WorldWideScience

Sample records for argonne distance tabletop

  1. Analysis of the Argonne distance tabletop exercise method.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanzman, E. A.; Nieves, L. A.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2008-02-14

    The purpose of this report is to summarize and evaluate the Argonne Distance Tabletop Exercise (DISTEX) method. DISTEX is intended to facilitate multi-organization, multi-objective tabletop emergency response exercises that permit players to participate from their own facility's incident command center. This report is based on experience during its first use during the FluNami 2007 exercise, which took place from September 19-October 17, 2007. FluNami 2007 exercised the response of local public health officials and hospitals to a hypothetical pandemic flu outbreak. The underlying purpose of the DISTEX method is to make tabletop exercising more effective and more convenient for playing organizations. It combines elements of traditional tabletop exercising, such as scenario discussions and scenario injects, with distance learning technologies. This distance-learning approach also allows playing organizations to include a broader range of staff in the exercise. An average of 81.25 persons participated in each weekly webcast session from all playing organizations combined. The DISTEX method required development of several components. The exercise objectives were based on the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Target Capabilities List. The ten playing organizations included four public health departments and six hospitals in the Chicago area. An extent-of-play agreement identified the objectives applicable to each organization. A scenario was developed to drive the exercise over its five-week life. Weekly problem-solving task sets were designed to address objectives that could not be addressed fully during webcast sessions, as well as to involve additional playing organization staff. Injects were developed to drive play between webcast sessions, and, in some cases, featured mock media stories based in part on player actions as identified from the problem-solving tasks. The weekly 90-minute webcast sessions were discussions among the playing organizations

  2. Car Stopping Distance on a Tabletop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugland, Ole Anton

    2013-01-01

    Stopping distances in car braking can be an intriguing topic in physics teaching. It illustrates some basic principles of physics, and sheds valuable light on students' attitude towards aggressive driving. Due to safety considerations, it can be difficult to make experiments with actual car braking. (Contains 2 figures.)

  3. Interactive Tabletops in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillenbourg, Pierre; Evans, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Interactive tabletops are gaining increased attention from CSCL researchers. This paper analyses the relation between this technology and teaching and learning processes. At a global level, one could argue that tabletops convey a socio-constructivist flavor: they support small teams that solve problems by exploring multiple solutions. The…

  4. Table-top job analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this Handbook is to establish general training program guidelines for training personnel in developing training for operation, maintenance, and technical support personnel at Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities. TTJA is not the only method of job analysis; however, when conducted properly TTJA can be cost effective, efficient, and self-validating, and represents an effective method of defining job requirements. The table-top job analysis is suggested in the DOE Training Accreditation Program manuals as an acceptable alternative to traditional methods of analyzing job requirements. DOE 5480-20A strongly endorses and recommends it as the preferred method for analyzing jobs for positions addressed by the Order.

  5. Tabletop Models for Electrical and Electromagnetic Geophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Charles T.

    2002-01-01

    Details the use of tabletop models that demonstrate concepts in direct current electrical resistivity, self-potential, and electromagnetic geophysical models. Explains how data profiles of the models are obtained. (DDR)

  6. Table-top diffuse optical imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturgeon, K.A.; Bakker, L.P.

    2006-01-01

    This report describes the work done during a six months internshipat Philips Research for a Masters in Electronic and Electrical Engineering. An existing table-top tomography system for measuring lightin phantom breasts was restored. Updated software control and image reconstruction software was cr

  7. Supporting Sandtray Therapy on an Interactive Tabletop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hancock, Mark; Cate, Thomas ten; Carpendale, Sheelagh; Isenberg, Tobias

    2010-01-01

    We present the iterative design of a virtual sandtray application for a tabletop display. The purpose of our prototype is to support sandtray therapy, a form of art therapy typically used for younger clients. A significant aspect of this therapy is the insight gained by the therapist as they observe

  8. Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — ATLAS is a national user facility at Argonne National Laboratory in Argonne, Illinois. The ATLAS facility is a leading facility for nuclear structure research in the...

  9. A modified commercial scanner as an image plate for table-top optical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casado-Rojo, S; Lorenzana, H E; Baonza, V G

    2008-12-09

    A reliable, accurate, and inexpensive optical detector for table-top applications is described here. Based on a commercial high resolution office scanner coupled to a projection on plate, it enables a large image plate surface, allowing recording of large images without systematic errors associated to coupling optics' aberrations. Several tests on distance-dependent and steady interference patterns will be presented and discussed. The extension to other types of optical measurement by substituting the projection on plate is proposed.

  10. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-11-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings of the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), conducted June 15 through 26, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. The team includes outside experts supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with ANL. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at ANL, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis (S A) Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The S A Plan will be executed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). When completed, the S A results will be incorporated into the Argonne National Laboratory Environmental Survey findings for inclusion in the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 75 refs., 24 figs., 60 tabs.

  11. Proposed environmental remediation at Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment evaluating proposed environmental remediation activity at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E), Argonne, Illinois. The environmental remediation work would (1) reduce, eliminate, or prevent the release of contaminants from a number of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) and two radiologically contaminated sites located in areas contiguous with SWMUs, and (2) decrease the potential for exposure of the public, ANL-E employees, and wildlife to such contaminants. The actions proposed for SWMUs are required to comply with the RCRA corrective action process and corrective action requirements of the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency; the actions proposed are also required to reduce the potential for continued contaminant release. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required.

  12. Argonne National Laboratory 1985 publications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopta, J.A. (ED.); Hale, M.R. (comp.)

    1987-08-01

    This report is a bibliography of scientific and technical 1985 publications of Argonne National Laboratory. Some are ANL contributions to outside organizations' reports published in 1985. This compilation, prepared by the Technical Information Services Technical Publications Section (TPB), lists all nonrestricted 1985 publications submitted to TPS by Laboratory's Divisions. The report is divided into seven parts: Journal Articles - Listed by first author, ANL Reports - Listed by report number, ANL and non-ANL Unnumbered Reports - Listed by report number, Non-ANL Numbered Reports - Listed by report number, Books and Book Chapters - Listed by first author, Conference Papers - Listed by first author, Complete Author Index.

  13. RFIDice - Augmenting Tabletop Dice with RFID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Langheinrich

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Augmented dice allow players of tabletop games to have the result of a roll be automatically recorded by a computer, e.g., for supporting strategy games. We have built a set of three augmented-dice-prototypes based on radio frequency identification (RFID technology, which allows us to build robust, cheap, and small augmented dice. Using a corresponding readout infrastructure and a sample application, we have evaluated our approach and show its advantages over other dice augmentation methods discussed in the literature.

  14. 2015 Annual Report - Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, James R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Papka, Michael E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cerny, Beth A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Coffey, Richard M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility provides supercomputing capabilities to the scientific and engineering community to advance fundamental discovery and understanding in a broad range of disciplines.

  15. 2014 Annual Report - Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, James R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Papka, Michael E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cerny, Beth A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Coffey, Richard M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility provides supercomputing capabilities to the scientific and engineering community to advance fundamental discovery and understanding in a broad range of disciplines.

  16. Argonne National Laboratory 1986 publications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopta, J.A.; Springer, C.J.

    1987-12-01

    This report is a bibliography of scientific and technical 1986 publications of Argonne National Laboratory. Some are ANL contributions to outside organizations' reports published in 1986. This compilation, prepared by the Technical Information Services Technical Publications Section (TPS), lists all nonrestricted 1986 publications submitted to TPS by the Laboratory's Divisions. Author indexes list ANL authors only. If a first author is not an ANL employee, an asterisk in the bibliographic citation indicates the first ANL author. The report is divided into seven parts: Journal Articles -- Listed by first author; ANL Reports -- Listed by report number; ANL and non-ANL Unnumbered Reports -- Listed by report number; Non-ANL Numbered Reports -- Listed by report number; Books and Book Chapters -- Listed by first author; Conference Papers -- Listed by first author; and Complete Author Index.

  17. Supporting Reflection and Classroom Orchestration with Tangible Tabletops

    OpenAIRE

    Do, Lenh Hung Son

    2012-01-01

    Tangible tabletop systems have been extensively proven to be able to enhance participation and engagement as well as enable many exciting activities, particularly in the education domain. However, it remains unclear as to whether students really benefit from using them for tasks that require a high level of reflection. Moreover, most existing tangible tabletops are designed as stand-alone systems or devices. Increasingly, this design assumption is no ...

  18. Push technology at Argonne National Laboratory.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noel, R. E.; Woell, Y. N.

    1999-04-06

    Selective dissemination of information (SDI) services, also referred to as current awareness searches, are usually provided by periodically running computer programs (personal profiles) against a cumulative database or databases. This concept of pushing relevant content to users has long been integral to librarianship. Librarians traditionally turned to information companies to implement these searches for their users in business, academia, and the science community. This paper describes how a push technology was implemented on a large scale for scientists and engineers at Argonne National Laboratory, explains some of the challenges to designers/maintainers, and identifies the positive effects that SDI seems to be having on users. Argonne purchases the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Current Contents data (all subject areas except Humanities), and scientists no longer need to turn to outside companies for reliable SDI service. Argonne's database and its customized services are known as ACCESS (Argonne-University of Chicago Current Contents Electronic Search Service).

  19. Tabletop synchrotron and its unique features

    CERN Document Server

    Yamada, H

    2002-01-01

    Two synchrotrons, AURORA and MIRRORCLE, were built in Ritsumeikan University. MIRRORCLE-20 is the smallest normal conduction synchrotron (15 cm orbit radius and 1.2 m outer diameter) in the world. It uses 2/3 resonance method for electron beam incidence but is not optimized for X-ray generation. MIRRORCLE-6 shall be optimized for X-ray generation. X-ray generated by MIRRORCLE shows very flat white light, rich in hard X-ray, pulse with width changeable from a few mu s to a few ms , wide radiation angle of 25 mrad at MIRRORCLE-20 and 80 mrad at MIRRORCLE-8 and high coherence. The feature such as pulsed light and high coherence is expected to new application which photon radiation cannot practice. Imaging experiments by MIRRORCLE were carried out by Cu plate, Al plate, Teflon and acryl plate. We took a photograph of insect, electric lamp, connector, and cyclotron. New X-ray generation mechanism, X-ray strength, development of tabletop synchrotron and features of X-ray beam are explained. (S.Y.)

  20. Tabletop Experimental Track for Magnetic Launch Assist

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) Advanced Space Transportation Program has developed the Magnetic Launch Assist System, formerly known as the Magnetic Levitation (MagLev) technology that could give a space vehicle a running start to break free from Earth's gravity. A Magnetic Launch Assist system would use magnetic fields to levitate and accelerate a vehicle along a track at speeds up to 600 mph. The vehicle would shift to rocket engines for launch into orbit. Similar to high-speed trains and roller coasters that use high-strength magnets to lift and propel a vehicle a couple of inches above a guideway, a Magnetic Launch Assist system would electromagnetically propel a space vehicle along the track. The tabletop experimental track for the system shown in this photograph is 44-feet long, with 22-feet of powered acceleration and 22-feet of passive braking. A 10-pound carrier with permanent magnets on its sides swiftly glides by copper coils, producing a levitation force. The track uses a linear synchronous motor, which means the track is synchronized to turn the coils on just before the carrier comes in contact with them, and off once the carrier passes. Sensors are positioned on the side of the track to determine the carrier's position so the appropriate drive coils can be energized. MSFC engineers have conducted tests on the indoor track and a 50-foot outdoor track. The major advantages of launch assist for NASA launch vehicles is that it reduces the weight of the take-off, the landing gear, the wing size, and less propellant resulting in significant cost savings. The US Navy and the British MOD (Ministry of Defense) are planning to use magnetic launch assist for their next generation aircraft carriers as the aircraft launch system. The US Army is considering using this technology for launching target drones for anti-aircraft training.

  1. Co-located collaborative visual analytics around a tabletop display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenberg, Petra; Fisher, Danyel; Paul, Sharoda A; Morris, Meredith Ringel; Inkpen, Kori; Czerwinski, Mary

    2012-05-01

    Co-located collaboration can be extremely valuable during complex visual analytics tasks. We present an exploratory study of a system designed to support collaborative visual analysis tasks on a digital tabletop display. Fifteen participant pairs employed Cambiera, a visual analytics system, to solve a problem involving 240 digital documents. Our analysis, supported by observations, system logs, questionnaires, and interview data, explores how pairs approached the problem around the table. We contribute a unique, rich understanding of how users worked together around the table and identify eight types of collaboration styles that can be used to identify how closely people work together while problem solving. We show how the closeness of teams’ collaboration and communication influenced how they performed on the task overall. We further discuss the role of the tabletop for visual analytics tasks and derive design implications for future co-located collaborative tabletop problem solving systems.

  2. Chemical research at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is a research and development laboratory located 25 miles southwest of Chicago, Illinois. It has more than 200 programs in basic and applied sciences and an Industrial Technology Development Center to help move its technologies to the industrial sector. At Argonne, basic energy research is supported by applied research in diverse areas such as biology and biomedicine, energy conservation, fossil and nuclear fuels, environmental science, and parallel computer architectures. These capabilities translate into technological expertise in energy production and use, advanced materials and manufacturing processes, and waste minimization and environmental remediation, which can be shared with the industrial sector. The Laboratory`s technologies can be applied to help companies design products, substitute materials, devise innovative industrial processes, develop advanced quality control systems and instrumentation, and address environmental concerns. The latest techniques and facilities, including those involving modeling, simulation, and high-performance computing, are available to industry and academia. At Argonne, there are opportunities for industry to carry out cooperative research, license inventions, exchange technical personnel, use unique research facilities, and attend conferences and workshops. Technology transfer is one of the Laboratory`s major missions. High priority is given to strengthening U.S. technological competitiveness through research and development partnerships with industry that capitalize on Argonne`s expertise and facilities. The Laboratory is one of three DOE superconductivity technology centers, focusing on manufacturing technology for high-temperature superconducting wires, motors, bearings, and connecting leads. Argonne National Laboratory is operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  3. Fission of actinides using a table-top laser

    CERN Document Server

    Schwoerer, H; Sauerbrey, R; Galy, J; Magill, J; Rondinella, V; Schenkel, R; Butz, T

    2003-01-01

    Powerful table-top lasers are now available in the laboratory and can be used to induce nuclear reactions. We report the first demonstration of nuclear fission using a high repetition rate table-top laser with intensities of 10 sup 2 sup 0 W/cm sup 2. Actinide photo-fission has been achieved in both sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U and sup 2 sup 3 sup 2 Th from the high-energy Bremsstrahlung radiation produced by laser acceleration of electrons. The fission products were identified by time-resolved gamma-spectroscopy. (authors)

  4. The Self-Reflexive Tabletop Role-Playing Game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan Torner

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Tabletop role-playing games combine performance, procedures, and improvisation to both tell stories and reflect on the nature of storytelling. This article discusses the three games 1,001 Nights by Meguey Baker, What Is a Role-Playing Game? by Epidiah Ravachol, and World Wide Wrestling by Nathan D. Paoletta in terms of how their procedures of play and framing devices comment on the tabletop role-playing game medium. Taken together, these three games on games demonstrate the inherent tensions of player motivation, collective fiction creation, and selling a performance to one’s fellow players, and how RPG theory helps us to understand them.

  5. Wire chamber degradation at the Argonne ZGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberichter, W.; Spinka, H.

    1986-01-01

    Experience with multiwire proportional chambers at high rates at the Argonne Zero Gradient Synchrotron is described. A buildup of silicon on the sense wires was observed where the beam passed through the chamber. Analysis of the chamber gas indicated that the density of silicon was probably less than 10 ppM.

  6. Repetitive tabletop plasma focus to produce a tunable damage factor on materials for fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Leopoldo; Pavez, Cristian; Inestrosa-Izurieta, Maria Jose; Moreno, Jose; Davis, Sergio; Bora, Biswajit; Avaria, Gonzalo; Jain, Jalaj; Altamirano, Luis; Panizo, Miguel; Gonzalez, Raquel; Rivera, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    Future thermonuclear reactors, both magnetic and inertial confinement approaches, need materials capable of withstanding the extreme radiation and heat loads expected from high repetition rate plasma. A damage factor (F = qτ1/2) in the order of 104 (W/cm2) s1/2 is expected. The axial plasma dynamics after the pinch in a tabletop plasma focus of hundred joules, PF-400J, was characterized by means of pulsed optical refractive diagnostics. The energy, interaction time and power flux of the plasma burst interacting with targets was obtained. Results show a high dependence of the damage factor with the distance from the anode top where the sample is located. A tunable damage factor in the range 10- 105(W/cm2) s1/2 can be obtained. At present the PF-400J operating at 0.077 Hz is being used to study the effects of fusion-relevant pulses on material target, including nanostructured materials. A new tabletop device to be operated up to 1Hz including tunable damage factor has been designed and is being constructed, thus thousand cumulative shots on materials could be obtained in few minutes. The scaling of the damage factor for plasma foci operating at different energies is discussed. Supported by CONICYT: PIA ACT-1115, PAI 79130026.

  7. An Evaluation of Interactive Tabletops in Elementary Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Alexander T.; Brummel, Bradley J.; Pollet, Cody L.; Greer, David D.

    2013-01-01

    This research examined the effect that a relatively new Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) device, specifically an interactive tabletop, has on elementary students' attitudes toward collaborative technologies, mathematical achievement, and the gender gap in mathematics. Prior research has shown many positive effects of CSCL…

  8. A Table-top Blast Driven Shock Tube

    OpenAIRE

    Courtney, Michael; Courtney, Amy

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of blast-induced traumatic brain injury in conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan has motivated laboratory scale experiments on biomedical effects of blast waves and studies of blast wave transmission properties of various materials in hopes of improving armor design to mitigate these injuries. This paper describes the design and performance of a table-top shock tube that is more convenient and widely accessible than traditional compression driven and blast driven shock tubes. The d...

  9. Dosimetric characteristics of the Siemens IGRT carbon fiber tabletop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spezi, Emiliano; Ferri, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    In this work, the dosimetric characteristics of a new commercial carbon fiber treatment table are investigated. The photon beam attenuation properties of the Siemens image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) tabletop were studied in detail. Two sets of dosimetric measurements were performed. In the first experiment a polystyrene slab phantom was used: the central axis attenuation and the skin-sparing detriment were investigated. In the second experiment, the off-axis treatment table transmission was investigated using a polystyrene cylindrical phantom. Measurements were taken at the isocenter for a 360 degrees rotation of the radiation beam. Our results show that the photon beam attenuation of the Siemens IGRT carbon fiber tabletop varies from a minimum of 2.1% (central axis) to a maximum of 4.6% (120 degrees and 240 degrees beam incidence). The beam entrance dose increases from 82% to 97% of the dose at the depth of maximum for a clinical 6-MV radiation field. The depth of maximum also decreases by 0.4 cm. Despite the wedge cross section of the table the beam attenuation properties of the IGRT tabletop remain constant along the longitudinal direction. American Association of Medical Dosimetrists.

  10. High Speed and High Resolution Table-Top Nanoscale Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Tadesse, G K; Demmler, S; HÄdrich, S; Wahyutama, I; Steinert, M; Spielmann, C; ZÜrch, M; TÜnnermann, A; Limpert, J; Rothhardt, J

    2016-01-01

    We present a table-top coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) experiment based on high-order harmonics generated at 18 nm by a high average power femtosecond fiber laser system. The high photon flux, narrow spectral bandwidth and high degree of spatial coherence allow for ultra-high sub-wavelength resolution imaging at a high numerical aperture. Our experiments demonstrate a half-pitch resolution of 13.6 nm, very close to the actual Abbe-limit of 12.4 nm, which is the highest resolution achieved from any table-top XUV or X-ray microscope. In addition, 20.5 nm resolution was achieved with only 3 sec of integration time bringing live diffraction imaging and 3D tomography on the nanoscale one step closer to reality. The current resolution is solely limited by the wavelength and the detector size. Thus, table-top nanoscopes with only a few-nm resolutions are in reach and will find applications in many areas of science and technology.

  11. Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-01

    This report describes the continuation of the work reported in “Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development”. The experiment was performed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in 2014. A rastered 35 MeV electron beam deposited power in a solution of uranyl sulfate, generating heat and radiolytic gas bubbles. Irradiations were performed at three beam power levels, 6, 12 and 15 kW. Solution temperatures were measured by thermocouples, and gas bubble behavior was observed. This report will describe the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model that was developed to calculate the temperatures and gas volume fractions in the solution vessel during the irradiations. The previous report described an initial analysis performed on a geometry that had not been updated to reflect the as-built solution vessel. Here, the as-built geometry is used. Monte-Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) calculations were performed on the updated geometry, and these results were used to define the power deposition profile for the CFD analyses, which were performed using Fluent, Ver. 16.2. CFD analyses were performed for the 12 and 15 kW irradiations, and further improvements to the model were incorporated, including the consideration of power deposition in nearby vessel components, gas mixture composition, and bubble size distribution. The temperature results of the CFD calculations are compared to experimental measurements.

  12. Status of RF superconductivity at Argonne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K.W.

    1989-01-01

    Development of a superconducting (SC) slow-wave structures began at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in 1971, and led to the first SC heavy-ion linac (ATLAS - the Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerating System), which began regularly scheduled operation in 1978. To date, more than 40,000 hours of bean-on target operating time has been accumulated with ATLAS. The Physics Division at ANL has continued to develop SC RF technology for accelerating heavy-ions, with the result that the SC linac has, up to the present, has been in an almost continuous process of upgrade and expansion. It should be noted that this has been accomplished while at the same time maintaining a vigorous operating schedule in support of the nuclear and atomic physics research programs of the division. In 1987, the Engineering Physics Division at ANL began development of SC RF components for the acceleration of high-brightness proton and deuterium beams. This work has included the evaluation of RF properties of high-{Tc} oxide superconductors, both for the above and for other applications. The two divisions collaborated while they worked on several applications of RF SC, and also worked to develop the technology generally. 11 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Face detection for interactive tabletop viewscreen system using olfactory display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Kunio; Kanazawa, Fumihiro

    2009-10-01

    An olfactory display is a device that delivers smells to the nose. It provides us with special effects, for example to emit smell as if you were there or to give a trigger for reminding us of memories. The authors have developed a tabletop display system connected with the olfactory display. For delivering a flavor to user's nose, the system needs to recognition and measure positions of user's face and nose. In this paper, the authors describe an olfactory display which enables to detect the nose position for an effective delivery.

  14. BubbleType : Enabling Text Entry within a Walk-Up Tabletop Installation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hinrichs, Uta; Schmidt, Holly; Isenberg, Tobias; Hancock, Mark; Carpendale, Sheelagh

    2008-01-01

    We address the issue of enabling text entry for walk-up-and-use interactive tabletop displays located in public spaces. Public tabletop installations are characterized by a diverse target user group, multi-person interaction, and the need for high approachability and intuitiveness. We first define t

  15. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

    1982-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1981 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measurements were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated.

  16. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N. W.; Duffy, T. L.; Sedlet, J.

    1981-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1980 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and foodstuffs; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measurements were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated.

  17. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N. W.; Duffy, T. L.; Sedlet, J.

    1980-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1979 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, Argonne effluent water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and foodstuffs; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environemetal penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measuremenets were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated.

  18. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

    1984-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1983 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, ground water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measurements were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. 19 references, 8 figures, 49 tables.

  19. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

    1983-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne Ntaional Laboratory for 1982 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, ground water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and masurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measurements were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated.

  20. Environmental assessment related to the operation of Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-08-01

    In order to evaluate the environmental impacts of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) operations, this assessment includes a descriptive section which is intended to provide sufficient detail to allow the various impacts to be viewed in proper perspective. In particular, details are provided on site characteristics, current programs, characterization of the existing site environment, and in-place environmental monitoring programs. In addition, specific facilities and operations that could conceivably impact the environment are described at length. 77 refs., 16 figs., 47 tabs.

  1. TIDE: Lightweight Device Composition for Enhancing Tabletop Environments with Smartphone Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sicard, Leo; Tabard, Aurelien; Ramos, Juan David Hincapie

    2013-01-01

    platforms have to be re-developed. At the same time, smartphones are pervasive computers that users carry around and with a large pool of applications. This paper presents TIDE, a lightweight device composition middleware to bring existing smartphone applica- tions onto the tabletop. Through TIDE......, applications running on the smartphone are displayed on the tabletop computer, and users can interact with them through the tabletop’s interactive surface. TIDE contributes to the areas of device compo- sition and tabletops by providing an OS-level middleware that is transparent to the smartphone applications...

  2. A 10 tesla table-top controlled waveform magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy Choudhury, Aditya N; Venkataraman, V

    2012-04-01

    Controlled waveform magnets (CWMs) are a class of pulsed magnets whose pulse shape with time can be programmed by the user. With a CWM, the user gains control not only over the magnitude of the field but also over its rate of change. In this work we present a table-top CWM, driven by a capacitor bank, capable of producing virtually any user-shaped magnetic field waveform up to 10 tesla. Insulated gate bipolar transistor chips have been paralleled to form the high current switch and paralleled chips of SiC Schottky diodes form the crowbar diode module. Sample controlled waveforms including flat-tops up to 10 tesla and some triangular magnetic field pulses have been successfully generated for 10-20 ms with a ripple <1%.

  3. Note: A table-top blast driven shock tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Michael W; Courtney, Amy C

    2010-12-01

    The prevalence of blast-induced traumatic brain injury in conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan has motivated laboratory scale experiments on biomedical effects of blast waves and studies of blast wave transmission properties of various materials in hopes of improving armor design to mitigate these injuries. This paper describes the design and performance of a table-top shock tube that is more convenient and widely accessible than traditional compression driven and blast driven shock tubes. The design is simple: it is an explosive driven shock tube employing a rifle primer that explodes when impacted by the firing pin. The firearm barrel acts as the shock tube, and the shock wave emerges from the muzzle. The small size of this shock tube can facilitate localized application of a blast wave to a subject, tissue, or material under test.

  4. A Table-top Blast Driven Shock Tube

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Michael; 10.1063/1.3518970

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of blast-induced traumatic brain injury in conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan has motivated laboratory scale experiments on biomedical effects of blast waves and studies of blast wave transmission properties of various materials in hopes of improving armor design to mitigate these injuries. This paper describes the design and performance of a table-top shock tube that is more convenient and widely accessible than traditional compression driven and blast driven shock tubes. The design is simple: it is an explosive driven shock tube employing a rifle primer which explodes when impacted by the firing pin. The firearm barrel acts as the shock tube, and the shock wave emerges from the muzzle. The small size of this shock tube can facilitate localized application of a blast wave to a subject, tissue, or material under test.

  5. Tabletop imaging of structural evolutions in chemical reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Ibrahim, Heide; Beaulieu, Samuel; Schmidt, Bruno E; Thiré, Nicolas; Bisson, Éric; Hebeisen, Christoph T; Wanie, Vincent; Giguére, Mathieu; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Sanderson, Joseph; Schuurman, Michael S; Légaré, François

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of femto-chemistry has made it a primary goal to follow the nuclear and electronic evolution of a molecule in time and space as it undergoes a chemical reaction. Using Coulomb Explosion Imaging we have shot the first high-resolution molecular movie of a to and fro isomerization process in the acetylene cation. So far, this kind of phenomenon could only be observed using VUV light from a Free Electron Laser [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 263002 (2010)]. Here we show that 266 nm ultrashort laser pulses are capable of initiating rich dynamics through multiphoton ionization. With our generally applicable tabletop approach that can be used for other small organic molecules, we have investigated two basic chemical reactions simultaneously: proton migration and C=C bond-breaking, triggered by multiphoton ionization. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with the timescales and relaxation pathways predicted by new and definitively quantitative ab initio trajectory simulations.

  6. Argonne National Laboratory research offers clues to Alzheimer's plaques

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Researchers from Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Chicago have developed methods to directly observe the structure and growth of microscopic filaments that form the characteristic plaques found in the brains of those with Alzheimer's Disease (1 page).

  7. High-temperature superconductor applications development at Argonne National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, J. R.; Poeppel, R. B.

    1992-02-01

    Developments at Argonne National Laboratory of near and intermediate term applications using high-temperature superconductors are discussed. Near-term applications of liquid-nitrogen depth sensors, current leads, and magnetic bearings are discussed in detail.

  8. Argonne National Lab gets Linux network teraflop cluster

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Linux NetworX, Salt Lake City, Utah, has delivered an Evolocity II (E2) Linux cluster to Argonne National Laboratory that is capable of performing more than one trillion calculations per second (1 teraFLOP). The cluster, named "Jazz" by Argonne, is designed to provide optimum performance for multiple disciplines such as chemistry, physics and reactor engineering and will be used by the entire scientific community at the Lab" (1 page).

  9. Argonne National Laboratory Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, T. M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gomez, J. L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Moos, L. P. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-09-02

    This report discusses the status and the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory for calendar year 2013. The status of Argonne environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with environmental management, sustainability efforts, environmental corrective actions, and habitat restoration. To evaluate the effects of Argonne operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and Argonne effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable standards intended to protect human health and the environment. A U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) CAP-88 Version 3 computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  10. Argonne National Laboratory Site Environmental report for calendar year 2009.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N. W.; Davis, T. M.; Moos, L. P.

    2010-08-04

    This report discusses the status and the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory for calendar year 2009. The status of Argonne environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects. To evaluate the effects of Argonne operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and Argonne effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) CAP-88 Version 3 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  11. Argonne National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N. W.; ESH/QA Oversight

    2007-09-13

    This report discusses the status and the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory for calendar year 2006. The status of Argonne environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects. To evaluate the effects of Argonne operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and Argonne effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A U.S. Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's CAP-88 Version 3 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  12. Argonne National Laboratory site enviromental report for calendar year 2008.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N. W.; Davis, T. M.; Moos, L. P.

    2009-09-02

    This report discusses the status and the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory for calendar year 2008. The status of Argonne environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects. To evaluate the effects of Argonne operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and Argonne effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A U.S. Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's CAP-88 Version 3 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  13. Argonne National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 2007.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N. W.; Davis, T. M.; Moos, L. P.; ESH/QA Oversight

    2008-09-09

    This report discusses the status and the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory for calendar year 2007. The status of Argonne environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects. To evaluate the effects of Argonne operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and Argonne effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A U.S. Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's CAP-88 Version 3 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  14. Promoting community preparedness: lessons learned from the implementation of a chemical disaster tabletop exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    High, Erika H; Lovelace, Kay A; Gansneder, Bruce M; Strack, Robert W; Callahan, Barbara; Benson, Phillip

    2010-05-01

    Health educators are frequently called on to facilitate community preparedness planning. One planning tool is community-wide tabletop exercises. Tabletop exercises can improve the preparedness of public health system agencies to address disaster by bringing together individuals representing organizations with different roles and perspectives in specific disasters. Thus, they have the opportunity to identify each other's roles, capabilities, and limitations and to problem-solve about how to address the gaps and overlaps in a low-threat collaborative setting. In 2005, the North Carolina Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response developed a series of exercises to test the preparedness for chemical disasters in a metropolitan region in the southeastern United States. A tabletop exercise allowed agency heads to meet in an environment promoting inter- and intraagency public-private coordination and cooperation. The evaluation results reported here suggest ways in which any tabletop exercise can be enhanced through recruitment, planning, and implementation.

  15. High immersive three-dimensional tabletop display system with high dense light field reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Mengqing; Yu, Xunbo; Xie, Songlin; Sang, Xinzhu; Yu, Chongxiu

    2014-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tabletop display is a kind of display with wide range of potential applications. An auto-stereoscopic 3D tabletop display system is designed to provide the observers with high level of immersive perception. To improve the freedom of viewing position, the eye tracking system and a set of active partially pixelated masks are utilized. To improve the display quality, large number of images is prepared to generate the stereo pair. The light intensity distribution and crosstalk of parallax images are measured respectively to evaluate the rationality of the auto-stereoscopic system. In the experiment, the high immersive auto-stereoscopic tabletop display system is demonstrated, together with the system architectures including hardware and software. Experimental results illustrate the effectiveness of the high immersive auto-stereoscopic tabletop display system.

  16. Argonne National Laboratory institutional plan FY 2001--FY 2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beggs, S.D.

    2000-12-07

    This Institutional Plan describes what Argonne management regards as the optimal future development of Laboratory activities. The document outlines the development of both research programs and support operations in the context of the nation's R and D priorities, the missions of the Department of Energy (DOE) and Argonne, and expected resource constraints. The Draft Institutional Plan is the product of many discussions between DOE and Argonne program managers, and it also reflects programmatic priorities developed during Argonne's summer strategic planning process. That process serves additionally to identify new areas of strategic value to DOE and Argonne, to which Laboratory Directed Research and Development funds may be applied. The Draft Plan is provided to the Department before Argonne's On-Site Review. Issuance of the final Institutional Plan in the fall, after further comment and discussion, marks the culmination of the Laboratory's annual planning cycle. Chapter II of this Institutional Plan describes Argonne's missions and roles within the DOE laboratory system, its underlying core competencies in science and technology, and six broad planning objectives whose achievement is considered critical to the future of the Laboratory. Chapter III presents the Laboratory's ''Science and Technology Strategic Plan,'' which summarizes key features of the external environment, presents Argonne's vision, and describes how Argonne's strategic goals and objectives support DOE's four business lines. The balance of Chapter III comprises strategic plans for 23 areas of science and technology at Argonne, grouped according to the four DOE business lines. The Laboratory's 14 major initiatives, presented in Chapter IV, propose important advances in key areas of fundamental science and technology development. The ''Operations and Infrastructure Strategic Plan'' in Chapter V includes

  17. Fire protection review revisit no. 2, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, P. H.; Earley, M. W.; Mattern, L. J.

    1985-05-01

    A fire protection survey was conducted at Argonne National Laboratory on April 1-5, 8-12, and April 29-May 2, 1985. The purpose was to review the facility fire protection program and to make recommendations or identify areas according to criteria established by the Department of Energy. There has been a substantial improvement in fire protection at this laboratory since the 1977 audit. Numerous areas which were previously provided with detection systems only have since been provided with automatic sprinkler protection. The following basic fire protection features are not properly controlled: (1) resealing wall and floor penetrations between fire areas after installation of services; (2) cutting and welding; and (3) housekeeping. The present Fire Department manpower level appears adequate to control a route fire. Their ability to adequately handle a high-challenge fire, or one involving injuries to personnel, or fire spread beyond the initial fire area is doubtful.

  18. Tiger team assessment of the Argonne Illinois site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-10-19

    This report documents the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Tiger Team Assessment of the Argonne Illinois Site (AIS) (including the DOE Chicago Operations Office, DOE Argonne Area Office, Argonne National Laboratory-East, and New Brunswick Laboratory) and Site A and Plot M, Argonne, Illinois, conducted from September 17 through October 19, 1990. The Tiger Team Assessment was conducted by a team comprised of professionals from DOE, contractors, consultants. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy with the status of Environment, Safety, and Health (ES H) Programs at AIS. Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) is the principal tenant at AIS. ANL-E is a multiprogram laboratory operated by the University of Chicago for DOE. The mission of ANL-E is to perform basic and applied research that supports the development of energy-related technologies. There are a significant number of ES H findings and concerns identified in the report that require prompt management attention. A significant change in culture is required before ANL-E can attain consistent and verifiable compliance with statutes, regulations and DOE Orders. ES H activities are informal, fragmented, and inconsistently implemented. Communication is seriously lacking, both vertically and horizontally. Management expectations are not known or commondated adequately, support is not consistent, and oversight is not effective.

  19. High photon flux table-top coherent extreme ultraviolet source

    CERN Document Server

    Hädrich, Steffen; Rothhardt, Jan; Krebs, Manuel; Hoffmann, Armin; Pronin, Oleg; Pervak, Vladimir; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    High harmonic generation (HHG) enables extreme ultraviolet radiation with table-top setups. Its exceptional properties, such as coherence and (sub)-femtosecond pulse durations, have led to a diversity of applications. Some of these require a high photon flux and megahertz repetition rates, e.g. to avoid space charge effects in photoelectron spectroscopy. To date this has only been achieved with enhancement cavities. Here, we establish a novel route towards powerful HHG sources. By achieving phase-matched HHG of a megahertz fibre laser we generate a broad plateau (25 eV - 40 eV) of strong harmonics, each containing more than $10^{12}$ photons/s, which constitutes an increase by more than one order of magnitude in that wavelength range. The strongest harmonic (H25, 30 eV) has an average power of 143 $\\mu$W ($3\\cdot10^{13}$ photons/s). This concept will greatly advance and facilitate applications in photoelectron or coincidence spectroscopy, coherent diffractive imaging or (multidimensional) surface science.

  20. Argonne's contribution to regional development : successful examples.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y. I.

    2000-11-14

    Argonne National Laboratory's mission is basic research and technology development to meet national goals in scientific leadership, energy technology, and environmental quality. In addition to its core missions as a national research and development center, Argonne has exerted a positive impact on its regional economic development, has carried out outstanding educational programs not only for college/graduate students but also for pre-college students and teachers, and has fostered partnerships with universities for research collaboration and with industry for shaping the new technological frontiers.

  1. Performance model of the Argonne Voyager multimedia server

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Disz, T.; Olson, R.; Stevens, R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Mathematics and Computer Science Div.

    1997-07-01

    The Argonne Voyager Multimedia Server is being developed in the Futures Lab of the Mathematics and Computer Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory. As a network-based service for recording and playing multimedia streams, it is important that the Voyager system be capable of sustaining certain minimal levels of performance in order for it to be a viable system. In this article, the authors examine the performance characteristics of the server. As they examine the architecture of the system, they try to determine where bottlenecks lie, show actual vs potential performance, and recommend areas for improvement through custom architectures and system tuning.

  2. The effect of the iBEAM Evo carbon fiber tabletop on skin sparing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, John B; Godwin, Guy A

    2011-01-01

    Replicating the attenuation properties of the treatment tabletop are of primary importance for accurate treatment planning; however, the effect of the tabletop on the skin-sparing properties of x-rays can be overlooked. Under some conditions, the reaction of skin to the radiation can be so serious as to be the dose-limiting organ for radiotherapy treatment. Hence, an understanding of the magnitude of the reduction in skin sparing is important. Because of the development of image-guided radiotherapy, modern tabletops have been developed without the use of metal supports that otherwise provided the necessary level of rigidity. Rigidity is instead provided by compressed foam within a carbon-fiber shell, which, although it provides artefact-free imaging and high levels of rigidity, has an adverse affect on the dose in the build-up region. Representative of this type is the iBEAM evo tabletop, whose effect on the skin dose was determined at 6-MV, 10-MV, and 18-MV x-rays. Skin dose was found to increase by 60-70% owing to the tabletop, with the effect increasing with field size and decreasing with energy. By considering an endpoint of erythema, a radiobiological advantage of selecting 10 MV over 6 MV for applicable treatments was demonstrated.

  3. Table-top pellet injector (TATOP) for impurity pellet injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szepesi, Tamás, E-mail: szepesi.tamas@wigner.mta.hu [Wigner RCP, RMI, Konkoly Thege 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Herrmann, Albrecht [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Kocsis, Gábor; Kovács, Ádám; Németh, József [Wigner RCP, RMI, Konkoly Thege 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Ploeckl, Bernhard [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • A portable pellet injector for solid state pellets was designed. • Aims to study ELM triggering potential of impurity pellets. • Aims for multi-machine comparison of pellet–plasma interaction. • Max. pellet speed: 450 m/s, max. rate: 25 Hz. • Pellet size: 0.5–1.5 mm (diameter). - Abstract: A table-top pellet injector (TATOP) has been designed to fulfill the following scientific aims: to study the ELM triggering potential of impurity pellets, and to make pellet injection experiments comparable over several fusion machines. The TATOP is based on a centrifugal accelerator therefore the complete system is run in vacuum, ensuring the compatibility with fusion devices. The injector is able to launch any solid material (stable at room temperature) in form of balls with a diameter in the 0.5–1.5 mm range. The device hosts three individual pellet tanks that can contain e.g. pellets of different materials, and the user can select from those without opening the vacuum chamber. A key element of the accelerator is a two-stage stop cylinder that reduces the spatial scatter of pellets exiting the acceleration arm below 6°, enabling the efficient collection of all fired pellets. The injector has a maximum launch speed of 450 m/s. The launching of pellets can be done individually by providing TTL triggers for the injector, giving a high level of freedom for the experimenter when designing pellet trains. However, the (temporary) firing rate cannot be larger than 25 Hz. TATOP characterization was done in a test bed; however, the project is still in progress and before application at a fusion oriented experiment.

  4. Argonne to open new facility for advanced vehicle testing

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory will open it's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility on Friday, Nov. 15. The facility is North America's only public testing facility for engines, fuel cells, electric drives and energy storage. State-of-the-art performance and emissions measurement equipment is available to support model development and technology validation (1 page).

  5. Brookhaven Lab and Argonne Lab scientists invent a plasma valve

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Scientists from Brookhaven National Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory have received U.S. patent number 6,528,948 for a device that shuts off airflow into a vacuum about one million times faster than mechanical valves or shutters that are currently in use (1 page).

  6. Argonne National Laboratory Publications July 1, 1968 - June 30, 1969.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1969-08-01

    This publication list is a bibliography of scientific and technical accounts originated at Argonne and published during the fiscal year 1969 (July 1, 1968 through June 30, 1969). It includes items published as journal articles, technical reports, books, etc., all of which have been made available to the public.

  7. Argonne Laboratory Computing Resource Center - FY2004 Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bair, R.

    2005-04-14

    In the spring of 2002, Argonne National Laboratory founded the Laboratory Computing Resource Center, and in April 2003 LCRC began full operations with Argonne's first teraflops computing cluster. The LCRC's driving mission is to enable and promote computational science and engineering across the Laboratory, primarily by operating computing facilities and supporting application use and development. This report describes the scientific activities, computing facilities, and usage in the first eighteen months of LCRC operation. In this short time LCRC has had broad impact on programs across the Laboratory. The LCRC computing facility, Jazz, is available to the entire Laboratory community. In addition, the LCRC staff provides training in high-performance computing and guidance on application usage, code porting, and algorithm development. All Argonne personnel and collaborators are encouraged to take advantage of this computing resource and to provide input into the vision and plans for computing and computational analysis at Argonne. Steering for LCRC comes from the Computational Science Advisory Committee, composed of computing experts from many Laboratory divisions. The CSAC Allocations Committee makes decisions on individual project allocations for Jazz.

  8. Three Argonne technologies win R&D 100 awards

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Three technologies developed or co-developed at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory have been recognized with R&D 100 Awards, which highlight some of the best products and technologies from around the world" (1 page).

  9. Representing distance, consuming distance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Gunvor Riber

    to mobility and its social context. Such an understanding can be approached through representations, as distance is being represented in various ways, most noticeably in maps and through the notions of space and Otherness. The question this talk subsequently asks is whether these representations of distance...... are being consumed in the contemporary society, in the same way as places, media, cultures and status are being consumed (Urry 1995, Featherstone 2007). An exploration of distance and its representations through contemporary consumption theory could expose what role distance plays in forming...... are present in theoretical and empirical elaborations on mobility, but these remain largely implicit and unchallenged (Bauman 1998). This talk will endeavour to unmask distance as a theoretical entity by exploring ways in which distance can be understood and by discussing distance through its representations...

  10. Two-phase (bio)catalytic reactions in a table-top centrifugal contact separator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraai, Gerard N.; Zwol, Floris van; Schuur, Boelo; Heeres, Hero J.; Vries, Johannes G. de

    2008-01-01

    A new spin on catalysis: A table-top centrifugal contact separator allows for fast continuous two-phase reactions to be performed by intimately mixing two immiscible phases and then separating them. Such a device has been used to produce biodiesel from sunflower oil and MeOH/NaOMe. A lipase-catalyze

  11. X-ray phase contrast imaging of biological specimens with tabletop synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Kneip, S; Dollar, F; Bloom, M S; Chvykov, V; Kalintchenko, G; Krushelnick, K; Maksimchuk, A; Mangles, S P D; Matsuoka, T; Najmudin, Z; Palmer, C A J; Schreiber, J; Schumaker, W; Thomas, A G R; Yanovsky, V

    2011-01-01

    Since their discovery in 1896, x-rays have had a profound impact on science, medicine and technology. Here we show that the x-rays from a novel tabletop source of bright coherent synchrotron radiation can be applied to phase contrast imaging of biological specimens, yielding superior image quality and avoiding the need for scarce or expensive conventional sources.

  12. Subjective User Experience and Performance with Active Tangibles on a Tabletop Interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, van Jan B.F.; Toet, Alexander; Meijer, Koos; Janssen, Joris; Jong, Arnoud

    2015-01-01

    We developed active tangibles (Sensators) that can be used in combination with multitouch tabletops and that can provide multisensory (visual, auditory, and vibrotactile) feedback. For spatial alignment and rotation tasks we measured subjective user experience and objective performance with these Se

  13. Collaborative Enquiry through the Tabletop for Second/Foreign Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mei; Preston, Anne; Kharrufa, Ahmed; Kong, Zhuoran

    2014-01-01

    Interactional communicative competence and higher-order thinking have been well documented as two of the biggest challenges for second/foreign language learners (EFL learners). This paper evaluates the use of digital tabletops as tools for problem-solving tasks in groups. The evaluation is based on a preliminary study of an application of the use…

  14. Educational Games for Early Childhood: Using Tabletop Surface Computers for Teaching the Arabic Alphabet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papadopoulos, Pantelis M.; Ibrahim, Zeinab; Karatsolis, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents initial evaluation regarding the use of simple educational games on tabletop surface computers to teach Kindergarten students in Qatar the Arabic alphabet. This effort is part of the “Arabiyyatii” research project, a 3-year endeavor aimed to teach 5-year-olds Modern Standard...

  15. Argonne's Laboratory computing center - 2007 annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bair, R.; Pieper, G. W.

    2008-05-28

    Argonne National Laboratory founded the Laboratory Computing Resource Center (LCRC) in the spring of 2002 to help meet pressing program needs for computational modeling, simulation, and analysis. The guiding mission is to provide critical computing resources that accelerate the development of high-performance computing expertise, applications, and computations to meet the Laboratory's challenging science and engineering missions. In September 2002 the LCRC deployed a 350-node computing cluster from Linux NetworX to address Laboratory needs for mid-range supercomputing. This cluster, named 'Jazz', achieved over a teraflop of computing power (1012 floating-point calculations per second) on standard tests, making it the Laboratory's first terascale computing system and one of the 50 fastest computers in the world at the time. Jazz was made available to early users in November 2002 while the system was undergoing development and configuration. In April 2003, Jazz was officially made available for production operation. Since then, the Jazz user community has grown steadily. By the end of fiscal year 2007, there were over 60 active projects representing a wide cross-section of Laboratory expertise, including work in biosciences, chemistry, climate, computer science, engineering applications, environmental science, geoscience, information science, materials science, mathematics, nanoscience, nuclear engineering, and physics. Most important, many projects have achieved results that would have been unobtainable without such a computing resource. The LCRC continues to foster growth in the computational science and engineering capability and quality at the Laboratory. Specific goals include expansion of the use of Jazz to new disciplines and Laboratory initiatives, teaming with Laboratory infrastructure providers to offer more scientific data management capabilities, expanding Argonne staff use of national computing facilities, and improving the scientific

  16. 1985 annual site environmental report for Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

    1986-03-01

    This is one in a series of annual reports prepared to provide DOE, environmental agencies, and the public with information on the level of radioactive and chemical pollutants in the environment and on the amounts of such substances, if any, added to the environment as a result of Argonne operations. Included in this report are the results of measurements obtained in 1985 for a number of radionuclides in air, surface water, ground water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in surface and subsurface water; and for the external penetrating radiation dose.

  17. Research in mathematics and computer science at Argonne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pieper, G.W.

