target, which is upregulated by EZH2 inhibition and contributes to the observed synthetic lethality by inhibiting PI3K/AKT signaling. Significantly, EZH2 inhibition causes regression of ARID1A mutated ovarian tumors in vivo. Together, these data demonstrate for the first time a synthetic lethality between ARID1A mutation and EZH2 inhibition. They indicate that pharmacological inhibition of EZH2 represents a novel treatment strategy for ARID1A mutated cancers. PMID:25686104

  3. Review of several problems on the study of eco-hydrological processes in arid zones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Ecosystem degradation is a common and cardinal environmental problem in arid zones. The change in the eco-hydrological processes is the basic cause responsible for such a problem. The study on the eco-hydrological processes in arid zones has become a forefront and focus of the eco-environmental research. Recent studies on eco-hydrological processes in arid zones show that the primary vegetation pattern and its eco-hydrological effect are of the most stable state of the ecosystem in arid zones. Special water absorption ways of plants in arid zones and the hydraulic lift and reverse hydraulic lift functions of some plants are the key mechanisms to maintain the stability of the ecosystem in arid zones. In the case of water shortage, ensuring ecological water requirement and maintaining proper ecological ground- water table are the prerequisite to keep healthful operation of the ecosystem in arid zones. The paper reviews some advances in the study of eco-hydrological processes in arid zones. It puts forward the concepts of critical ecological water requirement, optimal ecological water requirement and saturated ecological water requirement, and discusses their determination methods. It also emphasizes that the studies on natural vegetation pattern and eco-hydrological effect, on plants with hydraulic lift function, on water sources for plant absorption, on ecological water requirement and ecological groundwater table for different plant species should be strengthened to determine the species composition and pattern suitable for the restoration and reestablishment of vegetation in different arid zones in China.

  4. Influences of prior wildfires on vegetation response to subsequent fire in a reburned Southwestern landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coop, Jonathan D; Parks, Sean A; McClernan, Sarah R; Holsinger, Lisa M

    2016-03-01

    Large and severe wildfires have raised concerns about the future of forested landscapes in the southwestern United States, especially under repeated burning. In 2011, under extreme weather and drought conditions, the Las Conchas fire burned over several previous burns as well as forests not recently exposed to fire. Our purpose was to examine the influences of prior wildfires on plant community composition and structure, subsequent burn severity, and vegetation response. To assess these relationships, we used satellite-derived measures of burn severity and a nonmetric multidimensional scaling of pre- and post- Las Conchas field samples. Earlier burns were associated with shifts from forested sites to open savannas and meadows, oak scrub, and ruderal communities. These non-forested vegetation types exhibited both resistance to subsequent fire, measured by reduced burn severity, and resilience to reburning, measured by vegetation recovery relative to forests not exposed to recent prior fire. Previous shifts toward non-forested states were strongly reinforced by reburning. Ongoing losses of forests and their ecological values confirm the need for restoration interventions. However, given future wildfire and climate projections, there may also be opportunities presented by transformations toward fire-resistant and resilient vegetation types within portions of the landscape. PMID:27209778

  5. Distribution of natural radionuclides and 137Cs in soils of southwestern Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Canada and the United States approximately 82% of the annual total dose of radiation to any person comes from terrestrial and cosmogenic sources. The soil is also the main source of radon exposure to humans. Therefore it is important to know the background levels of natural and anthropogenic radioactivity in soils. In this study the radionuclides 40K, 226Ra, 232Th and 137Cs were measured in the soils of southwestern Ontario in order to determine the background levels and to understand the soil profile distribution. Clay content is the most important variable affecting the background levels of 40K, 226Ra, and 232Th in the soil. The profile distribution of these radionuclides is further influenced by pedogenic processes, particularly carbonate leaching from the solum and clay illuviation from the Ae to the Bt horizons. The lateral and vertical distribution of bomb-fallout 137Cs is influenced by soil management such as tillage, biopedoturbation by soil animals such as earthworms and groundhogs, soil erosion and soil organic matter cycling. Multiple regression analysis showed that clay content, sand content, percent CaCO3, pH and organic carbon content had variable influences on each of the radionuclide contents in the soil. (author)

  6. Petrography and geochronology of the Sao Jose dos Quatro Marcos granitoids, southwestern Mato Grosso, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An area of about 400Km2 was mapped in the region of Sao Jose dos Quatro Marcos, southwestern State of Mato Grosso, western Brazil. Various granitoid rocks were recognized, intrusive into basement gneisses, and mapped as two distinct units, one of massive late granitoids (mostly 3a and 3b granites) and one of foliated granitoids, with oriented mafic minerals, consisting mainly of tonalites and, to a lesser degree, of granodiorites. The sequence of intrusion is from tonalites to granodiorites to late granites. Magmatic textures are usually preserved in the rocks, with the exception of some clearly recrystallized samples. Field aspects, as well as petrography and mineralogy, suggest a genetic relationship between the various granitoid types, showing overall features commonly cited as typical of 'I' lineages. A Rb/Sr whole-rock isochron obtained from 3b granites (six points) shows an age of 1,472 +- 19 Ma, and Sr8786 initial ratio of 0.7037 +- 0.0004; a nine point isochron (adding two tonalites and one granodiorite) yelds similar results (age of 1,505 +- 20 Ma, initial ratio of 0.7029+- 0.0003). The obtained ages confirm the existence of a thermal-magmatic event at about 1,500 Ma at the southern border of the Amazon Craton. (author)

  7. Overthrusting and petroleum potential of the southwestern part of the Albanides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mezini, A.M.; Yzedin, S.S. [Albpetrol, Patos (Albania)

    1995-08-01

    The Albanides are the southern continuation of the Dinarides fold belt and represent a sector of Alpine thrust belt. Onshore and offshore seismic and geologic data indicate that thrusting is well developed in the Ionian basin in the southwestern part of the Albanides. Overthrusting is due to the collision of the north African plate with the East European plate. Cross section balancing indicates considerable deformation and displacement of rock units in the Ionian basin, as a result of strike-slip faults, normal faulting, overthrusts and back-thrusts. Most of the deformation and displacement occurred between the western flank of the structures and belts. The petroleum potential of Mesozoic carbonate deposits in the Ionian basin is closely connected to the occurrence of organic-rich source rock of Triassic-Jurassic age. Oil generation initiated in Early Miocene and coincides with the first stage of structure formation. The late tectonic and folding phases of Triassic-Jurassic age made possible the oil migration out of old traps and accumulation in newly formed traps. New fields were formed in sandstones which are directly in contact with the carbonates. The main trapping is structural. Other traps are of stratigraphic or/and combination. The thrust belt of western Albanides has favourable geological conditions for oil generation and accumulation. This area has the best petroleum potential in Albania.

  8. Assessment of historical surface-water quality data in southwestern Colorado, 1990-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lisa D.; Schaffrath, Keelin R.; Linard, Joshua I.

    2013-01-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of selected physical and chemical surface-water-quality characteristics were analyzed at stream sites throughout the Dolores and San Juan River Basins in southwestern Colorado using historical data collected from 1990 through 2005 by various local, State, Tribal, and Federal agencies. Overall, streams throughout the study area were well oxygenated. Values of pH generally were near neutral to slightly alkaline throughout most of the study area with the exception of the upper Animas River Basin near Silverton where acidic conditions existed at some sites because of hydrothermal alteration and(or) historical mining. The highest concentrations of dissolved aluminum, total recoverable iron, dissolved lead, and dissolved zinc were measured at sites located in the upper Animas River Basin. Thirty-two sites throughout the study area had at least one measured concentration of total mercury that exceeded the State chronic aquatic-life criterion of 0.01 μg/L. Concentrations of dissolved selenium at some sites exceeded the State chronic water-quality standard of 4.6 μg/L. Total ammonia, nitrate, nitrite, and total phosphorus concentrations generally were low throughout the study area. Overall, results from the trend analyses indicated improvement in water-quality conditions as a result of operation of the Paradox Valley Unit in the Dolores River Basin and irrigation and water-delivery system improvements made in the McElmo Creek Basin (Lower San Juan River Basin) and Mancos River Valley (Upper San Juan River Basin).

  9. Tectonic evolution of the Tombel graben basement, southwestern Cameroon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.S.Njome; C.E.Suh

    2005-01-01

    Planar structures (foliations and fractures) around the Tombel graben (southwestern end of the Central African Shear zone system) have been investigated and analyzed with the aim of unraveling the tectonic evolution of the basement. The foliations show two major trends, an older N-S-trending gneissose layering of uncertain agereworked by a later Pan-African (600 + 50 Ma) NE-SW ductile trend that is contemporaneous with sinistral shearing and mylonitization. The brittle phase characterized by NW-SE-trending open and partially filled fractures is younger than the mylonitization event and although it has not been dated, it is suggested that the origin of these fractures is linked to the onset of volcanism along the Cameroon volcanic line-31 m.y. ago.The mylonitic foliation is recognized for the first time and supports a tectonic evolution model for the Tombel graben in which ductile non-coaxial deformation was succeeded by brittle failure.

  10. Deep resistivity structure in southwestern Utah and its geothermal significance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wannamaker, P.E.; Ward, S.H.; Hohmann, G.W.; Sill, W.R.

    1983-02-01

    Magnetotelluric (MT) measurements in southwestern Utah have yielded a model of resistivity structure in this area to a depth of about 100 km. The MT observations are strongly affected by Great Basin graben sedimentary fill, which constitutes conductive upper-crustal lateral inhomogeneity and requires simulation using two- and three-dimensional modeling algorithms before deeper portions of the resistivity section can be resolved. Included in the model is a layer of low resistivity (20 ..cap omega..-m) residing from 35 to 65 km depth. Sensitivity tests of the data to the structure weigh strongly against the top of this layer being as shallow as 25 km and against the conductivity and thickness of the layer being highly correlated. No intra-crustal low-resistivity layer is indicated by the MT data.

  11. Tick-borne lymphadenopathy (TIBOLA acquired in Southwestern Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wölfel Silke

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tick-borne lymphadenopathy (TIBOLA was first described in 1997 in a patient in France. The causative agent, Rickettsia slovaca, is transmitted by Dermacentor ticks. Case presentation In southwestern Germany we encountered a patient with a tick bite at the dorsal scalp that resulted in an eschar and nuchal lymphadenopathy. Additionally, fever, malaise as well as elevated inflammatory markers and transaminases occurred. The characteristic clinical picture along with positive antibody testing for rickettsiae of the tick-borne spotted fever group strongly suggest the diagnosis TIBOLA. Conclusion Human rickettsioses are emerging infections. Clinicians should be aware of TIBOLA as a newly described rickettsial disease. As in our case, TIBOLA may be encountered in regions/countries where R. slovaca and Dermacentor ticks are prevalent but autochthonous acquisition was not described before.

  12. Macrofungi in the lateritic scrub jungles of southwestern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Greeshma

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A pilot study on macrofungi in scrub jungles (with and without fire-impact in lateritic region of southwestern coast of India was carried out.  Out of 11 species in 10 genera recovered, six and five species were confined to scrub jungle and fire-impacted scrub jungle, respectively.  An ectomycorrhizal Amanita sp. was the most frequent in scrub jungle associated with exotic (Acacia auriculiformis and A. mangium and plantation (Anacardium occidentale trees.  Based on traditional knowledge, it is a highly edible and nutritional delicacy in the coastal regions.  Astraeus odoratus was another common ectomycorrhizal fungus in native trees Hopea ponga, which was recovered from the fire-impacted scrub jungle and is possibly edible.  Edible termite mound mushroom Termitomyces striatus was also common in the fire-impacted scrub jungle.  Chlorophyllum molybdites was the most frequent mushroom in the fire-impacted scrub jungle.  

  13. Formal dementia care among first nations in southwestern Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Sara A; Forbes, Dorothy A; Richmond, Chantelle A M

    2012-09-01

    This article explores how dementia care is provided to First Nations communities in southwestern Ontario. Data were collected through in-depth interviews with health care providers and analysed using a constructivist grounded-theory methodology. Two interrelated frameworks for understanding dementia care were identified: a care delivery framework and a knowledge framework. The care delivery framework identified care goals, care elements being provided, care barriers, and strategies and solutions to deliver care and overcome barriers. The knowledge framework defined four groups of knowledge stakeholders: persons with dementia, informal care providers, formal care providers, and the First Nations community. It identified the knowledge each stakeholder held or needed and processes of sharing - or failing to share - knowledge in dementia care. Several barriers, many created by a lack of knowledge, negatively impacted dementia care. However, health care professionals had effective strategies for providing care, designed to overcome barriers and which encompassed elements of knowledge sharing. PMID:22828489

  14. Coccidioides niches and habitat parameters in the southwestern United States: A matter of scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, F.S.; Bultman, M.W.; Johnson, S.M.; Pappagianis, D.; Zaborsky, E.

    2007-01-01

    To determine habitat attributes and processes suitable for the growth of Coccidioides, soils were collected from sites in Arizona, California, and Utah where Coccidioides is known to have been present. Humans or animals or both have been infected by Coccidioides at all of the sites. Soil variables considered in the upper 20 cm of the soil profile included pH, electrical conductivity, salinity, selected anions, texture, mineralogy, vegetation types and density, and the overall geomorphologic and ecological settings. Thermometerswere buried to determine the temperature range in the upper part of the soil where Coccidioides is often found. With the exception of temperature regimes and soil textures, it is striking that none of the other variables or group of variables that might be definitive are indicative of the presence of Coccidioides. Vegetation ranges from sparse to relatively thick cover in lower Sonoran deserts, Chaparral-upper Sonoran brush and grasslands, and Mediterranean savannas and forested foothills. No particular grass, shrub, or forb is definitive. Material classified as very fine sand and silt is abundant in all of the Coccidioides-bearing soils and may be their most common shared feature. Clays are not abundant (less than 10%). All of the examined soil locations are noteworthy as generally 50% of the individuals who were exposed to the dust or were excavating dirt at the sites were infected. Coccidioides has persisted in the soil at a site in Dinosaur National Monument, Utah for 37 years and at a Tucson, Arizona site for 41 years. ?? 2007 New York Academy of Sciences.

  15. Monitoring and analysis of sand dune movement and growth on the Navajo Nation, southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redsteer, Margaret Hiza; Bogle, Rian C.; Vogel, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Recurring drought and rising temperatures have caused reactivation and renewed growth of sand dunes on the lands of the Navajo Nation on the Colorado Plateau. Migrating dunes threaten health, housing, and transportation pathways. U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists are conducting research to better understand the processes of dune growth and movement. This research will provide critical data to the Native peoples of the region in their response to the changing environment.

  16. The Primary Factors Increasing Superintendent Tenure in the Urban Southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Jason Wade

    2012-01-01

    It appears that superintendent turnover has become an accepted occurrence in districts across the country. Governing boards have resigned themselves to the idea that sustained district leadership is not realistic. There is a growing idea that good educational leaders, who are willing to endure the political landscape and the roller coaster ride…

  17. Resilience Lost: Intersecting Land Use and Landscape Dynamics in the Prehistoric Southwestern United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Schmich

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The interdisciplinary framework known as resilience theory used by ecologists, social scientists, as well as policy makers, is primarily concerned with the sources of transformation and stability in complex socioecological systems. The laboratory of the long and diverse archaeological record is uniquely suited to testing some of the implications of this theoretical perspective. In this paper, we consider the history of land use and landscape change across the transition from foraging to agricultural subsistence economies in the Middle Chevelon Creek region of northern Arizona. Through this discussion, we highlight the potential roles of diversity and flexibility at multiple spatial and temporal scales in the resilience of human land use practices from the prehistoric past. Expressing the long-term history of this region in a more general theoretical language that bridges the social and natural sciences promotes the collaboration of scientists with expertise deriving from different traditional disciplines. Such a broad perspective is necessary to characterize changes and stabilities in complex socioecological systems.

  18. EnviroAtlas - Biodiversity Metrics by 12-digit HUC for the Southwestern United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset was produced by a joint effort of New Mexico State University, US EPA, and the US Geological Survey (USGS) to support research and online...

  19. Tropical Cyclogenesis Conditions in the South-Western Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meetoo, Cherina; Roux, Frank

    2013-04-01

    Mature tropical cyclones around the world exist through similar atmospheric and oceanic processes: the necessary conditions for these storms to occur (warm SST, atmospheric instability, high humidity in the low to mid-troposphere, low wind shear, enough Coriolis force) are identical over all basins. However, the environments within which pre-existing disturbances evolve into warm-core cyclonic circulations are fairly different in the various basins. This is partly due to the influence of large-scale climatic cycles (e.g. ENSO, AMO, IOD, etc.) and of synoptic-scale propagating modes (e.g. tropical waves, Madden-Julian Oscillation, etc.). While many studies have examined the specific situations of the tropical basins in the northern hemisphere, storm formation is much less known in the southern hemisphere. Concerning the south-western Indian Ocean (0-30°S, 50-100°E), Bessafi and Wheeler (2006) have shown a large and statistically significant modulation by MJO and convectively coupled Equatorial Rossby waves, and a small yet significant modulation by Kelvin waves. The present study concerns the analysis of cyclogenetic evolution of named storms in the south-western Indian Ocean during 13 seasons from 1999-2000 to 2011-2012, from ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalyses and Meteosat-7 images. First, the methods used to find tropical storms (also identified in the IBTrACS database) in the ERA-Interim reanalyses will be shown. Besides, the upper- and lower-troposphere conditions in which storms develop will be examined using integrated diagnoses (McTaggart-Cowan et al., 2008). A spectral analysis in space and time of the different dynamical and thermodynamical environmental parameters (from ERA-Interim reanalyses and Meteosat-7 images) will then be presented. This analysis shows slow (period > 10 days) and fast (period < 10 days) eastward and westward tropical waves. Finally, the relationship between these waves and developing and non-developing storm cases will be discussed.

  20. Using Canonical Correlation Analysis to Identify Environmental Attitude Groups: Considerations for National Forest Planning in the Southwestern U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prera, Alejandro J.; Grimsrud, Kristine M.; Thacher, Jennifer A.; McCollum, Dan W.; Berrens, Robert P.

    2014-10-01

    As public land management agencies pursue region-specific resource management plans, with meaningful consideration of public attitudes and values, there is a need to characterize the complex mix of environmental attitudes in a diverse population. The contribution of this investigation is to make use of a unique household, mail/internet survey data set collected in 2007 in the Southwestern United States (Region 3 of the U.S. Forest Service). With over 5,800 survey responses to a set of 25 Public Land Value statements, canonical correlation analysis is able to identify 7 statistically distinct environmental attitudinal groups. We also examine the effect of expected changes in regional demographics on overall environmental attitudes, which may help guide in the development of socially acceptable long-term forest management policies. Results show significant support for conservationist management policies and passive environmental values, as well as a greater role for stakeholder groups in generating consensus for current and future forest management policies.

  1. Stratigraphy and environmental reconstruction at the middle Wisconsinan Gilman Canyon formation type locality, Buzzard's Roost, southwestern Nebraska, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, William C.; Willey, Karen L.; Mason, Joseph A.; May, David W.

    2007-05-01

    The middle Wisconsinan Gilman Canyon Formation at the Buzzard's Roost type locality in southwestern Nebraska was investigated to document the stratigraphy and to reconstruct the environmental and climate record. The Gilman Canyon Formation was subdivided into three loess units and three soils, with radiocarbon ages constraining it between about 40 ka and 25 ka. Stable carbon isotope ratios, magnetic susceptibility, and carbon content were used to define and characterize soils within both the Gilman Canyon Formation and underlying Illinoian Loveland Loess. At the height of soil development within the Gilman Canyon Formation, climate was supporting C 4-dominated grassland, with July temperatures equal to or exceeding those of today. Soil-forming intervals within the Loveland Loess, including the Sangamon Soil, also exhibited relative increases in C 4 biomass. Climate, as recorded in the Gilman Canyon Formation, is corroborated by regional proxy data. The formation accumulated during MIS 3, and concurrent soil formation coincided with a summer insolation maximum.

  2. Strengthening Student Interest and Learning of Watershed Science using a Case-History Investigation of a Rapidly Changing Semi-Arid Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huth, A. K.; Hall, M. K.

    2007-12-01

    In a changing climate, watershed disturbances such as drought, large-scale wildfires, and extreme rainfall patterns are on the rise, particularly in the southwestern U.S. Yet, at high-school grade levels, hydrology and watershed science get minimal coverage in classrooms. To address this situation, we developed a set of GIS- based student investigations on the affect of natural and human-induced disturbances on watershed hydrology. The case history focuses on the 2003 Aspen Fire in southern Arizona, but also incorporates investigations of undisturbed watersheds. We structured these investigations around recent hydrologic, geologic, and fire data collected by USGS, USFS, and University of Arizona scientists. The investigations encourage students to use Google Earth and MyWorld GIS to learn about the watersheds of the Santa Catalina Mountains in southern Arizona. Students use precipitation and streamflow data to discover the "normal" response of a semi-arid watershed to rainfall. Through spatial visualization and analysis of the data, they learn how and why a semi-arid watershed may become vulnerable to change due to "unusual" conditions. The large-scale Aspen wildfire and subsequent massive debris flows caused watershed instability and were used as teaching tools in these investigations. Field testing has focused on increasing usability and pedagogical effectiveness, whereas external peer reviews have addressed scientific accuracy. We found the overall response to these investigations by both students and teachers to be positive. The benefits of using real, scientific data in combination with spatial visualization tools to teach about a watershed's response to fire were measured using a survey assessment of student learning during field testing.

  3. Mitigating Climate Change in the Arid Lands of Namibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Martin B.; Sorensen, Marten

    2014-05-01

    Mitigating Climate Change in the Arid Lands of Namibia Namibia is the most arid country south of the Sahara, with scarce rainfall and perennial rivers only at its borders, > 80% of the area relies solely on groundwater. This has had devastating economic effects limiting opportunities for sustainable rural livelihoods that keep the population majority living below the World Bank poverty line (IFAD, 2013). A primary example of climatic variability which affects agrarian productivity is increased bush encroachment of Namibia's arid grazing land. The result has been a severe biodiversity loss, increased desertification and diminished water-use efficiency and underground water tables. Given these factors, Namibia's arid lands provide a unique opportunity to assess and test innovative / appropriate adaptation and mitigation strategies. Working toward sustainable management, restoration, and maintenance of balanced, resilient arid ecosystems in Namibia will also be a means to support and expand economic sectors incl. opportunities for job creation and potentially provide a model for similar arid regions. Main vegetation zones are: desert (46%), savannah (37%), and dry woodlands and forests (17%), i.e. management strategies currently used by rural communities. 2. Capture and assess cultural and gender dimensions of management strategies within stakeholder groups using participatory approaches. 3. Determine science-based alternatives for adaptive land management strategies and test their acceptability to local communities and within the current policy framework. 4. Integrate identified indigenous knowledge with appropriate science and new emerging technologies to develop a training toolkit of effective strategies relevant to all stakeholders. 5. Utilize training sessions, education workshops, curriculum revisions, and appropriate information and communication technologies (ICTs) including social media outlets to disseminate the toolkit strategies. 6. Apply a modified logic

  4. What influences climate and glacier change in southwestern China?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, Teppei J.

