WorldWideScience

Sample records for argon 39

  1. Potassium-argon/argon-40-argon-39 geochronology of Cenozoic alkali basalts from the South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Quanshu; SHI Xuefa; YANG Yaomin; WANG Kunshan

    2008-01-01

    Based on the isotopic chronologic results of Cenozoic alkali basalts from the South China Sea,the characteristics of volcanic activi-ty of the South China Sea after spreading were studied.The potassium - argon ages of eight alkali basalt samples from the South China Sea,and the argon - argon ages of two samples among them are reported.Apparent ages of the whole rock are 3.80 to 7.91 Ma with an average value of 5.43 Ma (potassium- argon,whole rock),and there is little difference among samples at the same location,e.g.,4.76~5.78 Ma for location S04-12.The argon - argon ages for the two samples are 6.06 and 4.71 Ma,which lie within the age scope of potassium - argon method.The dating results indicate that rock-forming age is from late Miocene to Pli-ocene,which is consistent with erupting event for alkali basalts from adjacent regions of the South China Sea.Volcanic activities occur after the cessation of spreading of the South China Sea,which are controlled by lithospheric fault and the spreading center formed during the spreading period of the South China Sea.These dating results,combined with geochemical characteristics of these basalts,the published chronological data for the South China Sea and its adjacent regions,and the updated geophysical data near Hainan Island,suggest that after the cessation of spreading of the South China Sea,there occur widely distributing magmatic activities which primarily is alkali basalt,and the volcanic activity continues to Quaternary.The activity may be relative to Hainan mantle plume originated from core/mantle boundary.

  2. Laser Argon-40-Argon-39 Age Studies of Dar Al Gani 262 Lunar Meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, V. A.; Burgess, R.; Turner, G.

    1999-01-01

    The lunar meteorite Dar al Gani 262 (DAG 262) was found in the Sahara Desert in Libya on March 23,1997. This was the first lunar meteorite found in a desert and is the thirteenth lunar meteorite discovered. DAG 262 is a polymict anorthositic lunar highland breccia. The Ar-40-Ar-39 dating technique has been applied to DAG 262 in an attempt to determine the crystallization age and shock events experienced by this meteorite. Previous studies have indicated that this meteorite may have suffered up to four shock events. Due to the brecciated nature of the rock and the likelihood of multiple shock events, a laser-probe technique has been used to analyze individual components (minerals and clasts) of the meteorite. The sample supplied to us ( about 1.5 g) shows two distinct clast types (1) feldspathic and (2) basaltic, the latter not having been previously described. Plagioclases show fractures and undulatory extinction as the result of shock events. The feldspathic clast has small, round low-Ca pyroxenes distributed within it. Electron-microprobe analyses of feldspar and pyroxene are given. The bulk composition as determined by suggests that the source of this clast is the ferroan-anorthositic suite. The basaltic clast shows a very fine intergranular texture with some larger plagioclase grains. The two clasts are separated by a melt-glass matrix that contains plagioclase with the same chemical composition as those plagioclases within the feldspathic clast. A devitrified mafic-glass spherule of - 150 mm diameter was identified within the matrix as well as other small fragments of possible glass spheres. Some dendritic veins can be observed on the outer part of the section, which formed after breccia lithification. Two laser Ar-40-Ar-39 experiments are being carried out: (1) infrared laser-stepped heating of feldspathic fragments that have been separated from the meteorite; and (2) ultraviolet laser spot fusion (50 micron) of a slice of meteorite (about 1.0 x 0.5 cm

  3. New argon-argon (40Ar/39Ar) radiometric age dates from selected subsurface basalt flows at the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Mary K.; Turrin, Brent D.; Champion, Duane E.; Swisher, Carl C.

    2015-01-01

    In 2011, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, collected samples for 12 new argon-argon radiometric ages from eastern Snake River Plain olivine tholeiite basalt flows in the subsurface at the Idaho National Laboratory. The core samples were collected from flows that had previously published paleomagnetic data. Samples were sent to Rutgers University for argon-argon radiometric dating analyses.

  4. Argon in hornblende, biotite and muscovite in geologic cooling - Ar-40/Ar-39-investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of the Ar-40/Ar-39 studies are discussed under the aspect of whether the age data of the minerals indicate a cooling process. The author hopes that isotope dating of minerals with different closing temperatures will describe the temperature/time history of an area in the temperature range of 600 to 2000C. The findings are analyzed under three aspects: How much do they contribute to the initial methodological question, what do they contribute to the regional geology of the areas investigated, and in what respects do they extent the present knowledge of the geochronological analysis, i.e. its techniques and interpretation. (orig.)

  5. Effect of argon ion implantation on the electrical and dielectric properties of CR-39

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Mahak; Shekhawat, Nidhi; Goyal, Meetika; Gupta, Divya; Sharma, Annu; Aggarwal, Sanjeev

    2016-05-01

    The objective of the present work is to study the effect of 130 keV Ar+ ions on the electrical and dielectric properties of CR-39 samples at various doses 5×1014, 1×1015 and 1×1016 Ar+ cm-2. Current-Voltage (I-V characteristics) measurements have been used to study the electrical properties of virgin and Ar+ implanted CR-39 specimens. The current has been found to be increased with increasing voltage as well as with increasing ion dose. The dielectric spectroscopy of these specimens has been done in the frequency range of 100 kHz-100 MHz. The dielectric constant has been found to be decreasing whereas dielectric loss factor increases with increasing ion fluence. These kind of behavior observed in the implanted specimens indicate towards the formation of carbonaceous clusters due to the cross linking, chemical bond cleavage, formation of free radicals. The changes observed in the dielectric behavior have been further correlated with the structural changes observed through I-V characteristics.

  6. 40Ar/39Ar impact ages and time-temperature argon diffusion history of the Bunburra Rockhole anomalous basaltic achondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdan, Fred; Benedix, Gretchen; Eroglu, Ela.; Bland, Phil. A.; Bouvier, Audrey.

    2014-09-01

    The Bunburra Rockhole meteorite is a brecciated anomalous basaltic achondrite containing coarse-, medium- and fine-grained lithologies. Petrographic observations constrain the limited shock pressure to between ca. 10 GPa and 20 GPa. In this study, we carried out nine 40Ar/39Ar step-heating experiments on distinct single-grain fragments extracted from the coarse and fine lithologies. We obtained six plateau ages and three mini-plateau ages. These ages fall into two internally concordant populations with mean ages of 3640 ± 21 Ma (n = 7; P = 0.53) and 3544 ± 26 Ma (n = 2; P = 0.54), respectively. Based on these results, additional 40Ar/39Ar data of fusion crust fragments, argon diffusion modelling, and petrographic observations, we conclude that the principal components of the Bunburra Rockhole basaltic achondrite are from a melt rock formed at ∼3.64 Ga by a medium to large impact event. The data imply that this impact generated high enough energy to completely melt the basaltic target rock and reset the Ar systematics, but only partially reset the Pb-Pb age. We also conclude that a complete 40Ar∗ resetting of pyroxene and plagioclase at this time could not have been achieved at solid-state conditions. Comparison with a terrestrial analog (Lonar crater) shows that the time-temperature conditions required to melt basaltic target rocks upon impact are relatively easy to achieve. Ar data also suggest that a second medium-size impact event occurred on a neighbouring part of the same target rock at ∼3.54 Ga. Concordant low-temperature step ages of the nine aliquots suggest that, at ∼3.42 Ga, a third smaller impact excavated parts of the ∼3.64 Ga and ∼3.54 Ga melt rocks and brought the fragments together. The lack of significant impact activity after 3.5 Ga, as recorded by the Bunburra Rockhole suggests that (1) either the meteorite was ejected in a small secondary parent body where it resided untouched by large impacts, or (2) it was covered by a porous heat

  7. Depleted Argon from Underground Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argon is a strong scintillator and an ideal target for Dark Matter detection; however 39Ar contamination in atmospheric argon from cosmic ray interactions limits the size of liquid argon dark matter detectors due to pile-up. Argon from deep underground is depleted in 39Ar due to the cosmic ray shielding of the earth. In Cortez, Colorado, a CO2 well has been discovered to contain approximately 600 ppm of argon as a contamination in the CO2. We first concentrate the argon locally to 3% in an Ar, N2, and He mixture, from the CO2 through chromatographic gas separation, and then the N2 and He will be removed by continuous distillation to purify the argon. We have collected 26 kg of argon from the CO2 facility and a cryogenic distillation column is under construction at Fermilab to further purify the argon.

  8. Behavior of argon gas release from manganese oxide minerals as revealed by 40Ar/39Ar laser incremental heating analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Manganese oxides in association with paleo- weathering may provide significant insights into the multiple factors affecting the formation and evolution of weathering profiles, such as temperature, precipitation, and biodiversity. Laser probe step-heating analysis of supergene hollandite and cryptomelane samples collected from central Queensland, Australia, yield well-defined plateaus andconsistent isochron ages, confirming the feasibility dating very-fined supergene manganese oxides by 40Ar/39Ar technique. Two distinct structural sites hostingAr isotopes can be identified in light of their degassing behaviors obtained byincremental heating analyses. The first site, releasing its gas fraction at thelaser power 0.2-0.4 W, yields primarily 40Aratm, 38Aratm, and 36Aratm (atmospheric Ar isotopes). The second sites yield predominantly 40Ar* (radiogenic 40Ar),39ArK, and 38ArK (nucleogenic components), at ~0.5-1.0 W. There is no significant Ar gas released at the laser power higher than 1.0 W, indicating the breakdown of the tunnel sites hosting the radiogenic and nucleogenic components. The excellent match between the degassing behaviors of 40Ar*, 39ArK, and 38ArK suggests that these isotopes occupy the same crystallographic sites and that 39ArK lossfrom the tunnel site by recoil during neutron irradiation and/or bake-out procedure preceding isotopic analysis does not occur. Present investigation supports that neither the overwhelming atmospheric 40Ar nor the very-fined nature of the supergene manganese oxides poses problems in extracting meaningful weathering geochronological information by analyzing supergene manganese oxides minerals.

  9. Ventilation of the deep Greenland and Norwegian seas: evidence from krypton-85, tritium, carbon-14 and argon-39

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On leg 5 of the TTO expedition, the distributions of 85Kr, tritium, 14C, 39Ar, temperature, salinity, oxygen, carbon dioxide and nutrients were measured in the Greenland and Norwegian seas. These observations support previous observations that Greenland Sea Deep Water is formed by a deep convective process within the Greenland gyre. They also support AAGAARD et al.'s (1985, Journal of Geophysical Research, 90, 4833-4846) new hypothesis that Norwegian Sea Deep Water forms from a mixture of Greenland Sea Deep Water and Eurasian Basin Deep Water. Volume transports estimated from the distributions of 85Kr, tritium, 14C and 39Ar range from 0.53 to 0.74 Sv for exchange between the surface and deep Greenland Sea and from 0.9 to 1.47 Sv for exchange between the deep Greenland and deep Norwegian Seas. The residence time of water and the deep Greenland Sea with respect to exchange with surface water ranges from 24 to 34 years reported by PETERSON and ROOTH (1976, Deep-Sea Research, 23, 273-283) and 35-42 years reported by BULLISTER and WEISS (1983, Science, 221, 265-268). The residence time of water in the deep Norwegian Sea with respect to exchange with the deep Greenland Sea ranges from 19 to 30 years compared to 97-107 years reported by PETERSON and ROOTH (1976) and 10-28 years reported by BULLISTER and WEISS (1983). The oxygen consumption rate was estimated to be at most 1.04 μM kg-1 y-1 for the deep Greenland Sea and to be between 0.47 and 0.79 μM kg-1 y-1 for the deep Norwegian Sea. (author)

  10. Hydrothermal fluids, argon isotopes and mineralization ages of the Fankou Pb-Zn deposit in south China: Insights from sphalerite 40Ar/39Ar progressive crushing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ying-De; Qiu, Hua-Ning; Xu, Yi-Gang

    2012-05-01

    Hydrothermal fluid geochemistry and mineralization timing are two important factors in the genesis of a hydrothermal deposit. 40Ar/39Ar analyses of fluid inclusions not only provide time constraints for the mineralization but also help to clarify the K-Ca-Cl-Ar characteristics for the ore-forming fluids. In this study, six sphalerite samples collected from the Fankou lead-zinc sulfide deposit are investigated by 40Ar/39Ar in vacuo crushing. Gases liberated from the early and late crushing steps exhibit distinct Ar isotopic compositions and 40Ar/39Ar apparent ages. Argon released in the early steps has much higher 40Ar and 38ArCl and lower 37ArCa contents than those in the late steps. The significant excess Ar (40ArE) extracted in the early crushing steps shows a strong correlation with 38ArCl with very high 40ArE/38ArCl ratios. In contrast, those of the late steps mainly consist of atmospheric Ar and K-correlated radiogenic Ar with a constant 40ArR/39ArK ratio and the atmospheric initial 40Ar/36Ar ratio. As a result, all samples yield similar declining age spectra: the fore segments with anomalously old apparent ages decline quickly in the early crushing steps and the rear ones are flat with concordant apparent ages in the late crushing steps. The data points of the early steps define linear correlations in plots of 40ArNA/39ArK vs. 38ArCl/39ArK and 38ArCl/40ArNA vs. 39ArK/40ArNA (NA for non-atmospheric) and most yield ages of 240-230 Ma. On the other hand, the data of the late steps always construct well-defined isochrons in the plots of 36ArA/40ArNA vs. 39ArK/40ArNA with consistent ages of ˜300 Ma. We interpret that gases released in the early steps were from the secondary fluid inclusions (SFIs) due to their distribution characteristics along cracks leading to be easily extracted, and those released in the later steps represented the contribution of the primary fluid inclusions (PFIs). The initial 40Ar/36Ar ratios of SFIs, much higher than the modern

  11. Depleted argon from underground sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, H.O.; /Princeton U.; Alton, A.; /Augustana U. Coll.; Calaprice, F.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; /Princeton U.; Kendziora, C.; /Fermilab; Loer, B.; /Princeton U.; Montanari, D.; /Fermilab; Mosteiro, P.; /Princeton U.; Pordes, S.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Argon is a powerful scintillator and an excellent medium for detection of ionization. Its high discrimination power against minimum ionization tracks, in favor of selection of nuclear recoils, makes it an attractive medium for direct detection of WIMP dark matter. However, cosmogenic {sup 39}Ar contamination in atmospheric argon limits the size of liquid argon dark matter detectors due to pile-up. The cosmic ray shielding by the earth means that Argon from deep underground is depleted in {sup 39}Ar. In Cortez Colorado a CO{sub 2} well has been discovered to contain approximately 500ppm of argon as a contamination in the CO{sub 2}. In order to produce argon for dark matter detectors we first concentrate the argon locally to 3-5% in an Ar, N{sub 2}, and He mixture, from the CO{sub 2} through chromatographic gas separation. The N{sub 2} and He will be removed by continuous cryogenic distillation in the Cryogenic Distillation Column recently built at Fermilab. In this talk we will discuss the entire extraction and purification process; with emphasis on the recent commissioning and initial performance of the cryogenic distillation column purification.

  12. Argon behaviour in an inverted Barrovian sequence, Sikkim Himalaya: The consequences of temperature and timescale on 40Ar/39Ar mica geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottram, Catherine M.; Warren, Clare J.; Halton, Alison M.; Kelley, Simon P.; Harris, Nigel B. W.

    2015-12-01

    40Ar/39Ar dating of metamorphic rocks sometimes yields complicated datasets which are difficult to interpret in terms of timescales of the metamorphic cycle. Single-grain fusion and step-heating data were obtained for rocks sampled through a major thrust-sense shear zone (the Main Central Thrust) and the associated inverted metamorphic zone in the Sikkim region of the eastern Himalaya. This transect provides a natural laboratory to explore factors influencing apparent 40Ar/39Ar ages in similar lithologies at a variety of metamorphic pressure and temperature (P-T) conditions. The 40Ar/39Ar dataset records progressively younger apparent age populations and a decrease in within-sample dispersion with increasing temperature through the sequence. The white mica populations span ~ 2-9 Ma within each sample in the structurally lower levels (garnet grade) but only ~ 0-3 Ma at structurally higher levels (kyanite-sillimanite grade). Mean white mica single-grain fusion population ages vary from 16.2 ± 3.9 Ma (2σ) to 13.2 ± 1.3 Ma (2σ) from lowest to highest levels. White mica step-heating data from the same samples yields plateau ages from 14.27 ± 0.13 Ma to 12.96 ± 0.05 Ma. Biotite yield older apparent age populations with mean single-grain fusion dates varying from 74.7 ± 11.8 Ma (2σ) at the lowest structural levels to 18.6 ± 4.7 Ma (2σ) at the highest structural levels; the step-heating plateaux are commonly disturbed. Temperatures > 600 °C at pressures of 0.4-0.8 GPa sustained over > 5 Ma, appear to be required for white mica and biotite ages to be consistent with diffusive, open-system cooling. At lower temperatures, and/or over shorter metamorphic timescales, more 40Ar is retained than results from simple diffusion models suggest. Diffusion modelling of Ar in white mica from the highest structural levels suggests that the high-temperature rocks cooled at a rate of ~ 50-80 °C Ma- 1, consistent with rapid thrusting, extrusion and exhumation along the Main

  13. 40Ar-39Ar and U-Pb ages of metadiorite from the East Kunlun Orogenic Belt: Evidence for Early-Paleozoic magmatic zone and excess argon in amphibole minerals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Single-grain zircon U-Pb and amphibole 40Ar-39Ar dating have beenconducted on a deformed and metamorphosed diorite in the East Kunlun Orogenic Belt, which intruded into the middle Proterozoic Kuhai Group exposed in the south of Xiangride region, Dulan County, NW Qinghai Province. The zircon gives a concordant U-Pb age of (446.5±9.1) Ma. The amphibole yields Ar plateau age of (488.0±1.2) Ma and an isochronal age of (488.9±5.6) Ma. Age results of both stepwise released Ar and conventional K-Ar analysis are remarkably higher than that of zircon U-Pb, suggesting that the amphibole contains excess argon and the amphibole plateau age cannot be taken as the timing of metamorphism or deformation. The zircon age is interpreted to be crystallization age of the diorite pluton, which suggests that an Early-Paleozoic magmatic zone indeed existed in the East Kunlun Orogenic Belt stretching along the region south to the Golmud, Normuhong and Xiangride.

  14. Argon in action

    CERN Multimedia

    Corinne Pralavorio

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few days, the SPS has been accelerating argon ions, which have started to be sent to the NA61/SHINE experiment. This operating mode, using a new type of ion, required a number of modifications to the accelerator.   Picture 1: a “super-cycle” of the SPS, featuring a proton cycle for the LHC, followed by an argon ion cycle for the North Area. Today, the accelerators are once again juggling particles and even performing completely new tricks. The SPS is supplying beams of argon ions for the first time, at energies never before achieved for this type of beam. They are destined for the NA61/SHINE experiment (see box) located in the North Area, which began receiving the beams on 11 February. Argon ions have a relatively large mass, as they consist of 40 nucleons, so they can be used in a similar way to lead ions. The main difficulty in accelerating them lies in the SPS, where the variation in acceleration frequency is limited. “The SPS was designed for a...

  15. Thermophysical properties of argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaques, A.

    1988-02-01

    The entire report consists of tables of thermodynamic properties (including sound velocity, thermal conductivity and diffusivity, Prandtl number, density) of argon at 86 to 400/degree/K, in the form of isobars over 0.9 to 100 bars. (DLC)

  16. Potassium-argon (argon-argon), structural fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosca, Michael A.; Rink, W. Jack; Thompson, Jereon

    2014-01-01

    Definition: 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of structural fabrics: The application of 40Ar/39Ar methods to date development of structural fabrics in geologic samples. Introduction: Structural fabrics develop during rock deformation at variable pressures (P), temperatures (T), fluid compositions (X), and time (t). Structural fabrics are represented in rocks by features such as foliations and shear zones developed at the mm to km scale. In ideal cases, the P-T-X history of a given structural fabric can be constrained using stable isotope, cation exchange, and/or mineral equilibria thermobarometry (Essene 1989). The timing of structural fabric development can be assessed qualitatively using geologic field observations or quantitatively using isotope-based geochronology. High-precision geochronology of the thermal and fluid flow histories associated with structural fabric development can answer fundamental geologic questions including (1) when hydrothermal fluids transported and deposited ore minerals, ...

  17. Liquid argon neutrino detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Battistoni, G

    2001-01-01

    The liquid argon imaging technique, as proposed for the ICARUS detector, offers the possibility to perform complementary and simultaneous measurements of neutrinos, as those of CERN to Gran Sasso beam (CNGS) and those from cosmic ray events. For the currently allowed values of the Super-Kamiokande results, the combination of both CNGS and atmospheric data will provide a precise determination of the oscillation parameters. Since one can observe and unambiguously identify nu /sub e/, nu /sub mu / and nu /sub tau / components, this technology allows to explore the full (3*3) mixing matrix. The same class of detector can be proposed for high precision measurements at a neutrino factory. (3 refs).

  18. Isentropic compression of argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veeser, L.R.; Ekdahl, C.A.; Oona, H. [and others

    1997-06-01

    The compression was done in an MC-1 flux compression (explosive) generator, in order to study the transition from an insulator to a conductor. Since conductivity signals were observed in all the experiments (except when the probe is removed), both the Teflon and the argon are becoming conductive. The conductivity could not be determined (Teflon insulation properties unknown), but it could be bounded as being {sigma}=1/{rho}{le}8({Omega}cm){sub -1}, because when the Teflon breaks down, the dielectric constant is reduced. The Teflon insulator problem remains, and other ways to better insulate the probe or to measure the conductivity without a probe is being sought.

  19. Argon isotope fractionation induced by stepwise heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trieloff, Mario; Falter, Martina; Buikin, Alexei I.; Korochantseva, Ekaterina V.; Jessberger, Elmar K.; Altherr, Rainer

    2005-03-01

    Noble gas isotopes are widely used to elucidate the history of the rocks in which they have been trapped, either from distinct reservoirs or by accumulation following radioactive decay. To extract noble gases from their host rocks, stepwise heating is the most commonly used technique to deconvolve isotopically different components, e.g., atmospheric, in situ radiogenic, or excess radiogenic from mantle or crustal reservoirs. The accurate determination of the isotopic composition of these different components is of crucial importance, e.g., for ages obtained by 40Ar- 39Ar stepheating plateaus. However, diffusion theory-based model calculations predict that the stepwise thermal extraction process from mineral phases induces isotope fractionation and, hence, adulterates the original composition. Such effects are largely unconsidered, as they are small and a compelling experimental observation is lacking. We report the first unequivocal evidence for significant mass fractionation of argon isotopes during thermal extraction, observed on shungite, a carbon-rich Precambrian sedimentary rock. The degree of fractionation, as monitored by 38Ar/ 36Ar and 40Ar/ 36Ar ratios, very well agrees with theoretical predictions assuming an inverse square root dependence of diffusion coefficient and atomic mass, resulting in easier extraction of lighter isotopes. Hence, subatmospheric 40Ar/ 36Ar ratios obtained for argon extracted at low temperatures may not represent paleoatmospheric argon. Shungite argon resembles modern atmospheric composition, but constraints on the timing of trapping appear difficult to obtain, as shungites are multicomponent systems. In 40Ar- 39Ar stepwise heating, the isotope fractionation effect could cause systematic underestimations of plateau ages, between 0.15 and 0.4% depending on age, or considerably higher if samples contain appreciable atmospheric Ar. The magnitude of this effect is similar to the presently achieved uncertainties of this increasingly

  20. The Liquid Argon Purity Demonstrator

    CERN Document Server

    Adamowski, M; Dvorak, E; Hahn, A; Jaskierny, W; Johnson, C; Jostlein, H; Kendziora, C; Lockwitz, S; Pahlka, B; Plunkett, R; Pordes, S; Rebel, B; Schmitt, R; Stancari, M; Tope, T; Voirin, E; Yang, T

    2014-01-01

    The Liquid Argon Purity Demonstrator was an R&D test stand designed to determine if electron drift lifetimes adequate for large neutrino detectors could be achieved without first evacuating the cryostat. We describe here the cryogenic system, its operations, and the apparatus used to determine the contaminant levels in the argon and to measure the electron drift lifetime. The liquid purity obtained by this system was facilitated by a gaseous argon purge. Additionally, gaseous impurities from the ullage were prevented from entering the liquid at the gas-liquid interface by condensing the gas and filtering the resulting liquid before returning to the cryostat. The measured electron drift lifetime in this test was greater than 6 ms, sustained over several periods of many weeks. Measurements of the temperature profile in the argon, to assess convective flow and boiling, were also made and are compared to simulation.

  1. The Liquid Argon Purity Demonstrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamowski, M.; Carls, B.; Dvorak, E.; Hahn, A.; Jaskierny, W.; Johnson, C.; Jostlein, H.; Kendziora, C.; Lockwitz, S.; Pahlka, B.; Plunkett, R.; Pordes, S.; Rebel, B.; Schmitt, R.; Stancari, M.; Tope, T.; Voirin, E.; Yang, T.

    2014-07-01

    The Liquid Argon Purity Demonstrator was an R&D test stand designed to determine if electron drift lifetimes adequate for large neutrino detectors could be achieved without first evacuating the cryostat. We describe here the cryogenic system, its operations, and the apparatus used to determine the contaminant levels in the argon and to measure the electron drift lifetime. The liquid purity obtained by this system was facilitated by a gaseous argon purge. Additionally, gaseous impurities from the ullage were prevented from entering the liquid at the gas-liquid interface by condensing the gas and filtering the resulting liquid before returning to the cryostat. The measured electron drift lifetime in this test was greater than 6 ms, sustained over several periods of many weeks. Measurements of the temperature profile in the argon, to assess convective flow and boiling, were also made and are compared to simulation.

  2. Fano factor in pure argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fano factor for 5.3 MeV alpha particles in pure argon has been measured with a gridded ionization chamber and estimated to be 0.20 (+0.01-0.02). The obtained value is consistent with the theoretical value if the contribution of elastic nuclear collisions to the Fano factor is taken into the consideration. There is no appreciable difference between the values for pure argon and for a gas mixture of Ar (10%)CH4 obtained in the previous measurement. (orig.)

  3. Attainable superheat of argon-helium, argon-neon solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baidakov, Vladimir G; Kaverin, Aleksey M; Andbaeva, Valentina N

    2008-10-16

    The method of lifetime measurement has been used to investigate the kinetics of spontaneous boiling-up of superheated argon-helium and argon-neon solutions. Experiments were made at a pressure of p = 1.5 MPa and concentrations up to 0.33 mol% in the range of nucleation rates from 10 (4) to 10 (8) s (-1) m (-3). The homogeneous nucleation regime has been distinguished. With good agreement between experimental data and homogeneous nucleation theory in temperature and concentration dependences of the nucleation rate, a systematic underestimation by 0.25-0.34 K has been revealed in superheat temperatures over the saturated line attained by experiment as compared with theoretical values calculated in a macroscopic approximation. The revealed disagreement between theory and experiment is connected with the dependence of the properties of new-phase nuclei on their size.

  4. Narrow spectral width laser diode for metastable argon atoms pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jun; Li, Bin; Wang, Xinbing; Zuo, Duluo

    2016-03-01

    Diode laser pump source with narrow emitting spectrum for optically pumped metastable rare gas laser (OPRGL) of argon was achieved by employing a complex external cavity coupled with volume Bragg grating (VBG). A commercially available c-mount laser diode with rated power of 6 W was used and studied in both the free running mode and VBG external cavity. The maximum output power of 3.9 W with FWHM less than 25 pm and peak wavelength locked around 811.53 nm was obtained from the VBG external cavity laser diode. Precise control of VBG temperature enabled fine tuning of the emission wavelength over a range of 450 pm. Future researches on OPRGL of argon will benefit from it.

  5. Binocular indirect argon laser photocoagulator.

    OpenAIRE

    Mizuno, K

    1981-01-01

    The binocular indirect argon laser photocoagulator was newly designed to enable visualisation of the entire fundus during panretinal laser photocoagulation and to treat retinal tears immediately after buckling procedures of the sclera. The lamp housing of the binocular ophthalmoscope was remodelled and adjusted so that the laser beam and illuminating light are coaxial after leaving the ophthalmoscope. The blocking filter was permanently fixed in the eye-pieces to lighten the weight of the oph...

  6. Liquid Argon Barrel Cryostat Arrived

    CERN Multimedia

    Pailler, P

    Last week the first of three cryostats for the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter arrived at CERN. It had travelled for 46 days over several thousand kilometers from Japan to CERN. During three years it has been fabricated by Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd. at Harima, close to Kobe, under contract from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) of the U.S.. This cryostat consists of two concentric cylinders made of aluminium: the outer vacuum vessel with a diameter of 5.5 m and a length of 7 m, and the inner cold vessel which will contain the electromagnetic barrel calorimeter immersed in liquid argon. The total weight will be 270 tons including the detectors and the liquid argon. The cryostat is now located in building 180 where it will be equipped with 64 feed-throughs which serve for the passage of 122,880 electrical lines which will carry the signals of the calorimeter. After integration of the calorimeter, the solenoidal magnet of ATLAS will be integrated in the vacuum vessel. A final cold test of the cryostat inc...

  7. Composing Experimental Environment of PRIDE Argon cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Seonho; Jang, Yongkuk; Cho, Il Je [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In PRIDE depleted Uranium feed material and a depleted Uranium mixed with some surrogate material are used for performing engineering scale Pyroprocessing. PRIDE has to maintain inert atmosphere because of the characteristic of Electrolytic Reduction technology, Electro refining technology, Electrowinning technology. The impurity concentration of the Argon cell has to be under 50 ppm(Oxygen, moisture). Atmospheric pressure changes and temperature changes can affect the Argon cell's impurity concentration. In this paper, how to compose the Argon cell impurity concentration under 50 ppm to make the exact optimal experimental environment(Oxygen, moisture) will be introduced. Composing the exact optimal experimental environment by supplying Argon gas have been introduced in this paper. Continuously supplying Argon gas which is heavier than the Oxygen through the bottom of the Argon cell the oxygen eventually discharged through the high vent fan and lower the impurity concentration of Oxygen.

  8. Low radioactivity argon dark matter search results from the DarkSide-50 experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Agnes, P; Albuquerque, I F M; Alexander, T; Alton, A K; Arisaka, K; Back, H O; Baldin, B; Biery, K; Bonfini, G; Bossa, M; Bottino, B; Brigatti, A; Brodsky, J; Budano, F; Bussino, S; Cadeddu, M; Cadonati, L; Cadoni, M; Calaprice, F; Canci, N; Candela, A; Cao, H; Cariello, M; Carlini, M; Catalanotti, S; Cavalcante, P; Chepurnov, A; Cocco, A G; Covone, G; Crippa, L; D'Angelo, D; D'Incecco, M; Davini, S; De Cecco, S; De Deo, M; De Vincenzi, M; Derbin, A; Devoto, 25 A; Di Eusanio, F; Di Pietro, G; Edkins, E; Empl, A; Fan, A; Fiorillo, G; Fomenko, K; Forster, G; Franco, D; Gabriele, F; Galbiati, C; Giganti, C; Goretti, A M; Granato, F; Grandi, L; Gromov, M; Guan, M; Guardincerri, Y; Hackett, B R; Herner, K; Hungerford, E V; Ianni, Al; Ianni, An; James, I; Jollet, C; Keeter, K; Kendziora, C L; Kobychev, V; Koh, G; Korablev, D; Korga, G; Kubankin, A; Li, X; Lissia, M; Lombardi, P; Luitz, S; Ma, Y; Machulin, I N; Mandarano, A; Mari, S M; Maricic, J; Marini, L; Martoff, C J; Meregaglia, A; Meyers, P D; Miletic, T; Milincic, R; Montanari, D; Monte, A; Montuschi, M; Monzani, M; Mosteiro, P; Mount, B J; Muratova, V N; Musico, P; Napolitano, J; Nelson, A; Odrowski, S; Orsini, M; Ortica, F; Pagani, L; Pallavicini, M; Pantic, E; Parmeggiano, S; Pelczar, K; Pelliccia, N; Perasso, S; Pocar, A; Pordes, S; Pugachev, D A; Qian, H; Randle, K; Ranucci, G; Razeto, A; Reinhold, B; Renshaw, A L; Romani, A; Rossi, B; Rossi, N; Rountree, D; Sablone, D; Saggese, P; Saldanha, R; Sands, W; Sangiorgio, S; Savarese, C; Segreto, E; Semenov, D A; Shields, E; Singh, P N; Skorokhvatov, M D; Smallcomb, M; Smirnov, O; Sotnikov, A; Stanford, C; Suvorov, Y; Tartaglia, R; Tatarowicz, J; Testera, G; Tonazzo, A; Trinchese, P; Unzhakov, E V; Vishneva, A; Vogelaar, B; Wada, M; Walker, S; Wang, H; Wang, Y; Watson, A W; Westerdale, S; Wilhelmi, J; Wojcik, M M; Xiang, X; Xu, J; Yang, C; Yoo, J; Zavatarelli, S; Zec, A; Zhong, W; Zhu, C; Zuzel, G

    2015-01-01

    The DarkSide-50 dark matter search reports the first results obtained using a target of low-radioactivity argon extracted from underground sources. The experiment is located at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and uses a two-phase time projection chamber as a detector. A total of 155 kg of low radioactivity argon has been obtained, and we have determined that underground argon is depleted in Ar-39 by a factor (1.4 +- 0.2) x 10^3 relative to atmospheric argon. The underground argon was also found to contain (2.05 +- 0.13) mBq/kg of Kr-85. We found no evidence for dark matter in the form of WIMPs in 70.9 live-days of data with a fiducial mass of (36.9 +- 0.6) kg. When combined with our preceding search with an atmospheric argon target, we set a 90 % C.L. upper limit on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section of 2.0 x 10^-44 cm^2 (8.6 x 10^-44 cm^2, 8.0 x 10^-43 cm^2 ) for a WIMP mass of 100 GeV/c^2 (1 TeV/c^2 , 10 TeV/c^2 ).

  9. Results from the first use of low radioactivity argon in a dark matter search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnes, P. [Universite Paris Diderot (France). et al.

    2016-04-08

    Liquid argon is a bright scintillator with potent particle identification properties, making it an attractive target for direct-detection dark matter searches. The DarkSide-50 dark matter search here reports the first WIMP search results obtained using a target of low-radioactivity argon. DarkSide-50 is a dark matter detector, using two-phase liquid argon time projection chamber, located at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. The underground argon is shown to contain Ar-39 at a level reduced by a factor (1.4 +- 0.2) x 103 relative to atmospheric argon. We report a background-free null result from (2616 +- 43) kg d of data, accumulated over 70.9 live-days. When combined with our previous search using an atmospheric argon, the 90 % C.L. upper limit on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section based on zero events found in the WIMP search regions, is 2.0 x 10-44 cm2 (8.6 x 10-44 cm2, 8.0 x 10-43 cm2) for a WIMP mass of 100 GeV/c2 (1 TeV/c2 , 10 TeV/c2).

  10. Transition probabilities for argon I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transition probabilities for ArI lines have been calculated on the basis of the (j,k)-coupling scheme for more than 16000 spectral lines belonging to the transition arrays 4s-np (n=4 to n=9), 5s-np (n=5 to n=9), 6s-np (n=6 to n=9), 7s-np (n=8 to n=9), 4p-ns (n=5 to n=10), 5p-ns (n=6 to n=9), 6p-ns (n=7 to n=8), 4p-nd (n=3 to n=9), 5p-nd (n=4 to n=9), 3d-np (n=5 to n=9), 4d-np (n=6 to n=9), 5d-np (n=7 to n=9), 3d-nf (n=4 to n=9), 4d-nf (n=4 to n=9), 5d-nf (n=5 to n=9), 4f-nd (n=5 to n=9) 5f-nd (n=6 to n=9), 4f-ng (n=5 to n=9), 5f-ng (n=6 to n=9). Inso far as values by other authors exist, comparison is made with these values. It turns out that the results obtained in (j,k)-coupling are close to those obtained in intermediate coupling except for intercombination lines. For high principal and/or orbital quantum numbers the transition probabilities for a multiplet approach those of the corresponding transitions in atomic hydrogen. The calculated values are applied to construct a simplified argon-atom model, which reflects the real transition properties and which allows simplified but realistic non-equilibrium calculations for argon plasmas which deviate from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE)

  11. Geological Dating by 40 Ar - 39 Ar method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The isotope 40 K is radioactive, it decays to 40 Ar stable. The number of 40 Ar atoms produced from 40 K, permits to calculate the date of rocks and minerals. This dating technique is named 'Conventional K-Ar Dating Method'. The 40 Ar - 39 Ar dating method permits to calculate the age of rocks and minerals eliminating the limitation of the K-Ar method by calculating potassium and argon concentrations in a single measurement of the ratio of argon isotopes. In this work, the irradiation of the sample with fast neutrons in the nuclear reactor was established. 39 Ar is obtained from the induced reaction 39 K (n,p) 39 Ar. Thus the ration of 40 Ar -39 Ar allows to obtain the date of rocks and minerals. This ratio was measured in a mass spectrometer. If the measurement of argon concentration in the sample is carried out at different increasing temperature values, it is possible to get information of paleotemperatures. The number of atoms 39 Ar is a function of the number 39 K atoms, irradiation time, neutrons flux, its energy E and the capture cross section σ of 39 K. These parameters are calculate indirectly by obtaining the so called 'J value ' by using a standard mineral with known age (HD-BI y Biot-133), this mineral is irradiated together with the unknown age sample. The values of 'J' obtained are in the interval of 2.85 a 3.03 (x 10-3)J/h. Rocks from 'Tres Virgenes' were dated by the method described in this work, showing an agreement with previous values of different authors. The age of this rocks are from Cenozoico era, mainly in the miocene period. (Author)

  12. DarkSide-50 WIMP search results with low radioactivity argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Xin; DarkSide Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Located at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, DarkSide-50 is the first physics detector of the DarkSide dark matter search program. The experiment features a dual-phase Time Projection Chamber as the WIMP detector, surrounded by an organic liquid-scintillator neutron veto and a water-Cherenkov muon detector. We report the results from the first use of low radioactivity argon extracted from underground sources in a dark matter search. We have determined that underground argon is depleted in 39Ar by a factor (1 . 4 +/- 0 . 2) ×103 relative to atmospheric argon whose 39Ar activity is 1 bq/kg. The underground argon is also found to contain (2 . 05 +/- 0 . 13) mBq/kg of 85Kr. We find no evidence for dark matter in the form of WIMPs in 70.9 live-days of data with a fiducial mass of (36 . 9 +/- 0 . 6) kg. When combined with our preceding search with an atmospheric argon target, we set a 90 % C.L. upper limit on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section of 2 . 0 ×10-44 cm2 (8 . 6 ×10-44 cm2, 8 . 0 ×10-43 cm2) for a WIMP mass of 100 GeV/c2 (1 TeV/c2, 10 TeV/c2). DS-50 will continue dark matter search with the underground argon target for a total of 3 years. See also the DS-50 presentations by E. Edkins and G. Koh.

  13. Opacity of Shock-Generated Argon Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王藩侯; 陈敬平; 周显明; 李西军; 经福谦; 孟续军; 孙永盛

    2001-01-01

    Argon plasmas with uniform density and temperature are generated by a planar shock wave through argon gas. The opacities of argon plasma, covering the thermodynamic states at temperatures of 1.4-2.2eV and in densities of 0.0083- 0.015 g/cm3, are investigated by measuring the emitted radiance versus time at several visible wavelengths. Comparison of the measured opacities with those calculated demonstrates that the average atom model can be used well to describe the essential transport behaviour of photons in argon plasma under the abovementioned thermodynamic condition. A simplified and self-consistent method to deduce the reflectivity R(λ) at the baseplate surface is applied. It demonstrates that the values of R(λ) are all around 0.4 in the experiments, which are basically in agreement with those given by Erskine previously (1994 J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat.Transfer 51 97).

  14. Status and perspecitves of liquid argon calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The status of liquid argon calorimeters is reviewed, and experience obtained with these devices is described. Future perspectives of the liquid ionization chamber technique in calorimetry are also discussed. (orig.)

  15. Clinical periodontics with the argon laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkbeiner, R. L.

    1995-04-01

    The argon laser has proven to be a valuable tool for the thermodynamic debridement of the periodontal lesion, incisions and tissue fusion. Illustrations of clinical applications and discussion of laser parameters will be provided.

  16. Argon plasma irradiation of polypropylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slepicka, P., E-mail: petr.slepicka@vscht.c [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 16628 Prague (Czech Republic); Vasina, A. [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 16628 Prague (Czech Republic); Kolska, Z. [J.E. Purkyne University, Department of Chemistry, 40096 Usti Nad Labem (Czech Republic); Luxbacher, T. [Anton Paar GmbH, 8054 Graz (Austria); Malinsky, P.; Mackova, A. [Nuclear Physics Institute of Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 25068 Rez (Czech Republic); Svorcik, V. [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 16628 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2010-06-15

    Polypropylene samples were exposed to argon plasma discharge and the changes of the PP surface properties were studied by different methods. Surface wettability was derived from contact angle measured by standard goniometry and chemical structure of the plasma modified PP was studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), surface morphology and roughness of samples using AFM. Zeta potential of pristine and modified PP was determined with the SurPASS. The presence of incorporated oxygen in the PP surface layer, about 60 nm thick, was observed in RBS spectra. Oxygen concentration is a decreasing function of the depth. With progressing aging time the oxygen concentration on the PP surface decreases. Plasma treatment results in a rapid decrease of the contact angle, which increases again with increasing aging time. In XPS measurement the oxygen containing structures, created by the plasma treatment, were found on the very surface of the modified PP and the zeta potential being changed too. The significant difference in zeta potential between pristine and plasma treated PP clearly indicates that the plasma treatment leads to a more hydrophilic PP surface.

  17. Darkside-20k: A 20 ton Liquid Argon Dark Matter Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, Henning; Darkside-20k Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Darkside-20k detector is the next step in the Darkside dark matter search program at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso in Italy. The Darkside detectors have grown in fiducial mass starting with 10kg in Darkside10, to 50 kg in Darkside50, and finally a proposed 20,000 kg fiducial mass, Darkside20k. The Darkside detectors are dual-phase argon TPCs that combine the very powerful scintillation pulse-shape analysis and ionization information to discriminate against background events. Two unique aspects to the Darkside program is the use of an external neutron veto based on borated liquid scintillator, and the use of low radioactivity argon from underground sources as the target. Argon from the atmosphere has an 39Ar activity of 1Bq/kg, which would be the limiting background, but the underground argon is essentially free of 39Ar. Additionally, the detector is placed in a water Cherenkov muon veto. Combining all these techniques allows Darkside-20k to achieve a background-free 100 t-yr exposure accumulated in a 5 yr run. Darkside-20k is expected to start operations in 2020 with data taking starting in 2021, and will be sensitive to WIMP-nucleon interaction cross sections of 1×10-47 cm2 (1x10-46 cm2) for WIMPs of 1 TeV/c2 (10 TeV/c2) mass.

  18. Negative corona current pulses in argon and in mixture argon with SF6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waveforms of the first negative current pulses in a short negative point-to plane gap in pure argon and argon with SF6 admixture have been investigated with a nanosecond time resolution at a gas pressure 50 kPa as a function of applied gap voltage and content of SF6 in the mixture. We have made an attempt to explain the differences in the discharge development in pure argon and in argon with admixture of SF6 based on the observed changes of the pulse shape. The experimental results obtained will be discussed in context with existing computer simulation models (Authors)

  19. Measurements on scintillation light from liquid argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that an argon calorimeter can operate as a scintillation detector, provided that xenon is added. With the addition of 170 ppm xenon a light yield of 70% has been obtained. In addition the light yield is determined under influence of an electric field, from differently ionising particles and by the use of aluminium mirrors acting as light guides. Finally first measurements with a photomultiplier working at liquid argon temperatures are reported. (orig.)

  20. Argon Laser Photoablation for Postburn Conjunctival Pigmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong Joon Ahn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of an ocular burn injury from boiling water which resulted in conjunctival pigmentation, 1 week following injury. For cosmetic purposes, 2 sessions of argon laser photoablation were performed. One month after laser treatment, conjunctival pigmentation had been successfully removed and the patient was very satisfied with the results. Argon laser photoablation may be an effective way to remove postburn conjunctival pigmentation.

  1. Argon clusters embedded in helium nanodroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Filipe Ferreira; Bartl, Peter; Denifl, Stephan; Echt, Olof; Märk, Tilmann D; Scheier, Paul

    2009-11-14

    Electron impact ionization of argon clusters embedded in helium droplets is investigated. Superior mass resolution makes it possible to distinguish between nominally isobaric cluster ions. An abundance maximum for ArHe(12)(+) is unambiguously confirmed; the spectra also prove the formation of Ar(2)He(n)(+) complexes that had been claimed to fragment into pure Ar(2)(+). Distributions of larger argon cluster ions containing up to 60 atoms closely resemble distributions observed upon electron impact or photoionization of bare argon clusters; caging and evaporative cooling provided by the helium matrix do not suffice to quench fragmentation of the nascent argon cluster ions. Intriguing abundance anomalies are observed in distributions of argon cluster ions that contain water, nitrogen or oxygen impurities. The strong abundance of Ar(55)H(2)O(+), Ar(54)O(2)(+) and Ar(54)N(2)(+) contrasts with the virtual absence of slightly larger cluster ions containing the corresponding impurities. The features are probably related to enhanced cluster ion stability upon closure of the second icosahedral shell but the difference in magic numbers (54 versus 55) and the well-known reactivity of charged argon-nitrogen complexes suggest structural differences. PMID:19851558

  2. At Least 39 Weeks

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ovulation calendar 39 weeks is best Order bereavement materials News Moms Need Blog News & Media News Videos ... Ovulation calendar 39 weeks is best Order bereavement materials News Moms Need Blog Stories & Media News & Media ...

  3. Liquid Argon Calorimeters Operation and Data Quality During the 2015 Proton Run

    CERN Document Server

    Camincher, Clement; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    In 2015 ATLAS operated with an excellent efficiency, recording an integrated luminosity of 3.9fb^{-1} at \\sqrt{s} = 13 TeV. The Liquid Argon (LAr) Calorimeter contributed to this effort by operating with a good data quality efficiency of 99.4% . This poster highlights the overall status, performances and data quality of the LAr Calorimeters during the first year of Run-2 operations.

  4. Argon Collection And Purification For Proliferation Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achey, R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hunter, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-09

    In order to determine whether a seismic event was a declared/undeclared underground nuclear weapon test, environmental samples must be taken and analyzed for signatures that are unique to a nuclear explosion. These signatures are either particles or gases. Particle samples are routinely taken and analyzed under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) verification regime as well as by individual countries. Gas samples are analyzed for signature gases, especially radioactive xenon. Underground nuclear tests also produce radioactive argon, but that signature is not well monitored. A radioactive argon signature, along with other signatures, can more conclusively determine whether an event was a nuclear test. This project has developed capabilities for collecting and purifying argon samples for ultra-low-background proportional counting. SRNL has developed a continuous gas enrichment system that produces an output stream containing 97% argon from whole air using adsorbent separation technology (the flow diagram for the system is shown in the figure). The vacuum swing adsorption (VSA) enrichment system is easily scalable to produce ten liters or more of 97% argon within twelve hours. A gas chromatographic separation using a column of modified hydrogen mordenite molecular sieve has been developed that can further purify the sample to better than 99% purity after separation from the helium carrier gas. The combination of these concentration and purification systems has the capability of being used for a field-deployable system for collecting argon samples suitable for ultra-low-background proportional counting for detecting nuclear detonations under the On-Site Inspection program of the CTBTO verification regime. The technology also has applications for the bulk argon separation from air for industrial purposes such as the semi-conductor industry.

  5. Attenuation of vacuum ultraviolet light in liquid argon

    CERN Document Server

    Neumeier, A; Oberauer, L; Potzel, W; Schönert, S; Dandl, T; Heindl, T; Ulrich, A; Wieser, J

    2015-01-01

    The transmission of liquid argon has been measured, wavelength resolved, for a wavelength interval from 118 to 250 nm. The wavelength dependent attenuation length is presented for pure argon. It is shown that no universal wavelength independent attenuation length can be assigned to liquid argon for its own fluorescence light due to the interplay between the wavelength dependent emission and absorption. A decreasing transmission is observed below 130 nm in both chemically cleaned and distilled liquid argon and assigned to absorption by the analogue of the first argon excimer continuum. For not perfectly cleaned argon a strong influence of impurities on the transmission is observed. Two strong absorption bands at 126.5 and 141.0 nm with approximately 2 and 4 nm width, respectively, are assigned to traces of xenon in argon. A broad absorption region below 180 nm is found for unpurified argon and tentatively attributed to the presence of water in the argon sample.

  6. Scintillation efficiency of liquid argon in low energy neutron-argon scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments searching for weak interacting massive particles with noble gases such as liquid argon require very low detection thresholds for nuclear recoils. A determination of the scintillation efficiency is crucial to quantify the response of the detector at low energy. We report the results obtained with a small liquid argon cell using a monoenergetic neutron beam produced by a deuterium-deuterium fusion source. The light yield relative to electrons was measured for six argon recoil energies between 11 and 120 keV at zero electric drift field

  7. Scintillation efficiency of liquid argon in low energy neutron-argon scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Creus, W; Amsler, C; Ferella, A D; Rochet, J; Scotto-Lavina, L; Walter, M

    2015-01-01

    Experiments searching for weak interacting massive particles with noble gases such as liquid argon require very low detection thresholds for nuclear recoils. A determination of the scintillation efficiency is crucial to quantify the response of the detector at low energy. We report the results obtained with a small liquid argon cell using a monoenergetic neutron beam produced by a deuterium-deuterium fusion source. The light yield relative to electrons was measured for six argon recoil energies between 11 and 120 keV at zero electric drift field.

  8. MeV Argon ion beam generation with narrow energy spread

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Jiancai; Shen, Baifei; Zhang, Hui; Li, Shun; Yu, Yong; Li, Jinfeng; Lu, Xiaoming; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Xinliang; Liang, Xiaoyan; Leng, Yuxin; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-01-01

    Laser driven particle acceleration has shown remarkable progresses in generating multi-GeV electron bunches and 10s of MeV ion beams based on high-power laser facilities. Intense laser pulse offers the acceleration field of 1012 Volt per meter, several orders of magnitude larger than that in conventional accelerators, enabling compact devices. Here we report that a highly-collimated argon ion beam with narrow energy spread is produced by irradiating a 45-fs fully-relativistic laser pulse onto an argon cluster target. The highly-charged (Argon ion with charge state of 16+) heavy ion beam has a minimum absolute energy spread of 0.19 MeV per nucleon at the energy peak of 0.39 MeV per nucleon. we identify a novel scheme from particle-in-cell simulations that greatly reduces the beam energy spread. The laser-driven intense plasma wakefield has a strong modulation on the ion beam in a way that the low energy part is cut off. The pre-accelerated argon ion beam from Coulomb explosion thus becomes more mono-energetic ...

  9. Contraction ionization waves in the argon contracted discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation of ionization waves in the argon contracted discharge and a definition of their arising propagation mechanism accounting for the specificity of elementary pocesses characteristic of argon are presented. (author)

  10. Thermal decomposition of barium valerate in argon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torres, P.; Norby, Poul; Grivel, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of barium valerate (Ba(C4H9CO2)(2)/Ba-pentanoate) was studied in argon by means of thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis, IR-spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and hot-stage optical microscopy. Melting takes place in two different steps, at 200 degrees C and 280...

  11. Antiapoptotic activity of argon and xenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaggiari, Sabrina; Kepp, Oliver; Rello-Varona, Santiago; Chaba, Kariman; Adjemian, Sandy; Pype, Jan; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Lemaire, Marc; Kroemer, Guido

    2013-08-15

    Although chemically non-reactive, inert noble gases may influence multiple physiological and pathological processes via hitherto uncharacterized physical effects. Here we report a cell-based detection system for assessing the effects of pre-defined gas mixtures on the induction of apoptotic cell death. In this setting, the conventional atmosphere for cell culture was substituted with gas combinations, including the same amount of oxygen (20%) and carbon dioxide (5%) but 75% helium, neon, argon, krypton, or xenon instead of nitrogen. The replacement of nitrogen with noble gases per se had no effects on the viability of cultured human osteosarcoma cells in vitro. Conversely, argon and xenon (but not helium, neon, and krypton) significantly limited cell loss induced by the broad-spectrum tyrosine kinase inhibitor staurosporine, the DNA-damaging agent mitoxantrone and several mitochondrial toxins. Such cytoprotective effects were coupled to the maintenance of mitochondrial integrity, as demonstrated by means of a mitochondrial transmembrane potential-sensitive dye and by assessing the release of cytochrome c into the cytosol. In line with this notion, argon and xenon inhibited the apoptotic activation of caspase-3, as determined by immunofluorescence microscopy coupled to automated image analysis. The antiapoptotic activity of argon and xenon may explain their clinically relevant cytoprotective effects. PMID:23907115

  12. Keeping argon under a graphene lid-Argon intercalation between graphene and nickel(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Späth, Florian; Gotterbarm, Karin; Amende, Max; Bauer, Udo; Gleichweit, Christoph; Höfert, Oliver; Steinrück, Hans-Peter; Papp, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We report on the intercalation of graphene grown on a Ni(111) crystal with argon. Argon is implanted in the Ni(111) crystal by ion bombardment before graphene growth, and diffuses to the surface during the growth of graphene at elevated temperatures. Graphene acts as an atomically thin barrier and keeps the argon underneath. We investigated this system with high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. From our experiments we determined the mean quantities of argon under graphene. From our analysis, a simple model to determine the pressure under the graphene layer is presented. In our measurements, we find an increased thermal stability of the intercalated graphene as compared to non-intercalated graphene on Ni(111).

  13. Argon Laser Treatment of Strawberry Hemangioma in Infancy

    OpenAIRE

    Achauer, Bruce M.; Vander Kam, Victoria M.

    1985-01-01

    Argon laser therapy is effective for removing port-wine stains and for reducing cutaneous vascular and pigmented lesions. Strawberry hemangiomas, being much thicker lesions than port-wine stains, were considered not appropriate for argon laser treatment. Using argon laser therapy in 13 cases of strawberry hemangioma, we achieved poor to dramatic results.

  14. Argon laser treatment of strawberry hemangioma in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achauer, B M; Vander Kam, V M

    1985-11-01

    Argon laser therapy is effective for removing port-wine stains and for reducing cutaneous vascular and pigmented lesions. Strawberry hemangiomas, being much thicker lesions than port-wine stains, were considered not appropriate for argon laser treatment. Using argon laser therapy in 13 cases of strawberry hemangioma, we achieved poor to dramatic results. PMID:4082569

  15. Atom trap trace analysis of {sup 39}Ar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welte, Joachim

    2011-12-14

    Detection of {sup 39}Ar in natural water samples can be employed for radiometric dating on a timescale of 50 to 1000 years before present. This experimental work comprises the setup of an atomic beam and trap apparatus that captures and detects {sup 39}Ar atoms by the laser-cooling technique ''Atom Trap Trace Analysis''. With this approach, the limitations of low-level counting, regarding sample size and measurement time, could be overcome. In the course of this work, the hyperfine structure spectrum of the cooling transition 1s{sub 5}-2p{sub 9} has been experimentally determined. A high intensity, optically collimated beam of slow metastable argon atoms has been set up and fluorescence detection of individual {sup 39}Ar atoms in a magneto-optical trap is realized. {sup 39}Ar count rates of 1 atom in about 4 hours have been achieved for atmospheric argon. Recent improvements further suggest that even higher count rates of 1 atom/hour are within reach.

  16. Subterranean production of neutrons, $^{39}$Ar and $^{21}$Ne: Rates and uncertainties

    OpenAIRE

    Šrámek, Ondřej; Stevens, Lauren; William F. McDonough; Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy; Peterson, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate understanding of the subsurface production of radionuclide $^{39}$Ar rate is necessary for argon dating techniques and noble gas geochemistry of the shallow and the deep Earth, and is also of interest to the WIMP dark matter experimental particle physics community. Our new calculations of subsurface production of neutrons, $^{21}$Ne, and $^{39}$Ar take advantage of the best available tools of nuclear physics to obtain reaction cross sections and spectra (TALYS) and to evaluate neutro...

  17. At Least 39 Weeks

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Collaboratives Launch Prematurity research centers What is team science? More than 75 years of solving problems March ... questions Ask our health experts Calculating your due date Ovulation calendar 39 weeks is best Order bereavement ...

  18. At Least 39 Weeks

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 39 weeks is best Order bereavement materials News Moms Need Blog News & Media News Videos Mission stories ... Tools & Resources Frequently asked media questions Blog: News Moms Need Share Your Story community Join us on ...

  19. Flow Parameters of Argon plasma Discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owing to the viscosity, the plasma will be adhering to the inner surface of the outer electrode and outer surface of the inner one. As result that the discharge will be eroding the walls of coaxial system. The thickness of the boundary layer near the walls has been estimated at different positions from the breech of coaxial plasma gun. It is found that the thickness of layer 0.008 cm at the end of inner electrode (17 cm). A coaxial plasma gun device is operated in argon gas at ambient pressure 0.6 Torr and discharge voltage about 10 KV. The electron temperature of argon discharge has been determined by using spectroscopic technique. It is found that kTe=3.4 eV. By knowing the thickness of the boundary layer, the density can be determined. The Reynolds number R=105 and Mach number M=5 i.e. the flow is compressible and hypersonic

  20. Argon laser irradiation of the otolithic organ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuno, T.; Nomura, Y.; Young, Y.H.; Hara, M. (Univ. of Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-12-01

    An argon laser was used to irradiate the otolithic organs of guinea pigs and cynomolgus monkeys. After stapedectomy, the argon laser (1.5 W x 0.5 sec/shot) irradiated the utricle or saccule without touching the sensory organs. The stapes was replaced over the oval window after irradiation. The animals used for acute observation were killed immediately for morphologic studies; those used for long-term observation were kept alive for 2, 4, or 10 weeks. Acute observation revealed that sensory and supporting cells were elevated from the basement membrane only in the irradiated area. No rupture of the membranous labyrinth was observed. Long-term observation revealed that the otolith of the macula utriculi had disappeared in 2-week specimens. The entire macula utricili had disappeared in 10-week specimens. No morphologic changes were observed in cochlea, semicircular canals, or membranous labyrinth. The saccule showed similar changes.

  1. Abnormal epidermal changes after argon laser treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, R.A.; Knobler, R.M.; Aberer, E.; Klein, W.; Kocsis, F.; Ott, E. (Univ. of Vienna (Austria))

    1991-02-01

    A 26-year-old woman with a congenital port-wine stain on the forehead was treated three times at 2-month intervals with an argon laser. Six months after the last treatment, moderate blanching and mild scaling confined to the treated area was observed. A biopsy specimen of the treated area revealed a significant decrease in ectatic vessels. However, epidermal changes similar to those of actinic keratosis with disorganized cell layers and marked cytologic abnormalities were seen. Analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes for a defect in DNA repair was negative. Multiple, argon laser-induced photothermal effects may be responsible for the changes observed in our case and may lead to premalignant epidermal transformation.

  2. Explanation of the memory effect in argon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Vidosav

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Memory effect - the long time variation of the electrical breakdown time delay on the relaxation time td (τ was observed in argon 24 hours after relaxation times and explained by the long-lived metastable states remaining from the preceding glow. However, the quenching processes reducing the effective lifetime of metastable states several orders of magnitude below that relevant for the time scale of observation were neglected. By applying approximate gas phase models it was found that the early afterglow kinetics up to hundreds of milliseconds is dominated by the decay of molecular argon ions Ar2+ and the approximate value of their ambipolar diffusion coefficient is determined. After that, nitrogen atoms present as impurities and recombined on the cathode surface and/or field emission determine the breakdown time delay down to the cosmic rays and natural radioactivity level.

  3. Anatomy of an Inversion - Argon Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamick, L.; Sharon, Y. Y.; Robinson, S. J. Q.

    2012-02-01

    Two different interactions give similar results for excitation energies and g factors of 2+1 states for most even-even argon isotopes except 46Ar. This is explained in terms of an inversion in J = ½+ and levels in 47K which is successfully obtained by one of the interactions but not the other. This example shows the possible dangers of nuclear astrophysics extrapolations.

  4. At Least 39 Weeks

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... premature birth The newborn intensive care unit (NICU) Birth defects & other health conditions Loss & grief Tools & Resources Frequently asked health questions Ask our health experts Calculating your due date Ovulation calendar 39 weeks is best Order bereavement materials News Moms Need Blog News & Media ...

  5. Development of a low-cost inductively coupled argon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this investigation is to drastically reduce running costs of an inductively coupled plasma. This is done by reducing the argon consumption from 20 l/min to about 1 l/min. First, a sample introduction system operating on 0.1 l/min of carrier argon is described. This system ensures a high ratio of plasma argon and carrier argon even at the low total argon consumptions intended. Next, the developed low consumption plasma is presented. In the proposed design, air is blown perpendicularly against the outside of the torch. A different coil has been developed to make air-cooling efficient. Preliminary data on coupling efficiency for the air-cooled plasma are presented. A similarly low argon consumption has been achieved with water as an external coolant medium. It is concluded that a cheaper alternative to the current ICP has become available. (Auth.)

  6. Scintillation Light from Cosmic-Ray Muons in Liquid Argon

    CERN Document Server

    Whittington, Denver

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the results of the first experiment to directly measure the properties of the scintillation light generated by minimum ionizing cosmic-ray muons in liquid argon. Scintillation light from these muons is of value to studies of weakly-interacting particles in neutrino experiments and dark matter searches, as well as for particle identification. The experiment was carried out at the TallBo facility at Fermilab using prototype light guides and electronics developed for the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment. Analysis of the time-resolved structure of the scintillation light from cosmic-ray muons gives $\\langle \\tau_{\\text{T}}\\rangle = 1.43 \\pm 0.04~\\text{(stat.)} \\pm 0.007~\\text{(sys.)}~\\mu$s for the triplet light decay time constant. The ratio of singlet to triplet light measured using surface-coated light guides is $R = 0.39 \\pm 0.01~\\text{(stat.)} \\pm 0.008~\\text{(sys.)}$. There is some evidence that this value is not consistent with $R$ for minimum ionizing electrons. However, the value for $...

