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Sample records for argon large electron

  1. Structure analysis of large argon clusters from gas-phase electron diffraction data: some recent results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waal, van de B.W.

    1999-01-01

    An up-to-date overview of recent developments in the structure elucidation of large ArN-clusters (103electron diffraction data, is given. Although a satisfactory model for N3000 had been found in 1996, the size range beyond N10,000 presents new and unexpected problems. T

  2. Monte Carlo simulation of electron back diffusion in argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radmilović, M.; Stojanović, V.; Petrović, Z. Lj.

    1999-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulation was applied to study the back-diffusion of electrons in argon at low and moderate values of E/N from 10Td to 10 kTd. Simulations were performed for gaps of 1 cm and for pressures corresponding to the breakdown voltages taken from experimental Paschen curves. Effects of inelastic collisions, ionization, reflection of electrons and anisotropic scattering as well as anisotropic initial and reflected angular distributions of electrons were included. A complete and detailed set of electron scattering cross sections that describes well electron transport in argon was used. We found a very good agreement of the results of simulations with the experimental data for well defined initial conditions, and with several models available in the literature.(A.V. Phelps and Z.LJ. Petrović), Plasma Sources Sci. Tehnol. 8, R21 (1999). While effect of reflection may be large, for realistic values of reflection coefficient and for realistic secondary electron productions the effect may be neglected for the accuracy required in gas discharge modeling.

  3. Electron Neutrino Classification in Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Płoński, Piotr; Sulej, Robert; Zaremba, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Neutrinos are one of the least known elementary particles. The detection of neutrinos is an extremely difficult task since they are affected only by weak sub-atomic force or gravity. Therefore large detectors are constructed to reveal neutrino's properties. Among them the Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr-TPC) detectors provide excellent imaging and particle identification ability for studying neutrinos. The computerized methods for automatic reconstruction and identification of particles are needed to fully exploit the potential of the LAr-TPC technique. Herein, the novel method for electron neutrino classification is presented. The method constructs a feature descriptor from images of observed event. It characterizes the signal distribution propagated from vertex of interest, where the particle interacts with the detector medium. The classifier is learned with a constructed feature descriptor to decide whether the images represent the electron neutrino or cascade produced by photons. The proposed ap...

  4. LArGe. A liquid argon scintillation veto for GERDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heisel, Mark

    2011-04-13

    LArGe is a GERDA low-background test facility to study novel background suppression methods in a low-background environment, for possible applications in the GERDA experiment. GERDA searches for the neutrinoless double-beta decay in {sup 76}Ge, by operating naked germanium detectors submersed into 65 m{sup 3} of liquid argon. Similarly, LArGe runs Ge-detectors in 1 m{sup 3} (1.4 tons) of liquid argon, which in addition is instrumented with photomultipliers to detect argon scintillation light. The light is used in anti-coincidence with the germanium detectors, to effectively suppress background events that deposit energy in the liquid argon. This work adresses the design, construction, and commissioning of LArGe. The background suppression efficiency has been studied in combination with a pulse shape discrimination (PSD) technique for various sources, which represent characteristic backgrounds to GERDA. Suppression factors of a few times 10{sup 3} have been achieved. First background data of LArGe (without PSD) yield a background index of (0.12-4.6).10{sup -2} cts/(keV.kg.y) (90% c.l.), which is at the level of the Gerda phase I design goal. Furthermore, for the first time we measure the natural {sup 42}Ar abundance (in parallel to Gerda), and have indication for the 2{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay in natural germanium. (orig.)

  5. Attosecond-correlated dynamics of two electrons in argon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Sharma; N Camus; B Fischer; M Kremer; A Rudenko; B Bergues; M Kuebel; N G Johnson; M F Kling; T Pfeifer; J Ullrich; R Moshammer

    2014-01-01

    In this work we explored strong field-induced decay of doubly excited transient Coulomb complex Ar** → Ar2++2. We measured the correlated two-electron emission as a function of carrier envelop phase (CEP) of 6 fs pulses in the non-sequential double ionization (NSDI) of argon. Classical model calculations suggest that the intermediate doubly excited Coulomb complex loses memory of its formation dynamics. We estimated the ionization time difference between the two electrons from NSDI of argon and it is 200 ± 100 as (N Camus et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 073003 (2012)).

  6. Measurement of Longitudinal Electron Diffusion in Liquid Argon

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yichen; Thorn, Craig; Qian, Xin; Diwan, Milind; Joshi, Jyoti; Kettell, Steve; Morse, William; Rao, Triveni; Stewart, Jim; Tang, Wei; Viren, Brett

    2015-01-01

    We report the measurement of longitudinal electron diffusion coefficients in liquid argon for electric fields between 100 and 2000 V/cm with a gold photocathode as a bright electron source. The measurement principle, apparatus, and data analysis are described. Our results, which are consistent with previous measurements in the region between 100 to 350 V/cm [1] , are systematically higher than the prediction of Atrazhev-Timoshkin[2], and represent the world's best measurement in the region between 350 to 2000 V/cm. The quantum efficiency of the gold photocathode, the drift velocity and longitudinal diffusion coefficients in gas argon are also presented.

  7. Performance of the Electronic Readout of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, H; Aleksa, M; Aperio Bella, L; Archambault, JP; Arfaoui, S; Arnaez, O; Auge, E; Aurousseau, M; Bahinipati, S; Ban, J; Banfi, D; Barajas, A; Barillari, T; Bazan, A; Bellachia, F; Beloborodova, O; Benchekroun, D; Benslama, K; Berger, N; Berghaus, F; Bernat, P; Bernier, R; Besson, N; Binet, S; Blanchard, JB; Blondel, A; Bobrovnikov, V; Bohner, O; Boonekamp, M; Bordoni, S; Bouchel, M; Bourdarios, C; Bozzone, A; Braun, HM; Breton, D; Brettel, H; Brooijmans, G; Caputo, R; Carli, T; Carminati, L; Caughron, S; Cavalleri, P; Cavalli, D; Chareyre, E; Chase, RL; Chekulaev, SV; Chen, H; Cheplakov, A; Chiche, R; Citterio, M; Cojocaru, C; Colas, J; Collard, C; Collot, J; Consonni, M; Cooke, M; Copic, K; Costa, GC; Courneyea, L; Cuisy, D; Cwienk, WD; Damazio, D; Dannheim, D; De Cecco, S; De La Broise, X; De La Taille, C; de Vivie, JB; Debennerot, B; Delagnes, E; Delmastro, M; Derue, F; Dhaliwal, S; Di Ciaccio, L; Doan, O; Dudziak, F; Duflot, L; Dumont-Dayot, N; Dzahini, D; Elles, S; Ertel, E; Escalier, M; Etienvre, AI; Falleau, I; Fanti, M; Farooque, T; Favre, P; Fayard, Louis; Fent, J; Ferencei, J; Fischer, A; Fournier, D; Fournier, L; Fras, M; Froeschl, R; Gadfort, T; Gallin-Martel, ML; Gibson, A; Gillberg, D; Gingrich, DM; Göpfert, T; Goodson, J; Gouighri, M; Goy, C; Grassi, V; Gray, J; Guillemin, T; Guo, B; Habring, J; Handel, C; Heelan, L; Heintz, H; Helary, L; Henrot-Versille, S; Hervas, L; Hobbs, J; Hoffman, J; Hostachy, JY; Hoummada, A; Hrivnac, J; Hrynova, T; Hubaut, F; Huber, J; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Iengo, P; Imbert, P; Ishmukhametov, R; Jantsch, A; Javadov, N; Jezequel, S; Jimenez Belenguer, M; Ju, XY; Kado, M; Kalinowski, A; Kar, D; Karev, A; Katsanos, I; Kazarinov, M; Kerschen, N; Kierstead, J; Kim, MS; Kiryunin, A; Kladiva, E; Knecht, N; Kobel, M; Koletsou, I; König, S; Krieger, P; Kukhtin, V; Kuna, M; Kurchaninov, L; Labbe, J; Lacour, D; Ladygin, E; Lafaye, R; Laforge, B; Lamarra, D; Lampl, W; Lanni, F; Laplace, S; Laskus, H; Le Coguie, A; Le Dortz, O; Le Maner, C; Lechowski, M; Lee, SC; Lefebvre, M; Leonhardt, K; Lethiec, L; Leveque, J; Liang, Z; Liu, C; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Loch, P; Lu, J; Ma, H; Mader, W; Majewski, S; Makovec, N; Makowiecki, D; Mandelli, L; Mangeard, PS; Mansoulie, B; Marchand, JF; Marchiori, G; Martin, D; Martin-Chassard, G; Martin dit Latour, B; Marzin, A; Maslennikov, A; Massol, N; Matricon, P; Maximov, D; Mazzanti, M; McCarthy, T; McPherson, R; Menke, S; Meyer, JP; Ming, Y; Monnier, E; Mooshofer, P; Neganov, A; Niedercorn, F; Nikolic-Audit, I; Nugent, IM; Oakham, G; Oberlack, H; Ocariz, J; Odier, J; Oram, CJ; Orlov, I; Orr, R; Parsons, JA; Peleganchuk, S; Penson, A; Perini, L; Perrodo, P; Perrot, G; Perus, A; Petit, E; Pisarev, I; Plamondon, M; Poffenberger, P; Poggioli, L; Pospelov, G; Pralavorio, P; Prast, J; Prudent, X; Przysiezniak, H; Puzo, P; Quentin, M; Radeka, V; Rajagopalan, S; Rauter, E; Reimann, O; Rescia, S; Resende, B; Richer, JP; Ridel, M; Rios, R; Roos, L; Rosenbaum, G; Rosenzweig, H; Rossetto, O; Roudil, W; Rousseau, D; Ruan, X; Rudert, A; Rusakovich, N; Rusquart, P; Rutherfoord, J; Sauvage, G; Savine, A; Schaarschmidt, J; Schacht, P; Schaffer, A; Schram, M; Schwemling, P; Seguin Moreau, N; Seifert, F; Serin, L; Seuster, R; Shalyugin, A; Shupe, M; Simion, S; Sinervo, P; Sippach, W; Skovpen, K; Sliwa, R; Soukharev, A; Spano, F; Stavina, P; Straessner, A; Strizenec, P; Stroynowski, R; Talyshev, A; Tapprogge, S; Tarrade, F; Tartarelli, GF; Teuscher, R; Tikhonov, Yu; Tocut, V; Tompkins, D; Thompson, P; Tisserant, S; Todorov, T; Tomasz, F; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Trinh, Thi N; Trochet, S; Trocme, B; Tschann-Grimm, K; Tsionou, D; Ueno, R; Unal, G; Urbaniec, D; Usov, Y; Voss, K; Veillet, JJ; Vincter, M; Vogt, S; Weng, Z; Whalen, K; Wicek, F; Wilkens, H; Wingerter-Seez, I; Wulf, E; Yang, Z; Ye, J; Yuan, L; Yurkewicz, A; Zarzhitsky, P; Zerwas, D; Zhang, H; Zhang, L; Zhou, N; Zimmer, J; Zitoun, R; Zivkovic, L

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS detector has been designed for operation at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. ATLAS includes electromagnetic and hadronic liquid argon calorimeters, with almost 200,000 channels of data that must be sampled at the LHC bunch crossing frequency of 40 MHz. The calorimeter electronics calibration and readout are performed by custom electronics developed specifically for these purposes. This paper describes the system performance of the ATLAS liquid argon calibration and readout electronics, including noise, energy and time resolution, and long term stability, with data taken mainly from full-system calibration runs performed after installation of the system in the ATLAS detector hall at CERN.

  8. Electron avalanches in liquid argon mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.G.; Dardin, S.M.; Kadel, R.W.; Kadyk, J.A.; Wenzel, W.B.; Peskov, V.

    2004-03-19

    We have observed stable avalanche gain in liquid argon when mixed with small amounts of xenon in the high electric field (>7 MV/cm) near the point of a chemically etched needle in a point-plane geometry. We identify two gain mechanisms, one pressure dependent, and the other independent of the applied pressure. We conclude that the pressure dependent signals are from avalanche gain in gas bubbles at the tip of the needle, while the pressure independent pulses are from avalanche gain in liquid. We measure the decay time spectra of photons from both types of avalanches. The decay times from the pressure dependent pulses decrease (increase) with the applied pressure (high voltage), while the decay times from the pressure independent pulses are approximately independent of pressure or high voltage. For our operating conditions, the collected charge distribution from avalanches is similar for 60 keV or 122 keV photon sources. With krypton additives, instead of Xe, we measure behavior consistent with only the pressure dependent pulses. Neon and TMS were also investigated as additives, and designs for practical detectors were tested.

  9. Fast-imaging and spectroscopic analysis of atmospheric argon streamers for large gap arc breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachuilo, Michael; Stefani, Francis; Bengtson, Roger; Raja, Laxminarayan

    2014-10-01

    A non-equilibrium plasma source has been developed to assist in the low-voltage arc breakdown of large electrode gaps. The source consists of a dielectric embedded wire helically wound around a confining cylindrical quartz chamber. Annular electrodes cap the ends of the quartz chamber. An argon feed gas is used to provide a uniform environment and exhausts to ambient atmospheric conditions. A negative polarity 50 kV trigger pulse is applied to the embedded trigger wire to initiate the arc breakdown. Application of the trigger pulse produces a localized coronal discharges along the inner surface of the quartz tube. The corona provides seed electrons through which streamers propagate from one of the main discharge electrode along the quartz surface until it reaches the opposite electrode to bridge the gap. Once the gap is bridged a spark over occurs and robust arc discharge is formed in the chamber volume. Fast imaging of the streamer propagation establishes its velocity in the range of ~ 100 km/s. Spectroscopy of the streamer discharge in atmospheric argon has been conducted and electron temperature and number density estimated from a collision radiative model. Argon spectrum is dominated by neutral argon lines in the 650--950 nm range, and singly ionized argon lines are observed in the ultra-violet to near UV (300--400 nm). Research was performed in connection with AFOSR Contract FA9550-11-1-0062.

  10. Studies of Electron Avalanche Behavior in Liquid Argon

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, J G; Jackson, K H; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J A; Peskov, Vladimir; Wenzel, W A

    2002-01-01

    Electron avalanching in liquid argon is being studied as a function of voltage, pressure, radiation intensity, and the concentrations of certain additives, especially xenon. The avalanches produced in an intense electric field at the tip of a tungsten needle are initiated by ionization from a moveable americium (241Am) gamma ray source. Photons from xenon excimers are detected as photomultiplier signals in coincidence with the current pulse from the needle. In pure liquid argon the avalanche behavior is erratic, but the addition of even a small amount of xenon (>100ppm) stabilizes the performance. Similar attempts with neon (30%) as an additive to argon have been unsuccessful. Tests with higher energy gamma rays (57Co) yield spectra and other performance characteristics quite similar to those using the 241Am source. Two types of signal pulses are commonly observed: a set of pulses that are sensitive to ambient pressure, and a set of somewhat smaller pulses that are not pressure dependent.

  11. Attachment cooling of electrons in oxygen-argon and SF6-argon mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaeva, Natalia; Kim, Sung Jin; Park, Gan Young; Lee, Jae Koo

    2004-09-01

    In e-beam sustained plasma different electron temperature can be obtained. Thus, in plasma of capacitive RF discharges in inert gases typical electron temperature is of the order of 2-3 eV. At certain conditions, in plasma of electronegative gases electron temperature can approach ion/neutral temperature. We consider e-beam sustained plasma of electronegative gases and their mixtures with argon where the main mechanism of plasma neutralization is connected with electron-molecule attachment. In such plasma, due to retardation of fast electrons of e-beam secondary electrons are created which loose their energy due to attachment. It is shown, that at certain conditions (in dependence of the e-beam intensity and spectrum of secondary electrons) electron temperature can obtain the values comparable or even less than temperature of neutral component. The effect can be explained by the increase of attachment rate coefficient with the increase of electron temperature (mean electron energy). Such a dependence leads to attachment of the fastest plasma electrons and selective loss of electrons whose energy exceeds the mean electron energy and, as a result, to effective electron cooling. The theoretical and numerical analysis of the problem has been conducted. The numerical results obtained using ELENDIF code are compared with Particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo simulations under similar conditions.

  12. Free electron lifetime achievements in liquid Argon imaging TPC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baibussinov, B; Ceolin, M Baldo; Centro, S; Cieslik, K; Farnese, C; Fava, A; Gibin, D; Guglielmi, A; Meng, G; Pietropaolo, F; Varanini, F; Ventura, S [INFN, Sezione di Padova via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Calligarich, E [INFN, Sezione di Pavia via Bassi 6, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Rubbia, C, E-mail: Carlo.Rubbia@cern.c [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso dell' INFN I-67010 Assergi (Italy)

    2010-03-15

    A key feature for the success of the liquid Argon imaging TPC (LAr-TPC) technology is the industrial purification against electro-negative impurities, especially Oxygen and Nitrogen remnants, which have to be continuously kept at an exceptionally low level by filtering and recirculating liquid Argon. Improved purification techniques have been applied to a 120 liters LAr-TPC test facility in the INFN-LNL laboratory. Through-going muon tracks have been used to determine the free electron lifetime in liquid Argon against electro-negative impurities. The short path length here observed (30 cm) is compensated by the high accuracy in the observation of the specific ionization of cosmic ray muons at sea level as a function of the drift distance. A free electron lifetime of tau {approx} (21.4{sup +7.3}{sub -4.3}) ms, namely > 15.8 ms at 90% C.L. has been observed over several weeks under stable conditions, corresponding to a residual Oxygen equivalent of {approx} 15 ppt (part per trillion). At 500 V/cm, the free electron speed is 1.5 mm/mus. In a LAr-TPC a free electron lifetime in excess of 15 ms corresponds for instance to an attenuation of less than 20% after a drift path of 5 m, opening the way to the operation of the LAr-TPC with exceptionally long drift distances.

  13. Measurement of longitudinal electron diffusion in liquid argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yichen, E-mail: yichen@bnl.gov [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 20 Pennsylvania St., Building 510E, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Tsang, Thomas [Instrumentation Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 20 N. Technology St., Building 535B, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Thorn, Craig; Qian, Xin; Diwan, Milind; Joshi, Jyoti; Kettell, Steve; Morse, William [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 20 Pennsylvania St., Building 510E, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Rao, Triveni [Instrumentation Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 20 N. Technology St., Building 535B, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Stewart, James; Tang, Wei; Viren, Brett [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 20 Pennsylvania St., Building 510E, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2016-04-21

    We report the measurement of longitudinal electron diffusion coefficients in liquid argon for electric fields between 100 and 2000 V/cm with a gold photocathode as a bright electron source. The measurement principle, apparatus, and data analysis are described. In the region between 100 and 350 V/cm, our results show a discrepancy with the previous measurement [1]. In the region between 350 and 2000 V/cm, our results represent the world's best measurement. Over the entire measured electric field range, our results are systematically higher than the calculation of Atrazhev‐Timoshkin [2]. The quantum efficiency of the gold photocathode, the drift velocity and longitudinal diffusion coefficients in gas argon are also presented.

  14. Large Area Pico-second Photodetectors (LAPPD) in Liquid Argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmapalan, Ranjan; Lappd Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The Large Area Pico-second Photodetector (LAPPD) project has recently produced the first working devices with a small form factor and pico-second timing resolution. A number of current and proposed neutrino and dark matter experiments use liquid argon as a detector medium. A flat photodetector with excellent timing resolution will help with background suppression and improve the overall sensitivity of the experiment. We present the research done and some preliminary results to customize the LAPPD devices to work in a cryogenic environment. Argonne National Laboratory (LDRD) and DOE.

  15. Temporal evolution of electron beam generated Argon plasma in pasotron device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Neha; Pal, U. N.; Prakash, Ram; Choyal, Y.

    2016-10-01

    The plasma- assisted slow wave oscillator (PASOTRON) is a high power microwave source in which the electron beam in the interaction region is confined by the background plasma. The plasma is generated by impact ionization of background gas with the electron beam. A model has been developed for temporal evolution of Argon plasma in pasotron device. In this model, we consider electron beam of energy E interacting with Argon gas. The resulting ionization creates quasi neutral argon plasma composed of argon Ar atoms, singly ionized ions Ar+1and electrons having energy from 0 to E. Electron impact excitation, ionization, radiative decay, radiative recombination and three body recombination processes are considered in this model. Population of ground and excited states of argon atom, ground state of argon ion as well as the population of electron energy groups is calculated by solving time dependent rate equations. Temporal evolution of electron beam generated plasma is given.

  16. Development of membrane cryostats for large liquid argon neutrino detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Montanari, D; Gendotti, A; Geynisman, M; Hentschel, S; Loew, T; Mladenov, D; Montanari, C; Murphy, S; Nessi, M; Norris, B; Noto, F; Rubbia, A; Sharma, R; Smargianaki, D; Stewart, J; Vignoli, C; Wilson, P; Wu, S

    2015-01-01

    A new collaboration is being formed to develop a multi-kiloton Long-Baseline neutrino experiment that will be located at the Surf Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. In the present design, the detector will be located inside cryostats filled with 68,400 ton of ultrapure liquid argon (less than 100 parts per trillion of oxygen equivalent contamination). To qualify the membrane technology for future very large-scale and underground implementations, a strong prototyping effort is ongoing: several smaller detectors of growing size with associated cryostats and cryogenic systems will be designed and built at Fermilab and CERN. They will take physics data and test different detector elements, filtration systems, design options and installation procedures. In addition, a 35 ton prototype is already operational at Fermilab and will take data with single-phase detector in early 2016. After the prototyping phase, the multi-kton detector will be constructed. After commissioning, it will detect and study ne...

  17. Optically Forbidden Excitations of 3s Electron of Argon by Fast Electron Impact

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱林繁; 成华东; 刘小井; 田鹏; 苑震生; 李文斌; 徐克尊

    2003-01-01

    The electron energy loss spectrum of argon in the energy region of 24.5-30.5eV was measured at 2.5 keV impact energy. The line profile parameters of the optically forbidden excitations of 3s-1ns (n = 4-6) and 3s-1nd (n = 3-7) of argon, I.e.,Eγ,Г,q and p,were determined.

  18. Development of ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter Read-out Electronics for the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Newcomer, Mitchel; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The high-luminosity phase of the Large Hadron Collider will provide a 5-7 times greater instantaneous and total luminosities than assumed in the original design of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters and their read-out system. An improved trigger system with higher acceptance rate and longer latency and a better radiation tolerance require an upgrade of the read-out electronics. Concepts for the future read-out of the 183.000 calorimeter channels at 40-80 MHz and 16 bit dynamic range, and the development of radiation tolerant, low noise, low power and high-bandwidth electronic components will be presented.

  19. Development of ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter Front-end Electronics for the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Tiankuan; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The high-luminosity phase of the Large Hadron Collider will provide 5-7 times greater luminosities than assumed in the original detector design. An improved trigger system requires an upgrade of the readout electronics of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter. Concepts for the future readout of the 182,500 calorimeter channels at 40-80 MHz and 16-bit dynamic range and the developments of radiation-tolerant, low-noise, low-power, and high-bandwidth front-end electronic components, including preamplifiers and shapers, 14-bit ADCs, and 10-Gb/s laser diode array drivers, are presented.

  20. Development of ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter front-end electronics for the HL-LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, T.

    2017-01-01

    The high-luminosity phase of the Large Hadron Collider will provide 5–7 times greater luminosities than assumed in the original detector design. An improved trigger system requires an upgrade of the readout electronics of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter. Concepts for the future readout of the 182,500 calorimeter cells at 40–80 MHz and 16-bit dynamic range and the developments of radiation-tolerant, low-noise, low-power, and high-bandwidth front-end electronic components, including preamplifiers and shapers, 14-bit ADCs, and 10-Gb/s laser diode array drivers, are presented in this paper.

  1. Study of electron recombination in liquid argon with the ICARUS TPC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoruso, S.; Antonello, M.; Aprili, P.; Arneodo, F.; Badertscher, A.; Baiboussinov, B.; Baldo Ceolin, M.; Battistoni, G.; Bekman, B.; Benetti, P.; Bischofberger, M.; Borio di Tigliole, A.; Brunetti, R.; Bruzzese, R.; Bueno, A.; Buzzanca, M.; Calligarich, E.; Campanelli, M.; Carbonara, F.; Carpanese, C.; Cavalli, D.; Cavanna, F.; Cennini, P.; Centro, S.; Cesana, A.; Chen, C.; Chen, D.; Chen, D.B.; Chen, Y.; Cieslik, K.; Cline, D.; Cocco, A.G.; Dai, Z.; De Vecchi, C.; Dabrowska, A.; Di Cicco, A.; Dolfini, R.; Ereditato, A.; Felcini, M.; Ferrari, A.; Ferri, F.; Fiorillo, G.; Galli, S.; Ge, Y.; Gibin, D.; Gigli Berzolari, A.; Gil-Botella, I.; Graczyk, K.; Grandi, L.; Guglielmi, A.; He, K.; Holeczek, J.; Huang, X.; Juszczak, C.; Kielczewska, D.; Kisiel, J.; Kozlowski, T.; Laffranchi, M.; Lagoda, J.; Li, Z.; Lu, F.; Ma, J.; Mangano, G.; Markiewicz, M.; Martinez de la Ossa, A.; Matthey, C.; Mauri, F.; Meng, G.; Messina, M.; Montanari, C.; Muraro, S.; Navas-Concha, S.; Otwinowski, S.; Ouyang, Q.; Palamara, O.; Pascoli, D.; Periale, L.; Piano Mortari, G.B.; Piazzoli, A.; Picchi, P.; Pietropaolo, F.; Polopek, W.; Rancati, T.; Rappoldi, A.; Raselli, G.L.; Rico, J.; Rondio, E.; Rossella, M.; Rubbia, A.; Rubbia, C.; Sala, P.R. E-mail: paola.sala@cern.ch; Santorelli, R.; Scannicchio, D.; Segreto, E.; Seo, Y.; Sergiampietri, F.; Sobczyk, J.; Spinelli, N.; Stepaniak, J.; Sulej, R.; Szarska, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Terrani, M.; Velotta, R.; Ventura, S.; Vignoli, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, X.; Woo, J.; Xu, G.; Xu, Z.; Zalewska, A.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, Q.; Zhen, S.; Zipper, W

    2004-05-11

    Electron recombination in liquid argon (LAr) is studied by means of charged particle tracks collected in various ICARUS liquid argon TPC prototypes. The dependence of the recombination on the particle stopping power has been fitted with a Birks functional dependence. The simulation of the process of electron recombination in Monte Carlo calculations is discussed. A quantitative comparison with previously published data is carried out.

  2. Free electron lifetime achievements in Liquid Argon Imaging TPC

    CERN Document Server

    Baibussinov, B; Calligarich, E; Centro, S; Cieslik, K; Farnese, C; Fava, A; Gibin, D; Guglielmi, A; Meng, G; Pietropaolo, F; Rubbia, C; Varanini, F; Ventura, S

    2010-01-01

    A key feature for the success of the Liquid Argon TPC technology is the industrial purification against electro-negative impurities, especially Oxygen and Nitrogen remnants, which have to be initially and continuously kept at an exceptional purity. New purification techniques have been applied to a 120 litres LAr-TPC test facility in the INFN-LNL laboratory. Through-going muon tracks have been used to monitor the LAr purity. The short path length used (30 cm) is compensated by the high accuracy in the observation of the specific ionization of cosmic rays muons at sea level. A free electron lifetime of (21.4+7.3-4.3) ms, namely > 15.8 ms at 90 % C.L. has been observed under stable conditions over several weeks, corresponding to about 15 ppt (part per trillion) of Oxygen equivalent. At 500 V/cm, where the electron speed is approximately of 1.5 mm/us, the free electron lifetime >15 ms corresponds to an attenuation <15 % for a drift path of 5 m, opening the way to reliable operation of LAr TPC for exceptionall...

  3. Electronic Readout of the Atlas Liquid Argon Calorimeter: Calibration and Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Majewski, S; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The Liquid Argon (LAr) calorimeter is a key detector component in the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The LHC is a proton-proton collider with a center-of-mass energy of 14 TeV. The machine has been operated at energies of 900 GeV and 2.36 TeV in 2009 and is expected to reach the energy of 7 TeV in 2010. The LAr calorimeter is designed to provide precision measurements of electrons, photons, jets and missing transverse energy. It consists of a set of sampling calorimeters with liquid argon as active medium kept into three separate cryostats. The LAr calorimeters are read out via a system of custom electronics. The electronic readout of the ATLAS LAr calorimeters is divided into a Front End (FE) system of boards mounted in custom crates directly on the cryostat feedthroughs, and a Back End (BE) system of VME-based boards located in an off-detector underground counting room where there is no radiation. The FE system includes Front End boards (FEBs), which perform the readout and dig...

  4. Solar neutrino detection in a large volume double-phase liquid argon experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Franco, D; Agnes, P; Agostino, L; Bottino, B; Davini, S; De Cecco, S; Fan, A; Fiorillo, G; Galbiati, C; Goretti, A M; Hungerford, E V; Ianni, Al; Ianni, An; Jollet, C; Marini, L; Martoff, C J; Meregaglia, A; Pagani, L; Pallavicini, M; Pantic, E; Pocar, A; Renshaw, A L; Rossi, B; Rossi, N; Suvorov, Y; Testera, G; Tonazzo, A; Wang, H; Zavatarelli, S

    2015-01-01

    The direct search for dark matter WIMP particles through their interaction with nuclei at the "neutrino floor" sensitivity, where neutrino-induced coherent scattering on nuclei starts contributing to the background, requires detectors capable of collecting exposures of the order of 1~ktonne yr free of background resulting from beta and gamma decays and cosmogenic and radiogenic neutrons. The same constraints are required for precision measurements of solar neutrinos elastically scattering on electrons. Two-phase liquid argon time projection chambers (LAr TPCs) are prime candidates for the ambitious program to explore the nature of dark matter. The large target, high scintillation light yield and good spatial resolution in all three cartesian directions concurrently allows a high precision measurement of solar neutrino fluxes. We studied the cosmogenic and radiogenic backgrounds affecting solar neutrino detection in a 300 tonne (100 tonne fiducial) LAr TPC operating at LNGS depth (3,800 meters of water equival...

  5. Large area liquid argon detectors for interrogation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary, Charles; Kane, Steve; Firestone, Murray I.; Smith, Gregory [Adelphi Technology LLC, Purdue Technology Center, 5225 Exploration Drive, Indianapolis, IN 46241 (United States); Gozani, Tsahi; Brown, Craig; Kwong, John; King, Michael J. [Rapiscan Laboratories, 520 Almanor Avenue, Sunnyvale, CA 94085 (United States); Nikkel, James A.; McKinsey, Dan [Physics Department, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)

    2013-04-19

    Measurements of the efficiency, pulse shape, and energy and time resolution of liquid argon (LAr) detectors are presented. Liquefied noble gas-based (LNbG) detectors have been developed for the detection of dark matter and neutrinoless double-beta decay. However, the same qualities that make LNbG detectors ideal for these applications, namely their size, cost, efficiency, pulse shape discrimination and resolution, make them promising for portal screening and the detection of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM). Two 18-liter prototype detectors were designed, fabricated, and tested, one with pure LAr and the other doped with liquid Xe (LArXe). The LArXe detector presented the better time and energy resolution of 3.3 ns and 20% at 662 KeV, respectively. The total efficiency of the detector was measured to be 35% with 4.5% of the total photons detected in the photopeak.

  6. Differential cross sections for the electron-impact near-threshold electronic excitation of argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondal, S; Lower, J; Buckman, S; McEachran, R P [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Garcia, G, E-mail: Suhendu.mondal@anu.edu.a [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 113-bis, 28006, Madrid (Germany)

    2009-11-01

    Absolute accurate differential cross section data are presented for the excitation of the 3p{sup 5}4s state in argon by electron impact. The study focuses on the near-threshold region, where previous studies have revealed persistent disparities between measurement and theory. The time-of-flight (TOF) technique is employed, allowing scattered electrons to be measured over a broad range of energies with constant transmission, thereby eliminating a potential source of error in relating relative intensities of elastic and inelastic transitions inherent to other techniques. The experimental results are compared to new relativistic distorted-wave (RDW) calculations as well as to previous experimental and theoretical studies.

  7. Development of ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters Readout Electronics for HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00388354; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The high-luminosity phase of the Large Hadron Collider will provide 5-7 times greater instantaneous and total luminosities than assumed in the original design of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters and their readout system. An improved trigger system with a higher acceptance rate of 1 MHz and a longer latency of up to 60 micro-seconds together with a better radiation tolerance require an upgrade of the readout electronics. Concepts for the future readout of the 182,500 calorimeter channels at 40/80 MHz and 16 bit dynamic range, and the development of low-noise, low-power and high-bandwidth electronic components will be presented. These include ASIC developments towards radiation-tolerant low-noise pre-amplifiers, analog-to-digital converters up to 14 bits and low-power optical links providing transfer rates of at least 10 Gb/s per fiber.

  8. Development of ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters Readout Electronics for HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00388354; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The high-luminosity phase of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will provide 5-7 times greater instantaneous and total luminosities than assumed in the original design of the ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) Calorimeters and their readout system. The improved trigger system has a higher acceptance rate of 1 MHz and a longer latency of up to 60 micro-seconds. This requires an upgrade of the readout electronics, a better radiation tolerance is also required. This paper will present concepts for the future readout of the 182,468 calorimeter channels at 40 or 80 MHz with a 16 bit dynamic range. Progress of the development of low-noise, low-power and high-bandwidth electronic components will be presented. These include radiation-tolerant preamplifiers, analog-to-digital converters (ADC) up to 14 bits and low-power optical links providing transfer rates of at least 10 Gbps per fiber.

  9. Solar neutrino detection in a large volume double-phase liquid argon experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, D.; Giganti, C.; Agnes, P.; Agostino, L.; Bottino, B.; Canci, N.; Davini, S.; De Cecco, S.; Fan, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A. M.; Hungerford, E. V.; Ianni, Al.; Ianni, An.; Jollet, C.; Marini, L.; Martoff, C. J.; Meregaglia, A.; Pagani, L.; Pallavicini, M.; Pantic, E.; Pocar, A.; Razeti, M.; Renshaw, A. L.; Rossi, B.; Rossi, N.; Suvorov, Y.; Testera, G.; Tonazzo, A.; Wang, H.; Zavatarelli, S.

    2016-08-01

    Precision measurements of solar neutrinos emitted by specific nuclear reaction chains in the Sun are of great interest for developing an improved understanding of star formation and evolution. Given the expected neutrino fluxes and known detection reactions, such measurements require detectors capable of collecting neutrino-electron scattering data in exposures on the order of 1 ktonne-yr, with good energy resolution and extremely low background. Two-phase liquid argon time projection chambers (LAr TPCs) are under development for direct Dark Matter WIMP searches, which possess very large sensitive mass, high scintillation light yield, good energy resolution, and good spatial resolution in all three cartesian directions. While enabling Dark Matter searches with sensitivity extending to the ``neutrino floor'' (given by the rate of nuclear recoil events from solar neutrino coherent scattering), such detectors could also enable precision measurements of solar neutrino fluxes using the neutrino-electron elastic scattering events. Modeling results are presented for the cosmogenic and radiogenic backgrounds affecting solar neutrino detection in a 300 tonne (100 tonne fiducial) LAr TPC operating at LNGS depth (3,800 meters of water equivalent). The results show that such a detector could measure the CNO neutrino rate with ~15% precision, and significantly improve the precision of the 7Be and pep neutrino rates compared to the currently available results from the Borexino organic liquid scintillator detector.

  10. Electron localizability indicators ELI and ELIA: the case of highly correlated wavefunctions for the argon atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezugly, Viktor; Wielgus, Pawel; Wagner, Frank R; Kohout, Miroslav; Grin, Yuri

    2008-06-01

    Electron localizability indicators based on the same-spin electron pair density and the opposite-spin electron pair density are studied for correlated wavefunctions of the argon atom. Different basis sets and reference spaces are used for the multireference configuration interaction method following the complete active space calculations aiming at the understanding of the effect of local electron correlation when approaching the exact wavefunction. The populations of the three atomic shells of Ar atom in real space are calculated for each case.

  11. First Observation of Low Energy Electron Neutrinos in a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acciarri, R.; et al.

    2016-10-13

    Liquid argon time projection chambers (LArTPCs) produce remarkable fidelity in the observation of neutrino interactions. The superior capabilities of such detectors to reconstruct the spatial and calorimetric information of neutrino events have made them the detectors of choice in a number of experiments, specifically those looking to observe electron neutrino ($\

  12. First Observation of Low Energy Electron Neutrinos in a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, R; Asaadi, J; Baller, B; Bolton, T; Bromberg, C; Cavanna, F; Church, E; Edmunds, D; Ereditato, A; Farooq, S; Fitzpatrick, R S; Fleming, B; Hackenburg, A; Horton-Smith, G; James, C; Lang, K; Luo, X; Mehdiyev, R; Page, B; Palamara, O; Rebel, B; Schukraft, A; Scanavini, G; Soderberg, M; Spitz, J; Szelc, A M; Weber, M; Yang, T; Zeller, G P

    2016-01-01

    Liquid argon time projection chambers (LArTPCs) produce remarkable fidelity in the observation of neutrino interactions. The superior capabilities of such detectors to reconstruct the spatial and calorimetric information of neutrino events have made them the detectors of choice in a number of experiments, specifically those looking to observe electron neutrino ($\

  13. LArGe - Active background suppression using argon scintillation for the GERDA $0\

    CERN Document Server

    Agostini, M; Budjáš, D; Cattadori, C; Gangapshev, A; Gusev, K; Heisel, M; Junker, M; Klimenko, A; Lubashevskiy, A; Pelczar, K; Schönert, S; Smolnikov, A; Zuzel, G

    2015-01-01

    LArGe is a GERDA low-background test facility to study novel background suppression methods in a low-background environment, for future application in the GERDA experiment. Similar to GERDA, LArGe operates bare germanium detectors submersed into liquid argon (1 m$^3$, 1.4 tons), which in addition is instrumented with photomultipliers to detect argon scintillation light. The scintillation signals are used in anti-coincidence with the germanium detectors to effectively suppress background events that deposit energy in the liquid argon. The background suppression efficiency was studied in combination with a pulse shape discrimination (PSD) technique using a BEGe detector for various sources, which represent characteristic backgrounds to GERDA. Suppression factors of a few times $10^3$ have been achieved. First background data of LArGe with a coaxial HPGe detector (without PSD) yield a background index of (0.12$-$4.6)$\\cdot 10^{-2}$ cts/(keV$\\cdot$kg$\\cdot$y) (90% C.L.), which is at the level of GERDA Phase I. Fu...

  14. Laser-Assisted Elastic Electron Scattering from Argon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Qiu-Bo; SUN Jin-Feng

    2009-01-01

    The second Born approximation (SBA) theory is applied to the study of electron-atom scattering in the presence of a CO2 laser field. The absolute differential cross sections of e-At scattering are calculated with multiphoton exchange in two special scattering geometries G1 (for small-angle scattering) and G2. For geometry G1, compared with the results of two different model potentials for electron elastic scattering by atoms, it is found that electronatom polarization potential plays an important role in laser-assisted electron-atom scattering. Some calculational results in geometries G2 are given. Our results are found to be better than other theoretical results as compared with the experimental data in geometries G1 and G2.

  15. Measurement of ionization and electron transport in methane-argon mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urquijo, J. de; Alvarez, I.; Basurto, E.; Cisneros, C. [Centro de Ciencias Fisicas, UNAM, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    1999-07-21

    We used a pulsed Townsend technique to measure the effective ionization coefficients, electron drift velocities and positive ion drift velocities in methane-argon mixtures over the combined density-normalized electric field intensity, E/N, range from 0.05 to 700x10{sup -17} V cm{sup 2}. The mixture studied contained 0.5, 3, 25, 50 and 75% CH{sub 4}, including pure methane and pure argon. We found a well defined dependence of the effective ionization coefficient on the amount of CH{sub 4} in the mixture at low E/N, while at the higher E/N end, all the curves merged into a single one. The electron drift velocities in the mixture show a pronounced negative differential conductivity region, the maxima and minima of which depend on the mixture ratio. (author)

  16. Electron-beam-sustained discharge revisited - light emission from combined electron beam and microwave excited argon at atmospheric pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Dandl, T; Neumeier, A; Wieser, J; Ulrich, A

    2015-01-01

    A novel kind of electron beam sustained discharge is presented in which a 12keV electron beam is combined with a 2.45GHz microwave power to excite argon gas at atmospheric pressure in a continuous mode of operation. Optical emission spectroscopy is performed over a wide wavelength range from the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) to the near infrared (NIR). Several effects which modify the emission spectra compared to sole electron beam excitation are observed and interpreted by the changing plasma parameters such as electron density, electron temperature and gas temperature.

  17. Comparisons of Electron and Muon Signals in the Atlas Liquid Argon Calorimeters with GEANT4 Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benchekroun, D.; Karpetian, G.; Mazini, R.; Kiryunin, A.; Salihagic, D.; Strizenec, P.; Kish, J.; Kordas, K.; Parrour, G.; Leltchouk, M.; Negroni, S.; Seligman, W.; Loch, P.; Soukharev, A.

    2002-01-01

    Signals from electrons and muons taken at testbeams with different modules of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter have been compared to corresponding simulations using the GEANT4 toolkit. These simulations have also been compared in some detail with GEANT3 based predictions. Results for signal linearity, energy resolution, and shower shapes all generally indicate a good agreement between experiment and the two simulation packages, typically at the level of a few percent.

  18. Phase - I Trigger Readout Electronics upgrade for the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Dinkespiler, Bernard; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) scheduled for shut-down period of 2018-2019, referred to as Phase-I upgrade, will increase the instantaneous luminosity to about three times the design value. Since the current ATLAS trigger system does not allow sufficient increase of the trigger rate, an improvement of the trigger system is required. The Liquid Argon (LAr) Calorimeter read-out will therefore be modified to use digital trigger signals with a higher spatial granularity in order to improve the identification efficiencies of electrons, photons, tau, jets and missing energy, at high background rejection rates at the Level-1 trigger. The new trigger signals will be arranged in 34000 so-called Super Cells which achieves 5-10 times better granularity than the trigger towers currently used and allows an improved background rejection. The readout of the trigger signals will process the signal of the Super Cells at every LHC bunch-crossing at 12-bit precision and a frequency of 40 MHz. The data will be tr...

  19. Inner-Shell Excitations of 2p Electrons of Argon Investigated by Fast Electron Impact with High Resolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Lin-Mao; WANG You-Yan; LI Dong-Dong; YUAN Zhen-Sheng; ZHU Lin-Fan

    2011-01-01

    @@ Electron energy loss spectra of inner-shell excitations of 2p electrons of argon are measured at an incident electron energy of 2500eV and scattering angles of 0° and 4°.The dipole-forbidden transitions of 2p3/2-14p and 2p3/2-15p are observed in the measured spectra and assigned based on the calculations of the Cowan code.The positions and line widths for the excitations of 2p3/2-1nl and 2p1/2-1nl(n ≤ 5) of argon are determined.The present results show that the line widths of the electric quadrupole transitions of 2p3/2-14p[5/2 + 3/2]2 and the electric monopole one of 2p3/2-14p[1/2]0 are less than those of the dipole-allowed transitions.%Electron energy loss spectra of inner-shell excitations of 2p electrons of argon are measured at an incident electron energy of 2500eV and scattering angles of 0° and 4°. The dipole-forbidden transitions of 2p-13/24p and 2p-13/25p are observed in the measured spectra and assigned based on the calculations of the Cowan code. The positions and line widths for the excitations of 2p-13/2nl and 2p-11/2nl(n ≤ 5) of argon are determined. The present results show that the line widths of the electric quadrupole transitions of 2p-13/24p[5/2 + 3/2]2 and the electric monopole one of 2p-13/2 4p[1/2]o are less than those of the dipole-allowed transitions.

  20. Investigation of argon ion sputtering on the secondary electron emission from gold samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Cui, Wanzhao; Li, Yun; Xie, Guibai; Zhang, Na; Wang, Rui; Hu, Tiancun; Zhang, Hongtai

    2016-09-01

    Secondary electron (SE) yield, δ, is a very sensitive surface property. The values of δ often are not consistent for even identical materials. The influence of surface changes on the SE yield was investigated experimentally in this article. Argon ion sputtering was used to remove the contamination from the surface. Surface composition was monitored by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and surface topography was scanned by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) before and after every sputtering. It was found that argon sputtering can remove contamination and roughen the surface. An "equivalent work function" is presented in this thesis to establish the relationship between SE yield and surface properties. Argon ion sputtering of 1.5keV leads to a significant increase of so called "work function" (from 3.7 eV to 6.0 eV), and a decrease of SE yield (from 2.01 to 1.54). These results provided a new insight into the influence of surface changes on the SE emission.

  1. The second Born approximation of electron-argon elastic scattering in a Bichromatic laser field

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Bin; Wen, Da-Yong

    2013-01-01

    We study the elastic scattering of atomic argon by electron in the presence of a bichromatic laser field in the second Born approximation. The target atom is approximated by a simple screening potential and the continuum states of the impinging and emitting electrons are described as Volkov states. We evaluate the S-matrix elements numerically. The dependence of differential cross section on the relative phase between the two laser components is presented. The results obtained in the first and second Born approximation are compared and analysed.

  2. ArgonCube: a novel, fully-modular approach for the realization of large-mass liquid argon TPC neutrino detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Amsler, C; Asaadi, J; Auger, M; Barbato, F; Bay, F; Bishai, M; Bleiner, D; Borgschulte, A; Bremer, J; Cavus, E; Chen, H; De Geronimo, G; Ereditato, A; Fleming, B; Goldi, D; Hanni, R; Kose, U; Kreslo, I; La Mattina, F; Lanni, F; Lissauer, D; Luthi, M; Lutz, P; Marchionni, A; Mladenov, D; Nessi, M; Noto, F; Palamara, O; Raaf, J L; Radeka, V; Rudolph Von Rohr, Ch; Smargianaki, D; Soderberg, M; Strauss, Th; Weber, M; Yu, B; Zeller, G P; Zeyrek, M; CERN. Geneva. SPS and PS Experiments Committee; SPSC

    2015-01-01

    The Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber is a prime candidate detector for future neutrino oscillation physics experiments, underground neutrino observatories and proton decay searches. A large international project based on this technology is currently being considered at the future LBNF facility in the United States on the very large mass scale of 40 kton. In this document, following the long standing R&D work conducted over the last years in several laboratories in Europe and in the United States, we intend to propose a novel Liquid Argon TPC approach based on a fully-modular, innovative design, the ArgonCube. The related R&D work will proceed along two main directions; one aimed at on the assessment of the proposed modular detector design, the other on the exploitation of new signal readout methods. Such a strategy will provide high performance while being cost-effective and robust at the same time. According to our plans, we will firstly realize a detector prototype hosted in a cryostat that is a...

  3. The Liquid Argon Purity Demonstrator

    CERN Document Server

    Adamowski, M; Dvorak, E; Hahn, A; Jaskierny, W; Johnson, C; Jostlein, H; Kendziora, C; Lockwitz, S; Pahlka, B; Plunkett, R; Pordes, S; Rebel, B; Schmitt, R; Stancari, M; Tope, T; Voirin, E; Yang, T

    2014-01-01

    The Liquid Argon Purity Demonstrator was an R&D test stand designed to determine if electron drift lifetimes adequate for large neutrino detectors could be achieved without first evacuating the cryostat. We describe here the cryogenic system, its operations, and the apparatus used to determine the contaminant levels in the argon and to measure the electron drift lifetime. The liquid purity obtained by this system was facilitated by a gaseous argon purge. Additionally, gaseous impurities from the ullage were prevented from entering the liquid at the gas-liquid interface by condensing the gas and filtering the resulting liquid before returning to the cryostat. The measured electron drift lifetime in this test was greater than 6 ms, sustained over several periods of many weeks. Measurements of the temperature profile in the argon, to assess convective flow and boiling, were also made and are compared to simulation.

  4. The Liquid Argon Purity Demonstrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamowski, M.; Carls, B.; Dvorak, E.; Hahn, A.; Jaskierny, W.; Johnson, C.; Jostlein, H.; Kendziora, C.; Lockwitz, S.; Pahlka, B.; Plunkett, R.; Pordes, S.; Rebel, B.; Schmitt, R.; Stancari, M.; Tope, T.; Voirin, E.; Yang, T.

    2014-07-01

    The Liquid Argon Purity Demonstrator was an R&D test stand designed to determine if electron drift lifetimes adequate for large neutrino detectors could be achieved without first evacuating the cryostat. We describe here the cryogenic system, its operations, and the apparatus used to determine the contaminant levels in the argon and to measure the electron drift lifetime. The liquid purity obtained by this system was facilitated by a gaseous argon purge. Additionally, gaseous impurities from the ullage were prevented from entering the liquid at the gas-liquid interface by condensing the gas and filtering the resulting liquid before returning to the cryostat. The measured electron drift lifetime in this test was greater than 6 ms, sustained over several periods of many weeks. Measurements of the temperature profile in the argon, to assess convective flow and boiling, were also made and are compared to simulation.

  5. Second-Order Born Effect in Single Ionization of Argon by Electron Impact

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yang; ZHOU Ya-Jun; JIAO Li-Guang

    2012-01-01

    We extend the standard distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA) to include the second-order Born amplitude in order to describe the multiple interactions between a projectile and an atomic target. Both the first- and second-order DWBA models are used to calculate triply differential cross sections (TDCS) of coplanar (e,2e) on atomic argon with the scattered electron energy fixed at 500 eV, the scattering angle at 6° and the ejected electron energies at 37, 74 and 205 eV. Overall agreements with experimental measurements have been obtained in shape, and the second-order DWBA model improves the calculations as expected, especially for recoil peak of TDCS.%We extend the standard distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA ) to include the second-order Born amplitude in order to describe the multiple interactions between a projectile and an atomic target.Both the first- and secondorder DWBA models are used to calculate triply differential cross sections (TDCS) of coplanar (e,2e) on atomic argon with the scattered electron energy fixed at 500eV,the scattering angle at 6° and the ejected electron energies at 37,74 and 205 e V.Overall agreements with experimental measurements have been obtained in shape,and the second-order DWBA model improves the calculations as expected,especially for recoil peak of TDCS.

  6. Exploring the electron density in plasmas induced by extreme ultraviolet radiation in argon

    CERN Document Server

    van der Horst, R M; Osorio, E A; Banine, V Y

    2015-01-01

    The new generation of lithography tools use high energy EUV radiation which ionizes the present background gas due to photoionization. To predict and understand the long term impact on the highly delicate mirrors It is essential to characterize these kinds of EUV-induced plasmas. We measured the electron density evolution in argon gas during and just after irradiation by a short pulse of EUV light at 13.5 nm by applying microwave cavity resonance spectroscopy. Dependencies on EUV pulse energy and gas pressure have been explored over a range relevant for industrial applications. Our experimental results show that the maximum reached electron density depends linearly on pulse energy. A quadratic dependence - caused by photoionization and subsequent electron impact ionization by free electrons - is found from experiments where the gas pressure is varied. This is demonstrated by our theoretical estimates presented in this manuscript as well.

  7. A comparison among optical emission spectroscopic methods of determining electron temperature in low pressure argon plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Niu Tian-Ye; Cao Jin-Xiang; Liu Lei; Liu Jin-Ying; Wang Yan; Wang Liang

    2007-01-01

    In this article, four kinds of optical emission spectroscopic methods of determining electron temperature are used to investigate the relationship between electron temperature and pressure in the cylindrical plasmas of dc glow discharges at low pressures in laboratory by measuring the relative intensities of ArI lines at various pressures. These methods are developed respectively on the basis of the Fermi-Dirac model, corona model, and two kinds of electron collision cross section models according to the kinetic analysis. Their theoretical bases and the conditions to which they are applicable are reviewed, and their calculation results and fitting errors are compared with each other. The investigation has indicated that the electron temperatures obtained by the four methods become consistent with each other when the pressure increases in the low pressure argon plasmas.

  8. Electron recombination in low-energy nuclear recoils tracks in liquid argon

    CERN Document Server

    Wojcik, Mariusz

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of electron-ion recombination processes in ionization tracks of recoiled atoms in liquid argon (LAr) detectors. The analysis is based on the results of computer simulations which use realistic models of electron transport and reactions. The calculations reproduce the recent experimental results of the ionization yield from 6.7 keV nuclear recoils in LAr. The statistical distribution of the number of electrons that escape recombination is found to deviate from the binomial distribution, and estimates of recombination fluctuations for nuclear recoils tracks are obtained. A study of the recombination kinetics shows that a significant part of electrons undergo very fast static recombination, an effect that may be responsible for the weak drift-field dependence of the ionization yield from nuclear recoils in some noble liquids. The obtained results can be useful in the search for hypothetical dark matter particles and in other studies that involve detection of recoiled nuclei.

  9. Microwave diagnostic for the determination of the electron temperature of a low density shock-heated argon plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, C. P.; Exberger, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    The diffraction, defocusing and beam bending effects of microwaves transmitted through a bounded shock-heated argon plasma with low electron density are investigated with the purpose of developing an accurate method for electron temperature (Te) determination. This report describes the evaluation technique and presents results for an argon plasma with pressure between 3 and 10 torr, and T2 between 5500 and 9500 K. The electron temperature values obtained have a range of uncertainty between -20% and +10% only. The electron temperature is equal or lower by approximately 1000 K in comparison to the heavy particle temperature (T2).

  10. Pressure broadening calculations for OH in collisions with argon: Rotational, vibrational, and electronic transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagdigian, Paul J.

    2017-03-01

    Collisional parameters describing both the pressure-induced broadening and shifting of isolated lines in the spectrum of the hydroxyl radical in collisions with argon have been determined through quantum scattering calculations using accurate potential energy surfaces describing the OH(X2 Π , A2Σ+)-Ar interactions. These calculations have been carried for pure rotational, vibrational, and electronic transitions. The calculated pressure broadening coefficients are in good agreement with the available measurements in the microwave, infrared, and ultraviolet spectral regions. Computed pressure broadening coefficients as a function of temperature are reported for these three types of transitions.

  11. Measurement of electron attachment coefficient in oxygen and oxygen-argon mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, B.; Nakamura, Y. [Keio University, Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-07-01

    We analyzed the electron arrival time signal measured in pure oxygen and in dilute oxygen-argon mixtures by using a double shutter electron drift tube with variable drift distance and derived the density normalized attachment coefficient for respective gases. The present attachment coefficient determined for pure oxygen agreed well with previously reported values and we confirmed that the present apparatus was useful in determining electron attachment coefficient even if there were no ionization, when there will be no steady state current growth and, hence, the steady state Townsend (SST) method can not be applied in principle. The measured attachment coefficients in the mixtures agreed very well with the calculation using our latest cross section set for the oxygen molecule and that `II be a confirmation for the validity of the cross section set. 11 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  12. The observation of unusual resonance channels in the electron attachment to mixed argon-oxygen clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foltin, M.; Grill, V.; Märk, T. D.

    1992-01-01

    An additional electron attachment resonance peak, not observable in pure oxygen cluster anions, has been found at an energy of about 11.5 eV for both the stoichiometric Ar m(O 2) n- and the nonstoichiometric Ar m(O 2) n-1 O - cluster anions (produced by electron attachment to mixed argon-oxygen clusters). Two possible competing mechanisms are proposed to explain the appearance of these resonance peaks, i.e. the multiple-collision electron-scavenging mechanism and the core-excited resonance attachment mechanism. From the peak-width analysis it follows that in Ar m(O 2) 2- the first mechanism is dominant, while in Ar m(O 2) n-1 O - the second mechanism seems to be the only one occurring.

  13. Dynamics of the ions in Liquid Argon Detectors and electron signal quenching

    CERN Document Server

    Romero, L; Montes, B

    2016-01-01

    A study of the dynamics of the positive charges in liquid argon has been carried out in the context of the future massive time projection chambers proposed for dark matter and neutrino physics. The ions spend considerably longer times in the active volume with respect to the electrons given their small mobility coefficient in liquid. The space charge can be additionally increased by the injection in the target volume of the ions produced by electron multiplying devices located in a gas phase above the liquid. The impact of the positive current on the uniformity of the field has been evaluated as well as the probability of the charge signal quenching due to the electron-ion recombination along the drift. The results show a potential concern for the operation of massive detectors with drift of many meters when located on surface.

  14. LArGe: active background suppression using argon scintillation for the GERDA 0νββ-experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agostini, M.; Budjas, D.; Schoenert, S. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Barnabe-Heider, M. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Cattadori, C. [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy); INFN, Milan (Italy); Gangapshev, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Institut for Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gusev, K. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Joint Institut for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); National Research Center Kurchatov Institut, Moscow (Russian Federation); Heisel, M.; Smolnikov, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Junker, M. [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy); Klimenko, A.; Lubashevskiy, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Joint Institut for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Pelczar, K. [Jagellonian University, Cracow (Poland); Zuzel, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Jagellonian University, Cracow (Poland)

    2015-10-15

    LArGe is a GERDA low-background test facility to study novel background suppression methods in a low-background environment, for future application in the GERDA experiment. Similar to GERDA, LArGe operates bare germanium detectors submersed into liquid argon (1 m{sup 3}, 1.4tons), which in addition is instrumented with photomultipliers to detect argon scintillation light. The scintillation signals are used in anti-coincidence with the germanium detectors to effectively suppress background events that deposit energy in the liquid argon. The background suppression efficiency was studied in combination with a pulse shape discrimination (PSD) technique using a BEGe detector for various sources, which represent characteristic backgrounds to GERDA. Suppression factors of a few times 10{sup 3} have been achieved. First background data of LArGe with a coaxial HPGe detector (without PSD) yield a background index of (0.12 - 4.6) x 10{sup -2} cts/(keV kg year) (90 % C.L.), which is at the level of GERDA Phase I. Furthermore, for the first time we monitor the natural {sup 42}Ar abundance (parallel to GERDA), and have indication for the 2νββ-decay in natural germanium. These results show the effectivity of an active liquid argon veto in an ultra-low background environment. As a consequence, the implementation of a liquid argon veto in GERDA Phase II is pursued. (orig.)

  15. MicroBooNE and the Road to Large Liquid Argon Neutrino Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagiorgi, G.

    Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LArTPC's) provide a promising technology for multi-kiloton scale detectors aiming to address-among other pressing particle physics questions-the possibility of short and long baseline electron neutrino and antineutrino appearance. MicroBooNE, a 170 ton LArTPC under construction, is the next necessary step in a phased R&D effort toward construction and stable operation of larger-scale LArTPC's. This development effort also leans heavily on the ArgoNeuT and LAr1 LArTPC R&D experiments at Fermilab. In addition to advancing the LArTPC technology, these projects also provide unique physics opportunities. For example, Micro-BooNE will be located in the Booster Neutrino Beamline at Fermilab, at ∼470 m from neutrino production. Thus, in addition to measuring a suite of low energy neutrino cross sections on argon, MicroBooNE will investigate the anomalous low energy excess seen by the MiniBooNE experiment. Furthermore, the neutrino beam energy and relatively short baseline provide MicroBooNE with sensitivity to high-∼m2 neutrino oscillations. These proceedings summarize the role of the MicroBooNE detector in the US LArTPC R&D program, present its physics reach, and briefly discuss the physics potential of a dedicated near-future neutrino oscillation program at the Booster Neutrino Beamline, as a way to maximize the physics output of the Fermilab LArTPC R&D projects.

  16. Compilation of electron collision excitation cross sections for neutral argon; Compilacion de resultados de secciones eficaces de excitacion para niveles del Argon neutro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco, F.

    1993-07-01

    The present work presents a compilation and critical analysis of the available data on electron collision excitation cross sections for neutral Argon levels. This study includes: 1.- A detailed description in intermediate coupling for all the levels belonging the 20 configurations 3p5 ns (n=4to 12), np(n=4to8) and nd(n=3to8)of neutral Argon. 2.- Calculation of the electron collision excitation cross sections in Born and Born-Oppenheimer-Ochkur approximations for all the levels in the 14 configurations 3p5 ns (n=4 to 7), np (n=4 to 7) and nd (n=3 to 8). 3.- comparison and discussion of the compiled data. These are the experimental and theoretical values available from the literature, and those from this work. 4.- Analysis of the regularities and systematic behaviors in order to determine which values can be considered more reliable. It is show that the concept of one electron cross section results quite useful for this purpose. In some cases it has been possible to obtain in this way approximate analytical expressions interpolating the experimental data. 5.- All the experimental and theoretical values studied are graphically presented and compared. 6.- The last part of the work includes a listing of several general purpose programs for Atomic Physics calculations developed for this work. (Author) 35 refs.

  17. Simulations and Measurement of Electron Energy and Effective Electron Temperature of Nanosecond Pulsed Argon Plasma%Simulations and Measurement of Electron Energy and Effective Electron Temperature of Nanosecond Pulsed Argon Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闻雪晴; 信裕; 冯春雷; 丁洪斌

    2012-01-01

    The behavior of argon plasma driven by nanosecond pulsed plasma in a low-pressure plasma reactor is investigated using a global model, and the results are compared with the experimental measurements. The time evolution of plasma density and the electron energy probability function are calculated by solving the energy balance and Boltzmann equations. During and shortly after the discharge pulse, the electron energy probability function can be represented by a bi-Maxwellian distribution, indicating two energy groups of electrons. According to the effective electron temperature calculation, we find that there are more high-energy electrons that play an important role in the excitation and ionization processes than low-energy electrons. The effective electron temperature is also measured via optical emission spectroscopy to evaluate the simulation model. In the comparison, the simulation results are found to be in agreement with the measure- ments. Furthermore, variations of the effective electron temperature are presented versus other discharge parameters, such as pulse width time, pulse rise time and gas pressure.

  18. Radiation Tolerant Electronics and Digital Processing for the Phase-1 Readout Upgrade of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Milic, Adriana; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The high luminosities of $L > 10^{34} cm^{-2} s^{-1}$ at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN produce an intense radiation environment that the detectors and their electronics must withstand. The ATLAS detector is a multi-purpose apparatus constructed to explore the new particle physics regime opened by the LHC. Of the many decay particles observed by the ATLAS detector, the energy of the created electrons and photons is measured by a sampling calorimeter technique that uses Liquid Argon (LAr) as its active medium. The front end (FE) electronic readout of the ATLAS LAr calorimeter located on the detector itself consists of a combined analog and digital processing system. In order to exploit the higher luminosity while keeping the same trigger bandwidth of 100 kHz, higher transverse granularity, higher resolution and longitudinal shower shape information will be provided from the LAr calorimeter to the Level-1 trigger processors. New trigger readout electronics have been designed for this purpose, which wil...