    1989-08-01

    This report reviews the research activities in the Mathematics and Computer Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory for the period January 1988 - August 1989. The body of the report gives a brief look at the MCS staff and the research facilities, and discusses various projects carried out in two major areas of research: analytical and numerical methods and advanced computing concepts. Projects funded by non-DOE sources are also discussed, and new technology transfer activities are described. Further information on division staff, visitors, workshops, and seminars is found in the appendices.

  18. Change in argonne national laboratory: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozley, A

    1971-10-01

    Despite traditional opposition to change within an institution and the known reluctance of an "old guard" to accept new managerial policies and techniques, the reactions suggested in this study go well beyond the level of a basic resistance to change. The response, indeed, drawn from a random sampling of Laboratory scientific and engineering personnel, comes close to what Philip Handler has recently described as a run on the scientific bank in a period of depression (1, p. 146). It appears that Argonne's apprehension stems less from the financial cuts that have reduced staff and diminished programs by an annual 10 percent across the last 3 fiscal years than from the administrative and conceptual changes that have stamped the institution since 1966. Administratively, the advent of the AUA has not forged a sense of collaborative effort implicit in the founding negotiations or contributed noticeably to increasing standards of excellence at Argonne. The AUA has, in fact, yet to exercise the constructive powers vested in them by the contract of reviewing and formulating long-term policy on the research and reactor side. Additionally, the University of Chicago, once the single operator, appears to have forfeited some of the trust and understanding that characterized the Laboratory's attitude to it in former years. In a period of complex and sensitive management the present directorate at Argonne is seriously dissociated from a responsible spectrum of opinion within the Laboratory. The crux of discontent among the creative scientific and engineering community appears to lie in a developed sense of being overadministered. In contrast to earlier periods, Argonne's professional staff feels a critical need for a voice in the formulation of Laboratory programs and policy. The Argonne senate could supply this mechanism. Slow to rally, their present concern springs from a firm conviction that the Laboratory is "withering on the vine." By contrast, the Laboratory director Powers

  19. Initial operation of the Argonne superconducting heavy-ion linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K. W.

    1979-01-01

    Initial operation and recent development of the Argonne superconducting heavy-ion linac are discussed. The linac has been developed in order to demonstrate a cost-effective means of extending the performance of electrostatic tandem accelerators. The results of beam acceleration tests which began in June 1978 are described. At present 7 of a planned array of 22 resonators are operating on-line, and the linac system provides an effective accelerating potential of 7.5 MV. Although some technical problems remain, the level of performance and reliability is sufficient that appreciable beam time is becoming available to users.

  20. Overview of Tabletop X-ray Laser Development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, J; Shlyaptsev, V; Nilsen, J; Smith, R; Keenan, R; Moon, S; Filevich, J; Rocca, J; Nelson, A; Hunter, J; Marconi, M; Li, Y; Osterheld, A; Shepherd, R; Fiedorowicz, H; Bartnik, A; Faenov, A Y; Pikuz, T; Zeitoun, P; Hubert, S; Jacquemot, S; Fajardo, M

    2006-11-03

    It is almost a decade since the first tabletop x-ray laser experiments were implemented at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The decision to pursue the picosecond-driven schemes at LLNL was largely based around the early demonstration of the tabletop Ne-like Ti x-ray laser at the Max Born Institute (MBI) as well as the established robustness of collisional excitation schemes. These picosecond x-ray lasers have been a strong growth area for x-ray laser research. Rapid progress in source development and characterization has achieved ultrahigh peak brightness rivaling the previous activities on the larger facilities. Various picosecond soft-x-ray based applications have benefited from the increased repetition rates. We will describe the activities at LLNL in this area.

  1. Table-top setup for investigating the scintillation properties of liquid argon

    CERN Document Server

    Heindl, T; Fedenev, A; Hofmann, M; Krücken, R; Oberauer, L; Potzel, W; Wieser, J; Ulrich, A

    2015-01-01

    The spectral and temporal light emission properties of liquid argon have been studied in the context of its use in large liquid rare-gas detectors for detecting Dark Matter particles in astronomy. A table-top setup has been developed. Continuous and pulsed low energy electron beam excitation is used to stimulate light emission. A spectral range from 110 to 1000 nm in wavelength is covered by the detection system with a time resolution on the order of 1 ns.

  2. A simple table-top demonstration of radiation pressure on a macroscopic object

    CERN Document Server

    Jesensky, G; Khomenko, O; Kim, W J

    2016-01-01

    We report a simple demonstration of radiation pressure on a table-top experiment. Utilizing dynamic force microscopy in ambient environment, the resonant motion of a cm-sized cantilever driven by an amplitude-modulated diode laser is directly observed. Our versatile setup involves a host of exciting techniques that are relevant in precision force measurements and represents an ideal experiment in the undergraduate laboratory.

  3. Table-top deterministic and collective colloidal assembly using videoprojector lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordeiro, J. [Univ Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, LTM, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Zelsmann, M., E-mail: marc.zelsmann@cea.fr [Univ Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, LTM, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Honegger, T. [Univ Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, LTM, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Picard, E.; Hadji, E. [Univ Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, INAC-SP2M, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Peyrade, D. [Univ Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, LTM, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2015-09-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Micrometric resolution substrates are made at low cost using a videoprojector. • Fabricated patterns could be used as substrates for capillary force assembly. • Arrays of organized particles are made using a table-top capillary assembly tool. • This process offers a new bridge between the colloidal domain and the chip world. - Abstract: In the field of micro- and nanotechnology, most lithography and fabrication tools coming from the microelectronic industry are expensive, time-consuming and may need some masks that have to be subcontracted. Such approach is not suitable for other fields that require rapid prototyping such as chemistry, life science or energy and may hinder research creativity. In this work, we present two table-top equipments dedicated to the fabrication of deterministic colloidal particles assemblies onto micro-structured substrates. We show that, with a limited modification of the optics of a standard videoprojector, it is possible to quickly obtain substrates with thousands of micrometric features. Then, we combine these substrates with thermodynamic colloidal assembly and generate arrays of particles without defects. This work opens the way to a simple and table-top fabrication of devices based on colloidal particles.

  4. Microscale chemistry technology exchange at Argonne National Laboratory - east.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pausma, R.

    1998-06-04

    The Division of Educational Programs (DEP) at Argonne National Laboratory-East interacts with the education community at all levels to improve science and mathematics education and to provide resources to instructors of science and mathematics. DEP conducts a wide range of educational programs and has established an enormous audience of teachers, both in the Chicago area and nationally. DEP has brought microscale chemistry to the attention of this huge audience. This effort has been supported by the U.S. Department of Energy through the Environmental Management Operations organization within Argonne. Microscale chemistry is a teaching methodology wherein laboratory chemistry training is provided to students while utilizing very small amounts of reagents and correspondingly small apparatus. The techniques enable a school to reduce significantly the cost of reagents, the cost of waste disposal and the dangers associated with the manipulation of chemicals. The cost reductions are achieved while still providing the students with the hands-on laboratory experience that is vital to students who might choose to pursue careers in the sciences. Many universities and colleges have already begun to switch from macroscale to microscale chemistry in their educational laboratories. The introduction of these techniques at the secondary education level will lead to freshman being better prepared for the type of experimentation that they will encounter in college.

  5. Draft environmental assessment of Argonne National Laboratory, East

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-10-01

    This environmental assessment of the operation of the Argonne National Laboratory is related to continuation of research and development work being conducted at the Laboratory site at Argonne, Illinois. The Laboratory has been monitoring various environmental parameters both offsite and onsite since 1949. Meteorological data have been collected to support development of models for atmospheric dispersion of radioactive and other pollutants. Gaseous and liquid effluents, both radioactive and non-radioactive, have been measured by portable monitors and by continuous monitors at fixed sites. Monitoring of constituents of the terrestrial ecosystem provides a basis for identifying changes should they occur in this regime. The Laboratory has established a position of leadership in monitoring methodologies and their application. Offsite impacts of nonradiological accidents are primarily those associated with the release of chlorine and with sodium fires. Both result in releases that cause no health damage offsite. Radioactive materials released to the environment result in a cumulative dose to persons residing within 50 miles of the site of about 47 man-rem per year, compared to an annual total of about 950,000 man-rem delivered to the same population from natural background radiation. 100 refs., 17 figs., 33 tabs.

  6. Tabletop Ultrabright Kiloelectronvolt X-Ray Sources from Xe and Kr Hollow Atom States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Poopalasingam

    Albert Einstein, the father of relativity, once said, "Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better". Today available higher resolution tabletop tool to look deep into matters and living thing is an x-ray source. Although the available tabletop x-rays sources of the 20th century, such as the ones used for medical or dental x-rays are tremendously useful for medical diagnostics and industry, a major disadvantage is that they have low quality skillful brightness, which limits its resolution and accuracy. In the other hand, x-ray free-electrons laser (XFEL) and synchrotron radiation sources provided extreme bright x-rays. However, number of applications of XFEL and synchrotron such as medical and industrials, has been hampered by their size, complexity, and cost. This has set a goal of demonstrating x-ray source with enough brightness for potential applications in an often-called tabletop compact x-ray source that could be operated in university laboratory or hospitals. We have developed two tabletop ultrabright keV x-ray sources, one from a Xe hollow-atom states and the other one from Kr hollow-atom stares with a unique characteristic that makes them complementary to currently-available extreme-light sources; XFEL, and synchrotron x-ray source. Upgraded tabletop ultra-fast KrF* pump-laser interacts with target rare-gas clusters and produces hollow-atom states, which later coherently collapse to the empty inner-shell and thereby generate keV x-ray radiation. The KrF* pump-laser beam is self-focused and forms a self-channel to guide the generated x-ray radiation in the direction of the pump-laser beam to produce directed x-ray beam. Xe (M) x-ray source operates at 1.2-1.6 nm wavelength while the Kr(L) x-ray source operates in 600-800 pm wavelength. System is mounted upon 3 optical-tables (5´x12´) with two KrF amplifiers at a repetition rate of 0.1 Hz. A lower bound for brightness value for both Xe and Kr x-ray sources is 1026 photons s-1mm-2

  7. Argonne National Lab deploys Force10 networks' massively dense ethernet switch for supercomputing cluster

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Force10 Networks, Inc. today announced that Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne, IL) has successfully deployed Force10 E-Series switch/routers to connect to the TeraGrid, the world's largest supercomputing grid, sponsored by the National Science Foundation (NSF)" (1/2 page).

  8. Frontiers: Research highlights 1946-1996 [50th Anniversary Edition. Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    This special edition of 'Frontiers' commemorates Argonne National Laboratory's 50th anniversary of service to science and society. America's first national laboratory, Argonne has been in the forefront of U.S. scientific and technological research from its beginning. Past accomplishments, current research, and future plans are highlighted.

  9. Users Handbook for the Argonne Premium Coal Sample Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorres, K.S.

    1993-10-01

    This Users Handbook for the Argonne Premium Coal Samples provides the recipients of those samples with information that will enhance the value of the samples, to permit greater opportunities to compare their work with that of others, and aid in correlations that can improve the value to all users. It is hoped that this document will foster a spirit of cooperation and collaboration such that the field of basic coal chemistry may be a more efficient and rewarding endeavor for all who participate. The different sections are intended to stand alone. For this reason some of the information may be found in several places. The handbook is also intended to be a dynamic document, constantly subject to change through additions and improvements. Please feel free to write to the editor with your comments and suggestions.

  10. From Tabletop RPG to Interactive Storytelling: Definition of a Story Manager for Videogames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmas, Guylain; Champagnat, Ronan; Augeraud, Michel

    Adding narrative in computer game is complicated because it may restrict player interactivity. Our aim is to design a controller that dynamically built a plot, through the game execution, centred on player's actions. Tabletop Role-playing games manage to deal with this goal. This paper presents a study of role-playing games, their organization, and the models commonly used for narrative generation. It then deduces a proposition of components and data structures for interactive storytelling in videogames. A prototype of a social game has been developed as example.

  11. Experimental plasma astrophysics using a T{sup 3} (Table-top Terawatt) laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajima, T.

    1996-11-01

    Lasers that can deliver immense power of Terawatt (10{sup 12}W) and can still compactly sit on a Table-Top (T{sup 3} lasers) emerged in the 1990s. The advent of these lasers allows us to access to regimes of astronomical physical conditions that once thought impossible to realize in a terrestrial laboratory. We touch on examples that include superhigh pressure materials that may resemble the interior of giant planets and white dwarfs and of relativistic temperature plasmas that may exist in the early cosmological epoch and in the neighborhood of the blackhole event horizon.

  12. Using an Augmented Reality Enhanced Tabletop System to Promote Learning of Mathematics: A Case Study with Students with Special Educational Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascales-Martínez, Antonia; Martínez-Segura, María-José; Pérez-López, David; Contero, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    The main objective of this research is to determine the feasibility of using a multi touch tabletop system for applied mathematics learning in primary education with students with special needs (SEN). The instructional content designed on the tabletop focuses on understanding and managing money, coins, and banknotes. The study also analyzes the…

  13. Study of energy transfer in table-top X-pinch driven by a water line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beg, F N [Mechanical and Aerospace Department, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA92093-0411 (United States); Zhang, T [Mechanical and Aerospace Department, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA92093-0411 (United States); Fedin, D [Mechanical and Aerospace Department, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA92093-0411 (United States); Beagen, B [Anglo Chinese Junior College, 25 Dover Close East, Singapore 139745 (Singapore); Chua, E [Anglo Chinese Junior College, 25 Dover Close East, Singapore 139745 (Singapore); Lee, J Y [Anglo Chinese Junior College, 25 Dover Close East, Singapore 139745 (Singapore); Rawat, R S [National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University, 1 Nanyang Walk, Singapore 637616 (Singapore); Lee, P [National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University, 1 Nanyang Walk, Singapore 637616 (Singapore)

    2007-08-15

    The current passing through X-pinches and the energy transferring from the pulse forming line to the load are modelled using a simple LCR circuit. A comparison of the electrical properties of two table-top X-pinch devices is made. It was found that up to 25% of the stored energy is transferred from the water transmission line to the load in the University of California,San Diego (UCSD) table-top X-pinch before x-ray emission starts. The highest energy transmitted (75%) is found after the current peak. In comparison, only 3% of the energy is transferred to the load in the National Institute of Education (NIE) X-pinch device just after the maximum current peak. The highest energy (25%) transmitted to the plasma occurs long after the current peak. The plasma in both devices is visually and qualitatively similar. However, the UCSD device emits intense x-rays with no x-rays observed in the NIE device. This observation is consistent with the electrical circuit analysis.

  14. Flow Induced Vibration Program at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has had a Flow Induced Vibration Program since 1967; the Program currently resides in the Laboratory's Components Technology Division. Throughout its existence, the overall objective of the program has been to develop and apply new and/or improved methods of analysis and testing for the design evaluation of nuclear reactor plant components and heat exchange equipment from the standpoint of flow induced vibration. Historically, the majority of the program activities have been funded by the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA), and Department of Energy (DOE). Current DOE funding is from the Breeder Mechanical Component Development Division, Office of Breeder Technology Projects; Energy Conversion and Utilization Technology (ECUT) Program, Office of Energy Systems Research; and Division of Engineering, Mathematical and Geosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Testing of Clinch River Breeder Reactor upper plenum components has been funded by the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) Project Office. Work has also been performed under contract with Foster Wheeler, General Electric, Duke Power Company, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and Westinghouse.

  15. Treatment of mixed radioactive liquid wastes at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandegrift, G.F.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Conner, C. [and others

    1994-03-01

    Aqueous mixed waste at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is traditionally generated in small volumes with a wide variety of compositions. A cooperative effort at ANL between Waste Management (WM) and the Chemical Technology Division (CMT) was established, to develop, install, and implement a robust treatment operation to handle the majority of such wastes. For this treatment, toxic metals in mixed-waste solutions are precipitated in a semiautomated system using Ca(OH){sub 2} and, for some metals, Na{sub 2}S additions. This step is followed by filtration to remove the precipitated solids. A filtration skid was built that contains several filter types which can be used, as appropriate, for a variety of suspended solids. When supernatant liquid is separated from the toxic-metal solids by decantation and filtration, it will be a low-level waste (LLW) rather than a mixed waste. After passing a Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test, the solids may also be treated as LLW.

  16. Argonne National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 2004.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N. W.; Kolzow, R. G.

    2005-09-02

    This report discusses the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for calendar year 2004. The status of ANL environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects. To evaluate the effects of ANL operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the ANL site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and ANL effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, fallout, ANL, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A U.S. Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's CAP-88 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  17. Routine environmental reaudit of the Argonne National Laboratory - West

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This report documents the results of the Routine Environmental Reaudit of the Argonne National Laboratory - West (ANL-W), Idaho Falls, Idaho. During this audit, the activities conducted by the audit team included reviews of internal documents and reports from previous audits and assessments; interviews with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), State of Idaho Department of Health and Welfare (IDHW), and DOE contractor personnel; and inspections and observations of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the audit was conducted from October 11 to October 22, 1993, by the DOE Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), located within the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). DOE 5482.113, {open_quotes}Environment, Safety, and Health Appraisal Program,{close_quotes} established the mission of EH-24 to provide comprehensive, independent oversight of Department-wide environmental programs on behalf of the Secretary of Energy. The ultimate goal of EH-24 is enhancement of environmental protection and minimization of risk to public health and the environment. EH-24 accomplishes its mission by conducting systematic and periodic evaluations of the Department`s environmental programs within line organizations, and by utilizing supplemental activities that serve to strengthen self-assessment and oversight functions within program, field, and contractor organizations.

  18. Argonne Natl Lab receives TeraFLOP Cluster Linux NetworX

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    " Linux NetworX announced today it has delivered an Evolocity II (E2) Linux cluster to Argonne National Laboratory that is capable of performing more than one trillion calculations per second (1 teraFLOP)" (1/2 page).

  19. Authorized limits for disposal of PCB capacitors from Buildings 361 and 391 at Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, J.-J.; Chen, S.-Y.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-12-22

    This report contains data and analyses to support the approval of authorized release limits for the clearance from radiological control of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) capacitors in Buildings 361 and 391 at Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois. These capacitors contain PCB oil that must be treated and disposed of as hazardous waste under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). However, they had been located in radiological control areas where the potential for neutron activation existed; therefore, direct release of these capacitors to a commercial facility for PCB treatment and landfill disposal is not allowable unless authorized release has been approved. Radiological characterization found no loose contamination on the exterior surface of the PCB capacitors; gamma spectroscopy analysis also showed the radioactivity levels of the capacitors were either at or slightly above ambient background levels. As such, conservative assumptions were used to expedite the analyses conducted to evaluate the potential radiation exposures of workers and the general public resulting from authorized release of the capacitors; for example, the maximum averaged radioactivity levels measured for capacitors nearest to the beam lines were assumed for the entire batch of capacitors. This approach overestimated the total activity of individual radionuclide identified in radiological characterization by a factor ranging from 1.4 to 640. On the basis of this conservative assumption, the capacitors were assumed to be shipped from Argonne to the Clean Harbors facility, located in Deer Park, Texas, for incineration and disposal. The Clean Harbors facility is a state-permitted TSCA facility for treatment and disposal of hazardous materials. At this facility, the capacitors are to be shredded and incinerated with the resulting incineration residue buried in a nearby landfill owned by the company. A variety of receptors that have the potential of receiving radiation exposures were

  20. Characterisation and testing of a prototype $6 \\times 6$ cm$^2$ Argonne MCP-PMT

    CERN Document Server

    Cowan, Greig A; Needham, Matthew; Gambetta, Silvia; Eisenhardt, Stephan; McBlane, Neil; Malek, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The Argonne micro-channel plate photomultiplier tube (MCP-PMT) is an offshoot of the Large Area Pico-second Photo Detector (LAPPD) project, wherein \\mbox{6 $\\times$ 6 cm$^2$} sized detectors are made at Argonne National Laboratory. Measurements of the properties of these detectors, including gain, time and spatial resolution, dark count rates, cross-talk and sensitivity to magnetic fields are reported. In addition, possible applications of these devices in future neutrino and collider physics experiments are discussed.

  1. Argonne National Laboratory`s photooxidation organic mixed-waste treatment system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shearer, T.L.; Torres, T.; Conner, C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

    1997-12-01

    This paper describes the installation and startup testing of the Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) photo-oxidation organic mixed-waste treatment system. This system will treat organic mixed (i.e., radioactive and hazardous) waste by oxidizing the organics to carbon dioxide and inorganic salts in an aqueous media. The residue will be treated in the existing radwaste evaporators. The system is installed in the waste management facility at the ANL-E site in Argonne, Illinois.

  2. The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility 2010 annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drugan, C. (LCF)

    2011-05-09

    Researchers found more ways than ever to conduct transformative science at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) in 2010. Both familiar initiatives and innovative new programs at the ALCF are now serving a growing, global user community with a wide range of computing needs. The Department of Energy's (DOE) INCITE Program remained vital in providing scientists with major allocations of leadership-class computing resources at the ALCF. For calendar year 2011, 35 projects were awarded 732 million supercomputer processor-hours for computationally intensive, large-scale research projects with the potential to significantly advance key areas in science and engineering. Argonne also continued to provide Director's Discretionary allocations - 'start up' awards - for potential future INCITE projects. And DOE's new ASCR Leadership Computing (ALCC) Program allocated resources to 10 ALCF projects, with an emphasis on high-risk, high-payoff simulations directly related to the Department's energy mission, national emergencies, or for broadening the research community capable of using leadership computing resources. While delivering more science today, we've also been laying a solid foundation for high performance computing in the future. After a successful DOE Lehman review, a contract was signed to deliver Mira, the next-generation Blue Gene/Q system, to the ALCF in 2012. The ALCF is working with the 16 projects that were selected for the Early Science Program (ESP) to enable them to be productive as soon as Mira is operational. Preproduction access to Mira will enable ESP projects to adapt their codes to its architecture and collaborate with ALCF staff in shaking down the new system. We expect the 10-petaflops system to stoke economic growth and improve U.S. competitiveness in key areas such as advancing clean energy and addressing global climate change. Ultimately, we envision Mira as a stepping-stone to exascale-class computers

  3. Designing and conducting tabletop exercises to assess public health preparedness for manmade and naturally occurring biological threats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dausey David J

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since 2001, state and local health departments in the United States (US have accelerated efforts to prepare for high-impact public health emergencies. One component of these activities has been the development and conduct of exercise programs to assess capabilities, train staff and build relationships. This paper summarizes lessons learned from tabletop exercises about public health emergency preparedness and about the process of developing, conducting, and evaluating them. Methods We developed, conducted, and evaluated 31 tabletop exercises in partnership with state and local health departments throughout the US from 2003 to 2006. Participant self evaluations, after action reports, and tabletop exercise evaluation forms were used to identify aspects of the exercises themselves, as well as public health emergency responses that participants found more or less challenging, and to highlight lessons learned about tabletop exercise design. Results Designing the exercises involved substantial collaboration with representatives from participating health departments to assure that the scenarios were credible, focused attention on local preparedness needs and priorities, and were logistically feasible to implement. During execution of the exercises, nearly all health departments struggled with a common set of challenges relating to disease surveillance, epidemiologic investigations, communications, command and control, and health care surge capacity. In contrast, performance strengths were more varied across participating sites, reflecting specific attributes of individual health departments or communities, experience with actual public health emergencies, or the emphasis of prior preparedness efforts. Conclusion The design, conduct, and evaluation of the tabletop exercises described in this report benefited from collaborative planning that involved stakeholders from participating health departments and exercise developers and

  4. Low-cost electron-gun pulser for table-top maser experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinberg, V.; Jerby, E.; Shahadi, A.

    1995-04-01

    A simple 10 kV electron-gun pulser for small-scale maser experiments is presented. This low-cost pulser has operated successfully in various table-top cyclotron-resonance maser (CRM) and free-electron maser (FEM) experiments. It consists of a low-voltage capacitor bank, an SCR control circuit and a transformer bank (car ignition coils) connected directly to the e-gun. The pulser produces a current of 3 A at 10 kV voltage in a Gaussian like shape of 1 ms pulse width. The voltage sweep during the pulse provides a useful tool to locate resonances of CRM and FEM interactions. Analytical expressions for the pulser design and experimental measurements are presented.

  5. Table-top solar flares produced with laser driven magnetic reconnections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong J.Y.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The American Nuclear Society (ANS has presented the prestigious Edward Teller award to Dr. Bruce A. Remington during the 2011 IFSA conference due to his “pioneering scientific work in the fields of inertial confinement fusion (ICF, and especially developing an international effort in high energy density laboratory astrophysics” [1,2]. This is a great acknowledgement to the subject of high energy density laboratory astrophysics. In this context, we report here one experiment conducted to model solar flares in the laboratory with intense lasers [3]. The mega-gauss –scale magnetic fields produced by laser produced plasmas can be used to make magnetic reconnection topology. We have produced one table-top solar flare in our laboratory experiment with the same geometric setup as associated with solar flares.

  6. Quantitative Chemically-Specific Coherent Diffractive Imaging of Buried Interfaces using a Tabletop EUV Nanoscope

    CERN Document Server

    Shanblatt, Elisabeth R; Gardner, Dennis F; Mancini, Giulia F; Karl, Robert M; Tanksalvala, Michael D; Bevis, Charles S; Vartanian, Victor H; Kapteyn, Henry C; Adams, Daniel E; Murnane, Margaret M

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing buried layers and interfaces is critical for a host of applications in nanoscience and nano-manufacturing. Here we demonstrate non-invasive, non-destructive imaging of buried interfaces using a tabletop, extreme ultraviolet (EUV), coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) nanoscope. Copper nanostructures inlaid in SiO2 are coated with 100 nm of aluminum, which is opaque to visible light and thick enough that neither optical microscopy nor atomic force microscopy can image the buried interfaces. Short wavelength (29 nm) high harmonic light can penetrate the aluminum layer, yielding high-contrast images of the buried structures. Moreover, differences in the absolute reflectivity of the interfaces before and after coating reveal the formation of interstitial diffusion and oxidation layers at the Al-Cu and Al-SiO2 boundaries. Finally, we show that EUV CDI provides a unique capability for quantitative, chemically-specific imaging of buried structures, and the material evolution that occurs at these buried ...

  7. Development and Evaluation of Disaster Information Management System Using Digital Pens and Tabletop User Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukada, Hidemi; Kobayashi, Kazue; Satou, Kenji; Kawana, Hideyuki; Masuda, Tomohiro

    Most traditional disaster information systems are necessary to post expert staff with high computer literacy to operate the system quickly and correctly in the tense situation when a disaster occurs. However, in the current disaster response system of local governments, it is not easy for local governments to post such expert staff because they are struggling with staff cuts due to administrative and fiscal reform. In this research, we propose a disaster information management system that can be easily operated, even under the disorderly conditions of a disaster, by municipal personnel in charge of disaster management. This system achieves usability enabling easy input of damage information, even by local government staff with no expertise, by using a digital pen and tabletop user interface. Evaluation was conducted by prospective users using a prototype, and the evaluation results are satisfactory with regard to the function and operationality of the proposed system.

  8. Tabletop Nanometer Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging in an Extended Reflection Mode using Coherent Fresnel Ptychography

    CERN Document Server

    Seaberg, Matthew D; Gardner, Dennis F; Shanblatt, Elisabeth R; Murnane, Margaret M; Kapteyn, Henry C; Adams, Daniel E

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate high resolution extreme ultraviolet (EUV) coherent diffractive imaging in the most general reflection geometry by combining ptychography with tilted plane correction. This method makes it possible to image extended surfaces at any angle of incidence. Refocused light from a tabletop coherent high harmonic light source at 29 nm illuminates a nanopatterned surface at 45 degree angle of incidence. The reconstructed image contains quantitative amplitude and phase (in this case pattern height) information, comparing favorably with both scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscopy images. In the future, this approach will enable imaging of complex surfaces and nanostructures with sub-10 nm-spatial resolution and fs-temporal resolution, which will impact a broad range of nanoscience and nanotechnology including for direct application in actinic inspection in support of EUV lithography.

  9. Authorized limits for disposal of PCB capacitors from Buildings 361 and 391 at Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, J.-J.; Chen, S.-Y.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-12-22

    This report contains data and analyses to support the approval of authorized release limits for the clearance from radiological control of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) capacitors in Buildings 361 and 391 at Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois. These capacitors contain PCB oil that must be treated and disposed of as hazardous waste under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). However, they had been located in radiological control areas where the potential for neutron activation existed; therefore, direct release of these capacitors to a commercial facility for PCB treatment and landfill disposal is not allowable unless authorized release has been approved. Radiological characterization found no loose contamination on the exterior surface of the PCB capacitors; gamma spectroscopy analysis also showed the radioactivity levels of the capacitors were either at or slightly above ambient background levels. As such, conservative assumptions were used to expedite the analyses conducted to evaluate the potential radiation exposures of workers and the general public resulting from authorized release of the capacitors; for example, the maximum averaged radioactivity levels measured for capacitors nearest to the beam lines were assumed for the entire batch of capacitors. This approach overestimated the total activity of individual radionuclide identified in radiological characterization by a factor ranging from 1.4 to 640. On the basis of this conservative assumption, the capacitors were assumed to be shipped from Argonne to the Clean Harbors facility, located in Deer Park, Texas, for incineration and disposal. The Clean Harbors facility is a state-permitted TSCA facility for treatment and disposal of hazardous materials. At this facility, the capacitors are to be shredded and incinerated with the resulting incineration residue buried in a nearby landfill owned by the company. A variety of receptors that have the potential of receiving radiation exposures were

  10. Information Distance

    CERN Document Server

    Bennett, Charles H; Li, Ming; Vitanyi, Paul M B; Zurek, Wojciech H

    2010-01-01

    While Kolmogorov complexity is the accepted absolute measure of information content in an individual finite object, a similarly absolute notion is needed for the information distance between two individual objects, for example, two pictures. We give several natural definitions of a universal information metric, based on length of shortest programs for either ordinary computations or reversible (dissipationless) computations. It turns out that these definitions are equivalent up to an additive logarithmic term. We show that the information distance is a universal cognitive similarity distance. We investigate the maximal correlation of the shortest programs involved, the maximal uncorrelation of programs (a generalization of the Slepian-Wolf theorem of classical information theory), and the density properties of the discrete metric spaces induced by the information distances. A related distance measures the amount of nonreversibility of a computation. Using the physical theory of reversible computation, we give...

  11. Argonne Leadership Computing Facility 2011 annual report : Shaping future supercomputing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papka, M.; Messina, P.; Coffey, R.; Drugan, C. (LCF)

    2012-08-16

    The ALCF's Early Science Program aims to prepare key applications for the architecture and scale of Mira and to solidify libraries and infrastructure that will pave the way for other future production applications. Two billion core-hours have been allocated to 16 Early Science projects on Mira. The projects, in addition to promising delivery of exciting new science, are all based on state-of-the-art, petascale, parallel applications. The project teams, in collaboration with ALCF staff and IBM, have undertaken intensive efforts to adapt their software to take advantage of Mira's Blue Gene/Q architecture, which, in a number of ways, is a precursor to future high-performance-computing architecture. The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) enables transformative science that solves some of the most difficult challenges in biology, chemistry, energy, climate, materials, physics, and other scientific realms. Users partnering with ALCF staff have reached research milestones previously unattainable, due to the ALCF's world-class supercomputing resources and expertise in computation science. In 2011, the ALCF's commitment to providing outstanding science and leadership-class resources was honored with several prestigious awards. Research on multiscale brain blood flow simulations was named a Gordon Bell Prize finalist. Intrepid, the ALCF's BG/P system, ranked No. 1 on the Graph 500 list for the second consecutive year. The next-generation BG/Q prototype again topped the Green500 list. Skilled experts at the ALCF enable researchers to conduct breakthrough science on the Blue Gene system in key ways. The Catalyst Team matches project PIs with experienced computational scientists to maximize and accelerate research in their specific scientific domains. The Performance Engineering Team facilitates the effective use of applications on the Blue Gene system by assessing and improving the algorithms used by applications and the techniques used to

  12. PHASE II VAULT TESTING OF THE ARGONNE RFID SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willoner, T.; Turlington, R.; Koenig, R.

    2012-06-25

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (Environmental Management [EM], Office of Packaging and Transportation [EM-45]) Packaging and Certification Program (DOE PCP) has developed a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tracking and monitoring system, called ARG-US, for the management of nuclear materials packages during transportation and storage. The performance of the ARG-US RFID equipment and system has been fully tested in two demonstration projects in April 2008 and August 2009. With the strong support of DOE-SR and DOE PCP, a field testing program was completed in Savannah River Site's K-Area Material Storage (KAMS) Facility, an active Category I Plutonium Storage Facility, in 2010. As the next step (Phase II) of continued vault testing for the ARG-US system, the Savannah River Site K Area Material Storage facility has placed the ARG-US RFIDs into the 910B storage vault for operational testing. This latest version (Mark III) of the Argonne RFID system now has the capability to measure radiation dose and dose rate. This paper will report field testing progress of the ARG-US RFID equipment in KAMS, the operability and reliability trend results associated with the applications of the system, and discuss the potential benefits in enhancing safety, security and materials accountability. The purpose of this Phase II K Area test is to verify the accuracy of the radiation monitoring and proper functionality of the ARG-US RFID equipment and system under a realistic environment in the KAMS facility. Deploying the ARG-US RFID system leads to a reduced need for manned surveillance and increased inventory periods by providing real-time access to status and event history traceability, including environmental condition monitoring and radiation monitoring. The successful completion of the testing program will provide field data to support a future development and testing. This will increase Operation efficiency and cost effectiveness for vault operation. As the next step

  13. Argonne National Laboratory summary site environmental report for calendar year 2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N. W.; ESH/QA Oversight

    2008-03-27

    This booklet is designed to inform the public about what Argonne National Laboratory is doing to monitor its environment and to protect its employees and neighbors from any adverse environmental impacts from Argonne research. The Downers Grove South Biology II class was selected to write this booklet, which summarizes Argonne's environmental monitoring programs for 2006. Writing this booklet also satisfies the Illinois State Education Standard, which requires that students need to know and apply scientific concepts to graduate from high school. This project not only provides information to the public, it will help students become better learners. The Biology II class was assigned to condense Argonne's 300-page, highly technical Site Environmental Report into a 16-page plain-English booklet. The site assessment relates to the class because the primary focus of the Biology II class is ecology and the environment. Students developed better learning skills by working together cooperatively, writing and researching more effectively. Students used the Argonne Site Environmental Report, the Internet, text books and information from Argonne scientists to help with their research on their topics. The topics covered in this booklet are the history of Argonne, groundwater, habitat management, air quality, Argonne research, Argonne's environmental non-radiological program, radiation, and compliance. The students first had to read and discuss the Site Environmental Report and then assign topics to focus on. Dr. Norbert Golchert and Mr. David Baurac, both from Argonne, came into the class to help teach the topics more in depth. The class then prepared drafts and wrote a final copy. Ashley Vizek, a student in the Biology class stated, 'I reviewed my material and read it over and over. I then took time to plan my paper out and think about what I wanted to write about, put it into foundation questions and started to write my paper. I rewrote and revised so I

  14. Argonne National Laboratory: Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 1993 program activities. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1993-12-23

    The purposes of Argonne`s Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory`s R&D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R&D studies which are not yet eligible for timely support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering ``proof-of-principle`` assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these projects are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne`s Five Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne as indicated in the Laboratory LDRD Plan for FY 1993.

  15. Feasibility study for an industrial superconducting table-top electron accelerator; Machbarkeitstudie fuer einen industriellen supraleitenden Table Top Elektronenbeschleuniger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buettig, H.; Enghardt, W.; Gabriel, F.; Janssen, D.; Michel, P.; Pobell, F.; Prade, H.; Schneider, C.; Kudryavtsev, A.; Haberstroh, C.; Sandner, W.; Will, I.

    2004-07-01

    A concept of a table-top accelerator, consisting of a superconducting resonator and subsequent 6 standard TESLA cells working with a frequency of 1.3 GHz, is presented. Then electron gun is based on a photocathode. Especially described are the photocathode part, the laser system, the cryostat module, the RF system, the beam extraction, and the cryogenic facility. Finally the efficiency and the costs are considered, (HSI)

  16. A table-top ion and electron beam facility for ionization quenching measurement and gas detector calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muraz, J.F.; Médard, J.; Couturier, C.; Fourrel, C.; Guillaudin, O.; Lamy, T.; Marton, M.; Riffard, Q.; Sortais, P.; Santos, D.; Sauzet, N.

    2016-10-01

    In the frame of the MiMAC project, the LPSC (Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie) has developed COMIMAC, a miniaturized and transportable table-top beam line, producing ions or electrons to make measurements of the “quenching” factor in ionization and detector calibration. The energy range of the COMIMAC beam facility starts from a few tens of eV up to 50 keV.

  17. Spent fuel treatment and mineral waste form development at Argonne National Laboratory-West

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goff, K.M.; Benedict, R.W.; Bateman, K. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lewis, M.A.; Pereira, C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Musick, C.A. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1996-07-01

    At Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-West) there are several thousand kilograms of metallic spent nuclear fuel containing bond sodium. This fuel will be treated in the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) at ANL-West to produce stable waste forms for storage and disposal. Both mineral and metal high-level waste forms will be produced. The mineral waste form will contain the active metal fission products and the transuranics. Cold small-scale waste form testing has been on-going at Argonne in Illinois. Large-scale testing is commencing at ANL-West.

  18. TangiWheel: A Widget for Manipulating Collections on Tabletop Displays Supporting Hybrid Input Modality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alejandro Catalá; Fernando Garcia-Sanjuan; Javier Jaen; Jose A.Mocholi

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present TangiWheel,a collection manipulation widget for tabletop displays.Our implementation is flexible,allowing either multi-touch or interaction,or even a hybrid scheme to better suit user choice and convenience.Different TangiWheel aspects and features are compared with other existing widgets for collection manipulation.The study reveals that TangiWheel is the first proposal to support a hybrid input modality with large resemblance levels between touch and tangible interaction styles.Several experiments were conducted to evaluate the techniques used in each input scheme for a better understanding of tangible surface interfaces in complex tasks performed by a single user (e.g.,involving a typical master-slave exploration pattern).The results show that tangibles perform significantly better than fingers,despite dealing with a greater number of interactions,in situations that require a large number of acquisitions and basic manipulation tasks such as establishing location and orientation.However,when users have to perform multiple exploration and selection operations that do not require previous basic manipulation tasks,for instance when collections are fixed in the interface layout,touch input is significantly better in terms of required time and number of actions.Finally,when a more elastic collection layout or more complex additional insertion or displacement operations are needed,the hybrid and tangible approaches clearly outperform finger-based interactions.

  19. Observation of iron spin-states using tabletop x-ray emission spectroscopy and microcalorimeter sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joe, Y. I.; O'Neil, G. C.; Miaja-Avila, L.; Fowler, J. W.; Jimenez, R.; Silverman, K. L.; Swetz, D. S.; Ullom, J. N.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) is a powerful probe of the electronic and chemical state of elemental species embedded within complex compounds. X-ray sensors that combine high resolving power and high collecting efficiency are desirable for photon-starved XES experiments such as measurements of dilute, gaseous, and radiation-sensitive samples, time-resolved measurements, and in-laboratory XES. To assess whether arrays of cryogenic microcalorimeters will be useful in photon-starved XES scenarios, we demonstrate that these emerging energy-dispersive sensors can detect the spin-state of 3d electrons of iron in two different compounds, Fe2O3 and FeS2. The measurements were conducted with a picosecond pulsed laser-driven plasma as the exciting x-ray source. The use of this tabletop source suggests that time-resolved in-laboratory XES will be possible in the future. We also present simulations of {{K}}α and {{K}}β spectra that reveal the spin-state sensitivity of different combinations of sensor resolution and accumulated counts. These simulations predict that our current experimental apparatus can perform time-resolved XES measurements on some samples with a measurement time of a few 10 s of hours per time delay.

  20. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Hard X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy on a Tabletop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miaja-Avila, Luis; O'Neil, Galen C.; Joe, Young I.; Alpert, Bradley K.; Damrauer, Niels H.; Doriese, William B.; Fatur, Steven M.; Fowler, Joseph W.; Hilton, Gene C.; Jimenez, Ralph; Reintsema, Carl D.; Schmidt, Daniel R.; Silverman, Kevin L.; Swetz, Daniel S.; Tatsuno, Hideyuki; Ullom, Joel N.

    2016-07-01

    Experimental tools capable of monitoring both atomic and electronic structure on ultrafast (femtosecond to picosecond) time scales are needed for investigating photophysical processes fundamental to light harvesting, photocatalysis, energy and data storage, and optical display technologies. Time-resolved hard x-ray (>3 keV ) spectroscopies have proven valuable for these measurements due to their elemental specificity and sensitivity to geometric and electronic structures. Here, we present the first tabletop apparatus capable of performing time-resolved x-ray emission spectroscopy. The time resolution of the apparatus is better than 6 ps. By combining a compact laser-driven plasma source with a highly efficient array of microcalorimeter x-ray detectors, we are able to observe photoinduced spin changes in an archetypal polypyridyl iron complex [Fe (2 ,2'-bipyridine)3]2 + and accurately measure the lifetime of the quintet spin state. Our results demonstrate that ultrafast hard x-ray emission spectroscopy is no longer confined to large facilities and now can be performed in conventional laboratories with 10 times better time resolution than at synchrotrons. Our results are enabled, in part, by a 100- to 1000-fold increase in x-ray collection efficiency compared to current techniques.

  1. Invited Article: High resolution angle resolved photoemission with tabletop 11 eV laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yu; Vishik, Inna M.; Yi, Ming; Yang, Shuolong; Lee, James J.; Chen, Sudi; Rebec, Slavko N.; Leuenberger, Dominik; Shen, Zhi-Xun [SIMES, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Liu, Zhongkai [SIMES, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Zong, Alfred [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Jefferson, C. Michael; Merriam, Andrew J. [Lumeras LLC, 207 McPherson St, Santa Cruz, California 95060 (United States); Moore, Robert G.; Kirchmann, Patrick S. [SIMES, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    We developed a table-top vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser with 113.778 nm wavelength (10.897 eV) and demonstrated its viability as a photon source for high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). This sub-nanosecond pulsed VUV laser operates at a repetition rate of 10 MHz, provides a flux of 2 × 10{sup 12} photons/s, and enables photoemission with energy and momentum resolutions better than 2 meV and 0.012 Å{sup −1}, respectively. Space-charge induced energy shifts and spectral broadenings can be reduced below 2 meV. The setup reaches electron momenta up to 1.2 Å{sup −1}, granting full access to the first Brillouin zone of most materials. Control over the linear polarization, repetition rate, and photon flux of the VUV source facilitates ARPES investigations of a broad range of quantum materials, bridging the application gap between contemporary low energy laser-based ARPES and synchrotron-based ARPES. We describe the principles and operational characteristics of this source and showcase its performance for rare earth metal tritellurides, high temperature cuprate superconductors, and iron-based superconductors.

  2. High Resolution Angle Resolved Photoemission with Tabletop 11eV Laser

    CERN Document Server

    He, Yu; Yi, Ming; Yang, Shuolong; Liu, Zhongkai; Lee, James; Chen, Sudi; Rebec, Slavko; Leuenberger, Dominik; Zong, Alfred; Jefferson, Michael; Moore, Robert; Kirchmann, Patrick; Merriam, Andrew; Shen, Zhixun

    2015-01-01

    We developed a table-top vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser with $113.778$nm wavelength (10.897eV) and demonstrated its viability as a photon source for high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). This sub-nanosecond pulsed VUV laser operates at a repetition rate of 10MHz, provides a flux of 2$\\times$10$^{12}$ photons/second, and enables photoemission with energy and momentum resolutions better than 2meV and 0.012\\AA$^{-1}$, respectively. Space-charge induced energy shifts and spectral broadenings can be reduced below 2meV. The setup reaches electron momenta up to 1.2\\AA$^{-1}$, granting full access to the first Brillouin zone of most materials. Control over the linear polarization, repetition rate, and photon flux of the VUV source facilitates ARPES investigations of a broad range of quantum materials, bridging the application gap between contemporary low energy laser-based ARPES and synchrotron-based ARPES. We describe the principles and operational characteristics of this source, and sho...

  3. Development of an ultrashort table-top electron and x-ray source pumped by laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardeau-Montaut, Jean-Pierre; Kiraly, Bela; Girardeau-Montaut, Claire; Leboutet, Hubert

    1999-09-01

    We report on the design of the CIBER-X source which is a new laser driven table-top ultrashort electron and x-ray source. X-ray pulses are produced by a three-step process which consists of the electron pulse production from a thin metallic photocathode illuminated by picosecond 213 nm laser pulses with 16 ps duration. The electrons are accelerated in the diode by a cw electric field of 11 MV/m, and the photoinjector produces a single 70 - 100 keV electron pulse of approximately 0,5 nC and approximately 20 A peak current at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The gun is a standard Pierce diode electrode type, the electrons leaving the diode through a hole made in the anode. The electrons are then transported along a path approximately 20 cm long, and are focused by two magnetic fields produced by electromagnetic coils. Finally, the x-rays are produced by the impact of electrons on a massive target of Tm. Simulations of geometrical and energetic characteristics of the complete source were done previously with assistance of the code PIXEL1. Finally, experimental performances of electron and x-ray bursts are discussed.

  4. A table-top femtosecond time-resolved soft x-ray transient absorption spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leone, Stephen; Loh, Zhi-Heng; Khalil, Munira; Correa, Raoul E.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2008-05-21

    A laser-based, table-top instrument is constructed to perform femtosecond soft x-ray transient absorption spectroscopy. Ultrashort soft x-ray pulses produced via high-order harmonic generation of the amplified output of a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser system are used to probe atomic core-level transient absorptions in atoms and molecules. The results provide chemically specific, time-resolved dynamics with sub-50-fs time resolution. In this setup, high-order harmonics generated in a Ne-filled capillary waveguide are refocused by a gold-coated toroidal mirror into the sample gas cell, where the soft x-ray light intersects with an optical pump pulse. The transmitted high-order harmonics are spectrally dispersed with a home-built soft x-ray spectrometer, which consists of a gold-coated toroidal mirror, a uniform-line spaced plane grating, and a soft x-ray CCD camera. The optical layout of the instrument, design of the soft x-ray spectrometer, and spatial and temporal characterization of the high-order harmonics are described. Examples of static and time-resolved photoabsorption spectra collected on this apparatus are presented.

  5. Computation of Two-Body Matrix Elements From the Argonne $v_{18}$ Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Mihaila, B; Mihaila, Bogdan; Heisenberg, Jochen H.

    1998-01-01

    We discuss the computation of two-body matrix elements from the Argonne $v_{18}$ interaction. The matrix elements calculation is presented both in particle-particle and in particle-hole angular momentum coupling. The procedures developed here can be applied to the case of other NN potentials, provided that they have a similar operator format.

  6. Argonne National Laboratory-East site environmental report for calendar year 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N.W.; Kolzow, R.G. [Environmental Management Operation, Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1996-09-01

    This report presents the environmental report for the Argonne National Laboratory-East for the year of 1995. Topics discussed include: general description of the site including climatology, geology, seismicity, hydrology, vegetation, endangered species, population, water and land use, and archaeology; compliance summary; environmental program information; environmental nonradiological program information; ground water protection; and radiological monitoring program.

  7. Applied mathematical sciences research at Argonne, April 1, 1981-March 31, 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pieper, G.W. (ed.)

    1982-01-01

    This report reviews the research activities in Applied Mathematical Sciences at Argonne National Laboratory for the period April 1, 1981, through March 31, 1982. The body of the report discusses various projects carried out in three major areas of research: applied analysis, computational mathematics, and software engineering. Information on section staff, visitors, workshops, and seminars is found in the appendices.