    2011-12-01

    The subject of climate change in the Tibetan Plateau (TP) and Himalayas has taken on increasing importance because of the availability of water resources from their mountain glaciers (Immerzeel et al 2010). Many of the glaciers over these regions have been retreating, while some are advancing and stable (Yao et al 2004, Scherler et al 2011). Other studies report that some glaciers in the Himalayas show acceleration of their shrinkage (e.g., Fujita and Nuimura 2011). However, the causes of glacier melting are still difficult to grasp because of the complexity of climatic change and its influence on glacier issues. Despite this, it is vital that we pursue further study to enable future predictions of glacier changes. The paper entitled 'Climate and glacier change in southwestern China during the past several decades' by Li et al (2011) provided carefully analyzed, quality controlled, long-term data on atmospheric temperature and precipitation during the period 1961-2008. The data were obtained from 111 Chinese stations. The researchers performed systematic analyses of temperature and precipitation over the whole southwestern Chinese domain. They discussed those changes in terms of other meteorological components such as atmospheric circulation patterns, radiation and altitude difference, and then showed how these factors could contribute to climate and glacier changes in the region. Air temperature and precipitation are strongly associated with glacier mass balance because of heat balance and the addition of mass when it snows. Temperature warming trends over many places in southwestern China were unequivocally dominant in all seasons and at higher altitudes. This indicates that the heat contribution to the glaciers has been increasing. On the other hand, precipitation has a wider variability in time and space. It is more difficult to clearly understand the effect of precipitation on the climate and glacier melting characteristics in the whole of southwestern China

  5. Meaningful traits for grouping plant species across arid ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bär Lamas, Marlene Ivonne; Carrera, A L; Bertiller, M B

    2016-05-01

    Grouping species may provide some degree of simplification to understand the ecological function of plants on key ecosystem processes. We asked whether groups of plant species based on morpho-chemical traits associated with plant persistence and stress/disturbance resistance reflect dominant plant growth forms in arid ecosystems. We selected twelve sites across an aridity gradient in northern Patagonia. At each site, we identified modal size plants of each dominant species and assessed specific leaf area (SLA), plant height, seed mass, N and soluble phenol concentration in green and senesced leaves at each plant. Plant species were grouped according with plant growth forms (perennial grasses, evergreen shrubs and deciduous shrubs) and plant morphological and/or chemical traits using cluster analysis. We calculated mean values of each plant trait for each species group and plant growth form. Plant growth forms significantly differed among them in most of the morpho-chemical traits. Evergreen shrubs were tall plants with the highest seed mass and soluble phenols in leaves, deciduous shrubs were also tall plants with high SLA and the highest N in leaves, and perennial grasses were short plants with high SLA and low concentration of N and soluble phenols in leaves. Grouping species by the combination of morpho-chemical traits yielded 4 groups in which species from one growth form prevailed. These species groups differed in soluble phenol concentration in senesced leaves and plant height. These traits were highly correlated. We concluded that (1) plant height is a relevant synthetic variable, (2) growth forms adequately summarize ecological strategies of species in arid ecosystems, and (3) the inclusion of plant morphological and chemical traits related to defenses against environmental stresses and herbivory enhanced the potential of species grouping, particularly within shrubby growth forms. PMID:26897637

  6. Sustainable Small-Scale Agriculture in Semi-Arid Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Scott Ingram; Margaret Nelson; Katherine A. Spielmann; Peeples, Matthew A.

    2011-01-01

    For at least the past 8000 years, small-scale farmers in semi-arid environments have had to mitigate shortfalls in crop production due to variation in precipitation and stream flow. To reduce their vulnerability to a shortfall in their food supply, small-scale farmers developed short-term strategies, including storage and community-scale sharing, to mitigate inter-annual variation in crop production, and long-term strategies, such as migration, to mitigate the effects of sustained droughts. W...

  7. Climate change and plant community composition in national parks of the southwestern US: forecasting regional, long-term effects to meet management needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, Seth M.; Belnap, Jayne; Webb, Robert H.; Hubbard, J. Andrew; Reiser, M. Hildegard; Gallo, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    The National Park Service (NPS) faces tremendous management challenges in the future as climates alter the abundance and distribution of plant species. These challenges will be especially daunting in the southwestern U.S., where large increases in aridity are forecasted. The expected reduction in water availability will negatively affect plant growth and may result in shifts of plant community composition. Synthesis of climate and plant vital sign data from National Park Service Inventory and Monitoring (I&M) networks is essential to provide park managers with important insights into contemporary climate responses and a sound basis to forecast likely future changes at species, community, and ecosystem scales. We describe a collaboration between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and NPS in which we have conducted regional cross-site assessments across the Sonoran and Chihuahuan Deserts to understand plant species responses to past climate and forecast future plant community composition. We also determined whether a widely-implemented vegetation monitoring protocol in these deserts is suitable to track long-term vegetation changes caused by climate and other factors. Our results from these analyses are intended to help natural resource managers identify and prepare for changes in plant cover and community composition and evaluate the efficacy of current monitoring programs.

  8. Late Pleistocene lithostratigraphy and sequences in the southwestern Mesopotamia (Argentina): Evidences of the last interglacial stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernesto, Brunetto; Soledad, Ferrero Brenda; Ignacio, Noriega Jorge

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to show the stratigraphic record of the Late Pleistocene corresponding to the distal region of the Paraná River basin. It displays sedimentological, paleontological and geochronological evidences that characterise the last interglacial-glacial cycle. In particular, strong environmental records are shown for the Last Interglacial Stage (LIS). Salto Ander Egg Formation (SAEF) is defined as a new lithostratigraphic unit representative of the Late Pleistocene in southwestern Mesopotamia. This unit is formed of complex fluvial deposits, which contains a heterogeneous collection of sub-environments, of ages ranging from 120 to 60 ky BP. The clast-supported gravel facies containing sparse boulders indicate high flow during a humid climate. The large and middle-scale architectures of fluvial sedimentary bodies evidence the relationship between the sediment accommodation and the sea level oscillations. Three sub-sequences identified in the succession suggest a transgressive trend during the MIS5e, a highstand stage in MIS5c, and a minor transgressive cycle during MIS3. A Brazilian faunal association collected at the bottom of the sequence and sedimentological interpretations display wet and warm climatic conditions, typical of tropical or subtropical environments. Such environmental conditions are characteristic of the maximum of the last interglacial stage (MIS5e) and show a signal stronger than the signal of the current interglacial stage. All these data show a direct correlation between the increases of paleodischarges and the elevation of the sea level. The whole sequence is completed with transitional swampy deposits, accumulated probably during the MIS3/MIS2 transition, and the typical loess of the Tezanos Pinto Formation, mantled during the Last Maximum Glacial.

  9. Report on water supply for the proposed Southwestern Reformatory at El Reno, Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, S.F.

    1931-01-01

    The investigation on which this report is based was made in response to a request from the Bureau of Prisons, United States Department of Justice, for advice in regard to the development of a water supply for the proposed Southwestern Reformatory on the Fort Reno Military Reservation, 2 miles west of El Reno, Oklahoma. The tract set aside for the reformatory includes sec. 12 and the eastern half of sec. 11, T. 12 N, R. 8 W., and is about 1,000 acres in area. The proposed building site is in the north-central part of sec. 12, on a flat-topped hill just north of well No. 69. (See Plate 1.) It is understood that a maximum of 1,200 inmates is contemplated for this reformatory and that a water supply of about 120,000 gallons a day, or 85 gallons a minute, will be required in the summer. However, the potential capacity of the wells should be somewhat greater than 85 gallons a minute to allow for decline in yield. The author, who was assigned to this work by the United States Geological Survey, arrived in Oklahoma City April 21, 1931, and spent one week in field work in the area. After a conference with Dr. C.N. Gould, State Geologist of Oklahoma, it was decided that the possible sources of ground water to be investigated were the 'Red Beds' underlying the whole area, the Tertiary sands capping the hills north of the North Canadian River, and the river alluvium in the North Canadian River Valley. The area in which field work was done is shown on Plate 1 and includes approximately 105 square miles, lying chiefly north and west of El Reno, the county seat of Canadian County. (available as photostat copy only)

  10. Preliminary results of high resolution magneto-biostratigraphy of continental sequences in Chapala Basin, Southwestern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez Cardenas, D. L.; Benammi, M.

    2007-05-01

    Chapala Lake is south from Guadalajara, Jalisco State (Southwestern Mexico). Belongs to a series of Pliocenic lakes along the Mexican Volcanic Belt. It is localized in the Chapala rift, and the entire area is controlled by the tectonic setting of the Colima, Tepic and Chapala rifts, constituting the triple junction rift-rift-rift. The deposits studied belong to volcanosedimentary sequences, composed by lacustrine and fluvial associations alternated with units of ash and pumice. The faunistic component reported consists at least of 27 mammals species, and the sediments were there're in have to work with special attention for seek rodents by handpicking. Probably these rodents will be the clue to determine the deposits correlation. Core demagnetization shows that they are low-coercivity magnetic minerals like magnetite or Ti-magnetite. It was verified that the characteristic magnetization corresponds to MNRp and the inversion test resulted good. Rodents are represented by Geomynae, Sigmondontinae and Sciurinae. The Geomynae family is the most common, and the faunistic association indicates Blancan age. This also allows a correlation with the polarity pattern in the GSS between 3,6 and 2,6 Ma. Actually, is known that this kind of studies in continental sequences supported with paleontological record of vertebrates could give us a more precised calibration of the age of such deposits. Allowing better understanding of the evolution of these mammals and their path trough geological record. This work shows the preliminary results of rodents palaeontology and high resolution magneto-stratigraphy in the units from to Chapala Basin.

  11. Aeolian deposition of Arabia and Somalia sediments on the southwestern continental margin of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chauhan, O.S.

    Kaolinite, smectite, illite and chlorite as major clay minerals and palygorskite and gibbsite in minor quantities have been recorded from the slope of southwestern continental margin of India. Contribution of kaolinite, smectite and gibbsite is from...

  12. Contaminants in Southwestern Willow Flycatcher Eggs and Prey Items, Arizona, 1998-2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This study documented concentrations and potential effects of organochlorine compounds and metals in addled eggs and potential prey of the endangered southwestern...

  13. Characteristics and distributions of atmospheric mercury emitted from anthropogenic sources in Guiyang, southwestern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Continuous measurements of speciated atmospheric mercury (Hg), including gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), particulate mercury (PHg), and reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) were conducted in Guizhou Province, southwestern China. Guiyang Power Plant (GPP), Guiyang Wujiang Cement Plant,...

  14. 1:75K-Scale Geologic Mapping of Southwestern Melas Chasma, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, L. A.; Skinner, J. A.

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this work is to document the geologic evolution of southwestern Melas Chasma, and to place localized observations into a broader, standardized context for comparison to other similar regions within the Valles Marineris basin system.

  15. Aerosol radiative effects over global arid and semi-arid regions based on MODIS Deep Blue satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzianastassiou, Nikolaos; Papadimas, Christos D.; Gkikas, Antonis; Matsoukas, Christos; Sayer, Andrew M.; Hsu, N. Christina; Vardavas, Ilias

    2014-05-01

    Aerosols are a key parameter for several atmospheric processes related to weather and climate of our planet. Specifically, the aerosol impact on Earth's climate is exerted and quantified through their radiative effects, which are induced by their direct, indirect and semi-direct interactions with radiation, in particular at short wavelengths (solar). It is acknowledged that the uncertainty of present and future climate assessments is mainly associated with aerosols and that a better understanding of their physico-chemical, optical and radiative effects is needed. The contribution of satellites to this aim is important as a complementary tool to climate and radiative transfer models, as well as to surface measurements, since space observations of aerosol properties offer an extended spatial coverage. However, such satellite based aerosol properties and associated model radiation computations have suffered from unavailability over highly reflecting surfaces, namely polar and desert areas. This is also the case for MODIS which, onboard the Terra and Aqua satellites, has been providing high quality aerosol data since 2000 and 2002, respectively. These data, more specifically the aerosol optical depth (AOD) which is the most important optical property used in radiative and climate models, are considered to be of best quality. In order to address this problem, the MODIS Deep Blue (DB) algorithm has been developed which enables the retrieval of AOD above arid and semi-arid areas of the globe, including the major deserts. In the present study we make use of the FORTH detailed spectral radiative transfer model (RTM) with MODIS DB AOD data, supplemented with single scattering albedo (SSA) and asymmetry parameter (AP) aerosol data from the Global Aerosol DataSet (GADS) to estimate the aerosol DREs over the arid and semi-arid regions of the globe. The RTM is run using surface and atmospheric data from the ISCCP-D2 dataset and the NCEP global reanalysis project and computes the

  16. Determinants of climate change adaptation strategies used by rice farmers in Southwestern, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Kayode Arimi

    2014-01-01

    Poor adaptation to climate change is a major threat to sustainable rice production in Nigeria. Determinants of appropriate climate-change adaptation strategies used by rice farmers in Southwestern Nigeria have not been fully investigated. In this study, the determinants of climate change adaptation strategies used by rice farmers in Southwestern Nigeria were investigated. Data were obtained through Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) and field survey conducted in the study areas. Data obtained wer...

  17. Personality Traits of Sports Administrators and Effective Sports Management in Southwestern Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Generally, there has been improvement in the sporting facilities available in the Southwestern part of Nigeria, particularly when one compares it with what was available in the 1970s. Despite this, recent results at the National Sports Festivals have shown a decline in sports performances of the southwestern states. This could be traced to ineffectiveness of sports administrators, which may be due to personality traits being exhibited individually. Therefore, this study investigated the relat...

  18. Multi-element stream sediment geochemistry of south-western and central Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Knights, K.V.; Lapworth, D. J.; Key, R. M.; Johnson, C C; Adekanmi, M.A.; Arisekola, T.M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary results from geochemical baseline stream sediment surveys from two Cells (South-western Cell and Central Cell) in Nigeria completed in 2009. This work was part of the World Bank funded Nigerian Sustainable Management of Mineral Resources Project carried out by the Nigerian Geological Survey Agency in cooperation with the British Geological Survey. A total of 284 stream sediment samples were collected from the South-western Cell, with an average sampling density...

  19. Preparedness of Colleges of Education in Southwestern Nigeria for the Adoption of Blended Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Idowu olusola Olayiwola; Kudirat Mojirade Alimi

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated the preparedness of colleges of education in Southwestern Nigeria in terms of available facilities and infrastructure for the use of blended learning.  The study adopted the survey design. The population consisted of students and lecturers in colleges of education in Southwestern Nigeria. The sample size was 1,059 students and 168 lecturers. Three states were selected from which three colleges of education (one per state) also selected using the random were sampling tec...

  20. STUDY ON SOME FACTORS FOR HEALTHY NUTRITION ENVIRONMENT IN RESTAURANTS IN SOUTHWESTERN BULGARIA

    OpenAIRE

    Ludmila Ivanova; Julieta Trifonova; Ilinka Terziyska

    2012-01-01

    The purpose – The purpose of the study is to conduct a regional survey in tourist companies in Southwestern Bulgaria for examining some key factors for building/forming a healthy nutrition environment. Design – The special focus is given to analysis of the key factors for creating healthy nutrition environment in restaurants. Methodology – A cross sectional survey conducted including 34 respondents from 120 operating hotels with restaurants in Southwestern Bulgaria and 30 independent restaura...

  1. Environmental Effects of Irrigation in Arid and Semi-Arid Regions Efectos Ambientales del Riego en Regiones Áridas y Semi-Áridas en América Latina

    OpenAIRE

    Alicia Fernández Cirelli; José Luis Arumí; Diego Rivera; Peter  W Boochs

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the state of the art with respect to the environmental effects of irrigated agriculture on water and soil quality in arid and semi-arid regions on a field scale. Information is scarce and fragmentary. Examples in selected areas of other arid and semi-arid regions in the world clearly show the importance of studying the environmental impact of irrigation practices on water and soil quality. Studies mainly refer to waterlogging and salinization. As regards agrochemicals, fe...

  2. Conservation tillage of rainfed maize in semi-arid Zimbabwe: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyakudya, I.W.; Stroosnijder, L.

    2015-01-01

    Food security in Sub-Saharan Africa, particularly in semi-arid tropics (41% of the region; 6 months of dry season) is threatened by droughts, dry spells and infertile soils. In Zimbabwe, 74% of smallholder farming areas are located in semi-arid areas mostly in areas with soils of low fertility and w

  3. Impact of grazing on range plant community components under arid Mediterranean climate in northern Syria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niane, A.A.

    2013-01-01

    Keywords: Rotational grazing, full protection, continuous grazing species richness, species diversity, soil seed bank, Bayesian methods, Salsola vermiculata, seed longevity, rangeland management, Syria.   Rangelands represent 70% of the semi-arid and arid Mediterranean land mass. It is a n

  4. A methodology to assess and evaluate rainwater harvesting techniques in (semi-) arid regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adham, Ammar; Riksen, Michel; Ouessar, Mohamed; Ritsema, Coen J.

    2016-01-01

    Arid and semi-arid regions around the world face water scarcity problems due to lack of precipitation and unpredictable rainfall patterns. For thousands of years, rainwater harvesting (RWH) techniques have been applied to cope with water scarcity. Researchers have used many different methodologie

  5. Estimation of vegetation fraction in arid areas using ALOS imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matkan, A. A.; Darvishzadeh, R.; Hosseiniasl, A.; Ebrahimi, M.

    2010-10-01

    Fraction of vegetation (Fv) plays an important role in ecosystems. Estimation of Fv is essential for drought monitoring, natural resources studies, estimation of soil erosion volume etc. The aim of this study is to estimate Fv in an arid area in Iran using ALOS Imagery (June 2008). In order to find the best index for estimation of Fv, Seventeen vegetation indices (ARVI, DVI, EVI, GEMI, IPVI, MSAVI1, MSAVI2, NDVI, PVI, SAVI, SARVI, SARVI2, SR, TSAVI, WDVI) were used. The canopy cover percentage of 52 sample plots (50m by 50m) was measured in the field in June 2009. Regression models were used to assess the relationships between the field data and the calculated Fv. The 52 sample plots were randomly divided two times to 30 calibrations and 22 validations, and to 35 and 17 samples. Results revealed that selecting the calibration and validation data randomly leads to different results. Therefore, cross-validation method was used to reduce random division effect. Results indicated that, among all indices, vegetation indices such as MSAVI1, PVI, WDVI and TSAVI which are based on soil line have higher R2 and lower RMSE (R2 > 0.63, RMSE ~ 3%). The results confirm the dominant effect of soil reflectance in arid areas.

  6. Expansive Soil Properties in a Semi-Arid Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MuawiaA. Dafalla

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The expansive soils in semi-arid regions are of great concern to design and geotechnical engineers. Range and variations of geotechnical properties of soils are very useful for appropriate design. Saudi Arabia; a semi arid region attracted the attention of researchers and practicing engineers over the last three decades following the rapid urbanizations in different parts of the country. Advanced testing equipments were made available for this study. The research group conducted joint visits with high officials from different municipality authorities to survey the problem and study the extent of damage to various structures. The areas visited included Al Ghatt, Al Zulfi, Al Hofuf, Um Al Sahik, Al Qatif, Tabuk, Tayma and Al Qaleeba. Single and two storey buildings, boundary walls, pavements and asphalt roads suffered significant damage in many parts of the visited locations. This paper presents the outcome of survey and a general review of previous works carried out for swelling clays in Saudi Arabia. Engineering properties for typical soil formation are presented.

  7. Feasibility of groundwater recharge dam projects in arid environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaafar, H. H.

    2014-05-01

    A new method for determining feasibility and prioritizing investments for agricultural and domestic recharge dams in arid regions is developed and presented. The method is based on identifying the factors affecting the decision making process and evaluating these factors, followed by determining the indices in a GIS-aided environment. Evaluated parameters include results from field surveys and site visits, land cover and soils data, precipitation data, runoff data and modeling, number of beneficiaries, domestic irrigation demand, reservoir objectives, demography, reservoirs yield and reliability, dam structures, construction costs, and operation and maintenance costs. Results of a case study on more than eighty proposed dams indicate that assessment of reliability, annualized cost/demand satisfied and yield is crucial prior to investment decision making in arid areas. Irrigation demand is the major influencing parameter on yield and reliability of recharge dams, even when only 3 months of the demand were included. Reliability of the proposed reservoirs as related to their standardized size and net inflow was found to increase with increasing yield. High priority dams were less than 4% of the total, and less priority dams amounted to 23%, with the remaining found to be not feasible. The results of this methodology and its application has proved effective in guiding stakeholders for defining most favorable sites for preliminary and detailed design studies and commissioning.

  8. Glacial aridity in central Indonesia coeval with intensified monsoon circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konecky, Bronwen; Russell, James; Bijaksana, Satria

    2016-03-01

    The Last Glacial Maximum was cool and dry over the Indo-Pacific Warm Pool (IPWP), a key region driving global oceanic-atmospheric circulation. Both low- and high-latitude teleconnections with insolation, ice sheets, and sea level have been suggested to explain the pervasive aridity observed in paleoecological and geomorphic data. However, proxies tracking the H- and O-isotopic composition of rainfall (e.g., speleothems, sedimentary biomarkers) suggest muted aridity or even wetter conditions than the present, complicating interpretations of glacial IPWP climate. Here we use multiproxy reconstructions from lake sediments and modern rainfall isotopic measurements from central Indonesia to show that, contrary to the classical "amount effect," intensified Australian-Indonesian monsoon circulation drove lighter H- and O-isotopic composition of IPWP rainfall during the LGM, while at the same time, dry conditions prevailed. Precipitation isotopes are particularly sensitive to the apparent increase in monsoon circulation and perhaps also decreased moisture residence time implied by our data, explaining contrasts among proxy records while illuminating glacial IPWP atmospheric circulation, a key target for climate models.

  9. Microclimates of the arid lands ecology reserve, 1968--1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorp, J. M.; Hinds, W. T.

    1977-04-01

    The climatology of the Hanford Reservation Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) Reserve does not end, of course, with this report. As this goes to press the arid lands of eastern Washington are experiencing the driest winter in 65 years of record. Even without including this winter's (1976-77) data in our summaries here, we have been fortunate to have had a very dry winter (1972-73) and a very wet winter (1973-74) occur within our first 8 years of climatological measurements on the Reserve. Our primary purpose with this report has been to analyze the first 8 years of climatological measurements from the ALE Reserve and to identify persistent spatial variations between stations or groups of stations. From these variations we have been able to recognize several distinct, but related microclimates occurring within the Reserve. Secondly, we have shown that significant correlations exist between each microclimate on the Reserve and that of the Hanford Meteorological Station nearby. These correlations, coupled with the 30-year weather record at the HMS and possibly with the 32-year (1912-1944) record at the Hanford townsite, allow ALE Reserve temperature and precipitation estimates to be made for years prior to the ALE climatology program.