  19. Radiation Tolerant Electronics and Digital Processing for the Phase-I Trigger Readout Upgrade of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Milic, Adriana; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The high luminosities of $\\mathcal{L} > 10^{34} \\mathrm{cm}^{-2} \\mathrm{s}^{-1}$at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN produce an intense radiation environment that the detectors and their electronics must withstand. The ATLAS detector is a multi-purpose apparatus constructed to explore the new particle physics regime opened by the LHC. Of the many decay particles observed by the ATLAS detector, the energy of the created electrons and photons is measured by a sampling calorimeter technique that uses Liquid Argon (LAr) as its active medium. The Front End (FE) electronic readout of the ATLAS LAr calorimeter located on the detector itself consists of a combined analog and digital processing system. The FE electronics were qualified for radiation levels corresponding to 10 years of LHC operations. The high luminosity running of the LHC (HL-LHC), with instantaneous luminosities of $5 \\times 10^{34} \\mathrm{cm}^ {-2} \\mathrm{s}^{-1}$ and an integrated luminosity of $3000 \\ \\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ will exceed these d...

  20. Electron Density and Temperature Measurement by Stark Broadening in a Cold Argon Arc-Plasma Jet at Atmospheric Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Qiuping; CHENG Cheng; MENG Yuedong

    2009-01-01

    Determination of both the electron density and temperature simultaneously in a cold argon arc-plasma jet by analyzing the Stark broadening of two different emission lines is presented.This method is based on the fact that the Stark broadening of different lines has a different dependence on the electron density and temperature.Therefore,a comparison of two or more line broadenings allows us to diagnose the electron density and temperature simultaneously.In this study we used the first two Balmer series hydrogen lines H_α and H_β for their large broadening width.For this purpose,a small amount of hydrogen was introduced into the discharge gas.The results of the Gigosos-Cardenoso computational model,considering more relevant processes for the hydrogen Balmer lines,is used to process the experimental data.With this method,we obtained reliable electron density and temperature,1.88 ×10 ~(15) cm~(-3 )and 13000 K,respectively.Possible sources of error were also analyzed.

  1. Excitation temperature and electron number density distributions experienced by analyte species in an inductively coupled argon plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalnicky, D.J.

    1977-02-01

    Spatially resolved, radial excitation temperatures and radial electron number density distributions experienced by analyte species in the observation zone of 15 to 25 mm above the load coil of a toroidally shaped, inductively coupled argon plasma (ICP) are presented and related to the analytical performance of these plasmas. A comparison of radial temperatures measured with support gas (Ar I) lines and with a typical analyte thermometric species (Fe I) at 15 mm above the load coil is given. Radial (Fe I) excitation temperatures obtained at three observation heights (15, 20, and 25 mm) are compared for aerosol carrier gas flows of 1.0 l/min and 1.3 l/min. The addition of a large amount of an easily ionized element (6900 ..mu..g Na/ml) did not significantly change Fe I excitation temperature distributions at the respective aerosol carrier gas flows and observation heights. A comparison of radial electron number density distributions measured by the Saha-Eggert ionization and Stark broadening methods is given for an observation height of 15 mm above the load coil. The differences between the electron number density values obtained by these methods is discussed. The effect of addition of 6900 ..mu..g Na/ml on Saha-Eggert electron density distributions at these observation heights is also discussed. The computer programs employed in this investigation and discussions of the computational procedures incorporated in these programs are given.

  2. Electronics development for the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter trigger and readout for future LHC running

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Walter

    2017-02-01

    The upgrade of the LHC will provide 7 times greater instantaneous and 10 times greater total luminosities than assumed in the original design of the ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) Calorimeters. Radiation tolerance criteria and an improved trigger system with higher acceptance rate and longer latency require an upgrade of the LAr readout electronics. In the first upgrade phase in 2019-2020, a trigger readout with up to 10 times higher granularity will be implemented. This allows an improved reconstruction of electromagnetic and hadronic showers and will reduce the background for electron, photon and energy-flow signals at the first trigger level. The analog and digital signal processing components are currently in their final design stages and a fully functional demonstrator system is operated and tested on the LAr Calorimeters. In a second upgrade stage in 2024-2026, the readout of all 183,000 LAr Calorimeter cells will be performed without trigger selection at 40 MHz sampling rate and 16 bit dynamic range. Calibrated energies of all cells will be available at the second trigger level operating at 1 MHz, in order to allow further mitigation of pile-up effects in energy reconstruction. Radiation tolerant, low-power front-end electronics optimized for high pile-up conditions are currently being developed, including pre-amplifier, ADC and serializer components in 65-180 nm technology. This contribution will give an overview of the future LAr readout electronics and present research results from the two upgrade programs.

  3. First demonstration of a sub-keV electron recoil energy threshold in a liquid argon ionization chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sangiorgio, S., E-mail: samuele@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Joshi, T.H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bernstein, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Coleman, J. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Oxford St, Liverpool L69 7Ze (United Kingdom); Foxe, M. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Hagmann, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Jovanovic, I. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Kazkaz, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Mavrokoridis, K. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Oxford St, Liverpool L69 7Ze (United Kingdom); Mozin, V.; Pereverzev, S.; Sorensen, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2013-11-11

    We describe the first demonstration of a sub-keV electron recoil energy threshold in a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber. This is an important step in an effort to develop a detector capable of identifying the ionization signal resulting from nuclear recoils with energies of order a few keV and below. We obtained this result by observing the peaks in the energy spectrum at 2.82 keV and 0.27 keV, following the K- and L-shell electron capture decay of {sup 37}Ar respectively. The {sup 37}Ar source preparation is described in detail, since it enables calibration that may also prove useful in dark matter direct detection experiments. An internally placed {sup 55}Fe x-ray source simultaneously provided another calibration point at 5.9 keV. We discuss the ionization yield and electron recombination in liquid argon at those three calibration energies. -- Highlights: • We measure sub-keV electron recoils in a dual-phase argon time projection chamber. • Ar-37 is produced via neutron irradiation and used as calibration source. • Ar-37 electron captures at 2.82 and 0.27 keV are measured together with Fe-55 x-rays. • Spurious single ionization electrons provided absolute calibration of charge signal. • Modified Thomas–Imel model describes low-energy electron-recoils in liquid Ar.

  4. Electronics Development for the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter - Trigger and Readout for Future LHC Running -

    CERN Document Server

    Starz, Steffen; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The upgrade of the LHC will provide up to 7.5 times greater instantaneous and total luminosities than assumed in the original design of the ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) Calorimeters. Radiation tolerance criteria and an improved trigger system with higher acceptance rate and longer latency require an upgrade of the LAr readout electronics. In the first upgrade phase in 2019-2020, a trigger-readout with up to 10 times higher granularity will be implemented. This allows an improved reconstruction of electromagnetic and hadronic showers and will reduce the background for electron, photon and energy-flow signals at the first trigger level. The analog and digital signal processing components are currently in their final design stages and a fully functional demonstrator system is operated and tested on the LAr Calorimeters. In a second upgrade stage in 2024-2026, the readout of all 183,000 LAr Calorimeter cells will be performed without trigger selection at 40 MHz sampling rate and 16 bit dynamic range. Calibrated energ...

  5. Electronics Development for the ATLAS Liquid ArgonCalorimeter Trigger and Readout for Future LHC Running

    CERN Document Server

    Hopkins, Walter; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The upgrade of the LHC will provide 7 times greater instantaneous and total luminosities than assumed in the original design of the ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) Calorimeters. Radiation tolerance criteria and an improved trigger system with higher acceptance rate and longer latency require an upgrade of the LAr readout electronics. In the first upgrade phase in 2019-2020, a trigger readout with up to 10 times higher granularity will be implemented. This allows an improved reconstruction of electromagnetic and hadronic showers and will reduce the background for electron, photon and energy-flow signals at the first trigger level. The analog and digital signal processing components are currently in their final design stages and a fully functional demonstrator system is operated and tested on the LAr Calorimeters. In a second upgrade stage in 2024-2026, the readout of all 183,000 LAr Calorimeter cells will be performed without trigger selection at 40 MHz sampling rate and 16 bit dynamic range. Calibrated energies of a...

  6. Upgraded readout and trigger electronics for the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeters for future LHC running

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanaka, T; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) calorimeters produce almost 200K signals that must be digitized and processed by the front-end and back-end electronics at every triggered event. Additionally, the front-end electronics sums analog signals to provide coarse-grained energy sums to the first-level (L1) trigger system. The current design was optimized for the nominal LHC luminosity of 10^34 cm^-2s^-1. However, in future higher-luminosity phases of LHC operation, the luminosity (and associated pile-up noise) will be 3-7 times higher. An improved spatial granularity of the trigger primitives is therefore proposed, in order to improve the trigger performance at high background rejection rates. For the first upgrade phase in 2018, new LAr Trigger Digitizer Boards are being designed to receive the higher granularity signals, digitize them on-detector and send them via fast optical links to a new digital processing system (DPS). This applies digital filtering and identifies significant energy depositions in each trigger ch...

  7. Upgrade readout and trigger electronics for the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeters for future LHC running

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanaka, T; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) calorimeters produce almost 200K signals that must be digitized and processed by the front-end and back-end electronics at every triggered event. Additionally, the front-end electronics sums analog signals to provide coarse-grained energy sums to the first-level (L1) trigger system. The current design was optimized for the nominal LHC luminosity of 10^34 cm^-2s^-1. However, in future higher-luminosity phases of LHC operation, the luminosity (and associated pile-up noise) will be 3-7 times higher. An improved spatial granularity of the trigger primitives is therefore proposed, in order to improve the trigger performance at high background rejection rates. For the first upgrade phase in 2018, new LAr Trigger Digitizer Boards are being designed to receive the higher granularity signals, digitize them on-detector and send them via fast optical links to a new digital processing system (DPS). This applies digital filtering and identifies significant energy depositions in each trigger ch...

  8. Upgraded readout and trigger electronics for the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeters for future LHC running

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Hong; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) calorimeters produce almost 200K signals that must be digitized and processed by the front-end and back-end electronics for every triggered event. Additionally, the front-end electronics sums analog signals to provide coarse-grained energy sums to the first-level (L1) trigger system. The current design was optimized for the nominal LHC luminosity of 10^34/cm^2/s. However, in future higher-luminosity phases of LHC operation, the luminosity (and associated pile-up noise) will be 3-7 times higher. An improved spatial granularity of the trigger primitives is therefore proposed, in order to improve the trigger performance at high background rejection rates. For the first upgrade phase in 2018, new LAr Trigger Digitizer Boards are being designed to receive the higher granularity signals, digitize them on-detector and send them via fast optical links to a new digital processing system (DPS). This applies digital filtering and identifies significant energy depositions in each trigger chan...

  9. Electronics Development for the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter Trigger and Readout for Future LHC Running

    CERN Document Server

    Hopkins, Walter; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The upgrade of the LHC will provide 7 times greater instantaneous and total luminosities than assumed in the original design of the ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) Calorimeters. Radiation tolerance criteria and an improved trigger system with higher acceptance rate and longer latency require an upgrade of the LAr readout electronics. In the first upgrade phase in 2019-2020, a trigger readout with up to 10 times higher granularity will be implemented. This allows an improved reconstruction of electromagnetic and hadronic showers and will reduce the background for electron, photon and energy-flow signals at the first trigger level. The analog and digital signal processing components are currently in their final design stages and a fully functional demonstrator system is operated and tested on the LAr Calorimeters. In a second upgrade stage in 2024-2026, the readout of all 183,000 LAr Calorimeter cells will be performed without trigger selection at 40 MHz sampling rate and 16 bit dynamic range. Calibrated energies of a...

  10. Electronics Development for the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter Trigger and Readout for Future LHC Running

    CERN Document Server

    Pacheco Rodriguez, Laura; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The upgrade of the LHC will provide up to 7.5 times greater instantaneous and total luminosities than assumed in the original design of the ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) Calorimeters. The radiation tolerance criteria and the improved trigger system with higher acceptance rate and longer latency require an upgrade of the LAr readout electronics. In the first upgrade phase in 2019-2020, a trigger-readout with up to 10 times higher granularity will be implemented. This allows an improved reconstruction of electromagnetic and hadronic showers and will reduce the background for electron, photon and energy-flow signals at the first trigger level. The analog and digital signal processing components are currently in their final design stages and a fully functional demonstrator system is operated and tested on the LAr Calorimeters. In a second upgrade stage in 2024-2026, the readout of all 183,000 LAr Calorimeter cells will be performed without trigger selection at 40 MHz sampling rate and 16 bit dynamic range. Calibrated ...

  11. First demonstration of a sub-keV electron recoil energy threshold in a liquid argon ionization chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Sangiorgio, S; Coleman, J; Foxe, M; Hagmann, C; Joshi, T H; Jovanovic, I; Kazkaz, K; Mavrokoridis, K; Mozin, V; Pereverzev, S; Sorensen, P

    2013-01-01

    We make a first demonstration of a sub-keV electron recoil energy threshold in a dual-phase liquid argon time-projection chamber. This is an important step in a program to build a detector capable of identifying the ionization signal resulting from nuclear recoils at a few keV and below. We obtained this result by observing the peaks in the energy spectrum at 2.82 keV and 0.27 keV, following the K- and L-shell electron capture decay of Ar-37. We describe the details of the Ar-37 source preparation, as this calibration technique may prove useful, e.g. for dark matter direct detection experiments. A Fe-55 internal x-ray source was also measured simultaneously and provided another calibration point at 5.9 keV. We discuss the ionization yield and electron recombination in liquid argon at the three calibration energies.

  12. A multi-term solution of the space-time Boltzmann equation for electrons in gaseous and liquid Argon

    CERN Document Server

    Boyle, G J; Tattersall, W J; McEachran, R P; White, R D

    2015-01-01

    In a recent paper [1] the scattering and transport of excess electrons in liquid argon in the hydrodynamic regime was investigated, generalizing the seminal works of Lekner and Cohen [2,3] with modern scattering theory techniques and kinetic theory. In this paper, the discussion is extended to the non-hydrodynamic regime through the development of a full multi-term space-time solution of Boltzmann's equation for electron transport in gases and liquids using a novel operator-splitting method. A Green's function formalism is considered that enables flexible adaptation to various experimental systems. The spatio-temporal evolution of electrons in liquids in the hydrodynamic regime is studied for a benchmark model Percus-Yevick liquid as well as for liquid argon. The temporal evolution of Franck-Hertz oscillations are observed for liquids, with striking differences in the spatio-temporal development of the velocity distribution function components between the uncorrelated gas and true liquid approximations in arg...

  13. Large area and flexible electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Caironi, Mario

    2015-01-01

    From materials to applications, this ready reference covers the entire value chain from fundamentals via processing right up to devices, presenting different approaches to large-area electronics, thus enabling readers to compare materials, properties and performance.Divided into two parts, the first focuses on the materials used for the electronic functionality, covering organic and inorganic semiconductors, including vacuum and solution-processed metal-oxide semiconductors, nanomembranes and nanocrystals, as well as conductors and insulators. The second part reviews the devices and applicatio

  14. Infrared spectra and electronic structure calculations for NN complexes with U, UN, and NUN in solid argon, neon, and nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Lester; Wang, Xuefeng; Gong, Yu; Kushto, Gary P; Vlaisavljevich, Bess; Gagliardi, Laura

    2014-07-17

    Reactions of laser-ablated U atoms with N2 molecules upon codeposition in excess argon or neon at 4 K gave intense NUN and weak UN absorptions. Annealing produced progressions of new absorptions for the UN2(N2)1,2,3,4,5 and UN(N2)1,2,3,4,5,6 complexes. The neon-to-argon matrix shift decreases with increasing NN ligation and therefore the number of noble gas atoms left in the primary coordination sphere around the NUN molecule. Small matrix shifts are observed when the secondary coordination layers around the primary UN2(N2)1,2,3,4,5 and UN(N2)1,2,3,4,5,6 complexes are changed from neon-to-argon to nitrogen. Electronic structure, energy, and frequency calculations provide support for the identification of these complexes and the characterization of the N≡U≡N and U≡N core molecules as terminal uranium nitrides. Codeposition of U with pure nitrogen produced the saturated U(NN)7 complex, which UV irradiation converted to the NUN(NN)5 complex with slightly lower frequencies than found in solid argon.

  15. Exploring the electron density in plasma induced by EUV radiation: II. Numerical studies in argon and hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Astakhov, D I; Lee, C J; Ivanov, V V; Krivtsun, V M; Koshelev, K N; Lopaev, D V; van der Horst, R M; Beckers, J; Osorio, E A; Bijkerk, F

    2016-01-01

    We used numerical modeling to study the evolution of EUV-induced plasmas in argon and hydrogen. The results of simulations were compared to the electron densities measured by microwave cavity resonance spectroscopy. It was found that the measured electron densities can be used to derive the integral amount of plasma in the cavity. However, in some regimes, the impact of the setup geometry, EUV spectrum, and EUV induced secondary emission should be taken into account. The influence of these parameters on the generated plasma and the measured electron density is discussed.

  16. Bibliography of electron and photon cross sections with atoms and molecules published in the 20th century. Argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Makoto [Gaseous Electronics Institute, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan)

    2003-01-01

    A bibliography of original and review reports of experiments or theories of electron and photon cross sections and also electron swarm data are presented for atomic or molecular species with specified targets. These works covered 17 atoms and 51 molecules. The present bibliography is only for argon (Ar). About 1,960 papers were compiled. A comprehensive author index is included. The bibliography covers the period 1921 through 2000 for Ar. Finally, author's recommended Ar electron collision cross section set is given in numerical tables. (author)

  17. Effect of oxygen impurities on atmospheric-pressure surface streamer discharge in argon for large gap arc breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashish; Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2016-10-01

    We report the results of a computational study that investigates the effect of impurities (molecular oxygen) on the development of argon surface streamers at atmospheric-pressure conditions. A continuous surface streamer has been proposed as a low-voltage mechanism to generate a conductive bridge for arc breakdown of a large interelectrode gap at high pressures. The streamer discharge model is based on the self-consistent, multispecies, continuum description of the plasma. Below a threshold voltage, no streamer discharge is observed and charge is localized only in the vicinity of the anode in the form of a localized corona. Above this voltage threshold in pure argon, a continuous conductive streamer successfully bridges the gap between two electrodes indicating high probability of transition to the arc. For small oxygen impurities (less than 5%), the threshold voltage is found to decrease by a few hundred volts compared to the threshold voltage in pure argon while the streamer induction time increases. No noticeable changes in the streamer conductivity is obtained for low impurities of oxygen in the above range. An increase of the oxygen density above the 5% impurity level causes a significant decrease in the continuous streamer conductivity and leads to a decrease in the probability of transition to arc.

  18. Spectroscopic diagnostics of electron temperature and energy conversion efficiency of laser-sustained plasma in flowing argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, J.; Krier, H.; Chen, X.

    1988-08-01

    Laser sustained plasmas are often formed during laser materials interaction. The University's 10 kW CW CO2 laser has been used to study argon plasmas for the application to laser supported propulsion and laser materials processing. The spectroscopic diagnostic method has been applied to study laser-sustained plasmas in 1 atmosphere pure argon gas flow with an f/7 on-axis laser focusing scheme. High flow speeds of 2 to 10 m/sec are achieved. Plasma electron temperatures distributions are determined from the 415.8 nm Ar1 line and its adjacent continuum intensities. Plasma core temperatures as high as 20,000 K are reported. The total absorption of the incident laser power and the radiation loss by the plasma are calculated from the temperature distribution. Results indicated that up to 86 percent of the incident laser power can be absorbed and nearly 60 percent of the incident laser power can be retained by the flowing argon gas to provide thrust. Further research is called for in the Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) technique for diagnostics of the downstream mixing zone and the plasma outer region. Experiments over a wider range of operating conditions, as well as multiple plasma testings, are required to find the optimum operating scheme.

  19. Experimental and Theoretical Estimation of Excited Species Generation in Pulsed Electron Beam-Generated Plasmas Produced in Pure Argon, Nitrogen, Oxygen, and Their Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    cross sections were used and they are shown in the appendix. It should be noted that Bretagne et al.17 modeled electrons beams in argon using an...811 nm and 750 nm lines respectively based on data by Bretagne , Hayashi, Phelps, and Boffard. d) Theoretical results Results from two sets of...discussed above. Bretagne et al. used the continuous-slowing-down approximation to model beams in argon. This approach is less accurate than the Monte

  20. Comparisons of the Electron and Muon Testbeam Response of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters with GEANT4 Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Benchekroun, D; Karapetian, G V; Kiryunin, A E; Kish, J; Kordas, K; Leltchouk, M; Loch, P; Mazini, R; Negroni, S; Parrour, G; Salihagic, D; Seligman, W; Soukharev, A M; Strízenec, P; Unal, G

    2004-01-01

    GEANT4, a new simulation toolkit, is now in use by the different sub-detectors which are currently being built and tested for the ATLAS experiment. The validation of the GEANT4 electromagnetic physics is done by comparing the response of the various modules of the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeters to electron and muon test beams to the results of GEANT4 simulations. Comparisons to the corresponding GEANT3 predictions has been done as well. This note presents the status of the work on this validation.

  1. Growth of microscopic cones on titanium cathodes of sputter-ion pumps driven by sorption of large argon quantities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porcelli, Tommaso, E-mail: tommaso-porcelli@saes-group.com [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria, 16, 20133 Milano, Italy and SAES Getters S.p.A., viale Italia, 77, 20020 Lainate, Milan (Italy); Siviero, Fabrizio; Bongiorno, Gero A. [SAES Getters S.p.A., viale Italia, 77, 20020 Lainate, Milan (Italy); Michelato, Paolo [INFN-LASA, via fratelli Cervi, 201, 20090 Segrate, Milan (Italy); Pagani, Carlo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria, 16, 20133 Milano, Italy and INFN-LASA, via fratelli Cervi, 201, 20090 Segrate, Milan (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    Microscopic cones have been observed on titanium cathodes of sputter-ion pumps (SIPs) after pump operation. The cones were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray analysis. Size and morphology of these cones are clearly correlated with the nature and the relative amount of each gas species pumped by each SIP during its working life. In particular, their growth was found to be fed by sputtering mechanisms, mostly during Ar pumping, and to be driven by the electromagnetic field applied to the Penning cells of each SIP. Experimental findings suggest that the formation and extent of such conic structures on cathode surfaces might play a leading role in the onset of phenomena typically related to the functioning of SIPs, e.g., the so-called argon instability.

  2. The Trigger Readout Electronics for the Phase-I Upgrade of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Hao; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    For the Phase-I luminosity upgrade of the LHC a higher granularity trigger readout of the ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) Calorimeters is foreseen to enhance the trigger feature extraction and background rejection. The new readout system digitizes the detector signals, grouped into 34000 so-called Super Cells, with 12bit precision at 40MHz and transfers the data on optical links to the digital processing system, which computes the Super Cell transverse energies. In this paper, development and test results of the new readout system are presented.

  3. Scanning drift tube measurements of electron transport parameters in different gases: argon, synthetic air, methane and deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolov, I.; Vass, M.; Donkó, Z.

    2016-10-01

    Measurements of transport coefficients of electrons in a scanning drift tube apparatus are reported for different gases: argon, synthetic air, methane and deuterium. The experimental system allows the spatio-temporal development of the electron swarms (‘swarm maps’) to be recorded and this information, when compared with the profiles predicted by theory, makes it possible to determine the ‘time-of-flight’ transport coefficients: the bulk drift velocity, the longitudinal diffusion coefficient and the effective ionization coefficient, in a well-defined way. From these data, the effective Townsend ionization coefficient is determined as well. The swarm maps provide, additionally, direct, unambiguous information about the hydrodynamic/non-hydrodynamic regimes of the swarms, aiding the selection of the proper regions applicable for the determination of the transport coefficients.

  4. Demonstrator System for the Phase-I Upgrade of the Trigger Readout Electronics of the ATLAS Liquid-Argon Calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Kai; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The trigger readout electronics of the ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) Calorimeters will be improved for the Phase- I luminosity upgrade of the LHC, to enhance the trigger feature extraction. Signals with higher spatial granularity will be digitized and processed by newly developed front-end and back- end electronics. In order to evaluate technical and performance aspects, a demonstrator system has been set up, many off-detector tests have been done. Analog signal parameters including the noise and cross-talk, as well as digital signal treatment, high speed data transmission have been measured and verified. After a series of tests, the demonstrator system has been installed on the ATLAS detector before the LHC run-2.

  5. Modeling Electronegative Impurity Concentrations in Liquid Argon Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wei; Li, Yichen; Thorn, Craig; Qian, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Achieving long electron lifetime is crucial to reach the high performance of large Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) envisioned for next generation neutrino experiments. We have built up a quantitative model to describe the impurity distribution and transportation in a cryostat. Henrys constants of Oxygen and water, which describe the partition of impurities between gas argon and liquid argon, have been deduced through this model with the measurements in BNL 20-L LAr test stand. These results indicate the importance of the gas purification system and prospects on large LArTPC detectors will be discussed.

  6. Demonstrator System for the Phase-I Upgrade of the Trigger Readout Electronics of the ATLAS Liquid-Argon Calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Kai; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The trigger readout electronics of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters are foreseen to be improved for the Phase-I luminosity upgrade of the LHC, in 2019, in order to enhance the trigger feature extraction. Signals with higher spatial granularity will be digitized and processed by newly developed front-end and back-end components. In order to evaluate technical and performance aspects, a demonstrator system is being developed, with the intention of installing it on the ATLAS detector for operation during the data-taking period beginning in 2015. Results from system tests of the analog signal treatment, the trigger digitizer, the optical signal transmission and the FPGA-based back-end modules will be reported.

  7. A study of the electron image due to ionizing events in a two-dimensional liquid argon TPC with a 24 cm drift gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, S.; Braggiotti, A.; Buckley, E.; Campanella, M.; Carugno, G.; Cecchet, G.; Cennini, P.; Centro, S.; Ciocio, A.; Cittolin, S.; Dainese, B.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Gasparini, F.; Gonidec, A.; Manfredi, P. F.; Meroni, E.; Muñoz, R.; Perreau, J.-M.; Pietropaolo, F.; Ptohos, F.; Ragusa, F.; Rossi, P.; Rubbia, C.; Schinzel, D.; Schmidt, W. F.; Seidl, W.

    1990-01-01

    We have tested a liquid argon time projection chamber with a novel wire configuration based on electrostatic focussing which allows the realization of a nondestructive detection of the electron image produced by ionizing events. The chamber was tested in a 5 GeV pion beam at the CERN proton synchrotron. The measured pulse shapes at both 200 V/cm and 500 V/cm were in very good agreement with the expected shapes, calculated taking into account the electron lifetime, the response of the electronics and the longitudinal diffusion of the electron cloud. The measured electron drift velocity was in good agreement with the results of other workers as well as with our previous measurements. We have also analysed a sample of events containing delta rays in order to study the behaviour of low-energy electrons in the liquid argon. We find that for electron energies greater than 5 MeV the measured energy spectrum agrees very well with the predicted spectrum after corrections for acceptance and energy loss, hence demonstrating the feasibility of recognizing low-energy electrons in liquid argon.

  8. Large-volume excitation of air, argon, nitrogen and combustible mixtures by thermal jets produced by nanosecond spark discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanyan, Sergey; Hayashi, Jun; Salmon, Arthur; Stancu, Gabi D.; Laux, Christophe O.

    2017-04-01

    This work presents experimental observations of strong expanding thermal jets following the application of nanosecond spark discharges. These jets propagate in a toroidal shape perpendicular to the interelectrode axis, with high velocities of up to 30 m s‑1 and over distances of the order of a cm. Their propagation length is much larger than the thermal expansion region produced by the conventional millisecond sparks used in car engine ignition, thus greatly improving the volumetric excitation of gas mixtures. The shape and velocity of the jets is found to be fairly insensitive to the shape of the electrodes. In addition, their spatial extent is found to increase with the number of nanosecond sparks and with the discharge voltage, and to decrease slightly with the pressure between 1 and 7 atm at constant applied voltage. Finally, this thermal jet phenomenon is observed in experiments conducted with many types of gas mixtures, including air, nitrogen, argon, and combustible CH4/air mixtures. This makes nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges particularly attractive for aerodynamic flow control or plasma-assisted combustion because of their ability to excite large volumes of gas, typically about 100 times the volume of the discharge.

  9. Upgraded Readout and Trigger Electronics for the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter at the LHC at the Horizons 2018-2022

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira Damazio, Denis; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) calorimeters produce a total of 182,486 signals which are digitized and processed by the front-end and back-end electronics at every triggered event. In addition, the front-end electronics is summing analog signals to provide coarsely grained energy sums, called trigger towers, to the first-level trigger system, which is optimized for nominal LHC luminosities. However, the pile-up noise expected during the High Luminosity phases of LHC will be increased by factors of 3 to 7. An improved spatial granularity of the trigger primitives is therefore proposed in order to improve the identification performance for trigger signatures, like electrons, photons, tau leptons, jets, total and missing energy, at high background rejection rates. For the first upgrade phase in 2018, new LAr Trigger Digitizer Board (LTDB) are being designed to receive higher granularity signals, digitize them on detector and send them via fast optical links to a new digital processing system (DPS). The DPS applies...

  10. Investigations on the time evolution of the plasma density in argon electron-beam plasma at intermediate pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaoyan, BAI; Chen, CHEN; Hong, LI; Wandong, LIU

    2017-03-01

    The time evolution of the argon electron-beam plasma at intermediate pressure and low electron beam intensity was presented. By applying the amplitude modulation with the frequency of 20 Hz on the stable beam current, the plasma evolution was studied. A Faraday cup was used for the measurement of the electron beam current and a single electrostatic probe was used for the measurement of the ion current. Experimental results indicated that the ion current was in phase with the electron beam current in the pressure range from 200 Pa to 3000 Pa and in the beam current range lower than 20 mA, the residual density increased approximately linearly with the maximum density in the log-log plot and the fitting coefficient was irrelative to the pressure. And then three kinds of kinetic models were developed and the simulated results given by the kinetic model, without the consideration of the excited atoms, mostly approached to the experimental results. This indicated that the effect of the excited atoms on the plasma density can be ignored at intermediate pressure and low electron beam current intensity, which can greatly simplify the kinetic model. In the end, the decrease of the plasma density when the beam current was suddenly off was studied based on the simplified model and it was found that the decease characteristic at intermediate pressure was approximate to the one at high pressure at low electron beam intensity, which was in good accordance with the experimental results. Supported by National Natural Science Foundations of China (No. 11375187) and the Foundation of State key Laboratory of China (No. SKLIPR1510).

  11. Electron drift velocities in fast Argon and CF4 based drift gases

    CERN Document Server

    van Apeldoorn, G

    1998-01-01

    98-063 Electron drift velocities in gas mixtures were measured in a tabletop experiment using a nitrogen laser to create the primary electrons. The maximum drift times for electrons in a 5 mm (10 mm) honeycomb drift cell at 2200 V anode voltage were 28 ns (53 ns) and 21 ns (61 ns) for Ar-Cf4-CH4 (75/18/6) and Ar-CF4-CO2 (68/27/5), respectively. Changing the ratio of the latter mix did not change the drift velocity very much. The gains of the gases are ~10^4 for a single primary electron. CF4 causes electron attachment. The measured drift times agree well with GARFIELD simulations.

  12. Study of the material photon and electron background and the liquid argon detector veto efficiency of the CDEX-10 experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Su, Jian; MA, Hao; Yue, Qian; Cheng, Jian-Ping; Chang, Jian-Ping; Chen, Nan; Chen, Ning; Chen, Qing-Hao; Chen, Yun-Hua; Chuang, Yo-Chun; Deng, Zhi; Du, Qiang; Gong, Hui; Hao, Xi-Qing; He, Qing-Ju; Huang, Han-Xiong; Huang, Teng-Rui; Jiang, Hao; Kang, Ke-Jun; Li, Hau-Bin; Li, Jian-Min; Li, Jin; Li, Jun; Li, Xia; Li, Xin-Ying; Li, Xue-Qian; Li, Yu-Lan; Li, Yuan-Jing; Liao, Heng-Yi; Lin, Fong-Kay; Lin, Shin-Ted; Liu, Shu-Kui; Lü, Lan-Chun; Mao, Shao-Ji; Qin, Jian-Qiang; Ren, Jie; Ren, Jing; Ruan, Xi-Chao; Shen, Man-Bin; Singh, Lakhwinder; Singh, Manoj Kumar; Soma, Arun Kumar; Tang, Chang-Jian; Tseng, Chao-Hsiung; Wang, Ji-Min; Wang, Li; Wang, Qing; Wong, Henry Tsz-King; Wu, Shi-Yong; Wu, Yu-Cheng; Xing, Hao-Yang; Xu, Yin; Xue, Tao; Yang, Li-Tao; Yang, Song-Wei; Yi, Nan; Yu, Chun-Xu; Yu, Hao; Yu, Xun-Zhen; Zeng, Xiong-Hui; Zhang, Lan; Zhang, Yun-Hua; Zhao, Ming-Gang; Zhao, Wei; Zhou, Zu-Ying; Zhu, Jing-Jun; Zhu, Wei-Bin; Zhu, Xue-Zhou; Zhu, Zhong-Hua

    2014-01-01

    The China Dark Matter Experiment (CDEX) is located at the China Jinping underground laboratory (CJPL) and aims to directly detect the WIMP flux with high sensitivity in the low mass region. Here we present a study of the predicted photon and electron backgrounds including the background contribution of the structure materials of the germanium detector, the passive shielding materials, and the intrinsic radioactivity of the liquid argon that serves as an anti-Compton active shielding detector. A detailed geometry is modeled and the background contribution has been simulated based on the measured radioactivities of all possible components within the GEANT4 program. Then the photon and electron background level in the energy region of interest (<10^-2 events kg-1 day-1 keV-1 (cpkkd)) is predicted based on Monte Carlo simulations. The simulated result is consistent with the design goal of CDEX-10 experiment, 0.1 cpkkd, which shows that the active and passive shield design of CDEX-10 is effective and feasible.

  13. Electron properties and air mixing in radio frequency driven argon plasma jets at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gessel, Bram van; Bruggeman, Peter [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Brandenburg, Ronny [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology (INP Greifswald), Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, D-17489 Greifswald (Germany)

    2013-08-05

    A time modulated radio frequency (RF) plasma jet operated with an Ar mixture is investigated by measuring the electron density and electron temperature using Thomson scattering. The measurements have been performed spatially resolved for two different electrode configurations and as a function of the plasma dissipated power and air concentration admixed to the Ar. Time resolved measurements of electron densities and temperatures during the RF cycle and after plasma power switch-off are presented. Furthermore, the influence of the plasma on the air entrainment into the effluent is studied using Raman scattering.

  14. LEP - Large Electron Positron Exhibition LEPFest 2000

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The Large Electron-Positron Collider (LEP) is 27 km long. Its four detectors (ALEPH, DELPHI, L3, OPAL) measure precisely what happens in the collisions of electrons and positrons. These conditions only exist-ed in the Universe when it was about 10 -10 sec old.

  15. Anomalous argon excitation in pulse supersonic flows of Ar + CH sub 4 , Ar + SiH sub 4 and Ar + CH sub 4 + SiH sub 4 mixtures, activated with an electron beam

    CERN Document Server

    Madirbaev, V Z; Korobejshchikov, N G; Sharafutdinov, R G

    2001-01-01

    The processes of energy exchange in the supersonic flows of the argon mixtures with methane and silane, activated by the electron beam, are studied. It is shown, that at the initial stage of condensation in the flux there takes place selective excitation of the argon atoms energy levels. The boundary parameters, whereby the effect of the anomalous radiation excitation is observed, are determined

  16. Improved installation prototype for measurement of low argon-37 activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhomov, Sergei; Dubasov, Yuri

    2015-04-01

    On-site Inspection (OSI) is a key element of verification of State Parties' compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). An on-site inspection is launched to establish whether or not a nuclear explosion has been carried out. One of the most significant evidence of n underground nuclear explosion (UNE) is detection above background concentrations of argon-37 in near surface air. Argon-37 is formed in large amounts at interaction of neutrons of UNE with the potassium which is a part of the majority of rocks. Its estimated contents for the 100th days after explosion with a energy of 1000 t of TNT near a surface can vary from 1 to 1000 mBq/m3. The background concentrations of argon-37 in subsoil air vary 1 do100 mBq/m3. Traditionally, for argon-37 activity measurement the gas-proportional counters are used. But at Khlopin Radium institute the developments of the new type of highly sensitive and low-background installation capable to provide the required range of measurements of the argon-37 concentration are conducted. The liquid scintillation method of the registration of the low-energetic argon-37 electrons is the basic installation principle and as scintillator, the itself condensed air argon sample is used. Registration of scintillations of liquid argon is made by means of system from 3 PMT which cathodes are cooled near to the temperature of liquid nitrogen together with the measuring chamber in which placed the quartz glass ampule, containing the measured sample of the liquefied argon. For converse the short wavelength photons (λ = 127 nm) of liquid argon scintillations to more long-wave, corresponding to the range of PMT sensitivity, the polymer film with tetra-phenyl-butadiene (TPB) is provided. Even the insignificant impurities of nitrogen, oxygen and others gaseous in the liquid argon samples can to cause the quenching of scintillation, especially their slow components. To account this effect and it influence on change of registration

  17. Production of highly charged argon ions from a room temperature electron beam ion trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Tie-Shan; PENG Hai-Bo; Ovsyannikov V P; Kentsch U; Ullmann F; CHENG Rui; Zschornack G

    2008-01-01

    In this work.highly charged ions have been extracted from the advanced Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS-A) developed in a scientific cooperation between the Dresden University of Technology and the DREEBIT GmbH Dresden.The charge state distributions of ions extracted from the EBIS-A are measured in and extracted in the leaky mode.3×105 Ar18+ ions per pulse are extracted in the pulse mode.The ion charge state distribution is a function of the ionization time.

  18. Radiation Tolerant Electronics and Digital Processing for the Phase-1 Read-out Upgrade of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milic, A. [Atlas Liquid Argon Calorimeter Group, CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2015-07-01

    The ATLAS Liquid Argon calorimeters are designed and built to study proton-proton collisions produced at the LHC at centre-of-mass energies up to 14 TeV. Liquid argon (LAr) sampling calorimeters are employed for all electromagnetic calorimetry in the pseudorapidity region |η|<3.2, and for hadronic calorimetry in the region from |η|=1.5 to |η|=4.9. Although the nominal LHC experimental programme is still in progress, an upgrade of the read-out electronics is being launched to cope with luminosities of up to 3x10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, which are beyond the original design by a factor of 3. An improved spatial granularity of the trigger primitives is therefore proposed in order to improve the identification performance for trigger signatures, like electrons, photons, tau leptons, jets, total and missing energy, at high background rejection rates. For the upgrade Phase-1 in 2018, new LAr Trigger Digitizer Boards (LTDB) are being designed to receive higher granularity signals, digitize them on detector and send them via fast optical links to a new LAr digital processing system (LDPS). The LDPS applies a digital filtering and identifies significant energy depositions in each trigger channel. The refined trigger primitives are then transmitted to the first level trigger system to extract improved trigger signatures. The read-out of the trigger signals will process 34000 so-called Super Cells at every LHC bunch-crossing at a frequency of 40 MHz. The new LTDB on-detector electronics is designed to be radiation tolerant in order to be operated for the remaining live-time of the ATLAS detector up to a total luminosity of 3000 fb{sup -1}. For the analog-to-digital conversion (12-bit ADC at 40 MSPS), the data serialization and the fast optical link (5.44 Gb/s) custom components have been developed. They have been qualified for the expected radiation environment of a total ionization dose of 1.3 kGy and a hadron fluence of 6 x 10{sup 13} h/cm{sup 2} with energies above

  19. Electron impact double ionization of neon, argon and molecular nitrogen: role of the two-step mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, C; Lahmam-Bennani, A; Staicu Casagrande, E M [Institut des Sciences Moleculaires d' Orsay (ISMO, UMR 8214), Universite Paris-Sud 11, Bat. 351, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Dal Cappello, C, E-mail: azzedine.bennani@u-psud.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Moleculaire et des Collisions, Institut de Physique, ICPMB (FR 2843), Universite Paul Verlaine-Metz, 1 rue Arago, 57078 Metz Cedex 3 (France)

    2011-06-14

    Recent measurements of the (e, 3-1e) fourfold differential cross sections for the double ionization of helium are here extended to more complex targets, namely neon, argon and molecular nitrogen. The previous observations of large angular shifts in the experimental fourfold differential cross section (4DCS) distributions with respect to the momentum transfer axis and the existence of structures in these distributions are found to similarly hold here. For the three investigated targets, the experimental data are compared with the kinematical analysis previously given to describe the second-order, 'two-step 2' (TS2) double ionization (DI) mechanism. Such a comparison confirms our interpretation which allows the observed shifts and structures in the intensity distributions to be mostly related to the 'two-step 2' mechanism, which is shown to predominate over the first-order 'shake-off' (SO) and 'two-step 1' (TS1) mechanisms under the present kinematics. The experimental data are also compared to the predictions of a first Born and second Born model, showing rather mixed agreement.

  20. FPGA-based 10-Gbit Ethernet Data Acquisition Interface for the Upgraded Electronics of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Grohs, J P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The readout of the trigger signals of the ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) calorimeters is foreseen to be upgraded in order to prepare for operation during the first high-luminosity phase of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Signals with improved spatial granularity are planned to be received from the detector by a Digitial Processing System (DPS) in ATCA technology and will be sent in real-time to the ATLAS trigger system using custom optical links. These data are also sampled by the DPS for monitoring and will be read out by the regular Data Acquisition (DAQ) system of ATLAS which is a network-based PC-farm. The bandwidth between DPS module and DAQ system is expected to be in the order of 10 Gbit/s per module and a standard Ethernet protocol is foreseen to be used. DSP data will be prepared and sent by a modern FPGA either through a switch or directly to a Read-Out System (ROS) PC serving as buffer interface of the ATLAS DAQ. In a prototype setup, an ATCA blade equipped with a Xilinx Virtex-5 FPGA is used to send da...

  1. Modification of argon impurity transport by electron cyclotron heating in KSTAR H-mode plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Joohwan; Henderson, S. S.; Kim, Kimin; Seon, C. R.; Song, Inwoo; Lee, H. Y.; Jang, Juhyeok; Park, Jae Sun; Lee, S. G.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, Seung Hun; Hong, Suk-Ho; Choe, Wonho

    2017-03-01

    Experiments with a small amount of Ar gas injection as a trace impurity were conducted in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) H-mode plasma ({{B}\\text{T}}   =  2.8 T, {{I}\\text{P}}   =  0.6 MA, and {{P}\\text{NBI}}   =  4.0 MW). 170 GHz electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECH) at 600 and 800 kW was focused along the mid-plane with a fixed major radial position of R   =  1.66 m. The emissivity of the Ar16+ (3.949 {\\mathring{\\text{A}}} ) and Ar15+ (353.860 {\\mathring{\\text{A}}} ) spectral lines were measured by x-ray imaging crystal spectroscopy (XICS) and a vacuum UV (VUV) spectrometer, respectively. ECH reduces the peak Ar15+ emission and increases the Ar16+ emission, an effect largest with 800 kW. The ADAS-SANCO impurity transport code was used to evaluate the Ar transport coefficients. It was found that the inward convective velocity found in the plasma core without ECH was decreased with ECH, while diffusion remained approximately constant resulting in a less-peaked Ar density profile. Theoretical results from the NEO code suggest that neoclassical transport is not responsible for the change in transport, while the microstability analysis using GKW predicts a dominant ITG mode during both ECH and non-ECH plasmas.

  2. Phase-I Trigger Readout Electronics Upgrade of the ATLAS Liquid-Argon Calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Mori, Tatsuya; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is foreseen to be upgraded during the shut-down period of 2018-2019 to deliver about 3 times the instantaneous design luminosity. Since the ATLAS trigger system, at that time, will not support such an increase of the trigger rate an improvement of the trigger system is required. The ATLAS LAr Calorimeter readout will therefore be modified and digital trigger signals with a higher spatial granularity will be provided to the trigger. The new trigger signals will be arranged in 34000 Super Cells which achieves a 5-10 better granularity than the trigger towers currently used and allows an improved background rejection. The Super Cell readout is composed of custom developed 12-bit combined SAR ADCs in 130 nm CMOS technology which will be installed on-detector in a radiation environment and digitizes the detector pulses at 40 MHz. The data will be transmitted to the back end using a custom serializer and optical converter applying 5.44 Gb/s optical links. These components are install...

  3. Power Consideration for Pulsed Discharges in Potassium Seeded Argon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Sheng-Guo; HE Jun-Jia; LIU Ke-Fu

    2007-01-01

    Minimization of energy consumed in plasma generation is critical for applications, in which a large volume of plasmas is needed. We suggest that a high electron density atmospheric pressure plasmas can be generated by pulsed discharges in potassium seeded argon at an elevated temperature with a very small power input. The ionization efficiency and power budget of pulsed discharges in such plasmas are analytically studied. The results show that ionization efficiency of argon, especially at small reduced electric field E/N (the ratio of the electric field to the gas number density), is improved effectively in the presence of small amount of potassium additives. Power input of pulsed discharge to sustain a prescribed average level of ionization in potassium seeded argon is three orders of magnitude lower than that in pure argon. Further, unlike in pure argon, it is found that very short high-voltage pulses with very high repetition rates are unnecessary in potassium seeded argon. A pulse with 100ns of pulse duration, 5kHz of repetition rate, and 2Td (1 Td = 1 ×10-21 Vm2) of E/N is enough to sustain an electron density of 10l9m-3 in 1 atm 1500 K Ar+0.1% K mixture, with a very small power input of about 0.08 × 104 W/m3.

  4. Electron impact ionization of large krypton clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Shao-Hui; Li Ru-Xin; Ni Guo-Quan; Xu Zhi-Zhan

    2004-01-01

    We show that the detection of ionization of very large van der Waals clusters in a pulsed jet or a beam can be realized by using a fast ion gauge. Rapid positive feedback electron impact ionization and fragmentation processes,which are initially ignited by electron impact ionization of the krypton clusters with the electron current of the ion gauge, result in the appearance of a progressional oscillation-like ion spectrum, or just of a single fast event under critical conditions. Each line in the spectrum represents a correlated explosion or avalanche ionization of the clusters.The phenomena have been analysed qualitatively along with a Rayleigh scattering experiment of the corresponding cluster jet.

  5. Large-area lanthanum hexaboride electron emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, D. M.; Hirooka, Y.; Sketchley, T. A.

    1985-09-01

    The characteristics of lanthanum-boron thermionic electron emitters are discussed, and a large-area, continuously operating cathode assembly and heater are described. Impurity production and structural problems involving the support of the LaB6 have been eliminated in the presented configuration. The performance of the cathode in a plasma discharge, where surface modification occurs by ion sputtering, is presented. Problem areas which affect lifetime and emission current capability are discussed.

  6. Electronic Aromaticity Index for Large Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Matito, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new electronic aromaticity index, AV1245, consisting in the average of the 4-center MCI values along the ring that keep a positional relationship of 1,2,4,5. AV1245 measures the extent of transferability of the delocalized electrons between bonds 1-2 and 4-5, which is expected to be large in conjugated circuits and, therefore, in aromatic molecules. A new algorithm for the calculation of MCI for large rings is also introduced and used to produce the data for the calibration of the new aromaticity index. AV1245 does not rely on reference values, does not suffer from large numerical precision errors, and it does not present any limitation on the nature of atoms, the molecular geometry or the level of calculation. It is a size-extensive measure with a small computational cost that grows linearly with the number of ring members. Therefore, it is specially suitable to study the aromaticity of large molecular rings as those occurring in belt-shaped M\\"obius structures or porphyrins.

  7. Argon in action

    CERN Multimedia

    Corinne Pralavorio

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few days, the SPS has been accelerating argon ions, which have started to be sent to the NA61/SHINE experiment. This operating mode, using a new type of ion, required a number of modifications to the accelerator.   Picture 1: a “super-cycle” of the SPS, featuring a proton cycle for the LHC, followed by an argon ion cycle for the North Area. Today, the accelerators are once again juggling particles and even performing completely new tricks. The SPS is supplying beams of argon ions for the first time, at energies never before achieved for this type of beam. They are destined for the NA61/SHINE experiment (see box) located in the North Area, which began receiving the beams on 11 February. Argon ions have a relatively large mass, as they consist of 40 nucleons, so they can be used in a similar way to lead ions. The main difficulty in accelerating them lies in the SPS, where the variation in acceleration frequency is limited. “The SPS was designed for a...

  8. A Large Hadron Electron Collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Abelleira Fernandez, J L; Adzic, P; Akay, A N; Aksakal, H; Albacete, J L; Allanach, B; Alekhin, S; Allport, P; Andreev, V; Appleby, R B; Arikan, E; Armesto, N; Azuelos, G; Bai, M; Barber, D; Bartels, J; Behnke, O; Behr, J; Belyaev, A S; Ben-Zvi, I; Bernard, N; Bertolucci, S; Bettoni, S; Biswal, S; Blumlein, J; Bottcher, H; Bogacz, A; Bracco, C; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Braun, H; Brodsky, S; Bruning, O; Bulyak, E; Buniatyan, A; Burkhardt, H; Cakir, I T; Cakir, O; Calaga, R; Caldwell, A; Cetinkaya, V; Chekelian, V; Ciapala, E; Ciftci, R; Ciftci, A K; Cole, B A; Collins, J C; Dadoun, O; Dainton, J; Roeck, A.De; d'Enterria, D; DiNezza, P; Dudarev, A; Eide, A; Enberg, R; Eroglu, E; Eskola, K J; Favart, L; Fitterer, M; Forte, S; Gaddi, A; Gambino, P; Garcia Morales, H; Gehrmann, T; Gladkikh, P; Glasman, C; Glazov, A; Godbole, R; Goddard, B; Greenshaw, T; Guffanti, A; Guzey, V; Gwenlan, C; Han, T; Hao, Y; Haug, F; Herr, W; Herve, A; Holzer, B J; Ishitsuka, M; Jacquet, M; Jeanneret, B; Jensen, E; Jimenez, J M; Jowett, J M; Jung, H; Karadeniz, H; Kayran, D; Kilic, A; Kimura, K; Klees, R; Klein, M; Klein, U; Kluge, T; Kocak, F; Korostelev, M; Kosmicki, A; Kostka, P; Kowalski, H; Kraemer, M; Kramer, G; Kuchler, D; Kuze, M; Lappi, T; Laycock, P; Levichev, E; Levonian, S; Litvinenko, V N; Lombardi, A; Maeda, J; Marquet, C; Mellado, B; Mess, K H; Milanese, A; Milhano, J G; Moch, S; Morozov, I I; Muttoni, Y; Myers, S; Nandi, S; Nergiz, Z; Newman, P R; Omori, T; Osborne, J; Paoloni, E; Papaphilippou, Y; Pascaud, C; Paukkunen, H; Perez, E; Pieloni, T; Pilicer, E; Pire, B; Placakyte, R; Polini, A; Ptitsyn, V; Pupkov, Y; Radescu, V; Raychaudhuri, S; Rinolfi, L; Rizvi, E; Rohini, R; Rojo, J; Russenschuck, S; Sahin, M; Salgado, C A; Sampei, K; Sassot, R; Sauvan, E; Schaefer, M; Schneekloth, U; Schorner-Sadenius, T; Schulte, D; Senol, A; Seryi, A; Sievers, P; Skrinsky, A N; Smith, W; South, D; Spiesberger, H; Stasto, A M; Strikman, M; Sullivan, M; Sultansoy, S; Sun, Y P; Surrow, B; Szymanowski, L; Taels, P; Tapan, I; Tasci, T; Tassi, E; Kate, H.Ten; Terron, J; Thiesen, H; Thompson, L; Thompson, P; Tokushuku, K; Tomas Garcia, R; Tommasini, D; Trbojevic, D; Tsoupas, N; Tuckmantel, J; Turkoz, S; Trinh, T N; Tywoniuk, K; Unel, G; Ullrich, T; Urakawa, J; VanMechelen, P; Variola, A; Veness, R; Vivoli, A; Vobly, P; Wagner, J; Wallny, R; Wallon, S; Watt, G; Weiss, C; Wiedemann, U A; Wienands, U; Willeke, F; Xiao, B W; Yakimenko, V; Zarnecki, A F; Zhang, Z; Zimmermann, F; Zlebcik, R; Zomer, F; CERN. Geneva. LHeC Department

    2012-01-01

    This document provides a brief overview of the recently published report on the design of the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC), which comprises its physics programme, accelerator physics, technology and main detector concepts. The LHeC exploits and develops challenging, though principally existing, accelerator and detector technologies. This summary is complemented by brief illustrations of some of the highlights of the physics programme, which relies on a vastly extended kinematic range, luminosity and unprecedented precision in deep inelastic scattering. Illustrations are provided regarding high precision QCD, new physics (Higgs, SUSY) and electron-ion physics. The LHeC is designed to run synchronously with the LHC in the twenties and to achieve an integrated luminosity of O(100) fb$^{-1}$. It will become the cleanest high resolution microscope of mankind and will substantially extend as well as complement the investigation of the physics of the TeV energy scale, which has been enabled by the LHC.

  9. Influences of the propyl group on the van der Waals structures of 4-propylaniline complexes with one and two argon atoms studied by electronic and cationic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zhijun [School of Basic Medical Sciences, Xinxiang Medical University, Xinxiang, Henan 453003 (China); Gu, Quanli [School of Basic Medical Sciences, Xinxiang Medical University, Xinxiang, Henan 453003 (China); Department of Chemistry, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Trindle, Carl O., E-mail: cot@virginia.edu [Chemistry Department, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Knee, J. L., E-mail: jknee@wesleyan.edu [Chemistry Department, Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut 06459 (United States)

    2015-07-21

    4-propylaniline complexes with one and two argon atoms formed in the molecular beam were studied in the first excited electronic state, S{sub 1}, using resonance enhanced two-photon ionization spectroscopy and in the cation ground state, D{sub 0}, using mass analyzed threshold ionization spectroscopy. The combination of electronic and cationic spectra of the clusters allows two conformations to be identified in both aniline-Ar{sub 1} and aniline-Ar{sub 2}, which are assigned to either the gauche configuration or anti-configuration of 4-propylaniline. The gauche isomer exhibits complex bands shifted 29 cm{sup −1} and 89 cm{sup −1} from the S{sub 1} origin bands and 83 cm{sup −1} and 148 cm{sup −1} from the ionization potential assigned to the Ar{sub 1} and Ar{sub 2} complexes, respectively. For the anti-rotamer, the corresponding shifts actually become nearly additive, 53 cm{sup −1} and 109 cm{sup −1} for the S{sub 1} origin bands, and 61 cm{sup −1} and 125 cm{sup −1} for the ionization potentials. Ab initio calculations provide insights into the influences of the propyl and amino groups on the positions of the argon atoms within the clusters. In addition, the binding energy of one argon with the gauche isomer of 4-propylaniline has been measured to be 550 ± 5 cm{sup −1} in the D{sub 0} state, 496 ± 5 cm{sup −1} in the S{sub 1} state, and 467 ± 5 cm{sup −1} in the neutral ground state, S{sub 0}.

  10. Monte Carlo simulation of large electron fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faddegon, Bruce A.; Perl, Joseph; Asai, Makoto

    2008-03-01

    Two Monte Carlo systems, EGSnrc and Geant4, the latter with two different 'physics lists,' were used to calculate dose distributions in large electron fields used in radiotherapy. Source and geometry parameters were adjusted to match calculated results to measurement. Both codes were capable of accurately reproducing the measured dose distributions of the six electron beams available on the accelerator. Depth penetration matched the average measured with a diode and parallel-plate chamber to 0.04 cm or better. Calculated depth dose curves agreed to 2% with diode measurements in the build-up region, although for the lower beam energies there was a discrepancy of up to 5% in this region when calculated results are compared to parallel-plate measurements. Dose profiles at the depth of maximum dose matched to 2-3% in the central 25 cm of the field, corresponding to the field size of the largest applicator. A 4% match was obtained outside the central region. The discrepancy observed in the bremsstrahlung tail in published results that used EGS4 is no longer evident. Simulations with the different codes and physics lists used different source energies, incident beam angles, thicknesses of the primary foils, and distance between the primary and secondary foil. The true source and geometry parameters were not known with sufficient accuracy to determine which parameter set, including the energy of the source, was closest to the truth. These results underscore the requirement for experimental benchmarks of depth penetration and electron scatter for beam energies and foils relevant to radiotherapy.

  11. A Radiation-Hard Dual Channel 4-bit Pipeline for a 12-bit 40 MS/s ADC Prototype with extended Dynamic Range for the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter Readout Electronics Upgrade at the CERN LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kuppambatti, Jayanth; Andeen, Timothy; Kinget, Peter; Brooijmans, Gustaaf

    2013-01-01

    The design of a radiation-hard dual channel 12-bit 40 MS/s pipeline ADC with extended dynamic range is presented, for use in the readout electronics upgrade for the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The design consists of two pipeline A/D channels with four Multiplying Digital-to-Analog Converters with nominal 12-bit resolution each. The design, fabricated in the IBM 130 nm CMOS process, shows a performance of 68 dB SNDR at 18 MHz for a single channel at 40 MS/s while consuming 55 mW/channel from a 2.5 V supply, and exhibits no performance degradation after irradiation. Various gain selection algorithms to achieve the extended dynamic range are implemented and tested.

  12. Electron attachment to pentafluorobenzene, to oxygen in a mixture of 90% argon and 10% methane, and to oxygen in various polar/nitrogen mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metcalfe, C. III

    1982-01-01

    By means of electron swarm experiments, electron attachment to pentafluorobenzene (C/sub 6/HF/sub 5/) in nitrogen (N/sub 2/) and to oxygen (O/sub 2/) in various gas mixtures has been studied. The variation of the electron attachment rate for C/sub 6/HF/sub 5/ in N/sub 2/ with the gas pressure and with the mean electron energy was determined. The lifetime of the species C/sub 6/HF/sub 5//sup -/ against autoionization was deduced and the electron attachment cross section for C/sub 6/HF/sub 5/ was calculated. The influence of the permanent electric dipole of C/sub 6/HF/sub 5/ upon the electron attachment process is discussed. Electron attachment to O/sub 2/ in P-10 (90% argon + 10% methane) and in mixtures of various polar molecules with N/sub 2/ was investigated. As a preliminary to these studies electron drift velocities in P-10 and in the various mixtures of polar species with N/sub 2/ were determined. These drift velocities are reported and discussed. The variation of the electron attachment rate for O/sub 2/ in P-10 with pressure and the mean electron energy was determined. The attachment rate as a function of mean electron energy was found to possess distinct structure. Models which account for this structure and for the variation of the attachment rate with the P-10 pressure are advanced and the corresponding reaction rate constant are presented. The electron attachment rates for O/sub 2/ in mixtures of N/sub 2/ with 1-butene, dimethyl amine, ammonia, trifluoromethane, and acetaldehyde were measured. Models of the variation of the attachment rate with the concentration of the polar species are advanced and the corresponding reaction rate constants are presented.

  13. Electron Attachment to Pentafluorobenzene, to Oxygen in a Mixture of 90% Argon and 10% Methane, and to Oxygen in Various Polar/nitrogen Mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Clive, III

    By means of electron swarm experiments, electron attachment to pentafluorobenzene (C(,6)HF(,5)) in nitrogen (N(,2)) and to oxygen (O(,2)) in various gas mixtures has been studied. The variation of the electron attachment rate for C(,6)HF(,5) in N(,2) with the gas pressure and with the mean electron energy was determined. The lifetime of the species C(,6)HF(,5)('-*) against autoionization was deduced and the electron attachment cross section for C(,6)HF(,5) was calculated. The influence of the permanent electric dipole of C(,6)HF(,5) upon the electron attachment process is discussed. Electron attachment to O(,2) in P-10 (90% argon + 10% methane) and in mixtures of various polar molecules with N(,2) was investigated. As a preliminary to these studies electron drift velocities in P-10 and in the various mixtures of polar species with N(,2) were determined. These drift velocities are reported and discussed. The variation of the electron attachment rate for O(,2) in P-10 with the P-10 pressure and the mean electron energy was determined. The attachment rate as a function of mean electron energy was found to possess distinct structure. Models which account for this structure and for the variation of the attachment rate with the P-10 pressure are advanced and the corresponding reaction rate constants are presented. The electron attachment rates for O(,2) in mixtures of N(,2) with 1-butene, dimethyl amine, ammonia, trifluoromethane, and acetaldehyde were measured. Models of the variation of the attachment rate with the concentration of the polar species are advanced and the corresponding reaction rate constants are presented.

  14. Simulation of the upgraded Phase-1 Trigger Readout Electronics of the Liquid-Argon Calorimeter of the ATLAS Detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00338138

    In the context of an intensive upgrade plan for the LHC in order to provide proton beams of increased luminosity, a revision of the data readout electronics of the Liquid-Argon-Calorimeter of the ATLAS detector is scheduled. This is required to retain the efficiency of the trigger at increased event rates despite its fixed bandwidth. The focus lies on the early digitization and finer segmentation of the data provided to the trigger. Furthermore, there is the possibility to implement new energy reconstruction algorithms which are adapted to the specific requirements of the trigger. In order to constitute crucial design decisions, such as the digitization scale or the choice of digital signal processing algorithms, comprehensive simulations are required. High trigger efficiencies are decisive at it for the successful continuation of the measurements of rare Standard Model processes as well as for a high sensitivity to new physics beyond the established theories. It can be shown that a significantly improved res...

  15. Ionization signals from electrons and alpha-particles in mixtures of liquid Argon and Nitrogen - perspectives on protons for Gamma Resonant Nuclear Absorption applications

    CERN Document Server

    Zeller, M; Delaquis, S; Ereditato, A; Janos, S; Kreslo, I; Messina, M; Moser, U; Rossi, B

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we report on a detailed study of ionization signals produced by Compton electrons and alpha-particles in a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) flled with different mixtures of liquid Argon and Nitrogen. The measurements were carried out with Nitrogen concentrations up to 15% and a drift electric feld in the range 0-50 kV/cm. A prediction for proton ionization signals is made by means of interpolation. This study has been conducted in view of the possible use of liquid Ar-N2 TPCs for the detection of gamma-rays in the resonant band of the Nitrogen absorption spectrum, a promising technology for security and medical applications.