  7. Effects of Nitrogen contamination in liquid Argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acciarri, R.; Antonello, M.; Baibussinov, B.; Baldo-Ceolin, M.; Benetti, P.; Calaprice, F.; Calligarich, E.; Cambiaghi, M.; Canci, N.; Carbonara, F.; Cavanna, F.; Centro, S.; Cocco, A. G.; Di Pompeo, F.; Fiorillo, G.; Galbiati, C.; Gallo, V.; Grandi, L.; Meng, G.; Modena, I.; Montanari, C.; Palamara, O.; Pandola, L.; Piano Mortari, G. B.; Pietropaolo, F.; Raselli, G. L.; Roncadelli, M.; Rossella, M.; Rubbia, C.; Segreto, E.; Szelc, A. M.; Ventura, S.; Vignoli, C.

    2010-06-01

    A dedicated test of the effects of Nitrogen contamination in liquid Argon has been performed at the INFN-Gran Sasso Laboratory (LNGS, Italy) within the WArP R&D program. A detector has been designed and assembled for this specific task and connected to a system for the injection of controlled amounts of gaseous Nitrogen into the liquid Argon. The purpose of the test is to detect the reduction of the Ar scintillation light emission as a function of the amount of the Nitrogen contaminant injected in the Argon volume. A wide concentration range, spanning from ~ 10-1 ppm up to ~ 103 ppm, has been explored. Measurements have been done with electrons in the energy range of minimum ionizing particles (γ-conversion from radioactive sources). Source spectra at different Nitrogen contaminations are analyzed, showing sensitive reduction of the scintillation yield at increasing concentrations. Direct PMT signal acquisition exploiting high time resolution by fast waveform recording allowed high precision extraction of the main characteristics of the scintillation light emission in contaminated LAr. In particular, the decreasing behavior in lifetime and relative amplitude of the slow component is found to be appreciable starting from Script O(1 ppm) of Nitrogen concentrations. The rate constant of the quenching process induced by Nitrogen in liquid Ar has been found to be kQ(N2) = 0.11 ± 0.01 μs-1ppm-1, consistent with a previous measurement of this quantity but with significant improvement in precision. On the other hand, no evidence for absorption by N2 impurities has been found up to the higher concentrations here explored.

  8. Argon diffusion from biotite at high temperature and pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈道公; 贾命命; 李彬贤; 陆全明; 谢鸿森; 侯渭

    1995-01-01

    t The experiments of argon diffusion dynamics for biotite were carried out at 700 -1000℃ and 0.5 - 2,0 GPa and the diffusion coefficient and activation energy using different models have been calculated. The results indicate that the pressure does affect the argon diffusion and its effect is opposite to that of temperature. When p increases, the activation energy increases and diffusion coefficient decreases. The relation between pressure, closure temperature and cooling rate has been obtained. It is postulated that in low T and high p conditions, the argon diffusion from the environment to the system could occur and incur the appearance of the external argon in minerals.

  9. Near-infrared scintillation of liquid argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, T. [Fermilab; Escobar, C. O. [Campinas State U.; Lippincott, W. H. [Fermilab; Rubinov, P. [Fermilab

    2016-03-03

    Since the 1970s it has been known that noble gases scintillate in the near infrared (NIR) region of the spectrum (0.7 $\\mu$m < $\\lambda$; < 1.5$\\mu$m). More controversial has been the question of the NIR light yield for condensed noble gases. We first present the motivation for using the NIR scintillation in liquid argon detectors, then briefly review early as well as more recent efforts and finally show encouraging preliminary results of a test performed at Fermilab.

  10. Near-infrared scintillation of liquid argon

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, T; Lippincott, W H; Rubinov, P

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1970s it has been known that noble gases scintillate in the near infrared (NIR) region of the spectrum (0.7 $\\mu$m < $\\lambda$; < 1.5$\\mu$m). More controversial has been the question of the NIR light yield for condensed noble gases. We first present the motivation for using the NIR scintillation in liquid argon detectors, then briefly review early as well as more recent efforts and finally show encouraging preliminary results of a test performed at Fermilab.

  11. Argon Purification Studies and a Novel Liquid Argon Re-circulation System

    CERN Document Server

    Mavrokoridis, K; Coleman, J; Lightfoot, P K; McCauley, N; McCormick, K J; Touramanis, C

    2011-01-01

    Future giant liquid argon (LAr) time projection chambers (TPCs) require a purity of better than 0.1 parts per billion (ppb) to allow the ionised electrons to drift without significant capture by any electronegative impurities. We present a comprehensive study of the effects of electronegative impurity on gaseous and liquid argon scintillation light, an analysis of the efficacy of various purification chemicals, as well as the Liverpool LAr setup, which utilises a novel re-circulation purification system. Of the impurities tested - Air, O_2, H_2O, N_2 and CO_2 in the range of between 0.01 ppm to 1000 ppm - H_2O was found to have the most profound effect on gaseous argon scintillation light, and N_2 was found to have the least. Additionally, a correlation between the slow component decay time and the total energy deposited with 0.01 ppm - 100 ppm O_2 contamination levels in liquid argon has been established. The superiority of molecular sieves over anhydrous complexes at absorbing Ar gas, N_2 gas and H_2O vapou...

  12. Ion-beam excitation of liquid argon

    CERN Document Server

    Hofmann, M; Heindl, T; Neumeier, A; Oberauer, L; Potzel, W; Roth, S; Schönert, S; Wieser, J; Ulrich, A

    2015-01-01

    The scintillation light of liquid argon has been recorded wavelength and time resolved with very good statistics in a wavelength interval ranging from 118 nm through 970 nm. Three different ion beams, protons, sulfur ions and gold ions, were used to excite liquid argon. Only minor differences were observed in the wavelength-spectra obtained with the different incident particles. Light emission in the wavelength range of the third excimer continuum was found to be strongly suppressed in the liquid phase. In time-resolved measurements, the time structure of the scintillation light can be directly attributed to wavelength in our studies, as no wavelength shifter has been used. These measurements confirm that the singlet-to-triplet intensity ratio in the second excimer continuum range is a useful parameter for particle discrimination, which can also be employed in wavelength-integrated measurements as long as the sensitivity of the detector system does not rise steeply for wavelengths longer than 190 nm. Using ou...

  13. Argon laser-welded arteriovenous anastomoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, R A; Kopchok, G; Donayre, C; White, G; Lyons, R; Fujitani, R; Klein, S R; Uitto, J

    1987-11-01

    This study compared the healing of laser-welded and sutured canine femoral arteriovenous anastomoses. Arteriovenous fistulas 2 cm in length were created bilaterally in the femoral vessels of 10 dogs and were studied at 1 (n = 2), 2 (n = 2), 4 (n = 3), and 8 (n = 3) weeks. In each animal, one anastomosis (control) was closed with running 6-0 polypropylene sutures, and the contralateral anastomosis (experimental) was sealed with an argon laser (0.5 watt, 4 minutes of exposure, 1830 J/cm2/1 cm length of anastomosis). At removal all experimental anastomoses were patent without hematomas, aneurysms, or luminal narrowing. Histologic examination at 4 weeks revealed that laser-welded anastomoses had less inflammatory response and almost normal collagen and elastin reorientation. At 8 weeks sutured anastomoses had significant intimal hyperplasia whereas laser repairs had normal luminal architecture. Tensile strength and collagen production, measured by the synthesis of hydroxyproline and the steady-state levels of type I and type III procollagen messenger ribonucleic acids, at the anastomoses and in adjacent vein and artery specimens were similar in sutured and laser-welded repairs at 2, 4, and 8 weeks. We conclude that argon laser welding of anastomoses is an acceptable alternative to suture techniques, with the advantage of improved healing without foreign body response and possible diminished intimal hyperplasia at the anastomotic line. PMID:3312648

  14. Electron scattering and transport in liquid argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transport of excess electrons in liquid argon driven out of equilibrium by an applied electric field is revisited using a multi-term solution of Boltzmann’s equation together with ab initio liquid phase cross-sections calculated using the Dirac-Fock scattering equations. The calculation of liquid phase cross-sections extends previous treatments to consider multipole polarisabilities and a non-local treatment of exchange, while the accuracy of the electron-argon potential is validated through comparison of the calculated gas phase cross-sections with experiment. The results presented highlight the inadequacy of local treatments of exchange that are commonly used in liquid and cluster phase cross-section calculations. The multi-term Boltzmann equation framework accounting for coherent scattering enables the inclusion of the full anisotropy in the differential cross-section arising from the interaction and the structure factor, without an a priori assumption of quasi-isotropy in the velocity distribution function. The model, which contains no free parameters and accounts for both coherent scattering and liquid phase screening effects, was found to reproduce well the experimental drift velocities and characteristic energies

  15. Pollution of liquid argon after neutron irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Andrieux, M L; Collot, J; de Saintignon, P; Ferrari, A; Hostachy, J Y; Hoummada, A; Martin, P; Merkel, B; Puzo, P; Sauvage, D; Wielers, M

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the neutron facility installed at SARA is to investigate the behavior of various materials to be used in the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter, when submitted to fast neutron radiation. The samples are placed in a liquid argon cryostat a few cm away from the neutron source. Various pieces of the electromagnetic calorimeter have been tested in order to evaluate the rate of pollution of the liquid and consequently the possible signal loss in energy measurements. The average fluence was equivalent to the maximum expected in the calorimeter in about 10 years. The most striking feature of the results is that the pollution is not due to oxygen, at least for most of it. Using a particular value of the absorption length derived from these data, a simulation was carried out and the energy signal loss in the calorimeter could be predicted. Within the limits of our present knowledge, the conclusion is that damages due to this pollution will not be a problem. (17 refs).

  16. Pollution of liquid argon after neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the neutron facility installed at SARA is to investigate the behavior of various materials to be used in the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter, when submitted to fast neutron radiation. The samples are placed in a liquid argon cryostat a few cm away from the neutron source. Various pieces of the electromagnetic calorimeter have been tested in order to evaluate the rate of pollution of the liquid and consequently the possible signal loss in energy measurements. The average fluence was equivalent to the maximum expected in the calorimeter in about 10 years. The most striking feature of the results is that the pollution is not due to oxygen, at least for most of it. Using a particular value of the absorption length derived from these data, a simulation was carried out and the energy signal loss in the calorimeter could be predicted. Within the limits of our present knowledge, the conclusion is that damages due to this pollution will not be a problem

  17. WARP: a double phase argon programme for dark matter detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WARP (Wimp ARgon Programme) is a double phase Argon detector for Dark Matter search under construction at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. We present recent results obtained operating a prototype with a sensitive mass of 2.3 litres deep underground

  18. Stopping Power of Solid Argon for Helium Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Besenbacher, F.; Bøttiger, Jørgen; Grauersen, O.;

    1981-01-01

    By means of the Rutherford-backscattering method, the stopping cross section of solid argon has been measured for 0.5–3 MeV helium ions to an accuracy of not, vert, similar3%. The results agree within the experimental accuracies with our earlier measurements for gaseous argon over the energy region...

  19. Nitrogen Removal from Molten Steel under Argon DC Glow Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Ming-shan; DING Wei-zhong; LU Xiong-gang

    2005-01-01

    Under argon DC glow plasma, the nitrogen removal from molten steel was studied. The experimental result showed that nitrogen mass percent could be reduced to 0.000 8%. The change of polarity had no impact on nitrogen removal when the nitrogen mass percent was low. The mechanism of denitrogenation of molten steel under argon DC glow plasma was discussed.

  20. Comparison of Diode and Argon Laser Lesions in Rabbit Retina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Zhang; Xiaoxin Li; Bin Li; Jiping Da

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the histological alteration of retina with various spot intensities between diode and argon lasers in order to instruct the clinical use of 810 nm diode laser.Methods: Transpupillary retinal photocoagulations were performed on 42 eyes of 27pigmented rabbits. Histopathologic alteration of lesions in different intensities and different time intervals after irradiation produced by diode and argon laser was observed and compared using light microscopy. Areas of various lesions measured by image analysis system (CMIAS) were compared quantitatively.Results: Histopathologically, two-week-old grade 2 lesions produced by diode laser induced the disappearance of outer nuclear cells. More than a half of all showed reduction in number of outer nuclear layer cells in argon. Fibroblasts appeared in the diode grade 3lesions 5 days after irradiation. CMIAS data showed that all the areas of diode lesions immediately after photocoagulation were to be larger than those of argon laser lesions in the same spot intensity (P < 0.05). However, twenty-four hours after photocoagulation, the area of the diode lesions increased less than that of the argon laser lesions (8%vs.23%).Conclusion: The acute histological effect caused by 810 nm diode laser and argon green laser is similar,while the expansion of lesion area 24 hours after photocoagulation was less with the diode laser compared to the argon. This may be the first report in the literature regarding quantitative analysis of the delayed reaction of argon green lasers.

  1. Nitrogen and argon radiopurity investigations for the Borexino and GERDA experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borexino will look for low energy solar neutrinos while GERDA is designed to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of 76Ge. Radioactive noble gases of atmospheric origin present as traces in nitrogen or argon can significantly contribute to the background in these experiments. The most important are 39Ar, 85Kr and 222Rn. Nitrogen is used in Borexino for scintillator purification and blanketing, LAr will serve in GERDA as a passive/active shield and as a cooling medium for the Ge crystals. Concentrations of 39Ar, 85Kr and 222Rn in nitrogen must be below 0.5, 0.2 and 7 μBq/m3 (STP), respectively. Rn concentration in the argon used in GERDA should be below 0.5 μBq/m3 (STP). We found such extremely pure nitrogen on the market and simulated experimentally the supply chain between a supplier and a customer in order to prove that it is possible to keep the purity under control. We discuss the obtained results and applied measurement techniques. Results of Ar purification tests from 222Rn, its oncentration measurements in a gas of different quality are also shown and compared with those obtained for nitrogen. Rn emanation from storage tanks is also discussed. (orig.)

  2. Merging of high speed argon plasma jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Case, A.; Messer, S.; Brockington, S.; Wu, L.; Witherspoon, F. D. [HyperV Technologies Corp., Chantilly, Virginia 22180 (United States); Elton, R. [University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Formation of an imploding plasma liner for the plasma liner experiment (PLX) requires individual plasma jets to merge into a quasi-spherical shell of plasma converging on the origin. Understanding dynamics of the merging process requires knowledge of the plasma phenomena involved. We present results from the study of the merging of three plasma jets in three dimensional geometry. The experiments were performed using HyperV Technologies Corp. 1 cm Minirailguns with a preionized argon plasma armature. The vacuum chamber partially reproduces the port geometry of the PLX chamber. Diagnostics include fast imaging, spectroscopy, interferometry, fast pressure probes, B-dot probes, and high speed spatially resolved photodiodes, permitting measurements of plasma density, temperature, velocity, stagnation pressure, magnetic field, and density gradients. These experimental results are compared with simulation results from the LSP 3D hybrid PIC code.

  3. Large vessel sealing with the argon laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, R A; Kopchok, G; Donayre, C; Lyons, R; White, G; Klein, S R; Pizzurro, D; Abergel, R P; Dwyer, R M; Uitto, J

    1987-01-01

    This study compared the histology, biochemistry, and tensile strength of laser-welded and sutured canine venotomies, arteriotomies, and arteriovenous fistulas. Twelve animals had bilateral femoral vessels studied, with one repair (control) closed with interrupted 6-0 polypropylene sutures, and the contralateral repair (experimental) welded with the argon laser. Specimens were examined at weekly intervals from 1 to 4 weeks (four animals for each type of repair), and were evaluated histologically by hematoxylin and eosin, elastin, and trichrome stains; biochemically by the formation of [3H]hydroxyproline as an index of collagen synthesis; and mechanically by tensile strength determinations. At removal, all experimental closures were patent without hematomas, aneurysms, or luminal dilatation. Histologic and biochemical examination and tensile strength determinations suggest that laser welding may be an alternative to sutures for repair of large-diameter venotomies, arteriotomies, and arteriovenous fistulas, as healing is comparable to that seen with suture repairs up to 4 weeks postoperatively. PMID:3306233

  4. Vascular Welding Using The Argon Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Rodney A.; Donayre, Carlos; Kopchok, George; White, Geoffrey; Abergel, R. Patrick; Lyons, Richard; Klein, Stanley; Dwyer, Richard; Uitto, Jouni

    1987-03-01

    This study compared the histology, biochemistry, and tensile strength of laser welded and sutured canine venotomies, arteriotomies and arteriovenous fistulas. Bilateral femoral, carotid or jugular vessels were studied with one repair (control) closed with interrupted 6-0 polypropylene sutures, and the contralatral repair (experimental) welded with the argon laser. Specimens were examined at weekly intervals from 1 to 4 weeks for each type of repair and evaluated histologically by hematoxylineosin, elastin and trichrome stains, biochemically by the formation of [3H] hyaroxyproline as an index of collagen synthesis, ana mechanically by tensile strength determinations. At removal, all experimental closures were patent without hematomas, aneurysms or luminal dilatation. Histologic and biochemical examination and tensile strength determinations suggest that laser welaing may be an alternative to sutures for repair of large diameter venotomies, arteriotomies and arteriovenous fistulas, as they heal comparable to suture repairs up to 4 weeks postoperatively.

  5. Commissioning of the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Rezaie, Erfan

    ATLAS, a multi-purpose detector built at the LHC at CERN, requires an extensive commissioning campaign to be ready for proton-proton collisions. In this work, we focus on the commissioning of the liquid Argon (LAr) calorimeters, with emphasis on commissioning with cosmic rays. First we outline one phase of the commissioning work, which involves testing of the front-end electronics of the two endcap calorimeters. We then describe two cosmic ray generators as input to a Monte-Carlo simulation of cosmic rays in ATLAS, and compare their results. Finally, we explain a technique developed for this work which uses information from the Tile calorimeters to predict the timing of cosmic rays within the LAr calorimeters, because cosmic rays occur randomly in time whereas the electronics are clocked at [Special characters omitted.] . The results from this analysis tool are compared to default tools, using both simulated and real cosmic ray data in the calorimeters.

  6. Argon laser induced changes to the carbonate content of enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argon laser irradiation can be used to cure orthodontic brackets onto teeth in significantly less time than conventional curing lights. In addition, it has been shown that the argon laser seems to impart a demineralization resistance to the enamel. The purpose of this study was to use surface science techniques to ascertain if this demineralization resistance is possibly a result of a decrease in the carbonate content of enamel. Eleven mandibular third molars previously scheduled for extraction were collected and used in the present study. The teeth were sectioned in two and randomly assigned to either the argon laser (457-502 nm; 250 mW cm-2) or the control (no treatment) group. The sections assigned to the argon laser group were cured for 10 s and analyzed. To exaggerate any potential changes the experimental sections were then exposed to a further 110 s of argon laser irradiation. Surface analysis was performed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). The results showed no statistically significant change in the carbonate content of enamel after argon laser irradiation (p > 0.05). Thus, it is suggested that any demineralization resistance imparted to the enamel surface by argon laser irradiation is not due to alterations in carbonate content.

  7. LArGe - A liquid argon scintillation veto for GERDA

    OpenAIRE

    Heisel, M.(Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Heidelberg, Germany)

    2011-01-01

    LArGe is a Gerda low-background test facility to study novel background suppression methods in a low-background environment, for possible applications in the Gerda experiment. Gerda searches for the neutrinoless double-beta decay in 76Ge, by operating naked germanium detectors submersed into 65 m3 of liquid argon. Similarly, LArGe runs Ge-detectors in 1 m3 (1.4 tons) of liquid argon, which in addition is instrumented with photomultipliers to detect argon scintillation light. The light is used...

  8. Practical reactor production of {sup 41}Ar from argon clathrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercer, J.R. E-mail: jmercer@pharmacy.ualberta.ca; Duke, M.J.M.; McQuarrie, S.A

    2000-06-01

    The radionuclide {sup 41}Ar has many ideal properties as a gas flow tracer. However, the modest cross-section of {sup 40}Ar for thermal neutron activation makes preparation of suitable activities of {sup 41}Ar technically difficult particularly for low flux reactors. Argon can however be trapped in a molecular complex called a clathrate that can then be irradiated. We prepared argon clathrate and explored its irradiation and stability characteristics. Argon clathrate can be used to provide gigabecquerel quantities of {sup 41}Ar even with low power reactors.

  9. Health screening - men - ages 18 to 39

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health maintenance visit - men - ages 18 to 39; Physical exam - men - ages 18 to 39; Yearly exam - ... 39; Checkup - men - ages 18 to 39; Men's health - ages 18 to 39; Preventive care exam - men - ...

  10. Health screening - women - ages 18 to 39

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health maintenance visit - women - ages 18 to 39; Physical exam - women - ages 18 to 39; Yearly exam - ... 39; Checkup - women - ages 18 to 39; Women's health - ages 18 to 39; Preventive care - women - ages ...

  11. The Effects of Dissolved Methane upon Liquid Argon Scintillation Light

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, B J P; Back, H O; Collin, G; Conrad, J M; Greene, A; Katori, T; Pordes, S; Toups, M

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we report on measurements of the effects of dissolved methane upon argon scintillation light. We monitor the light yield from an alpha source held 20 cm from a cryogenic photomultiplier tube (PMT) assembly as methane is injected into a high-purity liquid argon volume. We observe significant suppression of the scintillation light yield by dissolved methane at the 10 part per billion (ppb) level. By examining the late scintillation light time constant, we determine that this loss is caused by an absorption process and also see some evidence of methane-induced scintillation quenching at higher concentrations (50-100 ppb). Using a second PMT assembly we look for visible re-emission features from the dissolved methane which have been reported in gas-phase argon methane mixtures, and we find no evidence of visible re-emission from liquid-phase argon methane mixtures at concentrations between 10 ppb and 0.1%.

  12. Evidence of electric breakdown induced by bubbles in liquid argon

    CERN Document Server

    Bay, F; Murphy, S; Resnati, F; Rubbia, A; Sergiampietri, F; Wu, S

    2014-01-01

    We report on the results of a high voltage test in liquid argon in order to measure its dielectric rigidity. Under stable conditions and below the boiling point, liquid argon was found to sustain a uniform electric field of 100 kV/cm, applied in a region of 20 cm$^2$ area across 1 cm thick gap. When the liquid is boiling, breakdowns may occur at electric fields as low as 40 kV/cm. This test is one of the R&D efforts towards the Giant Liquid Argon Charge Imaging ExpeRiment (GLACIER) as proposed Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr TPC) for the LBNO observatory for neutrino physics, astrophysics and nucleon decay searches.

  13. A purity monitoring system for liquid argon calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For liquid argon calorimeters electronegative impurities dissolved in the medium degrade the detector response and deteriorate the energy resolution, especially at high energies. A concept for a purity monitoring system for liquid argon calorimeters has been developed and is presented here. Special combined monitors of 241Am- and 207Bi-cells are used to monitor the concentration of impurities. The working principle as well as results from test measurements are discussed

  14. Size Determination of Argon Clusters from a Rayleigh Scattering Experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI An-Le; ZHAI Hua-Jin; LIU Bing-Chen; LI Zhong; NI Guo-Yuan; XU Zhi-Zhan

    2000-01-01

    Argon clusters are produced in the process of adiabatic expansion of a high backing pressure gas into vacuum through a nozzle. The cluster size is determined by a Rayleigh scattering measurement. The scattered signal measured is proportional to the 2.78th power of gas stagnation pressure. The average cluster sizes vary from 100 to more than 12000 atoms/cluster with the argon gas backing pressures ranging between 3 to 45 atm.

  15. Pulse shape discrimination studies in a liquid Argon scintillation detector

    OpenAIRE

    Pollmann, T.

    2007-01-01

    Liquid rare gases have been gaining popularity as detector media in rare event searches, especially dark matter experiments, and one factor driving their adoption is the possibility to recognise different types of ionizing radiation by the pulse shapes they evoke. This work on pulse shape discrimination in a liquid argon scintillation detector was done in the framework of the GERDA experiment, where liquid argon scintillation signals may be used for background suppression purposes. Liquid arg...

  16. Toward Improvements in Inter-laboratory Calibration of Argon Isotope Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemming, S. R.; Deino, A. L.; Heizler, M. T.; Hodges, K. V.; McIntosh, W. C.; Renne, P. R.; Swisher, C. C., III; Turrin, B. D.; Van Soest, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    It is important to continue to develop strategies to improve our ability to compare results between laboratories chronometers. The U-Pb community has significantly reduced inter-laboratory biases with the application of a community tracer solution and the distribution of synthetic zircon solutions. Inevitably sample selection and processing and even biases in interpretations will still lead to some disagreements in the assignment of ages. Accordingly natural samples that are shared will be important for achievement of the highest levels of agreement. Analogous improvements in quality and inter-laboratory agreement of analytical aspects of Ar-Ar can be achieved through development of synthetic age standards in gas canisters with multiple pipettes to deliver various controlled amounts of argon to the mass spectrometer. A preliminary proof-of concept comes from the inter-laboratory calibration experiment for the 40Ar/39Ar community. This portable Argon Pipette Intercalibration System (APIS) consists of three 2.7 L canisters each equipped with three pipettes of 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 cc volumes. The currently traveling APIS has the three canisters filled with air and 40Ar*/39Ar of 1.73 and canister 2 has a 40Ar*/39Ar of 40.98 (~ Alder Creek and Fish Canyon in the same irradiation). With these pipettes it is possible to combine them to provide 0.1, 0.2, 0.3 (0.1+0.2), 0.4, 0.5 (0.1+0.4), 0.6 (0.2+0.4), and 0.7 (0.1+0.2+0.4) cc. The configuration allows a simple test for inter-laboratory biases and for volume/pressure dependent mass fractionation on the measured ratios for a gas with a single argon isotope composition. Although not yet tested, it is also possible to mix gas from any one of the three canisters in proportions of these increments, allowing even more tightly controlled calibration of measurements. We suggest that ultimately each EARTHTIME lab should be equipped with such a system permanently, with a community plan for a traveling system to periodically repeat the

  17. Power Consideration for Pulsed Discharges in Potassium Seeded Argon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Sheng-Guo; HE Jun-Jia; LIU Ke-Fu

    2007-01-01

    Minimization of energy consumed in plasma generation is critical for applications, in which a large volume of plasmas is needed. We suggest that a high electron density atmospheric pressure plasmas can be generated by pulsed discharges in potassium seeded argon at an elevated temperature with a very small power input. The ionization efficiency and power budget of pulsed discharges in such plasmas are analytically studied. The results show that ionization efficiency of argon, especially at small reduced electric field E/N (the ratio of the electric field to the gas number density), is improved effectively in the presence of small amount of potassium additives. Power input of pulsed discharge to sustain a prescribed average level of ionization in potassium seeded argon is three orders of magnitude lower than that in pure argon. Further, unlike in pure argon, it is found that very short high-voltage pulses with very high repetition rates are unnecessary in potassium seeded argon. A pulse with 100ns of pulse duration, 5kHz of repetition rate, and 2Td (1 Td = 1 ×10-21 Vm2) of E/N is enough to sustain an electron density of 10l9m-3 in 1 atm 1500 K Ar+0.1% K mixture, with a very small power input of about 0.08 × 104 W/m3.

  18. Energy resolution for α-particles in doped liquid argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes experiments on the effect of allene doped in liquid argon. In the case of doped argon, a large amount of charge is obtained even at low electric fields and the measured charge increases with the field gradually. This can be explained as follows; part of deposited energy which does not form charge in pure argon contributes to charge signal in doped argon through scintillation photons which ionize allene molecules. The main factors determining the energy resolution for α-particles are considered to be (1) fluctuation in the number of produced ion-electron pairs as expressed by the Fano factor, (2) fluctuation in recombination process, (3) fluctuation in photoionization, (4) fluctuation due to the condition of radioactive source and surface of electrodes, (5) fluctuation in geometrical efficiency due to the range and emission angle of α-particles in liquid argon, and (6) electronic noise of amplifier. The factors (1) and (3) can be neglected because of a large number of associated electrons or photons. In pure liquid argon, the factor (2) may be a cause of bad resolution since the fraction of the produced ion-electron paris which do not recombine is small and the photoionization process never occurs for photons emitted through recombination. (N.K.)

  19. ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter Performance in Run 1 and Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Kuwertz, Emma Sian; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS detector was designed and built to study proton-proton collisions produced at the LHC at centre-of-mass energies up to 14 TeV and instantaneous luminosities up to $10^{34}$ cm$^{−2}$ s$^{−1}$ . Liquid argon (LAr) sampling calorimeters are employed for all electromagnetic calorimetry in the pseudo-rapidity region $\\eta < 3.2$, and for hadronic calorimetry in the region from $\\eta = 1.5$ to $\\eta = 4.9$. In the first LHC run a total luminosity of $27$ fb$^{−1}$ has been collected at center-of-mass energies of 7-8 TeV. Following a period of detector consolidation during a long shutdown, Run-2 started in 2015 with approximately $3.9$ fb$^{-1}$ of data at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV recorded in this year. The well calibrated and highly granular Liquid Argon Calorimeter achieved its design values both in energy measurement as well as in direction resolution, which was a main ingredient for the successful discovery of a Higgs boson in the di-photon decay channel. This contribution will give ...

  20. Evolution of Martian atmospheric argon: Implications for sources of volatiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Kevin S.; Jakosky, Bruce M.

    We have examined processes affecting isotopes of argon (36Ar, 38Ar, 40Ar) in order to determine important atmospheric sources and sinks. Our simple model for argon evolution incorporates production of radiogenic argon in the mantle, outgassing of all argon species by extrusive and intrusive volcanism, and loss to space by knock-on sputtering above the exobase. Sputtering has been shown previously to be an important loss process for atmospheric species, especially isotopes of noble gases, which have few other mechanisms of escape. The integrated evolution of argon (36Ar, 38Ar, and 40Ar, respectively) is modeled in terms of these variables: (1) the planetary concentration of potassium, (2) the fraction of juvenile argon released catastrophically during the first 600 Myr., (3) potential variation in the time-history of sputtering loss from that suggested by Luhmann et al. [1992], and (4) the volume of total outgassing to the surface as compared to outgassing contributed by volcanic release. Our results indicate that Mars has lost between 85-95% of 36Ar and 70-88% of outgassed 40Ar. Due to this substantial loss, the planet must have outgassed the equivalent of between 10 and 100 times the total volume of gases released by extrusive and intrusive volcanics. This indicates that volcanic outgassing, alone, is insufficient to explain the present-day abundances of 36Ar and 40Ar in the Martian atmosphere. Similar calculations for 20Ne suggest outgassed volumes of between 100 and 1800 times in excess of that due to volcanism. This results in a distinct Ne/Ar elemental fractionation, with a preference for outgassing argon, of the order of 10 to 17. Although the results must be evaluated within the model uncertainties, the results are compelling in that they unequivocally show the existence of additional sources of atmospheric volatiles and helps define a means to identify them.

  1. 40Ar-39Ar geochronology and thermochronology: principles and potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geochronology based on radiogenic isotopes has become an invaluable tool in earth sciences. Several radioactive parent-daughter systems of varying half-lives such as Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, K-Ar have been traditionally used by researchers for determining the timing of geological and planetary processes. 40Ar-39Ar dating, a variant of the K-Ar system, is a well-established and versatile method of determining the eruptive ages of volcanic rocks and the ∼150-500 deg C thermal histories of a variety of more slowly cooled igneous and metamorphic rocks. This technique has been the most popular tool for dating felsic and intermediate volcanic rocks. Recently several new areas of research have been explored, including total-fusion dating of mineral grains from volcanic and sedimentary samples, mapping of argon isotopic gradients in crystals, and selective dating of fabric-defining minerals in poly deformed specimens

  2. Characterisation of GERDA Phase-I detectors in liquid argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GERDA will search for neutrinoless double beta decay in 76Ge by submerging bare enriched HPGe detectors in liquid argon. In GERDA Phase-I, reprocessed enriched-Ge detectors, which were previously operated by the Heidelberg-Moscow and IGEX collaborations, and reprocessed natural-Ge detectors from Genius-TF, will be redeployed. We have tested the operation and performance of bare HPGe detectors in liquid nitrogen and in liquid argon over more than three years with three non-enriched p-type prototype detectors. The detector handling and mounting procedures have been defined and the Phase-I detector technology, the low-mass assembly and the long-term stability in liquid argon have been tested successfully. The Phase-I detectors were reprocessed by Canberra Semiconductor NV, Olen, according to their standard technology but without the evaporation of a passivation layer. After their reprocessing, the detectors have been mounted in their low-mass holders and their characterisation in liquid argon performed. The leakage current, the counting characteristics and the efficiency of the detectors have been measured. The testing of the detectors was carried out in the liquid argon test stand of the GERDA underground Detector Laboratory (GDL) at LNGS. The detectors are now stored underground under vacuum until their operation in GERDA.

  3. The Spectroscopic Detectability of Argon in the Lunar Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, J W; Gladstone, G R; Shull, J M; Parker, Joel Wm.

    1999-01-01

    Direct measurements of the abundance of argon in the lunar atmosphere were made in 1973 by instruments placed on the Moon during the Apollo 17 mission, but the total daytime abundance is unknown due to instrument saturation effects; thus, until we are able to return to the Moon for improved direct measurements, we must use remote sensing to establish the daytime abundance. In this paper, we present a complete analysis of the potential for measuring argon in the lunar atmosphere via emission-line or absorption-line observations. We come to the surprising conclusion that the lower limit established by the in situ lunar argon measurements implies that any absorption-line measurement of argon in the lower, dayside lunar atmosphere requires analysis in the optically-thick regime. In light of this result, we present the results of our EUVS sounding rocket observations of the lunar occultation of Spica, which provide a new upper limit on the abundance of argon in the daytime lunar atmosphere. We also re-analyze a re...

  4. Metastable argon beam source using a surface wave sustained plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new source of metastable argon atoms in the thermal energy range is reported. The source is based on expanding a plasma sustained by electromagnetic surface waves in a quartz tube through a converging nozzle and extracting a beam from the supersonic free-expansion jet. The beam was characterized by time-of-flight measurements which yielded the absolute intensity and velocity distribution of the argon metastables. The source produced a maximum intensity of 6.2x1014 metastables per second per steradian, the highest time-averaged intensity of thermal argon metastables of any source reported to date. A simple picture of an expanding plasma in a recombination regime is used to explain the dependence of the metastable intensity on absorbed power

  5. On the electric breakdown in liquid argon at centimeter scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auger, M.; Blatter, A.; Ereditato, A.; Goeldi, D.; Janos, S.; Kreslo, I.; Luethi, M.; von Rohr, C. Rudolf; Strauss, T.; Weber, M. S.

    2016-03-01

    We present a study on the dependence of electric breakdown discharge properties on electrode geometry and the breakdown field in liquid argon near its boiling point. The measurements were performed with a spherical cathode and a planar anode at distances ranging from 0.1 mm to 10.0 mm. A detailed study of the time evolution of the breakdown volt-ampere characteristics was performed for the first time. It revealed a slow streamer development phase in the discharge. The results of a spectroscopic study of the visible light emission of the breakdowns complement the measurements. The light emission from the initial phase of the discharge is attributed to electro-luminescence of liquid argon following a current of drifting electrons. These results contribute to set benchmarks for breakdown-safe design of ionization detectors, such as Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LAr TPC).

  6. The Simulation of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Archambault, J P; Carli, T; Costanzo, D; Dell'Acqua, A; Djama, F; Gallas, M; Fincke-Keeler, M; Khakzad, M; Kiryunin, A; Krieger, P; Leltchouk, M; Loch, P; Ma, H; Menke, S; Monnier, E; Nairz, A; Niess, V; Oakham, G; Oram, C; Pospelov, G; Rajagopalan, S; Rimoldi, A; Rousseau, D; Rutherfoord, J; Seligman, W; Soukharev, A; Strízenec, P; Tóth, J; Tsukerman, I; Tsulaia, V; Unal, G; Grahn, K J

    2008-01-01

    In ATLAS, all of the electromagnetic calorimetry and part of the hadronic calorimetry is performed by a calorimeter system using liquid argon as the active material, together with various types of absorbers. The liquid argon calorimeter consists of four subsystems: the electromagnetic barrel and endcap accordion calorimeters; the hadronic endcap calorimeters, and the forward calorimeters. A very accurate geometrical description of these calorimeters is used as input to the Geant 4-based ATLAS simulation, and a careful modelling of the signal development is applied in the generation of hits. Certain types of Monte Carlo truth information ("Calibration Hits") may, additionally, be recorded for calorimeter cells as well as for dead material. This note is a comprehensive reference describing the simulation of the four liquid argon calorimeteter components.

  7. Energy resolution studies of liquid argon ionization detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gridded ionization chamber was used to study the energy resolution in liquid argon with electrons from a 207Bi radioactive source. Argon was purified in the gas phase with a simple and reliable system, capable of reducing the impurity level below 1 ppb O2 equivalent, as inferred by a pulse shape analysis of the ionization signals. The electron spectrum was measured at different drift fields, up to 10.9 KV/cm. At this maximum field, a total energy resolution of 32 keV (fwhm), corresponding to a noise-subtracted energy resolution of 26 keV (fwhm), was obtained for the 976 keV conversion electron line. This value is the best reported so far in liquid argon but is still a factor of seven worse than the theoretical limit set by the Fano factor. The reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. (orig.)

  8. Liquid Argon Calorimetry with LHC-Performance Specifications

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % RD-3 Liquid Argon Calorimetry with LHC-Performance Specifications \\\\ \\\\Good electromagnetic and hadronic calorimetry will play a central role in an LHC detector. Among the techniques used so far, or under development, the liquid argon sampling calorimetry offers high radiation resistence, good energy resolution (electromagnetic and hadronic), excellent calibration stability and response uniformity. Its rate capabilities, however, do not yet match the requirements for LHC. \\\\ \\\\The aim of this proposal is to improve the technique in such a way that high granularity, good hermiticity and adequate rate capabilities are obtained, without compromising the above mentioned properties. To reach this goal, we propose to use a novel structure, the $^{\\prime\\prime}$accordion$^{\\prime\\prime}$, coupled to fast preamplifiers working at liquid argon temperature. Converter and readout electrodes are no longer planar and perpendicular to particles, as usual, but instead they are wiggled around a plane containing particles. ...

  9. A therapeutic experience on Port Wine hemangiomas with Argon Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahvash M

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available Port wine stains are benign but cosmetically devasting congenital angiomas. The argon laser is a therapeutic device newly applied to this condition. Our program was begun 6 years ago. From the beginning, the study was conceived as a clinical investigation of both the port wine stain and its argon laser therapy. A total of 218 patients with port wine stains have been studied and many aspects of their clinical condition detailed. Employing the Argon laser, test spots have been carried out in patients and the results have been analyzed with clinical aspects of the lesions. Altogether, 501 treatments were performed in 218 patients. Good to excellent results were obtained in 81 patients. Moderate Result was obtained in 31 weak result in 65 patients. Most common complication were hyperpigmentation and depressed scar.

  10. On the Electric Breakdown in Liquid Argon at Centimeter Scale

    CERN Document Server

    Auger, M; Ereditato, A; Goeldi, D; Janos, S; Kreslo, I; Luethi, M; von Rohr, C Rudolf; Strauss, T; Weber, M S

    2015-01-01

    We present a study on the dependence of electric breakdown discharge parameters on electrode geometry and the breakdown field in liquid argon near its boiling point. The measurements were performed with a spherical cathode and a planar anode at distances ranging from 0.1 mm to 10.0 mm. A detailed study of the time evolution of the breakdown volt-ampere characteristics was performed for the first time. It revealed a slow streamer development phase in the discharge. The results of a spectroscopic study of the visible light emission of the breakdowns complement the measurements. The light emission from the initial phase of the discharge is attributed to electro-luminescence of liquid argon following a current of drifting electrons. These results contribute to set benchmarks for breakdown-safe design of ionization detectors, such as Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LAr TPC).

  11. Revised error propagation of 40Ar/39Ar data, including covariances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeesch, Pieter

    2015-12-01

    The main advantage of the 40Ar/39Ar method over conventional K-Ar dating is that it does not depend on any absolute abundance or concentration measurements, but only uses the relative ratios between five isotopes of the same element -argon- which can be measured with great precision on a noble gas mass spectrometer. The relative abundances of the argon isotopes are subject to a constant sum constraint, which imposes a covariant structure on the data: the relative amount of any of the five isotopes can always be obtained from that of the other four. Thus, the 40Ar/39Ar method is a classic example of a 'compositional data problem'. In addition to the constant sum constraint, covariances are introduced by a host of other processes, including data acquisition, blank correction, detector calibration, mass fractionation, decay correction, interference correction, atmospheric argon correction, interpolation of the irradiation parameter, and age calculation. The myriad of correlated errors arising during the data reduction are best handled by casting the 40Ar/39Ar data reduction protocol in a matrix form. The completely revised workflow presented in this paper is implemented in a new software platform, Ar-Ar_Redux, which takes raw mass spectrometer data as input and generates accurate 40Ar/39Ar ages and their (co-)variances as output. Ar-Ar_Redux accounts for all sources of analytical uncertainty, including those associated with decay constants and the air ratio. Knowing the covariance matrix of the ages removes the need to consider 'internal' and 'external' uncertainties separately when calculating (weighted) mean ages. Ar-Ar_Redux is built on the same principles as its sibling program in the U-Pb community (U-Pb_Redux), thus improving the intercomparability of the two methods with tangible benefits to the accuracy of the geologic time scale. The program can be downloaded free of charge from

  12. Ar-Ar_Redux: rigorous error propagation of 40Ar/39Ar data, including covariances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeesch, P.

    2015-12-01

    Rigorous data reduction and error propagation algorithms are needed to realise Earthtime's objective to improve the interlaboratory accuracy of 40Ar/39Ar dating to better than 1% and thereby facilitate the comparison and combination of the K-Ar and U-Pb chronometers. Ar-Ar_Redux is a new data reduction protocol and software program for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology which takes into account two previously underappreciated aspects of the method: 1. 40Ar/39Ar measurements are compositional dataIn its simplest form, the 40Ar/39Ar age equation can be written as: t = log(1+J [40Ar/39Ar-298.5636Ar/39Ar])/λ = log(1 + JR)/λ Where λ is the 40K decay constant and J is the irradiation parameter. The age t does not depend on the absolute abundances of the three argon isotopes but only on their relative ratios. Thus, the 36Ar, 39Ar and 40Ar abundances can be normalised to unity and plotted on a ternary diagram or 'simplex'. Argon isotopic data are therefore subject to the peculiar mathematics of 'compositional data', sensu Aitchison (1986, The Statistical Analysis of Compositional Data, Chapman & Hall). 2. Correlated errors are pervasive throughout the 40Ar/39Ar methodCurrent data reduction protocols for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology propagate the age uncertainty as follows: σ2(t) = [J2 σ2(R) + R2 σ2(J)] / [λ2 (1 + R J)], which implies zero covariance between R and J. In reality, however, significant error correlations are found in every step of the 40Ar/39Ar data acquisition and processing, in both single and multi collector instruments, during blank, interference and decay corrections, age calculation etc. Ar-Ar_Redux revisits every aspect of the 40Ar/39Ar method by casting the raw mass spectrometer data into a contingency table of logratios, which automatically keeps track of all covariances in a compositional context. Application of the method to real data reveals strong correlations (r2 of up to 0.9) between age measurements within a single irradiation batch. Propertly taking

  13. Vaporization kinetics of Sb2S3 in argon fluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨勇; 华一新

    2003-01-01

    The vaporization kinetics of antimony trisulfide in argon fluid was studied with thermogravimetry at 873- 1 173 K. A theoretical model was developed to calculate the overall rate constant and the mass transfer coefficient ingas phase. The experimental results show that the vaporization rate is enhanced with increasing temperature and ar-gon flow-rate. The evaporation rate is mainly controlled by mass transport in the gas phase. The apparent activationenergy for the process is found to be 55.54 kJ/mol. It is demonstrated that the mass transfer coefficient in gas phaseis decreased with increasing temperature.

  14. Modelling of a supersonic ICP argon-hydrogen expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An expanding argon-hydrogen plasma is investigated by means of simulations. The model is a hydrodynamical model specific for plasma expansions, taking into account the conservation laws of mass, momentum and energy. The code includes the Rankine-Hugoniot relations to calculate shock jump conditions. Results are shown for the expansion from an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) with a separated Laval nozzle. The expansion discussed here is a 'weakly' under-expanding argon-hydrogen plasma. The results from the ICP expansion are verified with probe measurements

  15. Attosecond-correlated dynamics of two electrons in argon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Sharma; N Camus; B Fischer; M Kremer; A Rudenko; B Bergues; M Kuebel; N G Johnson; M F Kling; T Pfeifer; J Ullrich; R Moshammer

    2014-01-01

    In this work we explored strong field-induced decay of doubly excited transient Coulomb complex Ar** → Ar2++2. We measured the correlated two-electron emission as a function of carrier envelop phase (CEP) of 6 fs pulses in the non-sequential double ionization (NSDI) of argon. Classical model calculations suggest that the intermediate doubly excited Coulomb complex loses memory of its formation dynamics. We estimated the ionization time difference between the two electrons from NSDI of argon and it is 200 ± 100 as (N Camus et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 073003 (2012)).

  16. Biostimulation of human carcinoma cells with the argon laser: a previously unreported potential iatrogenic effect of lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, D.J.; Saxton, R.E.; Fetterman, H.R.; Castro, D.J.; Ward, P.H.

    1988-01-01

    The human squamous carcinoma cell line P3 was subjected to treatment with a single mode argon laser at 514.5 nm. The temperature and energy levels delivered to the target cells were determined by a reproducible method of dosimetry. At energy levels between 860 to 990 J/cm2 and a corresponding temperature of 39 +/- 1 degrees C, a significant delayed stimulation in DNA synthesis was noted after 24 hours, but the cells remained viable. However, at energy levels and temperatures higher or equal to 1100 J/cm2 (41 degrees C), an immediate suppression of DNA synthesis was accompanied by nonviability of the P3 carcinoma cells. These results indicate that the argon laser has potential for selective biostimulation on carcinoma cell duplication at the specific non-thermal range of 39 +/- 1 degrees C. Similar effects were not observed when the P3 carcinoma cells were heated to this same temperature using a standard heat bath. This phenomenon appears to represent a previously undescribed potential iatrogenic effect of the monochromatic laser beam in the treatment of cancer.

  17. Subterranean production of neutrons, $^{39}$Ar and $^{21}$Ne: Rates and uncertainties

    CERN Document Server

    Šrámek, Ondřej; McDonough, William F; Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy; Peterson, R J

    2015-01-01

    Accurate understanding of the subsurface production of radionuclide $^{39}$Ar rate is necessary for argon dating techniques and noble gas geochemistry of the shallow and the deep Earth, and is also of interest to the WIMP dark matter experimental particle physics community. Our new calculations of subsurface production of neutrons, $^{21}$Ne, and $^{39}$Ar take advantage of the best available tools of nuclear physics to obtain reaction cross sections and spectra (TALYS) and to evaluate neutron propagation in rock (MCNP6). We discuss our method and results in relation to previous studies and show the relative importance of various neutron, $^{21}$Ne, and $^{39}$Ar nucleogenic production channels. Uncertainty in nuclear reaction cross sections, which is the major contributor to overall calculation uncertainty, is estimated from variability in existing experimental and library data. Depending on selected rock composition, on the order of $10^7$-$10^{10}$ {\\alpha} particles are produced in one kilogram of rock pe...

  18. Uranium-liquid argon calorimetry: preliminary results from the DO tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The motivations for using uranium and liquid argon in sampling calorimetry are reviewed and the pros and cons of the technique are discussed. Preliminary results of the DO uranium-liquid argon test program are presented. 9 refs., 7 figs

  19. Optical emission spectroscopy of argon and hydrogen-containing plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siepa, Sarah; Danko, Stephan; Tsankov, Tsanko V.; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2015-09-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) on neutral argon is applied to investigate argon, hydrogen and hydrogen-silane plasmas. The spectra are analyzed using an extensive collisional-radiative model (CRM), from which the electron density and the electron temperature (or mean energy) can be calculated. The CRM also yields insight into the importance of different excited species and kinetic processes. The OES measurements are performed on pure argon plasmas at intermediate pressure. Besides, hydrogen and hydrogen-silane plasmas are investigated using argon as a trace gas. Especially for the gas mixture discharges, CRMs for low and high pressure differ substantially. The commonly used line-ratio technique is found to lose its sensitivity for gas mixture discharges at higher pressure. A solution using absolutely calibrated line intensities is proposed. The effect of radiation trapping and the shape of the electron energy distribution function on the results are discussed in detail, as they have been found to significantly influence the results. This work was supported by the Ruhr University Research School PLUS, funded by Germany's Excellence Initiative [DFG GSC 98/3].

  20. Measurement of the argon plasma temperature by use of pyrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author describes in detail how to use pyrometer to measure the plasma temperature. The temperatures of shock-generated argon plasmas are given in the present work. Measured results of temperature-pressure curve are compared with calculated results using Saha-Debye-Huckel model, which are in good agreement

  1. Turbulence and transport in a magnetized argon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental study on turbulence and transport in the highly ionized argon plasma of a hollow cathode discharge is described. In order to determine the plasma parameters three standard diagnostics have been used, whilst two diagnostics have been developed to study the plasma turbulence. (Auth.)

  2. Thermophysical properties of multi-shock compressed dense argon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q F; Zheng, J; Gu, Y J; Chen, Y L; Cai, L C; Shen, Z J

    2014-02-21

    In contrast to the single shock compression state that can be obtained directly via experimental measurements, the multi-shock compression states, however, have to be calculated with the aid of theoretical models. In order to determine experimentally the multiple shock states, a diagnostic approach with the Doppler pins system (DPS) and the pyrometer was used to probe multiple shocks in dense argon plasmas. Plasma was generated by a shock reverberation technique. The shock was produced using the flyer plate impact accelerated up to ∼6.1 km/s by a two-stage light gas gun and introduced into the plenum argon gas sample, which was pre-compressed from the environmental pressure to about 20 MPa. The time-resolved optical radiation histories were determined using a multi-wavelength channel optical transience radiance pyrometer. Simultaneously, the particle velocity profiles of the LiF window was measured with multi-DPS. The states of multi-shock compression argon plasma were determined from the measured shock velocities combining the particle velocity profiles. We performed the experiments on dense argon plasmas to determine the principal Hugonoit up to 21 GPa, the re-shock pressure up to 73 GPa, and the maximum measure pressure of the fourth shock up to 158 GPa. The results are used to validate the existing self-consistent variational theory model in the partial ionization region and create new theoretical models. PMID:24559345

  3. Thermal decomposition of Yttrium(III) isovalerate in argon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grivel, Jean-Claude; Yue, Zhao; Tang, Xiao;

    2016-01-01

    The thermal behaviour of yttrium(III) isovalerate (Y(C4H9CO2)3) was studied in argon by means of thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis, FTIR-spectroscopy, hot-stage optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction with a laboratory Cu-tube source as well as with a synchrotron radiation source...

  4. Thermal decomposition of yttrium(III) valerate in argon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grivel, Jean-Claude; Yue, Zhao; Tang, Xiao;

    2014-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of yttrium(III) valerate (Y(C4H9CO2)3) was studied in argon by means of thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis, IR-spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, in-situ synchrotron diffraction and hot-stage microscopy as well as room temperature optical microscopy. Melting...

  5. Thermal decomposition of yttrium(III) hexanoate in argon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grivel, Jean-Claude; Suarez Guevara, Maria Josefina; Attique, Fahmida;

    2015-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of yttrium(III) hexanoate (Y(C5H11CO2)3)·xH2O in argon was studied by means of thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis, IR-spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction at a laboratory Cu-tube source and in-situ experiments at a synchrotron radiation source as well as hot...

  6. A 2-Dimensional Fluid Model for an Argon Rf Discharge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passchier, J. D. P.; W. J. Goedheer,

    1993-01-01

    A fluid model for an argon rf discharge in a cylindrical discharge chamber is presented. The model contains the particle balances for electrons and ions and the electron energy balance. A nonzero autobias voltage is obtained by imposing the condition that the time-averaged current toward the powered

  7. Study of Liquid Argon Dopants for LHC Hadron Calorimetry

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Hadron calorimetry based on the Liquid Argon Ionisation Chamber technique is one of the choice techniques for LHC-experimentation. A systematic study of the effect of selected dopants on Liquid Argon (LAr) will be carried out with the aim to achieve an improvement on: \\item (i)~``Fast Liquid Argon'' search and study of dopants to increase the drift velocity. It has been already shown that CH&sub4. added at a fraction of one percent increases the drift velocity by a factor of two or more. \\item (ii)~``Compensated Liquid Argon'' search and study of dopants to increase the response to densely ionising particles, resulting in improved compensation, such as photosensitive dopants. \\end{enumerate}\\\\ \\\\ Monitoring of the parameters involved in understanding the response of a calorimeter is essential. In case of doped LAr, the charge yield, the non-saturated drift velocity and the electron lifetime in the liquid should be precisely and simultaneously monitored as they all vary with the level of dopant concentrati...

  8. LArGe. A liquid argon scintillation veto for GERDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LArGe is a GERDA low-background test facility to study novel background suppression methods in a low-background environment, for possible applications in the GERDA experiment. GERDA searches for the neutrinoless double-beta decay in 76Ge, by operating naked germanium detectors submersed into 65 m3 of liquid argon. Similarly, LArGe runs Ge-detectors in 1 m3 (1.4 tons) of liquid argon, which in addition is instrumented with photomultipliers to detect argon scintillation light. The light is used in anti-coincidence with the germanium detectors, to effectively suppress background events that deposit energy in the liquid argon. This work adresses the design, construction, and commissioning of LArGe. The background suppression efficiency has been studied in combination with a pulse shape discrimination (PSD) technique for various sources, which represent characteristic backgrounds to GERDA. Suppression factors of a few times 103 have been achieved. First background data of LArGe (without PSD) yield a background index of (0.12-4.6).10-2 cts/(keV.kg.y) (90% c.l.), which is at the level of the Gerda phase I design goal. Furthermore, for the first time we measure the natural 42Ar abundance (in parallel to Gerda), and have indication for the 2νββ-decay in natural germanium. (orig.)

  9. LArGe. A liquid argon scintillation veto for GERDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heisel, Mark

    2011-04-13

    LArGe is a GERDA low-background test facility to study novel background suppression methods in a low-background environment, for possible applications in the GERDA experiment. GERDA searches for the neutrinoless double-beta decay in {sup 76}Ge, by operating naked germanium detectors submersed into 65 m{sup 3} of liquid argon. Similarly, LArGe runs Ge-detectors in 1 m{sup 3} (1.4 tons) of liquid argon, which in addition is instrumented with photomultipliers to detect argon scintillation light. The light is used in anti-coincidence with the germanium detectors, to effectively suppress background events that deposit energy in the liquid argon. This work adresses the design, construction, and commissioning of LArGe. The background suppression efficiency has been studied in combination with a pulse shape discrimination (PSD) technique for various sources, which represent characteristic backgrounds to GERDA. Suppression factors of a few times 10{sup 3} have been achieved. First background data of LArGe (without PSD) yield a background index of (0.12-4.6).10{sup -2} cts/(keV.kg.y) (90% c.l.), which is at the level of the Gerda phase I design goal. Furthermore, for the first time we measure the natural {sup 42}Ar abundance (in parallel to Gerda), and have indication for the 2{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay in natural germanium. (orig.)

  10. Design of capsules capable of argon-filling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of the use of polycarbosilane capsules as fuel container in inertial confinement fusion experiments was analyzed in the paper. Primary study indicates that the polycarbosilane capsules can be filled with argon by means of diffusion and possess reasonable retention time for deuterium. (author)

  11. Conversion of an atomic to a molecular argon ion and low pressure argon relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    M, N. Stankov; A, P. Jovanović; V, Lj Marković; S, N. Stamenković

    2016-01-01

    The dominant process in relaxation of DC glow discharge between two plane parallel electrodes in argon at pressure 200 Pa is analyzed by measuring the breakdown time delay and by analytical and numerical models. By using the approximate analytical model it is found that the relaxation in a range from 20 to 60 ms in afterglow is dominated by ions, produced by atomic-to-molecular conversion of Ar+ ions in the first several milliseconds after the cessation of the discharge. This conversion is confirmed by the presence of double-Gaussian distribution for the formative time delay, as well as conversion maxima in a set of memory curves measured in different conditions. Finally, the numerical one-dimensional (1D) model for determining the number densities of dominant particles in stationary DC glow discharge and two-dimensional (2D) model for the relaxation are used to confirm the previous assumptions and to determine the corresponding collision and transport coefficients of dominant species and processes. Project supported by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development of the Republic of Serbia (Grant No. ON171025).

  12. Observations of acoustic-wave-induced superluminescence in an argon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that in an argon discharge plasma it is possible to obtain overpopulation of certain electronic levels of atomic argon under the influence of acoustic waves. When the specified threshold is exceeded, then a superluminescence (in the form of light flashes) from the overpopulated electronic levels of atomic argon is observed

  13. 21 CFR 874.4490 - Argon laser for otology, rhinology, and laryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Argon laser for otology, rhinology, and laryngology. 874.4490 Section 874.4490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Argon laser for otology, rhinology, and laryngology. (a) Identification. The argon laser device for...

  14. Argon metastable dynamics and lifetimes in a direct current microdischarge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanović, Ilija; Kuschel, Thomas; Schröter, Sandra; Böke, Marc

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we study the properties of a pulsed dc microdischarge with the continuous flow of argon. Argon metastable lifetimes are measured by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) and are compared with calculated values which yield information about excitation and de-excitation processes. By increasing the gas flow-rate about 5 times from 10 to 50 sccm, the Arm lifetime increases from 1 to 5 μs due to the reduction of metastable quenching with gas impurities. Optical emission spectroscopy reveals nitrogen and water molecules as the main gas impurities. The estimated N2 density [N2] = 0.1% is too low to explain the measured metastable lifetimes. Water impurity was found to be the main de-excitation source of argon metastable atoms due to high quenching coefficients. The water impurity level of [H2O] = 0.15% to 1% is sufficient to bring calculated metastable lifetimes in line with experiments. The maximum value of water content in the discharge compared to the argon atoms is estimated to approximately 6%, due to the large surface to volume ratio of the microdischarge. The current pulse releases the water molecules from the electrode surface and they are either re-adsorbed in the time between 0.4 ms for [H2O] = 1% and 2.6 ms for [H2O] = 0.15% or pumped out of the discharge with the speed equal to the gas flow-rate. Depending on its partial pressure, the water impurity re-adsorption time is of the order of magnitude or less then the argon gas residence time.

  15. An Ediacaran–Cambrian thermal imprint in Rajasthan, western India: Evidence from 40Ar-39Ar geochronology of the Sindreth volcanics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Archisman Sen; Kanchan Pande; Hetu C Sheth; Kamal Kant Sharma; Shraboni Sarkar; A M Dayal; Harish Mistry

    2013-12-01

    The Sindreth Group exposed near Sirohi in southern Rajasthan, western India, is a volcanosedimentary sequence. Zircons from Sindreth rhyolite lavas and tuffs have yielded U–Pb crystallization ages of ∼768–761 Ma, suggesting that the Sindreth Group is a part of the Malani magmatic event. Earlier 40Ar-39Ar studies of other Malani volcanic and plutonic rocks yielded disturbed argon release spectra, ascribed to a ∼550 Ma thermal event possibly related to the Pan-African orogeny. To test and confirm this possibility, we dated two whole-rock and three feldspar separate samples of the Sindreth volcanics by the 40Ar-39Ar method. All samples yield disturbed argon release spectra suggesting radiogenic argon loss and with plateau segments at 550 Ma or 490 Ma. We interpret these as events of argon loss at 550–490 Ma related to an Ediacaran–Cambrian thermal event, possibly related to the Malagasy orogeny. The combined older and new 40Ar-39Ar results are significant in showing that whereas Ediacaran–Cambrian magmatic and metamorphic events are well known from many parts of India, they left thermal imprints in much of Trans-Aravalli Rajasthan as well. The overall evidence is consistent with a model of multiphase assembly of Gondwanaland from separate continental landmasses.

  16. Argon-argon age measurements and calculations of temperatures resulting from asteroidal break-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to providing chronological information, (40Ar-39Ar) measurements on meteorites can be used as a geothermometer providing a record of the thermal history of the fragmentation events that have led from asteroidal parent body to museum specimen. A simple method of treating the experimental data is in terms of effective outgassing temperature. This is the temperature required to produce in the laboratory, a fractional release of neutron induced 39Ar equal to the loss of radiogenic 40Ar determined from the 40Ar-39Ar age spectrum. An equation relating effective temperature, Tsub(e), of a meteorite heated during a single parent-body fragmentation or cratering event is given. An attempt has been made to relate the experimentally observed distribution of Tsub(e) for meteorites to the unknown distribution of fragmentation temperatures, by using a Monte Carlo model to predict the distribution of fragment cooling times. It is concluded that for ordinary chondrites the mean temperature rise during at least one such event is of the order of 200 to 400 K, corresponding to a mean energy dissipation of more than 2x105 J kg-1. Two mechanisms are suggested to account for these high values. (U.K.)

  17. EFFECTS OF ARGON ON THE PROPERTIES OF RF SPUTTERED AMORPHOUS SILICON

    OpenAIRE

    Shao-Qi, Peng; Qai, Yu; Xian, Zhang; Jing, Ye

    1981-01-01

    The Effects of argon on the properties of rf sputtered amorphous silicon film have been investigated. As the sputtering argon pressure is increased from 2 to 20 mTorr, the content of argon in the amorphous silicon film increases apparently (Argon/Silicon : from 10-2 to 5 x 10-2). The other properties measured as a function of argon pressure PAr show that as the PAr is increased, the photoconductivity, resistivity (300K), conductivity activation energy and optical gap increase also, while the ...