  8. Bush will tour Illionois lab working to fight terrorism Argonne develops chemical detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "A chemical sensor that detects cyanide gas, a biochip that can determine the presence of anthrax, and a portable device that finds concealed nuclear materials are among the items scientists at Argonne National Laboratory are working on to combat terrorism" (1/2 page).

  9. Quality management at Argonne National Laboratory: Status, accomplishments, and lessons learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    In April 1992, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) launched the implementation of quality management (QM) as an initiative of the Laboratory Director. The goal of the program is to seek ways of improving Laboratory performance and effectiveness by drawing from the realm of experiences in the global total quality management movement. The Argonne QM initiative began with fact finding and formulating a strategy for implementation; the emphasis is that the underlying principles of QM should be an integral part of how the Laboratory is managed and operated. A primary theme that has guided the Argonne QM initiative is to consider only those practices that offer the potential for real improvement, make sense, fit the culture, and would be credible to the broad population. In October 1993, the Laboratory began to pilot a targeted set of QM activities selected to produce outcomes important to the Laboratory--strengthening the customer focus, improving work processes, enhancing employee involvement and satisfaction, and institutionalizing QM. This report describes the results of the just-concluded QM development and demonstration phase in terms of detailed strategies, accomplishments, and lessons learned. These results are offered as evidence to support the conclusion that the Argonne QM initiative has achieved value-added results and credibility and is well positioned to support future deployment across the entire Laboratory as an integrated management initiative. Recommendations for follow-on actions to implement future deployment are provided separately.

  10. Argonne National Laboratory research to help U.S. steel industry

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has joined a $1.29 million project to develop technology software that will use advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD), a method of solving fluid flow and heat transfer problems. This technology allows engineers to evaluate and predict erosion patterns within blast furnaces (1 page).

  11. Update on intrusive characterization of mixed contact-handled transuranic waste at Argonne-West

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwight, C.C.; Jensen, B.A.; Bryngelson, C.D.; Duncan, D.S.

    1997-02-03

    Argonne National Laboratory and Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company have jointly participated in the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Transuranic Waste Characterization Program since 1990. Intrusive examinations have been conducted in the Waste Characterization Area, located at Argonne-West in Idaho Falls, Idaho, on over 200 drums of mixed contact-handled transuranic waste. This is double the number of drums characterized since the last update at the 1995 Waste Management Conference. These examinations have provided waste characterization information that supports performance assessment of WIPP and that supports Lockheed`s compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Operating philosophies and corresponding regulatory permits have been broadened to provide greater flexibility and capability for waste characterization, such as the provision for minor treatments like absorption, neutralization, stabilization, and amalgamation. This paper provides an update on Argonne`s intrusive characterization permits, procedures, results, and lessons learned. Other DOE sites that must deal with mixed contact-handled transuranic waste have initiated detailed planning for characterization of their own waste. The information presented herein could aid these other storage and generator sites in further development of their characterization efforts.

  12. Argonne National Laboratory annual report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities FY 2009.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Office of the Director

    2010-04-09

    I am pleased to submit Argonne National Laboratory's Annual Report on its Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) activities for fiscal year 2009. Fiscal year 2009 saw a heightened focus by DOE and the nation on the need to develop new sources of energy. Argonne scientists are investigating many different sources of energy, including nuclear, solar, and biofuels, as well as ways to store, use, and transmit energy more safely, cleanly, and efficiently. DOE selected Argonne as the site for two new Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) - the Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations and the Center for Electrical Energy Storage - and funded two other EFRCs to which Argonne is a major partner. The award of at least two of the EFRCs can be directly linked to early LDRD-funded efforts. LDRD has historically seeded important programs and facilities at the lab. Two of these facilities, the Advanced Photon Source and the Center for Nanoscale Materials, are now vital contributors to today's LDRD Program. New and enhanced capabilities, many of which relied on LDRD in their early stages, now help the laboratory pursue its evolving strategic goals. LDRD has, since its inception, been an invaluable resource for positioning the Laboratory to anticipate, and thus be prepared to contribute to, the future science and technology needs of DOE and the nation. During times of change, LDRD becomes all the more vital for facilitating the necessary adjustments while maintaining and enhancing the capabilities of our staff and facilities. Although I am new to the role of Laboratory Director, my immediate prior service as Deputy Laboratory Director for Programs afforded me continuous involvement in the LDRD program and its management. Therefore, I can attest that Argonne's program adhered closely to the requirements of DOE Order 413.2b and associated guidelines governing LDRD. Our LDRD program management continually strives to be more efficient. In

  13. Argonne National Laboratory summary site environmental report for calendar year 2007.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N. W.

    2009-05-22

    This summary of Argonne National Laboratory's Site Environmental Report for calendar year 2007 was written by 20 students at Downers Grove South High School in Downers Grove, Ill. The student authors are classmates in Mr. Howard's Bio II course. Biology II is a research-based class that teaches students the process of research by showing them how the sciences apply to daily life. For the past seven years, Argonne has worked with Biology II students to create a short document summarizing the Site Environmental Report to provide the public with an easy-to-read summary of the annual 300-page technical report on the results of Argonne's on-site environmental monitoring program. The summary is made available online and given to visitors to Argonne, researchers interested in collaborating with Argonne, future employees, and many others. In addition to providing Argonne and the public with an easily understandable short summary of a large technical document, the participating students learn about professional environmental monitoring procedures, achieve a better understanding of the time and effort put forth into summarizing and publishing research, and gain confidence in their own abilities to express themselves in writing. The Argonne Summary Site Environmental Report fits into the educational needs for 12th grade students. Illinois State Educational Goal 12 states that a student should understand the fundamental concepts, principles, and interconnections of the life, physical, and earth/space sciences. To create this summary booklet, the students had to read and understand the larger technical report, which discusses in-depth many activities and programs that have been established by Argonne to maintain a safe local environment. Creating this Summary Site Environmental Report also helps students fulfill Illinois State Learning Standard 12B5a, which requires that students be able to analyze and explain biodiversity issues, and the causes and effects of

  14. Integrating biologically inspired nanomaterials and table-top stereolithography for 3D printed biomimetic osteochondral scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Nathan J; O'Brien, Joseph; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2015-09-01

    The osteochondral interface of an arthritic joint is notoriously difficult to regenerate due to its extremely poor regenerative capacity and complex stratified architecture. Native osteochondral tissue extracellular matrix is composed of numerous nanoscale organic and inorganic constituents. Although various tissue engineering strategies exist in addressing osteochondral defects, limitations persist with regards to tissue scaffolding which exhibit biomimetic cues at the nano to micro scale. In an effort to address this, the current work focused on 3D printing biomimetic nanocomposite scaffolds for improved osteochondral tissue regeneration. For this purpose, two biologically-inspired nanomaterials have been synthesized consisting of (1) osteoconductive nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA) (primary inorganic component of bone) and (2) core-shell poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanospheres encapsulated with chondrogenic transforming growth-factor β1 (TGF-β1) for sustained delivery. Then, a novel table-top stereolithography 3D printer and the nano-ink (i.e., nHA + nanosphere + hydrogel) were employed to fabricate a porous and highly interconnected osteochondral scaffold with hierarchical nano-to-micro structure and spatiotemporal bioactive factor gradients. Our results showed that human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell adhesion, proliferation, and osteochondral differentiation were greatly improved in the biomimetic graded 3D printed osteochondral construct in vitro. The current work served to illustrate the efficacy of the nano-ink and current 3D printing technology for efficient fabrication of a novel nanocomposite hydrogel scaffold. In addition, tissue-specific growth factors illustrated a synergistic effect leading to increased cell adhesion and directed stem cell differentiation.

  15. MTF analysis of a prototype table-top inverse-geometry volumetric CT system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Taly G.; Bennett, N. Robert; Mazin, Samuel R.; Star-Lack, Josh; Solomon, Edward G.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2005-04-01

    This work investigates the modulation transfer function (MTF) of a prototype table-top inverse-geometry volumetric CT (IGCT) system. The IGCT system has been proposed to acquire sufficient volumetric data in one circular rotation using a large-area scanned source and a narrower array of fast detectors. The source and detector arrays have the same axial, or slice, extent, thus providing sufficient volumetric coverage. A prototype system has been built using a NexRay Scanning-Beam Digital X-ray system (NexRay, Inc., Los Gatos, CA) with the C-arm gantry in the horizontal position and a stage placed between the source and detector to rotate the scanned object. The resulting system has a 16-cm in-plane field of view (FOV) and 5-cm axial FOV. Two phantoms were constructed for measuring the MTF. A 76 micron tungsten wire placed axially in a plastic frame was used to measure the in-plane MTF, and the same wire slanted at 45 degrees was used to test the isotropy of the MTF. The data were calibrated for flat-field intensity and geometric misalignment and reconstructed using a modified 3D PET algorithm. For both phantoms, slices perpendicular to the wires were reconstructed. Simulations which model the IGCT system were used to verify the MTF measurement, along with analytical predictions. The measured MTF curve was similar in shape to the predicted curve with a 10% point at 20 lp/cm compared to a predicted 18 lp/cm. Future work will also study the uniformity of the MTF across the FOV and further characterize the IGCT system.

  16. Integrating biologically inspired nanomaterials and table-top stereolithography for 3D printed biomimetic osteochondral scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Nathan J.; O'Brien, Joseph; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2015-08-01

    The osteochondral interface of an arthritic joint is notoriously difficult to regenerate due to its extremely poor regenerative capacity and complex stratified architecture. Native osteochondral tissue extracellular matrix is composed of numerous nanoscale organic and inorganic constituents. Although various tissue engineering strategies exist in addressing osteochondral defects, limitations persist with regards to tissue scaffolding which exhibit biomimetic cues at the nano to micro scale. In an effort to address this, the current work focused on 3D printing biomimetic nanocomposite scaffolds for improved osteochondral tissue regeneration. For this purpose, two biologically-inspired nanomaterials have been synthesized consisting of (1) osteoconductive nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA) (primary inorganic component of bone) and (2) core-shell poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanospheres encapsulated with chondrogenic transforming growth-factor β1 (TGF-β1) for sustained delivery. Then, a novel table-top stereolithography 3D printer and the nano-ink (i.e., nHA + nanosphere + hydrogel) were employed to fabricate a porous and highly interconnected osteochondral scaffold with hierarchical nano-to-micro structure and spatiotemporal bioactive factor gradients. Our results showed that human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell adhesion, proliferation, and osteochondral differentiation were greatly improved in the biomimetic graded 3D printed osteochondral construct in vitro. The current work served to illustrate the efficacy of the nano-ink and current 3D printing technology for efficient fabrication of a novel nanocomposite hydrogel scaffold. In addition, tissue-specific growth factors illustrated a synergistic effect leading to increased cell adhesion and directed stem cell differentiation.

  17. Highly Efficient Tabletop Optical Parametric Chirped Pulse Amplifier at 1 (micron)m

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jovanovic, I.; Ebbers, C.A.; Comaskey, B.J.; Bonner, R.A.; Morse, E.C.

    2001-12-04

    Optical parametric chirped pulse amplification (OPCPA) is a scalable technology, for ultrashort pulse amplification. Its major advantages include design simplicity, broad bandwidth, tunability, low B-integral, high contrast, and high beam quality. OPCPA is suitable both for scaling to high peak power as well as high average power. We describe the amplification of stretched 100 fs oscillator pulses in a three-stage OPCPA system pumped by a commercial, single-longitudinal-mode, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. The stretched pulses were centered around 1054 nm with a FWHM bandwidth of 16.5 nm and had an energy of 0.5 nJ. Using our OPCPA system, we obtained an amplified pulse energy of up to 31 mJ at a 10 Hz repetition rate. The overall conversion efficiency from pump to signal is 6%, which is the highest efficiency obtained With a commercial tabletop pump laser to date. The overall conversion efficiency is limited due to the finite temporal overlap of the seed (3 ns) with respect to the duration of the pump (8.5 ns). Within the temporal window of the seed pulse the pump to signal conversion efficiency exceeds 20%. Recompression of the amplified signal was demonstrated to 310 fs, limited by the aberrations initially present in the low energy seed imparted by the pulse stretcher. The maximum gain in our OPCPA system is 6 x 10{sup 7}, obtained through single passing of 40 mm of beta-barium borate. We present data on the beam quality obtained from our system (M{sup 2}=1.1). This relatively simple system replaces a significantly more complex Ti:sapphire regenerative amplifier based CPA system used in the front end of a high energy short pulse laser. Future improvement will include obtaining shorter amplified pulses and higher average power.

  18. Direct structuring of solids by EUV radiation from a table-top laser produced plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkusky, Frank; Bayer, Armin; Peth, Christian; Mann, Klaus

    2009-05-01

    In recent years, technological developments in the area of extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) have experienced great improvements. Currently, the application of EUV radiation apart from microlithography comes more and more into focus. Main goal of our research is to utilize the unique interaction between soft x-ray radiation and matter for probing, modifying, and structuring solid surfaces. In this contribution we present a setup capable of generating and focusing EUV radiation. It consists of a table-top laser-produced plasma source. In order to obtain a small focal spot resulting in high EUV fluence, a modified Schwarzschild objective consisting of two spherical mirrors with Mo/Si multilayer coatings is adapted to this source, simultaneously blocking unwanted out-of-band radiation. By demagnified (10x) imaging of the plasma an EUV spot of 5 μm diameter with a maximum energy density of ~0.72 J/cm² is generated (pulse length 8.8 ns). We present first applications of this integrated source and optics system, demonstrating its potential for high-resolution modification and structuring of solid surfaces. As an example, etch rates for PMMA, PC and PTFE depending on EUV fluences were determined, indicating a linear etch behavior for lower energy densities. In order to investigate changes of the chemical composition of PMMA induced by EUV radiation we present FTIR and NEXAFS measurements on irradiated samples. The latter were performed using the laboratory source tuned to the XUV spectral range around the carbon K-edge (λ ~ 4.4 nm) and a flat-field spectrometer. For showing the potential of this setup, first damage tests were performed on grazing incidence gold mirrors. For these thin Gold films, threshold energy densities could be determined, scaling linear with the film thickness.

  19. Diagnostic studies on lithium-ion cells at Argonne National Laboratory: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Daniel P.

    2010-04-01

    High-power and high-energy lithium-ion cells are being studied at Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's FreedomCar and Vehicle Technologies (FCVT) program. Cells ranging in capacity from 1 mAh to 1Ah, and containing a variety of electrodes and electrolytes, are examined to determine suitable material combinations that will meet and exceed the FCVT performance, cost, and safety targets. In this article, accelerated aging of 18650-type cells, and characterization of components harvested from these cells, is described. Several techniques that include electrochemical measurements, analytical electron microscopy, and x-ray spectroscopy were used to study the various cell components. Data from these studies were used to identify the most likely contributors to property degradation and determine mechanisms responsible for cell capacity fade and impedance rise.

  20. Argonne National Laboratory Physics Division annual report, January--December 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayer, K.J. [ed.

    1997-08-01

    The past year has seen several of the Physics Division`s new research projects reach major milestones with first successful experiments and results: the atomic physics station in the Basic Energy Sciences Research Center at the Argonne Advanced Photon Source was used in first high-energy, high-brilliance x-ray studies in atomic and molecular physics; the Short Orbit Spectrometer in Hall C at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator (TJNAF) Facility that the Argonne medium energy nuclear physics group was responsible for, was used extensively in the first round of experiments at TJNAF; at ATLAS, several new beams of radioactive isotopes were developed and used in studies of nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics; the new ECR ion source at ATLAS was completed and first commissioning tests indicate excellent performance characteristics; Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of mass-8 nuclei were performed for the first time with realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions using state-of-the-art computers, including Argonne`s massively parallel IBM SP. At the same time other future projects are well under way: preparations for the move of Gammasphere to ATLAS in September 1997 have progressed as planned. These new efforts are imbedded in, or flowing from, the vibrant ongoing research program described in some detail in this report: nuclear structure and reactions with heavy ions; measurements of reactions of astrophysical interest; studies of nucleon and sub-nucleon structures using leptonic probes at intermediate and high energies; atomic and molecular structure with high-energy x-rays. The experimental efforts are being complemented with efforts in theory, from QCD to nucleon-meson systems to structure and reactions of nuclei. Finally, the operation of ATLAS as a national users facility has achieved a new milestone, with 5,800 hours beam on target for experiments during the past fiscal year.

  1. Derived concentration guideline levels for Argonne National Laboratory's building 310 area.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamboj, S., Dr.; Yu, C ., Dr. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-08-12

    The derived concentration guideline level (DCGL) is the allowable residual radionuclide concentration that can remain in soil after remediation of the site without radiological restrictions on the use of the site. It is sometimes called the single radionuclide soil guideline or the soil cleanup criteria. This report documents the methodology, scenarios, and parameters used in the analysis to support establishing radionuclide DCGLs for Argonne National Laboratory's Building 310 area.

  2. Research in mathematics and computer science at Argonne, July 1, 1986-January 6, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pieper, G.W. (ed.)

    1988-01-01

    This report reviews the research activities in the Mathematics and Computer Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory for the period July 1, 1986, through January 6, 1988. The body of the report gives a brief look at the MCS staff and the research facilities, and discusses various projects carried out in two major areas of research: analytical and numerical methods and advanced computer systems concepts. Information on division staff, visitors, workshops, and seminars is found in the appendixes. 6 figs.

  3. Status report on the positive ion injector (PII) for ATLAS at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkann, G.P.; Added, N.; Billquist, P.; Bogaty, J.; Clifft, B.; Markovich, P.; Phillips, D.; Strickhorn, P.; Shepard, K.W.

    1991-01-01

    The Positive Ion Injector (PII) is part of the Uranuim upgrade for ATLAS accelerator at Argonne National Laboratory. This paper will include a technical discussion of the Positive Ion Injector (PII) accelerator with its superconducting, niobium, very low-velocity accelerating structures. It will also discuss the current construction schedule of PII, and review an upgrade of the fast- tuning system. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development program activities FY 2011.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    (Office of The Director)

    2012-04-25

    As a national laboratory Argonne concentrates on scientific and technological challenges that can only be addressed through a sustained, interdisciplinary focus at a national scale. Argonne's eight major initiatives, as enumerated in its strategic plan, are Hard X-ray Sciences, Leadership Computing, Materials and Molecular Design and Discovery, Energy Storage, Alternative Energy and Efficiency, Nuclear Energy, Biological and Environmental Systems, and National Security. The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel technical concepts, enhance the Laboratory's research and development (R and D) capabilities, and pursue its strategic goals. projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R and D studies that require advance exploration before they are considered to be sufficiently developed to obtain support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the LDRD Program are the following: establishment of engineering proof of principle, assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities, development of instrumentation or computational methods or systems, and discoveries in fundamental science and exploratory development.

  5. Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development program activities FY 2010.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    (Office of The Director)

    2012-04-25

    As a national laboratory Argonne concentrates on scientific and technological challenges that can only be addressed through a sustained, interdisciplinary focus at a national scale. Argonne's eight major initiatives, as enumerated in its strategic plan, are Hard X-ray Sciences, Leadership Computing, Materials and Molecular Design and Discovery, Energy Storage, Alternative Energy and Efficiency, Nuclear Energy, Biological and Environmental Systems, and National Security. The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel technical concepts, enhance the Laboratory's research and development (R and D) capabilities, and pursue its strategic goals. projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R and D studies that require advance exploration before they are considered to be sufficiently developed to obtain support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the LDRD Program are the following: establishment of engineering proof of principle, assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities, development of instrumentation or computational methods or systems, and discoveries in fundamental science and exploratory development.

  6. Environment, Safety and Health Progress Assessment of the Argonne Illinois Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-01

    This report documents the results of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Progress Assessment of the Argonne Illinois Site (AIS), near Chicago, Illinois, conducted from October 25 through November 9, 1993. During the Progress Assessment, activities included a selective review of the ES&H management systems and programs with principal focus on the DOE Office of Energy Research (ER); CH, which includes the Argonne Area Office; the University of Chicago; and the contractor`s organization responsible for operation of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The ES&H Progress Assessments are part of DOE`s continuing effort to institutionalize line management accountability and the self-assessment process throughout DOE and its contractor organizations. The purpose of the AIS ES&H Progress Assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy, senior DOE managers, and contractor management with concise independent information on the following: change in culture and attitude related to ES&H activities; progress and effectiveness of the ES&H corrective actions resulting from the previous Tiger Team Assessment; adequacy and effectiveness of the ES&H self-assessment process of the DOE line organizations, the site management, and the operating contractor; and effectiveness of DOE and contractor management structures, resources, and systems to effectively address ES&H problems and new ES&H initiatives.

  7. Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1995-02-25

    The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory's R and D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R and D studies which are not yet eligible for timely support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering proof-of-principle; assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these projects are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne's Five-Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne as indicated in the Laboratory's LDRD Plan for FY 1994. Project summaries of research in the following areas are included: (1) Advanced Accelerator and Detector Technology; (2) X-ray Techniques for Research in Biological and Physical Science; (3) Nuclear Technology; (4) Materials Science and Technology; (5) Computational Science and Technology; (6) Biological Sciences; (7) Environmental Sciences: (8) Environmental Control and Waste Management Technology; and (9) Novel Concepts in Other Areas.

  8. Leidos Biomed Teams with NCI, DOE, and Argonne National Lab to Support National X-Ray Resource | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists are making progress in understanding a bleeding disorder caused by prescription drug interactions, thanks to a high-tech research facility involving two federal national laboratories, Argonne and Frederick.

  9. Argonne National Laboratory High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, January 1, 1989--June 30, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    This paper discuss the following areas on High Energy Physics at Argonne National Laboratory: experimental program; theory program; experimental facilities research; accelerator research and development; and SSC detector research and development.

  10. Argonne National Laboratory`s photo-oxidation organic mixed waste treatment system - installation and startup testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shearer, T.L.; Nelson, R.A.; Torres, T.; Conner, C.; Wygmans, D.

    1997-09-01

    This paper describes the installation and startup testing of the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL-E) Photo-Oxidation Organic Mixed Waste Treatment System. This system will treat organic mixed (i.e., radioactive and hazardous) waste by oxidizing the organics to carbon dioxide and inorganic salts in an aqueous media. The residue will be treated in the existing radwaste evaporators. The system is installed in the Waste Management Facility at the ANL-E site in Argonne, Illinois. 1 fig.

  11. Development and analysis of a meteorological database, Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over, Thomas M.; Price, Thomas H.; Ishii, Audrey

    2010-01-01

    A database of hourly values of air temperature, dewpoint temperature, wind speed, and solar radiation from January 1, 1948, to September 30, 2003, primarily using data collected at the Argonne National Laboratory station, was developed for use in continuous-time hydrologic modeling in northeastern Illinois. Missing and apparently erroneous data values were replaced with adjusted values from nearby stations used as 'backup'. Temporal variations in the statistical properties of the data resulting from changes in measurement and data-storage methodologies were adjusted to match the statistical properties resulting from the data-collection procedures that have been in place since January 1, 1989. The adjustments were computed based on the regressions between the primary data series from Argonne National Laboratory and the backup series using data obtained during common periods; the statistical properties of the regressions were used to assign estimated standard errors to values that were adjusted or filled from other series. Each hourly value was assigned a corresponding data-source flag that indicates the source of the value and its transformations. An analysis of the data-source flags indicates that all the series in the database except dewpoint have a similar fraction of Argonne National Laboratory data, with about 89 percent for the entire period, about 86 percent from 1949 through 1988, and about 98 percent from 1989 through 2003. The dewpoint series, for which observations at Argonne National Laboratory did not begin until 1958, has only about 71 percent Argonne National Laboratory data for the entire period, about 63 percent from 1948 through 1988, and about 93 percent from 1989 through 2003, indicating a lower reliability of the dewpoint sensor. A basic statistical analysis of the filled and adjusted data series in the database, and a series of potential evapotranspiration computed from them using the computer program LXPET (Lamoreux Potential

  12. Exploring Effects of Multi-Touch Tabletop on Collaborative Fraction Learning and the Relationship of Learning Behavior and Interaction with Learning Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Wu-Yuin; Shadiev, Rustam; Tseng, Chi-Wei; Huang, Yueh-Min

    2015-01-01

    This study designed a learning system to facilitate elementary school students' fraction learning. An experiment was carried out to investigate how the system, which runs on multi-touch tabletop versus tablet PC, affects fraction learning. Two groups, a control and experimental, were assigned. Control students have learned fraction by using tablet…

  13. Argonne's Laboratory Computing Resource Center 2009 annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bair, R. B. (CLS-CI)

    2011-05-13

    Now in its seventh year of operation, the Laboratory Computing Resource Center (LCRC) continues to be an integral component of science and engineering research at Argonne, supporting a diverse portfolio of projects for the U.S. Department of Energy and other sponsors. The LCRC's ongoing mission is to enable and promote computational science and engineering across the Laboratory, primarily by operating computing facilities and supporting high-performance computing application use and development. This report describes scientific activities carried out with LCRC resources in 2009 and the broad impact on programs across the Laboratory. The LCRC computing facility, Jazz, is available to the entire Laboratory community. In addition, the LCRC staff provides training in high-performance computing and guidance on application usage, code porting, and algorithm development. All Argonne personnel and collaborators are encouraged to take advantage of this computing resource and to provide input into the vision and plans for computing and computational analysis at Argonne. The LCRC Allocations Committee makes decisions on individual project allocations for Jazz. Committee members are appointed by the Associate Laboratory Directors and span a range of computational disciplines. The 350-node LCRC cluster, Jazz, began production service in April 2003 and has been a research work horse ever since. Hosting a wealth of software tools and applications and achieving high availability year after year, researchers can count on Jazz to achieve project milestones and enable breakthroughs. Over the years, many projects have achieved results that would have been unobtainable without such a computing resource. In fiscal year 2009, there were 49 active projects representing a wide cross-section of Laboratory research and almost all research divisions.

  14. Argonne CW Linac (ACWL) -- Legacy from SDI and opportunities for the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMichael, G.E.; Yule, T.J.

    1994-08-01

    The former Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) invested significant resources over a 6-year period to develop and build an accelerator to demonstrate the launching of a cw beam with characteristics suitable for a space-based Neutral Particle Beam (NPD) system. This accelerator, the CWDD (Continuous Wave Deuterium Demonstrator) accelerator, was designed to accelerate 80 mA cw of D{sup {minus}} to 7.5 MeV. A considerable amount of hardware was constructed and installed in the Argonne-based facility, and major performance milestones were achieved before program funding from the Department of Defense ended in October 1993. Existing assets have been turned over to Argonne. Assets include a fully functional 200 kV cw D{sup {minus}} injector, a cw RFQ that has been tuned, leak checked and aligned, beam lines and a high-power beam stop, all installed in a shielded vault with appropriate safety and interlock systems. In addition, there are two high power (1 MW) cw rf amplifiers and all the ancillary power, cooling and control systems required for a high-power accelerator system. The SDI mission required that the CWDD accelerator structures operate at cryogenic temperatures (26 K), a requirement that placed severe limitations on operating period (CWDD would have provided 20 seconds of cw beam every 90 minutes). However, the accelerator structures were designed for full-power rf operation with water cooling and ACWL (Argonne Continuous Wave Linac), the new name for CWDD in its water-cooled, positive-ion configuration, will be able to operate continuously. Project status and achievements will be reviewed. Preliminary design of a proton conversion for the RFQ, and other proposals for turning ACWL into a testbed for cw-linac engineering, will be discussed.

  15. Status of the Argonne heavy-ion-fusion low-beta linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, J.M.; Bogaty, J.M.; Moretti, A.; Sacks, R.A.; Sesol, N.Q.; Wright, A.J.

    1981-01-01

    The primary goal of the experimental program in heavy-ion fusion (HIF) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) during the next few years is to demonstrate many of the requirements of a RF linac driver for inertial-fusion power plants. So far, most of the construction effort has been applied to the front end. The ANL program has developed a high-intensity xenon source, a 1.5-MV preaccelerator, and the initial cavities of the low-beta linac. The design, initial tests, and status of the low-beta linac are described.

  16. Status of the Argonne heavy ion fusion low-beta linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, J.M.; Bogaty, J.M.; Moretti, A.; Sacks, R.A.; Sesol, N.Q.; Wright, A.J.

    1981-06-01

    The primary goal of the experimental program in heavy ion fusion (HIF) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) during the next few years is to demonstrate many of the requirements of a RF linac driver for inertial fusion power plants. So far, most of the construction effort has been applied to the front end. The ANL program has developed a high intensity xenon source, a 1.5 MV preaccelerator, and the initial cavities of the low-beta linac. The design, initial tests and status of the low-beta linac are described. 8 refs.

  17. Generation of annular, high-charge electron beams at the Argonne wakefield accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski, E. E.; Li, C.; Gai, W.; Power, J.

    2013-01-01

    We present and discuss the results from the experimental generation of high-charge annular(ring-shaped)electron beams at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA). These beams were produced by using laser masks to project annular laser profiles of various inner and outer diameters onto the photocathode of an RF gun. The ring beam is accelerated to 15 MeV, then it is imaged by means of solenoid lenses. Transverse profiles are compared for different solenoid settings. Discussion includes a comparison with Parmela simulations, some applications of high-charge ring beams,and an outline of a planned extension of this study.

  18. Ionomer-like structures and {pi}-cation interactions in Argonne Premium coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opaprakasit, P.; Scaroni, A.W.; Painter, P.C. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States). Energy Institute

    2002-06-01

    The increase in the amount of pyridine-soluble material obtained from Argonne Premium coals after acid treatment is examined. The amount of pyridine-soluble material in most of the coals increases significantly with acid treatment. In low and to some extent medium rank coals this is largely a result of the presence of ionic clusters formed by carboxylate groups. In higher rank coals we are proposing that {pi}-cation interactions play a major role. These ion/coal interactions are of sufficient strength to act as 'reversible' cross-links, in the same way as ionic clusters behave in ionomers. 26 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Research in mathematics and computer science at Argonne, September 1989--February 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pieper, G.W.

    1991-03-01

    This report reviews the research activities in the Mathematics and Computer Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory for the period September 1989 through February 1991. The body of the report gives a brief look at the MCS staff and the research facilities and then discusses the diverse research projects carried out in the division. Projects funded by non-DOE sources are also discussed, and new technology transfer activities are described. Further information on staff, visitors, workshops, and seminars is found in the appendixes.

  20. Survey of biomedical and environental data bases, models, and integrated computer systems at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murarka, I.P.; Bodeau, D.J.; Scott, J.M.; Huebner, R.H.

    1978-08-01

    This document contains an inventory (index) of information resources pertaining to biomedical and environmental projects at Argonne National Laboratory--the information resources include a data base, model, or integrated computer system. Entries are categorized as models, numeric data bases, bibliographic data bases, or integrated hardware/software systems. Descriptions of the Information Coordination Focal Point (ICFP) program, the system for compiling this inventory, and the plans for continuing and expanding it are given, and suggestions for utilizing the services of the ICFP are outlined.

  1. The big and little of fifty years of Moessbauer spectroscopy at Argonne.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westfall, C.

    2005-09-20

    Using radioactive materials obtained by chance, a turntable employing gears from Heidelberg's mechanical toy shops, and other minimal equipment available in post World War II Germany, in 1959 Rudolf Moessbauer confirmed his suspicion that his graduate research had yielded ground-breaking results. He published his conclusion: an atomic nucleus in a crystal undergoes negligible recoil when it emits a low energy gamma ray and provides the entire energy to the gamma ray. In the beginning Moessbauer's news might have been dismissed. As Argonne nuclear physicist Gilbert Perlow noted: ''Everybody knew that nuclei were supposed to recoil when emitting gamma rays--people made those measurements every day''. If any such effect existed, why had no one noticed it before? The notion that some nuclei would not recoil was ''completely crazy'', in the words of the eminent University of Illinois condensed matter physicist Frederich Seitz. Intrigued, however, nuclear physicists as well as condensed matter (or solid state) physicists in various locations--but particularly at the Atomic Energy Research Establishment at Harwell in Britain and at Argonne and Los Alamos in the U.S.--found themselves pondering the Moessbauer spectra with its nuclear and solid state properties starting in late 1959. After an exciting year during which Moessbauer's ideas were confirmed and extended, the physics community concluded that Moessbauer was right. Moessbauer won the Nobel Prize for his work in 1961. In the 1960s and 1970s Argonne physicists produced an increasingly clear picture of the properties of matter using the spectroscopy ushered in by Moessbauer. The scale of this traditional Moessbauer spectroscopy, which required a radioactive source and other simple equipment, began quite modestly by Argonne standards. For example Argonne hosted traditional Moessbauer spectroscopy research using mostly existing equipment in the early days and

  2. Table-top water-window soft X-ray microscope using a Z-pinching capillary discharge source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, M. F.; Nevrkla, M.; Jancarek, A.; Torrisi, A.; Parkman, T.; Turnova, J.; Stolcova, L.; Vrbova, M.; Limpouch, J.; Pina, L.; Wachulak, P.

    2016-07-01

    The development and demonstration of a table-top transmission soft X-ray (SXR) microscope, using a laboratory incoherent capillary discharge source has been carried out. This Z-pinching capillary discharge water-window SXR source, is a first of its kind to be used for high spatial resolution microscopy at λ = 2.88 nm (430 eV) . A grazing incidence ellipsoidal condenser mirror is used for focusing of the SXR radiation at the sample plane. The Fresnel zone plate objective lens is used for imaging of the sample onto a back-illuminated (BI) CCD camera. The achieved half-pitch spatial resolution of the microscope approaches 100 nm, as demonstrated by the knife-edge test. Details about the source, and the construction of the microscope are presented and discussed. Additionally, the SXR images of various samples, proving applicability of such microscope for observation of objects in the nanoscale, are shown.

  3. Improved performances of CIBER-X: a new tabletop laser-driven electron and x-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardeau-Montaut, Jean-Pierre; Kiraly, Bela; Girardeau-Montaut, Claire

    2000-11-01

    We present the most recent data concerning the performances of the table-top laser driven electron and x-ray source developed in our laboratory. X-ray pulses are produced by a three-step process which consists of the photoelectron emission from a thin metallic photocathode illuminated by 16 ps duration laser pulse at 213 nm. The e-gun is a standard pierce diode electrode type, in which electrons are accelerated by a cw electric fields of 12 MV/m. The photoinjector produced a train of 90 - 100 keV electron pulses of approximately 1 nC and 40 A peak current at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The electrons, transported outside the diode, are focused onto a target of thulium by magnetic fields produced by two electromagnetic coils to produce x-rays. Applications to low dose imagery of inert and living materials are also presented.

  4. Poster — Thur Eve — 38: Feasibility of a Table-Top Total Body Irradiation Technique using Robotic Couch Motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, Erika; Otto, Karl; Hoppe, Richard; Hsu, Annie; Loo, Billy; Million, Lynn; Xing, Lei; Fahimian, Benjamin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To develop and test the feasibility of a table-top implementation for total body irradiation (TBI) via robotic couch motion and coordinated monitor unit modulation on a standard C-arm linac geometry. Methods: To allow for collision free delivery and to maximize the effective field size, the couch was rotated to 270° IEC and dropped to 150 cm from the vertical radiation source. The robotic delivery was programmed using the TrueBeam STx Developer Mode using custom XML scripting. To assess the dosimetry of a sliding 30×20 cm{sup 2} field, irradiation on a solid water phantom of varying thickness was analyzed using EDR2 radiographic film and OSLDs. Beam modulation was achieved by dividing the couch path into multiple segments of varying dose rates and couch speeds in order to deliver 120 cGy to the midline. Results: The programmed irradiation in conjunction with coordinated couch motion was successfully delivered on a TrueBeam linac. When no beam modulation was employed, the dose difference between two different phantom sections was 17.0%. With simple beam modulation via changing dose rates and couch speeds, the desired prescription dose can be achieved at the centre of each phantom section within 1.9%. However, dose deviation at the junction was 9.2% due to the nonphysical change in the phantom thickness. Conclusions: The feasibility of robotic table-top TBI on a C-arm linac geometry was experimentally demonstrated. To achieve a more uniform dose distribution, inverse-planning allowing for a combination of dose rate modulation, jaw tracking and MLC motion is under investigation.

  5. Past and Future Work on Radiobiology Mega-Studies: A Case Study At Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haley, Benjamin; Wang, Qiong; Wanzer, Beau; Vogt, Stefan; Finney, Lydia; Yang, Ping Liu; Paunesku, Tatjana; Woloschak, Gayle

    2011-09-06

    Between 1952 and 1992, more than 200 large radiobiology studies were conducted in research institutes throughout Europe, North America, and Japan to determine the effects of external irradiation and internal emitters on the lifespan and tissue toxicity development in animals. At Argonne National Laboratory, 22 external beam studies were conducted on nearly 700 beagle dogs and 50,000 mice between 1969 and 1992. These studies helped to characterize the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on lifespan, tumorigenesis, and mutagenesis across a range of doses and dosing patterns. The records and tissues collected at Argonne during that time period have been carefully preserved and redisseminated. Using these archived data, ongoing statistical work has been done and continues to characterize quality of radiation, dose, dose rate, tissue, and gender-specific differences in the radiation responses of exposed animals. The ongoing application of newly-developed molecular biology techniques to the archived tissues has revealed gene-specific mutation rates following exposure to ionizing irradiation. The original and ongoing work with this tissue archive is presented here as a case study of a more general trend in the radiobiology megastudies. These experiments helped form the modern understanding of radiation responses in animals and continue to inform development of new radiation models. Recent archival efforts have facilitated open access to the data and materials produced by these studies, and so a unique opportunity exists to expand this continued research.

  6. An in-house alternative to traditional SDI services at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noel, R.E.; Dominiak, R.R.

    1997-02-20

    Selective Dissemination of Information (SDIs) are based on automated, well-defined programs that regularly produce precise, relevant bibliographic information. Librarians have typically turned to information vendors such as Dialog or STN international to design and implement these searches for their users in business, academia, and the science community. Because Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) purchases the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Current Contents tapes (all subject areas excluding Humanities). ANL scientists enjoy the benefit of in-house developments with BASISplus software programming and no longer need to turn to outside companies for reliable SDI service. The database and its customized services are known as ACCESS (Argonne Current Contents Electronic Search Service). Through collaboration with librarians on Boolean logic and selection of terms, users can now design their own personal profiles to comb the new data, thereby avoiding service fees from outside providers. Based on the feedback from scientists, it seems that this new service can help transform the ANL distributed libraries into more efficient central functioning entities that better serve the users. One goal is to eliminate the routing of paper copies of many new journal issues to different library locations for users to browse; instead users may be expected to rely more on electronic dissemination of both table of contents and customized SDIs for new scientific and technical information.

  7. The big and little of fifty years of Moessbauer spectroscopy at Argonne.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westfall, C.

    2005-09-20

    Using radioactive materials obtained by chance, a turntable employing gears from Heidelberg's mechanical toy shops, and other minimal equipment available in post World War II Germany, in 1959 Rudolf Moessbauer confirmed his suspicion that his graduate research had yielded ground-breaking results. He published his conclusion: an atomic nucleus in a crystal undergoes negligible recoil when it emits a low energy gamma ray and provides the entire energy to the gamma ray. In the beginning Moessbauer's news might have been dismissed. As Argonne nuclear physicist Gilbert Perlow noted: ''Everybody knew that nuclei were supposed to recoil when emitting gamma rays--people made those measurements every day''. If any such effect existed, why had no one noticed it before? The notion that some nuclei would not recoil was ''completely crazy'', in the words of the eminent University of Illinois condensed matter physicist Frederich Seitz. Intrigued, however, nuclear physicists as well as condensed matter (or solid state) physicists in various locations--but particularly at the Atomic Energy Research Establishment at Harwell in Britain and at Argonne and Los Alamos in the U.S.--found themselves pondering the Moessbauer spectra with its nuclear and solid state properties starting in late 1959. After an exciting year during which Moessbauer's ideas were confirmed and extended, the physics community concluded that Moessbauer was right. Moessbauer won the Nobel Prize for his work in 1961. In the 1960s and 1970s Argonne physicists produced an increasingly clear picture of the properties of matter using the spectroscopy ushered in by Moessbauer. The scale of this traditional Moessbauer spectroscopy, which required a radioactive source and other simple equipment, began quite modestly by Argonne standards. For example Argonne hosted traditional Moessbauer spectroscopy research using mostly existing equipment in the early days and

  8. Special Report on "Allegations of Conflict of Interest Regarding Licensing of PROTECT by Argonne National Laboratory"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-08-01

    In February 2009, the Office of Inspector General received a letter from Congressman Mark Steven Kirk of Illinois, which included constituent allegations that an exclusive technology licensing agreement by Argonne National Laboratory was tainted by inadequate competition, conflicts of interest, and other improprieties. The technology in question was for the Program for Response Options and Technology Enhancements for Chemical/Biological Terrorism, commonly referred to as PROTECT. Because of the importance of the Department of Energy's technology transfer program, especially as implementation of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act matures, we reviewed selected aspects of the licensing process for PROTECT to determine whether the allegations had merit. In summary, under the facts developed during our review, it was understandable that interested parties concluded that there was a conflict of interest in this matter and that Argonne may have provided the successful licensee with an unfair advantage. In part, this was consistent with aspects of the complaint from Congressman Kirk's constituent.

  9. Gas Warfare in World War I. The Use of Gas in the Meuse-Argonne Campaign, September-November 1918

    Science.gov (United States)

    1958-12-01

    ERIBULLES-our-MEUSE-CUNEL, the Vth Corps the heights in BOIS de GESNES , BOIS do MONCY and the METIT BOIS, and the lt Corps the FORE? D’ ARGONNE to include...use in Le Petit Bois, Bois do Gesnes , Bois do Moncy, and the Argonne that night and the next day. The next evening the Aire Gpg retorted that none of...October, the left and center corps made slight gains, reaching Apremont, Exermont, and Gesnes , but the right corps, "hampered by the German flanking

  10. Argonne's Laboratory Computing Resource Center : 2005 annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bair, R. B.; Coghlan, S. C; Kaushik, D. K.; Riley, K. R.; Valdes, J. V.; Pieper, G. P.

    2007-06-30

    Argonne National Laboratory founded the Laboratory Computing Resource Center in the spring of 2002 to help meet pressing program needs for computational modeling, simulation, and analysis. The guiding mission is to provide critical computing resources that accelerate the development of high-performance computing expertise, applications, and computations to meet the Laboratory's challenging science and engineering missions. The first goal of the LCRC was to deploy a mid-range supercomputing facility to support the unmet computational needs of the Laboratory. To this end, in September 2002, the Laboratory purchased a 350-node computing cluster from Linux NetworX. This cluster, named 'Jazz', achieved over a teraflop of computing power (10{sup 12} floating-point calculations per second) on standard tests, making it the Laboratory's first terascale computing system and one of the fifty fastest computers in the world at the time. Jazz was made available to early users in November 2002 while the system was undergoing development and configuration. In April 2003, Jazz was officially made available for production operation. Since then, the Jazz user community has grown steadily. By the end of fiscal year 2005, there were 62 active projects on Jazz involving over 320 scientists and engineers. These projects represent a wide cross-section of Laboratory expertise, including work in biosciences, chemistry, climate, computer science, engineering applications, environmental science, geoscience, information science, materials science, mathematics, nanoscience, nuclear engineering, and physics. Most important, many projects have achieved results that would have been unobtainable without such a computing resource. The LCRC continues to improve the computational science and engineering capability and quality at the Laboratory. Specific goals include expansion of the use of Jazz to new disciplines and Laboratory initiatives, teaming with Laboratory infrastructure

  11. Argonne's Laboratory computing resource center : 2006 annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bair, R. B.; Kaushik, D. K.; Riley, K. R.; Valdes, J. V.; Drugan, C. D.; Pieper, G. P.

    2007-05-31

    Argonne National Laboratory founded the Laboratory Computing Resource Center (LCRC) in the spring of 2002 to help meet pressing program needs for computational modeling, simulation, and analysis. The guiding mission is to provide critical computing resources that accelerate the development of high-performance computing expertise, applications, and computations to meet the Laboratory's challenging science and engineering missions. In September 2002 the LCRC deployed a 350-node computing cluster from Linux NetworX to address Laboratory needs for mid-range supercomputing. This cluster, named 'Jazz', achieved over a teraflop of computing power (10{sup 12} floating-point calculations per second) on standard tests, making it the Laboratory's first terascale computing system and one of the 50 fastest computers in the world at the time. Jazz was made available to early users in November 2002 while the system was undergoing development and configuration. In April 2003, Jazz was officially made available for production operation. Since then, the Jazz user community has grown steadily. By the end of fiscal year 2006, there were 76 active projects on Jazz involving over 380 scientists and engineers. These projects represent a wide cross-section of Laboratory expertise, including work in biosciences, chemistry, climate, computer science, engineering applications, environmental science, geoscience, information science, materials science, mathematics, nanoscience, nuclear engineering, and physics. Most important, many projects have achieved results that would have been unobtainable without such a computing resource. The LCRC continues to foster growth in the computational science and engineering capability and quality at the Laboratory. Specific goals include expansion of the use of Jazz to new disciplines and Laboratory initiatives, teaming with Laboratory infrastructure providers to offer more scientific data management capabilities, expanding Argonne staff

  12. Physics Division Argonne National Laboratory description of the programs and facilities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayer, K.J. [ed.

    1999-05-24

    The ANL Physics Division traces its roots to nuclear physics research at the University of Chicago around the time of the second world war. Following the move from the University of Chicago out to the present Argonne site and the formation of Argonne National Laboratory: the Physics Division has had a tradition of research into fundamental aspects of nuclear and atomic physics. Initially, the emphasis was on areas such as neutron physics, mass spectrometry, and theoretical studies of the nuclear shell model. Maria Goeppert Maier was an employee in the Physics Division during the time she did her Nobel-Prize-winning work on the nuclear shell model. These interests diversified and at the present time the research addresses a wide range of current problems in nuclear and atomic physics. The major emphasis of the current experimental nuclear physics research is in heavy-ion physics, centered around the ATLAS facility (Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System) with its new injector providing intense, energetic ion beams over the fill mass range up to uranium. ATLAS is a designated National User Facility and is based on superconducting radio-frequency technology developed in the Physics Division. A small program continues in accelerator development. In addition, the Division has a strong program in medium-energy nuclear physics carried out at a variety of major national and international facilities. The nuclear theory research in the Division spans a wide range of interests including nuclear dynamics with subnucleonic degrees of freedom, dynamics of many-nucleon systems, nuclear structure, and heavy-ion interactions. This research makes contact with experimental research programs in intermediate-energy and heavy-ion physics, both within the Division and on the national and international scale. The Physics Division traditionally has strong connections with the nation's universities. We have many visiting faculty members and we encourage students to participate in our

  13. 'Water window' compact, table-top laser plasma soft X-ray sources based on a gas puff target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachulak, P.W., E-mail: wachulak@gmail.co [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, ul. gen. S. Kaliskiego 2, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Bartnik, A.; Fiedorowicz, H.; Rudawski, P.; Jarocki, R.; Kostecki, J.; Szczurek, M. [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, ul. gen. S. Kaliskiego 2, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland)

    2010-05-15

    We have developed compact, high repetition, table-top soft-X-ray sources, based on a gas puff target, emitting in 'water window' spectral range at lambda = 2.88 nm from nitrogen gas target or, in 2-4 nm range of wavelengths, from argon gas target. Double stream gas puff target was pumped optically by commercial Nd:YAG laser, energy 0.74 J, pulse time duration 4 ns. Spatial distribution of laser-produced plasma was imaged using a pinhole camera. Using transmission grating spectrometer, argon and nitrogen emission spectra were obtained, showing strong emission in the 'water window' spectral range. Using AXUV100 detector the flux measurements of the soft-X-ray pulses were carried out and are presented. These debris free sources are table-top alternative for free electron lasers and synchrotron installations. They can be successfully employed in microscopy, spectroscopy and metrology experiments among others.