  16. Electron Lenses for the Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stancari, Giulio [Fermilab; Valishev, Alexander [Fermilab; Bruce, Roderik [CERN; Redaelli, Stefano [CERN; Rossi, Adriana [CERN; Salvachua, Belen [CERN

    2014-07-01

    Electron lenses are pulsed, magnetically confined electron beams whose current-density profile is shaped to obtain the desired effect on the circulating beam. Electron lenses were used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider for bunch-by-bunch compensation of long-range beam-beam tune shifts, for removal of uncaptured particles in the abort gap, for preliminary experiments on head-on beam-beam compensation, and for the demonstration of halo scraping with hollow electron beams. Electron lenses for beam-beam compensation are being commissioned in RHIC at BNL. Within the US LHC Accelerator Research Program and the European HiLumi LHC Design Study, hollow electron beam collimation was studied as an option to complement the collimation system for the LHC upgrades. This project is moving towards a technical design in 2014, with the goal to build the devices in 2015-2017, after resuming LHC operations and re-assessing needs and requirements at 6.5 TeV. Because of their electric charge and the absence of materials close to the proton beam, electron lenses may also provide an alternative to wires for long-range beam-beam compensation in LHC luminosity upgrade scenarios with small crossing angles.

  17. Electron Emission from Ultra-Large Area MOS Electron Emitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Lasse Bjørchmar; Nielsen, Gunver; Vendelbo, Søren Bastholm;

    2009-01-01

    Ultralarge metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices with an active oxide area of 1 cm2 have been fabricated for use as electron emitters. The MOS structures consist of a Si substrate, a SiO2 tunnel barrier (~5 nm), a Ti wetting layer (3–10 Å), and a Au top layer (5–60 nm). Electron emission from...... layer is varied from 3 to 10 Å which changes the emission efficiency by more than one order of magnitude. The apparent mean free path of ~5 eV electrons in Au is found to be 52 Å. Deposition of Cs on the Au film increased the electron emission efficiency to 4.3% at 4 V by lowering the work function....... Electron emission under high pressures (up to 2 bars) of Ar was observed. ©2009 American Vacuum Society...

  18. Cold front-end electronics and Ethernet-based DAQ systems for large LAr TPC readout

    CERN Document Server

    D.Autiero,; B.Carlus,; Y.Declais,; S.Gardien,; C.Girerd,; J.Marteau; H.Mathez

    2010-01-01

    Large LAr TPCs are among the most powerful detectors to address open problems in particle and astro-particle physics, such as CP violation in leptonic sector, neutrino properties and their astrophysical implications, proton decay search etc. The scale of such detectors implies severe constraints on their readout and DAQ system. We are carrying on a R&D in electronics on a complete readout chain including an ASIC located close to the collecting planes in the argon gas phase and a DAQ system based on smart Ethernet sensors implemented in a µTCA standard. The choice of the latter standard is motivated by the similarity in the constraints with those existing in Network Telecommunication Industry. We also developed a synchronization scheme developed from the IEEE1588 standard integrated by the use of the recovered clock from the Gigabit link

  19. Electron lenses for the large hadron collider

    CERN Document Server

    Stancari†, G; Bruce, R; Redaelli, S; Rossi, A; Salvachua Ferrando, B

    2014-01-01

    Electron lenses are pulsed, magnetically confined electron beamswhose current-density profile is shaped to obtain the desired effect on the circulating beam. Electron lenses were used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider for bunch-bybunch compensation of long-range beam-beam tune shifts, for removal of uncaptured particles in the abort gap, for preliminary experiments on head-on beam-beamcompensation, and for the demonstration of halo scrapingwith hollow electron beams. Electron lenses for beam-beam compensation are being commissioned in RHIC at BNL. Within the US LHC Accelerator Research Program and the European HiLumi LHC Design Study, hollow electron beam collimation was studied as an option to complement the collimation system for the LHC upgrades. A conceptual design was recently completed, and the project is moving towards a technical design in 2014–2015 for construction in 2015–2017, if needed, after resuming LHC operations and re-assessing collimation needs and requirements at 6.5 TeV. Because of the...

  20. A liquid argon calorimeter prototype for forward region at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artamonov, A. [Institut Teoreticheskoj i Ehksperimental`noj Fiziki, Moscow (Russian Federation); Epstein, V. [Institut Teoreticheskoj i Ehksperimental`noj Fiziki, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gorbunov, P. [Institut Teoreticheskoj i Ehksperimental`noj Fiziki, Moscow (Russian Federation); Jemanov, V. [Institut Teoreticheskoj i Ehksperimental`noj Fiziki, Moscow (Russian Federation); Khovansky, V. [Institut Teoreticheskoj i Ehksperimental`noj Fiziki, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kuchenkov, A. [Institut Teoreticheskoj i Ehksperimental`noj Fiziki, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kruchinin, S. [Institut Teoreticheskoj i Ehksperimental`noj Fiziki, Moscow (Russian Federation); Maslennikov, A. [Institut Teoreticheskoj i Ehksperimental`noj Fiziki, Moscow (Russian Federation); Rjabinin, M. [Institut Teoreticheskoj i Ehksperimental`noj Fiziki, Moscow (Russian Federation); Shatalov, P. [Institut Teoreticheskoj i Ehksperimental`noj Fiziki, Moscow (Russian Federation); Vinogradov, V. [Institut Teoreticheskoj i Ehksperimental`noj Fiziki, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zaitsev, V. [Institut Teoreticheskoj i Ehksperimental`noj Fiziki, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zeldovich, S. [Institut Teoreticheskoj i Ehksperimental`noj Fiziki, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zuckerman, I. [Institut Teoreticheskoj i Ehksperimental`noj Fiziki, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-02-21

    We report on the design and on beam test results of a liquid argon calorimeter prototype. This technology was proposed as an option for the forward region of an experiment at the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The measurements were performed using electrons from the ITEP PS with an energy range of 1 to 5 GeV. (orig.).

  1. Demonstrator System for the Phase-I Upgrade of the Trigger Readout Electronics of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    FRAGNAUD, J; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The trigger readout electronics of the ATLAS LAr Calorimeters will be improved for the Phase-I luminosity upgrade of the LHC to enhance the trigger feature extraction. Signals with higher spatial granularity will be digitized and processed by newly developed front-end and back-end components. In order to evaluate technical and performance aspects, a demonstrator system is being set up which is planned to be installed on the ATLAS detector during the upcoming LHC run. Results from system tests of the analog signal treatment, the trigger digitizer, the optical signal transmission and the FPGA-based back-end are reported.

  2. Properties of ThF(x) from infrared spectra in solid argon and neon with supporting electronic structure and thermochemical calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanthiriwatte, K Sahan; Wang, Xuefeng; Andrews, Lester; Dixon, David A; Metzger, Jens; Vent-Schmidt, Thomas; Riedel, Sebastian

    2014-03-20

    Laser-ablated Th atoms react with F2 in condensing noble gases to give ThF4 as the major product. Weaker higher frequency infrared absorptions at 567.2, 564.8 (576.1, 573.8) cm(-1), 575.1 (582.7) cm(-1) and 531.0, (537.4) cm(-1) in solid argon (neon) are assigned to the ThF, ThF2 and ThF3 molecules based on annealing and photolysis behavior and agreement with CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ vibrational frequency calculations. Bands at 528.4 cm(-1) and 460 cm(-1) with higher fluorine concentrations are assigned to the penta-coordinated species (ThF3)(F2) and ThF5(-). These bands shift to 544.2 and 464 cm(-1) in solid neon. The ThF5 molecule has the (ThF3)(F2) Cs structure and is essentially the unique [ThF3(+)][F2(-)] ion pair based on charge and spin density calculations. Electron capture by (ThF3)(F2) forms the trigonal bipyramidal ThF5(-) anion in a highly exothermic process. Extensive structure and frequency calculations were also done for thorium oxyfluorides and Th2F4,6,8 dimer species. The calculations provide the ionization potentials, electron affinities, fluoride affinities, Th-F bond dissociation energies, and the energies to bind F2 and F2(-) to a cluster as well as dimerization energies.

  3. Thickness of the electron atmosphere in large nuclear systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, A. F.; Sañudo, J.

    1986-03-01

    Using the relativistic Thomas-Fermi model and the virial theorem it is found that the thickness of the electron skin outside a large nuclear system is given by S⋍6.73 n-1/3, n being the electron density inside the nucleus. On leave from Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza, Spain.

  4. THEMIS Observations of the Magnetopause Electron Diffusion Region: Large Amplitude Waves and Heated Electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Xiangwei; Dombeck, John; Dai, Lei; Wilson, Lynn B; Breneman, Aaron; Hupach, Adam

    2013-01-01

    We present the first observations of large amplitude waves in a well-defined electron diffusion region at the sub-solar magnetopause using data from one THEMIS satellite. These waves identified as whistler mode waves, electrostatic solitary waves, lower hybrid waves and electrostatic electron cyclotron waves, are observed in the same 12-sec waveform capture and in association with signatures of active magnetic reconnection. The large amplitude waves in the electron diffusion region are coincident with abrupt increases in electron parallel temperature suggesting strong wave heating. The whistler mode waves which are at the electron scale and enable us to probe electron dynamics in the diffusion region were analyzed in detail. The energetic electrons (~30 keV) within the electron diffusion region have anisotropic distributions with T_{e\\perp}/T_{e\\parallel}>1 that may provide the free energy for the whistler mode waves. The energetic anisotropic electrons may be produced during the reconnection process. The whi...

  5. Electron cyclotron emission diagnostics on the large helical device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Y.; Kawahata, K.; England, A.; Ito, Y.; Bretz, N.; McCarthy, M.; Taylor, G.; Doane, J.; Ikezi, H.; Edlington, T.; Tomas, J.

    1999-01-01

    The electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostic system is installed on the large helical device (LHD). The system includes the following instruments: a heterodyne radiometer, a Michelson spectrometer, and a grating polychromator. A 63.5 mm corrugated waveguide system is fully utilized. Large collection optics and notch filters at the frequency of the LHD electron cyclotron heating (ECH) were developed for this system. In addition to these filters, the rectangular waveguide notch filters, the ECE measurement with the radiometer has been successfully performed during the ECH.

  6. Improving CASINO performance for models with large number of electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anton, L; Alfe, D; Hood, R Q; Tanqueray, D

    2009-05-13

    Quantum Monte Carlo calculations have at their core algorithms based on statistical ensembles of multidimensional random walkers which are straightforward to use on parallel computers. Nevertheless some computations have reached the limit of the memory resources for models with more than 1000 electrons because of the need to store a large amount of electronic orbitals related data. Besides that, for systems with large number of electrons, it is interesting to study if the evolution of one configuration of random walkers can be done faster in parallel. We present a comparative study of two ways to solve these problems: (1) distributed orbital data done with MPI or Unix inter-process communication tools, (2) second level parallelism for configuration computation.

  7. The scintillation of liquid argon

    CERN Document Server

    Heindl, T; Hofmann, M; Krücken, R; Oberauer, L; Potzel, W; Wieser, J; Ulrich, A

    2015-01-01

    A spectroscopic study of liquid argon from the vacuum ultraviolet at 110 nm to 1000 nm is presented. Excitation was performed using continuous and pulsed 12 keV electron beams. The emission is dominated by the analogue of the so called 2nd excimer continuum. Various additional emission features were found. The time structure of the light emission has been measured for a set of well defined wavelength positions. The results help to interpret literature data in the context of liquid rare gas detectors in which the wavelength information is lost due to the use of wavelength shifters.

  8. Metastable decay of argon clusters after photoionisation at high excess energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steger, H.; Vries, J. de; Kamke, W.; Hertel, I.V. (Freiburg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Fakultaet fuer Physik)

    1991-08-01

    Recently Maerk and collaborators reported the metastable emission of large fractions from argon and neon cluster ions after electron impact ionisation at high excess energies. The decay was interpreted as the result of an intra-cluster excitation of a metastable state by one of the electrons involved in the ionisation process. Here we report the first direct observation of such a correlated two electron process during photoionisation of argon clusters using synchrotron radiation and the TPEPICO technique. We observe at least two distinct maxima of the metastable TPEPICO spectrum at around 27 eV and 28.5 eV, the former being consistent with the previously reported energetic threshold for electron impact ionisation. (orig.).

  9. Radiation Belt Electron Dynamics Driven by Large-Amplitude Whistlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Tel'nikhin, A. A.; Kronberg, T. K.

    2013-01-01

    Acceleration of radiation belt electrons driven by oblique large-amplitude whistler waves is studied. We show analytically and numerically that this is a stochastic process; the intensity of which depends on the wave power modified by Bessel functions. The type of this dependence is determined by the character of the nonlinear interaction due to coupling between action and phase. The results show that physically significant quantities have a relatively weak dependence on the wave power.

  10. Gravure printing of graphene for large-area flexible electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secor, Ethan B; Lim, Sooman; Zhang, Heng; Frisbie, C Daniel; Francis, Lorraine F; Hersam, Mark C

    2014-07-09

    Gravure printing of graphene is demonstrated for the rapid production of conductive patterns on flexible substrates. Development of suitable inks and printing parameters enables the fabrication of patterns with a resolution down to 30 μm. A mild annealing step yields conductive lines with high reliability and uniformity, providing an efficient method for the integration of graphene into large-area printed and flexible electronics.

  11. Semiconductor-based, large-area, flexible, electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Amit

    2011-03-15

    Novel articles and methods to fabricate the same resulting in flexible, large-area, triaxially textured, single-crystal or single-crystal-like, semiconductor-based, electronic devices are disclosed. Potential applications of resulting articles are in areas of photovoltaic devices, flat-panel displays, thermophotovoltaic devices, ferroelectric devices, light emitting diode devices, computer hard disc drive devices, magnetoresistance based devices, photoluminescence based devices, non-volatile memory devices, dielectric devices, thermoelectric devices and quantum dot laser devices.

  12. ICARUS and status of liquid argon technology

    CERN Document Server

    Menegolli, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    ICARUS T600 is the largest liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr TPC) detector ever realized. It operates underground at the LNGS laboratory in Gran Sasso. It has been smoothly running since summer 2010, collecting data with the CNGS (Cern to Gran Sasso) beam and with cosmic particles. Liquid Argon TPCs are indeed 'electronic bubble chambers', providing a completely uniform imaging calorimetry with unprecedented accuracy on such massive volumes. ICARUS T600 is internationally considered as a milestone towards the realization of the next generation of massive detectors (tens of ktons) for neutrino and rare event physics. Results will be presented on the data collected so far with the detector.

  13. Invisible Higgs decay at the Large Hadron-Electron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yi-Lei; Zhang, Chen; Zhu, Shou-hua

    2016-07-01

    The possibility that the 125 GeV Higgs boson may decay into invisible non-standard-model (non-SM) particles is theoretically and phenomenologically intriguing. In this paper, we investigate the sensitivity of the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC) to an invisibly decaying Higgs, in its proposed high-luminosity running mode. We focus on the neutral current Higgs production channel which offers more kinematical handles than its charged current counterpart. The signal contains one electron, one jet, and large missing energy. With a cut-based parton-level analysis, we estimate that if the h Z Z coupling is at its standard model (SM) value, then assuming an integrated luminosity of 1 ab-1 , the LHeC with the proposed 60 GeV electron beam (with -0.9 polarization) and 7 TeV proton beam is capable of probing Br (h →TE)=6 % at 2 σ level. Good lepton veto performance (especially hadronic τ veto) in the forward region is crucial to the suppression of the dominant W j e background. We also explicitly point out the important role that may be played by the LHeC in probing a wide class of exotic Higgs decay processes and emphasize the general function of lepton-hadron colliders in the precision study of new resonances after their discovery in hadron-hadron collisions.

  14. LEP : the Large Electron Positron Collider Conference MT17

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    LEP was CERN's flagship research facility from 1989 until 2000 when it stepped aside to make way for installation of the Laboratory's next major accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider, LHC. With a circumference of 27 kilometres, LEP was the largest circular particle collider in the world. Inside its beam pipe, about 100 metres underground, bunches of electrons and positrons raced around in opposite directions as they were accelerated to almost the speed of light. In its first phase of operation, LEP was designed to collide electrons and positrons at an energy of around 100 GeV. After some seven years of accumulating data at this energy to study the Z particle - electrically neutral carrier of the weak interaction - everything was done to boost the energy of LEP's beams as high as possible.

  15. Table-top setup for investigating the scintillation properties of liquid argon

    CERN Document Server

    Heindl, T; Fedenev, A; Hofmann, M; Krücken, R; Oberauer, L; Potzel, W; Wieser, J; Ulrich, A

    2015-01-01

    The spectral and temporal light emission properties of liquid argon have been studied in the context of its use in large liquid rare-gas detectors for detecting Dark Matter particles in astronomy. A table-top setup has been developed. Continuous and pulsed low energy electron beam excitation is used to stimulate light emission. A spectral range from 110 to 1000 nm in wavelength is covered by the detection system with a time resolution on the order of 1 ns.

  16. Argon broad ion beam tomography in a cryogenic scanning electron microscope: a novel tool for the investigation of representative microstructures in sedimentary rocks containing pore fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbois, G; Urai, J L; Pérez-Willard, F; Radi, Z; Offern, S; Burkart, I; Kukla, P A; Wollenberg, U

    2013-03-01

    The contribution describes the implementation of a broad ion beam (BIB) polisher into a scanning electron microscope (SEM) functioning at cryogenic temperature (cryo). The whole system (BIB-cryo-SEM) provides a first generation of a novel multibeam electron microscope that combines broad ion beam with cryogenic facilities in a conventional SEM to produce large, high-quality cross-sections (up to 2 mm(2)) at cryogenic temperature to be imaged at the state-of-the-art SEM resolution. Cryogenic method allows detecting fluids in their natural environment and preserves samples against desiccation and dehydration, which may damage natural microstructures. The investigation of microstructures in the third dimension is enabled by serial cross-sectioning, providing broad ion beam tomography with slices down to 350 nm thick. The functionalities of the BIB-cryo-SEM are demonstrated by the investigation of rock salts (synthetic coarse-grained sodium chloride synthesized from halite-brine mush cold pressed at 150 MPa and 4.5 GPa, and natural rock salt mylonite from a salt glacier at Qom Kuh, central Iran). In addition, results from BIB-cryo-SEM on a gas shale and Boom Clay are also presented to show that the instrument is suitable for a large range of sedimentary rocks. For the first time, pore and grain fabrics of preserved host and reservoir rocks can be investigated at nm-scale range over a representative elementary area. In comparison with the complementary and overlapping performances of the BIB-SEM method with focused ion beam-SEM and X-ray tomography methods, the BIB cross-sectioning enables detailed insights about morphologies of pores at greater resolution than X-ray tomography and allows the production of large representative surfaces suitable for FIB-SEM investigations of a specific representative site within the BIB cross-section.

  17. Improvements in Monte Carlo Simulation of Large Electron Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faddegon, Bruce A.; /UC, San Francisco; Perl, Joseph; Asai, Makoto; /SLAC

    2007-11-28

    Two Monte Carlo systems, EGSnrc and Geant4, were used to calculate dose distributions in large electron fields used in radiotherapy. Source and geometry parameters were adjusted to match calculated results with measurement. Both codes were capable of accurately reproducing the measured dose distributions of the 6 electron beams available on the accelerator. Depth penetration was matched to 0.1 cm. Depth dose curves generally agreed to 2% in the build-up region, although there is an additional 2-3% experimental uncertainty in this region. Dose profiles matched to 2% at the depth of maximum dose in the central region of the beam, out to the point of the profile where the dose begins to fall rapidly. A 3%/3mm match was obtained outside the central region except for the 6 MeV beam, where dose differences reached 5%. The discrepancy observed in the bremsstrahlung tail in published results that used EGS4 is no longer evident. The different systems required different source energies, incident beam angles, thicknesses of the exit window and primary foils, and distance between the primary and secondary foil. These results underscore the requirement for an experimental benchmark of electron scatter for beam energies and foils relevant to radiotherapy.

  18. Future liquid Argon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Rubbia, A

    2013-01-01

    The Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber offers an innovative technology for a new class of massive detectors for rare-event detection. It is a precise tracking device that allows three-dimensional spatial reconstruction with mm-scale precision of the morphology of ionizing tracks with the imaging quality of a "bubble chamber", provides $dE/dx$ information with high sampling rate, and acts as high-resolution calorimeter for contained events. First proposed in 1977 and after a long maturing process, its holds today the potentialities of opening new physics opportunities by providing excellent tracking and calorimetry performance at the relevant multi-kton mass scales, outperforming other techniques. In this paper, we review future liquid argon detectors presently being discussed by the neutrino physics community.

  19. Performance of liquid argon neutrino detectors with enhanced sensitivity to scintillation light

    CERN Document Server

    Sorel, M

    2014-01-01

    Scintillation light is used in liquid argon neutrino detectors to provide a trigger signal, veto information against cosmic rays, and absolute event timing. In this work, we discuss additional opportunities offered by detectors with enhanced sensitivity to scintillation light, that is with light collection efficiencies of about $10^{-3}$. We focus on two key detector performance indicators for neutrino oscillation physics: calorimetric neutrino energy reconstruction and neutrino/antineutrino separation in a non-magnetized detector. Our simulations indicate that a neutrino energy resolution as good as 3.3\\% RMS for 4 GeV electron neutrino charged-current interactions can in principle be obtained in a large detector of this type, by using both charge and light information. By exploiting muon capture in argon and scintillation light information to veto muon decay electrons, we also obtain muon neutrino identification efficiencies of about 50\\%, and muon antineutrino misidentification rates at the few percent lev...

  20. Compact dewar and electronics for large-format infrared detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manissadjian, A.; Magli, S.; Mallet, E.; Cassaigne, P.

    2011-06-01

    Infrared systems cameras trend is to require higher performance (thanks to higher resolution) and in parallel higher compactness for easier integration in systems. The latest developments at SOFRADIR / France on HgCdTe (Mercury Cadmium Telluride / MCT) cooled IR staring detectors do show constant improvements regarding detector performances and compactness, by reducing the pixel pitch and optimizing their encapsulation. Among the latest introduced detectors, the 15μm pixel pitch JUPITER HD-TV format (1280×1024) has to deal with challenging specifications regarding dewar compactness, low power consumption and reliability. Initially introduced four years ago in a large dewar with a more than 2kg split Stirling cooler compressor, it is now available in a new versatile compact dewar that is vacuum-maintenance-free over typical 18 years mission profiles, and that can be integrated with the different available Stirling coolers: K548 microcooler for light solution (less than 0.7 kg), K549 or LSF9548 for split cooler and/or higher reliability solution. The IDDCAs are also required with simplified electrical interface enabling to shorten the system development time and to standardize the electronic boards definition with smaller volumes. Sofradir is therefore introducing MEGALINK, the new compact Command & Control Electronics compatible with most of the Sofradir IDDCAs. MEGALINK provides all necessary input biases and clocks to the FPAs, and digitizes and multiplexes the video outputs to provide a 14 bit output signal through a cameralink interface, in a surface smaller than a business card.

  1. Solar cell evaluation using electron beam induced current with the large chamber scanning electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wink, Tara; Kintzel, Edward; Marienhoff, Peter; Klein, Martin

    2012-02-01

    An initial study using electron beam induced current (EBIC) to evaluate solar cells has been carried out with the large chamber scanning electron microscope (LC-SEM) at the Western Kentucky University Nondestructive Analysis Center. EBIC is a scanning electron microscope technique used for the characterization of semiconductors. To facilitate our studies, we developed a Solar Amplification System (SASY) for analyzing current distribution and defects within a solar cell module. Preliminary qualitative results will be shown for a solar cell module that demonstrates the viability of the technique using the LC-SEM. Quantitative EBIC experiments will be carried out to analyze defects and minority carrier properties. Additionally, a well-focused spot of light from an LED mounted at the side of the SEM column will scan the same area of the solar cell using the LC-SEM positioning system. SASY will then output the solar efficiency to be compared with the minority carrier properties found using EBIC.

  2. ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter Module Zero

    CERN Multimedia

    1993-01-01

    This module was built and tested with beam to validate the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter design. One original design feature is the folding. 10 000 lead plates and electrodes are folded into an accordion shape and immersed in liquid argon. As they cross the folds, particles are slowed down by the lead. As they collide with the lead atoms, electrons and photons are ejected. There is a knock-on effect and as they continue on into the argon, a whole shower is produced. The electrodes collect up all the electrons and this signal gives a measurement of the energy of the initial particle. The M0 was fabricated by French institutes (LAL, LAPP, Saclay, Jussieu) in the years 1993-1994. It was tested in the H6/H8 beam lines in 1994, leading to the Technical Design Report in 1996.

  3. Electron turbulence and transport in large magnetic islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Lucas

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic islands, observed in both reversed-field pinches (RFPs) and tokamaks, often display unexpected turbulence and transport characteristics. For the first time in an RFP, the high repetition rate Thomson scattering diagnostic on MST has captured a 2D image of the rotating electron temperature structure of a magnetic island in a single discharge. MHD modeling using edge magnetic signals implies a 16 cm wide m,n =1,6 tearing mode island which completely overlaps a 5.5 cm n =7 island (12 cm between island centers). The 3D field is partially chaotic, but still reflective of the n =6 island structure. The measured temperature structure matches the shape and location of the n =6 partially chaotic (or `remnant') island. Contrary to the usual assumption that islands have flat internal temperature, the electron temperature is peaked inside the remnant magnetic island due to ohmic heating. The temperature peaking implies a local effective perpendicular conductivity 10-40 m2/s inside the remnant island. This agrees quantitatively with an effective perpendicular conductivity of 16 m2/s estimated using the magnetic diffusion coefficient (evaluated at the electron mean free path) calculated from the modeled chaotic field. Statistical analysis of measurement ensembles with lower time resolution implies that remnant island heating is common in MST discharges. To investigate the role of turbulence near a magnetic island, the 2D structure of long-wavelength density turbulence has been mapped around a large applied static m,n =2,1 L-mode island in the DIII-D tokamak. The turbulence exhibits intriguing spatial structure. Fluctuations are enhanced several-fold (compared to the no-island case) on the inboard side of the X-point, but not on the outboard side of the X-point and are also reduced near the O-point. This work is supported by the NSF and US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698, and DE-FG02-89ER53296.

  4. Electron Trapping and Charge Transport by Large Amplitude Whistlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, P. J.; Cattell, C. A.; Goetz, K.; Monson, S. J.; Wilson, L. B., III

    2010-01-01

    Trapping of electrons by magnetospheric whistlers is investigated using data from the Waves experiment on Wind and the S/WAVES experiment on STEREO. Waveforms often show a characteristic distortion which is shown to be due to electrons trapped in the potential of the electrostatic part of oblique whistlers. The density of trapped electrons is significant, comparable to that of the unperturbed whistler. Transport of these trapped electrons to new regions can generate potentials of several kilovolts, Trapping and the associated potentials may play an important role in the acceleration of Earth's radiation belt electrons.

  5. Scintillation time dependence and pulse shape discrimination in liquid argon

    CERN Document Server

    Lippincott, W H; Gastler, D; Hime, A; Kearns, E; McKinsey, D N; Nikkel, J A; Stonehill, L C

    2008-01-01

    Using a single-phase liquid argon detector with a signal yield of 4.85 photoelectrons per keV of electronic-equivalent recoil energy (keVee), we measure the scintillation time dependence of both electronic and nuclear recoils in liquid argon down to 5 keVee. We develop two methods of pulse shape discrimination to distinguish between electronic and nuclear recoils. Using one of these methods, we measure a background and statistics-limited level of electronic recoil contamination to be $7.6\\times10^{-7}$ between 60 and 128 keV of nuclear recoil energy (keVr) for a nuclear recoil acceptance of 50% with no nuclear recoil-like events above 72 keVr. Finally, we develop a maximum likelihood method of pulse shape discrimination using the measured scintillation time dependence and predict the sensitivity to WIMP-nucleon scattering in three configurations of a liquid argon dark matter detector.

  6. Analog Fault Diagnosis of Large-Scale Electronic Circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-08-01

    the art of electronics design. On the contrary, elec- tronics maintenance has changed little since the day of the vacuum tube. As...34stuck-at-one" or in the art of electronics design. The graphical "stuck-at-zero" and/or shorts and opens5s . Under algorithms of the previous...BACKGROUND During the past quarter century, the engineering community has been wit- ness to tremendous strides in the art of electronics design. On

  7. Study of nuclear recoils in liquid argon with monoenergetic neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Regenfus, C; Amsler, C; Creus, W; Ferella, A; Rochet, J; Walter, M

    2012-01-01

    For the development of liquid argon dark matter detectors we assembled a setup in the laboratory to scatter neutrons on a small liquid argon target. The neutrons are produced mono-energetically (E_kin=2.45 MeV) by nuclear fusion in a deuterium plasma and are collimated onto a 3" liquid argon cell operating in single-phase mode (zero electric field). Organic liquid scintillators are used to tag scattered neutrons and to provide a time-of-flight measurement. The setup is designed to study light pulse shapes and scintillation yields from nuclear and electronic recoils as well as from {\\alpha}-particles at working points relevant to dark matter searches. Liquid argon offers the possibility to scrutinise scintillation yields in noble liquids with respect to the populations of the two fundamental excimer states. Here we present experimental methods and first results from recent data towards such studies.

  8. Large Scale Cleaning Telescope Mirrors with Electron Beams Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cleaning Lenses and Mirrored Surfaces with Electrons tasks include: Development of Fractal Wand Geometries; Vacuum Chamber testing for Fractal Wand Prototypes;...

  9. Depleted argon from underground sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, H.O.; /Princeton U.; Alton, A.; /Augustana U. Coll.; Calaprice, F.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; /Princeton U.; Kendziora, C.; /Fermilab; Loer, B.; /Princeton U.; Montanari, D.; /Fermilab; Mosteiro, P.; /Princeton U.; Pordes, S.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Argon is a powerful scintillator and an excellent medium for detection of ionization. Its high discrimination power against minimum ionization tracks, in favor of selection of nuclear recoils, makes it an attractive medium for direct detection of WIMP dark matter. However, cosmogenic {sup 39}Ar contamination in atmospheric argon limits the size of liquid argon dark matter detectors due to pile-up. The cosmic ray shielding by the earth means that Argon from deep underground is depleted in {sup 39}Ar. In Cortez Colorado a CO{sub 2} well has been discovered to contain approximately 500ppm of argon as a contamination in the CO{sub 2}. In order to produce argon for dark matter detectors we first concentrate the argon locally to 3-5% in an Ar, N{sub 2}, and He mixture, from the CO{sub 2} through chromatographic gas separation. The N{sub 2} and He will be removed by continuous cryogenic distillation in the Cryogenic Distillation Column recently built at Fermilab. In this talk we will discuss the entire extraction and purification process; with emphasis on the recent commissioning and initial performance of the cryogenic distillation column purification.

  10. A 2-Dimensional Fluid Model for an Argon Rf Discharge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passchier, J. D. P.; W. J. Goedheer,

    1993-01-01

    A fluid model for an argon rf discharge in a cylindrical discharge chamber is presented. The model contains the particle balances for electrons and ions and the electron energy balance. A nonzero autobias voltage is obtained by imposing the condition that the time-averaged current toward the powered

  11. Floating potential of large dust grains with electron emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacharis, M., E-mail: minas.bacharis03@imperial.ac.uk [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-15

    Electron emission from the surface of solid particles plays an important role in many dusty plasma phenomena and applications. Examples of such cases include fusion plasmas and dusty plasma systems in our solar system. Electron emission complicates the physics of the plasma-dust interaction. One of the most important aspects of the physics of the dust plasma interaction is the calculation of the particle's floating potential. This is the potential a dust particle acquires when it is in contact with a plasma and it plays a very important role for determining its dynamical behaviour. The orbital motion limited (OML) approach is used in most cases in the literature to model the dust charging physics. However, this approach has severe limitations when the size of the particles is larger than the electron Debye length λ{sub De}. Addressing this shortcoming for cases without electron emission, a modified version of OML (MOML) was developed for modelling the charging physics of dust grains larger than the electron Debye length. In this work, we will focus on extending MOML in cases where the particles emit electrons. Furthermore, a general method for calculating the floating potential of dust particles with electron emission will be presented for a range of grain sizes.

  12. Large Scale Cleaning Telescope Mirrors with Electron Beams Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cleaning Lenses and Mirrored Surfaces with Electrons tasks include: Development of Fractal Wand Geometries; Vacuum Chamber testing of Fractal Wand...

  13. The Effect of Large Scale Magnetic Turbulence on the Acceleration of Electrons by Perpendicular Collisionless Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Fan

    2010-01-01

    We study the physics of electron acceleration at collisionless shocks that move through a plasma containing large-scale magnetic fluctuations. We numerically integrate the trajectories of a large number of electrons, which are treated as test particles moving in the time dependent electric and magnetic fields determined from 2-D hybrid simulations (kinetic ions, fluid electron). The large-scale magnetic fluctuations effect the electrons in a number of ways and lead to efficient and rapid energization at the shock front. Since the electrons mainly follow along magnetic lines of force, the large-scale braiding of field lines in space allows the fast-moving electrons to cross the shock front several times, leading to efficient acceleration. Ripples in the shock front occuring at various scales will also contribute to the acceleration by mirroring the electrons. Our calculation shows that this process favors electron acceleration at perpendicular shocks. The current study is also helpful in understanding the inje...

  14. Proton Scattering on Liquid Argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouabid, Ryan; LArIAT Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    LArIAT (Liquid Argon In A Test-beam) is a liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) positioned in a charged particle beamline whose primary purpose is to study the response of LArTPC's to charged particle interactions. This previously unmeasured experimental data will allow for improvement of Monte Carlo simulations and development of identification techniques, important for future planned LArTPC neutrino experiments. LArIAT's beamline is instrumented to allow for the identification of specific particles as well as measurement of those particles' incoming momenta. Among the particles present in the beamline, the analysis presented here focuses on proton-Argon interactions. This study uses particle trajectories and calorimetric information to identify proton-Argon interaction candidates. We present preliminary data results on the measurement of the proton-Argon cross-section. Liquid Argon In A Test Beam. The work is my analysis made possible through the efforts of LArIAT detector, data, and software.

  15. Electronic-structure calculations of large cadmium chalcogenide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frenzel, Johannes [Lehrstuhl fuer Theoretische Chemie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (Germany); Joswig, Jan-Ole [Physikalische Chemie, Technische Universitaet Dresden (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    In this paper, we will review our studies of large cadmium chalcogenide nanoparticles and present some new results on cadmium telluride systems. All calculations have been performed using density-functional based methods. The studies deal with the structural properties of saturated and unsaturated nanoparticles where the surfactants generally are hydrogen atoms or thiol groups. We have focused on the investigation of the density of states, the Mulliken charges, the eigenvalue spectra, and the spatial distributions of the frontier orbitals. Optical excitation spectra of pure CdS and CdSe/CdS core-shell systems have been calculated using a linear-response formalism. The reviewed studies are compared to the state of the art of modeling large cadmium chalcogenide particles. Optical excitations in large saturated cadmium chalcogenide nanoparticles with several thousand atoms. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Evidence of room temperature ferromagnetism in argon/oxygen annealed TiO{sub 2} thin films deposited by electron beam evaporation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, P. [School of Materials Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Kabiraj, D. [Inter University Accelerator Center, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Mandal, R.K. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Kulriya, P.K. [Inter University Accelerator Center, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Sinha, A.S.K. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Rath, Chandana, E-mail: chandanarath@yahoo.com [School of Materials Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2014-04-15

    TiO{sub 2} thin films deposited by electron beam evaporation technique annealed in either O{sub 2} or Ar atmosphere showed ferromagnetism at room temperature. The pristine amorphous film demonstrates anatase phase after annealing under Ar/O{sub 2} atmosphere. While the pristine film shows a super-paramagnetic behavior, both O{sub 2} and Ar annealed films display hysteresis at 300 K. X-ray photo emission spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, Rutherford’s backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were used to refute the possible role of impurities/contaminants in magnetic properties of the films. The saturation magnetization of the O{sub 2} annealed film is found to be higher than the Ar annealed one. It is revealed from shifting of O 1s and Ti 2p core level spectra as well as from the enhancement of high binding energy component of O 1s spectra that the higher magnetic moment is associated with higher oxygen vacancies. In addition, O{sub 2} annealed film demonstrates better crystallinity, uniform deposition and smoother surface than that of the Ar annealed one from glancing angle X-ray diffraction (GAXRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). We conclude that although ferromagnetism is due to oxygen vacancies, the higher magnetization in O{sub 2} annealed film could be due to crystallinity, which has been observed earlier in Co doped TiO{sub 2} film deposited by pulsed laser deposition (Mohanty et al., 2012 [10]). - Highlights: • TiO{sub 2} films were deposited by e-beam evaporation technique and post annealed under O{sub 2}/Ar at 500 °C. • The pristine film shows SPM behavior where as O{sub 2} and Ar annealed films demonstrate RTFM. • The presence of magnetic impurities has been discarded by various characterization techniques. • The magnetic moment is found to be higher in O{sub 2} annealed film than the Ar annealed one. • The higher M{sub s} in O{sub 2

  17. Large space systems technology electronics: Data and power distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, W. G.

    1980-01-01

    The development of hardware technology and manufacturing techniques required to meet space platform and antenna system needs in the 1980s is discussed. Preliminary designs for manned and automatically assembled space power system cables, connectors, and grounding and bonding materials and techniques are reviewed. Connector concepts, grounding design requirements, and bonding requirements are discussed. The problem of particulate debris contamination for large structure spacecraft is addressed.

  18. Performance study of the effective gain of the double phase liquid Argon LEM Time Projection Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Cantini, C; Gendotti, A; Horikawa, S; Periale, L; Murphy, S; Natterer, G; Regenfus, C; Resnati, F; Sergiampietri, F; Rubbia, A; Viant, T; Wu, S

    2014-01-01

    The Large Electron Multipliers (LEMs) are key components of double phase liquid argon TPCs. The drifting charges after being extracted from the liquid are amplified in the LEM positioned half a centimeter above the liquid in pure argon vapor at 87 K. The LEM is characterised by the size of its dielectric rim around the holes, the thickness of the LEM insulator, the diameter of the holes as well as their geometrical layout. The impact of those design parameters on the amplification were checked by testing seven different LEMs with an active area of 10$\\times$10 cm$^2$ in a double phase liquid argon TPC of 21 cm drift. We studied their response in terms of maximal reachable gain and impact on the collected charge uniformity as well as the long term stability of the gain. We show that we could reach maximal gains of around 150 which corresponds to a signal-to-noise ratio ($S/N$) of about 800 for a minimal ionising particle (MIP) signal on 3 mm readout strips. We could also conclude that the dielectric surfaces i...

  19. A Large Electron EDM and Minimal Flavor Violation

    CERN Document Server

    He, Xiao-Gang; Li, Siao-Fong; Tandean, Jusak

    2014-01-01

    The latest data from the ACME Collaboration have put a stringent constraint on the electric dipole moment (EDM) d_e of the electron. Nevertheless, the standard model (SM) prediction for d_e is many orders of magnitude below the new result, making it a powerful probe for physics beyond the SM. We carry out a model-independent study of d_e in the SM with right handed neutrinos and its extension with neutrino seesaw mechanism under the framework of minimal flavor violation. We find that d_e crucially depends on whether neutrinos are Dirac or Majorana particles. In the Majorana case, d_e can reach its experimental bound and constrains the scale of minimal flavor violation to be above a few hundred GeV or more. We also explore the effects on d_e of extra CP-violating sources in the Yukawa couplings of the right-handed neutrinos. Such new sources can have important effects on d_e.

  20. 高能氩离子在聚苯乙烯中的电子能损效应研究%Electronic Energy Loss Effects in Polystyrene Irradiated with High Energy Argon Ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱智勇; 金运范; 刘昌龙; 孙友梅; 王衍斌; 侯明东; 陈晓曦; 王志光; 张崇宏; 刘杰; 李保权

    2001-01-01

    用1.4GeV氩离子对多层堆叠的厚约53μm的聚苯乙烯薄膜在室温和真空条件下进行了辐照;对辐照后的样品进行了从红外到紫外的光吸收测量. 测量结果显示,材料经高能氩离子辐照后发生化学降解,降解过程强烈依赖于电子能损;在能量沉积密度很高的径迹芯中,分子主链和苯环均遭到破坏;在电子能损高于0.77keV/nm时有炔基产生.%Stacked polystyrene films of about 53μm in thickness were irradiated with 1.4GeV argon ions at room temperature and in vacuum. The radiation induced chemical changes of each film were studied by the Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) and ultraviolet/visible (UV/VIS) spectroscopies. It is found that the material is seriously degraded after irradiation and the chemical modifications depend strongly on electronic energy loss. Significant degradation of the material occurs above about 0.77keV/nm at the dose of 5.5×1012 ions/cm2, corresponding to an energy deposition of 6.4MGy. The main chains of PS as well as the phenyl ring are destroyed in the track core simultaneously. Damage cross sections of about 29nm2 are found for phenyl ring and the -CH2- group. Alkynes are produced above an energy loss of 0.77keV/nm.

  1. Large dynamic range diagnostics for high current electron LINACs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evtushenko, Pavel [JLAB

    2013-11-01

    The Jefferson Lab FEL driver accelerator - Energy Recovery Linac has provided a beam with average current of up to 9 mA and beam energy of 135 MeV. The high power beam operations have allowed developing and testing methods and approaches required to set up and tune such a facility simultaneously for the high beam power and high beam quality required for high performance FEL operations. In this contribution we briefly review this experience and outline problems that are specific to high current - high power non-equilibrium linac beams. While the original strategy for beam diagnostics and tuning have proven to be quite successful, some shortcomings and unresolved issues were also observed. The most important issues are the non-equilibrium (non-Gaussian) nature of the linac beam and the presence of small intensity - large amplitude fraction of the beam a.k.a. beam halo. Thus we also present a list of the possible beam halo sources and discuss possible mitigations means. We argue that for proper understanding and management of the beam halo large dynamic range (>10{sup 6}) transverse and longitudinal beam diagnostics can be used. We also present results of transverse beam profile measurements with the dynamic range approaching 10{sup 5} and demonstrate the effect the increased dynamic range has on the beam characterization, i.e., emittance and Twiss parameters measurements. We also discuss near future work planned in this field and where the JLab FEL facility will be used for beam tests of the developed of new diagnostics.

  2. Large dynamic range diagnostics for high current electron LINACs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evtushenko, P., E-mail: Pavel.Evtushenko@jlab.org [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2013-11-07

    The Jefferson Lab FEL driver accelerator - Energy Recovery Linac has provided a beam with average current of up to 9 mA and beam energy of 135 MeV. The high power beam operations have allowed developing and testing methods and approaches required to set up and tune such a facility simultaneously for the high beam power and high beam quality required for high performance FEL operations. In this contribution we briefly review this experience and outline problems that are specific to high current - high power non-equilibrium linac beams. While the original strategy for beam diagnostics and tuning have proven to be quite successful, some shortcomings and unresolved issues were also observed. The most important issues are the non-equilibrium (non-Gaussian) nature of the linac beam and the presence of small intensity - large amplitude fraction of the beam a.k.a. beam halo. Thus we also present a list of the possible beam halo sources and discuss possible mitigations means. We argue that for proper understanding and management of the beam halo large dynamic range (>10{sup 6}) transverse and longitudinal beam diagnostics can be used. We also present results of transverse beam profile measurements with the dynamic range approaching 10{sup 5} and demonstrate the effect the increased dynamic range has on the beam characterization, i.e., emittance and Twiss parameters measurements. We also discuss near future work planned in this field and where the JLab FEL facility will be used for beam tests of the developed of new diagnostics.

  3. High Power Density Power Electronic Converters for Large Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Senturk, Osman Selcuk

    as 3L-NPC-VSC, 3L active NPC VSC (3L-ANPC-VSC), and 3L neutralpoint-piloted VSC (3L-NPP-VSC) and are proven to be high power density and highly reliable solution in the MV converter market, are selected and employed as the gridside VSC of a large wind turbine as well as the 3L H-Bridge VSCs (3L......-HB-VSCs). As the switch technology for realizing these 3L-VSCs, press-pack IGBTs are chosen to ensure high power density and reliability. Based on the selected 3L-VSCs and switch technology, the converter electro-thermal models are developed comprehensively, implemented practically, and validated via a full-scale 3L......-VSC laboratory prototype. Using these validated models, the power density assessments, which include converter power capability and volume determinations, and the reliability assessments, which are based on statistical failure rates of IGBTs and DC capacitors and based on IGBT lifetime determined by junction...

  4. Commissioning of the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Rezaie, Erfan

    ATLAS, a multi-purpose detector built at the LHC at CERN, requires an extensive commissioning campaign to be ready for proton-proton collisions. In this work, we focus on the commissioning of the liquid Argon (LAr) calorimeters, with emphasis on commissioning with cosmic rays. First we outline one phase of the commissioning work, which involves testing of the front-end electronics of the two endcap calorimeters. We then describe two cosmic ray generators as input to a Monte-Carlo simulation of cosmic rays in ATLAS, and compare their results. Finally, we explain a technique developed for this work which uses information from the Tile calorimeters to predict the timing of cosmic rays within the LAr calorimeters, because cosmic rays occur randomly in time whereas the electronics are clocked at [Special characters omitted.] . The results from this analysis tool are compared to default tools, using both simulated and real cosmic ray data in the calorimeters.

  5. Microwave Argon Plasma Torch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    an electron-ion pair in the discharge. Fig. 2. EEDF is non - Maxwellian and changes along the plasma column The electron–neutral collision...plasma radius. Even at atmospheric pressure the EEDF is non - Maxwellian and it is changing along the plasma column. ...18 31st ICPIG, July 14-19, 2013, Granada, Spain EEDF usually strongly differs from Maxwellian and chages along the plasma column (this is

  6. Performance of the lead/liquid argon shower counter system of the mark II detector at SPEAR

    CERN Document Server

    Abrams, G S; Breidenbach, M; Briggs, D D; Carithers, W C; Dieterle, W E; Dorfan, J M; Eaton, M W; Hanson, G; Hitlin, D G; Jenni, Peter; Lankford, A J; Lüth, V; Pang, C Y; Vella, E N

    1980-01-01

    The shower counter system of the SLAC-LBL Mark II detector is a large lead-liquid argon system of the type pioneered by Willis and Radeka (1974); however, it differs in most details and is much larger than other such detectors currently in operation. It contains, for example, 8000 liters of liquid argon and 3000 channels of low noise electronics, which is about eight times the size of the system of Willis et al. in the CERN ISR. The authors report, with little reference to design, on the operation and performance of the Mark II system during approximately a year and a half of operation at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center's e/sup +/-e/sup -/ facility, SPEAR. The design and construction of the system have previously been described, Abrams et al. (1978) and a detailed discussion of all aspects-design, construction, operation, and performance-is in preparation. (8 refs).

  7. Measurement of scintillation efficiency for nuclear recoils in liquid argon

    CERN Document Server

    Gastler, D; Hime, A; Stonehill, L C; Seibert, S; Klein, J; Lippincott, W H; McKinsey, D N; Nikkel, J A

    2010-01-01

    The scintillation light yield of liquid argon from nuclear recoils relative to electronic recoils has been measured as a function of recoil energy from 10 keVr up to 250 keVr. The scintillation efficiency, defined as the ratio of the nuclear recoil scintillation response to the electronic recoil response, is 0.25 \\pm 0.02 + 0.01(correlated) above 20 keVr.

  8. First operation and drift field performance of a large area double phase LAr Electron Multiplier Time Projection Chamber with an immersed Greinacher high-voltage multiplier

    CERN Document Server

    Badertscher, A; Degunda, U; Epprecht, L; Gendotti, A; Horikawa, S; Knecht, L; Lussi, D; Marchionni, A; Natterer, G; Nguyen, K; Resnati, F; Rubbia, A; Viant, T

    2012-01-01

    We have operated a liquid-argon large-electron-multiplier time-projection chamber (LAr LEM-TPC) with a large active area of 76 $\\times$ 40 cm$^2$ and a drift length of 60 cm. This setup represents the largest chamber ever achieved with this novel detector concept. The chamber is equipped with an immersed built-in cryogenic Greinacher multi-stage high-voltage (HV) multiplier, which, when subjected to an external AC HV of $\\sim$1 kV$_{\\mathrm{pp}}$, statically charges up to a voltage a factor of $\\sim$30 higher inside the LAr vessel, creating a uniform drift field of $\\sim$0.5 kV/cm over the full drift length. This large LAr LEM-TPC was brought into successful operation in the double-phase (liquid-vapor) operation mode and tested during a period of $\\sim$1 month, recording impressive three-dimensional images of very high-quality from cosmic particles traversing or interacting in the sensitive volume. The double phase readout and HV systems achieved stable operation in cryogenic conditions demonstrating their go...

  9. Investigation of forbidden transitions in argon ions. [in laboratory plasma for solar corona simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalufka, N. W.

    1976-01-01

    An attempt has been made to observe the visible forbidden argon coronal lines at 553.6 nm (Ar X), 691.7 nm (Ar XI), 847.6 nm (Ar XIII), and 441.2 nm (Ar XIV) in a deuterium-argon plasma produced in a large theta pinch. The electron temperature (250 eV) and the electron density (5 by 10 to the 16th power per cu cm) were measured by Thomson scattering of ruby laser radiation. This temperature is adequate to produce ionization stages up to Ar XIV, as was verified by photographic observation of Ar XIV lines. No line corresponding to the coronal lines was observed from the high-temperature plasma, but lines with wavelengths very nearly identical to those of two of the forbidden transitions were observed; these lines were due to allowed transitions of Ar II in a cooler portion of the plasma. Calculation of rate coefficients in the Coulomb-Born approximation shows that for laboratory experiments, electron collisions are much more important than radiative decay in depopulating the upper state of the forbidden lines.

  10. Attenuation measurements of vacuum ultraviolet light in liquid argon revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumeier, A. [Physik-Department E15, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Straße 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Dandl, T.; Himpsl, A. [Physik-Department E12, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Straße 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Hofmann, M. [Physik-Department E15, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Straße 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); KETEK GmbH, Hofer Straße 3, 81737 München (Germany); Oberauer, L.; Potzel, W.; Schönert, S. [Physik-Department E15, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Straße 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Ulrich, A., E-mail: andreas.ulrich@ph.tum.de [Physik-Department E12, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Straße 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-11-11

    The attenuation of vacuum ultraviolet light in liquid argon in the context of its application in large liquid noble gas detectors has been studied. Compared to a previous publication several technical issues concerning transmission measurements in general are addressed and several systematic effects were quantitatively measured. Wavelength-resolved transmission measurements have been performed from the vacuum ultraviolet to the near-infrared region. On the current level of sensitivity with a length of the optical path of 11.6 cm, no xenon-related absorption effects could be observed, and pure liquid argon is fully transparent down to the short wavelength cut-off of the experimental setup at 118 nm. A lower limit for the attenuation length of pure liquid argon for its own scintillation light has been estimated to be 1.10 m based on a very conservative approach.

  11. Attenuation measurements of vacuum ultraviolet light in liquid argon revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Neumeier, A; Himpsl, A; Hofmann, M; Oberauer, L; Potzel, W; Schönert, S; Ulrich, A

    2015-01-01

    The attenuation of vacuum ultraviolet light in liquid argon in the context of its application in large liquid noble gas detectors has been studied. Compared to a previous publication several technical issues concerning transmission measurements in general are addressed and several systematic effects were quantitatively measured. Wavelength-resolved transmission measurements have been performed from the vacuum ultraviolet to the near-infrared region. On the current level of sensitivity with a length of the optical path of 11.6 cm, no xenon-related absorption effects could be observed, and pure liquid argon is fully transparent down to the short wavelength cut-off of the experimental setup at 118 nm. A lower limit for the attenuation length of pure liquid argon for its own scintillation light has been estimated to be 1.10 m based on a very conservative approach.

  12. Attainable superheat of argon-helium, argon-neon solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baidakov, Vladimir G; Kaverin, Aleksey M; Andbaeva, Valentina N

    2008-10-16

    The method of lifetime measurement has been used to investigate the kinetics of spontaneous boiling-up of superheated argon-helium and argon-neon solutions. Experiments were made at a pressure of p = 1.5 MPa and concentrations up to 0.33 mol% in the range of nucleation rates from 10 (4) to 10 (8) s (-1) m (-3). The homogeneous nucleation regime has been distinguished. With good agreement between experimental data and homogeneous nucleation theory in temperature and concentration dependences of the nucleation rate, a systematic underestimation by 0.25-0.34 K has been revealed in superheat temperatures over the saturated line attained by experiment as compared with theoretical values calculated in a macroscopic approximation. The revealed disagreement between theory and experiment is connected with the dependence of the properties of new-phase nuclei on their size.

  13. Argon isotope fractionation induced by stepwise heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trieloff, Mario; Falter, Martina; Buikin, Alexei I.; Korochantseva, Ekaterina V.; Jessberger, Elmar K.; Altherr, Rainer

    2005-03-01

    Noble gas isotopes are widely used to elucidate the history of the rocks in which they have been trapped, either from distinct reservoirs or by accumulation following radioactive decay. To extract noble gases from their host rocks, stepwise heating is the most commonly used technique to deconvolve isotopically different components, e.g., atmospheric, in situ radiogenic, or excess radiogenic from mantle or crustal reservoirs. The accurate determination of the isotopic composition of these different components is of crucial importance, e.g., for ages obtained by 40Ar- 39Ar stepheating plateaus. However, diffusion theory-based model calculations predict that the stepwise thermal extraction process from mineral phases induces isotope fractionation and, hence, adulterates the original composition. Such effects are largely unconsidered, as they are small and a compelling experimental observation is lacking. We report the first unequivocal evidence for significant mass fractionation of argon isotopes during thermal extraction, observed on shungite, a carbon-rich Precambrian sedimentary rock. The degree of fractionation, as monitored by 38Ar/ 36Ar and 40Ar/ 36Ar ratios, very well agrees with theoretical predictions assuming an inverse square root dependence of diffusion coefficient and atomic mass, resulting in easier extraction of lighter isotopes. Hence, subatmospheric 40Ar/ 36Ar ratios obtained for argon extracted at low temperatures may not represent paleoatmospheric argon. Shungite argon resembles modern atmospheric composition, but constraints on the timing of trapping appear difficult to obtain, as shungites are multicomponent systems. In 40Ar- 39Ar stepwise heating, the isotope fractionation effect could cause systematic underestimations of plateau ages, between 0.15 and 0.4% depending on age, or considerably higher if samples contain appreciable atmospheric Ar. The magnitude of this effect is similar to the presently achieved uncertainties of this increasingly

  14. System and method for interfacing large-area electronics with integrated circuit devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Naveen; Glisic, Branko; Sturm, James; Wagner, Sigurd

    2016-07-12

    A system and method for interfacing large-area electronics with integrated circuit devices is provided. The system may be implemented in an electronic device including a large area electronic (LAE) device disposed on a substrate. An integrated circuit IC is disposed on the substrate. A non-contact interface is disposed on the substrate and coupled between the LAE device and the IC. The non-contact interface is configured to provide at least one of a data acquisition path or control path between the LAE device and the IC.

  15. Breaking of Large Amplitude Electron Plasma Wave in a Maxwellian Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Mukherjee, Arghya

    2016-01-01

    The determination of maximum possible amplitude of a coherent longitudinal plasma oscillation/wave is a topic of fundamental importance in non-linear plasma physics. The amplitudes of these large amplitude plasma waves is limited by a phenomena called wave breaking which may be induced by several non-linear processes. It was shown by Coffey [T. P. Coffey, Phys. Fluids 14, 1402 (1971)] using a "water-bag" distribution for electrons that, in a warm plasma the maximum electric field amplitude and density amplitude implicitly depend on the electron temperature, known as Coffey's limit. In this paper, the breaking of large amplitude freely running electron plasma wave in a homogeneous warm plasma where electron's velocity distribution is Maxwellian has been studied numerically using 1D Particle in Cell (PIC) simulation method. It is found that Coffey's propagating wave solutions, which was derived using a "water-bag" distribution for electrons, also represent propagating waves in a Maxwellian plasma. Coffey's wave...

  16. Liquid Argon Barrel Cryostat Arrived

    CERN Multimedia

    Pailler, P

    Last week the first of three cryostats for the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter arrived at CERN. It had travelled for 46 days over several thousand kilometers from Japan to CERN. During three years it has been fabricated by Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd. at Harima, close to Kobe, under contract from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) of the U.S.. This cryostat consists of two concentric cylinders made of aluminium: the outer vacuum vessel with a diameter of 5.5 m and a length of 7 m, and the inner cold vessel which will contain the electromagnetic barrel calorimeter immersed in liquid argon. The total weight will be 270 tons including the detectors and the liquid argon. The cryostat is now located in building 180 where it will be equipped with 64 feed-throughs which serve for the passage of 122,880 electrical lines which will carry the signals of the calorimeter. After integration of the calorimeter, the solenoidal magnet of ATLAS will be integrated in the vacuum vessel. A final cold test of the cryostat inc...

  17. Magnetospheric Multiscale Observations of the Electron Diffusion Region of Large Guide Field Magnetic Reconnection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, S; Wilder, F D; Ergun, R E; Schwartz, S J; Cassak, P A; Burch, J L; Chen, L-J; Torbert, R B; Phan, T D; Lavraud, B; Goodrich, K A; Holmes, J C; Stawarz, J E; Sturner, A P; Malaspina, D M; Usanova, M E; Trattner, K J; Strangeway, R J; Russell, C T; Pollock, C J; Giles, B L; Hesse, M; Lindqvist, P-A; Drake, J F; Shay, M A; Nakamura, R; Marklund, G T

    2016-07-01

    We report observations from the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) satellites of a large guide field magnetic reconnection event. The observations suggest that two of the four MMS spacecraft sampled the electron diffusion region, whereas the other two spacecraft detected the exhaust jet from the event. The guide magnetic field amplitude is approximately 4 times that of the reconnecting field. The event is accompanied by a significant parallel electric field (E_{∥}) that is larger than predicted by simulations. The high-speed (∼300  km/s) crossing of the electron diffusion region limited the data set to one complete electron distribution inside of the electron diffusion region, which shows significant parallel heating. The data suggest that E_{∥} is balanced by a combination of electron inertia and a parallel gradient of the gyrotropic electron pressure.

  18. Study of Liquid Argon Dopants for LHC Hadron Calorimetry

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Hadron calorimetry based on the Liquid Argon Ionisation Chamber technique is one of the choice techniques for LHC-experimentation. A systematic study of the effect of selected dopants on Liquid Argon (LAr) will be carried out with the aim to achieve an improvement on: \\item (i)~``Fast Liquid Argon'' search and study of dopants to increase the drift velocity. It has been already shown that CH&sub4. added at a fraction of one percent increases the drift velocity by a factor of two or more. \\item (ii)~``Compensated Liquid Argon'' search and study of dopants to increase the response to densely ionising particles, resulting in improved compensation, such as photosensitive dopants. \\end{enumerate}\\\\ \\\\ Monitoring of the parameters involved in understanding the response of a calorimeter is essential. In case of doped LAr, the charge yield, the non-saturated drift velocity and the electron lifetime in the liquid should be precisely and simultaneously monitored as they all vary with the level of dopant concentrati...

  19. Behavior of Excited Argon Atoms in Inductively Driven Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Hebner, G A

    1999-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence has been used to measure the spatial distribution of the two lowest energy argon excited states, 1s sub 5 and 1s sub 4 , in inductively driven plasmas containing argon, chlorine and boron trichloride. The behavior of the two energy levels with plasma conditions was significantly different, probably because the 1s sub 5 level is metastable and the 1s sub 4 level is radiatively coupled to the ground state but is radiation trapped. The argon data is compared with a global model to identify the relative importance of processes such as electron collisional mixing and radiation trapping. The trends in the data suggest that both processes play a major role in determining the excited state density. At lower rfpower and pressure, excited state spatial distributions in pure argon were peaked in the center of the discharge, with an approximately Gaussian profile. However, for the highest rfpowers and pressures investigated, the spatial distributions tended to flatten in the center of the disch...

  20. Composing Experimental Environment of PRIDE Argon cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Seonho; Jang, Yongkuk; Cho, Il Je [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In PRIDE depleted Uranium feed material and a depleted Uranium mixed with some surrogate material are used for performing engineering scale Pyroprocessing. PRIDE has to maintain inert atmosphere because of the characteristic of Electrolytic Reduction technology, Electro refining technology, Electrowinning technology. The impurity concentration of the Argon cell has to be under 50 ppm(Oxygen, moisture). Atmospheric pressure changes and temperature changes can affect the Argon cell's impurity concentration. In this paper, how to compose the Argon cell impurity concentration under 50 ppm to make the exact optimal experimental environment(Oxygen, moisture) will be introduced. Composing the exact optimal experimental environment by supplying Argon gas have been introduced in this paper. Continuously supplying Argon gas which is heavier than the Oxygen through the bottom of the Argon cell the oxygen eventually discharged through the high vent fan and lower the impurity concentration of Oxygen.

  1. A novel electronic data collection system for large-scale surveys of neglected tropical diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan D King

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Large cross-sectional household surveys are common for measuring indicators of neglected tropical disease control programs. As an alternative to standard paper-based data collection, we utilized novel paperless technology to collect data electronically from over 12,000 households in Ethiopia. METHODOLOGY: We conducted a needs assessment to design an Android-based electronic data collection and management system. We then evaluated the system by reporting results of a pilot trial and from comparisons of two, large-scale surveys; one with traditional paper questionnaires and the other with tablet computers, including accuracy, person-time days, and costs incurred. PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: The electronic data collection system met core functions in household surveys and overcame constraints identified in the needs assessment. Pilot data recorders took 264 (standard deviation (SD 152 sec and 260 sec (SD 122 sec per person registered to complete household surveys using paper and tablets, respectively (P = 0.77. Data recorders felt a lack of connection with the interviewee during the first days using electronic devices, but preferred to collect data electronically in future surveys. Electronic data collection saved time by giving results immediately, obviating the need for double data entry and cross-correcting. The proportion of identified data entry errors in disease classification did not differ between the two data collection methods. Geographic coordinates collected using the tablets were more accurate than coordinates transcribed on a paper form. Costs of the equipment required for electronic data collection was approximately the same cost incurred for data entry of questionnaires, whereas repeated use of the electronic equipment may increase cost savings. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Conducting a needs assessment and pilot testing allowed the design to specifically match the functionality required for surveys. Electronic data collection

  2. Anomalously Large Chiral Sensitivity in the Dissociative Electron Attachment of 10-Iodocamphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreiling, J. M.; Lewis, F. W.; Mills, J. D.; Gay, T. J.