  18. 40Ar/39Ar Interlaboratory Calibration into the Holocene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heizler, M. T.; Jicha, B.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Miggins, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in 40Ar/39Ar analytical precision for very young rocks requires collaborative efforts amongst argon geochronology labs to demonstrate age reproducibility commensurate with high precision. NM Tech (NMT), the University of Wisconsin (UW) and Oregon State University (OSU) have each dated Quaternary flux monitor standard AC-2 sanidine (~1.185 Ma), a blind sanidine described as being 50-100 ka (BS) and sanidine from the Qixiangshan (QIX) flow (~10 ka), Changbaishan volcano, China. The samples were irradiated in a single package with FC-2 sanidine (28.201 Ma) as the flux monitor and the irradiated material was distributed amongst the labs. Heizler was present during analysis at both OSU and UW and Jicha attended OSU during analysis. Physical presence was key towards gaining understanding of individual protocols and prompted valuable discussions. Analyses were carried out on single crystals using total fusion and/or step heating approaches. Age agreement was achieved within 2s uncertainty that ranged between (0.03-0.3%, 0.13-0.37% and 1.8-2.6%) for AC-2, BS and QIX, respectively. Each lab found AC-2 to vary somewhat beyond a normal distribution and to yield an age relative to FC-2 of ~1.185 Ma that is ~1.3% (~5-10 sigma) lower than some published estimates. A key cause of the variation between this study and previous results may be variable gas pressure equilibration times between extraction line and mass spectrometer coupled with variable choices to estimate time zero by other laboratories. The majority of our efforts concentrated on the QIX sanidine where prior data obtained by our labs revealed a factor of two spread in age (~11 and 23 ka) based on experiments carried out by total fusion and bulk incremental heating. By conducting single crystal age spectrum analysis we were able to mitigate effects of melt inclusion hosted excess argon and xenocrystic contamination towards obtaining analytical agreement with apparent ages near 10 ka. However, philosophical

  19. An Update to the EARTHTIME Argon Intercalibration Pipette System (APIS): Smoking from the Same Pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrin, B. D.; Swisher, C. C., III; Hemming, S. R.; Renne, P. R.; Deino, A. L.; Hodges, K. V.; Van Soest, M. C.; Heizler, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    Background: An initial 40Ar/39Ar inter-calibration experiment, using two of the most commonly used 40Ar/39Ar mineral standards, Fish Canyon (FC, ~28.2 Ma) and Alder Creek (AC, ~1.2 Ma) sanidines, revealed significant inter-laboratory inconsistencies. The reported ages for the AC sanidines range from 1.173 to 1.200 Ma (FC 28.02) (±~2%), ~4 times greater than the reported precisions. These experiments have motivated the 40Ar/39Ar community to reevaluate procedures and subsequent informal lab intercalibrations experiments are in better agreement, but discrepancies remain that need to be addressed. Experiment: In an effort to isolate the causes of these inconsistencies, an Argon Intercalibration Pipette System (APIS) was designed and constructed. The APIS system consists of three gas canisters; one containing atmospheric Ar and the other two canisters contain 40Ar/39Ar ratios that represent FC and AC. The volumes of the pipettes, bulbs and manifold are determined to within 0.4% and both systems were initially filled to the same pressure with Ar standard gases. Each canister has 4x10-10 moles of 40Ar, is equipped with a 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 cc pipettes and can deliver increments from 0.1-0.7 cc. APIS-1 was designated as the traveling unit that is brought to participating labs, APIS-2 is the reserve/master standard. Early Results and Impressions: APIS-1 has been to four labs (Rutgers, LDEO, New Mexico Tech, and BGC) and is heading to ASU. Early APIS experimental data indicate that the inter-laboratory 40Ar/39Ar age results can meet or exceed the EARTHTIME goal of ±1‰ precision. The inter-laboratory comparisons are ongoing, and will include additional laboratories of opportunity. Lastly, the development of additional mineral standards that "fill in" the age gaps between the existing mineral standards would significantly improve attempting to achieve interlaboratory agreement at the ±1‰ level

  20. Evaporation and condensation at a liquid surface. I. Argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuoka, Kenji; Matsumoto, Mitsuhiro; Kataoka, Yosuke

    1994-11-01

    Molecular dynamics computer simulations were carried out to investigate the dynamics of evaporation and condensation for argon at the temperature of 80 and 100 K. From the decrease of the survival probability of vapor molecules, the ratio of self reflection to collision is estimated to be 12%-15%, only weakly dependent on the temperature. This suggests that argon vapor molecules are in the condition of almost complete capture, and the condensation is considered to be a barrierless process. The total ratio of reflection which is evaluated with the flux correlation of condensation and evaporation is 20% at both temperature. The difference between these two ratios of reflection is ascribed to a phenomenon that vapor molecules colliding with the surface drive out other liquid molecules. This molecule exchange at the surface is as important as the self-reflection, and the conventional picture of condensation as a unimolecular chemical reaction is not appropriate.

  1. The Erosion of Frozen Argon by Swift Helium Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Besenbacher, F.; Bøttiger, Jørgen; Graversen, O.;

    1981-01-01

    The temperature, energy, and thickness dependence of the erosion rates of frozen argon films when irradiated with 0.1–3 MeV helium ions have been measured. The erosion yields Y are much too high to be explained by the concentional collisional cascade-sputtering theory and are furthermore unequivo......The temperature, energy, and thickness dependence of the erosion rates of frozen argon films when irradiated with 0.1–3 MeV helium ions have been measured. The erosion yields Y are much too high to be explained by the concentional collisional cascade-sputtering theory and are furthermore...... unequivocally associated with electronic processes generated by the bombarding particle. In the present energy region, it is found that Y scales approximately as the electronic stopping power squared, depends on the charge state of the incoming helium ions, and perhaps more important, is independent...

  2. Demonstration of a Lightguide Detector for Liquid Argon TPCs

    CERN Document Server

    Bugel, L; Ignarra, C; Jones, B J P; Katori, T; Smidt, T; Tanaka, H -K

    2011-01-01

    We report demonstration of light detection in liquid argon using an acrylic lightguide detector system. This opens the opportunity for development of an inexpensive, large-area light collection system for large liquid argon time projection chambers. The guides are constructed of acrylic, with TPB embedded in a surface coating with a matching index of refraction. We study the response to early scintillation light produced by a 5.3 MeV alpha. We measure coating responses from 7 to 8 PE on average, compared to an ideal expectation of 10 PE on average. We estimate the attenuation length of light along the lightguide bar to be greater than 0.5 m. The coating response and the attenuation length can be improved; we show, however, that these results are already sufficient for triggering in a large detector.

  3. Trimming a Metallic Biliary Stent Using an Argon Plasma Coagulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. Distal migration is one of the common complications after insertion of a covered metallic stent. Stent repositioning or removal is not always possible in every patient. Therefore, trimming using an argon plasma coagulator (APC) may be a good alternative method to solve this problem. Methods. Metallic stent trimming by APC was performed in 2 patients with biliary Wallstent migration and in another patient with esophageal Ultraflex stent migration. The power setting was 60-100 watts with an argon flow of 0.8 l/min. Observations. The procedure was successfully performed and all distal parts of the stents were removed. No significant collateral damage to the nearby mucosa was observed. Conclusions. In a patient with a distally migrated metallic stent, trimming of the stent is possible by means of an APC. This new method may be applicable to other sites of metallic stent migration

  4. Readiness of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter for LHC Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, G; Abdallah, J; Abdelalim, A A; Abdesselam, A; Abdinov, O; Abi, B; Abolins, M; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Acharya, B S; Adams, D L; Addy, T N; Adelman, J; Adorisio, C; Adragna, P; Adye, T; Aefsky, S; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Aharrouche, M; Ahlen, S P; Ahles, F; Ahmad, A; Ahmed, H; Ahsan, M; Aielli, G; Akdogan, T; Åkesson, T P A; Akimoto, G; Akimov, A V; Aktas, A; Alam, M S; Alam, M A; Albert, J; Albrand, S; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Alessandria, F; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexandre, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Aliev, M; Alimonti, G; Alison, J; Aliyev, M; Allport, P P; Allwood-Spiers, S E; Almond, J; Aloisio, A; Alon, R; Alonso, A; Alviggi, M G; Amako, K; Amelung, C; Ammosov, V V; Amorim, A; Amorós, G; Amram, N; Anastopoulos, C; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Anduaga, X S; Angerami, A; Anghinolfi, F; Anjos, N; Antonaki, A; Antonelli, M; Antonelli, S; Antunovic, B; Anulli, F; Aoun, S; Arabidze, G; Aracena, I; Arai, Y; Arce, A T H; Archambault, J P; Arfaoui, S; Arguin, J-F; Argyropoulos, T; Arik, E; Arik, M; Armbruster, A J; Arnaez, O; Arnault, C; Artamonov, A; Arutinov, D; Asai, M; Asai, S; Asfandiyarov, R; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Asner, D; Asquith, L; Assamagan, K; Astbury, A; Astvatsatourov, A; Atoian, G; Auerbach, B; Auge, E; Augsten, K; Aurousseau, M; Austin, N; Avolio, G; Avramidou, R; Axen, D; Ay, C; Azuelos, G; Azuma, Y; Baak, M A; Baccaglioni, G; Bacci, C; Bach, A; Bachacou, H; Bachas, K; Backes, M; Badescu, E; Bagnaia, P; Bai, Y; Bailey, D C; Bain, T; Baines, J T; Baker, O K; Baker, M D; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F; Banas, E; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Banfi, D; Bangert, A; Bansal, V; Baranov, S P; Baranov, S; Barashkou, A; Barber, T; Barberio, E L; Barberis, D; Barbero, M; Bardin, D Y; Barillari, T; Barisonzi, M; Barklow, T; Barlow, N; Barnett, B M; Barnett, R M; Baron, S; Baroncelli, A; Barr, A J; Barreiro, F; BarreiroGuimarães da Costa, J; Barrillon, P; Barros, N; Bartoldus, R; Bartsch, D; Bastos, J; Bates, R L; Bathe, S; Batkova, L; Batley, J R; Battaglia, A; Battistin, M; Bauer, F; Bawa, H S; Bazalova, M; Beare, B; Beau, T; Beauchemin, P H; Beccherle, R; Becerici, N; Bechtle, P; Beck, G A; Beck, H P; Beckingham, M; Becks, K H; Bedajanek, I; Beddall, A J; Beddall, A; Bednár, P; Bednyakov, V A; Bee, C; Begel, M; Behar Harpaz, S; Behera, P K; Beimforde, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bell, P J; Bell, W H; Bella, G; Bellagamba, L; Bellina, F; Bellomo, M; Belloni, A; Belotskiy, K; Beltramello, O; Ben Ami, S; Benary, O; Benchekroun, D; Bendel, M; Benedict, B H; Benekos, N; Benhammou, Y; Benincasa, G P; Benjamin, D P; Benoit, M; Bensinger, J R; Benslama, K; Bentvelsen, S; Beretta, M; Berge, D; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E; Berger, N; Berghaus, F; Berglund, E; Beringer, J; Bernardet, K; Bernat, P; Bernhard, R; Bernius, C; Berry, T; Bertin, A; Besson, N; Bethke, S; Bianchi, R M; Bianco, M; Biebel, O; Biesiada, J; Biglietti, M; Bilokon, H; Bindi, M; Binet, S; Bingul, A; Bini, C; Biscarat, C; Bitenc, U; Black, K M; Blair, R E; Blanchard, J-B; Blanchot, G; Blocker, C; Blocki, J; Blondel, A; Blum, W; Blumenschein, U; Bobbink, G J; Bocci, A; Boehler, M; Boek, J; Boelaert, N; Böser, S; Bogaerts, J A; Bogouch, A; Bohm, C; Bohm, J; Boisvert, V; Bold, T; Boldea, V; Boldyrev, A; Bondarenko, V G; Bondioli, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, J R A; Bordoni, S; Borer, C; Borisov, A; Borissov, G; Borjanovic, I; Borroni, S; Bos, K; Boscherini, D; Bosman, M; Bosteels, M; Boterenbrood, H; Bouchami, J; Boudreau, J; Bouhova-Thacker, E V; Boulahouache, C; Bourdarios, C; Boyd, J; Boyko, I R; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Braem, A; Branchini, P; Brandenburg, G W; Brandt, A; Brandt, G; Brandt, O; Bratzler, U; Brau, B; Brau, J E; Braun, H M; Brelier, B; Bremer, J; Brenner, R; Bressler, S; Breton, D; Brett, N D; Britton, D; Brochu, F M; Brock, I; Brock, R; Brodbeck, T J; Brodet, E; Broggi, F; Bromberg, C; Brooijmans, G; Brooks, W K; Brown, G; Brubaker, E; Bruckman de Renstrom, P A; Bruncko, D; Bruneliere, R; Brunet, S; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bruschi, M; Buanes, T; Bucci, F; Buchanan, J; Buchholz, P; Buckley, A G; Budagov, I A; Budick, B; Büscher, V; Bugge, L; Bulekov, O; Bunse, M; Buran, T; Burckhart, H; Burdin, S; Burgess, T; Burke, S; Busato, E; Bussey, P; Buszello, C P; Butin, F; Butler, B; Butler, J M; Buttar, C M; Butterworth, J M; Byatt, T; Caballero, J; Cabrera Urbán, S; Caforio, D; Cakir, O; Calafiura, P; Calderini, G; Calfayan, P; Calkins, R; Caloba, L P; Caloi, R; Calvet, D; Camarri, P; Cambiaghi, M; Cameron, D; Campabadal-Segura, F; Campana, S; Campanelli, M; Canale, V; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Cantero, J; Capasso, L; Capeans-Garrido, M D M; Caprini, I; Caprini, M; Capua, M; Caputo, R; Caracinha, D; Caramarcu, C; Cardarelli, R; Carli, T; Carlino, G; Carminati, L; Caron, B; Caron, S; Carrillo Montoya, G D; Carron Montero, S; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Carvalho, J; Casadei, D; Casado, M P; Cascella, M; Caso, C; Castaneda Hernadez, A M; Castaneda-Miranda, E; Castillo Gimenez, V; Castro, N; Cataldi, G; Catinaccio, A; Catmore, J R; Cattai, A; Cattani, G; Caughron, S; Cauz, D; Cavalleri, P; Cavalli, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cavasinni, V; Ceradini, F; Cerqueira, A S; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Cerutti, F; Cetin, S A; Cevenini, F; Chafaq, A; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K; Chapman, J D; Chapman, J W; Chareyre, E; Charlton, D G; Chavda, V; Cheatham, S; Chekanov, S; Chekulaev, S V; Chelkov, G A; Chen, H; Chen, S; Chen, T; Chen, X; Cheng, S; Cheplakov, A; Chepurnov, V F; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R; Tcherniatine, V; Chesneanu, D; Cheu, E; Cheung, S L; Chevalier, L; Chevallier, F; Chiarella, V; Chiefari, G; Chikovani, L; Childers, J T; Chilingarov, A; Chiodini, G; Chizhov, M; Choudalakis, G; Chouridou, S; Chren, D; Christidi, I A; Christov, A; Chromek-Burckhart, D; Chu, M L; Chudoba, J; Ciapetti, G; Ciftci, A K; Ciftci, R; Cinca, D; Cindro, V; Ciobotaru, M D; Ciocca, C; Ciocio, A; Cirilli, M; Citterio, M; Clark, A; Cleland, W; Clemens, J C; Clement, B; Clement, C; Clements, D; Coadou, Y; Cobal, M; Coccaro, A; Cochran, J; Coelli, S; Coggeshall, J; Cogneras, E; Cojocaru, C D; Colas, J; Cole, B; Colijn, A P; Collard, C; Collins, N J; Collins-Tooth, C; Collot, J; Colon, G; Coluccia, R; Conde Muiño, P; Coniavitis, E; Consonni, M; Constantinescu, S; Conta, C; Conventi, F; Cook, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, B D; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Cooper-Smith, N J; Copic, K; Cornelissen, T; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F; Corso-Radu, A; Cortes-Gonzalez, A; Cortiana, G; Costa, G; Costa, M J; Costanzo, D; Costin, T; Côté, D; Coura Torres, R; Courneyea, L; Cowan, G; Cowden, C; Cox, B E; Cranmer, K; Cranshaw, J; Cristinziani, M; Crosetti, G; Crupi, R; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T; Curatolo, M; Curtis, C J; Cwetanski, P; Czyczula, Z; D'Auria, S; D'Onofrio, M; D'Orazio, A; Da Silva, P V M; Da Via, C; Dabrowski, W; Dai, T; Dallapiccola, C; Dallison, S J; Daly, C H; Dam, M; Danielsson, H O; Dannheim, D; Dao, V; Darbo, G; Darlea, G L; Davey, W; Davidek, T; Davidson, N; Davidson, R; Davison, A R; Dawson, I; Dawson, J W; Daya, R K; De, K; de Asmundis, R; De Castro, S; De Castro Faria Salgado, P E; De Cecco, S; de Graat, J; De Groot, N; de Jong, P; De La Cruz Burelo, E; De La Taille, C; De Mora, L; De Oliveira Branco, M; De Pedis, D; De Salvo, A; De Sanctis, U; De Santo, A; De Vivie De Regie, J B; De Zorzi, G; Dean, S; Deberg, H; Dedes, G; Dedovich, D V; Defay, P O; Degenhardt, J; Dehchar, M; Del Papa, C; Del Peso, J; Del Prete, T; Dell'Acqua, A; Dell'Asta, L; Della Pietra, M; della Volpe, D; Delmastro, M; Delruelle, N; Delsart, P A; Deluca, C; Demers, S; Demichev, M; Demirkoz, B; Deng, J; Deng, W; Denisov, S P; Dennis, C; Derkaoui, J E; Derue, F; Dervan, P; Desch, K; Deviveiros, P O; Dewhurst, A; DeWilde, B; Dhaliwal, S; Dhullipudi, R; Di Ciaccio, A; Di Ciaccio, L; Di Domenico, A; Di Girolamo, A; Di Girolamo, B; Di Luise, S; Di Mattia, A; Di Nardo, R; Di Simone, A; Di Sipio, R; Diaz, M A; Diblen, F; Diehl, E B; Dietrich, J; Diglio, S; Dindar Yagci, K; Dingfelder, D J; Dionisi, C; Dita, P; Dita, S; Dittus, F; Djama, F; Djilkibaev, R; Djobava, T; do Vale, M A B; Do Valle Wemans, A; Dobbs, M; Dobos, D; Dobson, E; Dobson, M; Dodd, J; Dogan, O B; Doherty, T; Doi, Y; Dolejsi, J; Dolenc, I; Dolezal, Z; Dolgoshein, B A; Dohmae, T; Donega, M; Donini, J; Dopke, J; Doria, A; Dos Anjos, A; Dotti, A; Dova, M T; Doxiadis, A; Doyle, A T; Drasal, Z; Driouichi, C; Dris, M; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Dudarev, A; Dudziak, F; Dührssen , M; Duflot, L; Dufour, M-A; Dunford, M; Duperrin, A; Duran-Yildiz, H; Dushkin, A; Duxfield, R; Dwuznik, M; Düren, M; Ebenstein, W L; Ebke, J; Eckert, S; Eckweiler, S; Edmonds, K; Edwards, C A; Eerola, P; Egorov, K; Ehrenfeld, W; Ehrich, T; Eifert, T; Eigen, G; Einsweiler, K; Eisenhandler, E; Ekelof, T; El Kacimi, M; Ellert, M; Elles, S; Ellinghaus, F; Ellis, K; Ellis, N; Elmsheuser, J; Elsing, M; Ely, R; Emeliyanov, D; Engelmann, R; Engl, A; Epp, B; Eppig, A; Epshteyn, V S; Ereditato, A; Eriksson, D; Ermoline, I; Ernst, J; Ernst, M; Ernwein, J; Errede, D; Errede, S; Ertel, E; Escalier, M; Escobar, C; Espinal Curull, X; Esposito, B; Etienne, F; Etienvre, A I; Etzion, E; Evans, H; Fabbri, L; Fabre, C; Faccioli, P; Facius, K; Fakhrutdinov, R M; Falciano, S; Falou, A C; Fang, Y; Fanti, M; Farbin, A; Farilla, A; Farley, J; Farooque, T; Farrington, S M; Farthouat, P; Fassi, F; Fassnacht, P; Fassouliotis, D; Fatholahzadeh, B; Fayard, L; Fayette, F; Febbraro, R; Federic, P; Fedin, O L; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W; Feligioni, L; Felzmann, C U; Feng, C; Feng, E J; Fenyuk, A B; Ferencei, J; Ferland, J; Fernandes, B; Fernando, W; Ferrag, S; Ferrando, J; Ferrari, A; Ferrari, P; Ferrari, R; Ferrer, A; Ferrer, M L; Ferrere, D; Ferretti, C; Fiascaris, M; Fiedler, F; Filipcic, A; Filippas, A; Filthaut, F; Fincke-Keeler, M; Fiolhais, M C N; Fiorini, L; Firan, A; Fischer, G; Fisher, M J; Flechl, M; Fleck, I; Fleckner, J; Fleischmann, P; Fleischmann, S; Flick, T; Flores-Castillo, L R; Flowerdew, M J; Föhlisch, F; Fokitis, M; Fonseca Martin, T; Forbush, D A; Formica, A; Forti, A; Fortin, D; Foster, J M; Fournier, D; Foussat, A; Fowler, A J; Fowler, K; Fox, H; Francavilla, P; Franchino, S; Francis, D; Franklin, M; Franz, S; Fraternali, M; Fratina, S; Freestone, J; French, S T; Froeschl, R; Froidevaux, D; Frost, J A; Fukunaga, C; Fullana Torregrosa, E; Fuster, J; Gabaldon, C; Gabizon, O; Gadfort, T; Gadomski, S; Gagliardi, G; Gagnon, P; Galea, C; Gallas, E J; Gallas, M V; Gallop, B J; Gallus, P; Galyaev, E; Gan, K K; Gao, Y S; Gaponenko, A; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garcí­a, C; Garcí­a Navarro, J E; Gardner, R W; Garelli, N; Garitaonandia, H; Garonne, V; Gatti, C; Gaudio, G; Gaumer, O; Gauzzi, P; Gavrilenko, I L; Gay, C; Gaycken, G; Gayde, J-C; Gazis, E N; Ge, P; Gee, C N P; Geich-Gimbel, Ch; Gellerstedt, K; Gemme, C; Genest, M H; Gentile, S; Georgatos, F; George, S; Gerlach, P; Gershon, A; Geweniger, C; Ghazlane, H; Ghez, P; Ghodbane, N; Giacobbe, B; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giangiobbe, V; Gianotti, F; Gibbard, B; Gibson, A; Gibson, S M; Gilbert, L M; Gilchriese, M; Gilewsky, V; Gillberg, D; Gillman, A R; Gingrich, D M; Ginzburg, J; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M P; Giordano, R; Giovannini, P; Giraud, P F; Girtler, P; Giugni, D; Giusti, P; Gjelsten, B K; Gladilin, L K; Glasman, C; Glazov, A; Glitza, K W; Glonti, G L; Godfrey, J; Godlewski, J; Goebel, M; Göpfert, T; Goeringer, C; Gössling, C; Göttfert, T; Goggi, V; Goldfarb, S; Goldin, D; Golling, T; Gollub, N P; Gomes, A; Gomez Fajardo, L S; Gonçalo, R; Gonella, L; Gong, C; González de la Hoz, S; Gonzalez Silva, M L; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S; Goodson, J J; Goossens, L; Gorbounov, P A; Gordon, H A; Gorelov, I; Gorfine, G; Gorini, B; Gorini, E; Gorisek, A; Gornicki, E; Goryachev, S V; Goryachev, V N; Gosdzik, B; Gosselink, M; Gostkin, M I; Gough Eschrich, I; Gouighri, M; Goujdami, D; Goulette, M P; Goussiou, A G; Goy, C; Grabowska-Bold, I; Grafström, P; Grahn, K-J; Granado Cardoso, L; Grancagnolo, F; Grancagnolo, S; Grassi, V; Gratchev, V; Grau, N; Gray, H M; Gray, J A; Graziani, E; Green, B; Greenshaw, T; Greenwood, Z D; Gregor, I M; Grenier, P; Griesmayer, E; Griffiths, J; Grigalashvili, N; Grillo, A A; Grimm, K; Grinstein, S; Grishkevich, Y V; Groer, L S; Grognuz, J; Groh, M; Groll, M; Gross, E; Grosse-Knetter, J; Groth-Jensen, J; Grybel, K; Guarino, V J; Guicheney, C; Guida, A; Guillemin, T; Guler, H; Gunther, J; Guo, B; Gupta, A; Gusakov, Y; Gutierrez, A; Gutierrez, P; Guttman, N; Gutzwiller, O; Guyot, C; Gwenlan, C; Gwilliam, C B; Haas, A; Haas, S; Haber, C; Hackenburg, R; Hadavand, H K; Hadley, D R; Haefner, P; Härtel, R; Hajduk, Z; Hakobyan, H; Haller, J; Hamacher, K; Hamilton, A; Hamilton, S; Han, H; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hance, M; Handel, C; Hanke, P; Hansen, J R; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, P H; Hansl-Kozanecka, T; Hansson, P; Hara, K; Hare, G A; Harenberg, T; Harrington, R D; Harris, O B; Harris, O M; Harrison, K; Hartert, J; Hartjes, F; Haruyama, T; Harvey, A; Hasegawa, S; Hasegawa, Y; Hashemi, K; Hassani, S; Hatch, M; Haug, F; Haug, S; Hauschild, M; Hauser, R; Havranek, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R J; Hawkins, D; Hayakawa, T; Hayward, H S; Haywood, S J; He, M; Head, S J; Hedberg, V; Heelan, L; Heim, S; Heinemann, B; Heisterkamp, S; Helary, L; Heller, M; Hellman, S; Helsens, C; Hemperek, T; Henderson, R C W; Henke, M; Henrichs, A; Henriques-Correia, A M; Henrot-Versille, S; Hensel, C; Henß, T; Hershenhorn, A D; Herten, G; Hertenberger, R; Hervas, L; Hessey, N P; Hidvegi, A; Higón-Rodriguez, E; Hill, D; Hill, J C; Hiller, K H; Hillier, S J; Hinchliffe, I; Hirose, M; Hirsch, F; Hobbs, J; Hod, N; Hodgkinson, M C; Hodgson, P; Hoecker, A; Hoeferkamp, M R; Hoffman, J; Hoffmann, D; Hohlfeld, M; Holmgren, S O; Holy, T; Holzbauer, J L; Homma, Y; Homola, P; Horazdovsky, T; Hori, T; Horn, C; Horner, S; Horvat, S; Hostachy, J-Y; Hou, S; Houlden, M A; Hoummada, A; Howe, T; Hrivnac, J; Hryn'ova, T; Hsu, P J; Hsu, S-C; Huang, G S; Hubacek, Z; Hubaut, F; Huegging, F; Hughes, E W; Hughes, G; Hughes-Jones, R E; Hurst, P; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Huseynov, N; Huston, J; Huth, J; Iacobucci, G; Iakovidis, G; Ibragimov, I; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Idarraga, J; Iengo, P; Igonkina, O; Ikegami, Y; Ikeno, M; Ilchenko, Y; Iliadis, D; Ilyushenka, Y; Imori, M; Ince, T; Ioannou, P; Iodice, M; Irles-Quiles, A; Ishikawa, A; Ishino, M; Ishmukhametov, R; Isobe, T; Issakov, V; Issever, C; Istin, S; Itoh, Y; Ivashin, A V; Iwanski, W; Iwasaki, H; Izen, J M; Izzo, V; Jackson, J N; Jackson, P; Jaekel, M; Jahoda, M; Jain, V; Jakobs, K; Jakobsen, S; Jakubek, J; Jana, D; Jansen, E; Jantsch, A; Janus, M; Jared, R C; Jarlskog, G; Jarron, P; Jeanty, L; Jelen, K; Jen-La Plante, I; Jenni, P; Jez, P; Jézéquel, S; Ji, W; Jia, J; Jiang, Y; Jimenez Belenguer, M; Jin, G; Jin, S; Jinnouchi, O; Joffe, D; Johansen, M; Johansson, K E; Johansson, P; Johnert, S; Johns, K A; Jon-And, K; Jones, G; Jones, R W L; Jones, T W; Jones, T J; Jonsson, O; Joos, D; Joram, C; Jorge, P M; Juranek, V; Jussel, P; Kabachenko, V V; Kabana, S; Kaci, M; Kaczmarska, A; Kado, M; Kagan, H; Kagan, M; Kaiser, S; Kajomovitz, E; Kalinovskaya, L V; Kalinowski, A; Kama, S; Kanaya, N; Kaneda, M; Kantserov, V A; Kanzaki, J; Kaplan, B; Kapliy, A; Kaplon, J; Karagounis, M; Karagoz Unel, M; Kartvelishvili, V; Karyukhin, A N; Kashif, L; Kasmi, A; Kass, R D; Kastanas, A; Kastoryano, M; Kataoka, M; Kataoka, Y; Katsoufis, E; Katzy, J; Kaushik, V; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kawamura, G; Kayl, M S; Kayumov, F; Kazanin, V A; Kazarinov, M Y; Kazi, S I; Keates, J R; Keeler, R; Keener, P T; Kehoe, R; Keil, M; Kekelidze, G D; Kelly, M; Kennedy, J; Kenyon, M; Kepka, O; Kerschen, N; Kersevan, B P; Kersten, S; Kessoku, K; Khakzad, M; Khalil-zada, F; Khandanyan, H; Khanov, A; Kharchenko, D; Khodinov, A; Kholodenko, A G; Khomich, A; Khoriauli, G; Khovanskiy, N; Khovanskiy, V; Khramov, E; Khubua, J; Kilvington, G; Kim, H; Kim, M S; Kim, P C; Kim, S H; Kind, O; Kind, P; King, B T; Kirk, J; Kirsch, G P; Kirsch, L E; Kiryunin, A E; Kisielewska, D; Kittelmann, T; Kiyamura, H; Kladiva, E; Klein, M; Klein, U; Kleinknecht, K; Klemetti, M; Klier, A; Klimentov, A; Klingenberg, R; Klinkby, E B; Klioutchnikova, T; Klok, P F; Klous, S; Kluge, E-E; Kluge, T; Kluit, P; Klute, M; Kluth, S; Knecht, N S; Kneringer, E; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Koblitz, B; Kocian, M; Kocnar, A; Kodys, P; Köneke, K; König, A C; Köpke, L; Koetsveld, F; Koevesarki, P; Koffas, T; Koffeman, E; Kohn, F; Kohout, Z; Kohriki, T; Kokott, T; Kolanoski, H; Kolesnikov, V; Koletsou, I; Koll, J; Kollar, D; Kolos, S; Kolya, S D; Komar, A A; Komaragiri, J R; Kondo, T; Kono, T; Kononov, A I; Konoplich, R; Konovalov, S P; Konstantinidis, N; Koperny, S; Korcyl, K; Kordas, K; Koreshev, V; Korn, A; Korolkov, I; Korolkova, E V; Korotkov, V A; Kortner, O; Kostka, P; Kostyukhin, V V; Kotamäki, M J; Kotov, S; Kotov, V M; Kotov, K Y; Koupilova, Z; Kourkoumelis, C; Koutsman, A; Kowalewski, R; Kowalski, H; Kowalski, T Z; Kozanecki, W; Kozhin, A S; Kral, V; Kramarenko, V A; Kramberger, G; Krasny, M W; Krasznahorkay, A; Kreisel, A; Krejci, F; Krepouri, A; Kretzschmar, J; Krieger, P; Krobath, G; Kroeninger, K; Kroha, H; Kroll, J; Kroseberg, J; Krstic, J; Kruchonak, U; Krüger, H; Krumshteyn, Z V; Kubota, T; Kuehn, S; Kugel, A; Kuhl, T; Kuhn, D; Kukhtin, V; Kulchitsky, Y; Kuleshov, S; Kummer, C; Kuna, M; Kupco, A; Kurashige, H; Kurata, M; Kurchaninov, L L; Kurochkin, Y A; Kus, V; Kuykendall, W; Kuznetsova, E; Kvasnicka, O; Kwee, R; La Rosa, M; La Rotonda, L; Labarga, L; Labbe, J; Lacasta, C; Lacava, F; Lacker, H; Lacour, D; Lacuesta, V R; Ladygin, E; Lafaye, R; Laforge, B; Lagouri, T; Lai, S; Lamanna, M; Lampen, C L; Lampl, W; Lancon, E; Landgraf, U; Landon, M P J; Lane, J L; Lankford, A J; Lanni, F; Lantzsch, K; Lanza, A; Laplace, S; Lapoire, C; Laporte, J F; Lari, T; Larionov, A V; Larner, A; Lasseur, C; Lassnig, M; Laurelli, P; Lavrijsen, W; Laycock, P; Lazarev, A B; Lazzaro, A; Le Dortz, O; Le Guirriec, E; Le Maner, C; Le Menedeu, E; Le Vine, M; Leahu, M; Lebedev, A; Lebel, C; LeCompte, T; Ledroit-Guillon, F; Lee, H; Lee, J S H; Lee, S C; Lefebvre, M; Legendre, M; LeGeyt, B C; Legger, F; Leggett, C; Lehmacher, M; Lehmann Miotto, G; Lei, X; Leitner, R; Lelas, D; Lellouch, D; Lellouch, J; Leltchouk, M; Lendermann, V; Leney, K J C; Lenz, T; Lenzen, G; Lenzi, B; Leonhardt, K; Leroy, C; Lessard, J-R; Lester, C G; Leung Fook Cheong, A; Levêque, J; Levin, D; Levinson, L J; Levitski, M S; Levonian, S; Lewandowska, M; Leyton, M; Li, H; Li, J; Li, S; Li, X; Liang, Z; Liang, Z; Liberti, B; Lichard, P; Lichtnecker, M; Lie, K; Liebig, W; Liko, D; Lilley, J N; Lim, H; Limosani, A; Limper, M; Lin, S C; Lindsay, S W; Linhart, V; Linnemann, J T; Liolios, A; Lipeles, E; Lipinsky, L; Lipniacka, A; Liss, T M; Lissauer, D; Litke, A M; Liu, C; Liu, D; Liu, H; Liu, J B; Liu, M; Liu, S; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Livan, M; Lleres, A; Lloyd, S L; Lobodzinska, E; Loch, P; Lockman, W S; Lockwitz, S; Loddenkoetter, T; Loebinger, F K; Loginov, A; Loh, C W; Lohse, T; Lohwasser, K; Lokajicek, M; Loken, J; Lopes, L; Lopez Mateos, D; Losada, M; Loscutoff, P; Losty, M J; Lou, X; Lounis, A; Loureiro, K F; Lovas, L; Love, J; Love, P; Lowe, A J; Lu, F; Lu, J; Lubatti, H J; Luci, C; Lucotte, A; Ludwig, A; Ludwig, D; Ludwig, I; Ludwig, J; Luehring, F; Luisa, L; Lumb, D; Luminari, L; Lund, E; Lund-Jensen, B; Lundberg, B; Lundberg, J; Lundquist, J; Lutz, G; Lynn, D; Lys, J; Lytken, E; Ma, H; Ma, L L; Maccarrone, G; Macchiolo, A; Macek, B; Machado Miguens, J; Mackeprang, R; Madaras, R J; Mader, W F; Maenner, R; Maeno, T; Mättig, P; Mättig, S; Magalhaes Martins, P J; Magradze, E; Magrath, C A; Mahalalel, Y; Mahboubi, K; Mahmood, A; Mahout, G; Maiani, C; Maidantchik, C; Maio, A; Majewski, S; Makida, Y; Makouski, M; Makovec, N; Malecki, Pa; Malecki, P; Maleev, V P; Malek, F; Mallik, U; Malon, D; Maltezos, S; Malyshev, V; Malyukov, S; Mambelli, M; Mameghani, R; Mamuzic, J; Manabe, A; Mandelli, L; Mandic, I; Mandrysch, R; Maneira, J; Mangeard, P S; Manjavidze, I D; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Mansoulie, B; Mapelli, A; Mapelli, L; March, L; Marchand, J F; Marchese, F; Marcisovsky, M; Marino, C P; Marques, C N; Marroquim, F; Marshall, R; Marshall, Z; Martens, F K; Marti i Garcia, S; Martin, A J; Martin, A J; Martin, B; Martin, B; Martin, F F; Martin, J P; Martin, T A; Martin dit Latour, B; Martinez, M; Martinez Outschoorn, V; Martini, A; Martynenko, V; Martyniuk, A C; Maruyama, T; Marzano, F; Marzin, A; Masetti, L; Mashimo, T; Mashinistov, R; Masik, J; Maslennikov, A L; Massaro, G; Massol, N; Mastroberardino, A; Masubuchi, T; Mathes, M; Matricon, P; Matsumoto, H; Matsunaga, H; Matsushita, T; Mattravers, C; Maxfield, S J; May, E N; Mayne, A; Mazini, R; Mazur, M; Mazzanti, M; Mazzanti, P; Mc Donald, J; Mc Kee, S P; McCarn, A; McCarthy, R L; McCubbin, N A; McFarlane, K W; McGlone, H; Mchedlidze, G; McLaren, R A; McMahon, S J; McMahon, T R; McPherson, R A; Meade, A; Mechnich, J; Mechtel, M; Medinnis, M; Meera-Lebbai, R; Meguro, T M; Mehdiyev, R; Mehlhase, S; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Meirose, B; Melamed-Katz, A; Mellado Garcia, B R; Meng, Z; Menke, S; Meoni, E; Merkl, D; Mermod, P; Merola, L; Meroni, C; Merritt, F S; Messina, A M; Messmer, I; Metcalfe, J; Mete, A S; Meyer, J-P; Meyer, J; Meyer, T C; Meyer, W T; Miao, J; Micu, L; Middleton, R P; Migas, S; Mijovic, L; Mikenberg, G; Mikuz, M; Miller, D W; Mills, W J; Mills, C M; Milov, A; Milstead, D A; Minaenko, A A; Miñano, M; Minashvili, I A; Mincer, A I; Mindur, B; Mineev, M; Mir, L M; Mirabelli, G; Misawa, S; Miscetti, S; Misiejuk, A; Mitrevski, J; Mitsou, V A; Miyagawa, P S; Mjörnmark, J U; Mladenov, D; Moa, T; Mockett, P; Moed, S; Moeller, V; Mönig, K; Möser, N; Mohn, B; Mohr, W; Mohrdieck-Möck, S; Moles-Valls, R; Molina-Perez, J; Moloney, G; Monk, J; Monnier, E; Montesano, S; Monticelli, F; Moore, R W; Mora-Herrera, C; Moraes, A; Morais, A; Morel, J; Morello, G; Moreno, D; Moreno Llácer, M; Morettini, P; Morii, M; Morley, A K; Mornacchi, G; Morozov, S V; Morris, J D; Moser, H G; Mosidze, M; Moss, J; Mount, R; Mountricha, E; Mouraviev, S V; Moyse, E J W; Mudrinic, M; Mueller, F; Mueller, J; Mueller, K; Müller, T A; Muenstermann, D; Muir, A; Murillo Garcia, R; Murray, W J; Mussche, I; Musto, E; Myagkov, A G; Myska, M; Nadal, J; Nagai, K; Nagano, K; Nagasaka, Y; Nairz, A M; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Nakatsuka, H; Nanava, G; Napier, A; Nash, M; Nation, N R; Nattermann, T; Naumann, T; Navarro, G; Nderitu, S K; Neal, H A; Nebot, E; Nechaeva, P; Negri, A; Negri, G; Nelson, A; Nelson, T K; Nemecek, S; Nemethy, P; Nepomuceno, A A; Nessi, M; Neubauer, M S; Neusiedl, A; Neves, R N; Nevski, P; Newcomer, F M; Nicholson, C; Nickerson, R B; Nicolaidou, R; Nicolas, L; Nicoletti, G; Niedercorn, F; Nielsen, J; Nikiforov, A; Nikolaev, K; Nikolic-Audit, I; Nikolopoulos, K; Nilsen, H; Nilsson, P; Nisati, A; Nishiyama, T; Nisius, R; Nodulman, L; Nomachi, M; Nomidis, I; Nomoto, H; Nordberg, M; Nordkvist, B; Notz, D; Novakova, J; Nozaki, M; Nozicka, M; Nugent, I M; Nuncio-Quiroz, A-E; Nunes Hanninger, G; Nunnemann, T; Nurse, E; O'Neil, D C; O'Shea, V; Oakham, F G; Oberlack, H; Ochi, A; Oda, S; Odaka, S; Odier, J; Odino, G A; Ogren, H; Oh, S H; Ohm, C C; Ohshima, T; Ohshita, H; Ohsugi, T; Okada, S; Okawa, H; Okumura, Y; Olcese, M; Olchevski, A G; Oliveira, M; Oliveira Damazio, D; Oliver, J; Oliver Garcia, E; Olivito, D; Olszewski, A; Olszowska, J; Omachi, C; Onofre, A; Onyisi, P U E; Oram, C J; Ordonez, G; Oreglia, M J; Oren, Y; Orestano, D; Orlov, I; Oropeza Barrera, C; Orr, R S; Ortega, E O; Osculati, B; Osuna, C; Otec, R; Ottersbach, J P; Ould-Saada, F; Ouraou, A; Ouyang, Q; Owen, M; Owen, S; Ozcan, V E; Ozone, K; Ozturk, N; Pacheco Pages, A; Padhi, S; Padilla Aranda, C; Paganis, E; Pahl, C; Paige, F; Pajchel, K; Pal, A; Palestini, S; Pallin, D; Palma, A; Palmer, J D; Pan, Y B; Panagiotopoulou, E; Panes, B; Panikashvili, N; Panitkin, S; Pantea, D; Panuskova, M; Paolone, V; Papadopoulou, Th D; Park, S J; Park, W; Parker, M A; Parker, S I; Parodi, F; Parsons, J A; Parzefall, U; Pasqualucci, E; Passardi, G; Passeri, A; Pastore, F; Pastore, Fr; Pásztor, G; Pataraia, S; Pater, J R; Patricelli, S; Patwa, A; Pauly, T; Peak, L S; Pecsy, M; Pedraza Morales, M I; Peleganchuk, S V; Peng, H; Penson, A; Penwell, J; Perantoni, M; Perez, K; Perez Codina, E; Pérez García-Estañ, M T; Perez Reale, V; Perini, L; Pernegger, H; Perrino, R; Perrodo, P; Persembe, S; Perus, P; Peshekhonov, V D; Petersen, B A; Petersen, J; Petersen, T C; Petit, E; Petridou, C; Petrolo, E; Petrucci, F; Petschull, D; Petteni, M; Pezoa, R; Pfeifer, B; Phan, A; Phillips, A W; Piacquadio, G; Piccinini, M; Piegaia, R; Pilcher, J E; Pilkington, A D; Pina, J; Pinamonti, M; Pinfold, J L; Ping, J; Pinto, B; Pirotte, O; Pizio, C; Placakyte, R; Plamondon, M; Plano, W G; Pleier, M-A; Poblaguev, A; Poddar, S; Podlyski, F; Poffenberger, P; Poggioli, L; Pohl, M; Polci, F; Polesello, G; Policicchio, A; Polini, A; Poll, J; Polychronakos, V; Pomarede, D M; Pomeroy, D; Pommès, K; Pontecorvo, L; Pope, B G; Popovic, D S; Poppleton, A; Popule, J; Portell Bueso, X; Porter, R; Pospelov, G E; Pospichal, P; Pospisil, S; Potekhin, M; Potrap, I N; Potter, C J; Potter, C T; Potter, K P; Poulard, G; Poveda, J; Prabhu, R; Pralavorio, P; Prasad, S; Pravahan, R; Preda, T; Pretzl, K; Pribyl, L; Price, D; Price, L E; Prichard, P M; Prieur, D; Primavera, M; Prokofiev, K; Prokoshin, F; Protopopescu, S; Proudfoot, J; Prudent, X; Przysiezniak, H; Psoroulas, S; Ptacek, E; Puigdengoles, C; Purdham, J; Purohit, M; Puzo, P; Pylypchenko, Y; Qi, M; Qian, J; Qian, W; Qian, Z; Qin, Z; Qing, D; Quadt, A; Quarrie, D R; Quayle, W B; Quinonez, F; Raas, M; Radeka, V; Radescu, V; Radics, B; Rador, T; Ragusa, F; Rahal, G; Rahimi, A M; Rahm, D; Rajagopalan, S; Rammes, M; Ratoff, P N; Rauscher, F; Rauter, E; Raymond, M; Read, A L; Rebuzzi, D M; Redelbach, A; Redlinger, G; Reece, R; Reeves, K; Reinherz-Aronis, E; Reinsch, A; Reisinger, I; Reljic, D; Rembser, C; Ren, Z L; Renkel, P; Rescia, S; Rescigno, M; Resconi, S; Resende, B; Reznicek, P; Rezvani, R; Richards, A; Richards, R A; Richter, D; Richter, R; Richter-Was, E; Ridel, M; Rieke, S; Rijpstra, M; Rijssenbeek, M; Rimoldi, A; Rinaldi, L; Rios, R R; Riu, I; Rivoltella, G; Rizatdinova, F; Rizvi, E R; Roa-Romero, D A; Robertson, S H; Robichaud-Veronneau, A; Robinson, D; Robinson, M; Robson, A; Rocha de Lima, J G; Roda, C; Rodriguez, D; Rodriguez Garcia, Y; Roe, S; Røhne, O; Rojo, V; Rolli, S; Romaniouk, A; Romanov, V M; Romeo, G; Romero-Maltrana, D; Roos, L; Ros, E; Rosati, S; Rosenbaum, G A; Rosenberg, E I; Rosselet, L; Rossi, L P; Rotaru, M; Rothberg, J; Rottländer, I; Rousseau, D; Royon, C R; Rozanov, A; Rozen, Y; Ruan, X; Ruckert, B; Ruckstuhl, N; Rud, V I; Rudolph, G; Rühr, F; Ruggieri, F; Ruiz-Martinez, A; Rumyantsev, L; Rusakovich, N A; Rutherfoord, J P; Ruwiedel, C; Ruzicka, P; Ryabov, Y F; Ryadovikov, V; Ryan, P; Rybkin, G; Rzaeva, S; Saavedra, A F; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sadykov, R; Sakamoto, H; Salamanna, G; Salamon, A; Saleem, M; Salihagic, D; Salnikov, A; Salt, J; Salvachua-Ferrando, B M; Salvatore, D; Salvatore, F; Salvucci, A; Salzburger, A; Sampsonidis, D; Samset, B H; Sanchis Lozano, M A; Sandaker, H; Sander, H G; Sanders, M P; Sandhoff, M; Sandstroem, R; Sandvoss, S; Sankey, D P C; Sanny, B; Sansoni, A; Santamarina Rios, C; Santi, L; Santoni, C; Santonico, R; Santos, D; Santos, J; Saraiva, J G; Sarangi, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sarri, F; Sasaki, O; Sasaki, T; Sasao, N; Satsounkevitch, I; Sauvage, G; Savard, P; Savine, A Y; Savinov, V; Sawyer, L; Saxon, D H; Says, L P; Sbarra, C; Sbrizzi, A; Scannicchio, D A; Schaarschmidt, J; Schacht, P; Schäfer, U; Schaetzel, S; Schaffer, A C; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Schamov, A G; Schegelsky, V A; Scheirich, D; Schernau, M; Scherzer, M I; Schiavi, C; Schieck, J; Schioppa, M; Schlenker, S; Schlereth, J L; Schmid, P; Schmidt, M P; Schmieden, K; Schmitt, C; Schmitz, M; Schott, M; Schouten, D; Schovancova, J; Schram, M; Schreiner, A; Schroeder, C; Schroer, N; Schroers, M; Schuler, G; Schultes, J; Schultz-Coulon, H-C; Schumacher, J; Schumacher, M; Schumm, B A; Schune, Ph; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwemling, Ph; Schwienhorst, R; Schwierz, R; Schwindling, J; Scott, W G; Searcy, J; Sedykh, E; Segura, E; Seidel, S C; Seiden, A; Seifert, F; Seixas, J M; Sekhniaidze, G; Seliverstov, D M; Sellden, B; Seman, M; Semprini-Cesari, N; Serfon, C; Serin, L; Seuster, R; Severini, H; Sevior, M E; Sfyrla, A; Shamim, M; Shan, L Y; Shank, J T; Shao, Q T; Shapiro, M; Shatalov, P B; Shaver, L; Shaw, C; Shaw, K; Sherman, D; Sherwood, P; Shibata, A; Shimojima, M; Shin, T; Shmeleva, A; Shochet, M J; Shupe, M A; Sicho, P; Sidoti, A; Siebel, A; Siegert, F; Siegrist, J; Sijacki, Dj; Silbert, O; Silva, J; Silver, Y; Silverstein, D; Silverstein, S B; Simak, V; Simic, Lj; Simion, S; Simmons, B; Simonyan, M; Sinervo, P; Sinev, N B; Sipica, V; Siragusa, G; Sisakyan, A N; Sivoklokov, S Yu; Sjoelin, J; Sjursen, T B; Skubic, P; Skvorodnev, N; Slater, M; Slavicek, T; Sliwa, K; Sloper, J; Sluka, T; Smakhtin, V; Smirnov, S Yu; Smirnov, Y; Smirnova, L N; Smirnova, O; Smith, B C; Smith, D; Smith, K M; Smizanska, M; Smolek, K; Snesarev, A A; Snow, S W; Snow, J; Snuverink, J; Snyder, S; Soares, M; Sobie, R; Sodomka, J; Soffer, A; Solans, C A; Solar, M; Solfaroli-Camillocci, E; Solodkov, A A; Solovyanov, O V; Soluk, R; Sondericker, J; Sopko, V; Sopko, B; Sosebee, M; Sosnovtsev, V V; Sospedra-Suay, L; Soukharev, A; Spagnolo, S; Spanò, F; Speckmayer, P; Spencer, E; Spighi, R; Spigo, G; Spila, F; Spiwoks, R; Spousta, M; Spreitzer, T; Spurlock, B; St Denis, R D; Stahl, T; Stamen, R; Stancu, S N; Stanecka, E; Stanek, R W; Stanescu, C; Stapnes, S; Starchenko, E A; Stark, J; Staroba, P; Starovoitov, P; Stastny, J; Staude, A; Stavina, P; Stavropoulos, G; Steinbach, P; Steinberg, P; Stekl, I; Stelzer, B; Stelzer, H J; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stenzel, H; Stevenson, K; Stewart, G; Stockton, M C; Stoerig, K; Stoicea, G; Stonjek, S; Strachota, P; Stradling, A; Straessner, A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strandlie, A; Strauss, M; Strizenec, P; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D M; Strong, J A; Stroynowski, R; Strube, J; Stugu, B; Stumer, I; Soh, D A; Su, D; Suchkov, S I; Sugaya, Y; Sugimoto, T; Suhr, C; Suk, M; Sulin, V V; Sultansoy, S; Sumida, T; Sun, X; Sundermann, J E; Suruliz, K; Sushkov, S; Susinno, G; Sutton, M R; Suzuki, T; Suzuki, Y; Sviridov, Yu M; Sykora, I; Sykora, T; Szymocha, T; Sánchez, J; Ta, D; Tackmann, K; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Taga, A; Takahashi, Y; Takai, H; Takashima, R; Takeda, H; Takeshita, T; Talby, M; Talyshev, A; Tamsett, M C; Tanaka, J; Tanaka, R; Tanaka, S; Tanaka, S; Tappern, G P; Tapprogge, S; Tardif, D; Tarem, S; Tarrade, F; Tartarelli, G F; Tas, P; Tasevsky, M; Tassi, E; Taylor, C; Taylor, F E; Taylor, G N; Taylor, R P; Taylor, W; Teixeira-Dias, P; Ten Kate, H; Teng, P K; Terada, S; Terashi, K; Terron, J; Terwort, M; Testa, M; Teuscher, R J; Tevlin, C M; Thadome, J; Thananuwong, R; Thioye, M; Thoma, S; Thomas, J P; Thomas, T L; Thompson, E N; Thompson, P D; Thompson, P D; Thompson, R J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thun, R P; Tic, T; Tikhomirov, V O; Tikhonov, Y A; Timmermans, C J W P; Tipton, P; Tique-Aires-Viegas, F J; Tisserant, S; Tobias, J; Toczek, B; Todorov, T; Todorova-Nova, S; Toggerson, B; Tojo, J; Tokár, S; Tokushuku, K; Tollefson, K; Tomasek, L; Tomasek, M; Tomasz, F; Tomoto, M; Tompkins, D; Tompkins, L; Toms, K; Tong, G; Tonoyan, A; Topfel, C; Topilin, N D; Torrence, E; Torró Pastor, E; Toth, J; Touchard, F; Tovey, D R; Tovey, S N; Trefzger, T; Tremblet, L; Tricoli, A; Trigger, I M; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Trinh, T N; Tripiana, M F; Triplett, N; Trivedi, A; Trocmé, B; Troncon, C; Trzupek, A; Tsarouchas, C; Tseng, J C-L; Tsiafis, I; Tsiakiris, M; Tsiareshka, P V; Tsionou, D; Tsipolitis, G; Tsiskaridze, V; Tskhadadze, E G; Tsukerman, I I; Tsulaia, V; Tsung, J-W; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Turala, M; Turecek, D; Turk Cakir, I; Turlay, E; Tuts, P M; Twomey, M S; Tylmad, M; Tyndel, M; Tzanakos, G; Uchida, K; Ueda, I; Uhlenbrock, M; Uhrmacher, M; Ukegawa, F; Unal, G; Underwood, D G; Undrus, A; Unel, G; Unno, Y; Urbaniec, D; Urkovsky, E; Urquijo, P; Urrejola, P; Usai, G; Uslenghi, M; Vacavant, L; Vacek, V; Vachon, B; Vahsen, S; Valenta, J; Valente, P; Valentinetti, S; Valkar, S; Valladolid Gallego, E; Vallecorsa, S; Valls Ferrer, J A; Van Berg, R; van der Graaf, H; van der Kraaij, E; van der Poel, E; Van Der Ster, D; van Eldik, N; van Gemmeren, P; van Kesteren, Z; van Vulpen, I; Vandelli, W; Vandoni, G; Vaniachine, A; Vankov, P; Vannucci, F; Varela Rodriguez, F; Vari, R; Varnes, E W; Varouchas, D; Vartapetian, A; Varvell, K E; Vasilyeva, L; Vassilakopoulos, V I; Vazeille, F; Vegni, G; Veillet, J J; Vellidis, C; Veloso, F; Veness, R; Veneziano, S; Ventura, A; Ventura, D; Venturi, M; Venturi, N; Vercesi, V; Verducci, M; Verkerke, W; Vermeulen, J C; Vetterli, M C; Vichou, I; Vickey, T; Viehhauser, G H A; Villa, M; Villani, E G; Villaplana Perez, M; Villate, J; Vilucchi, E; Vincter, M G; Vinek, E; Vinogradov, V B; Viret, S; Virzi, J; Vitale, A; Vitells, O V; Vivarelli, I; Vives Vaques, F; Vlachos, S; Vlasak, M; Vlasov, N; Vogt, H; Vokac, P; Volpi, M; Volpini, G; von der Schmitt, H; von Loeben, J; von Radziewski, H; von Toerne, E; Vorobel, V; Vorobiev, A P; Vorwerk, V; Vos, M; Voss, R; Voss, T T; Vossebeld, J H; Vranjes, N; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M; Vrba, V; Vreeswijk, M; Vu Anh, T; Vudragovic, D; Vuillermet, R; Vukotic, I; Wagner, P; Wahlen, H; Walbersloh, J; Walder, J; Walker, R; Walkowiak, W; Wall, R; Wang, C; Wang, H; Wang, J; Wang, J C; Wang, S M; Ward, C P; Warsinsky, M; Wastie, R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, M F; Watts, G; Watts, S; Waugh, A T; Waugh, B M; Webel, M; Weber, J; Weber, M D; Weber, M; Weber, M S; Weber, P; Weidberg, A R; Weingarten, J; Weiser, C; Wellenstein, H; Wells, P S; Wen, M; Wenaus, T; Wendler, S; Wengler, T; Wenig, S; Wermes, N; Werner, M; Werner, P; Werth, M; Werthenbach, U; Wessels, M; Whalen, K; Wheeler-Ellis, S J; Whitaker, S P; White, A; White, M J; White, S; Whiteson, D; Whittington, D; Wicek, F; Wicke, D; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wienemann, P; Wiglesworth, C; Wiik, L A M; Wildauer, A; Wildt, M A; Wilhelm, I; Wilkens, H G; Williams, E; Williams, H H; Willis, W; Willocq, S; Wilson, J A; Wilson, M G; Wilson, A; Wingerter-Seez, I; Winklmeier, F; Wittgen, M; Wolter, M W; Wolters, H; Wosiek, B K; Wotschack, J; Woudstra, M J; Wraight, K; Wright, C; Wright, D; Wrona, B; Wu, S L; Wu, X; Wulf, E; Xella, S; Xie, S; Xie, Y; Xu, D; Xu, N; Yamada, M; Yamamoto, A; Yamamoto, S; Yamamura, T; Yamanaka, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamazaki, T; Yamazaki, Y; Yan, Z; Yang, H; Yang, U K; Yang, Y; Yang, Z; Yao, W-M; Yao, Y; Yasu, Y; Ye, J; Ye, S; Yilmaz, M; Yoosoofmiya, R; Yorita, K; Yoshida, R; Young, C; Youssef, S P; Yu, D; Yu, J; Yu, M; Yu, X; Yuan, J; Yuan, L; Yurkewicz, A; Zaidan, R; Zaitsev, A M; Zajacova, Z; Zambrano, V; Zanello, L; Zarzhitsky, P; Zaytsev, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zeller, M; Zema, P F; Zemla, A; Zendler, C; Zenin, O; Zenis, T; Zenonos, Z; Zenz, S; Zerwas, D; Zevi della Porta, G; Zhan, Z; Zhang, H; Zhang, J; Zhang, Q; Zhang, X; Zhao, L; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, S; Zhong, J; Zhou, B; Zhou, N; Zhou, Y; Zhu, C G; Zhu, H; Zhu, Y; Zhuang, X; Zhuravlov, V; Zilka, B; Zimmermann, R; Zimmermann, S; Zimmermann, S; Ziolkowski, M; Zitoun, R; Zivkovic, L; Zmouchko, V V; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; zur Nedden, M; Zutshi, V

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter has been operating continuously since August 2006. At this time, only part of the calorimeter was readout, but since the beginning of 2008, all calorimeter cells have been connected to the ATLAS readout system in preparation for LHC collisions. This paper gives an overview of the liquid argon calorimeter performance measured in situ with random triggers, calibration data, cosmic muons, and LHC beam splash events. Results on the detector operation, timing performance, electronics noise, and gain stability are presented. High energy deposits from radiative cosmic muons and beam splash events allow to check the intrinsic constant term of the energy resolution. The uniformity of the electromagnetic barrel calorimeter response along eta (averaged over phi) is measured at the percent level using minimum ionizing cosmic muons. Finally, studies of electromagnetic showers from radiative muons have been used to cross-check the Monte Carlo simulation. The performance results obtained u...

  5. Breakdown voltage of metal-oxide resistors in liquid argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagby, L. F. [Fermilab; Gollapinni, S. [Kansas State U.; James, C. C. [Fermilab; Jones, B. J.P. [MIT; Jostlein, H. [Fermilab; Lockwitz, S. [Fermilab; Naples, D. [Pittsburgh U.; Raaf, J. L. [Fermilab; Rameika, R. [Fermilab; Schukraft, A. [Fermilab; Strauss, T. [Bern U., LHEP; Weber, M. S. [Bern U., LHEP; Wolbers, S. A. [Fermilab

    2014-11-07

    We characterized a sample of metal-oxide resistors and measured their breakdown voltage in liquid argon by applying high voltage (HV) pulses over a 3 second period. This test mimics the situation in a HV-divider chain when a breakdown occurs and the voltage across resistors rapidly rise from the static value to much higher values. All resistors had higher breakdown voltages in liquid argon than their vendor ratings in air at room temperature. Failure modes range from full destruction to coating damage. In cases where breakdown was not catastrophic, subsequent breakdown voltages were lower in subsequent measuring runs. One resistor type withstands 131 kV pulses, the limit of the test setup.

  6. A pressurized argon gas TPC as DUNE near detector

    CERN Document Server

    Martin-Albo, J

    2016-01-01

    DUNE is a new international experiment for neutrino physics and nucleon decay searches. It will consist of two detectors, about 1300 km apart, exposed to a multi-megawatt neutrino beam that will be built at Fermilab. One of the two detectors will be installed several hundred meters downstream of the neutrino production point with the primary role of characterising the energy spectrum and composition of the beam as well as performing precision measurements of neutrino cross sections. For the design of this so-called near detector, the DUNE Collaboration is considering, among other technologies, a pressurized argon gas time projection chamber. Such a detector, thanks to its low density and low detection thresholds, would allow the detailed measurement in argon of nuclear effects at the neutrino interaction vertex, which are considered at present one of the most important sources of systematic uncertainty for neutrino oscillation measurements.

  7. Opacity measurements in shock-generated argon plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erskine, D.

    1993-07-01

    Dense plasmas having uniform and constant density and temperature are generated by passage of a planar shock wave through gas. The opacity of the plasma is accurately measured versus wavelength by recording the risetime of emitted light. This technique is applicable to a wide variety of species and plasma conditions. Initial experiments in argon have produced plasmas with 2 eV temperatures, 0.004--0.04 g/cm{sup 3} densities, and coupling parameters {Gamma} {approximately}0.3--0.7. Measurements in visible light are compared with calculations using the HOPE code. An interesting peak in the capacity at 400 nm is observed for the first time and is identified with the 4s-5p transition in excited neutral argon atoms.

  8. Treatment of facial vascular lesions with an argon laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanczyk, Jacek; Golebiowska, Aleksandra; Michalska, I.

    1996-03-01

    Two-hundred-ninety-six patients with various vascular lesions of the face have been treated with argon laser LAK-1 in the Department of Dermatology Warsaw Medical Academy since April 1992. The diagnosis of the treated lesions was port-wine stains, multiple telangiectasiae and small, most often induced by trauma hemangioma cavernosum of the lip. Best results were achieved in the patients with small hemangiomas cavernosum of the lip and multiple telangiectasiae on the face. Cure rate in this group was 100%. In 112 port-wine stain cases fading of 50 - 75% comparing with the adjacent skin was achieved. With stress, the argon laser therapy is a method of choice for the treatment of hemangioma cavernosum, port-wine stains and multiple teleagiectasiae of the face.

  9. Development of cryogenic installations for large liquid argon neutrino detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Adamowski, M; Geynisman, M; Hentschel, S; Montanari, D; Nessi, M; Norris, B

    2015-01-01

    A proposal for a very large liquid argon (68,000 kg) based neutrino detector is being studied. To validate the design principles and the detector technology, and to gain experience in the development of the cryostats and the cryogenic systems needed for such large experiments, several smaller scale installations will be developed and implemented, at Fermilab and CERN. The cryogenic systems for these installations will be developed, constructed, installed and commissioned by an international engineering team. These installations shall bring the required cooling power under specific conditions to the experiments for the initial cool-down and the long term operation, and shall also guarantee the correct distribution of the cooling power within the cryostats to ensure a homogeneous temperature distribution within the cryostat itself. The cryogenic systems shall also include gaseous and liquid phase argon purification devices to be used to reach and maintain the very stringent purity requirements needed for these...