  14. Lessons learned from the first U.S./Russian Federation joint tabletop exercise to prepare for conducting on-site inspections under the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filarowski, C; Gough, R; Hawkins, W; Knowles, S; Kreek, S; MacLeod, G; Rockett, P; Smith, A; Sweeney, J; Wild, J; Wohletz, K

    1999-03-24

    A U.S./Russian Federation Joint Tabletop Exercise took place in Snezhinsk, Russia, from 19 to 24 October 1998, whose objectives were the following: (1) To simulate the actions of the Inspection Team (IT), including interactions with the inspected State Party (ISP), in order to examine different ways the United States and Russian Federation (RF) approach inspections and develop appropriate recommendations for the international community. (2) To identify ambiguities and contradictions in the interpretation of Treaty and Protocol provisions that might become apparent in the course of an inspection and that need clarification in connection with the development of Operational Manuals and on-site inspection (OSI) infrastructure. (3) To confirm the efficacy of using bilateral tabletop exercises to assist in developing an effective Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) verification regime. (4) To identify strong and weak points in the preparation and implementation methods of such exercises for the purpose of further improving possible future exercises.

  15. Encyclopedia of distances

    CERN Document Server

    Deza, Michel Marie

    2016-01-01

    This 4th edition of the leading reference volume on distance metrics is characterized by updated and rewritten sections on some items suggested by experts and readers, as well a general streamlining of content and the addition of essential new topics. Though the structure remains unchanged, the new edition also explores recent advances in the use of distances and metrics for e.g. generalized distances, probability theory, graph theory, coding theory, data analysis. New topics in the purely mathematical sections include e.g. the Vitanyi multiset-metric, algebraic point-conic distance, triangular ratio metric, Rossi-Hamming metric, Taneja distance, spectral semimetric between graphs, channel metrization, and Maryland bridge distance. The multidisciplinary sections have also been supplemented with new topics, including: dynamic time wrapping distance, memory distance, allometry, atmospheric depth, elliptic orbit distance, VLBI distance measurements, the astronomical system of units, and walkability distance. Lea...

  16. Overview of basic and applied research on battery systems at Argonne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nevitt, M. V.

    1979-01-01

    The need for a basic understanding of the ion transport and related effects that are observed under the unique physical and electrochemical conditions occurring in high-temperature, high-performance batteries is pointed out. Such effects include those that are typical of transport in bulk materials such as liquid and solid electrolytes and the less well understood effects observed in migration in and across the interfacial zones existing around electrodes. The basic and applied studies at Argonne National Laboratory, centered in part around the development of a Li(alloy)/iron sulfide battery system for energy storage, are briefly described as an example of the way that such an understanding is being sought by coordinated interdisciplinary research. 3 figures.

  17. Ground State Correlations Using exp(S) Method for the Argonne-v18 Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisenberg, Jochen; Mihaila, Bogdan

    1997-04-01

    We use the Argonne-v18 potential together with the phenomenological three-nucleon interaction to do the calculation of the mean-field single particle wave functions and the correlation operator S for ^16O. Our correlation operator includes the contributions from up to 4p4h terms. From the three-nucleon interaction we include only those terms that can be written as a density dependent two-body term. We present a breakdown of the contributions to the binding from the two- and the three-body interactions. The one- and the two-body densities for ^16O are presented. Effects of the center-of-mass correction on the charge density and form factor are also discussed.

  18. Two-Nucleon Scattering without partial waves using a momentum space Argonne V18 interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Veerasamy, S; Polyzou, W N

    2012-01-01

    We test the operator form of the Fourier transform of the Argonne V18 potential by computing selected scattering observables and all Wolfenstein parameters for a variety of energies. These are compared to the GW-DAC database and to partial wave calculations. We represent the interaction and transition operators as expansions in a spin-momentum basis. In this representation the Lippmann-Schwinger equation becomes a six channel integral equation in two variables. Our calculations use different numbers of spin-momentum basis elements to represent the on- and off-shell transition operators. This is because different numbers of independent spin-momentum basis elements are required to expand the on- and off-shell transition operators. The choice of on and off-shell spin-momentum basis elements is made so the coefficients of the on-shell spin-momentum basis vectors are simply related to the corresponding off-shell coefficients.

  19. The Anapole Moment of the Deuteron with the Argonne v18 Nucleon-Nucleon Interaction Model

    CERN Document Server

    Hyun, C H; Hyun, Chang Ho; Desplanques, Bertrand

    2003-01-01

    We calculate the deuteron anapole moment with the wave functions obtained from the Argonne $v18$ nucleon-nucleon interaction model. The anapole moment operators are considered at the leading order. To minimize the uncertainty due to a lack of current conservation, we calculate the matrix element of the anapole moment from the original definition. In virtue of accurate wave functions, we can obtain a more precise value of the deuteron anapole moment which contains less uncertainty than the former works. We obtain a result reduced by more than 25% in the magnitude of the deuteron anapole moment. The reduction of individual nuclear contributions is much more important however, varying from a factor 2 for the spin part to a factor 4 for the convection and associated two-body currents.

  20. National coal utilization assessment: modeling long-term coal production with the Argonne coal market model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dux, C.D.; Kroh, G.C.; VanKuiken, J.C.

    1977-08-01

    The Argonne Coal Market Model was developed as part of the National Coal Utilization Assessment, a comprehensive study of coal-related environmental, health, and safety impacts. The model was used to generate long-term coal market scenarios that became the basis for comparing the impacts of coal-development options. The model has a relatively high degree of regional detail concerning both supply and demand. Coal demands are forecast by a combination of trend and econometric analysis and then input exogenously into the model. Coal supply in each region is characterized by a linearly increasing function relating increments of new mine capacity to the marginal cost of extraction. Rail-transportation costs are econometrically estimated for each supply-demand link. A quadratic programming algorithm is used to calculate flow patterns that minimize consumer costs for the system.

  1. Decontamination and dismantlement of the JANUS Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory-East. Project final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellhauer, C.R.; Clark, F.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Technology Development Div.; Garlock, G.A. [MOTA Corp., Cayce, SC (United States)

    1997-10-01

    The decontamination and dismantlement of the JANUS Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) was completed in October 1997. Descriptions and evaluations of the activities performed and analyses of the results obtained during the JANUS D and D Project are provided in this Final Report. The following information is included: objective of the JANUS D and D Project; history of the JANUS Reactor facility; description of the ANL-E site and the JANUS Reactor facility; overview of the D and D activities performed; description of the project planning and engineering; description of the D and D operations; summary of the final status of the JANUS Reactor facility based upon the final survey results; description of the health and safety aspects of the project, including personnel exposure and OSHA reporting; summary of the waste minimization techniques utilized and total waste generated by the project; and summary of the final cost and schedule for the JANUS D and D Project.

  2. Proc. of the sixteenth symposium on energy engineering sciences, May 13-15, 1998, Argonne, IL.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1998-05-13

    This Proceedings Volume includes the technical papers that were presented during the Sixteenth Symposium on Energy Engineering Sciences on May 13--15, 1998, at Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois. The Symposium was structured into eight technical sessions, which included 30 individual presentations followed by discussion and interaction with the audience. A list of participants is appended to this volume. The DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), of which Engineering Research is a component program, is responsible for the long-term, mission-oriented research in the Department. The Office has prime responsibility for establishing the basic scientific foundation upon which the Nation's future energy options will be identified, developed, and built. BES is committed to the generation of new knowledge necessary to solve present and future problems regarding energy exploration, production, conversion, and utilization, while maintaining respect for the environment. Consistent with the DOE/BES mission, the Engineering Research Program is charged with the identification, initiation, and management of fundamental research on broad, generic topics addressing energy-related engineering problems. Its stated goals are to improve and extend the body of knowledge underlying current engineering practice so as to create new options for enhancing energy savings and production, prolonging the useful life of energy-related structures and equipment, and developing advanced manufacturing technologies and materials processing. The program emphasis is on reducing costs through improved industrial production and performance and expanding the nation's store of fundamental knowledge for solving anticipated and unforeseen engineering problems in energy technologies. To achieve these goals, the Engineering Research Program supports approximately 130 research projects covering a broad spectrum of topics that cut across traditional engineering disciplines. The program

  3. Changes in the Vegetation Cover in a Constructed Wetland at Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergman, C.L.; LaGory, K.

    2004-01-01

    Wetlands are valuable resources that are disappearing at an alarming rate. Land development has resulted in the destruction of wetlands for approximately 200 years. To combat this destruction, the federal government passed legislation that requires no net loss of wetlands. The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is responsible for regulating wetland disturbances. In 1991, the USACE determined that the construction of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory would damage three wetlands that had a total area of one acre. Argonne was required to create a wetland of equal acreage to replace the damaged wetlands. For the first five years after this wetland was created (1992-1996), the frequency of plant species, relative cover, and water depth was closely monitored. The wetland was not monitored again until 2002. In 2003, the vegetation cover data were again collected with a similar methodology to previous years. The plant species were sampled using quadrats at randomly selected locations along transects throughout the wetland. The fifty sampling locations were monitored once in June and percent cover of each of the plant species was determined for each plot. Furthermore, the extent of standing water in the wetland was measured. In 2003, 21 species of plants were found and identified. Eleven species dominated the wetland, among which were reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea), crown vetch (Coronilla varia), and Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense). These species are all non-native, invasive species. In the previous year, 30 species were found in the same wetland. The common species varied from the 2002 study but still had these non-native species in common. Reed canary grass and Canada thistle both increased by more than 100% from 2002. Unfortunately, the non-native species may be contributing to the loss of biodiversity in the wetland. In the future, control measures should be taken to ensure the establishment of more desired native species.

  4. Argonne National Laboratory study of the transfer of federal computational technology to manufacturing industry in the State of Michigan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, C.J.

    1991-11-01

    This report describes a pilot study to develop, initiate the implementation, and document a process to identify computational technology capabilities resident within Argonne National Laboratory to small and medium-sized businesses in the State of Michigan. It is a derivative of a program entitled ``Technology Applications Development Process for the State of Michigan`` undertaken by the Industrial Technology Institute and MERRA under funding from the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The overall objective of the latter program is to develop procedures which can facilitate the discovery and commercialization of new technologies for the benefit of small and medium-size manufacturing firms. Federal laboratories such as Argonne, along with universities, have been identified by the Industrial Technology Institute as key sources of technology which can be profitably commercialized by the target firms. The scope of this study limited the investigation of technology areas for technology transfer to that of computational science and engineering featuring high performance computing. This area was chosen as the broad technological capability within Argonne to investigate for technology transfer to Michigan firms for several reasons. First, and most importantly, as a multidisciplinary laboratory, Argonne has the full range of scientific and engineering skills needed to utilize leading-edge computing capabilities in many areas of manufacturing.

  5. Argonne National Laboratory study of the transfer of federal computational technology to manufacturing industry in the State of Michigan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, C.J.

    1991-11-01

    This report describes a pilot study to develop, initiate the implementation, and document a process to identify computational technology capabilities resident within Argonne National Laboratory to small and medium-sized businesses in the State of Michigan. It is a derivative of a program entitled Technology Applications Development Process for the State of Michigan'' undertaken by the Industrial Technology Institute and MERRA under funding from the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The overall objective of the latter program is to develop procedures which can facilitate the discovery and commercialization of new technologies for the benefit of small and medium-size manufacturing firms. Federal laboratories such as Argonne, along with universities, have been identified by the Industrial Technology Institute as key sources of technology which can be profitably commercialized by the target firms. The scope of this study limited the investigation of technology areas for technology transfer to that of computational science and engineering featuring high performance computing. This area was chosen as the broad technological capability within Argonne to investigate for technology transfer to Michigan firms for several reasons. First, and most importantly, as a multidisciplinary laboratory, Argonne has the full range of scientific and engineering skills needed to utilize leading-edge computing capabilities in many areas of manufacturing.

  6. Practical superconductor development for electrical applications - Argonne National Laboratory quarterly report for the period ending September 30, 2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorris, S. E.

    2002-12-02

    This is a multiyear experimental research program that focuses on improving relevant material properties of high-T{sub c} superconductors (HTSs) and developing fabrication methods that can be transferred to industry for production of commercial conductors. The development of teaming relationships through agreements with industrial partners is a key element of the Argonne (ANL) program.

  7. Practical superconductor development for electrical power applications - Argonne National Laboratory - quarterly report for the period ending June 30, 2001.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorris, S. E.

    2001-08-21

    This is a multiyear experimental research program focused on improving relevant material properties of high-T{sub c} superconductors (HTSs) and on development of fabrication methods that can be transferred to industry for production of commercial conductors. The development of teaming relationships through agreements with industrial partners is a key element of the Argonne (ANL) program.

  8. Distance Education Council.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indira Gandhi National Open University, New Delhi (India). Distance Education Council.

    Since its inception in India in 1962, distance education has grown in popularity. The Distance Education Council (DEC) directs distance learning within India's higher education system. The DEC's promotion, coordination, and maintenance of standards for distance education are its three major roles. Its initiatives include grants, support for…

  9. Training for Distance Teaching through Distance Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadorath, Jill; Harris, Simon; Encinas, Fatima

    2002-01-01

    Describes a mixed-mode bachelor degree course in English language teaching at the Universidad Autonoma de Puebla (Mexico) that was designed to help practicing teachers write appropriate distance education materials by giving them the experience of being distance students. Includes a course outline and results of a course evaluation. (Author/LRW)

  10. Keyhole reflection-mode coherent diffraction imaging of nano-patterned surfaces using a tabletop EUV source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanblatt, Elisabeth; Seaberg, Matthew; Zhang, Bosheng; Gardner, Dennis; Murnane, Margaret; Kapyetn, Henry; Adams, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate the first reflection-mode keyhole coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) of non-isolated samples from a single diffraction pattern. A tabletop high harmonic generation (HHG) beam at 30 nm with a curved wave-front is used to illuminate Ti nano-patterns on a Si substrate at 45 degree angle of incidence. The 30 nm illumination beam profile is first characterized using ptychograhic CDI. Keyhole CDI is then used to image the nano-sample. In contrast to ptychography CDI, keyhole CDI needs only one diffraction pattern, and therefore requires no scanning of the sample. This is a significant advantage for ultrafast pump-probe imaging of thermal or spin transport, allowing a sequence of time-delayed images of the same region to be easily acquired. Our technique opens the door for imaging dynamics in nanostructures with sub-10 nm spatial resolution and fs temporal resolution. National Science Foundation Engineering Research Center in EUV Science and Technology, AMRDEC, DARPA PULSE, SRC grant 2013-OJ-2443, NSSEFF Fellowship, NSF IGERT program.

  11. Table-top laser-driven ultrashort electron and X-ray source: the CIBER-X source project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardeau-Montaut, Jean-Pierre; Kiraly, Bélà; Girardeau-Montaut, Claire; Leboutet, Hubert

    2000-09-01

    We report on the development of a new laser-driven table-top ultrashort electron and X-ray source, also called the CIBER-X source . X-ray pulses are produced by a three-step process which consists of the photoelectron emission from a thin metallic photocathode illuminated by 16 ps duration laser pulses at 213 nm. The e-gun is a standard Pierce diode electrode type, in which electrons are accelerated by a cw electric field of ˜11 MV/m up to a hole made in the anode. The photoinjector produces a train of 70-80 keV electron pulses of ˜0.5 nC and 20 A peak current at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The electrons are then transported outside the diode along a path of 20 cm length, and are focused onto a target of thullium by magnetic fields produced by two electromagnetic coils. X-rays are then produced by the impact of electrons on the target. Simulations of geometrical, electromagnetic fields and energetic characteristics of the complete source were performed previously with the assistance of the code PIXEL1 also developed at the laboratory. Finally, experimental electron and X-ray performances of the CIBER-X source as well as its application to very low dose imagery are presented and discussed. source Compacte d' Impulsions Brèves d' Electrons et de Rayons X

  12. Encyclopedia of distances

    CERN Document Server

    Deza, Michel Marie

    2014-01-01

    This updated and revised third edition of the leading reference volume on distance metrics includes new items from very active research areas in the use of distances and metrics such as geometry, graph theory, probability theory and analysis. Among the new topics included are, for example, polyhedral metric space, nearness matrix problems, distances between belief assignments, distance-related animal settings, diamond-cutting distances, natural units of length, Heidegger’s de-severance distance, and brain distances. The publication of this volume coincides with intensifying research efforts into metric spaces and especially distance design for applications. Accurate metrics have become a crucial goal in computational biology, image analysis, speech recognition and information retrieval. Leaving aside the practical questions that arise during the selection of a ‘good’ distance function, this work focuses on providing the research community with an invaluable comprehensive listing of the main available di...

  13. Distances from Planetary Nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Ciardullo, R

    2003-01-01

    The [O III] 5007 planetary nebula luminosity function (PNLF) occupies an important place on the extragalactic distance ladder. Since it is the only method that is applicable to all the large galaxies of the Local Supercluster, it is uniquely useful for cross-checking results and linking the Population I and Population II distance scales. We review the physics underlying the method, demonstrate its precision, and illustrate its value by comparing its distances to distances obtained from Cepheids and the Surface Brightness Fluctuation (SBF) method. We use the Cepheid and PNLF distances to 13 galaxies to show that the metallicity dependence of the PNLF cutoff is in excellent agreement with that predicted from theory, and that no additional systematic corrections are needed for either method. However, when we compare the Cepheid-calibrated PNLF distance scale with the Cepheid-calibrated SBF distance scale, we find a significant offset: although the relative distances of both methods are in excellent agreement, th...

  14. A generalized evidence distance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongming Mo; Xi Lu; Yong Deng

    2016-01-01

    How to efficiently measure the distance between two basic probability assignments (BPAs) is an open issue. In this paper, a new method to measure the distance between two BPAs is proposed, based on two existing measures of evidence distance. The new proposed method is comprehen-sive and generalized. Numerical examples are used to ilus-trate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  15. Investigation of the vertical instability at the Argonne Intense Pulsed Neutron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaoheng; Dooling, J. C.; Harkay, K. C.; Kustom, R. L.; McMichael, G. E.

    2009-10-01

    The rapid cycling synchrotron of the intense pulsed neutron source at Argonne National Laboratory normally operates at an average beam current of 14 to 15μA, accelerating protons from 50 to 450 MeV 30 times per second. The beam current is limited by a single-bunch vertical instability that occurs in the later part of the 14 ms acceleration cycle. By analyzing turn-by-turn beam position monitor data, two cases of vertical beam centroid oscillations were discovered. The oscillations start from the tail of the bunch, build up, and develop toward the head of the bunch. The development stops near the bunch center and oscillations remain localized in the tail for a relatively long time (2-4 ms, 1-2×104 turns). This vertical instability is identified as the cause of the beam loss. We compared this instability with a head-tail instability that was purposely induced by switching off sextupole magnets. It appears that the observed vertical instability is different from the classical head-tail instability.

  16. Argonne National Laboratory-East site environmental report for calendar year 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N.W.; Kolzow, R.G.

    1995-05-01

    This report discusses the results of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL) for 1994. To evaluate the effects of ANL operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the ANL site were analyzed and compared to applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides was measured in air, surface water, groundwater, soil, grass, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and ANL effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. The results of the surveillance program are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, ANL, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A US Department of Energy (DOE) dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations and the CAP-88 version of the EPA-AIRDOSE/RADRISK COMPUTER CODE, is used in this report. The status of ANL environmental protection activities with respect to the various laws and regulations which govern waste handling and disposal is discussed. This report also discusses progress being made on environmental corrective actions and restoration projects.

  17. Argonne National Laboratory--East site environmental report for calendar year 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Moos, L.P.

    1991-07-01

    This report discusses the results of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL) for 1990. To evaluate the effects of ANL operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the ANL site were analyzed and compared to applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides was measured in air, surface water, groundwater, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and ANL effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. The results of the surveillance program are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, ANL, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A US Department of Energy (DOE) dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations, is used in this report. The status of ANL environmental protection activities with respect to the various laws and regulations which govern waste handling and disposal is discussed. This report also discusses progress being made on environmental corrective actions and restoration projects from past activities.

  18. Argonne National Laboratory-East site environmental report for calendar year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N.W.; Kolzow, R.G.

    1997-09-01

    This report discusses the results of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) for 1996. To evaluate the effects of ANL-E operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the ANL-E site were analyzed and compared to applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, soil, grass, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and ANL-E effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. The results of the surveillance program are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, ANL-E, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A US Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the CAP-88 version of the EPA-AIRDOSE/RADRISK computer code, is used in this report. The status of ANL-E environmental protection activities with respect to the various laws and regulations that govern waste handling and disposal is discussed. This report also discusses progress being made on environmental corrective actions and restoration projects.

  19. Argonne National Laboratory-East site environmental report for calendar year 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N.W.; Kolzow, R.G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environment and Waste Management Program

    1994-05-01

    This report discusses the results of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL) for 1993. To evaluate the effects of ANL operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the ANL site were analyzed and compared to applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides was measured in air, surface water, groundwater, soil, grass, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and ANL effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. The results of the surveillance program are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, ANL, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A US Department of Energy (DOE) dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations and the CAP-88 version of the EPA-AIRDOSE/RADRISK computer code, is used in this report. The status of ANL environmental protection activities with respect to the various laws and regulations which govern waste handling and disposal is discussed. This report also discusses progress being made on environmental corrective actions and restoration projects from past activities.

  20. Argonne National Laboratory-East site environmental report for calendar year 1998.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N.W.; Kolzow, R.G.

    1999-08-26

    This report discusses the results of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) for 1998. To evaluate the effects of ANL-E operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the ANL-E site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and ANL-E effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, fallout, ANL-E, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A US Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the US Environmental Protection Agency's CAP-88 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report. The status of ANL-E environmental protection activities with respect to the various laws and regulations that govern waste handling and disposal is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects.

  1. Vitrification as a low-level radioactive mixed waste treatment technology at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazer, J.J.; No, Hyo J.

    1995-08-01

    Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) is developing plans to use vitrification to treat low-level radioactive mixed wastes (LLMW) generated onsite. The ultimate objective of this project is to install a full-scale vitrification system at ANL-E capable of processing the annual generation and historic stockpiles of selected LLMW streams. This project is currently in the process of identifying a range of processible glass compositions that can be produced from actual mixed wastes and additives, such as boric acid or borax. During the formulation of these glasses, there has been an emphasis on maximizing the waste content in the glass (70 to 90 wt %), reducing the overall final waste volume, and producing a stabilized low-level radioactive waste glass. Crucible glass studies with actual mixed waste streams have produced alkali borosilicate glasses that pass the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test. These same glass compositions, spiked with toxic metals well above the expected levels in actual wastes, also pass the TCLP test. These results provide compelling evidence that the vitrification system and the glass waste form will be robust enough to accommodate expected variations in the LLMW streams from ANL-E. Approximately 40 crucible melts will be studied to establish a compositional envelope for vitrifying ANL-E mixed wastes. Also being determined is the identity of volatilized metals or off-gases that will be generated.

  2. Structural elucidation of Argonne premium coals: Molecular weights, heteroatom distributions and linkages between clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winans, R.E.,; Kim, Y.; Hunt, J.E.; McBeth, R.L.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this study is to create a statistically accurate picture of important structural features for a group of coals representing a broad rank range. Mass spectrometric techniques are used to study coals, coal extracts and chemically modified coals and extracts. Laser desorption mass spectrometry is used to determine molecular weight distributions. Desorption chemical ionization high resolution mass spectrometry provides detailed molecular information on compound classes of molecules is obtained using tandem mass spectrometry. These results are correlated with other direct studies on these samples such as solid NMR, XPS and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. From the complex sets of data, several general trends are emerging especially for heteroatom containing species. From a statistical point of view, heteroatoms must play important roles in the reactivity of all coals. Direct characterization of sulfur containing species in the Argonne coals has been reported from XANES analysis. Indirect methods used include: TG-FTIR and HRMS which rely on thermal desorption and pyrolysis to vaporize the samples. Both XANES and XPS data on nitrogen has been reported, but at this time, the XPS information is probably more reliable. Results from HRMS are discussed in this paper. Most other information on nitrogen is limited to analysis of liquefaction products. However, nitrogen can be important in influencing characteristics of coal liquids and as a source of NO{sub x}`s in coal combustion.

  3. Experimental results obtained with the positron-annihilation- radiation telescope of the Toulouse-Argonne collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naya, J.E.; von Ballmoos, P.; Albernhe, F.; Vedrenne, G. [Centre d`Etude Spatial des Rayonnements, Toulouse (France); Smither, R.K.; Faiz, M.; Fernandez, P.B.; Graber, T. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1995-10-01

    We present laboratory measurements obtained with a ground-based prototype of a focusing positron-annihilation-radiation telescope developed by the Toulouse-Argonne collaboration. This balloon-borne telescope has been designed to collect 511-keV photons with an extremely low instrumental background. The telescope features a Laue diffraction lens and a detector module containing a small array of germanium detectors. It will provide a combination of high spatial and energy resolution (15 arc sec and 2 keV, respectively) with a sensitivity of {approximately}3{times}10{sup {minus}5} photons cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}. These features will allow us to resolve a possible narrow 511-keV line both energetically and spatially within a Galactic center ``microquasar`` or in other broad-class annihilators. The ground-based prototype consists of a crystal lens holding small cubes of diffracting germanium crystals and a 3{times}3 germanium array that detects the concentrated beam in the focal plane. Measured performances of the instrument at different line energies (511 keV and 662 keV) are presented and compared with Monte-Carlo simulations. The advantages of a 3{times}3 Ge-detector array with respect to a standard-monoblock detector have been confirmed. The results obtained in the laboratory have strengthened interest in a crystal-diffraction telescope, offering new perspectives for die future of experimental gamma-ray astronomy.

  4. Experimental results obtained with the positron-annihilation-radiation telescope of the Toulouse-Argonne collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naya, J.E. [Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France). Centre d`Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements; Ballmoos, P. von [Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France). Centre d`Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements; Smither, R.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source Div.; Faiz, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source Div.; Fernandez, P.B. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source Div.; Graber, T. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source Div.; Albernhe, F. [Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France). Centre d`Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements; Vedrenne, G. [Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France). Centre d`Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements

    1996-04-11

    We present laboratory measurements obtained with a ground-based prototype of the focusing positron-annihilation-radiation telescope developed by the Toulouse-Argonne collaboration. This instrument has been designed to collect 511-keV photons from astrophysical sources when operating as a balloon borne observatory. The ground-based prototype consists of a crystal lens holding small cubes of diffracting germanium crystals and a 3 x 3 germanium array that detects the concentrated beam in the focal plane. Measured performances of the instrument at different line energies (511 and 662 keV) are presented and compared with Monte Carlo simulations; also the advantages of combining the lens with a detector array are discussed. The results obtained in the laboratory have strengthened interest in a crystal-diffraction telescope: the balloon instrument will provide a combination of high spatial and energy resolution (15 arc sec and 2 keV, respectively) with an extremely low instrumental background resulting in a sensitivity of similar 3.10{sup -5} photons cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. These features will allow us to resolve a possible narrow 511-keV line both energetically and spatially within a Galactic center microquasar or in other broad-class annihilators. (orig.).

  5. Inspection and monitoring plan, contaminated groundwater seeps 317/319/ENE Area, Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-11

    During the course of completing the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) in the 317/319/East-Northeast (ENE) Area of Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E), groundwater was discovered moving to the surface through a series of groundwater seeps. The seeps are located in a ravine approximately 600 ft south of the ANL-E fence line in Waterfall Glen Forest Preserve. Samples of the seep water were collected and analyzed for selected parameters. Two of the five seeps sampled were found to contain detectable levels of organic contaminants. Three chemical species were identified: chloroform (14--25 {micro}g/L), carbon tetrachloride (56--340 {micro}g/L), and tetrachloroethylene (3--6 {micro}g/L). The other seeps did not contain detectable levels of volatile organics. The nature of the contaminants in the seeps will also be monitored on a regular basis. Samples of surface water flowing through the bottom of the ravine and groundwater emanating from the seeps will be collected and analyzed for chemical and radioactive constituents. The results of the routine sampling will be compared with the concentrations used in the risk assessment. If the concentrations exceed those used in the risk assessment, the risk calculations will be revised by using the higher numbers. This revised analysis will determine if additional actions are warranted.

  6. The beam bunching and transport system of the Argonne positive ion injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Den Hartog, P.K.; Bogaty, J.M.; Bollinger, L.M.; Clifft, B.E.; Pardo, R.C.; Shepard, K.W.

    1989-01-01

    A new positive ion injector (PII) is currently under construction at Argonne that will replace the existing 9-MV tandem electrostatic accelerator as an injector into ATLAS. It consists of an electron-cyclotron resonance-ion source on a 350-kV platform injecting into a superconducting linac optimized for very slow (..beta.. less than or equal to .007 c) ions. This combination can potentially produce even higher quality heavy-ion beams than are currently available from the tandem since the emittance growth within the linac is largely determined by the quality of the bunching and beam transport. The system we have implemented uses a two-stage bunching system, composed of a 4-harmonic gridded buncher located on the ECR high-voltage platform and a room temperature spiral-loaded buncher of novel design. A sinusoidal beam chopper is used for removal of tails. The beam transport is designed to provide mass resolution of M/..delta..M > 250 and a doubly-isochronous beamline is used to minimize time spread due to path length differences. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Management of wildlife causing damage at Argonne National Laboratory-East, DuPage County, Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    The DOE, after an independent review, has adopted an Environmental Assessment (EA) prepared by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) which evaluates use of an Integrated Wildlife Damage Management approach at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) in DuPage County, Illinois (April 1995). In 1994, the USDA issued a programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) that covers nationwide animal damage control activities. The EA for Management of Wildlife Causing Damage at ANL-E tiers off this programmatic EIS. The USDA wrote the EA as a result of DOE`s request to USDA to prepare and implement a comprehensive Wildlife Management Damage Plan; the USDA has authority for animal damage control under the Animal Damage Control Act of 1931, as amended, and the Rural Development, Agriculture and Related Agencies Appropriations Act of 1988. DOE has determined, based on the analysis in the EA, that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an EIS is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  8. Software package as an information center product. [Activities of Argonne Code Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, M. K.

    1977-01-01

    The Argonne Code Center serves as a software exchange and information center for the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The goal of the Center's program is to provide a means for sharing of software among agency offices and contractors, and for transferring computing applications and technology, developed within the agencies, to the information-processing community. A major activity of the Code Center is the acquisition, review, testing, and maintenance of a collection of software--computer systems, applications programs, subroutines, modules, and data compilations--prepared by agency offices and contractors to meet programmatic needs. A brief review of the history of computer program libraries and software sharing is presented to place the Code Center activity in perspective. The state-of-the-art discussion starts off with an appropriate definition of the term software package, together with descriptions of recommended package contents and the Carter's package evaluation activity. An effort is made to identify the various users of the product, to enumerate their individual needs, to document the Center's efforts to meet these needs and the ongoing interaction with the user community. Desirable staff qualifications are considered, and packaging problems, reviewed. The paper closes with a brief look at recent developments and a forecast of things to come. 2 tables. (RWR)

  9. Design, calibration, and operation of 220Rn stack effluent monitoring systems at Argonne National Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munyon, W J; Kretz, N D; Marchetti, F P

    1994-09-01

    A group of stack effluent monitoring systems have been developed to monitor discharges of 220Rn from a hot cell facility at Argonne National Laboratory. The stack monitors use flow-through scintillation cells and are completely microprocessor-based systems. A method for calibrating the stack monitors in the laboratory and in the field is described. A nominal calibration factor for the stack monitoring systems in use is 15.0 cts min-1 per kBq m-3 (0.56 cts min-1 per pCi L-1) +/- 26% at the 95% confidence level. The plate-out fraction of decay products in the stack monitor scintillation cells, without any pre-filtering, was found to be nominally 25% under normal operating conditions. When the sample was pre-filtered upstream of the scintillation cell, the observed cell plate-out fraction ranged from 16-22%, depending on the specific sampling conditions. The instantaneous 220Rn stack concentration can be underestimated or overestimated when the steady state condition established between 220Rn and its decay products in the scintillation cell is disrupted by sudden changes in the monitored 220Rn concentration. For long-term measurements, however, the time-averaged response of the monitor represents the steady state condition and leads to a reasonable estimate of the average 220Rn concentration during the monitoring period.

  10. People bouncing on trampolines: dramatic energy transfer, a table-top demonstration, complex dynamics and a zero sum game.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Srinivasan

    Full Text Available Jumping on trampolines is a popular backyard recreation. In some trampoline games (e.g., "seat drop war", when two people land on the trampoline with only a small time-lag, one person bounces much higher than the other, as if energy has been transferred from one to the other. First, we illustrate this energy-transfer in a table-top demonstration, consisting of two balls dropped onto a mini-trampoline, landing almost simultaneously, sometimes resulting in one ball bouncing much higher than the other. Next, using a simple mathematical model of two masses bouncing passively on a massless trampoline with no dissipation, we show that with specific landing conditions, it is possible to transfer all the kinetic energy of one mass to the other through the trampoline - in a single bounce. For human-like parameters, starting with equal energy, the energy transfer is maximal when one person lands approximately when the other is at the bottom of her bounce. The energy transfer persists even for very stiff surfaces. The energy-conservative mathematical model exhibits complex non-periodic long-term motions. To complement this passive bouncing model, we also performed a game-theoretic analysis, appropriate when both players are acting strategically to steal the other player's energy. We consider a zero-sum game in which each player's goal is to gain the other player's kinetic energy during a single bounce, by extending her leg during flight. For high initial energy and a symmetric situation, the best strategy for both subjects (minimax strategy and Nash equilibrium is to use the shortest available leg length and not extend their legs. On the other hand, an asymmetry in initial heights allows the player with more energy to gain even more energy in the next bounce. Thus synchronous bouncing unstable is unstable both for passive bouncing and when leg lengths are controlled as in game-theoretic equilibria.

  11. R D activities at Argonne National Laboratory for the application of base seismic isolation in nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidensticker, R.W.

    1991-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has been deeply involved in the development of seismic isolation for use in nuclear facilities for the past decade. Initial focus of these efforts has been on the use of seismic isolation for advanced liquid metal reactors (LMR). Subsequent efforts in seismic isolation at ANL included a lead role in an accelerated development program for possible use of seismic isolation for the DOE's New Production reactors (NPR). Under funding provided by the National Science Foundation (NSF) Argonne is currently working with Shimizu in a joint United States-Japanese program on response of seismically-isolated buildings to actual earthquakes. The results of recent work in the seismic isolation program elements are described in this paper. The current Status of these programs is presented along with an assessment of work still needed to bring the benefits of this emerging technology to full potential in nuclear reactors and other nuclear facilities. 38 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Argonne National Laboratory, High Energy Physics Division: Semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1986-December 31, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses the research activity of the High Energy Physics Division at the Argonne National Laboratory for the period, July 1986-December 1986. Some of the topics included in this report are: high resolution spectrometers, computational physics, spin physics, string theories, lattice gauge theory, proton decay, symmetry breaking, heavy flavor production, massive lepton pair production, collider physics, field theories, proton sources, and facility development. (LSP)

  13. Tourists consuming distance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Gunvor Riber

    The environmental impact of tourism mobility is linked to the distances travelled in order to reach a holiday destination, and with tourists travelling more and further than previously, an understanding of how the tourists view the distance they travel across becomes relevant. Based on interviews...... contribute to an understanding of how it is possible to change tourism travel behaviour towards becoming more sustainable. How tourists 'consume distance' is discussed, from the practical level of actually driving the car or sitting in the air plane, to the symbolic consumption of distance that occurs when...... travelling on holiday becomes part of a lifestyle and a social positioning game. Further, different types of tourist distance consumers are identified, ranging from the reluctant to the deliberate and nonchalant distance consumers, who display very differing attitudes towards the distance they all travel...

  14. Learning string edit distance

    CERN Document Server

    Ristad, E S; Ristad, Eric Sven; Yianilos, Peter N.

    1996-01-01

    In many applications, it is necessary to determine the similarity of two strings. A widely-used notion of string similarity is the edit distance: the minimum number of insertions, deletions, and substitutions required to transform one string into the other. In this report, we provide a stochastic model for string edit distance. Our stochastic model allows us to learn a string edit distance function from a corpus of examples. We illustrate the utility of our approach by applying it to the difficult problem of learning the pronunciation of words in conversational speech. In this application, we learn a string edit distance with one fourth the error rate of the untrained Levenshtein distance. Our approach is applicable to any string classification problem that may be solved using a similarity function against a database of labeled prototypes. Keywords: string edit distance, Levenshtein distance, stochastic transduction, syntactic pattern recognition, prototype dictionary, spelling correction, string correction, ...

  15. Interface Simulation Distances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavol Černý

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The classical (boolean notion of refinement for behavioral interfaces of system components is the alternating refinement preorder. In this paper, we define a distance for interfaces, called interface simulation distance. It makes the alternating refinement preorder quantitative by, intuitively, tolerating errors (while counting them in the alternating simulation game. We show that the interface simulation distance satisfies the triangle inequality, that the distance between two interfaces does not increase under parallel composition with a third interface, and that the distance between two interfaces can be bounded from above and below by distances between abstractions of the two interfaces. We illustrate the framework, and the properties of the distances under composition of interfaces, with two case studies.

  16. MTBuilder: a User Interface Toolkit for Multi-touch Tabletop%MTBuilder:一个多触点交互桌面界面工具

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘佳升; 张凤军; 谭国富; 戴志军; 戴国忠; 王宏安

    2011-01-01

    针对基于WIMP范式的图形用户界面工具不能解决多触点交互桌面的多指手势识别、界面组件朝向等问题,提出基于自然用户界面通用隐喻OCGM(objects,containers,gestures and manipulations)的多触点交互桌面界面工具箱-MTBuilder.首先用层次化多触点数据表示模型存储多触点数据,然后对多指手势识别器进行动态管理以加速识别处理,最后基于OCGM设计并实现界面组件库.通过多人信息浏览、城市规划等原型系统的开发和实验评估可以看出,MTBuilder能够为交互桌面界面构造与快速原型系统开发提供强有力的支持.%To address the issue in multi-touch tabletop that the WIMP paradigm-based graphical user interfaces could not handle multi-finger gesture recognition and UI component reorientation, this paper proposes a new multi-touch tabletop UI toolkit, termed MTBuilder, based on the universal foundational metaphors OCGM(objects, containers, gestures, and manipulations). First MTBuilder employs a hierarchical data representation model to store the multi-finger information. Then it configures the gesture recognizers dynamically to improve the efficiency of recognition. Finally design the components of the user interface based on OCGM. Several typical prototypes are developed, such as multi-user InfoScan and city planning. The prototypes and the experimental results showed that MTBuilder can efficiently support construction and prototyping of a tabletop user interface.

  17. Numerical distance protection

    CERN Document Server

    Ziegler, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    Distance protection provides the basis for network protection in transmission systems and meshed distribution systems. This book covers the fundamentals of distance protection and the special features of numerical technology. The emphasis is placed on the application of numerical distance relays in distribution and transmission systems.This book is aimed at students and engineers who wish to familiarise themselves with the subject of power system protection, as well as the experienced user, entering the area of numerical distance protection. Furthermore it serves as a reference guide for s

  18. Biomechanics of Distance Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Peter R., Ed.

    Contributions from researchers in the field of running mechanics are included in the 13 chapters of this book. The following topics are covered: (1) "The Mechanics of Distance Running: A Historical Perspective" (Peter Cavanagh); (2) "Stride Length in Distance Running: Velocity, Body Dimensions, and Added Mass Effects" (Peter Cavanagh, Rodger…

  19. ORDERED WEIGHTED DISTANCE MEASURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zeshui XU; Jian CHEN

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop an ordered weighted distance (OWD) measure, which is thegeneralization of some widely used distance measures, including the normalized Hamming distance, the normalized Euclidean distance, the normalized geometric distance, the max distance, the median distance and the min distance, etc. Moreover, the ordered weighted averaging operator, the generalized ordered weighted aggregation operator, the ordered weighted geometric operator, the averaging operator, the geometric mean operator, the ordered weighted square root operator, the square root operator, the max operator, the median operator and the min operator axe also the special cases of the OWD measure. Some methods depending on the input arguments are given to determine the weights associated with the OWD measure. The prominent characteristic of the OWD measure is that it can relieve (or intensify) the influence of unduly large or unduly small deviations on the aggregation results by assigning them low (or high) weights. This desirable characteristic makes the OWD measure very suitable to be used in many actual fields, including group decision making, medical diagnosis, data mining, and pattern recognition, etc. Finally, based on the OWD measure, we develop a group decision making approach, and illustrate it with a numerical example.

  20. Normalized information distance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vitányi, P.M.B.; Balbach, F.J.; Cilibrasi, R.L.; Li, M.; Emmert-Streib, F.; Dehmer, M.

    2009-01-01

    The normalized information distance is a universal distance measure for objects of all kinds. It is based on Kolmogorov complexity and thus uncomputable, but there are ways to utilize it. First, compression algorithms can be used to approximate the Kolmogorov complexity if the objects have a string

  1. Normalized information distance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vitányi, P.M.B.; Balbach, F.J.; Cilibrasi, R.L.; Li, M.

    2008-01-01

    The normalized information distance is a universal distance measure for objects of all kinds. It is based on Kolmogorov complexity and thus uncomputable, but there are ways to utilize it. First, compression algorithms can be used to approximate the Kolmogorov complexity if the objects have a string

  2. Normalized Information Distance

    CERN Document Server

    Vitanyi, Paul M B; Cilibrasi, Rudi L; Li, Ming

    2008-01-01

    The normalized information distance is a universal distance measure for objects of all kinds. It is based on Kolmogorov complexity and thus uncomputable, but there are ways to utilize it. First, compression algorithms can be used to approximate the Kolmogorov complexity if the objects have a string representation. Second, for names and abstract concepts, page count statistics from the World Wide Web can be used. These practical realizations of the normalized information distance can then be applied to machine learning tasks, expecially clustering, to perform feature-free and parameter-free data mining. This chapter discusses the theoretical foundations of the normalized information distance and both practical realizations. It presents numerous examples of successful real-world applications based on these distance measures, ranging from bioinformatics to music clustering to machine translation.

  3. Estimating distances from parallaxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astraatmadja, Tri L.; Bailer-Jones, Coryn

    2017-01-01

    In astrometric surveys such as Gaia and LSST, parallaxes will be measured for about a billion stars, but zero distances will be measured. Distances must be inferred from the parallaxes, and the common inference practice is by inverting the parallax. This, however, is only appropriate when there is no noise present. As noise will always be present and most stars in future surveys will have non-negligible fractional parallax uncertainties, we must treat distance estimation as an inference problem. The usage of prior assumptions become unavoidable. In this talk I will present a method on how to infer distances using Bayesian inference. Three minimalists, isotropic priors are used, as well an anisotropic prior derived from the observability of stars in a Milky Way model. The performance of these priors are investigated using a simulated Gaia-like catalogue. Recent results of distance estimation using the parallaxes of 2 million Gaia DR1 stars will also be discussed.

  4. Combustion and leaching behavior of elements in the argonne premium coal samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelman, R.B.; Palmer, C.A.; Krasnow, M.R.; Aruscavage, P. J.; Sellers, G.A.; Dulong, F.T.

    1990-01-01

    Eight Argonne Premium Coal samples and two other coal samples were used to observe the effects of combustion and leaching on 30 elements. The results were used to infer the modes of occurrence of these elements. Instrumental neutron activation analysis indicates that the effects of combustion and leaching on many elements varied markedly among the samples. As much as 90% of the selenium and bromine is volatilized from the bituminous coal samples, but substantially less is volatilized from the low-rank coals. We interpret the combustion and leaching behavior of these elements to indicate that they are associated with the organic fraction. Sodium, although nonvolatile, is ion-exchangeable in most samples, particularly in the low-rank coal samples where it is likely to be associated with the organic constituents. Potassium is primarily in an ion-exchangeable form in the Wypdak coal but is in HF-soluble phases (probably silicates) in most other samples. Cesium is in an unidentified HNO3-soluble phase in most samples. Virtually all the strontium and barium in the low-rank coal samples is removed by NH4OAc followed by HCl, indicating that these elements probably occur in both organic and inorganic phases. Most tungsten and tantalum are in insoluble phases, perhaps as oxides or in organic association. Hafnium is generally insoluble, but as much as 65% is HF soluble, perhaps due to the presence of very fine grained or metamict zircon. We interpret the leaching behavior of uranium to indicate its occurrence in chelates and its association with silicates and with zircon. Most of the rare-earth elements (REE) and thorium appear to be associated with phosphates. Differences in textural relationships may account for some of the differences in leaching behavior of the REE among samples. Zinc occurs predominantly in sphalerite. Either the remaining elements occur in several different modes of occurrence (scandium, iron), or the leaching data are equivocal (arsenic, antimony

  5. Estimating distances from parallaxes

    CERN Document Server

    Bailer-Jones, C A L

    2015-01-01

    Astrometric surveys such as Gaia and LSST will measure parallaxes for hundreds of millions of stars. Yet they will not measure a single distance. Rather, a distance must be estimated from a parallax. In this didactic article, I show that doing this is not trivial once the fractional parallax error is larger than about 20%, which will be the case for about 80% of stars in the Gaia catalogue. Estimating distances is an inference problem in which the use of prior assumptions is unavoidable. I investigate the properties and performance of various priors and examine their implications. A supposed uninformative uniform prior in distance is shown to give very poor distance estimates (large bias and variance). Any prior with a sharp cut-off at some distance has similar problems. The choice of prior depends on the information one has available - and is willing to use - concerning, for example, the survey and the Galaxy. I demonstrate that a simple prior which decreases asymptotically to zero at infinite distance has g...

  6. Flood-hazard analysis of four headwater streams draining the Argonne National Laboratory property, DuPage County, Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soong, David T.; Murphy, Elizabeth A.; Straub, Timothy D.; Zeeb, Hannah L.

    2016-11-22

    Results of a flood-hazard analysis conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Argonne National Laboratory, for four headwater streams within the Argonne National Laboratory property indicate that the 1-percent and 0.2-percent annual exceedance probability floods would cause multiple roads to be overtopped. Results indicate that most of the effects on the infrastructure would be from flooding of Freund Brook. Flooding on the Northeast and Southeast Drainage Ways would be limited to overtopping of one road crossing for each of those streams. The Northwest Drainage Way would be the least affected with flooding expected to occur in open grass or forested areas.The Argonne Site Sustainability Plan outlined the development of hydrologic and hydraulic models and the creation of flood-plain maps of the existing site conditions as a first step in addressing resiliency to possible climate change impacts as required by Executive Order 13653 “Preparing the United States for the Impacts of Climate Change.” The Hydrological Simulation Program-FORTRAN is the hydrologic model used in the study, and the Hydrologic Engineering Center‒River Analysis System (HEC–RAS) is the hydraulic model. The model results were verified by comparing simulated water-surface elevations to observed water-surface elevations measured at a network of five crest-stage gages on the four study streams. The comparison between crest-stage gage and simulated elevations resulted in an average absolute difference of 0.06 feet and a maximum difference of 0.19 feet.In addition to the flood-hazard model development and mapping, a qualitative stream assessment was conducted to evaluate stream channel and substrate conditions in the study reaches. This information can be used to evaluate erosion potential.

  7. MOTIVATION FOR DISTANCE EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R zvan TEF NESCU

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Beginning with the 1980’s the new information, communication and computer based technologies stimulated the development of the distance education. In Romania the universities adapted rapidly to this type of learning that became an important financing source for most of them. In this article we approach the causes of attraction for the distance education. For this purpose we use an investigation we did on a group of students at Distance Education including interviews regarding their reasons for choosing this type of learning.