    2016-03-01

    We have studied dissociative electron attachment (DEA) between low energy (≤0.6 eV ) longitudinally polarized electrons and gas-phase chiral targets of 3-bromocamphor (C10 H15 BrO ), 3-iodocamphor (C10 H15 IO ), and 10-iodocamphor. The DEA rate depends on the sign of the incident electron helicity for a given target handedness, and it varies with both the atomic number (Z ) and location of the heaviest atom in the molecule. While simple dynamic mechanisms can account for the asymmetry dependence on Z , they fail to explain the large asymmetry variation with the heavy atom location.

  3. Investigation of Non-Equilibrium Argon and Hydrogen Plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Christopher Gifford

    1987-09-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations are made into non-equilibrium argon and hydrogen partially -ionized plasmas characteristic of glow discharge devices such as thyratrons and discharge tubes. For an argon plasma, the development and use of a collisional-radiative, steady -state, three-energy-level model is presented and experimental measurements on pulsed argon plasmas are briefly mentioned. Two different theoretical argon plasma models are discussed; the first is numerically solved using a non-Maxwellian electron distribution function, while the second is solved analytically, including atom-atom inelastic collisions, assuming Maxwellian electron and atom distribution functions. For a hydrogen plasma, experimental measurements using fluorescence and laser-induced fluorescence have been made in a modified hydrogen thyratron over a wide current density range (from 100 to 8,000 A/cm('2)) for the atomic hydrogen population densities n = 2,3,4. A pronounced rise in the atomic hydrogen excited state populations is observed after the end of the current pulse. A new method to measure the time-resolved electron density has been developed and results are presented. A time-dependent model for atomic hydrogen plasmas typical of a thyratron has been constructed, and preliminary results are shown. This model includes ten atomic energy levels (n = 1 to n = 9 and the continuum), takes into account energy balance with an externally supplied current density and assumes a Maxwellian electron distribution function. Implications of these measurements and theoretical analysis upon the operation of thyratrons are discussed. (Copies available exclusively from Micrographics Department, Doheny Library, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 -0182.).

  4. Kinetic modeling of the Townsend breakdown in argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macheret, S. O.; Shneider, M. N.

    2013-10-01

    Kinetic modeling of the Townsend breakdown in argon was performed in the "forward-back" approximation. The kinetic model was found to adequately describe the left branch of the Paschen curve, and the important role of ionization by fast ions and atoms near the cathode, as well as the increase in secondary emission coefficient in strong electric fields described in the literature, was confirmed. The modeling also showed that the electron energy distribution function develops a beam of high-energy electrons and that the runaway effect, i.e., the monotonic increase of the mean electron energy with the distance from the cathode, occurs at the left branch of the Paschen curve.

  5. Structural determination of argon trimer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiguo Xie

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rare gas clusters are model systems to investigate structural properties at finite size. However, their structures are difficult to be determined with available experimental techniques because of the strong coupling between the vibration and the rotation. Here we experimentally investigated multiple ionization and fragmentation dynamics of argon trimer by ultrashort intense laser fields and reconstructed their structures with Coulomb explosion technique. The measured structure distribution was compared with our finite-temperature ab initio calculations and the discrepancy was discussed. The present study provides a guidance for the development of theoretical methods for exploring the geometric structure of rare gas clusters.

  6. PMm2: large photomultipliers and innovative electronics for the next-generation neutrino experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Genolini, B; Blin, S; Campagne, J -E; Combettes, B; Conforti, S; De-haine, A -G; Duchesneau, D; Dulucq, F; Dumont-Dayot, N; Favier, J; Fouché, F; Hermel, R; de La Taille, C; Martin-Chassard, G; Trung, T Nguyen; Périnet, C; Peyré, J; Pouthas, J; Raux, L; Rindel, E; Rosier, P; Tassan-Viol, J; Wei, W; Zghiche, A

    2008-01-01

    The next generation of proton decay and neutrino experiments, the post-SuperKamiokande detectors as those that will take place in megaton size water tanks, will require very large surfaces of photodetection and a large volume of data. Even with large hemispherical photomultiplier tubes, the expected number of channels should reach hundreds of thousands. A funded R&D program to implement a solution is presented here. The very large surface of photodetection is segmented in macro pixels made of 16 hemispherical (12 inches) photomultiplier tubes connected to an autonomous front-end which works on a triggerless data acquisition mode. The expected data transmission rate is 5 Mb/s per cable, which can be achieved with existing techniques. This architecture allows to reduce considerably the cost and facilitate the industrialization. This document presents the simulations and measurements which define the requirements for the photomultipliers and the electronics. A proto-type of front-end electronics was successf...

  7. A 20-Liter Test Stand with Gas Purification for Liquid Argon Research

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yichen; Tang, Wei; Joshi, Jyoti; Qian, Xin; Diwan, Milind; Kettell, Steve; Morse, William; Rao, Triveni; Stewart, James; Tsang, Thomas; Zhang, Lige

    2016-01-01

    We describe the design of a 20-liter test stand constructed to study fundamental properties of liquid argon (LAr). This system utilizes a simple, cost-effective gas argon (GAr) purification to achieve ultra-high purity, which is necessary to study electron transport properties in LAr. An electron drift stack with up to 25 cm length is constructed to study electron drift, diffusion, and attachment at various electric fields. A gold photocathode and a pulsed laser are used as a bright electron source. The operational performance of this system is reported.

  8. Discovery of underground argon with low level of radioactive 39Ar and possible applications to WIMP dark matter detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Galbiati, C

    2007-01-01

    We report on the first measurement of 39Ar in argon from underground natural gas reservoirs. The gas stored in the US National Helium Reserve was found to contain a low level of 39Ar. The ratio of 39Ar to stable argon was found to be <=4x10-17 (84% C.L.), less than 5% the value in atmospheric argon (39Ar/Ar=8x10-16). The total quantity of argon currently stored in the National Helium Reserve is estimated at 1000 tons. 39Ar represents one of the most important backgrounds in argon detectors for WIMP dark matter searches. The findings reported demonstrate the possibility of constructing large multi-ton argon detectors with low radioactivity suitable for WIMP dark matter searches.

  9. Large Amplitude Low Frequency Waves in a Magnetized Nonuniform Electron-Positron-Ion Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Q. Haque; H. Saleem

    2004-01-01

    @@ It is shown that the large amplitude low-frequency electromagnetic drift waves in electron-positron-ion plasmas might give rise to dipolar vortices. A linear dispersion relation of several coupled electrostatic and electromagnetic low-frequency modes is obtained. The relevance of this work to both laboratory and astrophysical situations is pointed out.

  10. CMOS compatible route for GaAs based large scale flexible and transparent electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Nour, Maha A.

    2014-08-01

    Flexible electronics using gallium arsenide (GaAs) for nano-electronics with high electron mobility and optoelectronics with direct band gap are attractive for many applications. Here we describe a state-of-the-art CMOS compatible batch fabrication process of transforming traditional electronic circuitry into large-area flexible, semitransparent platform. We show a simple release process for peeling off 200 nm of GaAs from 200 nm GaAs/300 nm AlAs stack on GaAs substrate using diluted hydrofluoric acid (HF). This process enables releasing a single top layer compared to peeling off all layers with small sizes at the same time. This is done utilizing a network of release holes which contributes to the better transparency (45 % at 724 nm wavelength) observed.

  11. Conceptual design of hollow electron lenses for beam halo control in the Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stancari, Giulio [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Previtali, Valentina [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Valishev, Alexander [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Bruce, Roderik [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Redaelli, Stefano [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Rossi, Adriana [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Salvachua Ferrando, Belen [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-06-26

    Collimation with hollow electron beams is a technique for halo control in high-power hadron beams. It is based on an electron beam (possibly pulsed or modulated in intensity) guided by strong axial magnetic fields which overlaps with the circulating beam in a short section of the ring. The concept was tested experimentally at the Fermilab Tevatron collider using a hollow electron gun installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses. We are proposing a conceptual design for applying this technique to the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. A prototype hollow electron gun for the LHC was built and tested. The expected performance of the hollow electron beam collimator was based on Tevatron experiments and on numerical tracking simulations. Halo removal rates and enhancements of halo diffusivity were estimated as a function of beam and lattice parameters. Proton beam core lifetimes and emittance growth rates were checked to ensure that undesired effects were suppressed. Hardware specifications were based on the Tevatron devices and on preliminary engineering integration studies in the LHC machine. Required resources and a possible timeline were also outlined, together with a brief discussion of alternative halo-removal schemes and of other possible uses of electron lenses to improve the performance of the LHC.

  12. Argon purge gas cooled by chill box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiro, L. W.

    1966-01-01

    Cooling argon purge gas by routing it through a shop-fabricated chill box reduces charring of tungsten inert gas torch head components. The argon gas is in a cooled state as it enters the torch and prevents buildup of char caused by the high concentrations of heat in the weld area during welding operations.

  13. Generation and suppression of runaway electrons in disruption mitigation experiments in TEXTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozhenkov, S A; Lehnen, M; Finken, K H; Kantor, M; Marchuk, O V; Uzgel, E; Zimmermann, O; Reiter, D [Institute for Energy Research-Plasma Physics, Forschungzentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM-Association, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Jakubowski, M W; Wolf, R C [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Jaspers, R [FOM Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster PO BOX 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegin (Netherlands); Wassenhove, G van [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas/Laboratorium voor Plasmafysica, LPP-ERM/KMS, Association EURATOM-Belgian State, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: s.bozhenkov@fz-juelich.de

    2008-10-15

    Runaway electrons represent a serious problem for the reliable operation of the future experimental tokamak ITER. Due to the multiplication factor of exp(50) in the avalanche even a few seed runaway electrons will result in a beam of high energetic electrons that is able to damage the machine. Thus suppression of runaway electrons is a task of great importance, for which we present here a systematic study of runaway electrons following massive gas injection in TEXTOR. Argon injection can cause the generation of runaways carrying up to 30% of the initial plasma current, while disruptions triggered by injection of helium or of mixtures of argon (5%, 10%, 20%) with deuterium are runaway free. Disruptions caused by argon injection finally become runaway free for very large numbers of injected atoms. The appearance/absence of runaway electrons is related to the fraction of atoms delivered to the plasma centre. This so-called mixing efficiency is deduced from a 0D model of the current quench. The estimated mixing efficiency is 3% for argon, 15% for an argon/deuterium mixture and about 40% for helium. A low mixing efficiency of high-Z impurities can have a strong implication for the design of the disruption mitigation system for ITER. However, a quantitative prediction requires a better understanding of the mixing mechanism.

  14. Metal clusters on supported argon layers; Metallcluster auf dielektrischen Substraten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faber, Bernhard

    2011-10-21

    The deposition of small sodium clusters on supported Ar(001)-surfaces is simulated. Theoretical description is achieved by a hierarchical model consisting of time-dependent DFT and molecular dynamics. The valence electrons of the sodium atoms are considered by Kohn-Sham-Scheme with self interaction correction. The interaction of argon atoms and sodium ions is described by atom-atom potentials whereas the coupling to the QM electrons is done by local pseudo-potentials. A decisive part of the model is the dynamical polarizability of the rare-gas atoms. The optional metal support is considered by the method of image charges. The influence of the forces caused by image charges and the influence of the number of argon monolayers on structure, optical response and deposition dynamics of Na{sub 6} and Na{sub 8} is investigated. There is very little influence on cluster structure and only a small shift of the cluster perpendicular to the surface. Concerning optical response the position of the Mie plasmon peak stays robust whereas the details of spectral fragmentation react very sensitively to changes. The forces caused by image charges of the metal support play only a little role with the dynamics of deposition while the thickness of the argon surface strongly influences the dissipation. (orig.)

  15. High electron mobility and large magnetoresistance in the half-Heusler semimetal LuPtBi

    KAUST Repository

    Hou, Zhipeng

    2015-12-18

    Materials with high carrier mobility showing large magnetoresistance (MR) have recently received much attention because of potential applications in future high-performance magnetoelectric devices. Here, we report on an electron-hole-compensated half-Heusler semimetal LuPtBi that exhibits an extremely high electron mobility of up to 79000cm2/Vs with a nonsaturating positive MR as large as 3200% at 2 K. Remarkably, the mobility at 300 K is found to exceed 10500cm2/Vs, which is among the highest values reported in three-dimensional bulk materials thus far. The clean Shubnikov–de Haas quantum oscillation observed at low temperatures and the first-principles calculations together indicate that the high electron mobility is due to a rather small effective carrier mass caused by the distinctive band structure of the crystal. Our findings provide a different approach for finding large, high-mobility MR materials by designing an appropriate Fermi surface topology starting from simple electron-hole-compensated semimetals.

  16. Readiness of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter for LHC Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, G; Abdallah, J; Abdelalim, A A; Abdesselam, A; Abdinov, O; Abi, B; Abolins, M; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Acharya, B S; Adams, D L; Addy, T N; Adelman, J; Adorisio, C; Adragna, P; Adye, T; Aefsky, S; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Aharrouche, M; Ahlen, S P; Ahles, F; Ahmad, A; Ahmed, H; Ahsan, M; Aielli, G; Akdogan, T; Åkesson, T P A; Akimoto, G; Akimov, A V; Aktas, A; Alam, M S; Alam, M A; Albert, J; Albrand, S; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Alessandria, F; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexandre, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Aliev, M; Alimonti, G; Alison, J; Aliyev, M; Allport, P P; Allwood-Spiers, S E; Almond, J; Aloisio, A; Alon, R; Alonso, A; Alviggi, M G; Amako, K; Amelung, C; Ammosov, V V; Amorim, A; Amorós, G; Amram, N; Anastopoulos, C; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Anduaga, X S; Angerami, A; Anghinolfi, F; Anjos, N; Antonaki, A; Antonelli, M; Antonelli, S; Antunovic, B; Anulli, F; Aoun, S; Arabidze, G; Aracena, I; Arai, Y; Arce, A T H; Archambault, J P; Arfaoui, S; Arguin, J-F; Argyropoulos, T; Arik, E; Arik, M; Armbruster, A J; Arnaez, O; Arnault, C; Artamonov, A; Arutinov, D; Asai, M; Asai, S; Asfandiyarov, R; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Asner, D; Asquith, L; Assamagan, K; Astbury, A; Astvatsatourov, A; Atoian, G; Auerbach, B; Auge, E; Augsten, K; Aurousseau, M; Austin, N; Avolio, G; Avramidou, R; Axen, D; Ay, C; Azuelos, G; Azuma, Y; Baak, M A; Baccaglioni, G; Bacci, C; Bach, A; Bachacou, H; Bachas, K; Backes, M; Badescu, E; Bagnaia, P; Bai, Y; Bailey, D C; Bain, T; Baines, J T; Baker, O K; Baker, M D; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F; Banas, E; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Banfi, D; Bangert, A; Bansal, V; Baranov, S P; Baranov, S; Barashkou, A; Barber, T; Barberio, E L; Barberis, D; Barbero, M; Bardin, D Y; Barillari, T; Barisonzi, M; Barklow, T; Barlow, N; Barnett, B M; Barnett, R M; Baron, S; Baroncelli, A; Barr, A J; Barreiro, F; BarreiroGuimarães da Costa, J; Barrillon, P; Barros, N; Bartoldus, R; Bartsch, D; Bastos, J; Bates, R L; Bathe, S; Batkova, L; Batley, J R; Battaglia, A; Battistin, M; Bauer, F; Bawa, H S; Bazalova, M; Beare, B; Beau, T; Beauchemin, P H; Beccherle, R; Becerici, N; Bechtle, P; Beck, G A; Beck, H P; Beckingham, M; Becks, K H; Bedajanek, I; Beddall, A J; Beddall, A; Bednár, P; Bednyakov, V A; Bee, C; Begel, M; Behar Harpaz, S; Behera, P K; Beimforde, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bell, P J; Bell, W H; Bella, G; Bellagamba, L; Bellina, F; Bellomo, M; Belloni, A; Belotskiy, K; Beltramello, O; Ben Ami, S; Benary, O; Benchekroun, D; Bendel, M; Benedict, B H; Benekos, N; Benhammou, Y; Benincasa, G P; Benjamin, D P; Benoit, M; Bensinger, J R; Benslama, K; Bentvelsen, S; Beretta, M; Berge, D; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E; Berger, N; Berghaus, F; Berglund, E; Beringer, J; Bernardet, K; Bernat, P; Bernhard, R; Bernius, C; Berry, T; Bertin, A; Besson, N; Bethke, S; Bianchi, R M; Bianco, M; Biebel, O; Biesiada, J; Biglietti, M; Bilokon, H; Bindi, M; Binet, S; Bingul, A; Bini, C; Biscarat, C; Bitenc, U; Black, K M; Blair, R E; Blanchard, J-B; Blanchot, G; Blocker, C; Blocki, J; Blondel, A; Blum, W; Blumenschein, U; Bobbink, G J; Bocci, A; Boehler, M; Boek, J; Boelaert, N; Böser, S; Bogaerts, J A; Bogouch, A; Bohm, C; Bohm, J; Boisvert, V; Bold, T; Boldea, V; Boldyrev, A; Bondarenko, V G; Bondioli, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, J R A; Bordoni, S; Borer, C; Borisov, A; Borissov, G; Borjanovic, I; Borroni, S; Bos, K; Boscherini, D; Bosman, M; Bosteels, M; Boterenbrood, H; Bouchami, J; Boudreau, J; Bouhova-Thacker, E V; Boulahouache, C; Bourdarios, C; Boyd, J; Boyko, I R; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Braem, A; Branchini, P; Brandenburg, G W; Brandt, A; Brandt, G; Brandt, O; Bratzler, U; Brau, B; Brau, J E; Braun, H M; Brelier, B; Bremer, J; Brenner, R; Bressler, S; Breton, D; Brett, N D; Britton, D; Brochu, F M; Brock, I; Brock, R; Brodbeck, T J; Brodet, E; Broggi, F; Bromberg, C; Brooijmans, G; Brooks, W K; Brown, G; Brubaker, E; Bruckman de Renstrom, P A; Bruncko, D; Bruneliere, R; Brunet, S; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bruschi, M; Buanes, T; Bucci, F; Buchanan, J; Buchholz, P; Buckley, A G; Budagov, I A; Budick, B; Büscher, V; Bugge, L; Bulekov, O; Bunse, M; Buran, T; Burckhart, H; Burdin, S; Burgess, T; Burke, S; Busato, E; Bussey, P; Buszello, C P; Butin, F; Butler, B; Butler, J M; Buttar, C M; Butterworth, J M; Byatt, T; Caballero, J; Cabrera Urbán, S; Caforio, D; Cakir, O; Calafiura, P; Calderini, G; Calfayan, P; Calkins, R; Caloba, L P; Caloi, R; Calvet, D; Camarri, P; Cambiaghi, M; Cameron, D; Campabadal-Segura, F; Campana, S; Campanelli, M; Canale, V; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Cantero, J; Capasso, L; Capeans-Garrido, M D M; Caprini, I; Caprini, M; Capua, M; Caputo, R; Caracinha, D; Caramarcu, C; Cardarelli, R; Carli, T; Carlino, G; Carminati, L; Caron, B; Caron, S; Carrillo Montoya, G D; Carron Montero, S; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Carvalho, J; Casadei, D; Casado, M P; Cascella, M; Caso, C; Castaneda Hernadez, A M; Castaneda-Miranda, E; Castillo Gimenez, V; Castro, N; Cataldi, G; Catinaccio, A; Catmore, J R; Cattai, A; Cattani, G; Caughron, S; Cauz, D; Cavalleri, P; Cavalli, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cavasinni, V; Ceradini, F; Cerqueira, A S; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Cerutti, F; Cetin, S A; Cevenini, F; Chafaq, A; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K; Chapman, J D; Chapman, J W; Chareyre, E; Charlton, D G; Chavda, V; Cheatham, S; Chekanov, S; Chekulaev, S V; Chelkov, G A; Chen, H; Chen, S; Chen, T; Chen, X; Cheng, S; Cheplakov, A; Chepurnov, V F; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R; Tcherniatine, V; Chesneanu, D; Cheu, E; Cheung, S L; Chevalier, L; Chevallier, F; Chiarella, V; Chiefari, G; Chikovani, L; Childers, J T; Chilingarov, A; Chiodini, G; Chizhov, M; Choudalakis, G; Chouridou, S; Chren, D; Christidi, I A; Christov, A; Chromek-Burckhart, D; Chu, M L; Chudoba, J; Ciapetti, G; Ciftci, A K; Ciftci, R; Cinca, D; Cindro, V; Ciobotaru, M D; Ciocca, C; Ciocio, A; Cirilli, M; Citterio, M; Clark, A; Cleland, W; Clemens, J C; Clement, B; Clement, C; Clements, D; Coadou, Y; Cobal, M; Coccaro, A; Cochran, J; Coelli, S; Coggeshall, J; Cogneras, E; Cojocaru, C D; Colas, J; Cole, B; Colijn, A P; Collard, C; Collins, N J; Collins-Tooth, C; Collot, J; Colon, G; Coluccia, R; Conde Muiño, P; Coniavitis, E; Consonni, M; Constantinescu, S; Conta, C; Conventi, F; Cook, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, B D; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Cooper-Smith, N J; Copic, K; Cornelissen, T; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F; Corso-Radu, A; Cortes-Gonzalez, A; Cortiana, G; Costa, G; Costa, M J; Costanzo, D; Costin, T; Côté, D; Coura Torres, R; Courneyea, L; Cowan, G; Cowden, C; Cox, B E; Cranmer, K; Cranshaw, J; Cristinziani, M; Crosetti, G; Crupi, R; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T; Curatolo, M; Curtis, C J; Cwetanski, P; Czyczula, Z; D'Auria, S; D'Onofrio, M; D'Orazio, A; Da Silva, P V M; Da Via, C; Dabrowski, W; Dai, T; Dallapiccola, C; Dallison, S J; Daly, C H; Dam, M; Danielsson, H O; Dannheim, D; Dao, V; Darbo, G; Darlea, G L; Davey, W; Davidek, T; Davidson, N; Davidson, R; Davison, A R; Dawson, I; Dawson, J W; Daya, R K; De, K; de Asmundis, R; De Castro, S; De Castro Faria Salgado, P E; De Cecco, S; de Graat, J; De Groot, N; de Jong, P; De La Cruz Burelo, E; De La Taille, C; De Mora, L; De Oliveira Branco, M; De Pedis, D; De Salvo, A; De Sanctis, U; De Santo, A; De Vivie De Regie, J B; De Zorzi, G; Dean, S; Deberg, H; Dedes, G; Dedovich, D V; Defay, P O; Degenhardt, J; Dehchar, M; Del Papa, C; Del Peso, J; Del Prete, T; Dell'Acqua, A; Dell'Asta, L; Della Pietra, M; della Volpe, D; Delmastro, M; Delruelle, N; Delsart, P A; Deluca, C; Demers, S; Demichev, M; Demirkoz, B; Deng, J; Deng, W; Denisov, S P; Dennis, C; Derkaoui, J E; Derue, F; Dervan, P; Desch, K; Deviveiros, P O; Dewhurst, A; DeWilde, B; Dhaliwal, S; Dhullipudi, R; Di Ciaccio, A; Di Ciaccio, L; Di Domenico, A; Di Girolamo, A; Di Girolamo, B; Di Luise, S; Di Mattia, A; Di Nardo, R; Di Simone, A; Di Sipio, R; Diaz, M A; Diblen, F; Diehl, E B; Dietrich, J; Diglio, S; Dindar Yagci, K; Dingfelder, D J; Dionisi, C; Dita, P; Dita, S; Dittus, F; Djama, F; Djilkibaev, R; Djobava, T; do Vale, M A B; Do Valle Wemans, A; Dobbs, M; Dobos, D; Dobson, E; Dobson, M; Dodd, J; Dogan, O B; Doherty, T; Doi, Y; Dolejsi, J; Dolenc, I; Dolezal, Z; Dolgoshein, B A; Dohmae, T; Donega, M; Donini, J; Dopke, J; Doria, A; Dos Anjos, A; Dotti, A; Dova, M T; Doxiadis, A; Doyle, A T; Drasal, Z; Driouichi, C; Dris, M; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Dudarev, A; Dudziak, F; Dührssen , M; Duflot, L; Dufour, M-A; Dunford, M; Duperrin, A; Duran-Yildiz, H; Dushkin, A; Duxfield, R; Dwuznik, M; Düren, M; Ebenstein, W L; Ebke, J; Eckert, S; Eckweiler, S; Edmonds, K; Edwards, C A; Eerola, P; Egorov, K; Ehrenfeld, W; Ehrich, T; Eifert, T; Eigen, G; Einsweiler, K; Eisenhandler, E; Ekelof, T; El Kacimi, M; Ellert, M; Elles, S; Ellinghaus, F; Ellis, K; Ellis, N; Elmsheuser, J; Elsing, M; Ely, R; Emeliyanov, D; Engelmann, R; Engl, A; Epp, B; Eppig, A; Epshteyn, V S; Ereditato, A; Eriksson, D; Ermoline, I; Ernst, J; Ernst, M; Ernwein, J; Errede, D; Errede, S; Ertel, E; Escalier, M; Escobar, C; Espinal Curull, X; 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Roa-Romero, D A; Robertson, S H; Robichaud-Veronneau, A; Robinson, D; Robinson, M; Robson, A; Rocha de Lima, J G; Roda, C; Rodriguez, D; Rodriguez Garcia, Y; Roe, S; Røhne, O; Rojo, V; Rolli, S; Romaniouk, A; Romanov, V M; Romeo, G; Romero-Maltrana, D; Roos, L; Ros, E; Rosati, S; Rosenbaum, G A; Rosenberg, E I; Rosselet, L; Rossi, L P; Rotaru, M; Rothberg, J; Rottländer, I; Rousseau, D; Royon, C R; Rozanov, A; Rozen, Y; Ruan, X; Ruckert, B; Ruckstuhl, N; Rud, V I; Rudolph, G; Rühr, F; Ruggieri, F; Ruiz-Martinez, A; Rumyantsev, L; Rusakovich, N A; Rutherfoord, J P; Ruwiedel, C; Ruzicka, P; Ryabov, Y F; Ryadovikov, V; Ryan, P; Rybkin, G; Rzaeva, S; Saavedra, A F; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sadykov, R; Sakamoto, H; Salamanna, G; Salamon, A; Saleem, M; Salihagic, D; Salnikov, A; Salt, J; Salvachua-Ferrando, B M; Salvatore, D; Salvatore, F; Salvucci, A; Salzburger, A; Sampsonidis, D; Samset, B H; Sanchis Lozano, M A; Sandaker, H; Sander, H G; Sanders, M P; Sandhoff, M; Sandstroem, R; Sandvoss, S; Sankey, D P C; Sanny, B; Sansoni, A; Santamarina Rios, C; Santi, L; Santoni, C; Santonico, R; Santos, D; Santos, J; Saraiva, J G; Sarangi, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sarri, F; Sasaki, O; Sasaki, T; Sasao, N; Satsounkevitch, I; Sauvage, G; Savard, P; Savine, A Y; Savinov, V; Sawyer, L; Saxon, D H; Says, L P; Sbarra, C; Sbrizzi, A; Scannicchio, D A; Schaarschmidt, J; Schacht, P; Schäfer, U; Schaetzel, S; Schaffer, A C; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Schamov, A G; Schegelsky, V A; Scheirich, D; Schernau, M; Scherzer, M I; Schiavi, C; Schieck, J; Schioppa, M; Schlenker, S; Schlereth, J L; Schmid, P; Schmidt, M P; Schmieden, K; Schmitt, C; Schmitz, M; Schott, M; Schouten, D; Schovancova, J; Schram, M; Schreiner, A; Schroeder, C; Schroer, N; Schroers, M; Schuler, G; Schultes, J; Schultz-Coulon, H-C; Schumacher, J; Schumacher, M; Schumm, B A; Schune, Ph; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwemling, Ph; Schwienhorst, R; Schwierz, R; Schwindling, J; Scott, W G; Searcy, J; Sedykh, E; Segura, E; Seidel, S C; Seiden, A; Seifert, F; Seixas, J M; Sekhniaidze, G; Seliverstov, D M; Sellden, B; Seman, M; Semprini-Cesari, N; Serfon, C; Serin, L; Seuster, R; Severini, H; Sevior, M E; Sfyrla, A; Shamim, M; Shan, L Y; Shank, J T; Shao, Q T; Shapiro, M; Shatalov, P B; Shaver, L; Shaw, C; Shaw, K; Sherman, D; Sherwood, P; Shibata, A; Shimojima, M; Shin, T; Shmeleva, A; Shochet, M J; Shupe, M A; Sicho, P; Sidoti, A; Siebel, A; Siegert, F; Siegrist, J; Sijacki, Dj; Silbert, O; Silva, J; Silver, Y; Silverstein, D; Silverstein, S B; Simak, V; Simic, Lj; Simion, S; Simmons, B; Simonyan, M; Sinervo, P; Sinev, N B; Sipica, V; Siragusa, G; Sisakyan, A N; Sivoklokov, S Yu; Sjoelin, J; Sjursen, T B; Skubic, P; Skvorodnev, N; Slater, M; Slavicek, T; Sliwa, K; Sloper, J; Sluka, T; Smakhtin, V; Smirnov, S Yu; Smirnov, Y; Smirnova, L N; Smirnova, O; Smith, B C; Smith, D; Smith, K M; Smizanska, M; Smolek, K; Snesarev, A A; Snow, S W; Snow, J; Snuverink, J; Snyder, S; Soares, M; Sobie, R; Sodomka, J; Soffer, A; Solans, C A; Solar, M; Solfaroli-Camillocci, E; Solodkov, A A; Solovyanov, O V; Soluk, R; Sondericker, J; Sopko, V; Sopko, B; Sosebee, M; Sosnovtsev, V V; Sospedra-Suay, L; Soukharev, A; Spagnolo, S; Spanò, F; Speckmayer, P; Spencer, E; Spighi, R; Spigo, G; Spila, F; Spiwoks, R; Spousta, M; Spreitzer, T; Spurlock, B; St Denis, R D; Stahl, T; Stamen, R; Stancu, S N; Stanecka, E; Stanek, R W; Stanescu, C; Stapnes, S; Starchenko, E A; Stark, J; Staroba, P; Starovoitov, P; Stastny, J; Staude, A; Stavina, P; Stavropoulos, G; Steinbach, P; Steinberg, P; Stekl, I; Stelzer, B; Stelzer, H J; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stenzel, H; Stevenson, K; Stewart, G; Stockton, M C; Stoerig, K; Stoicea, G; Stonjek, S; Strachota, P; Stradling, A; Straessner, A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strandlie, A; Strauss, M; Strizenec, P; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D M; Strong, J A; Stroynowski, R; Strube, J; Stugu, B; Stumer, I; Soh, D A; Su, D; Suchkov, S I; Sugaya, Y; Sugimoto, T; Suhr, C; Suk, M; Sulin, V V; Sultansoy, S; Sumida, T; Sun, X; Sundermann, J E; Suruliz, K; Sushkov, S; Susinno, G; Sutton, M R; Suzuki, T; Suzuki, Y; Sviridov, Yu M; Sykora, I; Sykora, T; Szymocha, T; Sánchez, J; Ta, D; Tackmann, K; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Taga, A; Takahashi, Y; Takai, H; Takashima, R; Takeda, H; Takeshita, T; Talby, M; Talyshev, A; Tamsett, M C; Tanaka, J; Tanaka, R; Tanaka, S; Tanaka, S; Tappern, G P; Tapprogge, S; Tardif, D; Tarem, S; Tarrade, F; Tartarelli, G F; Tas, P; Tasevsky, M; Tassi, E; Taylor, C; Taylor, F E; Taylor, G N; Taylor, R P; Taylor, W; Teixeira-Dias, P; Ten Kate, H; Teng, P K; Terada, S; Terashi, K; Terron, J; Terwort, M; Testa, M; Teuscher, R J; Tevlin, C M; Thadome, J; Thananuwong, R; Thioye, M; Thoma, S; Thomas, J P; Thomas, T L; Thompson, E N; Thompson, P D; Thompson, P D; Thompson, R J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thun, R P; Tic, T; Tikhomirov, V O; Tikhonov, Y A; Timmermans, C J W P; Tipton, P; Tique-Aires-Viegas, F J; Tisserant, S; Tobias, J; Toczek, B; Todorov, T; Todorova-Nova, S; Toggerson, B; Tojo, J; Tokár, S; Tokushuku, K; Tollefson, K; Tomasek, L; Tomasek, M; Tomasz, F; Tomoto, M; Tompkins, D; Tompkins, L; Toms, K; Tong, G; Tonoyan, A; Topfel, C; Topilin, N D; Torrence, E; Torró Pastor, E; Toth, J; Touchard, F; Tovey, D R; Tovey, S N; Trefzger, T; Tremblet, L; Tricoli, A; Trigger, I M; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Trinh, T N; Tripiana, M F; Triplett, N; Trivedi, A; Trocmé, B; Troncon, C; Trzupek, A; Tsarouchas, C; Tseng, J C-L; Tsiafis, I; Tsiakiris, M; Tsiareshka, P V; Tsionou, D; Tsipolitis, G; Tsiskaridze, V; Tskhadadze, E G; Tsukerman, I I; Tsulaia, V; Tsung, J-W; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Turala, M; Turecek, D; Turk Cakir, I; Turlay, E; Tuts, P M; Twomey, M S; Tylmad, M; Tyndel, M; Tzanakos, G; Uchida, K; Ueda, I; Uhlenbrock, M; Uhrmacher, M; Ukegawa, F; Unal, G; Underwood, D G; Undrus, A; Unel, G; Unno, Y; Urbaniec, D; Urkovsky, E; Urquijo, P; Urrejola, P; Usai, G; Uslenghi, M; Vacavant, L; Vacek, V; Vachon, B; Vahsen, S; Valenta, J; Valente, P; Valentinetti, S; Valkar, S; Valladolid Gallego, E; Vallecorsa, S; Valls Ferrer, J A; Van Berg, R; van der Graaf, H; van der Kraaij, E; van der Poel, E; Van Der Ster, D; van Eldik, N; van Gemmeren, P; van Kesteren, Z; van Vulpen, I; Vandelli, W; Vandoni, G; Vaniachine, A; Vankov, P; Vannucci, F; Varela Rodriguez, F; Vari, R; Varnes, E W; Varouchas, D; Vartapetian, A; Varvell, K E; Vasilyeva, L; Vassilakopoulos, V I; Vazeille, F; Vegni, G; Veillet, J J; Vellidis, C; Veloso, F; Veness, R; Veneziano, S; Ventura, A; Ventura, D; Venturi, M; Venturi, N; Vercesi, V; Verducci, M; Verkerke, W; Vermeulen, J C; Vetterli, M C; Vichou, I; Vickey, T; Viehhauser, G H A; Villa, M; Villani, E G; Villaplana Perez, M; Villate, J; Vilucchi, E; Vincter, M G; Vinek, E; Vinogradov, V B; Viret, S; Virzi, J; Vitale, A; Vitells, O V; Vivarelli, I; Vives Vaques, F; Vlachos, S; Vlasak, M; Vlasov, N; Vogt, H; Vokac, P; Volpi, M; Volpini, G; von der Schmitt, H; von Loeben, J; von Radziewski, H; von Toerne, E; Vorobel, V; Vorobiev, A P; Vorwerk, V; Vos, M; Voss, R; Voss, T T; Vossebeld, J H; Vranjes, N; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M; Vrba, V; Vreeswijk, M; Vu Anh, T; Vudragovic, D; Vuillermet, R; Vukotic, I; Wagner, P; Wahlen, H; Walbersloh, J; Walder, J; Walker, R; Walkowiak, W; Wall, R; Wang, C; Wang, H; Wang, J; Wang, J C; Wang, S M; Ward, C P; Warsinsky, M; Wastie, R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, M F; Watts, G; Watts, S; Waugh, A T; Waugh, B M; Webel, M; Weber, J; Weber, M D; Weber, M; Weber, M S; Weber, P; Weidberg, A R; Weingarten, J; Weiser, C; Wellenstein, H; Wells, P S; Wen, M; Wenaus, T; Wendler, S; Wengler, T; Wenig, S; Wermes, N; Werner, M; Werner, P; Werth, M; Werthenbach, U; Wessels, M; Whalen, K; Wheeler-Ellis, S J; Whitaker, S P; White, A; White, M J; White, S; Whiteson, D; Whittington, D; Wicek, F; Wicke, D; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wienemann, P; Wiglesworth, C; Wiik, L A M; Wildauer, A; Wildt, M A; Wilhelm, I; Wilkens, H G; Williams, E; Williams, H H; Willis, W; Willocq, S; Wilson, J A; Wilson, M G; Wilson, A; Wingerter-Seez, I; Winklmeier, F; Wittgen, M; Wolter, M W; Wolters, H; Wosiek, B K; Wotschack, J; Woudstra, M J; Wraight, K; Wright, C; Wright, D; Wrona, B; Wu, S L; Wu, X; Wulf, E; Xella, S; Xie, S; Xie, Y; Xu, D; Xu, N; Yamada, M; Yamamoto, A; Yamamoto, S; Yamamura, T; Yamanaka, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamazaki, T; Yamazaki, Y; Yan, Z; Yang, H; Yang, U K; Yang, Y; Yang, Z; Yao, W-M; Yao, Y; Yasu, Y; Ye, J; Ye, S; Yilmaz, M; Yoosoofmiya, R; Yorita, K; Yoshida, R; Young, C; Youssef, S P; Yu, D; Yu, J; Yu, M; Yu, X; Yuan, J; Yuan, L; Yurkewicz, A; Zaidan, R; Zaitsev, A M; Zajacova, Z; Zambrano, V; Zanello, L; Zarzhitsky, P; Zaytsev, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zeller, M; Zema, P F; Zemla, A; Zendler, C; Zenin, O; Zenis, T; Zenonos, Z; Zenz, S; Zerwas, D; Zevi della Porta, G; Zhan, Z; Zhang, H; Zhang, J; Zhang, Q; Zhang, X; Zhao, L; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, S; Zhong, J; Zhou, B; Zhou, N; Zhou, Y; Zhu, C G; Zhu, H; Zhu, Y; Zhuang, X; Zhuravlov, V; Zilka, B; Zimmermann, R; Zimmermann, S; Zimmermann, S; Ziolkowski, M; Zitoun, R; Zivkovic, L; Zmouchko, V V; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; zur Nedden, M; Zutshi, V

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter has been operating continuously since August 2006. At this time, only part of the calorimeter was readout, but since the beginning of 2008, all calorimeter cells have been connected to the ATLAS readout system in preparation for LHC collisions. This paper gives an overview of the liquid argon calorimeter performance measured in situ with random triggers, calibration data, cosmic muons, and LHC beam splash events. Results on the detector operation, timing performance, electronics noise, and gain stability are presented. High energy deposits from radiative cosmic muons and beam splash events allow to check the intrinsic constant term of the energy resolution. The uniformity of the electromagnetic barrel calorimeter response along eta (averaged over phi) is measured at the percent level using minimum ionizing cosmic muons. Finally, studies of electromagnetic showers from radiative muons have been used to cross-check the Monte Carlo simulation. The performance results obtained u...

  17. Ordinary-mode fundamental electron cyclotron resonance absorption and emission in the Princeton Large Torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efthimion, P.C.; Arunasalam, V.; Hosea, J.C.

    1979-11-01

    Fundamental electron cyclotron resonance damping for 4 mm waves with ordinary polarization is measured for propagation along the major radius traversing the midplane of the plasma in the Princeton Large Torus (PLT). Optical depths obtained from the data are in good agreement with those predicted by the relativistic hot plasma theory. Near blackbody emission over much of the plasma midplane is obtained and, in conjunction with the damping measurements, indicates that the vessel reflectivity is high. The practical use of ordinary mode fundamental electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) in existing and future toroidal devices is supported by these results.

  18. Self-assembled heterogeneous argon/neon core-shell clusters studied by photoelectron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundwall, M; Pokapanich, W; Bergersen, H; Lindblad, A; Rander, T; Ohrwall, G; Tchaplyguine, M; Barth, S; Hergenhahn, U; Svensson, S; Björneholm, O

    2007-06-01

    Clusters formed by a coexpansion process of argon and neon have been studied using synchrotron radiation. Electrons from interatomic Coulombic decay as well as ultraviolet and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to determine the heterogeneous nature of the clusters and the cluster structure. Binary clusters of argon and neon produced by coexpansion are shown to exhibit a core-shell structure placing argon in the core and neon in the outer shells. Furthermore, the authors show that 2 ML of neon on the argon core is sufficient for neon valence band formation resembling the neon solid. For 1 ML of neon the authors observe a bandwidth narrowing to about half of the bulk value.

  19. Conceptual design of hollow electron lenses for beam halo control in the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Stancari, Giulio; Valishev, Alexander; Bruce, Roderik; Redaelli, Stefano; Rossi, Adriana; Ferrando, Belen Salvachua; Salvachua Ferrando, B

    2014-01-01

    Collimation with hollow electron beams is a technique for halo control in high-power hadron beams. It is based on an electron beam (possibly pulsed or modulated in intensity) guided by strong axial magnetic fields which overlaps with the circulating beam in a short section of the ring. The concept was tested experimentally at the Fermilab Tevatron collider using a hollow electron gun installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses. Within the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) and the European FP7 HiLumi LHC Design Study, we are proposing a conceptual design for applying this technique to the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. A prototype hollow electron gun for the LHC was built and tested. The expected performance of the hollow electron beam collimator was based on Tevatron experiments and on numerical tracking simulations. Halo removal rates and enhancements of halo diffusivity were estimated as a function of beam and lattice parameters. Proton beam core lifetimes and emittance growth rates were check...

  20. Liquid Argon TPC Signal Formation, Signal Processing and Hit Reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baller, Bruce [Fermilab

    2017-03-11

    This document describes the early stage of the reconstruction chain that was developed for the ArgoNeuT and MicroBooNE experiments at Fermilab. These experiments study accelerator neutrino interactions that occur in a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber. Reconstructing the properties of particles produced in these interactions requires knowledge of the micro-physics processes that affect the creation and transport of ionization electrons to the readout system. A wire signal deconvolution technique was developed to convert wire signals to a standard form for hit reconstruction, to remove artifacts in the electronics chain and to remove coherent noise.

  1. Study of a Novel Concept for a Liquid Argon Calorimeter \

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % RD33 \\\\ \\\\ The development of a fast, highly granular and compact electromagnetic liquid argon calorimeter prototype is proposed as a generic R\\&D project for a novel concept of calorimetry in proton-proton and electron-positron collider detectors: the $^{\\prime$Thin Gap Turbine$^{\\prime}$ (TGT). The TGT calorimeter has a modular construction, is flexible in its longitudinal and transverse granularity, and offers a uniform energy response and resolution, independent of the production angle of incident particles. An important aspect of the project is the development of fast, radiation-hard front-end electronics which is operating in the cold.

  2. Large parallel and perpendicular electric fields on electron spatial scales in the terrestrial bow shock

    CERN Document Server

    Bale, S D

    2007-01-01

    Large parallel ($\\leq$ 100 mV/m) and perpendicular ($\\leq$ 600 mV/m) electric fields were measured in the Earth's bow shock by the vector electric field experiment on the Polar satellite. These are the first reported direct measurements of parallel electric fields in a collisionless shock. These fields exist on spatial scales comparable to or less than the electron skin depth (a few kilometers) and correspond to magnetic field-aligned potentials of tens of volts and perpendicular potentials up to a kilovolt. The perpendicular fields are amongst the largest ever measured in space, with energy densities of $\\epsilon_0 E^2/ n k_b T_e$ of order 10%. The measured parallel electric field implies that the electrons can be demagnetized, which may result in stochastic (rather than coherent) electron heating.

  3. Characteristics of Electron Distributions Observed During Large Amplitude Whistler Wave Events in the Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Lynn B., III

    2010-01-01

    We present a statistical study of the characteristics of electron distributions associated with large amplitude whistler waves inside the terrestrial magnetosphere using waveform capture data as an addition of the study by Kellogg et al., [2010b]. We identified three types of electron distributions observed simultaneously with the whistler waves including beam-like, beam/flattop, and anisotropic distributions. The whistlers exhibited different characteristics dependent upon the observed electron distributions. The majority of the waveforms observed in our study have f/fce or = 8 nT pk-pk) whistler wave measured in the radiation belts. The majority of the largest amplitude whistlers occur during magnetically active periods (AE > 200 nT).

  4. On large amplitude motions of simplest amides in the ground and excited electronic states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tukachev, N. V.; Bataev, V. A.; Godunov, I. A.

    2016-12-01

    For the formamide, acetamide, N-methylformamide and N-methylacetamide molecules in the ground (S0) and lowest excited singlet (S1) and triplet (T1) electronic states equilibrium geometry parameters, harmonic vibrational frequencies, barriers to conformational transitions and conformer energy differences were estimated by means of MP2, CCSD(T), CASSCF, CASPT2 and MRCI ab initio methods. One-, two- and three-dimensional potential energy surface (PES) sections corresponding to different large amplitude motions (LAM) were calculated by means of MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ (S0) and CASPT2/cc-pVTZ (S1,T1). For these molecules, in each excited electronic state six minima were found on 2D PES sections. Using PES sections, different anharmonic vibrational problems were solved and the frequencies of large amplitude vibrations were determined.

  5. Scenarios to explore the futures of the emerging technology of organic and large area electronics

    OpenAIRE

    Parandian, Alireza; Rip, Arie

    2013-01-01

    Emerging technologies pose challenges for futures research because of their uncertainties combined with promises. Actors are anticipating and acting strategically. Sociotechnical scenarios building on endogenous futures support and enlighten actors. Such scenarios contribute to “strategic intelligence” about the technologies and their embedding in society. Organic and large area electronics promise to substitute silicon-based technologies, but firms and potential users are reluctant to invest...

  6. Development of electron cyclotron emission imaging system on Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwahara, D.; Tsuji-Iio, S. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Nagayama, Y.; Yoshinaga, T.; Tsuchiya, H.; Sugito, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Yamaguchi, S. [Kansai University, 3-3-35 Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan); Kogi, Y. [Fukuoka Institute of Technology, 3-30-1 Wajiro-Higashi, Fukuoka 811-0295 (Japan); Akaki, K.; Mase, A. [KASTEC, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-Koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    A combined system of microwave imaging reflectometry and electron cyclotron emission (ECE) imaging has been developed for the Large Helical Device. This system includes a wide-band two-dimensional horn-antenna mixer array (HMA). The HMA consists of horn antennas, waveguides, mixers, and intermediate frequency circuits. The frequency response of the HMA is between 50 and 110 GHz. The ECE signal is selected using a 95 GHz local oscillator and a 93 GHz high-pass filter.

  7. Graphene/MoS2 hybrid technology for large-scale two-dimensional electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lili; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Ling, Xi; Santos, Elton J G; Shin, Yong Cheol; Lin, Yuxuan; Dubey, Madan; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Kong, Jing; Wang, Han; Palacios, Tomás

    2014-06-11

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have generated great interest in the past few years as a new toolbox for electronics. This family of materials includes, among others, metallic graphene, semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides (such as MoS2), and insulating boron nitride. These materials and their heterostructures offer excellent mechanical flexibility, optical transparency, and favorable transport properties for realizing electronic, sensing, and optical systems on arbitrary surfaces. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel technology for constructing large-scale electronic systems based on graphene/molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) heterostructures grown by chemical vapor deposition. We have fabricated high-performance devices and circuits based on this heterostructure, where MoS2 is used as the transistor channel and graphene as contact electrodes and circuit interconnects. We provide a systematic comparison of the graphene/MoS2 heterojunction contact to more traditional MoS2-metal junctions, as well as a theoretical investigation, using density functional theory, of the origin of the Schottky barrier height. The tunability of the graphene work function with electrostatic doping significantly improves the ohmic contact to MoS2. These high-performance large-scale devices and circuits based on this 2D heterostructure pave the way for practical flexible transparent electronics.

  8. Monitoring and data quality assessment of the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allison, Lee John; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Backus Mayes, John; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Sarah; Balek, Petr; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Bartsch, Valeria; Bassalat, Ahmed; 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Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia, Olga; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Jennifer; Boek, Thorsten Tobias; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Bohm, Jan; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bolnet, Nayanka Myriam; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borri, Marcello; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boutouil, Sara; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Bracinik, Juraj; Branchini, Paolo; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Brelier, Bertrand; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Kieran; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Bromberg, Carl; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Brown, Gareth; Brown, Jonathan; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Bucci, Francesca; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Lars; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bundock, Aaron Colin; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burghgrave, Blake; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Byszewski, Marcin; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; 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Charfeddine, Driss; Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Liming; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Yujiao; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiefari, Giovanni; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christidi, Ilektra-Athanasia; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirkovic, Predrag; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Benoit; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collins-Tooth, Christopher; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Colon, German; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cooper-Smith, Neil; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davignon, Olivier; Davison, Adam; Davison, Peter; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De La Taille, Christophe; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; De Zorzi, Guido; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dechenaux, Benjamin; Dedovich, Dmitri; Degenhardt, James; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Deliot, Frederic; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; do Vale, Maria Aline Barros; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobos, Daniel; Dobson, Ellie; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dube, Sourabh; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Dwuznik, Michal; Dyndal, Mateusz; Ebke, Johannes; Edson, William; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Engelmann, Roderich; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Fernando, Waruna; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrara, Valentina; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Matthew; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fitzgerald, Eric Andrew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Florez Bustos, Andres Carlos; Flowerdew, Michael; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; French, Sky; Friedrich, Conrad; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; Garberson, Ford; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Giannetti, Paola; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Giunta, Michele; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Glonti, George; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goeringer, Christian; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Gozpinar, Serdar; Grabas, Herve Marie Xavier; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Francesco; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grout, Zara Jane; Grybel, Kai; Guan, Liang; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Shaun; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guttman, Nir; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Haefner, Petra; Hageboeck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Harvey, Alex; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Lukas; Heisterkamp, Simon; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Heller, Claudio; Heller, Matthieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Hengler, Christopher; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Hensel, Carsten; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg-Schubert, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hofmann, Julia Isabell; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holmes, Tova Ray; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Xueye; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Hurwitz, Martina; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Inamaru, Yuki; Ince, Tayfun; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansen, Hendrik; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanty, Laura; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jen-La Plante, Imai; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jungst, Ralph Markus; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kanno, Takayuki; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Keller, John; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Keung, Justin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Khodinov, Alexander; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kitamura, Takumi; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klinkby, Esben; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; König, Sebastian; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kurumida, Rie; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Labarga, Luis; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laier, Heiko; Lambourne, Luke; Lammers, Sabine; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, Clemens; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavorini, Vincenzo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Le, Bao Tran; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire, Alexandra; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lester, Christopher; Lester, Christopher Michael; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Shu; Li, Xuefei; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linde, Frank; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Jonathan; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Losty, Michael; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeno, Mayuko; Maeno, Tadashi; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Mahmoud, Sara; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany Andreina; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchese, Fabrizio; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marques, Carlos; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Homero; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mättig, Peter; Mättig, Stefan; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; Mclaughlan, Tom; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mendoza Navas, Luis; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Meric, Nicolas; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Merritt, Hayes; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Middleton, Robin; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Moeller, Victoria; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Mönig, Klaus; Monini, Caterina; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morange, Nicolas; Morel, Julien; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Mueller, Thibaut; Mueller, Timo; Muenstermann, Daniel; Munwes, Yonathan; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagel, Martin; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Nanava, Gizo; Narayan, Rohin; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neusiedl, Andrea; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olchevski, Alexander; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olivito, Dominick; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penwell, John; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Jorgen; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Petteni, Michele; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Piec, Sebastian Marcin; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pinto, Belmiro; Pires, Sylvestre; Pizio, Caterina; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Pohl, Martin; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Prabhu, Robindra; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Joe; Price, Lawrence; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopapadaki, Eftychia-sofia; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Pueschel, Elisa; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Pylypchenko, Yuriy; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Quilty, Donnchadha; Qureshi, Anum; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rammes, Marcus; Randle-Conde, Aidan Sean; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rao, Kanury; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Tobias Christian; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reinsch, Andreas; Reisin, Hernan; Relich, Matthew; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Rodrigues, Luis; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romeo, Gaston; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Anthony; Rose, Matthew; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ruzicka, Pavel; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Saddique, Asif; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvachua Ferrando, Belén; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savard, Pierre; Savu, Dan Octavian; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaelicke, Andreas; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R~Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Christopher; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schneider, Basil; Schnellbach, Yan Jie; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schroeder, Christian; Schuh, Natascha; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwegler, Philipp; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Schwoerer, Maud; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Scifo, Estelle; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scott, Bill; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekula, Stephen; Selbach, Karoline Elfriede; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellers, Graham; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Serre, Thomas; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shank, James; Shao, Qi Tao; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Sherwood, Peter; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Sicho, Petr; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silbert, Ohad; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simoniello, Rosa; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sircar, Anirvan; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinnari, Louise Anastasia; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snidero, Giacomo; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Song, Hong Ye; Soni, Nitesh; Sood, Alexander; Sopko, Vit; Sopko, Bruno; Sosebee, Mark; Soualah, Rachik; Soueid, Paul; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spearman, William Robert; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Stavina, Pavel; Steele, Genevieve; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoerig, Kathrin; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Subramania, Halasya Siva; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suhr, Chad; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Svatos, Michal; Swedish, Stephen; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takahashi, Yuta; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tam, Jason; Tamsett, Matthew; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanasijczuk, Andres Jorge; Tani, Kazutoshi; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Christopher; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thoma, Sascha; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thong, Wai Meng; Thun, Rudolf; Tian, Feng; Tibbetts, Mark James; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Topilin, Nikolai; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Tran, Huong Lan; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Triplett, Nathan; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; True, Patrick; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tua, Alan; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ughetto, Michael; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urquijo, Phillip; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van der Ster, Daniel; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veloso, Filipe; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigne, Ralph; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virzi, Joseph; Vitells, Ofer; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Adrian; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wagner, Peter; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Walsh, Brian; Wang, Chao; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Warsinsky, Markus; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watanabe, Ippei; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weigell, Philipp; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; 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Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Liwen; Yao, Weiming; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zaytsev, Alexander; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zitoun, Robert; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zurzolo, Giovanni; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2014-01-01

    The liquid argon calorimeter is a key component of the ATLAS detector installed at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The primary purpose of this calorimeter is the measurement of electrons and photons. It also provides a crucial input for measuring jets and missing transverse momentum. An advanced data monitoring procedure was designed to quickly identify issues that would affect detector performance and ensure that only the best quality data are used for physics analysis. This article presents the validation procedure developed during the 2011 and 2012 LHC data-taking periods, in which more than 98% of the proton–proton luminosity recorded by ATLAS at a centre-of-mass energy of 7–8 TeV had calorimeter data quality suitable for physics analysis.

  9. Epitaxial composite layers of electron donors and acceptors from very large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samorí, Paolo; Severin, Nikolai; Simpson, Christopher D; Müllen, Klaus; Rabe, Jürgen P

    2002-08-14

    Large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) can be considered as nanographenes, whose electron donating or accepting properties are controlled by their size and shape as well as functionalities in their periphery. Epitaxial thin films of them are targets for optoelectronic applications; however, large PAHs are increasingly difficult to process. Here we show that epitaxial layers of very large unsubstituted PAHs (C(42)H(18) and C(132)H(34)), as well as a mixed layer of C(42)H(18) with an electron acceptor, can be obtained by self-assembly from solution. The C(132)H(34) is by far the largest nanographene that up to now has been processed into ordered thin films; due to its size it cannot be sublimed in a vacuum. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) studies reveal that the interaction with the substrate induces a strong perturbation of the electronic structure of the pure donor in the first epitaxial monolayer. In a second epitaxial layer with a donor acceptor stoichiometry of 2:1 the molecules are unperturbed.

  10. Large-scale Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (Nanotomy) of Healthy and Injured Zebrafish Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuipers, Jeroen; Kalicharan, Ruby D; Wolters, Anouk H G; van Ham, Tjakko J; Giepmans, Ben N G

    2016-05-25

    Large-scale 2D electron microscopy (EM), or nanotomy, is the tissue-wide application of nanoscale resolution electron microscopy. Others and we previously applied large scale EM to human skin pancreatic islets, tissue culture and whole zebrafish larvae(1-7). Here we describe a universally applicable method for tissue-scale scanning EM for unbiased detection of sub-cellular and molecular features. Nanotomy was applied to investigate the healthy and a neurodegenerative zebrafish brain. Our method is based on standardized EM sample preparation protocols: Fixation with glutaraldehyde and osmium, followed by epoxy-resin embedding, ultrathin sectioning and mounting of ultrathin-sections on one-hole grids, followed by post staining with uranyl and lead. Large-scale 2D EM mosaic images are acquired using a scanning EM connected to an external large area scan generator using scanning transmission EM (STEM). Large scale EM images are typically ~ 5 - 50 G pixels in size, and best viewed using zoomable HTML files, which can be opened in any web browser, similar to online geographical HTML maps. This method can be applied to (human) tissue, cross sections of whole animals as well as tissue culture(1-5). Here, zebrafish brains were analyzed in a non-invasive neuronal ablation model. We visualize within a single dataset tissue, cellular and subcellular changes which can be quantified in various cell types including neurons and microglia, the brain's macrophages. In addition, nanotomy facilitates the correlation of EM with light microscopy (CLEM)(8) on the same tissue, as large surface areas previously imaged using fluorescent microscopy, can subsequently be subjected to large area EM, resulting in the nano-anatomy (nanotomy) of tissues. In all, nanotomy allows unbiased detection of features at EM level in a tissue-wide quantifiable manner.

  11. Surface modification of poly (vinyl chloride) by long-distance and direct argon RF plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports the effects of long- distance and direct argon radio frequency (RF) plasma surface treatment on polyvinyl chloride (PVC) films in terms of changes in surface wettability and surface chemistry. The surface properties are characterized by the water contact angle measurement, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The mechanism is further analyzed and the role of all kinds of active species, e.g. electrons, ions and free radicals involved in plasma surface modification is further evaluated. Results show that the long-distance and direct RF plasma treatments modify the PVC surface in morphology and composition, and both modifications cause surface oxidation of PVC films, in the forming of functional groups enhancing polymer wettability. The effect of the long-distance argon RF plasma is more notable. This suggests that long-distance argon RF plasma could restrain the ion and electron eroding effect and enhance free radical reaction.

  12. Bacteria Inactivation Using DBD Plasma Jet in Atmospheric Pressure Argon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Guimin; ZHANG Guanjun; SHI Xingmin; MA Yue; WANG Ning; LI Yuan

    2009-01-01

    A coaxial dielectric barrier discharge plasma jet Was designed,which can be operated in atmospheric pressure argon under an intermediate frequency sinusoidal resonant power supply,and an atmospheric pressure glow-like discharge Was achieved.Two kinds of typical bacteria,i.e.,the Staphylococcus aureus(S.aurens)and Escherichia coil(E.coil),were employed to study the bacterial inactivation mechanism by means of the non-thermal plasma.The killing log value (KLV)of S.aureus reached up to 5.38 with a treatment time of 90 s and that of E.coil up to 5.36 with 60 s,respectively.According to the argon emission spectra of the plasma jet and the scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the two bacteria before and after the plasma treatment.it is concluded that the reactive species in the argon plasma played a major role in the bacterial inactivation,while the heat,electric field and UV photons had little effect.

  13. Readiness of the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter for LHC collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmed, H.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Aktas, A.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amorós, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. 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A.; Petersen, J.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridou, C.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Petschull, D.; Petteni, M.; Pezoa, R.; Pfeifer, B.; Phan, A.; Phillips, A. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Piccinini, M.; Piegaia, R.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Ping, J.; Pinto, B.; Pirotte, O.; Pizio, C.; Placakyte, R.; Plamondon, M.; Plano, W. G.; Pleier, M.-A.; Poblaguev, A.; Poddar, S.; Podlyski, F.; Poffenberger, P.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, M.; Polci, F.; Polesello, G.; Policicchio, A.; Polini, A.; Poll, J.; Polychronakos, V.; Pomarede, D. M.; Pomeroy, D.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Popule, J.; Portell Bueso, X.; Porter, R.; Pospelov, G. E.; Pospichal, P.; Pospisil, S.; Potekhin, M.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Potter, K. P.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Prabhu, R.; Pralavorio, P.; Prasad, S.; Pravahan, R.; Preda, T.; Pretzl, K.; Pribyl, L.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Prichard, P. M.; Prieur, D.; Primavera, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Prudent, X.; Przysiezniak, H.; Psoroulas, S.; Ptacek, E.; Puigdengoles, C.; Purdham, J.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Qi, M.; Qian, J.; Qian, W.; Qian, Z.; Qin, Z.; Qing, D.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Quinonez, F.; Raas, M.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radics, B.; Rador, T.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rahimi, A. M.; Rahm, D.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammes, M.; Ratoff, P. N.; Rauscher, F.; Rauter, E.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Reinsch, A.; Reisinger, I.; Reljic, D.; Rembser, C.; Ren, Z. L.; Renkel, P.; Rescia, S.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Resende, B.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richards, A.; Richards, R. A.; Richter, D.; Richter, R.; Richter-Was, E.; Ridel, M.; Rieke, S.; Rijpstra, M.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Rios, R. R.; Riu, I.; Rivoltella, G.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E. R.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, M.; Robson, A.; Rocha de Lima, J. G.; Roda, C.; Rodriguez, D.; Rodriguez Garcia, Y.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rojo, V.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romanov, V. M.; Romeo, G.; Romero Maltrana, D.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosenbaum, G. A.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rosselet, L.; Rossi, L. P.; Rotaru, M.; Rothberg, J.; Rottländer, I.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Ruckert, B.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, G.; Rühr, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rumyantsev, L.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruwiedel, C.; Ruzicka, P.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Ryadovikov, V.; Ryan, P.; Rybkin, G.; Rzaeva, S.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Sakamoto, H.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvachua Ferrando, B. M.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Samset, B. H.; Sanchis Lozano, M. A.; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandstroem, R.; Sandvoss, S.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sanny, B.; Sansoni, A.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santi, L.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, D.; Santos, J.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarangi, T.; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E.; Sarri, F.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, T.; Sasao, N.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, G.; Savard, P.; Savine, A. Y.; Savinov, V.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D. H.; Says, L. P.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schäfer, U.; Schaetzel, S.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schamov, A. G.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schlereth, J. L.; Schmid, P.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitz, M.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schreiner, A.; Schroeder, C.; Schroer, N.; Schroers, M.; Schuler, G.; Schultes, J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schumacher, J.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwierz, R.; Schwindling, J.; Scott, W. G.; Searcy, J.; Sedykh, E.; Segura, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellden, B.; Seman, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sevior, M. E.; Sfyrla, A.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shank, J. T.; Shao, Q. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaver, L.; Shaw, C.; Shaw, K.; Sherman, D.; Sherwood, P.; Shibata, A.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siebel, A.; Siegert, F.; Siegrist, J.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simmons, B.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjoelin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skubic, P.; Skvorodnev, N.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Sloper, J.; Sluka, T.; Smakhtin, V.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, B. C.; Smith, D.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snow, S. W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Soluk, R.; Sondericker, J.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Sosnovtsev, V. V.; Sospedra Suay, L.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Speckmayer, P.; Spencer, E.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; Denis, R. D. St.; Stahl, T.; Stamen, R.; Stancu, S. N.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stastny, J.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Stavropoulos, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stevenson, K.; Stewart, G.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Strong, J. A.; Stroynowski, R.; Strube, J.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Soh, D. A.; Su, D.; Suchkov, S. I.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Sviridov, Yu. M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Szymocha, T.; Sánchez, J.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taga, A.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tappern, G. P.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, R. P.; Taylor, W.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terwort, M.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Tevlin, C. M.; Thadome, J.; Thananuwong, R.; Thioye, M.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas, T. L.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thun, R. P.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Timmermans, C. J. W. P.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires Viegas, F. J.; Tisserant, S.; Tobias, J.; Toczek, B.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Tomasz, F.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, D.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, G.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Tovey, S. N.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trinh, T. N.; Tripiana, M. F.; Triplett, N.; Trivedi, A.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiafis, I.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.-W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Turala, M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Tuts, P. M.; Twomey, M. S.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Tzanakos, G.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Underwood, D. G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urkovsky, E.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valenta, J.; Valente, P.; Valentinetti, S.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van Berg, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Vandelli, W.; Vandoni, G.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Varela Rodriguez, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasilyeva, L.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vegni, G.; Veillet, J. J.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veness, R.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Villa, M.; Villani, E. G.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Villate, J.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Viret, S.; Virzi, J.; Vitale, A.; Vitells, O. V.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaques, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogt, H.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T. T.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vudragovic, D.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, P.; Wahlen, H.; Walbersloh, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J. C.; Wang, S. M.; Ward, C. P.; Warsinsky, M.; Wastie, R.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Webel, M.; Weber, J.; Weber, M. D.; Weber, M.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Werthenbach, U.; Wessels, M.; Whalen, K.; Wheeler-Ellis, S. J.; Whitaker, S. P.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, M. G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wright, D.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wulf, E.; Xella, S.; Xie, S.; Xie, Y.; Xu, D.; Xu, N.; Yamada, M.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S. P.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, M.; Yu, X.; Yuan, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zambrano, V.; Zanello, L.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zema, P. F.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, S.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zilka, B.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.