  10. Spectroscopy of Argon Excited in an Electron Beam Ion Trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trabert, E

    2005-04-18

    Argon is one of the gases best investigated and most widely used in plasma discharge devices for a multitude of applications that range from wavelength reference standards to controlled fusion experiments. Reviewing atomic physics and spectroscopic problems in various ionization stages of Ar, the past use and future options of employing an electron beam ion trap (EBIT) for better and more complete Ar data in the x-ray, EUV and visible spectral ranges are discussed.

  11. Influence of argon pollution on the weld surface morphology

    OpenAIRE

    Krolczyk, G.M.; Nieslony, P.; Krolczyk, J.B.; I. Samardzic; Legutko, S.; S. Hloch; Barrans, Simon; Maruda, R.W.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the surfaces of butt welded joints in steel tubes were analyzed using an optical 3D measurement system to determine the morphology and topographic parameters. It was established that pollution of the argon shield gas with oxygen did not influence the width of the heat-affected zone. However, the composition of the shield gas significantly influenced the surface asymmetry, Ssk, and its inclination Sku. The measurement of these parameters enabled the selection of a ...

  12. STATUS OF THE ATLAS LIQUID ARGON CALORIMETER AND ITS PERFORMANCE

    CERN Document Server

    Berillari, T; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The liquid argon (LAr) calorimeters are used in ATLAS for all electromagnetic and for hadron calorimetry. The LAr calorimeter system consists of an electromagnetic barrel calorimeter and two endcaps with electromagnetic, hadronic and forward calorimeters. The latest status of the detector as well as problems and solutions addressed during the last years will be presented. Aspects of operation of a large detector over a long time period will be summarized and selected topics showing the performance of the detector will be shown.

  13. Thermal decomposition of lanthanum(III) butyrate in argon atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grivel, Jean-Claude; Yue, Zhao; Xiao, Tang;

    2013-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of La(C3H7CO2)3·xH2O (x≈0.82) was studied in argon during heating at 5K/min. After the loss of bound H2O, the anhydrous butyrate presents at 135°C a phase transition to a mesophase, which turns to an isotropic liquid at 180°C. The decomposition of the anhydrous butyrate ...

  14. Operational performance of a large liquid argon photon calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the performance of a large (0.9x1.4 m2) liquid argon photon calorimeter in high energy experiments at Fermilab. Resolutions for π0 and electron showers, obtained under data-taking conditions, are compared with electron-beam calibration results. Exceptional spatial and time resolutions have been achieved for isolated showers (sigmasub(x,y)0 data up to 180 GeV are presented. (orig.)

  15. Unified set of atomic transition probabilities for neutral argon

    OpenAIRE

    Wiese, W.; Brault, J.; Danzmann, K.; Helbig, V.; de Kock, M

    1989-01-01

    The atomic transition probabilities and radiative lifetimes of neutral argon have been the subject of numerous experiments and calculations, but the results exhibit many discrepancies and inconsistencies. We present a unified set of atomic transition probabilities, which is consistent with essentially all recent results, albeit sometimes only after critical reanalysis. The data consistency and scale confirmation has been achieved in two ways. (i) We have carried out some lifetime–branching-ra...

  16. Monte Carlo Simulation of Argon in Nano-Space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Min; YANG Chun; GUO Zeng-Yuan

    2000-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are performed to investigate the thermodynamic properties of argon confined in nano-scale cubes constructed of graphite walls. A remarkable depression of the system pressures is observed. The simulations reveal that the length-scale of the cube, the magnitude of the interaction between the fluid and the graphite wall and the density of the fluid exhibit reasonable effects on the thermodynamic property shifts of the luid.

  17. Two dimensional condensation of argon adsorbed on lamellar halides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamellar halides such as NiCl2, FeCl2, NiBr2, MnBr2, MgBr2, CdBr2, CoI2, FeI2, MnI2, CaI2 and PbI2 were sublimed in a rapid stream of dry nitrogen. The adsorption of argon on such materials shows stepped isotherms which reveal two dimensional condensations. From sets of isotherms the Helmholtz free energy, the internal energy and the entropy of the successive layers are determined. From the entropy of the first layer the role of the potential relief of the adsorbent surface on the structure of the adsorbed layer may be determined while the Helmholtz free energy reveals how the ionic character of the adsorbent governs the attractive force of adsorption. The study of the second third and fourth layers shows that their growth follows quite a different behaviour depending on whether the Van der Waals diameter of argon is greater or smaller than the distance between adjacent anions on the crystal surface. A proposition is made to account for the difference in the critical temperatures of the first and second dense layers in terms of the vibrationnal state of their respective substrate. The occurence for the maximum critical temperature observed of corresponding to a triangular layer 3% more expanded than the (111) plane of solid argon is discussed

  18. A liquid argon scintillation veto for the Gerda experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wegmann, Anne [Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    Gerda is an experiment to search for the neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge. Bare germanium detectors are operated in a cryostat with 65 m{sup 3} of liquid argon (LAr). To reach the aspired background index of ≤10{sup -3} cts/(keV.kg.yr) for Phase II active background-suppression techniques will be applied, including an active liquid argon veto (LAr veto). A light instrumentation of LAr installed in the LArGe test facility has demonstrated that the detection of argon scintillation light can be used to effectively suppress background events in the germanium, which simultaneously deposit energy in LAr. Based on these results, Gerda pursues several options for the light instrumentation, which have to be compatible with the stringent radiopurity requirements of the experiment and should provide a significant suppression of the background in the region of interest around Q{sub ββ} at 2039 keV. This talk gives an account of the competing design options under investigation in the Gerda collaboration. The design options using photomultiplier tubes (PMT) and silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) are discussed, together with their expected performance from Monte Carlo simulations. In addition, the progress of development is reported, along with the design criteria for light instrumentation in Gerda.

  19. A liquid argon scintillation veto for the Gerda experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerda is an experiment to search for the neutrinoless double beta decay of 76Ge. Bare germanium detectors are operated in a cryostat with 65 m3 of liquid argon (LAr). To reach the aspired background index of ≤10-3 cts/(keV.kg.yr) for Phase II active background-suppression techniques will be applied, including an active liquid argon veto (LAr veto). A light instrumentation of LAr installed in the LArGe test facility has demonstrated that the detection of argon scintillation light can be used to effectively suppress background events in the germanium, which simultaneously deposit energy in LAr. Based on these results, Gerda pursues several options for the light instrumentation, which have to be compatible with the stringent radiopurity requirements of the experiment and should provide a significant suppression of the background in the region of interest around Qββ at 2039 keV. This talk gives an account of the competing design options under investigation in the Gerda collaboration. The design options using photomultiplier tubes (PMT) and silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) are discussed, together with their expected performance from Monte Carlo simulations. In addition, the progress of development is reported, along with the design criteria for light instrumentation in Gerda.

  20. Space-charge effects in liquid argon ionization chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherfoord, J. P.; Walker, R. B.

    2015-03-01

    We have uniformly irradiated liquid argon ionization chambers with betas from high-activity 90Sr sources. The radiation environment is similar to that in the liquid argon calorimeters which are part of the ATLAS detector installed at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We measured the resulting ionization current over a wide range of applied potential for two different source activities and for three different chamber gaps. These studies provide operating experience at exceptionally high ionization rates. In particular they indicate a stability at the 0.1% level for these calorimeters over years of operation at the full LHC luminosity when operated in the normal mode at an electric field E = 1.0 kV / mm. We can operate these chambers in the normal mode or in the space-charge limited regime and thereby determine the transition point between the two. This transition point is parameterized by a positive argon ion mobility of μ+ = 0.08 ± 0.02mm2 / V s at a temperature of 88.0±0.5 K and at a pressure of 1.02±0.02 bar. In the space-charge limited regime the ionization currents are degraded and show signs of instability. At the highest electric fields in our study (6.7 kV/mm) the ionization current is still slowly rising with increasing electric field.

  1. ARAPUCA a new device for liquid argon scintillation light detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a totally innovative device for the detection of liquid argon scintillation light, that has been named ARAPUCA (Argon R and D Advanced Program at UniCAmp). It is composed of a passive light collector and of active devices. The latters are standard SiPMs that operate at liquid argon temperature, while the passive collector is based on a new technology, never explored in this field before. It is a photon trap, that allows to collect light with extremely high efficiency. The total detection efficiency of the device can be tuned by modifying the ratio between the area of the active devices (SiPM) and the area of the optical window. For example, it will allow to reach a detection efficiency at the level of 1% on a surface of 50 × 50 cm2 with an active coverage of 2 × 2 cm2 (two/three large area SiPM). It is also a cheap device, since the major part of its cost is represented by the active devices. For these reason this appears to be the ideal device for scintillation light detection in large Time Projection Chambers. With appropriate modifications it can be used also in next generation Dark Matter detectors

  2. Isotopic fractionation of argon during stepwise release from shungite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In previous attempts to determine the 40Ar/36Ar ratio in the ancient atmosphere, the only direct measurement yielding a value below the atmospheric value of today is for argon released at low temperatures from a pre-Cambrian shungite, an amorphous carbon mineral The present work confirms a low value for 40Ar/36Ar in gas released from a type I shungite at low temperatures. But quantitative scrutiny of the accompanying 38AR/36Ar ratios and the enhanced ratio of 40Ar/36Ar for the fractions released at high temperatures shows convincingly that the effect seen here is an artifact of the stepwise heating and the argon diffusion mobilized thereby. The low 40Ar/36Ar previously obtained is very likely from the same cause rather than reflecting the isotopic composition of the pre-Cambrian atmosphere. The vitreous character of and the sharp, conchoidal fractures seen in the specimens of type I shungite suggest that the substance may exhibit simple volume diffusion over macroscopic dimensions as glasses do. If so, the diffusion parameters (D infinitely = 3 x 10-4 cm2/s and E = 11 kcal/mole) obtained from the data imply rapid exchange with the atmosphere for any argon initially trapped in centimenter-thick veins of the material. (orig.)

  3. Isotopic fractionation of argon during stepwise release from shungite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rison, W.

    1980-05-01

    It is noted that in previous attempts to determine the Ar-40/Ar-36 ratio in the ancient atmosphere, the only direct measurement yielding a value below the atmospheric value of today is for argon released at low temperatures from a pre-Cambrian shungite. In the present work, a low value for Ar-40/Ar-36 in gas released from a type I shungite at low temperatures is confirmed. Attention is given to a study of the accompanying Ar-38/Ar-36 ratios and the enhanced ratio of Ar-40/Ar-36 for the fractions released at high temperatures which shows that the effect observed is a result of the stepwise heating and the argon diffusion mobilized thereby. It is suggested that the low Ar-40/Ar-36 obtained in the past is from the same source rather than reflecting the isotropic composition of the pre-Cambrian atmosphere, and that the type I shungite may exhibit simple volume diffusion over macroscopic dimensions as glasses do. It is concluded that if this is so, the diffusion parameters obtained from the data would imply rapid exchange with the atmosphere for any argon initially trapped in the veins of the material.

  4. Tin LPP plasma control in the argon cusp source

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGeoch, Malcolm W.

    2016-03-01

    The argon cusp plasma has been introduced [1,2] for 500W class tin LPP exhaust control in view of its high power handling, predicted low tin back-scatter from a beam dump, and avoidance of hydrogen usage. The physics of tin ion control by a plasma is first discussed. Experimentally, cusp stability and exhaust disc geometry have previously been proved at full scale [2], the equivalent of 300W-500W usable EUV. Here we verify operation of the plasma barrier that maintains a high argon density next to the collector, for its protection, and a low density in the long path toward the intermediate focus, for efficiency. A pressure differential of 2Pa has been demonstrated in initial work. Other aspects of tin LPP plasma control by the cusp have now been demonstrated using tin ions from a low Hz 130mJ CO2 laser pulse onto a solid tin surface at the cusp center. Plasma is rejected at the design to match a specified exhaust power is discussed. In view of this work, argon cusp exhaust control appears to be very promising for 500W class tin LPP sources.

  5. Bacteria Inactivation Using DBD Plasma Jet in Atmospheric Pressure Argon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Guimin; ZHANG Guanjun; SHI Xingmin; MA Yue; WANG Ning; LI Yuan

    2009-01-01

    A coaxial dielectric barrier discharge plasma jet Was designed,which can be operated in atmospheric pressure argon under an intermediate frequency sinusoidal resonant power supply,and an atmospheric pressure glow-like discharge Was achieved.Two kinds of typical bacteria,i.e.,the Staphylococcus aureus(S.aurens)and Escherichia coil(E.coil),were employed to study the bacterial inactivation mechanism by means of the non-thermal plasma.The killing log value (KLV)of S.aureus reached up to 5.38 with a treatment time of 90 s and that of E.coil up to 5.36 with 60 s,respectively.According to the argon emission spectra of the plasma jet and the scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the two bacteria before and after the plasma treatment.it is concluded that the reactive species in the argon plasma played a major role in the bacterial inactivation,while the heat,electric field and UV photons had little effect.

  6. Metal clusters on supported argon layers; Metallcluster auf dielektrischen Substraten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faber, Bernhard

    2011-10-21

    The deposition of small sodium clusters on supported Ar(001)-surfaces is simulated. Theoretical description is achieved by a hierarchical model consisting of time-dependent DFT and molecular dynamics. The valence electrons of the sodium atoms are considered by Kohn-Sham-Scheme with self interaction correction. The interaction of argon atoms and sodium ions is described by atom-atom potentials whereas the coupling to the QM electrons is done by local pseudo-potentials. A decisive part of the model is the dynamical polarizability of the rare-gas atoms. The optional metal support is considered by the method of image charges. The influence of the forces caused by image charges and the influence of the number of argon monolayers on structure, optical response and deposition dynamics of Na{sub 6} and Na{sub 8} is investigated. There is very little influence on cluster structure and only a small shift of the cluster perpendicular to the surface. Concerning optical response the position of the Mie plasmon peak stays robust whereas the details of spectral fragmentation react very sensitively to changes. The forces caused by image charges of the metal support play only a little role with the dynamics of deposition while the thickness of the argon surface strongly influences the dissipation. (orig.)

  7. K-Ar age of young volcanic rocks and excess argon--Binary mixing model and quantitative study of excess argon effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A binary mixing model for excess argon is suggested in the note. According to this model and the data of excess argon component obtained in our experiment , a quantitative study of the effect of excess argon on real K-Ar age of young volcanic rocks is done. The result indicates that the effect of 5% excess argon component in samples on K-Ar age of the samples more than 2 Ma is less than 7.36% and can lead K-Ar age of 0.5 Ma samples to increase by 32.4%, while 1% excess argon component leads K-Ar age of 0.5 Ma samples to increase by 6.26%. Therefore, when pre-processed excess argon component is ≤1%, K-Ar age of the samples more than 0.5 Ma should be credible. On this basis we suggest a principal opinion for evaluation of previous K-Ar dating results and propose that the matrix is used to determine K-Ar age of young volcanic rocks. For the samples less than 0.2 Ma, in the case of high excess argon content, even if only 1% excess argon component exists in their matrix, it can also greatly affect their K-A age. Thus it must be careful to treat the dating result.

  8. Roles of argon seeding in energy confinement and pedestal structure in JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of improving energy confinement with argon seeding at high density has been investigated in JT-60U. Better confinement is sustained at high density by argon seeding accompanied by higher core and pedestal temperatures. The electron density profiles become flatter with increasing density in conventional H-mode plasmas, whereas peaked density profiles are maintained with argon seeding. Density peaking and dilution effects lower the pedestal density at a given averaged density. The pedestal density in the argon seeded plasmas, which is lower than that in plasmas with deuterium puff, enables the pedestal temperature to be higher, whereas the increase in the pedestal pressure with argon seeding is small. High pedestal temperature is a boundary condition for high core temperature through profile stiffness, which leads to better confinement with argon seeding. The density peaking is a key factor of sustaining better confinement in argon seeded H-mode plasmas. The radiative loss power density is predominantly enhanced in the edge region by argon puff. The role of argon seeding in the pedestal characteristics has also been examined. The pedestal width becomes larger continuously with edge collisionality, but is nearly independent of the presence of argon seeding. (paper)

  9. Argon-41 production and evolution at the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor (OSTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, argon-41 concentrations were measured at various locations within the reactor facility to assess the accuracy of models used to predict argon-41 evolution from the reactor tank, and to determine the relationship between argon gas evolution from the tank and subsequent argon-41 concentrations throughout the reactor room. In particular, argon-41 was measured directly above the reactor tank with the reactor tank lids closed, at other accessible locations on the reactor top with the tank lids both closed and open, and at several locations on the first floor of the reactor room. These measured concentrations were then compared to values calculated using a modified argon-41 production and evolution model for TRIGA reactor tanks and ventilation values applicable to the OSTR facility. The modified model was based in part on earlier TRIGA models for argon-41 production and release, but added features which improved the agreement between predicted and measured values. The approximate dose equivalent rate due to the presence of argon-41 in reactor room air was calculated for several different locations inside the OSTR facility. These dose rates were determined using the argon-41 concentration measured at each specific location, and were subsequently converted to a predicted quarterly dose equivalent for each location based on the reactor's operating history. The predicted quarterly dose equivalent values were then compared to quarterly doses measured by film badges deployed as dose-integrating area radiation monitors at the locations of interest. The results indicate that the modified production and evolution model is able to predict argon-41 concentrations to within a factor of ten when compared to the measured data. Quarterly dose equivalents calculated from the measured argon-41 concentrations and the reactor's operating history seemed consistent with results obtained from the integrating area radiation monitors. Given the argon-41 concentrations measured

  10. Highly retentive core domains in K-feldspar preserve argon ages from high temperature stages of granite exhumation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Marnie; Lister, Gordon

    2016-04-01

    Retentive core domains are characterized by diffusion parameters that imply K-feldspar should be able to retain argon even at temperatures near or above the granite solidus. In this case it should be possible to date granite emplacement using argon geochronology, and the same answer should be obtained as by using other methods. We present one case study where this is the case, from the elevated Capoas granite stock on Palawan, in the Philippines, and another where it is not, from the South Cyclades Shear Zone, on Ios, Greece. We attempt to determine the factors such as the role of fluid ingress in triggering the in situ recrystallization that can eliminate and/or modify the core domains, leading to relatively youthful ages. Thermochronology is still possible, because less retentive diffusion domains exist, but different methods need to be applied to interpret the data. The work also demonstrates that K-feldspar can be sufficiently retentive as to allow direct dating of processes that reduce the dimensions of diffusion domains, e.g., cataclased and/or recrystallized K-feldspar in fault rock and/or mylonite. These are important developments in the methodology of 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, but to further advance we need to clarify the nature of these highly retentive core domains. In particular, we need better understand how they are modified by microstructural processes during deformation and metamorphism. We need also to assess the role of any crystal structural changes during step-heating in vacuo.

  11. Performance of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters in LHC Run-1 and Run-2

    CERN Document Server

    Benitez, Jose; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS detector was designed and built to study proton-proton collisions produced at the LHC at centre-of-mass energies up to 14 TeV and instantaneous luminosities up to $10^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$ s${^-1}$. Liquid argon (LAr) sampling calorimeters are employed for all electromagnetic calorimetry in the pseudorapidity region $|\\eta|<3.2$, and for hadronic calorimetry in the region from $|\\eta|=1.5$ to $|\\eta|=4.9$. The calibration and performance of the LAr calorimetry system was established during beam tests, cosmic ray muon measurements and in particular the first three years of pp collision data-taking. During this period, referred to as Run-1, approximately 27~fb$^{-1}$ of data have been collected at the center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8~TeV. Following a period of detector consolidation during a long shutdown, Run-2 started in 2015 with approximately 3.9~fb$^{-1}$ of data at a center-of-mass energy of 13~TeV recorded in this year. Results on the LAr calorimeter operation, monitoring and data quality, as we...

  12. The effects of argon in the bioenergetics of the hamster and the rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempel, G. E.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1974-01-01

    Oxygen consumption was examined in hamsters and rats exposed to normoxic mixtures of argon at 1 atm. In fasted and nonfasted animals, no marked change in O2 utilization was detectable at 22 C. However, at 7 C a significant decrease in oxygen consumption was observed where the animals were exposed in argon. The data are interpreted in terms of the greater thermal conductivity of nitrogen. The study was prompted by conflicting reports on the metabolic effects of argon and helium.

  13. Argon Laser Photoablation for Treating Benign Pigmented Conjunctival Nevi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsharif, Abdulrahman M.; Al-Gehedan, Saeed M.; Alasbali, Tariq; Alkuraya, Hisham S.; Lotfy, Nancy M.; Khandekar, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes of argon laser photoablation of benign conjunctival pigmented nevi with different clinical presentations. Patients and Methods: This interventional case series was conducted between July 2014 and January 2015. Patients presenting with benign conjunctival nevi were included. Data were collected on the clinical features at presentation, argon laser photoablation, and follow-up at 8 and 24 weeks. Postoperative photography allowed recording of the success of each case and the overall success rate. Complete removal of conjunctival pigments was considered an absolute success. Partial pigmentation requiring repeat laser treatment was considered a qualified success. Results: There were 14 eyes (four right eyes and ten left eyes) with benign pigmented conjunctival nevi. There were three males and eight females in the study sample. The median age was 36 (25% percentile: 26 years). Three patients had bilateral lesions. The nevi were located temporally in nine eyes, nasally in three eyes, and on the inferior bulbar conjunctiva in two eyes. The mean horizontal and vertical diameters of nevi were 5 ± 2 mm and 4 ± 2.7 mm, respectively. The mean follow-up period was 5 months. Following laser treatment, no eyes had subconjunctival hemorrhage, infection, scarring, neovascularization, recurrence, or corneal damage. The absolute success rate of laser ablation was 79%. Three eyes with elevated nevi had one to three sessions of laser ablation resulting in a qualified success rate of 100%. Conclusions: Argon laser ablation was a safe and effective treatment for the treatment of selective benign pigmented conjunctival nevi in Arab patients. PMID:27555708

  14. The abundances of neon, sulfur, and argon in planetary nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, S. C.; Lacy, J. H.; Townes, C. H.; Aller, L. H.; Geballe, T. R.; Baas, F.

    1981-01-01

    New infrared observations of Ne II, Ar III, and S IV are used in optical observations of other ionization states of the considered elements to evaluate the abundances of neon, argon, and sulfur in 18 planetary nebulae. Attention is also given to one or more of the infrared lines in 18 other nebulae. It is pointed out that S IV was detected in approximately 90% of the observed objects, while Ar III was found in about 80%, and Ne II in roughly one-third. It is noted that optical observations typically include only a limited region of the nebula, while the infrared measurements frequently involve integration over the entire nebular image.

  15. Ionization coefficients for argon in a micro-discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionization coefficients are measured for electrons in a dc micro-discharge in argon from optical emission profiles. The micro-discharge is operated in the Townsend regime between two parallel-plate electrodes. Axial profiles of emission are obtained with sufficient resolution to provide spatial ionization coefficients. The measured coefficients agree very well with the data obtained from other sources, indicating the operation of the discharge in the Townsend regime and also that Townsend mechanisms do not need extension to describe such discharges. (paper)

  16. Kinetic modeling of the Townsend breakdown in argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macheret, S. O.; Shneider, M. N.

    2013-10-01

    Kinetic modeling of the Townsend breakdown in argon was performed in the "forward-back" approximation. The kinetic model was found to adequately describe the left branch of the Paschen curve, and the important role of ionization by fast ions and atoms near the cathode, as well as the increase in secondary emission coefficient in strong electric fields described in the literature, was confirmed. The modeling also showed that the electron energy distribution function develops a beam of high-energy electrons and that the runaway effect, i.e., the monotonic increase of the mean electron energy with the distance from the cathode, occurs at the left branch of the Paschen curve.

  17. Ionization coefficients for argon in a micro-discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuschel, Thomas; Stefanović, Ilija; Malović, Gordana; Marić, Dragana; Petrović, Zoran Lj

    2013-08-01

    Ionization coefficients are measured for electrons in a dc micro-discharge in argon from optical emission profiles. The micro-discharge is operated in the Townsend regime between two parallel-plate electrodes. Axial profiles of emission are obtained with sufficient resolution to provide spatial ionization coefficients. The measured coefficients agree very well with the data obtained from other sources, indicating the operation of the discharge in the Townsend regime and also that Townsend mechanisms do not need extension to describe such discharges.

  18. Diffusion coefficient of metal vapours into rare gases. Mercury - argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The source information is present as well as the results of analysis and integration of data on mutual diffusion coefficient (MDC) of mercury - argon mixture at Hg concentration → 0 in 300-2500 K temperature range. Reference data on MDC for metal - inert gas binary mixtures obtained on the base of complex analysis of various information, as it exemplified by Hg-Ar pair, can be used as a part of metrological support at calibration of devices for determination MDC of gas - metal vapors

  19. Electron drift velocity in argon-methane mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Described are the results of a series of measurements of electron drift velocity taken with samples of chemically pure grade gas mixture of Ar-10% CH4 (N2222O<2 ppm). The measured drift velocity is plotted as a function of the ratio of electric field to pressure in the range from 0.05 to 0.8 V/cmxtorr. The measurements are reproducible only to within 4%. The results of numerical calculations employing the well-established argon elastic and methane elastic and inelastic cross sections are also included. The disagreement from the present experimental results, and from those obtained elsewhere, is rather puzzling

  20. High intensity, argon ion laser-jet photochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, R. Marshall; Schnapp, Karlyn A.; Hannemann, Klaus; Ho, Douglas M.; Memarian, Hamid R.; Azadnia, Ardeshir; Pinhas, Allan R.; Figley, Timothy M.

    A new technique for the study of high intensity solution photochemistry has been developed. With this laser-jet technique, a high velocity microjet is irradiated with the focussed output of an argon ion laser. Under these extremely high intensity conditions, photochemically generated transient species with suitable absorption properties are excited further and produce relatively large amounts of photoproducts which are not observed under low intensity conditions. The application of this laser-jet technique in the study of the photochemistry of radicals, biradicals, photoenols and the higher excited states of carbonyl and polycyclic aromatic compounds is described.

  1. Optical fiber read-out for liquid argon scintillation light

    CERN Document Server

    Csáthy, J Janicskó; Kratz, J; Schönert, S; Wiesinger, Ch

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we describe the performance of a light detector for Ar scintillation light made of wavelength-shifting (WLS) fibers connected to Silicon-Photomultipliers (SiPM). The setup was conceived to be used as anti-Compton veto for high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors operated directly in liquid Argon (LAr). Background suppression efficiencies for different radioactive sources were measured in a test cryostat with about 800 kg LAr. This work was part of the R\\&D effort for the GERDA experiment.

  2. Study of a novel electromagnetic liquid argon calorimeter TGT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept and the basic design of a fast, highly granular and compact electromagnetic liquid argon calorimeter are described. This novel calorimeter offers uniform energy response and constant energy resolution independent of the production angle of an impinging particle and of its impact position at the calorimeter. An example of a calorimeter with full rapidity coverage in an application in a collider detector is given. An important aspect of the concept is the electronics for fast signal processing matched to the short charge collection time. We report on the experience with the realization of a prototype calorimeter module and on its performance in a test beam exposure. 15 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Activation of copper by nitrogen and argon beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chetvertkova, Vera [IAP, Goethe-University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Mustafin, Edil; Strasik, Ivan [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Belousov, Anton [TU Darmstadt (Germany); Latysheva, Ludmila; Sobolevsky, Nikolai [INR RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ratzinger, Ulrich [IAP, Goethe-University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Monte Carlo transport codes are widely used for various purposes in nuclear physics, radiation protection, medical applications, accelerator design etc. Code verification by experiments is needed to be sure that the codes give accurate results. New data on the activation of copper by a nitrogen beam of 500 MeV/u is presented and compared with FLUKA and SHIELD simulation results. The activation of copper by a nitrogen beam is compared to activation by an argon beam and respective simulations. This gives a chance to see the accuracy of the codes at different projectile masses. Correspondences and discrepancies of calculations and experiments are discussed.

  4. Study of a Novel Concept for a Liquid Argon Calorimeter \

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % RD33 \\\\ \\\\ The development of a fast, highly granular and compact electromagnetic liquid argon calorimeter prototype is proposed as a generic R\\&D project for a novel concept of calorimetry in proton-proton and electron-positron collider detectors: the $^{\\prime$Thin Gap Turbine$^{\\prime}$ (TGT). The TGT calorimeter has a modular construction, is flexible in its longitudinal and transverse granularity, and offers a uniform energy response and resolution, independent of the production angle of incident particles. An important aspect of the project is the development of fast, radiation-hard front-end electronics which is operating in the cold.

  5. Activation of aluminum by argon: Experimental study and simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chetvertkova, V., E-mail: v.chetvertkova@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung Darmstadt, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); J. W. Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main, IAP, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Strasik, I. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung Darmstadt, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); J. W. Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main, IAP, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Belousov, A. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung Darmstadt, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Iwase, H. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Mokhov, N. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Mustafin, E. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung Darmstadt, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Latysheva, L. [Institute for Nuclear Research RAS, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); Pavlovic, M. [FEI STU, Ilkovicova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia); Ratzinger, U. [J. W. Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main, IAP, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Sobolevsky, N. [Institute for Nuclear Research RAS, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-06-15

    The paper presents the results of irradiation of aluminum targets by 430 and 500 MeV/u argon beams. Gamma-spectra were measured after the end of the irradiation in order to identify the induced nuclides as well as to determine their residual activity depth-profiles. The results of this experiment are compared with Monte Carlo simulations by FLUKA, GEANT4, MARS, PHITS and SHIELD-A codes. In case of a thin target, the agreement between the experiment and simulations is satisfactory, while in case of a thick target, some discrepancies are observed.

  6. Laser-induced vibrational dynamics of ozone in solid argon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Amstrup, B.; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1997-01-01

    We consider the vibrational dynamics, induced by an intense infrared laser pulse, in an ozone molecule with isotopic substitution, that is, (OOO)-O-16-O-16-O-18 and compare the dynamics in the gas phase and in solid ar on. not perturbed by argon on a time-scale of a few picoseconds and selective...... bond-breaking in the molecule should be possible following the same laser control scheme as suggested in the gas phase. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science B.V....

  7. Electron transport in argon in crossed electric and magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness; Makabe

    2000-09-01

    An investigation of electron transport in argon in the presence of crossed electric and magnetic fields is carried out over a wide range of values of electric and magnetic field strengths. Values of mean energy, ionization rate, drift velocity, and diffusion tensor are reported here. Two unexpected phenomena arise; for certain values of electric and magnetic field we find regions where the swarm mean energy decreases with increasing electric fields for a fixed magnetic field and regions where swarm mean energy increases with increasing magnetic field for a fixed electric field. PMID:11088933

  8. 14 CFR 141.39 - Aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aircraft. 141.39 Section 141.39 Aeronautics... CERTIFICATED AGENCIES PILOT SCHOOLS Personnel, Aircraft, and Facilities Requirements § 141.39 Aircraft. (a... certificate or provisional pilot school certificate must show that each aircraft used by the school for...

  9. 21 CFR 17.39 - Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Evidence. 17.39 Section 17.39 Food and Drugs FOOD... HEARINGS § 17.39 Evidence. (a) The presiding officer shall determine the admissibility of evidence. (b... Evidence.” However, the presiding officer may apply the “Federal Rules of Evidence” when appropriate,...

  10. 31 CFR 8.39 - Fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fees. 8.39 Section 8.39 Money and... AND FIREARMS Duties and Restrictions Relating to Practice § 8.39 Fees. No attorney, certified public accountant, or enrolled practitioner may charge an unconscionable fee for representing a client in any...

  11. 39 CFR 3060.21 - Income report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (line 3 less line 6). Line (8): Minimum amount of Institutional Cost contribution required under 39 CFR... calculated under 39 CFR 3060.40. Line (11): Line 9 less line 10. ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Income report. 3060.21 Section 3060.21...

  12. 46 CFR 151.03-39 - Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ocean. 151.03-39 Section 151.03-39 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-39 Ocean. A designation for all vessels normally navigating the waters of any ocean or the Gulf...

  13. 48 CFR 39.101 - Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Policy. 39.101 Section 39... CONTRACTING ACQUISITION OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY General 39.101 Policy. (a) Division A, Section 101(h), Title VI, Section 622 of the Omnibus Appropriations and Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1999 (Pub. L....

  14. 25 CFR 39.902 - Allocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Allocation. 39.902 Section 39.902 Indians BUREAU OF... Maintenance and Minor Repair Fund § 39.902 Allocation. (a) Interim Maintenance and Minor Repair funds shall be... determining school allocations shall be taken from the facilities inventory maintained by the Division...

  15. 10 CFR 25.39 - Criminal penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Criminal penalties. 25.39 Section 25.39 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ACCESS AUTHORIZATION Violations § 25.39 Criminal penalties. (a) Section 223 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, provides for criminal sanctions for willful violation...

  16. 14 CFR 437.39 - Flight rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight rules. 437.39 Section 437.39 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Documentation § 437.39 Flight rules. An applicant must provide flight rules as required by § 437.71....

  17. 14 CFR 35.39 - Endurance test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Endurance test. 35.39 Section 35.39... STANDARDS: PROPELLERS Tests and Inspections § 35.39 Endurance test. Endurance tests on the propeller system... propellers must be subjected to one of the following tests: (1) A 50-hour flight test in level flight or...

  18. 48 CFR 39.105 - Privacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Privacy. 39.105 Section 39... CONTRACTING ACQUISITION OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY General 39.105 Privacy. Agencies shall ensure that contracts for information technology address protection of privacy in accordance with the Privacy Act (5...

  19. 40 CFR 68.39 - Documentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Documentation. 68.39 Section 68.39... ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROVISIONS Hazard Assessment § 68.39 Documentation. The owner or operator shall... passive mitigation that were assumed to limit the quantity that could be released. Documentation...

  20. 45 CFR 605.39 - Private education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Private education. 605.39 Section 605.39 Public..., Elementary, and Secondary Education § 605.39 Private education. (a) A recipient that provides private elementary or secondary education may not, on the basis of handicap, exclude a qualified handicapped...

  1. 45 CFR 84.39 - Private education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Private education. 84.39 Section 84.39 Public... Secondary Education § 84.39 Private education. (a) A recipient that provides private elementary or secondary education may not, on the basis of handicap, exclude a qualified handicapped person if the person can,...

  2. 34 CFR 104.39 - Private education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Private education. 104.39 Section 104.39 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE FOR CIVIL RIGHTS, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION... Preschool, Elementary, and Secondary Education § 104.39 Private education. (a) A recipient that...

  3. 28 CFR 39.160 - Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Communications. 39.160 Section 39.160... PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE § 39.160 Communications. (a) The agency shall take appropriate steps to ensure effective communication with applicants, participants, personnel...

  4. 44 CFR 206.39 - Notification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notification. 206.39 Section 206.39 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY DISASTER ASSISTANCE FEDERAL DISASTER ASSISTANCE The Declaration Process § 206.39 Notification....

  5. 10 CFR 39.71 - Security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Security. 39.71 Section 39.71 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Security, Records, Notifications § 39.71 Security. (a) A logging supervisor must be physically present at a temporary jobsite...

  6. 10 CFR 76.39 - Public meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Public meeting. 76.39 Section 76.39 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Application § 76.39 Public meeting. (a) A public meeting will be held on an application for renewal if the Director, in his or...

  7. 40Ar/39Ar ages from blueschists of the Jambaló region, Central Cordillera of Colombia : implications on the styles of accretion in the Northern Andes

    OpenAIRE

    Bustamante, A.; Juliani, C.; C. M. Hall; Essene, E. J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the first argon dating of blueschists from the Jambaló area (Cauca Department) in the Central Cordillera of the Colombian Andes. Step-heating 40Ar/39Ar spectra were obtained for mica from several lenses of blueschists including greenschist facies rocks. The blueschists are mainly constituted of preserved lenticular cores in strongly mylonitic rocks, which resulted from retrometamorphic processes that affected the high pressure rocks during their exhumation. The majority of...

  8. LArIAT: Liquid Argon In A Testbeam

    CERN Document Server

    Cavanna, F; Raaf, J; Rebel, B

    2014-01-01

    Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LArTPCs) are ideal detectors for precision neutrino physics. These detectors, when located deep underground, can also be used for measurements of proton decay, and astrophysical neutrinos. The technology must be completely developed, up to very large mass scales, and fully mastered to construct and operate these detectors for this physics program. As part of an integrated plan of developing these detectors, accurate measurements in LArTPC of known particle species in the relevant energy ranges are now deemed as necessary. The LArIAT program aims to directly achieve these goals by deploying LArTPC detectors in a dedicated calibration test beam line at Fermilab. The set of measurements envisaged here are significant for both the short-baseline (SBN) and long-baseline (LBN) neutrino oscillation programs in the US, starting with MicroBooNE in the near term and with the adjoint near and far liquid argon detectors in the Booster beam line at Fermilab envisioned in the mid-term...

  9. A liquid argon scintillation veto for the GERDA experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerda is an experiment to search for the neutrinoless double beta decay of 76Ge. Results of Phase I have been published in summer 2013. Currently Gerda is being upgraded to a second phase. To reach the aspired background index of ≤ 10-3 cts/(keV . kg . yr) for Phase II active background-suppression techniques will be applied, including an active liquid argon veto (LAr veto). It has been demonstrated by the LArGe test facility that the detection of argon scintillation light can be used to effectively suppress background events in the germanium, which simultaneously deposit energy in LAr. This talk focusses on the light instrumentation which is being installed in GERDA. Photomultiplier tubes (PMT) and wavelength-shifting fibers connected to silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) are combined to maximize the photoelectron-yield with respect to various background sources. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed to optimize the design for background suppression and low self-induced background. First results of the prototypes and the progress of installation are reported.

  10. A liquid argon scintillation veto for the GERDA experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wegmann, Anne [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    Gerda is an experiment to search for the neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge. Results of Phase I have been published in summer 2013. Currently Gerda is being upgraded to a second phase. To reach the aspired background index of ≤ 10{sup -3} cts/(keV . kg . yr) for Phase II active background-suppression techniques will be applied, including an active liquid argon veto (LAr veto). It has been demonstrated by the LArGe test facility that the detection of argon scintillation light can be used to effectively suppress background events in the germanium, which simultaneously deposit energy in LAr. This talk focusses on the light instrumentation which is being installed in GERDA. Photomultiplier tubes (PMT) and wavelength-shifting fibers connected to silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) are combined to maximize the photoelectron-yield with respect to various background sources. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed to optimize the design for background suppression and low self-induced background. First results of the prototypes and the progress of installation are reported.

  11. Some transport properties in plasmas containing argon and fluorine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novaković R.N.V.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper some results of numerical evaluation of transport coefficients in plasmas in the mixtures of argon and fluorine are presented. These transport characteristics are given in the function of the temperature for low pressures ranging from 0,1 kPa to 1,0 kPa and for low temperatures between 500 K and 5 000 K in argon plasmas with 20% and 30% of the fluorine added. It is assumed that the system is kept under constant pressure and that a corresponding state of local thermodynamical equilibrium (LTE is attained in it. The equilibrium plasma composition, necessary for the evaluations, was determined on the ground of the Saha equations for ionization processes and the law of mass action for the thermal dissociation of F2, combined with the charge conservation relation and the assumption that the pressure remained constant in the course of temperature variations. The ionization energy lowering, required in conjunction with the Saha equations, was obtained with the aid of a modified expression for the plasma Debye radius proposed previously. A previously derived expression for the modified Debye radius, offering the possibility to treat the plasmas considered as weakly non-ideal in the whole temperature range, is used. The cut-off at the Landau length rather than of the smallest of ionic radii is introduced. This alteration in the evaluation procedure brings different considerable changes in the final numerical results for the all relevant quantities.

  12. Compilation of electron collision excitation cross sections for neutro argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work presents a compilation and critical analysis of the available data on electron collision excitation cross sections for neutral Argon levels. This study includes: 1.- A detailed description in intermediate coupling for all the levels belonging the 20 configurations 3p''5 ns(n=4 to 12), np(n=4 to 8) and nd(n=3 to 8) of neutral Argon. 2.- Calculation of the electron collision excitation cross sections in Born and Born-Oppenheimer-Ochkur approximations for all the levels in the 14 configurations 3p''5 ns(n=4 to 7), np(n=4 to 7) and nd(n=3 to 8). 3.- Comparison and discussion of the compiled data. These are the experimental and theoretical values available from the literature, and those from this work. 4.- Analysis of the regularities and systematic behaviors in order to determine which values can be considered more reliable. It is show that the concept of one electron cross section results quite useful for this purpose. In some cases it has been possible to obtain in this way approximate analytical expressions interpolating the experimental data. 5.- All the experimental and theoretical values studied are graphically presented and compared. 6.- The last part of the work includes a listing of several general purpose programs for Atomic Physics calculations developed for this work. (Author)

  13. Elastic properties of liquid and solid argon in nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schappert, Klaus; Pelster, Rolf

    2013-10-16

    We have measured sorption isotherms and determined the intrinsic longitudinal elastic modulus β(Ar,ads) of nanoconfined material via ultrasonic measurements combined with a special effective medium analysis. In the liquid regime the adsorbate only contributes to the measured effective properties when the pores are completely filled and the modulus is bulklike. At partial fillings its contribution is cancelled out by the high compressibility of the vapour phase. In contrast, at lower temperatures frozen argon as well as underlying liquid surface layers cause a linear increase of the effective longitudinal modulus upon filling. During sorption the contribution of the liquid surface layers near the pore wall β(Ar,surf) increases with the thickness of the solid layers reaching the bulk value β(Ar,liquid) only in the limit of complete pore filling. We interpret this effect as due to the gradual stiffening of the solid argon membrane. The measurements and their analysis show that longitudinal ultrasonic waves are well suited to the study of the elastic properties and liquid-solid phase transitions in porous systems. This method should also help to detect the influence of nanoconfinement on elastic properties in further research. PMID:24057946

  14. Local effects of ECRH on argon transport at ASDEX upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Future deuterium-tritium magnetically confined fusion power plants will most probably rely an high-Z Plasma Facing Components (PFCs) such as tungsten. This choice is determined by the necessity of low erosion of the first wall materials (to guarantee a long lifetime of the wall components) and by the need to avoid the too high tritium wall retention of typical carbon based PFCs. The experience gathered at the ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) tokamak has demonstrated the possibility of reliable and high performance plasma operation with a full tungsten-coated first wall. The observed accumulation of tungsten which can lead to excessive radiation losses is mitigated with the use of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH). Although this impurity control method is routinely performed at AUG, the underlying physics principles are still not clear. This thesis aims an providing further knowledge an the effects of ECRH an the transport of impurities inside the core plasma. The transport of argon has been therefore investigated in-depth in purely ECR heated L-mode (low-confinement) discharges. Studies an impurity transport in centrally ECR heated nitrogen-seeded H-mode (high-confinement) discharges have also been performed. To this scope, a new crystal X-ray spectrometer of the Johann type has been installed an AUG for argon concentration and ion temperature measurements. New methods for the experimental determination of the total argon density through the integrated use of this diagnostic and of the Soft X-Ray (SXR) diode arrays have been developed. This gives the possibility of evaluating the full profiles of the argon transport coefficients from the linear flux-gradient dependency of local argon density. In comparison to classical χ2-minimization methods, the approach proposed here delivers transport coefficients intrinsically independent of the modelling of periodic relaxation mechanisms such as those Lied to sawtooth MHD (Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic) activity. Moreover, the good

  15. Ful distil ation argon producing crud argon column on operating experience%全精馏制氩粗氩塔操作经验浅谈

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马光显

    2015-01-01

    This paper briefly introduces the ful distil ation argon recovery process in the crude argon column in air separation system of cooling,heating and put some matters needing attention in use.%简要介绍了全精馏制氩过程中粗氩塔在空分系统降温、升温及投用中的一些注意事项。

  16. Characteristics of atmospheric-pressure, radio-frequency glow discharges operated with argon added ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wen-Ting; Li, Guo; Li, He-Ping; Bao, Cheng-Yu; Wang, Hua-Bo; Zeng, Shi; Gao, Xing; Luo, Hui-Ying

    2007-06-01

    Rf, atmospheric-pressure glow discharge (APGD) plasmas with bare metal electrodes have promising prospects in the fields of plasma-aided etching, thin film deposition, disinfection and sterilization, etc. In this paper, the discharge characteristics are presented for the rf APGD plasmas generated with pure argon or argon-ethanol mixture as the plasma-forming gas and using water-cooled, bare copper electrodes. The experimental results show that the breakdown voltage can be reduced significantly when a small amount of ethanol is added into argon, probably due to the fact that the Penning ionization process is involved, and a pure α-mode discharge can be produced more easily with the help of ethanol. The uniformity of the rf APGDs of pure argon or argon-ethanol mixtures using bare metallic electrodes is identified with the aid of the intensified charge coupled device images.

  17. First measurements with ARGONTUBE, a 5 m long drift Liquid Argon TPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr TPC) technique is a promising technology for future neutrino detectors. At LHEP of the University of Bern (Switzerland), an R and D program towards large detectors are on-going. The main goal is to show the feasibility of long drift paths over many meters. Therefore, a liquid Argon TPC with 5 m of drift distance was constructed. Many other aspects of the liquid Argon TPC technology are also investigated, such as a new device to generate high voltage in liquid Argon (Greinacher circuit), a recirculation filtering system and the multi-photon ionization of liquid Argon with a UV laser. Two detectors are built: a medium size prototype for specific detector technology studies, and ARGONTUBE, a 5 m long device

  18. Characteristics of atmospheric-pressure, radio-frequency glow discharges operated with argon added ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rf, atmospheric-pressure glow discharge (APGD) plasmas with bare metal electrodes have promising prospects in the fields of plasma-aided etching, thin film deposition, disinfection and sterilization, etc. In this paper, the discharge characteristics are presented for the rf APGD plasmas generated with pure argon or argon-ethanol mixture as the plasma-forming gas and using water-cooled, bare copper electrodes. The experimental results show that the breakdown voltage can be reduced significantly when a small amount of ethanol is added into argon, probably due to the fact that the Penning ionization process is involved, and a pure α-mode discharge can be produced more easily with the help of ethanol. The uniformity of the rf APGDs of pure argon or argon-ethanol mixtures using bare metallic electrodes is identified with the aid of the intensified charge coupled device images

  19. First measurement of the ionization yield of nuclear recoils in liquid argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, T. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sangiorgio, Samuele [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bernstein, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Foxe, Michael P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering; Hagmann, Chris [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jovanovic, Igor [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering; Kazkaz, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mozin, Vladimir V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Norman, E. B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pereverzev, S. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rebassoo, Finn O. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sorensen, Peter F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Liquid phase argon has long been used as a target medium for particle detection via scintillation light. Recently there has been considerable interest in direct detection of both hypothetical darkmatter particles and coherent elastic neutrino nucleus scattering. These as-yet unobserved neutral particle interactions are expected to result in a recoiling argon atom O(keV), generally referred to in the literature as a nuclear recoil. This prompts the question of the available electromagnetic signal in a liquid argon detector. In this Letter we report the first measurement of the ionization yield (Qy), detected electrons per unit energy, resulting from nuclear recoils in liquid argon, measured at 6.7 keV. This is also the lowest energy measurement of nuclear recoils in liquid argon.

  20. Management of Liver Cancer Argon-helium Knife Therapy with Functional Computer Tomography Perfusion Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongbo; Shu, Shengjie; Li, Jinping; Jiang, Huijie

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to observe the change in blood perfusion of liver cancer following argon-helium knife treatment with functional computer tomography perfusion imaging. Twenty-seven patients with primary liver cancer treated with argon-helium knife and were included in this study. Plain computer tomography (CT) and computer tomography perfusion (CTP) imaging were conducted in all patients before and after treatment. Perfusion parameters including blood flows, blood volume, hepatic artery perfusion fraction, hepatic artery perfusion, and hepatic portal venous perfusion were used for evaluating therapeutic effect. All parameters in liver cancer were significantly decreased after argon-helium knife treatment (p liver tissue, but other parameters kept constant. CT perfusion imaging is able to detect decrease in blood perfusion of liver cancer post-argon-helium knife therapy. Therefore, CTP imaging would play an important role for liver cancer management followed argon-helium knife therapy.

  1. Development of membrane cryostats for large liquid argon neutrino detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Montanari, D; Gendotti, A; Geynisman, M; Hentschel, S; Loew, T; Mladenov, D; Montanari, C; Murphy, S; Nessi, M; Norris, B; Noto, F; Rubbia, A; Sharma, R; Smargianaki, D; Stewart, J; Vignoli, C; Wilson, P; Wu, S

    2015-01-01

    A new collaboration is being formed to develop a multi-kiloton Long-Baseline neutrino experiment that will be located at the Surf Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. In the present design, the detector will be located inside cryostats filled with 68,400 ton of ultrapure liquid argon (less than 100 parts per trillion of oxygen equivalent contamination). To qualify the membrane technology for future very large-scale and underground implementations, a strong prototyping effort is ongoing: several smaller detectors of growing size with associated cryostats and cryogenic systems will be designed and built at Fermilab and CERN. They will take physics data and test different detector elements, filtration systems, design options and installation procedures. In addition, a 35 ton prototype is already operational at Fermilab and will take data with single-phase detector in early 2016. After the prototyping phase, the multi-kton detector will be constructed. After commissioning, it will detect and study ne...

  2. Fluorescence Spectrum of SiO in an Argon Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scullman, R.; Hormes, J.; Schroeder, W.; Wiggenhauser, H.

    1987-04-01

    Fluorescence from SiO matrix isolated in argon has been investigated in the wavelength region 120-300 nm. Fluorescence emission spectra from the valence states, A1Π, E1Σ+ and G1Π, revealed that nearly all radiation comes from one channel at 305 nm, which was analysed as originating from the b3Π-X1Σ+ transition. Contrary to the A1Π and G1Π states, the E1Σ+ state also decays radiatively, although weakly, through two other channels situated in the vicinity of 305 nm. These two channels were believed to originate from the a3Σ+-X1Σ+ and e3Σ--X1Σ+ transitions.

  3. Electron Neutrino Classification in Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Płoński, Piotr; Sulej, Robert; Zaremba, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Neutrinos are one of the least known elementary particles. The detection of neutrinos is an extremely difficult task since they are affected only by weak sub-atomic force or gravity. Therefore large detectors are constructed to reveal neutrino's properties. Among them the Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr-TPC) detectors provide excellent imaging and particle identification ability for studying neutrinos. The computerized methods for automatic reconstruction and identification of particles are needed to fully exploit the potential of the LAr-TPC technique. Herein, the novel method for electron neutrino classification is presented. The method constructs a feature descriptor from images of observed event. It characterizes the signal distribution propagated from vertex of interest, where the particle interacts with the detector medium. The classifier is learned with a constructed feature descriptor to decide whether the images represent the electron neutrino or cascade produced by photons. The proposed ap...

  4. Large area liquid argon detectors for interrogation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary, Charles; Kane, Steve; Firestone, Murray I.; Smith, Gregory [Adelphi Technology LLC, Purdue Technology Center, 5225 Exploration Drive, Indianapolis, IN 46241 (United States); Gozani, Tsahi; Brown, Craig; Kwong, John; King, Michael J. [Rapiscan Laboratories, 520 Almanor Avenue, Sunnyvale, CA 94085 (United States); Nikkel, James A.; McKinsey, Dan [Physics Department, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)

    2013-04-19

    Measurements of the efficiency, pulse shape, and energy and time resolution of liquid argon (LAr) detectors are presented. Liquefied noble gas-based (LNbG) detectors have been developed for the detection of dark matter and neutrinoless double-beta decay. However, the same qualities that make LNbG detectors ideal for these applications, namely their size, cost, efficiency, pulse shape discrimination and resolution, make them promising for portal screening and the detection of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM). Two 18-liter prototype detectors were designed, fabricated, and tested, one with pure LAr and the other doped with liquid Xe (LArXe). The LArXe detector presented the better time and energy resolution of 3.3 ns and 20% at 662 KeV, respectively. The total efficiency of the detector was measured to be 35% with 4.5% of the total photons detected in the photopeak.

  5. Argon plasma coagulation for treatment of hemorrhagic radiation gastroduodenitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekawa, Shu-Ji; Aoyama, Nobuo; Shirasaka, Daisuke; Inoue, Takashi; Kuroda, Kohei; Ebara, Shigeyuki; Tamura, Takao; Miyamoto, Masaki; Kasuga, Masato [Kobe Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine

    2002-01-01

    A 79-year-old man who had received radiotherapy for portal vein thrombosis due to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) 5 months earlier, showed progressive anemia and melena. Endoscopy on admission revealed diffuse bleeding from multiple telangiectasias on the anterior wall of the antrum and bulbus. We treated this patient with a new non-contact hemostatic method: the argon plasma coagulator (APC). The melena stopped after the first session and the hemoglobin level remained stable for 7 months. No delayed complications have been observed. Gastrointestinal bleeding from chronic radiation gastroduodenitis is rarely reported compared with radiation proctitis. This case demonstrates that APC is effective for hemostasis of diffuse bleeding from radiation gastroduodenitis, just as for radiation protitis. (author)

  6. Line ratio diagnostics in helium and helium seeded argon plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boivin, R F [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849-5311 (United States); Loch, S D [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849-5311 (United States); Ballance, C P [Physics Department, Rollins College, White Park, FL 32789 (United States); Branscomb, D [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849-5311 (United States); Pindzola, M S [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849-5311 (United States)

    2007-08-15

    We investigate the potential use of line ratio diagnostics to evaluate electron temperature in either helium or helium seeded argon plasmas. Plasmas are produced in a helicon plasma source. A rf compensated Langmuir probe is used to measure both the electron temperature and plasma density while a spectrometer is used to measure He I line intensities from the plasma. For all plasma densities where the electron temperature remains at 5 {+-} 1 eV, three He line ratios are measured. Each experimental ratio is compared with the prediction of three different collisional radiative models. One of these models makes uses of recent R-matrix with pseudo-states calculations for collisional rate coefficients. A discussion related to the different observations and model predictions is presented.

  7. Photodegradation Mechanisms of Tetraphenyl Butadiene Coatings for Liquid Argon Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, B J P; Conrad, J M; Pla-Dalmau, A

    2013-01-01

    We report on studies of degradation mechanisms of tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) coatings of the type used in neutrino and dark matter liquid argon experiments. Using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry we have detected the ultraviolet-blocking impurity benzophenone (BP). We monitored the drop in performance and increase of benzophenone concentration in TPB plates with exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light, and demonstrate the correlation between these two variables. Based on the presence and initially exponential increase in the concentration of benzophenone observed, we propose that TPB degradation is a free radical-mediated photooxidation reaction, which is subsequently confirmed by displaying delayed degradation using a free radical inhibitor. Finally we show that the performance of wavelength-shifting coatings of the type envisioned for the LBNE experiment can be improved by 10-20%, with significantly delayed UV degradation, by using a 20% admixture of 4-tert-Butylcatechol.

  8. Kinetic modeling of the Townsend breakdown in argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macheret, S. O.; Shneider, M. N. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, D-414 Engineering Quadrangle, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Kinetic modeling of the Townsend breakdown in argon was performed in the “forward-back” approximation. The kinetic model was found to adequately describe the left branch of the Paschen curve, and the important role of ionization by fast ions and atoms near the cathode, as well as the increase in secondary emission coefficient in strong electric fields described in the literature, was confirmed. The modeling also showed that the electron energy distribution function develops a beam of high-energy electrons and that the runaway effect, i.e., the monotonic increase of the mean electron energy with the distance from the cathode, occurs at the left branch of the Paschen curve.

  9. Uranium (III) precipitation in molten chloride by wet argon sparging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigier, Jean-François; Laplace, Annabelle; Renard, Catherine; Miguirditchian, Manuel; Abraham, Francis

    2016-06-01

    In the context of pyrochemical processes for nuclear fuel treatment, the precipitation of uranium (III) in molten salt LiCl-CaCl2 (30-70 mol%) at 705 °C is studied. First, this molten chloride is characterized with the determination of the water dissociation constant. With a value of 10-4.0, the salt has oxoacid properties. Then, the uranium (III) precipitation using wet argon sparging is studied. The salt is prepared using UCl3 precursor. At the end of the precipitation, the salt is totally free of solubilized uranium. The main part is converted into UO2 powder but some uranium is lost during the process due to the volatility of uranium chloride. The main impurity of the resulting powder is calcium. The consequences of oxidative and reductive conditions on precipitation are studied. Finally, coprecipitation of uranium (III) and neodymium (III) is studied, showing a higher sensitivity of uranium (III) than neodymium (III) to precipitation.

  10. The readout driver (ROD) for the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efthymiopoulos, Ilias

    2001-04-01

    The Readout Driver (ROD) for the Liquid Argon calorimeter of the ATLAS detector is described. Each ROD module receives triggered data from 256 calorimeter cells via two fiber-optics 1.28 Gbit/s links with a 100 kHz event rate (25 kbit/event). Its principal function is to determine the precise energy and timing of the signal from discrete samples of the waveform, taken each period of the LHC clock (25 ns). In addition, it checks, histograms, and formats the digital data stream. A demonstrator system, consisting of a motherboard and several daughter-board processing units (PUs) was constructed and is currently used for tests in the lab. The design of this prototype board is presented here. The board offers maximum modularity and allows the development and testing of different PU designs based on today's leading integer and floating point DSPs.

  11. Characterization of SF6/Argon Plasmas for Microelectronics Applications; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents measurements in inductively driven plasmas containing SF(sub 6)/Argon gas mixtures. The data in this report is presented in a series of appendices with a minimum of interpretation. During the course of this work we investigated: the electron and negative ion density using microwave interferometry and laser photodetachment; the optical emission; plasma species using mass spectrometry, and the ion energy distributions at the surface of the rf biased electrode in several configurations. The goal of this work was to assemble a consistent set of data to understand the important chemical mechanisms in SF(sub 6) based processing of materials and to validate models of the gas and surface processes

  12. Photodegradation mechanisms of tetraphenyl butadiene coatings for liquid argon detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B. J. P.; VanGemert, J. K.; Conrad, J. M.; Pla-Dalmau, A.

    2013-01-01

    We report on studies of degradation mechanisms of tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) coatings of the type used in neutrino and dark matter liquid argon experiments. Using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry we have detected the ultraviolet-blocking impurity benzophenone. We monitored the drop in performance and increase of benzophenone concentration in TPB plates with exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light, and demonstrate the correlation between these two variables. Based on the presence and initially exponential increase in the concentration of benzophenone observed, we propose that TPB degradation is a free radical-mediated photooxidation reaction, which is subsequently confirmed by displaying delayed degradation using a free radical inhibitor. Finally we show that the performance of wavelength-shifting coatings of the type envisioned for the LBNE experiment can be improved by 10-20%, with significantly delayed UV degradation, by using a 20% admixture of 4-tert-Butylcatechol.

  13. Liquid Argon Cryogenic Detector Calibration by Inelastic Scattering of Neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Polosatkin, Sergey; Dolgov, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    A method for calibration of cryogenic liquid argon detector response to recoils with certain energy -8.2 keV - is proposed. The method utilizes a process of inelastic scattering of monoenergetic neutrons produced by fusion DD neutron generator. Features of kinematics of inelastic scattering cause sufficient (forty times) increase in count rate of useful events relative to traditional scheme exploited elastic scattering with the same recoil energy and compatible energy resolution. The benefits of the proposed scheme of calibration most well implemented with the use of tagged neutron generator as a neutron source that allows to eliminate background originated from casual coincidence of signals on cryogenic detector and additional detector of scattered neutrons.

  14. The liquid argon TPC for the ICARUS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Arneodo, F

    1997-01-01

    The ICARUS project aims at the realisation of a large liquid argon TPC to be run at the Underground Laboratories of Gran Sasso in Italy. An intense R&D; activity has put on firm grounds this new detector technology and experimentally confirmed its feasibility on a few ton scale. Based on these solid achievements, the collaboration is now confident of being able to build and safely operate a multi-kton detector. The reseach program of the experiment involves the systematic study of a wide spectrum of physical phenomena covering many orders of magnitude in the energy deposited in the detector: from the few MeV of solar neutrino interactions, to the about one GeV of the proton decay and atmospheric neutrinos, up to the higher energies of neutrinos from accelerators.

  15. Response Uniformity of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Aharrouche, M; Di Ciaccio, L; El Kacimi, M; Gaumer, O; Gouanère, M; Goujdami, D; Lafaye, R; Laplace, S; Le Maner, C; Neukermans, L; Perrodo, P; Poggioli, L; Prieur, D; Przysiezniak, H; Sauvage, G; Wingerter-Seez, I; Zitoun, R; Lanni, F; Lü, L; Ma, H; Rajagopalan, S; Takai, H; Belymam, A; Benchekroun, D; Hakimi, M; Hoummada, A; Gao, Y; Stroynowsk, R; Aleksa, M; Carli, T; Fassnacht, P; Gianotti, F; Hervás, L; Lampl, W; Collot, J; Hostachy, J Y; Ledroit-Guillon, F; Malek, F; Martin, P; Viret, S; Leltchouk, M; Parsons, J A; Simion, S; Barreiro, F; Del Peso, J; Labarga, L; Oliver, C; Rodier, S; Barrillon, P; Benchouk, C; Djama, F; Hubaut, F; Monnier, E; Pralavorio, P; Sauvage, D; Serfon, C; Tisserant, S; Tóth, J; Banfi, D; Carminati, L; Cavalli, D; Costa, G; Delmastro, M; Fanti, M; Mandell, L; Mazzanti, M; Tartarelli, F; Kotov, K; Maslennikov, A; Pospelov, G; Tikhonov, Yu; Bourdarios, C; Fayard, L; Fournier, D; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Kado, M; Parrour, G; Puzo, P; Rousseau, D; Sacco, R; Serin, L; Unal, G; Zerwas, D; Dekhissi, B; Derkaoui, J; EL Kharrim, A; Maaroufi, F; Cleland, W; Lacour, D; Laforge, B; Nikolic-Audit, I; Schwemling, Ph; Ghazlane, H; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R; Idrissi Fakhr-Eddine, A; Boonekamp, M; Kerschen, N; Mansoulié, B; Meyer, P; Schwindlingy, J; Lund-Jensen, B

    2007-01-01

    The construction of the ATLAS electromagnetic liquid argon calorimeter modules is completed and all the modules are assembled and inserted in the cryostats. During the production period four barrel and three endcap modules were exposed to test beams in order to assess their performance, ascertain the production quality and reproducibility, and to scrutinize the complete energy reconstruction chain from the readout and calibration electronics to the signal and energy reconstruction. It was also possible to check the full Monte Carlo simulation of the calorimeter. The analysis of the uniformity, resolution and extraction of constant term is presented. Typical non-uniformities of 0.5% and typical global constant terms of 0.6% are measured for the barrel and end-cap modules.