  8. Tabletop Aurora Demonstrator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaffo, Peter Alfred

    1991-01-01

    A simple apparatus for studying various forms of the aurora borealis on a miniature scale can be constructed from a neon-storage flask, aluminum tape, a cardboard box, and a small piezoelectric ion gun of the type used to neutralize static charges on phonograph records. (PR)

  9. NNWSI [Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations] waste form testing at Argonne National Laboratory; Semiannual report, January--June 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, J.K.; Gerding, T.J.; Ebert, W.L.; Mazer, J.J.; Biwer, B.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)

    1990-04-01

    The Chemical Technology Division of Argonne National Laboratory is performing experiments in support of the waste package development of the Yucca Mountain Project (formerly the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project). Experiments in progress include (1) the development and performance of a durability test in unsaturated conditions, (2) studies of waste form behavior in an irradiated atmosphere, (3) studies of behavior in water vapor, and (4) studies of naturally occurring glasses to be used as analogues for waste glass behavior. This report documents progress made during the period of January--June 1988. 21 refs., 37 figs., 12 tabs.

  10. An evaluation of alternative reactor vessel cutting technologies for the experimental boiling water reactor at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boing, L.E.; Henley, D.R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Manion, W.J.; Gordon, J.W. (Nuclear Energy Services, Inc., Danbury, CT (USA))

    1989-12-01

    Metal cutting techniques that can be used to segment the reactor pressure vessel of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) have been evaluated by Nuclear Energy Services. Twelve cutting technologies are described in terms of their ability to perform the required task, their performance characteristics, environmental and radiological impacts, and cost and schedule considerations. Specific recommendations regarding which technology should ultimately be used by ANL are included. The selection of a cutting method was the responsibility of the decommissioning staff at ANL, who included a relative weighting of the parameters described in this document in their evaluation process. 73 refs., 26 figs., 69 tabs.

  11. The friends that game together: A folkloric expansion of textual poaching to genre farming for socialization in tabletop role-playing games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Robert Underwood

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Tabletop role-playing games (RPGs are a folkloric form for creating and reaffirming community bonds and performing identity. Gaming is used to communicate and perform cultural capital and identity through fictional narratives, functioning as a form of community building and/or personal expression. With quotations from ethnographic research over the course of 2 years, including interviews with several groups of gamers and participant observation, I examine the ways that players create and affirm social bonds. I return to Michel De Certeau's idea of textual poaching, as adapted by Henry Jenkins, to contrast with it a new concept of genre farming. As both platform for and object of genre farming, RPGs allow players to display cultural competence, create and reaffirm social ties, and seek entertainment in a collaborative fashion.

  12. Distance learning for similarity estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, J.; Amores, J.; Sebe, N.; Radeva, P.; Tian, Q.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present a general guideline to find a better distance measure for similarity estimation based on statistical analysis of distribution models and distance functions. A new set of distance measures are derived from the harmonic distance, the geometric distance, and their generalized

  13. Stereoscopic distance perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, John M.

    1989-01-01

    Limited cue, open-loop tasks in which a human observer indicates distances or relations among distances are discussed. By open-loop tasks, it is meant tasks in which the observer gets no feedback as to the accuracy of the responses. What happens when cues are added and when the loop is closed are considered. The implications of this research for the effectiveness of visual displays is discussed. Errors in visual distance tasks do not necessarily mean that the percept is in error. The error could arise in transformations that intervene between the percept and the response. It is argued that the percept is in error. It is also argued that there exist post-perceptual transformations that may contribute to the error or be modified by feedback to correct for the error.

  14. Sets avoiding integral distances

    CERN Document Server

    Kurz, Sascha

    2012-01-01

    We study open point sets in Euclidean spaces $\\mathbb{R}^d$ without a pair of points an integral distance apart. By a result of Furstenberg, Katznelson, and Weiss such sets must be of Lebesgue upper density zero. We are interested in how large such sets can be in $d$-dimensional volume. We determine the lower and upper bounds for the volumes of the sets in terms of the number of their connected components and dimension, and also give some exact values. Our problem can be viewed as a kind of inverse to known problems on sets with pairwise rational or integral distances.

  15. Distance Teaching on Bornholm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Finn J. S.; Clausen, Christian

    2001-01-01

    The case study represents an example of a top-down introduction of distance teaching as part of Danish trials with the introduction of multimedia in education. The study is concerned with the background, aim and context of the trial as well as the role and working of the technology and the organi......The case study represents an example of a top-down introduction of distance teaching as part of Danish trials with the introduction of multimedia in education. The study is concerned with the background, aim and context of the trial as well as the role and working of the technology...

  16. Distances to Dark Clouds: Comparing Extinction Distances to Maser Parallax Distances

    CERN Document Server

    Foster, Jonathan B; Benjamin, Robert A; Hoare, Melvin G; Jackson, James M

    2012-01-01

    We test two different methods of using near-infrared extinction to estimate distances to dark clouds in the first quadrant of the Galaxy using large near infrared (2MASS and UKIDSS) surveys. VLBI parallax measurements of masers around massive young stars provide the most direct and bias-free measurement of the distance to these dark clouds. We compare the extinction distance estimates to these maser parallax distances. We also compare these distances to kinematic distances, including recent re-calibrations of the Galactic rotation curve. The extinction distance methods agree with the maser parallax distances (within the errors) between 66% and 100% of the time (depending on method and input survey) and between 85% and 100% of the time outside of the crowded Galactic center. Although the sample size is small, extinction distance methods reproduce maser parallax distances better than kinematic distances; furthermore, extinction distance methods do not suffer from the kinematic distance ambiguity. This validatio...

  17. Distances to star forming regions

    CERN Document Server

    Loinard, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    The determination of accurate distances to star-forming regions are discussed in the broader historical context of astronomical distance measurements. We summarize recent results for regions within 1 kpc and present perspectives for the near and more distance future.

  18. Prospect of Distance Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Monsurur; Karim, Reza; Byramjee, Framarz

    2015-01-01

    Many educational institutions in the United States are currently offering programs through distance learning, and that trend is rising. In almost all spheres of education a developing country like Bangladesh needs to make available the expertise of the most qualified faculty to her distant people. But the fundamental question remains as to whether…

  19. Coping with Distances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bærenholdt, Jørgen Ole

    Coping with distances - Producing Nordic Atlantic Societies Mennesker håndterer afstande og producerer derved samfund. Dette er det grundlæggende synspunkt i en afhandling, hvor samfund ikke tages for givet. Samfund er tværtimod noget som hele tiden må produceres, genproduceres og forandres, og d...

  20. Encyclopedia of Distance Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Caroline, Ed.; Boettecher, Judith, Ed.; Justice, Lorraine, Ed.; Schenk, Karen, Ed.; Rogers, Patricia, Ed.; Berg, Gary, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    The innovations in computer and communications technologies combined with on-going needs to deliver educational programs to students regardless of their physical locations, have lead to the innovation of distance education programs and technologies. To keep up with recent developments in both areas of technologies and techniques related to…

  1. Rapport in Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Elizabeth; Rodriguez-Manzanares, Maria A.

    2012-01-01

    Rapport has been recognized as important in learning in general but little is known about its importance in distance education (DE). The study we report on in this paper provides insights into the importance of rapport in DE as well as challenges to and indicators of rapport-building in DE. The study relied on interviews with 42 Canadian…

  2. Misconceptions of Astronomical Distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Brian W.; Brewer, William F.

    2010-01-01

    Previous empirical studies using multiple-choice procedures have suggested that there are misconceptions about the scale of astronomical distances. The present study provides a quantitative estimate of the nature of this misconception among US university students by asking them, in an open-ended response format, to make estimates of the distances…

  3. Global climate change and international security. Report on a conference held at Argonne National Laboratory, May 8--10, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, M.

    1991-12-31

    On May 8--10, 1991, the Midwest Consortium of International Security Studies (MCISS) and Argonne National Laboratory cosponsored a conference on Global Climate Change and International Security. The aim was to bring together natural and social scientists to examine the economic, sociopolitical, and security implications of the climate changes predicted by the general circulation models developed by natural scientists. Five themes emerged from the papers and discussions: (1) general circulation models and predicted climate change; (2) the effects of climate change on agriculture, especially in the Third World; (3) economic implications of policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions; (4) the sociopolitical consequences of climate change; and (5) the effect of climate change on global security.

  4. Radiological and Environmental Research Division annual report. Fundamental molecular physics and chemistry, June 1975--September 1976. [Summaries of research activities at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1976-01-01

    A summary of research activities in the fundamental molecular physics and chemistry section at Argonne National Laboratory from July 1975 to September 1976 is presented. Of the 40 articles and abstracts given, 24 have been presented at conferences or have been published and will be separately abstracted. Abstracts of the remaining 16 items appear in this issue of ERA. (JFP)

  5. Fuzzy clustering with Minkowski distance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J.F. Groenen (Patrick); U. Kaymak (Uzay); J.M. van Rosmalen (Joost)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractDistances in the well known fuzzy c-means algorithm of Bezdek (1973) are measured by the squared Euclidean distance. Other distances have been used as well in fuzzy clustering. For example, Jajuga (1991) proposed to use the L_1-distance and Bobrowski and Bezdek (1991) also used the L_inf

  6. Tolman's Luminosity-Distance, Poincare's Light-Distance and Cayley-Klein's Hyperbolic Distance

    CERN Document Server

    Pierseaux, Yves

    2009-01-01

    We deduce Tolman's formula of luminosity-distance in Cosmology from Poincare's definition of light-distance with Lorentz Transformation (LT).In Minkowskian metric, if distance is proper time (as it is often argued) then light-distance must be also the shortest distance, like proper duration (unlike Einstein's longest length within rest system). By introducing Poincare's proper light-distance in Einstein's basic synchronization we deduce a dilated distance between observer and receding mirror (with relativistic Doppler factor). Such a distance corresponds not to an Euclidean distance (Einstein's rigid rod) but to an Hyperbolic distance (Cayley-Klein) with a Lobatchevskian Horizon. From a basic proportionality hyperbolic distance-velocity, we deduce the law of Hubble. By following Penrose's Lobatchevskian representation of LT, we transform Special Relativity (SR) into an Hyperbolic Cosmological Relativity (HCR). by using only the LT but the whole LT. In Hyperbolic Rotation motion (basic active LT or Einstein's ...

  7. Risk assessment of seeps from the 317 Area of Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-17

    Chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminants have recently been detected in groundwater seeps on forest preserve property south of the 317 Area at ANL. The 317 Area is near ANL`s southern boundary and is considered the source of the contamination. Five seeps are about 200 m south of the ANL property line and about same distance from the nearest developed trails in the forest preserve. Conservative assumptions were used to assess the possibility of adverse health effects associated with forest preserve seeps impacted by the 317 Area. Results indicate that neither cancer risks nor noncarcinogenic effects associated with exposures to seep contaminants are a concern; thus, the area is safe for all visitors. The ecological impact study found that the presence of the three contaminants (CCl{sub 4}, CHCl{sub 3}, tetrachloroethylene) in the seep water does not pose a risk to biota in the area.

  8. Monge Distance between Quantum States

    CERN Document Server

    Zyczkowski, K; Zyczkowski, Karol; Slomczynski, Wojciech

    1998-01-01

    We define a metric in the space of quantum states taking the Monge distance between corresponding Husimi distributions (Q--functions). This quantity fulfills the axioms of a metric and satisfies the following semiclassical property: the distance between two coherent states is equal to the Euclidean distance between corresponding points in the classical phase space. We compute analytically distances between certain states (coherent, squeezed, Fock and thermal) and discuss a scheme for numerical computation of Monge distance for two arbitrary quantum states.

  9. Advanced hierarchical distance sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royle, Andy

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, we cover a number of important extensions of the basic hierarchical distance-sampling (HDS) framework from Chapter 8. First, we discuss the inclusion of “individual covariates,” such as group size, in the HDS model. This is important in many surveys where animals form natural groups that are the primary observation unit, with the size of the group expected to have some influence on detectability. We also discuss HDS integrated with time-removal and double-observer or capture-recapture sampling. These “combined protocols” can be formulated as HDS models with individual covariates, and thus they have a commonality with HDS models involving group structure (group size being just another individual covariate). We cover several varieties of open-population HDS models that accommodate population dynamics. On one end of the spectrum, we cover models that allow replicate distance sampling surveys within a year, which estimate abundance relative to availability and temporary emigration through time. We consider a robust design version of that model. We then consider models with explicit dynamics based on the Dail and Madsen (2011) model and the work of Sollmann et al. (2015). The final major theme of this chapter is relatively newly developed spatial distance sampling models that accommodate explicit models describing the spatial distribution of individuals known as Point Process models. We provide novel formulations of spatial DS and HDS models in this chapter, including implementations of those models in the unmarked package using a hack of the pcount function for N-mixture models.

  10. The DDO IVC Distance Project

    CERN Document Server

    Gladders, M D; Burns, C R; Attard, A; Casey, M P; Hamilton, D; Mallén-Ornelas, G; Karr, J L; Poirier, S M; Sawicki, M; Barrientos, F; Barkhouse, W A; Brodwin, M; Clark, J; McNaughton, R; Ruetalo-Pacheco, M; Mochnacki, S W; Gladders, Michael D.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Burns, Christopher R.; Attard, Allen; Casey, Michael P.; Hamilton, Devon; Mallen-Ornelas, Gabriela; Karr, Jennifer L.; Poirier, Sara M.; Sawicki, Marcin; Barrientos, Felipe; Barkhouse, Wayne; Brodwin, Mark; Clark, Jason; Naughton, Rosemary Mc; Ruetalo-Pacheco, Marcelo; Mochnacki, Stefan W.

    1998-01-01

    We present the first set of distance limits from the David Dunlap Observatory Intermediate Velocity Cloud (DDO IVC) distance project. Such distance measures are crucial to understanding the origins and dynamics of IVCs, as the distances set most of the basic physical parameters for the clouds. Currently there are very few IVCs with reliably known distances. This paper describes in some detail the basic techniques used to measure distances, with particular emphasis on the the analysis of interstellar absorption line data, which forms the basis of our distance determinations. As an example, we provide a detailed description of our distance determination for the Draco Cloud. Preliminary distance limits for a total of eleven clouds are provided.

  11. Long distance tunneling

    CERN Document Server

    Ivlev, B I

    2005-01-01

    Quantum tunneling between two potential wells in a magnetic field can be strongly increased when the potential barrier varies in the direction perpendicular to the line connecting the two wells and remains constant along this line. A periodic structure of the wave function is formed in the direction joining the wells. The resulting motion can be coherent like motion in a conventional narrow band periodic structure. A particle penetrates the barrier over a long distance which strongly contrasts to WKB-like tunneling. The whole problem is stationary. The coherent process can be influenced by dissipation.

  12. Distances on Lozenge Tilings

    CERN Document Server

    Bodini, Olivier; Fernique, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a structural property of the set of lozenge tilings of a 2n-gon is highlighted. We introduce a simple combinatorial value called Hamming-distance, which is a lower bound for the flipdistance (i.e. the number of necessary local transformations involving three lozenges) between two given tilings. It is here proven that, for n5, We show that there is some deficient pairs of tilings for which the flip connection needs more flips than the combinatorial lower bound indicates.

  13. Minimal distances between SCFTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buican, Matthew [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University,Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

    2014-01-28

    We study lower bounds on the minimal distance in theory space between four-dimensional superconformal field theories (SCFTs) connected via broad classes of renormalization group (RG) flows preserving various amounts of supersymmetry (SUSY). For N=1 RG flows, the ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) endpoints of the flow can be parametrically close. On the other hand, for RG flows emanating from a maximally supersymmetric SCFT, the distance to the IR theory cannot be arbitrarily small regardless of the amount of (non-trivial) SUSY preserved along the flow. The case of RG flows from N=2 UV SCFTs is more subtle. We argue that for RG flows preserving the full N=2 SUSY, there are various obstructions to finding examples with parametrically close UV and IR endpoints. Under reasonable assumptions, these obstructions include: unitarity, known bounds on the c central charge derived from associativity of the operator product expansion, and the central charge bounds of Hofman and Maldacena. On the other hand, for RG flows that break N=2→N=1, it is possible to find IR fixed points that are parametrically close to the UV ones. In this case, we argue that if the UV SCFT possesses a single stress tensor, then such RG flows excite of order all the degrees of freedom of the UV theory. Furthermore, if the UV theory has some flavor symmetry, we argue that the UV central charges should not be too large relative to certain parameters in the theory.

  14. Sub-100 nanometer lensless probing of Co/Pd magnetic nanodomains using a table-top femtosecond soft X-ray harmonic source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, X.; Ducousso, M.; Boutu, W.; Tudu, B.; Barbrel, B.; Gauthier, D.; Borta, A.; Gonzalez, A.-I.; Wang, F.; Iwan, B.; Billon, M.; Perdrix, M.; Guillaumet, D.; Lepetit, F.; Vodungbo, B.; Gautier, J.; Hawaldar, R.; Tortarolo, M.; Delaunay, R.; Zeitoun, P.; Lüning, J.; Merdji, H.

    2013-10-01

    We present recent developments of our table-top femtosecond high flux harmonic beamline towards single-shot probing of magnetic nanostructures. High harmonic generation (HHG) optimization in a single and two-color infrared laser pulse mode was investigated at high laser energy. Up to 109 photons per harmonic are generated between 40 and 80 eV in a single femtosecond laser shot. These soft X-ray harmonic photons are employed to characterize at the nanoscale the magnetic network of Co/Pd multilayer samples using resonant small-angle X-ray scattering. Selecting harmonics in the vicinity of magnetically dichroic absorption resonances of cobalt and palladium (Co M2,3 at 60 eV and Pd N2,3 at 51 eV) gives access to the magnetic nanodomain spatial structure. The magnetic scattering efficiency at the Pd edge is found to be comparable to that at the Co edge. This indicates that the Pd layers exhibit a significant induced magnetic moment. Magnetic sample optimization is then performed by characterizing its scattering efficiency as a function of layer composition and number of repetitions. We finally measure the spatial organization of magnetic nanodomains with a sub-100 nm spatial resolution from a single femtosecond X-ray pulse.

  15. The Distance to M51

    CERN Document Server

    McQuinn, Kristen B W; Dolphin, Andrew E; Berg, Danielle; Kennicutt, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Great investments of observing time have been dedicated to the study of nearby spiral galaxies with diverse goals ranging from understanding the star formation process to characterizing their dark matter distributions. Accurate distances are fundamental to interpreting observations of these galaxies, yet many of the best studied nearby galaxies have distances based on methods with relatively large uncertainties. We have started a program to derive accurate distances to these galaxies. Here we measure the distance to M51 - the Whirlpool galaxy - from newly obtained Hubble Space Telescope optical imaging using the tip of the red giant branch method. We measure the distance modulus to be 8.58+/-0.10 Mpc (statistical), corresponding to a distance modulus of 29.67+/-0.02 mag. Our distance is an improvement over previous results as we use a well-calibrated, stable distance indicator, precision photometry in a optimally selected field of view, and a Bayesian Maximum Likelihood technique that reduces measurement unce...

  16. Isolation by distance, web service

    OpenAIRE

    Bohonak Andrew J; Jensen Jeffrey L; Kelley Scott T

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background The population genetic pattern known as "isolation by distance" results from spatially limited gene flow and is a commonly observed phenomenon in natural populations. However, few software programs exist for estimating the degree of isolation by distance among populations, and they tend not to be user-friendly. Results We have created Isolation by Distance Web Service (IBDWS) a user-friendly web interface for determining patterns of isolation by distance. Using this site, ...

  17. Improved directional-distance filter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a new spatial-distance weighting function.By combining the weighting function and the traditional directional-distance filter (DDF) in a novel way,a new vector filter-the adaptive distance-weighted directional-distance filter (ADWDDF)-is presented.The experimental results show that the proposed solution provides better filtering performance and preserves better image chromaticity and edge or detail information compared with the traditional DDF and some other typical vector filters.

  18. Reconsidering Moore's Transactional Distance Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giossos, Yiannis; Koutsouba, Maria; Lionarakis, Antonis; Skavantzos, Kosmas

    2009-01-01

    One of the core theories of distance education is Michael Graham Moore's "Theory of Transactional Distance" that provides the broad framework of the pedagogy of distance education and allows the generation of almost infinite number of hypotheses for research. However, the review of the existing studies relating to the theory showed the use of a…

  19. Keeping Your Distance is Hard

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, Kyle; Heubach, Silvia; Huggan, Melissa; Huntemann, Svenja

    2016-01-01

    We study the computational complexity of distance games, a class of combinatorial games played on graphs. A move consists of colouring an uncoloured vertex subject to it not being at certain distances determined by two sets, D and S. D is the set of forbidden distances for colouring vertices in different colors, while S is the set of forbidden distances for the same colour. The last player to move wins. Well-known examples of distance games are Node-Kayles, Snort, and Col, whose complexities ...

  20. Vibratory response of a mirror support/positioning system for the Advanced Photon Source project at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basdogan, I.; Shu, Deming; Kuzay, T.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Royston, T.J.; Shabana, A.A. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The vibratory response of a typical mirror support/positioning system used at the experimental station of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) project at Argonne National Laboratory is investigated. Positioning precision and stability are especially critical when the supported mirror directs a high-intensity beam aimed at a distant target. Stability may be compromised by low level, low frequency seismic and facility-originated vibrations traveling through the ground and/or vibrations caused by flow-structure interactions in the mirror cooling system. The example case system has five positioning degrees of freedom through the use of precision actuators and rotary and linear bearings. These linkage devices result in complex, multi-dimensional vibratory behavior that is a function of the range of positioning configurations. A rigorous multibody dynamical approach is used for the development of the system equations. Initial results of the study, including estimates of natural frequencies and mode shapes, as well as limited parametric design studies, are presented. While the results reported here are for a particular system, the developed vibratory analysis approach is applicable to the wide range of high-precision optical positioning systems encountered at the APS and at other comparable facilities.

  1. New distances to RAVE stars

    CERN Document Server

    Binney, James; Kordopatis, Georges; McMillan, Paul J; Sharma, Sanjib; Zwitter, Tomaz; Bienayme, Olivier; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Steinmetz, Matthias; Gilmore, Gerry; Williams, Mary E K; Navarro, Julio; Grebel, Eva K; Helmi, Amina; Parker, Quentin; Reid, Warren A; Seabroke, George; Watson, Fred; Wyse, Rosie F G

    2013-01-01

    Probability density functions are determined from new stellar parameters for the distance moduli of stars for which the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) has obtained spectra with S/N>=10. The expectation value of distance is larger than the distance implied by the expectation of distance modulus; the latter is itself larger than the distance implied by the expectation value of the parallax. Our parallaxes of Hipparcos stars agree well with the values measured by Hipparcos, so the expectation of parallax is the most reliable distance indicator. The latter are improved by taking extinction into account. We provide one- two- or three-Gaussian fits to the distance pdfs. The effective temperature absolute-magnitude diagram of our stars is significantly improved when these pdfs are used to make the diagram. We use the method of kinematic corrections devised by Schoenrich, Binney & Asplund to check for systematic errors in our estimators for ordinary stars and confirm the conclusion reached from the Hipparcos s...

  2. The Earth Microbiome Project: Meeting report of the "1 EMP meeting on sample selection and acquisition" at Argonne National Laboratory October 6 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jack A; Meyer, Folker; Jansson, Janet; Gordon, Jeff; Pace, Norman; Tiedje, James; Ley, Ruth; Fierer, Noah; Field, Dawn; Kyrpides, Nikos; Glöckner, Frank-Oliver; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Wommack, K Eric; Glass, Elizabeth; Docherty, Kathryn; Gallery, Rachel; Stevens, Rick; Knight, Rob

    2010-12-25

    This report details the outcome the first meeting of the Earth Microbiome Project to discuss sample selection and acquisition. The meeting, held at the Argonne National Laboratory on Wednesday October 6(th) 2010, focused on discussion of how to prioritize environmental samples for sequencing and metagenomic analysis as part of the global effort of the EMP to systematically determine the functional and phylogenetic diversity of microbial communities across the world.

  3. Planning with Reachable Distances

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Xinyu

    2009-01-01

    Motion planning for spatially constrained robots is difficult due to additional constraints placed on the robot, such as closure constraints for closed chains or requirements on end effector placement for articulated linkages. It is usually computationally too expensive to apply sampling-based planners to these problems since it is difficult to generate valid configurations. We overcome this challenge by redefining the robot\\'s degrees of freedom and constraints into a new set of parameters, called reachable distance space (RD-space), in which all configurations lie in the set of constraint-satisfying subspaces. This enables us to directly sample the constrained subspaces with complexity linear in the robot\\'s number of degrees of freedom. In addition to supporting efficient sampling, we show that the RD-space formulation naturally supports planning, and in particular, we design a local planner suitable for use by sampling-based planners. We demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of our approach for several systems including closed chain planning with multiple loops, restricted end effector sampling, and on-line planning for drawing/sculpting. We can sample single-loop closed chain systems with 1000 links in time comparable to open chain sampling, and we can generate samples for 1000-link multi-loop systems of varying topology in less than a second. © 2009 Springer-Verlag.

  4. Distance learning for similarity estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jie; Amores, Jaume; Sebe, Nicu; Radeva, Petia; Tian, Qi

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, we present a general guideline to find a better distance measure for similarity estimation based on statistical analysis of distribution models and distance functions. A new set of distance measures are derived from the harmonic distance, the geometric distance, and their generalized variants according to the Maximum Likelihood theory. These measures can provide a more accurate feature model than the classical Euclidean and Manhattan distances. We also find that the feature elements are often from heterogeneous sources that may have different influence on similarity estimation. Therefore, the assumption of single isotropic distribution model is often inappropriate. To alleviate this problem, we use a boosted distance measure framework that finds multiple distance measures which fit the distribution of selected feature elements best for accurate similarity estimation. The new distance measures for similarity estimation are tested on two applications: stereo matching and motion tracking in video sequences. The performance of boosted distance measure is further evaluated on several benchmark data sets from the UCI repository and two image retrieval applications. In all the experiments, robust results are obtained based on the proposed methods.

  5. Lessons learned from the first US/Russian Federation joint tabletop exercise to prepare for conducting on-site inspections under the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filarowski, C; Kreek, S; Smith, A; Sweeney, J; Wild, J; Gough, R; Rockett, P; MacLeod, G; Hawkins, W; Wohletz, K; Knowles, S

    1999-03-24

    A U.S./Russian Federation Joint Tabletop Exercise took place in Snezhinsk, Russia, from 19 to 24 October 1998 whose objectives were to examine the functioning of an Inspection Team (IT) in a given scenario, to evaluate the strategies and techniques employed by the IT, to identify ambiguous interpretations of treaty provisions that needed clarification, and to confirm the overall utility of tabletop exercises to assist in developing an effective Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) verification regime. To achieve these objectives, the United States and Russian Federation (RF) agreed that two exercises would be conducted. The first would be developed by the RF, who would act as controller and as the inspected State Party (ISP), while the United States would play the role of the IT. The roles would be reversed in the second exercise; the United States would develop the scenario and play the ISP, while the RF would play the IT. A joint control team, comprised of members of both the U.S. and RF control teams, agreed on a number of ground rules for the two exercises and established a joint Evaluation Team to evaluate both of the exercises against the stated objectives. To meet time limitations, the scope of this joint exercise needed to be limited. The joint control team decided that each of the two exercises would not go beyond the first 25 days of an on-site inspection (OSI) and that the focus would be on examining the decision-making of the IT as it utilized the various technologies to clarify whether a nuclear test explosion had taken place. Hence, issues such as logistics, restricted access, and activities prior to Point of Entry (POE) would be played only to the extent needed to provide for a realistic context for the exercises' focus on inspection procedures, sensor deployments, and data interpretation. Each of the exercises began at the POE and proceeded with several iterations of negotiations between the IT and ISP, instrument deployments, and data

  6. Multi-mJ mid-infrared kHz OPCPA and Yb-doped pump lasers for tabletop coherent soft x-ray generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chien-Jen; Hong, Kyung-Han; Siqueira, Jonathas P.; Krogen, Peter; Chang, Chun-Lin; Stein, Gregory J.; Liang, Houkun; Keathley, Phillip D.; Laurent, Guillaume; Moses, Jeffrey; Zapata, Luis E.; Kärtner, Franz X.

    2015-09-01

    We present our recent progress on the development of a mid-infrared (mid-IR), multi-mJ, kHz optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification (OPCPA) system, pumped by a homebuilt picosecond cryogenic Yb:YAG chirped-pulse amplifier, and its application to soft x-ray high-order harmonic generation. The cryogenic Yb:YAG laser operating at 1 kHz repetition rate delivers 42 mJ, 17 ps, 1.03 μm pulses to pump the OPCPA system. Efficient second and fourth harmonic generations from the Yb:YAG system are demonstrated, which provide the pumping capability for OPCPA at various wavelengths. The mid-IR OPCPA system produces 2.6 mJ, 39 fs, 2.1 μm pulses with good beam quality (M 2 = ∼1.5) at 1 kHz repetition rate. The output pulses of the OPCPA are used to generate high-order harmonics in both gas cell and hollow-core fiber targets. A photon flux of ∼2 × 108 photon/s/1% bandwidth at 160 eV in Ar is measured while the cutoff is 190 eV. The direct measurements of the photon flux from x-ray photodiodes have confirmed the generation of water-window soft x-ray photons with a flux ∼106 photon/s/1% bandwidth at 330 eV in Ne. The demonstrated OPCPA and Yb:YAG pump laser technologies provide an excellent platform of energy and power scalable few-cycle mid-IR sources that are suitable for high-flux tabletop coherent soft x-ray generation.

  7. Table-top water window transmission x-ray microscopy: Review of the key issues, and conceptual design of an instrument for biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Jean-François; Moy, Jean-Pierre; Susini, Jean

    2005-09-01

    As it has been beautifully demonstrated in synchrotron facilities, water window transmission x-ray microscopy (WW-TXM) has a great potential for high resolution three dimensional (3D) tomographic imaging of frozen cells, without the cumbersome staining and slicing preparation needed by electron microscopy. However, the existing instruments do not exactly meet the expectations of cell biologists in terms of performance and accessibility: 3D images of entire cells grown on a flat substrate with details in the 50-80nm range are necessary for structural cell studies. Functional imaging is also a key issue. Specific molecular probes are widely used to achieve molecular imaging in optical and electron microscopy. The same demand applies to x-ray microscopy. Immediate availability of the observation technique within the biology laboratory is as important as its performance. Therefore, WW-TXM will develop on a wider scale only when table-top instruments become available. We present a detailed analysis of such a microscope. The source is clearly the key element. Laser created plasmas of carbon or nitrogen are a proven but expensive solution. Cerenkov emission in vanadium has been demonstrated as a potential monochromatic source, but we emphasize severe obstacles: huge thermal load and radiation protection. We show that oxygenKα line excitation by an electron beam is a realistic alternative. Being a purely monochromatic source, it would allow the use of a high efficiency mirror condenser, while laser plasmas imply spectral selection with the associated losses. We then describe the main elements of an affordable laboratory microscope, supported by numerical simulations and preliminary experimental work. We also show that functionalized quantum dots, currently used in fluorescence microscopy, are equally detectable with soft x-rays and would allow a dual modality observation. Finally, the expected performance of this prototype is discussed and confronted by the requirements

  8. Are contemporary tourists consuming distance?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Gunvor Riber

    represented by tourists? (guiding the empirical inquiry) • Does contemporary tourists consume distance? (guiding discussion merging theory and analysis) Together, these questions seeks to guide a theoretical (first question) and an empirical (second question) discussion of distance set in a leisure mobility...... of distance within the theoretical context of leisure mobility (question one) will be explored through the reading and discussion of literature concerned with concepts and theories that are using distance in their premises or as part of their argumentation. This will primarily be literature on mobility, space...... of 'consumption of distance' (question three) will draw on supplementing theoretical reflections, particularly on consumption, to summarise and bring together the theoretical and empirical analysis, and to discuss whether it is possible and indeed reasonable to understand distance as an object for consumption...

  9. Do you want to build such a machine? : Designing a high energy proton accelerator for Argonne National Laboratory.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paris, E.

    2004-04-05

    Argonne National Laboratory's efforts toward researching, proposing and then building a high-energy proton accelerator have been discussed in a handful of studies. In the main, these have concentrated on the intense maneuvering amongst politicians, universities, government agencies, outside corporations, and laboratory officials to obtain (or block) approval and/or funds or to establish who would have control over budgets and research programs. These ''top-down'' studies are very important but they can also serve to divorce such proceedings from the individuals actually involved in the ground-level research which physically served to create theories, designs, machines, and experiments. This can lead to a skewed picture, on the one hand, of a lack of effect that so-called scientific and technological factors exert and, on the other hand, of the apparent separation of the so-called social or political from the concrete practice of doing physics. An exception to this approach can be found in the proceedings of a conference on ''History of the ZGS'' held at Argonne at the time of the Zero Gradient Synchrotron's decommissioning in 1979. These accounts insert the individuals quite literally as they are, for the most part, personal reminiscences of those who took part in these efforts on the ground level. As such, they are invaluable raw material for historical inquiry but generally lack the rigor and perspective expected in a finished historical work. The session on ''Constructing Cold War Physics'' at the 2002 annual History of Science Society Meeting served to highlight new approaches circulating towards history of science and technology in the post-WWII period, especially in the 1950s. There is new attention towards the effects of training large numbers of scientists and engineers as well as the caution not to equate ''national security'' with military preparedness, but rather

  10. The Extended Edit Distance Metric

    CERN Document Server

    Fuad, Muhammad Marwan Muhammad

    2007-01-01

    Similarity search is an important problem in information retrieval. This similarity is based on a distance. Symbolic representation of time series has attracted many researchers recently, since it reduces the dimensionality of these high dimensional data objects. We propose a new distance metric that is applied to symbolic data objects and we test it on time series data bases in a classification task. We compare it to other distances that are well known in the literature for symbolic data objects. We also prove, mathematically, that our distance is metric.

  11. Doctoral education from a distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effken, Judith A

    2008-12-01

    This article describes the environmental factors that have contributed to the recent rapid growth of nursing doctoral education at a distance. Early and recent efforts to deliver distance doctoral education are discussed, using The University of Arizona College of Nursing experience as the key exemplar. The Community of Inquiry model is introduced as an appropriate model for doctoral education and then used as a framework to evaluate the current state of the art in distance doctoral nursing education. Successes and challenges in delivering doctoral education from a distance are described.

  12. Argonne Liquid-Metal Advanced Burner Reactor : components and in-vessel system thermal-hydraulic research and testing experience - pathway forward.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasza, K.; Grandy, C.; Chang, Y.; Khalil, H.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-06-30

    This white paper provides an overview and status report of the thermal-hydraulic nuclear research and development, both experimental and computational, conducted predominantly at Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne from the early 1970s through the early 1990s was the Department of Energy's (DOE's) lead lab for thermal-hydraulic development of Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs). During the 1970s and into the mid-1980s, Argonne conducted thermal-hydraulic studies and experiments on individual reactor components supporting the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR). From the mid-1980s and into the early 1990s, Argonne conducted studies on phenomena related to forced- and natural-convection thermal buoyancy in complete in-vessel models of the General Electric (GE) Prototype Reactor Inherently Safe Module (PRISM) and Rockwell International (RI) Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor (SAFR). These two reactor initiatives involved Argonne working closely with U.S. industry and DOE. This paper describes the very important impact of thermal hydraulics dominated by thermal buoyancy forces on reactor global operation and on the behavior/performance of individual components during postulated off-normal accident events with low flow. Utilizing Argonne's LMR expertise and design knowledge is vital to the further development of safe, reliable, and high-performance LMRs. Argonne believes there remains an important need for continued research and development on thermal-hydraulic design in support of DOE's and the international community's renewed thrust for developing and demonstrating the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) reactor(s) and the associated Argonne Liquid Metal-Advanced Burner Reactor (LM-ABR). This white paper highlights that further understanding is needed regarding reactor design under coolant low-flow events. These safety-related events are associated with the transition

  13. How Argonne's Intense Pulsed Neutron Source came to life and gained its niche : the view from an ecosystem perspective.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westfall, C.; Office of The Director

    2008-02-25

    At first glance the story of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) appears to have followed a puzzling course. When researchers first proposed their ideas for an accelerator-driven neutron source for exploring the structure of materials through neutron scattering, the project seemed so promising that both Argonne managers and officials at the laboratory's funding agency, the Department of Energy (DOE), suggested that it be made larger and more expensive. But then, even though prototype building, testing, and initial construction went well a group of prominent DOE reviewers recommended in fall 1980 that it be killed, just months before it had been slated to begin operation, and DOE promptly accepted the recommendation. In response, Argonne's leadership declared the project was the laboratory's top priority and rallied to save it. In late 1982, thanks to another review panel led by the same scientist who had chaired the panel that had delivered the death sentence, the project was granted a reprieve. However, by the late 1980s, the IPNS was no longer top priority within the international materials science community, at Argonne, or within the DOE budget because prospects for another, larger materials science accelerator emerged. At just this point, the facility started to produce exciting scientific results. For the next two decades, the IPNS, its research, and its experts became valued resources at Argonne, within the U.S. national laboratory system, and within the international materials science community. Why did this Argonne project prosper and then almost suffer premature death, even though it promised (and later delivered) good science? How was it saved and how did it go on to have a long, prosperous life for more than a quarter of a century? In particular, what did an expert assessment of the quality of IPNS science have to do with its fate? Getting answers to such questions is important. The U.S. government

  14. Distance spectra and Distance energy of Integral Circulant Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    c, Aleksandar Ili\\'

    2011-01-01

    The distance energy of a graph $G$ is a recently developed energy-type invariant, defined as the sum of absolute values of the eigenvalues of the distance matrix of $G$. There was a vast research for the pairs and families of non-cospectral graphs having equal distance energy, and most of these constructions were based on the join of graphs. A graph is called circulant if it is Cayley graph on the circulant group, i.e. its adjacency matrix is circulant. A graph is called integral if all eigenvalues of its adjacency matrix are integers. Integral circulant graphs play an important role in modeling quantum spin networks supporting the perfect state transfer. In this paper, we characterize the distance spectra of integral circulant graphs and prove that these graphs have integral eigenvalues of distance matrix $D$. Furthermore, we calculate the distance spectra and distance energy of unitary Cayley graphs. In conclusion, we present two families of pairs $(G_1, G_2)$ of integral circulant graphs with equal distanc...

  15. Transactional Distance and Autonomy in a Distance Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiloudis, G.; Koutsouba, M.; Giossos, Y.; Mavroidis, I.

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies the transactional distance between the students and the tutor as well as the autonomy of students in a postgraduate course of the Hellenic Open University (HOU). The aim of the paper is to examine how the relation between autonomy and transactional distance evolves during an academic year and how this relation is affected by…

  16. Distance labeling schemes for trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Stephen; Gørtz, Inge Li; Bistrup Halvorsen, Esben;

    2016-01-01

    variants such as, for example, small distances in trees [Alstrup et al., SODA, 2003]. We improve the known upper and lower bounds of exact distance labeling by showing that 1/4 log2(n) bits are needed and that 1/2 log2(n) bits are sufficient. We also give (1 + ε)-stretch labeling schemes using Theta...

  17. Virtual Bioinformatics Distance Learning Suite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolvanen, Martti; Vihinen, Mauno

    2004-01-01

    Distance learning as a computer-aided concept allows students to take courses from anywhere at any time. In bioinformatics, computers are needed to collect, store, process, and analyze massive amounts of biological and biomedical data. We have applied the concept of distance learning in virtual bioinformatics to provide university course material…

  18. Quality Content in Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Ezgi Pelin; Isman, Aytekin

    2016-01-01

    In parallel with technological advances in today's world of education activities can be conducted without the constraints of time and space. One of the most important of these activities is distance education. The success of the distance education is possible with content quality. The proliferation of e-learning environment has brought a need for…

  19. Distance labeling schemes for trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Stephen; Gørtz, Inge Li; Bistrup Halvorsen, Esben;

    2016-01-01

    We consider distance labeling schemes for trees: given a tree with n nodes, label the nodes with binary strings such that, given the labels of any two nodes, one can determine, by looking only at the labels, the distance in the tree between the two nodes. A lower bound by Gavoille et al. [Gavoill...

  20. The Psychology of Psychic Distance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Håkanson, Lars; Ambos, Björn; Schuster, Anja

    2016-01-01

    and their theoretical underpinnings assume psychic distances to be symmetric. Building on insights from psychology and sociology, this paper demonstrates how national factors and cognitive processes interact in the formation of asymmetric distance perceptions. The results suggest that exposure to other countries...

  1. The Distance to M104

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuinn, Kristen. B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Berg, Danielle; Kennicutt, Robert

    2016-11-01

    M104 (NGC 4594; the Sombrero galaxy) is a nearby, well-studied elliptical galaxy included in scores of surveys focused on understanding the details of galaxy evolution. Despite the importance of observations of M104, a consensus distance has not yet been established. Here, we use newly obtained Hubble Space Telescope optical imaging to measure the distance to M104 based on the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) method. Our measurement yields the distance to M104 to be 9.55 ± 0.13 ± 0.31 Mpc equivalent to a distance modulus of 29.90 ± 0.03 ± 0.07 mag. Our distance is an improvement over previous results as we use a well-calibrated, stable distance indicator, precision photometry in a optimally selected field of view, and a Bayesian maximum likelihood technique that reduces measurement uncertainties. The most discrepant previous results are due to Tully-Fisher method distances, which are likely inappropriate for M104 given its peculiar morphology and structure. Our results are part of a larger program to measure accurate distances to a sample of well-known spiral galaxies (including M51, M74, and M63) using the TRGB method. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the Data Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  2. The Distance to M51

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuinn, Kristen. B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Berg, Danielle; Kennicutt, Robert

    2016-07-01

    Great investments of observing time have been dedicated to the study of nearby spiral galaxies with diverse goals ranging from understanding the star formation process to characterizing their dark matter distributions. Accurate distances are fundamental to interpreting observations of these galaxies, yet many of the best studied nearby galaxies have distances based on methods with relatively large uncertainties. We have started a program to derive accurate distances to these galaxies. Here we measure the distance to M51—the Whirlpool galaxy—from newly obtained Hubble Space Telescope optical imaging using the tip of the red giant branch method. We measure the distance modulus to be 8.58 ± 0.10 Mpc (statistical), corresponding to a distance modulus of 29.67 ± 0.02 mag. Our distance is an improvement over previous results as we use a well-calibrated, stable distance indicator, precision photometry in a optimally selected field of view, and a Bayesian Maximum Likelihood technique that reduces measurement uncertainties. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the Data Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  3. Faculty Attitudes about Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smidt, Esther; McDyre, Brian; Bunk, Jennifer; Li, Rui; Gatenby, Tanya

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a dramatic increase in distance learning in higher education. Given this, it is extremely important to understand faculty attitudes about distance education, not only because they can vary widely, but also because it is the faculty, through their design and implementation of online courses, that will shape the…

  4. Hierarchical traits distances explain grassland Fabaceae species’ ecological niches distances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian eFort

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fabaceae species play a key role in ecosystem functioning through their capacity to fix atmospheric nitrogen via their symbiosis with Rhizobium bacteria. To increase benefits of using Fabaceae in agricultural systems, it is necessary to find ways to evaluate species or genotypes having potential adaptations to sub-optimal growth conditions. We evaluated the relevance of phylogenetic distance, absolute trait distance and hierarchical trait distance for comparing the adaptation of 13 grassland Fabaceae species to different habitats, i.e. ecological niches. We measured a wide range of functional traits (root traits, leaf traits and whole plant traits in these species. Species phylogenetic and ecological distances were assessed from a species-level phylogenetic tree and species’ ecological indicator values, respectively. We demonstrated that differences in ecological niches between grassland Fabaceae species were related more to their hierarchical trait distances than to their phylogenetic distances. We showed that grassland Fabaceae functional traits tend to converge among species with the same ecological requirements. Species with acquisitive root strategies (thin roots, shallow root systems are competitive species adapted to non-stressful meadows, while conservative ones (coarse roots, deep root systems are able to tolerate stressful continental climates. In contrast, acquisitive species appeared to be able to tolerate low soil-P availability, while conservative ones need high P availability. Finally we highlight that traits converge along the ecological gradient, providing the assumption that species with similar root-trait values are better able to coexist, regardless of their phylogenetic distance.

  5. Gammasphere activities at Argonne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoo, T.L.; Carpenter, M.; Ahmad, I. [and others

    1995-08-01

    A powerful third-generation national gamma-ray facility consisting of 110 Ge detectors with BGO Compton suppressors is being constructed at LBL. After 18 months of operation there it will move to another site. This detector system combines calorimetric and multiplicity information with the excellent energy resolution, large efficiency, and high granularity of the Ge detectors. The large number of Ge detectors is essential for high- ({>=} 3) fold coincidences. Since each additional fold results in roughly an order-of-magnitude improvement in selectivity, this feature makes it possible to isolate cleanly weak structures, where new physics will undoubtedly lie. Since Gammasphere represents a national facility, we have made substantial contributions in its construction. In addition, T. L. Khoo is the Chairman of the Gammasphere Scientific Advisory Committee (formerly Steering Committee) which follows, and provides advice on, the construction of Gammasphere, while R.V. F. Janssens is Chairman of the Users Executive Committee.

  6. Argonne Braille Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunwald, A.

    1977-07-01

    Development of a braille machine is summarized. It is noted that the machine has reached the stage where development of the system appears both possible and desirable. Sections are included containing papers on computer translation and auxiliary equipment, and on letters and awards in recognition of the braille machine development. (JRD)

  7. The Distance Field Model and Distance Constrained MAP Adaptation Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUPeng; WANGZuoying

    2003-01-01

    Spatial structure information, i.e., the rel-ative position information of phonetic states in the feature space, is long to be carefully researched yet. In this pa-per, a new model named “Distance Field” is proposed to describe the spatial structure information. Based on this model, a modified MAP adaptation algorithm named dis-tance constrained maximum a poateriori (DCMAP) is in-troduced. The distance field model gives large penalty when the spatial structure is destroyed. As a result the DCMAP reserves the spatial structure information in adaptation process. Experiments show the Distance Field Model improves the performance of MAP adapta-tion. Further results show DCMAP has strong cross-state estimation ability, which is used to train a well-performed speaker-dependent model by data from only part of pho-

  8. The Distance to M104

    CERN Document Server

    McQuinn, Kristen B W; Dolphin, Andrew E; Berg, Danielle; Kennicutt, Robert

    2016-01-01

    M104 (NGC 4594; the Sombrero galaxy) is a nearby, well-studied elliptical galaxy included in scores of surveys focused on understanding the details of galaxy evolution. Despite the importance of observations of M104, a consensus distance has not yet been established. Here, we use newly obtained Hubble Space Telescope optical imaging to measure the distance to M104 based on the tip of the red giant branch method. Our measurement yields the distance to M104 to be 9.55 +/- 0.13 +/- 0.31 Mpc equivalent to a distance modulus of 29.90 +/- 0.03 +/- 0.07 mag. Our distance is an improvement over previous results as we use a well-calibrated, stable distance indicator, precision photometry in a optimally selected field of view, and a Bayesian Maximum Likelihood technique that reduces measurement uncertainties. The most discrepant previous results are due to Tully-Fisher method distances, which are likely inappropriate for M104 given its peculiar morphology and structure. Our results are part of a larger program to measu...