    2010-12-01

    The ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter has been operating continuously since August 2006. At this time, only part of the calorimeter was readout, but since the beginning of 2008, all calorimeter cells have been connected to the ATLAS readout system in preparation for LHC collisions. This paper gives an overview of the liquid argon calorimeter performance measured in situ with random triggers, calibration data, cosmic muons, and LHC beam splash events. Results on the detector operation, timing performance, electronics noise, and gain stability are presented. High energy deposits from radiative cosmic muons and beam splash events allow to check the intrinsic constant term of the energy resolution. The uniformity of the electromagnetic barrel calorimeter response along η (averaged over φ) is measured at the percent level using minimum ionizing cosmic muons. Finally, studies of electromagnetic showers from radiative muons have been used to cross-check the Monte Carlo simulation. The performance results obtained using the ATLAS readout, data acquisition, and reconstruction software indicate that the liquid argon calorimeter is well-prepared for collisions at the dawn of the LHC era.

  14. Single electron tunneling in large scale nanojunction arrays with bisferrocene-nanoparticle hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Shilpi; Kumar, Susmit; Marzo, Pasquale; Primiceri, Elisabetta; di Corato, Riccardo; Rinaldi, Ross; Cozzi, Pier Giorgio; Bramanti, Alessandro Paolo; Maruccio, Giuseppe

    2012-03-01

    We report on the fabrication and single electron tunneling behaviour of large scale arrays of nanogap electrodes bridged by bisferrocene-gold nanoparticle hybrids (BFc-AuNP). Coulomb staircase was observed in the low temperature current-voltage curves measured on the junctions with asymmetric tunnel barriers. On the other hand, junctions with symmetric tunneling barrier exhibited mere nonlinear current voltage characteristics without discrete staircase. The experimental results agreed well with simulations based on the orthodox theory. The junction resistance showed thermally activated conduction behaviour at higher temperature. The overall voltage and temperature dependent results show that the transport behaviour of the large arrays of single particle devices obtained by a facile optical lithography and chemical etching process corresponds with the behaviour of single particle devices fabricated by other techniques like e-beam lithography and mechanical breaking methods.We report on the fabrication and single electron tunneling behaviour of large scale arrays of nanogap electrodes bridged by bisferrocene-gold nanoparticle hybrids (BFc-AuNP). Coulomb staircase was observed in the low temperature current-voltage curves measured on the junctions with asymmetric tunnel barriers. On the other hand, junctions with symmetric tunneling barrier exhibited mere nonlinear current voltage characteristics without discrete staircase. The experimental results agreed well with simulations based on the orthodox theory. The junction resistance showed thermally activated conduction behaviour at higher temperature. The overall voltage and temperature dependent results show that the transport behaviour of the large arrays of single particle devices obtained by a facile optical lithography and chemical etching process corresponds with the behaviour of single particle devices fabricated by other techniques like e-beam lithography and mechanical breaking methods. Electronic supplementary

  15. Opacity of Shock-Generated Argon Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王藩侯; 陈敬平; 周显明; 李西军; 经福谦; 孟续军; 孙永盛

    2001-01-01

    Argon plasmas with uniform density and temperature are generated by a planar shock wave through argon gas. The opacities of argon plasma, covering the thermodynamic states at temperatures of 1.4-2.2eV and in densities of 0.0083- 0.015 g/cm3, are investigated by measuring the emitted radiance versus time at several visible wavelengths. Comparison of the measured opacities with those calculated demonstrates that the average atom model can be used well to describe the essential transport behaviour of photons in argon plasma under the abovementioned thermodynamic condition. A simplified and self-consistent method to deduce the reflectivity R(λ) at the baseplate surface is applied. It demonstrates that the values of R(λ) are all around 0.4 in the experiments, which are basically in agreement with those given by Erskine previously (1994 J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat.Transfer 51 97).

  16. Clinical periodontics with the argon laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkbeiner, R. L.

    1995-04-01

    The argon laser has proven to be a valuable tool for the thermodynamic debridement of the periodontal lesion, incisions and tissue fusion. Illustrations of clinical applications and discussion of laser parameters will be provided.

  17. Emittance and Energy Diagnostics for Electron Beams with Large Momentum Spread

    CERN Document Server

    Olvegård, Maja; Thibaut, Lefevre; Enrico, Bravin

    Olvegård, M. 2013. Emittance and Energy Diagnostics for Electron Beams with Large Momentum Spread. Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis. Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Science and Technology 1036. 75 pp. Uppsala. ISBN 978-91-554-8646-4. Following the discovery of the Higgs-like boson at the Large Hadron Collider, there is demand for precision measurements on recent findings. The Compact Linear Collider, CLIC, is a candidate for a future linear electron-positron collider for such precision measurements. In CLIC, the beams will be brought to collisions in the multi-TeV regime through high gradient acceleration with high frequency RF power. A high intensity electron beam, the so-called drive beam, will serve as the power source for the main beam, as the drive beam is decelerated in special structures, from which power is extracted and transfered to the main beam. When the drive beam is decelerated the beam quality deteriorates and the momentum spread increases, which make...

  18. Argon Laser Photoablation for Postburn Conjunctival Pigmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong Joon Ahn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of an ocular burn injury from boiling water which resulted in conjunctival pigmentation, 1 week following injury. For cosmetic purposes, 2 sessions of argon laser photoablation were performed. One month after laser treatment, conjunctival pigmentation had been successfully removed and the patient was very satisfied with the results. Argon laser photoablation may be an effective way to remove postburn conjunctival pigmentation.

  19. Drift time measurement in the ATLAS liquid argon electromagnetic calorimeter using cosmic muons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aad..[], G.; Dam, Mogens; Hansen, Jørgen Beck

    2010-01-01

    The ionization signals in the liquid argon of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter are studied in detail using cosmic muons. In particular, the drift time of the ionization electrons is measured and used to assess the intrinsic uniformity of the calorimeter gaps and estimate its impact on the co......The ionization signals in the liquid argon of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter are studied in detail using cosmic muons. In particular, the drift time of the ionization electrons is measured and used to assess the intrinsic uniformity of the calorimeter gaps and estimate its impact...

  20. Evolution of precipitate in nickel-base alloy 718 irradiated with argon ions at elevated temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shuoxue; Luo, Fengfeng; Ma, Shuli; Chen, Jihong; Li, Tiecheng; Tang, Rui; Guo, Liping

    2013-07-01

    Alloy 718 is a nickel-base superalloy whose strength derives from γ'(Ni3(Al,Ti)) and γ″(Ni3Nb) precipitates. The evolution of the precipitates in alloy 718 irradiated with argon ions at elevated temperature were examined via transmission electron microscopy. Selected-area electron diffraction indicated superlattice spots disappeared after argon ion irradiation, which showing that the ordered structure of the γ' and γ″ precipitates became disordered. The size of the precipitates became smaller with the irradiation dose increasing at 290 °C.

  1. Attosecond time delay in valence photoionization and photorecombination of argon: a TDLDA study

    CERN Document Server

    Magrakvelidze, Maia; Dixit, Gopal; Ivanov, Misha; Chakraborty, Himadri S

    2015-01-01

    We determine and analyze the quantum phases and time delays in photoionization and photorecombination of valence 3p and 3s electrons of argon using the Kohn-Sham local density functional approach. The time-dependent local density approximation (TDLDA) is used to account for the electron correlation. Resulting attosecond Wigner-Smith time delays show excellent agreements with two recent independent experiments on argon that measured the relative 3s-3p time delay in photoionization [Physical Review Letters {\\bf 106}, 143002 (2011)] and the delay in 3p photorecombination [Physical Review Letters {\\bf 112}, 153002 (2014)

  2. Detection of Steel Fatigue Cracks with Strain Sensing Sheets Based on Large Area Electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Yao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Reliable early-stage damage detection requires continuous monitoring over large areas of structure, and with sensors of high spatial resolution. Technologies based on Large Area Electronics (LAE can enable direct sensing and can be scaled to the level required for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM of civil structures and infrastructure. Sensing sheets based on LAE contain dense arrangements of thin-film strain sensors, associated electronics and various control circuits deposited and integrated on a flexible polyimide substrate that can cover large areas of structures. This paper presents the development stage of a prototype strain sensing sheet based on LAE for crack detection and localization. Two types of sensing-sheet arrangements with size 6 × 6 inch (152 × 152 mm were designed and manufactured, one with a very dense arrangement of sensors and the other with a less dense arrangement of sensors. The sensing sheets were bonded to steel plates, which had a notch on the boundary, so the fatigue cracks could be generated under cyclic loading. The sensors within the sensing sheet that were close to the notch tip successfully detected the initialization of fatigue crack and localized the damage on the plate. The sensors that were away from the crack successfully detected the propagation of fatigue cracks based on the time history of the measured strain. The results of the tests have validated the general principles of the proposed sensing sheets for crack detection and identified advantages and challenges of the two tested designs.

  3. Detection of steel fatigue cracks with strain sensing sheets based on large area electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yao; Glisic, Branko

    2015-04-07

    Reliable early-stage damage detection requires continuous monitoring over large areas of structure, and with sensors of high spatial resolution. Technologies based on Large Area Electronics (LAE) can enable direct sensing and can be scaled to the level required for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) of civil structures and infrastructure. Sensing sheets based on LAE contain dense arrangements of thin-film strain sensors, associated electronics and various control circuits deposited and integrated on a flexible polyimide substrate that can cover large areas of structures. This paper presents the development stage of a prototype strain sensing sheet based on LAE for crack detection and localization. Two types of sensing-sheet arrangements with size 6 × 6 inch (152 × 152 mm) were designed and manufactured, one with a very dense arrangement of sensors and the other with a less dense arrangement of sensors. The sensing sheets were bonded to steel plates, which had a notch on the boundary, so the fatigue cracks could be generated under cyclic loading. The sensors within the sensing sheet that were close to the notch tip successfully detected the initialization of fatigue crack and localized the damage on the plate. The sensors that were away from the crack successfully detected the propagation of fatigue cracks based on the time history of the measured strain. The results of the tests have validated the general principles of the proposed sensing sheets for crack detection and identified advantages and challenges of the two tested designs.

  4. Power Electronic Drives, Controls, and Electric Generators for Large Wind Turbines - An Overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke; Tutelea, L.; Boldea, Ion

    2015-01-01

    Wind represents a major and growing source of renewable energy for the electric power systems. This article provides an overview of state-of-the-art technologies and anticipated developments in the area of power electronic drives, controls, and electric generators for large multi-megawatt wind...... of power electronics, ranging from devices to circuit topologies, and similar matters for electric generators, together with results of optimal design studies are included. It is shown that the individual power rating of wind turbines has increased over the years, and technologies required to reach...... turbine systems. The principal components employed in a turbine for energy conversion from wind to electricity are described, and the main solutions that are commercially available are briefly reviewed. The specific issues of complex mission profiles, power codes, and reliability are discussed. Topics...

  5. Broadband microwave measurement of electron temperature of a large coaxial gridded hollow cathode helium plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ruilin; Yuan, Chengxun; Jia, Jieshu; Zhou, Zhong-Xiang; Wang, Ying; Wang, Xiaoou; Li, Hui; Wu, Jian

    2016-10-01

    This paper reports a new kind of large coaxial gridded hollow cathode discharge at low pressure in a helium atmosphere. A method is presented to determine the electron temperature by measuring the broadband microwave properties; typically, the frequency band extends from 2 to 12 GHz. The method involves positioning the discharge device between the two antenna ports to measure the scattering parameter using a network analyzer. For a weak ionized plasma, this method is stable over the entire frequency range. A microwave signal loss of 0.27-37.83 dB was measured within the frequency range. Based on the measured attenuation of the microwaves, the electron temperature was estimated to range from 1.6-4.6 eV under different conditions, which showed good agreements with the results of Langmuir Probe measurements.

  6. A polarized window for left-right symmetry at the Large Hadron-Electron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mondal, Subhadeep

    2015-01-01

    The breaking of parity, a fundamental symmetry between left and right is best understood in the framework of left-right symmetric extension of the standard model. We show that the production of a heavy right-handed neutrino at the proposed Large Hadron-Electron Collider (LHeC) could give us the most simple and direct hint of the scale of this breaking in left-right symmetric theories. This production mode gives a lepton number violating signal with $\\Delta L=2$ which is very clean and has practically no standard model background. We highlight that the right-handed nature of $W_R$ exchange which defines the left-right symmetric theories can be confirmed by using a polarized electron beam and also enhance the production rates with relatively lower beam energy.

  7. Measurement of separate cosmic-ray electron and positron spectra with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Ackermann, M; Allafort, A; Baldini, L; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bouvier, A; Bregeon, J; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Dermer, C D; Digel, S W; Silva, E do Couto e; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Ferrara, E C; Focke, W B; Fortin, P; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Germani, S; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grove, J E; Guiriec, S; Gustafsson, M; Hadasch, D; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hughes, R E; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Knödlseder, J; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Garde, M Llena; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nakamori, T; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Ormes, E Orlando J F; Ozaki, M; Paneque, D; Parent, D; Pesce-Rollins, M; Pierbattista, M; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Romani, R W; Roth, M; Sadrozinski, H F -W; Sbarra, C; Schalk, T L; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Strong, A W; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J G; Thayer, J B; Tibaldo, L; Tinivella, M; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Troja, E; Uchiyama, Y; Usher, T L; Vandenbroucke, J; Vasileiou, V; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Wood, M; Yang, Z; Zimmer, S

    2011-01-01

    We measured separate cosmic-ray electron and positron spectra with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Because the instrument does not have an onboard magnet, we distinguish the two species by exploiting the Earth's shadow, which is offset in opposite directions for opposite charges due to the Earth's magnetic field. We estimate and subtract the cosmic-ray proton background using two different methods that produce consistent results. We report the electron-only spectrum, the positron-only spectrum, and the positron fraction between 20 GeV and 200 GeV. We confirm that the fraction rises with energy in the 20--100 GeV range and determine for the first time that it continues to rise between 100 and 200 GeV.

  8. Flush-mounted probe diagnostics for argon glow discharge plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Liang, E-mail: xld02345@mail.ustc.edu.cn; Cao, Jinxiang; Liu, Yu; Wang, Jian; Du, Yinchang; Zheng, Zhe; Zhang, Xiao; Wang, Pi [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Zhang, Jin; Li, Xiao; Qin, Yongqiang; Zhao, Liang [Science and Technology on Space Physics Laboratory, Beijing 100076 (China)

    2014-09-15

    A comparison is made between plasma parameters measured by a flush-mounted probe (FP) and a cylindrical probe (CP) in argon glow discharge plasma. Parameters compared include the space potential, the plasma density, and the effective electron temperature. It is found that the ion density determined by the FP agrees well with the electron density determined by the CP in the quasi-neutral plasma to better than 10%. Moreover, the space potential and effective electron temperature calculated from electron energy distribution function measured by the FP is consistent with that measured by the CP over the operated discharge current and pressure ranges. These results present the FP can be used as a reliable diagnostic tool in the stable laboratory plasma and also be anticipated to be applied in other complicated plasmas, such as tokamaks, the region of boundary-layer, and so on.

  9. Antenna Electronics Concept for the Next-Generation Very Large Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, Anthony J.; Jackson, Jim; Selina, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), in collaboration with its international partners, completed two major projects over the past decade: the sensitivity upgrade for the Karl Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and the construction of the Atacama Large Millimeter/Sub-Millimeter Array (ALMA). The NRAO is now considering the scientific potential and technical feasibility of a next-generation VLA (ngVLA) with an emphasis on thermal imaging at milli-arcsecond resolution. The preliminary goals for the ngVLA are to increase both the system sensitivity and angular resolution of the VLA tenfold and to cover a frequency range of 1.2-116 GHz.A number of key technical challenges have been identified for the project. These include cost-effective antenna manufacturing (in the hundreds), suitable wide-band feed and receiver designs, broad-band data transmission, and large-N correlators. Minimizing the overall operations cost is also a fundamental design requirement.The designs of the antenna electronics, reference distribution system, and data transmission system are anticipated to be major construction and operations cost drivers for the facility. The electronics must achieve a high level of performance, while maintaining low operation and maintenance costs and a high level of reliability. Additionally, due to the uncertainty in the feasibility of wideband receivers, advancements in digitizer technology, and budget constraints, the hardware system architecture should be scalable to the number of receiver bands and the speed and resolution of available digitizers.Here, we present the projected performance requirements of the ngVLA, a proposed block diagram for the instrument’s electronics systems, parameter tradeoffs within the system specifications, and areas of technical risk where technical advances may be required for successful production and installation.

  10. Potassium-argon/argon-40-argon-39 geochronology of Cenozoic alkali basalts from the South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Quanshu; SHI Xuefa; YANG Yaomin; WANG Kunshan

    2008-01-01

    Based on the isotopic chronologic results of Cenozoic alkali basalts from the South China Sea,the characteristics of volcanic activi-ty of the South China Sea after spreading were studied.The potassium - argon ages of eight alkali basalt samples from the South China Sea,and the argon - argon ages of two samples among them are reported.Apparent ages of the whole rock are 3.80 to 7.91 Ma with an average value of 5.43 Ma (potassium- argon,whole rock),and there is little difference among samples at the same location,e.g.,4.76~5.78 Ma for location S04-12.The argon - argon ages for the two samples are 6.06 and 4.71 Ma,which lie within the age scope of potassium - argon method.The dating results indicate that rock-forming age is from late Miocene to Pli-ocene,which is consistent with erupting event for alkali basalts from adjacent regions of the South China Sea.Volcanic activities occur after the cessation of spreading of the South China Sea,which are controlled by lithospheric fault and the spreading center formed during the spreading period of the South China Sea.These dating results,combined with geochemical characteristics of these basalts,the published chronological data for the South China Sea and its adjacent regions,and the updated geophysical data near Hainan Island,suggest that after the cessation of spreading of the South China Sea,there occur widely distributing magmatic activities which primarily is alkali basalt,and the volcanic activity continues to Quaternary.The activity may be relative to Hainan mantle plume originated from core/mantle boundary.

  11. Space-charge effects in liquid argon ionization chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherfoord, J. P.; Walker, R. B.

    2015-03-01

    We have uniformly irradiated liquid argon ionization chambers with betas from high-activity 90Sr sources. The radiation environment is similar to that in the liquid argon calorimeters which are part of the ATLAS detector installed at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We measured the resulting ionization current over a wide range of applied potential for two different source activities and for three different chamber gaps. These studies provide operating experience at exceptionally high ionization rates. In particular they indicate a stability at the 0.1% level for these calorimeters over years of operation at the full LHC luminosity when operated in the normal mode at an electric field E = 1.0 kV / mm. We can operate these chambers in the normal mode or in the space-charge limited regime and thereby determine the transition point between the two. This transition point is parameterized by a positive argon ion mobility of μ+ = 0.08 ± 0.02mm2 / V s at a temperature of 88.0±0.5 K and at a pressure of 1.02±0.02 bar. In the space-charge limited regime the ionization currents are degraded and show signs of instability. At the highest electric fields in our study (6.7 kV/mm) the ionization current is still slowly rising with increasing electric field.

  12. The two-photon exchange contribution to elastic electron-nucleon scattering at large momentum transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei V. Afanasev; Stanley J. Brodsky; Carl E. Carlson; Yu-Chun Chen; Marc Vanderhaeghen

    2005-01-01

    We estimate the two-photon exchange contribution to elastic electron-proton scattering at large momentum transfer by using a quark-parton representation of virtual Compton scattering. We thus can relate the two-photon exchange amplitude to the generalized parton distributions which also enter in other wide angle scattering processes. We find that the interference of one- and two-photon exchange contribution is able to substantially resolve the difference between electric form factor measurements from Rosenbluth and polarization transfer experiments.

  13. The Silicon Tracker Readout Electronics of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldini, Luca; Brez, Alessandro; Himel, Thomas; Hirayama, Masaharu; Johnson, R.P.; Kroeger, Wilko; Latronico, Luca; Minuti, Massimo; Nelson, David; Rando, Riccardo; Sadrozinski, H.F.-W.; Sgro, Carmelo; Spandre, Gloria; Spencer, E.N.; Sugizaki, Mutsumi; Tajima, Hiro; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann; Ziegler, Marcus; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /SLAC /Maryland

    2006-02-27

    A unique electronics system has been built and tested for reading signals from the silicon-strip detectors of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope mission. The system amplifies and processes signals from 884,736 36-cm strips using only 160 W of power, and it achieves close to 100% detection efficiency with noise occupancy sufficiently low to allow it to self trigger. The design of the readout system is described, and results are presented from ground-based testing of the completed detector system.

  14. Investigation of induced radioactivity in the CERN Large Electron Positron collider for its decommissioning

    CERN Document Server

    Silari, Marco

    2004-01-01

    The future installation of the Large Hadron Collider in the tunnel formerly housing the Large Electron Positron collider (LEP) required the dismantling of the latter after 11-year operation. As required by the French legislation, an extensive theoretical study was conducted before decommissioning to establish the possible activation paths both in the accelerator and in the four experiments (L3, ALEPH, OPAL and DELPHI) installed around the ring. The aim was to define which areas may contain activated material and which ones would be completely free of activation. The four major sources of activation in LEP, i.e., distributed and localized beam losses, synchrotron radiation and the super-conducting RF cavities, were investigated. Conversion coefficients from unit lost beam power to induced specific activity were established for a number of materials. A similar study was conducted for the four experiments, evaluating the four potential sources of induced radioactivity, namely e**+e **- annihilation events, two-p...

  15. Electron cyclotron emission measurements by means of a grating polychromator on the Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vries, P.C. de; Kawahata, K.; Nagayama, Y.; Inagaki, S.; Sasao, H.; Ito, Y. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    The electron cyclotron emission (ECE) spectrum at the Large Helical Device (LHD) is measured by a 14-channel grating polychromator. During standard operation the polychromator monitors 2nd harmonic frequencies (100-150 GHz) with a spectral resolution of 1.5 GHz. At sufficient high density the 2nd harmonic X-mode polarization is optically thick and can be used to determine the temperature profile. However, the large magnetic field shear in LHD affects the ECE polarization. This effect has been studied numerically. The wave polarization was found to rotate in the laboratory frame. Experiments have been carried out by means of a polarization rotator in the diagnostic waveguide system, which confirmed the calculations. By a proper setting of the polarization rotator, the rotation can be corrected and pure X-mode is detected. Temperature profiles have been measured successfully by the polychromator. (author)

  16. Coherent and incoherent Thomson scattering on an argon/hydrogen microwave plasma torch with transient behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrusník, A.; Synek, P.; Hübner, S.; van der Mullen, J. J. A. M.; Zajíčková, L.; Nijdam, S.

    2016-10-01

    A new method of processing time-integrated coherent Thomson scattering spectra is presented, which provides not only the electron density and temperature but also information about the transient behaviour of the plasma. Therefore, it is an alternative to single-shot Thomson scattering measurements as long as the scattering is coherent. The method is applied to a microwave plasma torch operating in argon or a mixture of argon with hydrogen at atmospheric pressure. Electron densities up to 8\\cdot {{10}21} m-3 (ionization degree above 10-3) were observed, which is more than two times higher than presented in earlier works on comparable discharges. Additionally, a parametric study with respect to the argon/hydrogen ratio and the input power was carried out and the results are discussed together with earlier Stark broadening measurements on the same plasma.

  17. Ionic Wind Phenomenon and Charge Carrier Mobility in Very High Density Argon Corona Discharge Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, M.; Bonifaci, N.; Denat, A.

    2014-04-01

    Wind ions phenomenon has been observed in the high density argon corona discharge plasma. Corona discharge plasma was produced by point to plane electrodes and high voltage DC. Light emission from the recombination process was observed visually. The light emission proper follow the electric field lines that occur between point and plane electrodes. By using saturation current, the mobilities of non-thermal electrons and ions have been obtained in argon gas and liquid with variation of density from 2,5 1021 to 2 1022 cm-3. In the case of ions, we found that the behaviour of the apparent mobility inversely proportional to the density or follow the Langevin variation law. For non-thermal electron, mobility decreases and approximately follows a variation of Langevin type until the density <= 0,25 the critical density of argon.

  18. Argon Collection And Purification For Proliferation Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achey, R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hunter, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-09

    In order to determine whether a seismic event was a declared/undeclared underground nuclear weapon test, environmental samples must be taken and analyzed for signatures that are unique to a nuclear explosion. These signatures are either particles or gases. Particle samples are routinely taken and analyzed under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) verification regime as well as by individual countries. Gas samples are analyzed for signature gases, especially radioactive xenon. Underground nuclear tests also produce radioactive argon, but that signature is not well monitored. A radioactive argon signature, along with other signatures, can more conclusively determine whether an event was a nuclear test. This project has developed capabilities for collecting and purifying argon samples for ultra-low-background proportional counting. SRNL has developed a continuous gas enrichment system that produces an output stream containing 97% argon from whole air using adsorbent separation technology (the flow diagram for the system is shown in the figure). The vacuum swing adsorption (VSA) enrichment system is easily scalable to produce ten liters or more of 97% argon within twelve hours. A gas chromatographic separation using a column of modified hydrogen mordenite molecular sieve has been developed that can further purify the sample to better than 99% purity after separation from the helium carrier gas. The combination of these concentration and purification systems has the capability of being used for a field-deployable system for collecting argon samples suitable for ultra-low-background proportional counting for detecting nuclear detonations under the On-Site Inspection program of the CTBTO verification regime. The technology also has applications for the bulk argon separation from air for industrial purposes such as the semi-conductor industry.

  19. Application of backscatter electrons for large area imaging of cavities produced by neutron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastukhov, V. I.; Averin, S. A.; Panchenko, V. L.; Portnykh, I. A.; Freyer, P. D.; Giannuzzi, L. A.; Garner, F. A.

    2016-11-01

    It is shown that with proper optimization, backscattered electrons in a scanning electron microscope can produce images of cavity distribution in austenitic steels over a large specimen surface for a depth of ∼500-700 nm, eliminating the need for electropolishing or multiple specimen production. This technique is especially useful for quantifying cavity structures when the specimen is known or suspected to contain very heterogeneous distributions of cavities. Examples are shown for cold-worked EK-164, a very heterogeneously-swelling Russian fast reactor fuel cladding steel and also for AISI 304, a homogeneously-swelling Western steel used for major structural components of light water cooled reactors. This non-destructive overview method of quantifying cavity distribution can be used to direct the location and number of required focused ion beam prepared transmission electron microscopy specimens for examination of either neutron or ion-irradiated specimens. This technique can also be applied in stereo mode to quantify the depth dependence of cavity distributions.

  20. Cryogenic Studies for the Proposed CERN Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC)

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, F

    2011-01-01

    The LHeC (Large Hadron electron Collider) is a proposed future colliding beam facility for lepton-nucleon scattering particle physics at CERN. A new 60 GeV electron accelerator will be added to the existing 27 km circumference 7 TeV LHC for collisions of electrons with protons and heavy ions. Two basic design options are being pursued. The first is a circular accelerator housed in the existing LHC tunnel which is referred to as the "Ring-Ring" version. Low field normal conducting magnets guide the particle beam while superconducting (SC) RF cavities cooled to 2 K are installed at two opposite locations at the LHC tunnel to accelerate the beams. For this version in addition a 10 GeV re-circulating SC injector will be installed. In total four refrigerators with cooling capacities between 1.2 kW and 3 kW @ 4.5 K are needed. The second option, referred to as the "Linac-Ring" version consists of a race-track re-circulating energy-recovery type machine with two 1 km long straight acceleration sections. The 944 hi...

  1. The Atmospheric Remote-sensing Infrared Exoplanets Large-survey (ARIEL) payload electronic subsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focardi, M.; Pace, E.; Colomé, J.; Ribas, I.; Rataj, M.; Ottensamer, R.; Farina, M.; Di Giorgio, A. M.; Wawer, P.; Pancrazzi, M.; Noce, V.; Pezzuto, S.; Morgante, G.; Artigues, B.; Sierra-Roig, C.; Gesa, L.; Eccleston, P.; Crook, M.; Micela, G.

    2016-07-01

    The ARIEL mission has been proposed to ESA by an European Consortium as the first space mission to extensively perform remote sensing on the atmospheres of a well defined set of warm and hot transiting gas giant exoplanets, whose temperature range between ~600 K and 3000 K. ARIEL will observe a large number (~500) of warm and hot transiting gas giants, Neptunes and super-Earths around a range of host star types using transit spectroscopy in the ~2-8 μm spectral range and broad-band photometry in the NIR and optical. ARIEL will target planets hotter than 600 K to take advantage of their well-mixed atmospheres, which should show minimal condensation and sequestration of high-Z materials and thus reveal their bulk and elemental composition. One of the major motivations for exoplanet characterisation is to understand the probability of occurrence of habitable worlds, i.e. suitable for surface liquid water. While ARIEL will not study habitable planets, its major contribution to this topic will results from its capability to detect the presence of atmospheres on many terrestrial planets outside the habitable zone and, in many cases, characterise them. This represents a fundamental breakthrough in understanding the physical and chemical processes of a large sample of exoplanets atmospheres as well as their bulk properties and to probe in-space technology. The ARIEL infrared spectrometer (AIRS) provides data on the atmospheric composition; these data are acquired and processed by an On-Board Data Handling (OBDH) system including the Cold Front End Electronics (CFEE) and the Instrument Control Unit (ICU). The Telescope Control Unit (TCU) is also included inside the ICU. The latter is directly connected to the Control and Data Management Unit (CDMU) on board the Service Module (SVM). The general hardware architecture and the application software of the ICU are described. The Fine Guidance Sensor (FGS) electronics and the Cooler Control Electronics are also presented.

  2. Attenuation of vacuum ultraviolet light in liquid argon

    CERN Document Server

    Neumeier, A; Oberauer, L; Potzel, W; Schönert, S; Dandl, T; Heindl, T; Ulrich, A; Wieser, J

    2015-01-01

    The transmission of liquid argon has been measured, wavelength resolved, for a wavelength interval from 118 to 250 nm. The wavelength dependent attenuation length is presented for pure argon. It is shown that no universal wavelength independent attenuation length can be assigned to liquid argon for its own fluorescence light due to the interplay between the wavelength dependent emission and absorption. A decreasing transmission is observed below 130 nm in both chemically cleaned and distilled liquid argon and assigned to absorption by the analogue of the first argon excimer continuum. For not perfectly cleaned argon a strong influence of impurities on the transmission is observed. Two strong absorption bands at 126.5 and 141.0 nm with approximately 2 and 4 nm width, respectively, are assigned to traces of xenon in argon. A broad absorption region below 180 nm is found for unpurified argon and tentatively attributed to the presence of water in the argon sample.

  3. Sensing sheets based on large area electronics for fatigue crack detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yao; Glisic, Branko

    2015-03-01

    Reliable early-stage damage detection requires continuous structural health monitoring (SHM) over large areas of structure, and with high spatial resolution of sensors. This paper presents the development stage of prototype strain sensing sheets based on Large Area Electronics (LAE), in which thin-film strain gauges and control circuits are integrated on the flexible electronics and deposited on a polyimide sheet that can cover large areas. These sensing sheets were applied for fatigue crack detection on small-scale steel plates. Two types of sensing-sheet interconnects were designed and manufactured, and dense arrays of strain gauge sensors were assembled onto the interconnects. In total, four (two for each design type) strain sensing sheets were created and tested, which were sensitive to strain at virtually every point over the whole sensing sheet area. The sensing sheets were bonded to small-scale steel plates, which had a notch on the boundary so that fatigue cracks could be generated under cyclic loading. The fatigue tests were carried out at the Carleton Laboratory of Columbia University, and the steel plates were attached through a fixture to the loading machine that applied cyclic fatigue load. Fatigue cracks then occurred and propagated across the steel plates, leading to the failure of these test samples. The strain sensor that was close to the notch successfully detected the initialization of fatigue crack and localized the damage on the plate. The strain sensor that was away from the crack successfully detected the propagation of fatigue crack based on the time history of measured strain. Overall, the results of the fatigue tests validated general principles of the strain sensing sheets for crack detection.

  4. Kinetic modeling of the Townsend breakdown in argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macheret, S. O.; Shneider, M. N. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, D-414 Engineering Quadrangle, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Kinetic modeling of the Townsend breakdown in argon was performed in the “forward-back” approximation. The kinetic model was found to adequately describe the left branch of the Paschen curve, and the important role of ionization by fast ions and atoms near the cathode, as well as the increase in secondary emission coefficient in strong electric fields described in the literature, was confirmed. The modeling also showed that the electron energy distribution function develops a beam of high-energy electrons and that the runaway effect, i.e., the monotonic increase of the mean electron energy with the distance from the cathode, occurs at the left branch of the Paschen curve.

  5. Spectral Analysis and Metastable Absorption Measurements of High Pressure Capacitively and Inductively Coupled Radio-Frequency Argon-Helium Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    states. The non -statistical nature implies either the equilibrium kinetics of the argon and electrons in the discharge are non - Maxwellian , the pop...and is shown in Figure 16. The clearly non - Maxwellian nature of the population distribution and the exclusion of the higher lying states are the...approaches the non - Maxwellian production and destruction rates of of the argon states in the discharge and is forcing them into a Boltzmann

  6. An "Electronic Fluorescent Pictograph" browser for exploring and analyzing large-scale biological data sets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie Winter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The exploration of microarray data and data from other high-throughput projects for hypothesis generation has become a vital aspect of post-genomic research. For the non-bioinformatics specialist, however, many of the currently available tools provide overwhelming amounts of data that are presented in a non-intuitive way. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to facilitate the interpretation and analysis of microarray data and data from other large-scale data sets, we have developed a tool, which we have dubbed the electronic Fluorescent Pictograph - or eFP - Browser, available at http://www.bar.utoronto.ca/, for exploring microarray and other data for hypothesis generation. This eFP Browser engine paints data from large-scale data sets onto pictographic representations of the experimental samples used to generate the data sets. We give examples of using the tool to present Arabidopsis gene expression data from the AtGenExpress Consortium (Arabidopsis eFP Browser, data for subcellular localization of Arabidopsis proteins (Cell eFP Browser, and mouse tissue atlas microarray data (Mouse eFP Browser. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The eFP Browser software is easily adaptable to microarray or other large-scale data sets from any organism and thus should prove useful to a wide community for visualizing and interpreting these data sets for hypothesis generation.

  7. GPU-accelerated brain connectivity reconstruction and visualization in large-scale electron micrographs

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, Wonki

    2011-01-01

    This chapter introduces a GPU-accelerated interactive, semiautomatic axon segmentation and visualization system. Two challenging problems have been addressed: the interactive 3D axon segmentation and the interactive 3D image filtering and rendering of implicit surfaces. The reconstruction of neural connections to understand the function of the brain is an emerging and active research area in neuroscience. With the advent of high-resolution scanning technologies, such as 3D light microscopy and electron microscopy (EM), reconstruction of complex 3D neural circuits from large volumes of neural tissues has become feasible. Among them, only EM data can provide sufficient resolution to identify synapses and to resolve extremely narrow neural processes. These high-resolution, large-scale datasets pose challenging problems, for example, how to process and manipulate large datasets to extract scientifically meaningful information using a compact representation in a reasonable processing time. The running time of the multiphase level set segmentation method has been measured on the CPU and GPU. The CPU version is implemented using the ITK image class and the ITK distance transform filter. The numerical part of the CPU implementation is similar to the GPU implementation for fair comparison. The main focus of this chapter is introducing the GPU algorithms and their implementation details, which are the core components of the interactive segmentation and visualization system. © 2011 Copyright © 2011 NVIDIA Corporation and Wen-mei W. Hwu Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved..

  8. Large Gas Electron Multiplier Trackers for Super Bigbite Spectrometer at Jefferson lab Hall A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenboonruang, K.; Gnanvo, K.; Liyanage, N.; Nelyubin, V.; Sacher, S.; Cisbani, E.; Musico, P.; Wojtsekhowski, B.

    2013-04-01

    The 12 GeV upgrade at Jefferson Lab (JLAB) makes many exciting nuclear experiments possible. These experiments also require new high performance instrumentation. The Super Bigbite Spectrometer (SBS) was proposed to perform a series of high precision nucleon form factor experiments at large momentum transfer. The SBS will be capable of operating at a very high luminosity and provide a large solid angle acceptance of 76 msr. SBS will be equipped with a double focal plane polarimeter. Thus, SBS will have three large trackers made of Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) chambers. The first, second, and third trackers will consist of six, four, and four tracking layers respectively. When completed in 2017, the SBS GEM trackers will form one of the largest sets of GEM chambers in the world. The GEM trackers allow the SBS to operate under high background rates over 500 kHz/cm^2, while providing an excellent spatial resolution of 70 μm. The first tracker will be constructed at the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare in Italy, while the second and third trackers will be built at the University of Virginia. In 2012, the first UVa SBS GEM chamber prototype was successfully constructed and tested. The GEM chamber construction details and test results will be presented in this talk.

  9. Test beam results of a stereo preshower integrated in the liquid argon accordion calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, R; Greenious, G; Kitching, P; Olsen, B; Pinfold, James L; Rodning, N L; Boos, E; Zhautykov, B O; Aubert, Bernard; Bazan, A; Beaugiraud, B; Boniface, J; Colas, Jacques; Eynard, G; Jézéquel, S; Le Flour, T; Linossier, O; Nicoleau, S; Sauvage, G; Thion, J; Van den Plas, D; Wingerter-Seez, I; Zitoun, R; Zolnierowski, Y; Chmeissani, M; Fernández, E; Garrido, L; Martínez, M; Padilla, C; Citterio, M; Gordon, H A; Lissauer, D; Ma, H; Makowiecki, D S; Radeka, V; Rahm, David Charles; Rescia, S; Stephani, D; Takai, H; Baisin, L; Berset, J C; Chevalley, J L; Gianotti, F; Gildemeister, O; Marin, C P; Nessi, Marzio; Poggioli, Luc; Richter, W; Vuillemin, V; Baze, J M; Delagnes, E; Gosset, L G; Lavocat, P; Lottin, J P; Mansoulié, B; Meyer, J P; Renardy, J F; Schwindling, J; Simion, S; Taguet, J P; Teiger, J; Walter, C; Collot, J; de Saintignon, P; Hostachy, J Y; Mahout, G; Barreiro, F; Del Peso, J; García, J; Hervás, L; Labarga, L; Romero, P; Scheel, C V; Chekhtman, A; Cousinou, M C; Dargent, P; Dinkespiler, B; Etienne, F; Fassnacht, P; Fouchez, D; Martin, L; Miotto, A; Monnier, E; Nagy, E; Olivetto, C; Tisserant, S; Battistoni, G; Camin, D V; Cavalli, D; Costa, G; Cozzi, L; Fedyakin, N N; Ferrari, A; Mandelli, L; Mazzanti, M; Perini, L; Resconi, S; Sala, P R; Beaudoin, G; Depommier, P; León-Florián, E; Leroy, C; Roy, P; Augé, E; Breton, D; Chase, Robert L; Chollet, J C; de La Taille, C; Fayard, Louis; Fournier, D; González, J; Hrisoho, A T; Jacquier, Y; Merkel, B; Nikolic, I A; Noppe, J M; Parrour, G; Pétroff, P; Puzo, P; Richer, J P; Schaffer, A C; Seguin-Moreau, N; Serin, L; Tisserand, V; Veillet, J J; Vichou, I; Canton, B; David, J; Genat, J F; Imbault, D; Le Dortz, O; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Schwemling, P; Eek, L O; Lund-Jensen, B; Söderqvist, J; Astbury, Alan; Keeler, Richard K; Lefebvre, M; Robertson, S; White, J

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the construction of an integrated preshower within the RD3 liquid argon accordion calorimeter. It has a stereo view which enables the measurement of two transverse coordinates. The prototype was tested at CERN with electrons, photons and muons to validate its capability to work at LHC ( Energy resolution, impact point resolution, angular resolution, $\\pi^o$/$\\gamma$ rejection ).

  10. Low energy (e,2e) ionization of Argon in the equal energy sharing geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Mazevet, S; Langlois, J M; Tweed, R J; Robaux, O; Tannous, C; Fakhreddine, K

    2002-01-01

    Quantum Defect theory is a well established theoretical concept in modern spectroscopy. We show that this approach is useful in electron impact ionization problems where state of the art theoretical methods are presently restricted mostly to simple atomic targets. For the well documented Argon ionization case in equal energy sharing geometry the approach suggested leads to significant improvements compared to previous calculations.

  11. Low-Temperature Positive Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry of Neat and Argon-Diluted Organic Solids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkman, Harry T.; Michl, Josef; King, Robert N.; Andrade, Joseph D.

    1978-01-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry of neat solid propane, n-pentane, benzene, toluene, and of propane imbedded in an argon matrix were observed at temperatures varying from 10 to 110 K and show fragmentation patterns similar to those known from ordinary electron impact mass spectrometry. The effects of

  12. Efficient preconditioning of the electronic structure problem in large scale ab initio molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiffmann, Florian; VandeVondele, Joost, E-mail: Joost.VandeVondele@mat.ethz.ch [Nanoscale Simulations, Department of Materials, ETH Zürich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Str. 27, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2015-06-28

    We present an improved preconditioning scheme for electronic structure calculations based on the orbital transformation method. First, a preconditioner is developed which includes information from the full Kohn-Sham matrix but avoids computationally demanding diagonalisation steps in its construction. This reduces the computational cost of its construction, eliminating a bottleneck in large scale simulations, while maintaining rapid convergence. In addition, a modified form of Hotelling’s iterative inversion is introduced to replace the exact inversion of the preconditioner matrix. This method is highly effective during molecular dynamics (MD), as the solution obtained in earlier MD steps is a suitable initial guess. Filtering small elements during sparse matrix multiplication leads to linear scaling inversion, while retaining robustness, already for relatively small systems. For system sizes ranging from a few hundred to a few thousand atoms, which are typical for many practical applications, the improvements to the algorithm lead to a 2-5 fold speedup per MD step.

  13. Large-scale all-electron density functional theory calculations using an enriched finite element basis

    CERN Document Server

    Kanungo, Bikash

    2016-01-01

    We present a computationally efficient approach to perform large-scale all-electron density functional theory calculations by enriching the classical finite element basis with compactly supported atom-centered numerical basis functions that are constructed from the solution of the Kohn-Sham (KS) problem for single atoms. We term these numerical basis functions as enrichment functions, and the resultant basis as the enriched finite element basis. The enrichment functions are compactly supported through the use of smooth cutoff functions, which enhances the conditioning and maintains the locality of the basis. The integrals involved in the evaluation of the discrete KS Hamiltonian and overlap matrix in the enriched finite element basis are computed using an adaptive quadrature grid based on the characteristics of enrichment functions. Further, we propose an efficient scheme to invert the overlap matrix by using a block-wise matrix inversion in conjunction with special reduced-order quadrature rules to transform...

  14. Large area stress distribution in crystalline materials calculated from lattice deformation identified by electron backscatter diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yongliang; Zhang, Lei; Hao, Xiaopeng; Wu, Yongzhong; Dai, Yuanbin; Tian, Yuan; Huo, Qin

    2014-08-05

    We report a method to obtain the stress of crystalline materials directly from lattice deformation by Hooke's law. The lattice deformation was calculated using the crystallographic orientations obtained from electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technology. The stress distribution over a large area was obtained efficiently and accurately using this method. Wurtzite structure gallium nitride (GaN) crystal was used as the example of a hexagonal crystal system. With this method, the stress distribution of a GaN crystal was obtained. Raman spectroscopy was used to verify the stress distribution. The cause of the stress distribution found in the GaN crystal was discussed from theoretical analysis and EBSD data. Other properties related to lattice deformation, such as piezoelectricity, can also be analyzed by this novel approach based on EBSD data.

  15. Large-Scale Electron Microscopy Maps of Patient Skin and Mucosa Provide Insight into Pathogenesis of Blistering Diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sokol, Ena; Kramer, Duco; Diercks, Gilles F. H.; Kuipers, Jeroen; Jonkman, Marcel F.; Pas, Hendri H.; Giepmans, Ben N. G.

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale electron microscopy ("nanotomy") allows straight forward ultrastructural examination of tissue, cells, organelles, and macromolecules in a single data set. Such data set equals thousands of conventional electron microscopy images and is freely accessible (www.nanotomy.org). The software

  16. Left-Right Symmetry and Lepton Number Violation at the Large Hadron Electron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Lindner, Manfred; Rodejohann, Werner; Yaguna, Carlos E

    2016-01-01

    We show that the proposed Large Hadron electron Collider (LHeC) will provide a great opportunity to search for left-right symmetry and establish lepton number violation, complementing current and planned searches based on LHC data and neutrinoless double beta decay. We consider several plausible configurations for the LHeC -- including different electron energies and polarizations, as well as distinct values for the charge misidentification rate. Within left-right symmetric theories we determine the values of right-handed neutrino and gauge boson masses that could be tested at the LHeC after one, five and ten years of operation. Our results indicate that this collider might probe, via the $\\Delta L =2$ signal $e^-p\\to e^+jjj$, Majorana neutrino masses up to $1$ TeV and $W_R$ masses up to $\\sim 6.5$ TeV. Interestingly, part of this parameter space is beyond the expected reach of the LHC and of future neutrinoless double beta decay experiments.

  17. Inner-shell Annihilation of Positrons in Argon, Iron and Copper Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Abdel-Raouf, M A; El-Bakry, S Y

    2007-01-01

    The annihilation parameters of positrons with electrons in different shells of Argon, Iron and Copper atoms are calculated below the positronium (Ps) formation thresholds. Quite accurate ab initio calculations of the bound state wavefunctions of Argon, Iron and Copper orbitals are obtained from Cowan computer code. A least-squares variational method (LSVM) is used for determining the wavefunction of the positrons. The program is employed for calculating the s-wave partial cross sections of positrons scattered by Iron and Copper atoms. Our results of the effective charge are compared with available experimental and theoretical ones. --

  18. A Prospective Analysis of Patients Presenting for Medical Attention at a Large Electronic Dance Music Festival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Matt S; Plocki, Alex; Likourezos, Antonios; Pushkar, Illya; Bazos, Andrew N; Fromm, Christian; Friedman, Benjamin W

    2017-02-01

    Mass-Gathering Medicine studies have identified variables that predict greater patient presentation rates (PPRs) and transport to hospital rates (TTHRs). This is a descriptive report of patients who presented for medical attention at an annual electronic dance music festival (EDMF). At this large, single EDMF in New York City (NYC; New York, USA), the frequency of patient presentation, the range of presentations, and interventions performed were identified. This descriptive report examined consecutive patients who presented to the medical tent of a summertime EDMF held at an outdoor venue with an active, mobile, bounded crowd. Alcohol was available for sale. Entry was restricted to persons 18 years and older. The festival occurred on three consecutive days with a total cumulative attendance of 58,000. Medical staffing included two Emergency Medicine physicians, four registered nurses, and 86 Emergency Medical Services (EMS) providers. Data collected included demographics, past medical history, vital signs, physical exam, drug and alcohol use, interventions performed, and transport decisions. Eighty-four patients were enrolled over 2.5 days. Six were transported and zero died. The ages of the subjects ranged from 17 to 61 years. Forty-three (51%) were male. Thirty-eight (45%) initially presented with abnormal vital signs; four (5%) were hyperthermic. Of these latter patients, 34 (90%) reported ingestions with 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) or other drugs. Eleven (65%) patients were diaphoretic or mydriatic. The most common prehospital interventions were intravenous normal saline (8/84; 10%), ondansetron (6/84; 7%), and midazolam (3/84; 4%). Electronic dance music festivals are a growing trend and a new challenge for Mass-Gathering Medicine as new strategies must be employed to decrease TTHR and mortality. Addressing common and expected medical emergencies at mass-gathering events through awareness, preparation, and early, focused medical interventions may

  19. Development of large area, pico-second resolution photo-detectors and associated readout electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grabas, H.; Oberla, E. [Enrico Fermi Inst., Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Attenkoffer, K. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Bogdan, M.; Frisch, H. J. [Enrico Fermi Inst., Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Genat, J. F. [LPNHE, CNRS/IN2P3/LPNHE, Paris 75252 (France); Northrop, R. [Enrico Fermi Inst., Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); May, E. N. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Varner, G. S. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Wetstein, M. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    The Large Area Pico-second Photo-detectors described in this contribution incorporate a photo-cathode and a borosilicate glass capillary Micro-Channel Plate (MCP) pair functionalized by atomic layer deposition (ALD) of separate resistive and electron secondary emitters materials. They may be used for biomedical imaging purposes, a remarkable opportunity to apply technologies developed in HEP having the potential to make major advances in the medical world, in particular for Positron Emission Tomography (PET). If daisy-chained and coupled to fast transmission lines read at both ends, they could be implemented in very large dimensions. Initial testing with matched pairs of small glass capillary test has demonstrated gains of the order of 105 to 106. Compared to other fast imaging devices, these photo-detectors are expected to provide timing resolutions in the 10-100 ps range, and two-dimension position in the sub-millimeter range. A 6-channel readout ASIC has been designed in 130 nm CMOS technology and tested. As a result, fast analog sampling up to 17 GS/s has been obtained, the intrinsic analog bandwidth being presently under evaluation. The digitization in parallel of several cells in two microseconds allows getting off-chip digital data read at a maximum rate of 40 MHz. Digital Signal Processing of the sampled waveforms is expected achieving the timing and space resolutions obtained with digital oscilloscopes. (authors)

  20. Role of magnetic shear in dynamics of large-scale structures in electron temperature gradient turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiquan; Kishimoto, Y.; Miyato, N.; Matsumoto, T.

    2004-11-01

    We investigate how the magnetic shear governs the dynamics of large-scale structures, such as zonal flows and streamers, in electron temperature gradient (ETG) driven turbulence. Based on the well-known 2D Hasegawa-Mima turbulence modeling, which is the inviscid version of fluid (or gyrofluid) ETG turbulence [1], we derive a general dispersion relation of secondary fluctuations through modulation instability analysis. The results show that the formation of different large-scale structures including zonal flow, streamer and so-called generalized Kelvin-Helmholtz (GKH) mode in ETG turbulence depends on the spectral anisotropy of turbulent fluctuation. In a slab geometry, the magnetic shear closely relates to the ETG mode structures so that it may determine the pattern selection in the quasi-steady ETG turbulence. 3D gyrofluid slab ETG simulations show that turbulent ETG fluctuation energy condenses to the zonal flows in the weak shear plasmas and to the streamer component for the high shears. 2D ETG simulations with rather high resolution not only exhibits the global spectral distribution of zonal flows, but also further confirm a mechanism: enhanced zonal flow in weak shear ETG turbulence is limited by exciting a KH mode [1]. Furthermore, in toroidal ETG simulations, streamer structures are observed at around good curvature region along the flux tube in the quasisteady state in some medium shear regime. Related streamer dynamics are also investigated. [1] Jiquan Li and Y. Kishimoto, Phys. Plasmas 11, 1493(2004)

  1. Probing Energy Levels of Large Array Quantum Dot Superlattice by Electronic Transport Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisri, S. Z.; Degoli, E.; Spallanzani, N.; Krishnan, G.; Kooi, B.; Ghica, C.; Yarema, M.; Protesescu, L.; Heiss, W.; Kovalenko, M.; Pulci, O.; Ossicini, S.; Iwasa, Y.; Loi, M. A.

    2015-03-01

    Colloidal quantum dot superlattice (CQDS) emerges as new type of hybrid solids allowing easy fabrication of devices that exploits the quantum confinement properties of individual QD. This materials displays peculiar characters, making investigation of their transport properties nontrivial. Besides the bandgap variations, 0D nature of QD lead to the formation of discrete energy subbands. These subbands are crucial for multiple exciton generation (for efficient solar cell), thermoelectric material and multistate transistor. Full understanding of the CQDS energy level structure is vital to use them in complex devices. Here we show a powerful method to determine the CQDS electronic energy levels from their intrinsic charge transport characteristics. Via the use of ambipolar transistors with CQDS as active materials and gated using highly capacitive ionic liquid gating, Fermi energy can be largely tuned. It can access energy levels beyond QD's HOMO & LUMO. Ability to probe not only the bandgap, but also the discrete energy level from large assembly of QD at room temperature suggests the formation of energy minibands in this system.

  2. First measurement of surface nuclear recoil background for argon dark matter searches

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Jingke; Westerdale, Shawn; Calaprice, Frank; Wright, Alexander; Shi, Zhiming

    2016-01-01

    One major background in direct searches for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) comes from the deposition of radon progeny on detector surfaces. The most dangerous surface background is the $^{206}$Pb recoils produced by $^{210}$Po decays. In this letter, we report the first characterization of this background in liquid argon. The scintillation signal of low energy Pb recoils is measured to be highly quenched in argon, and we estimate that the 103keV $^{206}$Pb recoil background will produce a signal equal to that of a ~5keV (30keV) electron recoil ($^{40}$Ar recoil). In addition, we demonstrate that this dangerous $^{210}$Po surface background can be suppressed by a factor of ~100 or higher using pulse shape discrimination methods, which can make argon dark matter detectors near background-free and enhance their potential for discovery of medium- and high-mass WIMPs. We also discuss the impact on other low background experiments.

  3. Effects of oxygen concentration on atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge in Argon-Oxygen Mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuechun; Li, Dian; Wang, Younian

    2016-09-01

    A dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) can generate a low-temperature plasma easily at atmospheric pressure and has been investigated for applications in trials in cancer therapy, sterilization, air pollution control, etc. It has been confirmed that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a key role in the processes. In this work, we use a fluid model to simulate the plasma characteristics for DBD in argon-oxygen mixture. The effects of oxygen concentration on the plasma characteristics have been discussed. The evolution mechanism of ROS has been systematically analyzed. It was found that the ground state oxygen atoms and oxygen molecular ions are the dominated oxygen species under the considered oxygen concentrations. With the oxygen concentration increasing, the densities of electrons, argon atomic ions, resonance state argon atoms, metastable state argon atoms and excited state argon atoms all show a trend of decline. The oxygen molecular ions density is high and little influenced by the oxygen concentration. Ground state oxygen atoms density tends to increase before falling. The ozone density increases significantly. Increasing the oxygen concentration, the discharge mode begins to change gradually from the glow discharge mode to Townsend discharge mode. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11175034).

  4. Discretization of Electronic States in Large InAsP/InP Multilevel Quantum Dots Probed by Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fain, B.; Robert-Philip, I.; Beveratos, A.; David, C.; Wang, Z. Z.; Sagnes, I.; Girard, J. C.

    2012-03-01

    The topography and the electronic structure of InAsP/InP quantum dots are probed by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The study of the local density of states in such large quantum dots confirms the discrete nature of the electronic levels whose wave functions are measured by differential conductivity mapping. Because of their large dimensions, the energy separation between the discrete electronic levels is low, allowing for quantization in both the lateral and growth directions as well as the observation of the harmonicity of the dot lateral potential.

  5. Scanning electron microscopy reveals severe external root resorption in the large periapical lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ookubo, Kensuke; Ookubo, Atsushi; Tsujimoto, Masaki; Sugimoto, Kouji; Yamada, Shizuka; Hayashi, Yoshihiko

    2016-06-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the relationships between clinicopathological findings and the resorptive conditions of root apices of teeth with periodontitis. The samples included 21 root apices with large periapical radiolucent lesions. The preoperative computed tomography (CT) and intraoperative findings were correlated with the presence, extension, and the progression pattern of periapical resorption using a scanning electron microscope. The subjects' age, gender, chief complaint, type of tooth, percussion test results, size of periapical lesion using CT, and intraoperative findings were recorded. All apicoectomies were performed under an operative microscope for endodontic microsurgery. A significant large size was observed in cystic lesions compared with granulomatous lesions. The cementum surface at the periphery of the lesion was covered with globular structures (2-3 μm in diameter). Cementum resorption started as small defect formations at the surface. As the defect formation progressed, a lamellar structure appeared at the resorption area, and the size of globular structures became smaller than that of globules at the surface. Further resorption produced typical lacuna formation, which was particularly observed in fracture cases. The most morphologically severe destructive pattern of dentin resorption was observed in large cystic lesions. This study is the first report to elucidate the relationships between three clinical types of undesirable periapical lesions: (1) undertreatment, (2) periapical fracture, (3) macro-level resorption, and the microstructure of external root resorption including from small defects at the cementum surface to a significant destructive pattern inside the dentin. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:495-500, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Characterization of an atmospheric double arc argon-nitrogen plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, X.; Chéron, B. G.; Yan, J. H.; Yu, L.; Cen, K. F.

    2008-05-01

    In the framework of studies devoted to hazardous waste destruction, an original dc double anode plasma torch has been designed and tested, which produces an elongated, weak fluctuation and reproducible plasma jet at atmospheric pressure. The arc instabilities and dynamic behavior of the double arc argon-nitrogen plasma jet are investigated through the oscillations of electrical signals by combined means of fast Fourier transform and Wigner distribution. In our experiment, the restrike mode is identified as the typical fluctuation behavior in an argon-nitrogen plasma jet. The Fourier spectra and Wigner distributions exhibit two characteristic frequencies of 150 Hz and 4.1 kHz, which reveals that the nature of fluctuations in the double arc argon-nitrogen plasma can be ascribed to the undulation of the power supply and both arc roots motion on the anode channels. In addition, the microscopic properties of the plasma jet inside and outside the arc chamber are investigated by means of optical emission spectroscopy, which yields excitation, electronic, rotational, and vibrational temperatures, as well as the electron number density. The results allow us to examine the validity criteria of a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) state in the plasma arc. The measured electron densities are in good agreement with those calculated from the LTE model, which indicates that the atmospheric double arc argon-nitrogen plasma in the core region is close to the LTE state under our experimental conditions.

  7. Positive and negative pulsed corona in argon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuizen, E.M. van; Rutgers, W.R.; Ebert, U.

    2002-01-01

    Photographs are obtained of corona discharges in argon at atmospheric pressure using a high resolution, intensified CCD camera. Positive and negative polarity is applied at the curved electrode in a point-plane gap and a plane-plane gap with a protruding point. Branching is observed in the positive

  8. The ATLAS Liquid Argon calorimeter: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkens, Henric; ATLAS LArg Collaboration

    2009-04-01

    The various cryostats with the ATLAS LArg calorimeter are installed in the ATLAS cavern since several years. Following this, an effort to install and commission the front end read-out electronics (infrastructure, crates, boards) has been ongoing and is converging, in time for LHC start. After the mechanical installation of the LArg calorimeter 99.9 % of the read-out channels were working, hence great care was taken to assure the same high level of quality after the installation of the read-out electronics. Following cautious procedures and with continuous testing-campaigns of the electronics at each step of the installation advancement, the result is a fully commissioned calorimeter with its readout and a small number of non-functional channels.

  9. Electronic length measurement using small and large files in enlarged canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, H Q; Kaufman, A Y; Komorowski, R C; Friedman, S

    1996-11-01

    Electronic apex locators are frequently used attached to a small size endodontic file; however, the effect on the measurement of the relative diameters of the file and the root canal has not been clarified. In this study, the length of enlarged canals was measured using small size files and files matching the canal diameter to observe a possible discrepancy. The accuracy of electronic length control during canal preparation with rotary files was also assessed. The root canals in 21 extracted, single rooted teeth were accessed, and their actual length (AL) established by passing a size 10 file just through the minor apical foramen. The teeth were then embedded in an alginate mold. The initial canal length (IL) was measured with the Root ZX apex locator by negotiating a size 10 file to the apical constriction. The canal was enlarged to size 60 with rotary files while the length was continuously controlled with the apex locator. Then, the final length measurements were obtained with a size 10 file and a size 60 file (FL-10 and FL-60, respectively). The average values of IL, FL-10 and FL-60 were calculated and compared using Repeated Measures Analysis of Variance followed by Tukey's Studentized Range test (P apical 4 mm of the canal was exposed by grinding the buccal aspect of the root. The IL was 0.45 mm shorter than AL (P apical constriction was absent in all the teeth, but the file tips were confined within the root. This study concluded that the Root ZX indicated the location of an apical constriction even when the anatomic constriction was eliminated. In the enlarged canals, length measurements obtained with small and large size files were comparable.