  16. A Thermodynamic Model for Argon Plasma Kernel Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Keck

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Plasma kernel formation of argon is studied experimentally and theoretically. The experiments have been performed in a constant volume cylindrical vessel located in a shadowgraph system. The experiments have been done in constant pressure. The energy of plasma is supplied by an ignition system through two electrodes located in the vessel. The experiments have been done with two different spark energies to study the effect of input energy on kernel growth and its properties. A thermodynamic model employing mass and energy balance was developed to predict the experimental data. The agreement between experiments and model prediction is very good. The effect of various parameters such as initial temperature, initial radius of the kernel, and the radiation energy loss have been investigated and it has been concluded that initial condition is very important on formation and expansion of the kernel.

  17. The readout driver (ROD) for the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Efthymiopoulos, I

    2001-01-01

    The Readout Driver (ROD) for the Liquid Argon calorimeter of the ATLAS detector is described. Each ROD module receives triggered data from 256 calorimeter cells via two fiber-optics 1.28 Gbit/s links with a 100 kHz event rate (25 kbit/event). Its principal function is to determine the precise energy and timing of the signal from discrete samples of the waveform, taken each period of the LHC clock (25 ns). In addition, it checks, histograms, and formats the digital data stream. A demonstrator system, consisting of a motherboard and several daughter-board processing units (PUs) was constructed and is currently used for tests in the lab. The design of this prototype board is presented here. The board offers maximum modularity and allows the development and testing of different PU designs based on today's leading integer and floating point DSPs. (3 refs).

  18. Attosecond Coherent Control of Single and Double Photoionization in Argon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogle, C W; Tong, X M; Martin, L; Murnane, M M; Kapteyn, H C; Ranitovic, P

    2015-10-23

    Ultrafast high harmonic beams provide new opportunities for coherently controlling excitation and ionization processes in atoms, molecules, and materials on attosecond time scales by employing multiphoton two-pathway electron-wave-packet quantum interferences. Here we use spectrally tailored and frequency tuned vacuum and extreme ultraviolet harmonic combs, together with two phase-locked infrared laser fields, to show how the total single and double photoionization yields of argon can be coherently modulated by controlling the relative phases of both optical and electronic-wave-packet quantum interferences. This Letter is the first to apply quantum control techniques to double photoionization, which is a fundamental process where a single, high-energy photon ionizes two electrons simultaneously from an atom. PMID:26551112

  19. Dynamic resonances and tunnelling in the multiphoton ionization of argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present results of wavepacket simulations for multiphoton ionization in argon. A single active electron model is applied to estimate the single-electron ionization rates and photoelectron energy distributions for λ = 390 nm light with intensities up to I = 2 x 1014 W cm-2. The multiphoton ionization rates are compared with R-matrix Floquet calculations and found to be in very good agreement. The photoelectron energy distribution is used to study the nature of ionization at the higher intensities. Our results are consistent with recent calculations and experiments which show the imprint of the tunnelling process in the multiphoton regime. For few-cycle intense pulses, we find that the strong modulation of intensity and increased bandwidth leads to dynamic mixing of the 3d and 5s resonances.

  20. The ATLAS liquid Argon calorimeters read-out system

    CERN Document Server

    Blondel, A; Fayard, L; La Marra, D; Léger, A; Matricon, P; Perrot, G; Poggioli, L; Prast, J; Riu, I; Simion, S

    2004-01-01

    The calorimetry of the ATLAS experiment takes advantage of different detectors based on the liquid Argon (LAr) technology. Signals from the LAr calorimeters are processed by various stages before being delivered to the Data Acquisition system. The calorimeter cell signals are received by the front-end boards, which digitize a predetermined number of samples of the bipolar waveform and sends them to the Read-Out Driver (ROD) boards. The ROD board receives triggered data from 1028 calorimeter cells, and determines the precise energy and timing of the signals by processing the discrete samplings of the pulse. In addition, it formats the digital stream for the following elements of the DAQ chain, and performs monitoring. The architecture and functionality of the ATLAS LAr ROD board are discussed, along with the final design of the Processing Unit boards housing the Digital Signal Processors (DSP). (9 refs).

  1. Electron-ion recombination study in argon at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study deals with a wall-stabilized arc burning in argon at atmospheric pressure. A transient mode is obtained using a fast thyristor connected to the electrodes, which short-circuits the discharge. By means of two wavelengths laser interferometry and spectroscopy measurements we have determined the temporal changes of the electron density, ground state atom density and excited atom density. We have shown that, when the electric field is suppressed, the electron temperature rapidly decreases to the gas temperature before changing electron and atom densities. This phenomenon is applied to determine the gas temperature and to evaluate the role played by ionization in electron density balance. The coefficients of ambipolar diffusion, ionization and recombination and an apparent recombination coefficient are determined versus electron temperature and compared with theoretical values

  2. z39.50 Information Retrieval Protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Koganuramath, M. M.; Angadi, Mallikarjun; Kademani, B. S.

    2001-01-01

    This article describes the Internet information retrieval protocol z39.50 and it's usage. Brief history, definition and the working of z39.50 are also depicted here. An attempt has also been made to study various versions of z39.50 and on freely available softwares on the web. Some of the problems encountered, current developments and new initiatives are also discussed here.

  3. Atmospheric dispersion of argon-41 from anuclear research reactor: measurement and modeling of plume geometry and gamma radiation field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Bent; Astrup, Poul; Drews, Martin;

    2003-01-01

    An atmospheric dispersion experiment was conducted using a visible tracer along with the routine release of argon-41 from the BR1 research reactor in Mol, Belgium. Simultaneous measurements of plume geometry and radiation fields for argon-41 decay were performed as well as measurements of the argon...

  4. 39 CFR 2.4 - Seal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... description of the Postal Service emblem is described at 39 CFR 221.7. ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Seal. 2.4 Section 2.4 Postal Service UNITED STATES... (ARTICLE II) § 2.4 Seal. (a) The Seal of the Postal Service is filed by the Board in the Office of...

  5. 10 CFR 39.61 - Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training. 39.61 Section 39.61 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... Training. (a) The licensee may not permit an individual to act as a logging supervisor until that person— (1) Has completed training in the subjects outlined in paragraph (e) of this section; (2)...

  6. 14 CFR 151.39 - Project eligibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Project eligibility. 151.39 Section 151.39 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS... located; and (ii) Adequate replacement housing that is open to all persons, regardless of race,...

  7. 39 CFR 963.15 - Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Evidence. 963.15 Section 963.15 Postal Service... PANDERING ADVERTISEMENTS STATUTE, 39 U.S.C. 3008 § 963.15 Evidence. (a) In general, admissibility will hinge on relevancy and materiality. However, relevant evidence may be excluded if its probative value...

  8. 39 CFR 964.10 - Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Evidence. 964.10 Section 964.10 Postal Service... DELIVERY PURSUANT TO 39 U.S.C. 3003, 3004 § 964.10 Evidence. (a) In general, admissibility will hinge on relevancy and materiality. However, relevant evidence may be excluded if its probative value...

  9. 7 CFR 652.39 - Mitigating factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mitigating factors. 652.39 Section 652.39 Agriculture... factors. In considering whether to decertify, the period of decertification, and scope of decertification, the deciding official will take into consideration any mitigating factors. Examples of...

  10. 27 CFR 72.39 - Final action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Final action. 72.39... Remission or Mitigation of Forfeitures § 72.39 Final action. (a) Petitions for remission or mitigation of forfeiture. (1) The Director shall take final action on any petition filed pursuant to these...

  11. 19 CFR 148.39 - Rented automobiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rented automobiles. 148.39 Section 148.39 Customs... automobiles. (a) Importation for temporary period. An automobile rented by a resident of the United States... (HTSUS) (19 U.S.C. 1202), without payment of duty. The automobile shall be used for the transportation...

  12. 39 CFR 913.2 - Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Service. 913.2 Section 913.2 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES PROCEDURES FOR THE ISSUANCE OF ADMINISTRATIVE SUBPOENAS UNDER 39 U.S.C. 3016 § 913.2 Service. (a) Service within the United States. A subpoena issued under this section may...

  13. 34 CFR 300.39 - Special education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special education. 300.39 Section 300.39 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN...

  14. 7 CFR 2902.39 - Floor strippers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Floor strippers. (a) Definition. Products that are formulated to loosen waxes, resins, or varnishes from floor surfaces. They can be in either liquid or gel form, and may also be used with or without... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Floor strippers. 2902.39 Section 2902.39...

  15. Argon Kα measurement on DIII endash D by Ross filters technique (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Techniques to reduce the heat flux to the divertor plates in tokamak power plants and the consequent erosion of, and subsequent damage to the divertor target plates include the injection of impurities such as argon, that can dissipate the energy (through radiative or collisional processes) before it reaches the target plates. An important issue with this type of scheme is poisoning of the plasma core by the impurities introduced in the divertor region. Subsequently, there is a desire to measure the profiles of the injected impurities in the core. X-ray Ross filters with an effective narrow band pass centered on the argon Kα line at 3.2 keV, have been installed on two of the existing x-ray arrays on DIII endash D in order to help determine the argon concentration profiles. Emissivity profiles of the Kα lines and the emissivity profiles for the argon enhanced continuum can be inferred from the inverted filtered x-ray brightness signals if Te, ne, and Ar18+ profiles are known. The MIST code is used to couple the filtered x-ray signals to the time dependent measurements of Te and ne. Further, the Ar16+ profiles measured by charge transfer spectroscopy, are used as a constraint on the MIST code runs to calculate Ar18+ profiles and unfold the argon emissivity profiles. A discussion of the Ross filters, the DIII endash D argon data, and the data analysis scheme for inferring argon emissivity profiles will be discussed. Estimates of the total argon concentration in the core determined from this technique in DIII endash D argon puff experiments will be presented. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  16. O uso do laser de argônio no tratamento da triquíase Argon laser in the treatment of trichiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilson Lopes da Fonseca Junior

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a eficácia da técnica de termoablação dos folículos pilosos dos cílios em triquíase com laser de argônio e observar a preferência dos pacientes submetidos a este tratamento, pela anestesia tópica com colírio anestésico ou pela anestesia local injetável. MÉTODOS: Estudo prospectivo de 55 pálpebras de 39 pacientes com triquíase, tratados com fotocoagulação dos folículos pilosos com "Argon green laser" (Alcon® - EUA. Neste estudo avaliou-se a idade e o sexo dos pacientes, o número de sessões realizadas, a evolução após as aplicações e a preferência pelo tipo de anestesia. Os parâmetros utilizados foram: (1 Mira - 150 µm; (2 Potência- 750 mW; (3 Tempo de exposição- 0,2 s. Cada cílio recebeu, no máximo, 9 disparos por sessão. RESULTADOS: Dentre os 39 participantes do estudo, 58,9% eram do sexo feminino e 41% do sexo masculino. A idade média foi de 71 anos. Houve cura em 69% (38 pálpebras, sendo 29% (16 pálpebras com apenas uma sessão de laser. Houve preferência estatisticamente significativa pelo procedimento realizado sob anestesia local injetável. CONCLUSÃO: Os resultados sugerem que a anestesia local no tratamento da triquíase com laser de argônio é a preferência da maioria dos pacientes e que a termoablação dos folículos pilosos com laser de argônio é tratamento efetivo para a triquíase.PURPOSE: To evaluate the effectiveness of thermoablation of eyelashes in trichiasis with Argon laser and to observe the patients' choice of topic or local anesthesia. METHODS: Prospective study of 55 eyelids of 39 patients with trichiasis treated with photocoagulation of the eyelash follicle with Argon green laser (Alcon® - USA. Age, sex, number of applications in each session, evolution after the application and preference for the anesthesic method were evaluated. The laser settings were: 150 µm aim 750 mW potency; 0.2 seconds exhibition. Each eyelash received no more than 9 applications per

  17. Wetting and evaporation of argon nanodroplets on smooth and rough substrates: Molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qun; Wang, Baohe; Chen, Yonggang; Zhao, Zongchang

    2016-10-01

    Wetting and evaporation behaviors of argon nanodroplets on smooth and rough substrates are studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Effects of interaction energy between solid and argon atoms on wetting and evaporation and differences between nanodroplets on smooth and rough substrates have been investigated. The results show that for both smooth and rough substrates, as the interaction energy between solid and argon atoms increases, the contact angle and total evaporation increase. For rough substrates, the variations of contact angle and contact radius during evaporation progress are much more complex and the total evaporation is much larger than that of smooth substrates.

  18. A Study of Dielectric Breakdown Along Insulators Surrounding Conductors in Liquid Argon

    CERN Document Server

    Lockwitz, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    High voltage breakdown in liquid argon is an important consideration in the design of liquid argon time projection chambers, which are often used as neutrino and dark matter detectors. We have made systematic measurements of breakdown voltages in liquid argon along insulators surrounding negative rod electrodes. The purpose of these tests is to understand the effects of materials, of breakdown path length, and of surface topology. We have found no material-specific effects other than those due to their permittivity. We have found no dependence on breakdown voltage on the length of the exposed insulator. A model for the breakdown mechanism is presented that can help inform future designs.

  19. Design Principles and Operational Results of the Cryogenic System for the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Fabre, C; Chalifour, M; Gonidec, G; Passardi, Giorgio; Petit, P; Pezzetti, M; Wicek, F

    2009-01-01

    The ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter housed in three independent cryostats containing a total argon volume of about 78 m3 has been installed in the underground cavern. The three detectors have been cooled down following stringent temperature gradient limits and have been filled with liquid argon. The cryostats are now in a stable condition for periods going up to almost two years. The temperature uniformity within each of the three detector volumes is found to be within 70 mK rms, while the temperature stability stays below 5 mK rms.

  20. A new ozone standard - The vapor pressure of ozone at liquid argon temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauersberger, K.; Hanson, D.; Morton, J.

    1985-01-01

    The vapor pressure of ozone has been measured at liquid argon temperatures. At the normal boiling point of argon (-185.9 C) an ozone pressure of 0.0405 torr was obtained with an accuracy of + or - 1.5 percent. Increases and decreases in liquid argon temperatures raised and lowered the ozone vapor pressure, respectively. During the vapor pressure measurements the purity of ozone was monitored with a mass spectrometer. The proposed ozone standard will considerably improve the calibration of experiments for atmospheric research, the determination of absorption cross sections and other laboratory ozone studies.

  1. Surface compositional changes in GaAs subjected to argon plasma treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surdu-Bob, C.C.; Sullivan, J.L.; Saied, S.O.; Layberry, R.; Aflori, M

    2002-12-30

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been employed to study surface compositional changes in GaAs (1 0 0) subjected to argon plasma treatment. The experimental results have been explained in terms of predicted argon ion energies, measured ion densities and etch rates. A model is proposed for the processes taking place at the surface of GaAs in terms of segregation, sputtering and surface relaxation. Stopping and range of ions in matter (SRIM) code has also been employedan aid to identification of the mechanisms responsible for the compositional changes. Argon plasma treatment induced surface oxidation at very low energies and sputtering and surface damage with increasing energy.

  2. Changes in a surface of polycrystalline aluminum upon bombardment with argon ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkhotov, O. G.; Ashkhotova, I. B.; Bliev, A. P.; Magkoev, T. T.; Krymshokalova, D. A.

    2014-10-01

    The interaction between argon ions and a natural oxide layer of polycrystalline aluminum is studied via Auger electron (AE) and electron energy loss (EEL) spectroscopy. It is found that bombardment with argon ions whose energy is lower than the Al2O3 sputtering threshold results in the accumulation of bombarding ions in interstitial surface voids, thus forming a supersaturated solid solution of target atoms and bombarding ions of argon and nitrogen entrapped by the ion beam from the residual gas of the working chamber of the spectrometer.

  3. Investigation of the impact of the $^{39}$Ar(n , $\\alpha)^{36}$S reaction on the nucleosynthesis of the rare isotope $^{36}$S

    CERN Multimedia

    Geltenbort, P

    2002-01-01

    The origin of the rare, neutron rich isotope $^{36}$S remains a debated question. One of the key reactions in the s-process nucleosynthesis network leading to $^{36}$S is $^{39}$Ar(n , $\\alpha) ^{36}\\!$S. This reaction has never been studied so far, which is due to the fact that $^{39}$Ar is a radioactive (T$_{1/2}$ = 269 y) gas, which is not commercially available. During a three days experimental campaign, an optimized $^{39}$Ar sample was prepared at ISOLDE. A dedicated titaniumoxide target (8 g/cm$^{2}$) was bombarded with 1 GeV protons from the PS Booster. In order to obtain a pure argon beam, a water-cooled transfer line was used to freeze-out less volatile isobars before they can reach the ion source. Adding stable argon with a calibrated leak to the ion source enabled to determine the ionization efficiency (3.5%). For the isotope separation, the low-mass side (GLM) of the General Purpose Separator was used. After magnetic separation, $^{39}$Ar ions (1+) were implanted at 60 keV in a 12 mm thick alumin...

  4. Self-assembled heterogeneous argon/neon core-shell clusters studied by photoelectron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundwall, M; Pokapanich, W; Bergersen, H; Lindblad, A; Rander, T; Ohrwall, G; Tchaplyguine, M; Barth, S; Hergenhahn, U; Svensson, S; Björneholm, O

    2007-06-01

    Clusters formed by a coexpansion process of argon and neon have been studied using synchrotron radiation. Electrons from interatomic Coulombic decay as well as ultraviolet and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to determine the heterogeneous nature of the clusters and the cluster structure. Binary clusters of argon and neon produced by coexpansion are shown to exhibit a core-shell structure placing argon in the core and neon in the outer shells. Furthermore, the authors show that 2 ML of neon on the argon core is sufficient for neon valence band formation resembling the neon solid. For 1 ML of neon the authors observe a bandwidth narrowing to about half of the bulk value.

  5. Surface Chemistry of Polymers Physical Adsorption of Nitrogen, Argon, Sulfur Dioxide and Neopentane on Polyvinylidene Fluoride

    OpenAIRE

    Houriet, Jean-Philippe; Ghiste, Patrick; Stoeckli, Fritz

    2007-01-01

    The adsorption of nitrogen, argon, sulfur dioxide and neopentane on polyvinylidene fluoride has been measured by static methods and by gas-solid chromatography. The polymer has a homogeneous surface of low energy, which is not significantly affected by heating.

  6. Surface modification of polypropylene using argon plasma: Statistical optimization of the process variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low pressure plasma treatment using radiofrequency (rf) discharge of argon gas was employed to improve the hydrophilicity of polypropylene. The effects of argon plasma on the wettability, surface chemistry and surface morphology of polypropylene were studied using static contact angle measurements, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Increase in surface energy of polypropylene was observed as a result of argon plasma treatment. SEM and AFM images revealed the increased surface roughness. A set of identified process variables (rf power, pressure, argon flow rate and time) were used in this study and were optimized using central composite design (CCD) of response surface methodology (RSM). A statistical model was developed to represent the surface energy in terms of the process variables mentioned above. Accuracy of the model was verified and found to be high.

  7. Simulations of argon accident scenarios in the ATLAS experimental cavern a safety analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Balda, F

    2002-01-01

    Some characteristic accidents in the ATLAS experimental cavern (UX15) are simulated by means of STAR-CD, a code using the "Finite-Volume" method. These accidents involve different liquid argon leaks from the barrel cryostat of the detector, thus causing the dispersion of the argon into the Muon Chamber region and the evaporation of the liquid. The subsequent temperature gradients and distribution of argon concentrations, as well as their evolution in time are simulated and discussed, with the purpose of analysing the dangers related to asphyxiation and to contact with cryogenic fluids for the working personnel. A summary of the theory that stands behind the code is also given. In order to validate the models, an experimental test on a liquid argon spill performed earlier is simulated, showing that the program is able to output reliable results. At the end, some safety-related recommendations are listed.

  8. Pose Measurement Performance of the Argon Relative Navigation Sensor Suite in Simulated Flight Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galante, Joseph M.; Eepoel, John Van; Strube, Matt; Gill, Nat; Gonzalez, Marcelo; Hyslop, Andrew; Patrick, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    Argon is a flight-ready sensor suite with two visual cameras, a flash LIDAR, an on- board flight computer, and associated electronics. Argon was designed to provide sensing capabilities for relative navigation during proximity, rendezvous, and docking operations between spacecraft. A rigorous ground test campaign assessed the performance capability of the Argon navigation suite to measure the relative pose of high-fidelity satellite mock-ups during a variety of simulated rendezvous and proximity maneuvers facilitated by robot manipulators in a variety of lighting conditions representative of the orbital environment. A brief description of the Argon suite and test setup are given as well as an analysis of the performance of the system in simulated proximity and rendezvous operations.

  9. Formation and characterization of magnesium bisozonide and carbonyl complexes in solid argon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guanjun; Gong, Yu; Zhang, Qingqing; Zhou, Mingfei

    2010-10-14

    The reactions of magnesium atoms with dioxygen and dioxygen/carbon monoxide mixture have been investigated by matrix isolation infrared absorption spectroscopy. Magnesium atoms react with dioxygen in solid argon to form the inserted MgO(2) molecules under UV excitation, which were previously characterized. Annealing allows the dioxygen molecules to diffuse and to react with MgO(2) and form the magnesium bisozonide complex, Mg(O(3))(2), which is proposed to be coordinated by two argon atoms in solid argon matrix. The Mg(O(3))(2)(Ar)(2) complex is characterized to have two equivalent side-on bonded ozonide ligands with a D(2h) symmetry. The coordinated argon atoms can be replaced by carbon monoxide to give the magnesium bisozonide dicarbonyl complex, Mg(O(3))(2)(CO)(2), a neutral magnesium carbonyl complex with CO binding to the Mg(2+) center. PMID:20857987

  10. Dynamic range compression in a liquid argon calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleland, W.E. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Lissauer, D.; Radeka, V.; Rescia, S.; Takai, H. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Wingerter-Seez, I. [LAPP, Annecy-le-Vieux (France)

    1996-12-31

    The anticipated range of particle energies at the LHC, coupled with the need for precision, low noise calorimetry makes severe demands on the dynamic range of the calorimeter readout. A common approach to this problem is to use shapers with two or more gain scales. In this paper, the authors describe their experience with a new approach in which a preamplifier with dynamic gain compression is used. An unavoidable consequence of dynamic gain adjustment is that the peaking time of the shaper output signal becomes amplitude dependent. The authors have carried out a test of such a readout system in the RD3 calorimeter, a liquid argon device with accordion geometry. The calibration system is used to determine both the gain of the individual channels as well as to map the shape of the waveform as a function of signal amplitude. A new procedure for waveform analysis, in which the fitted parameters describe the impulse response of the system, permits a straightforward translation of the calibration waveform to the waveform generated by a particle crossing the ionization gap. They find that the linearity and resolution of the calorimeter is equivalent to that obtained with linear preamplifiers, up to an energy of 200 GeV.

  11. Coherent set of electron cross sections for argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, L. L.; Ferreira, C. M.

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents a coherent set of electron impact cross sections for argon (elastic momentum-transfer, inelastic for the excitation of 37 levels Ar(4s,4p,3d,5p,4d,6s) and ionization), which was recently uploaded onto the LXcat IST-Lisbon database. The cross section set was validated by comparing calculated swarm parameters (electron mobility and characteristic energy) and rate coefficients (Townsend ionization coefficient and direct + cascade excitation coefficients to the 4s and 4p states) with available experimental data, for E / N = 10-4 - 100 Td and Tg = 300, 77 K. The validation procedure involves the solution to the homogeneous two-term electron Boltzmann equation, resorting to three different solvers: (i) IST-Lisbon's (ii) BOLSIG+ (v1.2) with LXcat; (iii) BOLSIG+ (v1.23). The results obtained with these solvers are compared to evidence the importance of certain numerical features related with both the energy-grid (number of points, grid-type and maximum energy value) and the interpolation scheme adopted for the cross sections. In particular, the latter can cause a 6% variation on the values of swarm parameters at intermediate E/Ns.

  12. An update of argon inelastic cross sections for plasma discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper proposes a coherent set of electron impact inelastic cross sections for argon, based on recent experimental measurements. The updated set is validated by comparing calculated swarm parameters and rate coefficients (obtained by solving the two-term approximation electron Boltzmann equation) with available experimental data. This validation procedure is usually adopted when the cross section set is to be later used in plasma discharge modelling. Simulation results for the electron drift velocity and characteristic energy are in very good agreement with experimental values of these quantities. Calculations, using cross section sets proposed by different authors, of the total (direct + cascade) excitation coefficients to the 4s and 4p states, and of the Townsend ionization coefficient, show that the present set ensures the best overall agreement with measured values. The agreement is particularly good for the excitation coefficient to metastable 4s'[1/2]0 and the Townsend ionization coefficient, which are probably the most relevant electron macroscopic coefficients in the modelling of discharge plasmas

  13. Argon defect complexes in low energy Ar irradiated molybdenum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Veen, A.; Buters, W.T.M.; van der Kolk, G.J.; Caspers, L.M. (Interuniversitair Reactor Instituut, Delft (Netherlands)); Armstrong, T.R. (Victoria Univ., Wellington (New Zealand). Dept. of Physics)

    1982-03-15

    Thermal desorption spectrometry has been used to study the defects created in Mo irradiated along the <110> direction with Ar ions ranging in energy from 0.1 to 2 keV. In addition to monitoring the release of the implanted Ar, additional information has been obtained by decoration of the defects with low energy helium and subsequent monitoring of the helium release. The studies show evidence that the Ar can be trapped in both substitutional sites and in a configuration in which the Ar is associated with vacancies (ArVsub(n), n >= 2). Most of the Ar implanted at high energy is released at approx. equal to 1500 K by thermal vacancy assisted diffusion. Argon trapped closer to the surface is released at lower temperatures via at least three different surface related release mechanisms. Additional results are presented on the interaction of self interstitial atoms (introduced by 100 eV Xe bombardment) with the Ar defects. Substitutional Ar is found to convert to interstitial Ar which seems to be mobile at room temperature. The Ar-vacancy complexes are found to be reduced to substitutional Ar. The results of atomistic calculations of the release mechanisms will also be presented.

  14. State-selective radiative recombination cross sections of argon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The n-, (n,l)- and fine-structure level state-selective radiative recombinations (RR) cross sections of argon ions Ar18+,Ar13+,Ar7+ and Ar+ are obtained with the semi-classical Kramer formula, the relativistic self-consistent field (RSCF) method and the relativistic configuration interaction (RCI) method. It is found that for the highly charged ions with few electrons, the cross sections calculated with these three methods are in good agreement with each other. But as the number of electrons increases, the Kramer formula deviates from the RSCF and RCI results. For instance, when the energy of the incident electron is larger than 100 eV, the n-state selective cross sections of Ar7+ calculated from the Kramer formula are underestimated for more than 50%. The RSCF results are in general agreement with the RCI results. However, for the low charged ions, a clear distinction appears due to the strong configuration interaction, especially near the Cooper minimum. The n-resolved (n≤10) and total Maxwellian averaged rate coefficients are calculated, and the analytic fitting parameters are also provided. -- Highlights: ► The RR cross sections of Ar18+, Ar13+, Ar7+ and Ar+ are obtained. ► The Kramer formula, the relativistic self-consistent field and RCI methods are used. ► Results from three methods are compared with each other.

  15. Electronics calibration board for the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To calibrate the energy response of the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter, an electronics calibration board has been designed; it delivers a signal whose shape is close to the calorimeter ionization current signal with amplitude up to 100 mA in 50 Ω with 16 bit dynamic range. The amplitude of this signal is designed to be uniform over all calorimeters channels, stable in time and with an integral linearity much better that the electronics readout. The various R and D phases and most of the difficulties met are discussed and illustrated by many measurements. The custom design circuits are described and the layout of the ATLAS calibration board presented. The procedure used to qualify the boards is explained and the performance obtained illustrated: a dynamic range up to 3 TeV in three energy scales with an integral linearity better than 0.1% in each of them, a response uniformity better than 0.2% and a stability better than 0.1%. The performance of the board is well within the ATLAS requirements. Finally, in situ measurements done on the ATLAS calorimeter are shown to validate these performances

  16. Methane from benzene in argon dielectric barrier discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Efficient on-line conversion of benzene to methane at room temperature. ► Absence of other H-atom donor suggests new type of chemistry. ► For parent loss > 90%, methane yield was ∼40% of limit due to H-atom availability. ► Surface moisture contributed ·OH radical for trace phenolic products’ formation. ► This method may emerge as an exploitable tactic for pollutants’ usable alterations. -- Abstract: A first-time account of direct, on-line, instantaneous and efficient chemical conversion of gas phase benzene to methane in argon Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) is presented. In the absence of another overt hydrogen-donating source, potency of analogous parents toward methane generation is found to follow the order: benzene > toluene > p-xylene. Simultaneous production of trace amounts of phenolic surface deposits suggest (a) prompt decomposition of the parent molecules, including a large fraction yielding atomic transients (H-atom), (b) continuous and appropriate recombination of such parts, and (c) trace moisture in parent contributing ·OH radicals and additional H-atoms, which suitably react with the unreacted fraction of the parent, and also other intermediates. Results highlight Ar DBD to be a simple and exploitable technology for transforming undesirable hazardous aromatics to usable/useful low molecular weight open-chain products following the principles of green chemistry and engineering

  17. Optically Forbidden Excitations of 3s Electron of Argon by Fast Electron Impact

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱林繁; 成华东; 刘小井; 田鹏; 苑震生; 李文斌; 徐克尊

    2003-01-01

    The electron energy loss spectrum of argon in the energy region of 24.5-30.5eV was measured at 2.5 keV impact energy. The line profile parameters of the optically forbidden excitations of 3s-1ns (n = 4-6) and 3s-1nd (n = 3-7) of argon, I.e.,Eγ,Г,q and p,were determined.

  18. Benchmarking TPB-coated Light Guides for Liquid Argon TPC Light Detection Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Baptista, B.; Bugel, L.; Chiu, C; Conrad, J. M.; Ignarra, C. M.; Jones, B. J. P.; Katori, T.; Mufson, S.

    2012-01-01

    Scintillation light from liquid argon is produced at 128 nm and thus must be shifted to visible wavelengths in light detection systems used for Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LArTPCs). To date, designs have employed tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) coatings on photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) or plates placed in front of the PMTs. Recently, a new approach using TPB-coated light guides was proposed. In this paper, we show that the response of lightguides coated with TPB in a UV Transmitting (UV...

  19. TPB-coated Light Guides for Liquid Argon TPC Light Detection Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ignarra, C M

    2013-01-01

    Light detection systems in Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LArTPCs) require the detection of the 128 nm light produced during argon scintillation. Most detectors use Tetraphenyl Butadiene (TPB) to shift the wavelength of the light into a range visible to Photomultiplier Tubes (PMTs). These proceedings summarize characterizations of light-guides coated with a matrix of TPB in UV transmitting acrylic which are more compact than existing LArTPC light collection systems.

  20. TPB-coated light guides for liquid argon TPC light detection systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignarra, C. M.

    2013-10-01

    Light detection systems in Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LArTPCs) require the detection of the 128 nm light produced during argon scintillation. Most detectors use Tetraphenyl Butadiene (TPB) to shift the wavelength of the light into a range visible to Photomultiplier Tubes (PMTs). These proceedings summarize characterizations of light-guides coated with a matrix of TPB in UV transmitting acrylic which are more compact than existing LArTPC light collection systems.

  1. Effect of Ginkgo biloba on the lesions induced by retinal argon laser photocoagulation in rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clairambault, P.; Pairault, C.; Droy-Lefaix, M.T.; Magnier, B.; Magnier, M.

    1986-01-09

    In rabbits, retinal argon laser photocoagulation disrupts the arrangement of cell layers and produces interstitial edema. Photochemical and thermal energy is released with production of free oxygenated radicals that are responsible for destruction of cell membranes. Retinal argon laser photocoagulation in rabbits was used as a pharmacologic model to evaluate the protective effect of EGB 761 against membrane lesions and edema. As a strong free radicals scavengers, EGB 761 confirms its protective action on cells membranes and its anti-edema effect.

  2. Configurational Entropy,Diffusivity and Potential Energy Landscape in Liquid Argon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Yong-Ping; MA Cong-Xiao; LI Jia-Yun; LI Cong; WANG Dan; LI Mei-Li; SUN Min-Hua

    2009-01-01

    The configurational entropy, diffusion coefficient, dynamics and thermodynamics fragility indices of liquid argon are calculated using molecular dynamics simulations at two densities. The relationship between dynamics and thermodynamics properties is studied. The diffusion coefficient depends linearly on configurational entropy, which is consistent with the hypothesis of Adam-Gibbs. The consistence of dynamics and thermodynamics fragility indices demonstrates that dynamical behaviour is governed by thermodynamics behaviour in glass transition of liquid argon.

  3. Effect of Ginkgo biloba on the lesions induced by retinal argon laser photocoagulation in rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In rabbits, retinal argon laser photocoagulation disrupts the arrangement of cell layers and produces interstitial edema. Photochemical and thermal energy is released with production of free oxygenated radicals that are responsible for destruction of cell membranes. Retinal argon laser photocoagulation in rabbits was used as a pharmacologic model to evaluate the protective effect of EGB 761 against membrane lesions and edema. As a strong free radicals scavengers, EGB 761 confirms its protective action on cells membranes and its anti-edema effect

  4. A correction to Birks' Law in liquid argon ionization chamber simulations for highly ionizing particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a study of the performance of Birks' Law in liquid argon ionization chamber simulations as applied to highly ionizing particles, such as particles with multiple electric charges or with magnetic charge. We used Birks' Law to model recombination effects in a GEANT4 simulation of heavy ions in a liquid argon calorimeter. We then compared the simulation to published heavy-ion data to extract a highly ionizing particle correction to Birks' Law.

  5. LArGe: Background suppression using liquid argon (LAr) scintillation for 0$\

    CERN Document Server

    Marco, M D; Schönert, S

    2007-01-01

    Measurements with a bare p-type high purity germanium diode (HPGe) submerged in a 19 kg liquid argon (LAr) scintillation detector at MPIK Heidelberg are reported. The liquid argon--germanium system (LArGe) is operated as a 4$\\pi$ anti-Compton spectrometer to suppress backgrounds in the HPGe. This R&D is carried out in the framework of the GERDA experiment which searches for 0$\

  6. 21 CFR 814.39 - PMA supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... sterilization procedures. (5) Changes in packaging. (6) Changes in the performance or design specifications..., § 814.39 was amended by adding paragraph (h), effective Aug. 16, 2010. For the convenience of the...

  7. Feshbach resonances in ultracold {sup 39}K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Errico, Chiara [LENS and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Firenze, Via Nello Carrara 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Zaccanti, Matteo [LENS and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Firenze, Via Nello Carrara 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Fattori, Marco [Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche ' Enrico Fermi' , Compendio del Viminale, 00184 Roma (Italy); Roati, Giacomo [LENS and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Firenze, Via Nello Carrara 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Inguscio, Massimo [LENS and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Firenze, Via Nello Carrara 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Modugno, Giovanni [LENS and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Firenze, Via Nello Carrara 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Simoni, Andrea [Laboratoire de Physique des Atomes, Lasers, Molecules et Surfaces, UMR 6627 du CNRS and Universite de Rennes, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France)

    2007-07-15

    We discover several magnetic Feshbach resonances in collisions of ultracold {sup 39}K atoms, by studying atom losses and molecule formation. Accurate determination of the magnetic-field resonance locations allows us to optimize a quantum collision model for potassium isotopes. We employ the model to predict the magnetic-field dependence of scattering lengths and of near-threshold molecular levels. Our findings will be useful to plan future experiments on ultracold {sup 39}K atoms and molecules.

  8. Discovery of photospheric argon in very hot central stars of planetary nebulae and white dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Werner, K; Kruk, J W

    2007-01-01

    We report the first discovery of argon in hot evolved stars and white dwarfs. We have identified the ArVII 1063.55A line in some of the hottest known (Teff=95000-110000 K) central stars of planetary nebulae and (pre-) white dwarfs of various spectral type. We determine the argon abundance and compare it to theoretical predictions from stellar evolution theory as well as from diffusion calculations. We analyze high-resolution spectra taken with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer. We use non-LTE line-blanketed model atmospheres and perform line-formation calculations to compute synthetic argon line profiles. We find a solar argon abundance in the H-rich central star NGC1360 and in the H-deficient PG1159 star PG1424+535. This confirms stellar evolution modeling that predicts that the argon abundance remains almost unaffected by nucleosynthesis. For the DAO-type central star NGC7293 and the hot DA white dwarfs PG0948+534 and REJ1738+669 we find argon abundances that are up to three orders of magnitude sma...

  9. Numerical study of breakdown pattern induced by an intense microwave under nitrogen and argon gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masayuki; Ohnishi, Naofumi

    2016-07-01

    Filamentary plasma induced by microwave beam irradiation was reproduced in nitrogen and argon by combining fluid or particle plasma models with electromagnetic wave propagation. Transport coefficients used in the fluid model are estimated from particle simulation to maintain consistency of the breakdown structure between the fluid and particle models. A discrete structure was obtained using the one-dimensional (1D) fluid model, because a standing wave is generated in front of the plasma when the incident microwave beam is reflected by the overcritical plasma, which agrees with the breakdown structure obtained using the 1D particle model. A 2D plasma filament was also reproduced using the fluid model in nitrogen and argon. Reflection of the incident microwave in argon becomes stronger than that in nitrogen because of the denser argon plasma. Change in filament shape is induced in argon because the electric field is deformed at the plasma tip owing to stronger wave reflection from the neighboring filament. The propagation speed of the plasma front becomes larger in argon breakdown because of the larger ionization frequency and the larger diffusion coefficient.

  10. Condensed argon isentropic compression with ultrahigh magnetic field pressure: Experimental design. Post-shot report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bykov, A.I.; Boriskov, G.V.; Dolotenko, M.I. [All-Russian Research Inst. of Experimental Physics, Sarov (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    This report continues the series of work devoted to experimental study of a high-dense condensed argon state. Remember that according to work of Kwon et. al., hexagonal close-packed structure is profitable in terms of energy rather than face-centered argon structure (stable with zero pressure). What is most interesting and intriguing here is the issue of possible argon metallization, when it is compressed up to the densities more than 9.17 g/cm{sup 3}. In the experiment of 1995 (the arrangement and data are described in a cited reference) the authors recorded appearance of conductivity in argon, which is non-conductive in the initial state, when it is compressed more than a factor of four. The peak value of argon specific conductivity recorded in this experiment did not exceed 10 (Ohm x cm){sup {minus}1}. This value of conductivity is characteristic of semiconductors, but not metals, which have 10{sup 4} (Ohm x cm){sup {minus}1}. At this stage of the work the main attention is paid to recording of argon conductive state and studying the possibilities of multiframed radiography of the sample in the compressed state.

  11. 49 CFR 1242.30 - Dismantling retired road property and depreciation (accounts XX-17-39, XX-18-39, XX-19-39, 62-17...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dismantling retired road property and depreciation (accounts XX-17-39, XX-18-39, XX-19-39, 62-17-00, 62-18-00, and 62-19-00). 1242.30 Section 1242.30....30 Dismantling retired road property and depreciation (accounts XX-17-39, XX-18-39, XX-19-39,...

  12. Inhaled 45–50% argon augments hypothermic brain protection in a piglet model of perinatal asphyxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broad, Kevin D.; Fierens, Igor; Fleiss, Bobbi; Rocha-Ferreira, Eridan; Ezzati, Mojgan; Hassell, Jane; Alonso-Alconada, Daniel; Bainbridge, Alan; Kawano, Go; Ma, Daqing; Tachtsidis, Ilias; Gressens, Pierre; Golay, Xavier; Sanders, Robert D.; Robertson, Nicola J.

    2016-01-01

    Cooling to 33.5 °C in babies with neonatal encephalopathy significantly reduces death and disability, however additional therapies are needed to maximize brain protection. Following hypoxia–ischemia we assessed whether inhaled 45–50% Argon from 2–26 h augmented hypothermia neuroprotection in a neonatal piglet model, using MRS and aEEG, which predict outcome in babies with neonatal encephalopathy, and immunohistochemistry. Following cerebral hypoxia–ischemia, 20 Newborn male Large White piglets < 40 h were randomized to: (i) Cooling (33 °C) from 2–26 h (n = 10); or (ii) Cooling and inhaled 45–50% Argon (Cooling + Argon) from 2–26 h (n = 8). Whole-brain phosphorus-31 and regional proton MRS were acquired at baseline, 24 and 48 h after hypoxia–ischemia. EEG was monitored. At 48 h after hypoxia–ischemia, cell death (TUNEL) was evaluated over 7 brain regions. There were no differences in body weight, duration of hypoxia–ischemia or insult severity; throughout the study there were no differences in heart rate, arterial blood pressure, blood biochemistry and inotrope support. Two piglets in the Cooling + Argon group were excluded. Comparing Cooling + Argon with Cooling there was preservation of whole-brain MRS ATP and PCr/Pi at 48 h after hypoxia–ischemia (p < 0.001 for both) and lower 1H MRS lactate/N acetyl aspartate in white (p = 0.03 and 0.04) but not gray matter at 24 and 48 h. EEG background recovery was faster (p < 0.01) with Cooling + Argon. An overall difference between average cell-death of Cooling versus Cooling + Argon was observed (p < 0.01); estimated cells per mm2 were 23.9 points lower (95% C.I. 7.3–40.5) for the Cooling + Argon versus Cooling. Inhaled 45–50% Argon from 2–26 h augmented hypothermic protection at 48 h after hypoxia–ischemia shown by improved brain energy metabolism on MRS, faster EEG recovery and reduced cell death on TUNEL. Argon may provide a cheap and practical therapy

  13. Modelling steel’s homogenization during argon purging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Pieprzyca

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: One of the primary tasks that put the steel producers to the test is to reduce production costs while maintaining high quality. This objective is achieved among others through the optimization of conducted technological processes. Commonly used technology of steel homogenization with inert gases is an important stage in the production of steel in which that objective can be accomplished.Design/methodology/approach: Tests of hydrodynamic processes occurring during the steel blowing with inert gases process directly in industrial conditions is very difficult or impossible. Therefore, as the primary research method physical modelling was used. In order to carry out the tests described in the article a physical model of the station for the argon purging was used that is working at the VSB-TU, Department of Metallurgy and Foundry in Ostrava.Findings: As a result the study provided values for the investigated process and determined the appropriate location of the gas-permeable fittings in steelmaking ladle’s bottom plug. This allows to obtain the required conditions for the steel mixing in the entire volume of ladle’s workspace.Research limitations/implications: Tests presented in the article were carried out in the VSB-TU in Ostrava. Due to this fact some research limitations occurs that applies to localization and physical model’s specific construction. Therefore, as a result of cooperation between VSB-TU in Ostrava and the Silesian University of Technology will be carried out the construction of the new research station in Katowice.Practical implications: The results of the research constitute the basis to make changes that will allow the optimization to so far used purge of steel technology.Originality/value: The results presented in the article are addressed to the steel producers and it allows to optimize on-going steel homogenization process that takes place in the ladle

  14. Scintillation light from cosmic-ray muons in liquid argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittington, Denver Wade [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Physics Dept.; Mufson, S. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Astronomy Dept.; Howard, B. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Physics Dept.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports the results of an experiment to directly measure the time-resolved scintillation signal from the passage of cosmic-ray muons through liquid argon. Scintillation light from these muons is of value to studies of weakly-interacting particles in neutrino experiments and dark matter searches. The experiment was carried out at the TallBo dewar facility at Fermilab using prototype light guide detectors and electronics developed for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. Two models are presented for the time structure of the scintillation light, a phenomenological model and a physically-motivated model. Both models find tT = 1:52 ms for the decay time constant of the Ar 2 triplet state. These models also show that the identification of the “early” light fraction in the phenomenological model, FE 25% of the signal, with the total light from singlet decays is an underestimate. The total fraction of singlet light is FS 36%, where the increase over FE is from singlet light emitted by the wavelength shifter through processes with long decay constants. The models were further used to compute the experimental particle identification parameter Fprompt, the fraction of light coming in a short time window after the trigger compared with the light in the total recorded waveform. The models reproduce quite well the typical experimental value 0.3 found by dark matter and double b-decay experiments, which suggests this parameter provides a robust metric for discriminating electrons and muons from more heavily ionizing particles.

  15. Scintillation Light from Cosmic-Ray Muons in Liquid Argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittington, Denver Wade [Indiana U.; Mufson, S. [Indiana U., Bloomington, Dept. Astron.; Howard, B. [Indiana U.

    2015-11-13

    This paper reports the results of an experiment to directly measure the time-resolved scintillation signal from the passage of cosmic-ray muons through liquid argon. Scintillation light from these muons is of value to studies of weakly-interacting particles in neutrino experiments and dark matter searches. The experiment was carried out at the TallBo dewar facility at Fermilab using prototype light guide detectors and electronics developed for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. Two models are presented for the time structure of the scintillation light, a phenomenological model and a physically-motivated model. Both models find tT = 1:52 ms for the decay time constant of the Ar 2 triplet state. These models also show that the identification of the “early” light fraction in the phenomenological model, FE 25% of the signal, with the total light from singlet decays is an underestimate. The total fraction of singlet light is FS 36%, where the increase over FE is from singlet light emitted by the wavelength shifter through processes with long decay constants. The models were further used to compute the experimental particle identification parameter Fprompt, the fraction of light coming in a short time window after the trigger compared with the light in the total recorded waveform. The models reproduce quite well the typical experimental value 0.3 found by dark matter and double b-decay experiments, which suggests this parameter provides a robust metric for discriminating electrons and muons from more heavily ionizing particles.

  16. Scintillation light from cosmic-ray muons in liquid argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, D.; Mufson, S.; Howard, B.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports the results of an experiment to directly measure the time-resolved scintillation signal from the passage of cosmic-ray muons through liquid argon. Scintillation light from these muons is of value to studies of weakly-interacting particles in neutrino experiments and dark matter searches. The experiment was carried out at the TallBo dewar facility at Fermilab using prototype light guide detectors and electronics developed for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. Two models are presented for the time structure of the scintillation light, a phenomenological model and a composite model. Both models find τT = 1.52 μs for the decay time constant of the Ar2* triplet state. These models also show that the identification of the ``early'' light fraction in the phenomenological model, FE ≈ 25% of the signal, with the total light from singlet decays is an underestimate. The total fraction of singlet light is FS ≈ 36%, where the increase over FE is from singlet light emitted by the wavelength shifter through processes with long decay constants. The models were further used to compute the experimental particle identification parameter Fprompt, the fraction of light coming in a short time window after the trigger compared with the light in the total recorded waveform. The models reproduce quite well the typical experimental value ~0.3 found by dark matter and double β-decay experiments, which suggests this parameter provides a robust metric for discriminating electrons and muons from more heavily ionizing particles.

  17. AcEST: CL39Contig1 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CL39Contig1 913 36 Adiantum capillus-veneris contig: CL39contig1 sequence. Link to clone list Show CL39C...ontig1 Contig ID CL39Contig1 Length 913 Number of clones 36 Definition Adiantum capillus-veneris contig: CL39c

  18. Efficacy of argon plasma coagulation in the management of portal hypertensive gastropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanafy, Amr Shaaban; El Hawary, Amr Talaat

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Evaluation of the outcome and experience in 2 years of management of portal hypertensive gastropathy (PHG) by argon plasma coagulation (APC) in a cohort of Egyptian cirrhotic patients. Methods: This study was conducted over a 2-year period from January 2011 to February 2013. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed to evaluate the degree and site of PHG. APC was applied to areas with mucosal vascular lesions. Results: In total, 200 cirrhotic patients were enrolled; 12 patients were excluded due to death (n = 6) caused by hepatic encephalopathy (n = 3), hepatorenal syndrome (n = 2), or chronic lymphatic leukemia (n = 1), or did not complete the treatment sessions (n = 6), so 188 patients completed the study. PHG was mainly fundic in 73 patients (38.8 %), corporeal in 66 patients (35.1 %), and pangastric in 49 patients (26.1 %) (P = 0.026). Patients were exposed to APC and received proton pump inhibitors together with propranolol at a dose sufficient to reduce the heart rate by 25 % or down to 55 beats/min. The mean (± standard deviation) number of sessions was 1.65 ± 0.8; six patients needed four sessions (3.2 %), 19 patients needed three sessions (10.1 %), 74 patients needed two sessions (39.4 %), and 89 patients needed one session (47.3 %). Patients with fundic and corporeal PHG required the lowest number of sessions (P = 0.000). Patients were followed up every 2 months for up to 1 year; the end point was a complete response with improved anemia and blood transfusion requirement which was achieved after one session in 89 patients (75.4 %), two sessions in 24 patients (20.3 %) and three sessions in five patients (4.3 %). A complete response was more prevalent in patients with corporeal and fundic PHG (P = 0.04). Conclusions: After 2 years’ experience in managing PHG, we found that a combination of APC and non-selective beta blockers was highly efficacious and safe in controlling

  19. 耐酸油墨THC-39

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    田菱精细化工有限公司推出电容式触摸屏滚轮涂布型耐酸油墨THC-39,具有以下显著特点。 THC-39耐酸油墨在黄光作业下,使用滚轮涂布的方式,将其整版涂布在电容式触摸屏的ITO膜表面,再进行曝光显影作业,以使图案成像,蚀刻出来,

  20. Measurements of fast neutrons in Hiroshima by use of (39)Ar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, Eckehart; Rühm, Werner; Loosli, H Hugo; Tolstikhin, Igor; Kato, Kazuo; Huber, Thomas C; Egbert, Stephen D

    2006-03-01

    The survivors of the A-bomb explosions over Hiroshima and Nagasaki were exposed to a mixed neutron and gamma radiation field. To validate the high-energy portion of the neutron field and thus the neutron dose to the survivors, a method is described that allows retrospective assessment of the fast neutrons from the A-bombs. This is accomplished by the extraction of the noble gas argon from biotites separated from Hiroshima granite samples, and then the detection of the (39)Ar activity that was produced by the capture of the fast neutrons on potassium. Adjusted to the year 1945, activities measured in the first samples taken at distances of 94, 818, 992, and 1,173 m from the hypocenter were 6.9+/-0.2, 0.32+/-0.01, 0.14+/-0.02, and 0.09+/-0.01 mBq/g K, respectively. All signals were significantly above detector background and show low uncertainties. Considering their uncertainties they agree with the calculated (39)Ar activation in the samples, based on the most recent dosimetry system DS02. It is concluded that this method can be used to investigate samples obtained from large distances in Hiroshima, where previous data on fast neutrons are characterized by considerable uncertainties. Additionally, the method can be used to reconstruct the fast neutron fluence in Nagasaki, where no experimental data exist. PMID:16429279

  1. A test of the 40Ar/39Ar age spectrum technique on some terrestrial materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanphere, M.A.; Brent, Dalrymple G.

    1971-01-01

    40Ar/39Ar age spectra were determined for 10 terrestrial rock and mineral samples whose geologic history is known from independent evidence. The spectra for six mineral and whole rock samples, including biotite, feldspar, hornblende, muscovite, and granodiorite, that have experienced post-crystallization heating did not reveal the age of crystallization in any obvious way. Minima in the spectra, however, give reasonable maximum ages for reheating and high-temperature maxima can be interpreted as minimum crystallization ages. High-temperature ages of microcline and albite that have not been reheated are approximately 10% younger than the known crystallization age. Apparently there are no domains in these feldspars that have retained radiogenic 40Ar quantitatively. Spectra from two diabase samples that contain significant quantities of excess argon might mistakenly be interpreted as spectra from reheated samples and do not give the age of emplacement. The 40Ar/39Ar age spectrum technique may be a potentially valuable tool for the study of geologic areas with complex histories, but the interpretation of age spectra from terrestrial samples seems to be more difficult than suggested by some previous studies. ?? 1971.

  2. Argon gas concentration effects on nanostructured molybdenum nitride layer growth using 100 Hz pulsed dc glow discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikhlaq, U.; Ahmad, R.; Saleem, S.; Shah, M. S.; Umm-i-Kalsoom; Khan, N.; Khalid, N.

    2012-08-01

    The effect of argon concentration (10%-40%) on the surface properties of molybdenum is studied in nitrogen-argon mixture using 100 Hz pulsed dc glow discharge. The analysis is carried out by using X-ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Vickers microhardness tester to investigate surface properties of the nitrided samples. XRD results exhibit the formation of molybdenum nitrides. Crystallite size analysis and SEM morphology confirm the growth of nanostructured molybdenum nitride layers. Moreover, significant increase in surface hardness (by a factor of about two times) is found when the sample is treated for 30% argon in nitrogen-argon mixed plasma.

  3. Improved TPB-coated light guides for liquid argon TPC light detection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scintillation light produced in liquid argon (LAr) must be shifted from 128 nm to visible wavelengths in light detection systems used for liquid argon time-projection chambers (LArTPCs). To date, LArTPC light collection systems have employed tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) coatings on photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) or plates placed in front of the PMTs. Recently, a new approach using TPB-coated light guides was proposed. In this paper, we report on light guides with improved attenuation lengths above 100 cm when measured in air. This is an important step in the development of meter-scale light guides for future LArTPCs. Improvements come from using a new acrylic-based coating, diamond-polished cast UV transmitting acrylic bars, and a hand-dipping technique to coat the bars. We discuss a model for connecting bar response in air to response in liquid argon and compare this to data taken in liquid argon. The good agreement between the prediction of the model and the measured response in liquid argon demonstrates that characterization in air is sufficient for quality control of bar production. This model can be used in simulations of light guides for future experiments

  4. Improved TPB-coated light guides for liquid argon TPC light detection systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Z.; Bugel, L.; Collin, G.; Conrad, J. M.; Jones, B. J. P.; Moon, J.; Toups, M.; Wongjirad, T.

    2015-08-01

    Scintillation light produced in liquid argon (LAr) must be shifted from 128 nm to visible wavelengths in light detection systems used for liquid argon time-projection chambers (LArTPCs). To date, LArTPC light collection systems have employed tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) coatings on photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) or plates placed in front of the PMTs. Recently, a new approach using TPB-coated light guides was proposed. In this paper, we report on light guides with improved attenuation lengths above 100 cm when measured in air. This is an important step in the development of meter-scale light guides for future LArTPCs. Improvements come from using a new acrylic-based coating, diamond-polished cast UV transmitting acrylic bars, and a hand-dipping technique to coat the bars. We discuss a model for connecting bar response in air to response in liquid argon and compare this to data taken in liquid argon. The good agreement between the prediction of the model and the measured response in liquid argon demonstrates that characterization in air is sufficient for quality control of bar production. This model can be used in simulations of light guides for future experiments.

  5. Fast-imaging and spectroscopic analysis of atmospheric argon streamers for large gap arc breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachuilo, Michael; Stefani, Francis; Bengtson, Roger; Raja, Laxminarayan

    2014-10-01

    A non-equilibrium plasma source has been developed to assist in the low-voltage arc breakdown of large electrode gaps. The source consists of a dielectric embedded wire helically wound around a confining cylindrical quartz chamber. Annular electrodes cap the ends of the quartz chamber. An argon feed gas is used to provide a uniform environment and exhausts to ambient atmospheric conditions. A negative polarity 50 kV trigger pulse is applied to the embedded trigger wire to initiate the arc breakdown. Application of the trigger pulse produces a localized coronal discharges along the inner surface of the quartz tube. The corona provides seed electrons through which streamers propagate from one of the main discharge electrode along the quartz surface until it reaches the opposite electrode to bridge the gap. Once the gap is bridged a spark over occurs and robust arc discharge is formed in the chamber volume. Fast imaging of the streamer propagation establishes its velocity in the range of ~ 100 km/s. Spectroscopy of the streamer discharge in atmospheric argon has been conducted and electron temperature and number density estimated from a collision radiative model. Argon spectrum is dominated by neutral argon lines in the 650--950 nm range, and singly ionized argon lines are observed in the ultra-violet to near UV (300--400 nm). Research was performed in connection with AFOSR Contract FA9550-11-1-0062.

  6. Prediction of the thermophysical properties of pure neon, pure argon, and the binary mixtures neon-argon and argon-krypton by Monte Carlo simulation using ab initio potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrabad, A E; Laghaei, R; Deiters, U K

    2004-10-01

    Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo simulations were used to test the ability of intermolecular pair potentials derived ab initio from quantum mechanical principles, enhanced by Axilrod-Teller triple-dipole interactions, to predict the vapor-liquid phase equilibria of pure neon, pure argon, and the binary mixtures neon-argon and argon-krypton. The interaction potentials for Ne-Ne, Ar-Ar, Kr-Kr, and Ne-Ar were taken from literature; for Ar-Kr a different potential has been developed. In all cases the quantum mechanical calculations had been carried out with the coupled-cluster approach [CCSD(T) level of theory] and with correlation consistent basis sets; furthermore an extrapolation scheme had been applied to obtain the basis set limit of the interaction energies. The ab initio pair potentials as well as the thermodynamic data based on them are found to be in excellent agreement with experimental data; the only exception is neon. It is shown, however, that in this case the deviations can be quantitatively explained by quantum effects. The interaction potentials that have been developed permit quantitative predictions of high-pressure phase equilibria of noble-gas mixtures.

  7. 39 CFR 955.9 - Hearing election.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hearing election. 955.9 Section 955.9 Postal... CONTRACT APPEALS § 955.9 Hearing election. As directed by Board order, each party shall inform the Board... elected, the election should state where and when the electing party desires the hearing to be...

  8. 39 CFR 261.2 - Authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... Included is the authority to issue records management policy and to delegate or take appropriate action if... UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION RECORDS AND INFORMATION MANAGEMENT § 261.2... dispose of such property. (b) 39 CFR 262.2 assigns to the Postal Service Records Office, located under...

  9. 39 CFR 3020.55 - Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Review. 3020.55 Section 3020.55 Postal Service... the Product Lists Described Within the Mail Classification Schedule § 3020.55 Review. The Commission shall review the request, the Postal Service reply, and any public comment to determine whether...

  10. 39 CFR 3020.34 - Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Review. 3020.34 Section 3020.34 Postal Service... the Product Lists Described Within the Mail Classification Schedule § 3020.34 Review. The Commission shall review the request and responsive comments. The Commission shall either: (a) Approve the...

  11. 39 CFR 3020.75 - Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Review. 3020.75 Section 3020.75 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL PRODUCT LISTS Proposal of the Commission To Modify the Product Lists Described Within the Mail Classification Schedule § 3020.75 Review. The Commission shall...

  12. 39 CFR 3003.6 - Fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fees. 3003.6 Section 3003.6 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL PRIVACY ACT RULES § 3003.6 Fees. The first copy of any record furnished under the Privacy Act of 1974 will be provided without charge. Additional copies will be charged at the...

  13. 41 CFR 101-39.303 - Maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Maintenance. 101-39.303... Maintenance. In order to ensure uninterrupted operation of GSA Interagency Fleet Management System (IFMS) vehicles, safety and preventive maintenance inspections will be performed at regularly scheduled...

  14. 39 CFR 3002.3 - Official seal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Official seal. 3002.3 Section 3002.3 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL ORGANIZATION § 3002.3 Official seal. (a) Authority. The Seal described in this section is hereby established as the official seal of the Postal Rate...

  15. 39 CFR 262.3 - Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Information. 262.3 Section 262.3 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION RECORDS AND INFORMATION MANAGEMENT DEFINITIONS § 262.3 Information. Data combined with the knowledge of its context and having the potential...

  16. 49 CFR 230.39 - Broken staybolts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Staybolts § 230.39 Broken staybolts. (a) Maximum allowable number of broken staybolts. No boiler shall be... inside the firebox or combustion chamber on a straight line. No boiler shall be allowed to remain...

  17. 39 CFR 957.16 - Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Evidence. 957.16 Section 957.16 Postal Service... SUSPENSION FROM CONTRACTING § 957.16 Evidence. (a) Except as otherwise provided in the rules in this part, the rules of evidence governing civil proceedings in matters not involving trial by jury in the...

  18. 39 CFR 959.17 - Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Evidence. 959.17 Section 959.17 Postal Service... STATUTES § 959.17 Evidence. (a) Except as otherwise provided in these rules, the rules of evidence... repetitious evidence. (b) Testimony shall be under oath or affirmation and witnesses shall be subject to...

  19. 39 CFR 952.18 - Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Evidence. 952.18 Section 952.18 Postal Service... AND LOTTERY ORDERS § 952.18 Evidence. (a) Except as otherwise provided in these rules, the Federal Rules of Evidence shall govern. However, such rules may be relaxed to the extent that the...

  20. 39 CFR 259.2 - Red Cross.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Red Cross. 259.2 Section 259.2 Postal Service....2 Red Cross. (a) General. The Postal Service and the Red Cross cooperate to maintain communication... those caused by enemy action. (b) Role of Postal Service. The Postal Service and the Red Cross...

  1. 39 CFR 955.28 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suspension. 955.28 Section 955.28 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PRACTICE BEFORE THE POSTAL SERVICE BOARD OF CONTRACT APPEALS § 955.28 Suspension. (a) Whenever at any time it appears that the parties are in agreement as...

  2. 39 CFR 957.27 - Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suspension. 957.27 Section 957.27 Postal Service... SUSPENSION FROM CONTRACTING § 957.27 Suspension. (a) Any firm or individual suspended under chapter 3, section 7 of the Postal Service Purchasing Manual who believes that the suspension has not been...

  3. 39 CFR 3020.92 - Public input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Public input. 3020.92 Section 3020.92 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL PRODUCT LISTS Requests Initiated by the Postal Service to Change the Mail Classification Schedule § 3020.92 Public input. The Commission shall publish...

  4. 39 CFR 3030.21 - Investigator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Investigator. 3030.21 Section 3030.21 Postal... Investigator. The Commission may appoint an investigator to examine issues raised by the complaint and responses thereto. The investigator will use appropriate due diligence under the circumstances and provide...

  5. 39 CFR 3050.35 - Financial reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Financial reports. 3050.35 Section 3050.35 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL PERIODIC REPORTING § 3050.35 Financial reports. (a) The... submission of the Federal Budget by the President to the Congress); and (d) Integrated Financial Plan...

  6. 25 CFR 39.1001 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION THE INDIAN SCHOOL EQUALIZATION PROGRAM Administrative Cost Formula § 39.1001 Definitions. (a) Agency Education Office means a field office of the Office of Indian Education Programs providing administrative direction and supervision to one or more...