  9. Reducing the distance in distance-caregiving by technology innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazelle E Benefield

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Lazelle E Benefield1, Cornelia Beck21College of Nursing, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA; 2Pat & Willard Walker Family Memory Research Center, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas, USAAbstract: Family caregivers are responsible for the home care of over 34 million older adults in the United States. For many, the elder family member lives more than an hour’s distance away. Distance caregiving is a growing alternative to more familiar models where: 1 the elder and the family caregiver(s may reside in the same household; or 2 the family caregiver may live nearby but not in the same household as the elder. The distance caregiving model involves elders and their family caregivers who live at some distance, defined as more than a 60-minute commute, from one another. Evidence suggests that distance caregiving is a distinct phenomenon, differs substantially from on-site family caregiving, and requires additional assistance to support the physical, social, and contextual dimensions of the caregiving process. Technology-based assists could virtually connect the caregiver and elder and provide strong support that addresses the elder’s physical, social, cognitive, and/or sensory impairments. Therefore, in today’s era of high technology, it is surprising that so few affordable innovations are being marketed for distance caregiving. This article addresses distance caregiving, proposes the use of technology innovation to support caregiving, and suggests a research agenda to better inform policy decisions related to the unique needs of this situation.Keywords: caregiving, family, distance, technology, elders

  10. Inter-laboratory comparison II: CO{sub 2} isotherms measured on moisture-equilibrated Argonne premium coals at 55 C and up to 15 MPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodman, A.L.; Romanov, V.; Schroeder, K.; White, C.M. [U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Busch, A.; Gensterblum, Y.; Krooss, B.M. [Institute of Geology and Geochemistry of Petroleum and Coal, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Bustin, R.M.; Chikatamarla, L. [University of British Columbia, Earth and Ocean Sciences, Vancouver (Canada); Day, S.; Duffy, G.J.; Sakurovs, R. [CSIRO Energy Technology, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Fitzgerald, J.E.; Gasem, K.A.M.; Jing, C.; Mohammed, S.; Robinson, R.L. Jr. [School of Chemical Engineering, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK (United States); Hartman, C.; Pratt, T. [TICORA Geosciences, Inc.19000 West Hwy. 72, Suite 100, Arvada, CO 80007 (United States)

    2007-11-22

    Sorption isotherms, which describe the coal's gas storage capacity, are important for estimating the carbon sequestration potential of coal seams. This study investigated the inter-laboratory reproducibility of carbon dioxide isotherm measurements on moisture-equilibrated Argonne premium coal samples (Pocahontas No. 3, Illinois No. 6, and Beulah Zap). Six independent laboratories provided isotherm data on the three moisture-equilibrated coal samples at 55 C and pressures up to 15 MPa. Agreement among the laboratories was good up to 8 MPa. At the higher pressures, the data among the laboratories diverged significantly for two of the laboratories and coincided reasonably well for four of the laboratories. (author)

  11. KNOWLEDGE DISTANCE IN INFORMATION SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuhua QIAN; Jiye LIANG; Chuangyin DANG; Feng WANG; Wei XU

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we first introduce the concepts of knowledge closeness and knowledge distance for measuring the sameness and the difference among knowledge in an information system, respectively.The relationship between these two concepts is a strictly mutual complement relation. We then investigate some important properties of knowledge distance and perform experimental analyses on two public data sets, which show the presented measure appears to be well suited to characterize the nature of knowledge in an information system. Finally, we establish the relationship between the knowledge distance and knowledge granulation, which shows that two variants of the knowledge distance can also be used to construct the knowledge granulation. These results will be helpful for studying uncertainty in information systems.

  12. ECONOMICS OF DISTANCE EDUCATION RECONSIDERED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfram LAASER

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT According to Gartner a certain hype of e-Learning was followed by a downturn but eLearning will continue to be an important factor in learning scenarios. However the economic viability of e-learning projects will be questioned with more scrutiny than in earlier periods. Therefore it seems to be a good opportunity to see what can be learned from past experience in costing distance learning projects and what aspects are added by current attempts to measure economic efficiency. After reviewing early research about costing distance learning some more recent approaches will be discussed, such as eLearning ROI-calculators and the concept of total cost of ownership. Furthermore some microeconomic effects referring to localization of distance learning courses are outlined. Finally several unsolved issues in costing distance education are summarized.

  13. Distance Education in Technological Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R .C. SHARMA

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Distance Education in Technological AgeRomesh Verma (Editor, New Delhi: Anmol Publications, 2005, ISBN 81-261-2210-2, pp. 419 Reviewed by R C SHARMARegional DirectorIndira Gandhi National Open University-INDIA The advancements in information and communication technologies have brought significant changes in the way the open and distance learning are provided to the learners. The impact of such changes is quite visible in both developed and developing countries. Switching over to online mode, joining hands with private initiatives and making a presence in foreign waters, are some of the hallmarks of the open and distance education (ODE institutions in developing countries. The compilation of twenty six essays on themes as applicable to ODE has resulted in the book, “Distance Education in Technological Age”. These essays follow a progressive style of narration, starting from describing conceptual framework of distance education, how the distance education was emerged on the global scene and in India, and then goes on to discuss emergence of online distance education and research aspects in ODE. The initial four chapters provide a detailed account of historical development and growth of distance education in India and State Open University and National Open University Model in India . Student support services are pivot to any distance education and much of its success depends on how well the support services are provided. These are discussed from national and international perspective. The issues of collaborative learning, learning on demand, life long learning, learning-unlearning and re-learning model and strategic alliances have also given due space by the authors. An assortment of technologies like communication technology, domestic technology, information technology, mass media and entertainment technology, media technology and educational technology give an idea of how these technologies are being adopted in the open universities. The study

  14. Distance Learning for Special Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Rodger A.

    2012-01-01

    Distance education strategies for remotely deployed, highly mobile, or institutionalized populations are reviewed and critiqued. Specifically, asynchronous, offline responses for special military units, Native Americans on remote reservations, prison populations and other geographically, temporally or technologically isolated niche populations are…

  15. Academy Distance Learning Tools (IRIS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — IRIS is a suite of front-end web applications utilizing a centralized back-end Oracle database. The system fully supports the FAA Academy's Distance Learning Program...

  16. Graph distance for complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Yutaka; Hirata, Yoshito; Ikeguchi, Tohru; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2016-10-01

    Networks are widely used as a tool for describing diverse real complex systems and have been successfully applied to many fields. The distance between networks is one of the most fundamental concepts for properly classifying real networks, detecting temporal changes in network structures, and effectively predicting their temporal evolution. However, this distance has rarely been discussed in the theory of complex networks. Here, we propose a graph distance between networks based on a Laplacian matrix that reflects the structural and dynamical properties of networked dynamical systems. Our results indicate that the Laplacian-based graph distance effectively quantifies the structural difference between complex networks. We further show that our approach successfully elucidates the temporal properties underlying temporal networks observed in the context of face-to-face human interactions.

  17. Categorical perception of tactile distance

    OpenAIRE

    Knight, F. L. C.; Longo, M. R.; Bremner, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    The tactile surface forms a continuous sheet covering the body. And yet, the perceived distance between two touches varies across stimulation sites. Perceived tactile distance is larger when stimuli cross over the wrist, compared to when both fall on either the hand or the forearm. This effect could reflect a categorical distortion of tactile space across body-part boundaries (in which stimuli crossing the wrist boundary are perceptually elongated) or may simply reflect a localised increased ...

  18. Categorical perception of tactile distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Frances Le Cornu; Longo, Matthew R; Bremner, Andrew J

    2014-05-01

    The tactile surface forms a continuous sheet covering the body. And yet, the perceived distance between two touches varies across stimulation sites. Perceived tactile distance is larger when stimuli cross over the wrist, compared to when both fall on either the hand or the forearm. This effect could reflect a categorical distortion of tactile space across body-part boundaries (in which stimuli crossing the wrist boundary are perceptually elongated) or may simply reflect a localised increased in acuity surrounding anatomical landmarks (in which stimuli near the wrist are perceptually elongated). We tested these two interpretations across two experiments, by comparing a well-documented bias to perceive mediolateral tactile distances across the forearm/hand as larger than proximodistal ones along the forearm/hand at three different sites (hand, wrist, and forearm). According to the 'categorical' interpretation, tactile distances should be elongated selectively in the proximodistal axis thus reducing the anisotropy. According to the 'localised acuity' interpretation, distances will be perceptually elongated in the vicinity of the wrist regardless of orientation, leading to increased overall size without affecting anisotropy. Consistent with the categorical account, we found a reduction in the magnitude of anisotropy at the wrist, with no evidence of a corresponding localised increase in precision. These findings demonstrate that we reference touch to a representation of the body that is categorically segmented into discrete parts, which consequently influences the perception of tactile distance.

  19. Center—Distance Continuous Probability Models and the Distance Measure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑方; 吴文虎; 等

    1998-01-01

    In this paper,a new statistic model named Center-Distance Continuous Probability Model(CDCPM)for speech recognition is described,which is based on Center-Distance Normal(CDN)distribution.In a CDCPM,the probability transition matrix is omitted,and the observation probability density function(PDF)in each state is in the form of embedded multiple-model(EMM)based on the Nearest Neighbour rule.The experimental results on two giant real-world Chinese speech databases and a real-world continuous-manner 2000 phrase system show that this model is a powerful one.Also,a distance measure for CDPMs is proposed which is based on the Bayesian minimum classification error(MCE) discrimination.

  20. A table-top LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Barbara Warmbein

    2011-01-01

    Many years ago, when ATLAS was no more than a huge empty underground cavern and Russian artillery shell casings were being melted down to become part of the CMS calorimetry system, science photographer Peter Ginter started documenting the LHC’s progress. He was there when special convoys of equipment crossed the Jura at night, when cranes were lowering down detector slices and magnet coils were being wound in workshops. Some 18 years of LHC history have been documented by Ginter, and the result has just come out as a massive coffee table book full of double-page spreads of Ginter’s impressive images.   The new coffee table book, LHC: the Large Hadron Collider. Published by the Austrian publisher Edition Lammerhuber in cooperation with CERN and UNESCO Publishing, LHC: the Large Hadron Collider is an unusual piece in the company’s portfolio. As the publisher’s first science book, LHC: the Large Hadron Collider weighs close to five kilos and comes in a s...

  1. Computing Distances between Probabilistic Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Tracol

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We present relaxed notions of simulation and bisimulation on Probabilistic Automata (PA, that allow some error epsilon. When epsilon is zero we retrieve the usual notions of bisimulation and simulation on PAs. We give logical characterisations of these notions by choosing suitable logics which differ from the elementary ones, L with negation and L without negation, by the modal operator. Using flow networks, we show how to compute the relations in PTIME. This allows the definition of an efficiently computable non-discounted distance between the states of a PA. A natural modification of this distance is introduced, to obtain a discounted distance, which weakens the influence of long term transitions. We compare our notions of distance to others previously defined and illustrate our approach on various examples. We also show that our distance is not expansive with respect to process algebra operators. Although L without negation is a suitable logic to characterise epsilon-(bisimulation on deterministic PAs, it is not for general PAs; interestingly, we prove that it does characterise weaker notions, called a priori epsilon-(bisimulation, which we prove to be NP-difficult to decide.

  2. Distance sampling methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Buckland, S T; Marques, T A; Oedekoven, C S

    2015-01-01

    In this book, the authors cover the basic methods and advances within distance sampling that are most valuable to practitioners and in ecology more broadly. This is the fourth book dedicated to distance sampling. In the decade since the last book published, there have been a number of new developments. The intervening years have also shown which advances are of most use. This self-contained book covers topics from the previous publications, while also including recent developments in method, software and application. Distance sampling refers to a suite of methods, including line and point transect sampling, in which animal density or abundance is estimated from a sample of distances to detected individuals. The book illustrates these methods through case studies; data sets and computer code are supplied to readers through the book’s accompanying website.  Some of the case studies use the software Distance, while others use R code. The book is in three parts.  The first part addresses basic methods, the ...

  3. Conceptualizing Educational Research in Distance Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Ryan; Schlosser, Charles

    2003-01-01

    Suggests a starting place for formal inquiry into distance education. Topics covered include: background on educational research and research on distance education; research paradigms that are applicable to distance education; subsystems of a distance education program; and a matrix for conceptualizing distance education research. (MES)

  4. The Distance Geometry of Music

    CERN Document Server

    Demaine, Erik D; Meijer, Henk; Rappaport, David; Taslakian, Perouz; Toussaint, Godfried T; Winograd, Terry; Wood, David R

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate relationships between the classic Euclidean algorithm and many other fields of study, particularly in the context of music and distance geometry. Specifically, we show how the structure of the Euclidean algorithm defines a family of rhythms which encompass over forty timelines (\\emph{ostinatos}) from traditional world music. We prove that these \\emph{Euclidean rhythms} have the mathematical property that their onset patterns are distributed as evenly as possible: they maximize the sum of the Euclidean distances between all pairs of onsets, viewing onsets as points on a circle. Indeed, Euclidean rhythms are the unique rhythms that maximize this notion of \\emph{evenness}. We also show that essentially all Euclidean rhythms are \\emph{deep}: each distinct distance between onsets occurs with a unique multiplicity, and these multiplicies form an interval $1,2,...,k-1$. Finally, we characterize all deep rhythms, showing that they form a subclass of generated rhythms, which in turn proves a useful prop...

  5. Asymmetric distances for binary embeddings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordo, Albert; Perronnin, Florent; Gong, Yunchao; Lazebnik, Svetlana

    2014-01-01

    In large-scale query-by-example retrieval, embedding image signatures in a binary space offers two benefits: data compression and search efficiency. While most embedding algorithms binarize both query and database signatures, it has been noted that this is not strictly a requirement. Indeed, asymmetric schemes that binarize the database signatures but not the query still enjoy the same two benefits but may provide superior accuracy. In this work, we propose two general asymmetric distances that are applicable to a wide variety of embedding techniques including locality sensitive hashing (LSH), locality sensitive binary codes (LSBC), spectral hashing (SH), PCA embedding (PCAE), PCAE with random rotations (PCAE-RR), and PCAE with iterative quantization (PCAE-ITQ). We experiment on four public benchmarks containing up to 1M images and show that the proposed asymmetric distances consistently lead to large improvements over the symmetric Hamming distance for all binary embedding techniques.

  6. Virtual bioinformatics distance learning suite*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolvanen, Martti; Vihinen, Mauno

    2004-05-01

    Distance learning as a computer-aided concept allows students to take courses from anywhere at any time. In bioinformatics, computers are needed to collect, store, process, and analyze massive amounts of biological and biomedical data. We have applied the concept of distance learning in virtual bioinformatics to provide university course material over the Internet. Currently, we provide two fully computer-based courses, "Introduction to Bioinformatics" and "Bioinformatics in Functional Genomics." Here we will discuss the application of distance learning in bioinformatics training and our experiences gained during the 3 years that we have run the courses, with about 400 students from a number of universities. The courses are available at bioinf.uta.fi.

  7. Ghost imaging with broad distance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段德洋; 张路; 杜少将; 夏云杰

    2015-01-01

    We present a scheme that is able to achieve the ghost imaging with broad distance. The physical nature of our scheme is that the different wavelength beams are separated in free space by an optical media according to the slow light or dispersion principle. Meanwhile, the equality of the optical distance of the two light arms is not violated. The photon correlation is achieved by the rotating ground glass plate (RGGP) and spatial light modulator (SLM), respectively. Our work shows that a monochromic ghost image can be obtained in the case of RGGP. More importantly, the position (or distance) of the object can be ascertained by the color of the image. Thus, the imaging and ranging processes are combined as one process for the first time to the best of our knowledge. In the case of SLM, we can obtain a colored image regardless of where the object is.

  8. Fast Exact Euclidean Distance (FEED) Transformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, Theo; Broek, van den Egon; Kittler, J.; Petrou, M.; Nixon, M.

    2004-01-01

    Fast Exact Euclidean Distance (FEED) transformation is introduced, starting from the inverse of the distance transformation. The prohibitive computational cost of a naive implementation of traditional Euclidean Distance Transformation, is tackled by three operations: restriction of both the number o

  9. Isolation by distance, web service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohonak Andrew J

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The population genetic pattern known as "isolation by distance" results from spatially limited gene flow and is a commonly observed phenomenon in natural populations. However, few software programs exist for estimating the degree of isolation by distance among populations, and they tend not to be user-friendly. Results We have created Isolation by Distance Web Service (IBDWS a user-friendly web interface for determining patterns of isolation by distance. Using this site, population geneticists can perform a variety of powerful statistical tests including Mantel tests, Reduced Major Axis (RMA regression analysis, as well as calculate FST between all pairs of populations and perform basic summary statistics (e.g., heterozygosity. All statistical results, including publication-quality scatter plots in Postscript format, are returned rapidly to the user and can be easily downloaded. Conclusion IBDWS population genetics analysis software is hosted at http://phage.sdsu.edu/~jensen/ and documentation is available at http://www.bio.sdsu.edu/pub/andy/IBD.html. The source code has been made available on Source Forge at http://sourceforge.net/projects/ibdws/.

  10. The Perception of Ideological Distance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Granberg, Donald; Brown, Thad A.

    1992-01-01

    Data from national election studies in Britain, the Netherlands, Sweden, and the U.S. were analyzed to test hypotheses concerning the perception of ideological distance between parties and candidates. The first hypothesis, derived from Sherif's social judgment theory and Heider's balance theory, was

  11. Lessons in Developing Distance Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gant, Lenora Peters

    1996-01-01

    Describes the use of video teletraining (VTT) for distance learning in the Department of Defense. Topics include planning and organizing the VTT facility, staff development, site facilitators, the necessity of protocol, instructional design and development strategies, student involvement and interactivity, and evaluation and assessment. (LRW)

  12. Distance, Lending Relationships and Competition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Degryse, H.A.; Ongena, S.

    2002-01-01

    A recent string of theoretical papers highlights the importance of geographical distance in explaining pricing and availability of loans to small firms.Lenders located in the vicinity of small firms have significantly lower monitoring and transaction costs, and hence considerable market power if com

  13. Distance, Lending Relationships, and Competition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Degryse, H.A.; Ongena, S.

    2003-01-01

    A recent string of theoretical papers has highlighted the importance of geographical distance in explaining loan rates for small firms.Lenders located in the vicinity of small firms face significantly lower transportation and monitoring costs, and hence wield considerable market power, if competing

  14. Distance Education Instructional Model Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Diane H.; Swan, Michael K.

    1995-01-01

    A survey of graduate students involved in distance education on North Dakota State University's Interactive Video Network included 80 on campus and 13 off. The instructional models rated most effective were role playing, simulation, jurisprudential (Socratic method), memorization, synectics, and inquiry. Direct instruction was rated least…

  15. Favourite distances in high dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Swanepoel, Konrad J

    2011-01-01

    Let $S$ be a set of $n$ points in $d$-dimensional Euclidean space. Assign to each $x\\in S$ an arbitrary distance $r(x)>0$. Let $e_r(x,S)$ denote the number of points in $S$ at distance $r(x)$ from $x$. Avis, Erd\\"os and Pach (1988) introduced the extremal quantity $f_d(n)=\\max\\sum_{x\\in S}e_r(x,S)$, where the maximum is taken over all $n$-point sets $S$ in $d$-dimensional space and all assignments $r\\colon S\\to(0,\\infty)$ of distances. We give a quick derivation of the asymptotics of the error term of $f_d(n)$ using only the analogous asymptotics of the maximum number of unit distance pairs in a set of $n$ points, which improves on previous results of Avis, Erd\\"os and Pach (1988) and Erd\\"os and Pach (1990). Then we prove a stability result for $d\\geq 4$, asserting that if $(S,r)$ with $|S|=n$ satisfies $e_r(S)=f_d(n)-o(n^2)$, then, up to $o(n)$ points, $S$ is a Lenz construction with $r$ constant. Finally we use stability to show that for $n$ sufficiently large (depending on $d$) the pairs $(S,r)$ that atta...

  16. On Maximum Lee Distance Codes

    OpenAIRE

    Alderson, Tim L.; Svenja Huntemann

    2013-01-01

    Singleton-type upper bounds on the minimum Lee distance of general (not necessarily linear) Lee codes over ℤq are discussed. Two bounds known for linear codes are shown to also hold in the general case, and several new bounds are established. Codes meeting these bounds are investigated and in some cases characterised.

  17. Video Surveillance using Distance Maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, Theo E.; Kuppens, Harco C.; Broek, van den Egon L.; Kehtarnavaz, Nasser; Laplante, Phillip A.

    2006-01-01

    Human vigilance is limited; hence, automatic motion and distance detection is one of the central issues in video surveillance. Hereby, many aspects are of importance, this paper specially addresses: efficiency, achieving real-time performance, accuracy, and robustness against various noise factors.

  18. Distance Learning: Untried and Untrue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfond, Jay A.

    2010-01-01

    G. K. Chesterton famously once said: "Christianity has not been tried and found wanting; it has been found difficult and not tried." This, the author believes, applies to distance learning as well. There is far too much self-congratulatory hyperbole about the growth and pervasiveness of online learning--which exaggerates reality and overlooks the…

  19. Curriculum Control in Distance Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesterton, Paul

    1985-01-01

    The nature of distance education is to shift the locus of curriculum control toward the institution and its staff and away from the students. This imposes a responsibility on the institution to examine and evaluate the values and assumptions underlying the decision-making and the implications of the patterns of control that emerge. (Author/MSE)

  20. The Future of Distance Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saba, Farhad

    2000-01-01

    Examines factors that will influence how distance education is practiced in the first few decades of this new century. Discusses developments in digital technology; the exponential growth of knowledge about the brain, as well as physiology, chemistry, and psychology of learning; the system relationship between individual learners and instructors;…

  1. A Streaming Distance Transform Algorithm for Neighborhood-Sequence Distances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Normand

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe an algorithm that computes a “translated” 2D Neighborhood-Sequence Distance Transform (DT using a look up table approach. It requires a single raster scan of the input image and produces one line of output for every line of input. The neighborhood sequence is specified either by providing one period of some integer periodic sequence or by providing the rate of appearance of neighborhoods. The full algorithm optionally derives the regular (centered DT from the “translated” DT, providing the result image on-the-fly, with a minimal delay, before the input image is fully processed. Its efficiency can benefit all applications that use neighborhood- sequence distances, particularly when pipelined processing architectures are involved, or when the size of objects in the source image is limited.

  2. Fiscal years 1993 and 1994 decontamination and decommissioning activities photobriefing book for the Argonne National Laboratory-East Site, Technology Development Division, Decontamination and Decommissioning Projects Department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This photobriefing book describes the ongoing decontamination and decommissioning projects at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)-East Site near Lemont, Illinois. The book is broken down into three sections: introduction, project descriptions, and summary. The introduction elates the history and mission of the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Projects Department at ANL-East. The second section describes the active ANL-East D and D projects, giving a project history and detailing fiscal year (FY) 1993 and FY 1994 accomplishments and FY 1995 goals. The final section summarizes the goals of the D and D Projects Department and the current program status. The D/D projects include the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor, Chicago Pile-5 Reactor, that cells, and plutonium gloveboxes. 73 figs.

  3. Particulate Emissions Control using Advanced Filter Systems: Final Report for Argonne National Laboratory, Corning Inc. and Hyundai Motor Company CRADA Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Hee Je [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Choi, Seungmok [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-10-09

    This is a 3-way CRADA project working together with Corning, Inc. and Hyundai Motor Co. (HMC). The project is to understand particulate emissions from gasoline direct-injection engines (GDI) and their physico-chemical properties. In addition, this project focuses on providing fundamental information about filtration and regeneration mechanisms occurring in gasoline particulate filter (GPF) systems. For the work, Corning provides most advanced filter substrates for GPF applications and HMC provides three-way catalyst (TWC) coating services of these filter by way of a catalyst coating company. Then, Argonne National Laboratory characterizes fundamental behaviors of filtration and regeneration processes as well as evaluated TWC functionality for the coated filters. To examine aging impacts on TWC and GPF performance, the research team evaluates gaseous and particulate emissions as well as back-pressure increase with ash loading by using an engine-oil injection system to accelerate ash loading in TWC-coated GPFs.

  4. Direct determination of sulfur species in coals from the Argonne premium sample program by solid sampling electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Daniela; Vogt, Thomas; Klinger, Mathias; Masset, Patrick Joseph; Otto, Matthias

    2014-10-21

    A new direct solid sampling method for speciation of sulfur in coals by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ETV-ICP OES) is presented. On the basis of the controlled thermal decomposition of coal in an argon atmosphere, it is possible to determine the different sulfur species in addition to elemental sulfur in coals. For the assignment of the obtained peaks from the sulfur transient emission signal, several analytical techniques (reflected light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction) were used. The developed direct solid sampling method enables a good accuracy (relative standard deviation ≤ 6%), precision and was applied to determine the sulfur forms in the Argonne premium coals, varying in rank. The generated method is time- and cost-effective and well suited for the fast characterization of sulfur species in coal. It can be automated to a large extent and is applicable for process-accompanying analyses.

  5. Physics with fast molecular-ion beams. Proceedings of workshop held at Argonne National Laboratory, August 20-21, 1979. [Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gemmell, D.S. (ed.)

    1979-01-01

    The Workshop on Physics with Fast Molecular-Ion Beams was held in the Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory on August 20 and 21, 1979. The meeting brought together representatives from several groups studying the interactions of fast (MeV) molecular-ion beams with matter. By keeping the Workshop program sharply focussed on current work related to the interactions of fast molecular ions, it was made possible for the participants to engage in vigorous and detailed discussions concerning such specialized topics as molecular-ion dissociation and transmission, wake effects, ionic charge states, cluster stopping powers, beam-foil spectroscopy, electron-emissions studies with molecular-ion beams, and molecular-ion structure determinations.

  6. Moral distance in dictator games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Aguiar

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available We perform an experimental investigation using a dictator game in which individuals must make a moral decision --- to give or not to give an amount of money to poor people in the Third World. A questionnaire in which the subjects are asked about the reasons for their decision shows that, at least in this case, moral motivations carry a heavy weight in the decision: the majority of dictators give the money for reasons of a consequentialist nature. Based on the results presented here and of other analogous experiments, we conclude that dicator behavior can be understood in terms of moral distance rather than social distance and that it systematically deviates from the egoism assumption in economic models and game theory. %extit{JEL}: A13, C72, C91

  7. Theological Librarianship from a Distance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melody Diehl Detar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This essay examines distance theological librarianship and the field’s suitability for remote librarians. A brief introduction to the landscape of online programs in theological education is followed by an overview of virtual librarianship and how theological librarians may serve students while working from a distance themselves. The essay then describes a method for initiating a remote librarian position in a theological library context, and then reviews the steps of determining whether remote work is feasible and desirable at an institution, approaching leadership with a plan, setting up a trial remote work period, and assessing its success. Particular emphasis is given to communication expectations, modes of virtual reference and instruction, campus committee service and meaningful ways of remaining part of the campus community.

  8. Determining distances using asteroseismic methods

    CERN Document Server

    Aguirre, V Silva; Basu, S; Campante, T L; Chaplin, W J; Huber, D; Miglio, A; Serenelli, A M; WG#1, KASC

    2012-01-01

    Asteroseismology has been extremely successful in determining the properties of stars in different evolutionary stages with a remarkable level of precision. However, to fully exploit its potential, robust methods for estimating stellar parameters are required and independent verification of the results is needed. In this talk, I present a new technique developed to obtain stellar properties by coupling asteroseismic analysis with the InfraRed Flux Method. Using two global seismic observables and multi-band photometry, the technique determines masses, radii, effective temperatures, bolometric fluxes, and thus distances for field stars in a self-consistent manner. Applying our method to a sample of solar-like oscillators in the {\\it Kepler} field that have accurate {\\it Hipparcos} parallaxes, we find agreement in our distance determinations to better than 5%. Comparison with measurements of spectroscopic effective temperatures and interferometric radii also validate our results, and show that our technique can ...

  9. Managerial Distance and Virtual Ownership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansmann, Henry; Thomsen, Steen

    Industrial foundations are autonomous nonprofit entities that own and control one or more conventional business firms. These foundations are common in Northern Europe, where they own a number of internationally prominent companies. Previous studies have indicated, surprisingly, that companies con......, but corporate governance and fiduciary behavior more generally....... on differences among the industrial foundations themselves. We work with a rich data set comprising 113 foundation-owned Danish companies over the period 2003-2008. We focus in particular on a composite structural factor that we term “managerial distance.” We propose this as a measure of the extent to which......-seeking outside owners of the company. Consistent with this hypothesis, our empirical analysis shows a positive, significant, and robust association between managerial distance and the economic performance of foundation owned companies. The findings appear to illuminate not just foundation governance...

  10. Distance Education Use in Rural Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannum, Wallace H.; Irvin, Matthew J.; Banks, Jonathan B.; Farmer, Thomas W.

    2009-01-01

    A national survey of rural school systems in the United States was conducted to determine the extent to which distance education is being utilized by rural schools, the technologies used, the curriculum areas impacted, the perceived needs for distance education, their satisfaction with distance education, and the barriers to distance education…

  11. History and Heritage in Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Bill; Simpson, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Distance education's history is a tremendous resource for all involved in distance education. Some aspects of that history provide enduring touchstones for present distance educators, creating a heritage that should not be overlooked as distance education continues to develop and expand. In this article we draw on the concept of generational…

  12. Effective Teaching in Distance Education. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Dan

    Distance education is an alternative method for delivering academic course work to students unable to attend traditional campus-based classes. This Digest presents information on the many forms of distance education and keys to successful teaching with distance education. Distance education is a method of education in which the learner is…

  13. Argonne's performance assessment of major facility systems to support semiconductor manufacturing by the National Security Agency/R Group, Ft. Meade, Maryland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, W.; Miller, G.M.

    1990-12-01

    The National Security Agency (NSA) was authorized in 1983 to construct a semiconductor and circuit-board manufacturing plant at its Ft. Meade, Maryland, facility. This facility was to become known as the Special Process Laboratories (SPL) building. Phase I construction was managed by the US Army Corps of Engineers, Baltimore District (USACE/BD) and commenced in January 1986. Phase I construction provided the basic building and support systems, such as the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning system, the deionized-water and wastewater-treatment systems, and the high-purity-gas piping system. Phase II construction involved fitting the semiconductor manufacturing side of the building with manufacturing tools and enhancing various aspects of the Phase I construction. Phase II construction was managed by NSA and commenced in April 1989. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) was contracted by USACE/BD midway through the Phase I construction period to provide quality-assured performance reviews of major facility systems in the SPL. Following completion of the Phase I construction, ANL continued its performance reviews under NSA sponsorship, focusing its attention on the enhancements to the various manufacturing support systems of interest. The purpose of this document is to provide a guide to the files that were generated by ANL during its term of technical assistance to USACE/BD and NSA and to explain the quality assurance program that was implemented when ANL conducted its performance reviews of the SPL building's systems. One set of the ANL project files is located at NSA, Ft. Meade, and two sets are at Argonne, Illinois. The ANL sets will be maintained until the year 2000, or for the 10-year estimated life of the project. 1 fig.

  14. Distance effects in electrochemical micromachining

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Considering exponential dependence of currents on double-layer voltage and the feedback effect of the electrolyte resistance, a distance effect in electrochemical micromachining is found, namely that both time constant and double-layer voltage depend on the separation of electrodes. The double-layer voltage is the real voltage used in processing. Under DC voltage, the apparent voltages between two electrodes are constant for different separations, but the real voltages change with the separat...

  15. Hardware Euclidean Distance Transform Implementation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Ying-hua; ZENG Pei-feng; TANG Li-ping

    2004-01-01

    Based on an efficient algorithm of Euclidean distance transform for binary images, a circuit of O(N2) size is proposed. With in-place calculation, both the intermediate data storing and the result output use the same memory with the input data. This reduces the amount of memory largely. By replacing multipliers with counters, comparators, and adders, the circuit size is further reduced and its calculation speed is improved also.

  16. Distance Probes of Dark Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, A; Aldering, G; Allen, S; Baltay, C; Cahn, R; D'Andrea, C; Dalal, N; Dawson, K; Denney, K; Eisenstein, D; Finley, D; Freedman, W; Ho, S; Holz, D; Kent, A; Kasen, D; Kessler, R; Kuhlmann, S; Linder, E; Martini, P; Nugent, P; Perlmutter, S; Peterson, B; Riess, A; Rubin, D; Sako, M; Suntzeff, N; Suzuki, N; Thomas, R; Wood-Vasey, W M; Woosley, S

    2013-01-01

    This document presents the results from the Distances subgroup of the Cosmic Frontier Community Planning Study (Snowmass 2013). We summarize the current state of the field as well as future prospects and challenges. In addition to the established probes using Type IA supernovae and baryon acoustic oscillations, we also consider prospective methods based on clusters, active galactic nuclei, gravitational wave sirens and strong lensing time delays.

  17. Students’ Role in Distance Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Beers Fägersten, Kristy

    2008-01-01

    1. IntroductionMuch of the support that students have in a traditional classroom is absent in a distance learning course. In the traditional classroom, the learner is together with his or her classmates and the teacher; learning is socially embedded. Students can talk to each other and may learn from each other as they go through the learning process together. They also witness the teacher’s expression of the knowledge firsthand. The class participants communicate to each other not ...

  18. The Magnetotail at Lunar Distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibeck, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    This presentation reviews some of the single-point observations of the magnetotail at lunar distances made by ALSEP, Explorer 33, 35, ISEE-3, and Geotail that form the framework for interpreting more recent dual-spacecraft ARTEMIS observations. Earth's distant magnetotail flaps, twists, and flattens in response to variations in the solar wind flow direction and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientation. It may even disappear leaving nothing more than a wake during strongly northward IMF orientations. Standing slow mode expansion fans provide for a gradual transition between magnetotail lobe and magnetosheath plasma and magnetic field parameters. The distant neutral line may at times reside at lunar distances, creating jets of sunward-streaming plasma within the cislunar plasma sheet and layers of streaming energetic particles on its boundaries. Reconnection at near-Earth neutral lines releases antisunward-moving plasmoids that transit lunar distances, briefly expanding the diameter of the plasma sheet and magnetotail. Taken as a whole, the distant magnetotail is a fascinating plasma laboratory and a region of great important to the magnetosphere.

  19. Fingerprinting with Minimum Distance Decoding

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Shih-Chun; Gamal, Hesham El

    2007-01-01

    This work adopts an information theoretic framework for the design of collusion-resistant coding/decoding schemes for digital fingerprinting. More specifically, the minimum distance decision rule is used to identify 1 out of t pirates. Achievable rates, under this detection rule, are characterized in two distinct scenarios. First, we consider the averaging attack where a random coding argument is used to show that the rate 1/2 is achievable with t=2 pirates. Our study is then extended to the general case of arbitrary $t$ highlighting the underlying complexity-performance tradeoff. Overall, these results establish the significant performance gains offered by minimum distance decoding as compared to other approaches based on orthogonal codes and correlation detectors. In the second scenario, we characterize the achievable rates, with minimum distance decoding, under any collusion attack that satisfies the marking assumption. For t=2 pirates, we show that the rate $1-H(0.25)\\approx 0.188$ is achievable using an ...

  20. Support Services for Distance Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Frieden

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The creation and operation of a distance education support infrastructure requires the collaboration of virtually all administrative departments whose activities deal with students and faculty, and all participating academic departments. Implementation can build on where the institution is and design service-oriented strategies that strengthen institutional support and commitment. Issues to address include planning, faculty issues and concerns, policies and guidelines, approval processes, scheduling, training, publicity, information-line operations, informational materials, orientation and registration processes, class coordination and support, testing, evaluations, receive site management, partnerships, budgets, staffing, library and e-mail support, and different delivery modes (microwave, compressed video, radio, satellite, public television/cable, video tape and online. The process is ongoing and increasingly participative as various groups on campus begin to get involved with distance education activities. The distance education unit must continuously examine and revise its processes and procedures to maintain the academic integrity and service excellence of its programs. It’s a daunting prospect to revise the way things have been done for many years, but each department has an opportunity to respond to new ways of serving and reaching students.

  1. The Monge distance between quantum states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zyczkowski, Karol [Institute for Plasma Research, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Slomczynski, Wojciech [Instytut Matematyki, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, Cracow (Poland)

    1998-11-13

    We define a metric in the space of quantum states taking the Monge distance between corresponding Husimi distributions (Q-functions). This quantity fulfils the axioms of a metric and satisfies the following semiclassical property: the distance between two coherent states is equal to the Euclidean distance between corresponding points in the classical phase space. We compute analytically distances between certain states (coherent, squeezed, Fock and thermal) and discuss a scheme for numerical computation of Monge distance for two arbitrary quantum states. (author)

  2. Editorial ~ Global Diversity of Distance Education

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    In a panel presentation at the recent International Council for Open and Distance Education (ICDE) world conference in Dusseldorf, Germany, I had the opportunity to explain the unique role and mission of International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning (IRRODL) vis – vis our more established sister journals: Open Praxis, Open Learning, Journal of Distance Education, Distance Education, and American Journal of Distance Education. Although all of these journals share a common comm...

  3. Mattig's relation and dynamical distance indicators

    CERN Document Server

    Teerikorpi, Pekka

    2016-01-01

    We discuss how the redshift (Mattig) method in Friedmann cosmology relates to dynamical distance indicators based on Newton's gravity (Teerikorpi 2011). It belongs to the class of indicators where the relevant length inside the system is the distance itself (in this case the proper metric distance). As the Friedmann model has Newtonian analogy, its use to infer distances has instructive similarities to classical dynamical distance indicators. In view of the theoretical exact linear distance-velocity law, we emphasize that it is conceptually correct to derive the cosmological distance via the route: redshift (primarily observed) --> space expansion velocity (not directly observed) --> metric distance (physical length in "cm"). Important properties of the proper metric distance are summarized.

  4. Distance Measurement Solves Astrophysical Mysteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-08-01

    Location, location, and location. The old real-estate adage about what's really important proved applicable to astrophysics as astronomers used the sharp radio "vision" of the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) to pinpoint the distance to a pulsar. Their accurate distance measurement then resolved a dispute over the pulsar's birthplace, allowed the astronomers to determine the size of its neutron star and possibly solve a mystery about cosmic rays. "Getting an accurate distance to this pulsar gave us a real bonanza," said Walter Brisken, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, NM. Monogem Ring The Monogem Ring, in X-Ray Image by ROSAT satellite CREDIT: Max-Planck Institute, American Astronomical Society (Click on Image for Larger Version) The pulsar, called PSR B0656+14, is in the constellation Gemini, and appears to be near the center of a circular supernova remnant that straddles Gemini and its neighboring constellation, Monoceros, and is thus called the Monogem Ring. Since pulsars are superdense, spinning neutron stars left over when a massive star explodes as a supernova, it was logical to assume that the Monogem Ring, the shell of debris from a supernova explosion, was the remnant of the blast that created the pulsar. However, astronomers using indirect methods of determining the distance to the pulsar had concluded that it was nearly 2500 light-years from Earth. On the other hand, the supernova remnant was determined to be only about 1000 light-years from Earth. It seemed unlikely that the two were related, but instead appeared nearby in the sky purely by a chance juxtaposition. Brisken and his colleagues used the VLBA to make precise measurements of the sky position of PSR B0656+14 from 2000 to 2002. They were able to detect the slight offset in the object's apparent position when viewed from opposite sides of Earth's orbit around the Sun. This effect, called parallax, provides a direct measurement of

  5. An overview on distance and pseudo distance functions and their applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Xiangyang; DING Han; ZHONG Binglin; XIONG Youlun

    2003-01-01

    The fast and accurate collision detection and distance calculation between geometric models is fundamental in robotics, manufacturing and computer-simulated environments. This paper surveys the state of the art in the theory and algorithms of distance and pseudo distance functions between convex sets. An overview on the existing results, including fast algorithms for distance calculation, definitions and properties of various pseudo distance functions (the J-function, the growth distance, and the pseudo minimum translational distance), is presented. The distance and pseudo distance functions are versatile in a wide range of areas. Their applications in robot motion planning, grasp analysis/synthesis, form error evaluation, and engineering optimization is demonstrated.

  6. Anxiety and Resistance in Distance Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazime Tuncay

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate students' anxiety and resistance towards learning through distance education.Specifically, the study sought answers to the following questions: -What are the reasons of students not choosing distancelearning courses? -Which symptoms of anxiety, if any, do distance learner’s exhibit towards distance learning? Does genderhave any significant relationships with distance learners' perception of factors that affect their anxiety and resistance? A totalof 120 distance education students in Near East University were observed and 96 of them were interviewed. Computer anxiety,language anxiety, social anxiety were observed to be among the reasons of students’ resistance to distance learning.

  7. A note on the path interval distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coons, Jane Ivy; Rusinko, Joseph

    2016-06-01

    The path interval distance accounts for global congruence between locally incongruent trees. We show that the path interval distance provides a lower bound for the nearest neighbor interchange distance. In contrast to the Robinson-Foulds distance, random pairs of trees are unlikely to be maximally distant from one another under the path interval distance. These features indicate that the path interval distance should play a role in phylogenomics where the comparison of trees on a fixed set of taxa is becoming increasingly important.

  8. Lightweight Distance Bounding Protocol against Relay Attacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Seok; Cho, Kookrae; Yum, Dae Hyun; Hong, Sung Je; Lee, Pil Joong

    Traditional authentication protocols are based on cryptographic techniques to achieve identity verification. Distance bounding protocols are an enhanced type of authentication protocol built upon both signal traversal time measurement and cryptographic techniques to accomplish distance verification as well as identity verification. A distance bounding protocol is usually designed to defend against the relay attack and the distance fraud attack. As there are applications to which the distance fraud attack is not a serious threat, we propose a streamlined distance bounding protocol that focuses on the relay attack. The proposed protocol is more efficient than previous protocols and has a low false acceptance rate under the relay attack.

  9. A Cognitively Grounded Measure of Pronunciation Distance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieling, M.; Nerbonne, J.; Bloem, J.; Gooskens, C.; Heeringa, W.; Baayen, R.H.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we develop pronunciation distances based on naive discriminative learning (NDL). Measures of pronunciation distance are used in several subfields of linguistics, including psycholinguistics, dialectology and typology. In contrast to the commonly used Levenshtein algorithm, NDL is groun

  10. Distance-based classification of keystroke dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran Nguyen, Ngoc

    2016-07-01

    This paper uses the keystroke dynamics in user authentication. The relationship between the distance metrics and the data template, for the first time, was analyzed and new distance based algorithm for keystroke dynamics classification was proposed. The results of the experiments on the CMU keystroke dynamics benchmark dataset1 were evaluated with an equal error rate of 0.0614. The classifiers using the proposed distance metric outperform existing top performing keystroke dynamics classifiers which use traditional distance metrics.

  11. THE INFLUENCE OF WOMEN ON DISTANCE EDUCATION

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The impact of distance education on women has been significant. Distance education has been a viable means for helping women reach their educational ambitions. Over the last 40 years distance education has increased the ease of access and control over study time. With geographical and time barriers removed, women in particular were able to add the role of student to their list of responsibilities. Women have defeated educational barriers through educational opportunities presented by distance...

  12. Time delay and distance measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshire, James B. (Inventor); Sun, Xiaoli (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method for measuring time delay and distance may include providing an electromagnetic radiation carrier frequency and modulating one or more of amplitude, phase, frequency, polarization, and pointing angle of the carrier frequency with a return to zero (RZ) pseudo random noise (PN) code. The RZ PN code may have a constant bit period and a pulse duration that is less than the bit period. A receiver may detect the electromagnetic radiation and calculate the scattering profile versus time (or range) by computing a cross correlation function between the recorded received signal and a three-state RZ PN code kernel in the receiver. The method also may be used for pulse delay time (i.e., PPM) communications.

  13. Distance effects in electrochemical micromachining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lizhong; Pan, Yue; Zhao, Chuanjun

    2016-09-01

    Considering exponential dependence of currents on double-layer voltage and the feedback effect of the electrolyte resistance, a distance effect in electrochemical micromachining is found, namely that both time constant and double-layer voltage depend on the separation of electrodes. The double-layer voltage is the real voltage used in processing. Under DC voltage, the apparent voltages between two electrodes are constant for different separations, but the real voltages change with the separations. Small separations exert substantial effects on the real voltages. Accordingly, a DC-voltage small-separation electrochemical micromachining technique was proposed. The double-layer voltage drops sharply as the small separation increases. Thus, the electrochemical reactions are confined to electrode regions in very close proximity even under DC voltage. The machining precision can be significantly enhanced by reducing the voltage and separation between electrodes. With this technique, the machining of conducting materials with submicrometre precision was achieved.

  14. Normalized Compression Distance of Multiples

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, Andrew R

    2012-01-01

    Normalized compression distance (NCD) is a parameter-free similarity measure based on compression. The NCD between pairs of objects is not sufficient for all applications. We propose an NCD of finite multisets (multiples) of objacts that is metric and is better for many applications. Previously, attempts to obtain such an NCD failed. We use the theoretical notion of Kolmogorov complexity that for practical purposes is approximated from above by the length of the compressed version of the file involved, using a real-world compression program. We applied the new NCD for multiples to retinal progenitor cell questions that were earlier treated with the pairwise NCD. Here we get significantly better results. We also applied the NCD for multiples to synthetic time sequence data. The preliminary results are as good as nearest neighbor Euclidean classifier.

  15. Rough Way for Academics: Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gursul, Fatih

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to compare the academics' perceptions about face to face and distance education, beside finding out the contributions of distance education to them, difficulties they experience in synchronous and asynchronous distance education environments and suggestions for possible solutions of the existing problems. The sample consists of 52…

  16. Global continuation for distance geometry problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    More, J.J.; Wu, Zhijun

    1995-03-01

    Distance geometry problems arise in the interpretation of NMR data and in the determination of protein structure. The authors formulate the distance geometry problem as a global minimization problem with special structure, and show the global smoothing techniques and a continuation approach for global optimization can be used to determine solutions of distance geometry problems with a nearly 100% probability of success.

  17. Perspectives of Research on Distance Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, Borje

    The history of research on distance education was studied. Major research done on distance education in such diverse areas as the United States, Venezuela, and Europe was analyzed. It was discovered that the earliest attempts to develop theories of distance education were mainly concerned with identifying its very concept. Like most educational…

  18. Continuity Properties of Distances for Markov Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaeger, Manfred; Mao, Hua; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we investigate distance functions on finite state Markov processes that measure the behavioural similarity of non-bisimilar processes. We consider both probabilistic bisimilarity metrics, and trace-based distances derived from standard Lp and Kullback-Leibler distances. Two desirable...... continuity properties for such distances are identified. We then establish a number of results that show that these two properties are in conflict, and not simultaneously fulfilled by any of our candidate natural distance functions. An impossibility result is derived that explains to some extent...

  19. Kinematic Distance of Galactic Planetary Nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, A Y; Zhu, H; Leahy, D A; Wu, D

    2016-01-01

    We construct \\HI~absorption spectra for 18 planetary nebulae (PNe) and their background sources using the data from the International Galactic Plane Survey. We estimate the kinematic distances of these PNe, among which 15 objects' kinematic distances are obtained for the first time. The distance uncertainties of 13 PNe range from 10% to 50%, which is a significant improvement with uncertainties of a factor two or three smaller than most of previous distance measurements. We confirm that PN G030.2-00.1 is not a PN because of its large distance found here.

  20. Critical Points in Distance Learning System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Airina Savickaitė

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – This article presents the results of distance learning system analysis, i.e. the critical elements of the distance learning system. The critical points of distance learning are a part of distance education online environment interactivity/community process model. The most important is the fact that the critical point is associated with distance learning participants. Design/methodology/approach – Comparative review of articles and analysis of distance learning module. Findings – A modern man is a lifelong learner and distance learning is a way to be a modern person. The focus on a learner and feedback is the most important thing of learning distance system. Also, attention should be paid to the lecture-appropriate knowledge and ability to convey information. Distance system adaptation is the way to improve the learner’s learning outcomes. Research limitations/implications – Different learning disciplines and learning methods may have different critical points. Practical implications – The information of analysis could be important for both lecturers and students, who studies distance education systems. There are familiar critical points which may deteriorate the quality of learning. Originality/value – The study sought to develop remote systems for applications in order to improve the quality of knowledge. Keywords: distance learning, process model, critical points. Research type: review of literature and general overview.