  10. 46 CFR 151.50-36 - Argon or nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Argon or nitrogen. 151.50-36 Section 151.50-36 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-36 Argon or nitrogen. (a) A cargo tank that contains argon or nitrogen and that has a maximum allowable working pressure of 172 kPa...

  11. Argon laser versus erbium:YAG laser in the treatment of xanthelasma palpebrarum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelkader, Mona; Alashry, Shereen Ezzelregal

    2014-01-01

    Background Xanthelasma palpebrarum is the most common of the xanthomas with asymptomatic, symmetrical, bilateral, soft, yellow, polygonal papules around the eyelids. Though it is a benign lesion causing no functional disturbance, it is esthetically annoying. The surgical laser offers an extremely elegant and powerful solution to this problem. Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of erbium:YAG and argon lasers in the treatment of xanthelasma lesions. Patients and methods Forty patients were included in the study. Twenty patients (15 patients were bilateral with 30 eyes either in the upper or lower lid and 5 patients were unilateral) were treated with erbium:YAG laser. Another 20 patients (10 patients were bilateral with 20 eyes and 10 patients were unilateral) were treated with argon laser. Results In the majority of treated patients (either treated with erbium:YAG or argon laser), xanthelasma lesions were completely disappeared or significantly decreased in size. Two patients showed pigmentary changes in the form of hypopigmentation with erbium:YAG laser (one case), another case showed hyperpigmentation. No intraoperative complication was observed. No significant scar or recurrence was observed. Conclusion Argon laser in xanthelasma is an easy, effective, and safe method of treatment for small lesions and YAG laser is more better for large lesions than argon laser. PMID:25892929

  12. Measurement of the attenuation length of argon scintillation light in the ArDM LAr TPC

    CERN Document Server

    Calvo, J; Crivelli, P; Daniel, M; DiLuise, S; Gendotti, A; Horikawa, S; Molina-Bueno, L; Montes, B; Mu, W; Murphy, S; Natterer, G; Ngyuen, K; Periale, L; Quan, Y; Radics, B; Regenfus, C; Romero, L; Rubbia, A; Santorelli, R; Sergiampietri, F; Viant, T; Wu, S

    2016-01-01

    We report on a measurement of the attenuation length for the scintillation light in the tonne size liquid argon target of the ArDM dark matter experiment. The data was recorded in the first underground operation of the experiment in single-phase operational mode. The results were achieved by comparing the light yield spectra from 39-Ar and 83m-Kr to a description of the ArDM setup with a model of full light ray tracing. A relatively low value close to 0.5 m was found for the attenuation length of the liquid argon bulk to its own scintillation light. We interpret this result as a presence of optically active impurities in the liquid argon which are not filtered by the installed purification systems. We also present analyses of the argon gas employed for the filling and discuss cross sections in the vacuum ultraviolet of various molecules in respect to purity requirements in the context of large liquid argon installations.

  13. Large-scale drifts observed on electron temperature measurements on JET plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Gerbaud, Thomas; Alper, Barry; Beausang, Kieran; Beurskens, Marc; Flanagan, Joanne; Kempenaars, Mark; Sirinelli, Antoine; Maslov, Mikhail; Dif-Pradalier, Guilhem; Contributors, JET EFDA

    2012-01-01

    Between 1995 and 2009, electron temperature (Te) measurements of more than 15000 plasmas produced in the Joint European Torus (JET) have been carefully reviewed using the two main diagnostics available over this time period: Michelson interferometer and Thomson scattering systems. Long term stability of JET Te is experimentaly observed by defining the ECE TS ratio as the ratio of central Te measured by Michelson and LIDAR. This paper, based on a careful review of Te measurement from 15 years of JET plasmas, concludes that JET Te exhibits a 15-20% effective uncertainty mostly made of large-scale temporal drifts, and an overall uncertainty of 16-22%. Variations of 18 plasma parameters are checked in another data set, made of a "reference data set" made of ohmic pulses as similar as possible between 1998 and 2009. Time drifts of ECE TS ratios appear to be mostly disconnected from the variations observed on these 18 plasma parameters, except for the very low amplitude variations of the field which are well correl...

  14. Gas electron multipliers. Development of large area GEMS and spherical GEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, Serge Duarte

    2011-08-15

    Gaseous radiation detectors have been a crucial part of high-energy physics instrumentation since the 1960s, when the first multiwire proportional counters were built. In the 1990s the first micropattern gas detectors (MPGDS) saw the light; with sub-millimeter feature sizes these novel detectors were faster and more accurate than their predecessors. The gas electron multiplier (GEM) is one of the most successful of these technologies. It is a charge multiplication structure made from a copper clad polymer foil, pierced with a regular and dense pattern of holes. I describe the properties and the application of GEMs and GEM. detectors, and the research and development I have done on this technology. Two of the main objectives were the development of large area GEMs ({proportional_to}m{sup 2}) for particle physics experiments and GEMs with a spherical shape for X-ray or neutron diffraction detectors. Both have been realized, and the new techniques involved are finding their way to applications in research and industry. (orig.)

  15. Structural and electrical properties of large area epitaxial VO2 films grown by electron beam evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Théry, V.; Boulle, A.; Crunteanu, A.; Orlianges, J. C.; Beaumont, A.; Mayet, R.; Mennai, A.; Cosset, F.; Bessaudou, A.; Fabert, M.

    2017-02-01

    Large area (up to 4 squared inches) epitaxial VO2 films, with a uniform thickness and exhibiting an abrupt metal-insulator transition with a resistivity ratio as high as 2.85 × 10 4 , have been grown on (001)-oriented sapphire substrates by electron beam evaporation. The lattice distortions (mosaicity) and the level of strain in the films have been assessed by X-ray diffraction. It is demonstrated that the films grow in a domain-matching mode where the distortions are confined close to the interface which allows growth of high-quality materials despite the high film-substrate lattice mismatch. It is further shown that a post-deposition high-temperature oxygen annealing step is crucial to ensure the correct film stoichiometry and provide the best structural and electrical properties. Alternatively, it is possible to obtain high quality films with a RF discharge during deposition, which hence do not require the additional annealing step. Such films exhibit similar electrical properties and only slightly degraded structural properties.

  16. Gas Electron Multipliers: Development of large area GEMs and spherical GEMs

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte Pinto, Serge; Brock, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Gaseous radiation detectors have been a crucial part of high-energy physics instrumentation since the 1960s, when the first multiwire proportional counters were built. In the 1990s the first micropattern gas detectors (MPGDs) saw the light; with sub-millimeter feature sizes these novel detectors were faster and more accurate than their predecessors. The gas electron multiplier (GEM) is one of the most successful of these technologies. It is a charge multiplication structure made from a copper clad polymer foil, pierced with a regular and dense pattern of holes. I will describe the properties and the application of GEMs and GEM detectors, and the research and development I have done on this technology. Two of the main objectives were the development of large area GEMs (~m^2) for particle physics experiments and GEMs with a spherical shape for x-ray or neutron diffraction detectors. Both have been realized, and the new techniques involved are finding their way to applications in research and industry.

  17. Performance of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter after three years of LHC operation and plans for a future upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Nikiforou, Nikiforos

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Liquid argon sampling calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry as well as hadronic calorimetry in the endcaps. After installation in 2004--2006, the calorimeters were extensively commissioned over the three--year period prior to first collisions in 2009, using cosmic rays and single LHC beams. Since then, approximately 27~fb$\\mathbf{^{-1}}$ of data have been collected at an unprecedented center of mass energy. During all these stages, the calorimeter and its electronics have been operating almost optimally, with a performance very close to specifications. This paper covers all aspects of these first years of operation. The excellent performance achieved is especially presented in the context of the discovery of the elusive Higgs boson. The future plans to preserve this performance until the end of the LHC program are also presented.

  18. Construction and test of a fine-grained liquid argon preshower prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, R; Pinfold, J L; Rodning, N L; Boos, E; Zhautykov, B O; Aubert, Bernard; Bazan, A; Beaugiraud, B; Boniface, J; Colas, Jacques; Eynard, G; Jézéquel, S; Le Flour, T; Linossier, O; Nicoleau, S; Rival, F; Sauvage, G; Thion, J; Van den Plas, D; Wingerter-Seez, I; Zitoun, R; Zolnierowski, Y; Chmeissani, M; Fernández, E; Garrido, L; Martínez, M; Padilla, C; Gordon, H A; Radeka, V; Rahm, David Charles; Stephani, D; Baisin, L; Berset, J C; Chevalley, J L; Gianotti, F; Gildemeister, O; Marin, C P; Nessi, Marzio; Poggioli, Luc; Richter, W; Vuillemin, V; Baze, J M; Gosset, L G; Lavocat, P; Lottin, J P; Mansoulié, B; Meyer, J P; Renardy, J F; Schwindling, J; Teiger, J; Collot, J; de Saintignon, P; Dzahini, D; Hostachy, J Y; Hoummada, A; Laborie, G; Mahout, G; Hervás, L; Chekhtman, A; Cousinou, M C; Dargent, P; Dinkespiler, B; Etienne, F; Fassnacht, P; Fouchez, D; Martin, L; Miotto, A; Monnier, E; Nagy, E; Olivetto, C; Tisserant, S; Battistoni, G; Camin, D V; Cavalli, D; Costa, G; Cozzi, L; Fedyakin, N N; Ferrari, A; Mandelli, L; Mazzanti, M; Perini, L; Resconi, S; Sala, P R; Beaudoin, G; Depommier, P; León-Florián, E; Leroy, C; Roy, P; Augé, E; Chase, Robert L; Chollet, J C; de La Taille, C; Fayard, Louis; Fournier, D; Hrisoho, A T; Merkel, B; Noppe, J M; Parrour, G; Pétroff, P; Schaffer, A C; Seguin-Moreau, N; Serin, L; Tisserand, V; Vichou, I; Canton, B; David, J; Genat, J F; Imbault, D; Le Dortz, O; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Schwemling, P; Eek, L O; Lund-Jensen, B; Söderqvist, J; Lefebvre, M; Robertson, S

    1997-01-01

    A separate liquid argon preshower detector consisting of two layers featuring a fine granularity of 2.5~10$^{\\mathrm{-3}}$ was studied by the RD3 collaboration. A prototype covering approximately 0.8 in pseudo-rapidity and 9 degrees in azimuth was built and tested at CERN in July 94. CMOS and GaAs VLSI preamplifiers were designed and tested for this occasion. The combined response of this detector and an accordion electromagnetic calorimeter prototype to muons, electrons and photons is presented. For minimum ionizing tracks a signal-to-noise ratio of 4.5 per preshower layer was measured. Above 150~GeV the space resolution for electrons is better than 250~$\\mu$m in both directions. The precision on the electromagnetic shower direction, determined together with the calorimeter, is better than 4 mrad above 50~GeV. It is concluded that the preshower detector would adequately fulfil its role for future operation at CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  19. Chebyshev polynomial filtered subspace iteration in the Discontinuous Galerkin method for large-scale electronic structure calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Amartya S; Hu, Wei; Yang, Chao; Pask, John E

    2016-01-01

    The Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) electronic structure method employs an adaptive local basis set to solve the equations of density functional theory in a discontinuous Galerkin framework. The methodology is implemented in the Discontinuous Galerkin Density Functional Theory (DGDFT) code for large-scale parallel electronic structure calculations. In DGDFT, the basis is generated on-the-fly to capture the local material physics, and can systematically attain chemical accuracy with only a few tens of degrees of freedom per atom. Hence, DGDFT combines the key advantage of planewave basis sets in terms of systematic improvability with that of localized basis sets in reducing basis size. A central issue for large-scale calculations, however, is the computation of the electron density from the discretized Hamiltonian in an efficient and scalable manner. We show in this work how Chebyshev polynomial filtered subspace iteration (CheFSI) can be used to address this issue and push the envelope in large-scale materials si...

  20. Drift Time Measurement in the ATLAS Liquid Argon Electromagnetic Calorimeter using Cosmic Muons

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, G; Abdallah, J; Abdelalim, A A; Abdesselam, A; Abdinov, O; Abi, B; Abolins, M; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Acharya, B S; Adams, D L; Addy, T N; Adelman, J; Adorisio, C; Adragna, P; Adye, T; Aefsky, S; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Aharrouche, M; Ahlen, S P; Ahles, F; Ahmad, A; Ahmed, H; Ahsan, M; Aielli, G; Akdogan, T; Åkesson, T P A; Akimoto, G; Akimov, A V; Aktas, A; Alam, M S; Alam, M A; Albert, J; Albrand, S; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Alessandria, F; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexandre, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Aliev, M; Alimonti, G; Alison, J; Aliyev, M; Allport, P P; Allwood-Spiers, S E; Almond, J; Aloisio, A; Alon, R; Alonso, A; Alviggi, M G; Amako, K; Amelung, C; Ammosov, V V; Amorim, A; Amorós, G; Amram, N; Anastopoulos, C; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Anduaga, X S; Angerami, A; Anghinolfi, F; Anjos, N; Antonaki, A; Antonelli, M; Antonelli, S; Antos, J; Antunovic, B; Anulli, F; Aoun, S; Arabidze, G; Aracena, I; Arai, Y; Arce, A T H; Archambault, J P; Arfaoui, S; Arguin, J F; Argyropoulos, T; Arik, E; Arik, M; Armbruster, A J; Arnaez, O; Arnault, C; Artamonov, A; Arutinov, D; Asai, M; Asai, S; Asfandiyarov, R; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Asner, D; Asquith, L; Assamagan, K; Astbury, A; Astvatsatourov, A; Atoian, G; Auerbach, B; Auge, E; Augsten, K; Aurousseau, M; Austin, N; Avolio, G; Avramidou, R; Axen, D; Ay, C; Azuelos, G; Azuma, Y; Baak, M A; Bacci, C; Bach, A; Bachacou, H; Bachas, K; Backes, M; Badescu, E; Bagnaia, P; Bai, Y; Bailey, D C; Bain, T; Baines, J T; Baker, O K; Baker, M D; Baker, S; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F; Banas, E; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Banfi, D; Bangert, A; Bansal, V; Baranov, S P; Baranov, S; Barashkou, A; Barber, T; Barberio, E L; Barberis, D; Barbero, M; Bardin, D Y; Barillari, T; Barisonzi, M; Barklow, T; Barlow, N; Barnett, B M; Barnett, R M; Baron, S; Baroncelli, A; Barr, A J; Barreiro, F; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J; Barrillon, P; Barros, N; Bartoldus, R; Bartsch, D; Bastos, J; Bates, R L; Batkova, L; Batley, J R; Battaglia, A; Battistin, M; Bauer, F; Bawa, H S; Bazalova, M; Beare, B; Beau, T; Beauchemin, P H; Beccherle, R; Becerici, N; Bechtle, P; Beck, G A; Beck, H P; Beckingham, M; Becks, K H; Bedajanek, I; Beddall, A J; Beddall, A; Bednár, P; Bednyakov, V A; Bee, C; Begel, M; Behar Harpaz, S; Behera, P K; Beimforde, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bell, P J; Bell, W H; Bella, G; Bellagamba, L; Bellina, F; Bellomo, M; Belloni, A; Belotskiy, K; Beltramello, O; Ben Ami, S; Benary, O; Benchekroun, D; Bendel, M; Benedict, B H; Benekos, N; Benhammou, Y; Benincasa, G P; Benjamin, D P; Benoit, M; Bensinger, J R; Benslama, K; Bentvelsen, S; Beretta, M; Berge, D; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E; Berger, N; Berghaus, F; Berglund, E; Beringer, J; Bernardet, K; Bernat, P; Bernhard, R; Bernius, C; Berry, T; Bertin, A; Besana, M I; Besson, N; Bethke, S; Bianchi, R M; Bianco, M; Biebel, O; Biesiada, J; Biglietti, M; Bilokon, H; Bindi, M; Binet, S; Bingul, A; Bini, C; Biscarat, C; Bitenc, U; Black, K M; Blair, R E; Blanchard, J B; Blanchot, G; Blocker, C; Blocki, J; Blondel, A; Blum, W; Blumenschein, U; Bobbink, G J; Bocci, A; Boehler, M; Boek, J; Boelaert, N; Böser, S; Bogaerts, J A; Bogouch, A; Bohm, C; Bohm, J; Boisvert, V; Bold, T; Boldea, V; Boldyrev, A; Bondarenko, V G; Bondioli, M; Boonekamp, M; Bordoni, S; Borer, C; Borisov, A; Borissov, G; Borjanovic, I; Borroni, S; Bos, K; Boscherini, D; Bosman, M; Bosteels, M; Boterenbrood, H; Bouchami, J; Boudreau, J; Bouhova-Thacker, E V; Boulahouache, C; Bourdarios, C; Boyd, J; Boyko, I R; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Braem, A; Branchini, P; Brandenburg, G W; Brandt, A; Brandt, G; Brandt, O; Bratzler, U; Brau, B; Brau, J E; Braun, H M; Brelier, B; Bremer, J; Brenner, R; Bressler, S; Breton, D; Britton, D; Brochu, F M; Brock, I; Brock, R; Brodbeck, T J; Brodet, E; Broggi, F; Bromberg, C; Brooijmans, G; Brooks, W K; Brown, G; Brubaker, E; Bruckman de Renstrom, P A; Bruncko, D; Bruneliere, R; Brunet, S; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bruschi, M; Buanes, T; Bucci, F; Buchanan, J; Buchholz, P; Buckley, A G; Budagov, I A; Budick, B; Büscher, V; Bugge, L; Bulekov, O; Bunse, M; Buran, T; Burckhart, H; Burdin, S; Burgess, T; Burke, S; Busato, E; Bussey, P; Buszello, C P; Butin, F; Butler, B; Butler, J M; Buttar, C M; Butterworth, J M; Byatt, T; Caballero, J; Cabrera Urbán, S; Caforio, D; Cakir, O; Calafiura, P; Calderini, G; Calfayan, P; Calkins, R; Caloba, L P; Caloi, R; Calvet, D; Camarri, P; Cambiaghi, M; Cameron, D; Campabadal Segura, F; Campana, S; Campanelli, M; Canale, V; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Cantero, J; Capasso, L; Capeans Garrido, M D M; Caprini, I; Caprini, M; Capua, M; Caputo, R; Caracinha, D; Caramarcu, C; Cardarelli, R; Carli, T; Carlino, G; Carminati, L; Caron, B; Caron, S; Carrillo Montoya, G D; Carron Montero, S; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Carvalho, J; Casadei, D; Casado, M P; Cascella, M; Caso, C; Castaneda Hernadez, A M; Castaneda-Miranda, E; Castillo Gimenez, V; Castro, N; Cataldi, G; Catinaccio, A; Catmore, J R; Cattai, A; Cattani, G; Caughron, S; Cauz, D; Cavalleri, P; Cavalli, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cavasinni, V; Ceradini, F; Cerqueira, A S; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Cerutti, F; Cetin, S A; Cevenini, F; Chafaq, A; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K; Chapman, J D; Chapman, J W; Chareyre, E; Charlton, D G; Chavda, V; Cheatham, S; Chekanov, S; Chekulaev, S V; Chelkov, G A; Chen, H; Chen, S; Chen, T; Chen, X; Cheng, S; Cheplakov, A; Chepurnov, V F; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R; Tcherniatine, V; Chesneanu, D; Cheu, E; Cheung, S L; Chevalier, L; Chevallier, F; Chiarella, V; Chiefari, G; Chikovani, L; Childers, J T; Chilingarov, A; Chiodini, G; Chizhov, M; Choudalakis, G; Chouridou, S; Christidi, I A; Christov, A; Chromek-Burckhart, D; Chu, M L; Chudoba, J; Ciapetti, G; Ciftci, A K; Ciftci, R; Cinca, D; Cindro, V; Ciobotaru, M D; Ciocca, C; Ciocio, A; Cirilli, M; Citterio, M; Clark, A; Cleland, W; Clemens, J C; Clement, B; Clement, C; Coadou, Y; Cobal, M; Coccaro, A; Cochran, J; Coelli, S; Coggeshall, J; Cogneras, E; Cojocaru, C D; Colas, J; Cole, B; Colijn, A P; Collard, C; Collins, N J; Collins-Tooth, C; Collot, J; Colon, G; Conde Muiño, P; Coniavitis, E; Consonni, M; Constantinescu, S; Conta, C; Conventi, F; Cook, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, B D; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Cooper-Smith, N J; Copic, K; Cornelissen, T; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F; Corso-Radu, A; Cortes-Gonzalez, A; Cortiana, G; Costa, G; Costa, M J; Costanzo, D; Costin, T; Côté, D; Coura Torres, R; Courneyea, L; Cowan, G; Cowden, C; Cox, B E; Cranmer, K; Cranshaw, J; Cristinziani, M; Crosetti, G; Crupi, R; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T; Curatolo, M; Curtis, C J; Cwetanski, P; Czyczula, Z; D'Auria, S; D'Onofrio, M; D'Orazio, A; Da Silva, P V M; Da Via, C; Dabrowski, W; Dai, T; Dallapiccola, C; Dallison, S J; Daly, C H; Dam, M; Danielsson, H O; Dannheim, D; Dao, V; Darbo, G; Darlea, G L; Davey, W; Davidek, T; Davidson, N; Davidson, R; Davies, M; Davison, A R; Dawson, I; Dawson, J W; Daya, R K; De, K; de Asmundis, R; De Castro, S; De Castro Faria Salgado, P E; De Cecco, S; de Graat, J; De Groot, N; de Jong, P; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De La Taille, C; De Mora, L; De Oliveira Branco, M; De Pedis, D; De Salvo, A; De Sanctis, U; De Santo, A; De Vivie De Regie, J B; De Zorzi, G; Dean, S; Deberg, H; Dedes, G; Dedovich, D V; Defay, P O; Degenhardt, J; Dehchar, M; Del Papa, C; Del Peso, J; Del Prete, T; Dell'Acqua, A; Dell'Asta, L; Della Pietra, M; della Volpe, D; Delmastro, M; Delruelle, N; Delsart, P A; Deluca, C; Demers, S; Demichev, M; Demirkoz, B; Deng, J; Deng, W; Denisov, S P; Dennis, C; Derkaoui, J E; Derue, F; Dervan, P; Desch, K; Deviveiros, P O; Dewhurst, A; DeWilde, B; Dhaliwal, S; Dhullipudi, R; Di Ciaccio, A; Di Ciaccio, L; Di Domenico, A; Di Girolamo, A; Di Girolamo, B; Di Luise, S; Di Mattia, A; Di Nardo, R; Di Simone, A; Di Sipio, R; Diaz, M A; Diblen, F; Diehl, E B; Dietrich, J; Dietzsch, T A; Diglio, S; Dindar Yagci, K; Dingfelder, D J; Dionisi, C; Dita, P; Dita, S; Dittus, F; Djama, F; Djilkibaev, R; Djobava, T; do Vale, M A B; Do Valle Wemans, A; Doan, T K O; Dobbs, M; Dobos, D; Dobson, E; Dobson, M; Dodd, J; Doherty, T; Doi, Y; Dolejsi, J; Dolenc, I; Dolezal, Z; Dolgoshein, B A; Dohmae, T; Donega, M; Donini, J; Dopke, J; Doria, A; Dos Anjos, A; Dotti, A; Dova, M T; Doxiadis, A; Doyle, A T; Drasal, Z; Driouichi, C; Dris, M; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Dudarev, A; Dudziak, F; Dührssen , M; Duflot, L; Dufour, M A; Dunford, M; Duperrin, A; Duran Yildiz, H; Dushkin, A; Duxfield, R; Dwuznik, M; Düren, M; Ebenstein, W L; Ebke, J; Eckert, S; Eckweiler, S; Edmonds, K; Edwards, C A; Eerola, P; Egorov, K; Ehrenfeld, W; Ehrich, T; Eifert, T; Eigen, G; Einsweiler, K; Eisenhandler, E; Ekelof, T; El Kacimi, M; Ellert, M; Elles, S; Ellinghaus, F; Ellis, K; Ellis, N; Elmsheuser, J; Elsing, M; Ely, R; Emeliyanov, D; Engelmann, R; Engl, A; Epp, B; Eppig, A; Epshteyn, V S; Ereditato, A; Eriksson, D; Ermoline, I; Ernst, J; Ernst, M; Ernwein, J; Errede, D; Errede, S; Ertel, E; Escalier, M; Escobar, C; Espinal Curull, X; Esposito, B; Etienne, F; Etienvre, A I; Etzion, E; Evans, H; Fabbri, L; Fabre, C; Facius, K; Fakhrutdinov, R M; Falciano, S; Falou, A C; Fang, Y; Fanti, M; Farbin, A; Farilla, A; Farley, J; Farooque, T; Farrington, S M; Farthouat, P; Fassi, F; Fassnacht, P; Fassouliotis, D; Fatholahzadeh, B; Fayard, L; Fayette, F; Febbraro, R; Federic, P; Fedin, O L; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W; Feligioni, L; Felzmann, C U; Feng, C; Feng, E J; Fenyuk, A B; Ferencei, J; Ferland, J; Fernandes, B; Fernando, W; Ferrag, S; Ferrando, J; Ferrari, A; Ferrari, P; Ferrari, R; Ferrer, A; Ferrer, M L; Ferrere, D; Ferretti, C; Fiascaris, M; Fiedler, F; Filipcic, A; Filippas, A; Filthaut, F; Fincke-Keeler, M; Fiolhais, M C N; Fiorini, L; Firan, A; Fischer, G; Fisher, M J; Flechl, M; Fleck, I; Fleckner, J; Fleischmann, P; Fleischmann, S; Flick, T; Flores Castillo, L R; Flowerdew, M J; Föhlisch, F; Fokitis, M; Fonseca Martin, T; Forbush, D A; Formica, A; Forti, A; Fortin, D; Foster, J M; Fournier, D; Foussat, A; Fowler, A J; Fowler, K; Fox, H; Francavilla, P; Franchino, S; Francis, D; Franklin, M; Franz, S; Fraternali, M; Fratina, S; Freestone, J; French, S T; Froeschl, R; Froidevaux, D; Frost, J A; Fukunaga, C; Fullana Torregrosa, E; Fuster, J; Gabaldon, C; Gabizon, O; Gadfort, T; Gadomski, S; Gagliardi, G; Gagnon, P; Galea, C; Gallas, E J; Gallas, M V; Gallo, V; Gallop, B J; Gallus, P; Galyaev, E; Gan, K K; Gao, Y S; Gaponenko, A; Garcia-Sciveres, M; García, C; García Navarro, J E; Gardner, R W; Garelli, N; Garitaonandia, H; Garonne, V; Gatti, C; Gaudio, G; Gaumer, O; Gauzzi, P; Gavrilenko, I L; Gay, C; Gaycken, G; Gayde, J C; Gazis, E N; Ge, P; Gee, C N P; Geich-Gimbel, Ch; Gellerstedt, K; Gemme, C; Genest, M H; Gentile, S; Georgatos, F; George, S; Gerlach, P; Gershon, A; Geweniger, C; Ghazlane, H; Ghez, P; Ghodbane, N; Giacobbe, B; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giangiobbe, V; Gianotti, F; Gibbard, B; Gibson, A; Gibson, S M; Gilbert, L M; Gilchriese, M; Gilewsky, V; Gillman, A R; Gingrich, D M; Ginzburg, J; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M P; Giordano, R; Giovannini, P; Giraud, P F; Girtler, P; Giugni, D; Giusti, P; Gjelsten, B K; Gladilin, L K; Glasman, C; Glazov, A; Glitza, K W; Glonti, G L; Godfrey, J; Godlewski, J; Goebel, M; Göpfert, T; Goeringer, C; Gössling, C; Göttfert, T; Goggi, V; Goldfarb, S; Goldin, D; Golling, T; Gollub, N P; Gomes, A; Gomez Fajardo, L S; Gonçalo, R; Gonella, L; Gong, C; González de la Hoz, S; Gonzalez Silva, M L; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S; Goodson, J J; Goossens, L; Gorbounov, P A; Gordon, H A; Gorelov, I; Gorfine, G; Gorini, B; Gorini, E; Gorisek, A; Gornicki, E; Goryachev, V N; Gosdzik, B; Gosselink, M; Gostkin, M I; Gough Eschrich, I; Gouighri, M; Goujdami, D; Goulette, M P; Goussiou, A G; Goy, C; Grabowska-Bold, I; Grafström, P; Grahn, K J; Granado Cardoso, L; Grancagnolo, F; Grancagnolo, S; Grassi, V; Gratchev, V; Grau, N; Gray, H M; Gray, J A; Graziani, E; Green, B; Greenshaw, T; Greenwood, Z D; Gregor, I M; Grenier, P; Griesmayer, E; Griffiths, J; Grigalashvili, N; Grillo, A A; Grimm, K; Grinstein, S; Grishkevich, Y V; Groer, L S; Grognuz, J; Groh, M; Groll, M; Gross, E; Grosse-Knetter, J; Groth-Jensen, J; Grybel, K; Guarino, V J; Guicheney, C; Guida, A; Guillemin, T; Guler, H; Gunther, J; Guo, B; Gupta, A; Gusakov, Y; Gutierrez, A; Gutierrez, P; Guttman, N; Gutzwiller, O; Guyot, C; Gwenlan, C; Gwilliam, C B; Haas, A; Haas, S; Haber, C; Hackenburg, R; Hadavand, H K; Hadley, D R; Haefner, P; Härtel, R; Hajduk, Z; Hakobyan, H; Haller, J; Hamacher, K; Hamilton, A; Hamilton, S; Han, H; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hance, M; Handel, C; Hanke, P; Hansen, J R; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, P H; Hansl-Kozanecka, T; Hansson, P; Hara, K; Hare, G A; Harenberg, T; Harrington, R D; Harris, O M; Harrison, K; Hartert, J; Hartjes, F; Haruyama, T; Harvey, A; Hasegawa, S; Hasegawa, Y; Hashemi, K; Hassani, S; Hatch, M; Haug, F; Haug, S; Hauschild, M; Hauser, R; Havranek, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R J; Hawkins, D; Hayakawa, T; Hayward, H S; Haywood, S J; He, M; Head, S J; Hedberg, V; Heelan, L; Heim, S; Heinemann, B; Heisterkamp, S; Helary, L; Heller, M; Hellman, S; Helsens, C; Hemperek, T; Henderson, R C W; Henke, M; Henrichs, A; Henriques Correia, A M; Henrot-Versille, S; Hensel, C; Henss, T; Hernández Jiménez, Y; Hershenhorn, A D; Herten, G; Hertenberger, R; Hervas, L; Hessey, N P; Hidvegi, A; Higón-Rodriguez, E; Hill, D; Hill, J C; Hiller, K H; Hillert, S; Hillier, S J; Hinchliffe, I; Hines, E; Hirose, M; Hirsch, F; Hirschbuehl, D; Hobbs, J; Hod, N; Hodgkinson, M C; Hodgson, P; Hoecker, A; Hoeferkamp, M R; Hoffman, J; Hoffmann, D; Hohlfeld, M; Holmgren, S O; Holy, T; Holzbauer, J L; Homma, Y; Homola, P; Horazdovsky, T; Hori, T; Horn, C; Horner, S; Horvat, S; Hostachy, J Y; Hou, S; Houlden, M A; Hoummada, A; Howe, T; Hrivnac, J; Hryn'ova, T; Hsu, P J; Hsu, S C; Huang, G S; Hubacek, Z; Hubaut, F; Huegging, F; Hughes, E W; Hughes, G; Hughes-Jones, R E; Hurst, P; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Huseynov, N; Huston, J; Huth, J; Iacobucci, G; Iakovidis, G; Ibragimov, I; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Idarraga, J; Iengo, P; Igonkina, O; Ikegami, Y; Ikeno, M; Ilchenko, Y; Iliadis, D; Ilyushenka, Y; Imori, M; Ince, T; Ioannou, P; Iodice, M; Irles Quiles, A; Ishikawa, A; Ishino, M; Ishmukhametov, R; Isobe, T; Issakov, V; Issever, C; Istin, S; Itoh, Y; Ivashin, A V; Iwasaki, H; Izen, J M; Izzo, V; Jackson, B; Jackson, J N; Jackson, P; Jaekel, M; Jahoda, M; Jain, V; Jakobs, K; Jakobsen, S; Jakubek, J; Jana, D; Jansen, E; Jantsch, A; Janus, M; Jared, R C; Jarlskog, G; Jarron, P; Jeanty, L; Jen-La Plante, I; Jenni, P; Jez, P; Jézéquel, S; Ji, W; Jia, J; Jiang, Y; Jimenez-Belenguer, M; Jin, G; Jin, S; Jinnouchi, O; Joffe, D; Johansen, M; Johansson, K E; Johansson, P; Johnert, S; Johns, K A; Jon-And, K; Jones, G; Jones, R W L; Jones, T W; Jones, T J; Jonsson, O; Joos, D; Joram, C; Jorge, P M; Juranek, V; Jussel, P; Kabachenko, V V; Kabana, S; Kaci, M; Kaczmarska, A; Kado, M; Kagan, H; Kagan, M; Kaiser, S; Kajomovitz, E; Kalinin, S; Kalinovskaya, L V; Kalinowski, A; Kama, S; Kanaya, N; Kaneda, M; Kantserov, V A; Kanzaki, J; Kaplan, B; 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    2010-01-01

    The ionization signals in the liquid argon of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter are studied in detail using cosmic muons. In particular, the drift time of the ionization electrons is measured and used to assess the intrinsic uniformity of the calorimeter gaps and estimate its impact on the constant term of the energy resolution. The drift times of electrons in the cells of the second layer of the calorimeter are uniform at the level of 1.3% in the barrel and 2.7% in the endcaps. This leads to an estimated contribution to the constant term of 0.29% in the barrel and 0.53% in the endcaps. The same data are used to measure the drift velocity of ionization electrons in liquid argon, which is found to be 4.61 +- 0.07 mm/microsecond at 88.5 K and 1 kV/mm.

  1. Drift Time Measurement in the ATLAS Liquid Argon Electromagnetic Calorimeter using Cosmic Muons

    Science.gov (United States)

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T.; Perez Reale, V.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrino, R.; Perrodo, P.; Persembe, S.; Perus, P.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, J.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridou, C.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Petschull, D.; Petteni, M.; Pezoa, R.; Pfeifer, B.; Phan, A.; Phillips, A. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Piccinini, M.; Piegaia, R.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Ping, J.; Pinto, B.; Pizio, C.; Placakyte, R.; Plamondon, M.; Plano, W. G.; Pleier, M.-A.; Poblaguev, A.; Poddar, S.; Podlyski, F.; Poffenberger, P.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, M.; Polci, F.; Polesello, G.; Policicchio, A.; Polini, A.; Poll, J.; Polychronakos, V.; Pomarede, D. M.; Pomeroy, D.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Popule, J.; Portell Bueso, X.; Porter, R.; Pospelov, G. E.; Pospichal, P.; Pospisil, S.; Potekhin, M.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Potter, K. P.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Prabhu, R.; Pralavorio, P.; Prasad, S.; Pravahan, R.; Preda, T.; Pretzl, K.; Pribyl, L.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Prichard, P. M.; Prieur, D.; Primavera, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Prudent, X.; Przysiezniak, H.; Psoroulas, S.; Ptacek, E.; Puigdengoles, C.; Purdham, J.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Qi, M.; Qian, J.; Qian, W.; Qian, Z.; Qin, Z.; Qing, D.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Quinonez, F.; Raas, M.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radics, B.; Rador, T.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rahimi, A. M.; Rahm, D.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammes, M.; Ratoff, P. N.; Rauscher, F.; Rauter, E.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Reinsch, A.; Reisinger, I.; Reljic, D.; Rembser, C.; Ren, Z. L.; Renkel, P.; Rescia, S.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Resende, B.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richards, A.; Richards, R. A.; Richter, R.; Richter-Was, E.; Ridel, M.; Rieke, S.; Rijpstra, M.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Rios, R. R.; Riu, I.; Rivoltella, G.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E. R.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J.; Robinson, M.; Robson, A.; Rocha de Lima, J. G.; Roda, C.; Roda Dos Santos, D.; Rodriguez, D.; Rodriguez Garcia, Y.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rojo, V.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romanov, V. M.; Romeo, G.; Romero Maltrana, D.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosenbaum, G. A.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rosselet, L.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, L. P.; Rotaru, M.; Rothberg, J.; Rottländer, I.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Ruckert, B.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, G.; Rühr, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rumyantsev, L.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruwiedel, C.; Ruzicka, P.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Ryadovikov, V.; Ryan, P.; Rybkin, G.; Rzaeva, S.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Sakamoto, H.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvachua Ferrando, B. M.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Samset, B. H.; Sanchis Lozano, M. A.; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandstroem, R.; Sandvoss, S.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sanny, B.; Sansoni, A.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santi, L.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, J.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarangi, T.; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E.; Sarri, F.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, T.; Sasao, N.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, G.; Savard, P.; Savine, A. Y.; Savinov, V.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D. H.; Says, L. P.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schäfer, U.; Schaetzel, S.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schamov, A. G.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schlereth, J. L.; Schmid, P.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitz, M.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schreiner, A.; Schroeder, C.; Schroer, N.; Schroers, M.; Schuler, G.; Schultes, J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schumacher, J. W.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwierz, R.; Schwindling, J.; Scott, W. G.; Searcy, J.; Sedykh, E.; Segura, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellden, B.; Seman, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sevior, M. E.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shank, J. T.; Shao, Q. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaver, L.; Shaw, K.; Sherman, D.; Sherwood, P.; Shibata, A.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siebel, A.; Siegert, F.; Siegrist, J.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simmons, B.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjoelin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skubic, P.; Skvorodnev, N.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Sloper, J.; Sluka, T.; Smakhtin, V.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, B. C.; Smith, D.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snow, S. W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Soluk, R.; Sondericker, J.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Sosnovtsev, V. V.; Sospedra Suay, L.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Speckmayer, P.; Spencer, E.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; Denis, R. D. St.; Stahl, T.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stancu, S. N.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stastny, J.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Stavropoulos, G.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stevenson, K.; Stewart, G.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Strong, J. A.; Stroynowski, R.; Strube, J.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Soh, D. A.; Su, D.; Suchkov, S. I.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Sviridov, Yu. M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Szymocha, T.; Sánchez, J.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taga, A.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tappern, G. P.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Tatarkhanov, M.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, R. P.; Taylor, W.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Tennenbaum-Katan, Y. D.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terwort, M.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Tevlin, C. M.; Thadome, J.; Thananuwong, R.; Thioye, M.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas, T. L.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thun, R. P.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Timmermans, C. J. W. P.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires Viegas, F. J.; Tisserant, S.; Tobias, J.; Toczek, B.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Tomasz, F.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, D.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, G.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Tovey, S. N.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trinh, T. N.; Tripiana, M. F.; Triplett, N.; Trischuk, W.; Trivedi, A.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiafis, I.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.-W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Turala, M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Tuts, P. M.; Twomey, M. S.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Tzanakos, G.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Underwood, D. G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urkovsky, E.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valenta, J.; Valente, P.; Valentinetti, S.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van Berg, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Vandelli, W.; Vandoni, G.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Varela Rodriguez, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasilyeva, L.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vegni, G.; Veillet, J. J.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veness, R.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Villa, M.; Villani, E. G.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Villate, J.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Viret, S.; Virzi, J.; Vitale, A.; Vitells, O. V.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaques, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T. T.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vudragovic, D.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, P.; Wahlen, H.; Walbersloh, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J. C.; Wang, S. M.; Ward, C. P.; Warsinsky, M.; Wastie, R.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Webel, M.; Weber, J.; Weber, M. D.; Weber, M.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Werthenbach, U.; Wessels, M.; Whalen, K.; Wheeler-Ellis, S. J.; Whitaker, S. P.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, M. G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wright, D.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wulf, E.; Xella, S.; Xie, S.; Xie, Y.; Xu, D.; Xu, N.; Yamada, M.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S. P.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, M.; Yu, X.; Yuan, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zambrano, V.; Zanello, L.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zema, P. F.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, S.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.

    2010-12-01

    The ionization signals in the liquid argon of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter are studied in detail using cosmic muons. In particular, the drift time of the ionization electrons is measured and used to assess the intrinsic uniformity of the calorimeter gaps and estimate its impact on the constant term of the energy resolution. The drift times of electrons in the cells of the second layer of the calorimeter are uniform at the level of 1.3% in the barrel and 2.8% in the endcaps. This leads to an estimated contribution to the constant term of (0.29^{+0.05}_{-0.04})% in the barrel and (0.54^{+0.06}_{-0.04})% in the endcaps. The same data are used to measure the drift velocity of ionization electrons in liquid argon, which is found to be 4.61±0.07 mm/μs at 88.5 K and 1 kV/mm.

  2. A G/NARRLI Effort. Measuring the Ionization Yield of Low-Energy Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Tenzing Henry Yatish [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Liquid argon has long been used for particle detection due to its attractive drift properties, ample abundance, and reasonable density. The response of liquid argon to lowenergy O(102 -1044 eV) interactions is, however, largely unexplored. Weakly interacting massive particles such as neutrinos and hypothetical dark-matter particles (WIMPs) are predicted to coherently scatter on atomic nuclei, leaving only an isolated low-energy nuclear recoil as evidence. The response of liquid argon to low-energy nuclear recoils must be studied to determine the sensitivity of liquid argon based detectors to these unobserved interactions. Detectors sensitive to coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering may be used to monitor nuclear reactors from a distance, to detect neutrinos from supernova, and to test the predicted behavior of neutrinos. Additionally, direct detection of hypothetical weakly interacting dark matter would be a large step toward understanding the substance that accounts for nearly 27% of the universe. In this dissertation I discuss a small dual-phase (liquid-gas) argon proportional scintillation counter built to study the low-energy regime and several novel calibration and characterization techniques developed to study the response of liquid argon to low-energy O(102 -104 eV) interactions.

  3. Electromagnetic Radiation Originating from Unstable Electron Oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Pécseli, Hans

    1975-01-01

    Electromagnetic oscillations in the range 300 – 700 MHz were observed from an unmagnetized argon discharge with an unstable electron velocity distribution function.......Electromagnetic oscillations in the range 300 – 700 MHz were observed from an unmagnetized argon discharge with an unstable electron velocity distribution function....

  4. Monolithic Ge-on-Si lasers for large-scale electronic-photonic integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jifeng; Kimerling, Lionel C.; Michel, Jurgen

    2012-09-01

    A silicon-based monolithic laser source has long been envisioned as a key enabling component for large-scale electronic-photonic integration in future generations of high-performance computation and communication systems. In this paper we present a comprehensive review on the development of monolithic Ge-on-Si lasers for this application. Starting with a historical review of light emission from the direct gap transition of Ge dating back to the 1960s, we focus on the rapid progress in band-engineered Ge-on-Si lasers in the past five years after a nearly 30-year gap in this research field. Ge has become an interesting candidate for active devices in Si photonics in the past decade due to its pseudo-direct gap behavior and compatibility with Si complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) processing. In 2007, we proposed combing tensile strain with n-type doping to compensate the energy difference between the direct and indirect band gap of Ge, thereby achieving net optical gain for CMOS-compatible diode lasers. Here we systematically present theoretical modeling, material growth methods, spontaneous emission, optical gain, and lasing under optical and electrical pumping from band-engineered Ge-on-Si, culminated by recently demonstrated electrically pumped Ge-on-Si lasers with >1 mW output in the communication wavelength window of 1500-1700 nm. The broad gain spectrum enables on-chip wavelength division multiplexing. A unique feature of band-engineered pseudo-direct gap Ge light emitters is that the emission intensity increases with temperature, exactly opposite to conventional direct gap semiconductor light-emitting devices. This extraordinary thermal anti-quenching behavior greatly facilitates monolithic integration on Si microchips where temperatures can reach up to 80 °C during operation. The same band-engineering approach can be extended to other pseudo-direct gap semiconductors, allowing us to achieve efficient light emission at wavelengths previously

  5. Backprojection of GNSS total-electron content signals for recent large earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikesell, T. D.; Rolland, L.; Haney, M. M.; Larmat, C. S.; Lee, R.

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that earthquakes and tsunamis couple energy into the dynamically fluid atmosphere. This energy can propagate up to the ionosphere where we can observe perturbations in the total-electron content (TEC) signals measured by global navigation space systems (GNSS). Recent emphasis has been placed on using these new observables to characterize earthquake and tsunami hazards from space, as well as for planetary exploration. Backprojection is an array-based imaging technique used in seismology to characterize the seismic source location, including complex energy release patterns from large earthquakes. Here we present TEC backprojection results from 3 recent earthquakes - 1) 2009 Samoa triggered doublet (Mw 8.1), 2) 2011 Van dip-slip event (Mw 7.1) and 3) 2012 Haida Gwaii strike-slip underthrust event (Mw 7.8). Each of these events presents new obstacles to overcome if backprojection is to be used routinely to monitor hazards from space. We will discuss these obstacles in detail and present approaches to overcome them. For instance, one problem arises from the fact that the observation point is non-stationary in time because the satellites are moving. Another problem stems from the relative geometry of the geomagnetic field and the incoming acoustic wave at the ionosphere. Finally, we present array-based methods to reduce artifacts in the backprojection images, e.g. array deconvolution, and we show that under favorable circumstances, this approach can be used to characterize motion at the Earth surface from space with high temporal and spatial resolution.

  6. Laser Direct Write micro-fabrication of large area electronics on flexible substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharatos, F.; Makrygianni, M.; Geremia, R.; Biver, E.; Karnakis, D.; Leyder, S.; Puerto, D.; Delaporte, P.; Zergioti, I.

    2016-06-01

    To date, Laser Direct Write (LDW) techniques, such as Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT), selective laser ablation and selective laser sintering of metal nanoparticle (NP) ink layers are receiving growing attention for the printing of uniform and well-defined conductive patterns with resolution down to 10 μm. For flexible substrates in particular, selective laser sintering of such NP patterns has been widely applied, as a low temperature and high resolution process compatible with large area electronics. In this work, LDW of silver NP inks has been carried out on polyethylene-terephthalate (PET), polyethylene-naphthalate (PEN) and polyimide (PI) substrates to achieve low electrical resistivity electrodes. In more detail, high speed short pulsed (picosecond and nanosecond) lasers with repetition rates up to 1 MHz were used to print (LIFT) metal NP inks. We thus achieved uniform and continuous patterns with a minimum feature size of 1 μm and a total footprint larger than 1 cm2. Next, the printed patterns were laser sintered with ns pulses at 532 nm over a wide laser fluence window, resulting in an electrical resistivity of 10 μΩ cm. We carried out spatial beam shaping experiments to achieve a top-hat laser intensity profile and employed selective laser ablation of thin films (thickness on the order of 100 nm) to produce silver micro-electrodes with a resolution on the order of 10 μm and a low line edge roughness. Laser sintering was combined with laser ablation to constitute a fully autonomous micro-patterning technique of metallic micro-features, with a 10 μm resolution and geometrical characteristics tuned for interdigitated electrodes for sensor applications.

  7. Evaluation of Electronic Medical Record (EMR at large urban primary care sexual health centre.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher K Fairley

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Despite substantial investment in Electronic Medical Record (EMR systems there has been little research to evaluate them. Our aim was to evaluate changes in efficiency and quality of services after the introduction of a purpose built EMR system, and to assess its acceptability by the doctors, nurses and patients using it. METHODS: We compared a nine month period before and after the introduction of an EMR system in a large sexual health service, audited a sample of records in both periods and undertook anonymous surveys of both staff and patients. RESULTS: There were 9,752 doctor consultations (in 5,512 consulting hours in the Paper Medical Record (PMR period and 9,145 doctor consultations (in 5,176 consulting hours in the EMR period eligible for inclusion in the analysis. There were 5% more consultations per hour seen by doctors in the EMR period compared to the PMR period (rate ratio = 1.05; 95% confidence interval, 1.02, 1.08 after adjusting for type of consultation. The qualitative evaluation of 300 records for each period showed no difference in quality (P>0.17. A survey of clinicians demonstrated that doctors and nurses preferred the EMR system (P<0.01 and a patient survey in each period showed no difference in satisfaction of their care (97% for PMR, 95% for EMR, P = 0.61. CONCLUSION: The introduction of an integrated EMR improved efficiency while maintaining the quality of the patient record. The EMR was popular with staff and was not associated with a decline in patient satisfaction in the clinical care provided.

  8. Abnormal epidermal changes after argon laser treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, R.A.; Knobler, R.M.; Aberer, E.; Klein, W.; Kocsis, F.; Ott, E. (Univ. of Vienna (Austria))

    1991-02-01

    A 26-year-old woman with a congenital port-wine stain on the forehead was treated three times at 2-month intervals with an argon laser. Six months after the last treatment, moderate blanching and mild scaling confined to the treated area was observed. A biopsy specimen of the treated area revealed a significant decrease in ectatic vessels. However, epidermal changes similar to those of actinic keratosis with disorganized cell layers and marked cytologic abnormalities were seen. Analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes for a defect in DNA repair was negative. Multiple, argon laser-induced photothermal effects may be responsible for the changes observed in our case and may lead to premalignant epidermal transformation.

  9. Explanation of the memory effect in argon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Vidosav

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Memory effect - the long time variation of the electrical breakdown time delay on the relaxation time td (τ was observed in argon 24 hours after relaxation times and explained by the long-lived metastable states remaining from the preceding glow. However, the quenching processes reducing the effective lifetime of metastable states several orders of magnitude below that relevant for the time scale of observation were neglected. By applying approximate gas phase models it was found that the early afterglow kinetics up to hundreds of milliseconds is dominated by the decay of molecular argon ions Ar2+ and the approximate value of their ambipolar diffusion coefficient is determined. After that, nitrogen atoms present as impurities and recombined on the cathode surface and/or field emission determine the breakdown time delay down to the cosmic rays and natural radioactivity level.

  10. Argon gas flow through glass nanopipette

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takami, Tomohide; Nishimoto, Kiwamu; Goto, Tadahiko; Ogawa, Shuichi; Iwata, Futoshi; Takakuwa, Yuji

    2016-12-01

    We have observed the flow of argon gas through a glass nanopipette in vacuum. A glass nanopipette with an inner diameter of 100 nm and a shank length of 3 mm was set between vacuum chambers, and argon gas was introduced from the top of the nanopipette to the bottom. The exit pressure was monitored with an increase in entrance pressure in the range of 50-170 kPa. Knudsen flow was observed at an entrance pressure lower than 100 kPa, and Poiseuille flow was observed at an entrance pressure higher than 120 kPa. The proposed pressure-dependent gas flow method provides a means of evaluating the glass nanopipette before using it for various applications including nanodeposition to surfaces and femtoinjection to living cells.

  11. LIQUID ARGON CALORIMETER PERFORMANCE AT HIGH RATES

    CERN Document Server

    Kukhtin, V; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The performance of the ATLAS liquid argon endcap and forward calorimeters has been projected at the planned high luminosity LHC option HL-LHC by exposing small calorimeter modules of the electromagnetic, hadronic, and forward calorimeters to high intensity proton beams at IHEP/Protvino accelerator. The results of HV current and of pulse shape analysis, and also the dependence of signal amplitude on beam intensity are presented.

  12. An impact hypothesis for Venus argon anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaula, W. M.; Newman, W. I.

    1997-03-01

    The Ar-36+38 argon-excess anomally of Venus has been hypothesized to have its origin in the impact of an outer solar system body of about 100-km diameter. A critical evaluation is made of this hypothesis and its competitors; it is judged that its status must for the time being remain one of 'Sherlock Holmes' type, in that something so improbable must be accepted when all alternatives are eliminated.

  13. Enhanced Field Emission from Argon Plasma-Treated Ultra-sharp α-Fe2O3Nanoflakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang JX

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hematite nanoflakes have been synthesized by a simple heat oxide method and further treated by Argon plasmas. The effects of Argon plasma on the morphology and crystal structures of nanoflakes were investigated. Significant enhancement of field-induced electron emission from the plasma-treated nanoflakes was observed. The transmission electron microscopy investigation shows that the plasma treatment effectively removes amorphous coating and creates plenty of sub-tips at the surface of the nanoflakes, which are believed to contribute the enhancement of emission. This work suggests that plasma treatment technique could be a direct means to improve field-emission properties of nanostructures.

  14. Nanotextured Shrink Wrap Superhydrophobic Surfaces by Argon Plasma Etching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolie M. Nokes

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a rapid, simple, and scalable approach to achieve superhydrophobic (SH substrates directly in commodity shrink wrap film utilizing Argon (Ar plasma. Ar plasma treatment creates a stiff skin layer on the surface of the shrink film. When the film shrinks, the mismatch in stiffness between the stiff skin layer and bulk shrink film causes the formation of multiscale hierarchical wrinkles with nano-textured features. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM images confirm the presence of these biomimetic structures. Contact angle (CA and contact angle hysteresis (CAH measurements, respectively, defined as values greater than 150° and less than 10°, verified the SH nature of the substrates. Furthermore, we demonstrate the ability to reliably pattern hydrophilic regions onto the SH substrates, allowing precise capture and detection of proteins in urine. Finally, we achieved self-driven microfluidics via patterning contrasting superhydrophilic microchannels on the SH Ar substrates to induce flow for biosensing.

  15. Argon plasma immersion ion implantation of polystyrene films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondyurin, A. [Applied and Plasma Physics, School of Physics (A28), University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)], E-mail: kond@mailcity.com; Gan, B.K.; Bilek, M.M.M.; McKenzie, D.R.; Mizuno, K. [Applied and Plasma Physics, School of Physics (A28), University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Wuhrer, R. [Microstructural Analysis Unit, University of Technology Sydney, P.O. Box 123, Broadway, NSW 2007 (Australia)

    2008-04-15

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII), using bias voltages of 5, 10, 15 and 20 kV in an argon plasma and fluences in the range of 2 x 10{sup 14}-2 x 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}, was applied to 100 nm polystyrene films coated on silicon wafer substrates. The etching kinetics and structural changes induced in the polystyrene films were investigated with ellipsometry, Raman and FTIR spectroscopies, optical and scanning electron microscopies, atomic force microscopy and contact angle measurements. Effects such as carbonisation, oxidation and cross-linking were observed and their dependence on the applied bias voltage is reported. Variations in the etching rate during the PIII process and its relationship to carbonisation of the modified surface layer are explored.

  16. Total skin electron therapy treatment verification: Monte Carlo simulation and beam characteristics of large non-standard electron fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavon, Ester Carrasco [Dpto Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Sevilla, Avda Sanchez Pizjuan, 4, E-41009, Sevilla (Spain); Sanchez-Doblado, Francisco [Dpto Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Sevilla, Avda Sanchez Pizjuan, 4, E-41009, Sevilla (Spain); Leal, Antonio [Dpto Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Sevilla, Avda Sanchez Pizjuan, 4, E-41009, Sevilla (Spain); Capote, Roberto [Dpto Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Sevilla, Avda Sanchez Pizjuan, 4, E-41009, Sevilla (Spain); Lagares, Juan Ignacio [Dpto Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Sevilla, Avda Sanchez Pizjuan, 4, E-41009, Sevilla (Spain); Perucha, Maria [Dpto Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Sevilla, Avda Sanchez Pizjuan, 4, E-41009, Sevilla (Spain); Arrans, Rafael [Dpto Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Sevilla, Avda Sanchez Pizjuan, 4, E-41009, Sevilla (Spain)

    2003-09-07

    Total skin electron therapy (TSET) is a complex technique which requires non-standard measurements and dosimetric procedures. This paper investigates an essential first step towards TSET Monte Carlo (MC) verification. The non-standard 6 MeV 40 x 40 cm{sup 2} electron beam at a source to surface distance (SSD) of 100 cm as well as its horizontal projection behind a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) screen to SSD = 380 cm were evaluated. The EGS4 OMEGA-BEAM code package running on a Linux home made 47 PCs cluster was used for the MC simulations. Percentage depth-dose curves and profiles were calculated and measured experimentally for the 40 x 40 cm{sup 2} field at both SSD = 100 cm and patient surface SSD = 380 cm. The output factor (OF) between the reference 40 x 40 cm{sup 2} open field and its horizontal projection as TSET beam at SSD = 380 cm was also measured for comparison with MC results. The accuracy of the simulated beam was validated by the good agreement to within 2% between measured relative dose distributions, including the beam characteristic parameters (R{sub 50}, R{sub 80}, R{sub 100}, R{sub p}, E{sub 0}) and the MC calculated results. The energy spectrum, fluence and angular distribution at different stages of the beam (at SSD = 100 cm, at SSD = 364.2 cm, behind the PMMA beam spoiler screen and at treatment surface SSD = 380 cm) were derived from MC simulations. Results showed a final decrease in mean energy of almost 56% from the exit window to the treatment surface. A broader angular distribution (FWHM of the angular distribution increased from 13deg at SSD 100 cm to more than 30deg at the treatment surface) was fully attributable to the PMMA beam spoiler screen. OF calculations and measurements agreed to less than 1%. The effect of changing the electron energy cut-off from 0.7 MeV to 0.521 MeV and air density fluctuations in the bunker which could affect the MC results were shown to have a negligible impact on the beam fluence distributions. Results

  17. Multiple large filament bundles observed in Caulobacter crescentus by electron cryotomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Briegel, A; Dias, DP; Li, Z;

    2006-01-01

    , molecular mechanisms have remained obscure in part for lack of electron microscopy-resolution images where these filaments can be seen acting within their cellular context. Here, electron cryotomography was used to image the widely studied model prokaryote Caulobacter crescentus in an intact, near...

  18. Large-charge quasimonoenergetic electron beams produced by off-axis colliding laser pulses in underdense plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Z. G.; Zhang, Z. M.; Zhang, B.; He, S. K.; Teng, J.; Hong, W.; Dong, K. G.; Wu, Y. C.; Zhu, B.; Gu, Y. Q.

    2017-02-01

    Electrons can be efficiently injected into a plasma wave by colliding two counterpropagating laser pulses in a laser wakefield acceleration. However, the generation of a high-quality electron beam with a large charge is difficult in the traditional on-axis colliding scheme due to the growth of the electron beam duration coming from the increase of the beam charge. To solve this problem, we propose an off-axis colliding scheme, in which the collision point is away from the axis of the driver pulse. We show that the electrons injected from the off-axis region are highly concentered on the tail of the bubble even for a large trapped charge, thus feeling almost the same accelerating field. As a result, quasimonoenergetic electron beams with a large charge can be produced. The validity of this scheme is confirmed by both the particle-in-cell simulations and the Hamiltonian model. Furthermore, it is shown that a Laguerre-Gauss (LG) laser can be adopted as the injection pulse to realize the off-axis colliding injection in three dimensions symmetrically, which may be useful in simplifying the technical layout of the real experiment setup.

  19. Laser Direct Write micro-fabrication of large area electronics on flexible substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zacharatos, F.; Makrygianni, M. [National Technical University of Athens, Physics Department, Zografou Campus, 15780 (Greece); Geremia, R.; Biver, E.; Karnakis, D. [Oxford Lasers Ltd, Unit 8 Moorbrook Park, Oxfordshire OX11 7HP (United Kingdom); Leyder, S.; Puerto, D.; Delaporte, P. [Aix-Marseille University, CNRS, LP3 – UMR 7341, 13288 Marseille Cedex 9 (France); Zergioti, I., E-mail: zergioti@central.ntua.gr [National Technical University of Athens, Physics Department, Zografou Campus, 15780 (Greece)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • Laser Direct Writing of metallic patterns with a minimum feature size of 1 μm. • Selective Laser Ablation of 50 nm thick metal films on flexible substrates. • Selective Laser sintering resulting in an electrical resistivity of 9 μΩ cm. • Laser fabrication of interdigitated electrodes for sensor applications. - Abstract: To date, Laser Direct Write (LDW) techniques, such as Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT), selective laser ablation and selective laser sintering of metal nanoparticle (NP) ink layers are receiving growing attention for the printing of uniform and well-defined conductive patterns with resolution down to 10 μm. For flexible substrates in particular, selective laser sintering of such NP patterns has been widely applied, as a low temperature and high resolution process compatible with large area electronics. In this work, LDW of silver NP inks has been carried out on polyethylene-terephthalate (PET), polyethylene-naphthalate (PEN) and polyimide (PI) substrates to achieve low electrical resistivity electrodes. In more detail, high speed short pulsed (picosecond and nanosecond) lasers with repetition rates up to 1 MHz were used to print (LIFT) metal NP inks. We thus achieved uniform and continuous patterns with a minimum feature size of 1 μm and a total footprint larger than 1 cm{sup 2}. Next, the printed patterns were laser sintered with ns pulses at 532 nm over a wide laser fluence window, resulting in an electrical resistivity of 10 μΩ cm. We carried out spatial beam shaping experiments to achieve a top-hat laser intensity profile and employed selective laser ablation of thin films (thickness on the order of 100 nm) to produce silver micro-electrodes with a resolution on the order of 10 μm and a low line edge roughness. Laser sintering was combined with laser ablation to constitute a fully autonomous micro-patterning technique of metallic micro-features, with a 10 μm resolution and geometrical characteristics tuned for

  20. Simultaneous observation of small- and large-energy-transfer electron-electron scattering in three-dimensional indium oxide thick films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Liu, Xin-Dian; Li, Zhi-Qing

    2016-05-01

    In three-dimensional (3D) disordered metals, the electron-phonon (e-ph) scattering is the sole significant inelastic process. Thus the theoretical prediction concerning the electron-electron (e\\text-e) scattering rate 1/τ_\\varphi as a function of temperature T in 3D disordered metal has not been fully tested thus far, though it was proposed 40 years ago (Schmid A., Z. Phys., 271 (1974) 251). We report here the simultaneous observation of small- and large-energy-transfer e\\text-e scattering in 3D indium oxide thick films. In the temperature region T≳100 \\text{K} , the temperature dependence of resistivity of each film obeys Bloch-Grüneisen law, indicating that the films possess degenerate-semiconductor characteristics in electrical transport property. In the low-temperature regime, 1/τ_\\varphi as a function of T for each film can not be ascribed to e-ph scattering. To quantitatively describe the temperature behavior of 1/τ_\\varphi , both the 3D small- and large-energy-transfer e\\text-e scattering processes should be considered. (The small- and large-energy-transfer e\\text-e scattering rates are proportional to T3/2 and T 2, respectively.) In addition, the experimental prefactors of T3/2 and T 2 are proportional to k_F-5/2 \\ell-3/2 and E_F-1 (k F is the Fermi wave number, ℓ is the electron elastic mean free path, and E F is the Fermi energy), respectively, which are completely consistent with the theoretical predictions. Our experimental results fully demonstrate the validity of the theoretical predictions concerning both small- and large-energy-transfer e\\text-e scattering rates.