  7. 39 CFR 3060.12 - Asset allocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Asset allocation. 3060.12 Section 3060.12 Postal... COMPETITIVE PRODUCTS ENTERPRISE § 3060.12 Asset allocation. Within 6 months of January 23, 2009, and for each... competitive products enterprise using a method of allocation based on appropriate revenue or cost...

  8. 39 CFR 491.5 - Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Costs. 491.5 Section 491.5 Postal Service UNITED... RATE COMMISSION § 491.5 Costs. The Postal Service's administrative costs in executing the garnishment action shall be added to each garnishment and the costs recovered shall be retained as...

  9. 39 CFR 775.14 - Hearings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hearings. 775.14 Section 775.14 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATIONS NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT PROCEDURES § 775... §§ 775.11(d)(1) and 775.13 must be complied with whenever a hearing is to be held....

  10. 39 CFR 775.3 - Responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Responsibilities. 775.3 Section 775.3 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATIONS NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT PROCEDURES § 775.3 Responsibilities. (a) The Chief Environmental Officer is responsible for...

  11. 39 CFR 775.2 - Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Policy. 775.2 Section 775.2 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATIONS NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT PROCEDURES § 775.2 Policy. It is the policy of the Postal Service to: (a) Interpret and administer applicable...

  12. 39 CFR 775.6 - Categorical exclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Categorical exclusions. 775.6 Section 775.6 Postal... PROCEDURES § 775.6 Categorical exclusions. (a) The classes of actions in this section are those that the... “reference actions” documented under § 775.6(b)(17). (9) Acquisition and disposal through sale,...

  13. 39 CFR 775.4 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....4 Definitions. (a) The definitions set forth in 40 CFR part 1508 apply to this part 775. (b) In addition to the terms defined in 40 CFR part 1508, the following definitions apply to this part: Approving... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Definitions. 775.4 Section 775.4 Postal...

  14. 39 CFR 775.10 - Environmental assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Environmental assessments. 775.10 Section 775.10 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATIONS NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT PROCEDURES § 775.10 Environmental assessments. (a) An environmental assessment must contain: (1) A summary...

  15. 39 CFR 775.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Purpose. 775.1 Section 775.1 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATIONS NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT PROCEDURES § 775.1 Purpose. These procedures implement the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) regulations (40 CFR...

  16. 39 CFR 262.5 - Systems (Privacy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Systems (Privacy). 262.5 Section 262.5 Postal... DEFINITIONS § 262.5 Systems (Privacy). (a) Privacy Act system of records. A Postal Service system containing... individual. (c) Computer matching program. A “matching program,” as defined in the Privacy Act, 5 U.S.C....

  17. 39 CFR 3060.20 - Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reports. 3060.20 Section 3060.20 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL ACCOUNTING PRACTICES AND TAX RULES FOR THE THEORETICAL COMPETITIVE... ending September 30, 2008. (f) The accounting practices used by the Postal Service in the reports...

  18. 27 CFR 4.39 - Prohibited practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... this is necessary in order to prevent confusion as to the person, company, or brand name to which the... with the requirements of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, TTB will not approve the use of that... Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 4.39, see the List of CFR Sections Affected,...

  19. 39 CFR 233.12 - Civil penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Civil penalties. False representation and lottery orders— (a) Issuance. Pursuant to 39 U.S.C. 3005, the... matter which is nonmailable, or engaged in conducting a lottery, gift enterprise, or scheme for the distribution of money or of real or personal property, by lottery, chance, or drawing of any kind....

  20. 39 CFR 3030.11 - Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Service. 3030.11 Section 3030.11 Postal Service... Pleadings § 3030.11 Service. Any person filing a complaint must simultaneously serve a copy of the complaint on the Postal Service at the following address: PRCCOMPLAINTS@usps.gov. A complaint is not...

  1. 39 CFR 952.8 - Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Service. 952.8 Section 952.8 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PRACTICE IN PROCEEDINGS RELATIVE TO FALSE REPRESENTATION AND LOTTERY ORDERS § 952.8 Service. (a) Where the Respondent's mailing address is within the United...

  2. 39 CFR 3060.41 - Supporting documentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Supporting documentation. 3060.41 Section 3060.41 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL ACCOUNTING PRACTICES AND TAX RULES FOR THE THEORETICAL COMPETITIVE PRODUCTS ENTERPRISE § 3060.41 Supporting documentation. (a) In support of...

  3. 39 CFR 221.5 - Headquarters organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Headquarters organization. 221.5 Section 221.5 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION GENERAL ORGANIZATION § 221.5 Headquarters organization. (a) Postmaster General—(1) Appointment. The postmaster general (PMG), the...

  4. 39 CFR 3004.12 - Reading room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reading room. 3004.12 Section 3004.12 Postal... Reading room. (a) The Commission maintains a public reading room at its offices (901 New York Avenue, NW., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20268-0001) and an electronic reading room at http://www.prc.gov. The...

  5. 39 CFR 601.100 - Purchasing policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Purchasing policy. 601.100 Section 601.100 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCUREMENT SYSTEM FOR THE U.S. POSTAL SERVICE: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS OTHER THAN PATENTS PURCHASING OF PROPERTY AND SERVICES § 601.100 Purchasing policy. The...

  6. 39 CFR 10.2 - Advisory service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., including 5 CFR part 2638. (b) A Governor may obtain advice and guidance on questions of conflicts of... regulations contained in 5 CFR parts 2635 and 7001, or conduct which creates the appearance of such a... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Advisory service. 10.2 Section 10.2 Postal...

  7. 39 CFR 955.34 - Sanctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... attorney, the standards include the rules of professional conduct and ethics of the jurisdictions in which... established for the purpose of the case; (2) Forbidding challenge of the accuracy of any evidence; (3... accordance with 39 CFR Part 951, referral to an appropriate licensing authority, or such other action...

  8. 9 CFR 311.39 - Biological residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Biological residues. 311.39 Section... Biological residues. Carcasses, organs, or other parts of carcasses of livestock shall be condemned if it is determined that they are adulterated because of the presence of any biological residues....

  9. 7 CFR 1780.39 - Application processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) WATER AND WASTE LOANS AND GRANTS Loan and Grant Application Processing § 1780.39... providing the services necessary to plan projects including design of facilities, environmental review and... of professional services required and at a fair and reasonable price. (ii) When project...

  10. First measurement of surface nuclear recoil background for argon dark matter searches

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Jingke; Westerdale, Shawn; Calaprice, Frank; Wright, Alexander; Shi, Zhiming

    2016-01-01

    One major background in direct searches for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) comes from the deposition of radon progeny on detector surfaces. The most dangerous surface background is the $^{206}$Pb recoils produced by $^{210}$Po decays. In this letter, we report the first characterization of this background in liquid argon. The scintillation signal of low energy Pb recoils is measured to be highly quenched in argon, and we estimate that the 103keV $^{206}$Pb recoil background will produce a signal equal to that of a ~5keV (30keV) electron recoil ($^{40}$Ar recoil). In addition, we demonstrate that this dangerous $^{210}$Po surface background can be suppressed by a factor of ~100 or higher using pulse shape discrimination methods, which can make argon dark matter detectors near background-free and enhance their potential for discovery of medium- and high-mass WIMPs. We also discuss the impact on other low background experiments.

  11. The WArP Experiment: A Double-Phase Argon Detector for Dark Matter Searches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cryogenic noble liquids emerged in the previous decade as one of the best media to perform WIMP dark matter searches, in particular due to the possibility to scale detector volumes to multiton sizes. The WArP experiment was then developed as one of the first to implement the idea of coupling Argon in liquid and gas phase, in order to discriminate β/γ-interactions from nuclear recoils and then achieve reliable background rejection. Since its construction, other projects spawned, employing Argon and Xenon and following its steps. The WArP 100l detector was assembled in 2008 at the Gran Sasso National Laboratories (LNGS), as the final step of a years-long R&D programme, aimed at characterising the technology of Argon in double phase for dark matter detection. Though it never actually performed a physics run, a technical run was taken in 2011, to characterise the detector response

  12. Operation of a GERDA phase I prototype detector in liquid argon and nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A GERDA phase I prototype detector, consisting of a bare non-enriched high-purity (HP) p-type germanium diode mounted in a low mass holder has been operated both in liquid nitrogen and liquid argon. Because of its high density, liquid argon has been selected as cryogenic liquid and shield for GERDA experiment. The testing of this detector assembly has been carried out in the underground detector laboratory at LNGS, and at the detector manufacturer. The best resolution achieved is 2.2 keV FWHM at 1.332 MeV, which is the same as the resolution measured in a standard test cryostat. The long-term measurements with the prototype detector are performed in liquid argon. Up to now, 38 thermal cycles have been carried out with this detector. The operations, measurements and results of the prototype detector testing are summarized. (orig.)

  13. Lattice gas model for fragmentation from argon on scandium to gold on gold

    CERN Document Server

    Das-Gupta, S; Gupta, Subal Das; Pan, Jicai

    1995-01-01

    The recent fragmentation data for central collisions of Gold on Gold are even qualitatively different from those for central collisions of Argon on Scandium. The latter can be fitted with a lattice gas model calculation. Effort is made to understand why the model fails for Gold on Gold. The calculation suggests that the large Coulomb interaction which is operative for the larger system is responsible for this discrepancy. This is demonstrated by mapping the lattice gas model to a molecular dynamics calculation for disassembly. This mapping is quite faithful for Argon on Scandium but deviates strongly for Gold on Gold. The molecular dynamics calculation for disassembly reproduces the characteristics of the fragmentation data for both Gold on Gold and Argon on Scandium.

  14. Theoretical and experimental comparisons of Gamble 2 argon gas puff experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A one-dimensional radiative MHD analysis of an imploding argon gas puff plasma is performed. The calculations are set up to approximate the conditions of a series of argon gas puff experiments that were carried out on the NRL Gamble II generator. Annular gas puffs (2.5 cm diameter) are imploded with a 1.2-MA peak driving current for different initial argon mass loadings. Comparisons are made with the experimental results for implosion times, K, L-shell x-ray emission, and energy coupled from the generator to the plasma load. The purpose of these calculations is to provide a foundation from which a variety of physical phenomena which influence the power and total energy of the x-ray emission can be analyzed. Comparisons with similar experimental and theoretical results for aluminum plasmas are discussed

  15. Atomistic-Continuum Hybrid Simulation of Heat Transfer between Argon Flow and Copper Plates

    CERN Document Server

    Mao, Yijin; Chen, C L

    2016-01-01

    A simulation work aiming to study heat transfer coefficient between argon fluid flow and copper plate is carried out based on atomistic-continuum hybrid method. Navier-Stokes equations for continuum domain are solved through the Pressure Implicit with Splitting of Operators (PISO) algorithm, and the atom evolution in molecular domain is solved through the Verlet algorithm. The solver is validated by solving Couette flow and heat conduction problems. With both momentum and energy coupling method applied, simulations on convection of argon flows between two parallel plates are performed. The top plate is kept as a constant velocity and has higher temperature, while the lower one, which is modeled with FCC copper lattices, is also fixed but has lower temperature. It is found that, heat transfer between argon fluid flow and copper plate in this situation is much higher than that at macroscopic when the flow is fully developed.

  16. Argon: Systematic Review on Neuro- and Organoprotective Properties of an “Inert” Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke Höllig

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Argon belongs to the group of noble gases, which are regarded as chemically inert. Astonishingly some of these gases exert biological properties and during the last decades more and more reports demonstrated neuroprotective and organoprotective effects. Recent studies predominately use in vivo or in vitro models for ischemic pathologies to investigate the effect of argon treatment. Promising data has been published concerning pathologies like cerebral ischemia, traumatic brain injury and hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. However, models applied and administration of the therapeutic gas vary. Here we provide a systematic review to summarize the available data on argon’s neuro- and organoprotective effects and discuss its possible mechanism of action. We aim to provide a summary to allow further studies with a more homogeneous setting to investigate possible clinical applications of argon.

  17. Surface modification of poly (vinyl chloride) by long-distance and direct argon RF plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports the effects of long- distance and direct argon radio frequency (RF) plasma surface treatment on polyvinyl chloride (PVC) films in terms of changes in surface wettability and surface chemistry. The surface properties are characterized by the water contact angle measurement, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The mechanism is further analyzed and the role of all kinds of active species, e.g. electrons, ions and free radicals involved in plasma surface modification is further evaluated. Results show that the long-distance and direct RF plasma treatments modify the PVC surface in morphology and composition, and both modifications cause surface oxidation of PVC films, in the forming of functional groups enhancing polymer wettability. The effect of the long-distance argon RF plasma is more notable. This suggests that long-distance argon RF plasma could restrain the ion and electron eroding effect and enhance free radical reaction.

  18. The effects of accelerated heavy nuclei of neon and argon on mammalian cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The survival of human T-1 kidney cells in high-energy neon (400MeV/nucleon) and argon (500MeV/nucleon) beams has been studied at the Berkeley Bevalac. Cells were plated in monolayers on glass and studied at different residual-range values. The survival curves depend on LET and on particle velocity. The effectiveness of the beams increases as the range decreases, except for argon beams with very low range values, where the effectiveness decreases again. The 'oxygen effect' is high at high particle energies (2.6 for neon and 2.4 for argon); it decreases to values between 1.1 and 1.3 near the Bragg peak. (author)

  19. Synodic and semiannual oscillations of argon-40 in the lunar exosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, R. Richard; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    The neutral mass spectrometer on the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) spacecraft collected a trove of exospheric data, including a set of high-quality measurements of radiogenic 40Ar over a period of 142 days. Data synthesis studies, using well-established exosphere simulation tools, show that the LADEE argon data are consistent with an exosphere-regolith interaction that is dominated by adsorption and that the desorption process generates the Armand distribution of exit velocities. The synthesis work has uncovered an apparent semiannual oscillation of argon that is consistent with temporal sequestration in the seasonal cold traps created at the poles by the obliquity of the Moon. In addition, the LADEE data provide new insight into the pristine nature of lunar regolith, its spatially varying sorption properties, and the influence of sorption processes on the synodic oscillation of the argon exosphere.

  20. Atomistic Simulation of Properties of Ultra-thin Layer of Liquid Argon Compressed Between Diamond Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Khomenko

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Using the method of classical molecular dynamics we investigate the properties of ultrathin film of liquid argon, which consists of one or two layers of molecules and is confined by two atomically smooth crystalline diamond surfaces. The aim of the research is validating the use of rigid surfaces and one of the available models of the argon molecule. We study the behavior of the equilibrium and dynamic characteristics of the system. It is shown that at increasing external load the transition of film in the solid-like state occurs, which is indicated by the behavior of the velocity autocorrelation function of argon molecules, reduction of the magnitude of the diffusion coefficient and the shear viscosity increase. The organization of molecules in layers and the presence of their in-plane ordering are revealed. The dependences of the kinetic friction force on time and load are obtained. The results are compared with experimental data.

  1. Coherent and incoherent Thomson scattering on an argon/hydrogen microwave plasma torch with transient behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrusník, A.; Synek, P.; Hübner, S.; van der Mullen, J. J. A. M.; Zajíčková, L.; Nijdam, S.

    2016-10-01

    A new method of processing time-integrated coherent Thomson scattering spectra is presented, which provides not only the electron density and temperature but also information about the transient behaviour of the plasma. Therefore, it is an alternative to single-shot Thomson scattering measurements as long as the scattering is coherent. The method is applied to a microwave plasma torch operating in argon or a mixture of argon with hydrogen at atmospheric pressure. Electron densities up to 8\\cdot {{10}21} m-3 (ionization degree above 10-3) were observed, which is more than two times higher than presented in earlier works on comparable discharges. Additionally, a parametric study with respect to the argon/hydrogen ratio and the input power was carried out and the results are discussed together with earlier Stark broadening measurements on the same plasma.

  2. Ionic Wind Phenomenon and Charge Carrier Mobility in Very High Density Argon Corona Discharge Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, M.; Bonifaci, N.; Denat, A.

    2014-04-01

    Wind ions phenomenon has been observed in the high density argon corona discharge plasma. Corona discharge plasma was produced by point to plane electrodes and high voltage DC. Light emission from the recombination process was observed visually. The light emission proper follow the electric field lines that occur between point and plane electrodes. By using saturation current, the mobilities of non-thermal electrons and ions have been obtained in argon gas and liquid with variation of density from 2,5 1021 to 2 1022 cm-3. In the case of ions, we found that the behaviour of the apparent mobility inversely proportional to the density or follow the Langevin variation law. For non-thermal electron, mobility decreases and approximately follows a variation of Langevin type until the density <= 0,25 the critical density of argon.

  3. Operation of a high purity germanium crystal in liquid argon as a Compton suppressed radiation spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Orrell, J L; Amsbaugh, J F; Doe, P J; Hossbach, T W; Orrell, John L.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Amsbaugh, John F.; Doe, Peter J.; Hossbach, Todd W.

    2007-01-01

    A high purity germanium crystal was operated in liquid argon as a Compton suppressed radiation spectrometer. Spectroscopic quality resolution of less than 1% of the full-width half maximum of full energy deposition peaks was demonstrated. The construction of the small apparatus used to obtain these results is reported. The design concept is to use the liquid argon bath to both cool the germanium crystal to operating temperatures and act as a scintillating veto. The scintillation light from the liquid argon can veto cosmic-rays, external primordial radiation, and gamma radiation that does not fully deposit within the germanium crystal. This technique was investigated for its potential impact on ultra-low background gamma-ray spectroscopy. This work is based on a concept initially developed for future germanium-based neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments.

  4. 40Ar/39Ar dating of Quaternary volcanic ashes by multi-collection noble gas mass spectrometry: protocols, precision and intercalibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storey, Michael; Rivera, Tiffany; Flude, Stephanie;

    for single crystal 40Ar/39Ar dating of Quaternary samples because of: (i) improved source sensitivity; (ii) ion-counting electron multipliers, which have low signal to noise ratios enabling precise measurement of very small 36Ar signals - resulting in accurate correction for atmospheric-derived 40Ar; (iii......) higher mass resolution allows hydrocarbon interferences to be pseudo resolved for the different argon isotopes; and (iv) multi-collection, allowing more data to be gathered in a fixed time in comparison with single-collector peak-switching measurements. We evaluate (i) protocols for detector inter...

  5. Calculation of ion energy distributions of argon excimer ions generated in helicon plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Tong-Zhen; Jiang Nan; Wang Long

    2005-01-01

    A program is developed to calculate the ion energy distributions (IEDs) of Ar2+ making use of a simplified kinetic model with a combination of Monte Carlo method. Several coefficients are used to realize good match between the calculated and measured results. Some important assumptions are confirmed: argon excimer ions have short lifetime,hence they are formed in a short range before the collecting electrode. The excimer ions that encounter collisions will be discarded because they turn to other ion species after they collide with argon atoms. From the calculated results some plasma parameters such as the cross section or neutral density in discharge could be evaluated.

  6. Transport coefficients of helium-argon mixture based on ab initio potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharipov, Felix; Benites, Victor J

    2015-10-21

    The viscosity, thermal conductivity, diffusion coefficient, and thermal diffusion factor of helium-argon mixtures are calculated for a wide range of temperature and for various mole fractions up to the 12th order of the Sonine polynomial expansion with an ab initio intermolecular potential. The calculated values for these transport coefficients are compared with other data available in the open literature. The comparison shows that the obtained transport coefficients of helium-argon mixture have the best accuracy for the moment. PMID:26493894

  7. Heat Transfer During Evaporation of Cesium From Graphite Surface in an Argon Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bespala Evgeny

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on discussion of problem of graphite radioactive waste formation and accumulation. It is shown that irradiated nuclear graphite being inalienable part of uranium-graphite reactor may contain fission and activation products. Much attention is given to the process of formation of radioactive cesium on the graphite element surface. It is described a process of plasma decontamination of irradiated graphite in inert argon atmosphere. Quasi-one mathematical model is offered, it describes heat transfer process in graphite-cesium-argon system. Article shows results of calculation of temperature field inside the unit cell. Authors determined the factors which influence on temperature change.

  8. Evolution of precipitate in nickel-base alloy 718 irradiated with argon ions at elevated temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shuoxue; Luo, Fengfeng; Ma, Shuli; Chen, Jihong; Li, Tiecheng; Tang, Rui; Guo, Liping

    2013-07-01

    Alloy 718 is a nickel-base superalloy whose strength derives from γ'(Ni3(Al,Ti)) and γ″(Ni3Nb) precipitates. The evolution of the precipitates in alloy 718 irradiated with argon ions at elevated temperature were examined via transmission electron microscopy. Selected-area electron diffraction indicated superlattice spots disappeared after argon ion irradiation, which showing that the ordered structure of the γ' and γ″ precipitates became disordered. The size of the precipitates became smaller with the irradiation dose increasing at 290 °C.

  9. A 20-Liter Test Stand with Gas Purification for Liquid Argon Research

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yichen; Tang, Wei; Joshi, Jyoti; Qian, Xin; Diwan, Milind; Kettell, Steve; Morse, William; Rao, Triveni; Stewart, James; Tsang, Thomas; Zhang, Lige

    2016-01-01

    We describe the design of a 20-liter test stand constructed to study fundamental properties of liquid argon (LAr). This system utilizes a simple, cost-effective gas argon (GAr) purification to achieve ultra-high purity, which is necessary to study electron transport properties in LAr. An electron drift stack with up to 25 cm length is constructed to study electron drift, diffusion, and attachment at various electric fields. A gold photocathode and a pulsed laser are used as a bright electron source. The operational performance of this system is reported.

  10. Pulse Compression by Filamentation in Argon with an Acoustic Optical Programmable Dispersive Filter for Predispersion Compensation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiao-Wei; JIANG Yong-Liang; LENG Yu-Xin; LIU Jun; GE Xiao-Chun; LI Ru-Xin; XU Zhi-Zhan

    2006-01-01

    @@ We have experimentally demonstrated pulses 0.4 mJ in duration smaller than 12 fs with an excellent spatial beam profile by self-guided propagation in argon. The original 52fs pulses from the chirped pulsed amplification laser system are first precompressed to 32 fs by inserting an acoustic optical programmable dispersive filter instrument into the laser system for spectrum reshaping and dispersion compensation, and the pulse spectrum is subsequently broadened by filamentation in an argon cell. By using chirped mirrors for post-dispersion compensation, the pulses are successfully compressed to smaller than 12fs.

  11. The Discovery of Argon in Comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp)

    CERN Document Server

    Stern, S A; Festou, M C; Parker, J W; A'Hearn, M F; Wilkinson, E; Gladstone, G R

    2000-01-01

    On 30.14 March 1997 we observed the EUV spectrum of the bright comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) at the time of its perihelion, using our EUVS sounding rocket telescope/spectrometer. The spectra reveal the presence H Ly beta, O+, and, most notably, Argon. Modelling of the retrieved Ar production rates indicates that comet Hale-Bopp is enriched in Ar relative to cosmogonic expectations. This in turn indicates that Hale-Bopp's deep interior has never been exposed to the 35-40 K temperatures necessary to deplete the comet's primordial argon supply.

  12. Physiological responses of Vigna radiata L. to nitrogen and argon+ laser irradiation - Short Communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of nitrogen laser (337.1 nm) and argon+ laser (514.5 nm) irradiation on physiological responses in the green gram seedlings was studied. The shoot and root lengths and fresh and dry weights of the seedlings increased with 30 min exposure to nitrogen laser and 5 min exposure to Argon+ laser. Protein content was maximum with 20 min exposure to N laser and 5 min exposure to Ar+ laser, while DNA and RNA contents were maximum at 5 min exposure with both the laser treatments

  13. Inner-shell Annihilation of Positrons in Argon, Iron and Copper Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Abdel-Raouf, M A; El-Bakry, S Y

    2007-01-01

    The annihilation parameters of positrons with electrons in different shells of Argon, Iron and Copper atoms are calculated below the positronium (Ps) formation thresholds. Quite accurate ab initio calculations of the bound state wavefunctions of Argon, Iron and Copper orbitals are obtained from Cowan computer code. A least-squares variational method (LSVM) is used for determining the wavefunction of the positrons. The program is employed for calculating the s-wave partial cross sections of positrons scattered by Iron and Copper atoms. Our results of the effective charge are compared with available experimental and theoretical ones. --

  14. Application of argon laser LAK-1 for therapy in selected blood vessel diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanczyk, Jacek; Golebiowska, Aleksandra; Michalska, I.; Nowakowski, Wlodzimierz

    1995-03-01

    Argon laser was applied in 172 patients with various vascular disorders and epidermal nevi. The best therapeutical results were obtained in facial telangiectasia and in cavernous hemangiomas, in which there was a complete or almost complete regression. In capillary facial hemangiomas in 49 patients (79%) clearing of 50% to 75% was obtained, and in epidermal nevi the full regression was in 4 (44%) of the cases, and 50% regression in 4 (44%). In telangiectasia of the lower limbs the results were not satisfactory. We stress that cavernous, and capillary hemangiomas, as well as facial telangiectasia are an indication for the argon laser therapy.

  15. Performance of the Electronic Readout of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, H; Aleksa, M; Aperio Bella, L; Archambault, JP; Arfaoui, S; Arnaez, O; Auge, E; Aurousseau, M; Bahinipati, S; Ban, J; Banfi, D; Barajas, A; Barillari, T; Bazan, A; Bellachia, F; Beloborodova, O; Benchekroun, D; Benslama, K; Berger, N; Berghaus, F; Bernat, P; Bernier, R; Besson, N; Binet, S; Blanchard, JB; Blondel, A; Bobrovnikov, V; Bohner, O; Boonekamp, M; Bordoni, S; Bouchel, M; Bourdarios, C; Bozzone, A; Braun, HM; Breton, D; Brettel, H; Brooijmans, G; Caputo, R; Carli, T; Carminati, L; Caughron, S; Cavalleri, P; Cavalli, D; Chareyre, E; Chase, RL; Chekulaev, SV; Chen, H; Cheplakov, A; Chiche, R; Citterio, M; Cojocaru, C; Colas, J; Collard, C; Collot, J; Consonni, M; Cooke, M; Copic, K; Costa, GC; Courneyea, L; Cuisy, D; Cwienk, WD; Damazio, D; Dannheim, D; De Cecco, S; De La Broise, X; De La Taille, C; de Vivie, JB; Debennerot, B; Delagnes, E; Delmastro, M; Derue, F; Dhaliwal, S; Di Ciaccio, L; Doan, O; Dudziak, F; Duflot, L; Dumont-Dayot, N; Dzahini, D; Elles, S; Ertel, E; Escalier, M; Etienvre, AI; Falleau, I; Fanti, M; Farooque, T; Favre, P; Fayard, Louis; Fent, J; Ferencei, J; Fischer, A; Fournier, D; Fournier, L; Fras, M; Froeschl, R; Gadfort, T; Gallin-Martel, ML; Gibson, A; Gillberg, D; Gingrich, DM; Göpfert, T; Goodson, J; Gouighri, M; Goy, C; Grassi, V; Gray, J; Guillemin, T; Guo, B; Habring, J; Handel, C; Heelan, L; Heintz, H; Helary, L; Henrot-Versille, S; Hervas, L; Hobbs, J; Hoffman, J; Hostachy, JY; Hoummada, A; Hrivnac, J; Hrynova, T; Hubaut, F; Huber, J; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Iengo, P; Imbert, P; Ishmukhametov, R; Jantsch, A; Javadov, N; Jezequel, S; Jimenez Belenguer, M; Ju, XY; Kado, M; Kalinowski, A; Kar, D; Karev, A; Katsanos, I; Kazarinov, M; Kerschen, N; Kierstead, J; Kim, MS; Kiryunin, A; Kladiva, E; Knecht, N; Kobel, M; Koletsou, I; König, S; Krieger, P; Kukhtin, V; Kuna, M; Kurchaninov, L; Labbe, J; Lacour, D; Ladygin, E; Lafaye, R; Laforge, B; Lamarra, D; Lampl, W; Lanni, F; Laplace, S; Laskus, H; Le Coguie, A; Le Dortz, O; Le Maner, C; Lechowski, M; Lee, SC; Lefebvre, M; Leonhardt, K; Lethiec, L; Leveque, J; Liang, Z; Liu, C; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Loch, P; Lu, J; Ma, H; Mader, W; Majewski, S; Makovec, N; Makowiecki, D; Mandelli, L; Mangeard, PS; Mansoulie, B; Marchand, JF; Marchiori, G; Martin, D; Martin-Chassard, G; Martin dit Latour, B; Marzin, A; Maslennikov, A; Massol, N; Matricon, P; Maximov, D; Mazzanti, M; McCarthy, T; McPherson, R; Menke, S; Meyer, JP; Ming, Y; Monnier, E; Mooshofer, P; Neganov, A; Niedercorn, F; Nikolic-Audit, I; Nugent, IM; Oakham, G; Oberlack, H; Ocariz, J; Odier, J; Oram, CJ; Orlov, I; Orr, R; Parsons, JA; Peleganchuk, S; Penson, A; Perini, L; Perrodo, P; Perrot, G; Perus, A; Petit, E; Pisarev, I; Plamondon, M; Poffenberger, P; Poggioli, L; Pospelov, G; Pralavorio, P; Prast, J; Prudent, X; Przysiezniak, H; Puzo, P; Quentin, M; Radeka, V; Rajagopalan, S; Rauter, E; Reimann, O; Rescia, S; Resende, B; Richer, JP; Ridel, M; Rios, R; Roos, L; Rosenbaum, G; Rosenzweig, H; Rossetto, O; Roudil, W; Rousseau, D; Ruan, X; Rudert, A; Rusakovich, N; Rusquart, P; Rutherfoord, J; Sauvage, G; Savine, A; Schaarschmidt, J; Schacht, P; Schaffer, A; Schram, M; Schwemling, P; Seguin Moreau, N; Seifert, F; Serin, L; Seuster, R; Shalyugin, A; Shupe, M; Simion, S; Sinervo, P; Sippach, W; Skovpen, K; Sliwa, R; Soukharev, A; Spano, F; Stavina, P; Straessner, A; Strizenec, P; Stroynowski, R; Talyshev, A; Tapprogge, S; Tarrade, F; Tartarelli, GF; Teuscher, R; Tikhonov, Yu; Tocut, V; Tompkins, D; Thompson, P; Tisserant, S; Todorov, T; Tomasz, F; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Trinh, Thi N; Trochet, S; Trocme, B; Tschann-Grimm, K; Tsionou, D; Ueno, R; Unal, G; Urbaniec, D; Usov, Y; Voss, K; Veillet, JJ; Vincter, M; Vogt, S; Weng, Z; Whalen, K; Wicek, F; Wilkens, H; Wingerter-Seez, I; Wulf, E; Yang, Z; Ye, J; Yuan, L; Yurkewicz, A; Zarzhitsky, P; Zerwas, D; Zhang, H; Zhang, L; Zhou, N; Zimmer, J; Zitoun, R; Zivkovic, L

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS detector has been designed for operation at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. ATLAS includes electromagnetic and hadronic liquid argon calorimeters, with almost 200,000 channels of data that must be sampled at the LHC bunch crossing frequency of 40 MHz. The calorimeter electronics calibration and readout are performed by custom electronics developed specifically for these purposes. This paper describes the system performance of the ATLAS liquid argon calibration and readout electronics, including noise, energy and time resolution, and long term stability, with data taken mainly from full-system calibration runs performed after installation of the system in the ATLAS detector hall at CERN.

  16. Experimental Measurement for Shock Velocity-Mass Velocity Relationship of Liquid Argon Up to 46 GPa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟川民; 施尚春; 董石; 杨向东; 谭华; 经福谦

    2003-01-01

    Shock properties of liquid argon were measured in the shock pressure up to 46 GPa by employing the two-stage light gas gun. Liquid nitrogen was used as coolant liquid. The cryogenic target system has been improved to compare with the previous work. Shock velocities were measured with self-shorting electrical probes. Impactor velocities were measured with an electrical-magnetic induction system. Mass velocities were obtained by mean of shock impedance matching method. The experimental data shows that the slope of experimental Hugoniot curve of liquid argon begins to decrease above 30 GPa.

  17. Intermolecular interaction potentials of methane-argon complex calculated using LDA approaches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bai Yu-Lin; Chen Xiang-Rong; Zhou Xiao-Lin; Yang Xiang-Dong; Wang Hai-Yan

    2004-01-01

    The intermolecular interaction potential for methane-argon complex is calculated by local density approximation (LDA) approaches. The calculated potential has a minimum when the intermolecular distance of methane-argon complex is 6.75 a.u.; the corresponding depth of the potential is 0.0163eV which has good agreement with experimental data. We also have made a nonlinear fitting of our results for the Lennard-Jones (12-6) potential function and obtain that V(R) = 143794365.332/R12 - 3032.093/R6 (R in a.u. and V(R) in eV).

  18. Ablation of Barrett’s esophagus using the second-generation argon plasma coagulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the efficacy and safety of the second-generation argon plasma coagulation (VIO APC) in ablation of Barrett’s esophagus. Methods Eighteen patients with Barrett’s esophagus (12 males, median age of 55 years, median length of 2.1 cm,1 low-grade dysplasia, 13 cases of short segment Barrett’s esophagus) received VIO APC, which was performed at a power setting of 40W and argon gas flow at 1.5-2.0 L/min, "forced" mode, in 1-3 sessions (mean 1.3). All the patients received treatment with hi...

  19. Research of On-line Analytical Method of Trace Oxygen and Water in Argon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Metal sodium has an active chemical quality. When it is used as a coolant in a fast neutron reactor, it must be protected by a cover gas argon for safety operation of the reactor. But oxygen and water in argon can produce chemical reaction with sodium. Then sodium hydroxide, sodium oxide and hydrogen can be produced. This will be harmful to the safety operation of reactor. The purpose of controlling a level of impurity in the cover gas is for controlling a level of impurity in sodium. The research is to find an on-line determining method and a sampling system to monitor

  20. ArgonCube: a novel, fully-modular approach for the realization of large-mass liquid argon TPC neutrino detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Amsler, C; Asaadi, J; Auger, M; Barbato, F; Bay, F; Bishai, M; Bleiner, D; Borgschulte, A; Bremer, J; Cavus, E; Chen, H; De Geronimo, G; Ereditato, A; Fleming, B; Goldi, D; Hanni, R; Kose, U; Kreslo, I; La Mattina, F; Lanni, F; Lissauer, D; Luthi, M; Lutz, P; Marchionni, A; Mladenov, D; Nessi, M; Noto, F; Palamara, O; Raaf, J L; Radeka, V; Rudolph Von Rohr, Ch; Smargianaki, D; Soderberg, M; Strauss, Th; Weber, M; Yu, B; Zeller, G P; Zeyrek, M; CERN. Geneva. SPS and PS Experiments Committee; SPSC

    2015-01-01

    The Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber is a prime candidate detector for future neutrino oscillation physics experiments, underground neutrino observatories and proton decay searches. A large international project based on this technology is currently being considered at the future LBNF facility in the United States on the very large mass scale of 40 kton. In this document, following the long standing R&D work conducted over the last years in several laboratories in Europe and in the United States, we intend to propose a novel Liquid Argon TPC approach based on a fully-modular, innovative design, the ArgonCube. The related R&D work will proceed along two main directions; one aimed at on the assessment of the proposed modular detector design, the other on the exploitation of new signal readout methods. Such a strategy will provide high performance while being cost-effective and robust at the same time. According to our plans, we will firstly realize a detector prototype hosted in a cryostat that is a...

  1. 40 CFR 63.10686 - What are the requirements for electric arc furnaces and argon-oxygen decarburization vessels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Area Sources: Electric Arc Furnace Steelmaking Facilities Standards and Compliance Requirements § 63.10686 What are the requirements for electric arc furnaces and argon-oxygen... arc furnaces and argon-oxygen decarburization vessels? 63.10686 Section 63.10686 Protection...

  2. Numerical Simulation of the Thermal Conductivity of Thermal Insulation Pipe by Vacuum and High Pressure Argon Pre-filled

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    [Abstract]By analyzing the insulation effect of argon-filled tubing and vacuum-insulated tubing before and after hydrogen permeation respectively, a conclusion can be drawn that the insulated tubing filled with high pressure argon is better than the vacuum insulated tubing considering the lifetime and heat insulation effect.

  3. Mars at Ls 39o: Syrtis Major

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    18 April 2006 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 39o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 39o occurs in mid-April 2006. The picture shows the Syrtis Major face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Spring/Southern Autumn

  4. Mars at Ls 39o: Tharsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    4 April 2006 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 39o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 39o occurs in mid-April 2006. The picture shows the Tharsis face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn. Season: Northern Spring/Southern Autumn

  5. Optical and Magnetic Trapping of Potassium 39

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensher, Jason; Cornell, Eric; Cataliotti, Francesco; Fort, Chiara; Marin, Francesco; Prevedelli, Marco; Inguscio, Massimo; Ricci, Leonardo; Tino, Guglielmo

    1998-05-01

    We present measurments of optical trapping and cooling and magnetic trapping of ^39K in a double-MOT apparatus. (Optics Lett. 21, 290(1996)) We have measured light-assisted collisional loss rates from our second MOT over a range of trap light intensities. At an intensity of 10 mW/cm^2 we find a loss rate parameter β of 2 x 10-11 cc/s. β increases with trap light intensity and is consistent with the values measured by Williamson and Walker (JOSA B 12, 1393 (1995)). We also present studies of the temperature of atoms in a MOT of ^39K. Under certain conditions of repump light intensity and trap light detuning we measure temperatures nearly as low as the Doppler Limit. Finally, we report on prelimiary results of magnetic trapping in which we have trapped several 10^7 atoms in a quadrupole magnetic trap.

  6. Feshbach resonances in ultracold K(39)

    CERN Document Server

    D'Errico, C; Fattori, M; Roati, G; Inguscio, M; Modugno, G; Simoni, A

    2007-01-01

    We discover several magnetic Feshbach resonances in collisions of ultracold K(39) atoms, by studying atom losses and molecule formation. Accurate determination of the magnetic-field resonance locations allows us to optimize a quantum collision model for potassium isotopes. We employ the model to predict the magnetic-field dependence of scattering lengths and of near-threshold molecular levels. Our findings will be useful to plan future experiments on ultracold potassium atoms and molecules.

  7. Analysis list: Suv39h1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Suv39h1 Pluripotent stem cell + mm9 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Suv...39h1.1.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Suv39h1.5.tsv http://dbarchive.bi...osciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Suv39h1.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Suv39h

  8. Analysis list: Suv39h2 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Suv39h2 Pluripotent stem cell + mm9 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Suv...39h2.1.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Suv39h2.5.tsv http://dbarchive.bi...osciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Suv39h2.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Suv39h

  9. Ex vivo and in vivo neuroprotection induced by argon when given after an excitotoxic or ischemic insult.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène N David

    Full Text Available In vitro studies have well established the neuroprotective action of the noble gas argon. However, only limited data from in vivo models are available, and particularly whether postexcitotoxic or postischemic argon can provide neuroprotection in vivo still remains to be demonstrated. Here, we investigated the possible neuroprotective effect of postexcitotoxic-postischemic argon both ex vivo in acute brain slices subjected to ischemia in the form of oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD, and in vivo in rats subjected to an intrastriatal injection of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA or to the occlusion of middle-cerebral artery (MCAO. We show that postexcitotoxic-postischemic argon reduces OGD-induced cell injury in brain slices, and further reduces NMDA-induced brain damage and MCAO-induced cortical brain damage in rats. Contrasting with its beneficial effect at the cortical level, we show that postischemic argon increases MCAO-induced subcortical brain damage and provides no improvement of neurologic outcome as compared to control animals. These results extend previous data on the neuroprotective action of argon. Particularly, taken together with previous in vivo data that have shown that intraischemic argon has neuroprotective action at both the cortical and subcortical level, our findings on postischemic argon suggest that this noble gas could be administered during but not after ischemia, i.e. before but not after reperfusion has occurred, in order to provide cortical neuroprotection and to avoid increasing subcortical brain damage. Also, the effects of argon are discussed as regards to the oxygen-like chemical, pharmacological, and physical properties of argon.

  10. Photoionization cross-sections for atoms and ions of aluminum, silicon, and argon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, R. D.; Henry, R. J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Photoionization cross sections for all levels belonging to the configurations of atoms and ions of aluminum, silicon, and argon have been calculated using Hartree-Fock bound-electron wave functions and close-coupling approximation free-electron wave functions. The results are presented in the form of a computationally convenient interpolation formula and should find wide astrophysical application.

  11. Liquid Argon Dielectric Breakdown Studies with the MicroBooNE Purification System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acciarri, R. [Fermilab; Carls, B. [Fermilab; James, C. [Fermilab; Johnson, B. [Fermilab; Jostlein, H. [Fermilab; Lockwitz, S. [Fermilab; Lundberg, B. [Fermilab; Raaf, J. L. [Fermilab; Rameika, R. [Fermilab; Rebel, B. [Fermilab; Zeller, G. P. [Fermilab; Zuckerbrot, M. [Fermilab

    2014-11-04

    The proliferation of liquid argon time projection chamber detectors makes the characterization of the dielectric properties of liquid argon a critical task. To improve understanding of these properties, a systematic study of the breakdown electric field in liquid argon was conducted using a dedicated cryostat connected to the MicroBooNE cryogenic system at Fermilab. An electrode sphere-plate geometry was implemented using spheres with diameters of 1.3 mm, 5.0 mm, and 76 mm. The MicroBooNE cryogenic system allowed measurements to be taken at a variety of electronegative contamination levels ranging from a few parts-per-million to tens of parts-per-trillion. The cathode-anode distance was varied from 0.1 mm to 2.5 cm. The results demonstrate a geometric dependence of the electric field strength at breakdown. This study is the first time that the dependence of the breakdown field on stressed cathode area has been shown for liquid argon.

  12. Resonance ionization spectroscopy of argon, krypton, and xenon using vacuum ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resonant, single-photon excitation of ground state inert gases requires light in the vacuum ultraviolet spectral region. This paper discusses methods for generating this light. Efficient schemes for ionizing argon, krypton, and xenon using resonant, stepwise single-photon excitation are presented

  13. A calculation of internal kinetic energy and polarizability of compressed argon from the statistical atom model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seldam, C.A. ten; Groot, S.R. de

    1952-01-01

    From Jensen's and Gombás' modification of the statistical Thomas-Fermi atom model, a theory for compressed atoms is developed by changing the boundary conditions. Internal kinetic energy and polarizability of argon are calculated as functions of pressure. At 1000 atm. an internal kinetic energy of a

  14. First Observation of Low Energy Electron Neutrinos in a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, R; Asaadi, J; Baller, B; Bolton, T; Bromberg, C; Cavanna, F; Church, E; Edmunds, D; Ereditato, A; Farooq, S; Fitzpatrick, R S; Fleming, B; Hackenburg, A; Horton-Smith, G; James, C; Lang, K; Luo, X; Mehdiyev, R; Page, B; Palamara, O; Rebel, B; Schukraft, A; Scanavini, G; Soderberg, M; Spitz, J; Szelc, A M; Weber, M; Yang, T; Zeller, G P

    2016-01-01

    Liquid argon time projection chambers (LArTPCs) produce remarkable fidelity in the observation of neutrino interactions. The superior capabilities of such detectors to reconstruct the spatial and calorimetric information of neutrino events have made them the detectors of choice in a number of experiments, specifically those looking to observe electron neutrino ($\

  15. Operation of a GERDA phase I prototype detector in liquid argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A non-enriched high-purity (HP) p-type germanium diode has been operated in a low mass holder in liquid nitrogen and liquid argon. Because of the shielding and scintillation properties of liquid argon, GERDA experiment is planned to use it as a cryogenic fluid shield. Therefore, the long-term measurements with the bare detector are performed in liquid argon. The testing of the prototype detector and the preparation of the enriched detectors for GERDA phase I are being carried out in the GERDA underground Detector Laboratory (GDL) at LNGS. The phase I prototype detector assembly is being operated since beginning of 2006 to study detector handling protocols, detector assembly performance and detector assembly stability. 45 warming and cooling cyclings have been carried out. Since February 8 2007, the prototype detector is continuously operated in liquid argon under varying irradiation conditions. The operations, measurements and results of the prototype detector testing as well as the status of the phase I enriched detectors are summarized

  16. Liquid Argon Dielectric Breakdown Studies with the MicroBooNE Purification System

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, R; James, C; Johnson, B; Jostlein, H; Lockwitz, S; Lundberg, B; Raaf, J L; Rameika, R; Rebel, B; Zeller, G P; Zuckerbrot, M

    2014-01-01

    The proliferation of liquid argon time projection chamber detectors makes the characterization of the dielectric properties of liquid argon a critical task. To improve understanding of these properties, a systematic study of the breakdown electric field in liquid argon was conducted using a dedicated cryostat connected to the MicroBooNE cryogenic system at Fermilab. An electrode sphere-plate geometry was implemented using spheres with diameters of 1.3 mm, 5.0 mm, and 76 mm. The MicroBooNE cryogenic system allowed measurements to be taken at a variety of electronegative contamination levels ranging from a few parts-per-million to tens of parts-per- trillion. The cathode-anode distance was varied from 0.1 mm to 2.5 cm. The results demonstrate a geometric dependence of the electric field strength at breakdown. This study is the first time that the dependence of the breakdown field on stressed cathode area has been shown for liquid argon.

  17. Common versus noble Bacillus subtilis differentially responds to air and argon gas plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Theresa; Bernhardt, Jörg; Winter, Jörn; Mäder, Ulrike; Schlüter, Rabea; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Hecker, Michael; Kusch, Harald

    2013-09-01

    The applications of low-temperature plasma are not only confined to decontamination and sterilization but are also found in the medical field in terms of wound and skin treatment. For the improvement of already established and also for new plasma techniques, in-depth knowledge on the interactions between plasma and microorganism is essential. In an initial study, the interaction between growing Bacillus subtilis and argon plasma was investigated by using a growth chamber system suitable for low-temperature gas plasma treatment of bacteria in liquid medium. In this follow-up investigation, a second kind of plasma treatment-namely air plasma-was applied. With combined proteomic and transcriptomic analyses, we were able to investigate the plasma-specific stress response of B. subtilis toward not only argon but also air plasma. Besides an overlap of cellular responses due to both argon and air plasma treatment (DNA damage and oxidative stress), a variety of gas-dependent cellular responses such as growth retardation and morphological changes were observed. Only argon plasma treatments lead to a phosphate starvation response whereas air plasma induced the tryptophan operon implying damage by photooxidation. Biological findings were supported by the detection of reactive plasma species by optical emission spectroscopy and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy measurements. PMID:23794223

  18. Effect of Low Electric Fields on Alpha Scintillation Light Yield in Liquid Argon

    CERN Document Server

    Agnes, P; Alexander, T; Alton, A K; Asner, D M; Back, H O; Baldin, B; Biery, K; Bocci, V; Bonfini, G; Bonivento, W; Bossa, M; Bottino, B; Brigatti, A; Brodsky, J; Budano, F; Bussino, S; Cadeddu, M; Cadoni, M; Calaprice, F; Canci, N; Candela, A; Caravati, M; Cariello, M; Carlini, M; Catalanotti, S; Cavalcante, P; Chepurnov, A; Cicalò, C; Cocco, A G; Covone, G; D'Angelo, D; D'Incecco, M; Davini, S; De Cecco, S; De Deo, M; De Vincenzi, M; Derbin, A; Devoto, A; Di Eusanio, F; Di Pietro, G; Dionisi, C; Edkins, E; Empl, A; Fan, A; Fiorillo, G; Fomenko, K; Forster, G; Franco, D; Gabriele, F; Galbiati, C; Giagu, S; Giganti, C; Giovanetti, G K; Goretti, A M; Granato, F; Gromov, M; Guan, M; Guardincerri, Y; Hackett, B R; Herner, K; Hughes, D; Humble, P; Hungerford, E V; Ianni, A; James, I; Johnson, T N; Jollet, C; Keeter, K; Kendziora, C L; Koh, G; Korablev, D; Korga, G; Kubankin, A; Li, X; Lissia, M; Loer, B; Lombardi, P; Longo, G; Ma, Y; Machulin, I N; Mandarano, A; Mari, S M; Maricic, J; Marini, L; Martoff, C J; Meregaglia, A; Meyers, P D; Milincic, R; Miller, J D; Montanari, D; Monte, A; Mount, B J; Muratova, V N; Musico, P; Napolitano, J; Agasson, A Navrer; Odrowski, S; Oleinik, A; Orsini, M; Ortica, F; Pagani, L; Pallavicini, M; Pantic, E; Parmeggiano, S; Pelczar, K; Pelliccia, N; Pocar, A; Pordes, S; Pugachev, D A; Qian, H; Randle, K; Ranucci, G; Razeti, M; Razeto, A; Reinhold, B; Renshaw, A L; Rescigno, M; Riffard, Q; Romani, A; Rossi, B; Rossi, N; Rountree, D; Sablone, D; Saggese, P; Sands, W; Savarese, C; Schlitzer, B; Segreto, E; Semenov, D A; Shields, E; Singh, P N; Skorokhvatov, M D; Smirnov, O; Sotnikov, A; Stanford, C; Suvorov, Y; Tartaglia, R; Tatarowicz, J; Testera, G; Tonazzo, A; Trinchese, P; Unzhakov, E V; Verducci, M; Vishneva, A; Vogelaar, B; Wada, M; Walker, S; Wang, H; Wang, Y; Watson, A W; Westerdale, S; Wilhelmi, J; Wojcik, M M; Xiang, X; Xiao, X; Xu, J; Yang, C; Zhong, W; Zhu, C; Zuzel, G

    2016-01-01

    Measurements were made of scintillation light yield of alpha particles from the $^{222}$Rn decay chain within the DarkSide-50 liquid argon time projection chamber. The light yield was found to increase as the applied electric field increased, with alphas in a 200 V/cm electric field exhibiting a $\\sim$2% increase in light yield compared to alphas in no field.

  19. Neutral gas temperature estimates and metastable resonance energy transfer for argon-nitrogen discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovibrational spectroscopy band fitting of the nitrogen (N2) second positive system is a technique used to estimate the neutral gas temperature of N2 discharges, or atomic discharges with trace amounts of a N2 added. For mixtures involving argon and N2, resonant energy transfer between argon metastable atoms (Ar*) and N2 molecules may affect gas temperature estimates made using the second positive system. The effect of Ar* resonance energy transfer is investigated here by analyzing neutral gas temperatures of argon-N2 mixtures, for N2 percentages from 1% to 100%. Neutral gas temperature estimates are higher than expected for mixtures involving greater than 5% N2 addition, but are reasonable for argon with less than 5% N2 addition when compared with an analytic model for ion-neutral charge exchange collisional heating. Additional spatiotemporal investigations into neutral gas temperature estimates with 10% N2 addition demonstrate that although absolute temperature values may be affected by Ar* resonant energy transfer, spatiotemporal trends may still be used to accurately diagnose the discharge

  20. Three-body dispersion contributions to the thermodynamic properties and effective pair interactions in liquid argon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoef, van der Martin A.; Madden, Paul A.

    1999-01-01

    The contributions of three-body triple dipole and dipole-dipole-quadrupole dispersion interactions to the thermodynamic properties of liquid argon are examined, using a recently introduced simulation scheme which contains an explicit, quantum mechanical representation of the underlying electronic st

  1. Arc Root Motions in an Argon-Hydrogen Direct-Current Plasma Torch at Reduced Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG He-Ji; PAN Wen-Xia; WU Cheng-Kang

    2008-01-01

    Arc root motions in generating dc argon hydrogen plasma at reduced pressure are optically observed using a high-speed video camera. The time resolved angular position of the arc root attachment point is measured and analysed. The arc root movement is characterized as a chaotic and jumping motion along the circular direction on the anode surface.

  2. Simulations of geometrically pinched argon plasmas using an extended one-dimensional model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.T.A.L. Burm,; W. J. Goedheer,; D.C. Schram,

    2001-01-01

    The subject of this paper is the modelling of a wall-stabilized cylinder symmetric cascaded are which is to be used as a high-density plasma source. To enhance the ion flux emerging from cascaded are argon plasmas the confining wall can be changed into a nozzle geometry. Such pinched geometries incr

  3. CT assessment of liver hemodynamics in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma after argon-helium cryoablation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Jia Hao; Jin-Ping Li; Hui-Jie Jiang; Da-Qing Li; Zai-Sheng Ling

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Assessment  of  tumor  response  after  argon-helium  cryoablation  is  critical  in  guiding  future  therapy  for unresectable  hepatocellular  carcinoma.  This  study  aimed  to evaluate  liver  hemodynamics  in  hepatocellular  carcinoma after  argon-helium  cryoablation  with  computed  tomography perfusion. METHODS: The  control  group  comprised  40  volunteers without liver disease.  The  experimental  group  was  composed of  15  patients  with  hepatocellular  carcinoma  treated  with argon-helium  cryoablation.  Computed  tomography  perfusion parameters were measured: hepatic blood flow, hepatic blood volume,  mean  transit  time,  permeability  of  capillary  vessel surface, hepatic arterial fraction, hepatic arterial perfusion, and hepatic portal perfusion. RESULTS: After  treatment,  in  the  tumor  foci,  permeability of  capillary  vessel  surface  was  higher,  and  hepatic  blood flow,  hepatic  blood  volume,  hepatic  arterial  fraction,  and hepatic  arterial  perfusion  values  were  lower  (P0.05). CONCLUSION: Computed tomography perfusion can evaluate tumor response after argon-helium cryoablation.

  4. Neutral gas temperature estimates and metastable resonance energy transfer for argon-nitrogen discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greig, A., E-mail: amelia.greig@anu.edu.au; Charles, C.; Boswell, R. W. [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Laboratory, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia)

    2016-01-15

    Rovibrational spectroscopy band fitting of the nitrogen (N{sub 2}) second positive system is a technique used to estimate the neutral gas temperature of N{sub 2} discharges, or atomic discharges with trace amounts of a N{sub 2} added. For mixtures involving argon and N{sub 2}, resonant energy transfer between argon metastable atoms (Ar*) and N{sub 2} molecules may affect gas temperature estimates made using the second positive system. The effect of Ar* resonance energy transfer is investigated here by analyzing neutral gas temperatures of argon-N{sub 2} mixtures, for N{sub 2} percentages from 1% to 100%. Neutral gas temperature estimates are higher than expected for mixtures involving greater than 5% N{sub 2} addition, but are reasonable for argon with less than 5% N{sub 2} addition when compared with an analytic model for ion-neutral charge exchange collisional heating. Additional spatiotemporal investigations into neutral gas temperature estimates with 10% N{sub 2} addition demonstrate that although absolute temperature values may be affected by Ar* resonant energy transfer, spatiotemporal trends may still be used to accurately diagnose the discharge.

  5. Test beam results of a stereo preshower integrated in the liquid argon accordion calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, R; Greenious, G; Kitching, P; Olsen, B; Pinfold, James L; Rodning, N L; Boos, E; Zhautykov, B O; Aubert, Bernard; Bazan, A; Beaugiraud, B; Boniface, J; Colas, Jacques; Eynard, G; Jézéquel, S; Le Flour, T; Linossier, O; Nicoleau, S; Sauvage, G; Thion, J; Van den Plas, D; Wingerter-Seez, I; Zitoun, R; Zolnierowski, Y; Chmeissani, M; Fernández, E; Garrido, L; Martínez, M; Padilla, C; Citterio, M; Gordon, H A; Lissauer, D; Ma, H; Makowiecki, D S; Radeka, V; Rahm, David Charles; Rescia, S; Stephani, D; Takai, H; Baisin, L; Berset, J C; Chevalley, J L; Gianotti, F; Gildemeister, O; Marin, C P; Nessi, Marzio; Poggioli, Luc; Richter, W; Vuillemin, V; Baze, J M; Delagnes, E; Gosset, L G; Lavocat, P; Lottin, J P; Mansoulié, B; Meyer, J P; Renardy, J F; Schwindling, J; Simion, S; Taguet, J P; Teiger, J; Walter, C; Collot, J; de Saintignon, P; Hostachy, J Y; Mahout, G; Barreiro, F; Del Peso, J; García, J; Hervás, L; Labarga, L; Romero, P; Scheel, C V; Chekhtman, A; Cousinou, M C; Dargent, P; Dinkespiler, B; Etienne, F; Fassnacht, P; Fouchez, D; Martin, L; Miotto, A; Monnier, E; Nagy, E; Olivetto, C; Tisserant, S; Battistoni, G; Camin, D V; Cavalli, D; Costa, G; Cozzi, L; Fedyakin, N N; Ferrari, A; Mandelli, L; Mazzanti, M; Perini, L; Resconi, S; Sala, P R; Beaudoin, G; Depommier, P; León-Florián, E; Leroy, C; Roy, P; Augé, E; Breton, D; Chase, Robert L; Chollet, J C; de La Taille, C; Fayard, Louis; Fournier, D; González, J; Hrisoho, A T; Jacquier, Y; Merkel, B; Nikolic, I A; Noppe, J M; Parrour, G; Pétroff, P; Puzo, P; Richer, J P; Schaffer, A C; Seguin-Moreau, N; Serin, L; Tisserand, V; Veillet, J J; Vichou, I; Canton, B; David, J; Genat, J F; Imbault, D; Le Dortz, O; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Schwemling, P; Eek, L O; Lund-Jensen, B; Söderqvist, J; Astbury, Alan; Keeler, Richard K; Lefebvre, M; Robertson, S; White, J

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the construction of an integrated preshower within the RD3 liquid argon accordion calorimeter. It has a stereo view which enables the measurement of two transverse coordinates. The prototype was tested at CERN with electrons, photons and muons to validate its capability to work at LHC ( Energy resolution, impact point resolution, angular resolution, $\\pi^o$/$\\gamma$ rejection ).

  6. Low energy (e,2e) ionization of Argon in the equal energy sharing geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Mazevet, S; Langlois, J M; Tweed, R J; Robaux, O; Tannous, C; Fakhreddine, K

    2002-01-01

    Quantum Defect theory is a well established theoretical concept in modern spectroscopy. We show that this approach is useful in electron impact ionization problems where state of the art theoretical methods are presently restricted mostly to simple atomic targets. For the well documented Argon ionization case in equal energy sharing geometry the approach suggested leads to significant improvements compared to previous calculations.

  7. Evaporation characteristics of thin film liquid argon in nano-scale confinement: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Mohammad Nasim; Shavik, Sheikh Mohammad; Rabbi, Kazi Fazle; Haque, Mominul

    2016-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation has been carried out to explore the evaporation characteristics of thin liquid argon film in nano-scale confinement. The present study has been conducted to realize the nano-scale physics of simultaneous evaporation and condensation inside a confined space for a three phase system with particular emphasis on the effect of surface wetting conditions. The simulation domain consisted of two parallel platinum plates; one at the top and another at the bottom. The fluid comprised of liquid argon film at the bottom plate and vapor argon in between liquid argon and upper plate of the domain. Considering hydrophilic and hydrophobic nature of top and bottom surfaces, two different cases have been investigated: (i) Case A: Both top and bottom surfaces are hydrophilic, (ii) Case B: both top and bottom surfaces are hydrophobic. For all cases, equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) was performed to reach equilibrium state at 90 K. Then the lower wall was set to four different temperatures such as 110 K, 120 K, 130 K and 140 K to perform non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD). The variation of temperature and density as well as the variation of system pressure with respect to time were closely monitored for each case. The heat fluxes normal to top and bottom walls were estimated and discussed to illuminate the effectiveness of heat transfer in both hydrophilic and hydrophobic confinement at various boundary temperatures of the bottom plate.

  8. A liquid argon calorimeter prototype for forward region at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artamonov, A. [Institut Teoreticheskoj i Ehksperimental`noj Fiziki, Moscow (Russian Federation); Epstein, V. [Institut Teoreticheskoj i Ehksperimental`noj Fiziki, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gorbunov, P. [Institut Teoreticheskoj i Ehksperimental`noj Fiziki, Moscow (Russian Federation); Jemanov, V. [Institut Teoreticheskoj i Ehksperimental`noj Fiziki, Moscow (Russian Federation); Khovansky, V. [Institut Teoreticheskoj i Ehksperimental`noj Fiziki, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kuchenkov, A. [Institut Teoreticheskoj i Ehksperimental`noj Fiziki, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kruchinin, S. [Institut Teoreticheskoj i Ehksperimental`noj Fiziki, Moscow (Russian Federation); Maslennikov, A. [Institut Teoreticheskoj i Ehksperimental`noj Fiziki, Moscow (Russian Federation); Rjabinin, M. [Institut Teoreticheskoj i Ehksperimental`noj Fiziki, Moscow (Russian Federation); Shatalov, P. [Institut Teoreticheskoj i Ehksperimental`noj Fiziki, Moscow (Russian Federation); Vinogradov, V. [Institut Teoreticheskoj i Ehksperimental`noj Fiziki, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zaitsev, V. [Institut Teoreticheskoj i Ehksperimental`noj Fiziki, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zeldovich, S. [Institut Teoreticheskoj i Ehksperimental`noj Fiziki, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zuckerman, I. [Institut Teoreticheskoj i Ehksperimental`noj Fiziki, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-02-21

    We report on the design and on beam test results of a liquid argon calorimeter prototype. This technology was proposed as an option for the forward region of an experiment at the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The measurements were performed using electrons from the ITEP PS with an energy range of 1 to 5 GeV. (orig.).

  9. Ionization EM calorimetry with accordion electrodes and liquid krypton or argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radeka, V.

    1993-11-01

    The results of a study and tests of a liquid krypton/argon electromagnetic calorimeter with accordion electrode structure are briefly summarized. This includes the calorimeter response to electrons and muons, energy, pointing and timing resolution, and a measurement by multiple sampling. The electrode layout with fine segmentation is illustrated.

  10. Pollution of liquid argon after neutron irradiation measured at SARA: summary of raw data

    CERN Document Server

    Andrieux, M L; de Saintignon, P; Ferrari, A; Hostachy, J Y; Martin, P; Wielers, M; Belymam, A; Hoummada, A; Merkel, B; Puzo, P M; Sauvage, D

    1998-01-01

    The SARA fast neutron facility has been used to irradiate various pieces of materials due to be used in the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter, immersed in a liquid argon cryostat. The subsequent pollution was measured. The raw data have been summarized in this paper.