  10. Sustainable Small-Scale Agriculture in Semi-Arid Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Ingram

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available For at least the past 8000 years, small-scale farmers in semi-arid environments have had to mitigate shortfalls in crop production due to variation in precipitation and stream flow. To reduce their vulnerability to a shortfall in their food supply, small-scale farmers developed short-term strategies, including storage and community-scale sharing, to mitigate inter-annual variation in crop production, and long-term strategies, such as migration, to mitigate the effects of sustained droughts. We use the archaeological and paleoclimatic records from A.D. 900-1600 in two regions of the American Southwest to explore the nature of variation in the availability of water for crops, and the strategies that enhanced the resilience of prehistoric agricultural production to climatic variation. Drawing on information concerning contemporary small-scale farming in semi-arid environments, we then suggest that the risk coping and mitigation strategies that have endured for millennia are relevant to enhancing the resilience of contemporary farmers' livelihoods to environmental and economic perturbations.

  11. Soil microbial responses to nitrogen addition in arid ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L Sinsabaugh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The N cycle of arid ecosystems is influenced by low soil organic matter, high soil pH and extremes in water potential and temperature that lead to open canopies and development of biological soil crusts (biocrusts. We investigated the effects of N amendment on soil microbial dynamics in a Larrea tridentata-Ambrosia dumosa shrubland site in southern Nevada USA. Sites were fertilized with a NO3-NH4 mix at 0, 7, and 15 kg ha-1 yr-1 from March 2012 to March 2013. In March 2013, biocrust (0-0.5 cm and bulk soils (0-10 cm were collected beneath Ambrosia canopies and in the interspaces between plants. Biomass responses were assessed as bacterial and fungal SSU rRNA gene copy number and chlorophyll a concentration. Metabolic responses were measured by five ecoenzyme activities (EEA and rates of N transformation. By most measures, nutrient availability, microbial biomass and process rates were greater in soils beneath the shrub canopy compared to the interspace between plants, and greater in the surface biocrust horizon compared to the deeper 10 cm soil profile. Most measures responded positively to experimental N addition. Effect sizes were generally greater for bulk soil than biocrust. Results were incorporated into a meta-analysis of arid ecosystem responses to N.

  12. An Evaluation of Unsaturated Flow Models in an Arid Climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of two unsaturated flow models in arid regions. The area selected for the study was the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site in Nye County, Nevada. The two models selected for this evaluation were HYDRUS-1D [Simunek et al., 1998] and the SHAW model [Flerchinger and Saxton, 1989]. Approximately 5 years of soil-water and atmospheric data collected from an instrumented weighing lysimeter site near the RWMS were used for building the models with actual initial and boundary conditions representative of the site. Physical processes affecting the site and model performance were explored. Model performance was based on a detailed sensitivity analysis and ultimately on storage comparisons. During the process of developing descriptive model input, procedures for converting hydraulic parameters for each model were explored. In addition, the compilation of atmospheric data collected at the site became a useful tool for developing predictive functions for future studies. The final model results were used to evaluate the capacities of the HYDRUS and SHAW models for predicting soil-moisture movement and variable surface phenomena for bare soil conditions in the arid vadose zone. The development of calibrated models along with the atmospheric and soil data collected at the site provide useful information for predicting future site performance at the RWMS

  13. An Evaluation of Unsaturated Flow Models in an Arid Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, J.

    1999-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of two unsaturated flow models in arid regions. The area selected for the study was the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site in Nye County, Nevada. The two models selected for this evaluation were HYDRUS-1D [Simunek et al., 1998] and the SHAW model [Flerchinger and Saxton, 1989]. Approximately 5 years of soil-water and atmospheric data collected from an instrumented weighing lysimeter site near the RWMS were used for building the models with actual initial and boundary conditions representative of the site. Physical processes affecting the site and model performance were explored. Model performance was based on a detailed sensitivity analysis and ultimately on storage comparisons. During the process of developing descriptive model input, procedures for converting hydraulic parameters for each model were explored. In addition, the compilation of atmospheric data collected at the site became a useful tool for developing predictive functions for future studies. The final model results were used to evaluate the capacities of the HYDRUS and SHAW models for predicting soil-moisture movement and variable surface phenomena for bare soil conditions in the arid vadose zone. The development of calibrated models along with the atmospheric and soil data collected at the site provide useful information for predicting future site performance at the RWMS.

  14. Physicochemical and biochemical properties of honeys from arid regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Hosam M; Al Meqbali, Fatima T; Kamal, Hina; Souka, Usama D; Ibrahim, Wissam H

    2014-06-15

    This study was conducted to evaluate the quality of 11 honeys from arid regions for first time, and compare it with 5 different honeys from non-arid regions. Mean values obtained for physicochemical parameters were: pH 4.76 ± 0.55; 17.32 ± 1.8% moisture; 80.95 ± 1.60 °Brix sugar; 69.05 ± 4.41% total sugar; 413.81 ± 178.48 μS cm(-1) electrical conductivity; 17.58 ± 7.68 meq/kg free acidity; 11.05 ± 3.18 meq/kg lactonic acidity; 28.63 ± 9.6 meq/kg total acidity; 12.66 ± 20.39 mg/kg HMF; 0.58 ± 0.03 water activity; and 0.98 ± 0.62 colour intensity. Potassium was the major mineral (1760.54 ± 685.24 mg/kg). All the samples showed considerable significant variations with reference to their physicochemical and biochemical properties, moreover, the total free amino acids and total carotenoids were 61.13 ± 63.16 mg/100g and 4.07 ± 10.05 μg/100g respectively. Acrylamide was detected only in one sample at 2.39 ± 0.22 μg/kg. PMID:24491697

  15. Aridity, desalination plants and tourism in the eastern Canary Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José-León García-Rodríguez

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The islands of Lanzarote and Fuerteventura are the easternmost of the Canary Islands, and are located on the southern edge of the temperate zone, in the subtropical anticyclone belt. With less than 150 mm of rainfall a year, they are classified as an arid zone. Their inhabitants have devised original agricultural systems to combat the aridity, although low yields have historically limited socio-economic development and population growth. These systems were used until the introduction of seawater desalination plants and the arrival of tourism in the last third of the twentieth century, which improved living standards for the local population but also led to a cultural transition. Nevertheless, these farming systems have left behind an important regional heritage, with an environmental and scenic value that has played an integral role in the latest phase of development. The systems have become a tourist attraction and have been central to the two islands being designated biosphere reserves by UNESCO. This article aims to analyse the main socioeconomic and land-use changes that have come about as a result of desalination technology.

  16. Isotope hydrology applied to evaluation of groundwater in arid areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capture of underground water in arid or semi-arid areas in developing countries is essential to safeguarding life. In order to realize in time, or to prevent, endangerment of exploitable groundwater resources due to pollution or excess exploitation, isotope hydrology offers low-cost methods that are applied along with other methods. Their results contribute to determine the origin, mixing, residence time (or age), and pollution of endangered groundwater resources. The research report in hand uses the results of hydrochemical analyses and isotope hydrological data from hydrogeological studies made over some years by the Bundesanstalt fuer Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe in six selected countries: Jordan, Cyprus, Brazil, Sudan, Djibouti, Senegal. It also uses data of recent analyses of the years 1985 and 1986. Data evaluation is done applying modern, qualitative and quantitative methods of interpretation. The available long-term series of isotopic data are scanned for any early information on water quality deterioration that is not otherwise detected. The information thus obtained is a prerequisite of urgently needed measures for protecting the groundwater reserves. (orig./HP)

  17. WATER MANAGEMENT AND EXTERNALITIES IN TROPICAL ARID- AND SEMI-ARID AGRICULTURE: AN ECONOMIC APPROACH BASED ON EXAMPLES OF NITRATE LOSSES AND SALINIZATION

    OpenAIRE

    Baird, Kathrine E.

    1989-01-01

    This paper summarized the theory of welfare economics and natural resource allocation, and illustrated how application of this theory can lead to Pareto improvements in the design of irrigation systems in tropical arid- and semi-arid agricultural systems. Drawing on the two examples of nitrate losses and salinization, the paper concludes that economic analysis can help design policies to conserve natural resource stocks, but that such analysis is limited by insufficient data, methodological d...

  18. Resistance Status of the Malaria Vector Mosquitoes, Anopheles stephensi and Anopheles subpictus Towards Adulticides and Larvicides in Arid and Semi-Arid Areas of India

    OpenAIRE

    Tikar, S. N.; M J Mendki; Sharma, A K; D. Sukumaran; Veer, Vijay; Prakash, Shri; Parashar, B. D.

    2011-01-01

    Susceptibility studies of malaria vectors Anopheles stephensi Liston (Diptera: Culicidae) and An. subpictus Grassi collected during 2004–2007 from various locations of Arid and Semi-Arid Zone of India were conducted by adulticide bioassay of DDT, malathion, deltamethrin and larvicide bioassay of fenthion, temephos, chlorpyriphos and malathion using diagnostic doses. Both species from all locations exhibited variable resistance to DDT and malathion from majority of location. Adults of both the...

  19. Salinity tolerance and mycorrhizal responsiveness of native xeroriparian plants in semi-arid western USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchamp, Vanessa B.; Walz, C.; Shafroth, P.B.

    2009-01-01

    Restoration of salt-affected soils is a global concern. In the western United States, restoration of salinized land, particularly in river valleys, often involves control of Tamarix, an introduced species with high salinity tolerance. Revegetation of hydrologically disconnected floodplains and terraces after Tamarix removal is often difficult because of limited knowledge regarding the salinity tolerance of candidate native species for revegetation. Additionally, Tamarix appears to be non-mycorrhizal. Extended occupation of Tamarix may deplete arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in the soil, further decreasing the success of revegetation efforts. To address these issues, we screened 42 species, races, or ecotypes native to southwestern U.S. for salinity tolerance and mycorrhizal responsiveness. As expected, the taxa tested showed a wide range of responses to salinity and mycorrhizal fungi. This variation also occurred between ecotypes or races of the same species, indicating that seed collected from high-salinity reference systems is likely better adapted to harsh conditions than seed originating from less saline environments. All species tested had a positive or neutral response to mycorrhizal inoculation. We found no clear evidence that mycorrhizae increased salinity tolerance, but some species were so dependent on mycorrhizal fungi that they grew poorly at all salinity levels in pasteurized soil. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  20. Impact of rhizobial populations and their host legumes on microbial activity in soils of arid regions in Tunisia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fterich, A.; Mahdhi, M.; Mars, M.

    2009-07-01

    Nitrogen fixing legumes and their microsymbionts are a fundamental contributor to soil fertility and prevent their degradation in arid and semi arid ecosystems. In Tunisia, few data are available on the contribution of these legumes in microbial activity in the arid soil. In this objective, a study was undertaken on five leguminous species from different arid regions to evaluate their ability to regenerate microbiological processes of the soil: Genista saharea, Genista microcephala, Acacia tortilis sspr raddiana, Retama raetam and Prosopis stephaniana. (Author)

  1. Impact of rhizobial populations and their host legumes on microbial activity in soils of arid regions in Tunisia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrogen fixing legumes and their microsymbionts are a fundamental contributor to soil fertility and prevent their degradation in arid and semi arid ecosystems. In Tunisia, few data are available on the contribution of these legumes in microbial activity in the arid soil. In this objective, a study was undertaken on five leguminous species from different arid regions to evaluate their ability to regenerate microbiological processes of the soil: Genista saharea, Genista microcephala, Acacia tortilis sspr raddiana, Retama raetam and Prosopis stephaniana. (Author)

  2. Radiocarbon evidence of the Middle to Upper Palaeolithic transition in Southwestern Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jöris, Olaf

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper we systematically evaluate the radiometric database underlying the Middle to Upper Palaeolithc transition in southwestern Europe.The different models which attempt to explain the demographical processes underlying this transition rely to a large degree on radiocarbon chronology. We observe that: 1 with increasing age, dates on bone samples show large offsets against those on charcoal, often underestimating these for several thousand years BP and; 2 there is no proof for a persistence of Middle Palaeolithic industries into the time of the earliest Aurignacian in SW Europe. These data contradict the “Ebro- Frontier” model that distinguishes Late Middle Palaeolithic industries in the SW of the Iberian Peninsula from early Aurignacian ones in the NE. On the contrary, our data 3 imply a model of interregional shifts of populations contracting during severe cold and arid phases and expanding under warmer, interstadial conditions, raising ideas on a regional in situ development of the SW European Aurignacian out of Latest Middle Palaeolithic industries made by Neanderthals some 40.0 kyr cal BC.

    Se presenta un estudio sistemático sobre la información radiometrica disponible para la transición Paleolítico Medio-Paleolítico Superior en el Suroeste de Europa. Los diferentes modelos para explicar el proceso demográfico que subyace en esta transición dependen en gran medida de la cronología radiocarbónica. Se observa que: 1 a mayor antiguedad las fechas sobre hueso muestran una mayor desvisación frente a las muestras sobre carbón, a menudo infravalorando estas varios miles de años BP y 2 que no hay pruebas de perduración de industrias de Paleolítico Medio durante las fases tempranas del Auriñaciense en el SW de Europa. Estos datos contradicen el modelo de “frontera del Ebro” que distingue industrias de Paleolítico Medio Tardío en el SW de la Península Ibérica de las industrias del Auriñaciense temprano

  3. Epidemiological Aspects of Dermatophytosis in Khuzestan, southwestern Iran, an Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei-Matehkolaei, Ali; Rafiei, Abdollah; Makimura, Koichi; Gräser, Yvonne; Gharghani, Maral; Sadeghi-Nejad, Batool

    2016-08-01

    Dermatophytosis is among the most common superficial mycoses in Iran. The purpose of this report was to update the clinical and mycological features of human dermatophytosis in the Khuzestan, southwestern Iran. In the framework of a one-year survey, a total of 4120 skin, hair and nail samples obtained from the outpatients with symptoms suggestive of tinea were analyzed by using direct microscopy, culture and molecular identification methods. Strains isolated from cultures were subjected to amplification of the nuclear rDNA ITS regions in a PCR assay followed by an early established RFLP analysis. For confirmation of species identification, 100 isolates as representatives of all presumable species were subjected to ITS sequencing. Infection was confirmed in 1123 individuals (27.25 %) in the age range of 1-89 years by direct microscopy and/or culture including 603 males versus 520 females. Frequencies of infections were the highest and the lowest in age groups of 21-30 and 11-20 years, respectively. Tinea corporis was the most prevalent clinical manifestation followed by tinea cruris, tinea capitis, tinea manuum, tinea pedis, tinea unguium, tinea faciei and tinea barbae. Trichophyton interdigitale (58.7 %) was the most dominant isolate followed by Epidermophyton floccosum (35.4 %), Microsporum canis (3 %), T. rubrum (1.5 %), T. species of Arthroderma benhamiae (0.5 %), T. tonsurans (0.3 %) and T. violaceum (0.3 %). Other species included M. gypseum, M. fulvum and T. verrucosum (each one 0.1 %). Such a high occurrence of infection with T. interdigitale, which has not been reported from Iran, is due to the use of accurate molecular methods based on new species concept in dermatophytes. The prevalence of dermatophytoses caused by zoophilic species remarkably increased and Trichophyton species of A. benhamiae has emerged as a new agent of dermatophytosis in southwestern Iran, while infections due to anthropophilic species, except E. floccosum, took a

  4. Hierarchical distance-based fuzzy approach to evaluate urban water supply systems in a semi-arid region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yekta, Tahereh Sadeghi; Khazaei, Mohammad; Nabizadeh, Ramin; Mahvi, Amir Hossein; Nasseri, Simin; Yari, Ahmad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Hierarchical distance-based fuzzy multi-criteria group decision making was served as a tool to evaluate the drinking water supply systems of Qom, a semi-arid city located in central part of Iran. A list of aspects consisting of 6 criteria and 35 sub-criteria were evaluated based on a linguistic term set by five decision-makers. Four water supply alternatives including "Public desalinated distribution system", "PET Bottled Drinking Water", "Private desalinated water suppliers" and "Household desalinated water units" were assessed based on criteria and sub-criteria. Data were aggregated and normalized to apply Performance Ratings of Alternatives. Also, the Performance Ratings of Alternatives were aggregated again to achieve the Aggregate Performance Ratings. The weighted distances from ideal solution and anti-ideal solution were calculated after secondary normalization. The proximity of each alternative to the ideal solution was determined as the final step. The alternatives were ranked based on the magnitude of ideal solutions. Results showed that "Public desalinated distribution system" was the most appropriate alternative to supply the drinking needs of Qom population. Also, "PET Bottled Drinking Water" was the second acceptable option. A novel classification of alternatives to satisfy the drinking water requirements was proposed which is applicable for the other cities located in semi-arid regions of Iran. The health issues were considered as independent criterion, distinct from the environmental issues. The constraints of high-tech alternatives were also considered regarding to the level of dependency on overseas. PMID:26221535

  5. From Segregation to School Finance: The Legal Context for Language Rights in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Jeanne M.

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter, the author reviews the legal trajectory of language rights in public schooling in the United States and how language has been intertwined with other policy issues in court cases aimed at expanding access and equity for minority students: desegregation and school finance. Most of these cases originated in the Southwestern United…

  6. Onchocerca lupi Nematodes in Dogs Exported from the United States into Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conboy, Gary; Lejeune, Manigandan; Marron, Fany; Hanna, Paul; MacDonald, Erin; Skorobohach, Brian; Wilcock, Brian; Kutz, Susan J.; Gilleard, John S.

    2016-01-01

    The Onchocerca lupi nematode is an emerging helminth capable of infecting pets and humans. We detected this parasite in 2 dogs that were imported into Canada from the southwestern United States, a region to which this nematode is endemic. We discuss risk for establishment of O. lupi in Canada. PMID:27434170

  7. Influence of biological soil crusts at different successional stages in the implantation of biogeochemical cycles in arid and semiarid zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Sotres, F.; Miralles, I.; Canton-Castilla, Y.; Domingo, F.; Leiros, M. C.; Trasar-Cepeda, C.

    2012-04-01

    involved in C (invertase, CM-cellulase, β-glucosidase), N (urease, BAA-protease, casein-protease) and P (phosphomonoesterase) cycles in BSCs at different successional stages (cyanobacteria represents the first successional stage, lichen Diploschistes diacapsis in an intermediate state and lichen Lepraria crassissima, with the greatest successional state). Our results show that BSCs at lower successional stage enriched the surface geological substrate in hydrolase enzymes to a lesser extent than mature BSCs (Lepraria crassissima), which show the highest values in all enzymatic activities. In contrast, the specific enzyme activities (activity values expressed per unit of carbon) were higher in the BSCs at lower successional stage, decreasing in the direction: cyanobacteria > Diploschistes diacapsis-lichen > Lepraria crassissima-lichen. These results suggest a different role of BSCs depending on their successional stage with regard to the implantation of biogeochemical cycles during the surface substrate colonization. Our conclusions are highly relevant to improve the knowledge of biogeochemical cycles in arid and semiarid areas. Keywords: Biological Soil Crusts, arid ecosystems, hydrolytic enzymes, biochemical activity

  8. Survey of Revegetated Areas on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve: Status and Initial Monitoring Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downs, Janelle L.; Link, Steven O.; Rozeboom, Latricia L.; Durham, Robin E.; Cruz, Rico O.; Mckee, Sadie A.

    2011-09-01

    During 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office removed a number of facilities and debris from the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE), which is part of the Hanford Reach National Monument (HRNM). Revegetation of disturbed sites is necessary to stabilize the soil, reduce invasion of these areas by exotic weeds, and to accelerate re-establishment of native plant communities. Seven revegetation units were identified on ALE based on soils and potential native plant communities at the site. Native seed mixes and plant material were identified for each area based on the desired plant community. Revegetation of locations affected by decommissioning of buildings and debris removal was undertaken during the winter and early spring of 2010 and 2011, respectively. This report describes both the details of planting and seeding for each of the units, describes the sampling design for monitoring, and summarizes the data collected during the first year of monitoring. In general, the revegetation efforts were successful in establishing native bunchgrasses and shrubs on most of the sites within the 7 revegetation units. Invasion of the revegetation areas by exotic annual species was minimal for most sites, but was above initial criteria in 3 areas: the Hodges Well subunit of Unit 2, and Units 6 and 7.

  9. Diversity and distribution patterns of root-associated fungi on herbaceous plants in alpine meadows of southwestern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qian; Yang, Zhu L

    2016-01-01

    The diversity of root-associated fungi associated with four ectomycorrhizal herbaceous species, Kobresia capillifolia, Carex parva, Polygonum macrophyllum and Potentilla fallens, collected in three sites of alpine meadows in southwestern China, was estimated based on internal transcribed spacer (ITS) rDNA sequence analysis of root tips. Three hundred seventy-seven fungal sequences sorted to 154 operational taxonomical units (sequence similarity of ≥ 97% across the ITS) were obtained from the four plant species across all three sites. Similar taxa (in GenBank with ≥ 97% similarity) were not found in GenBank and/or UNITE for most of the OTUs. Ectomycorrhiz a made up 64% of the fungi operational taxonomic units (OTUs), endophytes constituted 4% and the other 33% were unidentified root-associated fungi. Fungal OTUs were represented by 57% basidiomycetes and 43% ascomycetes. Inocybe, Tomentella/Thelophora, Sebacina, Hebeloma, Pezizomycotina, Cenococcum geophilum complex, Cortinarius, Lactarius and Helotiales were OTU-rich fungal lineages. Across the sites and host species the root-associated fungal communities generally exhibited low host and site specificity but high host and sampling site preference. Collectively our study revealed noteworthy diversity and endemism of root-associated fungi of alpine plants in this global biodiversity hotspot. PMID:26740542

  10. Southwestern Federal Power System 1995 Financial Statement audit under the Chief Financial Officers Act (WR-FC-96-02)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-22

    The Southwestern Federal Power System encompasses the operation of 24 hydroelectric power plants by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the marketing of power and energy from those plants by the Southwestern Power Administration of the U.S. Department of Energy. To integrate the operation of these hydroelectric generating plants and to transmit power from the dams to its customers, Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern) maintains 2,220 kilometers (1,380 miles) of high-voltage transmission lines, 24 substations, and 46 microwave and VHF radio sites. Southwestern`s headquarters are in Tulsa, Oklahoma; its dispatch center is in Springfield, Missouri; and its maintenance crews are based in Jonesboro, Arkansas, in Gore and Tupelo, Oklahoma, and in Springfield, Missouri. Three offices - Power Marketing and Delivery, Maintenance, and Administration and Rates - are responsible for meeting Southwestern`s mission. Twelve of the 24 generating plants are scheduled directly by Southwestern, and a total of 19 contribute to the interconnected system operations. Generation at the five remaining projects (Denison, Narrows, Sam Rayburn, Whitney, and Willis) is used to serve specific customer loads. At the end of fiscal year 1995, Southwestern marketed power and energy to 10 generation and transmission cooperatives, one distribution cooperative, three military installations, 44 municipal utilities, and three municipal utility joint-action agencies. One of the joint-action agencies has its own allocation of power from Southwestern; the other two serve 33 municipal utilities to whom Southwestern has allocated power. The total number of power allocation customers is 92. Additionally, excess energy is occasionally sold to non-allocation utilities.