  1. Large Amplitude Whistler Waves and Electron Acceleration in the Earth's Radiation Belts: A Review of STEREO and Wind Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattell, Cynthia; Breneman, A.; Goetz, K.; Kellogg, P.; Kersten, K.; Wygant, J.; Wilson, L. B., III; Looper, Mark D.; Blake, J. Bernard; Roth, I.

    2012-01-01

    One of the critical problems for understanding the dynamics of Earth's radiation belts is determining the physical processes that energize and scatter relativistic electrons. We review measurements from the Wind/Waves and STEREO S/Waves waveform capture instruments of large amplitude whistler-mode waves. These observations have provided strong evidence that large amplitude (100s mV/m) whistler-mode waves are common during magnetically active periods. The large amplitude whistlers have characteristics that are different from typical chorus. They are usually nondispersive and obliquely propagating, with a large longitudinal electric field and significant parallel electric field. We will also review comparisons of STEREO and Wind wave observations with SAMPEX observations of electron microbursts. Simulations show that the waves can result in energization by many MeV and/or scattering by large angles during a single wave packet encounter due to coherent, nonlinear processes including trapping. The experimental observations combined with simulations suggest that quasilinear theoretical models of electron energization and scattering via small-amplitude waves, with timescales of hours to days, may be inadequate for understanding radiation belt dynamics.

  2. FORMATION OF CARBON NANOSTRUCTURES USING ACETYLENE, ARGON-ACETYLENE AND ARGON-HYDROGEN-ACETYLENE PLASMAS

    OpenAIRE

    Marcinauskas, Liutauras; Grigonis, Alfonsas; Valincius, Vitas

    2013-01-01

    The amorphous carbon films were deposited on silicon-metal substrates by plasma jet chemical vapor deposition (PJCVD) and plasma enchanted CVD (PECVD). PJCVD carbon films have been prepared at atmospheric pressure in argon-acetylene and argon-hydrogen-acetylene plasma mixtures. The films deposited in Ar-C2H2 plasma are attributed to graphite-like carbon films. The formation of the nanocrystalline graphite was obtained in Ar-H2-C2H2 plasma. Addition of the hydrogen gas lead to the ...

  3. Effects of gamma-ray irradiation on electronic and non-electronic equipment of Large Helical Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    K, Ogawa; T, Nishitani; M, Isobe; M, Sato; M, Yokota; H, Hayashi; T, Kobuchi; T, Nishimura

    2017-02-01

    In a deuterium operation on the Large Helical Device, the measurement and control equipment placed in the torus hall must survive under an environment of radiation. To study the effects of gamma-ray irradiation on the equipment, an irradiation experiment is performed at the Cobalt-60 irradiation facility of Nagoya University. Transient and permanent effects on a personal computer, media converters, programmable logic controllers, isolation amplifiers, a web camera, optical flow meters, and water sealing gaskets are experimentally surveyed. Transient noise appears on the web camera. Offset of the signal increases with an increase of the integrated dose on the programmable logic controller. The DeviceNet module on the programmable logic controller is broken at the integrated dose of 72 Gy, which is the expected range of the integrated dose of the torus hall. The other equipment can survive under the gamma-ray field in the torus hall.

  4. An investigation of CO2 splitting using nanosecond pulsed corona discharge: effect of argon addition on CO2 conversion and energy efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, M. S.; Yanallah, K.; Allen, R. W. K.; Pontiga, F.

    2017-03-01

    The plasma chemical splitting of carbon dioxide (CO2) to produce carbon monoxide (CO) in a pulsed corona discharge was investigated from both an experimental and a numerical standpoint. High voltage nanosecond pulses were applied to a stream of pure CO2 and its mixture with argon, and the gaseous products were identified using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Due to the shape of pulses, the process of CO2 splitting was found to proceed in two phases. The first phase is dominated by ionization, which generates a high electron density. Then, during the second phase, direct electron impact dissociation of CO2 contributes to a large portion of CO production. Conversion and energy efficiency were calculated for the tested conditions. The conversions achieved are comparable to those obtained using other high pressure non-thermal discharges, such as dielectric barrier discharge. However, the energy efficiencies were considerably higher, which are favorable to industrial applications that require atmospheric conditions and elevated gas flow rates.

  5. MeV Argon ion beam generation with narrow energy spread

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Jiancai; Shen, Baifei; Zhang, Hui; Li, Shun; Yu, Yong; Li, Jinfeng; Lu, Xiaoming; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Xinliang; Liang, Xiaoyan; Leng, Yuxin; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-01-01

    Laser driven particle acceleration has shown remarkable progresses in generating multi-GeV electron bunches and 10s of MeV ion beams based on high-power laser facilities. Intense laser pulse offers the acceleration field of 1012 Volt per meter, several orders of magnitude larger than that in conventional accelerators, enabling compact devices. Here we report that a highly-collimated argon ion beam with narrow energy spread is produced by irradiating a 45-fs fully-relativistic laser pulse onto an argon cluster target. The highly-charged (Argon ion with charge state of 16+) heavy ion beam has a minimum absolute energy spread of 0.19 MeV per nucleon at the energy peak of 0.39 MeV per nucleon. we identify a novel scheme from particle-in-cell simulations that greatly reduces the beam energy spread. The laser-driven intense plasma wakefield has a strong modulation on the ion beam in a way that the low energy part is cut off. The pre-accelerated argon ion beam from Coulomb explosion thus becomes more mono-energetic ...

  6. Modified morphology of graphene sheets by Argon-atom bombardment: molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiao-Lin; Zhang, Kai-Wang; Wang, Ru-Zhi; Liu, Wen-Liang; Zhong, Jian-Xin

    2011-12-01

    By a molecular dynamics method, we simulated the process of Argon-atom bombardment on a graphene sheet with 2720 carbon atoms. The results show that, the damage of the bombardment on the graphene sheet depends not only on the incident energy but also on the particle flux density of Argon atoms. To compare and analyze the effect of the incident energy and the particle flux density in the Argon-atom bombardment, we defined the impact factor on graphene sheet by calculating the broken-hole area. The results indicate that, there is an exponential accumulated-damage for the impact of both the incident energy and the particle flux density and there is a critical incident energy ranging from 20-30 eV/atom in Argon-atom bombardment. Different configurations, such as sieve-like and circle-like graphene can be formed by controlling of different particle flux density as the incident energy is more than the critical value. Our results supply a feasible method on fabrication of porous graphene-based materials for gas-storages and molecular sieves, and it also helps to understand the damage mechanism of graphene-based electronic devices under high particle radiation.

  7. Are the argon metastables important in high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudmundsson, J. T., E-mail: tumi@hi.is [Department of Space and Plasma Physics, School of Electrical Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhaga 3, IS-107 Reykjavik (Iceland); Lundin, D.; Minea, T. M. [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et Plasmas - LPGP, UMR 8578 CNRS, Université Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Stancu, G. D. [CentraleSupélec, Grande Voie des Vignes, 92295 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France); CNRS, UPR 288 Laboratoire EM2C, Grande Voie des Vignes, 92295 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France); Brenning, N. [Department of Space and Plasma Physics, School of Electrical Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Plasma and Coatings Physics Division, IFM-Materials Physics, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden)

    2015-11-15

    We use an ionization region model to explore the ionization processes in the high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge in argon with a titanium target. In conventional dc magnetron sputtering (dcMS), stepwise ionization can be an important route for ionization of the argon gas. However, in the HiPIMS discharge stepwise ionization is found to be negligible during the breakdown phase of the HiPIMS pulse and becomes significant (but never dominating) only later in the pulse. For the sputtered species, Penning ionization can be a significant ionization mechanism in the dcMS discharges, while in the HiPIMS discharge Penning ionization is always negligible as compared to electron impact ionization. The main reasons for these differences are a higher plasma density in the HiPIMS discharge, and a higher electron temperature. Furthermore, we explore the ionization fraction and the ionized flux fraction of the sputtered vapor and compare with recent experimental work.

  8. Electron Acceleration at a Coronal Shock Propagating Through a Large-scale Streamer-like Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Kong, Xiangliang; Guo, Fan; Feng, Shiwei; Du, Guohui; Li, Gang

    2016-01-01

    With a test-particle simulation, we investigate the effect of large-scale coronal magnetic fields on electron acceleration at an outward-propagating coronal shock with a circular front. The coronal field is approximated by an analytical solution with a streamer-like magnetic field featured by partially open magnetic field and a current sheet at the equator atop the closed region. We show that the large-scale shock-field configuration, especially the relative curvature of the shock and the magnetic field line across which the shock is sweeping, plays an important role in the efficiency of electron acceleration. At low shock altitudes, when the shock curvature is larger than that of magnetic field lines, the electrons are mainly accelerated at the shock flanks; at higher altitudes, when the shock curvature is smaller, the electrons are mainly accelerated at the shock nose around the top of closed field lines. The above process reveals the shift of efficient electron acceleration region along the shock front dur...

  9. The liquid argon TPC for the ICARUS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Arneodo, F

    1997-01-01

    The ICARUS project aims at the realisation of a large liquid argon TPC to be run at the Underground Laboratories of Gran Sasso in Italy. An intense R&D; activity has put on firm grounds this new detector technology and experimentally confirmed its feasibility on a few ton scale. Based on these solid achievements, the collaboration is now confident of being able to build and safely operate a multi-kton detector. The reseach program of the experiment involves the systematic study of a wide spectrum of physical phenomena covering many orders of magnitude in the energy deposited in the detector: from the few MeV of solar neutrino interactions, to the about one GeV of the proton decay and atmospheric neutrinos, up to the higher energies of neutrinos from accelerators.

  10. Emission analysis of large number of various passenger electronic devices in aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüür, Jens; Oppermann, Lukas; Enders, Achim; Nunes, Rafael R.; Oertel, Carl-Henrik

    2016-09-01

    The ever increasing use of PEDs (passenger or portable electronic devices) has put pressure on the aircraft industry as well as operators and administrations to reevaluate established restrictions in PED-use on airplanes in the last years. Any electronic device could cause electromagnetic interference to the electronics of the airplane, especially interference at receiving antennas of sensitive wireless navigation and communication (NAV/COM) systems. This paper presents a measurement campaign in an Airbus A320. 69 test passengers were asked to actively use a combination of about 150 electronic devices including many attached cables, preferentially with a high data load on their buses, to provoke maximal emissions. These emissions were analysed within the cabin as well as at the inputs of aircraft receiving antennas outside of the fuselage. The emissions of the electronic devices as well as the background noise are time-variant, so just comparing only one reference and one transmission measurement is not sufficient. Repeated measurements of both cases lead to a more reliable first analysis. Additional measurements of the absolute received power at the antennas of the airplane allow a good estimation of the real interference potential to aircraft NAV/COM systems. Although there were many measured emissions within the cabin, there were no disturbance signals detectable at the aircraft antennas.

  11. Large work function difference driven electron transfer from electrides to single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menamparambath, Mini Mol; Park, Jong-Ho; Yoo, Ho-Sung; Patole, Shashikant P; Yoo, Ji-Beom; Kim, Sung Wng; Baik, Seunghyun

    2014-08-07

    A difference in work function plays a key role in charge transfer between two materials. Inorganic electrides provide a unique opportunity for electron transfer since interstitial anionic electrons result in a very low work function of 2.4-2.6 eV. Here we investigated charge transfer between two different types of electrides, [Ca(2)N](+)·e(-) and [Ca(24)Al(28)O(64)](4+)·4e(-), and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with a work function of 4.73-5.05 eV. [Ca(2)N](+) · e(-) with open 2-dimensional electron layers was more effective in donating electrons to SWNTs than closed cage structured [Ca(24)Al(28)O(64)](4+) · 4e(-) due to the higher electron concentration (1.3 × 10(22) cm(-3)) and mobility (∼ 200 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at RT). A non-covalent conjugation enhanced near-infrared fluorescence of SWNTs as high as 52%. The field emission current density of electride-SWNT-silver paste dramatically increased by a factor of 46,000 (14.8 mA cm(-2)) at 2 V μm(-1) (3.5 wt% [Ca(2)N](+) · e(-)) with a turn-on voltage of 0.85 V μm(-1).

  12. Formation of the inner electron radiation belt by enhanced large-scale electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yi-Jiun; Selesnick, Richard S.; Blake, J. B.

    2016-09-01

    A two-dimensional bounce-averaged test particle code was developed to examine trapped electron trajectories during geomagnetic storms with the assumption of conservation of the first and second adiabatic invariants. The March 2013 storm was selected as an example because the geomagnetic activity Kp index sharply increased from 2 + to 7- at 6:00 UT on 17 March. Electron measurements with energies between 37 and 460 keV from the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) instrument onboard Van Allen Probes (VAP) are used as initial conditions prior to the storm onset and served to validate test particle simulations during the storm. Simulation results help to interpret the observed electron injection as nondiffusive radial transport over a short distance in the inner belt and slot region based on various electric field models, although the quantitative comparisons are not precise. We show that electron drift trajectories are sensitive to the selection of electric field models. Moreover, our simulation results suggest that the actual field strength of penetration electric fields during this storm is stronger than any existing electric field model, particularly for L ≤ 2.

  13. Large work function difference driven electron transfer from electrides to single-walled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Menamparambath, Mini Mol

    2014-06-23

    A difference in work function plays a key role in charge transfer between two materials. Inorganic electrides provide a unique opportunity for electron transfer since interstitial anionic electrons result in a very low work function of 2.4-2.6 eV. Here we investigated charge transfer between two different types of electrides, [Ca2N]+·e- and [Ca 24Al28O64]4+·4e-, and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with a work function of 4.73-5.05 eV. [Ca2N]+·e- with open 2-dimensional electron layers was more effective in donating electrons to SWNTs than closed cage structured [Ca24Al28O64] 4+·4e- due to the higher electron concentration (1.3 × 1022 cm-3) and mobility (∼200 cm 2 V-1 s-1 at RT). A non-covalent conjugation enhanced near-infrared fluorescence of SWNTs as high as 52%. The field emission current density of electride-SWNT-silver paste dramatically increased by a factor of 46000 (14.8 mA cm-2) at 2 V μm-1 (3.5 wt% [Ca2N]+·e-) with a turn-on voltage of 0.85 V μm-1. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  14. Investigation of transfer ionization processes in the collision of partially stripped carbon ions on Argon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The ratios of the cross section of the transfer-ionization to the single-electron-capture of Argon induced by Cq+ (q=1,2,3) ions are measured by means of position sensitive and time-of-flight techniques. Our experimental results are compared with the data of Heq+ (q=1,2)-Ar of DuBois. A qualitative interpretation is presented based on the Classical-Over-Barrier Model of Bohr.

  15. The lead-liquid argon sampling calorimeter of the SLD detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axen, D.; Bougerolle, S.; Sobie, R. (Univ. British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)); Eigen, G.; De Jongh, F.; Hitlin, D.; Kelsey, M.; Klein, M.; Mincer, A.; Wisniewski, W.; Wolf, R. (California Inst. of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)); Arroyo, C.; Au, Y.; Baltay, C.; Bolton, T.; Bazarko, A.; Camilleri, L.; Hyatt, E.; Manly, S.; Rabinowitz, S.; Rowson, P.C.; Seligman, S.; Shaevitz, M.H.; Smith, S.; Steiner, R.V. (Columbia Univ., Nevis Lab., Irvington, NY (United States)); Abt, I.; Alzofon, D.; Arnett, D.; Barrera, F.; Bell, R.; Bes, S.C.; Bogart, J.; Breidenbach, M.; Candia, A.; Claus, R.; Cutler, H.; Davis, R.; Dubois, R.; Foss, M.; Fox, J.; Fox, M.; Gioumousis, A.; Grebenyuk, A.; Haller, G.; Hamilton, V.; Hodgson, J.; Huffer, M.; Junk, T.; Kim, P.; Labs, J.; Neal, H.; Nelson, D.; Nordby, M.; Paffrath, L.; Putallaz, G.; Rogers, H.; Russell, J.J.; Saez, P.; Seward, P.; Sherden, D.; Skarpaas, K.; Schindler, R.H.; Waite, A.P.; Watt, R. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, CA

    1993-05-01

    The lead-liquid argon sampling calorimeter of the SLD detector is one of the largest detectors employing cryogenic liquids now in operation. This paper details the design and performance considerations, the mechanical and cryogenic systems, the absorber design and tower segmentation, the data acquisition electronics, and the control systems of the detector. The initial operational performance of the device is discussed. Detailed resolution studies will be presented in a later paper. (orig.).

  16. Large Logarithms in the Beam Normal Spin Asymmetry of Elastic Electron--Proton Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei Afanasev; Mykola Merenkov

    2004-06-01

    We study a parity-conserving single-spin beam asymmetry of elastic electron-proton scattering induced by an absorptive part of the two-photon exchange amplitude. It is demonstrated that excitation of inelastic hadronic intermediate states by the consecutive exchange of two photons leads to logarithmic and double-logarithmic enhancement due to contributions of hard collinear quasi-real photons. The asymmetry at small electron scattering angles is expressed in terms of the total photoproduction cross section on the proton, and is predicted to reach the magnitude of 20-30 parts per million. At these conditions and fixed 4-momentum transfers, the asymmetry is rising logarithmically with increasing electron beam energy, following the high-energy diffractive behavior of total photoproduction cross section on the proton.

  17. ELECTRON ACCELERATION AT A CORONAL SHOCK PROPAGATING THROUGH A LARGE-SCALE STREAMER-LIKE MAGNETIC FIELD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Xiangliang; Chen, Yao; Feng, Shiwei; Du, Guohui [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy and Solar-Terrestrial Environment, and Institute of Space Sciences, Shandong University, Weihai, Shandong 264209 (China); Guo, Fan [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Li, Gang, E-mail: yaochen@sdu.edu.cn [Department of Space Science and CSPAR, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2016-04-10

    Using a test-particle simulation, we investigate the effect of large-scale coronal magnetic fields on electron acceleration at an outward-propagating coronal shock with a circular front. The coronal field is approximated by an analytical solution with a streamer-like magnetic field featuring a partially open magnetic field and a current sheet at the equator atop the closed region. We show that the large-scale shock-field configuration, especially the relative curvature of the shock and the magnetic field line across which the shock is sweeping, plays an important role in the efficiency of electron acceleration. At low shock altitudes, when the shock curvature is larger than that of the magnetic field lines, the electrons are mainly accelerated at the shock flanks; at higher altitudes, when the shock curvature is smaller, the electrons are mainly accelerated at the shock nose around the top of closed field lines. The above process reveals the shift of the efficient electron acceleration region along the shock front during its propagation. We also find that, in general, the electron acceleration at the shock flank is not as efficient as that at the top of the closed field because a collapsing magnetic trap can be formed at the top. In addition, we find that the energy spectra of electrons are power-law-like, first hardening then softening with the spectral index varying in a range of −3 to −6. Physical interpretations of the results and implications for the study of solar radio bursts are discussed.

  18. Two Dimensional LIF Measurements and Potential Structure of Ion Beam Formation in an Argon Helicon Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Evan; Scime, Earl; Good, Timothy

    2016-10-01

    We report 2-dimensional, spatially resolved observations of ion beam formation in an expanding helicon plasma. Previous studies found that a current free double layer (CFDL) spontaneously arises at low pressure, below 1 mT. We use Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF), a non-perturbative diagnostic to measure the ion velocity distribution functions (IVDFs) of argon ions both parallel and perpendicular to the background magnetic field. We report ion beam formation as a function of the expansion chamber magnetic field (0-108 G). The ion beam appears peaked in the center of the expansion chamber and decays over a few centimeters radially. We also report the potential structure of the plasma obtained with a planar Langmuir probe. To obtain meaningful Langmuir probe measurements, averages of tens of current-voltage are needed to reduce the effects of large electrostatic fluctuations that arise in plasmas that generate ion beams. We report the dependence of density, electron temperature, and floating potential on radial and axial position in the expansion plume. NSF Award PHYS-1360278.

  19. Anode-Coupled Readout for Light Collection in Liquid Argon TPCs

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, Z; Bugel, L; Collin, G H; Conrad, J M

    2015-01-01

    This paper will discuss a new method of signal read-out from photon detectors in ultra-large, underground liquid argon time projection chambers. In this design, the signal from the light collection system is coupled via capacitive plates to the TPC wire-planes. This signal is then read out using the same cabling and electronics as the charge information. This greatly benefits light collection: it eliminates the need for an independent readout, substantially reducing cost; It reduces the number of cables in the vapor region of the TPC that can produce impurities; And it cuts down on the number of feed-throughs in the cryostat wall that can cause heat-leaks and potential points of failure. We present experimental results that demonstrate the sensitivity of a LArTPC wire plane to photon detector signals. We also simulate the effect of a 1 $\\mu$s shaping time and a 2 MHz sampling rate on these signals in the presence of noise, and find that a single photoelectron timing resolution of $\\sim$30 ns can be achieved.

  20. Argon diffusion from biotite at high temperature and pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈道公; 贾命命; 李彬贤; 陆全明; 谢鸿森; 侯渭

    1995-01-01

    t The experiments of argon diffusion dynamics for biotite were carried out at 700 -1000℃ and 0.5 - 2,0 GPa and the diffusion coefficient and activation energy using different models have been calculated. The results indicate that the pressure does affect the argon diffusion and its effect is opposite to that of temperature. When p increases, the activation energy increases and diffusion coefficient decreases. The relation between pressure, closure temperature and cooling rate has been obtained. It is postulated that in low T and high p conditions, the argon diffusion from the environment to the system could occur and incur the appearance of the external argon in minerals.

  1. Measurement of Tensor Polarization in Elastic Electron-Deuteron Scattering at Large Momentum Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Abbott; Abdellah Ahmidouch; Heinz Anklin; Francois Arvieux; Jacques Ball; S. Beedoe; Elizabeth Beise; Louis Bimbot; Werner Boeglin; Herbert Breuer; Roger Carlini; Nicholas Chant; Samuel Danagoulian; K. Dow; Jean-Eric Ducret; James Dunne; Lars Ewell; Laurent Eyraud; Christophe Furget; Michel Garcon; Ronald Gilman; Charles Glashausser; Paul Gueye; Kenneth Gustafsson; Kawtar Hafidi; Adrian Honegger; Juerg Jourdan; Serge Kox; Gerfried Kumbartzki; L. Lu; Allison Lung; David Mack; Pete Markowitz; Justin McIntyre; David Meekins; Fernand Merchez; Joseph Mitchell; R. Mohring; Sekazi Mtingwa; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; David Pitz; Liming Qin; Ronald Ransome; Jean-Sebastien Real; Philip Roos; Paul Rutt; Reyad Sawafta; Samuel Stepanyan; Raphael Tieulent; Egle Tomasi-Gustafsson; William Turchinetz; Kelley Vansyoc; Jochen Volmer; Eric Voutier; William Vulcan; Claude Williamson; Stephen Wood; Chen Yan; Jie Zhao; Wenxia Zhao

    2000-05-01

    Tensor polarization observables (t20, t21 and t22) have been measured in elastic electron-deuteron scattering for six values of momentum transfer between 0.66 and 1.7 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The experiment was performed at the Jefferson Laboratory in Hall C using the electron HMS Spectrometer, a specially designed deuteron magnetic channel and the recoil deuteron polarimeter POLDER. The new data determine to much larger Q{sup 2} the deuteron charge form factors G{sub C} and G{sub Q}. They are in good agreement with relativistic calculations and disagree with pQCD predictions.

  2. Combining configuration interaction with perturbation theory for atoms with large number of valence electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Dzuba, V A; Harabati, C; Flambaum, V V

    2016-01-01

    A version of the configuration interaction (CI) method is developed which treats highly excited many-electron basis states perturbatively, so that their inclusion does not affect the size of the CI matrix. This removes, at least in principle, the main limitation of the CI method in dealing with many-electron atoms or ions. We perform calculations of the spectra of iodine and its ions, tungsten, and ytterbium as examples of atoms with open $s$, $p$, $d$ and $f$-shells. Good agreement of the calculated data with experiment illustrates the power of the method. Its advantages and limitations are discussed.

  3. Self-consistent Kinetic Description of the Low-Pressure Solenoidal Inductively Coupled Argon Discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛明; 王友年

    2005-01-01

    Using an one-dimensional slab model, we have studied the electron energy distribution, the anomalous skin effect, and power absorption in the solenoidal-inductively-coupled argon discharge under low pressures (≤1.33 Pa). The electron energy distribution function and rf electromagnetic field in the plasma are determined self-consistently by the linearized Bolztmann equation incorporating with the Maxwell equations. The numerical results show that, at low pressures, the electron energy distribution function exhibits a non-Maxwellian distribution with a long high-energy tail. The anomalous skin effect is greatly enhanced under low pressures and the negative power absorption is also obtained.

  4. Near-infrared scintillation of liquid argon

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, T; Lippincott, W H; Rubinov, P

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1970s it has been known that noble gases scintillate in the near infrared (NIR) region of the spectrum (0.7 $\\mu$m < $\\lambda$; < 1.5$\\mu$m). More controversial has been the question of the NIR light yield for condensed noble gases. We first present the motivation for using the NIR scintillation in liquid argon detectors, then briefly review early as well as more recent efforts and finally show encouraging preliminary results of a test performed at Fermilab.

  5. Near-infrared scintillation of liquid argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, T. [Fermilab; Escobar, C. O. [Campinas State U.; Lippincott, W. H. [Fermilab; Rubinov, P. [Fermilab

    2016-03-03

    Since the 1970s it has been known that noble gases scintillate in the near infrared (NIR) region of the spectrum (0.7 $\\mu$m < $\\lambda$; < 1.5$\\mu$m). More controversial has been the question of the NIR light yield for condensed noble gases. We first present the motivation for using the NIR scintillation in liquid argon detectors, then briefly review early as well as more recent efforts and finally show encouraging preliminary results of a test performed at Fermilab.

  6. Flexible and printable paper-based strain sensors for wearable and large-area green electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xinqin; Zhang, Zheng; Liao, Qingliang; Liang, Qijie; Ou, Yang; Xu, Minxuan; Li, Minghua; Zhang, Guangjie; Zhang, Yue

    2016-06-01

    Paper-based (PB) green electronics is an emerging and potentially game-changing technology due to ease of recycling/disposal, the economics of manufacture and the applicability to flexible electronics. Herein, new-type printable PB strain sensors (PPBSSs) from graphite glue (graphite powder and methylcellulose) have been fabricated. The graphite glue is exposed to thermal annealing to produce surface micro/nano cracks, which are very sensitive to compressive or tensile strain. The devices exhibit a gauge factor of 804.9, response time of 19.6 ms and strain resolution of 0.038%, all performance indicators attaining and even surpassing most of the recently reported strain sensors. Due to the distinctive sensing properties, flexibility and robustness, the PPBSSs are suitable for monitoring of diverse conditions such as structural strain, vibrational motion, human muscular movements and visual control.Paper-based (PB) green electronics is an emerging and potentially game-changing technology due to ease of recycling/disposal, the economics of manufacture and the applicability to flexible electronics. Herein, new-type printable PB strain sensors (PPBSSs) from graphite glue (graphite powder and methylcellulose) have been fabricated. The graphite glue is exposed to thermal annealing to produce surface micro/nano cracks, which are very sensitive to compressive or tensile strain. The devices exhibit a gauge factor of 804.9, response time of 19.6 ms and strain resolution of 0.038%, all performance indicators attaining and even surpassing most of the recently reported strain sensors. Due to the distinctive sensing properties, flexibility and robustness, the PPBSSs are suitable for monitoring of diverse conditions such as structural strain, vibrational motion, human muscular movements and visual control. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02172g

  7. Extremely large electronic anisotropy caused by electronic phase separation in Ca3(Ru0.97Ti0.03)2O7 single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jing; Wu, Xiaoshan; Mao, Zhiqiang

    2015-03-01

    Bilayered ruthenate Ca3 Ru2O7 exhibits rich electronic and magnetic properties. It orders at 56K, with FM bilayers antiferromagnetically coupled along c-axis (AFM-a). The AFM transition is closely followed by a first-order metal-insulator (MI) transition at 48K where spin directions switch to the b-axis (AFM-b). While this MI transition is accompanied by the opening of anisotropic charge gap; small Fermi pockets survive from the MI transition, thus resulting in quasi-2D metallic transport behavior for Tinsulating state with a nearest-neighbor AFM order via Ti doping. Ca3(Ru0 . 97 Ti0 . 03) 2O7 is close to the critical composition for the AFM-b-to-G-AFM phase transition. Our recent studies show the sample with this composition is characterized by an electronic phase separation between the insulating G-AFM phase (major) and the localized AFM-b phase (minor). The minor AFM-b phase forms a conducting path through electronic percolation within the ab-plane, but not along the c-axis, thus resulting in extremely large electronic anisotropy with ρab /ρc ~109 , which may be the largest among bulk materials.

  8. Stretchable Multichannel Electromyography Sensor Array Covering Large Area for Controlling Home Electronics with Distinguishable Signals from Multiple Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Namyun; Lim, Taehoon; Song, Kwangsun; Yang, Sung; Lee, Jongho

    2016-08-17

    Physiological signals provide important information for biomedical applications and, more recently, in the form of wearable electronics for active interactions between bodies and external environments. Multiple physiological sensors are often required to map distinct signals from multiple points over large areas for more diverse applications. In this paper, we present a reusable, multichannel, surface electromyography (EMG) sensor array that covers multiple muscles over relatively large areas, with compliant designs that provide different levels of stiffness for repetitive uses, without backing layers. Mechanical and electrical characteristics along with distinct measurements from different muscles demonstrate the feasibility of the concept. The results should be useful to actively control devices in the environment with one array of wearable sensors, as demonstrated with home electronics.

  9. A simple model for large-scale simulations of fcc metals with explicit treatment of electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, D. R.; Foulkes, W. M. C.; Sutton, A. P.

    2010-01-01

    The continuing advance in computational power is beginning to make accurate electronic structure calculations routine. Yet, where physics emerges through the dynamics of tens of thousands of atoms in metals, simplifications must be made to the electronic Hamiltonian. We present the simplest extension to a single s-band model [A.P. Sutton, T.N. Todorov, M.J. Cawkwell and J. Hoekstra, Phil. Mag. A 81 (2001) p.1833.] of metallic bonding, namely, the addition of a second s-band. We show that this addition yields a reasonable description of the density of states at the Fermi level, the cohesive energy, formation energies of point defects and elastic constants of some face-centred cubic (fcc) metals.

  10. Electron beam welding of copper-stabilized superconductors for a large bubble chamber magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Albrecht, C

    1972-01-01

    In the European Nuclear Research Center CERN in Geneva, the presently largest hydrogen bubble chamber of the world is due to be put into operation at the end of 1972. The magnetic flux density of 3.5 T necessary for the detection of the high-energy elementary particles is generated by superconducting coils of 4.7 m inner diameter. The fully stabilized conductor for half of these coils was fabricated from component conductors by longitudinal seam welding with the electron beam under vacuum. The conductor design, the design and the method of operation of the electron beam welding installation and the operating and fabricating experience gained by the processing of approximately 60 t of conductor material are discussed. (7 refs).

  11. Theoretical calculation of triple differential cross sections of 3s orbital of argon in coplanar symmetric (e, 2e) reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Xing-Ju; Chen Xiang-Jun; Shan Xu; Chen Li-Qing; Xu Ke-Zun

    2004-01-01

    The triple differential cross section for the low-energy electron impact ionization of inner-valence 3s orbital of argon has been calculated using the modified distorted wave Born approximation in coplanar symmetric energy-sharing geometry. Satisfactory agreement between theory and experiment is achieved when the polarization and post-collisional interaction (PCI) are included in the calculations. It is shown that the polarization and PCI effects play a very important role in the case of argon at low incident energies.

  12. Large-scale variation of electron parameters from Quasi-Thermal Noise during WIND perigees in the Earth's magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issautier, Karine; Ongala-Edoumou, Samuel; Moncuquet, Michel

    2016-04-01

    The quasi-thermal noise (QTN) method consists in measuring the electrostatic fluctuations produced by the thermal motion of the ambient particles. This noise is detected with a sensitive wave receiver and measured at the terminal of a passive electric antenna, which is immersed in a stable plasma. The analysis of the so-called QTN provides in situ measurements, mainly the total electron density, with a good accuracy, and thermal temperature in a large number of space media. We create a preliminary electron database to analyse the anti-correlation between electron density and temperature deduced from WIND perigees in the Earth's plasmasphere. We analyse the radio power spectra measured by the Thermal Noise Receiver (TNR), using the 100-m long dipole antenna, onboard WIND spacecraft. We develop a systematic routine to determine the electron density, core and halo temperature and the magnitude of the magnetic field based on QTN in Bernstein modes. Indeed, the spectra are weakly banded between gyroharmonics below the upper hybrid frequency, from which we derive the local electron density. From the gyrofrequency determination, we obtain an independent measure of the magnetic field magnitude, which is in close agreement with the onboard magnetometer.

  13. Performance of a liquid argon accordion hadronic calorimeter prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gingrich, D.M. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Greeniaus, G. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Kitching, P. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Olsen, B. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Pinfold, J.L. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Rodning, N.L. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Boos, E. [Alma-Ata (Kazakhstan); Schaoutnikov, B.O. [Alma-Ata (Kazakhstan); Aubert, B. [Grenoble-1 Univ., 74 - Annecy (France). Lab. de Physique des Particules; Bazan, A. [Grenoble-1 Univ., 74 - Annecy (France). Lab. de Physique des Particules; Beaugiraud, B. [Grenoble-1 Univ., 74 - Annecy (France). Lab. de Physique des Particules; Boniface, J. [Grenoble-1 Univ., 74 - Annecy (France). Lab. de Physique des Particules; Colas, J. [Grenoble-1 Univ., 74 - Annecy (France). Lab. de Physique des Particules; Jezequel, S. [Grenoble-1 Univ., 74 - Annecy (France). Lab. de Physique des Particules; Leflour, T. [Grenoble-1 Univ., 74 - Annecy (France). Lab. de Physique des Particules; Maire, M. [Grenoble-1 Univ., 74 - Annecy (France). Lab. de Physique des Particules; Rival, F. [Grenoble-1 Univ., 74 - Annecy (France). Lab. de Physique des Particules; Stipcevic, M. [Grenoble-1 Univ., 74 - Annecy (France). Lab. de Physique des Particules; Thion, J. [Grenoble-1 Univ., 74 - Annecy (France). Lab. de Physique des Particules; VanDenPlas, D. [Grenoble-1 Univ., 74 - Annecy (France). Lab. de Physique des Particules; Wingerter-Seez, I. [Grenoble-1 Univ., 74 - Annecy (France). Lab. de Physique des Particules; Zolnierowski, Y.P. [Grenoble-1 Univ., 74 - Annecy (France). Lab. de Physique des Particules; Chmeissani, M. [Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); Fernandez, E. [Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); Garrido, L. [Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); Martinez, M. [Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); Padilla, C. [Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); Gordon, H.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); RD3 Colla...

    1995-02-15

    A liquid argon hadronic calorimeter using the ``accordion`` geometry and the electrostatic transformer readout scheme has been tested at CERN, together with a liquid argon accordion electromagnetic prototype. The results obtained for pions on the linearity, the energy resolution and the uniformity of the calorimeter response are well within the requirements for operation at the LHC. ((orig.))

  14. Comparison of Diode and Argon Laser Lesions in Rabbit Retina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Zhang; Xiaoxin Li; Bin Li; Jiping Da

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the histological alteration of retina with various spot intensities between diode and argon lasers in order to instruct the clinical use of 810 nm diode laser.Methods: Transpupillary retinal photocoagulations were performed on 42 eyes of 27pigmented rabbits. Histopathologic alteration of lesions in different intensities and different time intervals after irradiation produced by diode and argon laser was observed and compared using light microscopy. Areas of various lesions measured by image analysis system (CMIAS) were compared quantitatively.Results: Histopathologically, two-week-old grade 2 lesions produced by diode laser induced the disappearance of outer nuclear cells. More than a half of all showed reduction in number of outer nuclear layer cells in argon. Fibroblasts appeared in the diode grade 3lesions 5 days after irradiation. CMIAS data showed that all the areas of diode lesions immediately after photocoagulation were to be larger than those of argon laser lesions in the same spot intensity (P < 0.05). However, twenty-four hours after photocoagulation, the area of the diode lesions increased less than that of the argon laser lesions (8%vs.23%).Conclusion: The acute histological effect caused by 810 nm diode laser and argon green laser is similar,while the expansion of lesion area 24 hours after photocoagulation was less with the diode laser compared to the argon. This may be the first report in the literature regarding quantitative analysis of the delayed reaction of argon green lasers.

  15. Stopping Power of Solid Argon for Helium Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Besenbacher, F.; Bøttiger, Jørgen; Grauersen, O.

    1981-01-01

    By means of the Rutherford-backscattering method, the stopping cross section of solid argon has been measured for 0.5–3 MeV helium ions to an accuracy of not, vert, similar3%. The results agree within the experimental accuracies with our earlier measurements for gaseous argon over the energy region...

  16. Quantum chemical prediction of vibrational spectra of large molecular systems with radical or metallic electronic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, Yoshio; Irle, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    Quantum chemical simulation of infrared (IR) and Raman spectra for molecules with open-shell, radical, or multiradical electronic structure represents a major challenge. We report analytic second-order geometrical derivatives of the Mermin free energy for the second-order self-consistent-charge density-functional tight-binding (DFTB2) method with fractional occupation numbers (FONs). This new method is applied to the evaluation of Nsbnd O radical stretching modes in various open-shell molecules and to the prediction of the evolution of IR and Raman spectra of graphene nanoribbons with increasing molecular size.

  17. Large electron transfer rate effects from the Duschinsky mixing of vibrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sando, Gerald M.; Spears, Kenneth G; Hupp, Joseph T

    2001-01-01

    vibrations are very important. The Duschinsky effect arises when two electronic states have vibrational normal mode coordinate systems that are rotated and translated relative to each other. We use a conventional quantum rate model for ET, and the examples include 6-8 vibrations, where two vibrational modes...... are mixed with different amounts of coordinate rotation. The multidimensional Franck-Condon factors (FCF) are computed with standard algorithms and recently developed recursion relations. When displaced, totally symmetric modes are involved, rates with Duschinsky mixing can increase several orders...

  18. In situ scanning tunnelling microscopy of redox molecules. Coherent electron transfer at large bias voltages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2003-01-01

    Theories of in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) of molecules with redox levels near the substrate and tip Fermi levels point to 'spectroscopic' current-overpotential features. Prominent features require a narrow 'probing tip', i.e. a small bias voltage, eV(bias), compared...... and tip Fermi levels. STM here involves coherent two-step interfacial electron transfer between the redox level and the enclosing substrate and tip. We have also extended previous experimental in situ STM studies of the blue copper protein Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin, adsorbed on Au(111), to cover...

  19. Large-Scale Production of Carbon Nanotubes Using the Jefferson Lab Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Brian C.

    2003-01-01

    We report on our interdisciplinary program to use the Free Electron Laser (FEL) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (J-Lab) for high-volume pulsed laser vaporization synthesis of carbon nanotubes. Based in part on the funding of from this project, a novel nanotube production system was designed, tested, and patented. Using this new system nanotube production rates over 100 times faster than conventional laser systems were achieved. Analysis of the material produced shows that it is of as high a quality as the standard laser-based materials.

  20. Short Range Correlations in Nuclei at Large xbj through Inclusive Quasi-Elastic Electron Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Zhihong [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2013-12-01

    The experiment, E08-014, in Hall-A at Jefferson Lab aims to study the short-range correlations (SRC) which are necessary to explain the nuclear strength absent in the mean field theory. The cross sections for 2H, 3He, 4He, 12C, 40Ca and 48Ca, were measured via inclusive quasi-elastic electron scattering from these nuclei in a Q2 range between 0.8 and 2.8 (GeV/c)2 for x>1. The cross section ratios of heavy nuclei to 2H were extracted to study two-nucleon SRC for 1

  1. A Linear Scaling Three Dimensional Fragment Method for Large ScaleElectronic Structure Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lin-Wang; Zhao, Zhengji; Meza, Juan

    2007-07-26

    We present a novel linear scaling ab initio total energyelectronic structure calculation method, which is simple to implement,easily to parallelize, and produces essentially thesame results as thedirect ab initio method, while it could be thousands of times faster.Using this method, we have studied the dipole moments of CdSe quantumdots, and found both significant bulk and surface contributions. The bulkdipole contribution cannot simply be estimated from the bulk spontaneouspolarization value by a proportional volume factor. Instead it has ageometry dependent screening effect. The dipole moment also produces astrong internal electric field which induces a strong electron holeseparation.

  2. Electron tunneling through alkanedithiol self-assembled monolayers in large-area molecular junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, Hylke B.; Naber, Ronald C. G.; Jongbloed, Bert; van Hal, Paul A.; Blom, Paul W. M.; de Leeuw, Dago M.; de Boer, Bert

    2007-01-01

    The electrical transport through self-assembled monolayers of alkanedithiols was studied in large-area molecular junctions and described by the Simmons model [Simmons JIG (1963) J Appi Phys 34:1793-1803 and 2581-2590] for tunneling through a practical barrier, i.e., a rectangular barrier with the im

  3. First results from a Dark Matter search with liquid Argon at 87 K in the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Benetti, P; Adamo, F; Baibussinov, B; Baldo-Ceolin, M; Belluco, M; Calaprice, F; Calligarich, E; Cambiaghi, M; Carbonara, F; Cavanna, F; Centro, Sandro; Cocco, A G; Di Pompeo, F; Ferrari, N; Fiorillo, G; Galbiati, C; Gallo, V; Grandi, L; Ianni, A; Mangano, G; Meng, G; Montanari, C; Palamara, O; Pandola, L; Pietropaolo, F; Raselli, G L; Rossella, M; Rubbia, C; Szelc, A M; Ventura, Sandro; Vignoli, C; 10.1016/j.astropartphys.2007.08.002

    2008-01-01

    A new method of searching for dark matter in the form of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMP) has been developed with the direct detection of the low energy nuclear recoils observed in a massive target (ultimately many tons) of ultra pure Liquid Argon at 87 K. A high selectivity for Argon recoils is achieved by the simultaneous observation of both the VUV scintillation luminescence and of the electron signal surviving columnar recombination, extracted through the liquid-gas boundary by an electric field. First physics results from this method are reported, based on a small 2.3 litre test chamber filled with natural Argon and an accumulated fiducial exposure of about 100 kg x day, supporting the future validity of this method with isotopically purified 40Ar and for a much larger unit presently under construction with correspondingly increased sensitivities.

  4. Effects of swift argon-ion irradiation on the proton-exchanged LiNbO3 crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Qing; Liu Peng; Liu Tao; Guo Sha-Sha; Wang Xue-Lin

    2012-01-01

    A proton-exchanged LiNbO3 crystal was subjected to 70-MeV argon-ion irradiation.The lattice damage was investigated by the Rutherford backscattering and channeling technique.It was found that the lattice disorder induced by the proton exchange process was partially recovered and the proton-exchanged layer was broadened.It indicated that the lithium ions underneath the initial proton-exchanged layer migrated to the surface during the swift argon-ion irradiation and supplemented the lack of lithium ions in the initial proton-exchanged layer.This effect was ascribed to the great electronic energy deposition and relaxation.The swift argon-ion irradiation induced an increase in extraordinary refractive index and formed another waveguide structure beneath the proton-exchanged waveguide.

  5. Effects of swift argon-ion irradiation on the proton-exchanged LiNbO3 crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qing; Liu, Peng; Liu, Tao; Guo, Sha-Sha; Wang, Xue-Lin

    2012-05-01

    A proton-exchanged LiNbO3 crystal was subjected to 70-MeV argon-ion irradiation. The lattice damage was investigated by the Rutherford backscattering and channeling technique. It was found that the lattice disorder induced by the proton exchange process was partially recovered and the proton-exchanged layer was broadened. It indicated that the lithium ions underneath the initial proton-exchanged layer migrated to the surface during the swift argon-ion irradiation and supplemented the lack of lithium ions in the initial proton-exchanged layer. This effect was ascribed to the great electronic energy deposition and relaxation. The swift argon-ion irradiation induced an increase in extraordinary refractive index and formed another waveguide structure beneath the proton-exchanged waveguide.

  6. Effects of metastable species in helium and argon atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) on inactivation of periodontopathogenic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sung-Young; Kim, Kyoung-Hwa; Seol, Yang-Jo; Kim, Su-Jeong; Bae, Byeongjun; Huh, Sung-Ryul; Kim, Gon-Ho

    2016-05-01

    The helium and argon have been widely used as discharge gases in atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) for bacteria inactivation. The APPJs show apparent different in bullet propagation speed and bacteria inactivation rate apparently vary with discharge gas species. This work shows that these two distinctive features of APPJs can be linked through one factor, the metastable energy level. The effects of helium and argon metastable species on APPJ discharge mechanism for reactive oxygen nitrogen species (RONS) generation in APPJs are investigated by experiments and numerical estimation. The discharge mechanism is investigated by using the bullet velocity from the electric field which is obtained with laser induced fluorescence (LIF) measurement. The measured electric field also applied on the estimation of RONS generation, as electron energy source term in numerical particle reaction. The estimated RONS number is verified by comparing NO and OH densities to the inactivation rate of periodontitis bacteria. The characteristic time for bacteria inactivation of the helium-APPJ was found to be 1.63 min., which is significantly less than that of the argon-APPJ, 12.1 min. In argon-APPJ, the argon metastable preserve the energy due to the lack of the Penning ionization. Thus the surface temperature increase is significantly higher than helium-APPJ case. It implies that the metastable energy plays important role in both of APPJ bullet propagation and bacteria inactivation mechanism.

  7. TPEPICO studies near ionization threshold of argon and krypton clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, J.; Vries, J. de; Steger, H.; Kaiser, E.; Kamke, B.; Kamke, W. (Freiburg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Fakultaet fuer Physik Freiburg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Freiburger Materialforschungszentrum)

    1991-01-01

    Single photon ionization of argon- and krypton clusters has been studied in the region between threshold and the ionization potential of the corresponding atom. Synchrotron radiation from the electron storage ring BESSY is used to ionize the clusters; threshold-photoelectron-photoion-coincidence (TPEPICO)-time-of-flight technique is used to detect ions correlated with the emission of zero-kinetic-energy-electrons. The spectra of the clusters in the range of n=2 to 15 are discussed in view of the extensive fragmentation taking place in these systems. In order to characterize the properties of the clusters a method using scaling laws is applied. The principles and the deduction of Hagena's scaling parameter {Gamma}{sup *} are briefly reviewed. Using {Gamma}{sup *} an experimentally derived mean cluster size for molecular beams can be assigned. This allows one to clearly demonstrate the systematic variations of the measured spectra due to cluster fragmentation. As a general feature it is observed that, in the range studied, the peak in the measured ionization rate for a cluster ion (fragment) of a given size shifts to higher photon energies as the mean cluster size is increased. (orig.).

  8. Search for new physics in final states with a high energy electron and large missing transverse energy

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00345099

    The most successful and comprehensive theory describing the microcosm is the Standard Model of particle physics (SM). It comprises all known elementary particles and describes in high precision the basic processes of three of the four fundamental interactions. But still, not all experimental observations and theoretical challenges are covered. Many models exist that take the SM as a good approximation of natural phenomena in already discovered energy regions, but extend it in various ways. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) provides the opportunity to look into these high energy regions using proton-proton collisions at significantly higher center-of-mass energies than previous experiments. This dissertation searches for physics beyond the SM especially in final states with one highly energetic electron (respectively positron) and large missing transverse energy. With the data set recorded in 2012 by the ATLAS detector, a large multi-purpose detector making use of the LHC, the spectrum of the related combined ...

  9. Electronics and readout of a large area silicon detector for LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borer, K.; Munday, D.J.; Parker, M.A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Aspell, P.; Campbell, M.; Chilingarov, A.; Jarron, P.; Heijne, E.H.M.; Santiard, J.C.; Scampoli, P.; Verweij, H.; Goessling, C.; Lisowski, B.; Reichold, A.; Spiwoks, R.; Tsesmelis, E.; Benslama, K.; Bonino, R.; Clark, A.G.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Kambara, H.; Wu, X.; Fretwurst, E.; Lindstroem, G.; Schultz, T.; Bardos, R.A.; Gorfine, G.W.; Moorhead, G.F.; Taylor, G.N.; Tovey, S.N.; Bibby, J.H.; Hawkings, R.J.; Kundu, N.; Weidberg, A.; Campbell, D.; Murray, P.; Seller, P.; Teiger, J. (Univ. of Bern (Switzerland) Cavendish Lab., Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom) CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) Inst. fuer Physik, Univ. Dortmund (Germany) DPNC, Geneva Univ. (Switzerland) 1. Inst. fur Experimentalphysik, Hamburg (Germany) School of Physics, Univ. of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC (Australia) Dept. of Nuclear Physics, Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom) Rutherford Appleton Lab., Chilton, Didcot (United Kingdom) Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 Gif

    1994-04-21

    The purpose of the RD2 project is to evaluate the feasibility of a silicon tracker and/or preshower detector for LHC. Irradiation studies with doses equivalent to those expected at LHC have been performed to determine the behavior of operational parameters such as leakage current, depletion voltage and charge collection during the life of the detector. The development of fast, dense, low power and low cost signal processing electronics is one of the major activities of the collaboration. We describe the first fully functional integrated analog memory chip with asynchronous read and write operations and level 1 trigger capture capabilities. A complete test beam system using this analog memory chip at 66 MHz has been successfully operated with RD2 prototype silicon detectors during various test runs. The flexibility of the electronics and readout have allowed us to easily interface our set-up to other data acquisition systems. Mechanical studies are in progress to design a silicon tracking detector with several million channels that may be operated at low (0-10 C) temperature, while maintaining the required geometrical precision. Prototype readout boards for such a detector are being developed and simulation studies are being performed to optimize the readout architecture. (orig.)

  10. Large area mold fabrication for the nanoimprint lithography using electron beam lithography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The mold fabrication is a critical issue for the development of nanoimprint lithography as an effective low-cost and mass production process.This paper describes the fabrication process developed to fabricate the large area nanoimprint molds on the silicon wafers.The optimization of e-beam exposure dose and pattern design is presented.The overlayer process is developed to improve the field stitching accuracy of e-beam exposure,and around 10 nm field stitching accuracy is obtained.By means of the optimization of the e-beam exposure dose,pattern design and overlayer process,large area nanoimprint molds having dense line structures with around 10 nm field stitching accuracy have been fabricated.The fabricated mold was used to imprint commercial imprinting resist.

  11. Large-scale quantum transport calculations for electronic devices with over ten thousand atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wenchang; Lu, Yan; Xiao, Zhongcan; Hodak, Miro; Briggs, Emil; Bernholc, Jerry

    The non-equilibrium Green's function method (NEGF) has been implemented in our massively parallel DFT software, the real space multigrid (RMG) code suite. Our implementation employs multi-level parallelization strategies and fully utilizes both multi-core CPUs and GPU accelerators. Since the cost of the calculations increases dramatically with the number of orbitals, an optimal basis set is crucial for including a large number of atoms in the ``active device'' part of the simulations. In our implementation, the localized orbitals are separately optimized for each principal layer of the device region, in order to obtain an accurate and optimal basis set. As a large example, we calculated the transmission characteristics of a Si nanowire p-n junction. The nanowire is along (110) direction in order to minimize the number dangling bonds that are saturated by H atoms. Its diameter is 3 nm. The length of 24 nm is necessary because of the long-range screening length in Si. Our calculations clearly show the I-V characteristics of a diode, i.e., the current increases exponentially with forward bias and is near zero with backward bias. Other examples will also be presented, including three-terminal transistors and large sensor structures.

  12. Nanometer-scale sharpening and surface roughening of ZnO nanorods by argon ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Shyamal, E-mail: shyamal@iitbbs.ac.in [School of Basic Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology, Bhubaneswar 751013 (India); Behera, Akshaya K. [School of Basic Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology, Bhubaneswar 751013 (India); Banerjee, Amarabha; Tribedi, Lokesh C. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India); Som, Tapobrata [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India); Ayyub, Pushan, E-mail: pushan@tifr.res.in [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India)

    2012-07-01

    We report the effects of exposing a hydrothermally grown, single crystalline ZnO nanorod array to a beam of 50 keV argon ions at room temperature. High resolution electron microscopy reveals that the ion bombardment results in a nanometer-scale roughening of the nanorod sidewalls, which were almost atomically flat in the pristine sample. Ion bombardment further causes the flat, Almost-Equal-To 100 nm diameter nanorod tips to get sharpened to ultrafine points less than 10 nm across. While tip sharpening is attributed to preferential sputtering, the formation of crystalline surface protuberances can be ascribed to surface instability due to curvature dependent sputtering and surface diffusion under argon-ion bombardment. Both the nanoscale roughening as well as the tip sharpening are expected to favorably impact a wide variety of applications, such as those involving catalysis, gas sensing, solar cells, field emission and gas discharge.

  13. Two-phase Cryogenic Avalanche Detector with electroluminescence gap operated in argon doped with nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondar, A.; Buzulutskov, A.; Dolgov, A.; Nosov, V.; Shekhtman, L.; Shemyakina, E.; Sokolov, A.

    2017-02-01

    A two-phase Cryogenic Avalanche Detector (CRAD) with electroluminescence (EL) gap, operated in argon doped with a minor (49±7 ppm) admixture of nitrogen, has been studied. The EL gap was optically read out using cryogenic PMTs located on the perimeter of the gap. We present the results of the measurements of the N2 content, detector sensitivity to X-ray-induced signals, EL gap yield and electron lifetime in the liquid. The detector sensitivity, at a drift field in liquid Ar of 0.6 kV/cm, was measured to be 9 and 16 photoelectrons recorded at the PMTs per keV of deposited energy at 23 and 88 keV respectively. Such two-phase detectors, with enhanced sensitivity to the S2 (ionization-induced) signal, are relevant in the field of argon detectors for dark matter search and low energy neutrino detection.

  14. Novel Diamond Films Synthesis Strategy: Methanol and Argon Atmosphere by Microwave Plasma CVD Method Without Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Jiang, Caiyi; Guo, Shenghui; Zhang, Libo; Gao, Jiyun; Peng, Jinhui; Hu, Tu; Wang, Liang

    2016-09-01

    Diamond thin films are grown on silicon substrates by only using methanol and argon mixtures in microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) reactor. It is worth mentioning that the novel strategy makes the synthesis reaction works smoothly without hydrogen atmosphere, and the substrates temperature is only 500 °C. The evidence of surface morphology and thickness under different time is obtained by characterizing the samples using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). X-ray diffractometer (XRD) spectrum reveals that the preferential orientation of (111) plane sample is obtained. The Raman spectra indicate that the dominant component of all the samples is a diamond. Moreover, the diamond phase content of the targeted films was quantitatively analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) method, and the surface roughness of diamond films was investigated by atomic force microscope (AFM). Meanwhile, the possible synthesis mechanism of the diamond films in methanol- and argon-mixed atmosphere was discussed.

  15. Characteristics of a DC discharge with a water cathode in argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, S. A.; Shutov, D. A.; Bobkova, E. S.; Rybkin, V. V., E-mail: rybkin@isuct.ru [Ivanovo State University of Chemistry and Technology (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The characteristics of a dc discharge excited between a metal anode and a water cathode in argon were studied experimentally. The dimensions of the positive column and the electric field in it were measured, and the vibrational temperature in the positive column was determined from the N{sub 2}C{sup 3}Π{sub u} → B{sup 3}Π{sub g} (0–2) emission band. It is shown that the power deposited in the positive column is almost entirely spent on gas heating. The obtained dependence of the reduced electric field on the gas pressure and the ionization frequencies calculated by solving the Boltzmann equation indicate that electrons are lost diffusively, whereas ionization proceeds in a stepwise manner via the lower metastable states of argon atoms.

  16. Two-phase Cryogenic Avalanche Detector with electroluminescence gap operated in argon doped with nitrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Bondar, A; Dolgov, A; Nosov, V; Shekhtman, L; Shemyakina, E; Sokolov, A

    2016-01-01

    A two-phase Cryogenic Avalanche Detector (CRAD) with electroluminescence (EL) gap, operated in argon doped with a minor (49$\\pm$7 ppm) admixture of nitrogen, has been studied. The EL gap was optically read out using cryogenic PMTs located on the perimeter of the gap. We present the results of the measurements of the N$_2$ content, detector sensitivity to X-ray-induced signals, EL gap yield and electron lifetime in the liquid. The detector sensitivity, at a drift field in liquid Ar of 0.6 kV/cm, was measured to be 9 and 16 photoelectrons recorded at the PMTs per keV of deposited energy at 23 and 88 keV respectively. Such two-phase detectors, with enhanced sensitivity to the S2 (ionization-induced) signal, are relevant in the field of argon detectors for dark matter search and low energy neutrino detection.

  17. Rotational and Vibrational Temperatures of Atmospheric Double Arc Argon-Nitrogen Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Jian-Hua; TU Xin; MA Zeng-Yi; CEN Ke-Fa; B.G.Chéron

    2007-01-01

    The spectroscopic technique is employed to study the emission of atmospheric argon-nitrogen plasma jet generated by an original dc double anode plasma torch. The molecular bands of the N(+2) first negative system are observed at the torch exit and chosen to evaluate the rotational and vibrational temperatures in comparison with the simulated spectra. The excitation temperature (Texc≈9600 K) is determined from the Boltzmann plot method. The results show that the rotational, vibrational, electron and kinetic temperatures are in good agreement with one another, which indicates that the core region of atmospheric double arc argon-nitrogen plasma jet at the torch exit is close to the local thermodynamic equilibrium state under our experimental conditions.

  18. Espina: A Tool for the Automated Segmentation and Counting of Synapses in Large Stacks of Electron Microscopy Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Juan; Alonso-Nanclares, Lidia; Rodríguez, José-Rodrigo; DeFelipe, Javier; Rodríguez, Ángel; Merchán-Pérez, Ángel

    2011-01-01

    The synapses in the cerebral cortex can be classified into two main types, Gray's type I and type II, which correspond to asymmetric (mostly glutamatergic excitatory) and symmetric (inhibitory GABAergic) synapses, respectively. Hence, the quantification and identification of their different types and the proportions in which they are found, is extraordinarily important in terms of brain function. The ideal approach to calculate the number of synapses per unit volume is to analyze 3D samples reconstructed from serial sections. However, obtaining serial sections by transmission electron microscopy is an extremely time consuming and technically demanding task. Using focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope microscopy, we recently showed that virtually all synapses can be accurately identified as asymmetric or symmetric synapses when they are visualized, reconstructed, and quantified from large 3D tissue samples obtained in an automated manner. Nevertheless, the analysis, segmentation, and quantification of synapses is still a labor intensive procedure. Thus, novel solutions are currently necessary to deal with the large volume of data that is being generated by automated 3D electron microscopy. Accordingly, we have developed ESPINA, a software tool that performs the automated segmentation and counting of synapses in a reconstructed 3D volume of the cerebral cortex, and that greatly facilitates and accelerates these processes. PMID:21633491

  19. Laser-assisted reduction of graphene oxide for paper based large area flexible electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balliu, E.; Andersson, H.; Engholm, M.; Forsberg, S.; Olin, H.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we present a promising method for fabrication of conductive tracks on paper based substrates by laser assisted reduction of Graphene Oxide (GO). Printed electronics on paper based substrates is be coming more popular due to lower cost and recyclability. Fabrication of conductive tracks is of great importance where metal, carbon and polymer inks are commonly used. An emerging option is reduced graphene oxide (r-GO), which can be a good conductor. Here we have evaluated reduction of GO by using a 532 nm laser source, showing promising results with a decrease of sheet resistance from >100 M Ω/Sqr for unreduced GO down to 126 Ω/Sqr. without any observable damage to the paper substrates.

  20. Merging of high speed argon plasma jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Case, A.; Messer, S.; Brockington, S.; Wu, L.; Witherspoon, F. D. [HyperV Technologies Corp., Chantilly, Virginia 22180 (United States); Elton, R. [University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Formation of an imploding plasma liner for the plasma liner experiment (PLX) requires individual plasma jets to merge into a quasi-spherical shell of plasma converging on the origin. Understanding dynamics of the merging process requires knowledge of the plasma phenomena involved. We present results from the study of the merging of three plasma jets in three dimensional geometry. The experiments were performed using HyperV Technologies Corp. 1 cm Minirailguns with a preionized argon plasma armature. The vacuum chamber partially reproduces the port geometry of the PLX chamber. Diagnostics include fast imaging, spectroscopy, interferometry, fast pressure probes, B-dot probes, and high speed spatially resolved photodiodes, permitting measurements of plasma density, temperature, velocity, stagnation pressure, magnetic field, and density gradients. These experimental results are compared with simulation results from the LSP 3D hybrid PIC code.

  1. Large Fermi Surface of Heavy Electrons at the Border of Mott Insulating State in NiS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedemann, S; Chang, H; Gamża, M B; Reiss, P; Chen, X; Alireza, P; Coniglio, W A; Graf, D; Tozer, S; Grosche, F M

    2016-05-12

    One early triumph of quantum physics is the explanation why some materials are metallic whereas others are insulating. While a treatment based on single electron states is correct for most materials this approach can fail spectacularly, when the electrostatic repulsion between electrons causes strong correlations. Not only can these favor new and subtle forms of matter, such as magnetism or superconductivity, they can even cause the electrons in a half-filled energy band to lock into position, producing a correlated, or Mott insulator. The transition into the Mott insulating state raises important fundamental questions. Foremost among these is the fate of the electronic Fermi surface and the associated charge carrier mass, as the Mott transition is approached. We report the first direct observation of the Fermi surface on the metallic side of a Mott insulating transition by high pressure quantum oscillatory measurements in NiS2. Our results point at a large Fermi surface consistent with Luttinger's theorem and a strongly enhanced quasiparticle effective mass. These two findings are in line with central tenets of the Brinkman-Rice picture of the correlated metal near the Mott insulating state and rule out alternative scenarios in which the carrier concentration vanishes continuously at the metal-insulator transition.