  11. The Ashima/MIT Mars GCM and argon in the martian atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Yuan; Richardson, Mark I.; Newman, Claire E.; Lee, Christopher; Toigo, Anthony D.; Mischna, Michael A.; Campin, Jean-Michel

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the ability of modern general circulation models (GCMs) to simulate transport in the martian atmosphere using measurements of argon as a proxy for the transport processes. Argon provides the simplest measure of transport as it is a noble gas with no sinks or sources on seasonal timescales. Variations in argon result solely from 'freeze distillation', as the atmosphere condenses at the winter poles, and from atmospheric transport. Comparison of all previously published models when rescaled to a common definition of the argon enhancement factor (EF) suggest that models generally do a poor job in predicting the peak enhancement in southern winter over the winter pole - the time when the capability of the model transport approaches are most severely tested. Despite observed peak EF values of ˜6, previously published model predictions peaked at EF values of only 2-3. We introduce a new GCM that provides a better treatment of mass conservation within the dynamical core, includes more sophisticated tracer transport approaches, and utilizes a cube-sphere grid structure thus avoiding the grid-point convergence problem at the pole that exists for most current Mars GCMs. We describe this model - the Ashima Research/Massachusetts Institute of Technology Mars General Circulation Model (Ashima/MIT Mars GCM) and use it to demonstrate the significant sensitivity of peak EF to the choices of transport approach for both tracers and heat. We obtain a peak EF of 4.75 which, while over 50% higher than any prior model, remains well short of the observed value. We show that the polar EF value in winter is primarily determined by the competition between two processes: (1) mean meridional import of lower-latitude air not enriched in argon and (2) the leakage of enriched argon out of the polar column by eddies in the lowest atmospheric levels. We suggest possibilities for improving GCM representation of the CO2 cycle and the general circulation that may further improve the

  12. Cryogenic separation of oxygen-argon mixture in natural air samples for isotopic and molecular ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habeeb Rahman, Keedakkadan; Abe, Osamu

    2014-05-01

    The discovery of mass independent isotope fractionation in oxygen during the formation of ozone in the stratosphere has initiated a wide application in isotope geochemistry field. Separation of oxygen-argon mixture has become the foundation of high precision analysis of Δ17O and δ(O2/Ar) for geochemical applications. Here we present precise and simplified cryogenic separation of argon oxygen mixture from the atmospheric and dissolved air using 30/60 mesh 5A molecular sieve zeolite. A pioneer study of this method was conducted by Thiemens and Meagher in 1984. The column which is made of glass tube contains about 1.1 grams of molecular sieve zeolite and both ends of column was filled with glass wools. The experimental set up was tested for different combination of molecular sieves and slurry temperatures. We found the most efficient condition for the separation was at a column temperature of -103°C. For complete transfer of O2 and Ar mixture usually takes in 15-20 minutes time. The isotopic ratios of oxygen were analyzed using mass spectrometer (Thermo Fischer Delta Plus) relative to reference oxygen-argon mixture at 3V of m/z 32 for both sample and reference side. The signals of m/z 28, 32, and 40 were measured by dynamically to determine oxygen -argon ratio and to check nitrogen contamination. Repeated measurements of atmospheric air yielded a reproducibility (SE n=80) of 0.006, 0.004 and 0.19‰ for δ17O, δ18O and δO2/Ar respectively. The isotopic and molecular fractionation of argon- oxygen mixture during gas adsorption and desorption while using molecular sieve under liquid nitrogen temperature was studied. We have established a linear relationship governing the effect of 13X and 5A molecular sieves on molecular fractionation. And suggested the use of single 1/8" pellet 13X molecular sieve provided a negligible fractionation.

  13. Size Effect on Transport Properties of Gaseous Argon: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have carried out a series of equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations of gaseous argon at 273.15 K and 1.00 atm for the calculation of transport properties as a function of the number of argon molecules (N). While the diffusion coefficients (D) of gaseous argon approach to the experimental measure with increasing N, the viscosities (η) and thermal conductivities (λ) obtained for N = 432 are unreliable due to the high fluctuation of the time correlation functions and those for N = 1728 are rather acceptable. Increasing further to N = 6912 has improved the MD results a little closer to the experimental measures for η and λ. Both the EMD results for η and λ for N = 6912 underestimate the experimental measures and it is not expected that the more increasing N makes the closer results to the experimental measures. One possible explanation for the large disagreement between MD results and the experimental measures for η and λ may be due to the use of LJ parameters which were used for liquid argon. In a recent study, we have examined the Green-Kubo formula for the calculation of transport properties (diffusion coefficient, viscosity, and thermal conductivity) of noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) by carrying out a series of equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations for the system of N=1728 at 273.15 K and 1.00 atm.1 While the diffusion coefficients (D) of noble gases were obtained through the original Green-Kubo formula, the viscosities (η) and thermal conductivities (λ) were obtained by utilizing the revised Green-Kubo formulas. The structural and dynamic properties of gaseous argon are completely different from those of liquid argon at 94.4 K and 1.374 g/cm3. The results for transport properties (D, η, and λ) at 273.15 K and 1.00 atm obtained from our EMD simulations are in general agreement with the experimental data and superior to the rigorous results of the kinetic theory

  14. Preservation of Sub-Microscopic Scale Structural Relics in Biotite: Implications for 40AR/39AR Geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrando, M.; Di Vincenzo, G.; Ferraris, C.

    2012-12-01

    , characterized by a concordant central segment, with an error-weighted mean age of 44.9 ± 0.3 Ma. Age profiling on separate grains from sample JT1007, analyzed perpendicularly to the cleavage plane, reveal a broad core-to-rim age variation, with a maximum apparent age of ~66 Ma in the core and a minimum age in the rim as low as ~45. Similar age gradients and concave upward spectra from relict minerals that underwent at least one re-heating event are generally ascribed to incomplete diffusive resetting of the original argon reservoir or to the influx of extraneous argon followed by partial diffusive loss. However, major element compositional variations and the preservation of sub-micron scale magmatic biotite relics within largely re-equilibrated crystals suggest that the observed age spread may be explained by the coexistence of two different argon reservoirs related to the two different microstructural sites. This study suggests that, in addition to the well documented influx of externally-derived argon, anomalously old 40Ar/39Ar ages in metamorphic biotite may also be related to the preservation of sub-microscopic scale mineral relics that escaped complete re-equilibration during the subsequent tectono-metamorphic evolution.

  15. Argon, oxygen, and boron isotopic evidence documenting 40ArE accumulation in phengite during water-rich high-pressure subduction metasomatism of continental crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menold, Carrie A.; Grove, Marty; Sievers, Natalie E.; Manning, Craig E.; Yin, An; Young, Edward D.; Ziegler, Karen

    2016-07-01

    The Luliang Shan area of the North Qaidam high pressure (HP) to ultrahigh pressure (UHP) metamorphic terrane in northwestern China features thick, garnet- and phengite-rich metasomatic selvages that formed around gneiss-hosted mafic eclogite blocks during HP conditions. Here we present new 40Ar/39Ar, δ18 O, and δ11 B results from a previously studied 30 m, 18 sample traverse that extends from the host gneiss into a representative eclogite block. Previous thermobarometry and new mica-quartz oxygen isotope thermometry from the traverse reveal that the phengite-rich selvage formed at temperatures similar to those recorded by the eclogites at peak pressure. Quartz and white mica δ18 O data from the selvage cannot be explained by simple mixing of gneiss and eclogite, and indicate a fluid/rock ratio >1 during regional-scale infiltration of high δ18 O (ca. 14‰) fluids. Heavy δ18 O overgrowths of metamorphic zircon over lighter δ18 O detrital grains indicate that the gneiss was similarly affected. Starkly contrasting boron content and δ11 B compositions for the host gneiss and the selvage also cannot be explained by local-scale devolatilization of the gneiss to form the selvage. Instead, the boron systematics are best attributed to two distinct phases of fluid infiltration: (1) low-boron selvage phengite with δ11 B from -10 to -30‰ grew under HP conditions; and (2) tourmaline and boron-rich muscovite with generally positive δ11 B crystallized in the host gneiss under subsequent lower pressure epidote-amphibolite facies conditions as the Luliang Shan gneiss terrane was exhumed past shallower portions of the subduction channel. Consistent with observations made worldwide, we were able to identify uptake of excess argon (40ArE) in phengite as a high pressure phenomenon. Phengite 40Ar/39Ar ages from massive eclogite exceed the ca. 490 Ma zircon U-Pb age of eclogite metamorphism by a factor of 1.5. However, phengite ages from the more permeable schistose selvage

  16. 25 CFR 226.39 - Measurement of gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Measurement of gas. 226.39 Section 226.39 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF OSAGE RESERVATION LANDS FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Requirements of Lessees § 226.39 Measurement of gas. All gas, required to...

  17. 29 CFR 3.9 - Prohibited payroll deductions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Prohibited payroll deductions. 3.9 Section 3.9 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor CONTRACTORS AND SUBCONTRACTORS ON PUBLIC BUILDING OR PUBLIC WORK FINANCED IN WHOLE OR IN PART BY LOANS OR GRANTS FROM THE UNITED STATES § 3.9 Prohibited payroll...

  18. 10 CFR 39.69 - Radioactive contamination control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Radioactive contamination control. 39.69 Section 39.69... Radiation Safety Requirements § 39.69 Radioactive contamination control. (a) If the licensee detects evidence that a sealed source has ruptured or licensed materials have caused contamination, the...

  19. 49 CFR 663.39 - Post-delivery audit review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Post-delivery audit review. 663.39 Section 663.39... Audits § 663.39 Post-delivery audit review. (a) If a recipient cannot complete a post-delivery audit because the recipient or its agent cannot certify Buy America compliance or that the rolling stock...

  20. 41 CFR 101-39.407 - Accident records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Accident records. 101-39...-INTERAGENCY FLEET MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS 39.4-Accidents and Claims § 101-39.407 Accident records. If GSA's records of vehicle accidents indicate that a particular activity has had an unusually high accident...

  1. 14 CFR 120.39 - Testing for alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Testing for alcohol. 120.39 Section 120.39... AND OPERATORS FOR COMPENSATION OR HIRE: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAM... Under § 91.147 of This Chapter and Safety-Sensitive Employees § 120.39 Testing for alcohol. (a)...

  2. 10 CFR 1.39 - Office of Human Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Office of Human Resources. 1.39 Section 1.39 Energy... § 1.39 Office of Human Resources. The Office of Human Resources— (a) Plans and implements NRC policies... agency's human resources; (b) Provides labor relations and personnel policy guidance and...

  3. 32 CFR 516.39 - Duties and procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Duties and procedures. 516.39 Section 516.39 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AID OF CIVIL AUTHORITIES AND PUBLIC RELATIONS LITIGATION Environmental Litigation § 516.39 Duties and procedures. (a) Water...

  4. 34 CFR 33.39 - Appeal to Department head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Appeal to Department head. 33.39 Section 33.39 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT § 33.39 Appeal... circumstances causing the failure to raise the objection. (i) If any party demonstrates to the satisfaction...

  5. 12 CFR 229.39 - lnsolvency of bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false lnsolvency of bank. 229.39 Section 229.39 Banks... AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS AND COLLECTION OF CHECKS (REGULATION CC) Collection of Checks § 229.39 lnsolvency of bank..., collecting, depositary, or returning bank that suspends payment, and which is not paid, shall be returned...

  6. 10 CFR 39.49 - Uranium sinker bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Uranium sinker bars. 39.49 Section 39.49 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.49 Uranium sinker bars. The licensee may use a uranium sinker bar in well logging applications only if it is...

  7. 36 CFR 7.39 - Mesa Verde National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mesa Verde National Park. 7.39 Section 7.39 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.39 Mesa Verde National Park. (a) Visiting...

  8. 42 CFR 60.39 - Death and disability claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Death and disability claims. 60.39 Section 60.39... ASSISTANCE LOAN PROGRAM The Lender and Holder § 60.39 Death and disability claims. (a) Death. The Secretary... death. (b) Disability. (1) The Secretary will discharge a borrower's liability on the loan in...

  9. 10 CFR 39.53 - Energy compensation source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Energy compensation source. 39.53 Section 39.53 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.53 Energy compensation source. The licensee may use an energy compensation source (ECS) which...

  10. 47 CFR 87.39 - Equipment acceptable for licensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment acceptable for licensing. 87.39 Section 87.39 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AVIATION SERVICES Applications and Licenses § 87.39 Equipment acceptable for...

  11. 29 CFR 1910.39 - Fire prevention plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fire prevention plans. 1910.39 Section 1910.39 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Means of Egress § 1910.39 Fire prevention plans. (a) Application. An employer must have a fire prevention plan when an OSHA standard in this part requires one. The...

  12. 34 CFR 668.39 - Study abroad programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Study abroad programs. 668.39 Section 668.39 Education..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Student Eligibility § 668.39 Study abroad programs. A student enrolled in a program of study abroad is eligible to receive title IV, HEA...

  13. 50 CFR 622.39 - Bag and possession limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... affecting § 622.39, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bag and possession limits. 622.39 Section... § 622.39 Bag and possession limits. (a) Applicability. (1) The bag and possession limits apply...

  14. 46 CFR 188.10-39 - Lakes, bays, and sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lakes, bays, and sounds. 188.10-39 Section 188.10-39... PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-39 Lakes, bays, and sounds. Under this designation shall be included all vessels navigating the waters of any of the lakes, bays, or sounds,...

  15. 29 CFR 785.39 - Travel away from home community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Travel away from home community. 785.39 Section 785.39 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEMENTS... Principles Traveltime § 785.39 Travel away from home community. Travel that keeps an employee away from...

  16. Operating Instructions for the Cryogenics in the Liquid Argon Detector at CIEMAT; Operacion de la Criogenia del Detector de Argon Liquido del CIEMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, L.; Leal, M. D.; Prado, M. del; Ramirez, J. L.

    2009-12-19

    Ciemat has wide experience in designing and developing gaseous particle detectors. It has taken part in the building of experiments for CERN accelerators, constructing shares of the muon chambers for L3 experiment in LEP and CMS experiment in LHC. Recently, new concepts for particle detectors have been developed, as a natural evolution from the ones built at Ciemat. These new radiation detectors use liquefied noble gases as active media. A testing system for these kind of liquefied argon detectors has been built at Ciemat, and includes a supporting cryogenic system for the liquefaction and maintenance of the liquid argon needed for operating the detector. This document describes the technical features of this cryogenic system. Besides the documentation of the cryogenic system, this technical report can be of help for the management and upgrading of the detector. As well as an introduction, the report includes the following chapters: The second one is a description of the cryogenics and gas systems. The third chapter shows the controlling electronics. The fourth chapter deals with the important topic that is security, its systems and protocols. The fifth describes the cryogenic operations possible in this equipment. The report is completed with diagrams, schemes, pictures and tables for the easier management of the setup. (Author)

  17. Compilation of electron collision excitation cross sections for neutral argon; Compilacion de resultados de secciones eficaces de excitacion para niveles del Argon neutro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco, F.

    1993-07-01

    The present work presents a compilation and critical analysis of the available data on electron collision excitation cross sections for neutral Argon levels. This study includes: 1.- A detailed description in intermediate coupling for all the levels belonging the 20 configurations 3p5 ns (n=4to 12), np(n=4to8) and nd(n=3to8)of neutral Argon. 2.- Calculation of the electron collision excitation cross sections in Born and Born-Oppenheimer-Ochkur approximations for all the levels in the 14 configurations 3p5 ns (n=4 to 7), np (n=4 to 7) and nd (n=3 to 8). 3.- comparison and discussion of the compiled data. These are the experimental and theoretical values available from the literature, and those from this work. 4.- Analysis of the regularities and systematic behaviors in order to determine which values can be considered more reliable. It is show that the concept of one electron cross section results quite useful for this purpose. In some cases it has been possible to obtain in this way approximate analytical expressions interpolating the experimental data. 5.- All the experimental and theoretical values studied are graphically presented and compared. 6.- The last part of the work includes a listing of several general purpose programs for Atomic Physics calculations developed for this work. (Author) 35 refs.

  18. Surface modification of fluorosilicone acrylate RGP contact lens via low-temperature argon plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin Shiheng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Analytical and Testing Center, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Wang Yingjun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Ren Li [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)], E-mail: psliren@scut.edu.cn; Zhao Lianna [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Kuang Tongchun [Analytical and Testing Center, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Chen Hao [Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325035 (China)], E-mail: chenhao823@mail.wz.zj.cn; Qu Jia [Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325035 (China)

    2008-11-15

    A fluorosilicone acrylate rigid gas permeable (RGP) contact lens was modified via argon plasma to improve surface hydrophilicity and resistance to protein deposition. The influence of plasma treatment on surface chemical structure, hydrophilicity and morphology of RGP lens was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS), contact angle measurements and scanning electron microscope (SEM), respectively. The contact angle results showed that the hydrophilicity of the contact lens was improved after plasma treatment. XPS results indicated that the incorporation of oxygen-containing groups on surface and the transformation of silicone into hydrophilic silicate after plasma treatment are the main reasons for the surface hydrophilicity improvement. SEM results showed that argon plasma with higher power could lead to surface etching.

  19. Novel Diamond Films Synthesis Strategy: Methanol and Argon Atmosphere by Microwave Plasma CVD Method Without Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Jiang, Caiyi; Guo, Shenghui; Zhang, Libo; Gao, Jiyun; Peng, Jinhui; Hu, Tu; Wang, Liang

    2016-12-01

    Diamond thin films are grown on silicon substrates by only using methanol and argon mixtures in microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) reactor. It is worth mentioning that the novel strategy makes the synthesis reaction works smoothly without hydrogen atmosphere, and the substrates temperature is only 500 °C. The evidence of surface morphology and thickness under different time is obtained by characterizing the samples using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). X-ray diffractometer (XRD) spectrum reveals that the preferential orientation of (111) plane sample is obtained. The Raman spectra indicate that the dominant component of all the samples is a diamond. Moreover, the diamond phase content of the targeted films was quantitatively analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) method, and the surface roughness of diamond films was investigated by atomic force microscope (AFM). Meanwhile, the possible synthesis mechanism of the diamond films in methanol- and argon-mixed atmosphere was discussed. PMID:27644241

  20. Nanometer-scale sharpening and surface roughening of ZnO nanorods by argon ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Shyamal, E-mail: shyamal@iitbbs.ac.in [School of Basic Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology, Bhubaneswar 751013 (India); Behera, Akshaya K. [School of Basic Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology, Bhubaneswar 751013 (India); Banerjee, Amarabha; Tribedi, Lokesh C. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India); Som, Tapobrata [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India); Ayyub, Pushan, E-mail: pushan@tifr.res.in [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India)

    2012-07-01

    We report the effects of exposing a hydrothermally grown, single crystalline ZnO nanorod array to a beam of 50 keV argon ions at room temperature. High resolution electron microscopy reveals that the ion bombardment results in a nanometer-scale roughening of the nanorod sidewalls, which were almost atomically flat in the pristine sample. Ion bombardment further causes the flat, Almost-Equal-To 100 nm diameter nanorod tips to get sharpened to ultrafine points less than 10 nm across. While tip sharpening is attributed to preferential sputtering, the formation of crystalline surface protuberances can be ascribed to surface instability due to curvature dependent sputtering and surface diffusion under argon-ion bombardment. Both the nanoscale roughening as well as the tip sharpening are expected to favorably impact a wide variety of applications, such as those involving catalysis, gas sensing, solar cells, field emission and gas discharge.

  1. Pressure-Induced Argon Insertion into an Auxetic Small Pore Zeolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y.; Hriljac, J; Vogt, T

    2010-01-01

    We report that natrolite, Na{sub 16}Al{sub 16}Si{sub 24}O{sub 48} {center_dot} 16H{sub 2}O, a small pore auxetic zeolite can incorporate significant amounts of Argon under moderate pressure- and temperature conditions resulting in Na{sub 16}Al{sub 16}Si{sub 24}O{sub 80} {center_dot} 16H{sub 2}O {center_dot} 6Ar. This material has a {approx}6.5% larger unit cell than natrolite at ambient conditions and its structure is related to Na{sub 16}Al{sub 16}Si{sub 24}O{sub 80} {center_dot} 24H{sub 2}O, an intermediate superhydrated natrolite referred to as para-natrolite. Argon insertion under pressure into auxetic frameworks such as natrolites is an important and overlooked confinement mechanism with potential applications and implications.

  2. Photochemistry of the ozone-water complex in cryogenic neon, argon, and krypton matrixes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuge, Masashi; Tsuji, Kazuhide; Kawai, Akio; Shibuya, Kazuhiko

    2013-12-12

    The photochemistry of ozone-water complexes and the wavelength dependence of the reactions were studied by matrix isolation FTIR spectrometry in neon, argon, and krypton matrixes. Hydrogen peroxide was formed upon the irradiation of UV light below 355 nm. Quantitative analyses of the reactant and product were performed to evaluate the matrix cage effect of the photoreaction. In argon and krypton matrixes, a bimolecular O((1)D) + H2O → H2O2 reaction was found to occur to form hydrogen peroxide, where the O((1)D) atom generated by the photolysis of ozone diffused in the cryogenic solids to encounter water. In a neon matrix, hydrogen peroxide was generated through intracage photoreaction of the ozone-water complex, indicating that a neon matrix medium is most appropriate to study the photochemistry of the ozone-water complex.

  3. Are the argon metastables important in high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudmundsson, J. T., E-mail: tumi@hi.is [Department of Space and Plasma Physics, School of Electrical Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhaga 3, IS-107 Reykjavik (Iceland); Lundin, D.; Minea, T. M. [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et Plasmas - LPGP, UMR 8578 CNRS, Université Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Stancu, G. D. [CentraleSupélec, Grande Voie des Vignes, 92295 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France); CNRS, UPR 288 Laboratoire EM2C, Grande Voie des Vignes, 92295 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France); Brenning, N. [Department of Space and Plasma Physics, School of Electrical Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Plasma and Coatings Physics Division, IFM-Materials Physics, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden)

    2015-11-15

    We use an ionization region model to explore the ionization processes in the high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge in argon with a titanium target. In conventional dc magnetron sputtering (dcMS), stepwise ionization can be an important route for ionization of the argon gas. However, in the HiPIMS discharge stepwise ionization is found to be negligible during the breakdown phase of the HiPIMS pulse and becomes significant (but never dominating) only later in the pulse. For the sputtered species, Penning ionization can be a significant ionization mechanism in the dcMS discharges, while in the HiPIMS discharge Penning ionization is always negligible as compared to electron impact ionization. The main reasons for these differences are a higher plasma density in the HiPIMS discharge, and a higher electron temperature. Furthermore, we explore the ionization fraction and the ionized flux fraction of the sputtered vapor and compare with recent experimental work.

  4. Radon backgrounds in the DEAP-1 liquid argon based Dark Matter detector

    CERN Document Server

    Amaudruz, P -A; Beltran, B; Boudjemline, K; Caldwell, M G Boulay B Cai T; Chen, M; Chouinard, R; Cleveland, B T; Contreras, D; Dering, K; Duncan, F; Ford, R; Giuliani, R Gagnon F; Golovko, M Gold V V; Gorel, P; Graham, K; Grant, D R; Hakobyan, R; Hallin, A L; Harvey, P; Hearns, C; Jillings, C J; Kuźniak, M; Lawson, I; Li, O; Lidgard, J; Liimatainen, P; Lippincott, W H; Mathew, R; McDonald, A B; McElroy, T; McFarlane, K; McKinsey, D; Muir, A; Nantais, C; Nicolics, K; Nikkel, J; Noble, T; O'Dwyer, E; Olsen, K S; Ouellet, C; Pasuthip, P; Pollmann, T; Rau, W; Retiere, F; Ronquest, M; Skensved, P; Sonley, T; Vázquez-Jáuregui, E; Veloce, L; Ward, M

    2012-01-01

    The DEAP-1 \\SI{7}{kg} single phase liquid argon scintillation detector was operated underground at SNOLAB in order to test the techniques and measure the backgrounds inherent to single phase detection, in support of the DEAP-3600 Dark Matter detector. Backgrounds in DEAP are controlled through material selection, construction techniques, pulse shape discrimination and event reconstruction. This report details the analysis of background events observed in three iterations of the DEAP-1 detector, and the measures taken to reduce them. The $^{222}$Rn decay rate in the liquid argon was measured to be between 16 and \\SI{26}{\\micro\\becquerel\\per\\kilogram}. We found that the background spectrum near the region of interest for Dark Matter detection in the final DEAP-1 detector generation is well described considering events from three sources: radon daughters decaying on the surface of the active volume, the expected rate of electromagnetic events misidentified as nuclear recoils due to inefficiencies in the pulse sh...

  5. ATLAS endcap liquid argon calorimeters. Description and construction of the cryostats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mace, Guy; Prat, Serge; Veillet, Jean-Jacques [Laboratoire de l' Accelerateur Lineaire IN2P3-CNRS et Universite de Paris-Sud 11, BP 34, F-91898 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2006-05-15

    All forward calorimeters of the ATLAS detector use the same detection technique, energy loss in passive plates, followed by ionisation and charge detection in liquid argon. They are therefore all grouped in the same vessel which must basically support and keep in place the heavy plates and the detection electrodes and maintain liquid argon at cold and stable temperature. Taking into account all the constraints as detailed below, and the overall detector size, 5 meter diameter by 3 meter length this was quite a challenge. The design, construction and tests of these two cryostats, up to their delivery at CERN, are described in this document. These two cryostats are a joint 'in kind' contribution to the Atlas experiment of LAL (Orsay), Max Planck Institute (Muenchen) and Wuppertal University (Wuppertal) and have been designed and built under the responsibility of LAL (Orsay) with contributions of the technical groups of the above institutions and of ATLAS-CERN. (authors)

  6. Two-phase Cryogenic Avalanche Detector with electroluminescence gap operated in argon doped with nitrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Bondar, A; Dolgov, A; Nosov, V; Shekhtman, L; Shemyakina, E; Sokolov, A

    2016-01-01

    A two-phase Cryogenic Avalanche Detector (CRAD) with electroluminescence (EL) gap, operated in argon doped with a minor (49$\\pm$7 ppm) admixture of nitrogen, has been studied. The EL gap was optically read out using cryogenic PMTs located on the perimeter of the gap. We present the results of the measurements of the N$_2$ content, detector sensitivity to X-ray-induced signals, EL gap yield and electron lifetime in the liquid. The detector sensitivity, at a drift field in liquid Ar of 0.6 kV/cm, was measured to be 9 and 16 photoelectrons recorded at the PMTs per keV of deposited energy at 23 and 88 keV respectively. Such two-phase detectors, with enhanced sensitivity to the S2 (ionization-induced) signal, are relevant in the field of argon detectors for dark matter search and low energy neutrino detection.

  7. Experimental study of electric breakdowns in liquid argon at centimeter scale

    CERN Document Server

    Blatter, A; Hsu, C -C; Janos, S; Kreslo, I; Luethi, M; von Rohr, C Rudolf; Schenk, M; Strauss, T; Weber, M S; Zeller, M

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present results on measurements of the dielectric strength of liquid argon near its boiling point and cathode-anode distances in the range of 0.1 mm to 40 mm with spherical cathode and plane anode. We show that at such distances the applied electric field at which breakdowns occur is as low as 40 kV/cm. Flash-overs across the ribbed dielectric of the high voltage feed-through are observed for a length of 300 mm starting from a voltage of 55 kV. These results contribute to set reference for the breakdown-free design of ionization detectors, such as Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LAr TPC).

  8. Characteristics of a DC discharge with a water cathode in argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, S. A.; Shutov, D. A.; Bobkova, E. S.; Rybkin, V. V., E-mail: rybkin@isuct.ru [Ivanovo State University of Chemistry and Technology (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The characteristics of a dc discharge excited between a metal anode and a water cathode in argon were studied experimentally. The dimensions of the positive column and the electric field in it were measured, and the vibrational temperature in the positive column was determined from the N{sub 2}C{sup 3}Π{sub u} → B{sup 3}Π{sub g} (0–2) emission band. It is shown that the power deposited in the positive column is almost entirely spent on gas heating. The obtained dependence of the reduced electric field on the gas pressure and the ionization frequencies calculated by solving the Boltzmann equation indicate that electrons are lost diffusively, whereas ionization proceeds in a stepwise manner via the lower metastable states of argon atoms.

  9. Adsorption and diffusion of argon confined in ordered and disordered microporous carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We use a combination of grand canonical Monte Carlo and microcanonical molecular dynamics simulations to study the adsorption and diffusion of argon at 77 K and 120 K confined in previously generated models of a disordered bituminous coal-based carbon, BPL, and an ordered carbon replica of Faujasite zeolite (C-FAU). Both materials exhibit a maximum in the diffusion coefficient as well as anomalous (sub-diffusive) behavior in the mean-squared displacements at short times at some relative pressures. In BPL, the anomalous diffusion occurs at low relative pressures, due to the trapping of argon atoms in small pores. In C-FAU, the anomalous diffusion occurs at high relative pressures, due to competitive diffusion of atoms traveling through windows and constrictions which interconnect the pores. All diffusion eventually tends to Fickian diffusion at longer times.

  10. First results obtained from the Cello liquid argon end cap calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cello liquid argon calorimeter is presented in the first part of this thesis. The cryogenic system has to supply three cryostats filled with liquid argon: one cylindrical cryostat of 25 m3 volume contains 2x8 separate modules; each of the two symmetric end cap cryostats contains two half cylindrical modules. Each module in the end cap part consists of 42 layers of lead strips interleaved with 43 full plates. The strips are alternatively vertical, horizontal and circular. In front of the lead calorimeter are 4 planes of copper foils glued on epoxy for dE/dx measurement. The electronics, signal processing and data acquisition system are described. In the second part, the performance and analysis of data measured by the end cap calorimeters are reported: study of Bhabha scattering e+e- → e+e-; preliminary results obtained in two photon physics e+e- → e+e-γγ → e+e-X

  11. Benchmarking TPB-coated Light Guides for Liquid Argon TPC Light Detection Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Baptista, B; Chiu, C; Conrad, J M; Ignarra, C M; Jones, B J P; Katori, T; Mufson, S

    2012-01-01

    Scintillation light from liquid argon is produced at 128 nm and thus must be shifted to visible wavelengths in light detection systems used for Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LArTPCs). To date, designs have employed tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) coatings on photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) or plates placed in front of the PMTs. Recently, a new approach using TPB-coated light guides was proposed. In this paper, we show that the response of lightguides coated with TPB in a UV Transmitting (UVT) acrylic matrix is very similar to that of a coating using a polystyrene (PS) matrix. We obtain a factor of three higher light yield than has been previously reported from lightguides. This paper provides information on the response of the lightguides so that these can be modeled in simulations for future LArTPCs. This paper also identifies areas of R&D for potential improvements in the lightguide response

  12. Development of wavelength shifter coated reflectors for the ArDM argon dark matter detector

    CERN Document Server

    Boccone, V; Mavrokoridis, K; Regenfus, C; Amsler, C; Badertscher, A; Bueno, A; Cabrera, H; Carmona-Benitez, M C; Daniel, M; Daw, E J; Degunda, U; Dell'Antone, A; Gendotti, A; Epprecht, L; Horikawa, S; Kaufmann, L; Knecht, L; Laffranchi, M; Lazzaro, C; Lussi, D; Lozano, J; Marchionni, A; Melgarejo, A; Mijakowski, P; Natterer, G; Navas-Concha, S; Otyugova, P; de Prado, M; Przewlocki, P; Resnati, F; Robinson, M; Rochet, J; Romero, L; Rondio, E; Rubbia, A; Spooner, N J C; Strauss, T; Ulbricht, J; Viant, T

    2009-01-01

    To optimise the design of the light readout in the ArDM 1-ton liquid argon dark matter detector, a range of reflector and WLS coating combinations were investigated in several small setups, where argon scintillation light was generated by radioactive sources in gas at normal temperature and pressure and shifted into the blue region by tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB). Various thicknesses of TPB were deposited by spraying and vacuum evaporation onto specular 3M{\\small\\texttrademark}-foil and diffuse Tetratex{\\small\\textregistered} (TTX) substrates. Light yields of each reflector and TPB coating combination were compared. Reflection coefficients of TPB coated reflectors were independently measured using a spectroradiometer in a wavelength range between 200 and 650~nm. WLS coating on the PMT window was also studied. These measurements were used to define the parameters of the light reflectors of the ArDM experiment. Fifteen large $120\\times 25$~cm$^2$ TTX sheets were coated and assembled in the detector. Measurements...

  13. Tetraphenyl-butadiene films: VUV-Vis optical characterization from room to liquid argon temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francini, R.; Montereali, R. M.; Nichelatti, E.; Vincenti, M. A.; Canci, N.; Segreto, E.; Cavanna, F.; Di Pompeo, F.; Carbonara, F.; Fiorillo, G.; Perfetto, F.

    2013-09-01

    A thin film of Tetraphenyl-butadiene (TPB) deposited onto the surface delimiting the active volume of the detector and/or onto the photosensor's optical window is the most common solution to down convert argon VUV scintillation light in current and planned liquid argon based experiments for dark matter searches and neutrino physics. Characterization of the main features of TPB coatings on different, commonly used substrates is reported, as a result of measurements at the specialized optical metrology labs of ENEA and University of Tor Vergata. Measured features include TPB emission spectra with lineshape and relative intensity variation recorded as a function of the film thickness and for the first time down to LAr temperature, as well as optical reflectance and transmittance spectra of the TPB coated substrates in the wavelength range of the TPB emission.

  14. Improved TPB-coated Light Guides for Liquid Argon TPC Light Detection Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, Z; Collin, G; Conrad, J M; Jones, B J P; Moon, J; Toups, M; Wongjirad, T

    2014-01-01

    Scintillation light produced in liquid argon (LAr) must be shifted from 128 nm to visible wavelengths in light detection systems used for liquid argon time-projection chambers (LArTPCs). To date, LArTPC light collection systems have employed tetra phenyl butadiene (TPB) coatings on photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) or plates placed in front of the PMTs. Recently, a new approach using TPB-coated light guides was proposed. In this paper, we report on light guides with improved attenuation lengths above 100 cm when measured in air. This is an important step in the development of meter-scale light guides for future LArTPCs. Improvements come from using a new acrylic-based coating, diamond-polished cast UV transmitting acrylic bars, and a hand-dipping technique to coat the bars.

  15. Some effects of argon and helium upon explosions of carbon monoxide and oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiock, Ernst F; Roeder, Carl H

    1937-01-01

    Report presents the results of an investigation conducted to study the effects of the inert gases, argon and helium, upon flame speed and expansion ratio in exploding mixtures of carbon monoxide, oxygen and water.For the particular gas mixtures investigated the results show that: (1) With the possible exception of helium in small amounts the addition of inert gas always produces decreased flame speed and expansion ratio; (2) like volumes of argon and helium have very different effects upon flame speed but practically the same effect upon expansion ratio; and (3) the difference in the effect of these two gases upon speed is independent of the ratio of carbon monoxide to oxygen. A discussion of some possible modes by which inert gases may produce the observed effects is included.

  16. Transpupillary Argon Laser Cyclophotocoagulation in a Refractory Traumatic Glaucoma Patient with Aphakia and Aniridia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umut Duygu Uzunel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of transpupillary argon laser cyclophotocoagulation (TALC in a patient with traumatic aniridia and aphakia secondary to blunt trauma who had previous bilateral trabeculectomy. Four months after the trauma the patient’s intraocular pressure (IOP rose to 35 mmHg despite topical antiglaucomatous medication. Inferior 180 degrees cyclophotocoagulation was performed with transpupillary argon laser in the first session and his IOP fell to values of 12-17 mmHg. Twelve weeks after TALC, his IOP rose to 22 mmHg and we had to apply TALC to the residual ciliary processes. Seven months later his IOP was 13 mmHg with topical dorzolamide/timolol and latanoprost administration. TALC may be an effective treatment alternative for lowering IOP in patients with visible ciliary processes who do not respond to conventional medical or laser treatment.

  17. Oxidized dahlia-like carbon nanohorns: adsorption of argon, methane and nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krungleviciute, Vaiva; Migone, Aldo; Yudasaka, Masako; Iijima, Sumio

    2010-03-01

    Different types of nanohorns, and nanohorn aggregates, can be produced depending on the parameters used during their production. We used a sample consisting mainly of dahlia-like nanohorn aggregates. In the dahlia-like aggregates the individual nanohorns are aligned radially, forming a sphere, with their individual ends protruding from the outer surface of the spherule. Our sample was oxidized by flowing pure oxygen. This treatment opened entry ports into the spaces at the interior of the individual nanohorns. We measured volumetric adsorption isotherms at 77.3 K with argon, methane, and nitrogen. For argon and methane two distinct substeps are present in the adsorption data; the steps for each of these two gases are comparable in size. For nitrogen there is a clear step present at lower adsorbent loadings, and a more gradual growth in the amount adsorbed as saturation is approached.

  18. Influence of dissociative recombination on the LTE of argon high-frequency plasmas at atmospheric pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Sainz, A; García, M C; Calzada, M D; Sainz, Abel; Margot, Joelle; Garcia, Maria Carmen; Calzada, Maria Dolores

    2004-01-01

    This work presents a few preliminary results from a collisional-radiative (CR) model intended to describe an argon microwave (2.45 GHz) plasma at atmospheric pressure. This model aims to investigate the influence of dissociative recombination products on the Saha-Boltzmann plasma equilibrium. The model is tested through comparison with experimental results obtained in an argon plasma column generated by a traveling electromagnetic surface-wave, which is suitable to perform a parametric investigation of the plasma. It is shown that dissociative recombination predominantly populates the 4s levels and the ground state. It is further observed that it strongly influences the population of the levels, specially those of lower energy. However, the higher levels (close to the ionization limit) appear to be in equilibrium whatever the plasma density. This allows assuming that the excitation temperature Texc determined from the upper levels in the atomic system in the Boltzmann-plot is equal to Te.

  19. Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber research and development in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baller, B.; Bromberg, C.; Buchanan, N.; Cavanna, F.; Chen, H.; Church, E.; Gehman, V.; Greenlee, H.; Guardincerri, E.; Jones, B.; Junk, T.; Katori, T.; Kirby, M.; Lang, K.; Loer, B.; Marchionni, A.; Maruyama, T.; Mauger, C.; Menegolli, A.; Montanari, D.; Mufson, S.; Norris, B.; Pordes, S.; Raaf, J.; Rebel, B.; Sanders, R.; Soderberg, M.; St. John, J.; Strauss, T.; Szelc, A.; Tope, T.; Touramanis, C.; Thorn, C.; Urheim, J.; Van de Water, R.; Wang, H.; Yu, B.; Zuckerbrot, M.

    2014-05-01

    A workshop was held at Fermilab on March 20-21, 2013 to discuss the development of liquid argon time projection chambers (LArTPCs) in the United States. The workshop was organized under the auspices of the Coordinating Panel for Advanced Detectors, a body that was initiated by the American Physical Society Division of Particles and Fields. All presentations at the workshop were made in seven topical plenary sessions: i) Argon Purity, ii) Cryogenics, iii) TPC and High Voltage, iv) Electronics, Data Acquisition and Triggering, v) Scintillation Light Detection, vi) Calibration and Test Beams, and vii) Software. This document summarizes the current efforts in each of these areas. It also highlights areas in LArTPC research and development that are common between neutrino experiments and dark matter experiments.

  20. Rotational and Vibrational Temperatures of Atmospheric Double Arc Argon-Nitrogen Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Jian-Hua; TU Xin; MA Zeng-Yi; CEN Ke-Fa; B.G.Chéron

    2007-01-01

    The spectroscopic technique is employed to study the emission of atmospheric argon-nitrogen plasma jet generated by an original dc double anode plasma torch. The molecular bands of the N(+2) first negative system are observed at the torch exit and chosen to evaluate the rotational and vibrational temperatures in comparison with the simulated spectra. The excitation temperature (Texc≈9600 K) is determined from the Boltzmann plot method. The results show that the rotational, vibrational, electron and kinetic temperatures are in good agreement with one another, which indicates that the core region of atmospheric double arc argon-nitrogen plasma jet at the torch exit is close to the local thermodynamic equilibrium state under our experimental conditions.

  1. Observation of Ω mode electron heating in dusty argon radio frequency discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killer, Carsten; Bandelow, Gunnar; Schneider, Ralf; Melzer, André [Institut für Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität Greifswald, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Matyash, Konstantin [Universitätsrechenzentrum, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität Greifswald, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)

    2013-08-15

    The time-resolved emission of argon atoms in a dusty plasma has been measured with phase-resolved optical emission spectroscopy using an intensified charge-coupled device camera. For that purpose, three-dimensional dust clouds have been confined in a capacitively coupled rf argon discharge with the help of thermophoretic levitation. While electrons are exclusively heated by the expanding sheath (α mode) in the dust-free case, electron heating takes place in the entire plasma bulk when the discharge volume is filled with dust particles. Such a behavior is known as Ω mode, first observed in electronegative plasmas. Furthermore, particle-in-cell simulations have been carried out, which reproduce the trends of the experimental findings. These simulations support previous numerical models showing that the enhanced atomic emission in the plasma can be attributed to a bulk electric field, which is mainly caused by the reduced electrical conductivity due to electron depletion.

  2. Experimental thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and specific heat values for mixtures of nitrogen, oxygen, and argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, R. A.; Cieszkiewicz, M. T.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental measurements of thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity obtained with a transient hot-wire apparatus are reported for three mixtures of nitrogen, oxygen, and argon. Values of the specific heat, Cp, are calculated from these measured values and the density calculated with an equation of state. The measurements were made at temperatures between 65 and 303 K with pressures between 0.1 and 70 MPa. The data cover the vapor, liquid, and supercritical gas phases for the three mixtures. The total reported points are 1066 for the air mixture (78.11 percent nitrogen, 20.97 percent oxygen, and 0.92 percent argon), 1058 for the 50 percent nitrogen, 50 percent oxygen mixture, and 864 for the 25 percent nitrogen, 75 oxygen mixture. Empirical thermal conductivity correlations are provided for the three mixtures.