  11. Selected data from thermal-spring areas, southwestern Montana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, R.B.; Brosten, T.M.; Midtlyng, N.A.

    1978-05-01

    During 1975 to 1977 the Montana district of the US Geological Survey collected and assembled data describing the flow, temperature, and chemical characteristics of thermal and related waters. The work was part of an assessment of the geothermal resources of southwestern Montana, excluding Yellowstone Park. Representative data are presented here from 24 thermal springs and 3 deep wells where water temperatures exceed 38/sup 0/C (100/sup 0/F). Initially, the data base included references reported by Waring (1965). The data base also included unpublished chemical analyses of water samples and related data collected during 1959 to 1973 by the Montana State Board of Health (now Montana Department of Health and Environmental Sciences), the Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology, and by graduate students for theses. Results of analyses and engineering reports were collected from landowners, and additional published and unpublished data were collected by Geological Survey investigators during 1967 to 1975. Tabulation of the data revealed wide discrepancies in reported parameters for some sites. Inadequate description of the sampling sites limited the value of much of the previously reported data, because most of the thermal springs were characterized by multiple outlets. Field measurements of rate, specific conductance, pH, and temperature of flow at the various outlets, particularly those having the highest temperatures, were compared with previously reported determinations.

  12. Infrared images of core sediments offshore southwestern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, H. T.; Chuang, Y. H.

    2015-12-01

    The core sediments may retain the negative thermal anomaly caused by the gas hydrate dissociation on the way uploading from sea floor. To identify the signal of negative thermal anomaly, fifteen infrared images of core sediments with tens of meter in length have been analyzed the temperature distribution off southwestern Taiwan. This study results show that most of the core sediments were found lots of gaps with spiking pattern recognition of high temperature on the lower portions. The geochemistry study suggested that the gas in gaps and the sediments were mainly composed of methane which may be the indicators of gas hydrate dissociation in the higher temperature and lower pressure environment. The thermal gradients 0.044-0.114 ℃/m of core sediments are close to the observations in situ by the measurements of temperature probes that thermal gradient are 0.06-0.09 ℃/m. The temperature of all core sediments are greater than 20 ℃. It is obvious that the temperature of core sediments were increased tremendously by the heating of sea water. We found eight out of fifteen core sediments with significant negative thermal anomaly 0.4-1.0 ℃ in different depth between 2 and 10 meters below sea floor. Compare to the experiment in lab that the temperature could be decreased 1.1-1.5 ℃ due to the gas hydrate dissociation, the quantity of the negative thermal anomaly of the core sediments are possible related to the gas hydrate dissociation.

  13. Structural controls of hot-spring systems on southwestern Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Robert A.; Leonard, Robert Benjamin

    1979-01-01

    Thermal waters that issue as hot (more than 38C) springs in southwestern Montana appear to circulate to depth along Cenozoic block faults, deep fractures penetrating the dominantly crystalline rock crust, or major structural lineaments. At individual hot springs, rising thermal waters are transmitted along conduits formed by the intersection of a major fault with other faults, fracture zones, anticlinal axes (which may be faulted or fractures), or sedimentary aquifers. Step faults and other intra-valley faults may influence circulation at some springs. At others, fracture zones alone may provide the necessary vertical permeability. Normal regional heat apparently is sufficient to maintain the hydrothermal systems without enhancement from cooling igneous bodies. The thermal gradient normally is higher in low thermal conductivity sediments of the block-fault valleys than the 30C per kilometer average for crystalline rock. To attain reservoir temperatures of 60 to 120C indicated by chemical geothermometers, waters would have to circulate to depths of about 2 to 4 kilometers in crystalline rock and about 1 to 2 kilometers in valley sediments. (Kosco-USGS)

  14. Babesia bovis infection in cattle in the southwestern Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Luciana G; Rocha, Rodrigo B; Barbieri, Fábio da S; Ribeiro, Elisana S; Vendrami, Fabiano B; Souza, Gislaine C R; Giglioti, Rodrigo; Regitano, Luciana C A; Falcoski, Thaís O R S; Tizioto, Polyana C; Oliveira, Márcia C S

    2013-02-01

    The present study provides the first epidemiological data on infection with Babesia bovis in cattle raised in the southwestern Brazilian Amazon. Blood clot samples were filtered through nylon cloth before being submitted to DNA extraction. PCR and nested-PCR were applied to assess the frequency of infection with B. bovis in calves with ages from 4 to 12 months bred in 4 microregions each in the states of Rondônia and Acre. After the DNA was extracted from the samples, the infection in cattle was investigated by amplification of the "rap1" gene from B. bovis. The DNA amplification results revealed a frequency of infection with B. bovis of 95.1% (272/286) in the samples from Rondônia and 96.1% (195/203) in those from Acre. The high frequency of B. bovis infection in the animals with ages from 4 to 12 months indicates a situation of enzootic stability in the regions studied. The infection rates are comparable to those detected by immunodiagnostic techniques in other endemic regions of Brazil. PMID:23312480

  15. Drought-induced vegetation stress in southwestern North America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trends towards earlier greenup and increased average greenness have been widely reported in both humid and dry ecosystems. By analyzing NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) data from 1982 to 2007, we report complex trends in both the growing season amplitude and seasonally integrated vegetation greenness in southwestern North America and further highlight regions consistently experiencing drought stress. In particular, greenness measurements from 1982 to 2007 show an increasing trend in grasslands but a decreasing trend in shrublands. However, vegetation greenness in this period has experienced a strong cycle, increasing from 1982 to 1993 but decreasing from 1993 to 2007. The significant decrease during the last decade has reduced vegetation greenness by 6% in shrublands and 13% in grasslands (16% and 21%, respectively, in the severe drought years). The greenness cycle correlates to both annual precipitation and dry season length derived from NOAA North America Regional Reanalysis data. If drought events continue as predicted by climate models, they will exacerbate ecosystem degradation and reduce carbon uptake.

  16. Orchid conservation in the biodiversity hotspot of southwestern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Chen, Jin; Corlett, Richard T; Fan, XuLi; Yu, DongLi; Yang, HongPei; Gao, JiangYun

    2015-12-01

    Xishuangbanna is on the northern margins of tropical Asia in southwestern China and has the largest area of tropical forest remaining in the country. It is in the Indo-Burma hotspot and contains 16% of China's vascular flora in medicinal or ornamental value) was significantly related to endangerment. Expansion of rubber tree plantations was less of a threat to orchids than to other taxa because only 75 orchid species (17.6%) occurred below the 1000-m-elevation ceiling for rubber cultivation, and most of these (46) occurred in nature reserves. However, climate change is projected to lift this ceiling to around 1300 m by 2050, and the limited area at higher elevations reduces the potential for upslope range expansion. The Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden is committed to achieving zero plant extinctions in Xishuangbanna, and orchids are a high priority. Appropriate in and ex situ conservation strategies, including new protected areas and seed banking, have been developed for every threatened orchid species and are being implemented. PMID:26372504

  17. The melliferous potential of apiflora of southwestern Vojvodina (Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mačukanović-Jocić Marina P.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The individual and community-level melliferous potential of apiflora was evaluated in southwestern Vojvodina in order to assess its significance and contribution to the bee pasture. Seven plant communities belonging to ruderal, segetal and floodplain type of vegetation, with a total of 279 plant species were registered. Apifloristic and phytocoenological investigations included the determination and analysis of honey plants using the following parameters: total number, percentage, abundance and frequency of these species in the communities, as well as their intensity of pollen and nectar production. The coenotic coefficient of melliferousness (CCm indicating the melliferous potential of each community, was calculated based on the above parameters. Although the greatest number of melliferous species was found in the ass. Chenopodio-Ambrosietum artemisiifoliae (132, the highest percentage (80% of them was registered in the ass. Consolido-Polygonetum avicularis. Considering the coefficients of nectar and pollen production, the most valuable honey plants commonly present in the majority of communities were: Cirsium arvense, Rubus caesius, Lythrum salicaria, Daucus carota, Trifolium pratense, Dipsacus laciniatus, Medicago sativa, Asclepias syriaca, Cichorium intybus and Taraxacum officinale. The low abundance and frequency of melliferous species within the Consolido-Polygonetum avicularis, Polygonetum convolvulo-avicularis and Populetum nigrae-albae communities indicated their poor contribution to the bee pasture. Within ruderal vegetation, the highest CCm was registered in Amorpho-Typhaetum, providing, theoretically, the richest food resource for the honeybees in the investigated area. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 46009 i br. 173018

  18. Implementing Quantitative Literacy at Southwestern Community College, North Carolina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicki Todd

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available There is a time when articulation agreements between universities and community colleges come to an end. When this happened in North Carolina, there was great hope that not only would the mathematics classes that were offered in the North Carolina Community College System be revamped with respect to overlapping content, but also that mathematics classes would be developed that have a clear connection between what is seen in the world and what is taught in the classroom especially for non-STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics-related studies students. This paper describes how Southwestern Community College (SCC implemented a quantitative literacy class as it is now described in the newly adopted articulation agreement between the University of North Carolina (UNC System and the North Carolina Community College System (NCCCS, why such a class was chosen to be in that articulation agreement from the standpoint of SCC, and the success that was seen from such an endeavor. Results of preliminary statistical analysis suggest that students enrolled in the new Quantitative Literacy (MAT 143 course performed better on a quantitative reasoning assessment, on average, than their peers enrolled in similar traditional courses at SCC.

  19. Ecosystem biophysical memory in the southwestern North America climate system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To elucidate the potential role of vegetation to act as a memory source in the southwestern North America climate system, we explore correlation structures of remotely sensed vegetation dynamics with precipitation, temperature and teleconnection indices over 1982–2006 for six ecoregions. We found that lagged correlations between vegetation dynamics and climate variables are modulated by the dominance of monsoonal or Mediterranean regimes and ecosystem-specific physiological processes. Subtropical and tropical ecosystems exhibit a one month lag positive correlation with precipitation, a zero- to one-month lag negative correlation with temperature, and modest negative effects of sea surface temperature (SST). Mountain forests have a zero month lag negative correlation with precipitation, a zero–one month lag negative correlation with temperature, and no significant correlation with SSTs. Deserts show a strong one–four month lag positive correlation with precipitation, a low zero–two month lag negative correlation with temperature, and a high four–eight month lag positive correlation with SSTs. The ecoregion-specific biophysical memories identified offer an opportunity to improve the predictability of land–atmosphere interactions and vegetation feedbacks onto climate. (letter)

  20. Larval habitats of mosquito fauna in Osogbo metropolis, Southwestern Nigeria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Monsuru Adebayo Adeleke; Wasiu Olalekan Adebimpe; AbdulWasiu Oladele Hassan; Sunday Olukayode Oladejo; Ismail Olaoye; Ganiyu Olatunji Olatunde; Taiwo Adewole

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To determine the larval habitats of mosquito fauna and possible impact of land use/land cover changes on the epidemiology of mosquito-borne diseases in Osogbo metropolis, Southwestern, Nigeria. Methods: All accessible larval habitats were surveyed between May and September, 2011 in Osogbo metropolis while Land Use/ Land cover of the city was analyzed using 2 Lansat Multispectral Scanner satellite imagery of SPOT 1986 and LANDSAT TM 2009. Results:A total of six species namely, Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus, Aedes vittatus, Anopheles gambiae complex, Culex quinquefasciatus and Eretmapodite chrysogaster were encountered during the study. The occurrence and contribution of disused tyres was significantly higher (P0.05). The accessible land use/land covered of the study area between 1986 and 2009 showed that the wet land coverage and settlement area increased from 0.19 to 9.09 hectare and 1.00 to 2.01 hectare respectively while the forest area decreased from 60.18 to 50.14 hectare. Conclusion: The contribution of the habitats coupled with the increasing rate of flooded environment which could provide ample breeding sites for mosquitoes call for sustained environmental sanitation and management in Osogbo metropolis.

  1. K-Ar geochronology of the southwestern Brooks Range, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The southern Brooks Range schist belt is characterized by metasediments with subordinate metabasites and metafelsites. Blueschists occur within the schist belt from the Chandalar Quadrangle westward to the Baird Mountains Quadrangle. We report 76 new 40K-40Ar mineral ages from 47 metamorphic and igneous rocks in the southwestern Brooks Range. The pattern of radiometric ages provide evidence that the schist belt has, at least in part, undergone a Late Precambrian blueschist facies metamorphism. Silurian to Devonian carbonates and Middle Devonian felsic volcanics were later deposited on this Precambrian basement. Subsequent deformations produced the present pattern of isoclinal, recumbent folds, resulting in the interlayering of rocks of markedly different ages and lithologies. The entire schist terrane was metamorphosed to greenchist facies in Mesozoic time, probably as a result of Jurassic-Cretaceous northward overthrusting of oceanic crust and upper mantle, resulting in the resetting of most K-Ar mica ages to the mid-Cretaceous. A series of apparent 40K-40Ar ages intermediate between Late Precambrian and mid-Cretaceous are interpreted as indicating varying amounts of partial argon loss from older rocks during the Mesozoic metamorphism. Some glaucophanes contain excess radiogenic 40Ar. (auth)

  2. Acidic deposition and its effects in southwestern China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The emissions of SO2 in China correspond at present to 8-10 TgSy-1. The rapid industrialization has caused a dramatic increase in the emissions in recent years and this increase is likely to continue. This paper describes studies of concentrations and effects of acidifying substances in parts of the Guizhou and the Sichuan provinces where the S-emissions are large, mainly coming from coal combustion. A small catchment about 10 km from Guiyang centre was equipped with instruments for studies of soils, soil water and streamwater chemistry. The molar ratio Al/(Ca + Mg) is > 0.8 in soil water in some places. Two small streams have median pH-values about 4.6 and 5.1. Laboratory studies with selected Chinese soils showed that the anion adsorption was low. These studies gave also important information on soil sensitivity. The studies confirm that acid deposition may affect soils in parts of south-western China, but the sensitivity varies dramatically and there is a strong need for more information. 11 refs., 3 tabs., 3 figs

  3. Allochthonous Matter Input in Five Headwater Streams in Southwestern Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chara, J.; Baird, D.; Telfer, T.

    2005-05-01

    In order to determine the interactions between riparian vegetation and the stream environment in relation to the provision and seasonality of allochthonous energy, a study was done measuring the amount of litter inputs in five streams at mid altitude in southwestern Colombia during one year. Direct and lateral litter traps were placed in a 100m reach of each stream. Total amount of litter fall ranged from 1406 to 2812 g-m-2 year-1. Leaves were the most important component of the litter representing between 56 to 72% of direct and between 68 to 81% of lateral inputs. Seasonality of litter fall was minimal and only in one stream direct input was negatively correlated with rainfall (r=-0.62; p=0.033). According to these results, low-order streams in middle altitude in Colombia receive one of the highest amounts of litter fall reported so far. This supply is constant throughout the year providing a continuous source of food and substrate for the stream environment. As in temperate streams litterfall in the Andean zone is an important link between streams and the riparian environment. The higher amount recorded and the constant supply demonstrate that deforestation of riparian forests may be more negative for the streams in tropical areas.

  4. Some geophysical constraints to dynamic processes in the Southwestern Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Chiozzi

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available The total tectonic subsidence, thermal state and seismotectonic regime have been analysed to better constrain the dynamic processes which originated the basins of the Southwestern Mediterranean. It is argued that backarc extension and oceanic spreading are the possible and main processes which took place within a compressional framework, driven by the interaction between the African and European plates. As inferred by both subsidence and heat-flux data, in the central part of the Algerian-Balearic basin the crust is oceanic, 20 Ma old on average, originated by a spreading phase, which also affected the Ligurian-Provençal basin. The Alboran basin, which is underlain by stretched continental crust, shows an intermediate seismic activity and a few deep events, explainable by a gravitational collapse of cold lithosphere. After a review of the most recent geodynamical hypotheses, an evolutionary scheme is attempted envisaging the lateral continental escape of the Gibraltar arc. Within a convergent tectonic framework, some lithospheric material could translate almost perpendicular to the convergence direction, and undergo a lateral subduction process, secondary to the main boundary between plates.

  5. MIDDLE TRIASSIC AUTOCLASTIC DEPOSITS FROM SOUTHWESTERN BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duje Smirčić

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Middle Triassic volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks have been recognized at several localities near Bosansko Grahovo, in southwestern part of Bosnia and Herzegovina in the External Dinarides. Peculiar types of autoclastic rocks were investigated. These are peperites and hyaloclastites. Regarding specific structures, mineral composition and micropetrographic characteristics it was possible to further differentiate hyaloclastites into in situ hyaloclastites and slightly resedimented hyaloclastites that represent genetic succession. All rock types occurred in a deep sea troughs that formed as a consequence of Middle Triassic extensional tectonic and rift related wrench faulting. In situ hyaloclastites and slightly resedimented hyaloclastites were formed due to quenching at the contact of lava effusions with sea water. Genesis of peperites is related to lava emplacement in unconsolidated water saturated lime mudstones that were deposited in deep sea basin. All investigated rock types represent first findings of autoclastic deposits in the External Dinarides. Biostratigraphic constraints achieved by means of conodont species Neogondolella excentrica, Paragondolella excelsa, Paragondolella trammeri and Gladigondolella tethydis indicate Late Anisian to Early Ladinian interval of the autoclastic deposits from Bosansko Grahovo.

  6. Permian karst topography in the Wichita uplift, southwestern Oklahoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donovan, R.N. Busbey, A.B. (Texas Christian Univ., Ft. Worth, TX (United States). Geology Dept.)

    1993-02-01

    The Wichita uplift in southwestern Oklahoma is one part of a record of Pennsylvania and early Permian deformation that affected the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen. As a result of a partial inversion, the Lower Paleozoic section of this aulacogen was sequentially stripped off an uplift between the Wichita uplift and the Anadarko basin, resulting in the exposure of ultrabasic rocks deep in the Cambrian igneous fill of the aulacogen. Following the late Paleozoic tectonism, the topography of the uplift was entombed beneath Permian sediments and remained essentially undisturbed until exhumation during the present erosional cycle. Modern erosion is gradually exposing this topography, permitting morphometric analysis of the Permian hill forms. Because of the variation of lithology in the uplift, it is possible to isolate the effects of weathering processes such as intense hydrolysis of the igneous rocks (producing, among other features, or topography) and limestone dissolution, in the form of a surface and subsurface karst imprint. The latter process resulted in a network of small caves that are essentially fissures eroded along tectonic fractures. These small caves can be found in all the exposed areas of limestone. They are particularly noteworthy for three reasons: in at least five examples they contain a complex fauna of Permian vertebrates (mostly fragmentary), speleothems in some examples contain hydrocarbon inclusions, derived from the underlying Anadarko basin, some of the caves yield evidence of post burial evolution in the form of clay infiltration from the surface and brine flushing from the underlying Anadarko basin.