  2. A Large Hadron Electron Collider at CERN: Report on the Physics and Design Concepts for Machine and Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abelleira Fernandez, J L; Akay, A N; Aksakal, H; Albacete, J L; Alekhin, S; Allport, P; Andreev, V; Appleby, R B; Arikan, E; Armesto, N; Azuelos, G; Bai, M; Barber, D; Bartels, J; Behnke, O; Behr, J; Belyaev, A S; Ben-Zvi, I; Bernard, N; Bertolucci, S; Bettoni, S; Biswal, S; Blumlein, J; Bottcher, H; Bogacz, A; Bracco, C; Brandt, G; Braun, H; Brodsky, S; Brüning, O; Bulyak, E; Buniatyan, A; Burkhardt, H; Cakir, I T; Cakir, O; Calaga, R; Cetinkaya, V; Ciapala, E; Ciftci, R; Ciftci, A K; Cole, B A; Collins, J C; Dadoun, O; Dainton, J; De Roeck, A; d'Enterria, D; Dudarev, A; Eide, A; Enberg, R; Eroglu, E; Eskola, K J; Favart, L; Fitterer, M; Forte, S; Gaddi, A; Gambino, P; Garcia Morales, H; Gehrmann, T; Gladkikh, P; Glasman, C; Godbole, R; Goddard, B; Greenshaw, T; Guffanti, A; Guzey, V; Gwenlan, C; Han, T; Hao, Y; Haug, F; Herr, W; Herve, A; Holzer, B J; Ishitsuka, M; Jacquet, M; Jeanneret, B; Jimenez, J M; Jowett, J M; Jung, H; Karadeniz, H; Kayran, D; Kilic, A; Kimura, K; Klein, M; Klein, U; Kluge, T; Kocak, F; Korostelev, M; Kosmicki, A; Kostka, P; Kowalski, H; Kramer, G; Kuchler, D; Kuze, M; Lappi, T; Laycock, P; Levichev, E; Levonian, S; Litvinenko, V N; Lombardi, A; Maeda, J; Marquet, C; Mellado, B; Mess, K H; Milanese, A; Moch, S; Morozov, I I; Muttoni, Y; Myers, S; Nandi, S; Nergiz, Z; Newman, P R; Omori, T; Osborne, J; Paoloni, E; Papaphilippou, Y; Pascaud, C; Paukkunen, H; Perez, E; Pieloni, T; Pilicer, E; Pire, B; Placakyte, R; Polini, A; Ptitsyn, V; Pupkov, Y; Radescu, V; Raychaudhuri, S; Rinol, L; Rohini, R; Rojo, J; Russenschuck, S; Sahin, M; Salgado, C A; Sampei, K; Sassot, R; Sauvan, E; Schneekloth, U; Schorner-Sadenius, T; Schulte, D; Senol, A; Seryi, A; Sievers, P; Skrinsky, A N; Smith, W; Spiesberger, H; Stasto, A M; Strikman, M; Sullivan, M; Sultansoy, S; Sun, Y P; Surrow, B; Szymanowski, L; Taels, P; Tapan, I; Tasci, T; Tassi, E; Ten Kate, H; Terron, J; Thiesen, H; Thompson, L; Tokushuku, K; Tomas Garcia, R; Tommasini, D; Trbojevic, D; Tsoupas, N; Tuckmantel, J; Turkoz, S; Trinh, T N; Tywoniuk, K; Unel, G; Urakawa, J; VanMechelen, P; Variola, A; Veness, R; Vivoli, A; Vobly, P; Wagner, J; Wallny, R; Wallon, S; Watt, G; Weiss, C; Wiedemann, U A; Wienands, U; Willeke, F; Xiao, B W; Yakimenko, V; Zarnecki, A F; Zhang, Z; Zimmermann, F; Zlebcik, R; Zomer, F

    2012-01-01

    The physics programme and the design are described of a new collider for particle and nuclear physics, the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC), in which a newly built electron beam of 60 GeV, up to possibly 140 GeV, energy collides with the intense hadron beams of the LHC. Compared to HERA, the kinematic range covered is extended by a factor of twenty in the negative four-momentum squared, $Q^2$, and in the inverse Bjorken $x$, while with the design luminosity of $10^{33}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ the LHeC is projected to exceed the integrated HERA luminosity by two orders of magnitude. The physics programme is devoted to an exploration of the energy frontier, complementing the LHC and its discovery potential for physics beyond the Standard Model with high precision deep inelastic scattering measurements. These are designed to investigate a variety of fundamental questions in strong and electroweak interactions. The physics programme also includes electron-deuteron and electron-ion scattering in a $(Q^2, 1/x)$ ran...

  3. High precision wavelength measurements of QED-sensitive forbidden transitions in highly charged argon ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draganić, I; Crespo López-Urrutia, J R; DuBois, R; Fritzsche, S; Shabaev, V M; Orts, R Soria; Tupitsyn, I I; Zou, Y; Ullrich, J

    2003-10-31

    We present the results of an experimental study of magnetic dipole (M1) transitions in highly charged argon ions (Ar X, Ar XI, Ar XIV, Ar XV) in the visible spectral range using an electron beam ion trap. Their wavelengths were determined with, for highly charged ions, unprecedented accuracy up to the sub-ppm level and compared with theoretical calculations. The QED contributions, calculated in this Letter, are found to be 4 orders of magnitude larger than the experimental error and are absolutely indispensable to bring theory and experiment to a good agreement. This method shows great potential for the study of QED effects in relativistic few-electron systems.

  4. Radiation hard micro-coaxial cables for the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Bonivento, W; Imbert, P; de La Taille, C

    2000-01-01

    The ATLAS collaboration has chosen for the electromagnetic barrel calorimeter and for all the end-cap calorimeters a sampling technique, with liquid argon as the active medium. The read-out electronics and the calibration pulsers are located in boxes outside the cryostats housing the detectors. Signals are transmitted between the detectors and the electronic boxes through custom-designed micro- coaxial cables, which are the subject of this paper. These cables have to satisfy very stringent tolerances in terms of signal transmission, dimensions and radiation hardness. Following a successful pre-series production, these cables have been selected for equipping the ATLAS calorimeter. (16 refs).

  5. Search for Displaced Supersymmetry in events with an electron and a muon with large impact parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Bansal, Monika; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Rougny, Romain; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dobur, Didar; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Léonard, Alexandre; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Zenoni, Florian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Crucy, Shannon; Dildick, Sven; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Dos Reis Martins, Thiago; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Pol, Maria Elena; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Da Costa, Eliza Melo; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santaolalla, Javier; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Zheng; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Zhang, Linlin; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Mekterovic, Darko; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Dahms, Torsten; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Filipovic, Nicolas; Florent, Alice; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Miné, Philippe; Mironov, Camelia; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Paganini, Pascal; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Brochet, Sébastien; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sabes, David; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Xiao, Hong; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Bontenackels, Michael; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Hindrichs, Otto; Klein, Katja; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Perieanu, Adrian; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Knutzen, Simon; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Weber, Martin; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Heister, Arno; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Perchalla, Lars; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behr, Joerg; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bell, Alan James; Bergholz, Matthias; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Choudhury, Somnath; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Flucke, Gero; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gunnellini, Paolo; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Horton, Dean; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nayak, Aruna; Novgorodova, Olga; Ntomari, Eleni; Perrey, Hanno; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Roland, Benoit; Ron, Elias; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Saxena, Pooja; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schröder, Matthias; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Vargas Trevino, Andrea Del Rocio; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Görner, Martin; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Lange, Jörn; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Ott, Jochen; Peiffer, Thomas; Pietsch, Niklas; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Pöhlsen, Thomas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Seidel, Markus; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Frensch, Felix; Giffels, Manuel; Hartmann, Frank; Hauth, Thomas; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Nürnberg, Andreas; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Ratnikov, Fedor; Röcker, Steffen; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weiler, Thomas; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Psallidas, Andreas; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Stiliaris, Efstathios; Aslanoglou, Xenofon; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Gupta, Ruchi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Mittal, Monika; Nishu, Nishu; Singh, Jasbir; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Modak, Atanu; Mukherjee, Swagata; Roy, Debarati; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Goldouzian, Reza; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Barbone, Lucia; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Sharma, Archana; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Ferretti, Roberta; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Gerosa, Raffaele; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bisello, Dario; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; Dorigo, Tommaso; Galanti, Mario; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Giubilato, Piero; Gozzelino, Andrea; Kanishchev, Konstantin; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pegoraro, Matteo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Triossi, Andrea; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Gabusi, Michele; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiezia, Aniello; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Moon, Chang-Seong; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Vernieri, Caterina; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Grassi, Marco; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Soffi, Livia; Traczyk, Piotr; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Casasso, Stefano; Costa, Marco; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Ortona, Giacomo; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Tamponi, Umberto; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Schizzi, Andrea; Umer, Tomo; Zanetti, Anna; Chang, Sunghyun; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Oh, Young Do; Park, Hyangkyu; Sakharov, Alexandre; Son, Dong-Chul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Kim, Jae Yool; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kyong Sei; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Ryu, Min Sang; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Seo, Hyunkwan; Yu, Intae; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Reucroft, Steve; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michał; Wolszczak, Weronika; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Bunichev, Viacheslav; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Lokhtin, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Ekmedzic, Marko; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Soares, Mara Senghi; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Brun, Hugues; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Graziano, Alberto; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benaglia, Andrea; Bendavid, Joshua; Benhabib, Lamia; Benitez, Jose F; Bernet, Colin; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Bondu, Olivier; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Colafranceschi, Stefano; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; De Visscher, Simon; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dordevic, Milos; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Eugster, Jürg; Franzoni, Giovanni; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Guida, Roberto; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Magini, Nicolo; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Marrouche, Jad; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Musella, Pasquale; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Perrozzi, Luca; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Plagge, Michael; Racz, Attila; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Steggemann, Jan; Stieger, Benjamin; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Treille, Daniel; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Wollny, Heiner; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Chanon, Nicolas; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Dünser, Marc; Eller, Philipp; Grab, Christoph; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Masciovecchio, Mario; Meister, Daniel; Mohr, Niklas; Nägeli, Christoph; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pauss, Felicitas; Peruzzi, Marco; Quittnat, Milena; Rebane, Liis; Rossini, Marco; Starodumov, Andrei; Takahashi, Maiko; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Amsler, Claude; Canelli, Maria Florencia; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Cosa, Annapaola; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Lange, Clemens; Millan Mejias, Barbara; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Robmann, Peter; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Taroni, Silvia; Verzetti, Mauro; Yang, Yong; Cardaci, Marco; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Ferro, Cristina; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Kao, Kai-Yi; Lei, Yeong-Jyi; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Majumder, Devdatta; Petrakou, Eleni; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wilken, Rachel; Asavapibhop, Burin; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Mehmet; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Gamsizkan, Halil; Karapinar, Guler; Ocalan, Kadir; Sekmen, Sezen; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Isildak, Bora; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Cankocak, Kerem; Vardarli, Fuat Ilkehan; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Meng, Zhaoxia; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Vincent J; Williams, Thomas; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Womersley, William John; Worm, Steven; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Burton, Darren; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Cutajar, Michael; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Dunne, Patrick; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Gilbert, Andrew; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; Jarvis, Martyn; Karapostoli, Georgia; Kenzie, Matthew; Lane, Rebecca; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Mathias, Bryn; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Raymond, David Mark; Rogerson, Samuel; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Tapper, Alexander; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Martin, William; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Kasmi, Azeddine; Liu, Hongxuan; Scarborough, Tara; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Lawson, Philip; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; St John, Jason; Sulak, Lawrence; Alimena, Juliette; Berry, Edmund; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Christopher, Grant; Cutts, David; Demiragli, Zeynep; Dhingra, Nitish; Ferapontov, Alexey; Garabedian, Alex; Heintz, Ulrich; Kukartsev, Gennadiy; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Luk, Michael; Narain, Meenakshi; Segala, Michael; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Speer, Thomas; Swanson, Joshua; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Miceli, Tia; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Searle, Matthew; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Cousins, Robert; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Rakness, Gregory; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Malberti, Martina; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wimpenny, Stephen; Andrews, Warren; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Evans, David; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Klein, Daniel; Lebourgeois, Matthew; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Sudano, Elizabeth; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Welke, Charles; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Barge, Derek; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Danielson, Thomas; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Mccoll, Nickolas; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; To, Wing; West, Christopher; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Duarte, Javier; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Rogan, Christopher; Spiropulu, Maria; Timciuc, Vladlen; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wilkinson, Richard; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carlson, Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Krohn, Michael; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Nauenberg, Uriel; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Eggert, Nicholas; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Ryd, Anders; Salvati, Emmanuele; Skinnari, Louise; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Weng, Yao; Winstrom, Lucas; Wittich, Peter; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gao, Yanyan; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Kaadze, Ketino; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Kwan, Simon; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena Ingrid; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Musienko, Yuri; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Prokofyev, Oleg; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Sharma, Seema; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vidal, Richard; Whitbeck, Andrew; Whitmore, Juliana; Yang, Fan; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Carver, Matthew; Cheng, Tongguang; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; De Gruttola, Michele; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Hugon, Justin; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kypreos, Theodore; Low, Jia Fu; Matchev, Konstantin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Shchutska, Lesya; Snowball, Matthew; Sperka, David; Yelton, John; Zakaria, Mohammed; Hewamanage, Samantha; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Diamond, Brendan; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Bazterra, Victor Eduardo; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Khalatyan, Samvel; Kurt, Pelin; Moon, Dong Ho; O'Brien, Christine; Silkworth, Christopher; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Duru, Firdevs; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sen, Sercan; Tan, Ping; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yetkin, Taylan; Yi, Kai; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bolognesi, Sara; Fehling, David; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Martin, Christopher; Swartz, Morris; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Bruner, Christopher; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Malek, Magdalena; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Sanders, Stephen; Sekaric, Jadranka; Stringer, Robert; Wang, Quan; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Shrestha, Shruti; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Svintradze, Irakli; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Lu, Ying; Marionneau, Matthieu; Mignerey, Alice; Pedro, Kevin; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Bauer, Gerry; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Chan, Matthew; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Gulhan, Doga; Klute, Markus; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Ma, Teng; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Stephans, George; Stöckli, Fabian; Sumorok, Konstanty; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zanetti, Marco; Zhukova, Victoria; Dahmes, Bryan; Gude, Alexander; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Pastika, Nathaniel; Rusack, Roger; Singovsky, Alexander; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Keller, Jason; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Malik, Sudhir; Meier, Frank; Snow, Gregory R; Zvada, Marian; Dolen, James; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Haley, Joseph; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael; Stoynev, Stoyan; Sung, Kevin; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Chan, Kwok Ming; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Luo, Wuming; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Pearson, Tessa; Planer, Michael; Ruchti, Randy; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Antonelli, Louis; Brinson, Jessica; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Smith, Geoffrey; Winer, Brian L; Wolfe, Homer; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hebda, Philip; Hunt, Adam; Koay, Sue Ann; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zuranski, Andrzej; Brownson, Eric; Mendez, Hector; Ramirez Vargas, Juan Eduardo; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bortoletto, Daniela; De Mattia, Marco; Gutay, Laszlo; Hu, Zhen; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Kurt; Kress, Matthew; Leonardo, Nuno; Lopes Pegna, David; Maroussov, Vassili; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shi, Xin; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Zablocki, Jakub; Zheng, Yu; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; Covarelli, Roberto; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Petrillo, Gianluca; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Ciesielski, Robert; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Lungu, Gheorghe; Mesropian, Christina; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Kaplan, Steven; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Patel, Rishi; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; York, Andrew; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Montalvo, Roy; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Sakuma, Tai; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Kunori, Shuichi; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Mao, Yaxian; Melo, Andrew; Sharma, Monika; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wood, John; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Friis, Evan; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Levine, Aaron; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ross, Ian; Sarangi, Tapas; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Verwilligen, Piet; Vuosalo, Carl; Woods, Nathaniel

    2015-01-01

    A search for new long-lived particles decaying to leptons is presented using proton-proton collisions produced by the LHC at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV. Data used for the analysis were collected by the CMS detector and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb$^{-1}$. Events are selected with an electron and a muon that have transverse impact parameter values between 0.02 cm and 2 cm. The search has been designed to be sensitive to a wide range of models with non-prompt e-$\\mu$ final states. Limits are set on the ''displaced supersymmetry'' model, with pair production of top squarks decaying into an e-$\\mu$ final state via R-parity violating interactions. The results are the most restrictive to date on this model, with the most stringent limit being obtained for a top squark lifetime corresponding to $c\\tau$ = 2 cm, excluding masses below 790 GeV at 95% confidence level.

  6. Analysis of large effective electric fields of weakly polar molecules for electron electric dipole moment searches

    CERN Document Server

    Sunaga, A; Hada, M; Das, B P

    2016-01-01

    The electric dipole moment of an electron (eEDM) is one of the sensitive probes of physics beyond the standard model. The possible existence of the eEDM gives rise to an experimentally observed energy shift, which is proportional to the effective electric field (Eeff) of a target molecule. Hence, an analysis of the quantities that enhance Eeff is necessary to identify suitable molecules for eEDM searches. In the context of such searches, it is generally believed that a molecule with larger electric polarization also has a larger value of Eeff. However, our Dirac-Fock and relativistic coupled-cluster singles and doubles calculations show that the hydrides of Yb and Hg have larger Eeff than those of fluorides, even though their polarizations are smaller. This is due to significant mixing of valence s and p orbitals of the heavy atom in the molecules. This mixing has been attributed to the energy differences of the valence atomic orbitals and the overlap of the two atomic orbitals based on the orbital interactio...

  7. Inclusive electron scattering from nuclei in the quasielastic region at large momentum transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fomin, Nadia [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Experiment E02-019, performed in Hall C at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), was a measurement of inclusive electron cross sections for several nuclei (2H,3He, 4He, 9Be,12C, 63Cu, and 197Au) in the quasielastic region at high momentum transfer. In the region of low energy transfer, the cross sections were analyzed in terms of the reduced response, F(y), by examining its y-scaling behavior. The data were also examined in terms of the nuclear structure function νWA 2 and its behavior in x and the Nachtmann variable ξ. The data show approximate scaling of νWA 2 in ξ for all targets at all kinematics, unlike scaling in x, which is confined to the DIS regime. However, y-scaling observations are limited to the kinematic region dominated by the quasielastic response (y <0), where some scaling violations arising from FSIs are observed.

  8. Electron diffraction analysis for the molecules with degenerate large amplitude motions: Intramolecular dynamics in arsenic pentafluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochikov, Igor V.; Kovtun, Dmitry M.; Tarasov, Yury I.

    2017-03-01

    There exists a noticeable disagreement in the difference of axial and equatorial bond lengths in D3h symmetry arsenic and phosphorus pentafluorides between the GED data and high level quantum chemical results. In order to resolve this disagreement, a new structural analysis of the original experiment of (Clippard & Bartell, Inorg. Chem., 9 (1970) 805-811) was undertaken on the basis of modern approach incorporating spectroscopic evidence and quantum chemical information and allowing for intramolecular large-amplitude motion. The results of the analysis prove the internal insufficiency of the experimental material in the description of the accurate positions of the peaks on the radial distribution function. Additional experimental investigation of pentahalide molecules, especially at high temperatures, is of interest.

  9. Packaging Concerns and Techniques for Large Devices: Challenges for Complex Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Sampson, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    NASA is going to have to accept the use of non-hermetic packages for complex devices. There are a large number of packaging options available. Space application subjects the packages to stresses that they were probably not designed for (vacuum for instance). NASA has to find a way of having assurance in the integrity of the packages. There are manufacturers interested in qualifying non-hermetic packages to MIL-PRF-38535 Class V. Government space users are agreed that Class V should be for hermetic packages only. NASA is working on a new Class for non-hermetic packages for M38535 Appendix B, "Class Y". Testing for package integrity will be required but can be package specific as described by a Package Integrity Test Plan. The plan is developed by the manufacturer and approved by DSCC and government space.

  10. Argon laser induced changes to the carbonate content of enamel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziglo, M.J. [Orthodontic Graduate Program, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Private Practice, Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada); Nelson, A.E., E-mail: aenelson@dow.com [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Alberta (Canada); Heo, G.; Major, P.W. [Orthodontic Graduate Program, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta (Canada)

    2009-05-15

    Argon laser irradiation can be used to cure orthodontic brackets onto teeth in significantly less time than conventional curing lights. In addition, it has been shown that the argon laser seems to impart a demineralization resistance to the enamel. The purpose of this study was to use surface science techniques to ascertain if this demineralization resistance is possibly a result of a decrease in the carbonate content of enamel. Eleven mandibular third molars previously scheduled for extraction were collected and used in the present study. The teeth were sectioned in two and randomly assigned to either the argon laser (457-502 nm; 250 mW cm{sup -2}) or the control (no treatment) group. The sections assigned to the argon laser group were cured for 10 s and analyzed. To exaggerate any potential changes the experimental sections were then exposed to a further 110 s of argon laser irradiation. Surface analysis was performed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). The results showed no statistically significant change in the carbonate content of enamel after argon laser irradiation (p > 0.05). Thus, it is suggested that any demineralization resistance imparted to the enamel surface by argon laser irradiation is not due to alterations in carbonate content.

  11. Radiation of de-excited electrons at large times in a strong electromagnetic plane wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazinski, P.O., E-mail: kpo@phys.tsu.ru

    2013-12-15

    The late time asymptotics of the physical solutions to the Lorentz–Dirac equation in the electromagnetic external fields of simple configurations–the constant homogeneous field, the linearly polarized plane wave (in particular, the constant uniform crossed field), and the circularly polarized plane wave–are found. The solutions to the Landau–Lifshitz equation for the external electromagnetic fields admitting a two-parametric symmetry group, which include as a particular case the above mentioned field configurations, are obtained. Some general properties of the total radiation power of a charged particle are established. In particular, for a circularly polarized wave and constant uniform crossed fields, the total radiation power in the asymptotic regime is independent of the charge and the external field strength, when expressed in terms of the proper-time, and equals a half the rest energy of a charged particle divided by its proper-time. The spectral densities of the radiation power formed on the late time asymptotics are derived for a charged particle moving in the external electromagnetic fields of the simple configurations pointed above. This provides a simple method to verify experimentally that the charged particle has reached the asymptotic regime. -- Highlights: •Late time asymptotics of the solutions to the Lorentz–Dirac equation are studied. •General properties of the total radiation power of electrons are established. •The total radiation power equals a half the rest energy divided by the proper-time. •Spectral densities of radiation formed on the late time asymptotics are derived. •Possible experimental verification of the results is proposed.

  12. First test of a high voltage feedthrough for liquid Argon TPCs connected to a 300 kV power supply

    CERN Document Server

    Cantini, C; Bueno, L Molina; Murphy, S; Radics, B; Regenfus, C; Rigaut, Y-A; Rubbia, A; Sergiampietri, F; Viant, T; Wu, S

    2016-01-01

    Voltages above a hundred kilo-volt will be required to generate the drift field of future very large liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers. The most delicate component is the feedthrough whose role is to safely deliver the very high voltage to the cathode through the thick insulating walls of the cryostat without compromising the purity of the argon inside. This requires a feedthrough that is typically meters long and carefully designed to be vacuum tight and have small heat input. Furthermore, all materials should be carefully chosen to allow operation in cryogenic conditions. In addition, electric fields in liquid argon should be kept below a threshold to reduce risks of discharges. The combination of all above requirements represents significant challenges from the design and manufacturing perspective. In this paper, we report on the successful operation of a feedthrough satisfying all the above requirements. The details of the feedthrough design and its manufacturing steps are provided. Very high voltages...

  13. Plasma characteristics of argon glow discharge produced by AC power supply operating at low frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kongpiboolkid, Watcharapon; Mongkolnavin, Rattachat [Department of Physics, Facuty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok (Thailand); Plasma Technology and Nuclear Fusion Research Unit, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2015-04-24

    Non-thermal properties of Argon glow discharge operating with various operating pressures were measured and presented in this work. The Argon plasma is produced by a parallel conducting electrodes coupling with a high voltage AC power supply. The power supply can generate high AC voltage at various frequencies. The frequencies for the operation are in the range of a few kHz. The system is capable of generating electric field between the two metal electrodes discharge system. The characteristics of plasma produced were measured by optical emission spectroscopy (OES) technique where electron temperature (T{sub e}) and electron number density (n{sub e}) can be determined by line intensity ratio method. The value of electron number density was then determined from the Saha-Eggert equation. Our results show that the electron number density of the discharge obtained is of the order of 10{sup −17} − 10{sup −18} m{sup −3} where the electron temperature is between 1.00−2.00 eV for various operating frequencies used which are in good agreement with similar results published earlier.

  14. Generation of uniform atmospheric pressure argon glow plasma by dielectric barrier discharge

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raju Bhai Tyata; Deepak Prasad Subedi; Rajendra Shrestha; Chiow San Wong

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, atmospheric pressure glow discharges (APGD) in argon generated in parallel plate dielectric barrier discharge system is investigated by means of electrical and optical measurements. Using a high voltage (0–20 kV) power supply operating at 10–30 kHz, homogeneous and steady APGD has been observed between the electrodes with gap spacing from 0.5 mm to 2 mm and with a dielectric barrier of thickness 2 mm while argon gas is fed at a controlled flow rate of 11/min. The electron temperature and electron density of the plasma are determined by means of optical emission spectroscopy. Our results show that the electron density of the discharge obtained is of the order of 1016 cm-3 while the electron temperature is estimated to be 0.65 eV. The important result is that electron density determined from the line intensity ratio method and stark broadening method are in very good agreement. The Lissajous figure is used to estimate the energy deposited to the glow discharge. It is found that the energy deposited to the discharge is in the range of 20 to 25 $\\$J with a discharge voltage of 1.85 kV. The energy deposited to the discharge is observed to be higher at smaller gas spacing. The glow discharge plasma is tested to be effective in reducing the hydrophobicity of polyethylene film significantly.

  15. Analysis of diagnoses extracted from electronic health records in a large mental health case register

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, Yevgeniya; Stewart, Robert; Broadbent, Matthew; Hubbard, Tim J. P.; Dobson, Richard J. B.

    2017-01-01

    The UK government has recently recognised the need to improve mental health services in the country. Electronic health records provide a rich source of patient data which could help policymakers to better understand needs of the service users. The main objective of this study is to unveil statistics of diagnoses recorded in the Case Register of the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, one of the largest mental health providers in the UK and Europe serving a source population of over 1.2 million people residing in south London. Based on over 500,000 diagnoses recorded in ICD10 codes for a cohort of approximately 200,000 mental health patients, we established frequency rate of each diagnosis (the ratio of the number of patients for whom a diagnosis has ever been recorded to the number of patients in the entire population who have made contact with mental disorders). We also investigated differences in diagnoses prevalence between subgroups of patients stratified by gender and ethnicity. The most common diagnoses in the considered population were (recurrent) depression (ICD10 codes F32-33; 16.4% of patients), reaction to severe stress and adjustment disorders (F43; 7.1%), mental/behavioural disorders due to use of alcohol (F10; 6.9%), and schizophrenia (F20; 5.6%). We also found many diagnoses which were more likely to be recorded in patients of a certain gender or ethnicity. For example, mood (affective) disorders (F31-F39); neurotic, stress-related and somatoform disorders (F40-F48, except F42); and eating disorders (F50) were more likely to be found in records of female patients, while males were more likely to be diagnosed with mental/behavioural disorders due to psychoactive substance use (F10-F19). Furthermore, mental/behavioural disorders due to use of alcohol and opioids were more likely to be recorded in patients of white ethnicity, and disorders due to use of cannabinoids in those of black ethnicity. PMID:28207753

  16. A new fragment-based approach for calculating electronic excitation energies of large systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yingjin; Liu, Yang; Ma, Haibo

    2012-01-14

    We present a new fragment-based scheme to calculate the excited states of large systems without necessity of a Hartree-Fock (HF) solution of the whole system. This method is based on the implementation of the renormalized excitonic method [M. A. Hajj et al., Phys. Rev. B 72, 224412 (2005)] at ab initio level, which assumes that the excitation of the whole system can be expressed by a linear combination of various local excitations. We decomposed the whole system into several blocks and then constructed the effective Hamiltonians for the intra- and inter-block interactions with block canonical molecular orbitals instead of widely used localized molecular orbitals. Accordingly, we avoided the prerequisite HF solution and the localization procedure of the molecular orbitals in the popular local correlation methods. Test calculations were implemented for hydrogen molecule chains at the full configuration interaction, symmetry adapted cluster/symmetry adapted cluster configuration interaction, HF/configuration interaction singles (CIS) levels and more realistic polyene systems at the HF/CIS level. The calculated vertical excitation energies for lowest excited states are in reasonable accordance with those determined by the calculations of the whole systems with traditional methods, showing that our new fragment-based method can give good estimates for low-lying energy spectra of both weak and moderate interaction systems with economic computational costs.

  17. Production of electron cyclotron resonance plasma by using multifrequencies microwaves and active beam profile control on a large bore electron cyclotron resonance ion source with permanent magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yushi; Watanabe, Takeyoshi; Matsui, Yuuki; Hirai, Yoshiaki; Kutsumi, Osamu; Sakamoto, Naoki; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2010-02-01

    A new concept on magnetic field with all magnets on plasma production and confinement has been proposed to enhance efficiency of an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma for broad and dense ion beam source under the low pressure. The magnetic field configuration is constructed by a pair of magnets assembly, i.e., comb-shaped magnet which cylindrically surrounds the plasma chamber. The resonance zones corresponding to the fundamental ECR for 2.45 GHz and 11-13 GHz frequencies are constructed at different positions. The profiles of the plasma parameters in the ECR ion source are different from each frequency of microwave. Large bore extractor is set at the opposite side against the microwave feeds. It is found that differences of their profiles also appear at those of ion beam profiles. We conducted to launch simultaneously multiplex frequencies microwaves controlled individually, and tried to control the profiles of the plasma parameters and then those of extracted ion beam.

  18. Practical reactor production of {sup 41}Ar from argon clathrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercer, J.R. E-mail: jmercer@pharmacy.ualberta.ca; Duke, M.J.M.; McQuarrie, S.A

    2000-06-01

    The radionuclide {sup 41}Ar has many ideal properties as a gas flow tracer. However, the modest cross-section of {sup 40}Ar for thermal neutron activation makes preparation of suitable activities of {sup 41}Ar technically difficult particularly for low flux reactors. Argon can however be trapped in a molecular complex called a clathrate that can then be irradiated. We prepared argon clathrate and explored its irradiation and stability characteristics. Argon clathrate can be used to provide gigabecquerel quantities of {sup 41}Ar even with low power reactors.

  19. A Power Interruption Technique for Investigation of Temperature Difference in Stabilized Low Direct-Current Arc Burning in Pure Argon on Atmospheric Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. M. Kuzmanovi(c); J. J. Savovi(c); D. P. Rankovi(c); M. Stoiljkovi(c); A. Anti(c)-Jovanovi(c); M.S. Pavlovi(c); M. Marinkovi(c)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Plasma of argon stabilized arc column, in a current range 3-11 A, is investigated using emission spectrometric diagnostic techniques. Temperatures are evaluated using several methods: argon line to adjacent recombinational continuum intensity ratio, absolute emissivity of argon fine, measurement of electron number density, and power interruption. Electron number density is evaluated from absolute emissivity of recombinational continuum. The difference between electron Te and heavy particle Th temperature ranged from 4500 K for 3 A to 2300 K for 11 A arc current. By comparing the present with the previously obtained results, using the same arc device but with the introduction of water aerosol, it is concluded that water aerosol reduces the difference Te - Th and brings plasma closer to the partial thermodynamic equilibrium state.

  20. Background studies for a ton-scale argon dark matter detector (ArDM)

    CERN Document Server

    Kaufmann, L

    2006-01-01

    The ArDM project aims at operating a large noble liquid detector to search for direct evidence of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMP) as Dark Matter in the universe. Background sources relevant to ton-scale liquid and gaseous argon detectors, such as neutrons from detector components, muon-induced neutrons and neutrons caused by radioactivity of rock, as well as the internal $^{39}Ar$ background, are studied with simulations. These background radiations are addressed with the design of an appropriate shielding as well as with different background rejection potentialities. Among them the project relies on event topology recognition, event localization, density ionization discrimination and pulse shape discrimination. Background rates, energy spectra, characteristics of the background-induced nuclear recoils in liquid argon, as well as the shielding performance and rejection performance of the detector are described.

  1. Optimization of the electron collection efficiency of a large area MCP-PMT for the JUNO experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Lin, E-mail: chenlin@opt.cn [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi’an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics (XIOPM), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Xi’an 710119 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing 100049 (China); Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Tian, Jinshou [Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing 100049 (China); Liu, Chunliang [Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Wang, Yifang; Zhao, Tianchi [Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP) of CAS, Beijing 100049 (China); Liu, Hulin; Wei, Yonglin; Sai, Xiaofeng [Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing 100049 (China); Chen, Ping [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi’an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics (XIOPM), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Xi’an 710119 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing 100049 (China); Wang, Xing; Lu, Yu [Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing 100049 (China); Hui, Dandan; Guo, Lehui [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi’an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics (XIOPM), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Xi’an 710119 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing 100049 (China); Liu, Shulin; Qian, Sen; Xia, Jingkai; Yan, Baojun; Zhu, Na [Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP) of CAS, Beijing 100049 (China); Sun, Jianning; Si, Shuguang [North Night Vision Technology (NNVT) CO., LTD, Nanjing 210110 (China); and others

    2016-08-11

    A novel large-area (20-inch) photomultiplier tube based on microchannel plate (MCP-PMTs) is proposed for the Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) experiment. Its photoelectron collection efficiency C{sub e} is limited by the MCP open area fraction (A{sub open}). This efficiency is studied as a function of the angular (θ), energy (E) distributions of electrons in the input charge cloud and the potential difference (U) between the PMT photocathode and the MCP input surface, considering secondary electron emission from the MCP input electrode. In CST Studio Suite, Finite Integral Technique and Monte Carlo method are combined to investigate the dependence of C{sub e} on θ, E and U. Results predict that C{sub e} can exceed A{sub open}, and are applied to optimize the structure and operational parameters of the 20-inch MCP-PMT prototype. C{sub e} of the optimized MCP-PMT is expected to reach 81.2%. Finally, the reduction of the penetration depth of the MCP input electrode layer and the deposition of a high secondary electron yield material on the MCP are proposed to further optimize C{sub e}.

  2. 大型电子游戏的数字叙事%The Digital Narrative in the Large Electronic Games

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵萍

    2016-01-01

    Electronic games’narrative have three characteristics, that is,players participate, multi-media and more space narrative but less time narrative are used in the narrative. From narrative symbol and narrative mode,how electronic games tell story was discussed, and in this process, three narrative models used in large electronic games, including linear narrative mode, derivative model based on linear narrative and the sandbox game narrative model, got more attention.%分析电子游戏叙事的3个特点,即玩家介入叙事,多媒介叙事,空间叙事加强和时间叙事弱化。从叙事符号和叙事模型两个角度探讨电子游戏如何叙事,并较为详细地探讨了线性叙事模型、线性叙事衍生模型和沙盒游戏叙事模型3种大型电子游戏叙事模型。

  3. Commissioning of the ArDM experiment at the Canfranc underground laboratory: first steps towards a tonne-scale liquid argon time projection chamber for Dark Matter searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, J.; Cantini, C.; Crivelli, P.; Daniel, M.; Di Luise, S.; Gendotti, A.; Horikawa, S.; Montes, B.; Mu, W.; Murphy, S.; Natterer, G.; Nguyen, K.; Periale, L.; Quan, Y.; Radics, B.; Regenfus, C.; Romero, L.; Rubbia, A.; Santorelli, R.; Sergiampietri, F.; Viant, T.; Wu, S.

    2017-03-01

    The Argon Dark Matter (ArDM) experiment consists of a liquid argon (LAr) time projection chamber (TPC) sensitive to nuclear recoils, resulting from scattering of hypothetical Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) on argon targets. With an active target mass of 850 kg ArDM represents an important milestone towards developments for large LAr Dark Matter detectors. Here we present the experimental apparatus currently installed underground at the Laboratorio Subterráneo de Canfranc (LSC), Spain. We show data on gaseous or liquid argon targets recorded in 2015 during the commissioning of ArDM in single phase at zero E-field (ArDM Run I). The data confirms the overall good and stable performance of the ArDM tonne-scale LAr detector.

  4. Numerical and experimental study of transferred arcs in argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bini, R [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, Via Bonardi 9, 20133 Milan (Italy); Monno, M [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, Via Bonardi 9, 20133 Milan (Italy); Boulos, M I [Centre de Recherche en Energie, Plasma et Electrochimie (CREPE), Department de Genie Chimique Universite de Sherbrooke, 2500 Boul. Universite, Sherbrooke, J1K1R2 (Canada)

    2006-08-07

    The bidimensional model of the electric arc is enhanced with the plasma-electrodes interaction to predict the properties and the energy distribution of an argon arc operating with current intensities between 100 and 200 A and electrode gaps of 10 and 20 mm. An adaptive numerical insulation is applied to the cathode, to properly simulate its thermionic emission mechanism and overcome the dependence on empirical distributions of the current density at its tip. The numerical results are quantitatively compared with the data obtained from calorimetric and spectroscopical measurements, performed on a device which generates a transferred arc between a water cooled copper anode and a thoriated tungsten cathode enclosed in a stainless steel chamber. The calculation of the heat fluxes towards the electrodes permits to determine the amount of power delivered to each component of the arc system (the anode, the cathode assembly and the chamber) and to evaluate the overall efficiency of the process for different configurations. The agreement between theory and data, over the range of parameters investigated, is sensible both in the temperature profiles and in the energy distributions. In such configurations, the conduction from the hot gas is the most relevant term in the overall heat transferred to the anode, but it is the electron transfer which rules the heat transfer in the arc attachment zone. The arc attachment radius is also dependent on the process parameters and increases with the arc current (from approximately 5 mm at 100 A to 7 mm at 200 A) and the arc length. However the maximum heat flux reached on the axis decreases increasing the gap between the electrodes, although more power is delivered to the anode due to the radial spreading of the plasma. A 10 mm 200 A argon arc releases to the anode about 2.6 kW, which corresponds to 75% of the total arc power available. If the arc is extended to 20 mm the power transferred rises by nearly 350 W, but the overall

  5. The effects of argon ion bombardment on the corrosion resistance of tantalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezani, A. H.; Sari, A. H.; Shokouhy, A.

    2017-02-01

    Application of ion beam has been widely used as a surface modification method to improve surface properties. This paper investigates the effect of argon ion implantation on surface structure as well as resistance against tantalum corrosion. In this experiment, argon ions with energy of 30 keV and in doses of 1 × 1017-10 × 1017 ions/cm2 were used. The surface bombardment with inert gases mainly produces modified topography and morphology of the surface. Atomic Force Microscopy was also used to patterned the roughness variations prior to and after the implantation phase. Additionally, the corrosion investigation apparatus wear was applied to compare resistance against tantalum corrosion both before and after ion implantation. The results show that argon ion implantation has a substantial impact on increasing resistance against tantalum corrosion. After the corrosion test, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyzed the samples' surface morphologies. In addition, the elemental composition is characterized by energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. The purpose of this paper was to obtain the perfect condition for the formation of tantalum corrosion resistance. In order to evaluate the effect of the ion implantation on the corrosion behavior, potentiodynamic tests were performed. The results show that the corrosion resistance of the samples strongly depends on the implantation doses.

  6. Waves generated in the vicinity of an argon plasma gun in the ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, L. J., Jr.; Arnoldy, R. L.; Lysak, R. L.; Peria, W.; Lynch, K. A.

    1993-01-01

    Wave and particle observations were made in the close vicinity of an argon plasma gun carned to over 600 km altitude on a sounding rocket. The gun was carned on a subpayload, separated from the main payload early in the flight. Twelve-second argon ion ejections were energized alternately with a peak energy of 100 or 200 eV. They produced waves, with multiple harmonics, in the range of ion cyclotron waves, 10 to 1000 Hz at rocket altitudes. Many of these waves could not be identified as corresponding to the cyclotron frequencies of any of the ions, argon or ambient, known to be present. In addition, the wave frequencies were observed to rise and fall and to change abruptly during a 12-s gun operation. The wave amplitudes, near a few hundred Hertz, were of the order of O. 1 V/m. Some of the waves may be ion-ion hybrid waves. Changes in ion populations were observed at the main payload and at the subpayload during gun operations. A gun-related, field-aligned, electron population also appeared.

  7. New level-resolved collision data for neutral argon, benchmarked against the ALEXIS plasma experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Nicholas; Loch, Stuart; Ballance, Connor; Thomas, Ed

    2016-10-01

    Performing spectroscopic measurements of emission lines in low temperature laboratory plasmas is challenging because the plasma is often neutral-dominated and not in thermal equilibrium. The densities and temperatures are such that coronal models do not apply; meaning that generalized collisional-radiative (GCR) methods must be employed to theoretically analyze atomic processes. However, for most noble gases, detailed, level-resolved atomic data for neutral and low-charge states does not exist in the literature. We report on a new project, where we use existing atomic physics codes to calculate level-resolved atomic data for neutral and low charge states of argon and compare with previously published, term-resolved theoretical results. In addition, we use the Atomic Structure and Data Analysis (ADAS) suite of codes to calculate a GCR model for low temperature neutral argon, which we compare to published measurements of argon optical emission cross sections. Finally, we compare synthetic spectra generated from our data with observations taken from the Auburn Linear Experiment for Instability Studies (ALEXIS) in an attempt to develop new optical plasma diagnostics for electron temperature and plasma density measurements. This project is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. Grant Number: DE-FG02-00ER54476.

  8. Ionization effects in the generation of wake-fields by ultra-high contrast femtosecond laser pulses in argon gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makito, K.; Shin, J.-H. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Zhidkov, A.; Hosokai, T.; Masuda, S. [Photon Pioneers Center, Osaka University, 2-8, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), CREST, 2-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Kodama, R. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Photon Pioneers Center, Osaka University, 2-8, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), CREST, 2-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2012-10-15

    Difference in mechanisms of wake-field generation and electron self-injection by high contrast femtosecond laser pulses in an initially neutral Argon gas and in pre-ionized plasma without ionization is studied via 2D particle-in-cell simulations including optical ionization of the media. For shorter laser pulses, 40 fs, ionization results only in an increase of the charge of accelerated electrons by factor of {approx}3 with qualitatively the same energy distribution. For longer pulses, 80 fs, a more stable wake field structure is observed in the neutral gas with the maximal energy of the accelerated electrons exceeding that in the fixed density plasma. In higher density Argon, an ionizing laser pulse converts itself to a complex system of solitons at a self-induced, critical density ramp.

  9. Ionization effects in the generation of wake-fields by ultra-high contrast femtosecond laser pulses in argon gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makito, K.; Zhidkov, A.; Hosokai, T.; Shin, J.-H.; Masuda, S.; Kodama, R.

    2012-10-01

    Difference in mechanisms of wake-field generation and electron self-injection by high contrast femtosecond laser pulses in an initially neutral Argon gas and in pre-ionized plasma without ionization is studied via 2D particle-in-cell simulations including optical ionization of the media. For shorter laser pulses, 40 fs, ionization results only in an increase of the charge of accelerated electrons by factor of ˜3 with qualitatively the same energy distribution. For longer pulses, 80 fs, a more stable wake field structure is observed in the neutral gas with the maximal energy of the accelerated electrons exceeding that in the fixed density plasma. In higher density Argon, an ionizing laser pulse converts itself to a complex system of solitons at a self-induced, critical density ramp.

  10. Chebyshev polynomial filtered subspace iteration in the discontinuous Galerkin method for large-scale electronic structure calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Amartya S.; Lin, Lin; Hu, Wei; Yang, Chao; Pask, John E.

    2016-10-01

    The Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) electronic structure method employs an adaptive local basis (ALB) set to solve the Kohn-Sham equations of density functional theory in a discontinuous Galerkin framework. The adaptive local basis is generated on-the-fly to capture the local material physics and can systematically attain chemical accuracy with only a few tens of degrees of freedom per atom. A central issue for large-scale calculations, however, is the computation of the electron density (and subsequently, ground state properties) from the discretized Hamiltonian in an efficient and scalable manner. We show in this work how Chebyshev polynomial filtered subspace iteration (CheFSI) can be used to address this issue and push the envelope in large-scale materials simulations in a discontinuous Galerkin framework. We describe how the subspace filtering steps can be performed in an efficient and scalable manner using a two-dimensional parallelization scheme, thanks to the orthogonality of the DG basis set and block-sparse structure of the DG Hamiltonian matrix. The on-the-fly nature of the ALB functions requires additional care in carrying out the subspace iterations. We demonstrate the parallel scalability of the DG-CheFSI approach in calculations of large-scale two-dimensional graphene sheets and bulk three-dimensional lithium-ion electrolyte systems. Employing 55 296 computational cores, the time per self-consistent field iteration for a sample of the bulk 3D electrolyte containing 8586 atoms is 90 s, and the time for a graphene sheet containing 11 520 atoms is 75 s.

  11. Thermal decomposition of barium valerate in argon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torres, P.; Norby, Poul; Grivel, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    degrees C and evidence was found for the solidification of the melt at 380-440 degrees C, i.e. simultaneously with the onset of decomposition. Between 400 degrees C and 520 degrees C (Ba(C4H9CO2)(2) decomposes in two main steps, first into BaCO3 with release of C4H9COC4H9 (5-nonanone), whereas final......The thermal decomposition of barium valerate (Ba(C4H9CO2)(2)/Ba-pentanoate) was studied in argon by means of thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis, IR-spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and hot-stage optical microscopy. Melting takes place in two different steps, at 200 degrees C and 280...... conversion to BaO takes place with release of CO2. Elemental carbon that is left as a by-product is finally slowly burned by the residual oxygen present in the Ar atmosphere. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  12. Liquid argon calorimeter performance at high rates

    CERN Document Server

    Seifert, F; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The expected increase of luminosity at HL-LHC by a factor of ten with respect to LHC luminosities has serious consequences for the signal reconstruction, radiation hardness requirements and operations of the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeters in the endcap, respectively forward region. Small modules of each type of calorimeter have been built and exposed to a high intensity proton beam of 50 GeV at IHEP/Protvino. The beam is extracted via the bent crystal technique, offering the unique opportunity to cover intensities ranging from $10^6$ p/s up to $10^{12}$ p/s. This exceeds the deposited energy per time expected at HL-LHC by more than a factor of 100. The correlation between beam intensity and the read-out signal has been studied. The data show clear indications of pulse shape distortion due to the high ionization build-up, in agreement with MC expectations. This is also confirmed from the dependence of the HV currents on beam intensity.

  13. Liquid Argon Calorimeter performance at High Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Seifert, F; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The expected increase of luminosity at HL-LHC by a factor of ten with respect to LHC luminosities has serious consequences for the signal reconstruction, radiation hardness requirements and operations of the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeters in the endcap, respectively forward region. Small modules of each type of calorimeter have been built and exposed to a high intensity proton beam of 50 GeV at IHEP/Protvino. The beam is extracted via the bent crystal technique, offering the unique opportunity to cover intensities ranging from $10^6$ p/s up to $3\\cdot10^{11}$ p/s. This exceeds the deposited energy per time expected at HL-LHC by more than a factor of 100. The correlation between beam intensity and the read-out signal has been studied. The data show clear indications of pulse shape distortion due to the high ionization build-up, in agreement with MC expectations. This is also confirmed from the dependence of the HV currents on beam intensity.

  14. Clinical curative effect analysis of the treatment of granulation hyperplasia bronchial tuberculosis by cryotherapy combined with argon knife through electronic bronchoscope%电子支气管镜下冷冻及氩气序贯治疗肉芽增殖型支气管结核的临床疗效分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘伟; 谢永宏; 顾兴; 孙瑞琳; 李王平; 金发光

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical curative effect of the treatment of granulation hyperplasia bronchial tuberculosis by cryotherapy combined with argon knife. Methods A total of 328 patients with granulation hyperplasia bronchial tuberculosis were observed from January 2013 to October 2015. All patients were given antituberculosis therapy, 157 patients were treated by cryotherapy only, while 171 patients were treated by cryotherapy combined with argon knife. After four times treatment, their efficacy were assessed by symptom, imaging improvement and expression under bronchoscope. Results The total curative effect of cryotherapy combined with argon knife ( 98. 83%) was more higher than cryotherapy only ( 88. 54%) . Meanwhile, cryotherapy combined with argon knife has lower risk of bleeding. Conclusions Cryotherapy combined with argon knife are the effective methods for treating granulation hyperplasia bronchial tuberculosis.%目的:探讨冷冻及氩气序贯治疗肉芽增殖型支气管结核的临床疗效。方法回顾性分析我科2013年1月至2015年10月进行气管镜下治疗的肉芽增殖型支气管结核患者328例,所有患者均给予全身抗结核治疗,其中157例单纯进行冷冻治疗,171例行冷冻及氩气序贯治疗。通过评估局部治疗4次后对患者的症状,影像学改变及气管镜下表现等指标进行疗效分析。结果冷冻及氩气序贯治疗肉芽增殖型支气管结核的总有效率(98.83%)明显高于单纯冷冻治疗(88.54%),且出血风险明显降低。结论冷冻及氩气序贯治疗肉芽增殖型支气管结核临床疗效确切,并发症少,值得临床推广。

  15. A Study of the Residual 39Ar Content in Argon from Underground Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, J; Galbiati, C; Goretti, A; Guray, G; Hohman, T; Holtz, D; Ianni, A; Laubenstein, M; Loer, B; Love, C; Martoff, C J; Montanari, D; Mukhopadhyay, S; Nelson, A; Rountree, S D; Vogelaar, R B; Wright, A

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of argon from underground sources with significantly less 39Ar than atmospheric argon was an important step in the development of direct-detection dark matter experiments using argon as the active target. We report on the design and operation of a low background detector with a single phase liquid argon target that was built to study the 39Ar content of the underground argon. Underground argon from the Kinder Morgan CO2 plant in Cortez, Colorado was determined to have less than 0.65% of the 39Ar activity in atmospheric argon.

  16. An experimental study of atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subedi, D. P. [Department of Natural Sciences, School of Science, Kathmandu University, Dhulikhel (Nepal); Tyata, R. B. [Department of Natural Sciences, School of Science, Kathmandu University, Dhulikhel, Nepal and Department of Electrical, Khwopa College of Engineering, Libali-2, Bhaktapur (Nepal); Shrestha, R. [Department of Natural Sciences, School of Science, Kathmandu University, Dhulikhel, Nepal and Department of Physics, Basu College, Kalighat, Byasi, Bhaktapur (Nepal); Wong, C. S. [Plasma Technology Research Centre, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-03-05

    In this paper, experimental results on atmospheric pressure argon dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) have been presented. The discharge was generated using a high voltage (0 to 20 kV) power supply operating at frequency of 10 to 30 kHz and was studied by means of electrical and optical measurements. A homogeneous and steady discharge was observed between the electrodes with gap spacing from 1 mm to 3 mm and with a dielectric barrier of thickness 1.5 mm while argon gas is fed at a controlled flow rate of 2liter per min. The electron temperature (T{sub e}) and electron density (n{sub e}) of the plasma have been determined by means of optical emission spectroscopy. Our results show that the electron density is of the order of 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} while the electron temperature is estimated to be ∼ 1 eV. The homogeneity and non-thermal nature of the discharge were utilized in the investigation of the change in wettabilty of a polymer sample subjected to the treatment by the discharge. Contact angle analysis showed that the discharge was effective in improving the wettability of low density Polyethylene (LDPE) polymer sample after the treatment.

  17. Study of a contracted glow in low-frequency plasma-jet discharges operating with argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minotti, F.; Giuliani, L.; Xaubet, M.; Grondona, D. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, C1428EHA, Buenos Aires, Argentina and Instituto de Física del Plasma (INFIP), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Universidad de Buenos Aires - UBA, C1428EHA, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2015-11-15

    In this work, we present an experimental and theoretical study of a low frequency, atmospheric plasma-jet discharge in argon. The discharge has the characteristics of a contracted glow with a current channel of submillimeter diameter and a relatively high voltage cathode layer. In order to interpret the measurements, we consider the separate modeling of each region of the discharge: main channel and cathode layer, which must then be properly matched together. The main current channel was modeled, extending a previous work, as similar to an arc in which joule heating is balanced by lateral heat conduction, without thermal equilibrium between electrons and heavy species. The cathode layer model, on the other hand, includes the emission of secondary electrons by ion impact and by additional mechanisms, of which we considered emission due to collision of atoms excited at metastable levels, and field-enhanced thermionic emission (Schottky effect). The comparison of model and experiment indicates that the discharge can be effectively sustained in its contracted form by the secondary electrons emitted by collision of excited argon atoms, whereas thermionic emission is by far insufficient to provide the necessary electrons.

  18. Size Determination of Argon Clusters from a Rayleigh Scattering Experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI An-Le; ZHAI Hua-Jin; LIU Bing-Chen; LI Zhong; NI Guo-Yuan; XU Zhi-Zhan

    2000-01-01

    Argon clusters are produced in the process of adiabatic expansion of a high backing pressure gas into vacuum through a nozzle. The cluster size is determined by a Rayleigh scattering measurement. The scattered signal measured is proportional to the 2.78th power of gas stagnation pressure. The average cluster sizes vary from 100 to more than 12000 atoms/cluster with the argon gas backing pressures ranging between 3 to 45 atm.

  19. Tests of innovative photon detectors and integrated electronics for the large-area CLAS12 ring-imaging Cherenkov detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contalbrigo, Marco [INFN, Ferrara, Italy

    2015-07-01

    A large area ring-imaging Cherenkov detector has been designed to provide clean hadron identification capability in the momentum range from 3 GeV/c to 8 GeV/c for the CLAS12 experiments at the upgraded 12 GeV continuous electron beam accelerator facility of Jefferson Lab. Its aim is to study the 3D nucleon structure in the yet poorly explored valence region by deep-inelastic scattering, and to perform precision measurements in hadron spectroscopy. The adopted solution foresees a novel hybrid optics design based on an aerogel radiator, composite mirrors and a densely packed and highly segmented photon detector. Cherenkov light will either be imaged directly (forward tracks) or after two mirror reflections (large angle tracks). Extensive tests have been performed on Hamamatsu H8500 and novel flat multi-anode photomultipliers under development and on various types of silicon photomultipliers. A large scale prototype based on 28 H8500 MA-PMTs has been realized and tested with few GeV/c hadron beams at the T9 test-beam facility of CERN. In addition a small prototype was used to study the response of customized SiPM matrices within a temperature interval ranging from 25 down to –25 °C. The preliminary results of the individual photon detector tests and of the prototype performance at the test-beams are here reported.

  20. Tests of innovative photon detectors and integrated electronics for the large-area CLAS12 ring-imaging Cherenkov detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contalbrigo, M., E-mail: contalbrigo@fe.infn.it

    2015-07-01

    A large area ring-imaging Cherenkov detector has been designed to provide clean hadron identification capability in the momentum range from 3 GeV/c to 8 GeV/c for the CLAS12 experiments at the upgraded 12 GeV continuous electron beam accelerator facility of Jefferson Lab. Its aim is to study the 3D nucleon structure in the yet poorly explored valence region by deep-inelastic scattering, and to perform precision measurements in hadron spectroscopy. The adopted solution foresees a novel hybrid optics design based on an aerogel radiator, composite mirrors and a densely packed and highly segmented photon detector. Cherenkov light will either be imaged directly (forward tracks) or after two mirror reflections (large angle tracks). Extensive tests have been performed on Hamamatsu H8500 and novel flat multi-anode photomultipliers under development and on various types of silicon photomultipliers. A large scale prototype based on 28 H8500 MA-PMTs has been realized and tested with few GeV/c hadron beams at the T9 test-beam facility of CERN. In addition a small prototype was used to study the response of customized SiPM matrices within a temperature interval ranging from 25 down to −25 °C. The preliminary results of the individual photon detector tests and of the prototype performance at the test-beams are here reported.

  1. Study of materials and machines for 3D printed large-scale, flexible electronic structures using fused deposition modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Seyeon

    The 3 dimensional printing (3DP), called to additive manufacturing (AM) or rapid prototyping (RP), is emerged to revolutionize manufacturing and completely transform how products are designed and fabricated. A great deal of research activities have been carried out to apply this new technology to a variety of fields. In spite of many endeavors, much more research is still required to perfect the processes of the 3D printing techniques especially in the area of the large-scale additive manufacturing and flexible printed electronics. The principles of various 3D printing processes are briefly outlined in the Introduction Section. New types of thermoplastic polymer composites aiming to specified functional applications are also introduced in this section. Chapter 2 shows studies about the metal/polymer composite filaments for fused deposition modeling (FDM) process. Various metal particles, copper and iron particles, are added into thermoplastics polymer matrices as the reinforcement filler. The thermo-mechanical properties, such as thermal conductivity, hardness, tensile strength, and fracture mechanism, of composites are tested to figure out the effects of metal fillers on 3D printed composite structures for the large-scale printing process. In Chapter 3, carbon/polymer composite filaments are developed by a simple mechanical blending process with an aim of fabricating the flexible 3D printed electronics as a single structure. Various types of carbon particles consisting of multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT), conductive carbon black (CCB), and graphite are used as the conductive fillers to provide the thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) with improved electrical conductivity. The mechanical behavior and conduction mechanisms of the developed composite materials are observed in terms of the loading amount of carbon fillers in this section. Finally, the prototype flexible electronics are modeled and manufactured by the FDM process using Carbon/TPU composite filaments and

  2. Alternating current electrical properties of Argon plasma treated jute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Masroor Anwer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Low temperature plasma (LTP treatment, a kind of environment friendly surface modification technique, was applied to biodegradable and environment friendly jute fibre with the use of nonpolymerizing gas, namely argon, at various discharge power levels and exposure times with a definite flow rate. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM microphotographs reveal that the roughness of the fibre surfaces increases with the increase of discharge power and exposure time. This is caused due to the bombardment of high energetic ions on the fibre surface and the fibres become sputtered. The capacitance and the electrical conductance of raw and LTP treated jute fibre were measured as a function of frequency at room temperature. The dielectric constant, conductivity, dielectric loss-tangent and the surface morphology of raw and LTP treated jute as a function of frequency were studied at room temperature. It was observed that for all the samples the dielectric constant almost constant at lower frequencies and then decreases gradually in the high frequency region. In addition, dielectric constant increases with the increase of plasma treatment time as well as discharge power. It is also observed for all the samples that the conductivity increases as the frequency increases with a lower slope in the low frequency region and with a higher slope in the higher frequency region. In addition, the conductivity decreases with the increase of plasma exposure time as well as discharge power. The conductivity increases with frequency due to the hopping mechanism of electrons. The dependence of the dielectric loss-tangent with frequency at different treatment times and discharge powers for all the jute samples show small relaxation peaks in the very low frequency region. The dielectric loss-tangent decreases with the increase of both plasma treatment time and discharge power. In addition, the relaxation peaks are shifted to the higher frequency region as the plasma treatment

  3. Scintillation light from cosmic-ray muons in liquid argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittington, Denver Wade [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Physics Dept.; Mufson, S. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Astronomy Dept.; Howard, B. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Physics Dept.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports the results of an experiment to directly measure the time-resolved scintillation signal from the passage of cosmic-ray muons through liquid argon. Scintillation light from these muons is of value to studies of weakly-interacting particles in neutrino experiments and dark matter searches. The experiment was carried out at the TallBo dewar facility at Fermilab using prototype light guide detectors and electronics developed for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. Two models are presented for the time structure of the scintillation light, a phenomenological model and a physically-motivated model. Both models find tT = 1:52 ms for the decay time constant of the Ar 2 triplet state. These models also show that the identification of the “early” light fraction in the phenomenological model, FE 25% of the signal, with the total light from singlet decays is an underestimate. The total fraction of singlet light is FS 36%, where the increase over FE is from singlet light emitted by the wavelength shifter through processes with long decay constants. The models were further used to compute the experimental particle identification parameter Fprompt, the fraction of light coming in a short time window after the trigger compared with the light in the total recorded waveform. The models reproduce quite well the typical experimental value 0.3 found by dark matter and double b-decay experiments, which suggests this parameter provides a robust metric for discriminating electrons and muons from more heavily ionizing particles.

  4. The effect of chirped intense femtosecond laser pulses on the Argon cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Ghaforyan, H; Irani, E

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of intense femtosecond laser pulses with atomic Argon clusters has been investigated by using nano-plasma model. Based on the dynamic simulations, ionization process, heating and expansion of a cluster after irradiation by femtosecond laser pulses at intensities up to 2*1017 Wcm-2 are studied. The analytical calculation provides ionization ratefor different mechanisms and time evolution of the density of electrons for different pulse shapes. In this approach the strong dependence of laser intensity, pulse duration and laser shape on the electron energy, the electron density and the cluster size are presented using the intense chirped laser pulses. Based on the presented theoretical modifications, the effect of chirped laser pulse on the complex dynamical process of the interaction is studied. It is found that the energy of electrons and the radius of cluster for the negatively chirped pulsesare improved up to 20% in comparison to the unchirped and positively chirped pulses.

  5. The Effect of Chirped Intense Femtosecond Laser Pulses on the Argon Cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ghaforyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of intense femtosecond laser pulses with atomic Argon clusters has been investigated by using nanoplasma model. Based on the dynamic simulations, ionization process, heating, and expansion of a cluster after irradiation by femtosecond laser pulses at intensities up to 2 × 1017 Wcm−2 are studied. The analytical calculation provides ionization rate for different mechanisms and time evolution of the density of electrons for different pulse shapes. In this approach, the strong dependence of laser intensity, pulse duration, and laser shape on the electron energy, the electron density, and the cluster size is presented using the intense chirped laser pulses. Based on the presented theoretical modifications, the effect of chirped laser pulse on the complex dynamical process of the interaction is studied. It is found that the energy of electrons and the radius of cluster for the negatively chirped pulses are improved up to 20% in comparison to the unchirped and positively chirped pulses.

  6. Examining Agencies' Satisfaction with Electronic Record Management Systems in e-Government: A Large-Scale Survey Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Fang-Ming; Hu, Paul Jen-Hwa; Chen, Hsinchun; Hu, Han-Fen

    While e-government is propelling and maturing steadily, advanced technological capabilities alone cannot guarantee agencies’ realizing the full benefits of the enabling computer-based systems. This study analyzes information systems in e-government settings by examining agencies’ satisfaction with an electronic record management system (ERMS). Specifically, we investigate key satisfaction determinants that include regulatory compliance, job relevance, and satisfaction with support services for using the ERMS. We test our model and the hypotheses in it, using a large-scale survey that involves a total of 1,652 government agencies in Taiwan. Our results show significant effects of regulatory compliance on job relevance and satisfaction with support services, which in turn determine government agencies’ satisfaction with an ERMS. Our data exhibit a reasonably good fit to our model, which can explain a significant portion of the variance in agencies’ satisfaction with an ERMS. Our findings have several important implications to research and practice, which are also discussed.