  3. Drift Time Measurement in the ATLAS Liquid Argon Electromagnetic Calorimeter using Cosmic Muons

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, G; Abdallah, J; Abdelalim, A A; Abdesselam, A; Abdinov, O; Abi, B; Abolins, M; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Acharya, B S; Adams, D L; Addy, T N; Adelman, J; Adorisio, C; Adragna, P; Adye, T; Aefsky, S; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Aharrouche, M; Ahlen, S P; Ahles, F; Ahmad, A; Ahmed, H; Ahsan, M; Aielli, G; Akdogan, T; Åkesson, T P A; Akimoto, G; Akimov, A V; Aktas, A; Alam, M S; Alam, M A; Albert, J; Albrand, S; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Alessandria, F; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexandre, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Aliev, M; Alimonti, G; Alison, J; Aliyev, M; Allport, P P; Allwood-Spiers, S E; Almond, J; Aloisio, A; Alon, R; Alonso, A; Alviggi, M G; Amako, K; Amelung, C; Ammosov, V V; Amorim, A; Amorós, G; Amram, N; Anastopoulos, C; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Anduaga, X S; Angerami, A; Anghinolfi, F; Anjos, N; Antonaki, A; Antonelli, M; Antonelli, S; Antos, J; Antunovic, B; Anulli, F; Aoun, S; Arabidze, G; Aracena, I; Arai, Y; Arce, A T H; Archambault, J P; Arfaoui, S; Arguin, J F; Argyropoulos, T; Arik, E; Arik, M; Armbruster, A J; Arnaez, O; Arnault, C; Artamonov, A; Arutinov, D; Asai, M; Asai, S; Asfandiyarov, R; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Asner, D; Asquith, L; Assamagan, K; Astbury, A; Astvatsatourov, A; Atoian, G; Auerbach, B; Auge, E; Augsten, K; Aurousseau, M; Austin, N; Avolio, G; Avramidou, R; Axen, D; Ay, C; Azuelos, G; Azuma, Y; Baak, M A; Bacci, C; Bach, A; Bachacou, H; Bachas, K; Backes, M; Badescu, E; Bagnaia, P; Bai, Y; Bailey, D C; Bain, T; Baines, J T; Baker, O K; Baker, M D; Baker, S; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F; Banas, E; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Banfi, D; Bangert, A; Bansal, V; Baranov, S P; Baranov, S; Barashkou, A; Barber, T; Barberio, E L; Barberis, D; Barbero, M; Bardin, D Y; Barillari, T; Barisonzi, M; Barklow, T; Barlow, N; Barnett, B M; Barnett, R M; Baron, S; Baroncelli, A; Barr, A J; Barreiro, F; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J; Barrillon, P; Barros, N; Bartoldus, R; Bartsch, D; Bastos, J; Bates, R L; Batkova, L; Batley, J R; Battaglia, A; Battistin, M; Bauer, F; Bawa, H S; Bazalova, M; Beare, B; Beau, T; Beauchemin, P H; Beccherle, R; Becerici, N; Bechtle, P; Beck, G A; Beck, H P; Beckingham, M; Becks, K H; Bedajanek, I; Beddall, A J; Beddall, A; Bednár, P; Bednyakov, V A; Bee, C; Begel, M; Behar Harpaz, S; Behera, P K; Beimforde, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bell, P J; Bell, W H; Bella, G; Bellagamba, L; Bellina, F; Bellomo, M; Belloni, A; Belotskiy, K; Beltramello, O; Ben Ami, S; Benary, O; Benchekroun, D; Bendel, M; Benedict, B H; Benekos, N; Benhammou, Y; Benincasa, G P; Benjamin, D P; Benoit, M; Bensinger, J R; Benslama, K; Bentvelsen, S; Beretta, M; Berge, D; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E; Berger, N; Berghaus, F; Berglund, E; Beringer, J; Bernardet, K; Bernat, P; Bernhard, R; Bernius, C; Berry, T; Bertin, A; Besana, M I; Besson, N; Bethke, S; Bianchi, R M; Bianco, M; Biebel, O; Biesiada, J; Biglietti, M; Bilokon, H; Bindi, M; Binet, S; Bingul, A; Bini, C; Biscarat, C; Bitenc, U; Black, K M; Blair, R E; Blanchard, J B; Blanchot, G; Blocker, C; Blocki, J; Blondel, A; Blum, W; Blumenschein, U; Bobbink, G J; Bocci, A; Boehler, M; Boek, J; Boelaert, N; Böser, S; Bogaerts, J A; Bogouch, A; Bohm, C; Bohm, J; Boisvert, V; Bold, T; Boldea, V; Boldyrev, A; Bondarenko, V G; Bondioli, M; Boonekamp, M; Bordoni, S; Borer, C; Borisov, A; Borissov, G; Borjanovic, I; Borroni, S; Bos, K; Boscherini, D; Bosman, M; Bosteels, M; Boterenbrood, H; Bouchami, J; Boudreau, J; Bouhova-Thacker, E V; Boulahouache, C; Bourdarios, C; Boyd, J; Boyko, I R; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Braem, A; Branchini, P; Brandenburg, G W; Brandt, A; Brandt, G; Brandt, O; Bratzler, U; Brau, B; Brau, J E; Braun, H M; Brelier, B; Bremer, J; Brenner, R; Bressler, S; Breton, D; Britton, D; Brochu, F M; Brock, I; Brock, R; Brodbeck, T J; Brodet, E; Broggi, F; Bromberg, C; Brooijmans, G; Brooks, W K; Brown, G; Brubaker, E; Bruckman de Renstrom, P A; Bruncko, D; Bruneliere, R; Brunet, S; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bruschi, M; Buanes, T; Bucci, F; Buchanan, J; Buchholz, P; Buckley, A G; Budagov, I A; Budick, B; Büscher, V; Bugge, L; Bulekov, O; Bunse, M; Buran, T; Burckhart, H; Burdin, S; Burgess, T; Burke, S; Busato, E; Bussey, P; Buszello, C P; Butin, F; Butler, B; Butler, J M; Buttar, C M; Butterworth, J M; Byatt, T; Caballero, J; Cabrera Urbán, S; Caforio, D; Cakir, O; Calafiura, P; Calderini, G; Calfayan, P; Calkins, R; Caloba, L P; Caloi, R; Calvet, D; Camarri, P; Cambiaghi, M; Cameron, D; Campabadal Segura, F; Campana, S; Campanelli, M; Canale, V; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Cantero, J; Capasso, L; Capeans Garrido, M D M; Caprini, I; Caprini, M; Capua, M; Caputo, R; Caracinha, D; Caramarcu, C; Cardarelli, R; Carli, T; Carlino, G; Carminati, L; Caron, B; Caron, S; Carrillo Montoya, G D; Carron Montero, S; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Carvalho, J; Casadei, D; Casado, M P; Cascella, M; Caso, C; Castaneda Hernadez, A M; Castaneda-Miranda, E; Castillo Gimenez, V; Castro, N; Cataldi, G; Catinaccio, A; Catmore, J R; Cattai, A; Cattani, G; Caughron, S; Cauz, D; Cavalleri, P; Cavalli, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cavasinni, V; Ceradini, F; Cerqueira, A S; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Cerutti, F; Cetin, S A; Cevenini, F; Chafaq, A; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K; Chapman, J D; Chapman, J W; Chareyre, E; Charlton, D G; Chavda, V; Cheatham, S; Chekanov, S; Chekulaev, S V; Chelkov, G A; Chen, H; Chen, S; Chen, T; Chen, X; Cheng, S; Cheplakov, A; Chepurnov, V F; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R; Tcherniatine, V; Chesneanu, D; Cheu, E; Cheung, S L; Chevalier, L; Chevallier, F; Chiarella, V; Chiefari, G; Chikovani, L; Childers, J T; Chilingarov, A; Chiodini, G; Chizhov, M; Choudalakis, G; Chouridou, S; Christidi, I A; Christov, A; Chromek-Burckhart, D; Chu, M L; Chudoba, J; Ciapetti, G; Ciftci, A K; Ciftci, R; Cinca, D; Cindro, V; Ciobotaru, M D; Ciocca, C; Ciocio, A; Cirilli, M; Citterio, M; Clark, A; Cleland, W; Clemens, J C; Clement, B; Clement, C; Coadou, Y; Cobal, M; Coccaro, A; Cochran, J; Coelli, S; Coggeshall, J; Cogneras, E; Cojocaru, C D; Colas, J; Cole, B; Colijn, A P; Collard, C; Collins, N J; Collins-Tooth, C; Collot, J; Colon, G; Conde Muiño, P; Coniavitis, E; Consonni, M; Constantinescu, S; Conta, C; Conventi, F; Cook, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, B D; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Cooper-Smith, N J; Copic, K; Cornelissen, T; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F; Corso-Radu, A; Cortes-Gonzalez, A; Cortiana, G; Costa, G; Costa, M J; Costanzo, D; Costin, T; Côté, D; Coura Torres, R; Courneyea, L; Cowan, G; Cowden, C; Cox, B E; Cranmer, K; Cranshaw, J; Cristinziani, M; Crosetti, G; Crupi, R; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T; Curatolo, M; Curtis, C J; Cwetanski, P; Czyczula, Z; D'Auria, S; D'Onofrio, M; D'Orazio, A; Da Silva, P V M; Da Via, C; Dabrowski, W; Dai, T; Dallapiccola, C; Dallison, S J; Daly, C H; Dam, M; Danielsson, H O; Dannheim, D; Dao, V; Darbo, G; Darlea, G L; Davey, W; Davidek, T; Davidson, N; Davidson, R; Davies, M; Davison, A R; Dawson, I; Dawson, J W; Daya, R K; De, K; de Asmundis, R; De Castro, S; De Castro Faria Salgado, P E; De Cecco, S; de Graat, J; De Groot, N; de Jong, P; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De La Taille, C; De Mora, L; De Oliveira Branco, M; De Pedis, D; De Salvo, A; De Sanctis, U; De Santo, A; De Vivie De Regie, J B; De Zorzi, G; Dean, S; Deberg, H; Dedes, G; Dedovich, D V; Defay, P O; Degenhardt, J; Dehchar, M; Del Papa, C; Del Peso, J; Del Prete, T; Dell'Acqua, A; Dell'Asta, L; Della Pietra, M; della Volpe, D; Delmastro, M; Delruelle, N; Delsart, P A; Deluca, C; Demers, S; Demichev, M; Demirkoz, B; Deng, J; Deng, W; Denisov, S P; Dennis, C; Derkaoui, J E; Derue, F; Dervan, P; Desch, K; Deviveiros, P O; Dewhurst, A; DeWilde, B; Dhaliwal, S; Dhullipudi, R; Di Ciaccio, A; Di Ciaccio, L; Di Domenico, A; Di Girolamo, A; Di Girolamo, B; Di Luise, S; Di Mattia, A; Di Nardo, R; Di Simone, A; Di Sipio, R; Diaz, M A; Diblen, F; Diehl, E B; Dietrich, J; Dietzsch, T A; Diglio, S; Dindar Yagci, K; Dingfelder, D J; Dionisi, C; Dita, P; Dita, S; Dittus, F; Djama, F; Djilkibaev, R; Djobava, T; do Vale, M A B; Do Valle Wemans, A; Doan, T K O; Dobbs, M; Dobos, D; Dobson, E; Dobson, M; Dodd, J; Doherty, T; Doi, Y; Dolejsi, J; Dolenc, I; Dolezal, Z; Dolgoshein, B A; Dohmae, T; Donega, M; Donini, J; Dopke, J; Doria, A; Dos Anjos, A; Dotti, A; Dova, M T; Doxiadis, A; Doyle, A T; Drasal, Z; Driouichi, C; Dris, M; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Dudarev, A; Dudziak, F; Dührssen , M; Duflot, L; Dufour, M A; Dunford, M; Duperrin, A; Duran Yildiz, H; Dushkin, A; Duxfield, R; Dwuznik, M; Düren, M; Ebenstein, W L; Ebke, J; Eckert, S; Eckweiler, S; Edmonds, K; Edwards, C A; Eerola, P; Egorov, K; Ehrenfeld, W; Ehrich, T; Eifert, T; Eigen, G; Einsweiler, K; Eisenhandler, E; Ekelof, T; El Kacimi, M; Ellert, M; Elles, S; Ellinghaus, F; Ellis, K; Ellis, N; Elmsheuser, J; Elsing, M; Ely, R; Emeliyanov, D; Engelmann, R; Engl, A; Epp, B; Eppig, A; Epshteyn, V S; Ereditato, A; Eriksson, D; Ermoline, I; Ernst, J; Ernst, M; Ernwein, J; Errede, D; Errede, S; Ertel, E; Escalier, M; Escobar, C; Espinal Curull, X; Esposito, B; Etienne, F; Etienvre, A I; Etzion, E; Evans, H; Fabbri, L; Fabre, C; Facius, K; Fakhrutdinov, R M; Falciano, S; Falou, A C; Fang, Y; Fanti, M; Farbin, A; Farilla, A; Farley, J; Farooque, T; Farrington, S M; Farthouat, P; Fassi, F; Fassnacht, P; Fassouliotis, D; Fatholahzadeh, B; Fayard, L; Fayette, F; Febbraro, R; Federic, P; Fedin, O L; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W; Feligioni, L; Felzmann, C U; Feng, C; Feng, E J; Fenyuk, A B; Ferencei, J; Ferland, J; Fernandes, B; Fernando, W; Ferrag, S; Ferrando, J; Ferrari, A; Ferrari, P; Ferrari, R; Ferrer, A; Ferrer, M L; Ferrere, D; Ferretti, C; Fiascaris, M; Fiedler, F; Filipcic, A; Filippas, A; Filthaut, F; Fincke-Keeler, M; Fiolhais, M C N; Fiorini, L; Firan, A; Fischer, G; Fisher, M J; Flechl, M; Fleck, I; Fleckner, J; Fleischmann, P; Fleischmann, S; Flick, T; Flores Castillo, L R; Flowerdew, M J; Föhlisch, F; Fokitis, M; Fonseca Martin, T; Forbush, D A; Formica, A; Forti, A; Fortin, D; Foster, J M; Fournier, D; Foussat, A; Fowler, A J; Fowler, K; Fox, H; Francavilla, P; Franchino, S; Francis, D; Franklin, M; Franz, S; Fraternali, M; Fratina, S; Freestone, J; French, S T; Froeschl, R; Froidevaux, D; Frost, J A; Fukunaga, C; Fullana Torregrosa, E; Fuster, J; Gabaldon, C; Gabizon, O; Gadfort, T; Gadomski, S; Gagliardi, G; Gagnon, P; Galea, C; Gallas, E J; Gallas, M V; Gallo, V; Gallop, B J; Gallus, P; Galyaev, E; Gan, K K; Gao, Y S; Gaponenko, A; Garcia-Sciveres, M; García, C; García Navarro, J E; Gardner, R W; Garelli, N; Garitaonandia, H; Garonne, V; Gatti, C; Gaudio, G; Gaumer, O; Gauzzi, P; Gavrilenko, I L; Gay, C; Gaycken, G; Gayde, J C; Gazis, E N; Ge, P; Gee, C N P; Geich-Gimbel, Ch; Gellerstedt, K; Gemme, C; Genest, M H; Gentile, S; Georgatos, F; George, S; Gerlach, P; Gershon, A; Geweniger, C; Ghazlane, H; Ghez, P; Ghodbane, N; Giacobbe, B; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giangiobbe, V; Gianotti, F; Gibbard, B; Gibson, A; Gibson, S M; Gilbert, L M; Gilchriese, M; Gilewsky, V; Gillman, A R; Gingrich, D M; Ginzburg, J; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M P; Giordano, R; Giovannini, P; Giraud, P F; Girtler, P; Giugni, D; Giusti, P; Gjelsten, B K; Gladilin, L K; Glasman, C; Glazov, A; Glitza, K W; Glonti, G L; Godfrey, J; Godlewski, J; Goebel, M; Göpfert, T; Goeringer, C; Gössling, C; Göttfert, T; Goggi, V; Goldfarb, S; Goldin, D; Golling, T; Gollub, N P; Gomes, A; Gomez Fajardo, L S; Gonçalo, R; Gonella, L; Gong, C; González de la Hoz, S; Gonzalez Silva, M L; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S; Goodson, J J; Goossens, L; Gorbounov, P A; Gordon, H A; Gorelov, I; Gorfine, G; Gorini, B; Gorini, E; Gorisek, A; Gornicki, E; Goryachev, V N; Gosdzik, B; Gosselink, M; Gostkin, M I; Gough Eschrich, I; Gouighri, M; Goujdami, D; Goulette, M P; Goussiou, A G; Goy, C; Grabowska-Bold, I; Grafström, P; Grahn, K J; Granado Cardoso, L; Grancagnolo, F; Grancagnolo, S; Grassi, V; Gratchev, V; Grau, N; Gray, H M; Gray, J A; Graziani, E; Green, B; Greenshaw, T; Greenwood, Z D; Gregor, I M; Grenier, P; Griesmayer, E; Griffiths, J; Grigalashvili, N; Grillo, A A; Grimm, K; Grinstein, S; Grishkevich, Y V; Groer, L S; Grognuz, J; Groh, M; Groll, M; Gross, E; Grosse-Knetter, J; Groth-Jensen, J; Grybel, K; Guarino, V J; Guicheney, C; Guida, A; Guillemin, T; Guler, H; Gunther, J; Guo, B; Gupta, A; Gusakov, Y; Gutierrez, A; Gutierrez, P; Guttman, N; Gutzwiller, O; Guyot, C; Gwenlan, C; Gwilliam, C B; Haas, A; Haas, S; Haber, C; Hackenburg, R; Hadavand, H K; Hadley, D R; Haefner, P; Härtel, R; Hajduk, Z; Hakobyan, H; Haller, J; Hamacher, K; Hamilton, A; Hamilton, S; Han, H; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hance, M; Handel, C; Hanke, P; Hansen, J R; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, P H; Hansl-Kozanecka, T; Hansson, P; Hara, K; Hare, G A; Harenberg, T; Harrington, R D; Harris, O M; Harrison, K; Hartert, J; Hartjes, F; Haruyama, T; Harvey, A; Hasegawa, S; Hasegawa, Y; Hashemi, K; Hassani, S; Hatch, M; Haug, F; Haug, S; Hauschild, M; Hauser, R; Havranek, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R J; Hawkins, D; Hayakawa, T; Hayward, H S; Haywood, S J; He, M; Head, S J; Hedberg, V; Heelan, L; Heim, S; Heinemann, B; Heisterkamp, S; Helary, L; Heller, M; Hellman, S; Helsens, C; Hemperek, T; Henderson, R C W; Henke, M; Henrichs, A; Henriques Correia, A M; Henrot-Versille, S; Hensel, C; Henss, T; Hernández Jiménez, Y; Hershenhorn, A D; Herten, G; Hertenberger, R; Hervas, L; Hessey, N P; Hidvegi, A; Higón-Rodriguez, E; Hill, D; Hill, J C; Hiller, K H; Hillert, S; Hillier, S J; Hinchliffe, I; Hines, E; Hirose, M; Hirsch, F; Hirschbuehl, D; Hobbs, J; Hod, N; Hodgkinson, M C; Hodgson, P; Hoecker, A; Hoeferkamp, M R; Hoffman, J; Hoffmann, D; Hohlfeld, M; Holmgren, S O; Holy, T; Holzbauer, J L; Homma, Y; Homola, P; Horazdovsky, T; Hori, T; Horn, C; Horner, S; Horvat, S; Hostachy, J Y; Hou, S; Houlden, M A; Hoummada, A; Howe, T; Hrivnac, J; Hryn'ova, T; Hsu, P J; Hsu, S C; Huang, G S; Hubacek, Z; Hubaut, F; Huegging, F; Hughes, E W; Hughes, G; Hughes-Jones, R E; Hurst, P; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Huseynov, N; Huston, J; Huth, J; Iacobucci, G; Iakovidis, G; Ibragimov, I; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Idarraga, J; Iengo, P; Igonkina, O; Ikegami, Y; Ikeno, M; Ilchenko, Y; Iliadis, D; Ilyushenka, Y; Imori, M; Ince, T; Ioannou, P; Iodice, M; Irles Quiles, A; Ishikawa, A; Ishino, M; Ishmukhametov, R; Isobe, T; Issakov, V; Issever, C; Istin, S; Itoh, Y; Ivashin, A V; Iwasaki, H; Izen, J M; Izzo, V; Jackson, B; Jackson, J N; Jackson, P; Jaekel, M; Jahoda, M; Jain, V; Jakobs, K; Jakobsen, S; Jakubek, J; Jana, D; Jansen, E; Jantsch, A; Janus, M; Jared, R C; Jarlskog, G; Jarron, P; Jeanty, L; Jen-La Plante, I; Jenni, P; Jez, P; Jézéquel, S; Ji, W; Jia, J; Jiang, Y; Jimenez-Belenguer, M; Jin, G; Jin, S; Jinnouchi, O; Joffe, D; Johansen, M; Johansson, K E; Johansson, P; Johnert, S; Johns, K A; Jon-And, K; Jones, G; Jones, R W L; Jones, T W; Jones, T J; Jonsson, O; Joos, D; Joram, C; Jorge, P M; Juranek, V; Jussel, P; Kabachenko, V V; Kabana, S; Kaci, M; Kaczmarska, A; Kado, M; Kagan, H; Kagan, M; Kaiser, S; Kajomovitz, E; Kalinin, S; Kalinovskaya, L V; Kalinowski, A; Kama, S; Kanaya, N; Kaneda, M; Kantserov, V A; Kanzaki, J; Kaplan, B; Kapliy, A; Kaplon, J; Karagounis, M; Karagoz Unel, M; Kartvelishvili, V; Karyukhin, A N; Kashif, L; Kasmi, A; Kass, R D; Kastanas, A; Kastoryano, M; Kataoka, M; Kataoka, Y; Katsoufis, E; Katzy, J; Kaushik, V; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kawamura, G; Kayl, M S; Kayumov, F; Kazanin, V A; Kazarinov, M Y; Kazi, S I; Keates, J R; Keeler, R; Keener, P T; Kehoe, R; Keil, M; Kekelidze, G D; Kelly, M; Kennedy, J; Kenyon, M; Kepka, O; Kerschen, N; Kersevan, B P; Kersten, S; Kessoku, K; Khakzad, M; Khalil-zada, F; Khandanyan, H; Khanov, A; Kharchenko, D; Khodinov, A; Kholodenko, A G; Khomich, A; Khoriauli, G; Khovanskiy, N; Khovanskiy, V; Khramov, E; Khubua, J; Kilvington, G; Kim, H; Kim, M S; Kim, P C; Kim, S H; Kind, O; Kind, P; King, B T; Kirk, J; Kirsch, G P; Kirsch, L E; Kiryunin, A E; Kisielewska, D; Kittelmann, T; Kiyamura, H; Kladiva, E; Klein, M; Klein, U; Kleinknecht, K; Klemetti, M; Klier, A; Klimentov, A; Klingenberg, R; Klinkby, E B; Klioutchnikova, T; Klok, P F; Klous, S; Kluge, E E; Kluge, T; Kluit, P; Klute, M; Kluth, S; Knecht, N S; Kneringer, E; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Koblitz, B; Kocian, M; Kocnar, A; Kodys, P; Köneke, K; König, A C; Köpke, L; Koetsveld, F; Koevesarki, P; Koffas, T; Koffeman, E; Kohn, F; Kohout, Z; Kohriki, T; Kokott, T; Kolanoski, H; Kolesnikov, V; Koletsou, I; Koll, J; Kollar, D; Kolos, S; Kolya, S D; Komar, A A; Komaragiri, J R; Kondo, T; Kono, T; Kononov, A I; Konoplich, R; Konovalov, S P; Konstantinidis, N; Koperny, S; Korcyl, K; Kordas, K; Koreshev, V; Korn, A; Korolkov, I; Korolkova, E V; Korotkov, V A; Kortner, O; Kostka, P; Kostyukhin, V V; Kotamäki, M J; Kotov, S; Kotov, V M; Kotov, K Y; Koupilova, Z; Kourkoumelis, C; Koutsman, A; Kowalewski, R; Kowalski, H; Kowalski, T Z; Kozanecki, W; Kozhin, A S; Kral, V; Kramarenko, V A; Kramberger, G; Krasny, M W; Krasznahorkay, A; Kreisel, A; Krejci, F; Krepouri, A; Kretzschmar, J; Krieger, P; Krobath, G; Kroeninger, K; Kroha, H; Kroll, J; Kroseberg, J; Krstic, J; Kruchonak, U; Krüger, H; Krumshteyn, Z V; Kubota, T; Kuehn, S; Kugel, A; Kuhl, T; Kuhn, D; Kukhtin, V; Kulchitsky, Y; Kuleshov, S; Kummer, C; Kuna, M; Kunkle, J; Kupco, A; Kurashige, H; Kurata, M; Kurchaninov, L L; Kurochkin, Y A; Kus, V; Kuznetsova, E; Kvasnicka, O; Kwee, R; La Rotonda, L; Labarga, L; Labbe, J; Lacasta, C; Lacava, F; Lacker, H; Lacour, D; Lacuesta, V R; Ladygin, E; Lafaye, R; Laforge, B; Lagouri, T; Lai, S; Lamanna, M; Lampen, C L; Lampl, W; Lancon, E; Landgraf, U; Landon, M P J; Lane, J L; Lankford, A J; Lanni, F; Lantzsch, K; Lanza, A; Laplace, S; Lapoire, C; Laporte, J F; Lari, T; Larionov, A V; Larner, A; Lasseur, C; Lassnig, M; Laurelli, P; Lavrijsen, W; Laycock, P; Lazarev, A B; Lazzaro, A; Le Dortz, O; Le Guirriec, E; Le Maner, C; Le Menedeu, E; Le Vine, M; Leahu, M; Lebedev, A; Lebel, C; LeCompte, T; Ledroit-Guillon, F; Lee, H; Lee, J S H; Lee, S C; Lefebvre, M; Legendre, M; LeGeyt, B C; Legger, F; Leggett, C; Lehmacher, M; Lehmann Miotto, G; Lei, X; Leitner, R; Lelas, D; Lellouch, D; Lellouch, J; Leltchouk, M; Lendermann, V; Leney, K J C; Lenz, T; Lenzen, G; Lenzi, B; Leonhardt, K; Leroy, C; Lessard, J R; Lester, C G; Leung Fook Cheong, A; Levêque, J; Levin, D; Levinson, L J; Levitski, M S; Levonian, S; Lewandowska, M; Leyton, M; Li, H; Li, J; Li, S; Li, X; Liang, Z; Liang, Z; Liberti, B; Lichard, P; Lichtnecker, M; Lie, K; Liebig, W; Liko, D; Lilley, J N; Lim, H; Limosani, A; Limper, M; Lin, S C; Lindsay, S W; Linhart, V; Linnemann, J T; Liolios, A; Lipeles, E; Lipinsky, L; Lipniacka, A; Liss, T M; Lissauer, D; Lister, A; Litke, A M; Liu, C; Liu, D; Liu, H; Liu, J B; Liu, M; Liu, S; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Livan, M; Lleres, A; Lloyd, S L; Lobodzinska, E; Loch, P; Lockman, W S; Lockwitz, S; Loddenkoetter, T; Loebinger, F K; Loginov, A; Loh, C W; Lohse, T; Lohwasser, K; Lokajicek, M; Loken, J; Lopes, L; Lopez Mateos, D; Losada, M; Loscutoff, P; Losty, M J; Lou, X; Lounis, A; Loureiro, K F; Lovas, L; Love, J; Love, P; Lowe, A J; Lu, F; Lu, J; Lubatti, H J; Luci, C; Lucotte, A; Ludwig, A; Ludwig, D; Ludwig, I; Ludwig, J; Luehring, F; Luisa, L; Lumb, D; Luminari, L; Lund, E; Lund-Jensen, B; Lundberg, B; Lundberg, J; Lundquist, J; Lutz, G; Lynn, D; Lys, J; Lytken, E; Ma, H; Ma, L L; Macana Goia, J A; Maccarrone, G; Macchiolo, A; Macek, B; Machado Miguens, J; Mackeprang, R; Madaras, R J; Mader, W F; Maenner, R; Maeno, T; Mättig, P; Mättig, S; Magalhaes Martins, P J; Magradze, E; Magrath, C A; Mahalalel, Y; Mahboubi, K; Mahmood, A; Mahout, G; Maiani, C; Maidantchik, C; Maio, A; Majewski, S; Makida, Y; Makouski, M; Makovec, N; Malecki, Pa; Malecki, P; Maleev, V P; Malek, F; Mallik, U; Malon, D; Maltezos, S; Malyshev, V; Malyukov, S; Mambelli, M; Mameghani, R; Mamuzic, J; Manabe, A; Mandelli, L; Mandic, I; Mandrysch, R; Maneira, J; Mangeard, P S; Manjavidze, I D; Manning, P M; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Mansoulie, B; Mapelli, A; Mapelli, L; March, L; Marchand, J F; Marchese, F; Marchiori, G; Marcisovsky, M; Marino, C P; Marques, C N; Marroquim, F; Marshall, R; Marshall, Z; Martens, F K; Marti i Garcia, S; Martin, A J; Martin, A J; Martin, B; Martin, B; Martin, F F; Martin, J P; Martin, T A; Martin dit Latour, B; Martinez, M; Martinez Outschoorn, V; Martini, A; Martyniuk, A C; Maruyama, T; Marzano, F; Marzin, A; Masetti, L; Mashimo, T; Mashinistov, R; Masik, J; Maslennikov, A L; Massaro, G; Massol, N; Mastroberardino, A; Masubuchi, T; Mathes, M; Matricon, P; Matsunaga, H; Matsushita, T; Mattravers, C; Maxfield, S J; May, E N; Mayne, A; Mazini, R; Mazur, M; Mazzanti, M; Mazzanti, P; Mc Donald, J; Mc Kee, S P; McCarn, A; McCarthy, R L; McCubbin, N A; McFarlane, K W; McGlone, H; Mchedlidze, G; McLaren, R A; McMahon, S J; McMahon, T R; McPherson, R A; Meade, A; Mechnich, J; Mechtel, M; Medinnis, M; Meera-Lebbai, R; Meguro, T M; Mehdiyev, R; Mehlhase, S; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Meirose, B; Melachrinos, C; Melamed-Katz, A; Mellado Garcia, B R; Meng, Z; Menke, S; Meoni, E; Merkl, D; Mermod, P; Merola, L; Meroni, C; Merritt, F S; Messina, A M; Messmer, I; Metcalfe, J; Mete, A S; Meyer, J P; Meyer, J; Meyer, J; Meyer, T C; Meyer, W T; Miao, J; Michal, S; Micu, L; Middleton, R P; Migas, S; Mijovic, L; Mikenberg, G; Mikuz, M; Miller, D W; Mills, W J; Mills, C M; Milov, A; Milstead, D A; Minaenko, A A; Miñano, M; Minashvili, I A; Mincer, A I; Mindur, B; Mineev, M; Ming, Y; Mir, L M; Mirabelli, G; Misawa, S; Miscetti, S; Misiejuk, A; Mitrevski, J; Mitsou, V A; Miyagawa, P S; Mjörnmark, J U; Mladenov, D; Moa, T; Moed, S; Moeller, V; Mönig, K; Möser, N; Mohn, B; Mohr, W; Mohrdieck-Möck, S; Moles-Valls, R; Molina-Perez, J; Moloney, G; Monk, J; Monnier, E; Montesano, S; Monticelli, F; Moore, R W; Mora Herrera, C; Moraes, A; Morais, A; Morel, J; Morello, G; Moreno, D; Moreno Llácer, M; Morettini, P; Morii, M; Morley, A K; Mornacchi, G; Morozov, S V; Morris, J D; Moser, H G; Mosidze, M; Moss, J; Mount, R; Mountricha, E; Mouraviev, S V; Moyse, E J W; Mudrinic, M; Mueller, F; Mueller, J; Mueller, K; Müller, T A; Muenstermann, D; Muir, A; Munwes, Y; Murillo Garcia, R; Murray, W J; Mussche, I; Musto, E; Myagkov, A G; Myska, M; Nadal, J; Nagai, K; Nagano, K; Nagasaka, Y; Nairz, A M; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Nakatsuka, H; Nanava, G; Napier, A; Nash, M; Nation, N R; Nattermann, T; Naumann, T; Navarro, G; Nderitu, S K; Neal, H A; Nebot, E; Nechaeva, P; Negri, A; Negri, G; Nelson, A; Nelson, T K; Nemecek, S; Nemethy, P; Nepomuceno, A A; Nessi, M; Neubauer, M S; Neusiedl, A; Neves, R N; Nevski, P; Newcomer, F M; Nickerson, R B; Nicolaidou, R; Nicolas, L; Nicoletti, G; Niedercorn, F; Nielsen, J; Nikiforov, A; Nikolaev, K; Nikolic-Audit, I; Nikolopoulos, K; Nilsen, H; Nilsson, P; Nisati, A; Nishiyama, T; Nisius, R; Nodulman, L; Nomachi, M; Nomidis, I; Nordberg, M; Nordkvist, B; Notz, D; Novakova, J; Nozaki, M; Nozicka, M; Nugent, I M; Nuncio-Quiroz, A -E; Nunes Hanninger, G; Nunnemann, T; Nurse, E; O'Neil, D C; O'Shea, V; Oakham, F G; Oberlack, H; Ochi, A; Oda, S; Odaka, S; Odier, J; Odino, G A; Ogren, H; Oh, A; Oh, S H; Ohm, C C; Ohshima, T; Ohshita, H; Ohsugi, T; Okada, S; Okawa, H; Okumura, Y; Olcese, M; Olchevski, A G; Oliveira, M; Oliveira Damazio, D; Oliver, J; Oliver Garcia, E; Olivito, D; Olszewski, A; Olszowska, J; Omachi, C; Onofre, A; Onyisi, P U E; Oram, C J; Ordonez, G; Oreglia, M J; Oren, Y; Orestano, D; Orlov, I; Oropeza Barrera, C; Orr, R S; Ortega, E O; Osculati, B; Ospanov, R; Osuna, C; Otec, R; Ottersbach, J P; Ould-Saada, F; Ouraou, A; Ouyang, Q; Owen, M; Owen, S; Oyarzun, A; Ozcan, V E; Ozone, K; Ozturk, N; Pacheco Pages, A; Padhi, S; Padilla Aranda, C; Paganis, E; Pahl, C; Paige, F; Pajchel, K; Palestini, S; Pallin, D; Palma, A; Palmer, J D; Pan, Y B; Panagiotopoulou, E; Panes, B; Panikashvili, N; Panitkin, S; Pantea, D; Panuskova, M; Paolone, V; Papadopoulou, Th D; Park, S J; Park, W; Parker, M A; Parker, S I; Parodi, F; Parsons, J A; Parzefall, U; Pasqualucci, E; Passardi, G; Passeri, A; Pastore, F; Pastore, Fr; Pásztor, G; Pataraia, S; Pater, J R; Patricelli, S; Patwa, A; Pauly, T; Peak, L S; Pecsy, M; Pedraza Morales, M I; Peleganchuk, S V; Peng, H; Penson, A; Penwell, J; Perantoni, M; Perez, K; Perez Codina, E; Pérez García-Estañ, M T; Perez Reale, V; Perini, L; Pernegger, H; Perrino, R; Perrodo, P; Persembe, S; Perus, P; Peshekhonov, V D; Petersen, B A; Petersen, J; Petersen, T C; Petit, E; Petridou, C; Petrolo, E; Petrucci, F; Petschull, D; Petteni, M; Pezoa, R; Pfeifer, B; Phan, A; Phillips, A W; Piacquadio, G; Piccinini, M; Piegaia, R; Pilcher, J E; Pilkington, A D; Pina, J; Pinamonti, M; Pinfold, J L; Ping, J; Pinto, B; Pizio, C; Placakyte, R; Plamondon, M; Plano, W G; Pleier, M A; Poblaguev, A; Poddar, S; Podlyski, F; Poffenberger, P; Poggioli, L; Pohl, M; Polci, F; Polesello, G; Policicchio, A; Polini, A; Poll, J; Polychronakos, V; Pomarede, D M; Pomeroy, D; Pommès, K; Pontecorvo, L; Pope, B G; Popovic, D S; Poppleton, A; Popule, J; Portell Bueso, X; Porter, R; Pospelov, G E; Pospichal, P; Pospisil, S; Potekhin, M; Potrap, I N; Potter, C J; Potter, C T; Potter, K P; Poulard, G; Poveda, J; Prabhu, R; Pralavorio, P; Prasad, S; Pravahan, R; Preda, T; Pretzl, K; Pribyl, L; Price, D; Price, L E; Prichard, P M; Prieur, D; Primavera, M; Prokofiev, K; Prokoshin, F; Protopopescu, S; Proudfoot, J; Prudent, X; Przysiezniak, H; Psoroulas, S; Ptacek, E; Puigdengoles, C; Purdham, J; Purohit, M; Puzo, P; Pylypchenko, Y; Qi, M; Qian, J; Qian, W; Qian, Z; Qin, Z; Qing, D; Quadt, A; Quarrie, D R; Quayle, W B; Quinonez, F; Raas, M; Radeka, V; Radescu, V; Radics, B; Rador, T; Ragusa, F; Rahal, G; Rahimi, A M; Rahm, D; Rajagopalan, S; Rammes, M; Ratoff, P N; Rauscher, F; Rauter, E; Raymond, M; Read, A L; Rebuzzi, D M; Redelbach, A; Redlinger, G; Reece, R; Reeves, K; Reinherz-Aronis, E; Reinsch, A; Reisinger, I; Reljic, D; Rembser, C; Ren, Z L; Renkel, P; Rescia, S; Rescigno, M; Resconi, S; Resende, B; Reznicek, P; Rezvani, R; Richards, A; Richards, R A; Richter, R; Richter-Was, E; Ridel, M; Rieke, S; Rijpstra, M; Rijssenbeek, M; Rimoldi, A; Rinaldi, L; Rios, R R; Riu, I; Rivoltella, G; Rizatdinova, F; Rizvi, E R; Roa Romero, D A; Robertson, S H; Robichaud-Veronneau, A; Robinson, D; Robinson, J; Robinson, M; Robson, A; Rocha de Lima, J G; Roda, C; Roda Dos Santos, D; Rodriguez, D; Rodriguez Garcia, Y; Roe, S; Røhne, O; Rojo, V; Rolli, S; Romaniouk, A; Romanov, V M; Romeo, G; Romero Maltrana, D; Roos, L; Ros, E; Rosati, S; Rosenbaum, G A; Rosenberg, E I; Rosselet, L; Rossetti, V; Rossi, L P; Rotaru, M; Rothberg, J; Rottländer, I; Rousseau, D; Royon, C R; Rozanov, A; Rozen, Y; Ruan, X; Ruckert, B; Ruckstuhl, N; Rud, V I; Rudolph, G; Rühr, F; Ruggieri, F; Ruiz-Martinez, A; Rumyantsev, L; Rusakovich, N A; Rutherfoord, J P; Ruwiedel, C; Ruzicka, P; Ryabov, Y F; Ryadovikov, V; Ryan, P; Rybkin, G; Rzaeva, S; Saavedra, A F; Sadrozinski, H F W; Sadykov, R; Sakamoto, H; Salamanna, G; Salamon, A; Saleem, M; Salihagic, D; Salnikov, A; Salt, J; Salvachua Ferrando, B M; Salvatore, D; Salvatore, F; Salvucci, A; Salzburger, A; Sampsonidis, D; Samset, B H; Sanchis Lozano, M A; Sandaker, H; Sander, H G; Sanders, M P; Sandhoff, M; Sandstroem, R; Sandvoss, S; Sankey, D P C; Sanny, B; Sansoni, A; Santamarina Rios, C; Santi, L; Santoni, C; Santonico, R; Santos, J; Saraiva, J G; Sarangi, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sarri, F; Sasaki, O; Sasaki, T; Sasao, N; Satsounkevitch, I; Sauvage, G; Savard, P; Savine, A Y; Savinov, V; Sawyer, L; Saxon, D H; Says, L P; Sbarra, C; Sbrizzi, A; Scannicchio, D A; Schaarschmidt, J; Schacht, P; Schäfer, U; Schaetzel, S; Schaffer, A C; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Schamov, A G; Schegelsky, V A; Scheirich, D; Schernau, M; Scherzer, M I; Schiavi, C; Schieck, J; Schioppa, M; Schlenker, S; Schlereth, J L; Schmid, P; Schmieden, K; Schmitt, C; Schmitz, M; Schott, M; Schouten, D; Schovancova, J; Schram, M; Schreiner, A; Schroeder, C; Schroer, N; Schroers, M; Schuler, G; Schultes, J; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Schumacher, J W; Schumacher, M; Schumm, B A; Schune, Ph; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwemling, Ph; Schwienhorst, R; Schwierz, R; Schwindling, J; Scott, W G; Searcy, J; Sedykh, E; Segura, E; Seidel, S C; Seiden, A; Seifert, F; Seixas, J M; Sekhniaidze, G; Seliverstov, D M; Sellden, B; Seman, M; Semprini-Cesari, N; Serfon, C; Serin, L; Seuster, R; Severini, H; Sevior, M E; Sfyrla, A; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shan, L Y; Shank, J T; Shao, Q T; Shapiro, M; Shatalov, P B; Shaver, L; Shaw, K; Sherman, D; Sherwood, P; Shibata, A; Shimojima, M; Shin, T; Shmeleva, A; Shochet, M J; Shupe, M A; Sicho, P; Sidoti, A; Siebel, A; Siegert, F; Siegrist, J; Sijacki, Dj; Silbert, O; Silva, J; Silver, Y; Silverstein, D; Silverstein, S B; Simak, V; Simic, Lj; Simion, S; Simmons, B; Simonyan, M; Sinervo, P; Sinev, N B; Sipica, V; Siragusa, G; Sisakyan, A N; Sivoklokov, S Yu; Sjoelin, J; Sjursen, T B; Skubic, P; Skvorodnev, N; Slater, M; Slavicek, T; Sliwa, K; Sloper, J; Sluka, T; Smakhtin, V; Smirnov, S Yu; Smirnov, Y; Smirnova, L N; Smirnova, O; Smith, B C; Smith, D; Smith, K M; Smizanska, M; Smolek, K; Snesarev, A A; Snow, S W; Snow, J; Snuverink, J; Snyder, S; Soares, M; Sobie, R; Sodomka, J; Soffer, A; Solans, C A; Solar, M; Solc, J; Solfaroli Camillocci, E; Solodkov, A A; Solovyanov, O V; Soluk, R; Sondericker, J; Sopko, V; Sopko, B; Sosebee, M; Sosnovtsev, V V; Sospedra Suay, L; Soukharev, A; Spagnolo, S; Spanó, F; Speckmayer, P; Spencer, E; Spighi, R; Spigo, G; Spila, F; Spiwoks, R; Spousta, M; Spreitzer, T; Spurlock, B; St Denis, R D; Stahl, T; Stahlman, J; Stamen, R; Stancu, S N; Stanecka, E; Stanek, R W; Stanescu, C; Stapnes, S; Starchenko, E A; Stark, J; Staroba, P; Starovoitov, P; Stastny, J; Staude, A; Stavina, P; Stavropoulos, G; Steele, G; Steinbach, P; Steinberg, P; Stekl, I; Stelzer, B; Stelzer, H J; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stenzel, H; Stevenson, K; Stewart, G; Stockton, M C; Stoerig, K; Stoicea, G; Stonjek, S; Strachota, P; Stradling, A; Straessner, A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strandlie, A; Strauss, M; Strizenec, P; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D M; Strong, J A; Stroynowski, R; Strube, J; Stugu, B; Stumer, I; Soh, D A; Su, D; Suchkov, S I; Sugaya, Y; Sugimoto, T; Suhr, C; Suk, M; Sulin, V V; Sultansoy, S; Sumida, T; Sun, X; Sundermann, J E; Suruliz, K; Sushkov, S; Susinno, G; Sutton, M R; Suzuki, T; Suzuki, Y; Sviridov, Yu M; Sykora, I; Sykora, T; Szymocha, T; Sánchez, J; Ta, D; Tackmann, K; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Taga, A; Takahashi, Y; Takai, H; Takashima, R; Takeda, H; Takeshita, T; Talby, M; Talyshev, A; Tamsett, M C; Tanaka, J; Tanaka, R; Tanaka, S; Tanaka, S; Tappern, G P; Tapprogge, S; Tardif, D; Tarem, S; Tarrade, F; Tartarelli, G F; Tas, P; Tasevsky, M; Tassi, E; Tatarkhanov, M; Taylor, C; Taylor, F E; Taylor, G N; Taylor, R P; Taylor, W; Teixeira-Dias, P; Ten Kate, H; Teng, P K; Tennenbaum-Katan, Y D; Terada, S; Terashi, K; Terron, J; Terwort, M; Testa, M; Teuscher, R J; Tevlin, C M; Thadome, J; Thananuwong, R; Thioye, M; Thoma, S; Thomas, J P; Thomas, T L; Thompson, E N; Thompson, P D; Thompson, P D; Thompson, R J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thun, R P; Tic, T; Tikhomirov, V O; Tikhonov, Y A; Timmermans, C J W P; Tipton, P; Tique Aires Viegas, F J; Tisserant, S; Tobias, J; Toczek, B; Todorov, T; Todorova-Nova, S; Toggerson, B; Tojo, J; Tokár, S; Tokushuku, K; Tollefson, K; Tomasek, L; Tomasek, M; Tomasz, F; Tomoto, M; Tompkins, D; Tompkins, L; Toms, K; Tong, G; Tonoyan, A; Topfel, C; Topilin, N D; Torrence, E; Torró Pastor, E; Toth, J; Touchard, F; Tovey, D R; Tovey, S N; Trefzger, T; Tremblet, L; Tricoli, A; Trigger, I M; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Trinh, T N; Tripiana, M F; Triplett, N; Trischuk, W; Trivedi, A; Trocmé, B; Troncon, C; Trzupek, A; Tsarouchas, C; Tseng, J C L; Tsiafis, I; Tsiakiris, M; Tsiareshka, P V; Tsionou, D; Tsipolitis, G; Tsiskaridze, V; Tskhadadze, E G; Tsukerman, I I; Tsulaia, V; Tsung, J W; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Turala, M; Turecek, D; Turk Cakir, I; Turlay, E; Tuts, P M; Twomey, M S; Tylmad, M; Tyndel, M; Tzanakos, G; Uchida, K; Ueda, I; Ugland, M; Uhlenbrock, M; Uhrmacher, M; Ukegawa, F; Unal, G; Underwood, D G; Undrus, A; Unel, G; Unno, Y; Urbaniec, D; Urkovsky, E; Urquijo, P; Urrejola, P; Usai, G; Uslenghi, M; Vacavant, L; Vacek, V; Vachon, B; Vahsen, S; Valenta, J; Valente, P; Valentinetti, S; Valkar, S; Valladolid Gallego, E; Vallecorsa, S; Valls Ferrer, J A; Van Berg, R; van der Graaf, H; van der Kraaij, E; van der Poel, E; Van Der Ster, D; van Eldik, N; van Gemmeren, P; van Kesteren, Z; van Vulpen, I; Vandelli, W; Vandoni, G; Vaniachine, A; Vankov, P; Vannucci, F; Varela Rodriguez, F; Vari, R; Varnes, E W; Varouchas, D; Vartapetian, A; Varvell, K E; Vasilyeva, L; Vassilakopoulos, V I; Vazeille, F; Vegni, G; Veillet, J J; Vellidis, C; Veloso, F; Veness, R; Veneziano, S; Ventura, A; Ventura, D; Venturi, M; Venturi, N; Vercesi, V; Verducci, M; Verkerke, W; Vermeulen, J C; Vetterli, M C; Vichou, I; Vickey, T; Viehhauser, G H A; Villa, M; Villani, E G; Villaplana Perez, M; Villate, J; Vilucchi, E; Vincter, M G; Vinek, E; Vinogradov, V B; Viret, S; Virzi, J; Vitale, A; Vitells, O V; Vivarelli, I; Vives Vaques, F; Vlachos, S; Vlasak, M; Vlasov, N; Vogel, A; Vokac, P; Volpi, M; Volpini, G; von der Schmitt, H; von Loeben, J; von Radziewski, H; von Toerne, E; Vorobel, V; Vorobiev, A P; Vorwerk, V; Vos, M; Voss, R; Voss, T T; Vossebeld, J H; Vranjes, N; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M; Vrba, V; Vreeswijk, M; Vu Anh, T; Vudragovic, D; Vuillermet, R; Vukotic, I; Wagner, P; Wahlen, H; Walbersloh, J; Walder, J; Walker, R; Walkowiak, W; Wall, R; Wang, C; Wang, H; Wang, J; Wang, J C; Wang, S M; Ward, C P; Warsinsky, M; Wastie, R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, M F; Watts, G; Watts, S; Waugh, A T; Waugh, B M; Webel, M; Weber, J; Weber, M D; Weber, M; Weber, M S; Weber, P; Weidberg, A R; Weingarten, J; Weiser, C; Wellenstein, H; Wells, P S; Wen, M; Wenaus, T; Wendler, S; Wengler, T; Wenig, S; Wermes, N; Werner, M; Werner, P; Werth, M; Werthenbach, U; Wessels, M; Whalen, K; Wheeler-Ellis, S J; Whitaker, S P; White, A; White, M J; White, S; Whiteson, D; Whittington, D; Wicek, F; Wicke, D; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wienemann, P; Wiglesworth, C; Wiik, L A M; Wildauer, A; Wildt, M A; Wilhelm, I; Wilkens, H G; Williams, E; Williams, H H; Willis, W; Willocq, S; Wilson, J A; Wilson, M G; Wilson, A; Wingerter-Seez, I; Winklmeier, F; Wittgen, M; Wolter, M W; Wolters, H; Wosiek, B K; Wotschack, J; Woudstra, M J; Wraight, K; Wright, C; Wright, D; Wrona, B; Wu, S L; Wu, X; Wulf, E; Xella, S; Xie, S; Xie, Y; Xu, D; Xu, N; Yamada, M; Yamamoto, A; Yamamoto, S; Yamamura, T; Yamanaka, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamazaki, T; Yamazaki, Y; Yan, Z; Yang, H; Yang, U K; Yang, Y; Yang, Z; Yao, W M; Yao, Y; Yasu, Y; Ye, J; Ye, S; Yilmaz, M; Yoosoofmiya, R; Yorita, K; Yoshida, R; Young, C; Youssef, S P; Yu, D; Yu, J; Yu, M; Yu, X; Yuan, J; Yuan, L; Yurkewicz, A; Zaidan, R; Zaitsev, A M; Zajacova, Z; Zambrano, V; Zanello, L; Zarzhitsky, P; Zaytsev, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zeller, M; Zema, P F; Zemla, A; Zendler, C; Zenin, O; Zenis, T; Zenonos, Z; Zenz, S; Zerwas, D; Zevi della Porta, G; Zhan, Z; Zhang, H; Zhang, J; Zhang, Q; Zhang, X; Zhao, L; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, S; Zhong, J; Zhou, B; Zhou, N; Zhou, Y; Zhu, C G; Zhu, H; Zhu, Y; Zhuang, X; Zhuravlov, V; Zimmermann, R; Zimmermann, S; Zimmermann, S; Ziolkowski, M; Zitoun, R; Zivkovic, L; Zmouchko, V V; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; zur Nedden, M; Zutshi, V

    2010-01-01

    The ionization signals in the liquid argon of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter are studied in detail using cosmic muons. In particular, the drift time of the ionization electrons is measured and used to assess the intrinsic uniformity of the calorimeter gaps and estimate its impact on the constant term of the energy resolution. The drift times of electrons in the cells of the second layer of the calorimeter are uniform at the level of 1.3% in the barrel and 2.7% in the endcaps. This leads to an estimated contribution to the constant term of 0.29% in the barrel and 0.53% in the endcaps. The same data are used to measure the drift velocity of ionization electrons in liquid argon, which is found to be 4.61 +- 0.07 mm/microsecond at 88.5 K and 1 kV/mm.

  4. Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Research and Development in the United States

    CERN Document Server

    Bromberg, C; Junk, T; Katori, T; Lang, K; Marchionni, A; Mauger, C; Mufson, S; Pordes, S; Raaf, J; Rebel, B; Soderberg, M; Thorn, C; Urheim, J

    2013-01-01

    A workshop was held at Fermilab on March 20-21, 2013 to discuss the development of liquid argon time projection chambers (LArTPC) in the United States. The workshop was organized under the auspices of the Coordinating Panel for Advanced Detectors, a body that was initiated by the American Physical Society Division of Particles and Fields. All presentations at the workshop were made in plenary sessions organized into seven topical categories: $i)$ Argon Purity, $ii)$ Cryogenics, $iii)$ TPC and High Voltage, $iv)$ Electronics, Data Acquisition and Triggering, $v)$ Scintillation Light Detection, $vi)$ Calibration and Test Beams, and $vii)$ Software. This document summarizes the current efforts in each of these topical categories. It also highlights areas in LArTPC research and development that are common between neutrino experiments and dark matter experiments.

  5. Investigation of capacitively coupled argon plasma driven at various frequencies and validation of surface waves excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Fattah, E., E-mail: essam29@hotmail.com [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Zagazig University, Zagazig 44519 (Egypt); Physics Department, College of Science, Salman bin AbdulAziz University, Al-Kharj, P.O. 83, Al-Kharj 11942 (Saudi Arabia)

    2013-01-03

    The influence of excitation frequency (13.56–96 MHz) on the characteristics of capacitively coupled argon plasma is investigated by means of Langmuir probe and a high-voltage probe. Measurements are performed in argon pressure of 40 and 60 mTorr at a fixed discharge voltage V{sub pp}=200 V. The measured electron energy distribution function EEPFs are a bi-Maxwellian type irrespective of the driving frequency and gas pressure. The electron density and temperatures show peak over frequency range of 54–72 MHz, beyond which it decreases. The non-monotonic dependences of plasma parameters with driving frequency were interpreted in terms of excited surface wave excited at the powered electrode.

  6. Shock tube study of ionization rates of NaCl-contaminated argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, K.-P.; Park, C.

    1975-01-01

    Electron density, electron temperature, and concentration of excited sodium atoms are measured in the weakly ionized regime behind a shock wave in impure argon in a shock tube using microwave techniques and spectrally resolved radiometry. Evidence is presented to show that an apparent increase in the rate of ionization is due to electron detachment of negative chlorine ions produced from sodium chloride vapor contained as an impurity. To be consistent with this chemical model, rate coefficients are found in the temperature range between 5500 and 8600 K for the dissociation of NaCl into an ion pair, dissociation of NaCl into a neutral pair, and electron detachment of a negative chlorine ion. Electron temperature is lower than heavy-particle temperature by roughly 1000 K. The electron-argon impact-ionization rate coefficient is a weak function of electron temperature in contradiction to expectation.

  7. Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber research and development in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A workshop was held at Fermilab on March 20-21, 2013 to discuss the development of liquid argon time projection chambers (LArTPCs) in the United States. The workshop was organized under the auspices of the Coordinating Panel for Advanced Detectors, a body that was initiated by the American Physical Society Division of Particles and Fields. All presentations at the workshop were made in seven topical plenary sessions: i) Argon Purity, ii) Cryogenics, iii) TPC and High Voltage, iv) Electronics, Data Acquisition and Triggering, v) Scintillation Light Detection, vi) Calibration and Test Beams, and vii) Software. This document summarizes the current efforts in each of these areas. It also highlights areas in LArTPC research and development that are common between neutrino experiments and dark matter experiments

  8. ATLAS endcap liquid argon calorimeters. Description and construction of the cryostats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All forward calorimeters of the ATLAS detector use the same detection technique, energy loss in passive plates, followed by ionisation and charge detection in liquid argon. They are therefore all grouped in the same vessel which must basically support and keep in place the heavy plates and the detection electrodes and maintain liquid argon at cold and stable temperature. Taking into account all the constraints as detailed below, and the overall detector size, 5 meter diameter by 3 meter length this was quite a challenge. The design, construction and tests of these two cryostats, up to their delivery at CERN, are described in this document. These two cryostats are a joint 'in kind' contribution to the Atlas experiment of LAL (Orsay), Max Planck Institute (Muenchen) and Wuppertal University (Wuppertal) and have been designed and built under the responsibility of LAL (Orsay) with contributions of the technical groups of the above institutions and of ATLAS-CERN. (authors)

  9. Hydrogen-bonded complexes of 2-aminopyrimidine-parabenzoquinone in an argon matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plokhotnichenko, A. M.; Stepanian, S. G.; Karachevtsev, V. A.; Adamowicz, L.

    2006-02-01

    The H-bonded complexes of 2-aminopyrimidine (NH2Py) with parabenzoquinone (Qu) in a low-temperature argon matrix are investigated by the method of IR spectroscopy. The IR absorption spectra in the spectral range 400-3600cm-1 are obtained for different concentration ratios of these compounds at a temperature of 11K. The molar integrated absorption coefficients in the bands of the stretching modes of the free and H-bonded NH2 group are determined. Quantum-mechanical calculations of the IR spectra of the NH2Py and Qu molecules and their dimers are carried out. A comparison of the experimental and calculated results permits the conclusion that NH2Py-Qu dimers in an argon matrix have a planar structure with two weak hydrogen bonds, NH ⋯O and CH ⋯N.

  10. Low-pressure argon adsorption assessment of micropore connectivities in activated carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimny, T; Villieras, F; Finqueneisel, G; Cossarutto, L; Weber, J V

    2006-01-01

    Low-pressure argon adsorption has been used to study the energetic distribution of microporous activated carbons differing by their burn-off. The collected isotherms were analyzed using the derivative isotherm summation method. Some oscillations on the experimental curves for very low partial pressures were detected. The results are analyzed and discussed according to the literature and could be attributed to local overheating caused by spontaneous mass transfer of argon through constrictions between former pores and the new opening pore or deadend pores. We used the dynamic character of the experimental method and mainly the discrepancy of the quasi-equilibrium state to deduce key parameters related to the porosity topology. PMID:16112680

  11. CFD Simulation of a Hydrogen/Argon Plasma Jet Reactor for Coal Pyrolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN H. G.; XIE K. C.

    2004-01-01

    A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model was formulated for DC arc hydrogen/argon plasma jet reactors used in the process of the thermal H2/Ar plasma pyrolysis of coal to acetylene. In this model, fluid flow, convective heat transfer and conjugate heat conductivity are considered simultaneously. The error caused by estimating the inner-wall temperature of a reactor is avoided. The thermodynamic and transport properties of the hydrogen/argon mixture plasma system, which are usually expressed by a set of discrete dats, are fitted into expressions that can be easily implemented in the program. The effects of the turbulence are modeled by two standard k-s equations. The temperature field and velocity field in the plasma jet reactor were calculated by employing SIMPLEST algorithm. The knowledge and insight obtained are useful for the design improvement and scale-up of plasma reactors.

  12. Novel Diamond Films Synthesis Strategy: Methanol and Argon Atmosphere by Microwave Plasma CVD Method Without Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Jiang, Caiyi; Guo, Shenghui; Zhang, Libo; Gao, Jiyun; Peng, Jinhui; Hu, Tu; Wang, Liang

    2016-09-01

    Diamond thin films are grown on silicon substrates by only using methanol and argon mixtures in microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) reactor. It is worth mentioning that the novel strategy makes the synthesis reaction works smoothly without hydrogen atmosphere, and the substrates temperature is only 500 °C. The evidence of surface morphology and thickness under different time is obtained by characterizing the samples using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). X-ray diffractometer (XRD) spectrum reveals that the preferential orientation of (111) plane sample is obtained. The Raman spectra indicate that the dominant component of all the samples is a diamond. Moreover, the diamond phase content of the targeted films was quantitatively analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) method, and the surface roughness of diamond films was investigated by atomic force microscope (AFM). Meanwhile, the possible synthesis mechanism of the diamond films in methanol- and argon-mixed atmosphere was discussed.

  13. Performance and emission characteristics of the thermal barrier coated SI engine by adding argon inert gas to intake mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeya Sharma, T

    2015-11-01

    Dilution of the intake air of the SI engine with the inert gases is one of the emission control techniques like exhaust gas recirculation, water injection into combustion chamber and cyclic variability, without scarifying power output and/or thermal efficiency (TE). This paper investigates the effects of using argon (Ar) gas to mitigate the spark ignition engine intake air to enhance the performance and cut down the emissions mainly nitrogen oxides. The input variables of this study include the compression ratio, stroke length, and engine speed and argon concentration. Output parameters like TE, volumetric efficiency, heat release rates, brake power, exhaust gas temperature and emissions of NOx, CO2 and CO were studied in a thermal barrier coated SI engine, under variable argon concentrations. Results of this study showed that the inclusion of Argon to the input air of the thermal barrier coated SI engine has significantly improved the emission characteristics and engine's performance within the range studied. PMID:26644918

  14. Investigation of transfer ionization processes in the collision of partially stripped carbon ions on Argon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jun; Du Juan; SUN GuangZhi; CHEN Lin; CHEN XiMeng; DING BaoWei; FU HongBin; CUI Ying; SHAO JianXiong; LU YanXia; GAO ZhiMin; LIU YuWen

    2008-01-01

    The ratios of the cross section of the transfer-ionization to the single-electroncapture of Argon induced by Cq+ (q=1,2,3) ions are measured by means of position sensitive and time-of-flight techniques. Our experimental results are compared with the data of Heq+ (q=1,2)-Ar of DuBois. A qualitative interpretation is presented based on the Classical-Over-Barrier Model of Bohr,

  15. EBR-II argon cooling system restricted fuel handling I and C upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The instrumentation and control of the Argon Cooling System (ACS) restricted fuel handling control system at Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) is being upgraded from a system comprised of many discrete components and controllers to a computerized system with a graphical user interface (GUI). This paper describes the aspects of the upgrade including reasons for the upgrade, the old control system, upgrade goals, design decisions, philosophies and rationale, and the new control system hardware and software

  16. The WArP Experiment: A Double-Phase Argon Detector for Dark Matter Searches

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea Zani

    2014-01-01

    Cryogenic noble liquids emerged in the previous decade as one of the best media to perform WIMP dark matter searches, in particular due to the possibility to scale detector volumes to multiton sizes. The WArP experiment was then developed as one of the first to implement the idea of coupling Argon in liquid and gas phase, in order to discriminate β/γ -interactions from nuclear recoils and then achieve reliable background rejection. Since its construction, other projects spawned, employing Arg...

  17. Gas temperature effect on the time for onset of particle nucleation in argon diluted acetylene plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Stefanovic, I; Berndt, J; Winter, J; Stefanovic, Ilija; Kovacevic, Eva; Berndt, Johannes; Winter, Jorg

    2004-01-01

    In our work we are focused on study of powder formation in C2H2/Ar plasmas. In this scope we used a combination of FTIR and mass spectroscopy, which are the mostly used experimental techniques for plasma powder formation diagnostics. To test the proposed mechanism for particle nucleation delay we measured the particle nucleation under different plasma conditions: firstly we increased the gas temperature and secondly we changed the background gas from argon to helium.

  18. Performance of VUV-sensitive MPPC for liquid argon scintillation light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, T.; Tanaka, M.; Washimi, T.; Yorita, K.

    2016-10-01

    A new multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC) sensitive to vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) light (wavelength λ dark count rate of the MPPCs are also evaluated. Using an 241Am α-ray source, the absolute photon detection efficiency (PDE) of the liquid argon (LAr) scintillation light (λ=128 nm) for the latest MPPC model is estimated to be 13%. Based on these basic measurements a possible application of the new MPPC to LAr detectors in dark matter search is suggested.

  19. Alternating-Gradient Focusing of the Benzonitrile-Argon Van der Waals Complex

    OpenAIRE

    Putzke, S.; Filsinger, F.; Küpper, J.; Meijer, G.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the focusing and guiding of the van der Waals complex formed between benzonitrile molecules (C$_6$H$_5$CN) and argon atoms in a cold molecular beam using an ac electric quadrupole guide. The distribution of quantum states in the guided beam is non-thermal, because the transmission efficiency depends on the state-dependent effective dipole moment in the applied electric fields. At a specific ac frequency, however, the excitation spectrum can be described by a thermal distribution ...

  20. Upgraded Readout Electronics for the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters at the High Luminosity LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andeen, Timothy R.; ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter Group

    2012-12-01

    The ATLAS liquid-argon calorimeters produce a total of 182,486 signals which are digitized and processed by the front-end and back-end electronics at every triggered event. In addition, the front-end electronics sum analog signals to provide coarsely grained energy sums, called trigger towers, to the first-level trigger system, which is optimized for nominal LHC luminosities. However, the pile-up background expected during the high luminosity phases of the LHC will be increased by factors of 3 to 7. An improved spatial granularity of the trigger primitives is therefore proposed in order to improve the identification performance for trigger signatures, like electrons or photons, at high background rejection rates. For the first upgrade phase in 2018, new Liquid Argon Trigger Digitizer Boards are being designed to receive higher granularity signals, digitize them on detector and send them via fast optical links to a new, off-detector digital processing system. The digital processing system applies digital filtering and identifies significant energy depositions. The refined trigger primitives are then transmitted to the first level trigger system to extract improved trigger signatures. The general concept of the upgraded liquid-argon calorimeter readout together with the various electronics components to be developed for such a complex system is presented. The research activities and architectural studies undertaken by the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter Group are described, particularly details of the on-going design of mixed-signal front-end electronics, of radiation tolerant optical-links, and of the high-speed off-detector digital processing system.

  1. One more study of argon arc binding to pure tungsten cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadzhiev, M. Kh.; Sargsyan, M. A.; Tereshonok, D. V.; Tyuftyaev, A. S.

    2016-08-01

    Pyrometric and spectroscopic investigations of pure tungsten cathode in argon arc plasma discharge at atmospheric pressure are reported. The distribution of surface cathode temperature and the radial distribution of plasma temperature at different distance from the cathode tip were measured. We conducted a comparison between our work and other studies on arc discharges where cathodes from lanthanated (W-2% La2O3) and thoriated (W-2% ThO2) tungsten were used.

  2. Characterisation of an RF excited argon plasma cathode electron beam gun

    OpenAIRE

    Del Pozo, S.; Ribton, C; Smith, DR

    2014-01-01

    This work describes the experimental set up used for carrying out spectroscopic measurements in a plasma cathode electron beam (EB) gun. Advantages of plasma cathode guns over thermionic guns are described. The factors affecting electron beam power such as plasma pressure, excitation power and plasma chamber geometry are discussed. The maximum beam current extracted was 53 mA from a 0.5 mm diameter aperture in the plasma chamber. In this work, the electron source is an argon plasma excited at...

  3. Electron localizability indicators ELI and ELIA: the case of highly correlated wavefunctions for the argon atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezugly, Viktor; Wielgus, Pawel; Wagner, Frank R; Kohout, Miroslav; Grin, Yuri

    2008-06-01

    Electron localizability indicators based on the same-spin electron pair density and the opposite-spin electron pair density are studied for correlated wavefunctions of the argon atom. Different basis sets and reference spaces are used for the multireference configuration interaction method following the complete active space calculations aiming at the understanding of the effect of local electron correlation when approaching the exact wavefunction. The populations of the three atomic shells of Ar atom in real space are calculated for each case.

  4. Evaluation of the procedures in BR 3014 for the assessment of Argon-41 activity in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses conflicting measurements which have been made at RNC Greenwich using a 92 cc Argon-41 collection chamber in the detecting assembly MK 5NHA with the counter scaler MK 4NCA. It is concluded that the original calibration is not in serious error but it is recommended that the calibration factor should be increased by 27% over that given in BR 3014. (author)

  5. Effect of argon on the performance of a fast-axial flow CO2 laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelvani, S.; Amiri, Kh; Pazokian, H.; Montazerolghaem, M.; Mollabashi, M.; Naeimi, S. A.; Esmaeilpour, D.

    2011-01-01

    The performance characteristics of a fast-axial flow (FAF) cw CO2 laser are described. The dependences of the output power, efficiency, and discharge voltage on the discharge current of a FAF cw CO2 laser with optimised composition of the CO2:N2:He=1:4.4:7.6 gas mixture with a small amount of argon are studied experimentally at two pressures of 50 and 60 mbar in open and closed cycle regimes of the laser system.

  6. Fano factor in gaseous argon measured by the proportional scintillation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is found that the apparent Fano factor in argon obtained by using 5.90 keV X-rays with the proportional scintillation method depends on the gas pressure and that the true Fano factor can be obtained by extrapolating the linear relation between the apparent Fano factor and the reciprocal of the gas pressure. The Fano factor thus obtained gives good agreement, within experimental errors, with the value recently obtained by using a gridded ionization chamber. (orig.)

  7. Experimental investigation of MHD impact on argon plasma flows by variation of magnetic flux density

    OpenAIRE

    Knapp, A.; Fulge, Hannes; Herdrich, Georg; Ono, N.; Wernitz, Ricarda; AUWETER-KURTZ, Monika; Röser, Hans-Peter; Fasoulas, Stefanos

    2012-01-01

    The interaction between a probe body and argon plasma flow is investigated to examine to what extent the probe head temperature and the bow shock distance can be influenced by applying a strong magnetic field. The experiments are performed using a strong permanent magnet installed inside a probe body with a spherical, coated probe head. Former investigations showed strong influence on the bow shock geometry but also on the inflow plasma jet. Several boundary conditions have been varied to eva...

  8. Bronchial asthma control after argon plasma coagulation turbinectomy in patients with chronic rhinitis

    OpenAIRE

    Jura-Szołtys, Edyta; Ficek, Rafał; Ficek, Joanna; Markowski, Jarosław; Chudek, Jerzy

    2013-01-01

    Bronchial asthma is frequently accompanied by chronic rhinitis. It has been observed that effective treatment of rhinitis may reduce asthma symptoms. The aim of the study was the evaluation of the control of bronchial asthma symptoms in patients with chronic rhinitis after argon plasma coagulation turbinectomy (APCt). The effect of APCt was assessed in 47 adults with drug-resistant chronic rhinitis and bronchial asthma 3-month post-procedure. Changes of asthma symptoms were scored using Asthm...

  9. The lead-liquid argon sampling calorimeter of the SLD detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axen, D.; Bougerolle, S.; Sobie, R. (Univ. British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)); Eigen, G.; De Jongh, F.; Hitlin, D.; Kelsey, M.; Klein, M.; Mincer, A.; Wisniewski, W.; Wolf, R. (California Inst. of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)); Arroyo, C.; Au, Y.; Baltay, C.; Bolton, T.; Bazarko, A.; Camilleri, L.; Hyatt, E.; Manly, S.; Rabinowitz, S.; Rowson, P.C.; Seligman, S.; Shaevitz, M.H.; Smith, S.; Steiner, R.V. (Columbia Univ., Nevis Lab., Irvington, NY (United States)); Abt, I.; Alzofon, D.; Arnett, D.; Barrera, F.; Bell, R.; Bes, S.C.; Bogart, J.; Breidenbach, M.; Candia, A.; Claus, R.; Cutler, H.; Davis, R.; Dubois, R.; Foss, M.; Fox, J.; Fox, M.; Gioumousis, A.; Grebenyuk, A.; Haller, G.; Hamilton, V.; Hodgson, J.; Huffer, M.; Junk, T.; Kim, P.; Labs, J.; Neal, H.; Nelson, D.; Nordby, M.; Paffrath, L.; Putallaz, G.; Rogers, H.; Russell, J.J.; Saez, P.; Seward, P.; Sherden, D.; Skarpaas, K.; Schindler, R.H.; Waite, A.P.; Watt, R. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, CA

    1993-05-01

    The lead-liquid argon sampling calorimeter of the SLD detector is one of the largest detectors employing cryogenic liquids now in operation. This paper details the design and performance considerations, the mechanical and cryogenic systems, the absorber design and tower segmentation, the data acquisition electronics, and the control systems of the detector. The initial operational performance of the device is discussed. Detailed resolution studies will be presented in a later paper. (orig.).

  10. Increased Efficiency in SI Engine with Air Replaced by Oxygen in Argon Mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killingsworth, N J; Rapp, V H; Flowers, D L; Aceves, S M; Chen, J; Dibble, R

    2010-01-13

    Basic engine thermodynamics predicts that spark ignited engine efficiency is a function of both the compression ratio of the engine and the specific heat ratio of the working fluid. In practice the compression ratio of the engine is often limited due to knock. Both higher specific heat ratio and higher compression ratio lead to higher end gas temperatures and increase the likelihood of knock. In actual engine cycles, heat transfer losses increase at higher compression ratios and limit efficiency even when the knock limit is not reached. In this paper we investigate the role of both the compression ratio and the specific heat ratio on engine efficiency by conducting experiments comparing operation of a single-cylinder variable-compression-ratio engine with both hydrogen-air and hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures. For low load operation it is found that the hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures result in higher indicated thermal efficiencies. Peak efficiency for the hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures is found at compression ratio 5.5 whereas for the hydrogen-air mixture with an equivalence ratio of 0.24 the peak efficiency is found at compression ratio 13. We apply a three-zone model to help explain the effects of specific heat ratio and compression ratio on efficiency. Operation with hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures at low loads is more efficient because the lower compression ratio results in a substantially larger portion of the gas to reside in the adiabatic core rather than in the boundary layer and in the crevices, leading to less heat transfer and more complete combustion.

  11. Investigation of transfer ionization processes in the collision of partially stripped carbon ions on Argon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The ratios of the cross section of the transfer-ionization to the single-electron-capture of Argon induced by Cq+ (q=1,2,3) ions are measured by means of position sensitive and time-of-flight techniques. Our experimental results are compared with the data of Heq+ (q=1,2)-Ar of DuBois. A qualitative interpretation is presented based on the Classical-Over-Barrier Model of Bohr.

  12. A measurement of E/. pi. for a fast lead liquid argon calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makowiecki, D.; Gordon, H.A.; Ma, H.; Murtagh, M.; Radeka, V.; Rahm, D.; Rescia, S. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Abrams, G.S.; Groom, D.E.; Kirsten, F.; Levi, M.; Siegrist, J. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Amako, K.; Inaba, O.; Kondo, T. (National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)); Baden, A.R.; Fong, D.; Hadley, N.; Kunori, S.; Skuja, A. (Maryland U

    1990-01-01

    The NA34 (HELIOS) calorimeter has measured e/{pi} {congruent} 1.1 in a uranium/liquid argon calorimeter with a shaping time of 135 nsec. Lead may be a viable alternative, but e/{pi} must first be measured at fast shaping times in lead. We re preparing to measure e/{pi} at momenta ranging from 0.5 to 20 GeV/c and with shaping times of 50, 100 and 150 nsec.

  13. A measurement of E/{pi} for a fast lead liquid argon calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makowiecki, D.; Gordon, H.A.; Ma, H.; Murtagh, M.; Radeka, V.; Rahm, D.; Rescia, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Abrams, G.S.; Groom, D.E.; Kirsten, F.; Levi, M.; Siegrist, J. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Amako, K.; Inaba, O.; Kondo, T. [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Baden, A.R.; Fong, D.; Hadley, N.; Kunori, S.; Skuja, A. [Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States); Bowen, T.; Forden, G.; Jenkins, E.; Johns, K.; Rutherfoord, J.; Shupe, M. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States); Burnett, T.; Cook, V.; Davisson, R.; Mockett, P.; Rothberg, J.; Williams, R.W. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States); Cremaldi, L.; Reidy, J.; Summers, D. [Mississippi Univ., University, MS (United States); DiGiacomo, N. [Martin Marietta Aerospace, Denver, CO (United States). Astronautics Group; Draper, P.; Ferbel, T.; Lobkowicz, F. [Rochester Univ., NY (United States); Faust, J.; Hauptman, J.; Pang, M. [Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames, IA (United States); Gabriel, T.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hagopian, V.; Womersley, J. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Handler, T. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States); Hitlin, D. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States); Mulholland, G.T. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Watanabe, Y. [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan); Weerts, H. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    1990-12-31

    The NA34 (HELIOS) calorimeter has measured e/{pi} {congruent} 1.1 in a uranium/liquid argon calorimeter with a shaping time of 135 nsec. Lead may be a viable alternative, but e/{pi} must first be measured at fast shaping times in lead. We re preparing to measure e/{pi} at momenta ranging from 0.5 to 20 GeV/c and with shaping times of 50, 100 and 150 nsec.

  14. Influence of gas discharge parameters on emissions from a dielectric barrier discharge excited argon excimer lamp

    OpenAIRE

    Mike Collier; Erich Rohwer; Timo Stehmann; Hubertus M. von Bergmann; Dumisani J. Hlatywayo; Peter Baricholo

    2011-01-01

    A dielectric barrier discharge excited neutral argon (Ar I) excimer lamp has been developed and characterised. The aim of this study was to develop an excimer lamp operating at atmospheric pressure that can replace mercury lamps and vacuum equipment used in the sterilisation of medical equipment and in the food industry. The effects of discharge gas pressure, flow rate, excitation frequency and pulse width on the intensity of the Ar I vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) emission at 126 nm and near infra...

  15. Performance Of A Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Exposed To The WANF Neutrino Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Arneodo, F; Bonesini, M; Borio di Tigliole, A; Boschetti, B; Bueno, A; Calligarich, E; Casagrande, F; Cavalli, D; Cavanna, F; Cennini, P; Centro, Sandro; Cesana, E; Cline, D; Curioni, A; De Mitri, I; De Vecchi, C; Dolfini, R; Ferrari, A; Ghezzi, A; Guglielmi, A; Kisiel, J; Mannocchi, G; Martinez de la Ossa, A; Matthey, C; Mauri, F; Montanari, C; Navas, S; Negri, P; Nicoletto, Marino; Otwinowski, S; Paganoni, M; Palamara, O; Pepato, Adriano; Periale, L; Piano Mortari, G; Picchi, P; Pietropaolo, F; Puccini, A; Pullia, A; Ragazzi, S; Rancati, T; Rappoldi, A; Raselli, G L; Redaelli, N; Rondio, E; Rubbia, André; Rubbia, Carlo; Sala, P R; Sergiampietri, F; Sobczyk, J; Suzuki, S; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Terrani, M; Terranova, F; Tonazzo, A; Ventura, Sandro; Vignoli, C; Wang, H; Zalewska A

    2006-01-01

    We present the results of the first exposure of a Liquid Argon TPC to a multi-GeV neutrino beam. The data have been collected with a 50 liters ICARUS-like chamber located between the CHORUS and NOMAD experiments at the CERN West Area Neutrino Facility (WANF). We discuss both the instrumental performance of the detector and its capability to identify and reconstruct low multiplicity neutrino interactions.

  16. Relativistic configuration-interaction calculation of $K\\alpha$ transition energies in beryllium-like argon

    CERN Document Server

    Yerokhin, V A; Fritzsche, S

    2014-01-01

    Relativistic configuration-interaction calculations have been performed for the energy levels of the low-lying and core-excited states of beryllium-like argon, Ar$^{14+}$. These calculations include the one-loop QED effects as obtained by two different methods, the screening-potential approach as well as the model QED operator approach. The calculations are supplemented by a systematic estimation of uncertainties of theoretical predictions.

  17. Measurement of neutrino interactions in gaseous argon with T2K

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2016-01-01

    The T2K near-detector, ND280, employs three large argon gas TPCs (Time Projection Chambers) for particle tracking and identification. The gas inside the TPCs can be used as an active target to study the neutrino interactions in great detail. The low density of the gas leads to very low track energy thresholds, allowing the reconstruction of very low momentum tracks, e.g. protons with kinetic energies down to $\\mathcal{O}$(1 MeV). Since different nuclear interaction models vary considerably in their predictions of those low momentum track multiplicities, this makes neutrino interactions on gases a powerful probe to test those models. The TPCs operate with an argon-based gas mixture (95% by volume) and have been exposed to the T2K neutrino beam since the beginning of the experiment in 2010. Due to the low total mass of the gas, neutrino argon interactions happen only rarely, compared to the surrounding scintillator-based detectors. We expect about 600 such events in the recorded data so far (about 200 in the fi...

  18. Photoelectron yield in the prototype of the liquid argon detector for CDEX-10

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Qing-Hao; Cheng, Jian-Ping; Kang, Ke-Jun; Li, Yuan-Jing; Lin, Shin-Ted; Tang, Chang-Jian; Xing, Hao-Yang; Yu, Xun-Zhen; Zeng, Ming

    2015-01-01

    The China Dark Matter Experiment (CDEX) is a low background experiment at China Jinping Underground Laboratory (CJPL) designed to directly detect dark matter with a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. In the second phase CDEX-10 with 10 kg germanium array detector system, the liquid argon (LAr) anti-Compton active shielding and cooling system is proposed. For purpose of studying the properties of LAr detector, a prototype with an active volume of 7 liters of liquid argon was built and operated. The photoelectron yields, as a critically important parameter for the LAr detector, have been measured to be 0.051-0.079 p.e./keV for 662 keV gamma lines at different positions. The good agreement between the experimental and simulation results has provided a quite reasonable understanding and determination of the important parameters such as the Surviving Fraction of the $Ar_{2}^{*}$ excimers, the absorption length for 128 nm photons in liquid argon, the reflectivity of Teflon and so on.

  19. Waves generated in the vicinity of an argon plasma gun in the ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, L. J., Jr.; Arnoldy, R. L.; Lysak, R. L.; Peria, W.; Lynch, K. A.

    1993-01-01

    Wave and particle observations were made in the close vicinity of an argon plasma gun carned to over 600 km altitude on a sounding rocket. The gun was carned on a subpayload, separated from the main payload early in the flight. Twelve-second argon ion ejections were energized alternately with a peak energy of 100 or 200 eV. They produced waves, with multiple harmonics, in the range of ion cyclotron waves, 10 to 1000 Hz at rocket altitudes. Many of these waves could not be identified as corresponding to the cyclotron frequencies of any of the ions, argon or ambient, known to be present. In addition, the wave frequencies were observed to rise and fall and to change abruptly during a 12-s gun operation. The wave amplitudes, near a few hundred Hertz, were of the order of O. 1 V/m. Some of the waves may be ion-ion hybrid waves. Changes in ion populations were observed at the main payload and at the subpayload during gun operations. A gun-related, field-aligned, electron population also appeared.

  20. Performance of bare high-purity germanium detectors in liquid argon for the GERDA experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Heider, Marik Barnabé; Chkvorets, Oleg; Di Vacri, Assunta; Gusev, Konstantin; Schönert, Stefan; Shirchenko, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The GERmanium Detector Array, GERDA, will search for neutrinoless double beta decay in 76Ge at the National Gran Sasso Laboratory of the INFN. Bare high-purity germanium detectors enriched in 76Ge will be submerged in liquid argon serving simultaneously as a shield against external radioactivity and as a cooling medium. In GERDA Phase-I, reprocessed enriched-Ge detectors, which were previously operated by the Heidelberg-Moscow and IGEX collaborations, will be redeployed. Before operating the enriched detectors, tests are performed with non-enriched bare HPGe detectors in the GERDA underground Detector Laboratory to test the Phase-I detector assembly, the detector handling protocols, the refurbishment technology and to study the long-term stability in liquid argon. The leakage currents in liquid argon and liquid nitrogen have been extensively studied under varying gamma irradiation conditions. In total three non-enriched high-purity p-type prototype germanium detectors have been operated successfully. The dete...