  7. Is southwestern China experiencing more frequent precipitation extremes?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Climate extremes have and will continue to cause severe damages to buildings and natural environments around the world. A full knowledge of the probability of the climate extremes is important for the management and mitigation of natural hazards. Based on Mann–Kendall trend test and copulas, this study investigated the characteristics of precipitation extremes as well as their implications in southwestern China (Yunnan, Guangxi and Guizhou Province), through analyzing the changing trends and probabilistic characteristics of six indices, including the consecutive dry days, consecutive wet days, annual total wet day precipitation, heavy precipitation days (R25), max 5 day precipitation amount (Rx5) and the rainy days (RDs). Results showed that the study area had generally become drier (regional mean annual precipitation decreased by 11.4 mm per decade) and experienced enhanced precipitation extremes in the past 60 years. Relatively higher risk of drought in Yuanan and flood in Guangxi was observed, respectively. However, the changing trends of the precipitation extremes were not spatially uniform: increasing risk of extreme wet events for Guangxi and Guizhou, and increasing probability of concurrent extreme wet and dry events for Yunnan. Meanwhile, trend analyses of the 10 year return levels of the selected indices implied that the severity of droughts decreased in Yunnan but increased significantly in Guangxi and Guizhou, and the severity of floods increased in Yunnan and Guangxi in the past decades. Hence, the policy-makers need to be aware of the different characterizations and the spatial heterogeneity of the precipitation extremes. (letters)

  8. Conceptual model for water management in Brazilian semi-arid regions: From intervention to sustainability, case of Lagoa Real Uranium Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The world water lack problem has been already diagnosed and is acknowledged as one of the greatest challenges for this century. The scientific literature, documents and either nationals or internationals official reports like the Brazilian Water Agency (ANA) and UNESCO point out the main shortages and general management practices. Also in Brazil, it is a multi-facet problem that envelops several social agents for many decades and has tragic consequences in some regions of the country, like is the case of the northeastern semi-arid region. This work presents the strategies for expertise integration to attend demands for the establishment of partnerships that include several institutions, with different experiences in the region, to improve the acquaintance with dry climate in Brazilian semi-arid. The general objective was developing a conceptual model of technical multi-institutional arrangements as tools for aquifer management, promoting sustainable use of groundwater in the semi-arid region. Here, we present a conceptual model based in technical, political and socio-economical dimensions of sustainability that exchange information among them and with management requirements. This process must be turned in more productive agricultural systems with the introduction of new technology that respect the family arrangement of the production units. It is also expected that validation of this conceptual model allows an applicable alternative to other areas in the future, respected of course all the geo-socio-economical constraints of each site. (author)

  9. Precipitation pulses and carbon fluxes in semiarid and arid ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huxman, Travis E; Snyder, Keirith A; Tissue, David; Leffler, A Joshua; Ogle, Kiona; Pockman, William T; Sandquist, Darren R; Potts, Daniel L; Schwinning, Susan

    2004-10-01

    In the arid and semiarid regions of North America, discrete precipitation pulses are important triggers for biological activity. The timing and magnitude of these pulses may differentially affect the activity of plants and microbes, combining to influence the C balance of desert ecosystems. Here, we evaluate how a "pulse" of water influences physiological activity in plants, soils and ecosystems, and how characteristics, such as precipitation pulse size and frequency are important controllers of biological and physical processes in arid land ecosystems. We show that pulse size regulates C balance by determining the temporal duration of activity for different components of the biota. Microbial respiration responds to very small events, but the relationship between pulse size and duration of activity likely saturates at moderate event sizes. Photosynthetic activity of vascular plants generally increases following relatively larger pulses or a series of small pulses. In this case, the duration of physiological activity is an increasing function of pulse size up to events that are infrequent in these hydroclimatological regions. This differential responsiveness of photosynthesis and respiration results in arid ecosystems acting as immediate C sources to the atmosphere following rainfall, with subsequent periods of C accumulation should pulse size be sufficient to initiate vascular plant activity. Using the average pulse size distributions in the North American deserts, a simple modeling exercise shows that net ecosystem exchange of CO2 is sensitive to changes in the event size distribution representative of wet and dry years. An important regulator of the pulse response is initial soil and canopy conditions and the physical structuring of bare soil and beneath canopy patches on the landscape. Initial condition influences responses to pulses of varying magnitude, while bare soil/beneath canopy patches interact to introduce nonlinearity in the relationship between pulse

  10. Improvement of Surface Albedo Simulations over Arid Regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAO Yan; L(U) Shihua; ZHANG Yu; MENG Xianhong; YANG Shengpeng

    2008-01-01

    To improve the simulation of the surface radiation budget and related thermal processes in arid regions, three sophisticated surface albedo schemes designed for such regions were incorporated into the Biosphere-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS). Two of these schemes are functions of the solar zenith angle (SZA), where the first one has one adjustable parameter defined as SZA1 scheme, and the second one has two empir-ical parameters defined as SZA2 scheme. The third albedo scheme is a function of solar angle and soil water that were developed based on arid-region observations from the Dunhuang field experiment (DHEX) (defined as DH scheme). We evaluated the performance of the original and newly-incorporated albedo schemes within BATS using the in-situ data from the Oasis System Energy and Water Cycle Field Experiment that was carried out in JinTa, Gansu arid area (JTEX). The results indicate that a control run by the original version of the BATS generates a constant albedo, while the SZA1 and SZA2 schemes basically can reproduce the observed diurnal cycle of surface albedo, although these two schemes still underestimate the albedo when SZA is high in the early morning and late afternoon, and overestimate it when SZA is low during noontime. The SZA2 scheme has a better overall performance than the SZA1 scheme. In addition, BATS with the DH scheme slightly improves the albedo simulation in magnitude as compared to that from the control run, but a diurnal cycle of albedo is not produced by this scheme. The SZAl and SZA2 schemes significantly increase the surface absorbed solar radiation by nearly 70 W m~2, which further raises the ground temperature by 6 K and the sensible heat flux by 35 W m~2. The increased solar radiation, heat flux, and temperature are more consistent with the observations that those from the control run. However, a significant improvement in these three variables is not found in BATS with the DH scheme due to the neglect of the diurnal cycle of

  11. Factors Affecting Adoption of Agroforestry Farming System as a Mean for Sustainable Agricultural Development and Environment Conservation in Arid Areas of Northern Kordofan State, Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arid and semi-arid areas represent about 60 percent of Sudan total area. One of the main environmental problems in the arid and semi-arid areas is diffraction's which reduces the natural potential of the already fragile ecosystems and renders rural people vulnerable to food shortages, the vagaries of weather and natural disasters. Deforestation which is considered one of the most critical environmental problems facing the world is one of the main causes of diffraction's. Between the years 1990 and 2005 Sudan lost about 8.8 millions hectares of forests, which represents 11%, of its forests mainly because of subsistence activities such as overgrazing, trees cutting and expansion of traditional agriculture. One of the areas that are very much affected by diffraction's is Northern Kordofan State. To rescue the situation the government of Sudan, with assistance from the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) and some donors, implemented a project that aimed primarily at restocking Acacia Senegal trees in Northern Kordofan State. This study is intended to explore the factors that caused differential rate of farmers' adoption rate of the Acacia Senegal based agroforestry farming system. The study data was collected from a clustered random sample of 300 farmers, through face to face interviews using a questionnaire that was pre-tested and validated. Frequency distribution and multiple regression analysis were used to analyze the data. It has been found that farmers' adoption of agroforestry farming system in Northern Kordofan state was significantly affected by the farmers' level of formal education, contact with extension agents, level of environmental awareness, cosmopoliteness, total area of owned land and extent of social participation. (author)

  12. Performance and effects of land cover type on synthetic surface reflectance data and NDVI estimates for assessment and monitoring of semi-arid rangeland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olexa, Edward M.; Lawrence, Rick L.

    2014-08-01

    Federal land management agencies provide stewardship over much of the rangelands in the arid and semi-arid western United States, but they often lack data of the proper spatiotemporal resolution and extent needed to assess range conditions and monitor trends. Recent advances in the blending of complementary, remotely sensed data could provide public lands managers with the needed information. We applied the Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflectance Fusion Model (STARFM) to five Landsat TM and concurrent Terra MODIS scenes, and used pixel-based regression and difference image analyses to evaluate the quality of synthetic reflectance and NDVI products associated with semi-arid rangeland. Predicted red reflectance data consistently demonstrated higher accuracy, less bias, and stronger correlation with observed data than did analogous near-infrared (NIR) data. The accuracy of both bands tended to decline as the lag between base and prediction dates increased; however, mean absolute errors (MAE) were typically ≤10%. The quality of area-wide NDVI estimates was less consistent than either spectral band, although the MAE of estimates predicted using early season base pairs were ≤10% throughout the growing season. Correlation between known and predicted NDVI values and agreement with the 1:1 regression line tended to decline as the prediction lag increased. Further analyses of NDVI predictions, based on a 22 June base pair and stratified by land cover/land use (LCLU), revealed accurate estimates through the growing season; however, inter-class performance varied. This work demonstrates the successful application of the STARFM algorithm to semi-arid rangeland; however, we encourage evaluation of STARFM's performance on a per product basis, stratified by LCLU, with attention given to the influence of base pair selection and the impact of the time lag.

  13. Pipeline monitoring with interferometry in non-arid regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCardle, Adrian; Rabus, Bernhard; Ghuman, Parwant [MacDonald Dettwiler, Richmond, BC (Canada); Freymueller, Jeff T. [University of Alaska, Fairbanks (United States)

    2005-07-01

    Interferometry has become a proven technique for accurately measuring ground movements caused by subsidence, landslides, earthquakes and volcanoes. Using space borne sensors such as the ERS, ENVISAT and RADARSAT satellites, ground deformation can be monitored on a millimeter level. Traditionally interferometry has been limited to arid areas however new technology has allowed for successful monitoring in vegetated regions and areas of changing land-cover. Analysis of ground movement of the Trans-Alaskan pipeline demonstrates how these techniques can offer pipeline engineers a new tool for observing potential dangers to pipeline integrity. Results from Interferometric Point Target Analysis were compared with GPS measurements and speckle tracking interferometry was demonstrated to measure a major earthquake. (author)

  14. Dynamic modeling of vegetation change in arid lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, V. B.; Coiner, J. C.; Barringer, T. H.

    1982-01-01

    A general framework for a digital desertification monitoring system (DDMS) for assessing the worldwide desertification growth rate is presented. The system relies on the development of Landsat derived indicators to identify local processes signalling the growth of arid regions. A study area consisting of the eastern edge of the Niger River delta in Mali was used to characterize three indicators in terms of the covariance of the multispectral scanner (MSS) bands 2 and 4, the correlation of the two bands, and the percent variance expressed by the first eigenvalue. The scenes are imaged multitemporallly in a 400 x 400 pixel array to detect vegetation cover changes. Criteria were defined which characterized the decrease or increase of vegetation. It was determined that the correlation coefficients are the best indicators, and are easily computed.

  15. Evaluating management-induced soil salinization in golf courses in semi-arid landscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Young

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Site-specific information on land management practices are often desired to make better assertions of their environmental impacts. A study was conducted in Lubbock, TX, in the Southern High Plains of the United States, an area characterized by semi-arid climatic conditions, to (1 examine the potential management-induced alteration in soil salinity indicators in golf course facilities and (2 develop predictive relationships for a more rapid soil salinity examination within these urban landscape soils using findings from portable x-ray fluorescence (PXRF spectrometer. Soil samples were collected from the managed (well irrigated and non-managed (non irrigated areas of seven golf course facilities at 0–10, 10–20, and 20–30 cm depths, and analyzed for a suite of chemical properties. Among the extractable cations, sodium (Na was significantly (p p < 0.05 higher in the managed areas. Water quality report collected over a 22-year period (1991–2013, all years not available indicated a gradual increase in pH, EC, SAR, total alkalinity, and extractable ions, thus, supporting the former findings. Findings from the PXRF suggested possible differences in chemical species and sources that contribute to salinity between the managed and non-managed zones. PXRF quantified Cl and S, and to a lesser extent Ca, individually and collectively explained 23–85% of the variability associated with soil salinity at these facilities.

  16. Bacterial Diversity within the Extreme Arid Atacama Desert Soils of the Yungay Region, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connon, S. A.; Lester, E. D.; Shafaat, H. S.; Obenhuber, D. C.; Ponce, A.

    2006-12-01

    Surface and subsurface soil samples analyzed for this study were collected from the hyper-arid Yungay region of the Atacama Desert, Chile. This is the first report of microbial diversity from DNA extracted directly from these extremely desiccated soils. Our data shows that 94% of the 16S rRNA genes cloned from these soils belong to the Actinobacteria phylum. A 24-hour time course series showed a diurnal water activity (aw) cycle that peaked at 0.52 in the early predawn hours, and ranged from 0.08 0.01 during the day. All measured water activity values were below the level required for microbial growth or enzyme activity. Total organic carbon (TOC) levels in this region were just above the limits of detection and ranged from 220 660 μg/g of soil. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) levels indicated cellular biomass ranging from 2 ×105 to 7 ×106 cell equivalents per gram of soil. The culturable counts were low with most samples showing no growth on standard plates of R2A medium; the highest single count was 47 colony forming units (CFU) per gram.

  17. Integrated Demonstration program -- Applying innovative technologies to VOC remediation in arid environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Historical activities at US DOE facilities around the United States during World War II, including development of a nuclear deterrent, resulted in the discharge of chemical and radioactive materials to the environment. The DOE has now focused a major technical effort on the mitigation of the effects of those discharges through an environmental restoration program. The DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD) launched a major initiative to develop and demonstrate more cost-effective and safer means of restoring contaminated areas. This initiative integrates available conventional technologies and innovative and/or emerging technologies with ongoing environmental restoration activities. The ultimate goal of the OTD initiative is to have demonstrated technologies available for commercial application when they are needed at DOE sites. A key element of the initiative is the creation of Integrated Demonstrations (IDs). The VOC Arid-ID is providing the mechanism for developing and deploying cradle-to-grave technical solutions using a creative approach for solving environmental cleanup problems at the Hanford site. Within the last 10 months, and from it's inception, the ID has been successful in deploying demonstrated technologies from monitoring and characterization through site remediation. The creation of IDs has provided DOE with a mechanism to accelerate the Hanford site cleanup by bringing technology forward in a timely manner to meet the needs of the stakeholders

  18. Alternative Landfill Cover and Monitoring Systems for Landfills in Arid Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In December 2000, a performance monitoring facility was constructed adjacent to the mixed waste disposal unit U-3ax/bl at the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site. This facility consists of eight drainage lysimeters measuring 10 feet in diameter, 8 feet deep, and backfilled with native soil. The lysimeters have three different surface treatments: two were left bare, two were revegetated with native species, and two were allowed to revegetate with invader species (two are reserved for future studies). The lysimeters are instrumented with an array of soil water content and soil water potential sensors and have sealed bottoms so that any drainage can be measured. All sensors are working properly and indicate that the bare lysimeters are the wettest, as expected. The vegetated lysimeters, both seeded and those allowed to revegetate with invader species, are significantly drier than the bare cover treatments. No drainage has occurred in any of the lysimeters. The Accelerated Site Technology Deployment program under the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science and Technology provided the funding for this project with the objective of reducing the uncertainty associated with the performance of monolayer-evapotranspiration waste covers in arid regions such as the one deployed at U-3ax/bl

  19. Optimal integrated management of groundwater resources and irrigated agriculture in arid coastal regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundmann, J.; Schütze, N.; Heck, V.

    2014-09-01

    Groundwater systems in arid coastal regions are particularly at risk due to limited potential for groundwater replenishment and increasing water demand, caused by a continuously growing population. For ensuring a sustainable management of those regions, we developed a new simulation-based integrated water management system. The management system unites process modelling with artificial intelligence tools and evolutionary optimisation techniques for managing both water quality and water quantity of a strongly coupled groundwater-agriculture system. Due to the large number of decision variables, a decomposition approach is applied to separate the original large optimisation problem into smaller, independent optimisation problems which finally allow for faster and more reliable solutions. It consists of an analytical inner optimisation loop to achieve a most profitable agricultural production for a given amount of water and an outer simulation-based optimisation loop to find the optimal groundwater abstraction pattern. Thereby, the behaviour of farms is described by crop-water-production functions and the aquifer response, including the seawater interface, is simulated by an artificial neural network. The methodology is applied exemplarily for the south Batinah re-gion/Oman, which is affected by saltwater intrusion into a coastal aquifer system due to excessive groundwater withdrawal for irrigated agriculture. Due to contradicting objectives like profit-oriented agriculture vs aquifer sustainability, a multi-objective optimisation is performed which can provide sustainable solutions for water and agricultural management over long-term periods at farm and regional scales in respect of water resources, environment, and socio-economic development.

  20. A Multi-Satellite Approach for Water Storage Monitoring in an Arid Watershed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawit T. Ghebreyesus

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to use satellite imagery to monitor the water budget of Al Ain region in the United Arab Emirates (UAE. Inflows and outflows were estimated and the trend of water storage variation in the study area was examined from 2005 to 2014. Evapotranspiration was estimated using the simplified Penman-Monteith equation. Landsat images were used to determine the extent of agricultural and green areas. Time series of gravity recovery and climate experiment (GRACE observations over the study area were used to assess the inferred water storage variation from satellite data. The change of storage inferred from the Water Budget Equation showed a decreasing trend at an average rate of 2.57 Mm3 annually. Moreover, GRACE readings showed a decreasing trend at a rate of 0.35 cm of water depth annually. Mann-Kendal, a non-parametric trend test, proved the presence of significant negative trends in both time series at a 5% significance level. A two-month lag resulted in a better agreement (R2 = 0.55 between the change in water storage and GRACE anomalies within the study area. These results suggest that water storage in the study area is being depleted significantly. Moreover, the potential of remote sensing in water resource management, especially in remote and arid areas, was demonstrated.

  1. Various ARID1A expression patterns and their clinical significance in gastric cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Bae; Ham, In-Hye; Hur, Hoon; Lee, Dakeun

    2016-03-01

    AT-rich interactive domain 1A (ARID1A) is frequently mutated in gastric cancers, and loss of ARID1A expression is considered a poor prognostic factor in various cancers. However, in practice, ARID1A shows various expression patterns, and our understanding of its significance is limited. We performed immunohistochemistry for ARID1A, MLH1, and pS6 using whole tissue blocks of 350 gastric cancers and classified the ARID1A expression as follows: retained (63.7%), reduced (17.7%), complete loss (14.9%), and partial loss (3.7%). Complete/partial loss was more common in poorly differentiated histology (P hazard ratio [HR], 1.732; P = .015) and OS (HR, 1.751; P = .013). Worse DFS (HR, 2.672; P = .005) and OS (HR, 2.531; P = .002) were also noted in the group with partial loss. High expression of pS6 was observed more frequently in groups showing altered ARID1A expression patterns (P understanding ARID1A with implications for future research and therapeutics. PMID:26826411

  2. Thermoluminescence and new 14C age estimates for late quaternary loesses in southwestern Nebraska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maat, P.B.; Johnson, W.C.

    1996-01-01

    Loess of late Quaternary age mantles most of Nebraska south of the Platte River Valley. At least five late Quaternary loesses are recognized: from oldest to youngest, one or more undifferentiated pre-lllinoian loesses, the Loveland Loess, the Gilman Canyon Loess, which exhibits a well developed soil and rests unconformably on the Sangamon soil, the Peoria Loess capped by the Brady soil, and the Bignell Loess, which is distributed discontinuously. Previous research shows that the Loveland Loess is Illinoian. the Gilman Canyon Loess and Peoria Loess are Wisconsin, and the Bignell Loess is Holocene. We present here the first thermoluminescence (TL) age estimates and new C ages for these late Quaternary loesses at two key sections in southwestern Nebraska, the Eustis ash pit and the Bignell Hill road cut. TL age estimates from all samples collected from Eustis ash pit and Bignell Hill were internally consistent. TL and C age estimates from these two sections generally agree and support previous age determinations. The TL age estimate on Loveland Loess indicates deposition at 163 ka. TL and radiocarbon age estimates indicate that Oilman Canyon Loess, believed to be deposited during the Farmdale interstade, first began to accumulate at about 40 ka: the lower part of the Gilman Canyon Loess is 36 ka at Eustis and the middle of the unit is 30 ka at Bignell Hill. The lower and upper parts of the Peoria Loess give age estimates of 24 ka and 17 ka, respectively. TL age estimates for deposition of the Bignell Loess are 9 ka near the base, in agreement with radiocarbon age estimates, and 6 ka immediately below the modern soil, substantiating its Holocene age. Comparisons of TL age estimates with ??18O and insolation curves which show loess deposition during interglacial and interstadial as well as glacial periods, indicate that loess deposition on the Great Plains can occur under a variety of climatic conditions.

  3. Incidence of retinopathy of prematurity and risk factors in the South-Western Region of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Feghhi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of this study was to report the incidence of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP and the contribution of various risk factors to ROP in the south-western region of Iran. Material and Methods: This cross-sectional case-control series reviewed all low birth weight (LBW, ≤2000 g neonates and/or neonates less than 32 weeks gestational age who had been hospitalized in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit from 2006 to 2010. The cohort was divided into infants without ROP (nonROP group and infants with ROP (ROP group. Infants were first examined by a group of pediatric ophthalmologists 6 weeks after delivery, and then were followed every 1-2 weeks until death, discharge or complete retinal avascularization. If an infant developed ROP, further examinations were performed based on the Early Treatment for Retinopathy of Prematurity Study protocol. Demographic data, medical treatment, and ophthalmic disorders were all statistically analyzed. Results: A total of 576 infants met the criteria for evaluation. Of 576 total patients, 183 infants (32% (88 males, 95 females had ROP. There were significant differences between groups in gestational age, body weight, and duration of oxygen administration, and sepsis (P<0.05. Male/female ratio, single and multiple births, and jaundice, phototherapy, and blood transfusion were not significant. The majority of ROP was stage I or II (137, 74.8%. Stage III or greater developed in 46 infants (25.1% [Note: The ocular history and ocular outcomes are not risk factors.] Conclusions: The incidence of ROP in this study is higher than that in other parts of the world. Awareness and knowledge of ROP and its relative risks need to be reinforced in ophthalmologists and other health practitioners.

  4. Managing Carbon on Federal Public Lands: Opportunities and Challenges in Southwestern Colorado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilling, Lisa; Kelsey, Katharine C; Fernandez, Daniel P; Huang, Yin D; Milford, Jana B; Neff, Jason C

    2016-08-01

    Federal lands in the United States have been identified as important areas where forests could be managed to enhance carbon storage and help mitigate climate change. However, there has been little work examining the context for decision making for carbon in a multiple-use public land environment, and how science can support decision making. This case study of the San Juan National Forest and the Bureau of Land Management Tres Rios Field Office in southwestern Colorado examines whether land managers in these offices have adequate tools, information, and management flexibility to practice effective carbon stewardship. To understand how carbon was distributed on the management landscape we added a newly developed carbon map for the SJNF-TRFO area based on Landsat TM texture information (Kelsey and Neff in Remote Sens 6:6407-6422. doi: 10.3390/rs6076407 , 2014). We estimate that only about 22 % of the aboveground carbon in the SJNF-TRFO is in areas designated for active management, whereas about 38 % is in areas with limited management opportunities, and 29 % is in areas where natural processes should dominate. To project the effects of forest management actions on carbon storage, staff of the SJNF are expected to use the Forest Vegetation Simulator (FVS) and extensions. While identifying FVS as the best tool generally available for this purpose, the users and developers we interviewed highlighted the limitations of applying an empirically based model over long time horizons. Future research to improve information on carbon storage should focus on locations and types of vegetation where carbon management is feasible and aligns with other management priorities. PMID:27272016

  5. Managing Carbon on Federal Public Lands: Opportunities and Challenges in Southwestern Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilling, Lisa; Kelsey, Katharine C.; Fernandez, Daniel P.; Huang, Yin D.; Milford, Jana B.; Neff, Jason C.

    2016-08-01

    Federal lands in the United States have been identified as important areas where forests could be managed to enhance carbon storage and help mitigate climate change. However, there has been little work examining the context for decision making for carbon in a multiple-use public land environment, and how science can support decision making. This case study of the San Juan National Forest and the Bureau of Land Management Tres Rios Field Office in southwestern Colorado examines whether land managers in these offices have adequate tools, information, and management flexibility to practice effective carbon stewardship. To understand how carbon was distributed on the management landscape we added a newly developed carbon map for the SJNF-TRFO area based on Landsat TM texture information (Kelsey and Neff in Remote Sens 6:6407-6422. doi: 10.3390/rs6076407, 2014). We estimate that only about 22 % of the aboveground carbon in the SJNF-TRFO is in areas designated for active management, whereas about 38 % is in areas with limited management opportunities, and 29 % is in areas where natural processes should dominate. To project the effects of forest management actions on carbon storage, staff of the SJNF are expected to use the Forest Vegetation Simulator (FVS) and extensions. While identifying FVS as the best tool generally available for this purpose, the users and developers we interviewed highlighted the limitations of applying an empirically based model over long time horizons. Future research to improve information on carbon storage should focus on locations and types of vegetation where carbon management is feasible and aligns with other management priorities.

  6. The genesis of manganese concretions in the Igarra area, Southwestern Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bafor, B. E.; Mücke, A.