  1. Distance Education at Silesian University of Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Klosowski

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents Distance Learning Platform used by Silesian University of Technology. Distance Learning Platform is based on modular object-oriented dynamic learning environment, represents LMS (Learning Management Systems technology, a software package designed to help educators create quality online courses. Currently on Distance Learning Platform at Silesian University of Technology are available over 520 online courses created for students of twelve University's faculties. Number of Distance Learning Platform users exceeds 12000. Distance Learning Platform works as typically asynchronous e-learning service, but in the future more synchronous e-learning services will be added. Distance Learning Platform has great potential to create a successful elearning experience by providing a plethora of excellent tools that can be used to enhance conventional classroom instruction, in hybrid courses, or any distance learning arrangements.

  2. Application of Argonne's Glass Furnace Model to longhorn glass corporation oxy-fuel furnace for the production of amber glass.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, B.; Shell, J.; Jones, S.; Energy Systems; Shell Glass Consulting; Anheuser-Busch Packaging Group

    2006-09-06

    The objective of this project is to apply the Argonne National Laboratory's Glass Furnace Model (GFM) to the Longhorn oxy-fuel furnace to improve energy efficiency and to investigate the transport of gases released from the batch/melt into the exhaust. The model will make preliminary estimates of the local concentrations of water, carbon dioxide, elemental oxygen, and other subspecies in the entire combustion space as well as the concentration of these species in the furnace exhaust gas. This information, along with the computed temperature distribution in the combustion space may give indications on possible locations of crown corrosion. An investigation into the optimization of the furnace will be performed by varying several key parameters such as the burner firing pattern, exhaust number/size, and the boost usage (amount and distribution). Results from these parametric studies will be analyzed to determine more efficient methods of operating the furnace that reduce crown corrosion. Finally, computed results from the GFM will be qualitatively correlated to measured values, thus augmenting the validation of the GFM.

  3. Treatment of EBR-I NaK mixed waste at Argonne National Laboratory and subsequent land disposal at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, S. D.; Buzzell, J. A.; Holzemer, M. J.

    1998-02-03

    Sodium/potassium (NaK) liquid metal coolant, contaminated with fission products from the core meltdown of Experimental Breeder Reactor I (EBR-I) and classified as a mixed waste, has been deactivated and converted to a contact-handled, low-level waste at Argonne's Sodium Component Maintenance Shop and land disposed at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Treatment of the EBR-I NaK involved converting the sodium and potassium to its respective hydroxide via reaction with air and water, followed by conversion to its respective carbonate via reaction with carbon dioxide. The resultant aqueous carbonate solution was solidified in 55-gallon drums. Challenges in the NaK treatment involved processing a mixed waste which was incompletely characterized and difficult to handle. The NaK was highly radioactive, i.e. up to 4.5 R/hr on contact with the mixed waste drums. In addition, the potential existed for plutonium and toxic characteristic metals to be present in the NaK, resultant from the location of the partial core meltdown of EBR-I in 1955. Moreover, the NaK was susceptible to degradation after more than 40 years of storage in unmonitored conditions. Such degradation raised the possibility of energetic exothermic reactions between the liquid NaK and its crust, which could have consisted of potassium superoxide as well as hydrated sodium/potassium hydroxides.

  4. Report on the workshop "Decay spectroscopy at CARIBU: advanced fuel cycle applications, nuclear structure and astrophysics". 14-16 April 2011, Argonne National Laboratory, USA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondev, F.; Carpenter, M.P.; Chowdhury, P.; Clark, J.A.; Lister, C.J.; Nichols, A.L.; Swewryniak, D. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (Univ. of Massachusetts); (Univ. of Surrey)

    2011-10-06

    A workshop on 'Decay Spectroscopy at CARIBU: Advanced Fuel Cycle Applications, Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics' will be held at Argonne National Laboratory on April 14-16, 2011. The aim of the workshop is to discuss opportunities for decay studies at the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) of the ATLAS facility with emphasis on advanced fuel cycle (AFC) applications, nuclear structure and astrophysics research. The workshop will consist of review and contributed talks. Presentations by members of the local groups, outlining the status of relevant in-house projects and availabile equipment, will also be organized. time will also be set aside to discuss and develop working collaborations for future decay studies at CARIBU. Topics of interest include: (1) Decay data of relevance to AFC applications with emphasis on reactor decay heat; (2) Discrete high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy following radioactive decya and related topics; (3) Calorimetric studies of neutron-rich fission framgents using Total ABsorption Gamma-Ray Spectrometry (TAGS) technique; (4) Beta-delayed neutron emissions and related topics; and (5) Decay data needs for nuclear astrophysics.

  5. Giant Sparks at Cosmological Distances?

    CERN Document Server

    Kulkarni, S R; Neill, J D; Zheng, Z; Juric, M

    2014-01-01

    [Abridged] Millisecond duration bright radio pulses in the 1.4-GHz band and with inferred dispersion measures (DM) well in excess of Galactic values have been reported by Lorimer et al. and Thornton et al.. The all-sky rate of these events is large, ~10^4 per day above ~1 Jy. To add to the mystery there now exists "Perytons'' -- also pulsed and dispersed sources but most certainly of local (artificial or atmospheric) origin. The suggested models now range from sources originating in the Earth's atmosphere, in stellar coronae, in other galaxies and at even cosmological distances. Using a series of physically motivated assumptions combined with the observed properties of these bursts, we explore possible constraints on sites or processes that can account for such high DMs. In our analysis, we focus on the first such reported event by Lorimer et al.: a 30 Jy, 5-ms duration burst with a dispersion measure of 375 cm^-3 pc and exhibiting a steep frequency-dependent pulse width (hereafter dubbed as the Sparker). Ass...

  6. THE GOULD'S BELT DISTANCE SURVEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Loinard

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Observaciones que utilizan la interferometría de muy larga línea de base (VLBI por sus siglas en ingl´es pueden proveer la posición de radiofuentes compactas con una precisión del orden de 50 micro-segundos de arco. Esto es suficiente para medir la paralaje trigonométrica y los movimientos propios de cualquier objeto localizado hasta 500 pc del Sol con una precisión mejor que unos porcientos. Por ser magnéticamente activas, las estrellas jóvenes a menudo emiten emisión radio compacta detectable usando técnicas VLBI. Aquí, mostraremos cómo observaciones VLBI ya han restringido la distancia a las regiones de formación estelar cercanas más frecuentemente estudiadas (Tauro, Ofiuco, Orión, etc. y han empezado a revelar su estructura y su cinemática interna. Luego, describiremos un gran proyecto (llamado The Gould's Belt Distance Survey diseñado para proveer una vista detallada de la formación estelar en la vecindad Solar, usando observaciones VLBI.

  7. The redshift-distance relation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, I E

    1993-06-01

    Key predictions of the Hubble law are inconsistent with direct observations on equitable complete samples of extragalactic sources in the optical, infrared, and x-ray wave bands-e.g., the predicted dispersion in apparent magnitude is persistently greatly in excess of its observed value, precluding an explanation via hypothetical perturbations or irregularities. In contrast, the predictions of the Lundmark (homogeneous quadratic) law are consistent with the observations. The Lundmark law moreover predicts the deviations between Hubble law predictions and observation with statistical consistency, while the Hubble law provides no explanation for the close fit of the Lundmark law. The flux-redshift law F [symbol, see text] (1 + z)/z appears consistent with observations on equitable complete samples in the entire observed redshift range, when due account is taken of flux limits by an optimal statistical method. Under the theoretical assumption that space is a fixed sphere, as in the Einstein universe, this law implies the redshift-distance relation z = tan2(r/2R), where R is the radius of the spherical space. This relation coincides with the prediction of chronometric cosmology, which estimates R as 160 +/- 40 Mpc (1 parsec = 3.09 x 10(16) m) from the proper motion to redshift relation of superluminal sources. Tangential aspects, including statistical methodology, fundamental physical theory, bright cluster galaxy samples, and proposed luminosity evolution, are briefly considered.

  8. Long-Distance Free Fall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallant, Joseph

    1999-04-01

    One of the goals of physics education is to instill a sense of wonder in our students. We hope our natural curiosity will rub off on them and that they will apply the critical thinking skills we teach them to other aspects of their lives outside the classroom. As an example of this, consider the situation described in Milton's epic poem ``Paradise Lost''. Milton wrote that when the devil was cast out of heaven, he fell for nine days before landing in hell. In Milton's universe, hell is a separate place from Earth, but many people place hell at the center of the Earth. Based on these ideas, we can apply Newton's laws of motion to calculate the distance from heaven to Earth. This exercise is an example of the kind of intellectual exercise a physicist (or a physics student) might carry out when confronted with such information. We apply the basic principles of physics to a situation described in work of literature while making no attempt to validate or refute any philosophy, theology or ideology.

  9. Open and Distance Learning Today. Routledge Studies in Distance Education Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Fred, Ed.

    This book contains the following papers on open and distance learning today: "Preface" (Daniel); "Big Bang Theory in Distance Education" (Hawkridge); "Practical Agenda for Theorists of Distance Education" (Perraton); "Trends, Directions and Needs: A View from Developing Countries" (Koul); "American Distance Education" (Moore); "Creating the…

  10. Robotic laboratory for distance education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciano, Sarah C.; Kost, Alan R.

    2016-09-01

    This project involves the construction of a remote-controlled laboratory experiment that can be accessed by online students. The project addresses a need to provide a laboratory experience for students who are taking online courses to be able to provide an in-class experience. The chosen task for the remote user is an optical engineering experiment, specifically aligning a spatial filter. We instrument the physical laboratory set up in Tucson, AZ at the University of Arizona. The hardware in the spatial filter experiment is augmented by motors and cameras to allow the user to remotely control the hardware. The user interacts with a software on their computer, which communicates with a server via Internet connection to the host computer in the Optics Laboratory at the University of Arizona. Our final overall system is comprised of several subsystems. These are the optical experiment set-up, which is a spatial filter experiment; the mechanical subsystem, which interfaces the motors with the micrometers to move the optical hardware; the electrical subsystem, which allows for the electrical communications from the remote computer to the host computer to the hardware; and finally the software subsystem, which is the means by which messages are communicated throughout the system. The goal of the project is to convey as much of an in-lab experience as possible by allowing the user to directly manipulate hardware and receive visual feedback in real-time. Thus, the remote user is able to learn important concepts from this particular experiment and is able to connect theory to the physical world by actually seeing the outcome of a procedure. The latter is a learning experience that is often lost with distance learning and is one that this project hopes to provide.

  11. Distance and Cable Length Measurement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Sergio Elias; Acosta, Leopoldo; Toledo, Jonay

    2009-01-01

    A simple, economic and successful design for distance and cable length detection is presented. The measurement system is based on the continuous repetition of a pulse that endlessly travels along the distance to be detected. There is a pulse repeater at both ends of the distance or cable to be measured. The endless repetition of the pulse generates a frequency that varies almost inversely with the distance to be measured. The resolution and distance or cable length range could be adjusted by varying the repetition time delay introduced at both ends and the measurement time. With this design a distance can be measured with centimeter resolution using electronic system with microsecond resolution, simplifying classical time of flight designs which require electronics with picosecond resolution. This design was also applied to position measurement. PMID:22303169

  12. Distance and Cable Length Measurement System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonay Toledo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A simple, economic and successful design for distance and cable length detection is presented. The measurement system is based on the continuous repetition of a pulse that endlessly travels along the distance to be detected. There is a pulse repeater at both ends of the distance or cable to be measured. The endless repetition of the pulse generates a frequency that varies almost inversely with the distance to be measured. The resolution and distance or cable length range could be adjusted by varying the repetition time delay introduced at both ends and the measurement time. With this design a distance can be measured with centimeter resolution using electronic system with microsecond resolution, simplifying classical time of flight designs which require electronics with picosecond resolution. This design was also applied to position measurement.

  13. The Distance to the Draco Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Gladders, M D; Burns, C R; Attard, A; Casey, M P; Hamilton, D; Mallén-Ornelas, G; Karr, J L; Poirier, S M; Sawicki, M; Barrientos, L F; Mochnacki, S W; Gladders, Michael D.; Burns, Christopher R.; Hamilton, Devon; Mallén-Ornelas, Gabriela; Poirier, Sara M.; Sawicki, Marcin; Mochnacki, Stefan W.

    1998-01-01

    The understanding of the nature of intermediate and high velocity gas in the Milky Way is hampered by a paucity of distance estimates to individual clouds. A project has been started at the David Dunlap Observatory to address this lack of distance measures by observing early-type stars along the line of sight towards these clouds and searching for sodium doublet absorption at the clouds' systemic velocities. Distances to foreground stars (no absorption) and background stars (with absorption) are estimated from spectroscopic parallax, and thus the distance to the bracketed cloud is estimated. In this Letter, we present the first result from this ongoing project, a measurement of the distance to the Draco Cloud, which is the most studied of the intermediate velocity clouds. The result presented here is the first distance bracket which tightly constrains the position of the Draco Cloud. We briefly describe our target selection and observing methodology, and then demonstrate absorption at the velocity of the Drac...

  14. Inverse Distance Weighted Interpolation Involving Position Shading

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Zhengquan; WU Yaoxiang

    2015-01-01

    Considering the shortcomings of inverse distance weighted (IDW) interpolation in practical applications, this study improved the IDW algorithm and put forward a new spatial interpolation method that named as adjusted inverse distance weighted (AIDW). In interpolating process, the AIDW is capable of taking into account the comprehensive influence of distance and position of sample point to interpolation point, by adding a coefficient (K) into the normal IDW formula. The coefficient (K) is used...

  15. Long distance signaling using axionlike particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stancil, Daniel D.

    2007-12-01

    The possible existence of axionlike particles could lead to a new type of long-distance communication. In this work, basic antenna concepts are defined and a Friis-like equation is derived to facilitate long-distance link calculations. An example calculation is presented showing that communication over distances of 1000 km or more may be possible for ma5×10-8GeV-1.

  16. A Cognitively Grounded Measure of Pronunciation Distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieling, Martijn; Nerbonne, John; Bloem, Jelke; Gooskens, Charlotte; Heeringa, Wilbert; Baayen, R. Harald

    2014-01-01

    In this study we develop pronunciation distances based on naive discriminative learning (NDL). Measures of pronunciation distance are used in several subfields of linguistics, including psycholinguistics, dialectology and typology. In contrast to the commonly used Levenshtein algorithm, NDL is grounded in cognitive theory of competitive reinforcement learning and is able to generate asymmetrical pronunciation distances. In a first study, we validated the NDL-based pronunciation distances by comparing them to a large set of native-likeness ratings given by native American English speakers when presented with accented English speech. In a second study, the NDL-based pronunciation distances were validated on the basis of perceptual dialect distances of Norwegian speakers. Results indicated that the NDL-based pronunciation distances matched perceptual distances reasonably well with correlations ranging between 0.7 and 0.8. While the correlations were comparable to those obtained using the Levenshtein distance, the NDL-based approach is more flexible as it is also able to incorporate acoustic information other than sound segments. PMID:24416119

  17. A cognitively grounded measure of pronunciation distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieling, Martijn; Nerbonne, John; Bloem, Jelke; Gooskens, Charlotte; Heeringa, Wilbert; Baayen, R Harald

    2014-01-01

    In this study we develop pronunciation distances based on naive discriminative learning (NDL). Measures of pronunciation distance are used in several subfields of linguistics, including psycholinguistics, dialectology and typology. In contrast to the commonly used Levenshtein algorithm, NDL is grounded in cognitive theory of competitive reinforcement learning and is able to generate asymmetrical pronunciation distances. In a first study, we validated the NDL-based pronunciation distances by comparing them to a large set of native-likeness ratings given by native American English speakers when presented with accented English speech. In a second study, the NDL-based pronunciation distances were validated on the basis of perceptual dialect distances of Norwegian speakers. Results indicated that the NDL-based pronunciation distances matched perceptual distances reasonably well with correlations ranging between 0.7 and 0.8. While the correlations were comparable to those obtained using the Levenshtein distance, the NDL-based approach is more flexible as it is also able to incorporate acoustic information other than sound segments.

  18. Predation risk increases dispersal distance in prey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, Hatsune; Yano, Shuichi

    2014-06-01

    Understanding the ecological factors that affect dispersal distances allows us to predict the consequences of dispersal. Although predator avoidance is an important cause of prey dispersal, its effects on dispersal distance have not been investigated. We used simple experimental setups to test dispersal distances of the ambulatory dispersing spider mite ( Tetranychus kanzawai) in the presence or absence of a predator ( Neoseiulus womersleyi). In the absence of predators, most spider mites settled in adjacent patches, whereas the majority of those dispersing in the presence of predators passed through adjacent patches and settled in distant ones. This is the first study to experimentally demonstrate that predators induce greater dispersal distance in prey.

  19. Sublinear distance labeling for sparse graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Stephen; Dahlgaard, Søren; Knudsen, Mathias Bæk Tejs;

    2015-01-01

    between pairs of nodes that are at distance at least $D$ from each other. In this paper we consider distance labeling schemes for the classical case of unweighted and undirected graphs. We present the first distance labeling scheme of size $o(n)$ for sparse graphs (and hence bounded degree graphs......). This addresses an open problem by Gavoille et. al. [J. Algo. 2004], hereby separating the complexity from general graphs which require $\\Omega(n)$ size Moon [Proc. of Glasgow Math. Association 1965]. As an intermediate result we give a $O(\\frac{n}{D}\\log^2 D)$ $D$-preserving distance labeling scheme, improving...

  20. A cognitively grounded measure of pronunciation distance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martijn Wieling

    Full Text Available In this study we develop pronunciation distances based on naive discriminative learning (NDL. Measures of pronunciation distance are used in several subfields of linguistics, including psycholinguistics, dialectology and typology. In contrast to the commonly used Levenshtein algorithm, NDL is grounded in cognitive theory of competitive reinforcement learning and is able to generate asymmetrical pronunciation distances. In a first study, we validated the NDL-based pronunciation distances by comparing them to a large set of native-likeness ratings given by native American English speakers when presented with accented English speech. In a second study, the NDL-based pronunciation distances were validated on the basis of perceptual dialect distances of Norwegian speakers. Results indicated that the NDL-based pronunciation distances matched perceptual distances reasonably well with correlations ranging between 0.7 and 0.8. While the correlations were comparable to those obtained using the Levenshtein distance, the NDL-based approach is more flexible as it is also able to incorporate acoustic information other than sound segments.

  1. Analysis of movement kinematics on analogous spatial learning tasks demonstrates conservation of direction and distance estimation across humans (Homo sapiens) and rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köppen, Jenny R; Winter, Shawn S; Loda, Eileah L; Apger, Brianne P; Grimelli, Danielle; Hamilton, Derek A; Wallace, Douglas G

    2013-05-01

    This series of experiments evaluates the nature of the representation that mediates human (Homo sapiens) and rat (Rattus norvegicus) movement characteristics on analogous spatial learning tasks. The results of Experiment 1 demonstrated that self-movement cues were sufficient to guide the performance of human participants during place training and matching-to-place testing tasks adapted to tabletop or manipulatory scale. Experiment 2 investigated the effect of manipulating access to environmental cues during place training on the nature of the representation used to guide performance. Blindfolded human participants appeared to encode the absolute location of the goal, whereas participants with access to environmental cues appeared to encode the relative location of the goal. The results of Experiment 3 demonstrated that human participants with access to environmental cues exhibited a similar response tendency (as observed in Experiment 2) after half as many trials of place training. During Experiment 4, rats exhibited movement characteristics in the water maze that were similar to movement characteristics observed in human participants who were provided access to environmental cues. These observations provide evidence that direction and distance estimation processes mediate performance on spatial tasks that are conserved across humans and rats.

  2. Studies of acute and chronic radiation injury at the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 1970-1992: The JANUS Program Survival and Pathology Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grahn, D.; Wright, B.J.; Carnes, B.A.; Williamson, F.S.; Fox, C.

    1995-02-01

    A research reactor for exclusive use in experimental radiobiology was designed and built at Argonne National Laboratory in the 1960`s. It was located in a special addition to Building 202, which housed the Division of Biological and Medical Research. Its location assured easy access for all users to the animal facilities, and it was also near the existing gamma-irradiation facilities. The water-cooled, heterogeneous 200-kW(th) reactor, named JANUS, became the focal point for a range of radiobiological studies gathered under the rubic of {open_quotes}the JANUS program{close_quotes}. The program ran from about 1969 to 1992 and included research at all levels of biological organization, from subcellular to organism. More than a dozen moderate- to large-scale studies with the B6CF{sub 1} mouse were carried out; these focused on the late effects of whole-body exposure to gamma rays or fission neutrons, in matching exposure regimes. In broad terms, these studies collected data on survival and on the pathology observed at death. A deliberate effort was made to establish the cause of death. This archieve describes these late-effects studies and their general findings. The database includes exposure parameters, time of death, and the gross pathology and histopathology in codified form. A series of appendices describes all pathology procedures and codes, treatment or irradiation codes, and the manner in which the data can be accessed in the ORACLE database management system. A series of tables also presents summaries of the individual experiments in terms of radiation quality, sample sizes at entry, mean survival times by sex, and number of gross pathology and histopathology records.

  3. National Wind Distance Learning Collaborative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. James B. Beddow

    2013-03-29

    Executive Summary The energy development assumptions identified in the Department of Energy's position paper, 20% Wind Energy by 2030, projected an exploding demand for wind energy-related workforce development. These primary assumptions drove a secondary set of assumptions that early stage wind industry workforce development and training paradigms would need to undergo significant change if the workforce needs were to be met. The current training practice and culture within the wind industry is driven by a relatively small number of experts with deep field experience and knowledge. The current training methodology is dominated by face-to-face, classroom based, instructor present training. Given these assumptions and learning paradigms, the purpose of the National Wind Distance Learning Collaborative was to determine the feasibility of developing online learning strategies and products focused on training wind technicians. The initial project scope centered on (1) identifying resources that would be needed for development of subject matter and course design/delivery strategies for industry-based (non-academic) training, and (2) development of an appropriate Learning Management System (LMS). As the project unfolded, the initial scope was expanded to include development of learning products and the addition of an academic-based training partner. The core partners included two training entities, industry-based Airstreams Renewables and academic-based Lake Area Technical Institute. A third partner, Vision Video Interactive, Inc. provided technology-based learning platforms (hardware and software). The revised scope yielded an expanded set of results beyond the initial expectation. Eight learning modules were developed for the industry-based Electrical Safety course. These modules were subsequently redesigned and repurposed for test application in an academic setting. Software and hardware developments during the project's timeframe enabled redesign providing

  4. Binding Principle for Long-Distance Anaphors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Dong-Ik

    1997-01-01

    An analysis of long-distance anaphora, a binding phenomenon in which reflexives find their antecedents outside their local domain, is presented, using data from English, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Russian, Icelandic, and Italian. It is found that no approach deals with long-distance anaphors exclusively and elegantly. The binding domain…

  5. Efficient Communication Protocols for Deciding Edit Distance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jowhari, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Parsing method of [5,6] in combination with the Karp-Rabin fingerprints. In addition to yielding non-trivial bounds for the edit distance problem, this paper suggest a new conceptual framework and raises new questions regarding the embeddability of edit distance into the Hamming cube which might...

  6. Modes of Production: Fordism and Distance Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnes, Nick

    1993-01-01

    Analyzes the historical development of economic and educational systems and considers the relationship between industrialization and distance education. Modes of production and stages of conventional and distance education development are described, and future possibilities of mass higher and continuing education through the use of computer-based…

  7. Measuring Distances to Remote Galaxies and Quasars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Patrick J.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the use of spectroscopy and the redshift to measure how far an object is by measuring how fast it is receding from earth. Lists the most distant quasars yet found. Tables include "Redshift vs. Distance" and "Distances to Celestial Objects for Various Cosmologies." (CW)

  8. Introduction : The Metaphor of Historical Distance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Den Hollander, Jaap; Paul, Herman; Peters, Rik

    2011-01-01

    What does "historical distance" mean? Starting with Johan Huizinga, the famous Dutch historian who refused to lecture on contemporary history, this introductory article argues that "historical distance" is a metaphor used in a variety of intellectual contexts. Accordingly, the metaphor has ontologic

  9. Cultural Distance Asymmetry in Expatriate Adjustment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmer, Jan; Chiu, Randy K.; Shenkar, Oded

    2007-01-01

    Purpose - The current literature implicitly assumes a symmetric impact of cultural distance (CD) on expatriate adjustment. By using distance as a predictor of adjustment, the literature has rendered the direction of the flow irrelevant: a US expatriate in Germany is presumed to face the same hurd...

  10. Distance Education in India Present and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datt, Ruddar

    Distance education is offered by 4 universities and 34 institutes/directorates in India. All open universities have been brought under the direction of the Indira Gandhi National Open University with regard to networking and determination of grants. The networking has avoided unnecessary duplication of course preparation costs. Distance education…

  11. Spectral distance on the Moyal plane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinetti, Pierre [Universitaet Goettingen (Germany). Courant Centre

    2010-07-01

    We compute the spectral distance, defined in Connes' noncommutative geometry, in the Moyal plane. We find that the distance between the eigenstates m,m+1 of the quantum harmonic oscillator is proportional to m{sup -1/2}. We also show how to truncate the Moyal spectral triple in order to obtain quantum metric spaces in the sense of Rieffel.

  12. Exploring Cloud Computing for Distance Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wu; Cernusca, Dan; Abdous, M'hammed

    2011-01-01

    The use of distance courses in learning is growing exponentially. To better support faculty and students for teaching and learning, distance learning programs need to constantly innovate and optimize their IT infrastructures. The new IT paradigm called "cloud computing" has the potential to transform the way that IT resources are utilized and…

  13. A Roman Dodecahedron for measuring distance

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2012-01-01

    Here I am discussing a possible use of a Roman Dodecahedron, a bronze artifact of gallo-roman origin, for measuring distance. A dodecahedron, found at Jublains, the ancient Nouiodunum, dating from the 2nd or 3rd century AD, is used to create a model. Looking through the model, it is possible to test it for measurements of distance based on similar triangles.

  14. Who Graduates from Irish Distance University Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    This paper outlines results from an online survey of recent distance graduates. The study, based in Dublin City University (DCU) addresses a gap in the research on this cohort of graduates. Findings indicate that distance graduates are primarily from lower socio economic backgrounds, a group largely under-represented in full-time university…

  15. Distance Education for People with Visual Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liakou, Maria; Manousou, Evaggelia

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies the standards of higher Distance Education, focusing on the Hellenic Open University, for people who have visual impairments, so that it becomes fully accessible and thus helps reduce social exclusion. Specifically, it aims to study the operational context of Distance Education, the possibilities that modern technology provides…

  16. Audiences and Providers of Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarinia Roy, R. Roudi; Schumm, Walter R.

    2011-01-01

    As noted by Moore (2007, xxiii), the fifth section of the second edition of the "Handbook of Distance Education" focused on "some of the main consumers and suppliers of distance education programs," including elementary and secondary education, community colleges, universities, the corporate sector, continuing professional…

  17. Investigating Distance Education Students' Study Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poyraz, Cengiz

    2013-01-01

    Distance education, which is a planned way of teaching in which students and instructors are brought face to face in a classroom environment in several different ways by means of technology, has started to become widespread in many fields today. In distance education, students and instructors reside in different locations. Students can learn at…

  18. Applying Leadership Theories to Distance Education Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nworie, John

    2012-01-01

    The instructional delivery mode in distance education has been transitioning from the context of a physical classroom environment to a virtual learning environment or maintaining a hybrid of the two. However, most distance education programs in dual mode institutions are situated in traditional face-to-face instructional settings. Distance…

  19. Distance Education Report, 2011-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Community Colleges, Chancellor's Office, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This is a report on distance education in the California Community College. This is the seventh report to the California Community Colleges Board of Governors (BOG) per BOG Standing Order 409 (b) "that evaluates the effectiveness of distance education and education technology system wide and provides analysis of data demographically (by age,…

  20. Three Generations of Distance Education Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Terry; Dron, Jon

    2011-01-01

    This paper defines and examines three generations of distance education pedagogy. Unlike earlier classifications of distance education based on the technology used, this analysis focuses on the pedagogy that defines the learning experiences encapsulated in the learning design. The three generations of cognitive-behaviourist, social constructivist,…

  1. Research on Distance Education Development in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Ding; Jian, Niu; Yanhui, Han

    2010-01-01

    Distance education is among the significant fields for the application of educational technology. Distance education in China has gone through three phases, namely: correspondence-based education, radio and TV-based education and online education. This paper was based on educational technology application, and the historical, dialectic and…

  2. NASA Langley/CNU Distance Learning Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caton, Randall; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    NASA Langley Research Center and Christopher Newport University (CNU) provide, free to the public, distance learning programs that focus on math, science, and/or technology over a spectrum of education levels from K-adult. The effort started in 1997, and currently there are a suite of five distance-learning programs. This paper presents the major…

  3. Measuring Norwegian dialect distances using acoustic features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heeringa, Wilbert; Johnson, Keith; Gooskens, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    Levenshtein distance has become a popular tool for measuring linguistic dialect distances, and has been applied to Irish Gaelic, Dutch, German and other dialect groups. The method, in the current state of the art, depends upon phonetic transcriptions, even when acoustic differences are used the numb

  4. Institutional and specialized Distance learning program accreditation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehzabul Hoque Nahid

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Teaching and learning are no longer confined to the classroom or the school day. There are many technologies that can offer a great deal of flexibility in when, where, and how education is distributed. The Teacher's Guide to Distance Learning is intended for K-12 educators who are interested in implementing distance learning technologies. It provides an overview of the advantages and characteristics of the various technologies now being used to reach remote learners. Distance learning provides "access to learning when the source of information and the learners are separated by time and distance, or both." Distance education courses that require a physical on-site presence for any reason (excluding taking examinations may be referred to as hybrid or blended courses of study. Massive open online courses (MOOCs, aimed at large-scale interactive participation and open access via the web or other network technologies, are recent developments in distance education. A number of other terms are used roughly synonymously with distance education. However distance is the oldest and mostly commonly used term globally. It is also the broadest term and has the largest collection of related research articles. The main objective of this paper is develop an understanding of the characteristics and needs of distant students with little first-hand experience and limited, if any, face-to-face contact.

  5. Designing legible fonts for distance reading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Sofie

    2016-01-01

    This chapter reviews existing knowledge on distance legibility of fonts, and finds that for optimal distance reading, letters and numbers benefit from relative wide shapes, open inner counters and a large x-height; fonts should further be widely spaced, and the weight should not be too heavy or t...

  6. Sensor Network Localization with Imprecise Distances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cao, M.; Morse, A.S.; Anderson, B.D.O.

    2006-01-01

    An approach to formulate geometric relations among distances between nodes as equality constraints is introduced in this paper to study the localization problem with imprecise distance information in sensor networks. These constraints can be further used to formulate optimization problems for distan

  7. A Survey on Distance Vector Routing Protocols

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Linpeng

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we give a brief introduction to five different distance vector routing protocols (RIP, AODV, EIGRP, RIP-MTI and Babel) and give some of our thoughts on how to solve the count to infinity problem. Our focus is how distance vector routing protocols, based on limited information, can prevent routing loops and the count to infinity problem.

  8. New Strategy of the Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunyatova, Fatma Khanim; Salamov, Gulbala

    2014-01-01

    This article is dedicated to new strategy of distance education. The article deals with the possibilities of ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) in teaching specially distance education. In the article, ICT technological tools and their methods of application in educational process are looked over; discrepancy of intellectual…

  9. DISTANCES IN THE SPACES OF STATISTICAL DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlov A. I.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The core of applied statistics is statistics in spaces of arbitrary nature, based on the use of distances and optimization problems. This article discusses the various distances in spaces of statistical data, in particular, their conclusions on the basis of appropriate systems of axioms. The conditions and proofs of theorems first published in scientific periodicals

  10. 治疗床两侧金属C型臂对吸收剂量的影响%Dosimetric Evaluation of Metal C-arm for Precise Tabletop

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛宁; 王运来; 陈福慈; 张继青

    2011-01-01

    objective: To investigate the influence of metal C-arm on absorbed doses for Precise accelerator.Methods: Solid water phantom was placed in the centre of tennis racket panel and the distance from ion chamber to the panel were 5 cm and 10 cm respectively.The involved gantry angels were measured for different field sizes crossing the right C-arm which had 7 fixed positions.Transmission factors of the right-side C-arm were measured using 0.6 cm3 ion chamber for 6 MV and 15 MV X-ray with fixed gantry angle and rotational fields.Results: From 90°to 180°, the involved range of gantry angles was largest while the right C-arm was at R7.The restrict range of gantry angle enlarged with larger field size and smaller treatment depth.The dose deviation caused by C-arm increased with the beam energy and the distance through which the beam passed C-arm.For rotational beams, larger dose errors were found when the C-arm was closer to the linac isocenter.Conclusions:There is large deviation of absorbed dose caused by the C-arms of the treatment table.It is desirable to avoid the C-arm inside field in treatment planning and patient setup.%目的:研究加速器治疗床两侧金属C型臂对吸收剂量的影响.方法:测量模体置于治疗床板中央,电离室插孔到床板距离分别为5 cm和10 cm.右侧C型臂分别置于7个不同角度,确定不同面积射野经过C型臂时的机架角度.利用0.6 cc电离室测量6 MV和15 MV X线经过C型臂后固定野照射吸收剂量的变化,以及C型臂位置对旋转照射吸收剂量的影响.结果:机架角为90°~180°,治疗床右侧C型臂位于R7位置时,机架角度布野受限范围最大;机架角布野受限范围随射野面积的增大而增大,随治疗深度的减小而增大.对固定野照射,射线能量越小,吸收剂量的衰减越大;射线穿过C型臂的距离越大,吸收剂量的衰减越大;旋转照射时C型臂位置越靠近床板中心轴,吸收剂量衰减越大.结论:治疗床两侧金

  11. Automatic analysis of distance bounding protocols

    CERN Document Server

    Malladi, Sreekanth; Kothapalli, Kishore

    2010-01-01

    Distance bounding protocols are used by nodes in wireless networks to calculate upper bounds on their distances to other nodes. However, dishonest nodes in the network can turn the calculations both illegitimate and inaccurate when they participate in protocol executions. It is important to analyze protocols for the possibility of such violations. Past efforts to analyze distance bounding protocols have only been manual. However, automated approaches are important since they are quite likely to find flaws that manual approaches cannot, as witnessed in literature for analysis pertaining to key establishment protocols. In this paper, we use the constraint solver tool to automatically analyze distance bounding protocols. We first formulate a new trace property called Secure Distance Bounding (SDB) that protocol executions must satisfy. We then classify the scenarios in which these protocols can operate considering the (dis)honesty of nodes and location of the attacker in the network. Finally, we extend the const...

  12. Simple expressions for the long walk distance

    CERN Document Server

    Chebotarev, Pavel; Balaji, R

    2011-01-01

    The walk distances in graphs are defined as the result of appropriate transformations of the $\\sum_{k=0}^\\infty(tA)^k$ proximity measures, where $A$ is the weighted adjacency matrix of a connected weighted graph and $t$ is a sufficiently small positive parameter. The walk distances are graph-geodetic, moreover, they converge to the shortest path distance and to the so-called long walk distance as the parameter $t$ approaches its limiting values. In this paper, simple expressions for the long walk distance are obtained. They involve the generalized inverse, minors, and inverses of submatrices of the symmetric irreducible singular M-matrix ${\\cal L}=\\rho I-A,$ where $\\rho$ is the Perron root of $A.$

  13. Three Generations of Distance Education Pedagogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Anderson

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper defines and examines three generations of distance education pedagogy. Unlike earlier classifications of distance education based on the technology used, this analysis focuses on the pedagogy that defines the learning experiences encapsulated in the learning design. The three generations of cognitive-behaviourist, social constructivist, and connectivist pedagogy are examined, using the familiar community of inquiry model (Garrison, Anderson, & Archer, 2000 with its focus on social, cognitive, and teaching presences. Although this typology of pedagogies could also be usefully applied to campus-based education, the need for and practice of openness and explicitness in distance education content and process makes the work especially relevant to distance education designers, teachers, and developers. The article concludes that high-quality distance education exploits all three generations as determined by the learning content, context, and learning expectations.

  14. On Properties of the Generalized Wasserstein Distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoli, Benedetto; Rossi, Francesco

    2016-12-01

    The Wasserstein distances W p ( p {≥q} 1), defined in terms of a solution to the Monge-Kantorovich problem, are known to be a useful tool to investigate transport equations. In particular, the Benamou-Brenier formula characterizes the square of the Wasserstein distance W 2 as the infimum of the kinetic energy, or action functional, of all vector fields transporting one measure to the other. Another important property of the Wasserstein distances is the Kantorovich-Rubinstein duality, stating the equality between the distance W 1( μ, ν) of two probability measures μ, ν and the supremum of the integrals in d( μ - ν) of Lipschitz continuous functions with Lipschitz constant bounded by one. An intrinsic limitation of Wasserstein distances is the fact that they are defined only between measures having the same mass. To overcome such a limitation, we recently introduced the generalized Wasserstein distances {W_p^{a,b}}, defined in terms of both the classical Wasserstein distance W p and the total variation (or L 1) distance, see (Piccoli and Rossi in Archive for Rational Mechanics and Analysis 211(1):335-358, 2014). Here p plays the same role as for the classic Wasserstein distance, while a and b are weights for the transport and the total variation term. In this paper we prove two important properties of the generalized Wasserstein distances: (1) a generalized Benamou-Brenier formula providing the equality between {W_2^{a,b}} and the supremum of an action functional, which includes a transport term (kinetic energy) and a source term; (2) a duality à la Kantorovich-Rubinstein establishing the equality between {W_1^{1,1}} and the flat metric.

  15. The ideal subject distance for passport pictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoff, Marcel A; Witzel, Carsten; Kreutz, Kerstin; Ramsthaler, Frank

    2008-07-04

    In an age of global combat against terrorism, the recognition and identification of people on document images is of increasing significance. Experiments and calculations have shown that the camera-to-subject distance - not the focal length of the lens - can have a significant effect on facial proportions. Modern passport pictures should be able to function as a reference image for automatic and manual picture comparisons. This requires a defined subject distance. It is completely unclear which subject distance, in the taking of passport photographs, is ideal for the recognition of the actual person. We show here that the camera-to-subject distance that is perceived as ideal is dependent on the face being photographed, even if the distance of 2m was most frequently preferred. So far the problem of the ideal camera-to-subject distance for faces has only been approached through technical calculations. We have, for the first time, answered this question experimentally with a double-blind experiment. Even if there is apparently no ideal camera-to-subject distance valid for every face, 2m can be proposed as ideal for the taking of passport pictures. The first step would actually be the determination of a camera-to-subject distance for the taking of passport pictures within the standards. From an anthropological point of view it would be interesting to find out which facial features allow the preference of a shorter camera-to-subject distance and which allow the preference of a longer camera-to-subject distance.

  16. Micro X-ray Fluorescence Imaging in a Tabletop Full Field-X-ray Fluorescence Instrument and in a Full Field-Particle Induced X-ray Emission End Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Francesco Paolo; Caliri, Claudia; Cosentino, Luigi; Gammino, Santo; Mascali, David; Pappalardo, Lighea; Rizzo, Francesca; Scharf, Oliver; Santos, Hellen Cristine

    2016-10-08

    A full field-X-ray camera (FF-XRC) was developed for performing the simultaneous mapping of chemical elements with a high lateral resolution. The device is based on a conventional CCD detector coupled to a straight shaped polycapillary. Samples are illuminated at once with a broad primary beam that can consist of X-rays or charged particles in two different analytical setups. The characteristic photons induced in the samples are guided by the polycapillary to the detector allowing the elemental imaging without the need for scanning. A single photon counting detection operated in a multiframe acquisition mode and a processing algorithm developed for event hitting reconstruction have enabled one to use the CCD as a high energy resolution X-ray detector. A novel software with a graphical user interface (GUI) programmed in Matlab allows full control of the device and the real-time imaging with a region-of-interest (ROI) method. At the end of the measurement, the software produces spectra for each of the pixels in the detector allowing the application of a least-squares fitting with external analytical tools. The FF-XRC is very compact and can be installed in different experimental setups. This work shows the potentialities of the instrument in both a full field-micro X-ray fluorescence (FF-MXRF) tabletop device and in a full field-micro particle induced X-ray emission (FF-MPIXE) end-station operated with an external proton beam. Some examples of applications are given as well.

  17. Labour Market Theories and Distance Education I: Industrialization and Distance Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumble, Greville

    1995-01-01

    Addresses industrialization and distance education and how they relate to the modernist and postmodernist models of work, Fordism, neo-Fordism and post-Fordism. Concludes that not all distance education is industrialized; traditional education is not always a craft; and Fordism does not adequately explain the development of distance education.…

  18. Rethinking Distance Learning Activities: A Comparison of Transactional Distance Theory and Activity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Haijun; Gyorke, Allan S.

    2008-01-01

    Despite its invaluable guidance to distance education development, transactional distance (TD) theory is not seamlessly synchronised with current field practice and lacks a social component. After it has provided over 30 years of guidance, there is now a need to re-appraise TD's propositions about distance learning activities. The social-cultural…

  19. Secondary Education at a Distance. IEC Broadsheets on Distance Learning No. 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perraton, Hilary

    One of a series offering practical advice and information on distance teaching, this broadsheet focuses on the ways in which distance teaching can support, expand, and change secondary education. Traditional criticisms of secondary schools are examined, including their irrelevancy, inefficiency, and inequity. Issues of distance education…

  20. The Cost of Distance Education. IEC Broadsheets on Distance Learning No. 17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perraton, Hilary

    One of a series offering practical advice and information on distance teaching, this broadsheet first looks at the reasons for trying to measure distance teaching costs and the methodological and economic difficulties involved in such measurements. Broadcasting and print costs in distance teaching are discussed, and evidence about the costs of…

  1. GLOBALIZATION, DISTANCE EDUCATION AND HEGEMONIC FUTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn RUSSELL

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Consideration of the place of theory in distance education suggests that existing definitions do not adequately account for economic, cultural and historical factors. The application of the notion of hegemonic valency to distance education highlights the ways in which tools, technological systems and online environments operate in predictable ways. Historically, the imperatives of market forces and social justice have displayed a tension that is continued in contemporary contexts including virtual learning environments. A characteristic of this tension can be seen in the forces and interactions associated with globalisation and technology. These forces, in association with others, have contributed to a null curriculum in which some alternatives open to distance education practitioners remain invisible. It is likely that this situation is further compounded by the difficulty of ascertaining what distance education practices are actually operating world-wide at any identifiable time. Available options for distance educators can be understood in terms of instrumental and interpersonal axes that can potentially indicate the relative consideration that can be given to these factors. This approach is suggested as one way to understand available options at a time when there has been an apparent increase in instrumental approaches to distance education at the expense of interpersonal approaches and issues of social justice. While this problem is of concern, it is more appropriate to reflect on the unintended consequences of distance education for society and identify them than it is to uncritically oppose globalisation and its adherents.

  2. Distance-based features in pattern classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Wei-Yang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In data mining and pattern classification, feature extraction and representation methods are a very important step since the extracted features have a direct and significant impact on the classification accuracy. In literature, numbers of novel feature extraction and representation methods have been proposed. However, many of them only focus on specific domain problems. In this article, we introduce a novel distance-based feature extraction method for various pattern classification problems. Specifically, two distances are extracted, which are based on (1 the distance between the data and its intra-cluster center and (2 the distance between the data and its extra-cluster centers. Experiments based on ten datasets containing different numbers of classes, samples, and dimensions are examined. The experimental results using naïve Bayes, k-NN, and SVM classifiers show that concatenating the original features provided by the datasets to the distance-based features can improve classification accuracy except image-related datasets. In particular, the distance-based features are suitable for the datasets which have smaller numbers of classes, numbers of samples, and the lower dimensionality of features. Moreover, two datasets, which have similar characteristics, are further used to validate this finding. The result is consistent with the first experiment result that adding the distance-based features can improve the classification performance.

  3. Approximate Graph Edit Distance in Quadratic Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesen, Kaspar; Ferrer, Miquel; Bunke, Horst

    2015-09-14

    Graph edit distance is one of the most flexible and general graph matching models available. The major drawback of graph edit distance, however, is its computational complexity that restricts its applicability to graphs of rather small size. Recently the authors of the present paper introduced a general approximation framework for the graph edit distance problem. The basic idea of this specific algorithm is to first compute an optimal assignment of independent local graph structures (including substitutions, deletions, and insertions of nodes and edges). This optimal assignment is complete and consistent with respect to the involved nodes of both graphs and can thus be used to instantly derive an admissible (yet suboptimal) solution for the original graph edit distance problem in O(n3) time. For large scale graphs or graph sets, however, the cubic time complexity may still be too high. Therefore, we propose to use suboptimal algorithms with quadratic rather than cubic time for solving the basic assignment problem. In particular, the present paper introduces five different greedy assignment algorithms in the context of graph edit distance approximation. In an experimental evaluation we show that these methods have great potential for further speeding up the computation of graph edit distance while the approximated distances remain sufficiently accurate for graph based pattern classification.

  4. Transforming distance education curricula through distributive leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Keppell

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines a core leadership strategy for transforming learning and teaching in distance education through flexible and blended learning. It focuses on a project centred on distributive leadership that involves collaboration, shared purpose, responsibility and recognition of leadership irrespective of role or position within an organisation. Distributive leadership was a core principle in facilitating the transformation of learning and teaching through a Teaching Fellowship Scheme that empowered leaders across a regional distance education university. In parallel, a design-based research project analysed the perceptions of the Teaching Fellows in relation to blended learning, time/space, peer learning, innovation and equity issues in relation to distance education.

  5. Pragmatic Distance and Appropriateness of Utterance Politeness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴丽丽

    2014-01-01

    The Politeness Principle proposed by Leech complements Grice ’ Cooperative Principle to a cer-tain extent in explaining the indirectness of language .However , the nature of politeness is its relativity . Determined by various factors such as social and cultural ones , the appropriateness of politeness at utter-ance level is affected by the appropriateness of the pragmatic distance between the participants .Different from the interpersonal relationships , pragmatic distance is calculated and determined in the process of communication varying with the variation of the communicative factors .Pragmatic distance is dynamic and can be maintained and altered by participants by using certain linguistic expressions to achieve the appro -priateness of politeness in communication .

  6. Robustness of Distance-to-Default

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Cathrine; Lando, David

    2013-01-01

    Distance-to-default is a remarkably robust measure for ranking firms according to their risk of default. The ranking seems to work despite the fact that the Merton model from which the measure is derived produces default probabilities that are far too small when applied to real data. We use...... simulations to investigate the robustness of the distance-to-default measure to different model specifications. Overall we find distance-to-default to be robust to a number of deviations from the simple Merton model that involve different asset value dynamics and different default triggering mechanisms...

  7. YUCCA Mountain Project - Argonne National Laboratory, Annual Progress Report, FY 1997 for activity WP 1221 unsaturated drip condition testing of spent fuel and unsaturated dissolution tests of glass.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, J. K.; Buck, E. C.; Emery, J. W.; Finch, R. J.; Finn, P. A.; Fortner, J.; Hoh, J. C.; Mertz, C.; Neimark, L. A.; Wolf, S. F.; Wronkiewicz, D. J.