    An unusual supergene manganese enrichment occurs in the Igarra Formation within the schist belt of southwestern Nigeria. The manganese occurs mainly as peanut-size pisolitic grains or spherical concretions in the weathered schistose units within the formation. The mineralogy of the weathered schists consists of irregularly shaped quartz grains of varying sizes embedded in a matrix composed mainly of sheet-silicates, organic materials and heavy minerals (mostly oxides) which have been almost completely replaced by todorokite. The most abundant of these heavy minerals was probably ilnenite (FeTiO 3) which has now been transformed into pseudo-rutile (Fe 2Ti 3O 9) by the leaching of iron. Ore microscopic studies reveal that the concretions have essentially the same mineralogy as the weathered host rock. But in addition, they also contain some plant remains in the form of decomposing cellular tissues which are generally either completely or partly replaced by todorokite which also replaces the surrounding cement. Microprobe analysis of relicts of the original cement indicates that it was initially thuringitic to chamositic in composition, with FeO content of about 38 weight %. Manganese replacement of the cement was at various stages. The final product of the enrichment process contained over 70 % MnO while the FeO value decreased to only about 2 %. The unusual aspect of this enrichment is the reversal in the usual process of separation of manganese from iron. The reversal is explained as resulting from the transportation of the two elements in the supergene solution in the form of organo-metallic complexes. The manganese complex, being less stable than the iron complex, was precipitated around spots defined by relicts of decomposing plant materials whcih formed a geochemical manganese barrier, while the more stable iron complex still remained in solution. Subsequent erosion concentrated the manganese-rich spots into resistant concretions paving the present surface of

  7. Designing of zero energy office buildings in hot arid climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Gwad, Mohamed

    2011-07-01

    The designing of office buildings by using large glass areas to have a transparent building is an attractive approach in the modern office building architecture. This attitude increases the energy demand for cooling specially in the hot arid region which has long sun duration time, while the use of small glazing areas increases the energy demand for lighting. The use of uncontrolled natural ventilation increases the rate of hot ambient air flow which increases the building energy demand for cooling. At the same time, the use of mechanical ventilation to control the air change rate may increase the energy demand for fans. Some ideas such as low energy design concept are introduced for improving the building energy performance and different rating systems have been developed such as LEED, BREEAM and DGNB for evaluating building energy performance system. One of the new ideas for decreasing the dependence on fossil fuels and improving the use of renewable energy is the net zero-energy building concept in which the building generates enough renewable energy on site to equal or exceed its annual energy use. This work depends on using the potentials of mixing different energy strategies such as hybrid ventilation strategy, passive night cooling, passive chilled ceiling side by side with the integrating of photovoltaic modules into the building facade to produce energy and enrich the architectural aesthetics and finally reaching the Net Zero Energy Building. There are different definitions for zero energy buildings, however in this work the use of building-integrated Photovoltaic (BIPV) to provide the building with its annual energy needs is adopted, in order to reach to a Grid-Connected Net-Zero Energy Office Building in the hot arid desert zone represented by Cairo, Egypt. (orig.)

  8. Ecotoxicology for risk assessment in arid zones: some key issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everts, J W

    1997-01-01

    In the hot arid zones of the world, ecotoxicological research is in statu nascendi. In these zones, the major sources of contamination by toxicants are: (1) plant protection and vector control in wet zones; (2) large-scale crop protection campaigns in dry and ephemeral wet zones; (3) refuse and obsolete pesticides in dry zones; and (4) mining. Economic development in many of these zones requires an adequate knowledge of certain basic principles, i.e., where extrapolating existing knowledge does not apply. The vulnerability of ecosystems to contaminants is closely related to water flow. In dry areas, species are susceptible to factors that interfere with the ecophysiological properties regulating water loss. Most hot arid areas are found at low latitudes where temperatures show striking extremes both in time and space. Living organisms are physiologically resistant and/or show adaptive behavior to these temperature extremes. Very little is known about the effects of toxicants on these key resistant and adaptive functions, although by extrapolation a few assumptions can be made. The effects of hyperthermia, for instance, can be aggravated by GSH depleting substances, and the temporary disabling effects characteristic of many pesticides may prove fatal under these circumstances. Most wet areas show a spatial concentration of both human activity and wildlife. In mesic zones, the contamination of water represents a health risk to both humans and other living organisms. The vast majority of aquatic communities are those inhabiting temporary pools and streams. Their populations are characterized by short reproductive cycles and/or long dormant stages. Toxicants affecting growth in these areas have been shown to have a deleterious effect. In a synthesis of existing knowledge the most prominent gaps are identified and priorities for further research are made. PMID:9002429

  9. Diversity and activity of denitrifiers of Chilean arid soil ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GescheBraker

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The Chilean sclerophyllous matorral is a Mediterranean semiarid ecosystem affected by erosion, with low soil fertility and limited by nitrogen. However, limitation of resources is even more severe for desert soils such as from the Atacama Desert, one of the most extreme arid deserts on Earth. Topsoil organic matter, nitrogen and moisture content were significantly higher in the semiarid soil compared to the desert soil. Although the most significant loss of biologically preferred nitrogen from terrestrial ecosystems occurs via denitrification, virtually nothing is known on the activity and composition of denitrifier communities thriving in arid soils. In this study, we explored denitrifier communities from two soils with profoundly distinct edaphic factors. While denitrification activity in the desert soil was below detection limit, the semiarid soil sustained denitrification activity. To elucidate the genetic potential of the soils to sustain denitrification processes we performed community analysis of denitrifiers based on nitrite reductase (nirK and nirS genes as functional marker genes for this physiological group. Presence of nirK-type denitrifiers in both soils was demonstrated but failure to amplify nirS from the desert soil suggests very low abundance of nirS-type denitrifiers shedding light on the lack of denitrification activity. Phylogenetic analysis showed a very low diversity of nirK with only three distinct genotypes in the desert soil which conditions presumably exert a high selection pressure. While nirK diversity was also limited to only few, albeit distinct genotypes, the semiarid matorral soil showed a surprisingly broad genetic variability of the nirS gene. The Chilean matorral is a shrub land plant community which form vegetational patches stabilizing the soil and increasing its nitrogen and carbon content. These islands of fertility may sustain the development and activity of the overall microbial community and of

  10. Intermediate depth burial of classified transuranic wastes in arid alluvium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intermediate depth disposal operations were conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) at the DOE's Nevada Test Site (NTS) from 1984 through 1989. These operations emplaced high-specific activity low-level wastes (LLW) and limited quantities of classified transuranic (TRU) wastes in 37 m (120-ft) deep, Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) boreholes. The GCD boreholes are 3 m (10 ft) in diameter and founded in a thick sequence of arid alluvium. The bottom 15 m (50 ft) of each borehole was used for waste emplacement and the upper 21 m (70 ft) was backfilled with native alluvium. The bottom of each GCD borehole is almost 200 m (650 ft) above the water table. The GCD boreholes are located in one of the most arid portions of the US, with an average precipitation of 13 cm (5 inches) per year. The limited precipitation, coupled with generally warm temperatures and low humidities results in a hydrologic system dominated by evapotranspiration. The US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) 40 CFR 191 defines the requirements for protection of human health from disposed TRU wastes. This EPA standard sets a number of requirements, including probabilistic limits on the cumulative releases of radionuclides to the accessible environment for 10,000 years. The DOE Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) has contracted with Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) to conduct a performance assessment (PA) to determine if the TRU wastes emplaced in the GCD boreholes complies with the EPA's 40 CFR 191 requirements. This paper describes DOE's actions undertaken to evaluate whether the TRU wastes in the GCD boreholes will, or will not, endanger human health. Based on preliminary modeling, the TRU wastes in the GCD boreholes meet the EPA's requirements, and are, therefore, protective of human health

  11. Rainfall partitioning by desert shrubs in arid regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    We measured the rainfall partitioning among throughfall, stemflow, and interception by desert shrubs in an arid region of China, and analyzed the influence of rainfall and canopy characteristics on this partitioning and its ecohydrological effects. The percent-ages of total rainfall accounted for by throughfall, stemflow, and interception ranged from 78.85±2.78 percent to 86.29±5.07 per-cent, from 5.50±3.73 percent to 8.47±4.19 percent, and from 7.54±2.36 percent to 15.95±4.70 percent, respectively, for the four shrubs in our study (Haloxylon ammodendron, Elaeagnus angustifolia, Tamarix ramosissima, and Nitraria sphaerocarpa). Rain-fall was significantly linearly correlated with throughfall, stemflow, and interception (P < 0.0001). The throughfall, stemflow, and interception percentages were logarithmically related to total rainfall (P < 0.01), but were quadratically related to the maximum 1-hour rainfall intensity (P < 0.01). The throughfall and stemflow percentages increased significantly with increasing values of the rainfall characteristics, whereas the interception percentage generally decreased (except for average wind speed, air temperature, and canopy evaporation). Regression analysis suggested that the stemflow percentage increased significantly with increasing crown length, number of branches, and branch angle (R2 = 0.92, P < 0.001). The interception percentage increased significantly with increasing LAI (leaf area index) and crown length, but decreased with increasing branch angle (R2 = 0.96, P < 0.001). The mean funnelling percentages for the four shrubs ranged from 30.27±4.86 percent to 164.37±6.41 percent of the bulk precipitation. Much of the precipitation was funnelled toward the basal area of the stem, confirming that shrub stemflow conserved in deep soil layers may be an available moisture source to support plant survival and growth under arid conditions.

  12. Isotopic evidence of the origin of groundwater in arid zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contribution of different pathways of recharge to the groundwater in the Negev desert, the southern arid part of Israel, is examined by means of isotope and chemical signatures which are imprinted on the waters. In regions covered by sand dunes, with no perennial vegetation cover, it was found that evaporation amounts to about 30%, while 70% of the rain water infiltrates into the subsurface. In dune areas covered by deep-rooted vegetation, all water flowing into the subsurface may be transpired by the vegetation. In limestone areas, recharge to groundwater is of the order of 2% and is mainly through gravel-filled river beds by flood water. The water from springs and wells in the Eocene limestone terrain conserves the mean isotopic composition of rainfall, with a tendency for enrichment in the heavy isotopes. The salinity of the groundwater is a function of rock dissolution rather than of evaporation. In chalk-built terrains the water flows in solution channels developed along joints in the vicinity of river beds. The tritium content of the water points towards a 'piston-action' model of recharge by floods. A preliminary study of the isotope salinity relations in the runoff from a small watershed has shown that rains which do not pass a certain threshold (2 mm) evaporate totally. Evaporation from surface flows produced by stronger rains is small. Salinity is increased by a factor of two as a result of flushing of salts left behind by previous, totally evaporated rains. All data lead to the conclusion that in arid regions the total quantity of water in local basins is limited. However, base-level basins, such as inter-mountain basins, rift valleys, etc., form a sink into which relatively small quantities from local watersheds flow which may accumulate to substantial quantities that could be used for regional development projects. The Arava rift valley is discussed as a case study. (author)

  13. Aridity/humidity status of land surface in China during the last three decades

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Shaohong; YIN Yunhe; ZHENG Du; YANG Qinye

    2005-01-01

    To clarify aridity/humidity status of land surface is helpful for studying environmental background and regional differences, seeking causes of environmental change, and providing a scientific basis for researches on climate change in the future. In this paper, the authors calculated potential evapotranspiration of China using data from 616 meteorological stations during the period of 1971-2000 with the Penman-Monteith model recommanded by FAO in 1998. Vysothkii's model was used to calculate aridity/humidity index. Then the calculated results of stations were interpolated to land surface using ArcGIS. Results show that the annual average potential evapotranspiration is 400-1500 mm in the whole country, 600-800 mm in most parts of it; and 350-1400 mm in growing season (April-Octobor), which is nearly 200 mm less than the annual average. According to the aridity/humidity indexes of 1.0, 1.5 and 4.0, the aridity/humidity status is categorized to four types, namely, humid, subhumid, semiarid and arid. A majority of stations (76%) are more humid in growing season than the annual average. Results of comprisons between the distribution map of aridity/humidity index with that of precipitation and vegetation indicate a good consistence of aridity/humidity status with natural environment. Therefore potential evapotranspiration calculated with modified FAO's Penman-Monteith model in combination with aridity/humidity index that considers water balance can more reasonably explain the actual land surface aridity/humidity status of China.

  14. Tropical Warm Semi-Arid Regions Expanding Over Temperate Latitudes In The Projected 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaud, A.; de Noblet, N. I.

    2015-12-01

    Two billion people today live in drylands, where extreme climatic conditions prevail, and natural resources are limited. Drylands are expected to expand under several scenarios of climatic change. However, relevant adaptation strategies need to account for the aridity level: it conditions the equilibrium tree-cover density, ranging from deserts (hyper-arid) to dense savannas (sub-humid). Here we focus on the evolution of climatically defined warm semi-arid areas, where low-tree density covers can be maintained. We study the global repartition of these regions in the future and the bioclimatic shifts involved. We adopted a bioclimatological approach based on the Köppen climate classification. The warm semi-arid class is characterized by mean annual temperatures over 18°C and a rainfall-limitation criterion. A multi-model ensemble of CMIP5 projections for three representative concentration pathways was selected to analyze future conditions. The classification was first applied to the start, middle and end of the 20th and 21st centuries, in order to localize past and future warm semi-arid regions. Then, time-series for the classification were built to characterize trends and variability in the evolution of those regions. According to the CRU datasets, global expansion of the warm semi-arid area has already started (~+13%), following the global warming trend since the 1900s. This will continue according to all projections, most significantly so outside the tropical belt. Under the "business as usual" scenario, the global warm semi-arid area will increase by 30% and expand 12° poleward in the Northern Hemisphere, according to the multi-model mean. Drying drives the conversion from equatorial sub-humid conditions. Beyond 30° of latitude, cold semi-arid conditions become warm semi-arid through warming, and temperate conditions through combined warming and drying processes. Those various transitions may have drastic but also very distinct ecological and sociological

  15. Antibody Reactivity of B Cells in Lupus Patients with Increased Disease Activity and ARID3a Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie M. Ward

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Earlier studies showed that the DNA-binding protein, Bright/ARID3a bound to a subset of human and mouse immunoglobulin heavy chain promoters where it enhanced expression. Indeed, mice with transgenic expression of ARID3a in all B lymphocytes have expanded MZ B cells and produce anti-nuclear antibodies (ANAs. Consistent with our findings in mice, we observed that human systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE patients had expanded numbers of peripheral blood ARID3a+ B cells that were associated with increased disease activity (p = 0.0038. We hypothesized that ARID3a+ naïve B cells would eventually produce autoantibodies, explaining associations between ARID3a expression and disease activity in lupus. Unlike healthy controls, ARID3a was expressed in the naïve B cell population in SLE patients, and we hypothesized that these might represent expansions of autoreactive cells. Therefore, monoclonal antibodies were generated from single-sorted naïve B cells derived from patients with normal (ARID3aN and high (ARID3aH numbers of ARID3a+ B cells. We found that ARID3a expression did not correlate with autoantibody expression. Furthermore, measures of antigen specificities of autoreactive antibodies did not reveal skewing toward particular proteins. These data suggest that the association of increased disease activity in SLE with numbers of ARID3a+ B lymphocytes may be mediated by an antibody-independent mechanism.

  16. Arthropods in Natural Communities in Mescal Agave (Agave durangensis Gentry in an Arid Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria P. Gonzalez-Castillo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The arthropods have a very important role in the arid zones due to their interactions with many organism and because they constituted an important element in the structure of the plant community. Nevertheless their importance there are few knowledge about the community of arthropods associated to vegetation in arid zones in the North of Mexico. The present study had the objective of determining the abundance, richness and diversity of arthropods in three localities where there are natural populations of mescal agave in the State of Durango, Mexico. Approach: In order to know the structure community of the arthropods associated to the mescal agave, we perform a sampling schedule during March 2008 to November 2010 by direct collection, using transects in three different localities with the presence of mescal agave. The relative abundance, species richness, Shannon’s diversity index, Pielou’s Index of evenness, Jaccard’s similitude and Simpson’s dominance indexes were determined. Results: A total of 4665 individual arthropods associated to mescal agave corresponding to 39 species were found. El Mezquital had the highest abundance and relative abundance (44.1% with 29 species. The mean species abundance was not significantly different between localities using Turkey’s test. The highest density per unit of area was found in El Mezquital (La Brena had the highest species diversity (1.89, evenness (0.61 and dominance (0.78. At the taxon level, Hymenoptera had the highest number of species represented (14, followed by Coleoptera (9 and hemiptera (5, with the remaining taxons with four, two and one species each. Conclusion: The greatest similitude was observed between La Brena and El Mezquital (46% which shared seven taxons, while the least similitude was observed between El Venado and La Brena (29%. Dominance/diversity curves are presented for each locality. The species Caulotops sp., Acutaspis agavis, Chilorus sp

  17. Should we plant trees to offset greenhouse gas emissions in semi-arid environments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pataki, D. E.; Pincetl, S.; Gillespie, T. W.; Li, W.; McCarthy, H. R.; Saatchi, S.; Saphores, J.

    2008-12-01

    Urban tree planting programs have been gaining popularity in the United States. Urban trees have been associated with a variety of environmental benefits, including improvements in air quality, mitigation of urban heat island effects, reductions in stormwater runoff, and more recently, carbon sequestration. There are also other potential aesthetic and economic benefits of urban forests, which have been shown to affect real estate values. However, there may also be significant economic and environmental costs of planting and maintaining trees in urban areas, particularly in semi-arid environments where trees are not native and require irrigation and fertilization. We are conducting an analysis of the Million Tree Initiative in the city of Los Angeles, which has committed to a major tree planting program. Los Angeles currently has a low tree canopy cover relative to other cities, particularly in its low income neighborhoods. We are evaluating the decision-making processes associated with the new tree planting program, its perceived benefits, and its actual benefits based on measurements of plant and ecosystem processes such as transpiration, photosynthesis, and water use efficiency; remote sensing analyses of tree cover and surface temperature; and economic analyses. We have found great variability in the interpretation of the program by its various participants, but also significant institutional learning as the program has evolved. Our datasets have challenged some of the common assumptions of the program, for example, the assumption that native species use less water than imported species and are therefore more environmentally beneficial in terms of water resources. We have also found significant impacts of the urban forest on air temperature, which may reduce energy use during the summer due to reductions in air conditioning. This is likely to be a larger effect of urban trees on greenhouse gas emissions than direct carbon sequestration alone, which is a very

  18. The 2010 spring drought reduced primary productivity in southwestern China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many parts of the world experience frequent and severe droughts. Summer drought can significantly reduce primary productivity and carbon sequestration capacity. The impacts of spring droughts, however, have received much less attention. A severe and sustained spring drought occurred in southwestern China in 2010. Here we examine the influence of this spring drought on the primary productivity of terrestrial ecosystems using data on climate, vegetation greenness and productivity. We first assess the spatial extent, duration and severity of the drought using precipitation data and the Palmer drought severity index. We then examine the impacts of the drought on terrestrial ecosystems using satellite data for the period 2000–2010. Our results show that the spring drought substantially reduced the enhanced vegetation index (EVI) and gross primary productivity (GPP) during spring 2010 (March–May). Both EVI and GPP also substantially declined in the summer and did not fully recover from the drought stress until August. The drought reduced regional annual GPP and net primary productivity (NPP) in 2010 by 65 and 46 Tg C yr−1, respectively. Both annual GPP and NPP in 2010 were the lowest over the period 2000–2010. The negative effects of the drought on annual primary productivity were partly offset by the remarkably high productivity in August and September caused by the exceptionally wet conditions in late summer and early fall and the farming practices adopted to mitigate drought effects. Our results show that, like summer droughts, spring droughts can also have significant impacts on vegetation productivity and terrestrial carbon cycling. (letter)

  19. A multiscaled model of southwestern willow flycatcher breeding habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatten, J.R.; Paradzick, C.E.

    2003-01-01

    The southwestern willow flycatcher (SWFL; Empidonax traillii extimus) is an endangered songbird whose habitat has declined dramatically over the last century. Understanding habitat selection patterns and the ability to identify potential breeding areas for the SWFL is crucial to the management and conservation of this species. We developed a multiscaled model of SWTL breeding habitat with a Geographic Information System (GIS), survey data, GIS variables, and multiple logistic regressions. We obtained presence and absence survey data from a riverine ecosystem and a reservoir delta in south-central Arizona, USA, in 1999. We extracted the GIS variables from satellite imagery and digital elevation models to characterize vegetation and floodplain within the project area. We used multiple logistic regressions within a cell-based (30 X 30 m) modeling environment to (1) determine associations between GIS variables and breeding-site occurrence at different spatial scales (0.09-72 ha), and (2) construct a predictive model. Our best model explained 54% of the variability in breeding-site occurrence with the following variables: vegetation density at the site (0.09 ha), proportion of dense vegetation and variability in vegetation density within a 4.5-ha neighborhood, and amount of floodplain or flat terrain within a 41-ha neighborhood. The density of breeding sites was highest in areas that the model predicted to be most suitable within the project area and at an external test site 200 km away. Conservation efforts must focus on protecting not only occupied patches, but also surrounding riparian forests and floodplain to ensure long-term viability of SWTL. We will use the multiscaled model to map SWTL breeding habitat in Arizona, prioritize future survey effort, and examine changes in habitat abundance and quality over time.

  20. Exploration for uranium in southwestern Anatolia. A case history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present project, a UNDP/IAEA technical assistance project with the Turkish Mineral Exploration and Research Institute, seeks unoxidized ore in the reduzate zone below the water table in southwestern Turkey. It employs a multi-method attack that utilizes reconnaissance geological mapping, scintillometer surveys, stream sediment surveys, water sampling for uranium and radon, rotary non-core drilling, multielement geochemical laboratory analysis of field samples, radiometric determinations for secular equilibrium, and computer treatment of the results. Ideally, the initial stages would include both radiometric surveys and reconnaissance geological mapping; the mapping also provides basic stratigraphic and structural control for drilling. More detailed follow-up surveys in anomalous areas consist of a scintillometer survey, soil gas (Rn), and soil geochemistry on a predetermined grid, and a detailed hydrogeochemical survey where numerous wells exist. The geochemical investigations are supported by a laboratory in Ankara that can perform over 1000 determinations a day with a five-man team. Non-core rotary drilling with 1-m samples of cuttings, together with gamma, spontaneous potential, and resistance logs provide adequate sub-surface information. About 25000 m have been drilled by the equivalent of two rig years. Only four holes have been cored for mineralogical and equilibrium information. Drilling to a nominal 100-m depth is accomplished to determine the stratigraphy and to evaluate the area for uranium favourability. Particular attention is given to carbon and pyrite content and to the possibility of redox interfaces. Mineralized zones have been penetrated in two areas. At one, the lead was a possible redox interface. The favourability of the area was confirmed by later geochemical surveys. At the other area, drilling was stimulated and guided by hydrogeochemical anomalies. It is concluded that the multi-method attack on exploration is effective in identifying

  1. "Actionable" Climate Scenarios for Natural Resource Managers in Southwestern Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangwala, I.; Rondeau, R.; Wyborn, C.

    2014-12-01

    Locally relevant projections of climate change provide critical insights for natural resource managers seeking to adapt their management activities to climate change. To provide such information, we developed narrative scenarios of future climate change and its impacts on different ecosystems in southwestern Colorado. This multi-institution and trans-disciplinary project seeks to provide useful and useable knowledge to facilitate climate change adaptation in the context of uncertainty. The narratives are intended to provide detailed insights into the range of changes that natural resource managers may face in the future. These scenarios were developed in an iterative process through interactions between ecologists, social and climate scientists. In our scenario development process, climate uncertainty is acknowledged by having multiple scenarios, where each scenario is regarded as a storyline with equal probability as another scenario. Rather than a qualitative narration of the general direction of change and range in responses, we quantified changes in several decision relevant climate and ecological responses based on our best available understanding and provided a tight storyline for each scenario to facilitate (a) a more augmented use of scientific information in a decision-making process, (b) differential responses from stakeholders across the different scenarios, and (c) identification of strategies that could work across these multiple scenarios. This presentation will discuss the process of selecting the scenarios, quantifying climate and ecological responses, and the criteria for building the narrative for each scenario. We will also cover the process by which these scenarios get used, and how the user feedbacks are integrated in further developing the tools and processes.

  2. A new species of Enyalioides (Iguanidae: Hoplocercinae from southwestern Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Torres-Carvajal

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a new species of Enyalioides from lowland cloud forests in southwestern Ecuador. This represents the third species in the genus known to occur west of the Andes in South America; the other two species are E. heterolepis and E. oshaughnessyi. Among other characters, the new species can be distinguished from other members in the genus by having small, keeled, paravertebrals; a series of skin folds on the lateral aspects of body and neck; size-homogeneous scales on body and limbs; distinct caudal segments; and an extensive dark patch on the gular region of adult males. Morphological similarity suggests that the new species, which we call E. touzeti, is closely related to E. oshaughnessyi.Describimos una especie nueva de Enyalioides del bosque nublado al suroccidente de Ecuador. Esta representa la tercera especie de este género que habita al occidente de los Andes en América del Sur; las otras dos especies occidentales son E. heterolepis y E. oshaughnessyi. La especie nueva se diferencia de otras especies del género por tener, entre otras características, paravertebrales pequeñas y quilladas, pliegues dermales a los lados del cuello y cuerpo, escamas homogéneas en el cuerpo y extremidades, segmentos caudales visibles, y un parche oscuro que cubre gran parte de la región gular en machos. Semejanzas morfológicas sugieren que la especie nueva, a la cual llamamos E. touzeti, está cercanamente relacionada con E. oshaughnessyi.

  3. Pattern of corrosive ingestion in southwestern Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingested corrosive material is a major pediatric emergency all over the world. The corrosive material can cause damage to the digestive tract, ranging from minor injury to strictures, and sometimes even death. We aimed to review the pattern of corrosive ingestion in children who had been admitted to Aseer Central Hospital in the Southwestern region of Saudi Arabia. This is a retrospective study of all children who had been admitted with a history of corrosive ingestion to Aseer Central Hospital over a period of five years period from 1990 to 1995. The records of 72 patients (38 males and 34 females) were reviewed. The data included age, sex, time lapse till admission, action taken by parents, presenting symptoms, general management given to the child, barium study, endoscopy, and the postcorrosive ingestion outcome of the child. The mean age of the pediatric patients was 28 + - 20 months. Different types of corrosives were encountered. The most common type was 5.25% hypochlorite in 36 patients (50%), kerosene in 12 patients (16.7%), caustic soda in nine patients (12.5%), hydrogen chloride and N-alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride (HC and ADB) in eight patients (11.1%), and other material in seven patients (9.7%). Endoscopy was done in 30 patients (31.7%), 14 of whom were abnormal. Barium swallow was performed in 11 patients; five of them showed strictures that required frequent dilatation whereas one needed interposition surgery. Corrosive injury is still a major pediatric emergency among young children. It carries a major risk of complications (mainly stricture) and requires standardized management based on evidence-based medicine. (author)

  4. Post-Gondwana geomorphic evolution of southwestern Africa: Implications for hte controls on landscape development from observations and numerical experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, Alan R.; Kooi, Henk; Beaumont, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between morphology and surficial geology is used to quantify the denudation that has occurred across southwestern Africa sicne the fragmentation of Gondwana during the Early Mesozoic. Two main points emerge. Signficant denudation, of the order of kilometers, is widespread except in the Kalahari region of the continental interior. The denudation is systematically distributed so that the continental exterior catchment, draining directly to the Cape basin, is denuded to a greater depth than the interior catchment inland of the Great Escarpment. The analysis also implies tha the majority of the denudation occurred before the beginning of the Cenozoic for both teh exerior and interior catchments. Existing models of landscape development are reviewed, and implications of the denudation chronology are incorporated into a revised conceptual model. This revision implies tha thte primary effect of rifting on the subsequent landscape evolution is that it generates two distinct drainage regimes. A marginal upwarp, or rift flank uplift, separates rejuvenated rivers that drain into the subsiding rift from rivers in the continetal interior that are deflected but not rejuvenated. The two catchments evolve independently unless they are integrated by breaching of hte marginal upwarp. If this occurs, the exterior baselevel is communicated to the interior catchment that is denuded accordingly. Denudation rates generally decrease as the margin evolves, and this decrease is reinforced by the exposure of substrate that is resistant to denudation and/or a change to a more arid climate. The observations do not reveal a particular style of smaller-scale landscape evolution, sucha s escarpment retreat, that is responsible for the differential denudation across the region. It is proposed that numerical model experiments, which reflect the observational insights at the large scale, may identify the smaller-scale controls on escarpment development if the model and natural

  5. Variation in functional rooting depth and soil water partitioning along an elevational gradient in the southwestern U.S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, J.; Hungate, B. A.; Kolb, T.; KOCH, G. W.

    2012-12-01

    In semi-arid environments, co-existing plant species may vary in rooting depth, reflecting functional differences in water sources. In mountains of the southwestern U.S., moisture availability increases with elevation and winter and summer precipitation inputs differ isotopically. Examining variation in functional rooting depth among different plant communities and seasons is important to understanding how these communities may respond to the predicted warming and drying of the Southwest. The goal of this study was to assess the water partitioning of the woody plant community along an elevational moisture gradient using water isotopes as a proxy for rooting depth. We hypothesized that spatial and temporal water partitioning would be greatest in low elevation, moisture-stressed sites and would decrease as moisture availability increases with elevation. Five plots were established in each of five biotic communities: upland Sonoran desert, pinyon-juniper woodland, ponderosa pine forest, mixed-conifer forest, and spruce-fir forest. Soils (surface, 20 cm, 40 cm) and stem samples of dominant woody perennials were sampled during the late spring dry season and in late summer following monsoon rains, water was extracted using a cryo-vacuum line, and δD and δ18O values were determined by off-axis cavity ringdown spectroscopy. Soil moisture content increased with elevation across all sites and increased with soil depth in the desert, pinyon-juniper, and ponderosa sites. The δD values differed significantly among species in the desert and the ponderosa forest communities (p=0.014 and 0.039 ), while no species differences in δD were found in the pinyon-juniper woodland or mixed-conifer forest. With the exception of the pinyon-juniper woodland, these data support our hypothesis that niche differentiation between species becomes less significant higher on the topographic moisture gradient, in the mixed-conifer forest. While spatial water partitioning mostly follows our

  6. Ecotoxicology of organisms adapted to life in temporary freshwater ponds in arid and semi-arid regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahr, J

    1997-01-01

    Hot arid and semi-arid zones are characterized by an abundance of temporary ponds. Most of these depend on rain for their existence. These habitats are distinguished by fluctuating and unpredictable changes in their hydrological regime and of physical and chemical conditions.They contain a uniquely-adapted fauna that copes in different ways with changing and often extreme temperatures, oxygen levels, pH, salinity and turbidity. A classification is presented of the most distinctive adaptations,the various tactics that organisms apply to survive dry periods. The main strategies are dormancy (escape in time) and dispersal (escape in space). These adaptations may affect the impact of toxicants on individuals, populations and communities of temporary ponds. The physiological adaptations of species found in temporary ponds are likely to alter the sensitivity to pollutants of characteristic species. Results from laboratory experiments,for example, suggest that fairy shrimp (Branchiopoda, Anostraca) may react differently to heavy metals and pesticides as the standard test species Daphnia. Life history strategies influence recovery rates of populations after exposure to acutely toxic substances such as pesticides. It is also suggested that slow growth and decreased reproductive capacity of organisms caused by toxicants may, in ephemeral ponds, result in the failure of annual recruitment. Whether assemblages of organisms in temporary ponds are generally more vulnerable or more resilient than those in permanent waters or temperate regions could not be determined conclusively with the limited data available. Ecological concepts for studying the habitat and the development of risk assessment methods for temporary ponds are briefly discussed. PMID:9002434

  7. Changes of AM fungal abundance along environmental gradients in the arid and semi-arid grasslands of northern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajun Hu

    Full Text Available Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi are ubiquitous symbionts of higher plants in terrestrial ecosystems, while the occurrence of the AM symbiosis is influenced by a complex set of abiotic and biotic factors. To reveal the regional distribution pattern of AM fungi as driven by multiple environmental factors, and to understand the ecological importance of AM fungi in natural ecosystems, we conducted a field investigation on AM fungal abundance along environmental gradients in the arid and semi-arid grasslands of northern China. In addition to plant parameters recorded in situ, soil samples were collected, and soil chemo-physical and biological parameters were measured in the lab. Statistical analyses were performed to reveal the relative contribution of climatic, edaphic and vegetation factors to AM fungal abundance, especially for extraradical hyphal length density (HLD in the soil. The results indicated that HLD were positively correlated with mean annual temperature (MAT, soil clay content and soil pH, but negatively correlated with both soil organic carbon (SOC and soil available N. The multiple regressions and structural equation model showed that MAT was the key positive contributor and soil fertility was the key negative contributor to HLD. Furthermore, both the intraradical AM colonization (IMC and relative abundance of AM fungi, which was quantified by real-time PCR assay, tended to decrease along the increasing SOC content. With regard to the obvious negative correlation between MAT and SOC in the research area, the positive correlation between MAT and HLD implied that AM fungi could potentially mitigate soil carbon losses especially in infertile soils under global warming. However, direct evidence from long-term experiments is still expected to support the AM fungal contribution to soil carbon pools.

  8. Assessing deep-seated landslide susceptibility using 3-D groundwater and slope-stability analyses, southwestern Seattle, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brien, Dianne L.; Reid, Mark E.

    2008-01-01

    In Seattle, Washington, deep-seated landslides on bluffs along Puget Sound have historically caused extensive damage to land and structures. These large failures are controlled by three-dimensional (3-D) variations in strength and pore-water pressures. We assess the slope stability of part of southwestern Seattle using a 3-D limit-equilibrium analysis coupled with a 3-D groundwater flow model. Our analyses use a high-resolution digital elevation model (DEM) combined with assignment of strength and hydraulic properties based on geologic units. The hydrogeology of the Seattle area consists of a layer of permeable glacial outwash sand that overlies less permeable glacial lacustrine silty clay. Using a 3-D groundwater model, MODFLOW-2000, we simulate a water table above the less permeable units and calibrate the model to observed conditions. The simulated pore-pressure distribution is then used in a 3-D slope-stability analysis, SCOOPS, to quantify the stability of the coastal bluffs. For wet winter conditions, our analyses predict that the least stable areas are steep hillslopes above Puget Sound, where pore pressures are elevated in the outwash sand. Groundwater flow converges in coastal reentrants, resulting in elevated pore pressures and destabilization of slopes. Regions predicted to be least stable include the areas in or adjacent to three mapped historically active deep-seated landslides. The results of our 3-D analyses differ significantly from a slope map or results from one-dimensional (1-D) analyses.

  9. Geology of conglomerate in Vempalle formation: new insights in stratigraphy of Papaghni Group, southwestern margin of Cuddapah Basin, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The southwestern part of Cuddapah Basin consists of two distinct types of rocks, i.e. lower arenaceous and upper calcareous, which are termed as Gulcheru quartzite and Vempalle formation. Results of field and subsurface exploration revealed two repeated sedimentary sequences of arenaceous-argillaceous-carbonate units in Papaghni Group. These sequences represent marine transgression and regression cycles in Papaghni Group. Field characteristics of conglomerate (Vempalle Conglomerate), observed above massive dolostone in lower part of Vempalle Formation, show extra-formational and polymictic nature. Subsurface exploration in Tumallapalle and extension areas has also proved continuity of Vempalle conglomerate over 25 km along strike and 3.10 km along downdip direction. Secondly, the gradational contact was observed between Gulcheru shale and massive dolostone in surface exposures, which was also confirmed in one borehole (BH No. TPL-II/83) drilled more than a kilometer vertical depth. The strike and dip continuity (of Vempalle conglomerate) and gradational contact (in Gulcheru) have given a new understanding to the stratigraphic position of rock sequence in Papaghni Group. In the present study, it is proposed to revise the stratigraphic succession by placing carbonate unit of massive dolostone as a part of Gulcheru Formation, and Vempalle Formation would commence with the Vempalle conglomerate. (author)

  10. Energy map of southwestern Wyoming, Part B: oil and gas, oil shale, uranium, and solar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biewick, Laura R.H.; Wilson, Anna B.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has compiled Part B of the Energy Map of Southwestern Wyoming for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI). Part B consists of oil and gas, oil shale, uranium, and solar energy resource information in support of the WLCI. The WLCI represents the USGS partnership with other Department of the Interior Bureaus, State and local agencies, industry, academia, and private landowners, all of whom collaborate to maintain healthy landscapes, sustain wildlife, and preserve recreational and grazing uses while developing energy resources in southwestern Wyoming. This product is the second and final part of the Energy Map of Southwestern Wyoming series (also see USGS Data Series 683, http://pubs.usgs.gov/ds/683/), and encompasses all of Carbon, Lincoln, Sublette, Sweetwater, and Uinta Counties, as well as areas in Fremont County that are in the Great Divide and Green River Basins.

  11. Characteristics and laws of MODS coupling relation in arid zone under global change

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ranghui; ZHANG Huizhi; HUANG Qing

    2006-01-01

    Global change has influenced the distribution pattern and spatio-temporal changes of resources in arid zone, and has restrained the land use and land cover change, which is shown by water-heat state, landscape structure, climate effect, and human activities. The above-mentioned characteristics have a close coupling relation with the mountain-oasisdesert system (MODS). The climate in Central Asia arid zone is warm and wet, which is different from that in northern China which takes a tendency of aridity, and the mechanism has restricted the characteristics and laws of MODS. Systematic interface characteristics and process, especially the formation,transformation and consumption laws of water resource reflect directly MODS's response to global change in arid zone. Spatio-temporal pattern, dynamic change, scale change and coupling mode of MODS reflect the ecology mechanism between the systems and within the systems.

  12. Integrating management objectives and grazing strategies on semi-arid rangelands

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Rangelands account for almost half of Nebraska's 24 million acres. Much of these expansive natural resource areas are in the semi-arid climatic region of Nebraska...

  13. Energy and water budgets of larks in a life history perspective : Parental effort varies with aridity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tieleman, BI; Williams, JB; Visser, GH

    2004-01-01

    We compared physiological, demographic, and ecological variables of larks to gain insights into life history variation along an aridity gradient, incorporating phylogenetic relationships in analyses when appropriate. Quantifying field metabolic rate (FMR). and water influx rate (WIR) of parents feed

  14. A brief introduction to Physical Geography of Arid Land in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A book, Physical Geography of Arid Land in China, mainly edited by Prof. Xi CHEN from Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography, Chinese Academy of Sciences has been published by Science Press in July of 2010.

  15. Assessment of Environment Control in Arid Area Green house coupled with Earth Tube Heat Exchanger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamlesh R. Jethva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In hot arid regions, yields are low and unstable, growing season limited to one. Greenhouses can stabilize and improve yields and extend seasons. But their adoption is impeded by the requirement of large amount of water for (evaporative cooling. Arid Area Greenhouse (AAG is developed to reduce or eliminate this need by employing earth-tube-heat-exchanger (ETHE. ETHE was able to heat the greenhouse from 9°C to 22-23°C in 30 minutes in the cold winter nights. Static ventilation along with shading was effective for day time to control till early March. Subsequently ETHE was also operated. Yield of tomato in Arid Area Greenhouse was 1.5 to 2 times and water saving in AAG was 44% of that in open-field condition. ETHE and natural ventilation hold promise as environmental control devices for greenhouses in hot arid regions

  16. Naturally occurring arsenic in the Miocene Hawthorn Group, southwestern Florida: Potential implication for phosphate mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To understand the mineralogical association, concentration, and distribution of arsenic (As) in the Hawthorn Group, the chemical and mineralogical composition of 362 samples that were collected from 16 cores in southwestern Florida were examined in detail. In the study area, the Hawthorn Group consisted primarily of a basal carbonate unit (the Arcadia Formation) and an upper siliciclastic unit (The Peace River Formation). The Peace River Formation contains appreciable amounts of phosphate and is currently being exploited for phosphate ore. Samples were taken from cores of each formation at intervals of 7.5 m. In addition, to the interval samples, sections likely to have high As concentrations, such as zones with pyrite crystals, hydrous ferric oxides, green clays, and organic material, were collected and analyzed. Bulk As concentrations were determined by hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS) after digestion with aqua regia (3:1 HCl and HNO3). The elements Fe, Al, Si, Mg, Ca, S, and P were measured on the same solutions by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The identification of discrete minerals was aided by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and chemical compositions within the sample matrix and in individual minerals were obtained by electron-probe microanalysis (EMPA). This detailed mineralogical and geochemical study demonstrated that: (1) As in the Hawthorn Group varied from formation to formation and was mostly concentrated in trace minerals, such as pyrite; (2) average As concentrations significantly changed from 8.8 mg/kg (σ = 8.6 mg/kg) in the Peace River Formation to 3.0 mg/kg (σ = 3.7 mg/kg) in the Tampa Member of the Arcadia Formation. Arsenic concentrations for all Hawthorn samples varied from 0.1 to 69.0 mg/kg; (3) pyrite, with one exception, occurred as framboids and was unevenly distributed throughout the Hawthorn Group; (4) pyrite framboids were located inside a francolite (carbonate

  17. Naturally occurring arsenic in the Miocene Hawthorn Group, southwestern Florida: Potential implication for phosphate mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazareva, Olesya [Department of Geology, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States); Pichler, Thomas [Department of Geology, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States)]. E-mail: pichler@shell.cas.usf.edu

    2007-05-15

    To understand the mineralogical association, concentration, and distribution of arsenic (As) in the Hawthorn Group, the chemical and mineralogical composition of 362 samples that were collected from 16 cores in southwestern Florida were examined in detail. In the study area, the Hawthorn Group consisted primarily of a basal carbonate unit (the Arcadia Formation) and an upper siliciclastic unit (The Peace River Formation). The Peace River Formation contains appreciable amounts of phosphate and is currently being exploited for phosphate ore. Samples were taken from cores of each formation at intervals of 7.5 m. In addition, to the interval samples, sections likely to have high As concentrations, such as zones with pyrite crystals, hydrous ferric oxides, green clays, and organic material, were collected and analyzed. Bulk As concentrations were determined by hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS) after digestion with aqua regia (3:1 HCl and HNO{sub 3}). The elements Fe, Al, Si, Mg, Ca, S, and P were measured on the same solutions by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The identification of discrete minerals was aided by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and chemical compositions within the sample matrix and in individual minerals were obtained by electron-probe microanalysis (EMPA). This detailed mineralogical and geochemical study demonstrated that: (1) As in the Hawthorn Group varied from formation to formation and was mostly concentrated in trace minerals, such as pyrite; (2) average As concentrations significantly changed from 8.8 mg/kg ({sigma} = 8.6 mg/kg) in the Peace River Formation to 3.0 mg/kg ({sigma} = 3.7 mg/kg) in the Tampa Member of the Arcadia Formation. Arsenic concentrations for all Hawthorn samples varied from 0.1 to 69.0 mg/kg; (3) pyrite, with one exception, occurred as framboids and was unevenly distributed throughout the Hawthorn Group; (4) pyrite framboids were located inside a francolite

  18. Understanding runoff processes in a semi-arid environment through isotope and hydrochemical hydrograph separations

    OpenAIRE

    Camacho Suarez, V. V.; Saraiva Okello, A. M. L.; Wenninger, J.W.; Uhlenbrook, S.

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of runoff generation mechanisms is crucial for the sustainable management of river basins such as the allocation of water resources or the prediction of floods and droughts. However, identifying the mechanisms of runoff generation has been a challenging task, even more so in arid and semi-arid areas where high rainfall and streamflow variability, high evaporation rates, and deep groundwater reservoirs may increase the complexity of hydrological process dyna...

  19. Understanding runoff processes in a semi-arid environment through isotope and hydrochemical hydrograph separations

    OpenAIRE

    V. V. Camacho; Saraiva Okello, A. M. L.; Wenninger, J.W.; Uhlenbrook, S.

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of runoff generation mechanisms is crucial for the sustainable management of river basins such as the allocation of water resources or the prediction of floods and droughts. However, identifying the mechanisms of runoff generation has been a challenging task, even more so in arid and semi-arid areas where high rainfall and streamflow variability, high evaporation rates, and deep groundwater reservoirs increase the complexity of hydrologica...

  20. Impact of grazing on range plant community components under arid Mediterranean climate in northern Syria

    OpenAIRE

    Niane, A.A.

    2013-01-01

    Keywords: Rotational grazing, full protection, continuous grazing species richness, species diversity, soil seed bank, Bayesian methods, Salsola vermiculata, seed longevity, rangeland management, Syria.   Rangelands represent 70% of the semi-arid and arid Mediterranean land mass. It is a natural habitat for millions of people whose livelihood depends on animal husbandry. The revolutionary developments in the animal husbandry and veterinary medicines resulted in exponential increases in h...

  1. Deletion of Arid1a in Reproductive Tract Mesenchymal Cells Reduces Fertility in Female Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiyin; Khatri, Shikha; Broaddus, Russell; Wang, Zhong; Hawkins, Shannon M

    2016-04-01

    Women with endometriosis can suffer from decreased fecundity or complete infertility via abnormal oocyte function or impaired placental-uterine interactions required for normal pregnancy establishment and maintenance. Although AT-rich interactive domain 1A (SWI-like) (ARID1A) is a putative tumor suppressor in human endometrial cancers and endometriosis-associated ovarian cancers, little is known about its role in normal uterine function. To study the potential function of ARID1A in the female reproductive tract, we generated mice with a conditional knockout of Arid1a using anti-Müllerian hormone receptor 2-Cre Female Arid1a conditional knockout mice exhibited a progressive decrease in number of pups per litter, with a precipitous decline after the second litter. We observed no tumors in virgin mice, although one knockout mouse developed a uterine tumor after pregnancy. Unstimulated virgin female knockout mice showed normal oviductal, ovarian, and uterine histology. Uteri of Arid1a knockout mice showed a normal decidualization response and appropriate responses to estradiol and progesterone stimulation. In vitro studies using primary cultures of human endometrial stromal fibroblasts revealed that small interfering RNA knockdown of ARID1A did not affect decidualization in vitro. Timed pregnancy studies revealed the significant resorption of embryos at Embryonic Day 16.5 in knockout mice in the third pregnancy. In addition to evidence of implantation site hemorrhage, pregnant Arid1a knockout mice showed abnormal placental morphology. These results suggest that Arid1a supports successful pregnancy through its role in placental function. PMID:26962117

  2. Optical satellite pictures - The up to date source for discharge determination in arid countries

    OpenAIRE

    Mett, Michael; Aufleger, Markus

    2009-01-01

    Many arid countries suffer severe water scarcity. Often lacking knowledge about hydrologic features like discharge prohibits the utilisation of valuable water resources. In this paper the basic approach is described to derive information about runoff water in arid landscapes by using optical satellite images. Wadi systems are highly sensitive regarding fluviomorphologic changes which are induced by rare flood events. Changes of river pattern, river width, sinuosity and so on correspond to dur...