    1998-09-18

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Waste Management Section of the Chemical Technology Division of Argonne National Laboratory in the period of October 1996 through September 1997. Studies have been performed to evaluate the behavior of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel samples under the unsaturated conditions (low-volume water contact) that are likely to exist in the Yucca Mountain environment being considered as a potential site for a high-level waste repository. Tests with actinide-doped waste glasses, in progress for over 11 years, indicate that the transuranic element release is dominated by colloids that continuously form and span from the glass surface. The nature of the colloids that form in the glass and spent fuel testing programs is being investigated by dynamic light scattering to determine the size distribution, by autoradiography to determine the chemistry, and by zeta potential to measure the electrical properties of the colloids. Tests with UO{sub 2} have been ongoing for 12 years. They show that the oxidation of UO{sub 2} occurs rapidly, and the resulting paragenetic sequence of secondary phases forming on the sample surface is similar to that observed for uranium found in natural oxidizing environments. The reaction of spent fuel samples in conditions similar to those used with UO{sub 2} have been in progress for over six years, and the results suggest that spent fuel forms many of the same alteration products as UO{sub 2}. With spent fuel, the bulk of the reaction occurs via a through-grain reaction process, although grain boundary attack is sufficient to have reacted all of the grain boundary regions in the samples. New test methods are under development to evaluate the behavior of spent fuel samples with intact cladding: the rate at which alteration and radionuclide release occurs when water penetrates fuel sections and whether the reaction causes the cladding to split. Alteration phases have been formed on fine grains of UO

  8. Environmental Impact of Long Distance Travel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Linda

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the CO2 emission resulting from long distance travel by Danes. The emissions are analysed as the Danes’ footprint the whole way from Denmark to the final destination. International travel represents 31% of the Danes’ CO2 emission from passenger travel and the cl......This paper presents an analysis of the CO2 emission resulting from long distance travel by Danes. The emissions are analysed as the Danes’ footprint the whole way from Denmark to the final destination. International travel represents 31% of the Danes’ CO2 emission from passenger travel...... and the climate burden from long overseas distances is especially high even though only few travel overseas. The travel activity is furthermore increasing much more for long distances than for European destinations. Domestic travel activity with overnight stay is nearly stagnating. The study furthermore shows...

  9. Distance function selection in several clustering algorithrms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Yu

    2004-01-01

    Most clustering algorithms need to describe the similarity of objects by a predefined distance function. Three distance functions which are widely used in two traditional clustering algorithms k-means and hierarchical clustering were investigated.Both theoretical analysis and detailed experimental results were given. It is shown that a distance function greatly affects clustering results and can be used to detect the outlier of a cluster by the comparison of such different results and give the shape information of clusters. In practice situation, it is suggested to use different distance function separately, compare the clustering results and pick out the "swing points". And such points may leak out more information for data analysts.

  10. Project Work in Networked Distance Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Morten; Helbo, Jan; Jensen, Lars Peter

    2000-01-01

    . As the experience since then has proven this to be a very successful innovation in higher education [1], it seems to be an obvious idea also to base our new distance educations on the project study form. Traditionally, however, distance education has been characterized by one-way communication and self......-study, whereas the project study form is based on collaboration and dialogue. Consequently, successful implementation of project work in distance education requires extensive utilisation of new information and communication technology. In this paper the experiences of project work in a new Master of Industrial...... Information Technology distance education is described. The program is offered through Open University, and the students have a BSc degree or equivalent and at least 2 years of relevant professional experience - and a full-time job. The students are assumed to study 20 hours per week, half of the time being...

  11. A glocal distance for network comparison

    CERN Document Server

    Jurman, Giuseppe; Riccadonna, Samantha; Filosi, Michele; Furlanello, Cesare

    2012-01-01

    When comparing networks (with the same number of nodes) with direct methods, a number of possible distances is already available in literature. Among others, two of the most common families are the set of edit-like distances and the spectral distances. The functions in the former family quantitatively evaluate the differences between two networks in terms of minimum number of edit operations (with possibly different costs) transforming one network into the other, that is, deletion and insertion of links, while spectral measures relies on functions of the eigenvalues of one of the connectivity matrices of the underlying graph. A noticeable issue affecting edit distance is the fact of being local, i.e. not taking into account the global structure of the networks but only summing the contributions coming from each single link. On the other hand, spectral measures cannot distinguish isomorphic or isospectral graphs. We propose here a possible solution to overcome both issues: combining together an edit and a spec...

  12. Manifold Learning by Preserving Distance Orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataer-Cansizoglu, Esra; Akcakaya, Murat; Orhan, Umut; Erdogmus, Deniz

    2014-03-01

    Nonlinear dimensionality reduction is essential for the analysis and the interpretation of high dimensional data sets. In this manuscript, we propose a distance order preserving manifold learning algorithm that extends the basic mean-squared error cost function used mainly in multidimensional scaling (MDS)-based methods. We develop a constrained optimization problem by assuming explicit constraints on the order of distances in the low-dimensional space. In this optimization problem, as a generalization of MDS, instead of forcing a linear relationship between the distances in the high-dimensional original and low-dimensional projection space, we learn a non-decreasing relation approximated by radial basis functions. We compare the proposed method with existing manifold learning algorithms using synthetic datasets based on the commonly used residual variance and proposed percentage of violated distance orders metrics. We also perform experiments on a retinal image dataset used in Retinopathy of Prematurity (ROP) diagnosis.

  13. LEVEL SET METHODS BASED ON DISTANCE FUNCTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王德军; 唐云; 于洪川; 唐泽圣

    2003-01-01

    Some basic problems on the level set methods were discussed, such as the method used to preserve the distance function, the existence and uniqueness of solution for the level set equations. The main contribution is to prove that in a neighborhood of the initial zero level set, the level set equations with the restriction of the distance function have a unique solution, which must be the signed distance function with respect to the evolving surface. Some skillful approaches were used: Noticing that any solution for the original equation was a distance function, the original level set equations were transformed into a simpler alternative form. Moreover, since the new system was not a classical one, the system was transforned into an ordinary one, for which the implicit function method was adopted.

  14. Institutional Distance and the Internationalization Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pogrebnyakov, Nicolai; Maitland, Carleen

    2011-01-01

    This paper applies the institutional lens to the internationalization process model. It updates the concept of psychic distance in the model with a recently developed, theoretically grounded construct of institutional distance. Institutions are considered simultaneously at the national and indust...... used in the internationalization process research. The results also indicate that the internationalization behavior of this type of service firms might differ from the staged process predicted by the internationalization process model.......This paper applies the institutional lens to the internationalization process model. It updates the concept of psychic distance in the model with a recently developed, theoretically grounded construct of institutional distance. Institutions are considered simultaneously at the national and industry...... levels. It also aims to understand whether the internationalization process of service firms is different from the behavior predicted by the model, which was developed for the manufacturing context. We empirically test the model using proportional hazard analysis with 130 instances of entry and presence...

  15. Mahalanobis Distance Based Iterative Closest Point

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mads Fogtmann; Blas, Morten Rufus; Larsen, Rasmus

    2007-01-01

    the notion of a mahalanobis distance map upon a point set with associated covariance matrices which in addition to providing correlation weighted distance implicitly provides a method for assigning correspondence during alignment. This distance map provides an easy formulation of the ICP problem that permits......This paper proposes an extension to the standard iterative closest point method (ICP). In contrast to ICP, our approach (ICP-M) uses the Mahalanobis distance to align a set of shapes thus assigning an anisotropic independent Gaussian noise to each point in the reference shape. The paper introduces...... a fast optimization. Initially, the covariance matrices are set to the identity matrix, and all shapes are aligned to a randomly selected shape (equivalent to standard ICP). From this point the algorithm iterates between the steps: (a) obtain mean shape and new estimates of the covariance matrices from...

  16. Improving Pulsar Distances by Modelling Interstellar Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Deshpande, A A

    1998-01-01

    We present here a method to study the distribution of electron density fluctuations in pulsar directions as well as to estimate pulsar distances. The method, based on a simple two-component model of the scattering medium discussed by Gwinn et al. (1993), uses scintillation & proper motion data in addition to the measurements of angular broadening & temporal broadening to solve for the model parameters, namely, the fractional distance to a discrete scatterer and the ascociated relative scattering strength. We show how this method can be used to estimate pulsar distances reliably, when the location of a discrete scatterer (e.g. an HII region), if any, is known. Considering the specific example of PSR B0736-40, we illustrate how a simple characterization of the Gum nebula region (using the data on the Vela pulsar) is possible and can be used along with the temporal broadening measurements to estimate pulsar distances.

  17. Markets, Distance Education, and Australian Higher Education

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The paper argues that the Australian university system is unstable. There will be significant change as government implements its reform agenda and even more radical change if it moves to new deregulation. The role of distance education in university education needs to be analyzed against this ‘market’ agenda of government in terms of characteristics of markets and market behavior. After a scan of the current role, the paper looks at two scenarios (regulated and deregulated) for distance educ...

  18. Unit distances and diameters in Euclidean spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Swanepoel, Konrad J

    2007-01-01

    We show that the maximum number of unit distances or of diameters in a set of n points in d-dimensional Euclidean space is attained only by specific types of Lenz constructions, for all d >= 4 and n sufficiently large, depending on d. As a corollary we determine the exact maximum number of unit distances for all even d >= 6, and the exact maximum number of diameters for all d >= 4, for all $n$ sufficiently large, depending on d.

  19. Redshift-distance relation in inhomogeneous cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Scharf, Günter

    2015-01-01

    We continue to study a cosmological model with large-scale inhomogeneity. Working in the cosmic rest frame we determine null geodesics, redshift and area and luminosity distance. Combining the result with Hubble's law enables us to calculate the distance of the local group of galaxies from the origin where the Big Bang gas taken place. We obtain a surprisingly small value of about 2 million light years.

  20. Perspectives on Group Work In Distance Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Hausstätter, Rune Sarromaa; NORDKVELLE, Yngve Troye

    2015-01-01

    Current distance education benefits greatly from educational software that makes group work possible for students who are separated in time and space. However, some students prefer distance education because they can work on their own. This paper explores how students react to expectations on behalf of the course provider to do their assignments in collaborative groups. They are seemingly both positively surprised by the challenges that group work offer, and they are less positive to the down...

  1. Distance Education at Conventional Universities in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Henning Kappel

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Germany’s educational system has undergone a series of transformations during the last 40 years. In recent years, marked increases in enrolment have occurred. In response, admission requirements have been relaxed and new universities have been established.Academic distance education in the former Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany was ushered in by the educational radio broadcasts around the end of the 1960s. Aside from the formation of the FernUniversität (Open University in West Germany in 1975, there were significant developments in distance education occurring at the major universities in the German Democratic Republic (East Germany. After German reunification in 1990, the new unitary state launched programs to advance the development of distance education programs at conventional universities.Germany’s campus-based universities (Präsenzuniversitäten created various entities, including central units and consortia of universities to design and market distance education programs. Hybridisation provides the necessary prerequisites for dual mode delivery, such as basic and continuing education programs, as well as for the combination of distance and campus-based education (Präsenzstudium. Hybridisation also has also opened the door for the creation of new programs.Following an initial phase in which distance education research is expected to centralize a trend towards decentralisation is likely to follow. The German Association for Distance Education (AG-F offers a viable research network in distance education. Two dual mode case studies are also be surveyed: The Master of Arts degree, offered by the University of Koblenz-Landau, with Library Science as the second major, and the University of Kaiserslautern, where basic education will continue to be captured within the domain of the Präsenzstudium or campus-based education.The area in which distance education is flourishing most is within the field of academic continuing

  2. INVESTIGATING DISTANCE EDUCATION STUDENTS’ STUDY SKILLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cengiz POYRAZ

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Distance education, which is a planned way of teaching in which students and instructors are brought face to face in a classroom environment in several different ways by means of technology, has started to become widespread in many fields today. In distance education, students and instructors reside in different locations. Students can learn at their pace and control their learning path, content and load of what they have learned and evaluate it. However, they should adopt strategies for effective studying in order not to waste their time and efforts. Because study skills, motivation, time management, exam preparation and coping with exam stress have an impact on students’ success. In this context, distance education students’ study skills are foregrounded in today’s widespread use of distance education. In accordance with this, this study aims to investigate some variables which are influential on the dimensions of distance education students’ motivation, time management, exam preparation and coping with exam stress. A personal information form and the Study Skills scale were used for data collection. This study was designed in survey model and SPSS16.0 statistical package program was used for the statistical analyses of the research data. The research findings were discussed in line with the literature and some suggestions were presented for further research and researchers.

  3. Constraining the Correlation Distance in Quantum Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Jean

    2010-01-01

    Standard Quantum Physics states that the outcome of measurements for some distant entangled subsystems are instantaneously statistically correlated, whatever their mutual distance. This correlation presents itself as if there were a correlation at a distance with infinite speed. It is expressed by the Bell Theorem. It has been experimentally verified over distances up to 18 km with a time resolution of a few picosecond, which can be translated into an apparent effective correlation speed larger than 10^7 c. The purpose of the present White Paper is to discuss the scientific interest and the feasibility to extend the correlation distance up to the Earth-Moon distance, i.e. 2 10^4 times larger than in present experiments. We are thus led to propose to install on the Moon a polarimter and a high performance photon detector with a high temporal resolution. Such an exploratory experiment would provide new tests of Quantum Physics and could perhaps discriminate between standard Quantum Physics and for instance the ...

  4. A Distance Measure for Genome Phylogenetic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Minh Duc; Allison, Lloyd; Dix, Trevor

    Phylogenetic analyses of species based on single genes or parts of the genomes are often inconsistent because of factors such as variable rates of evolution and horizontal gene transfer. The availability of more and more sequenced genomes allows phylogeny construction from complete genomes that is less sensitive to such inconsistency. For such long sequences, construction methods like maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood are often not possible due to their intensive computational requirement. Another class of tree construction methods, namely distance-based methods, require a measure of distances between any two genomes. Some measures such as evolutionary edit distance of gene order and gene content are computational expensive or do not perform well when the gene content of the organisms are similar. This study presents an information theoretic measure of genetic distances between genomes based on the biological compression algorithm expert model. We demonstrate that our distance measure can be applied to reconstruct the consensus phylogenetic tree of a number of Plasmodium parasites from their genomes, the statistical bias of which would mislead conventional analysis methods. Our approach is also used to successfully construct a plausible evolutionary tree for the γ-Proteobacteria group whose genomes are known to contain many horizontally transferred genes.

  5. Stochastic model updating using distance discrimination analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Zhongmin; Bi Sifeng; Sez Atamturktur

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript presents a stochastic model updating method, taking both uncertainties in models and variability in testing into account. The updated finite element (FE) models obtained through the proposed technique can aid in the analysis and design of structural systems. The authors developed a stochastic model updating method integrating distance discrimination analysis (DDA) and advanced Monte Carlo (MC) technique to (1) enable more efficient MC by using a response surface model, (2) calibrate parameters with an iterative test-analysis correlation based upon DDA, and (3) utilize and compare different distance functions as correlation metrics. Using DDA, the influence of distance functions on model updating results is analyzed. The proposed sto-chastic method makes it possible to obtain a precise model updating outcome with acceptable cal-culation cost. The stochastic method is demonstrated on a helicopter case study updated using both Euclidian and Mahalanobis distance metrics. It is observed that the selected distance function influ-ences the iterative calibration process and thus, the calibration outcome, indicating that an integra-tion of different metrics might yield improved results.

  6. KINEMATIC DISTANCE ASSIGNMENTS WITH H I ABSORPTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Courtney; Dickey, John M. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Private Bag 37, University of Tasmania, Hobart 7000 (Australia)

    2012-07-01

    Using H I absorption spectra from the International Galactic Plane Survey, a new method is implemented to resolve the kinematic distance ambiguity for 75 H II regions with known systemic velocities from radio recombination lines. A further 40 kinematic distance determinations are made for H II region candidates without known systemic velocities through an investigation of the presence of H I absorption around the terminal velocity. New kinematic distance determinations can be used to further constrain spiral arm parameters and the location and extent of other structures in the Milky Way disk. H I absorption toward continuum sources beyond the solar circle is also investigated. Follow-up studies of H I at higher resolution than the 1' to 2' of existing Galactic Plane Surveys will provide kinematic distances to many more H II regions on the far side of the Galactic center. On the basis of the velocity channel summation technique developed in this paper, a much larger sample of H II regions will be analyzed in a future paper to remove the near-far distance ambiguity.

  7. Refocusing distance of a standard plenoptic camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahne, Christopher; Aggoun, Amar; Velisavljevic, Vladan; Fiebig, Susanne; Pesch, Matthias

    2016-09-19

    Recent developments in computational photography enabled variation of the optical focus of a plenoptic camera after image exposure, also known as refocusing. Existing ray models in the field simplify the camera's complexity for the purpose of image and depth map enhancement, but fail to satisfyingly predict the distance to which a photograph is refocused. By treating a pair of light rays as a system of linear functions, it will be shown in this paper that its solution yields an intersection indicating the distance to a refocused object plane. Experimental work is conducted with different lenses and focus settings while comparing distance estimates with a stack of refocused photographs for which a blur metric has been devised. Quantitative assessments over a 24 m distance range suggest that predictions deviate by less than 0.35 % in comparison to an optical design software. The proposed refocusing estimator assists in predicting object distances just as in the prototyping stage of plenoptic cameras and will be an essential feature in applications demanding high precision in synthetic focus or where depth map recovery is done by analyzing a stack of refocused photographs.

  8. Absolute Orientation Based on Distance Kernel Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanbiao Sun

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The classical absolute orientation method is capable of transforming tie points (TPs from a local coordinate system to a global (geodetic coordinate system. The method is based only on a unique set of similarity transformation parameters estimated by minimizing the total difference between all ground control points (GCPs and the fitted points. Nevertheless, it often yields a transformation with poor accuracy, especially in large-scale study cases. To address this problem, this study proposes a novel absolute orientation method based on distance kernel functions, in which various sets of similarity transformation parameters instead of only one set are calculated. When estimating the similarity transformation parameters for TPs using the iterative solution of a non-linear least squares problem, we assigned larger weighting matrices for the GCPs for which the distances from the point are short. The weighting matrices can be evaluated using the distance kernel function as a function of the distances between the GCPs and the TPs. Furthermore, we used the exponential function and the Gaussian function to describe distance kernel functions in this study. To validate and verify the proposed method, six synthetic and two real datasets were tested. The accuracy was significantly improved by the proposed method when compared to the classical method, although a higher computational complexity is experienced.

  9. Validity of Self-Reported Running Distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dideriksen, Mette; Soegaard, Cristina; Nielsen, Rasmus O

    2016-06-01

    It is unclear whether there is a difference between subjective evaluation and objective global positioning systems (GPS) measurement of running distance. The purpose of this study was to investigate if such difference exists. A total of 100 participants (51% men; median age, 41.5; body mass, 78.1 kg ±13.8 SD) completed a run of free choice, then subjectively reported the distance in kilometer (km). This information was subsequently compared with the distance derived from a nondifferential GPS watch using paired t-tests and Bland-Altman's 95% limits of agreement. No significant difference was found between the mean paired differences between subjective evaluations and GPS measurements (1.86%, 95% confidence interval = -1.53%; 5.25%, p = 0.96). The Bland-Altman 95% limits of agreement revealed considerable variation (lower limit = -28% and upper limit = 40%). Such variation exceeds the clinical error range of 10%. In conclusion, the mean running distance (km) is similar between self-reporting and GPS measurements. However, researchers should consider using GPS measurements in favor of subjective reporting of running distance because of considerable variation on an individual level.

  10. Estimating Distances from Parallaxes. III. Distances of Two Million Stars in the Gaia DR1 Catalogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astraatmadja, Tri L.; Bailer-Jones, Coryn A. L.

    2016-12-01

    We infer distances and their asymmetric uncertainties for two million stars using the parallaxes published in the Gaia DR1 (GDR1) catalogue. We do this with two distance priors: A minimalist, isotropic prior assuming an exponentially decreasing space density with increasing distance, and an anisotropic prior derived from the observability of stars in a Milky Way model. We validate our results by comparing our distance estimates for 105 Cepheids which have more precise, independently estimated distances. For this sample we find that the Milky Way prior performs better (the rms of the scaled residuals is 0.40) than the exponentially decreasing space density prior (rms is 0.57), although for distances beyond 2 kpc the Milky Way prior performs worse, with a bias in the scaled residuals of -0.36 (versus -0.07 for the exponentially decreasing space density prior). We do not attempt to include the photometric data in GDR1 due to the lack of reliable color information. Our distance catalog is available at http://www.mpia.de/homes/calj/tgas_distances/main.html as well as at CDS. This should only be used to give individual distances. Combining data or testing models should be done with the original parallaxes, and attention paid to correlated and systematic uncertainties.

  11. A Foundation for Efficient Indoor Distance-Aware Query Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Hua; Cao, Xin; Jensen, Christian Søndergaard

    2012-01-01

    indoor distances. However, existing indoor space models do not account well for indoor distances. To address this shortcoming, we propose a data management infrastructure that captures indoor distance and facilitates distance-aware query processing. In particular, we propose a distance-aware indoor space...

  12. 14 CFR 25.113 - Takeoff distance and takeoff run.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Takeoff distance and takeoff run. 25.113... and takeoff run. (a) Takeoff distance on a dry runway is the greater of— (1) The horizontal distance... include a clearway, the takeoff run is equal to the takeoff distance. If the takeoff distance includes...

  13. Averaging of random sets based on their distance functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baddeley, A.J.; Molchanov, I.S.

    1995-01-01

    A new notion of expectation (or distance average) of random closed sets based on their distance function representation is introduced. A general concept of the distance function is exploited to define the expectation, which is the set whose distance function is closest to the expected distance funct

  14. Short distance behaviour of the effective string

    CERN Document Server

    Caselle, M; Panero, M

    2004-01-01

    We study the Polyakov loop correlator in the (2+1) dimensional Z_2 gauge model. A novel algorithm that we have presented recently, allows us to reach high precision results for a large range of distances and temperatures, giving us a unique opportunity to test predictions of the effective Nambu-Goto string model. Here we focus on the regime of low temperatures and small distances. In contrast to the high temperature, large distance regime, we find that our numerical results are not well described by the two loop-prediction of the Nambu-Goto model. In addition we compare our data with those for the SU(2) and SU(3) gauge models in (2+1) dimensions obtained by other authors. We generalize the result of Luscher and Weisz for a boundary term in the interquark potential to the finite temperature case.

  15. Estimating shot distance from limited pellets pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plebe, Alessio; Compagnini, Domenico

    2012-10-10

    Several methods are available for shooting range estimation based on pellets pattern on the target that have a remarkable degree of accuracy. The task is usually approached working under the assumption that the entire distribution of pellets is available for examination. These methods fail, however, when the victim has been hit by a portion of the pattern only. The problem can be solved with reasonable accuracy when there are areas of void in the victim that are adjacent to the area struck by pellets. This study presents a method that can be used in precisely this type of situation, allowing the estimation of shot distance in cases of partial pellet patterns. It is based on collecting distributions in test shots at several distances, and taking samples in the targets, constrained by the shape of the void and the pellet hit areas. Statistical descriptors of patterns are extracted from such samples, and fed into a neural network classifier, estimating shot ranges of distance.

  16. Optimal architectures for long distance quantum communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Sreraman; Li, Linshu; Kim, Jungsang; Lütkenhaus, Norbert; Lukin, Mikhail D; Jiang, Liang

    2016-02-15

    Despite the tremendous progress of quantum cryptography, efficient quantum communication over long distances (≥ 1000 km) remains an outstanding challenge due to fiber attenuation and operation errors accumulated over the entire communication distance. Quantum repeaters (QRs), as a promising approach, can overcome both photon loss and operation errors, and hence significantly speedup the communication rate. Depending on the methods used to correct loss and operation errors, all the proposed QR schemes can be classified into three categories (generations). Here we present the first systematic comparison of three generations of quantum repeaters by evaluating the cost of both temporal and physical resources, and identify the optimized quantum repeater architecture for a given set of experimental parameters for use in quantum key distribution. Our work provides a roadmap for the experimental realizations of highly efficient quantum networks over transcontinental distances.

  17. Distance-Based Opportunistic Mobile Data Offloading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaofeng; Lio, Pietro; Hui, Pan

    2016-01-01

    Cellular network data traffic can be offload onto opportunistic networks. This paper proposes a Distance-based Opportunistic Publish/Subscribe (DOPS) content dissemination model, which is composed of three layers: application layer, decision-making layer and network layer. When a user wants new content, he/she subscribes on a subscribing server. Users having the contents decide whether to deliver the contents to the subscriber based on the distance information. If in the meantime a content owner has traveled further in the immediate past time than the distance between the owner and the subscriber, the content owner will send the content to the subscriber through opportunistic routing. Simulations provide an evaluation of the data traffic offloading efficiency of DOPS. PMID:27314361

  18. Distance Duality Relation from Strong Gravitational Lensing

    CERN Document Server

    Liao, Kai; Cao, Shuo; Biesiada, Marek; Zheng, Xiaogang; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Under very general assumptions of metric theory of spacetime, photons traveling along null geodesics and photon number conservation, two observable concepts of cosmic distance, i.e. the angular diameter and the luminosity distances are related to each other by the so called distance duality relation (DDR) $D^L=D^A(1+z)^2$. Observational validation of this relation is quite important because any evidence of its violation could be a signal of new physics. In this letter we introduce a new method to test DDR based on strong gravitational lensing systems and supernovae Ia. Using a new compilation of strong lensing systems and JLA compilation of SNe Ia we found no evidence of DDR violation. However, not so much the final result but the method itself is worth attention, because unlike previously proposed techniques, it does not depend on prior assumptions concerning the details of cosmological model and galaxy cluster modelling.

  19. [Panorama of nursing distance education in Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo, Priscila Tagliaferro; Vieira, Sheila de Souza; Zem-Mascarenhas, Silvia Helena; Sandor, Elisane Regina; Vieira, Carla Roberta Sola de Paula

    2011-12-01

    The development of distance education is associated with the popularization and democratization of the accessibility to information and communication technologies. Nursing has been using this modality of education in both undergraduate and graduate courses, which has provided knowledge about other technologies, an easier accessibility, flexibility of time and space, and reduced costs. The objective of this study is map the national higher education distance nursing courses. This exploratory, descriptive study was developed by visiting governmental, non-governmental and institutional websites. Two undergraduate and nine graduate courses in nursing were found, which is considered to be a low number, considering that distance education is an appropriate pedagogical tool that permits to prepare a large number of nurses who are geographically dispersed and who do not have access to the conventional educational processes.

  20. Spectral Clustering with Local Projection Distance Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Diao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Constructing a rational affinity matrix is crucial for spectral clustering. In this paper, a novel spectral clustering via local projection distance measure (LPDM is proposed. In this method, the Local-Projection-Neighborhood (LPN is defined, which is a region between a pair of data, and other data in the LPN are projected onto the straight line among the data pairs. Utilizing the Euclidean distance between projective points, the local spatial structure of data can be well detected to measure the similarity of objects. Then the affinity matrix can be obtained by using a new similarity measurement, which can squeeze or widen the projective distance with the different spatial structure of data. Experimental results show that the LPDM algorithm can obtain desirable results with high performance on synthetic datasets, real-world datasets, and images.

  1. Length and distance on a quantum space

    CERN Document Server

    Martinetti, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    This contribution is an introduction to the metric aspect of noncommutative geometry, with emphasize on the Moyal plane. Starting by questioning "how to define a standard meter in a space whose coordinates no longer commute?", we list several recent results regarding Connes's spectral distance calculated between eigenstates of the quantum harmonic oscillator arXiv:0912.0906, as well as between coherent states arXiv:1110.6164. We also question the difference (which remains hidden in the commutative case) between the spectral distance and the notion of quantum length inherited from the length operator defined in various models of noncommutative space-time (DFR and \\theta-Minkowski). We recall that a standard procedure in noncommutative geometry, consisting in doubling the spectral triple, allows to fruitfully confront the spectral distance with the quantum length. Finally we refine the idea of discrete vs. continuous geodesics in the Moyal plane, introduced in arXiv:1106.0261.

  2. Distance dependence of fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R S Swathi; K L Sebastian

    2009-09-01

    Deviations from the usual -6 dependence of the rate of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) on the distance between the donor and the acceptor have been a common scenario in the recent times. In this paper, we present a critical analysis of the distance dependence of FRET, and try to illustrate the non--6 type behaviour of the rate for the case of transfer from a localized electronic excitation on the donor, a dye molecule to three different energy acceptors with delocalized electronic excitations namely, graphene, a two-dimensional semiconducting sheet and the case of such a semiconducting sheet rolled to obtain a nanotube. We use simple analytic models to understand the distance dependence in each case.

  3. The social distance theory of power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Joe C; Smith, Pamela K

    2013-05-01

    We propose that asymmetric dependence between individuals (i.e., power) produces asymmetric social distance, with high-power individuals feeling more distant than low-power individuals. From this insight, we articulate predictions about how power affects (a) social comparison, (b) susceptibility to influence, (c) mental state inference and responsiveness, and (d) emotions. We then explain how high-power individuals' greater experienced social distance leads them to engage in more abstract mental representation. This mediating process of construal level generates predictions about how power affects (a) goal selection and pursuit, (b) attention to desirability and feasibility concerns, (c) subjective certainty, (d) value-behavior correspondence, (e) self-control, and (f) person perception. We also reassess the approach/inhibition theory of power, noting limitations both in what it can predict and in the evidence directly supporting its proposed mechanisms. Finally, we discuss moderators and methodological recommendations for the study of power from a social distance perspective.

  4. Optimal architectures for long distance quantum communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Sreraman; Li, Linshu; Kim, Jungsang; Lütkenhaus, Norbert; Lukin, Mikhail D.; Jiang, Liang

    2016-02-01

    Despite the tremendous progress of quantum cryptography, efficient quantum communication over long distances (≥1000 km) remains an outstanding challenge due to fiber attenuation and operation errors accumulated over the entire communication distance. Quantum repeaters (QRs), as a promising approach, can overcome both photon loss and operation errors, and hence significantly speedup the communication rate. Depending on the methods used to correct loss and operation errors, all the proposed QR schemes can be classified into three categories (generations). Here we present the first systematic comparison of three generations of quantum repeaters by evaluating the cost of both temporal and physical resources, and identify the optimized quantum repeater architecture for a given set of experimental parameters for use in quantum key distribution. Our work provides a roadmap for the experimental realizations of highly efficient quantum networks over transcontinental distances.

  5. DISTANCE FORMAT OF PSYCHOLOGICAL COMPETENCIES DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunona M. Ilina

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on the conceptual model of the distance learning course (DLC “Success” aimed at the development of psychological competencies. The course was developed on the basis of design technology method and intended for adults that are in need of psychological competencies development, i.e. inhabitants of villages, towns, people with special needs, university faculty, trainers and social workers, educators, who want to use DLC in the process of psychological competencies development that are the result in enhancement of life quality. The structure of the distance learning course “Success” and underlying principles is described.

  6. An Introduction to Distance Measurement in Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    de Grijs, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Distance determination is an essential technique in astronomy, and is briefly covered in most textbooks on astrophysics and cosmology. It is rarely covered as a coherent topic in its own right. When it is discussed the approach is frequently very dry, splitting the teaching into, for example, stars, galaxies and cosmologies, and as a consequence, books lack depth and are rarely comprehensive. Adopting a unique and engaging approach to the subject An Introduction to distance Measurement in Astronomy will take the reader on a journey from the solar neighbourhood to the edge of the Universe, dis

  7. Human recognition at a distance in video

    CERN Document Server

    Bhanu, Bir

    2010-01-01

    Most biometric systems employed for human recognition require physical contact with, or close proximity to, a cooperative subject. Far more challenging is the ability to reliably recognize individuals at a distance, when viewed from an arbitrary angle under real-world environmental conditions. Gait and face data are the two biometrics that can be most easily captured from a distance using a video camera. This comprehensive and logically organized text/reference addresses the fundamental problems associated with gait and face-based human recognition, from color and infrared video data that are

  8. Short-Distance Structure of Nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas Higinbotham, Eliazer Piasetzky, Stephen Wood

    2011-06-01

    One of Jefferson Lab's original missions was to further our understanding of the short-distance structure of nuclei. In particular, to understand what happens when two or more nucleons within a nucleus have strongly overlapping wave-functions; a phenomena commonly referred to as short-range correlations. Herein, we review the results of the (e,e'), (e,e'p) and (e,e'pN) reactions that have been used at Jefferson Lab to probe this short-distance structure as well as provide an outlook for future experiments.

  9. Regularisation of 3D Signed Distance Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas; Larsen, Rasmus

    2009-01-01

    Signed 3D distance fields are used a in a variety of domains. From shape modelling to surface registration. They are typically computed based on sampled point sets. If the input point set contains holes, the behaviour of the zero-level surface of the distance field is not well defined...... Cholesky factorisation. It is demonstrated that the zero-level surface will act as a membrane after the proposed regularisation. This effectively closes holes in a predictable way. Finally, the performance of the method is tested with a set of synthetic point clouds of increasing complexity....

  10. Markets, Distance Education, and Australian Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted Nunan

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper argues that the Australian university system is unstable. There will be significant change as government implements its reform agenda and even more radical change if it moves to new deregulation. The role of distance education in university education needs to be analyzed against this ‘market’ agenda of government in terms of characteristics of markets and market behavior. After a scan of the current role, the paper looks at two scenarios (regulated and deregulated for distance education in university teaching and learning in Australia.

  11. Explorations in Physics and Distance Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caviness, Kenneth

    2010-02-01

    How can the activity-based directed inquiry model be applied in a distance learning class? Lessons learned during a two-year pilot program (2007-2009) using the ``Explorations in Physics'' curriculum (David P. Jackson, Priscilla W. Laws, Scott V. Franklin) for a class taught over the internet using VCAM technology. The author reports on the successes, difficulties and surprises of teaching an exploratory physics class at a distance, where teacher-student interaction occurred via high-definition camera and big screen, two-way sight and sound carried by high-speed internet. )

  12. Nonapproximablity of the Normalized Information Distance

    CERN Document Server

    Terwijn, Sebastiaan A; Vitanyi, Paul M B

    2009-01-01

    Normalized information distance (NID) uses the theoretical notion of Kolmogorov complexity, which for practical purposes is approximated by the length of the compressed version of the file involved, using a real-world compression program. This practical application is called `normalized compression distance' and it is trivially computable. It is a parameter-free similarity measure based on compression, and is used in pattern recognition, data mining, phylogeny, clustering, and classification. The complexity properties of its theoretical precursor, the NID, have been open. We show that the NID is neither upper semicomputable nor lower semicomputable up to any reasonable precision.

  13. Normalized Information Distance is Not Semicomputable

    CERN Document Server

    Terwijn, Sebastiaan A; Vitanyi, Paul M B

    2010-01-01

    Normalized information distance (NID) uses the theoretical notion of Kolmogorov complexity, which for practical purposes is approximated by the length of the compressed version of the file involved, using a real-world compression program. This practical application is called 'normalized compression distance' and it is trivially computable. It is a parameter-free similarity measure based on compression, and is used in pattern recognition, data mining, phylogeny, clustering, and classification. The complexity properties of its theoretical precursor, the NID, have been open. We show that the NID is neither upper semicomputable nor lower semicomputable.

  14. Contextual Distance Refining for Image Retrieval

    KAUST Repository

    Islam, Almasri

    2014-09-16

    Recently, a number of methods have been proposed to improve image retrieval accuracy by capturing context information. These methods try to compensate for the fact that a visually less similar image might be more relevant because it depicts the same object. We propose a new quick method for refining any pairwise distance metric, it works by iteratively discovering the object in the image from the most similar images, and then refine the distance metric accordingly. Test show that our technique improves over the state of art in terms of accuracy over the MPEG7 dataset.

  15. PERSPECTIVES ON GROUP WORK IN DISTANCE LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rune Sarromaa HAUSSTÄTTER

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Current distance education benefits greatly from educational software that makes group work possible for students who are separated in time and space. However, some students prefer distance education because they can work on their own. This paper explores how students react to expectations on behalf of the course provider to do their assignments in collaborative groups. They are seemingly both positively surprised by the challenges that group work offer, and they are less positive to the downsides of group work. The paper discusses both sides of the experiences and suggests why this might be a paradox to live with.

  16. Who Am I as a Distance Tutor? An Investigation of Distance Tutors' Professional Identity in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Junhong

    2016-01-01

    Much research has been conducted in the area of teacher professional identity in the past decades. Nonetheless, very little attention has been paid to the professional identity of tutors in distance education. Using interviews, this study set out to investigate distance tutors' claimed and assigned professional identities, their actual, ought and…

  17. Cultural Differences in Transactional Distance Preference by Arab and American Distance Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harthi, Aisha S.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the differences between Arab and American distance learners' preference in the 2 components of transactional distance (structure and interaction) and their relation to learners' self-efficacy and help seeking. The study sample consisted of 95 cases from each group (N = 190). Study results indicated significant differences…

  18. Fast Exact Euclidean Distance (FEED) : A new class of adaptable distance transforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, Theo E.; van den Broek, Egon L.

    2014-01-01

    A new unique class of foldable distance transforms of digital images (DT) is introduced, baptized: Fast Exact Euclidean Distance (FEED) transforms. FEED class algorithms calculate the DT startingdirectly from the definition or rather its inverse. The principle of FEED class algorithms is introduced,

  19. Fast Exact Euclidean Distance (FEED): A new class of adaptable distance transforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, Theo E.; Broek, van den Egon L.

    2014-01-01

    A new unique class of foldable distance transforms of digital images (DT) is introduced, baptized: Fast Exact Euclidean Distance (FEED) transforms. FEED class algorithms calculate the DT starting directly from the definition or rather its inverse. The principle of FEED class algorithms is introduced

  20. Deciphering the Distance between Distance Education and Working Professionals in Difficult Geographies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Jatin; Singh, Manjari

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the factors that draw working professionals towards distance education programs, and the factors that sustain their distance education experience. The study is conducted in difficult terrains of Uttarakhand, a hilly state in India which helps us investigate the phenomenon in difficult geographies. Through interviews of ten…

  1. The Lesotho Distance Teaching Centre: Five Years' Learning. IEC Broadsheets on Distance Learning No. 16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Paud

    This report describes the activities of the first 5 years of the Lesotho Distance Teaching Center, which uses distance teaching methods to bring education to more people in Lesotho. Also described are the Center's internal organization, its relationship to other organizations in Lesotho, its costs, and some evaluation findings. Background…

  2. Making Distance Visible: Assembling Nearness in an Online Distance Learning Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Jen; Gallagher, Michael Sean; Macleod, Hamish

    2013-01-01

    Online distance learners are in a particularly complex relationship with the educational institutions they belong to (Bayne, Gallagher, & Lamb, 2012). For part-time distance students, arrivals and departures can be multiple and invisible as students take courses, take breaks, move into independent study phases of a programme, find work or…

  3. The Gould's Belt Distances Survey (GOBELINS) III. The distance to the Serpens/Aquila Molecular Complex

    CERN Document Server

    Ortiz-León, Gisela N; Kounkel, Marina A; Loinard, Laurent; Mioduszewski, Amy J; Rodríguez, Luis F; Torres, Rosa M; Pech, Gerardo; Rivera, Juana L; Hartmann, Lee; Boden, Andrew F; Evans, Neal J; Briceño, Cesar; Tobin, John J; Galli, Phillip A B

    2016-01-01

    We report on new distances and proper motions to seven stars across the Serpens/Aquila complex. The observations were obtained as part of the Gould's Belt Distances Survey (GOBELINS) project between September 2013 and April 2016 with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). One of our targets is the proto-Herbig AeBe object EC 95, which is a binary system embedded in the Serpens Core. For this system, we combined the GOBELINS observations with previous VLBA data to cover a total period of ~8 years, and derive the orbital elements and an updated source distance. The individual distances to sources in the complex are fully consistent with each other, and the mean value corresponds to a distance of $436.0\\pm9.2$~pc for the Serpens/W40 complex. Given this new evidence, we argue that Serpens Main, W40 and Serpens South are physically associated and form a single cloud structure.

  4. P-Distances, Q-Distances and a Generalized Ekeland's Variational Principle in Uniform Spaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Hui QIU; Fei HE

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,we attempt to give a unified approach to the existing several versions of Ekeland's variational principle. In the framework of uniform spaces,we introduce p-distances and more generally,q-distances.Then we introduce a new type of completeness for uniform spaces,i.e.,sequential completeness with respect to a q-distance (particularly,a p-distance),which is a very extensive concept of completeness.By using q-distances and the new type of completeness,we prove a generalized Takahashi's nonconvex minimization theorem,a generalized Ekeland's variational principle and a generalized Caristi's fixed point theorem.Moreover,we show that the above three theorems are equivalent to each other.From the generalized Ekeland's variational principle,we deduce a number of particular versions of Ekeland's principle,which include many known versions of the principle and their improvements.

  5. On the Distance between Three Arbitrary Points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parin Chaipunya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We point out some equivalence between the results in (Sedghi et al., 2012 and (Khamsi, 2010. Then, we introduce the notion of a general distance between three arbitrary points and study some of its properties. In the final section, some fixed point results are proposed.

  6. Characterizing the round sphere by mean distance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kokkendorff, Simon Lyngby

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the measure theoretic metric invariants extent, rendezvous number and mean distance of a general compact metric space X and relate these to classical metric invariants such as diameter and radius. In the final section we focus attention to the category of Riemannian manifolds. The main...

  7. Respect distances. Rationale and means of computation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munier, Raymond [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Hoekmark, Harald [Clay Technology, Lund (Sweden)

    2004-12-01

    Canisters with spent nuclear fuel can obviously not be located within deformation zones as this might jeopardise their long term mechanical stability and thereby constitute a potential hazard to the biosphere. Less apparent, but equally important, is the fact that earthquakes trigger reactivation, slip, of structures some distance from their hypocentres due to, among many other factors, stress redistribution. Fault slip across a deposition hole might damage the isolation capacity of the canister and thereby jeopardise the overall integrity of the barrier system. Therefore, the following question might be posed: What is the distance from a deformation zone beyond which a canister can be safely emplaced? This respect distance cannot be readily computed because, unknown future events aside, there are some complicated aspects that need to be addressed e.g. degree of conservatism, scale, our ability to model ice sheets and earthquakes, etc. In this report we discuss various aspects of the assignment of respect distances, propose a methodology for its assignment and apply the methodology to the Forsmark Site as a worked example. Our main concern, in the context discussed in this report, is the post glacial faults anticipated to occur after the next glaciations. To properly address conservativeness, analysis of risk, and its implementation in safety analysis, we provide an extensive compilation of our current knowledge on post glacial faults as an appendix.

  8. CHALLENGES ENCOUNTERED BY A DISTANCE LEARNING ORGANISATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta MALIK

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This study explores; the rapid growth of the adult learner population is increasing the demand of distance learning techniques. The demographic study of the learners will help target the adult learner population and proper training will help organizations to develop course materials and techniques appropriately.

  9. Markets, Distance Education, and Australian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunan, Ted

    2005-01-01

    The paper argues that the Australian university system is unstable. There will be significant change as government implements its reform agenda and even more radical change if it moves to new deregulation. The role of distance education in university education needs to be analyzed against this "market" agenda of government in terms of…

  10. Learning Styles and Satisfaction in Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Darren C.

    2014-01-01

    Although complex, controversial, and contradicting, learning styles is highly influential. Distance education (DE) has experienced tremendous growth in the last few decades. The popularity of learning styles and DE necessitates research. This correlational research study was conducted to determine if there is any evidence to incorporate learning…

  11. Combinatorics of distance-based tree inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardi, Fabio; Gascuel, Olivier

    2012-10-01

    Several popular methods for phylogenetic inference (or hierarchical clustering) are based on a matrix of pairwise distances between taxa (or any kind of objects): The objective is to construct a tree with branch lengths so that the distances between the leaves in that tree are as close as possible to the input distances. If we hold the structure (topology) of the tree fixed, in some relevant cases (e.g., ordinary least squares) the optimal values for the branch lengths can be expressed using simple combinatorial formulae. Here we define a general form for these formulae and show that they all have two desirable properties: First, the common tree reconstruction approaches (least squares, minimum evolution), when used in combination with these formulae, are guaranteed to infer the correct tree when given enough data (consistency); second, the branch lengths of all the simple (nearest neighbor interchange) rearrangements of a tree can be calculated, optimally, in quadratic time in the size of the tree, thus allowing the efficient application of hill climbing heuristics. The study presented here is a continuation of that by Mihaescu and Pachter on branch length estimation [Mihaescu R, Pachter L (2008) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 105:13206-13211]. The focus here is on the inference of the tree itself and on providing a basis for novel algorithms to reconstruct trees from distances.

  12. QDist—Quartet Distance Between Evolutionary Trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mailund; Pedersen, Christian N. Storm

    2004-01-01

    QDist is a program for computing the quartet distance between two unrooted evolutionary trees, i.e. the number of quartet topology differences between the two trees, where a quartet topology is the topological subtree induced by four species. The implementation is based on an algorithm with running...... time O(n log² n), which makes it practical to compare large trees....

  13. Distance, Bank Organizational Structure and Credit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Degryse, H.A.; Cerqueiro, G.M.; Ongena, S.

    2007-01-01

    We survey the extant literature on the effects of both a bank’s organizational structure and the physical distance separating it from the lender on lending decisions. Banks do engage in spatial pricing, where the underlying mechanism can be both transportation costs and information asymmetries. More

  14. Running Patterns of Highly Skilled Distance Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunetts, Michael J.; Dillman, Charles J.

    The biomechanical elements inherent in the running styles of Olympic-level athletes were examined in order to obtain a range of parameter values for specific running velocities. Forty-eight athletes participated in middle and long distance running events that were filmed and later analyzed to determine the relationship between the physical…

  15. Biomechanics of Distance Running: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Richard C.; Gregor, Robert J.

    1976-01-01

    Training for distance running over a long period produces meaningful changes in the running mechanics of experienced runners, as revealed in this longitudinal study of the biomechanical components of stride length, stride rate, stride time, and support and nonsupport time. (MB)

  16. Psychic Distance, Innovation, and Firm Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azar, Goudarz; Drogendijk, Rian

    2014-01-01

    Previous research suggests that internationalization improves a firm's ability to innovate, but the effect of internationalizing into specific target markets or destinations on the innovation ability of firms has not been fully investigated. This study examined whether the psychic distance between t

  17. The Impact of Distance Education on Libraries

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Technological advances and the Internet have radically changed the way people learn, live, and grow. In higher education, libraries have been challenged to look at how to serve people not only locally but at a distance. At Asbury Theological Seminary these changes have revolved around three issues: providing the same resources online, information literacy, and the importance of collaboration.

  18. Computer Systems for Distributed and Distance Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, M.; Jackson, David

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of network-based learning focuses on a survey of computer systems for distributed and distance learning. Both Web-based systems and non-Web-based systems are reviewed in order to highlight some of the major trends of past projects and to suggest ways in which progress may be made in the future. (Contains 92 references.) (Author/LRW)

  19. Distance Learning For Mobile Internet Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beran NECAT

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an overview on the current state of art in the field of Distance learning for mobile users. It mentions a large range of technologies, services and approaches that may be used to bring distance learning to mobile internet users. These technologies are supposed to considerably increase innovative e-learning solutions for the next generation. While this definitely appears to be true, I think what is not so clear are the implications for students, and lecturers etc. In this article I first evaluate distributed e-learning technologies. With some of the most vital topics, focusing on adaptive distributed e-learning for Mobile Internet Users (MIUs. I also provide a brief analysis of Broadband Network Services, Collaborative e-Learning Tools and Distributed Virtual Environments, Internet-Based Adaptive Learning Technologies and Personalised Distance Learning. I continue my discussion on to Internet Development Tools (IDTs for Distance Learning Solutions, Learning Technologies for MIUs, Semantic and Web-Based Services for Enriching Learning Interactivity, and Evaluations of Distributed Learning Technologies (DLTs.

  20. The Minimum Distance of Graph Codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høholdt, Tom; Justesen, Jørn

    2011-01-01

    We study codes constructed from graphs where the code symbols are associated with the edges and the symbols connected to a given vertex are restricted to be codewords in a component code. In particular we treat such codes from bipartite expander graphs coming from Euclidean planes and other geome...... geometries. We give results on the minimum distances of the codes....