  3. Archipelago of endolithic microbial life in the hyper arid core of the Atacama Desert

    OpenAIRE

    Wierzchos, Jacek; Davila, Alfonso F.; Diruggiero, J.; Ríos, Asunción de los; Valea, Sergio; Cámara Gallego, Beatriz; Artieda, Octavio; Speranza, Mariela; Robinson, Courtney K; Souterre, T.; Souza Egipsy, Virginia; Ascaso, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    The hyper-arid core of the Atacama Desert is considered the driest and most life-limited place on Earth. As such, this desert is an ideal environment to study the survival and biological adaptation strategies of microorganisms to this extremely dry environment. The extreme aridity of the Atacama Desert allows us to address questions such as the potential for life in extraterrestrial environments such as the surface of Mars. Our results over the last six years of searching for micr...

  4. Groundwater prospecting, drilling and well construction in hard rocks in semi-arid regions: an overview

    OpenAIRE

    Chambel, António

    2012-01-01

    In semi-arid and arid areas rock weathering is normally much less deep that in rainy areas. So, rocks tend to be more near the topographic surface. These climatic conditions also generate much less vegetation, which in all the cases clearly favours a direct observation of rock condition, fracturing or weathering. By other side, aquifers in hard rocks present specificities in relation to water presence and movement that implies a different approach when dealing with groundwater prospecting....

  5. A Methodology to Assess and Evaluate Rainwater Harvesting Techniques in (Semi-) Arid Regions

    OpenAIRE

    Ammar Adham; Michel Riksen; Mohamed Ouessar; Coen J Ritsema

    2016-01-01

    Arid and semi-arid regions around the world face water scarcity problems due to lack of precipitation and unpredictable rainfall patterns. For thousands of years, rainwater harvesting (RWH) techniques have been applied to cope with water scarcity. Researchers have used many different methodologies for determining suitable sites and techniques for RWH. However, limited attention has been given to the evaluation of RWH structure performance. The aim of this research was to design a scientifical...

  6. REUSE OF TREATED WASTEWATER IN AGRICULTURE: SOLVING WATER DEFICIT PROBLEMS IN ARID AREAS (REVIEW)

    OpenAIRE

    Faissal AZIZ; Farissi, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    In the arid and semiarid areas, the availability and the management of irrigation water have become priorities of great importance. The successive years of drought, induced by climate change and population growth, increasingly reduced the amount of water reserved for agriculture. Consequently, many countries have included wastewater reuse as an important dimension of water resources planning. In the more arid areas wastewater is used in agriculture, releasing high resource of water supplies. ...

  7. Distribution of Actual Evapotranspiration over Qaidam Basin, an Arid Area in China

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaomei Jin; Renhong Guo; Wei Xia

    2013-01-01

    Evapotranspiration is a major loss flux of the water balance in arid and semi-arid areas. The estimation of actual evapotranspiration has significance for hydrological and environmental purposes. The Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) algorithm was applied to estimate actual evapotranspiration in the Qaidam Basin and its eight hydrological sub-regions, Northwest China. There were 3,036 cloud-free and atmospherically corrected MODIS satellite images from 2001 to 2011 used in the SEBS algorit...

  8. Spatial-Temporal Variation of Aridity Index of China during 1960–2013

    OpenAIRE

    Huiping Huang; Yuping Han; Mingming Cao; Jinxi Song; Heng Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Aridity index, as the ration of potential evapotranspiration and precipitation, is an important indicator of regional climate. GIS technology, Morlet wavelet, Mann-Kendall test, and principal component analysis are utilized to investigate the spatial-temporal variation of aridity index and its impacting factors in China on basis of climate data from 599 stations during 1960–2013. Results show the following. (1) Boundaries between humid and semihumid region, and semihumid and semiarid region c...

  9. Geochemical Weathering Increases Lead Bioaccessibility in Semi-Arid Mine Tailings

    OpenAIRE

    Hayes, Sarah M.; Webb, Sam M.; Bargar, John R.; O'Day, Peggy A; Maier, Raina M.; Chorover, Jon

    2012-01-01

    Mine tailings can host elevated concentrations of toxic metal(loid)s that represent a significant hazard to surrounding communities and ecosystems. Eolian transport, capable of translocating small (micrometer-sized) particles, can be the dominant mechanism of toxic metal dispersion in arid or semi-arid landscapes. Human exposure to metals can then occur via direct inhalation or ingestion of particulates. The fact that measured doses of total lead (Pb) in geomedia correlate poorly with blood P...

  10. Land use and habitat conditions across the southwestern Wyoming sagebrush steppe: development impacts, management effectiveness and the distribution of invasive plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manier, Daniel J.; Aldridge, Cameron L.; Anderson, Patrick; Chong, Geneva; Homer, Collin G.; O'Donnell, Michael S.; Schell, Spencer

    2011-01-01

    For the past several years, USGS has taken a multi-faceted approach to investigating the condition and trends in sagebrush steppe ecosystems. This recent effort builds upon decades of work in semi-arid ecosystems providing a specific, applied focus on the cumulative impacts of expanding human activities across these landscapes. Here, we discuss several on-going projects contributing to these efforts: (1) mapping and monitoring the distribution and condition of shrub steppe communities with local detail at a regional scale, (2) assessing the relationships between specific, land-use features (for example, roads, transmission lines, industrial pads) and invasive plants, including their potential (environmentally defined) distribution across the region, and (3) monitoring the effects of habitat treatments on the ecosystem, including wildlife use and invasive plant abundance. This research is focused on the northern sagebrush steppe, primarily in Wyoming, but also extending into Montana, Colorado, Utah and Idaho. The study area includes a range of sagebrush types (including, Artemisia tridentata ssp. tridentata, Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis, Artemisia tridentata ssp. vaseyana, Artemisia nova) and other semi-arid shrubland types (for example, Sarcobatus vermiculatus, Atriplex confertifolia, Atriplex gardneri), impacted by extensive interface between steppe ecosystems and industrial energy activities resulting in a revealing multiple-variable analysis. We use a combination of remote sensing (AWiFS (1 Any reference to platforms, data sources, equipment, software, patented or trade-marked methods is for information purposes only. It does not represent endorsement of the U.S.D.I., U.S.G.S. or the authors), Landsat and Quickbird platforms), Geographic Information System (GIS) design and data management, and field-based, replicated sampling to generate multiple scales of data representing the distribution of shrub communities for the habitat inventory. Invasive plant

  11. Enclosing the commons: reasons for the adoption and adaptation of enclosures in the arid and semi-arid rangelands of Chepareria, Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Wairore, John N; Mureithi, Stephen M.; Wasonga, Oliver V; Nyberg, Gert

    2015-01-01

    The adoption and adaptation of enclosures in the arid and semi-arid rangelands of sub-Saharan Africa is driven and sustained by a combination of factors. However, reviews indicate that these factors cannot be generalized, as they tend to be case specific. A study was therefore conducted to explore the history and reasons for enclosure establishment in Chepareria, a formerly degraded communal rangeland in north-western Kenya. While Vi-Agroforestry Organization accounting for 52.5 % was the mai...

  12. Acoustic Velocity Of The Sediments Offshore Southwestern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, C.; Liu, C.; Huang, P.

    2004-12-01

    Along the Manila Trench south of 21øXN, deep-sea sediments are being underthrusted beneath the Taiwan accretionary prism which is composed of the Kaoping Slope and Hengchun Ridge. Offshore southwestern Taiwan, foreland sediments and Late Miocene strata of the Tainan Basin are being accreted onto the fold-and thrust belt of the syn-collision accretionary wedge of the Kaoping Slope. The Kaoping Slope consists of thick Neogene to Recent siliciclastics deformed by fold-and-thrust structures and mud diapers. These Pliocene-Quaternary sediments deposited in the Kaoping Shelf and upper slope area are considered to be paleo-channel deposits confined by NNE-SSW trend mud diapiric structure. Seismic P-wave velocities of the sediment deposited in the Kaoping Shelf and Kaoping Slope area are derived from mutichannel seismic reflection data and wide-angle reflection and refraction profiles collected by sonobuoys. Sediment velocity structures constrained from mutichannel seismic reflection data using velocity spectrum analysis method and that derived from sonobuoy data using tau-sum inversion method are compared, and they both provide consistent velocity structures. Seismic velocities were analyzed along the seismic profile from the surface to maximum depths of about 2.0 km below the seafloor. Our model features a sediment layer1 with 400 ms in thickness and a sediment layer2 with 600 ms in thickness. For the shelf sediments, we observe a linear interval velocity trend of V=1.53+1.91T in layer1, and V=1.86+0.87T in layer2, where T is the one way travel time within the layer. For the slop sediment, the trend of V=1.47+1.93T in layer1, and V=1.70+1.55T in layer2. The layer1¡¦s velocities gradients are similar between the shelf (1.91 km/sec2) and the slope(1.93 km/sec2). It means layer1 distributes over the slope and shelf widely. The result of the sediment velocity gradients in this area are in good agreement with that reported for the south Atlantic continental margins.

  13. Kinematics of the Southwestern Caribbean from New Geodetic Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, G.; La Femina, P. C.; Tapia, A.; Camacho, E.; Chichaco, E.; Mora-Paez, H.; Geirsson, H.

    2014-12-01

    The interaction of the Caribbean, Cocos, Nazca, and South American plates has resulted in a complex plate boundary zone and the formation of second order tectonic blocks (e.g., the North Andean, Choco and Central America Fore Arc blocks). The Panama Region [PR], which is bounded by these plates and blocks, has been interpreted and modeled as a single tectonic block or deformed plate boundary. Previous research has defined the main boundaries: 1) The Caribbean plate subducts beneath the isthmus along the North Panama Deformed Belt, 2) The Nazca plate converges at very high obliquity with the PR and motion is assumed along a left lateral transform fault and the South Panama Deformed Belt, 3) The collision of PR with NW South America (i.e., the N. Andean and Choco blocks) has resulted in the Eastern Panama Deformed Belt, and 4) collision of the Cocos Ridge in the west is accommodated by crustal shortening, Central American Fore Arc translation and deformation across the Central Costa Rican Deformed Belt. In addition, there are several models that suggest internal deformation of this region by cross-isthmus strike-slip faults. Recent GPS observations for the PR indicates movement to the northeast relative to a stable Caribbean plate at rates of 6.9±4.0 - 7.8±4.8 mm a-1 from southern Costa Rica to eastern Panama, respectively (Kobayashi et al., 2014 and references therein). However, the GPS network did not have enough spatial density to estimate elastic strain accumulation across these faults. Recent installation and expansion of geodetic networks in southwestern Caribbean (i.e., Costa Rica, Panama, and Colombia) combined with geological and geophysical observations provide a new input to investigate crustal deformation processes in this complex tectonic setting, specifically related to the PR. We use new and existing GPS data to calculate a new velocity field for the region and to investigate the kinematics of the PR, including elastic strain accumulation on the

  14. Functional Analysis of In-frame Indel ARID1A Mutations Reveals New Regulatory Mechanisms of Its Tumor Suppressor Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Guan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available AT-rich interactive domain 1A (ARID1A has emerged as a new tumor suppressor in which frequent somatic mutations have been identified in several types of human cancers. Although most ARID1A somatic mutations are frame-shift or nonsense mutations that contribute to mRNA decay and loss of protein expression, 5% of ARID1A mutations are in-frame insertions or deletions (indels that involve only a small stretch of peptides. Naturally occurring in-frame indel mutations provide unique and useful models to explore the biology and regulatory role of ARID1A. In this study, we analyzed indel mutations identified in gynecological cancers to determine how these mutations affect the tumor suppressor function of ARID1A. Our results demonstrate that all in-frame mutants analyzed lost their ability to inhibit cellular proliferation or activate transcription of CDKN1A, which encodes p21, a downstream effector of ARID1A. We also showed that ARID1A is a nucleocytoplasmic protein whose stability depends on its subcellular localization. Nuclear ARID1A is less stable than cytoplasmic ARID1A because ARID1A is rapidly degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system in the nucleus. In-frame deletions affecting the consensus nuclear export signal reduce steady-state protein levels of ARID1A. This defect in nuclear exportation leads to nuclear retention and subsequent degradation. Our findings delineate a mechanism underlying the regulation of ARID1A subcellular distribution and protein stability and suggest that targeting the nuclear ubiquitin-proteasome system can increase the amount of the ARID1A protein in the nucleus and restore its tumor suppressor functions.

  15. Patterns of ant (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) richness and relative abundance along an aridity gradient in Western Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Sánchez, A J; Lattke, J E; Viloria, A L

    2013-04-01

    In xeric ecosystems, ant diversity response to aridity varies with rainfall magnitude and gradient extension. At a local scale and with low precipitation regimes, increased aridity leads to a reduction of species richness and an increased relative abundance for some ant species. In order to test this pattern in tropical environments, ant richness and relative abundance variation were evaluated along 35 km of an aridity gradient in the Araya Peninsula, state of Sucre, Venezuela. Three sampling stations comprising five transects each were set up. Pitfall traps and direct collecting from vegetation were assessed per transect. Overall, 52 species, 23 genera, and 7 subfamilies of ants were recorded in the peninsula. The total number of species and genera recorded by both sampling stations and transects decreased linearly with increasing aridity. Total relative abundance was highest in the most arid portion of the peninsula, with Crematogaster rochai (Forel) and Camponotus conspicuus zonatus (Emery) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) being the numerically dominant species. Spatial and multivariate analyses revealed significant changes in ant composition every 11 km of distance, and showed a decrease of ant diversity with the increase of harsh conditions in the gradient. Here, we discuss how local geographic and topographic features of Araya originate the aridity gradient and so affect the microhabitat conditions for the ant fauna. PMID:23949745

  16. Temporal limits to the archaeological record in arid western NSW, Australia : lessons from OSL and radiocarbon dating of hearths and sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Western NSW Archaeology Program (WNSWAP) has been investigating surface scatters of Aboriginal stone artefacts and associated heat-retainer hearths in arid northwestern NSW, Australia, since 1995. The research combines new methods for documenting and analysing stone artefact scatters with an understanding of geomorphic landscape dynamics to seek insights into spatial and temporal patterns of Aboriginal occupation of the arid margin of Australia during the Late Holocene. The temporal dimension is dealt with in two ways: by radiocarbon determinations on charcoal from the remains of heat-retainer hearths associated with the artefact scatters, and by using optically simulated luminescence (OSL) and radiocarbon determinations from valley fill sediments to develop a chronology of landscape evolution of the valleys in which the artefacts and hearths are found. The heat-retainer hearths produced a record of just less than 2000 years of activity within the valley of Stud Creek, a 30 square km catchment in Sturt National Park. However, the record is discontinuous, with a gap in heat-retainer hearth construction of 200-400 years occurring between about 800 and 1100 y BP. Examination of patterns of erosion and deposition at the places where the hearths were found, and Bayesian statistical analysis of the radiocarbon determinations, demonstrates that this gap is real and not an artefact of the survey protocol. A discontinuous record is also evident when the sediments that comprise the valley fill upon which the hearths and stone artefact scatters are currently lying are examined. Five major sedimentary units can be identified, providing a record of depositional episodes ranging from modern or post-European back to the Late Pleistocene (about 70,000 years). But, in contrast to the record from the remains of the heat-retainer hearths, erosion is the major determinant of the temporal pattern of landscape change that can be reconstructed from this record. Gaps of up to 10

  17. Multiple episodes of hydrothermal activity and epithermal mineralization in the southwestern Nevada volcanic field and their relations to magmatic activity, volcanism and regional extension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, S.I.; Noble, D.C.; Jackson, M.C. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    Volcanic rocks of middle Miocene age and underlying pre-Mesozoic sedimentary rocks host widely distributed zones of hydrothermal alteration and epithermal precious metal, fluorite and mercury deposits within and peripheral to major volcanic and intrusive centers of the southwestern Nevada volcanic field (SWNVF) in southern Nevada, near the southwestern margin of the Great Basin of the western United States. Radiometric ages indicate that episodes of hydrothermal activity mainly coincided with and closely followed major magmatic pulses during the development of the field and together spanned more than 4.5 m.y. Rocks of the SWNVF consist largely of rhyolitic ash-flow sheets and intercalated silicic lava domes, flows and near-vent pyroclastic deposits erupted between 15.2 and 10 Ma from vent areas in the vicinity of the Timber Mountain calderas, and between about 9.5 and 7 Ma from the outlying Black Mountain and Stonewall Mountain centers. Three magmatic stages can be recognized: the main magmatic stage, Mountain magmatic stage (11.7 to 10.0 Ma), and the late magmatic stage (9.4 to 7.5 Ma).

  18. Status of Water Levels in Aquifers in the Nacatoch Sand of Southwestern and Northeastern Arkansas and the Tokio Formation of Southwestern Arkansas, February 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, T.P.

    2007-01-01

    The Nacatoch Sand and Tokio Formation aquifers in southwestern Arkansas and the Nacatoch Sand aquifer in northeastern Arkansas are sources of water for industrial, public supply, domestic, and agricultural uses. Potentiometric-surface maps were constructed from water-level measurements made in 60 wells completed in the Nacatoch Sand and 50 wells completed in the Tokio Formation during February 2005. Aquifers in the Nacatoch Sand and Tokio Formation are hereafter referred to as the Nacatoch aquifer and Tokio aquifer, respectively. The direction of ground-water flow in the Nacatoch aquifer in northeastern Arkansas generally is towards the southeast. The potentiometric high is located along the north and northwestern boundaries of the area. The direction of ground-water flow in the Nacatoch aquifer in southwestern Arkansas is towards the south-southeast in Little River, Miller, and Hempstead Counties and to the east-southeast in Nevada and Clark Counties. The potentiometric high is located within the outcrop area in north-central Hempstead County. A cone of depression exists in the Nacatoch aquifer at Hope in southeastern Hempstead County. The direction of ground-water flow in the Tokio aquifer in southwestern Arkansas generally is towards the south or southeast. The potentiometric high is within the outcrop area. An area of artesian flow exists in southeastern Pike, northeastern Hempstead, and northwestern Nevada Counties. One apparent cone of depression might exist northwest of Hope in Hempstead County. In northeastern Arkansas, withdrawals from the Nacatoch aquifer increased by 516 percent from 1965 to 2000. In southwestern Arkansas, withdrawals from Nacatoch aquifer and Tokio aquifer increased by 125 percent and 201 percent, respectively, from 1965 to 1980 and decreased by 93 percent and 80 percent, respectively, from 1980 to 2000. Long-term hydrographs were prepared for 10 wells in the study areas. Changes in water levels in some wells may be associated with

  19. Status of Water Levels in Aquifers in the Nacatoch Sand of Southwestern and Northeastern Arkansas and the Tokio Formation of Southwestern Arkansas, 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Tony P.

    1999-01-01

    Nacatoch Sand and Tokio Formation aquifers in southwestern Arkansas and the Nacatoch Sand aquifer in northeastern Arkansas are a source of water for industrial, public supply, domestic, and agricultural uses. Potentiometric-surface maps were constructed from water-level measurements made in 59 wells completed in the Nacatoch Sand and 45 wells completed in the Tokio Formation from April through May 1999. The direction of ground-water flow in the aquifer in the Nacatoch Sand in northeastern Arkansas generally is towards the southeast. The potentiometric high is located along the north and northwestern boundaries. The direction of ground-water flow in the aquifer in the Nacatoch Sand in southwestern Arkansas is towards the south-southeast in Little River, Miller, and Hempstead Counties and to the east-southeast in Nevada and Clark Counties. The potentiometric high is located within the outcrop area in north-central Hempstead County. A cone of depression exists in the aquifer in the Nacatoch Sand at Hope in southeastern Hempstead County. The direction of ground-water flow in the aquifer in the Yokio Formation in southwestern Arkansas generally is towards the southeast. The potentiometric high is within the outcrop area. An area of artesian flow exists in southeastern Pike, northeastern Hempstead, and northwestern Nevada Counties. One apparent cone of depression might exist northwest of Hope in Hempstead County. In northeastern Arkansas, withdrawals from the Nacatoch Sand increased by 736 percent from 1965 to 1995. In southwestern Arkansas withdrawals from aquifers in the Nacatoch Sand and Yokio Formation increased by 125 percent and 201 percent, respectively, from 1965 to 1980 and decreased by 78 percent and 63 percent, respectively, from 1980 to 1995. Long-term hydrographs were prepared for 13 wells in the study area. Changes in water levels in some wells may be associated with changes in withdrawals from the respective aquifers.

  20. Sources and transport of nitrogen in arid urban watersheds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, Rebecca L.; Turnbull, Laura; Earl, Stevan; Grimm, Nancy B.; Riha, Krystin M.; Michalski, Greg; Lohse, Kathleen; Childers, Daniel L.

    2014-06-03

    Urban watersheds are often sources of nitrogen (N) to downstream systems, contributing to poor water quality. However, it is unknown which components (e.g., land cover and stormwater infrastructure type) of urban watersheds contribute to N export and which may be sites of retention. In this study we investigated which watershed characteristics control N sourcing, biogeochemical processing of nitrate (NO3–) during storms, and the amount of rainfall N that is retained within urban watersheds. We used triple isotopes of NO3– (δ15N, δ18O, and Δ17O) to identify sources and transformations of NO3– during storms from 10 nested arid urban watersheds that varied in stormwater infrastructure type and drainage area. Stormwater infrastructure and land cover—retention basins, pipes, and grass cover—dictated the sourcing of NO3– in runoff. Urban watersheds can be strong sinks or sources of N to stormwater depending on the proportion of rainfall that leaves the watershed as runoff, but we found no evidence that denitrification occurred during storms. Our results suggest that watershed characteristics control the sources and transport of inorganic N in urban stormwater but that retention of inorganic N at the timescale of individual runoff events is controlled by hydrologic, rather than biogeochemical, mechanisms.